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Sample records for insertional mutagenesis identifies

  1. Transposon insertional mutagenesis in mice identifies human breast cancer susceptibility genes and signatures for stratification.

    PubMed

    Chen, Liming; Jenjaroenpun, Piroon; Pillai, Andrea Mun Ching; Ivshina, Anna V; Ow, Ghim Siong; Efthimios, Motakis; Zhiqun, Tang; Tan, Tuan Zea; Lee, Song-Choon; Rogers, Keith; Ward, Jerrold M; Mori, Seiichi; Adams, David J; Jenkins, Nancy A; Copeland, Neal G; Ban, Kenneth Hon-Kim; Kuznetsov, Vladimir A; Thiery, Jean Paul

    2017-03-14

    Robust prognostic gene signatures and therapeutic targets are difficult to derive from expression profiling because of the significant heterogeneity within breast cancer (BC) subtypes. Here, we performed forward genetic screening in mice using Sleeping Beauty transposon mutagenesis to identify candidate BC driver genes in an unbiased manner, using a stabilized N-terminal truncated β-catenin gene as a sensitizer. We identified 134 mouse susceptibility genes from 129 common insertion sites within 34 mammary tumors. Of these, 126 genes were orthologous to protein-coding genes in the human genome (hereafter, human BC susceptibility genes, hBCSGs), 70% of which are previously reported cancer-associated genes, and ∼16% are known BC suppressor genes. Network analysis revealed a gene hub consisting of E1A binding protein P300 (EP300), CD44 molecule (CD44), neurofibromin (NF1) and phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN), which are linked to a significant number of mutated hBCSGs. From our survival prediction analysis of the expression of human BC genes in 2,333 BC cases, we isolated a six-gene-pair classifier that stratifies BC patients with high confidence into prognostically distinct low-, moderate-, and high-risk subgroups. Furthermore, we proposed prognostic classifiers identifying three basal and three claudin-low tumor subgroups. Intriguingly, our hBCSGs are mostly unrelated to cell cycle/mitosis genes and are distinct from the prognostic signatures currently used for stratifying BC patients. Our findings illustrate the strength and validity of integrating functional mutagenesis screens in mice with human cancer transcriptomic data to identify highly prognostic BC subtyping biomarkers.

  2. Transposon insertional mutagenesis in mice identifies human breast cancer susceptibility genes and signatures for stratification

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Liming; Jenjaroenpun, Piroon; Pillai, Andrea Mun Ching; Ivshina, Anna V.; Ow, Ghim Siong; Efthimios, Motakis; Zhiqun, Tang; Lee, Song-Choon; Rogers, Keith; Ward, Jerrold M.; Mori, Seiichi; Adams, David J.; Jenkins, Nancy A.; Copeland, Neal G.; Ban, Kenneth Hon-Kim; Kuznetsov, Vladimir A.; Thiery, Jean Paul

    2017-01-01

    Robust prognostic gene signatures and therapeutic targets are difficult to derive from expression profiling because of the significant heterogeneity within breast cancer (BC) subtypes. Here, we performed forward genetic screening in mice using Sleeping Beauty transposon mutagenesis to identify candidate BC driver genes in an unbiased manner, using a stabilized N-terminal truncated β-catenin gene as a sensitizer. We identified 134 mouse susceptibility genes from 129 common insertion sites within 34 mammary tumors. Of these, 126 genes were orthologous to protein-coding genes in the human genome (hereafter, human BC susceptibility genes, hBCSGs), 70% of which are previously reported cancer-associated genes, and ∼16% are known BC suppressor genes. Network analysis revealed a gene hub consisting of E1A binding protein P300 (EP300), CD44 molecule (CD44), neurofibromin (NF1) and phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN), which are linked to a significant number of mutated hBCSGs. From our survival prediction analysis of the expression of human BC genes in 2,333 BC cases, we isolated a six-gene-pair classifier that stratifies BC patients with high confidence into prognostically distinct low-, moderate-, and high-risk subgroups. Furthermore, we proposed prognostic classifiers identifying three basal and three claudin-low tumor subgroups. Intriguingly, our hBCSGs are mostly unrelated to cell cycle/mitosis genes and are distinct from the prognostic signatures currently used for stratifying BC patients. Our findings illustrate the strength and validity of integrating functional mutagenesis screens in mice with human cancer transcriptomic data to identify highly prognostic BC subtyping biomarkers. PMID:28251929

  3. Lentiviral Vector-based Insertional Mutagenesis Identifies Genes Involved in the Resistance to Targeted Anticancer Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Ranzani, Marco; Annunziato, Stefano; Calabria, Andrea; Brasca, Stefano; Benedicenti, Fabrizio; Gallina, Pierangela; Naldini, Luigi; Montini, Eugenio

    2014-01-01

    The high transduction efficiency of lentiviral vectors in a wide variety of cells makes them an ideal tool for forward genetics screenings addressing issues of cancer research. Although molecular targeted therapies have provided significant advances in tumor treatment, relapses often occur by the expansion of tumor cell clones carrying mutations that confer resistance. Identification of the culprits of anticancer drug resistance is fundamental for the achievement of long-term response. Here, we developed a new lentiviral vector-based insertional mutagenesis screening to identify genes that confer resistance to clinically relevant targeted anticancer therapies. By applying this genome-wide approach to cell lines representing two subtypes of HER2+ breast cancer, we identified 62 candidate lapatinib resistance genes. We validated the top ranking genes, i.e., PIK3CA and PIK3CB, by showing that their forced expression confers resistance to lapatinib in vitro and found that their mutation/overexpression is associated to poor prognosis in human breast tumors. Then, we successfully applied this approach to the identification of erlotinib resistance genes in pancreatic cancer, thus showing the intrinsic versatility of the approach. The acquired knowledge can help identifying combinations of targeted drugs to overcome the occurrence of resistance, thus opening new horizons for more effective treatment of tumors. PMID:25195596

  4. Sleeping Beauty insertional mutagenesis in mice identifies drivers of steatosis-associated hepatic tumor.

    PubMed

    Tschida, Barbara R; Temiz, Nuri A; Kuka, Timothy P; Lee, Lindsey A; Riordan, Jesse D; Tierrablanca, Carlos A; Hullsiek, Robert; Wagner, Sandra; Hudson, Wendy A; Linden, Michael A; Amin, Khalid; Beckmann, Pauline J; Heuer, Rachel A; Sarver, Aaron L; Yang, Ju Dong; Roberts, Lewis R; Nadeau, Joseph H; Dupuy, Adam J; Keng, Vincent W; Largaespada, David

    2017-10-09

    Hepatic steatosis is a strong risk factor for the development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), yet little is known about the molecular pathology associated with this factor. In this study, we performed a forward genetic screen using Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon insertional mutagenesis in mice treated to induce hepatic steatosis, and compared the results to human HCC data. In humans, we determined that steatosis increased the proportion of female HCC patients, a pattern also reflected in mice. Our genetic screen identified 203 candidate steatosis-associated HCC genes, many of which are altered in human HCC and are members of established HCC-driving signaling pathways. The protein kinase A/cyclic AMP signaling pathway was altered frequently in mouse and human steatosis-associated HCC. We found that activated PKA expression drove steatosis-specific liver tumorigenesis in a mouse model. Another candidate HCC driver, the N-acetyltransferase NAT10, which we found to be overexpressed in human steatosis-associated HCC and associated with decreased survival in human HCC, also drove liver tumorigenesis in a steatotic mouse model. This study identifies genes and pathways promoting HCC that may represent novel targets for prevention and treatment in the context of hepatic steatosis, an area of rapidly growing clinical significance. Copyright ©2017, American Association for Cancer Research.

  5. Pigmentation-based insertional mutagenesis is a simple and potent screening approach for identifying neurocristopathy-associated genes in mice

    PubMed Central

    Pilon, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Neurocristopathies form a specific group of rare genetic diseases in which a defect in neural crest cell development is causal. Because of the large number of neural crest cell derivatives, distinct structures/cell types (isolated or in combination) are affected in each neurocristopathy. The most important issues in this research field is that the underlying genetic cause and associated pathogenic mechanism of most cases of neurocristopathy are poorly understood. This article describes how a relatively simple insertional mutagenesis approach in the mouse has proved useful for identifying new candidate genes and pathogenic mechanisms for diverse neurocristopathies. PMID:27141416

  6. Systems Biology-Based Investigation of Cellular Antiviral Drug Targets Identified by Gene-Trap Insertional Mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Feixiong; Murray, James L; Zhao, Junfei; Sheng, Jinsong; Zhao, Zhongming; Rubin, Donald H

    2016-09-01

    Viruses require host cellular factors for successful replication. A comprehensive systems-level investigation of the virus-host interactome is critical for understanding the roles of host factors with the end goal of discovering new druggable antiviral targets. Gene-trap insertional mutagenesis is a high-throughput forward genetics approach to randomly disrupt (trap) host genes and discover host genes that are essential for viral replication, but not for host cell survival. In this study, we used libraries of randomly mutagenized cells to discover cellular genes that are essential for the replication of 10 distinct cytotoxic mammalian viruses, 1 gram-negative bacterium, and 5 toxins. We herein reported 712 candidate cellular genes, characterizing distinct topological network and evolutionary signatures, and occupying central hubs in the human interactome. Cell cycle phase-specific network analysis showed that host cell cycle programs played critical roles during viral replication (e.g. MYC and TAF4 regulating G0/1 phase). Moreover, the viral perturbation of host cellular networks reflected disease etiology in that host genes (e.g. CTCF, RHOA, and CDKN1B) identified were frequently essential and significantly associated with Mendelian and orphan diseases, or somatic mutations in cancer. Computational drug repositioning framework via incorporating drug-gene signatures from the Connectivity Map into the virus-host interactome identified 110 putative druggable antiviral targets and prioritized several existing drugs (e.g. ajmaline) that may be potential for antiviral indication (e.g. anti-Ebola). In summary, this work provides a powerful methodology with a tight integration of gene-trap insertional mutagenesis testing and systems biology to identify new antiviral targets and drugs for the development of broadly acting and targeted clinical antiviral therapeutics.

  7. Systems Biology-Based Investigation of Cellular Antiviral Drug Targets Identified by Gene-Trap Insertional Mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Junfei; Sheng, Jinsong; Rubin, Donald H.

    2016-01-01

    Viruses require host cellular factors for successful replication. A comprehensive systems-level investigation of the virus-host interactome is critical for understanding the roles of host factors with the end goal of discovering new druggable antiviral targets. Gene-trap insertional mutagenesis is a high-throughput forward genetics approach to randomly disrupt (trap) host genes and discover host genes that are essential for viral replication, but not for host cell survival. In this study, we used libraries of randomly mutagenized cells to discover cellular genes that are essential for the replication of 10 distinct cytotoxic mammalian viruses, 1 gram-negative bacterium, and 5 toxins. We herein reported 712 candidate cellular genes, characterizing distinct topological network and evolutionary signatures, and occupying central hubs in the human interactome. Cell cycle phase-specific network analysis showed that host cell cycle programs played critical roles during viral replication (e.g. MYC and TAF4 regulating G0/1 phase). Moreover, the viral perturbation of host cellular networks reflected disease etiology in that host genes (e.g. CTCF, RHOA, and CDKN1B) identified were frequently essential and significantly associated with Mendelian and orphan diseases, or somatic mutations in cancer. Computational drug repositioning framework via incorporating drug-gene signatures from the Connectivity Map into the virus-host interactome identified 110 putative druggable antiviral targets and prioritized several existing drugs (e.g. ajmaline) that may be potential for antiviral indication (e.g. anti-Ebola). In summary, this work provides a powerful methodology with a tight integration of gene-trap insertional mutagenesis testing and systems biology to identify new antiviral targets and drugs for the development of broadly acting and targeted clinical antiviral therapeutics. PMID:27632082

  8. A novel gammaretroviral shuttle vector insertional mutagenesis screen identifies SHARPIN as a breast cancer metastasis gene and prognostic biomarker

    PubMed Central

    Bii, Victor M.; Rae, Dustin T.; Trobridge, Grant D.

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer (BC) is the second leading cause of malignancy among U.S. women. Metastasis results in a poor prognosis and increased mortality, but the molecular mechanisms by which metastatic tumors occur are not well understood. Identifying the genes that drive the metastatic process could provide targets for improved therapy and biomarkers to improve BC patient outcomes. Using a forward mutagenesis screen, BC cells mutagenized with a replication-incompetent gammaretroviral vector (γRV) were xenotransplanted into the mammary fat pad of immunodeficient mice. In this approach the vector provirus dysregulates nearby genes, providing a selective advantage to transduced cells to form metastases. Metastatic tumors were analyzed for proviral integration sites to identify nearby candidate metastasis genes. The γRV has a transgene cassette that allows for rescue in bacteria and rapid identification of vector integration sites. Using this approach, we identified the previously described metastasis gene WWTR1 (TAZ), and three other novel candidate metastasis genes including SHARPIN. SHARPIN was independently validated in vivo as a BC metastasis gene. Analysis of patient data showed that SHARPIN expression predicts metastasis-free survival after adjuvant therapy. Our approach has broad potential to identify genes involved in oncogenic processes for BC and other cancers. We show here it can identify both known (WWTR1) and novel (SHARPIN) BC metastasis genes. PMID:26506596

  9. Comparison and Validation of Putative Pathogenicity-Related Genes Identified by T-DNA Insertional Mutagenesis and Microarray Expression Profiling in Magnaporthe oryzae

    PubMed Central

    Wáng, Ying; Tan, Qi; Gao, Ying Nv; Li, Yan

    2017-01-01

    High-throughput technologies of functional genomics such as T-DNA insertional mutagenesis and microarray expression profiling have been employed to identify genes related to pathogenicity in Magnaporthe oryzae. However, validation of the functions of individual genes identified by these high-throughput approaches is laborious. In this study, we compared two published lists of genes putatively related to pathogenicity in M. oryzae identified by T-DNA insertional mutagenesis (comprising 1024 genes) and microarray expression profiling (comprising 236 genes), respectively, and then validated the functions of some overlapped genes between the two lists by knocking them out using the method of target gene replacement. Surprisingly, only 13 genes were overlapped between the two lists, and none of the four genes selected from the overlapped genes exhibited visible phenotypic changes on vegetative growth, asexual reproduction, and infection ability in their knockout mutants. Our results suggest that both of the lists might contain large proportions of unrelated genes to pathogenicity and therefore comparing the two gene lists is hardly helpful for the identification of genes that are more likely to be involved in pathogenicity as we initially expected. PMID:28286772

  10. Comparison and Validation of Putative Pathogenicity-Related Genes Identified by T-DNA Insertional Mutagenesis and Microarray Expression Profiling in Magnaporthe oryzae.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Wáng, Ying; Tan, Qi; Gao, Ying Nv; Li, Yan; Bao, Da Peng

    2017-01-01

    High-throughput technologies of functional genomics such as T-DNA insertional mutagenesis and microarray expression profiling have been employed to identify genes related to pathogenicity in Magnaporthe oryzae. However, validation of the functions of individual genes identified by these high-throughput approaches is laborious. In this study, we compared two published lists of genes putatively related to pathogenicity in M. oryzae identified by T-DNA insertional mutagenesis (comprising 1024 genes) and microarray expression profiling (comprising 236 genes), respectively, and then validated the functions of some overlapped genes between the two lists by knocking them out using the method of target gene replacement. Surprisingly, only 13 genes were overlapped between the two lists, and none of the four genes selected from the overlapped genes exhibited visible phenotypic changes on vegetative growth, asexual reproduction, and infection ability in their knockout mutants. Our results suggest that both of the lists might contain large proportions of unrelated genes to pathogenicity and therefore comparing the two gene lists is hardly helpful for the identification of genes that are more likely to be involved in pathogenicity as we initially expected.

  11. Insertional mutagenesis and illegitimate recombination in mycobacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Kalpana, G V; Bloom, B R; Jacobs, W R

    1991-01-01

    Mycobacteria, particularly Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Mycobacterium leprae, and Mycobacterium avium, are major pathogens of man. Although insertional mutagenesis has been an invaluable genetic tool for analyzing the mechanisms of microbial pathogenesis, it has not yet been possible to apply it to the mycobacteria. To overcome intrinsic difficulties in directly manipulating the genetics of slow-growing mycobacteria, including M. tuberculosis and bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccine strains, we developed a system for random shuttle mutagenesis. A genomic library of Mycobacterium smegmatis was subjected to transposon mutagenesis with Tn5 seq1, a derivative of Tn5, in Escherichia coli and these transposon-containing recombinant plasmids were reintroduced into mycobacterial chromosomes by homologous recombination. This system has allowed us to isolate several random auxotrophic mutants of M. smegmatis. To extend this strategy to M. tuberculosis and BCG, targeted mutagenesis was performed using a cloned BCG methionine gene that was subjected to Tn5 seq1 mutagenesis in E. coli and reintroduced into the mycobacteria. Surprisingly for prokaryotes, both BCG and M. tuberculosis were found to incorporate linear DNA fragments into illegitimate sites throughout the mycobacterial genomes at a frequency of 10(-5) to 10(-4) relative to the number of transformants obtained with autonomously replicating vectors. Thus the efficient illegitimate recombination of linear DNA fragments provides the basis for an insertional mutagenesis system for M. tuberculosis and BCG. Images PMID:2052623

  12. New transposon delivery plasmids for insertional mutagenesis in Bacillus anthracis

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Adam C.; Perego, Marta; Hoch, James A.

    2007-01-01

    Two new transposon delivery vector systems utilizing Mariner and mini-Tn10 transposons have been developed for in vivo insertional mutagenesis in Bacillus anthracis and other compatible Gram-positive species. The utility of both systems was directly demonstrated through the mutagenesis of a widely used B. anthracis strain. PMID:17931726

  13. Cryptococcus neoformans Virulence Gene Discovery through Insertional Mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Idnurm, Alexander; Reedy, Jennifer L.; Nussbaum, Jesse C.; Heitman, Joseph

    2004-01-01

    Insertional mutagenesis was applied to Cryptococcus neoformans to identify genes associated with virulence attributes. Using biolistic transformation, we generated 4,300 nourseothricin (NAT)-resistant strains, of which 590 exhibited stable resistance. We focused on mutants with defects in established virulence factors and identified two with reduced growth at 37°C, four with reduced production of the antioxidant pigment melanin, and two with an increased sensitivity to nitric oxide (NO). The NAT insertion and mutant phenotypes were genetically linked in five of eight mutants, and the DNA flanking the insertions was characterized. For the strains with altered growth at 37°C and altered melanin production, mutations were in previously uncharacterized genes, while the two NO-sensitive strains bore insertions in the flavohemoglobin gene FHB1, whose product counters NO stress. Because of the frequent instability of nourseothricin resistance associated with biolistic transformation, Agrobacterium-mediated transformation was tested. This transkingdom DNA delivery approach produced 100% stable nourseothricin-resistant transformants, and three melanin-defective strains were identified from 576 transformants, of which 2 were linked to NAT in segregation analysis. One of these mutants contained a T-DNA insertion in the promoter of the LAC1 (laccase) gene, which encodes a key enzyme required for melanin production, while the second contained an insertion in the promoter of the CLC1 gene, encoding a voltage-gated chloride channel. Clc1 and its homologs are required for ion homeostasis, and in their absence Cu+ transport into the secretory pathway is compromised, depriving laccase and other Cu+-dependent proteins of their essential cofactor. The NAT resistance cassette was optimized for cryptococcal codon usage and GC content and was then used to disrupt a mitogen-activated protein kinase gene, a predicted gene, and two putative chloride channel genes to analyze their

  14. Genetic aspects of targeted insertion mutagenesis in yeasts.

    PubMed

    Klinner, U; Schäfer, B

    2004-05-01

    Targeted insertion mutagenesis is a main molecular tool of yeast science initially applied in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The method was extended to fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe and to "non-conventional" yeast species, which show specific properties of special interest to both basic and applied research. Consequently, the behaviour of such non-Saccharomyces yeasts is reviewed against the background of the knowledge of targeted insertion mutagenesis in S. cerevisiae. Data of homologous integration efficiencies obtained with circular, ends-in or ends-out vectors in several yeasts are compared. We follow details of targeted insertion mutagenesis in order to recognize possible rate-limiting steps. The route of the vector to the target and possible mechanisms of its integration into chromosomal genes are considered. Specific features of some yeast species are discussed. In addition, similar approaches based on homologous recombination that have been established for the mitochondrial genome of S. cerevisiae are described.

  15. Insertional mutagenesis using Tnt1 retrotransposon in potato

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Potato is the third most important food crop in the world. However, genetics and genomics research of potato has lagged behind many major crop species due to its autotetraploidy and a highly heterogeneous genome. Insertional mutagenesis using T-DNA or transposable elements, which is available in sev...

  16. Detecting Statistically Significant Common Insertion Sites in Retroviral Insertional Mutagenesis Screens

    PubMed Central

    de Ridder, Jeroen; Uren, Anthony; Kool, Jaap; Reinders, Marcel; Wessels, Lodewyk

    2006-01-01

    Retroviral insertional mutagenesis screens, which identify genes involved in tumor development in mice, have yielded a substantial number of retroviral integration sites, and this number is expected to grow substantially due to the introduction of high-throughput screening techniques. The data of various retroviral insertional mutagenesis screens are compiled in the publicly available Retroviral Tagged Cancer Gene Database (RTCGD). Integrally analyzing these screens for the presence of common insertion sites (CISs, i.e., regions in the genome that have been hit by viral insertions in multiple independent tumors significantly more than expected by chance) requires an approach that corrects for the increased probability of finding false CISs as the amount of available data increases. Moreover, significance estimates of CISs should be established taking into account both the noise, arising from the random nature of the insertion process, as well as the bias, stemming from preferential insertion sites present in the genome and the data retrieval methodology. We introduce a framework, the kernel convolution (KC) framework, to find CISs in a noisy and biased environment using a predefined significance level while controlling the family-wise error (FWE) (the probability of detecting false CISs). Where previous methods use one, two, or three predetermined fixed scales, our method is capable of operating at any biologically relevant scale. This creates the possibility to analyze the CISs in a scale space by varying the width of the CISs, providing new insights in the behavior of CISs across multiple scales. Our method also features the possibility of including models for background bias. Using simulated data, we evaluate the KC framework using three kernel functions, the Gaussian, triangular, and rectangular kernel function. We applied the Gaussian KC to the data from the combined set of screens in the RTCGD and found that 53% of the CISs do not reach the significance

  17. Embryonic Lethals and T-DNA Insertional Mutagenesis in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed Central

    Errampalli, D; Patton, D; Castle, L; Mickelson, L; Hansen, K; Schnall, J; Feldmann, K; Meinke, D

    1991-01-01

    T-DNA insertional mutagenesis represents a promising approach to the molecular isolation of genes with essential functions during plant embryo development. We describe in this report the isolation and characterization of 18 mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana defective in embryo development following seed transformation with Agrobacterium tumefaciens. Random T-DNA insertion was expected to result in a high frequency of recessive embryonic lethals because many target genes are required for embryogenesis. The cointegrate Ti plasmid used in these experiments contained the nopaline synthase and neomycin phosphotransferase gene markers. Nopaline assays and resistance to kanamycin were used to estimate the number of functional inserts present in segregating families. Nine families appeared to contain a T-DNA insert either within or adjacent to the mutant gene. Eight families were clearly not tagged with a functional insert and appeared instead to contain mutations induced during the transformation process. DNA gel blot hybridization with internal and right border probes revealed a variety of rearrangements associated with T-DNA insertion. A general strategy is presented to simplify the identification of tagged embryonic mutants and facilitate the molecular isolation of genes required for plant embryogenesis. PMID:12324593

  18. Analysis of HIV-2 Vpx by modeling and insertional mutagenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Mahnke, Lisa A. . E-mail: lmahnke@im.wustl.edu; Belshan, Michael; Ratner, Lee . E-mail: lratner@im.wustl.edu

    2006-04-25

    Vpx facilitates HIV-2 nuclear localization by a poorly understood mechanism. We have compared Vpx to an NMR structure HIV-1 Vpr in a central helical domain and probed regions of Vpx by insertional mutagenesis. A predicted loop between helices two and three appears to be unique, overlapping with a known novel nuclear localization signal. Overall, Vpx was found to be surprisingly flexible, tolerating a series of large insertions. We found that insertion within the polyproline-containing C-terminus destabilizes nuclear localization, whereas mutating a second helix in the central domain disrupts viral packaging. Other insertional mutants in the predicted loop and in a linker region between the central domain and the C-terminus may be useful as sites of intramolecular tags as they could be packaged adequately and retained preintegration complex associated integration activity in a serum starvation assay. An unexpected result was found within a previously defined nuclear localization motif near aa 71. This mutant retained robust nuclear localization in a GFP fusion assay and was competent for preintegration complex associated nuclear import. In summary, we have modeled helical content in Vpx and assessed potential sites of intramolecular tags which may prove useful for protein-protein interactions studies.

  19. Insertional mutagenesis by a hybrid piggyBac and sleeping beauty transposon in the rat.

    PubMed

    Furushima, Kenryo; Jang, Chuan-Wei; Chen, Diane W; Xiao, Ningna; Overbeek, Paul A; Behringer, Richard R

    2012-12-01

    A hybrid piggyBac/Sleeping Beauty transposon-based insertional mutagenesis system that can be mobilized by simple breeding was established in the rat. These transposons were engineered to include gene trap sequences and a tyrosinase (Tyr) pigmentation reporter to rescue the albinism of the genetic background used in the mutagenesis strategy. Single-copy transposon insertions were transposed into the rat genome by co-injection of plasmids carrying the transposon and RNA encoding piggyBac transposase into zygotes. The levels of transgenic Tyr expression were influenced by chromosomal context, leading to transgenic rats with different pigmentation that enabled visual genotyping. Transgenic rats designed to ubiquitously express either piggyBac or Sleeping Beauty transposase were generated by standard zygote injection also on an albino background. Bigenic rats carrying single-copy transposons at known loci and transposase transgenes exhibited coat color mosaicism, indicating somatic transposition. PiggyBac or Sleeping Beauty transposase bigenic rats bred with wild-type albino rats yielded offspring with pigmentation distinct from the initial transposon insertions as a consequence of germline transposition to new loci. The germline transposition frequency for Sleeping Beauty and piggyBac was ∼10% or about one new insertion per litter. Approximately 50% of the insertions occurred in introns. Chimeric transcripts containing endogenous and gene trap sequences were identified in Gabrb1 mutant rats. This mutagenesis system based on simple crosses and visual genotyping can be used to generate a collection of single-gene mutations in the rat.

  20. Insertional Mutagenesis by a Hybrid PiggyBac and Sleeping Beauty Transposon in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Furushima, Kenryo; Jang, Chuan-Wei; Chen, Diane W.; Xiao, Ningna; Overbeek, Paul A.; Behringer, Richard R.

    2012-01-01

    A hybrid piggyBac/Sleeping Beauty transposon-based insertional mutagenesis system that can be mobilized by simple breeding was established in the rat. These transposons were engineered to include gene trap sequences and a tyrosinase (Tyr) pigmentation reporter to rescue the albinism of the genetic background used in the mutagenesis strategy. Single-copy transposon insertions were transposed into the rat genome by co-injection of plasmids carrying the transposon and RNA encoding piggyBac transposase into zygotes. The levels of transgenic Tyr expression were influenced by chromosomal context, leading to transgenic rats with different pigmentation that enabled visual genotyping. Transgenic rats designed to ubiquitously express either piggyBac or Sleeping Beauty transposase were generated by standard zygote injection also on an albino background. Bigenic rats carrying single-copy transposons at known loci and transposase transgenes exhibited coat color mosaicism, indicating somatic transposition. PiggyBac or Sleeping Beauty transposase bigenic rats bred with wild-type albino rats yielded offspring with pigmentation distinct from the initial transposon insertions as a consequence of germline transposition to new loci. The germline transposition frequency for Sleeping Beauty and piggyBac was ∼10% or about one new insertion per litter. Approximately 50% of the insertions occurred in introns. Chimeric transcripts containing endogenous and gene trap sequences were identified in Gabrb1 mutant rats. This mutagenesis system based on simple crosses and visual genotyping can be used to generate a collection of single-gene mutations in the rat. PMID:23023007

  1. Insertional mutagenesis of an industrial strain of Streptococcus thermophilus.

    PubMed

    Labarre, C; Schirawski, J; van der Zwet, A; Fitzgerald, G F; van Sinderen, D

    2001-06-12

    Random mutagenesis of an industrial strain of Streptococcus thermophilus was achieved through an adapted version of a two-plasmid system. The mutagenesis strategy is based on random integration of derivatives of the non-replicative (Rep(-)) plasmid pORI19 by means of homologous recombination following a temperature shift that eliminates replication of the temperature-sensitive (Rep(ts)) helper plasmid pVE6007. In this way mutants were generated which were affected in bacteriophage sensitivity or sucrose metabolism. Homologues were identified of a protein related to folate metabolism from a bacteriophage-resistant mutant and of two subunits of an oligopeptide transport system from a mutant deficient in sucrose utilisation.

  2. Genes Necessary for Bacterial Magnetite Biomineralization Identified by Transposon Mutagenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nash, C. Z.; Komeili, A.; Newman, D. K.; Kirschvink, J. L.

    2004-12-01

    Magnetic bacteria synthesize nanoscale crystals of magnetite in intracellular, membrane-bounded organelles (magnetosomes). These crystals are preserved in the fossil record at least as far back as the late Neoproterozoic and have been tentatively identified in much older rocks (1). This fossil record may provide deep time calibration points for molecular evolution studies once the genes involved in biologically controlled magnetic mineralization (BCMM) are known. Further, a genetic and biochemical understanding of BCMM will give insight into the depositional environment and biogeochemical cycles in which magnetic bacteria play a role. The BCMM process is not well understood, though proteins have been identified from the magnetosome membrane and genetic manipulation and biochemical characterization of these proteins are underway. Most of the proteins currently thought to be involved are encoded within the mam cluster, a large cluster of genes whose products localize to the magnetosome membrane and are conserved among magnetic bacteria (2). In an effort to identify all of the genes necessary for bacterial BCMM, we undertook a transposon mutagenesis of Magnetospirillum magneticum AMB-1. Non-magnetic mutants (MNMs) were identified by growth in liquid culture followed by a magnetic assay. The insertion site of the transposon was identified two ways. First MNMs were screened with a PCR assay to determine if the transposon had inserted into the mam cluster. Second, the transposon was rescued from the mutant DNA and cloned for sequencing. The majority insertion sites are located within the mam cluster. Insertion sites also occur in operons which have not previously been suspected to be involved in magnetite biomineralization. None of the insertion sites have occurred within genes reported from previous transposon mutagenesis studies of AMB-1 (3, 4). Two of the non-mam cluster insertion sites occur in operons containing genes conserved particularly between MS-1 and MC-1. We

  3. Functional characterization of the Sindbis virus E2 glycoprotein by transposon linker-insertion mutagenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Navaratnarajah, Chanakha K.; Kuhn, Richard J. . E-mail: kuhnr@purdue.edu

    2007-06-20

    The glycoprotein envelope of alphaviruses consists of two proteins, E1 and E2. E1 is responsible for fusion and E2 is responsible for receptor binding. An atomic structure is available for E1, but one for E2 has not been reported. In this study, transposon linker-insertion mutagenesis was used to probe the function of different domains of E2. A library of mutants, containing 19 amino acid insertions in the E2 glycoprotein sequence of the prototype alphavirus, Sindbis virus (SINV), was generated. Fifty-seven independent E2 insertions were characterized, of which more than half (67%) gave rise to viable virus. The wild-type-like mutants identify regions that accommodate insertions without perturbing virus production and can be used to insert targeting moieties to direct SINV to specific receptors. The defective and lethal mutants give insight into regions of E2 important for protein stability, transport to the cell membrane, E1-E2 contacts, and receptor binding.

  4. Sleeping Beauty transposon insertional mutagenesis based mouse models for cancer gene discovery

    PubMed Central

    Moriarity, Branden S; Largaespada, David A

    2016-01-01

    Large-scale genomic efforts to study human cancer, such as the cancer gene atlas (TCGA), have identified numerous cancer drivers in a wide variety of tumor types. However, there are limitations to this approach, the mutations and expression or copy number changes that are identified are not always clearly functionally relevant, and only annotated genes and genetic elements are thoroughly queried. The use of complimentary, nonbiased, functional approaches to identify drivers of cancer development and progression is ideal to maximize the rate at which cancer discoveries are achieved. One such approach that has been successful is the use of the Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon-based mutagenesis system in mice. This system uses a conditionally expressed transposase and mutagenic transposon allele to target mutagenesis to somatic cells of a given tissue in mice to cause random mutations leading to tumor development. Analysis of tumors for transposon common insertion sites (CIS) identifies candidate cancer genes specific to that tumor type. While similar screens have been performed in mice with the PiggyBac (PB) transposon and viral approaches, we limit extensive discussion to SB. Here we discuss the basic structure of these screens, screens that have been performed, methods used to identify CIS. PMID:26051241

  5. Sleeping Beauty transposon insertional mutagenesis based mouse models for cancer gene discovery.

    PubMed

    Moriarity, Branden S; Largaespada, David A

    2015-02-01

    Large-scale genomic efforts to study human cancer, such as the cancer gene atlas (TCGA), have identified numerous cancer drivers in a wide variety of tumor types. However, there are limitations to this approach, the mutations and expression or copy number changes that are identified are not always clearly functionally relevant, and only annotated genes and genetic elements are thoroughly queried. The use of complimentary, nonbiased, functional approaches to identify drivers of cancer development and progression is ideal to maximize the rate at which cancer discoveries are achieved. One such approach that has been successful is the use of the Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon-based mutagenesis system in mice. This system uses a conditionally expressed transposase and mutagenic transposon allele to target mutagenesis to somatic cells of a given tissue in mice to cause random mutations leading to tumor development. Analysis of tumors for transposon common insertion sites (CIS) identifies candidate cancer genes specific to that tumor type. While similar screens have been performed in mice with the PiggyBac (PB) transposon and viral approaches, we limit extensive discussion to SB. Here we discuss the basic structure of these screens, screens that have been performed, methods used to identify CIS.

  6. Insertional mutagenesis of genes required for seed development in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed Central

    McElver, J; Tzafrir, I; Aux, G; Rogers, R; Ashby, C; Smith, K; Thomas, C; Schetter, A; Zhou, Q; Cushman, M A; Tossberg, J; Nickle, T; Levin, J Z; Law, M; Meinke, D; Patton, D

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to identify large numbers of Arabidopsis genes with essential functions during seed development. More than 120,000 T-DNA insertion lines were generated following Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. Transgenic plants were screened for defective seeds and putative mutants were subjected to detailed analysis in subsequent generations. Plasmid rescue and TAIL-PCR were used to recover plant sequences flanking insertion sites in tagged mutants. More than 4200 mutants with a wide range of seed phenotypes were identified. Over 1700 of these mutants were analyzed in detail. The 350 tagged embryo-defective (emb) mutants identified to date represent a significant advance toward saturation mutagenesis of EMB genes in Arabidopsis. Plant sequences adjacent to T-DNA borders in mutants with confirmed insertion sites were used to map genome locations and establish tentative identities for 167 EMB genes with diverse biological functions. The frequency of duplicate mutant alleles recovered is consistent with a relatively small number of essential (EMB) genes with nonredundant functions during seed development. Other functions critical to seed development in Arabidopsis may be protected from deleterious mutations by extensive genome duplications. PMID:11779812

  7. Trapping Cardiac Recessive Mutants via Expression-based Insertional Mutagenesis Screening

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Yonghe; Liu, Weibin; Deng, Yun; Jomok, Beninio; Yang, Jingchun; Huang, Wei; Clark, Karl J.; Zhong, Tao P.; Lin, Xueying; Ekker, Stephen C.; Xu, Xiaolei

    2013-01-01

    Rationale Mutagenesis screening is a powerful genetic tool for probing biological mechanisms underlying vertebrate development and human diseases. However, the increased colony management efforts in vertebrates impose a significant challenge for identifying genes affecting a particular organ such as the heart, especially those exhibiting adult phenotypes upon depletion. Objective We aim to develop a facile approach that streamlines colony management efforts via enriching cardiac mutants, which enables us to screen for adult phenotypes. Methods and Results The transparency of the zebrafish embryos enabled us to score 67 stable transgenic lines generated from an insertional mutagenesis screen using a transposon-based protein trapping vector. Fifteen lines with cardiac monomeric red fluorescent protein (mRFP) reporter expression were identified. We defined the molecular nature for 10 lines and bred them to homozygosity, which led to the identification of one embryonic lethal, one larval lethal, and one adult recessive mutant exhibiting cardiac hypertrophy at one year of age. Further characterization of these mutants uncovered an essential function of methionine adenosyltransferase II, alpha a (mat2aa) in cardiogenesis, an essential function of mitochondrial ribosomal protein S18B (mrps18b) in cardiac mitochondrial homeostasis, as well as a function of DnaJ (Hsp40) homolog, subfamily B, member 6b (dnajb6b) in adult cardiac hypertrophy. Conclusions We demonstrate that transposon-based gene trapping is an efficient approach for identifying both embryonic and adult recessive mutants with cardiac expression. The generation of a Zebrafish Insertional Cardiac (ZIC) mutant collection shall facilitate the annotation of a vertebrate cardiac genome, as well as enable heart-based adult screens. PMID:23283723

  8. [Cloning and insertion mutagenesis of DNA fragment coding for the luminescent system of Photobacterium leiognathi].

    PubMed

    Ptitsyn, L R; Gurevich, V B; Barsanova, T G; Shenderov, A N; Khaĭkinson, M Ia

    1988-10-01

    Fragments of DNA, obtained from the luminescent bacterium Photobacterium leiognathi and inserted into the plasmid pBR322, were found to code for the luminescence expressed in E. coli cells. The genetic functions necessary for light production in E. coli are localized on a DNA fragment of about 7 kbp. The insertion mutagenesis was used to define the luminescence functions encoded by the hybrid plasmid.

  9. Identification of pathogenicity-related genes in the rice pathogen Ustilaginoidea virens through random insertional mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Yu, Mina; Yu, Junjie; Hu, Jiankun; Huang, Lei; Wang, Yahui; Yin, Xiaole; Nie, Yafeng; Meng, Xiangkun; Wang, Weiduo; Liu, Yongfeng

    2015-03-01

    Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation (ATMT) is becoming a popular effective system as an insertional mutagenesis tool in filamentous fungi. To gain more insight into the cellular and molecular mechanisms in the pathogenesis of Ustilaginoidea virens, the causal agent of rice false smut disease, a T-DNA insertion mutant library of U. virens was established using ATMT. We optimized a range of conditions to improve the transformation efficiency. Transformants were most effectively obtained when the optimal co-cultivation time is 72h, with 50μM AS in medium and 100μl A. tumefaciens for co-cultivation, leading to the production of 160-185 hygromycin B resistant transformants per 1×10(5) conidia. Southern blot analysis indicated that 58.14% of transformants had a single T-DNA copy. Among 5600 transformants tested for virulence, 37 mutants with reproducible pathogenic defects were obtained. The flanking sequences of three avirulent tranformants (B20, B1015 and B1465) and two pathogenicity-reduced transformants (B726 and B785) were amplified by high-efficiency thermal asymmetric interlaced PCR. Sequence analyses revealed that single T-DNA insertion in mutant B20 targeted the coding region of a gene encoding a protein highly similar to SUN family protein, and in mutant B726 targeted upstream of a gene with unknown function. The two T-DNA insertion sites in mutant B785 were found in the coding region of a gene encoding C6 transcription factor, but failed in amplified flanking sequence of another T-DNA. Chromosomal rearrangement occurred in the genome of mutant B1016 and B1465 with single T-DNA insertion. Among avirulent mutants, B20 showed altered colony growth and pigmentation. The T-DNA insert in B20 was detected in the coding region of a gene named UvSUN2. Morphophysiological characterization analysis suggested that UvSUN2 might be a virulence factor, and possibly required for proper fungal growth, cell wall construction, and stress responses in U. virens

  10. Molecular pathogenesis of feline leukemia virus-induced malignancies: insertional mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Fujino, Yasuhito; Ohno, Koichi; Tsujimoto, Hajime

    2008-05-15

    Feline leukemia virus (FeLV), which is subclassified into three subgroups of A, B and C, is a pathogenic retrovirus in cats. FeLV-A is minimally pathogenic, FeLV-C can cause pure red cell aplasia, and FeLV-B is associated with a variety of pathogenic properties such as lymphoma, leukemia and anemia. FeLV-induced neoplasms are caused, at least in part, by somatically acquired insertional mutagenesis in which the integrated provirus may activate a proto-oncogene or disrupt a tumor suppressor gene. The common integration sites for FeLV have been identified in six loci with feline lymphomas: c-myc, flvi-1, flvi-2 (contains bmi-1), fit-1, pim-1 and flit-1. Oncogenic association of the loci includes that c-myc is known as a proto-oncogene, bmi-1 and pim-1 have been recognized as myc-collaborators, fit-1 appears to be closely linked to myb, and flit-1 insertion is shown to be associated with over-expression of a cellular gene, e.g. ACVRL1. Thus, identification of common integration sites for FeLV is a tenable model to clarify oncogenesis. Recent advances in molecular biology and cytogenetics have developed to rapidly detect numbers of retroviral integration sites by genome-wide large-scale analyses. Especially, polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based strategies and chromosome analyses with fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) will be applicable for studies on FeLV.

  11. Identification and cloning of an Erwinia carotovora subsp. carotovora bacteriocin regulator gene by insertional mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Chuang, D Y; Kyeremeh, A G; Gunji, Y; Takahara, Y; Ehara, Y; Kikumoto, T

    1999-03-01

    Avirulent Erwinia carotovora subsp. carotovora CGE234-M403 produces two types of bacteriocin. For the purpose of cloning the bacteriocin genes of strain CGE234M403, a spontaneous rifampin-resistant mutant of this strain, M-rif-11-2, was isolated. By Tn5 insertional mutagenesis using M-rif-11-2, a mutant, TM01A01, which produces the high-molecular-weight bacteriocin but not the low-molecular-weight bacteriocin was obtained. By thermal asymmetric interlaced PCR, the DNA sequence from the Tn5 insertion site and the DNA sequence of a contiguous 1,280-bp region were determined. One complete open reading frame (ORF), designated ORF2, was identified within the sequenced fragment. The 3' end of another ORF, ORF1, was located upstream of ORF2. A noncoding region and a putative promoter were located between ORF1 and ORF2. Downstream from ORF2, the 5' end of another ORF (ORF3) was found. Deduction from the nucleotide sequence indicated that ORF2 encodes a protein of 99 amino acids, which showed high homology with Yersinia enterocolitica Yrp, a regulator of enterotoxin (Y-ST) production; Escherichia coli host factor 1, required for Qbeta-replicase; and Azorhizobium caulinodans NrfA, required for the expression of nifA. ORF2 was designated brg, bacteriocin regulator gene. A fragment containing ORF2 and its promoter was amplified and cloned into pBR322 and pHSG415r, and the recombinant plasmids, pBYL1 and pHYL1, were transferred into E. coli DH5. Plasmid pBYL1 was reisolated and transferred into the insertion mutant TM01A01. Transformants carrying the plasmid, which was reisolated and designated pBYL1, re-produced the low-molecular-weight bacteriocin.

  12. Mouse models of cancer: Sleeping Beauty transposons for insertional mutagenesis screens and reverse genetic studies.

    PubMed

    Tschida, Barbara R; Largaespada, David A; Keng, Vincent W

    2014-03-01

    The genetic complexity and heterogeneity of cancer has posed a problem in designing rationally targeted therapies effective in a large proportion of human cancer. Genomic characterization of many cancer types has provided a staggering amount of data that needs to be interpreted to further our understanding of this disease. Forward genetic screening in mice using Sleeping Beauty (SB) based insertional mutagenesis is an effective method for candidate cancer gene discovery that can aid in distinguishing driver from passenger mutations in human cancer. This system has been adapted for unbiased screens to identify drivers of multiple cancer types. These screens have already identified hundreds of candidate cancer-promoting mutations. These can be used to develop new mouse models for further study, which may prove useful for therapeutic testing. SB technology may also hold the key for rapid generation of reverse genetic mouse models of cancer, and has already been used to model glioblastoma and liver cancer. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. The use of T-DNA insertional mutagenesis to improve cellulase production by the thermophilic fungus Humicola insolens Y1

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xinxin; Li, Jinyang; Shi, Pengjun; Ji, Wangli; Liu, Bo; Zhang, Yuhong; Yao, Bin; Fan, Yunliu; Zhang, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Humicola insolens is an excellent producer of pH-neutral active, thermostable cellulases that find many industrial applications. In the present study, we developed an efficient Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation system for H. insolens. We transformed plasmids carrying the promoter of the glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase gene of H. insolens driving the transcription of genes encoding neomycin phosphotransferase, hygromycin B phosphotransferase, and enhanced green fluorescent protein. We optimized transformation efficiency to obtain over 300 transformants/106 conidia. T-DNA insertional mutagenesis was employed to generate an H. insolens mutant library, and we isolated a transformant termed T4 with enhanced cellulase and hemicellulase activities. The FPase, endoglucanase, cellobiohydrolase, β-glucosidase, and xylanase activities of T4, measured at the end of fermentation, were 60%, 440%, 320%, 41%, and 81% higher than those of the wild-type strain, respectively. We isolated the sequences flanking the T-DNA insertions and thus identified new genes potentially involved in cellulase and hemicellulase production. Our results show that it is feasible to use T-DNA insertional mutagenesis to identify novel candidate genes involved in cellulase production. This will be valuable when genetic improvement programs seeking to enhance cellulase production are planned, and will also allow us to gain a better understanding of the genetics of the thermophilic fungus H. insolens. PMID:27506519

  14. Slingshot: a PiggyBac based transposon system for tamoxifen-inducible 'self-inactivating' insertional mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Kong, Jun; Wang, Feng; Brenton, James D; Adams, David J

    2010-10-01

    We have developed a self-inactivating PiggyBac transposon system for tamoxifen inducible insertional mutagenesis from a stably integrated chromosomal donor. This system, which we have named 'Slingshot', utilizes a transposon carrying elements for both gain- and loss-of-function screens in vitro. We show that the Slingshot transposon can be efficiently mobilized from a range of chromosomal loci with high inducibility and low background generating insertions that are randomly dispersed throughout the genome. Furthermore, we show that once the Slingshot transposon has been mobilized it is not remobilized producing stable clonal integrants in all daughter cells. To illustrate the efficacy of Slingshot as a screening tool we set out to identify mediators of resistance to puromycin and the chemotherapeutic drug vincristine by performing genetrap screens in mouse embryonic stem cells. From these genome-wide screens we identified multiple independent insertions in the multidrug resistance transporter genes Abcb1a/b and Abcg2 conferring resistance to drug treatment. Importantly, we also show that the Slingshot transposon system is functional in other mammalian cell lines such as human HEK293, OVCAR-3 and PE01 cells suggesting that it may be used in a range of cell culture systems. Slingshot represents a flexible and potent system for genome-wide transposon-mediated mutagenesis with many potential applications.

  15. The use of T-DNA insertional mutagenesis to improve cellulase production by the thermophilic fungus Humicola insolens Y1.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xinxin; Li, Jinyang; Shi, Pengjun; Ji, Wangli; Liu, Bo; Zhang, Yuhong; Yao, Bin; Fan, Yunliu; Zhang, Wei

    2016-08-10

    Humicola insolens is an excellent producer of pH-neutral active, thermostable cellulases that find many industrial applications. In the present study, we developed an efficient Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation system for H. insolens. We transformed plasmids carrying the promoter of the glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase gene of H. insolens driving the transcription of genes encoding neomycin phosphotransferase, hygromycin B phosphotransferase, and enhanced green fluorescent protein. We optimized transformation efficiency to obtain over 300 transformants/10(6) conidia. T-DNA insertional mutagenesis was employed to generate an H. insolens mutant library, and we isolated a transformant termed T4 with enhanced cellulase and hemicellulase activities. The FPase, endoglucanase, cellobiohydrolase, β-glucosidase, and xylanase activities of T4, measured at the end of fermentation, were 60%, 440%, 320%, 41%, and 81% higher than those of the wild-type strain, respectively. We isolated the sequences flanking the T-DNA insertions and thus identified new genes potentially involved in cellulase and hemicellulase production. Our results show that it is feasible to use T-DNA insertional mutagenesis to identify novel candidate genes involved in cellulase production. This will be valuable when genetic improvement programs seeking to enhance cellulase production are planned, and will also allow us to gain a better understanding of the genetics of the thermophilic fungus H. insolens.

  16. Generation of an Enhancer-Trapping Vector for Insertional Mutagenesis in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chunyan; Song, Guili; Mao, Lin; Long, Yong; Li, Qing; Cui, Zongbin

    2015-01-01

    Enhancer trapping (ET) is a powerful approach to establish tissue- or cell-specific reporters and identify expression patterns of uncharacterized genes. Although a number of enhancer-trapping vectors have been developed and a large library of fish lines with distinct tissue- or cell-specific expression of reporter genes have been generated, the specificity and efficiency of trapping vectors need to be improved because of the bias interaction of minimal promoters with genomic enhancers. Accordingly, we generated an enhancer-trapping vector pTME that contains a minimal mouse metallothionein gene (mMTI) promoter upstream of EGFP reporter. In the first round of screening, twelve zebrafish lines that carry a single copy of ET cassettes were characterized to have tissue- or cell-specific EGFP expression. One of the highly conserved noncoding elements near an insertion site of trapping cassettes was characterized as an enhancer that can specifically regulate the expression of EGFP in cells of the central nervous system. In addition, the pTME vector contains a mutation-cassette that is able to effectively block the transcription of an endogenous gene in an ET line with ubiquitous EGFP expression. Thus, the pTME vector can be used as an alternative tool for both enhancer trapping and mutagenesis across a target genome. PMID:26436547

  17. Engineered Zymomonas mobilis for salt tolerance using EZ-Tn5-based transposon insertion mutagenesis system.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing-Li; Wu, Bo; Qin, Han; You, Yang; Liu, Song; Shui, Zong-Xia; Tan, Fu-Rong; Wang, Yan-Wei; Zhu, Qi-Li; Li, Yan-Bin; Ruan, Zhi-Yong; Ma, Ke-Dong; Dai, Li-Chun; Hu, Guo-Quan; He, Ming-Xiong

    2016-06-10

    The cell growth and ethanol yield of Zymomonas mobilis may be detrimentally affected by salt stress frequently present in some biomass-based fermentation systems, leading to a decrease in the rate of sugar conversion to ethanol or other bioproducts. To address this problem, improving the salt tolerance of Z. mobilis is a desirable way. However, limited progress has been made in development of Z. mobilis with higher salt tolerance for some technical challenges in the past decades. Recently, transposon insertion mutant system has been widely used as a novel genetic tool in many organisms to develop mutant strains. In this study, Tn5-based transposon insertion mutagenesis system firstly used for construction of higher salt tolerance strain in Z. mobilis. Approximately 200 Z. mobilis ZM4 mutants were generated by using Tn5-based transposon mutagenesis system. The mutant strain ZMT2 with improved salt tolerance phenotype was obtained by screening on RM agar plates with additional 1 % NaCl. Strain ZMT2 was confirmed to exhibit better fermentation performance under NaCl stress than wild type of strain ZM4. The transposon insertion was located in ZMO1122 (himA) by genome walking. Discruption of himA gene showed that himA may play an important role in response to salt tolerance in Z. mobils. The mutant strain ZMT2 with a transposon insertion in himA gene of the genome showed obviously higher sugar conversion rate to ethonal under up to 2 % NaCl stress than did the wild ZM4 strain. Besides, ZMT2 exhibited shared fermentative capabilities with wild ZM4 strain under no or low NaCl stress. This report firstly showed that himA played a role in responding to NaCl stress. Furthermore, the result indicated that Tn5-based transposon mutagenesis system was a feasible tool not only for genetic engineering in Z. mobilis strain improvement, but also in tapping resistent genes.

  18. Bidirectional promoter trapping T-DNA for insertional mutagenesis in Verticillium dahliae.

    PubMed

    Deng, Sheng; Wang, Cai-yue; Zhang, Xin; Lin, Ling

    2014-07-01

    Transfer DNA (T-DNA)-based random insertional mutagenesis is a universal forward genetic approach for gene identification and cloning in many phytopathogenic fungi. In a large number of randomly selected transformants, screening for mutants with a specific phenotype is laborious, especially for pathogenicity-defective mutants. To accelerate mutant screening and gene identification, a bidirectional promoter-trapping Ti binary vector, 1300-bisGFP-hyg, was constructed and deployed in this study. More than 6000 Verticillium dahliae transformants were obtained by the mediation of Agrobacterium tumefaciens carrying the vector. One thousand randomly selected transformants were cultured on Czapek-Dox and on Czapek-Dox plus cotton root extract media plates. The cultured transformants with green fluorescent protein (GFP) expression or changes in phenotype were selected and used in virulence or promoter-trapping assays. Based on the virulence assay of 60 transformants, the pathogenicity of 17 of these mutants was compromised. Ten pathogenicity-defective mutants were found with GFP expression, and 6 with expression in Czapek-Dox plus cotton root extract media specifically. Using TAIL-PCR (thermal asymmetric interlaced polymerase chain reaction), the T-DNA insertion sites were identified in 8 GFP-expressing transformants, including 5 pathogenicity-defective mutants and 3 unaffected transformants. Promoters of 6 genes were successfully trapped using the T-DNA method in this study. The nonpathogenic transformant 24C9 was the subject of additional investigation. It displayed strong GFP expression on water agar medium supplemented with cotton root extracts and on cotton seedling stems. The results obtained by Southern blot and quantitative real-time PCR confirmed that the transcription level of VdUGPU (encoding UTP-glucose-1-phosphate uridylyltransferase) was significantly reduced owing to T-DNA insertion in the gene promoter region. These results indicate that the bidirectional

  19. Genetically engineered insertional mutagenesis in mice to model cancer: Sleeping Beauty.

    PubMed

    Howell, Viive M; Colvin, Emily K

    2014-01-01

    The ability to accurately model human cancer in mice enables in vivo examination of the biological mechanisms related to cancer initiation and progression as well as preclinical testing of new anticancer treatments and potential targets. The emergence of the genetically engineered Sleeping Beauty system of insertional mutagenesis has led to the development of a new generation of genetic mouse models of cancer and identification of novel cancer-causing genes. This chapter reviews the published cancer models of Sleeping Beauty and strategies using available strains to generate several models of cancer.

  20. A novel reverse-genetic approach (SIMF) identifies Mutator insertions in new Myb genes.

    PubMed

    Rabinowicz, P D; Grotewold, E

    2000-11-01

    We have developed a new strategy designated SIMF (Systematic Insertional Mutagenesis of Families), to identify DNA insertions in many members of a gene family simultaneously. This method requires only a short amino acid sequence conserved in all members of the family to make a degenerate oligonucleotide, and a sequence from the end of the DNA insertion. The SIMF strategy was successfully applied to the large maize R2R3 Myb family of regulatory genes, and Mutator insertions in several novel Myb genes were identified. Application of this technique to identify insertions in other large gene families could significantly decrease the effort involved in screening at the same time for insertions in all members of groups of genes that share a limited sequence identity.

  1. Random insertion and gene disruption via transposon mutagenesis of Ureaplasma parvum using a mini-transposon plasmid.

    PubMed

    Aboklaish, Ali F; Dordet-Frisoni, Emilie; Citti, Christine; Toleman, Mark A; Glass, John I; Spiller, O Brad

    2014-11-01

    While transposon mutagenesis has been successfully used for Mycoplasma spp. to disrupt and determine non-essential genes, previous attempts with Ureaplasma spp. have been unsuccessful. Using a polyethylene glycol-transformation enhancing protocol, we were able to transform three separate serovars of Ureaplasma parvum with a Tn4001-based mini-transposon plasmid containing a gentamicin resistance selection marker. Despite the large degree of homology between Ureaplasma parvum and Ureaplasma urealyticum, all attempts to transform the latter in parallel failed, with the exception of a single clinical U. urealyticum isolate. PCR probing and sequencing were used to confirm transposon insertion into the bacterial genome and identify disrupted genes. Transformation of prototype serovar 3 consistently resulted in transfer only of sequence between the mini-transposon inverted repeats, but some strains showed additional sequence transfer. Transposon insertion occurred randomly in the genome resulting in unique disruption of genes UU047, UU390, UU440, UU450, UU520, UU526, UU582 for single clones from a panel of screened clones. An intergenic insertion between genes UU187 and UU188 was also characterised. Two phenotypic alterations were observed in the mutated strains: Disruption of a DEAD-box RNA helicase (UU582) altered growth kinetics, while the U. urealyticum strain lost resistance to serum attack coincident with disruption of gene UUR10_137 and loss of expression of a 41 kDa protein. Transposon mutagenesis was used successfully to insert single copies of a mini-transposon into the genome and disrupt genes leading to phenotypic changes in Ureaplasma parvum strains. This method can now be used to deliver exogenous genes for expression and determine essential genes for Ureaplasma parvum replication in culture and experimental models.

  2. Evaluating Risks of Insertional Mutagenesis by DNA Transposons in Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Hackett, Perry B.; Largaespada, David A.; Switzer, Kirsten C.; Cooper, Laurence J.N.

    2013-01-01

    Investigational therapy can be successfully undertaken using viral- and non-viral-mediated ex vivo gene transfer. Indeed, recent clinical trials have established the potential for genetically modified T cells to improve and restore health. Recently the Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon/transposase system has been applied in clinical trials to stably insert a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) to redirect T-cell specificity. We discuss the context in which the SB system can be harnessed for gene therapy and describe the human application of SB-modified CAR+ T cells. We have focused on theoretical issues relating to insertional mutagenesis in the context of human genomes that are naturally subjected to remobilization of transposons and the experimental evidence over the last decade of employing SB transposons for defining genes that induce cancer. These findings are put into the context of the use of SB transposons in the treatment of human disease. PMID:23313630

  3. Evaluating risks of insertional mutagenesis by DNA transposons in gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Hackett, Perry B; Largaespada, David A; Switzer, Kirsten C; Cooper, Laurence J N

    2013-04-01

    Investigational therapy can be successfully undertaken using viral- and nonviral-mediated ex vivo gene transfer. Indeed, recent clinical trials have established the potential for genetically modified T cells to improve and restore health. Recently, the Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon/transposase system has been applied in clinical trials to stably insert a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) to redirect T-cell specificity. We discuss the context in which the SB system can be harnessed for gene therapy and describe the human application of SB-modified CAR(+) T cells. We have focused on theoretical issues relating to insertional mutagenesis in the context of human genomes that are naturally subjected to remobilization of transposons and the experimental evidence over the last decade of employing SB transposons for defining genes that induce cancer. These findings are put into the context of the use of SB transposons in the treatment of human disease.

  4. Insertional mutagenesis and marker rescue in a protozoan parasite: cloning of the uracil phosphoribosyltransferase locus from Toxoplasma gondii.

    PubMed Central

    Donald, R G; Roos, D S

    1995-01-01

    Nonhomologous integration vectors have been used to demonstrate the feasibility of insertional mutagenesis in haploid tachyzoites of the protozoan parasite Toxoplasma gondii. Mutant clones resistant to 5-fluorouracil were identified at a frequency of approximately 10(-6) (approximately 2 x 10(-5) of the stable transformants). Four independent mutants were isolated, all of which were shown to lack uracil phosphoribosyl-transferase (UPRT) activity and harbor transgenes integrated at closely linked loci, suggesting inactivation of the UPRT-encoding gene. Genomic DNA flanking the insertion point (along with the integrated vector) was readily recovered by bacterial transformation with restriction-digested, self-ligated total genomic DNA. Screening of genomic libraries with the recovered fragment identified sequences exhibiting high homology to known UPRT-encoding genes from other species, and cDNA clones were isolated that contain a single open reading frame predicted to encode the 244-amino acid enzyme. Homologous recombination vectors were exploited to create genetic knock-outs at the UPRT locus, which are deficient in enzyme activity but can be complemented by transient transformation with wild-type sequences--formally confirming identification of the functional UPRT gene. Mapping of transgene insertion points indicates that multiple independent mutants arose from integration at distinct sites within the UPRT gene, suggesting that nonhomologous integration is sufficiently random to permit tagging of the entire parasite genome in a single transformation. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:7777580

  5. Large-Scale Transposition Mutagenesis of Streptomyces coelicolor Identifies Hundreds of Genes Influencing Antibiotic Biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhong; Wang, Yemin; Chater, Keith F; Ou, Hong-Yu; Xu, H Howard; Deng, Zixin; Tao, Meifeng

    2017-03-15

    Gram-positive Streptomyces bacteria produce thousands of bioactive secondary metabolites, including antibiotics. To systematically investigate genes affecting secondary metabolism, we developed a hyperactive transposase-based Tn5 transposition system and employed it to mutagenize the model species Streptomyces coelicolor, leading to the identification of 51,443 transposition insertions. These insertions were distributed randomly along the chromosome except for some preferred regions associated with relatively low GC content in the chromosomal core. The base composition of the insertion site and its flanking sequences compiled from the 51,443 insertions implied a 19-bp expanded target site surrounding the insertion site, with a slight nucleic acid base preference in some positions, suggesting a relative randomness of Tn5 transposition targeting in the high-GC Streptomyces genome. From the mutagenesis library, 724 mutants involving 365 genes had altered levels of production of the tripyrrole antibiotic undecylprodigiosin (RED), including 17 genes in the RED biosynthetic gene cluster. Genetic complementation revealed that most of the insertions (more than two-thirds) were responsible for the changed antibiotic production. Genes associated with branched-chain amino acid biosynthesis, DNA metabolism, and protein modification affected RED production, and genes involved in signaling, stress, and transcriptional regulation were overrepresented. Some insertions caused dramatic changes in RED production, identifying future targets for strain improvement.IMPORTANCE High-GC Gram-positive streptomycetes and related actinomycetes have provided more than 100 clinical drugs used as antibiotics, immunosuppressants, and antitumor drugs. Their genomes harbor biosynthetic genes for many more unknown compounds with potential as future drugs. Here we developed a useful genome-wide mutagenesis tool based on the transposon Tn5 for the study of secondary metabolism and its regulation

  6. ENU mutagenesis in mice identifies candidate genes for hypogonadism.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Jeffrey; Hurley, Lisa A; Harris, Rebecca M; Finlayson, Courtney; Tong, Minghan; Fisher, Lisa A; Moran, Jennifer L; Beier, David R; Mason, Christopher; Jameson, J Larry

    2012-06-01

    Genome-wide mutagenesis was performed in mice to identify candidate genes for male infertility, for which the predominant causes remain idiopathic. Mice were mutagenized using N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU), bred, and screened for phenotypes associated with the male urogenital system. Fifteen heritable lines were isolated and chromosomal loci were assigned using low-density genome-wide SNP arrays. Ten of the 15 lines were pursued further using higher-resolution SNP analysis to narrow the candidate gene regions. Exon sequencing of candidate genes identified mutations in mice with cystic kidneys (Bicc1), cryptorchidism (Rxfp2), restricted germ cell deficiency (Plk4), and severe germ cell deficiency (Prdm9). In two other lines with severe hypogonadism, candidate sequencing failed to identify mutations, suggesting defects in genes with previously undocumented roles in gonadal function. These genomic intervals were sequenced in their entirety and a candidate mutation was identified in SnrpE in one of the two lines. The line harboring the SnrpE variant retains substantial spermatogenesis despite small testis size, an unusual phenotype. In addition to the reproductive defects, heritable phenotypes were observed in mice with ataxia (Myo5a), tremors (Pmp22), growth retardation (unknown gene), and hydrocephalus (unknown gene). These results demonstrate that the ENU screen is an effective tool for identifying potential causes of male infertility.

  7. Targeted Mutagenesis, Precise Gene Editing, and Site-Specific Gene Insertion in Maize Using Cas9 and Guide RNA.

    PubMed

    Svitashev, Sergei; Young, Joshua K; Schwartz, Christine; Gao, Huirong; Falco, S Carl; Cigan, A Mark

    2015-10-01

    Targeted mutagenesis, editing of endogenous maize (Zea mays) genes, and site-specific insertion of a trait gene using clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-associated (Cas)-guide RNA technology are reported in maize. DNA vectors expressing maize codon-optimized Streptococcus pyogenes Cas9 endonuclease and single guide RNAs were cointroduced with or without DNA repair templates into maize immature embryos by biolistic transformation targeting five different genomic regions: upstream of the liguleless1 (LIG1) gene, male fertility genes (Ms26 and Ms45), and acetolactate synthase (ALS) genes (ALS1 and ALS2). Mutations were subsequently identified at all sites targeted, and plants containing biallelic multiplex mutations at LIG1, Ms26, and Ms45 were recovered. Biolistic delivery of guide RNAs (as RNA molecules) directly into immature embryo cells containing preintegrated Cas9 also resulted in targeted mutations. Editing the ALS2 gene using either single-stranded oligonucleotides or double-stranded DNA vectors as repair templates yielded chlorsulfuron-resistant plants. Double-strand breaks generated by RNA-guided Cas9 endonuclease also stimulated insertion of a trait gene at a site near LIG1 by homology-directed repair. Progeny showed expected Mendelian segregation of mutations, edits, and targeted gene insertions. The examples reported in this study demonstrate the utility of Cas9-guide RNA technology as a plant genome editing tool to enhance plant breeding and crop research needed to meet growing agriculture demands of the future.

  8. Agrobacterium-mediated transformation (AMT) of Trichoderma reesei as an efficient tool for random insertional mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Yao Hua; Wang, Xiao Li; Wang, Tian Hong; Jiang, Qiao

    2007-01-01

    Filamentous fungus Trichoderma reesei QM9414 was successfully transformed with Agrobacterium tumefaciens AGL-1 for random integration of transforming DNA (T-DNA). Co-cultivation of T. reesei conidia or protoplasts with A. tumefaciens in the presence of acetosyringone resulted in the formation of hygromycin B-resistant fungal colonies with high transformation frequency. Nine randomly selected resistant clones were proved to be stable through mitotic cell division. The integration of the hph gene into T. reesei genome was determined by PCR and dot blot analysis. Transgenic T. reesei strains were analyzed using TAIL-PCR for their T-DNA contents. The results showed that T-DNA inserts occurred evidently by fusing DNA at T-DNA borders via random recombination, which suggests that Agrobacterium-mediated transformation is a potentially powerful tool towards tagged mutagenesis and gene transfer technology for T. reesei.

  9. Insertional mutagenesis reveals progression genes and checkpoints in MYC/Runx2 lymphomas

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    In this study we have exploited the power of insertional mutagenesis to elucidate tumor progression pathways in mice carrying two oncogenes (MYC/Runx2) that collaborate to drive early lymphoma development. Neonatal infection of these mice with Moloney murine leukemia virus (MLV) resulted in accelerated tumor onset with associated increases in clonal complexity and lymphoid dissemination. Large-scale analysis of retroviral integration sites in these tumors revealed a profound bias towards a narrow range of target genes including Jdp2 (Jundm2), D cyclin and Pim family genes. Remarkably, direct PCR analysis of integration hot-spots revealed that every progressing tumor consisted of multiple clones harbouring hits at these loci, giving access to large numbers of independent insertion events and uncovering the contrasting mutagenic mechanisms operating at each target gene. Direct PCR analysis showed that high frequency targeting occurs only in the tumor environment in vivo and is specific for the progression gene set. These results indicate that early lymphomas in MYC/Runx2 mice remain dependent on exogenous growth signals and that progression can be achieved by constitutive activation of pathways converging on a cell cycle checkpoint that acts as the major rate-limiting step for lymphoma outgrowth. PMID:17545590

  10. Stem cell gene therapy: the risks of insertional mutagenesis and approaches to minimize genotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chuanfeng; Dunbar, Cynthia E

    2011-12-01

    Virus-based vectors are widely used in hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) gene therapy, and have the ability to integrate permanently into genomic DNA, thus driving long-term expression of corrective genes in all hematopoietic lineages. To date, HSC gene therapy has been successfully employed in the clinic for improving clinical outcomes in small numbers of patients with X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID-X1), adenosine deaminase deficiency (ADA-SCID), adrenoleukodystrophy (ALD), thalassemia, chronic granulomatous disease (CGD), and Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS). However, adverse events were observed during some of these HSC gene therapy clinical trials, linked to insertional activation of proto-oncogenes by integrated proviral vectors leading to clonal expansion and eventual development of leukemia. Numerous studies have been performed to understand the molecular basis of vector-mediated genotoxicity, with the aim of developing safer vectors and lower-risk gene therapy protocols. This review will summarize current information on the mechanisms of insertional mutagenesis in hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells due to integrating gene transfer vectors, discuss the available assays for predicting genotoxicity and mapping vector integration sites, and introduce newly-developed approaches for minimizing genotoxicity as a way to further move HSC gene therapy forward into broader clinical application.

  11. Retrovirus-induced insertional mutagenesis: mechanism of collagen mutation in Mov13 mice.

    PubMed Central

    Barker, D D; Wu, H; Hartung, S; Breindl, M; Jaenisch, R

    1991-01-01

    The Mov13 mouse strain carries a mutation in the alpha 1(I) procollagen gene which is due to the insertion of a Moloney murine leukemia provirus into the first intron. This insertion results in the de novo methylation of the provirus and flanking DNA, the alteration of chromatin structure, and the transcriptional inactivity of the collagen promoter. To address the mechanism of mutagenesis, we reintroduced a cloned and therefore demethylated version of the Mov13 mutant allele into mouse fibroblasts. The transfected gene was not transcribed, indicating that the transcriptional defect was not due to the hypermethylation. Rather, this result strongly suggests that the mutation is due to the displacement or disruption of cis-acting regulatory DNA sequences within the first intron. We also constructed a Mov13 variant allele containing a single long terminal repeat instead of the whole provirus. This construct also failed to express mRNA, indicating that the Mov13 mutation does not revert by provirus excision as has been observed for other retrovirus-induced mutations. Images PMID:1922037

  12. Transposon Mutagenesis of Mycobacterium marinum Identifies a Locus Linking Pigmentation and Intracellular Survival

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Lian-Yong; Groger, Richard; Cox, Jeffery S.; Beverley, Stephen M.; Lawson, Elise H.; Brown, Eric J.

    2003-01-01

    Pathogenic mycobacteria survive and replicate within host macrophages, but the molecular mechanisms involved in this necessary step in the pathogenesis of infection are not completely understood. Mycobacterium marinum has recently been used as a model for aspects of the pathogenesis of tuberculosis because of its close genetic relationship to Mycobacterium tuberculosis and because of similarities in the pathology and course of infection caused by this organism in its natural hosts, fish and frogs, with tuberculosis in humans. In order to advance the utility of the M. marinum model, we have developed efficient transposon mutagenesis of the organism by using a Drosophila melanogaster mariner-based transposon. To determine the efficiency of transposition, we have analyzed pigmentation mutants from the transposon mutant library. In addition to insertions in four known genes in the pathway of pigment biosynthesis, two insertions in novel genes were identified in our mutant library. One of these is in a putative inhibitor of the carotenoid biosynthesis pathway. The second unexpected insertion is in an intergenic region between two genes homologous to Rv2603c and Rv2604c of M. tuberculosis. In addition to a pigmentation defect, this mutant showed increased susceptibility to singlet oxygen and grew poorly in murine macrophages. Complementation with M. tuberculosis genomic DNA encompassing Rv2603c to Rv2606c corrected the pigmentation and growth defects of the mutant. These data demonstrate the utility of mariner-based transposon mutagenesis of M. marinum and that M. marinum can be used to study the function of M. tuberculosis genes involved in intracellular survival and replication. PMID:12540574

  13. Structure-Function Studies of Escherichia coli RpoH (σ32) by In Vitro Linker Insertion Mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Narberhaus, Franz; Balsiger, Sylvia

    2003-01-01

    The sigma factor RpoH (σ32) is the key regulator of the heat shock response in Escherichia coli. Many structural and functional properties of the sigma factor are poorly understood. To gain further insight into RpoH regions that are either important or dispensable for its cellular activity, we generated a collection of tetrapeptide insertion variants by a recently established in vitro linker insertion mutagenesis technique. Thirty-one distinct insertions were obtained, and their sigma factor activity was analyzed by using a groE-lacZ reporter fusion in an rpoH-negative background. Our study provides a map of permissive sites which tolerate linker insertions and of functionally important regions at which a linker insertion impairs sigma factor activity. Selected linker insertion mutants will be discussed in the light of known sigma factor properties and in relation to a modeled structure of an RpoH fragment containing region 2. PMID:12700252

  14. Structure-function studies of Escherichia coli RpoH (sigma32) by in vitro linker insertion mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Narberhaus, Franz; Balsiger, Sylvia

    2003-05-01

    The sigma factor RpoH (sigma(32)) is the key regulator of the heat shock response in Escherichia coli. Many structural and functional properties of the sigma factor are poorly understood. To gain further insight into RpoH regions that are either important or dispensable for its cellular activity, we generated a collection of tetrapeptide insertion variants by a recently established in vitro linker insertion mutagenesis technique. Thirty-one distinct insertions were obtained, and their sigma factor activity was analyzed by using a groE-lacZ reporter fusion in an rpoH-negative background. Our study provides a map of permissive sites which tolerate linker insertions and of functionally important regions at which a linker insertion impairs sigma factor activity. Selected linker insertion mutants will be discussed in the light of known sigma factor properties and in relation to a modeled structure of an RpoH fragment containing region 2.

  15. Insertional mutagenesis combined with acquired somatic mutations causes leukemogenesis following gene therapy of SCID-X1 patients

    PubMed Central

    Howe, Steven J.; Mansour, Marc R.; Schwarzwaelder, Kerstin; Bartholomae, Cynthia; Hubank, Michael; Kempski, Helena; Brugman, Martijn H.; Pike-Overzet, Karin; Chatters, Stephen J.; de Ridder, Dick; Gilmour, Kimberly C.; Adams, Stuart; Thornhill, Susannah I.; Parsley, Kathryn L.; Staal, Frank J.T.; Gale, Rosemary E.; Linch, David C.; Bayford, Jinhua; Brown, Lucie; Quaye, Michelle; Kinnon, Christine; Ancliff, Philip; Webb, David K.; Schmidt, Manfred; von Kalle, Christof; Gaspar, H. Bobby; Thrasher, Adrian J.

    2008-01-01

    X-linked SCID (SCID-X1) is amenable to correction by gene therapy using conventional gammaretroviral vectors. Here, we describe the occurrence of clonal T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) promoted by insertional mutagenesis in a completed gene therapy trial of 10 SCID-X1 patients. Integration of the vector in an antisense orientation 35 kb upstream of the protooncogene LIM domain only 2 (LMO2) caused overexpression of LMO2 in the leukemic clone. However, leukemogenesis was likely precipitated by the acquisition of other genetic abnormalities unrelated to vector insertion, including a gain-of-function mutation in NOTCH1, deletion of the tumor suppressor gene locus cyclin-dependent kinase 2A (CDKN2A), and translocation of the TCR-β region to the STIL-TAL1 locus. These findings highlight a general toxicity of endogenous gammaretroviral enhancer elements and also identify a combinatorial process during leukemic evolution that will be important for risk stratification and for future protocol design. PMID:18688286

  16. Insertional mutagenesis combined with acquired somatic mutations causes leukemogenesis following gene therapy of SCID-X1 patients.

    PubMed

    Howe, Steven J; Mansour, Marc R; Schwarzwaelder, Kerstin; Bartholomae, Cynthia; Hubank, Michael; Kempski, Helena; Brugman, Martijn H; Pike-Overzet, Karin; Chatters, Stephen J; de Ridder, Dick; Gilmour, Kimberly C; Adams, Stuart; Thornhill, Susannah I; Parsley, Kathryn L; Staal, Frank J T; Gale, Rosemary E; Linch, David C; Bayford, Jinhua; Brown, Lucie; Quaye, Michelle; Kinnon, Christine; Ancliff, Philip; Webb, David K; Schmidt, Manfred; von Kalle, Christof; Gaspar, H Bobby; Thrasher, Adrian J

    2008-09-01

    X-linked SCID (SCID-X1) is amenable to correction by gene therapy using conventional gammaretroviral vectors. Here, we describe the occurrence of clonal T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) promoted by insertional mutagenesis in a completed gene therapy trial of 10 SCID-X1 patients. Integration of the vector in an antisense orientation 35 kb upstream of the protooncogene LIM domain only 2 (LMO2) caused overexpression of LMO2 in the leukemic clone. However, leukemogenesis was likely precipitated by the acquisition of other genetic abnormalities unrelated to vector insertion, including a gain-of-function mutation in NOTCH1, deletion of the tumor suppressor gene locus cyclin-dependent kinase 2A (CDKN2A), and translocation of the TCR-beta region to the STIL-TAL1 locus. These findings highlight a general toxicity of endogenous gammaretroviral enhancer elements and also identify a combinatorial process during leukemic evolution that will be important for risk stratification and for future protocol design.

  17. Insertional Mutagenesis and Deep Profiling Reveals Gene Hierarchies and a Myc/p53-Dependent Bottleneck in Lymphomagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Huser, Camille A.; Gilroy, Kathryn L.; de Ridder, Jeroen; Kilbey, Anna; Borland, Gillian; Mackay, Nancy; Jenkins, Alma; Bell, Margaret; Herzyk, Pawel; van der Weyden, Louise; Adams, David J.; Rust, Alistair G.; Cameron, Ewan; Neil, James C.

    2014-01-01

    Retroviral insertional mutagenesis (RIM) is a powerful tool for cancer genomics that was combined in this study with deep sequencing (RIM/DS) to facilitate a comprehensive analysis of lymphoma progression. Transgenic mice expressing two potent collaborating oncogenes in the germ line (CD2-MYC, -Runx2) develop rapid onset tumours that can be accelerated and rendered polyclonal by neonatal Moloney murine leukaemia virus (MoMLV) infection. RIM/DS analysis of 28 polyclonal lymphomas identified 771 common insertion sites (CISs) defining a ‘progression network’ that encompassed a remarkably large fraction of known MoMLV target genes, with further strong indications of oncogenic selection above the background of MoMLV integration preference. Progression driven by RIM was characterised as a Darwinian process of clonal competition engaging proliferation control networks downstream of cytokine and T-cell receptor signalling. Enhancer mode activation accounted for the most efficiently selected CIS target genes, including Ccr7 as the most prominent of a set of chemokine receptors driving paracrine growth stimulation and lymphoma dissemination. Another large target gene subset including candidate tumour suppressors was disrupted by intragenic insertions. A second RIM/DS screen comparing lymphomas of wild-type and parental transgenics showed that CD2-MYC tumours are virtually dependent on activation of Runx family genes in strong preference to other potent Myc collaborating genes (Gfi1, Notch1). Ikzf1 was identified as a novel collaborating gene for Runx2 and illustrated the interface between integration preference and oncogenic selection. Lymphoma target genes for MoMLV can be classified into (a) a small set of master regulators that confer self-renewal; overcoming p53 and other failsafe pathways and (b) a large group of progression genes that control autonomous proliferation in transformed cells. These findings provide insights into retroviral biology, human cancer

  18. Validation-based insertional mutagenesis for identification of Nup214 as a host factor for EV71 replication in RD cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Bei; Zhang, XiaoYu; Zhao, Zhendong

    2013-08-02

    Highlights: •We introduced a new mutagenesis strategy named VBIM to the viral research. •This method can identify either host factors or host restriction factors. •Using VBIM system, we identified Nup214 as a host factor for EV71 replication in RD cells. -- Abstract: Lentiviral validation-based insertional mutagenesis (VBIM) is a sophisticated, forward genetic approach that is used for the investigation of signal transduction in mammalian cells. Using VBIM, we conducted function-based genetic screening for host genes that affect enterovirus 71 (EV71) viral replication. This included host factors that are required for the life cycle of EV71 and host restriction factors that inhibit EV71 replication. Several cell clones, resistant to EV71, were produced using EV71 infection as a selection pressure and the nuclear pore protein 214 (Nup214) was identified as a host factor required for EV71 replication. In SD2-2, the corresponding VBIM lentivirus transformed clone, the expression of endogenous Nup214 was significantly down-regulated by the reverse inserted VBIM promoter. After Cre recombinase-mediated excision of the VBIM promoter, the expression of Nup214 recovered and the clone regained sensitivity to the EV71 infection. Furthermore, over-expression of Nup214 in the cells suggested that Nup214 was promoting EV71 replication. Results of this study indicate that a successful mutagenesis strategy has been established for screening host genes related to viral replication.

  19. Cell-intrinsic and Vector-related Properties Cooperate to Determine the Incidence and Consequences of Insertional Mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Kustikova, Olga S; Schiedlmeier, Bernhard; Brugman, Martijn H; Stahlhut, Maike; Bartels, Stefan; Li, Zhixiong; Baum, Christopher

    2009-01-01

    In gene therapeutic approaches targeting hematopoietic cells, insertional mutagenesis may provoke clonal dominance with potential progress to overt leukemia. To investigate the contribution of cell-intrinsic features and determine the frequency of insertional proto-oncogene activation, we sorted hematopoietic subpopulations before transduction with replication-deficient γ-retroviral vectors and studied the clonal repertoire in transplanted C57BL/6J mice. Progressive clonal dominance only developed in the progeny of populations with intrinsic stem cell potential, where expanding clones with insertional upregulation of proto-oncogenes such as Evi1 were retrieved with a frequency of ~10−4. Longitudinal studies by high-throughput sequencing and locus-specific quantitative PCR showed clones with >50-fold expansion between weeks 5 and 31 after transplantation. In contrast, insertional events in proto-oncogenes did not endow the progeny of multipotent or myeloid-restricted progenitors with the potential for clonal dominance (risk <10−6). Transducing sorted hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) with self-inactivating (SIN) lentiviral vectors in short-term cultures improved chimerism, and although clonal dominance developed, there was no evidence for insertional events in the vicinity of proto-oncogenes as the underlying cause. We conclude that cell-intrinsic properties cooperate with vector-related features to determine the incidence and consequences of insertional mutagenesis. Furthermore, our study offers perspectives for refinement of animal experiments in the assessment of vector-related genotoxicity. PMID:19532134

  20. Identification of pathogenicity-related genes in the vascular wilt fungus Verticillium dahliae by Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated T-DNA insertional mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Maruthachalam, K; Klosterman, S J; Kang, S; Hayes, R J; Subbarao, K V

    2011-11-01

    Verticillium dahliae is the causal agent of vascular wilt in many economically important crops worldwide. Identification of genes that control pathogenicity or virulence may suggest targets for alternative control methods for this fungus. In this study, Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation (ATMT) was applied for insertional mutagenesis of V. dahliae conidia. Southern blot analysis indicated that T-DNAs were inserted randomly into the V. dahliae genome and that 69% of the transformants were the result of single copy T-DNA insertion. DNA sequences flanking T-DNA insertion were isolated through inverse PCR (iPCR), and these sequences were aligned to the genome sequence to identify the genomic position of insertion. V. dahliae mutants of particular interest selected based on culture phenotypes included those that had lost the ability to form microsclerotia and subsequently used for virulence assay. Based on the virulence assay of 181 transformants, we identified several mutant strains of V. dahliae that did not cause symptoms on lettuce plants. Among these mutants, T-DNA was inserted in genes encoding an endoglucanase 1 (VdEg-1), a hydroxyl-methyl glutaryl-CoA synthase (VdHMGS), a major facilitator superfamily 1 (VdMFS1), and a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) mannosyltransferase 3 (VdGPIM3). These results suggest that ATMT can effectively be used to identify genes associated with pathogenicity and other functions in V. dahliae.

  1. First Streptococcus pyogenes signature-tagged mutagenesis screen identifies novel virulence determinants.

    PubMed

    Kizy, Anne E; Neely, Melody N

    2009-05-01

    The virulence of bacterial pathogens is a complex process that requires the dynamic expression of many genes for the pathogens to invade and circumvent host defenses, as well as to proliferate in vivo. In this study, we employed a large-scale screen, signature-tagged mutagenesis (STM), to identify Streptococcus pyogenes virulence genes important for pathogenesis within the host. Approximately 1,200 STM mutants were created and screened using the zebrafish infectious disease model. The transposon insertion site was identified for 29 of the 150 mutants that were considered attenuated for virulence. Previously reported streptococcal virulence genes, such as mga, hasA, amrA, smeZ, and two genes in the sil locus, were identified, confirming the utility of the model for revealing genes important for virulence. Multiple genes not previously implicated in virulence were also identified, including genes encoding putative transporters, hypothetical cytosolic proteins, and macrolide efflux pumps. The STM mutant strains display various levels of attenuation, and multiple separate insertions were identified in either the same gene or the same locus, suggesting that these factors are important for this type of acute, invasive infection. We further examined two such genes, silB and silC of a putative quorum-sensing regulon, and determined that they are significant virulence factors in our model of necrotizing fasciitis. sil locus promoter expression was examined under various in vitro conditions, as well as in zebrafish tissues, and was found to be differentially induced. This study was a unique investigation of S. pyogenes factors required for successful invasive infection.

  2. Low-copy piggyBac transposon mutagenesis in mice identifies genes driving melanoma.

    PubMed

    Ni, Thomas K; Landrette, Sean F; Bjornson, Robert D; Bosenberg, Marcus W; Xu, Tian

    2013-09-17

    Despite considerable efforts to sequence hypermutated cancers such as melanoma, distinguishing cancer-driving genes from thousands of recurrently mutated genes remains a significant challenge. To circumvent the problematic background mutation rates and identify new melanoma driver genes, we carried out a low-copy piggyBac transposon mutagenesis screen in mice. We induced eleven melanomas with mutation burdens that were 100-fold lower relative to human melanomas. Thirty-eight implicated genes, including two known drivers of human melanoma, were classified into three groups based on high, low, or background-level mutation frequencies in human melanomas, and we further explored the functional significance of genes in each group. For two genes overlooked by prevailing discovery methods, we found that loss of membrane associated guanylate kinase, WW and PDZ domain containing 2 and protein tyrosine phosphatase, receptor type, O cooperated with the v-raf murine sarcoma viral oncogene homolog B (BRAF) recurrent V600E mutation to promote cellular transformation. Moreover, for infrequently mutated genes often disregarded by current methods, we discovered recurrent mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase 1 (Map3k1)-activating insertions in our screen, mirroring recurrent MAP3K1 up-regulation in human melanomas. Aberrant expression of Map3k1 enabled growth factor-autonomous proliferation and drove BRAF-independent ERK signaling, thus shedding light on alternative means of activating this prominent signaling pathway in melanoma. In summary, our study contributes several previously undescribed genes involved in melanoma and establishes an important proof-of-principle for the utility of the low-copy transposon mutagenesis approach for identifying cancer-driving genes, especially those masked by hypermutation.

  3. Tryptophan Scanning Mutagenesis Identifies the Molecular Determinants of Distinct Barttin Functions*

    PubMed Central

    Wojciechowski, Daniel; Fischer, Martin; Fahlke, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    CLC-K chloride channels are expressed in the kidney and in the inner ear and require the accessory subunit barttin for proper function and membrane insertion. Barttin exerts multiple functions on CLC-proteins: it modifies protein stability and intracellular trafficking as well as channel activity, ion conduction, and gating. So far, the molecular determinants of these distinct barttin functions have remained elusive. Here we performed serial perturbation mutagenesis to identify the sequence determinants of barttin function. Barttin consists of two transmembrane helices followed by a long intracellular carboxyl terminus, and earlier work demonstrated that the transmembrane core of barttin suffices for most effects on the α-subunit. We individually substituted every amino acid of the predicted transmembrane core (amino acids 9–26 and 35–55) with tryptophan, co-expressed mutant barttin with hClC-Ka or V166E rClC-K1, and characterized CLC-K/barttin channels by patch clamp techniques, biochemistry, and confocal microscopy. The majority of mutations left the chaperone function of barttin, i.e. the effects on endoplasmic reticulum exit and surface membrane insertion, unaffected. In contrast, tryptophan insertion at multiple positions resulted in impaired activity of hClC-Ka/barttin and changes in gating of V166E rClC-K1/barttin. These results demonstrate that mutations in a cluster of hydrophobic residues within transmembrane domain 1 affect barttin-CLC-K interaction and impair gating modification by the accessory subunit. Whereas tight interaction is necessary for functional modification, even impaired association of barttin and CLC-K suffices for normal intracellular trafficking. Our findings allow definition of a likely interaction surface and clarify the mechanisms underlying CLC-K channel modification by barttin. PMID:26063802

  4. Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation: An efficient tool for insertional mutagenesis and targeted gene disruption in Harpophora oryzae.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ning; Chen, Guo-Qing; Ning, Guo-Ao; Shi, Huan-Bin; Zhang, Chu-Long; Lu, Jian-Ping; Mao, Li-Juan; Feng, Xiao-Xiao; Liu, Xiao-Hong; Su, Zhen-Zhu; Lin, Fu-Cheng

    2016-01-01

    The endophytic filamentous fungus Harpophora oryzae is a beneficial endosymbiont isolated from the wild rice. H. oryzae could not only effectively improve growth rate and biomass yield of rice crops, but also induce systemic resistance against the rice blast fungus, Magnaporthe oryzae. In this study, Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation (ATMT) was employed and optimized to modify the H. oryzae genes by either random DNA fragment integration or targeted gene replacement. Our results showed that co-cultivation of H. oryzae conidia with A. tumefaciens in the presence of acetosyringone for 48 h at 22 °C could lead to a relatively highest frequency of transformation, and 200 μM acetosyringone (AS) pre-cultivation of A. tumefaciens is also suggested. ATMT-mediated knockout mutagenesis was accomplished with the gene-deletion cassettes using a yeast homologous recombination method with a yeast-Escherichia-Agrobacterium shuttle vector pKOHo. Using the ATMT-mediated knockout mutagenesis, we successfully deleted three genes of H. oryzae (HoATG5, HoATG7, and HoATG8), and then got the null mutants ΔHoatg5, ΔHoatg7, and ΔHoatg8. These results suggest that ATMT is an efficient tool for gene modification including randomly insertional mutagenesis and gene deletion mutagenesis in H. oryzae. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  5. Characterization of DNA repair deficient strains of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii generated by insertional mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Plecenikova, Andrea; Slaninova, Miroslava; Riha, Karel

    2014-01-01

    While the mechanisms governing DNA damage response and repair are fundamentally conserved, cross-kingdom comparisons indicate that they differ in many aspects due to differences in life-styles and developmental strategies. In photosynthetic organisms these differences have not been fully explored because gene-discovery approaches are mainly based on homology searches with known DDR/DNA repair proteins. Here we performed a forward genetic screen in the green algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii to identify genes deficient in DDR/DNA repair. We isolated five insertional mutants that were sensitive to various genotoxic insults and two of them exhibited altered efficiency of transgene integration. To identify genomic regions disrupted in these mutants, we established a novel adaptor-ligation strategy for the efficient recovery of the insertion flanking sites. Four mutants harbored deletions that involved known DNA repair factors, DNA Pol zeta, DNA Pol theta, SAE2/COM1, and two neighbouring genes encoding ERCC1 and RAD17. Deletion in the last mutant spanned two Chlamydomonas-specific genes with unknown function, demonstrating the utility of this approach for discovering novel factors involved in genome maintenance.

  6. Spontaneous mutagenesis of a plant potyvirus genome after insertion of a foreign gene.

    PubMed Central

    Dolja, V V; Herndon, K L; Pirone, T P; Carrington, J C

    1993-01-01

    The RNA genome of tobacco etch potyvirus (TEV) was engineered to express bacterial beta-glucuronidase (GUS) fused to the virus helper component proteinase (HC-Pro). It was shown previously that prolonged periods (approximately 1 month) of TEV-GUS propagation in plants resulted in the appearance of spontaneous deletion variants. Nine deletion mutants were identified by nucleotide sequence analysis of 40 cDNA clones obtained after polymerase chain reaction amplification. The mutants were missing between 1,741 and 2,074 nucleotides from TEV-GUS, including the sequences coding for most of GUS and the N-terminal region of HC-Pro. This region of HC-Pro contains determinants involved in helper component activity during aphid transmission, as well as a highly conserved series of cysteine residues. The deletion variants were shown to replicate and move systemically without the aid of a helper virus. Infectious viruses harboring the two largest HC-Pro deletions (termed TEV-2del and TEV-7del) were reconstructed by subcloning the corresponding mutated regions into full-length DNA copies of the TEV genome. Characterization of these and additional variants derived by site-directed mutagenesis demonstrated that deletion of sequences coding for the HC-Pro N-terminal domain had a negative effect on accumulation of viral RNA and coat protein. The TEV-2del variant possessed an aphid-nontransmissible phenotype that could be rescued partially by prefeeding of aphids on active HC-Pro from another potyvirus. These data suggest that the N-terminal domain of HC-Pro or its coding sequence enhances virus replication or genome expression but does not provide an activity essential for these processes. The function of this domain, as well as a proposed deletion mechanism involving nonhomologous recombination, is discussed. Images PMID:8371351

  7. Validation-based insertional mutagenesis for identification of Nup214 as a host factor for EV71 replication in RD cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bei; Zhang, Xiaoyu; Zhao, Zhendong

    2013-08-02

    Lentiviral validation-based insertional mutagenesis (VBIM) is a sophisticated, forward genetic approach that is used for the investigation of signal transduction in mammalian cells. Using VBIM, we conducted function-based genetic screening for host genes that affect enterovirus 71 (EV71) viral replication. This included host factors that are required for the life cycle of EV71 and host restriction factors that inhibit EV71 replication. Several cell clones, resistant to EV71, were produced using EV71 infection as a selection pressure and the nuclear pore protein 214 (Nup214) was identified as a host factor required for EV71 replication. In SD2-2, the corresponding VBIM lentivirus transformed clone, the expression of endogenous Nup214 was significantly down-regulated by the reverse inserted VBIM promoter. After Cre recombinase-mediated excision of the VBIM promoter, the expression of Nup214 recovered and the clone regained sensitivity to the EV71 infection. Furthermore, over-expression of Nup214 in the cells suggested that Nup214 was promoting EV71 replication. Results of this study indicate that a successful mutagenesis strategy has been established for screening host genes related to viral replication.

  8. Transposon mutagenesis identifies genes and cellular processes driving epithelial-mesenchymal transition in hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kodama, Takahiro; Newberg, Justin Y.; Kodama, Michiko; Rangel, Roberto; Yoshihara, Kosuke; Tien, Jean C.; Parsons, Pamela H.; Wu, Hao; Finegold, Milton J.; Copeland, Neal G.; Jenkins, Nancy A.

    2016-01-01

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is thought to contribute to metastasis and chemoresistance in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), leading to their poor prognosis. The genes driving EMT in HCC are not yet fully understood, however. Here, we show that mobilization of Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposons in immortalized mouse hepatoblasts induces mesenchymal liver tumors on transplantation to nude mice. These tumors show significant down-regulation of epithelial markers, along with up-regulation of mesenchymal markers and EMT-related transcription factors (EMT-TFs). Sequencing of transposon insertion sites from tumors identified 233 candidate cancer genes (CCGs) that were enriched for genes and cellular processes driving EMT. Subsequent trunk driver analysis identified 23 CCGs that are predicted to function early in tumorigenesis and whose mutation or alteration in patients with HCC is correlated with poor patient survival. Validation of the top trunk drivers identified in the screen, including MET (MET proto-oncogene, receptor tyrosine kinase), GRB2-associated binding protein 1 (GAB1), HECT, UBA, and WWE domain containing 1 (HUWE1), lysine-specific demethylase 6A (KDM6A), and protein-tyrosine phosphatase, nonreceptor-type 12 (PTPN12), showed that deregulation of these genes activates an EMT program in human HCC cells that enhances tumor cell migration. Finally, deregulation of these genes in human HCC was found to confer sorafenib resistance through apoptotic tolerance and reduced proliferation, consistent with recent studies showing that EMT contributes to the chemoresistance of tumor cells. Our unique cell-based transposon mutagenesis screen appears to be an excellent resource for discovering genes involved in EMT in human HCC and potentially for identifying new drug targets. PMID:27247392

  9. Cloning of Flagellar Genes in Chlamydomonas Reinhardtii by DNA Insertional Mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Tam, L. W.; Lefebvre, P. A.

    1993-01-01

    Chlamydomonas is a popular genetic model system for studying many cellular processes. In this report, we describe a new approach to isolate Chlamydomonas genes using the cloned nitrate reductase gene (NIT1) as an insertional mutagen. A linearized plasmid containing the NIT1 gene was introduced into nit1 mutant cells by glass-bead transformation. Of 3000 Nit(+) transformants examined, 74 showed motility defects of a wide range of phenotypes, suggesting that DNA transformation is an effective method for mutagenizing cells. For 13 of 15 such motility mutants backcrossed to nit(-) mutant strains, the motility phenotype cosegregated with the Nit(+) phenotype, indicating that the motility defects of these 13 mutants may be caused by integration of the plasmid. Further genetic analysis indicated that three of these mutants contained alleles of previously identified loci: mbo2 (move backward only), pf13 (paralyzed flagella) and vfl1 (variable flagellar number). Three other abnormal-flagellar-number mutants did not map to any previously described loci at which mutations produce similar phenotypes. Genomic sequences flanking the integrated plasmid in the mbo2 and vfl1 mutants were isolated and used as probes to obtain wild-type genomic clones, which complemented the motility defects upon transformation into cells. Our results demonstrate the potential of this new approach for cloning genes identified by mutation in Chlamydomonas. PMID:8244002

  10. Insertional Mutagenesis for Genes involved in Otic/Vestibular Development and Function in Xenopus Tropicalis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torrejon, Marcela; Li, Erica; Nguyen, Minh; Winfree, Seth; Wang, Esther; Reinsch, Sigrid; Dalton, Bonnie (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Sensitivity to gravity is essential for spatial orientation. Consequently, the gravity receptor system is one of the phylogenetically oldest sensory systems, and the special adaptations that enhance sensitivity to gravity are highly conserved. The main goal of this project is to use Xenopus (frog) to identify genes expressed during vestibular and auditory development. These studies will lead a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms involved in vestibular and auditory development and function. We are using a gene-trap approach in Xenopus tropicalis with the green fluorescent protein (GFP) gene as the transgene reporter. GFP expression occurs only when the GFP gene is correctly integrated in actively transcribed genes. Using the GFP as a tag we can easily identify and clone the mutated gene. In addition, we can study the function of the mutated gene by analyzing the defects generated by insertion of the GFP transgene. To date we have tissue specific GFP expression in X. tropicalis including expression in ear, neural tube, kidney, muscle, eyes and nose. Our transgenic animals will soon reach maturity so that we can outcross them and analyze their progeny. Our next goal is to isolate RNA from our transgenics and clone the tagged genes using RACE-PCR. Currently we are optimizing the RACE-PCR method using transgenics with crystallin GFP expression.

  11. Insertional Mutagenesis for Genes involved in Otic/Vestibular Development and Function in Xenopus Tropicalis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torrejon, Marcela; Li, Erica; Nguyen, Minh; Winfree, Seth; Wang, Esther; Reinsch, Sigrid; Dalton, Bonnie (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Sensitivity to gravity is essential for spatial orientation. Consequently, the gravity receptor system is one of the phylogenetically oldest sensory systems, and the special adaptations that enhance sensitivity to gravity are highly conserved. The main goal of this project is to use Xenopus (frog) to identify genes expressed during vestibular and auditory development. These studies will lead a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms involved in vestibular and auditory development and function. We are using a gene-trap approach in Xenopus tropicalis with the green fluorescent protein (GFP) gene as the transgene reporter. GFP expression occurs only when the GFP gene is correctly integrated in actively transcribed genes. Using the GFP as a tag we can easily identify and clone the mutated gene. In addition, we can study the function of the mutated gene by analyzing the defects generated by insertion of the GFP transgene. To date we have tissue specific GFP expression in X. tropicalis including expression in ear, neural tube, kidney, muscle, eyes and nose. Our transgenic animals will soon reach maturity so that we can outcross them and analyze their progeny. Our next goal is to isolate RNA from our transgenics and clone the tagged genes using RACE-PCR. Currently we are optimizing the RACE-PCR method using transgenics with crystallin GFP expression.

  12. Neurobehavioral Mutants Identified in an ENU Mutagenesis Project

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, Melloni N.; Dunning, Jonathan P; Wiley, Ronald G; Chesler, Elissa J; Johnson, Dabney K; Goldowitz, Daniel

    2007-01-01

    We report on a behavioral screening test battery that successfully identified several neurobehavioral mutants among a large-scale ENU-mutagenized mouse population. Large numbers of ENU mutagenized mice were screened for abnormalities in central nervous system function based on abnormal performance in a series of behavior tasks. We developed and employed a high-throughput screen of behavioral tasks to detect behavioral outliers. Twelve mutant pedigrees, representing a broad range of behavioral phenotypes, have been identified. Specifically, we have identified two open field mutants (one displaying hyper-locomotion, the other hypo-locomotion), four tail suspension mutants (all displaying increased immobility), one nociception mutant (displaying abnormal responsiveness to thermal pain), two prepulse inhibition mutants (displaying poor inhibition of the startle response), one anxiety-related mutant (displaying decreased anxiety in the light/dark test), and one learning and memory mutant (displaying reduced response to the conditioned stimulus) These findings highlight the utility of a set of behavioral tasks used in a high throughput screen to identify neurobehavioral mutants. Further analysis (i.e., behavioral and genetic mapping studies) of mutants is in progress with the ultimate goal of identification of novel genes and mouse models relevant to human disorders as well as the identification of novel therapeutic targets.

  13. Gene-scrambling mutagenesis: generation and analysis of insertional mutations in the alginate regulatory region of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed Central

    Mohr, C D; Deretic, V

    1990-01-01

    A novel method for random mutagenesis of targeted chromosomal regions in Pseudomona aeruginosa was developed. This method can be used with a cloned DNA fragment of indefinite size that contains a putative gene of interest. Cloned DNA is digested to produce small fragments that are then randomly reassembled into long DNA inserts by using cosmid vectors and lambda packaging reaction. This DNA is then transferred into P. aeruginosa and forced into the chromosome via homologous recombination, producing in a single step a random set of insertional mutants along a desired region of the chromosome. Application of this method to extend the analysis of the alginate regulatory region, using a cloned 6.2-kb fragment with the algR gene and the previously uncharacterized flanking regions, produced several insertional mutations. One mutation was obtained in algR, a known transcriptional regulatory of mucoidy in P. aeruginosa. The null mutation of algR was generated in a mucoid derivative of the standard genetic strain PAO responsive to different environmental factors. This mutation was used to demonstrate that the algR gene product was not essential for the regulation of its promoters. Additional insertions were obtained in regions downstream and upstream of algR. A mutation that did not affect mucoidy was generated in a gene located 1 kb upstream of algR. This gene was transcribed in the direction opposite that of algR transcription and encoded a polypeptide of 47 kDa. Partial nucleotide sequence analysis revealed strong homology of its predicted gene product with the human and yeast argininosuccinate lyases. An insertion downstream of algR produced a strain showing reduced induction of mucoidy in response to growth on nitrate as the nitrogen source. Images PMID:2121708

  14. Deletion mutagenesis identifies a haploinsufficient role for gamma-zein in opaque-2 endosperm modification

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Quality Protein Maize (QPM) is a hard kernel variant of the high-lysine mutant, opaque-2. Using gamma irradiation, we created opaque QPM variants to identify opaque-2 modifier genes and to investigate deletion mutagenesis combined with Illumina sequencing as a maize functional genomics tool. A K0326...

  15. Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation as an efficient tool for insertional mutagenesis of Cercospora zeae-maydis.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yuanyuan; Xiao, Shuqin; Wang, Fen; Sun, Jiaying; Zhao, Likun; Yan, Libin; Xue, Chunsheng

    2017-02-01

    An efficient Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation (ATMT) approach was developed for the plant pathogenic fungus, Cercospora zeae-maydis, which is the causative agent of gray leaf spot in maize. The transformation was evaluated with five parameters to test the efficiencies of transformation. Results showed that spore germination time, co-cultivation temperature and time were the significant influencing factors in all parameters. Randomly selected transformants were confirmed and the transformants were found to be mitotically stable, with single-copy T-DNA integration in the genome. T-DNA flanking sequences were cloned by thermal asymmetric interlaced PCR. Thus, the ATMT approach is an efficient tool for insertional mutagenesis of C. zeae-maydis.

  16. Novel strategies for gene trapping and insertional mutagenesis mediated by Sleeping Beauty transposon.

    PubMed

    Song, Guili; Cui, Zongbin

    2013-09-01

    Gene and poly(A) trappings are high-throughput approaches to capture and interrupt the expression of endogenous genes within a target genome. Although a number of trapping vectors have been developed for investigation of gene functions in cells and vertebrate models, there is still room for the improvement of their efficiency and sensitivity. Recently, two novel trapping vectors mediated by Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon have been generated by the combination of three functional cassettes that are required for finding endogenous genes, disrupting the expression of trapped genes, and inducing the excision of integrated traps from their original insertion sites and then inserting into another gene. In addition, several other strategies are utilized to improve the activities of two trapping vectors. First, activities of all components were examined in vitro before the generation of two vectors. Second, the inducible promoter from the tilapia Hsp70 gene was used to drive the expression of SB gene, which can mediate the excision of integrated transposons upon induction at 37 °C. Third, the Cre/LoxP system was introduced to delete the SB expression cassette for stabilization of gene interruption and bio-safety. Fourth, three stop codons in different reading frames were introduced downstream of a strong splice acceptor (SA) in the gene trapping vector to effectively terminate the translation of trapped endogenous genes. Fifth, the strong splicing donor (SD) and AU-rich RNA-destabilizing element exhibited no obvious insertion bias and markedly reduced SD read-through events, and the combination of an enhanced SA, a poly(A) signal and a transcript terminator in the poly(A) trapping vector efficiently disrupted the transcription of trapped genes. Thus, these two trapping vectors are alternative and effective tools for large-scale identification and disruption of endogenous genes in vertebrate cells and animals.

  17. Isolation of acetate auxotrophs of the methane-producing archaeon Methanococcus maripaludis by random insertional mutagenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Kim, W; Whitman, W B

    1999-01-01

    To learn more about autotrophic growth of methanococci, we isolated nine conditional mutants of Methanococcus maripaludis after transformation of the wild type with a random library in pMEB.2, a suicide plasmid bearing the puromycin-resistance cassette pac. These mutants grew poorly in mineral medium and required acetate or complex organic supplements such as yeast extract for normal growth. One mutant, JJ104, was a leaky acetate auxotroph. A plasmid, pWDK104, was recovered from this mutant by electroporation of a plasmid preparation into Escherichia coli. Transformation of wild-type M. maripaludis with pWDK104 produced JJ104-1, a mutant with the same phenotype as JJ104, thus establishing that insertion of pWDK104 into the genome was responsible for the phenotype. pWDK104 contained portions of the methanococcal genes encoding an ABC transporter closely related to MJ1367-MJ1368 of M. jannaschii. Because high levels of molybdate, tungstate, and selenite restored growth to wild-type levels, this transporter may be specific for these oxyanions. A second acetate auxotroph, JJ117, had an absolute growth requirement for either acetate or cobalamin, and wild-type growth was observed only in the presence of both. Cobinamide, 5', 6'-dimethylbenzimidazole, and 2-aminopropanol did not replace cobalamin. This phenotype was correlated with tandem insertions in the genome but not single insertions and appeared to have resulted from an indirect effect on cobamide metabolism. Plasmids rescued from other mutants contained portions of ORFs denoted in M. jannaschii as endoglucanase (MJ0555), transketolase (MJ0681), thiamine biosynthetic protein thiI (MJ0931), and several hypothetical proteins (MJ1031, MJ0835, and MJ0835.1). PMID:10430573

  18. Analysis of the adenovirus type 5 terminal protein precursor and DNA polymerase by linker insertion mutagenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Roovers, D J; van der Lee, F M; van der Wees, J; Sussenbach, J S

    1993-01-01

    A series of adenovirus type 5 precursor terminal protein (pTP) and DNA polymerase (Ad pol) genes with linker insertion mutations were separately introduced into the vaccinia virus genome under the control of a late vaccinia virus promoter. The recombinant viruses were used for overexpression of the mutant genes in HeLa cells. In total, 22 different mutant pTP and 10 different Ad pol vaccinia virus recombinants were constructed, including some that expressed carboxyl-terminus-truncated forms of both proteins and one that produced the mutant H5ts149 Ad pol. To investigate the structure-function relationships of both proteins, extracts from cells infected with the recombinant viruses were tested for in vitro complementation of the initiation and elongation steps in adenovirus DNA replication. The results were in accordance with those of earlier in vivo experiments with these insertion mutants and indicate that multiple regions of both proteins are essential for adenovirus DNA replication. The carboxyl termini of both pTP and Ad pol were shown to be essential for proper functioning of these proteins during initiation of adenovirus DNA replication. Three different DNA replication-negative pTP mutants were shown to have residual activity in the initiation assay, suggesting not only that pTP is required for initiation but also that it may play a role in DNA replication after the deoxycytidylation step. Images PMID:8416372

  19. Transposon mutagenesis identifies genes that cooperate with mutant Pten in breast cancer progression.

    PubMed

    Rangel, Roberto; Lee, Song-Choon; Hon-Kim Ban, Kenneth; Guzman-Rojas, Liliana; Mann, Michael B; Newberg, Justin Y; Kodama, Takahiro; McNoe, Leslie A; Selvanesan, Luxmanan; Ward, Jerrold M; Rust, Alistair G; Chin, Kuan-Yew; Black, Michael A; Jenkins, Nancy A; Copeland, Neal G

    2016-11-29

    Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) has the worst prognosis of any breast cancer subtype. To better understand the genetic forces driving TNBC, we performed a transposon mutagenesis screen in a phosphatase and tensin homolog (Pten) mutant mice and identified 12 candidate trunk drivers and a much larger number of progression genes. Validation studies identified eight TNBC tumor suppressor genes, including the GATA-like transcriptional repressor TRPS1 Down-regulation of TRPS1 in TNBC cells promoted epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) by deregulating multiple EMT pathway genes, in addition to increasing the expression of SERPINE1 and SERPINB2 and the subsequent migration, invasion, and metastasis of tumor cells. Transposon mutagenesis has thus provided a better understanding of the genetic forces driving TNBC and discovered genes with potential clinical importance in TNBC.

  20. Transposon mutagenesis identifies genes that cooperate with mutant Pten in breast cancer progression

    PubMed Central

    Rangel, Roberto; Lee, Song-Choon; Hon-Kim Ban, Kenneth; Guzman-Rojas, Liliana; Mann, Michael B.; Newberg, Justin Y.; McNoe, Leslie A.; Selvanesan, Luxmanan; Ward, Jerrold M.; Rust, Alistair G.; Chin, Kuan-Yew; Black, Michael A.; Jenkins, Nancy A.; Copeland, Neal G.

    2016-01-01

    Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) has the worst prognosis of any breast cancer subtype. To better understand the genetic forces driving TNBC, we performed a transposon mutagenesis screen in a phosphatase and tensin homolog (Pten) mutant mice and identified 12 candidate trunk drivers and a much larger number of progression genes. Validation studies identified eight TNBC tumor suppressor genes, including the GATA-like transcriptional repressor TRPS1. Down-regulation of TRPS1 in TNBC cells promoted epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) by deregulating multiple EMT pathway genes, in addition to increasing the expression of SERPINE1 and SERPINB2 and the subsequent migration, invasion, and metastasis of tumor cells. Transposon mutagenesis has thus provided a better understanding of the genetic forces driving TNBC and discovered genes with potential clinical importance in TNBC. PMID:27849608

  1. Chemical and UV Mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Bose, Jeffrey L

    2016-01-01

    The ability to create mutations is an important step towards understanding bacterial physiology and virulence. While targeted approaches are invaluable, the ability to produce genome-wide random mutations can lead to crucial discoveries. Transposon mutagenesis is a useful approach, but many interesting mutations can be missed by these insertions that interrupt coding and noncoding sequences due to the integration of an entire transposon. Chemical mutagenesis and UV-based random mutagenesis are alternate approaches to isolate mutations of interest with the potential of only single nucleotide changes. Once a standard method, difficulty in identifying mutation sites had decreased the popularity of this technique. However, thanks to the recent emergence of economical whole-genome sequencing, this approach to making mutations can once again become a viable option. Therefore, this chapter provides an overview protocol for random mutagenesis using UV light or DNA-damaging chemicals.

  2. Modification of nitrogen remobilization, grain fill and leaf senescence in maize (Zea mays) by transposon insertional mutagenesis in a protease gene.

    PubMed

    Donnison, Iain S; Gay, Alan P; Thomas, Howard; Edwards, Keith J; Edwards, David; James, Caron L; Thomas, Ann M; Ougham, Helen J

    2007-01-01

    A maize (Zea mays) senescence-associated legumain gene, See2beta, was characterized at the physiological and molecular levels to determine its role in senescence and resource allocation. A reverse-genetics screen of a maize Mutator (Mu) population identified a Mu insertion in See2beta. Maize plants homozygous for the insertion were produced. These See2 mutant and sibling wild-type plants were grown under high or low quantities of nitrogen (N). The early development of both genotypes was similar; however, tassel tip and collar emergence occurred earlier in the mutant. Senescence of the mutant leaves followed a similar pattern to that of wild-type leaves, but at later sampling points mutant plants contained more chlorophyll than wild-type plants and showed a small extension in photosynthetic activity. Total plant weight was higher in the wild-type than in the mutant, and there was a genotype x N interaction. Mutant plants under low N maintained cob weight, in contrast to wild-type plants under the same treatment. It is concluded, on the basis of transposon mutagenesis, that See2beta has an important role in N-use and resource allocation under N-limited conditions, and a minor but significant function in the later stages of senescence.

  3. Genetic transformation of Colletotrichum truncatum associated with anthracnose disease of chili by random insertional mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Auyong, Adelene Shu Mei; Ford, Rebecca; Taylor, Paul William James

    2012-08-01

    An Agrobacterium tumefaciens -mediated transformation (ATMT) system was successfully developed for Colletotrichum truncatum, the causal agent of chili anthracnose. A. tumefaciens carrying a hygromycin phosphotransferase gene (hph) and a green fluorescent protein (gfp) gene was used to transform the conidiospores of two C. truncatum pathotypes F8-3B and BRIP26974. Optimum transformation efficiency was obtained when equal volumes of A. tumefaciens strain AGL1 carrying either pJF1 or pPK2 binary vector was used to transform C. truncatum conidiospores at 10(6) /ml and co-cultivated at 24 °C for three days. Southern blot analysis indicated that 87.5% of the transformants contained randomly inserted, single copies of the T-DNA. Infection and colonisation of chili fruit at the mature red stage with F8-3B-GFP and BRIP26974-GFP confirmed the maintenance of virulence within these transformed pathotypes. In situ studies of infection and colonisation of the susceptible genotype fruit using fluorescent microscopy and transformed isolates of C. truncatum expressing GFP revealed that the pathogen was able to colonise healthy fruit tissue intercellularly in an endophytic manner without producing secondary biotrophic infection structures. The developed transformation system will be used to study the function of pathogenicity genes in C. truncatum using both forward and reverse genetics approaches.

  4. Genes Associated with Desiccation and Osmotic Stress in Listeria monocytogenes as Revealed by Insertional Mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Hingston, Patricia A; Piercey, Marta J; Truelstrup Hansen, Lisbeth

    2015-08-15

    Listeria monocytogenes is a foodborne pathogen whose survival in food processing environments may be associated with its tolerance to desiccation. To probe the molecular mechanisms used by this bacterium to adapt to desiccation stress, a transposon library of 11,700 L. monocytogenes mutants was screened, using a microplate assay, for strains displaying increased or decreased desiccation survival (43% relative humidity, 15°C) in tryptic soy broth (TSB). The desiccation phenotypes of selected mutants were subsequently assessed on food-grade stainless steel (SS) coupons in TSB plus 1% glucose (TSB-glu). Single transposon insertions in mutants exhibiting a change in desiccation survival of >0.5 log CFU/cm(2) relative to that of the wild type were determined by sequencing arbitrary PCR products. Strain morphology, motility, and osmotic stress survival (in TSB-glu plus 20% NaCl) were also analyzed. The initial screen selected 129 desiccation-sensitive (DS) and 61 desiccation-tolerant (DT) mutants, out of which secondary screening on SS confirmed 15 DT and 15 DS mutants. Among the DT mutants, seven immotile and flagellum-less strains contained transposons in genes involved in flagellum biosynthesis (fliP, flhB, flgD, flgL) and motor control (motB, fliM, fliY), while others harbored transposons in genes involved in membrane lipid biosynthesis, energy production, potassium uptake, and virulence. The genes that were interrupted in the 15 DS mutants included those involved in energy production, membrane transport, protein metabolism, lipid biosynthesis, oxidative damage control, and putative virulence. Five DT and 14 DS mutants also demonstrated similar significantly (P < 0.05) different survival relative to that of the wild type when exposed to osmotic stress, demonstrating that some genes likely have similar roles in allowing the organism to survive the two water stresses.

  5. Construction of Nontoxigenic Mutants of Nonproteolytic Clostridium botulinum NCTC 11219 by Insertional Mutagenesis and Gene Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Clauwers, Charlien; Vanoirbeek, Kristof; Delbrassinne, Laurence

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Group II nonproteolytic Clostridium botulinum (gIICb) strains are an important concern for the safety of minimally processed ready-to-eat foods, because they can grow and produce botulinum neurotoxin during refrigerated storage. The principles of control of gIICb by conventional food processing and preservation methods have been well investigated and translated into guidelines for the food industry; in contrast, the effectiveness of emerging processing and preservation techniques has been poorly documented. The reason is that experimental studies with C. botulinum are cumbersome because of biosafety and biosecurity concerns. In the present work, we report the construction of two nontoxigenic derivatives of the type E gIICb strain NCTC 11219. In the first strain, the botulinum toxin gene (bont/E) was insertionally inactivated with a retargeted intron using the ClosTron system. In the second strain, bont/E was exchanged for an erythromycin resistance gene using a new gene replacement strategy that makes use of pyrE as a bidirectional selection marker. Growth under optimal and stressed conditions, sporulation efficiency, and spore heat resistance of the mutants were unaltered, except for small differences in spore heat resistance at 70°C and in growth at 2.3% NaCl. The mutants described in this work provide a safe alternative for basic research as well as for food challenge and process validation studies with gIICb. In addition, this work expands the clostridial genetic toolbox with a new gene replacement method that can be applied to replace any gene in gIICb and other clostridia. IMPORTANCE The nontoxigenic mutants described in this work provide a safe alternative for basic research as well as for food challenge and process validation studies with psychrotrophic Clostridium botulinum. In addition, this work expands the clostridial genetic toolbox with a new gene replacement method that can be applied to replace any gene in clostridia. PMID:26994073

  6. Genes Associated with Desiccation and Osmotic Stress in Listeria monocytogenes as Revealed by Insertional Mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Hingston, Patricia A.; Piercey, Marta J.

    2015-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a foodborne pathogen whose survival in food processing environments may be associated with its tolerance to desiccation. To probe the molecular mechanisms used by this bacterium to adapt to desiccation stress, a transposon library of 11,700 L. monocytogenes mutants was screened, using a microplate assay, for strains displaying increased or decreased desiccation survival (43% relative humidity, 15°C) in tryptic soy broth (TSB). The desiccation phenotypes of selected mutants were subsequently assessed on food-grade stainless steel (SS) coupons in TSB plus 1% glucose (TSB-glu). Single transposon insertions in mutants exhibiting a change in desiccation survival of >0.5 log CFU/cm2 relative to that of the wild type were determined by sequencing arbitrary PCR products. Strain morphology, motility, and osmotic stress survival (in TSB-glu plus 20% NaCl) were also analyzed. The initial screen selected 129 desiccation-sensitive (DS) and 61 desiccation-tolerant (DT) mutants, out of which secondary screening on SS confirmed 15 DT and 15 DS mutants. Among the DT mutants, seven immotile and flagellum-less strains contained transposons in genes involved in flagellum biosynthesis (fliP, flhB, flgD, flgL) and motor control (motB, fliM, fliY), while others harbored transposons in genes involved in membrane lipid biosynthesis, energy production, potassium uptake, and virulence. The genes that were interrupted in the 15 DS mutants included those involved in energy production, membrane transport, protein metabolism, lipid biosynthesis, oxidative damage control, and putative virulence. Five DT and 14 DS mutants also demonstrated similar significantly (P < 0.05) different survival relative to that of the wild type when exposed to osmotic stress, demonstrating that some genes likely have similar roles in allowing the organism to survive the two water stresses. PMID:26025900

  7. Identification of the genes affecting the regulation of riboflavin synthesis in the flavinogenic yeast Pichia guilliermondii using insertion mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Boretsky, Yuriy R.; Pynyaha, Yuriy V.; Boretsky, Volodymyr Y.; Fedorovych, Dariya V.; Fayura, Lyubov R.; Protchenko, Olha; Philpott, Caroline C.; Sibirny, Andriy A.

    2012-01-01

    Pichia guilliermondii is a representative of a group of so-called flavinogenic yeast species that overproduce riboflavin (vitamin B2) in response to iron limitation. Using insertion mutagenesis, we isolated P. guilliermondii mutants overproducing riboflavin. Analysis of nucleotide sequence of recombination sites revealed that insertion cassettes integrated into the genome disrupting P. guilliermondii genes similar to the VMA1 gene of Ashbya gossypii and Saccharomyces cerevisiae and FES1 and FRA1 genes of S. cerevisiae. The constructed P. guilliermondii Δvma1–17 mutant possessed five- to sevenfold elevated riboflavin production and twofold decreased iron cell content as compared with the parental strain. Pichia guilliermondii Δfra1–45 mutant accumulated 1.8–2.2-fold more iron in the cells and produced five- to sevenfold more riboflavin as compared with the parental strain. Both Δvma1–17 and Δfes1–77 knockout strains could not grow at 37 °C in contrast to the wild-type strain and the Δfra1–45 mutant. Increased riboflavin production by the wild-type strain was observed at 37 °C. Although the Δfes1–77 mutant did not overproduce riboflavin, it showed partial complementation when crossed with previously isolated P. guilliermondii riboflavin-overproducing mutant rib80–22. Complementation analysis revealed that Δvma1–17 and Δfra1–45 mutants are distinct from previously reported riboflavin-producing mutants hit1-1, rib80-22 and rib81-31 of this yeast. PMID:21261808

  8. Sleeping Beauty transposon mutagenesis identifies genes that cooperate with mutant Smad4 in gastric cancer development.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Haruna; Rust, Alistair G; Ward, Jerrold M; Yew, Christopher Chin Kuan; Jenkins, Nancy A; Copeland, Neal G

    2016-04-05

    Mutations in SMAD4 predispose to the development of gastrointestinal cancer, which is the third leading cause of cancer-related deaths. To identify genes driving gastric cancer (GC) development, we performed a Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon mutagenesis screen in the stomach of Smad4(+/-) mutant mice. This screen identified 59 candidate GC trunk drivers and a much larger number of candidate GC progression genes. Strikingly, 22 SB-identified trunk drivers are known or candidate cancer genes, whereas four SB-identified trunk drivers, including PTEN, SMAD4, RNF43, and NF1, are known human GC trunk drivers. Similar to human GC, pathway analyses identified WNT, TGF-β, and PI3K-PTEN signaling, ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis, adherens junctions, and RNA degradation in addition to genes involved in chromatin modification and organization as highly deregulated pathways in GC. Comparative oncogenomic filtering of the complete list of SB-identified genes showed that they are highly enriched for genes mutated in human GC and identified many candidate human GC genes. Finally, by comparing our complete list of SB-identified genes against the list of mutated genes identified in five large-scale human GC sequencing studies, we identified LDL receptor-related protein 1B (LRP1B) as a previously unidentified human candidate GC tumor suppressor gene. In LRP1B, 129 mutations were found in 462 human GC samples sequenced, and LRP1B is one of the top 10 most deleted genes identified in a panel of 3,312 human cancers. SB mutagenesis has, thus, helped to catalog the cooperative molecular mechanisms driving SMAD4-induced GC growth and discover genes with potential clinical importance in human GC.

  9. Sleeping Beauty transposon mutagenesis identifies genes that cooperate with mutant Smad4 in gastric cancer development

    PubMed Central

    Takeda, Haruna; Rust, Alistair G.; Ward, Jerrold M.; Yew, Christopher Chin Kuan; Jenkins, Nancy A.; Copeland, Neal G.

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in SMAD4 predispose to the development of gastrointestinal cancer, which is the third leading cause of cancer-related deaths. To identify genes driving gastric cancer (GC) development, we performed a Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon mutagenesis screen in the stomach of Smad4+/− mutant mice. This screen identified 59 candidate GC trunk drivers and a much larger number of candidate GC progression genes. Strikingly, 22 SB-identified trunk drivers are known or candidate cancer genes, whereas four SB-identified trunk drivers, including PTEN, SMAD4, RNF43, and NF1, are known human GC trunk drivers. Similar to human GC, pathway analyses identified WNT, TGF-β, and PI3K-PTEN signaling, ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis, adherens junctions, and RNA degradation in addition to genes involved in chromatin modification and organization as highly deregulated pathways in GC. Comparative oncogenomic filtering of the complete list of SB-identified genes showed that they are highly enriched for genes mutated in human GC and identified many candidate human GC genes. Finally, by comparing our complete list of SB-identified genes against the list of mutated genes identified in five large-scale human GC sequencing studies, we identified LDL receptor-related protein 1B (LRP1B) as a previously unidentified human candidate GC tumor suppressor gene. In LRP1B, 129 mutations were found in 462 human GC samples sequenced, and LRP1B is one of the top 10 most deleted genes identified in a panel of 3,312 human cancers. SB mutagenesis has, thus, helped to catalog the cooperative molecular mechanisms driving SMAD4-induced GC growth and discover genes with potential clinical importance in human GC. PMID:27006499

  10. Transposon mutagenesis identifies genes driving hepatocellular carcinoma in a chronic hepatitis B mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Bard-Chapeau, Emilie A.; Nguyen, Anh-Tuan; Rust, Alistair G.; Sayadi, Ahmed; Lee, Philip; Chua, Belinda Q; New, Lee-Sun; de Jong, Johann; Ward, Jerrold M.; Chin, Christopher KY.; Chew, Valerie; Toh, Han Chong; Abastado, Jean-Pierre; Benoukraf, Touati; Soong, Richie; Bard, Frederic A.; Dupuy, Adam J.; Johnson, Randy L.; Radda, George K.; Chan, Eric CY.; Wessels, Lodewyk FA.; Adams, David J.

    2014-01-01

    The most common risk factor for developing hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is chronic infection with hepatitis B virus (HBV). To better understand the evolutionary forces driving HCC we performed a near saturating transposon mutagenesis screen in a mouse HBV model of HCC. This screen identified 21 candidate early stage drivers, and a bewildering number (2860) of candidate later stage drivers, that were enriched for genes mutated, deregulated, or that function in signaling pathways important for human HCC, with a striking 1199 genes linked to cellular metabolic processes. Our study provides a comprehensive overview of the genetic landscape of HCC. PMID:24316982

  11. A single-copy Sleeping Beauty transposon mutagenesis screen identifies new PTEN-cooperating tumor suppressor genes

    PubMed Central

    de la Rosa, Jorge; Weber, Julia; Friedrich, Mathias Josef; Li, Yilong; Rad, Lena; Ponstingl, Hannes; Liang, Qi; de Quirós, Sandra Bernaldo; Noorani, Imran; Metzakopian, Emmanouil; Strong, Alexander; Li, Meng Amy; Astudillo, Aurora; Fernández-García, María Teresa; Fernández-García, María Soledad; Hoffman, Gary J.; Fuente, Rocío; Vassiliou, George S.; Rad, Roland; López-Otín, Carlos; Bradley, Allan; Cadiñanos, Juan

    2017-01-01

    The overwhelming amount of genetic alterations identified through cancer genome sequencing requires complementary approaches to interpret their significance and interactions. We developed a novel whole-body insertional mutagenesis screen in mice, designed for the discovery of Pten-cooperating tumor suppressors, in which mobilization of a single-copy inactivating Sleeping Beauty transposon is coupled to Pten disruption within the same genome. The analysis of 278 transposition-induced prostate, breast and skin tumors detected tissue-specific and shared datasets of known and candidate cancer genes. We validated ZBTB20, CELF2, PARD3, AKAP13 and WAC, identified by our screens in multiple cancer types, as new tumor suppressors in prostate cancer: we demonstrated their synergy with PTEN for preventing invasion in vitro and confirmed their clinical relevance. Further characterization of Wac in vivo revealed obligate haploinsufficiency for this autophagy-regulating gene in a Pten-deficient context. Our study identifies complex PTEN-cooperating tumor suppressor networks in different cancer types with potential clinical implications. PMID:28319090

  12. A single-copy Sleeping Beauty transposon mutagenesis screen identifies new PTEN-cooperating tumor suppressor genes.

    PubMed

    de la Rosa, Jorge; Weber, Julia; Friedrich, Mathias Josef; Li, Yilong; Rad, Lena; Ponstingl, Hannes; Liang, Qi; de Quirós, Sandra Bernaldo; Noorani, Imran; Metzakopian, Emmanouil; Strong, Alexander; Li, Meng Amy; Astudillo, Aurora; Fernández-García, María Teresa; Fernández-García, María Soledad; Hoffman, Gary J; Fuente, Rocío; Vassiliou, George S; Rad, Roland; López-Otín, Carlos; Bradley, Allan; Cadiñanos, Juan

    2017-03-20

    The overwhelming number of genetic alterations identified through cancer genome sequencing requires complementary approaches to interpret their significance and interactions. Here we developed a novel whole-body insertional mutagenesis screen in mice, which was designed for the discovery of Pten-cooperating tumor suppressors. Toward this aim, we coupled mobilization of a single-copy inactivating Sleeping Beauty transposon to Pten disruption within the same genome. The analysis of 278 transposition-induced prostate, breast and skin tumors detected tissue-specific and shared data sets of known and candidate genes involved in cancer. We validated ZBTB20, CELF2, PARD3, AKAP13 and WAC, which were identified by our screens in multiple cancer types, as new tumor suppressor genes in prostate cancer. We demonstrated their synergy with PTEN in preventing invasion in vitro and confirmed their clinical relevance. Further characterization of Wac in vivo showed obligate haploinsufficiency for this gene (which encodes an autophagy-regulating factor) in a Pten-deficient context. Our study identified complex PTEN-cooperating tumor suppressor networks in different cancer types, with potential clinical implications.

  13. Rational and random mutagenesis of firefly luciferase to identify an efficient emitter of red bioluminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Branchini, Bruce R.; Southworth, Tara L.; Khattak, Neelum F.; Murtiashaw, Martha H.; Fleet, Sarah E.

    2004-06-01

    Firefly luciferase, which emits yellow-green (557 nm) light, and the corresponding cDNA have been used successfully as a bioluminescence reporter of gene expression. One particularly exciting application is in the area of in vivo bioluminescence imaging. Our interest is in developing improved reagents by identifying Photinus pyralis luciferase mutants that efficiently emit red bioluminescence. In this way, the proven advantages of the P. pyralis protein can be combined with the potential advantages of a red-shifted emitter. Using site-directed mutagenesis techniques, we have identified many mutants emitting red bioluminescence. Unfortunately, these enzymes generally have significantly decreased bioluminescence activity. Interestingly, we discovered a mutation, Ile351Ala, that produced a moderate 16 nm red-shift, while maintaining excellent bioluminescence activity. We then undertook a random mutagenesis approach to identify luciferase mutants that emit further red-shifted bioluminescence with minimal loss of activity. Libraries of mutants were created using an error-prone PCR method and the Ile351Ala luciferase mutant as the template DNA. The libraries were screened by in vivo bacterial assays and the promising mutants were purified to enable accurate determination of bioluminescence emission spectra and total bioluminescence activity. We will report the characterization results, including the identification of the randomly altered amino acids, of several mutants that catalyze bioluminescence with emission maxima of approximately 600 nm.

  14. Insertional mutagenesis and development of malignancies induced by integrating gene delivery systems: implications for the design of safer gene-based interventions in patients.

    PubMed

    Romano, Gaetano; Marino, Ignazio R; Pentimalli, Francesca; Adamo, Vincenzo; Giordano, Antonio

    2009-05-01

    Effective gene-based interventions for the treatment of genetic disorders, neurodegenerative diseases and cardiovascular maladies require longterm transgene expression in target cells. Integrating viral vector systems based on the genera of the retroviridae and on adeno-associated virus are suitable tools, as the integration of viral vector genomes into the cellular chromosomal DNA allows for a more stable and long-lasting transgene expression than episomal gene-delivery models. Two nonviral gene-delivery systems with integrating properties have also been developed. These are based on the Sleeping Beauty DNA transposon system and on the Streptomyces bacteriophage integrase phiC31. However, the integration of recombinant vector systems may damage the natural genetic arrangement of the target cell. Such genetic alterations are termed insertional mutagenesis, which might result in malignant cell transformation. Insertional mutagenesis caused leukemia in five patients who participated in clinical trials for the treatment of severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID)-X1; sadly, one of the patients died. Gene therapists had to assess the real risk-versus-benefit ratio for the use of retroviral vectors in patients and devise novel strategies to minimize the occurrence of insertional mutagenesis-related malignancies. In this respect, a particular emphasis was placed on the engineering of enhancer-less self-inactivating retroviridae-based systems.

  15. An ENU mutagenesis screen identifies novel and known genes involved in epigenetic processes in the mouse

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background We have used a sensitized ENU mutagenesis screen to produce mouse lines that carry mutations in genes required for epigenetic regulation. We call these lines Modifiers of murine metastable epialleles (Mommes). Results We report a basic molecular and phenotypic characterization for twenty of the Momme mouse lines, and in each case we also identify the causative mutation. Three of the lines carry a mutation in a novel epigenetic modifier, Rearranged L-myc fusion (Rlf), and one gene, Rap-interacting factor 1 (Rif1), has not previously been reported to be involved in transcriptional regulation in mammals. Many of the other lines are novel alleles of known epigenetic regulators. For two genes, Rlf and Widely-interspaced zinc finger (Wiz), we describe the first mouse mutants. All of the Momme mutants show some degree of homozygous embryonic lethality, emphasizing the importance of epigenetic processes. The penetrance of lethality is incomplete in a number of cases. Similarly, abnormalities in phenotype seen in the heterozygous individuals of some lines occur with incomplete penetrance. Conclusions Recent advances in sequencing enhance the power of sensitized mutagenesis screens to identify the function of previously uncharacterized factors and to discover additional functions for previously characterized proteins. The observation of incomplete penetrance of phenotypes in these inbred mutant mice, at various stages of development, is of interest. Overall, the Momme collection of mouse mutants provides a valuable resource for researchers across many disciplines. PMID:24025402

  16. An ENU mutagenesis screen identifies novel and known genes involved in epigenetic processes in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Daxinger, Lucia; Harten, Sarah K; Oey, Harald; Epp, Trevor; Isbel, Luke; Huang, Edward; Whitelaw, Nadia; Apedaile, Anwyn; Sorolla, Anabel; Yong, Joan; Bharti, Vandhana; Sutton, Joanne; Ashe, Alyson; Pang, Zhenyi; Wallace, Nathan; Gerhardt, Daniel J; Blewitt, Marnie E; Jeddeloh, Jeffrey A; Whitelaw, Emma

    2013-01-01

    We have used a sensitized ENU mutagenesis screen to produce mouse lines that carry mutations in genes required for epigenetic regulation. We call these lines Modifiers of murine metastable epialleles (Mommes). We report a basic molecular and phenotypic characterization for twenty of the Momme mouse lines, and in each case we also identify the causative mutation. Three of the lines carry a mutation in a novel epigenetic modifier, Rearranged L-myc fusion (Rlf), and one gene, Rap-interacting factor 1 (Rif1), has not previously been reported to be involved in transcriptional regulation in mammals. Many of the other lines are novel alleles of known epigenetic regulators. For two genes, Rlf and Widely-interspaced zinc finger (Wiz), we describe the first mouse mutants. All of the Momme mutants show some degree of homozygous embryonic lethality, emphasizing the importance of epigenetic processes. The penetrance of lethality is incomplete in a number of cases. Similarly ,abnormalities in phenotype seen in the heterozygous individuals of some lines occur with incomplete penetrance. Recent advances in sequencing enhance the power of sensitized mutagenesis screens to identify the function of previously uncharacterized factors and to discover additional functions for previously characterized proteins. The observation of incomplete penetrance of phenotypes in these inbred mutant mice, at various stages of development, is of interest. Overall, the Momme collection of mouse mutants provides a valuable resource for researchers across many disciplines.

  17. Transposon mutagenesis identifies genetic drivers of BrafV600E melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Mann, Michael B; Black, Michael A; Jones, Devin J; Ward, Jerrold M; Yew, Christopher Chin Kuan; Newberg, Justin Y; Dupuy, Adam J; Rust, Alistair G; Bosenberg, Marcus W; McMahon, Martin; Print, Cristin G; Copeland, Neal G; Jenkins, Nancy A

    2016-01-01

    Although nearly half of human melanomas harbor oncogenic BRAFV600E mutations, the genetic events that cooperate with these mutations to drive melanogenesis are still largely unknown. Here we show that Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon-mediated mutagenesis drives melanoma progression in BrafV600E mutant mice and identify 1,232 recurrently mutated candidate cancer genes (CCGs) from 70 SB-driven melanomas. CCGs are enriched in Wnt, PI3K, MAPK and netrin signaling pathway components and are more highly connected to one another than predicted by chance, indicating that SB targets cooperative genetic networks in melanoma. Human orthologs of >500 CCGs are enriched for mutations in human melanoma or showed statistically significant clinical associations between RNA abundance and survival of patients with metastatic melanoma. We also functionally validate CEP350 as a new tumor-suppressor gene in human melanoma. SB mutagenesis has thus helped to catalog the cooperative molecular mechanisms driving BRAFV600E melanoma and discover new genes with potential clinical importance in human melanoma. PMID:25848750

  18. Transposon mutagenesis identifies genetic drivers of Braf(V600E) melanoma.

    PubMed

    Mann, Michael B; Black, Michael A; Jones, Devin J; Ward, Jerrold M; Yew, Christopher Chin Kuan; Newberg, Justin Y; Dupuy, Adam J; Rust, Alistair G; Bosenberg, Marcus W; McMahon, Martin; Print, Cristin G; Copeland, Neal G; Jenkins, Nancy A

    2015-05-01

    Although nearly half of human melanomas harbor oncogenic BRAF(V600E) mutations, the genetic events that cooperate with these mutations to drive melanogenesis are still largely unknown. Here we show that Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon-mediated mutagenesis drives melanoma progression in Braf(V600E) mutant mice and identify 1,232 recurrently mutated candidate cancer genes (CCGs) from 70 SB-driven melanomas. CCGs are enriched in Wnt, PI3K, MAPK and netrin signaling pathway components and are more highly connected to one another than predicted by chance, indicating that SB targets cooperative genetic networks in melanoma. Human orthologs of >500 CCGs are enriched for mutations in human melanoma or showed statistically significant clinical associations between RNA abundance and survival of patients with metastatic melanoma. We also functionally validate CEP350 as a new tumor-suppressor gene in human melanoma. SB mutagenesis has thus helped to catalog the cooperative molecular mechanisms driving BRAF(V600E) melanoma and discover new genes with potential clinical importance in human melanoma.

  19. Crizotinib-Resistant Mutants of EML4-ALK Identified Through an Accelerated Mutagenesis Screen

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Sen; Wang, Frank; Keats, Jeffrey; Zhu, Xiaotian; Ning, Yaoyu; Wardwell, Scott D; Moran, Lauren; Mohemmad, Qurish K; Anjum, Rana; Wang, Yihan; Narasimhan, Narayana I; Dalgarno, David; Shakespeare, William C; Miret, Juan J; Clackson, Tim; Rivera, Victor M

    2011-01-01

    Activating gene rearrangements of anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) have been identified as driver mutations in non-small-cell lung cancer, inflammatory myofibroblastic tumors, and other cancers. Crizotinib, a dual MET/ALK inhibitor, has demonstrated promising clinical activity in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer and inflammatory myofibroblastic tumors harboring ALK translocations. Inhibitors of driver kinases often elicit kinase domain mutations that confer resistance, and such mutations have been successfully predicted using in vitro mutagenesis screens. Here, this approach was used to discover an extensive set of ALK mutations that can confer resistance to crizotinib. Mutations at 16 residues were identified, structurally clustered into five regions around the kinase active site, which conferred varying degrees of resistance. The screen successfully predicted the L1196M, C1156Y, and F1174L mutations, recently identified in crizotinib-resistant patients. In separate studies, we demonstrated that crizotinib has relatively modest potency in ALK-positive non-small-cell lung cancer cell lines. A more potent ALK inhibitor, TAE684, maintained substantial activity against mutations that conferred resistance to crizotinib. Our study identifies multiple novel mutations in ALK that may confer clinical resistance to crizotinib, suggests that crizotinib's narrow selectivity window may underlie its susceptibility to such resistance and demonstrates that a more potent ALK inhibitor may be effective at overcoming resistance. PMID:22034911

  20. Final technical report for: Insertional Mutagenesis of Brachypodium distachyon DE-AI02-07ER64452

    SciTech Connect

    John, Vogel P.

    2015-10-29

    Several bioenergy grasses are poised to become a major source of energy in the United States. Despite their increasing importance, we know little about the basic biology underlying the traits that control the utility of grasses as energy crops. Better knowledge of grass biology (e.g. identification of the genes that control cell wall composition, plant architecture, cell size, cell division, reproduction, nutrient uptake, carbon flux, etc.) could be used to design rational strategies for crop improvement and shorten the time required to domesticate these species. The use of an appropriate model system is an efficient way to gain this knowledge. Brachypodium distachyon is a small annual grass with all the attributes needed to be a modern model organism including simple growth requirements, fast generation time, small stature, small genome size and self-fertility. These attributes led to the recommendation in the DOE’s “Breaking the Biological Barriers to Cellulosic Ethanol: A Joint Research Agenda” report to propose developing and using B. distachyon as a model for energy crops to accelerate their domestication. Strategic investments (e.g. genome sequencing) in B. distachyon by the DOE are now bearing fruit and B. distachyon is being used as a model grass by hundreds of laboratories worldwide. Sequence indexed insertional mutants are an extremely powerful tool for both forward and reverse genetics. They allow researchers to order mutants in any gene tagged in the collection by simply emailing a request. The goal of this project was to create a collection of sequence indexed insertional mutants (T-DNA lines) for the model grass Brachypodium distachyon in order to facilitate research by the scientific community. During the course of this grant we created a collection of 23,649 B. distachyon T-DNA lines and identified 26,112 unique insertion sites. The collection can be queried through the project website (http://jgi.doe.gov/our-science

  1. Resistance mechanisms to TP53-MDM2 inhibition identified by in vivo piggyBac transposon mutagenesis screen in an Arf(-/-) mouse model.

    PubMed

    Chapeau, Emilie A; Gembarska, Agnieszka; Durand, Eric Y; Mandon, Emeline; Estadieu, Claire; Romanet, Vincent; Wiesmann, Marion; Tiedt, Ralph; Lehar, Joseph; de Weck, Antoine; Rad, Roland; Barys, Louise; Jeay, Sebastien; Ferretti, Stephane; Kauffmann, Audrey; Sutter, Esther; Grevot, Armelle; Moulin, Pierre; Murakami, Masato; Sellers, William R; Hofmann, Francesco; Jensen, Michael Rugaard

    2017-03-21

    Inhibitors of double minute 2 protein (MDM2)-tumor protein 53 (TP53) interaction are predicted to be effective in tumors in which the TP53 gene is wild type, by preventing TP53 protein degradation. One such setting is represented by the frequent CDKN2A deletion in human cancer that, through inactivation of p14ARF, activates MDM2 protein, which in turn degrades TP53 tumor suppressor. Here we used piggyBac (PB) transposon insertional mutagenesis to anticipate resistance mechanisms occurring during treatment with the MDM2-TP53 inhibitor HDM201. Constitutive PB mutagenesis in Arf(-/-) mice provided a collection of spontaneous tumors with characterized insertional genetic landscapes. Tumors were allografted in large cohorts of mice to assess the pharmacologic effects of HDM201. Sixteen out of 21 allograft models were sensitive to HDM201 but ultimately relapsed under treatment. A comparison of tumors with acquired resistance to HDM201 and untreated tumors identified 87 genes that were differentially and significantly targeted by the PB transposon. Resistant tumors displayed a complex clonality pattern suggesting the emergence of several resistant subclones. Among the most frequent alterations conferring resistance, we observed somatic and insertional loss-of-function mutations in transformation-related protein 53 (Trp53) in 54% of tumors and transposon-mediated gain-of-function alterations in B-cell lymphoma-extra large (Bcl-xL), Mdm4, and two TP53 family members, resulting in expression of the TP53 dominant negative truncations ΔNTrp63 and ΔNTrp73. Enhanced BCL-xL and MDM4 protein expression was confirmed in resistant tumors, as well as in HDM201-resistant patient-derived tumor xenografts. Interestingly, concomitant inhibition of MDM2 and BCL-xL demonstrated significant synergy in p53 wild-type cell lines in vitro. Collectively, our findings identify several potential mechanisms by which TP53 wild-type tumors may escape MDM2-targeted therapy.

  2. Membrane topology of the outer membrane protein OprH from Pseudomonas aeruginosa: PCR-mediated site-directed insertion and deletion mutagenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Rehm, B H; Hancock, R E

    1996-01-01

    The 21-kDa outer membrane protein OprH from Pseudomonas aeruginosa is overexpressed under Mg2+ starvation conditions and when overproduced causes resistance to polymyxin B, gentamicin, and EDTA. By circular dichroism analysis, OprH revealed a calculated beta-sheet structure content of 47.3%. PCR-based site-directed deletion and epitope insertion mutagenesis was used to test a topological model of OprH as an eight-stranded beta-barrel. Three permissive and seven nonpermissive malarial epitope insertion mutants and four permissive and four nonpermissive deletion mutants confirmed the general accuracy of this model. Thus, OprH is the smallest outer membrane protein to date to be confirmed as a beta-stranded protein. PMID:8655519

  3. Transposon mutagenesis of Campylobacter jejuni identifies a bipartite energy taxis system required for motility.

    PubMed

    Hendrixson, D R; Akerley, B J; DiRita, V J

    2001-04-01

    Campylobacter jejuni constitutes the leading cause of bacterial gastroenteritis in the United States and a major cause of diarrhoea worldwide. Little is known about virulence mechanisms in this organism because of the scarcity of suitable genetic tools. We have developed an efficient system of in vitro transposon mutagenesis using a mariner-based transposon and purified mariner transposase. Through in vitro transposition of C. jejuni chromosomal DNA followed by natural transformation of the transposed DNA, large random transposon mutant libraries consisting of approximately 16 000 individual mutants were generated. The first genetic screen of C. jejuni using a transposon-generated mutant library identified 28 mutants defective for flagellar motility, one of the few known virulence determinants of this pathogen. We developed a second genetic system, which allows for the construction of defined chromosomal deletions in C. jejuni, and demonstrated the requirement of sigma28 and sigma54 for motility. In addition, we show that sigma28 is involved in the transcription of flaA and that sigma54 is required for transcription of three other flagellar genes, flaB and flgDE. We also identified two previously uncharacterized genes required for motility encoding proteins that we call CetA and CetB, which mediate energy taxis responses. Through our analysis of the Cet proteins, we propose a unique mechanism for sensing energy levels and mediating energy taxis in C. jejuni.

  4. A sensitized mutagenesis screen identifies Gli3 as a modifier of Sox10 neurocristopathy

    PubMed Central

    Matera, Ivana; Watkins-Chow, Dawn E.; Loftus, Stacie K.; Hou, Ling; Incao, Arturo; Silver, Debra L.; Rivas, Cecelia; Elliott, Eugene C.; Baxter, Laura L.; Pavan, William J.

    2008-01-01

    Haploinsufficiency for the transcription factor SOX10 is associated with the pigmentary deficiencies of Waardenburg syndrome (WS) and is modeled in Sox10 haploinsufficient mice (Sox10LacZ/+). As genetic background affects WS severity in both humans and mice, we established an N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU) mutagenesis screen to identify modifiers that increase the phenotypic severity of Sox10LacZ/+ mice. Analysis of 230 pedigrees identified three modifiers, named modifier of Sox10 neurocristopathies (Mos1, Mos2 and Mos3). Linkage analysis confirmed their locations on mouse chromosomes 13, 4 and 3, respectively, within regions distinct from previously identified WS loci. Positional candidate analysis of Mos1 identified a truncation mutation in a hedgehog(HH)-signaling mediator, GLI-Kruppel family member 3 (Gli3). Complementation tests using a second allele of Gli3 (Gli3Xt-J) confirmed that a null mutation of Gli3 causes the increased hypopigmentation in Sox10LacZ/+;Gli3Mos1/+ double heterozygotes. Early melanoblast markers (Mitf, Sox10, Dct, and Si) are reduced in Gli3Mos1/Mos1 embryos, indicating that loss of GLI3 signaling disrupts melanoblast specification. In contrast, mice expressing only the GLI3 repressor have normal melanoblast specification, indicating that the full-length GLI3 activator is not required for specification of neural crest to the melanocyte lineage. This study demonstrates the feasibility of sensitized screens to identify disease modifier loci and implicates GLI3 and other HH signaling components as modifiers of human neurocristopathies. PMID:18397875

  5. Development of Safer Gene Delivery Systems to Minimize the Risk of Insertional Mutagenesis-Related Malignancies: A Critical Issue for the Field of Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Romano, Gaetano

    2012-01-01

    Integrating gene delivery systems allow for a more stable transgene expression in mammalian cells than the episomal ones. However, the integration of the shuttle vector within the cellular chromosomal DNA is associated with the risk of insertional mutagenesis, which, in turn, may cause malignant cell transformation. The use of a retroviral-derived vector system was responsible for the development of leukemia in five children, who participated in various clinical trials for the treatment of severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID-X1) in France and in the United Kingdom. Unfortunately, the hematological malignancy claimed the life of one patient in 2004, who was enrolled in the French clinical trial. In addition, adeno-associated-viral-(AAV-) mediated gene transfer induced tumors in animal models, whereas the Sleeping Beauty (SB) DNA transposon system was associated with insertional mutagenesis events in cell culture systems. On these grounds, it is necessary to develop safer gene delivery systems for the genetic manipulation of mammalian cells. This paper discusses the latest achievements that have been reported in the field of vector design. PMID:23209944

  6. Sensitized mutagenesis screen in Factor V Leiden mice identifies thrombosis suppressor loci.

    PubMed

    Westrick, Randal J; Tomberg, Kärt; Siebert, Amy E; Zhu, Guojing; Winn, Mary E; Dobies, Sarah L; Manning, Sara L; Brake, Marisa A; Cleuren, Audrey C; Hobbs, Linzi M; Mishack, Lena M; Johnston, Alexander J; Kotnik, Emilee; Siemieniak, David R; Xu, Jishu; Li, Jun Z; Saunders, Thomas L; Ginsburg, David

    2017-09-05

    Factor V Leiden (F5(L) ) is a common genetic risk factor for venous thromboembolism in humans. We conducted a sensitized N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU) mutagenesis screen for dominant thrombosuppressor genes based on perinatal lethal thrombosis in mice homozygous for F5(L) (F5(L/L) ) and haploinsufficient for tissue factor pathway inhibitor (Tfpi(+/-) ). F8 deficiency enhanced the survival of F5(L/L)Tfpi(+/-) mice, demonstrating that F5(L/L)Tfpi(+/-) lethality is genetically suppressible. ENU-mutagenized F5(L/L) males and F5(L/+)Tfpi(+/-) females were crossed to generate 6,729 progeny, with 98 F5(L/L)Tfpi(+/-) offspring surviving until weaning. Sixteen lines, referred to as "modifier of Factor 5 Leiden (MF5L1-16)," exhibited transmission of a putative thrombosuppressor to subsequent generations. Linkage analysis in MF5L6 identified a chromosome 3 locus containing the tissue factor gene (F3). Although no ENU-induced F3 mutation was identified, haploinsufficiency for F3 (F3(+/-) ) suppressed F5(L/L)Tfpi(+/-) lethality. Whole-exome sequencing in MF5L12 identified an Actr2 gene point mutation (p.R258G) as the sole candidate. Inheritance of this variant is associated with suppression of F5(L/L)Tfpi(+/-) lethality (P = 1.7 × 10(-6)), suggesting that Actr2(p.R258G) is thrombosuppressive. CRISPR/Cas9 experiments to generate an independent Actr2 knockin/knockout demonstrated that Actr2 haploinsufficiency is lethal, supporting a hypomorphic or gain-of-function mechanism of action for Actr2(p.R258G) Our findings identify F8 and the Tfpi/F3 axis as key regulators in determining thrombosis balance in the setting of F5(L) and also suggest a role for Actr2 in this process.

  7. Induced mutagenesis of plasmid and chromosomal genes inserted into the plasmid DNA. II. Mutagenic action of chemical factors

    SciTech Connect

    Esipova, V.V.; Vedunova, S.L.; Kriviskii, A.S.

    1986-02-01

    Following the study of the mutagenic action of UV and ..gamma..-radiation on plasmid DNA in vitro, they investigated the induction of mutations under the influence of chemical mutagens on the same DNA of plasmid RSF2124, determining the synthesis of colicine E1 and resistance to ampicillin. The inactivating action of the mutagen was assessed from the yield of transformants resistant to the antibiotic and the mutagenic effect from the loss by colonies of transformants that were capable of releasing colicine into the external medium. In these experiments they mainly used chemical compounds whose mutagenic effect if well known in other systems (transforming and transfecting DNA, microbial viruses). As a result all mutagens tested for their activity were divided into four groups: first group, those exceeding the level of mutagenesis by more than 100-fold above the spontaneous background (hydroxylamine, O-methylhydroxylamine); second group, those exceeding it by a factor of 10 (UV radiation (lambda = 254 nm), W-mutagenesis, ionizing radiation, nitrous acid, mitomycin C); third group, those exceeding it by a factor of <10 (indirect UV mutagenesis, nitrous acid, ..beta..-chloroethyldiethylamine hydrochloride, nitrosoguanidine); fourth group, no mutagenic effect (acridine orange, ethyl methane sulfonate, sodium azide, 0-..beta..-diethylaminoethylhydroxylamine).

  8. Rapid 96-well plates DNA extraction and sequencing procedures to identify genome-wide transposon insertion sites in a difficult to lyse bacterium: Lactobacillus casei.

    PubMed

    Scornec, Hélène; Tichit, Magali; Bouchier, Christiane; Pédron, Thierry; Cavin, Jean-François; Sansonetti, Philippe J; Licandro-Seraut, Hélène

    2014-11-01

    Random transposon mutagenesis followed by adequate screening methods is an unavoidable procedure to characterize genetics of bacterial adaptation to environmental changes. We have recently constructed a mutant library of Lactobacillus casei and we aimed to fully annotate it. However, we have observed that, for L. casei which is a difficult to lyse bacterium, methods used to identify the transposon insertion site in a few mutants (transposon rescue by restriction and recircularization or PCR-based methods) were not transposable for a larger number because they are too time-consuming and sometimes not reliable. Here, we describe a method for large-scale and reliable identification of transposon insertion sites in a L. casei mutant library of 9250 mutants. DNA extraction procedure based on silica membranes in 96-column format was optimized to obtain genomic DNA from a large number of mutants. Then reliable direct genomic sequencing was improved to fit the obtained genomic DNA extracts. Using this procedure, readable and identifiable sequences were obtained for 87% of the L. casei mutants. This method extends the applications of a library of this type, reduces the number of insertions needed to be screened, and allows selection of specific mutants from an arrayed and stored mutant library. This method is applicable to any already existing mutant library (obtained by transposon or insertional mutagenesis) and could be useful for other bacterial species, especially for highly lysis-resistant bacteria species such as lactic acid bacteria. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Identifying pitfalls in chest tube insertion: improving teaching and performance.

    PubMed

    Davis, James S; Garcia, George D; Jouria, Jassin M; Wyckoff, Mary M; Alsafran, Salman; Graygo, Jill M; Withum, Kelly F; Schulman, Carl I

    2013-01-01

    Chest tube thoracostomies are common surgical procedures, but little is known about how practitioners learn the skill. This study evaluates the frequency with which correctly performed tasks are executed by subjects during chest tube thoracostomies. In this prospective study, we developed a mobile-learning module, containing stepwise multimedia guidance on chest tube insertion. Next, we developed and tested a 14-item checklist, modeled after key skills in the module. Participants, defined as "novice" (fewer than 10 chest tubes placed) or "expert" (10 or more placed), were assigned to either the video or control group. A trained clinician used the checklist to rate participants while they inserted a chest tube on a TraumaMan simulator. University of Miami, Miller School of Medicine, a tertiary care academic institution. Current medical students, residents, and the United States Army Forward Surgical Team members rotating through the institution. One hundred twenty-eight subjects entered and finished the study. One hundred twenty-eight subjects enrolled in the study; 86 (67%) were residents or US Army Forward Surgical Team members, 66 (77%) were novices, and 20 (23%) were experts. Novices most frequently connected the tube to suction (91%), adequately dissected the soft tissue (82%), and scrubbed or anesthetized appropriately (80%). They least frequently completed full finger sweeps (33%), avoided the neurovascular bundle (35%), and performed a controlled pleural puncture (39%). Comparing the novice video group with the novice control group, the video group was more likely to correctly perform a finger sweep (42%, p<0.001) and clamp the distal end of the chest tube (42%, p<0.001). Of all the steps, experts least frequently completed full finger sweeps (70%) and avoided the neurovascular bundle (75%). Comparing the expert video group with the expert control group, the video group was more likely to correctly perform finger sweeps, the incision, and clamping the distal

  10. Mutagenesis and behavioral screening for altered circadian activity identifies the mouse mutant, Wheels.

    PubMed

    Pickard, G E; Sollars, P J; Rinchik, E M; Nolan, P M; Bucan, M

    1995-12-24

    The molecular processes underlying the generation of circadian behavior in mammals are virtually unknown. To identify genes that regulate or alter circadian activity rhythms, a mouse mutagenesis program was initiated in conjunction with behavioral screening for alterations in circadian period (tau), a fundamental property of the biological clock. Male mice of the inbred BALB/c strain, treated with the potent mutagen N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea were mated with wild-type hybrids. Wheel-running activity of approximately 300 male progeny was monitored for 6-10 weeks under constant dark (DD) conditions. The tau DD of a single mouse (#187) was longer than the population mean by more than three standard deviations (24.20 vs. 23.32 +/- 0.02 h; mean +/- S.E.M.; n = 277). In addition, mouse #187 exhibited other abnormal phenotypes, including hyperactive bi-directional circling/spinning activity and an abnormal response to light. Heterozygous progeny of the founder mouse, generated from outcrossings with wild-type C57BL/6J mice, displayed lengthened tau DD although approximately 20% of the animals showed no wheel-running activity despite being quite active. Under light:dark conditions, all animals displaying circling behavior that ran in the activity wheels exhibited robust wheel-running activity at lights-ON and these animals also showed enhanced wheel-running activity in constant light conditions. The genetic dissection of the complex behavior associated with this mutation was facilitated by the previously described genetic mapping of the mutant locus causing circling behavior, designated Wheels (Whl), to the subcentromeric portion of mouse chromosome 4. In this report, the same locus is shown to be responsible for the abnormal responses to light and presumably for the altered circadian behavior. Characterization of the gene altered in the novel Whl mutation will contribute to understanding the molecular elements involved in mammalian circadian regulation.

  11. Identifying and calling insertions, deletions, and single-base mutations efficiently from sequence data

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Whole genome sequencing studies can directly identify causative mutations for subsequent use in genomic evaluations, but sequence variant identification is a lengthy and sometimes inaccurate process. The speed and accuracy of identifying small insertions and deletions of sequence, collectively terme...

  12. Transposon activation mutagenesis as a screening tool for identifying resistance to cancer therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The development of resistance to chemotherapies represents a significant barrier to successful cancer treatment. Resistance mechanisms are complex, can involve diverse and often unexpected cellular processes, and can vary with both the underlying genetic lesion and the origin or type of tumor. For these reasons developing experimental strategies that could be used to understand, identify and predict mechanisms of resistance in different malignant cells would be a major advance. Methods Here we describe a gain-of-function forward genetic approach for identifying mechanisms of resistance. This approach uses a modified piggyBac transposon to generate libraries of mutagenized cells, each containing transposon insertions that randomly activate nearby gene expression. Genes of interest are identified using next-gen high-throughput sequencing and barcode multiplexing is used to reduce experimental cost. Results Using this approach we successfully identify genes involved in paclitaxel resistance in a variety of cancer cell lines, including the multidrug transporter ABCB1, a previously identified major paclitaxel resistance gene. Analysis of co-occurring transposons integration sites in single cell clone allows for the identification of genes that might act cooperatively to produce drug resistance a level of information not accessible using RNAi or ORF expression screening approaches. Conclusion We have developed a powerful pipeline to systematically discover drug resistance in mammalian cells in vitro. This cost-effective approach can be readily applied to different cell lines, to identify canonical or context specific resistance mechanisms. Its ability to probe complex genetic context and non-coding genomic elements as well as cooperative resistance events makes it a good complement to RNAi or ORF expression based screens. PMID:23442791

  13. Variant-aware saturating mutagenesis using multiple Cas9 nucleases identifies regulatory elements at trait-associated loci.

    PubMed

    Canver, Matthew C; Lessard, Samuel; Pinello, Luca; Wu, Yuxuan; Ilboudo, Yann; Stern, Emily N; Needleman, Austen J; Galactéros, Frédéric; Brugnara, Carlo; Kutlar, Abdullah; McKenzie, Colin; Reid, Marvin; Chen, Diane D; Das, Partha Pratim; A Cole, Mitchel; Zeng, Jing; Kurita, Ryo; Nakamura, Yukio; Yuan, Guo-Cheng; Lettre, Guillaume; Bauer, Daniel E; Orkin, Stuart H

    2017-02-20

    Cas9-mediated, high-throughput, saturating in situ mutagenesis permits fine-mapping of function across genomic segments. Disease- and trait-associated variants identified in genome-wide association studies largely cluster at regulatory loci. Here we demonstrate the use of multiple designer nucleases and variant-aware library design to interrogate trait-associated regulatory DNA at high resolution. We developed a computational tool for the creation of saturating-mutagenesis libraries with single or multiple nucleases with incorporation of variants. We applied this methodology to the HBS1L-MYB intergenic region, which is associated with red-blood-cell traits, including fetal hemoglobin levels. This approach identified putative regulatory elements that control MYB expression. Analysis of genomic copy number highlighted potential false-positive regions, thus emphasizing the importance of off-target analysis in the design of saturating-mutagenesis experiments. Together, these data establish a widely applicable high-throughput and high-resolution methodology to identify minimal functional sequences within large disease- and trait-associated regions.

  14. Identifying novel mycobacterial stress associated genes using a random mutagenesis screen in Mycobacterium smegmatis.

    PubMed

    Viswanathan, Gopinath; Joshi, Shrilaxmi V; Sridhar, Aditi; Dutta, Sayantanee; Raghunand, Tirumalai R

    2015-12-10

    Cell envelope associated components of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb) have been implicated in stress response, immune modulation and in vivo survival of the pathogen. Although many such factors have been identified, there is a large disparity between the number of genes predicted to be involved in functions linked to the envelope and those described in the literature. To identify and characterise novel stress related factors associated with the mycobacterial cell envelope, we isolated colony morphotype mutants of Mycobacterium smegmatis (M. smegmatis), based on the hypothesis that mutants with unusual colony morphology may have defects in the biosynthesis of cell envelope components. On testing their susceptibility to stress conditions relevant to M.tb physiology, multiple mutants were found to be sensitive to Isoniazid, Diamide and H2O2, indicative of altered permeability due to changes in cell envelope composition. Two mutants showed defects in biofilm formation implying possible roles for the target genes in antibiotic tolerance and/or virulence. These assays identified novel stress associated roles for several mycobacterial genes including sahH, tatB and aceE. Complementation analysis of selected mutants with the M. smegmatis genes and their M.tb homologues showed phenotypic restoration, validating their link to the observed phenotypes. A mutant carrying an insertion in fhaA encoding a forkhead associated domain containing protein, showed reduced survival in THP-1 macrophages, providing in vivo validation to this screen. Taken together, these results suggest that the M.tb homologues of a majority of the identified genes may play significant roles in the pathogenesis of tuberculosis.

  15. Use of signature-tagged mutagenesis to identify virulence determinants in Haemophilus ducreyi responsible for ulcer formation.

    PubMed

    Yeung, Angela; Cameron, D William; Desjardins, Marc; Lee, B Craig

    2011-02-01

    Elucidating the molecular mechanisms responsible for chancroid, a genital ulcer disease caused by Haemophilus ducreyi, has been hampered in part by the relative genetic intractability of the organism. A whole genome screen using signature-tagged mutagenesis in the temperature-dependent rabbit model (TDRM) of H. ducreyi infection uncovered 26 mutants with a presumptive attenuated phenotype. Insertions in two previously recognized virulence determinants, hgbA and lspA1, validated this genome scanning technique. Database interrogation allowed assignment of 24 mutants to several functional classes, including transport, metabolism, DNA repair, stress response and gene regulation. The attenuated virulence for a 3 strain with a mutation in hicB was confirmed by individual infection in the TDRM. The results from this preliminary study indicate that this high throughput strategy will further the understanding of the pathogenesis of H. ducreyi infection.

  16. Genetic analysis of lipopolysaccharide core biosynthesis by Escherichia coli K-12: insertion mutagenesis of the rfa locus.

    PubMed Central

    Austin, E A; Graves, J F; Hite, L A; Parker, C T; Schnaitman, C A

    1990-01-01

    Tn10 insertions were selected on the basis of resistance to the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-specific bacteriophage U3. The majority of these were located in a 2-kilobase region within the rfa locus, a gene cluster of about 18 kb that contains genes for LPS core biosynthesis. The rfa::Tn10 insertions all exhibited a deep rough phenotype that included hypersensitivity to hydrophobic antibiotics, a reduction in major outer membrane proteins, and production of truncated LPS. These mutations were complemented by a Clarke-Carbon plasmid known to complement rfa mutations of Salmonella typhimurium, and analysis of the insert from this plasmid showed that it contained genes for at least six polypeptides which appear to be arranged in the form of a complex operon. Defects in two of these genes were specifically implicated as the cause of the deep rough phenotype. One of these appeared to be rfaG, which encodes a function required for attachment of the first glucose residue to the heptose region of the core. The other gene did not appear to be directly involved in determination of the sugar composition of the core. We speculate that the product of this gene is involved in the attachment of phosphate or phosphorylethanolamine to the core and that it is the lack of one of these substituents which results in the deep rough phenotype. Images PMID:2168379

  17. Illegitimate integration of non-replicative vectors in the genome of Rhodococcus fascians upon electrotransformation as an insertional mutagenesis system.

    PubMed

    Desomer, J; Crespi, M; Van Montagu, M

    1991-09-01

    Electrotransformation of Rhodococcus fascians by non-replicating plasmids containing a suitable resistance marker resulted in stable transformants by integration of these constructs at various sites in the genome, thereby generating different mutations. Tagged genes could be isolated in Escherichia coli owing to the presence of a CoIE1 replicon and an ampicillin resistance gene in the inserted sequences. Southern analysis and nucleotide sequencing revealed that recombination can occur at defined locations in the plasmid, while no site preference for target sequences could be detected. Low homology between the recombining sequences indicates illegitimate recombination. The specificity of the plasmid sites could be explained by assuming a linear recombination intermediate, generated by cleavage of the transformed plasmid.

  18. Large-scale insertional mutagenesis of Chlamydomonas supports phylogenomic functional prediction of photosynthetic genes and analysis of classical acetate-requiring mutants.

    PubMed

    Dent, Rachel M; Sharifi, Marina N; Malnoë, Alizée; Haglund, Cat; Calderon, Robert H; Wakao, Setsuko; Niyogi, Krishna K

    2015-04-01

    Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is a unicellular green alga that is a key model organism in the study of photosynthesis and oxidative stress. Here we describe the large-scale generation of a population of insertional mutants that have been screened for phenotypes related to photosynthesis and the isolation of 459 flanking sequence tags from 439 mutants. Recent phylogenomic analysis has identified a core set of genes, named GreenCut2, that are conserved in green algae and plants. Many of these genes are likely to be central to the process of photosynthesis, and they are over-represented by sixfold among the screened insertional mutants, with insertion events isolated in or adjacent to 68 of 597 GreenCut2 genes. This enrichment thus provides experimental support for functional assignments based on previous bioinformatic analysis. To illustrate one of the uses of the population, a candidate gene approach based on genome position of the flanking sequence of the insertional mutant CAL027_01_20 was used to identify the molecular basis of the classical C. reinhardtii mutation ac17. These mutations were shown to affect the gene PDH2, which encodes a subunit of the plastid pyruvate dehydrogenase complex. The mutants and associated flanking sequence data described here are publicly available to the research community, and they represent one of the largest phenotyped collections of algal insertional mutants to date.

  19. High-Resolution Functional Mapping of the Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis Virus Genome by Insertional Mutagenesis and Massively Parallel Sequencing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-10-14

    functions of Alphavirus non- structural proteins has been elucidated through molecular and classical genetics studies of two prototypical alphaviruses ...sensitive mutants have been used extensively to elucidate replication and virulence properties of alphaviruses . To demonstrate the utility of our functional... Alphavirus replication , and has helped to identify the activities and interactions of many viral proteins [10,21,37,38,39,40,41,42, 43,44]. We

  20. Latheo, a New Gene Involved in Associative Learning and Memory in Drosophila Melanogaster, Identified from P Element Mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Boynton, S.; Tully, T.

    1992-01-01

    Genetic dissection of learning and memory in Drosophila has been limited by the existence of ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS)-induced mutations in only a small number of X-linked genes. To remedy this shortcoming, we have begun a P element mutagenesis to screen for autosomal mutations that disrupt associative learning and/or memory. The generation of ``P-tagged'' mutant alleles will expedite molecular cloning of these new genes. Here, we describe a behavior-genetic characterization of latheo(P1), a recessive, hypomorphic mutation of an essential gene. latheo(P1) flies perform poorly in olfactory avoidance conditioning experiments. This performance deficit could not be attributed to abnormal olfactory acuity or shock reactivity-two task-relevant ``peripheral'' behaviors which are used during classical conditioning. Thus, the latheo(P1) mutation appears to affect learning/memory specifically. Consistent with chromosomal in situ localization of the P element insertion, deficiencies of the 49F region of the second chromosome failed to complement the behavioral effect of the latheo(P1) mutation. Further complementation analyses between latheo(P1) and lethal alleles, produced by excision of the latheo(P1) insert or by EMS or γ-rays, in the 49F region mapped the latheo mutation to one vital complementation group. Flies heterozygous for latheo(P1) and one of two EMS lethal alleles or one lethal excision allele also show the behavioral deficits, thereby demonstrating that the behavioral and lethal phenotypes co-map to the same locus. PMID:1321066

  1. Genetic Transformation of Hordeum vulgare ssp. spontaneum for the Development of a Transposon-Based Insertional Mutagenesis System.

    PubMed

    Cardinal, Marie-Josée; Kaur, Rajvinder; Singh, Jaswinder

    2016-10-01

    Domestication and intensive selective breeding of plants has triggered erosion of genetic diversity of important stress-related alleles. Researchers highlight the potential of using wild accessions as a gene source for improvement of cereals such as barley, which has major economic and social importance worldwide. Previously, we have successfully introduced the maize Ac/Ds transposon system for gene identification in cultivated barley. The objective of current research was to investigate the response of Hordeum vulgare ssp. spontaneum wild barley accessions in tissue culture to standardize parameters for introduction of Ac/Ds transposons through genetic transformation. We investigated the response of ten wild barley genotypes for callus induction, regenerative green callus induction and regeneration of fertile plants. The activity of exogenous Ac/Ds elements was observed through a transient assay on immature wild barley embryos/callus whereby transformed embryos/calli were identified by the expression of GUS. Transient Ds expression bombardment experiments were performed on 352 pieces of callus (3-5 mm each) or immature embryos in 4 genotypes of wild barley. The transformation frequency of putative transgenic callus lines based on transient GUS expression ranged between 72 and100 % in wild barley genotypes. This is the first report of a transformation system in H. vulgare ssp. spontaneum.

  2. Ten polymorphic microsatellite loci identified from a small insert genomic library for Peronospora tabacina

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Ten polymorphic microsatellite loci for the oomycete obligate, biotrophic pathogen Peronospora tabacina of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) were identified from a small insert genomic library enriched for GT motifs. Eighty-five percent of the loci were composed of dinucleotide repeats, whereas only 4% ...

  3. Genomic saturation mutagenesis and polygenic analysis identify novel yeast genes affecting ethyl acetate production, a non-selectable polygenic trait

    PubMed Central

    Abt, Tom Den; Souffriau, Ben; Foulquié-Moreno, Maria R.; Duitama, Jorge; Thevelein, Johan M.

    2016-01-01

    Isolation of mutants in populations of microorganisms has been a valuable tool in experimental genetics for decades. The main disadvantage, however, is the inability of isolating mutants in non-selectable polygenic traits. Most traits of organisms, however, are non-selectable and polygenic, including industrially important properties of microorganisms. The advent of powerful technologies for polygenic analysis of complex traits has allowed simultaneous identification of multiple causative mutations among many thousands of irrelevant mutations. We now show that this also applies to haploid strains of which the genome has been loaded with induced mutations so as to affect as many non-selectable, polygenic traits as possible. We have introduced about 900 mutations into single haploid yeast strains using multiple rounds of EMS mutagenesis, while maintaining the mating capacity required for genetic mapping. We screened the strains for defects in flavor production, an important non-selectable, polygenic trait in yeast alcoholic beverage production. A haploid strain with multiple induced mutations showing reduced ethyl acetate production in semi-anaerobic fermentation, was selected and the underlying quantitative trait loci (QTLs) were mapped using pooled-segregant whole-genome sequence analysis after crossing with an unrelated haploid strain. Reciprocal hemizygosity analysis and allele exchange identified PMA1 and CEM1 as causative mutant alleles and TPS1 as a causative genetic background allele. The case of CEM1 revealed that relevant mutations without observable effect in the haploid strain with multiple induced mutations (in this case due to defective mitochondria) can be identified by polygenic analysis as long as the mutations have an effect in part of the segregants (in this case those that regained fully functional mitochondria). Our results show that genomic saturation mutagenesis combined with complex trait polygenic analysis could be used successfully to

  4. Genomic saturation mutagenesis and polygenic analysis identify novel yeast genes affecting ethyl acetate production, a non-selectable polygenic trait.

    PubMed

    Abt, Tom Den; Souffriau, Ben; Foulquié-Moreno, Maria R; Duitama, Jorge; Thevelein, Johan M

    2016-03-18

    Isolation of mutants in populations of microorganisms has been a valuable tool in experimental genetics for decades. The main disadvantage, however, is the inability of isolating mutants in non-selectable polygenic traits. Most traits of organisms, however, are non-selectable and polygenic, including industrially important properties of microorganisms. The advent of powerful technologies for polygenic analysis of complex traits has allowed simultaneous identification of multiple causative mutations among many thousands of irrelevant mutations. We now show that this also applies to haploid strains of which the genome has been loaded with induced mutations so as to affect as many non-selectable, polygenic traits as possible. We have introduced about 900 mutations into single haploid yeast strains using multiple rounds of EMS mutagenesis, while maintaining the mating capacity required for genetic mapping. We screened the strains for defects in flavor production, an important non-selectable, polygenic trait in yeast alcoholic beverage production. A haploid strain with multiple induced mutations showing reduced ethyl acetate production in semi-anaerobic fermentation, was selected and the underlying quantitative trait loci (QTLs) were mapped using pooled-segregant whole-genome sequence analysis after crossing with an unrelated haploid strain. Reciprocal hemizygosity analysis and allele exchange identified PMA1 and CEM1 as causative mutant alleles and TPS1 as a causative genetic background allele. The case of CEM1 revealed that relevant mutations without observable effect in the haploid strain with multiple induced mutations (in this case due to defective mitochondria) can be identified by polygenic analysis as long as the mutations have an effect in part of the segregants (in this case those that regained fully functional mitochondria). Our results show that genomic saturation mutagenesis combined with complex trait polygenic analysis could be used successfully to

  5. Transposon mutagenesis of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis identifies genes that contribute to invasiveness in human and chicken cells and survival in egg albumen.

    PubMed

    Shah, Devendra H; Zhou, Xiaohui; Kim, Hye-Young; Call, Douglas R; Guard, Jean

    2012-12-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis is an important food-borne pathogen, and chickens are a primary reservoir of human infection. While most knowledge about Salmonella pathogenesis is based on research conducted on Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, S. Enteritidis is known to have pathobiology specific to chickens that impacts epidemiology in humans. Therefore, more information is needed about S. Enteritidis pathobiology in comparison to that of S. Typhimurium. We used transposon mutagenesis to identify S. Enteritidis virulence genes by assay of invasiveness in human intestinal epithelial (Caco-2) cells and chicken liver (LMH) cells and survival within chicken (HD-11) macrophages as a surrogate marker for virulence. A total of 4,330 transposon insertion mutants of an invasive G1 Nal(r) strain were screened using Caco-2 cells. This led to the identification of attenuating mutations in a total of 33 different loci, many of which include genes previously known to contribute to enteric infection (e.g., Salmonella pathogenicity island 1 [SPI-1], SPI-4, SPI-5, CS54, fliH, fljB, csgB, spvR, and rfbMN) in S. Enteritidis and other Salmonella serovars. Several genes or genomic islands that have not been reported previously (e.g., SPI-14, ksgA, SEN0034, SEN2278, and SEN3503) or that are absent in S. Typhimurium or in most other Salmonella serovars (e.g., pegD, SEN1152, SEN1393, and SEN1966) were also identified. Most mutants with reduced Caco-2 cell invasiveness also showed significantly reduced invasiveness in chicken liver cells and impaired survival in chicken macrophages and in egg albumen. Consequently, these genes may play an important role during infection of the chicken host and also contribute to successful egg contamination by S. Enteritidis.

  6. Transposon Mutagenesis of Salmonella enterica Serovar Enteritidis Identifies Genes That Contribute to Invasiveness in Human and Chicken Cells and Survival in Egg Albumen

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xiaohui; Kim, Hye-Young; Call, Douglas R.; Guard, Jean

    2012-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis is an important food-borne pathogen, and chickens are a primary reservoir of human infection. While most knowledge about Salmonella pathogenesis is based on research conducted on Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, S. Enteritidis is known to have pathobiology specific to chickens that impacts epidemiology in humans. Therefore, more information is needed about S. Enteritidis pathobiology in comparison to that of S. Typhimurium. We used transposon mutagenesis to identify S. Enteritidis virulence genes by assay of invasiveness in human intestinal epithelial (Caco-2) cells and chicken liver (LMH) cells and survival within chicken (HD-11) macrophages as a surrogate marker for virulence. A total of 4,330 transposon insertion mutants of an invasive G1 Nalr strain were screened using Caco-2 cells. This led to the identification of attenuating mutations in a total of 33 different loci, many of which include genes previously known to contribute to enteric infection (e.g., Salmonella pathogenicity island 1 [SPI-1], SPI-4, SPI-5, CS54, fliH, fljB, csgB, spvR, and rfbMN) in S. Enteritidis and other Salmonella serovars. Several genes or genomic islands that have not been reported previously (e.g., SPI-14, ksgA, SEN0034, SEN2278, and SEN3503) or that are absent in S. Typhimurium or in most other Salmonella serovars (e.g., pegD, SEN1152, SEN1393, and SEN1966) were also identified. Most mutants with reduced Caco-2 cell invasiveness also showed significantly reduced invasiveness in chicken liver cells and impaired survival in chicken macrophages and in egg albumen. Consequently, these genes may play an important role during infection of the chicken host and also contribute to successful egg contamination by S. Enteritidis. PMID:22988017

  7. A phenotype-driven ENU mutagenesis screen identifies novel alleles with functional roles in early mouse craniofacial development.

    PubMed

    Sandell, Lisa L; Iulianella, Angelo; Melton, Kristin R; Lynn, Megan; Walker, Macie; Inman, Kimberly E; Bhatt, Shachi; Leroux-Berger, Margot; Crawford, Michelle; Jones, Natalie C; Dennis, Jennifer F; Trainor, Paul A

    2011-04-01

    Proper craniofacial development begins during gastrulation and requires the coordinated integration of each germ layer tissue (ectoderm, mesoderm, and endoderm) and its derivatives in concert with the precise regulation of cell proliferation, migration, and differentiation. Neural crest cells, which are derived from ectoderm, are a migratory progenitor cell population that generates most of the cartilage, bone, and connective tissue of the head and face. Neural crest cell development is regulated by a combination of intrinsic cell autonomous signals acquired during their formation, balanced with extrinsic signals from tissues with which the neural crest cells interact during their migration and differentiation. Although craniofacial anomalies are typically attributed to defects in neural crest cell development, the cause may be intrinsic or extrinsic. Therefore, we performed a phenotype-driven ENU mutagenesis screen in mice with the aim of identifying novel alleles in an unbiased manner, that are critically required for early craniofacial development. Here we describe 10 new mutant lines, which exhibit phenotypes affecting frontonasal and pharyngeal arch patterning, neural and vascular development as well as sensory organ morphogenesis. Interestingly, our data imply that neural crest cells and endothelial cells may employ similar developmental programs and be interdependent during early embryogenesis, which collectively is critical for normal craniofacial morphogenesis. Furthermore our novel mutants that model human conditions such as exencephaly, craniorachischisis, DiGeorge, and Velocardiofacial sydnromes could be very useful in furthering our understanding of the complexities of specific human diseases. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  8. A Phenotype-Driven ENU Mutagenesis Screen Identifies Novel Alleles With Functional Roles in Early Mouse Craniofacial Development

    PubMed Central

    Sandell, Lisa L.; Iulianella, Angelo; Melton, Kristin R.; Lynn, Megan; Walker, Macie; Inman, Kimberly E.; Bhatt, Shachi; Leroux-Berger, Margot; Crawford, Michelle; Jones, Natalie C.; Dennis, Jennifer F.; Trainor, Paul A.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Proper craniofacial development begins during gastrulation and requires the coordinated integration of each germ layer tissue (ectoderm, mesoderm, and endoderm) and its derivatives in concert with the precise regulation of cell proliferation, migration, and differentiation. Neural crest cells, which are derived from ectoderm, are a migratory progenitor cell population that generates most of the cartilage, bone, and connective tissue of the head and face. Neural crest cell development is regulated by a combination of intrinsic cell autonomous signals acquired during their formation, balanced with extrinsic signals from tissues with which the neural crest cells interact during their migration and differentiation. Although craniofacial anomalies are typically attributed to defects in neural crest cell development, the cause may be intrinsic or extrinsic. Therefore, we performed a phenotype-driven ENU mutagenesis screen in mice with the aim of identifying novel alleles in an unbiased manner, that are critically required for early craniofacial development. Here we describe 10 new mutant lines, which exhibit phenotypes affecting frontonasal and pharyngeal arch patterning, neural and vascular development as well as sensory organ morphogenesis. Interestingly, our data imply that neural crest cells and endothelial cells may employ similar developmental programs and be interdependent during early embryogenesis, which collectively is critical for normal craniofacial morphogenesis. Furthermore our novel mutants that model human conditions such as exencephaly, craniorachischisis, DiGeorge, and Velocardiofacial sydnromes could be very useful in furthering our understanding of the complexities of specific human diseases. PMID:21305688

  9. Transposon mutagenesis with coat color genotyping identifies an essential role for Skor2 in sonic hedgehog signaling and cerebellum development

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Baiping; Harrison, Wilbur; Overbeek, Paul A.; Zheng, Hui

    2011-01-01

    Correct development of the cerebellum requires coordinated sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling from Purkinje to granule cells. How Shh expression is regulated in Purkinje cells is poorly understood. Using a novel tyrosinase minigene-tagged Sleeping Beauty transposon-mediated mutagenesis, which allows for coat color-based genotyping, we created mice in which the Ski/Sno family transcriptional co-repressor 2 (Skor2) gene is deleted. Loss of Skor2 leads to defective Purkinje cell development, a severe reduction of granule cell proliferation and a malformed cerebellum. Skor2 is specifically expressed in Purkinje cells in the brain, where it is required for proper expression of Shh. Skor2 overexpression suppresses BMP signaling in an HDAC-dependent manner and stimulates Shh promoter activity, suggesting that Skor2 represses BMP signaling to activate Shh expression. Our study identifies an essential function for Skor2 as a novel transcriptional regulator in Purkinje cells that acts upstream of Shh during cerebellum development. PMID:21937600

  10. ENU mutagenesis identifies mice with mitochondrial branched-chain aminotransferase deficiency resembling human maple syrup urine disease

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jer-Yuarn; Kao, Hsiao-Jung; Li, Sing-Chung; Stevens, Robert; Hillman, Steven; Millington, David; Chen, Yuan-Tsong

    2004-01-01

    Tandem mass spectrometry was applied to detect derangements in the pathways of amino acid and fatty acid metabolism in N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea–treated (ENU-treated) mice. We identified mice with marked elevation of blood branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs), ketoaciduria, and clinical features resembling human maple syrup urine disease (MSUD), a severe genetic metabolic disorder caused by the deficiency of branched-chain α-keto acid dehydrogenase (BCKD) complex. However, the BCKD genes and enzyme activity were normal. Sequencing of branched-chain aminotransferase genes (Bcat) showed no mutation in the cytoplasmic isoform (Bcat-1) but revealed a homozygous splice site mutation in the mitochondrial isoform (Bcat-2). The mutation caused a deletion of exon 2, a marked decrease in Bcat-2 mRNA, and a deficiency in both BCAT-2 protein and its enzyme activity. Affected mice responded to a BCAA-restricted diet with amelioration of the clinical symptoms and normalization of the amino acid pattern. We conclude that BCAT-2 deficiency in the mouse can cause a disease that mimics human MSUD. These mice provide an important animal model for study of BCAA metabolism and its toxicity. Metabolomics-guided screening, coupled with ENU mutagenesis, is a powerful approach in uncovering novel enzyme deficiencies and recognizing important pathways of genetic metabolic disorders. PMID:14755340

  11. Alanine Scanning Mutagenesis Identifies an Asparagine–Arginine–Lysine Triad Essential to Assembly of the Shell of the Pdu Microcompartment

    SciTech Connect

    Sinha, Sharmistha; Cheng, Shouqiang; Sung, Yea Won; McNamara, Dan E.; Sawaya, Michael R.; Yeates, Todd O.; Bobik, Thomas A.

    2014-06-01

    Bacterial microcompartments (MCPs) are the simplest organelles known. They function to enhance metabolic pathways by confining several related enzymes inside an all-protein envelope called the shell. In this study, we investigated the factors that govern MCP assembly by performing scanning mutagenesis on the surface residues of PduA, a major shell protein of the MCP used for 1,2-propanediol degradation. Biochemical, genetic, and structural analysis of 20 mutants allowed us to determine that PduA K26, N29, and R79 are crucial residues that stabilize the shell of the 1,2-propanediol MCP. In addition, we identify two PduA mutants (K37A and K55A) that impair MCP function most likely by altering the permeability of its protein shell. These are the first studies to examine the phenotypic effects of shell protein structural mutations in an MCP system. The findings reported here may be applicable to engineering protein containers with improved stability for biotechnology applications.

  12. Deletion Mutagenesis Identifies a Haploinsufficient Role for γ-Zein in opaque2 Endosperm Modification1[C][W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Lingling; Dou, Yongchao; Kianian, Shahryar F.; Zhang, Chi; Holding, David R.

    2014-01-01

    Quality Protein Maize (QPM) is a hard kernel variant of the high-lysine mutant opaque2. Using γ-irradiation, we created opaque QPM variants to identify opaque2 modifier genes and to investigate deletion mutagenesis combined with Illumina sequencing as a maize (Zea mays) functional genomics tool. A K0326Y QPM deletion mutant was null for the 27- and 50-kD γ-zeins and abolished vitreous endosperm formation. Illumina exon and RNA sequencing revealed a 1.2-megabase pair deletion encompassing the 27- and 50-kD γ-zein genes on chromosome 7 and a deletion of at least 232 kb on chromosome 9. Protein body number was reduced by over 90%, while protein body size is similar to the wild type. Kernels hemizygous for the γ-zein deletion had intermediate 27- and 50-kD γ-zein levels and were semivitreous, indicating haploinsufficiency of these gene products in opaque2 endosperm modification. The γ-zein deletion further increased lysine in QPM in its homozygous and hemizygous states. This work identifies 27-kD γ-zein as an opaque2 modifier gene within the largest QPM quantitative trait locus and may suggest the 50-kD γ-zein also contributes to this quantitative trait locus. It further demonstrates that genome-wide deletions in nonreference maize lines can be identified through a combination of assembly of Illumina reads against the B73 genome and integration of RNA sequencing data. PMID:24214534

  13. The utility of transposon mutagenesis for cancer studies in the era of genome editing.

    PubMed

    DeNicola, Gina M; Karreth, Florian A; Adams, David J; Wong, Chi C

    2015-10-19

    The use of transposons as insertional mutagens to identify cancer genes in mice has generated a wealth of information over the past decade. Here, we discuss recent major advances in transposon-mediated insertional mutagenesis screens and compare this technology with other screening strategies.

  14. Transposon mutagenesis identified chromosomal and plasmid genes essential for adaptation of the marine bacterium Dinoroseobacter shibae to anaerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Ebert, Matthias; Laaß, Sebastian; Burghartz, Melanie; Petersen, Jörn; Koßmehl, Sebastian; Wöhlbrand, Lars; Rabus, Ralf; Wittmann, Christoph; Tielen, Petra; Jahn, Dieter

    2013-10-01

    Anaerobic growth and survival are integral parts of the life cycle of many marine bacteria. To identify genes essential for the anoxic life of Dinoroseobacter shibae, a transposon library was screened for strains impaired in anaerobic denitrifying growth. Transposon insertions in 35 chromosomal and 18 plasmid genes were detected. The essential contribution of plasmid genes to anaerobic growth was confirmed with plasmid-cured D. shibae strains. A combined transcriptome and proteome approach identified oxygen tension-regulated genes. Transposon insertion sites of a total of 1,527 mutants without an anaerobic growth phenotype were determined to identify anaerobically induced but not essential genes. A surprisingly small overlap of only three genes (napA, phaA, and the Na(+)/Pi antiporter gene Dshi_0543) between anaerobically essential and induced genes was found. Interestingly, transposon mutations in genes involved in dissimilatory and assimilatory nitrate reduction (napA, nasA) and corresponding cofactor biosynthesis (genomic moaB, moeB, and dsbC and plasmid-carried dsbD and ccmH) were found to cause anaerobic growth defects. In contrast, mutation of anaerobically induced genes encoding proteins required for the later denitrification steps (nirS, nirJ, nosD), dimethyl sulfoxide reduction (dmsA1), and fermentation (pdhB1, arcA, aceE, pta, acs) did not result in decreased anaerobic growth under the conditions tested. Additional essential components (ferredoxin, cccA) of the anaerobic electron transfer chain and central metabolism (pdhB) were identified. Another surprise was the importance of sodium gradient-dependent membrane processes and genomic rearrangements via viruses, transposons, and insertion sequence elements for anaerobic growth. These processes and the observed contributions of cell envelope restructuring (lysM, mipA, fadK), C4-dicarboxylate transport (dctM1, dctM3), and protease functions to anaerobic growth require further investigation to unravel the

  15. ENU Mutagenesis Identifies Mice with Morbid Obesity and Severe Hyperinsulinemia Caused by a Novel Mutation in Leptin

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Chih-Ya; Chou, Chuan-Kai; Jheng, Huei-Fen; Chuang, You-Chung; Yang, Chia-Ning; Lin, Ya-Tzu; Hsu, Chih-Wei; Cheng, Irene H.; Chen, Shiow-Yi; Tsai, Shih-Jen; Liou, Ying-Jay; Tsai, Yau-Sheng

    2010-01-01

    Background Obesity is a multifactorial disease that arises from complex interactions between genetic predisposition and environmental factors. Leptin is central to the regulation of energy metabolism and control of body weight in mammals. Methodology/Principal Findings To better recapitulate the complexity of human obesity syndrome, we applied N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU) mutagenesis in combination with a set of metabolic assays in screening mice for obesity. Mapping revealed linkage to the chromosome 6 within a region containing mouse Leptin gene. Sequencing on the candidate genes identified a novel T-to-A mutation in the third exon of Leptin gene, which translates to a V145E amino acid exchange in the leptin propeptide. Homozygous Leptin145E/145E mutant mice exhibited morbid obesity, accompanied by adipose hypertrophy, energy imbalance, and liver steatosis. This was further associated with severe insulin resistance, hyperinsulinemia, dyslipidemia, and hyperleptinemia, characteristics of human obesity syndrome. Hypothalamic leptin actions in inhibition of orexigenic peptides NPY and AgRP and induction of SOCS1 and SOCS3 were attenuated in Leptin145E/145E mice. Administration of exogenous wild-type leptin attenuated hyperphagia and body weight increase in Leptin145E/145E mice. However, mutant V145E leptin coimmunoprecipitated with leptin receptor, suggesting that the V145E mutation does not affect the binding of leptin to its receptor. Molecular modeling predicted that the mutated residue would form hydrogen bond with the adjacent residues, potentially affecting the structure and formation of an active complex with leptin receptor within that region. Conclusions/Significance Thus, our evolutionary, structural, and in vivo metabolic information suggests the residue 145 as of special function significance. The mouse model harboring leptin V145E mutation will provide new information on the current understanding of leptin biology and novel mouse model for the study of

  16. Extensive mutagenesis of a transcriptional activation domain identifies single hydrophobic and acidic amino acids important for activation in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Sainz, M B; Goff, S A; Chandler, V L

    1997-01-01

    C1 is a transcriptional activator of genes encoding biosynthetic enzymes of the maize anthocyanin pigment pathway. C1 has an amino terminus homologous to Myb DNA-binding domains and an acidic carboxyl terminus that is a transcriptional activation domain in maize and yeast cells. To identify amino acids critical for transcriptional activation, an extensive random mutagenesis of the C1 carboxyl terminus was done. The C1 activation domain is remarkably tolerant of amino acid substitutions, as changes at 34 residues had little or no effect on transcriptional activity. These changes include introduction of helix-incompatible amino acids throughout the C1 activation domain and alteration of most single acidic amino acids, suggesting that a previously postulated amphipathic alpha-helix is not required for activation. Substitutions at two positions revealed amino acids important for transcriptional activation. Replacement of leucine 253 with a proline or glutamine resulted in approximately 10% of wild-type transcriptional activation. Leucine 253 is in a region of C1 in which several hydrophobic residues align with residues important for transcriptional activation by the herpes simplex virus VP16 protein. However, changes at all other hydrophobic residues in C1 indicate that none are critical for C1 transcriptional activation. The other important amino acid in C1 is aspartate 262, as a change to valine resulted in only 24% of wild-type transcriptional activation. Comparison of our C1 results with those from VP16 reveal substantial differences in which amino acids are required for transcriptional activation in vivo by these two acidic activation domains. PMID:8972191

  17. Random T-DNA mutagenesis identifies a Cu-Zn-superoxide dismutase gene as a virulence factor of Sclerotinia sclerotiorum

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The Ascomycetous fungus Sclerotinia sclerotiorum is a devastating pathogen capable of infecting more than 400 plant species including many economically important crops. In order to gain a better mechanistic understanding of its non-specific host-pathogen interactions, random mutagenesis through Agro...

  18. Transcriptome Analysis of Neisseria meningitidis in Human Whole Blood and Mutagenesis Studies Identify Virulence Factors Involved in Blood Survival

    PubMed Central

    Del Tordello, Elena; Seib, Kate L.; Francois, Patrice; Rappuoli, Rino; Pizza, Mariagrazia; Serruto, Davide

    2011-01-01

    During infection Neisseria meningitidis (Nm) encounters multiple environments within the host, which makes rapid adaptation a crucial factor for meningococcal survival. Despite the importance of invasion into the bloodstream in the meningococcal disease process, little is known about how Nm adapts to permit survival and growth in blood. To address this, we performed a time-course transcriptome analysis using an ex vivo model of human whole blood infection. We observed that Nm alters the expression of ≈30% of ORFs of the genome and major dynamic changes were observed in the expression of transcriptional regulators, transport and binding proteins, energy metabolism, and surface-exposed virulence factors. In particular, we found that the gene encoding the regulator Fur, as well as all genes encoding iron uptake systems, were significantly up-regulated. Analysis of regulated genes encoding for surface-exposed proteins involved in Nm pathogenesis allowed us to better understand mechanisms used to circumvent host defenses. During blood infection, Nm activates genes encoding for the factor H binding proteins, fHbp and NspA, genes encoding for detoxifying enzymes such as SodC, Kat and AniA, as well as several less characterized surface-exposed proteins that might have a role in blood survival. Through mutagenesis studies of a subset of up-regulated genes we were able to identify new proteins important for survival in human blood and also to identify additional roles of previously known virulence factors in aiding survival in blood. Nm mutant strains lacking the genes encoding the hypothetical protein NMB1483 and the surface-exposed proteins NalP, Mip and NspA, the Fur regulator, the transferrin binding protein TbpB, and the L-lactate permease LctP were sensitive to killing by human blood. This increased knowledge of how Nm responds to adaptation in blood could also be helpful to develop diagnostic and therapeutic strategies to control the devastating disease cause by

  19. eQTL mapping identify insertion and deletion specific eQTLs in multiple tissues

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jinyan; Chen, Jun; Esparza, Jorge; Ding, Jun; Elder, James; Abecasis, Goncalo R; Lee, Young-Ae; Lathrop, G. Mark; Moffatt, Miriam F; Cookson, William O C; Liang, Liming

    2016-01-01

    GenomeC wide gene expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) mapping have been focused on single nucleotide polymorphisms and have helped interpret findings from diseases mapping studies. The functional effect of structure variants, especially short insertions and deletions (indel) has not been well investigated. Here we imputed 1,380,133 indels based on the latest 1000 Genomes Project panel into 3 eQTL datasets from multiple tissues. Imputation of indels increased 9.9% power and identified indel specific eQTLs for 325 genes. We found introns and vicinities of UTRs were more enriched of indel eQTLs and 3.6 (singleC tissue)C 9.2%(multiC tissue) of previous identified eSNPs were taggers of eindels. Functional analyses identified epigenetics marks, gene ontology categories and disease GWAS loci affected by SNPs and indels eQTLs showing tissueC consistent or tissueC specific effects. This study provides new insights into the underlying genetic architecture of gene expression across tissues and new resource to interpret function of diseases and traits associated structure variants. PMID:25951796

  20. Combining modelling and mutagenesis studies of synaptic vesicle protein 2A to identify a series of residues involved in racetam binding.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jiye; Anderson, Dina; Lynch, Berkley A; Castaigne, Jean-Gabriel; Foerch, Patrik; Lebon, Florence

    2011-10-01

    LEV (levetiracetam), an antiepileptic drug which possesses a unique profile in animal models of seizure and epilepsy, has as its unique binding site in brain, SV2A (synaptic vesicle protein 2A). Previous studies have used a chimaeric and site-specific mutagenesis approach to identify three residues in the putative tenth transmembrane helix of SV2A that, when mutated, alter binding of LEV and related racetam derivatives to SV2A. In the present paper, we report a combined modelling and mutagenesis study that successfully identifies another 11 residues in SV2A that appear to be involved in ligand binding. Sequence analysis and modelling of SV2A suggested residues equivalent to critical functional residues of other MFS (major facilitator superfamily) transporters. Alanine scanning of these and other SV2A residues resulted in the identification of residues affecting racetam binding, including Ile273 which differentiated between racetam analogues, when mutated to alanine. Integrating mutagenesis results with docking analysis led to the construction of a mutant in which six SV2A residues were replaced with corresponding SV2B residues. This mutant showed racetam ligand-binding affinity intermediate to the affinities observed for SV2A and SV2B.

  1. Silencing of end-joining repair for efficient site-specific gene insertion after TALEN/CRISPR mutagenesis in Aedes aegypti

    PubMed Central

    Basu, Sanjay; Aryan, Azadeh; Overcash, Justin M.; Samuel, Glady Hazitha; Anderson, Michelle A. E.; Dahlem, Timothy J.; Myles, Kevin M.; Adelman, Zach N.

    2015-01-01

    Conventional control strategies for mosquito-borne pathogens such as malaria and dengue are now being complemented by the development of transgenic mosquito strains reprogrammed to generate beneficial phenotypes such as conditional sterility or pathogen resistance. The widespread success of site-specific nucleases such as transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/Cas9 in model organisms also suggests that reprogrammable gene drive systems based on these nucleases may be capable of spreading such beneficial phenotypes in wild mosquito populations. Using the mosquito Aedes aegypti, we determined that mutations in the FokI domain used in TALENs to generate obligate heterodimeric complexes substantially and significantly reduce gene editing rates. We found that CRISPR/Cas9-based editing in the mosquito Ae. aegypti is also highly variable, with the majority of guide RNAs unable to generate detectable editing. By first evaluating candidate guide RNAs using a transient embryo assay, we were able to rapidly identify highly effective guide RNAs; focusing germ line-based experiments only on this cohort resulted in consistently high editing rates of 24–90%. Microinjection of double-stranded RNAs targeting ku70 or lig4, both essential components of the end-joining response, increased recombination-based repair in early embryos as determined by plasmid-based reporters. RNAi-based suppression of Ku70 concurrent with embryonic microinjection of site-specific nucleases yielded consistent gene insertion frequencies of 2–3%, similar to traditional transposon- or ΦC31-based integration methods but without the requirement for an initial docking step. These studies should greatly accelerate investigations into mosquito biology, streamline development of transgenic strains for field releases, and simplify the evaluation of novel Cas9-based gene drive systems. PMID:25775608

  2. Silencing of end-joining repair for efficient site-specific gene insertion after TALEN/CRISPR mutagenesis in Aedes aegypti.

    PubMed

    Basu, Sanjay; Aryan, Azadeh; Overcash, Justin M; Samuel, Glady Hazitha; Anderson, Michelle A E; Dahlem, Timothy J; Myles, Kevin M; Adelman, Zach N

    2015-03-31

    Conventional control strategies for mosquito-borne pathogens such as malaria and dengue are now being complemented by the development of transgenic mosquito strains reprogrammed to generate beneficial phenotypes such as conditional sterility or pathogen resistance. The widespread success of site-specific nucleases such as transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/Cas9 in model organisms also suggests that reprogrammable gene drive systems based on these nucleases may be capable of spreading such beneficial phenotypes in wild mosquito populations. Using the mosquito Aedes aegypti, we determined that mutations in the FokI domain used in TALENs to generate obligate heterodimeric complexes substantially and significantly reduce gene editing rates. We found that CRISPR/Cas9-based editing in the mosquito Ae. aegypti is also highly variable, with the majority of guide RNAs unable to generate detectable editing. By first evaluating candidate guide RNAs using a transient embryo assay, we were able to rapidly identify highly effective guide RNAs; focusing germ line-based experiments only on this cohort resulted in consistently high editing rates of 24-90%. Microinjection of double-stranded RNAs targeting ku70 or lig4, both essential components of the end-joining response, increased recombination-based repair in early embryos as determined by plasmid-based reporters. RNAi-based suppression of Ku70 concurrent with embryonic microinjection of site-specific nucleases yielded consistent gene insertion frequencies of 2-3%, similar to traditional transposon- or ΦC31-based integration methods but without the requirement for an initial docking step. These studies should greatly accelerate investigations into mosquito biology, streamline development of transgenic strains for field releases, and simplify the evaluation of novel Cas9-based gene drive systems.

  3. Silent Mischief: Bacteriophage Mu Insertions Contaminate Products of Escherichia coli Random Mutagenesis Performed Using Suicidal Transposon Delivery Plasmids Mobilized by Broad-Host-Range RP4 Conjugative Machinery ▿

    PubMed Central

    Ferrières, Lionel; Hémery, Gaëlle; Nham, Toan; Guérout, Anne-Marie; Mazel, Didier; Beloin, Christophe; Ghigo, Jean-Marc

    2010-01-01

    Random transposon mutagenesis is the strategy of choice for associating a phenotype with its unknown genetic determinants. It is generally performed by mobilization of a conditionally replicating vector delivering transposons to recipient cells using broad-host-range RP4 conjugative machinery carried by the donor strain. In the present study, we demonstrate that bacteriophage Mu, which was deliberately introduced during the original construction of the widely used donor strains SM10 λpir and S17-1 λpir, is silently transferred to Escherichia coli recipient cells at high frequency, both by hfr and by release of Mu particles by the donor strain. Our findings suggest that bacteriophage Mu could have contaminated many random-mutagenesis experiments performed on Mu-sensitive species with these popular donor strains, leading to potential misinterpretation of the transposon mutant phenotype and therefore perturbing analysis of mutant screens. To circumvent this problem, we precisely mapped Mu insertions in SM10 λpir and S17-1 λpir and constructed a new Mu-free donor strain, MFDpir, harboring stable hfr-deficient RP4 conjugative functions and sustaining replication of Π-dependent suicide vectors. This strain can therefore be used with most of the available transposon-delivering plasmids and should enable more efficient and easy-to-analyze mutant hunts in E. coli and other Mu-sensitive RP4 host bacteria. PMID:20935093

  4. Multipurpose Transposon-Insertion Libraries in Yeast.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Anuj

    2016-06-01

    Libraries of transposon-insertion alleles constitute powerful and versatile tools for large-scale analysis of yeast gene function. Transposon-insertion libraries are constructed most simply through mutagenesis of a plasmid-based genomic DNA library; modification of the mutagenizing transposon by incorporation of yeast selectable markers, recombination sites, and an epitope tag enables the application of insertion alleles for phenotypic screening and protein localization. In particular, yeast genomic DNA libraries have been mutagenized with modified bacterial transposons carrying the URA3 marker, lox recombination sites, and sequence encoding multiple copies of the hemagglutinin (HA) epitope. Mutagenesis with these transposons has yielded a large resource of insertion alleles affecting nearly 4000 yeast genes in total. Through well-established protocols, these insertion libraries can be introduced into the desired strain backgrounds and the resulting insertional mutants can be screened or systematically analyzed. Relative to alternative methods of UV irradiation or chemical mutagenesis, transposon-insertion alleles can be easily identified by PCR-based approaches or high-throughput sequencing. Transposon-insertion libraries also provide a cost-effective alternative to targeted deletion approaches, although, in contrast to start-codon to stop-codon deletions, insertion alleles might not represent true null-mutants. For protein-localization studies, transposon-insertion alleles can provide encoded epitope tags in-frame with internal codons; in many cases, these transposon-encoded epitope tags can provide a more accurate localization for proteins in which terminal sequences are crucial for intracellular targeting. Thus, overall, transposon-insertion libraries can be used quickly and economically and have a particular utility in screening for desired phenotypes and localization patterns in nonstandard genetic backgrounds. © 2016 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  5. Substitution of Feline Leukemia Virus Long Terminal Repeat Sequences into Murine Leukemia Virus Alters the Pattern of Insertional Activation and Identifies New Common Insertion Sites

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Chassidy; Lobelle-Rich, Patricia A.; Puetter, Adriane; Levy, Laura S.

    2005-01-01

    The recombinant retrovirus, MoFe2-MuLV (MoFe2), was constructed by replacing the U3 region of Moloney murine leukemia virus (M-MuLV) with homologous sequences from the FeLV-945 LTR. NIH/Swiss mice neonatally inoculated with MoFe2 developed T-cell lymphomas of immature thymocyte surface phenotype. MoFe2 integrated infrequently (0 to 9%) near common insertion sites (CISs) previously identified for either parent virus. Using three different strategies, CISs in MoFe2-induced tumors were identified at six loci, none of which had been previously reported as CISs in tumors induced by either parent virus in wild-type animals. Two of the newly identified CISs had not previously been implicated in lymphoma in any retrovirus model. One of these, designated 3-19, encodes the p101 regulatory subunit of phosphoinositide-3-kinase-gamma. The other, designated Rw1, is predicted to encode a protein that functions in the immune response to virus infection. Thus, substitution of FeLV-945 U3 sequences into the M-MuLV long terminal repeat (LTR) did not alter the target tissue for M-MuLV transformation but significantly altered the pattern of CIS utilization in the induction of T-cell lymphoma. These observations support a growing body of evidence that the distinctive sequence and/or structure of the retroviral LTR determines its pattern of insertional activation. The findings also demonstrate the oligoclonal nature of retrovirus-induced lymphomas by demonstrating proviral insertions at CISs in subdominant populations in the tumor mass. Finally, the findings demonstrate the utility of novel recombinant retroviruses such as MoFe2 to contribute new genes potentially relevant to the induction of lymphoid malignancy. PMID:15596801

  6. Use of a novel polydimethylsiloxane well insert to successfully mature, culture and identify single porcine oocytes and embryos.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Ye; Paczkowski, Melissa; Wheeler, Matthew B; Krisher, Rebecca L

    2014-03-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of a novel polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) well-insert system for oocyte in vitro maturation (IVM) and in vitro embryo culture (IVC) in pigs. The PDMS well inserts, consisting of multiple microwells with connecting microchannels, resulted in equivalent blastocyst development compared with standard microdrop culture for IVC. These PDMS well inserts were then evaluated for IVM or IVC in a rocking versus static environment. The rocking environment during both oocyte IVM and embryo culture had detrimental effects on oocyte and embryo development compared with a static environment. Importantly, blastocyst development of oocytes and embryos cultured in the PDMS well inserts in the static environment was equivalent to that of standard microdrops. Further analysis of transcript abundance in blastocysts produced from these different environments revealed that the PDMS well-insert system may produce more viable embryos. In conclusion, this PDMS well-insert system can successfully mature oocytes and culture embryos in an individually-identifiable manner without compromising, and perhaps enhancing, developmental potential.

  7. Development of a high-efficient transformation system of Bacillus pumilus strain DX01 to facilitate gene isolation via gfp-tagged insertional mutagenesis and visualize bacterial colonization of rice roots.

    PubMed

    Shen, Xinqian; Chen, Yunpeng; Liu, Tong; Hu, Xiaolu; Gu, Zhenfang

    2013-09-01

    A Tn5 transposition vector, pMOD-tet-egfp, was constructed and used for the random insertional mutagenesis of Bacillus pumilus. Various parameters were investigated to increase the transformation efficiency B. pumilus DX01 via Tn5 transposition complexes (transposome): bacterial growth phase, type of electroporation buffer, electric field strength, and recovery medium. Transformation efficiency was up to 3 × 10(4) transformants/μg of DNA under the optimized electroporation conditions, and a total of 1,467 gfp-tagged transformants were obtained. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis showed that all gfp-tagged bacterial cells expressed GFP, indicating that foreign DNA has been successfully integrated into the genome of B. pumilus and expressed. Finally, flanking DNA sequences were isolated from several transformants and colonization of rice roots by B. pumilus DX01 was also studied. The method developed here will be useful for creating an insertion mutant library of gram-positive bacteria, thus facilitating their molecular genetic and cytological studies.

  8. Insertional Mutagenesis by CRISPR/Cas9 Ribonucleoprotein Gene Editing in Cells Targeted for Point Mutation Repair Directed by Short Single-Stranded DNA Oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Rivera-Torres, Natalia; Banas, Kelly; Bialk, Pawel; Bloh, Kevin M; Kmiec, Eric B

    2017-01-01

    CRISPR/Cas9 and single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides (ssODNs) have been used to direct the repair of a single base mutation in human genes. Here, we examine a method designed to increase the precision of RNA guided genome editing in human cells by utilizing a CRISPR/Cas9 ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complex to initiate DNA cleavage. The RNP is assembled in vitro and induces a double stranded break at a specific site surrounding the mutant base designated for correction by the ssODN. We use an integrated mutant eGFP gene, bearing a single base change rendering the expressed protein nonfunctional, as a single copy target in HCT 116 cells. We observe significant gene correction activity of the mutant base, promoted by the RNP and single-stranded DNA oligonucleotide with validation through genotypic and phenotypic readout. We demonstrate that all individual components must be present to obtain successful gene editing. Importantly, we examine the genotype of individually sorted corrected and uncorrected clonally expanded cell populations for the mutagenic footprint left by the action of these gene editing tools. While the DNA sequence of the corrected population is exact with no adjacent sequence modification, the uncorrected population exhibits heterogeneous mutagenicity with a wide variety of deletions and insertions surrounding the target site. We designate this type of DNA aberration as on-site mutagenicity. Analyses of two clonal populations bearing specific DNA insertions surrounding the target site, indicate that point mutation repair has occurred at the level of the gene. The phenotype, however, is not rescued because a section of the single-stranded oligonucleotide has been inserted altering the reading frame and generating truncated proteins. These data illustrate the importance of analysing mutagenicity in uncorrected cells. Our results also form the basis of a simple model for point mutation repair directed by a short single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides and

  9. Insertional Mutagenesis by CRISPR/Cas9 Ribonucleoprotein Gene Editing in Cells Targeted for Point Mutation Repair Directed by Short Single-Stranded DNA Oligonucleotides

    PubMed Central

    Rivera-Torres, Natalia; Bialk, Pawel; Bloh, Kevin M.; Kmiec, Eric B.

    2017-01-01

    CRISPR/Cas9 and single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides (ssODNs) have been used to direct the repair of a single base mutation in human genes. Here, we examine a method designed to increase the precision of RNA guided genome editing in human cells by utilizing a CRISPR/Cas9 ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complex to initiate DNA cleavage. The RNP is assembled in vitro and induces a double stranded break at a specific site surrounding the mutant base designated for correction by the ssODN. We use an integrated mutant eGFP gene, bearing a single base change rendering the expressed protein nonfunctional, as a single copy target in HCT 116 cells. We observe significant gene correction activity of the mutant base, promoted by the RNP and single-stranded DNA oligonucleotide with validation through genotypic and phenotypic readout. We demonstrate that all individual components must be present to obtain successful gene editing. Importantly, we examine the genotype of individually sorted corrected and uncorrected clonally expanded cell populations for the mutagenic footprint left by the action of these gene editing tools. While the DNA sequence of the corrected population is exact with no adjacent sequence modification, the uncorrected population exhibits heterogeneous mutagenicity with a wide variety of deletions and insertions surrounding the target site. We designate this type of DNA aberration as on-site mutagenicity. Analyses of two clonal populations bearing specific DNA insertions surrounding the target site, indicate that point mutation repair has occurred at the level of the gene. The phenotype, however, is not rescued because a section of the single-stranded oligonucleotide has been inserted altering the reading frame and generating truncated proteins. These data illustrate the importance of analysing mutagenicity in uncorrected cells. Our results also form the basis of a simple model for point mutation repair directed by a short single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides and

  10. Insertional mutagenesis and cloning of the genes required for biosynthesis of the host-specific AK-toxin in the Japanese pear pathotype of Alternaria alternata.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, A; Shiotani, H; Yamamoto, M; Tsuge, T

    1999-08-01

    The Japanese pear pathotype of Alternaria alternata causes black spot of Japanese pear by producing a host-specific toxin known as AK-toxin. Restriction enzyme-mediated integration (REMI) mutagenesis was used to tag genes required for toxin biosynthesis. Protoplasts of a wild-type strain were treated with a linearized plasmid along with the restriction enzyme used to linearize the plasmid. Of 984 REMI transformants recovered, three produced no detectable AK-toxin and lost pathogenicity on pear leaves. Genomic DNA flanking the integrated plasmid was recovered from one of the mutants. With the recovered DNA used as a probe, a cosmid clone of the wild-type strain was isolated. Structural and functional analyses of an 8.0-kb region corresponding to the tagged site indicated the presence of two genes. One, designated AKT1, encodes a member of the class of carboxyl-activating enzymes. The other, AKT2, encodes a protein of unknown function. The essential roles of these two genes in both AK-toxin production and pathogenicity were confirmed by transformation-mediated gene disruption experiments. DNA gel blot analysis detected AKT1 and AKT2 homologues not only in the Japanese pear pathotype strains but also in strains from the tangerine and strawberry pathotypes. The host-specific toxins of these two pathotypes are similar in structure to AK-toxin. Homologues were not detected in other pathotypes or in non-pathogenic strains of A. alternata, suggesting acquisition of AKT1 and AKT2 by horizontal transfer.

  11. Long Interspersed Element Sequencing (L1-Seq): A Method to Identify Somatic LINE-1 Insertions in the Human Genome

    PubMed Central

    Doucet, Tara T.; Kazazian, Haig H.

    2017-01-01

    L1-seq is a high-throughput sequencing technique which is utilized to identify novel L1 insertions in genomic DNA samples of interest. Using special diagnostic nucleotides unique to the youngest and most active L1 sequence, we can amplify new somatic insertions. This technique has helped to establish the number of L1 insertions present in the general population as well as the variation among individuals with regard to their complement of active L1 elements. More recently, this technique has been employed to assess the level of retrotransposition occurring in various diseases such as cancer. These efforts try to establish a connection between the process of retrotransposition and disease development and/or progression. PMID:26895047

  12. Long Interspersed Element Sequencing (L1-Seq): A Method to Identify Somatic LINE-1 Insertions in the Human Genome.

    PubMed

    Doucet, Tara T; Kazazian, Haig H

    2016-01-01

    L1-seq is a high-throughput sequencing technique which is utilized to identify novel L1 insertions in genomic DNA samples of interest. Using special diagnostic nucleotides unique to the youngest and most active L1 sequence, we can amplify new somatic insertions. This technique has helped to establish the number of L1 insertions present in the general population as well as the variation among individuals with regard to their complement of active L1 elements. More recently, this technique has been employed to assess the level of retrotransposition occurring in various diseases such as cancer. These efforts try to establish a connection between the process of retrotransposition and disease development and/or progression.

  13. Identifying microbial fitness determinants by insertion sequencing using genome-wide transposon mutant libraries.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Andrew L; Wu, Meng; Gordon, Jeffrey I

    2011-11-17

    Insertion sequencing (INSeq) is a method for determining the insertion site and relative abundance of large numbers of transposon mutants in a mixed population of isogenic mutants of a sequenced microbial species. INSeq is based on a modified mariner transposon containing MmeI sites at its ends, allowing cleavage at chromosomal sites 16-17 bp from the inserted transposon. Genomic regions adjacent to the transposons are amplified by linear PCR with a biotinylated primer. Products are bound to magnetic beads, digested with MmeI and barcoded with sample-specific linkers appended to each restriction fragment. After limited PCR amplification, fragments are sequenced using a high-throughput instrument. The sequence of each read can be used to map the location of a transposon in the genome. Read count measures the relative abundance of that mutant in the population. Solid-phase library preparation makes this protocol rapid (18 h), easy to scale up, amenable to automation and useful for a variety of samples. A protocol for characterizing libraries of transposon mutant strains clonally arrayed in a multiwell format is provided.

  14. A bioinformatics approach for identifying transgene insertion sites using whole genome sequencing data.

    PubMed

    Park, Doori; Park, Su-Hyun; Ban, Yong Wook; Kim, Youn Shic; Park, Kyoung-Cheul; Kim, Nam-Soo; Kim, Ju-Kon; Choi, Ik-Young

    2017-08-15

    Genetically modified crops (GM crops) have been developed to improve the agricultural traits of modern crop cultivars. Safety assessments of GM crops are of paramount importance in research at developmental stages and before releasing transgenic plants into the marketplace. Sequencing technology is developing rapidly, with higher output and labor efficiencies, and will eventually replace existing methods for the molecular characterization of genetically modified organisms. To detect the transgenic insertion locations in the three GM rice gnomes, Illumina sequencing reads are mapped and classified to the rice genome and plasmid sequence. The both mapped reads are classified to characterize the junction site between plant and transgene sequence by sequence alignment. Herein, we present a next generation sequencing (NGS)-based molecular characterization method, using transgenic rice plants SNU-Bt9-5, SNU-Bt9-30, and SNU-Bt9-109. Specifically, using bioinformatics tools, we detected the precise insertion locations and copy numbers of transfer DNA, genetic rearrangements, and the absence of backbone sequences, which were equivalent to results obtained from Southern blot analyses. NGS methods have been suggested as an effective means of characterizing and detecting transgenic insertion locations in genomes. Our results demonstrate the use of a combination of NGS technology and bioinformatics approaches that offers cost- and time-effective methods for assessing the safety of transgenic plants.

  15. Random mutagenesis in Corynebacterium glutamicum ATCC 13032 using an IS6100-based transposon vector identified the last unknown gene in the histidine biosynthesis pathway

    PubMed Central

    Mormann, Sascha; Lömker, Alexander; Rückert, Christian; Gaigalat, Lars; Tauch, Andreas; Pühler, Alfred; Kalinowski, Jörn

    2006-01-01

    Background Corynebacterium glutamicum, a Gram-positive bacterium of the class Actinobacteria, is an industrially relevant producer of amino acids. Several methods for the targeted genetic manipulation of this organism and rational strain improvement have been developed. An efficient transposon mutagenesis system for the completely sequenced type strain ATCC 13032 would significantly advance functional genome analysis in this bacterium. Results A comprehensive transposon mutant library comprising 10,080 independent clones was constructed by electrotransformation of the restriction-deficient derivative of strain ATCC 13032, C. glutamicum RES167, with an IS6100-containing non-replicative plasmid. Transposon mutants had stable cointegrates between the transposon vector and the chromosome. Altogether 172 transposon integration sites have been determined by sequencing of the chromosomal inserts, revealing that each integration occurred at a different locus. Statistical target site analyses revealed an apparent absence of a target site preference. From the library, auxotrophic mutants were obtained with a frequency of 2.9%. By auxanography analyses nearly two thirds of the auxotrophs were further characterized, including mutants with single, double and alternative nutritional requirements. In most cases the nutritional requirement observed could be correlated to the annotation of the mutated gene involved in the biosynthesis of an amino acid, a nucleotide or a vitamin. One notable exception was a clone mutagenized by transposition into the gene cg0910, which exhibited an auxotrophy for histidine. The protein sequence deduced from cg0910 showed high sequence similarities to inositol-1(or 4)-monophosphatases (EC 3.1.3.25). Subsequent genetic deletion of cg0910 delivered the same histidine-auxotrophic phenotype. Genetic complementation of the mutants as well as supplementation by histidinol suggests that cg0910 encodes the hitherto unknown essential L

  16. Random T-DNA mutagenesis identifies a Cu-Zn-superoxide dismutase gene as a virulence factor of Sclerotinia sclerotiorum

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Agrobacterium-mediated transformation (AMT) was used to identify potential virulence factors in Sclerotinia sclerotiorum. Screening AMT transformants identified two mutants showing significantly reduced virulence. The mutants showed similar growth rate, colony morphology, and sclerotial and oxalate ...

  17. Fluorescence-Based Flow Sorting in Parallel with Transposon Insertion Site Sequencing Identifies Multidrug Efflux Systems in Acinetobacter baumannii

    PubMed Central

    Cain, Amy K.; Huang, TaoTao; Liu, Qi; Elbourne, Liam D. H.; Boinett, Christine J.; Brzoska, Anthony J.; Li, Liping; Ostrowski, Martin; Nhu, Nguyen Thi Khanh; Nhu, Tran Do Hoang; Baker, Stephen; Paulsen, Ian T.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Multidrug efflux pumps provide clinically significant levels of drug resistance in a number of Gram-negative hospital-acquired pathogens. These pathogens frequently carry dozens of genes encoding putative multidrug efflux pumps. However, it can be difficult to determine how many of these pumps actually mediate antimicrobial efflux, and it can be even more challenging to identify the regulatory proteins that control expression of these pumps. In this study, we developed an innovative high-throughput screening method, combining transposon insertion sequencing and cell sorting methods (TraDISort), to identify the genes encoding major multidrug efflux pumps, regulators, and other factors that may affect the permeation of antimicrobials, using the nosocomial pathogen Acinetobacter baumannii. A dense library of more than 100,000 unique transposon insertion mutants was treated with ethidium bromide, a common substrate of multidrug efflux pumps that is differentially fluorescent inside and outside the bacterial cytoplasm. Populations of cells displaying aberrant accumulations of ethidium were physically enriched using fluorescence-activated cell sorting, and the genomic locations of transposon insertions within these strains were determined using transposon-directed insertion sequencing. The relative abundance of mutants in the input pool compared to the selected mutant pools indicated that the AdeABC, AdeIJK, and AmvA efflux pumps are the major ethidium efflux systems in A. baumannii. Furthermore, the method identified a new transcriptional regulator that controls expression of amvA. In addition to the identification of efflux pumps and their regulators, TraDISort identified genes that are likely to control cell division, cell morphology, or aggregation in A. baumannii. PMID:27601573

  18. A two-component enhancer-inhibitor transposon mutagenesis system for functional analysis of the Arabidopsis genome.

    PubMed Central

    Speulman, E; Metz, P L; van Arkel, G; te Lintel Hekkert, B; Stiekema, W J; Pereira, A

    1999-01-01

    A modified Enhancer-Inhibitor transposon system was used to generate a series of mutant lines by single-seed descent such that multiple I insertions occurred per plant. The distribution of original insertions in the population was assessed by isolating transposon-flanking DNA, and a database of insertion sites was created. Approximately three-quarters of the identified insertion sites show similarity to sequences stored in public databases, which demonstrates the power of this regimen of insertional mutagenesis. To isolate insertions in specific genes, we developed three-dimensional pooling and polymerase chain reaction strategies that we then validated by identifying mutants for the regulator genes APETALA1 and SHOOT MERISTEMLESS. The system then was used to identify inserts in a class of uncharacterized genes involved in lipid biosynthesis; one such insertion conferred a fiddlehead mutant phenotype. PMID:10521517

  19. Using Yeast Transposon-Insertion Libraries for Phenotypic Screening and Protein Localization.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Anuj

    2016-06-01

    This protocol details how to use a transposon-insertion library for phenotypic screening and protein localization. The insertion library was generated by mutagenesis of a plasmid-based yeast genomic DNA library by using a multipurpose transposon; the transposon produces gene disruptions, and, by Cre-mediated recombination at lox sites incorporated within the transposon, alleles with an in-frame insertion can be truncated to a residual transposon encoding multiple copies of the hemagglutinin epitope. Insertions are generated in yeast by shuttle mutagenesis. Yeast genomic DNA containing a transposon insertion is released from the library, and the mutagenized DNA sequences are introduced into a desired strain of yeast, where the insertion alleles replace native loci by homologous recombination. The insertion mutants can be screened for phenotypes, and the site of transposon insertion can subsequently be identified in selected mutants by inverse polymerase chain reaction (PCR). In-frame insertions within genes of interest can be truncated to an epitope-tagged allele by Cre-lox recombination, and the subcellular localization of the encoded protein product can be identified by standard methods of indirect immunofluorescence. In summary, the transposon-insertion libraries represent an informative resource for large-scale mutagenesis, presenting a straightforward alternative to labor-intensive targeted approaches for the construction of deletion alleles and fluorescent protein fusions.

  20. Newly identified essential amino acid residues affecting ^8-sphingolipid desaturase activity revealed by site-directed mutagenesis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In order to identify amino acid residues crucial for the enzymatic activity of ^8-sphingolipid desaturases, a sequence comparison was performed among ^8-sphingolipid desaturases and ^6-fatty acid desaturase from various plants. In addition to the known conserved cytb5 (cytochrome b5) HPGG motif and...

  1. Homology modelling, docking, pharmacophore and site directed mutagenesis analysis to identify the critical amino acid residue of PknI from Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Kandasamy, Srinivasan; Hassan, Sameer; Gopalaswamy, Radha; Narayanan, Sujatha

    2014-07-01

    Tuberculosis is caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis, an intracellular pathogen. PknI is one of the 11 functional Serine/Threonine Protein Kinases which is predicted to regulate the cell division of M. tuberculosis. In order to find newer drugs and vaccine we need to understand the pathogenesis of the disease. We have used the bioinformatics approach to identify the functionally active residues of PknI and to confirm the same with wet lab experiments. In the current study, we have created homology model for PknI and have done comparative structural analysis of PknI with other kinases. Molecular docking studies were done with a library of kinase inhibitors and T95 was found as the potent inhibitor for PknI. Based on structure based pharmacophore analysis of kinase substrate complexes, Lys 41 along with Asp90, Val92 and Asp96 were identified as functionally important residues. Further, we used site directed mutagenesis technique to mutate Lys 41 to Met resulting in defective cell division of Mycobacterium smegmatis mc(2). Overall, the proposed model together with its binding features gained from pharmacophore docking studies helped in identifying ligand inhibitor specific to PknI which was confirmed by laboratory experiments. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Mutagenesis identifies the critical amino acid residues of human endonuclease G involved in catalysis, magnesium coordination, and substrate specificity

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Shih-Lu; Li, Chia-Cheng; Chen, Jaw-Chyun; Chen, Yi-Jin; Lin, Ching-Ting; Ho, Tin-Yun; Hsiang, Chien-Yun

    2009-01-01

    Background Endonuclease G (EndoG), a member of DNA/RNA nonspecific ββα-Me-finger nucleases, is involved in apoptosis and normal cellular proliferation. In this study, we analyzed the critical amino acid residues of EndoG and proposed the catalytic mechanism of EndoG. Methods To identify the critical amino acid residues of human EndoG, we replaced the conserved histidine, asparagine, and arginine residues with alanine. The catalytic efficacies of Escherichia coli-expressed EndoG variants were further analyzed by kinetic studies. Results Diethyl pyrocarbonate modification assay revealed that histidine residues were involved in EndoG activity. His-141, Asn-163, and Asn-172 in the H-N-H motif of EndoG were critical for catalysis and substrate specificity. H141A mutant required a higher magnesium concentration to achieve its activity, suggesting the unique role of His-141 in both catalysis and magnesium coordination. Furthermore, an additional catalytic residue (Asn-251) and an additional metal ion binding site (Glu-271) of human EndoG were identified. Conclusion Based on the mutational analysis and homology modeling, we proposed that human EndoG shared a similar catalytic mechanism with nuclease A from Anabaena. PMID:19272175

  3. Genetic Analysis of the Heterochromatin of Chromosome 3 in Drosophila Melanogaster. II. Vital Loci Identified through Ems Mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Marchant, G. E.; Holm, D. G.

    1988-01-01

    Chromosome 3 of Drosophila melanogaster contains the last major blocks of heterochromatin in this species to be genetically analyzed. Deficiencies of heterochromatin generated through the detachment of compound-3 chromosomes revealed the presence of vital loci in the heterochromatin of chromosome 3, but an extensive complementation analysis with various combinations of lethal and nonlethal detachment products gave no evidence of tandemly repeated vital genes in this region. These findings indicate that the heterochromatin of chromosome 3 is genetically similar to that of chromosome 2. A more thorough genetic analysis of the heterochromatic regions has been carried out using the chemical mutagen ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS). Seventy-five EMS-induced lethals allelic to loci uncovered by detachment-product deficiencies were recovered and tested for complementation. In total, 12 complementation groups were identified, ten in the heterochromatin to the left of the centromere and two to the right. All but two complementation groups in the left heterochromatic block could be identified as separate loci through deficiency mapping. The interallelic complementation observed between some EMS-induced lethals, as well as the recovery of a temperature-sensitive allele for each of the two loci, provided further evidence that single-copy, transcribed vital genes reside in the heterochromatin of chromosome 3. Cytological analysis of three detachment-product deficiencies provided evidence that at least some of the genes uncovered in this study are located in the most distal segments of the heterochromatin in both arms. This study provides a detailed genetic analysis of chromosome 3 heterochromatin and offers further information on the genetic nature and heterogeneity of Drosophila heterochromatin. PMID:17246481

  4. Insertional mutagenesis in Populus: relevance and feasibility

    Treesearch

    Victor Busov; Matthias Fladung; Andrew Groover; Steven Strauss

    2005-01-01

    The recent sequencing of the first tree genome, that of the black cottonwood (Populus trichocarpa), opens a new chapter in tree functional genomics. While the completion of the genome is a milestone, mobilizing this significant resource for better understanding the growth and development of woody perennials will be an even greater undertaking in the...

  5. Acidic residues important for substrate binding and cofactor reactivity in eukaryotic ornithine decarboxylase identified by alanine scanning mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Osterman, A L; Kinch, L N; Grishin, N V; Phillips, M A

    1995-05-19

    Ornithine decarboxylases from Trypanosoma brucei, mouse, and Leishmania donovani share strict specificity for three basic amino acids, ornithine, lysine, and arginine. To identify residues involved in this substrate specificity and/or in the reaction chemistry, six conserved acidic resides (Asp-88, Glu-94, Asp-233, Glu-274, Asp-361, and Asp-364) were mutated to alanine in the T. brucei enzyme. Each mutation causes a substantial loss in enzyme efficiency. Most notably, mutation of Asp-361 increases the Km for ornithine by 2000-fold, with little effect on kcat, suggesting that this residue is an important substrate binding determinant. Mutation of the only strictly conserved acidic residue, Glu-274, decreases kcat 50-fold; however, substitution of N-methylpyridoxal-5'-phosphate for pyridoxal-5'-phosphate as the cofactor in the reaction restores the kcat of E274A to wild-type levels. These data demonstrate that Glu-274 interacts with the protonated pyridine nitrogen of the cofactor to enhance the electron withdrawing capability of the ring, analogous to Asp-222 in aspartate aminotransferase (Onuffer, J. J., and Kirsch, J. F. (1994) Protein Eng. 7, 413-424). Eukaryotic ornithine decarboxylase is a homodimer with two shared active sites. Residues 88, 94, 233, and 274 are contributed to each active site from the same subunit as Lys-69, while residues 361 and 364 are part of the Cys-360 subunit.

  6. Random mutagenesis of yeast 25S rRNA identify bases critical for 60S subunit structural integrity and function

    PubMed Central

    Nemoto, Naoki; Udagawa, Tsuyoshi; Chowdhury, Wasimul; Kitabatake, Makoto; Shin, Byung-shik; Hiraishi, Hiroyuki; Wang, Suzhi; Singh, Chingakham Ranjit; Brown, Susan J.; Ohno, Mutsuhito; Asano, Katsura

    2013-01-01

    In yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, 25S rRNA makes up the major mass and shape of the 60S ribosomal subunit. During translation initiation, the 60S subunit joins the 40S initiation complex, producing the 80S initiation complex. During elongation, the 60S subunit binds the CCA-ends of aminoacyl- and peptidyl-tRNAs at the A-loop and P-loop, respectively, transferring the peptide onto the α-amino group of the aminoacyl-tRNA. To study the role of 25S rRNA in translation in vivo, we randomly mutated 25S rRNA and isolated and characterized seven point mutations that affected yeast cell growth and polysome profiles. Four of these mutations, G651A, A1435U, A1446G and A1587G, change a base involved in base triples crucial for structural integrity. Three other mutations change bases near the ribosomal surface: C2879U and U2408C alter the A-loop and P-loop, respectively, and G1735A maps near a Eukarya-specific bridge to the 40S subunit. By polysome profiling in mmslΔ mutants defective in nonfunctional 25S rRNA decay, we show that some of these mutations are defective in both the initiation and elongation phases of translation. Of the mutants characterized, C2879U displays the strongest defect in translation initiation. The ribosome transit-time assay directly shows that this mutation is also defective in peptide elongation/termination. Thus, our genetic analysis not only identifies bases critical for structural integrity of the 60S subunit, but also suggests a role for bases near the peptidyl transferase center in translation initiation. PMID:26824023

  7. Ligand-bound Structures and Site-directed Mutagenesis Identify the Acceptor and Secondary Binding Sites of Streptomyces coelicolor Maltosyltransferase GlgE.

    PubMed

    Syson, Karl; Stevenson, Clare E M; Miah, Farzana; Barclay, J Elaine; Tang, Minhong; Gorelik, Andrii; Rashid, Abdul M; Lawson, David M; Bornemann, Stephen

    2016-10-07

    GlgE is a maltosyltransferase involved in α-glucan biosynthesis in bacteria that has been genetically validated as a target for tuberculosis therapies. Crystals of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis enzyme diffract at low resolution so most structural studies have been with the very similar Streptomyces coelicolor GlgE isoform 1. Although the donor binding site for α-maltose 1-phosphate had been previously structurally defined, the acceptor site had not. Using mutagenesis, kinetics, and protein crystallography of the S. coelicolor enzyme, we have now identified the +1 to +6 subsites of the acceptor/product, which overlap with the known cyclodextrin binding site. The sugar residues in the acceptor subsites +1 to +5 are oriented such that they disfavor the binding of malto-oligosaccharides that bear branches at their 6-positions, consistent with the known acceptor chain specificity of GlgE. A secondary binding site remote from the catalytic center was identified that is distinct from one reported for the M. tuberculosis enzyme. This new site is capable of binding a branched α-glucan and is most likely involved in guiding acceptors toward the donor site because its disruption kinetically compromises the ability of GlgE to extend polymeric substrates. However, disruption of this site, which is conserved in the Streptomyces venezuelae GlgE enzyme, did not affect the growth of S. venezuelae or the structure of the polymeric product. The acceptor subsites +1 to +4 in the S. coelicolor enzyme are well conserved in the M. tuberculosis enzyme so their identification could help inform the design of inhibitors with therapeutic potential. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  8. Ligand-bound Structures and Site-directed Mutagenesis Identify the Acceptor and Secondary Binding Sites of Streptomyces coelicolor Maltosyltransferase GlgE*

    PubMed Central

    Syson, Karl; Stevenson, Clare E. M.; Miah, Farzana; Barclay, J. Elaine; Tang, Minhong; Gorelik, Andrii; Rashid, Abdul M.; Lawson, David M.; Bornemann, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    GlgE is a maltosyltransferase involved in α-glucan biosynthesis in bacteria that has been genetically validated as a target for tuberculosis therapies. Crystals of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis enzyme diffract at low resolution so most structural studies have been with the very similar Streptomyces coelicolor GlgE isoform 1. Although the donor binding site for α-maltose 1-phosphate had been previously structurally defined, the acceptor site had not. Using mutagenesis, kinetics, and protein crystallography of the S. coelicolor enzyme, we have now identified the +1 to +6 subsites of the acceptor/product, which overlap with the known cyclodextrin binding site. The sugar residues in the acceptor subsites +1 to +5 are oriented such that they disfavor the binding of malto-oligosaccharides that bear branches at their 6-positions, consistent with the known acceptor chain specificity of GlgE. A secondary binding site remote from the catalytic center was identified that is distinct from one reported for the M. tuberculosis enzyme. This new site is capable of binding a branched α-glucan and is most likely involved in guiding acceptors toward the donor site because its disruption kinetically compromises the ability of GlgE to extend polymeric substrates. However, disruption of this site, which is conserved in the Streptomyces venezuelae GlgE enzyme, did not affect the growth of S. venezuelae or the structure of the polymeric product. The acceptor subsites +1 to +4 in the S. coelicolor enzyme are well conserved in the M. tuberculosis enzyme so their identification could help inform the design of inhibitors with therapeutic potential. PMID:27531751

  9. Transposon mutagenesis of probiotic Lactobacillus casei identifies asnH, an asparagine synthetase gene involved in its immune-activating capacity.

    PubMed

    Ito, Masahiro; Kim, Yun-Gi; Tsuji, Hirokazu; Takahashi, Takuya; Kiwaki, Mayumi; Nomoto, Koji; Danbara, Hirofumi; Okada, Nobuhiko

    2014-01-01

    Lactobacillus casei ATCC 27139 enhances host innate immunity, and the J1 phage-resistant mutants of this strain lose the activity. A transposon insertion mutant library of L. casei ATCC 27139 was constructed, and nine J1 phage-resistant mutants out of them were obtained. Cloning and sequencing analyses identified three independent genes that were disrupted by insertion of the transposon element: asnH, encoding asparagine synthetase, and dnaJ and dnaK, encoding the molecular chaperones DnaJ and DnaK, respectively. Using an in vivo mouse model of Listeria infection, only asnH mutant showed deficiency in their ability to enhance host innate immunity, and complementation of the mutation by introduction of the wild-type asnH in the mutant strain recovered the immuno-augmenting activity. AsnH protein exhibited asparagine synthetase activity when the lysozyme-treated cell wall extracts of L. casei ATCC 27139 was added as substrate. The asnH mutants lost the thick and rigid peptidoglycan features that are characteristic to the wild-type cells, indicating that AsnH of L. casei is involved in peptidoglycan biosynthesis. These results indicate that asnH is required for the construction of the peptidoglycan composition involved in the immune-activating capacity of L. casei ATCC 27139.

  10. Site-directed mutagenesis of the cytochrome b gene and development of diagnostic methods for identifying QoI resistance of rice blast fungus.

    PubMed

    Wei, Chuan-Zhao; Katoh, Hiroshi; Nishimura, Kumiko; Ishii, Hideo

    2009-12-01

    It is possible that a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) (G143A mutation) in the cytochrome b gene could confer resistance to quinone outside inhibiting (QoI) fungicides (strobilurins) in rice blast fungus because this mutation caused a high level of resistance to fungicides such as azoxystrobin in Pyricularia grisea Sacc. and other fungal plant pathogens. The aim of this study was to survey Magnaporthe oryzae B Couch sp. nov. isolates in Japan for resistance to QoIs, and to try to develop molecular detection methods for QoI resistance. A survey on the QoI resistance among M. oryzae isolates from rice was conducted in Japan. A total of 813 single-spore isolates of M. oryzae were tested for their sensitivity to azoxystrobin using a mycelial growth test on PDA. QoI fungicide resistance was not found among these isolates. The introduction of G143A mutation into a plasmid containing the cytochrome b gene sequence of rice blast fungus was achieved by site-directed mutagenesis. Molecular diagnostic methods were developed for identifying QoI resistance in rice blast fungus using the plasmid construct. As the management of rice blast disease is often dependent on chemicals, the rational design of control programmes requires a proper understanding of the fungicide resistance phenomenon in field populations of the pathogen. Mutation of the cytochrome b gene of rice blast fungus would be specifically detected from diseased leaves and seeds using the molecular methods developed in this study. (c) 2009 Society of Chemical Industry.

  11. Genome Sequencing and Transposon Mutagenesis of Burkholderia seminalis TC3.4.2R3 Identify Genes Contributing to Suppression of Orchid Necrosis Caused by B. gladioli.

    PubMed

    Araújo, Welington L; Creason, Allison L; Mano, Emy T; Camargo-Neves, Aline A; Minami, Sonia N; Chang, Jeff H; Loper, Joyce E

    2016-06-01

    From a screen of 36 plant-associated strains of Burkholderia spp., we identified 24 strains that suppressed leaf and pseudobulb necrosis of orchid caused by B. gladioli. To gain insights into the mechanisms of disease suppression, we generated a draft genome sequence from one suppressive strain, TC3.4.2R3. The genome is an estimated 7.67 megabases in size, with three replicons, two chromosomes, and the plasmid pC3. Using a combination of multilocus sequence analysis and phylogenomics, we identified TC3.4.2R3 as B. seminalis, a species within the Burkholderia cepacia complex that includes opportunistic human pathogens and environmental strains. We generated and screened a library of 3,840 transposon mutants of strain TC3.4.2R3 on orchid leaves to identify genes contributing to plant disease suppression. Twelve mutants deficient in suppression of leaf necrosis were selected and the transposon insertions were mapped to eight loci. One gene is in a wcb cluster that is related to synthesis of extracellular polysaccharide, a key determinant in bacterial-host interactions in other systems, and the other seven are highly conserved among Burkholderia spp. The fundamental information developed in this study will serve as a resource for future research aiming to identify mechanisms contributing to biological control.

  12. Large-Scale Insertional Mutagenesis of the Coleopteran Stored Grain Pest, the Red Flour Beetle Tribolium castaneum, Identifies Embryonic Lethal Mutations and Enhancer Traps

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Given its sequenced genome and efficient systemic RNA interference response, Tribolium castaneum is a model organism well suited for the application of “reverse genetics” approaches to elucidate the function of candidate genes. However, there is still a continuing need for “forward genetic” analysi...

  13. Random mutagenesis of the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus using in vitro mariner transposition and natural transformation

    PubMed Central

    Guschinskaya, Natalia; Brunel, Romain; Tourte, Maxime; Lipscomb, Gina L.; Adams, Michael W. W.; Oger, Philippe; Charpentier, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    Transposition mutagenesis is a powerful tool to identify the function of genes, reveal essential genes and generally to unravel the genetic basis of living organisms. However, transposon-mediated mutagenesis has only been successfully applied to a limited number of archaeal species and has never been reported in Thermococcales. Here, we report random insertion mutagenesis in the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus. The strategy takes advantage of the natural transformability of derivatives of the P. furiosus COM1 strain and of in vitro Mariner-based transposition. A transposon bearing a genetic marker is randomly transposed in vitro in genomic DNA that is then used for natural transformation of P. furiosus. A small-scale transposition reaction routinely generates several hundred and up to two thousands transformants. Southern analysis and sequencing showed that the obtained mutants contain a single and random genomic insertion. Polyploidy has been reported in Thermococcales and P. furiosus is suspected of being polyploid. Yet, about half of the mutants obtained on the first selection are homozygous for the transposon insertion. Two rounds of isolation on selective medium were sufficient to obtain gene conversion in initially heterozygous mutants. This transposition mutagenesis strategy will greatly facilitate functional exploration of the Thermococcales genomes. PMID:27824140

  14. Next-Generation Sequencing Identifies the Danforth's Short Tail Mouse Mutation as a Retrotransposon Insertion Affecting Ptf1a Expression

    PubMed Central

    Vlangos, Christopher N.; Siuniak, Amanda N.; Robinson, Dan; Chinnaiyan, Arul M.; Lyons, Robert H.; Cavalcoli, James D.; Keegan, Catherine E.

    2013-01-01

    The semidominant Danforth's short tail (Sd) mutation arose spontaneously in the 1920s. The homozygous Sd phenotype includes severe malformations of the axial skeleton with an absent tail, kidney agenesis, anal atresia, and persistent cloaca. The Sd mutant phenotype mirrors features seen in human caudal malformation syndromes including urorectal septum malformation, caudal regression, VACTERL association, and persistent cloaca. The Sd mutation was previously mapped to a 0.9 cM region on mouse chromosome 2qA3. We performed Sanger sequencing of exons and intron/exon boundaries mapping to the Sd critical region and did not identify any mutations. We then performed DNA enrichment/capture followed by next-generation sequencing (NGS) of the critical genomic region. Standard bioinformatic analysis of paired-end sequence data did not reveal any causative mutations. Interrogation of reads that had been discarded because only a single end mapped correctly to the Sd locus identified an early transposon (ETn) retroviral insertion at the Sd locus, located 12.5 kb upstream of the Ptf1a gene. We show that Ptf1a expression is significantly upregulated in Sd mutant embryos at E9.5. The identification of the Sd mutation will lead to improved understanding of the developmental pathways that are misregulated in human caudal malformation syndromes. PMID:23437000

  15. Use of signature-tagged mutagenesis to identify genes associated with colonization of sheep by E. coli O157:H7.

    PubMed

    Cornick, Nancy A; Pitzer, Josh; Helgerson, Amy F; Madsen, Melissa L; Kurth, Kathy T; Xiao, Qianjun; Minion, F Chris

    2017-03-01

    Outbreaks of Escherichia coli O157:H7 in the United States due to contaminated foods are a public health issue and a continuing problem. The major reservoir for these organisms is the gastrointestinal tract of ruminants where they are a member of the resident microbiota. Several factors that contribute to the colonization of cattle have been identified, but a systematic screen of genes that might contribute to the colonization and persistence phenotype in mature ruminants has not been reported. Using a sheep model of persistence, signature tagged mutagenesis (STM) was used to screen 1326 mutants for a persistence-negative phenotype of E. coli O157:H7. We identified 9 genes by STM that appeared to be required for colonization and/or survival in sheep. Three of the genes had functions associated with central metabolism (thiK, ftrA and nrdB), one was involved with LPS formation (wbdP), one encodes a non-LEE encoded effector protein (nleB) and one was a methyltransferase encoded on a prophage (Z2389). The remaining three genes did not have homology with any known genes. Six sheep given ΔwbdP and 2 sheep each were given mutants (ΔthiK (Z1745), ΔftrA (Z2164) and Z2389). The ΔwbdP mutant was recovered from the feces of 4/6 sheep at 6 days pi with a mean number of 1.42log10CFU/g feces compared to 4.6log10CFU/g feces for the wild type strain. This difference was significant (P<0.001) over the time course of the experiment (days 6-23). Both ΔthiK and ΔftrA mutants were recovered from 1 of 2 sheep at 9 days PI by enrichment procedures (<50CFU/g feces) whereas mutant Z2389 was not recovered from either animal past 2 days pi. The roles of all of these gene products require further study to determine how the persistence phenotype of a given strain of E. coli O157:H7 interacts with host factors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Critical active-site residues identified by site-directed mutagenesis in Pseudomonas aeruginosa phosphorylcholine phosphatase, a new member of the haloacid dehalogenases hydrolase superfamily.

    PubMed

    Beassoni, Paola R; Otero, Lisandro H; Massimelli, Maria J; Lisa, Angela T; Domenech, Carlos E

    2006-12-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa phosphorylcholine phosphatase (PChP), the product of the PA5292 gene, is synthesized when the bacteria are grown with choline, betaine, dimethylglycine, or carnitine. In the presence of Mg(2+), PChP catalyzes the hydrolysis of both phosphorylcholine (PCh) and p-nitrophenylphosphate (p-NPP). PCh saturation curve analysis of the enzyme with or without the signal peptide indicated that the peptide was the fundamental factor responsible for decreasing the affinity of the second site of PChP for PCh, either at pH 5.0 or pH 7.4. PChP contained three conserved motifs characteristic of the haloacid dehalogenases superfamily. In the PChP without the signal peptide, motifs I, II, and III correspond to the residues (31)DMDNT(35), (166)SAA(168), and K(242)/(261)GDTPDSD(267), respectively. To determine the catalytic importance of the D31, D33, T35, S166, K242, D262, D265, and D267 on the enzyme activity, site-directed mutagenesis was performed. D31, D33, D262, and D267 were identified as the more important residues for catalysis. D265 and D267 may be involved in the stabilization of motif III, or might contribute to substrate specificity. The substitution of T35 by S35 resulted in an enzyme with a low PChP activity, but conserves the catalytic sites involved in the hydrolysis of PCh (K(m1) 0.03 mM: , K(m2) 0.5 mM: ) or p-NPP (K(m) 2.1 mM: ). Mutating either S166 or K242 revealed that these residues are also important to catalyze the hydrolysis of both substrates. The substitution of lysine by arginine or by glutamine revealed the importance of the positive charged group, either from the amino or guanidinium groups, because K242Q was inactive, whereas K242R was a functional enzyme.

  17. Signature tagged mutagenesis in the functional genetic analysis of gastrointestinal pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Cummins, Joanne; Gahan, Cormac G.M.

    2012-01-01

    Signature tagged mutagenesis is a genetic approach that was developed to identify novel bacterial virulence factors. It is a negative selection method in which unique identification tags allow analysis of pools of mutants in mixed populations. The approach is particularly well suited to functional genetic analysis of the gastrointestinal phase of infection in foodborne pathogens and has the capacity to guide the development of novel vaccines and therapeutics. In this review we outline the technical principles underpinning signature-tagged mutagenesis as well as novel sequencing-based approaches for transposon mutant identification such as TraDIS (transposon directed insertion-site sequencing). We also provide an analysis of screens that have been performed in gastrointestinal pathogens which are a global health concern (Escherichia coli, Listeria monocytogenes, Helicobacter pylori, Vibrio cholerae and Salmonella enterica). The identification of key virulence loci through the use of signature tagged mutagenesis in mice and relevant larger animal models is discussed. PMID:22555467

  18. Identifying regulatory mechanisms underlying tumorigenesis using locus expression signature analysis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eunjee; de Ridder, Jeroen; Kool, Jaap; Wessels, Lodewyk F A; Bussemaker, Harmen J

    2014-04-15

    Retroviral insertional mutagenesis is a powerful tool for identifying putative cancer genes in mice. To uncover the regulatory mechanisms by which common insertion loci affect downstream processes, we supplemented genotyping data with genome-wide mRNA expression profiling data for 97 tumors induced by retroviral insertional mutagenesis. We developed locus expression signature analysis, an algorithm to construct and interpret the differential gene expression signature associated with each common insertion locus. Comparing locus expression signatures to promoter affinity profiles allowed us to build a detailed map of transcription factors whose protein-level regulatory activity is modulated by a particular locus. We also predicted a large set of drugs that might mitigate the effect of the insertion on tumorigenesis. Taken together, our results demonstrate the potential of a locus-specific signature approach for identifying mammalian regulatory mechanisms in a cancer context.

  19. In vitro models of mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Strauss, B S; Larson, K; Sagher, D; Rabkin, S; Shenkar, R; Sahm, J

    1985-01-01

    The bypass of lesions in DNA with insertion of nucleotides opposite damaged bases has been studied as a model for mutagenesis in an in vitro system. Lesions introduced by dimethyl sulfate at adenines and by ultraviolet light at pyrimidine dimers act as termination sites on both double- and single-stranded DNA templates. Base selection opposite noninformational lesions is, in part, a property of the polymerases: different polymerases have different selectivities although all polymerases tested seem to prefer purines. The ability to insert "incorrect" bases is determined in part by the sequence 5' to the lesion on the template strand. The hypothesis that damaged purines tend to result in transversions can be applied to published data on activation of the c-ras oncogene.

  20. Signature-tagged mutagenesis of Vibrio vulnificus

    PubMed Central

    YAMAMOTO, Mai; KASHIMOTO, Takashige; TONG, Ping; XIAO, Jianbo; SUGIYAMA, Michiko; INOUE, Miyuki; MATSUNAGA, Rie; HOSOHARA, Kohei; NAKATA, Kazue; YOKOTA, Kenji; OGUMA, Keiji; YAMAMOTO, Koichiro

    2015-01-01

    Vibrio vulnificus is the causative agent of primary septicemia, wound infection and gastroenteritis in immunocompromised people. In this study, signature-tagged mutagenesis (STM) was applied to identify the virulence genes of V. vulnificus. Using STM, 6,480 mutants in total were constructed and divided into 81 sets (INPUT pools); each mutant in a set was assigned a different tag. Each INPUT pool was intraperitoneally injected into iron-overloaded mice, and in vivo surviving mutants were collected from blood samples from the heart (OUTPUT pools). From the genomic DNA of mixed INPUT or OUTPUT pools, digoxigenin-labeled DNA probes against the tagged region were prepared and used for dot hybridization. Thirty tentatively attenuated mutants, which were hybridized clearly with INPUT probes but barely with OUTPUT probes, were negatively selected. Lethal doses of 11 of the 30 mutants were reduced to more than 1/100; of these, the lethal doses of 2 were reduced to as low as 1/100,000. Transposon-inserted genes in the 11 attenuated mutants were those for IMP dehydrogenase, UDP-N-acetylglucosamine-2-epimerase, aspartokinase, phosphoribosylformylglycinamidine cyclo-ligase, malate Na (+) symporter and hypothetical protein. When mice were immunized with an attenuated mutant strain into which IMP dehydrogenase had been inserted with a transposon, they were protected against V. vulnificus infection. In this study, we demonstrated that the STM method can be used to search for the virulence genes of V. vulnificus. PMID:25755021

  1. A Noise Trimming and Positional Significance of Transposon Insertion System to Identify Essential Genes in Yersinia pestis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zheng Rong; Bullifent, Helen L.; Moore, Karen; Paszkiewicz, Konrad; Saint, Richard J.; Southern, Stephanie J.; Champion, Olivia L.; Senior, Nicola J.; Sarkar-Tyson, Mitali; Oyston, Petra C. F.; Atkins, Timothy P.; Titball, Richard W.

    2017-02-01

    Massively parallel sequencing technology coupled with saturation mutagenesis has provided new and global insights into gene functions and roles. At a simplistic level, the frequency of mutations within genes can indicate the degree of essentiality. However, this approach neglects to take account of the positional significance of mutations - the function of a gene is less likely to be disrupted by a mutation close to the distal ends. Therefore, a systematic bioinformatics approach to improve the reliability of essential gene identification is desirable. We report here a parametric model which introduces a novel mutation feature together with a noise trimming approach to predict the biological significance of Tn5 mutations. We show improved performance of essential gene prediction in the bacterium Yersinia pestis, the causative agent of plague. This method would have broad applicability to other organisms and to the identification of genes which are essential for competitiveness or survival under a broad range of stresses.

  2. A Noise Trimming and Positional Significance of Transposon Insertion System to Identify Essential Genes in Yersinia pestis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zheng Rong; Bullifent, Helen L.; Moore, Karen; Paszkiewicz, Konrad; Saint, Richard J.; Southern, Stephanie J.; Champion, Olivia L.; Senior, Nicola J.; Sarkar-Tyson, Mitali; Oyston, Petra C. F.; Atkins, Timothy P.; Titball, Richard W.

    2017-01-01

    Massively parallel sequencing technology coupled with saturation mutagenesis has provided new and global insights into gene functions and roles. At a simplistic level, the frequency of mutations within genes can indicate the degree of essentiality. However, this approach neglects to take account of the positional significance of mutations - the function of a gene is less likely to be disrupted by a mutation close to the distal ends. Therefore, a systematic bioinformatics approach to improve the reliability of essential gene identification is desirable. We report here a parametric model which introduces a novel mutation feature together with a noise trimming approach to predict the biological significance of Tn5 mutations. We show improved performance of essential gene prediction in the bacterium Yersinia pestis, the causative agent of plague. This method would have broad applicability to other organisms and to the identification of genes which are essential for competitiveness or survival under a broad range of stresses. PMID:28165493

  3. A Noise Trimming and Positional Significance of Transposon Insertion System to Identify Essential Genes in Yersinia pestis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zheng Rong; Bullifent, Helen L; Moore, Karen; Paszkiewicz, Konrad; Saint, Richard J; Southern, Stephanie J; Champion, Olivia L; Senior, Nicola J; Sarkar-Tyson, Mitali; Oyston, Petra C F; Atkins, Timothy P; Titball, Richard W

    2017-02-06

    Massively parallel sequencing technology coupled with saturation mutagenesis has provided new and global insights into gene functions and roles. At a simplistic level, the frequency of mutations within genes can indicate the degree of essentiality. However, this approach neglects to take account of the positional significance of mutations - the function of a gene is less likely to be disrupted by a mutation close to the distal ends. Therefore, a systematic bioinformatics approach to improve the reliability of essential gene identification is desirable. We report here a parametric model which introduces a novel mutation feature together with a noise trimming approach to predict the biological significance of Tn5 mutations. We show improved performance of essential gene prediction in the bacterium Yersinia pestis, the causative agent of plague. This method would have broad applicability to other organisms and to the identification of genes which are essential for competitiveness or survival under a broad range of stresses.

  4. Protein-Trap Insertional Mutagenesis Uncovers New Genes Involved in Zebrafish Skin Development, Including a Neuregulin 2a-Based ErbB Signaling Pathway Required during Median Fin Fold Morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Westcot, Stephanie E; Hatzold, Julia; Urban, Mark D; Richetti, Stefânia K; Skuster, Kimberly J; Harm, Rhianna M; Lopez Cervera, Roberto; Umemoto, Noriko; McNulty, Melissa S; Clark, Karl J; Hammerschmidt, Matthias; Ekker, Stephen C

    2015-01-01

    Skin disorders are widespread, but available treatments are limited. A more comprehensive understanding of skin development mechanisms will drive identification of new treatment targets and modalities. Here we report the Zebrafish Integument Project (ZIP), an expression-driven platform for identifying new skin genes and phenotypes in the vertebrate model Danio rerio (zebrafish). In vivo selection for skin-specific expression of gene-break transposon (GBT) mutant lines identified eleven new, revertible GBT alleles of genes involved in skin development. Eight genes--fras1, grip1, hmcn1, msxc, col4a4, ahnak, capn12, and nrg2a--had been described in an integumentary context to varying degrees, while arhgef25b, fkbp10b, and megf6a emerged as novel skin genes. Embryos homozygous for a GBT insertion within neuregulin 2a (nrg2a) revealed a novel requirement for a Neuregulin 2a (Nrg2a)-ErbB2/3-AKT signaling pathway governing the apicobasal organization of a subset of epidermal cells during median fin fold (MFF) morphogenesis. In nrg2a mutant larvae, the basal keratinocytes within the apical MFF, known as ridge cells, displayed reduced pAKT levels as well as reduced apical domains and exaggerated basolateral domains. Those defects compromised proper ridge cell elongation into a flattened epithelial morphology, resulting in thickened MFF edges. Pharmacological inhibition verified that Nrg2a signals through the ErbB receptor tyrosine kinase network. Moreover, knockdown of the epithelial polarity regulator and tumor suppressor lgl2 ameliorated the nrg2a mutant phenotype. Identifying Lgl2 as an antagonist of Nrg2a-ErbB signaling revealed a significantly earlier role for Lgl2 during epidermal morphogenesis than has been described to date. Furthermore, our findings demonstrated that successive, coordinated ridge cell shape changes drive apical MFF development, making MFF ridge cells a valuable model for investigating how the coordinated regulation of cell polarity and cell shape

  5. Protein-Trap Insertional Mutagenesis Uncovers New Genes Involved in Zebrafish Skin Development, Including a Neuregulin 2a-Based ErbB Signaling Pathway Required during Median Fin Fold Morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Urban, Mark D.; Richetti, Stefânia K.; Skuster, Kimberly J.; Harm, Rhianna M.; Lopez Cervera, Roberto; Umemoto, Noriko; McNulty, Melissa S.; Clark, Karl J.; Hammerschmidt, Matthias; Ekker, Stephen C.

    2015-01-01

    Skin disorders are widespread, but available treatments are limited. A more comprehensive understanding of skin development mechanisms will drive identification of new treatment targets and modalities. Here we report the Zebrafish Integument Project (ZIP), an expression-driven platform for identifying new skin genes and phenotypes in the vertebrate model Danio rerio (zebrafish). In vivo selection for skin-specific expression of gene-break transposon (GBT) mutant lines identified eleven new, revertible GBT alleles of genes involved in skin development. Eight genes—fras1, grip1, hmcn1, msxc, col4a4, ahnak, capn12, and nrg2a—had been described in an integumentary context to varying degrees, while arhgef25b, fkbp10b, and megf6a emerged as novel skin genes. Embryos homozygous for a GBT insertion within neuregulin 2a (nrg2a) revealed a novel requirement for a Neuregulin 2a (Nrg2a) – ErbB2/3 – AKT signaling pathway governing the apicobasal organization of a subset of epidermal cells during median fin fold (MFF) morphogenesis. In nrg2a mutant larvae, the basal keratinocytes within the apical MFF, known as ridge cells, displayed reduced pAKT levels as well as reduced apical domains and exaggerated basolateral domains. Those defects compromised proper ridge cell elongation into a flattened epithelial morphology, resulting in thickened MFF edges. Pharmacological inhibition verified that Nrg2a signals through the ErbB receptor tyrosine kinase network. Moreover, knockdown of the epithelial polarity regulator and tumor suppressor lgl2 ameliorated the nrg2a mutant phenotype. Identifying Lgl2 as an antagonist of Nrg2a – ErbB signaling revealed a significantly earlier role for Lgl2 during epidermal morphogenesis than has been described to date. Furthermore, our findings demonstrated that successive, coordinated ridge cell shape changes drive apical MFF development, making MFF ridge cells a valuable model for investigating how the coordinated regulation of cell polarity

  6. Mutational analysis identifies leucine-rich repeat insertions crucial for pigeon toll-like receptor 7 recognition and signaling.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Dan; Song, Li; Jiao, Yang; Kang, Xilong; Chen, Xiang; Geng, Shizhong; Pan, Zhiming; Jiao, Xinan

    2015-11-15

    Toll-like receptor 7 (TLR7) is responsible for recognizing viral single-stranded RNA and antiviral imidazoquinoline compounds, leading to the activation of the innate immune response. In this study, mutated pigeon TLR7 fragments, in which the insertion at position 10 of leucine-rich repeat 10 (LRR10) or at position 15 of LRR2/11/13/14 was deleted, were amplified with an overlap-PCR method, and inserted into the expression vector pCMV. The immune functions of the TLR7 mutants were determined with an NF-κB luciferase assay of transfected cells. The deletion of the insertions absolutely abolished TLR7-NF-κB signaling. With quantitative real-time PCR and sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, we observed that stimulation with R848 failed to induce the expression of interleukin 8 (IL-8) in any of the mutant-TLR7-transfected cells, consistent with their lack of NF-κB activity. However, the expression of interferon α (IFN-α) and tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) was significantly upregulated in the Del10IN10 and Del14IN15 groups. Remarkably, the levels of pigeon TLR7 expression were significantly increased in all the TLR7-mutated groups. Therefore, we speculate that another part of the deficient TLR7 mediates the induction of IFN-α and TNF-α by increasing the expression of TLR7 as compensation. However, the increased expression of TLR7 in the Del11IN15 group failed to induce the production of IFN-α, IL-8, or TNF-α, indicating that a false compensation occurred when the crucial LRR insertion was deleted.

  7. Sleeping Beauty mutagenesis in a mouse medulloblastoma model defines networks that discriminate between human molecular subgroups.

    PubMed

    Genovesi, Laura A; Ng, Ching Ging; Davis, Melissa J; Remke, Marc; Taylor, Michael D; Adams, David J; Rust, Alistair G; Ward, Jerrold M; Ban, Kenneth H; Jenkins, Nancy A; Copeland, Neal G; Wainwright, Brandon J

    2013-11-12

    The Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon mutagenesis screen is a powerful tool to facilitate the discovery of cancer genes that drive tumorigenesis in mouse models. In this study, we sought to identify genes that functionally cooperate with sonic hedgehog signaling to initiate medulloblastoma (MB), a tumor of the cerebellum. By combining SB mutagenesis with Patched1 heterozygous mice (Ptch1(lacZ/+)), we observed an increased frequency of MB and decreased tumor-free survival compared with Ptch1(lacZ/+) controls. From an analysis of 85 tumors, we identified 77 common insertion sites that map to 56 genes potentially driving increased tumorigenesis. The common insertion site genes identified in the mutagenesis screen were mapped to human orthologs, which were used to select probes and corresponding expression data from an independent set of previously described human MB samples, and surprisingly were capable of accurately clustering known molecular subgroups of MB, thereby defining common regulatory networks underlying all forms of MB irrespective of subgroup. We performed a network analysis to discover the likely mechanisms of action of subnetworks and used an in vivo model to confirm a role for a highly ranked candidate gene, Nfia, in promoting MB formation. Our analysis implicates candidate cancer genes in the deregulation of apoptosis and translational elongation, and reveals a strong signature of transcriptional regulation that will have broad impact on expression programs in MB. These networks provide functional insights into the complex biology of human MB and identify potential avenues for intervention common to all clinical subgroups.

  8. A mariner transposon vector adapted for mutagenesis in oral streptococci

    PubMed Central

    Nilsson, Martin; Christiansen, Natalia; Høiby, Niels; Twetman, Svante; Givskov, Michael; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim

    2014-01-01

    This article describes the construction and characterization of a mariner-based transposon vector designed for use in oral streptococci, but with a potential use in other Gram-positive bacteria. The new transposon vector, termed pMN100, contains the temperature-sensitive origin of replication repATs-pWV01, a selectable kanamycin resistance gene, a Himar1 transposase gene regulated by a xylose-inducible promoter, and an erythromycin resistance gene flanked by himar inverted repeats. The pMN100 plasmid was transformed into Streptococcus mutans UA159 and transposon mutagenesis was performed via a protocol established to perform high numbers of separate transpositions despite a low frequency of transposition. The distribution of transposon inserts in 30 randomly picked mutants suggested that mariner transposon mutagenesis is unbiased in S. mutans. A generated transposon mutant library containing 5000 mutants was used in a screen to identify genes involved in the production of sucrose-dependent extracellular matrix components. Mutants with transposon inserts in genes encoding glycosyltransferases and the competence-related secretory locus were predominantly found in this screen. PMID:24753509

  9. Mariner-based transposon mutagenesis for Bacteroides species.

    PubMed

    Ichimura, Minoru; Uchida, Keiko; Nakayama-Imaohji, Haruyuki; Hirakawa, Hideki; Tada, Tomoyo; Morita, Hidetoshi; Yasutomo, Koji; Okazaki, Katsuichiro; Kuwahara, Tomomi

    2014-06-01

    Bacteroides is one of the most predominant groups of human gut microbiota. Recent metagenomic analyses and studies on gnotobiotic mice demonstrated the tight association of Bacteroides with epithelial function, the gut immune system and systemic metabolism in the host. The mariner family transposon shows relatively low target site specificity and has hosts ranging from prokaryotes to eukaryotes. Thereby, random mutagenesis using the mariner family transposon is expected to identify key molecules for human-Bacteroides symbiosis. In this study, we constructed the plasmid pMI07 to deliver the gene cassette (ermF/ITR), which harbors the erythromycin resistant marker (ermF) and the inverted repeat sequences (ITRs) recognized by Himar1 transposase, to Bacteroides via electrotransformation. pMI07 successfully delivered ermF/ITR to the Bacteroides genomes and generated thousands of insertion mutants/μg of pMI07 in B. thetaiotaomicron, B. fragilis, B. ovatus, and also, although to a lesser extent, B. vulgatus. Analyses of the ermF/ITR insertion sites in B. thetaiotaomicron and B. vulgatus revealed that the cassette targeted the dinucleotide TA and integrated into the genomes in an unbiased manner. The data reported here will provide useful information for transposon mutagenesis in Bacteroides species, which will enable identification of the genes responsible for their unique phenotypes. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Lethal mutagenesis of viruses.

    PubMed

    Perales, Celia; Martín, Verónica; Domingo, Esteban

    2011-11-01

    Lethal mutagenesis aims at extinguishing viruses by increased mutagenesis prompted by virus-specific mutagenic agents, mainly nucleoside analogues. It is derived from the error threshold relationship of quasispecies theory, and it is slowly finding its way towards a clinical application. We summarize the current situation of research in this field of antiviral therapy. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. The LORE1 insertion mutant resource.

    PubMed

    Małolepszy, Anna; Mun, Terry; Sandal, Niels; Gupta, Vikas; Dubin, Manu; Urbański, Dorian; Shah, Niraj; Bachmann, Asger; Fukai, Eigo; Hirakawa, Hideki; Tabata, Satoshi; Nadzieja, Marcin; Markmann, Katharina; Su, Junyi; Umehara, Yosuke; Soyano, Takashi; Miyahara, Akira; Sato, Shusei; Hayashi, Makoto; Stougaard, Jens; Andersen, Stig U

    2016-10-01

    Long terminal repeat (LTR) retrotransposons are closely related to retroviruses, and their activities shape eukaryotic genomes. Here, we present a complete Lotus japonicus insertion mutant collection generated by identification of 640 653 new insertion events following de novo activation of the LTR element Lotus retrotransposon 1 (LORE1) (http://lotus.au.dk). Insertion preferences are critical for effective gene targeting, and we exploit our large dataset to analyse LTR element characteristics in this context. We infer the mechanism that generates the consensus palindromes typical of retroviral and LTR retrotransposon insertion sites, identify a short relaxed insertion site motif, and demonstrate selective integration into CHG-hypomethylated genes. These characteristics result in a steep increase in deleterious mutation rate following activation, and allow LORE1 active gene targeting to approach saturation within a population of 134 682 L. japonicus lines. We suggest that saturation mutagenesis using endogenous LTR retrotransposons with germinal activity can be used as a general and cost-efficient strategy for generation of non-transgenic mutant collections for unrestricted use in plant research.

  12. Positional scanning mutagenesis of α-conotoxin PeIA identifies critical residues that confer potency and selectivity for α6/α3β2β3 and α3β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    PubMed

    Hone, Arik J; Ruiz, Miguel; Scadden, Mick'l; Christensen, Sean; Gajewiak, Joanna; Azam, Layla; McIntosh, J Michael

    2013-08-30

    The nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) subtype α6β2* (the asterisk denotes the possible presence of additional subunits) has been identified as an important molecular target for the pharmacotherapy of Parkinson disease and nicotine dependence. The α6 subunit is closely related to the α3 subunit, and this presents a problem in designing ligands that discriminate between α6β2* and α3β2* nAChRs. We used positional scanning mutagenesis of α-conotoxin PeIA, which targets both α6β2* and α3β2*, in combination with mutagenesis of the α6 and α3 subunits, to gain molecular insights into the interaction of PeIA with heterologously expressed α6/α3β2β3 and α3β2 receptors. Mutagenesis of PeIA revealed that Asn(11) was located in an important position that interacts with the α6 and α3 subunits. Substitution of Asn(11) with a positively charged amino acid essentially abolished the activity of PeIA for α3β2 but not for α6/α3β2β3 receptors. These results were used to synthesize a PeIA analog that was >15,000-fold more potent on α6/α3β2β3 than α3β2 receptors. Analogs with an N11R substitution were then used to show a critical interaction between the 11th position of PeIA and Glu(152) of the α6 subunit and Lys(152) of the α3 subunit. The results of these studies provide molecular insights into designing ligands that selectively target α6β2* nAChRs.

  13. Structure-Based Mutagenesis of the Substrate-Recognition Domain of Nrdp1/FLRF Identifies the Binding Site for the Receptor Tyrosine Kinase ErbB3

    SciTech Connect

    Bouyain,S.; Leahy, D.

    2007-01-01

    The E3 ubiquitin ligase neuregulin receptor degrading protein 1 (Nrdp1) mediates the ligand-independent degradation of the epidermal growth factor receptor family member ErbB3/HER3. By regulating cellular levels of ErbB3, Nrdp1 influences ErbB3-mediated signaling, which is essential for normal vertebrate development. Nrdp1 belongs to the tripartite or RBCC (RING, B-box, coiled-coil) family of ubiquitin ligases in which the RING domain is responsible for ubiquitin ligation and a variable C-terminal region mediates substrate recognition. We report here the 1.95 A crystal structure of the C-terminal domain of Nrdp1 and show that this domain is sufficient to mediate ErbB3 binding. Furthermore, we have used site-directed mutagenesis to map regions of the Nrdp1 surface that are important for interacting with ErbB3 and mediating its degradation in transfected cells. The ErbB3-binding site localizes to a region of Nrdp1 that is conserved from invertebrates to vertebrates, in contrast to ErbB3, which is only found in vertebrates. This observation suggests that Nrdp1 uses a common binding site to recognize its targets in different species.

  14. Second-Site Mutagenesis of a Hypomorphic argonaute1 Allele Identifies SUPERKILLER3 as an Endogenous Suppressor of Transgene Posttranscriptional Gene Silencing1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Agnès; Saudemont, Baptiste; Bouteiller, Nathalie; Elvira-Matelot, Emilie; Lepère, Gersende; Parent, Jean-Sébastien; Morel, Jean-Benoit; Cao, Jun; Elmayan, Taline; Vaucheret, Hervé

    2015-01-01

    Second-site mutagenesis was performed on the argonaute1-33 (ago1-33) hypomorphic mutant, which exhibits reduced sense transgene posttranscriptional gene silencing (S-PTGS). Mutations in FIERY1, a positive regulator of the cytoplasmic 5′-to-3′ EXORIBONUCLEASE4 (XRN4), and in SUPERKILLER3 (SKI3), a member of the SKI complex that threads RNAs directly to the 3′-to-5′ exoribonuclease of the cytoplasmic exosome, compensated AGO1 partial deficiency and restored S-PTGS with 100% efficiency. Moreover, xrn4 and ski3 single mutations provoked the entry of nonsilenced transgenes into S-PTGS and enhanced S-PTGS on partially silenced transgenes, indicating that cytoplasmic 5′-to-3′ and 3′-to-5′ RNA degradation generally counteract S-PTGS, likely by reducing the amount of transgene aberrant RNAs that are used by the S-PTGS pathway to build up small interfering RNAs that guide transgene RNA cleavage by AGO1. Constructs generating improperly terminated transgene messenger RNAs (mRNAs) were not more sensitive to ski3 or xrn4 than regular constructs, suggesting that improperly terminated transgene mRNAs not only are degraded from both the 3′ end but also from the 5′ end, likely after decapping. The facts that impairment of either 5′-to-3′ or 3′-to-5′ RNA degradation is sufficient to provoke the entry of transgene RNA into the S-PTGS pathway, whereas simultaneous impairment of both pathways is necessary to provoke the entry of endogenous mRNA into the S-PTGS pathway, suggest poor RNA quality upon the transcription of transgenes integrated at random genomic locations. PMID:26286717

  15. Targeted Mutagenesis in Zebrafish Using Customized Zinc Finger Nucleases

    PubMed Central

    Foley, Jonathan E.; Maeder, Morgan L.; Pearlberg, Joseph; Joung, J. Keith; Peterson, Randall T.; Yeh, Jing-Ruey J.

    2009-01-01

    Zebrafish mutants have traditionally been obtained using random mutagenesis or retroviral insertions, methods that cannot be targeted to a specific gene and require laborious gene mapping and sequencing. Recently, we and others have shown that customized zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs) can introduce targeted frame-shift mutations with high efficiency, thereby enabling directed creation of zebrafish gene mutations. Here we describe a detailed protocol for constructing ZFN expression vectors, for generating and introducing ZFN-encoding RNAs into zebrafish embryos, and for identifying ZFN-generated mutations in targeted genomic sites. All of our vectors and methods are compatible with previously described Zinc Finger Consortium reagents for constructing engineered zinc finger arrays. Using these methods, zebrafish founders carrying targeted mutations can be identified within four months. PMID:20010934

  16. Angiotensin-converting enzyme gene insertion/deletion polymorphism studies in Asian Indian pregnant women biochemically identifies gestational diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Khan, Imran A; Jahan, Parveen; Hasan, Qurratulain; Rao, Pragna

    2014-12-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is defined as glucose intolerance first recognized during pregnancy. Insertion/deletion (I/D) polymorphism of a 287 bp Alu repetitive sequence in intron 16 of the angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) gene has been widely investigated in Asian Indian populations with different ethnic origins. The present study examined possible association between I/D polymorphism of the ACE gene and GDM in Asian Indian pregnant women. A total of 200 pregnant women (100 GDM and 100 non-GDM) were recruited in this study and I/D polymorphism of a 287 bp Alu1 element inside intron 16 of the ACE gene was examined by polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based gel electrophoresis. The distribution of the variants like II, ID, and DD genotypes of ACE gene showed differences between normal GDM versus non-GDM subjects, and the frequency of the ID+ DD Vs II genotype was significant (p=0.0002) in the GDM group. ACE gene polymorphism was associated with GDM in Asian Indian pregnant women. © The Author(s) 2013.

  17. Feasibility studies on newly identified LiCrP2O7 compound for lithium insertion behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gangulibabu; Bhuvaneswari, D.; Kalaiselvi, N.

    2009-08-01

    A new category of lithium intercalating cathode candidates, namely LiCrP2O7, was synthesized at 800°C using a citric acid assisted modified (CAM) sol-gel method and examined for possible lithium insertion behavior. The formation of a phase pure and monoclinic LiCrP2O7 compound with finer crystallite size was confirmed from the X-ray diffraction patterns. The presence of nano-sized particles as observed from a transmittance electron microscope image of LiCrP2O7 and the presence of a preferred local cation environment, evidenced from Fourier transform infra-red and 7Li nuclear magnetic resonance studies, are the added advantages of the present study. Further, cyclic voltametry study performed on 2016 coin cells consisting of the synthesized LiCrP2O7 cathode revealed an excellent cycling reversibility and structural stability. Hence, CAM sol-gel synthesized LiCrP2O7 is found to possess desirable physical as well as electrochemical properties, leading one to consider the same as a possible lithium intercalating cathode material.

  18. Germline mutagenesis mediated by Sleeping Beauty transposon system in mice

    PubMed Central

    Takeda, Junji; Keng, Vincent W; Horie, Kyoji

    2007-01-01

    Following the descovery of its transposition activity in mammalian culture systems, the Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon has since been applied to achieve germline mutagenesis in mice. Initially, the transposition efficiency was found to be low in cultured systems, but its activity in germ cells was unexpectedly high. This difference in transposition efficiency was found to be largely dependent on chromosomal status of the host genomic DNA and transposon vector design. The SB transposon system has been found to be suitable for comprehensive mutagenesis in mice. Therefore, it is an effective tool as a forward genetics screen for tagged insertional mutagenesis in mice. PMID:18047691

  19. A Validation Study of a Novel 3-Dimensional MRI Modeling Technique to Identify the Anatomic Insertions of the Anterior Cruciate Ligament

    PubMed Central

    Hui, Catherine; Pi, Yeli; Swami, Vimarsha; Mabee, Myles; Jaremko, Jacob L.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Anatomic single bundle anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is the current gold standard in ACL reconstructive surgery. However, placement of femoral and tibial tunnels at the anatomic center of the ACL insertion sites can be difficult intraoperatively. We developed a “virtual arthroscopy” program that allows users to identify ACL insertions on preoperative knee magnetic resonance images (MRIs) and generates a 3-dimensional (3D) bone model that matches the arthroscopic view to help guide intraoperative tunnel placement. Purpose: To test the validity of the ACL insertion sites identified using our 3D modeling program and to determine the accuracy of arthroscopic ACL reconstruction guided by our “virtual arthroscopic” model. Study Design: Descriptive laboratory study. Methods: Sixteen cadaveric knees were prescanned using routine MRI sequences. A trained, blinded observer then identified the center of the ACL insertions using our program. Eight knees were dissected, and the centers of the ACL footprints were marked with a screw. In the remaining 8 knees, arthroscopic ACL tunnels were drilled into the center of the ACL footprints based on landmarks identified using our virtual arthroscopic model. Postprocedural MRI was performed on all 16 knees. The 3D distance between pre- and postoperative 3D centers of the ACL were calculated by 2 trained, blinded observers and a musculoskeletal radiologist. Results: With 2 outliers removed, the postoperative femoral and tibial tunnel placements in the open specimens differed by 2.5 ± 0.9 mm and 2.9 ± 0.7 mm from preoperative centers identified on MRI. Postoperative femoral and tibial tunnel centers in the arthroscopic specimens differed by 3.2 ± 0.9 mm and 2.9 ± 0.7 mm, respectively. Conclusion: Our results show that MRI-based 3D localization of the ACL and our virtual arthroscopic modeling program is feasible and does not show a statistically significant difference to an open arthrotomy approach

  20. Transposon Mutagenesis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Largaespada, David A.

    2010-01-01

    Understanding the functional landscape of the mammalian genome is the next big challenge of biomedical research. The completion of the first phases of the mouse and human genome projects, and expression analyses using microarray hybridization, generate critically important questions about the functional landscape and structure of the mammalian genome: how many genes, and of what type, are there; what kind of functional elements make up a properly functioning gene? One step in this process will be to create mutations in every identifiable mouse gene and analyze the resultant phenotypes. Transposons are being considered as tools to further initiatives to create a comprehensive resource of mutant mouse strains. Also, it may be possible to use transposons in true forward genetic screens in the mouse. The “Sleeping Beauty” (SB) transposon system is one such tool. Moreover, due to its tendency for local hopping, SB has been proposed as a method for regional saturation mutagenesis of the mouse genome. In this chapter, we review the tools and methods currently available to create mutant mice using in vivo, germline transposition in mice. PMID:19266336

  1. Use of site-directed mutagenesis of allele-specific PCR primers to identify the GSTM1 A, GSTM1 B, GSTM1 A,B and GSTM1 null polymorphisms at the glutathione S-transferase, GSTM1 locus.

    PubMed Central

    Fryer, A A; Zhao, L; Alldersea, J; Pearson, W R; Strange, R C

    1993-01-01

    We describe the identification of the GSTM1 null, GSTM1 A, GSTM1 B and GSTM1 A,B polymorphisms at the glutathione S-transferase GSTM1 locus using a single-step PCR method. Target DNA was amplified using primers to intron 6 and exon 7 with site-directed mutagenesis being used to introduce a restriction site in DNA amplified from GSTM1 *A, thereby allowing differentiation of this allele and GSTM1 *B. The accuracy of this approach in identifying the GSTM1 A, GSTM1 B, GSTM1 A,B and GSTM1 null polymorphisms was confirmed by comparison with, firstly, an established PCR method that distinguishes GSTM1 *0 homozygotes from individuals with the other GSTM1 genotypes and, secondly, GSTM1 phenotypes determined using chromatofocusing. Images Figure 1 PMID:8216235

  2. A robust protocol for efficient generation, and genomic characterization of insertional mutants of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Pollock, Steve V; Mukherjee, Bratati; Bajsa-Hirschel, Joanna; Machingura, Marylou C; Mukherjee, Ananya; Grossman, Arthur R; Moroney, James V

    2017-01-01

    Random insertional mutagenesis of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii using drug resistance cassettes has contributed to the generation of tens of thousands of transformants in dozens of labs around the world. In many instances these insertional mutants have helped elucidate the genetic basis of various physiological processes in this model organism. Unfortunately, the insertion sites of many interesting mutants are never defined due to experimental difficulties in establishing the location of the inserted cassette in the Chlamydomonas genome. It is fairly common that several months, or even years of work are conducted with no result. Here we describe a robust method to identify the location of the inserted DNA cassette in the Chlamydomonas genome. Insertional mutants were generated using a DNA cassette that confers paromomycin resistance. This protocol identified the cassette insertion site for greater than 80% of the transformants. In the majority of cases the insertion event was found to be simple, without large deletions of flanking genomic DNA. Multiple insertions were observed in less than 10% of recovered transformants. The method is quick, relatively inexpensive and does not require any special equipment beyond an electroporator. The protocol was tailored to ensure that the sequence of the Chlamydomonas genomic DNA flanking the random insertion is consistently obtained in a high proportion of transformants. A detailed protocol is presented to aid in the experimental design and implementation of mutant screens in Chlamydomonas.

  3. Large-Scale Mutagenesis of the Yeast Genome Using a Tn7-Derived Multipurpose Transposon

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Anuj; Seringhaus, Michael; Biery, Matthew C.; Sarnovsky, Robert J.; Umansky, Lara; Piccirillo, Stacy; Heidtman, Matthew; Cheung, Kei-Hoi; Dobry, Craig J.; Gerstein, Mark B.; Craig, Nancy L.; Snyder, Michael

    2004-01-01

    We present here an unbiased and extremely versatile insertional library of yeast genomic DNA generated by in vitro mutagenesis with a multipurpose element derived from the bacterial transposon Tn7. This mini-Tn7 element has been engineered such that a single insertion can be used to generate a lacZ fusion, gene disruption, and epitope-tagged gene product. Using this transposon, we generated a plasmid-based library of ∼300,000 mutant alleles; by high-throughput screening in yeast, we identified and sequenced 9032 insertions affecting 2613 genes (45% of the genome). From analysis of 7176 insertions, we found little bias in Tn7 target-site selection in vitro. In contrast, we also sequenced 10,174 Tn3 insertions and found a markedly stronger preference for an AT-rich 5-base pair target sequence. We further screened 1327 insertion alleles in yeast for hypersensitivity to the chemotherapeutic cisplatin. Fifty-one genes were identified, including four functionally uncharacterized genes and 25 genes involved in DNA repair, replication, transcription, and chromatin structure. In total, the collection reported here constitutes the largest plasmid-based set of sequenced yeast mutant alleles to date and, as such, should be singularly useful for gene and genome-wide functional analysis. PMID:15466296

  4. Large-scale mutagenesis of the yeast genome using a Tn7-derived multipurpose transposon.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Anuj; Seringhaus, Michael; Biery, Matthew C; Sarnovsky, Robert J; Umansky, Lara; Piccirillo, Stacy; Heidtman, Matthew; Cheung, Kei-Hoi; Dobry, Craig J; Gerstein, Mark B; Craig, Nancy L; Snyder, Michael

    2004-10-01

    We present here an unbiased and extremely versatile insertional library of yeast genomic DNA generated by in vitro mutagenesis with a multipurpose element derived from the bacterial transposon Tn7. This mini-Tn7 element has been engineered such that a single insertion can be used to generate a lacZ fusion, gene disruption, and epitope-tagged gene product. Using this transposon, we generated a plasmid-based library of approximately 300,000 mutant alleles; by high-throughput screening in yeast, we identified and sequenced 9032 insertions affecting 2613 genes (45% of the genome). From analysis of 7176 insertions, we found little bias in Tn7 target-site selection in vitro. In contrast, we also sequenced 10,174 Tn3 insertions and found a markedly stronger preference for an AT-rich 5-base pair target sequence. We further screened 1327 insertion alleles in yeast for hypersensitivity to the chemotherapeutic cisplatin. Fifty-one genes were identified, including four functionally uncharacterized genes and 25 genes involved in DNA repair, replication, transcription, and chromatin structure. In total, the collection reported here constitutes the largest plasmid-based set of sequenced yeast mutant alleles to date and, as such, should be singularly useful for gene and genome-wide functional analysis.

  5. Establishment of Tn5096-Based Transposon Mutagenesis in Gordonia polyisoprenivorans

    PubMed Central

    Banh, Quyen; Arenskötter, Matthias; Steinbüchel, Alexander

    2005-01-01

    The transposons Tn5, Tn10, Tn611, and Tn5096 were characterized regarding transposition in Gordonia polyisoprenivorans strain VH2. No insertional mutants were obtained employing Tn5 or Tn10. The thermosensitive plasmid pCG79 harboring Tn611 integrated into the chromosome of G. polyisoprenivorans; however, the insertional mutants were fairly unstable und reverted frequently to the wild-type phenotype. In contrast, various stable mutants were obtained employing Tn5096-mediated transposon mutagenesis. Auxotrophic mutants, mutants defective or deregulated in carotenoid biosynthesis, and mutants defective in utilization of rubber and/or highly branched isoprenoid hydrocarbons were obtained by integration of plasmid pMA5096 harboring Tn5096 as a whole into the genome. From about 25,000 isolated mutants, the insertion loci of pMA5096 were subsequently mapped in 20 independent mutants in genes which could be related to the above-mentioned metabolic pathways or to putative regulation proteins. Analyses of the genotypes of pMA5096-mediated mutants defective in biodegradation of poly(cis-1,4-isoprene) did not reveal homologues to recently identified genes coding for enzymes catalyzing the initial cleavage of poly(cis-1,4-isoprene). One rubber-negative mutant was disrupted in mcr, encoding an α-methylacyl-coenzyme A racemase. This mutant was defective in degradation of poly(cis-1,4-isoprene) and also of highly branched isoprenoid hydrocarbons. PMID:16151089

  6. Saturation Mutagenesis of a CepR Binding Site as a Means to Identify New Quorum-regulated Promoters in Burkholderia cenocepacia

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Yuping; Ryan, Gina T.; Flores-Mireles, Ana L.; Costa, Esther D.; Schneider, David J.; Winans, Stephen C.

    2011-01-01

    Burkholderia cenocepacia is an opportunistic pathogen of humans that encodes two genes that resemble the acylhomoserine lactone (AHL) synthase gene luxI of Vibrio fischeri and three genes that resemble the AHL receptor gene luxR. Of these, CepI synthesizes octanoylhomoserine lactone (OHL), while CepR is an OHL-dependent transcription factor. In the current study we developed a strategy to identify genes that are directly regulated by CepR. We systematically altered a CepR binding site (cep box) upstream of a target promoter to identify nucleotides that are essential for CepR activity in vivo and for CepR binding in vitro. We constructed 34 self-complementary oligonucleotides containing altered cep boxes, and measured binding affinity for each. These experiments allowed us to identify a consensus CepR binding site. Several hundred similar sequences were identified, some of which were adjacent to probable promoters. Several such promoters were fused to a reporter gene with and without intact cep boxes. This allowed us to identify four new regulated promoters that were induced by OHL, and that required a cep box for induction. CepR-dependent, OHL-dependent expression of all four promoters was reconstituted in E. coli. Purified CepR bound to each of these sites in electrophoretic mobility shift assays. PMID:21255107

  7. A Plasmid-Transposon Hybrid Mutagenesis System Effective in a Broad Range of Enterobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Monson, Rita; Smith, Debra S.; Matilla, Miguel A.; Roberts, Kevin; Richardson, Elizabeth; Drew, Alison; Williamson, Neil; Ramsay, Josh; Welch, Martin; Salmond, George P. C.

    2015-01-01

    Random transposon mutagenesis is a powerful technique used to generate libraries of genetic insertions in many different bacterial strains. Here we develop a system facilitating random transposon mutagenesis in a range of different Gram-negative bacterial strains, including Pectobacterium atrosepticum, Citrobacter rodentium, Serratia sp. ATCC39006, Serratia plymuthica, Dickeya dadantii, and many more. Transposon mutagenesis was optimized in each of these strains and three studies are presented to show the efficacy of this system. Firstly, the important agricultural pathogen D. dadantii was mutagenized. Two mutants that showed reduced protease production and one mutant producing the previously cryptic pigment, indigoidine, were identified and characterized. Secondly, the enterobacterium, Serratia sp. ATCC39006 was mutagenized and mutants incapable of producing gas vesicles, proteinaceous intracellular organelles, were identified. One of these contained a β-galactosidase transcriptional fusion within the gene gvpA1, essential for gas vesicle production. Finally, the system was used to mutate the biosynthetic gene clusters of the antifungal, anti-oomycete and anticancer polyketide, oocydin A, in the plant-associated enterobacterium, Dickeya solani MK10. The mutagenesis system was developed to allow easy identification of transposon insertion sites by sequencing, after facile generation of a replicon encompassing the transposon and adjacent DNA, post-excision. Furthermore, the system can also create transcriptional fusions with either β-galactosidase or β-glucuronidase as reporters, and exploits a variety of drug resistance markers so that multiple selectable fusions can be generated in a single strain. This system of various transposons has wide utility and can be combined in many different ways. PMID:26733980

  8. A Plasmid-Transposon Hybrid Mutagenesis System Effective in a Broad Range of Enterobacteria.

    PubMed

    Monson, Rita; Smith, Debra S; Matilla, Miguel A; Roberts, Kevin; Richardson, Elizabeth; Drew, Alison; Williamson, Neil; Ramsay, Josh; Welch, Martin; Salmond, George P C

    2015-01-01

    Random transposon mutagenesis is a powerful technique used to generate libraries of genetic insertions in many different bacterial strains. Here we develop a system facilitating random transposon mutagenesis in a range of different Gram-negative bacterial strains, including Pectobacterium atrosepticum, Citrobacter rodentium, Serratia sp. ATCC39006, Serratia plymuthica, Dickeya dadantii, and many more. Transposon mutagenesis was optimized in each of these strains and three studies are presented to show the efficacy of this system. Firstly, the important agricultural pathogen D. dadantii was mutagenized. Two mutants that showed reduced protease production and one mutant producing the previously cryptic pigment, indigoidine, were identified and characterized. Secondly, the enterobacterium, Serratia sp. ATCC39006 was mutagenized and mutants incapable of producing gas vesicles, proteinaceous intracellular organelles, were identified. One of these contained a β-galactosidase transcriptional fusion within the gene gvpA1, essential for gas vesicle production. Finally, the system was used to mutate the biosynthetic gene clusters of the antifungal, anti-oomycete and anticancer polyketide, oocydin A, in the plant-associated enterobacterium, Dickeya solani MK10. The mutagenesis system was developed to allow easy identification of transposon insertion sites by sequencing, after facile generation of a replicon encompassing the transposon and adjacent DNA, post-excision. Furthermore, the system can also create transcriptional fusions with either β-galactosidase or β-glucuronidase as reporters, and exploits a variety of drug resistance markers so that multiple selectable fusions can be generated in a single strain. This system of various transposons has wide utility and can be combined in many different ways.

  9. Targeted and random mutagenesis of Ehrlichia chaffeensis for the identification of genes required for in vivo infection.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Chuanmin; Nair, Arathy D S; Indukuri, Vijaya V; Gong, Shanzhong; Felsheim, Roderick F; Jaworski, Deborah; Munderloh, Ulrike G; Ganta, Roman R

    2013-02-01

    Ehrlichia chaffeensis is a tick transmitted pathogen responsible for the disease human monocytic ehrlichiosis. Research to elucidate gene function in rickettsial pathogens is limited by the lack of genetic manipulation methods. Mutational analysis was performed, targeting to specific and random insertion sites within the bacterium's genome. Targeted mutagenesis at six genomic locations by homologous recombination and mobile group II intron-based methods led to the consistent identification of mutants in two genes and in one intergenic site; the mutants persisted in culture for 8 days. Three independent experiments using Himar1 transposon mutagenesis of E. chaffeensis resulted in the identification of multiple mutants; these mutants grew continuously in macrophage and tick cell lines. Nine mutations were confirmed by sequence analysis. Six insertions were located within non-coding regions and three were present in the coding regions of three transcriptionally active genes. The intragenic mutations prevented transcription of all three genes. Transposon mutants containing a pool of five different insertions were assessed for their ability to infect deer and subsequent acquisition by Amblyomma americanum ticks, the natural reservoir and vector, respectively. Three of the five mutants with insertions into non-coding regions grew well in deer. Transposition into a differentially expressed hypothetical gene, Ech_0379, and at 18 nucleotides downstream to Ech_0230 gene coding sequence resulted in the inhibition of growth in deer, which is further evidenced by their failed acquisition by ticks. Similarly, a mutation into the coding region of ECH_0660 gene inhibited the in vivo growth in deer. This is the first study evaluating targeted and random mutagenesis in E. chaffeensis, and the first to report the generation of stable mutants in this obligate intracellular bacterium. We further demonstrate that in vitro mutagenesis coupled with in vivo infection assessment is a

  10. Development of an efficient screening system to identify novel bone metabolism-related genes using the exchangeable gene trap mutagenesis mouse models

    PubMed Central

    Kurogi, Syuji; Sekimoto, Tomohisa; Funamoto, Taro; Ota, Tomomi; Nakamura, Shihoko; Nagai, Takuya; Nakahara, Mai; Yoshinobu, Kumiko; Araki, Kimi; Araki, Masatake; Chosa, Etsuo

    2017-01-01

    Despite numerous genetic studies on bone metabolism, understanding of the specific mechanisms is lacking. We developed an efficient screening system to identify novel genes involved in bone metabolism using mutant mouse strains registered with the Exchangeable Gene Trap Clones (EGTC) database. From 1278 trap clones in the EGTC database, 52 candidate lines were selected in the first screening, determined based on “EST profile”, “X-gal”, “Related article”, and “Novel gene”. For the second screening, bone morphometric analysis, biomechanical strength analysis, bone X-gal staining, etc. were performed on candidate lines. Forty-two male trap lines (80.8%) showed abnormalities with either bone morphometric analysis or biomechanical strength analysis. In the screening process, X-gal staining was significantly efficient (P = 0.0057). As examples, Lbr and Nedd4 trap lines selected using the screening system showed significant bone decrease and fragility, suggesting a relationship with osteoblast differentiation. This screening system using EGTC mouse lines is extremely efficient for identifying novel genes involved in bone metabolism. The gene trap lines identified as abnormal using this screening approach are highly likely to trap important genes for bone metabolism. These selected trap mice will be valuable for use as novel bio-resources in bone research. PMID:28106071

  11. 2004 Mutagenesis Gordon Conference

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Sue Jinks-Robertson

    2005-09-16

    Mutations are genetic alterations that drive biological evolution and cause many, if not all, human diseases. Mutation originates via two distinct mechanisms: ''vertical'' variation is de novo change of one or few bases, whereas ''horizontal'' variation occurs by genetic recombination, which creates new mosaics of pre-existing sequences. The Mutagenesis Conference has traditionally focused on the generation of mutagenic intermediates during normal DNA synthesis or in response to environmental insults, as well as the diverse repair mechanisms that prevent the fixation of such intermediates as permanent mutations. While the 2004 Conference will continue to focus on the molecular mechanisms of mutagenesis, there will be increased emphasis on the biological consequences of mutations, both in terms of evolutionary processes and in terms of human disease. The meeting will open with two historical accounts of mutation research that recapitulate the intellectual framework of this field and thereby place the current research paradigms into perspective. The two introductory keynote lectures will be followed by sessions on: (1) mutagenic systems, (2) hypermutable sequences, (3) mechanisms of mutation, (4) mutation avoidance systems, (5) mutation in human hereditary and infectious diseases, (6) mutation rates in evolution and genotype-phenotype relationships, (7) ecology, mutagenesis and the modeling of evolution and (8) genetic diversity of the human population and models for human mutagenesis. The Conference will end with a synthesis of the meeting as the keynote closing lecture.

  12. Computer Simulation of Mutagenesis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North, J. C.; Dent, M. T.

    1978-01-01

    A FORTRAN program is described which simulates point-substitution mutations in the DNA strands of typical organisms. Its objective is to help students to understand the significance and structure of the genetic code, and the mechanisms and effect of mutagenesis. (Author/BB)

  13. Computer Simulation of Mutagenesis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North, J. C.; Dent, M. T.

    1978-01-01

    A FORTRAN program is described which simulates point-substitution mutations in the DNA strands of typical organisms. Its objective is to help students to understand the significance and structure of the genetic code, and the mechanisms and effect of mutagenesis. (Author/BB)

  14. Mechanism of proflavin mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Sarabhai, A; Lamfrom, H

    1969-08-01

    The mutagenic action of proflavin on bacteriophage T4 is greater in the presence of defective T4 ligase than in the presence of normal T4 ligase. This suggests that the persistence of single-strand breaks in DNA enhances proflavin mutagenesis.

  15. Structure-Function Relationship of a Plant NCS1 Member – Homology Modeling and Mutagenesis Identified Residues Critical for Substrate Specificity of PLUTO, a Nucleobase Transporter from Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Witz, Sandra; Panwar, Pankaj; Schober, Markus; Deppe, Johannes; Pasha, Farhan Ahmad; Lemieux, M. Joanne; Möhlmann, Torsten

    2014-01-01

    Plastidic uracil salvage is essential for plant growth and development. So far, PLUTO, the plastidic nucleobase transporter from Arabidopsis thaliana is the only known uracil importer at the inner plastidic membrane which represents the permeability barrier of this organelle. We present the first homology model of PLUTO, the sole plant NCS1 member from Arabidopsis based on the crystal structure of the benzyl hydantoin transporter MHP1 from Microbacterium liquefaciens and validated by molecular dynamics simulations. Polar side chains of residues Glu-227 and backbones of Val-145, Gly-147 and Thr-425 are proposed to form the binding site for the three PLUTO substrates uracil, adenine and guanine. Mutational analysis and competition studies identified Glu-227 as an important residue for uracil and to a lesser extent for guanine transport. A differential response in substrate transport was apparent with PLUTO double mutants E227Q G147Q and E227Q T425A, both of which most strongly affected adenine transport, and in V145A G147Q, which markedly affected guanine transport. These differences could be explained by docking studies, showing that uracil and guanine exhibit a similar binding mode whereas adenine binds deep into the catalytic pocket of PLUTO. Furthermore, competition studies confirmed these results. The present study defines the molecular determinants for PLUTO substrate binding and demonstrates key differences in structure-function relations between PLUTO and other NCS1 family members. PMID:24621654

  16. Structure-function relationship of a plant NCS1 member--homology modeling and mutagenesis identified residues critical for substrate specificity of PLUTO, a nucleobase transporter from Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Witz, Sandra; Panwar, Pankaj; Schober, Markus; Deppe, Johannes; Pasha, Farhan Ahmad; Lemieux, M Joanne; Möhlmann, Torsten

    2014-01-01

    Plastidic uracil salvage is essential for plant growth and development. So far, PLUTO, the plastidic nucleobase transporter from Arabidopsis thaliana is the only known uracil importer at the inner plastidic membrane which represents the permeability barrier of this organelle. We present the first homology model of PLUTO, the sole plant NCS1 member from Arabidopsis based on the crystal structure of the benzyl hydantoin transporter MHP1 from Microbacterium liquefaciens and validated by molecular dynamics simulations. Polar side chains of residues Glu-227 and backbones of Val-145, Gly-147 and Thr-425 are proposed to form the binding site for the three PLUTO substrates uracil, adenine and guanine. Mutational analysis and competition studies identified Glu-227 as an important residue for uracil and to a lesser extent for guanine transport. A differential response in substrate transport was apparent with PLUTO double mutants E227Q G147Q and E227Q T425A, both of which most strongly affected adenine transport, and in V145A G147Q, which markedly affected guanine transport. These differences could be explained by docking studies, showing that uracil and guanine exhibit a similar binding mode whereas adenine binds deep into the catalytic pocket of PLUTO. Furthermore, competition studies confirmed these results. The present study defines the molecular determinants for PLUTO substrate binding and demonstrates key differences in structure-function relations between PLUTO and other NCS1 family members.

  17. Systematic site-directed mutagenesis of the Helicobacter pylori CagL protein of the Cag type IV secretion system identifies novel functional domains

    PubMed Central

    Bönig, Tobias; Olbermann, Patrick; Bats, Simon H.; Fischer, Wolfgang; Josenhans, Christine

    2016-01-01

    The Cag Type IV secretion system, which contributes to inflammation and cancerogenesis during chronic infection, is one of the major virulence factors of the bacterial gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori. We have generated and characterized a series of non-marked site-directed chromosomal mutants in H. pylori to define domains of unknown function of the essential tip protein CagL of the Cag secretion system. Characterizing the CagL mutants, we determined that their function to activate cells and transport the effector CagA was reduced to different extents. We identified three novel regions of the CagL protein, involved in its structural integrity, its possible interaction with the CagPAI T4SS pilus protein CagI, and in its binding to integrins and other host cell ligands. In particular two novel variable CagL motifs were involved in integrin binding, TSPSA, and TASLI, which is located opposite of its integrin binding motif RGD. We thereby defined functionally important subdomains within the CagL structure, which can be used to clarify CagL contributions in the context of other CagPAI proteins or for inhibition of the CagT4SS. This structure-function correlation of CagL domains can also be instructive for the functional characterization of other potential VirB5 orthologs whose structure is not yet known. PMID:27922023

  18. Design, synthesis and evaluation of a potent substrate analog inhibitor identified by scanning Ala/Phe mutagenesis, mimicking substrate co-evolution, against multidrug-resistant HIV-1 protease.

    PubMed

    Yedidi, Ravikiran S; Muhuhi, Joseck M; Liu, Zhigang; Bencze, Krisztina Z; Koupparis, Kyriacos; O'Connor, Carrie E; Kovari, Iulia A; Spaller, Mark R; Kovari, Ladislau C

    2013-09-06

    Multidrug-resistant (MDR) clinical isolate-769, human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) protease (PDB ID: 1TW7), was shown to exhibit wide-open flaps and an expanded active site cavity, causing loss of contacts with protease inhibitors. In the current study, the expanded active site cavity of MDR769 HIV-1 protease was screened with a series of peptide-inhibitors that were designed to mimic the natural substrate cleavage site, capsid/p2. Scanning Ala/Phe chemical mutagenesis approach was incorporated into the design of the peptide series to mimic the substrate co-evolution. Among the peptides synthesized and evaluated, a lead peptide (6a) with potent activity (IC50: 4.4nM) was identified against the MDR769 HIV-1 protease. Isothermal titration calorimetry data showed favorable binding profile for 6a against both wild type and MDR769 HIV-1 protease variants. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectrum of (15)N-labeled MDR769 HIV-1 protease in complex with 6a showed some major perturbations in chemical shift, supporting the peptide induced conformational changes in protease. Modeling analysis revealed multiple contacts between 6a and MDR769 HIV-1 protease. The lead peptide-inhibitor, 6a, with high potency and good binding profile can be used as the basis for developing potent small molecule inhibitors against MDR variants of HIV. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Comprehensive Essentiality Analysis of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis Genome via Saturating Transposon Mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    DeJesus, Michael A.; Gerrick, Elias R.; Xu, Weizhen; Park, Sae Woong; Long, Jarukit E.; Boutte, Cara C.; Rubin, Eric J.; Schnappinger, Dirk; Ehrt, Sabine; Fortune, Sarah M.; Sassetti, Christopher M.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT   For decades, identifying the regions of a bacterial chromosome that are necessary for viability has relied on mapping integration sites in libraries of random transposon mutants to find loci that are unable to sustain insertion. To date, these studies have analyzed subsaturated libraries, necessitating the application of statistical methods to estimate the likelihood that a gap in transposon coverage is the result of biological selection and not the stochasticity of insertion. As a result, the essentiality of many genomic features, particularly small ones, could not be reliably assessed. We sought to overcome this limitation by creating a completely saturated transposon library in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. In assessing the composition of this highly saturated library by deep sequencing, we discovered that a previously unknown sequence bias of the Himar1 element rendered approximately 9% of potential TA dinucleotide insertion sites less permissible for insertion. We used a hidden Markov model of essentiality that accounted for this unanticipated bias, allowing us to confidently evaluate the essentiality of features that contained as few as 2 TA sites, including open reading frames (ORF), experimentally identified noncoding RNAs, methylation sites, and promoters. In addition, several essential regions that did not correspond to known features were identified, suggesting uncharacterized functions that are necessary for growth. This work provides an authoritative catalog of essential regions of the M. tuberculosis genome and a statistical framework for applying saturating mutagenesis to other bacteria. PMID:28096490

  20. Transposon and Deletion Mutagenesis of Genes Involved in Perchlorate Reduction in Azospira suillum PS

    PubMed Central

    Melnyk, Ryan A.; Clark, Iain C.; Liao, Annette; Coates, John D.

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Although much work on the biochemistry of the key enzymes of bacterial perchlorate reduction, chlorite dismutase, and perchlorate reductase has been published, understanding of the molecular mechanisms of this metabolism has been somewhat hampered by the lack of a clear model system amenable to genetic manipulation. Using transposon mutagenesis and clean deletions, genes important for perchlorate reduction in Azospira suillum PS have been identified both inside and outside the previously described perchlorate reduction genomic island (PRI). Transposon mutagenesis identified 18 insertions in 11 genes that completely abrogate growth via reduction of perchlorate but have no phenotype during denitrification. Of the mutants deficient in perchlorate reduction, 14 had insertions that were mapped to eight different genes within the PRI, highlighting its importance in this metabolism. To further explore the role of these genes, we also developed systems for constructing unmarked deletions and for complementing these deletions. Using these tools, every core gene in the PRI was systematically deleted; 8 of the 17 genes conserved in the PRI are essential for perchlorate respiration, including 3 genes that comprise a unique histidine kinase system. Interestingly, the other 9 genes in the PRI are not essential for perchlorate reduction and may thus have unknown functions during this metabolism. We present a model detailing our current understanding of perchlorate reduction that incorporates new concepts about this metabolism. PMID:24381299

  1. Rapid mapping of insertional mutations to probe cell wall regulation in Cryptococcus neoformans.

    PubMed

    Esher, Shannon K; Granek, Joshua A; Alspaugh, J Andrew

    2015-09-01

    Random insertional mutagenesis screens are important tools in microbial genetics studies. Investigators in fungal systems have used the plant pathogen Agrobacterium tumefaciens to create tagged, random mutations for genetic screens in their fungal species of interest through a unique process of trans-kingdom cellular transconjugation. However, identifying the locations of insertion has traditionally required tedious PCR-based methods, limiting the effective throughput of this system. We have developed an efficient genomic sequencing and analysis method (AIM-Seq) to facilitate identification of randomly generated genomic insertions in microorganisms. AIM-Seq combines batch sampling, whole genome sequencing, and a novel bioinformatics pipeline, AIM-HII, to rapidly identify sites of genomic insertion. We have specifically applied this technique to Agrobacterium-mediated transconjugation in the human fungal pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans. With this approach, we have screened a library of C. neoformans cell wall mutants, selecting twenty-seven mutants of interest for analysis by AIM-Seq. We identified thirty-five putative genomic insertions in known and previously unknown regulators of cell wall processes in this pathogenic fungus. We confirmed the relevance of a subset of these by creating independent mutant strains and analyzing resulting cell wall phenotypes. Through our sequence-based analysis of these mutations, we observed "typical" insertions of the Agrobacterium transfer DNA as well as atypical insertion events, including large deletions and chromosomal rearrangements. Initially applied to C. neoformans, this mutant analysis tool can be applied to a wide range of experimental systems and methods of mutagenesis, facilitating future microbial genetic screens.

  2. Design, synthesis and evaluation of a potent substrate analog inhibitor identified by scanning Ala/Phe mutagenesis, mimicking substrate co-evolution, against multidrug-resistant HIV-1 protease

    SciTech Connect

    Yedidi, Ravikiran S.; Muhuhi, Joseck M.; Liu, Zhigang; Bencze, Krisztina Z.; Koupparis, Kyriacos; O’Connor, Carrie E.; Kovari, Iulia A.; Spaller, Mark R.; Kovari, Ladislau C.

    2013-09-06

    Highlights: •Inhibitors against MDR HIV-1 protease were designed, synthesized and evaluated. •Lead peptide (6a) showed potent inhibition (IC{sub 50}: 4.4 nM) of MDR HIV-1 protease. •(6a) Showed favorable binding isotherms against NL4-3 and MDR proteases. •(6a) Induced perturbations in the {sup 15}N-HSQC spectrum of MDR HIV-1 protease. •Molecular modeling suggested that (6a) may induce total flap closure inMDR protease. -- Abstract: Multidrug-resistant (MDR) clinical isolate-769, human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) protease (PDB ID: (1TW7)), was shown to exhibit wide-open flaps and an expanded active site cavity, causing loss of contacts with protease inhibitors. In the current study, the expanded active site cavity of MDR769 HIV-1 protease was screened with a series of peptide-inhibitors that were designed to mimic the natural substrate cleavage site, capsid/p2. Scanning Ala/Phe chemical mutagenesis approach was incorporated into the design of the peptide series to mimic the substrate co-evolution. Among the peptides synthesized and evaluated, a lead peptide (6a) with potent activity (IC{sub 50}: 4.4 nM) was identified against the MDR769 HIV-1 protease. Isothermal titration calorimetry data showed favorable binding profile for 6aagainst both wild type and MDR769 HIV-1 protease variants. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectrum of {sup 15}N-labeled MDR769 HIV-1 protease in complex with 6a showed some major perturbations in chemical shift, supporting the peptide induced conformational changes in protease. Modeling analysis revealed multiple contacts between 6a and MDR769 HIV-1 protease. The lead peptide-inhibitor, 6a, with high potency and good binding profile can be used as the basis for developing potent small molecule inhibitors against MDR variants of HIV.

  3. Isolation of Insertion Sequence ISRLdTAL1145-1 from a Rhizobium sp. (Leucaena diversifolia) and Distribution of Homologous Sequences Identifying Cross-Inoculation Group Relationships †

    PubMed Central

    Rice, Douglas J.; Somasegaran, Padma; MacGlashan, Kathryn; Bohlool, B. Ben

    1994-01-01

    Insertion sequence (IS) element ISRLdTAL1145-1 from Rhizobium sp. (Leucaena diversifolia) strain TAL 1145 was entrapped in the sacB gene of the positive selection vector pUCD800 by insertional inactivation. A hybridization probe prepared from the whole 2.5-kb element was used to determine the distribution of homologous sequences in a diverse collection of 135 Rhizobium and Bradyrhizobium strains. The IS probe hybridized strongly to Southern blots of genomic DNAs from 10 rhizobial strains that nodulate both Phaseolus vulgaris (beans) and Leucaena leucocephala (leguminous trees), 1 Rhizobium sp. that nodulates Leucaena spp., 9 R. meliloti (alfalfa) strains, 4 Rhizobium spp. that nodulate Sophora chrysophylla (leguminous trees), and 1 nonnodulating bacterium associated with the nodules of Pithecellobium dulce from the Leucaena cross-inoculation group, producing distinguishing IS patterns for each strain. Hybridization analysis revealed that ISRLdTAL1145-1 was strongly homologous with and closely related to a previously isolated element, ISRm USDA1024-1 from R. meliloti, while restriction enzyme analysis found structural similarities and differences between the two IS homologs. Two internal segments of these IS elements were used to construct hybridization probes of 1.2 kb and 380 bp that delineate a structural similarity and a difference, respectively, of the two IS homologs. The internal segment probes were used to analyze the structures of homologous IS elements in other strains. Five types of structural variation in homolog IS elements were found. The predominate IS structural type naturally occurring in a strain can reasonably identify the strain's cross-inoculation group relationships. Three IS structural types were found in Rhizobium species that nodulate beans and Leucaena species, one of which included the designated type IIB strain of R. tropici (CIAT 899). Weak homology to the whole IS probe, but not with the internal segments, was found with two

  4. X-ray microtomographic confirmation of the reliability of CBCT in identifying the scalar location of cochlear implant electrode after round window insertion.

    PubMed

    Zou, Jing; Hannula, Markus; Lehto, Kalle; Feng, Hao; Lähelmä, Jaakko; Aula, Antti S; Hyttinen, Jari; Pyykkö, Ilmari

    2015-08-01

    Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) plays a key role in cochlear implantation in both planning implantation before surgery and quality control during surgery due to the high spatial resolution and convenience of application in the operation theater. We recently designed a novel, highresolution cone-beam acquisition system that has been tested in temporal bones with cochlear implantation to identify the scalar localization of the electrode arrays. The current study aimed to verify the reliability of the experimental CBCT set-up using high-resolution in vitro X-ray microtomography (μCT) imaging as a reference. Nine human temporal bones were studied by inserting a straight electrode of a cochlear implant using the round window approach followed by sequential imaging using experimental CBCT and μCT with and without 1% iodine as the contrast agent. In the CBCT images, the electrodes were located in the scala tympani and near the lateral wall in all temporal bones. In the μCT images, the cochlear fine structures, including Reissner's membrane, stria vascularis, spiral ligament, basilar membrane, spiral limbus, osseous spiral lamina, and Rosenthal's canal that hosts the spiral ganglion cells, were clearly delineated; the electrode array avoided the lateral wall of the scala tympani in the hook region and then ran along the lateral wall of the scala tympani without any exception, a feature that was also detected in a temporal bone with ruptures in the basilar and Reissner's membranes. In conclusion, the current in vitro μCT imaging system produced high-quality images that could demonstrate the fine cochlear structures faithfully and verify the reliability of a novel experimental CBCT set-up aimed for clinical application in identifying the scalar localization of the electrode array. The straight electrode is safe for cochlear structures with low risk of translocation and is suitable for atraumatic implantation, although a large gap between the contacts and the

  5. Phenotypic mutants of the intracellular actinomycete Rhodococcus equi created by in vivo Himar1 transposon mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Ashour, Joseph; Hondalus, Mary K

    2003-04-01

    Rhodococcus equi is a facultative intracellular opportunistic pathogen of immunocompromised people and a major cause of pneumonia in young horses. An effective live attenuated vaccine would be extremely useful in the prevention of R. equi disease in horses. Toward that end, we have developed an efficient transposon mutagenesis system that makes use of a Himar1 minitransposon delivered by a conditionally replicating plasmid for construction of R. equi mutants. We show that Himar1 transposition in R. equi is random and needs no apparent consensus sequence beyond the required TA dinucleotide. The diversity of the transposon library was demonstrated by the ease with which we were able to screen for auxotrophs and mutants with pigmentation and capsular phenotypes. One of the pigmentation mutants contained an insertion in a gene encoding phytoene desaturase, an enzyme of carotenoid biosynthesis, the pathway necessary for production of the characteristic salmon color of R. equi. We identified an auxotrophic mutant with a transposon insertion in the gene encoding a putative dual-functioning GTP cyclohydrolase II-3,4-dihydroxy-2-butanone-4-phosphate synthase, an enzyme essential for riboflavin biosynthesis. This mutant cannot grow in minimal medium in the absence of riboflavin supplementation. Experimental murine infection studies showed that, in contrast to wild-type R. equi, the riboflavin-requiring mutant is attenuated because it is unable to replicate in vivo. The mutagenesis methodology we have developed will allow the characterization of R. equi virulence mechanisms and the creation of other attenuated strains with vaccine potential.

  6. Phenotypic Mutants of the Intracellular Actinomycete Rhodococcus equi Created by In Vivo Himar1 Transposon Mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Ashour, Joseph; Hondalus, Mary K.

    2003-01-01

    Rhodococcus equi is a facultative intracellular opportunistic pathogen of immunocompromised people and a major cause of pneumonia in young horses. An effective live attenuated vaccine would be extremely useful in the prevention of R. equi disease in horses. Toward that end, we have developed an efficient transposon mutagenesis system that makes use of a Himar1 minitransposon delivered by a conditionally replicating plasmid for construction of R. equi mutants. We show that Himar1 transposition in R. equi is random and needs no apparent consensus sequence beyond the required TA dinucleotide. The diversity of the transposon library was demonstrated by the ease with which we were able to screen for auxotrophs and mutants with pigmentation and capsular phenotypes. One of the pigmentation mutants contained an insertion in a gene encoding phytoene desaturase, an enzyme of carotenoid biosynthesis, the pathway necessary for production of the characteristic salmon color of R. equi. We identified an auxotrophic mutant with a transposon insertion in the gene encoding a putative dual-functioning GTP cyclohydrolase II-3,4-dihydroxy-2-butanone-4-phosphate synthase, an enzyme essential for riboflavin biosynthesis. This mutant cannot grow in minimal medium in the absence of riboflavin supplementation. Experimental murine infection studies showed that, in contrast to wild-type R. equi, the riboflavin-requiring mutant is attenuated because it is unable to replicate in vivo. The mutagenesis methodology we have developed will allow the characterization of R. equi virulence mechanisms and the creation of other attenuated strains with vaccine potential. PMID:12670990

  7. Feeding tube insertion - gastrostomy

    MedlinePlus

    ... tube insertion; G-tube insertion; PEG tube insertion; Stomach tube insertion; Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tube insertion ... and down the esophagus, which leads to the stomach. After the endoscopy tube is inserted, the skin ...

  8. Whole Genome Sequencing Identifies a 78 kb Insertion from Chromosome 8 as the Cause of Charcot-Marie-Tooth Neuropathy CMTX3

    PubMed Central

    Brewer, Megan H.; Chaudhry, Rabia; Qi, Jessica; Kidambi, Aditi; Drew, Alexander P.; Ryan, Monique M.; Subramanian, Gopinath M.; Young, Helen K.; Zuchner, Stephan; Reddel, Stephen W.; Nicholson, Garth A.; Kennerson, Marina L.

    2016-01-01

    With the advent of whole exome sequencing, cases where no pathogenic coding mutations can be found are increasingly being observed in many diseases. In two large, distantly-related families that mapped to the Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy CMTX3 locus at chromosome Xq26.3-q27.3, all coding mutations were excluded. Using whole genome sequencing we found a large DNA interchromosomal insertion within the CMTX3 locus. The 78 kb insertion originates from chromosome 8q24.3, segregates fully with the disease in the two families, and is absent from the general population as well as 627 neurologically normal chromosomes from in-house controls. Large insertions into chromosome Xq27.1 are known to cause a range of diseases and this is the first neuropathy phenotype caused by an interchromosomal insertion at this locus. The CMTX3 insertion represents an understudied pathogenic structural variation mechanism for inherited peripheral neuropathies. Our finding highlights the importance of considering all structural variation types when studying unsolved inherited peripheral neuropathy cases with no pathogenic coding mutations. PMID:27438001

  9. Whole Genome Sequencing Identifies a 78 kb Insertion from Chromosome 8 as the Cause of Charcot-Marie-Tooth Neuropathy CMTX3.

    PubMed

    Brewer, Megan H; Chaudhry, Rabia; Qi, Jessica; Kidambi, Aditi; Drew, Alexander P; Menezes, Manoj P; Ryan, Monique M; Farrar, Michelle A; Mowat, David; Subramanian, Gopinath M; Young, Helen K; Zuchner, Stephan; Reddel, Stephen W; Nicholson, Garth A; Kennerson, Marina L

    2016-07-01

    With the advent of whole exome sequencing, cases where no pathogenic coding mutations can be found are increasingly being observed in many diseases. In two large, distantly-related families that mapped to the Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy CMTX3 locus at chromosome Xq26.3-q27.3, all coding mutations were excluded. Using whole genome sequencing we found a large DNA interchromosomal insertion within the CMTX3 locus. The 78 kb insertion originates from chromosome 8q24.3, segregates fully with the disease in the two families, and is absent from the general population as well as 627 neurologically normal chromosomes from in-house controls. Large insertions into chromosome Xq27.1 are known to cause a range of diseases and this is the first neuropathy phenotype caused by an interchromosomal insertion at this locus. The CMTX3 insertion represents an understudied pathogenic structural variation mechanism for inherited peripheral neuropathies. Our finding highlights the importance of considering all structural variation types when studying unsolved inherited peripheral neuropathy cases with no pathogenic coding mutations.

  10. Function search in a large transcription factor gene family in Arabidopsis: assessing the potential of reverse genetics to identify insertional mutations in R2R3 MYB genes.

    PubMed Central

    Meissner, R C; Jin, H; Cominelli, E; Denekamp, M; Fuertes, A; Greco, R; Kranz, H D; Penfield, S; Petroni, K; Urzainqui, A; Martin, C; Paz-Ares, J; Smeekens, S; Tonelli, C; Weisshaar, B; Baumann, E; Klimyuk, V; Marillonnet, S; Patel, K; Speulman, E; Tissier, A F; Bouchez, D; Jones, J J; Pereira, A; Wisman, E

    1999-01-01

    More than 92 genes encoding MYB transcription factors of the R2R3 class have been described in Arabidopsis. The functions of a few members of this large gene family have been described, indicating important roles for R2R3 MYB transcription factors in the regulation of secondary metabolism, cell shape, and disease resistance, and in responses to growth regulators and stresses. For the majority of the genes in this family, however, little functional information is available. As the first step to characterizing these genes functionally, the sequences of >90 family members, and the map positions and expression profiles of >60 members, have been determined previously. An important second step in the functional analysis of the MYB family, through a process of reverse genetics that entails the isolation of insertion mutants, is described here. For this purpose, a variety of gene disruption resources has been used, including T-DNA-insertion populations and three distinct populations that harbor transposon insertions. We report the isolation of 47 insertions into 36 distinct MYB genes by screening a total of 73 genes. These defined insertion lines will provide the foundation for subsequent detailed functional analyses for the assignment of specific functions to individual members of the R2R3 MYB gene family. PMID:10521515

  11. Targeted mutagenesis in sea urchin embryos using TALENs.

    PubMed

    Hosoi, Sayaka; Sakuma, Tetsushi; Sakamoto, Naoaki; Yamamoto, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    Genome editing with engineered nucleases such as zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs) and transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) has been reported in various animals. We previously described ZFN-mediated targeted mutagenesis and insertion of reporter genes in sea urchin embryos. In this study, we demonstrate that TALENs can induce mutagenesis at specific genomic loci of sea urchin embryos. Injection of TALEN mRNAs targeting the HpEts transcription factor into fertilized eggs resulted in the impairment of skeletogenesis. Sequence analyses of the mutations showed that deletions and/or insertions occurred at the HpEts target site in the TALEN mRNAs-injected embryos. The results suggest that targeted gene disruption using TALENs is feasible in sea urchin embryos. © 2013 The Authors Development, Growth & Differentiation © 2013 Japanese Society of Developmental Biologists.

  12. Two novel PRP31 premessenger ribonucleic acid processing factor 31 homolog mutations including a complex insertion-deletion identified in Chinese families with retinitis pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Dong, Bing; Chen, Jieqiong; Zhang, Xiaohui; Pan, Zhe; Bai, Fengge; Li, Yang

    2013-01-01

    To identify the causative mutations in two Chinese families with retinitis pigmentosa (RP), and to describe the associated phenotype. Individuals from two unrelated families underwent full ophthalmic examinations. After informed consent was obtained, genomic DNA was extracted from the venous blood of all participants. Linkage analysis was performed on the known genetic loci for autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa with a panel of polymorphic markers in the two families, and then all coding exons of the PRP31 premessenger ribonucleic acid processing factor 31 homolog (PRPF31) gene were screened for mutations with direct sequencing of PCR-amplified DNA fragments. Allele-specific PCR was used to validate a substitution in all available family members and 100 normal controls. A large deletion was detected with real-time quantitative PCR (RQ-PCR) using a panel of primers from regions around the PRPF31 gene. Long-range PCR, followed by DNA sequencing, was used to define the breakpoints. Clinical examination and pedigree analysis revealed two four-generation families (RP24 and RP106) with autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa. A significant two-point linkage odd disequilibrium score was generated at marker D19S926 (Zmax=3.55, θ=0) for family RP24 and D19S571 (Zmax=3.21, θ=0) for family RP106, and further linkage and haplotype studies confined the disease locus to chromosome 19q13.42 where the PRPF31 gene is located. Mutation screening of the PRPF31 gene revealed a novel deletion c.1215delG (p.G405fs+7X) in family RP106. The deletion cosegregated with the family's disease phenotype, but was not found in 100 normal controls. No disease-causing mutation was detected in family RP24 with PCR-based sequencing analysis. RQ-PCR and long-range PCR analysis revealed a complex insertion-deletion (indel) in the patients of family RP24. The deletion is more than 19 kb and encompasses part of the PRPF31 gene (exons 1-3), together with three adjacent genes. Our results further

  13. Identifying Cancer Driver Genes Using Replication-Incompetent Retroviral Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Bii, Victor M.; Trobridge, Grant D.

    2016-01-01

    Identifying novel genes that drive tumor metastasis and drug resistance has significant potential to improve patient outcomes. High-throughput sequencing approaches have identified cancer genes, but distinguishing driver genes from passengers remains challenging. Insertional mutagenesis screens using replication-incompetent retroviral vectors have emerged as a powerful tool to identify cancer genes. Unlike replicating retroviruses and transposons, replication-incompetent retroviral vectors lack additional mutagenesis events that can complicate the identification of driver mutations from passenger mutations. They can also be used for almost any human cancer due to the broad tropism of the vectors. Replication-incompetent retroviral vectors have the ability to dysregulate nearby cancer genes via several mechanisms including enhancer-mediated activation of gene promoters. The integrated provirus acts as a unique molecular tag for nearby candidate driver genes which can be rapidly identified using well established methods that utilize next generation sequencing and bioinformatics programs. Recently, retroviral vector screens have been used to efficiently identify candidate driver genes in prostate, breast, liver and pancreatic cancers. Validated driver genes can be potential therapeutic targets and biomarkers. In this review, we describe the emergence of retroviral insertional mutagenesis screens using replication-incompetent retroviral vectors as a novel tool to identify cancer driver genes in different cancer types. PMID:27792127

  14. Identifying Cancer Driver Genes Using Replication-Incompetent Retroviral Vectors.

    PubMed

    Bii, Victor M; Trobridge, Grant D

    2016-10-25

    Identifying novel genes that drive tumor metastasis and drug resistance has significant potential to improve patient outcomes. High-throughput sequencing approaches have identified cancer genes, but distinguishing driver genes from passengers remains challenging. Insertional mutagenesis screens using replication-incompetent retroviral vectors have emerged as a powerful tool to identify cancer genes. Unlike replicating retroviruses and transposons, replication-incompetent retroviral vectors lack additional mutagenesis events that can complicate the identification of driver mutations from passenger mutations. They can also be used for almost any human cancer due to the broad tropism of the vectors. Replication-incompetent retroviral vectors have the ability to dysregulate nearby cancer genes via several mechanisms including enhancer-mediated activation of gene promoters. The integrated provirus acts as a unique molecular tag for nearby candidate driver genes which can be rapidly identified using well established methods that utilize next generation sequencing and bioinformatics programs. Recently, retroviral vector screens have been used to efficiently identify candidate driver genes in prostate, breast, liver and pancreatic cancers. Validated driver genes can be potential therapeutic targets and biomarkers. In this review, we describe the emergence of retroviral insertional mutagenesis screens using replication-incompetent retroviral vectors as a novel tool to identify cancer driver genes in different cancer types.

  15. Whole-body sleeping beauty mutagenesis can cause penetrant leukemia/lymphoma and rare high-grade glioma without associated embryonic lethality.

    PubMed

    Collier, Lara S; Adams, David J; Hackett, Christopher S; Bendzick, Laura E; Akagi, Keiko; Davies, Michael N; Diers, Miechaleen D; Rodriguez, Fausto J; Bender, Aaron M; Tieu, Christina; Matise, Ilze; Dupuy, Adam J; Copeland, Neal G; Jenkins, Nancy A; Hodgson, J Graeme; Weiss, William A; Jenkins, Robert B; Largaespada, David A

    2009-11-01

    The Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon system has been used as a somatic mutagen to identify candidate cancer genes. In previous studies, efficient leukemia/lymphoma formation on an otherwise wild-type genetic background occurred in mice undergoing whole-body mobilization of transposons, but was accompanied by high levels of embryonic lethality. To explore the utility of SB for large-scale cancer gene discovery projects, we have generated mice that carry combinations of different transposon and transposase transgenes. We have identified a transposon/transposase combination that promotes highly penetrant leukemia/lymphoma formation on an otherwise wild-type genetic background, yet does not cause embryonic lethality. Infiltrating gliomas also occurred at lower penetrance in these mice. SB-induced or accelerated tumors do not harbor large numbers of chromosomal amplifications or deletions, indicating that transposon mobilization likely promotes tumor formation by insertional mutagenesis of cancer genes, and not by promoting wide-scale genomic instability. Cloning of transposon insertions from lymphomas/leukemias identified common insertion sites at known and candidate novel cancer genes. These data indicate that a high mutagenesis rate can be achieved using SB without high levels of embryonic lethality or genomic instability. Furthermore, the SB system could be used to identify new genes involved in lymphomagenesis/leukemogenesis.

  16. Conditional gene-trap mutagenesis in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Maddison, Lisette A; Li, Mingyu; Chen, Wenbiao

    2014-01-01

    Zebrafish has become a widely used model for analysis of gene function. Several methods have been used to create mutations in this organism and thousands of mutant lines are available. However, all the conventional zebrafish mutations affect the gene in all cells at all time, making it difficult to determine tissue-specific functions. We have adopted a FlEx Trap approach to generate conditional mutations in zebrafish by gene-trap mutagenesis. Combined with appropriate Cre or Flp lines, the insertional mutants not only allow spatial- and temporal-specific gene inactivation but also permit spatial- and temporal-specific rescue of the disrupted gene. We provide experimental details on how to generate and use such mutations.

  17. Improved antibiotic resistance gene cassette for marker exchange mutagenesis in Ralstonia solanacearum and Burkholderia species.

    PubMed

    Um, Hae Young; Chung, Eunsook; Lee, Jai-Heon; Lee, Seon-Woo

    2011-04-01

    Marker exchange mutagenesis is a fundamental approach to understanding gene function at a molecular level in bacteria. New plasmids carrying a kanamycin resistance gene or a trimethoprim resistance gene were constructed to provide antibiotic resistance cassettes for marker exchange mutagenesis in Ralstonia solanacearum and many antibiotic-resistant Burkholderia spp. Insertion sequences present in the flanking sequences of the antibiotic resistance cassette were removed to prevent aberrant gene replacement and polar mutation during mutagenesis in wild-type bacteria. Plasmids provided in this study would be convenient for use in gene cassettes for gene replacement in other Gram-negative bacteria.

  18. Transposon mutagenesis reveals cooperation of ETS family transcription factors with signaling pathways in erythro-megakaryocytic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Jian Zhong; Carmichael, Catherine L.; Shi, Wei; Metcalf, Donald; Ng, Ashley P.; Hyland, Craig D.; Jenkins, Nancy A.; Copeland, Neal G.; Howell, Viive M.; Zhao, Zhizhuang Joe; Smyth, Gordon K.; Kile, Benjamin T.; Alexander, Warren S.

    2013-01-01

    To define genetic lesions driving leukemia, we targeted cre-dependent Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon mutagenesis to the blood-forming system using a hematopoietic-selective vav 1 oncogene (vav1) promoter. Leukemias of diverse lineages ensued, most commonly lymphoid leukemia and erythroleukemia. The inclusion of a transgenic allele of Janus kinase 2 (JAK2)V617F resulted in acceleration of transposon-driven disease and strong selection for erythroleukemic pathology with transformation of bipotential erythro-megakaryocytic cells. The genes encoding the E-twenty-six (ETS) transcription factors Ets related gene (Erg) and Ets1 were the most common sites for transposon insertion in SB-induced JAK2V617F-positive erythroleukemias, present in 87.5% and 65%, respectively, of independent leukemias examined. The role of activated Erg was validated by reproducing erythroleukemic pathology in mice transplanted with fetal liver cells expressing translocated in liposarcoma (TLS)-ERG, an activated form of ERG found in human leukemia. Via application of SB mutagenesis to TLS-ERG–induced erythroid transformation, we identified multiple loci as likely collaborators with activation of Erg. Jak2 was identified as a common transposon insertion site in TLS-ERG–induced disease, strongly validating the cooperation between JAK2V617F and transposon insertion at the Erg locus in the JAK2V617F-positive leukemias. Moreover, loci expressing other regulators of signal transduction pathways were conspicuous among the common transposon insertion sites in TLS-ERG–driven leukemia, suggesting that a key mechanism in erythroleukemia may be the collaboration of lesions disturbing erythroid maturation, most notably in genes of the ETS family, with mutations that reduce dependence on exogenous signals. PMID:23533276

  19. Transposon mutagenesis reveals cooperation of ETS family transcription factors with signaling pathways in erythro-megakaryocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jian Zhong; Carmichael, Catherine L; Shi, Wei; Metcalf, Donald; Ng, Ashley P; Hyland, Craig D; Jenkins, Nancy A; Copeland, Neal G; Howell, Viive M; Zhao, Zhizhuang Joe; Smyth, Gordon K; Kile, Benjamin T; Alexander, Warren S

    2013-04-09

    To define genetic lesions driving leukemia, we targeted cre-dependent Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon mutagenesis to the blood-forming system using a hematopoietic-selective vav 1 oncogene (vav1) promoter. Leukemias of diverse lineages ensued, most commonly lymphoid leukemia and erythroleukemia. The inclusion of a transgenic allele of Janus kinase 2 (JAK2)V617F resulted in acceleration of transposon-driven disease and strong selection for erythroleukemic pathology with transformation of bipotential erythro-megakaryocytic cells. The genes encoding the E-twenty-six (ETS) transcription factors Ets related gene (Erg) and Ets1 were the most common sites for transposon insertion in SB-induced JAK2V617F-positive erythroleukemias, present in 87.5% and 65%, respectively, of independent leukemias examined. The role of activated Erg was validated by reproducing erythroleukemic pathology in mice transplanted with fetal liver cells expressing translocated in liposarcoma (TLS)-ERG, an activated form of ERG found in human leukemia. Via application of SB mutagenesis to TLS-ERG-induced erythroid transformation, we identified multiple loci as likely collaborators with activation of Erg. Jak2 was identified as a common transposon insertion site in TLS-ERG-induced disease, strongly validating the cooperation between JAK2V617F and transposon insertion at the Erg locus in the JAK2V617F-positive leukemias. Moreover, loci expressing other regulators of signal transduction pathways were conspicuous among the common transposon insertion sites in TLS-ERG-driven leukemia, suggesting that a key mechanism in erythroleukemia may be the collaboration of lesions disturbing erythroid maturation, most notably in genes of the ETS family, with mutations that reduce dependence on exogenous signals.

  20. Insertion Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Mahillon, Jacques; Chandler, Michael

    1998-01-01

    Insertion sequences (ISs) constitute an important component of most bacterial genomes. Over 500 individual ISs have been described in the literature to date, and many more are being discovered in the ongoing prokaryotic and eukaryotic genome-sequencing projects. The last 10 years have also seen some striking advances in our understanding of the transposition process itself. Not least of these has been the development of various in vitro transposition systems for both prokaryotic and eukaryotic elements and, for several of these, a detailed understanding of the transposition process at the chemical level. This review presents a general overview of the organization and function of insertion sequences of eubacterial, archaebacterial, and eukaryotic origins with particular emphasis on bacterial elements and on different aspects of the transposition mechanism. It also attempts to provide a framework for classification of these elements by assigning them to various families or groups. A total of 443 members of the collection have been grouped in 17 families based on combinations of the following criteria: (i) similarities in genetic organization (arrangement of open reading frames); (ii) marked identities or similarities in the enzymes which mediate the transposition reactions, the recombinases/transposases (Tpases); (iii) similar features of their ends (terminal IRs); and (iv) fate of the nucleotide sequence of their target sites (generation of a direct target duplication of determined length). A brief description of the mechanism(s) involved in the mobility of individual ISs in each family and of the structure-function relationships of the individual Tpases is included where available. PMID:9729608

  1. Identification of virulence determinants for endocarditis in Streptococcus sanguinis by signature-tagged mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Paik, Sehmi; Senty, Lauren; Das, Sankar; Noe, Jody C; Munro, Cindy L; Kitten, Todd

    2005-09-01

    Streptococcus sanguinis is a gram-positive, facultative anaerobe and a normal inhabitant of the human oral cavity. It is also one of the most common agents of infective endocarditis, a serious endovascular infection. To identify virulence factors for infective endocarditis, signature-tagged mutagenesis (STM) was applied to the SK36 strain of S. sanguinis, whose genome is being sequenced. STM allows the large-scale creation, in vivo screening, and recovery of a series of mutants with altered virulence. Screening of 800 mutants by STM identified 38 putative avirulent and 5 putative hypervirulent mutants. Subsequent molecular analysis of a subset of these mutants identified genes encoding undecaprenol kinase, homoserine kinase, anaerobic ribonucleotide reductase, adenylosuccinate lyase, and a hypothetical protein. Virulence reductions ranging from 2-to 150-fold were confirmed by competitive index assays. One putatively hypervirulent strain with a transposon insertion in an intergenic region was identified, though increased virulence was not confirmed in competitive index assays. All mutants grew comparably to SK36 in aerobic broth culture except for the homoserine kinase mutant. Growth of this mutant was restored by the addition of threonine to the medium. Mutants containing an insertion or in-frame deletion in the anaerobic ribonucleotide reductase gene failed to grow under strictly anaerobic conditions. The results suggest that housekeeping functions such as cell wall synthesis, amino acid and nucleic acid synthesis, and the ability to survive under anaerobic conditions are important virulence factors in S. sanguinis endocarditis.

  2. Maize-targeted mutagenesis: A knockout resource for maize.

    PubMed

    May, Bruce P; Liu, Hong; Vollbrecht, Erik; Senior, Lynn; Rabinowicz, Pablo D; Roh, Donna; Pan, Xiaokang; Stein, Lincoln; Freeling, Mike; Alexander, Danny; Martienssen, Rob

    2003-09-30

    We describe an efficient system for site-selected transposon mutagenesis in maize. A total of 43,776 F1 plants were generated by using Robertson's Mutator (Mu) pollen parents and self-pollinated to establish a library of transposon-mutagenized seed. The frequency of new seed mutants was between 10-4 and 10-5 per F1 plant. As a service to the maize community, maize-targeted mutagenesis selects insertions in genes of interest from this library by using the PCR. Pedigree, knockout, sequence, phenotype, and other information is stored in a powerful interactive database (maize-targeted mutagenesis database) that enables analysis of the entire population and the handling of knockout requests. By inhibiting Mu activity in most F1 plants, we sought to reduce somatic insertions that may cause false positives selected from pooled tissue. By monitoring the remaining Mu activity in the F2, however, we demonstrate that seed phenotypes depend on it, and false positives occur in lines that appear to lack it. We conclude that more than half of all mutations arising in this population are suppressed on losing Mu activity. These results have implications for epigenetic models of inbreeding and for functional genomics.

  3. A piggyBac insertion disrupts Foxl2 expression that mimics BPES syndrome in mice.

    PubMed

    Shi, Fubiao; Ding, Sheng; Zhao, Shimin; Han, Min; Zhuang, Yuan; Xu, Tian; Wu, Xiaohui

    2014-07-15

    Blepharophimosis, ptosis, epicanthus inversus syndrome (BPES) is an autosomal dominant genetic disorder characterized by small palpebral fissures and other craniofacial malformations, often with (type I) but could also without (type II) premature ovarian failure. While mutations of the forkhead transcription factor FOXL2 are associated with and likely be responsible for many BPES cases, how FOXL2 affects craniofacial development remain to be understood. Through a large-scale piggyBac (PB) insertion mutagenesis, we have identified a mouse mutant carrying a PB insertion ∼160 kb upstream of the transcription start site (TSS) of Foxl2. The insertion reduces, but not eliminates, the expression of Foxl2. This mutant, but not its revertant, displays BPES-like conditions such as midface hypoplasia, eyelid abnormalities and female subfertility. Further analysis indicates that the mutation does not affect mandible, but causes premature fusion of the premaxilla-maxilla suture, smaller premaxilla and malformed maxilla during midface development. We further identified an evolutionarily conserved fragment near the insertion site and observed enhancer activity of this element in tissue culture cells. Analyses using DNase I hypersensitivity assay and chromosome conformation capture assay in developing maxillary and periocular tissues suggest that the DNA region near the insertion site likely interacts with Foxl2 TSS. Therefore, this mutant presents an excellent animal model for mechanistic study of BPES and regulation of Foxl2. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. PAX5 is a tumor suppressor in mouse mutagenesis models of acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Dang, Jinjun; Wei, Lei; de Ridder, Jeroen; Su, Xiaoping; Rust, Alistair G.; Roberts, Kathryn G.; Payne-Turner, Debbie; Cheng, Jinjun; Ma, Jing; Qu, Chunxu; Wu, Gang; Song, Guangchun; Huether, Robert G.; Schulman, Brenda; Janke, Laura; Zhang, Jinghui; Downing, James R.; van der Weyden, Louise; Adams, David J.

    2015-01-01

    Alterations of genes encoding transcriptional regulators of lymphoid development are a hallmark of B-progenitor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL) and most commonly involve PAX5, encoding the DNA-binding transcription factor paired-box 5. The majority of PAX5 alterations in ALL are heterozygous, and key PAX5 target genes are expressed in leukemic cells, suggesting that PAX5 may be a haploinsufficient tumor suppressor. To examine the role of PAX5 alterations in leukemogenesis, we performed mutagenesis screens of mice heterozygous for a loss-of-function Pax5 allele. Both chemical and retroviral mutagenesis resulted in a significantly increased penetrance and reduced latency of leukemia, with a shift to B-lymphoid lineage. Genomic profiling identified a high frequency of secondary genomic mutations, deletions, and retroviral insertions targeting B-lymphoid development, including Pax5, and additional genes and pathways mutated in ALL, including tumor suppressors, Ras, and Janus kinase-signal transducer and activator of transcription signaling. These results show that in contrast to simple Pax5 haploinsufficiency, multiple sequential alterations targeting lymphoid development are central to leukemogenesis and contribute to the arrest in lymphoid maturation characteristic of ALL. This cross-species analysis also validates the importance of concomitant alterations of multiple cellular growth, signaling, and tumor suppression pathways in the pathogenesis of B-ALL. PMID:25855603

  5. Transposon mutagenesis in Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae with a Tn10 derivative.

    PubMed Central

    Tascon, R I; Rodriguez-Ferri, E F; Gutierrez-Martin, C B; Rodriguez-Barbosa, I; Berche, P; Vazquez-Boland, J A

    1993-01-01

    A transposon mutagenesis procedure functional in the gram-negative swine pathogen Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae was developed for the first time. The technique involved the use of a suicide conjugative plasmid, pLOF/Km, carrying a mini-Tn10 with an isopropyl-beta-D-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG)-inducible transposase located outside the mobile element (M. Herrero, V. de Lorenzo, and K. N. Timmis, J. Bacteriol. 172:6557-6567, 1990). The plasmid was mobilized from Escherichia coli to A. pleuropneumoniae through the RP4-mediated broad-host-range conjugal transfer functions provided by the chromosome of the donor strain. When IPTG was present in the mating medium, A. pleuropneumoniae CM5 transposon mutants were obtained at a frequency of 10(-5), while no mutants were detected in the absence of IPTG. Since the frequency of conjugal transfer of the RP4 plasmid from E. coli to A. pleuropneumoniae CM5 was found to be as low as 10(-4), the above result indicated that the expression level of the transposase was a critical factor for obtaining a workable efficiency of transposon mutagenesis. The transposon insertions occurred at random, as determined by Southern blotting of chromosomal DNA of randomly selected mutants and by the ability to generate mutants defective for the selected phenotypes. Almost all the mutants analyzed resulted from a single insertion of the Tn10 element. About 1.2% of the mutants resulted from the cointegration of pLOF/Km into the A. pleuropneumoniae chromosome. The applicability of this transposon mutagenesis system was verified on other A. pleuropneumoniae strains of different serotypes. The usefulness of this transposon mutagenesis system in genetic studies of A. pleuropneumoniae is discussed. Images PMID:8396122

  6. Mechanisms for Complex Chromosomal Insertions

    PubMed Central

    Szafranski, Przemyslaw; Akdemir, Zeynep Coban; Yuan, Bo; Cooper, Mitchell L.; Magriñá, Maria A.; Bacino, Carlos A.; Lalani, Seema R.; Patel, Ankita; Song, Rodger H.; Bi, Weimin; Cheung, Sau Wai; Carvalho, Claudia M. B.; Lupski, James R.

    2016-01-01

    Chromosomal insertions are genomic rearrangements with a chromosome segment inserted into a non-homologous chromosome or a non-adjacent locus on the same chromosome or the other homologue, constituting ~2% of nonrecurrent copy-number gains. Little is known about the molecular mechanisms of their formation. We identified 16 individuals with complex insertions among 56,000 individuals tested at Baylor Genetics using clinical array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Custom high-density aCGH was performed on 10 individuals with available DNA, and breakpoint junctions were fine-mapped at nucleotide resolution by long-range PCR and DNA sequencing in 6 individuals to glean insights into potential mechanisms of formation. We observed microhomologies and templated insertions at the breakpoint junctions, resembling the breakpoint junction signatures found in complex genomic rearrangements generated by replication-based mechanism(s) with iterative template switches. In addition, we analyzed 5 families with apparently balanced insertion in one parent detected by FISH analysis and found that 3 parents had additional small copy-number variants (CNVs) at one or both sides of the inserting fragments as well as at the inserted sites. We propose that replicative repair can result in interchromosomal complex insertions generated through chromothripsis-like chromoanasynthesis involving two or three chromosomes, and cause a significant fraction of apparently balanced insertions harboring small flanking CNVs. PMID:27880765

  7. Mechanisms for Complex Chromosomal Insertions.

    PubMed

    Gu, Shen; Szafranski, Przemyslaw; Akdemir, Zeynep Coban; Yuan, Bo; Cooper, Mitchell L; Magriñá, Maria A; Bacino, Carlos A; Lalani, Seema R; Breman, Amy M; Smith, Janice L; Patel, Ankita; Song, Rodger H; Bi, Weimin; Cheung, Sau Wai; Carvalho, Claudia M B; Stankiewicz, Paweł; Lupski, James R

    2016-11-01

    Chromosomal insertions are genomic rearrangements with a chromosome segment inserted into a non-homologous chromosome or a non-adjacent locus on the same chromosome or the other homologue, constituting ~2% of nonrecurrent copy-number gains. Little is known about the molecular mechanisms of their formation. We identified 16 individuals with complex insertions among 56,000 individuals tested at Baylor Genetics using clinical array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Custom high-density aCGH was performed on 10 individuals with available DNA, and breakpoint junctions were fine-mapped at nucleotide resolution by long-range PCR and DNA sequencing in 6 individuals to glean insights into potential mechanisms of formation. We observed microhomologies and templated insertions at the breakpoint junctions, resembling the breakpoint junction signatures found in complex genomic rearrangements generated by replication-based mechanism(s) with iterative template switches. In addition, we analyzed 5 families with apparently balanced insertion in one parent detected by FISH analysis and found that 3 parents had additional small copy-number variants (CNVs) at one or both sides of the inserting fragments as well as at the inserted sites. We propose that replicative repair can result in interchromosomal complex insertions generated through chromothripsis-like chromoanasynthesis involving two or three chromosomes, and cause a significant fraction of apparently balanced insertions harboring small flanking CNVs.

  8. Characterization of highly efficient heavy-ion mutagenesis in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Heavy-ion mutagenesis is recognised as a powerful technology to generate new mutants, especially in higher plants. Heavy-ion beams show high linear energy transfer (LET) and thus more effectively induce DNA double-strand breaks than other mutagenic techniques. Previously, we determined the most effective heavy-ion LET (LETmax: 30.0 keV μm-1) for Arabidopsis mutagenesis by analysing the effect of LET on mutation induction. However, the molecular structure of mutated DNA induced by heavy ions with LETmax remains unclear. Knowledge of the structure of mutated DNA will contribute to the effective exploitation of heavy-ion beam mutagenesis. Results Dry Arabidopsis thaliana seeds were irradiated with carbon (C) ions with LETmax at a dose of 400 Gy and with LET of 22.5 keV μm-1 at doses of 250 Gy or 450 Gy. The effects on mutation frequency and alteration of DNA structure were compared. To characterise the structure of mutated DNA, we screened the well-characterised mutants elongated hypocotyls (hy) and glabrous (gl) and identified mutated DNA among the resulting mutants by high-resolution melting curve, PCR and sequencing analyses. The mutation frequency induced by C ions with LETmax was two-fold higher than that with 22.5 keV μm-1 and similar to the mutation frequency previously induced by ethyl methane sulfonate. We identified the structure of 22 mutated DNAs. Over 80% of the mutations caused by C ions with both LETs were base substitutions or deletions/insertions of less than 100 bp. The other mutations involved large rearrangements. Conclusions The C ions with LETmax showed high mutation efficiency and predominantly induced base substitutions or small deletions/insertions, most of which were null mutations. These small alterations can be determined by single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) detection systems. Therefore, C ions with LETmax might be useful as a highly efficient reverse genetic system in conjunction with SNP detection systems, and will be

  9. A mouse chromosome 4 balancer ENU-mutagenesis screen isolates eleven lethal lines

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    ENU-mutagenesis is a powerful technique to identify genes regulating mammalian development. To functionally annotate the distal region of mouse chromosome 4, we performed an ENU-mutagenesis screen using a balancer chromosome targeted to this region of the genome. We isolated 11 lethal lines that map...

  10. Characterization of the mgl operon of Escherichia coli by transposon mutagenesis and molecular cloning.

    PubMed

    Harayama, S; Bollinger, J; Iino, T; Hazelbauer, G L

    1983-01-01

    We used transposon insertion mutagenesis, molecular cloning, and a novel procedure for in vitro construction of polar and nonpolar insertion mutations to characterize the genetic organization and gene products of the beta-methylgalactoside (Mgl) transport system, which utilizes the galactose-binding protein. The data indicate that the mgl operon contained three genes, which were transcribed in the order mglB, mglA, and mglC. The first gene coded for the 31,000 Mr galactose-binding protein, which was synthesized as a 3,000-dalton-larger precursor form. The mglA product was a 50,000 Mr protein which was tightly associated with the membrane, and the mglC product was a 38,000 Mr protein which was apparently loosely associated with the membrane and was probably located on the internal face of the cytoplasmic membrane. Identification of gene products was facilitated by in vitro insertion of a fragment of Tn5 containing the gene conferring kanamycin resistance into a restriction site in the operon. The fragment proved to have a polar effect on the expression of promoter-distal genes only when inserted in one of the two possible orientations. The three identified gene products were necessary and apparently sufficient for transport activity, but only the binding protein was required for chemotaxis towards galactose. The transport system appeared to contain the minimum number of components for a binding protein-related system: a periplasmic recognition component, a transmembrane protein, and a peripheral membrane protein that may be involved in energy linkage.

  11. Combined use of progesterone inserts, ultrasongraphy, and GnRH to identify and resynchronize nonpregnant cows and heifers 21 days after timed artificial insemination.

    PubMed

    Kelley, D E; Ibarbia, L; Daetz, R; Bittar, J H; Risco, C A; Santos, J E P; Ribeiro, E S; Galvão, K N

    2016-01-15

    The objective was to decrease the reinsemination interval (RI) when dairy cows and heifers are inseminated using all timed artificial insemination (TAI) programs. Holstein cows (n = 211) and heifers (n = 153) were randomly assigned to a control or 21-day Resynch (21dRES) at 13 days after TAI. Animals in 21dRES (n = 109 cows and 77 heifers) had a progesterone device inserted on Day 13 and removed on Day 20 after TAI and ovaries scanned by ultrasonography. Animals found not to have an active CL (<15 mm) or a CL that decreased 10 mm or greater from Days 13 to 20, and to have a follicle of 12 mm or greater received GnRH and TAI on Day 21. Pregnancy diagnosis was performed on Day 32. Nonpregnant control cows (n = 102) were resynchronized immediately using Ovsynch-56, and control heifers (n = 76) were resynchronized using 5-day Cosynch starting on Day 34; therefore, cows and heifers were reinseminated on Day 42. Nonpregnant 21dRES animals that had not been reinseminated on Day 21 were resynchronized concurrently with the control animals. Pregnancy per AI (PAI) for the initial TAI was similar (P = 0.80) for 21dRES and control cows (30.3% vs. 29.4%) and heifers (49.4% vs. 51.3%). Of the nonpregnant 21dRES animals, 33 of 76 cows (43.4%) and 22 of 39 heifers (56.4%) had been reinseminated on Day 21. Therefore, the RI was decreased by 9.9 days (33.3 ± 1.0 vs. 43.2 ± 1.0 days; P < 0.001) in 21dRES cows and by 12.2 days in 21dRES heifers (30.1 ± 1.3 vs. 42.3 ± 1.3 days; P < 0.001) compared with controls. The overall resynchronized PAI was similar for 21dRES cows compared with controls (31.6% vs. 25.0%; P = 0.23). The PAI was 24.2% for 21dRES cows reinseminated on Day 21 and 37.2% for 21dRES cows reinseminated on Day 42. The overall resynchronized PAI was increased for 21dRES heifers compared with controls (57.5% vs. 32.4%; P = 0.03) because 21dRES heifers reinseminated on Day 21 had similar PAI compared with controls (43.5% vs. 32

  12. Chest tube insertion

    MedlinePlus

    Chest drainage tube insertion; Insertion of tube into chest; Tube thoracostomy; Pericardial drain ... When your chest tube is inserted, you will lie on your side or sit partly upright, with one arm over your head. Sometimes, ...

  13. Dihalocarbene Insertion Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goh, S. H.

    1975-01-01

    Describes the insertion reaction using the insertion of carbenes into carbon-hydrogen bonds as an example. Outlines an experiment that will illustrate dihalocarbene insertions into diisopropyl ether. (GS)

  14. A mutagenesis study of a catalytic antibody

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, D.Y.; Prudent, J.R.; Baldwin, E.P.; Schultz, P.G. )

    1991-01-01

    The authors have generated seven site-specific mutations in the genes encoding the variable region of the heavy chain domain (V{sub H}) of the phosphocholine-binding antibody S107.S107 is a member of a family of well-characterized highly homologous antibodies that bind phosphorylcholine mono- and diesters. Two of these antibodies, MOPC-167 and T15, have previously been shown to catalyze the hydrolysis of 4-nitrophenyl N-trimethylammonioethyl carbonate. Two conserved heavy-chain residues, Tyr-33 and Arg-52, were postulated to be involved in binding and hydrolysis of 4-nitrophenylcholine carbonate esters. To more precisely define the catalytic roles of these residues, three Arg-52 mutants (R52K, R52Q, R52C) and four Tyr-33 mutants (Y33H, Y33F, Y33E, Y33D) of antibody S107 were generated. The genes encoding the V{sub H} binding domain of S107 were inserted into plasmid pUC-fl, and in vitro mutagenesis was performed. These results not only demonstrate the importance of electrostatic interactions in catalysis by antibody S107 but also show that catalytic side chains can be introduced into antibodies to enhance their catalytic efficiency.

  15. An efficient TALEN mutagenesis system in rice.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kunling; Shan, Qiwei; Gao, Caixia

    2014-08-15

    Targeted gene mutagenesis is a powerful tool for elucidating gene function and facilitating genetic improvement in rice. TALENs (transcription activator-like effector nucleases), consisting of a custom TALE DNA binding domain fused to a nonspecific FokI cleavage domain, are one of the most efficient genome engineering methods developed to date. The technology of TALENs allows DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) to be introduced into predetermined chromosomal loci. DSBs trigger DNA repair mechanisms and can result in loss of gene function by error-prone non-homologous end joining (NHEJ), or they can be exploited to modify gene function or activity by precise homologous recombination (HR). In this paper, we describe a detailed protocol for constructing TALEN expression vectors, assessing nuclease activities in vivo using rice protoplast-based assays, generating and introducing TALEN DNAs into embryogenic calluses of rice and identifying TALEN-generated mutations at targeted genomic sites. Using these methods, T0 rice plants resulting from TALEN mutagenesis can be produced within 4-5 months.

  16. Massive parallel insertion site sequencing of an arrayed Sinorhizobium meliloti signature-tagged mini-Tn 5 transposon mutant library.

    PubMed

    Serrania, Javier; Johner, Tobias; Rupp, Oliver; Goesmann, Alexander; Becker, Anke

    2017-02-21

    Transposon mutagenesis in conjunction with identification of genomic transposon insertion sites is a powerful tool for gene function studies. We have implemented a protocol for parallel determination of transposon insertion sites by Illumina sequencing involving a hierarchical barcoding method that allowed for tracking back insertion sites to individual clones of an arrayed signature-tagged transposon mutant library. This protocol was applied to further characterize a signature-tagged mini-Tn 5 mutant library comprising about 12,000 mutants of the symbiotic nitrogen-fixing alphaproteobacterium Sinorhizobium meliloti (Pobigaylo et al., 2006; Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 72, 4329-4337). Previously, insertion sites have been determined for 5000 mutants of this library. Combining an adapter-free, inverse PCR method for sequencing library preparation with next generation sequencing, we identified 4473 novel insertion sites, increasing the total number of transposon mutants with known insertion site to 9562. The number of protein-coding genes that were hit at least once by a transposon increased by 1231 to a total number of 3673 disrupted genes, which represents 59% of the predicted protein-coding genes in S. meliloti.

  17. GATMD: γ-Aminobutyric Acid Transporter Mutagenesis Database

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Cynthia M.; Kidd, Patrick D.; Eskandari, Sepehr

    2010-01-01

    Since the cloning of the first γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) transporter (GAT1; SLC6A1) from rat brain in 1990, more than 50 published studies have provided structure–function information on investigator-designed rat and mouse GAT1 mutants. To date, more than 200 of 599 GAT1 residues have been subjected to mutagenesis experiments by substitution with different amino acids, and the resulting transporter functional properties have significantly advanced our understanding of the mechanism of Na+- and Cl–-coupled GABA transport by this important member of the neurotransmitter:sodium symporter family. Moreover, many studies have addressed the functional consequences of amino acid deletion or insertion at various positions along the primary sequence. The enormity of this growing body of structure–function information has prompted us to develop GABA Transporter Mutagenesis Database (GATMD), a web-accessible, relational database of manually annotated biochemical, functional and pharmacological data reported on GAT1—the most intensely studied GABA transporter isoform. As of the last update of GATMD, 52 GAT1 mutagenesis papers have yielded 3360 experimental records, which collectively contain a total of ∼100 000 annotated parameters. Database URL: http://physiology.sci.csupomona.edu/GATMD/ PMID:21131297

  18. Genome-wide mutagenesis of dengue virus reveals plasticity of the NS1 protein and enables generation of infectious tagged reporter viruses.

    PubMed

    Eyre, Nicholas S; Johnson, Stephen M; Eltahla, Auda A; Aloi, Maria; Aloia, Amanda L; McDevitt, Christopher A; Bull, Rowena A; Beard, Michael R

    2017-09-27

    Dengue virus (DENV) is a major global pathogen that causes significant morbidity and mortality in tropical and sub-tropical areas worldwide. An improved understanding of the regions within the DENV genome and its encoded proteins that are required for the virus replication cycle will expedite development of urgently required therapeutics and vaccines. We subjected an infectious DENV genome to unbiased insertional mutagenesis and employed next-generation sequencing to identify sites that tolerate 15-nucleotide insertions during the virus replication cycle in hepatic cell culture. This revealed that regions within capsid, NS1 and the 3' UTR were most tolerant of insertions. In contrast, prM- and NS2A-encoding regions were largely intolerant of insertions. Notably, the multifunctional NS1 protein readily tolerated insertions in regions within the Wing, connector and β-ladder domains with minimal effects on viral RNA replication and infectious virus production. Using this information we generated infectious reporter viruses, including a variant encoding the APEX2 electron microscopy tag in NS1 that uniquely enabled high resolution imaging of its localization to the surface and interior of viral replication vesicles. Additionally, we generated a tagged virus bearing an mScarlet fluorescent protein insertion in NS1 that, despite an impact on fitness, enabled live cell imaging of NS1 localization and traffic in infected cells. Overall, this genome-wide profile of DENV genome flexibility may be further dissected and exploited in reporter virus generation and antiviral strategies.IMPORTANCE Regions of genetic flexibility in viral genomes can be exploited in generation of reporter virus tools and should arguably be avoided in antiviral drug and vaccine design. Here we subjected the DENV genome to high-throughput insertional mutagenesis to identify regions of genetic flexibility and enable tagged reporter virus generation. In particular, the viral NS1 protein displayed

  19. The rice miniature inverted repeat transposable element mPing is an effective insertional mutagen in soybean.

    PubMed

    Hancock, C Nathan; Zhang, Feng; Floyd, Kristen; Richardson, Aaron O; Lafayette, Peter; Tucker, Donna; Wessler, Susan R; Parrott, Wayne A

    2011-10-01

    Insertional mutagenesis of legume genomes such as soybean (Glycine max) should aid in identifying genes responsible for key traits such as nitrogen fixation and seed quality. The relatively low throughput of soybean transformation necessitates the use of a transposon-tagging strategy where a single transformation event will produce many mutations over a number of generations. However, existing transposon-tagging tools being used in legumes are of limited utility because of restricted transposition (Ac/Ds: soybean) or the requirement for tissue culture activation (Tnt1: Medicago truncatula). A recently discovered transposable element from rice (Oryza sativa), mPing, and the genes required for its mobilization, were transferred to soybean to determine if it will be an improvement over the other available transposon-tagging tools. Stable transformation events in soybean were tested for mPing transposition. Analysis of mPing excision at early and late embryo developmental stages revealed increased excision during late development in most transgenic lines, suggesting that transposition is developmentally regulated. Transgenic lines that produced heritable mPing insertions were identified, with the plants from the highest activity line producing at least one new insertion per generation. Analysis of the mPing insertion sites in the soybean genome revealed that features displayed in rice were retained including transposition to unlinked sites and a preference for insertion within 2.5 kb of a gene. Taken together these findings indicate that mPing has the characteristics necessary for an effective transposon-tagging resource.

  20. Coupled mutagenesis screens and genetic mapping in zebrafish.

    PubMed Central

    Rawls, John F; Frieda, Matthew R; McAdow, Anthony R; Gross, Jason P; Clayton, Chad M; Heyen, Candy K; Johnson, Stephen L

    2003-01-01

    Forward genetic analysis is one of the principal advantages of the zebrafish model system. However, managing zebrafish mutant lines derived from mutagenesis screens and mapping the corresponding mutations and integrating them into the larger collection of mutations remain arduous tasks. To simplify and focus these endeavors, we developed an approach that facilitates the rapid mapping of new zebrafish mutations as they are generated through mutagenesis screens. We selected a minimal panel of 149 simple sequence length polymorphism markers for a first-pass genome scan in crosses involving C32 and SJD inbred lines. We also conducted a small chemical mutagenesis screen that identified several new mutations affecting zebrafish embryonic melanocyte development. Using our first-pass marker panel in bulked-segregant analysis, we were able to identify the genetic map positions of these mutations as they were isolated in our screen. Rapid mapping of the mutations facilitated stock management, helped direct allelism tests, and should accelerate identification of the affected genes. These results demonstrate the efficacy of coupling mutagenesis screens with genetic mapping. PMID:12663538

  1. Exploiting the power of LINE-1 retrotransposon mutagenesis for identification of genes involved in embryonic stem cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Lenka, Nibedita; Krishnan, Shruthi; Board, Philip; Rangasamy, Danny

    2014-06-01

    Identifying the genes or epigenetic factors that control the self-renewal and differentiation of stem cells is critical to understanding the molecular basis of cell commitment. Although a number of insertional mutagenesis vectors have been developed for identifying gene functions in animal models, the L1 retrotransposition system offers additional advantages as a tool to disrupt genes in embryonic stem cells in order to identify their functions and the phenotypes associated with them. Recent advances in producing synthetic versions of L1 retrotransposon vector system and the optimization of techniques to accurately identify retrotransposon integration sites have increased their utility for gene discovery applications. We have developed a novel episomal, nonviral L1 retrotransposon vector using scaffold/matrix attachment regions that provides stable, sustained levels of retrotransposition in cell cultures without being affected by epigenetic silencing or from some of the common problems of vector integration. This modified vector contains a GFP marker whose expression occurs only after successful gene disruption events and thus the cells with disrupted genes can be easily picked for functional analysis. Here we present a method to disrupt gene function in embryonic stem cells that aid in the identification of genes involved in stem cell differentiation processes. The methods presented here can be easily adapted to the study of other types of cancer stem cells or induced pluripotent stem cells using the L1 retrotransposon as an insertional mutagen.

  2. Transposon and deletion mutagenesis of genes involved in perchlorate reduction in Azospira suillum PS.

    PubMed

    Melnyk, Ryan A; Clark, Iain C; Liao, Annette; Coates, John D

    2013-12-31

    Although much work on the biochemistry of the key enzymes of bacterial perchlorate reduction, chlorite dismutase, and perchlorate reductase has been published, understanding of the molecular mechanisms of this metabolism has been somewhat hampered by the lack of a clear model system amenable to genetic manipulation. Using transposon mutagenesis and clean deletions, genes important for perchlorate reduction in Azospira suillum PS have been identified both inside and outside the previously described perchlorate reduction genomic island (PRI). Transposon mutagenesis identified 18 insertions in 11 genes that completely abrogate growth via reduction of perchlorate but have no phenotype during denitrification. Of the mutants deficient in perchlorate reduction, 14 had insertions that were mapped to eight different genes within the PRI, highlighting its importance in this metabolism. To further explore the role of these genes, we also developed systems for constructing unmarked deletions and for complementing these deletions. Using these tools, every core gene in the PRI was systematically deleted; 8 of the 17 genes conserved in the PRI are essential for perchlorate respiration, including 3 genes that comprise a unique histidine kinase system. Interestingly, the other 9 genes in the PRI are not essential for perchlorate reduction and may thus have unknown functions during this metabolism. We present a model detailing our current understanding of perchlorate reduction that incorporates new concepts about this metabolism. Although perchlorate is generated naturally in the environment, groundwater contamination is largely a result of industrial activity. Bacteria capable of respiring perchlorate and remediating contaminated water have been isolated, but relatively little is known about the biochemistry and genetics of this process. Here we used two complementary approaches to identify genes involved in perchlorate reduction. Most of these genes are located on a genomic island

  3. Insertion mutation of the int-1 and int-2 loci by mouse mammary tumor virus in premalignant and malignant neoplasms from the GR mouse strain.

    PubMed Central

    Morris, D W; Barry, P A; Bradshaw, H D; Cardiff, R D

    1990-01-01

    Mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV)-induced mammary adenocarcinomas can develop from several different premalignant precursors common in GR mice. Insertion mutagenesis of the mammary protooncogenes int-1 and int-2 was studied in this multistep system by analyzing samples from various stages of neoplastic development for novel int-1 and int-2 restriction fragments generated by MMTV provirus integration. int-1 and int-2 insertion mutations were observed in both premalignant lesions and malignant tumors. Some of the tumors with insertion mutations were experimentally derived from insertion mutation-free premalignant precursors. Each class of neoplasm examined had a characteristic frequency of int-1 and int-2 insertion mutations; however, no correspondence was observed between neoplasm morphology and mutation of either gene. These results indicate that insertion mutation of the int-1 and int-2 loci by MMTV provirus can be involved in the earliest identifiable stages of neoplastic development as well as during progression of premalignant lesions to tumors. Insertion mutation of int-1 and int-2 is therefore not stage specific in this system. Images PMID:2157060

  4. Identification of genes involved in biofilm formation and respiration via mini-Himar transposon mutagenesis of Geobacter sulfurreducens.

    PubMed

    Rollefson, Janet B; Levar, Caleb E; Bond, Daniel R

    2009-07-01

    Electron transfer from cells to metals and electrodes by the Fe(III)-reducing anaerobe Geobacter sulfurreducens requires proper expression of redox proteins and attachment mechanisms to interface bacteria with surfaces and neighboring cells. We hypothesized that transposon mutagenesis would complement targeted knockout studies in Geobacter spp. and identify novel genes involved in this process. Escherichia coli mating strains and plasmids were used to develop a conjugation protocol and deliver mini-Himar transposons, creating a library of over 8,000 mutants that was anaerobically arrayed and screened for a range of phenotypes, including auxotrophy for amino acids, inability to reduce Fe(III) citrate, and attachment to surfaces. Following protocol validation, mutants with strong phenotypes were further characterized in a three-electrode system to simultaneously quantify attachment, biofilm development, and respiratory parameters, revealing mutants defective in Fe(III) reduction but unaffected in electron transfer to electrodes (such as an insertion in GSU1330, a putative metal export protein) or defective in electrode reduction but demonstrating wild-type biofilm formation (due to an insertion upstream of the NHL domain protein GSU2505). An insertion in a putative ATP-dependent transporter (GSU1501) eliminated electrode colonization but not Fe(III) citrate reduction. A more complex phenotype was demonstrated by a mutant containing an insertion in a transglutaminase domain protein (GSU3361), which suddenly ceased to respire when biofilms reached approximately 50% of the wild-type levels. As most insertions were not in cytochromes but rather in transporters, two-component signaling proteins, and proteins of unknown function, this collection illustrates how biofilm formation and electron transfer are separate but complementary phenotypes, controlled by multiple loci not commonly studied in Geobacter spp.

  5. Sleeping Beauty transposon mutagenesis in rat spermatogonial stem cells.

    PubMed

    Ivics, Zoltán; Izsvák, Zsuzsanna; Medrano, Gerardo; Chapman, Karen M; Hamra, F Kent

    2011-09-08

    We describe an experimental approach for generating mutant alleles in rat spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) using Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon-mediated insertional mutagenesis. The protocol is based on mobilization of mutagenic gene-trap transposons from transfected plasmid vectors into the genomes of cultured stem cells. Cells with transposon insertions in expressed genes are selected on the basis of activation of an antibiotic-resistance gene encoded by the transposon. These gene-trap clones are transplanted into the testes of recipient males (either as monoclonal or polyclonal libraries); crossing of these founders with wild-type females allows the insertions to be passed to F(1) progeny. This simple, economic and user-friendly methodological pipeline enables screens for functional gene annotation in the rat, with applicability in other vertebrate models where germ line-competent stem cells have been established. The complete protocol from transfection of SSCs to the genotyping of heterozygous F(1) offspring that harbor genomic SB gene-trap insertions takes 5-6 months.

  6. Analysis of inserts in prokaryote genomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cristea, Paul Dan; Tuduce, Rodica Aurora

    2008-02-01

    Nucleotide genomic signals satisfy regularities that reveal restrictions in the distribution of nucleotides and pairs of nucleotides along DNA sequences. Structurally, a chromosome appears to be more than a plain text, by satisfying symmetry constrains that evoke the rhythm and rhyme in poems. These regularities make it easy to identify exogenous inserts in the genomes of prokaryotes, because such inserts obey different regularities than the background sequence. The paper presents instances of inserts found in the genomes of Bacillus subtilis, Mycobacterium tuberculosis and other prokaryotes. Inserts of exogenous material are frequently accompanied by complementary inserts tending to restore the original constrains.

  7. Tailoring of global transcription sigma D factor by random mutagenesis to improve Escherichia coli tolerance towards low-pHs.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xi; Jiang, Ling; Zhu, Liying; Xu, Qing; Xu, Xian; Huang, He

    2016-04-20

    Bioconversion processes of organic acid or acid hydrolysis of raw material for microbial metabolism often suffer limitations as a result of microbial sensitivity in low-pH conditions. We adopted a three-step method called RAndom Insertional-deletional Strand Exchange mutagenesis (RAISE) to engineer the components of global regulator Sigma D factor (RpoD) of Escherichia coli to improve its acid tolerance. The best strain Mutant VII was identified from random mutagenesis libraries based on the growth performance, which exhibited much higher growth rate than the control (0.22h(-1) vs. 0.15h(-1)) at pH as low as 3.17. Combined transcriptome and phenome analysis of E. coli was carried out to better understand the global effects of RpoD on the regulatory networks. Our analysis showed that 95 (2.1%) of all E. coli genes were induced and 178 (4.0%) genes were repressed, including those for trehalose biosynthesis, nucleotides biosynthesis, carbon metabolism, amino acid utilization, except for acid resistance. Also regulated were the master regulators (ArcA, EvgA, H-NS and RpoS) and gene/operon-specific transcription factors (GadX, GadW, AppY, YdeO, KdgR). These results demonstrated that RpoD acts as global regulator in the growth phase of E. coli and consequently improves acid tolerances.

  8. Transposon Tn916 mutagenesis in Bacillus anthracis.

    PubMed Central

    Ivins, B E; Welkos, S L; Knudson, G B; Leblanc, D J

    1988-01-01

    Mutagenesis of Bacillus anthracis by the streptococcal tetracycline resistance transposon Tn916 is described. Tn916 was transferred from Streptococcus faecalis DS16C1 to B. anthracis VNR-1 by conjugation in a standard filter mating procedure. Tetracycline-resistant (Tcr) transconjugants were obtained at a frequency of 1.6 X 10(-8) per donor CFU. When donor and recipient cells were treated with nafcillin before conjugation, the frequency was increased nearly 10-fold. Nafcillin pretreatment of donor and recipient strains was used in all subsequent conjugation experiments. S.faecalis CG110, containing multiple chromosomal insertions of Tn916, transferred the transposon to B. anthracis VNR-1 at a frequency of 9.3 x 10(-5). A Tcr B. anthracis transconjugant, strain VNR-1-tet-1, transferred Tn916 to B. anthracis UM23-1 and Bacillus subtilis BST1 at frequencies of 2.1 x 10(-4) and 5.8 X 10(-6), respectively. The transfer of Tn916 occurred only on membrane filters, since no Tcr transconjugants were obtained when strains VNR-1-tet-1 and UM23-1 were mixed and incubated in broth culture. The presence of the Tn916-associated tetM gene in Tcr B. anthracis and B. subtilis transconjugants was confirmed in hybridization experiments by using a 5-kilobase-pair DNA fragment containing the tetM gene as a probe. Of 3,000 B. anthracis UM23-1 Tcr transconjugants tested, 21 were phenylalanine auxotrophs and 2 were auxotrophic for phenylalanine, tyrosine, and tryptophan. Images PMID:2826334

  9. Theory of lethal mutagenesis for viruses.

    PubMed

    Bull, J J; Sanjuán, R; Wilke, C O

    2007-03-01

    Mutation is the basis of adaptation. Yet, most mutations are detrimental, and elevating mutation rates will impair a population's fitness in the short term. The latter realization has led to the concept of lethal mutagenesis for curing viral infections, and work with drugs such as ribavirin has supported this perspective. As yet, there is no formal theory of lethal mutagenesis, although reference is commonly made to Eigen's error catastrophe theory. Here, we propose a theory of lethal mutagenesis. With an obvious parallel to the epidemiological threshold for eradication of a disease, a sufficient condition for lethal mutagenesis is that each viral genotype produces, on average, less than one progeny virus that goes on to infect a new cell. The extinction threshold involves an evolutionary component based on the mutation rate, but it also includes an ecological component, so the threshold cannot be calculated from the mutation rate alone. The genetic evolution of a large population undergoing mutagenesis is independent of whether the population is declining or stable, so there is no runaway accumulation of mutations or genetic signature for lethal mutagenesis that distinguishes it from a level of mutagenesis under which the population is maintained. To detect lethal mutagenesis, accurate measurements of the genome-wide mutation rate and the number of progeny per infected cell that go on to infect new cells are needed. We discuss three methods for estimating the former. Estimating the latter is more challenging, but broad limits to this estimate may be feasible.

  10. Trap(Seq): An RNA Sequencing-Based Pipeline for the Identification of Gene-Trap Insertions in Mammalian Cells.

    PubMed

    Mayor-Ruiz, Cristina; Dominguez, Orlando; Fernandez-Capetillo, Oscar

    2017-09-01

    The development of haploid mammalian cell lines, coupled to next-generation sequencing, has recently facilitated forward genetic screenings in mammals. For mutagenesis, retrovirus- or transposon-based gene traps are frequently used. Current methods to map gene-trap insertions are based on inverse or splinkerette PCR, which despite their efficacy are prone to artifacts and do not provide information on expression of the targeted gene. Here, we describe a new RNA sequencing-based method (Trap(Seq)) to map gene-trap insertions. By recognizing chimeric mRNAs containing gene-trap sequences spliced to an exon, our method identifies insertions that lead to productive trapping. When applied to individual mutant clones, our method provides a fast and cost-effective way that not only identifies the insertion site but also reveals its impact on the expression of the trapped gene. As proof of principle, we conducted two independent screenings for resistance against 6-thioguanine and an ATR inhibitor, which identified mutations known to provide resistance to these reagents and revealed ECT2 as a novel determinant for the sensitivity to ATR inhibition. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Environmental Stress Induces Trinucleotide Repeat Mutagenesis in Human Cells by Alt-Nonhomologous End Joining Repair.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Nimrat; Lin, Yunfu; Yotnda, Patricia; Wilson, John H

    2016-07-31

    Multiple pathways modulate the dynamic mutability of trinucleotide repeats (TNRs), which are implicated in neurodegenerative disease and evolution. Recently, we reported that environmental stresses induce TNR mutagenesis via stress responses and rereplication, with more than 50% of mutants carrying deletions or insertions-molecular signatures of DNA double-strand break repair. We now show that knockdown of alt-nonhomologous end joining (alt-NHEJ) components-XRCC1, LIG3, and PARP1-suppresses stress-induced TNR mutagenesis, in contrast to the components of homologous recombination and NHEJ, which have no effect. Thus, alt-NHEJ, which contributes to genetic mutability in cancer cells, also plays a novel role in environmental stress-induced TNR mutagenesis. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  12. Chair Inserts for Preschoolers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horn, Eva; And Others

    1987-01-01

    The article provides detailed procedures (with diagrams) for constructing cardboard chair inserts to meet the needs of preschool children with minimal to severe physical limitations. The inserts offer reduced expense and increased flexibility allowing a customized fit. (DB)

  13. Intrauterine device insertion during the postpartum period: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Kapp, Nathalie; Curtis, Kathryn M

    2009-10-01

    Insertion of an intrauterine device (IUD) at different times or by different routes during the postpartum period may increase the risk of complications. We searched Medline, Lilacs and Cochrane Collaboration databases for articles in any language, between database inception until December 2008, which compared outcomes of postpartum IUD insertion time intervals. Search terms included postpartum, puerperium, postcesarean delivery, cesarean section, IUD(s), IUCD(s), intrauterine device(s) and insertion. From 297 articles, we identified 15 for inclusion in this review: all studies examined the outcomes from copper IUD insertions within the postpartum time period compared to other time intervals or compared routes (vaginal or via hysterotomy) of postpartum insertion. No studies of levonorgestrel IUDs were identified. Immediate IUD insertion (within 10 min of placental delivery) was safe when compared with later postpartum time periods and interval insertion. Immediate postpartum IUD insertion demonstrated lower expulsion rates when compared with delayed postpartum insertion but with higher rates than interval insertion. Immediate insertion following cesarean delivery demonstrated lower expulsion rates than immediate insertion following vaginal delivery. Poor to fair quality evidence from 15 articles demonstrated no increase in risk of complications among women who had an IUD inserted during the postpartum period; however, some increase in expulsion rates occurred with delayed postpartum insertion when compared to immediate insertion and with immediate insertion when compared to interval insertion. Postplacental placements during cesarean delivery are associated with lower expulsion rates than postplacental vaginal insertions, without increasing rates of postoperative complications.

  14. Sola dosis facit venenum. Leukemia in gene therapy trials: a question of vectors, inserts and dosage?

    PubMed

    Staal, F J T; Pike-Overzet, K; Ng, Y Y; van Dongen, J J M

    2008-10-01

    In clinical gene therapy trials for X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency, the development of leukemia has come up as a severe adverse effect. In all five cases, T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) occurred as a direct consequence of insertional mutagenesis by the retrovirus used to deliver the therapeutic gene. Here, we review the mechanisms of insertional mutagenesis, the function of the Il2RG gene and the future developments in the field. New lentiviral and gamma retroviral vectors can significantly improve the safety profile of the tools used but still carry the risk of insertional mutagenesis, as shown in this issue of Leukemia. Finally, the unfortunate side effects of gene therapy have given more insight into the development of human T-ALL.

  15. A highly efficient transposon mutagenesis system for the tomato pathogen Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis.

    PubMed

    Kirchner, O; Gartemann, K H; Zellermann, E M; Eichenlaub, R; Burger, A

    2001-11-01

    A transposon mutagenesis system for Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis was developed based on antibiotic resistance transposons that were derived from the insertion element IS1409 from Arthrobacter sp. strain TM1 NCIB12013. As a prerequisite, the electroporation efficiency was optimized by using unmethylated DNA and treatment of the cells with glycine such that about 5 x 10(6) transformants per microg of DNA were generally obtained. Electroporation of C. michiganensis subsp. michiganensis with a suicide vector carrying transposon Tn1409C resulted in approximately 1 x 10(3) transposon mutants per pg of DNA and thus is suitable for saturation mutagenesis. Analysis of Tn1409C insertion sites suggests a random mode of transposition. Transposition of Tn1409C was also demonstrated for other subspecies of C. michiganensis.

  16. Insertional hypermutation in mineral oil-induced plasmacytomas.

    PubMed

    Knittel, Gero; Metzner, Mirjam; Beck-Engeser, Gabriele; Kan, Ada; Ahrends, Tomasz; Eilat, Dan; Huppi, Konrad; Wabl, Matthias

    2014-09-01

    Unless stimulated by a chronic inflammatory agent, such as mineral oil, plasma cell tumors are rare in young BALB/c mice. This raises the questions: What do inflammatory tissues provide to promote mutagenesis? And what is the nature of mutagenesis? We determined that mineral oil-induced plasmacytomas produce large amounts of endogenous retroelements--ecotropic and polytropic murine leukemia virus and intracisternal A particles. Therefore, plasmacytoma formation might occur, in part, by de novo insertion of these retroelements, induced or helped by the inflammation. We recovered up to ten de novo insertions in a single plasmacytoma, mostly in genes with common retroviral integration sites. Additional integrations accompany tumor evolution from a solid tumor through several generations in cell culture. The high frequency of de novo integrations into cancer genes suggests that endogenous retroelements are coresponsible for plasmacytoma formation and progression in BALB/c mice.

  17. Mutagenesis of diploid mammalian genes by gene entrapment

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Qing; Donahue, Sarah L.; Moore-Jarrett, Tracy; Cao, Shang; Osipovich, Anna B.; Ruley, H. Earl

    2006-01-01

    The present study describes a genome-wide method for biallelic mutagenesis in mammalian cells. Novel poly(A) gene trap vectors, which contain features for direct cloning vector–cell fusion transcripts and for post-entrapment genome engineering, were used to generate a library of 979 mutant ES cells. The entrapment mutations generally disrupted gene expression and were readily transmitted through the germline, establishing the library as a resource for constructing mutant mice. Cells homozygous for most entrapment loci could be isolated by selecting for enhanced expression of an inserted neomycin-resistance gene that resulted from losses of heterozygosity (LOH). The frequencies of LOH measured at 37 sites in the genome ranged from 1.3 × 10−5 to 1.2 × 10−4 per cell and increased with increasing distance from the centromere, implicating mitotic recombination in the process. The ease and efficiency of obtaining homozygous mutations will (i) facilitate genetic studies of gene function in cultured cells, (ii) permit genome-wide studies of recombination events that result in LOH and mediate a type of chromosomal instability important in carcinogenesis, and (iii) provide new strategies for phenotype-driven mutagenesis screens in mammalian cells. PMID:17062627

  18. Mutagenesis of diploid mammalian genes by gene entrapment.

    PubMed

    Lin, Qing; Donahue, Sarah L; Moore-Jarrett, Tracy; Cao, Shang; Osipovich, Anna B; Ruley, H Earl

    2006-01-01

    The present study describes a genome-wide method for biallelic mutagenesis in mammalian cells. Novel poly(A) gene trap vectors, which contain features for direct cloning vector-cell fusion transcripts and for post-entrapment genome engineering, were used to generate a library of 979 mutant ES cells. The entrapment mutations generally disrupted gene expression and were readily transmitted through the germline, establishing the library as a resource for constructing mutant mice. Cells homozygous for most entrapment loci could be isolated by selecting for enhanced expression of an inserted neomycin-resistance gene that resulted from losses of heterozygosity (LOH). The frequencies of LOH measured at 37 sites in the genome ranged from 1.3 x 10(-5) to 1.2 x 10(-4) per cell and increased with increasing distance from the centromere, implicating mitotic recombination in the process. The ease and efficiency of obtaining homozygous mutations will (i) facilitate genetic studies of gene function in cultured cells, (ii) permit genome-wide studies of recombination events that result in LOH and mediate a type of chromosomal instability important in carcinogenesis, and (iii) provide new strategies for phenotype-driven mutagenesis screens in mammalian cells.

  19. Statistical methods for building random transposon mutagenesis libraries.

    PubMed

    Will, Oliver

    2008-01-01

    During the construction of random transposon mutagenesis libraries, four essential statistical issues arise: (1) Computing basic probability results for number of open reading frame knockouts. (2) Estimating the number of new open reading frames that will be knockouts in the next set of clones. (3) Estimating the number of essential open reading frames. (4) Computing the probability that an open reading frame is essential given the distribution of insertions. This chapter examines these issues and evaluates potential solutions using three different approaches: Efron and Thisted's estimator, Will and Jacobs's parametric bootstrap, and Blades and Broman's Gibbs sampler. In doing so, this chapter provides guidance for using the R statistical project to solve these problems.

  20. Nonrandom mutagenesis. Progress report, March 1, 1981-February 28, 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Goldsby, R.A.

    1981-01-01

    The ultimate goal is the development of tools, approaches and systems which will increase our ability to detect and control mutagenesis. We have continued to develop hybrid cell lines suited to the investigation of the expression and mutagenesis of human cell surface markers. The development and characterization of the monoclonal antibody probes to identify and characterize variation in selected human cell surface antigens has continued. Human X mouse T lymphoma hybrids have proven valuable in obtaining clonal populations expressing cell surface determinants characteristic of particular differentiated cell types. We have constructed a set of human lymphocyte X mouse T lymphoma hybrids which have proven useful for the mapping of cell surface determinants to particular chromosomes.

  1. Characterization of pal-1, a common proviral insertion site in murine leukemia virus-induced lymphomas of c-myc and Pim-1 transgenic mice.

    PubMed Central

    Scheijen, B; Jonkers, J; Acton, D; Berns, A

    1997-01-01

    Insertional mutagenesis with Moloney murine leukemia virus (MoMLV) in c-myc and Pim-1 transgenic mice permits the identification of oncogenes that collaborate with the transgenes in lymphomagenesis. The recently identified common insertion site pal-1, in MoMLV-induced lymphomas, is located in a region in which several independent integration clusters are found: eis-1, gfi-1, and evi-5. Proviral insertions of MoMLV in the different integration clusters upregulate the transcriptional activity of the Gfi-1 gene, which is located within the pal-1 locus. The eis-1/pal-1/gfi-1/evi-5 locus serves as a target for MoMLV proviral insertions in pre-B-cell lymphomas of Emu-myc transgenic mice (20%) and in T-cell lymphomas of H-2K-myc (75%) and Emu-pim-1 (93%) transgenic mice. Many tumors overexpress both Gfi-1 as well as Myc and Pim gene family members, indicating that Gfi-1 collaborates with Myc and Pim in lymphomagenesis. Proviral integrations in the previously identified insertion site bmi-1 are, however, mutually exclusive with integrations in the eis-1/pal-1/gfi-1/evi-5 locus. This finding suggests that Bmi-1 and Gfi-1 belong to the same complementation group in lymphoid transformation. PMID:8985317

  2. [Stress-induced cellular adaptive mutagenesis].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Linjiang; Li, Qi

    2014-04-01

    The adaptive mutations exist widely in the evolution of cells, such as antibiotic resistance mutations of pathogenic bacteria, adaptive evolution of industrial strains, and cancerization of human somatic cells. However, how these adaptive mutations are generated is still controversial. Based on the mutational analysis models under the nonlethal selection conditions, stress-induced cellular adaptive mutagenesis is proposed as a new evolutionary viewpoint. The hypothetic pathway of stress-induced mutagenesis involves several intracellular physiological responses, including DNA damages caused by accumulation of intracellular toxic chemicals, limitation of DNA MMR (mismatch repair) activity, upregulation of general stress response and activation of SOS response. These responses directly affect the accuracy of DNA replication from a high-fidelity manner to an error-prone one. The state changes of cell physiology significantly increase intracellular mutation rate and recombination activity. In addition, gene transcription under stress condition increases the instability of genome in response to DNA damage, resulting in transcription-associated DNA mutagenesis. In this review, we summarize these two molecular mechanisms of stress-induced mutagenesis and transcription-associated DNA mutagenesis to help better understand the mechanisms of adaptive mutagenesis.

  3. Analysis of mammalian cytochrome P450 structure and function by site-directed mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Domanski, T L; Halpert, J R

    2001-06-01

    Over the past decade, site-directed mutagenesis has become an essential tool in the study of mammalian cytochrome P450 structure-function relationships. Residues affecting substrate specificity, cooperativity, membrane localization, and interactions with redox partners have been identified using a combination of amino-acid sequence alignments, homology modeling, chimeragenesis, and site-directed mutagenesis. As homology modeling and substrate docking technology continue to improve, the ability to predict more precise functions for specific residues will also advance, making it possible to utilize site-directed mutagenesis to test these predictions. Future studies will employ site-directed mutagenesis to learn more about cytochrome P450 substrate access channels, to define the role of residues that do not lie within substrate recognition sites, to engineer additional soluble forms of microsomal cytochromes P450 for x-ray crystallography, and to engineer more efficient enzymes for drug activation and/or bioremediation.

  4. Mutagenesis and functional analysis of the pore-forming toxin HALT-1 from Hydra magnipapillata.

    PubMed

    Liew, Yvonne Jing Mei; Soh, Wai Tuck; Jiemy, William Febry; Hwang, Jung Shan

    2015-02-03

    Actinoporins are small 18.5 kDa pore-forming toxins. A family of six actinoporin genes has been identified in the genome of Hydra magnipapillata, and HALT-1 (Hydra actinoporin-like toxin-1) has been shown to have haemolytic activity. In this study, we have used site-directed mutagenesis to investigate the role of amino acids in the pore-forming N-terminal region and the conserved aromatic cluster required for cell membrane binding. A total of 10 mutants of HALT-1 were constructed and tested for their haemolytic and cytolytic activity on human erythrocytes and HeLa cells, respectively. Insertion of 1-4 negatively charged residues in the N-terminal region of HALT-1 strongly reduced haemolytic and cytolytic activity, suggesting that the length or charge of the N-terminal region is critical for pore-forming activity. Moreover, substitution of amino acids in the conserved aromatic cluster reduced haemolytic and cytolytic activity by more than 80%, suggesting that these aromatic amino acids are important for attachment to the lipid membrane as shown for other actinoporins. The results suggest that HALT-1 and other actinoporins share similar mechanisms of pore formation and that it is critical for HALT-1 to maintain an amphipathic helix at the N-terminus and an aromatic amino acid-rich segment at the site of membrane binding.

  5. SDM-Assist software to design site-directed mutagenesis primers introducing "silent" restriction sites.

    PubMed

    Karnik, Abhijit; Karnik, Rucha; Grefen, Christopher

    2013-03-22

    Over the past decades site-directed mutagenesis (SDM) has become an indispensable tool for biological structure-function studies. In principle, SDM uses modified primer pairs in a PCR reaction to introduce a mutation in a cDNA insert. DpnI digestion of the reaction mixture is used to eliminate template copies before amplification in E. coli; however, this process is inefficient resulting in un-mutated clones which can only be distinguished from mutant clones by sequencing. We have developed a program - 'SDM-Assist' which creates SDM primers adding a specific identifier: through additional silent mutations a restriction site is included or a previous one removed which allows for highly efficient identification of 'mutated clones' by a simple restriction digest. The direct identification of SDM clones will save time and money for researchers. SDM-Assist also scores the primers based on factors such as Tm, GC content and secondary structure allowing for simplified selection of optimal primer pairs.

  6. Peripherally Inserted Central Catheters and Hemodialysis Outcomes.

    PubMed

    McGill, Rita L; Ruthazer, Robin; Meyer, Klemens B; Miskulin, Dana C; Weiner, Daniel E

    2016-08-08

    Use of peripherally inserted central catheters has expanded rapidly, but the consequences for patients who eventually require hemodialysis are undefined. Our national, population-based analysis included 33,918 adult Medicare beneficiaries from the US Renal Data System who initiated hemodialysis with central venous catheters as their sole vascular access in 2010 and 2011. We used linked Medicare claims to identify peripherally inserted central catheter exposures and evaluate the associations of peripherally inserted central catheter placement with transition to working arteriovenous fistulas or grafts and patient survival using a Cox model with time-dependent variables. Among 33,918 individuals initiating hemodialysis with a catheter as sole access, 12.6% had received at least one peripherally inserted central catheter. Median follow-up was 404 days (interquartile range, 103-680 days). Among 6487 peripherally inserted central catheters placed, 3435 (53%) were placed within the 2 years before hemodialysis initiation, and 3052 (47%) were placed afterward. Multiple peripherally inserted central catheters were placed in 30% of patients exposed to peripherally inserted central catheters. Recipients of peripherally inserted central catheters were more likely to be women and have comorbid diagnoses and less likely to have received predialysis nephrology care. After adjustment for clinical and demographic factors, peripherally inserted central catheters placed before or after hemodialysis initiation were independently associated with lower likelihoods of transition to any working fistula or graft (hazard ratio for prehemodialysis peripherally inserted central catheter, 0.85; 95% confidence interval, 0.79 to 0.91; hazard ratio for posthemodialysis peripherally inserted central catheter, 0.81; 95% confidence interval, 0.73 to 0.89). Peripherally inserted central catheter placement was common and associated with adverse vascular access outcomes. Recognition of potential long

  7. SOMA: a single oligonucleotide mutagenesis and cloning approach.

    PubMed

    Pfirrmann, Thorsten; Lokapally, Ashwin; Andréasson, Claes; Ljungdahl, Per; Hollemann, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Modern biology research requires simple techniques for efficient and restriction site-independent modification of genetic material. Classical cloning and mutagenesis strategies are limited by their dependency on restriction sites and the use of complementary primer pairs. Here, we describe the Single Oligonucleotide Mutagenesis and Cloning Approach (SOMA) that is independent of restriction sites and only requires a single mutagenic oligonucleotide to modify a plasmid. We demonstrate the broad application spectrum of SOMA with three examples. First, we present a novel plasmid that in a standardized and rapid fashion can be used as a template for SOMA to generate GFP-reporters. We successfully use such a reporter to assess the in vivo knock-down quality of morpholinos in Xenopus laevis embryos. In a second example, we show how to use a SOMA-based protocol for restriction-site independent cloning to generate chimeric proteins by domain swapping between the two human hRMD5a and hRMD5b isoforms. Last, we show that SOMA simplifies the generation of randomized single-site mutagenized gene libraries. As an example we random-mutagenize a single codon affecting the catalytic activity of the yeast Ssy5 endoprotease and identify a spectrum of tolerated and non-tolerated substitutions. Thus, SOMA represents a highly efficient alternative to classical cloning and mutagenesis strategies.

  8. Transposon-mediated mutagenesis of a baculovirus.

    PubMed

    Fraser, M J; Brusca, J S; Smith, G E; Summers, M D

    1985-09-01

    Spontaneous mutants of insect nuclear polyhedrosis viruses of Autographa californica (AcMNPV) and Galleria mellonella (GmMNPV) were analyzed. These mutants produce few polyhedra in infected cells and have insertions of host cell DNA. All the insertions mapped to two adjacent sites in the genome. The junctions between two host insertions and the viral DNA were sequenced. One of the insertions contained a perfect 7-bp inverted terminal repeat, and had caused a direct duplication of 4 bp of viral DNA at the point of insertion. Therefore, this insertion sequence has properties of a transposon of the host cell Trichoplusia ni.

  9. Screening for improved activity of a transglutaminase from Streptomyces mobaraensis created by a novel rational mutagenesis and random mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Keiichi; Utsumi, Hiroe; Nakamura, Takefumi; Ogaya, Daisuke; Shimba, Nobuhisa; Suzuki, Eiichiro; Taguchi, Seiichi

    2010-08-01

    Microbial transglutaminase (MTG) has been used extensively in academic research and the food industries through its cross-linking or posttranslational modification of proteins. Two enzyme engineering approaches were applied to improve MTG activity. One is a novel method of rational mutagenesis, called water-accessible surface hot-space region-oriented mutagenesis (WASH-ROM). One hundred and fifty-one point mutations were selected at 40 residues, bearing high solvent-accessibility surface area, within a 15 A space from the active site Cys64. Among them, 32 mutants showed higher specific activity than the wild type. The other is a random mutagenesis of the whole region of the MTG gene, coupled with a new plate assay screening system, using Corynebacterium Expression System CORYNEX. This in vivo system allowed us to readily distinguish the change in enzymatic activity by monitoring the intensity of enzymatic reaction-derived color zones surrounding recombinant cells. From the library of 24,000 mutants, ten were finally selected as beneficial mutants exhibiting higher specific activity than the wild type. Furthermore, we found that Ser199Ala mutant with additional N-terminal tetrapeptide showed the highest specific activity (1.7 times higher than the wild type). These various beneficial positions leading to increased specific activity of MTG were identified to achieve further enzyme improvements.

  10. Identification and mutagenesis by allelic exchange of choE, encoding a cholesterol oxidase from the intracellular pathogen Rhodococcus equi.

    PubMed

    Navas, J; González-Zorn, B; Ladrón, N; Garrido, P; Vázquez-Boland, J A

    2001-08-01

    The virulence mechanisms of the facultative intracellular parasite Rhodococcus equi remain largely unknown. Among the candidate virulence factors of this pathogenic actinomycete is a secreted cholesterol oxidase, a putative membrane-damaging toxin. We identified and characterized the gene encoding this enzyme, the choE monocistron. Its protein product, ChoE, is homologous to other secreted cholesterol oxidases identified in Brevibacterium sterolicum and Streptomyces spp. ChoE also exhibits significant similarities to putative cholesterol oxidases encoded by Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium leprae. Genetic tools for use with R. equi are poorly developed. Here we describe the first targeted mutagenesis system available for this bacterium. It is based on a suicide plasmid, a selectable marker (the aacC4 apramycin resistance gene from Salmonella), and homologous recombination. The choE allele was disrupted by insertion of the aacC4 gene, cloned in pUC19 and introduced by electroporation in R. equi. choE recombinants were isolated at frequencies between 10(-2) and 10(-3). Twelve percent of the recombinants were double-crossover choE mutants. The choE mutation was associated with loss of cooperative (CAMP-like) hemolysis with sphingomyelinase-producing bacteria (Listeria ivanovii). Functional complementation was achieved by expression of choE from pVK173-T, a pAL5000 derivative conferring hygromycin resistance. Our data demonstrate that ChoE is an important cytolytic factor for R. equi. The highly efficient targeted mutagenesis procedure that we used to generate choE isogenic mutants will be a valuable tool for the molecular analysis of R. equi virulence.

  11. Lethal Mutagenesis Failure May Augment Viral Adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Paff, Matthew L.; Stolte, Steven P.; Bull, James J.

    2014-01-01

    Lethal mutagenesis, the attempt to extinguish a population by elevating its mutation rate, has been endorsed in the virology literature as a promising approach for treating viral infections. In support of the concept, in vitro studies have forced viral extinction with high doses of mutagenic drugs. However, the one known mutagenic drug used on patients commonly fails to cure infections, and in vitro studies typically find a wide range of mutagenic conditions permissive for viral growth. A key question becomes how subsequent evolution is affected if the viral population is mutated but avoids extinction—Is viral adaptation augmented rather than suppressed? Here we consider the evolution of highly mutated populations surviving mutagenesis, using the DNA phage T7. In assays using inhibitory hosts, whenever resistance mutants were observed, the mutagenized populations exhibited higher frequencies, but some inhibitors blocked plaque formation by even the mutagenized stock. Second, outgrowth of previously mutagenized populations led to rapid and potentially complete fitness recovery but polymorphism was slow to decay, and mutations exhibited inconsistent patterns of change. Third, the combination of population bottlenecks with mutagenesis did cause fitness declines, revealing a vulnerability that was not apparent from mutagenesis of large populations. The results show that a population surviving high mutagenesis may exhibit enhanced adaptation in some environments and experience little negative fitness consequences in many others. PMID:24092771

  12. Genome ARTIST: a robust, high-accuracy aligner tool for mapping transposon insertions and self-insertions.

    PubMed

    Ecovoiu, Alexandru Al; Ghionoiu, Iulian Constantin; Ciuca, Andrei Mihai; Ratiu, Attila Cristian

    2016-01-01

    A critical topic of insertional mutagenesis experiments performed on model organisms is mapping the hits of artificial transposons (ATs) at nucleotide level accuracy. Mapping errors may occur when sequencing artifacts or mutations as single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and small indels are present very close to the junction between a genomic sequence and a transposon inverted repeat (TIR). Another particular item of insertional mutagenesis is mapping of the transposon self-insertions and, to our best knowledge, there is no publicly available mapping tool designed to analyze such molecular events. We developed Genome ARTIST, a pairwise gapped aligner tool which works out both issues by means of an original, robust mapping strategy. Genome ARTIST is not designed to use next-generation sequencing (NGS) data but to analyze ATs insertions obtained in small to medium-scale mutagenesis experiments. Genome ARTIST employs a heuristic approach to find DNA sequence similarities and harnesses a multi-step implementation of a Smith-Waterman adapted algorithm to compute the mapping alignments. The experience is enhanced by easily customizable parameters and a user-friendly interface that describes the genomic landscape surrounding the insertion. Genome ARTIST is functional with many genomes of bacteria and eukaryotes available in Ensembl and GenBank repositories. Our tool specifically harnesses the sequence annotation data provided by FlyBase for Drosophila melanogaster (the fruit fly), which enables mapping of insertions relative to various genomic features such as natural transposons. Genome ARTIST was tested against other alignment tools using relevant query sequences derived from the D. melanogaster and Mus musculus (mouse) genomes. Real and simulated query sequences were also comparatively inquired, revealing that Genome ARTIST is a very robust solution for mapping transposon insertions. Genome ARTIST is a stand-alone user-friendly application, designed for high

  13. High-resolution definition of the Vibrio cholerae essential gene set with hidden Markov model-based analyses of transposon-insertion sequencing data.

    PubMed

    Chao, Michael C; Pritchard, Justin R; Zhang, Yanjia J; Rubin, Eric J; Livny, Jonathan; Davis, Brigid M; Waldor, Matthew K

    2013-10-01

    The coupling of high-density transposon mutagenesis to high-throughput DNA sequencing (transposon-insertion sequencing) enables simultaneous and genome-wide assessment of the contributions of individual loci to bacterial growth and survival. We have refined analysis of transposon-insertion sequencing data by normalizing for the effect of DNA replication on sequencing output and using a hidden Markov model (HMM)-based filter to exploit heretofore unappreciated information inherent in all transposon-insertion sequencing data sets. The HMM can smooth variations in read abundance and thereby reduce the effects of read noise, as well as permit fine scale mapping that is independent of genomic annotation and enable classification of loci into several functional categories (e.g. essential, domain essential or 'sick'). We generated a high-resolution map of genomic loci (encompassing both intra- and intergenic sequences) that are required or beneficial for in vitro growth of the cholera pathogen, Vibrio cholerae. This work uncovered new metabolic and physiologic requirements for V. cholerae survival, and by combining transposon-insertion sequencing and transcriptomic data sets, we also identified several novel noncoding RNA species that contribute to V. cholerae growth. Our findings suggest that HMM-based approaches will enhance extraction of biological meaning from transposon-insertion sequencing genomic data.

  14. High-resolution definition of the Vibrio cholerae essential gene set with hidden Markov model–based analyses of transposon-insertion sequencing data

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Michael C.; Pritchard, Justin R.; Zhang, Yanjia J.; Rubin, Eric J.; Livny, Jonathan; Davis, Brigid M.; Waldor, Matthew K.

    2013-01-01

    The coupling of high-density transposon mutagenesis to high-throughput DNA sequencing (transposon-insertion sequencing) enables simultaneous and genome-wide assessment of the contributions of individual loci to bacterial growth and survival. We have refined analysis of transposon-insertion sequencing data by normalizing for the effect of DNA replication on sequencing output and using a hidden Markov model (HMM)-based filter to exploit heretofore unappreciated information inherent in all transposon-insertion sequencing data sets. The HMM can smooth variations in read abundance and thereby reduce the effects of read noise, as well as permit fine scale mapping that is independent of genomic annotation and enable classification of loci into several functional categories (e.g. essential, domain essential or ‘sick’). We generated a high-resolution map of genomic loci (encompassing both intra- and intergenic sequences) that are required or beneficial for in vitro growth of the cholera pathogen, Vibrio cholerae. This work uncovered new metabolic and physiologic requirements for V. cholerae survival, and by combining transposon-insertion sequencing and transcriptomic data sets, we also identified several novel noncoding RNA species that contribute to V. cholerae growth. Our findings suggest that HMM-based approaches will enhance extraction of biological meaning from transposon-insertion sequencing genomic data. PMID:23901011

  15. Novel principles of gamma-retroviral insertional transcription activation in murine leukemia virus-induced end-stage tumors.

    PubMed

    Sokol, Martin; Wabl, Matthias; Ruiz, Irene Rius; Pedersen, Finn Skou

    2014-05-19

    Insertional mutagenesis screens of retrovirus-induced mouse tumors have proven valuable in human cancer research and for understanding adverse effects of retroviral-based gene therapies. In previous studies, the assignment of mouse genes to individual retroviral integration sites has been based on close proximity and expression patterns of annotated genes at target positions in the genome. We here employed next-generation RNA sequencing to map retroviral-mouse chimeric junctions genome-wide, and to identify local patterns of transcription activation in T-lymphomas induced by the murine leukemia gamma-retrovirus SL3-3. Moreover, to determine epigenetic integration preferences underlying long-range gene activation by retroviruses, the colocalization propensity with common epigenetic enhancer markers (H3K4Me1 and H3K27Ac) of 6,117 integrations derived from end-stage tumors of more than 2,000 mice was examined. We detected several novel mechanisms of retroviral insertional mutagenesis: bidirectional activation of mouse transcripts on opposite sides of a provirus including transcription of unannotated mouse sequence; sense/antisense-type activation of genes located on opposite DNA strands; tandem-type activation of distal genes that are positioned adjacently on the same DNA strand; activation of genes that are not the direct integration targets; combination-type insertional mutagenesis, in which enhancer activation, alternative chimeric splicing and retroviral promoter insertion are induced by a single retrovirus. We also show that irrespective of the distance to transcription start sites, the far majority of retroviruses in end-stage tumors colocalize with H3K4Me1 and H3K27Ac-enriched regions in murine lymphoid tissues. We expose novel retrovirus-induced host transcription activation patterns that reach beyond a single and nearest annotated gene target. Awareness of this previously undescribed layer of complexity may prove important for elucidation of adverse effects

  16. Cloning-Independent and Counterselectable Markerless Mutagenesis System in Streptococcus mutans▿

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Zhoujie; Okinaga, Toshinori; Qi, Fengxia; Zhang, Zhijun; Merritt, Justin

    2011-01-01

    Insertion duplication mutagenesis and allelic replacement mutagenesis are among the most commonly utilized approaches for targeted mutagenesis in bacteria. However, both techniques are limited by a variety of factors that can complicate mutant phenotypic studies. To circumvent these limitations, multiple markerless mutagenesis techniques have been developed that utilize either temperature-sensitive plasmids or counterselectable suicide vectors containing both positive- and negative-selection markers. For many species, these techniques are not especially useful due to difficulties of cloning with Escherichia coli and/or a lack of functional negative-selection markers. In this study, we describe the development of a novel approach for the creation of markerless mutations. This system employs a cloning-independent methodology and should be easily adaptable to a wide array of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial species. The entire process of creating both the counterselection cassette and mutation constructs can be completed using overlapping PCR protocols, which allows extremely quick assembly and eliminates the requirement for either temperature-sensitive replicons or suicide vectors. As a proof of principle, we used Streptococcus mutans reference strain UA159 to create markerless in-frame deletions of 3 separate bacteriocin genes as well as triple mutants containing all 3 deletions. Using a panel of 5 separate wild-type S. mutans strains, we further demonstrated that the procedure is nearly 100% efficient at generating clones with the desired markerless mutation, which is a considerable improvement in yield compared to existing approaches. PMID:21948849

  17. Grommet Having Metal Insert

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-09-28

    axially with respect to the body. The 1 means for releasably securing a tool to the insert comprises 2 female threads formed on an inner surface of the...below 10 the flange 32. These surfaces 34, 36 are threaded ( female 11 threads) so that the end of a tool 38 having male threads can 12 engage the...further includes a rigid insert secured to the body in the 12 centrally located aperture. The insert has female threads formed 13 therein for releasably

  18. Economical analysis of saturation mutagenesis experiments

    PubMed Central

    Acevedo-Rocha, Carlos G.; Reetz, Manfred T.; Nov, Yuval

    2015-01-01

    Saturation mutagenesis is a powerful technique for engineering proteins, metabolic pathways and genomes. In spite of its numerous applications, creating high-quality saturation mutagenesis libraries remains a challenge, as various experimental parameters influence in a complex manner the resulting diversity. We explore from the economical perspective various aspects of saturation mutagenesis library preparation: We introduce a cheaper and faster control for assessing library quality based on liquid media; analyze the role of primer purity and supplier in libraries with and without redundancy; compare library quality, yield, randomization efficiency, and annealing bias using traditional and emergent randomization schemes based on mixtures of mutagenic primers; and establish a methodology for choosing the most cost-effective randomization scheme given the screening costs and other experimental parameters. We show that by carefully considering these parameters, laboratory expenses can be significantly reduced. PMID:26190439

  19. Transposon mutagenesis in Desulfovibrio desulfuricans: Development of a random mutagenesis tool from Tn7

    SciTech Connect

    Wall, J.D.; Murnan, T.; Argyle, J.

    1996-10-01

    The transposons Tn5, Tn7, Tn9, and Tn10 or their derivatives have been examined for transposition in the sulfate-reducing bacterium Desulfovibrio desulfuricans G20. Tn7 inserted with a frequency of 10{sup {minus}4} to 10{sup {minus}3} into a unique attachment site that shows strong homology with those sites identified in other gram-negative bacteria. Inactivation of the tnsD gene in Tn7, encoding the function directing insertion into the unique site, yielded a derivative that transposed essentially randomly with a frequency of ca. 10{sup {minus}6} per donor. Derivatives of Tn5, but not wild-type Tn5, were also found to undergo random transposition at a similar frequency. No evidence was obtained for transposition of Tn9 or Tn10. 34 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. P53 Gene Mutagenesis in Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-03-01

    suppressor gene in sporadic breast tumours . 1991. Loss of chromosome 17 pl3 sequences and mutation of p53 Oncogene 5 :1573-1579. in human breast...COVERED March 2005 Final (I Aug 2000 - 1 Feb 2004) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5 . FUNDING NUMBERS p53 Gene Mutagenesis in Breast Cancer DAMD17-00-1-0204 6. AUTHOR...The central hypothesis of this proposal is that variability in the patterns of p 5 3 mutagenesis in breast cancer reflects differences in exposures to

  1. A novel approach to identify driver genes involved in androgen-independent prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Insertional mutagenesis screens have been used with great success to identify oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes. Typically, these screens use gammaretroviruses (γRV) or transposons as insertional mutagens. However, insertional mutations from replication-competent γRVs or transposons that occur later during oncogenesis can produce passenger mutations that do not drive cancer progression. Here, we utilized a replication-incompetent lentiviral vector (LV) to perform an insertional mutagenesis screen to identify genes in the progression to androgen-independent prostate cancer (AIPC). Methods Prostate cancer cells were mutagenized with a LV to enrich for clones with a selective advantage in an androgen-deficient environment provided by a dysregulated gene(s) near the vector integration site. We performed our screen using an in vitro AIPC model and also an in vivo xenotransplant model for AIPC. Our approach identified proviral integration sites utilizing a shuttle vector that allows for rapid rescue of plasmids in E. coli that contain LV long terminal repeat (LTR)-chromosome junctions. This shuttle vector approach does not require PCR amplification and has several advantages over PCR-based techniques. Results Proviral integrations were enriched near prostate cancer susceptibility loci in cells grown in androgen-deficient medium (p < 0.001), and five candidate genes that influence AIPC were identified; ATPAF1, GCOM1, MEX3D, PTRF, and TRPM4. Additionally, we showed that RNAi knockdown of ATPAF1 significantly reduces growth (p < 0.05) in androgen-deficient conditions. Conclusions Our approach has proven effective for use in PCa, identifying a known prostate cancer gene, PTRF, and also several genes not previously associated with prostate cancer. The replication-incompetent shuttle vector approach has broad potential applications for cancer gene discovery, and for interrogating diverse biological and disease processes. PMID:24885513

  2. Plastic pipe insertion

    SciTech Connect

    Diskin, J.

    1987-05-01

    In March 1987 KPL changed all that when the utility inserted 1,000 ft of 16-in. SDR 15.5 Phillips Driscopipe 8000 pipe with a wall thickness of 1.032-in., into an abandoned 24-in. cast-iron line in downtown Kansas City. This is believed to be the largest diameter insert removal job ever done for gas distribution in the U.S. For KPL it was a natural progression from the smaller sizes used earlier. The procedure is the same, and the operation was quick and comparatively simple. Lower construction costs were the bottom line because with insert renewal there is no need to cut up the streets, a major expense in any urban pipeline work. There are other significant costs savings as well because the insert renewal construction process is faster than other techniques.

  3. Ear tube insertion - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100045.htm Ear tube insertion - series—Normal anatomy To use the ... 4 Overview The eardrum (tympanic membrane) separates the ear canal from the middle ear. Review Date 8/ ...

  4. Photochemical mutagenesis: examples and toxicological relevance.

    PubMed

    Gocke, E

    2001-01-01

    Induction of DNA damage as a consequence of exposure to UV light has been established as the major cause of skin cancer. DNA molecules absorb photon energy directly for wavelengths <320 nm, and lead to well-characterized mutagenic DNA damage. Alternatively, endogenous or exogenous chemicals (sensitizers) may absorb light with the potential of subsequent energy or electron transfer, and lead indirectly to DNA damage. A few light-absorbing pharmaceuticals have long been known to cause photo(geno)toxic effects. Notably, psoralen and chlorpromazine derivatives have been established as photomutagens and the reaction mechanisms have been identified; the fluoroquinolone antibiotics have more recently been recognized as being photomutagenic. The type of DNA damage and the modulation by antioxidants indicate the involvement of reactive oxygen species (ROS), but other mechanisms are also reported for, at least, some derivatives. In routine genotoxicity studies, we observed the photomutagenic activity of a compound (Ro 19-8022) under development as an anxiolytic agent in the Ames tester strain TA102 under normal laboratory illumination conditions. Further investigations showed strong photogenotoxic activity in tests for gene mutations and chromosomal aberrations in mammalian cells. The finding led to the termination of drug development. Another example of a pharmaceutical for which photogenotoxic properties were observed during development is Ro 47-7737, a bisquinoline derivative of the antimalaria compound chloroquine. Also in this case, the photochemical reactivity contributed to the termination of the development process. The risk/benefit assessment for the described compounds has to take into account the human exposure situation, for example, the ability to avoid light exposure during treatment. Consideration of photochemical mutagenesis is specifically important for sunscreen ingredients. The active components of sunscreen lotions are efficient UV absorbers. Consequently

  5. Transposon-directed base-exchange mutagenesis (TDEM): a novel method for multiple-nucleotide substitutions within a target gene.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yun Cheol; Lee, Hui Sun; Yoon, Sukjoon; Morrison, Sherie L

    2009-06-01

    In this report we describe transposon-directed base-exchange mutagenesis (TDEM), an efficient and controllable method for introducing a mutation into a gene. Each round of TDEM can remove up to 11 base pairs from a randomly selected site within the target gene and replace them with any length of DNA of predetermined sequence. Therefore, the number of bases to be deleted and inserted can be independently regulated providing greater versatility than existing methods of transposon-based mutagenesis. Subsequently, multiple rounds of mutagenesis will provide a diverse mutant library that contains multiple mutations throughout the gene. Additionally, we developed a simple frame-checking procedure that eliminates nonfunctional mutants containing frameshifts or stop codons. As a proof of principle, we used TDEM to generate mutant lacZalpha lacking alpha-complementation activity and recovered active revertants using a second round of TDEM. Furthermore, a single round of TDEM yielded unique, inactive mutants of ccdB.

  6. CRISPR/Cas9-mediated targeted mutagenesis of GmFT2a delays flowering time in soya bean.

    PubMed

    Cai, Yupeng; Chen, Li; Liu, Xiujie; Guo, Chen; Sun, Shi; Wu, Cunxiang; Jiang, Bingjun; Han, Tianfu; Hou, Wensheng

    2017-05-16

    Flowering is an indication of the transition from vegetative growth to reproductive growth and has considerable effects on the life cycle of soya bean (Glycine max). In this study, we employed the CRISPR/Cas9 system to specifically induce targeted mutagenesis of GmFT2a, an integrator in the photoperiod flowering pathway in soya bean. The soya bean cultivar Jack was transformed with three sgRNA/Cas9 vectors targeting different sites of endogenous GmFT2a via Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation. Site-directed mutations were observed at all targeted sites by DNA sequencing analysis. T1-generation soya bean plants homozygous for null alleles of GmFT2a frameshift mutated by a 1-bp insertion or short deletion exhibited late flowering under natural conditions (summer) in Beijing, China (N39°58', E116°20'). We also found that the targeted mutagenesis was stably heritable in the following T2 generation, and the homozygous GmFT2a mutants exhibited late flowering under both long-day and short-day conditions. We identified some 'transgene-clean' soya bean plants that were homozygous for null alleles of endogenous GmFT2a and without any transgenic element from the T1 and T2 generations. These 'transgene-clean' mutants of GmFT2a may provide materials for more in-depth research of GmFT2a functions and the molecular mechanism of photoperiod responses in soya bean. They will also contribute to soya bean breeding and regional introduction. © 2017 The Authors. Plant Biotechnology Journal published by Society for Experimental Biology and The Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. In vivo site-directed mutagenesis using oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Storici, F; Lewis, L K; Resnick, M A

    2001-08-01

    Functional characterization of the genes of higher eukaryotes has been aided by their expression in model organisms and by analyzing site-specific changes in homologous genes in model systems such as the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Modifying sequences in yeast or other organisms such that no heterologous material is retained requires in vitro mutagenesis together with subcloning. PCR-based procedures that do not involve cloning are inefficient or require multistep reactions that increase the risk of additional mutations. An alternative approach, demonstrated in yeast, relies on transformation with an oligonucleotide, but the method is restricted to the generation of mutants with a selectable phenotype. Oligonucleotides, when combined with gap repair, have also been used to modify plasmids in yeast; however, this approach is limited by restriction-site availability. We have developed a mutagenesis approach in yeast based on transformation by unpurified oligonucleotides that allows the rapid creation of site-specific DNA mutations in vivo. A two-step, cloning-free process, referred to as delitto perfetto, generates products having only the desired mutation, such as a single or multiple base change, an insertion, a small or a large deletion, or even random mutations. The system provides for multiple rounds of mutation in a window up to 200 base pairs. The process is RAD52 dependent, is not constrained by the distribution of naturally occurring restriction sites, and requires minimal DNA sequencing. Because yeast is commonly used for random and selective cloning of genomic DNA from higher eukaryotes such as yeast artificial chromosomes, the delitto perfetto strategy also provides an efficient way to create precise changes in mammalian or other DNA sequences.

  8. CRISPR/Cas9-mediated targeted mutagenesis in Nicotiana tabacum.

    PubMed

    Gao, Junping; Wang, Genhong; Ma, Sanyuan; Xie, Xiaodong; Wu, Xiangwei; Zhang, Xingtan; Wu, Yuqian; Zhao, Ping; Xia, Qingyou

    2015-01-01

    Genome editing is one of the most powerful tools for revealing gene function and improving crop plants. Recently, RNA-guided genome editing using the type II clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-associated protein (Cas) system has been used as a powerful and efficient tool for genome editing in various organisms. Here, we report genome editing in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) mediated by the CRISPR/Cas9 system. Two genes, NtPDS and NtPDR6, were used for targeted mutagenesis. First, we examined the transient genome editing activity of this system in tobacco protoplasts, insertion and deletion (indel) mutations were observed with frequencies of 16.2-20.3% after transfecting guide RNA (gRNA) and the nuclease Cas9 in tobacco protoplasts. The two genes were also mutated using multiplexing gRNA at a time. Additionally, targeted deletions and inversions of a 1.8-kb fragment between two target sites in the NtPDS locus were demonstrated, while indel mutations were also detected at both the sites. Second, we obtained transgenic tobacco plants with NtPDS and NtPDR6 mutations induced by Cas9/gRNA. The mutation percentage was 81.8% for NtPDS gRNA4 and 87.5% for NtPDR6 gRNA2. Obvious phenotypes were observed, etiolated leaves for the psd mutant and more branches for the pdr6 mutant, indicating that highly efficient biallelic mutations occurred in both transgenic lines. No significant off-target mutations were obtained. Our results show that the CRISPR/Cas9 system is a useful tool for targeted mutagenesis of the tobacco genome.

  9. Software-supported USER cloning strategies for site-directed mutagenesis and DNA assembly.

    PubMed

    Genee, Hans Jasper; Bonde, Mads Tvillinggaard; Bagger, Frederik Otzen; Jespersen, Jakob Berg; Sommer, Morten O A; Wernersson, Rasmus; Olsen, Lars Rønn

    2015-03-20

    USER cloning is a fast and versatile method for engineering of plasmid DNA. We have developed a user friendly Web server tool that automates the design of optimal PCR primers for several distinct USER cloning-based applications. Our Web server, named AMUSER (Automated DNA Modifications with USER cloning), facilitates DNA assembly and introduction of virtually any type of site-directed mutagenesis by designing optimal PCR primers for the desired genetic changes. To demonstrate the utility, we designed primers for a simultaneous two-position site-directed mutagenesis of green fluorescent protein (GFP) to yellow fluorescent protein (YFP), which in a single step reaction resulted in a 94% cloning efficiency. AMUSER also supports degenerate nucleotide primers, single insert combinatorial assembly, and flexible parameters for PCR amplification. AMUSER is freely available online at http://www.cbs.dtu.dk/services/AMUSER/.

  10. Ultrafast solvation dynamics at internal sites of staphylococcal nuclease investigated by site-directed mutagenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Guang-Yu; Li, Yu; Wang, Wei; Wang, Shu-Feng; Dongping, Zhong; Gong, Qi-Huang

    2015-01-01

    Internal solvation of protein was studied by site-directed mutagenesis, with which an intrinsically fluorescent probe, tryptophan, is inserted into the desired position inside a protein molecule for ultrafast spectroscopic study. Here we review this unique method for protein dynamics research. We first introduce the frontiers of protein solvation, site-directed mutagenesis, protein stability and characteristics, and the spectroscopic methods. Then we present time-resolved spectroscopic dynamics of solvation dynamics inside cavities of active sites. The studies are carried out on a globular protein, staphylococcal nuclease. The solvation at sites inside the protein molecule’s cavities clearly reveals characteristics of the local environment. These solvation behaviors are directly correlated to enzyme activity. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant Nos. 2013CB921904, 2009CB930504, and 2013CB328700) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11074016, 11121091, 10934001, 61177020, 11134001, and 10828407).

  11. Herpesvirus mutagenesis facilitated by infectious bacterial artificial chromosomes (iBACs).

    PubMed

    Robinson, Karl E; Mahony, Timothy J

    2015-01-01

    A critical factor in the study of herpesviruses, their genes and gene functions is the capacity to derive mutants that harbor deletions, truncations, or insertions within the genetic elements of interest. Once constructed the impact of the introduced mutation on the phenotypic properties of the rescued virus can be determined in either in vitro or in vivo systems. However, the construction of such mutants by traditional virological mutagenesis techniques can be a difficult and laborious undertaking. The maintenance of a viral genome as an infectious bacterial artificial chromosome (iBAC), however, endows the capacity to manipulate the viral genome for mutagenesis studies with relative ease. Here, the construction and characterization of two gene deletion mutants of an alphaherpesvirus maintained as iBAC in combination with an inducible homologous recombination system in Escherichia coli is detailed. The methodology is generally applicable to any iBAC and is demonstrated to be a highly efficient and informative approach for mutant virus construction.

  12. Transposon mutagenesis as an approach to improved understanding of Borrelia pathogenesis and biology

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Tao; Troy, Erin B.; Hu, Linden T.; Gao, Lihui; Norris, Steven J.

    2014-01-01

    Transposon insertion provides a method for near-random mutation of bacterial genomes, and has been utilized extensively for the study of bacterial pathogenesis and biology. This approach is particularly useful for organisms that are relatively refractory to genetic manipulation, including Lyme disease Borrelia. In this review, progress to date in the application of transposon mutagenesis to the study of Borrelia burgdorferi is reported. An effective Himar1-based transposon vector has been developed and used to acquire a sequence-defined library of nearly 4500 mutants in the infectious, moderately transformable B. burgdorferi B31 derivative 5A18NP1. Analysis of these transposon mutants using signature-tagged mutagenesis (STM) and Tn-seq approaches has begun to yield valuable information regarding the genes important in the pathogenesis and biology of this organism. PMID:24904839

  13. Faux Mutagenesis: Teaching Troubleshooting through Controlled Failure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartberg, Yasha

    2006-01-01

    By shifting pedagogical goals from obtaining successful mutations to teaching students critical troubleshooting skills, it has been possible to introduce site-directed mutagenesis into an undergraduate teaching laboratory. Described in this study is an inexpensive laboratory exercise in which students follow a slightly modified version of…

  14. Faux Mutagenesis: Teaching Troubleshooting through Controlled Failure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartberg, Yasha

    2006-01-01

    By shifting pedagogical goals from obtaining successful mutations to teaching students critical troubleshooting skills, it has been possible to introduce site-directed mutagenesis into an undergraduate teaching laboratory. Described in this study is an inexpensive laboratory exercise in which students follow a slightly modified version of…

  15. CHALLENGES FOR THE FUTURE IN ENVIRONMENTAL MUTAGENESIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    CHALLENGES FOR THE FUTURE IN ENVIRONMENTAL MUTAGENESIS
    Michael D. Waters
    US Environmental Protection Agency, MD-51A, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711 USA

    Our rapidly growing understanding of the structure of the human genome is forming the basis for numerous new...

  16. CHALLENGES FOR THE FUTURE IN ENVIRONMENTAL MUTAGENESIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    CHALLENGES FOR THE FUTURE IN ENVIRONMENTAL MUTAGENESIS
    Michael D. Waters
    US Environmental Protection Agency, MD-51A, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711 USA

    Our rapidly growing understanding of the structure of the human genome is forming the basis for numerous new...

  17. Profiling of engineering hotspots identifies an allosteric CRISPR-Cas9 switch

    PubMed Central

    Oakes, Benjamin L; Nadler, Dana C.; Flamholz, Avi; Fellmann, Christof; Staahl, Brett T.; Doudna, Jennifer A.; Savage, David F.

    2016-01-01

    The CRISPR-associated protein Cas9 from Streptococcus pyogenes is an RNA-guided DNA endonuclease with widespread utility for genome modification. However, the structural constraints limiting the engineering of Cas9 have not been determined. Here we experimentally profile Cas9 using randomized insertional mutagenesis and delineate hotspots in the structure capable of tolerating insertions of a PDZ domain without disrupting the enzyme’s binding and cleavage functions. Orthogonal domains or combinations of domains can be inserted into the identified sites with minimal functional consequence. To illustrate the utility of the identified sites, we construct an allosterically regulated Cas9 by insertion of the Estrogen Receptor α Ligand Binding Domain. This protein displayed robust, ligand-dependent activation in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells, establishing a versatile one-component system for inducible and reversible Cas9 activation. Thus, domain insertion profiling facilitates the rapid generation of new Cas9 functionalities and provides useful data for future engineering of Cas9. PMID:27136077

  18. Insertion sequence elements in Lactococcus garvieae.

    PubMed

    Eraclio, Giovanni; Ricci, Giovanni; Fortina, Maria Grazia

    2015-01-25

    Insertion sequences are the simplest intracellular Mobile Genetic Elements which can occur in very high numbers in prokaryotic genomes, where they play an important evolutionary role by promoting genome plasticity. As such, the studies on the diversity and distribution of insertion sequences in genomes not yet investigated can contribute to improve the knowledge on a bacterial species and to identify new transposable elements. The present work describes the occurrence of insertion sequences in Lactococcus garvieae, an opportunistic emerging zoonotic and human pathogen, also associated with different food matrices. To date, no insertion elements have been described for L. garvieae in the IS element database. The analysis of the twelve published L. garvieae genomes identified 15 distinct insertion sequences that are members of the IS3, IS982, IS6, IS21 and IS256 families, including five new elements. Most of the insertion sequences in L. garvieae show substantial homology to the Lactococcus lactis elements, suggesting the movement of IS between these two species phylogenetically closely related. ISLL6 elements belonging to IS3 family were most abundant, with several copies distributed in 9 of the 12 genomes analyzed. An alignment analysis of two complete genomes carrying multi-copies of this insertion sequence indicates a possible involvement of ISLL6 in chromosomal rearrangement.

  19. Arthroscopic classification of posterior labrum glenoid insertion.

    PubMed

    Nourissat, G; Radier, C; Aim, F; Lacoste, S

    2014-04-01

    We performed a prospective arthroscopic study to explore the variability of the posterior labrum glenoid insertion. We aimed to classify the insertions and to explore whether these insertions can be identified by pre-operative arthro-CT scan. From January to December 2011, 86 patients were prospectively included in the current study. During arthroscopy, anterior labrum was evaluated and posterior labrum was assessed in 3 different locations: superior, medial, and inferior. For each segment, the labrum was considered normally inserted (directly to the glenoid cartilage), medialized (inserted at the posterior part of the glenoid bone, without direct contact with the cartilage), torn (macroscopic degenerative changes, tears, fragments) or absent (agenesis). Imaging was analyzed segment by segment by an experienced osteoarticular radiologist, using the same classification. Four types of posterior labrum insertions were identified. Type 1, 60% of the cases, corresponded to a posterior labrum totally inserted in the glenoid, with direct contact with the cartilage. Type 2, 20% of the cases, represented medialized insertion of the superior segment. Type 3, 15% of the cases, represented an associated medialization of the superior and medial segment of the posterior labrum. Type 4 is a medialized insertion of the all-posterior labrum. Fifty-six shoulders were used for arthro-CT and arthroscopy correlation: for the superior segment (n=22/56), the sensitivity of arthro-CT to identify an abnormal insertion when the labrum is medialized was 68.18%, specificity 70.59%, positive predictive value (PPV) 60%, and negative predictive value (NPV) 77.42%. For the medial segment (n=16/56), the sensitivity of arthro-CT to identify an abnormal insertion when the labrum is medialized was 81.25%, specificity 57.50%, PPV 43.33% and NPV 88.46%. For the inferior segment (n=5/56), the sensitivity was 100%, specificity 47.60%, PPV 15.63% and NPV 100%. The current study points out the high

  20. Generation of a Tn5 transposon library in Haemophilus parasuis and analysis by transposon-directed insertion-site sequencing (TraDIS).

    PubMed

    Luan, Shi-Lu; Chaudhuri, Roy R; Peters, Sarah E; Mayho, Matthew; Weinert, Lucy A; Crowther, Sarah A; Wang, Jinhong; Langford, Paul R; Rycroft, Andrew; Wren, Brendan W; Tucker, Alexander W; Maskell, Duncan J

    2013-10-25

    Haemophilus parasuis is an important respiratory tract pathogen of swine and the etiological agent of Glässer's disease. The molecular pathogenesis of H. parasuis is not well studied, mainly due to the lack of efficient tools for genetic manipulation of this bacterium. In this study we describe a Tn5-based random mutagenesis method for use in H. parasuis. A novel chloramphenicol-resistant Tn5 transposome was electroporated into the virulent H. parasuis serovar 5 strain 29755. High transposition efficiency of Tn5, up to 10(4) transformants/μg of transposon DNA, was obtained by modification of the Tn5 DNA in the H. parasuis strain HS071 and establishment of optimal electrotransformation conditions, and a library of approximately 10,500 mutants was constructed. Analysis of the library using transposon-directed insertion-site sequencing (TraDIS) revealed that the insertion of Tn5 was evenly distributed throughout the genome. 10,001 individual mutants were identified, with 1561 genes being disrupted (69.4% of the genome). This newly-developed, efficient mutagenesis approach will be a powerful tool for genetic manipulation of H. parasuis in order to study its physiology and pathogenesis.

  1. Reconstitutional Mutagenesis of the Maize P Gene by Short-Range Ac Transpositions

    PubMed Central

    Moreno, M. A.; Chen, J.; Greenblatt, I.; Dellaporta, S. L.

    1992-01-01

    The tendency for Ac to transpose over short intervals has been utilized to develop insertional mutagenesis and fine structure genetic mapping strategies in maize. We recovered excisions of Ac from the P gene and insertions into nearby chromosomal sites. These closely linked Ac elements reinserted into the P gene, reconstituting over 250 unstable variegated alleles. Reconstituted alleles condition a variety of variegation patterns that reflect the position and orientation of Ac within the P gene. Molecular mapping and DNA sequence analyses have shown that reinsertion sites are dispersed throughout a 12.3-kb chromosomal region in the promoter, exons and introns of the P gene, but in some regions insertions sites were clustered in a nonrandom fashion. Transposition profiles and target site sequence data obtained from these studies have revealed several features of Ac transposition including its preference for certain target sites. These results clearly demonstrate the tendency of Ac to transpose to nearby sites in both proximal and distal directions from the donor site. With minor modifications, reconstitutional mutagenesis should be applicable to many Ac-induced mutations in maize and in other plant species and can possibly be extended to other eukaryotic transposon systems as well. PMID:1325389

  2. ALS insertion devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoyer, E.; Chin, J.; Halbach, K.; Hassenzahl, W. V.; Humphries, D.; Kincaid, B.; Lancaster, H.; Plate, D.

    1991-08-01

    The Advanced Light Source (ALS), the first US third generation synchrotron radiation source, is currently under construction at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. The low-emittance, 1.5 GeV electron storage ring and the insertion devices are specifically designed to produce high brightness beams in the UV to soft X-Ray range. The planned initial complement of insertion devices includes four 4.6 m long undulators, with period lengths of 3.9 cm, 5.0 cm (2) and 8.0 cm, and a 2.9 m long wiggler of 16 cm period length. Undulator design is well advanced and fabrication has begun on the 5.0 cm and 8.0 cm period length undulators. This paper discusses ALS insertion device requirements; general design philosophy; and design of the magnetic structure, support structure/drive systems, control system and vacuum system.

  3. EMS mutagenesis in mature seed-derived rice calli as a new method for rapidly obtaining TILLING mutant populations

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background TILLING (Targeting Induced Local Lesions IN Genomes) is a reverse genetic method that combines chemical mutagenesis with high-throughput genome-wide screening for point mutation detection in genes of interest. However, this mutation discovery approach faces a particular problem which is how to obtain a mutant population with a sufficiently high mutation density. Furthermore, plant mutagenesis protocols require two successive generations (M1, M2) for mutation fixation to occur before the analysis of the genotype can begin. Results Here, we describe a new TILLING approach for rice based on ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS) mutagenesis of mature seed-derived calli and direct screening of in vitro regenerated plants. A high mutagenesis rate was obtained (i.e. one mutation in every 451 Kb) when plants were screened for two senescence-related genes. Screening was carried out in 2400 individuals from a mutant population of 6912. Seven sense change mutations out of 15 point mutations were identified. Conclusions This new strategy represents a significant advantage in terms of time-savings (i.e. more than eight months), greenhouse space and work during the generation of mutant plant populations. Furthermore, this effective chemical mutagenesis protocol ensures high mutagenesis rates thereby saving in waste removal costs and the total amount of mutagen needed thanks to the mutagenesis volume reduction. PMID:24475756

  4. Characterization of a dual-function domain that mediates membrane insertion and excision of Ff filamentous bacteriophage.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Nicholas J; Gagic, Dragana; Sutherland-Smith, Andrew J; Rakonjac, Jasna

    2011-09-02

    The filamentous phage Ff (f1, fd, or M13) of Escherichia coli is assembled at the cell membranes by a process that is morphologically similar to that of pilus assembly. The release of the filament virion is mediated by excision from the membrane; conversely, entry into a host cell is mediated by insertion of the virion coat proteins into the membrane. The N-terminal domains of the minor virion protein pIII have the sole role of binding to host receptors during infection. In contrast, the C domain of pIII is required for two opposite functions: insertion of the virion into the membrane during infection and excision at the termination step of assembly/secretion. We identified a 28-residue-long segment in the pIII C domain, which is required for phage entry but dispensable for release from the membrane at the end of assembly. This segment, which we named the infection-competence segment (ICS), works only in cis with the N-terminal receptor-binding domains and does not require the equivalent ICS sequences in other subunits within the virion cap. The ICS contains a predicted amphipathic α-helix and is rich in small amino acids, Gly, Ala, and Ser, which are arranged as a [small]XXX[small]XX[small]XXX[small]XXX[small] motif. Scanning Ala/Gly mutagenesis of ICS showed that small residues are compatible with infection. Overall, organization of the C domain is reminiscent of α-helical pore-forming toxins' membrane insertion domains. The unique ability of pIII to mediate both membrane insertion and excision allowed us to compare these two fundamental membrane transactions and to show that receptor-triggered insertion is a more complex process than excision from membranes. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Pyrosequencing: Applicability for Studying DNA Damage-induced Mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Minko, Irina G.; Earley, Lauriel F.; Larlee, Kimberly E.; Lin, Ying-Chih; Lloyd, R. Stephen

    2014-01-01

    Site-specifically modified DNAs are routinely used in the study of DNA damage-induced mutagenesis. These analyses involve the creation of DNA vectors containing a lesion at a predetermined position, DNA replication, and detection of mutations at the target site. The final step has previously required the isolation of individual DNA clones, hybridization with radioactively-labeled probes, and verification of mutations by Sanger sequencing. In search for an alternative procedure that would allow direct quantification of sequence variants in a mixed population of DNA molecules, we evaluated the applicability of pyrosequencing to site-specific mutagenesis assays. The progeny DNAs were analyzed that originated from replication of N6-(deoxy-D-erythro-pentofuranosyl)-2,6-diamino-3,4-dihydro-4-oxo-5-N-methylformamidopyrimidine (MeFapy-dG)-containing vectors in primate cells, with the lesion being positioned in the 5′-GCNGG-3′ sequence context. Pyrosequencing detected ~8% G to T transversions and ~3.5% G to A transitions, a result that was in excellent agreement with frequencies previously measured by the standard procedure [Earley et al., 2013]. However, ~3.5% G to C transversions and ~2.0% deletions could not be detected by pyrosequencing. Consistent with these observations, the sensitivity of pyrosequencing for measuring the single deoxynucleotide variants differed depending on the deoxynucleotide identity, and in the given sequence contexts, was determined to be ~1-2% for A and T and ~5% for C. Pyrosequencing of other DNA isolates that were obtained following replication of MeFapy-dG-containing vectors in primate cells or Escherichia coli, identified several additional limitations. Collectively, our data demonstrated that pyrosequencing can be used for studying DNA damage-induced mutagenesis as an effective complementary experimental approach to current protocols. PMID:24962778

  6. Modified mariner transposons for random inducible-expression insertions and transcriptional reporter fusion insertions in Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Pozsgai, Eric R; Blair, Kris M; Kearns, Daniel B

    2012-02-01

    Transposons are mobile genetic elements bounded by insertion sequences that are recognized by a specific mobilizing transposase enzyme. The transposase may mobilize not only the insertion sequences but also intervening DNA. mariner is a particularly efficient transposon for the random chromosomal integration of genes and insertional mutagenesis. Here, we modify an existing mariner transposon, TnYLB, such that it can easily be genetically manipulated and introduced into Bacillus subtilis. We generate a series of three new mariner derivatives that mobilize spectinomycin, chloramphenicol, and kanamycin antibiotic resistance cassettes. Furthermore, we generate a series of transposons with a strong, outward-oriented, optionally isopropyl-β-D-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG)-inducible promoter for the random overexpression of neighboring genes and a series of transposons with a promoterless lacZ gene for the random generation of transcriptional reporter fusions. We note that the modification of the base transposon is not restricted to B. subtilis and should be applicable to any mariner-compatible host organism, provided that in vitro mutagenesis or an in vivo species-specific delivery vector is employed.

  7. Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation of Valsa mali: an efficient tool for random insertion mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Caixia; Guan, Xiangnan; Wang, Hanyan; Li, Guifang; Dong, Xiangli; Wang, Guoping; Li, Baohua

    2013-01-01

    Valsa mali is a causal agent of apple and pear trees canker disease, which is a destructive disease that causes serious economic losses in eastern Asia, especially in China. The lack of an efficient transformation system for Valsa mali retards its investigation, which poses difficulties to control the disease. In this research, a transformation system for this pathogen was established for the first time using A. tumefaciens-mediated transformation (ATMT), with the optimal transformation conditions as follows: 10(6)/mL conidia suspension, cocultivation temperature 22°C, cocultivation time 72 hours, and 200  μ M acetosyringone (AS) in the inductive medium. The average transformation efficiency was 1015.00 ± 37.35 transformants per 10(6) recipient conidia. Thirty transformants were randomly selected for further confirmation and the results showed the presence of T-DNA in all hygromycin B resistant transformants and also revealed random and single gene integration with genetic stability. Compared with wild-type strain, those transformants exhibited various differences in morphology, conidia production, and conidia germination ability. In addition, pathogenicity assays revealed that 14 transformants had mitigated pathogenicity, while one had enhanced infection ability. The results suggest that ATMT of V. mali is a useful tool to gain novel insight into this economically important pathogen at molecular levels.

  8. New insights and unresolved issues regarding insertional mutagenesis in X-linked SCID gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Pike-Overzet, Karin; van der Burg, Mirjam; Wagemaker, Gerard; van Dongen, Jacques J M; Staal, Frank J T

    2007-11-01

    The oncogenic potential of retrovirus-mediated gene therapy has been re-emphasized because four patients developed T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL)-like disease from an otherwise successful gene therapy trial for X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (X-linked SCID). X-linked SCID, a disease caused by inactivating mutations in the IL2Rgamma gene, is part of a heterogeneous group of SCIDs characterized by the lack of T cells in conjunction with the absence of B and/or natural killer (NK) cells. Gene therapy approaches are being developed for this group of diseases. In this review we discuss the various forms of SCID in relation to normal T-cell development. In addition, we consider the possible role of LMO2 and other T-ALL oncogenes in the development of adverse effects as seen in the X-linked SCID gene therapy trial. Furthermore, we debate whether the integration near the LMO2 locus is sufficient to result in T-ALL-like proliferations or whether the gamma-retroviral viral expression of the therapeutic IL2RG gene contributes to leukemogenesis. Finally, we review some newly developed murine models that may have added value for gene therapy safety studies.

  9. Insertion in Persian

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kambuziya, Aliyeh Kord-e Zafaranlu; Dehghan, Masoud

    2011-01-01

    This paper investigates epenthesis process in Persian to catch some results in relating to vowel and consonant insertion in Persian lexicon. This survey has a close relationship to the description of epenthetic consonants and the conditions in which these consonants are used. Since no word in Persian may begin with a vowel, so that hiatus can't be…

  10. MELFI Sample Insertion

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-06-28

    ISS024-E-006699 (28 June 2010) --- NASA astronaut Doug Wheelock, Expedition 24 flight engineer, prepares to insert biological samples into trays in the Minus Eighty Laboratory Freezer for ISS-2 (MELFI-2) in the Destiny laboratory of the International Space Station.

  11. MELFI Sample Insertion

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-07-02

    ISS024-E-007346 (2 July 2010) --- NASA astronauts Tracy Caldwell Dyson (background) and Shannon Walker, both Expedition 24 flight engineers, prepare to insert biological samples in a dewar tray in the Minus Eighty Laboratory Freezer for ISS (MELFI-1) in the Kibo laboratory of the International Space Station.

  12. MELFI Sample Insertion

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-06-28

    ISS024-E-006697 (28 June 2010) --- NASA astronaut Doug Wheelock, Expedition 24 flight engineer, prepares to insert biological samples into trays in the Minus Eighty Laboratory Freezer for ISS-2 (MELFI-2) in the Destiny laboratory of the International Space Station.

  13. Genetic analysis of mutagenesis in aging Escherichia coli colonies.

    PubMed

    Taddei, F; Halliday, J A; Matic, I; Radman, M

    1997-10-01

    Bacteria live in unstructured and structured environments, experiencing feast and famine lifestyles. Bacterial colonies can be viewed as model structured environments. SOS induction and mutagenesis have been observed in aging Escherichia coli colonies, in the absence of exogenous sources of DNA damage. This cAMP-dependent mutagenesis occurring in Resting Organisms in a Structured Environment (ROSE) is unaffected by a umuC mutation and therefore differs from both targeted UV mutagenesis and recA730 (SOS constitutive) untargeted mutagenesis. As a recB mutation has only a minor effect on ROSE mutagenesis it also differs from both adaptive reversion of the lacI33 allele and from iSDR (inducible Stable DNA Replication) mutagenesis. Besides its recA and lexA dependence, ROSE mutagenesis is also uvrB and polA dependent. These genetic requirements are reminiscent of the untargeted mutagenesis in lambda phage observed when unirradiated lambda infects UV-irradiated E. coli. These mutations, which are not observed in aging liquid cultures, accumulate linearly with the age of the colonies. ROSE mutagenesis might offer a good model for bacterial mutagenesis in structured environments such as biofilms and for mutagenesis of quiescent eukaryotic cells.

  14. Final report [DNA Repair and Mutagenesis - 1999

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Graham C.

    2001-05-30

    The meeting, titled ''DNA Repair and Mutagenesis: Mechanism, Control, and Biological Consequences'', was designed to bring together the various sub-disciplines that collectively comprise the field of DNA Repair and Mutagenesis. The keynote address was titled ''Mutability Doth Play Her Cruel Sports to Many Men's Decay: Variations on the Theme of Translesion Synthesis.'' Sessions were held on the following themes: Excision repair of DNA damage; Transcription and DNA excision repair; UmuC/DinB/Rev1/Rad30 superfamily of DNA polymerases; Cellular responses to DNA damage, checkpoints, and damage tolerance; Repair of mismatched bases, mutation; Genome-instability, and hypermutation; Repair of strand breaks; Replicational fidelity, and Late-breaking developments; Repair and mutation in challenging environments; and Defects in DNA repair: consequences for human disease and aging.

  15. Novel Random Mutagenesis Method for Directed Evolution.

    PubMed

    Feng, Hong; Wang, Hai-Yan; Zhao, Hong-Yan

    2017-01-01

    Directed evolution is a powerful strategy for gene mutagenesis, and has been used for protein engineering both in scientific research and in the biotechnology industry. The routine method for directed evolution was developed by Stemmer in 1994 (Stemmer, Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 91, 10747-10751, 1994; Stemmer, Nature 370, 389-391, 1994). Since then, various methods have been introduced, each of which has advantages and limitations depending upon the targeted genes and procedure. In this chapter, a novel alternative directed evolution method which combines mutagenesis PCR with dITP and fragmentation by endonuclease V is described. The kanamycin resistance gene is used as a reporter gene to verify the novel method for directed evolution. This method for directed evolution has been demonstrated to be efficient, reproducible, and easy to manipulate in practice.

  16. Combining localized PCR mutagenesis and natural transformation in direct genetic analysis of a transcriptional regulator gene, pobR.

    PubMed Central

    Kok, R G; D'Argenio, D A; Ornston, L N

    1997-01-01

    We present a procedure for efficient random mutagenesis of selected genes in a bacterial chromosome. The method combines PCR replication errors with the uptake of PCR-amplified DNA via natural transformation. Cloning of PCR fragments is not required, since mutations are transferred directly to the chromosome via homologous recombination. Random mutations were introduced into the Acinetobacter chromosomal pobR gene encoding the transcriptional activator of pobA, the structural gene for 4-hydroxybenzoate 3-hydroxylase. Mutant strains with strongly reduced PobR activity were selected by demanding the inability to convert 4-hydroxybenzoate to a toxic metabolite. Of spontaneous pobR mutants, 80% carry the insertion element IS1236, rendering them inappropriate for structure-function studies. Transformation with Taq-amplified pobR DNA increased the mutation frequency 240-fold and reduced the proportion of IS1236 inserts to undetectable levels. The relative fidelity of Pfu polymerase compared with Taq polymerase was illustrated by a reduced effect on the mutation frequency; a procedure for rapid assessment of relative polymerase fidelity in PCR follows from this observation. Over 150 independent mutations were localized by transformation with DNA fragments containing nested deletions of wild-type pobR. Sequence analysis of 89 of the mutant pobR alleles showed that the mutations were predominantly single-nucleotide substitutions broadly distributed within pobR. Promoter mutations were recovered, as were two mutations that are likely to block pobR translation. One-third of the recovered mutations conferred a leaky or temperature-sensitive phenotype, whereas the remaining null mutations completely blocked growth with 4-hydroxybenzoate. Strains containing two different nonsense mutations in pobR were transformed with PCR-amplified DNA to identify permissible codon substitutions. Independently, second-site suppressor mutations were recovered within pcaG, another member of the

  17. Quantitative analysis of bristle number in Drosophila mutants identifies genes involved in neural development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norga, Koenraad K.; Gurganus, Marjorie C.; Dilda, Christy L.; Yamamoto, Akihiko; Lyman, Richard F.; Patel, Prajal H.; Rubin, Gerald M.; Hoskins, Roger A.; Mackay, Trudy F.; Bellen, Hugo J.

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The identification of the function of all genes that contribute to specific biological processes and complex traits is one of the major challenges in the postgenomic era. One approach is to employ forward genetic screens in genetically tractable model organisms. In Drosophila melanogaster, P element-mediated insertional mutagenesis is a versatile tool for the dissection of molecular pathways, and there is an ongoing effort to tag every gene with a P element insertion. However, the vast majority of P element insertion lines are viable and fertile as homozygotes and do not exhibit obvious phenotypic defects, perhaps because of the tendency for P elements to insert 5' of transcription units. Quantitative genetic analysis of subtle effects of P element mutations that have been induced in an isogenic background may be a highly efficient method for functional genome annotation. RESULTS: Here, we have tested the efficacy of this strategy by assessing the extent to which screening for quantitative effects of P elements on sensory bristle number can identify genes affecting neural development. We find that such quantitative screens uncover an unusually large number of genes that are known to function in neural development, as well as genes with yet uncharacterized effects on neural development, and novel loci. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings establish the use of quantitative trait analysis for functional genome annotation through forward genetics. Similar analyses of quantitative effects of P element insertions will facilitate our understanding of the genes affecting many other complex traits in Drosophila.

  18. A Synthetic Approach to Stop-Codon Scanning Mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Nie, Lihua; Lavinder, Jason J.; Sarkar, Mohosin; Stephany, Kimberly; Magliery, Thomas J.

    2011-01-01

    A general combinatorial mutagenesis strategy using common DMT-protected mononucleotide phosphoramidites and a single orthogonally-protected trinucleotide phosphoramidite (Fmoc-TAG) was developed to scan a gene with the TAG amber stop codon with complete synthetic control. In combination with stop-codon suppressors that insert natural (e.g., alanine) or unnatural (e.g., p-benzoylphenylalanine or Bpa) amino acids, a single DNA library can be used to incorporate different amino acids for diverse purposes. Here, we scanned TAG codons through part of the gene for a model four-helix bundle protein, Rop, which regulates the copy number of ColE1 plasmids. Alanine was incorporated into Rop for mapping its binding site using an in vivo activity screen, and subtle but important differences from in vitro gel-shift studies of Rop function are evident. As a test, Bpa was incorporated using a Phe14 amber mutant isolated from the scanning library. Surprisingly, Phe14Bpa Rop is weakly active, despite the critical role of Phe14 in Rop activity. Bpa is a photoaffinity label unnatural amino acid that can form covalent bonds with adjacent molecules upon UV irradiation. Irradiation of Phe14Bpa-Rop, which is a dimer in solution like wild-type Rop, results in covalent dimers, trimers and tetramers. This suggests that Phe14Bpa Rop weakly associates as a tetramer in solution and highlights the use of Bpa crosslinking as a means of trapping weak and transient interactions. PMID:21452871

  19. Estimation of insertion depth angle based on cochlea diameter and linear insertion depth: a prediction tool for the CI422.

    PubMed

    Franke-Trieger, Annett; Mürbe, Dirk

    2015-11-01

    Beside the cochlear size, the linear insertion depth (LID) influences the insertion depth angle of cochlear implant electrode arrays. For the specific implant CI422 the recommended LID is not fixed but can vary continuously between 20 and 25 mm. In the current study, the influence of cochlea size and LID on the final insertion depth angle was investigated to develop a prediction tool for the insertion depth angle by means of cochlea diameter and LID. Preoperative estimation of insertion depth angles might help surgeons avoid exceeding an intended insertion depth, especially with respect to low-frequency residual hearing preservation. Postoperative, high-resolution 3D-radiographs provided by Flat Panel Computed Volume Tomography (FPCT) were used to investigate the insertion depth angle in 37 CI422 recipients. Furthermore, the FPCT images were used to measure linear insertion depth and diameter of the basal turn of the cochlea. A considerable variation of measured insertion depth angles ranging from 306° to 579° was identified. The measured linear insertion depth ranged from -18.6 to 26.2 mm and correlated positively with the insertion depth angle. The cochlea diameter ranged from 8.11 to 10.42 mm and correlated negatively with the insertion depth angle. The results suggest that preoperatively measured cochlea diameter combined with the option of different array positions by means of LID may act as predictors for the final insertion depth angle.

  20. TALEN mediated somatic mutagenesis in murine models of cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shuyuan; Li, Lin; Kendrick, Sara L.; Gerard, Robert D.; Zhu, Hao

    2014-01-01

    Cancer genome sequencing has identified numerous somatic mutations whose biological relevance is uncertain. In this study, we used genome-editing tools to create and analyze targeted somatic mutations in murine models of liver cancer. TALEN were designed against β-catenin (Ctnnb1) and Apc, two commonly mutated genes in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), to generate isogenic HCC cell lines. Both mutant cell lines exhibited evidence of Wnt pathway dysregulation. We asked if these TALENs could create targeted somatic mutations after hydrodynamic transfection (HDT) into mouse liver. TALENs targeting β-catenin promoted endogenous HCC carrying the intended gain-of-function mutations. However, TALENs targeting Apc were not as efficient in inducing in vivo homozygous loss-of-function mutations. We hypothesized that hepatocyte polyploidy might be protective against TALEN-induced loss of heterozygosity (LOH), and indeed Apc gene editing was less efficient in tetraploid than in diploid hepatocytes. To increase efficiency, we administered adenoviral Apc TALENs and found that we could achieve a higher mutagenesis rate in vivo. Our results demonstrate that genome-editing tools can enable the in vivo study of cancer genes and faithfully recapitulate the mosaic nature of mutagenesis in mouse cancer models. PMID:25070752

  1. New approach for fish breeding by chemical mutagenesis: establishment of TILLING method in fugu (Takifugu rubripes) with ENU mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In fish breeding, it is essential to discover and generate fish exhibiting an effective phenotype for the aquaculture industry, but screening for natural mutants by only depending on natural spontaneous mutations is limited. Presently, reverse genetics has become an important tool to generate mutants, which exhibit the phenotype caused by inactivation of a gene. TILLING (Targeting Induced Local Lesions INGenomes) is a reverse genetics strategy that combines random chemical mutagenesis with high-throughput discovery technologies for screening the induced mutations in target genes. Although the chemical mutagenesis has been used widely in a variety of model species and also genetic breeding of microorganisms and crops, the application of the mutagenesis in fish breeding has been only rarely reported. Results In this study, we developed the TILLING method in fugu with ENU mutagenesis and high-resolution melting (HRM) analysis to detect base pair changes in target sequences. Fugu males were treated 3 times at weekly intervals with various ENU concentrations, and then the collected sperm after the treatment was used to fertilize normal female for generating the mutagenized population (F1). The fertilization and the hatching ratios were similar to those of the control and did not reveal a dose dependency of ENU. Genomic DNA from the harvested F1 offspring was used for the HRM analysis. To obtain a fish exhibiting a useful phenotype (e.g. high meat production and rapid growth), fugu myostatin (Mstn) gene was examined as a target gene, because it has been clarified that the mstn deficient medaka exhibited double-muscle phenotype in common with MSTN knockout mice and bovine MSTN mutant. As a result, ten types of ENU-induced mutations were identified including a nonsense mutation in the investigated region with HRM analysis. In addition, the average mutation frequency in fugu Mstn gene was 1 mutant per 297 kb, which is similar to values calculated for zebrafish

  2. Mutant fatty acid desaturase and methods for directed mutagenesis

    DOEpatents

    Shanklin, John [Shoreham, NY; Whittle, Edward J [Greenport, NY

    2008-01-29

    The present invention relates to methods for producing fatty acid desaturase mutants having a substantially increased activity towards substrates with fewer than 18 carbon atom chains relative to an unmutagenized precursor desaturase having an 18 carbon chain length specificity, the sequences encoding the desaturases and to the desaturases that are produced by the methods. The present invention further relates to a method for altering a function of a protein, including a fatty acid desaturase, through directed mutagenesis involving identifying candidate amino acid residues, producing a library of mutants of the protein by simultaneously randomizing all amino acid candidates, and selecting for mutants which exhibit the desired alteration of function. Candidate amino acids are identified by a combination of methods. Enzymatic, binding, structural and other functions of proteins can be altered by the method.

  3. New insights into behaviour using mouse ENU mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Oliver, Peter L; Davies, Kay E

    2012-10-15

    Identifying genes involved in behavioural disorders in man is a challenge as the cause is often multigenic and the phenotype is modulated by environmental cues. Mouse mutants are a valuable tool for identifying novel pathways underlying specific neurological phenotypes and exploring the influence both genetic and non-genetic factors. Many human variants causing behavioural disorders are not gene deletions but changes in levels of expression or activity of a gene product; consequently, large-scale mouse ENU mutagenesis has the advantage over the study of null mutants in that it generates a range of point mutations that frequently mirror the subtlety and heterogeneity of human genetic lesions. ENU mutants have provided novel and clinically relevant functional information on genes that influence many aspects of mammalian behaviour, from neuropsychiatric endophenotypes to circadian rhythms. This review will highlight some of the most important findings that have been made using this method in several key areas of neurological disease research.

  4. High Speed Video Insertion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janess, Don C.

    1984-11-01

    This paper describes a means of inserting alphanumeric characters and graphics into a high speed video signal and locking that signal to an IRIG B time code. A model V-91 IRIG processor, developed by Instrumentation Technology Systems under contract to Instrumentation Marketing Corporation has been designed to operate in conjunction with the NAC model FHS-200 High Speed Video Camera which operates at 200 fields per second. The system provides for synchronizing the vertical and horizontal drive signals such that the vertical sync precisely coincides with five millisecond transitions in the IRIG time code. Additionally, the unit allows for the insertion of an IRIG time message as well as other data and symbols.

  5. Insertional mutation of orfD of the DCW cluster of Streptococcus pneumoniae attenuates virulence.

    PubMed

    Palmen, R; Ogunniyi, A D; Berroy, P; Larpin, S; Paton, J C; Trombe, M C

    1999-12-01

    Mutational analysis of a 5.5 kb fragment of the genome Streptococcus pneumoniae led to the identification of a putative new virulence gene, designated orfD. Insertion mutagenesis of flanking genes on the fragment suggested that the corresponding gene products were required for in vitro growth. In contrast, insertion mutation of orfD did not alter in vitro growth or the transformability pattern of the mutated strain. However, it did reduce bacterial growth in mice and attenuated virulence in an intraperitoneal model of infection. orfD is flanked by orfC (63 codons) and ftsL (105 codons) and all three genes are upstream of pbpx. orfC showed no similarity with other known proteins. ftsL of S. pneumoniae exhibits minimal sequence similarity with ftsL of E. coli, but shares 16% identical residues with the ftsL homologue encoded by ylld of B. subtilis. Also, ftsL of S. pneumoniae has a predicted topology similar to that described for ftsL of E. coli. Putative promoters with an extended -10 box could be identified upstream of both orfC or orfD. The four open reading frames (including pbpx) are orientated in the same direction, and polycistronic transcription could theoretically start at either promoter. Interestingly, this region shows organizational and sequence homologies with genes controlling division and cell wall biosynthesis (DCW) in other bacteria. The attenuation of virulence in the orfD insertion mutant might be due to the loss of function of the orfD gene product or to an altered level of expression of downstream genes.

  6. Targeted mutagenesis in cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) using the CRISPR/Cas9 system

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiugui; Lu, Xuke; Shu, Na; Wang, Shuai; Wang, Junjuan; Wang, Delong; Guo, Lixue; Ye, Wuwei

    2017-01-01

    The CRISPR (Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats)/Cas9 system has been widely used for genome editing in various plants because of its simplicity, high efficiency and design flexibility. However, to our knowledge, there is no report on the application of CRISPR/Cas9-mediated targeted mutagenesis in cotton. Here, we report the genome editing and targeted mutagenesis in upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L., hereafter cotton) using the CRISPR/Cas9 system. We designed two guide RNAs to target distinct sites of the cotton Cloroplastos alterados 1 (GhCLA1) and vacuolar H+-pyrophosphatase (GhVP) genes. Mutations in these two genes were detected in cotton protoplasts. Most of the mutations were nucleotide substitutions, with one nucleotide insertion and one substitution found in GhCLA1 and one deletion found in GhVP in cotton protoplasts. Subsequently, the two vectors were transformed into cotton shoot apexes through Agrobacterium-mediated transformation, resulting in efficient target gene editing. Most of the mutations were nucleotide deletions, and the mutation efficiencies were 47.6–81.8% in transgenic cotton plants. Evaluation using restriction-enzyme-PCR assay and sequence analysis detected no off-target mutations. Our results indicated that the CRISPR/Cas9 system was an efficient and specific tool for targeted mutagenesis of the cotton genome. PMID:28287154

  7. CRISPR/Cas9-mediated mutagenesis of the RIN locus that regulates tomato fruit ripening.

    PubMed

    Ito, Yasuhiro; Nishizawa-Yokoi, Ayako; Endo, Masaki; Mikami, Masafumi; Toki, Seiichi

    2015-11-06

    Site-directed mutagenesis using genetic approaches can provide a wealth of resources for crop breeding as well as for biological research. The clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated 9 endonuclease (CRISPR/Cas9) system is a novel strategy used to induce mutations in a specific genome region; the system functions in a variety of organisms, including plants. Here, we report application of the CRISPR/Cas9 system to efficient mutagenesis of the tomato genome. In this study, we targeted the tomato RIN gene, which encodes a MADS-box transcription factor regulating fruit ripening. Three regions within the gene were targeted and mutations consisting either of a single base insertion or deletion of more than three bases were found at the Cas9 cleavage sites in T0 regenerated plants. The RIN-protein-defective mutants produced incomplete-ripening fruits in which red color pigmentation was significantly lower than that of wild type, while heterologous mutants expressing the remaining wild-type gene reached full-ripening red color, confirming the important role of RIN in ripening. Several mutations that were generated at three independent target sites were inherited in the T1 progeny, confirming the applicability of this mutagenesis system in tomato. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Targeted mutagenesis in cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) using the CRISPR/Cas9 system.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiugui; Lu, Xuke; Shu, Na; Wang, Shuai; Wang, Junjuan; Wang, Delong; Guo, Lixue; Ye, Wuwei

    2017-03-13

    The CRISPR (Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats)/Cas9 system has been widely used for genome editing in various plants because of its simplicity, high efficiency and design flexibility. However, to our knowledge, there is no report on the application of CRISPR/Cas9-mediated targeted mutagenesis in cotton. Here, we report the genome editing and targeted mutagenesis in upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L., hereafter cotton) using the CRISPR/Cas9 system. We designed two guide RNAs to target distinct sites of the cotton Cloroplastos alterados 1 (GhCLA1) and vacuolar H(+)-pyrophosphatase (GhVP) genes. Mutations in these two genes were detected in cotton protoplasts. Most of the mutations were nucleotide substitutions, with one nucleotide insertion and one substitution found in GhCLA1 and one deletion found in GhVP in cotton protoplasts. Subsequently, the two vectors were transformed into cotton shoot apexes through Agrobacterium-mediated transformation, resulting in efficient target gene editing. Most of the mutations were nucleotide deletions, and the mutation efficiencies were 47.6-81.8% in transgenic cotton plants. Evaluation using restriction-enzyme-PCR assay and sequence analysis detected no off-target mutations. Our results indicated that the CRISPR/Cas9 system was an efficient and specific tool for targeted mutagenesis of the cotton genome.

  9. Thought Insertion Clarified

    PubMed Central

    Ratcliffe, Matthew; Wilkinson, Sam

    2016-01-01

    ‘Thought insertion’ in schizophrenia involves somehow experiencing one’s own thoughts as someone else’s. Some philosophers try to make sense of this by distinguishing between ownership and agency: one still experiences oneself as the owner of an inserted thought but attributes it to another agency. In this paper, we propose that thought insertion involves experiencing thought contents as alien, rather than episodes of thinking. To make our case, we compare thought insertion to certain experiences of ‘verbal hallucination’ and show that they amount to different descriptions of the same phenomenon: a quasi-perceptual experience of thought content. We add that the agency/ownership distinction is unhelpful here. What requires explanation is not why a person experiences a type of intentional state without the usual sense of agency, but why she experiences herself as the agent of one type of intentional state rather than another. We conclude by sketching an account of how this might happen. PMID:28123340

  10. Insertion Profiles of 4 Headless Compression Screws

    PubMed Central

    Hart, Adam; Harvey, Edward J.; Lefebvre, Louis-Philippe; Barthelat, Francois; Rabiei, Reza; Martineau, Paul A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose In practice, the surgeon must rely on screw position (insertion depth) and tactile feedback from the screwdriver (insertion torque) to gauge compression. In this study, we identified the relationship between interfragmentary compression and these 2 factors. Methods The Acutrak Standard, Acutrak Mini, Synthes 3.0, and Herbert-Whipple implants were tested using a polyurethane foam scaphoid model. A specialized testing jig simultaneously measured compression force, insertion torque, and insertion depth at half-screw-turn intervals until failure occurred. Results The peak compression occurs at an insertion depth of −3.1 mm, −2.8 mm, 0.9 mm, and 1.5 mm for the Acutrak Mini, Acutrak Standard, Herbert-Whipple, and Synthes screws respectively (insertion depth is positive when the screw is proud above the bone and negative when buried). The compression and insertion torque at a depth of −2 mm were found to be 113 ± 18 N and 0.348 ± 0.052 Nm for the Acutrak Standard, 104 ± 15 N and 0.175 ± 0.008 Nm for the Acutrak Mini, 78 ± 9 N and 0.245 ± 0.006 Nm for the Herbert-Whipple, and 67 ± 2N, 0.233 ± 0.010 Nm for the Synthes headless compression screws. Conclusions All 4 screws generated a sizable amount of compression (> 60 N) over a wide range of insertion depths. The compression at the commonly recommended insertion depth of −2 mm was not significantly different between screws; thus, implant selection should not be based on compression profile alone. Conically shaped screws (Acutrak) generated their peak compression when they were fully buried in the foam whereas the shanked screws (Synthes and Herbert-Whipple) reached peak compression before they were fully inserted. Because insertion torque correlated poorly with compression, surgeons should avoid using tactile judgment of torque as a proxy for compression. Clinical relevance Knowledge of the insertion profile may improve our understanding of the implants, provide a better basis for comparing screws

  11. A retroviral mutagenesis screen reveals strong cooperation between Bcl11a overexpression and loss of the Nf1 tumor suppressor gene

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Bin; Delwel, Ruud; Valk, Peter J.; Wallace, Margaret R.; Loh, Mignon L.; Shannon, Kevin M.

    2009-01-01

    NF1 inactivation occurs in specific human cancers, including juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia, an aggressive myeloproliferative disorder of childhood. However, evidence suggests that Nf1 loss alone does not cause leukemia. We therefore hypothesized that inactivation of the Nf1 tumor suppressor gene requires cooperating mutations to cause acute leukemia. To search for candidate genes that cooperate with Nf1 deficiency in leukemogenesis, we performed a forward genetic screen using retroviral insertion mutagenesis in Nf1 mutant mice. We identified 43 common proviral insertion sites that contain candidate genes involved in leukemogenesis. One of these genes, Bcl11a, confers a growth advantage in cultured Nf1 mutant hematopoietic cells and causes early onset of leukemia of either myeloid or lymphoid lineage in mice when expressed in Nf1-deficient bone marrow. Bcl11a-expressing cells display compromised p21Cip1 induction, suggesting that Bcl11a's oncogenic effects are mediated, in part, through suppression of p21Cip1. Importantly, Bcl11a is expressed in human chronic myelomonocytic leukemia and juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia samples. A subset of AML patients, who had poor outcomes, of 16 clusters, displayed high levels of BCL11A in leukemic cells. These findings suggest that deregulated Bcl11a cooperates with Nf1 in leukemogenesis, and a therapeutic strategy targeting the BCL11A pathway may prove beneficial in the treatment of leukemia. PMID:18948576

  12. SDM-Assist software to design site-directed mutagenesis primers introducing “silent” restriction sites

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Over the past decades site-directed mutagenesis (SDM) has become an indispensable tool for biological structure-function studies. In principle, SDM uses modified primer pairs in a PCR reaction to introduce a mutation in a cDNA insert. DpnI digestion of the reaction mixture is used to eliminate template copies before amplification in E. coli; however, this process is inefficient resulting in un-mutated clones which can only be distinguished from mutant clones by sequencing. Results We have developed a program – ‘SDM-Assist’ which creates SDM primers adding a specific identifier: through additional silent mutations a restriction site is included or a previous one removed which allows for highly efficient identification of ‘mutated clones’ by a simple restriction digest. Conclusions The direct identification of SDM clones will save time and money for researchers. SDM-Assist also scores the primers based on factors such as Tm, GC content and secondary structure allowing for simplified selection of optimal primer pairs. PMID:23522286

  13. Rapid generation of drug-resistance alleles at endogenous loci using CRISPR-Cas9 indel mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Ipsaro, Jonathan J.; Shen, Chen; Arai, Eri; Xu, Yali; Kinney, Justin B.; Joshua-Tor, Leemor; Vakoc, Christopher R.

    2017-01-01

    Genetic alterations conferring resistance to the effects of chemical inhibitors are valuable tools for validating on-target effects in cells. Unfortunately, for many therapeutic targets such alleles are not available. To address this issue, we evaluated whether CRISPR-Cas9-mediated insertion/deletion (indel) mutagenesis can produce drug-resistance alleles at endogenous loci. This method takes advantage of the heterogeneous in-frame alleles produced following Cas9-mediated DNA cleavage, which we show can generate rare alleles that confer resistance to the growth-arrest caused by chemical inhibitors. We used this approach to identify novel resistance alleles of two lysine methyltransferases, DOT1L and EZH2, which are each essential for the growth of MLL-fusion leukemia cells. We biochemically characterized the DOT1L mutation, showing that it is significantly more active than the wild-type enzyme. These findings validate the on-target anti-leukemia activities of existing DOT1L and EZH2 inhibitors and reveal a simple method for deriving drug-resistance alleles for novel targets, which may have utility during early stages of drug development. PMID:28231254

  14. Rapid generation of drug-resistance alleles at endogenous loci using CRISPR-Cas9 indel mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Ipsaro, Jonathan J; Shen, Chen; Arai, Eri; Xu, Yali; Kinney, Justin B; Joshua-Tor, Leemor; Vakoc, Christopher R; Shi, Junwei

    2017-01-01

    Genetic alterations conferring resistance to the effects of chemical inhibitors are valuable tools for validating on-target effects in cells. Unfortunately, for many therapeutic targets such alleles are not available. To address this issue, we evaluated whether CRISPR-Cas9-mediated insertion/deletion (indel) mutagenesis can produce drug-resistance alleles at endogenous loci. This method takes advantage of the heterogeneous in-frame alleles produced following Cas9-mediated DNA cleavage, which we show can generate rare alleles that confer resistance to the growth-arrest caused by chemical inhibitors. We used this approach to identify novel resistance alleles of two lysine methyltransferases, DOT1L and EZH2, which are each essential for the growth of MLL-fusion leukemia cells. We biochemically characterized the DOT1L mutation, showing that it is significantly more active than the wild-type enzyme. These findings validate the on-target anti-leukemia activities of existing DOT1L and EZH2 inhibitors and reveal a simple method for deriving drug-resistance alleles for novel targets, which may have utility during early stages of drug development.

  15. Site-directed mutagenesis and saturation mutagenesis for the functional study of transcription factors involved in plant secondary metabolite biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Pattanaik, Sitakanta; Werkman, Joshua R; Kong, Que; Yuan, Ling

    2010-01-01

    Regulation of gene expression is largely coordinated by a complex network of interactions between transcription factors (TFs), co-factors, and their cognate cis-regulatory elements in the genome. TFs are multidomain proteins that arise evolutionarily through protein domain shuffling. The modular nature of TFs has led to the idea that specific modules of TFs can be re-designed to regulate desired gene(s) through protein engineering. Utilization of designer TFs for the control of metabolic pathways has emerged as an effective approach for metabolic engineering. We are interested in engineering the basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH, Myc-type) transcription factors. Using site-directed and saturation mutagenesis, in combination with efficient and high-throughput screening systems, we have identified and characterized several amino acid residues critical for higher transactivation activity of a Myc-like bHLH transcription factor involved in anthocyanin biosynthetic pathway in plants. Site-directed and saturation mutagenesis should be generally applicable to engineering of all TFs.

  16. PBmice: an integrated database system of piggyBac (PB) insertional mutations and their characterizations in mice

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Ling V.; Jin, Ke; Liu, Yiming; Yang, Wenwei; Xie, Xing; Ye, Lin; Wang, Li; Zhu, Lin; Ding, Sheng; Su, Yi; Zhou, Jie; Han, Min; Zhuang, Yuan; Xu, Tian; Wu, Xiaohui; Gu, Ning; Zhong, Yang

    2008-01-01

    DNA transposon piggyBac (PB) is a newly established mutagen for large-scale mutagenesis in mice. We have designed and implemented an integrated database system called PBmice (PB Mutagenesis Information CEnter) for storing, retrieving and displaying the information derived from PB insertions (INSERTs) in the mouse genome. This system is centered on INSERTs with information including their genomic locations and flanking genomic sequences, the expression levels of the hit genes, and the expression patterns of the trapped genes if a trapping vector was used. It also archives mouse phenotyping data linked to INSERTs, and allows users to conduct quick and advanced searches for genotypic and phenotypic information relevant to a particular or a set of INSERT(s). Sequence-based information can be cross-referenced with other genomic databases such as Ensembl, BLAST and GBrowse tools used in PBmice offer enhanced search and display for additional information relevant to INSERTs. The total number and genomic distribution of PB INSERTs, as well as the availability of each PB insertional LINE can also be viewed with user-friendly interfaces. PBmice is freely available at http://www.idmshanghai.cn/PBmice or http://www.scbit.org/PBmice/. PMID:17932058

  17. Use of a mariner-based transposon mutagenesis system to isolate Clostridium perfringens mutants deficient in gliding motility.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hualan; Bouillaut, Laurent; Sonenshein, Abraham L; Melville, Stephen B

    2013-02-01

    Clostridium perfringens is an anaerobic Gram-positive pathogen that causes many human and animal diseases, including food poisoning and gas gangrene. C. perfringens lacks flagella but possesses type IV pili (TFP). We have previously shown that C. perfringens can glide across an agar surface in long filaments composed of individual bacteria attached end to end and that two TFP-associated proteins, PilT and PilC, are needed for this. To discover additional gene products that play a role in gliding, we developed a plasmid-based mariner transposon mutagenesis system that works effectively in C. perfringens. More than 10,000 clones were screened for mutants that lacked the ability to move away from the edge of a colony. Twenty-four mutants (0.24%) were identified that fit the criteria. The genes containing insertions that affected gliding motility fell into nine different categories. One gene, CPE0278, which encodes a homolog of the SagA cell wall-dependent endopeptidase, acquired distinct transposon insertions in two independent mutants. sagA mutants were unable to form filaments due to a complete lack of end-to-end connections essential for gliding motility. Complementation of the sagA mutants with a wild-type copy of the gene restored gliding motility. We constructed an in-frame deletion mutation in the sagA gene and found that this mutant had a phenotype similar to those of the transposon mutants. We hypothesize that the sagA mutant strains are unable to form the molecular complexes which are needed to keep the cells in an end-to-end orientation, leading to separation of daughter cells and the inability to carry out gliding motility.

  18. Gene-trap mutagenesis using Mol/MSM-1 embryonic stem cells from MSM/Ms mice.

    PubMed

    Nakahara, Mai; Tateyama, Hiroki; Araki, Masatake; Nakagata, Naomi; Yamamura, Ken-ichi; Araki, Kimi

    2013-06-01

    The MSM/Ms strain is derived from the Japanese wild mouse Mus musculus molossinus and displays characteristics not observed in common laboratory strains. Functional genomic analyses using genetically engineered MSM/Ms mice will reveal novel phenotypes and gene functions/interactions. We previously reported the establishment of a germline-competent embryonic stem (ES) cell line, Mol/MSM-1, from the MSM/Ms strain. To analyze its usefulness for insertional mutagenesis, we performed gene-trapping using these cells. In the present study, we compared the gene-trap events between Mol/MSM-1 and a conventional ES cell line, KTPU8, derived from the F1 progeny of a C57BL/6 × CBA cross. We introduced a promoter-trap vector carrying the promoterless β-galactosidase/neomycin-resistance fusion gene into Mol/MSM-1 and KTPU8 cells, isolated clones, and identified the trapped genes by rapid amplification of cDNA 5'-ends (5'-RACE), inverse PCR, or plasmid rescue. Unexpectedly, the success rate of 5'-RACE in Mol/MSM trap clones was 47 %, lower than the 87 % observed in KTPU8 clones. Genomic analysis of the 5'-RACE-failed clones revealed that most had trapped ribosomal RNA gene regions. The percentage of ribosomal RNA region trap clones was 41 % in Mol/MSM-1 cells, but less than 10 % in KTPU8 cells. However, within the Mol/MSM-1 5'-RACE-successful clones, the trapping frequency of annotated genes, the chromosomal distribution of vector insertions, the frequency of integration into an intron around the start codon-containing exon, and the functional spectrum of trapped genes were comparable to those in KTPU8 cells. By selecting 5'-RACE-successful clones, it is possible to perform gene-trapping efficiently using Mol/MSM-1 ES cells and promoter-trap vectors.

  19. High-Throughput Parallel Sequencing to Measure Fitness of Leptospira interrogans Transposon Insertion Mutants during Acute Infection

    PubMed Central

    Matsunaga, James; Haake, David A.

    2016-01-01

    Pathogenic species of Leptospira are the causative agents of leptospirosis, a zoonotic disease that causes mortality and morbidity worldwide. The understanding of the virulence mechanisms of Leptospira spp is still at an early stage due to the limited number of genetic tools available for this microorganism. The development of random transposon mutagenesis in pathogenic strains a decade ago has contributed to the identification of several virulence factors. In this study, we used the transposon sequencing (Tn-Seq) technique, which combines transposon mutagenesis with massive parallel sequencing, to study the in vivo fitness of a pool of Leptospira interrogans mutants. We infected hamsters with a pool of 42 mutants (input pool), which included control mutants with insertions in four genes previously analyzed by virulence testing (loa22, ligB, flaA1, and lic20111) and 23 mutants with disrupted signal transduction genes. We quantified the mutants in different tissues (blood, kidney and liver) at 4 days post-challenge by high-throughput sequencing and compared the frequencies of mutants recovered from tissues to their frequencies in the input pool. Control mutants that were less fit in the Tn-Seq experiment were attenuated for virulence when tested separately in the hamster model of lethal leptospirosis. Control mutants with unaltered fitness were as virulent as the wild-type strain. We identified two mutants with the transposon inserted in the same putative adenylate/guanylate cyclase gene (lic12327) that had reduced in vivo fitness in blood, kidney and liver. Both lic12327 mutants were attenuated for virulence when tested individually in hamsters. Growth of the control mutants and lic12327 mutants in culture medium were similar to that of the wild-type strain. These results demonstrate the feasibility of screening large pools of L. interrogans transposon mutants for those with altered fitness, and potentially attenuated virulence, by transposon sequencing. PMID

  20. High-Throughput Parallel Sequencing to Measure Fitness of Leptospira interrogans Transposon Insertion Mutants during Acute Infection.

    PubMed

    Lourdault, Kristel; Matsunaga, James; Haake, David A

    2016-11-01

    Pathogenic species of Leptospira are the causative agents of leptospirosis, a zoonotic disease that causes mortality and morbidity worldwide. The understanding of the virulence mechanisms of Leptospira spp is still at an early stage due to the limited number of genetic tools available for this microorganism. The development of random transposon mutagenesis in pathogenic strains a decade ago has contributed to the identification of several virulence factors. In this study, we used the transposon sequencing (Tn-Seq) technique, which combines transposon mutagenesis with massive parallel sequencing, to study the in vivo fitness of a pool of Leptospira interrogans mutants. We infected hamsters with a pool of 42 mutants (input pool), which included control mutants with insertions in four genes previously analyzed by virulence testing (loa22, ligB, flaA1, and lic20111) and 23 mutants with disrupted signal transduction genes. We quantified the mutants in different tissues (blood, kidney and liver) at 4 days post-challenge by high-throughput sequencing and compared the frequencies of mutants recovered from tissues to their frequencies in the input pool. Control mutants that were less fit in the Tn-Seq experiment were attenuated for virulence when tested separately in the hamster model of lethal leptospirosis. Control mutants with unaltered fitness were as virulent as the wild-type strain. We identified two mutants with the transposon inserted in the same putative adenylate/guanylate cyclase gene (lic12327) that had reduced in vivo fitness in blood, kidney and liver. Both lic12327 mutants were attenuated for virulence when tested individually in hamsters. Growth of the control mutants and lic12327 mutants in culture medium were similar to that of the wild-type strain. These results demonstrate the feasibility of screening large pools of L. interrogans transposon mutants for those with altered fitness, and potentially attenuated virulence, by transposon sequencing.

  1. Z-2 Threaded Insert Design and Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, Amy; Rhodes, Richard; Jones, Robert J.; Graziosi, David; Ferl, Jinny; Sweeny, Mitch; Scarborough, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    NASA's Z-2 prototype space suit contains several components fabricated from an advanced hybrid composite laminate consisting of IM10 carbon fiber and fiber glass. One requirement was to have removable, replaceable helicoil inserts to which other suit components would be fastened. An approach utilizing bonded in inserts with helicoils inside of them was implemented. During initial assembly, cracking sounds were heard followed by the lifting of one of the blind inserts out of its hole when the screws were torqued. A failure investigation was initiated to understand the mechanism of the failure. Ultimately, it was determined that the pre-tension caused by torqueing the fasteners is a much larger force than induced from the pressure loads of the suit which was not considered in the insert design. Bolt tension is determined by dividing the torque on the screw by a k value multiplied by the thread diameter of the bolt. The k value is a factor that accounts for friction in the system. A common value used for k for a non-lubricated screw is 0.2. The k value can go down by as much as 0.1 if the screw is lubricated which means for the same torque, a much larger tension could be placed on the bolt and insert. This paper summarizes the failure investigation that was performed to identify the root cause of the suit failure and details how the insert design was modified to resist a higher pull out tension.

  2. A shuttle mutagenesis system for tagging genes in the yeast Yarrowia lipolytica.

    PubMed

    Neuvéglise, C; Nicauda, J M; Ross-Macdonald, P; Gaillardin, C

    1998-06-15

    A shuttle mutagenesis system was developed for the dimorphic yeast Yarrowia lipolytica. This system combines transposon insertions generated in Escherichia coli with the transformation of yeast with the Tn-mutagenized DNA. The mini-transposon mTn-3xHA/GFP, used in Saccharomyces cerevisiae for producing stable insertions, was adapted for use in the yeast Y. lipolytica. The mTnYl1 transposon (for mini-Tn of Y. lipolytica) confers resistance to tetracycline in E. coli. It also contains the Y. lipolytica URA3 gene for selection of yeast transformants, and the coding sequence for the S65T mutant form of GFP. The rare cutter endonuclease, I-SceI, restriction site, which enables identification of the chromosomal localization of mutagenized genes, was also incorporated. mTnYl1 was first tested on the ACO1 gene, which encodes an Acyl CoA oxidase isozyme. The mutagenesis system was further validated on a Y. lipolytica genomic DNA library constructed in a pHSS6 derivative vector. Mutants with a particular morphology or defective for alkane, fatty acids and oil degradation were obtained.

  3. Characterization of the staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec insertion site in 108 isolates lacking the mecA gene and identified as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus by the Xpert MRSA assay.

    PubMed

    Stojanov, M; Blanc, D S

    2014-11-01

    During a 3-year period, 848 patients were detected as carriers of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) by the Xpert MRSA assay (Cepheid). Among them, 108 patients (12.7 %) were colonized with strains showing methicillin-susceptible phenotypes and absence of the mecA gene, despite being positive with the rapid polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay. DNA sequences of the staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) insertion site of these "false-positive" strains was determined by direct sequencing of the genomic DNA. More than half (53.7 %) of the strains had DNA sequences unrelated to either SCC or SCCmec and one-third had DNA sequences related to non-mec SCC. Only 10.2 % of the strains carried sequences related to SCCmec, suggesting that a sequence containing the mecA gene was lost from an SCCmec. These findings differ from the general idea that all methicillin-susceptible S. aureus having positive Xpert MRSA assay results are essentially MRSA that lost the mecA gene.

  4. Fluorometric method of quantitative cell mutagenesis

    DOEpatents

    Dolbeare, F.A.

    1980-12-12

    A method for assaying a cell culture for mutagenesis is described. A cell culture is stained first with a histochemical stain, and then a fluorescent stain. Normal cells in the culture are stained by both the histochemical and fluorescent stains, while abnormal cells are stained only by the fluorescent stain. The two stains are chosen so that the histochemical stain absorbs the wavelengths that the fluorescent stain emits. After the counterstained culture is subjected to exciting light, the fluorescence from the abnormal cells is detected.

  5. Fluorometric method of quantitative cell mutagenesis

    DOEpatents

    Dolbeare, Frank A.

    1982-01-01

    A method for assaying a cell culture for mutagenesis is described. A cell culture is stained first with a histochemical stain, and then a fluorescent stain. Normal cells in the culture are stained by both the histochemical and fluorescent stains, while abnormal cells are stained only by the fluorescent stain. The two stains are chosen so that the histochemical stain absorbs the wavelengths that the fluorescent stain emits. After the counterstained culture is subjected to exciting light, the fluorescence from the abnormal cells is detected.

  6. Translesion DNA Synthesis and Mutagenesis in Eukaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Sale, Julian E.

    2013-01-01

    The structural features that enable replicative DNA polymerases to synthesize DNA rapidly and accurately also limit their ability to copy damaged DNA. Direct replication of DNA damage is termed translesion synthesis (TLS), a mechanism conserved from bacteria to mammals and executed by an array of specialized DNA polymerases. This chapter examines how these translesion polymerases replicate damaged DNA and how they are regulated to balance their ability to replicate DNA lesions with the risk of undesirable mutagenesis. It also discusses how TLS is co-opted to increase the diversity of the immunoglobulin gene hypermutation and the contribution it makes to the mutations that sculpt the genome of cancer cells. PMID:23457261

  7. AS52/GPT Mammalian Mutagenesis Assay

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-05-10

    dimethylnitrosamine (DMN) at 50 and 100 f.J.g/rnl was used as a 3 TLS Project Nn. A0ŗ-003: AS52/GPT Mammalian Mutagenesis Assay promutagen that requires metabolic...Chemical Source Lot No. air Air Products N/A calcium chloride Sigma 84F-0723 d imeth y !sulfoxide Fisher 933274 dimethylnitrosamine Sigma 82B0365...methanesulfonate (EMS) at 150 and 300 J.i-g/ml is used as a direct-acting mutagen for the nonactivated portion, and dimethylnitrosamine (DMN) at 150 and 300

  8. Gene discovery by chemical mutagenesis and whole-genome sequencing in Dictyostelium

    PubMed Central

    Li, Cheng-Lin Frank; Santhanam, Balaji; Webb, Amanda Nicole; Zupan, Blaž

    2016-01-01

    Whole-genome sequencing is a useful approach for identification of chemical-induced lesions, but previous applications involved tedious genetic mapping to pinpoint the causative mutations. We propose that saturation mutagenesis under low mutagenic loads, followed by whole-genome sequencing, should allow direct implication of genes by identifying multiple independent alleles of each relevant gene. We tested the hypothesis by performing three genetic screens with chemical mutagenesis in the social soil amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum. Through genome sequencing, we successfully identified mutant genes with multiple alleles in near-saturation screens, including resistance to intense illumination and strong suppressors of defects in an allorecognition pathway. We tested the causality of the mutations by comparison to published data and by direct complementation tests, finding both dominant and recessive causative mutations. Therefore, our strategy provides a cost- and time-efficient approach to gene discovery by integrating chemical mutagenesis and whole-genome sequencing. The method should be applicable to many microbial systems, and it is expected to revolutionize the field of functional genomics in Dictyostelium by greatly expanding the mutation spectrum relative to other common mutagenesis methods. PMID:27307293

  9. Timing of the IUD insertion.

    PubMed

    Edelman, D A; Zipper, J; Rivera, M; Medel, M

    1979-05-01

    The relationship between the time in the menstrual cycle when a TCu-200 or Cu-7-200 is inserted and subsequent IUD-related events was evaluated. For women who had either TCus or Cu-7s inserted, the pregnancy, expulsion and medical removal rates were similar for insertions performed at any time of the menstrual cycle.

  10. Probabilistic analysis of recessive mutagenesis screen strategies.

    PubMed

    Silver, Jeremy D; Hilton, Douglas J; Bahlo, Melanie; Kile, Benjamin T

    2007-01-01

    Random mutagenesis screens for recessive phenotypes require three generations of breeding, using either a backcross (BC) or intercross (IC) strategy. Hence, they are more costly and technically demanding than those for dominant phenotypes. Maximizing the return from these screens requires maximizing the number of mutations that are bred to homozyosity in the G(3) generation. Using a probabilistic approach, we compare different designs of screens for recessive phenotypes and the impact each one has on the number of mutations that can be effectively screened. We address the issue of BC versus IC strategies and consider genome-wide, region-specific screens and suppressor screens. We find that optimally designed BC and IC screens allow the screening of, on average, similar numbers of mutations but that interpedigree variation is more pronounced when the IC strategy is employed. By conducting a retrospective analysis of published mutagenesis screens, we show that, depending on the strategy, a threefold difference in the numbers of mutations screened per animal used could be expected. This method allows researchers to contrast, for a range of experimental designs, the cost per mutation screened and to maximize the number of mutations that one can expect to screen in a given experiment.

  11. Lethal mutagenesis in a structured environment.

    PubMed

    Steinmeyer, Shelby H; Wilke, Claus O

    2009-11-07

    We analyze how lethal mutagenesis operates in a compartmentalized host. We assume that different compartments receive different amounts of mutagen and that virions can migrate among compartments. We address two main questions: (1) To what extent can refugia, i.e., compartments that receive little mutagen, prevent extinction? (2) Does migration among compartments limit the effectiveness of refugia? We find that if there is little migration, extinction has to be achieved separately in all compartments. In this case, the total dose of mutagen administered to the host needs to be so high that the mutagen is effective even in the refugia. By contrast, if migration is extensive, then lethal mutagenesis is effective as long as the average growth in all compartments is reduced to below replacement levels. The effectiveness of migration is governed by the ratio of virion replication and death rates, R(0). The smaller R(0), the less migration is necessary to neutralize refugia and the less mutagen is necessary to achieve extinction at high migration rates.

  12. Insertion loads and forearm muscle activity during flexible hose insertion tasks.

    PubMed

    Grieshaber, D Christian; Armstrong, Thomas J

    2007-10-01

    To quantify the physical demands of hose insertion tasks in automotive assembly operations and how they are affected by method and the mechanical interference between the hose and the flange. Insertion tasks were identified by workers as physically demanding and can often lead to fatigue or losses in production attributable to pain or injury. Six male and 6 female participants pushed a 25.4-mm flexible rubber hose onto a stationary flange during simulated insertions. Three insertion methods -- rock, straight, and twist -- were examined in the study. Muscle activity of the finger flexors was recorded to estimate grip effort during the simulated insertions. The twist method (114.8 N) resulted in a 26% reduction in axial force compared with the straight method (155.7 N). Average muscle activity ranged from a low of 14% maximum voluntary contraction (MVC; men, straight method) to a high of 67% MVC (women, twist method). Hose resultant forces ranged from a low of 52.2 N to a high of 461.1 N for all participants. Men exerted 6% higher resultant forces with 37% less muscle activity than women. There are situations when the 26% reduction in the axial force attributable to twisting may be helpful during an insertion, despite the fact that forearm muscle activity was highest for both male and female participants during twisting insertions. The results of this study can be applied to the future design of tasks that involve the joining of two parts such as a hose and flange.

  13. Metal and cofactor insertion.

    PubMed

    Mendel, Ralf R; Smith, Alison G; Marquet, Andree; Warren, Martin J

    2007-10-01

    Cells require metal ions as cofactors for the assembly of metalloproteins. Principally one has to distinguish between metal ions that are directly incorporated into their cognate sites on proteins and those metal ions that have to become part of prosthetic groups, cofactors or complexes prior to insertion of theses moieties into target proteins. Molybdenum is only active as part of the molybdenum cofactor, iron can be part of diverse Fe-S clusters or of the heme group, while copper ions are directly delivered to their targets. We will focus in greater detail on molybdenum metabolism because molybdenum metabolism is a good example for demonstrating the role and the network of metals in metabolism: each of the three steps in the pathway of molybdenum cofactor formation depends on a different metal (iron, copper, molybdenum) and also the enzymes finally harbouring the molybdenum cofactor need additional metal-containing groups to function (iron sulfur-clusters, heme-iron).

  14. Stabilization of a prokaryotic LAT transporter by random mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Banqueri, Arturo; Errasti-Murugarren, Ekaitz; Bartoccioni, Paola; Kowalczyk, Lukasz; Perálvarez-Marín, Alex; Palacín, Manuel; Vázquez-Ibar, José Luis

    2016-04-01

    The knowledge of three-dimensional structures at atomic resolution of membrane transport proteins has improved considerably our understanding of their physiological roles and pathological implications. However, most structural biology techniques require an optimal candidate within a protein family for structural determination with (a) reasonable production in heterologous hosts and (b) good stability in detergent micelles. SteT, the Bacillus subtilis L-serine/L-threonine exchanger is the best-known prokaryotic paradigm of the mammalian L-amino acid transporter (LAT) family. Unfortunately, SteT's lousy stability after extracting from the membrane prevents its structural characterization. Here, we have used an approach based on random mutagenesis to engineer stability in SteT. Using a split GFP complementation assay as reporter of protein expression and membrane insertion, we created a library of 70 SteT mutants each containing random replacements of one or two residues situated in the transmembrane domains. Analysis of expression and monodispersity in detergent of this library permitted the identification of evolved versions of SteT with a significant increase in both expression yield and stability in detergent with respect to wild type. In addition, these experiments revealed a correlation between the yield of expression and the stability in detergent micelles. Finally, and based on protein delipidation and relipidation assays together with transport experiments, possible mechanisms of SteT stabilization are discussed. Besides optimizing a member of the LAT family for structural determination, our work proposes a new approach that can be used to optimize any membrane protein of interest. © 2016 Rodríguez-Banqueri et al.

  15. Stabilization of a prokaryotic LAT transporter by random mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Banqueri, Arturo; Errasti-Murugarren, Ekaitz; Bartoccioni, Paola; Kowalczyk, Lukasz; Perálvarez-Marín, Alex

    2016-01-01

    The knowledge of three-dimensional structures at atomic resolution of membrane transport proteins has improved considerably our understanding of their physiological roles and pathological implications. However, most structural biology techniques require an optimal candidate within a protein family for structural determination with (a) reasonable production in heterologous hosts and (b) good stability in detergent micelles. SteT, the Bacillus subtilis l-serine/l-threonine exchanger is the best-known prokaryotic paradigm of the mammalian l–amino acid transporter (LAT) family. Unfortunately, SteT’s lousy stability after extracting from the membrane prevents its structural characterization. Here, we have used an approach based on random mutagenesis to engineer stability in SteT. Using a split GFP complementation assay as reporter of protein expression and membrane insertion, we created a library of 70 SteT mutants each containing random replacements of one or two residues situated in the transmembrane domains. Analysis of expression and monodispersity in detergent of this library permitted the identification of evolved versions of SteT with a significant increase in both expression yield and stability in detergent with respect to wild type. In addition, these experiments revealed a correlation between the yield of expression and the stability in detergent micelles. Finally, and based on protein delipidation and relipidation assays together with transport experiments, possible mechanisms of SteT stabilization are discussed. Besides optimizing a member of the LAT family for structural determination, our work proposes a new approach that can be used to optimize any membrane protein of interest. PMID:26976827

  16. Mutagenesis assays of human amniotic fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Everson, R.B.; Milne, K.L.; Warbuton, D.; McClamrock, H.D.; Buchanan, P.D.

    1985-01-01

    Extracts of amniocentesis samples from 144 women were tested for the presence of mutagenic substances using tester strain TA1538 in the Ames Salmonella/mammalian-microsome mutagenicity test. Because the volume of amniotic fluid in these samples was limited (generally less than 10 ml), the authors investigated modifications of this mutagenesis assay that could increase its ability to detect effects from small quantities of test material. Using mutagenicity in samples of urine from smokers as a model, it appeared that improved ability to detect small amounts of mutagen could be obtained by reducing volumes of media and reagents while keeping the amount of test sample constant. Tests of amniotic fluid extracts by this modified procedure showed small increases in revertants, about 50% above dimethylsulfoxide solvent control values. The increases suggest the presence of small amounts of mutagenic material in many of the amniotic fluid samples. At the doses employed, mutagenic activity in these samples was not associated with maternal smoking.

  17. From Chemical Mutagenesis to Post‐Expression Mutagenesis: A 50 Year Odyssey

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Tom H.; Vallée, M. Robert J.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Site‐directed (gene) mutagenesis has been the most useful method available for the conversion of one amino acid residue of a given protein into another. Until relatively recently, this strategy was limited to the twenty standard amino acids. The ongoing maturation of stop codon suppression and related technologies for unnatural amino acid incorporation has greatly expanded access to nonstandard amino acids by expanding the scope of the translational apparatus. However, the necessity for translation of genetic changes restricts the diversity of residues that may be incorporated. Herein we highlight an alternative approach, termed post‐expression mutagenesis, which operates at the level of the very functional biomolecules themselves. Using the lens of retrosynthesis, we highlight prospects for new strategies in protein modification, alteration, and construction which will enable protein science to move beyond the constraints of the “translational filter” and lead to a true synthetic biology. PMID:27119221

  18. Immediate post-partum insertion of intrauterine devices.

    PubMed

    Grimes, David A; Lopez, Laureen M; Schulz, Kenneth F; Van Vliet, Huib Aam; Stanwood, Nancy L

    2010-05-12

    Insertion of an intrauterine device (IUD) immediately after delivery is appealing for several reasons. The woman is known not to be pregnant, her motivation for contraception may be high, and the setting may be convenient for both the woman and her provider. However, the risk of spontaneous expulsion may be unacceptably high. To assess the efficacy and feasibility of IUD insertion immediately after expulsion of the placenta. Our a priori hypothesis was that this practice is safe but associated with higher expulsion rates than interval IUD insertion. We searched MEDLINE, CENTRAL, POPLINE, EMBASE, ClinicalTrials.gov, and ICTRP. We also contacted investigators to identify other trials. We sought all randomized controlled trials (RCTs) with at least one treatment arm that involved immediate post-partum (within 10 minutes of placental expulsion) insertion of an IUD. Comparisons could include different IUDs, different insertion techniques, immediate versus delayed post-partum insertion, or immediate versus interval insertion (unrelated to pregnancy). Studies could include either vaginal or cesarean deliveries. We evaluated the methodological quality of each report and sought to identify duplicate reporting of data from multicenter trials. Two authors abstracted the data. Principal outcome measures were pregnancy, expulsion, and continuation rates. Because the trials did not have uniform interventions, we were unable to aggregate them in a meta-analysis. We found nine RCTs; one directly compared immediate post-partum insertion with delayed insertion. Expulsion by six months was more likely for the immediate group than the delayed insertion group (OR 6.77; 95% CI 1.43 to 32.14). In trials of immediate insertion alone, modifications of existing devices, such as adding absorbable sutures or additional appendages, did not appear beneficial. Most studies showed no important differences between insertions done by hand or by instruments. Lippes Loop and Progestasert devices did

  19. Facility target insert shielding assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Mocko, Michal

    2015-10-06

    Main objective of this report is to assess the basic shielding requirements for the vertical target insert and retrieval port. We used the baseline design for the vertical target insert in our calculations. The insert sits in the 12”-diameter cylindrical shaft extending from the service alley in the top floor of the facility all the way down to the target location. The target retrieval mechanism is a long rod with the target assembly attached and running the entire length of the vertical shaft. The insert also houses the helium cooling supply and return lines each with 2” diameter. In the present study we focused on calculating the neutron and photon dose rate fields on top of the target insert/retrieval mechanism in the service alley. Additionally, we studied a few prototypical configurations of the shielding layers in the vertical insert as well as on the top.

  20. Impedance calculation for ferrite inserts

    SciTech Connect

    Breitzmann, S.C.; Lee, S.Y.; Ng, K.Y.; /Fermilab

    2005-01-01

    Passive ferrite inserts were used to compensate the space charge impedance in high intensity space charge dominated accelerators. They study the narrowband longitudinal impedance of these ferrite inserts. they find that the shunt impedance and the quality factor for ferrite inserts are inversely proportional to the imaginary part of the permeability of ferrite materials. They also provide a recipe for attaining a truly passive space charge impedance compensation and avoiding narrowband microwave instabilities.

  1. Versatile Vectors for Efficient Mutagenesis of Bradyrhizobium diazoefficiens and Other Alphaproteobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Ledermann, Raphael; Strebel, Silvan; Kampik, Clara

    2016-01-01

    less-well-characterized organisms is often impaired by the lack of efficient methods. Here we describe a set of novel genetic tools for facilitated mutagenesis of the nitrogen-fixing soybean symbiont Bradyrhizobium diazoefficiens and related alphaproteobacteria. We demonstrated their usefulness by generating several mutant strains lacking defined genes. Isolation of both antibiotic resistance gene-containing and markerless deletion mutants is greatly facilitated because undesired clones which contain the entire mutagenic plasmid integrated in the genome can be identified on the basis of their fluorescent phenotype derived from the mCherry gene carried by the vector backbone. The possibility to generate markerless mutants assists with the isolation of strains carrying multiple deletions, which can be crucial while studying functionally redundant genes. PMID:26921431

  2. Insertion device and method for accurate and repeatable target insertion

    DOEpatents

    Gubeli, III, Joseph F.; Shinn, Michelle D.; Bevins, Michael E.; Dillon-Townes, Lawrence; Neil, George R.

    2017-07-04

    The present invention discloses a device and a method for inserting and positioning a target within a free electron laser, particle accelerator, or other such device that generates or utilizes a beam of energy or particles. The system includes a three-point registration mechanism that insures angular and translational accuracy and repeatability of positioning upon multiple insertions within the same structure.

  3. Comparison of intramenstrual IUD insertion with insertion following menstrual regulation.

    PubMed

    Otolorin, E O; Ladipo, O A

    1985-03-01

    To evaluate the use-effectiveness and safety of IUD insertion immediately after menstrual regulation (MR) for delayed menses, a Lippes Loop D (LLD) intrauterine device was inserted in each of 100 consecutive clients at the University College Hospital, Ibadan, immediately after menstrual regulation. Pertinent event rates after 12 months of use were compared with those of 100 consecutive women who had the LLD inserted during menstruation. The cumulative net expulsion rate after 12 months of use was 8% for the study group and 4% for the controls. The overall rate of removals was 15% for the study group and 16% for the control group. None of the observed differences was statistically significant. The continuation rates at 12 months were comparable for both groups (78% and 80%, respectively). There were no accidental pregnancies during the study period. The authors suggest that IUD insertion immediately after menstrual regulation is as effective and safe as intramenstrual insertion, provided prophylactic antibiotics are given.

  4. A Defect in DNA Ligase4 Enhances the Frequency of TALEN-Mediated Targeted Mutagenesis in Rice1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Cermak, Tomas; Sugimoto, Kazuhiko; Saika, Hiroaki; Mori, Akiko; Osakabe, Keishi; Hamada, Masao; Katayose, Yuichi; Voytas, Daniel F.

    2016-01-01

    We have established methods for site-directed mutagenesis via transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) in the endogenous rice (Oryza sativa) waxy gene and demonstrated stable inheritance of TALEN-induced somatic mutations to the progeny. To analyze the role of classical nonhomologous end joining (cNHEJ) and alternative nonhomologous end joining (altNHEJ) pathways in TALEN-induced mutagenesis in plant cells, we investigated whether a lack of DNA Ligase4 (Lig4) affects the kinetics of TALEN-induced double-strand break repair in rice cells. Deep-sequencing analysis revealed that the frequency of all types of mutations, namely deletion, insertion, combination of insertion with deletion, and substitution, in lig4 null mutant calli was higher than that in a lig4 heterozygous mutant or the wild type. In addition, the ratio of large deletions (greater than 10 bp) and deletions repaired by microhomology-mediated end joining (MMEJ) to total deletion mutations in lig4 null mutant calli was higher than that in the lig4 heterozygous mutant or wild type. Furthermore, almost all insertions (2 bp or greater) were shown to be processed via copy and paste of one or more regions around the TALENs cleavage site and rejoined via MMEJ regardless of genetic background. Taken together, our findings indicate that the dysfunction of cNHEJ leads to a shift in the repair pathway from cNHEJ to altNHEJ or synthesis-dependent strand annealing. PMID:26668331

  5. A modifier screen identifies DNAJB6 as a cardiomyopathy susceptibility gene

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Yonghe; Long, Pamela A.; Bos, J. Martijn; Shih, Yu-Huan; Ma, Xiao; Sundsbak, Rhianna S.; Chen, Jianhua; Zhao, Liqun; Hu, Xinyang; Wang, Jianan; Shi, Yongyong; Ackerman, Michael J.; Lin, Xueying; Ekker, Stephen C.; Redfield, Margaret M.; Olson, Timothy M.

    2016-01-01

    Mutagenesis screening is a powerful forward genetic approach that has been successfully applied in lower-model organisms to discover genetic factors for biological processes. This phenotype-based approach has yet to be established in vertebrates for probing major human diseases, largely because of the complexity of colony management. Herein, we report a rapid strategy for identifying genetic modifiers of cardiomyopathy (CM). Based on the application of doxorubicin stress to zebrafish insertional cardiac (ZIC) mutants, we identified 4 candidate CM-modifying genes, of which 3 have been linked previously to CM. The long isoform of DnaJ (Hsp40) homolog, subfamily B, member 6b (dnajb6b(L)) was identified as a CM susceptibility gene, supported by identification of rare variants in its human ortholog DNAJB6 from CM patients. Mechanistic studies indicated that the deleterious, loss-of-function modifying effects of dnajb6b(L) can be ameliorated by inhibition of ER stress. In contrast, overexpression of dnajb6(L) exerts cardioprotective effects on both fish and mouse CM models. Together, our findings establish a mutagenesis screening strategy that is scalable for systematic identification of genetic modifiers of CM, feasible to suggest therapeutic targets, and expandable to other major human diseases. PMID:27642634

  6. Sleeping Beauty Transposon Mutagenesis of the Rat Genome in Spermatogonial Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ivics, Zoltán; Izsvák, Zsuzsanna; Chapman, Karen M.; Hamra, F. Kent

    2011-01-01

    Since several aspects of physiology in rats has evolved to be more similar to humans than that of mice, it is highly desirable to link the rat into the process of annotating the human genome with function. However, the lack of technology for generating defined mutants in the rat genome has hindered the identification of causative relationships between genes and disease phenotypes. As an important step towards this goal, an approach of establishing transposon-mediated insertional mutagenesis in rat spermatogonial stem cells was recently developed. Transposons can be viewed as natural DNA transfer vehicles that, similar to integrating viruses, are capable of efficient genomic insertion. The mobility of transposons can be controlled by conditionally providing the transposase component of the transposition reaction. Thus, a DNA of interest such as a mutagenic gene trap cassette cloned between the inverted repeat sequences of a transposon-based vector can be utilized for stable genomic insertion in a regulated and highly efficient manner. Gene trap transposons integrate into the genome in a random fashion, and those mutagenic insertions that occurred in expressed genes can be selected in vitro based on activation of a reporter. Selected monoclonal as well as polyclonal libraries of gene trap clones are transplanted into the testes of recipient/founder male rats allowing passage of the mutation through the germline to F1 progeny after only a single cross with wild-type females. This paradigm enables a powerful methodological pipeline for forward genetic screens for functional gene annotation in the rat, as well as other vertebrate models. This article provides a detailed description on how to culturerat spermatogonial stem cell lines, their transfection with transposon plasmids, selection of gene trap insertions with antibiotics, transplantation of genetically modified stem cells and genotyping of knockout animals. PMID:21193047

  7. Sleeping Beauty transposon mutagenesis of the rat genome in spermatogonial stem cells.

    PubMed

    Ivics, Zoltán; Izsvák, Zsuzsanna; Chapman, Karen M; Hamra, F Kent

    2011-04-01

    Since several aspects of physiology in rats have evolved to be more similar to humans than that of mice, it is highly desirable to link the rat into the process of annotating the human genome with function. However, the lack of technology for generating defined mutants in the rat genome has hindered the identification of causative relationships between genes and disease phenotypes. As an important step towards this goal, an approach of establishing transposon-mediated insertional mutagenesis in rat spermatogonial stem cells was recently developed. Transposons can be viewed as natural DNA transfer vehicles that, similar to integrating viruses, are capable of efficient genomic insertion. The mobility of transposons can be controlled by conditionally providing the transposase component of the transposition reaction. Thus, a DNA of interest such as a mutagenic gene trap cassette cloned between the inverted repeat sequences of a transposon-based vector can be utilized for stable genomic insertion in a regulated and highly efficient manner. Gene-trap transposons integrate into the genome in a random fashion, and those mutagenic insertions that occurred in expressed genes can be selected in vitro based on activation of a reporter. Selected monoclonal as well as polyclonal libraries of gene trap clones are transplanted into the testes of recipient/founder male rats allowing passage of the mutation through the germline to F1 progeny after only a single cross with wild-type females. This paradigm enables a powerful methodological pipeline for forward genetic screens for functional gene annotation in the rat, as well as other vertebrate models. This article provides a detailed description on how to culture rat spermatogonial stem cell lines, their transfection with transposon plasmids, selection of gene-trap insertions with antibiotics, transplantation of genetically modified stem cells and genotyping of knockout animals. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Genome-scale mutagenesis and phenotypic characterization of two-component signal transduction systems in Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris ATCC 33913.

    PubMed

    Qian, Wei; Han, Zhong-Ji; Tao, Jun; He, Chaozu

    2008-08-01

    The gram-negative bacterium Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris is the causal agent of black rot disease of cruciferous plants. Its genome encodes a large repertoire of two-component signal transduction systems (TCSTSs), which consist of histidine kinases and response regulators (RR) to monitor and respond to environmental stimuli. To investigate the biological functions of these TCSTS genes, we aimed to inactivate all 54 RR genes in X. campestris pv. campestris ATCC 33913, and successfully generated 51 viable mutants using the insertion inactivation method. Plant inoculation identified two novel response regulator genes (XCC1958 and XCC3107) that are involved in virulence of this strain. Genetic complementation demonstrated that XCC3107, designated as vgrR (virulence and growth regulator), also affects bacterial growth and activity of extracellular proteases. In addition, we assessed the survival of these mutants under various stresses, including osmotic stress, high sodium concentration, heat shock, and sodium dodecyl sulfate exposure, and identified a number of genes that may be involved in the general stress response of X. campestris pv. campestris. Mutagenesis and phenotypic characterization of RR genes in this study will facilitate future studies on signaling networks in this important phytopathogenic bacterium.

  9. Human formyl peptide receptor ligand binding domain(s). Studies using an improved mutagenesis/expression vector reveal a novel mechanism for the regulation of receptor occupancy.

    PubMed

    Perez, H D; Vilander, L; Andrews, W H; Holmes, R

    1994-09-09

    Recently, we reported the domain requirements for the binding of formyl peptide to its specific receptor. Based on experiments using receptor chimeras, we also postulated an importance for the amino-terminal domain of the receptor in ligand binding (Perez, H. D., Holmes, R., Vilander, L., Adams, R., Manzana, W., Jolley, D., and Andrews, W. H. (1993) J. Biol. Chem. 268, 2292-2295). We have begun to perform a detailed analysis of the regions within the formyl peptide receptor involved in ligand binding. To address the importance of the receptor amino-terminal domain, we substituted (or inserted) hydrophilic sequences within the amino-terminal domain, expressed the receptors, and determined their ability to bind ligand. A stretch of nine amino acids next to the initial methionine was identified as crucial for receptor occupancy. A peptide containing such a sequence specifically completed binding of the ligand to the receptor. Alanine screen mutagenesis of the second extracellular domain also identified amino acids involved in ligand binding as well as a disulfide bond (Cys98 to Cys176) crucial for maintaining the binding pocket. These studies provide evidence for a novel mechanism involved in regulation of receptor occupancy. Binding of the ligand induces conformational changes in the receptor that result in the apposition of the amino-terminal domain over the ligand, providing a lid to the binding pocket.

  10. Sink Inserts for Flood Prevention

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleming, Fraser F.; Bodnar, Daniel J.; Hardesty, David L.

    2004-09-01

    A simple, inexpensive insert is described for preventing flooding in lab sinks. The insert is essentially a tube with slots cut into the side that fits snugly into the drain outlet, preventing water buildup and providing additional drainage sites to avoid constriction by small lab items and paper towels.

  11. Dissecting partner recognition by an intrinsically disordered protein using descriptive random mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Gruet, Antoine; Dosnon, Marion; Vassena, Andrea; Lombard, Vincent; Gerlier, Denis; Bignon, Christophe; Longhi, Sonia

    2013-09-23

    In view of getting insights into the molecular determinants of the binding efficiency of intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs), we used random mutagenesis. As a proof of concept, we chose the interaction between the intrinsically disordered C-terminal domain of the measles virus nucleoprotein (NTAIL) and the X domain (XD) of the viral phosphoprotein and assessed how amino acid substitutions introduced at random within NTAIL affect partner recognition. In contrast with directed evolution approaches, we did not apply any selection and used the gene library approach not for production purposes but for achieving a better understanding of the NTAIL/XD interaction. For that reason, and to differentiate our approach from similar approaches that make use of systematic (i.e., targeted) mutagenesis, we propose to call it "descriptive random mutagenesis" (DRM). NTAIL variants generated by error-prone PCR were picked at random in the absence of selection pressure and were characterized in terms of sequence and binding abilities toward XD. DRM not only identified determinants of NTAIL/XD interaction that were in good agreement with previous work but also provided new insights. In particular, we discovered that the primary interaction site is poorly evolvable in terms of binding abilities toward XD. We also identified a critical NTAIL residue whose role in stabilizing the NTAIL/XD complex had previously escaped detection, and we identified NTAIL regulatory sites that dampen the interaction while being located outside the primary interaction site. Results show that DRM is a valuable approach to study binding abilities of IDPs.

  12. Transposon mutagenesis in Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae using a novel mariner-based system for generating random mutations.

    PubMed

    Maglennon, Gareth A; Cook, Beth S; Deeney, Alannah S; Bossé, Janine T; Peters, Sarah E; Langford, Paul R; Maskell, Duncan J; Tucker, Alexander W; Wren, Brendan W; Rycroft, Andrew N

    2013-12-21

    Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae is the cause of enzootic pneumonia in pigs, a chronic respiratory disease associated with significant economic losses to swine producers worldwide. The molecular pathogenesis of infection is poorly understood due to the lack of genetic tools to allow manipulation of the organism and more generally for the Mycoplasma genus. The objective of this study was to develop a system for generating random transposon insertion mutants in M. hyopneumoniae that could prove a powerful tool in enabling the pathogenesis of infection to be unraveled. A novel delivery vector was constructed containing a hyperactive C9 mutant of the Himar1 transposase along with a mini transposon containing the tetracycline resistance cassette, tetM. M. hyopneumoniae strain 232 was electroporated with the construct and tetM-expressing transformants selected on agar containing tetracycline. Individual transformants contained single transposon insertions that were stable upon serial passages in broth medium. The insertion sites of 44 individual transformants were determined and confirmed disruption of several M. hyopneumoniae genes. A large pool of over 10 000 mutants was generated that should allow saturation of the M. hyopneumoniae strain 232 genome. This is the first time that transposon mutagenesis has been demonstrated in this important pathogen and could be generally applied for other Mycoplasma species that are intractable to genetic manipulation. The ability to generate random mutant libraries is a powerful tool in the further study of the pathogenesis of this important swine pathogen.

  13. Heat shock and herpes virus: enhanced reactivation without untargeted mutagenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Lytle, C.D.; Carney, P.G.

    1988-01-01

    Enhanced reactivation of Ultraviolet-irradiated virus has been reported to occur in heat-shocked host cells. Since enhanced virus reactivation is often accompanied by untargeted mutagenesis, we investigated whether such mutagenesis would occur for herpes simplex virus (HSV) in CV-1 monkey kidney cells subjected to heat shock. In addition to expressing enhanced reactivation, the treated cells were transiently more susceptible to infection by unirradiated HSV. No mutagenesis of unirradiated HSV was found whether infection occurred at the time of increased susceptibility to infection or during expression of enhanced viral reactivation.

  14. Small genomic insertions form enhancers that misregulate oncogenes

    PubMed Central

    Abraham, Brian J.; Hnisz, Denes; Weintraub, Abraham S.; Kwiatkowski, Nicholas; Li, Charles H.; Li, Zhaodong; Weichert-Leahey, Nina; Rahman, Sunniyat; Liu, Yu; Etchin, Julia; Li, Benshang; Shen, Shuhong; Lee, Tong Ihn; Zhang, Jinghui; Look, A. Thomas; Mansour, Marc R.; Young, Richard A.

    2017-01-01

    The non-coding regions of tumour cell genomes harbour a considerable fraction of total DNA sequence variation, but the functional contribution of these variants to tumorigenesis is ill-defined. Among these non-coding variants, somatic insertions are among the least well characterized due to challenges with interpreting short-read DNA sequences. Here, using a combination of Chip-seq to enrich enhancer DNA and a computational approach with multiple DNA alignment procedures, we identify enhancer-associated small insertion variants. Among the 102 tumour cell genomes we analyse, small insertions are frequently observed in enhancer DNA sequences near known oncogenes. Further study of one insertion, somatically acquired in primary leukaemia tumour genomes, reveals that it nucleates formation of an active enhancer that drives expression of the LMO2 oncogene. The approach described here to identify enhancer-associated small insertion variants provides a foundation for further study of these abnormalities across human cancers. PMID:28181482

  15. Reciprocal relationship between mouse germ-cell mutagenesis and basic genetics: from early beginnings to future opportunities.

    PubMed

    Russell, L B

    1989-01-01

    The scientific foundations for several mammalian germ-line mutagenesis tests in common use today were laid in the 1930s, 1940s, and early 1950s. Subsequent developments in the field have had multiple objectives: detection of mutagenicity of environmental agents (which has led to the development of numerous methodologies), identification of biological and physical factors that affect mutation yield, analysis of the structural nature of the genetic alterations, and assessment of the organismic effects of various types of mutations. Mutagenesis studies have made numerous contributions to basic genetics by generating mutant types that led to elucidation of sex-determining mechanisms in mammals; formulation of the single-active-, or inactive-, X-chromosome hypothesis; correlation of genetic and cytological maps; discovery of genetic "imprinting" phenomena; study of developmental pathways and cell lineages, etc. Particularly useful are sets of complexly overlapping deletions that have been recovered in radiation mutagenesis studies, propagated in breeding stocks, and genetically analyzed; these have constituted prerequisites for molecular genetic studies aimed at development of the DNA structure-function relationships for important genomic regions. Mutagenesis experiments have also served to identify mutagens that are particularly effective in inducing specific types of genetic lesions desired for basic studies. Reciprocally, basic genetics has contributed to the development of mutagenesis tests and has enhanced the value of the specific-locus test by adding to its quantitative capabilities the capability for qualitatively characterizing the actions of mutagens.

  16. Efficient targeted mutagenesis of rice and tobacco genomes using Cpf1 from Francisella novicida

    PubMed Central

    Endo, Akira; Masafumi, Mikami; Kaya, Hidetaka; Toki, Seiichi

    2016-01-01

    CRISPR/Cas9 systems are nowadays applied extensively to effect genome editing in various organisms including plants. CRISPR from Prevotella and Francisella 1 (Cpf1) is a newly characterized RNA-guided endonuclease that has two distinct features as compared to Cas9. First, Cpf1 utilizes a thymidine-rich protospacer adjacent motif (PAM) while Cas9 prefers a guanidine-rich PAM. Cpf1 could be used as a sequence-specific nuclease to target AT-rich regions of a genome that Cas9 had difficulty accessing. Second, Cpf1 generates DNA ends with a 5′ overhang, whereas Cas9 creates blunt DNA ends after cleavage. “Sticky” DNA ends should increase the efficiency of insertion of a desired DNA fragment into the Cpf1-cleaved site using complementary DNA ends. Therefore, Cpf1 could be a potent tool for precise genome engineering. To evaluate whether Cpf1 can be applied to plant genome editing, we selected Cpf1 from Francisella novicida (FnCpf1), which recognizes a shorter PAM (TTN) within known Cpf1 proteins, and applied it to targeted mutagenesis in tobacco and rice. Our results show that targeted mutagenesis had occurred in transgenic plants expressing FnCpf1 with crRNA. Deletions of the targeted region were the most frequently observed mutations. Our results demonstrate that FnCpf1 can be applied successfully to genome engineering in plants. PMID:27905529

  17. Efficient and Heritable Targeted Mutagenesis in Mosses Using the CRISPR/Cas9 System.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Toshihisa; Sakurai, Tetsuya; Osakabe, Yuriko; Osakabe, Keishi; Sakakibara, Hitoshi

    2016-12-01

    Targeted genome modification by RNA-guided nucleases derived from the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated nuclease 9 (Cas9) system has seen rapid development in many organisms, including several plant species. In the present study, we succeeded in introducing the CRISPR/Cas9 system into the non-model organism Scopelophila cataractae, a moss that exhibits heavy metal tolerance, and the model organism Physcomitrella patens Utilizing the process by which moss plants regenerate from protoplasts, we conducted targeted mutagenesis by expression of single-chain guide RNA (sgRNA) and Cas9 in protoplasts. Using this method, the acquisition rate of strains exhibiting phenotypic changes associated with the target genes was approximately 45-69%, and strains with phenotypic changes exhibited various insertion and deletion mutations. In addition, we report that our method is capable of multiplex targeted mutagenesis (two independent genes) and also permits the efficient introduction of large deletions (∼3 kbp). These results demonstrate that the CRISPR/Cas9 system can be used to accelerate investigations of bryology and land plant evolution.

  18. History of attempts to quantify environmental mutagenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Hollaender, A.

    1981-01-01

    It became obvious in the early 1960's that the ready recognition of mutations produced by chemicals could have a profound influence on the refinement of methods to detect environmental mutagens. The experience derived over the previous 30 years in characterizing the effects of ionizing and ultraviolet radiation on the genetic mechanism came to serve us in good stead. Although the effects of chemicals are considerably more complicated and often require the analysis of individual substances, nonetheless, the area has developed rapidly in recent decades. The establishment and historical background of the International Association of Environmental Mutagen Societies (IAEMS) will be discussed. An attempt at the quantitation of chemical effects has been developed in comparison with radiation mutagenesis. As a first step, a definition of the Mutagen Burden or unavoidable exposure to chemicals will be discussed. A mathematical approach (Haynes/Eckhardt) will be considered and finally an outline for the comprehensive investigation of detailed interscience study will be made of less than six chemicals.

  19. Genomic approaches to DNA repair and mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Wyrick, John J; Roberts, Steven A

    2015-12-01

    DNA damage is a constant threat to cells, causing cytotoxicity as well as inducing genetic alterations. The steady-state abundance of DNA lesions in a cell is minimized by a variety of DNA repair mechanisms, including DNA strand break repair, mismatch repair, nucleotide excision repair, base excision repair, and ribonucleotide excision repair. The efficiencies and mechanisms by which these pathways remove damage from chromosomes have been primarily characterized by investigating the processing of lesions at defined genomic loci, among bulk genomic DNA, on episomal DNA constructs, or using in vitro substrates. However, the structure of a chromosome is heterogeneous, consisting of heavily protein-bound heterochromatic regions, open regulatory regions, actively transcribed genes, and even areas of transient single stranded DNA. Consequently, DNA repair pathways function in a much more diverse set of chromosomal contexts than can be readily assessed using previous methods. Recent efforts to develop whole genome maps of DNA damage, repair processes, and even mutations promise to greatly expand our understanding of DNA repair and mutagenesis. Here we review the current efforts to utilize whole genome maps of DNA damage and mutation to understand how different chromosomal contexts affect DNA excision repair pathways. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Mutagenesis during plant responses to UVB radiation.

    PubMed

    Holá, M; Vágnerová, R; Angelis, K J

    2015-08-01

    We tested an idea that induced mutagenesis due to unrepaired DNA lesions, here the UV photoproducts, underlies the impact of UVB irradiation on plant phenotype. For this purpose we used protonemal culture of the moss Physcomitrella patens with 50% of apical cells, which mimics actively growing tissue, the most vulnerable stage for the induction of mutations. We measured the UVB mutation rate of various moss lines with defects in DNA repair (pplig4, ppku70, pprad50, ppmre11), and in selected clones resistant to 2-Fluoroadenine, which were mutated in the adenosine phosphotrasferase gene (APT), we analysed induced mutations by sequencing. In parallel we followed DNA break repair and removal of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers with a half-life τ = 4 h 14 min determined by comet assay combined with UV dimer specific T4 endonuclease V. We show that UVB induces massive, sequence specific, error-prone bypass repair that is responsible for a high mutation rate owing to relatively slow, though error-free, removal of photoproducts by nucleotide excision repair (NER). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Lethal mutagenesis in viruses and bacteria.

    PubMed

    Chen, Peiqiu; Shakhnovich, Eugene I

    2009-10-01

    In this work we study how mutations that change physical properties of cell proteins (stability) affect population survival and growth. We present a model in which the genotype is presented as a set folding free energies of cell proteins. Mutations occur upon replication, so stabilities of some proteins in daughter cells differ from those in the parent cell by amounts deduced from the distribution of mutational effects on protein stability. The genotype-phenotype relationship posits that the cell's fitness (replication rate) is proportional to the concentration of its folded proteins and that unstable essential proteins result in lethality. Simulations reveal that lethal mutagenesis occurs at a mutation rate close to seven mutations in each replication of the genome for RNA viruses and at about half that rate for DNA-based organisms, in accord with earlier predictions from analytical theory and experimental results. This number appears somewhat dependent on the number of genes in the organisms and the organism's natural death rate. Further, our model reproduces the distribution of stabilities of natural proteins, in excellent agreement with experiments. We find that species with high mutation rates tend to have less stable proteins compared to species with low mutation rates.

  2. Genomic Approaches to DNA repair and Mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Wyrick, John J.; Roberts, Steven A.

    2015-01-01

    DNA damage is a constant threat to cells, causing cytotoxicity as well as inducing genetic alterations. The steady-state abundance of DNA lesions in a cell is minimized by a variety of DNA repair mechanisms, including DNA strand break repair, mismatch repair, nucleotide excision repair, base excision repair, and ribonucleotide excision repair. The efficiencies and mechanisms by which these pathways remove damage from chromosomes have been primarily characterized by investigating the processing of lesions at defined genomic loci, among bulk genomic DNA, on episomal DNA constructs, or using in vitro substrates. However, the structure of a chromosome is heterogeneous, consisting of heavily protein-bound heterochromatic regions, open regulatory regions, actively transcribed genes, and even areas of transient single stranded DNA. Consequently, DNA repair pathways function in a much more diverse set of chromosomal contexts than can be readily assessed using previous methods. Recent efforts to develop whole genome maps of DNA damage, repair processes, and even mutations promise to greatly expand our understanding of DNA repair and mutagenesis. Here we review the current efforts to utilize whole genome maps of DNA damage and mutation to understand how different chromosomal contexts affect DNA excision repair pathways. PMID:26411877

  3. Patients' experiences of the PICC insertion procedure.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, Jackie; Davies, Louise

    Peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs) are a type of central venous access device used to deliver a variety of intravenous therapies, including chemotherapy. PICCs may be placed by interventional radiologists, anaesthetists or, as is increasingly common, by specialist nurses in the hospital setting. However, little is known about how patients feel regarding the PICC insertion procedure. The aim of this study was to interview patients who had undergone a recent PICC insertion in the chemotherapy day unit to identify their experiences. On analysis of the qualitative data obtained from the semi-structured interview, five themes emerged: the context of cancer; expectations; levels of pain and anxiety; coping strategies; and explanation. The findings of this study support some previously described elements of procedural experiences; however, new understanding has provided implications for practice in the areas of expectations, allaying anxiety levels, supporting individual coping strategies and providing explanation. The major limitation of the study was the homogenous sample of oncology patients with a clear link between the patient experience of the PICC insertion and the context of cancer. The main recommendation for further research would be to repeat this study with a broader patient population.

  4. Development of an inducible transposon system for efficient random mutagenesis in Clostridium acetobutylicum

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ying; Xu, Shu; Chai, Changsheng; Yang, Sheng; Jiang, Weihong; Minton, Nigel P.; Gu, Yang

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium acetobutylicum is an industrially important Gram-positive organism, which is capable of producing economically important chemicals in the ABE (Acetone, Butanol and Ethanol) fermentation process. Renewed interests in the ABE process necessitate the availability of additional genetics tools to facilitate the derivation of a greater understanding of the underlying metabolic and regulatory control processes in operation through forward genetic strategies. In this study, a xylose inducible, mariner-based, transposon system was developed and shown to allow high-efficient random mutagenesis in the model strain ATCC 824. Of the thiamphenicol resistant colonies obtained, 91.9% were shown to be due to successful transposition of the catP-based mini-transposon element. Phenotypic screening of 200 transposon clones revealed a sporulation-defective clone with an insertion in spo0A, thereby demonstrating that this inducible transposon system can be used for forward genetic studies in C. acetobutylicum. PMID:27001972

  5. Molecular basis of transcriptional fidelity and DNA lesion-induced transcriptional mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Liang; Da, Lintai; Plouffe, Steven W.; Chong, Jenny; Kool, Eric; Wang, Dong

    2014-01-01

    Maintaining high transcriptional fidelity is essential for life. Some DNA lesions lead to significant changes in transcriptional fidelity. In this review, we will summarize recent progress towards understanding the molecular basis of RNA polymerase II (Pol II) transcriptional fidelity and DNA lesion-induced transcriptional mutagenesis. In particular, we will focus on the three key checkpoint steps of controlling Pol II transcriptional fidelity: insertion (specific nucleotide selection and incorporation), extension (differentiation of RNA transcript extension of a matched over mismatched 3'-RNA terminus), and proofreading (preferential removal of misincorporated nucleotides from the 3'-RNA end). We will also discuss some novel insights into the molecular basis and chemical perspectives of controlling Pol II transcriptional fidelity through structural, computational, and chemical biology approaches. PMID:24767259

  6. Molecular basis of transcriptional fidelity and DNA lesion-induced transcriptional mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Liang; Da, Linati; Plouffe, Steven W; Chong, Jenny; Kool, Eric; Wang, Dong

    2014-07-01

    Maintaining high transcriptional fidelity is essential for life. Some DNA lesions lead to significant changes in transcriptional fidelity. In this review, we will summarize recent progress towards understanding the molecular basis of RNA polymerase II (Pol II) transcriptional fidelity and DNA lesion-induced transcriptional mutagenesis. In particular, we will focus on the three key checkpoint steps of controlling Pol II transcriptional fidelity: insertion (specific nucleotide selection and incorporation), extension (differentiation of RNA transcript extension of a matched over mismatched 3'-RNA terminus), and proofreading (preferential removal of misincorporated nucleotides from the 3'-RNA end). We will also discuss some novel insights into the molecular basis and chemical perspectives of controlling Pol II transcriptional fidelity through structural, computational, and chemical biology approaches. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Pericarditis following permanent pacemaker insertion.

    PubMed

    Levy, Yair; Shovman, Ora; Granit, Chava; Luria, David; Gurevitz, Osnat; Bar-Lev, David; Eldar, Michael; Shoenfeld, Yehuda; Glikson, Michael

    2004-10-01

    The appearance of pericarditis following insertion of a permanent pacemaker is not widely acknowledged in the literature. To describe our experience with pericarditis following 395 permanent pacemaker implantations over 2 years. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 395 consecutive patients in whom new pacing systems or pacemaker leads had been implanted over a 2 year period. We searched the records for pericarditis that developed within 1 month after pacemaker implantation according to the ICD-9 code. The incidence, clinical picture, response to treatment, and relationship to lead design and location were studied. Eight cases (2%) of pericarditis following implantation were detected. Clinical manifestations in all patients were similar to those of post-pericardiotomy syndrome and included chest pain (n = 7), friction rub (n = 1), fever (n = 2), fatigue (n = 2), pleural effusion (n = 2), new atrial fibrillation (n = 2), elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate (n = 4), and echcardiographic evidence of pericardial effusion (n = 8). All affected patients had undergone active fixation (screw-in) lead implantation in the atrial position. The incidence of pericarditis with screw-in atrial leads was 3% compared to 0% in other cases (P < 0.05). Pericarditis is not uncommon following pacemaker implantation with active fixation atrial leads. Special attention should be paid to identifying pericardial complications following pacemaker implantation, especially when anticoagulant therapy is resumed or initiated. The use of passive fixation leads is likely to reduce the incidence of pericarditis but this issue should be further investigated.

  8. Favipiravir elicits antiviral mutagenesis during virus replication in vivo.

    PubMed

    Arias, Armando; Thorne, Lucy; Goodfellow, Ian

    2014-10-21

    Lethal mutagenesis has emerged as a novel potential therapeutic approach to treat viral infections. Several studies have demonstrated that increases in the high mutation rates inherent to RNA viruses lead to viral extinction in cell culture, but evidence during infections in vivo is limited. In this study, we show that the broad-range antiviral nucleoside favipiravir reduces viral load in vivo by exerting antiviral mutagenesis in a mouse model for norovirus infection. Increased mutation frequencies were observed in samples from treated mice and were accompanied with lower or in some cases undetectable levels of infectious virus in faeces and tissues. Viral RNA isolated from treated animals showed reduced infectivity, a feature of populations approaching extinction during antiviral mutagenesis. These results suggest that favipiravir can induce norovirus mutagenesis in vivo, which in some cases leads to virus extinction, providing a proof-of-principle for the use of favipiravir derivatives or mutagenic nucleosides in the clinical treatment of noroviruses.

  9. Symposium on molecular and cellular mechanisms of mutagenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-01-01

    These proceedings contain abstracts only of the 21 papers presented at the Sympsoium. The papers dealt with molecular mechanisms of mutagenesis and cellular responses to chemical and physical mutagenic agents. (ERB)

  10. Ultraviolet Mutagenesis in Bacteriophage T4 I. Irradiation of Extracellular Phage Particles

    PubMed Central

    Drake, John W.

    1966-01-01

    Drake, John W. (University of Illinois, Urbana). Ultraviolet mutagenesis in bacteriophage T4. I. Irradiation of extracellular phage particles. J. Bacteriol. 91:1775–1780. 1966.—Ultraviolet (UV) irradiation of extracellular T4 phage particles induces about 2 × 10−4r mutations per lethal hit. The mutants largely escape detection unless the irradiated phages are plated with very soft overlay agar. Multiplicity reactivation is not a prerequisite for mutagenesis. A much higher frequency of base pair substitution-type mutants is induced than is found in the spontaneous background, but sign mutants are also induced. Nearly half of the mutants map into previously identified UV hot spots. The rII mutants induced extracellularly are very similar to those induced intracellularly. The mutants also appear to result from direct radiation effects upon the bacteriophage deoxyribonucleic acid. PMID:5937237

  11. Altered lipid accumulation in Nannochloropsis salina CCAP849/3 following EMS and UV induced mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Beacham, T.A.; Macia, V. Mora; Rooks, P.; White, D.A.; Ali, S.T.

    2015-01-01

    Microalgae have potential as a chemical feed stock in a range of industrial applications. Nannochloropsis salina was subject to EMS mutagenesis and the highest lipid containing cells selected using fluorescence-activated cell sorting. Assessment of growth, lipid content and fatty acid composition identified mutant strains displaying a range of altered traits including changes in the PUFA content and a total FAME increase of up to 156% that of the wild type strain. Combined with a reduction in growth this demonstrated a productivity increase of up to 76%. Following UV mutagenesis, lipid accumulation of the mutant cultures was elevated to more than 3 fold that of the wild type strain, however reduced growth rates resulted in a reduction in overall productivity. Changes observed are indicative of alterations to the regulation of the omega 6 Kennedy pathway. The importance of these variations in physiology for industrial applications such as biofuel production is discussed. PMID:26753128

  12. Mouse ENU Mutagenesis to Understand Immunity to Infection: Methods, Selected Examples, and Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Caignard, Grégory; Eva, Megan M.; van Bruggen, Rebekah; Eveleigh, Robert; Bourque, Guillaume; Malo, Danielle; Gros, Philippe; Vidal, Silvia M.

    2014-01-01

    Infectious diseases are responsible for over 25% of deaths globally, but many more individuals are exposed to deadly pathogens. The outcome of infection results from a set of diverse factors including pathogen virulence factors, the environment, and the genetic make-up of the host. The completion of the human reference genome sequence in 2004 along with technological advances have tremendously accelerated and renovated the tools to study the genetic etiology of infectious diseases in humans and its best characterized mammalian model, the mouse. Advancements in mouse genomic resources have accelerated genome-wide functional approaches, such as gene-driven and phenotype-driven mutagenesis, bringing to the fore the use of mouse models that reproduce accurately many aspects of the pathogenesis of human infectious diseases. Treatment with the mutagen N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU) has become the most popular phenotype-driven approach. Our team and others have employed mouse ENU mutagenesis to identify host genes that directly impact susceptibility to pathogens of global significance. In this review, we first describe the strategies and tools used in mouse genetics to understand immunity to infection with special emphasis on chemical mutagenesis of the mouse germ-line together with current strategies to efficiently identify functional mutations using next generation sequencing. Then, we highlight illustrative examples of genes, proteins, and cellular signatures that have been revealed by ENU screens and have been shown to be involved in susceptibility or resistance to infectious diseases caused by parasites, bacteria, and viruses. PMID:25268389

  13. Tube thoracostomy: Increased angle of insertion is associated with complications.

    PubMed

    Hernandez, Matthew C; Laan, Danuel V; Zimmerman, Stacey L; Naik, Nimesh D; Schiller, Henry J; Aho, Johnathon M

    2016-08-01

    Tube thoracostomy (TT), considered a routine procedure, has significant complications. Current recommendations for placement rely on surface anatomy. There is no information to guide operators regarding angle of insertion relative to chest wall. We aim to determine if angle of insertion is associated with complications of TT. We performed a retrospective review of adult trauma patients who necessitated TT at a Level I trauma center over a 2-year period (January 2012 to December 2013). Tube thoracostomies performed intraoperatively or using radiological guidance were excluded. Thoracic anteroposterior or posteroanterior radiographs were reviewed to determine the angle of insertion of TT relative to the thoracic wall. A previously validated classification method was used to categorize complications. Descriptive and univariate statistics were used to compare angle of insertion and complicated versus uncomplicated TT. Review identified 154 patients who underwent a total of 246 TT placed for emergent trauma. All patients had a postprocedural chest x-ray. We identified 90 complications (37%) over the study period. One hundred forty-four of the TTs reviewed had an angle of insertion less than 45 degrees of which there were 27 complications (19%). One hundred two of the TTs had an angle greater than 45 degrees and 63 complications (62%); p < 0.0001. Tube thoracostomy insertion is inherently dangerous. Placement of TT using a higher angle of insertion greater than 45 degrees is associated with increased complications. Further prospective studies quantifying TT angle of insertion on outcomes are needed. Therapeutic study, level IV.

  14. Gene transfer and mutagenesis mediated by Sleeping Beauty transposon in Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus).

    PubMed

    He, Xiaozhen; Li, Jie; Long, Yong; Song, Guili; Zhou, Peiyong; Liu, Qiuxiang; Zhu, Zuoyan; Cui, Zongbin

    2013-10-01

    The success of gene transfer has been demonstrated in many of vertebrate species, whereas the efficiency of producing transgenic animals remains pretty low due to the random integration of foreign genes into a recipient genome. The Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon is able to improve the efficiency of gene transfer in zebrafish and mouse, but its activity in tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) has yet to be characterized. Herein, we demonstrate the potential of using the SB transposon system as an effective tool for gene transfer and insertional mutagenesis in tilapia. A transgenic construct pT2/tiHsp70-SB11 was generated by subcloning the promoter of tilapia heat shock protein 70 (tiHsp70) gene, the SB11 transposase gene and the carp β-actin gene polyadenylation signal into the second generation of SB transposon. Transgenic tilapia was produced by microinjection of this construct with in vitro synthesized capped SB11 mRNA. SB11 transposon was detected in 28.89 % of founders, 12.9 % of F1 and 43.75 % of F2. Analysis of genomic sequences flanking integrated transposons indicates that this transgenic tilapia line carries two copies of SB transposon, which landed into two different endogenous genes. Induced expression of SB11 gene after heat shock was detected using reverse transcription PCR in F2 transgenic individuals. In addition, the Cre/loxP system was introduced to delete the SB11 cassette for stabilization of gene interruption and bio-safety. These findings suggest that the SB transposon system is active and can be used for efficient gene transfer and insertional mutagenesis in tilapia.

  15. Efficient targeted mutagenesis of the chordate Ciona intestinalis genome with zinc-finger nucleases.

    PubMed

    Kawai, Narudo; Ochiai, Hiroshi; Sakuma, Tetsushi; Yamada, Lixy; Sawada, Hitoshi; Yamamoto, Takashi; Sasakura, Yasunori

    2012-06-01

    Zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs) are engineered nucleases that induce DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) at target sequences. They have been used as tools for generating targeted mutations in the genomes of multiple organisms in both animals and plants. The DSB induced by ZFNs is repaired by non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) or by homologous recombination (HR) mechanisms. Non-homologous end joining induces some errors because it is independent of a reference DNA sequence. Through the NHEJ mechanism, ZFNs generate insertional or deletional mutations at the target sequence. We examined the usability, specificity and toxicity of ZFNs in the basal chordate Ciona intestinalis. As the target of ZFNs, we chose an enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) gene artificially inserted in the C. intestinalis genome because this locus is neutral for the development and growth of C. intestinalis, and the efficiency of mutagenesis with ZFNs can thus be determined without any bias. We introduced EGFP -ZFN mRNAs into the embryos of an EGFP -transgenic line and observed the mutation frequency in the target site of EGFP . We also examined the effects of the EGFP -ZFNs at off-target sites resembling the EGFP target sequence in the C. intestinalis genome in order to examine the specificity of ZFNs. We further investigated the influence of ZFNs on embryogenesis, and showed that adequate amounts of ZFNs, which do not disrupt embryogenesis, can efficiently induce mutations on the on-target site with less effect on the off-target sites. This suggests that target mutagenesis with ZFNs will be a powerful technique in C. intestinalis.

  16. Identification and Characterization of Non-Cellulose-Producing Mutants of Gluconacetobacter hansenii Generated by Tn5 Transposon Mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Ying; Nagachar, Nivedita; Xiao, Chaowen; Tien, Ming

    2013-01-01

    The acs operon of Gluconacetobacter is thought to encode AcsA, AcsB, AcsC, and AcsD proteins that constitute the cellulose synthase complex, required for the synthesis and secretion of crystalline cellulose microfibrils. A few other genes have been shown to be involved in this process, but their precise role is unclear. We report here the use of Tn5 transposon insertion mutagenesis to identify and characterize six non-cellulose-producing (Cel−) mutants of Gluconacetobacter hansenii ATCC 23769. The genes disrupted were acsA, acsC, ccpAx (encoding cellulose-complementing protein [the subscript “Ax” indicates genes from organisms formerly classified as Acetobacter xylinum]), dgc1 (encoding guanylate dicyclase), and crp-fnr (encoding a cyclic AMP receptor protein/fumarate nitrate reductase transcriptional regulator). Protein blot analysis revealed that (i) AcsB and AcsC were absent in the acsA mutant, (ii) the levels of AcsB and AcsC were significantly reduced in the ccpAx mutant, and (iii) the level of AcsD was not affected in any of the Cel− mutants. Promoter analysis showed that the acs operon does not include acsD, unlike the organization of the acs operon of several strains of closely related Gluconacetobacter xylinus. Complementation experiments confirmed that the gene disrupted in each Cel− mutant was responsible for the phenotype. Quantitative real-time PCR and protein blotting results suggest that the transcription of bglAx (encoding β-glucosidase and located immediately downstream from acsD) was strongly dependent on Crp/Fnr. A bglAx knockout mutant, generated via homologous recombination, produced only ∼16% of the wild-type cellulose level. Since the crp-fnr mutant did not produce any cellulose, Crp/Fnr may regulate the expression of other gene(s) involved in cellulose biosynthesis. PMID:24013627

  17. In vivo growth characteristics of leucine and methionine auxotrophic mutants of Mycobacterium bovis BCG generated by transposon mutagenesis.

    PubMed Central

    McAdam, R A; Weisbrod, T R; Martin, J; Scuderi, J D; Brown, A M; Cirillo, J D; Bloom, B R; Jacobs, W R

    1995-01-01

    Insertional mutagenesis in Mycobacterium bovis BCG, a member of the slow-growing M. tuberculosis complex, was accomplished with transposons engineered from the Mycobacterium smegmatis insertion element IS1096. Transposons were created by placing a kanamycin resistance gene in several different positions in IS1096, and the resulting transposons were electroporated into BCG on nonreplicating plasmids. These analyses demonstrated that only one of the two open reading frames was necessary for transposition. A library of insertions was generated. Southern analysis of 23 kanamycin-resistant clones revealed that the transposons had inserted directly, with no evidence of cointegrate formation, into different restriction fragments in each clone. Sequence analysis of nine of the clones revealed junctional direct 8-bp repeats with only a slight similarity in target sites. These results suggest that IS1096-derived transposons transposed into the BCG genome in a relatively random fashion. Three auxotrophs, two for leucine and one for methionine, were isolated from the library of transposon insertions in BCG. They were characterized by sequencing and found to be homologous to the leuD gene of Escherichia coli and a sulfate-binding protein of cyanobacteria, respectively. When inoculated intravenously into C57BL/6 mice, the leucine auxotrophs, in contrast to the parent BCG strain or the methionine auxotroph, showed an inability to grow in vivo and were cleared within 7 weeks from the lungs and spleen. PMID:7868221

  18. Environmental stress induces trinucleotide repeat mutagenesis in human cells.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Nimrat; Lin, Yunfu; Santillan, Beatriz A; Yotnda, Patricia; Wilson, John H

    2015-03-24

    The dynamic mutability of microsatellite repeats is implicated in the modification of gene function and disease phenotype. Studies of the enhanced instability of long trinucleotide repeats (TNRs)-the cause of multiple human diseases-have revealed a remarkable complexity of mutagenic mechanisms. Here, we show that cold, heat, hypoxic, and oxidative stresses induce mutagenesis of a long CAG repeat tract in human cells. We show that stress-response factors mediate the stress-induced mutagenesis (SIM) of CAG repeats. We show further that SIM of CAG repeats does not involve mismatch repair, nucleotide excision repair, or transcription, processes that are known to promote TNR mutagenesis in other pathways of instability. Instead, we find that these stresses stimulate DNA rereplication, increasing the proportion of cells with >4 C-value (C) DNA content. Knockdown of the replication origin-licensing factor CDT1 eliminates both stress-induced rereplication and CAG repeat mutagenesis. In addition, direct induction of rereplication in the absence of stress also increases the proportion of cells with >4C DNA content and promotes repeat mutagenesis. Thus, environmental stress triggers a unique pathway for TNR mutagenesis that likely is mediated by DNA rereplication. This pathway may impact normal cells as they encounter stresses in their environment or during development or abnormal cells as they evolve metastatic potential.

  19. Environmental stress induces trinucleotide repeat mutagenesis in human cells

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Nimrat; Lin, Yunfu; Santillan, Beatriz A.; Yotnda, Patricia; Wilson, John H.

    2015-01-01

    The dynamic mutability of microsatellite repeats is implicated in the modification of gene function and disease phenotype. Studies of the enhanced instability of long trinucleotide repeats (TNRs)—the cause of multiple human diseases—have revealed a remarkable complexity of mutagenic mechanisms. Here, we show that cold, heat, hypoxic, and oxidative stresses induce mutagenesis of a long CAG repeat tract in human cells. We show that stress-response factors mediate the stress-induced mutagenesis (SIM) of CAG repeats. We show further that SIM of CAG repeats does not involve mismatch repair, nucleotide excision repair, or transcription, processes that are known to promote TNR mutagenesis in other pathways of instability. Instead, we find that these stresses stimulate DNA rereplication, increasing the proportion of cells with >4 C-value (C) DNA content. Knockdown of the replication origin-licensing factor CDT1 eliminates both stress-induced rereplication and CAG repeat mutagenesis. In addition, direct induction of rereplication in the absence of stress also increases the proportion of cells with >4C DNA content and promotes repeat mutagenesis. Thus, environmental stress triggers a unique pathway for TNR mutagenesis that likely is mediated by DNA rereplication. This pathway may impact normal cells as they encounter stresses in their environment or during development or abnormal cells as they evolve metastatic potential. PMID:25775519

  20. Empirical complexities in the genetic foundations of lethal mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Bull, James J; Joyce, Paul; Gladstone, Eric; Molineux, Ian J

    2013-10-01

    From population genetics theory, elevating the mutation rate of a large population should progressively reduce average fitness. If the fitness decline is large enough, the population will go extinct in a process known as lethal mutagenesis. Lethal mutagenesis has been endorsed in the virology literature as a promising approach to viral treatment, and several in vitro studies have forced viral extinction with high doses of mutagenic drugs. Yet only one empirical study has tested the genetic models underlying lethal mutagenesis, and the theory failed on even a qualitative level. Here we provide a new level of analysis of lethal mutagenesis by developing and evaluating models specifically tailored to empirical systems that may be used to test the theory. We first quantify a bias in the estimation of a critical parameter and consider whether that bias underlies the previously observed lack of concordance between theory and experiment. We then consider a seemingly ideal protocol that avoids this bias-mutagenesis of virions-but find that it is hampered by other problems. Finally, results that reveal difficulties in the mere interpretation of mutations assayed from double-strand genomes are derived. Our analyses expose unanticipated complexities in testing the theory. Nevertheless, the previous failure of the theory to predict experimental outcomes appears to reside in evolutionary mechanisms neglected by the theory (e.g., beneficial mutations) rather than from a mismatch between the empirical setup and model assumptions. This interpretation raises the specter that naive attempts at lethal mutagenesis may augment adaptation rather than retard it.

  1. Tool Removes Coil-Spring Thread Inserts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, Gerald J., Jr.; Swenson, Gary J.; Mcclellan, J. Scott

    1991-01-01

    Tool removes coil-spring thread inserts from threaded holes. Threads into hole, pries insert loose, grips insert, then pulls insert to thread it out of hole. Effects essentially reverse of insertion process to ease removal and avoid further damage to threaded inner surface of hole.

  2. Immediate postabortal insertion of intrauterine devices.

    PubMed

    Okusanya, Babasola O; Oduwole, Olabisi; Effa, Emmanuel E

    2014-07-28

    Background The use of an effective contraceptive may be necessary after an abortion. Insertion of an intrauterine device (IUD) may be done the same day or later. Immediate IUD insertion is an option since the woman is not pregnant, pain of insertion is less because the cervical os is open, and her motivation to use contraception may be high. However, insertion of an IUD immediately after a pregnancy ends carries risks, such as spontaneous expulsion.Objectives To assess the safety and efficacy of IUD insertion immediately after spontaneous or induced abortion.Search methods We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE, POPLINE, ClinicalTrials.gov,and ICTRP in January 27, 2014. We also contacted investigators to identify other trials.Selection criteria We sought all randomised controlled trials (RCTs) with at least one treatment arm that involved IUD insertion immediately after an induced abortion or after curettage for spontaneous abortion.Data collection and analysis We evaluated the methodological quality of each report and abstracted the data. We focused on discontinuation rates for accidental pregnancy, perforation, expulsion, and pelvic inflammatory disease.We computed the weighted average of the rate ratios.We compute drisk ratios (RRs) with 95% Confidence Intervals (CIs).We performed an intention-to-treat (ITT) analysis by including all randomised participants in the analysis according to the Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Interventions.Main results We identified 12 trials most of which are of moderate risk of bias involving 7,119 participants which described random assignment.Five trials randomised to either immediate or delayed insertion of IUD. One of them randomised to immediate versus delayed insertion of Copper 7 showed immediate insertion of the Copper 7 was associated with a higher risk of expulsion than was delayed insertion(RR 11.98, 95% CI 1.61 to 89.35,1 study, 259 participants); the

  3. Non-insertional Achilles tendinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Pearce, Christopher J.; Tan, Audrey

    2016-01-01

    Non-insertional Achilles tendinopathy is a degenerative condition characterised by pain on activity. Eccentric stretching is the most effective treatment. Surgical treatment is reserved for recalcitrant cases. Minimally-invasive and tendinoscopic treatments are showing promising results. Cite this article: Pearce CJ, Tan A. Non-insertional Achilles tendinopathy. EFORT Open Rev 2016;1:383-390. DOI: 10.1302/2058-5241.1.160024. PMID:28461917

  4. Endogenous mutagenesis in recombinant sulfolobus plasmids.

    PubMed

    Sakofsky, Cynthia J; Grogan, Dennis W

    2013-06-01

    Low rates of replication errors in chromosomal genes of Sulfolobus spp. demonstrate that these extreme thermoacidophiles can maintain genome integrity in environments with high temperature and low pH. In contrast to this genetic stability, we observed unusually frequent mutation of the β-D-glycosidase gene (lacS) of a shuttle plasmid (pJlacS) propagated in Sulfolobus acidocaldarius. The resulting Lac(-) mutants also grew faster than the Lac(+) parent, thereby amplifying the impact of the frequent lacS mutations on the population. We developed a mutant accumulation assay and corrections for the effects of copy number and differential growth for this system; the resulting measurements and calculations yielded a corrected rate of 5.1 × 10(-4) mutational events at the lacS gene per plasmid replication. Analysis of independent lacS mutants revealed three types of mutations: (i) G · C-to-A · T transitions, (ii) slipped-strand events, and (iii) deletions. These mutations were frequent in plasmid-borne lacS expressed at a high level but not in single-copy lacS in the chromosome or at lower levels of expression in a plasmid. Substitution mutations arose at only two of 12 potential priming sites of the DNA primase of the pRN1 replicon, but nearly all these mutations created nonsense (chain termination) codons. The spontaneous mutation rate of plasmid-borne lacS was 175-fold higher under high-expression than under low-expression conditions. The results suggest that important DNA repair or replication fidelity functions are impaired or overwhelmed in pJlacS, with results analogous to those of the "transcription-associated mutagenesis" seen in bacteria and eukaryotes.

  5. Rescuing Alu: Recovery of New Inserts Shows LINE-1 Preserves Alu Activity through A-Tail Expansion

    PubMed Central

    Wagstaff, Bradley J.; Hedges, Dale J.; Derbes, Rebecca S.; Campos Sanchez, Rebeca; Chiaromonte, Francesca; Makova, Kateryna D.; Roy-Engel, Astrid M.

    2012-01-01

    Alu elements are trans-mobilized by the autonomous non-LTR retroelement, LINE-1 (L1). Alu-induced insertion mutagenesis contributes to about 0.1% human genetic disease and is responsible for the majority of the documented instances of human retroelement insertion-induced disease. Here we introduce a SINE recovery method that provides a complementary approach for comprehensive analysis of the impact and biological mechanisms of Alu retrotransposition. Using this approach, we recovered 226 de novo tagged Alu inserts in HeLa cells. Our analysis reveals that in human cells marked Alu inserts driven by either exogenously supplied full length L1 or ORF2 protein are indistinguishable. Four percent of de novo Alu inserts were associated with genomic deletions and rearrangements and lacked the hallmarks of retrotransposition. In contrast to L1 inserts, 5′ truncations of Alu inserts are rare, as most of the recovered inserts (96.5%) are full length. De novo Alus show a random pattern of insertion across chromosomes, but further characterization revealed an Alu insertion bias exists favoring insertion near other SINEs, highly conserved elements, with almost 60% landing within genes. De novo Alu inserts show no evidence of RNA editing. Priming for reverse transcription rarely occurred within the first 20 bp (most 5′) of the A-tail. The A-tails of recovered inserts show significant expansion, with many at least doubling in length. Sequence manipulation of the construct led to the demonstration that the A-tail expansion likely occurs during insertion due to slippage by the L1 ORF2 protein. We postulate that the A-tail expansion directly impacts Alu evolution by reintroducing new active source elements to counteract the natural loss of active Alus and minimizing Alu extinction. PMID:22912586

  6. Detection of a Putative TetR-Like Gene Related to Mycobacterium bovis BCG Growth in Cholesterol Using a gfp-Transposon Mutagenesis System.

    PubMed

    Otal, Isabel; Pérez-Herrán, Esther; Garcia-Morales, Lazaro; Menéndez, María C; Gonzalez-Y-Merchand, Jorge A; Martín, Carlos; García, María J

    2017-01-01

    In vitro transposition is a powerful genetic tool for identifying mycobacterial virulence genes and studying virulence factors in relation to the host. Transposon shuttle mutagenesis is a method for constructing stable insertions in the genome of different microorganisms including mycobacteria. Using an IS1096 derivative, we have constructed the Tngfp, a transposon containing a promoterless green fluorescent protein (gfp) gene. This transposon was able to transpose randomly in Mycobacterium bovis BCG. Bacteria with a single copy of the gfp gene per chromosome from an M. bovis BCG::Tngfp library were analyzed and cells exhibiting high levels of fluorescence were detected by flow cytometry. Application of this approach allowed for the selection of a mutant, BCG_2177c::Tngfp (BCG-Tn), on the basis of high level of long-standing fluorescence at stationary phase. This BCG-Tn mutant showed some particular phenotypic features compared to the wild type strain, mainly during stationary phase, when cholesterol was used as a sole carbon source, thus supporting the relationships of the targeted gene with the regulation of cholesterol metabolism in this bacteria. This approach showed that Tngfp is a potentially useful tool for studying the involvement of the targeted loci in metabolic pathways of mycobacteria.

  7. Detection of a Putative TetR-Like Gene Related to Mycobacterium bovis BCG Growth in Cholesterol Using a gfp-Transposon Mutagenesis System

    PubMed Central

    Otal, Isabel; Pérez-Herrán, Esther; Garcia-Morales, Lazaro; Menéndez, María C.; Gonzalez-y-Merchand, Jorge A.; Martín, Carlos; García, María J.

    2017-01-01

    In vitro transposition is a powerful genetic tool for identifying mycobacterial virulence genes and studying virulence factors in relation to the host. Transposon shuttle mutagenesis is a method for constructing stable insertions in the genome of different microorganisms including mycobacteria. Using an IS1096 derivative, we have constructed the Tngfp, a transposon containing a promoterless green fluorescent protein (gfp) gene. This transposon was able to transpose randomly in Mycobacterium bovis BCG. Bacteria with a single copy of the gfp gene per chromosome from an M. bovis BCG::Tngfp library were analyzed and cells exhibiting high levels of fluorescence were detected by flow cytometry. Application of this approach allowed for the selection of a mutant, BCG_2177c::Tngfp (BCG-Tn), on the basis of high level of long-standing fluorescence at stationary phase. This BCG-Tn mutant showed some particular phenotypic features compared to the wild type strain, mainly during stationary phase, when cholesterol was used as a sole carbon source, thus supporting the relationships of the targeted gene with the regulation of cholesterol metabolism in this bacteria. This approach showed that Tngfp is a potentially useful tool for studying the involvement of the targeted loci in metabolic pathways of mycobacteria. PMID:28321208

  8. Random mutagenesis of the proton-coupled folate transporter (SLC46A1), clustering of mutations, and the bases for associated losses of function.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Rongbao; Shin, Daniel Sanghoon; Diop-Bove, Ndeye; Ovits, Channa Gila; Goldman, I David

    2011-07-08

    Loss-of-function mutations in the proton-coupled folate transporter (PCFT, SLC46A1) result in the autosomal recessive disorder, hereditary folate malabsorption (HFM). Identification and characterization of HFM mutations provide a wealth of information on the structure-function relationship of this transporter. In the current study, PCR-based random mutagenesis was employed to generate unbiased loss-of-function mutations of PCFT, simulating the spectrum of alterations that might occur in the human disorder. A total of 26 mutations were generated and 4 were identical to HFM mutations. Eleven were base deletion or insertion mutations that led to a frameshift and, along with similar HFM mutations, are predominantly localized to two narrow regions of the pcft gene at the 5'-end. Base substitution mutations identified in the current study and HFM patients were largely distributed across the pcft gene. Elimination of the ATG initiation codon by a one-base substitution (G > A) did not result in a complete lack of translation at the same codon consistent with rare non-ATG translation initiation. Among six missense mutants evaluated, three mutant PCFTs were not detected at the plasma membrane, one mutation resulted in decreased binding to folate substrate, and one had a reduced rate of conformational change associated with substrate translocation. The remaining PCFT mutant had defects in both processes. These results broaden understanding of the regions of the pcft gene prone to base insertion and deletion and inform further approaches to the analysis of the structure-function of PCFT.

  9. Genetic Regulation of Charged Particle Mutagenesis in Human Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kronenberg, Amy; Gauny, S.; Cherbonnel-Lasserre, C.; Liu, W.; Wiese, C.

    1999-01-01

    Our studies use a series of syngeneic, and where possible, isogenic human B-lymphoblastoid cell lines to assess the genetic factors that modulate susceptibility apoptosis and their impact on the mutagenic risks of low fluence exposures to 1 GeV Fe ions and 55 MeV protons. These ions are representative of the types of charged particle radiation that are of particular significance for human health in the space radiation environment. The model system employs cell lines derived from the male donor WIL-2. These cells have a single X chromosome and they are hemizygous for one mutation marker, hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT). TK6 and WTK1 cells were each derived from descendants of WIL-2 and were each selected as heterozygotes for a second mutation marker, the thymidine kinase (TK) gene located on chromosome 17q. The HPRT and TK loci can detect many different types of mutations, from single basepair substitutions up to large scale loss of heterozygosity (LOH). The single expressing copy of TK in the TK6 and WTKI cell lines is found on the same copy of chromosome 17, and this allele can be identified by a restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) identified when high molecular weight DNA is digested by the SacI restriction endonuclease and hybridized against the cDNA probe for TK. A large series of polymorphic linked markers has been identified that span more than 60 cM of DNA (approx. 60 megabasepairs) and distinguish the copy of chromosome 17 bearing the initially active TK allele from the copy of chromosome 17 bearing the silent TK allele in both TK6 and WTKI cells. TK6 cells express normal p53 protein while WTKI cells express homozygous mutant p53. Expression of mutant p53 can increase susceptibility to x-ray-induced mutations. It's been suggested that the increased mutagenesis in p53 mutant cells might be due to reduced apoptosis.

  10. Genetic Regulation of Charged Particle Mutagenesis in Human Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kronenberg, Amy; Gauny, S.; Cherbonnel-Lasserre, C.; Liu, W.; Wiese, C.

    1999-01-01

    Our studies use a series of syngeneic, and where possible, isogenic human B-lymphoblastoid cell lines to assess the genetic factors that modulate susceptibility apoptosis and their impact on the mutagenic risks of low fluence exposures to 1 GeV Fe ions and 55 MeV protons. These ions are representative of the types of charged particle radiation that are of particular significance for human health in the space radiation environment. The model system employs cell lines derived from the male donor WIL-2. These cells have a single X chromosome and they are hemizygous for one mutation marker, hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT). TK6 and WTK1 cells were each derived from descendants of WIL-2 and were each selected as heterozygotes for a second mutation marker, the thymidine kinase (TK) gene located on chromosome 17q. The HPRT and TK loci can detect many different types of mutations, from single basepair substitutions up to large scale loss of heterozygosity (LOH). The single expressing copy of TK in the TK6 and WTKI cell lines is found on the same copy of chromosome 17, and this allele can be identified by a restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) identified when high molecular weight DNA is digested by the SacI restriction endonuclease and hybridized against the cDNA probe for TK. A large series of polymorphic linked markers has been identified that span more than 60 cM of DNA (approx. 60 megabasepairs) and distinguish the copy of chromosome 17 bearing the initially active TK allele from the copy of chromosome 17 bearing the silent TK allele in both TK6 and WTKI cells. TK6 cells express normal p53 protein while WTKI cells express homozygous mutant p53. Expression of mutant p53 can increase susceptibility to x-ray-induced mutations. It's been suggested that the increased mutagenesis in p53 mutant cells might be due to reduced apoptosis.

  11. Efficient Preparation of Site-Specific Antibody-Drug Conjugates Using Cysteine Insertion.

    PubMed

    Dimasi, Nazzareno; Fleming, Ryan; Zhong, Haihong; Bezabeh, Binyam; Kinneer, Krista; Christie, Ronald J; Fazenbaker, Christine; Wu, Herren; Gao, Changshou

    2017-05-01

    Antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs) are a class of biopharmaceuticals that combine the specificity of antibodies with the high-potency of cytotoxic drugs. Engineering cysteine residues in the antibodies using mutagenesis is a common method to prepare site-specific ADCs. With this approach, solvent accessible amino acids in the antibody have been selected for substitution with cysteine for conjugating maleimide-bearing cytotoxic drugs, resulting in homogeneous and stable site-specific ADCs. Here we describe a cysteine engineering approach based on the insertion of cysteines before and after selected sites in the antibody, which can be used for site-specific preparation of ADCs. Cysteine-inserted antibodies have expression level and monomeric content similar to the native antibodies. Conjugation to a pyrrolobenzodiazepine dimer (SG3249) resulted in comparable efficiency of site-specific conjugation between cysteine-inserted and cysteine-substituted antibodies. Cysteine-inserted ADCs were shown to have biophysical properties, FcRn, and antigen binding affinity similar to the cysteine-substituted ADCs. These ADCs were comparable for serum stability to the ADCs prepared using cysteine-mutagenesis and had selective and potent cytotoxicity against human prostate cancer cells. Two of the cysteine-inserted variants abolish binding of the resulting ADCs to FcγRs in vitro, thereby potentially preventing non-target mediated uptake of the ADCs by cells of the innate immune system that express FcγRs, which may result in mitigating off-target toxicities. A selected cysteine-inserted ADC demonstrated potent dose-dependent anti-tumor activity in a xenograph tumor mouse model of human breast adenocarcinoma expressing the oncofetal antigen 5T4.

  12. A mouse forward genetics screen identifies LISTERIN as an E3 ubiquitin ligase involved in neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Chu, Jessie; Hong, Nancy A; Masuda, Claudio A; Jenkins, Brian V; Nelms, Keats A; Goodnow, Christopher C; Glynne, Richard J; Wu, Hua; Masliah, Eliezer; Joazeiro, Claudio A P; Kay, Steve A

    2009-02-17

    A mouse neurological mutant, lister, was identified through a genome-wide N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU) mutagenesis screen. Homozygous lister mice exhibit profound early-onset and progressive neurological and motor dysfunction. lister encodes a RING finger protein, LISTERIN, which functions as an E3 ubiquitin ligase in vitro. Although lister is widely expressed in all tissues, motor and sensory neurons and neuronal processes in the brainstem and spinal cord are primarily affected in the mutant. Pathological signs include gliosis, dystrophic neurites, vacuolated mitochondria, and accumulation of soluble hyperphosphorylated tau. Analysis with a different lister allele generated through targeted gene trap insertion reveals LISTERIN is required for embryonic development and confirms that direct perturbation of a LISTERIN-regulated process causes neurodegeneration. The lister mouse uncovers a pathway involved in neurodegeneration and may serves as a model for understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying human neurodegenerative disorders.

  13. A mouse forward genetics screen identifies LISTERIN as an E3 ubiquitin ligase involved in neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Jessie; Hong, Nancy A.; Masuda, Claudio A.; Jenkins, Brian V.; Nelms, Keats A.; Goodnow, Christopher C.; Glynne, Richard J.; Wu, Hua; Masliah, Eliezer; Joazeiro, Claudio A. P.; Kay, Steve A.

    2009-01-01

    A mouse neurological mutant, lister, was identified through a genome-wide N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU) mutagenesis screen. Homozygous lister mice exhibit profound early-onset and progressive neurological and motor dysfunction. lister encodes a RING finger protein, LISTERIN, which functions as an E3 ubiquitin ligase in vitro. Although lister is widely expressed in all tissues, motor and sensory neurons and neuronal processes in the brainstem and spinal cord are primarily affected in the mutant. Pathological signs include gliosis, dystrophic neurites, vacuolated mitochondria, and accumulation of soluble hyperphosphorylated tau. Analysis with a different lister allele generated through targeted gene trap insertion reveals LISTERIN is required for embryonic development and confirms that direct perturbation of a LISTERIN-regulated process causes neurodegeneration. The lister mouse uncovers a pathway involved in neurodegeneration and may serves as a model for understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying human neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:19196968

  14. Simulation and estimation of gene number in a biological pathway using almost complete saturation mutagenesis screening of haploid mouse cells.

    PubMed

    Tokunaga, Masahiro; Kokubu, Chikara; Maeda, Yusuke; Sese, Jun; Horie, Kyoji; Sugimoto, Nakaba; Kinoshita, Taroh; Yusa, Kosuke; Takeda, Junji

    2014-11-24

    Genome-wide saturation mutagenesis and subsequent phenotype-driven screening has been central to a comprehensive understanding of complex biological processes in classical model organisms such as flies, nematodes, and plants. The degree of "saturation" (i.e., the fraction of possible target genes identified) has been shown to be a critical parameter in determining all relevant genes involved in a biological function, without prior knowledge of their products. In mammalian model systems, however, the relatively large scale and labor intensity of experiments have hampered the achievement of actual saturation mutagenesis, especially for recessive traits that require biallelic mutations to manifest detectable phenotypes. By exploiting the recently established haploid mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs), we present an implementation of almost complete saturation mutagenesis in a mammalian system. The haploid ESCs were mutagenized with the chemical mutagen N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU) and processed for the screening of mutants defective in various steps of the glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchor biosynthetic pathway. The resulting 114 independent mutant clones were characterized by a functional complementation assay, and were shown to be defective in any of 20 genes among all 22 known genes essential for this well-characterized pathway. Ten mutants were further validated by whole-exome sequencing. The predominant generation of single-nucleotide substitutions by ENU resulted in a gene mutation rate proportional to the length of the coding sequence, which facilitated the experimental design of saturation mutagenesis screening with the aid of computational simulation. Our study enables mammalian saturation mutagenesis to become a realistic proposition. Computational simulation, combined with a pilot mutagenesis experiment, could serve as a tool for the estimation of the number of genes essential for biological processes such as drug target pathways when a positive selection of

  15. Aberrant splicing and transcription termination caused by P element insertion into the intron of a Drosophila gene

    SciTech Connect

    Horowitz, H.; Berg, C.A.

    1995-01-01

    Insertional mutagenesis screens using the P[lacZ, rosy{sup +}] (PZ) transposable element have provided thousands of mutant lines for analyzing genes of varied function in the fruitfly, Drosophila melanogaster. As has been observed with other P elements, many of the PZ-induced mutations result from insertion of the P element into the promoter or 5{prime} untranslated regions of the affected gene. We document here a novel mechanism for mutagenesis by this element. We show that sequences present within the element direct aberrant splicing and termination events that produce an mRNA composed of 5{prime} sequences from the mutated gene (in this case, pipsqueak) and 3{prime} sequences from within the P[lacZ, rosy{sup +}] element. These truncated RNAs could yield proteins with dominant mutant effects. 43 refs., 4 figs.

  16. A mouse chromosome 4 balancer ENU-mutagenesis screen isolates eleven lethal lines

    PubMed Central

    Boles, Melissa K; Wilkinson, Bonney M; Maxwell, Andrea; Lai, Lihua; Mills, Alea A; Nishijima, Ichiko; Salinger, Andrew P; Moskowitz, Ivan; Hirschi, Karen K; Liu, Bin; Bradley, Allan; Justice, Monica J

    2009-01-01

    Background ENU-mutagenesis is a powerful technique to identify genes regulating mammalian development. To functionally annotate the distal region of mouse chromosome 4, we performed an ENU-mutagenesis screen using a balancer chromosome targeted to this region of the genome. Results We isolated 11 lethal lines that map to the region of chromosome 4 between D4Mit117 and D4Mit281. These lines form 10 complementation groups. The majority of lines die during embryonic development between E5.5 and E12.5 and display defects in gastrulation, cardiac development, and craniofacial development. One line displayed postnatal lethality and neurological defects, including ataxia and seizures. Conclusion These eleven mutants allow us to query gene function within the distal region of mouse chromosome 4 and demonstrate that new mouse models of mammalian developmental defects can easily and quickly be generated and mapped with the use of ENU-mutagenesis in combination with balancer chromosomes. The low number of mutations isolated in this screen compared with other balancer chromosome screens indicates that the functions of genes in different regions of the genome vary widely. PMID:19267930

  17. Distal Insertions of the Biceps Femoris

    PubMed Central

    Branch, Eric A.; Anz, Adam W.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Avulsion of the biceps femoris from the fibula and proximal tibia is encountered in clinical practice. While the anatomy of the primary posterolateral corner structures has been qualitatively and quantitatively described, a quantitative analysis regarding the insertions of the biceps femoris on the fibula and proximal tibia is lacking. Purpose: To quantitatively assess the insertions of the biceps femoris, fibular collateral ligament (FCL), and anterolateral ligament (ALL) on the fibula and proximal tibia as well as establish relationships among these structures and to pertinent surgical anatomy. Study Design: Descriptive laboratory study. Methods: Dissections were performed on 12 nonpaired, fresh-frozen cadaveric specimens identifying the biceps femoris, FCL, and ALL, and their insertions on the proximal tibia and fibula. The footprint areas, orientations, and distances from relevant osseous landmarks were measured using a 3-dimensional coordinate measurement device. Results: Dissection produced 6 easily identifiable and reproducible anatomic footprints. Tibial footprints included the insertion of the ALL and an insertion of the biceps femoris (TBF). Fibular footprints included the insertion of the FCL, a distal insertion of the biceps femoris (DBF), a medial footprint of the biceps femoris (MBF), and a proximal footprint of the biceps femoris (PBF). The mean area of these footprints (95% CI) was as follows: ALL, 53.0 mm2 (38.4-67.6); TBF, 93.9 mm2 (72.0-115.8); FCL, 86.8 mm2 (72.3-101.2); DBF, 119 mm2 (91.1-146.9); MBF, 46.8 mm2 (29.0-64.5); and PBF, 215 mm2 (192.4-237.5). The mean distance (95% CI) from the Gerdy tubercle to the center of the ALL footprint was 24.3 mm (21.6-27.0) and to the center of the TBF was 22.5 mm (21.0-24.0). The center of the DBF was 8.68 mm (7.0-10.3) from the anterior border of the fibula, the center of the FCL was 14.6 mm (12.5-16.7) from the anterior border of the fibula and 20.7 mm (19.0-22.4) from the tip of the fibular

  18. Flexibility in MuA transposase family protein structures: functional mapping with scanning mutagenesis and sequence alignment of protein homologues.

    PubMed

    Rasila, Tiina S; Vihinen, Mauno; Paulin, Lars; Haapa-Paananen, Saija; Savilahti, Harri

    2012-01-01

    MuA transposase protein is a member of the retroviral integrase superfamily (RISF). It catalyzes DNA cleavage and joining reactions via an initial assembly and subsequent structural transitions of a protein-DNA complex, known as the Mu transpososome, ultimately attaching transposon DNA to non-specific target DNA. The transpososome functions as a molecular DNA-modifying machine and has been used in a wide variety of molecular biology and genetics/genomics applications. To analyze structure-function relationships in MuA action, a comprehensive pentapeptide insertion mutagenesis was carried out for the protein. A total of 233 unique insertion variants were generated, and their activity was analyzed using a quantitative in vivo DNA transposition assay. The results were then correlated with the known MuA structures, and the data were evaluated with regard to the protein domain function and transpososome development. To complement the analysis with an evolutionary component, a protein sequence alignment was produced for 44 members of MuA family transposases. Altogether, the results pinpointed those regions, in which insertions can be tolerated, and those where insertions are harmful. Most insertions within the subdomains Iγ, IIα, IIβ, and IIIα completely destroyed the transposase function, yet insertions into certain loop/linker regions of these subdomains increased the protein activity. Subdomains Iα and IIIβ were largely insertion-tolerant. The comprehensive structure-function data set will be useful for designing MuA transposase variants with improved properties for biotechnology/genomics applications, and is informative with regard to the function of RISF proteins in general.

  19. Comparison of Insertional RNA Editing in Myxomycetes

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Cai; Frankhouser, David; Bundschuh, Ralf

    2012-01-01

    RNA editing describes the process in which individual or short stretches of nucleotides in a messenger or structural RNA are inserted, deleted, or substituted. A high level of RNA editing has been observed in the mitochondrial genome of Physarum polycephalum. The most frequent editing type in Physarum is the insertion of individual Cs. RNA editing is extremely accurate in Physarum; however, little is known about its mechanism. Here, we demonstrate how analyzing two organisms from the Myxomycetes, namely Physarum polycephalum and Didymium iridis, allows us to test hypotheses about the editing mechanism that can not be tested from a single organism alone. First, we show that using the recently determined full transcriptome information of Physarum dramatically improves the accuracy of computational editing site prediction in Didymium. We use this approach to predict genes in the mitochondrial genome of Didymium and identify six new edited genes as well as one new gene that appears unedited. Next we investigate sequence conservation in the vicinity of editing sites between the two organisms in order to identify sites that harbor the information for the location of editing sites based on increased conservation. Our results imply that the information contained within only nine or ten nucleotides on either side of the editing site (a distance previously suggested through experiments) is not enough to locate the editing sites. Finally, we show that the codon position bias in C insertional RNA editing of these two organisms is correlated with the selection pressure on the respective genes thereby directly testing an evolutionary theory on the origin of this codon bias. Beyond revealing interesting properties of insertional RNA editing in Myxomycetes, our work suggests possible approaches to be used when finding sequence motifs for any biological process fails. PMID:22383871

  20. Comparison of insertional RNA editing in Myxomycetes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Cai; Frankhouser, David; Bundschuh, Ralf

    2012-01-01

    RNA editing describes the process in which individual or short stretches of nucleotides in a messenger or structural RNA are inserted, deleted, or substituted. A high level of RNA editing has been observed in the mitochondrial genome of Physarum polycephalum. The most frequent editing type in Physarum is the insertion of individual Cs. RNA editing is extremely accurate in Physarum; however, little is known about its mechanism. Here, we demonstrate how analyzing two organisms from the Myxomycetes, namely Physarum polycephalum and Didymium iridis, allows us to test hypotheses about the editing mechanism that can not be tested from a single organism alone. First, we show that using the recently determined full transcriptome information of Physarum dramatically improves the accuracy of computational editing site prediction in Didymium. We use this approach to predict genes in the mitochondrial genome of Didymium and identify six new edited genes as well as one new gene that appears unedited. Next we investigate sequence conservation in the vicinity of editing sites between the two organisms in order to identify sites that harbor the information for the location of editing sites based on increased conservation. Our results imply that the information contained within only nine or ten nucleotides on either side of the editing site (a distance previously suggested through experiments) is not enough to locate the editing sites. Finally, we show that the codon position bias in C insertional RNA editing of these two organisms is correlated with the selection pressure on the respective genes thereby directly testing an evolutionary theory on the origin of this codon bias. Beyond revealing interesting properties of insertional RNA editing in Myxomycetes, our work suggests possible approaches to be used when finding sequence motifs for any biological process fails.

  1. mariner-Based Transposon Mutagenesis of Rickettsia prowazekii▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhi-Mei; Tucker, Aimee M.; Driskell, Lonnie O.; Wood, David O.

    2007-01-01

    Rickettsia prowazekii, the causative agent of epidemic typhus, is an obligate intracellular bacterium that grows directly within the cytoplasm of its host cell, unbounded by a vacuolar membrane. The obligate intracytoplasmic nature of rickettsial growth places severe restrictions on the genetic analysis of this distinctive human pathogen. In order to expand the repertoire of genetic tools available for the study of this pathogen, we have employed the versatile mariner-based, Himar1 transposon system to generate insertional mutants of R. prowazekii. A transposon containing the R. prowazekii arr-2 rifampin resistance gene and a gene coding for a green fluorescent protein (GFPUV) was constructed and placed on a plasmid expressing the Himar1 transposase. Electroporation of this plasmid into R. prowazekii resulted in numerous transpositions into the rickettsial genome. Transposon insertion sites were identified by rescue cloning, followed by DNA sequencing. Random transpositions integrating at TA sites in both gene coding and intergenic regions were identified. Individual rickettsial clones were isolated by the limiting-dilution technique. Using both fixed and live-cell techniques, R. prowazekii transformants expressing GFPUV were easily visible by fluorescence microscopy. Thus, a mariner-based system provides an additional mechanism for generating rickettsial mutants that can be screened using GFPUV fluorescence. PMID:17720821

  2. In Vivo Site-Specific Mutagenesis and Gene Collage Using the Delitto Perfetto System in Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Stuckey, Samantha; Mukherjee, Kuntal; Storici, Francesca

    2016-01-01

    Delitto perfetto is a site-specific in vivo mutagenesis system that has been developed to generate changes at will in the genome of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Using this technique, it is possible to rapidly and efficiently engineer yeast strains without requiring several intermediate steps as it functions in only two steps, both of which rely on homologous recombination to drive the changes to the target DNA region. The first step involves the insertion of a cassette containing two markers at or near the locus to be altered. The second step involves complete removal of this cassette with oligonucleotides and/or other genetic material and transfer of the expected genetic modification(s) to the chosen DNA locus. Here we provide a detailed protocol of the delitto perfetto approach and present examples of the most common and useful applications for in vivo mutagenesis to generate base substitutions, deletions, insertions, as well as for precise in vivo assembly and integration of multiple genetic elements, or gene collage. PMID:21660695

  3. The genomic landscape of polymorphic human nuclear mitochondrial insertions

    PubMed Central

    Dayama, Gargi; Emery, Sarah B.; Kidd, Jeffrey M.; Mills, Ryan E.

    2014-01-01

    The transfer of mitochondrial genetic material into the nuclear genomes of eukaryotes is a well-established phenomenon that has been previously limited to the study of static reference genomes. The recent advancement of high throughput sequencing has enabled an expanded exploration into the diversity of polymorphic nuclear mitochondrial insertions (NumtS) within human populations. We have developed an approach to discover and genotype novel Numt insertions using whole genome, paired-end sequencing data. We have applied this method to a thousand individuals in 20 populations from the 1000 Genomes Project and other datasets and identified 141 new sites of Numt insertions, extending our current knowledge of existing NumtS by almost 20%. We find that recent Numt insertions are derived from throughout the mitochondrial genome, including the D-loop, and have integration biases that differ in some respects from previous studies on older, fixed NumtS in the reference genome. We determined the complete inserted sequence for a subset of these events and have identified a number of nearly full-length mitochondrial genome insertions into nuclear chromosomes. We further define their age and origin of insertion and present an analysis of their potential impact to ongoing studies of mitochondrial heteroplasmy and disease. PMID:25348406

  4. USP7 Is a Suppressor of PCNA Ubiquitination and Oxidative-Stress-Induced Mutagenesis in Human Cells.

    PubMed

    Kashiwaba, Shu-ichiro; Kanao, Rie; Masuda, Yuji; Kusumoto-Matsuo, Rika; Hanaoka, Fumio; Masutani, Chikahide

    2015-12-15

    Mono-ubiquitinated PCNA activates error-prone DNA polymerases; therefore, strict regulation of PCNA mono-ubiquitination is crucial in avoiding undesired mutagenesis. In this study, we used an in vitro assay system to identify USP7 as a deubiquitinating enzyme of mono-ubiquitinated PCNA. Suppression of USP1, a previously identified PCNA deubiquitinase, or USP7 increased UV- and H2O2-induced PCNA mono-ubiquitination in a distinct and additive manner, suggesting that USP1 and USP7 make different contributions to PCNA deubiquitination in human cells. Cell-cycle-synchronization analyses revealed that USP7 suppression increased H2O2-induced PCNA ubiquitination throughout interphase, whereas USP1 suppression specifically increased ubiquitination in S-phase cells. UV-induced mutagenesis was elevated in USP1-suppressed cells, whereas H2O2-induced mutagenesis was elevated in USP7-suppressed cells. These results suggest that USP1 suppresses UV-induced mutations produced in a manner involving DNA replication, whereas USP7 suppresses H2O2-induced mutagenesis involving cell-cycle-independent processes such as DNA repair. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Multiple independent defective suppressor-mutator transposon insertions in Arabidopsis: a tool for functional genomics.

    PubMed Central

    Tissier, A F; Marillonnet, S; Klimyuk, V; Patel, K; Torres, M A; Murphy, G; Jones, J D

    1999-01-01

    A new system for insertional mutagenesis based on the maize Enhancer/Suppressor-mutator (En/Spm) element was introduced into Arabidopsis. A single T-DNA construct carried a nonautonomous defective Spm (dSpm) element with a phosphinothricin herbicide resistance (BAR) gene, a transposase expression cassette, and a counterselectable gene. This construct was used to select for stable dSpm transpositions. Treatments for both positive (BAR) and negative selection markers were applicable to soil-grown plants, allowing the recovery of new transpositions on a large scale. To date, a total of 48,000 lines in pools of 50 have been recovered, of which approximately 80% result from independent insertion events. DNA extracted from these pools was used in reverse genetic screens, either by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using primers from the transposon and the targeted gene or by the display of insertions whereby inverse PCR products of insertions from the DNA pools are spotted on a membrane that is then hybridized with the probe of interest. By sequencing PCR-amplified fragments adjacent to insertion sites, we established a sequenced insertion-site database of 1200 sequences. This database permitted a comparison of the chromosomal distribution of transpositions from various T-DNA locations. PMID:10521516

  6. CT fluoroscopic guided insertion of inferior vena cava filters.

    PubMed

    Ignotus, P; Wetton, C; Berry, J

    2006-03-01

    The value and use of inferior vena cava (IVC) filters is well documented and has been growing since the first reported filter placement in 1973 and the first percutaneous insertion in 1982. Access routes now include both jugular veins, both ante-cubital veins and both femoral veins. However, all insertions require some form of imaging, usually fluoroscopy, to identify the location of the filter with respect to the IVC and the renal veins. We describe two cases where the patients' weight was significantly greater than the weight limit of the angiography table, necessitating insertion under CT fluoroscopic guidance.

  7. Mobilizing diversity: transposable element insertions in genetic variation and disease

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Transposable elements (TEs) comprise a large fraction of mammalian genomes. A number of these elements are actively jumping in our genomes today. As a consequence, these insertions provide a source of genetic variation and, in rare cases, these events cause mutations that lead to disease. Yet, the extent to which these elements impact their host genomes is not completely understood. This review will summarize our current understanding of the mechanisms underlying transposon regulation and the contribution of TE insertions to genetic diversity in the germline and in somatic cells. Finally, traditional methods and emerging technologies for identifying transposon insertions will be considered. PMID:20813032

  8. Predicting oligonucleotide-directed mutagenesis failures in protein engineering

    PubMed Central

    Wassman, Christopher D.; Tam, Phillip Y.; Lathrop, Richard H.; Weiss, Gregory A.

    2004-01-01

    Protein engineering uses oligonucleotide-directed mutagenesis to modify DNA sequences through a two-step process of hybridization and enzymatic synthesis. Inefficient reactions confound attempts to introduce mutations, especially for the construction of vast combinatorial protein libraries. This paper applied computational approaches to the problem of inefficient mutagenesis. Several results implicated oligonucleotide annealing to non-target sites, termed ‘cross-hybridization’, as a significant contributor to mutagenesis reaction failures. Test oligonucleotides demonstrated control over reaction outcomes. A novel cross-hybridization score, quickly computable for any plasmid and oligonucleotide mixture, directly correlated with yields of deleterious mutagenesis side products. Cross-hybridization was confirmed conclusively by partial incorporation of an oligonucleotide at a predicted cross-hybridization site, and by modification of putative template secondary structure to control cross-hybridization. Even in low concentrations, cross-hybridizing species in mixtures poisoned reactions. These results provide a basis for improved mutagenesis efficiencies and increased diversities of cognate protein libraries. PMID:15585664

  9. Gene Insertion Patterns and Sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vain, Philippe; Thole, Vera

    During the past 25 years, the molecular analysis of transgene insertion patterns and sites in plants has greatly contributed to our understanding of the mechanisms underlying transgene integration, expression, and stability in the nuclear genome. Molecular characterization is also an essential step in the safety assessment of genetically modified crops. This chapter describes the standard experimental procedures used to analyze transgene insertion patterns and loci in cereals and grasses transformed using Agrobacterium tumefaciens or direct transfer of DNA. Methods and protocols enabling the determination of the number and configuration of transgenic loci via a combination of inheritance studies, polymerase chain reaction, and Southern analyses are presented. The complete characterization of transgenic inserts in plants is, however, a holistic process relying on a wide variety of experimental approaches. In this chapter, these additional approaches are not detailed but references to relevant bibliographic records are provided.

  10. Control of hemA Expression in Rhodobacter sphaeroides 2.4.1: Effect of a Transposon Insertion in the hbdA Gene

    PubMed Central

    Fales, Linda; Kryszak, Luiza; Zeilstra-Ryalls, Jill

    2001-01-01

    The common precursor to all tetrapyrroles is 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA), and in Rhodobacter sphaeroides its formation occurs via the Shemin pathway. ALA synthase activity is encoded by two differentially regulated genes in R. sphaeroides 2.4.1: hemA and hemT. In our investigations of hemA regulation, we applied transposon mutagenesis under aerobic conditions, followed by a selection that identified transposon insertion mutants in which hemA expression is elevated. One of these mutants has been characterized previously (J. Zeilstra-Ryalls and S. Kaplan, J. Bacteriol. 178:985–993, 1996), and here we describe our analysis of a second mutant strain. The transposon inserted into the coding sequences of hbdA, coding for S-(+)-β-hydroxybutyryl–coenzyme A dehydrogenase and catalyzing an NAD-dependent reaction. We provide evidence that the hbdA gene product participates in polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) metabolism and, based on our findings, we discuss possibilities as to how defective PHB metabolism might alter the level of hemA expression. PMID:11160087

  11. Targeted Capture of Phylogenetically Informative Ves SINE Insertions in Genus Myotis

    PubMed Central

    Platt, Roy N.; Zhang, Yuhua; Witherspoon, David J.; Xing, Jinchuan; Suh, Alexander; Keith, Megan S.; Jorde, Lynn B.; Stevens, Richard D.; Ray, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Identification of retrotransposon insertions in nonmodel taxa can be technically challenging and costly. This has inhibited progress in understanding retrotransposon insertion dynamics outside of a few well-studied species. To address this problem, we have extended a retrotransposon-based capture and sequence method (ME-Scan [mobile element scanning]) to identify insertions belonging to the Ves family of short interspersed elements (SINEs) across seven species of the bat genus Myotis. We identified between 120,000 and 143,000 SINE insertions in six taxa lacking a draft genome by comparing to the M. lucifugus reference genome. On average, each Ves insertion was sequenced to 129.6 × coverage. When mapped back to the M. lucifugus reference genome, all insertions were confidently assigned within a 10-bp window. Polymorphic Ves insertions were identified in each taxon based on their mapped locations. Using cross-species comparisons and the identified insertion positions, a presence–absence matrix was created for approximately 796,000 insertions. Dollo parsimony analysis of more than 85,000 phylogenetically informative insertions recovered strongly supported, monophyletic clades that correspond with the biogeography of each taxa. This phylogeny is similar to previously published mitochondrial phylogenies, with the exception of the placement of M. vivesi. These results support the utility of our variation on ME-Scan to identify polymorphic retrotransposon insertions in taxa without a reference genome and for large-scale retrotransposon-based phylogenetics. PMID:26014613

  12. Fluorescent protein engineering by in vivo site-directed mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Ceballos, Melvys Valledor; Hu, Qinghua; Schiller, Paul; Myers, Richard S.

    2012-01-01

    Summary In vivo site-directed mutagenesis by ssDNA recombineering is a facile method to change the color of fluorescent proteins without cloning. Two different starting alleles of GFP were targeted for mutagenesis: gfpmut3* residing in the E. coli genome and egfp carried by a bacterial/mammalian dual expression lentiviral plasmid vector. Fluorescent protein spectra were shifted by subtle modification of the chromophore region and residues interacting with the chromophore of the fluorescent protein. Eight different fluorescent proteins (Violeta, Azure, Aqua, Mar, Celeste, Amarillo, Mostaza and Bronze) were isolated and shown to be useful in multicolor imaging and flow cytometry of bacteria and transgenic human stem cells. To make in vivo site-directed mutagenesis more efficient, the recombineering method was optimized using the fluorescence change as a sensitive quantitative assay for recombination. A set of rules to simplify mutant isolation by recombineering is provided. PMID:22639380

  13. Empirical Complexities in the Genetic Foundations of Lethal Mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Bull, James J.; Joyce, Paul; Gladstone, Eric; Molineux, Ian J.

    2013-01-01

    From population genetics theory, elevating the mutation rate of a large population should progressively reduce average fitness. If the fitness decline is large enough, the population will go extinct in a process known as lethal mutagenesis. Lethal mutagenesis has been endorsed in the virology literature as a promising approach to viral treatment, and several in vitro studies have forced viral extinction with high doses of mutagenic drugs. Yet only one empirical study has tested the genetic models underlying lethal mutagenesis, and the theory failed on even a qualitative level. Here we provide a new level of analysis of lethal mutagenesis by developing and evaluating models specifically tailored to empirical systems that may be used to test the theory. We first quantify a bias in the estimation of a critical parameter and consider whether that bias underlies the previously observed lack of concordance between theory and experiment. We then consider a seemingly ideal protocol that avoids this bias—mutagenesis of virions—but find that it is hampered by other problems. Finally, results that reveal difficulties in the mere interpretation of mutations assayed from double-strand genomes are derived. Our analyses expose unanticipated complexities in testing the theory. Nevertheless, the previous failure of the theory to predict experimental outcomes appears to reside in evolutionary mechanisms neglected by the theory (e.g., beneficial mutations) rather than from a mismatch between the empirical setup and model assumptions. This interpretation raises the specter that naive attempts at lethal mutagenesis may augment adaptation rather than retard it. PMID:23934886

  14. ENU mutagenesis to generate genetically modified rat models.

    PubMed

    van Boxtel, Ruben; Gould, Michael N; Cuppen, Edwin; Smits, Bart M G

    2010-01-01

    The rat is one of the most preferred model organisms in biomedical research and has been extremely useful for linking physiology and pathology to the genome. However, approaches to genetically modify specific genes in the rat germ line remain relatively scarce. To date, the most efficient approach for generating genetically modified rats has been the target-selected N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU) mutagenesis-based technology. Here, we describe the detailed protocols for ENU mutagenesis and mutant retrieval in the rat model organism.

  15. Mutagenesis of Trichoderma Viride by Ultraviolet and Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Risheng; Li, Manman; Deng, Shengsong; Hu, Huajia; Wang, Huai; Li, Fenghe

    2012-04-01

    Considering the importance of a microbial strain capable of increased cellulase production, a mutant strain UP4 of Trichoderma viride was developed by ultraviolet (UV) and plasma mutation. The mutant produced a 21.0 IU/mL FPase which was 98.1% higher than that of the parent strain Trichoderma viride ZY-1. In addition, the effect of ultraviolet and plasma mutagenesis was not merely simple superimposition of single ultraviolet mutation and single plasma mutation. Meanwhile, there appeared a capsule around some of the spores after the ultraviolet and plasma treatment, namely, the spore surface of the strain became fuzzy after ultraviolet or ultraviolet and plasma mutagenesis.

  16. MELFI Urine Sample First Insertion

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-04-11

    ISS019-E-005715 (11 April 2009) --- Astronaut Michael Barratt, Expedition 19/20 flight engineer, performs an insertion of urine samples into the Minus Eighty Degree Laboratory Freezer for ISS (MELFI) as part of the Nutritional Status Assessment (NUTRITION) study in the Japanese Kibo laboratory of the International Space Station.

  17. A mutagenesis-derived Lrp5 mouse mutant with abnormal retinal vasculature and low bone mineral density

    PubMed Central

    Charette, Jeremy R.; Earp, Sarah E.; Bell, Brent A.; Ackert-Bicknell, Cheryl L.; Godfrey, Dana A.; Rao, Sujata; Anand-Apte, Bela; Nishina, Patsy M.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Familial exudative vitreoretinopathy (FEVR) is caused by mutations in the genes encoding low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein (LRP5) or its interacting partners, namely frizzled class receptor 4 (FZD4) and norrin cystine knot growth factor (NDP). Mouse models for Lrp5, Fzd4, and Ndp have proven to be important for understanding the retinal pathophysiology underlying FEVR and systemic abnormalities related to defective Wnt signaling. Here, we report a new mouse mutant, tvrm111B, which was identified by electroretinogram (ERG) screening of mice generated in the Jackson Laboratory Translational Vision Research Models (TVRM) mutagenesis program. Methods ERGs were used to examine outer retinal physiology. The retinal vasculature was examined by in vivo retinal imaging, as well as by histology and immunohistochemistry. The tvrm111B locus was identified by genetic mapping of mice generated in a cross to DBA/2J, and subsequent sequencing analysis. Gene expression was examined by real-time PCR of retinal RNA. Bone mineral density (BMD) was examined by peripheral dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Results The tvrm111B allele is inherited as an autosomal recessive trait. Genetic mapping of the decreased ERG b-wave phenotype of tvrm111B mice localized the mutation to a region on chromosome 19 that included Lrp5. Sequencing of Lrp5 identified the insertion of a cytosine (c.4724_4725insC), which is predicted to cause a frameshift that disrupts the last three of five conserved PPPSPxS motifs in the cytoplasmic domain of LRP5, culminating in a premature termination. In addition to a reduced ERG b-wave, Lrp5tvrm111B homozygotes have low BMD and abnormal features of the retinal vasculature that have been reported previously in Lrp5 mutant mice, including persistent hyaloid vessels, leakage on fluorescein angiography, and an absence of the deep retinal capillary bed. Conclusions The phenotype of the Lrp5tvrm111B mutant includes abnormalities of the retinal

  18. Peripheral insertion modulates the editing activity of the isolated CP1 domain of leucyl-tRNA synthetase.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ru-Juan; Tan, Min; Du, Dao-Hai; Xu, Bei-Si; Eriani, Gilbert; Wang, En-Duo

    2011-12-01

    A large insertion domain called CP1 (connective peptide 1) present in class Ia aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases is responsible for post-transfer editing. LeuRS (leucyl-tRNA synthetase) from Aquifex aeolicus and Giardia lamblia possess unique 20 and 59 amino acid insertions respectively within the CP1 that are crucial for editing activity. Crystal structures of AaLeuRS-CP1 [2.4 Å (1 Å=0.1 nm)], GlLeuRS-CP1 (2.6 Å) and the insertion deletion mutant AaLeuRS-CP1Δ20 (2.5 Å) were solved to understand the role of these insertions in editing. Both insertions are folded as peripheral motifs located on the opposite side of the proteins from the active-site entrance in the CP1 domain. Docking modelling and site-directed mutagenesis showed that the insertions do not interact with the substrates. Results of molecular dynamics simulations show that the intact CP1 is more dynamic than its mutant devoid of the insertion motif. Taken together, the data show that a peripheral insertion without a substrate-binding site or major structural role in the active site may modulate catalytic function of a protein, probably from protein dynamics regulation in two respective LeuRS CP1s. Further results from proline and glycine mutational analyses intended to reduce or increase protein flexibility are consistent with this hypothesis.

  19. Trans-NIH neuroscience initiatives on mouse phenotyping and mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Moldin, S O; Farmer, M E; Chin, H R; Battey, J F

    2001-08-01

    In the post-genomic era, the laboratory mouse will excel as a premier mammalian system to study normal and disordered biological processes, in part because of low cost, but largely because of the rich opportunities that exist for exploiting genetic tools and technologies in the mouse to systematically determine mammalian gene function. Many robust models of human disease may therefore be developed, and these in turn will provide critical clues to understanding gene function. The full potential of the mouse for understanding many of the neural and behavioral phenotypes of relevance to neuroscientists has yet to be realized. With the full anatomy of the mouse genome at hand, researchers for the first time will be able to move beyond traditional gene-by-gene approaches and take a global view of gene expression patterns crucial for neurobiological processes. In response to an action plan for mouse genomics developed on the basis of recommendations from the scientific community, seven institutes of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) initiated in 1999 a mouse genetics research program that specifically focused on neurobiology and complex behavior. The specific goals of these neuroscience initiatives are to develop high-throughput phenotyping assays and to initiate genome-wide mutagenesis projects to identify hundreds of mutant strains with heritable abnormalities of high relevance to neuroscientists. Assays and mutants generated in these efforts will be made widely available to the scientific community, and such resources will provide neuroscientists unprecedented opportunities to elucidate the molecular mechanisms of neural function and complex behavior. Such research tools ultimately will permit the manipulation and analysis of the mouse genome, as a means of gaining insight into the genetic bases of the mammalian nervous system and its complex disorders.

  20. Generation of Enterobacter sp. YSU auxotrophs using transposon mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Caguiat, Jonathan James

    2014-10-31

    Prototrophic bacteria grow on M-9 minimal salts medium supplemented with glucose (M-9 medium), which is used as a carbon and energy source. Auxotrophs can be generated using a transposome. The commercially available, Tn5-derived transposome used in this protocol consists of a linear segment of DNA containing an R6Kγ replication origin, a gene for kanamycin resistance and two mosaic sequence ends, which serve as transposase binding sites. The transposome, provided as a DNA/transposase protein complex, is introduced by electroporation into the prototrophic strain, Enterobacter sp. YSU, and randomly incorporates itself into this host's genome. Transformants are replica plated onto Luria-Bertani agar plates containing kanamycin, (LB-kan) and onto M-9 medium agar plates containing kanamycin (M-9-kan). The transformants that grow on LB-kan plates but not on M-9-kan plates are considered to be auxotrophs. Purified genomic DNA from an auxotroph is partially digested, ligated and transformed into a pir+ Escherichia coli (E. coli) strain. The R6Kγ replication origin allows the plasmid to replicate in pir+ E. coli strains, and the kanamycin resistance marker allows for plasmid selection. Each transformant possesses a new plasmid containing the transposon flanked by the interrupted chromosomal region. Sanger sequencing and the Basic Local Alignment Search Tool (BLAST) suggest a putative identity of the interrupted gene. There are three advantages to using this transposome mutagenesis strategy. First, it does not rely on the expression of a transposase gene by the host. Second, the transposome is introduced into the target host by electroporation, rather than by conjugation or by transduction and therefore is more efficient. Third, the R6Kγ replication origin makes it easy to identify the mutated gene which is partially recovered in a recombinant plasmid. This technique can be used to investigate the genes involved in other characteristics of Enterobacter sp. YSU or of a

  1. Use of Mutagenesis, Genetic Mapping and Next Generation Transcriptomics to Investigate Insecticide Resistance Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Kalajdzic, Predrag; Oehler, Stefan; Reczko, Martin; Pavlidi, Nena; Vontas, John; Hatzigeorgiou, Artemis G.; Savakis, Charalambos

    2012-01-01

    Insecticide resistance is a worldwide problem with major impact on agriculture and human health. Understanding the underlying molecular mechanisms is crucial for the management of the phenomenon; however, this information often comes late with respect to the implementation of efficient counter-measures, particularly in the case of metabolism-based resistance mechanisms. We employed a genome-wide insertional mutagenesis screen to Drosophila melanogaster, using a Minos-based construct, and retrieved a line (MiT[w−]3R2) resist