Science.gov

Sample records for insecticide lindane identification

  1. Lindane

    MedlinePlus

    Lindane comes as a lotion to apply to the skin and a shampoo to apply to the hair and scalp. It should only be used ... your hands well when you are finished.Lindane lotion is used only to treat scabies. Do not ...

  2. Partition of the organochlorine insecticide lindane into the human sperm surface induces membrane depolarization and Ca2+ influx.

    PubMed Central

    Silvestroni, L; Fiorini, R; Palleschi, S

    1997-01-01

    The effects of the insecticide lindane (the gamma-isomer of 1,2,3,4,5,6-hexachlorocyclohexane) on membrane potential, cytosolic free Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) and surface biophysical properties were studied in human spermatozoa. The insecticide induces rapid, transient and reproducible membrane depolarization and opening of voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels leading to an increase in [Ca2+]i. In contrast with the effect in somatic cells, lindane did not affect gamma-aminobutyric acid receptor-linked Cl- currents. Ca2+ and K+ currents were found to drive lindane-induced membrane depolarization and repolarization respectively, whereas Na+ and Cl- fluxes appear not to have a role in the phenomenon. The insecticide was still able to produce membrane depolarization both in the combined absence of extracellular Ca2+ and Na+ and in high-K+ buffer, suggesting that lindane alters the membrane dipole potential. In agreement with this, Laurodan and Prodan fluorescence spectroscopy revealed that lindane partition into the sperm plasma membrane lowers water molecular dynamics in the uppermost region of the membrane external leaflet, probably as the result of reordering of water dipoles. We propose that the first effect of lindane partitioning into the sperm plasma membrane is a change in the membrane dipole potential, which results in the activation of membrane-located Ca2+-influx pathways. PMID:9032455

  3. Lindane poisonings.

    PubMed

    Davies, J E; Dedhia, H V; Morgade, C; Barquet, A; Maibach, H I

    1983-02-01

    One percent lindane, widely used to treat scabies and pediculosis, presents toxicologic problems when used excessively. A 16-year-old mentally retarded boy accidentally ingested approximately 392 g of 1% lindane shampoo and recovered. A 2-month-old, 4.5-kg, male infant was found dead in his crib after excessive application of a 1% lindane lotion. In the former patient, initial serum levels of lindane were 206 parts per billion (ppb) declining to 1.0 ppb after 25 days. In the latter, lindane was identified in the brain at a concentration of 110 ppb. Brain levels of lindane were three times greater than the levels found in the blood. Although the relationship of this pesticide exposure to the fatal outcome in the second case was conjectural, it was illustrative of the problem of interpreting CNS events that occur shortly after excessive exposure to this insecticide.

  4. Effects of a mixture of two insecticides in freshwater microcosms: I. Fate of chlorpyrifos and lindane and responses of macroinvertebrates.

    PubMed

    Cuppen, Jan G M; Crum, Steven J H; Van den Heuvel, Harry H; Smidt, Rob A; Van den Brink, Paul J

    2002-06-01

    Effects of chronic application of a mixture of the insecticides chlorpyrifos and lindane were studied in indoor freshwater microcosms. The exposure concentrations (based on 0, 0.005, 0.01, 0.05, 0.1 and 0.5 times the LC50 of the most sensitive standard test organism for each compound) were kept at a constant level for four weeks. The calculated mean concentrations for chlorpyrifos were found to be almost at their corresponding nominal level during the treatment period. The mean calculated lindane concentrations, however, were found to be 15-40% higher than intended. In the post treatment period both insecticides dissipated fast (t 1/2: chlorpyrifos 9 days, lindane 22 days) from the water phase. The concentrations of the mixture at the highest treatment level corresponded to 0.53 toxic units (TU) for Daphnia magna and 0.61 TU for the most sensitive fish. The decomposition of Populus leaves in litter bags was significantly lower at the three highest insecticide concentrations. The macroinvertebrate community was seriously affected at the three highest treatment levels, with Crustacea and the Chironomidae Corynoneura proving to be the most sensitive groups. Gastropoda and Oligochaeta were relatively insensitive and some taxa (e.g. Valvata piscinalis, juvenile Physa fontinalis, Nemertea and Stylaria lacustris) increased in numbers. The observed effects could be explained from the individual toxicity of the insecticides to the invertebrates, and did not indicate synergistic effects. A second paper (Van den Brink et al., 2002) addresses the effects on other endpoints, as well as the overall risk assessment of the insecticide mixture.

  5. The response of soil organism communities to the application of the insecticide lindane in terrestrial model ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Scholz-Starke, B; Beylich, A; Moser, T; Nikolakis, A; Rumpler, N; Schäffer, A; Theißen, B; Toschki, A; Roß-Nickoll, M

    2013-03-01

    The EU plant protection regulation 1107/2009/EC defines the requirements for active ingredients to be approved, specifically including the assessment of effects on biodiversity and ecosystems. According to that, semi-field methods are expected to be more important in the near future. Therefore, a higher-tier experiment suitable to assess the risk for soil organisms was conducted to further develop the TME (terrestrial model ecosystems) methodology in a dose-response design with the persistent insecticidal model compound lindane (gamma-HCH). The effects of lindane on soil communities such as collembolans, oribatid mites, nematodes, soil fungi and plant biomass were determined in 42 TME. Intact TME-soil cores (diameter 300 mm, height 400 mm) from undisturbed grassland were stored outdoor under natural climatic conditions. Lindane was applied in five concentrations between 0.032 mg active ingredients (ai)/kg dry soil and 3.2 mg ai/kg dry weight soil, six-fold replicated each. Twelve TME served as untreated controls. Abundance and community structures of oribatids, collembolans, enchytraeids, nematodes and fungi were recorded. Oribatid mites' community responded 3 months after treatment, although they were not significantly affected by the overall treatment regimen. Collembolans in total and species-specific abundance as well as the community endpoints (principal response curves, diversity measures) were adversely affected by moderate dosages of lindane. Effects were transient between 3 and 5 months after treatment with a recovery within 1 year. No significant effects could be detected for enchytraeids, nematodes and fungi. The study design and the obtained results allow for calculations of no observed effect concentrations below the highest treatment level for populations and for soil communities as defined entities, as well as effective concentrations. The paper discusses the limits of effect detection in the light of achievable coefficients of variation and by means

  6. Dermal absorption of the insecticide lindane (1 delta, 2 delta, 3 beta, 4 delta, 5 delta, 6 beta-hexachlorocyclohexane) in rats and rhesus monkeys: effect of anatomical site.

    PubMed

    Moody, R P; Ritter, L

    1989-01-01

    Dermal absorption of the insecticide lindane (1 delta, 2 delta, 3 beta, 4 delta, 5 delta, 6 beta-hexachlorocyclohexane) was determined in rats and rhesus monkeys. Lindane is in widespread use as a 1% cream or lotion scabicide formulation and as a 1% miticide shampoo for body lice control in humans. Results obtained following our in vivo dermal absorption procedure demonstrated that 18 +/- 4.1%, 34 +/- 5.2%, and 54 +/- 26.3% of the applied dose was absorbed following topical applications at a rate of 1.5 micrograms/cm2 (6.2 micrograms/100 microliters of acetone) of the 14C-labeled pesticide to 4.2-cm2 regions of the forearm (n = 8), forehead (n = 7), and palm (n = 4) of rhesus monkeys, respectively. Dose sites were washed with soapy water 24 h posttreatment. Comparative studies in rats (n = 5) dosed middorsally demonstrated 31 +/- 9.5% absorption. Statistical analysis of the 14C excretion kinetics demonstrated slower clearance of lindane from rats than monkey forearm, forehead, or palm. Intramuscular (im) injections of 14C-lindane gave 52 +/- 7.1% recovery in monkey (n = 8) and 64 +/- 5.9% in rats (n = 5), suggesting body storage of this lipophilic chemical.

  7. Dermal absorption of the insecticide lindane (1 delta, 2 delta, 3 beta, 4 delta, 5 delta, 6 beta-hexachlorocyclohexane) in rats and rhesus monkeys: Effect of anatomical site

    SciTech Connect

    Moody, R.P.; Ritter, L. )

    1989-01-01

    Dermal absorption of the insecticide lindane (1 delta, 2 delta, 3 beta, 4 delta, 5 delta, 6 beta-hexachlorocyclohexane) was determined in rats and rhesus monkeys. Lindane is in widespread use as a 1% cream or lotion scabicide formulation and as a 1% miticide shampoo for body lice control in humans. Results obtained following our in vivo dermal absorption procedure demonstrated that 18 +/- 4.1%, 34 +/- 5.2%, and 54 +/- 26.3% of the applied dose was absorbed following topical applications at a rate of 1.5 micrograms/cm2 (6.2 micrograms/100 microliters of acetone) of the 14C-labeled pesticide to 4.2-cm2 regions of the forearm (n = 8), forehead (n = 7), and palm (n = 4) of rhesus monkeys, respectively. Dose sites were washed with soapy water 24 h posttreatment. Comparative studies in rats (n = 5) dosed middorsally demonstrated 31 +/- 9.5% absorption. Statistical analysis of the 14C excretion kinetics demonstrated slower clearance of lindane from rats than monkey forearm, forehead, or palm. Intramuscular (im) injections of 14C-lindane gave 52 +/- 7.1% recovery in monkey (n = 8) and 64 +/- 5.9% in rats (n = 5), suggesting body storage of this lipophilic chemical.

  8. Lindane removal by pure and mixed cultures of immobilized actinobacteria.

    PubMed

    Saez, Juliana M; Benimeli, Claudia S; Amoroso, María J

    2012-11-01

    Lindane (γ-HCH) is an organochlorine insecticide that has been widely used in developing countries. It is known to persist in the environment and can cause serious health problems. One of the strategies adopted to remove lindane from the environment is bioremediation using microorganisms. Immobilized cells present advantages over free suspended cells, like their high degradation efficiency and protection against toxins. The aims of this work were: (1) To evaluate the ability of Streptomyces strains immobilized in four different matrices to remove lindane, (2) To select the support with optimum lindane removal by pure cultures, (3) To assay the selected support with consortia and (4) To evaluate the reusability of the immobilized cells. Four Streptomyces sp. strains had previously shown their ability to grow in the presence of lindane. Lindane removal by microorganisms immobilized was significantly higher than in free cells. Specifically immobilized cells in cloth sachets showed an improvement of around 25% in lindane removal compared to the abiotic control. Three strains showed significantly higher microbial growth when they were entrapped in silicone tubes. Strains immobilized in PVA-alginate demonstrated lowest growth. Mixed cultures immobilized inside cloth sachets showed no significant enhancement compared to pure cultures, reaching a maximum removal of 81% after 96 h for consortium I, consisting of the four immobilized strains together. Nevertheless, the cells could be reused for two additional cycles of 96 h each, obtaining a maximum removal efficiency of 71.5% when each of the four strains was immobilized in a separate bag (consortium III). PMID:22840534

  9. Particle-facilitated transport of lindane in water-saturated tropical lateritic porous media.

    PubMed

    Ngueleu, Stéphane K; Grathwohl, Peter; Cirpka, Olaf A

    2014-07-01

    The persistent insecticide lindane [(1α,2α,3β,4α,5α,6β)-1,2,3,4,5,6-hexachlorocyclohexane] is still in use in many tropical countries and remains a threat to soil and water quality. We studied the sorption and transport of lindane onto and through lateritic soils in both the absence and presence of lignite particles, onto which lindane may preferably sorb. We determined a linear distribution coefficient of lindane onto the soil matrix of 3.38 ± 0.16 L kg. Soil particles were not released from the porous medium on changing ionic strength, and also transport of lindane was not affected by changes in ionic strength. We fitted coupled transport models for lindane and the particles to the data, revealing that: (i) sorption kinetics of lindane onto the matrix is described best by intraparticle diffusion; (ii) 20% of the total porosity of the lateritic sample is intraparticle porosity; and (iii) only lignite particles with a median diameter <0.45 μm were not retained in the porous medium and thus facilitated the transport of lindane. We conclude that although lindane and similar pollutants may sorb on tropical lateritic porous media, their transport may be facilitated by particles with high organic-C content or dissolved organic C (DOC). This may be of relevance in farmlands and swamp groundwater systems where DOC, produced by leaching or slow biodegradation of surface organic matter, could cause rapid groundwater contamination by sorbing pollutants. Moreover, the results of this study can help to understand nanoparticle behavior in lateritic soils as the size of particles that facilitate lindane transport approaches the nanoparticle size range.

  10. Effects of pH on the toxicity and uptake of (14C)lindane in the midge, Chironomus riparius

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, S.W.

    1985-10-01

    The toxicity of the insecticide, lindane, was measured in the midge, Chironomus riparius, at pH 4, 6, and 8 with the finding that lindane is significantly more toxic at pH 6 than at pH 4 and 8. The higher toxicity of lindane at pH 6 is a product of two factors. First the penetration of the compound into the midge is lower at pH 4 than at pH 6 and 8. Second, a greater percentage of total radioactivity is contributed by parent compound at pH 6.

  11. Laboratory study of the response of select insecticides to toxicity identification evaluation procedures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kuivila, Kathryn M.; Crepeau, Kathryn L.

    1999-01-01

    A laboratory study was used to evaluate the response of select insecticides to toxicity identification evaluation procedures. Fourteen insecticides, one degradation product, and one synergist were spiked into organic-grade water and carried through toxicity identification evaluation procedures. Concentrations of each compound were analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. During Phase I, the water sample was pumped through a C-8 solid-phase extraction cartridge and then eluted with methanol. Dimethoate was not removed by the extraction, but remained in the rinsate. In contrast, permethrin was removed by the extraction, but was not recovered by the methanol elution, and 80 percent of the permethrin remained on the cartridge, teflon tubing, and glassware. Chlorpyrifos also was not recovered completely with the methanol elution (only 62 percent was recovered). The other insecticides were extracted by C-8 solid-phase extraction cartridge and recovered by elution with methanol (80 percent or greater). During Phase II, a new spiked water sample was extracted by C-8 solid-phase extraction cartridge and then eluted with varying concentrations of methanol and water into different fractions. Each methanol:water fraction was analyzed for the added compounds. Most of the insecticides eluted in two fractions, with concentrations of 10 percent or greater. The largest number of insecticides eluted in the 75 percent methanol:water fraction.

  12. Identification of genes involved in pyrethroid-, propoxur-, and dichlorvos- insecticides resistance in the mosquitoes, Culex pipiens complex (Diptera: Culicidae).

    PubMed

    Li, Chun-xiao; Guo, Xiao-xia; Zhang, Ying-mei; Dong, Yan-de; Xing, Dan; Yan, Ting; Wang, Gang; Zhang, Heng-duan; Zhao, Tong-yan

    2016-05-01

    Culex pipiens pallens and Cx. p. quinquefasciatus are important vectors of many diseases, such as West Nile fever and lymphatic filariasis. The widespread use of insecticides to control these disease vectors and other insect pests has led to insecticide resistance becoming common in these species. In this study, high throughout Illumina sequencing was used to identify hundreds of Cx. p. pallens and Cx. p. quinquefasciatus genes that were differentially expressed in response to insecticide exposure. The identification of these genes is a vital first step for more detailed investigation of the molecular mechanisms involved in insecticide resistance in Culex mosquitoes.

  13. Atmospheric degradation of lindane and 1,3-dichloroacetone in the gas phase. Studies at the EUPHORE simulation chamber.

    PubMed

    Vera, Teresa; Borrás, Esther; Chen, Jianmin; Coscollá, Clara; Daële, Véronique; Mellouki, Abdelwahid; Ródenas, Milagros; Sidebottom, Howard; Sun, Xiaomin; Yusá, Vicent; Zhang, Xue; Muñoz, Amalia

    2015-11-01

    The gas-phase degradation of lindane (γ-isomer of hexachlorocyclohexane) towards OH radical was investigated under atmospheric conditions at the large outdoor European simulation chamber (EUPHORE) in Valencia, Spain. The rate coefficient for the reaction of hydroxyl radicals with lindane was measured using a conventional relative rate technique leading to a value of kOH(lindane)=(6.4±1.6)×10(-13) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) at 300±5 K and atmospheric pressure. The results suggest that the tropospheric lifetime of lindane with respect to OH radicals is approximately 20 days. The product distribution studies on the OH-initiated oxidation of lindane provided evidence that the major initial carbon-containing oxidation product is pentachlorocyclohexanone. 1,3-Dichloroacetone was employed as a model compound for pentachlorocyclohexanone, and an investigation of its photolysis and reaction with OH radicals under atmospheric conditions was carried out. The data indicate that the atmospheric degradation of pentachlorocyclohexanone would be relatively rapid, and would not form persistent organic compounds. Theoretical study was also employed to calculate possible degradation pathways. Mechanism for reaction of lindane with OH radicals is proposed, and C-Cl bond cleavage is discussed. OH abstraction is considered to be a reasonable way for Cl to escape during degradation. The atmospheric implications of the use of lindane as an insecticide are discussed.

  14. Insecticide residues in big game mammals of South Dakota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Greenwood, R.J.; Greichus, Y.A.; Hugghins, E.J.

    1967-01-01

    An analysis was made of eight insecticide residues in the renal fat tissue of 23 white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus), 13 mule deer (O. hemionus), 9 pronghorns (Antilocapra americana), and 2 elk (Cervus canadensis) collected in South Dakota during the fall of 1964. Identification and quantitative analysis of the insecticide residues were accomplished by thin-layer and gas-liquid chromatography. Eighty-five percent of the samples had residues of DDT with an average of 0.13 ppm. DDD residues were found in 11 percent of the samples, DDE in 38 percent, dieldrin in 38 percent, and lindane in 15 percent, with an average of 0.07, 0.04, 0.03, and 0.04 ppm, respectively. Heptachlor, heptachlor epoxide, and aldrin were not detected in concentrations above the limits of the experiment set by the investigators.

  15. Absorption of lindane (gamma benzene hexachloride) in infants and children.

    PubMed

    Ginsburg, C M; Lowry, W; Reisch, J S

    1977-12-01

    Concentrations of lindane (gamma benzene hexachloride) were measured in blood from children who had received treatment with 1% lindane lotion. Lindane was present in the blood of all patients from two of 48 hours following application. Concentrations were inversely related to weight, surface area, and were independent of the quantity of lindane applied.

  16. Effect of natural particles on the transport of lindane in saturated porous media: Laboratory experiments and model-based analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngueleu, Stéphane K.; Grathwohl, Peter; Cirpka, Olaf A.

    2013-06-01

    Colloidal particles can act as carriers for adsorbing pollutants, such as hydrophobic organic pollutants, and enhance their mobility in the subsurface. In this study, we investigate the influence of colloidal particles on the transport of pesticides through saturated porous media by column experiments. We also investigate the effect of particle size on this transport. The model pesticide is lindane (gamma-hexachlorocyclohexane), a representative hydrophobic insecticide which has been banned in 2009 but is still used in many developing countries. The breakthrough curves are analyzed with the help of numerical modeling, in which we examine the minimum model complexity needed to simulate such transport. The transport of lindane without particles can be described by advective-dispersive transport coupled to linear three-site sorption, one site being in local equilibrium and the others undergoing first-order kinetic sorption. In the presence of mobile particles, the total concentration of mobile lindane is increased, that is, lindane is transported not only in aqueous solution but also sorbed onto the smallest, mobile particles. The models developed to simulate separate and associated transport of lindane and the particles reproduced the measurements very well and showed that the adsorption/desorption of lindane to the particles could be expressed by a common first-order rate law, regardless whether the particles are mobile, attached, or strained.

  17. Identification, Validation, and Application of Molecular Diagnostics for Insecticide Resistance in Malaria Vectors.

    PubMed

    Donnelly, Martin J; Isaacs, Alison T; Weetman, David

    2016-03-01

    Insecticide resistance is a major obstacle to control of Anopheles malaria mosquitoes in sub-Saharan Africa and requires an improved understanding of the underlying mechanisms. Efforts to discover resistance genes and DNA markers have been dominated by candidate gene and quantitative trait locus studies of laboratory strains, but with greater availability of genome sequences a shift toward field-based agnostic discovery is anticipated. Mechanisms evolve continually to produce elevated resistance yielding multiplicative diagnostic markers, co-screening of which can give high predictive value. With a shift toward prospective analyses, identification and screening of resistance marker panels will boost monitoring and programmatic decision making.

  18. Identification, Validation, and Application of Molecular Diagnostics for Insecticide Resistance in Malaria Vectors.

    PubMed

    Donnelly, Martin J; Isaacs, Alison T; Weetman, David

    2016-03-01

    Insecticide resistance is a major obstacle to control of Anopheles malaria mosquitoes in sub-Saharan Africa and requires an improved understanding of the underlying mechanisms. Efforts to discover resistance genes and DNA markers have been dominated by candidate gene and quantitative trait locus studies of laboratory strains, but with greater availability of genome sequences a shift toward field-based agnostic discovery is anticipated. Mechanisms evolve continually to produce elevated resistance yielding multiplicative diagnostic markers, co-screening of which can give high predictive value. With a shift toward prospective analyses, identification and screening of resistance marker panels will boost monitoring and programmatic decision making. PMID:26750864

  19. Reversibility of the inhibitory effect of atrazine and lindane on cytosol 5. alpha. -dihydrotestosterone receptor complex formation in rat prostate

    SciTech Connect

    Simic, B.; Kniewald, Z.; Kniewald, J. ); Davies, J.E. )

    1991-01-01

    Once entering the bloodstream, most toxic substances, including pesticides, can reach organs involved in the reproductive system. They can cross the placenta, as well as the brain barrier, posing various risks to the reproductive processes. The organochlorine insecticide lindane and the s-triazine herbicide atrazine produce changes in hormone-dependent reactions in the rat hypothalamus, anterior pituitary, and prostate. Lindane also causes histological and biochemical alterations in the rat testis. In vivo treatment with atrazine produces a markedly inhibitory influence of 5{alpha}-dihydrotestosterone - receptor complex formation in rat prostate cytosol. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate whether such changes in the crucial step in the reproductive process are reversible. A parallel investigation using lindane was also undertaken.

  20. Effects of lindane, paraquat, toxaphene, and 2,4,5-trichlorophenoxyacetic acid on mallard embryo development

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hoffman, D.J.; Eastin, W.C.

    1982-01-01

    The effects were determined of externally treating mallard (Anas platyrhynchos) eggs with two insecticides (lindane and toxaphene) and two herbicides (paraquat and 2,4,5-T) with formulations and concentrations similar to field applications. Paraquat was the most embryotoxic of the four compounds regardless of the type of vehicle. The LC50 for paraquat was 1.5 lb of active ingredient/ acre in aqueous emulsion and 0.1 lb/acre in the oil vehicle. The other compounds had LC50's that were several orders of magnitude higher. Both paraquat and toxaphene caused some mortality at 1/2 of the field level of application. Paraquat impaired growth and was slightly teratogenic at 1/2 of the field level of application, but required higher concentrations (1.5 to 3 times the field level) to produce brain and visceral defects. Lindane was teratogenic, resulting in multiple defects but only at doses that were greater than five times the field level of application. Toxaphene resulted in defects of the joints at doses close to or exceeding the LC50. The herbicide 2,4,5-T resulted in few toxic effects and relatively few abnormal survivors with gross defects. The overall embryotoxicity with either vehicle was paraquat > lindane > toxaphene > 2,4,5-T on a lb per acre basis. However the potential hazard at exposures of up to five times the field level of application was paraquat > toxaphene; neither lindane nor 2,4,5-T constituted much of a hazard. Both paraquat and lindane were more toxic on a lb-peracre basis when administered in oil vehicle but only paraquat represented a potential hazard at five times the field level of application.

  1. Lindane toxicity to one year old calves

    SciTech Connect

    Venant, A.; Borrel, S.; Mallet, J. ); Sery, C. )

    1991-05-01

    Lindane (the gamma isomer of 1,2,3,4,5,6 hexachlorocyclohexane) is still recommended and used as seed treatment and for control of pests especially against lice and ticks on sheep and cattle (but not on dairy cattle and laying hens). Unlike others organochlorine pesticides, lindane does not persist in the environment or in living animals. Multitest data have established that is not a highly toxic pesticide. About domestic animals toxicity, no exact data is available and LD50 is not exactly known. Values obtained after an accidental intoxication allow the authors to have some data on toxicity levels and on toxic origin symptoms. During the last year, one case of intoxication of calves was investigated on 30 calves (sprayed against ectoparasite with lindane) in which 5 died. Results are reported in the present work.

  2. The effect of lindane on terrestrial invertebrates.

    PubMed

    Lock, K; De Schamphelaere, K A C; Janssen, C R

    2002-02-01

    Acute and chronic ecotoxicity tests with lindane were carried out using the soil invertebrates Eisenia fetida, Enchytraeus albidus, and Folsomia candida. To assess the influence of soil type on the bioavailability, these tests were carried out in a standard artificial OECD soil and in sandy and loamy field soil. For each species, differences in lindane toxicity were observed for the three soil types. These differences were, however, not related to the organic matter content. The relative differences in lindane toxicity between the soils was species-specific. These results therefore indicate that the pore-water hypothesis, i.e., the pore-water contaminant fraction being the toxicological bioavailable fraction, is not always applicable for organic substances. NOEC, NEC, as well as EC10 data were subsequently used to calculate hazardous concentrations for 5% of the species; this methodology, aimed at setting environmental quality criteria, is discussed.

  3. The sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus immunological response to chemical pollution exposure: The case of lindane.

    PubMed

    Stabili, Loredana; Pagliara, Patrizia

    2015-09-01

    In the marine environment organochlorine insecticides can be broadly detected in water, sediments, and biota. These pollutants may have major ecological consequences since they may affect marine organisms and endanger organismal growth, reproduction or survival. In this study we investigated the modification of some sea urchin immunological parameters in response to subchronic lindane (γ-HCH) exposure. Adult specimens of the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus were exposed to two different concentrations (0.1 and 0.5 mg L(-1)) of lindane. After 24 and 48h of treatment, we examined the lindane influence on coelomocytes vitality and enumeration as well on some humoral parameters. Our results showed that the presence of the pesticide affected both cellular and humoral components of the immune system. In particular, P. lividus coelomocytes vitality did not change but a decrease of the total cell number and an increase of the red cells was recorded. Haemolytic and lysozyme-like activities as well as antibacterial activity on Vibrio alginolyticus of treated animals decreased. Sea urchin immunological competence modifications might represent a tool for monitoring disease susceptibility thus providing biological criteria for the implementation of water quality standards to protect marine organisms.

  4. Treatment of Scabies: Comparison of Lindane 1% vs Permethrin 5.

    PubMed

    Rezaee, Elham; Goldust, Mohamad; Alipour, Houman

    2015-01-01

    Scabies, whose etiologic agent is Sarcoptes scabiei, is a neglected parasitic disease that is a major public health problem in many resourcepoor regions. Its current therapies include benzyl benzoate, lindane, permethrin, sulfur, crotamiton, monosulfiram, and oral ivermectin. The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy and safety of lindane 1% lotion vs permethrin 5% in the treatment of scabies. A total of 120 patients with scabies attending a dermatology outpatient department were included. Patients were randomly divided into two groups. Sixty patients and their family contacts received 5% permethrin cream and the other 60 received 1% lindane lotion. Treatment was evaluated at intervals of 2 and 4 weeks. Permethrin provided improvement in 48 patients (80%) after 2 weeks, whereas lindane was effective in only 28 patients (46.6%). Permethrin (5%) cream was found to be significantly more effective in the treatment of scabies compared with lindane in this study. Adverse effects were rare in both the permethrin and lindane groups.

  5. Fatality after a single dermal application of lindane lotion.

    PubMed

    Sudakin, Daniel L

    2007-01-01

    Lindane lotion, approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for treatment of scabies and lice, poses risks of serious adverse effects on the nervous system. In 2003, the FDA issued a public health advisory for lindane products, emphasizing the importance of compliance with labeling instructions. The author presents a case in which a fatal outcome followed a single dermal application of lindane. The product was not applied according to the labeling instructions, and the 66-year-old man rapidly developed hypoxemia, seizures, respiratory acidosis, and hypotension. The final diagnosis at autopsy was hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy from lindane. This case is consistent with other reports of severe neurological outcomes from pharmaceutical use of lindane. These factors suggest a need for the FDA to reassess whether the risks of lindane have been effectively communicated to healthcare providers.

  6. Phytoextraction and dissipation of lindane by Spinacia oleracea L.

    PubMed

    Dubey, Rama Kant; Tripathi, Vishal; Singh, Nandita; Abhilash, P C

    2014-11-01

    Remediation and management of organochlorine pesticide (OCPs) contaminated soil is becoming a global priority as they are listed in the Stockholm list of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) for global elimination. Lindane is a OCPs candidate recently included in the Stockholm list. However, India has an exemption to produce lindane for malaria control. Because of its widespread use during the last few decades, lindane contaminated soils are found in almost all parts of India. Since phytoremediation is widely acknowledged as an innovative strategy for the clean-up of contaminated soils; the present study was aimed to evaluate the phytoextraction and dissipation of lindane by a leafy vegetable Spinacia oleracea L (Spinach). The test plant was grown in different concentrations of lindane (5, 10, 15 and 20 mg kg(-1)) and harvested at 10, 30 and 45 days. At 45 days, the concentrations of lindane in root and leaf of Spinach growing in four different concentrations were reached up to 3.5, 5.4, 7.6 and 12.3 mg kg(-1) and 1.8, 2.2, 3 and 4.9 mg kg(-1), respectively. There was a significant difference (p<0.01) in the dissipation of lindane in vegetated and non-vegetated soil. Moreover, the residual lindane in four experiments was reduced to 81, 76, 69 and 61 percent, respectively. The experimental results indicate that Spinach can be used for the phytoremediation of lindane. However, more studies are required to prevent the toxicity of harvested parts.

  7. Effect of prenatal exposure of lindane on alterations in the expression of cerebral cytochrome P450s and neurotransmitter receptors in brain regions.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Shikha; Singh, Anshuman; Shukla, Rajendra K; Khanna, Vinay K; Parmar, Devendra

    2015-03-01

    Prenatal exposure to low doses (0.0625- or 0.125- or 0.25 mg/kg b. wt., orally) of lindane, an organochlorine insecticide, from gestation day (GD) 5-21 was found to produce a dose-dependent increase in the mRNA expression of cytochrome P450s (CYPs) and associated transcription factors in frontal cortex, cerebellum and corpus striatum isolated from the offsprings. Though the increase in the expression persisted up to postnatal day 60, the increase was significant at postnatal days 21-, and 45- in the offsprings exposed prenatally to relatively higher doses (0.125- or 0.25 mg/kg) of lindane and even up to postnatal day 60 in the offsprings exposed prenatally to the highest dose of lindane. A similar increase in the expression of dopamine D2, 5HT2A and GABAA receptors and associated neurotransmitter receptor binding was observed in the brain regions of the exposed offsprings. Scatchard analysis also suggested an increase in the levels of these neurotransmitter receptors in offsprings prenatally exposed to lindane. The data indicating similarities in the alterations of neurotransmitter receptors and CYPs in brain regions in prenatally exposed offsprings have suggested that neurotransmission processes and CYPs are closely linked that will eventually help in understanding the developmental neurotoxicity of lindane. PMID:25572523

  8. MEDIA SERUM LEVELS AND IN VITRO HEPATIC ABSORPTION OF LINDANE

    EPA Science Inventory

    High plasma protein binding is known to reduce the tissue uptake of chemicals in vivo, but the extent of its importance in vitro is less clear. Experiments were conducted to determine the cellular uptake of lindane in vitro under different conditions. Lindane was selected because...

  9. Identification and characterization of mutations in housefly (Musca domestica) acetylcholinesterase involved in insecticide resistance.

    PubMed

    Walsh, S B; Dolden, T A; Moores, G D; Kristensen, M; Lewis, T; Devonshire, A L; Williamson, M S

    2001-10-01

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) insensitive to organophosphate and carbamate insecticides has been identified as a major resistance mechanism in numerous arthropod species. However, the associated genetic changes have been reported in the AChE genes from only three insect species; their role in conferring insecticide insensitivity has been confirmed, using functional expression, only for those in Drosophila melanogaster. The housefly, Musca domestica, was one of the first insects shown to have this mechanism; here we report the occurrence of five mutations (Val-180-->Leu, Gly-262-->Ala, Gly-262-->Val, Phe-327-->Tyr and Gly-365-->Ala) in the AChE gene of this species that, either singly or in combination, confer different spectra of insecticide resistance. The baculovirus expression of wild-type and mutated housefly AChE proteins has confirmed that the mutations each confer relatively modest levels of insecticide insensitivity except the novel Gly-262-->Val mutation, which results in much stronger resistance (up to 100-fold) to certain compounds. In all cases the effects of mutation combinations are additive. The mutations introduce amino acid substitutions that are larger than the corresponding wild-type residues and are located within the active site of the enzyme, close to the catalytic triad. The likely influence of these substitutions on the accessibility of the different types of inhibitor and the orientation of key catalytic residues are discussed in the light of the three-dimensional structures of the AChE protein from Torpedo californica and D. melanogaster. PMID:11563981

  10. Multiplex Assay for Species Identification and Monitoring of Insecticide Resistance in Anopheles punctulatus Group Populations of Papua New Guinea

    PubMed Central

    Henry-Halldin, Cara N.; Nadesakumaran, Kogulan; Keven, John Bosco; Zimmerman, Allison M.; Siba, Peter; Mueller, Ivo; Hetzel, Manuel W.; Kazura, James W.; Thomsen, Edward; Reimer, Lisa J.; Zimmerman, Peter A.

    2012-01-01

    Anopheles punctulatus sibling species (An. punctulatus s.s., Anopheles koliensis, and Anopheles farauti species complex [eight cryptic species]) are principal vectors of malaria and filariasis in the Southwest Pacific. Given significant effort to reduce malaria and filariasis transmission through insecticide-treated net distribution in the region, effective strategies to monitor evolution of insecticide resistance among An. punctulatus sibling species is essential. Mutations in the voltage-gated sodium channel (VGSC) gene have been associated with knock-down resistance (kdr) to pyrethroids and DDT in malarious regions. By examining VGSC sequence polymorphism we developed a multiplex assay to differentiate wild-type versus kdr alleles and query intron-based polymorphisms that enable simultaneous species identification. A survey including mosquitoes from seven Papua New Guinea Provinces detected no kdr alleles in any An. punctulatus species. Absence of VGSC sequence introgression between species and evidence of geographic separation within species suggests that kdr must be monitored in each An. punctulatus species independently. PMID:22232465

  11. Treatment of Scabies: Comparison of Lindane 1% vs Permethrin 5.

    PubMed

    Rezaee, Elham; Goldust, Mohamad; Alipour, Houman

    2015-01-01

    Scabies, whose etiologic agent is Sarcoptes scabiei, is a neglected parasitic disease that is a major public health problem in many resourcepoor regions. Its current therapies include benzyl benzoate, lindane, permethrin, sulfur, crotamiton, monosulfiram, and oral ivermectin. The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy and safety of lindane 1% lotion vs permethrin 5% in the treatment of scabies. A total of 120 patients with scabies attending a dermatology outpatient department were included. Patients were randomly divided into two groups. Sixty patients and their family contacts received 5% permethrin cream and the other 60 received 1% lindane lotion. Treatment was evaluated at intervals of 2 and 4 weeks. Permethrin provided improvement in 48 patients (80%) after 2 weeks, whereas lindane was effective in only 28 patients (46.6%). Permethrin (5%) cream was found to be significantly more effective in the treatment of scabies compared with lindane in this study. Adverse effects were rare in both the permethrin and lindane groups. PMID:26861425

  12. Nerve membrane ion channels as the target site of insecticides.

    PubMed

    Narahashi, Toshio

    2002-08-01

    Most insecticides are potent neurotoxicants that act on various neuroreceptors and ion channels. However, the major target receptors are limited to sodium channels, GABA receptors, and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. DDT and pyrethroids act similarly on sodium channels to keep them open leading to hyperexcitation. Indoxacarb inhibits sodium channels and certain subtypes of nicotinic receptors. Dieldrin, lindane and fipronil block GABA receptors. Imidacloprid modulates nicotinic receptors in a complex manner. Spinosad's major target site appears to be nicotinic receptors.

  13. Development of a Human Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetics (PBPK) Model For Dermal Permeability for Lindane

    EPA Science Inventory

    Lindane is a neurotoxicant used for the treatment of lice and scabies present on human skin. Due to its pharmaceutical application, an extensive pharmacokinetic database exists in humans. Mathematical diffusion models allow for calculation of lindane skin permeability coefficient...

  14. Ivermectin vs. lindane in the treatment of scabies.

    PubMed

    Goldust, Mohamad; Rezaee, Elham; Raghifar, Ramin; Naghavi-Behzad, Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    Scabies is commonly treated with acaricides but the treatment of choice is still controversial. This study aimed at comparing the efficacy of oral ivermectin vs. lindane lotion 1% for the treatment of scabies. Four hundred fourty patients with scabies were enrolled, and randomized into two groups: the first group received a single dose of oral ivermectin 200 microg/kg body weight, and the second group were treated with two applications of topical lindane lotion 1%, with a 1-week interval. Treatment was evaluated at intervals of 2 and 4 weeks, and if there was treatment failure at the 2-week follow-up, treatment was repeated. Single dose of oral ivermectin provided a cure rate of 63.6% at the 2-week follow-up, which increased to 81.8% at the 4-week follow-up after repeating the treatment. Treatment with two applications of lindane lotion 1%, with a 1-week interval between them, was effective in 45.4% of patients at the 2-week follow-up, which increased to 63.6% at the 4-week follow-up after this treatment was repeated. Single dose ivermectin was as effective as two applications of lindane lotion 1% at the 2-week follow-up. After repeating the treatment, ivermectin was superior to lindane lotion 1% at the 4-week follow up.

  15. The release of lindane from contaminated building materials.

    PubMed

    Volchek, Konstantin; Thouin, Geneviève; Kuang, Wenxing; Li, Ken; Tezel, F Handan; Brown, Carl E

    2014-10-01

    The release of the organochlorine pesticide lindane (γ-hexachlorocyclohexane) from several types of contaminated building materials was studied to assess inhalation hazard and decontamination requirements in response to accidental and/or intentional spills. The materials included glass, polypropylene carpet, latex-painted drywall, ceramic tiles, vinyl floor tiles, and gypsum ceiling tiles. For each surface concentration, an equilibrium concentration was determined in the vapour phase of the surrounding air. Vapor concentrations depended upon initial surface concentration, temperature, and type of building material. A time-weighted average (TWA) concentration in the air was used to quantify the health risk associated with the inhalation of lindane vapors. Transformation products of lindane, namely α-hexachlorocyclohexane and pentachlorocyclohexene, were detected in the vapour phase at both temperatures and for all of the test materials. Their formation was greater on glass and ceramic tiles, compared to other building materials. An empiric Sips isotherm model was employed to approximate experimental results and to estimate the release of lindane and its transformation products. This helped determine the extent of decontamination required to reduce the surface concentrations of lindane to the levels corresponding to vapor concentrations below TWA.

  16. Treatment of scabies: comparison of ivermectin vs. lindane lotion 1%.

    PubMed

    Mohebbipour, Alireza; Saleh, Parviz; Goldust, Mohamad; Amirnia, Mehdi; Zadeh, Yousef Javad; Mohamadi, Ramin Mir; Rezaee, Elham

    2012-01-01

    Topical antiscabietics have poor compliance. This study aimed at comparing the efficacy and safety of oral ivermectin with topical lindane in treating scabies. In this clinical trial, 248 patients from 2 to 86 years of age were divided into two groups. Oral ivermectin was given to group A in a single dose of 200 μg/kg body weight. Group B received application of lindane lotion 1% twice at one-week interval. When there was no cure in two weeks, 2nd treatment was given with either drug in the respective group. A single dose of ivermectin provided a cure rate of 58.6% at two-week follow up, which increased to 92.7% with 2 doses at the end of 4-week interval. The application of lindane lotion 1% twice at one-week interval was effective in 44.3% of patients at two-week follow up, which increased to 71.7% after repeating the treatment for another two weeks. Single dose application of oral ivermectin was as effective as twice application of lindane lotion 1% at one-week interval. Two doses of ivermectin proved superior to lindane lotion 1% after repeating the treatment at 4-week follow up.

  17. Identification and level of organochlorine insecticide contamination in groundwater and iridology analysis for people in Upper Citarum cascade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oginawati, K.; Pratama, M. A.

    2016-03-01

    Organochlorines are the main pollutants in the class of persistent organic pollutants which are types of pollutants that are being questioned worldwide due to chronic persistence, toxicity and bioaccumulation. Human around the Citarum River are still using groundwater as a drinking source. It is very risky for people health that consume groundwater because in 2009 the application of organochlorine still found in the Upper Citarum watershed rice field and had potential to contaminate groundwater. Groundwater was analyzed with nine species belonging to the organochlorine pollutants Organic Peristent types. 7 types of organochlorinesAldrin was detected with an average concentration of 0.09 ppb, dieldrin with an average concentration of 24 ppb, heptaklor with an average concentration of 0.51 ppb, with concentrations of endosulfan on average 0.73 ppb, DDT with average concentration of 0.13 ppb, Lindan with an average concentration of 1.2 ppb, endrin with an average concentration of 0.03 ppb. Types with the highest concentration of organochlorine a lindan and endosulfan. Residues of aldrin, dieldrin and heptaklor in groundwater already exceeds the quality standards for drinking water Permenkes 492/2010. Based on the iridology analysis obtained several systems are expected to nervous, immune and reproductive system disorders and toxin deposits under the skin.

  18. Biomimetic fat cell (BFC) modification and for lindane removal from aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Liyan, Song; Youcai, Zhao; Guojian, Wang; Bing, Li; Dongjie, Niu; Xiaoli, Chai

    2008-03-01

    To improve the regeneration ability of biomimetic fat cell (BFC), an innovative agent for hydrophobic organic contaminants (HOCs) removal, BFC was modified through introducing 1, 3, 5-benzenetricarboxyl trichloride with trifunctional group and heterocyclic piperazine in this research. Modified biomimetic fat cell (MBFC) has a good lindane removal capacity close to that of BFC and powder activated carbon (PAC), and the lindane removal is 97.68, 96.65 and 98.36% with 7 mg/L lindane initial concentration, respectively. At the same time, 20 mg/L MBFC or PAC is sufficient for 10 microg/L lindane removal, and in 20-60 mg/L doses range the lindane removal by both MBFC and PAC can reach 99.0%; When the doses is below 10 mg/L, MBFC showed better lindane removal than PAC and MBFC even could reach 96.8% lindane removal in 5 mg/L dose. Lindane removal by MBFC could be held on 95% above in first 6-time reuse. Though the lindane removal by MBFC decreased with the reuse time increasing, MBFC still could remove 80 % lindane after 9 times regeneration. In contract with BFC, MBFC showed obvious advantage on the regeneration. The lindane removal mechanism by MBFC, similar with BFC, includes bioaccumulation by MBFC nucleolus-triolein and adsorption by MBFC membrane, and the bioaccumulation is the main way.

  19. Identification and Characterization of Maize salmon silks Genes Involved in Insecticidal Maysin Biosynthesis[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Falcone-Ferreyra, María Lorena; Rodríguez, Eduardo; Engelmeier, Jacob; Grotewold, Erich

    2016-01-01

    The century-old maize (Zea mays) salmon silks mutation has been linked to the absence of maysin. Maysin is a C-glycosyl flavone that, when present in silks, confers natural resistance to the maize earworm (Helicoverpa zea), which is one of the most damaging pests of maize in America. Previous genetic analyses predicted Pericarp Color1 (P1; R2R3-MYB transcription factor) to be epistatic to the sm mutation. Subsequent studies identified two loci as being capable of conferring salmon silks phenotypes, salmon silks1 (sm1) and sm2. Benefitting from available sm1 and sm2 mapping information and from knowledge of the genes regulated by P1, we describe here the molecular identification of the Sm1 and Sm2 gene products. Sm2 encodes a rhamnosyl transferase (UGT91L1) that uses isoorientin and UDP-rhamnose as substrates and converts them to rhamnosylisoorientin. Sm1 encodes a multidomain UDP-rhamnose synthase (RHS1) that converts UDP-glucose into UDP-l-rhamnose. Here, we demonstrate that RHS1 shows unexpected substrate plasticity in converting the glucose moiety in rhamnosylisoorientin to 4-keto-6-deoxy glucose, resulting in maysin. Both Sm1 and Sm2 are direct targets of P1, as demonstrated by chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments. The molecular characterization of Sm1 and Sm2 described here completes the maysin biosynthetic pathway, providing powerful tools for engineering tolerance to maize earworm in maize and other plants. PMID:27221383

  20. Insecticide poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... are breathed in. Stronger insecticides, which a commercial greenhouse might use or someone might store in their garage, contain many dangerous substances. These include: Carbamates Organophosphates Paradichlorobenzenes (mothballs)

  1. Role of human GABA(A) receptor beta3 subunit in insecticide toxicity.

    PubMed

    Ratra, G S; Kamita, S G; Casida, J E

    2001-05-01

    The gamma-aminobutyric acid type A (GABA(A)) receptor is the target for the major insecticides alpha-endosulfan, lindane, and fipronil and for many analogs. Their action as chloride channel blockers is directly measured by binding studies with [(3)H]ethynylbicycloorthobenzoate ([(3)H]EBOB). This study tests the hypothesis that GABA(A) receptor subunit composition determines the sensitivity and selectivity of insecticide toxicity. Human receptor subtypes were expressed individually (alpha1, alpha6, beta1, beta3, and gamma2) and in combination in insect Sf9 cells. Binding parameters were similar for [(3)H]EBOB in the beta3 homooligomer, alpha1beta3gamma2 heterooligomer, and native brain membranes, but toxicological profiles were very different. Surprisingly, alpha-endosulfan, lindane, and fipronil were all remarkably potent on the recombinant beta3 homooligomeric receptor (IC50 values of 0.5-2.4 nM), whereas they were similar in potency on the alpha1beta3gamma2 subtype (IC50 values of 16-33 nM) and highly selective on the native receptor (IC50 values of 7.3, 306, and 2470 nM, respectively). The selectivity order for 29 insecticides and convulsants as IC50 ratios for native/beta3 or alpha1beta3gamma2/beta3 was as follows: fipronil > lindane > 19 other insecticides including alpha-endosulfan and picrotoxinin > 4 trioxabicyclooctanes and dithianes (almost nonselective) > tetramethylenedisulfotetramine, 4-chlorophenylsilatrane, or alpha-thujone. Specificity between mammals and insects at the target site (fipronil > lindane > alpha-endosulfan) paralleled that for toxicity. Potency at the native receptor is more predictive for inhibition of GABA-stimulated chloride uptake than that at the beta3 or alpha1beta3gamma2 receptors. Therefore, the beta3 subunit contains the insecticide target and other subunits differentially modulate the binding to confer compound-dependent specificity and selective toxicity.

  2. Lindane haematotoxicity confirmed by in vitro tests on human and rat progenitors.

    PubMed

    Parent-Massin, D; Thouvenot, D; Rio, B; Riche, C

    1994-02-01

    Blood dyscrasias such as aplastic anaemia and leukopenia are described following the use of lindane for agricultural purposes or against ectoparasites in animal and human health. In order to determine the involvement of lindane in these effects, an in vitro model of haematotoxicity evaluation has been used. Culture of haematopoietic progenitors, Colony Forming Unit-Granulocyte and Macrophage (CFU-GM), have been performed in the presence of lindane with increasing concentrations. Results showed that lindane was cytotoxic for human progenitors. They were one thousand times more sensitive to the lindane than rat CFU-GM. This cytotoxicity was observed with lindane concentrations similar to those measured in human blood in cases of acute intoxication and in fat tissues of exposed populations.

  3. The mechanism for lindane-induced inhibition of steroidogenesis in cultured rat Leydig cells.

    PubMed

    Ronco, A M; Valdés, K; Marcus, D; Llanos, M

    2001-02-21

    The in vitro effect of the gamma-isomer of hexachlorocyclohexane, lindane, on rat Leydig cell steroidogenesis was studied. Leydig cells from mature male rats were incubated with human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG, 1 IU) for 3 h at 34 degrees C in the presence of different doses of lindane (2-200 microg/ml; 2-200 ppm). Results demonstrate that lindane produces a dose-dependent inhibition of testosterone production in hCG-stimulated Leydig cells. The decreased testosterone synthesis was accompanied with a half-reduced LH/hCG receptor number without any modification in the K(d) value. In addition, lindane also decreased cAMP production. These effects were not due to a detrimental action of lindane on cell viability. Results of this study demonstrate a direct inhibitory action of lindane on testicular steroidogenesis, at least in part, through a reduction in the classical second messenger production involved in this pathway.

  4. Identification of insecticidal constituents of the essential oils of Dahlia pinnata Cav. against Sitophilus zeamais and Sitophilus oryzae.

    PubMed

    Wang, Da-Cheng; Qiu, Da-Ren; Shi, Li-Na; Pan, Hong-Yu; Li, Ya-Wei; Sun, Jin-Zhu; Xue, Ying-Jie; Wei, Dong-Sheng; Li, Xiang; Zhang, Ya-Mei; Qin, Jian-Chun

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this research was to determine the chemical composition of the essential oils of Dahlia pinnata, their insecticidal activity against Sitophilus zeamais and Sitophilusoryzae and to isolate insecticidal constituents. Based on bioactivity-guided fractionation, active constituents were isolated and identified as D-limonene, 4-terpineol and α-terpineol. Essential oils and active compounds tested exhibited contact toxicity, with LD50 values ranging from 132.48 to 828.79 μg/cm(2) against S. zeamais and S. oryzae. Essential oils possessed fumigant toxicity against S. zeamais and S. oryzae with LC50 from 14.10 to 73.46 mg/L. d-Limonene (LC50 = 4.55 and 7.92 mg/L) showed stronger fumigant toxicity against target insects. 4-Terpineol (88 ± 8%) and d-limonene (87 ± 5%) showed the strongest repellency against S. zeamais and S. oryzae, respectively. The results indicate that essential oils and insecticidal constituents have potential for development into natural fumigants, insecticides or repellents for control of the stored-product insect pests. PMID:25563135

  5. Hepatoprotective Effect of Curcumin on Lindane-induced Oxidative Stress in Male Wistar Rats

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Rambir; Sharma, Poonam

    2011-01-01

    Lindane, an organochlorine pesticide, is recognized as a major public health concern because of its potential toxic effects on human health. Its persistence in the body fluids may lead to continuous blood circulation, liver exposure and hepatotoxicity. The present study was undertaken to evaluate the possible protective role of curcumin on lindane-induced hepatotoxicity. Forty-two healthy adult male Wistar rats were divided into seven groups of six rats each. Group I was given dimethylsulfoxide. A single dose of lindane (60 mg/kg bw) was given to group II. Lindane (30 mg/kg bw) was given daily to group III for 14 days. Treatment with curcumin (100 and 200 mg/kg) was given to groups IV and V before (pretreatment) and to groups VI and VII after (post-treatment) 14 days exposure of lindane. Oxidative stress parameters and antioxidative enzymes were investigated in the liver of exposed and treated rats. A significant increase in lipid peroxidation, and decrease in glutathione level, Superoxide dismutase catalase, glutathione-S-transferase, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase and NADPH quinine reductase activities was observed in liver of rats exposed to lindane. Curcumin (Pre- and post-treatment) nearly normalized all these parameters. Histological alterations were also observed in the liver tissue after lindane exposure. Treatment with curcumin significantly prevented the lindane-induced histological alterations. In conclusion, curcumin has protective effect over lindane-induced oxidative damage in rat liver. PMID:21976817

  6. Altered transport of lindane caused by the retention of natural particles in saturated porous media.

    PubMed

    Ngueleu, Stéphane K; Grathwohl, Peter; Cirpka, Olaf A

    2014-07-01

    Attachment and straining of colloidal particles in porous media result in their reversible and irreversible retention. The retained particles may either increase the retention of hydrophobic pollutants by sorption onto the particles, or enhance pollutant transport when particles, loaded with the pollutants, are remobilized. The present study examines the effects of retained particles on the transport of the hydrophobic pesticide lindane (gamma-hexachlorocyclohexane) in saturated porous media. The lignite particles used have median diameters of about 3 μm, 1 μm, 0.8 μm, and 0.2 μm, respectively. Laboratory column experiments were analyzed by numerical modeling in order to identify and understand the processes involved in the transport of the particles and of lindane. Four scenarios were considered in which the solution containing lindane is injected either during or after the elution of the particles. The results show that lignite particles retained in a sandy porous medium alter the transport of the invading lindane. Particle retention was high in all scenarios and increased with increasing particle size. Remobilization of particles occurred due to a change in solution chemistry, and continuous particle detachment was observed over time. Numerical modeling of particle transport suggests that both reversible attachment and irreversible straining affected the transport of the particles. Lindane was retarded in all scenarios due to the strong particle retention in conjunction with the sorption of lindane onto the sand and onto retained particles, and the limited number of mobile particles carrying lindane. Moreover, it was found that intra-particle diffusion limited adsorption/desorption of lindane onto/from both limestone fragments of the sand and lignite particles. We assume that retention of lindane is reversible even though lindane recovery was incomplete over the duration of the experiments. The analysis of the effluent concentration suggests that retained

  7. Comparative study on the effect of some chlorinated hydrocarbon insecticides on the formation of ectotrophic mycorrhizae in seedlings of Picea abies (L.) Karst.

    PubMed

    Iloba, C

    1978-01-01

    Pot experiments were conducted to determine the effect of lindane and toxaphene on the ectotrophic mycorrhizae in Picea abies (L.) Karst. seedlings. The concentrations investigated gave variable results. Quantitative reductions were found in mycorrhizal short roots and intensity. In general the initiated lateral roots were mainly infected by mycorrhizae, even in the presence of insecticidal injuries in the root system.

  8. Outcomes of the California Ban on Pharmaceutical Lindane: Clinical and Ecologic Impacts

    PubMed Central

    Humphreys, Elizabeth H.; Janssen, Sarah; Heil, Ann; Hiatt, Patricia; Solomon, Gina; Miller, Mark D.

    2008-01-01

    Introduction There are increasing concerns over the presence and implications of pharmaceutical agents in water. In 2002, California banned pharmaceutical use of lindane because of concerns about water quality, as lindane treatment for head lice and scabies was found to be a significant factor adversely affecting wastewater quality. Objectives In this article we describe the effects the ban has had on wastewater quality, unintentional exposures, and clinical practice. This is the first time that a pharmaceutical has been outlawed to protect water quality. As such, this ban provides a rare opportunity to evaluate the possible or potential outcomes of future public health interventions aimed at reducing pharmaceutical water contamination. Methods We compiled data on lindane in wastewater treatment plant effluent for several large plants in California and one outside of California. Data on exposures to lindane were obtained from records of the California Poison Control System. We assessed the impact on clinical practice via a survey of 400 pediatricians Results Wastewater treatment plant monitoring showed that lindane declined in California after the ban. Similarly, unintentional exposure calls declined. Most physicians were aware of the ban (81%) and had used lindane previously (61%), but they did not notice any difficulties with the ban (78%). Conclusions The California experience suggests that elimination of pharmaceutical lindane produced environmental benefits, was associated with a reduction in reported unintentional exposures, and did not adversely affect head lice and scabies treatment. This ban serves as a model for governing bodies considering limits on the use of lindane or other pharmaceuticals. PMID:18335094

  9. Analytical investigations on the lindane bioremediation capability of the demosponge Hymeniacidon perlevis.

    PubMed

    Aresta, Antonella; Nonnis Marzano, Carlotta; Lopane, Chiara; Corriero, Giuseppe; Longo, Caterina; Zambonin, Carlo; Stabili, Loredana

    2015-01-15

    Lindane is an organochlorine pesticide that has been widely used to treat agricultural pests. It is of particular concern because of its toxicity, persistence and tendency to bioaccumulate in terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. In this context, we investigated the ability of the demosponge Hymeniacidon perlevis to bioremediate lindane polluted seawater during in vitro experimentation. Lindane was extracted by solid-phase micro-extraction (SPME) and determined by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Furthermore, we assessed the role exerted in lindane degradation by bacteria isolated from the sponge. Sponges showed low mortality in experimental conditions (lindane concentration 1 μg/L) and were able to remove about 50% of the lindane content from seawater in 48 h. Bacteria isolated from sponges showed a remarkable remediating capacity (up to 97% of lindane removed after 8-days). A lindane metabolite was identified, 1,3,4,5,6-pentachloro-cyclohexene. The results obtained are a prelude to the development of future strategies for the in situ bioremediation of this pollutant. PMID:25467876

  10. Degradation of lindane by a novel embedded bio-nano hybrid system in aqueous environment.

    PubMed

    Salam, Jaseetha Abdul; Das, Nilanjana

    2015-03-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of an embedded bio-nano hybrid system using nanoscale zinc oxide (n-ZnO) and lindane-degrading yeast Candida VITJzN04 for lindane degradation. Nano-embedding of the yeast was done with chemically synthesized n-ZnO particles (50 mg/mL) and was visualized by atomic force microscope (AFM) and scanning electron microscope (SEM). Nanoparticles were embedded substantially on the surfaces of the yeast cells and translocated into the cell cytoplasm without causing any lethal effect to the cell until 50 mg/mL. Lindane (600 mg/L) degradation was studied both in the individual and hybrid system. Rapid reductive-dechlorination of lindane was attained with n-ZnO under illuminated conditions, with the generation of chlorobenzene and benzene as dechlorination products. The bio-nano hybrid was found to be more effective compared to the native yeasts for lindane degradation and resulted in complete removal within 3 days. The kinetic data analysis implied that the half-life of lindane was 9 h for bio-nano hybrid and 28 h for Candida VITJzN04. The enhanced lindane degradation by bio-nano hybrid might be due to increased porosity and permeability of the yeast cell membrane, facilitating the easy entry of lindane into cell cytoplasm and n-ZnO-mediated dechlorination. To the best of our knowledge, this report, for the first time, suggests the use of n-ZnO-mediated dechlorination of lindane and the novel bio-nano hybrid system that reduces the half-life to one third of the time taken by the yeast alone. The embedded bio-nano hybrid system may be exploited as an effective remediation tool for the treatment of lindane-contaminated wastewaters.

  11. Identification of repellent and insecticidal constituents of the essential oil of Artemisia rupestris L. aerial parts against Liposcelis bostrychophila Badonnel.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xin Chao; Li, Yin Ping; Li, He Qin; Deng, Zhi Wei; Zhou, Ligang; Liu, Zhi Long; Du, Shu Shan

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this research was to determine the chemical composition and insecticidal and repellent activity of the essential oil of Artemisia rupestris L. aerial parts against the booklice Liposcelis bostrychophila Badonnel and isolation of insecticidal and repellent constituents from the essential oil. The essential oil of A. rupestris was obtained by hydrodistillation and analyzed by GC-MS. A total of 30 components of the essential oil of A. rupestris was identified and the principal compounds in the essential oil were α-terpinyl acetate (37.18%), spathulenol (10.65%), α-terpineol (10.09%), and linalool (7.56%), followed by 4-terpineol (3.92%) and patchoulol (3.05%). Based on bioactivity-guided fractionation, the four active constituents were isolated from the essential oil and identified as α-terpineol, α-terpinyl acetate, 4-terpineol and linalool. The essential oil of A. rupestris exhibited contact toxicity against L. bostrychophila with LD₅₀ value of 414.48 µg/cm². α-Terpinyl acetate (LD₅₀ = 92.59 µg/cm²) exhibited stronger contact toxicity against booklice than α-terpineol (LD₅₀ = 140.30 µg/cm²), 4-terpineol (LD₅₀ = 211.35 µg/cm²), and linalool (LD5₅₀ = 393.16 µg/cm²). The essential oil of A. rupestris (LC₅₀ = 6.67 mg/L air) also possessed fumigant toxicity against L. bostrychophila while the four constituents, 4-terpineol, α-terpineol, α-terpinyl acetate and linalool had LC₅₀ values of 0.34, 1.12, 1.26 and 1.96 mg/L air, respectively. α-Terpinol and α-terpinyl acetate showed strong repellency against L. bostrychophila, while linalool and 4-terpinol exhibited weak repellency. The results indicate that the essential oil of A. rupestris aerial parts and its constituent compounds have potential for development into natural insecticides or fumigants as well as repellents for control of insects in stored grains. PMID:24005967

  12. Experiments on the accumulation of lindane (gamma-BHC) by the primary producers Chlorella spec. and Chlorella pyrenoidosa.

    PubMed

    Hansen, P D

    1979-01-01

    Experiments were performed on the accumulation of the pesticide lindane (gamma-isomer of BHC) by two algae with different surfaces. An analytical procedure was developed for the gas chromatographic determinnation of lindane. At room temperature, lindane had a water solubility of 7.8 mg/L in distilled water and 6.7 mg/L in tap water. Under the experimental conditions of 10 to 100 microgram/L, 2.3% of the dissolved lindane was lost through adsorption on the glass walls of the equipment and 0.2% through evaporation. The recovery rate of lindane was 98% for the water samples and more than 90% for Chlorella spec. The tolerance in the gas chromatographic measurements amounted to 1.2%. Investigations on the effect of lindane on the growth of Chlorella spec. revealed irreparable damage to the algae cells through loss of chlorophyll, coagulation, and complete sedimentation at concentrations greater than 300 microgram/L. The experiments on sublethal accumulation showed the development of a state of equilibrium between the amount of lindane per cell and in the surrounding water with lindane concentrations of 10 to 100 microgram/L. The lindane was adsorptively attached to the algal cells within a few hr, and after three days lindane stabilized in the cells. The gelatinous surface of the algae increases the accumulation of lindane. PMID:93882

  13. Effect of quercetin against lindane induced alterations in the serum and hepatic tissue lipids in wistar rats

    PubMed Central

    Padma, Viswanadha Vijaya; Lalitha, Gurusamy; Shirony, Nicholson Puthanveedu; Baskaran, Rathinasamy

    2012-01-01

    Objective To assess the effect of quercetin (flavonoid) against lindane induced alterations in lipid profile of wistar rats. Methods Rats were administered orally with lindane (100 mg/kg body weight) and quercetin (10 mg/kg body weight) for 30 days. After the end of treatment period lipid profile was estimated in serum and tissue. Results Elevated levels of serum cholesterol, triglycerides, low density lipoprotein (LDL), very Low Density Lipoprotein (VLDL) and tissue triglycerides, cholesterol with concomitant decrease in serum HDL and tissue phospholipids were decreased in lindane treated rats were found to be significantly decreased in the quercetin and lindane co-treated rats. Conclusions Our study suggests that quercetin has hypolipidemic effect and offers protection against lindane induced toxicity in liver by restoring the altered levels of lipids. The quercetin cotreatment along with lindane for 30 days reversed these biochemical alterations in lipids induced by lindane. PMID:23569870

  14. γ-Lindane Increases Microcystin Synthesis in Microcystis aeruginosa PCC7806.

    PubMed

    Ceballos-Laita, Laura; Calvo-Begueria, Laura; Lahoz, Jessica; Bes, María-Teresa; Fillat, María F; Peleato, María-Luisa

    2015-09-01

    HCH factories, and the waste dumpsites associated to its production, have become a global environmental concern, and their runoff could pollute ground and surface waters with high levels of the pollutant. In this study, the influence of lindane (γ-HCH) on microcystin production has been investigated in Microcystis aeruginosa PCC7806. This toxic cyanobacterium is highly tolerant to γ-lindane (20 mg/L), and produces more toxin (microcystin) in the presence of the pollutant. Microcystis degrades γ-lindane and presence of γ-lindane induces genes involved in its own degradation (nirA). RT-PCRsq has been used to monitor changes in levels of transcripts encoded by the mcy operon (mcyD, mcyH and mcyJ), responsible for the microcystin synthesis machinery, as well as other genes involved in its transcriptional regulation, such as ntcA and fur family members. The presence of lindane in the culture media induces mcyD expression, as well as ntcA gene transcription, while other genes, such as mcyH, (putative ABC transporter), are downregulated. The amount of microcystin found in the cells and the culture media is higher when M. aeruginosa is treated with γ-lindane than in control cells. The results suggest that in a lindane polluted environment, Microcystis toxic strains may enhance their microcystin synthesis.

  15. Cross-resistance between fipronil and lindane in Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus.

    PubMed

    Castro Janer, E; Klafke, G M; Capurro, M L; Schumaker, T T S

    2015-05-30

    The southern cattle tick, Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus (Canestrini), is one of the most damaging parasites of cattle in tropical and subtropical regions. Several chemical groups have been used for its control, including cyclodienes (lindane and dieldrin). In Uruguay and Brazil these products were used at the beginning of the 1960s and during a few years. Fipronil and lindane act on the same target site. In both countries, southern cattle tick resistance to fipronil has sometimes developed quickly after only a few acaricide treatments (three to seven). The objective of the present study was to determine cross-resistance between fipronil and lindane in southern cattle ticks from Uruguay and Brazil. Initially, the FAO's (Food and Agricultural Organization) larval packet test with lindane was applied to a fipronil-resistant strain and to susceptible field populations. Mozo and POA strains were used as the susceptible controls. A larval immersion test was used to assess fipronil toxicity. Of fifteen fipronil-resistant field populations that were tested with lindane, eleven were lindane-resistant and three were susceptible. The last three populations had incipient resistance to fipronil. Finally, cross-resistance between fipronil and lindane in the southern cattle tick is reported in this study for the first time. PMID:25868846

  16. Comparative trial of permethrin 5% versus lindane 1% for the treatment of scabies.

    PubMed

    Goldust, Mohamad; Babae Nejad, Shahla; Rezaee, Elham; Raghifar, Ramin

    2013-01-20

    Objective: Treatment of scabies is an important issue in infectious dermatology. The aim of this study was to specify whether permethrin is effective for the treatment of human scabies and to compare its effectiveness with that of 1% lindane by topical application. Methods: 220 patients with scabies with the mean age of 44 ± 12/24 attended the study. Patients were divided into two groups randomly. The first group and their family contacts received 5% permethrin cream and the other received 1% lindane lotion. Treatment was evaluated at intervals of 2 and 4 weeks. Results: Of 254 patients, 220 completed the study. 110 in the group treated with lindane and 110 in the group treated with permethrin. Permethrin provided an improvement rate of 92 (83.6%) after 2 weeks, whereas lindane was effective only in 54 (49%) of patients. After 4 weeks improvement rate was 96.3% (106 of 110) in permethrin group since it was only 69.1% (76 of 110) in lindane group. Conclusion: Permethrin (5%) cream was found to be significantly more effective in the treatment of scabies in comparison with lindane in this study. There were no adverse effects with either permethrin or lindane.

  17. γ-Lindane Increases Microcystin Synthesis in Microcystis aeruginosa PCC7806.

    PubMed

    Ceballos-Laita, Laura; Calvo-Begueria, Laura; Lahoz, Jessica; Bes, María-Teresa; Fillat, María F; Peleato, María-Luisa

    2015-09-01

    HCH factories, and the waste dumpsites associated to its production, have become a global environmental concern, and their runoff could pollute ground and surface waters with high levels of the pollutant. In this study, the influence of lindane (γ-HCH) on microcystin production has been investigated in Microcystis aeruginosa PCC7806. This toxic cyanobacterium is highly tolerant to γ-lindane (20 mg/L), and produces more toxin (microcystin) in the presence of the pollutant. Microcystis degrades γ-lindane and presence of γ-lindane induces genes involved in its own degradation (nirA). RT-PCRsq has been used to monitor changes in levels of transcripts encoded by the mcy operon (mcyD, mcyH and mcyJ), responsible for the microcystin synthesis machinery, as well as other genes involved in its transcriptional regulation, such as ntcA and fur family members. The presence of lindane in the culture media induces mcyD expression, as well as ntcA gene transcription, while other genes, such as mcyH, (putative ABC transporter), are downregulated. The amount of microcystin found in the cells and the culture media is higher when M. aeruginosa is treated with γ-lindane than in control cells. The results suggest that in a lindane polluted environment, Microcystis toxic strains may enhance their microcystin synthesis. PMID:26404326

  18. γ-Lindane Increases Microcystin Synthesis in Microcystis aeruginosa PCC7806

    PubMed Central

    Ceballos-Laita, Laura; Calvo-Begueria, Laura; Lahoz, Jessica; Bes, María-Teresa; Fillat, María F.; Peleato, María-Luisa

    2015-01-01

    HCH factories, and the waste dumpsites associated to its production, have become a global environmental concern, and their runoff could pollute ground and surface waters with high levels of the pollutant. In this study, the influence of lindane (γ-HCH) on microcystin production has been investigated in Microcystis aeruginosa PCC7806. This toxic cyanobacterium is highly tolerant to γ-lindane (20 mg/L), and produces more toxin (microcystin) in the presence of the pollutant. Microcystis degrades γ-lindane and presence of γ-lindane induces genes involved in its own degradation (nirA). RT-PCRsq has been used to monitor changes in levels of transcripts encoded by the mcy operon (mcyD, mcyH and mcyJ), responsible for the microcystin synthesis machinery, as well as other genes involved in its transcriptional regulation, such as ntcA and fur family members. The presence of lindane in the culture media induces mcyD expression, as well as ntcA gene transcription, while other genes, such as mcyH, (putative ABC transporter), are downregulated. The amount of microcystin found in the cells and the culture media is higher when M. aeruginosa is treated with γ-lindane than in control cells. The results suggest that in a lindane polluted environment, Microcystis toxic strains may enhance their microcystin synthesis. PMID:26404326

  19. Responsiveness of cerebral and hepatic cytochrome P450s in rat offspring prenatally exposed to lindane

    SciTech Connect

    Johri, Ashu; Yadav, Sanjay; Dhawan, Alok; Parmar, Devendra

    2008-08-15

    ABSTRACT: Prenatal exposure to low doses of lindane has been shown to affect the ontogeny of xenobiotic metabolizing cytochrome P450s (CYPs), involved in the metabolism and neurobehavioral toxicity of lindane. Attempts were made in the present study to investigate the responsiveness of CYPs in offspring prenatally exposed to lindane (0.25 mg/kg b. wt.; 1/350th of LD{sub 50}; p. o. to mother) when challenged with 3-methylcholanthrene (MC) or phenobarbital (PB), inducers of CYP1A and 2B families or a sub-convulsant dose of lindane (30 mg/kg b. wt., p. o.) later in life. Prenatal exposure to lindane was found to produce an increase in the mRNA and protein expression of CYP1A1, 1A2, 2B1, 2B2 isoforms in brain and liver of the offspring at postnatal day 50. The increased expression of the CYPs in the offspring suggests the sensitivity of the CYPs during postnatal development, possibly, to low levels of lindane, which may partition into mother's milk. A higher increase in expression of CYP1A and 2B isoenzymes and their catalytic activity was observed in animals pretreated prenatally with lindane and challenged with MC (30 mg/kg, i. p. x 5 days) or PB (80 mg/kg, i. p. x 5 days) when young at age (approx. 7 weeks) compared to animals exposed to MC or PB alone. Further, challenge of the control and prenatally exposed offspring with a single sub-convulsant dose of lindane resulted in an earlier onset and increased incidence of convulsions in the offspring prenatally exposed to lindane have demonstrated sensitivity of the CYPs in the prenatally exposed offspring. Our data assume significance as the subtle changes in the expression profiles of hepatic and cerebral CYPs in rat offspring during postnatal development could modify the adult response to a later exposure to xenobiotics.

  20. Actions of insecticides on the insect GABA receptor complex

    SciTech Connect

    Bermudez, I.; Hawkins, C.A.; Taylor, A.M.; Beadle, D.J. )

    1991-01-01

    The actions of insecticides on the insect gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptor were investigated using (35S)t-butylbicyclophosphorothionate (( 35S)TBPS) binding and voltage-clamp techniques. Specific binding of (35S)TBPS to a membrane homogenate derived from the brain of Locusta migratoria locusts is characterised by a Kd value of 79.3 {plus minus} 2.9 nM and a Bmax value of 1770 {plus minus} 40 fmol/mg protein. (35S)TBPS binding is inhibited by mM concentrations of barbiturates and benzodiazepines. In contrast dieldrin, ivermectin, lindane, picrotoxin and TBPS are inhibitors of (35S)TBPS binding at the nanomolar range. Bicuculline, baclofen and pyrethroid insecticides have no effect on (35S)TBPS binding. These results are similar to those obtained in electrophysiological studies of the current elicited by GABA in both Locusta and Periplaneta americana central neurones. Noise analysis of the effects of lindane, TBPS, dieldrin and picrotoxin on the cockroach GABA responses reveals that these compounds decrease the variance of the GABA-induced current but have no effect on its mean open time. All these compounds, with the exception of dieldrin, significantly decrease the conductance of GABA-evoked single current.

  1. Biomimetic fat cell (BFC) preparation and for lindane removal from aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Liyan, Song; Youcai, Zhao; Guojian, Wang; Bing, Li; Dongjie, Niu; Xiaoli, Chai

    2007-07-19

    Fat tissue of organism can accumulate hydrophobic chemicals efficiently and the accumulation level has a positive correlation with fat quantity. In this work, based on this characteristic, an innovative agent, that is, biomimetic fat cell (BFC) has been synthesized with interfacial polymerization. BFC has a hydrophobic nucleolus-triolein and hydrophilic membrane-polyamide, through which water, carrying hydrophobic organic contaminants (HOCs), can pass. This process is followed by the accumulation of HOCs. BFC has 97.39% lindane removal ability. This is close to 98.12% lindane removal by powder active carbon (PAC) in aqueous solution and 7 mg/L initial concentration of lindane. BFC can be regenerated easily by organic solvent dialysis in comparison with high temperature or pressure used for PAC regeneration. Lindane removal by BFC may occur through two mechanisms: bioaccumulation by BFC nucleolus-triolein; and adsorption by BFC membrane. Bioaccumulation is the prevailing mechanism.

  2. Plasma absorption and ultrastructural changes of rat testicular cells induced by lindane.

    PubMed

    Suwalsky, M; Villena, F; Marcus, D; Ronco, A M

    2000-09-01

    This paper describes, for the first time, how topical application in rats of a commercial preparation of lindane widely used in public health, at similar doses and routes of administration as in humans, leads to rapid absorption and accumulation of lindane in the testes. An early peak of absorption was detected in plasma 6 h after topical treatment of male Wistar rats with a commercial preparation of 1% lindane (Plomurol). Higher plasma levels were observed after repetitive doses of 60 mg/kg b.w., the amount recommended for the treatment of scabies and pediculosis in humans in several countries. A residue level of 7.4 +/- 0.67 microg/g was found in testicular tissue 6 h after a single daily topical application for 4 consecutive days. The ultrastructural study of testicular interstitial cells exposed to dermal application of lindane (Plomurol) revealed widespread damage of a great number of Leydig cells, some of which were completely disintegrated. PMID:11204556

  3. Neurotoxic reaction to lindane in an HIV-seropositive patient. An old medication's new problem.

    PubMed

    Solomon, B A; Haut, S R; Carr, E M; Shalita, A R

    1995-03-01

    Scabies is a common infestation for patients of all ages throughout the world. One of the standard therapies for scabies is 1% lindane lotion. Lindane has been associated with neurotoxic reactions, specifically seizures. We describe a case of a middle-aged adult man with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection who was found to have typical scabies and was treated with a single topical application of lindane. Two hours after the application, the patient experienced a new-onset generalized seizure. We believe that the triad of HIV infection, medications that reduce seizure thresholds, and percutaneous absorption factors, in the aggregate, induced the seizure. We believe that lindane should not be prescribed for patients with HIV infection.

  4. Neonicotinoid Insecticides and Their Impacts on Bees: A Systematic Review of Research Approaches and Identification of Knowledge Gaps.

    PubMed

    Lundin, Ola; Rundlöf, Maj; Smith, Henrik G; Fries, Ingemar; Bommarco, Riccardo

    2015-01-01

    It has been suggested that the widespread use of neonicotinoid insecticides threatens bees, but research on this topic has been surrounded by controversy. In order to synthesize which research approaches have been used to examine the effect of neonicotinoids on bees and to identify knowledge gaps, we systematically reviewed research on this subject that was available on the Web of Science and PubMed in June 2015. Most of the 216 primary research studies were conducted in Europe or North America (82%), involved the neonicotinoid imidacloprid (78%), and concerned the western honey bee Apis mellifera (75%). Thus, little seems to be known about neonicotinoids and bees in areas outside Europe and North America. Furthermore, because there is considerable variation in ecological traits among bee taxa, studies on honey bees are not likely to fully predict impacts of neonicotinoids on other species. Studies on crops were dominated by seed-treated maize, oilseed rape (canola) and sunflower, whereas less is known about potential side effects on bees from the use of other application methods on insect pollinated fruit and vegetable crops, or on lawns and ornamental plants. Laboratory approaches were most common, and we suggest that their capability to infer real-world consequences are improved when combined with information from field studies about realistic exposures to neonicotinoids. Studies using field approaches often examined only bee exposure to neonicotinoids and more field studies are needed that measure impacts of exposure. Most studies measured effects on individual bees. We suggest that effects on the individual bee should be linked to both mechanisms at the sub-individual level and also to the consequences for the colony and wider bee populations. As bees are increasingly facing multiple interacting pressures future research needs to clarify the role of neonicotinoids in relative to other drivers of bee declines.

  5. Neonicotinoid Insecticides and Their Impacts on Bees: A Systematic Review of Research Approaches and Identification of Knowledge Gaps

    PubMed Central

    Lundin, Ola; Rundlöf, Maj; Smith, Henrik G.; Fries, Ingemar; Bommarco, Riccardo

    2015-01-01

    It has been suggested that the widespread use of neonicotinoid insecticides threatens bees, but research on this topic has been surrounded by controversy. In order to synthesize which research approaches have been used to examine the effect of neonicotinoids on bees and to identify knowledge gaps, we systematically reviewed research on this subject that was available on the Web of Science and PubMed in June 2015. Most of the 216 primary research studies were conducted in Europe or North America (82%), involved the neonicotinoid imidacloprid (78%), and concerned the western honey bee Apis mellifera (75%). Thus, little seems to be known about neonicotinoids and bees in areas outside Europe and North America. Furthermore, because there is considerable variation in ecological traits among bee taxa, studies on honey bees are not likely to fully predict impacts of neonicotinoids on other species. Studies on crops were dominated by seed-treated maize, oilseed rape (canola) and sunflower, whereas less is known about potential side effects on bees from the use of other application methods on insect pollinated fruit and vegetable crops, or on lawns and ornamental plants. Laboratory approaches were most common, and we suggest that their capability to infer real-world consequences are improved when combined with information from field studies about realistic exposures to neonicotinoids. Studies using field approaches often examined only bee exposure to neonicotinoids and more field studies are needed that measure impacts of exposure. Most studies measured effects on individual bees. We suggest that effects on the individual bee should be linked to both mechanisms at the sub-individual level and also to the consequences for the colony and wider bee populations. As bees are increasingly facing multiple interacting pressures future research needs to clarify the role of neonicotinoids in relative to other drivers of bee declines. PMID:26313444

  6. Neonicotinoid Insecticides and Their Impacts on Bees: A Systematic Review of Research Approaches and Identification of Knowledge Gaps.

    PubMed

    Lundin, Ola; Rundlöf, Maj; Smith, Henrik G; Fries, Ingemar; Bommarco, Riccardo

    2015-01-01

    It has been suggested that the widespread use of neonicotinoid insecticides threatens bees, but research on this topic has been surrounded by controversy. In order to synthesize which research approaches have been used to examine the effect of neonicotinoids on bees and to identify knowledge gaps, we systematically reviewed research on this subject that was available on the Web of Science and PubMed in June 2015. Most of the 216 primary research studies were conducted in Europe or North America (82%), involved the neonicotinoid imidacloprid (78%), and concerned the western honey bee Apis mellifera (75%). Thus, little seems to be known about neonicotinoids and bees in areas outside Europe and North America. Furthermore, because there is considerable variation in ecological traits among bee taxa, studies on honey bees are not likely to fully predict impacts of neonicotinoids on other species. Studies on crops were dominated by seed-treated maize, oilseed rape (canola) and sunflower, whereas less is known about potential side effects on bees from the use of other application methods on insect pollinated fruit and vegetable crops, or on lawns and ornamental plants. Laboratory approaches were most common, and we suggest that their capability to infer real-world consequences are improved when combined with information from field studies about realistic exposures to neonicotinoids. Studies using field approaches often examined only bee exposure to neonicotinoids and more field studies are needed that measure impacts of exposure. Most studies measured effects on individual bees. We suggest that effects on the individual bee should be linked to both mechanisms at the sub-individual level and also to the consequences for the colony and wider bee populations. As bees are increasingly facing multiple interacting pressures future research needs to clarify the role of neonicotinoids in relative to other drivers of bee declines. PMID:26313444

  7. Biodegradation of lindane using a novel yeast strain, Rhodotorula sp. VITJzN03 isolated from agricultural soil.

    PubMed

    Abdul Salam, Jaseetha; Lakshmi, V; Das, Devlina; Das, Nilanjana

    2013-03-01

    Lindane is a notorious organochlorine pesticide due to its high toxicity, persistence in the environment and its tendency to bioaccumulate. A yeast strain isolated from sorghum cultivation field was able to use lindane as carbon and energy source under aerobic conditions. With molecular techniques, it was identified and named as Rhodotorula strain VITJzN03. The effects of nutritional and environmental factors on yeast growth and the biodegradation of lindane was investigated. The maximum production of yeast biomass along with 100 % lindane mineralization was noted at an initial lindane concentration of 600 mg l(-1) within a period of 10 days. Lindane concentration above 600 mg l(-1) inhibited the growth of yeast in liquid medium. A positive relationship was noted between the release of chloride ions and the increase of yeast biomass as well as degradation of lindane. The calculated degradation rate and half life of lindane were found to be 0.416 day(-1) and 1.66 days, respectively. The analysis of the metabolites using GC-MS identified the formation of seven intermediates including γ-pentachlorocyclohexane(γ-PCCH), 1,3,4,6-tetrachloro-1,4-cyclohexadiene(1,4-TCCHdiene), 1,2,4-trichlorobenzene (1,2,4 TCB), 1,4-dichlorobenzene (1,4 DCB), chloro-cis-1,2-dihydroxycyclohexadiene (CDCHdiene), 3-chlorocatechol (3-CC) and maleylacetate (MA) derivatives indicating that lindane degradation follows successive dechlorination and oxido-reduction. Based on the results of the present study, the possible pathway for lindane degradation by Rhodotorula sp. VITJzN03 has been proposed. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on lindane degradation by yeast which can serve as a potential agent for in situ bioremediation of medium to high level lindane-contaminated sites.

  8. Dual actions of lindane ({gamma}-hexachlorocyclohexane) on calcium homeostasis and exocytosis in rat PC12 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Heusinkveld, Harm J.; Thomas, Gareth O.; Lamot, Ischa; Berg, Martin van den; Kroese, Alfons B.A.; Westerink, Remco H.S.

    2010-10-01

    The persistent organochlorine pesticide lindane is still abundantly found in the environment and in human and animal tissue samples. Lindane induces a wide range of adverse health effects, which are at least partially mediated via the known inhibition of GABA{sub A} and glycine receptors. Additionally, lindane has been reported to increase the basal intracellular Ca{sup 2+} concentration ([Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i}). As Ca{sup 2+} triggers many cellular processes, including cell death and vesicular neurotransmitter release (exocytosis), we investigated whether lindane affects exocytosis, Ca{sup 2+} homeostasis, production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and cytotoxicity in neuroendocrine PC12 cells. Amperometric recordings and [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} imaging experiments with fura-2 demonstrated that lindane ({>=} 10 {mu}M) rapidly increases basal exocytosis and basal [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i}. Additional imaging and electrophysiological recordings revealed that this increase was largely due to a lindane-induced membrane depolarization and subsequent opening of N- and P/Q-type voltage-gated Ca{sup 2+} channels (VGCC). On the other hand, lindane ({>=} 3 {mu}M) induced a concentration-dependent but non-specific inhibition of VGCCs, thereby limiting the lindane-induced increase in basal [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} and exocytosis. Importantly, the non-specific inhibition of VGCCs also reduced stimulation-evoked exocytosis and Ca{sup 2+} influx. Though lindane exposure concentration-dependently increased ROS production, cell viability was not affected indicating that the used concentrations were not acute cytotoxic. These combined findings indicate that lindane has two, partly counteracting effects. Lindane causes membrane depolarization, thereby increasing basal [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} and exocytosis. In parallel, lindane inhibits VGCCs, thereby limiting the basal effects and reducing stimulation-evoked [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} and exocytosis. This study further underlines the need to consider

  9. Biodegradation of lindane using a novel yeast strain, Rhodotorula sp. VITJzN03 isolated from agricultural soil.

    PubMed

    Abdul Salam, Jaseetha; Lakshmi, V; Das, Devlina; Das, Nilanjana

    2013-03-01

    Lindane is a notorious organochlorine pesticide due to its high toxicity, persistence in the environment and its tendency to bioaccumulate. A yeast strain isolated from sorghum cultivation field was able to use lindane as carbon and energy source under aerobic conditions. With molecular techniques, it was identified and named as Rhodotorula strain VITJzN03. The effects of nutritional and environmental factors on yeast growth and the biodegradation of lindane was investigated. The maximum production of yeast biomass along with 100 % lindane mineralization was noted at an initial lindane concentration of 600 mg l(-1) within a period of 10 days. Lindane concentration above 600 mg l(-1) inhibited the growth of yeast in liquid medium. A positive relationship was noted between the release of chloride ions and the increase of yeast biomass as well as degradation of lindane. The calculated degradation rate and half life of lindane were found to be 0.416 day(-1) and 1.66 days, respectively. The analysis of the metabolites using GC-MS identified the formation of seven intermediates including γ-pentachlorocyclohexane(γ-PCCH), 1,3,4,6-tetrachloro-1,4-cyclohexadiene(1,4-TCCHdiene), 1,2,4-trichlorobenzene (1,2,4 TCB), 1,4-dichlorobenzene (1,4 DCB), chloro-cis-1,2-dihydroxycyclohexadiene (CDCHdiene), 3-chlorocatechol (3-CC) and maleylacetate (MA) derivatives indicating that lindane degradation follows successive dechlorination and oxido-reduction. Based on the results of the present study, the possible pathway for lindane degradation by Rhodotorula sp. VITJzN03 has been proposed. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on lindane degradation by yeast which can serve as a potential agent for in situ bioremediation of medium to high level lindane-contaminated sites. PMID:23108665

  10. GABA receptor subunit composition relative to insecticide potency and selectivity.

    PubMed

    Ratra, G S; Casida, J E

    2001-07-01

    Three observations on the 4-[(3)H]propyl-4'-ethynylbicycloorthobenzoate ([(3)H]EBOB) binding site in the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptor indicate the specific target for insecticide action in human brain and a possible mechanism for selectivity. First, from published data, alpha-endosulfan, lindane and fipronil compete for the [(3)H]EBOB binding site with affinities of 0.3--7 nM in both human recombinant homooligomeric beta 3 receptors and housefly head membranes. Second, from structure-activity studies, including new data, GABAergic insecticide binding potency on the pentameric receptor formed from the beta 3 subunit correlates well with that on the housefly receptor (r=0.88, n=20). This conserved inhibitor specificity is consistent with known sequence homologies in the housefly GABA receptor and the human GABA(A) receptor beta 3 subunit. Third, as mostly new findings, various combinations of alpha 1, alpha 6, and gamma 2 subunits coexpressed with a beta 1 or beta 3 subunit confer differential insecticide binding sensitivity, particularly to fipronil, indicating that subunit composition is a major factor in insecticide selectivity.

  11. Lindane biodegradation in groundwater using semi-continuous soil columns

    SciTech Connect

    LaPat-Polasko, L.T.; Lazarr, N.C.; Reker, M.A.

    1995-12-31

    To evaluate the potential for bioremediation of various isomers of benzene hexachloride (BHC) including lindane (gamma BHC)-contaminated groundwater, a bench-scale study was conducted using site groundwater and soil collected from a chemical manufacturing facility located in southwest Missouri. Three soil columns were prepared to evaluate various conditions under which contaminant biodegredation is known to occur: Column 1 (the hydrogen peroxide and nutrient column) received site groundwater, hydrogen peroxide (an oxygen source to promote aerobic conditions) and ammonium polyphosphate (nutrients); Column 2 received site groundwater, nutrients and sodium sulfite (a reductant to promote anaerobic conditions); and Column 3 received the same amendments as Column 1 but under sterile conditions. Column 3 was used to evaluate abiotic losses of contaminants. The indigenous soil and/or groundwater microbial population removed more than 99 percent of the BHC isomers present in the hydrogen peroxide and nutrient column influent in 24 hours. Abiotic losses of contaminants were less than 20 percent after initial column exchanges based on the results of sterile column data. Anaerobic conditions were not as conducive to contaminant degradation. During the 24-hour exchange periods, less than 80 percent BHC removal was observed in the groundwater effluents from the anaerobic column.

  12. Simultaneous Removal of Lindane, Lead and Cadmium from Soils by Rhamnolipids Combined with Citric Acid

    PubMed Central

    Long, Tao; Ying, Rongrong; Ye, Mao; Zhang, Shengtian; Li, Qun; Zhou, Yan; Lin, Yusuo

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the performance of rhamnolipids-citric acid mixed agents in simultaneous desorption of lindane and heavy metals from soils. The capacity of the mixed agents to solubilize lindane, lead and cadmium in aqueous solution was also explored. The results showed that the presence of citric acid greatly enhanced the solubilization of lindane and cadmium by rhamnolipids. A combined effect of the mixed agents on lindane and heavy metals removal from soils was observed. The maximum desorption ratios for lindane, cadmium and lead were 85.4%, 76.4% and 28.1%, respectively, for the mixed agents containing 1% rhamnolipidsand 0.1 mol/L citric acid. The results also suggest that the removal efficiencies of lead and cadmium were strongly related to their speciations in soils, and metals in the exchangeable and carbonate forms were easier to be removed. Our study suggests that the combining use of rhamnolipids and citric acid is a promising alternative to simultaneously remove organochlorine pesticides and heavy metals from soils. PMID:26087302

  13. Simultaneous Removal of Lindane, Lead and Cadmium from Soils by Rhamnolipids Combined with Citric Acid.

    PubMed

    Wan, Jinzhong; Meng, Die; Long, Tao; Ying, Rongrong; Ye, Mao; Zhang, Shengtian; Li, Qun; Zhou, Yan; Lin, Yusuo

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the performance of rhamnolipids-citric acid mixed agents in simultaneous desorption of lindane and heavy metals from soils. The capacity of the mixed agents to solubilize lindane, lead and cadmium in aqueous solution was also explored. The results showed that the presence of citric acid greatly enhanced the solubilization of lindane and cadmium by rhamnolipids. A combined effect of the mixed agents on lindane and heavy metals removal from soils was observed. The maximum desorption ratios for lindane, cadmium and lead were 85.4%, 76.4% and 28.1%, respectively, for the mixed agents containing 1% rhamnolipidsand 0.1 mol/L citric acid. The results also suggest that the removal efficiencies of lead and cadmium were strongly related to their speciations in soils, and metals in the exchangeable and carbonate forms were easier to be removed. Our study suggests that the combining use of rhamnolipids and citric acid is a promising alternative to simultaneously remove organochlorine pesticides and heavy metals from soils.

  14. Comparative study of 5% permethrin cream and 1% lindane lotion for the treatment of scabies.

    PubMed

    Schultz, M W; Gomez, M; Hansen, R C; Mills, J; Menter, A; Rodgers, H; Judson, F N; Mertz, G; Handsfield, H H

    1990-02-01

    A multicenter, randomized, investigator-blind controlled trial was conducted to compare the safety and efficacy of a single, whole-body application of 5% permethrin cream with that of 1% lindane lotion for the treatment of scabies in 467 patients. At 14 +/- 3 days after treatment, the mean active lesion count decreased from pretreatment levels of 85 (range, 4 to 600) in both treatment groups to 14 (range, 0 to 133) in the permethrin group and to 15 lesions (range, 0 to 500) in the lindane group. At 28 +/- 7 days after treatment, complete resolution had occurred in 181 (91%) of 199 patients treated with permethrin and in 176 (86%) of 205 patients given lindane. Pruritus due to scabies persisted at 28 +/- 7 days in 14% of the permethrin group and in 25% of the lindane group. The most frequent adverse effects were new or increased pruritus and mild, transient burning or stinging; the latter was slightly more frequent following permethrin treatment and appeared to be related to severity of infestation. Because of a lower potential for neurologic toxicity, permethrin may be preferable to lindane for the treatment of scabies particularly in children.

  15. Dichlorvos and lindane induced oxidative stress in rat brain: Protective effects of ginger

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Poonam; Singh, Rambir

    2012-01-01

    Background: Dichlorvos and lindane pesticide causes toxicity in animals including humans. Ginger (Zingiber officinale) is widely used as a culinary medicine in the Ayurvedic system of medicine, possessing a number of pharmacological properties. Objective: This study was designed to assess ameliorating effects of ginger juice in dichlorvos and lindane induced neurotoxicity in wistar rats. Materials and Methods: Dichlorvos (8.8 mg/kg bw) and lindane (8.8 mg/kg bw) were orally administered alone as well as in combination to adult male and female wistar rats for 14 days followed by the post-treatment of ginger juice (100 mg/kg bw) for 14 days. Lipid peroxidation (LPO), reduced glutathione (GSH), and activities of antioxidant enzymes such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), glutathione S-transferase (GST), glutathione reductase (GR), quinine reductase (QR), and protein level were measured to evaluate the toxicity of these pesticides in brain. Results: Dichlorvos and lindane administration alone and in combination increased LPO and decreased the GSH level, SOD, CAT, GPx, GST, GR, QR activity, and protein. Oxidative stress due to abnormal production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is believed to be involved in the toxicities induced by these pesticides. Post-treatment of ginger juice decreased LPO and increased the level of GSH, SOD, CAT, GPx, GST, GR, QR activity and protein in the brain of rats. Conclusions: The results indicated that dichlorovos and lindane induced tissue damage was ameliorated by ginger juice. PMID:22224058

  16. Effects of lindane on the glucose metabolism in rat brain cortex cells

    SciTech Connect

    Pulido, J.A.; del Hoyo, N.; Perez-Albarsanz, M.A. )

    1990-01-01

    The influence of 0.5 mM {gamma}-hexachlorocyclohexane ({gamma}-HCH, lindane) on glucose transport has been investigated using the analog 3-O-methyl-D(U-{sup 14}C) glucose. The glucose uptake was lineal for at least 10 sec. Preincubation of dissociated brain cortex cells with lindane decreased the transport of glucose with respect to the controls. The treatment of brain cortex cells with other organochlorine compounds indicated that the {alpha}-, {delta}-HCH isomers and dieldrin reproduced the same inhibitory pattern, while {beta}-HCH and endrin were inactive. The total radioactivity incorporated into CO{sub 2} from (U-{sup 14}C) glucose in the cerebral cortex is also inhibited by lindane in a time dependent manner.

  17. Development of a human physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model for dermal permeability for lindane.

    PubMed

    Sawyer, Megan E; Evans, Marina V; Wilson, Charles A; Beesley, Lauren J; Leon, Lider S; Eklund, Chris R; Croom, Edward L; Pegram, Rex A

    2016-03-14

    Lindane is a neurotoxicant used for the treatment of lice and scabies present on human skin. Due to its pharmaceutical application, an extensive pharmacokinetic database exists in humans. Mathematical diffusion models allow for calculation of lindane skin permeability coefficients using human kinetic data obtained from in vitro and in vivo experimentation as well as a default compound-specific calculation based on physicochemical characteristics used in the absence of kinetic data. A dermal model was developed to describe lindane diffusion into the skin, where the skin compartment consisted of homogeneous dermal tissue. This study utilized Fick's law of diffusion along with chemical binding to protein and lipids to determine appropriate dermal absorption parameters which were then incorporated into a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model to describe in vivo kinetics. The estimation of permeability coefficients using chemical binding in combination with in vivo data demonstrates the advantages of combining physiochemical properties with a PBPK model to predict dermal absorption.

  18. The protective effect of aloe vera juice on lindane induced hepatotoxicity and genotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Etim, O E; Farombi, E O; Usoh, I F; Akpan, E J

    2006-10-01

    The protective effect of fresh aloe vera (AV) leaves extract on lindane (LD) - induced hepatoxicity and genotoxicity was studied. Serum levels of hepatic enzyme markers: glutamate pyruvate transaminase (GPT), glutamate oxaloacetate transaminase (GOT), gamma glutamyl transferase (GGT) and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) were determined after oral administration of aloe vera leaves extract and lindane. The level of polychromatic erythrocytes was also observed. Pretreatment with aloe vera leaves extract at concentration of 1.0 ml/kg body weight significantly decreased (P<0.05) the serum levels of GPT (by 41.8%), GOT (by 36.5%), GGT (by 14.3%) and ALP (by 10.7%) induced by 100mg/kg body weight of lindane. The level of polychromatic erythrocytes observed was not statistically significant when compared to control.

  19. Comparative biodegradation of alkyl halide insecticides by the white rot fungus, Phanerochaete chrysosporium (BKM-F-1767)

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, D.W.; Aust, S.D.; Bumpus, J.A. )

    1990-08-01

    The ability of Phanerochaete chrysosporium to degrade six alkyl halide insecticides (aldrin, dieldrin, heptachlor, chlordane, lindane, and mirex) in liquid and soil-corncob matrices was compared by using {sup 14}C-labeled compounds. Of these, only ({sup 14}C)lindane and ({sup 14}C)chlordane underwent extensive biodegradation, as evidenced by the fact that 9.4 to 23.4% of these compounds were degraded to {sup 14}CO{sub 2} in 30 days in liquid cultures and 60 days in soil-corncob cultures inoculated with P. chrysosporium. Although ({sup 14}C)aldrin, ({sup 14}C)dieldrin, ({sup 14}C)heptachlor, and (14D)mirex were poorly mineralized, substantial bioconversion occurred, as determined by substrate disappearance and metabolite formation. Nonbiological disappearance was observed only with chlordane and heptachlor.

  20. Oral ivermectin in scabies patients: a comparison with 1% topical lindane lotion.

    PubMed

    Madan, V; Jaskiran, K; Gupta, U; Gupta, D K

    2001-09-01

    Scabies. which constitutes a significant proportion of the outpatient attendance in tropical dermatology clinics, has so far been treated with lindane, crotamiton, sulphur, permethrin, etc. Ivermectin, an orally administered drug, was tried in scabies patients and compared with 1% topical lindane lotion to evaluate its effects and toxicity profile. Two hundred scabies patients were randomly allocated to one of two groups. One group received oral invermectin in a single dose of 200 micrograms/kg body weight. The other received 1% lindane lotion for topical application overnight. Patients were assessed after 48 hours, two weeks and four weeks. After a period of four weeks, 82.6% of the patients in the ivermectin group showed marked improvement; only 44.44% of the patients in the lindance group showed a similar response. A side effects in the form of severe headache were noted in one patient in group A. Oral ivermectin is an easy drug to administer. It is given as a single oral dose, unlike lindane, which has to be applied topically. The compliance is accordingly increased. Moreover, ivermectin induces an early and effective improvement in signs and symptoms. Thus, it may be a better option for scabies than the traditional topical linlane lotion.

  1. Zebra mussels (Dreissena polymorpha) as indicators of freshwater contamination with lindane.

    PubMed

    Berny, Ph; Lachaux, O; Buronfosse, T; Mazallon, M; Gillet, C

    2002-10-01

    Zebra mussels are common freshwater mollusks in many European lakes and rivers. Their abundance, wide distribution, and filtering activity make them good candidates to evaluate the contamination of freshwaters with environmental contaminants. The purpose of this work was to determine the kinetics of lindane in zebra mussels and compare laboratory results with in situ measurements. Exposure was conducted in small tanks, under controlled experimental conditions. Our results indicated that mussels accumulated lindane with a bioconcentration factor around 10. They generally reached equilibrium within 4 days. Elimination was rapid but biphasic and the terminal elimination half-life was long (> 168 h). Age of the mussels and temperature also affected the kinetics of lindane in mussels. In the Lake of Geneva, zebra mussels were sampled and showed that mussels accumulated it to significant values (up to 900 ng/g fresh weight) depending on the site and period of sampling. The in situ results, together with the laboratory exposures, showed that freshwater mussels could be used to monitor point sources of pollutants such as lindane over short periods of time (< 1 week).

  2. Effect of acute lindane and alcohol intoxication on serum concentration of enzymes and fatty acids in rats.

    PubMed

    Radosavljević, T; Mladenović, D; Vucević, D; Petrović, J; Hrncić, D; Djuric, D; Loncar-Stevanović, H; Stanojlović, O

    2008-05-01

    This study examines possible synergistic effects of lindane and ethanol on inducing liver injury and serum fatty acid derangement in adult male Wistar rats. When administered together, ethanol and lindane-induced even more pronounced increase of alanine aminotransferase (165 +/- 10 U/L) and gamma-glutamyltranspeptidase activity (10.3 +/- 0.6 U/L) than after isolated administration of either substance. In addition, separate administration of lindane and ethanol was followed by a significant decrease of linoleic acid level in the serum (301 +/- 38 mg/L, 276 +/- 35 mg/L vs. 416 +/- 48 mg/L). However, when ethanol administration was followed by lindane injection, serum linoleic acid was at the similar level found in the control group (516 +/- 62 mg/L). Ethanol-treated rats that received lindane 30 min after ethanol administration have shown a marked increase of palmitic (421 +/- 27 mg/L) and linolic acid level (43 +/- 5 mg/L) in comparison with rats that have been treated only with ethanol (316+/-26 mg/L for palmitic and 32 +/- 2 mg/L for linolic acid) or lindane (295 +/- 26 mg/L for palmitic and 301 +/- 38 mg/L for linolic acid). Linolic acid level was significantly greater in comparison with control group (29 +/- 1 mg/L). In conclusion, this study found enough evidence to support the hypothesis that acute ethanol intoxication potentiates lindane-induced liver injury and enhances lipid derangement.

  3. Improving in vitro to in vivo extrapolation by incorporating toxicokinetic measurements: a case study of lindane-induced neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Croom, Edward L; Shafer, Timothy J; Evans, Marina V; Mundy, William R; Eklund, Chris R; Johnstone, Andrew F M; Mack, Cina M; Pegram, Rex A

    2015-02-15

    Approaches for extrapolating in vitro toxicity testing results for prediction of human in vivo outcomes are needed. The purpose of this case study was to employ in vitro toxicokinetics and PBPK modeling to perform in vitro to in vivo extrapolation (IVIVE) of lindane neurotoxicity. Lindane cell and media concentrations in vitro, together with in vitro concentration-response data for lindane effects on neuronal network firing rates, were compared to in vivo data and model simulations as an exercise in extrapolation for chemical-induced neurotoxicity in rodents and humans. Time- and concentration-dependent lindane dosimetry was determined in primary cultures of rat cortical neurons in vitro using "faux" (without electrodes) microelectrode arrays (MEAs). In vivo data were derived from literature values, and physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling was used to extrapolate from rat to human. The previously determined EC50 for increased firing rates in primary cultures of cortical neurons was 0.6μg/ml. Media and cell lindane concentrations at the EC50 were 0.4μg/ml and 7.1μg/ml, respectively, and cellular lindane accumulation was time- and concentration-dependent. Rat blood and brain lindane levels during seizures were 1.7-1.9μg/ml and 5-11μg/ml, respectively. Brain lindane levels associated with seizures in rats and those predicted for humans (average=7μg/ml) by PBPK modeling were very similar to in vitro concentrations detected in cortical cells at the EC50 dose. PBPK model predictions matched literature data and timing. These findings indicate that in vitro MEA results are predictive of in vivo responses to lindane and demonstrate a successful modeling approach for IVIVE of rat and human neurotoxicity.

  4. Improving in vitro to in vivo extrapolation by incorporating toxicokinetic measurements: A case study of lindane-induced neurotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Croom, Edward L.; Shafer, Timothy J.; Evans, Marina V.; Mundy, William R.; Eklund, Chris R.; Johnstone, Andrew F.M.; Mack, Cina M.; Pegram, Rex A.

    2015-02-15

    Approaches for extrapolating in vitro toxicity testing results for prediction of human in vivo outcomes are needed. The purpose of this case study was to employ in vitro toxicokinetics and PBPK modeling to perform in vitro to in vivo extrapolation (IVIVE) of lindane neurotoxicity. Lindane cell and media concentrations in vitro, together with in vitro concentration-response data for lindane effects on neuronal network firing rates, were compared to in vivo data and model simulations as an exercise in extrapolation for chemical-induced neurotoxicity in rodents and humans. Time- and concentration-dependent lindane dosimetry was determined in primary cultures of rat cortical neurons in vitro using “faux” (without electrodes) microelectrode arrays (MEAs). In vivo data were derived from literature values, and physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling was used to extrapolate from rat to human. The previously determined EC{sub 50} for increased firing rates in primary cultures of cortical neurons was 0.6 μg/ml. Media and cell lindane concentrations at the EC{sub 50} were 0.4 μg/ml and 7.1 μg/ml, respectively, and cellular lindane accumulation was time- and concentration-dependent. Rat blood and brain lindane levels during seizures were 1.7–1.9 μg/ml and 5–11 μg/ml, respectively. Brain lindane levels associated with seizures in rats and those predicted for humans (average = 7 μg/ml) by PBPK modeling were very similar to in vitro concentrations detected in cortical cells at the EC{sub 50} dose. PBPK model predictions matched literature data and timing. These findings indicate that in vitro MEA results are predictive of in vivo responses to lindane and demonstrate a successful modeling approach for IVIVE of rat and human neurotoxicity. - Highlights: • In vitro to in vivo extrapolation for lindane neurotoxicity was performed. • Dosimetry of lindane in a micro-electrode array (MEA) test system was assessed. • Cell concentrations at the MEA EC

  5. Identification of Genes Putatively Involved in Chitin Metabolism and Insecticide Detoxification in the Rice Leaf Folder (Cnaphalocrocis medinalis) Larvae through Transcriptomic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hai-Zhong; Wen, De-Fu; Wang, Wan-Lin; Geng, Lei; Zhang, Yan; Xu, Jia-Ping

    2015-01-01

    The rice leaf roller (Cnaphalocrocis medinalis) is one of the most destructive agricultural pests. Due to its migratory behavior, it is difficult to control worldwide. To date, little is known about major genes of C. medinalis involved in chitin metabolism and insecticide detoxification. In order to obtain a comprehensive genome dataset of C. medinalis, we conducted de novo transcriptome sequencing which focused on the major feeding stage of fourth-instar larvae, and our work revealed useful information on chitin metabolism and insecticide detoxification and target genes of C. medinalis. We acquired 29,367,797 Illumina reads and assembled these reads into 63,174 unigenes with an average length of 753 bp. Among these unigenes, 31,810 were annotated against the National Center for Biotechnology Information non-redundant (NCBI nr) protein database, resulting in 24,246, 8669 and 18,176 assigned to Swiss-Prot, clusters of orthologous group (COG), and gene ontology (GO), respectively. We were able to map 10,043 unigenes into 285 pathways using the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes Pathway database (KEGG). Specifically, 16 genes, including five chitin deacetylases, two chitin synthases, five chitinases and four other related enzymes, were identified to be putatively involved in chitin biosynthesis and degradation, whereas 360 genes, including cytochrome P450s, glutathione S-transferases, esterases, and acetylcholinesterases, were found to be potentially involved in insecticide detoxification or as insecticide targets. The reliability of the transcriptome data was determined by reverse transcription quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) for the selected genes. Our data serves as a new and valuable sequence resource for genomic studies on C. medinalis. The findings should improve our understanding of C. medinalis genetics and contribute to management of this important agricultural pest. PMID:26378520

  6. Identification and Characterization of CYP9A40 from the Tobacco Cutworm Moth (Spodoptera litura), a Cytochrome P450 Gene Induced by Plant Allelochemicals and Insecticides.

    PubMed

    Wang, Rui-Long; Staehelin, Christian; Xia, Qing-Qing; Su, Yi-Juan; Zeng, Ren-Sen

    2015-09-18

    Cytochrome P450 monooxygenases (P450s) of insects play crucial roles in the metabolism of endogenous and dietary compounds. Tobacco cutworm moth (Spodoptera litura), an important agricultural pest, causes severe yield losses in many crops. In this study, we identified CYP9A40, a novel P450 gene of S. litura, and investigated its expression profile and potential role in detoxification of plant allelochemicals and insecticides. The cDNA contains an open reading frame encoding 529 amino acid residues. CYP9A40 transcripts were found to be accumulated during various development stages of S. litura and were highest in fifth and sixth instar larvae. CYP9A40 was mainly expressed in the midgut and fat body. Larval consumption of xenobiotics, namely plant allelochemicals (quercetin and cinnamic acid) and insecticides (deltamethrin and methoxyfenozide) induced accumulation of CYP9A40 transcripts in the midgut and fat body. Injection of dsCYP9A40 (silencing of CYP9A40 by RNA interference) significantly increased the susceptibility of S. litura larvae to the tested plant allelochemicals and insecticides. These results indicate that CYP9A40 expression in S. litura is related to consumption of xenobiotics and suggest that CYP9A40 is involved in detoxification of these compounds.

  7. Degradation of lindane and hexachlorobenzene in supercritical carbon dioxide using palladium nanoparticles stabilized in microcellular high-density polyethylene.

    PubMed

    Wu, Bei-Zen; Chen, GuanYu; Yak, HwaKwang; Liao, Weisheng; Chiu, KongHwa; Peng, Shie-Ming

    2016-06-01

    Palladium nanoparticles stabilized in microcellular high-density polyethylene prepared through supercritical foaming, supercritical impregnation, and H2 reduction are used for the hydrodechlorination of lindane and hexachlorobenzene in supercritical carbon dioxide below 100 °C. Both lindane and hexachlorobenzene can be almost 100% transformed to cyclohexane in 1 h. Reaction intermediates, such as lower chlorinated products or benzene, are not observed or exist in trace amount indicating that most of them may undergo reactions without leaving the metal surface.

  8. Lindane toxicity. (Latest citations from the Life Sciences Collection database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-05-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning acute and long-term biochemical effects of the pesticide, lindane. Topics include case studies of human and animal poisonings, metabolism of the compound, effects on enzyme activity, dosage effects, liver carcinoma development, and synergistic effects with other pesticides. Reports pertaining to occupational exposure, and detection methods are also referenced. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  9. Effect of some plant growth regulators on lindane and alpha-endosulfan toxicity to Brassica chinensis.

    PubMed

    Chouychai, Waraporn

    2012-07-01

    The effect of indolebutyric acid (IBA) and gibberellic acid (GA3), to alleviate the organochlorine phytotoxicity were studied in Brassica chinensis. Presence of organochlorine decreased Brassica chinensis seedlings growth in contaminated alkaline soil. One mg l(-1) IBA could enhance 14 and 26% shoot and root length of B. chinensis seedlings grown at 40 mg kg(-1) lindane contaminated soil, respectively. Ten mg l(-1) IBA also increased 80 and 40% root fresh weight of seedling grown in 40 mg kg(-1) lindane and alpha-endosulfan contaminated soils, respectively. However, IBAhad no effect on shoot and root length of seedlings grown in endosulfan contaminated soil. On the other hand, 10 mg l(-1) GA3 only increased 80% of shoot and root fresh weigh of B. chinensisin 40 mg kg(-1) endosulfan contaminated soil. External auxin addition could increase B. chinensis growth in lindane more than endosulfan contaminated soil. External gibberellin was less effective than external auxin to increase B. chinensis growth in organochlorine contaminated soil. There is possibility that auxin could decrease organochlorine phytotoxicity in plants and hence can be useful for organochlorine phytoremediation.

  10. Effect of some plant growth regulators on lindane and alpha-endosulfan toxicity to Brassica chinensis.

    PubMed

    Chouychai, Waraporn

    2012-07-01

    The effect of indolebutyric acid (IBA) and gibberellic acid (GA3), to alleviate the organochlorine phytotoxicity were studied in Brassica chinensis. Presence of organochlorine decreased Brassica chinensis seedlings growth in contaminated alkaline soil. One mg l(-1) IBA could enhance 14 and 26% shoot and root length of B. chinensis seedlings grown at 40 mg kg(-1) lindane contaminated soil, respectively. Ten mg l(-1) IBA also increased 80 and 40% root fresh weight of seedling grown in 40 mg kg(-1) lindane and alpha-endosulfan contaminated soils, respectively. However, IBAhad no effect on shoot and root length of seedlings grown in endosulfan contaminated soil. On the other hand, 10 mg l(-1) GA3 only increased 80% of shoot and root fresh weigh of B. chinensisin 40 mg kg(-1) endosulfan contaminated soil. External auxin addition could increase B. chinensis growth in lindane more than endosulfan contaminated soil. External gibberellin was less effective than external auxin to increase B. chinensis growth in organochlorine contaminated soil. There is possibility that auxin could decrease organochlorine phytotoxicity in plants and hence can be useful for organochlorine phytoremediation. PMID:23360012

  11. Identification of multi-insecticide residues using GC-NPD and the degradation kinetics of chlorpyrifos in sweet corn and soils.

    PubMed

    Wang, Peidan; Rashid, Muhammad; Liu, Jie; Hu, Meiying; Zhong, Guohua

    2016-12-01

    Because more than one insecticide is applied to crops to protect plants from pests, an analytical multi-residue determination method was developed using gas chromatography with a nitrogen phosphorus detector (GC-NPD). The retention time for 12 insecticides was 3.7-27.7min. Under the selected conditions, the limits of detection (LOD) and quantification (LOQ) were below the maximum residue limits (MRLs) and in the range of 0.00315-0.05μgmL(-1) and 0.01-0.165μgmL(-1), respectively. Using GC-NPD, we investigated the dissipation dynamics and final residual levels of chlorpyrifos in sweet corn and soil and determined that the half-lives was 4-7days, that is, that chlorpyrifos is safe to use on sweet corn with a pre-harvest interval of 16-22days before harvest. These results provide new insights into chlorpyrifos degradation in plants and its environmental behavior. PMID:27374551

  12. Proteases as Insecticidal Agents

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Robert L.; Bonning, Bryony C.

    2010-01-01

    Proteases from a variety of sources (viruses, bacteria, fungi, plants, and insects) have toxicity towards insects. Some of these insecticidal proteases evolved as venom components, herbivore resistance factors, or microbial pathogenicity factors, while other proteases play roles in insect development or digestion, but exert an insecticidal effect when over-expressed from genetically engineered plants or microbial pathogens. Many of these proteases are cysteine proteases, although insect-toxic metalloproteases and serine proteases have also been examined. The sites of protease toxic activity range from the insect midgut to the hemocoel (body cavity) to the cuticle. This review discusses these insecticidal proteases along with their evaluation and use as potential pesticides. PMID:22069618

  13. Mortality of a wireworm, Agriotes obscurus (Coleoptera: Elateridae), after topical application of various insecticides.

    PubMed

    Van Herk, W G; Vernon, R S; Tolman, J H; Saavedra, H Ortiz

    2008-04-01

    Ten insecticides representing seven chemical groups were applied at various concentrations topically by using a Potter Spray Tower to evaluate their relative toxicities on the European wireworm Agriotes obscurus L. (Coleoptera: Elateridae). Wireworms were stored at 15 degrees C after exposure to organophosphate (OP) (chlorpyrifos, diazinon), pyrethroid (tefluthrin), thianicotinoid (thiamethoxam, clothianidin), chloronicotinoid (imidacloprid, acetamiprid), phenyl pyrazole (fipronil), organochlorine (lindane), and spinosyn (spinosad) insecticides, and their postapplication health was evaluated weekly for up to 301 d. LC50, LC90, LT50, and LT90 values were calculated for each chemical except acetamiprid, and compared with those of lindane, clothianidin, and chlorpyrifos. Wireworms exposed to OPs died or recovered more quickly (LT50 < 20 d, LT90 < 50 d), than those exposed to all other insecticides tested except tefluthrin (LT50 = 25.5 d, LT90 = 66.5 d). Wireworms exposed to sublethal concentrations of all neonicotinoids quickly became moribund after application but made a full recovery. Wireworms exposed to fipronil at concentrations near the LC90 value showed no intoxication symptoms for up to 35 d, and they did not recover after symptoms developed. For each chemical, increasing the concentration increased the time required for wireworms to recover but decreased the time required to kill wireworms. Fipronil was highly toxic to wireworms (LC50 = 0.0001%), but acetamiprid (LC50 = 1.82%), imidacloprid (LC50 = 0.83%), tefluthrin (LC50 = 0.23%), diazinon (LC50 = 0.54%), and spinosad (LC50 = 0.51%) were not. The toxicity of both clothianidin (LC50 = 0.07%) and thiamethoxam (LC50 = 0.17%) were similar to those oflindane (LC50 = 0.06%) and chlorpyrifos (LC50 = 0.10%).

  14. Naturally occurring insecticides.

    PubMed Central

    Soloway, S B

    1976-01-01

    Naturally occurring insecticides are abundant and varied in their effects, though but a few are articles of commerce. Even for these, pyrethrum, nicotine, rotenone, hellebore, ryania, and sabadilla, there is a paucity of information on mammalian toxicology and environmental effects. In general, these materials are characterized favorably by low acute toxicity and ready dissipation in nature. Unfavorable aspects of natural insecticides are the contained mixture of active and inactive components and the low active ingredient content on a crop yield basis pointing to a high unit cost. Natural insecticides can serve additionally as leads to unnatural mimics, of which the commercially successful synthetic pyrethroids are prime examples. The chemical nature, relationship of insecticidal activity to chemical structure, occurrence, production, and utilization, registered uses, metabolism, and insect and mammalian toxicity are reviewed. PMID:789058

  15. Insecticides and Biological Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Furness, G. O.

    1972-01-01

    Use of insecticides has been questioned due to their harmful effects on edible items. Biological control of insects along with other effective practices for checking spread of parasites on crops are discussed. (PS)

  16. Insecticide Compendium. MP-29.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spackman, Everett W.; And Others

    This document presents information on most of the known insecticides and their general usage, toxicity, formulation, compound type, manufacturers, and the chemical, trade and common names applied to each compound. (CS)

  17. Versatility of Streptomyces sp. M7 to bioremediate soils co-contaminated with Cr(VI) and lindane.

    PubMed

    Aparicio, JuanDaniel; Solá, María Zoleica Simón; Benimeli, Claudia Susana; Amoroso, María Julia; Polti, Marta Alejandra

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this work was to study the impact of environmental factors on the bioremediation of Cr(VI) and lindane contaminated soil, by an actinobacterium, Streptomyces sp. M7, in order to optimize the process. Soil samples were contaminated with 25 µg kg(-1) of lindane and 50 mg kg(-1) of Cr(VI) and inoculated with Streptomyces sp. M7. The lowest inoculum concentration which simultaneously produced highest removal of Cr(VI) and lindane was 1 g kg(-1). The influence of physical and chemical parameters was assessed using a full factorial design. The factors and levels tested were: Temperature: 25, 30, 35°C; Humidity: 10%, 20%, 30%; Initial Cr(VI) concentration: 20, 50, 80 mg kg(-1); Initial lindane concentration: 10, 25, 40 µg kg(-1). Streptomyces sp. M7 exhibited strong versatility, showing the ability to bioremediate co-contaminated soil samples at several physicochemical conditions. Streptomyces sp. M7 inoculum size was optimized. Also, it was fitted a model to study this process, and it was possible to predict the system performance, knowing the initial conditions. Moreover, optimum temperature and humidity conditions for the bioremediation of soil with different concentrations of Cr(VI) and lindane were determined. Lettuce seedlings were a suitable biomarker to evaluate the contaminants mixture toxicity. Streptomyces sp. M7 carried out a successful bioremediation, which was demonstrated through ecotoxicity test with Lactuca sativa. PMID:25749405

  18. Versatility of Streptomyces sp. M7 to bioremediate soils co-contaminated with Cr(VI) and lindane.

    PubMed

    Aparicio, JuanDaniel; Solá, María Zoleica Simón; Benimeli, Claudia Susana; Amoroso, María Julia; Polti, Marta Alejandra

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this work was to study the impact of environmental factors on the bioremediation of Cr(VI) and lindane contaminated soil, by an actinobacterium, Streptomyces sp. M7, in order to optimize the process. Soil samples were contaminated with 25 µg kg(-1) of lindane and 50 mg kg(-1) of Cr(VI) and inoculated with Streptomyces sp. M7. The lowest inoculum concentration which simultaneously produced highest removal of Cr(VI) and lindane was 1 g kg(-1). The influence of physical and chemical parameters was assessed using a full factorial design. The factors and levels tested were: Temperature: 25, 30, 35°C; Humidity: 10%, 20%, 30%; Initial Cr(VI) concentration: 20, 50, 80 mg kg(-1); Initial lindane concentration: 10, 25, 40 µg kg(-1). Streptomyces sp. M7 exhibited strong versatility, showing the ability to bioremediate co-contaminated soil samples at several physicochemical conditions. Streptomyces sp. M7 inoculum size was optimized. Also, it was fitted a model to study this process, and it was possible to predict the system performance, knowing the initial conditions. Moreover, optimum temperature and humidity conditions for the bioremediation of soil with different concentrations of Cr(VI) and lindane were determined. Lettuce seedlings were a suitable biomarker to evaluate the contaminants mixture toxicity. Streptomyces sp. M7 carried out a successful bioremediation, which was demonstrated through ecotoxicity test with Lactuca sativa.

  19. Effect of treatment of cow's urine "Gomutra" and antioxidants in alleviating the lindane-induced oxidative stress in kidney of Swiss mice (Mus musculus).

    PubMed

    Nagda, Girima; Bhatt, Devendra Kumar

    2014-01-01

    The study aimed to evaluate the effect of cow urine and combination of antioxidants against lindane induced oxidative stress in Swiss mice. Male healthy mice, 8-10 weeks old, weighing 30 ± 5 g were randomly selected and divided into eight groups, namely, control (C); lindane (L); antioxidant (A), antioxidant+lindane (A+L), cow urine (U), cow urine+lindane (U+L), cow urine+antioxidants (U+A) and cow urine+antioxidants+lindane (U+A+L). Group C animals were administered only the vehicle (olive oil); doses selected for other treatments were: lindane: 40 mg/kg b.w.; antioxidants: 125 mg/kg b.w. (vitamin C: 50 mg/kg b.w., vitamin E: 50 mg/kg b.w., α-lipoic acid: 25 mg/kg b.w.) and cow urine: 0.25 ml/kg b.w. In group A+L and U+L antioxidants and cow urine were administered 1 h prior to lindane administration and in group U+A and U+A+L cow urine was administered 10 min before antioxidants. All treatments were administered orally continuously for 60 days. Lindane treated group showed increased lipid peroxidation, whereas glutathione, glutathione peroxidase, superoxide dismutase, catalase, protein and endogenous levels of vitamin C and E were significantly decreased compared to control. Administration of cow urine and antioxidants alleviated the levels of these biochemical parameters.

  20. Evaluation of lindane diffusion along the southeastern Adriatic coastal strip (Mediterranean Sea): a case study in an Albanian industrial area.

    PubMed

    Marini, Mauro; Betti, Mattia; Grati, Fabio; Marconi, Valerio; Mastrogiacomo, Anna Rita; Polidori, Piero; Sanxhaku, Mitat

    2012-03-01

    This study aimed to analyze the impact at sea of a pesticide factory located 7 km north of Durres (Albania) by investigating a lowland area under the sea situated 0.7 km from the shoreline. The main product of this factory was lindane. Production ceased in 1991 during the Albanian civil war, and a large amount of industrial waste was dispersed over the ground surrounding the factory, resulting in a high level of lindane pollution. A water-scoop channels the ground water accumulated around the disused factory directly into the sea. The concentrations of lindane in sediments collected along the coasts of the region ranged from 0.60 to 22.55 ng g(-1). The average concentration in the muscles of fish did not exceed the limits specified by European Commission legislation, whereas the concentration in the liver did exceed these limits; consequently, liver is not recommended for consumption.

  1. Insecticide residues in bats along a land use-gradient dominated by cotton cultivation in northern Benin, West Africa.

    PubMed

    Stechert, Christin; Kolb, Marit; Bahadir, Müfit; Djossa, Bruno A; Fahr, Jakob

    2014-01-01

    Many regions in Africa are currently being converted from subsistence to cash crop farming such as cotton. Agricultural intensification is usually accompanied by increased use of pesticides, which can have an impact on non-target organisms. Bats are particularly sensitive to insecticide loads while providing substantial ecosystem services as predators of herbivorous insects. In this study, pesticide residues in bats in a landscape in northern Benin were investigated, which spanned a land use gradient from an agricultural zone dominated by cotton farms, through a buffer zone, and into a national park. Insecticides used in cotton cultivation, such as endosulfan, chlorpyrifos, flubendiamide, and spirotetramat, as well as persistent insecticides such as bis(4-chlorophenyl)-1,1,1-trichloroethane (DDT), lindane, and aldrine, were analysed. Insecticide residues detected in bats comprised DDT, endosulfan, and their corresponding transformation products. Maximum concentrations in the sampled bats were 11.2 mg/kg lipid of p,p'-DDE (median: 0.0136 mg/kg lipid) and 0.797 mg/kg lipid of β-endosulfan (median: below detection limit [DL]). While insecticide concentrations were below lethal concentrations our data suggest that DDT had probably been recently used in the study region, and larger scale use would pose an increased risk for bat populations due to the high biomagnification of DDT.

  2. Organophosphorus Insecticide Pharmacokinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Timchalk, Charles

    2010-01-01

    This chapter highlights a number of current and future applications of pharmacokinetics to assess organophosphate (OP) insecticide dosimetry, biological response and risk in humans exposed to these agents. Organophosphates represent a large family of pesticides where insecticidal as well as toxicological mode of action is associated with their ability to target and inhibit acetylcholinesterase (AChE). Pharmacokinetics entails the quantitative integration of physiological and metabolic processes associated with the absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion (ADME) of drugs and xenobiotics. Pharmacokinetic studies provide important data on the amount of toxicant delivered to a target site as well as species-, age-, gender-specific and dose-dependent differences in biological response. These studies have been conducted with organophosphorus insecticides in multiple species, at various dose levels, and across different routes of exposure to understand their in vivo pharmacokinetics and how they contribute to the observed toxicological response. To access human exposure to organophosphorus insecticides, human pharmacokinetic studies have been conducted and used to develop biological monitoring strategies based on the quantitation of key metabolites in biological fluids. Pharmacokinetic studies with these insecticides are also useful to facilitate extrapolation of dosimetry and biological response from animals to humans and for the assessment of human health risk. In this regard, physiologically based pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic (PBPK/PD) models are being utilized to assess risk and understand the toxicological implications of known or suspected exposures to various insecticides. In this chapter a number of examples are presented that illustrate the utility and limitation of pharmacokinetic studies to address human health concerns associated with organophosphorus insecticides.

  3. Identification of a cluster of residues in transmembrane segment 6 of domain III of the cockroach sodium channel essential for the action of pyrethroid insecticides.

    PubMed

    Du, Yuzhe; Lee, Jung-Eun; Nomura, Yoshiko; Zhang, Tianxiang; Zhorov, Boris S; Dong, Ke

    2009-04-15

    A phenylalanine residue (Phe1519) in the sixth transmembrane segment of domain III (IIIS6) of the cockroach BgNa(v) sodium channel is required for the binding and action of pyrethroids. However, whether or not other residues in IIIS6 participate in the action of pyrethroids remains to be determined. In the present study, we conducted a systematic analysis of 20 residues in IIIS6 of the BgNa(v) channel using alanine-scanning mutagenesis. Our results show that alanine substitutions of four residues, Ile1514, Gly1516, Phe1518 and Asn1522, altered sodium channel sensitivity to pyrethroid insecticides. Whereas the G1516A, F1518A and N1522A substitutions diminished sodium channel sensitivity to all seven pyrethroids examined, including four type I (lacking the alpha-cyano group at the phenoxybenzyl alcohol) and three type II (containing the alpha-cyano group) pyrethroids, the I1514A substitution enhanced sodium channel sensitivity to four type I and type II pyrethroids that contain the phenoxybenzyl alcohol only. We also show that alanine/lysine substitutions of Leu1521 and Ser1517 affected the action of BTX (batrachotoxin), but not pyrethroids. In the Kv1.2-based homology model of the open sodium channel, side chains of Ile1514, Phe1518 and Asn1522 are exposed towards helix IIS5 and linker IIS4-IIS5, which contain previously identified pyrethroid-interacting residues, whereas Ser1517 and Leu1521 face the inner pore where the BTX receptor is located. Thus the present study provides further evidence for structural models in which pyrethroids bind to the lipid-exposed interface formed by helices IIIS6, IIS5 and linker helix IIS4-IIS5, whereas BTX binds to the pore-exposed side of the IIIS6 helix.

  4. Current internal exposure to pesticides in children and adolescents in Germany: blood plasma levels of pentachlorophenol (PCP), lindane (gamma-HCH), and dichloro(diphenyl)ethylene (DDE), a biostable metabolite of dichloro(diphenyl)trichloroethane (DDT).

    PubMed

    Heudorf, U; Angerer, J; Drexler, H

    2003-10-01

    Pesticides are widely used throughout the world in agriculture to protect crops, and in public health to control diseases transmitted by animal vectors or intermediate hosts. After the prohibition of organochlorines such as DDT internal exposure of the general population to the organochlorines has been reduced markedly. Herein, current internal exposure of children and adolescents in an urban area in Germany to PCP, lindane, and DDT/E is reported. One hundred and thirty children and adolescents took part in this voluntary investigation. All of them stated they had never used pesticides in their homes or for medical reasons. Blood plasma was analysed for pentachlorophenol (PCP), lindane (gamma-HCH), and dichloro(diphenyl)ethylene (DDE), a biostable metabolite of dichloro(diphenyl)trichloroethane (DDT), using gas chromatography/electron capture detection according to well established methods approved by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft. Median (and 95th percentiles) in the age groups < 6, 6- < 12, and 12- < 18 years of age were (microgram/l): DDE: 0.75 (4.45), 0.95 (5.04), 0.89 (8.77); DDT: < 0.1 (0.22), < 0.1 (0.25), < 0.1 (0.30); PCP: 2.48 (17.32), 2.69 (5.85), 2.08 (8.04); lindane: < 0.1 (0.12, < 0.1 (0.08), < 0.1 (0.09). High levels of internal exposure to DDT in two girls were probably obtained during a holiday stay in India; high PCP-levels in two other girls were caused by a leather jacket impregnated with PCP, and a holiday abroad, respectively. Current background levels of internal exposure to organochlorine insecticides in children and adolescents in Germany are quantified. Exposure to these substances in the general population is thought to occur mainly via residues in food, which are low in general, today. In special cases, however, individual exposures may be dominated by other sources, i.e. impregnated leather clothes. PMID:14626896

  5. Insecticide Resistance in Fleas

    PubMed Central

    Rust, Michael K.

    2016-01-01

    Fleas are the major ectoparasite of cats, dogs, and rodents worldwide and potential vectors of animal diseases. In the past two decades the majority of new control treatments have been either topically applied or orally administered to the host. Most reports concerning the development of insecticide resistance deal with the cat flea, Ctenocephalides felis felis. Historically, insecticide resistance has developed to many of the insecticides used to control fleas in the environment including carbamates, organophosphates, and pyrethroids. Product failures have been reported with some of the new topical treatments, but actual resistance has not yet been demonstrated. Failures have often been attributed to operational factors such as failure to adequately treat the pet and follow label directions. With the addition of so many new chemistries additional monitoring of flea populations is needed. PMID:26999217

  6. Insecticide Resistance in Fleas.

    PubMed

    Rust, Michael K

    2016-03-17

    Fleas are the major ectoparasite of cats, dogs, and rodents worldwide and potential vectors of animal diseases. In the past two decades the majority of new control treatments have been either topically applied or orally administered to the host. Most reports concerning the development of insecticide resistance deal with the cat flea, Ctenocephalides felis felis. Historically, insecticide resistance has developed to many of the insecticides used to control fleas in the environment including carbamates, organophosphates, and pyrethroids. Product failures have been reported with some of the new topical treatments, but actual resistance has not yet been demonstrated. Failures have often been attributed to operational factors such as failure to adequately treat the pet and follow label directions. With the addition of so many new chemistries additional monitoring of flea populations is needed.

  7. Insecticide Resistance in Fleas.

    PubMed

    Rust, Michael K

    2016-01-01

    Fleas are the major ectoparasite of cats, dogs, and rodents worldwide and potential vectors of animal diseases. In the past two decades the majority of new control treatments have been either topically applied or orally administered to the host. Most reports concerning the development of insecticide resistance deal with the cat flea, Ctenocephalides felis felis. Historically, insecticide resistance has developed to many of the insecticides used to control fleas in the environment including carbamates, organophosphates, and pyrethroids. Product failures have been reported with some of the new topical treatments, but actual resistance has not yet been demonstrated. Failures have often been attributed to operational factors such as failure to adequately treat the pet and follow label directions. With the addition of so many new chemistries additional monitoring of flea populations is needed. PMID:26999217

  8. Organochlorine insecticide residues are found in surface, irrigated water samples from several districts in Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Alamgir Zaman; Islam, Mohammad Nazrul; Moniruzzaman, Mohammed; Gan, Siew Hua; Alam, Md Khorshed

    2013-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the occurrence and distribution of organochlorines such as aldrin, dieldrin, dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (DDE), dichlorodiphenyldichloroethane (DDD), dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT), endrin, lindane and heptachlor insecticide residues in irrigated surface water samples collected from 22 districts in Bangladesh. The concentrations of the pesticides were determined using gas chromatography mass spectrophotometry. Water samples from five locations (Feni, Nawabganj, Putia, Burichang and Chatak) were contaminated with DDT; the highest DDT concentration detected was 8.29 μg/L, and its metabolite, DDE, was detected at 4.06 μg/L. Water samples from four other locations (Natore, Sikderpara, Chatak and Rajoir) were contaminated with heptachlor residues, and the highest level detected was 5.24 μg/L, which is the above the maximum contaminant level recommended by the World Health Organisation. A water sample collected from Chatak, Sunamganj, was contaminated with both DDT and heptachlor pesticide residues. None of the water samples were contaminated with aldrin, DDD, dieldrin, endrin or lindane. It is concluded that continuous, long-term monitoring and essential steps to limit the use of the pesticides in Bangladesh are needed. PMID:23212886

  9. Availability of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and lindane for uptake by intestinal Caco-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Oomen, A G; Tolls, J; Kruidenier, M; Bosgra, S S; Sips, A J; Groten, J P

    2001-07-01

    Children may ingest contaminated soil from hand to mouth. To assess this exposure route, we need to know the oral bioavailability of the contaminants. Two determining steps in bioavailability of soil-borne contaminants are mobilization from soil during digestion, which is followed by intestinal absorption. The first step has been investigated in previous studies that showed that a substantial fraction of PCBs and lindane is mobilized from soil during artificial digestion. Furthermore, almost all contaminants are sorbed to constituents of artificial human small intestinal fluid (i.e., chyme), whereas only a small fraction is freely dissolved. In this study, we examine the second step using intestinal epithelial Caco-2 cells. The composition of the apical exposure medium was varied by addition of artificial chyme, bile, or oleic acid at similar or increasing total contaminant concentrations. The uptake curves were described by rate constants. The uptake flux seemed to be dose-dependent. Furthermore, different exposure media with similar total contaminant concentrations resulted in various uptake rates. This can be attributed to different freely dissolved concentrations and carrier effects. In addition, the large fractions of contaminants in the cells indicate that PCBs and lindane sorbed to bile, oleic acid, and digestive proteins contributed to the uptake flux toward the cells. These results can be extrapolated qualitatively to in vivo conditions. Because the sorbed contaminants should be considered available for absorption, the first step of mobilization from soil is the most important step for oral bioavailability of the presently investigated soil-borne contaminants.

  10. Availability of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and lindane for uptake by intestinal Caco-2 cells.

    PubMed Central

    Oomen, A G; Tolls, J; Kruidenier, M; Bosgra, S S; Sips, A J; Groten, J P

    2001-01-01

    Children may ingest contaminated soil from hand to mouth. To assess this exposure route, we need to know the oral bioavailability of the contaminants. Two determining steps in bioavailability of soil-borne contaminants are mobilization from soil during digestion, which is followed by intestinal absorption. The first step has been investigated in previous studies that showed that a substantial fraction of PCBs and lindane is mobilized from soil during artificial digestion. Furthermore, almost all contaminants are sorbed to constituents of artificial human small intestinal fluid (i.e., chyme), whereas only a small fraction is freely dissolved. In this study, we examine the second step using intestinal epithelial Caco-2 cells. The composition of the apical exposure medium was varied by addition of artificial chyme, bile, or oleic acid at similar or increasing total contaminant concentrations. The uptake curves were described by rate constants. The uptake flux seemed to be dose-dependent. Furthermore, different exposure media with similar total contaminant concentrations resulted in various uptake rates. This can be attributed to different freely dissolved concentrations and carrier effects. In addition, the large fractions of contaminants in the cells indicate that PCBs and lindane sorbed to bile, oleic acid, and digestive proteins contributed to the uptake flux toward the cells. These results can be extrapolated qualitatively to in vivo conditions. Because the sorbed contaminants should be considered available for absorption, the first step of mobilization from soil is the most important step for oral bioavailability of the presently investigated soil-borne contaminants. PMID:11485873

  11. Removal of lindane and malathion from wastewater using bagasse fly ash--a sugar industry waste.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Vinod K; Jain, C K; Ali, Imran; Chandra, S; Agarwal, S

    2002-05-01

    The bagasse fly ash, obtained from the local sugar industry, has been used as inexpensive and effective adsorbent for the removal of lindane and malathion from wastewater. The optimum contact needed to reach equilibrium was found to be 60 min. Maximum removal takes place at pH 6.0. The removal of the pesticides increases with an increase in adsorbent dose and decreases with adsorbent particle size. The optimum adsorbent dose is 5 g/l of particle size 200-250 microm. Removal of the two pesticides was achieved up to 97-98% under optimum conditions. The material exhibits good adsorption capacity and follows both Langmuir and Freundlich models. Thermodynamic parameters also indicate the feasibility of the process. The adsorption was found to be exothermic in nature. At lower concentrations, adsorption is controlled by film diffusion, while at higher concentrations, it is controlled by particle diffusion mechanisms. The adsorbent is a very useful and economic product for the removal of lindane and malathion.

  12. Identification of a novel cytochrome P450 CYP321B1 gene from tobacco cutworm moth (Spodoptera litura) and RNA interference to evaluate its role in commonly used insecticides.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    BACKGROUND: Insect cytochrome P450 monooxygenases (CYPs or P450s) play an important role in detoxifying insecticides leading to resistance in insect populations. A polyphagous pest, Spodoptera litura (Lepidoptera, Noctuidae) has been shown to be resistant to a wide range of insecticides. In this stu...

  13. Improving In Vitro to In Vivo Extrapolation by Incorporating Toxicokinetic Measurements: A Case Study of Lindane-Induced Neurotoxicity

    EPA Science Inventory

    Approaches for extrapolating in vitro toxicity testing results for prediction of human in vivo outcomes are needed. The purpose of this case study was to employ in vitro toxicokinetics and PBPK modeling to perform in vitro to in vivo extrapolation (IVIVE) of lindane neurotoxicit...

  14. Improving in vitro to in vivo extrapolation (IVIVE) by incorporation of toxicokinetic measurements: a case study with lindane induced seizures.

    EPA Science Inventory

    In vitro toxicokinetic assessments are needed to maximize the capability of in vitro toxicity assays to predict in vivo outcomes. The purpose of this study was to determine the in vitro distribution of lindane, a non-competitive GABAA receptor antagonist, in rat primary neocortic...

  15. Removal of lindane from an aqueous solution by using aminopropyl silica gel-immobilized calix[6]arene.

    PubMed

    Tor, Ali; Aydin, Mehmet Emin; Aydin, Senar; Tabakci, Mustafa; Beduk, Fatma

    2013-11-15

    An aminopropyl silica gel-immobilized calix[6]arene (C[6]APS) has been used for the removal of lindane from an aqueous solution in batch sorption technique. The C[6]APS was synthesized with p-tert-butylcalix[6]arene hexacarboxylate derivative and aminopropyl silica gel in the presence of N,N'-diisopropyl carbodiimide coupling reagent. The sorption study was carried out as functions of solution pH, contact time, initial lindane concentration, C[6]APS dosage and ionic strength of solution. The matrix effect of natural water samples on the sorption efficiency of C[6]APS was also investigated. Maximum lindane removal was obtained at a wide pH range of 2-8 and sorption equilibrium was achieved in 2h. The isotherm analysis indicated that the sorption data can be represented by both Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models. Increasing ionic strength of the solutions increased the sorption efficiency and matrix of natural water samples had no effect on the sorption of lindane. By using multilinear regression model, regression equation was also developed to explain the effects of the experimental variables.

  16. Lindane degradation by Candida VITJzN04, a newly isolated yeast strain from contaminated soil: kinetic study, enzyme analysis and biodegradation pathway.

    PubMed

    Salam, Jaseetha Abdul; Das, Nilanjana

    2014-04-01

    A new yeast strain was isolated from sugarcane cultivation field which was able to utilize lindane as sole carbon source for growth in mineral medium. The yeast was identified and named as Candida sp. VITJzN04 based on a polyphasic approach using morphological, biochemical and 18S rDNA, D1/D2 and ITS sequence analysis. The isolated yeast strain efficiently degraded 600 mg L⁻¹ of lindane within 6 days in mineral medium under the optimal conditions (pH 7; temperature 30 °C and inoculum dosage 0.06 g L⁻¹) with the least half-life of 1.17 days and degradation constant of 0.588 per day. Lindane degradation was tested with various kinetic models and results revealed that the reaction could be described best by first-order and pseudo first-order models. In addition, involvement of the enzymes viz. dechlorinase, dehalogenase, dichlorohydroquinone reductive dechlorinase, lignin peroxidase and manganese peroxidase was noted during lindane degradation. Addition of H2O2 in the mineral medium showed 32 % enhancement of lindane degradation within 3 days. Based on the metabolites identified by GC-MS and FTIR analysis, sequential process of lindane degradation by Candida VITJzN04 was proposed. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of isolation and characterization of lindane-degrading Candida sp. and elucidation of enzyme systems during the degradation process.

  17. ANTICHOLINESTERASE INSECTICIDE RETROSPECTIVE

    PubMed Central

    Casida, John E.; Durkin, Kathleen A.

    2012-01-01

    The anticholinesterase (antiChE) organophosphorus (OP) and methylcarbamate (MC) insecticides have been used very effectively as contact and systemic plant protectants for seven decades. About 90 of these compounds are still in use – the largest number for any insecticide chemotype or mode of action. In both insects and mammals, AChE inhibition and acetylcholine accumulation leads to excitation and death. The cholinergic system of insects is located centrally (where it is protected from ionized OPs and MCs) but not at the neuromuscular junction. Structural differences between insect and mammalian AChE are also evident in their genomics, amino acid sequences and active site conformations. Species selectivity is determined in part by inhibitor and target site specificity. Pest population selection with OPs and MCs has resulted in a multitude of modified AChEs of altered inhibitor specificity some conferring insecticide resistance and others enhancing sensitivity. Much of the success of antiChE insecticides results from a suitable balance of bioactivation and detoxification by families of CYP450 oxidases, hydrolases, glutathione S-transferases and others. Known inhibitors for these enzymes block detoxification and enhance potency which is particularly important in resistant strains. The current market for OPs and MCs of 19% of worldwide insecticide sales is only half of that of 10 years ago for several reasons: there have been no major new compounds for 30 years; resistance has eroded their effectiveness; human toxicity problems are still encountered; the patents have expired reducing the incentive to update registration packages; alternative chemotypes or control methods have been developed. Despite this decline, they still play a major role in pest control and the increasing knowledge on their target sites and metabolism may make it possible to redesign the inhibitors for insensitive AChEs and to target new sites in the cholinergic system. The OPs and MCs are down

  18. Development of a monoclonal immunoassay selective for chlorinated cyclodiene insecticides.

    PubMed

    Manclús, Juan J; Abad, Antonio; Lebedev, Mijail Y; Mojarrad, Fatemeh; Micková, Barbora; Mercader, Josep V; Primo, Jaime; Miranda, Miguel A; Montoya, Angel

    2004-05-19

    Organochlorine pesticides still generate public health concerns because of their unresolved health impact and their persistence in living beings, which is demanding appropriate analytical techniques for their monitoring. In this study, an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay based on monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) for the detection of an important group of organochlorine pesticides, the cyclodiene group, has been developed. With this aim, several hapten-protein conjugates, characterized by exposure of the common hexachlorinated bicyclic (norbornene) moiety and differing in the linking structure to the carrier protein, were prepared. From mice immunized with these conjugates, several MAbs with the ability to sensitively bind the majority of cyclodienes were obtained. Among them CCD2.2 MAb displaying the broadest recognition to cyclodiene compounds (endosulfan, dieldrin, endrin, chlordane, heptachlor, aldrin, toxaphene: I(50) values in the 6-25 nM range) was selected for the assay. Interestingly, this MAb showed certain stereospecificity toward other polychlorinated cycloalkanes because the gamma-isomer of hexachlorocyclohexane (lindane) was also very well recognized (I(50) value of 22 nM). This immunoassay is potentially a very valuable analytical tool for the rapid and sensitive determination of cyclodiene insecticides and related compounds, which in turn may contribute to the understanding of the biological activities and of the overall environmental impact of these persistent organic pollutants.

  19. The effects of heptachlor and lindane on birds, Columbia Basin, Oregon and Washington, 1976-1981

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blus, L.J.; Henny, C.J.; Krynitsky, A.J.

    1985-01-01

    The effects of heptachlor seed treatments on birds in the vicinity of the Umatilla National Wildlife Refuge, Oregon and Washington, were investigated from 1978 to 1981. An egg was collected from each of 60 nests representing six species. Heptachlor epoxide (HE) residues were detected in 35 eggs and were particularly high (8?13 :g g-1) in a few eggs of the black-billed magpie, mallard, and ring-necked pheasant. These residues were within the range that induced reproductive problems in other species in the area. Diagnostically lethal residue levels (> 9 :g g-1) of HE were detected in the brains of nine birds (four species). Most of the avifauna in the area contained residues of HE and related compounds. Lindane, the replacement chemical for heptachlor, did not produce adverse effects in birds, and residues were not detected in either their eggs or brains.

  20. Evaluation of the potential carcinogenicity of gamma-hexachlorocyclohexane (lindane). Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-06-01

    Gamma-Hexachlorocyclohexane (gamma-BHC or Lindane) is a probable to possible human carcinogen, classified as weight-of-evidence Group B2/C under the EPA Guidelines for Carcinogen Risk Assessment (U.S. EPA, 1986a). Evidence on potential carcinogenicity from animal studies is Sufficient to Limited, and the evidence from human studies is Inadequate. The potency factor (F) for gamma-BHC is estimated to be 7.39/(mg/kg/day), placing it in potency group 2 according to the CAG's methodology for evaluating potential carcinogens (U.S. EPA, 1986b). Combining the weight-of-evidence group and the potency group, gamma-BHC is assigned a MEDIUM hazard ranking for the purposes of RQ adjustment. (When the weight-of-evidence is expressed as a range, the hazard ranking is based on the higher weight-of-evidence group.)

  1. Reduced birthweight and length in the offspring of females exposed to PCDFs, PCP, and lindane.

    PubMed Central

    Karmaus, W; Wolf, N

    1995-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate a broad range of adverse health outcomes and their potential association to wood preservative used in daycare centers. This article focuses on reproductive effects. A sample of 221 exposed teachers was provided by the employer's liability insurers. A comparison group (n = 189) insured by the same two organizations was recruited from nonexposed daycare centers. In a face-to-face interview, job history and reproductive history of 398 female teachers were ascertained. Data on exposure were provided, including measurements on concentration of pentachlorophenol (PCP) and lindane in wood panels, and of PCP, lindane, polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans in indoor air. An exposure matrix based on individual job history, independent exposure information from each center, and reproductive history was set up with regard to the vulnerable time windows for each pregnancy. Using this approach, 49 exposed and 507 nonexposed pregnancies were identified, including 32 exposed and 386 nonexposed live births. For subgroup analyses the observations were restricted to independent pregnancies, excluding multiple and consecutive births. The data were analyzed with linear regression techniques, taking confounders into account. The crude median difference between exposed and nonexposed was 175 g in birthweight and 2 cm in length. Controlling for confounders, the results show a significantly reduced but weight (p = 0.04) and length (p = 0.02) in exposed pregnancies, even after restricting the data to independent pregnancies and pregnancies for which data could be validated from the mother's health cards. These differences were not explained by differences in gestational age indicating that a toxic effect, which could cause small-for date newborns, might have affected the fetus. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 3. PMID:8747018

  2. Modelling of lindane transport in groundwater of metropolitan city Vadodara, Gujarat, India.

    PubMed

    Sharma, M K; Jain, C K; Rao, G Tamma; Rao, V V S Gurunadha

    2015-05-01

    Migration pattern of organochloro pesticide lindane has been studied in groundwater of metropolitan city Vadodara. Groundwater flow was simulated using the groundwater flow model constructed up to a depth of 60 m considering a three-layer structure with grid size of 40 × 40 × 40 m(3). The general groundwater flow direction is from northeast to south and southwest. The river Vishwamitri and river Jambua form natural hydrologic boundary. The constant head in the north and south end of the study area is taken as another boundary condition in the model. The hydraulic head distribution in the multilayer aquifer has been computed from the visual MODFLOW groundwater flow model. TDS has been computed though MT3D mass transport model starting with a background concentration of 500 mg/l and using a porosity value of 0.3. Simulated TDS values from the model matches well with the observed data. Model MT3D was run for lindane pesticide with a background concentration of 0.5 μg/l. The predictions of the mass transport model for next 50 years indicate that advancement of containment of plume size in the aquifer system both spatially and depth wise as a result of increasing level of pesticide in river Vishwamitri. The restoration of the aquifer system may take a very long time as seen from slow improvement in the groundwater quality from the predicted scenarios, thereby, indicating alarming situation of groundwater quality deterioration in different layers. It is recommended that all the industries operating in the region should install efficient effluent treatment plants to abate the pollution problem.

  3. Enhanced biodegradation of lindane using oil-in-water bio-microemulsion stabilized by biosurfactant produced by a new yeast strain, Pseudozyma VITJzN01.

    PubMed

    Abdul Salam, Jaseetha; Das, Nilanjana

    2013-11-28

    Organochlorine pesticide residues continue to remain as a major environmental threat worldwide. Lindane is an organochlorine pesticide widely used as an acaricide in medicine and agriculture. In the present study, a new lindane-degrading yeast strain, Pseudozyma VITJzN01, was identified as a copious producer of glycolipid biosurfactant. The glycolipid structure and type were elucidated by FTIR, NMR spectroscopy, and GC-MS analysis. The surface activity and stability of the glycolipid was analyzed. The glycolipids, characterized as mannosylerythritol lipids (MELs), exhibited excellent surface active properties and the surface tension of water was reduced to 29 mN/m. The glycolipid was stable over a wide range of pH, temperature, and salinity, showing a very low CMC of 25 mg/l. Bio-microemulsion of olive oil-in-water (O/W) was prepared using the purified biosurfactant without addition of any synthetic cosurfactants, for lindane solubilization and enhanced degradation assay in liquid and soil slurry. The O/W bio-microemulsions enhanced the solubility of lindane up to 40-folds. Degradation of lindane (700 mg/l) by VITJzN01 in liquid medium amended with bio-microemulsions was found to be enhanced by 36% in 2 days, compared with degradation in 12 days in the absence of bio-microemulsions. Lindane-spiked soil slurry incubated with bio-microemulsions also showed 20-40% enhanced degradation compared with the treatment with glycolipids or yeast alone. This is the first report on lindane degradation by Pseudozyma sp., and application of bio-microemulsions for enhanced lindane degradation. MEL-stabilized bio-microemulsions can serve as a potential tool for enhanced remediation of diverse lindanecontaminated environments. PMID:23928846

  4. The Molecular Genetics of Insecticide Resistance

    PubMed Central

    ffrench-Constant, Richard H.

    2013-01-01

    The past 60 years have seen a revolution in our understanding of the molecular genetics of insecticide resistance. While at first the field was split by arguments about the relative importance of mono- vs. polygenic resistance and field- vs. laboratory-based selection, the application of molecular cloning to insecticide targets and to the metabolic enzymes that degrade insecticides before they reach those targets has brought out an exponential growth in our understanding of the mutations involved. Molecular analysis has confirmed the relative importance of single major genes in target-site resistance and has also revealed some interesting surprises about the multi-gene families, such as cytochrome P450s, involved in metabolic resistance. Identification of the mutations involved in resistance has also led to parallel advances in our understanding of the enzymes and receptors involved, often with implications for the role of these receptors in humans. This Review seeks to provide an historical perspective on the impact of molecular biology on our understanding of resistance and to begin to look forward to the likely impact of rapid advances in both sequencing and genome-wide association analysis. PMID:23908373

  5. Alternative insecticides: an urgent need.

    PubMed

    Zaim, Morteza; Guillet, Pierre

    2002-04-01

    Most insecticides used against pests and vectors of human disease (e.g. fleas, flies and mosquitoes) are spin-offs from agrochemical research and development. The arsenal of safe and cost-effective public health insecticides is being depleted by restrictions for various reasons (e.g. insecticide resistance, unacceptable side effects and non re-registration) and the number of new products launched is dwindling. Mobilizing public resources and establishment of partnerships to support research and development of public health insecticides is crucial in the post-DDT and post-pyrethroid era.

  6. Anticholinesterase insecticide poisoning.

    PubMed

    Mackey, C L

    1982-01-01

    Anticholinesterase insecticides can be lethal, especially to small children. Prevention, not treatment, is the key to lowering the mortality rate. However, treatment, when necessary, can be effective if the poisoning agent is identified quickly as an anticholinesterase insecticide and therapy is begun immediately and aggressively. Large doses (up to 5 gm) of atropine, which block the parasympathetic effects of the poison, in conjunction with pralidoxime, a cholinesterase regenerator, need to be administered, second only in priority to establishing an airway. The second line of attack after adequate atropinization is supportive. Assistance with ventilation is individualized according to the degree of patient need. Intake with cautiously vigorous fluid therapy and output via Foley catheter are essential. Gastric lavage, seizure precautions and control as necessary, good body hygiene, and frequent turning are also part of necessary nursing intervention. Prognosis is fairly good if improvement is shown after therapy is begun. Maintaining adequate atropinization seems to be difficult yet essential to the success of the treatment and a good prognosis for the patient. PMID:6921196

  7. Impacts of lindane usage in the Canadian prairies on the Great Lakes ecosystem. 1. Coupled atmospheric transport model and modeled concentrations in air and soil.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jianmin; Daggupaty, Sreerama; Harner, Tom; Li, Yifan

    2003-09-01

    A coupled atmospheric transport, soil-air, water-air exchange model was developed to investigate the impacts of gamma-hexachlorocyclohexane (gamma-HCH or lindane) usage in the Canadian prairies over the Great Lakes region. The fate of gamma-HCH in air and soil is governed by atmospheric dynamics and physical and chemical processes that are described by the coupled model. These processes include transport and turbulent diffusion in the atmosphere, dry and wet deposition, exchange at the interfacial boundaries of air-water and soil-air, and removal processes from the soil such as diffusion, leaching, and degradation. Numerical experiments were conducted for the period of May 1, 1998-April 30, 1999, starting with application of lindane in the spring. The coupled model was executed with two lindane emission (usage) inventories in the model domain. The first scenario contained all known fresh emission sources in Canada-98% was usage in the prairies; the second excluded emission sources from Ontario and Quebec. The model showed that, in the absence of the reemission from past application of lindane, usage of lindane in Ontario and Quebec has a negligible impact on air concentrations in these regions and that the lindane budget in the Great Lakes ecosystem is mostly attributed to applications of lindane in the canola fields in Canadian prairie provinces. Model-predicted air concentrations and seasonal trends agreed well with measured data over the same time period for several background sites operated under the Integrated Atmospheric Deposition Network. Air temperature was shown to play a key role on surface-air exchange dynamics of gamma-HCH. A future paper will assess loadings to the Great Lakes based on these validated model results. PMID:12967095

  8. Impacts of lindane usage in the Canadian prairies on the Great Lakes ecosystem. 1. Coupled atmospheric transport model and modeled concentrations in air and soil.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jianmin; Daggupaty, Sreerama; Harner, Tom; Li, Yifan

    2003-09-01

    A coupled atmospheric transport, soil-air, water-air exchange model was developed to investigate the impacts of gamma-hexachlorocyclohexane (gamma-HCH or lindane) usage in the Canadian prairies over the Great Lakes region. The fate of gamma-HCH in air and soil is governed by atmospheric dynamics and physical and chemical processes that are described by the coupled model. These processes include transport and turbulent diffusion in the atmosphere, dry and wet deposition, exchange at the interfacial boundaries of air-water and soil-air, and removal processes from the soil such as diffusion, leaching, and degradation. Numerical experiments were conducted for the period of May 1, 1998-April 30, 1999, starting with application of lindane in the spring. The coupled model was executed with two lindane emission (usage) inventories in the model domain. The first scenario contained all known fresh emission sources in Canada-98% was usage in the prairies; the second excluded emission sources from Ontario and Quebec. The model showed that, in the absence of the reemission from past application of lindane, usage of lindane in Ontario and Quebec has a negligible impact on air concentrations in these regions and that the lindane budget in the Great Lakes ecosystem is mostly attributed to applications of lindane in the canola fields in Canadian prairie provinces. Model-predicted air concentrations and seasonal trends agreed well with measured data over the same time period for several background sites operated under the Integrated Atmospheric Deposition Network. Air temperature was shown to play a key role on surface-air exchange dynamics of gamma-HCH. A future paper will assess loadings to the Great Lakes based on these validated model results.

  9. Derivation of predicted No-effect concentrations for lindane, 3, 4-dichloroaniline, atrazine, and copper.

    PubMed

    Girling, A E; Tattersfield, L; Mitchell, G C; Crossland, N O; Pascoe, D; Blockwell, S J; Maund, S J; Taylor, E J; Wenzel, A; Janssen, C R; Jüttner, I

    2000-06-01

    Environmental risk assessment is a key feature of regulations controlling the placing of new, and the maintenance of existing, chemicals products in the market place. For example, European Commission Directive 93/67/EC on Risk Assessment for New Notified Substances and Commission Regulation (EC) No. 1488/94 on Risk Assessment for Existing Substances requires that risk assessments be carried out for new and existing substances in the European Community. The process of environmental risk assessment seeks to determine the balance of probability of species and communities being damaged by chemical releases. The process relies upon a valid estimation of a predicted environmental concentration (PEC) in relevant environmental compartments and a predicted no effect concentration (PNEC) below which the organisms present in that compartment are unlikely to be significantly affected. If the PEC exceeds the PNEC there is a potential for damaging effects to occur. This article focuses on the determination of PNECs for risk assessment. Methods for determining a PNEC described in OECD Monograph 26 (1989, Report of the OECD Workshop on Ecological Effect Assessment, Paris, France, have been applied to data derived for the four chemicals lindane, 3,4-dichloroaniline, atrazine, and copper in a series of collaborative research projects funded by the European Commission.

  10. Mass Spectrometric Analyses of Organophosphate Insecticide Oxon Protein Adducts

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Charles M.; Prins, John M.; George, Kathleen M.

    2010-01-01

    Objective Organophosphate (OP) insecticides continue to be used to control insect pests. Acute and chronic exposures to OP insecticides have been documented to cause adverse health effects, but few OP-adducted proteins have been correlated with these illnesses at the molecular level. Our aim was to review the literature covering the current state of the art in mass spectrometry (MS) used to identify OP protein biomarkers. Data sources and extraction We identified general and specific research reports related to OP insecticides, OP toxicity, OP structure, and protein MS by searching PubMed and Chemical Abstracts for articles published before December 2008. Data synthesis A number of OP-based insecticides share common structural elements that result in predictable OP–protein adducts. The resultant OP–protein adducts show an increase in molecular mass that can be identified by MS and correlated with the OP agent. Customized OP-containing probes have also been used to tag and identify protein targets that can be identified by MS. Conclusions MS is a useful and emerging tool for the identification of proteins that are modified by activated organophosphate insecticides. MS can characterize the structure of the OP adduct and also the specific amino acid residue that forms the key bond with the OP. Each protein that is modified in a unique way by an OP represents a unique molecular biomarker that with further research can lead to new correlations with exposure. PMID:20056576

  11. Gridded usage inventories of technical hexachlorocyclohexane and lindane for China with 1/6 degrees latitude by 1/4 degrees longitude resolution.

    PubMed

    Li, Y F; Cai, D J; Shan, Z J; Zhu, Z L

    2001-10-01

    China banned the use of technical HCH (BHC: 1,2,3,4,5,6-hexachlorocyclohexane) in 1983; lindane has been used in this country since 1991. The total production was around 4 million t for technical HCH from 1952 to 1984, and 11,400 t for lindane between 1991 and 2000. Though the total produced technical HCH was considered to be used in China, only 3,200 t of lindane were used between 1991 and 2000 with the rest for export or on unused stack. Annual usage of these two compounds was located into each province first and then broken for different crops. Inventories of gridded usage of both technical HCH and lindane with 1/6 degrees by 1/4 degrees latitude/longitude resolution have been created by different gridded cropland data sets as surrogate data. The intensive use of technical HCH on croplands was concentrated in the southeastern part of China, but the use of lindane was concentrated in the northern part of China.

  12. DDT and HCH, two discontinued organochlorine insecticides in the Great Lakes region: isomer trends and sources.

    PubMed

    Venier, Marta; Hites, Ronald A

    2014-08-01

    The uses of the insecticides 1,1'-(2,2,2-trichloroethylidene)bis[4-chlorobenzene] (p,p'-DDT) and γ-hexachlorocyclohexane (γ-HCH) have been discontinued for several years, but they are still consistently detected in air samples collected on the shores of the Great Lakes. Although the agricultural uses of DDT have been restricted in the United States since 1972, DDT continued to be used to manufacture the miticide, dicofol, up until 2011. The use of the technical HCH mixture in North America was restricted in the 1970s, when it was replaced by one of its purified conformers, γ-HCH, also known as lindane. In this study, we have focused on isomer-specific data to gain insights on the temporal trends and possible sources of these compounds. In particular, we calculated ratios of the concentrations of p,p'-DDE+p,p'-DDD versus the sum of the concentrations of the three p,p' isomers. These ratios are about the same at all five of our sampling sites and are about the same as observed globally. We also calculated the ratio of the concentrations of o,p'-DDT versus the sum of concentrations of o,p'-DDT+p,p'-DDT. This ratio has increased significantly at all five sites over the last 15-20 years. We suggest that dicofol, which contained about 11% o,p'-DDT, may now be a significant, additional source of DDT to the Great Lakes. The average ratio of the concentration of γ-HCH (lindane) versus the sum of the concentrations of γ-HCH+α-HCH did not vary significantly with time, but it did show an urban signature, suggesting that cities may be more important sources of these compounds than previously suspected.

  13. Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Risk and Insecticide, Fungicide and Fumigant Use in the Agricultural Health Study

    PubMed Central

    Alavanja, Michael C. R.; Hofmann, Jonathan N.; Lynch, Charles F.; Hines, Cynthia J.; Barry, Kathryn H.; Barker, Joseph; Buckman, Dennis W.; Thomas, Kent; Sandler, Dale P.; Hoppin, Jane A.; Koutros, Stella; Andreotti, Gabriella; Lubin, Jay H.; Blair, Aaron; Beane Freeman, Laura E.

    2014-01-01

    Farming and pesticide use have previously been linked to non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and multiple myeloma (MM). We evaluated agricultural use of specific insecticides, fungicides, and fumigants and risk of NHL and NHL-subtypes (including CLL and MM) in a U.S.-based prospective cohort of farmers and commercial pesticide applicators. A total of 523 cases occurred among 54,306 pesticide applicators from enrollment (1993–97) through December 31, 2011 in Iowa, and December 31, 2010 in North Carolina. Information on pesticide use, other agricultural exposures and other factors was obtained from questionnaires at enrollment and at follow-up approximately five years later (1999–2005). Information from questionnaires, monitoring, and the literature were used to create lifetime-days and intensity-weighted lifetime days of pesticide use, taking into account exposure-modifying factors. Poisson and polytomous models were used to calculate relative risks (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) to evaluate associations between 26 pesticides and NHL and five NHL-subtypes, while adjusting for potential confounding factors. For total NHL, statistically significant positive exposure-response trends were seen with lindane and DDT. Terbufos was associated with total NHL in ever/never comparisons only. In subtype analyses, terbufos and DDT were associated with small cell lymphoma/chronic lymphocytic leukemia/marginal cell lymphoma, lindane and diazinon with follicular lymphoma, and permethrin with MM. However, tests of homogeneity did not show significant differences in exposure-response among NHL-subtypes for any pesticide. Because 26 pesticides were evaluated for their association with NHL and its subtypes, some chance finding could have occurred. Our results showed pesticides from different chemical and functional classes were associated with an excess risk of NHL and NHL subtypes, but not all members of any single class of pesticides were

  14. A renaissance for botanical insecticides?

    PubMed

    Isman, Murray B

    2015-12-01

    Botanical insecticides continue to be a subject of keen interest among the international research community, reflected in the steady growth in scientific publications devoted to the subject. Until very recently though, the translation of that theory to practice, i.e. the commercialisation and adoption of new botanical insecticides in the marketplace, has seriously lagged behind. Strict regulatory regimes, long the bane of small pesticide producers, are beginning to relax some of the data requirements for 'low-risk' pesticide products, facilitating movement of more botanicals into the commercial arena. In this paper I discuss some of the jurisdictions where botanicals are increasingly finding favour, some of the newer botanical insecticides in the plant and animal health arsenal and some of the specific sectors where botanicals are most likely to compete effectively with other types of insecticidal product.

  15. A renaissance for botanical insecticides?

    PubMed

    Isman, Murray B

    2015-12-01

    Botanical insecticides continue to be a subject of keen interest among the international research community, reflected in the steady growth in scientific publications devoted to the subject. Until very recently though, the translation of that theory to practice, i.e. the commercialisation and adoption of new botanical insecticides in the marketplace, has seriously lagged behind. Strict regulatory regimes, long the bane of small pesticide producers, are beginning to relax some of the data requirements for 'low-risk' pesticide products, facilitating movement of more botanicals into the commercial arena. In this paper I discuss some of the jurisdictions where botanicals are increasingly finding favour, some of the newer botanical insecticides in the plant and animal health arsenal and some of the specific sectors where botanicals are most likely to compete effectively with other types of insecticidal product. PMID:26251334

  16. Tessaracoccus flavus sp. nov., isolated from the drainage system of a lindane-producing factory.

    PubMed

    Kumari, Rashmi; Singh, Priya; Schumann, Peter; Lal, Rup

    2016-04-01

    Strain RP1T, a Gram-stain-positive, non-motile, non-spore-forming, coccus-shaped bacterium, was isolated from drainage of India Pesticides Limited, a lindane-producing unit situated at Chinhat, Lucknow, India. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis revealed that strain RP1T belongs to the family Propionibacteriaceae and was closely related to the members of the genus Tessaracoccus with a similarity range of 95.4-97.6%. Strain RP1T was facultatively anaerobic, oxidase-negative, catalase-positive and capable of nitrate reduction. Strain RP1T contained peptidoglycan type A3γ', with ll-diaminopimelic acid as the diagnostic diamino acid and glycine at position 1 of the peptide subunit. The major cellular fatty acid of strain RP1T was anteiso-C15 : 0 but a significant amount of iso-C14:0 was also detected. MK-9(H4) was the major respiratory quinone and polyamines detected were spermine and spermidine. The polar lipids included diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol, two unknown glycolipids and two unknown phospholipids. The G+C content of the DNA was 66.7 mol%. The levels of DNA-DNA relatedness between RP1T and Tessaracoccus lubricantis KSS-17SeT, Tessaracoccus oleiagri SL014B-20A1T and Tessaracoccus flavescens SST-39T were 49.8, 34.8 and 23.5%, respectively. Based on the phenotypic and phylogenetic data presented, strain RP1T can be differentiated from previously described species of the genus Tessaracoccus, and thus represents a novel species, for which the name Tessaracoccus flavus sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is RP1T (=DSM 100159T=MCC 2769T=KCTC 39686T). PMID:26869509

  17. Effects of heptachlor- and lindane-treated seed on Canada geese

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blus, L.J.; Henny, C.J.; Lenhart, D.J.; Kaiser, T.E.

    1984-01-01

    A study of Canada geese (B. canadensis) was conducted in the Pacific Northwest from 1978 through 1981. Lowered reproductive success, mortality of adults, and a population decline of resident western Canada geese (B. c. moffitti) at the Umatilla National Wildlife Refuge (Umatilla NWR) Oregon and Washington [USA] were associated with the use of heptachlor-treated wheat. Analyses of eggs and tissues from dead geese provided strong evidence that heptachlor was responsible for the mortality and decreased production. Residues of heptachlor epoxide (HE) in brains of B. c. moffitti found dead in 1978 and 1979 equalled or exceeded the lethal hazard zone of 8-9 .mu.g/g in experimental passerine birds; HE residues of > 10 .mu.g/g in sample eggs were associated with low nest success. The breeding population of Canada geese at Umatilla decreased from 129 pairs in 1974 to about 100 pairs in 1979. The heptachlor problem was restricted to the Umatilla area; HE residues were low in tissues and eggs collected at other sites in Oregon, Washington and Idaho. In Sept., 1979, the use of heptachlor-treated seed was banned in a 1700-km2 area that encompassed both sides of the Columbia River near Umatilla. Lindane was substituted for heptachlor in the restricted area in 1979, and its use was extended to much of the Columbia Basin in 1981. Concurrently, reproductive success of geese increased, mortality decreased, and the nesting population increased to 170 pairs by 1983. There was no evidence for either biomagnification of lindance residues from treated seed to goose tissues or eggs or for induction of adverse effects by this compound.

  18. Insecticides and the Great Lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reinert, Robert E.

    1969-01-01

    Cracks in the perfect image of DDT appeared when traces of the insecticide began to show up in a wide variety of organisms throughout the world. As more and more people investigated this problem, it became increasingly evident that terrestrial and aquatic animals were accumulating comparatively high concentrations of DDT from extremely low levels in their environment. It also became apparent that DDT and all of the other chlorinated hydrocarbon insecticides were not species-specific, but were toxic to all forms of animal life including man. In 1965, when the Great Lakes Fishery Laboratory of the U.S. Bureau of Commercial Fisheries began to monitor pesticide residues in fish from the Great Lakes, it was discovered that the fish contained not only DDT, but also dieldrin, another chlorinated hydrocarbon insecticide. Fish from Lake Michigan in particular contained relatively high levels of both of these insecticides; concentrations of DDT were in the parts per million (ppm) range, a factor at least several million times greater than the few parts per trillion found in the water. Two questions presented themselves: first, How did these insecticides get into the water? and second, How did the fish build up such high concentrations in their bodies from such low concentrations in the water?

  19. Determination of atrazine, lindane, pentachlorophenol, and diazinon in water and soil by isotope dilution gas chromatography/mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez-Avila, V.; Hirata, P.; Kraska, S.; Flanagan, M.; Taylor, J.H. Jr.; Hern, S.C.

    1985-12-01

    This paper describes an isotope dilution GC/MS technique for the analysis of low-parts-per-billion concentrations of atrazine, lindane, pentachlorophenol, and diazinon in water and soil. Known amounts of stable-labeled isotopes such as atrazine-d/sub 5/, lindane-d/sub 6/, pentachlorophenol-/sup 13/C/sub 6/, and diazinon-d/sub 10/ are spiked into each sample prior to extraction. Water samples are extracted with methylene chloride; soil samples are extracted with acetone/hexane. Analysis is performed by high-resolution GC/MS with the mass spectrometer operated in the selected ion monitoring mode. Accuracy greater than 86% and precision better than 8% were demonstrated by use of spiked samples. This technique has been used successfully in the analysis of over 300 water and 300 soil samples. Detection limits of 0.1-1.0 ppb were achieved for the test compounds by selected ion monitoring GC/MS. 8 references, 2 figures, 4 tables.

  20. Meta-diamide insecticides acting on distinct sites of RDL GABA receptor from those for conventional noncompetitive antagonists.

    PubMed

    Nakao, Toshifumi; Banba, Shinich; Nomura, Michikazu; Hirase, Kangetsu

    2013-04-01

    The RDL GABA receptor is an attractive target of insecticides. Here we demonstrate that meta-diamides [3-benzamido-N-(4-(perfluoropropan-2-yl)phenyl)benzamides] are a distinct class of RDL GABA receptor antagonists showing high insecticidal activity against Spodoptera litura. We also suggest that the mode of action of the meta-diamides is distinct from that of conventional noncompetitive antagonists (NCAs), such as fipronil, picrotoxin, lindane, dieldrin, and α-endosulfan. Using a membrane potential assay, we examined the effects of the meta-diamide 3-benzamido-N-(2-bromo-4-(perfluoropropan-2-yl)-6-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl)-2-fluorobenzamide (meta-diamide 7) and NCAs on mutant Drosophila RDL GABA receptors expressed in Drosophila Mel-2 cells. NCAs had little or no inhibitory activity against at least one of the three mutant receptors (A2'S, A2'G, and A2'N), which were reported to confer resistance to NCAs. In contrast, meta-diamide 7 inhibited all three A2' mutant receptors, at levels comparable to its activity with the wild-type receptor. Furthermore, the A2'S·T6'V mutation almost abolished the inhibitory effects of all NCAs. However, meta-diamide 7 inhibited the A2'S・T6'S mutant receptor at the same level as its activity with the wild-type receptor. In contrast, a G336M mutation in the third transmembrane domain of the RDL GABA receptor abolished the inhibitory activities of meta-diamide 7, although the G336M mutation had little effect on the inhibitory activities of conventional NCAs. Molecular modeling studies also suggested that the binding site of meta-diamides was different from those of NCAs. Meta-diamide insecticides are expected to be prominent insecticides effective against A2' mutant RDL GABA receptors with a different mode of action.

  1. Fate of invading bacteria in soil and survival of transformants after simulated uptake of transgenes, as evaluated by a model system based on lindane degradation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaojun; Nesme, Joseph; Simonet, Pascal; Frostegård, Asa

    2012-04-01

    Emergence of bacteria carrying new traits resulting from mutations, gene synthesis by gene-shuffling or acquisition of exogenous DNA underpins the need to better understand factors influencing their spread and establishment. Studies of soils may be difficult, since the gene of interest is often already present in high numbers. The gene linA, responsible for the first dechlorination steps during degradation of lindane (γ-hexachlorocyclohexane), has low background levels in soil and is simple to detect. Development of transgenic plants containing linA and newly proposed approaches to bioremediation by in situ electrotransformation after addition of a vector carrying this gene call for documentation on the fate of bacteria that incorporate it. We inserted linA into the broad-host-range conjugative RP4-plasmid and transferred it to different soil bacteria which were inoculated into soil microcosms in the presence/absence of lindane. Similar experiments were performed using Sphingobium francense Sp+, which carries all genes for complete lindane degradation. This strain increased in numbers during lindane mineralization, but other bacteria increased more, resulting in a modified bacterial community structure. The engineered strains decreased below the detection limit, but rose in numbers after nutrient addition, demonstrating that new invading bacteria may persist in soil in the form of small populations over extended time periods.

  2. Overexpression of cerebral and hepatic cytochrome P450s alters behavioral activity of rat offspring following prenatal exposure to lindane

    SciTech Connect

    Johri, Ashu; Yadav, Sanjay; Dhawan, Alok; Parmar, Devendra

    2007-12-15

    Oral administration of different doses (0.0625, 0.125 or 0.25 mg/kg corresponding to 1/1400th, 1/700th or 1/350th of LD{sub 50}) of lindane to the pregnant Wistar rats from gestation days 5 to 21 were found to produce a dose-dependent increase in the activity of cytochrome P450 (CYP)-dependent 7-ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (EROD), 7-pentoxyresorufin-O-dealkylase (PROD) and N-nitrosodimethylamine demethylase (NDMA-d) in brain and liver of offspring postnatally at 3 weeks. The increase in the activity of CYP monooxygenases was found to be associated with the increase in the mRNA and protein expression of xenobiotic metabolizing CYP1A, 2B and 2E1 isoenzymes in the brain and liver of offspring. Dose-dependent alterations in the parameters of spontaneous locomotor activity in the offspring postnatally at 3 weeks have suggested that increase in CYP activity may possibly lead to the formation of metabolites to the levels that may be sufficient to alter the behavioral activity of the offspring. Interestingly, the inductive effect on cerebral and hepatic CYPs was found to persist postnatally up to 6 weeks in the offspring at the relatively higher doses (0.125 and 0.25 mg/kg) of lindane and up to 9 weeks at the highest dose (0.25 mg/kg), though the magnitude of induction was less than that observed at 3 weeks. Alterations in the parameters of spontaneous locomotor activity in the offspring postnatally at 6 and 9 weeks, though significant only in the offspring at 3 and 6-week of age, have further indicated that due to the reduced activity of the CYPs during the ontogeny, lindane and its metabolites may not be effectively cleared from the brain. The data suggest that low dose prenatal exposure to the pesticide has the potential to produce overexpression of xenobiotic metabolizing CYPs in brain and liver of the offspring which may account for the behavioral changes observed in the offspring.

  3. Pyrethrum flowers and pyrethroid insecticides.

    PubMed Central

    Casida, J E

    1980-01-01

    The natural pyrethrins from the daisy-like flower, Tanacetum or Chrysanthemum cinerariifolium, are nonpersistent insecticides of low toxicity to mammals. Synthetic analogs or pyrethroids, evolved from the natural compounds by successive isosteric modifications, are more potent and stable and are the newest important class of crop protection chemicals. They retain many of the favorable properties of the pyrethrins. PMID:6993201

  4. Bioassays for Monitoring Insecticide Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Audra L.E.; Tindall, Kelly; Leonard, B. Rogers

    2010-01-01

    Pest resistance to pesticides is an increasing problem because pesticides are an integral part of high-yielding production agriculture. When few products are labeled for an individual pest within a particular crop system, chemical control options are limited. Therefore, the same product(s) are used repeatedly and continual selection pressure is placed on the target pest. There are both financial and environmental costs associated with the development of resistant populations. The cost of pesticide resistance has been estimated at approximately $ 1.5 billion annually in the United States. This paper will describe protocols, currently used to monitor arthropod (specifically insects) populations for the development of resistance. The adult vial test is used to measure the toxicity to contact insecticides and a modification of this test is used for plant-systemic insecticides. In these bioassays, insects are exposed to technical grade insecticide and responses (mortality) recorded at a specific post-exposure interval. The mortality data are subjected to Log Dose probit analysis to generate estimates of a lethal concentration that provides mortality to 50% (LC50) of the target populations and a series of confidence limits (CL's) as estimates of data variability. When these data are collected for a range of insecticide-susceptible populations, the LC50 can be used as baseline data for future monitoring purposes. After populations have been exposed to products, the results can be compared to a previously determined LC50 using the same methodology. PMID:21248689

  5. Limonene--A Natural Insecticide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beatty, Joseph H.

    1986-01-01

    Describes a high school chemistry student's research project in which limonene was isolated from the oil of lemons and oranges. Outlines the students' tests on the use of this chemical as an insecticide. Discusses possible extensions of the exercises based on questions generated by the students. (TW)

  6. Typical Monoterpenes as Insecticides and Repellents against Stored Grain Pests.

    PubMed

    Reis, Suelen L; Mantello, Anieli G; Macedo, Jeferson M; Gelfuso, Erica A; da Silva, Cássio P; Fachin, Ana L; Cardoso, Alexandre M; Beleboni, Rene O

    2016-01-01

    Five monoterpenes naturally occurring in essential oils were tested for their insecticidal and repellent activities against the bruchid beetle Callosobruchus maculatus and the maize weevil Sitophilus zeamais. The monoterpenes were highly efficient as inducers of mortality or repellency against both insect species. They were more efficient in their fumigant activity against C. maculatus than against S. zeamais, while this profile of action was inverted when considering the repellent activities. Eugenol was one the most effective fumigants against both insects and one the most effective repellent against C. maculatus, while citronellal and geranial were one the most effective repellents against S. zeamais. Functional and positional isomerism of the monoterpenes pairs appears to exert little or no influence on theirs effects, especially in case of repellency. The validation of the insecticidal/repellent efficacy of isolated monoterpenes may permit a more advantageous, rapid, economic and optimized approach to the identification of promising oils for commercial formulations when combined with ethnobotanical strategies. PMID:26907246

  7. Evaluation of a two-generation reproduction toxicity study adding endpoints to detect endocrine disrupting activity using lindane.

    PubMed

    Matsuura, Ikuo; Saitoh, Tetsuji; Tani, Einosuke; Wako, Yumi; Iwata, Hiroshi; Toyota, Naoto; Ishizuka, Yoshihito; Namiki, Masato; Hoshino, Nobuhito; Tsuchitani, Minoru; Ikeda, Yasuo

    2005-12-01

    A two-generation reproduction toxicity study in rats adding extra endpoints to detect endocrine disrupting activity was conducted using lindane by dietary administration at 0, 10, 60, and 300 ppm, for investigation of its utility. The extra endpoints included anogenital distance (AGD), nipple development, sexual maturation (vaginal opening and preputial separation), estrous cycle, spermatogenesis, sex organ weights, and blood hormone concentrations (thyroid and sex hormones). F1 offspring were examined for emotionality (open field test), motor coordination (rotarod test), as well as learning and memory (pole-climbing test). Hepatic drug-metabolizing enzyme activities were also measured. The results revealed general toxicological effects on parental animals, influence on reproductive function, and altered development of offspring; however, they did not demonstrate any distinct changes in the extra endpoints for detection of endocrine disrupting activity. Adult toxicity was observed in both F0 and F1 animals, including suppressed body weight gain and reduced food consumption in both sexes, and deaths of females at 300 ppm. Convulsions and irritability were observed during the perinatal period in pregnant F1 females given 300 ppm. Pathological examination revealed increased liver weights and centrilobular hepatocellular hypertrophy in both sexes and generations at 10 or 60 ppm and above; in addition, increased kidney weights and increased hyaline droplets in the proximal tubule epithelium, and basophilic renal tubules in males were noted at 10 ppm and above. Pituitary weights were decreased in F0 females and in F1 males and females and adrenal weights were increased in F1 males and females at 300 ppm; however, no histological changes were observed, and manifestations suggesting endocrine disrupting activity related to these changes were lacking. Hypertrophy of the thyroid follicular epithelium in F0 females at 300 ppm and in F1 males at 60 and 300 ppm, and decreases

  8. Unique insecticide specificity of human homomeric rho 1 GABA(C) receptor.

    PubMed

    Ratra, Gurpreet S; Erkkila, Brian E; Weiss, David S; Casida, John E

    2002-03-24

    Several convulsants and major insecticides block the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-gated chloride channel in brain on binding to the GABA(A) receptor. The GABA(C) receptor, important in retina and present in brain, is also coupled to a chloride channel and is therefore a potential target for toxicant action examined here in radioligand binding and electrophysiological experiments. Human homomeric rho 1 GABA(C) receptor expressed in human embryonic kidney cells (HEK293) undergoes specific and saturable high-affinity binding of 4-n-[3H]propyl-4' -ethynylbicycloorthobenzoate ([3H]EBOB) using a cyano analog (CNBOB) to determine non-specific binding. This GABA(C) rho 1 receptor is very sensitive to CNBOB and lindane relative to alpha-endosulfan, tert-butylbicyclophosphorothionate, picrotoxinin and fipronil (IC(50) values of 23, 91, 800, 1080, 4000 and >10000 nM, respectively, in displacing [3H]EBOB). A similar potency sequence (except for picrotoxinin) is observed for inhibition of GABA-induced currents of rho 1 receptor expressed in Xenopus oocytes. The present study does not consider rho 2 homomeric and rho 1 rho 2 heteromeric GABA(C) receptors which are known to be more sensitive than rho 1 to picrotoxinin. The inhibitor sensitivity and specificity of this rho 1 GABA(C) receptor differ greatly from those of human homomeric beta 3 and native GABA(A) receptors.

  9. Pyridalyl, a novel insecticide: potency and insecticidal selectivity.

    PubMed

    Isayama, S; Saito, S; Kuroda, K; Umeda, K; Kasamatsu, K

    2005-04-01

    Pyridalyl is an insecticide of a novel chemical class (unclassified insecticides). Toxicity of pyridalyl to two insect pest species, Spodoptera litura and Frankliniella occidentalis, an insect predator, Orius stringicollis, and a pollinator, Bombus terrestris, was evaluated in the laboratory. The insecticidal activity of pyridalyl against S. litura was evaluated using the leaf-dipping method. The potency of pyridalyl was highly effective against all development stages (2nd to 6th instar larvae) of S. litura. This compound was also evaluated against F. occidentalis using the direct spray method. For F. occidentalis, toxicity of pyridalyl was almost similar to that of acrinathrin, but greater than acrinathrin for adults. Then the toxicity of this product to the natural enemies, Orius stringicollis and the pollinating insect Bombus terrestris, was evaluated using the body-dipping method or direct spray method. No acute toxicity of this product was observed on these non-target insects. Moreover, the influence of pyridalyl to the nest of Bombus terrestris was evaluated using the direct spray to the inside of the nest. No apparent influence of this compound was observed by 21 days after treatment. The cytotoxicity of pyridalyl to the Sf9 insect cell line and the CHO-K1 mammalian cell line was evaluated using the trypan-blue exclusion method. High toxicity to the insect cell line, but almost no toxicity to the mammalian cell line, was observed. Thus, pyridalyl exhibited high selectivity in cytotoxicity between the insect and mammalian cell line as well as in insecticidal activity among insect species. We infer pyridalyl may be useful for IPM programs of greenhouse cultivation system. PMID:15756699

  10. The insecticide-resistance problem

    PubMed Central

    Brown, A. W. A.

    1958-01-01

    The author reviews the growth of the insecticide-resistance problem throughout the world during the period between July 1956 and November 1957, and the developments in research on the subject during the same period. Three new resistant species have been discovered—Anopheles subpictus, Chrysomyia putoria and Rhipicephalus sanguineus—and eight new types of resistance in already resistant species have been observed. Moreover, the geographical area covered by certain resistant insect populations has considerably increased. The research accomplishments during the period under review include: systems of detecting resistance in the field by standard test methods; confirmation of two distinct types of resistance to chlorinated-hydrocarbon insecticides in mosquitos and bed-bugs as well as in houseflies; evidence that DDT-resistance in the housefly, Anopheles sundaicus and Aëdes aegypti is due mainly to a single genetic factor associated with the ability to dehydrochlorinate DDT, and that dieldrin-resistance of Anopheles gambiae also derives from a single factor present even in untouched populations; a fuller understanding of the physiological mechanism of BHC-resistance in the housefly; and demonstration that selection pressure from organo-phosphorus compounds induces resistance to themselves and to chlorinated-hydrocarbon insecticides. PMID:13536795

  11. The risk of insecticides to pollinating insects

    PubMed Central

    Connolly, Christopher N.

    2013-01-01

    A key new risk to our pollinators has been identified as exposure to neonicotinoid insecticides. These discoveries have refuelled the debate over whether or not the neonicotinoid insecticides should be banned and conflicting evidence is used in this battle. However, the issue is not black or white, but gray. It is not an issue of whether the neonicotinoids are toxic to insects or not. Clearly, all insecticides were designed and optimized for this attribute. The real question is, or at least should be, which insecticide is the safest for use for a particular need. PMID:24265849

  12. Mechanisms for selective toxicity of fipronil insecticide and its sulfone metabolite and desulfinyl photoproduct.

    PubMed

    Hainzl, D; Cole, L M; Casida, J E

    1998-12-01

    Fipronil, an N-phenylpyrazole with a trifluoromethylsulfinyl substituent, initiated the second generation of insecticides acting at the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptor to block the chloride channel. The first generation includes the polychlorocycloalkanes alpha-endosulfan and lindane. In this study, we examine the mechanisms for selective toxicity of the sulfoxide fipronil and its sulfone metabolite and desulfinyl photoproduct relative to their target site interactions in vitro and ex vivo and the importance in fipronil action of biooxidation to the sulfone. Differences in GABA receptor sensitivity, assayed by displacement of 4'-ethynyl-4-n-[2, 3-3H2]propylbicycloorthobenzoate ([3H]EBOB) from the noncompetitive blocker site, appear to be a major factor in fipronil being much more toxic to the insects (housefly and fruit fly) than to the vertebrates (humans, dogs, mice, chickens, quail, and salmon) examined; in insects, the IC50s range from 3 to 12 nM for fipronil and its sulfone and desulfinyl derivatives, while in vertebrates, the IC50 average values are 1103, 175, and 129 nM for fipronil, fipronil sulfone, and desulfinyl fipronil, respectively. The insect relative to the vertebrate specificity decreases in the following order: fipronil > lindane > desulfinyl fipronil > fipronil sulfone > alpha-endosulfan. Ex vivo inhibition of [3H]EBOB binding in mouse brain is similar for fipronil and its sulfone and desulfinyl derivatives at the LD50 dose, but surprisingly, at higher doses fipronil can be lethal without detectably blocking the [3H]EBOB site. The P450 inhibitor piperonyl butoxide, acting in houseflies, increases the metabolic stability and effectiveness of fipronil and the sulfone but not those of the desulfinyl compound, and in mice it completely blocks the sulfoxide to sulfone conversion without altering the poisoning. Thus, the selective toxicity of fipronil and fipronil-derived residues is due in part to the higher potency of the parent compound at

  13. Gas chromatographic methods for determination of gamma-BHC in technical emulsifiable concentrates and water-dispersible powder formulations and in lindane shampoo and lotion: collaborative study.

    PubMed

    Miles, J W; Mount, D L; Beckmann, T J; Carrigan, S K; Galoux, I M; Hitos, P; Hodge, M C; Kissler, K; Martijn, A; Sanchez-Rasero, F

    1984-01-01

    Although the gas chromatographic separation of the isomers of BHC was demonstrated two decades ago, the present AOAC method of analysis of BHC for gamma-isomer (lindane) content is based on a separation carried out on a liquid chromatographic partition column. A method of analysis has been developed that uses an OV-210 column for separation of the gamma-isomer from the other isomers and impurities in technical BHC. Di-n-propyl phthalate was chosen as an internal standard. The same system allows quantitation of lindane in lotion and shampoo after these products are extracted with ethyl acetate-isooctane (1 + 4). The analytical methods were subjected to a collaborative trial with 10 laboratories. The coefficient of variation for technical BHC was 2.83%. For the water-dispersible powder and emulsifiable concentrate, the coefficients of variation were 2.89% and 4.62%, respectively. Coefficients of variation for 1% lindane lotion and shampoo were 4.36% and 11.92%, respectively. The method has been adopted official first action.

  14. Insecticide Recommendations for Arkansas. MP 144.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Bill F.; Barnes, Gordon

    This publication gives, in chart form, insecticides for use on animals, field crops, fruits, flowers, trees and shrubs, household pests, recreation areas, lawn and turf grass, pecans, stored grain, and vegetables. Included in the charts are the insecticides recommended for each insect, formulation to be used, amount, time to apply, and other…

  15. Distribution of lindane in water, sediment, and fish from the warri river of the niger delta, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Ezemonye, Lawrence Ikechukwu; Ikpesu, Thomas Ohwofasa; Tongo, Isioma

    2008-12-01

    This paper is the first attempt to quantify the levels and the distribution pattern of lindane in the surface water, sediment and fish (Chrysichthys furcatus and Tilapia zilli). The samples were collected from three stations (Ovwian, Ekakpamre, and Ovu) of the Warri River in the western Niger Delta of Nigeria in 2006: during the dry (January-April) and wet seasons (May-August). The analysis included a total of 96 samples made up of 24 samples each for water, sediment, and fish. The pesticide levels were analysed using high performance liquid chromatography to elucidate its distribution in various environmental compartments. Residue levels in the matrices ranged from below the detection limit (BDL) to 1.37microg L(-1) in water, BDL to 12.66 microg g(-1) dry weight (dw) in sediment, BDL to 16.67 microg g(-1)dw in Chrysichthys furcatus, and BDL to 0.15 microg g(-1)dw in Tilapia zilli. The observed values were above the ecological benchmarks (0.01 microg L(-1)) recommended by the Nigerian Environmental Protection Agency and European Union. They were also relatively higher than in previous studies on the Nigerian environment, which calls for regular monitoring of the Niger Delta water bodies. PMID:19064363

  16. Insecticide resistance in Anopheles sacharovi

    PubMed Central

    de Zulueta, Julian

    1959-01-01

    A series of observations is presented on the susceptibility or resistance to insecticides of Anopheles sacharovi in Greece, Iran, Italy, Romania and Turkey. High physiological resistance to DDT was observed in the Tarsus area of southern Turkey. In Greece very marked physiological resistance to dieldrin was found in all the areas examined and was associated, at least in the Peloponnese, with similar resistance to DDT, affecting, however, only a part of the sacharovi population. In Italy and Romania, after 10 years' use of DDT, sacharovi is still susceptible to it; long use of BHC in Romania has not resulted in the development of resistance to dieldrin or to BHC. Further investigation of the situation in Iran is considered necessary. The fact that the use of DDT in Greece, after the development of resistance to this insecticide in 1951, has not resulted in the formation of a highly resistant mosquito population is considered to be due to the irritant effect of the DDT on susceptible mosquitos, causing them to leave sprayed surfaces before they have picked up a lethal dose. The information to date points to the existence in A. sacharovi of two independent mechanisms of physiological resistance—one to DDT and another to dieldrin and BHC—which may or may not be present together. PMID:13847916

  17. Insecticide Control of Vector-Borne Diseases: When Is Insecticide Resistance a Problem?

    PubMed Central

    Rivero, Ana; Vézilier, Julien; Weill, Mylène; Read, Andrew F.; Gandon, Sylvain

    2010-01-01

    Many of the most dangerous human diseases are transmitted by insect vectors. After decades of repeated insecticide use, all of these vector species have demonstrated the capacity to evolve resistance to insecticides. Insecticide resistance is generally considered to undermine control of vector-transmitted diseases because it increases the number of vectors that survive the insecticide treatment. Disease control failure, however, need not follow from vector control failure. Here, we review evidence that insecticide resistance may have an impact on the quality of vectors and, specifically, on three key determinants of parasite transmission: vector longevity, competence, and behaviour. We argue that, in some instances, insecticide resistance is likely to result in a decrease in vector longevity, a decrease in infectiousness, or in a change in behaviour, all of which will reduce the vectorial capacity of the insect. If this effect is sufficiently large, the impact of insecticide resistance on disease management may not be as detrimental as previously thought. In other instances, however, insecticide resistance may have the opposite effect, increasing the insect's vectorial capacity, which may lead to a dramatic increase in the transmission of the disease and even to a higher prevalence than in the absence of insecticides. Either way—and there may be no simple generality—the consequence of the evolution of insecticide resistance for disease ecology deserves additional attention. PMID:20700451

  18. The insecticidal potential of venom peptides.

    PubMed

    Smith, Jennifer J; Herzig, Volker; King, Glenn F; Alewood, Paul F

    2013-10-01

    Pest insect species are a burden to humans as they destroy crops and serve as vectors for a wide range of diseases including malaria and dengue. Chemical insecticides are currently the dominant approach for combating these pests. However, the de-registration of key classes of chemical insecticides due to their perceived ecological and human health risks in combination with the development of insecticide resistance in many pest insect populations has created an urgent need for improved methods of insect pest control. The venoms of arthropod predators such as spiders and scorpions are a promising source of novel insecticidal peptides that often have different modes of action to extant chemical insecticides. These peptides have been optimized via a prey-predator arms race spanning hundreds of millions of years to target specific types of insect ion channels and receptors. Here we review the current literature on insecticidal venom peptides, with a particular focus on their structural and pharmacological diversity, and discuss their potential for deployment as insecticides. PMID:23525661

  19. Mosquito age and susceptibility to insecticides.

    PubMed

    Rajatileka, Shavanthi; Burhani, Joseph; Ranson, Hilary

    2011-05-01

    Insecticides play a crucial role in controlling the transmission of mosquito-borne diseases and the development and spread of insecticide resistance is a major threat to sustainable control. Guidelines developed by the WHO to monitor for insecticide resistance recommend using 1-3 day old, non blood fed female mosquitoes. This standardisation facilitates comparison between different tests, which is important when monitoring for spatial or longitudinal variations in resistance in the field. However, mosquitoes of this age cannot transmit human pathogens. In order to transmit disease, the mosquito must live long enough to pick up the pathogen via a blood meal, survive the extrinsic incubation period and then pass on the pathogen during a subsequent blood meal. Previous studies have reported declines in insecticide resistance with mosquito age. If widely applicable this would have important implications for predictions of the impact of resistance that are based on results from WHO bioassays. This study investigated the impact of senescence and blood feeding on insecticide induced mortality in six different mosquito populations and found higher mortality after insecticide exposure in older mosquitoes in three populations of Aedes aegypti and two Anopheles gambiae populations. Age dependent changes in the expression of a known insecticide detoxification gene, GSTe2, and in the frequency of a target site mutation (kdr 1014F) were investigated in an attempt to explain the results. PMID:21353689

  20. The insecticidal potential of venom peptides.

    PubMed

    Smith, Jennifer J; Herzig, Volker; King, Glenn F; Alewood, Paul F

    2013-10-01

    Pest insect species are a burden to humans as they destroy crops and serve as vectors for a wide range of diseases including malaria and dengue. Chemical insecticides are currently the dominant approach for combating these pests. However, the de-registration of key classes of chemical insecticides due to their perceived ecological and human health risks in combination with the development of insecticide resistance in many pest insect populations has created an urgent need for improved methods of insect pest control. The venoms of arthropod predators such as spiders and scorpions are a promising source of novel insecticidal peptides that often have different modes of action to extant chemical insecticides. These peptides have been optimized via a prey-predator arms race spanning hundreds of millions of years to target specific types of insect ion channels and receptors. Here we review the current literature on insecticidal venom peptides, with a particular focus on their structural and pharmacological diversity, and discuss their potential for deployment as insecticides.

  1. Gene amplification and insecticide resistance.

    PubMed

    Bass, Chris; Field, Linda M

    2011-08-01

    Pesticide resistance in arthropods has been shown to evolve by two main mechanisms, the enhanced production of metabolic enzymes, which bind to and/or detoxify the pesticide, and mutation of the target protein, which makes it less sensitive to the pesticide. One route that leads to enhanced metabolism is the duplication or amplification of the structural gene(s) encoding the detoxifying enzyme, and this has now been described for the three main families (esterases, glutathione S-transferases and cytochrome P450 monooxygenases) implicated in resistance. More recently, a direct or indirect role for gene duplication or amplification has been described for target-site resistance in several arthropod species. This mini-review summarises the involvement of gene duplication/amplification in the insecticide/acaricide resistance of insect and mite pests and highlights recent developments in this area in relation to P450-mediated and target-site resistance.

  2. Fungal degradation of organophosphorous insecticides

    SciTech Connect

    Bumpus, J.A.; Kakar, S.N.; Coleman, R.D.

    1992-07-01

    Organophosphorous insecticides are used extensively to treat a variety of pests and insects. Although as a group they are easily degraded by bacteria in the environment, a number of them have half-lives of several months. Little is known about their biodegradation by fungi. We have shown that Phanerochaete chrysosporium can substantially degrade chlorpyrifos, fonofos, and terbufos (27.5%, 12.2%, and 26.6%, respectively) during 18-day incubation in nitrogen-limited stationary cultures. The results demonstrate that the clorinated pyridinyl ring of chlorpyrifos and the phenyl ring of fonofos undergo ring cleavage during biodegradation by the fungus. The usefulness of the fungus system for bioremediation is discussed. 16 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. Fungal degradation of organophosphorous insecticides

    SciTech Connect

    Bumpus, J.A. ); Kakar, S.N.; Coleman, R.D. )

    1992-01-01

    Organophosphorous insecticides are used extensively to treat a variety of pests and insects. Although as a group they are easily degraded by bacteria in the environment, a number of them have half-lives of several months. Little is known about their biodegradation by fungi. We have shown that Phanerochaete chrysosporium can substantially degrade chlorpyrifos, fonofos, and terbufos (27.5%, 12.2%, and 26.6%, respectively) during 18-day incubation in nitrogen-limited stationary cultures. The results demonstrate that the clorinated pyridinyl ring of chlorpyrifos and the phenyl ring of fonofos undergo ring cleavage during biodegradation by the fungus. The usefulness of the fungus system for bioremediation is discussed. 16 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. The effects of density fluctuations on the partitioning of foreign molecules into lipid bilayers: application to anaesthetics and insecticides.

    PubMed

    Jørgensen, K; Ipsen, J H; Mouritsen, O G; Bennett, D; Zuckermann, M J

    1991-08-26

    An extensive computer-simulation study is performed on a simple but general molecular model recently proposed (Jørgensen et al. (1991) Biochem. Biophys. Acta 1062, 277-238) to describe foreign molecules interacting with lipid bilayers. The model is a multi-state lattice model of the main bilayer transition in which the foreign molecules are assumed to intercalate at interstitial lattice positions. Specific as well as non-specific interactions between the foreign molecules and the lipid acyl chains are considered. Particular attention is paid to the fluctuating properties of the membrane and how the presence of the foreign molecules modulates these fluctuations in the transition region. By means of computer-stimulation techniques, a detailed account is given of the macroscopic as well as microscopic consequences of the fluctuations. The macroscopic consequences of the fluctuations are seen in the thermal anomalies of the specific heat and the passive trans-membrane permeability. Microscopically, the fluctuations manifest themselves in lipid-domain formation in the transition region which implies an effective dynamic membrane heterogeneity. Within the model it is found that certain anaesthetics and insecticides which are characterised by specific interactions with the lipids have a strong effect on the heterogeneity of the membrane inducing regions of locally very high concentration of the foreign molecules. This leads to a broadening of the specific heat peak and a maximum in the membrane/water partition coefficient. These results are in accordance with available experimental data for volatile general anaesthetics like halothane, local anaesthetics like cocain derivatives, and insecticides like lindane.

  5. Study on effects of temperature, moisture and pH in degradation and degradation kinetics of aldrin, endosulfan, lindane pesticides during full-scale continuous rotary drum composting.

    PubMed

    Ali, Muntjeer; Kazmi, A A; Ahmed, Naseem

    2014-05-01

    Study focused on effects of temperature, moisture and pH on degradation and degradation kinetics of aldrin, endosulfan (α), endosulfan (β) and lindane during vegetable waste composting using full-scale continuous rotary drum composter (FSCRDC). Extraction, concentration and quantification of pesticides were made from waste material at different stages by ultra-sonification, silica gel column and GC-MS analysis. Removal efficiency of aldrin, endosulfan α, endosulfan β and lindane was found 85.67%, 84.95%, 83.20% and 81.36% respectively due to optimum temperature, moisture, pH and enhanced microbial activity. Maximum temperature in inlet zone was found 60-65°C which is most suitable for complex microbial population. After feeding and turning in inlet zone, temperature reduced to 38°C from 60 to 65°C and regained it within 7-8h, and pH reduced to 5.3±0.2 from 7.5±0.3 in 4h and regained it in 10h. Heterotrophic bacteria Bacillus sp., Pseudomonas sp. and Lactobacillus sp. also decreased from 4.4×10(3) to 7.80×10(2)CFU g(-1) in 2 h due to gradual variation in temperature and pH. No significant temperature change was found in middle and outlet zones during feeding and turning. Degradation of pesticides was observed as first order kinetics and half-life of aldrin, endosulfan α, endosulfan β and lindane was reduced to 25.54, 18.43, 18.43 and 27.43 d from 1095, 60, 270 and 160 d respectively. Thus, the observations in contrast of removal and degradation kinetics of organochlorine pesticides residues in vegetable waste though full-scale rotary drum composting proved it the best suited technique.

  6. Certification of the European reference soil set (IRMM-443--EUROSOILS). Part I. Adsorption coefficients for atrazine, 2,4-D and lindane.

    PubMed

    Gawlik, B M; Lamberty, A; Pauwels, J; Blum, W E H; Mentler, A; Bussian, B; Eklo, O; Fox, K; Kördel, W; Hennecke, D; Maurer, T; Perrin-Ganier, C; Pflugmacher, J; Romero-Taboada, E; Szabo, G; Muntau, H

    2003-08-01

    The European Commission has characterised and certified a set of six European soils (the EUROSOILS) under the number IRMM-443. After a successful validation and trial period with a preliminary batch it was decided to produce a new batch of certified reference materials. Part I of this paper describes the certification of adsorption coefficients for atrazine, 2,4-D and lindane in these soils. The adsorption coefficients were determined according to OECD Test Guideline 106. Additionally, the underlying principles for the value assignment process according to the GUM and their practical application to the numerical data obtained during the certification exercise according to ISO Guide 34 and 35 are discussed.

  7. Gap junction endocytosis and lysosomal degradation of connexin43-P2 in WB-F344 rat liver epithelial cells treated with DDT and lindane.

    PubMed

    Guan, X; Ruch, R J

    1996-09-01

    Treatment of WB-F344 rat liver epithelial cells with DDT (1,1-bis(p-chlorophenyl)-2,2,2-trichloroethane) or lindane induces a loss of gap junction plaques and a decrease in the phosphorylated gap junction protein connexin43-P2 (Cx43-P2), which is associated with the plaques. In this study we have considered several mechanisms. The loss of junctional plaques could be due to disaggregation of junctional particles or to endocytosis of the plaques, while the loss of Cx43-P2 could be due to dephosphorylation or degradation. Immunohistochemical analyses of DDT- or lindane-treated cells revealed a reduction in plasma membranous Cx43-positive gap junction plaques coincident with the appearance of Cx43-positive punctate cytoplasmic structures. The cytoplasmic Cx43-positive structures eventually disappeared after 4 h treatment. Diffuse Cx43-positive plasma membranous staining was not seen following DDT or lindane treatment. Western blot analyses of these cells indicated that Cx43-P2 decreased in a time-dependent manner that paralleled the disappearance of gap junction plaques from the plasma membrane. The loss of Cx43-P2 was not due to dephosphorylation, since no increase in non-phosphorylated (Cx43-NP) or other phosphorylated (Cx43-P1) forms of the protein were evident. The decrease in Cx43-P2 and the disappearance of cytoplasmic Cx43-positive structures were prevented by colchicine and chloroquine, which suggests that Cx43-P2-containing plaques were internalized and degraded in lysosomes. In addition, two small (approximately 18 and approximately 22 kDa) bands appeared in Western blots coincident with the loss of Cx43-P2 and may be degradation products of the protein. These immunohistochemical and biochemical data strongly suggest that the loss of gap junction plaques and of Cx43-P2 in WB-F344 cells treated with DDT and lindane were due to endocytosis of the plaques and degradation of Cx43-P2 in lysosomes.

  8. Developmental neurotoxicity of pyrethroid insecticides in zebrafish embryos.

    PubMed

    DeMicco, Amy; Cooper, Keith R; Richardson, Jason R; White, Lori A

    2010-01-01

    Pyrethroid insecticides are one of the most commonly used residential and agricultural insecticides. Based on the increased use of pyrethroids and recent studies showing that pregnant women and children are exposed to pyrethroids, there are concerns over the potential for developmental neurotoxicity. However, there have been relatively few studies on the developmental neurotoxicity of pyrethroids. In this study, we sought to investigate the developmental toxicity of six common pyrethroids, three type I compounds (permethrin, resmethrin, and bifenthrin) and three type II compounds (deltamethrin, cypermethrin, and lambda-cyhalothrin), and to determine whether zebrafish embryos may be an appropriate model for studying the developmental neurotoxicity of pyrethroids. Exposure of zebrafish embryos to pyrethroids caused a dose-dependent increase in mortality and pericardial edema, with type II compounds being the most potent. At doses approaching the LC(50), permethrin and deltamethrin caused craniofacial abnormalities. These findings are consistent with mammalian studies demonstrating that pyrethroids are mildly teratogenic at very high doses. However, at lower doses, body axis curvature and spasms were observed, which were reminiscent of the classic syndromes observed with pyrethroid toxicity. Treatment with diazepam ameliorated the spasms, while treatment with the sodium channel antagonist MS-222 ameliorated both spasms and body curvature, suggesting that pyrethroid-induced neurotoxicity is similar in zebrafish and mammals. Taken in concert, these data suggest that zebrafish may be an appropriate alternative model to study the mechanism(s) responsible for the developmental neurotoxicity of pyrethroid insecticides and aid in identification of compounds that should be further tested in mammalian systems.

  9. History of insecticide resistance of Triatominae vectors.

    PubMed

    Pessoa, Grasielle Caldas Dávila; Vinãs, Pedro Albajar; Rosa, Aline Cristine Luiz; Diotaiuti, Liléia

    2015-01-01

    In the last 15 years, different types of Triatominae resistance to different insecticides have been reported; thus, resistance may be more widespread than known, requiring better characterization and delimitation, which was the aim of this review. This review was structured on a literature search of all articles from 1970 to 2015 in the PubMed database that contained the keywords Insecticide resistance and Triatominae . Out of 295 articles screened by title, 33 texts were selected for detailed analysis. Insecticide resistance of Triatomines is a complex phenomenon that has been primarily reported in Argentina and Bolivia, and is caused by different factors (associated or isolated). Insecticide resistance of Triatominae is a characteristic inherited in an autosomal and semi-dominant manner, and is polygenic, being present in both domestic and sylvatic populations. The toxicological profile observed in eggs cannot be transposed to different stages of evolution. Different toxicological profiles exist at macro- and microgeographical levels. The insecticide phenotype has both reproductive and developmental costs. Different physiological mechanisms are involved in resistance. Studies of Triatomine resistance to insecticides highlight three deficiencies in interpreting the obtained results: I) the vast diversity of methodologies, despite the existence of a single guiding protocol; II) the lack of information on the actual impact of resistance ratios in the field; and III) the concept of the susceptibility reference lineage. Research on the biological and behavioral characteristics of each Triatominae species that has evolved resistance is required in relation to the environmental conditions of each region.

  10. Insecticidal sugar baits for adult biting midges.

    PubMed

    Snyder, D; Cernicchiaro, N; Allan, S A; Cohnstaedt, L W

    2016-06-01

    The mixing of an insecticide with sugar solution creates an oral toxin or insecticidal sugar bait (ISB) useful for reducing adult insect populations. The ability of ISBs to kill the biting midge Culicoides sonorensis Wirth and Jones (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae), a vector of bluetongue virus, epizootic hemorrhagic disease and vesicular stomatitis viruses, was tested. The commercial insecticide formulations (percentage active ingredient) tested included bifenthrin, cyfluthrin, deltamethrin, permethrin, dinotefuran, imidacloprid, thiamethoxam and spinosad. Mortality rates were determined for various concentrations of commercial formulations (0.01, 0.05, 0.1, 1, 2 and 3%) and observed at 1, 4, 10 and 24 h post-exposure to the ISB. In the first set of assays, laboratory-reared midges were fed sugar ad libitum and then exposed to insecticide-treated sugar solutions to measure mortality. The second assay assessed competitive feeding: midges were provided with a control sugar solution (10% sucrose) in one vial, and a sugar and insecticide solution in another. Pyrethroid treatments resulted in the greatest mortality in the first hour at the lowest concentrations and spinosad consumption resulted in the least mortality. Biting midges were not deterred from feeding on the 1% ISB solutions despite the presence of an insecticide-free alternative source of sugar. PMID:26789534

  11. Impact of insecticides on the invasive Halyomorpha halys (Hemiptera: Pentatomidae): analysis of insecticide lethality.

    PubMed

    Leskey, Tracy C; Lee, Doo-Hyung; Short, Brent D; Wright, Starker E

    2012-10-01

    The efficacy of 37 insecticide treatments against adult Halyomorpha halys (Stål) was established based on exposure to 18-h old dry insecticide residue in laboratory bioassays. Individual adult H. halys were exposed to an insecticide residue for 4.5 h and then monitored daily for survivorship over a 7-d period. The proportion of dead and moribund insects was used as an estimate of overall insecticide efficacy against H. halys immediately after the exposure period and over the 7-d trial. Among all materials evaluated, 14 insecticides exhibited increasing efficacy, in which the percentage of dead and moribund insects (used as a measure of insecticide efficacy) increased by > 10% after 7 d. By contrast, insecticide efficacy values of eight insecticides declined by > 10% (based on recovery of adults from a moribund state) over the 7-d period with most belonging to the pyrethroid class. In this study, the efficacy value of neonicotinoid, acetamiprid, showed the greatest decline from 93 to 10% over 7 d. A lethality index (scale of 0-100) was developed to compare insecticides based on quantifying the immediate and longer-term effects of insecticide exposure on H. halys. Among all materials evaluated, dimethoate, malathion, bifenthrin, methidathion, endosulfan, methomyl, chlorpyrifos, acephate, fenpropathrin, and permethrin yielded the highest values (> 75) because of a high degree of immediate mortality with very little recovery. Our results provide baseline information regarding potential of candidate insecticides against adult H. halys and highlight the need to consider longer-term effects in establishing overall efficacy ratings against this invasive species. PMID:23156170

  12. Evaluation of Alternatives to Carbamate and Organophosphate Insecticides Against Thrips and Tomato Spotted Wilt Virus in Peanut Production.

    PubMed

    Marasigan, K; Toews, M; Kemerait, R; Abney, M R; Culbreath, A; Srinivasan, R

    2016-04-01

    Thrips are important pests of peanut. They cause severe feeding injuries on peanut foliage in the early season. They also transmit Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV), which causes spotted wilt disease. At-plant insecticides and cultivars that exhibit field resistance to TSWV are often used to manage thrips and spotted wilt disease. Historically, peanut growers used the broad-spectrum insecticides aldicarb (IRAC class 1A; Temik) and phorate (IRAC class 1B; Thimet) for managing thrips and thereby reducing TSWV transmission. Aldicarb has not been produced since 2011 and its usage in peanut will be legally phased out in 2018; therefore, identification of alternative chemistries is critical for thrips and spotted wilt management. Here, eight alternative insecticides, with known thrips activity, were evaluated in field trials conducted from 2011 through 2013. In addition, different application methods of alternatives were also evaluated. Imidacloprid (Admire Pro), thiamethoxam (Actara), spinetoram (Radiant), and cyantraniliprole (Exirel) were as effective as aldicarb and phorate in suppressing thrips, but none of the insecticides significantly suppressed spotted wilt incidence. Nevertheless, greenhouse assays demonstrated that the same alternative insecticides were effective in suppressing thrips feeding and reducing TSWV transmission. Spotted wilt incidence in the greenhouse was more severe (∼80%) than in the field (5–25%). In general, field resistance to TSWV in cultivars only marginally influenced spotted wilt incidence. Results suggest that effective management of thrips using alternative insecticides and subsequent feeding reduction could improve yields under low to moderate virus pressure.

  13. Multiple insecticide resistances in the disease vector Culex p. quinquefasciatus from Western Indian Ocean.

    PubMed

    Pocquet, Nicolas; Milesi, Pascal; Makoundou, Patrick; Unal, Sandra; Zumbo, Betty; Atyame, Célestine; Darriet, Frédéric; Dehecq, Jean-Sébastien; Thiria, Julien; Bheecarry, Ambicadutt; Iyaloo, Diana P; Weill, Mylène; Chandre, Fabrice; Labbé, Pierrick

    2013-01-01

    Several mosquito-borne diseases affect the Western Indian Ocean islands. Culex pipiens quinquefasciatus is one of these vectors and transmits filariasis, Rift Valley and West Nile viruses and the Japanese encephalitis. To limit the impact of these diseases on public health, considerable vector control efforts have been implemented since the 50s, mainly through the use of neurotoxic insecticides belonging to Organochlorines (OC), Organophosphates (OP) and pyrethroids (PYR) families. However, mosquito control failures have been reported on site, and they were probably due to the selection of resistant individuals in response to insecticide exposure. In this study, we used different approaches to establish a first regional assessment of the levels and mechanisms of resistance to various insecticides. Bioassays were used to evaluate resistance to various insecticides, enzyme activity was measured to assess the presence of metabolic resistances through elevated detoxification, and molecular identification of known resistance alleles was investigated to determine the frequency of target-site mutations. These complementary approaches showed that resistance to the most used insecticides families (OC, OP and PYR) is widespread at a regional scale. However, the distribution of the different resistance genes is quite heterogeneous among the islands, some being found at high frequencies everywhere, others being frequent in some islands and absent in others. Moreover, two resistance alleles displayed clinal distributions in Mayotte and La Réunion, probably as a result of a heterogeneous selection due to local treatment practices. These widespread and diverse resistance mechanisms reduce the capacity of resistance management through classical strategies (e.g. insecticide rotation). In case of a disease outbreak, it could undermine the efforts of the vector control services, as only few compounds could be used. It thus becomes urgent to find alternatives to control populations

  14. Multiple Insecticide Resistances in the Disease Vector Culex p. Quinquefasciatus from Western Indian Ocean

    PubMed Central

    Pocquet, Nicolas; Milesi, Pascal; Makoundou, Patrick; Unal, Sandra; Zumbo, Betty; Atyame, Célestine; Darriet, Frédéric; Dehecq, Jean-Sébastien; Thiria, Julien; Bheecarry, Ambicadutt; Iyaloo, Diana P.; Weill, Mylène; Chandre, Fabrice; Labbé, Pierrick

    2013-01-01

    Several mosquito-borne diseases affect the Western Indian Ocean islands. Culex pipiens quinquefasciatus is one of these vectors and transmits filariasis, Rift Valley and West Nile viruses and the Japanese encephalitis. To limit the impact of these diseases on public health, considerable vector control efforts have been implemented since the 50s, mainly through the use of neurotoxic insecticides belonging to Organochlorines (OC), Organophosphates (OP) and pyrethroids (PYR) families. However, mosquito control failures have been reported on site, and they were probably due to the selection of resistant individuals in response to insecticide exposure. In this study, we used different approaches to establish a first regional assessment of the levels and mechanisms of resistance to various insecticides. Bioassays were used to evaluate resistance to various insecticides, enzyme activity was measured to assess the presence of metabolic resistances through elevated detoxification, and molecular identification of known resistance alleles was investigated to determine the frequency of target-site mutations. These complementary approaches showed that resistance to the most used insecticides families (OC, OP and PYR) is widespread at a regional scale. However, the distribution of the different resistance genes is quite heterogeneous among the islands, some being found at high frequencies everywhere, others being frequent in some islands and absent in others. Moreover, two resistance alleles displayed clinal distributions in Mayotte and La Réunion, probably as a result of a heterogeneous selection due to local treatment practices. These widespread and diverse resistance mechanisms reduce the capacity of resistance management through classical strategies (e.g. insecticide rotation). In case of a disease outbreak, it could undermine the efforts of the vector control services, as only few compounds could be used. It thus becomes urgent to find alternatives to control populations

  15. THE INTERACTION OF AN ANTICHOLINESTERASE INSECTICIDE, DIAZINON, WITH A PYRETHROID INSECTICIDE, DELTAMETHRIN.

    EPA Science Inventory

    This present study explores the interaction of the toxicity induced by an organophosphorus insecticide, diazinon (diethyl 2-isopropyl-6methyl-4-pyrimidal phosphorothionate), with a pyrethroid insecticide, deltamethrin ((S)-a-cyano-3-phenoxybenzyl (1R,3R)-3-(2,2-dibromovinyl)-2,...

  16. Fungitoxic and insecticidal plant polypeptides.

    PubMed

    Becker-Ritt, Arlete Beatriz; Carlini, Célia Regina

    2012-01-01

    According to the World Bank and FAO, the population grows worldwide and the poorest countries are expected to double their population within the next decades, reaching approximately 7.2 billion in 2015. Moreover, the food and financial crisis together with the global economic recession pushed the number of hungry and undernourished people in the world to unprecedented levels. The substitution of animal proteins by plant proteins in food and feed is a general trend because of the lower cost and better production efficiency. Pathogens and pests can reduce the crop yields up to 30%. In some places, the losses can reach 80% due to climate conditions, proliferation of insects, and fungal diseases. All together, the harvest and postharvest losses vary from 5% to 20% and depending on the commodity can be as high as 50%. Plants have a complex chemical armory for defense composed of low and high molecular mass compounds that can act over a variety of pests and pathogens, from micro-organisms to phytophagous insects or grazing animals. Among them, plant fungitoxic and insecticidal polypeptides represent promising alternatives to increase the supply of plant-derived proteins and tackle the hunger in a global scale. PMID:23193601

  17. Insecticide discovery: an evaluation and analysis.

    PubMed

    Sparks, Thomas C

    2013-09-01

    There is an on-going need for the discovery and development of new insecticides due to the loss of existing products through the development of resistance, the desire for products with more favorable environmental and toxicological profiles, shifting pest spectrums, and changing agricultural practices. Since 1960, the number of research-based companies in the US and Europe involved in the discovery of new insecticidal chemistries has been declining. In part this is a reflection of the increasing costs of the discovery and development of new pesticides. Likewise, the number of compounds that need to be screened for every product developed has, until recently, been climbing. In the past two decades the agrochemical industry has been able to develop a range of new products that have more favorable mammalian vs. insect selectivity. This review provides an analysis of the time required for the discovery, or more correctly the building process, for a wide range of insecticides developed during the last 60 years. An examination of the data around the time requirements for the discovery of products based on external patents, prior internal products, or entirely new chemistry provides some unexpected observations. In light of the increasing costs of discovery and development, coupled with fewer companies willing or able to make the investment, insecticide resistance management takes on greater importance as a means to preserve existing and new insecticides. PMID:25149229

  18. Meeting on insecticide-impregnated materials.

    PubMed

    1996-06-01

    Malaria causes considerable morbidity and mortality in Africa, killing 1.5-2.7 million people on the continent annually. A meeting on insecticide-impregnated materials was held at the World Health Organization (WHO) Regional Office for Africa (AFRO) during March 18-20, 1996, to promote the use of insecticide-impregnated materials by communities in Africa, review and discuss the results of recently conducted studies in the Africa Region on the use of insecticide-treated nets (ITNs) in malaria control, examine the best ways of implementing the wide-scale use of insecticide-impregnated materials under differing epidemiological and socioeconomic conditions, discuss major operational research priorities, and make recommendations for the promotion and wide use of insecticide-impregnated materials by malaria control programs and communities. The meeting was jointly organized by the WHO Division of Control of Tropical Diseases (CTD), the UNDP/World Bank/WHO Special Program for Research and Training in Tropical Diseases (TDR), and AFRO, and attended by experts, malaria control program managers, private sector representatives, nongovernmental organizations, and technical and scientific institutions. Conclusions and recommendations include the need to assess whether pregnant women could benefit from the use of ITNs. Elements of the successful implementation of sustained malaria control activities involving the use of ITNs are listed. Problems encountered in the large-scale implementation of ITNs in Africa should be addressed collaboratively at the regional and global levels, and coordinated by WHO.

  19. Insecticide discovery: an evaluation and analysis.

    PubMed

    Sparks, Thomas C

    2013-09-01

    There is an on-going need for the discovery and development of new insecticides due to the loss of existing products through the development of resistance, the desire for products with more favorable environmental and toxicological profiles, shifting pest spectrums, and changing agricultural practices. Since 1960, the number of research-based companies in the US and Europe involved in the discovery of new insecticidal chemistries has been declining. In part this is a reflection of the increasing costs of the discovery and development of new pesticides. Likewise, the number of compounds that need to be screened for every product developed has, until recently, been climbing. In the past two decades the agrochemical industry has been able to develop a range of new products that have more favorable mammalian vs. insect selectivity. This review provides an analysis of the time required for the discovery, or more correctly the building process, for a wide range of insecticides developed during the last 60 years. An examination of the data around the time requirements for the discovery of products based on external patents, prior internal products, or entirely new chemistry provides some unexpected observations. In light of the increasing costs of discovery and development, coupled with fewer companies willing or able to make the investment, insecticide resistance management takes on greater importance as a means to preserve existing and new insecticides.

  20. Neurobehavioral toxicology of pyrethroid insecticides

    SciTech Connect

    Crofton, K.M.

    1986-01-01

    Pyrethroid insecticides are classified as either Type I or Type II based upon in vivo toxic signs, and neurophysiological and biochemical data. Both axonal sodium channels and the ..gamma..-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptor complex have been proposed as the major site of action of the Type II pyrethroids. This investigation characterized the behavior and biochemical effects of low dosages of pyrethroids in rats. Type I and II pyrethroids were tested for effects on figure-eight maze activity and the acoustic startle response (ASR). All compounds decreased figure-eight maze activity. Interactions of Type I and II pyrethroids with the three major binding sites on the GABA complex were determined in vivo. Radioligand binding experiments assessed in vitro interactions of pyrethroids with the three major GABA-complex binding sites. None of the pyrethroids competed for (/sup 3/H)-muscimol or (/sup 3/H)-flunitrazepam binding. Only Type II pyrethroids inhibited binding of (/sup 35/S)-t-butylbicyclophosphorothionate (TBPS) in cortical synaptosome preparations with K/sub i/ values of 5 to 10 ..mu..M. The (/sup 35/S)-TBPS data implicate the TBPS/picrotoxinin binding site in the mechanism of Type II pyrethroid toxicity. The results of these experiments support the classification of pyrethroids into two classes, and demonstrate the utility of the figure-eight maze and the ASR in studies to elucidate neurotoxic mechanisms. The interaction of the Type II pyrethroids is probably restricted to the TBPS/picrotoxinin binding domain on the GABA complex as shown by both the in vivo and in vitro studies.

  1. Irrigation runoff insecticide pollution of rivers in the Imperial Valley, California (USA).

    PubMed

    de Vlaming, V; DiGiorgio, C; Fong, S; Deanovic, L A; de la Paz Carpio-Obeso, M; Miller, J L; Miller, M J; Richard, N J

    2004-11-01

    The Alamo and New Rivers located in the Imperial Valley, California receive large volumes of irrigation runoff and discharge into the ecologically sensitive Salton Sea. Between 1993 and 2002 we conducted a series of studies to assess water quality using three aquatic species: a cladoceran (Ceriodaphnia dubia), a mysid (Neomysis mercedis), and a larval fish (Pimephales promelas). Although no mortality was observed with the P. promelas, high-level toxicity to the invertebrate species was documented in samples from both rivers during many months of each year. Toxicity identifications and chemical analyses identified the organophosphorus insecticides (OP), chlorpyrifos and diazinon, as the cause of C. dubia toxicity. The extent of the C. dubia mortality was highly correlated with quantities of these OPs applied in the river watersheds. C. dubia mortality occurred during more months of our 2001/2002 study than in the 1990s investigations. During 2001/2002, the extensive C. dubia mortality observed in New River samples was caused by OP insecticide pollution that originated from Mexico. Mortality to N. mercedis in New River samples was likely caused by contaminants other than OP insecticides. Our studies document OP insecticide-caused pollution of the Alamo River over a 10-year period and provide the necessary information for remediation efforts. PMID:15312936

  2. Insecticide susceptibility of Anopheles coluzzii and Anopheles gambiae mosquitoes in Ibadan, South-West Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Okorie, Patricia N.; Ademowo, George O.; Irving, Helen; Kelly-Hope, Louise A.; Wondji, Charles S.

    2014-01-01

    The emergence of insecticide resistance in Anopheles mosquitoes has great implications for malaria control in Nigeria. This study aimed to determine the dynamics of insecticide susceptibility levels and frequency of knockdown resistance (kdr) mutations (L1014F) in wild Anopheles coluzzii Coetzee & Wilkerson sp. n. and An. gambiae Giles ( (Diptera: Culicidae) from Ojoo and Bodija areas of Ibadan, South-West, Nigeria. Insecticide susceptibility to pyrethroids, organophosphates, carbamates and organochlorines was assessed using WHO bioassays. A subset of the mosquitoes exposed to pyrethroids and DDT was used for species and molecular form identification and kdr genotyping was determined using the Taqman real time PCR assay. The mosquitoes were resistant to pyrethroids and DDT but completely susceptible to organophosphates and carbamates. Bodja samples (n=186) comprised of An. gambiae (91.4%) and An. coluzzii (8.1%) while one An. coluzzii / An. gambiae hybrid was recorded. All mosquitoes screened in Ojoo (n=26) were An. gambiae. The 1014F kdr mutation was detected at a frequency of 24.52% and 5.8% in Bodija and Ojoo respectively. No correlation was observed between kdr genotypes and resistance phenotypes. The results indicate that metabolic resistance probably plays an important role in the resistance and highlights the need to implement insecticide resistance management strategies. PMID:25417803

  3. Pyrethroid Activity-Based Probes for Profiling Cytochrome P450 Activities Associated with Insecticide Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Ismail, Hanafy M.; O'Neill, Paul M.; Hong, David; Finn, Robert; Henderson, Colin; Wright, Aaron T.; Cravatt, Benjamin; Hemingway, Janet; Paine, Mark J.

    2014-01-18

    Pyrethroid insecticides are used to control a diverse spectrum of diseases spread by arthropods. We have developed a suite of pyrethroid mimetic activity based probes (PyABPs) to selectively label and identify P450s associated with pyrethroid metabolism. The probes were screened against pyrethroid metabolizing and non-metabolizing mosquito P450s, as well as rodent microsomes to measure labeling specificity, plus CPR and b5 knockout mouse livers to validate P450 activation and establish the role for b5 in probe activation. Using a deltamethrin mimetic PyABP we were able to profile active enzymes in rat liver microsomes and identify pyrethroid metabolizing enzymes in the target tissue. The most reactive enzyme was a P450, CYP2C11, which is known to metabolize deltamethrin. Furthermore, several other pyrethroid metabolizers were identified (CYPs 2C6, 3A4, 2C13 and 2D1) along with related detoxification enzymes, notably UDP-g’s 2B1 - 5, suggesting a network of associated pyrethroid metabolizing enzymes, or ‘pyrethrome’. Considering the central role that P450s play in metabolizing insecticides, we anticipate that PyABPs will aid the identification and profiling of P450s associated with insecticide pharmacology in a wide range of species, improving understanding of P450-insecticide interactions and aiding the development of new tools for disease control.

  4. Insecticide susceptibility of three species of cutworm (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) pests of grapes.

    PubMed

    Smirle, Michael J; Zurowski, Cheryl L; Lowery, D Thomas; Mostafa, Ayman M

    2013-10-01

    Climbing cutworms in the genus Abagrotis are economically important pests of grapes in the Okanagan Valley of British Columbia (BC). Grapes are recently introduced into many areas of the region, and the association between crop and pest is new and still evolving. This has led to limited information being available on pest management strategies, including the evaluation of chemical controls compatible with local production practices. Few insecticides are currently registered in Canada for cutworm control on grapes, and our study was initiated to provide information on the efficacy of potential control materials. We were also interested in the relative susceptibilities of the three most common cutworm species attacking grape buds in BC--Abagrotis orbis (Grote), Abagrotis reedi Buckett, and Abagrotis nefascia (Smith). Dose-response bioassays with nine insecticides were conducted on neonate larvae using Bok Choy leaf disks, and on fourth-instar larvae using diet incorporation. There were considerable differences in the toxicity of insecticides within species for neonates and fourth instars. For some materials, the relative toxicity to neonates and fourth instars were not correlated. Response to insecticides among the three species showed variation as well, and correct identification of the species complex present in individual locations is important in choosing the best available control material.

  5. Insecticide susceptibility of three species of cutworm (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) pests of grapes.

    PubMed

    Smirle, Michael J; Zurowski, Cheryl L; Lowery, D Thomas; Mostafa, Ayman M

    2013-10-01

    Climbing cutworms in the genus Abagrotis are economically important pests of grapes in the Okanagan Valley of British Columbia (BC). Grapes are recently introduced into many areas of the region, and the association between crop and pest is new and still evolving. This has led to limited information being available on pest management strategies, including the evaluation of chemical controls compatible with local production practices. Few insecticides are currently registered in Canada for cutworm control on grapes, and our study was initiated to provide information on the efficacy of potential control materials. We were also interested in the relative susceptibilities of the three most common cutworm species attacking grape buds in BC--Abagrotis orbis (Grote), Abagrotis reedi Buckett, and Abagrotis nefascia (Smith). Dose-response bioassays with nine insecticides were conducted on neonate larvae using Bok Choy leaf disks, and on fourth-instar larvae using diet incorporation. There were considerable differences in the toxicity of insecticides within species for neonates and fourth instars. For some materials, the relative toxicity to neonates and fourth instars were not correlated. Response to insecticides among the three species showed variation as well, and correct identification of the species complex present in individual locations is important in choosing the best available control material. PMID:24224256

  6. Insecticide susceptibility of Anopheles coluzzii and Anopheles gambiae mosquitoes in Ibadan, Southwest Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Okorie, P N; Ademowo, O G; Irving, H; Kelly-Hope, L A; Wondji, C S

    2015-03-01

    The emergence of insecticide resistance in Anopheles (Diptera: Culicidae) mosquitoes has great implications for malaria control in Nigeria. This study aimed to determine the dynamics of insecticide susceptibility levels and the frequency of knock-down resistance (kdr) mutations (L1014F) in wild Anopheles coluzzii Coetzee & Wilkerson sp. n. and Anopheles gambiae Giles from the Ojoo and Bodija areas of Ibadan, in southwest Nigeria. Insecticide susceptibility to pyrethroids, organophosphates, carbamates and organochlorines was assessed using World Health Organization (WHO) bioassays. A subset of the mosquitoes exposed to pyrethroids and DDT was used for species and molecular form identification; kdr genotyping was determined using the TaqMan real-time polymerase chain reaction assay. The mosquitoes were resistant to pyrethroids and DDT but completely susceptible to organophosphates and carbamates. Bodija samples (n = 186) consisted of An. gambiae (91.4%) and An. coluzzii (8.1%) and included one An. coluzzii/An. gambiae hybrid specimen. All mosquitoes screened in Ojoo (n = 26) were An. gambiae. The 1014F kdr mutation was detected at frequencies of 24.5 and 5.8% in Bodija and Ojoo, respectively. No correlation was observed between kdr genotypes and resistance phenotypes. The results indicate that metabolic resistance probably plays an important role in the development of resistance and highlight the need to implement insecticide resistance management strategies. PMID:25417803

  7. Ecotoxicity of neonicotinoid insecticides to bees.

    PubMed

    Decourtye, Axel; Devillers, James

    2010-01-01

    This chapter reviews the available data on the toxicity of neonicotinoid insecticides to bees that are the prominent and the most economically important group of pollinators worldwide. Classical and new methods developed to take into account the characteristics and different types of effects of the neonicotinoid insecticides to bees are described. The available toxicity results are critically analyzed. Thus, the nitro-substituted compounds (clothianidin, dinotefuran, imidacloprid and its metabolites, thiamethoxam, nitenpyram) appear the most toxic to bees. The cyano-substituted neonicotinoids seem to exhibit a much lower toxicity (acetamiprid and thiacloprid). The chapter ends with suggestions for additional studies aiming at better assess the hazard of this important insecticide family to bees.

  8. Inhibition of aflatoxin production by selected insecticides.

    PubMed

    Draughon, F A; Ayres, J C

    1981-04-01

    The insecticide naled completed inhibition production of aflatoxins B1, B2, G1, and G2 by and growth of Aspergillus parasiticus at a 100-ppm (100 microgram/ml) concentration. The insecticides dichlorvos, Landrin, pyrethrum, Sevin, malathion, and Diazinon significantly (P = 0.05) inhibited production of aflatoxins at a 100-ppm concentration. However, at a concentration of 10 ppm, significant inhibition in production of aflatoxins was found only with naled, dichlorvos, Sevin, Landrin, and pyrethrum. Dichlorvos, Landrin, Sevin, and naled inhibited growth of A. parasiticus by 28.9 , 18.9, 15.7, and 100%, respectively, at 100 ppm. Stimulation of growth was observed when diazinon was added to cultures. Aflatoxin B1 was most resistant to inhibition by insecticides, followed by G1, G2, and B2, respectively. PMID:6786222

  9. Residual insecticides and the problem of sorption

    PubMed Central

    Bertagna, P.

    1959-01-01

    Whereas laboratory investigations have elucidated the mechanism of sorption of residual insecticides and demonstrated that their persistency is determined by a number of physico-chemical factors and is therefore theoretically calculable, the variables encountered in the field may produce results in apparent conflict with those theoretically expected. Attempts to enhance persistency through the prevention of sorption, although promising, have so far not been fully successful. It is consequently also necessary to assess the residual effectiveness of insecticides, “effectiveness” here being viewed as a biological effect expressed in terms of the mosquito mortality produced. For this purpose bio-assay tests have been used, but with very variable results, and it is suggested that a study of the bio-assay technique itself is needed. This should be conducted in parallel with chemical determinations of the total amount of insecticide present both on and below the sprayed surface. PMID:13799942

  10. A genetic model of the effects of insecticide-treated bed nets on the evolution of insecticide-resistance

    PubMed Central

    Birget, Philip L. G.; Koella, Jacob C.

    2015-01-01

    Background and objectives: The evolution of insecticide-resistance in malaria vectors is emerging as a serious challenge for the control of malaria. Modelling the spread of insecticide-resistance is an essential tool to understand the evolutionary pressures and dynamics caused by the application of insecticides. Methodology: We developed a population-genetic model of the spread of insecticide-resistance in a population of Anopheles vectors in response to insecticides used either as adulticides (focussing on insecticide-treated bed nets (ITNs)) or as larvicides (either for the control of malaria or, as an inadvertent side-product, in agriculture). Results: We show that indoor use of insecticides leads to considerably less selection pressure than their use as larvicides, supporting the idea that most resistance of malaria vectors is due to the agricultural use of the insecticides that are also used for malaria control. The reasons for the relatively low selection pressure posed by adulticides are (i) that males are not affected by the ITNs and, in particular, (ii) that the insecticides are also repellents, keeping mosquitoes at bay from contacting the insecticide but also driving them to bite either people who do not use the insecticide or alternative hosts. Conclusion: We conclude by discussing the opposing public health benefits of high repellency at an epidemiological and an evolutionary timescale: whereas repellency is beneficial to delay the evolution of resistance, other models have shown that it decreases the population-level protection of the insecticide. PMID:26320183

  11. Insecticide Resistance: Challenge to Pest Management and Basic Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brattsten, L. B.; Holyoke, C. W.; Leeper, J. R.; Raffa, K. F.

    1986-03-01

    The agricultural use of synthetic insecticides usually protects crops but imposes strong selection pressures that can result in the development of resistance. The most important resistance mechanisms are enhancement of the capacity to metabolically detoxify insecticides and alterations in target sites that prevent insecticides from binding to them. Insect control methods must incorporate strategies to minimize resistance development and preserve the utility of the insecticides. The most promising approach, integrated pest management, includes the use of chemical insecticides in combination with improved cultural and biologically based techniques.

  12. Insecticidal sugar baits for adult biting midges

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    One of the latest trends in mosquito control is the use of insecticidal sugar baits (ISBs) to reduce adult mosquito populations. Tested here is the ability of ISB’s to knock-down the biting midge, Culicoides sonorensis, a disease vector of bluetongue, epizootic hemorrhagic disease, and vesicular sto...

  13. The 1975 Insecticide, Herbicide, Fungicide Quick Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Page, Bill G.; Thomson, W. T.

    This is a quick guide for choosing a chemical to use to control a certain pest on a specific crop. Information in the book was obtained from manufacturers' labels and from the USDA and FDA pesticide summary. The book is divided into four parts: (1) insecticides, (2) herbicides, (3) fungicides, and (4) conversion tables. Each of the first three…

  14. Newer insecticides for plant virus disease management

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Effective management of insect and mite vectors of plant pathogens is of crucial importance to minimizing vector-borne diseases in crops. Insecticides play an important role in managing vector populations by reducing the number of individuals that can acquire and transmit a virus, thereby potentiall...

  15. DEVELOPMENTAL NEUROTOXICITY OF PYRETHROID INSECTICIDES: CRITICAL REVIEW.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pyrethroids are widely utilized insecticides whose primary action is the disruption of voltage-sensitive sodium channels (VSSC). Although these compounds have been in use for over 30 years and their acute neurotoxicity has been well characterized, there is considerably less info...

  16. In vivo and in vitro effects of the organochlorine pesticides DDT, TCPM, methoxychlor, and lindane on the female reproductive tract of mammals: a review.

    PubMed

    Tiemann, U

    2008-04-01

    The present paper summarizes the toxicological data on the effects of the organochlorine pesticides DDT, its metabolites, TCPM, methoxychlor and lindane on folliculogenesis, ovulation, fertilization, and implantation of female reproductive organs in human, laboratory, and farm animals. These compounds possess the ability to disrupt endogenous hormone synthesis, storage or metabolism. Cells of the ovary, oviduct, and uterus are susceptible to the disruptive effects of organochlorine compounds (OCCs). This review discusses that the exposure to OCC causes an impairment of (1) female fertility by altering ovarian development and function and (2) implantation by altering endometrial function through their estrogenic activity. The main focus of this review is to provide an overview on data which support that assumption that OCC can substitute for estradiol in regulating the microanatomy of the female reproductive tract. The data indicate the potential of these compounds act as endocrine disrupting agents, but in a different extent.

  17. Fate and bioavailability of ¹⁴C-pyrene and ¹⁴C-lindane in sterile natural and artificial soils and the influence of aging.

    PubMed

    Smídová, Klára; Hofman, Jakub; Ite, Aniefiok E; Semple, Kirk T

    2012-12-01

    Soil organic matter is used to extrapolate the toxicity and bioavailability of organic pollutants between different soils. However, it has been shown that other factors such as microbial activity are crucial. The aim of this study was to investigate if sterilization can reduce differences in the fate and bioavailability of organic pollutants between different soils. Three natural soils with increasing total organic carbon (TOC) content were collected and three artificial soils were prepared to obtain similar TOCs. Soils were sterilized and spiked with (14)C-pyrene and (14)C-lindane. Total (14)C radioactivity, HPCD extractability, and bioaccumulation in Eisenia fetida were measured over 56 days. When compared to non-sterile soils, differences between the natural and artificial soils and the influence of soil-contaminant contact time were generally reduced in the sterile soils (especially with middle TOC). The results indicate the possibility of using sterile soils as "the worst case scenario" in soil ecotoxicity studies.

  18. Effects of exposure to oxamyl, carbofuran, dichlorvos, and lindane on acetylcholinesterase activity in the gills of the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas.

    PubMed

    Anguiano, Gerardo A; Amador, Alejandro; Moreno-Legorreta, Manuel; Arcos-Ortega, Fabiola; Vazquez-Boucard, Celia

    2010-08-01

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity has been used to test the exposure of mollusk bivalves to pesticides and other pollutants. The Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas is a species with a worldwide distribution, and it has a high commercial value. The use of this species as a bioindicator in the marine environment, and the use of measurements of AChE activity in tissues of C. gigas require prior evaluation of organisms exposed to several toxic compounds in the laboratory. In our study, the effects of pesticides on AChE activity in the gills and mantle tissues of C. gigas were analyzed by exposing animals to organophosphate (dichlorvos), carbamate (carbofuran and oxamyl), and organochlorine (lindane) pesticides. Adult Pacific oysters were exposed to several concentrations (0.1-200 microM) of dichlorvos, carbofuran, and oxamyl for 96 h, and lindane (1.0 and 2.5 microM) was applied for 12 days. In gill tissues, all pesticides analyzed caused a decrease in AChE activity when compared to the control unexposed group. The mean inhibition concentration (IC(50)) values were determined for dichlorvos, carbofuran, and oxamyl pesticides. Dichlorvos had the highest toxic effect, with an IC(50) of 1.08 microM; lesser effects were caused by oxamyl and carbofuran, with IC(50)s of 1.67 and 3.03 microM, respectively. This study reports the effects of pesticides with several chemical structures and validates measurement of AChE activity in the gill tissues of C. gigas for use in environmental evaluations or food quality tests.

  19. Oviposition and olfaction responses of Aedes aegypti mosquitoes to insecticides.

    PubMed

    Canyon, D V; Muller, R

    2013-12-01

    Insecticide applications are not particularly effective on Aedes aegypti mosquitoes which has been attributed to their 'closet' behaviour, or ability to rest in places that remain unexposed to insecticides. Some researchers have suggested that insecticides repel mosquitoes, which would result in less exposure and increased dispersal. If repellence due to insecticides is a fact, acquiring a vector-borne disease, such as dengue, could legitimately be attributed to local vector control efforts and this would lead to restitution claims. This study thus investigated the effect of insecticide presence on mosquito behaviour indirectly via oviposition and directly via olfactory response. In all experiments, oviposition in each insecticide compared to its water and ethanol controls was not significantly different. This indicates that Ae. aegypti mosquitoes are not affected by insecticide presence and that increased dispersal is unlikely to be caused by vector control spraying.

  20. Insecticide resistance in disease vectors from Mayotte: an opportunity for integrated vector management

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Mayotte, a small island in the Indian Ocean, has been affected for many years by vector-borne diseases. Malaria, Bancroftian filariasis, dengue, chikungunya and Rift Valley fever have circulated or still circulate on the island. They are all transmitted by Culicidae mosquitoes. To limit the impact of these diseases on human health, vector control has been implemented for more than 60 years on Mayotte. In this study, we assessed the resistance levels of four major vector species (Anopheles gambiae, Culex pipiens quinquefasciatus, Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus) to two types of insecticides: i) the locally currently-used insecticides (organophosphates, pyrethroids) and ii) alternative molecules that are promising for vector control and come from different insecticide families (bacterial toxins or insect growth regulators). When some resistance was found to one of these insecticides, we characterized the mechanisms involved. Methods Larval and adult bioassays were used to evaluate the level of resistance. When resistance was found, we tested for the presence of metabolic resistance through detoxifying enzyme activity assays, or for target-site mutations through molecular identification of known resistance alleles. Results Resistance to currently-used insecticides varied greatly between the four vector species. While no resistance to any insecticides was found in the two Aedes species, bioassays confirmed multiple resistance in Cx. p. quinquefasciatus (temephos: ~ 20 fold and deltamethrin: only 10% mortality after 24 hours). In An. gambiae, resistance was scarce: only a moderate resistance to temephos was found (~5 fold). This resistance appears to be due only to carboxyl-esterase overexpression and not to target modification. Finally, and comfortingly, none of the four species showed resistance to any of the new insecticides. Conclusions The low resistance observed in Mayotte’s main disease vectors is particularly interesting, because it leaves a

  1. Insecticide resistance in Bemisia tabaci Gennadius (Homoptera: Aleyrodidae) and Anopheles gambiae Giles (Diptera: Culicidae) could compromise the sustainability of malaria vector control strategies in West Africa.

    PubMed

    Gnankiné, Olivier; Bassolé, Imael H N; Chandre, Fabrice; Glitho, Isabelle; Akogbeto, Martin; Dabiré, Roch K; Martin, Thibaud

    2013-10-01

    Insecticides from the organophosphate (OP) and pyrethroid (PY) chemical families, have respectively, been in use for 50 and 30 years in West Africa, mainly against agricultural pests, but also against vectors of human disease. The selection pressure, with practically the same molecules year after year (mainly on cotton), has caused insecticide resistance in pest populations such as Bemisia tabaci, vector of harmful phytoviruses on vegetables. The evolution toward insecticide resistance in malaria vectors such as Anopheles gambiae sensus lato (s.l.) is probably related to the current use of these insecticides in agriculture. Thus, successful pest and vector control in West Africa requires an investigation of insect susceptibility, in relation to the identification of species and sub species, such as molecular forms or biotypes. Identification of knock down resistance (kdr) and acetylcholinesterase gene (Ace1) mutations modifying insecticide targets in individual insects and measure of enzymes activity typically involved in insecticide metabolism (oxidase, esterase and glutathion-S-transferase) are indispensable in understanding the mechanisms of resistance. Insecticide resistance is a good example in which genotype-phenotype links have been made successfully. Insecticides used in agriculture continue to select new resistant populations of B. tabaci that could be from different biotype vectors of plant viruses. As well, the evolution of insecticide resistance in An. gambiae threatens the management of malaria vectors in West Africa. It raises the question of priority in the use of insecticides in health and/or agriculture, and more generally, the question of sustainability of crop protection and vector control strategies in the region. Here, we review the susceptibility tests, biochemical and molecular assays data for B. tabaci, a major pest in cotton and vegetable crops, and An. gambiae, main vector of malaria. The data reviewed was collected in Benin and Burkina

  2. Exploring the molecular basis of insecticide resistance in the dengue vector Aedes aegypti: a case study in Martinique Island (French West Indies)

    PubMed Central

    Marcombe, Sébastien; Poupardin, Rodolphe; Darriet, Frederic; Reynaud, Stéphane; Bonnet, Julien; Strode, Clare; Brengues, Cecile; Yébakima, André; Ranson, Hilary; Corbel, Vincent; David, Jean-Philippe

    2009-01-01

    Background The yellow fever mosquito Aedes aegypti is a major vector of dengue and hemorrhagic fevers, causing up to 100 million dengue infections every year. As there is still no medicine and efficient vaccine available, vector control largely based on insecticide treatments remains the only method to reduce dengue virus transmission. Unfortunately, vector control programs are facing operational challenges with mosquitoes becoming resistant to commonly used insecticides. Resistance of Ae. aegypti to chemical insecticides has been reported worldwide and the underlying molecular mechanisms, including the identification of enzymes involved in insecticide detoxification are not completely understood. Results The present paper investigates the molecular basis of insecticide resistance in a population of Ae. aegypti collected in Martinique (French West Indies). Bioassays with insecticides on adults and larvae revealed high levels of resistance to organophosphate and pyrethroid insecticides. Molecular screening for common insecticide target-site mutations showed a high frequency (71%) of the sodium channel 'knock down resistance' (kdr) mutation. Exposing mosquitoes to detoxification enzymes inhibitors prior to bioassays induced a significant increased susceptibility of mosquitoes to insecticides, revealing the presence of metabolic-based resistance mechanisms. This trend was biochemically confirmed by significant elevated activities of cytochrome P450 monooxygenases, glutathione S-transferases and carboxylesterases at both larval and adult stages. Utilization of the microarray Aedes Detox Chip containing probes for all members of detoxification and other insecticide resistance-related enzymes revealed the significant constitutive over-transcription of multiple detoxification genes at both larval and adult stages. The over-transcription of detoxification genes in the resistant strain was confirmed by using real-time quantitative RT-PCR. Conclusion These results suggest

  3. Insecticide residues on weathered passerine carcass feet

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vyas, N.B.; Spann, J.W.; Hulse, C.S.; Butterbrodt, J.J.; Mengelkoch, J.; MacDougall, K.; Williams, B.; Pendergrass, P.

    2003-01-01

    Nine brown-headed cowbirds (Molothrus ater) were exposed to turf srayed with either EarthCare? (25% diazinon; 477 L a.i./ha) or Ortho-Klor? (12 .6% chlorpyrifos; 5.21 L a.i./ha.). Birds were euthanized and one foot from each bird was weathered outdoors for up to 28 days and the other foot was kept frozen until residue analysis. When compared to the unweathered feet, feet weathered for 28 days retained 43% and 37% of the diazinon and chlorpyrifors, respectively. Insecticide residues were below the level of detection (1.0 ppm) on control feet. Weathered feet may be used for determining organophosphorus insecticide exposure to birds.

  4. Insect sodium channels and insecticide resistance

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels are essential for the generation and propagation of action potentials (i.e., electrical impulses) in excitable cells. Although most of our knowledge about sodium channels is derived from decades of studies of mammalian isoforms, research on insect sodium channels is revealing both common and unique aspects of sodium channel biology. In particular, our understanding of the molecular dynamics and pharmacology of insect sodium channels has advanced greatly in recent years, thanks to successful functional expression of insect sodium channels in Xenopus oocytes and intensive efforts to elucidate the molecular basis of insect resistance to insecticides that target sodium channels. In this review, I discuss recent literature on insect sodium channels with emphases on the prominent role of alternative splicing and RNA editing in the generation of functionally diverse sodium channels in insects and the current understanding of the interactions between insect sodium channels and insecticides. PMID:17206406

  5. Insecticide tolerance of Culex nigripalpus in Florida.

    PubMed

    Boike, A H; Rathburn, C B; Floore, T G; Rodriguez, H M; Coughlin, J S

    1989-12-01

    Larval susceptibility tests of Culex nigripalpus populations from various areas of Florida have shown resistance to several organophosphorus insecticides since 1984. Although the degree of resistance is low (2 to 7 times), it can be termed tolerance and appears to be the greatest for fenthion, followed by temephos, naled and malathion. It is suggested that pesticide runoff from lawns, golf courses and agricultural and urban areas may play a role in developing resistance in Florida mosquito populations. PMID:2614401

  6. Insecticide Resistance and Management Strategies in Urban Ecosystems

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Fang; Lavine, Laura; O’Neal, Sally; Lavine, Mark; Foss, Carrie; Walsh, Douglas

    2016-01-01

    The increased urbanization of a growing global population makes imperative the development of sustainable integrated pest management (IPM) strategies for urban pest control. This emphasizes pests that are closely associated with the health and wellbeing of humans and domesticated animals. Concurrently there are regulatory requirements enforced to minimize inadvertent exposures to insecticides in the urban environment. Development of insecticide resistance management (IRM) strategies in urban ecosystems involves understanding the status and mechanisms of insecticide resistance and reducing insecticide selection pressure by combining multiple chemical and non-chemical approaches. In this review, we will focus on the commonly used insecticides and molecular and physiological mechanisms underlying insecticide resistance in six major urban insect pests: house fly, German cockroach, mosquitoes, red flour beetle, bed bugs and head louse. We will also discuss several strategies that may prove promising for future urban IPM programs. PMID:26751480

  7. Insecticide Resistance and Management Strategies in Urban Ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Fang; Lavine, Laura; O'Neal, Sally; Lavine, Mark; Foss, Carrie; Walsh, Douglas

    2016-01-01

    The increased urbanization of a growing global population makes imperative the development of sustainable integrated pest management (IPM) strategies for urban pest control. This emphasizes pests that are closely associated with the health and wellbeing of humans and domesticated animals. Concurrently there are regulatory requirements enforced to minimize inadvertent exposures to insecticides in the urban environment. Development of insecticide resistance management (IRM) strategies in urban ecosystems involves understanding the status and mechanisms of insecticide resistance and reducing insecticide selection pressure by combining multiple chemical and non-chemical approaches. In this review, we will focus on the commonly used insecticides and molecular and physiological mechanisms underlying insecticide resistance in six major urban insect pests: house fly, German cockroach, mosquitoes, red flour beetle, bed bugs and head louse. We will also discuss several strategies that may prove promising for future urban IPM programs. PMID:26751480

  8. Spatial and Temporal Trends in Insecticide Resistance among Malaria Vectors in Chad Highlight the Importance of Continual Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Geraldine Marie; Coleman, Michael; Thomsen, Edward; Ranson, Hilary; Yangalbé-Kalnone, Elise; Moundai, Tchomfienet; Demba Kodindo, Israel; Nakebang, Amen; Mahamat, Adoum; Peka, Mallaye; Kerah-Hinzoumbé, Clement

    2016-01-01

    Background A longitudinal Anopheles gambiae s.l. insecticide resistance monitoring programme was established in four sentinel sites in Chad 2008–2010. When this programme ended, only sporadic bioassays were performed in a small number of sites. Methods WHO diagnostic dose assays were used to measure the prevalence of insecticide resistance to 0.1% bendiocarb, 4% DDT, 0.05% deltamethrin, 1% fenitrothion, and 0.75% permethrin in the main malaria vectors at the beginning and end of the malaria transmission season for three years 2008–2010, with subsequent collections in 2011 and 2014. Species and molecular identification of An. gambiae M and S forms and kdr genotyping was performed using PCR-RLFP; circumsporozoite status was assessed using ELISA. Results Between 2008 and 2010, significant changes in insecticide resistance profiles to deltamethrin and permethrin were seen in 2 of the sites. No significant changes were seen in resistance to DDT in any site during the study period. Testing performed after the period of routine monitoring had ended showed dramatic increases to DDT and pyrethroid resistance in 3 sites. No resistance to organophosphate or carbamate insecticides was detected. An. arabiensis was the predominate member of the An. gambiae complex in all 4 sites; adult collections showed temporal variation in species composition in only 1 site. Kdr analysis identified both 1014F and 1014S alleles in An. gambiae S only. Circumsporozoite analysis showed the highest vector infection rates were present in Donia, a site with extensive use of agricultural insecticides. Conclusions During the monitoring gap of four years, significant changes occurred in resistance prevalence in 3 of the 4 sites (p = <0.001), endangering the efficacy of currently implemented malaria control interventions. Significant changes in insecticide resistance profiles and a lack of kdr resistance alleles in adult populations highlight the urgent need for comprehensive entomological

  9. Isolation, Characterization, and Insecticidal Activity of an Endophyte of Drunken Horse Grass, Achnatherum inebrians

    PubMed Central

    Shi, YingWu; Zhang, Xuebing; Lou, Kai

    2013-01-01

    Endophytic microorganisms reside within plant tissues and have often been found to promote plant growth. In this study, endophytic microorganisms were isolated from the roots, stems, leaves, and seeds of healthy drunken horse grass, Achnatherum inebrians (Hance) Keng (Poales: Poaceae), through the use of a grinding separation method and identified by a dual approach of morphological and physiological observation and 16S rRNA gene-based (for bacteria) and internal transcribed sequence-based (for fungi) molecular identification. The endophytes were then inoculated into liquid media for fermentation, and their crude extracts were employed for insecticidal activity tests using slide disc immersion and nebulization methods. A total of 89 bacteria species, which were classified into eight genera, Bacillus, Pseudomonas, Actinomyces, Corynebacterium, Acinetobacter, Sphingomonas, Paenibacillus, and Phyllobacterium, and two fungi, Claviceps and Chaetomium, were isolated. Of these species, isolates Streptomyces albus (Rossi-Doria) Waksman and Henrici (Actinomycetales: Streptomycetaceae) (GA) and Claviceps purpurea (Fr.) Tul. (Hypocreales: Clavicipitaceae) (PF-2) were shown to produce mortality rates of more than 90% in the cotton aphid, Aphis gossypii Glover (Hemiptera: Aphididae), after first and second screenings. The isolates PF-2 and GA associated with A. inebrians had significant insecticidal activities towards A. gossypii Glover (Hemiptera: Aphididae) and may provide a new biological resource for exploring a new microbial insecticide. PMID:24784492

  10. Insecticides suppress natural enemies and increase pest damage in cabbage.

    PubMed

    Bommarco, Riccardo; Miranda, Freddy; Bylund, Helena; Björkman, Christer

    2011-06-01

    Intensive use of pesticides is common and increasing despite a growing and historically well documented awareness of the costs and hazards. The benefits from pesticides of increased yields from sufficient pest control may be outweighed by developed resistance in pests and killing of beneficial natural enemies. Other negative effects are human health problems and lower prices because of consumers' desire to buy organic products. Few studies have examined these trade-offs in the field. Here, we demonstrate that Nicaraguan cabbage (Brassica spp.) farmers may suffer economically by using insecticides as they get more damage by the main pest diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella (L.) (Lepidoptera: Plutellidae), at the same time as they spend economic resources on insecticides. Replicated similarly sized cabbage fields cultivated in a standardized manner were either treated with insecticides according common practice or not treated with insecticides over two seasons. Fields treated with insecticides suffered, compared with nontreated fields, equal or, at least in some periods of the seasons, higher diamondback moth pest attacks. These fields also had increased leaf damage on the harvested cabbage heads. Weight and size of the heads were not affected. The farmers received the same price on the local market irrespective of insecticide use. Rates of parasitized diamondback moth were consistently lower in the treated fields. Negative effects of using insecticides against diamondback moth were found for the density of parasitoids and generalist predatory wasps, and tended to affect spiders negatively. The observed increased leaf damages in insecticide-treated fields may be a combined consequence of insecticide resistance in the pest, and of lower predation and parasitization rates from naturally occurring predators that are suppressed by the insecticide applications. The results indicate biological control as a viable and economic alternative pest management strategy

  11. Characterization of the transcriptome of the Asian gypsy moth Lymantria dispar identifies numerous transcripts associated with insecticide resistance.

    PubMed

    Cao, ChuanWang; Sun, LiLi; Wen, RongRong; Shang, QingLi; Ma, Ling; Wang, ZhiYing

    2015-03-01

    Although the Asian gypsy moth Lymantria dispar causes extensive forest damage worldwide, little is known regarding the genes involved in its development or response to insecticides. Accordingly, characterization of the transcriptome of L. dispar larvae would promote the development of toxicological methods for its control. RNA-seq analysis of L. dispar larvae messenger RNA (mRNA) generated 62,063 unigenes with N50 of 993 bp, from which 23,975 unique sequences (E-value < 10(-5)) were identified using a BLASTx search of the NCBI non-redundant (nr) database. Using functional classification in the Gene Ontology (GO) and Clusters of Orthologous Groups (COG) databases, 7,309 indentified sequences were categorized into 51 functional groups and 8,079 sequences were categorized into 25 functional groups, respectively. Moreover, we identified a large number of transcripts encoding known insecticide targets, or proteins involved in the metabolism of insecticides. Reads per kilobase of unigene length per million mapped reads (RPKM) analysis identified 39 high abundance transcripts, of which 27 exhibited significantly altered expression patterns across the egg, larvae, pupae, male and female adult stages. Our study provides the most comprehensive transcriptomic sequence resource for L. dispar, which will form the basis for future identification of candidate insecticide resistance genes in L. dispar.

  12. Characterization of the transcriptome of the Asian gypsy moth Lymantria dispar identifies numerous transcripts associated with insecticide resistance.

    PubMed

    Cao, ChuanWang; Sun, LiLi; Wen, RongRong; Shang, QingLi; Ma, Ling; Wang, ZhiYing

    2015-03-01

    Although the Asian gypsy moth Lymantria dispar causes extensive forest damage worldwide, little is known regarding the genes involved in its development or response to insecticides. Accordingly, characterization of the transcriptome of L. dispar larvae would promote the development of toxicological methods for its control. RNA-seq analysis of L. dispar larvae messenger RNA (mRNA) generated 62,063 unigenes with N50 of 993 bp, from which 23,975 unique sequences (E-value < 10(-5)) were identified using a BLASTx search of the NCBI non-redundant (nr) database. Using functional classification in the Gene Ontology (GO) and Clusters of Orthologous Groups (COG) databases, 7,309 indentified sequences were categorized into 51 functional groups and 8,079 sequences were categorized into 25 functional groups, respectively. Moreover, we identified a large number of transcripts encoding known insecticide targets, or proteins involved in the metabolism of insecticides. Reads per kilobase of unigene length per million mapped reads (RPKM) analysis identified 39 high abundance transcripts, of which 27 exhibited significantly altered expression patterns across the egg, larvae, pupae, male and female adult stages. Our study provides the most comprehensive transcriptomic sequence resource for L. dispar, which will form the basis for future identification of candidate insecticide resistance genes in L. dispar. PMID:25868817

  13. Baculovirus Insecticide Production in Insect Larvae.

    PubMed

    van Beek, Nikolai; Davis, David C

    2016-01-01

    Baculovirus-based insecticides are currently being used worldwide, and new products are in development in many countries. The most dramatic examples of successful baculovirus insecticides are found in soybean in Brazil and cotton in China. Production of baculoviruses is generally done in larvae of a convenient host species, and the level of sophistication varies tremendously between field-collection of infected insects at the one extreme and automated mass manufacturing at the other. Currently, only products with wild type baculoviruses as active ingredients are commercially available. Baculoviruses encoding insecticidal proteins are considered attractive, especially for crops with little tolerance to feeding damage, where speed-of-kill is an important characteristic. Successful field tests with such recombinant baculoviruses have been done in the past, and more tests are ongoing. However, low-cost production of recombinant baculovirus in larvae poses specific problems, due to the short survival time of the production host.In this chapter, benchtop-scale production of two typical baculoviruses is described. First, we describe the production of wild type Helicoverpa zea nucleopolyhedrovirus in bollworm (H. zea) larvae. H. zea larvae are very aggressive and need to be reared in isolation from each other. Second, we describe the production of a recombinant Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus in the non-cannibalistic cabbage looper, Trichoplusia ni. The recombinant baculovirus encodes the insect-specific scorpion toxin LqhIT2. The tetracycline transactivator system enables the production of wild-type quantity and quality product while toxin expression is repressed since normal toxin production would result in premature death of the production host that would limit progeny virus production.

  14. Assimilation efficiency and toxicokinetics of 14C-lindane in the terrestrial isopod Porcellionides pruinosus: the role of isopods in degradation of persistent soil pollutants.

    PubMed

    Loureiro, Susana; Sousa, J P; Nogueira, A J A; Soares, A M V M

    2002-12-01

    An achievable way to evaluate the bioavailability of a certain toxic in the environment is to measure the concentration inside soil organisms. Non-target saprotrophic organisms like isopods are often exposed to agrochemicals or other kind of persistent chemicals. In this study the isopod Porcellionides pruinosus was exposed to a constant concentration of Lindane (gamma-HCH) via food. Using toxicokinetic models the bioaccumulation and fate of the pesticide by isopods was assessed and compared with previous studies, where an unexpected decrease in gamma-HCH concentration was observed. Animal body burdens showed higher values, and a lower assimilation rate constant, although the elimination rate constant was twice the value previously observed. It was also observed that a significant amount of gamma-HCH had an unknown fate. To discover its possible destiny, a factorial experiment was carried out using two types of CO2 traps and contaminated leaves in the presence and absence of isopods. It was concluded that isopod activity might have been responsible for a more rapid biotransformation of gamma-HCH in leaves, since the amount of the pesticide is reduced in their presence.

  15. Conifer flavonoid compounds inhibit detoxification enzymes and synergize insecticides.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhiling; Zhao, Zhong; Cheng, Xiaofei; Liu, Suqi; Wei, Qin; Scott, Ian M

    2016-02-01

    Detoxification by glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) and esterases are important mechanisms associated with insecticide resistance. Discovery of novel GST and esterase inhibitors from phytochemicals could provide potential new insecticide synergists. Conifer tree species contain flavonoids, such as taxifolin, that inhibit in vitro GST activity. The objectives were to test the relative effectiveness of taxifolin as an enzyme inhibitor and as an insecticide synergist in combination with the organophosphorous insecticide, Guthion (50% azinphos-methyl), and the botanical insecticide, pyrethrum, using an insecticide-resistant Colorado potato beetle (CPB) Leptinotarsa decemlineata (Say) strain. Both taxifolin and its isomer, quercetin, increased the mortality of 1(st) instar CPB larvae after 48h when combined with Guthion, but not pyrethrum. Taxifolin had greater in vitro esterase inhibition compared with the commonly used esterase inhibitor, S, S, S-tributyl phosphorotrithioate (DEF). An in vivo esterase and GST inhibition effect after ingestion of taxifolin was measured, however DEF caused a greater suppression of esterase activity. This study demonstrated that flavonoid compounds have both in vitro and in vivo esterase inhibition, which is likely responsible for the insecticide synergism observed in insecticide-resistant CPB. PMID:26821651

  16. Evaluating Coverage and Efficacy of Insecticides to Control Navel Orangeworm

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A novel method employing eggs was designed to assess insecticide coverage in pistachio clusters. Strips of paper towel with known numbers of eggs were pinned into pistachio clusters immediately before insecticide application. The eggs were removed 24-48 hours after application and placed on diet, re...

  17. Effects of organophosphorus insecticides on sage grouse in southeastern Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blus, L.J.; Staley, C.S.; Henny, C.J.; Pendleton, G.W.; Craig, T.H.; Craig, E.H.; Halford, D.K.

    1989-01-01

    Unverified reports indicated die-offs of sage grouse have occurred since the 1970s in southeastern Idaho. Some verification that organophosphorus insecticides were involved was obtained in 1981 and 1983. A radio telemetry study indicated that dimethoate was responsible for most mortality. Methamidophos also acounted for mortality. Sage grouse populations may be adversely affected by organophosphorus insecticides.

  18. Interactions of transgenic Bacillus thuringiensis insecticidal crops with spiders (Araneae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genetically modified crops expressing insecticidal proteins from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) have dramatically increased in acreage since their introduction in the mid-1990’s. Although the insecticidal mechanisms of Bt target specific pests, concerns persist regarding direct and indirect effects on...

  19. ANDROGEN RECEPTOR ANTAGONISM BY THE ORGANOPHOSPHATE INSECTICIDE FENITROTHION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Androgen receptor antagonism by the organophosphate insecticide fenitrothion. Tamura, H., Maness, S.C., Reischmann, K. Dorman, D.C., Gray, L.E., and Gaido, K.W. (2000). Toxicol. Sci.

    Organophosphate insecticides represent one of the most widely used classes of pesticide...

  20. An Operational Framework for Insecticide Resistance Management Planning.

    PubMed

    Chanda, Emmanuel; Thomsen, Edward K; Musapa, Mulenga; Kamuliwo, Mulakwa; Brogdon, William G; Norris, Douglas E; Masaninga, Freddie; Wirtz, Robert; Sikaala, Chadwick H; Muleba, Mbanga; Craig, Allen; Govere, John M; Ranson, Hilary; Hemingway, Janet; Seyoum, Aklilu; Macdonald, Michael B; Coleman, Michael

    2016-05-01

    Arthropod vectors transmit organisms that cause many emerging and reemerging diseases, and their control is reliant mainly on the use of chemical insecticides. Only a few classes of insecticides are available for public health use, and the increased spread of insecticide resistance is a major threat to sustainable disease control. The primary strategy for mitigating the detrimental effects of insecticide resistance is the development of an insecticide resistance management plan. However, few examples exist to show how to implement such plans programmatically. We describe the formulation and implementation of a resistance management plan for mosquito vectors of human disease in Zambia. We also discuss challenges, steps taken to address the challenges, and directions for the future. PMID:27089119

  1. Averting a malaria disaster: will insecticide resistance derail malaria control?

    PubMed

    Hemingway, Janet; Ranson, Hilary; Magill, Alan; Kolaczinski, Jan; Fornadel, Christen; Gimnig, John; Coetzee, Maureen; Simard, Frederic; Roch, Dabiré K; Hinzoumbe, Clément Kerah; Pickett, John; Schellenberg, David; Gething, Peter; Hoppé, Mark; Hamon, Nicholas

    2016-04-23

    World Malaria Day 2015 highlighted the progress made in the development of new methods of prevention (vaccines and insecticides) and treatment (single dose drugs) of the disease. However, increasing drug and insecticide resistance threatens the successes made with existing methods. Insecticide resistance has decreased the efficacy of the most commonly used insecticide class of pyrethroids. This decreased efficacy has increased mosquito survival, which is a prelude to rising incidence of malaria and fatalities. Despite intensive research efforts, new insecticides will not reach the market for at least 5 years. Elimination of malaria is not possible without effective mosquito control. Therefore, to combat the threat of resistance, key stakeholders need to rapidly embrace a multifaceted approach including a reduction in the cost of bringing new resistance management methods to market and the streamlining of associated development, policy, and implementation pathways to counter this looming public health catastrophe. PMID:26880124

  2. Production of Insecticide Degradates in Juices: Implications for Risk Assessment.

    PubMed

    Radford, Samantha A; Panuwet, Parinya; Hunter, Ronald E; Barr, Dana Boyd; Ryan, P Barry

    2016-06-01

    This study was designed to observe the production of degradates of two organophosphorus insecticides and one pyrethroid insecticide in beverages. Purified water, white grape juice, apple juice, and red grape juice were fortified with 500 ng/g malathion, chlorpyrifos, and permethrin, and aliquots were extracted for malathion dicarboxylic acid (MDA), 3,5,6-trichloro-2-pyridinol (TCPy), and 3-phenoxybenzoic acid (3-PBA) several times over a 15 day period of being stored in the dark at 2.5 °C. Overall, first-order kinetics were observed for production of MDA, and statistically significant production of TCPy was also observed. Statistically significant production of 3-phenoxybenzoic acid was not observed. Results indicate that insecticides degrade in food and beverages, and this degradation may lead to preexisting insecticide metabolites in the beverages. Therefore, it is suggested that caution should be exercised when using urinary insecticide metabolites to assess exposure and risk. PMID:27213611

  3. An Operational Framework for Insecticide Resistance Management Planning

    PubMed Central

    Chanda, Emmanuel; Thomsen, Edward K.; Musapa, Mulenga; Kamuliwo, Mulakwa; Brogdon, William G.; Norris, Douglas E.; Masaninga, Freddie; Wirtz, Robert; Sikaala, Chadwick H.; Muleba, Mbanga; Craig, Allen; Govere, John M.; Ranson, Hilary; Hemingway, Janet; Seyoum, Aklilu; Macdonald, Michael B.

    2016-01-01

    Arthropod vectors transmit organisms that cause many emerging and reemerging diseases, and their control is reliant mainly on the use of chemical insecticides. Only a few classes of insecticides are available for public health use, and the increased spread of insecticide resistance is a major threat to sustainable disease control. The primary strategy for mitigating the detrimental effects of insecticide resistance is the development of an insecticide resistance management plan. However, few examples exist to show how to implement such plans programmatically. We describe the formulation and implementation of a resistance management plan for mosquito vectors of human disease in Zambia. We also discuss challenges, steps taken to address the challenges, and directions for the future. PMID:27089119

  4. Botanical insecticides inspired by plant-herbivore chemical interactions.

    PubMed

    Miresmailli, Saber; Isman, Murray B

    2014-01-01

    Plants have evolved a plethora of secondary chemicals to protect themselves against herbivores and pathogens, some of which have been used historically for pest management. The extraction methods used by industry render many phytochemicals ineffective as insecticides despite their bioactivity in the natural context. In this review, we examine how plants use their secondary chemicals in nature and compare this with how they are used as insecticides to understand why the efficacy of botanical insecticides can be so variable. If the commercial production of botanical insecticides is to become a viable pest management option, factors such as production cost, resource availability, and extraction and formulation techniques need be considered alongside innovative application technologies to ensure consistent efficacy of botanical insecticides.

  5. Ecotoxicological study of insecticide effects on arthropods in common bean.

    PubMed

    de Barros, Emerson Cristi; Ventura, Hudson Vaner; Gontijo, Pablo Costa; Pereira, Renata Ramos; Picanço, Marcelo Coutinho

    2015-01-01

    Arthropods are an important group of macroorganisms that work to maintain ecosystem health. Despite the agricultural benefits of chemical control against arthropod pests, insecticides can cause environmental damage. We examined the effects of one and two applications of the insecticides chlorfenapyr (0.18 liters a.i. ha-1) and methamidophos (0.45 liters a.i. ha-1), both independently and in combination, on arthropods in plots of common bean. The experiment was repeated for two growing seasons. Principal response curve, richness estimator, and Shannon-Wiener diversity index analyses were performed. The insecticides generally affected the frequency, richness, diversity, and relative abundance of the arthropods. In addition, the arthropods did not experience recovery after the insecticide applications. The results suggest that the insecticide impacts were sufficiently drastic to eliminate many taxa from the studied common bean plots.

  6. An Operational Framework for Insecticide Resistance Management Planning.

    PubMed

    Chanda, Emmanuel; Thomsen, Edward K; Musapa, Mulenga; Kamuliwo, Mulakwa; Brogdon, William G; Norris, Douglas E; Masaninga, Freddie; Wirtz, Robert; Sikaala, Chadwick H; Muleba, Mbanga; Craig, Allen; Govere, John M; Ranson, Hilary; Hemingway, Janet; Seyoum, Aklilu; Macdonald, Michael B; Coleman, Michael

    2016-05-01

    Arthropod vectors transmit organisms that cause many emerging and reemerging diseases, and their control is reliant mainly on the use of chemical insecticides. Only a few classes of insecticides are available for public health use, and the increased spread of insecticide resistance is a major threat to sustainable disease control. The primary strategy for mitigating the detrimental effects of insecticide resistance is the development of an insecticide resistance management plan. However, few examples exist to show how to implement such plans programmatically. We describe the formulation and implementation of a resistance management plan for mosquito vectors of human disease in Zambia. We also discuss challenges, steps taken to address the challenges, and directions for the future.

  7. Insecticide resistance in the horn fly: alternative control strategies.

    PubMed

    Oyarzún, M P; Quiroz, A; Birkett, M A

    2008-09-01

    The horn fly, Haematobia irritans (Linnaeus 1758) (Diptera: Muscidae) is one of the most widespread and economically important pests of cattle. Although insecticides have been used for fly control, success has been limited because of the development of insecticide resistance in all countries where the horn fly is found. This problem, along with public pressure for insecticide-free food and the prohibitive cost of developing new classes of compounds, has driven the investigation of alternative control methods that minimize or avoid the use of insecticides. This review provides details of the economic impact of horn flies, existing insecticides used for horn fly control and resistance mechanisms. Current research on new methods of horn fly control based on resistant cattle selection, semiochemicals, biological control and vaccines is also discussed.

  8. Ecotoxicological Study of Insecticide Effects on Arthropods in Common Bean

    PubMed Central

    de Barros, Emerson Cristi; Ventura, Hudson Vaner; Gontijo, Pablo Costa; Pereira, Renata Ramos; Picanço, Marcelo Coutinho

    2015-01-01

    Arthropods are an important group of macroorganisms that work to maintain ecosystem health. Despite the agricultural benefits of chemical control against arthropod pests, insecticides can cause environmental damage. We examined the effects of one and two applications of the insecticides chlorfenapyr (0.18 liters a.i. ha-1) and methamidophos (0.45 liters a.i. ha-1), both independently and in combination, on arthropods in plots of common bean. The experiment was repeated for two growing seasons. Principal response curve, richness estimator, and Shannon–Wiener diversity index analyses were performed. The insecticides generally affected the frequency, richness, diversity, and relative abundance of the arthropods. In addition, the arthropods did not experience recovery after the insecticide applications. The results suggest that the insecticide impacts were sufficiently drastic to eliminate many taxa from the studied common bean plots. PMID:25700537

  9. Insecticidal sesquiterpene from Alpinia oxyphylla against Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Miyazawa, M; Nakamura, Y; Ishikawa, Y

    2000-08-01

    In the course of screening for novel naturally occurring insecticides from Chinese crude drugs, an MeOH extract of Alpinia oxyphylla was found to possess insecticidal activity against larvae of Drosophila melanogaster Meigen. From the extract, an insecticidal compound was isolated by bioassay-guided fractionation and identified as nootkatone (1) by GC, GC-MS, and (1)H and (13)C NMR spectroscopy. In bioassays for insecticidal activity, 1 showed an LC(50) value of 11.5 micromol/mL of diet against larvae of D. melanogaster and an LD(50) value of 96 microg/adult against adults. Epinootkatol (1A), however, showed slight insecticidal activity in both assays, indicating that the carbonyl group at the 2-position in 1 was the important function for enhanced activity of 1. PMID:10956162

  10. Averting a malaria disaster: will insecticide resistance derail malaria control?

    PubMed

    Hemingway, Janet; Ranson, Hilary; Magill, Alan; Kolaczinski, Jan; Fornadel, Christen; Gimnig, John; Coetzee, Maureen; Simard, Frederic; Roch, Dabiré K; Hinzoumbe, Clément Kerah; Pickett, John; Schellenberg, David; Gething, Peter; Hoppé, Mark; Hamon, Nicholas

    2016-04-23

    World Malaria Day 2015 highlighted the progress made in the development of new methods of prevention (vaccines and insecticides) and treatment (single dose drugs) of the disease. However, increasing drug and insecticide resistance threatens the successes made with existing methods. Insecticide resistance has decreased the efficacy of the most commonly used insecticide class of pyrethroids. This decreased efficacy has increased mosquito survival, which is a prelude to rising incidence of malaria and fatalities. Despite intensive research efforts, new insecticides will not reach the market for at least 5 years. Elimination of malaria is not possible without effective mosquito control. Therefore, to combat the threat of resistance, key stakeholders need to rapidly embrace a multifaceted approach including a reduction in the cost of bringing new resistance management methods to market and the streamlining of associated development, policy, and implementation pathways to counter this looming public health catastrophe.

  11. Can nutrients mask community responses to insecticide mixtures?

    PubMed

    Alexander, Alexa C; Luis, Ana T; Culp, Joseph M; Baird, Donald J; Cessna, Allan J

    2013-09-01

    The ecological effect of simultaneous exposure to two nutrient gradients, three insecticides and different predator intensities was investigated over a 3-week period in 80 outdoor, artificial streams using field-collected benthic invertebrates. The experimental design consisted of a 2 × 5 factorial structure with two nutrient levels (oligotrophic or mesotrophic) and five concentrations of the ternary insecticide mixture consisting of the insecticides (chlorpyrifos, dimethoate and imidacloprid). Equivalent toxic unit doses were summed to create a ternary insecticide dose (e.g., 0.1 + 0.1 + 0.1 = 0.3 TU) resulting in a range of ternary insecticide mixture toxicity (i.e., control groundwater, 0.3, 0.6, 0.9 and 1.2 TU). Two genera of insect predators, Gomphus spp. (Odonata) and Agnetina spp. (Plecoptera) were also added into each replicate stream, at densities and sizes comparable to those found at our collection site, to evaluate how the contribution of predators may change in nutrient limited (oligotrophic) versus amended (mesotrophic) systems. We describe a causal mechanism whereby the combined action of nutrients and insecticides reshaped aquatic community structure by interacting through multiple pathways. Specifically, mesotrophic conditions reduced the toxic effects of ternary insecticide mixtures for aquatic insects which, in some cases, appeared to increase abundance of aquatic insects. However, higher levels of insecticides in mesotrophic streams negated this effect and were even more toxic; for example, to aquatic insect grazers than the same insecticide doses in oligotrophic treatment levels. Effects of predators were only significant in oligotrophic streams. Evidence is provided as to how nutrient and contaminant interactions can greatly complicate the assessment of community level responses to insecticide mixtures due to direct and indirect effects of the resulting changes in the density of different genera and functional feeding groups within a

  12. Risks of neonicotinoid insecticides to honeybees.

    PubMed

    Fairbrother, Anne; Purdy, John; Anderson, Troy; Fell, Richard

    2014-04-01

    The European honeybee, Apis mellifera, is an important pollinator of agricultural crops. Since 2006, when unexpectedly high colony losses were first reported, articles have proliferated in the popular press suggesting a range of possible causes and raising alarm over the general decline of bees. Suggested causes include pesticides, genetically modified crops, habitat fragmentation, and introduced diseases and parasites. Scientists have concluded that multiple factors in various combinations-including mites, fungi, viruses, and pesticides, as well as other factors such as reduction in forage, poor nutrition, and queen failure-are the most probable cause of elevated colony loss rates. Investigators and regulators continue to focus on the possible role that insecticides, particularly the neonicotinoids, may play in honeybee health. Neonicotinoid insecticides are insect neurotoxicants with desirable features such as broad-spectrum activity, low application rates, low mammalian toxicity, upward systemic movement in plants, and versatile application methods. Their distribution throughout the plant, including pollen, nectar, and guttation fluids, poses particular concern for exposure to pollinators. The authors describe how neonicotinoids interact with the nervous system of honeybees and affect individual honeybees in laboratory situations. Because honeybees are social insects, colony effects in semifield and field studies are discussed. The authors conclude with a review of current and proposed guidance in the United States and Europe for assessing the risks of pesticides to honeybees. PMID:24692231

  13. Risks of neonicotinoid insecticides to honeybees

    PubMed Central

    Fairbrother, Anne; Purdy, John; Anderson, Troy; Fell, Richard

    2014-01-01

    The European honeybee, Apis mellifera, is an important pollinator of agricultural crops. Since 2006, when unexpectedly high colony losses were first reported, articles have proliferated in the popular press suggesting a range of possible causes and raising alarm over the general decline of bees. Suggested causes include pesticides, genetically modified crops, habitat fragmentation, and introduced diseases and parasites. Scientists have concluded that multiple factors in various combinations—including mites, fungi, viruses, and pesticides, as well as other factors such as reduction in forage, poor nutrition, and queen failure—are the most probable cause of elevated colony loss rates. Investigators and regulators continue to focus on the possible role that insecticides, particularly the neonicotinoids, may play in honeybee health. Neonicotinoid insecticides are insect neurotoxicants with desirable features such as broad-spectrum activity, low application rates, low mammalian toxicity, upward systemic movement in plants, and versatile application methods. Their distribution throughout the plant, including pollen, nectar, and guttation fluids, poses particular concern for exposure to pollinators. The authors describe how neonicotinoids interact with the nervous system of honeybees and affect individual honeybees in laboratory situations. Because honeybees are social insects, colony effects in semifield and field studies are discussed. The authors conclude with a review of current and proposed guidance in the United States and Europe for assessing the risks of pesticides to honeybees. PMID:24692231

  14. Risks of neonicotinoid insecticides to honeybees.

    PubMed

    Fairbrother, Anne; Purdy, John; Anderson, Troy; Fell, Richard

    2014-04-01

    The European honeybee, Apis mellifera, is an important pollinator of agricultural crops. Since 2006, when unexpectedly high colony losses were first reported, articles have proliferated in the popular press suggesting a range of possible causes and raising alarm over the general decline of bees. Suggested causes include pesticides, genetically modified crops, habitat fragmentation, and introduced diseases and parasites. Scientists have concluded that multiple factors in various combinations-including mites, fungi, viruses, and pesticides, as well as other factors such as reduction in forage, poor nutrition, and queen failure-are the most probable cause of elevated colony loss rates. Investigators and regulators continue to focus on the possible role that insecticides, particularly the neonicotinoids, may play in honeybee health. Neonicotinoid insecticides are insect neurotoxicants with desirable features such as broad-spectrum activity, low application rates, low mammalian toxicity, upward systemic movement in plants, and versatile application methods. Their distribution throughout the plant, including pollen, nectar, and guttation fluids, poses particular concern for exposure to pollinators. The authors describe how neonicotinoids interact with the nervous system of honeybees and affect individual honeybees in laboratory situations. Because honeybees are social insects, colony effects in semifield and field studies are discussed. The authors conclude with a review of current and proposed guidance in the United States and Europe for assessing the risks of pesticides to honeybees.

  15. Effects of spiracle-blocking insecticides and microbial insecticides on the predator mirid bug, Nesidiocoris tenuis (reuter) (heteroptera: miridae).

    PubMed

    Nakaishi, K; Arakawa, R

    2011-11-01

    Spiracle-blocking insecticides and microbial insecticides are widely used for Integrated Pest Management (IPM) in Japan while Nesidiocoris tenuis is used for the control of thrips and whiteflies in Kochi Prefecture, Japan. However, the effects of the insecticides mentioned above on N. tenuis were unclear. This study investigated the effects of five spiracle-blocking insecticides and two microbial insecticides on the nymphs and adults ofN. tenuis. Propylene glycol fatty acid monoester was slightly harmful to both the nymphs and adults. Hydroxypropyl starch was slightly harmful to the nymphs, while sodium oleate was slightly harmful to the adults. Decanoyloctanoylglycerol and hydrogenated starch hydrolysate were not harmful to either the nymphs or adults. Beauveria bassiana was extremely harmful to the adults and was moderately harmful to the nymphs. Lecanicillium muscarium was slightly harmful to the adults. Therefore, decanoyloctanoylglycerol and hydrogenated starch hydrolysate can be used in combination with N. tenuis to establish an IPM program.

  16. Susceptibility of Cimex lectularius (Hemiptera: Cimicidae) to pyrethroid insecticides and to insecticidal dusts with or without pyrethroid insecticides.

    PubMed

    Anderson, John F; Cowles, Richard S

    2012-10-01

    Relative increases of bed bug, Cimex lectularius L., populations are probably due in large measure to their resistance to pyrethroids, which have been used extensively against urban pests. A Connecticut population of bed bugs was assessed for sensitivity to pyrethroids and exposed to commonly-used commercial insecticides applied to various substrates on which the residues were allowed to age for 0-24 wk. Type I and type II pyrethroids differed in toxicity when applied at a high dosage (1 microg) per bed bug. Some type II pyrethroids (cyfluthrin, lambda-cyhalothrin, cis-cypermethrin, and deltamethrin) caused > 80% mortality, whereas exposure to type I pyrethroids caused < 5% mortality over 72 h (with one exception, pyrethrins caused 23% mortality). Dust products were not affected by residue aging; mortality response over time of exposure closely fit (R2 > 0.95) an exponential rise to a maximum model from which the survival half-life (S1/2) was calculated directly. Tempo Dust (Bayer Environmental Science, Montvale, NJ) killed bed bugs relatively quickly, as did Syloid 244 (Grace Davison, Columbia, MD) and Drione (Bayer Environmental Science, Montvale, NJ) on hardboard and mattress fabric substrates (S1/2 < 1 d); DeltaDust (Bayer Environmental Science, Montvale, NJ) provided a relatively slow kill (S1/2 approximately equal to 3.5 d). The sprayable pyrethroids, Cyonara 9.7 (Insecticide Control solutions, Pasadena, TX) and D-Force HPX Aerosol 0.06% (Waterbury Companies, Waterbury, CT), displayed reduced residual toxicity as they aged; the mortality was < 50% on some substrates after 4 d. Desiccant dusts, with their physical mode of action and long residual activity, appear to be superior to sprayable pyrethroid products for killing bed bugs.

  17. How to make evolution-proof insecticides for malaria control.

    PubMed

    Read, Andrew F; Lynch, Penelope A; Thomas, Matthew B

    2009-04-01

    Insecticides are one of the cheapest, most effective, and best proven methods of controlling malaria, but mosquitoes can rapidly evolve resistance. Such evolution, first seen in the 1950s in areas of widespread DDT use, is a major challenge because attempts to comprehensively control and even eliminate malaria rely heavily on indoor house spraying and insecticide-treated bed nets. Current strategies for dealing with resistance evolution are expensive and open ended, and their sustainability has yet to be demonstrated. Here we show that if insecticides targeted old mosquitoes, and ideally old malaria-infected mosquitoes, they could provide effective malaria control while only weakly selecting for resistance. This alone would greatly enhance the useful life span of an insecticide. However,such weak selection for resistance can easily be overwhelmed if resistance is associated with fitness costs. In that case, late-life-acting insecticides would never be undermined by mosquito evolution.We discuss a number of practical ways to achieve this, including different use of existing chemical insecticides,biopesticides, and novel chemistry. Done right, a one-off investment in a single insecticide would solve the problem of mosquito resistance forever.

  18. Simulating cholinesterase inhibition in birds caused by dietary insecticide exposure

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Corson, M.S.; Mora, M.A.; Grant, W.E.

    1998-01-01

    We describe a stochastic simulation model that simulates avian foraging in an agricultural landscape to evaluate factors affecting dietary insecticide exposure and to predict post-exposure cholinesterase (ChE) inhibition. To evaluate the model, we simulated published field studies and found that model predictions of insecticide decay and ChE inhibition reasonably approximated most observed results. Sensitivity analysis suggested that foraging location usually influenced ChE inhibition more than diet preferences or daily intake rate. Although organophosphorus insecticides usually caused greater inhibition than carbamate insecticides, insecticide toxicity appeared only moderately important. When we simulated impact of heavy insecticide applications during breeding seasons of 15 wild bird species, mean maximum ChE inhibition in most species exceeded 20% at some point. At this level of inhibition, birds may experience nausea and/or may exhibit minor behavioral changes. Simulated risk peaked in April-May and August-September and was lowest in July. ChE inhibition increased with proportion of vegetation in the diet. This model, and ones like it, may help predict insecticide exposure of and sublethal ChE inhibition in grassland animals, thereby reducing dependence of ecological risk assessments on field studies alone.

  19. Insecticides induced biochemical changes in freshwater microalga Chlamydomonas mexicana.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Muthukannan Satheesh; Kabra, Akhil N; Min, Booki; El-Dalatony, Marwa M; Xiong, Jiuqiang; Thajuddin, Nooruddin; Lee, Dae Sung; Jeon, Byong-Hun

    2016-01-01

    The effect of insecticides (acephate and imidacloprid) on a freshwater microalga Chlamydomonas mexicana was investigated with respect to photosynthetic pigments, carbohydrate and protein contents, fatty acids composition and induction of stress indicators including proline, superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT). C. mexicana was cultivated with 1, 5, 10, 15, 20 and 25 mg L(-1) of acephate and imidacloprid. The microalga growth increased with increasing concentrations of both insecticides up to 15 mg L(-1), beyond which the growth declined compared to control condition (without insecticides). C. mexicana cultivated with 15 mg L(-1) of both insecticides for 12 days was used for further analysis. The accumulation of photosynthetic pigments (chlorophyll and carotenoids), carbohydrates and protein was decreased in the presence of both insecticides. Acephate and imidacloprid induced the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) and increased the concentration of proline in the microalga, which play a defensive role against various environmental stresses. Fatty acid analysis revealed that the fraction of polyunsaturated fatty acids decreased on exposure to both insecticides. C. mexicana also promoted 25 and 21% removal of acephate and imidacloprid, respectively. The biochemical changes in C. mexicana on exposure to acephate and imidacloprid indicate that the microalga undergoes an adaptive change in response to the insecticide-induced oxidative stress.

  20. Time-of-day specific changes in metabolic detoxification and insecticide resistance in the malaria mosquito Anopheles gambiae.

    PubMed

    Balmert, Nathaniel J; Rund, Samuel S C; Ghazi, John P; Zhou, Peng; Duffield, Giles E

    2014-05-01

    Mosquitoes exhibit ∼24 h rhythms in physiology and behavior, regulated by the cooperative action of an endogenous circadian clock and the environmental light:dark cycle. Here, we characterize diel (observed under light:dark conditions) time-of-day changes in metabolic detoxification and resistance to insecticide challenge in Anopheles gambiae mosquitoes. A better understanding of mosquito chronobiology will yield insights into developing novel control strategies for this important disease vector. We have previously identified >2000 rhythmically expressed An. gambiae genes. These include metabolic detoxification enzymes peaking at various times throughout the day. Especially interesting was the identification of rhythmic genes encoding enzymes capable of pyrethroid and/or DDT metabolism (CYP6M2, CYP6P3, CYP6Z1, and GSTE2). We hypothesized that these temporal changes in gene expression would confer time-of-day specific changes in metabolic detoxification and responses to insecticide challenge. An. gambiae mosquitoes (adult female Pimperena and Mali-NIH strains) were tested by gene expression analysis for diel rhythms in key genes associated with insecticidal resistance. Biochemical assays for total GST, esterase, and oxidase enzymatic activities were undertaken on time-specific mosquito head and body protein lysates. To determine for rhythmic susceptibility to insecticides by survivorship, mosquitoes were exposed to DDT or deltamethrin across the diel cycle. We report the occurrence of temporal changes in GST activity in samples extracted from the body and head with a single peak at late-night to dawn, but no rhythms were detected in oxidase or esterase activity. The Pimperena strain was found to be resistant to insecticidal challenge, and subsequent genomic analysis revealed the presence of the resistance-conferring kdr mutation. We observed diel rhythmicity in key insecticide detoxification genes in the Mali-NIH strain, with peak phases as previously reported in

  1. Quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) for insecticides: development of predictive in vivo insecticide activity models.

    PubMed

    Naik, P K; Singh, T; Singh, H

    2009-07-01

    Quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) analyses were performed independently on data sets belonging to two groups of insecticides, namely the organophosphates and carbamates. Several types of descriptors including topological, spatial, thermodynamic, information content, lead likeness and E-state indices were used to derive quantitative relationships between insecticide activities and structural properties of chemicals. A systematic search approach based on missing value, zero value, simple correlation and multi-collinearity tests as well as the use of a genetic algorithm allowed the optimal selection of the descriptors used to generate the models. The QSAR models developed for both organophosphate and carbamate groups revealed good predictability with r(2) values of 0.949 and 0.838 as well as [image omitted] values of 0.890 and 0.765, respectively. In addition, a linear correlation was observed between the predicted and experimental LD(50) values for the test set data with r(2) of 0.871 and 0.788 for both the organophosphate and carbamate groups, indicating that the prediction accuracy of the QSAR models was acceptable. The models were also tested successfully from external validation criteria. QSAR models developed in this study should help further design of novel potent insecticides.

  2. Induced tolerance from a sublethal insecticide leads to cross-tolerance to other insecticides.

    PubMed

    Hua, Jessica; Jones, Devin K; Relyea, Rick A

    2014-04-01

    As global pesticide use increases, the ability to rapidly respond to pesticides by increasing tolerance has important implications for the persistence of nontarget organisms. A recent study of larval amphibians discovered that increased tolerance can be induced by an early exposure to low concentrations of a pesticide. Since natural systems are often exposed to a variety of pesticides that vary in mode of action, we need to know whether the induction of increased tolerance to one pesticide confers increased tolerance to other pesticides. Using larval wood frogs (Lithobates sylvaticus), we investigated whether induction of increased tolerance to the insecticide carbaryl (AChE-inhibitor) can induce increased tolerance to other insecticides that have the same mode of action (chlorpyrifos, malathion) or a different mode of action (Na(+)channel-interfering insecticides; permethrin, cypermethrin). We found that embryonic exposure to sublethal concentrations of carbaryl induced higher tolerance to carbaryl and increased cross-tolerance to malathion and cypermethrin but not to chlorpyrifos or permethrin. In one case, the embryonic exposure to carbaryl induced tolerance in a nonlinear pattern (hormesis). These results demonstrate that that the newly discovered phenomenon of induced tolerance also provides induced cross-tolerance that is not restricted to pesticides with the same mode of action.

  3. Surveying biotransformations with à la carte genetic traps: translating dehydrochlorination of lindane (gamma-hexachlorocyclohexane) into lacZ-based phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Mohn, William W; Garmendia, Junkal; Galvao, Teca C; de Lorenzo, Víctor

    2006-03-01

    The ability of the product of a desired reaction to activate a bacterial transcriptional regulator was exploited to develop genetic traps that render the catalytic activity born by a DNA clone into a selectable/scorable phenotype. We established this strategy with a system to expose the activity of dehydrochlorinases acting upon gamma-hexachlorocyclohexane (gamma-HCH or lindane). To this end, the effector-binding protein, XylR, was evolved by gene shuffling plus mutagenic polymerase chain reaction to be optimally responsive to the major product of gamma-HCH dehydrochlorination, 1,2,4-trichlorobenzene (TCB). We then derived Escherichia coli strains that constitutively expressed the modified XylR variant (named XylR5) and had lacZ under control of the Pu promoter, which is activated by XylR. A robotic beta-galactosidase assay indicated that when the resulting strain was transformed with a linA+ clone (expressing a gamma-HCH dehydrochlorinase from Sphingomonas paucimobilis UT26), it had levels of beta-galactosidase that were dependent on the gamma-HCH concentration. This à la carte host thus translated the conversion of gamma-HCH to TCB into upregulation of lacZ. An alternate host additionally expressing LacY grew efficiently on lactose only when LacZ was upregulated in a fashion dependent on TCB or other effectors of XylR5. These results demonstrated the power of deriving a host for the genetic scrutiny, rather than enzymatic screening, of clones expressing a given catabolic enzyme. PMID:16478460

  4. Plasmatic concentration of organochlorine lindane acts as metabolic disruptors in HepG2 liver cell line by inducing mitochondrial disorder

    SciTech Connect

    Benarbia, Mohammed el Amine; Macherel, David; Faure, Sébastien; Jacques, Caroline; Andriantsitohaina, Ramaroson; Malthièry, Yves

    2013-10-15

    Lindane (LD) is a persistent environmental pollutant that has been the subject of several toxicological studies. However, concentrations used in most of the reported studies were relatively higher than those found in the blood of the contaminated area residents and effects of low concentrations remain poorly investigated. Moreover, effects on cell metabolism and mitochondrial function of exposure to LD have received little attention. This study was designed to explore the effects of low concentrations of LD on cellular metabolism and mitochondrial function, using the hepatocarcinoma cell line HepG2. Cells were exposed to LD for 24, 48 and 72 h and different parameters linked with mitochondrial regulation and energy metabolism were analyzed. Despite having any impact on cellular viability, exposure to LD at plasmatic concentrations led to an increase of maximal respiratory capacity, complex I activity, intracellular ATP and NO release but decreased uncoupled respiration to ATP synthesis and medium lactate levels. In addition, LD exposure resulted in the upregulation of mitochondrial biogenesis genes. We suggest that, at plasmatic concentrations, LD acts as a metabolic disruptor through impaired mitochondrial function and regulation with an impact on cellular energetic metabolism. In addition, we propose that a cellular assay based on the analysis of mitochondria function, such as described here for LD, may be applicable for larger studies on the effects of low concentrations of xenobiotics, because of the exquisite sensitivity of this organelle. - Highlights: Our data clearly demonstrated in HepG2 cells that exposure at plasmatic low concentrations of LD were able to: • Impair mitochondrial function • Caused alteration on nucleo-mitochondrial cross-talk • Increase nitric oxide release and protein nitration • Impair cellular energetic metabolism and lipid accumulation.

  5. Resistance to insecticides in Heliothine Lepidoptera: a global view

    PubMed Central

    McCaffery, A. R.

    1998-01-01

    The status of resistance to organophosphate, carbamate, cyclodiene and pyrethroid insecticides in the heliothine Lepidoptera is reviewed. In particular, resistance in the tobacco budworm, Heliothis virescens, and the corn earworm, Helicoverpa zea, from the New World, and the cotton bollworm, Helicoverpa armigera, from the Old World, are considered in detail. Particular emphasis has been placed on resistance to the most widely used of these insecticide groups, the pyrethroids. In each case, the incidence and current status of resistance are considered before a detailed view of the mechanisms of resistance is given. Controversial issues regarding the nature of mechanisms of resistance to pyrethroid insecticides are discussed. The implications for resistance management are considered.

  6. Present status of biochemical research on the insecticide resistance problem*

    PubMed Central

    Agosin, Moises

    1963-01-01

    In order to provide a rational basis for the development of new insecticides, a thorough understanding of resistance mechanisms is necessary and this presupposes a detailed knowledge of the normal biochemical pathways in insects. The author reviews recent progress in this field, particularly the work on enzymatic detoxication of insecticides which appears to be the most important single factor in the production of resistance. The mechanisms include dehydrochlorination and α-methylenic oxidation (DDT), hydrolysis by phosphatases or carboxyesterases (organophosphorus compounds), and oxidation by microsomal enzyme systems (various classes of insecticides). Much work still needs to be done on the enzyme systems involved, especially in relation to substrate specificity and the effect of enzyme inhibitors that might act as synergists of insecticides. PMID:20604178

  7. Insect P450 inhibitors and insecticides: challenges and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Feyereisen, René

    2015-06-01

    P450 enzymes are encoded by a large number of genes in insects, often over a hundred. They play important roles in insecticide metabolism and resistance, and growing numbers of P450 enzymes are now known to catalyse important physiological reactions, such as hormone metabolism or cuticular hydrocarbon synthesis. Ways to inhibit P450 enzymes specifically or less specifically are well understood, as P450 inhibitors are found as drugs, as fungicides, as plant growth regulators and as insecticide synergists. Yet there are no P450 inhibitors as insecticides on the market. As new modes of action are constantly needed to support insecticide resistance management, P450 inhibitors should be considered because of their high potential for insect selectivity, their well-known mechanisms of action and the increasing ease of rational design and testing.

  8. Accidental organophosphate insecticide intoxication in children: a reminder

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Misuse of organophosphate insecticides, even in case of domestic application, can be life threatening. We report the case of siblings admitted with respiratory distress, pinpoint pupils and slurred speech. The symptoms appear after spraying the skin by insecticides. Plasma pseudocholinesterase level appeared to be very low, consistent with acute intoxication with organophosphate insecticide. Management of organophosphate poisoning consists of airway management, administration of oxygen and fluid, as well as atropine in increasing doses and pralidoxime. Decontamination of the patient's skin and the removal of the patient's clothes are mandatory in order to avoid recontamination of the patient as well as the surrounding healthcare personnel. Plasma pseudocholinesterase analysis is a cheap and an easy indicator for organophosphate insecticides intoxications and could be used for diagnosis and treatment monitoring. PMID:21676238

  9. USING ARRAY TECHNOLOGY TO IDENTIFY POTENTIAL BIOMARKERS FOR PYRETHROID INSECTICIDES.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pyrethroid insecticides affect nervous system function by disruption of sodium channels in nerve membranes. FQPA requirements for assessing cumulative risk have increased the need for rapid and sensitive biomarkers of effect. This project aims to develop biochemical markers of n...

  10. Mechanism of Insect Resistance to the Microbial Insecticide Bacillus thuringiensis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Rie, J.; McGaughey, W. H.; Johnson, D. E.; Barnett, B. D.; van Mellaert, H.

    1990-01-01

    Receptor binding studies show that resistance of a laboratory-selected Plodia interpunctella strain to a Bacillus thuringiensis insecticidal crystal protein (ICP) is correlated with a 50-fold reduction in affinity of the membrane receptor for this protein. The strain is sensitive to a second type of ICP that apparently recognizes a different receptor. Understanding the mechanism of resistance will provide strategies to prevent or delay resistance and hence prolong the usefulness of B. thuringiensis ICPs as environmentally safe insecticides.

  11. Comparative toxicities of organophosphate and pyrethroid insecticides to aquatic macroarthropods.

    PubMed

    Halstead, Neal T; Civitello, David J; Rohr, Jason R

    2015-09-01

    As agricultural expansion and intensification increase to meet the growing global food demand, so too will insecticide use and thus the risk of non-target effects. Insecticide pollution poses a particular threat to aquatic macroarthropods, which play important functional roles in freshwater ecosystems. Thus, understanding the relative toxicities of insecticides to non-target functional groups is critical for predicting effects on ecosystem functions. We exposed two common macroarthropod predators, the crayfish Procambarus alleni and the water bug Belostoma flumineum, to three insecticides in each of two insecticide classes (three organophosphates: chlorpyrifos, malathion, and terbufos; and three pyrethroids: esfenvalerate, λ-cyhalothrin, and permethrin) to assess their toxicities. We generated 150 simulated environmental exposures using the US EPA Surface Water Contamination Calculator to determine the proportion of estimated peak environmental concentrations (EECs) that exceeded the US EPA level of concern (0.5×LC50) for non-endangered aquatic invertebrates. Organophosphate insecticides generated consistently low-risk exposure scenarios (EECs<0.5×LC50) for both P. alleni and B. flumineum. Pyrethroid exposure scenarios presented consistently high risk (EECs>0.5×LC50) to P. alleni, but not to B. flumineum, where only λ-cyhalothrin produced consistently high-risk exposures. Survival analyses demonstrated that insecticide class accounted for 55.7% and 91.1% of explained variance in P. alleni and B. flumineum survival, respectively. Thus, risk to non-target organisms is well predicted by pesticide class. Identifying insecticides that pose low risk to aquatic macroarthropods might help meet increased demands for food while mitigating against potential negative effects on ecosystem functions.

  12. Comparative toxicities of organophosphate and pyrethroid insecticides to aquatic macroarthropods.

    PubMed

    Halstead, Neal T; Civitello, David J; Rohr, Jason R

    2015-09-01

    As agricultural expansion and intensification increase to meet the growing global food demand, so too will insecticide use and thus the risk of non-target effects. Insecticide pollution poses a particular threat to aquatic macroarthropods, which play important functional roles in freshwater ecosystems. Thus, understanding the relative toxicities of insecticides to non-target functional groups is critical for predicting effects on ecosystem functions. We exposed two common macroarthropod predators, the crayfish Procambarus alleni and the water bug Belostoma flumineum, to three insecticides in each of two insecticide classes (three organophosphates: chlorpyrifos, malathion, and terbufos; and three pyrethroids: esfenvalerate, λ-cyhalothrin, and permethrin) to assess their toxicities. We generated 150 simulated environmental exposures using the US EPA Surface Water Contamination Calculator to determine the proportion of estimated peak environmental concentrations (EECs) that exceeded the US EPA level of concern (0.5×LC50) for non-endangered aquatic invertebrates. Organophosphate insecticides generated consistently low-risk exposure scenarios (EECs<0.5×LC50) for both P. alleni and B. flumineum. Pyrethroid exposure scenarios presented consistently high risk (EECs>0.5×LC50) to P. alleni, but not to B. flumineum, where only λ-cyhalothrin produced consistently high-risk exposures. Survival analyses demonstrated that insecticide class accounted for 55.7% and 91.1% of explained variance in P. alleni and B. flumineum survival, respectively. Thus, risk to non-target organisms is well predicted by pesticide class. Identifying insecticides that pose low risk to aquatic macroarthropods might help meet increased demands for food while mitigating against potential negative effects on ecosystem functions. PMID:25966044

  13. Assessing the fate and effects of an insecticidal formulation.

    PubMed

    de Perre, Chloé; Williard, Karl W J; Schoonover, Jon E; Young, Bryan G; Murphy, Tracye M; Lydy, Michael J

    2015-01-01

    A 3-yr study was conducted on a corn field in central Illinois, USA, to understand the fate and effects of an insecticidal formulation containing the active ingredients phostebupirim and cyfluthrin. The objectives were to determine the best tillage practice (conventional vs conservation tillage) in terms of grain yields and potential environmental risk, to assess insecticidal exposure using concentrations measured in soil and runoff water and sediments, to compare measured insecticidal concentrations with predicted concentrations from selected risk assessment exposure models, and to calculate toxicity benchmarks from laboratory bioassays performed on reference aquatic and terrestrial nontarget organisms, using individual active ingredients and the formulation. Corn grain yields were not significantly different based on tillage treatment. Similarly, field concentrations of insecticides were not significantly (p > 0.05) different in strip tillage versus conventional tillage, suggesting that neither of the tillage systems would enable greater environmental risk from the insecticidal formulation. Risk quotients were calculated from field concentrations and toxicity data to determine potential risk to nontarget species. The insecticidal formulation used at the recommended rate resulted in soil, sediment, and water concentrations that were potentially harmful to aquatic and terrestrial invertebrates, if exposure occurred, with risk quotients up to 34. PMID:25331413

  14. Impact of some selected insecticides application on soil microbial respiration.

    PubMed

    Latif, M A; Razzaque, M A; Rahman, M M

    2008-08-15

    The aim of present study was to investigate the impact of selected insecticides used for controlling brinjal shoot and fruit borer on soil microorganisms and to find out the insecticides or nontoxic to soil microorganism the impact of nine selected insecticides on soil microbial respiration was studied in the laboratory. After injection of different insecticides solutions, the soil was incubated in the laboratory at room temperature for 32 days. The amount of CO2 evolved due to soil microbial respiration was determined at 2, 4, 8, 16, 24 and 32 days of incubation. Flubendiamide, nimbicidine, lambda-cyhalothrin, abamectin and thiodicarb had stimulatory effect on microbial respiration during the initial period of incubation. Chlorpyriphos, cartap and carbosulfan had inhibitory effect on microbial respiration and cypermethrin had no remarkable effect during the early stage of incubation. The negative effect of chlorpyriphos, cartap and carbosulfan was temporary, which was disappeared after 4 days of insecticides application. No effect of the selected insecticides on soil microorganisms was observed after 24 or 32 days of incubation. PMID:19266909

  15. Design, synthesis and insecticidal evaluation of aryloxy dihalopropene derivatives.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ji-Chun; Li, Miao; Wu, Qiao; Liu, Chang-Ling; Chang, Xiu-Hui

    2016-02-01

    Plutella xylostella (P. xylostella) is a highly migratory, cosmopolitan species and one of the most important pest of cruciferous crops worldwide. Pyridalyl as a novel class of insecticides has good efficacy against P. xylostella. On the basis of the commercial insecticide pyridalyl, a series of new aryloxy dihalopropene derivatives were designed and synthesized by using Intermediate Derivatization Methods. Their chemical structures were confirmed by (1)H NMR, high-resolution mass spectrum (HRMS), and single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. The insecticidal activities of the new compounds against P. xylostella were evaluated. The results of bioassays indicated that most of the compounds showed moderate to high activities at the tested concentration, especially compounds 10e and 10g displayed more than 75% insecticidal activity against P. xylostella at 6.25mg/L, while pyridalyl showed 50% insecticidal activity at the same concentration. The field trials result of the insecticidal activities showed that compound 10e as a 10% emulsifiable concentrate (EC) was effective in the control of P. xylostella at 75-150g a.i./ha, and the mortality of P. xylostella for treatment with compound 10e at 75g a.i./ha was equivalent to pyridalyl at 105g a.i./ha. PMID:26432606

  16. Australian funnel-web spiders: master insecticide chemists.

    PubMed

    Tedford, Hugo W; Sollod, Brianna L; Maggio, Francesco; King, Glenn F

    2004-04-01

    Arthropods are the most diverse animal group on the planet. Their ability to inhabit a vast array of ecological niches has inevitably brought them into conflict with humans. Although only a small minority are classified as pest species, they nevertheless destroy about a quarter of the world's annual crop production and transmit an impressive array of pathogens of human and veterinary public health importance. Arthropod pests have been controlled almost exclusively with chemical insecticides since the introduction of DDT in the 1940s. However, the evolution of resistance to many insecticides, coupled with increased awareness of the potential environmental and human and animal health impacts of these chemicals, has stimulated the search for new insecticidal compounds, novel molecular targets, and alternative control methods. Spider venoms are complex chemical cocktails that have evolved to kill or paralyze arthropod prey, and they represent a largely untapped reservoir of insecticidal compounds. This review focuses on several families of invertebrate-specific peptide neurotoxins that were isolated from the venom of Australian funnel-web spiders. These peptides are promising insecticide leads because of their selectivity for invertebrates and activity on previously unvalidated targets. These toxins should facilitate the development of novel target-based screens for new insecticide leads, while their mapped pharmacophores will provide templates for rational design of mimetics that act at these target sites. Furthermore, genes encoding these toxins can be used to improve the efficacy of insect-specific viruses.

  17. Determination of chlorinated insecticides in blood samples of agricultural workers.

    PubMed

    Rosell, M G; Obiols, J; Berenguer, M J; Guardino, X; López, F; Brosa, J

    1993-11-26

    Lindane, aldrin and p,p'-DDT were determined in blood samples from 71 farmers by means of an analytical method which combines a direct whole-blood extraction with n-hexane and gas chromatography (GC)-electron-capture detection (ECD), using a capillary column, applied to the organic extract. This technique allowed the determination of pesticides at levels varying from 0.1 to 180 micrograms per l of blood, the detection limit for every pesticide being 0.1 microgram/l. GC-mass spectrometry was used to confirm the identity of each pesticide. The advantage of capillary column GC-ECD for pesticide determination is its sensitivity and high resolution, which makes it possible to separate pesticides from a complex n-hexane extract obtained in a very simple pretreatment of the blood sample, which is itself a very complex matrix.

  18. Sublethal and transgenerational effects of insecticides in developing Trichogramma galloi (Hymenoptera: Trichogrammatidae) : toxicity of insecticides to Trichogramma galloi.

    PubMed

    Costa, Mariana Abreu; Moscardini, Valéria Fonseca; da Costa Gontijo, Pablo; Carvalho, Geraldo Andrade; de Oliveira, Rodrigo Lopes; de Oliveira, Harley Nonato

    2014-10-01

    This study assessed the transgenerational effects of insecticides in developing Trichogramma galloi (Hymenoptera: Trichogrammatidae). Laboratory bioassays were performed in which five insecticides were sprayed on egg-larval, pre-pupal and pupal stages of the parasitoid. The interaction between insecticides and development stages of the parasitoid was not significant for the rate of F0 emergence. All insecticides significantly reduced the emergence of wasps, with the lowest emergence observed when they were applied to the pupal stage. For the sex ratio, only spinosad applied to the pre-pupal stage and triflumuron applied on the egg-larval and pre-pupal stages did not differ from the controls. Triflumuron applied to pre-pupae did not lead to any difference in the parasitism rate of the treated generation (F0) when compared to the control. There were no significant differences among survival curves for females of F0 when all insecticides were sprayed on the egg-larval stage. Both concentrations of lambda-cyhalothrin + thiamethoxam reduced female pre-pupal survival, and all treatments reduced female pupal survival. In addition, we observed a transgenerational effect of the insecticides on emergence and sex ratio of next generation (F1). Lambda-cyhalothrin + thiamethoxam (Min) applied to the pre-pupae and pupae, the maximum rate of the same insecticides applied to the egg-larvae and pre-pupae, and spinosad applied to pre-pupae all significantly reduced the adults emergence of T. galloi F1 generation. Only triflumuron did not alter the F1 sex ratio. These bioassays provide a basis for better understanding the effects of insecticide use on beneficial parasitoids.

  19. Male Mosquitoes as Vehicles for Insecticide

    PubMed Central

    Mains, James W.; Brelsfoard, Corey L.; Dobson, Stephen L.

    2015-01-01

    Background The auto-dissemination approach has been shown effective at treating cryptic refugia that remain unaffected by existing mosquito control methods. This approach relies on adult mosquito behavior to spread larvicide to breeding sites at levels that are lethal to immature mosquitoes. Prior studies demonstrate that ‘dissemination stations,’ deployed in mosquito-infested areas, can contaminate adult mosquitoes, which subsequently deliver the larvicide to breeding sites. In some situations, however, preventative measures are needed, e.g., to mitigate seasonal population increases. Here we examine a novel approach that combines elements of autocidal and auto-dissemination strategies by releasing artificially reared, male mosquitoes that are contaminated with an insecticide. Methodology Laboratory and field experiments examine for model-predicted impacts of pyriproxyfen (PPF) directly applied to adult male Aedes albopictus, including (1) the ability of PPF-treated males to cross-contaminate females and to (2) deliver PPF to breeding sites. Principal Findings Similar survivorship was observed in comparisons of PPF-treated and untreated males. Males contaminated both female adults and oviposition containers in field cage tests, at levels that eliminated immature survivorship. Field trials demonstrate an ability of PPF-treated males to transmit lethal doses to introduced oviposition containers, both in the presence and absence of indigenous females. A decline in the Ae. albopictus population was observed following the introduction of PPF-treated males, which was not observed in two untreated field sites. Conclusions/Significance The results demonstrate that, in cage and open field trials, adult male Ae. albopictus can tolerate PPF and contaminate, either directly or indirectly, adult females and immature breeding sites. The results support additional development of the proposed approach, in which male mosquitoes act as vehicles for insecticide delivery

  20. Insecticide Mixtures Could Enhance the Toxicity of Insecticides in a Resistant Dairy Population of Musca domestica L

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Hafiz Azhar Ali; Akram, Waseem; Shad, Sarfraz Ali; Lee, Jong-Jin

    2013-01-01

    House flies, Musca domestica L., are important pests of dairy operations worldwide, with the ability to adapt wide range of environmental conditions. There are a number of insecticides used for their management, but development of resistance is a serious problem. Insecticide mixtures could enhance the toxicity of insecticides in resistant insect pests, thus resulting as a potential resistance management tool. The toxicity of bifenthrin, cypermethrin, deltamethrin, chlorpyrifos, profenofos, emamectin benzoate and fipronil were assessed separately, and in mixtures against house flies. A field-collected population was significantly resistant to all the insecticides under investigation when compared with a laboratory susceptible strain. Most of the insecticide mixtures like one pyrethroid with other compounds evaluated under two conditions (1∶1-“A” and LC50: LC50-“B”) significantly increased the toxicity of pyrethroids in the field population. Under both conditions, the combination indices of pyrethroids with other compounds, in most of the cases, were significantly below 1, suggesting synergism. The enzyme inhibitors, PBO and DEF, when used in combination with insecticides against the resistant population, toxicities of bifenthrin, cypermethrin, deltamethrin and emamectin were significantly increased, suggesting esterase and monooxygenase based resistance mechanism. The toxicities of bifenthrin, cypermethrin and deltamethrin in the resistant population of house flies could be enhanced by the combination with chlorpyrifos, profenofos, emamectin and fipronil. The findings of the present study might have practical significance for resistance management in house flies. PMID:23613758

  1. Turning cigarette butt waste into an alternative control tool against an insecticide-resistant mosquito vector.

    PubMed

    Dieng, Hamady; Rajasaygar, Sudha; Ahmad, Abu Hassan; Ahmad, Hamdan; Rawi, Che Salmah Md; Zuharah, Wan Fatma; Satho, Tomomitsu; Miake, Fumio; Fukumitsu, Yuki; Saad, Ahmad Ramli; Ghani, Idris Abd; Vargas, Ronald Enrique Morales; Majid, Abdul Hafiz Ab; Abubakar, Sazaly

    2013-12-01

    Annually, 4.5 trillion cigarette butts (CBs) are flicked into our environment. Evidence exists that CB waste is deadly to aquatic life, but their lethality to the aquatic life of the main dengue vector is unknown. CBs are full of toxicants that occur naturally, during planting and manufacturing, which may act as larvicidal agents. We assessed Aedes aegypti vulnerability to Marlboro butts during its development. Overall, CBs showed insecticidal activities against larvae. At early phases of development, mortality rates were much higher in two CBs solution (2CBSol) and 3CBSol microcosms (MICRs). Larval survival gradually decreased with development in 1CBSol-MICRs. However, in great presence of CBs, mortality was high even for the late developmental stages. These results suggest that A. aegypti larvae are vulnerable to CB presence in their habitats, but this effect was seen most during the early developmental phases and in the presence of increased amounts of cigarette remnants. CB filters are being used as raw material in many sectors, i.e., brick, art, fashion, plastic industries, as a practical solution to the pollution problem, the observed butt waste toxicity to mosquito larvae open new avenues for the identification of novel insecticide products. PMID:23999373

  2. Gene duplication in the major insecticide target site, Rdl, in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Remnant, Emily J.; Good, Robert T.; Schmidt, Joshua M.; Lumb, Christopher; Robin, Charles; Daborn, Phillip J.; Batterham, Philip

    2013-01-01

    The Resistance to Dieldrin gene, Rdl, encodes a GABA-gated chloride channel subunit that is targeted by cyclodiene and phenylpyrazole insecticides. The gene was first characterized in Drosophila melanogaster by genetic mapping of resistance to the cyclodiene dieldrin. The 4,000-fold resistance observed was due to a single amino acid replacement, Ala301 to Ser. The equivalent change was subsequently identified in Rdl orthologs of a large range of resistant insect species. Here, we report identification of a duplication at the Rdl locus in D. melanogaster. The 113-kb duplication contains one WT copy of Rdl and a second copy with two point mutations: an Ala301 to Ser resistance mutation and Met360 to Ile replacement. Individuals with this duplication exhibit intermediate dieldrin resistance compared with single copy Ser301 homozygotes, reduced temperature sensitivity, and altered RNA editing associated with the resistant allele. Ectopic recombination between Roo transposable elements is involved in generating this genomic rearrangement. The duplication phenotypes were confirmed by construction of a transgenic, artificial duplication integrating the 55.7-kb Rdl locus with a Ser301 change into an Ala301 background. Gene duplications can contribute significantly to the evolution of insecticide resistance, most commonly by increasing the amount of gene product produced. Here however, duplication of the Rdl target site creates permanent heterozygosity, providing unique potential for adaptive mutations to accrue in one copy, without abolishing the endogenous role of an essential gene. PMID:23959864

  3. Turning cigarette butt waste into an alternative control tool against an insecticide-resistant mosquito vector.

    PubMed

    Dieng, Hamady; Rajasaygar, Sudha; Ahmad, Abu Hassan; Ahmad, Hamdan; Rawi, Che Salmah Md; Zuharah, Wan Fatma; Satho, Tomomitsu; Miake, Fumio; Fukumitsu, Yuki; Saad, Ahmad Ramli; Ghani, Idris Abd; Vargas, Ronald Enrique Morales; Majid, Abdul Hafiz Ab; Abubakar, Sazaly

    2013-12-01

    Annually, 4.5 trillion cigarette butts (CBs) are flicked into our environment. Evidence exists that CB waste is deadly to aquatic life, but their lethality to the aquatic life of the main dengue vector is unknown. CBs are full of toxicants that occur naturally, during planting and manufacturing, which may act as larvicidal agents. We assessed Aedes aegypti vulnerability to Marlboro butts during its development. Overall, CBs showed insecticidal activities against larvae. At early phases of development, mortality rates were much higher in two CBs solution (2CBSol) and 3CBSol microcosms (MICRs). Larval survival gradually decreased with development in 1CBSol-MICRs. However, in great presence of CBs, mortality was high even for the late developmental stages. These results suggest that A. aegypti larvae are vulnerable to CB presence in their habitats, but this effect was seen most during the early developmental phases and in the presence of increased amounts of cigarette remnants. CB filters are being used as raw material in many sectors, i.e., brick, art, fashion, plastic industries, as a practical solution to the pollution problem, the observed butt waste toxicity to mosquito larvae open new avenues for the identification of novel insecticide products.

  4. Tolerance to the carbamate insecticide propoxur.

    PubMed

    Costa, L G; Hand, H; Schwab, B W; Murphy, S D

    1981-01-01

    Male mice were given the carbamate insecticide propoxur (2-isopropoxy phenyl methylcarbamate; Baygon) in the drinking water at weekly increasing concentrations (from 50 to 2000 ppm), for a period of 6 weeks. At the end of the treatment the LD50 for propoxur was significantly higher in the treated animals as compared with controls. Propoxur-treated animals were also resistant to the hypothermic effect of an acute administration of the same compound. Groups of mice were challenged with the cholinergic agonist carbachol at intervals during the drinking water dosing and at its end. No differences in sensitivity to carbachol acute toxicity were found between control and treated animals. Propoxur-tolerant animals were also not resistant to the hypothermic effect of oxotremorine, another cholinergic agonist. [3H]Quinuclidinyl benzilate ([3H]QNB) binding (a measure of muscarinic receptor density and affinity) in forebrain, hindbrain and ileum never differed in control and treated mice. The possibility that repeated administrations of propoxur induced increased metabolic inactivation was tested by measuring hexobarbital sleeping time and carboxylesterase activity in treated and control mice. No changes in tissue carboxylesterase activities occurred but hexobarbital sleeping time was significantly reduced in propoxur treated animals suggesting an induction of hepatic microsomal enzymes. These results suggest that tolerance to propoxur is not mediated by a decrease of cholinergic receptors, as reported for other acetylcholinesterase inhibitors, but possibly by an enhancement of its metabolism.

  5. Federal chemist reports on insecticide dangers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    DeWitt, J.B.

    1957-01-01

    There's been much discussion, and considerable argument, in recent years regarding the effects of crop dusting on game populations. In an attempt to get some of the answers, the U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service has been conducting a series of experiments, using captive quail? and pheasants.....By. feeding. specified amounts??of various insecticides, they found how 'much it would take to kill outright all test birds, how much to produce partIal kill, and how much would have relatively little effect. An interesting result? of the experiments was the proof that even non-fatal doses would stunt growth and reduce egg fertility, and that birds were unable to reproduce at all after two generations of exposure to these poisons....Of the cheriricals tested, aldrin and endrin were the most poisonous to the birds. If aldrin were applied at the rate of one pound per acre, each square? foot of ground would have enough poison? to kill two adult quail or 20 two-week-old birds.

  6. Mutagenic and cytotoxic activities of benfuracarb insecticide.

    PubMed

    Eren, Yasin; Erdoğmuş, Sevim Feyza; Akyıl, Dilek; Özkara, Arzu

    2016-08-01

    Benfuracarb is a carbamate insecticide used to control insect pests in vegetables and it has anti-acetylcholinesterase activity lower than other carbamates. Cytotoxic effects of benfuracarb were evaluated by using root growth inhibition (EC50), mitotic index (MI), and mitotic phase determinations on the root meristem cells of Allium cepa and mutagenic effects were determined in Salmonella typhymurium Ames test by TA98 and TA100 strains with and without metabolic activation. In Allium test, 1 % DMSO was used as negative control group and 10 ppm MMS was used as positive control group. 75 ppm concentration of benfuracarb was found as EC50. In MI and mitotic phases determination study, 37.5, 75 and 150 ppm doses of benfuracarb were used. Dose-dependent cytotoxic activity was found by root growth inhibition and MI studies. It was identified that mitotic inhibition activity of benfuracarb was higher than 10 ppm MMS. In Ames test, mutagenic activity was not observed and over 200 µg/plate of benfuracarb was determined as cytotoxic to S. typhymurium strains. Benfuracarb can be called as "mitotic inhibitor" but not called as mutagen. PMID:25381170

  7. Insecticidal crystal proteins of Bacillus thuringiensis.

    PubMed Central

    Höfte, H; Whiteley, H R

    1989-01-01

    A classification for crystal protein genes of Bacillus thuringiensis is presented. Criteria used are the insecticidal spectra and the amino acid sequences of the encoded proteins. Fourteen genes are distinguished, encoding proteins active against either Lepidoptera (cryI), Lepidoptera and Diptera (cryII), Coleoptera (cryIII), or Diptera (cryIV). One gene, cytA, encodes a general cytolytic protein and shows no structural similarities with the other genes. Toxicity studies with single purified proteins demonstrated that every described crystal protein is characterized by a highly specific, and sometimes very restricted, insect host spectrum. Comparison of the deduced amino acid sequences reveals sequence elements which are conserved for Cry proteins. The expression of crystal protein genes is affected by a number of factors. Recently, two distinct sigma subunits regulating transcription during different stages of sporulation have been identified, as well as a protein regulating the expression of a crystal protein at a posttranslational level. Studies on the biochemical mechanisms of toxicity suggest that B. thuringiensis crystal proteins induce the formation of pores in membranes of susceptible cells. In vitro binding studies with radiolabeled toxins demonstrated a strong correlation between the specificity of B. thuringiensis toxins and the interaction with specific binding sites on the insect midgut epithelium. The expression of B. thuringiensis crystal proteins in plant-associated microorganisms and in transgenic plants has been reported. These approaches are potentially powerful strategies for the protection of agriculturally important crops against insect damage. Images PMID:2666844

  8. Intensive care management of organophosphate insecticide poisoning

    PubMed Central

    Sungur, Murat; Güven, Muhammed

    2001-01-01

    Introduction Organophosphate (OP) insecticides inhibit both cholinesterase and pseudo-cholinesterase activities. The inhibition of acetylcholinesterase causes accumulation of acetylcholine at synapses, and overstimulation of neurotransmission occurs as a result of this accumulation. The mortality rate of OP poisoning is high. Early diagnosis and appropriate treatment is often life saving. Treatment of OP poisoning consists of intravenous atropine and oximes. The clinical course of OP poisoning may be quite severe and may need intensive care management. We report our experience with the intensive care management of serious OP insecticide poisonings. Methods A retrospective study was performed on the patients with OP poisoning followed at our medical intensive care unit. Forty-seven patients were included. Diagnosis was performed from the history taken either from the patient or from the patient's relatives about the agent involved in the exposure. Diagnosis could not be confirmed with serum and red blood cell anticholinesterase levels because these are not performed at our institution. Intravenous atropine and pralidoxime was administered as soon as possible. Pralidoxime could not be given to 16 patients: 2 patients did not receive pralidoxime because they were late admissions and 14 did not receive pralidoxime because the Ministry of Health office was out of stock. Other measures for the treatment were gastric lavage and administration of activated charcoal via nasogastric tube, and cleansing the patient's body with soap and water. The patients were intubated and mechanically ventilated if the patients had respiratory failure, a depressed level of consciousness, which causes an inability to protect the airway, and hemodynamic instability. Mechanical ventilation was performed as synchronized intermittent mandatory ventilation + pressure support mode, either as volume or pressure control. Positive end expiratory pressure was titrated to keep SaO2 above 94% with 40

  9. Azobenzene Modified Imidacloprid Derivatives as Photoswitchable Insecticides: Steering Molecular Activity in a Controllable Manner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zhiping; Shi, Lina; Jiang, Danping; Cheng, Jiagao; Shao, Xusheng; Li, Zhong

    2015-10-01

    Incorporating the photoisomerizable azobenzene into imidacloprid produced a photoswitchable insecticidal molecule as the first neonicotinoid example of remote control insecticide performance with spatiotemporal resolution. The designed photoswitchable insecticides showed distinguishable activity against Musca both in vivo and in vitro upon irradiation. Molecular docking study further suggested the binding difference of the two photoisomers. The generation of these photomediated insecticides provides novel insight into the insecticidal activity facilitating further investigation on the functions of insect nicotinic acetylcholine receptors and opens a novel way to control and study insect behavior on insecticide poisoning using light.

  10. Soil microorganisms in cotton fields sequentially treated with insecticides.

    PubMed

    Vig, K; Singh, D K; Agarwal, H C; Dhawan, A K; Dureja, P

    2008-02-01

    A crop protection system consisting of sequential treatments by six insecticides--dimethoate, monocrotophos, deltamethrin, endosulfan, cypermethrin, and triazophos--at recommended dosages in cotton fields in Punjab, India was investigated for its effects on nontarget soil microorganisms and their activities. Successive applications of the insecticides caused only short-lived adverse effects on the soil microorganisms. None of the insecticides used had any adverse effects on soil fungi as reflected by their total numbers. Significant change in Azotobacter numbers were observed after dimethoate, triazophos, and endosulfan treatment in 1998 soil. An increase of up to 71% in actinomycetes numbers was observed after deltamethrin treatment in the treated fields in 1995. Few short-term changes in iron-reduction capacity were observed after endosulfan and cypermethrin treatments. No adverse effect was observed on the soil respiration during all the experimental periods. The amount of residues detected in soil ranged from 8.5 to 42.0 ng g(-1)dry wt. soil for organophosphorus insecticides and from nondetectable to 5.55 ng g (-1)dry wt. soil for synthetic pyrethroids. It ranged between 7.3 and 35.6 ng g(-1)dry wt. soil for endosulfan. On many occasions two or three insecticide residues were detected together; therefore, the effect observed on soil microorganisms and their activities was a multiresidue effect. In 1998, crop soil amounts of insecticide residues were generally more than those in 1995 and 1996. Persistence and dissipation patterns in soils with a history of exposure to the insecticides compared to the non-history soils were similar.

  11. Insecticide resistance in the bed bug comes with a cost.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Jennifer R; Potter, Michael F; Haynes, Kenneth F

    2015-01-01

    Adaptation to new environmental stress is often associated with an alteration of one or more life history parameters. Insecticide resistant populations of insects often have reduced fitness relative to susceptible populations in insecticide free environments. Our previous work showed that three populations of bed bugs, Cimex lectularius L., evolved significantly increased levels of resistance to one product containing both β-cyfluthrin and imidacloprid insecticides with only one generation of selection, which gave us an opportunity to explore potential tradeoffs between life history parameters and resistance using susceptible and resistant strains of the same populations. Life history tables were compiled by collecting weekly data on mortality and fecundity of bugs from each strain and treatment throughout their lives. Selection led to a male-biased sex ratio, shortened oviposition period, and decreased life-time reproductive rate. Generation time was shortened by selection, a change that represents a benefit rather than a cost. Using these life history characteristics we calculated that there would be a 90% return to pre-selection levels of susceptibility within 2- 6.5 generations depending on strain. The significant fitness costs associated with resistance suggest that insecticide rotation or utilization of non-insecticidal control tactics could be part of an effective resistance management strategy. PMID:26039510

  12. Insecticide resistance in the bed bug comes with a cost

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Jennifer R.; Potter, Michael F.; Haynes, Kenneth F.

    2015-01-01

    Adaptation to new environmental stress is often associated with an alteration of one or more life history parameters. Insecticide resistant populations of insects often have reduced fitness relative to susceptible populations in insecticide free environments. Our previous work showed that three populations of bed bugs, Cimex lectularius L., evolved significantly increased levels of resistance to one product containing both β-cyfluthrin and imidacloprid insecticides with only one generation of selection, which gave us an opportunity to explore potential tradeoffs between life history parameters and resistance using susceptible and resistant strains of the same populations. Life history tables were compiled by collecting weekly data on mortality and fecundity of bugs from each strain and treatment throughout their lives. Selection led to a male-biased sex ratio, shortened oviposition period, and decreased life-time reproductive rate. Generation time was shortened by selection, a change that represents a benefit rather than a cost. Using these life history characteristics we calculated that there would be a 90% return to pre-selection levels of susceptibility within 2- 6.5 generations depending on strain. The significant fitness costs associated with resistance suggest that insecticide rotation or utilization of non-insecticidal control tactics could be part of an effective resistance management strategy. PMID:26039510

  13. Insecticide cytotoxicology in China: Current status and challenges.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Guohua; Cui, Gaofeng; Yi, Xin; Sun, Ranran; Zhang, Jingjing

    2016-09-01

    The insecticide cytotoxicology, as a new branch of toxicology, has rapidly developed in China. During the past twenty years, thousands of investigations have sprung up to evaluate the damages and clarify the mechanisms of insecticidal chemical substances to insect cells in vivo or in vitro. The mechanisms of necrosis, apoptosis or autophagy induced by synthetic or biogenic pesticides and virus infections have been systematically illuminated in many important models, including S2, BmN, SL-1, Sf21 and Sf9 cell lines. In addition, a variety of methods have also been applied to examine the effects of insecticides and elaborate the modes of action. As a result, many vital factors and pathways, such as cytochrome c, the Bcl-2 family and caspases, in mitochondrial signaling pathways, intracellular free calcium and lysosome signal pathways have been illuminated and drawn much attention. Benefiting from the application of insecticide cytotoxicology, natural products purifications, biological activities assessments of synthetic compounds and high throughput screening models have been accelerated in China. However, many questions remained, and there exist great challenges, especially in theory system, evaluation criterion, evaluation model, relationship between activity in vitro and effectiveness in vivo, and the toxicological mechanism. Fortunately, the generation of "omics" could bring opportunities for the development of insecticide cytotoxicology. PMID:27521907

  14. Insecticide susceptibility in mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae) from French Polynesia.

    PubMed

    Failloux, A B; Ung, A; Raymond, M; Pasteur, N

    1994-09-01

    Susceptibility to six organophosphate (OP), two pyrethroid (PY), and one carbamate (C) insecticides was investigated in Culex pipiens quinquefasciatus Say, Aedes aegypti (L.), and Aedes polynesiensis Marks larvae from the island of Tahiti. Cx. p. quinquefasciatus and Ae. aegypti were compared with susceptible reference strains treated simultaneously. A low, but significant, resistance to bromophos (4.6x), chlorpyrifos (5.7x), fenthion (2.4x), fenitrothion (5.0x), temephos (4.3x) and permethrin (2.1x) was found in Cx. p. quinquefasciatus, and to malathion (1.5x), temephos (2.3x), permethrin (1.8x) and propoxur (1.7x) in Ae. aegypti. Cx. p. quinquefasciatus was shown to possess over-produced esterases A2 and B2, which are known to be involved in resistance to OPs in other countries. Ae. polynesiensis was less resistant than the Ae. aegypti reference strain to all insecticides except temephos (1.8x) and permethrin (6.7x). To determine whether Ae. polynesiensis had developed resistance to these insecticides in Tahiti, a geographical survey covering 12 islands of the Society, Tuamotu, Tubuai, Marquesas, and Gambier archipelagoes was undertaken with three insecticides (temephos, deltamethrin, and permethrin). Two- to threefold variations in LC50S were observed among collections. Results are discussed in relationship to the level of insecticide exposure on the different islands. PMID:7966164

  15. Broken promise? Taxes and tariffs on insecticide treated mosquito nets.

    PubMed

    Alilio, Martin; Mwenesi, Halima; Barat, Lawrence M; Payes, Roshelle M; Prysor-Jones, Suzanne; Diara, Malick; McGuire, David; Shaw, Willard

    2007-12-01

    Seven years ago, the removal of taxes and tariffs on insecticide treated nets (ITNs) was considered one of the easiest resolutions for most countries to implement among the targets agreed upon at the African Summit on Roll Back Malaria in Abuja, Nigeria, on April 25, 2000. However, seven years later, 24 of the 39 Abuja signatories continue to impose taxes and tariffs on this life-saving tool. Taxes and tariffs significantly increase the price of an insecticide treated net, reduce affordability, and discourage the commercial sector from importing insecticide treated net products. Consequently, Roll Back Malaria partners are engaged in advocacy efforts to remove taxes and tariffs on insecticide treated nets in malaria-endemic countries of Africa. This viewpoint summarizes key obstacles to the removal of taxes and tariffs that have been identified through a review of country situations. To achieve the goal of producing and supplying more than 160 million insecticide treated nets needed to reach the revised Roll Back Malaria Partnership targets by 2010, tax and tariff reforms are urgently needed. Such reforms must be accompanied by country-specific systems to protect the poor (e.g., through voucher systems for vulnerable groups and other forms of targeted subsidies).

  16. The global status of insect resistance to neonicotinoid insecticides.

    PubMed

    Bass, Chris; Denholm, Ian; Williamson, Martin S; Nauen, Ralf

    2015-06-01

    The first neonicotinoid insecticide, imidacloprid, was launched in 1991. Today this class of insecticides comprises at least seven major compounds with a market share of more than 25% of total global insecticide sales. Neonicotinoid insecticides are highly selective agonists of insect nicotinic acetylcholine receptors and provide farmers with invaluable, highly effective tools against some of the world's most destructive crop pests. These include sucking pests such as aphids, whiteflies, and planthoppers, and also some coleopteran, dipteran and lepidopteran species. Although many insect species are still successfully controlled by neonicotinoids, their popularity has imposed a mounting selection pressure for resistance, and in several species resistance has now reached levels that compromise the efficacy of these insecticides. Research to understand the molecular basis of neonicotinoid resistance has revealed both target-site and metabolic mechanisms conferring resistance. For target-site resistance, field-evolved mutations have only been characterized in two aphid species. Metabolic resistance appears much more common, with the enhanced expression of one or more cytochrome P450s frequently reported in resistant strains. Despite the current scale of resistance, neonicotinoids remain a major component of many pest control programmes, and resistance management strategies, based on mode of action rotation, are of crucial importance in preventing resistance becoming more widespread. In this review we summarize the current status of neonicotinoid resistance, the biochemical and molecular mechanisms involved, and the implications for resistance management.

  17. IRAC: Mode of action classification and insecticide resistance management.

    PubMed

    Sparks, Thomas C; Nauen, Ralf

    2015-06-01

    Insecticide resistance is a long standing and expanding problem for pest arthropod control. Effective insecticide resistance management (IRM) is essential if the utility of current and future insecticides is to be preserved. Established in 1984, the Insecticide Resistance Action Committee (IRAC) is an international association of crop protection companies. IRAC serves as the Specialist Technical Group within CropLife International focused on ensuring the long term efficacy of insect, mite and tick control products through effective resistance management for sustainable agriculture and improved public health. A key function of IRAC is the continued development of the Mode of Action (MoA) classification scheme, which provides up-to-date information on the modes of action of new and established insecticides and acaricides and which serves as the basis for developing appropriate IRM strategies for crop protection and vector control. The IRAC MoA classification scheme covers more than 25 different modes of action and at least 55 different chemical classes. Diversity is the spice of resistance management by chemical means and thus it provides an approach to IRM providing a straightforward means to identify potential rotation/alternation options.

  18. Insecticide susceptibility in mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae) from French Polynesia.

    PubMed

    Failloux, A B; Ung, A; Raymond, M; Pasteur, N

    1994-09-01

    Susceptibility to six organophosphate (OP), two pyrethroid (PY), and one carbamate (C) insecticides was investigated in Culex pipiens quinquefasciatus Say, Aedes aegypti (L.), and Aedes polynesiensis Marks larvae from the island of Tahiti. Cx. p. quinquefasciatus and Ae. aegypti were compared with susceptible reference strains treated simultaneously. A low, but significant, resistance to bromophos (4.6x), chlorpyrifos (5.7x), fenthion (2.4x), fenitrothion (5.0x), temephos (4.3x) and permethrin (2.1x) was found in Cx. p. quinquefasciatus, and to malathion (1.5x), temephos (2.3x), permethrin (1.8x) and propoxur (1.7x) in Ae. aegypti. Cx. p. quinquefasciatus was shown to possess over-produced esterases A2 and B2, which are known to be involved in resistance to OPs in other countries. Ae. polynesiensis was less resistant than the Ae. aegypti reference strain to all insecticides except temephos (1.8x) and permethrin (6.7x). To determine whether Ae. polynesiensis had developed resistance to these insecticides in Tahiti, a geographical survey covering 12 islands of the Society, Tuamotu, Tubuai, Marquesas, and Gambier archipelagoes was undertaken with three insecticides (temephos, deltamethrin, and permethrin). Two- to threefold variations in LC50S were observed among collections. Results are discussed in relationship to the level of insecticide exposure on the different islands.

  19. Insecticides promote viral outbreaks by altering herbivore competition.

    PubMed

    Pan, Huipeng; Preisser, Evan L; Chu, Dong; Wang, Shaoli; Wu, Qingjun; Carriére, Yves; Zhou, Xuguo; Zhang, Youjun

    2015-09-01

    While the management of biological invasions is often characterized by a series of single-specieg decisions, invasive species exist within larger food webs. These biotic interactions can alter the impact of control/eradication programs and may cause suppression efforts to inadvertently facilitate invasion spread and impact. We document the rapid replacement of the invasive Bemisia Middle East-Asia Minor I (MEAM1) cryptic biotype by the cryptic Mediterranean (MED) biotype throughout China and demonstrate that MED is more tolerant of insecticides and a better vector of tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV) than MEAMJ. While MEAM1 usually excludes MED under natural conditions, insecticide application reverses the MEAM1-MED competitive hierarchy and allows MED to exclude MEAMI. The insecticide-mediated success of MED has led to TYLCV outbreaks throughout China. Our work strongly supports the hypothesis that insecticide use in China reverses the MEAMl-MED competitive hierarchy and allows MED to displace MEAM1 in managed landscapes. By promoting the dominance of a Bemisia species that is a competent viral vector, insecticides thus increase the spread and impact of TYLCV in heterogeneous agroecosystems. PMID:26552266

  20. Resistance to bio-insecticides or how to enhance their sustainability: a review

    PubMed Central

    Siegwart, Myriam; Graillot, Benoit; Blachere Lopez, Christine; Besse, Samantha; Bardin, Marc; Nicot, Philippe C.; Lopez-Ferber, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    After more than 70 years of chemical pesticide use, modern agriculture is increasingly using biological control products. Resistances to conventional insecticides are wide spread, while those to bio-insecticides have raised less attention, and resistance management is frequently neglected. However, a good knowledge of the limitations of a new technique often provides greater sustainability. In this review, we compile cases of resistance to widely used bio-insecticides and describe the associated resistance mechanisms. This overview shows that all widely used bio-insecticides ultimately select resistant individuals. For example, at least 27 species of insects have been described as resistant to Bacillus thuringiensis toxins. The resistance mechanisms are at least as diverse as those that are involved in resistance to chemical insecticides, some of them being common to bio-insecticides and chemical insecticides. This analysis highlights the specific properties of bio-insecticides that the scientific community should use to provide a better sustainability of these products. PMID:26150820

  1. Resistance to bio-insecticides or how to enhance their sustainability: a review.

    PubMed

    Siegwart, Myriam; Graillot, Benoit; Blachere Lopez, Christine; Besse, Samantha; Bardin, Marc; Nicot, Philippe C; Lopez-Ferber, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    After more than 70 years of chemical pesticide use, modern agriculture is increasingly using biological control products. Resistances to conventional insecticides are wide spread, while those to bio-insecticides have raised less attention, and resistance management is frequently neglected. However, a good knowledge of the limitations of a new technique often provides greater sustainability. In this review, we compile cases of resistance to widely used bio-insecticides and describe the associated resistance mechanisms. This overview shows that all widely used bio-insecticides ultimately select resistant individuals. For example, at least 27 species of insects have been described as resistant to Bacillus thuringiensis toxins. The resistance mechanisms are at least as diverse as those that are involved in resistance to chemical insecticides, some of them being common to bio-insecticides and chemical insecticides. This analysis highlights the specific properties of bio-insecticides that the scientific community should use to provide a better sustainability of these products. PMID:26150820

  2. Influence of Pyrethroid Insecticides on Sodium and Calcium Influx in Neocortical Neurons

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pyrethroid insecticides bind to voltage-gated sodium channels and modify their gating kinetics, thereby disrupting neuronal function. Using murine neocortical neurons in primary culture, we have compared the ability of 11 structurally diverse pyrethroid insecticides to evoke Na+ ...

  3. Modeling the integration of parasitoid, insecticide, and transgenic insecticidal crop for the long-term control of an insect pest.

    PubMed

    Onstad, David W; Liu, Xiaoxia; Chen, Mao; Roush, Rick; Shelton, Anthony M

    2013-06-01

    The tools of insect pest management include host plant resistance, biological control, and insecticides and how they are integrated will influence the durability of each. We created a detailed model of the population dynamics and population genetics of the diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella L., and its parasitoid, Diadegma insulare (Cresson), to study long-term pest management in broccoli Brassica oleracea L. Given this pest's history of evolving resistance to various toxins, we also evaluated the evolution of resistance to transgenic insecticidal Bt broccoli (expressing Cry1Ac) and two types of insecticides. Simulations demonstrated that parasitism provided the most reliable, long-term control of P. xylostella populations. Use of Bt broccoli with a 10% insecticide-free refuge did not reduce the long-term contribution of parasitism to pest control. Small refuges within Bt broccoli fields can delay evolution of resistance > 30 generations if resistance alleles are rare in the pest population. However, the effectiveness of these refuges can be compromised by insecticide use. Rainfall mortality during the pest's egg and neonate stages significantly influences pest control but especially resistance management. Our model results support the idea that Bt crops and biological control can be integrated in integrated pest management and actually synergistically support each other. However, the planting and maintenance of toxin-free refuges are critical to this integration.

  4. Synthesis, insecticidal activities, and SAR studies of novel pyridylpyrazole acid derivatives based on amide bridge modification of anthranilic diamide insecticides.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bao-Lei; Zhu, Hong-Wei; Ma, Yi; Xiong, Li-Xia; Li, Yong-Qiang; Zhao, Yu; Zhang, Ji-Feng; Chen, You-Wei; Zhou, Sha; Li, Zheng-Ming

    2013-06-12

    Anthranilic diamides are one of the most important classes of modern agricultural insecticides. To discover new structure-modified compounds with high activity, series of novel carbonyl thioureas, carbonyl ureas, oxadiazoles, carbonyl thiophosphorylureas, oxadiazole-containing amides, and thiazoline-containing amides were designed through the modification of the amide bridge based on the structure of chlorantraniliprole and were synthesized, and bioassays were carried out. The compounds were characterized and confirmed by melting point, IR, (1)H NMR, and elemental analyses or HRMS. Preliminary bioassays indicated that some compounds exhibited significant insecticidal activities against oriental armyworm, diamondback moth, beet armyworm, corn borer, and mosquito. Among them, trifluoroethoxyl-containing carbonyl thiourea 20a showed best larvicidal activity against oriental armyworm, with LC50 and LC95 values of 0.1812 and 0.7767 mg/L, respectively. Meanwhile, 20c and 20e showed 86 and 57% death rates against diamondback moth at 0.005 mg/L, and the LC50 values of the two compounds were 0.0017 and 0.0023 mg/L, respectively, which were lower than that of the control chlorantraniliprole. The relationship between structure and insecticidal activity was discussed, and the HF calculation results indicated that the carbonyl thiourea moiety plays an important role in the insecticidal activity. The present work demonstrated that the trifluoroethoxyl-containing carbonyl thioureas can be used as lead compounds for further development of novel insecticides.

  5. A comparative study of insecticide toxicity among seven cladoceran species.

    PubMed

    Mano, Hiroyuki; Sakamoto, Masaki; Tanaka, Yoshinari

    2010-11-01

    The sensitivities of seven cladoceran species (Ceriodaphnia reticulata, Chydorus sphaericus, Daphnia galeata, Diaphanosoma brachyurum, Moina macrocopa, Scapholeberis kingi, and Simocephalus vetulus) to carbamate insecticides (carbaryl and methomyl) were investigated by acute toxicity tests. The sensitivities to carbaryl and methomyl were highly correlated among the tested organisms, but the co-tolerance level varied markedly among species. C. reticulata showed the highest sensitivity, whereas M. macrocopa and S. kingi showed the lowest sensitivities to the two insecticides. These results indicate that the degree of chemical impacts on natural communities can vary depending on cladoceran species composition. The highly positive correlation between the EC(50) values for both insecticides indicates that the two chemicals have a shared mode of action on cladoceran species. Unlike previous reports, acute toxicity was not correlated with body size. The results are discussed in relation to community-level experiments, the functions of freshwater ecosystems, and ecological risk assessment. PMID:20862541

  6. Insects, Insecticides and Hormesis: Evidence and Considerations for Study

    PubMed Central

    Cutler, G. Christopher

    2013-01-01

    Insects are ubiquitous, crucial components of almost all terrestrial and fresh water ecosystems. In agricultural settings they are subjected to, intentionally or unintentionally, an array of synthetic pesticides and other chemical stressors. These ecological underpinnings, the amenability of insects to laboratory and field experiments, and our strong knowledgebase in insecticide toxicology, make the insect-insecticide model an excellent one to study many questions surrounding hormesis. Moreover, there is practical importance for agriculture with evidence of pest population growth being accelerated by insecticide hormesis. Nevertheless, insects have been underutilized in studies of hormesis. Where hormesis hypotheses have been tested, results clearly demonstrate stimulatory effects on multiple taxa as measured through several biological endpoints, both at individual and population levels. However, many basic questions are outstanding given the myriad of chemicals, responses, and ecological interactions that are likely to occur. PMID:23930099

  7. Validation of the Target Protein of Insecticidal Dihydroagarofuran Sesquiterpene Polyesters

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Lina; Qi, Zhijun; Li, Qiuli; Wu, Wenjun

    2016-01-01

    A series of insecticidal dihydroagarofuran sesquiterpene polyesters were isolated from the root bark of Chinese bittersweet (Celastrus angulatus Max). A previous study indicated that these compounds affect the digestive system of insects, and aminopeptidase N3 and V-ATPase have been identified as the most putative target proteins by affinity chromatography. In this study, the correlation between the affinity of the compounds to subunit H and the insecticidal activity or inhibitory effect on the activity of V-ATPase was analyzed to validate the target protein. Results indicated that the subunit H of V-ATPase was the target protein of the insecticidal compounds. In addition, the possible mechanism of action of the compounds was discussed. The results provide new ideas for developing pesticides acting on V-ATPase of insects. PMID:26999207

  8. Insecticide resistance in vector Chagas disease: evolution, mechanisms and management.

    PubMed

    Mougabure-Cueto, Gastón; Picollo, María Inés

    2015-09-01

    Chagas disease is a chronic parasitic infection restricted to America. The disease is caused by the protozoa Trypanosoma cruzi, which is transmitted to human through the feces of infected triatomine insects. Because no treatment is available for the chronic forms of the disease, vector chemical control represents the best way to reduce the incidence of the disease. Chemical control has been based principally on spraying dwellings with insecticide formulations and led to the reduction of triatomine distribution and consequent interruption of disease transmission in several areas from endemic region. However, in the last decade it has been repeatedly reported the presence triatomnes, mainly Triatoma infestans, after spraying with pyrethroid insecticides, which was associated to evolution to insecticide resistance. In this paper the evolution of insecticide resistance in triatomines is reviewed. The insecticide resistance was detected in 1970s in Rhodnius prolixus and 1990s in R. prolixus and T. infestans, but not until the 2000s resistance to pyrthroids in T. infestans associated to control failures was described in Argentina and Bolivia. The main resistance mechanisms (i.e. enhanced metabolism, altered site of action and reduced penetration) were described in the T. infestans resistant to pyrethrods. Different resistant profiles were demonstrated suggesting independent origin of the different resistant foci of Argentina and Bolivia. The deltamethrin resistance in T. infestans was showed to be controlled by semi-dominant, autosomally inherited factors. Reproductive and developmental costs were also demonstrated for the resistant T. infestans. A discussion about resistance and tolerance concepts and the persistence of T. infestans in Gran Chaco region are presented. In addition, theoretical concepts related to toxicological, evolutionary and ecological aspects of insecticide resistance are discussed in order to understand the particular scenario of pyrethroid

  9. Insecticide resistance in vector Chagas disease: evolution, mechanisms and management.

    PubMed

    Mougabure-Cueto, Gastón; Picollo, María Inés

    2015-09-01

    Chagas disease is a chronic parasitic infection restricted to America. The disease is caused by the protozoa Trypanosoma cruzi, which is transmitted to human through the feces of infected triatomine insects. Because no treatment is available for the chronic forms of the disease, vector chemical control represents the best way to reduce the incidence of the disease. Chemical control has been based principally on spraying dwellings with insecticide formulations and led to the reduction of triatomine distribution and consequent interruption of disease transmission in several areas from endemic region. However, in the last decade it has been repeatedly reported the presence triatomnes, mainly Triatoma infestans, after spraying with pyrethroid insecticides, which was associated to evolution to insecticide resistance. In this paper the evolution of insecticide resistance in triatomines is reviewed. The insecticide resistance was detected in 1970s in Rhodnius prolixus and 1990s in R. prolixus and T. infestans, but not until the 2000s resistance to pyrthroids in T. infestans associated to control failures was described in Argentina and Bolivia. The main resistance mechanisms (i.e. enhanced metabolism, altered site of action and reduced penetration) were described in the T. infestans resistant to pyrethrods. Different resistant profiles were demonstrated suggesting independent origin of the different resistant foci of Argentina and Bolivia. The deltamethrin resistance in T. infestans was showed to be controlled by semi-dominant, autosomally inherited factors. Reproductive and developmental costs were also demonstrated for the resistant T. infestans. A discussion about resistance and tolerance concepts and the persistence of T. infestans in Gran Chaco region are presented. In addition, theoretical concepts related to toxicological, evolutionary and ecological aspects of insecticide resistance are discussed in order to understand the particular scenario of pyrethroid

  10. Optimal Cotton Insecticide Application Termination Timing: A Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Griffin, T W; Zapata, S D

    2016-08-01

    The concept of insecticide termination timing is generally accepted among cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) researchers; however, exact timings are often disputed. Specifically, there is uncertainty regarding the last economic insecticide application to control fruit-feeding pests including tarnished plant bug (Lygus lineolaris (Palisot de Beauvois)), boll weevil (Anthonomus grandis), bollworm (Helicoverpa zea), tobacco budworm (Heliothis virescens), and cotton fleahopper (Pseudatomoscelis seriatus). A systematic review of prior studies was conducted within a meta-analytic framework. Nine publicly available articles were amalgamated to develop an optimal timing principle. These prior studies reported 53 independent multiple means comparison field experiments for a total of 247 trial observations. Stochastic plateau theory integrated with econometric meta-analysis methodology was applied to the meta-database to determine the shape of the functional form of both the agronomic optimal insecticide termination timing and corresponding yield potential. Results indicated that current university insecticide termination timing recommendations are later than overall estimated timing suggested. The estimated 159 heat units (HU) after the fifth position above white flower (NAWF5) was found to be statistically different than the 194 HU termination used as the status quo recommended termination timing. Insecticides applied after 159 HU may have been applied in excess, resulting in unnecessary economic and environmental costs. Empirical results also suggested that extending the insecticide termination time by one unit resulted in a cotton lint yield increase of 0.27 kilograms per hectare up to the timing where the plateau began. Based on economic analyses, profit-maximizing producers may cease application as soon as 124 HU after NAWF5. These results provided insights useful to improve production systems by applying inputs only when benefits were expected to be in excess of the

  11. Optimal Cotton Insecticide Application Termination Timing: A Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Griffin, T W; Zapata, S D

    2016-08-01

    The concept of insecticide termination timing is generally accepted among cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) researchers; however, exact timings are often disputed. Specifically, there is uncertainty regarding the last economic insecticide application to control fruit-feeding pests including tarnished plant bug (Lygus lineolaris (Palisot de Beauvois)), boll weevil (Anthonomus grandis), bollworm (Helicoverpa zea), tobacco budworm (Heliothis virescens), and cotton fleahopper (Pseudatomoscelis seriatus). A systematic review of prior studies was conducted within a meta-analytic framework. Nine publicly available articles were amalgamated to develop an optimal timing principle. These prior studies reported 53 independent multiple means comparison field experiments for a total of 247 trial observations. Stochastic plateau theory integrated with econometric meta-analysis methodology was applied to the meta-database to determine the shape of the functional form of both the agronomic optimal insecticide termination timing and corresponding yield potential. Results indicated that current university insecticide termination timing recommendations are later than overall estimated timing suggested. The estimated 159 heat units (HU) after the fifth position above white flower (NAWF5) was found to be statistically different than the 194 HU termination used as the status quo recommended termination timing. Insecticides applied after 159 HU may have been applied in excess, resulting in unnecessary economic and environmental costs. Empirical results also suggested that extending the insecticide termination time by one unit resulted in a cotton lint yield increase of 0.27 kilograms per hectare up to the timing where the plateau began. Based on economic analyses, profit-maximizing producers may cease application as soon as 124 HU after NAWF5. These results provided insights useful to improve production systems by applying inputs only when benefits were expected to be in excess of the

  12. First results on the insecticidal action of saponins.

    PubMed

    De Geyter, Ellen; Geelen, Danny; Smagghe, Guy

    2007-01-01

    In the search for new, natural insecticides, numerous scientists are currently trying to obtain useful compound from plants. A possibly interesting class of molecules are the saponins, a group of steroidal or triterpenoidal secondary plant metabolites with divergent biological activities. In this study, we investigated the activity of saponins against living caterpillars Spodoptera littoralis) and aphids (Acyrthosiphon pisum) via treatment on artificial diets containing different concentrations of saponins. We conclude that saponins have insecticidal activity, causing mortality and/or growth inhibition in the tested insects, although from our experiments the mode of action could not be identified. PMID:18399498

  13. Haematological parameters as bioindicators of insecticide exposure in teleosts.

    PubMed

    Singh, Narendra Nath; Srivastava, Anil Kumar

    2010-06-01

    Haematological parameters, such as erythrocyte and leucocyte count, erythrocyte indices and thrombocyte number vis-a-vis coagulation of blood has been considered bioindicators of toxicosis in fish following exposure to organochlorine, organophosphate, carbamate and pyrethroid insecticides. This review deals with the effects of insecticides on the morphology of red blood cells, total erythrocyte count, haemoglobin content, haematocrit, mean corpuscular volume, mean corpuscular haemoglobin, mean corpuscular haemoglobin concentration, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, total and differential leucocyte counts, thrombocyte count and clotting time in the peripheral blood of a number of teleosts. The review also takes stock of knowledge of the subject and explores prospects of additional research in the related area. PMID:20177774

  14. Adult vial bioassays of insecticidal toxicity against cotton fleahopper, Pseudatomoscelis seriatus (Reuter) (Hemiptera: Miridae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Glass vials coated with several technical insecticides were used to determine the contact toxicity of insecticides on adult laboratory-reared and field-collected cotton fleahopper, Pseudatomoscelis seriatus (Reuter). For the 17 insecticides evaluated for laboratory-reared cotton fleahoppers, bifent...

  15. Insecticide applications to soil contribute to the development of Burkholderia mediating insecticide resistance in stinkbugs.

    PubMed

    Tago, Kanako; Kikuchi, Yoshitomo; Nakaoka, Sinji; Katsuyama, Chie; Hayatsu, Masahito

    2015-07-01

    Some soil Burkholderia strains are capable of degrading the organophosphorus insecticide, fenitrothion, and establish symbiosis with stinkbugs, making the host insects fenitrothion-resistant. However, the ecology of the symbiotic degrading Burkholderia adapting to fenitrothion in the free-living environment is unknown. We hypothesized that fenitrothion applications affect the dynamics of fenitrothion-degrading Burkholderia, thereby controlling the transmission of symbiotic degrading Burkholderia from the soil to stinkbugs. We investigated changes in the density and diversity of culturable Burkholderia (i.e. symbiotic and nonsymbiotic fenitrothion degraders and nondegraders) in fenitrothion-treated soil using microcosms. During the incubation with five applications of pesticide, the density of the degraders increased from less than the detection limit to around 10(6)/g of soil. The number of dominant species among the degraders declined with the increasing density of degraders; eventually, one species predominated. This process can be explained according to the competitive exclusion principle using V(max) and K(m) values for fenitrothion metabolism by the degraders. We performed a phylogenetic analysis of representative strains isolated from the microcosms and evaluated their ability to establish symbiosis with the stinkbug Riptortus pedestris. The strains that established symbiosis with R. pedestris were assigned to a cluster including symbionts commonly isolated from stinkbugs. The strains outside the cluster could not necessarily associate with the host. The degraders in the cluster predominated during the initial phase of degrader dynamics in the soil. Therefore, only a few applications of fenitrothion could allow symbiotic degraders to associate with their hosts and may cause the emergence of symbiont-mediated insecticide resistance.

  16. Role of cytochrome P450s in insecticide resistance: impact on the control of mosquito-borne diseases and use of insecticides on Earth

    PubMed Central

    David, Jean-Philippe; Ismail, Hanafy Mahmoud; Chandor-Proust, Alexia; Paine, Mark John Ingraham

    2013-01-01

    The fight against diseases spread by mosquitoes and other insects has enormous environmental, economic and social consequences. Chemical insecticides remain the first line of defence but the control of diseases, especially malaria and dengue fever, is being increasingly undermined by insecticide resistance. Mosquitoes have a large repertoire of P450s (over 100 genes). By pinpointing the key enzymes associated with insecticide resistance we can begin to develop new tools to aid the implementation of control interventions and reduce their environmental impact on Earth. Recent technological advances are helping us to build a functional profile of the P450 determinants of insecticide metabolic resistance in mosquitoes. Alongside, the cross-responses of mosquito P450s to insecticides and pollutants are also being investigated. Such research will provide the means to produce diagnostic tools for early detection of P450s linked to resistance. It will also enable the design of new insecticides with optimized efficacy in different environments. PMID:23297352

  17. Role of cytochrome P450s in insecticide resistance: impact on the control of mosquito-borne diseases and use of insecticides on Earth.

    PubMed

    David, Jean-Philippe; Ismail, Hanafy Mahmoud; Chandor-Proust, Alexia; Paine, Mark John Ingraham

    2013-02-19

    The fight against diseases spread by mosquitoes and other insects has enormous environmental, economic and social consequences. Chemical insecticides remain the first line of defence but the control of diseases, especially malaria and dengue fever, is being increasingly undermined by insecticide resistance. Mosquitoes have a large repertoire of P450s (over 100 genes). By pinpointing the key enzymes associated with insecticide resistance we can begin to develop new tools to aid the implementation of control interventions and reduce their environmental impact on Earth. Recent technological advances are helping us to build a functional profile of the P450 determinants of insecticide metabolic resistance in mosquitoes. Alongside, the cross-responses of mosquito P450s to insecticides and pollutants are also being investigated. Such research will provide the means to produce diagnostic tools for early detection of P450s linked to resistance. It will also enable the design of new insecticides with optimized efficacy in different environments.

  18. Flupyradifurone: a brief profile of a new butenolide insecticide

    PubMed Central

    Nauen, Ralf; Jeschke, Peter; Velten, Robert; Beck, Michael E; Ebbinghaus-Kintscher, Ulrich; Thielert, Wolfgang; Wölfel, Katharina; Haas, Matthias; Kunz, Klaus; Raupach, Georg

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND The development and commercialisation of new chemical classes of insecticides for efficient crop protection measures against destructive invertebrate pests is of utmost importance to overcome resistance issues and to secure sustainable crop yields. Flupyradifurone introduced here is the first representative of the novel butenolide class of insecticides active against various sucking pests and showing an excellent safety profile. RESULTS The discovery of flupyradifurone was inspired by the butenolide scaffold in naturally occurring stemofoline. Flupyradifurone acts reversibly as an agonist on insect nicotinic acetylcholine receptors but is structurally different from known agonists, as shown by chemical similarity analysis. It shows a fast action on a broad range of sucking pests, as demonstrated in laboratory bioassays, and exhibits excellent field efficacy on a number of crops with different application methods, including foliar, soil, seed treatment and drip irrigation. It is readily taken up by plants and translocated in the xylem, as demonstrated by phosphor imaging analysis. Flupyradifurone is active on resistant pests, including cotton whiteflies, and is not metabolised by recombinantly expressed CYP6CM1, a cytochrome P450 conferring metabolic resistance to neonicotinoids and pymetrozine. CONCLUSION The novel butenolide insecticide flupyradifurone shows unique properties and will become a new tool for integrated pest management around the globe, as demonstrated by its insecticidal, ecotoxicological and safety profile. © 2014 The Authors. Pest Management Science published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Society of Chemical Industry. PMID:25351824

  19. Comparative metabolism and selectivity of organophosphate and carbamate insecticides

    PubMed Central

    Hollingworth, R. M.

    1971-01-01

    The comparative metabolism and toxicity of organophosphorus and carbamate insecticides are reviewed with the purpose of assessing our present ability to design new toxicants with improved selectivity. The occurrence of quantitative and qualitative differences in metabolism in vertebrates and insects is considered and an assessment is made of the role of metabolic activation and degradation in the complex interactions governing toxicity. PMID:4328819

  20. Development of an insecticidal nanoemulsion with Manilkara subsericea (Sapotaceae) extract

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Plants have been recognized as a good source of insecticidal agents, since they are able to produce their own defensives to insect attack. Moreover, there is a growing concern worldwide to develop pesticides with low impact to environment and non-target organisms. Hexane-soluble fraction from ethanolic crude extract from fruits of Manilkara subsericea and its triterpenes were considered active against a cotton pest (Dysdercus peruvianus). Several natural products with insecticidal activity have poor water solubility, including triterpenes, and nanotechnology has emerged as a good alternative to solve this main problem. On this context, the aim of the present study was to develop an insecticidal nanoemulsion containing apolar fraction from fruits of Manilkara subsericea. Results It was obtained a formulation constituted by 5% of oil (octyldodecyl myristate), 5% of surfactants (sorbitan monooleate/polysorbate 80), 5% of apolar fraction from M. subsericea and 85% of water. Analysis of mean droplet diameter (155.2 ± 3.8 nm) confirmed this formulation as a nanoemulsion. It was able to induce mortality in D. peruvianus. It was observed no effect against acetylcholinesterase or mortality in mice induced by the formulation, suggesting the safety of this nanoemulsion for non-target organisms. Conclusions The present study suggests that the obtained O/A nanoemulsion may be useful to enhance water solubility of poor water soluble natural products with insecticidal activity, including the hexane-soluble fraction from ethanolic crude extract from fruits of Manilkara subsericea. PMID:24886215

  1. Control of rugose spiraling whitefly using biological insecticides, 2014

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of selected biological insecticides against a new invasive whitefly pest, Aleurodicus rugioperculatus Martin, in white bird of paradise under field condition. The trial was conducted at United States Horticultural Research Laboratory in Fort P...

  2. THE DETERMINATION OF PYRETHROID AND PRETHRIN INSECTICIDES IN FOODS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pyrethrins, and the more light stable synthetic pyrethroids, are insecticides that are effective against many pests. They have been used for many years and are relatively non-toxic to warm blooded animals. The residue analysis of pyrethrins and pyrethroids is of interest to the...

  3. Mixture for Controlling Insecticide-Resistant Malaria Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Costantini, Carlo; Corbel, Vincent; Licciardi, Séverine; Dabiré, Roch K.; Lapied, Bruno; Chandre, Fabrice; Hougard, Jean-Marc

    2008-01-01

    The spread of resistance to pyrethroids in the major Afrotropical malaria vectors Anopheles gambiae s.s. necessitates the development of new strategies to control resistant mosquito populations. To test the efficacy of nets treated with repellent and insecticide against susceptible and insecticide-resistant An. gambiae mosquito populations, we impregnated mosquito bed nets with an insect repellent mixed with a low dose of organophosphorous insecticide and tested them in a rice-growing area near Bobo-Dioulasso, Burkina Faso. During the first 2 weeks posttreatment, the mixture was as effective as deltamethrin alone and was more effective at killing An. gambiae that carried knockdown resistance (kdr) or insensitive acetylcholinesterase resistance (Ace1R) genes. The mixture seemed to not kill more susceptible genotypes for the kdr or Ace1R alleles. Mixing repellents and organophosphates on bed nets could be used to control insecticide-resistant malaria vectors if residual activity of the mixture is extended and safety is verified. PMID:18976553

  4. Seed coating with a neonicotinoid insecticide negatively affects wild bees.

    PubMed

    Rundlöf, Maj; Andersson, Georg K S; Bommarco, Riccardo; Fries, Ingemar; Hederström, Veronica; Herbertsson, Lina; Jonsson, Ove; Klatt, Björn K; Pedersen, Thorsten R; Yourstone, Johanna; Smith, Henrik G

    2015-05-01

    Understanding the effects of neonicotinoid insecticides on bees is vital because of reported declines in bee diversity and distribution and the crucial role bees have as pollinators in ecosystems and agriculture. Neonicotinoids are suspected to pose an unacceptable risk to bees, partly because of their systemic uptake in plants, and the European Union has therefore introduced a moratorium on three neonicotinoids as seed coatings in flowering crops that attract bees. The moratorium has been criticized for being based on weak evidence, particularly because effects have mostly been measured on bees that have been artificially fed neonicotinoids. Thus, the key question is how neonicotinoids influence bees, and wild bees in particular, in real-world agricultural landscapes. Here we show that a commonly used insecticide seed coating in a flowering crop can have serious consequences for wild bees. In a study with replicated and matched landscapes, we found that seed coating with Elado, an insecticide containing a combination of the neonicotinoid clothianidin and the non-systemic pyrethroid β-cyfluthrin, applied to oilseed rape seeds, reduced wild bee density, solitary bee nesting, and bumblebee colony growth and reproduction under field conditions. Hence, such insecticidal use can pose a substantial risk to wild bees in agricultural landscapes, and the contribution of pesticides to the global decline of wild bees may have been underestimated. The lack of a significant response in honeybee colonies suggests that reported pesticide effects on honeybees cannot always be extrapolated to wild bees.

  5. Hydrocarbon insecticides: their risks for environment and human health.

    PubMed

    El-Bahnasawy, Mamdouh M; Mohammad, Amina El-Hosini; Morsy, Tosson A

    2014-08-01

    Insecticides are used to control diseases spread by arthropods, but theys vary greatly in toxicity. Toxicity depends on the chemical and physical properties of a substance, and may be defined as the quality of being poisonous or harmful to animals or plants. Poisons have many different modes of action, but in general cause biochemical changes which interfere with normal body functions. Toxicity can be either acute or chronic. Acute toxicity is the ability of a substance to cause harmful effects which develop rapidly following absorption, i.e. a few hours or a day. Chronic toxicity is the ability of a substance to cause adverse health effects resulting from long-term exposure to a substance. There is a great range in the toxicity of insecticides to humans. The relative hazard of an insecticide is dependent upon the toxicity of the pesticide, the dose received and the length of time exposed. A hazard can be defined as a source of danger. The great majority of insecticides are poisonous to man and his beneficial insects and animals and are carcinogenic agents particularly, the halogenated hydrocarbons containing benzene ring.

  6. Synthesis and Testing of the Insecticide Carbaryl: A Laboratory Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thadeo, Peter F.; Mowery, Dwight F.

    1984-01-01

    Carbaryl, 1-naphthyl-N-methylcarbamate, is the biodegradable (soft) insecticide most commonly marketed by the Union Carbide Corporation under the trade name of Sevin. Procedures for the synthesis and testing of carbaryl and for the testing of some compounds similar to carbaryl are provided. Equations showing its synthesis from methyl isocyanate…

  7. Paraoxonase 1 (PON1) Status and Risk of Insecticide Exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Furlong, Clement E.; Cole, Toby B.; Walter, Betsy J.; Shih, Diana M.; Tward, Aaron; Lusis, Aldons J.; Timchalk, Chuck; Richter, Rebecca J.; Costa, Lucio G.

    2005-06-23

    Paraoxonase 1 (PON1) is an HDL associated enzyme that catalyzes a number of different reactions including the hydrolysis of the toxic oxon metabolites of the insecticides diazinon and chlorpyrifos. PON1 has also been implicated in the detoxication of oxidized lipids and the metabolism of a number of drugs, activating some, while inactivating others. There are two common PON1 coding region polymorphisms (L55M and Q192R). The latter determines the catalytic efficiency of hydrolysis of a number of substrates including chlorpyrifos oxon, but not diazoxon. Evidence for the physiological importance of PON1 in modulating exposures to these two insecticides comes from several different studies. Early studies noted that species with high levels of PON1 were much more resistant to certain organophosphorus (OP) insecticides than were species with low levels. Another early study by Main demonstrated that injected rabbit paraoxonase protected rats from paraoxon toxicity. Our research group began the development of a mouse model system for examining the importance of PON1 in the detoxication of OP insecticides.

  8. Efficacy of insecticides for control of stored-product psocids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A series of experiments were carried out between 2007 and 2009 to test the efficacy of selected insecticides against several stored-product psocids. Three series of experiments were conducted against Liposcelis spp. (Psocoptera: Liposcelididae) and Lepinotus reticulatus Enderlein (Psocoptera: Trogii...

  9. Ecological determinants of resistance to insecticides in Bemisia tabaci

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Insecticide resistance is a critical issue in pest management and has often been implicated as the primary cause of outbreaks of the global whitefly pest Bemisia tabaci Gennadius. Resistance to all modes of action used commonly against B. tabaci has been documented in various locations throughout t...

  10. Control of vectors and insecticide resistance: Implications for disease control

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Effective management of insect and mite vectors of plant pathogens is of crucial importance to minimizing vector-borne diseases in crops. Insecticides play an important role in managing vector populations by reducing the number of individuals that can acquire and transmit a virus, thereby potentiall...

  11. Pharmacokinetics of a pyrethroid insecticide mixture in the rat

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pyrethroid insecticides are used and co-occur in the environment, in residences and day care facilities. Pharmacokinetic models of pyrethroids and assessment of risk from their exposure would be better informed if data are derived from studies using chemical mixtures. The objecti...

  12. Potential of the insecticides acephate and methamidophos to contaminate groundwater.

    PubMed

    Yen, J H; Lin, K H; Wang, Y S

    2000-01-01

    The possible contamination of groundwater by the insecticides acephate and methamidophos was assessed using the behavior assessment model (BAM) and the groundwater pollution-potential model (GWP). The dissipation coefficients of the two insecticides in two soils (Annei silt loam and Pingchen silt clay loam) at different moisture contents (50 and 100% field capacity) and soil temperatures (20 and 30 degrees C) were studied by determining the degradation and adsorption of each insecticide in the soil. The movement of acephate and methamidophos was studied by leaching each insecticide in a soil column in the laboratory. The absorption coefficient of methamidophos was much higher than that of acephate in both types of soil. In the leaching test, methamidophos more easily leached out from the Pingchen soil column than from the Annei soil column. Methamidophos was rapidly degraded, with a half-life of 1.11 to 1.61 days in the Annei soil and 7.50 to 13.20 days in the Pingchen soil at different temperatures and soil water contents. Acephate was found to have a longer half-life than methamidophos in soil; however, the mobility of methamidophos in both soils was slower than that of acephate. The mobility of acephate in soil is somewhat faster than that of methamidophos, and thus acephate may lead to the contamination of groundwater much more easily than methamidophos under normal conditions.

  13. Control of Frankliniella occidentalis with foliar insecticides, 2014

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of selected chemical insecticides against a western flower thrips Frankliniella occidentalis Pergande, in ornamental pepper under greenhouse condition. The trial was conducted at United States Horticultural Research Laboratory in Fort Pierce, ...

  14. Seed coating with a neonicotinoid insecticide negatively affects wild bees.

    PubMed

    Rundlöf, Maj; Andersson, Georg K S; Bommarco, Riccardo; Fries, Ingemar; Hederström, Veronica; Herbertsson, Lina; Jonsson, Ove; Klatt, Björn K; Pedersen, Thorsten R; Yourstone, Johanna; Smith, Henrik G

    2015-05-01

    Understanding the effects of neonicotinoid insecticides on bees is vital because of reported declines in bee diversity and distribution and the crucial role bees have as pollinators in ecosystems and agriculture. Neonicotinoids are suspected to pose an unacceptable risk to bees, partly because of their systemic uptake in plants, and the European Union has therefore introduced a moratorium on three neonicotinoids as seed coatings in flowering crops that attract bees. The moratorium has been criticized for being based on weak evidence, particularly because effects have mostly been measured on bees that have been artificially fed neonicotinoids. Thus, the key question is how neonicotinoids influence bees, and wild bees in particular, in real-world agricultural landscapes. Here we show that a commonly used insecticide seed coating in a flowering crop can have serious consequences for wild bees. In a study with replicated and matched landscapes, we found that seed coating with Elado, an insecticide containing a combination of the neonicotinoid clothianidin and the non-systemic pyrethroid β-cyfluthrin, applied to oilseed rape seeds, reduced wild bee density, solitary bee nesting, and bumblebee colony growth and reproduction under field conditions. Hence, such insecticidal use can pose a substantial risk to wild bees in agricultural landscapes, and the contribution of pesticides to the global decline of wild bees may have been underestimated. The lack of a significant response in honeybee colonies suggests that reported pesticide effects on honeybees cannot always be extrapolated to wild bees. PMID:25901681

  15. Novel diamide insecticides: sulfoximines, sulfonimidamides and other new sulfonimidoyl derivatives.

    PubMed

    Gnamm, Christian; Jeanguenat, André; Dutton, Ana C; Grimm, Christoph; Kloer, Daniel P; Crossthwaite, Andrew J

    2012-06-01

    Novel insecticidal anthranilamides with elaborated sulfur-containing groups are described. The synthesis of compounds with functional groups such as sulfoximines and scarcely reported groups such as sulfonimidoyl hydrazides and hydroxylamides, their in vitro and in vivo biological activity as well as their physical properties are reported. PMID:22552196

  16. Control of Scirtothrips dorsalis with foliar insecticides, 2011

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of several conventional and novel insecticides against a new invasive thrips pest, Scirtothrips dorsalis Hood, in pepper under greenhouse condition. The trial was conducted at Tropical Research and Education Center in Homestead, Florida in hop...

  17. Soil applied insecticidal control of Scirtothrips dorsalis, 2011

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of several conventional and novel soil applied insecticides against a new invasive thrips pest, Scirtothrips dorsalis Hood, in pepper under greenhouse condition. The trial was conducted at Tropical Research and Education Center in Homestead, F...

  18. Novel and Viable Acetylcholinesterase Target Site for Developing Effective and Environmentally Safe Insecticides

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Yuan-Ping; Brimijoin, Stephen; Ragsdale, David W; Zhu, Kun Yan; Suranyi, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Insect pests are responsible for human suffering and financial losses worldwide. New and environmentally safe insecticides are urgently needed to cope with these serious problems. Resistance to current insecticides has resulted in a resurgence of insect pests, and growing concerns about insecticide toxicity to humans discourage the use of insecticides for pest control. The small market for insecticides has hampered insecticide development; however, advances in genomics and structural genomics offer new opportunities to develop insecticides that are less dependent on the insecticide market. This review summarizes the literature data that support the hypothesis that an insect-specific cysteine residue located at the opening of the acetylcholinesterase active site is a promising target site for developing new insecticides with reduced off-target toxicity and low propensity for insect resistance. These data are used to discuss the differences between targeting the insect-specific cysteine residue and targeting the ubiquitous catalytic serine residue of acetylcholinesterase from the perspective of reducing off-target toxicity and insect resistance. Also discussed is the prospect of developing cysteine-targeting anticholinesterases as effective and environmentally safe insecticides for control of disease vectors, crop damage, and residential insect pests within the financial confines of the present insecticide market. PMID:22280344

  19. Analysis of Insecticides in Dead Wild Birds in Korea from 2010 to 2013.

    PubMed

    Kim, Soohee; Park, Mi-Young; Kim, Hyo-Jin; Shin, Jin Young; Ko, Kyung Yuk; Kim, Dong-Gyu; Kim, MeeKyung; Kang, Hwan-Goo; So, ByungJae; Park, Sung-Won

    2016-01-01

    Wild birds are exposed to insecticides in a variety of ways, at different dose levels and via multiple routes, including ingestion of contaminated food items, and dermal, inhalation, preening, and embryonic exposure. Most poisoning by insecticides occurs as a result of misuse or accidental exposure, but intentional killing of unwanted animals also occurs. In this study, we investigated insecticides in the gastric contents of dead wild birds that were suspected to have died from insecticide poisoning based on necropsy. The wild birds were found dead in various regions and locations such as in mountains, and agricultural and urban areas. A total of 182 dead wild birds of 27 species were analyzed in this study, and insecticide residue levels were determined in 60.4% of the total samples analyzed. Monocrotophos and phosphamidon were the most common insecticides identified at rates of 50.0% and 30.7% of the insecticide-positive samples, respectively. Other insecticides identified in dead wild birds included organophosphorous, organochlorine and carbamate insecticides. However, there was limited evidence to conclusively establish the cause of death related to insecticides in this study. Nevertheless, considering the level of insecticide exposure, it is speculated that the exposure was mainly a result of accidental or intentional killing, and not from environmental residue.

  20. Toxicity of biorational insecticides: activity against the green peach aphid, Myzus persicae (Sulzer).

    PubMed

    Edelson, Jonathan V; Duthie, J; Roberts, W

    2002-03-01

    The relationship between dose for each of four biorational insecticides (pyrethrins, neem extract, capsiacin extract, insecticidal soap) and mortality of the green peach aphid (Myzus persicae) was determined using a laboratory bioassay. These insecticides were toxic to aphids and paired mixtures of the insecticides provided synergistic activity as measured by aphid mortality under the laboratory bioassay conditions. Capsiacin extracts were found to provide low levels of mortality alone but acted synergistically in mixtures with the other insecticides and provided higher than expected levels of mortality. Activity as determined in the laboratory for each insecticide was not evident under field-use conditions in five separate experiments. Under field conditions and using common application methods, these insecticides did not provide significant levels of control of aphids.

  1. Agricultural insecticides threaten surface waters at the global scale

    PubMed Central

    Stehle, Sebastian; Schulz, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    Compared with nutrient levels and habitat degradation, the importance of agricultural pesticides in surface water may have been underestimated due to a lack of comprehensive quantitative analysis. Increasing pesticide contamination results in decreasing regional aquatic biodiversity, i.e., macroinvertebrate family richness is reduced by ∼30% at pesticide concentrations equaling the legally accepted regulatory threshold levels (RTLs). This study provides a comprehensive metaanalysis of 838 peer-reviewed studies (>2,500 sites in 73 countries) that evaluates, for the first time to our knowledge on a global scale, the exposure of surface waters to particularly toxic agricultural insecticides. We tested whether measured insecticide concentrations (MICs; i.e., quantified insecticide concentrations) exceed their RTLs and how risks depend on insecticide development over time and stringency of environmental regulation. Our analysis reveals that MICs occur rarely (i.e., an estimated 97.4% of analyses conducted found no MICs) and there is a complete lack of scientific monitoring data for ∼90% of global cropland. Most importantly, of the 11,300 MICs, 52.4% (5,915 cases; 68.5% of the sites) exceeded the RTL for either surface water (RTLSW) or sediments. Thus, the biological integrity of global water resources is at a substantial risk. RTLSW exceedances depend on the catchment size, sampling regime, and sampling date; are significantly higher for newer-generation insecticides (i.e., pyrethroids); and are high even in countries with stringent environmental regulations. These results suggest the need for worldwide improvements to current pesticide regulations and agricultural pesticide application practices and for intensified research efforts on the presence and effects of pesticides under real-world conditions. PMID:25870271

  2. Agricultural insecticides threaten surface waters at the global scale.

    PubMed

    Stehle, Sebastian; Schulz, Ralf

    2015-05-01

    Compared with nutrient levels and habitat degradation, the importance of agricultural pesticides in surface water may have been underestimated due to a lack of comprehensive quantitative analysis. Increasing pesticide contamination results in decreasing regional aquatic biodiversity, i.e., macroinvertebrate family richness is reduced by ∼30% at pesticide concentrations equaling the legally accepted regulatory threshold levels (RTLs). This study provides a comprehensive metaanalysis of 838 peer-reviewed studies (>2,500 sites in 73 countries) that evaluates, for the first time to our knowledge on a global scale, the exposure of surface waters to particularly toxic agricultural insecticides. We tested whether measured insecticide concentrations (MICs; i.e., quantified insecticide concentrations) exceed their RTLs and how risks depend on insecticide development over time and stringency of environmental regulation. Our analysis reveals that MICs occur rarely (i.e., an estimated 97.4% of analyses conducted found no MICs) and there is a complete lack of scientific monitoring data for ∼90% of global cropland. Most importantly, of the 11,300 MICs, 52.4% (5,915 cases; 68.5% of the sites) exceeded the RTL for either surface water (RTLSW) or sediments. Thus, the biological integrity of global water resources is at a substantial risk. RTLSW exceedances depend on the catchment size, sampling regime, and sampling date; are significantly higher for newer-generation insecticides (i.e., pyrethroids); and are high even in countries with stringent environmental regulations. These results suggest the need for worldwide improvements to current pesticide regulations and agricultural pesticide application practices and for intensified research efforts on the presence and effects of pesticides under real-world conditions.

  3. Insecticide resistance in Culex quinquefasciatus from Zanzibar: implications for vector control programmes

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Zanzibar has a long history of lymphatic filariasis (LF) caused by the filarial parasite Wuchereria bancrofti, and transmitted by the mosquito Culex quinquefasciatus Say. The LF Programme in Zanzibar has successfully implemented mass drug administration (MDA) to interrupt transmission, and is now in the elimination phase. Monitoring infections in mosquitoes, and assessing the potential role of interventions such as vector control, is important in case the disease re-emerges as a public health problem. Here, we examine Culex mosquito species from the two main islands to detect W. bancrofti infection and to determine levels of susceptibility to the insecticides used for vector control. Methods Culex mosquitoes collected during routine catches in Vitongoji, Pemba Island, and Makadara, Unguja Island were tested for W. bancrofti infection using PCR. Insecticide bioassays on Culex mosquitoes were performed to determine susceptibility to permethrin, deltamethrin, lambda-cyhalothrin, DDT and bendiocarb. Additional synergism assays with piperonyl butoxide (PBO) were used for lambda-cyhalothrin. Pyrosequencing was used to determine the kdr genotype and sequencing of the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase I (mtCOI) subunit performed to identify ambiguous Culex species. Results None of the wild-caught Culex mosquitoes analysed were found to be positive for W. bancrofti. High frequencies of resistance to all insecticides were found in Wete, Pemba Island, whereas Culex from the nearby site of Tibirinzi (Pemba) and in Kilimani, Unguja Island remained relatively susceptible. Species identification confirmed that mosquitoes from Wete were Culex quinquefasciatus. The majority of the Culex collected from Tibirinzi and all from Kilimani could not be identified to species by molecular assays. Two alternative kdr alleles, both resulting in a L1014F substitution were detected in Cx. quinquefasciatus from Wete with no homozygote susceptible detected. Metabolic resistance to

  4. Pressure programmed microbore column supercritical fluid chromatography-mass spectrometry for the determination of organophosphorus insecticides

    SciTech Connect

    Kalinoski, H.T.; Smith, R.D.

    1988-03-15

    The use of the high flow rate (HFR) interface for supercritical fluid chromatography-mass spectrometry (SFC-MS) is shown to allow operation under conditions which provide efficient pressure programmed separations with appropriate microbore (packed) HPLC columns. The combined advantages of selectivity offered by the microparticle-packed stationary phase and variable solvating power of the supercritical fluid are fully utilized in this approach. The greater sample loadings and lower detection limits possible using packed columns (based on concentration of sample in the injection solvent) compared with commercially available capillary columns are demonstrated for the determination of a series of organophosphorus insecticides. Low concentrations of polar fluid modifiers, generally required for high-quality separations in packed-column SFC, also function as mild chemical ionization reagents. Broad classes of thermally labile, higher molecular weight, moderately polar pesticides are amenable to identification by SFC-MS, which provides a sensitive, selective, and broadly applicable technique for the identification of pesticide compounds with detection limits in the part-per-billion range.

  5. Insecticidal effect of plant extracts on Phlebotomus argentipes (Diptera: Psychodidae) in Bihar, India

    PubMed Central

    Dinesh, Diwakar Singh; Kumari, Seema; Pandit, Vibhishan; Kumar, Jainendra; Kumari, Nisha; Kumar, Prahlad; Hassan, Faizan; Kumar, Vijay; Das, Pradeep

    2015-01-01

    Background & objectives: Phlebotomus argentipes (Diptera: Psychodidae), the established vector for kala-azar is presently being controlled by indoor residual spray of DDT in kala-azar endemic areas in India. Search for non-hazardous and non-toxic biodegradable active molecules from botanicals may provide cost-effective and eco-friendly alternatives to synthetic insecticides. The present study was aimed at evaluating various plant extracts from endemic and non-endemic areas of Bihar for their insecticidal activity against sandfly to identify the most effective plant extract. Methods: Bio-assay test was conducted with larvae and adult of P. argentipes with different plant extracts collected in distilled water, hexane, ethyl acetate, acetone and methanol. Thin layer chromatography (TLC), column chromatography and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) were conducted for detection of active molecules. Results: Adults and larvae of sandflies exposed to the aqueous extract of Nicotiana tabacum resulted in 100 per cent mortality. The hexane extract of Clerodendrum infortunatum was found to kill 77 per cent adults but was ineffective against larvae. Bio-assay test of the ninth fraction (hexane extract-methanol phase) separated by column chromatography was found to be 63 per cent effective. The purple spot on the TLC of this fraction indicated the presence of a diterpenoid. HPLC of this fraction detected nine compounds with two peaks covering 20.44 and 56.52 per cent areas with retention time of 2.439 and 5.182 min, respectively supporting the TLC results. Interpretation & conclusions: The column separated 9th fraction of C. infortunatum extract was found to be effective in killing 63 per cent of adult P. argentipes. Compounds of this fraction need to be evaluated further for identification and characterization of the active molecule by conducting individual bio-assay tests followed by further fractionation and HPLC. Once the structure of the active molecule is

  6. Effect of Natural Abiotic Colloids on the Transport of Lindane (gamma-hexachlorocyclohexane) through Saturated Porous Media: Laboratory Experiments and Model-Based Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngueleu Kamangou, S.; Cirpka, O. A.; Grathwohl, P.

    2012-04-01

    In many developing countries, the hygienic situation has improved by changing from surface-water bodies to groundwater as drinking water resource. However, failures have frequently been reported, presumably caused by wrong design of groundwater extraction (e.g., wells too close to open-water bodies, landfill leachates or agricultural areas). Moreover threat to groundwater pollution is enhanced when colloidal particles in the subsurface can act as carriers for adsorbing contaminants such as hydrophobic chlorinated organic contaminants. In this study, the main objective was to investigate the influence of particles in the size range of colloids on the subsurface transport of pesticides which are known to cause severe health problems. The model pesticide was gamma-hexachlorocyclohexane, a representative hydrophobic insecticide which is still used mainly in tropical countries. Colloid-facilitated transport was carried out by considering a first case where the adsorption of the contaminant to the particles is at equilibrium before getting simultaneously transported, and a second case where this equilibrium was not reached before their transport. Another focus besides colloid-facilitated transport was placed on the release of the contaminant from trapped colloids. Data analysis was done with the help of numerical modeling and the minimum model complexity needed to simulate such transports was examined.

  7. A comparison of bioinsecticide, Spinosad, the semi-synthetic insecticide, Spinetoram and synthetic insecticides as soil drenches for control of Tephritid fruit flies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Eight insecticides, including the natural bioinsecticide spinosad and the semi-synthetic insecticide spinetoram, as well as two synthetic pyrethroids, an insect growth regulator, an anthranilic diamide, and an organophosphate were evaluated as soil drench treatments for control of three economically...

  8. [INSECTICIDE RESISTANCE IN MAJOR MALARIA VECTORS IN UZBEKISTAN].

    PubMed

    Zhakhongirov, Sh M; Saifiev, Sh T; Abidov, Z I

    2016-01-01

    The resistance of Anopheles artemievi to DDT (26.7%) and propoxur (80.0%) was established in the kishlak of Chubat, Bulungursky District, Samarkand Viloyati and that in the kishlak of Rastguzar, Uichinsky District, Namangan Viloyati, was 45.0 and 22.5%, respectively. In the kishlak of Navruz, Kanlikulsky District, Republic of Karakalpakstan, there was reduced propoxur susceptibil- ity (90.0% An. superpictus death); in other human settle- ments, An. artemievi was susceptible--100% death in the use of the test insecticides. An. superpictus proved to be susceptive to 7 test insecticides (other than propoxur). In Uzbekistan, the resistance of An. artemievi was noted only in a small area. Among the major malaria vectors, An. superpictus remained susceptible to pyrethroid insec- ticides.

  9. Secondary metabolites and insecticidal activity of Anemone pavonina.

    PubMed

    Varitimidis, Christos; Petrakis, Panos V; Vagias, Constantinos; Roussis, Vassilios

    2006-01-01

    The insecticidal properties of the crude extracts of the leaves and flowers of Anemone pavonina were evaluated on Pheidole pallidula ants and showed significant levels of activity. Bioassay-guided fractionations led to the isolation of the butenolide ranunculin (1) as the active principle. Chemical investigations of the extracts showed them to contain as major components the sitosterol glycopyranoside lipids 2-5 and the glycerides 6-8. The structures of the metabolites were elucidated, following acetylation and hydrolysis of the natural products, by interpretation of their NMR and mass spectral data. The uncommon lipid metabolites 2-8 were isolated for the first time from the genus Anemone and this is the first report of insecticidal activity of the Anemone metabolite ranunculin against ants.

  10. Fipronil insecticide: novel photochemical desulfinylation with retention of neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Hainzl, D; Casida, J E

    1996-11-12

    Fipronil is an outstanding new insecticide for crop protection with good selectivity between insects and mammals. The insecticidal action involves blocking the lambda-aminobutyric acid-gated chloride channel with much greater sensitivity of this target in insects than in mammals. Fipronil contains a trifluoromethylsulfinyl moiety that is unique among the agrochemicals and therefore presumably important in its outstanding performance. We find that this substituent unexpectedly undergoes a novel and facile photoextrusion reaction on plants upon exposure to sunlight, yielding the corresponding trifluoromethylpyrazole, i.e., the desulfinyl derivative. The persistence of this photoproduct and its high neuroactivity, resulting from blocking the lambda-aminobutyric acid-gated chloride channel, suggest that it may be a significant contributor to the effectiveness of fipronil. In addition, desulfinylfipronil is not a metabolite in mammals, so the safety evaluations must take into account not only the parent compound but also this completely new environmental product. PMID:8917493

  11. Resistance is not Futile: It Shapes Insecticide Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Hardy, Margaret C.

    2014-01-01

    Conventional chemical control compounds used for the management of insect pests have been much maligned, but still serve a critical role in protecting people and agricultural products from insect pests, as well as conserving biodiversity by eradicating invasive species. Although biological control can be an effective option for area-wide management of established pests, chemical control methods are important for use in integrated pest management (IPM) programs, as well as in export treatments, eradicating recently arrived invasive species, and minimizing population explosions of vectors of human disease. Cogitated research and development programs have continued the innovation of insecticides, with a particular focus on combating insecticide resistance. Recent developments in the fields of human health, protecting the global food supply, and biosecurity will be highlighted. PMID:26462586

  12. [INSECTICIDE RESISTANCE IN MAJOR MALARIA VECTORS IN UZBEKISTAN].

    PubMed

    Zhakhongirov, Sh M; Saifiev, Sh T; Abidov, Z I

    2016-01-01

    The resistance of Anopheles artemievi to DDT (26.7%) and propoxur (80.0%) was established in the kishlak of Chubat, Bulungursky District, Samarkand Viloyati and that in the kishlak of Rastguzar, Uichinsky District, Namangan Viloyati, was 45.0 and 22.5%, respectively. In the kishlak of Navruz, Kanlikulsky District, Republic of Karakalpakstan, there was reduced propoxur susceptibil- ity (90.0% An. superpictus death); in other human settle- ments, An. artemievi was susceptible--100% death in the use of the test insecticides. An. superpictus proved to be susceptive to 7 test insecticides (other than propoxur). In Uzbekistan, the resistance of An. artemievi was noted only in a small area. Among the major malaria vectors, An. superpictus remained susceptible to pyrethroid insec- ticides. PMID:27405213

  13. Comparative insecticidal power of three pyrethroids on netting.

    PubMed

    Adams, K J; Chavasse, D C; Mount, D L; Carneiro, I A; Curtis, C F

    2002-03-01

    Adult mosquitoes, Anopheles gambiae Giles and Culex quinquefasciatus Say (Diptera: Culicidae), were exposed for 3 min to replicate samples of polyester netting cut from replicate bednets treated with pyrethroid insecticide formulations at the recommended concentration (alphacypermethrin SC at 40mg ai/m2; cyfluthrin EW at 50 mg ai/m2; deltamethrin WT at 25 mg ai/m2), or treated with only a quarter of those dosages. After 4 months domestic use of the bednets in Malawi, chemical assays showed that pyrethroid deposits on the netting were somewhat less than the target concentrations. Comparing the pyrethroid bioassay results with Anopheles at both treatment concentrations, deltamethrin gave significantly higher mortality (99.7-100%) than the other compounds (alphacypermethrin 94-96%, cyfluthrin 80-89%). Culex bioassay mortality was lower (alphacypermethrin 56-74%; cyfluthrin 63-65%; deltamethrin 50-81 %) and results with the three pyrethroid insecticides at their recommended doses did not differ significantly.

  14. A critical review of neonicotinoid insecticides for developmental neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Sheets, Larry P; Li, Abby A; Minnema, Daniel J; Collier, Richard H; Creek, Moire R; Peffer, Richard C

    2016-02-01

    A comprehensive review of published and previously unpublished studies was performed to evaluate the neonicotinoid insecticides for evidence of developmental neurotoxicity (DNT). These insecticides have favorable safety profiles, due to their preferential affinity for nicotinic receptor (nAChR) subtypes in insects, poor penetration of the mammalian blood-brain barrier, and low application rates. Nevertheless, examination of this issue is warranted, due to their insecticidal mode of action and potential exposure with agricultural and residential uses. This review identified in vitro, in vivo, and epidemiology studies in the literature and studies performed in rats in accordance with GLP standards and EPA guidelines with imidacloprid, acetamiprid, thiacloprid, clothianidin, thiamethoxam, and dinotefuran, which are all the neonicotinoids currently registered in major markets. For the guideline-based studies, treatment was administered via the diet or gavage to primiparous female rats at three dose levels, plus a vehicle control (≥20/dose level), from gestation day 0 or 6 to lactation day 21. F1 males and females were evaluated using measures of motor activity, acoustic startle response, cognition, brain morphometry, and neuropathology. The principal effects in F1 animals were associated with decreased body weight (delayed sexual maturation, decreased brain weight, and morphometric measurements) and acute toxicity (decreased activity during exposure) at high doses, without neuropathology or impaired cognition. No common effects were identified among the neonicotinoids that were consistent with DNT or the neurodevelopmental effects associated with nicotine. Findings at high doses were associated with evidence of systemic toxicity, which indicates that these insecticides do not selectively affect the developing nervous system. PMID:26513508

  15. Sucrose Improves Insecticide Activity Against Drosophila suzukii (Diptera: Drosophilidae).

    PubMed

    Cowles, Richard S; Rodriguez-Saona, Cesar; Holdcraft, Robert; Loeb, Gregory M; Elsensohn, Johanna E; Hesler, Steven P

    2015-04-01

    The addition of sucrose to insecticides targeting spotted wing drosophila, Drosophila suzukii (Matsumura), enhanced lethality in laboratory, semifield, and field tests. In the laboratory, 0.1% sucrose added to a spray solution enhanced spotted wing drosophila feeding. Flies died 120 min earlier when exposed to spinosad residues at label rates enhanced with sucrose. Added sucrose reduced the LC50 for dried acetamiprid residues from 82 to 41 ppm in the spray solution. Laboratory bioassays of spotted wing drosophila mortality followed exposure to grape and blueberry foliage and/or fruit sprayed and aged in the field. On grape foliage, the addition of 2.4 g/liter of sugar with insecticide sprays resulted in an 11 and 6% increase of spotted wing drosophila mortality at 1 and 2 d exposures to residues, respectively, averaged over seven insecticides with three concentrations. In a separate experiment, spinetoram and cyantraniliprole reduced by 95-100% the larval infestation of blueberries, relative to the untreated control, 7 d after application at labeled rates when applied with 1.2 g/liter sucrose in a spray mixture, irrespective of rainfall; without sucrose infestation was reduced by 46-91%. Adding sugar to the organically acceptable spinosyn, Entrust, reduced larval infestation of strawberries by >50% relative to without sugar for five of the six sample dates during a season-long field trial. In a small-plot field test with blueberries, weekly applications in alternating sprays of sucrose plus reduced-risk insecticides, spinetoram or acetamiprid, reduced larval infestation relative to the untreated control by 76%; alternating bifenthrin and phosmet (without sucrose) reduced infestation by 65%.

  16. Evaluation of compounds for insecticidal activity on adult mosquitos*

    PubMed Central

    Hadaway, A. B.; Barlow, F.; Grose, J. E. H.; Turner, C. R.; Flower, L. S.

    1970-01-01

    New pyrethrin-like compounds are compared with earlier synthetic pyrethroids and natural pyrethrins for intrinsic toxicity to adult mosquitos and for residual contact activity. Two of the compounds are at least as toxic as pyrethrin I to female Anopheles stephensi and Aedes aegypti. Residues of these compounds are very persistent in the dark or in very subdued lighting but they decompose on exposure to normal intensities of daylight and rapidly lose their insecticidal activity. PMID:4392939

  17. Sucrose Improves Insecticide Activity Against Drosophila suzukii (Diptera: Drosophilidae).

    PubMed

    Cowles, Richard S; Rodriguez-Saona, Cesar; Holdcraft, Robert; Loeb, Gregory M; Elsensohn, Johanna E; Hesler, Steven P

    2015-04-01

    The addition of sucrose to insecticides targeting spotted wing drosophila, Drosophila suzukii (Matsumura), enhanced lethality in laboratory, semifield, and field tests. In the laboratory, 0.1% sucrose added to a spray solution enhanced spotted wing drosophila feeding. Flies died 120 min earlier when exposed to spinosad residues at label rates enhanced with sucrose. Added sucrose reduced the LC50 for dried acetamiprid residues from 82 to 41 ppm in the spray solution. Laboratory bioassays of spotted wing drosophila mortality followed exposure to grape and blueberry foliage and/or fruit sprayed and aged in the field. On grape foliage, the addition of 2.4 g/liter of sugar with insecticide sprays resulted in an 11 and 6% increase of spotted wing drosophila mortality at 1 and 2 d exposures to residues, respectively, averaged over seven insecticides with three concentrations. In a separate experiment, spinetoram and cyantraniliprole reduced by 95-100% the larval infestation of blueberries, relative to the untreated control, 7 d after application at labeled rates when applied with 1.2 g/liter sucrose in a spray mixture, irrespective of rainfall; without sucrose infestation was reduced by 46-91%. Adding sugar to the organically acceptable spinosyn, Entrust, reduced larval infestation of strawberries by >50% relative to without sugar for five of the six sample dates during a season-long field trial. In a small-plot field test with blueberries, weekly applications in alternating sprays of sucrose plus reduced-risk insecticides, spinetoram or acetamiprid, reduced larval infestation relative to the untreated control by 76%; alternating bifenthrin and phosmet (without sucrose) reduced infestation by 65%. PMID:26470175

  18. Insecticidal properties of a Chenopodium-based botanical.

    PubMed

    Chiasson, H; Vincent, C; Bostanian, N J

    2004-08-01

    The emulsifiable concentrate UDA-245 based on an essential oil extract from Chenopodium ambrosioides variety near ambrosioides, a North American herbaceous plant, was compared with commercially available pesticides for their effectiveness to control green peach aphid, Myzus persicae (Sulzer) (Homoptera: Aphididae), western flower thrips, Frankliniella occidentalis (Pergande) (Thysanoptera: Thripidae), and greenhouse whitefly, Trialeurodes vaporariorium (Westwood) (Homoptera: Aleyrodidae). Side effects on the whitefly parasitoid Encarsia formosa Gahan (Hymenoptera: Aphelinidae) also were determined. With green peach aphid, UDA-245 at 0.5% concentration was significantly more effective than the control (water) treatment in a laboratory bioassay and significantly more effective than neem oil and the control treatment and as effective as insecticidal soap in a greenhouse assay. With the western flower thrips, UDA-245 at 0.5% was significantly more effective than neem oil, insecticidal soap and the control treatment in a laboratory bioassay, whereas in a greenhouse assay, UDA-245 at 1.0% was the only treatment that maintained control of the western flower thrips 2 wk after the last treatment period. UDA-245 at 0.5% (laboratory bioassay) was significantly more effective in managing greenhouse whitefly than neem oil, endosulfan, and the control treatment and as effective as insecticidal soap. Insecticidal soap proved to be toxic to the parasitoid E. formosa (71.9% mortality), whereas UDA-245 at 0.5% was not significantly more toxic than the control (11.2 and 4.6% mortality, respectively). Our results suggest that a greenhouse integrated pest management (IPM) program using a botanical such as UDA-245 could effectively control infestations of major pests present while having a negligible effect on biological control agents.

  19. A critical review of neonicotinoid insecticides for developmental neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Sheets, Larry P; Li, Abby A; Minnema, Daniel J; Collier, Richard H; Creek, Moire R; Peffer, Richard C

    2016-02-01

    A comprehensive review of published and previously unpublished studies was performed to evaluate the neonicotinoid insecticides for evidence of developmental neurotoxicity (DNT). These insecticides have favorable safety profiles, due to their preferential affinity for nicotinic receptor (nAChR) subtypes in insects, poor penetration of the mammalian blood-brain barrier, and low application rates. Nevertheless, examination of this issue is warranted, due to their insecticidal mode of action and potential exposure with agricultural and residential uses. This review identified in vitro, in vivo, and epidemiology studies in the literature and studies performed in rats in accordance with GLP standards and EPA guidelines with imidacloprid, acetamiprid, thiacloprid, clothianidin, thiamethoxam, and dinotefuran, which are all the neonicotinoids currently registered in major markets. For the guideline-based studies, treatment was administered via the diet or gavage to primiparous female rats at three dose levels, plus a vehicle control (≥20/dose level), from gestation day 0 or 6 to lactation day 21. F1 males and females were evaluated using measures of motor activity, acoustic startle response, cognition, brain morphometry, and neuropathology. The principal effects in F1 animals were associated with decreased body weight (delayed sexual maturation, decreased brain weight, and morphometric measurements) and acute toxicity (decreased activity during exposure) at high doses, without neuropathology or impaired cognition. No common effects were identified among the neonicotinoids that were consistent with DNT or the neurodevelopmental effects associated with nicotine. Findings at high doses were associated with evidence of systemic toxicity, which indicates that these insecticides do not selectively affect the developing nervous system.

  20. A critical review of neonicotinoid insecticides for developmental neurotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Sheets, Larry P.; Li, Abby A.; Minnema, Daniel J.; Collier, Richard H.; Creek, Moire R.; Peffer, Richard C.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract A comprehensive review of published and previously unpublished studies was performed to evaluate the neonicotinoid insecticides for evidence of developmental neurotoxicity (DNT). These insecticides have favorable safety profiles, due to their preferential affinity for nicotinic receptor (nAChR) subtypes in insects, poor penetration of the mammalian blood–brain barrier, and low application rates. Nevertheless, examination of this issue is warranted, due to their insecticidal mode of action and potential exposure with agricultural and residential uses. This review identified in vitro, in vivo, and epidemiology studies in the literature and studies performed in rats in accordance with GLP standards and EPA guidelines with imidacloprid, acetamiprid, thiacloprid, clothianidin, thiamethoxam, and dinotefuran, which are all the neonicotinoids currently registered in major markets. For the guideline-based studies, treatment was administered via the diet or gavage to primiparous female rats at three dose levels, plus a vehicle control (≥20/dose level), from gestation day 0 or 6 to lactation day 21. F1 males and females were evaluated using measures of motor activity, acoustic startle response, cognition, brain morphometry, and neuropathology. The principal effects in F1 animals were associated with decreased body weight (delayed sexual maturation, decreased brain weight, and morphometric measurements) and acute toxicity (decreased activity during exposure) at high doses, without neuropathology or impaired cognition. No common effects were identified among the neonicotinoids that were consistent with DNT or the neurodevelopmental effects associated with nicotine. Findings at high doses were associated with evidence of systemic toxicity, which indicates that these insecticides do not selectively affect the developing nervous system. PMID:26513508

  1. Insecticidal properties of a Chenopodium-based botanical.

    PubMed

    Chiasson, H; Vincent, C; Bostanian, N J

    2004-08-01

    The emulsifiable concentrate UDA-245 based on an essential oil extract from Chenopodium ambrosioides variety near ambrosioides, a North American herbaceous plant, was compared with commercially available pesticides for their effectiveness to control green peach aphid, Myzus persicae (Sulzer) (Homoptera: Aphididae), western flower thrips, Frankliniella occidentalis (Pergande) (Thysanoptera: Thripidae), and greenhouse whitefly, Trialeurodes vaporariorium (Westwood) (Homoptera: Aleyrodidae). Side effects on the whitefly parasitoid Encarsia formosa Gahan (Hymenoptera: Aphelinidae) also were determined. With green peach aphid, UDA-245 at 0.5% concentration was significantly more effective than the control (water) treatment in a laboratory bioassay and significantly more effective than neem oil and the control treatment and as effective as insecticidal soap in a greenhouse assay. With the western flower thrips, UDA-245 at 0.5% was significantly more effective than neem oil, insecticidal soap and the control treatment in a laboratory bioassay, whereas in a greenhouse assay, UDA-245 at 1.0% was the only treatment that maintained control of the western flower thrips 2 wk after the last treatment period. UDA-245 at 0.5% (laboratory bioassay) was significantly more effective in managing greenhouse whitefly than neem oil, endosulfan, and the control treatment and as effective as insecticidal soap. Insecticidal soap proved to be toxic to the parasitoid E. formosa (71.9% mortality), whereas UDA-245 at 0.5% was not significantly more toxic than the control (11.2 and 4.6% mortality, respectively). Our results suggest that a greenhouse integrated pest management (IPM) program using a botanical such as UDA-245 could effectively control infestations of major pests present while having a negligible effect on biological control agents. PMID:15384351

  2. The impact of insecticides to local honey bee colony Apis cerana indica in laboratory condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Putra, Ramadhani E.; Permana, Agus D.; Nuriyah, Syayidah

    2014-03-01

    Heavy use of insecticides considered as one of common practice at local farming systems. Even though many Indonesian researchers had stated the possible detrimental effect of insecticide on agriculture environment and biodiversity, researches on this subject had been neglected. Therefore, our purpose in this research is observing the impact of insecticides usage by farmer to non target organisme like local honey bee (Apis cerana indica), which commonly kept in area near agriculture system. This research consisted of field observations out at Ciburial, Dago Pakar, Bandung and laboratory tests at School of Life Sciences and Technology, Institut Teknologi Bandung. The field observations recorded visited agriculture corps and types of pollen carried by bees to the nest while laboratory test recorderd the effect of common insecticide to mortality and behavior of honey bees. Three types of insecticides used in this research were insecticides A with active agent Chlorantraniliprol 50 g/l, insecticide B with active agent Profenofos 500 g/l, and insecticides C with active agent Chlorantraniliprol 100 g/l and λ-cyhalotrin 50g/l. The results show that during one week visit, wild flower, Wedelia montana, visited by most honey bees with average visit 60 honey bees followed by corn, Zea mays, with 21 honey bees. The most pollen carried by foragers was Wedelia montana, Calliandra callothyrsus, and Zea mays. Preference test show that honeybees tend move to flowers without insecticides as the preference to insecticides A was 12.5%, insecticides B was 0%, and insecticides was C 4.2%. Mortality test showed that insecticides A has LD50 value 0.01 μg/μl, insecticide B 0.31 μg/μl, and insecticides C 0.09 μg/μl which much lower than suggested dosage recommended by insecticides producer. This research conclude that the use of insecticide could lower the pollination service provide by honey bee due to low visitation rate to flowers and mortality of foraging bees.

  3. Neonicotinoid insecticides can serve as inadvertent insect contraceptives

    PubMed Central

    Villamar-Bouza, Laura; Bruckner, Selina; Chantawannakul, Panuwan; Gauthier, Laurent; Khongphinitbunjong, Kitiphong; Retschnig, Gina; Troxler, Aline; Vidondo, Beatriz; Neumann, Peter; Williams, Geoffrey R.

    2016-01-01

    There is clear evidence for sublethal effects of neonicotinoid insecticides on non-target ecosystem service-providing insects. However, their possible impact on male insect reproduction is currently unknown, despite the key role of sex. Here, we show that two neonicotinoids (4.5 ppb thiamethoxam and 1.5 ppb clothianidin) significantly reduce the reproductive capacity of male honeybees (drones), Apis mellifera. Drones were obtained from colonies exposed to the neonicotinoid insecticides or controls, and subsequently maintained in laboratory cages until they reached sexual maturity. While no significant effects were observed for male teneral (newly emerged adult) body mass and sperm quantity, the data clearly showed reduced drone lifespan, as well as reduced sperm viability (percentage living versus dead) and living sperm quantity by 39%. Our results demonstrate for the first time that neonicotinoid insecticides can negatively affect male insect reproductive capacity, and provide a possible mechanistic explanation for managed honeybee queen failure and wild insect pollinator decline. The widespread prophylactic use of neonicotinoids may have previously overlooked inadvertent contraceptive effects on non-target insects, thereby limiting conservation efforts. PMID:27466446

  4. The molecular action of the novel insecticide, Pyridalyl.

    PubMed

    Powell, Gerard F; Ward, Deborah A; Prescott, Mark C; Spiller, David G; White, Michael R H; Turner, Phillip C; Earley, Fergus G P; Phillips, Janet; Rees, Huw H

    2011-07-01

    Pyridalyl is a recently discovered insecticide that exhibits high insecticidal activity against Lepidoptera and Thysanoptera. Pyridalyl action requires cytochrome P450 activity, possibly for production of a bioactive derivative, Pyridalyl metabolism being prevented by general P450 inhibitors. Apoptosis is apparently not involved in the cytotoxicity. Continuous culture of Spodoptera frugiperda Sf21 cells in sub-lethal doses of Pyridalyl, results in a Pyridalyl-resistant cell line. Probing the molecular action of Pyridalyl by comparison of the proteomes of Pyridalyl-resistant and -susceptible cell lines, revealed differential expression of a number of proteins, including the up-regulation of thiol peroxiredoxin (TPx), in the resistant cells. Treatment of Bombyx mori larvae with Pyridalyl, followed by comparison of the midgut microsomal sub-proteome, revealed the up-regulation of three proteasome subunits. Such subunits, together with Hsp70 stress proteins, glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenases (GAPDHs) and thiol peroxiredoxin (TPx) were also up-regulated in the whole proteome of B. mori BM36 cells following treatment with the insecticide. The foregoing results lead to the hypothesis that cytochrome P450 action leads to an active Pyridalyl metabolite, which results in production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), that leads to damage to cellular macromolecules (e.g., proteins) and enhanced proteasome activity leads to increased protein degradation and necrotic cell death.

  5. Dermal insecticide residues from birds inhabiting an orchard

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vyas, N.B.; Spann, J.W.; Hulse, C.S.; Gentry, S.; Borges, S.L.

    2007-01-01

    The US Environmental Protection Agency conducts risk assessments of insecticide applications to wild birds using a model that is limited to the dietary route of exposure. However, free-flying birds are also exposed to insecticides via the inhalation and dermal routes. We measured azinphos-methyl residues on the skin plus feathers and the feet of brown-headed cowbirds (Molothrus ater) in order to quantify dermal exposure to songbirds that entered and inhabited an apple (Malus x domestica) orchard following an insecticide application. Exposure to azinphos-methyl was measured by sampling birds from an aviary that was built around an apple tree. Birds sampled at 36 h and 7-day post-application were placed in the aviary within 1 h after the application whereas birds exposed for 3 days were released into the aviary 4-day post-application. Residues on vegetation and soil were also measured. Azinphos-methyl residues were detected from the skin plus feathers and the feet from all exposure periods. Our results underscore the importance of incorporating dermal exposure into avian pesticide risk assessments.

  6. Photodegradation of neonicotinoid insecticides in water by semiconductor oxides.

    PubMed

    Fenoll, José; Garrido, Isabel; Hellín, Pilar; Flores, Pilar; Navarro, Simón

    2015-10-01

    The photocatalytic degradation of three neonicotinoid insecticides (NIs), thiamethoxam (TH), imidacloprid (IM) and acetamiprid (AC), in pure water has been studied using zinc oxide (ZnO) and titanium dioxide (TiO2) as photocatalysts under natural sunlight and artificial light irradiation. Photocatalytic experiments showed that the addition of these chalcogenide oxides in tandem with the electron acceptor (Na2S2O8) strongly enhances the degradation rate of these compounds in comparison with those carried out with ZnO and TiO2 alone and photolytic tests. Comparison of catalysts showed that ZnO is the most efficient for the removal of such insecticides in optimal conditions and at constant volumetric rate of photon absorption. Thus, the complete disappearance of all the studied compounds was achieved after 10 and 30 min of artificial light irradiation, in the ZnO/Na2S2O8 and TiO2/Na2S2O8 systems, respectively. The highest degradation rate was noticed for IM, while the lowest rate constant was obtained for AC under artificial light irradiation. In addition, solar irradiation was more efficient compared to artificial light for the removal of these insecticides from water. The main photocatalytic intermediates detected during the degradation of NIs were identified. PMID:26002372

  7. Bacterial Vegetative Insecticidal Proteins (Vip) from Entomopathogenic Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Chakroun, Maissa; Banyuls, Núria; Bel, Yolanda; Escriche, Baltasar; Ferré, Juan

    2016-06-01

    Entomopathogenic bacteria produce insecticidal proteins that accumulate in inclusion bodies or parasporal crystals (such as the Cry and Cyt proteins) as well as insecticidal proteins that are secreted into the culture medium. Among the latter are the Vip proteins, which are divided into four families according to their amino acid identity. The Vip1 and Vip2 proteins act as binary toxins and are toxic to some members of the Coleoptera and Hemiptera. The Vip1 component is thought to bind to receptors in the membrane of the insect midgut, and the Vip2 component enters the cell, where it displays its ADP-ribosyltransferase activity against actin, preventing microfilament formation. Vip3 has no sequence similarity to Vip1 or Vip2 and is toxic to a wide variety of members of the Lepidoptera. Its mode of action has been shown to resemble that of the Cry proteins in terms of proteolytic activation, binding to the midgut epithelial membrane, and pore formation, although Vip3A proteins do not share binding sites with Cry proteins. The latter property makes them good candidates to be combined with Cry proteins in transgenic plants (Bacillus thuringiensis-treated crops [Bt crops]) to prevent or delay insect resistance and to broaden the insecticidal spectrum. There are commercially grown varieties of Bt cotton and Bt maize that express the Vip3Aa protein in combination with Cry proteins. For the most recently reported Vip4 family, no target insects have been found yet. PMID:26935135

  8. Photodegradation of neonicotinoid insecticides in water by semiconductor oxides.

    PubMed

    Fenoll, José; Garrido, Isabel; Hellín, Pilar; Flores, Pilar; Navarro, Simón

    2015-10-01

    The photocatalytic degradation of three neonicotinoid insecticides (NIs), thiamethoxam (TH), imidacloprid (IM) and acetamiprid (AC), in pure water has been studied using zinc oxide (ZnO) and titanium dioxide (TiO2) as photocatalysts under natural sunlight and artificial light irradiation. Photocatalytic experiments showed that the addition of these chalcogenide oxides in tandem with the electron acceptor (Na2S2O8) strongly enhances the degradation rate of these compounds in comparison with those carried out with ZnO and TiO2 alone and photolytic tests. Comparison of catalysts showed that ZnO is the most efficient for the removal of such insecticides in optimal conditions and at constant volumetric rate of photon absorption. Thus, the complete disappearance of all the studied compounds was achieved after 10 and 30 min of artificial light irradiation, in the ZnO/Na2S2O8 and TiO2/Na2S2O8 systems, respectively. The highest degradation rate was noticed for IM, while the lowest rate constant was obtained for AC under artificial light irradiation. In addition, solar irradiation was more efficient compared to artificial light for the removal of these insecticides from water. The main photocatalytic intermediates detected during the degradation of NIs were identified.

  9. The stability of organophosphorus insecticides in fresh blood.

    PubMed

    Ageda, Saori; Fuke, Chiaki; Ihama, Yoko; Miyazaki, Tetsuji

    2006-05-01

    We investigated the stability of 14 organophosphorus insecticides: dichlorvos, fenitrothion, cyanophos, malathion, phenthoate, methidathion, dimethoate, thiometon, isoxathion, diazinon, trichlorfon, EPN, acephate and sulprofos, in fresh blood. The organophosphorus compounds, except for sulprofos, decomposed over time at 37 degrees C, with varying decomposition speed for each compound. Methyl phosphate types (dichlorvos) decomposed most rapidly, followed by methyl thiophosphate types (fenitrothion and cyanophos) and methyl dithiophosphate types (methidathion, dimethoate and thiometon). Methyl thiophosphate types decomposed faster than ethyl thiophosphate types (isoxathion and diazinon). Of the five methyl dithiophosphate type insecticides (malathion, phenthoate, methidathion, dimethoate and thiometon), the compounds with a carboxylic ester bond (malathion and phenthoate) decomposed faster than the others. Compounds left standing at 37 degrees C decomposed faster than those left standing at 4 degrees C. Temperature has a great effect on the decomposition of organophosphorus insecticides in blood. However, the order of the decomposition speeds of each compound was approximately the same at different temperatures. In cases of suspected organophosphate poisoning, it should be considered that the blood concentration of the compound might decrease during the postmortem interval.

  10. Penetration of household insecticides through different types of textile fabrics.

    PubMed

    Saleh, M A; Kamel, A; el-Demerdash, A; Jones, J

    1998-03-01

    Six different types of fabrics were compared for their ability to protect against human exposure to three different commercial household aerosol insecticides. Fabrics used in this investigation were, 100% cotton, cotton-polyester thermal underwear, cotton-polyester blend (twill), 100% acrylic, 100% wool and artificial silk (rayon). The household insecticides were, Black Flag (Ant and Roach Killer), Raid (Ant and Roach Killer) and Hot Shot (Wasp and Hornet Killer) containing propoxur, permethrin/pyrethrins and chlorpyrifos/allethrins as their active ingredients respectively. A fluorescent tracer, 4-methyl-7-diethyl amino coumarin was mixed with the aerosol (or equivalent aliquot) and sprayed onto cloth squares fitted on Whatman paper patches. The percentage of penetration through the cloth was quantified by the intensity of the fluorescence spectrum of each patch extract and the amount of the tracer recovered was calculated. The extract was concentrated to 1/10th of the volume to measure the content of each of the insecticides by supercritical fluid chromatography (SFC) using electron capture (ECD) and diode array detectors. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) images of the fabrics showed the geometry of the yarn. The results obtained from the fluorescence spectra, SFC and SEM showed that cotton-polyester (twill), cotton, wool and cotton thermal underwear were the least penetrable materials for the aerosols. On the other hand, acrylic and artificial silk (rayon) were the most penetrable cloth types.

  11. Neonicotinoid insecticides can serve as inadvertent insect contraceptives.

    PubMed

    Straub, Lars; Villamar-Bouza, Laura; Bruckner, Selina; Chantawannakul, Panuwan; Gauthier, Laurent; Khongphinitbunjong, Kitiphong; Retschnig, Gina; Troxler, Aline; Vidondo, Beatriz; Neumann, Peter; Williams, Geoffrey R

    2016-07-27

    There is clear evidence for sublethal effects of neonicotinoid insecticides on non-target ecosystem service-providing insects. However, their possible impact on male insect reproduction is currently unknown, despite the key role of sex. Here, we show that two neonicotinoids (4.5 ppb thiamethoxam and 1.5 ppb clothianidin) significantly reduce the reproductive capacity of male honeybees (drones), Apis mellifera Drones were obtained from colonies exposed to the neonicotinoid insecticides or controls, and subsequently maintained in laboratory cages until they reached sexual maturity. While no significant effects were observed for male teneral (newly emerged adult) body mass and sperm quantity, the data clearly showed reduced drone lifespan, as well as reduced sperm viability (percentage living versus dead) and living sperm quantity by 39%. Our results demonstrate for the first time that neonicotinoid insecticides can negatively affect male insect reproductive capacity, and provide a possible mechanistic explanation for managed honeybee queen failure and wild insect pollinator decline. The widespread prophylactic use of neonicotinoids may have previously overlooked inadvertent contraceptive effects on non-target insects, thereby limiting conservation efforts.

  12. Efficacy of Selected Insecticides Applied to Hybrid Rice Seed

    PubMed Central

    Adams, A.; Gore, J.; Musser, F.; Cook, D.; Walker, T.; Dobbins, C.

    2016-01-01

    Hybrid rice and insecticide seed treatments targeting rice water weevil, Lissorhoptrus oryzophilus Kuschel, have altered the landscape of rice production. The effect of reduced seeding rates on seed treatment efficacy in hybrid rice has not been studied. During 2011 and 2012, an experiment was conducted at seven locations to determine the relationship between low seeding rates used in hybrid rice and efficacy of selected insecticidal seed treatments as measured by rice water weevil densities and yield. Labeled rates of thiamethoxam, chlorantraniliprole, and clothianidin were compared with higher rates of these products to determine if labeled rates provide an acceptable level of control of the rice water weevil. Study locations were divided into low, moderate, and high groups based on rice water weevil larval densities. All seed treatments and seed treatment rates reduced rice water weevil densities. However, there was no observed yield or economic benefit from the use of an insecticidal seed treatment in areas of low pressure. Differences in yield were observed among seed treatments and seed treatment rates in moderate and high pressure locations, and all seed treatments yielded better than the untreated plots, but these differences were not always economical. All seed treatments showed an economic advantage in areas of high weevil pressure, and there were no differences among seed treatment products or rates, suggesting that currently labeled seed treatment rates in hybrid rice are effective for rice water weevil management. PMID:26537671

  13. Efficacy of Selected Insecticides Applied to Hybrid Rice Seed.

    PubMed

    Adams, A; Gore, J; Musser, F; Cook, D; Catchot, A; Walker, T; Dobbins, C

    2016-02-01

    Hybrid rice and insecticide seed treatments targeting rice water weevil, Lissorhoptrus oryzophilus Kuschel, have altered the landscape of rice production. The effect of reduced seeding rates on seed treatment efficacy in hybrid rice has not been studied. During 2011 and 2012, an experiment was conducted at seven locations to determine the relationship between low seeding rates used in hybrid rice and efficacy of selected insecticidal seed treatments as measured by rice water weevil densities and yield. Labeled rates of thiamethoxam, chlorantraniliprole, and clothianidin were compared with higher rates of these products to determine if labeled rates provide an acceptable level of control of the rice water weevil. Study locations were divided into low, moderate, and high groups based on rice water weevil larval densities. All seed treatments and seed treatment rates reduced rice water weevil densities. However, there was no observed yield or economic benefit from the use of an insecticidal seed treatment in areas of low pressure. Differences in yield were observed among seed treatments and seed treatment rates in moderate and high pressure locations, and all seed treatments yielded better than the untreated plots, but these differences were not always economical. All seed treatments showed an economic advantage in areas of high weevil pressure, and there were no differences among seed treatment products or rates, suggesting that currently labeled seed treatment rates in hybrid rice are effective for rice water weevil management. PMID:26537671

  14. Dermal insecticide residues from birds inhabiting an orchard.

    PubMed

    Vyas, Nimish B; Spann, James W; Hulse, Craig S; Gentry, Sallie; Borges, Shannon L

    2007-10-01

    The US Environmental Protection Agency conducts risk assessments of insecticide applications to wild birds using a model that is limited to the dietary route of exposure. However, free-flying birds are also exposed to insecticides via the inhalation and dermal routes. We measured azinphos-methyl residues on the skin plus feathers and the feet of brown-headed cowbirds (Molothrus ater) in order to quantify dermal exposure to songbirds that entered and inhabited an apple (Malus x domestica) orchard following an insecticide application. Exposure to azinphos-methyl was measured by sampling birds from an aviary that was built around an apple tree. Birds sampled at 36 h and 7-day post-application were placed in the aviary within 1 h after the application whereas birds exposed for 3 days were released into the aviary 4-day post-application. Residues on vegetation and soil were also measured. Azinphos-methyl residues were detected from the skin plus feathers and the feet from all exposure periods. Our results underscore the importance of incorporating dermal exposure into avian pesticide risk assessments.

  15. Neonicotinoid insecticides can serve as inadvertent insect contraceptives.

    PubMed

    Straub, Lars; Villamar-Bouza, Laura; Bruckner, Selina; Chantawannakul, Panuwan; Gauthier, Laurent; Khongphinitbunjong, Kitiphong; Retschnig, Gina; Troxler, Aline; Vidondo, Beatriz; Neumann, Peter; Williams, Geoffrey R

    2016-07-27

    There is clear evidence for sublethal effects of neonicotinoid insecticides on non-target ecosystem service-providing insects. However, their possible impact on male insect reproduction is currently unknown, despite the key role of sex. Here, we show that two neonicotinoids (4.5 ppb thiamethoxam and 1.5 ppb clothianidin) significantly reduce the reproductive capacity of male honeybees (drones), Apis mellifera Drones were obtained from colonies exposed to the neonicotinoid insecticides or controls, and subsequently maintained in laboratory cages until they reached sexual maturity. While no significant effects were observed for male teneral (newly emerged adult) body mass and sperm quantity, the data clearly showed reduced drone lifespan, as well as reduced sperm viability (percentage living versus dead) and living sperm quantity by 39%. Our results demonstrate for the first time that neonicotinoid insecticides can negatively affect male insect reproductive capacity, and provide a possible mechanistic explanation for managed honeybee queen failure and wild insect pollinator decline. The widespread prophylactic use of neonicotinoids may have previously overlooked inadvertent contraceptive effects on non-target insects, thereby limiting conservation efforts. PMID:27466446

  16. The molecular action of the novel insecticide, Pyridalyl.

    PubMed

    Powell, Gerard F; Ward, Deborah A; Prescott, Mark C; Spiller, David G; White, Michael R H; Turner, Phillip C; Earley, Fergus G P; Phillips, Janet; Rees, Huw H

    2011-07-01

    Pyridalyl is a recently discovered insecticide that exhibits high insecticidal activity against Lepidoptera and Thysanoptera. Pyridalyl action requires cytochrome P450 activity, possibly for production of a bioactive derivative, Pyridalyl metabolism being prevented by general P450 inhibitors. Apoptosis is apparently not involved in the cytotoxicity. Continuous culture of Spodoptera frugiperda Sf21 cells in sub-lethal doses of Pyridalyl, results in a Pyridalyl-resistant cell line. Probing the molecular action of Pyridalyl by comparison of the proteomes of Pyridalyl-resistant and -susceptible cell lines, revealed differential expression of a number of proteins, including the up-regulation of thiol peroxiredoxin (TPx), in the resistant cells. Treatment of Bombyx mori larvae with Pyridalyl, followed by comparison of the midgut microsomal sub-proteome, revealed the up-regulation of three proteasome subunits. Such subunits, together with Hsp70 stress proteins, glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenases (GAPDHs) and thiol peroxiredoxin (TPx) were also up-regulated in the whole proteome of B. mori BM36 cells following treatment with the insecticide. The foregoing results lead to the hypothesis that cytochrome P450 action leads to an active Pyridalyl metabolite, which results in production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), that leads to damage to cellular macromolecules (e.g., proteins) and enhanced proteasome activity leads to increased protein degradation and necrotic cell death. PMID:21497652

  17. Metabolomic profiling of permethrin-treated Drosophila melanogaster identifies a role for tryptophan catabolism in insecticide survival.

    PubMed

    Brinzer, Robert A; Henderson, Louise; Marchiondo, Alan A; Woods, Debra J; Davies, Shireen A; Dow, Julian A T

    2015-12-01

    Insecticides and associated synergists are rapidly losing efficacy in target insect pest populations making the discovery of alternatives a priority. To discover novel targets for permethrin synergists, metabolomics was performed on permethrin-treated Drosophila melanogaster. Changes were observed in several metabolic pathways including those for amino acids, glycogen, glycolysis, energy, nitrogen, NAD(+), purine, pyrimidine, lipids and carnitine. Markers for acidosis, ammonia stress, oxidative stress and detoxification responses were also observed. Many of these changes had not been previously characterized after permethrin exposure. From the altered pathways, tryptophan catabolism was selected for further investigation. The knockdown of some tryptophan catabolism genes (vermilion, cinnabar and CG6950) in the whole fly and in specific tissues including fat body, midgut and Malpighian tubules using targeted RNAi resulted in altered survival phenotypes against acute topical permethrin exposure. The knockdown of vermilion, cinnabar and CG6950 in the whole fly also altered survival phenotypes against chronic oral permethrin, fenvalerate, DDT, chlorpyriphos and hydramethylnon exposure. Thus tryptophan catabolism has a previously uncharacterized role in defence against insecticides, and shows that metabolomics is a powerful tool for target identification in pesticide research. PMID:26474926

  18. Toxicity Analysis of N- and C-Terminus-Deleted Vegetative Insecticidal Protein from Bacillus thuringiensis

    PubMed Central

    Selvapandiyan, A.; Arora, N.; Rajagopal, R.; Jalali, S. K.; Venkatesan, T.; Singh, S. P.; Bhatnagar, Raj K.

    2001-01-01

    A vegetative insecticidal protein (VIP)-encoding gene from a local isolate of Bacillus thuringiensis has been cloned, sequenced, and expressed in Escherichia coli. The expressed protein shows insecticidal activity against several lepidopteran pests but is ineffective against Agrotis ipsilon. Comparison of the amino acid sequence with those of reported VIPs revealed a few differences. Analysis of insecticidal activity with N- and C-terminus deletion mutants suggests a differential mode of action of VIP against different pests. PMID:11722946

  19. A Standardized Lepidopteran Bioassay to Investigate the Bioactivity of Insecticidal Proteins Produced in Transgenic Crops.

    PubMed

    Graser, Gerson; Walters, Frederick S

    2016-01-01

    Insecticidal bioassays are the only reliable method to investigate the biological activity of an insecticidal protein and therefore provide an essential toolkit for the characterization and potency determination of these proteins. Here we present a standardized method for a lepidopteran larval bioassay, which is optimized to specifically estimate activity of insecticidal proteins produced in transgenic plants. The treatment can be either applied to the surface of the artificial diet, or blended into the diet. PMID:26614295

  20. Additive effects on the improvement of insecticidal activity: Design, synthesis, and insecticidal activity of novel pymetrozine derivatives.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yan; Liu, Yuxiu; Song, Hongjian; Li, Yongqiang; Wang, Qingmin

    2016-02-01

    A series of new pymetrozine analogues containing both methyl on the imine carbon and phenoxy group at the pyridine ring were designed and synthesized. Their insecticidal activities against bean aphid (Aphis craccivora), mosquito larvae (Culex pipiens pallens), cotton bollworm (Helicoverpa armigera), corn borer (Ostrinia nubilalis) and oriental armyworm (Mythimna separata) were evaluated. The results of bioassays indicated that most of the target compounds showed good insecticidal activity against bean aphid; especially, IIIf (80%) and IIIl (80%) exhibited higher aphicidal activity than pymetrozine (30%) at 5mg/kg, and the two compounds still showed 20% and 30% mortality at 2.5mg/kg, respectively, whereas pymetrozine displayed no activity at the same concentration. These compounds exhibited a completely different structure-activity relationship to that of known pymetrozine derivatives, in which it is thought introducing alkyl group on the imine carbon could be detrimental to the activities. Our new result suggested that the methyl on the imine carbon and phenoxy group at the pyridine ring of phenoxy group may play additive effects on the improvement of aphicidal activity. Besides this, compound IIIs, containing an allyl at the para position of phenoxy group, exhibited excellent insecticidal activity against mosquito larvae, lepidoptera pests cotton bollworm, corn borer and oriental armyworm. PMID:26342545

  1. Posttreatment Feeding Affects Mortality of Bed Bugs (Hemiptera: Cimicidae) Exposed to Insecticides.

    PubMed

    Singh, Narinderpal; Wang, Changlu; Cooper, Richard

    2016-02-01

    Insecticide sprays and dusts are used for controlling bed bugs, Cimex lectularius L. In natural environments, bed bugs have daily access to hosts after they are exposed to insecticides. The established laboratory insecticide bioassay protocols do not provide feeding after insecticide treatments, which can result in inflated mortality compared with what would be encountered in the field. We evaluated the effect of posttreatment feeding on mortality of bed bugs treated with different insecticides. None of the insecticides tested had a significant effect on the amount of blood consumed and percent feeding. The effect of posttreatment feeding on bed bug mortality varied among different insecticides. Feeding significantly reduced mortality in bed bugs exposed to deltamethrin spray, an essential oil mixture (Bed Bug Fix) spray, and diatomaceous earth dust. Feeding increased the mean survival time for bed bugs treated with chlorfenapyr spray and a spray containing an essential oil mixture (Ecoraider), but did not affect the final mortality. First instars hatched from eggs treated with chlorfenapyr liquid spray had reduced feeding compared with nymphs hatched from nontreated eggs. Those nymphs hatched from eggs treated with chlorfenapyr liquid spray and successfully fed had reduced mortality and a higher mean survival time than those without feeding. We conclude that the availability of a bloodmeal after insecticide exposure has a significant effect on bed bug mortality. Protocols for insecticide efficacy testing should consider offering a bloodmeal to the treated bed bugs within 1 to 3 d after treatment. PMID:26494709

  2. Effects of persistent insecticides on beneficial soil arthropod in conventional fields compared to organic fields, puducherry.

    PubMed

    Anbarashan, Padmavathy; Gopalswamy, Poyyamoli

    2013-07-15

    The usage of synthetic fertilizers/insecticides in conventional farming has dramatically increased over the past decades. The aim of the study was to compare the effects of bio-pesticides and insecticides/pesticides on selected beneficial non targeted arthropods. Orders Collembola, Arachinida/Opiliones, Oribatida and Coleoptera were the main groups of arthropods found in the organic fields and Coleoptera, Oribatida, Gamasida and Collembola in conventional fields. Pesticides/insecticides had a significant effect on non-targeted arthropods order- Collembola, Arachinida/Opiliones, Hymenoptera and Thysonoptera were suppressed after pesticides/insecticides spraying. Bio-insecticides in organic fields had a non-significant effect on non targeted species and they started to increase in abundance after 7 days of spraying, whereas insecticide treatment in conventional fields had a significant long-term effect on non targeted arthropods and short term effect on pests/insects, it started to increase after 21 days of the spraying. These results indicate that insecticide treatment kept non targeted arthropods at low abundance. In conclusion, organic farming does not significantly affected the beneficial-non targeted arthropods biodiversity, whereas preventive insecticide application in conventional fields had significant negative effects on beneficial non targeted arthropods. Therefore, conventional farmers should restrict insecticide applications, unless pest densities reach the thresholds and more desirably can switch to organic farming practices. PMID:24505991

  3. Evaluation of the Insecticidal Efficacy of Wild Type and Recombinant Baculoviruses.

    PubMed

    Popham, Holly J R; Ellersieck, Mark R; Li, Huarong; Bonning, Bryony C

    2016-01-01

    A considerable amount of work has been undertaken to genetically enhance the efficacy of baculovirus insecticides. Following construction of a genetically altered baculovirus, laboratory bioassays are used to quantify various parameters of insecticidal activity such as the median lethal concentration (or dose) required to kill 50 % of infected larvae (LC50 or LD50), median survival of larvae infected (ST50), and feeding damage incurred by infected larvae. In this chapter, protocols are described for a variety of bioassays and the corresponding data analyses for assessment of the insecticidal activity of baculovirus insecticides.

  4. Current Perspectives on Plague Vector Control in Madagascar: Susceptibility Status of Xenopsylla cheopis to 12 Insecticides.

    PubMed

    Miarinjara, Adélaïde; Boyer, Sébastien

    2016-02-01

    Plague is a rodent disease transmissible to humans by infected flea bites, and Madagascar is one of the countries with the highest plague incidence in the world. This study reports the susceptibility of the main plague vector Xenopsylla cheopis to 12 different insecticides belonging to 4 insecticide families (carbamates, organophosphates, pyrethroids and organochlorines). Eight populations from different geographical regions of Madagascar previously resistant to deltamethrin were tested with a World Health Organization standard bioassay. Insecticide susceptibility varied amongst populations, but all of them were resistant to six insecticides belonging to pyrethroid and carbamate insecticides (alphacypermethrin, lambdacyhalothrin, etofenprox, deltamethrin, bendiocarb and propoxur). Only one insecticide (dieldrin) was an efficient pulicide for all flea populations. Cross resistances were suspected. This study proposes at least three alternative insecticides (malathion, fenitrothion and cyfluthrin) to replace deltamethrin during plague epidemic responses, but the most efficient insecticide may be different for each population studied. We highlight the importance of continuous insecticide susceptibility surveillance in the areas of high plague risk in Madagascar. PMID:26844772

  5. Effects of persistent insecticides on beneficial soil arthropod in conventional fields compared to organic fields, puducherry.

    PubMed

    Anbarashan, Padmavathy; Gopalswamy, Poyyamoli

    2013-07-15

    The usage of synthetic fertilizers/insecticides in conventional farming has dramatically increased over the past decades. The aim of the study was to compare the effects of bio-pesticides and insecticides/pesticides on selected beneficial non targeted arthropods. Orders Collembola, Arachinida/Opiliones, Oribatida and Coleoptera were the main groups of arthropods found in the organic fields and Coleoptera, Oribatida, Gamasida and Collembola in conventional fields. Pesticides/insecticides had a significant effect on non-targeted arthropods order- Collembola, Arachinida/Opiliones, Hymenoptera and Thysonoptera were suppressed after pesticides/insecticides spraying. Bio-insecticides in organic fields had a non-significant effect on non targeted species and they started to increase in abundance after 7 days of spraying, whereas insecticide treatment in conventional fields had a significant long-term effect on non targeted arthropods and short term effect on pests/insects, it started to increase after 21 days of the spraying. These results indicate that insecticide treatment kept non targeted arthropods at low abundance. In conclusion, organic farming does not significantly affected the beneficial-non targeted arthropods biodiversity, whereas preventive insecticide application in conventional fields had significant negative effects on beneficial non targeted arthropods. Therefore, conventional farmers should restrict insecticide applications, unless pest densities reach the thresholds and more desirably can switch to organic farming practices.

  6. Posttreatment Feeding Affects Mortality of Bed Bugs (Hemiptera: Cimicidae) Exposed to Insecticides.

    PubMed

    Singh, Narinderpal; Wang, Changlu; Cooper, Richard

    2016-02-01

    Insecticide sprays and dusts are used for controlling bed bugs, Cimex lectularius L. In natural environments, bed bugs have daily access to hosts after they are exposed to insecticides. The established laboratory insecticide bioassay protocols do not provide feeding after insecticide treatments, which can result in inflated mortality compared with what would be encountered in the field. We evaluated the effect of posttreatment feeding on mortality of bed bugs treated with different insecticides. None of the insecticides tested had a significant effect on the amount of blood consumed and percent feeding. The effect of posttreatment feeding on bed bug mortality varied among different insecticides. Feeding significantly reduced mortality in bed bugs exposed to deltamethrin spray, an essential oil mixture (Bed Bug Fix) spray, and diatomaceous earth dust. Feeding increased the mean survival time for bed bugs treated with chlorfenapyr spray and a spray containing an essential oil mixture (Ecoraider), but did not affect the final mortality. First instars hatched from eggs treated with chlorfenapyr liquid spray had reduced feeding compared with nymphs hatched from nontreated eggs. Those nymphs hatched from eggs treated with chlorfenapyr liquid spray and successfully fed had reduced mortality and a higher mean survival time than those without feeding. We conclude that the availability of a bloodmeal after insecticide exposure has a significant effect on bed bug mortality. Protocols for insecticide efficacy testing should consider offering a bloodmeal to the treated bed bugs within 1 to 3 d after treatment.

  7. Delayed action insecticides and their role in mosquito and malaria control.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chuncheng; Gourley, Stephen A; Liu, Rongsong

    2014-01-01

    There is considerable interest in the management of insecticide resistance in mosquitoes. One possible approach to slowing down the evolution of resistance is to use late-life-acting (LLA) insecticides that selectively kill only the old mosquitoes that transmit malaria, thereby reducing selection pressure favoring resistance. In this paper we consider an age-structured compartmental model for malaria with two mosquito strains that differ in resistance to insecticide, using an SEI approach to model malaria in the mosquitoes and thereby incorporating the parasite developmental times for the two strains. The human population is modeled using an SEI approach. We consider both conventional insecticides that target all adult mosquitoes, and LLA insecticides that target only old mosquitoes. According to linearised theory the potency of the insecticide affects mainly the speed of evolution of resistance. Mutations that confer resistance can also affect other parameters such as mean adult life span and parasite developmental time. For both conventional and LLA insecticides the stability of the malaria-free equilibrium, with only the resistant mosquito strain present, depends mainly on these other parameters. This suggests that the main long term role of an insecticide could be to induce genetic changes that have a desirable effect on a vital parameter such as adult life span. However, when this equilibrium is unstable, numerical simulations suggest that a potent LLA insecticide can slow down the spread of malaria in humans but that the timing of its action is very important.

  8. Effects of irrigation levels on interactions among Lygus hesperus (Hemiptera: Miridae), insecticides, and predators in cotton.

    PubMed

    Asiimwe, Peter; Naranjo, Steven E; Ellsworth, Peter C

    2014-04-01

    Variation in plant quality and natural enemy abundance plays an important role in insect population dynamics. In manipulative field studies, we evaluated the impact of varying irrigation levels and insecticide type on densities of Lygus hesperus Knight and the arthropod predator community in cotton. Three watering levels were established via irrigations timed according to three levels of percent soil water depletion (SWD): 20, 40, or 60, where 40% SWD is considered standard grower practice, 60% represents a deficit condition likely to impose plant productivity losses, and 20% represents surplus conditions with likely consequences on excessive vegetative plant production. The two key L. hesperus insecticides used were the broad-spectrum insecticide acephate and the selective insecticide flonicamid, along with an untreated check. We hypothesized that densities of L. hesperus and its associated predators would be elevated at higher irrigation levels and that insecticides would differentially impact L. hesperus and predator dynamics depending on their selectivity. L. hesperus were more abundant at the higher irrigation level (20% SWD) but the predator densities were unaffected by irrigation levels. Both L. hesperus and its predators were affected by the selectivity of the insecticide with highest L. hesperus densities and lowest predator abundance where the broad spectrum insecticide (acephate) was used. There were no direct interactions between irrigation level and insecticides, indicating that insecticide effects on L. hesperus and its predators were not influenced by the irrigation levels used here. The implications of these findings on the overall ecology of insect-plant dynamics and yield in cotton are discussed.

  9. Indirect evidence that agricultural pesticides select for insecticide resistance in the malaria vector Anopheles gambiae.

    PubMed

    Luc, Djogbénou S; Benoit, Assogba; Laurette, Djossou; Michel, Makoutode

    2016-06-01

    We investigated the possible relationship between the agricultural use of insecticides and the emergence of insecticide resistance. Bioassays were conducted using simulated mosquito larval habitats and well known Anopheles gambiae strains. Soil samples were collected from vegetable production areas in Benin, including one site with insecticide use, one site where insecticides had not been used for two months, and a third where insecticides had not been used. Pupation and emergence rates were very low in pyrethroid-susceptible strains when exposed to soil that had been recently exposed to insecticides. Pupation and emergence rates in strains with the kdr mutation alone or both the kdr and Ace-1 mutations were much higher. Overall, strains with the kdr mutation survived at higher rates compared to that without kdr mutation. Although this study is observational, we provide indirect evidence indicating that soils from agricultural areas contain insecticide residues that can play a role in the emergence of insecticide resistance in Anopheles. This aspect should be taken into account to better utilize the insecticide in the context of integrated pest management programs.

  10. Current Perspectives on Plague Vector Control in Madagascar: Susceptibility Status of Xenopsylla cheopis to 12 Insecticides.

    PubMed

    Miarinjara, Adélaïde; Boyer, Sébastien

    2016-02-01

    Plague is a rodent disease transmissible to humans by infected flea bites, and Madagascar is one of the countries with the highest plague incidence in the world. This study reports the susceptibility of the main plague vector Xenopsylla cheopis to 12 different insecticides belonging to 4 insecticide families (carbamates, organophosphates, pyrethroids and organochlorines). Eight populations from different geographical regions of Madagascar previously resistant to deltamethrin were tested with a World Health Organization standard bioassay. Insecticide susceptibility varied amongst populations, but all of them were resistant to six insecticides belonging to pyrethroid and carbamate insecticides (alphacypermethrin, lambdacyhalothrin, etofenprox, deltamethrin, bendiocarb and propoxur). Only one insecticide (dieldrin) was an efficient pulicide for all flea populations. Cross resistances were suspected. This study proposes at least three alternative insecticides (malathion, fenitrothion and cyfluthrin) to replace deltamethrin during plague epidemic responses, but the most efficient insecticide may be different for each population studied. We highlight the importance of continuous insecticide susceptibility surveillance in the areas of high plague risk in Madagascar.

  11. Temporal Trends of Insecticide Concentrations in Carpet Dust in California from 2001 to 2006.

    PubMed

    Gunier, Robert B; Nuckols, John R; Whitehead, Todd P; Colt, Joanne S; Deziel, Nicole C; Metayer, Catherine; Reynolds, Peggy; Ward, Mary H

    2016-07-19

    Active ingredients in residential and agricultural insecticides have changed over time, due in part to regulatory restrictions. Few studies have evaluated how changes in active ingredients have impacted insecticide levels measured in homes. We measured concentrations of insecticides in one carpet-dust sample from each of 434 homes in California from 2001 to 2006. Analytes included four insecticides sold for indoor home use during our study period (carbaryl, cypermethrin, permethrin, and propoxur) and four that are no longer sold for indoor use including dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethylene (DDT, removed from the market in 1972), chlordane (1988), chlorpyrifos (2001), and diazinon (2004). We considered other potential determinants of concentrations of insecticides in carpet dust, such as home and garden use, occupational exposure, and nearby agricultural applications. We calculated the percentage change in the concentration of each insecticide per year, adjusting for significant determinants. In adjusted models, concentrations of insecticides in carpet dust decreased for three of four insecticides no longer sold for residential use: chlordane (-15% per year), chlorpyrifos (-31%), diazinon (-48%), and propoxur (-34%), which is currently sold for residential use but with increased restrictions since 1997. Concentrations of other insecticides sold for indoor use (carbaryl, cypermethrin, and permethrin) and DDT did not change over time in our study population. PMID:27341453

  12. A comparison of Drosophila melanogaster detoxification gene induction responses for six insecticides, caffeine and phenobarbital.

    PubMed

    Willoughby, Lee; Chung, Henry; Lumb, Chris; Robin, Charles; Batterham, Philip; Daborn, Phillip J

    2006-12-01

    Modifications of metabolic pathways are important in insecticide resistance evolution. Mutations leading to changes in expression levels or substrate specificities of cytochrome P450 (P450), glutathione-S-transferase (GST) and esterase genes have been linked to many cases of resistance with the responsible enzyme shown to utilize the insecticide as a substrate. Many studies show that the substrates of enzymes are capable of inducing the expression of those enzymes. We investigated if this was the case for insecticides and the enzymes responsible for their metabolism. The induction responses for P450s, GSTs and esterases to six different insecticides were investigated using a custom designed microarray in Drosophila melanogaster. Even though these gene families can all contribute to insecticide resistance, their induction responses when exposed to insecticides are minimal. The insecticides spinosad, diazinon, nitenpyram, lufenuron and dicyclanil did not induce any P450, GST or esterase gene expression after a short exposure to high lethal concentrations of insecticide. DDT elicited the low-level induction of one GST and one P450. These results are in contrast to induction responses we observed for the natural plant compound caffeine and the barbituate drug phenobarbital, both of which highly induced a number of P450 and GST genes under the same short exposure regime. Our results indicate that, under the insecticide exposure conditions we used, constitutive over-expression of metabolic genes play more of a role in insect survival than induction of members of these gene families. PMID:17098168

  13. Current Perspectives on Plague Vector Control in Madagascar: Susceptibility Status of Xenopsylla cheopis to 12 Insecticides

    PubMed Central

    Miarinjara, Adélaïde; Boyer, Sébastien

    2016-01-01

    Plague is a rodent disease transmissible to humans by infected flea bites, and Madagascar is one of the countries with the highest plague incidence in the world. This study reports the susceptibility of the main plague vector Xenopsylla cheopis to 12 different insecticides belonging to 4 insecticide families (carbamates, organophosphates, pyrethroids and organochlorines). Eight populations from different geographical regions of Madagascar previously resistant to deltamethrin were tested with a World Health Organization standard bioassay. Insecticide susceptibility varied amongst populations, but all of them were resistant to six insecticides belonging to pyrethroid and carbamate insecticides (alphacypermethrin, lambdacyhalothrin, etofenprox, deltamethrin, bendiocarb and propoxur). Only one insecticide (dieldrin) was an efficient pulicide for all flea populations. Cross resistances were suspected. This study proposes at least three alternative insecticides (malathion, fenitrothion and cyfluthrin) to replace deltamethrin during plague epidemic responses, but the most efficient insecticide may be different for each population studied. We highlight the importance of continuous insecticide susceptibility surveillance in the areas of high plague risk in Madagascar. PMID:26844772

  14. Sensitivity of Bemisia tabaci (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) to several new insecticides in China: effects of insecticide type and whitefly species, strain, and stage.

    PubMed

    Xie, Wen; Liu, Yang; Wang, Shaoli; Wu, Qingjun; Pan, Huipeng; Yang, Xin; Guo, Litao; Zhang, Youjun

    2014-01-01

    Whitefly biotypes B and Q are the two most damaging members of the Bemisia tabaci (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) species complex. Control of B. tabaci (and especially of Q) has been impaired by resistance to commonly used insecticides. To find new insecticides for B. tabaci management in China, we investigated the sensitivity of eggs, larvae, and adults of laboratory strains of B and Q (named Lab-B and Lab-Q) and field strains of Q to several insecticides. For eggs, larvae, and adults of B. tabaci and for six insecticides (cyantraniliprole, chlorantraniliprole, pyriproxyfen, buprofezin, acetamiprid, and thiamethoxam), LC50 values were higher for Lab-Q than for Lab-B; avermectin LC50 values, however, were low for adults of both Lab-Q and Lab-B. Based on the laboratory results, insecticides were selected to test against eggs, larvae, and adults of four field strains of B. tabaci Q. Although the field strains differed in their sensitivity to the insecticides, the eggs and larvae of all strains were highly sensitive to cyantraniliprole, and the adults of all strains were highly sensitive to avermectin. The eggs, larvae, and adults of B. tabaci Q were generally more resistant than those of B. tabaci B to the tested insecticides. B. tabaci Q eggs and larvae were sensitive to cyantraniliprole and pyriproxyfen, whereas B. tabaci Q adults were sensitive to avermectin. Field trials should be conducted with cyantraniliprole, pyriproxyfen, and avermectin for control of B. tabaci Q and B in China. PMID:25434040

  15. Degradation of Insecticides in Poultry Manure: Determining the Insecticidal Treatment Interval for Managing House Fly (Diptera: Muscidae) Populations in Poultry Farms.

    PubMed

    Ong, Song-Quan; Ab Majid, Abdul Hafiz; Ahmad, Hamdan

    2016-04-01

    It is crucial to understand the degradation pattern of insecticides when designing a sustainable control program for the house fly, Musca domestica (L.), on poultry farms. The aim of this study was to determine the half-life and degradation rates of cyromazine, chlorpyrifos, and cypermethrin by spiking these insecticides into poultry manure, and then quantitatively analyzing the insecticide residue using ultra-performance liquid chromatography. The insecticides were later tested in the field in order to study the appropriate insecticidal treatment intervals. Bio-assays on manure samples were later tested at 3, 7, 10, and 15 d for bio-efficacy on susceptible house fly larvae. Degradation analysis demonstrated that cyromazine has the shortest half-life (3.01 d) compared with chlorpyrifos (4.36 d) and cypermethrin (3.75 d). Cyromazine also had a significantly greater degradation rate compared with chlorpyrifos and cypermethrin. For the field insecticidal treatment interval study, 10 d was the interval that had been determined for cyromazine due to its significantly lower residue; for ChCy (a mixture of chlorpyrifos and cypermethrin), the suggested interval was 7 d. Future work should focus on the effects of insecticide metabolites on targeted pests and the poultry manure environment.

  16. Sensitivity of Bemisia tabaci (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) to several new insecticides in China: effects of insecticide type and whitefly species, strain, and stage.

    PubMed

    Xie, Wen; Liu, Yang; Wang, Shaoli; Wu, Qingjun; Pan, Huipeng; Yang, Xin; Guo, Litao; Zhang, Youjun

    2014-01-01

    Whitefly biotypes B and Q are the two most damaging members of the Bemisia tabaci (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) species complex. Control of B. tabaci (and especially of Q) has been impaired by resistance to commonly used insecticides. To find new insecticides for B. tabaci management in China, we investigated the sensitivity of eggs, larvae, and adults of laboratory strains of B and Q (named Lab-B and Lab-Q) and field strains of Q to several insecticides. For eggs, larvae, and adults of B. tabaci and for six insecticides (cyantraniliprole, chlorantraniliprole, pyriproxyfen, buprofezin, acetamiprid, and thiamethoxam), LC50 values were higher for Lab-Q than for Lab-B; avermectin LC50 values, however, were low for adults of both Lab-Q and Lab-B. Based on the laboratory results, insecticides were selected to test against eggs, larvae, and adults of four field strains of B. tabaci Q. Although the field strains differed in their sensitivity to the insecticides, the eggs and larvae of all strains were highly sensitive to cyantraniliprole, and the adults of all strains were highly sensitive to avermectin. The eggs, larvae, and adults of B. tabaci Q were generally more resistant than those of B. tabaci B to the tested insecticides. B. tabaci Q eggs and larvae were sensitive to cyantraniliprole and pyriproxyfen, whereas B. tabaci Q adults were sensitive to avermectin. Field trials should be conducted with cyantraniliprole, pyriproxyfen, and avermectin for control of B. tabaci Q and B in China.

  17. Design and fabrication of molecularly imprinted polymer-based potentiometric sensor from the surface modified multiwalled carbon nanotube for the determination of lindane (γ-hexachlorocyclohexane), an organochlorine pesticide.

    PubMed

    Anirudhan, Thayyath S; Alexander, Sheeba

    2015-02-15

    A novel potentiometric sensor with high selectivity in addition to sensitivity was developed for the determination of lindane, γ-hexachlorocyclohexane (γ-HCCH), based on the modification of γ-HCCH imprinted polymer film onto the surface of Cu electrode. A multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) was grafted using glycidyl methacrylate (GMA). The reaction of MWCNT with GMA produces MWCNT-g-GMA and the epoxide ring present in the GMA upon reaction with allylamine produces the vinylated MWCNT (MWCNT-CH = CH2). MWCNT based imprinted polymer (MWCNT-MIP) was synthesized by means of methacrylic acid (MAA) as the monomer, ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (EGDMA) as the cross linker, α,α'-azobisisobutyronitrile (AIBN) as the initiator and γ-HCCH, an organochlorine pesticide molecule, as the template. The optimizations of operational parameters were also done. Organized material was characterized by means of FTIR, XRD, Raman spectra and TEM analyses. The sensor responds to γ-HCCH in the range 1 × 10(-10)-1 × 10(-3)M and the detection limit was found to be 1.0 × 10(-10)M.

  18. [Advances in effects of insecticidal crystal proteins released from transgenic Bt crops on soil ecology].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xue-Yong; Liu, Ning; Zhao, Man; Li, He; Zhou, Lang; Tang, Zong-Wen; Cao, Fei; Li, Wei

    2011-05-01

    With the large scale cultivation of transgenic crops expressing Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) insecticidal crystal proteins in the world, the problem of environmental safety caused by these Bt crops has received extensive attention. These insecticidal crystal proteins can be released into the soil continuously in the growing period of Bt plants. If their accumulation of the insecticidal crystal proteins exceeds consumption by insect larvae and degradation by the environmental factors, these insecticidal crystal proteins could constitute a hazard to non-target insects and soil microbiota. There are three main ways to release insecticidal crystal proteins into soil for Bt plants: root exudates, pollen falling, and crop reside returning. The Bt insecticidal crystal proteins released into soil can be adsorbed rapidly by active soil particles and the absorption equilibrium attained within 1-3 h. The adsorption protects Bt insecticidal crystal proteins against soil microbial degradation or enzyme degradation, which leads to remarkable prolong of the persistence of insecticidal activity. The change of soil microorganism species is an important index for evaluating the effect of Bt plants on soil ecology. The research showed that these insecticidal crystal proteins released by the Bt plant root exudates or Bt organism had no toxicity to the soil earthworms, nematodes, protozoa, bacteria and fungi; however, it could reduce the mycelium length of the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) and restrain AMF to form invasion unit. The influencing degree of Bt protein on soil enzyme activity varied with the releasing modes or growth period of Bt crops. Bt Cry1Ab protein can be taken up from soil by parts of following crops; however, different results were obtained with different commercial kits. To better understand the soil ecological evaluation about the insecticidal crystal proteins released from transgenic Bt crops, this review provides a comprehensive overview about the release

  19. Impact of reduced-risk insecticides on soybean aphid and associated natural enemies.

    PubMed

    Ohnesorg, Wayne J; Johnson, Kevin D; O'Neal, Matthew E

    2009-10-01

    Insect predators in North America suppress Aphis glycines Matsumura (Hemiptera: Aphididae) populations; however, insecticides are required when populations reach economically damaging levels. Currently, insecticides used to manage A. glycines are broad-spectrum (pyrethroids and organophosphates), and probably reduce beneficial insect abundance in soybean, Glycine max (L.) Merr. Our goal was to determine whether insecticides considered reduced-risk by the Environmental Protection Agency could protect soybean yield from A. glycines herbivory while having a limited impact on the aphid's natural enemies. We compared three insecticides (imidacloprid, thiamethoxam, and pymetrozine,) to a broad-spectrum insecticide (lamda-cyhalothrin) and an untreated control using two application methods. We applied neonicotinoid insecticides to seeds (imidacloprid and thiamethoxam) as well as foliage (imidacloprid); pymetrozine and lamda-cyhalothrin were applied only to foliage. Foliage-applied insecticides had lower A. glycines populations and higher yields than the seed-applied insecticides. Among foliage-applied insecticides, pymetrozine and imidacloprid had an intermediate level of A. glycines population and yield protection compared with lamda-cyhalothrin and the untreated control. We monitored natural enemies with yellow sticky cards, sweep-nets, and direct observation. Before foliar insecticides were applied (i.e., before aphid populations developed) seed treatments had no observable effect on the abundance of natural enemies. After foliar insecticides were applied, differences in natural enemy abundance were observed when sampled with sweep-nets and direct observation but not with yellow sticky cards. Based on the first two sampling methods, pymetrozine and the foliage-applied imidacloprid had intermediate abundances of natural enemies compared with the untreated control and lamda-cyhalothrin.

  20. Impact of reduced-risk insecticides on soybean aphid and associated natural enemies.

    PubMed

    Ohnesorg, Wayne J; Johnson, Kevin D; O'Neal, Matthew E

    2009-10-01

    Insect predators in North America suppress Aphis glycines Matsumura (Hemiptera: Aphididae) populations; however, insecticides are required when populations reach economically damaging levels. Currently, insecticides used to manage A. glycines are broad-spectrum (pyrethroids and organophosphates), and probably reduce beneficial insect abundance in soybean, Glycine max (L.) Merr. Our goal was to determine whether insecticides considered reduced-risk by the Environmental Protection Agency could protect soybean yield from A. glycines herbivory while having a limited impact on the aphid's natural enemies. We compared three insecticides (imidacloprid, thiamethoxam, and pymetrozine,) to a broad-spectrum insecticide (lamda-cyhalothrin) and an untreated control using two application methods. We applied neonicotinoid insecticides to seeds (imidacloprid and thiamethoxam) as well as foliage (imidacloprid); pymetrozine and lamda-cyhalothrin were applied only to foliage. Foliage-applied insecticides had lower A. glycines populations and higher yields than the seed-applied insecticides. Among foliage-applied insecticides, pymetrozine and imidacloprid had an intermediate level of A. glycines population and yield protection compared with lamda-cyhalothrin and the untreated control. We monitored natural enemies with yellow sticky cards, sweep-nets, and direct observation. Before foliar insecticides were applied (i.e., before aphid populations developed) seed treatments had no observable effect on the abundance of natural enemies. After foliar insecticides were applied, differences in natural enemy abundance were observed when sampled with sweep-nets and direct observation but not with yellow sticky cards. Based on the first two sampling methods, pymetrozine and the foliage-applied imidacloprid had intermediate abundances of natural enemies compared with the untreated control and lamda-cyhalothrin. PMID:19886446

  1. Postfledging survival of European starlings exposed as nestlings to an organophosphorus insecticide

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stromborg, K.L.; Grue, C.E.; Nichols, J.D.; Hepp, G.R.; Hines, J.E.; Bourne, H.C.

    1988-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that exposure to organophosphorus (OP) insecticides reduces postfledging survival of altricial birds, 16-d-old European Starlings (Sturnus vulgaris) were weighed and orally dosed with corn oil containing 6.0 mg of dicrotophos per kilogram of body mass or an equivalent exposure of pure corn oil (controls). Two days later, each survivor was weighed again and patagially tagged for identification after fledging. Resightings of marked fledglings were made during weekly 2-d intensive observations yielding four estimates of postfledging survival. Before fledging, only OP-dosed birds died (18.5%), and OP-dosed survivors lost more mass (5.2%, P = .001) than controls (1.4%) but their masses on day 18 were only slightly lower (2% of control mean, P = .10). Brain cholinesterase activity, a sensitive indicator of OP exposure in birds, was depressed and average of 93% in OP-dosed nestlings that died compared to controls, and an average of 46% in OP-dosed nestlings alive on day 18. Age at fledging, postfledging survival, flocking behavior, and habitat use, however, did not differ between OP-dosed and control birds. The effects of the OP on the nestlings appeared to be rapid, to be reversible in survivors, and did not extend into the postfledging period. In addition, we found no relationship between body mass at fledging and postfledging survival.

  2. Molecular determinants on the insect sodium channel for the specific action of type II pyrethroid insecticides.

    PubMed

    Du, Yuzhe; Nomura, Yoshiko; Luo, Ningguang; Liu, Zhiqi; Lee, Jung-Eun; Khambay, Bhupinder; Dong, Ke

    2009-01-15

    Pyrethroid insecticides are classified as type I or type II based on their distinct symptomology and effects on sodium channel gating. Structurally, type II pyrethroids possess an alpha-cyano group at the phenylbenzyl alcohol position, which is lacking in type I pyrethroids. Both type I and type II pyrethroids inhibit deactivation consequently prolonging the opening of sodium channels. However, type II pyrethroids inhibit the deactivation of sodium channels to a greater extent than type I pyrethroids inducing much slower decaying of tail currents upon repolarization. The molecular basis of a type II-specific action, however, is not known. Here we report the identification of a residue G(1111) and two positively charged lysines immediately downstream of G(1111) in the intracellular linker connecting domains II and III of the cockroach sodium channel that are specifically involved in the action of type II pyrethroids, but not in the action of type I pyrethroids. Deletion of G(1111), a consequence of alternative splicing, reduced the sodium channel sensitivity to type II pyrethroids, but had no effect on channel sensitivity to type I pyrethroids. Interestingly, charge neutralization or charge reversal of two positively charged lysines (Ks) downstream of G(1111) had a similar effect. These results provide the molecular insight into the type II-specific interaction of pyrethroids with the sodium channel at the molecular level.

  3. Molecular determinants on the insect sodium channel for the specific action of type II pyrethroid insecticides

    SciTech Connect

    Du Yuzhe; Nomura, Yoshiko; Luo Ningguang; Liu Zhiqi; Lee, Jung-Eun; Khambay, Bhupinder; Dong Ke

    2009-01-15

    Pyrethroid insecticides are classified as type I or type II based on their distinct symptomology and effects on sodium channel gating. Structurally, type II pyrethroids possess an {alpha}-cyano group at the phenylbenzyl alcohol position, which is lacking in type I pyrethroids. Both type I and type II pyrethroids inhibit deactivation consequently prolonging the opening of sodium channels. However, type II pyrethroids inhibit the deactivation of sodium channels to a greater extent than type I pyrethroids inducing much slower decaying of tail currents upon repolarization. The molecular basis of a type II-specific action, however, is not known. Here we report the identification of a residue G{sup 1111} and two positively charged lysines immediately downstream of G{sup 1111} in the intracellular linker connecting domains II and III of the cockroach sodium channel that are specifically involved in the action of type II pyrethroids, but not in the action of type I pyrethroids. Deletion of G{sup 1111}, a consequence of alternative splicing, reduced the sodium channel sensitivity to type II pyrethroids, but had no effect on channel sensitivity to type I pyrethroids. Interestingly, charge neutralization or charge reversal of two positively charged lysines (Ks) downstream of G{sup 1111} had a similar effect. These results provide the molecular insight into the type II-specific interaction of pyrethroids with the sodium channel at the molecular level.

  4. Insecticidal and fungicidal activity of new synthesized chitosan derivatives.

    PubMed

    Rabea, Entsar I; Badawy, Mohamed E I; Rogge, Tina M; Stevens, Christian V; Höfte, Monica; Steurbaut, Walter; Smagghe, Guy

    2005-10-01

    Chitosan, the N-deacetylated derivative of chitin, is a potential biopolysaccharide owing to its specific structure and properties. In this paper, we report on the synthesis of 24 new chitosan derivatives, N-alkyl chitosans (NAC) and N-benzyl chitosans (NBC), that are soluble in dilute aqueous acetic acid. The different derivatives were synthesized by reductive amination and analyzed by 1H NMR spectroscopy. A high degree of substitution (DS) was obtained with N-(butyl)chitosan (DS 0.36) at a 1:1 mole ratio for NAC derivatives and N-(2,4-dichlorobenzyl)chitosan (DS 0.52) for NBC derivatives. Their insecticidal and fungicidal activities were tested against larvae of the cotton leafworm Spodoptera littoralis (Boisduval) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae), the grey mould Botrytis cinerea Pers (Leotiales: Sclerotiniaceae) and the rice leaf blast Pyricularia grisea Cavara (Teleomorph: Magnaporthe grisea (Hebert) Barr). The oral feeding bioassay indicated that all the derivatives had significant insecticidal activity at 5 g kg(-1) in artificial diet. The most active was N-(2-chloro-6-fluorobenzyl)chitosan, which caused 100% mortality at 0.625 g kg(-1), with an estimated LC50 of 0.32 g kg(-1). Treated larvae ceased feeding after 2-3 days; the mechanism of action remains unknown. In a radial hyphal growth bioassay with both plant pathogens, all derivatives showed a higher fungicidal action than chitosan. N-Dodecylchitosan, N-(p-isopropylbenzyl)chitosan and N-(2,6-dichlorobenzyl)chitosan were the most active against B cinerea, with EC50 values of 0.57, 0.57 and 0.52 g litre(-1), respectively. Against P grisea, N-(m-nitrobenzyl)chitosan was the most active, with 77% inhibition at 5 g litre(-1). The effect of different substitutions is discussed in relation to insecticidal and fungicidal activity.

  5. Presentation and outcome of severe anticholinesterase insecticide poisoning

    PubMed Central

    Verhulst, L; Waggie, Z; Hatherill, M; Reynolds, L; Argent, A

    2002-01-01

    Aims: To document the patterns of presentation and outcome of severe anticholinesterase insecticide poisoning in children requiring intensive care. Methods: Retrospective case note review of all 5541 children admitted to the paediatric intensive care unit (PICU) of a university hospital during the 10 years from January 1990 to May 2000. Fifty four children (1%) with anticholinesterase insecticide poisoning were identified. Presenting features, route of exposure, treatment, complications, and mortality were recorded. Data were analysed by the Fisher's exact and Mann–Whitney tests. Results: More children than expected were from a rural area (46% versus 25%). Decontamination occurred in 50% of children prior to PICU admission. Enteral exposure was most common (n = 27; 50%). Median pseudocholinesterase level was 185 IU/l (range 75–7404). Median total dose of atropine required to maintain mydriasis was 0.3 mg/kg (range 0.03–16.7) over a median of 10 hours (range 1–160). Complications included coma (31%), seizures (30%), shock (9%), arrhythmias (9%), and respiratory failure requiring ventilation (35%). No significant differences were detected in incidence of seizures, cardiac arrhythmias, respiratory failure, mortality, duration of ventilation, or PICU stay, according to route of exposure, or state of decontamination. Four children died (7%). Mortality was associated with the presence of a cardiac arrhythmia (likelihood ratio 8.3) and respiratory failure (likelihood ratio 3.3). Conclusion: The mortality and morbidity of severe anticholinesterase insecticide poisoning in childhood is not related to route of exposure, or to delay in decontamination. However, the presence of either a cardiac arrhythmia or respiratory failure is associated with a poor prognosis. PMID:11970930

  6. Investigation on possible ecotoxicological risk of carbofuran insecticides.

    PubMed

    Lehel, J; Déri, J; Laczay, P; Darin, E G; Budai, P; Kormos, E

    2010-01-01

    Carbofuran-containing insecticides are widely used agents in plant protection. Their use may pose considerable environmental risk for both the protected and non-protected predator and plantivorous birds. For defence of wild birds a model experiment was carried out on broiler chickens. In the study, eight animals were treated orally by gastric tube with a carbofuran-containing insecticide at a single dose of 2.5 mg/kg b.w. One animal served as untreated control specimen. Forage and drinking water were provided ad libitum. After the treatment, the possible clinical signs were observed carefully, blood samples were obtained from each bird and after exsanguinations liver, breast and leg muscle samples and stomach content were taken. The carbofuran concentration in blood, tissues and stomach content was determined by gas chromatographic method. Thirty minutes after poisoning, the average carbofuran concentration in breast muscle of chickens exceeded the maximum level of 0.1 mg/kg permitted in edible tissues, whereas ninety minutes after poisoning the concentration of one sample was still above the limit value. In the liver, leg-muscle and blood samples, the measured carbofuran concentration was lower than the permitted maximum value, except in the blood of two animals. The carbofuran concentration of the stomach content markedly exceeded the limit value. The sublethal concentration of the pesticides can reduce the capable of living of wild animals. Due to the sub toxic dose the poisoned birds can survive; however, the residue of insecticides can lead to secondary toxicosis of other animals.

  7. Insecticide Resistance and the Future of Malaria Control in Zambia

    PubMed Central

    Chanda, Emmanuel; Hemingway, Janet; Kleinschmidt, Immo; Rehman, Andrea M.; Ramdeen, Varsha; Phiri, Faustina N.; Coetzer, Sarel; Mthembu, David; Shinondo, Cecilia J.; Chizema-Kawesha, Elizabeth; Kamuliwo, Mulakwa; Mukonka, Victor; Baboo, Kumar S.; Coleman, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Background In line with the Global trend to improve malaria control efforts a major campaign of insecticide treated net distribution was initiated in 1999 and indoor residual spraying with DDT or pyrethroids was reintroduced in 2000 in Zambia. In 2006, these efforts were strengthened by the President's Malaria Initiative. This manuscript reports on the monitoring and evaluation of these activities and the potential impact of emerging insecticide resistance on disease transmission. Methods Mosquitoes were captured daily through a series of 108 window exit traps located at 18 sentinel sites. Specimens were identified to species and analyzed for sporozoites. Adult Anopheles mosquitoes were collected resting indoors and larva collected in breeding sites were reared to F1 and F0 generations in the lab and tested for insecticide resistance following the standard WHO susceptibility assay protocol. Annual cross sectional household parasite surveys were carried out to monitor the impact of the control programme on prevalence of Plasmodium falciparum in children aged 1 to 14 years. Results A total of 619 Anopheles gambiae s.l. and 228 Anopheles funestus s.l. were captured from window exit traps throughout the period, of which 203 were An. gambiae malaria vectors and 14 An. funestus s.s.. In 2010 resistance to DDT and the pyrethroids deltamethrin, lambda-cyhalothrin and permethrin was detected in both An. gambiae s.s. and An. funestus s.s.. No sporozoites were detected in either species. Prevalence of P. falciparum in the sentinel sites remained below 10% throughout the study period. Conclusion Both An. gambiae s.s. and An. funestus s.s. were controlled effectively with the ITN and IRS programme in Zambia, maintaining a reduced disease transmission and burden. However, the discovery of DDT and pyrethroid resistance in the country threatens the sustainability of the vector control programme. PMID:21915314

  8. Respiratory exposure of museum personnel to dichlorvos insecticide.

    PubMed

    Deer, H M; Beck, E D; Roe, A H

    1993-06-01

    Dichlorvos (DDVP) is an organophosphate insecticide used to protect museum specimens from insect pests. Respiratory exposure of museum personnel to DDVP has not been studied previously. Analysis of air samples from museum rooms where DDVP was being used when the ventilation system was "on" showed a lower and significantly different (p = 0.025) amount of DDVP when compared to air samples collected from the same rooms when the ventilation system was "off". The DDVP concentrations of all samples collected were below the threshold limit value established by the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists. PMID:8351794

  9. Natural product derived insecticides: discovery and development of spinetoram.

    PubMed

    Galm, Ute; Sparks, Thomas C

    2016-03-01

    This review highlights the importance of natural product research and industrial microbiology for product development in the agricultural industry, based on examples from Dow AgroSciences. It provides an overview of the discovery and development of spinetoram, a semisynthetic insecticide derived by a combination of a genetic block in a specific O-methylation of the rhamnose moiety of spinosad coupled with neural network-based QSAR and synthetic chemistry. It also emphasizes the key role that new technologies and multidisciplinary approaches play in the development of current spinetoram production strains.

  10. Bibliography of synthetic pyrethroid insecticides in the environment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Capel, Paul D.; Nelson, Blake J.

    1995-01-01

    Citations from the scientific literature on the environmental behavior and occurrence of synthetic pyrethroid insecticides were obtained from three computerized bibliographic databases: Agricola, Chemical Abstracts, and Selected Water Resources Abstracts. Approximately 10,000 citations were found but more than half were eliminated because they were directed strictly toward agricultural or industrial uses. The remaining 4,000 were categorized by environmental process, occurrence, analysis, toxicity, or physical/chemical property. The information is available in ASCII files on 3 1/2-inch diskette.

  11. Natural product derived insecticides: discovery and development of spinetoram.

    PubMed

    Galm, Ute; Sparks, Thomas C

    2016-03-01

    This review highlights the importance of natural product research and industrial microbiology for product development in the agricultural industry, based on examples from Dow AgroSciences. It provides an overview of the discovery and development of spinetoram, a semisynthetic insecticide derived by a combination of a genetic block in a specific O-methylation of the rhamnose moiety of spinosad coupled with neural network-based QSAR and synthetic chemistry. It also emphasizes the key role that new technologies and multidisciplinary approaches play in the development of current spinetoram production strains. PMID:26582335

  12. Childhood Brain Tumors, Residential Insecticide Exposure, and Pesticide Metabolism Genes

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Susan Searles; McKean-Cowdin, Roberta; Farin, Federico M.; Holly, Elizabeth A.; Preston-Martin, Susan; Mueller, Beth A.

    2010-01-01

    Background Insecticides that target the nervous system may play a role in the development of childhood brain tumors (CBTs). Constitutive genetic variation affects metabolism of these chemicals. Methods We analyzed population-based case–control data to examine whether CBT is associated with the functional genetic polymorphisms PON1C–108T, PON1Q192R, PON1L55M, BCHEA539T, FMO1C–9536A, FMO3E158K, ALDH3A1S134A, and GSTT1 (null). DNA was obtained from newborn screening archives for 201 cases and 285 controls, ≤ 10 years of age, and born in California or Washington State between 1978 and 1990. Conception-to-diagnosis home insecticide treatment history was ascertained by interview. Results We observed no biologically plausible main effects for any of the metabolic polymorphisms with CBT risk. However, we observed strong interactions between genotype and insecticide exposure during childhood. Among exposed children, CBT risk increased per PON1–108T allele [odds ratio (OR) = 1.8; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.1–3.0] and FMO1–9536A (*6) allele (OR = 2.7; 95% CI, 1.2–5.9), whereas among children never exposed, CBT risk was not increased (PON1: OR = 0.7; 95% CI, 0.5–1.0, interaction p = 0.005; FMO1: OR = 1.0; 95% CI, 0.6–1.6, interaction p = 0.009). We observed a similar but statistically nonsignificant interaction between childhood exposure and BCHEA539T (interaction p = 0.08). These interactions were present among both Hispanic and non-Hispanic white children. Conclusion Based on known effects of these variants, these results suggest that exposure in childhood to organophosphorus and perhaps to carbamate insecticides in combination with a reduced ability to detoxify them may be associated with CBT. Confirmation in other studies is required. PMID:20056567

  13. A LABORATORY BIOASSAY FOR MONITORING RESISTANCE IN TARNISHED PLANT BUG POPULATIONS TO NEONICOTINOID INSECTICIDES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A laboratory bioassay was developed for testing tarnished plant bug populations for resistance development to the neonicotinoid insecticides imidacloprid and thiamethoxam. The bioassay allows for the determination of LC50 values by feeding known doses of the insecticides to adult tarnished plant bu...

  14. Laboratory effects of two organically-certified insecticides on Trichopoda pennipes (Diptera:Tachinidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this laboratory study was to determine the effects of two organically-certified insecticides, azadirachtin and spinosad, on the stink bug parasitoid Trichopoda pennipes (Fab.) (Diptera: Tachinidae) in residual, topical, and oral toxicity tests. The insecticide lambda-cyhalothrin was...

  15. Synthesis of the insecticide prothrin and its analogues from biomass-derived 5-(chloromethyl)furfural.

    PubMed

    Chang, Fei; Dutta, Saikat; Becnel, James J; Estep, Alden S; Mascal, Mark

    2014-01-15

    Prothrin, a synthetic pyrethroid insecticide, was synthesized from the biomass-derived platform chemical 5-(chloromethyl)furfural in six steps and overall 65% yield. Two structural analogues of prothrin were also prepared following the same synthetic approach. Preliminary testing of these furan-based pyrethroids against the yellow fever mosquito Aedes aegypti indicates promising insecticidal activities.

  16. Insecticide use in hybrid onion seed production affects pre- and postpollination processes.

    PubMed

    Gillespie, Sandra; Long, Rachael; Seitz, Nicola; Williams, Neal

    2014-02-01

    Research on threats to pollination service in agro-ecosystems has focused primarily on the negative impacts of land use change and agricultural practices such as insecticide use on pollinator populations. Insecticide use could also affect the pollination process, through nonlethal impacts on pollinator attraction and postpollination processes such as pollen viability or pollen tube growth. Hybrid onion seed (Allium cepa L., Alliaceae) is an important pollinator-dependent crop that has suffered yield declines in California, concurrent with increased insecticide use. Field studies suggest that insecticide use reduces pollination service in this system. We conducted a field experiment manipulating insecticide use to examine the impacts of insecticides on 1) pollinator attraction, 2) pollen/stigma interactions, and 3) seed set and seed quality. Select insecticides had negative impacts on pollinator attraction and pollen/stigma interactions, with certain products dramatically reducing pollen germination and pollen tube growth. Decreased pollen germination was not associated with reduced seed set; however, reduced pollinator attraction was associated with lower seed set and seed quality, for one of the two female lines examined. Our results highlight the importance of pesticide effects on the pollination process. Overuse may lead to yield reductions through impacts on pollinator behavior and postpollination processes. Overall, in hybrid onion seed production, moderation in insecticide use is advised when controlling onion thrips, Thrips tabaci, on commercial fields. PMID:24665681

  17. Relative toxicity and residual activity of insecticides used in blueberry pest management: mortality of natural enemies.

    PubMed

    Roubos, Craig R; Rodriguez-Saona, Cesar; Holdcraft, Robert; Mason, Keith S; Isaacs, Rufus

    2014-02-01

    A series of bioassays were conducted to determine the relative toxicities and residual activities of insecticides labeled for use in blueberry (Vaccinium corymbosum L.) on natural enemies, to identify products with low toxicity or short duration effects on biological control agents. In total, 14 insecticides were evaluated using treated petri dishes and four commercially available natural enemies (Aphidius colemani Viereck, Orius insidiosus [Say], Chrysoperla rufilabris [Burmeister], and Hippodamia convergens [Guérin-Menéville]). Dishes were aged under greenhouse conditions for 0, 3, 7, or 14 d before introducing insects to test residual activity. Acute effects (combined mortality and knockdown) varied by insecticide, residue age, and natural enemy species. Broad-spectrum insecticides caused high mortality to all biocontrol agents, whereas products approved for use in organic agriculture had little effect. The reduced-risk insecticide acetamiprid consistently caused significant acute effects, even after aging for 14 d. Methoxyfenozide, novaluron, and chlorantraniliprole, which also are classified as reduced-risk insecticides, had low toxicity, and along with the organic products could be compatible with biological control. This study provides information to guide blueberry growers in their selection of insecticides. Further research will be needed to determine whether adoption of a pest management program based on the use of more selective insecticides will result in higher levels of biological control in blueberry.

  18. Economic Consequences of Restricting the Use of Organochlorine Insecticides on Cotton, Corn, Peanuts, and Tobacco.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Velmar W.; And Others

    The Department of Agriculture continually reviews needs for insecticides and recommends those which are effective with least hazard to people and the environment. This report estimates the economic effects of reducing the use of organochlorine insecticides. Using data from a 1966 Economic Research Service Survey, the report concludes that these…

  19. 40 CFR 23.6 - Timing of Administrator's action under Federal Insecticide, Fungicide and Rodenticide Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Timing of Administrator's action under Federal Insecticide, Fungicide and Rodenticide Act. 23.6 Section 23.6 Protection of Environment... Administrator's action under Federal Insecticide, Fungicide and Rodenticide Act. Unless the...

  20. 40 CFR 23.6 - Timing of Administrator's action under Federal Insecticide, Fungicide and Rodenticide Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Timing of Administrator's action under Federal Insecticide, Fungicide and Rodenticide Act. 23.6 Section 23.6 Protection of Environment... Administrator's action under Federal Insecticide, Fungicide and Rodenticide Act. Unless the...

  1. 40 CFR 23.6 - Timing of Administrator's action under Federal Insecticide, Fungicide and Rodenticide Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Timing of Administrator's action under Federal Insecticide, Fungicide and Rodenticide Act. 23.6 Section 23.6 Protection of Environment... Administrator's action under Federal Insecticide, Fungicide and Rodenticide Act. Unless the...

  2. 40 CFR 23.6 - Timing of Administrator's action under Federal Insecticide, Fungicide and Rodenticide Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Timing of Administrator's action under Federal Insecticide, Fungicide and Rodenticide Act. 23.6 Section 23.6 Protection of Environment... Administrator's action under Federal Insecticide, Fungicide and Rodenticide Act. Unless the...

  3. 40 CFR 23.6 - Timing of Administrator's action under Federal Insecticide, Fungicide and Rodenticide Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Timing of Administrator's action under Federal Insecticide, Fungicide and Rodenticide Act. 23.6 Section 23.6 Protection of Environment... Administrator's action under Federal Insecticide, Fungicide and Rodenticide Act. Unless the...

  4. Insecticide, Sugar and Diet Effects on Feeding and Mortality in Rhagoletis indifferens (Dipt., Tephritidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effects of spinosad bait and various insecticides, the presence of sugar in insecticides, and diet on feeding responses and mortality in western cherry fruit fly, Rhagoletis indifferens Curran (Diptera: Tephritidae), were determined. Diet was defined as feeding on sugar only or yeast extract +...

  5. Length of efficacy for control of curly top in sugar beet with seed foliar insecticides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Curly top in sugar beet caused by Beet curly top virus (BCTV) is an important yield limiting disease that can be reduced via neonicotinoid and pyrethroid insecticides. However the length of efficacy of these insecticides is poorly understood, so a series of field experiments was conducted with the ...

  6. Assessing Insecticide Susceptibility of Laboratory Lutzomyia longipalpis and Phlebotomus papatasi Sand Flies (Diptera: Psychodidae: Phlebotominae).

    PubMed

    Denlinger, David S; Lozano-Fuentes, Saul; Lawyer, Phillip G; Black, William C; Bernhardt, Scott A

    2015-09-01

    Chemical insecticides are effective for controlling Lutzomyia and Phlebotomus sand fly (Diptera: Psychodidae) vectors of Leishmania parasites. However, repeated use of certain insecticides has led to tolerance and resistance. The objective of this study was to determine lethal concentrations (LCs) and lethal exposure times (LTs) to assess levels of susceptibility of laboratory Lutzomyia longipalpis (Lutz and Nieva) and Phlebotomus papatasi (Scopoli) to 10 insecticides using a modified version of the World Health Organization (WHO) exposure kit assay and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) bottle bioassay. Sand flies were exposed to insecticides coated on the interior of 0.5-gallon and 1,000-ml glass bottles. Following exposure, the flies were allowed to recover for 24 h, after which mortality was recorded. From dose-response survival curves for L. longipalpis and P. papatasi generated with the QCal software, LCs causing 50, 90, and 95% mortality were determined for each insecticide. The LCs and LTs from this study will be useful as baseline reference points for future studies using the CDC bottle bioassays to assess insecticide susceptibility of sand fly populations in the field. There is a need for a larger repository of sand fly insecticide susceptibility data from the CDC bottle bioassays, including a range of LCs and LTs for more sand fly species with more insecticides. Such a repository would be a valuable tool for vector management.

  7. Acute illnesses associated with insecticides used to control bed bugs--seven states, 2003--2010.

    PubMed

    2011-09-23

    The common bed bug, Cimex lectularius, is a wingless, reddish-brown insect that requires blood meals from humans, other mammals, or birds to survive. Bed bugs are not considered to be disease vectors, but they can reduce quality of life by causing anxiety, discomfort, and sleeplessness. Bed bug populations and infestations are increasing in the United States and internationally. Bed bug infestations often are treated with insecticides, but insecticide resistance is a problem, and excessive use of insecticides or use of insecticides contrary to label directions can raise the potential for human toxicity. To assess the frequency of illness from insecticides used to control bed bugs, relevant cases from 2003-2010 were sought from the Sentinel Event Notification System for Occupational Risks (SENSOR)-Pesticides program and the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene (NYC DOHMH). Cases were identified in seven states: California, Florida, Michigan, North Carolina, New York, Texas, and Washington. A total of 111 illnesses associated with bed bug-related insecticide use were identified; although 90 (81%) were low severity, one fatality occurred. Pyrethroids, pyrethrins, or both were implicated in 99 (89%) of the cases, including the fatality. The most common factors contributing to illness were excessive insecticide application, failure to wash or change pesticide-treated bedding, and inadequate notification of pesticide application. Although few cases of illnesses associated with insecticides used to control bed bugs have been reported, recommendations to prevent this problem from escalating include educating the public about effective bed bug management.

  8. Interactive cost of Plasmodium infection and insecticide resistance in the malaria vector Anopheles gambiae

    PubMed Central

    Alout, Haoues; Dabiré, Roch K.; Djogbénou, Luc S.; Abate, Luc; Corbel, Vincent; Chandre, Fabrice; Cohuet, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Insecticide resistance raises concerns for the control of vector-borne diseases. However, its impact on parasite transmission could be diverse when considering the ecological interactions between vector and parasite. Thus we investigated the fitness cost associated with insecticide resistance and Plasmodium falciparum infection as well as their interactive cost on Anopheles gambiae survival and fecundity. In absence of infection, we observed a cost on fecundity associated with insecticide resistance. However, survival was higher for mosquito bearing the kdr mutation and equal for those with the ace-1R mutation compared to their insecticide susceptible counterparts. Interestingly, Plasmodium infection reduced survival only in the insecticide resistant strains but not in the susceptible one and infection was associated with an increase in fecundity independently of the strain considered. This study provides evidence for a survival cost associated with infection by Plasmodium parasite only in mosquito selected for insecticide resistance. This suggests that the selection of insecticide resistance mutation may have disturbed the interaction between parasites and vectors, resulting in increased cost of infection. Considering the fitness cost as well as other ecological aspects of this natural mosquito-parasite combination is important to predict the epidemiological impact of insecticide resistance. PMID:27432257

  9. Liquid-Liquid Extraction of Insecticides from Juice: An Analytical Chemistry Laboratory Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Radford, Samantha A.; Hunter, Ronald E., Jr.; Barr, Dana Boyd; Ryan, P. Barry

    2013-01-01

    A laboratory experiment was developed to target analytical chemistry students and to teach them about insecticides in food, sample extraction, and cleanup. Micro concentrations (sub-microgram/mL levels) of 12 insecticides spiked into apple juice samples are extracted using liquid-liquid extraction and cleaned up using either a primary-secondary…

  10. Pheromone-assisted techniques to improve the efficacy of insecticide sprays against Linepithema humile (Hymenoptera: Formicidae).

    PubMed

    Choe, Dong-Hwan; Tsai, Kasumi; Lopez, Carlos M; Campbell, Kathleen

    2014-02-01

    Outdoor residual sprays are among the most common methods for targeting pestiferous ants in urban pest management programs. If impervious surfaces such as concrete are treated with these insecticides, the active ingredients can be washed from the surface by rain or irrigation. As a result, residual sprays with fipronil and pyrethroids are found in urban waterways and aquatic sediments. Given the amount of insecticides applied to urban settings for ant control and their possible impact on urban waterways, the development of alternative strategies is critical to decrease the overall amounts of insecticides applied, while still achieving effective control of target ant species. Herein we report a "pheromone-assisted technique" as an economically viable approach to maximize the efficacy of conventional sprays targeting the Argentine ant. By applying insecticide sprays supplemented with an attractive pheromone compound, (Z)-9-hexadecenal, Argentine ants were diverted from nearby trails and nest entrances and subsequently exposed to insecticide residues. Laboratory experiments with fipronil and bifenthrin sprays indicated that the overall kill of the insecticides on Argentine ant colonies was significantly improved (57-142% increase) by incorporating (Z)-9-hexadecenal in the insecticide sprays. This technique, once it is successfully implemented in practical pest management programs, has the potential of providing maximum control efficacy with reduced amount of insecticides applied in the environment. PMID:24665716

  11. Current insecticide susceptibility status of Malaysian Anopheles maculatus Theobald to malathion, permethrin, DDT and deltamethrin.

    PubMed

    Rohani, A; Aziz, I; Zurainee, M N; Rohana, S H; Zamree, I; Lee, H L

    2014-03-01

    Chemical insecticides are still considered as important control agents for malaria vector control. However, prolonged use of these chemicals may select mosquito vectors for resistance. In this study, susceptibility status of adult Anopheles maculatus collected from 9 localities in peninsular Malaysia, viz., Jeli, Temerloh, Pos Banun, Senderut, Jeram Kedah, Segamat, Kota Tinggi, Kluang and Pos Lenjang were determined using the standard WHO bioassay method in which the adult mosquitoes were exposed to standard insecticide impregnated papers malathion, permethrin, DDT and deltamethrin--at pre-determined diagnostic dosage. Deltamethrin was most effective insecticide among the four insecticides tested, with the LT50 of 29.53 min, compared to malathion (31.67 min), DDT (47.76 min) and permethrin (48.01 min). The effect of all insecticides on the laboratory strain was greater (with all insecticides demonstrated LT50 < 1 hour) than the field strains (deltamethrin 32.7, malathion 53.0, permethrin 62.0, DDT 67.4 min). An. maculatus exhibited low degree of resistance to all test insecticides, indicating that these chemical insecticides are still effective in the control of malaria vector.

  12. Uptake and effectiveness of systemic insecticides as influenced by application technique

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The use of systemic neonicotinoid insecticides such as Imidacloprid and Thiamethoxam have been shown to be effective against different types of insects including sucking insect like aphids, whiteflies, scales and mealybugs. The most common forms of application of these neonicotinoid insecticides ha...

  13. Lifetime Organophosphorous Insecticide Used among Private Pesticide Applicators in the Agricultural Health Study

    EPA Science Inventory

    Organophosphorous insecticides (OPs) are the most commonly used insecticides in US agriculture, but little information is available regarding specific OP use by individual farmers. We describe OP use for licensed private pesticide applicators from Iowa and North Carolina in the Ag...

  14. Using a lethality index to assess susceptibility of Tribolium confusum and Oryzaephilus surinamensis to insecticides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We evaluated the knockdown effect caused by four insecticides: alpha-cypermethrin, chlorfenapyr, pirimiphos-methyl and fipronil against Tribolium confusum and Oryzaephilus surinamensis adults. Furthermore, for the same species and insecticides, we developed a “lethality index”, to assess knockdown p...

  15. Assessing Insecticide Susceptibility of Laboratory Lutzomyia longipalpis and Phlebotomus papatasi Sand Flies (Diptera: Psychodidae: Phlebotominae)

    PubMed Central

    Denlinger, David S.; Lozano-Fuentes, Saul; Lawyer, Phillip G.; Black, William C.; Bernhardt, Scott A.

    2015-01-01

    Chemical insecticides are effective for controlling Lutzomyia and Phlebotomus sand fly (Diptera: Psychodidae) vectors of Leishmania parasites. However, repeated use of certain insecticides has led to tolerance and resistance. The objective of this study was to determine lethal concentrations (LCs) and lethal exposure times (LTs) to assess levels of susceptibility of laboratory Lutzomyia longipalpis (Lutz and Nieva) and Phlebotomus papatasi (Scopoli) to 10 insecticides using a modified version of the World Health Organization (WHO) exposure kit assay and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) bottle bioassay. Sand flies were exposed to insecticides coated on the interior of 0.5-gallon and 1,000-ml glass bottles. Following exposure, the flies were allowed to recover for 24 h, after which mortality was recorded. From dose–response survival curves for L. longipalpis and P. papatasi generated with the QCal software, LCs causing 50, 90, and 95% mortality were determined for each insecticide. The LCs and LTs from this study will be useful as baseline reference points for future studies using the CDC bottle bioassays to assess insecticide susceptibility of sand fly populations in the field. There is a need for a larger repository of sand fly insecticide susceptibility data from the CDC bottle bioassays, including a range of LCs and LTs for more sand fly species with more insecticides. Such a repository would be a valuable tool for vector management. PMID:26336231

  16. Potential exposure of pollinators to neonicotinoid insecticides from the use of insecticide seed treatments in the mid-southern United States.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Scott D; Lorenz, Gus M; Catchot, Angus L; Gore, Jeff; Cook, Don; Skinner, John; Mueller, Thomas C; Johnson, Donald R; Zawislak, Jon; Barber, Jonathan

    2014-08-19

    Research was done during 2012 to evaluate the potential exposure of pollinators to neonicotinoid insecticides used as seed treatments on corn, cotton, and soybean. Samples were collected from small plot evaluations of seed treatments and from commercial fields in agricultural production areas in Arkansas, Mississippi, and Tennessee. In total, 560 samples were analyzed for concentrations of clothianidin, imidacloprid, thiamethoxam, and their metabolites. These included pollen from corn and cotton, nectar from cotton, flowers from soybean, honey bees, Apis mellifera L., and pollen carried by foragers returning to hives, preplanting and in-season soil samples, and wild flowers adjacent to recently planted fields. Neonicotinoid insecticides were detected at a level of 1 ng/g or above in 23% of wild flower samples around recently planted fields, with an average detection level of about 10 ng/g. We detected neonicotinoid insecticides in the soil of production fields prior to planting at an average concentration of about 10 ng/g, and over 80% of the samples having some insecticide present. Only 5% of foraging honey bees tested positive for the presence of neonicotinoid insecticides, and there was only one trace detection (< 1 ng/g) in pollen being carried by those bees. Soybean flowers, cotton pollen, and cotton nectar contained little or no neonicotinoids resulting from insecticide seed treatments. Average levels of neonicotinoid insecticides in corn pollen ranged from less than 1 to 6 ng/g. The highest neonicotinoid concentrations were found in soil collected during early flowering from insecticide seed treatment trials. However, these levels were generally not well correlated with neonicotinoid concentrations in flowers, pollen, or nectar. Concentrations in flowering structures were well below defined levels of concern thought to cause acute mortality in honey bees. The potential implications of our findings are discussed. PMID:25010122

  17. Larval susceptibility of an insecticide-resistant western corn rootworm (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) population to soil insecticides: laboratory bioassays, assays of detoxification enzymes, and field performance.

    PubMed

    Wright, R J; Scharf, M E; Meinke, L J; Zhou, X; Siegfried, B D; Chandler, L D

    2000-02-01

    Soil insecticides were evaluated in laboratory and field studies against larvae of an insecticide resistant population (Phelps County, NE) of western corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte. Insecticide toxicity was evaluated by topical application of technical insecticides to 3rd instars from Saunders County, NE (susceptible) and Phelps County populations. Resistance ratios (LD50 Phelps County/LD50 Saunders County) for the insecticides methyl parathion, tefluthrin, carbofuran, terbufos, and chlorpyrifos were 28.0, 9.3, 8.7, 2.6 and 1.3, respectively. Biochemical investigation of suspected enzymatic resistance mechanisms in 3rd instars identified significant elevation of esterase activity (alpha and beta naphthyl acetate hydrolysis [3.8- and 3.9-fold]). Examination of 3rd instar esterases by native PAGE identified increased intensity of several isoenzymes in the resistant population. Assays of cytochrome P450 activity (4-CNMA demethylation and aldrin epoxidation) did not identify elevated activity in resistant 3rd instars. Granular soil insecticides were applied at planting to corn, Zea mays L., in replicated field trials in 1997 and 1998 at the same Phelps County site as the source of resistant rootworms for the laboratory studies. In 1997, planting time applications of Counter 20CR, Counter 15 G (terbufos), and Lorsban 15 G (chlorpyrifos) resulted in the lowest root injury ratings (1-6 Iowa scale); 2.50, 2.55, 2.65, respectively (untreated check root rating of 4.55). In 1998, all insecticides performed similarly against a lower rootworm density (untreated check root rating of 3.72). These studies suggest that resistance previously documented in adults also is present in 3rd instars, esterases are possibly involved as resistance mechanisms, and resistance to methyl parathion in adults is also evident in larvae, but does not confer cross-resistance in larvae to all organophosphate insecticides.

  18. Potential exposure of pollinators to neonicotinoid insecticides from the use of insecticide seed treatments in the mid-southern United States.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Scott D; Lorenz, Gus M; Catchot, Angus L; Gore, Jeff; Cook, Don; Skinner, John; Mueller, Thomas C; Johnson, Donald R; Zawislak, Jon; Barber, Jonathan

    2014-08-19

    Research was done during 2012 to evaluate the potential exposure of pollinators to neonicotinoid insecticides used as seed treatments on corn, cotton, and soybean. Samples were collected from small plot evaluations of seed treatments and from commercial fields in agricultural production areas in Arkansas, Mississippi, and Tennessee. In total, 560 samples were analyzed for concentrations of clothianidin, imidacloprid, thiamethoxam, and their metabolites. These included pollen from corn and cotton, nectar from cotton, flowers from soybean, honey bees, Apis mellifera L., and pollen carried by foragers returning to hives, preplanting and in-season soil samples, and wild flowers adjacent to recently planted fields. Neonicotinoid insecticides were detected at a level of 1 ng/g or above in 23% of wild flower samples around recently planted fields, with an average detection level of about 10 ng/g. We detected neonicotinoid insecticides in the soil of production fields prior to planting at an average concentration of about 10 ng/g, and over 80% of the samples having some insecticide present. Only 5% of foraging honey bees tested positive for the presence of neonicotinoid insecticides, and there was only one trace detection (< 1 ng/g) in pollen being carried by those bees. Soybean flowers, cotton pollen, and cotton nectar contained little or no neonicotinoids resulting from insecticide seed treatments. Average levels of neonicotinoid insecticides in corn pollen ranged from less than 1 to 6 ng/g. The highest neonicotinoid concentrations were found in soil collected during early flowering from insecticide seed treatment trials. However, these levels were generally not well correlated with neonicotinoid concentrations in flowers, pollen, or nectar. Concentrations in flowering structures were well below defined levels of concern thought to cause acute mortality in honey bees. The potential implications of our findings are discussed.

  19. Synergistic effects of a combined exposure to herbicides and an insecticide in Hyla versicolor

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mazanti, L.; Sparling, D.W.; Rice, C.; Bialek, K.; Stevenson, C.; Teels, B.; ,

    2003-01-01

    Combinations of the herbicides atrazine and metolachlor and the insecticide chlorpyrifos were tested under both laboratory and field conditions to determine their individual and combined effects on amphibian populations. In the lab Hyla versicolor tadpoles experienced 100% mortality when exposed to a high combination of the pesticides (2.0 mg/L atrazine, 2.54 mg/L metolachlor, 1.0 mg/L chlorpyrifos) whereas low concentrations of the pesticides (0.2 mg/L atrazine, 0.25 mg/L metolachlor, 0.1 mg/L chlorpyrifos) or high concentrations of either herbicides or insecticide alone caused lethargy, reduced growth and delayed metamorphosis but no significant mortality. In the field high herbicide, low insecticide and low herbicide, low insecticide mixtures significantly reduced amphibian populations compared to controls but in the low herbicide, low insecticide wetlands amphibian populations were able to recover through recruitment by the end of the season.

  20. Quantitative structure-toxicity relationship (QSTR) studies on the organophosphate insecticides.

    PubMed

    Can, Alper

    2014-11-01

    Organophosphate insecticides are the most commonly used pesticides in the world. In this study, quantitative structure-toxicity relationship (QSTR) models were derived for estimating the acute oral toxicity of organophosphate insecticides to male rats. The 20 chemicals of the training set and the seven compounds of the external testing set were described by means of using descriptors. Descriptors for lipophilicity, polarity and molecular geometry, as well as quantum chemical descriptors for energy were calculated. Model development to predict toxicity of organophosphate insecticides in different matrices was carried out using multiple linear regression. The model was validated internally and externally. In the present study, QSTR model was used for the first time to understand the inherent relationships between the organophosphate insecticide molecules and their toxicity behavior. Such studies provide mechanistic insight about structure-toxicity relationship and help in the design of less toxic insecticides.

  1. 48 CFR 1552.235-77 - Data Security for Federal Insecticide, Fungicide and Rodenticide Act Confidential Business...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Insecticide, Fungicide and Rodenticide Act Confidential Business Information (DEC 1997). 1552.235-77 Section... Federal Insecticide, Fungicide and Rodenticide Act Confidential Business Information (DEC 1997). As prescribed in 1535.007-70(d), insert the following clause: Data Security for Federal Insecticide,...

  2. 48 CFR 1552.235-73 - Access to Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act Confidential Business Information...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act Confidential Business Information (APR 1996). 1552.235-73 Section... Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act Confidential Business Information (APR 1996). As prescribed in 1535.007(a), insert the following provision: Access to Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and...

  3. 48 CFR 1552.235-73 - Access to Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act Confidential Business Information...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act Confidential Business Information (APR 1996). 1552.235-73 Section... Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act Confidential Business Information (APR 1996). As prescribed in 1535.007(a), insert the following provision: Access to Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and...

  4. 40 CFR 2.307 - Special rules governing certain information obtained under the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... information obtained under the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide and Rodenticide Act. 2.307 Section 2.307... Insecticide, Fungicide and Rodenticide Act. (a) Definitions. For the purposes of this section; (1) Act means the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide and Rodenticide Act, as amended, 7 U.S.C. 136 et seq., and...

  5. 48 CFR 1552.235-77 - Data Security for Federal Insecticide, Fungicide and Rodenticide Act Confidential Business...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Insecticide, Fungicide and Rodenticide Act Confidential Business Information (DEC 1997). 1552.235-77 Section... Federal Insecticide, Fungicide and Rodenticide Act Confidential Business Information (DEC 1997). As prescribed in 1535.007-70(d), insert the following clause: Data Security for Federal Insecticide,...

  6. 48 CFR 1552.235-77 - Data Security for Federal Insecticide, Fungicide and Rodenticide Act Confidential Business...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Insecticide, Fungicide and Rodenticide Act Confidential Business Information (DEC 1997). 1552.235-77 Section... Federal Insecticide, Fungicide and Rodenticide Act Confidential Business Information (DEC 1997). As prescribed in 1535.007-70(d), insert the following clause: Data Security for Federal Insecticide,...

  7. 48 CFR 1552.235-73 - Access to Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act Confidential Business Information...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act Confidential Business Information (APR 1996). 1552.235-73 Section... Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act Confidential Business Information (APR 1996). As prescribed in 1535.007(a), insert the following provision: Access to Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and...

  8. 40 CFR 2.307 - Special rules governing certain information obtained under the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... information obtained under the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide and Rodenticide Act. 2.307 Section 2.307... Insecticide, Fungicide and Rodenticide Act. (a) Definitions. For the purposes of this section; (1) Act means the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide and Rodenticide Act, as amended, 7 U.S.C. 136 et seq., and...

  9. 48 CFR 1552.235-77 - Data Security for Federal Insecticide, Fungicide and Rodenticide Act Confidential Business...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Insecticide, Fungicide and Rodenticide Act Confidential Business Information (DEC 1997). 1552.235-77 Section... Federal Insecticide, Fungicide and Rodenticide Act Confidential Business Information (DEC 1997). As prescribed in 1535.007-70(d), insert the following clause: Data Security for Federal Insecticide,...

  10. 40 CFR 2.307 - Special rules governing certain information obtained under the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... information obtained under the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide and Rodenticide Act. 2.307 Section 2.307... Insecticide, Fungicide and Rodenticide Act. (a) Definitions. For the purposes of this section; (1) Act means the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide and Rodenticide Act, as amended, 7 U.S.C. 136 et seq., and...

  11. 40 CFR 2.307 - Special rules governing certain information obtained under the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... information obtained under the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide and Rodenticide Act. 2.307 Section 2.307... Insecticide, Fungicide and Rodenticide Act. (a) Definitions. For the purposes of this section; (1) Act means the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide and Rodenticide Act, as amended, 7 U.S.C. 136 et seq., and...

  12. 48 CFR 1552.235-77 - Data Security for Federal Insecticide, Fungicide and Rodenticide Act Confidential Business...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Insecticide, Fungicide and Rodenticide Act Confidential Business Information (DEC 1997). 1552.235-77 Section... Federal Insecticide, Fungicide and Rodenticide Act Confidential Business Information (DEC 1997). As prescribed in 1535.007-70(d), insert the following clause: Data Security for Federal Insecticide,...

  13. 48 CFR 1552.235-73 - Access to Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act Confidential Business Information...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act Confidential Business Information (APR 1996). 1552.235-73 Section... Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act Confidential Business Information (APR 1996). As prescribed in 1535.007(a), insert the following provision: Access to Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and...

  14. 48 CFR 1552.235-73 - Access to Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act Confidential Business Information...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act Confidential Business Information (APR 1996). 1552.235-73 Section... Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act Confidential Business Information (APR 1996). As prescribed in 1535.007(a), insert the following provision: Access to Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and...

  15. cDNA microarray analysis of gene expression in insecticide-susceptible and –resistant Tarnished Plant bug

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Insecticide resistance in the tarnished plant bug is most likely associated with increased detoxification gene expression. To better understand the molecular mechanisms of insecticide resistance, an insecticide-susceptible laboratory colony and several resistant field-collected strains of Lygus line...

  16. Application site and adult age impact on the efficacy of two topically-applied insecticides to Culex quinquefasciatus Say

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Insecticide droplets will impact the mosquito body, but little is known about the interaction of these droplets to a mosquito as it is flying through the air. Droplets of insecticide were applied to the mosquito body in order to determine if a droplet of insecticide will kill a mosquito when it com...

  17. Captures in methyl eugenol and cue-lure detection traps with and without insecticides and with a Farma Tech solid lure and insecticide dispenser.

    PubMed

    Vargas, Roger I; Burns, R E; Mau, Ronald F L; Stark, John D; Cook, Peter; Piñero, Jaime C

    2009-04-01

    Methyl eugenol (ME) and cue-lure (C-L) traps to detect tephritid flies on the U.S. mainland were tested with and without insecticides under Hawaiian weather conditions against small populations of oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel) and melon fly, Bactrocera cucurbitae (Coquillett), respectively. In comparative tests, standard Jackson traps with naled and the Hawaii fruit fly areawide pest management (AWPM) trap with 2,2-dichorovinyl dimethyl phosphate (DDVP) insecticidal strips outperformed traps without an insecticide. Addition of the reduced risk insecticide spinosad did not increase trap capture significantly compared with Jackson traps without an insecticide. Captures in AWPM traps with DDVP compared favorably with those for the Jackson trap with liquid naled (the Florida standard). In subsequent tests, captures with solid Farma Tech wafer dispensers with ME or C-L and DDVP placed inside Jackson and AWPM traps were equal to those for a Jackson trap with naled, currently used for detection of ME and C-L responding fruit flies in Florida. Farma Tech ME and C-L wafers with DDVP would be more convenient and safer to handle than current liquid insecticide formulations (e.g., naled) used for detection programs in Florida.

  18. Captures in methyl eugenol and cue-lure detection traps with and without insecticides and with a Farma Tech solid lure and insecticide dispenser.

    PubMed

    Vargas, Roger I; Burns, R E; Mau, Ronald F L; Stark, John D; Cook, Peter; Piñero, Jaime C

    2009-04-01

    Methyl eugenol (ME) and cue-lure (C-L) traps to detect tephritid flies on the U.S. mainland were tested with and without insecticides under Hawaiian weather conditions against small populations of oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel) and melon fly, Bactrocera cucurbitae (Coquillett), respectively. In comparative tests, standard Jackson traps with naled and the Hawaii fruit fly areawide pest management (AWPM) trap with 2,2-dichorovinyl dimethyl phosphate (DDVP) insecticidal strips outperformed traps without an insecticide. Addition of the reduced risk insecticide spinosad did not increase trap capture significantly compared with Jackson traps without an insecticide. Captures in AWPM traps with DDVP compared favorably with those for the Jackson trap with liquid naled (the Florida standard). In subsequent tests, captures with solid Farma Tech wafer dispensers with ME or C-L and DDVP placed inside Jackson and AWPM traps were equal to those for a Jackson trap with naled, currently used for detection of ME and C-L responding fruit flies in Florida. Farma Tech ME and C-L wafers with DDVP would be more convenient and safer to handle than current liquid insecticide formulations (e.g., naled) used for detection programs in Florida. PMID:19449634

  19. Insecticide residues in cotton soils of Burkina Faso and effects of insecticides on fluctuating asymmetry in honey bees (Apis mellifera Linnaeus).

    PubMed

    Ondo Zue Abaga, Norbert; Alibert, Paul; Dousset, Sylvie; Savadogo, Paul W; Savadogo, Moussa; Sedogo, Michel

    2011-04-01

    Four insecticides (acetamiprid, cypermethrin, endosulfan and profenofos) are used quarterly in the cotton-growing areas of Burkina Faso, West Africa. These insecticides were investigated in soils collected from traditionally cultivated and new cotton areas. Also, the effects of insecticide exposure on the developmental instability of honey bees, Apis mellifera, were explored. In soil samples collected three months after insecticide treatments, endosulfan and profenofos concentrations varied in the range of 10-30 μg kg(-1) in the traditionally cultivated zones and 10-80 μg kg(-1) in the new cotton zones, indicating a pollution of agricultural lands. However, only profenofos concentrations were significantly higher in the new cotton zone than the traditionally cultivated zones. In addition, the index of fluctuating asymmetry, FA1, in the length of second tarsus (L(HW)) was increased for bees when exposed to pesticide treated cotton fields for 82d, and their FA levels were significantly higher than those in the control colony in an orchard. The other studied traits of bees exposed to insecticides were not significantly different from controls. Our results indicate that FA may be considered as a biomarker reflecting the stress induced by insecticide treatments. However, the relationship between FA and stressors needs further investigations. PMID:21190716

  20. Effects of Direct and Indirect Exposure of Insecticides to Garden Symphylan (Symphyla: Scutigerellidae) in Laboratory Bioassays.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Shimat V

    2015-12-01

    The garden symphylan, Scutigerella immaculata Newport, is a serious soil pest whose root feeding affects yield and survival of several high valued crops in the California's central coast. Because organophosphate insecticides, widely used for S. immaculata control, are rigorously regulated and little is known about the efficacy of alternate insecticides, laboratory bioassays were conducted to determine insecticide efficacy through repellency and lethality. To determine indirect repellency (noncontact) of insecticides, choice assays were conducted where five S. immaculata were introduced into the arena to choose between insecticide-treated and untreated wells whereas, in direct repellency (contact) assays, three insecticide-treated 1-cm-diameter discs were pasted into the arena and the number of visits, time spent per visitation, and number of long-duration (>10 s) stays of five S. immaculata were quantified. To determine efficacy through direct mortality, number of S. immaculata died after 72 h were determined by introducing 10 S. immaculata to insecticide-treated soil assays. In indirect exposure bioassays, seven (clothianidin, oxamyl, zeta-cypermethrin, chlorpyrifos, ethoprop, azadirachtin, and a combination of beta-cyfluthrin and imidacloprid) out of 14 insecticides tested elicited repellency to S. immaculata. Of six insecticides tested in the direct exposure assays, only tolfenpyrad elicited contact repellency. In soil assays, after 72 h of introduction, bifenthrin, oxamyl, clothianidin, zeta-cypermethrin, and tolfenpyrad caused 100, 95, 80, 44, and 44% S. immaculata mortality, respectively, which was significantly greater than distilled water and four other insecticides. The implications of these results on S. immaculata management in the California's central coast are discussed. PMID:26470373

  1. Insecticide Resistance Mechanisms in the Green Peach Aphid Myzus persicae (Hemiptera: Aphididae) I: A Transcriptomic Survey

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Andrea X.; Jander, Georg; Samaniego, Horacio; Ramsey, John S; Figueroa, Christian C.

    2012-01-01

    Background Insecticide resistance is one of the best examples of rapid micro-evolution found in nature. Since the development of the first synthetic insecticide in 1939, humans have invested considerable effort to stay ahead of resistance phenotypes that repeatedly develop in insects. Aphids are a group of insects that have become global pests in agriculture and frequently exhibit insecticide resistance. The green peach aphid, Myzus persicae, has developed resistance to at least seventy different synthetic compounds, and different insecticide resistance mechanisms have been reported worldwide. Methodology/Principal Findings To further characterize this resistance, we analyzed genome-wide transcriptional responses in three genotypes of M. persicae, each exhibiting different resistance mechanisms, in response to an anti-cholinesterase insecticide. The sensitive genotype (exhibiting no resistance mechanism) responded to the insecticide by up-regulating 183 genes primarily ones related to energy metabolism, detoxifying enzymes, proteins of extracellular transport, peptidases and cuticular proteins. The second genotype (resistant through a kdr sodium channel mutation), up-regulated 17 genes coding for detoxifying enzymes, peptidase and cuticular proteins. Finally, a multiply resistant genotype (carrying kdr and a modified acetylcholinesterase), up-regulated only 7 genes, appears not to require induced insecticide detoxification, and instead down-regulated many genes. Conclusions/Significance This study suggests strongly that insecticide resistance in M. persicae is more complex that has been described, with the participation of a broad array of resistance mechanisms. The sensitive genotype exhibited the highest transcriptional plasticity, accounting for the wide range of potential adaptations to insecticides that this species can evolve. In contrast, the multiply resistant genotype exhibited a low transcriptional plasticity, even for the expression of genes encoding

  2. Effects of Direct and Indirect Exposure of Insecticides to Garden Symphylan (Symphyla: Scutigerellidae) in Laboratory Bioassays.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Shimat V

    2015-12-01

    The garden symphylan, Scutigerella immaculata Newport, is a serious soil pest whose root feeding affects yield and survival of several high valued crops in the California's central coast. Because organophosphate insecticides, widely used for S. immaculata control, are rigorously regulated and little is known about the efficacy of alternate insecticides, laboratory bioassays were conducted to determine insecticide efficacy through repellency and lethality. To determine indirect repellency (noncontact) of insecticides, choice assays were conducted where five S. immaculata were introduced into the arena to choose between insecticide-treated and untreated wells whereas, in direct repellency (contact) assays, three insecticide-treated 1-cm-diameter discs were pasted into the arena and the number of visits, time spent per visitation, and number of long-duration (>10 s) stays of five S. immaculata were quantified. To determine efficacy through direct mortality, number of S. immaculata died after 72 h were determined by introducing 10 S. immaculata to insecticide-treated soil assays. In indirect exposure bioassays, seven (clothianidin, oxamyl, zeta-cypermethrin, chlorpyrifos, ethoprop, azadirachtin, and a combination of beta-cyfluthrin and imidacloprid) out of 14 insecticides tested elicited repellency to S. immaculata. Of six insecticides tested in the direct exposure assays, only tolfenpyrad elicited contact repellency. In soil assays, after 72 h of introduction, bifenthrin, oxamyl, clothianidin, zeta-cypermethrin, and tolfenpyrad caused 100, 95, 80, 44, and 44% S. immaculata mortality, respectively, which was significantly greater than distilled water and four other insecticides. The implications of these results on S. immaculata management in the California's central coast are discussed.

  3. Electrostatic coating enhances bioavailability of insecticides and breaks pyrethroid resistance in mosquitoes.

    PubMed

    Andriessen, Rob; Snetselaar, Janneke; Suer, Remco A; Osinga, Anne J; Deschietere, Johan; Lyimo, Issa N; Mnyone, Ladslaus L; Brooke, Basil D; Ranson, Hilary; Knols, Bart G J; Farenhorst, Marit

    2015-09-29

    Insecticide resistance poses a significant and increasing threat to the control of malaria and other mosquito-borne diseases. We present a novel method of insecticide application based on netting treated with an electrostatic coating that binds insecticidal particles through polarity. Electrostatic netting can hold small amounts of insecticides effectively and results in enhanced bioavailability upon contact by the insect. Six pyrethroid-resistant Anopheles mosquito strains from across Africa were exposed to similar concentrations of deltamethrin on electrostatic netting or a standard long-lasting deltamethrin-coated bednet (PermaNet 2.0). Standard WHO exposure bioassays showed that electrostatic netting induced significantly higher mortality rates than the PermaNet, thereby effectively breaking mosquito resistance. Electrostatic netting also induced high mortality in resistant mosquito strains when a 15-fold lower dose of deltamethrin was applied and when the exposure time was reduced to only 5 s. Because different types of particles adhere to electrostatic netting, it is also possible to apply nonpyrethroid insecticides. Three insecticide classes were effective against strains of Aedes and Culex mosquitoes, demonstrating that electrostatic netting can be used to deploy a wide range of active insecticides against all major groups of disease-transmitting mosquitoes. Promising applications include the use of electrostatic coating on walls or eave curtains and in trapping/contamination devices. We conclude that application of electrostatically adhered particles boosts the efficacy of WHO-recommended insecticides even against resistant mosquitoes. This innovative technique has potential to support the use of unconventional insecticide classes or combinations thereof, potentially offering a significant step forward in managing insecticide resistance in vector-control operations.

  4. Electrostatic coating enhances bioavailability of insecticides and breaks pyrethroid resistance in mosquitoes

    PubMed Central

    Andriessen, Rob; Snetselaar, Janneke; Suer, Remco A.; Osinga, Anne J.; Deschietere, Johan; Lyimo, Issa N.; Mnyone, Ladslaus L.; Brooke, Basil D.; Ranson, Hilary; Knols, Bart G. J.; Farenhorst, Marit

    2015-01-01

    Insecticide resistance poses a significant and increasing threat to the control of malaria and other mosquito-borne diseases. We present a novel method of insecticide application based on netting treated with an electrostatic coating that binds insecticidal particles through polarity. Electrostatic netting can hold small amounts of insecticides effectively and results in enhanced bioavailability upon contact by the insect. Six pyrethroid-resistant Anopheles mosquito strains from across Africa were exposed to similar concentrations of deltamethrin on electrostatic netting or a standard long-lasting deltamethrin-coated bednet (PermaNet 2.0). Standard WHO exposure bioassays showed that electrostatic netting induced significantly higher mortality rates than the PermaNet, thereby effectively breaking mosquito resistance. Electrostatic netting also induced high mortality in resistant mosquito strains when a 15-fold lower dose of deltamethrin was applied and when the exposure time was reduced to only 5 s. Because different types of particles adhere to electrostatic netting, it is also possible to apply nonpyrethroid insecticides. Three insecticide classes were effective against strains of Aedes and Culex mosquitoes, demonstrating that electrostatic netting can be used to deploy a wide range of active insecticides against all major groups of disease-transmitting mosquitoes. Promising applications include the use of electrostatic coating on walls or eave curtains and in trapping/contamination devices. We conclude that application of electrostatically adhered particles boosts the efficacy of WHO-recommended insecticides even against resistant mosquitoes. This innovative technique has potential to support the use of unconventional insecticide classes or combinations thereof, potentially offering a significant step forward in managing insecticide resistance in vector-control operations. PMID:26324912

  5. Electrostatic coating enhances bioavailability of insecticides and breaks pyrethroid resistance in mosquitoes.

    PubMed

    Andriessen, Rob; Snetselaar, Janneke; Suer, Remco A; Osinga, Anne J; Deschietere, Johan; Lyimo, Issa N; Mnyone, Ladslaus L; Brooke, Basil D; Ranson, Hilary; Knols, Bart G J; Farenhorst, Marit

    2015-09-29

    Insecticide resistance poses a significant and increasing threat to the control of malaria and other mosquito-borne diseases. We present a novel method of insecticide application based on netting treated with an electrostatic coating that binds insecticidal particles through polarity. Electrostatic netting can hold small amounts of insecticides effectively and results in enhanced bioavailability upon contact by the insect. Six pyrethroid-resistant Anopheles mosquito strains from across Africa were exposed to similar concentrations of deltamethrin on electrostatic netting or a standard long-lasting deltamethrin-coated bednet (PermaNet 2.0). Standard WHO exposure bioassays showed that electrostatic netting induced significantly higher mortality rates than the PermaNet, thereby effectively breaking mosquito resistance. Electrostatic netting also induced high mortality in resistant mosquito strains when a 15-fold lower dose of deltamethrin was applied and when the exposure time was reduced to only 5 s. Because different types of particles adhere to electrostatic netting, it is also possible to apply nonpyrethroid insecticides. Three insecticide classes were effective against strains of Aedes and Culex mosquitoes, demonstrating that electrostatic netting can be used to deploy a wide range of active insecticides against all major groups of disease-transmitting mosquitoes. Promising applications include the use of electrostatic coating on walls or eave curtains and in trapping/contamination devices. We conclude that application of electrostatically adhered particles boosts the efficacy of WHO-recommended insecticides even against resistant mosquitoes. This innovative technique has potential to support the use of unconventional insecticide classes or combinations thereof, potentially offering a significant step forward in managing insecticide resistance in vector-control operations. PMID:26324912

  6. Dissolved insecticides and polychlorinated biphenyls in the Pearl River Estuary and South China Sea.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Z; Dai, M; Hong, H; Zhou, J L; Yu, G

    2002-12-01

    Persistent organic pollutants (POPs) such as organochlorine (OCl) insecticides and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB), together with the new generation of organophosphorus (OP) insecticides, are of global concern, due to their widespread occurrence, persistence, bioaccumulation and hormone disruption potential. This paper represents an attempt to study the source and transportation of such pollutants in estuarine and coastal environments as an integrated ecosystem, by determining the levels of 18 OCl insecticides, 21 PCB congeners, and 17 OP insecticides in the Pearl River Estuary and South China Sea. The total concentrations varied from 126-1198 ng l(-1) for OCl insecticides, 33.38-1064 ng l(-1) for PCB congeners, and 4.44-6356 ng l(-1) for OP insecticides in the Pearl River Estuary. In comparison, their levels in the South China Sea were significantly lower, varying from 57.09-202 ng l(-1) for OCl insecticides, 21.72-144 ng l(-1) for PCBs, and 1.27-122 ng l(-1) for OP insecticides, respectively. The predominance of beta-HCH in HCHs, and DDE in DDTs in all water samples was clearly observed, suggesting beta-HCH and DDE's resistance to further degradation. The PCBs were dominated by those with 3-6 chlorines. The distribution characteristic of OP insecticides shows that five compounds (methamidophos, dimethoate, malathion, dichlorvos and omethoate) accounted for 56% and 72% of the total OP insecticide concentration. The relationship between pollutant concentrations and salinity in the estuary showed that they were all removed during the mixing process, therefore behaving non-conservatively.

  7. Evolution of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry toxins insecticidal activity.

    PubMed

    Bravo, Alejandra; Gómez, Isabel; Porta, Helena; García-Gómez, Blanca Ines; Rodriguez-Almazan, Claudia; Pardo, Liliana; Soberón, Mario

    2013-01-01

    Insecticidal Cry proteins produced by Bacillus thuringiensis are use worldwide in transgenic crops for efficient pest control. Among the family of Cry toxins, the three domain Cry family is the better characterized regarding their natural evolution leading to a large number of Cry proteins with similar structure, mode of action but different insect specificity. Also, this group is the better characterized regarding the study of their mode of action and the molecular basis of insect specificity. In this review we discuss how Cry toxins have evolved insect specificity in nature and analyse several cases of improvement of Cry toxin action by genetic engineering, some of these examples are currently used in transgenic crops. We believe that the success in the improvement of insecticidal activity by genetic evolution of Cry toxins will depend on the knowledge of the rate-limiting steps of Cry toxicity in different insect pests, the mapping of the specificity binding regions in the Cry toxins, as well as the improvement of mutagenesis strategies and selection procedures.

  8. Chronic toxicity to quail and pheasants of some chlorinated insecticides

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    DeWitt, J.B.

    1956-01-01

    Quantitative report of tests. 'Inclusion of 1 p.p.m, of aldrin, dieldrin, or endrin in diets fed growing quail resulted in high mortality rates, but the birds survived on diets containing 100 p.p.m, of DDT or 50 p.p.m. of strobane. Young pheasants survived on diets containing 50 p.p.m, of DDT or strobane, but failed to survive on diets containing 5 p.p.m, of aldrin, dieldrin, or endrin. No ill effects were noted when quail were fed winter diets containing 50 p.p.m, of strobane, or 1 p.p.m, of dieldrin or endrin, but nearly all birds died when fed diets containing 0.5 p.p.m, of aldrin. Mortality rates among pheasants fed 50 p.p.m, and of quail fed 100 p.p.m. of DDT were higher than for birds receiving normal diets, but none of the birds displayed symptoms characteristic of DDT poisoning. Egg production, fertility, and hatchability were relatively unaffected by inclusion of insecticides in diets fed breeding quail, but chicks from these matings showed high mortality rates even when reared on insecticide-free diets. Lowered viability of quail chicks was most pronounced in groups receiving DDT and strobane in the reproduction diets. Hatchability of pheasant eggs and viability of chicks were adversely affected by inclusion of aldrin, dieldrin, or endrin in the reproduction diets.'

  9. Biological response of earthworm, Eisenia fetida, to five neonicotinoid insecticides.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kai; Pang, Sen; Mu, Xiyan; Qi, Suzhen; Li, Dongzhi; Cui, Feng; Wang, Chengju

    2015-08-01

    Earthworms (Eisenia fetida) are one of the most abundant terrestrial species, and play an important role in maintaining the ecological function of soil. Neonicotinoids are some of the most widely used insecticides applied to crops. Studies on the effect of neonicotinoids on E. fetida are limited. In the present work, we evaluated the effects of five neonicotinoid insecticides on reproduction, cellulase activity and the tissues of E. fetida. The results showed that, the LC50 of imidacloprid, acetamiprid, nitenpyram, clothianidin and thiacloprid was 3.05, 2.69, 4.34, 0.93 and 2.68mgkg(-1), respectively. They also could seriously affect the reproduction of E. fetida, reducing the fecundity by 84.0%, 39.5%, 54.3%, 45.7% and 39.5% at the sub-lethal concentrations of 2.0, 1.5, 0.80, 2.0 and 1.5mgkg(-1), respectively. The cellulase activity of E. fetida was most sensitive to clothianidin. Significant disruption of the epidermal and midgut tissue was observed after 14d exposure. In summary, we demonstrate that imidacloprid, acetamiprid, nitenpyram, clothianidin and thiacloprid have high toxic to earthworm, and can significantly inhibited fecundity and cellulase activity of E. fetida, and they also damage the epidermal and midgut cells of earthworm. PMID:25828917

  10. Have Regulatory Efforts to Reduce Organophosphorus Insecticide Exposures Been Effective?

    PubMed Central

    Clune, Alison L.; Ryan, P. Barry

    2012-01-01

    Background: The Food Quality Protection Act (FQPA) was signed into law in 1996 to strengthen the regulation of pesticide tolerances in food. Organophosphorus (OP) insecticides were the first group of pesticides reviewed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) under the new law. Objective: Our goal was to determine whether urinary concentrations of dialkylphosphate (DAP) metabolites of OP pesticides declined between the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) III and NHANES 1999–2004. Methods: Using mass spectrometry–based methods, we analyzed urine samples from a nationally representative sample of 2,874 adults 20–59 years of age in NHANES 1999–2004 and samples from a non-nationally representative sample of 197 adult participants for NHANES III (1988–1994) for six common DAP metabolites of OP pesticides. Results: Median urinary DAP concentrations decreased by more than half between NHANES III and NHANES 2003–2004. Reductions of about 50%–90% were also observed for 95th percentile concentrations of five of the six metabolites. Frequencies of detection (FODs) decreased in all six metabolites (< 50% reduction). On average, median and 95th percentile concentrations and FODs showed a larger decrease in diethylphosphate metabolites than dimethylphosphate metabolites. Conclusions: Human exposure to OP insecticides as assessed by urinary DAP concentrations has decreased since the implementation of the FQPA, although we cannot be certain that U.S. EPA actions in response to the FQPA directly caused the decrease in DAP concentrations. PMID:22251442

  11. Aquatic hazard assessment of the organophosphate insecticide fonofos

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fairchild, James F.; Little, Edward E.; Huckins, James N.

    1992-01-01

    This study determined the acute and chronic toxicity of the organophosphate insecticide fonofos to standard freshwater aquatic organisms under laboratory conditions. Fonofos was acutely toxic to bluegill (Lepomis macrochirus), Daphnia (D. magna), and midge (Chironomous riparius) at 5.3, 2.7, and 39 μg/L, respectively. Three fonofos formulations (technical, 94.8% A.I.; 20G, field granular 20% A.I.; and 4E, field liquid 4#/gal A.I.) exhibited similar acute toxicities to bluegill. Exposure to fonofos delayed reproduction and decreased the intrinsic rate of increase of Daphnia during 21-d chronic exposure at the lowest tested concentration (0.08 μg/L). The no observable effect concentration (NOEC) for Daphnia survival was 0.42 μg/L; 0% survival occurred at the lowest observable effect concentration (LOEC) of 1.45 μg/L. The NOEC for midge emergence was 3.42 μg/L; only 34% emergence occurred at the LOEC of 8.24 μg/L. Chronic 30-d exposure of juvenile bluegills decreased growth and survival at 5.65 μg/L (LOEC), but no effects occurred at 2.33 μg/L (NOEC). The relative hazard of fonofos to aquatic life is similar to other carbamate and organophosphate corn insecticides.

  12. Volatile aldehydes are promising broad-spectrum postharvest insecticides.

    PubMed

    Hammond, D G; Rangel, S; Kubo, I

    2000-09-01

    A variety of naturally occurring aldehydes common in plants have been evaluated for their insecticidal activity and for phytotoxicity to postharvest fruits, vegetables, and grains. Twenty-nine compounds were initially screened for their activity against aphids on fava bean leaf disks. Application under reduced pressure (partial vacuum) for the first quarter of fumigation increased insecticidal activity severalfold. The 11 best aldehydes were assayed against aphids placed under the third leaf of whole heads of iceberg lettuce using the same two-tier reduced-pressure regime, which caused no additional detriment to the commodity over fumigation at atmospheric pressure. Phytotoxicity to naked and wrapped iceburg lettuce, green and red table grapes, lemon, grapefruit, orange, broccoli, avocado, cabbage, pinto bean, and rice at doses that killed 100% of aphids was recorded for three promising fumigants: propanal, (E)-2-pentenal, and 2-methyl-(E)-2-butenal. These three compounds have excellent potential as affordable postharvest insect control agents, killing 100% of the aphids with little or no detectable harm to a majority of the commodities tested. Preliminary assays indicate that similar doses are also effective against mealybugs, thrips, and whitefly. PMID:10995371

  13. Biological response of earthworm, Eisenia fetida, to five neonicotinoid insecticides.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kai; Pang, Sen; Mu, Xiyan; Qi, Suzhen; Li, Dongzhi; Cui, Feng; Wang, Chengju

    2015-08-01

    Earthworms (Eisenia fetida) are one of the most abundant terrestrial species, and play an important role in maintaining the ecological function of soil. Neonicotinoids are some of the most widely used insecticides applied to crops. Studies on the effect of neonicotinoids on E. fetida are limited. In the present work, we evaluated the effects of five neonicotinoid insecticides on reproduction, cellulase activity and the tissues of E. fetida. The results showed that, the LC50 of imidacloprid, acetamiprid, nitenpyram, clothianidin and thiacloprid was 3.05, 2.69, 4.34, 0.93 and 2.68mgkg(-1), respectively. They also could seriously affect the reproduction of E. fetida, reducing the fecundity by 84.0%, 39.5%, 54.3%, 45.7% and 39.5% at the sub-lethal concentrations of 2.0, 1.5, 0.80, 2.0 and 1.5mgkg(-1), respectively. The cellulase activity of E. fetida was most sensitive to clothianidin. Significant disruption of the epidermal and midgut tissue was observed after 14d exposure. In summary, we demonstrate that imidacloprid, acetamiprid, nitenpyram, clothianidin and thiacloprid have high toxic to earthworm, and can significantly inhibited fecundity and cellulase activity of E. fetida, and they also damage the epidermal and midgut cells of earthworm.

  14. Selective effects of insecticides on nigrostriatal dopaminergic nerve pathways.

    PubMed

    Bloomquist, Jeffrey R; Barlow, Rebecca L; Gillette, Jeffrey S; Li, Wen; Kirby, Michael L

    2002-10-01

    A degeneration of the nigrostriatal pathway is a primary component of Parkinson's disease (PD), and we have investigated the actions of insecticides on this pathway. For in vivo exposures, C57BL/6 mice were treated three times over a 2-week period with heptachlor, the pyrethroids deltamethrin and permethrin, or chlorpyrifos. One day after the last treatment, we observed that heptachlor and the pyrethroids increased maximal [3H]dopamine uptake in striatal synaptosomes from treated mice, with dose-dependent changes in Vmax displaying a bell-shaped curve. Western blot analysis confirmed increased levels of dopamine transporter (DAT) protein in the striatum of mice treated with heptachlor and permethrin. In contrast, we observed a small, but statistically significant decrease in dopamine uptake by 100 mg/kg chlorpyrifos. For heptachlor, doses that upregulated DAT expression had little or no effect on serotonin transport. Permethrin did cause an upregulation of serotonin transport, but required a 30-fold greater dose than that effective on dopamine uptake. Other evidence of specificity was found in transmitter release assays, where heptachlor and deltamethrin released dopamine from striatal terminals with greater potency than other transmitter types. These findings confirm that insecticides possess specificity for effects on striatal dopaminergic neurotransmission.

  15. Inhibition of monocyte esterase activity by organophosphate insecticides.

    PubMed

    Lee, M J; Waters, H C

    1977-11-01

    Organophosphate insecticides, such as Vapona, Naled, and Rabon, are highly potent inhibitors of an enzyme found in human monocytes. The enzyme, a specific monocyte esterase, could be inhibited by Vapona in blood samples via airborne contamination at levels easily achieved from commercial slow-release insecticide strips. Fifty percent inhibition (I50)--as measured on the Hemalog D (Technicon Corp.)--occurred at solution concentrations of 0.22, 1.5, and 2.6 X 10(-6) g/liter for Vapona, Rabon, and Naled, respectively. Parathion (a thiophosphate) and Baygon (a carbamate) were less potent, with I50 values of 3.7 X 10(-5) and 1.5 X 10(-4) g/liter, respectively. Dursban (another thiophosphate) and Carbaryl (a carbamate) showed only marginal inhibition. Eserine, malathion, nicotine and pyrethrum had no inhibitory effect up to 0.5 g/liter. The occurrence of this effect in vivo has not yet been shown, nor is it clear what the implications of such an effect would be. The inhibition of this enzyme by airborne contaminants, however, may interfere with the proper functioning of the Hemalog D. PMID:907842

  16. Bioefficacy of insecticides against Leucinodes orbonalis on brinjal.

    PubMed

    Anil; Sharma, P C

    2010-07-01

    Studies on bioefficacy of insecticides against brinjal shoot and fruit borer, Leucinodes orbonalis Guenee on brinjal were carried out during 2007 and 2008. The results on bioefficacy of insecticides showed that in terms of shoot infestation, emamectin benzoate (0.002%), endosulfan (0.05%), novaluron (0.01%) and lambda-cyhalothrin (0.004%) were found superior. The total number of drooping shoots was minimum (4.17) in emamectin benzoate followed by endosulfan (6.83) and novaluron (7.00), as compared to spinosad (9.17), deltamethrin (11.67) and Bacillus thuringiensis (13.17). In terms of reduction in fruit infestation, emamectin benzoate (0.002%) was highly effective followed by endosulfan (0.05%), agrospray oil T (0.2%) and spinosad (0.0024%). However, cost benefit ratio was highest in agrospray oil T (0.2%) followed by lambda-cyhalothrin (0.004%), endosulfan (0.05%) and deltamethrin (0.0028%). PMID:21186709

  17. Effects of postharvest preparation on organophosphate insecticide residues in apples.

    PubMed

    Rawn, Dorothea F K; Quade, Sue C; Sun, Wing-Fung; Smith, Mark; Fouquet, André; Bélanger, André

    2008-02-13

    Apples were sampled directly from orchard trees at 96, 45, and 21 days postapplication with one of three organophosphate insecticides (azinphos methyl, phosalone, or phosmet, respectively). Individual apples were prepared for analysis following one of three postharvest preparations: no preparation, rinsed with deionized water for 10-15 s, or rinsed and peeled. Azinphos methyl, phosalone, and phosmet concentrations ranged from below the level of detection to 5.26 ng/g, 94.7 to 5720 ng/g, and 0.011 to 663 ng/g in the apples that received no postharvest preparation, respectively. Although rinsed apples had lower maximum concentrations than observed in apples with no preparation, levels were not significantly lower. Concentrations of all three OP insecticides in apples that were rinsed followed by peeling, however, were much lower (below detection limits to 0.733 ng/g, azinphos methyl; 0.322-219 ng/g, phosalone; and below detection limits to 44.0 ng/g, phosmet) than observed in apples that had been rinsed alone. Rinsing and peeling of apples resulted in a 74.5-97.9% reduction in OP residues, while rinsing alone lowered mean concentrations by 13.5-28.7% relative to apples that received no postharvest preparation.

  18. Enhancement of seed vigour following insecticide and phenolic elicitor treatment.

    PubMed

    Horii, A; McCue, P; Shetty, K

    2007-02-01

    Thiamethoxam (CGA 293'343) is a novel broad-spectrum neonicotinoid insecticide. It is commercially used as a seed treatment under the trademark Cruiser (CRZ). Although many reports detail its insecticidal, plant-protecting properties, there are minimal reports concerning the effect on seed germination activities which can be key control points of seedling vigour. In this report, we investigated the effect of CRZ, fish protein hydrolysates (FPH; a known elicitor of pentose-phosphate pathway) and the combination of CRZ and FPH (CF) on seed vigour of pea, soybean and corn. Seed vigour was investigated by estimating germination percentage, shoot height, shoot weight, total soluble phenolic content, antioxidant content, G6PDH (glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase) activity, and GPX (guaiacol peroxidase) activity. Addition of FPH to CRZ (CF) seemed to have a slightly positive effect on seed vigour, especially, CF and FPH treatment for corn and FPH treatment for pea, suggesting that pre-sowing treatments may cause positive/negative effects on seed vigour, depending on the concentration of treatments. Further research will be needed to determine their effects and the optimal concentration for seed priming.

  19. Effects of onboard insecticide use on airline flight attendants.

    PubMed

    Kilburn, Kaye H

    2004-06-01

    Flight attendants (FAs) exposed to insecticide spray in an aircraft were compared with unexposed subjects for neurobehavioral function, pulmonary function, mood states, and symptoms. The 33 symptomatic FAs were self-selected, and 5 had retired for disability. Testing procedures included balance, reaction time, color discrimination, visual fields, grip strength, verbal recall, problem solving, attention and discrimination functions, and long-term memory functions. Measurements were expressed as a percentage of their predicted values (derived from unexposed controls), and the author compared the means of the percentage predicted values by analysis of variance. Symptom frequencies and Profile of Mood States (POMS) scores were assessed. FAs were significantly more impaired than controls with respect to balance with eyes closed, grip strength, and color discrimination. Nearly half had 3 or more abnormal neurobehavioral functions, after adjustment was made for age, sex, and education level. Neither elevated POMS scores nor frequencies of average symptoms correlated with their numbers of abnormal measurements. Occupational exposure to synthetic pyrethrin insecticides on airliners was associated with neurobehavioral impairment and disability retirement.

  20. Insecticide resistance in malaria-transmitting mosquitoes in Zimbabwe: a review.

    PubMed

    Soko, White; Chimbari, Moses J; Mukaratirwa, Samson

    2015-01-01

    Malaria is a global public health problem, with about 3.2 billion people at risk of infection. The populations at risk mainly reside in Africa, Asia and America, with African populations accounting for the largest burden of the disease. In 2013, close to 198 million malaria cases were reported, leading to 584,000 deaths. Much (90 %) of the mortality rates were recorded from the World Health Organization (WHO) database in the African region and 78 % of these occurred in children under the age of five. In Zimbabwe, approximately half of the population is at risk of infection with malaria.Insecticide residual spraying (IRS) has been documented as an effective way to control malaria and has been adopted globally by the WHO and national governments. However, both insecticide resistance and climate change threaten to reverse the progress made by IRS in malaria control. Resistance has been reported in all four classes of insecticides approved by the WHO for vector control intervention. Variability of environmental temperature is suspected to complicate the situation through alteration in the genetic structure, and enzyme and protein profiles of mosquitoes. In Zimbabwe, little research has been done on the interaction between climate change, temperature variability and insecticide resistance in malarial mosquitoes over time. Such information is important for informing policies on insecticide selection for IRS.We reviewed literature on insecticide sensitivity among malarial mosquitoes in Zimbabwe from 1972 to 2014. International peer-reviewed articles on insecticide sensitivity in Zimbabwe, published in English in this time period, were searched using MEDLINE® (PubMed), Google Scholar, Google and grey literature. Eight publications were eligible for the present study, with one of the articles being a review paper. Six articles covered insecticide resistance, while the other two articles, published in 2000, were about the absence of resistance. Contradicting resistance

  1. Insecticide resistance in malaria-transmitting mosquitoes in Zimbabwe: a review.

    PubMed

    Soko, White; Chimbari, Moses J; Mukaratirwa, Samson

    2015-01-01

    Malaria is a global public health problem, with about 3.2 billion people at risk of infection. The populations at risk mainly reside in Africa, Asia and America, with African populations accounting for the largest burden of the disease. In 2013, close to 198 million malaria cases were reported, leading to 584,000 deaths. Much (90 %) of the mortality rates were recorded from the World Health Organization (WHO) database in the African region and 78 % of these occurred in children under the age of five. In Zimbabwe, approximately half of the population is at risk of infection with malaria.Insecticide residual spraying (IRS) has been documented as an effective way to control malaria and has been adopted globally by the WHO and national governments. However, both insecticide resistance and climate change threaten to reverse the progress made by IRS in malaria control. Resistance has been reported in all four classes of insecticides approved by the WHO for vector control intervention. Variability of environmental temperature is suspected to complicate the situation through alteration in the genetic structure, and enzyme and protein profiles of mosquitoes. In Zimbabwe, little research has been done on the interaction between climate change, temperature variability and insecticide resistance in malarial mosquitoes over time. Such information is important for informing policies on insecticide selection for IRS.We reviewed literature on insecticide sensitivity among malarial mosquitoes in Zimbabwe from 1972 to 2014. International peer-reviewed articles on insecticide sensitivity in Zimbabwe, published in English in this time period, were searched using MEDLINE® (PubMed), Google Scholar, Google and grey literature. Eight publications were eligible for the present study, with one of the articles being a review paper. Six articles covered insecticide resistance, while the other two articles, published in 2000, were about the absence of resistance. Contradicting resistance

  2. Decaleside: a new class of natural insecticide targeting tarsal gustatory sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajashekar, Yallappa; Rao, Lingamallu J. M.; Shivanandappa, Thimmappa

    2012-10-01

    Natural sources for novel insecticide molecules hold promise in view of their eco-friendly nature, selectivity, and mammalian safety. Recent progress in understanding the biology of insect olfaction and taste offers new strategies for developing selective pest control agents. We have isolated two natural insecticidal molecules from edible roots of Decalepis hamiltonii named Decalesides I and II, which are novel trisaccharides, highly toxic to household insect pests and stored-product insects. We have experimentally shown that insecticidal activity requires contact with tarsi on the legs but is not toxic orally. The insecticidal activity of molecules is lost by hydrolysis, and various sugars modify toxic response, showing that the insecticidal activity is via gustatory sites on the tarsi. Selective toxicity to insects by virtue of their gustatory site of action and the mammalian safety of the new insecticides is inherent in their chemical structure with 1-4 or 1-1 α linkage that is easily hydrolyzed by digestive enzymes of mammals. Decalesides represent a new chemical class of natural insecticides with a unique mode of action targeting tarsal chemosensory/gustatory system of insects.

  3. Using Drosophila melanogaster to validate metabolism-based insecticide resistance from insect pests.

    PubMed

    Daborn, Phillip J; Lumb, Christopher; Harrop, Thomas W R; Blasetti, Alex; Pasricha, Shivani; Morin, Shai; Mitchell, Sara N; Donnelly, Martin J; Müller, Pie; Batterham, Philip

    2012-12-01

    Identifying molecular mechanisms of insecticide resistance is important for preserving insecticide efficacy, developing new insecticides and implementing insect control. The metabolic detoxification of insecticides is a widespread resistance mechanism. Enzymes with the potential to detoxify insecticides are commonly encoded by members of the large cytochrome P450, glutathione S-transferase and carboxylesterase gene families, all rapidly evolving in insects. Here, we demonstrate that the model insect Drosophila melanogaster is useful for functionally validating the role of metabolic enzymes in conferring metabolism-based insecticide resistance. Alleles of three well-characterized genes from different pest insects were expressed in transgenic D. melanogaster : a carboxylesterase gene (αE7) from the Australian sheep blowfly Lucilia cuprina, a glutathione S-transferase gene (GstE2) from the mosquito Anopheles gambiae and a cytochrome P450 gene (Cyp6cm1) from the whitefly Bemisia tabaci. For all genes, expression in D. melanogaster resulted in insecticide resistance phenotypes mirroring those observed in resistant populations of the pest species. Using D. melanogaster to assess the potential for novel metabolic resistance mechanisms to evolve in pest species is discussed.

  4. Insecticides reduce survival and the expression of traits associated with carnivory of carnivorous plants.

    PubMed

    Jennings, David E; Congelosi, Alexandra M; Rohr, Jason R

    2012-03-01

    While agrochemical pollution is thought to be an important conservation threat to carnivorous plants, the effects of insecticides on these taxa have not been quantified previously. Using a combination of lab- and field-based experiments, we tested the effects of commercial and technical grades of three widely used insecticides (carbaryl, lambda-cyhalothrin, and malathion) on survival and the expression of traits associated with carnivory of pink sundews (Drosera capillaris) and Venus flytraps (Dionaea muscipula). Commercial grades were generally more harmful than technical grades under lab and field conditions, but all three insecticides were capable of reducing both survival and the expression of traits associated with carnivory within recommended application rates. However, pink sundews appeared to be more susceptible to insecticides than Venus flytraps, perhaps because of larger numbers of digestive glands on the leaf surfaces. We make several recommendations for future research directions, such as examining the long-term effects of insecticides on carnivorous plant populations, for example in terms of growth rates and fitness. Additionally, future research should include representative species from a wider-range of carnivorous plant growth forms, and explore the mechanism by which insecticides are harming the plants. Given the effects we observed in the present study, we suggest that the use of insecticides should be carefully managed in areas containing vulnerable carnivorous plant species.

  5. Chemical and biological insecticides select distinct gene expression patterns in Aedes aegypti mosquito

    PubMed Central

    Després, Laurence; Stalinski, Renaud; Faucon, Frédéric; Navratil, Vincent; Viari, Alain; Paris, Margot; Tetreau, Guillaume; Poupardin, Rodolphe; Riaz, Muhammad Asam; Bonin, Aurélie; Reynaud, Stéphane; David, Jean-Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Worldwide evolution of mosquito resistance to chemical insecticides represents a major challenge for public health, and the future of vector control largely relies on the development of biological insecticides that can be used in combination with chemicals (integrated management), with the expectation that populations already resistant to chemicals will not become readily resistant to biological insecticides. However, little is known about the metabolic pathways affected by selection with chemical or biological insecticides. Here we show that Aedes aegypti, a laboratory mosquito strain selected with a biological insecticide (Bacillus thuringiensis israelensis, Bti) evolved increased transcription of many genes coding for endopeptidases while most genes coding for detoxification enzymes were under-expressed. By contrast, in strains selected with chemicals, genes encoding detoxification enzymes were mostly over-expressed. In all the resistant strains, genes involved in immune response were under-transcribed, suggesting that basal immunity might be a general adjustment variable to compensate metabolic costs caused by insecticide selection. Bioassays generally showed no evidence for an increased susceptibility of selected strains towards the other insecticide type, and all chemical-resistant strains were as susceptible to Bti as the unselected parent strain, which is a good premise for sustainable integrated management of mosquito populations resistant to chemicals. PMID:25540155

  6. Comparison of house spraying and insecticide-treated nets for malaria control.

    PubMed Central

    Curtis, C. F.; Mnzava, A. E.

    2000-01-01

    The efficacies of using residual house spraying and insecticide-treated nets against malaria vectors are compared, using data from six recent comparisons in Africa, Asia and Melanesia. By all the entomological and malariological criteria recorded, pyrethroid-treated nets were at least as efficacious as house spraying with dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT), malathion or a pyrethroid. However, when data from carefully monitored house spraying projects carried out between the 1950s and 1970s at Pare-Taveta and Zanzibar (United Republic of Tanzania), Kisumu (Kenya) and Garki (Nigeria) are compared with recent insecticide-treated net trials with apparently similar vector populations, the results with the insecticide-treated nets were much less impressive. Possible explanations include the longer duration of most of the earlier spraying projects and the use of non-irritant insecticides. Non-irritant insecticides may yield higher mosquito mortalities than pyrethroids, which tend to make insects leave the site of treatment (i.e. are excito-repellent). Comparative tests with non-irritant insecticides, including their use on nets, are advocated. The relative costs and sustainability of spraying and of insecticide-treated net operations are briefly reviewed for villages in endemic and epidemic situations and in camps for displaced populations. The importance of high population coverage is emphasized, and the advantages of providing treatment free of charge, rather than charging individuals, are pointed out. PMID:11196486

  7. Chemical and biological insecticides select distinct gene expression patterns in Aedes aegypti mosquito.

    PubMed

    Després, Laurence; Stalinski, Renaud; Faucon, Frédéric; Navratil, Vincent; Viari, Alain; Paris, Margot; Tetreau, Guillaume; Poupardin, Rodolphe; Riaz, Muhammad Asam; Bonin, Aurélie; Reynaud, Stéphane; David, Jean-Philippe

    2014-12-01

    Worldwide evolution of mosquito resistance to chemical insecticides represents a major challenge for public health, and the future of vector control largely relies on the development of biological insecticides that can be used in combination with chemicals (integrated management), with the expectation that populations already resistant to chemicals will not become readily resistant to biological insecticides. However, little is known about the metabolic pathways affected by selection with chemical or biological insecticides. Here we show that Aedes aegypti, a laboratory mosquito strain selected with a biological insecticide (Bacillus thuringiensis israelensis, Bti) evolved increased transcription of many genes coding for endopeptidases while most genes coding for detoxification enzymes were under-expressed. By contrast, in strains selected with chemicals, genes encoding detoxification enzymes were mostly over-expressed. In all the resistant strains, genes involved in immune response were under-transcribed, suggesting that basal immunity might be a general adjustment variable to compensate metabolic costs caused by insecticide selection. Bioassays generally showed no evidence for an increased susceptibility of selected strains towards the other insecticide type, and all chemical-resistant strains were as susceptible to Bti as the unselected parent strain, which is a good premise for sustainable integrated management of mosquito populations resistant to chemicals.

  8. [Spatial distribution and risk assessment of insecticides in surface soil from a rapidly urbanizing region].

    PubMed

    Wei, Yan-Li; Bao, Lian-Jun; Wu, Cheng-Zhou; Zeng, Eddy Y

    2014-10-01

    To examine the distribution patterns of organic contaminants in rapidly urbanizing regions, the levels and spatial distributions of 19 overlooked insecticides, i. e., phenyl-pyrazole class (fipronil), chlordane, endosulfan, nonachlor, hexachlorobenzene, heptachlor, dieldrin, aldrin, endrin, methoxychlor and their metabolites, were examined in 229 soil samples collected from the Pearl River Delta (PRD) and surrounding areas. The results indicated that higher insecticide levels distributed in the central PRD, while lower levels congested in the surrounding areas. The similar spatial patterns between the levels of insecticides and economic prosperity or population density demonstrated that social-economic factors may have dictated the spatial patterns of insecticides. In addition, the changing of land-use types during urbanization processes, e.g., historical plowlands have been converted into residential landscapes, resulted in high concentrations of banned insecticides in metropolis of the central PRD. Source diagnostics indicated that new inputs of technical chlordane products existed in the PRD and surrounding areas. Fipronil was degraded into fipronil sulfone and fipronil sulfide in most soil samples because of its low half-life in soil. Finally, a risk assessment of 19 insecticides in soil for human health suggested that six samples collected from the major administrative districts with dense population had potential cancer or non-cancer risk to human health. Therefore, these overlooked insecticides should be concerned in future environmental research.

  9. Cytochrome P450s--Their expression, regulation, and role in insecticide resistance.

    PubMed

    Liu, Nannan; Li, Ming; Gong, Youhui; Liu, Feng; Li, Ting

    2015-05-01

    P450s are known to be critical for the detoxification and/or activation of xenobiotics such as drugs and pesticides and overexpression of P450 genes can significantly affect the disposition of xenobiotics in the tissues of organisms, altering their pharmacological/toxicological effects. In insects, P450s play an important role in detoxifying exogenous compounds such as insecticides and plant toxins and their overexpression can result in increased levels of P450 proteins and P450 activities. This has been associated with enhanced metabolic detoxification of insecticides and has been implicated in the development of insecticide resistance in insects. Multiple P450 genes have been found to be co-overexpressed in individual insect species via several constitutive overexpression and induction mechanisms, which in turn are co-responsible for high levels of insecticide resistance. Many studies have also demonstrated that the transcriptional overexpression of P450 genes in resistant insects is regulated by trans and/or cis regulatory genes/factors. Taken together, these earlier findings suggest not only that insecticide resistance is conferred via multi-resistance P450 genes, but also that it is mediated through the interaction of regulatory genes/factors and resistance genes. This chapter reviews our current understanding of how the molecular mechanisms of P450 interaction/gene regulation govern the development of insecticide resistance in insects and our progress along the road to a comprehensive characterization of P450 detoxification-mediated insecticide resistance.

  10. Decaleside: a new class of natural insecticide targeting tarsal gustatory sites.

    PubMed

    Rajashekar, Yallappa; Rao, Lingamallu J M; Shivanandappa, Thimmappa

    2012-10-01

    Natural sources for novel insecticide molecules hold promise in view of their eco-friendly nature, selectivity, and mammalian safety. Recent progress in understanding the biology of insect olfaction and taste offers new strategies for developing selective pest control agents. We have isolated two natural insecticidal molecules from edible roots of Decalepis hamiltonii named Decalesides I and II, which are novel trisaccharides, highly toxic to household insect pests and stored-product insects. We have experimentally shown that insecticidal activity requires contact with tarsi on the legs but is not toxic orally. The insecticidal activity of molecules is lost by hydrolysis, and various sugars modify toxic response, showing that the insecticidal activity is via gustatory sites on the tarsi. Selective toxicity to insects by virtue of their gustatory site of action and the mammalian safety of the new insecticides is inherent in their chemical structure with 1-4 or 1-1 α linkage that is easily hydrolyzed by digestive enzymes of mammals. Decalesides represent a new chemical class of natural insecticides with a unique mode of action targeting tarsal chemosensory/gustatory system of insects. PMID:22955371

  11. Decaleside: a new class of natural insecticide targeting tarsal gustatory sites.

    PubMed

    Rajashekar, Yallappa; Rao, Lingamallu J M; Shivanandappa, Thimmappa

    2012-10-01

    Natural sources for novel insecticide molecules hold promise in view of their eco-friendly nature, selectivity, and mammalian safety. Recent progress in understanding the biology of insect olfaction and taste offers new strategies for developing selective pest control agents. We have isolated two natural insecticidal molecules from edible roots of Decalepis hamiltonii named Decalesides I and II, which are novel trisaccharides, highly toxic to household insect pests and stored-product insects. We have experimentally shown that insecticidal activity requires contact with tarsi on the legs but is not toxic orally. The insecticidal activity of molecules is lost by hydrolysis, and various sugars modify toxic response, showing that the insecticidal activity is via gustatory sites on the tarsi. Selective toxicity to insects by virtue of their gustatory site of action and the mammalian safety of the new insecticides is inherent in their chemical structure with 1-4 or 1-1 α linkage that is easily hydrolyzed by digestive enzymes of mammals. Decalesides represent a new chemical class of natural insecticides with a unique mode of action targeting tarsal chemosensory/gustatory system of insects.

  12. Insecticidal peptides from the theraposid spider Brachypelma albiceps: an NMR-based model of Ba2.

    PubMed

    Corzo, Gerardo; Bernard, Cedric; Clement, Herlinda; Villegas, Elba; Bosmans, Frank; Tytgat, Jan; Possani, Lourival D; Darbon, Herve; Alagón, Alejandro

    2009-08-01

    Soluble venom and purified fractions of the theraposid spider Brachypelma albiceps were screened for insecticidal peptides based on toxicity to crickets. Two insecticidal peptides, named Ba1 and Ba2, were obtained after the soluble venom was separated by high performance liquid chromatography and cation exchange chromatography. The two insecticidal peptides contain 39 amino acid residues and three disulfide bonds, and based on their amino acid sequence, they are highly identical to the insecticidal peptides from the theraposid spiders Aphonopelma sp. from the USA and Haplopelma huwenum from China indicating a relationship among these genera. Although Ba1 and Ba2 were not able to modify currents in insect and vertebrate cloned voltage-gated sodium ion channels, they have noteworthy insecticidal activities compared to classical arachnid insecticidal toxins indicating that they might target unknown receptors in insect species. The most abundant insecticidal peptide Ba2 was submitted to NMR spectroscopy to determine its 3-D structure; a remarkable characteristic of Ba2 is a cluster of basic residues, which might be important for receptor recognition.

  13. Triple insecticide resistance in Anopheles culicifacies: a practical impediment for malaria control in Odisha State, India

    PubMed Central

    Sahu, S.S.; Gunasekaran, K.; Vijayakumar, T.; Jambulingam, P.

    2015-01-01

    Background & objectives: In Odisha State, the control of malaria vectors has become dependent on synthetic pyrethroids, which are used for treatment of all approved long-lasting insecticidal nets (LLINs). The vast use of just one class of insecticide has led to the problem of resistance to insecticides in malaria vectors. One of the major malaria vectors in Odisha State is Anopheles culicifacies Giles. The aim of this study was to determine the resistance status of An. culicifacies to deltamethrin, a synthetic pyrethroid and other common insecticides used by the National Vector Borne Diseases Control Programme (NVBDCP) for indoor residual spraying in Odisha State. Methods: Mosquitoes were collected during April 2014 - June 2014 from 15 randomly selected villages in five Plasmodium falciparum endemic southern districts of Odisha State. The blood-fed wild caught females were exposed to the diagnostic dosage of DDT (4.0%), malathion (5.0%) and deltamethrin (0.05%) for one hour. Mortality was recorded at 24 h after the exposure. Results: Results indicated that An. culicifacies was resistant to all the three insecticides used in the malaria control programme in the five districts of Odisha State. Interpretation & conclusions: Resistance management strategy by appropriate rotation of different groups of insecticides including carbamates and incorporating a synergist with synthetic pyrethroids for treating mosquito nets should be considered for the control of malaria vectors in the area, especially where An. culicifacies is predominant. Periodical monitoring of susceptibility/resistance status of An. culicifacies to different insecticides is warranted. PMID:26905243

  14. The discovery of pyridalyl: a novel insecticidal agent for controlling lepidopterous pests.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Noriyasu; Saito, Shigeru; Hirose, Taro; Suzuki, Masaya; Matsuo, Sanshiro; Izumi, Keiichi; Nagatomi, Toshio; Ikegami, Hiroshi; Umeda, Kimitoshi; Tsushima, Kazunori; Matsuo, Noritada

    2004-01-01

    Synthesis of analogues of two compounds with known insecticidal activity, both of which contain a 3,3-dichloro-2-propenyloxy group, produced 2-(trifluoromethyl)-4-phenoxyphenyl 3,3-dichloro-2-propenyl ether, which had weak activity against lepidopterous larvae. Structural modifications around this lead compound led to the development of pyridalyl [Pleo, S-1812; 2,6-dichloro-4-(3,3-dichloroallyloxy)phenyl 3-[5-(trifluoromethyl)-2-pyridyloxy]propyl ether], which belongs to a new class of insecticides. Pyridalyl gives very good control of various lepidopterous and thysanopterous pests on cotton and vegetables, without phytotoxicity. It controls populations of Heliothis virescens F and Plutella xylostella (L) which are resistant to various currently used insecticides. It also produces unique insecticidal symptoms, so it may have a different mode of action from other existing insecticides. Pyridalyl is also less harmful than existing insecticides to various beneficial arthropods, so it should provide an important tool in IPM and insecticidal management programmes for the control of lepidopterous and thysanopterous pests. The first market introduction is expected in Japan and some Asian countries in the years between 2004 and 2005. PMID:14727738

  15. Insecticidal peptides from the theraposid spider Brachypelma albiceps: an NMR-based model of Ba2.

    PubMed

    Corzo, Gerardo; Bernard, Cedric; Clement, Herlinda; Villegas, Elba; Bosmans, Frank; Tytgat, Jan; Possani, Lourival D; Darbon, Herve; Alagón, Alejandro

    2009-08-01

    Soluble venom and purified fractions of the theraposid spider Brachypelma albiceps were screened for insecticidal peptides based on toxicity to crickets. Two insecticidal peptides, named Ba1 and Ba2, were obtained after the soluble venom was separated by high performance liquid chromatography and cation exchange chromatography. The two insecticidal peptides contain 39 amino acid residues and three disulfide bonds, and based on their amino acid sequence, they are highly identical to the insecticidal peptides from the theraposid spiders Aphonopelma sp. from the USA and Haplopelma huwenum from China indicating a relationship among these genera. Although Ba1 and Ba2 were not able to modify currents in insect and vertebrate cloned voltage-gated sodium ion channels, they have noteworthy insecticidal activities compared to classical arachnid insecticidal toxins indicating that they might target unknown receptors in insect species. The most abundant insecticidal peptide Ba2 was submitted to NMR spectroscopy to determine its 3-D structure; a remarkable characteristic of Ba2 is a cluster of basic residues, which might be important for receptor recognition. PMID:19374957

  16. Does Drought Increase the Risk of Insects Developing Behavioral Resistance to Systemic Insecticides?

    PubMed

    Khodaverdi, Haleh; Fowles, Trevor; Bick, Emily; Nansen, Christian

    2016-10-01

    Increases in severity and frequency of drought periods, average global temperatures, and more erratic fluctuations in rainfall patterns due to climate change are predicted to have a dramatic impact on agricultural production systems. Insect pest populations in agricultural and horticultural systems are also expected to be impacted, both in terms of their spatial and temporal distributions and in their status as pest species. In this opinion-based article, we discuss how indirect effects of drought may adversely affect the performance of systemic insecticides and also lead to increased risk of insect pests developing behavioral insecticide resistance. We hypothesize that more pronounced drought will decrease uptake and increase the magnitude of nonuniform translocation of systemic insecticides within treated crop plants, and that may have two concurrent consequences: 1) reduced pesticide performance, and 2) increased likelihood of insect pests evolving behavioral insecticide resistance. Under this scenario, pests that can sense and avoid acquisition of lethal dosages of systemic insecticides within crop plants will have a selective advantage. This may lead to selection for insect behavioral avoidance, so that insects predominantly feed and oviposit on portions of crop plants with low concentration of systemic insecticide. Limited research has been published on the effect of environmental variables, including drought, on pesticide performance, but we present and discuss studies that support the hypothesis described above. In addition, we wish to highlight the importance of studying the many ways environmental factors can affect, directly and indirectly, both the performance of insecticides and the risk of target insect pests developing resistance.

  17. Toxicity of insecticides to the sweetpotato whitefly (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) and its natural enemies.

    PubMed

    Bacci, Leandro; Crespo, André L B; Galvan, Tederson L; Pereira, Eliseu J G; Picanço, Marcelo C; Silva, Gerson A; Chediak, Mateus

    2007-07-01

    Efficient chemical control is achieved when insecticides are active against insect pests and safe to natural enemies. In this study, the toxicity of 17 insecticides to the sweetpotato whitefly, Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius), and the selectivity of seven insecticides to natural enemies of this insect pest were evaluated. To determine the insecticide toxicity, B. tabaci adults were exposed to abamectin, acephate, acetamiprid, cartap, imidacloprid, malathion, methamidophos, bifenthrin, cypermethrin, deltamethrin, esfenvalerate, fenitrothion, fenpropathrin, fenthion, phenthoate, permethrin and trichlorphon at 50 and 100% of the field rate (FR), and to water (untreated control). To determine the insecticide selectivity, adults of Encarsia sp., Acanthinus sp., Discodon sp. and Lasiochilus sp. were exposed to abamectin, acephate, acetamiprid, cartap, imidacloprid, malathion and methamidophos at 50 and 100% FR, and to water. Groups of each insect species were exposed to kale leaves preimmersed in each treatment under laboratory conditions. Mortality of exposed individuals was recorded 24 h after treatment. Cartap and imidacloprid at 50 and 100% FR and abamectin and acetamiprid at 100% FR showed insecticidal activity to B. tabaci adults. Abamectin at 50 and 100% FR was the least insecticidal compound to the natural enemies Acanthinus sp., Discodon sp. and Lasiochilus sp. The present results suggest that abamectin at 100% FR may decrease B. tabaci field populations but can still be harmless to predators. Implications of these results within an integrated pest management context are discussed.

  18. Mitochondrial P-glycoprotein ATPase contributes to insecticide resistance in the cotton bollworm, Helicoverpa armigera (Noctuidae: Lepidoptera).

    PubMed

    Akbar, S Md; Aurade, Ravindra M; Sharma, H C; Sreeramulu, K

    2014-09-01

    Cotton bollworm, Helicoverpa armigera, is one of the most damaging polyphagous pests worldwide, which has developed high levels of resistance to commonly applied insecticides. Mitochondrial P-glycoprotein (Pgp) was detected in the insecticide-resistant strain of H. armigera using C219 antibodies, and its possible role was demonstrated in the efflux of xenobiotic compounds using spectrofluorometer. The TMR accumulated in mitochondria in the absence of ATP, and effluxed out in presence of ATP; the process of efflux was inhibited in the presence of ortho-vandate, an inhibitor of Pgp, in insecticide-resistant larvae of H. armigera. The mitochondria isolated from insecticide-resistant larvae were resistant to insecticide-induced inhibition of oxygen consumption and cytochrome c release. Membrane potential decreased in a dose-dependent manner in the presence of higher concentration of insecticides (>50 µM) in mitochondria of insecticide-resistant larvae. In conclusion, mitochondrial Pgp ATPase detected in the insecticide-resistant larvae influenced the efflux of xenobiotic compounds. Pgp might be involved in protecting the mitochondrial DNA and the components of the electron transport chain from damage due to insecticides, and contributing to the resistance to the deleterious effects of insecticides on the growth of insecticide-resistant H. armigera larvae.

  19. Neonicotinoid Insecticides Alter Induced Defenses and Increase Susceptibility to Spider Mites in Distantly Related Crop Plants

    PubMed Central

    Szczepaniec, Adrianna; Raupp, Michael J.; Parker, Roy D.; Kerns, David; Eubanks, Micky D.

    2013-01-01

    Background Chemical suppression of arthropod herbivores is the most common approach to plant protection. Insecticides, however, can cause unintended, adverse consequences for non-target organisms. Previous studies focused on the effects of pesticides on target and non-target pests, predatory arthropods, and concomitant ecological disruptions. Little research, however, has focused on the direct effects of insecticides on plants. Here we demonstrate that applications of neonicotinoid insecticides, one of the most important insecticide classes worldwide, suppress expression of important plant defense genes, alter levels of phytohormones involved in plant defense, and decrease plant resistance to unsusceptible herbivores, spider mites Tetranychus urticae (Acari: Tetranychidae), in multiple, distantly related crop plants. Methodology/Principal Findings Using cotton (Gossypium hirsutum), corn (Zea mays) and tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) plants, we show that transcription of phenylalanine amonia lyase, coenzyme A ligase, trypsin protease inhibitor and chitinase are suppressed and concentrations of the phytohormone OPDA and salicylic acid were altered by neonicotinoid insecticides. Consequently, the population growth of spider mites increased from 30% to over 100% on neonicotinoid-treated plants in the greenhouse and by nearly 200% in the field experiment. Conclusions/Significance Our findings are important because applications of neonicotinoid insecticides have been associated with outbreaks of spider mites in several unrelated plant species. More importantly, this is the first study to document insecticide-mediated disruption of plant defenses and link it to increased population growth of a non-target herbivore. This study adds to growing evidence that bioactive agrochemicals can have unanticipated ecological effects and suggests that the direct effects of insecticides on plant defenses should be considered when the ecological costs of insecticides are evaluated. PMID

  20. Declining ring-necked pheasants in the Klamath Basin, California: I. Insecticide exposure

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grove, Robert A.; Buhler, D.R.; Henny, Charles J.; Drew, A.D.

    1998-01-01

    A study of organophosphorus (OP) insecticide exposure was conducted on a declining population of ring-necked pheasants (Phasianus colchicus) associated with agricultural lands at Tule Lake National Wildlife Refuge (TLNWR) during the summers of 1990a??92. Findings at TLNWR were compared with a nearby pheasant population at Lower Klamath National Wildlife Refuge (LKNWR) not subjected to intensive farming or OP insecticide applications. Direct toxicity of anticholinesterase (antiChE) compounds (in this case methamidophos) killed 2 young pheasants (91 and 92% brain acetylcholinesterase [AChE] inhibition), but no deaths of adult radio-equipped hens were ascribed to direct insecticide intoxication. However, within 20 days postspray of OP insecticides, 68% (28 of 41) of the adult pheasants collected at TLNWR were exposed to antiChE insecticides, and exhibited brain AChE inhibition of 19a??62%, with 15% (6 of 41) showing >55% brain AChE inhibition. The lack of radio-equipped hens dying was unexpected because >50% brain AChE inhibition has been frequently used as a diagnostic tool for evaluating cause of death from antiChE insecticides. No young were radio-equipped, so the extent of the effects of insecticide exposure on the survivorship of young was unknown. It is concluded that insecticide exposure was not the major factor impacting the pheasant population (see Grove et al., in press), although some young were acutely intoxicated. However, the loss of insects killed by insecticide use may have contributed to food shortages of young pheasants, indirectly influencing survival.

  1. Reducing Insecticide Use in Broad-Acre Grains Production: An Australian Study

    PubMed Central

    Macfadyen, Sarina; Hardie, Darryl C.; Fagan, Laura; Stefanova, Katia; Perry, Kym D.; DeGraaf, Helen E.; Holloway, Joanne; Spafford, Helen; Umina, Paul A.

    2014-01-01

    Prophylactic use of broad-spectrum insecticides is a common feature of broad-acre grains production systems around the world. Efforts to reduce pesticide use in these systems have the potential to deliver environmental benefits to large areas of agricultural land. However, research and extension initiatives aimed at decoupling pest management decisions from the simple act of applying a cheap insecticide have languished. This places farmers in a vulnerable position of high reliance on a few products that may lose their efficacy due to pests developing resistance, or be lost from use due to regulatory changes. The first step towards developing Integrated Pest Management (IPM) strategies involves an increased efficiency of pesticide inputs. Especially challenging is an understanding of when and where an insecticide application can be withheld without risking yield loss. Here, we quantify the effect of different pest management strategies on the abundance of pest and beneficial arthropods, crop damage and yield, across five sites that span the diversity of contexts in which grains crops are grown in southern Australia. Our results show that while greater insecticide use did reduce the abundance of many pests, this was not coupled with higher yields. Feeding damage by arthropod pests was seen in plots with lower insecticide use but this did not translate into yield losses. For canola, we found that plots that used insecticide seed treatments were most likely to deliver a yield benefit; however other insecticides appear to be unnecessary and economically costly. When considering wheat, none of the insecticide inputs provided an economically justifiable yield gain. These results indicate that there are opportunities for Australian grain growers to reduce insecticide inputs without risking yield loss in some seasons. We see this as the critical first step towards developing IPM practices that will be widely adopted across intensive production systems. PMID:24586535

  2. Contrasting patterns of tolerance between chemical and biological insecticides in mosquitoes exposed to UV-A.

    PubMed

    Tetreau, Guillaume; Chandor-Proust, Alexia; Faucon, Frédéric; Stalinski, Renaud; Akhouayri, Idir; Prud'homme, Sophie M; Raveton, Muriel; Reynaud, Stéphane

    2013-09-15

    Mosquitoes are vectors of major human diseases, such as malaria, dengue or yellow fever. Because no efficient treatments or vaccines are available for most of these diseases, control measures rely mainly on reducing mosquito populations by the use of insecticides. Numerous biotic and abiotic factors are known to modulate the efficacy of insecticides used in mosquito control. Mosquito breeding sites vary from opened to high vegetation covered areas leading to a large ultraviolet gradient exposure. This ecological feature may affect the general physiology of the insect, including the resistance status against insecticides. In the context of their contrasted breeding sites, we assessed the impact of low-energetic ultraviolet exposure on mosquito sensitivity to biological and chemical insecticides. We show that several mosquito detoxification enzyme activities (cytochrome P450, glutathione S-transferases, esterases) were increased upon low-energy UV-A exposure. Additionally, five specific genes encoding detoxification enzymes (CYP6BB2, CYP6Z7, CYP6Z8, GSTD4, and GSTE2) previously shown to be involved in resistance to chemical insecticides were found over-transcribed in UV-A exposed mosquitoes, revealed by RT-qPCR experiments. More importantly, toxicological bioassays revealed that UV-exposed mosquitoes were more tolerant to four main chemical insecticide classes (DDT, imidacloprid, permethrin, temephos), whereas the bioinsecticide Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis (Bti) appeared more toxic. The present article provides the first experimental evidence of the capacity of low-energy UV-A to increase mosquito tolerance to major chemical insecticides. This is also the first time that a metabolic resistance to chemical insecticides is linked to a higher susceptibility to a bioinsecticide. These results support the use of Bti as an efficient alternative to chemical insecticides when a metabolic resistance to chemicals has been developed by mosquitoes.

  3. Adulticidal & larvicidal efficacy of three neonicotinoids against insecticide susceptible & resistant mosquito strains

    PubMed Central

    Uragayala, Sreehari; Verma, Vaishali; Natarajan, Elamathi; Velamuri, Poonam Sharma; Kamaraju, Raghavendra

    2015-01-01

    Background & objectives: Due to ever growing insecticide resistance in mosquitoes to commonly used insecticides in many parts of the globe, there is always a need for introduction of new insecticides for the control of resistant vector mosquitoes. In this study, larvicidal and adulticidal efficacies of three neonicotinoids (imidacloprid, thiacloprid and thiamethoxam) were tested against resistant and susceptible populations of Anopheles stephensi Liston 1901, Aedes (Stegomyia) aegypti Linnaeus, and Culex quinquefasciatus Say (Diptera: Culicidae). Methods: Laboratory-reared mosquito species were used. Insecticide susceptibility tests were done using standard WHO procedures and using diagnostic dosages of insecticide test papers and larvicides. Adulticidal efficacy of candidate insecticides was assessed using topical application method and larval bioassays were conducted using standard WHO procedure. Results: The results of topical application on 3-5 day old female mosquitoes indicated that resistant strain of An. stephensi registered lower LC50 values than the susceptible strain. Among the three insecticides tested, thiacloprid was found more effective than the other two insecticides. Culex quinquefasciatus registered lowest LC50 for imidacloprid than the other two mosquito species tested. In larval bioassays, the LC50 values registered for imidacloprid were in the order of Cx. quinquefasciatus insecticide resistant strains of mosquito species tested showed more susceptibility to the three neonicotinoids tested, and the possibility of using neonicotinoids for the control of resistant mosquitoes

  4. Reducing insecticide use in broad-acre grains production: an Australian study.

    PubMed

    Macfadyen, Sarina; Hardie, Darryl C; Fagan, Laura; Stefanova, Katia; Perry, Kym D; DeGraaf, Helen E; Holloway, Joanne; Spafford, Helen; Umina, Paul A

    2014-01-01

    Prophylactic use of broad-spectrum insecticides is a common feature of broad-acre grains production systems around the world. Efforts to reduce pesticide use in these systems have the potential to deliver environmental benefits to large areas of agricultural land. However, research and extension initiatives aimed at decoupling pest management decisions from the simple act of applying a cheap insecticide have languished. This places farmers in a vulnerable position of high reliance on a few products that may lose their efficacy due to pests developing resistance, or be lost from use due to regulatory changes. The first step towards developing Integrated Pest Management (IPM) strategies involves an increased efficiency of pesticide inputs. Especially challenging is an understanding of when and where an insecticide application can be withheld without risking yield loss. Here, we quantify the effect of different pest management strategies on the abundance of pest and beneficial arthropods, crop damage and yield, across five sites that span the diversity of contexts in which grains crops are grown in southern Australia. Our results show that while greater insecticide use did reduce the abundance of many pests, this was not coupled with higher yields. Feeding damage by arthropod pests was seen in plots with lower insecticide use but this did not translate into yield losses. For canola, we found that plots that used insecticide seed treatments were most likely to deliver a yield benefit; however other insecticides appear to be unnecessary and economically costly. When considering wheat, none of the insecticide inputs provided an economically justifiable yield gain. These results indicate that there are opportunities for Australian grain growers to reduce insecticide inputs without risking yield loss in some seasons. We see this as the critical first step towards developing IPM practices that will be widely adopted across intensive production systems.

  5. [Efficacy, toxicity and mechanism of insecticide KR-100: a preliminary study].

    PubMed

    Zhi, Guo-Zhou; Chen, Xiao-Guang; Zheng, Xue-Li; Chai, Ke-Sheng; Chen, Jin-Bo; Lin, Li-Feng; Cai, Song-Wu

    2002-04-01

    KR-100 is a newly developed long-lasting insecticide that incorporates cinerins substance, drug-release control substance and synergistic agent following certain procedures under carefully regulated conditions. Tests of the efficacy, toxicity, stability and long-term effect of KR-100 were conducted, and it was show that the insecticide possessed strong and long-lasting effect against mosquitoes, flies and cockroaches but was by no means toxic to human. Morphological study of KR-100 under scanning electron microscope revealed porous membrane form. This insecticide, therefore, can be safely applied with good pesticidal effect.

  6. Degradation of insecticides used for indoor spraying in malaria control and possible solutions

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The insecticide dichloro-diphenyl-trichloroethane (DDT) is widely used in indoor residual spraying (IRS) for malaria control owing to its longer residual efficacy in the field compared to other World Health Organization (WHO) alternatives. Suitable stabilization to render these alternative insecticides longer lasting could provide a less controversial and more acceptable and effective alternative insecticide formulations than DDT. Methods This study sought to investigate the reasons behind the often reported longer lasting behaviour of DDT by exposing all the WHO approved insecticides to high temperature, high humidity and ultra-violet light. Interactions between the insecticides and some mineral powders in the presence of an aqueous medium were also tested. Simple insecticidal paints were made using slurries of these mineral powders whilst some insecticides were dispersed into a conventional acrylic paint binder. These formulations were then spray painted on neat and manure coated mud plaques, representative of the material typically used in rural mud houses, at twice the upper limit of the WHO recommended dosage range. DDT was applied directly onto mud plaques at four times the WHO recommended concentration and on manure plaques at twice WHO recommended concentration. All plaques were subjected to accelerated ageing conditions of 40°C and a relative humidity of 90%. Results The pyrethroids insecticides outperformed the carbamates and DDT in the accelerated ageing tests. Thus UV exposure, high temperature oxidation and high humidity per se were ruled out as the main causes of failure of the alternative insecticides. Gas chromatography (GC) spectrograms showed that phosphogypsum stabilised the insecticides the most against alkaline degradation (i.e., hydrolysis). Bioassay testing showed that the period of efficacy of some of these formulations was comparable to that of DDT when sprayed on mud surfaces or cattle manure coated surfaces. Conclusions

  7. Synthesis of benzoxazole derivatives of honokiol as insecticidal agents against Mythimna separata Walker.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chun; Zhi, Xiaoyan; Xu, Hui

    2015-01-01

    A series of novel benzoxazole compounds derived from a naturally occurring neolignan honokiol were prepared. Their insecticidal activity was tested against the pre-third-instar larvae of oriental armyworm (Mythimna separata Walker) in vivo. Most of the tested derivatives exhibited more potential insecticidal activity than their precursor honokiol at the concentration of 1mg/mL. Especially compound 6e, containing 4-acetyloxyphenyl groups at the C8 and C8' positions, displayed the most potent insecticidal activity with the final mortality rate of 62.1%.

  8. Inhibition of Phenylamide Hydrolysis by Bacillus sphaericus with Methylcarbamate and Organophosphorus Insecticides

    PubMed Central

    Engelhardt, G.; Wallnöfer, P. R.

    1975-01-01

    The degradation of the phenylamide herbicides monolinuron, linuron, and solan by cultures of Bacillus sphaericus ATCC 12123 was inhibited by the methylcarbamate insecticides metmercapturon, aldicarb, propoxur, and carbaryl and by the organophosphorus insecticides fenthion and parathion. The extent of inhibition was largest with metmercapturon and smallest with parathion. Inhibition of hydrolysis of the two phenylurea herbicides was greater than of the acylanilide compound. Tests with crude enzyme preparations of aryl acylamidase derived from B. sphaericus showed that the inhibition of the hydrolysis of linuron with methylcarbamates is a competitive one. The insecticides tested did not induce the enzyme, nor could they serve as its substrate. PMID:1155931

  9. Toxicity of a neonicotinoid insecticide, guadipyr, in earthworm (Eisenia fetida).

    PubMed

    Wang, Kai; Mu, Xiyan; Qi, Suzhen; Chai, Tingting; Pang, Sen; Yang, Yang; Wang, Chengju; Jiang, Jiazhen

    2015-04-01

    Neonicotinoid insecticides are new class of pesticides and it is very meaningful to evaluate the toxicity of guadipyr to earthworm (Eisenia fetida). In the present study, effects of guadipyr on reproduction, growth, catalase(CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD), acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and DNA damage in earthworm were assessed using an artificial soil medium. Guadipyr showed low toxicity to earthworms and did not elicit an effect on earthworm reproduction or growth in artificial soils at concentrations <100mg/kg. However, after exposure to guadipyr, the activity of SOD and CAT in earthworm increased and then decreased to control level. AChE activity decreased at day 3 at 50 and 100mg/kg and then increased to control level. Our data indicate that guadipyr did not induce DNA damage in earthworms at concentration of <100mg/kg.

  10. Effects of chlorinated hydrocarbon insecticides upon quail and pheasants

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    DeWitt, J.B.

    1955-01-01

    Previous studies had shown that heavy or repeated applications of DDT resulted in decreases.in bird populations, but long-range effects of this and other chlorinated hydrocarbon insecticides had not been fully evaluated. Experiments were conducted to determine toxiCitY to quail and pheasants of aldrin, dieldrin, endrin, and strobane, and to determine effects of these compounds upon survival, growth, and reproduction....Feeding of diets containing 0.02% DDT to breeding quail resulted in significant decreases in hatchability of eggs and in viability of chiCks. Similar results were obtained by feeding 0.001% dieldrin, but effects upon reproduct.ion of short-term feeding of aldrin and endrin could not be determined....Aldrin, dieldrin, and endrin were lethal to both male and female quail when fed at levels of 0.0005% in the diets. Female pheasants appeared more resistant than males to the effects of these compounds.

  11. Toxicity of chlorinated insecticides to quail and pheasants

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    DeWitt, J.B.

    1956-01-01

    'Residues from insecticidal applications of chlorinated hydrocarbons may remain toxic for extended periods. In experiments designed to furnish information on the effects upon quail and pheasants of prolonged feeding upon diets containing small percentages of these compounds, it was shown that aldrin, dieldrin and endrin are cumulative, and that quail are unable to survive after ingesting 5-10 mg./kg, of aldrin, 30-50 mg./kg, of dieldrin, or 6-15 mg./kg, of endrin. Maximum levels (p.p.m.) in the diets permitting survival for extended periods were: DDT, 200; strobane, above 500; aldrin, 0.5; dieldrin, 1.0; endrin, 1.0. Inclusion of these compounds in the diets of breeding quail and pheasants affected hatchability of eggs and viability of chicks, even though the adult birds appeared unaffected.' Detailed figures are given for all points mentioned.

  12. Organochlorine insecticide residues in Ganga river water near Farrukhabad, India.

    PubMed

    Agnihotri, N P; Gajbhiye, V T; Kumar, M; Mohapatra, S P

    1994-04-01

    Multiple residues of organochlorine insecticides were monitored in Ganga river water in the district of Farrukhabad in northern Indian for one year (1991-1992). Almost all the samples were found to be contaminated with residues of HCH and DDT. Residues of aldrin, endosulfan and heptachlor were also detected in a larger number of samples. Alpha-HCH, pp'-DDT and alpha-endosulfan were found to dominate over the other isomers of HCH, DDT and endosulfan, respectively. Enhanced percentage of beta-HCH suggests accumulation of this isomer in the aquatic environment. The average concentration of aldrin was more than that of dieldrin. Aldrin residues often exceeded the WHO guideline value for drinking water and the concentration of heptachlor occasionally exceeded the specified limits.

  13. Organophosphate insecticide poisoning of Canada geese in the Texas panhandle

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    White, D.H.; Mitchell, C.A.; Wynn, L.D.; Flickinger, Edward L.; Kolbe, E.J.

    1982-01-01

    Sixteen hundred waterfowl, mostly Canada Geese, died near Etter, Texas, in late January 1981 from anticholinesterase poisoning. Winter wheat in the area of the die-off had been treated with organophosphate insecticides to control greenbugs. Cholinesterase (ChE) levels in brains of a sample of geese found dead were 75% below normal, enough to account for death (Ludke et al. 1975). The gastrointestinal (G I) tracts of geese found dead were packed with winter wheat; gas chromatography techniques identified parathion and methyl parathion in the GI tract contents. Residues of both chemicals were confirmed by mass spectrometry. We recommend that less toxic materials, such as malathion, be used on grain crops when waterfowl are in the vicinity of treatment.

  14. A Primer for Using Transgenic Insecticidal Cotton in Developing Countries

    PubMed Central

    Showalter, Ann M.; Heuberger, Shannon; Tabashnik, Bruce E.; Carrière, Yves

    2009-01-01

    Many developing countries face the decision of whether to approve the testing and commercial use of insecticidal transgenic cotton and the task of developing adequate regulations for its use. In this review, we outline concepts and provide information to assist farmers, regulators and scientists in making decisions concerning this technology. We address seven critical topics: 1) molecular and breeding techniques used for the development of transgenic cotton cultivars, 2) properties of transgenic cotton cultivars and their efficacy against major insect pests, 3) agronomic performance of transgenic cotton in developing countries, 4) factors affecting transgene expression, 5) impact of gene flow between transgenic and non-transgenic cotton, 6) non-target effects of transgenic cotton, and 7) management of pest resistance to transgenic cotton. PMID:19613464

  15. Decomposed gosling feet provide evidence of insecticide exposure

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vyas, N.B.; Spann, J.W.; Hulse, C.S.; Torrez, M.; Williams, B.I.; Leffel, R.

    2004-01-01

    Canada goose goslings were exposed to turf sprayed with D.Z.N(R) diazinon 50W application (2.24 kg a.i./ha). The control plot was subjected to a water application. One foot from each bird was placed outdoors for 7 d to decompose and the other foot was kept frozen. Diazinon residues were analyzed on both feet. Results showed that diazinon was detected from undecomposed and decomposed feet of the birds. Diazinon residues were below the level of detection (<0.01 ppm, a.i.) on the feet from the control goslings. Decomposed feet may be used for determining insecticide exposure when the traditional matrices are not available.

  16. A nicotinic acetylcholine receptor mutation (Y151S) causes reduced agonist potency to a range of neonicotinoid insecticides.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zewen; Williamson, Martin S; Lansdell, Stuart J; Han, Zhaojun; Denholm, Ian; Millar, Neil S

    2006-11-01

    Neonicotinoid insecticides are potent selective agonists of insect nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). Since their introduction in 1991, resistance to neonicotinoids has been slow to develop, but it is now established in some insect field populations such as the planthopper, Nilaparvata lugens, a major rice pest in many parts of Asia. We have reported recently the identification of a target-site mutation (Y151S) within two nAChR subunits (Nlalpha1 and Nlalpha3) from a laboratory-selected field population of N. lugens. In the present study, we have examined the influence of this mutation upon the functional properties of recombinant nAChRs expressed in Xenopus oocytes (as hybrid nAChRs, co-expressed with a rat beta2 subunit). The agonist potency of several nicotinic agonists has been examined, including all of the neonicotinoid insecticides that are currently licensed for either crop protection or animal health applications (acetamiprid, clothianidin, dinotefuran, imidacloprid, nitenpyram, thiacloprid and thiamethoxam). The Y151S mutation was found to have no significant effect on the maximal current (I(max)) observed with the endogenous agonist, acetylcholine. In contrast, a significant reduction in I(max) was observed for all neonicotinoids (the I(max) for mutant nAChRs ranged from 13 to 81% of that observed on wild-type receptors). In addition, nAChRs containing the Y151S mutation caused a significant rightward shift in agonist dose-response curves for all neonicotinoids, but of varying magnitude (shifts in EC(50) values ranged from 1.3 to 3.6-fold). The relationship between neonicotinoid structure and their potency on nAChRs containing the Y151S target-site mutation is discussed.

  17. Human erythrocytes are affected by the organochloride insecticide chlordane.

    PubMed

    Suwalsky, M; Rodríguez, C; Villena, F; Sotomayor, C P

    2005-05-01

    Chlordane is a widely used organochlorine insecticide. In order to evaluate its perturbing effect upon the morphology of human erythrocytes it was caused to interact with human red cells and molecular models of cell membranes. These consisted in bilayers of dimyristoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DMPE) and of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC), representative of phospholipid classes located in the inner and outer monolayers of the erythrocyte membrane, respectively. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) observations indicated that this pesticide induced a significant alteration in the shape of the erythrocytes as they changed their discoid shape to spherocytes. According to the bilayer couple hypothesis, the shape changes induced in erythrocytes by foreign molecules are due to differential expansion of their two monolayers. The fact that chlordane produced spherocytes would indicate that the pesticide was equally located in the outer and the inner moieties of the red cell membrane. This conclusion was supported by the results obtained from X-ray diffraction studies. These showed that the hydrophobic and polar head regions of DMPC bilayers were perturbed when the insecticide was in a 1:10 molar ratio with respect to the lipid. These results were confirmed by the fluorescence experiments performed in DMPC large unilamellar vesicles (LUV). Chlordane produced a sharp decrease in the anisotropy and general polarization parameters in the 0-0.1 mM range, implying an increase in the fluidity at the acyl chain and polar region of DMPC. On the other hand, the bilayer structure of DMPE was perturbed in a fashion similar to that observed by X-ray diffraction in DMPC, a fact that explains the morphological change induced by chlordane to the human erythrocytes. PMID:15778003

  18. A carbamate insecticide: a case study of aldicarb.

    PubMed

    Baron, R L

    1994-12-01

    Aldicarb, the active ingredient in the insecticide TEMIK, was introduced to the agricultural community over 25 years ago. It has been registered worldwide to control a wide variety of insect, mite, and nematode pests in agriculture. The toxicological research database supporting the registration and use of aldicarb was generated over more than 25 years and contains more than 280 animal studies on 12 species of animals, 2 clinical human trials, and over 20 human monitoring studies. This database, which includes biochemical aspects (metabolism and mode-of-action studies), acute toxicity and special short-term toxicity studies, long-term toxicity studies, and epidemiological observations in humans, serves as the starting point for the evaluation of the risks associated with the acceptance of levels of aldicarb residues in food and drinking water and for the more direct occupational exposure. This article highlights the available toxicological data and reviews worldwide regulation of aldicarb. Included in these discussions is a brief description of the toxicological end point upon which regulatory decisions have been based, namely acetylcholinesterase depression. Aldicarb, the N-methylcarbamic acid ester of 2-methyl-2-(methylthio) propionaldehyde oxime, was the first of a limited group of insecticidal oxime N-methylcarbamates that have properties distinct from N-methylcarbamates which have a phenolic constituent, instead of the oxime moiety. Aldicarb is highly water-soluble (approximately 6000 ppm), nonvolatile, relatively stable under acidic conditions, and is easily degraded under alkaline conditions. These properties are important determinants of its systemic action in plants and of its problematic environmental behavior. Possible environmental hazards involving the chemical include groundwater contamination and (more recently) excessive terminal residues in certain foods.

  19. Acute pancreatitis in children with anticholinesterase insecticide intoxication.

    PubMed

    Weizman, Z; Sofer, S

    1992-08-01

    Gastrointestinal symptoms are commonly seen in anticholinesterase insecticide intoxication. A few studies in adults have demonstrated some evidence for pancreatic damage in this poisoning. To see whether this association exists also in children, we conducted a prospective study in 17 consecutive children with typical organophosphate and carbamate poisoning. On admission and following recovery, serum amylase, immunoreactive trypsin, glucose, calcium, urea, creatinine, and arterial blood gas values were determined and compared with those of age-matched control subjects. Acute pancreatitis was diagnosed in 5 subjects. They demonstrated significantly elevated (greater than mean + 2 SD) serum levels of both immunoreactive trypsin (914.0 +/- 317.4 ng/mL, 159.9 +/- 36.4 ng/mL, and 169.7 +/- 41.2 ng/mL, respectively; P less than .01) and amylase (448.0 +/- 264.4 U/L, 152.8 +/- 90.9 U/L, and 56.8 +/- 26.3 U/L, respectively; P less than .001; n = 4), compared with other patients and control subjects. Gastrointestinal symptoms were noted in all 5 subjects, with severe abdominal pain in 2. Such symptoms were evident in only 41% of the other 12 patients. Serum glucose levels were significantly elevated in these subjects compared with others (389.0 +/- 66.2 mg/100 mL vs 180.4 +/- 72.3 mg/100 mL; P less than .01). None had hypocalcemia, renal dysfunction, or acidosis. All had complete recovery. It is concluded that acute pancreatitis is probably not rare in children with anticholinesterase insecticide poisoning. This may contribute to the development of gastrointestinal symptoms and hyperglycemia often observed in these patients.

  20. Insecticide susceptibility of Euschistus heros (Heteroptera: Pentatomidae) in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Sosa-Gómez, Daniel R; Da Silva, Jovenil J; Lopes, Ivani de Oliveira Negrao; Corso, Ivan C; Almeida, Alvaro M R; De Moraes, Giorla C Piubelli; Baur, Matrhew E

    2009-06-01

    Euschistus heros (F.) (Heteroptera: Pentatomidae) is the most prevalent stink bug pest in Brazil, and populations can be difficult to manage using organophosphates or endosulfan. Because E. heros is difficult to rear in the laboratory, no baseline insecticide susceptibility data have been published. Therefore, we conducted dose-mortality studies using field-collected insects, and, using the results from the dose-mortality studies, we surveyed susceptibility to acephate, methamidophos, and endosulfan in populations from southern and central Brazil. In addition, esterase activity was evaluated among populations as these enzymes have been related to organophosphate resistance. Finally, newer chemistries were evaluated for E. heros population management in small-plot field studies. In the dose-mortality bioassays, variation in susceptibility to methamidophos and endosulfan among populations was significant, but the variation in susceptibility to acephate was not. The population from Londrina (at the Embrapa Soybean Research Station, northern Parana state) was among the most susceptible, whereas the population from Pedrinhas Paulista (southwestern Sao Paulo state) was among the least susceptible. Significant variation among populations was observed in esterase activity with the population from Pedrinhas Paulista having the highest esterase levels and the population from Londrina having among the lowest levels. To survey populations, we used the dose-mortality data for the Londrina population (because it was, consistently, one of the most susceptible populations) to estimate the insecticide concentration that killed 99% of the population (LC99). The corresponding doses were 5.9 microg (AI) of acephate adult(-1), 0.7 microg (AI) methamidophos adult(-1), and 1,600 microg (AI) endosulfan adult(-1). The survey data confirmed the data from the dose-mortality bioassays in that the population from Pedrinhas Paulista was identified as one of the least susceptible and the