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Sample records for inspiratory muscle strength

  1. Inspiratory muscle strength in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Larson, Janet L; Covey, Margaret K; Corbridge, Susan

    2002-05-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease is associated with a functional weakness of the inspiratory muscles. Multiple factors contribute to the decline in functional strength including hyperinflation of the chest, deterioration in nutritional status, and the indirect effects of an exacerbation. The decreased inspiratory muscle strength contributes to sensations of dyspnea and places individuals at risk for respiratory muscle fatigue. The worsening dyspnea causes individuals to reduce their physical activities and ultimately become physically deconditioned. Maximal inspiratory pressure is commonly used to measure functional strength of the inspiratory muscles, and interventions to minimize the extent of decline include inspiratory muscle training, aerobic exercise training, nutritional supplementation, and methods to prevent exacerbations. In the critical care unit, multiple comorbid conditions contribute to further decline in inspiratory muscle strength, making it important to assess respiratory muscle function regularly.

  2. Determinants of inspiratory muscle strength in healthy humans.

    PubMed

    Brown, Peter I; Johnson, Michael A; Sharpe, Graham R

    2014-06-01

    We investigated (1) the relationship between the baseline and inspiratory muscle training (IMT) induced increase in maximal inspiratory pressure (P(I,max)) and (2) the relative contributions of the inspiratory chest wall muscles and the diaphragm (P(oes)/P(di)) to P(I,max) prior to and following-IMT. Experiment 1: P(I,max) was assessed during a Müeller manoeuvre before and after 4-wk IMT (n=30). Experiment 2: P(I,max) and the relative contribution of the inspiratory chest wall muscles to the diaphragm (P(oes)/P(di)) were assessed during a Müeller manoeuvre before and after 4-wk IMT (n=20). Experiment 1: P(I,max) increased 19% (P<0.01) post-IMT and was correlated with baseline P(I,max) (r=-0.373, P<0.05). Experiment 2: baseline P(I,max) was correlated with P(oe)/P(di) (r=0.582, P<0.05) and after IMT PI,max increased 22% and Poe/Pdi increased 5% (P<0.05). In conclusion, baseline P(I,max) and the contribution of the chest wall inspiratory muscles relative to the diaphragm affect, in part, baseline and IMT-induced P(I,max). Great care should be taken when designing future IMT studies to ensure parity in the between-subject baseline P(I,max).

  3. Inspiratory muscle strength training improves weaning outcome in failure to wean patients: a randomized trial

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Most patients are readily liberated from mechanical ventilation (MV) support, however, 10% - 15% of patients experience failure to wean (FTW). FTW patients account for approximately 40% of all MV days and have significantly worse clinical outcomes. MV induced inspiratory muscle weakness has been implicated as a contributor to FTW and recent work has documented inspiratory muscle weakness in humans supported with MV. Methods We conducted a single center, single-blind, randomized controlled trial to test whether inspiratory muscle strength training (IMST) would improve weaning outcome in FTW patients. Of 129 patients evaluated for participation, 69 were enrolled and studied. 35 subjects were randomly assigned to the IMST condition and 34 to the SHAM treatment. IMST was performed with a threshold inspiratory device, set at the highest pressure tolerated and progressed daily. SHAM training provided a constant, low inspiratory pressure load. Subjects completed 4 sets of 6-10 training breaths, 5 days per week. Subjects also performed progressively longer breathing trials daily per protocol. The weaning criterion was 72 consecutive hours without MV support. Subjects were blinded to group assignment, and were treated until weaned or 28 days. Results Groups were comparable on demographic and clinical variables at baseline. The IMST and SHAM groups respectively received 41.9 ± 25.5 vs. 47.3 ± 33.0 days of MV support prior to starting intervention, P = 0.36. The IMST and SHAM groups participated in 9.7 ± 4.0 and 11.0 ± 4.8 training sessions, respectively, P = 0.09. The SHAM group's pre to post-training maximal inspiratory pressure (MIP) change was not significant (-43.5 ± 17.8 vs. -45.1 ± 19.5 cm H2O, P = 0.39), while the IMST group's MIP increased (-44.4 ± 18.4 vs. -54.1 ± 17.8 cm H2O, P < 0.0001). There were no adverse events observed during IMST or SHAM treatments. Twenty-five of 35 IMST subjects weaned (71%, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 55% to 84

  4. Immediate effect of manual therapy on respiratory functions and inspiratory muscle strength in patients with COPD

    PubMed Central

    Yilmaz Yelvar, Gul Deniz; Çirak, Yasemin; Demir, Yasemin Parlak; Dalkilinç, Murat; Bozkurt, Bülent

    2016-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to investigate the immediate effect of manual therapy (MT) on respiratory functions and inspiratory muscle strength in patients with COPD. Participants and methods Thirty patients with severe COPD (eight females and 22 males; mean age 62.4±6.8 years) referred to pulmonary physiotherapy were included in this study. The patients participated in a single session of MT to measure the short-term effects. The lung function was measured using a portable spirometer. An electronic pressure transducer was used to measure respiratory muscle strength. Heart rate, breathing frequency, and oxygen saturation were measured with a pulse oximeter. For fatigue and dyspnea perception, the modified Borg rating of perceived exertion scale was used. All measurements were taken before and immediately after the first MT session. The ease-of-breathing visual analog scale was used for rating patients’ symptoms subjectively during the MT session. Results There was a significant improvement in the forced expiratory volume in the first second, forced vital capacity, and vital capacity values (P<0.05). The maximal inspiratory pressure and maximal expiratory pressure values increased significantly after MT, compared to the pre-MT session (P<0.05). There was a significant decrease in heart rate, respiratory rate (P<0.05), and dyspnea and fatigue perception (P<0.05). Conclusion A single MT session immediately improved pulmonary function, inspiratory muscle strength, and oxygen saturation and reduced dyspnea, fatigue, and heart and respiratory rates in patients with severe COPD. MT should be added to pulmonary rehabilitation treatment as a new alternative that is fast acting and motivating in patients with COPD. PMID:27382271

  5. Increased inspiratory and expiratory muscle strength following respiratory muscle strength training (RMST) in two patients with late-onset Pompe disease.

    PubMed

    Jones, Harrison N; Moss, Tronda; Edwards, Laurie; Kishnani, Priya S

    2011-11-01

    Respiratory muscle strength training (RMST) is an exercise-based intervention which targets respiratory muscle weakness. We implemented RMST in two patients with late-onset Pompe disease (LOPD), both who had received long-term enzyme replacement therapy and had severe respiratory weakness. Over 16-32 weeks, inspiratory muscle strength increased by 73-74%. Expiratory muscle strength increased 31-48% over 12-22 weeks. These findings suggest that RMST may increase respiratory muscle strength, even in the setting of LOPD and severe baseline weakness.

  6. Inspiratory Muscle Strength Training in Infants With Congenital Heart Disease and Prolonged Mechanical Ventilation: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Bleiweis, Mark S.; Neel, Cimaron R.; Martin, A. Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose Inspiratory muscle strength training (IMST) has been shown to improve maximal pressures and facilitate ventilator weaning in adults with prolonged mechanical ventilation (MV). The purposes of this case report are: (1) to describe the rationale for IMST in infants with MV dependence and (2) to summarize the device modifications used to administer training. Case Description Two infants with congenital heart disease underwent corrective surgery and were referred for inspiratory muscle strength evaluation after repeated weaning failures. It was determined that IMST was indicated due to inspiratory muscle weakness and a rapid, shallow breathing pattern. In order to accommodate small tidal volumes of infants, 2 alternative training modes were devised. For infant 1, IMST consisted of 15-second inspiratory occlusions. Infant 2 received 10-breath sets of IMST through a modified positive end-expiratory pressure valve. Four daily IMST sets separated by 3 to 5 minutes of rest were administered 5 to 6 days per week. The infants' IMST tolerance was evaluated by vital signs and daily clinical reviews. Outcomes Maximal inspiratory pressure (MIP) and rate of pressure development (dP/dt) were the primary outcome measures. Secondary outcome measures included the resting breathing pattern and MV weaning. There were no adverse events associated with IMST. Infants generated training pressures through the adapted devices, with improved MIP, dP/dt, and breathing pattern. Both infants weaned from MV to a high-flow nasal cannula, and neither required subsequent reintubation during their hospitalization. Discussion This case report describes pediatric adaptations of an IMST technique used to improve muscle performance and facilitate weaning in adults. Training was well tolerated in 2 infants with postoperative weaning difficulty and inspiratory muscle dysfunction. Further systematic examination will be needed to determine whether IMST provides a significant performance

  7. INSPIRATIonAL--INSPIRAtory muscle training in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Cheah, Benjamin C; Boland, Robert A; Brodaty, Nina E; Zoing, Margie C; Jeffery, Sandra E; McKenzie, David K; Kiernan, Matthew C

    2009-01-01

    Respiratory impairment, due to respiratory muscle weakness, is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis/motor neuron disease (ALS/MND). Threshold loading may strengthen the inspiratory muscles and thereby improve patient prognosis. A phase II, double-blind, randomized-controlled trial was undertaken to determine whether a 12-week inspiratory muscle training programme attenuated the decline in respiratory function and inspiratory muscle strength in patients with ALS/MND. Nine patients were randomized to inspiratory muscle training and 10 to sham training. Primary endpoints were respiratory function (forced vital capacity, vital capacity), lung volumes and inspiratory muscle strength. Patients were assessed before, during and immediately after a 12-week training period, and at eight weeks follow-up. While improvements in inspiratory muscle strength were observed in both treatment arms, there was a non-significant increase in maximum inspiratory pressure of 6.1% in the experimental group compared to controls (standard error of mean, 6.93%; 95% confidence interval -8.58 -20.79; p=0.39). The gains in inspiratory muscle strength were partially reversed during a period of training cessation. In conclusion, inspiratory muscle training may potentially strengthen the inspiratory muscles and slow the decline in respiratory function in patients with ALS/MND.

  8. Factors contributing to thixotropy of inspiratory muscles.

    PubMed

    Izumizaki, Masahiko; Shibata, Masahiko; Homma, Ikuo

    2004-06-25

    Thixotropy is a passive property of the skeletal muscle dependent on the muscle's immediate history of contraction and length change. Thixotropic properties of inspiratory muscles, introduced by forceful muscle contraction at an inflated lung volume, cause an increased end-expiratory position (EEP) of the rib cage. We searched for factors contributing to the development of inspiratory muscle thixotropy in nine healthy subjects. Using induction plethysmography, we examined aftereffects on EEP of the duration of inspiratory muscle contraction and subsequent muscle relaxation. We also studied effects of inspiratory effort intensity measured by mouth pressure at different lung volumes. EEP elevation was noted subsequent to 5-s contraction followed by 2-s relaxation and was enhanced when conditioned at higher lung volumes with a strong inspiratory effort. Our results suggest four factors that influence inspiratory muscle thixotropy: (1) intensity of muscle contraction, (2) lung volume when contraction occurs, (3) duration of contraction, and (4) muscle relaxation.

  9. Tutorial on maximum inspiratory and expiratory mouth pressures in individuals with idiopathic Parkinson disease (IPD) and the preliminary results of an expiratory muscle strength training program.

    PubMed

    Silverman, Erin P; Sapienza, Christine M; Saleem, Ahmad; Carmichael, Chris; Davenport, Paul W; Hoffman-Ruddy, Bari; Okun, Michael S

    2006-01-01

    Respiratory symptoms are recognized as sequelae of motor dysfunction in idiopathic Parkinson's disease (IPD) and these symptoms have the potential to cause problems with swallow, cough, voice and speech. Specifically, maneuvers that require rapid activation and coordination of upper airway and chest wall musculature become progressively impaired as motor dysfunction progresses during the natural course of the disease. This study reports on the maximum inspiratory and expiratory pressures produced by 28 participants (average age 64) diagnosed with moderate to severe IPD (average stage 2.5 with a range of 2.0-3.0). All measures were collected during the "medication on" state. Outcomes of a specific respiratory muscle strength training technique for improving maximum expiratory pressure are reported for three of the patients in this study. Techniques that focus on strengthening the respiratory muscles in patients with IPD (other than with low load breathing exercises), have not been previously reported. The results of this pilot study demonstrate that respiratory muscle weakness may be an important factor in the respiratory complications in IPD and that respiratory muscle strength training has the potential to improve expiratory muscle strength for this population. This improvement has the potential to positively impact high forced respiratory activities, such as forced breathing maneuvers, swallow, cough and speech functions that require greater magnitude and duration of expiration.

  10. Respiratory dysfunction in ventilated patients: can inspiratory muscle training help?

    PubMed

    Bissett, B; Leditschke, I A; Paratz, J D; Boots, R J

    2012-03-01

    Respiratory muscle dysfunction is associated with prolonged and difficult weaning from mechanical ventilation. This dysfunction in ventilator-dependent patients is multifactorial: there is evidence that inspiratory muscle weakness is partially explained by disuse atrophy secondary to ventilation, and positive end-expiratory pressure can further reduce muscle strength by negatively shifting the length-tension curve of the diaphragm. Polyneuropathy is also likely to contribute to apparent muscle weakness in critically ill patients, and nutritional and pharmaceutical effects may further compound muscle weakness. Moreover, psychological influences, including anxiety, may contribute to difficulty in weaning. There is recent evidence that inspiratory muscle training is safe and feasible in selected ventilator-dependent patients, and that this training can reduce the weaning period and improve overall weaning success rates. Extrapolating from evidence in sports medicine, as well as the known effects of inspiratory muscle training in chronic lung disease, a theoretical model is proposed to describe how inspiratory muscle training enhances weaning and recovery from mechanical ventilation. Possible mechanisms include increased protein synthesis (both Type 1 and Type 2 muscle fibres), enhanced limb perfusion via dampening of a sympathetically-mediated metaboreflex, reduced lactate levels and modulation of the perception of exertion, resulting in less dyspnoea and enhanced exercise capacity.

  11. [Indirect evaluation of respiratory muscle strength with the help of markers of maximal inspiratory and expiratory pressure in the mouth of healthy individuals].

    PubMed

    Adamiak-Kardas, Magdalena

    2002-03-01

    The aim of the study was the evaluation of respiratory muscle strength by measurement of maximal inspiratory (PImax) and expiratory (PEmax) pressures values. Results for 166 clinically normal subjects (79 female and 87 male) were obtained. The results were as follow: in woman PImax ranged 38-104 cm H2O, average 60 cm H2O, PEmax ranged 46-140 cm H2O average 87.5 cm H2O, in men PImax was 40-120 cm H2O, average 73.2 cm H2O, PEmax ranged 46-140 cm H2O, average 115.9 cm H2O. PImax was negatively correlated with age in both groups. There was no correlation between age and PImax or PEmax in both groups (p > 0.05). There was no correlation between PImax and PEmax and height in women group and men group treated apart. The correlation was found between PImax as well as PEmax and height for whole group (p = 0.00019). There were observed positive correlation between PImax, PEmax and weight in both (male and female) groups. The comparison of results of present study with those obtained in former studies reveals important differences of norms for different populations. The normal values of maximal inspiratory and expiratory pressures in the mouth (PImax, PEmax) should be qualified individually for studied population. The normal values recommended by producers of medical equipment might be inadequate for studied population.

  12. The effect of exercise training with an additional inspiratory load on inspiratory muscle fatigue and time-trial performance.

    PubMed

    McEntire, Serina J; Smith, Joshua R; Ferguson, Christine S; Brown, Kelly R; Kurti, Stephanie P; Harms, Craig A

    2016-08-01

    The purpose was to determine the effect of moderate-intensity exercise training (ET) on inspiratory muscle fatigue (IMF) and if an additional inspiratory load during ET (ET+IL) would further improve inspiratory muscle strength, IMF, and time-trial performance. 15 subjects were randomly divided to ET (n=8) and ET+IL groups (n=7). All subjects completed six weeks of exercise training three days/week at ∼70%V̇O2peak for 30min. The ET+IL group breathed through an inspiratory muscle trainer (15% PImax) during exercise. 5-mile, and 30-min time-trials were performed pre-training, weeks three and six. Inspiratory muscle strength increased (p<0.05) for both groups to a similar (p>0.05) extent. ET and ET+IL groups improved (p<0.05) 5-mile time-trial performance (∼10% and ∼18%) and the ET+IL group was significantly faster than ET at week 6. ET and ET+IL groups experienced less (p<0.05) IMF compared to pre-training following the 5-mile time-trial. In conclusion, these data suggest ET leads to less IMF, ET+IL improves inspiratory muscle strength and IMF, but not different than ET alone.

  13. Effects of inspiratory muscle training on resistance to fatigue of respiratory muscles during exhaustive exercise.

    PubMed

    Segizbaeva, M O; Timofeev, N N; Donina, Zh A; Kur'yanovich, E N; Aleksandrova, N P

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of inspiratory muscle training (IMT) on resistance to fatigue of the diaphragm (D), parasternal (PS), sternocleidomastoid (SCM) and scalene (SC) muscles in healthy humans during exhaustive exercise. Daily inspiratory muscle strength training was performed for 3 weeks in 10 male subjects (at a pressure threshold load of 60% of maximal inspiratory pressure (MIP) for the first week, 70% of MIP for the second week, and 80% of MIP for the third week). Before and after training, subjects performed an incremental cycle test to exhaustion. Maximal inspiratory pressure and EMG-analysis served as indices of inspiratory muscle fatigue assessment. The before-to-after exercise decreases in MIP and centroid frequency (fc) of the EMG (D, PS, SCM, and SC) power spectrum (P<0.05) were observed in all subjects before the IMT intervention. Such changes were absent after the IMT. The study found that in healthy subjects, IMT results in significant increase in MIP (+18%), a delay of inspiratory muscle fatigue during exhaustive exercise, and a significant improvement in maximal work performance. We conclude that the IMT elicits resistance to the development of inspiratory muscles fatigue during high-intensity exercise.

  14. Inspiratory Muscle Training and Functional Capacity in Patients Undergoing Cardiac Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Cordeiro, André Luiz Lisboa; de Melo, Thiago Araújo; Neves, Daniela; Luna, Julianne; Esquivel, Mateus Souza; Guimarães, André Raimundo França; Borges, Daniel Lago; Petto, Jefferson

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Cardiac surgery is a highly complex procedure which generates worsening of lung function and decreased inspiratory muscle strength. The inspiratory muscle training becomes effective for muscle strengthening and can improve functional capacity. Objective To investigate the effect of inspiratory muscle training on functional capacity submaximal and inspiratory muscle strength in patients undergoing cardiac surgery. Methods This is a clinical randomized controlled trial with patients undergoing cardiac surgery at Instituto Nobre de Cardiologia. Patients were divided into two groups: control group and training. Preoperatively, were assessed the maximum inspiratory pressure and the distance covered in a 6-minute walk test. From the third postoperative day, the control group was managed according to the routine of the unit while the training group underwent daily protocol of respiratory muscle training until the day of discharge. Results 50 patients, 27 (54%) males were included, with a mean age of 56.7±13.9 years. After the analysis, the training group had significant increase in maximum inspiratory pressure (69.5±14.9 vs. 83.1±19.1 cmH2O, P=0.0073) and 6-minute walk test (422.4±102.8 vs. 502.4±112.8 m, P=0.0031). Conclusion We conclude that inspiratory muscle training was effective in improving functional capacity submaximal and inspiratory muscle strength in this sample of patients undergoing cardiac surgery. PMID:27556313

  15. Coil Design for Functional Magnetic Stimulation of the Inspiratory Muscles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Coil design for functional magnetic stimulation of the inspiratory muscles Ian N. Hsiao, Ph.D., member IEEE, Ercheng Zhu, MD, PhD, Vernon Lin...new magnetic coil (MC) for effective functional magnetic stimulation (FMS) of inspiratory muscles in human subjects. Part 1 of the study emphasized...2 is reported in another paper titled “Racetrack magnetic coil for functional magnetic stimulation of the inspiratory muscles – toward magnetic

  16. Acute effects of inspiratory muscle warm-up on pulmonary function in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Özdal, Mustafa

    2016-06-15

    The acute effects of inspiratory muscle warm-up on pulmonary functions were examined in 26 healthy male subjects using the pulmonary function test (PFT) in three different trials. The control trial (CON) did not involve inspiratory muscle warm-up, while the placebo (IMWp) and experimental (IMW) trials involved inspiratory muscle warm-up. There were no significant changes between the IMWp and CON trials (p>0.05). All the PFT measurements, including slow vital capacity, inspiratory vital capacity, forced vital capacity, forced expiratory volume in one second, maximal voluntary ventilation, and maximal inspiratory pressure were significantly increased by 3.55%, 12.52%, 5.00%, 2.75%, 2.66%, and 7.03% respectively, in the subjects in the IMW trial than those in the CON trial (p<0.05). These results show that inspiratory muscle warm-up improved the pulmonary functions. The mechanisms responsible for these improvements are probably associated with the concomitant increase in the inspiratory muscle strength, and the cooperation of the upper thorax, neck, and respiratory muscles, and increased level of reactive O2 species in muscle tissue, and potentially improvement of muscle O2 delivery-to-utilization. However, further investigation is required to determine the precise mechanisms responsible from among these candidates.

  17. Controlled Frequency Breathing Reduces Inspiratory Muscle Fatigue.

    PubMed

    Burtch, Alex R; Ogle, Ben T; Sims, Patrick A; Harms, Craig A; Symons, Thorburn B; Folz, Rodney J; Zavorsky, Gerald S

    2016-08-16

    Controlled frequency breathing (CFB) is a common swim training modality involving holding one's breath for about 7 to 10 strokes before taking another breath. We sought to examine the effects of CFB training on reducing respiratory muscle fatigue. Competitive college swimmers were randomly divided into either the CFB group that breathed every 7 to 10 strokes, or a control group that breathed every 3-4 strokes. Twenty swimmers completed the study. The training intervention included 5-6 weeks (16 sessions) of 12x50-m repetitions with breathing 8-10 breaths per 50m (control group), or 2-3 breaths per 50-m (CFB group). Inspiratory muscle fatigue was defined as the decrease in maximal inspiratory mouth-pressure (MIP) between rest and 46s after a 200 yard free-style swimming race [115s (SD 7)]. Aerobic capacity, pulmonary diffusing capacity, and running economy were also measured pre and post-training. Pooled results demonstrated a 12% decrease in MIP at 46s post-race [-15 (SD 14) cm H2O, Effect size = -0.48, p < 0.01]. After four weeks of training, only the CFB group prevented a decline in MIP values pre to 46 s post-race [-2 (13) cm H2O, p > 0.05]. However, swimming performance, aerobic capacity, pulmonary diffusing capacity, and running economy did not improve (p > 0.05) post-training in either group. In conclusion, CFB training appears to prevent inspiratory muscle fatigue yet no difference was found in performance outcomes.

  18. Inspiratory muscle training to enhance recovery from mechanical ventilation: a randomised trial

    PubMed Central

    Bissett, Bernie M; Leditschke, I Anne; Neeman, Teresa; Boots, Robert; Paratz, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    Background In patients who have been mechanically ventilated, inspiratory muscles remain weak and fatigable following ventilatory weaning, which may contribute to dyspnoea and limited functional recovery. Inspiratory muscle training may improve inspiratory muscle strength and endurance following weaning, potentially improving dyspnoea and quality of life in this patient group. Methods We conducted a randomised trial with assessor-blinding and intention-to-treat analysis. Following 48 hours of successful weaning, 70 participants (mechanically ventilated ≥7 days) were randomised to receive inspiratory muscle training once daily 5 days/week for 2 weeks in addition to usual care, or usual care (control). Primary endpoints were inspiratory muscle strength and fatigue resistance index (FRI) 2 weeks following enrolment. Secondary endpoints included dyspnoea, physical function and quality of life, post-intensive care length of stay and in-hospital mortality. Results 34 participants were randomly allocated to the training group and 36 to control. The training group demonstrated greater improvements in inspiratory strength (training: 17%, control: 6%, mean difference: 11%, p=0.02). There were no statistically significant differences in FRI (0.03 vs 0.02, p=0.81), physical function (0.25 vs 0.25, p=0.97) or dyspnoea (−0.5 vs 0.2, p=0.22). Improvement in quality of life was greater in the training group (14% vs 2%, mean difference 12%, p=0.03). In-hospital mortality was higher in the training group (4 vs 0, 12% vs 0%, p=0.051). Conclusions Inspiratory muscle training following successful weaning increases inspiratory muscle strength and quality of life, but we cannot confidently rule out an associated increased risk of in-hospital mortality. Trial registration number ACTRN12610001089022, results. PMID:27257003

  19. Preoperative Ambulatory Inspiratory Muscle Training in Patients Undergoing Esophagectomy. A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Agrelli, Taciana Freitas; de Carvalho Ramos, Marisa; Guglielminetti, Rachel; Silva, Alex Augusto; Crema, Eduardo

    2012-01-01

    A major decline in pulmonary function is observed on the first day after upper abdominal surgery. This decline can reduce vital and inspiratory capacity and can culminate in restrictive lung diseases that cause atelectasis, reduced diaphragm movement, and respiratory insufficiency. The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of preoperative ambulatory respiratory muscle training in patients undergoing esophagectomy. The sample consisted of 20 adult patients (14 men [70%] and 6 women [30%]) with a diagnosis of advanced chagasic megaesophagus. A significant increase in maximum inspiratory pressure was observed after inspiratory muscle training when compared with baseline values (from −55.059 ± 18.359 to −76.286 ± 16.786). Preoperative ambulatory inspiratory muscle training was effective in increasing respiratory muscle strength in patients undergoing esophagectomy and contributed to the prevention of postoperative complications. PMID:23113846

  20. The Effect of Inspiratory Muscle Training on Respiratory and Limb Locomotor Muscle Deoxygenation During Exercise with Resistive Inspiratory Loading.

    PubMed

    Turner, L A; Tecklenburg-Lund, S L; Chapman, R; Shei, R-J; Wilhite, D P; Mickleborough, T

    2016-07-01

    We investigated how inspiratory muscle training impacted respiratory and locomotor muscle deoxygenation during submaximal exercise with resistive inspiratory loading. 16 male cyclists completed 6 weeks of either true (n=8) or sham (n=8) inspiratory muscle training. Pre- and post-training, subjects completed 3, 6-min experimental trials performed at ~80%  ˙VO2peak with interventions of either moderate inspiratory loading, heavy inspiratory loading, or maximal exercise imposed in the final 3 min. Locomotor and respiratory muscle oxy-, deoxy-, and total-haemoglobin and myoglobin concentration was continuously monitored using near-infrared spectroscopy. Locomotor muscle deoxygenation changes from 80%  ˙VO2peak to heavy inspiratory loading were significantly reduced pre- to post-training from 4.3±5.6 µM to 2.7±4.7 µM. Respiratory muscle deoxygenation was also significantly reduced during the heavy inspiratory loading trial (4.6±3.5 µM to 1.9±1.5 µM) post-training. There was no significant difference in oxy-, deoxy-, or total-haemoglobin and myoglobin during any of the other loading trials, from pre- to post-training, in either group. After inspiratory muscle training, highly-trained cyclists exhibited decreased locomotor and respiratory muscle deoxygenation during exercise with heavy inspiratory loading. These data suggest that inspiratory muscle training reduces oxygen extraction by the active respiratory and limb muscles, which may reflect changes in respiratory and locomotor muscle oxygen delivery.

  1. Inspiratory muscle training attenuates the human respiratory muscle metaboreflex

    PubMed Central

    Witt, Jonathan D; Guenette, Jordan A; Rupert, Jim L; McKenzie, Donald C; Sheel, A William

    2007-01-01

    We hypothesized that inspiratory muscle training (IMT) would attenuate the sympathetically mediated heart rate (HR) and mean arterial pressure (MAP) increases normally observed during fatiguing inspiratory muscle work. An experimental group (Exp, n = 8) performed IMT 6 days per week for 5 weeks at 50% of maximal inspiratory pressure (MIP), while a control group (Sham, n = 8) performed IMT at 10% MIP. Pre- and post-training, subjects underwent a eucapnic resistive breathing task (RBT) (breathing frequency = 15 breaths min−1, duty cycle = 0.70) while HR and MAP were continuously monitored. Following IMT, MIP increased significantly (P < 0.05) in the Exp group (−125 ± 10 to −146 ± 12 cmH2O; mean ±s.e.m.) but not in the Sham group (−141 ± 11 to −148 ± 11 cmH2O). Prior to IMT, the RBT resulted in significant increases in HR (Sham: 59 ± 2 to 83 ± 4 beats min−1; Exp: 62 ± 3 to 83 ± 4 beats min−1) and MAP (Sham: 88 ± 2 to 106 ± 3 mmHg; Exp: 84 ± 1 to 99 ± 3 mmHg) in both groups relative to rest. Following IMT, the Sham group observed similar HR and MAP responses to the RBT while the Exp group failed to increase HR and MAP to the same extent as before (HR: 59 ± 3 to 74 ± 2 beats min−1; MAP: 84 ± 1 to 89 ± 2 mmHg). This attenuated cardiovascular response suggests a blunted sympatho-excitation to resistive inspiratory work. We attribute our findings to a reduced activity of chemosensitive afferents within the inspiratory muscles and may provide a mechanism for some of the whole-body exercise endurance improvements associated with IMT. PMID:17855758

  2. Effects of Ramadan Fasting on Inspiratory Muscle Function

    PubMed Central

    Soori, Mohsen; Mohaghegh, Shahram; Hajain, Maryam; Moraadi, Behrooz

    2016-01-01

    Background Ramadan fasting is a major challenge for exercising Muslims especially in warm seasons. There is some evidence to indicate that Ramadan fasting causes higher subjective ratings of perceived exertion (RPE) in fasting Muslims. The mechanisms of this phenomenon are not known exactly. The role of respiratory muscle strength in this regard has not been studied yet. Objectives The aim of this study was investigation of the effects of Ramadan fasting on respiratory muscle strength. Patients and Methods In a before-after study, from 35 fasting, apparently healthy, male adults who had fasted from the beginning of Ramadan, maximal inspiratory muscle pressure (MIP) and peak inspiratory flow (PIF) were measured in the last week of Ramadan month in summer. At the time of test, there was not any sleep problem in participants and all of them had good cooperation. Three months later, after exclusion of incompatible persons mainly because of change in their physical activity level, smoking behavior or drug consumption, the measurements were repeated in 12 individuals. Results Weight, MIP and PIF data had normal distribution (Kolmogorov-Smirnov Test). There was a significant increase in MIP (mean 8.3 cm H2O with 95% confidence interval of 2.2 - 14.3) and PIF (mean 0.55 lit/s with 95% confidence interval of 0.02 - 1.07) and weight (mean 3.4 Kg with 95% confidence interval of 2.2 - 4.5) after Ramadan (Paired t test with P < 0.05). When weight difference was used as a covariate in repeated measure ANOVA test, there was no further significant difference between MIP and PIF measurements. Conclusions Ramadan fasting may cause reduction of respiratory muscle strength through reduction of body weight. PMID:27826401

  3. Relative activity of respiratory muscles during prescribed inspiratory muscle training in healthy people.

    PubMed

    Jung, Ju-Hyeon; Kim, Nan-Soo

    2016-03-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to determine the effects of different intensities of inspiratory muscle training on the relative respiratory muscle activity in healthy adults. [Subjects and Methods] Thirteen healthy male volunteers were instructed to perform inspiratory muscle training (0%, 40%, 60%, and 80% maximal inspiratory pressure) on the basis of their individual intensities. The inspiratory muscle training was performed in random order of intensities. Surface electromyography data were collected from the right-side diaphragm, external intercostal, and sternocleidomastoid, and pulmonary functions (forced expiratory volume in 1 s, forced vital capacity, and their ratio; peak expiratory flow; and maximal inspiratory pressure) were measured. [Results] Comparison of the relative activity of the diaphragm showed significant differences between the 60% and 80% maximal inspiratory pressure intensities and baseline during inspiratory muscle training. Furthermore, significant differences were found in sternocleidomastoid relative activity between the 60% and 80% maximal inspiratory pressure intensities and baseline during inspiratory muscle training. [Conclusion] During inspiratory muscle training in the clinic, the patients were assisted (verbally or through feedback) by therapists to avoid overactivation of their accessory muscles (sternocleidomastoid). This study recommends that inspiratory muscle training be performed at an accurate and appropriate intensity through the practice of proper deep breathing.

  4. Relative activity of respiratory muscles during prescribed inspiratory muscle training in healthy people

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Ju-hyeon; Kim, Nan-soo

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to determine the effects of different intensities of inspiratory muscle training on the relative respiratory muscle activity in healthy adults. [Subjects and Methods] Thirteen healthy male volunteers were instructed to perform inspiratory muscle training (0%, 40%, 60%, and 80% maximal inspiratory pressure) on the basis of their individual intensities. The inspiratory muscle training was performed in random order of intensities. Surface electromyography data were collected from the right-side diaphragm, external intercostal, and sternocleidomastoid, and pulmonary functions (forced expiratory volume in 1 s, forced vital capacity, and their ratio; peak expiratory flow; and maximal inspiratory pressure) were measured. [Results] Comparison of the relative activity of the diaphragm showed significant differences between the 60% and 80% maximal inspiratory pressure intensities and baseline during inspiratory muscle training. Furthermore, significant differences were found in sternocleidomastoid relative activity between the 60% and 80% maximal inspiratory pressure intensities and baseline during inspiratory muscle training. [Conclusion] During inspiratory muscle training in the clinic, the patients were assisted (verbally or through feedback) by therapists to avoid overactivation of their accessory muscles (sternocleidomastoid). This study recommends that inspiratory muscle training be performed at an accurate and appropriate intensity through the practice of proper deep breathing. PMID:27134409

  5. Inspiratory Muscle Training in a Child with Nemaline Myopathy and Organ Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Barbara K.; Bleiweis, Mark S.; Zauhar, Joni; Martin, A. Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Objective To report the use of inspiratory muscle strength training (IMST) to treat repeated ventilatory insufficiency in a child with nemaline myopathy (NM) who underwent cardiac and renal transplantation. Design Case report. Setting Pediatric intensive care unit of a tertiary care university teaching hospital. Intervention IMST was provided five days weekly for two weeks, accompanied by progressive weaning from non-invasive ventilation. Measurements and Main Results Maximal inspiratory pressure (MIP) increased from −36.7 cm H2O to −77.8 cm H2O, accompanied by improved inspiratory flow, volume, pressure activation and power. During the training period, the patient weaned from continuous non-invasive ventilatory assist to her pre-operative level of ventilatory function. Conclusions Inspiratory muscle training may be a beneficial component of care for children with NM who experience acute ventilatory insufficiency. PMID:20407395

  6. Diaphragm Thickness and Inspiratory Muscle Functions in Chronic Stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Minkyu; Lee, Kyeongbong; Cho, Jieun; Lee, Wanhee

    2017-01-01

    Background The aims of this study are to investigate the difference between the diaphragm thickness at end expiration and the thickness at total lung capacity (TLC), and to examine differences in inspiratory muscle function between stroke patients and healthy individuals. Material/Methods Forty-five stroke patients and 49 healthy volunteers were included in this study. Diaphragm thickness was measured at end expiration and at TLC by ultrasonography. The maximal inspiratory pressure (MIP), peak inspiratory flow (PIF), vital capacity (VC), and inspiratory muscle endurance (IME) were assess to evaluate inspiratory muscle function. Results In stroke patients, the diaphragm was significantly thinner on the affected side than the less affected side at end expiration and at TLC. The change between the thickness at end expiration and at TLC were also significant on both sides. Between groups, the difference in diaphragm thickness at end expiration was not significant, but at TLC, the diaphragms were significantly thicker in healthy individuals than on either side in stroke patients, and the change in diaphragm thickness was significantly greater for healthy individuals. Inspiratory muscle functions were also significantly greater in healthy individuals. MIP, PIF, and VC were positively correlated with the change in thickness in healthy individuals, and MIP was positively correlated with the change in thickness and IME in stroke patients. Conclusions Stroke patients showed decreases in the thickening ability of the diaphragm at TLC and in inspiratory muscle function. The change between the diaphragm thickness at end expiration and at TLC was positively correlated with MIP, PIF, and VC. PMID:28284044

  7. Inspiratory muscle warm-up and inspiratory muscle training: separate and combined effects on intermittent running to exhaustion.

    PubMed

    Lomax, Mitch; Grant, Ian; Corbett, Jo

    2011-03-01

    In the present study, we examined the independent and combined effects of an inspiratory muscle warm-up and inspiratory muscle training on intermittent running to exhaustion. Twelve males were recruited to undertake four experimental trials. Two trials (Trials 1 and 2) preceded either a 4-week training period of 1 × 30 breaths twice daily at 50% (experimental group) or 15% (control group) maximal inspiratory mouth pressure (PImax). A further two trials (Trials 3 and 4) were performed after the 4 weeks. Trials 2 and 4 were preceded by a warm-up: 2 × 30 breaths at 40% PImax. Pre-training PImax and distance covered increased (P < 0.05) similarly between groups after the warm-up (~11% and ~5-7% PImax and distance covered, respectively). After training, PImax increased by 20 ± 6.1% (P < 0.01; d = 3.6) and 26.7 ± 6.3% (P < 0.01; d = 3.1) when training and warm-up were combined in the experimental group. Distance covered increased after training in the experimental group by 12 ± 4.9% (P < 0.01; d = 3.6) and 14.9 ± 4.5% (P < 0.01; d = 2.3) when training and warm-up interventions were combined. In conclusion, inspiratory muscle training and inspiratory muscle warm-up can both increase running distance independently, but the greatest increase is observed when they are combined.

  8. Pulmonary adaptations to swim and inspiratory muscle training.

    PubMed

    Mickleborough, Timothy D; Stager, Joel M; Chatham, Ken; Lindley, Martin R; Ionescu, Alina A

    2008-08-01

    Because the anomalous respiratory characteristics of competitive swimmers have been suggested to be due to inspiratory muscle work, the respiratory muscle and pulmonary function of 30 competitively trained swimmers was assessed at the beginning and end of an intensive 12-week swim training (ST) program. Swimmers (n = 10) combined ST with either inspiratory muscle training (IMT) set at 80% sustained maximal inspiratory pressure (SMIP) with progressively increased work-rest ratios until task failure for 3-days per week (ST + IMT) or ST with sham-IMT (ST + SHAM-IMT, n = 10), or acted as controls (ST only, ST, n = 10). Measures of respiratory and pulmonary function were assessed at the beginning and end of the 12 week study period. There were no significant differences (P > 0.05) in respiratory and pulmonary function between groups (ST + IMT, ST + SHAM-IMT and ST) at baseline and at the end of the 12 week study period. However, within all groups significant increases (P < 0.05) were observed in a number of respiratory and pulmonary function variables at the end of the 12 week study, such as maximal inspiratory and expiratory pressure, inspiratory power output, forced vital capacity, forced expiratory and inspiratory volume in 1-s, total lung capacity and diffusion capacity of the lung. This study has demonstrated that there are no appreciable differences in terms of respiratory changes between elite swimmers undergoing a competitive ST program and those undergoing respiratory muscle training using the flow-resistive IMT device employed in the present study; as yet, the causal mechanisms involved are undefined.

  9. The role of the inspiratory muscle weakness in functional capacity in hemodialysis patients

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Rosalina Tossige; Neves, Camila Danielle Cunha; de Oliveira, Evandro Silveira; Alves, Frederico Lopes; Rodrigues, Vanessa Gomes Brandão; Maciel, Emílio Henrique Barroso

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Inspiratory muscle function may be affected in patients with End-Stage Renal Disease (ESRD), further worsening the functional loss in these individuals. However, the impact of inspiratory muscle weakness (IMW) on the functional capacity (FC) of hemodialysis patients remains unknown. Thus, the present study aimed to evaluate the impact of IMW on FC in ESRD patients undergoing hemodialysis. Materials and methods ESRD patients on hemodialysis treatment for more than six months were evaluated for inspiratory muscle strength and FC. Inspiratory muscle strength was evaluated based on maximal inspiratory pressure (MIP). IMW was defined as MIP values less than 70% of the predicted value. FC was evaluated using the Incremental Shuttle Walk test (ISWT). Patients whose predicted peak oxygen uptake (VO2peak) over the distance walked during the ISWT was less than 16mL/kg/min were considered to have FC impairment. Associations between variables were assessed by linear and logistic regression, with adjustment for age, sex, body mass index (BMI), presence of diabetes and hemoglobin level. Receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was used to determine different cutoff values of the MIP for normal inspiratory muscle strength and FC. Results Sixty-five ERSD patients (67.7% male), aged 48.2 (44.5–51.9) years were evaluated. MIP was an independent predictor of the distance walked during the ISWT (R2 = 0.44). IMW was an independent predictor of VO2peak < 16mL/kg/min. (OR = 5.7; p = 0.048) in adjusted logistic regression models. ROC curves showed that the MIP cutoff value of 82cmH2O had a sensitivity of 73.5% and specificity of 93.7% in predicting normal inspiratory strength and a sensitivity and specificity of 76.3% and 70.4%, respectively, in predicting VO2peak ≥ 16mL/kg/min. Conclusions IMW is associated with reduced FC in hemodialysis patients. Evaluation of the MIP may be important to functional monitoring in clinical practice and can help in the

  10. Systematic Review of Inspiratory Muscle Training After Cerebrovascular Accident.

    PubMed

    Martín-Valero, Rocío; De La Casa Almeida, Maria; Casuso-Holgado, Maria Jesus; Heredia-Madrazo, Alfonso

    2015-11-01

    This systematic review examines levels of evidence and recommendation grades of various therapeutic interventions of inspiratory muscle training in people who have had a stroke. Benefits from different levels of force and resistance in respiratory muscles are shown in this population. This review was conducted following the PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses) directives and was completed in November 2014. The search limits were studies published in English between 2004 and 2014. Relevant studies were searched for in MEDLINE, PEDro, OAIster, Scopus, PsycINFO, Web of Knowledge, CINAHL, SPORTDiscus, DOAJ, Cochrane, Embase, Academic Search Complete, Fuente Académica, and MedicLatina. Initially, 20 articles were identified. After analyzing all primary documents, 14 studies were excluded. Only 6 studies were relevant to this review. Three different types of interventions were found (maximum inspiratory training, controlled training, and nonintervention) in 3 different groups. One specific study compared 3 inspiratory muscle training groups with a group of breathing exercises (diaphragmatic exercises with pursed lips) and a control group. Future long-term studies with larger sample sizes are needed. It is necessary to apply respiratory muscle training as a service of the national health system and to consider its inclusion in the conventional neurological program.

  11. "Functional" Inspiratory and Core Muscle Training Enhances Running Performance and Economy.

    PubMed

    Tong, Tomas K; McConnell, Alison K; Lin, Hua; Nie, Jinlei; Zhang, Haifeng; Wang, Jiayuan

    2016-10-01

    Tong, TK, McConnell, AK, Lin, H, Nie, J, Zhang, H, and Wang, J. "Functional" inspiratory and core muscle training enhances running performance and economy. J Strength Cond Res 30(10): 2942-2951, 2016-We compared the effects of two 6-week high-intensity interval training interventions. Under the control condition (CON), only interval training was undertaken, whereas under the intervention condition (ICT), interval training sessions were followed immediately by core training, which was combined with simultaneous inspiratory muscle training (IMT)-"functional" IMT. Sixteen recreational runners were allocated to either ICT or CON groups. Before the intervention phase, both groups undertook a 4-week program of "foundation" IMT to control for the known ergogenic effect of IMT (30 inspiratory efforts at 50% maximal static inspiratory pressure [P0] per set, 2 sets per day, 6 days per week). The subsequent 6-week interval running training phase consisted of 3-4 sessions per week. In addition, the ICT group undertook 4 inspiratory-loaded core exercises (10 repetitions per set, 2 sets per day, inspiratory load set at 50% post-IMT P0) immediately after each interval training session. The CON group received neither core training nor functional IMT. After the intervention phase, global inspiratory and core muscle functions increased in both groups (p ≤ 0.05), as evidenced by P0 and a sport-specific endurance plank test (SEPT) performance, respectively. Compared with CON, the ICT group showed larger improvements in SEPT, running economy at the speed of the onset of blood lactate accumulation, and 1-hour running performance (3.04% vs. 1.57%, p ≤ 0.05). The changes in these variables were interindividually correlated (r ≥ 0.57, n = 16, p ≤ 0.05). Such findings suggest that the addition of inspiratory-loaded core conditioning into a high-intensity interval training program augments the influence of the interval program on endurance running performance and that this may be

  12. Effect of negative pressure ventilation on arterial blood gas pressures and inspiratory muscle strength during an exacerbation of chronic obstructive lung disease.

    PubMed Central

    Montserrat, J. M.; Martos, J. A.; Alarcon, A.; Celis, R.; Plaza, V.; Picado, C.

    1991-01-01

    The effects of intermittent negative pressure ventilation have been studied in 20 patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease during an exacerbation of their disease. Measurements of arterial blood gas tensions and maximal inspiratory pressure (MIP) were performed before and after six hours of negative pressure ventilation or standard treatment (control day) given in random order on two consecutive days. After negative pressure ventilation the mean (SD) value of MIP increased from 68.1 (21.5) to 74.8 (20) cm H2O;* arterial oxygen tension (PaCO2) fell from 60.6 (12.2) to 50.9 (8.9) mm Hg* but PaO2 changed little (from 48.4 (7.4) to 47.6 (8.2) mm Hg). There were no significant changes on the control day in arterial blood gas tensions (PaO2 47.8 (8.1) and 48.9 (9.4) and Paco2 59.8 (10.9) and 57.5 (8.06) mm Hg) or in MIP (69.4 (22.4) and 70.9 (22.9) cm H2O). Six patients tolerated negative pressure ventilation poorly and these patients showed less improvement after negative pressure ventilation. Our results suggest that intermittent negative pressure ventilation can increase alveolar ventilation in patients with an exacerbation of chronic obstructive lung disease, particularly in those who tolerate the procedure well. Most subjects showed a fall in PaCO2 and an increase in MIP. The fact that PaO2 was unchanged despite the fall in PaCO2 suggests that gas exchange may deteriorate with negative pressure ventilation in these patients. PMID:1908138

  13. The effect of inspiratory muscle fatigue on breathing pattern and ventilatory response to CO2.

    PubMed Central

    Mador, M J; Tobin, M J

    1992-01-01

    1. The effects of inducing inspiratory muscle fatigue on the subsequent breathing pattern were examined during resting unstimulated breathing and during CO2 rebreathing. In addition, we examined whether induction of inspiratory muscle fatigue alters CO2 responsiveness. 2. Global inspiratory muscle fatigue and diaphragmatic fatigue were achieved by having subjects breathe against an inspiratory resistive load while generating a predetermined fraction of either their maximal mouth pressure or maximal transdiaphragmatic pressure until they were unable to generate the target pressure. 3. Induction of inspiratory muscle fatigue had no effect on the subsequent breathing pattern during either unstimulated breathing or during CO2 rebreathing. 4. Following induction of inspiratory muscle fatigue, the slope of the ventilatory response to CO2 was significantly decreased from 18.8 +/- 3.3 during control to 13.8 +/- 2.1 l min-1 (% end-tidal CO2 concentration)-1 with fatigue (P < 0.02). PMID:1484352

  14. Effects of inspiratory muscle training on dynamic hyperinflation in patients with COPD.

    PubMed

    Petrovic, Milos; Reiter, Michael; Zipko, Harald; Pohl, Wolfgang; Wanke, Theodor

    2012-01-01

    Dynamic hyperinflation has important clinical consequences in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Given that most of these patients have respiratory and peripheral muscle weakness, dyspnea and functional exercise capacity may improve as a result of inspiratory muscle training (IMT). The aim of the study was to analyze the effects of IMT on exercise capacity, dyspnea, and inspiratory fraction (IF) during exercise in patients with COPD. Daily inspiratory muscle strength and endurance training was performed for 8 weeks in 10 patients with COPD GOLD II and III. Ten patients with COPD II and III served as a control group. Maximal inspiratory pressure (Pimax) and endurance time during resistive breathing maneuvers (tlim) served as parameter for inspiratory muscle capacity. Before and after training, the patients performed an incremental symptom limited exercise test to maximum and a constant load test on a cycle ergometer at 75% of the peak work rate obtained in the pretraining incremental test. ET was defined as the duration of loaded pedaling. Following IMT, there was a statistically significant increase in inspiratory muscle performance of the Pimax from 7.75 ± 0.47 to 9.15 ± 0.73 kPa (P < 0.01) and of tlim from 348 ± 54 to 467 ± 58 seconds (P < 0.01). A significant increase in IF, indicating decreased dynamic hyperinflation, was observed during both exercise tests. Further, the ratio of breathing frequency to minute ventilation (bf/V'(E)) decreased significantly, indicating an improved breathing pattern. A significant decrease in perception of dyspnea was also measured. Peak work rate during the incremental cycle ergometer test remained constant, while ET during the constant load test increased significantly from 597.1 ± 80.8 seconds at baseline to 733.6 ± 74.3 seconds (P < 0.01). No significant changes during either exercise tests were measured in the control group. The present study found that in patients with COPD, IMT results in

  15. Effects of inspiratory muscle training on dynamic hyperinflation in patients with COPD

    PubMed Central

    Petrovic, Milos; Reiter, Michael; Zipko, Harald; Pohl, Wolfgang; Wanke, Theodor

    2012-01-01

    Dynamic hyperinflation has important clinical consequences in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Given that most of these patients have respiratory and peripheral muscle weakness, dyspnea and functional exercise capacity may improve as a result of inspiratory muscle training (IMT). The aim of the study was to analyze the effects of IMT on exercise capacity, dyspnea, and inspiratory fraction (IF) during exercise in patients with COPD. Daily inspiratory muscle strength and endurance training was performed for 8 weeks in 10 patients with COPD GOLD II and III. Ten patients with COPD II and III served as a control group. Maximal inspiratory pressure (Pimax) and endurance time during resistive breathing maneuvers (tlim) served as parameter for inspiratory muscle capacity. Before and after training, the patients performed an incremental symptom limited exercise test to maximum and a constant load test on a cycle ergometer at 75% of the peak work rate obtained in the pretraining incremental test. ET was defined as the duration of loaded pedaling. Following IMT, there was a statistically significant increase in inspiratory muscle performance of the Pimax from 7.75 ± 0.47 to 9.15 ± 0.73 kPa (P < 0.01) and of tlim from 348 ± 54 to 467 ± 58 seconds (P < 0.01). A significant increase in IF, indicating decreased dynamic hyperinflation, was observed during both exercise tests. Further, the ratio of breathing frequency to minute ventilation (bf/V′E) decreased significantly, indicating an improved breathing pattern. A significant decrease in perception of dyspnea was also measured. Peak work rate during the incremental cycle ergometer test remained constant, while ET during the constant load test increased significantly from 597.1 ± 80.8 seconds at baseline to 733.6 ± 74.3 seconds (P < 0.01). No significant changes during either exercise tests were measured in the control group. The present study found that in patients with COPD, IMT results in

  16. Inspiratory muscle training lowers the oxygen cost of voluntary hyperpnea.

    PubMed

    Turner, Louise A; Tecklenburg-Lund, Sandra L; Chapman, Robert F; Stager, Joel M; Wilhite, Daniel P; Mickleborough, Timothy D

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if inspiratory muscle training (IMT) alters the oxygen cost of breathing (Vo(2RM)) during voluntary hyperpnea. Sixteen male cyclists completed 6 wk of IMT using an inspiratory load of 50% (IMT) or 15% placebo (CON) of maximal inspiratory pressure (Pi(max)). Prior to training, a maximal incremental cycle ergometer test was performed to determine Vo(2) and ventilation (V(E)) at multiple workloads. Pre- and post-training, subjects performed three separate 4-min bouts of voluntary eucapnic hyperpnea (mimic), matching V(E) that occurred at 50, 75, and 100% of Vo(2 max). Pi(max) was significantly increased (P < 0.05) by 22.5 ± 8.7% from pre- to post-IMT and remained unchanged in the CON group. The Vo(2RM) required during the mimic trial corresponded to 5.1 ± 2.5, 5.7 ± 1.4, and 11.7% ± 2.5% of the total Vo(2) (Vo(2T)) at ventilatory workloads equivalent to 50, 75, and 100% of Vo(2 max), respectively. Following IMT, the Vo(2RM) requirement significantly decreased (P < 0.05) by 1.5% (4.2 ± 1.4% of Vo(2T)) at 75% Vo(2 max) and 3.4% (8.1 ± 3.5% of Vo(2T)) at 100% Vo(2 max). No significant changes were shown in the CON group. IMT significantly reduced the O(2) cost of voluntary hyperpnea, which suggests that a reduction in the O(2) requirement of the respiratory muscles following a period of IMT may facilitate increased O(2) availability to the active muscles during exercise. These data suggest that IMT may reduce the O(2) cost of ventilation during exercise, providing an insight into mechanism(s) underpinning the reported improvements in whole body endurance performance; however, this awaits further investigation.

  17. Inspiratory muscles experience fatigue faster than the calf muscles during treadmill marching.

    PubMed

    Perlovitch, Renana; Gefen, Amit; Elad, David; Ratnovsky, Anat; Kramer, Mordechai R; Halpern, Pinchas

    2007-04-16

    The possibility that respiratory muscles may fatigue during extreme physical activity and thereby become a limiting factor leading to exhaustion is debated in the literature. The aim of this study was to determine whether treadmill marching exercise induces respiratory muscle fatigue, and to compare the extent and rate of respiratory muscle fatigue to those of the calf musculature. To identify muscle fatigue, surface electromyographic (EMG) signals of the inspiratory (sternomastoid, external intercostals), expiratory (rectus abdominis and external oblique) and calf (gastrocnemius lateralis) muscles were measured during a treadmill march of 2 km at a constant velocity of 8 km/h. The extent of fatigue was assessed by determining the increase in root-mean-square (RMS) of EMG over time, and the rate of fatigue was assessed from the slope of the EMG RMS versus time curve. Results indicated that (i) the inspiratory and calf muscles are the ones experiencing the most dominant fatigue during treadmill marching, (ii) the rate of fatigue of each muscle group was monotonic between the initial and terminal phases of exercise, and (iii) the inspiratory muscles fatigue significantly faster than the calf at the terminal phase of exercise, and are likely to fatigue faster during the initial exercise as well. Accordingly, this study supports the hypothesis that fatigue of the inspiratory muscles may be a limiting factor during exercise.

  18. Effects of inspiratory muscle training on exercise responses in Paralympic athletes with cervical spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    West, C R; Taylor, B J; Campbell, I G; Romer, L M

    2014-10-01

    We asked whether specific inspiratory muscle training (IMT) improves respiratory structure and function and peak exercise responses in highly trained athletes with cervical spinal cord injury (SCI). Ten Paralympic wheelchair rugby players with motor-complete SCI (C5-C7) were paired by functional classification then randomly assigned to an IMT or placebo group. Diaphragm thickness (B-mode ultrasonography), respiratory function [spirometry and maximum static inspiratory (PI ,max ) and expiratory (PE ,max ) pressures], chronic activity-related dyspnea (Baseline and Transition Dyspnea Indices), and physiological responses to incremental arm-crank exercise were assessed before and after 6 weeks of pressure threshold IMT or sham bronchodilator treatment. Compared to placebo, the IMT group showed significant increases in diaphragm thickness (P = 0.001) and PI ,max (P = 0.016). There was a significant increase in tidal volume at peak exercise in IMT vs placebo (P = 0.048) and a strong trend toward an increase in peak work rate (P = 0.081, partial eta-squared = 0.33) and peak oxygen uptake (P = 0.077, partial eta-squared = 0.34). No other indices changed post-intervention. In conclusion, IMT resulted in significant diaphragmatic hypertrophy and increased inspiratory muscle strength in highly trained athletes with cervical SCI. The strong trend, with large observed effect, toward an increase in peak aerobic performance suggests IMT may provide a useful adjunct to training in this population.

  19. The effect of progressive high-intensity inspiratory muscle training and fixed high-intensity inspiratory muscle training on the asymmetry of diaphragm thickness in stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Jung, Ju-Hyeon; Kim, Nan-Soo

    2015-10-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated the effects of progressive load and fixed load high-intensity inspiratory muscle training on the asymmetry of diaphragm thickness in stroke patients. [Subjects] Twenty-one stroke patients were assigned to one of three groups: progressive load high-intensity inspiratory muscle training (n = 8), fixed load high-intensity inspiratory muscle training (n = 6), and controls (n = 7). [Methods] The progressive load and fixed load high-intensity inspiratory muscle training participants undertook an exercise program for 20 minutes, three times weekly, for 6 weeks. After each session, diaphragm thickness was measured using ultrasonography. The diaphragm asymmetry ratio and diaphragm thickening ratio were standardized using a formula. [Results] After intervention, the diaphragm asymmetry ratio significantly differed among the three groups, and the diaphragm asymmetry ratio significantly increased in the control group. A significant increase was identified in the diaphragm thickening ratio within the progressive load and fixed load high-intensity inspiratory muscle training groups. [Conclusion] Progressive load and fixed load high-intensity inspiratory muscle training decreased the asymmetry of diaphragm thickness in stroke patients; this effect, in turn, increased the diaphragm thickening ratio in stroke patients. The two interventions examined here should be selectively applied to individuals in the clinical field.

  20. Inspiratory muscle training improves 100 and 200 m swimming performance.

    PubMed

    Kilding, Andrew E; Brown, Sarah; McConnell, Alison K

    2010-02-01

    Inspiratory muscle training (IMT) has been shown to improve time trial performance in competitive athletes across a range of sports. Surprisingly, however, the effect of specific IMT on surface swimming performance remains un-investigated. Similarly, it is not known whether any ergogenic influence of IMT upon swimming performance is confined to specific race distances. To determine the influence of IMT upon swimming performance over 3 competitive distances, 16 competitive club-level swimmers were assigned at random to either an experimental (pressure threshold IMT) or sham IMT placebo control group. Participants performed a series of physiological and performance tests, before and following 6 weeks of IMT, including (1) an incremental swim test to the limit of tolerance to determine lactate, heart rate and perceived exertion responses; (2) standard measures of lung function (forced vital capacity, forced expiratory volume in 1 s, peak expiratory flow) and maximal inspiratory pressure (MIP); and (3) 100, 200 and 400 m swim time trials. Training utilised a hand-held pressure threshold device and consisted of 30 repetitions, twice per day. Relative to control, the IMT group showed the following percentage changes in swim times: 100 m, -1.70% (90% confidence limits, +/-1.4%), 200 m, -1.5% (+/-1.0), and 400 m, 0.6% (+/-1.2). Large effects were observed for MIP and rates of perceived exertion. In conclusion, 6 weeks of IMT has a small positive effect on swimming performance in club-level trained swimmers in events shorter than 400 m.

  1. The Role of Inspiratory Muscle Training in the Process of Rehabilitation of Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    PubMed

    Majewska-Pulsakowska, M; Wytrychowski, K; Rożek-Piechura, K

    2016-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) adversely affects the quality of life and life expectancy of patients. Shortness of breath, cough, and fatigue in lower limbs are the main reasons limiting physical activities of patients. The lack of physical activity results in poorer muscle strength. The latest guidelines regarding breathing rehabilitation in COPD patients emphasize a significant role of inspiratory muscle exercises. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the effects of an 8-week long inspiratory muscle training, interval training on a cycle ergometer, and training combining both kinds of rehabilitation, on pulmonary function, health-related quality of life, and the tolerance to exercise in patients with COPD. The study was conducted in a group of 43 patients with diagnosed COPD stage II and III according to GOLD. They were randomly divided into four training groups: inspiratory muscle training (Group 1), cycle ergometer training (Group 2), cycle ergometer and inspiratory muscle training (Group 3), control group - patients who did not participate in any rehabilitation programs (Group 4 - control). Before the rehabilitation process and after its completion the patients were medically examined, they completed a health-related quality of life questionnaire, performed a 6-min walk test, spirometry, and a treadmill exercise test according to the modified Bruce protocol. The results demonstrate a significant improvement in the quality of life measured for Group 3 in comparison with the control group.

  2. Influence of different breathing frequencies on the severity of inspiratory muscle fatigue induced by high-intensity front crawl swimming.

    PubMed

    Jakovljevic, Djordje G; McConnell, Alison K

    2009-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the influence of 2 different breathing frequencies on the magnitude of inspiratory muscle fatigue after high-intensity front crawl swimming. The influence of different breathing frequencies on postexercise blood lactate ([La]) and heart rate (HR) was also examined. Ten collegiate swimmers performed 2 x 200-m front crawl swims at 90% of race pace with the following breathing frequencies: 1) 1 breath every second stroke (B2), and 2) 1 breath every fourth stroke (B4). Maximal inspiratory pressure (PImax) was measured at the mouth from residual volume before (baseline) and after swimming, in a standing position. The HR and [La] were assessed at rest and immediately at the cessation of swimming. The PImax decreased by 21% after B4 and by 11% after B2 compared with baseline (p < 0.05). The [La] was lower by 15% after B4 than after B2 (p < 0.05). The HR was not significantly different between B2 and B4. These data suggest that there is significant global inspiratory muscle fatigue after high-intensity swimming. Inspiratory muscle fatigue is, however, greater when breathing frequency is reduced during high-intensity front crawl swimming. Respiratory muscle training should be used to improve respiratory muscle strength and endurance in swimmers.

  3. Normal values for inspiratory muscle function in children.

    PubMed

    Mellies, Uwe; Stehling, Florian; Dohna-Schwake, Christian

    2014-10-01

    Assessment of inspiratory muscle function (IMF) is limited in children with neuromuscular disorders, because respiratory muscle tests are poorly standardized and valid normative data are unavailable. We investigated maximum inspiratory pressure after exhalation to residual volume (MIP), mouth occlusion pressure (P0.1) and time of inspiration during quiet breathing and derived inspiratory muscle load (P0.1/MIP), and tension time index (TTI) in 301 healthy schoolchildren 6-16 years old. Gender-specific and age-dependent percentile curves for MIP were drawn with the median, 5%, 10%, 25%, 75% and 95% percentile. P0.1 was equal in boys and girls (0.23  ±  0.11 kPa), while MIP was significantly higher in boys (6.8  ±  2.2 versus 5.8  ±  2.4 kPa). Consequently, P0.1/MIP (4.8% ± 3.2% versus 4.0% ± 3.1%) and TTI (0.2  ±  0.14 versus 0.16  ±  0.14) were significantly higher in girls. MIP was 2.90 + 0.36 × age (kPa) and 3.19 + 0.24 × age (kPa) in boys and girls, respectively. The 95% confidence intervals for boys and girls, respectively, were MIP, 6.3-7.3 kPA and 5.4-6.2 kPa; P0.1/MIP, 3.5%-4.5% and 4.3%-5.3%; TTI, 0.14-0.18 and 0.18-0.22; and P0.1, 0.20-0.24 kPa for both. IMF in children has a wide interindividual variability; however percentile curves facilitate a longitudinal assessment of individual patients. Furthermore, narrow confidence intervals allow for comparisons of study populations, making IMF an appropriate endpoint for clinical trials.

  4. Effects of inspiratory muscle training on respiratory muscle electromyography and dyspnea during exercise in healthy men.

    PubMed

    Ramsook, Andrew H; Molgat-Seon, Yannick; Schaeffer, Michele R; Wilkie, Sabrina S; Camp, Pat G; Reid, W Darlene; Romer, Lee M; Guenette, Jordan A

    2017-03-02

    Inspiratory muscle training (IMT) has consistently been shown to reduce exertional dyspnea in health and disease; however, the physiological mechanisms remain poorly understood. A growing body of literature suggests that dyspnea intensity can largely be explained by an awareness of increased neural respiratory drive, as indirectly measured using diaphragmatic electromyography (EMGdi). Accordingly, we sought to determine if improvements in dyspnea following IMT can be explained by decreases in inspiratory muscle EMG activity. Twenty-five healthy recreationally-active men completed a detailed familiarization visit followed by two maximal incremental cycle exercise tests separated by 5 weeks of randomly assigned pressure threshold IMT or sham control training (SC). The IMT group (n=12) performed 30 inspiratory efforts twice daily against a 30 repetition maximum intensity. The SC group (n=13) performed a daily bout of 60 inspiratory efforts against 10% maximal inspiratory pressure (MIP), with no weekly adjustments. Dyspnea intensity was measured throughout exercise using the modified 0-10 Borg scale. Sternocleidomastoid and scalene EMG were measured using surface electrodes whereas EMGdi was measured using a multi-pair esophageal electrode catheter. IMT significantly improved MIP (pre:-138±45 vs. post:-160±43cmH2O, p<0.01) whereas the SC intervention did not. Dyspnea was significantly reduced at the highest equivalent work rate (pre:7.6±2.5 vs. post:6.8±2.9Borg units, p<0.05), but not in the SC group, with no between-group interaction effects. There were no significant differences in respiratory muscle EMG during exercise in either group. Improvements in dyspnea intensity ratings following IMT in healthy humans cannot be explained by changes in the electrical activity of the inspiratory muscles.

  5. Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness After Inspiratory Threshold Loading in Healthy Adults

    PubMed Central

    Mathur, Sunita; Sheel, A. William; Road, Jeremy D.; Reid, W. Darlene

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Skeletal muscle damage occurs following high-intensity or unaccustomed exercise; however, it is difficult to monitor damage to the respiratory muscles, particularly in humans. The aim of this study was to use clinical measures to investigate the presence of skeletal muscle damage in the inspiratory muscles. Methods: Ten healthy subjects underwent 60 minutes of voluntary inspiratory threshold loading (ITL) at 70% of maximal inspiratory pressure. Maximal inspiratory and expiratory mouth pressures, delayed onset muscle soreness on a visual analogue scale and plasma creatine kinase were measured prior to ITL, and at repeated time points after ITL (4, 24 and 48 hours post-ITL). Results: Delayed onset muscle soreness was present in all subjects 24 hours following ITL (intensity = 22 ± 6 mm; significantly higher than baseline p = 0.02). Muscle soreness was reported primarily in the anterior neck region, and was correlated to the amount of work done by the inspiratory muscles during ITL (r = 0.72, p = 0.02). However, no significant change was observed in maximal inspiratory or expiratory pressures or creatine kinase. Conclusions: These findings suggest that an intense bout of ITL results in muscle soreness primarily in the accessory muscles of inspiration, however, may be insufficient to cause significant muscle damage in healthy adults. PMID:20467514

  6. Inspiratory Muscle Training Improves Sleep and Mitigates Cardiovascular Dysfunction in Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Vranish, Jennifer R.; Bailey, E. Fiona

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: New and effective strategies are needed to manage the autonomic and cardiovascular sequelae of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). We assessed the effect of daily inspiratory muscle strength training (IMT) on sleep and cardiovascular function in adults unable to use continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy. Methods: This is a placebo-controlled, single-blind study conducted in twenty four adults with mild, moderate, and severe OSA. Subjects were randomly assigned to placebo or inspiratory muscle strength training. Subjects in each group performed 5 min of training each day for 6 w. All subjects underwent overnight polysomnography at intake and again at study close. Results: We evaluated the effects of placebo training or IMT on sleep, blood pressure, and plasma catecholamines. Relative to placebo-trained subjects with OSA, subjects with OSA who performed IMT manifested reductions in systolic and diastolic blood pressures (−12.3 ± 1.6 SBP and −5.0 ± 1.3 DBP mmHg; P < 0.01); plasma norepinephrine levels (536.3 ± 56.6 versus 380.6 ± 41.2 pg/mL; P = 0.01); and registered fewer nighttime arousals and reported improved sleep (Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index scores: 9.1 ± 0.9 versus 5.1 ± 0.7; P = 0.001). These favorable outcomes were achieved without affecting apneahypopnea index. Conclusions: The results are consistent with our previously published findings in normotensive adults but further indicate that IMT can modulate blood pressure and plasma catecholamines in subjects with ongoing nighttime apnea and hypoxemia. Accordingly, we suggest IMT offers a low cost, nonpharmacologic means of improving sleep and blood pressure in patients who are intolerant of CPAP. Citation: Vranish JR, Bailey EF. Inspiratory muscle training improves sleep and mitigates cardiovascular dysfunction in obstructive sleep apnea. SLEEP 2016;39(6):1179–1185. PMID:27091540

  7. A comparison of inspiratory muscle fatigue following maximal exercise in moderately trained males and females.

    PubMed

    Ozkaplan, Atila; Rhodes, Edward C; Sheel, A William; Taunton, Jack E

    2005-09-01

    Exercise-induced inspiratory muscle fatigue (IMF) has been reported in males but there are few reports of IMF in females. It is not known if a gender difference exists for inspiratory muscle strength following heavy exercise, as is reported in locomotor muscles. Therefore, the relationship between fatigue and subsequent recovery of maximal inspiratory pressure (MIP) following exercise to maximal oxygen consumption (VO2max) was examined in a group of moderately trained males and females. Eighteen males (23+/-3 years; mean +/- SD) and 16 females (23+/-2 years) completed ten MIP and ten maximal handgrip (HG) strength maneuvers to establish baseline. Post-exercise MIP and HG were assessed successively immediately following a progressive intensity VO2max test on a cycle ergometer and at 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 10, and 15 min. VO2max, relative to fat-free mass was not statistically different between males (62+/-7 ml kg(-1) min(-1)) and females (60+/-8 ml kg(-1) min(-1)). Males had higher absolute MIP values than females at all time intervals (P<0.05). Immediately following exercise, MIP was significantly reduced in both genders (M=83+/-16%; F=78+/-15% of baseline) but HG values were not different than resting values. MIP values remained depressed for both males and females throughout the 15 min (P<0.05). Differences for MIP between males and females were not statistically significant at any measurement time (P>0.05). The findings in this study conclude that IMF, observed immediately following maximal exercise, demonstrated the same pattern of recovery for both genders.

  8. The role of inspiratory muscle training in the management of asthma and exercise-induced bronchoconstriction.

    PubMed

    Shei, Ren-Jay; Paris, Hunter L R; Wilhite, Daniel P; Chapman, Robert F; Mickleborough, Timothy D

    2016-11-01

    Asthma is a pathological condition comprising of a variety of symptoms which affect the ability to function in daily life. Due to the high prevalence of asthma and associated healthcare costs, it is important to identify low-cost alternatives to traditional pharmacotherapy. One of these low cost alternatives is the use of inspiratory muscle training (IMT), which is a technique aimed at increasing the strength and endurance of the diaphragm and accessory muscles of respiration. IMT typically consists of taking voluntary inspirations against a resistive load across the entire range of vital capacity while at rest. In healthy individuals, the most notable benefits of IMT are an increase in diaphragm thickness and strength, a decrease in exertional dyspnea, and a decrease in the oxygen cost of breathing. Due to the presence of expiratory flow limitation in asthma and exercise-induced bronchoconstriction, dynamic lung hyperinflation is common. As a result of varying operational lung volumes, due in part to hyperinflation, the respiratory muscles may operate far from the optimal portion of the length-tension curve, and thus may be forced to operate against a low pulmonary compliance. Therefore, the ability of these muscles to generate tension is reduced, and for any given level of ventilation, the work of breathing is increased as compared to non-asthmatics. Evidence that IMT is an effective treatment for asthma is inconclusive, due to limited data and a wide variation in study methodologies. However, IMT has been shown to decrease dyspnea, increase inspiratory muscle strength, and improve exercise capacity in asthmatic individuals. In order to develop more concrete recommendations regarding IMT as an effective low-cost adjunct in addition to traditional asthma treatments, we recommend that a standard treatment protocol be developed and tested in a placebo-controlled clinical trial with a large representative sample.

  9. The Role of Inspiratory Muscle Training in Sickle Cell Anemia Related Pulmonary Damage due to Recurrent Acute Chest Syndrome Attacks

    PubMed Central

    Camcıoğlu, Burcu; Boşnak-Güçlü, Meral; Karadallı, Müşerrefe Nur; Akı, Şahika Zeynep; Türköz-Sucak, Gülsan

    2015-01-01

    Background. The sickling of red blood cells causes a constellation of musculoskeletal, cardiovascular, and pulmonary manifestations. A 32-year-old gentleman with sickle cell anemia (SCA) had been suffering from recurrent acute chest syndrome (ACS). Aim. To examine the effects of inspiratory muscle training (IMT) on pulmonary functions, respiratory and peripheral muscle strength, functional exercise capacity, and quality of life in this patient with SCA. Methods. Functional exercise capacity was evaluated using six-minute walk test, respiratory muscle strength using mouth pressure device, hand grip strength using hand-held dynamometer, pain using Visual Analogue Scale, fatigue using Fatigue Severity Scale, dyspnea using Modified Medical Research Council Scale, and health related quality of life using European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer QOL measurement. Results. A significant improvement has been demonstrated in respiratory muscle strength, functional exercise capacity, pain, fatigue, dyspnea, and quality of life. There was no admission to emergency department due to acute chest syndrome in the following 12 months after commencing regular erythrocytapheresis. Conclusion. This is the first report demonstrating the beneficial effects of inspiratory muscle training on functional exercise capacity, respiratory muscle strength, pain, fatigue, dyspnea, and quality of life in a patient with recurrent ACS. PMID:26060589

  10. Respiratory Muscle Activity During Simultaneous Stationary Cycling and Inspiratory Muscle Training.

    PubMed

    Hellyer, Nathan J; Folsom, Ian A; Gaz, Dan V; Kakuk, Alynn C; Mack, Jessica L; Ver Mulm, Jacyln A

    2015-12-01

    Inspiratory muscle training (IMT) strengthens the muscles of respiration, improves breathing efficiency, and increases fitness. The IMT is generally performed independently of aerobic exercise; however, it is not clear whether there is added benefit of performing the IMT while simultaneously performing aerobic exercise in terms of activating and strengthening inspiratory muscles. The purpose of our study was to determine the effect of IMT on respiratory muscle electromyography (EMG) activity during stationary cycling in the upright and drops postures as compared with that when the IMT was performed alone. Diaphragm and sternocleidomastoid EMG activity was measured under different resting and cycling postures, with and without the use of the IMT at 40% maximal inspiratory pressure (n = 10; mean age 37). Cycling in an upright posture while simultaneously performing the IMT resulted in a significantly greater diaphragm EMG activity than while performing the IMT at rest in upright or drops postures (p ≤ 0.05). Cycling in drops postures while performing the IMT had a significantly greater diaphragm EMG activity than when performing the IMT at rest in either upright or drops postures (p ≤ 0.05). Sternocleidomastoid muscle activity increased with both cycling and IMT, although posture had little effect. These results support our hypothesis in that the IMT while cycling increases respiratory EMG activity to a significantly greater extent than when performing the IMT solely at rest, suggesting that the combination of IMT and cycling may provide an additive training effect.

  11. Effects of swim training on lung volumes and inspiratory muscle conditioning.

    PubMed

    Clanton, T L; Dixon, G F; Drake, J; Gadek, J E

    1987-01-01

    Lung volumes and inspiratory muscle (IM) function tests were measured in 16 competitive female swimmers (age 19 +/- 1 yr) before and after 12 wk of swim training. Eight underwent additional IM training; the remaining eight were controls. Vital capacity (VC) increased 0.25 +/- 0.25 liters (P less than 0.01), functional residual capacity (FRC) increased 0.39 +/- 0.29 liters (P less than 0.001), and total lung capacity (TLC) increased 0.35 +/- 0.47 (P less than 0.025) in swimmers, irrespective of IM training. Residual volume (RV) did not change. Maximum inspiratory mouth pressure (PImax) measured at FRC changed -43 +/- 18 cmH2O (P less than 0.005) in swimmers undergoing IM conditioning and -29 +/- 25 (P less than 0.05) in controls. The time that 65% of prestudy PImax could be endured increased in IM trainers (P less than 0.001) and controls (P less than 0.05). All results were compared with similar IM training in normal females (age 21.1 +/- 0.8 yr) in which significant increases in PImax and endurance were observed in IM trainers only with no changes in VC, FRC, or TLC (Clanton et al., Chest 87: 62-66, 1985). We conclude that 1) swim training in mature females increases VC, TLC, and FRC with no effect on RV, and 2) swim training increases IM strength and endurance measured near FRC.

  12. A Cycle Ergometer Exercise Program Improves Exercise Capacity and Inspiratory Muscle Function in Hospitalized Patients Awaiting Heart Transplantation: a Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Forestieri, Patrícia; Guizilini, Solange; Peres, Monique; Bublitz, Caroline; Bolzan, Douglas W.; Rocco, Isadora S.; Santos, Vinícius B.; Moreira, Rita Simone L.; Breda, João R.; de Almeida, Dirceu R.; Carvalho, Antonio Carlos de C.; Arena, Ross; Gomes, Walter J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of a cycle ergometer exercise program on exercise capacity and inspiratory muscle function in hospitalized patients with heart failure awaiting heart transplantation with intravenous inotropic support. Methods Patients awaiting heart transplantation were randomized and allocated prospectively into two groups: 1) Control Group (n=11) - conventional protocol; and 2) Intervention Group (n=7) - stationary cycle ergometer exercise training. Functional capacity was measured by the six-minute walk test and inspiratory muscle strength assessed by manovacuometry before and after the exercise protocols. Results Both groups demonstrated an increase in six-minute walk test distance after the experimental procedure compared to baseline; however, only the intervention group had a significant increase (P=0.08 and P=0.001 for the control and intervention groups, respectively). Intergroup comparison revealed a greater increase in the intervention group compared to the control (P<0.001). Regarding the inspiratory muscle strength evaluation, the intragroup analysis demonstrated increased strength after the protocols compared to baseline for both groups; statistical significance was only demonstrated for the intervention group, though (P=0.22 and P<0.01, respectively). Intergroup comparison showed a significant increase in the intervention group compared to the control (P<0.01). Conclusion Stationary cycle ergometer exercise training shows positive results on exercise capacity and inspiratory muscle strength in patients with heart failure awaiting cardiac transplantation while on intravenous inotropic support. PMID:27982348

  13. Common drive to the upper airway muscle genioglossus during inspiratory loading.

    PubMed

    Woods, Michael J; Nicholas, Christian L; Semmler, John G; Chan, Julia K M; Jordan, Amy S; Trinder, John

    2015-11-01

    Common drive is thought to constitute a central mechanism by which the efficiency of a motor neuron pool is increased. This study tested the hypothesis that common drive to the upper airway muscle genioglossus (GG) would increase with increased respiratory drive in response to an inspiratory load. Respiration, GG electromyographic (EMG) activity, single-motor unit activity, and coherence in the 0-5 Hz range between pairs of GG motor units were assessed for the 30 s before an inspiratory load, the first and second 30 s of the load, and the 30 s after the load. Twelve of twenty young, healthy male subjects provided usable data, yielding 77 pairs of motor units: 2 Inspiratory Phasic, 39 Inspiratory Tonic, 15 Expiratory Tonic, and 21 Tonic. Respiratory and GG inspiratory activity significantly increased during the loads and returned to preload levels during the postload periods (all showed significant quadratic functions over load trials, P < 0.05). As hypothesized, common drive increased during the load in inspiratory modulated motor units to a greater extent than in expiratory/tonic motor units (significant load × discharge pattern interaction, P < 0.05). Furthermore, this effect persisted during the postload period. In conclusion, common drive to inspiratory modulated motor units was elevated in response to increased respiratory drive. The postload elevation in common drive was suggestive of a poststimulus activation effect.

  14. Effects of a 10-Week Inspiratory Muscle Training Program on Lower-Extremity Mobility in People with Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Fry, Donna

    2011-01-01

    Pulmonary muscle weakness is common in ambulatory people with multiple sclerosis (MS) and may lead to deficits in mobility function. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of a 10-week home-based exercise program using an inspiratory muscle threshold trainer (IMT) on the results of four lower-extremity physical performance tests in people with MS. The study design was a two-group (experimental-control), pretest-posttest study. Outcome measures consisted of pulmonary function measures including maximal inspiratory pressure (MIP), maximal expiratory pressure (MEP), and maximal voluntary ventilation (MVV), and the following lower-extremity physical performance measures: the 6-Minute Walk (6MW) distance, gait velocity (GV), the Sit-to-Stand Test (SST), the Functional Stair Test (FST), and a balance test (BAL). A total of 46 ambulatory participants (Expanded Disability Status Scale [EDSS] score, 2.0–6.5) with MS were randomly assigned to an intervention group (mean EDSS score, 4.1) that received 10 weeks of home-based inspiratory muscle training or a nontreatment control group (mean EDSS score, 3.2). Of the original 46 participants, 20 intervention group participants and 19 control group participants completed the study. Compared with the control group, the intervention group made significantly greater gains in inspiratory muscle strength (P = .003) and timed balance scores (P = .008). A nonsignificant improvement in 6MW distance (P = .086) was also noted in the IMT-trained group as compared with the control group. This is the first study directly linking improvement in respiratory function to improvement in physical performance function in people with mild-to-moderate disability due to MS. PMID:24453703

  15. Inspiratory muscle training to facilitate weaning from mechanical ventilation: protocol for a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background In intensive care, weaning is the term used for the process of withdrawal of mechanical ventilation to enable spontaneous breathing to be re-established. Inspiratory muscle weakness and deconditioning are common in patients receiving mechanical ventilation, especially that of prolonged duration. Inspiratory muscle training could limit or reverse these unhelpful sequelae and facilitate more rapid and successful weaning. Methods This review will involve systematic searching of five electronic databases to allow the identification of randomised trials of inspiratory muscle training in intubated and ventilated patients. From these trials, we will extract available data for a list of pre-defined outcomes, including maximal inspiratory pressure, the duration of the weaning period, and hospital length of stay. We will also meta-analyse comparable results where possible, and report a summary of the available pool of evidence. Discussion The data generated by this review will be the most comprehensive answer available to the question of whether inspiratory muscle training is clinically useful in intensive care. As well as informing clinicians in the intensive care setting, it will also inform healthcare managers deciding whether health professionals with skills in respiratory therapy should be made available to provide this sort of intervention. Through the publication of this protocol, readers will ultimately be able to assess whether the review was conducted according to a pre-defined plan. Researchers will be aware that the review is underway, thereby avoid duplication, and be able to use it as a basis for planning similar reviews. PMID:21835031

  16. End-inspiratory airway occlusion: a method to assess the pressure developed by inspiratory muscles in patients with acute lung injury undergoing pressure support.

    PubMed

    Foti, G; Cereda, M; Banfi, G; Pelosi, P; Fumagalli, R; Pesenti, A

    1997-10-01

    We evaluated the end-inspiratory occlusion maneuver as a means to estimate the inspiratory effort during pressure support ventilation (PS). In nine nonobstructed acute lung injury (ALI) patients, we applied four levels of PS (0, 5, 10, 15 cm H2O) to modify the inspiratory effort. End inspiratory occlusions (2 to 3 s) were performed at the end of each experimental period by pushing the inspiratory hold button of the ventilator (Servo 900 C; Siemens, Berlin, Germany). We took the difference between the end-inspiratory occlusion plateau pressure and the airway pressure before the occlusion (PEEP + PS) as an estimate of the inspiratory effort and called it PMI (Pmusc,index). From the esophageal pressure tracing we obtained a reference measurement of the pressure developed by the inspiratory muscles at end inspiration (Pmusc,ei) and of the pressure-time product per breath (PTP/b) and per minute (PTP/min). In each patient, PMI was correlated with Pmusc,ei (p < 0.01) and PTP/b (p < 0.01). A PMI threshold of 6 cm H2O detected PTP/min < 125 cm H2O s/min with a sensitivity of 0.89 and a specificity of 0.89. We conclude that PMI is a good estimate of the pressure developed by the inspiratory muscles in ALI patients and may be used to titrate PS level. The major advantage of PMI is that it can be obtained from the ventilator display without any additional equipment.

  17. Comparison of incremental and constant load tests of inspiratory muscle endurance in COPD.

    PubMed

    Hill, K; Jenkins, S C; Philippe, D L; Shepherd, K L; Hillman, D R; Eastwood, P R

    2007-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the relative value of incremental and constant load tests in detecting changes in inspiratory muscle endurance following high-intensity inspiratory muscle training (H-IMT) in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. In total, 16 subjects (11 males; forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV(1)) 37.4+/-12.5%) underwent H-IMT. In addition, 17 subjects (11 males; FEV(1) 36.5+/-11.5%) underwent sham inspiratory muscle training (S-IMT). Training took place three times a week for 8 weeks. Baseline and post-training measurements were obtained of maximum threshold pressure sustained during an incremental load test (P(th,max)) and time breathing against a constant load (t(lim)). Breathing pattern was unconstrained. H-IMT increased P(th,max) and t(lim) relative to baseline and to any change seen following S-IMT. The effect size for P(th,max) was greater than for t(lim). Post-training tests were accompanied by changes in breathing pattern, including decreased duty cycle, which may have served to decrease inspiratory work and thereby contribute to the increase in P(th,max) and t(lim) in both groups. When assessing inspiratory muscle function in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease via tests in which the pattern of breathing is unconstrained, the current authors recommend incremental load tests be used in preference to constant load tests. However, to attribute changes in these tests to improvements in inspiratory muscle endurance, breathing pattern should be controlled.

  18. Training the inspiratory muscles improves running performance when carrying a 25 kg thoracic load in a backpack.

    PubMed

    Faghy, Mark A; Brown, Peter I

    2016-08-01

    Load carriage (LC) exercise in physically demanding occupations is typically characterised by periods of low-intensity steady-state exercise and short duration, high-intensity exercise while carrying an external mass in a backpack; this form of exercise is also known as LC exercise. This induces inspiratory muscle fatigue and reduces whole-body performance. Accordingly we investigated the effect of inspiratory muscle training (IMT, 50% maximal inspiratory muscle pressure (PImax) twice daily for six week) upon running time-trial performance with thoracic LC. Nineteen healthy males formed a pressure threshold IMT (n = 10) or placebo control group (PLA; n = 9) and performed 60 min LC exercise (6.5 km h(-1)) followed by a 2.4 km running time trial (LCTT) either side of a double-blind six week intervention. Prior to the intervention, PImax was reduced relative to baseline, post-LC and post-LCTT in both groups (pooled data: 13 ± 7% and 16 ± 8%, respectively, p < .05) and similar changes were observed post-PLA. Post-IMT only, resting PImax increased +31% (p < .05) and relative to pre-IMT was greater post-LC (+19%) and post-LCTT (+18%, p < .05), however, the relative reduction in PImax at each time point was unchanged (13 ± 11% and 17 ± 9%, respectively, p > .05). In IMT only, heart rate and perceptual responses were reduced post-LC (p < .05). Time-trial performance was unchanged post-PLA and improved 8 ± 4% after IMT (p < .05). In summary, when wearing a 25 kg backpack, IMT attenuated the cardiovascular and perceptual responses to steady-state exercise and improved high-intensity time-trial performance which we attribute in part to reduced relative work intensity of the inspiratory muscles due to improved inspiratory muscle strength. These findings have real-world implications for occupational contexts.

  19. Molecular and physiological events in respiratory muscles and blood of rats exposed to inspiratory threshold loading.

    PubMed

    Domínguez-Álvarez, Marisol; Sabaté-Brescó, Marina; Vilà-Ubach, Mònica; Gáldiz, Juan B; Alvarez, Francisco J; Casadevall, Carme; Gea, Joaquim; Barreiro, Esther

    2014-05-01

    High-intensity exercise induces oxidative stress and inflammatory events in muscles. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α may alter muscle protein metabolism or promote muscle regeneration. We hypothesized that a program of noninvasive chronic inspiratory loading of different intensities induces a differential pattern of physiological, molecular, and cellular events within rat diaphragms. Antioxidants and TNF-α blockade may influence those events. In the diaphragm, gastrocnemius, and blood of rats exposed to high-intensity inspiratory threshold loads (2 hour every 24 hours for 14 days), with and without treatment with N-acetyl cysteine or infliximab (anti-TNF-α antibody), inflammatory cells and cytokines, superoxide anion production, myogenesis markers, and muscle structure were explored. In all animals, maximum inspiratory pressure (MIP) and body weight were determined. High-intensity inspiratory loading for 2 weeks caused a decline in MIP and body weight, and in the diaphragm induced a reduction in fast-twitch fiber proportions and sizes, whereas inflammatory cells and cytokine levels, including TNF-α immunohistochemical expression, superoxide anion, internal nuclei counts, and markers of myogenesis were increased. Blockade of TNF-α improved respiratory muscle function and structure, and animal weight, and, in the diaphragm, reduced inflammatory cell numbers and superoxide anion production drastically while inducing larger increases in protein and messenger RNA levels and immunohistochemical expression of TNF-α, internal nuclei, and markers of muscle regeneration. Blunting of TNF-α also induced a reduction in blood inflammatory cytokines and superoxide anion production. We conclude that TNF-α synthesized by inflammatory cells or myofibers could have differential effects on muscle structure and function in response to chronic, noninvasive, high-intensity inspiratory threshold loading.

  20. Impact of a Behavioral-Based Intervention on Inspiratory Muscle Training Prescription by a Multidisciplinary Team

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simms, Alanna M.; Li, Linda C.; Geddes, E. Lynne; Brooks, Dina; Hoens, Alison M.; Reid, W. Darlene

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Our goal was to compare behavioral- and information-based interventions aimed at increasing prescription of inspiratory muscle training (IMT) for people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) by interdisciplinary teams during pulmonary rehabilitation (PR). Methods: Six hospital PR programs were randomly assigned to a…

  1. Effect of inspiratory muscle warm-up on submaximal rowing performance.

    PubMed

    Arend, Mati; Mäestu, Jarek; Kivastik, Jana; Rämson, Raul; Jürimäe, Jaak

    2015-01-01

    Performing inspiratory muscle warm-up might increase exercise performance. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of inspiratory muscle warm-up to submaximal rowing performance and to find if there is an effect on lactic acid accumulation and breathing parameters. Ten competitive male rowers aged between 19 and 27 years (age, 23.1 ± 3.8 years; height, 188.1 ± 6.3 cm; body mass, 85.6 ± 6.6 kg) were tested 3 times. During the first visit, maximal inspiratory pressure (MIP) assessment and the incremental rowing test were performed to measure maximal oxygen consumption and maximal aerobic power (Pamax). A submaximal intensity (90% Pamax) rowing test was performed twice with the standard rowing warm-up as test 1 and with the standard rowing warm-up and specific inspiratory muscle warm-up as test 2. During the 2 experimental tests, distance, duration, heart rate, breathing frequency, ventilation, peak oxygen consumption, and blood lactate concentration were measured. The only value that showed a significant difference between the test 1 and test 2 was breathing frequency (52.2 ± 6.8 vs. 53.1 ± 6.8, respectively). Heart rate and ventilation showed a tendency to decrease and increase, respectively, after the inspiratory muscle warm-up (p < 0.1). Despite some changes in respiratory parameters, the use of 40% MIP intensity warm-up is not suggested if the mean intensity of the competition is at submaximal level (at approximately 90% maximal oxygen consumption). In conclusion, the warm-up protocol of the respiratory muscles used in this study does not have a significant influence on submaximal endurance performance in highly trained male rowers.

  2. Inspiratory muscle fatigue after race-paced swimming is not restricted to the front crawl stroke.

    PubMed

    Lomax, Mitch; Iggleden, Colin; Tourell, Alice; Castle, Sophie; Honey, Jo

    2012-10-01

    The occurrence of inspiratory muscle fatigue (IMF) has been documented after front crawl (FC) swimming of various distances. Whether IMF occurs after other competitive swimming strokes is not known. The aim of the present study was to assess the impact of all 4 competitive swimming strokes on the occurrence of IMF after race-paced swimming and to determine whether the magnitude of IMF was related to the breathing pattern adopted and hence breathing frequency (f(b)). Eleven, nationally ranked, youth swimmers completed four 200-m swims (one in each competitive stroke) on separate occasions. The order of the swims, which consisted of FC, backstroke (BK), breaststroke (BR), and butterfly (FLY), was randomized. Maximal inspiratory mouth pressure (MIP) was assessed before (after a swimming and inspiratory muscle warm-up) and after each swim with f(b) calculated post swim from recorded data. Inspiratory muscle fatigue was evident after each 200-m swim (p < 0.05) but did not differ between the 4 strokes (range 18-21%). No relationship (p > 0.05) was observed between f(b) and the change in MIP (FC: r = -0.456; BK: r = 0.218; BR: r = 0.218; and FLY: r = 0.312). These results demonstrate that IMF occurs in response to 200-m race-paced swimming in all strokes and that the magnitude of IMF is similar between strokes when breathing is ad libitum occurring no less than 1 breath (inhalation) every third stroke.

  3. Respiratory muscle strength and training in stroke and neurology: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Pollock, Ross D; Rafferty, Ged F; Moxham, John; Kalra, Lalit

    2013-02-01

    We undertook two systematic reviews to determine the levels of respiratory muscle weakness and effects of respiratory muscle training in stroke patients. Two systematic reviews were conducted in June 2011 using a number of electronic databases. Review 1 compared respiratory muscle strength in stroke and healthy controls. Review 2 was expanded to include randomized controlled trials assessing the effects of respiratory muscle training on stroke and other neurological conditions. The primary outcomes of interest were maximum inspiratory and expiratory mouth pressure (maximum inspiratory pressure and maximum expiratory pressure, respectively). Meta-analysis of four studies revealed that the maximum inspiratory pressure and maximum expiratory pressure were significantly lower (P < 0·00001) in stroke patients compared with healthy individuals (weighted mean difference -41·39 and -54·62 cmH(2) O, respectively). Nine randomized controlled trials indicate a significantly (P = 0·0009) greater effect of respiratory muscle training on maximum inspiratory pressure in neurological patients compared with control subjects (weighted mean difference 6·94 cmH(2) O) while no effect on maximum expiratory pressure. Respiratory muscle strength appears to be impaired after stroke, possibly contributing to increased incidence of chest infection. Respiratory muscle training can improve inspiratory but not expiratory muscle strength in neurological conditions, although the paucity of studies in the area and considerable variability between them is a limiting factor. Respiratory muscle training may improve respiratory muscle function in neurological conditions, but its clinical benefit remains unknown.

  4. [Measurement of the reserve function of inspiratory muscle and its clinical significance].

    PubMed

    Xiao, X; Luo, Y; Chen, W; Yuan, Y; He, T; Zeng, J

    1995-06-01

    The principles of measuring inspiratory muscle tension-time index (TTim) and the ratio of the works of inspiration over the maximal works of inspiration (Wi/Wi(max)) were investigated and their formulae were deduced, i.e. TTim = (Pi x Ti)/(MIP x Ttot) and Wi/Wi(max) = (Pi x VT)/(MIP x IC). The importance of the inspiratory pressure and the maximal inspiratory pressure (MIP) measured at function residual capacity (FRC) level was emphasized. Both TTim and Wi/Wi(max) were measured in 35 normal subjects and 89 patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The results showed that normal value of TTim was 0.0253 +/- 0.0055 which corresponds to the normal value of the diaphragm tension-time index (TTdi = 0.02-0.03) reported by Bellemare. Patients with COPD had a mean TTim much higher than that of normals (P < 0.01). The works of inspiration (Wi) in patients with COPD increased, while the maximal works of inspiration (Wi(max)) declined, so Wi/Wi(max) became significantly greater than that of normals (P < 0.01). The results also showed that there was a linear relationship between Pi/Pimax and TTim or Wi/Wimax (r = 0.7891, 0.9738, 0.6459, 0.9327, P < 0.01). Therefore, we suggest that both TTim and Wi/Wimax can be used as clinical indices to reflect the reserve function of inspiratory muscles.

  5. Effects of inspiratory muscle training on exercise capacity and spontaneous physical activity in elderly subjects: a randomized controlled pilot trial.

    PubMed

    Aznar-Lain, S; Webster, A L; Cañete, S; San Juan, A F; López Mojares, L M; Pérez, M; Lucia, A; Chicharro, J L

    2007-12-01

    Inspiratory muscle training (IMT) has been shown to improve exercise capacity in diseased populations. We chose to examine the effects of eight weeks of IMT on exercise capacity and spontaneous physical activity in elderly individuals. Eighteen moderately active elderly subjects (68.1 +/- 6.8 years [mean +/- SD]; range 58 - 78 years) were randomly assigned to either an experimental group (n = 9) or a control group (n = 9) in a double-blind manner. All subjects underwent inspiratory muscle testing, treadmill exercise testing and a four-day measurement period of spontaneous physical activity (using accelerometry) both pre- and post-intervention. The experimental group underwent eight weeks of incremental IMT using a pressure threshold device, while the control group underwent sham training using identical devices. After IMT training, inspiratory muscle strength (mean + 21.5 cm H (2)O; 95 % CI: 9.3, 33.7; p = 0.002), V.O (2peak) (+ 2.8 ml x min (-1) x kg (-1); 95 % CI: 0.5, 5.2; p = 0.022), time to exhaustion during a fixed workload treadmill test (+ 7.1 min; 95 % CI: 1.8, 2.4; p = 0.013) and time engaged in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (+ 59 min; 95 % CI: 15, 78; p = 0.008) improved. Except for a decline in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity, no significant changes were seen in the control group. Therefore, IMT may be a useful technique for positively influencing exercise capacity and physical activity in elderly individuals.

  6. Effect of acute inflation on the mechanics of the inspiratory muscles.

    PubMed

    De Troyer, André; Wilson, Theodore A

    2009-07-01

    When the lung is inflated acutely, the capacity of the diaphragm to generate pressure, in particular pleural pressure (Ppl), is impaired because the muscle during contraction is shorter and generates less force. At very high lung volumes, the pressure-generating capacity of the diaphragm may be further reduced by an increase in the muscle radius of curvature. Lung inflation similarly impairs the pressure-generating capacity of the inspiratory intercostal muscles, both the parasternal intercostals and the external intercostals. In contrast to the diaphragm, however, this adverse effect is largely related to the orientation and motion of the ribs, rather than the ability of the muscles to generate force. During combined activation of the two sets of muscles, the change in Ppl is larger than during isolated diaphragm activation, and this added load on the diaphragm reduces the shortening of the muscle and increases muscle force. In addition, activation of the diaphragm suppresses the cranial displacement of the passive diaphragm that occurs during isolated intercostal contraction and increases the respiratory effect of the intercostals. As a result, the change in Ppl generated during combined diaphragm-intercostal activation is greater than the sum of the pressures generated during separate muscle activation. Although this synergistic interaction becomes particularly prominent at high lung volumes, lung inflation, either bilateral or unilateral, places a substantial stress on the inspiratory muscle pump.

  7. Inspiratory muscle training during pulmonary rehabilitation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: A randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Beaumont, M; Mialon, P; Le Ber-Moy, C; Lochon, C; Péran, L; Pichon, R; Gut-Gobert, C; Leroyer, C; Morelot-Panzini, C; Couturaud, F

    2015-11-01

    Although recommended by international guidelines, the benefit of inspiratory muscle training (IMT) in addition to rehabilitation remains uncertain. The objective was to demonstrate the effectiveness of IMT on dyspnea using Borg scale and multidimensional dyspnea profile questionnaire at the end of a 6-minute walk test (6MWT) in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) with preserved average maximum inspiratory pressure (PImax) of 85 cm H2O (95% of predicted (pred.) value) and admitted for a rehabilitation program in a dedicated center. In a randomized trial, comparing IMT versus no IMT in 32 COPD patients without inspiratory muscle weakness (PImax >60 cm H2O) who were admitted for pulmonary rehabilitation (PR) for 3 weeks, we evaluated the effect of IMT on dyspnea, using both Borg scale and multidimensional dyspnea profile (MDP) at the end of the 6MWT, and on functional parameters included inspiratory muscle function (PImax) and 6MWT. All testings were performed at the start and the end of PR. In unadjusted analysis, IMT was not found to be associated with an improvement of either dyspnea or PImax. After adjustment on confounders (initial Borg score) and variables of interaction (forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1)), we found a trend toward an improvement of "dyspnea sensory intensity", items from MDP and a significant improvement on the variation in the 2 items of MDP ("tight or constricted" and "breathing a lot"). In the subgroup of patients with FEV1 < 50% pred., 5 items of MDP were significantly improved, whereas no benefit was observed in patients with FEV1 > 50% pred. IMT did not significantly improve dyspnea or functional parameter in COPD patients with PImax > 60 cm H2O. However, in the subgroup of patients with FEV1 < 50% pred., MDP was significantly improved.

  8. Effects of concurrent inspiratory and expiratory muscle training on respiratory and exercise performance in competitive swimmers.

    PubMed

    Wells, Gregory D; Plyley, Michael; Thomas, Scott; Goodman, Len; Duffin, James

    2005-08-01

    The efficiency of the respiratory system presents significant limitations on the body's ability to perform exercise due to the effects of the increased work of breathing, respiratory muscle fatigue, and dyspnoea. Respiratory muscle training is an intervention that may be able to address these limitations, but the impact of respiratory muscle training on exercise performance remains controversial. Therefore, in this study we evaluated the effects of a 12-week (10 sessions week(-1)) concurrent inspiratory and expiratory muscle training (CRMT) program in 34 adolescent competitive swimmers. The CRMT program consisted of 6 weeks during which the experimental group (E, n = 17) performed CRMT and the sham group (S, n = 17) performed sham CRMT, followed by 6 weeks when the E and S groups performed CRMT of differing intensities. CRMT training resulted in a significant improvement in forced inspiratory volume in 1 s (FIV1.0) (P = 0.050) and forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1.0) (P = 0.045) in the E group, which exceeded the S group's results. Significant improvements in pulmonary function, breathing power, and chemoreflex ventilation threshold were observed in both groups, and there was a trend toward an improvement in swimming critical speed after 12 weeks of training (P = 0.08). We concluded that although swim training results in attenuation of the ventilatory response to hypercapnia and in improvements in pulmonary function and sustainable breathing power, supplemental respiratory muscle training has no additional effect except on dynamic pulmonary function variables.

  9. [Effect of methylphenidatum on inspiratory muscles function in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and its mechanism].

    PubMed

    Wang, Y; Luo, Y; Chen, W; Yuan, Y; He, T; Zeng, J

    1997-03-01

    To have a better understanding of the effect of methylphenidatum on inspiratory muscles function, we studied the respiratory force parameters of 70 patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease by intravenous infusion methylphenidatum in a randomized controlled clinical trial. The indices of respiratory force parameter included maximal inspiratory mouth pressure (MIP), maximal midinspiratory flow (MMIF), forced inspiratory capacity (FIC), maximal works of inspiration (Wimax) and airway occlusion pressure (P0.1), etc. Aminophylline and Nikethamidi were chosen as controls. The results showed that MIP, MMIF, FIC, Wimax, P0.1 and minute ventilation (Vr) were significantly increased after administration of methylphenidatum and aminophylline. There were no significant differences in MIP, MMIF, FIC and Wimax after administration of Nikethamidi, but P0.1 was significantly increased and the increase was higher than that after administration of methylphenidatum and aminophylline groups. We conclude that methylphenidatum can significantly improve the function of inspiratory muscles as aminophylline can do.

  10. Function of the canine inspiratory muscle pump in pleural effusion: influence of body position.

    PubMed

    Leduc, Dimitri; De Troyer, André

    2013-04-01

    Pleural effusion, a complicating feature of many diseases of the lung and pleura, adversely affects the pressure-generating capacity of the diaphragm in supine dogs. The objective of the present study was to assess the impact of body position on this effect and to evaluate the adaptation to effusion of the inspiratory muscle pump during breathing. Two experiments were performed. In the first, progressively increasing effusion was induced in anesthetized animals, and the changes in pleural (ΔPpl) and abdominal (ΔPab) pressure were measured during isolated phrenic nerve stimulation while the animals were placed in both the supine and the 45° head-up posture. In the second experiment, graded pleural effusion was also performed, and ΔPpl, ΔPab, and the electromyogram of the parasternal intercostal muscles were measured while the vagotomized animals were breathing spontaneously in the same two postures. The data showed that with effusion 1) ΔPpl during phrenic nerve stimulation was substantially lower with the animals in the head-up than in the supine posture; 2) this postural effect was primarily the result of the decrease in muscle length in the head-up posture; 3) during spontaneous breathing, however, parasternal intercostal inspiratory activity increased and ΔPpl remained unaltered while ΔPab decreased; and 4) the decrease in ΔPab and in the ΔPab/ΔPpl ratio was much larger in the head-up than in the supine posture. It is concluded that in the presence of pleural effusion, the pressure contribution of the inspiratory intercostal muscles during breathing increases and compensates for the shortening of the diaphragm, particularly in the upright posture.

  11. Short-term inspiratory muscle training potentiates the benefits of aerobic and resistance training in patients undergoing CABG in phase II cardiac rehabilitation program

    PubMed Central

    Hermes, Bárbara Maria; Cardoso, Dannuey Machado; Gomes, Tiago José Nardi; dos Santos, Tamires Daros; Vicente, Marília Severo; Pereira, Sérgio Nunes; Barbosa, Viviane Acunha; de Albuquerque, Isabella Martins

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the efficiency of short-term inspiratory muscle training program associated with combined aerobic and resistance exercise on respiratory muscle strength, functional capacity and quality of life in patients who underwent coronary artery bypass and are in the phase II cardiac rehabilitation program. Methods A prospective, quasi-experimental study with 24 patients who underwent coronary artery bypass and were randomly assigned to two groups in the Phase II cardiac rehabilitation program: inspiratory muscle training program associated with combined training (aerobic and resistance) group (GCR + IMT, n=12) and combined training with respiratory exercises group (GCR, n=12), over a period of 12 weeks, with two sessions per week. Before and after intervention, the following measurements were obtained: maximal inspiratory and expiratory pressures (PImax and PEmax), peak oxygen consumption (peak VO2) and quality of life scores. Data were compared between pre- and post-intervention at baseline and the variation between the pre- and post-phase II cardiac rehabilitation program using the Student's t-test, except the categorical variables, which were compared using the Chi-square test. Values of P<0.05 were considered statistically significant. Results Compared to GCR, the GCR + IMT group showed larger increments in PImax (P<0.001), PEmax (P<0.001), peak VO2 (P<0.001) and quality of life scores (P<0.001). Conclusion The present study demonstrated that the addition of inspiratory muscle training, even when applied for a short period, may potentiate the effects of combined aerobic and resistance training, becoming a simple and inexpensive strategy for patients who underwent coronary artery bypass and are in phase II cardiac rehabilitation. PMID:27163422

  12. Protocol: inspiratory muscle training for promoting recovery and outcomes in ventilated patients (IMPROVe): a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Leditschke, I Anne; Paratz, Jennifer D; Boots, Robert J

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Inspiratory muscle weakness is a known consequence of mechanical ventilation and a potential contributor to difficulty in weaning from ventilatory support. Inspiratory muscle training (IMT) reduces the weaning period and increases the likelihood of successful weaning in some patients. However, it is not known how this training affects the residual inspiratory muscle fatigability following successful weaning nor patients' quality of life or functional outcomes. Methods and analysis This dual centre study includes two concurrent randomised controlled trials of IMT in adult patients who are either currently ventilator-dependent (>7 days) (n=70) or have been recently weaned from mechanical ventilation (>7 days) in the past week (n=70). Subjects will be stable, alert and able to actively participate and provide consent. There will be concealed allocation to either treatment (IMT) or usual physiotherapy (including deep breathing exercises without a resistance device). Primary outcomes are inspiratory muscle fatigue resistance and maximum inspiratory pressures. Secondary outcomes are quality of life (Short Form-36v2, EQ-5D), functional status (Acute Care Index of Function), rate of perceived exertion (Borg Scale), intensive care length of stay (days), post intensive care length of stay (days), rate of reintubation (%) and duration of ventilation (days). Ethics and dissemination Ethics approval has been obtained from relevant institutions, and results will be published with a view to influencing physiotherapy practice in the management of long-term ventilator-dependent patients to accelerate weaning and optimise rehabilitation outcomes. Trial registration number ACTRN12610001089022. PMID:22389363

  13. The correlation of respiratory muscle strength and cough capacity in stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Jo, Myeong-Rae; Kim, Nan-Soo

    2016-10-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the correlation between respiratory muscle strength and cough capacity in stroke patients. [Subjects and Methods] Forty-two stroke patients were assigned to 2 different groups (intervention group=21, control group=21). Both groups participated in a conventional stroke rehabilitation program, with the intervention group also receiving respiratory muscle training for 20 to 30 minutes a day, 3 times a week for 8 weeks. Respiratory muscle strength (maximal inspiratory pressure, maximal expiratory pressure), forced vital capacity, and cough capacity were measured. [Results] The intervention group showed significant increases in maximal inspiratory pressure, maximal expiratory pressure, forced vital capacity, and cough capacity. The change in maximal inspiratory pressure, maximal expiratory pressure, and forced vital capacity showed a significant correlation with cough capacity, with maximal expiratory pressure showing the highest correlation. [Conclusion] The present study showed that the increase in maximal expiratory pressure plays an important role in improving the cough capacity of stroke patients.

  14. Influence of Inspiratory Muscle Training on Ventilatory Efficiency and Cycling Performance in Normoxia and Hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Salazar-Martínez, Eduardo; Gatterer, Hannes; Burtscher, Martin; Naranjo Orellana, José; Santalla, Alfredo

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyse the influence of inspiratory muscle training (IMT) on ventilatory efficiency, in normoxia and hypoxia, and to investigate the relationship between ventilatory efficiency and cycling performance. Sixteen sport students (23.05 ± 4.7 years; 175.11 ± 7.1 cm; 67.0 ± 19.4 kg; 46.4 ± 8.7 ml·kg−1·min−1) were randomly assigned to an inspiratory muscle training group (IMTG) and a control group (CG). The IMTG performed two training sessions/day [30 inspiratory breaths, 50% peak inspiratory pressure (Pimax), 5 days/week, 6-weeks]. Before and after the training period subjects carried out an incremental exercise test to exhaustion with gas analysis, lung function testing, and a cycling time trial test in hypoxia and normoxia. Simulated hypoxia (FiO2 = 16.45%), significantly altered the ventilatory efficiency response in all subjects (p < 0.05). Pimax increased significantly in the IMTG whereas no changes occurred in the CG (time × group, p < 0.05). Within group analyses showed that the IMTG improved ventilatory efficiency (VE/VCO2 slope; EqCO2VT2) in hypoxia (p < 0.05) and cycling time trial performance [WTTmax (W); WTTmean (W); PTF(W)] (p < 0.05) in hypoxia and normoxia. Significant correlations were not found in hypoxia nor normoxia found between ventilatory efficiency parameters (VE/VCO2 slope; LEqCO2; EqCO2VT2) and time trial performance. On the contrary the oxygen uptake efficiency slope (OUES) was highly correlated with cycling time trial performance (r = 0.89; r = 0.82; p < 0.001) under both conditions. Even though no interaction effect was found, the within group analysis may suggest that IMT reduces the negative effects of hypoxia on ventilatory efficiency. In addition, the data suggest that OUES plays an important role in submaximal cycling performance. PMID:28337149

  15. An experimental study on the impacts of inspiratory and expiratory muscles activities during mechanical ventilation in ARDS animal model

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xianming; Du, Juan; Wu, Weiliang; Zhu, Yongcheng; Jiang, Ying; Chen, Rongchang

    2017-01-01

    In spite of intensive investigations, the role of spontaneous breathing (SB) activity in ARDS has not been well defined yet and little has been known about the different contribution of inspiratory or expiratory muscles activities during mechanical ventilation in patients with ARDS. In present study, oleic acid-induced beagle dogs’ ARDS models were employed and ventilated with the same level of mean airway pressure. Respiratory mechanics, lung volume, gas exchange and inflammatory cytokines were measured during mechanical ventilation, and lung injury was determined histologically. As a result, for the comparable ventilator setting, preserved inspiratory muscles activity groups resulted in higher end-expiratory lung volume (EELV) and oxygenation index. In addition, less lung damage scores and lower levels of system inflammatory cytokines were revealed after 8 h of ventilation. In comparison, preserved expiratory muscles activity groups resulted in lower EELV and oxygenation index. Moreover, higher lung injury scores and inflammatory cytokines levels were observed after 8 h of ventilation. Our findings suggest that the activity of inspiratory muscles has beneficial effects, whereas that of expiratory muscles exerts adverse effects during mechanical ventilation in ARDS animal model. Therefore, for mechanically ventilated patients with ARDS, the demands for deep sedation or paralysis might be replaced by the strategy of expiratory muscles paralysis through epidural anesthesia. PMID:28230150

  16. An experimental study on the impacts of inspiratory and expiratory muscles activities during mechanical ventilation in ARDS animal model.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xianming; Du, Juan; Wu, Weiliang; Zhu, Yongcheng; Jiang, Ying; Chen, Rongchang

    2017-02-23

    In spite of intensive investigations, the role of spontaneous breathing (SB) activity in ARDS has not been well defined yet and little has been known about the different contribution of inspiratory or expiratory muscles activities during mechanical ventilation in patients with ARDS. In present study, oleic acid-induced beagle dogs' ARDS models were employed and ventilated with the same level of mean airway pressure. Respiratory mechanics, lung volume, gas exchange and inflammatory cytokines were measured during mechanical ventilation, and lung injury was determined histologically. As a result, for the comparable ventilator setting, preserved inspiratory muscles activity groups resulted in higher end-expiratory lung volume (EELV) and oxygenation index. In addition, less lung damage scores and lower levels of system inflammatory cytokines were revealed after 8 h of ventilation. In comparison, preserved expiratory muscles activity groups resulted in lower EELV and oxygenation index. Moreover, higher lung injury scores and inflammatory cytokines levels were observed after 8 h of ventilation. Our findings suggest that the activity of inspiratory muscles has beneficial effects, whereas that of expiratory muscles exerts adverse effects during mechanical ventilation in ARDS animal model. Therefore, for mechanically ventilated patients with ARDS, the demands for deep sedation or paralysis might be replaced by the strategy of expiratory muscles paralysis through epidural anesthesia.

  17. Exercise-induced inspiratory muscle fatigue during swimming: the effect of race distance.

    PubMed

    Brown, Sarah; Kilding, Andrew E

    2011-05-01

    Exercise-induced inspiratory muscle fatigue (IMF) has been quantified for several sports. However, it is not yet known if, or to what extent, IMF is determined by the competition distance. The aim of the present study was to assess the influence of 3 different competitive front-crawl swimming race distances on the magnitude of IMF. Ten well-trained swimmers from a local swim team participated in the study and on separate days completed maximal 100-, 200-, and 400-m time trials (TTs). Before and after each trial, maximal inspiratory pressure (MIP) was measured and %IMF determined from pre- and post-time-trial differences in MIP. The heart rate (HR) and rate of perceived dyspnea (RPD) was also assessed. For all distances, posttrial MIP was lower than pretrial MIP, though this was only significant for 100 m (p < 0.05). There were no differences between distances for absolute posttrial MIP. The %IMF after the 100-m TT (8.2 ± 4.1%) was, however, significantly greater than the 400 m (4.9 ± 3.8%) TT (p < 0.05) but not 200-m TT. There were no differences between trials for HR or RPD (p > 0.05). There were no relationships between %IMF and mean pretrial MIP (r = -0.28, p > 0.05) or between %IMF and time for any TT (100 m, r = 0.25; 200 m, r = 0.34; 400 m r = 0.18; p > 0.05). The lack of difference between trials for posttrial absolute MIP suggests that race distance during swimming does not substantially influence the degree of IMF.

  18. Reference Values for Inspiratory Muscle Endurance in Healthy Children and Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Woszezenki, Cristhiele Taís; Heinzmann-Filho, João Paulo; Vendrusculo, Fernanda Maria; Piva, Taila Cristina; Levices, Isadora; Donadio, Márcio Vinícius Fagundes

    2017-01-01

    Aims To generate reference values for two inspiratory muscle endurance (IME) protocols in healthy children and adolescents. Materials and methods This is an observational, cross-sectional study, in healthy children and adolescents from 4 to 18 years of age. Weight, height, maximal inspiratory pressure (MIP) and IME were measured using two protocols. A fixed load of 30% of MIP with a 10% increment every 2 minutes was used in the incremental threshold loading protocol. As for the maximal loading protocol, a fixed load of 70% of MIP was used and the time limit (Tlim) achieved until fatigue was measured. Results A total of 462 participants were included, 281 corresponding to the incremental loading protocol and 181 to maximal loading. There were moderate and positive correlations between IME and age, MIP, weight and height in the incremental threshold loading. However, the regression model demonstrated that MIP and age were the best variables to predict the IME. Otherwise, weak and positive correlations with age, weight and height were found in the maximal loading. Only age and height influenced endurance in the regression model. The predictive power (r2) of the incremental threshold loading protocol was 0.65, while the maximal loading was 0.15. The reproducibility measured by the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) was higher in the incremental loading (0.96) compared to the maximal loading test (0.69). Conclusion IME in healthy children and adolescents can be explained by age, height and MIP. The incremental threshold loading protocol showed more reliable results and should be the model of choice to evaluate IME in the pediatric age group. PMID:28122012

  19. The 400- and 800-m Track Running Induces Inspiratory Muscle Fatigue in Trained Female Middle-Distance Runners.

    PubMed

    Ohya, Toshiyuki; Yamanaka, Ryo; Hagiwara, Masahiro; Oriishi, Marie; Suzuki, Yasuhiro

    2016-05-01

    Inspiratory muscle fatigue (IMF) may limit exercise performance. A few studies have reported that IMF occurs after short-duration swimming exercise, but whether short-duration running can induce IMF remains unclear. Intra-abdominal pressure is increased during running through diaphragmatic activation to stabilize the spine during movements of the upper limbs. This occurs along with the increased inspiratory muscle effort associated with increased respirations during exercise; thus, we hypothesized that short-duration running exercise would induce IMF. To test this hypothesis, we measured maximal inspiratory pressure (MIP) before and after 400- and 800-m track running sessions. Eight female middle-distance (400, 800 m) runners performed a 400- and 800-m running test. Maximal inspiratory pressure was measured before and after each test using a portable autospirometer. The mean MIPs were significantly lower after running than before running; values obtained were 107 ± 25 vs. 97 ± 27 cmH2O (p = 0.01, effect size [ES] = 0.65) and 108 ± 26 vs. 92 ± 27 cmH2O (p = 0.01, ES = 0.74) before vs. after the 400- and 800-m tests, respectively. The mean MIP after the 800-m test was significantly lower than after the 400-m test (p = 0.04, ES = 0.48). There was no correlation between IMF value and running time (r = 0.53 and r = -0.28 for either the 400- and 800-m tests, respectively; p > 0.05). In conclusion, IMF occurs after short-duration running exercise. Coaches could consider prescribing inspiratory muscle training or warm-up in an effort to reduce the inevitable IMF associated with maximal effort running.

  20. Transdiaphragmatic pressure and neural respiratory drive measured during inspiratory muscle training in stable patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Weiliang; Zhang, Xianming; Lin, Lin; Ou, Yonger; Li, Xiaoying; Guan, Lili; Guo, Bingpeng; Zhou, Luqian; Chen, Rongchang

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Inspiratory muscle training (IMT) is a rehabilitation therapy for stable patients with COPD. However, its therapeutic effect remains undefined due to the unclear nature of diaphragmatic mobilization during IMT. Diaphragmatic mobilization, represented by transdiaphragmatic pressure (Pdi), and neural respiratory drive, expressed as the corrected root mean square (RMS) of the diaphragmatic electromyogram (EMGdi), both provide vital information to select the proper IMT device and loads in COPD, therefore contributing to the curative effect of IMT. Pdi and RMS of EMGdi (RMSdi%) were measured and compared during inspiratory resistive training and threshold load training in stable patients with COPD. Patients and methods Pdi and neural respiratory drive were measured continuously during inspiratory resistive training and threshold load training in 12 stable patients with COPD (forced expiratory volume in 1 s ± SD was 26.1%±10.2% predicted). Results Pdi was significantly higher during high-intensity threshold load training (91.46±17.24 cmH2O) than during inspiratory resistive training (27.24±6.13 cmH2O) in stable patients with COPD, with P<0.01 for each. Significant difference was also found in RMSdi% between high-intensity threshold load training and inspiratory resistive training (69.98%±16.78% vs 17.26%±14.65%, P<0.01). Conclusion We concluded that threshold load training shows greater mobilization of Pdi and neural respiratory drive than inspiratory resistive training in stable patients with COPD. PMID:28280321

  1. Effect of inspiratory muscle training on respiratory capacity and walking ability with subacute stroke patients: a randomized controlled pilot trial.

    PubMed

    Jung, Kyeong-Man; Bang, Dae-Hyouk

    2017-02-01

    [Purpose] To investigate the effects of inspiratory muscle training on respiratory capacity and walking ability in subacute stroke patients. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were randomly assigned to an experimental group (n=6) or a control group (n=6). Patients in the experimental group received inspiratory muscle training for 30 minutes (six sets of five-minutes) and traditional physical therapy once a day, five days a week, for four weeks. The control group received aerobic exercise for 30 minutes and traditional physical therapy for 30 minutes a day, five days a week, for four weeks. [Results] After the intervention, both groups showed significant improvements in the forced vital capacity, forced expiratory volume in one second, 10-meter walking test, and six-minute walking test over the baseline results. There were significant between-group differences for the forced vital capacity, forced expiratory volume in one second, and six-minute walking test. No statistically significant differences were observed for measures of saturation pulse oximetry oxygen and 10-meter walking test between the groups. [Conclusion] These findings gave some indications that inspiratory muscle training may benefit in patients with subacute stroke, and it is feasible to be included in rehabilitation program with this population.

  2. Effect of inspiratory muscle training on respiratory capacity and walking ability with subacute stroke patients: a randomized controlled pilot trial

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Kyeong-Man; Bang, Dae-Hyouk

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] To investigate the effects of inspiratory muscle training on respiratory capacity and walking ability in subacute stroke patients. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were randomly assigned to an experimental group (n=6) or a control group (n=6). Patients in the experimental group received inspiratory muscle training for 30 minutes (six sets of five-minutes) and traditional physical therapy once a day, five days a week, for four weeks. The control group received aerobic exercise for 30 minutes and traditional physical therapy for 30 minutes a day, five days a week, for four weeks. [Results] After the intervention, both groups showed significant improvements in the forced vital capacity, forced expiratory volume in one second, 10-meter walking test, and six-minute walking test over the baseline results. There were significant between-group differences for the forced vital capacity, forced expiratory volume in one second, and six-minute walking test. No statistically significant differences were observed for measures of saturation pulse oximetry oxygen and 10-meter walking test between the groups. [Conclusion] These findings gave some indications that inspiratory muscle training may benefit in patients with subacute stroke, and it is feasible to be included in rehabilitation program with this population. PMID:28265169

  3. Medicinal clays improve the endurance of loaded inspiratory muscles in COPD: a randomized clinical trial of nonpharmacological treatment

    PubMed Central

    Baldi, Simonetta; Pinna, Gian Domenico; Bruschi, Claudio; Caldara, Fabrizio; Maestri, Roberto; Dacosto, Elena; Rezzani, Antonella; Popovich, Ermanno; Bellinzona, Ezio; Crotti, Paola; Montemartini, Silvia; Fracchia, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    Background Inspiratory resistive breathing (IRB) challenges affect respiratory muscle endurance in healthy individuals, which is considered to be an interleukin 6 (IL-6)–dependent mechanism. Whether nonpharmacological thermal therapies promote the endurance of loaded inspiratory muscles in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is unclear. The objectives of this study were to compare the effects of two thermal interventions on endurance time (ET) and plasma IL-6 concentration following an IRB challenge. Methods This study was a randomized, parallel-group, unblinded clinical trial in a single-center setting. Forty-two patients (aged 42–76 years) suffering from mild to severe COPD participated in this study. Both groups completed 12 sessions of the mud bath therapy (MBT) (n=22) or leisure thermal activity (LTA) (n=19) in a thermal spa center in Italy. Pre- and postintervention spirometry, maximum inspiratory pressure, and plasma mediators were obtained and ET and endurance oxygen expenditure (VO2Endur) were measured following IRB challenge at 40% of maximum inspiratory pressure. Results There was no difference in ΔIL-6 between the intervention groups. But, IRB challenge increased cytokine IL-6 plasma levels systematically. The effect size was small. A statistically significant treatment by IRB challenge effect existed in ET, which significantly increased in the MBT group (P=0.003). In analysis of covariance treatment by IRB challenge analysis with LnVO2Endur as the dependent variable, ΔIL-6 after intervention predicted LnVO2Endur in the MBT group, but not in the LTA group. Adverse events occurred in two individuals in the MBT group, but they were mainly transient. One patient in the LTA group dropped out. Conclusion MBT model improves ET upon a moderate IRB challenge, indicating the occurrence of a training effect. The LnVO2Endur/ΔIL-6 suggests a physiologic adaptive mechanism in respiratory muscles of COPD patients allocated to treatment. Both thermal

  4. Inspiratory muscle training enhances pulmonary O(2) uptake kinetics and high-intensity exercise tolerance in humans.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Stephen J; Romer, Lee M; Kelly, James; Wilkerson, Daryl P; DiMenna, Fred J; Jones, Andrew M

    2010-08-01

    Fatigue of the respiratory muscles during intense exercise might compromise leg blood flow, thereby constraining oxygen uptake (Vo(2)) and limiting exercise tolerance. We tested the hypothesis that inspiratory muscle training (IMT) would reduce inspiratory muscle fatigue, speed Vo(2) kinetics and enhance exercise tolerance. Sixteen recreationally active subjects (mean + or - SD, age 22 + or - 4 yr) were randomly assigned to receive 4 wk of either pressure threshold IMT [30 breaths twice daily at approximately 50% of maximum inspiratory pressure (MIP)] or sham treatment (60 breaths once daily at approximately 15% of MIP). The subjects completed moderate-, severe- and maximal-intensity "step" exercise transitions on a cycle ergometer before (Pre) and after (Post) the 4-wk intervention period for determination of Vo(2) kinetics and exercise tolerance. There were no significant changes in the physiological variables of interest after Sham. After IMT, baseline MIP was significantly increased (Pre vs. Post: 155 + or - 22 vs. 181 + or - 21 cmH(2)O; P < 0.001), and the degree of inspiratory muscle fatigue was reduced after severe- and maximal-intensity exercise. During severe exercise, the Vo(2) slow component was reduced (Pre vs. Post: 0.60 + or - 0.20 vs. 0.53 + or - 0.24 l/min; P < 0.05) and exercise tolerance was enhanced (Pre vs. Post: 765 + or - 249 vs. 1,061 + or - 304 s; P < 0.01). Similarly, during maximal exercise, the Vo(2) slow component was reduced (Pre vs. Post: 0.28 + or - 0.14 vs. 0.18 + or - 0.07 l/min; P < 0.05) and exercise tolerance was enhanced (Pre vs. Post: 177 + or - 24 vs. 208 + or - 37 s; P < 0.01). Four weeks of IMT, which reduced inspiratory muscle fatigue, resulted in a reduced Vo(2) slow-component amplitude and an improved exercise tolerance during severe- and maximal-intensity exercise. The results indicate that the enhanced exercise tolerance observed after IMT might be related, at least in part, to improved Vo(2) dynamics, presumably as a

  5. Effects of fast expiration exercises without pressure on the respiratory muscle strength of healthy subjects

    PubMed Central

    Ishida, Hiroshi; Kuramoto, Yuri; Ikeda, Daiki; Watanabe, Susumu

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this investigation was to determine the effects of 4 weeks of fast expiration exercises performed without pressure on respiratory muscle strength. [Subjects and Methods] Respiratory muscle strength of the training group that performed fast expiration exercises (n=12) was compared with that of a control group that performed no exercises (n=12). The fast expiration exercises were performed using a peak expiratory flow meter device and consisted of 20 fast expiration exercises performed 3 times per week for 4 weeks. Maximal expiratory and inspiratory pressures were evaluated as respiratory muscle strength using a spirometer pre- and post- intervention. [Results] There were significant increases in maximal expiratory pressure from 76.9 ± 29.1 to 96.1 ± 37.5 cmH2O and maximal inspiratory pressure from 80.8 ± 36.6 to 95.3 ± 37.6 cmH2O in the training group, but there was no significant difference in respiratory muscle strength between pre- and post-intervention in the control group. [Conclusion] Fast expiration exercises may be beneficial for increasing respiratory muscle strength. The findings of this study should be considered when prescribing a variation of the expiratory muscle strength training, as part of a pulmonary rehabilitation program. PMID:27821930

  6. Pilates: Build Strength in Your Core Muscles

    MedlinePlus

    ... intimidating, but it's an accessible way to build strength in your core muscles for better posture, balance ... fanatics. It's actually an accessible way to build strength in your core muscles for better posture, balance ...

  7. Mechanical ventilation weaning in inclusion body myositis: feasibility of isokinetic inspiratory muscle training as an adjunct therapy.

    PubMed

    Cordeiro de Souza, Leonardo; Campos, Josué Felipe; Daher, Leandro Possidente; Furtado da Silva, Priscila; Ventura, Alex; do Prado, Pollyana Zamborlini; Brasil, Daniele; Mendonça, Debora; Lugon, Jocemir Ronaldo

    2014-01-01

    Inclusion body myositis is a rare myopathy associated with a high rate of respiratory complications. This condition usually requires prolonged mechanical ventilation and prolonged intensive care stay. The unsuccessful weaning is mainly related to respiratory muscle weakness that does not promptly respond to immunosuppressive therapy. We are reporting a case of a patient in whom the use of an inspiratory muscle-training program which started after a two-week period of mechanical ventilation was associated with a successful weaning in one week and hospital discharge after 2 subsequent weeks.

  8. Mechanical Ventilation Weaning in Inclusion Body Myositis: Feasibility of Isokinetic Inspiratory Muscle Training as an Adjunct Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Campos, Josué Felipe; Daher, Leandro Possidente; Ventura, Alex; do Prado, Pollyana Zamborlini; Brasil, Daniele; Mendonça, Debora; Lugon, Jocemir Ronaldo

    2014-01-01

    Inclusion body myositis is a rare myopathy associated with a high rate of respiratory complications. This condition usually requires prolonged mechanical ventilation and prolonged intensive care stay. The unsuccessful weaning is mainly related to respiratory muscle weakness that does not promptly respond to immunosuppressive therapy. We are reporting a case of a patient in whom the use of an inspiratory muscle-training program which started after a two-week period of mechanical ventilation was associated with a successful weaning in one week and hospital discharge after 2 subsequent weeks. PMID:25147743

  9. The effects of chest expansion resistance exercise on chest expansion and maximal respiratory pressure in elderly with inspiratory muscle weakness

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Chang-Beom; Yang, Jin-Mo; Choi, Jong-Duk

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to examine the effect of chest expansion resistance exercises (CERE) on chest expansion, maximal inspiratory pressure (MIP), and maximal expiratory pressure (MEP) in elderly people with inspiratory muscle weakness. [Subjects] Thirty elderly people with inspiratory muscle weakness (MIP < 80% of the predicted value) were randomly and equally assigned to a chest expansion resistance exercise (CERE) group, core conditioning exercise (CCE) group, and control group. [Methods] The intervention was applied to the CERE group and CCE group five times per week, 30 minutes each time, for six weeks. A tapeline was used to measure upper and lower chest expansion. MIP and MEP before and after the intervention were measured and compared. [Results] There was significant improvement in upper and lower chest expansion and MIP after the intervention in both the CERE group and the CCE group, whereas the control group did not show any significant difference. MEP did not significantly change in any of the three groups after the intervention. [Conclusion] The CERE group underwent greater changes than the CCE group, which proves that the CERE is more effective for improving elderly people’s chest expansion capacity and MIP in elderly people. Therefore, application of the CERE by therapists is recommended if the environment and conditions are appropriate for enhancement of chest expansion capacity and MIP in elderly people. PMID:25995570

  10. Effect of inspiratory muscle fatigue on exercise performance taking into account the fatigue-induced excess respiratory drive.

    PubMed

    Wüthrich, Thomas U; Notter, Dominic A; Spengler, Christina M

    2013-12-01

    Inspiratory muscle fatigue (IMF) is suggested to compromise exercise performance, possibly via a respiratory muscle metaboreflex that impairs blood flow to working muscles, thereby accelerating the development of fatigue in these muscles. Cycling with IMF has also been associated with an excess ventilatory response, which could per se impair performance. Therefore, the present study investigated whether prior-induced IMF would affect subsequent cycling performance via increased quadriceps muscle fatigue alone and whether fatigue-induced excess ventilation would contribute to this impairment. Fourteen healthy male subjects (peak oxygen uptake, 57.0 ± 5.5 ml min(-1) kg(-1)) cycled to exhaustion at 85% of their maximal work output with prior-induced IMF (PF-EX) and without prior-induced IMF (C-EX). Subjects then cycled twice for the duration of PF-EX but without prior IMF, once with spontaneous breathing (C-ISO) and once with breathing coached to match PF-EX ventilation (MATCH-ISO). Inspiratory muscle (P(tw)) and quadriceps muscle contractility (Q(tw)) was assessed via magnetic nerve stimulation before and after exercise. The time to exhaustion in the PF-EX conditions was significantly reduced by 14% compared with C-EX. The reduction in P(tw) and Q(tw) was greater after PF-EX (P(tw), 17.3 ± 9.7%; Q(tw), 32.0 ± 10.8%) than after MATCH-ISO (P(tw), 10.8 ± 10.3%; Q(tw), 23.3 ± 15.2%; P < 0.05), which may explain the increased perception of exertion and earlier task failure with prior-induced IMF. The augmented ventilatory drive had no effect on reductions in P(tw) and Q(tw) after MATCH-ISO compared with C-ISO. Thus, prior-induced IMF reduces exercise performance, probably as a result of the increased quadriceps muscle fatigue and thus greater perception of exertion independent of the excess respiratory drive when cycling with fatigued inspiratory muscles.

  11. Inspiratory muscle fatigue affects latissimus dorsi but not pectoralis major activity during arms only front crawl sprinting.

    PubMed

    Lomax, Mitch; Tasker, Louise; Bostanci, Ozgur

    2014-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether inspiratory muscle fatigue (IMF) affects the muscle activity of the latissimus dorsi and pectoralis major during maximal arms only front crawl swimming. Eight collegiate swimmers were recruited to perform 2 maximal 20-second arms only front crawl sprints in a swimming flume. Both sprints were performed on the same day, and IMF was induced 30 minutes after the first (control) sprint. Maximal inspiratory and expiratory mouth pressures (PImax and PEmax, respectively) were measured before and after each sprint. The median frequency (MDF) of the electromyographic signal burst was recorded from the latissimus dorsi and pectoralis major during each 20-second sprint along with stroke rate and breathing frequency. Median frequency was assessed in absolute units (Hz) and then referenced to the start of the control sprint for normalization. After IMF inducement, stroke rate increased from 56 ± 4 to 59 ± 5 cycles per minute, and latissimus dorsi MDF fell from 67 ± 11 Hz at the start of the sprint to 61 ± 9 Hz at the end. No change was observed in the MDF of the latissimus dorsi during the control sprint. Conversely, the MDF of the pectoralis major shifted to lower frequencies during both sprints but was unaffected by IMF. As the latter induced fatigue in the latissimus dorsi, which was not otherwise apparent during maximal arms only control sprinting, the presence of IMF affects the activity of the latissimus dorsi during front crawl sprinting.

  12. Inspiratory muscle training improves exercise tolerance in recreational soccer players without concomitant gain in soccer-specific fitness.

    PubMed

    Guy, Joshua H; Edwards, Andrew M; Deakin, Glen B

    2014-02-01

    This study investigated whether the addition of inspiratory muscle training (IMT) to an existing program of preseason soccer training would augment performance indices such as exercise tolerance and sports-specific performance beyond the use of preseason training alone. Thirty-one men were randomized across 3 groups: experimental (EXP: n = 12), placebo (PLA: n = 9), and control (CON: n = 10). The EXP and PLA completed a 6-week preseason program (2× weekly sessions) in addition to concurrent IMT with either an IMT load (EXP) or negligible (PLA) inspiratory resistance. Control group did not use an IMT device or undertake soccer training. All participants performed the following tests before and after the 6-week period: standard spirometry; maximal inspiratory mouth pressure (MIP); multistage fitness test (MSFT); and a soccer-specific fitness test (SSFT). After 6-weeks training, EXP significantly improved: MIP (p = 0.002); MSFT distance covered (p = 0.02); and post-SSFT blood lactate (BLa) (p = 0.04). No other outcomes from the SSFT were changed. Pre- to posttraining performance outcomes for PLA and CON were unchanged. These findings suggest the addition of IMT to preseason soccer training improved exercise tolerance (MSFT distance covered) but had little effect on soccer-specific fitness indices beyond a slightly reduced posttraining SSFT BLa. In conclusion, there may be benefit for soccer players to incorporate IMT to their preseason training but the effect is not conclusive. It is likely that a greater preseason training stimulus would be particularly meaningful for this population if fitness gains are a priority and evoke a stronger IMT response.

  13. Effect of acute inspiratory muscle exercise on blood flow of resting and exercising limbs and glucose levels in type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Corrêa, Ana Paula dos Santos; Antunes, Cristiano Fetter; Figueira, Franciele Ramos; de Castro, Marina Axmann; Ribeiro, Jorge Pinto; Schaan, Beatriz D'Agord

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the effects of inspiratory loading on blood flow of resting and exercising limbs in patients with diabetic autonomic neuropathy. Ten diabetic patients without cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy (DM), 10 patients with cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy (DM-CAN) and 10 healthy controls (C) were randomly assigned to inspiratory muscle load of 60% or 2% of maximal inspiratory pressure (PImax) for approximately 5 min, while resting calf blood flow (CBF) and exercising forearm blood flow (FBF) were measured. Reactive hyperemia was also evaluated. From the 20 diabetic patients initially allocated, 6 wore a continuous glucose monitoring system to evaluate the glucose levels during these two sessions (2%, placebo or 60%, inspiratory muscle metaboreflex). Mean age was 58 ± 8 years, and mean HbA1c, 7.8% (62 mmol/mol) (DM and DM-CAN). A PImax of 60% caused reduction of CBF in DM-CAN and DM (P<0.001), but not in C, whereas calf vascular resistance (CVR) increased in DM-CAN and DM (P<0.001), but not in C. The increase in FBF during forearm exercise was blunted during 60% of PImax in DM-CAN and DM, and augmented in C (P<0.001). Glucose levels decreased by 40 ± 18.8% (P<0.001) at 60%, but not at 2%, of PImax. A negative correlation was observed between reactive hyperemia and changes in CVR (Beta coefficient = -0.44, P = 0.034). Inspiratory muscle loading caused an exacerbation of the inspiratory muscle metaboreflex in patients with diabetes, regardless of the presence of neuropathy, but influenced by endothelial dysfunction. High-intensity exercise that recruits the diaphragm can abruptly reduce glucose levels.

  14. Quadriceps muscle strength in scoliosis.

    PubMed

    Swallow, E B; Barreiro, E; Gosker, H; Sathyapala, S A; Sanchez, F; Hopkinson, N S; Moxham, J; Schols, A; Gea, J; Polkey, M I

    2009-12-01

    Quadriceps muscle weakness is an important component of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). We hypothesised that quadriceps weakness would also be a feature of restrictive lung disease due to scoliosis. We studied 10 patients with severe scoliosis (median (interquartile range (IQR)) forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV(1))() 35.3 (11)% predicted), 10 patients with severe COPD (FEV(1) 26.5 (9.0)% pred) and 10 healthy age-matched adults. We measured quadriceps strength, exercise capacity and analysed quadriceps muscle biopsies for myosin heavy-chain (MyHC) isoform expression and the presence of oxidative stress. Both groups exhibited quadriceps weakness with median (IQR) maximal voluntary contraction force being 46.0 (17.0) kg, 21.5 (21.0) kg and 31.5 (11.0) kg, respectively (p = 0.02 and 0.04, respectively, for each patient group against controls). Oxidative stress was significantly greater in the quadriceps of both restrictive and COPD patients. The scoliosis patients exhibited a decrease in the proportion of MyHC type I compared with controls; median (IQR) 35.3 (18.5)% compared with 47.7 (9.3)%, p = 0.028. The scoliosis patients also showed an increase in MyHC IIx (26.3 (15.5)% compared with 11.3 (13.0)%, p = 0.01. Quadriceps weakness is a feature of severe scoliosis; the similarities between patients with scoliosis and patients with COPD suggest a common aetiology to quadriceps weakness in both conditions.

  15. Asymmetry of Muscle Strength in Elite Athletes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drid, Patrik; Drapsin, Miodrag; Trivic, Tatjana; Lukac, Damir; Obadov, Slavko; Milosevic, Zoran

    2009-01-01

    "Study aim": To determine muscle strength variables in elite judoists and wrestlers since thigh muscle strength and bilaterally balanced flexor-to-extensor ratio minimise injury risk and are desirable for achieving sport successes. "Material and methods": Judoists, wrestlers and untrained subjects, 10 each, were subjected to isokinetic strength…

  16. Respiratory muscle strength in the physically active elderly.

    PubMed

    Summerhill, Eleanor M; Angov, Nadia; Garber, Carol; McCool, F Dennis

    2007-12-01

    Advancing age is associated with a decline in the strength of the skeletal muscles, including those of respiration. Respiratory muscles can be strengthened with nonrespiratory activities. We therefore hypothesized that regular exercise in the elderly would attenuate this age-related decline in respiratory muscle strength. Twenty-four healthy subjects older than 65 years were recruited (11 males and 13 females). A comprehensive physical activity survey was administered, and subjects were categorized as active (n = 12) or inactive (n = 12). Each subject underwent testing of maximum inspiratory and expiratory pressures (PI(max) and PE(max)). Diaphragmatic thickness (tdi) was measured via two-dimensional B-mode ultrasound. There were no significant differences between the active and inactive groups with respect to age (75 vs. 73 years) or body weight (69.1vs. 69.9 kg). There were more women (9) than men (3) in the inactive group. Diaphragm thickness was greater in the active group (0.31 +/- 0.06 cm vs. 0.25 +/- 0.04 cm; p = 0.011). PE(max) and PI(max) were also greater in the active group (130 +/- 44 cm H(2)O vs. 80 +/- 24 cm H(2)O; p = 0.002; and 99 +/- 32 cm H(2)O vs. 75 +/- 14 cm H(2)O; p = 0.03). There was a positive association between PI(max )and tdi (r = 0.43, p = 0.03). Regular exercise was positively associated with diaphragm muscle thickness in this cohort. As PE(max) was higher in the active group, we postulate that recruitment of the diaphragm and abdominal muscles during nonrespiratory activities may be the source of this training effect.

  17. Maximal inspiratory mouth pressure in Japanese elite female athletes.

    PubMed

    Ohya, Toshiyuki; Hagiwara, Masahiro; Chino, Kentaro; Suzuki, Yasuhiro

    2017-04-01

    Maximal inspiratory mouth pressure (MIP) is a common measurement of inspiratory muscle strength, which is often used in a variety of exercises to evaluate the effects of inspiratory muscle training. The characteristics of MIP in elite female athletes remain unclear. This study aimed to determine the characteristics of MIP at rest in a variety of sport-specific elite female athletes. We also aimed to clarify if there is a sex difference of MIP in elite athletes. We studied 169 Japanese elite female athletes and 301 Japanese elite male athletes. MIP was assessed using a portable autospirometer with a handheld mouth pressure meter. Female athletes who regularly experienced exercise-induced inspiratory muscle fatigue tended to have higher MIP values. The mean absolute MIP value in females was significantly lower than that in males. However, when this value was expressed relative to body mass, this difference disappeared. Our findings provide essential information for prescribed, sport-specific, inspiratory muscle training in elite female athletes.

  18. [How I investigate...respiratory muscle disorders].

    PubMed

    Lehance, C; Close, P; Bury, Th

    2004-01-01

    As for other skeletal muscles, ventilatory muscle performance can be described in terms of strength and endurance. Ventilatory muscle strength is measured, for example, as the maximum inspiratory and expiratory mouth pressures. It is now a routine procedure in many pulmonary function laboratories. Measurements of ventilatory muscle endurance are more difficult but two general types of tests are used: maximum voluntary ventilation and inspiratory threshold loading.

  19. Chronic and acute inspiratory muscle loading augment the effect of a 6-week interval program on tolerance of high-intensity intermittent bouts of running.

    PubMed

    Tong, Tom K; Fu, Frank H; Eston, Roger; Chung, Pak-Kwong; Quach, Binh; Lu, Kui

    2010-11-01

    This study examined the hypothesis that chronic (training) and acute (warm-up) loaded ventilatory activities applied to the inspiratory muscles (IM) in an integrated manner would augment the training volume of an interval running program. This in turn would result in additional improvement in the maximum performance of the Yo-Yo intermittent recovery test in comparison with interval training alone. Eighteen male nonprofessional athletes were allocated to either an inspiratory muscle loading (IML) group or control group. Both groups participated in a 6-week interval running program consisting of 3-4 workouts (1-3 sets of various repetitions of selected distance [100-2,400 m] per workout) per week. For the IML group, 4-week IM training (30 inspiratory efforts at 50% maximal static inspiratory pressure [P0] per set, 2 sets·d-1, 6 d·wk-1) was applied before the interval program. Specific IM warm-up (2 sets of 30 inspiratory efforts at 40% P0) was performed before each workout of the program. For the control group, neither IML was applied. In comparison with the control group, the interval training volume as indicated by the repeatability of running bouts at high intensity was approximately 27% greater in the IML group. Greater increase in the maximum performance of the Yo-Yo test (control: 16.9 ± 5.5%; IML: 30.7 ± 4.7% baseline value) was also observed after training. The enhanced exercise performance was partly attributable to the greater reductions in the sensation of breathlessness and whole-body metabolic stress during the Yo-Yo test. These findings show that the combination of chronic and acute IML into a high-intensity interval running program is a beneficial training strategy for enhancing the tolerance to high-intensity intermittent bouts of running.

  20. Respiratory muscle activity and patient–ventilator asynchrony during different settings of noninvasive ventilation in stable hypercapnic COPD: does high inspiratory pressure lead to respiratory muscle unloading?

    PubMed Central

    Duiverman, Marieke L; Huberts, Anouk S; van Eykern, Leo A; Bladder, Gerrie; Wijkstra, Peter J

    2017-01-01

    Introduction High-intensity noninvasive ventilation (NIV) has been shown to improve outcomes in stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients. However, there is insufficient knowledge about whether with this more controlled ventilatory mode optimal respiratory muscle unloading is provided without an increase in patient–ventilator asynchrony (PVA). Patients and methods Ten chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients on home mechanical ventilation were included. Four different ventilatory settings were investigated in each patient in random order, each for 15 min, varying the inspiratory positive airway pressure and backup breathing frequency. With surface electromyography (EMG), activities of the intercostal muscles, diaphragm, and scalene muscles were determined. Furthermore, pressure tracings were derived simultaneously in order to assess PVA. Results Compared to spontaneous breathing, the most pronounced decrease in EMG activity was achieved with the high-pressure settings. Adding a high breathing frequency did reduce EMG activity per breath, while the decrease in EMG activity over 1 min was comparable with the high-pressure, low-frequency setting. With high backup breathing frequencies less breaths were pressure supported (25% vs 97%). PVAs occurred more frequently with the low-frequency settings (P=0.017). Conclusion High-intensity NIV might provide optimal unloading of respiratory muscles, without undue increases in PVA. PMID:28138234

  1. Relationship between chest expansion and respiratory muscle strength in patients with primary fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Ozgocmen, S; Cimen, O B; Ardicoglu, O

    2002-02-01

    In this paper the assessment of the relationship between chest expansion with maximal inspiratory (MIP) and expiratory pressures (MEP) in primary fibromyalgia (FM) syndrome is discussed. Chest expansion (CE) measurements, spirometric values, and MIP and MEP values in 30 female patients with primary FM are compared with 29 healthy age-matched female controls. Patients with FM had lower CE, MEP and MIP values than controls. CE correlated significantly with MIP and MEP values. There was no significant difference between groups in spirometric values. Our results indicate that patients with FM have impaired respiratory muscle strength, and measurement of CE may be a useful clinical parameter. Despite its limitations CE may reflect respiratory muscle strength. It is worth following up these data in a wider and controlled series, with ancillary tests in addition to the MIP and MEP.

  2. Association between respiratory muscle strength and reduction of arterial blood pressure levels after aerobic training in hypertensive subjects

    PubMed Central

    Galdino, Giovane; Silva, Andreia Maria; Bogão, José Angelo; Braz de Oliveira, Marcos Paulo; Araújo, Hayslenne Andressa Gonçalves de Oliveira; Oliveira, Maísa Sodoco; Maldonado, Ana Clara Desiderio; Ulisses de Oliveira, Herick; Borges, Juliana Bassalobre Carvalho

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of present study was associate the increase of respiratory muscle strength with blood pressure levels in hypertensive subjects who underwent an aerobic exercise program. [Subjects and Methods] 90 hypertensive subjects were divided in two groups: intervention and control. All participants had an interview with a physiotherapist and were evaluated by 6-minute walk test, maximal inspiratory pressure, maximal expiratory pressure, heart rate, systolic blood pressure and diastolic blood pressure, before and after the 8 weeks. In the intervention group, the subjects underwent aerobic exercise program, 2 times a week for 8 weeks [Results] After the program, the levels of blood pressure were significantly reduced and the distance walked in the 6-minute walk test and the respiratory muscle strength were increased, compared to pre intervention and control group values. However, there was no correlation between the results provided by 6-minute walk test, maximal inspiratory pressure and maximal expiratory pressure with systolic arterial blood pressure levels. Nonetheless, the distance walked correlated with respiratory muscle strength values, in the intervention group. [Conclusion] The present study demonstrated that the aerobic training was effective in reducing the arterial blood pressure in hypertensive subjects associated with an improvement of physical conditioning and respiratory muscle strength. PMID:28174465

  3. Human jaw muscle strength and size in relation to limb muscle strength and size.

    PubMed

    Raadsheer, M C; Van Eijden, T M G J; Van Ginkel, F C; Prahl-Andersen, B

    2004-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate to what extent general factors (e.g. genotype, hormones) and factors at the craniofacial level (e.g. craniofacial size, jaw muscle architecture) contribute to the size and strength of the jaw muscles. A strong relationship of jaw muscle size and strength with that of other muscles would argue for general influences, whereas a weak relationship would argue for craniofacial influences. In 121 adult individuals, moments of maximal bite force, arm flexion force and leg extension force were measured. In addition, thicknesses of jaw muscles, arm flexor muscles and leg extensor muscles were measured using ultrasound. Relationships were assessed by using a principal component analysis. In females, one component was found in which all force moments were represented. Bite force moment, however, loaded very low. In males, two components were found. One component loaded for arm flexion and leg extension moments, the other loaded for bite force moments. In both females and males, only one component was found for the muscle thicknesses in which all muscle groups loaded similarly. It was concluded that the size of the jaw muscles was significantly related to the size of the limb muscles, suggesting that they were both subject to the same general influences. Maximal voluntary bite force moments were not significantly related to the moments of the arm flexion and leg extension forces, suggesting that besides the general influence on the muscle size, variation in bite force moment was also influenced by local variables, such as craniofacial morphology.

  4. Single- and multiple-set resistance training improves skeletal and respiratory muscle strength in elderly women

    PubMed Central

    Abrahin, Odilon; Rodrigues, Rejane P; Nascimento, Vanderson C; Da Silva-Grigoletto, Marzo E; Sousa, Evitom C; Marçal, Anderson C

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Aging involves a progressive reduction of respiratory muscle strength as well as muscle strength. Purpose Compare the effects of resistance training volume on the maximum inspiratory pressure (MIP), maximum expiratory pressure (MEP), functional performance, and muscle strength in elderly women. Methods Thirty elderly women were randomly assigned to a group performing either single sets (1-SET) or three sets (3-SET) of exercises. The sit-to-stand test, MIP, MEP, and muscle strength were assessed before and after 24 training sessions. Progressive resistance training was performed two times per week for a total of 8–12 repetitions, using the main muscle groups of the upper and lower limbs. Results The main results showed that the participants significantly increased their MEP (P<0.05; 1-SET: 34.6%; 3-SET: 35.8%) and MIP (P<0.05; 1-SET: 13.7%; 3-SET: 11.2%). Both groups also improved in the sit-to-stand test (P<0.05; 1-SET: 10.6%; 3-SET: 17.1%). After 24 training sessions, muscle strength also significantly increased (P<0.0001; 40%–80%) in both groups. An intergroup comparison did not show any statistically significant differences between the groups in any of the parameters analyzed. Conclusion Single- and multiple-set resistance training programs increased MIP, MEP, muscle strength, and sit-to-stand test performance in elderly women after 24 sessions of training. In conclusion, our results suggested that elderly women who are not in the habit of physical activity may start with single-set resistance training programs as a short-term strategy for the maintenance of health. PMID:25342896

  5. The kinanthropometric and pulmonary determinants of global respiratory muscle strength and endurance indices in an athletic population.

    PubMed

    Kroff, Jacolene; Terblanche, Elmarie

    2010-09-01

    The morphological determinants of respiratory muscle (RM) strength and endurance in non-athletic populations are well documented, but are lacking in athletic populations. The purpose of this study was to determine the kinanthropometric and pulmonary predictors of RM strength and endurance. 160 athletes (103 men) were recruited from eight different sports to participate in the study. All subjects underwent a series of kinanthropometric and RM function assessments during a single visit to the laboratory. RM function assessments included the flow-volume curve test to assess pulmonary function, maximum voluntary ventilation (MVV) to assess RM endurance and maximum inspiratory mouth pressure (MIP) and maximum expiratory mouth pressure (MEP) to assess RM strength. Multiple regression analyses revealed that gender, mesomorphy and exercise sessions per week predicted 35% (SEE = 26.6 cmH(2)O) of the variance in inspiratory muscle strength (MIP). Gender and mesomorphy predicted 24% (SEE = 28.3 cmH(2)O) of the variance in expiratory muscle strength (MEP), while gender, relative sitting height, forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV(1)) and peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR) predicted 78% (SEE = 18.2 L min(-1)) of the variance in RM endurance (MVV). Although the reference equations are still not adequate to predict MIP and MEP in an athletic population, they provide more suitable reference values than previously reported. The predicted values derived from the equation for MVV can be applied as adequate reference values for athletic populations.

  6. Correlation of single-breath count test and neck flexor muscle strength with spirometry in myasthenia gravis

    PubMed Central

    Elsheikh, Bakri; Arnold, W. David; Gharibshahi, Shahram; Reynolds, Jerold; Freimer, Miriam; Kissel, John T.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Although formal spirometry is the gold standard for monitoring respiratory function in patients with myasthenia gravis (MG), such testing is often delayed or unavailable. There is a need for a simple bedside test that can accurately measure respiratory function. Method We conducted a prospective, cross-sectional, single-blind study in adults with acetylcholine receptor antibody positive MG. Participants performed the single breath count test (SBCT) and underwent manual muscle strength testing, while a respiratory therapist performed spirometry blinded to SBCT and strength results. Results Thirty-one patients, aged 57 ±19 years participated. SBCT showed significant correlations with forced vital capacity (FVC), negative inspiratory force (NIF), and neck flexor strength (P<0.01). FVC showed significant correlation with neck flexor strength (P=0.02) but no correlation with shoulder abductor strength. Discussion These data suggest that the SBCT and neck flexor strength testing are valuable tools for bedside assessment of respiratory function in MG patients. PMID:26437790

  7. The effects of inspiratory diaphragm breathing exercise and expiratory pursed-lip breathing exercise on chronic stroke patients’ respiratory muscle activation

    PubMed Central

    Seo, KyoChul; Hwan, Park Seung; Park, KwangYong

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study is to examine the effects of inspiratory diaphragm breathing exercise and expiratory pursed-lip breathing exercise on chronic stroke patients’ respiratory muscle activation. [Subjects and Methods] All experimental subjects performed exercises five times per week for four weeks. Thirty chronic stroke patients were randomly assign to an experimental group of 15 patients and a control group of 15 patients. The experimental group underwent exercises consisting of basic exercise treatment for 15 minutes and inspiratory diaphragm breathing exercise and expiratory pursed-lip breathing exercise for 15 minutes and the control group underwent exercises consisting of basic exercise treatment for 15 minutes and auto-med exercise for 15 minutes. The activation levels of respiratory muscles were measured before and after the experiment using MP 150WSW to obtain the results of the experiment. [Results] In the present study, when the pulmonary functions of the experimental group and the control group before and after the experiment were compared, whereas the experimental group showed significant differences in all sections. In the verification of intergroup differences between the experimental group and the control group before and after the experiment. [Conclusion] The respiratory rehabilitation exercise is considered to be capable of inducing positive effects on stroke patients’ respiratory muscles through diaphragm breathing exercise and lip puckering breathing exercise. PMID:28356632

  8. Respiratory muscle strength test: is it realistic in young children?

    PubMed Central

    Heinzmann-Filho, João Paulo; Donadio, Márcio Vinícius Fagundes

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To determine the success rate of the manovacuometry test in children between 4 and 12 years of age. Methods: Cross-sectional study involving children and adolescents from 4 to 12 years of age, enrolled in three basic education schools. All subjects had the anthropometric and respiratory muscle strength (maximum inspiratory pressure and maximum expiratory pressure) data measured. Students whose parents did not authorize participation or who did not want to undergo the test were excluded. The test was considered successful when the subject reached acceptability (no air leaks) and reproducibility (variation <10% between the two major maneuvers) criteria established by guidelines. Failure was defined when subjects did not meet the above criteria. Data were expressed as mean and standard deviation and the categorical variables in absolute and relative frequency. The comparison between proportions was performed using the chi-square test. Results: We included 196 children and adolescents, mean age of 8.4±2.5 years, 53.1% female. The success rate of the manovacuometry test in children and adolescents evaluated was 92.3%. When comparing the differences between the success rates of preschool children with those children and adolescents of school age, there was a significantly lower success rate in the pre-school (85.1%) group compared to the school group (94.6%) (p=0.032). However, no significant differences (p=0.575) were found when gender comparisons were performed. Conclusions: The manovacuometry test showed a high success rate in both preschool and school population assessed. Furthermore, the rate of success appears to be related to aging. PMID:26137867

  9. Correlation among proprioception, muscle strength, and balance.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huihui; Ji, Zhongqiu; Jiang, Guiping; Liu, Weitong; Jiao, Xibian

    2016-12-01

    [Purpose] To study the correlation among proprioception, muscle strength, and balance. [Subjects and Methods] A balance testing system (Biodex Balance System, BBS) and an isokinetic testing system (Biodex System 4, BS4) were used to test related indexes in 24 healthy young females. [Results] With the knee joint at 15 degree flexion, proprioception was significantly correlated with Limits of Stability-Time values, and was highly significantly correlated with Limits of Stability-Overall and Athlete Single Leg Medial/Lateral values. The sense of force was significantly correlated with Limits of Stability-Overall and Athlete Single Leg-Overall values. Quadriceps strength was significantly associated with Limits of Stability-Overall, Athlete Single Leg Medial/Lateral, and Athlete Double Leg-Overall values. The ratio of Quadriceps to Hamstring strength was significantly correlated with Athlete Single Leg Medial/Lateral, and Athlete Single Leg-Overall values. With the knee joint at 45°, proprioception was highly significantly correlated with dynamic balance, and was significantly correlated with double foot support under static balance; force sense had a high correlation with Limits of Stability-Overall, but no correlation with other indexes. Quadriceps strength had a significant correlation with dynamic and static balance; the ratio of Quadriceps/Hamstring had a highly significant correlation with Limits of Stability-Overall, Athlete Single Leg-Anterior/Posterior and Athlete Single Leg-Overall. [Conclusion] At different knee angles, the correlation differs among proprioception, force sense, quadriceps strength, the Quadriceps/Hamstring ratio, and balance.

  10. Effect of upper extremity proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation combined with elastic resistance bands on respiratory muscle strength: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Areas, Guilherme P. T.; Borghi-Silva, Audrey; Lobato, Arianne N.; Silva, Alessandra A.; Freire, Renato C.; Areas, Fernando Z. S.

    2013-01-01

    Background Elastic resistance bands (ERB) combined with proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF) are often used in resistance muscle training programs, which have potential effects on peripheral muscle strength. However, the effects of the combination of ERB and PNF on respiratory muscle strength warrant further investigation. Objectives The assessment of the effects of PNF combined with ERB on respiratory muscle strength. Method Twenty healthy, right-handed females were included. Subjects were randomized to either the resistance training program group (TG, n=10) or the control group (CG, n=10). Maximal expiratory pressure (MEP) and inspiratory pressure (MIP) were measured before and after four weeks of an upper extremity resistance training program. The training protocol consisted of upper extremity PNF combined with ERB, with resistance selected from 1 repetition maximum protocol. Results PNF combined with ERB showed significant increases in MIP and MEP (p<0.05). In addition, there were significant differences between the TG and CG regarding ∆MIP (p=0.01) and ∆MEP (p=0.04). Conclusions PNF combined with ERB can have a positive impact on respiratory muscle strength. These results may be useful with respect to cardiopulmonary chronic diseases that are associated with reduced respiratory muscle strength. PMID:24346292

  11. Inspiratory Muscle Training and Functional Electrical Stimulation for Treatment of Heart Failure With Preserved Ejection Fraction: Rationale and Study Design of a Prospective Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Palau, Patricia; Domínguez, Eloy; López, Laura; Heredia, Raquel; González, Jessika; Ramón, Jose María; Serra, Pilar; Santas, Enrique; Bodi, Vicente; Sanchis, Juan; Chorro, Francisco J; Núñez, Julio

    2016-08-01

    Heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) has become the most prevalent form of heart failure in developed countries. Regrettably, there is no evidence-based effective therapy for HFpEF. We seek to evaluate whether inspiratory muscle training, functional electrical stimulation, or a combination of both can improve exercise capacity as well as left ventricular diastolic function, biomarker profile, quality of life (QoL), and prognosis in patients with HFpEF. A total of 60 stable symptomatic patients with HFpEF (New York Heart Association class II-III/IV) will be randomized (1:1:1:1) to receive a 12-week program of inspiratory muscle training, functional electrical stimulation, a combination of both, or standard care alone. The primary endpoint of the study is change in peak exercise oxygen uptake; secondary endpoints are changes in QoL, echocardiogram parameters, and prognostic biomarkers. As of March 21, 2016, thirty patients have been enrolled. Searching for novel therapies that improve QoL and autonomy in the elderly with HFpEF has become a health care priority. We believe that this study will add important knowledge about the potential utility of 2 simple and feasible physical interventions for the treatment of advanced HFpEF.

  12. Sniff Nasal Inspiratory Pressure Does Not Decrease in Elderly Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chien-Hui; Yang, Gee-Gwo; Chen, Tung-Wei

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] Measurements of inspiratory strength are critical for detecting inspiratory muscle weakness. Sniff nasal inspiratory pressure (SNIP) is a quick, noninvasive measurement of global inspiratory strength; however, it is not clear how many trials are needed for reliable measurements. [Subjects and Methods] One hundred and nineteen subjects (age 39.9±16.5, range 18–69 yrs) completed the study. They were divided into subgroups of different ages and gender. Subjects were asked to take 20 maximal sniffs after normal expiration, with 30 seconds rest in-between. The highest values among the first 10 and last 10 SNIP maneuvers were recorded as SNIP1-10, and SNIP11-20, respectively. The paired t-test was used to compare the differences. Two-way measures ANOVA was used to compare the effects of age and gender on SNIP. [Results] SNIP 11–20 was significantly greater than SNIP1–10, suggesting that 10 trials is not enough to eliminate learning effects. Age did not affect SNIP in either gender, suggesting SNIP is preserved. In stepwise multiple linear regression analysis, the SNIP values were positively related with body mass index in women and positively related with weight in men. [Conclusion] The results suggest that twenty trials are needed for reliable SNIP measurements. The mean value and lower limits of normal SNIP are provided for clinical comparison. PMID:25276047

  13. Respiratory and skeletal muscle strength in COPD: Impact on exercise capacity and lower extremity function

    PubMed Central

    Singer, Jonathan; Yelin, Edward H.; Katz, Patricia P.; Sanchez, Gabriela; Iribarren, Carlos; Eisner, Mark D.; Blanc, Paul D.

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE We sought to quantify the impact of respiratory muscle and lower extremity strength on exercise capacity and lower extremity function in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). METHODS In 828 persons with COPD, we assessed the impact of reduced respiratory (maximum inspiratory pressure, MIP) and lower extremity muscle strength (quadriceps, QS) on exercise capacity (6 Minute Walk Distance, 6MWT) and lower extremity function (LEF, Short Physical Performance Battery). Multiple regression analyses taking into account key covariates, including lung function and smoking, tested the associations between muscle strength and exercise and functional capacity. RESULTS For each ½ standard deviation (0.5 SD) decrement in QS, men walked 18.3 meters less during 6MWT (95% CI −24.1 to −12.4); women 25.1 meters less (95% CI −31.1 to −12.4). For each 0.5 SD decrement in MIP, men walked 9.4 meters less during 6MWT (95% CI – 15.2 to −3.6); women 8.7 meters less (95% CI −14.1 to −3.4). For each 0.5 SD decrease in QS, men had a 1.32 higher odds (95% CI: 1.11 to 1.15) of poor LEF; women, 1.87 higher odds (95% CI: 1.54 to 2.27). Lower MIP (per 0.5 SD) was associated with increased odds of poor LEF in women (OR 1.18, 95% CI: 1.00 to 1.39), but not in men (OR 1.10, 95% CI: 0.93 to 1.31). CONCLUSION In COPD, reduced respiratory and lower extremity muscle strength are associated with decreased exercise and functional capacity. Muscle weakness is likely an important component of impairment and disability in patients with COPD. PMID:21240003

  14. Correlation among proprioception, muscle strength, and balance

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Huihui; Ji, Zhongqiu; Jiang, Guiping; Liu, Weitong; Jiao, Xibian

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] To study the correlation among proprioception, muscle strength, and balance. [Subjects and Methods] A balance testing system (Biodex Balance System, BBS) and an isokinetic testing system (Biodex System 4, BS4) were used to test related indexes in 24 healthy young females. [Results] With the knee joint at 15 degree flexion, proprioception was significantly correlated with Limits of Stability-Time values, and was highly significantly correlated with Limits of Stability-Overall and Athlete Single Leg Medial/Lateral values. The sense of force was significantly correlated with Limits of Stability-Overall and Athlete Single Leg-Overall values. Quadriceps strength was significantly associated with Limits of Stability-Overall, Athlete Single Leg Medial/Lateral, and Athlete Double Leg-Overall values. The ratio of Quadriceps to Hamstring strength was significantly correlated with Athlete Single Leg Medial/Lateral, and Athlete Single Leg-Overall values. With the knee joint at 45°, proprioception was highly significantly correlated with dynamic balance, and was significantly correlated with double foot support under static balance; force sense had a high correlation with Limits of Stability-Overall, but no correlation with other indexes. Quadriceps strength had a significant correlation with dynamic and static balance; the ratio of Quadriceps/Hamstring had a highly significant correlation with Limits of Stability-Overall, Athlete Single Leg-Anterior/Posterior and Athlete Single Leg-Overall. [Conclusion] At different knee angles, the correlation differs among proprioception, force sense, quadriceps strength, the Quadriceps/Hamstring ratio, and balance. PMID:28174475

  15. Autism Severity and Muscle Strength: A Correlation Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kern, Janet K.; Geier, David A.; Adams, James B.; Troutman, Melissa R.; Davis, Georgia; King, Paul G.; Young, John L.; Geier, Mark R.

    2011-01-01

    The current study examined the relationship between muscle strength, as measured by hand grip strength, and autism severity, as measured by the Childhood Autism Rating Scale (CARS). Thirty-seven (37) children with a diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) were evaluated using the CARS and then tested for hand muscle strength using a hand grip…

  16. Inspiratory resistive loading improves cycling capacity: a placebo controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Gething, A; Williams, M; Davies, B

    2004-01-01

    Background: Respiratory muscle training has been shown to improve both its strength and endurance. The effect of these improvements on whole-body exercise performance remains controversial. Objective: To assess the effect of a 10 week inspiratory resistive loading (IRL) intervention on respiratory muscle performance and whole-body exercise endurance. Methods: Fifteen apparently healthy subjects (10 men, 5 women) were randomly allocated to one of three groups. One group underwent IRL set at 80% of maximum inspiratory pressure with ever decreasing work/rest ratios until task failure, for three days a week for 10 weeks (IRL group). A second placebo group performed the same training procedure but with a minimal resistance (PLA group). IRL and placebo training were performed at rest. The remaining five control subjects performed no IRL during the 10 week study period (CON group). Cycling endurance capacity at 75% V·O2peak was measured before and after the intervention. Results: After the 10 week IRL intervention, respiratory muscle strength (maximum inspiratory pressure) and endurance (sum of sustained maximum inspiratory pressure) had significantly improved (by 34% and 38% respectively). An increase in diaphragm thickness was also observed. These improvements translated into a 36% increase in cycling time to exhaustion at 75% V·O2peak. During cycling trials, heart rate, ventilation, and rating of perceived exertion were attenuated in the IRL group. No changes were observed for the PLA or CON group either in the time to exhaustion or cardiorespiratory response to the same intensity of exercise. Conclusion: Ten weeks of IRL attenuated the heart rate, ventilatory, and perceptual response to constant workload exercise, and improved the cycling time to exhaustion. Familiarisation was not a factor and the placebo effect was minimal. PMID:15562168

  17. Sensible manual muscle strength testing to evaluate and monitor strength of the intrinsic muscles of the hand: a commentary.

    PubMed

    Brandsma, J W; Schreuders, T A

    2001-01-01

    Hand therapists often assess, evaluate, and monitor the status of, and changes in the strength of, the intrinsic muscles of the hand. Some common indications are peripheral and central neuropathies and nerve lacerations and repairs. The therapist will often use a muscle chart that lists all the muscles innervated by the ulnar and median nerves, and all muscles will be tested. Not all muscles in the hand can be sufficiently isolated to grade their strength, nor is it always necessary to test all muscles innervated by a particular nerve to evaluate the presence or extent of motor function impairment or monitor changes. This paper discusses the tests by which changes in strength of the ulnar and median innervated intrinsic muscles can be assessed and the reasons that certain muscles cannot or need not be tested. Information about the reliability of muscle testing is also given.

  18. Effects of muscle extension strength exercise on trunk muscle strength and stability of patients with lumbar herniated nucleus pulposus

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Kyoungkyu; Kim, Taeyoung; Lee, Sang-Ho

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to provide the data for constructing an integrated exercise program to help restore muscle strength and stability through extension strength exercise in adult females with lumbar disc herniation. [Subjects and Methods] An 8-week exercise program for lumbar muscle extension strength and stabilization was performed by 26 females older than 20 with lumbar disc herniation findings. [Results] Significant differences were found in lumbar extension muscle strength at every angle of lumbar flexion after participation in the 8-week stabilization exercise program; but there was no significant difference in the weight distribution index. [Conclusion] An integrated exercise program aiming to strengthen lumbar spine muscles, reduce pain and stabilize the trunk can help to maintain muscle strength and balance. In addition, improvement in extension strength is expected to be helpful in daily life by securing the range of joint motion and improving the strength and stability. PMID:27313342

  19. Strategies for Optimizing Strength, Power, and Muscle Hypertrophy in Women.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-09-01

    accretion and turnover that is needed for muscle hypertrophy and involves "cleaning up" the cell from the exercise -induced damage associated with...AD CONTRACT NUMBER DAMD17-95-C-5069 TITLE: Strategies for Optimizing Strength, Power, and Muscle Hypertrophy in Women PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR...DATES COVERED Annual (21 Aug 96 - 20 Aug 97) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Strategies for Optimizing Strength, Power, and Muscle Hypertrophy in Women 6

  20. Objective Evaluation of Muscle Strength in Infants with Hypotonia and Muscle Weakness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reus, Linda; van Vlimmeren, Leo A.; Staal, J. Bart; Janssen, Anjo J. W. M.; Otten, Barto J.; Pelzer, Ben J.; Nijhuis-van der Sanden, Maria W. G.

    2013-01-01

    The clinical evaluation of an infant with motor delay, muscle weakness, and/or hypotonia would improve considerably if muscle strength could be measured objectively and normal reference values were available. The authors developed a method to measure muscle strength in infants and tested 81 typically developing infants, 6-36 months of age, and 17…

  1. Generalization of Muscle Strength Capacities as Assessed From Different Variables, Tests, and Muscle Groups.

    PubMed

    Cuk, Ivan; Prebeg, Goran; Sreckovic, Sreten; Mirkov, Dragan M; Jaric, Slobodan

    2017-02-01

    Cuk, I, Prebeg, G, Sreckovic, S, Mirkov, DM, and Jaric, S. Generalization of muscle strength capacities as assessed from different variables, tests, and muscle groups. J Strength Cond Res 31(2): 305-312, 2017-The muscle strength capacities to exert force under various movement conditions have been indiscriminately assessed from various strength tests and variables applied on different muscles. We tested the hypotheses that the distinctive strength capacities would be revealed (H1) through different strength tests, and (H2) through different strength variables. Alternatively, (H3) all strength variables independent of the selected test could depict the same strength capacity of the tested muscle. Sixty subjects performed both the standard strength test and the test of alternating contractions of 6 pairs of antagonistic muscles acting in different leg and arm joints. The dependent variables obtained from each test and muscle were the maximum isometric force and the rate of force development. A confirmatory principle component analysis set to 2 factors explained 31.9% of the total variance. The factor loadings discerned between the tested arm and leg muscles, but not between the strength tests and variables. An exploratory analysis applied on the same data revealed 6 factors that explained 60.1% of the total variance. Again, the individual factors were mainly loaded by different tests and variables obtained from the same pair of antagonistic muscles. Therefore, a comprehensive assessment of the muscle strength capacity of the tested individual should be based on a single strength test and variable obtained from a number of different muscles, than on a single muscle tested through different tests and variables. The selected muscles should act in different limbs and joints, while the maximum isometric force should be the variable of choice.

  2. The effects of inspiratory muscle training on plasma interleukin-6 concentration during cycling exercise and a volitional mimic of the exercise hyperpnea.

    PubMed

    Mills, Dean E; Johnson, Michael A; McPhilimey, Martin J; Williams, Neil C; Gonzalez, Javier T; Barnett, Yvonne A; Sharpe, Graham R

    2013-10-15

    It is unknown whether the respiratory muscles contribute to exercise-induced increases in plasma interleukin-6 (IL-6) concentration, if this is related to diaphragm fatigue, and whether inspiratory muscle training (IMT) attenuates the plasma IL-6 response to whole body exercise and/or a volitional mimic of the exercise hyperpnea. Twelve healthy males were divided equally into an IMT or placebo (PLA) group, and before and after a 6-wk intervention they undertook, on separate days, 1 h of 1) passive rest, 2) cycling exercise at estimated maximal lactate steady state power (EX), and 3) volitional hyperpnea at rest, which mimicked the breathing and respiratory muscle recruitment patterns achieved during EX (HYPEX). Plasma IL-6 concentration remained unchanged during passive rest. The plasma IL-6 response to EX was reduced following IMT (main effect of intervention, P = 0.039) but not PLA (P = 0.272). Plasma IL-6 concentration increased during HYPEX (main effect of time, P < 0.01) and was unchanged postintervention. There was no evidence of diaphragm fatigue (measured by phrenic nerve stimulation) following each trial. In conclusion, plasma IL-6 concentration is increased during EX and HYPEX and this occurred in the absence of diaphragm fatigue. Furthermore, IMT reduced the plasma IL-6 response to EX but not HYPEX. These findings suggest that the respiratory muscles contribute to exercise-induced increases in plasma IL-6 concentration in the absence of diaphragm fatigue and that IMT can reduce the magnitude of the response to exercise but not a volitional mimic of the exercise hyperpnea.

  3. Evaluation of rotator cuff muscle strength in healthy individuals

    PubMed Central

    Cortez, Paulo José Oliveira; Tomazini, José Elias

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare the strength generated by the rotator muscles of the shoulder joint between the right upper limb and left upper limb among healthy individuals. METHODS: To evaluate the muscle strength of upper limbs from isometric contractions in the horizontal direction (rotation) an isometric dynamometer was used, equipped with transducers, signal conditioning, a data acquisition board, and finally, a computer. Study participants were 22 male military subjects, aged between 18 and 19 years old, body mass between 57.7 and 93.0 kg (71.8 ± 9.45 kg) and height between 1.67 and 1.90 m (1.75 ± 0.06 m), healthy and without clinical diseases or any type of orthopedic injury in the muscle skeletal system. RESULTS: The internal rotation in the right upper limb (RUL) was higher than the average strength of internal rotation in the left upper limb (LUL) (p = 0.723). The external rotation strength in RUL was lower than the average strength of external rotation in the LUL (p=0.788). No statistical difference was observed by comparing the strength values of all isometric strength tests. CONCLUSION: For the sample and methodology used to assess muscle strength, there was no statistical difference between the strength generated by the muscles of the rotator cuff of the right and left upper limbs. Experimental Study. PMID:26207091

  4. Twitch mouth pressure for detecting respiratory muscle weakness in suspicion of neuromuscular disorder.

    PubMed

    Santos, Dante Brasil; Desmarais, Gilbert; Falaize, Line; Ogna, Adam; Cognet, Sandrine; Louis, Bruno; Orlikowski, David; Prigent, Hélène; Lofaso, Frédéric

    2017-02-02

    Twitch mouth pressure using magnetic stimulation of the phrenic nerves and an automated inspiratory trigger is a noninvasive, non-volitional assessment of diaphragmatic strength. Our aims were to validate this method in patients with suspected neuromuscular disease, to determine the best inspiratory-trigger pressure threshold, and to evaluate whether twitch mouth pressure decreased the overdiagnosis of muscle weakness frequently observed with noninvasive volitional tests. Maximal inspiratory pressure, sniff nasal pressure, and twitch mouth pressure were measured in 112 patients with restrictive disease and suspected neuromuscular disorder. Esophageal and transdiaphragmatic pressures were measured in 64 of these patients to confirm or infirm inspiratory muscle weakness. Magnetic stimulation was triggered by inspiratory pressures of -1 and -5 cmH2O. The -5 cmH2O trigger produced the best correlation between twitch mouth pressure and twitch esophageal pressure (R(2) = 0.86; P <0.0001). The best association of noninvasive tests to predict inspiratory muscle weakness was sniff nasal pressure and twitch mouth pressure. Below-normal maximal inspiratory pressure and sniff nasal pressure values suggesting inspiratory muscle weakness were found in 63/112 patients. Only 52 of these 63 patients also had abnormal twitch mouth pressure. In conclusion twitch mouth pressure measurement is a simple, noninvasive, nonvolitional technique which may help to select patients with suspected neuromuscular disorder for invasive inspiratory-muscle investigation.

  5. [Development of Muscle Strength Evaluating System Based on Mobile Platform].

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiulin; Yao, Xiaoming; Xu, Xijiao; Hu, Xiaohui

    2015-08-01

    The development of muscle strength evaluating system based on Android system was developed in this research. The system consists of a lower unit and an intelligent mobile terminal. The pressure sensor of the lower unit was used to collect muscle strength parameters. And the parameters were sent to the Android device through the wireless Bluetooth serial port. Then the Android device would send the parameters to the doctor monitored platform through the Internet. The system realized analyzing the muscle strength parameters and real-time displaying them. After it ran on the Android mobile phones, it showed an effective result which proved that the system combined with mobile platform could make more convenient for the patients to assess their own muscle strength. It also provided reliable data references for doctors to know the patients' rehabilitation condition and to make the next rehabilitation plan.

  6. Maximal inspiratory pressure is influenced by intensity of the warm-up protocol.

    PubMed

    Arend, Mati; Kivastik, Jana; Mäestu, Jarek

    2016-08-01

    The aim of the study was to compare the effect of inspiratory muscle warm-up protocols with different intensities and breathing repetitions on maximal inspiratory pressure (MIP). Ten healthy and recreationally active men (183.3±5.5cm, 83.7±7.8kg, 26.4±4.1years) completed four different inspiratory muscle (IM) warm-up protocols (2×30 inspirations at 40% MIP, 2×12 inspirations at 60% MIP, 2×6 inspirations at 80% MIP, 2×30 inspirations at 15% MIP) on separate, randomly assigned visits. Pre-post values of MIP using MicroRPM (Micro Medical, Kent, UK) showed a significant increase in the mean values after the IM warm-up (POWERbreathe(®) K1, Warwickshire, UK) with 40% MIP and 60% MIP warm-up protocols, when MIP increased by 7cm H2O (95% CI: 0.10…13.89) (p=0.047) and by 6.4cm H2O (95% CI: 2.98…13.83) (p=0.027), respectively. In conclusion, a higher intensity inspiratory muscle warm-up protocol (2×12 breaths at 60% of MIP) can increase IM strength.

  7. Comparative Associations of Muscle Mass and Muscle Strength with Mortality in Dialysis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Isoyama, Naohito; Qureshi, Abdul Rashid; Avesani, Carla Maria; Lindholm, Bengt; Bàràny, Peter; Heimbürger, Olof; Cederholm, Tommy; Stenvinkel, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Background and objectives Reduced muscle mass and strength are prevalent conditions in dialysis patients. However, muscle strength and muscle mass are not congruent; muscle strength can diminish even though muscle mass is maintained or increased. This study addresses phenotype and mortality associations of these muscle dysfunction entities alone or in combination (i.e., concurrent loss of muscle mass and strength/mobility, here defined as sarcopenia). Design, setting, participants, & measurements This study included 330 incident dialysis patients (203 men, mean age 53±13 years, and mean GFR 7±2 ml/min per 1.73 m2) recruited between 1994 and 2010 and followed prospectively for up to 5 years. Low muscle mass (by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry appendicular mass index) and low muscle strength (by handgrip) were defined against young reference populations according to the European Working Group on Sarcopenia in Older People. Results Whereas 20% of patients had sarcopenia, low muscle mass and low muscle strength alone were observed in a further 24% and 15% of patients, respectively. Old age, comorbidities, protein-energy wasting, physical inactivity, low albumin, and inflammation associated with low muscle strength, but not with low muscle mass (multivariate ANOVA interactions). During follow-up, 95 patients (29%) died and both conditions associated with mortality as separate entities. When combined, individuals with low muscle mass alone were not at increased risk of mortality (adjusted hazard ratio [HR], 1.23; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 0.56 to 2.67). Individuals with low muscle strength were at increased risk, irrespective of their muscle stores being appropriate (HR, 1.98; 95% CI, 1.01 to 3.87) or low (HR, 1.93; 95% CI, 1.01 to 3.71). Conclusions Low muscle strength was more strongly associated with aging, protein-energy wasting, physical inactivity, inflammation, and mortality than low muscle mass. Assessment of muscle functionality may provide additional

  8. Muscle Power Predicts Adolescent Bone Strength: Iowa Bone Development Study

    PubMed Central

    Janz, Kathleen F.; Letuchy, Elena M.; Burns, Trudy L.; Francis, Shelby L.; Levy, Steven M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To assess association between lower body muscle power and bone strength, as well as the mediating effect of muscle cross-sectional area (MCSA) on that association. Methods Participants (N=141 males; 162 females) were approximately 17 years. Muscle power was predicted using vertical jump and the Sayers equation. Using peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT), bone strength indices were obtained at two locations of the tibia, corresponding to primary stressors acting upon each site: bone strength index for compression (BSI) at the distal 4% site; density-weighted polar section modulus strength-strain index [SSIp] and cortical bone area (CoA) at the 66% mid-shaft site for torsion. Muscle cross-sectional area (MCSA) was measured at the 66% site. Pearson bivariate and partial correlation coefficients were estimated to quantify the strength of the associations among variables. Direct and indirect mediation model effects were estimated and 95% bootstrap confidence intervals were constructed to test the causal hypothesis. Height and maturity were examined as covariates. Results Pearson correlation coefficients among muscle power, MCSA, and bone strength were statistically significant (p<0.01) and ranged from r=0.54 to 0.78. After adjustment for covariates, associations were reduced (r=0.37 to 0.69) (p<0.01). Mediation models for males for BSI, SSIp, and CoA accounted for 38%, 66%, and 54% of the variance in bone strength, respectively. Models for females for BSI, SSIp, and CoA accounted for 46%, 77%, and 66% of the variance, respectively. Conclusions We found strong and consistent associations, as well as direct and indirect pathways, among muscle power, MCSA, and tibia strength. These results support the use of muscle power as a component of health-related fitness in bone health interventions for older adolescents. PMID:25751769

  9. Examination of Strength Training and Detraining Effects in Expiratory Muscles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Susan; Davenport, Paul; Sapienza, Christine

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine strength gains following expiratory muscle strength training (EMST) and to determine detraining effects when the training stimulus is removed. Method: Thirty-two healthy participants were enrolled in an EMST program. Sixteen participants trained for 4 weeks (Group 1) and 16 participants trained…

  10. Abdominal muscle and quadriceps strength in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Man, W; Hopkinson, N; Harraf, F; Nikoletou, D; Polkey, M; Moxham, J

    2005-01-01

    Background: Quadriceps muscle weakness is common in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) but is not observed in a small hand muscle (adductor pollicis). Although this could be explained by reduced activity in the quadriceps, the observation could also be explained by anatomical location of the muscle or fibre type composition. However, the abdominal muscles are of a similar anatomical and fibre type distribution to the quadriceps, although they remain active in COPD. Cough gastric pressure is a recently described technique that assesses abdominal muscle (and hence expiratory muscle) strength more accurately than traditional techniques. A study was undertaken to test the hypothesis that more severe weakness exists in the quadriceps than in the abdominal muscles of patients with COPD compared with healthy elderly controls. Methods: Maximum cough gastric pressure and quadriceps isometric strength were measured in 43 patients with stable COPD and 25 healthy elderly volunteers matched for anthropometric variables. Results: Despite a significant reduction in mean quadriceps strength (29.9 kg v 41.2 kg; 95% CI –17.9 to –4.6; p = 0.001), cough gastric pressure was preserved in patients with COPD (227.3 cm H2O v 204.8 cm H2O; 95% CI –5.4 to 50.6; p = 0.11). Conclusions: Abdominal muscle strength is preserved in stable COPD outpatients in the presence of quadriceps weakness. This suggests that anatomical location and fibre type cannot explain quadriceps weakness in COPD. By inference, we conclude that disuse and consequent deconditioning are important factors in the development of quadriceps muscle weakness in COPD patients, or that activity protects the abdominal muscles from possible systemic myopathic processes. PMID:15923239

  11. Lower limb muscle strength is associated with functional performance and quality of life in patients with systemic sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Tatiana R. L.; Guimarães, Fernando S.; Carvalho, Mara N.; Sousa, Thaís L. M.; Menezes, Sara L. S.; Lopes, Agnaldo J.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Complaints of peripheral muscle weakness are quite common in patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc). It is likely that the muscle impairments may reduce the patients' exercise performance, which in turn may decrease their functional capacity and exert a direct impact on their quality of life. Objectives: To assess the peripheral and respiratory muscle strength in individuals with SSc and to investigate their correlation with the 6-min walk distance (6MWD) and quality of life measurements. Moreover, we aimed to characterize their nutritional status, pulmonary function, functional capacity, and quality of life compared to the controls. Method: The present cross-sectional study included 20 patients with SSc and 20 control subjects. All of the participants were subjected to isometric dynamometry, surface electromyography, bioelectrical impedance analysis, pulmonary function testing, and the 6-min walk test. Patients with SSc also responded to the Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36) and the Health Assessment Questionnaire Disability Index (HAQ-DI). Results: The individuals with SSc exhibited a reduction in quadriceps strength (p=0.0001), increased quadriceps fatigability (p=0.034), impaired pulmonary function, and a reduced 6MWD (p=0.0001) compared to the controls. Quadriceps strength was significantly correlated with the 6MWD (Rho=0.719; p=0.0004) and the HAQ-DI (Rho=-0.622; p=0.003). We also found significant correlations between quadriceps fatigability and maximal inspiratory (Rho=0.684; p=0.0009) and maximal expiratory (Rho=0.472; p=0.035) pressure. Conclusions: Patients with SSc exhibited reduced respiratory muscle and quadriceps strength and an increase in its fatigability. In these individuals, there was a relationship between quadriceps strength, functional capacity, and quality of life. PMID:25789555

  12. Muscle strength and knee range of motion after femoral lengthening

    PubMed Central

    Bhave, Anil; Shabtai, Lior; Woelber, Erik; Apelyan, Arman; Paley, Dror; Herzenberg, John E

    2017-01-01

    Background and purpose Femoral lengthening may result in decrease in knee range of motion (ROM) and quadriceps and hamstring muscle weakness. We evaluated preoperative and postoperative knee ROM, hamstring muscle strength, and quadriceps muscle strength in a diverse group of patients undergoing femoral lengthening. We hypothesized that lengthening would not result in a significant change in knee ROM or muscle strength. Patients and methods This prospective study of 48 patients (mean age 27 (9–60) years) compared ROM and muscle strength before and after femoral lengthening. Patient age, amount of lengthening, percent lengthening, level of osteotomy, fixation time, and method of lengthening were also evaluated regarding knee ROM and strength. The average length of follow-up was 2.9 (2.0–4.7) years. Results Mean amount of lengthening was 5.2 (2.4–11.0) cm. The difference between preoperative and final knee flexion ROM was 2° for the overall group. Congenital shortening cases lost an average of 5% or 6° of terminal knee flexion, developmental cases lost an average of 3% or 4°, and posttraumatic cases regained all motion. The difference in quadriceps strength at 45° preoperatively and after lengthening was not statistically or clinically significant (2.7 Nm; p = 0.06). Age, amount of lengthening, percent lengthening, osteotomy level, fixation time, and lengthening method had no statistically significant influence on knee ROM or quadriceps strength at final follow-up. Interpretation Most variables had no effect on ROM or strength, and higher age did not appear to be a limiting factor for femoral lengthening. Patients with congenital causes were most affected in terms of knee flexion. PMID:27892743

  13. Assessment of respiratory muscle strength in children according to the classification of body mass index

    PubMed Central

    da Rosa, George Jung; Schivinski, Camila Isabel S.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess and compare the respiratory muscle strength among eutrophic, overweight and obese school children, as well as to identify anthropometric and respiratory variables related to the results. METHODS: Cross-sectional survey with healthy schoolchildren aged 7-9 years old, divided into three groups: Normal weight, Overweight and Obese. The International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood (ISAAC) questionnaire was applied. The body mass index (BMI) was evaluated, as well as the forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) with a portable digital device. The maximal inspiratory and expiratory pressures (MIP and MEP) were measured by a digital manometer. Comparisons between the groups were made by Kruskal-Wallis test. Spearman's correlation coefficient was used to analyze the correlations among the variables. RESULTS: MIP of eutrophic school children was higher than MIP found in overweight (p=0.043) and obese (p=0.013) children. MIP was correlated with BMI percentile and weight classification (r=-0.214 and r=-0.256) and MEP was correlated with height (r=0.328). Both pressures showed strong correlation with each other in all analyses (r≥0.773), and less correlation with FEV1 (MIP - r=0.362 and MEP - r=0.494). FEV1 correlated with MEP in all groups (r: 0.429 - 0.569) and with MIP in Obese Group (r=0.565). Age was correlated with FEV1 (r=0.578), MIP (r=0.281) and MEP (r=0.328). CONCLUSIONS: Overweight and obese children showed lower MIP values, compared to eutrophic ones. The findings point to the influence of anthropometric variables on respiratory muscle strength in children. PMID:25119758

  14. Evaluation of Respiratory Muscle Strength in Mouth Breathers: Clinical Evidences

    PubMed Central

    Andrade da Cunha, Renata; Andrade da Cunha, Daniele; Assis, Roberta Borba; Bezerra, Luciana Ângelo; Justino da Silva, Hilton

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The child who chronically breathes through the mouth may develop a weakness of the respiratory muscles. Researchers and clinical are seeking for methods of instrumental evaluation to gather complementary data to clinical evaluations. With this in mind, it is important to evaluate breathing muscles in the child with Mouth Breathing. Objective To develop a review to investigate studies that used evaluation methods of respiratory muscle strength in mouth breathers. Data Synthesis  The authors were unanimous in relation to manovacuometry method as a way to evaluate respiratory pressures in Mouth Breathing children. Two of them performed with an analog manovacuometer and the other one, digital. The studies were not evaluated with regard to the method efficacy neither the used instruments. Conclusion There are few studies evaluating respiratory muscle strength in Mouth Breathing people through manovacuometry and the low methodological rigor of the analyzed studies hindered a reliable result to support or refuse the use of this technique. PMID:25992108

  15. Inspiratory-resistive loading increases the ventilatory response to arousal but does not reduce genioglossus muscle activity on the return to sleep.

    PubMed

    Cori, Jennifer M; Nicholas, Christian L; Baptista, Shaira; Huynh, Ivan; Rochford, Peter D; O'Donoghue, Fergal J; Trinder, John A; Jordan, Amy S

    2012-09-01

    Arousals from sleep are thought to predispose to obstructive sleep apnea by causing hyperventilation and hypocapnia, which reduce airway dilator muscle activity on the return to sleep. However, prior studies of auditory arousals have not resulted in reduced genioglossus muscle activity [GG-electromyogram (EMG)], potentially because airway resistance prior to arousal was low, leading to a small ventilatory response to arousal and minimal hypocapnia. Thus we aimed to increase the ventilatory response to arousal by resistive loading prior to auditory arousal and determine whether reduced GG-EMG occurred on the return to sleep. Eighteen healthy young men and women were recruited. Subjects were instrumented with a nasal mask with a pneumotachograph, an epiglottic pressure catheter, and intramuscular GG-EMG electrodes. Mask CO(2) levels were monitored. Three- to 15-s arousals from sleep were induced with auditory tones after resting breathing (No-Load) or inspiratory-resistive loading (Load; average 8.4 cmH(2)O·l(-1)·s(-1)). Peak minute ventilation following arousal was greater after Load than No-Load (mean ± SE; 8.0 ± 0.6 vs. 7.4 ± 0.6 l/min, respectively). However, the nadir end tidal partial pressure of CO(2) did not differ between Load conditions (43.1 ± 0.6 and 42.8 ± 0.5 mmHg, respectively), and no period of reduced GG activity occurred following the return to sleep (GG-EMG baseline, minimum after Load and No-Load = 2.9 ± 1.2%, 3.1 ± 1.3%, and 3.0 ± 1.3% max, respectively). These findings indicate that the hyperventilation, which occurs following tone-induced arousal, is appropriate for the prevailing level of respiratory drive, because loading did not induce marked hypocapnia or lower GG muscle activity on the return to sleep. Whether similar findings occur following obstructive events in patients remains to be determined.

  16. Thigh muscle strength in senior athletes and healthy controls.

    PubMed

    McCrory, Jean L; Salacinski, Amanda J; Hunt, Sarah E; Greenspan, Susan L

    2009-12-01

    Exercise is commonly recommended to counteract aging-related muscle weakness. While numerous exercise intervention studies on the elderly have been performed, few have included elite senior athletes, such as those who participate in the National Senior Games. The extent to which participation in highly competitive exercise affects muscle strength is unknown, as well as the extent to which such participation mitigates any aging-related strength losses. The purpose of this study was to examine isometric thigh muscle strength in selected athletes of the National Senior Games and healthy noncompetitive controls of similar age, as well as to investigate strength changes with aging in both groups. In all, 95 athletes of the Games and 72 healthy controls participated. Of the senior athletes, 43 were runners, 12 cyclists, and 40 swimmers. Three trials of isometric knee flexion and extension strength were collected using a load cell affixed to a custom-designed chair. Strength data were normalized to dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry-obtained lean mass of the leg. A 3-factor multivariate analysis of variance (group x gender x age group) was performed, which included both the extension and flexion variables (alpha = 0.05). Athletes exhibited 38% more extension strength and 66% more flexion strength than the controls (p < 0.001). Strength did not decrease with advancing age in either the athletes or the controls (p = 0.345). In conclusion, senior athletes who participate in highly competitive exercise have greater strength than healthy aged-matched individuals who do not. Neither group displayed the expected strength losses with aging. Our subject cohorts, however, were not typical of those over age 65 years because individuals with existing health conditions were excluded from the study.

  17. Predictive equations for respiratory muscle strength according to international and Brazilian guidelines.

    PubMed

    Pessoa, Isabela M B S; Houri Neto, Miguel; Montemezzo, Dayane; Silva, Luisa A M; Andrade, Armèle Dornelas De; Parreira, Verônica F

    2014-09-12

    Background: The maximum static respiratory pressures, namely the maximum inspiratory pressure (MIP) and maximum expiratory pressure (MEP), reflect the strength of the respiratory muscles. These measures are simple, non-invasive, and have established diagnostic and prognostic value. This study is the first to examine the maximum respiratory pressures within the Brazilian population according to the recommendations proposed by the American Thoracic Society and European Respiratory Society (ATS/ERS) and the Brazilian Thoracic Association (SBPT). Objective: To establish reference equations, mean values, and lower limits of normality for MIP and MEP for each age group and sex, as recommended by the ATS/ERS and SBPT. Method: We recruited 134 Brazilians living in Belo Horizonte, MG, Brazil, aged 20-89 years, with a normal pulmonary function test and a body mass index within the normal range. We used a digital manometer that operationalized the variable maximum average pressure (MIP/MEP). At least five tests were performed for both MIP and MEP to take into account a possible learning effect. Results: We evaluated 74 women and 60 men. The equations were as follows: MIP=63.27-0.55 (age)+17.96 (gender)+0.58 (weight), r2 of 34% and MEP= - 61.41+2.29 (age) - 0.03(age2)+33.72 (gender)+1.40 (waist), r2 of 49%. Conclusion: In clinical practice, these equations could be used to calculate the predicted values of MIP and MEP for the Brazilian population.

  18. Muscle strength and endurance following lowerlimb suspension in man

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tesch, Per A.; Berg, Hans E.; Haggmark, Tom; Ohlsen, Hans; Dudley, Gary A.

    1991-01-01

    The effect of lower-limb suspension on the muscle strength and muscle endurance was investigated in six men subjected to four weeks of unilateral unloading of a lower limb (using of a harness attached to a modified shoe), followed by seven weeks of weight-bearing recovery. Results showed a decrease in the cross-sectional area (CSA) of the thigh muscle and in the average peak torque (APT) during three bouts of 30 concentric knee extensions. While the the thigh muscle CSA returned to normal after seven weeks of recovery, the APT recovery was still reduced by 11 percent, suggesting that muscle metabolic function was severely affected by unloading and was not restored by ambulation.

  19. Intra- and inter-rater reliability of maximum inspiratory pressure measured using a portable capsule-sensing pressure gauge device in healthy adults

    PubMed Central

    Jalan, Nikita S; Daftari, Sonam S; Retharekar, Seemi S; Rairikar, Savita A; Shyam, Ashok M; Sancheti, Parag K

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Measurement of maximum inspiratory pressure is the most prevalent method used in clinical practice to assess the strength of the inspiratory muscles. Although there are many devices available for the assessment of inspiratory muscle strength, there is a dearth of literature describing the reliability of devices that can be used in clinical patient assessment. The capsule-sensing pressure gauge (CSPG-V) is a new tool that measures the strength of inspiratory muscles; it is easy to use, noninvasive, inexpensive and lightweight. OBJECTIVE: To test the intra- and inter-rater reliability of a CSPG-V device in healthy adults. METHODS: A cross-sectional study involving 80 adult subjects with a mean (± SD) age of 22±3 years was performed. Using simple randomization, 40 individuals (20 male, 20 female) were used for intrarater and 40 (20 male, 20 female) were used for inter-rater reliability testing of the CSPG-V device. The subjects performed three inspiratory efforts, which were sustained for at least 3 s; the best of the three readings was used for intra- and inter-rater comparison. The intra- and inter-rater reliability were calculated using intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs). RESULTS: The intrarater reliability ICC was 0.962 and the inter-rater reliability ICC was 0.922. CONCLUSION: Results of the present study suggest that maximum inspiratory pressure measured using a CSPG-V device has excellent intraand inter-rater reliability, and can be used as a diagnostic and prognostic tool in patients with respiratory muscle impairment. PMID:26089737

  20. Age at spinal cord injury determines muscle strength

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Christine K.; Grumbles, Robert M.

    2014-01-01

    As individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI) age they report noticeable deficits in muscle strength, endurance and functional capacity when performing everyday tasks. These changes begin at ~45 years. Here we present a cross-sectional analysis of paralyzed thenar muscle and motor unit contractile properties in two datasets obtained from different subjects who sustained a cervical SCI at different ages (≤46 years) in relation to data from uninjured age-matched individuals. First, completely paralyzed thenar muscles were weaker when C6 SCI occurred at an older age. Muscles were also significantly weaker if the injury was closer to the thenar motor pools (C6 vs. C4). More muscles were strong (>50% uninjured) in those injured at a younger (≤25 years) vs. young age (>25 years), irrespective of SCI level. There was a reduction in motor unit numbers in all muscles tested. In each C6 SCI, only ~30 units survived vs. 144 units in uninjured subjects. Since intact axons only sprout 4–6 fold, the limits for muscle reinnervation have largely been met in these young individuals. Thus, any further reduction in motor unit numbers with time after these injuries will likely result in chronic denervation, and may explain the late-onset muscle weakness routinely described by people with SCI. In a second dataset, paralyzed thenar motor units were more fatigable than uninjured units. This gap widened with age and will reduce functional reserve. Force declines were not due to electromyographic decrements in either group so the site of failure was beyond excitation of the muscle membrane. Together, these results suggest that age at SCI is an important determinant of long-term muscle strength, and fatigability, both of which influence functional capacity. PMID:24478643

  1. Adiposity, muscle mass, and muscle strength in relation to functional decline in older persons.

    PubMed

    Schaap, Laura A; Koster, Annemarie; Visser, Marjolein

    2013-01-01

    Aging is associated with changes in body composition and muscle strength. This review aimed to determine the relation between different body composition measures and muscle strength measures and functional decline in older men and women. By use of relevant databases (PubMed, Embase, and CINAHL) and keywords in a search from 1976 to April 2012, 50 articles were reviewed that met the inclusion criteria (written in English, a prospective, longitudinal design, involving older persons aged 65 years or more, and at least one of the measures that follow: body mass index (BMI), waist circumference, waist/hip ratio, midarm circumference, fat mass, muscle fat infiltration, muscle mass, or strength as independent variables and a measure of functional decline as outcome measure). Meta-analyses were performed and revealed that BMI ≥30 and low muscle strength were associated with functional decline (pooled odds ratio (OR) = 1.60, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.43, 1.80, for BMI ≥30 and OR = 1.86, 95% CI: 1.32, 2.64, for muscle strength). Low muscle mass was not significantly associated with functional decline (pooled OR = 1.19, 95% CI: 0.98, 1.45). Future intervention research should focus on positive changes in body composition to prevent onset or worsening of functional decline in old age.

  2. Mechanisms of genioglossus responses to inspiratory resistive load in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Aleksandrova, N P; Goloubeva, E V; Isaev, G G

    2002-07-01

    The purpose of the present study has been to determine whether pharyngeal dilator muscles participate in inspiratory load compensatory responses and if so, to elucidate role of upper airway mechanoreceptors in these responses. The experiments were performed on anaesthetized rabbits. Each animal was tested in three ways by the imposition of inspiratory resistive load: (1) at upper airways via face mask, (2) at the tracheostomic cannula placed below larynx (all upper airway receptors were 'bypassed') and (3) at the mouth after the section of the hypoglossus nerves (motor denervation of genioglossus muscle). The inspiratory load applied to the upper airways evoked significant increases in integrated genioglossus activity (to 129 +/- 14.7% of control) and its inspiratory duration (to 113 +/- 5% of control) already within the first loaded breath (P < 0.05). The increases in the inspiratory activity of musculius genioglossus were relatively greater than the simultaneous increases in the activity of the diaphragm. Motor denervation of the pharynx dilator muscles (including m. genioglossus) increased airway resistance to 184 +/- 19% of control (P < 0.05) and induced obstructive alterations in the breathing pattern during unloaded breathing: decrease in maximal inspiratory flow (-13%) and increase in the level of negative oesophageal pressure (+14%) and the peak diaphragm activity (+6%). After nervi hypoglossus sections additional increases in motor and pressure outputs were required in order to maintain unaltered ventilation at the same degree of loading as before denervation. The results indicate that the pharyngeal dilator muscles have a role in compensation of added inspiratory load. Activation of these muscles facilitate the load compensating function of 'pump' muscles by decreasing airway resistance. Tracheostomy did not reduce the genioglossus response to inspiratory loading, ruling out any role for upper airways receptors in the genioglossus response to inspiratory

  3. Treadmill walking in water induces greater respiratory muscle fatigue than treadmill walking on land in healthy young men.

    PubMed

    Yamashina, Yoshihiro; Yokoyama, Hisayo; Naghavi, Nooshin; Hirasawa, Yoshikazu; Takeda, Ryosuke; Ota, Akemi; Imai, Daiki; Miyagawa, Toshiaki; Okazaki, Kazunobu

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effect of walking in water on respiratory muscle fatigue compared with that of walking on land at the same exercise intensity. Ten healthy males participated in 40-min treadmill walking trials on land and in water at an intensity of 60% of peak oxygen consumption. Respiratory function and respiratory muscle strength were evaluated before and after walking trials. Inspiratory muscle strength and forced expiratory volume in 1 s were significantly decreased immediately after walking in water, and expiratory muscle strength was significantly decreased immediately and 5 min after walking in water compared with the baseline. The decreases of inspiratory and expiratory muscle strength were significantly greater compared with that after walking on land. In conclusion, greater inspiratory and expiratory muscle fatigue was induced by walking in water than by walking on land at the same exercise intensity in healthy young men.

  4. Myotonometry as a Surrogate Measure of Muscle Strength

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ang, B. S.; Feeback, D. L.; Leonard, C. T.; Sykes, J.; Kruger, E.; Clarke, M. S. F.

    2007-01-01

    Space flight-induced muscle atrophy/neuromuscular degradation and the consequent decrements in crew-member performance are of increasing concern as mission duration lengthens, and planetary exploration after extended space flight is planned. Pre- to post-flight strength measures have demonstrated that specific countermeasures, such as resistive exercise, are effective at countering microgravity-induced muscle atrophy and preventing decrements in muscle strength. However, in-flight assessment/monitoring of exercise countermeasure effectiveness will be essential during exploration class missions due to their duration. The ability to modify an exercise countermeasure prescription based on such real-time information will allow each individual crew member to perform the optimal amount and type of exercise countermeasure to maintain performance. In addition, such measures can be used to determine if a crew member is physically capable of performing a particular mission-related task during exploration class missions. The challenges faced in acquiring such data are those common to all space operations, namely the requirement for light-weight, low power, mechanically reliable technologies that make valid measurements in microgravity, in this case of muscle strength/neuromuscular function. Here we describe a simple, light-weight, low power, non-invasive device, known as the Myotonometer, that measures tissue stiffness as an indirect measure of muscle contractile state and muscle force production. Repeat myotonometer measurements made at the same location on the surface of the rectis femoris muscle (as determined using a 3D locator device, SEM plus or minus 0.34 mm) were shown to be reproducible over time at both maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) and at rest in a total of 17 sedentary subjects assessed three times over a period of seven days. In addition, graded voluntary isometric force production (i.e. 20%, 40%, 60%, 80% & 100% of MVC) during knee extension was shown to

  5. Levator plate upward lift and levator muscle strength

    PubMed Central

    Rostaminia, Ghazaleh; Peck, Jennifer; Quiroz, Lieschen; Shobeiri, S. Abbas

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of study was to compare digital palpation with the levator plate lift measured by endovaginal and transperineal dynamic ultrasound. Methods Dynamic transperineal and endovaginal ultrasound were performed as part of multicompartmental pelvic floor functional assessment. Patients were instructed to perform Kegels while a probe captured the video clip of the levator plate movement at rest and during contraction in 2D mid-sagittal posterior view. We measured the distance between the levator plate and the probe on endovaginal ultrasound as well as the distance between the levator plate and the gothic arch of the pubis in transperineal ultrasound. The change in diameter (lift) and a levator plate lift ratio (lift / rest) x 100) were calculated. Pelvic floor muscle strength was assessed by digital palpation and divided into functional and non-functional groups using the Modified Oxford Scale (MOS). Mean differences in levator plate upward lifts were compared by MOS score using student t-tests and analysis of variance (ANOVA). Results 74 women were available for analysis. The mean age was 55 (SD±11.9). When measured by vaginal dynamic ultrasound, mean values of the lift and lift/rest ratio increased with increasing MOS score (ANOVA p=0.09 and p=0.04, respectively). When MOS scores were categorized to represent non-functional (MOS 0-1) and functional (MOS 2-5) muscle strength groups, the mean values of the lift (3.2 mm vs. 4.6 mm, p=0.03) and lift/rest ratio (13% vs 20%, p=0.01) were significantly higher in women with functional muscle strength. All patients with ≥ 30% lift detected by vaginal ultrasound had functional muscle strength. Conclusions Greater levator plate lift ratio detected by dynamic endovaginal ultrasound was associated with higher muscle strength as determined by MOS. This novel measurement can be incorporated into ultrasound evaluation of the levator ani function. PMID:26333568

  6. Muscle strength in breast cancer patients receiving different treatment regimes

    PubMed Central

    Klassen, Oliver; Schmidt, Martina E.; Ulrich, Cornelia M.; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Potthoff, Karin; Steindorf, Karen

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background Muscle dysfunction and sarcopenia have been associated with poor performance status, an increased mortality risk, and greater side effects in oncologic patients. However, little is known about how performance is affected by cancer therapy. We investigated muscle strength in breast cancer patients in different adjuvant treatment settings and also compared it with data from healthy individuals. Methods Breast cancer patients (N = 255) from two randomized controlled exercise trials, staged 0–III and aged 54.4 ± 9.4 years, were categorized into four groups according to their treatment status. In a cross‐sectional design, muscle function was assessed bilaterally by isokinetic dynamometry (0°, 60°, 180°/s) as maximal voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC) and maximal isokinetic peak torque (MIPT) in shoulder rotators and knee flexors and extensors. Additionally, muscular fatigue index (FI%) and shoulder flexibility were evaluated. Healthy women (N = 26), aged 53.3 ± 9.8 years, were tested using the same method. Analysis of covariance was used to estimate the impact of different cancer treatments on skeletal muscle function with adjustment for various clinical and socio‐demographic factors. Results Consistently, lower muscle strength was measured in shoulder and knee strength in patients after chemotherapy. On average, patients had up to 25% lower strength in lower extremities and 12–16% in upper extremities in MVIC and MIPT during cancer treatment compared with healthy women. No substantial difference between patient groups in shoulder strength, but significantly lower shoulder flexibility in patients with radical mastectomy was measured. Chemotherapy‐treated patients had consistently higher FI%. No serious adverse events were reported. Conclusions Breast cancer patients showed markedly impaired muscle strength and joint dysfunctions before and after anticancer treatment. The significant differences between patients

  7. Exercise, muscle, and the applied load-bone strength balance.

    PubMed

    Giangregorio, L; El-Kotob, R

    2017-01-01

    A fracture occurs when the applied load is greater than the bone can withstand. Clinical practice guidelines for the management of osteoporosis include recommendations for exercise; one of the few therapies where the proposed anti-fracture mechanisms that include effects on both bone strength and applied loads, where applied loads can come in the form of a fall, externally applied loads, body weight, or muscle forces. The aim of this review is to provide an overview of the clinical evidence pertaining to the potential efficacy of exercise for preventing fractures in older adults, including its direct effects on outcomes along the causal pathway to fractures (e.g., falls, posture, bone strength) and the indirect effects on muscle or the muscle-bone relationship. The evidence is examined as it pertains to application in clinical practice. Considerations for future research are discussed, such as the need for trials in individuals with low bone mass or students that evaluate whether changes in muscle mediate changes in bone. Future trials should also consider adequacy of calorie or protein intake, the confounding effect of exercise-induced weight loss, or the most appropriate therapeutic goal (e.g., strength, weight bearing, or hypertrophy) and outcome measures (e.g., fracture, disability, cost-effectiveness).

  8. Bone mineral density, muscle strength, and recreational exercise in men

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snow-Harter, C.; Whalen, R.; Myburgh, K.; Arnaud, S.; Marcus, R.

    1992-01-01

    Muscle strength has been shown to predict bone mineral density (BMD) in women. We examined this relationship in 50 healthy men who ranged in age from 28 to 51 years (average 38.3 years). BMD of the lumbar spine, proximal femur, whole body, and tibia were measured by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (Hologic QDR 1000W). Dynamic strength using one repetition maximum was assessed for the biceps, quadriceps, and back extensors and for the hip abductors, adductors, and flexors. Isometric grip strength was measured by dynamometry. Daily walking mileage was assessed by 9 week stepmeter records and kinematic analysis of video filming. Subjects were designated as exercisers and nonexercisers. Exercisers participated in recreational exercise at least two times each week. The results demonstrated that BMD at all sites correlated with back and biceps strength (p < 0.01 to p = 0.0001). Body weight correlated with tibia and whole-body BMD (p < 0.001); age negatively correlated with Ward's triangle BMD (p < 0.01). In stepwise multiple regressions, back strength was the only independent predictor of spine and femoral neck density (R2 = 0.27). Further, back strength was the most robust predictor of BMD at the trochanter, Ward's triangle, whole body, and tibia, although biceps strength, age, body weight, and leg strength contributed significantly to BMD at these skeletal sites, accounting for 35-52% of the variance in BMD. Exercisers and nonexercisers were similar for walking (3.97 versus 3.94 miles/day), age (37.8 versus 38.5) years, and weight (80.0 versus 77.7 kg). However, BMD and muscle strength were significantly greater in exercises than in nonexercisers.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS).

  9. Associations between personality traits, physical activity level, and muscle strength.

    PubMed

    Tolea, Magdalena I; Terracciano, Antonio; Simonsick, Eleanor M; Metter, E Jeffrey; Costa, Paul T; Ferrucci, Luigi

    2012-06-01

    Associations among personality as measured by the Five Factor Model, physical activity, and muscle strength were assessed using data from the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging (N = 1220, age: mean = 58, SD = 16). General linear modeling with adjustment for age, sex, race, and body mass index, and bootstrapping for mediation were used. We found neuroticism and most of its facets to negatively correlate with strength. The extraversion domain and its facets of warmth, activity, and positive-emotions were positively correlated with strength, independent of covariates. Mediation analysis results suggest that these associations are partly explained by physical activity level. Findings extend the evidence of an association between personality and physical function to its strength component and indicate health behavior as an important pathway.

  10. A comparison of respiratory and peripheral muscle strength, functional exercise capacity, activities of daily living and physical fitness in patients with cystic fibrosis and healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Arikan, Hulya; Yatar, İlker; Calik-Kutukcu, Ebru; Aribas, Zeynep; Saglam, Melda; Vardar-Yagli, Naciye; Savci, Sema; Inal-Ince, Deniz; Ozcelik, Ugur; Kiper, Nural

    2015-01-01

    There are limited reports that compare muscle strength, functional exercise capacity, activities of daily living (ADL) and parameters of physical fitness of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients with healthy peers in the literature. The purpose of this study was to assess and compare respiratory and peripheral muscle strength, functional exercise capacity, ADL and physical fitness in patients with CF and healthy subjects. Nineteen patients with CF (mean forced expiratory volume in one second-FEV1: 86.56±18.36%) and 20 healthy subjects were included in this study. Respiratory (maximal inspiratory pressure-MIP and maximal expiratory pressure-MEP) and peripheral muscle strength (quadriceps, shoulder abductors and hand grip strength) were evaluated. Functional exercise capacity was determined with 6min walk test (6MWT). ADL was assessed with Glittre ADL test and physical fitness was assessed with Munich fitness test (MFT). There were not any statistically significant difference in MIP, %MIP, MEP and %MEP values between two groups (p>0.05). %Peripheral muscle strength (% quadriceps and shoulder abductors strength), 6MWT distance and %6MWT distance were significantly lower in patients with CF than those of healthy subjects (p<0.05). Glittre ADL-test time was significantly longer in patients with CF than healthy subjects (p<0.05). According to Munich fitness test, the number of bouncing a ball, hanging score, distance of standing vertical jumping and standing vertical jumping score were significantly lower in patients with CF than those of healthy subjects (p<0.05). Peripheral muscle strength, functional exercise capacity, ADL performance and speed, coordination, endurance and power components of physical fitness are adversely affected in mild-severe patients with CF compared to healthy peers. Evaluations must be done in comprehensive manner in patients with CF with all stages.

  11. Muscle Strength and Flexibility without and with Visual Impairments Judoka's

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karakoc, Onder

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine muscle strength and flexibility of judoka with and without visual impairments. A total of 32 male national judoka volunteered to participate in this study. There were 20 male judoka without visual impairments (mean ± SD; age: 19.20 ± 5.76 years, body weight: 66.45 ± 11.09 kg, height: 169.60 ± 7.98 cm, sport…

  12. Should we abandon manual muscle strength testing in the ICU?

    PubMed

    Hermans, Greet; Gosselink, Rik

    2011-03-01

    Intensive-care-unit-acquired weakness is a major complication in critically ill patients. The paper by Hough and coworkers suggests that the current method of manual muscle strength testing with the Medical Research Council sum score is of limited value in the intensive care unit. However, their results raise a number of questions and provide important lessons for implementation of such evaluations in the intensive care unit.

  13. Does grip strength on the unaffected side of patients with hemiparetic stroke reflect the strength of other ipsilateral muscles?

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Jumpei; Nishiyama, Toru; Matsushima, Yoshimasa

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] Grip strength is used as an indicator of overall body muscular strength. However, most studies on grip strength have been performed in healthy people, and no study has evaluated it in the unaffected side of patients with hemiparetic stroke. The purpose of this study was to determine if grip strength on the unaffected side of patients with hemiparetic stroke correlates with the strength of other ipsilateral musculature. [Subjects and Methods] The maximal strengths of the muscles on the unaffected side of 31 patients with hemiparetic stroke were measured, and correlation coefficients were calculated. [Results] The results revealed significant positive correlations between grip strength on the unaffected side and the strength of the other ipsilateral muscle groups, with relatively high correlations being observed for the upper extremity muscle groups. [Conclusion] This suggests that grip strength on the unaffected side of patients with hemiparetic stroke can be used as a simple way to estimate overall strength on that side. PMID:28210040

  14. Does grip strength on the unaffected side of patients with hemiparetic stroke reflect the strength of other ipsilateral muscles?

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Jumpei; Nishiyama, Toru; Matsushima, Yoshimasa

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] Grip strength is used as an indicator of overall body muscular strength. However, most studies on grip strength have been performed in healthy people, and no study has evaluated it in the unaffected side of patients with hemiparetic stroke. The purpose of this study was to determine if grip strength on the unaffected side of patients with hemiparetic stroke correlates with the strength of other ipsilateral musculature. [Subjects and Methods] The maximal strengths of the muscles on the unaffected side of 31 patients with hemiparetic stroke were measured, and correlation coefficients were calculated. [Results] The results revealed significant positive correlations between grip strength on the unaffected side and the strength of the other ipsilateral muscle groups, with relatively high correlations being observed for the upper extremity muscle groups. [Conclusion] This suggests that grip strength on the unaffected side of patients with hemiparetic stroke can be used as a simple way to estimate overall strength on that side.

  15. Effects of whole-body vibration after eccentric exercise on muscle soreness and muscle strength recovery.

    PubMed

    Timon, Rafael; Tejero, Javier; Brazo-Sayavera, Javier; Crespo, Carmen; Olcina, Guillermo

    2016-06-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to investigate whether or not a single whole-body vibration treatment after eccentric exercise can reduce muscle soreness and enhance muscle recovery. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty untrained participants were randomly assigned to two groups: a vibration group (n=10) and control group (n=10). Participants performed eccentric quadriceps training of 4 sets of 5 repetitions at 120% 1RM, with 4 min rest between sets. After that, the vibration group received 3 sets of 1 min whole body vibration (12 Hz, 4 mm) with 30 s of passive recovery between sets. Serum creatine kinase, blood urea nitrogen, muscle soreness (visual analog scale) and muscle strength (peak isometric torque) were assessed. [Results] Creatine kinase was lower in the vibration group than in the control group at 24 h (200.2 ± 8.2 vs. 300.5 ± 26.1 U/L) and at 48 h (175.2 ± 12.5 vs. 285.2 ± 19.7 U/L) post-exercise. Muscle soreness decreased in vibration group compared to control group at 48 h post-exercise (34.1 ± 11.4 vs. 65.2 ± 13.2 mm). [Conclusion] Single whole-body vibration treatment after eccentric exercise reduced delayed onset muscle soreness but it did not affect muscle strength recovery.

  16. Effects of whole-body vibration after eccentric exercise on muscle soreness and muscle strength recovery

    PubMed Central

    Timon, Rafael; Tejero, Javier; Brazo-Sayavera, Javier; Crespo, Carmen; Olcina, Guillermo

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to investigate whether or not a single whole-body vibration treatment after eccentric exercise can reduce muscle soreness and enhance muscle recovery. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty untrained participants were randomly assigned to two groups: a vibration group (n=10) and control group (n=10). Participants performed eccentric quadriceps training of 4 sets of 5 repetitions at 120% 1RM, with 4 min rest between sets. After that, the vibration group received 3 sets of 1 min whole body vibration (12 Hz, 4 mm) with 30 s of passive recovery between sets. Serum creatine kinase, blood urea nitrogen, muscle soreness (visual analog scale) and muscle strength (peak isometric torque) were assessed. [Results] Creatine kinase was lower in the vibration group than in the control group at 24 h (200.2 ± 8.2 vs. 300.5 ± 26.1 U/L) and at 48 h (175.2 ± 12.5 vs. 285.2 ± 19.7 U/L) post-exercise. Muscle soreness decreased in vibration group compared to control group at 48 h post-exercise (34.1 ± 11.4 vs. 65.2 ± 13.2 mm). [Conclusion] Single whole-body vibration treatment after eccentric exercise reduced delayed onset muscle soreness but it did not affect muscle strength recovery. PMID:27390415

  17. CCL2 and CCR2 variants are associated with skeletal muscle strength and change in strength with resistance training

    PubMed Central

    Harmon, Brennan T.; Orkunoglu-Suer, E. Funda; Adham, Kasra; Larkin, Justin S.; Gordish-Dressman, Heather; Clarkson, Priscilla M.; Thompson, Paul D.; Angelopoulos, Theodore J.; Gordon, Paul M.; Moyna, Niall M.; Pescatello, Linda S.; Visich, Paul S.; Zoeller, Robert F.; Hubal, Monica J.; Tosi, Laura L.; Hoffman, Eric P.

    2010-01-01

    Baseline muscle size and muscle adaptation to exercise are traits with high variability across individuals. Recent research has implicated several chemokines and their receptors in the pathogenesis of many conditions that are influenced by inflammatory processes, including muscle damage and repair. One specific chemokine, chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2 (CCL2), is expressed by macrophages and muscle satellite cells, increases expression dramatically following muscle damage, and increases expression further with repeated bouts of exercise, suggesting that CCL2 plays a key role in muscle adaptation. The present study hypothesizes that genetic variations in CCL2 and its receptor (CCR2) may help explain muscle trait variability. College-aged subjects [n = 874, Functional Single-Nucleotide Polymorphisms Associated With Muscle Size and Strength (FAMUSS) cohort] underwent a 12-wk supervised strength-training program for the upper arm muscles. Muscle size (via MR imaging) and elbow flexion strength (1 repetition maximum and isometric) measurements were taken before and after training. The study participants were then genotyped for 11 genetic variants in CCL2 and five variants in CCR2. Variants in the CCL2 and CCR2 genes show strong associations with several pretraining muscle strength traits, indicating that inflammatory genes in skeletal muscle contribute to the polygenic system that determines muscle phenotypes. These associations extend across both sexes, and several of these genetic variants have been shown to influence gene regulation. PMID:20947712

  18. Comparison of isokinetic muscle strength and muscle power by types of warm-up.

    PubMed

    Sim, Young-Je; Byun, Yong-Hyun; Yoo, Jaehyun

    2015-05-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to clarify the influence of static stretching at warm-up on the isokinetic muscle torque (at 60°/sec) and muscle power (at 180°/sec) of the flexor muscle and extensor muscle of the knee joint. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects of this study were 10 healthy students with no medically specific findings. The warm-up group and warm-up with stretching group performed their respective warm-up prior to the isokinetic muscle torque evaluation of the knee joint. One-way ANOVA was performed by randomized block design for each variable. [Results] The results were as follows: First, the flexor peak torque and extensor peak torque of the knee joint tended to decrease at 60°/sec in the warm-up with stretching group compared with the control group and warm-up group, but without statistical significance. Second, extensor power at 180°/sec was also not statistically significant. However, it was found that flexor power increased significantly in the warm-up with stretching group at 180°/sec compared with the control group and warm-up group in which stretching was not performed. [Conclusion] Therefore, it is considered that in healthy adults, warm-up including two sets of stretching for 20 seconds per muscle group does not decrease muscle strength and muscle power.

  19. Comparison of isokinetic muscle strength and muscle power by types of warm-up

    PubMed Central

    Sim, Young-Je; Byun, Yong-Hyun; Yoo, Jaehyun

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to clarify the influence of static stretching at warm-up on the isokinetic muscle torque (at 60°/sec) and muscle power (at 180°/sec) of the flexor muscle and extensor muscle of the knee joint. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects of this study were 10 healthy students with no medically specific findings. The warm-up group and warm-up with stretching group performed their respective warm-up prior to the isokinetic muscle torque evaluation of the knee joint. One-way ANOVA was performed by randomized block design for each variable. [Results] The results were as follows: First, the flexor peak torque and extensor peak torque of the knee joint tended to decrease at 60°/sec in the warm-up with stretching group compared with the control group and warm-up group, but without statistical significance. Second, extensor power at 180°/sec was also not statistically significant. However, it was found that flexor power increased significantly in the warm-up with stretching group at 180°/sec compared with the control group and warm-up group in which stretching was not performed. [Conclusion] Therefore, it is considered that in healthy adults, warm-up including two sets of stretching for 20 seconds per muscle group does not decrease muscle strength and muscle power. PMID:26157247

  20. Isokinetic muscle strength and hiking performance in elite sailors.

    PubMed

    Aagaard, P; Beyer, N; Simonsen, E B; Larsson, B; Magnusson, S P; Kjaer, M

    1998-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to describe the isokinetic strength profile and its relation to hiking performance in male (SM, n = 15) and female (SF, n = 6) elite sailors compared to a group of male control subjects (CM, n = 8) similar in age, anthropometry and level of fitness. Eccentric knee extension strength was higher in SM compared to CM (P < 0.01). Furthermore, SM were stronger during trunk extension (P < 0.05), but not during trunk flexion compared to CM. Overall muscle strength was lower in SF compared to SM (P < 0.01) and CM (P < 0.05), except for eccentric knee extension strength, where SF and CM did not differ (P > 0.05). Hiking performance correlated to maximal eccentric and isometric knee extensor strength in SF (rs = 0.83-0.88, P < 0.05) and in CM (rs = 0.73-0.77, P < 0.05) and to maximal eccentric knee extensor strength at high velocity in SM (rs = 0.46-0.54, P < 0.05). For a subgroup of hikers in SM (n = 8), hiking performance correlated to maximal isometric-eccentric knee extensor strength (rs = 0.67-0.74, P < 0.05), whereas no correlations emerged for the non-hikers (n = 7). Few correlations were observed between hiking performance and maximal concentric trunk flexor strength (rs = 0.69-0.92, P < 0.05). Unexpectedly, in SM correlations also were observed between hiking performance and maximal strength of the trunk extensors (rs = 0.46-0.53, hiker subgroup: rs = 0.64-0.67, P < 0.05). In conclusion, notably high levels of maximal eccentric knee extensor strength were observed for the male and female elite sailors examined in the present study. Furthermore, the present results suggest that hiking performance depends in part on maximal isometric-eccentric knee extensor strength. The maximal strength of the trunk extensors, which potentially stabilizes the lower back and spine, also seems to have some importance for the hiking performance of top-level sailors.

  1. Effect of Gender, Disease Duration and Treatment on Muscle Strength in Myasthenia Gravis

    PubMed Central

    Citirak, Gülsenay; Cejvanovic, Sanja; Andersen, Henning; Vissing, John

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this observational, cross-sectional study was to quantify the potential presence of muscle weakness among patients with generalized myasthenia gravis (gMG). The influence of gender, treatment intensity and disease duration on muscle strength and disease progression was also assessed. Methods Muscle strength was tested in 8 muscle groups by manual muscle testing and by hand-held dynamometry in 107 patients with gMG and 89 healthy age- and gender-matched controls. Disease duration, severity and treatment history were reviewed and compared with muscle strength. Results Patients had reduced strength in all tested muscle group compared to control subjects (p<0.05). Women with gMG were stronger than men (decrease in strength 22.6% vs. 32.7% in men, P<0.05). Regional differences in muscle weakness were also evident, with proximal muscles being more affected. Interestingly, muscle strength did not correlate with disease duration and treatment intensity. Conclusions The results of this study show that in patients with gMG; 1) there is significant muscle weakness, 2) muscle weakness is more pronounced in men than women, 3) shoulder abductors, hip flexors, and neck muscles are the most affected muscle groups and 4) disease duration or treatment intensity alone are not predictors of loss of muscle strength in gMG. PMID:27741232

  2. Balance and Muscle Strength in Elderly Women Who Dance Samba

    PubMed Central

    Serra, Marcos Maurício; Alonso, Angelica Castilho; Peterson, Mark; Mochizuki, Luis; Greve, Júlia Maria D'Andréa; Garcez-Leme, Luiz Eugênio

    2016-01-01

    Considering the growth of the aging population, and the increasing risk for falls and related morbidity, it is vital to seek efficient, comprehensive, and culturally relevant prevention programs for elderly people to reduce risks for falls. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the postural balance and muscle strength among women participating in the "Wing of Baianas" in the carnival parades. One hundred and ten women, with an average age of 67.4±5.9 years, were divided into two groups: Baianas group—elderly participants of the carnival parades in the “Wing of Baianas”, and a Control group of women who do not dance samba. Assessments included a physical activity questionnaire, isokinetic muscle strength testing for the knee extensors and flexors, and a postural balance assessment completed on a force platform. There were no differences between groups, for postural balance outcomes, during the eyes open condition; however, with eyes closed, there was a significant effect between groups (Baianas vs Control) in all variables. The Baianas group showed less medio-lateral displacement (p < 0.04); and anteroposterior displacement (p < 0.007); larger amplitudes of medio-lateral displacement (p < 0.001); and anteroposterior displacement (p < 0.001); increased mean velocity (p < 0.01); and elliptical area (p < 0.01) There were no differences in the isokinetic peak torque corrected by body weight, total work and flexor/extensor ratio. Participation in the Wing of Baianas is associated with better balance with closed eyes, but there were no differences between dancers and non-dancers for muscle strength. PMID:27906984

  3. Relative appendicular skeletal muscle mass is associated with isokinetic muscle strength and balance in healthy collegiate men.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung-Eun; Hong, Ju; Cha, Jun-Youl; Park, Jung-Min; Eun, Denny; Yoo, Jaehyun; Jee, Yong-Seok

    2016-11-01

    There are few studies on the relationship between skeletal muscle mass and balance in the young ages. We investigated the relationship between appendicular skeletal muscle mass, isokinetic muscle strength of lower extremity, and balance among healthy young men using relative skeletal muscle index. Thirty men were grouped according to relative appendicular skeletal muscle mass index: higher skeletal muscle group (n = 15) and lower skeletal muscle group (n = 15). Static and dynamic balance abilities were measured using the following: a test where participants stood on one leg with eyes closed, a modified Clinical Test of Sensory Interaction on Balance (mCTSIB) with eyes open and eyes closed, a stability test, and limits of stability test. The muscle strength of lower extremities was measured with an isokinetic analyser in hip, knee, and ankle joints. Participants with higher appendicular skeletal muscle mass were significantly more stable in maintaining dynamic balance than those with lower appendicular skeletal muscle mass. Moreover, appendicular skeletal muscle mass index was positively correlated with dynamic balance ability. Participants with higher appendicular skeletal muscle mass had stronger strength in the lower extremity, and there were significant differences in the isokinetic torque ratios between groups. From these results, it can be inferred that higher appendicular skeletal muscle mass relates to muscle strength and the alteration in the peak torque ratio of the lower extremity, contributing to the maintenance of balance.

  4. Inspiratory high frequency airway oscillation attenuates resistive loaded dyspnea and modulates respiratory function in young healthy individuals.

    PubMed

    Morris, Theresa; Sumners, David Paul; Green, David Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Direct chest-wall percussion can reduce breathlessness in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease and respiratory function may be improved, in health and disease, by respiratory muscle training (RMT). We tested whether high-frequency airway oscillation (HFAO), a novel form of airflow oscillation generation can modulate induced dyspnoea and respiratory strength and/or patterns following 5 weeks of HFAO training (n = 20) compared to a SHAM-RMT (conventional flow-resistive RMT) device (n = 15) in healthy volunteers (13 males; aged 20-36 yrs). HFAO causes oscillations with peak-to-peak amplitude of 1 cm H2O, whereas the SHAM-RMT device was identical but created no pressure oscillation. Respiratory function, dyspnoea and ventilation during 3 minutes of spontaneous resting ventilation, 1 minute of maximal voluntary hyperventilation and 1 minute breathing against a moderate inspiratory resistance, were compared PRE and POST 5-weeks of training (2 × 30 breaths at 70% peak flow, 5 days a week). Training significantly reduced NRS dyspnoea scores during resistive loaded ventilation, both in the HFAO (p = 0.003) and SHAM-RMT (p = 0.005) groups. Maximum inspiratory static pressure (cm H2O) was significantly increased by HFAO training (vs. PRE; p<0.001). Maximum inspiratory dynamic pressure was increased by training in both the HFAO (vs. PRE; p<0.001) and SHAM-RMT (vs. PRE; p = 0.021) groups. Peak inspiratory flow rate (L.s(-1)) achieved during the maximum inspiratory dynamic pressure manoeuvre increased significantly POST (vs. PRE; p = 0.001) in the HFAO group only. HFAO reduced inspiratory resistive loading-induced dyspnoea and augments static and dynamic maximal respiratory manoeuvre performance in excess of flow-resistive IMT (SHAM-RMT) in healthy individuals without the respiratory discomfort associated with RMT.

  5. The impact of obesity on skeletal muscle strength and structure through adolescence to old age.

    PubMed

    Tomlinson, D J; Erskine, R M; Morse, C I; Winwood, K; Onambélé-Pearson, Gladys

    2016-06-01

    Obesity is associated with functional limitations in muscle performance and increased likelihood of developing a functional disability such as mobility, strength, postural and dynamic balance limitations. The consensus is that obese individuals, regardless of age, have a greater absolute maximum muscle strength compared to non-obese persons, suggesting that increased adiposity acts as a chronic overload stimulus on the antigravity muscles (e.g., quadriceps and calf), thus increasing muscle size and strength. However, when maximum muscular strength is normalised to body mass, obese individuals appear weaker. This relative weakness may be caused by reduced mobility, neural adaptations and changes in muscle morphology. Discrepancies in the literature remain for maximal strength normalised to muscle mass (muscle quality) and can potentially be explained through accounting for the measurement protocol contributing to muscle strength capacity that need to be explored in more depth such as antagonist muscle co-activation, muscle architecture, a criterion valid measurement of muscle size and an accurate measurement of physical activity levels. Current evidence demonstrating the effect of obesity on muscle quality is limited. These factors not being recorded in some of the existing literature suggest a potential underestimation of muscle force either in terms of absolute force production or relative to muscle mass; thus the true effect of obesity upon skeletal muscle size, structure and function, including any interactions with ageing effects, remains to be elucidated.

  6. Force steadiness, muscle activity, and maximal muscle strength in subjects with subacromial impingement syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bandholm, Thomas; Rasmussen, Lars; Aagaard, Per; Jensen, Bente Rona; Diederichsen, Louise

    2006-11-01

    We investigated the effects of the subacromial impingement syndrome (SIS) on shoulder sensory-motor control and maximal shoulder muscle strength. It was hypothesized that both would be impaired due to chronic shoulder pain associated with the syndrome. Nine subjects with unilateral SIS who remained physically active in spite of shoulder pain and nine healthy matched controls were examined to determine isometric and isokinetic submaximal shoulder-abduction force steadiness at target forces corresponding to 20%, 27.5%, and 35% of the maximal shoulder abductor torque, and maximal shoulder muscle strength (MVC). Electromyographic (EMG) activity was assessed using surface and intramuscular recordings from eight shoulder muscles. Force steadiness was impaired in SIS subjects during concentric contractions at the highest target force level only, with muscle activity largely unaffected. No between-group differences in shoulder MVC were observed. The present data suggest that shoulder sensory-motor control is only mildly impaired in subjects with SIS who are able to continue with upper body physical activity in spite of shoulder pain. Thus, physical activity should be continued by patients with SIS, if possible, to avoid the loss in neural and muscle functions associated with inactivity.

  7. Muscle Strength and Speed Performance in Youth Soccer Players.

    PubMed

    Peñailillo, Luis; Espíldora, Francisco; Jannas-Vela, Sebastián; Mujika, Iñigo; Zbinden-Foncea, Hermann

    2016-04-01

    This study aimed to examine the relationship between maximum leg extension strength and sprinting performance in youth elite male soccer players. Sixty-three youth players (12.5 ± 1.3 years) performed 5 m, flying 15 m and 20 m sprint tests and a zigzag agility test on a grass field using timing gates. Two days later, subjects performed a one-repetition maximum leg extension test (79.3 ± 26.9 kg). Weak to strong correlations were found between leg extension strength and the time to perform 5 m (r = -0.39, p = 0.001), flying 15 m (r = -0.72, p < 0.001) and 20 m (r = -0.67, p < 0.001) sprints; between body mass and 5 m (r = -0.43, p < 0.001), flying 15 m (r = -0.75, p < 0.001), 20 m (r = -0.65, p < 0.001) sprints and agility (r =-0.29, p < 0.001); and between height and 5 m (r = -0.33, p < 0.01) and flying 15 m (r = -0.74, p < 0.001) sprints. Our results show that leg muscle strength and anthropometric variables strongly correlate with sprinting ability. This suggests that anthropometric characteristics should be considered to compare among youth players, and that youth players should undergo strength training to improve running speed.

  8. Muscle Strength and Speed Performance in Youth Soccer Players

    PubMed Central

    Peñailillo, Luis; Espíldora, Francisco; Jannas-Vela, Sebastián; Mujika, Iñigo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This study aimed to examine the relationship between maximum leg extension strength and sprinting performance in youth elite male soccer players. Sixty-three youth players (12.5 ± 1.3 years) performed 5 m, flying 15 m and 20 m sprint tests and a zigzag agility test on a grass field using timing gates. Two days later, subjects performed a one-repetition maximum leg extension test (79.3 ± 26.9 kg). Weak to strong correlations were found between leg extension strength and the time to perform 5 m (r = -0.39, p = 0.001), flying 15 m (r = -0.72, p < 0.001) and 20 m (r = -0.67, p < 0.001) sprints; between body mass and 5 m (r = -0.43, p < 0.001), flying 15 m (r = -0.75, p < 0.001), 20 m (r = -0.65, p < 0.001) sprints and agility (r =-0.29, p < 0.001); and between height and 5 m (r = -0.33, p < 0.01) and flying 15 m (r = -0.74, p < 0.001) sprints. Our results show that leg muscle strength and anthropometric variables strongly correlate with sprinting ability. This suggests that anthropometric characteristics should be considered to compare among youth players, and that youth players should undergo strength training to improve running speed. PMID:28149358

  9. Respiratory muscle strength effect on linear and nonlinear heart rate variability parameters in COPD patients

    PubMed Central

    Goulart, Cássia Da Luz; Simon, Julio Cristiano; Schneiders, Paloma De Borba; San Martin, Elisabete Antunes; Cabiddu, Ramona; Borghi-Silva, Audrey; Trimer, Renata; da Silva, Andréa Lúcia Gonçalves

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is recognized as a multisystemic inflammatory disease associated with extrapulmonary comorbidities, including respiratory muscle weakness and cardiovascular and cardiac autonomic regulation disorders. We investigated whether alterations in respiratory muscle strength (RMS) would affect cardiac autonomic modulation in COPD patients. Methods This study was a cross-sectional study done in ten COPD patients affected by moderate to very severe disease. The heart rate variability (HRV) signal was recorded using a Polar cardiofrequencimeter at rest in the sitting position (10 minutes) and during a respiratory sinus arrhythmia maneuver (RSA-M; 4 minutes). Linear analysis in the time and frequency domains and nonlinear analysis were performed on the recorded signals. RMS was assessed using a digital manometer, which provided the maximum inspiratory pressure (PImax) and the maximum expiratory pressure (PEmax). Results During the RSA-M, patients presented an HRV power increase in the low-frequency band (LFnu) (46.9±23.7 vs 75.8±27.2; P=0.01) and a decrease in the high-frequency band (HFnu) (52.8±23.5 vs 24.0±27.0; P=0.01) when compared to the resting condition. Significant associations were found between RMS and HRV spectral indices: PImax and LFnu (r=−0.74; P=0.01); PImax and HFnu (r=0.74; P=0.01); PEmax and LFnu (r=−0.66; P=0.01); PEmax and HFnu (r=0.66; P=0.03); between PEmax and sample entropy (r=0.83; P<0.01) and between PEmax and approximate entropy (r=0.74; P=0.01). Using a linear regression model, we found that PImax explained 44% of LFnu behavior during the RSA-M. Conclusion COPD patients with impaired RMS presented altered cardiac autonomic control, characterized by marked sympathetic modulation and a reduced parasympathetic response; reduced HRV complexity was observed during the RSA-M. PMID:27555757

  10. A method for comparing manual muscle strength measurements with joint moments during walking.

    PubMed

    Fosang, Adrienne; Baker, Richard

    2006-12-01

    This paper describes a protocol for dynamometer assisted manual muscle testing of the major muscle groups of the lower extremity and its application to 11 able-bodied children who also had conventional gait analysis to obtain joint kinetics. Data from the manual muscle testing was processed in such a way that the results for maximum muscle strength (grade 5) and resistance against gravity alone (grade 3) were presented in Nm/kg allowing direct comparison with conventional joint kinetics. The strength measurements of the hip muscles and the knee extensors were between two and three times the moments exerted during normal walking. Those of the knee flexors and dorsiflexors were about five times the joint moments. Measured plantarflexor strength was only just greater than the moment exerted during walking. These results, particularly those for the plantarflexors, question how valid it is to use measures of isometric muscle strength as indicators of muscle function during activity. The study also compares grade 3 muscle strength with both grade 5 strength and the maximum joint moments. For all muscle groups tested grade 3 muscle strength was less than the maximum moment exerted during normal walking. For the plantarflexors it was less than 1% of that moment. The study demonstrates that reliable isometric muscle testing is possible in able-bodied children but requires considerable care and is time consuming. More work is required to understand how measurements made in this way relate to how muscles function during activity.

  11. Deviation in the recovery of the lower limb and respiratory muscles of patients with polymyositis: a preliminary clinical study

    PubMed Central

    Nishikawa, Yuichi; Hosomi, Naohisa; Ueno, Hiroki; Kurashige, Takashi; Ochi, Kazuhide; Takahashi, Tetsuya; Orita, Naoya; Ueda,, Kazuyuki; Maruyama, Hirofumi; Kimura, Hiroaki; Matsumoto, Masayasu

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purposes of this study were to quantify the serial changes in lower limb and respiratory muscle strengths and to evaluate the acute effects of physiotherapy in polymyositis patients. [Subjects and Methods] Five patients (57.6 ± 9.0 years, 50 to 72; four females) received physiotherapy five days a week for four weeks. The lower limb and respiratory muscle strength, the % vital capacity, and the Barthel index were evaluated at baseline and after the intervention. [Results] The patient’s symptoms and creatine kinase values did not change, and after four weeks, all of the patients exhibited significantly increased outcomes compared with the baseline. However, the inspiratory muscle strength of the patients presented smaller improvements than the expiratory muscle strength. [Conclusion] Differential changes in inspiratory and expiratory muscle strength were observed following physiotherapy, and an unbalanced muscle distribution may explain the pathological and therapeutic effects. PMID:27799713

  12. Manual muscle testing: a method of measuring extremity muscle strength applied to critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Ciesla, Nancy; Dinglas, Victor; Fan, Eddy; Kho, Michelle; Kuramoto, Jill; Needham, Dale

    2011-04-12

    Survivors of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and other causes of critical illness often have generalized weakness, reduced exercise tolerance, and persistent nerve and muscle impairments after hospital discharge. Using an explicit protocol with a structured approach to training and quality assurance of research staff, manual muscle testing (MMT) is a highly reliable method for assessing strength, using a standardized clinical examination, for patients following ARDS, and can be completed with mechanically ventilated patients who can tolerate sitting upright in bed and are able to follow two-step commands. (7, 8) This video demonstrates a protocol for MMT, which has been taught to ≥ 43 research staff who have performed >800 assessments on >280 ARDS survivors. Modifications for the bedridden patient are included. Each muscle is tested with specific techniques for positioning, stabilization, resistance, and palpation for each score of the 6-point ordinal Medical Research Council scale. Three upper and three lower extremity muscles are graded in this protocol: shoulder abduction, elbow flexion, wrist extension, hip flexion, knee extension, and ankle dorsiflexion. These muscles were chosen based on the standard approach for evaluating patients for ICU-acquired weakness used in prior publications. (1,2).

  13. A NEW CLINICAL MUSCLE FUNCTION TEST FOR ASSESSMENT OF HIP EXTERNAL ROTATION STRENGTH: AUGUSTSSON STRENGTH TEST

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction Dynamic clinical tests of hip strength applicable on patients, non–athletes and athletes alike, are lacking. The aim of this study was therefore to develop and evaluate the reliability of a dynamic muscle function test of hip external rotation strength, using a novel device. A second aim was to determine if gender differences exist in absolute and relative hip strength using the new test. Methods Fifty–three healthy sport science students (34 women and 19 men) were tested for hip external rotation strength using a device that consisted of a strap connected in series with an elastic resistance band loop, and a measuring tape connected in parallel with the elastic resistance band. The test was carried out with the subject side lying, positioned in 45 ° of hip flexion and the knees flexed to 90 ° with the device firmly fastened proximally across the knees. The subject then exerted maximal concentric hip external rotation force against the device thereby extending the elastic resistance band. The displacement achieved by the subject was documented by the tape measure and the corresponding force production was calculated. Both right and left hip strength was measured. Fifteen of the subjects were tested on repeated occasions to evaluate test–retest reliability. Results No significant test–retest differences were observed. Intra–class correlation coefficients ranged 0.93–0.94 and coefficients of variation 2.76–4.60%. In absolute values, men were significantly stronger in hip external rotation than women (right side 13.2 vs 11.0 kg, p = 0.001, left side 13.2 vs 11.5 kg, p = 0.002). There were no significant differences in hip external rotation strength normalized for body weight (BW) between men and women (right side 0.17 kg/BW vs 0.17 kg/BW, p = 0.675, left side 0.17 kg/BW vs 0.18 kg/BW, p = 0.156). Conclusions The new muscle function test showed high reliability and thus could be useful for measuring dynamic hip

  14. Evaluation of Respiratory Muscle Strength and Pulmonary Function in Patients with Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease Type 2.

    PubMed

    Garcez, Catarina Andrade; Neves, Eduardo Luis Aquino; Melo, Saulo Maia D''avila; Nunes, Paula Santos; Barreto, Lidiane Carine Lima; Costa, Iandra Maria Pinheiro; Souza, Cynthia Coelho; Rezende, Rejane Lenier; Araújo, Adriano Antunes de Souza

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the pulmonary condition in a large family with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 2 (CMT2). Eighteen participants diagnosed with CMT2 and 20 healthy individuals were evaluated by spirometry and maximal expiratory and maximal inspiratory pressures (MEP and MIP, respectively). Clinical disability was measured with CMT neuropathy score (CMTNS; range 0-36). One control group (CG) comprising 20 individuals, matched for age, sex and body mass index, were used for comparison. Eight patients were female (44.5%) and 10 patients were male (55.5%); mean age was 31.8 years (range 11-79) and CMTNS range was 6-26. Differences between CMT2 and CG in the spirometry and respiratory muscle strength were statistically significant for all dimensions. There were significant correlations between CMTNS and MIP (Pearson = -0.581) and MEP (Pearson = -0.5090). The results of this study show that patients with CMT, in spite of not showing clinical signs of advanced respiratory impairment, may present subclinical respiratory changes. The respiratory comprise in the CMT disease can be silent and insidious without presenting characteristic clinical signals.

  15. Characteristics of locomotion, muscle strength, and muscle tissue in regenerating rat skeletal muscles.

    PubMed

    Iwata, Akira; Fuchioka, Satoshi; Hiraoka, Koichi; Masuhara, Mitsuhiko; Kami, Katsuya

    2010-05-01

    Although numerous studies have aimed to elucidate the mechanisms used to repair the structure and function of injured skeletal muscles, it remains unclear how and when movement recovers following damage. We performed a temporal analysis to characterize the changes in movement, muscle function, and muscle structure after muscle injury induced by the drop-mass technique. At each time-point, movement recovery was determined by ankle kinematic analysis of locomotion, and functional recovery was represented by isometric force. As a histological analysis, the cross-sectional area of myotubes was measured to examine structural regeneration. The dorsiflexion angle of the ankle, as assessed by kinematic analysis of locomotion, increased after injury and then returned to control levels by day 14 post-injury. The isometric force returned to normal levels by day 21 post-injury. However, the size of the myotubes did not reach normal levels, even at day 21 post-injury. These results indicate that recovery of locomotion occurs prior to recovery of isometric force and that functional recovery occurs earlier than structural regeneration. Thus, it is suggested that recovery of the movement and function of injured skeletal muscles might be insufficient as markers for estimating the degree of neuromuscular system reconstitution.

  16. Functional outcomes associated with expiratory muscle strength training: narrative review.

    PubMed

    Laciuga, Helena; Rosenbek, John C; Davenport, Paul W; Sapienza, Christine M

    2014-01-01

    This review presents the available evidence for the effects of expiratory muscle strength training (EMST) with the use of a pressure threshold device. The investigators used computerized database searches for studies reporting the outcomes of pressure threshold EMST published after 1994. A total of 24 selected articles presented outcomes related but not limited to respiratory function, such as speech, swallow, voice, and cough function in persons with neurologic conditions such as Parkinson disease, multiple sclerosis, and Lance-Adams syndrome; in persons with respiratory diseases, such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease; and in healthy young adults and sedentary and active elderly. Several studies demonstrated promising outcomes of EMST as a non-task-specific training for airway protection in persons with dysphagia secondary to neuromuscular impairments; however, further research is needed to confirm and generalize the reported findings.

  17. Impact of exacerbations of cystic fibrosis on muscle strength

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Adult patients with cystic fibrosis have peripheral muscle weakness, which is related to exercise intolerance and poor prognosis. The influence of acute exacerbations on muscle strength has been poorly studied. This study aimed to investigate whether quadriceps force (QF), as assessed with an involuntary technique, changes during intravenous antibiotics therapy (IVAT) for an exacerbation. Methods QF was measured in 20 patients using twitch stimulation of the femoral nerve at the day of hospitalization (day 1) and at termination (day 14) of the IVAT. Physical activity was monitored during IVAT using a SenseWear armband. Ten stable patients served as control subjects. Results QF did not change during exacerbation (potentiated twitch force at day 1: 140 ± 42 N, at day 14: 140 ± 47 N), but a decrease was observed in individual patients. Changes in twitch force during exacerbation were correlated with time spent in activities of at least moderate intensity (r = 0.61, p = 0.007). Conclusions QF does not systematically decrease during exacerbations of cystic fibrosis. Individual changes in QF are well correlated with daily time spent in activities of at least moderate intensity. PMID:23601143

  18. Inspiratory Resistance as a Potential Treatment for Orthostatic Intolerance and Hemorrhagic Shock

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-04-01

    Association REVIEW ARTICLE Inspiratory Resistance as a Potential Treatment for Orthostatic Intolerance and Hemorrhagic Shock Victor A. Convertino, William H...Cooke, and Keith G. Lurie CONVERTINO VA, COOKE WH, LURIE KG. Inspiratory resistance as a potential treatment for orthostatic intolerance and...central blood volume by forcing the thoracic muscles to develop increased negative pressure, thus drawing venous blood from extrathoracic cavi- ties

  19. Effects of Growth Hormone Administration on Muscle Strength in Men over 50 Years Old

    PubMed Central

    Tavares, A. B. W.; Micmacher, E.; Biesek, S.; Assumpção, R.; Redorat, R.; Veloso, U.; Vaisman, M.; Farinatti, P. T. V.; Conceição, F.

    2013-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH) use has been speculated to improve physical capacity in subjects without GH deficiency (GHD) through stimulation of collagen synthesis in the tendon and skeletal muscle, which leads to better exercise training and increased muscle strength. In this context, the use of GH in healthy elderly should be an option for increasing muscle strength. Our aim was to evaluate the effect of GH therapy on muscle strength in healthy men over 50 years old. Fourteen healthy men aged 50–70 years were evaluated at baseline for body composition and muscle strength (evaluated by leg press and bench press exercises, which focus primarily on quadriceps—lower body part and pectoralis major—upper body part—muscles, resp.). Subjects were randomised into 2 groups: GH therapy (7 subjects) and placebo (7 subjects) and reevaluated after 6 months of therapy. Thirteen subjects completed the study (6 subjects in the placebo group and 7 subjects in the GH group). Subjects of both groups were not different at baseline. After 6 months of therapy, muscle strength in the bench press responsive muscles did not increase in both groups and showed a statistically significant increase in the leg press responsive muscles in the GH group. Our study demonstrated an increase in muscle strength in the lower body part after GH therapy in healthy men. This finding must be considered and tested in frail older populations, whose physical incapacity is primarily caused by proximal muscle weakness. The trial was registered with NCT01853566. PMID:24382963

  20. Impact on nutrition on muscle strength and performance in older adults

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Muscle strength plays an important role in determining risk for falls, which result in fractures and other injuries. While bone loss has long been recognized as an inevitable consequence of aging, sarcopenia-the gradual loss of skeletal muscle mass and strength that occurs with advancing age-has rec...

  1. Do muscle mass, muscle density, strength and physical function similarly influence risk of hospitalization in older adults?

    PubMed Central

    Cawthon, Peggy Mannen; Fox, Kathleen M.; Gandra, Shravanthi. R.; Delmonico, Matthew J.; Chiou, Chiun-Fang; Anthony, Mary S.; Sewall, Ase; Goodpaster, Bret; Satterfield, Suzanne; Cummings, Steven R.; Harris, Tamara B.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To examine the association between strength, function, lean mass, muscle density and risk of hospitalization. Design Prospective cohort stud Setting Two U.S. clinical centers Participants Adults aged 70 – 80 years (N=3,011) from the Health, Aging and Body Composition Study. Measurements Measures included grip strength; knee extension strength; lean mass; walking speed; chair stand pace. Thigh computed tomography scans assessed muscle area and density (a proxy for muscle fat infiltration). Hospitalizations were confirmed by local review of medical records. Negative binomial regression models estimated incident rate ratios (IRRs) of hospitalization for race/sex specific quartiles of each muscle/function parameter separately. Multivariate models adjusted for age, body mass index, health status and coexisting medical conditions. Results During an average 4.7 years of follow-up, 1,678 (55.7%) participants experienced ≥1 hospitalization. Participants in the lowest quartile of muscle density were more likely to be subsequently hospitalized (multivariate IRR: 1.47, 95% CI: 1.24, 1.73) compared to the highest quartile. Similarly, participants with the weakest grip strength were at increased risk of hospitalization (MIRR: 1.52, 95% CI: 1.30, 1.78, Q1 vs. Q4). Comparable results were seen for knee strength, walking pace and chair stands pace. Lean mass and muscle area were not associated with risk of hospitalization. Conclusion Weak strength, poor function and low muscle density, but not muscle size or lean mass, were associated with an increased risk of hospitalization. Interventions to reduce the disease burden associated with sarcopenia should focus on increasing muscle strength and improving physical function rather than simply increasing lean mass. PMID:19682143

  2. Effects of Age on Strength and Morphology of Toe Flexor Muscles.

    PubMed

    Mickle, Karen J; Angin, Salih; Crofts, Gillian; Nester, Christopher J

    2016-12-01

    Study Design Descriptive, cross-sectional. Background Age-related muscle atrophy is common in lower-limb muscles. We therefore speculated that foot muscles may also diminish with age. However, there is a paucity of literature characterizing foot muscle strength and morphology, and any relationship between these 2, in older people. Objective To compare the strength and size of the toe flexor muscles of older adults relative to their younger counterparts. Methods Seventeen young adults with a normal foot type were matched by sex and body mass index to 17 older adults with a normal foot type, from an available sample of 41 younger (18 to 50 years of age) and 44 older (60 or more years of age) adults. Among the matched groups (n = 34), muscle thickness and cross-sectional area for 5 intrinsic and 2 extrinsic toe flexor muscles were obtained using ultrasound. Toe strength was assessed using a pressure platform. Differences in toe flexor strength and muscle size between the young and older matched groups were determined using analysis of covariance (controlling for height). Correlations between strength and size of the toe flexor muscles of the pooled group (n = 34) were also calculated. Results Toe strength and the thickness and cross-sectional area of most foot muscles were significantly reduced in the older adults (P<.05). Hallux and toe flexor strength values were strongly correlated with the size of the intrinsic toe flexor muscles. Conclusion The smaller foot muscles appear to be affected by sarcopenia in older adults. This could contribute to reduced toe flexion force production and may affect the ability of older people to walk safely. Interventions aimed at reversing foot muscle atrophy in older people require further investigation. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2016;46(12):1065-1070. Epub 29 Oct 2016. doi:10.2519/jospt.2016.6597.

  3. Detraining outcomes with expiratory muscle strength training in Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Troche, Michelle S; Rosenbek, John C; Okun, Michael S; Sapienza, Christine M

    2014-01-01

    Expiratory muscle strength training (EMST) is efficacious for improving maximum expiratory pressure (MEP), cough function, and swallowing safety in Parkinson disease (PD). However, there are no published reports describing detraining effects following EMST in persons with PD. Moreover, there are no published reports describing detraining effects following any behavioral swallowing intervention. Ten participants with PD underwent 3 mo of detraining following EMST. Measures of MEP and swallowing safety were made prior to beginning EMST (baseline), posttreatment (predetraining), and 3 mo postdetraining. Participants demonstrated, on average, a 19% improvement in MEP from pre- to post-EMST. Following the 3 mo detraining period, MEP declined by 2% yet remained 17% above the baseline value. No statistically significant changes were found in swallowing safety from post-EMST to postdetraining period. Following the 3 mo detraining period, seven participants demonstrated no change in swallowing safety, one worsened, and two had improvements. This preliminary study highlights the need for the design of maintenance programs to sustain function following intensive periods of training.

  4. Correlation between Limb Muscle Endurance, Strength, and Functional Capacity in People with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Törnberg, Anna; Wadell, Karin

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the correlation between limb muscle function (endurance and strength) and functional capacity in upper limbs (ULs) and lower limbs (LLs) of people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Method: This article describes a secondary analysis of data from a randomized controlled trial. A stationary dynamometer was used to measure isokinetic muscle strength and endurance; the 6-minute walk test, the 6-minute pegboard and ring test, and the unsupported UL exercise test were used to measure functional capacity. Results: Participants were 44 adults with COPD. Muscle strength and endurance in ULs and LLs demonstrated a moderate to strong correlation with functional capacity. When controlling for muscle strength, muscle endurance was moderately correlated with functional capacity in ULs and LLs, but when controlling for muscle endurance, there was no positive and significant correlation between muscle strength and functional capacity for the ULs or LLs. Conclusions: Functional capacity seems to be more closely related to limb muscle endurance than to limb muscle strength in people with COPD. PMID:27504047

  5. Muscle strength and kinetic gait pattern in children with bilateral spastic CP.

    PubMed

    Eek, Meta Nyström; Tranberg, Roy; Beckung, Eva

    2011-03-01

    Cerebral palsy is often associated with an abnormal gait pattern. This study put focus on relation between muscle strength and kinetic gait pattern in children with bilateral spastic cerebral palsy and compares them with a reference group. In total 20 children with CP and 20 typically developing children participated. They were all assessed with measurement of muscle strength in eight muscle groups in the legs and a 3-dimensional gait analysis including force data. It was found that children with CP were not only significantly weaker in all muscle groups but also walked with slower velocity and shorter stride length when compared with the reference group. Gait moments differed at the ankle level with significantly lower moments in children with CP. Gait moments were closer to the maximal muscle strength in the group of children with CP. Furthermore a correlation between plantarflexing gait moment and muscle strength was observed in six of the eight muscle groups in children with CP, a relation not found in the reference group. A similar pattern was seen between muscle strength and generating ankle power with a rho=0.582-0.766. The results of this study state the importance of the relationship of the overall muscle strength pattern in the lower extremity, not only the plantarflexors.

  6. Effects of Vitamin D Supplementation on Muscle Strength in Athletes: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Chien-Ming; Ismaeel, Ahmed; Griffis, Rachel B; Weems, Suzy

    2017-02-01

    Chiang, C-m, Ismaeel, A, Griffis, RB, and Weems, S. Effects of vitamin D supplementation on muscle strength in athletes: A systematic review. J Strength Cond Res 31(2): 566-574, 2017-The purpose of this systematic review of the literature was to investigate the effects of vitamin D supplementation on muscle strength in athletes. A computerized literature search of 3 databases (PubMed, MEDLINE, and Scopus) was performed. Included in the review were randomized controlled trials (RCTs), published in English, which measured serum vitamin D concentrations and muscle strength in healthy, athletic participants aged 18-45 years. Quality was assessed using the PEDro scale. Five RCTs and 1 controlled trial were identified, and quality assessment showed 5 trials were of "excellent quality" and 1 was of "good quality." Trials lasted from 4 weeks to 6 months and dosages ranged from 600 to 5,000 International Units (IU) per day. Vitamin D2 was found to be ineffective at impacting muscle strength in both studies wherein it was administered. In contrast, vitamin D3 was shown to have a positive impact on muscle strength. In 2 studies, strength outcome measures were significantly improved after supplementation (p ≤ 0.05). In the other 2 studies administering vitamin D3, there were trends for improved muscle strength. Specifically, improvements in strength ranged from 1.37 to 18.75%. Additional studies are needed to confirm these associations.

  7. Quantitative MRI and strength measurements in the assessment of muscle quality in Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Wokke, B H; van den Bergen, J C; Versluis, M J; Niks, E H; Milles, J; Webb, A G; van Zwet, E W; Aartsma-Rus, A; Verschuuren, J J; Kan, H E

    2014-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess leg muscle quality and give a detailed description of leg muscle involvement in a series of Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients using quantitative MRI and strength measurements. Fatty infiltration, as well as total and contractile (not fatty infiltrated) cross sectional areas of various leg muscles were determined in 16 Duchenne patients and 11 controls (aged 8-15). To determine specific muscle strength, four leg muscle groups (quadriceps femoris, hamstrings, anterior tibialis and triceps surae) were measured and related to the amount of contractile tissue. In patients, the quadriceps femoris showed decreased total and contractile cross sectional area, attributable to muscle atrophy. The total, but not the contractile, cross sectional area of the triceps surae was increased in patients, corresponding to hypertrophy. Specific strength decreased in all four muscle groups of Duchenne patients, indicating reduced muscle quality. This suggests that muscle hypertrophy and fatty infiltration are two distinct pathological processes, differing between muscle groups. Additionally, the quality of remaining muscle fibers is severely reduced in the legs of Duchenne patients. The combination of quantitative MRI and quantitative muscle testing could be a valuable outcome parameter in longitudinal studies and in the follow-up of therapeutic effects.

  8. Muscle strength training to improve gait function in children with cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Eek, Meta Nyström; Tranberg, Roy; Zügner, Roland; Alkema, Kristina; Beckung, Eva

    2008-10-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the influence of muscle strength training on gait outcomes in children with cerebral palsy. Sixteen children (two females, 14 males, Gross Motor Function Classification System levels I-II, mean age 12y 6mo, range 9y 4mo-15y 4mo) underwent muscle strength measurement using a handheld device, Gross Motor Function Measure (GMFM) assessment, three-dimensional gait analysis, joint range of motion assessment, and grading of spasticity before and after 8 weeks of training. All participants had a diagnosis of spastic diplegia and could walk without aids. Training consisted of exercises for lower extremity muscles with free weights, rubber bands, and body weight for resistance, three times a week. Values for muscle strength below normal were identified in all children; this was most pronounced at the ankle, followed by the hip muscles. After training, muscle strength and GMFM scores increased, velocity was unchanged, stride length increased, and cadence was reduced. There was an increase in hip extensor moment and power generated at push off. Eight weeks of muscle strength training can increase muscle strength and improve gait function.

  9. [Effect of respiratory muscle fatigue on their function during exercise].

    PubMed

    Sliwiński, P; Yan, S; Gauthier, A P; Macklem, P T

    1996-01-01

    We evaluated the effect of global inspiratory muscle fatigue (GF) on respiratory muscle control during exercise at 30%, 60%, and 90% of maximal power output in normal subjects. Fatigue was induced by breathing against a high inspiratory resistance until exhaustion. Respiratory pressures, breathing pattern, and perceived breathlessness were measured. Induction of GF had no effect on the ventilatory parameters during mild and moderate exercise. It altered, however, ventilatory response to heavy exercise by increasing breathing frequency and minute ventilation, with minor changes in tidal volume. This was accompanied by an increase in perceived breathlessness. GF significantly increased both the tonic and phasic activities of abdominal muscles that allowed 1) the diaphragm to maintain its function while developing less pressure, 2) the same tidal volume with lesser shortening of the rib cage inspiratory muscles, and 3) relaxation of the abdominal muscles to contribute to lung inflation. The increased work performed by the abdominal muscles may, however, lead to a reduction in their strength. GF may impair exercise performance in some healthy subjects that is probably not related to excessive breathlessness or other ventilatory factors. The respiratory system is remarkably adaptable in maintaining ventilation during exercise even with impaired inspiratory muscle contractility.

  10. Effect of muscle contraction strength on gating of somatosensory magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Sugawara, Kazuhiro; Onishi, Hideaki; Yamashiro, Koya; Kotan, Shinichi; Kojima, Sho; Miyaguchi, Shota; Tsubaki, Atsuhiro; Kirimoto, Hikari; Tamaki, Hiroyuki; Shirozu, Hiroshi; Kameyama, Shigeki

    2016-11-01

    Afferent somatosensory information is modulated before the afferent input arrives at the primary somatosensory cortex during voluntary movement. The aim of the present study was to clarify the effect of muscular contraction strength on somatosensory evoked fields (SEFs) during voluntary movement. In addition, we examined the differences in gating between innervated and non-innervated muscle during contraction. We investigated the changes in gating effect by muscular contraction strength and innervated and non-innervated muscles in human using 306-channel magnetoencephalography. SEFs were recorded following the right median nerve stimulation in a resting condition and during isometric muscular contractions from 10 % electromyographic activity (EMG), 20 and 30 % EMG of the right extensor indicis muscle and abductor pollicis brevis muscle. Our results showed that the equivalent current dipole (ECD) strength for P35m decreased with increasing strength of muscular contraction of the right abductor pollicis brevis muscle. However, changes were observed only at 30 % EMG contraction level of the right extensor indicis muscle, which was not innervated by the median nerve. There were no significant changes in the peak latencies and ECD locations of each component in all conditions. The ECD strength did not differ significantly for N20m and P60m regardless of the strength of muscular contraction and innervation. Therefore, we suggest that the gating of SEF waveforms following peripheral nerve stimulation was affected by the strength of muscular contraction and innervation of the contracting muscle.

  11. Effects of a Strength Training Session After an Exercise Inducing Muscle Damage on Recovery Kinetics.

    PubMed

    Abaïdia, Abd-Elbasset; Delecroix, Barthélémy; Leduc, Cédric; Lamblin, Julien; McCall, Alan; Baquet, Georges; Dupont, Grégory

    2017-01-01

    Abaïdia, A-E, Delecroix, B, Leduc, C, Lamblin, J, McCall, A, Baquet, G, and Dupont, G. Effects of a strength training session after an exercise inducing muscle damage on recovery kinetics. J Strength Cond Res 31(1): 115-125, 2017-The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of an upper-limb strength training session the day after an exercise inducing muscle damage on recovery of performance. In a randomized crossover design, subjects performed the day after the exercise, on 2 separate occasions (passive vs. active recovery conditions) a single-leg exercise (dominant in one condition and nondominant in the other condition) consisting of 5 sets of 15 eccentric contractions of the knee flexors. Active recovery consisted of performing an upper-body strength training session the day after the exercise. Creatine kinase, hamstring strength, and muscle soreness were assessed immediately and 20, 24, and 48 hours after exercise-induced muscle damage. The upper-body strength session, after muscle-damaging exercise accelerated the recovery of slow concentric force (effect size = 0.65; 90% confidence interval = -0.06 to 1.32), but did not affect the recovery kinetics for the other outcomes. The addition of an upper-body strength training session the day after muscle-damaging activity does not negatively affect the recovery kinetics. Upper-body strength training may be programmed the day after a competition.

  12. Neuromuscular adaptations during the acquisition of muscle strength, power and motor tasks.

    PubMed

    Moritani, T

    1993-01-01

    Neuromuscular performance is determined not only by the size of the involved muscles, but also by the ability of the nervous system to appropriately activate the muscles. Adaptive changes in the nervous system in response to training are referred to as neural adaptation. This article briefly reviews current evidence regarding the neural adaptations during the acquisition of muscle strength power and motor tasks and will be organized under four main topics, namely: (i) muscle strength gain: neural factors versus hypertrophy, (ii) neural adaptations during power training, (iii) neuromuscular adaptations during the acquisition of a motor task, and (iv) neuromuscular adaptations during a ballistic movement.

  13. Strength measurements of the intrinsic hand muscles: a review of the development and evaluation of the Rotterdam intrinsic hand myometer.

    PubMed

    Schreuders, Ton A R; Selles, Ruud W; Roebroeck, Marij E; Stam, Henk J

    2006-01-01

    Numerous neurological diseases are accompanied by atrophy of the intrinsic muscles of the hand. Muscle strength testing of these muscles is frequently used for clinical decision making. Traditionally, these strength measurements have focused on manual muscle testing (MMT) or on grip and pinch strength dynamometry. We have developed a hand-held dynamometer, the Rotterdam Intrinsic Hand Myometer (RIHM), to measure this intrinsic muscle strength. The RIHM was designed such that it can measure a wide range of muscle groups, such as the abduction and adduction strength of the little finger and index finger, the opposition, palmar abduction (anteposition) and opposition strength of the thumb, and intrinsic muscles of the fingers combined in the intrinsic plus position. We found that the reliability of RIHM measurements in nerve injury patients was comparable to grip and pinch strength measurements and is appropriate to study the functional recovery of the intrinsic muscles of the hand in isolation. We have applied the RIHM in a recent study on the long-term outcome of muscle strength in patients with ulnar and median nerve injuries and found that while recovery of grip and pinch strength was relatively good, recovery of the ulnar nerve innervated muscles measured with the RIHM was poor. This poor recovery could not be detected with manual muscle strength testing or with grip and pinch dynamometry. We conclude that the RIHM provides an accurate clinical assessment of the muscle strength of the intrinsic hand muscles that adds valuable information to MMT and grip and pinch dynamometry.

  14. High-Intensity Inspiratory Protocol Increases Heart Rate Variability in Myocardial Revascularization Patients

    PubMed Central

    Caruso, Flavia Cristina Rossi; Simões, Rodrigo Polaquini; Reis, Michel Silva; Guizilini, Solange; Alves, Vera Lucia dos Santos; Papa, Valeria; Arena, Ross; Borghi-Silva, Audrey

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate heart rate variability during an inspiratory muscle endurance protocol at three different load levels [30%, 60% and 80% of maximal inspiratory pressure], in patients who had previously undergone coronary artery bypass grafting. Methods: Nineteen late postoperative myocardial revascularization patients participating in a cardiovascular rehabilitation program were studied. Maximal inspiratory pressure maneuvers were performed. An inspiratory muscle endurance protocol at 30%, 60% and 80% of maximal inspiratory pressure was applied for four minutes each, in random order. Heart rate and RR intervals were recorded and heart rate variability was analyzed by time (RMSSD-the mean of the standard deviations for all R-R intervals, and RMSM-root-mean square differences of successive R-R intervals) and frequency domains indices (high and low frequency) in normalized units. ANOVA for repeated measurements was used to compare heart rate variability indices and Student t-test was used to compare the maximal inspiratory pressure and maximal expiratory pressure values. Results: Heart rate increased during performance of maximal respiratory pressures maneuvers, and the maximal inspiratory pressure and maximal expiratory pressure mean values were significantly lower than predicted values (P<0.05). RMSSD increased significantly at 80% in relation to rest and 30% of maximal inspiratory pressure and RMSM decreased at 30% and 60% of maximal inspiratory pressure in relation to rest (P<0.05). Additionally, there was significant and progressive decrease in low frequency and increase in high frequency at 30%, 60% and 80% of maximal inspiratory pressure in relation to the resting condition. Conclusion: These results suggest that respiratory muscle training at high intensities can promote greater parasympathetic activity and it may confer important benefits during a rehabilitation program in post-coronary artery bypass grafting. PMID:27074273

  15. Relationships between Lower Limb Muscle Strength and Locomotor Capacity in Children and Adolescents with Cerebral Palsy Who Walk Independently

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferland, Chantale; Lepage, Celine; Moffet, Helene; Maltais, Desiree B.

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to quantify relationships between lower limb muscle strength and locomotor capacity for children and adolescents with cerebral palsy (CP) to identify key muscle groups for strength training. Fifty 6- to 16-year-olds with CP (Gross Motor Function Classification System level I or II) participated. Isometric muscle strength of hip…

  16. Effect of trapezius muscle strength on three-dimensional scapular kinematics

    PubMed Central

    Turgut, Elif; Duzgun, Irem; Baltaci, Gul

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to investigate the effect of trapezius muscle isometric strength on three-dimensional scapular kinematics in asymptomatic shoulders. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty asymptomatic subjects were included to the study. Isometric strengths of the upper, middle, and lower trapezius muscle were measured using a handheld dynamometer. Three-dimensional scapular kinematics was recorded by an electromagnetic tracking device during frontal and sagittal plane elevation. For each muscle, the cut-off value for muscle strength was determined with the upper bound of the 95% confidence interval, and Student’s t-test was used to compare the scapular kinematics between subjects with relatively weaker or stronger trapezius muscles. [Results] Shoulders with stronger upper trapezius muscles showed greater upward scapular rotation at 30°, 60°, 90°, and 120° of elevation in the frontal plane. Shoulders with stronger middle trapezius had greater scapular upward rotation at 90° of elevation in the frontal plane. Shoulders with stronger lower trapezius showed greater scapular posterior tilt at 90° of elevation in the sagittal plane. [Conclusion] This study’s findings showed that isometric strength of the trapezius muscle affects upward scapular rotation and posterior tilt in asymptomatic shoulders. Therefore, trapezius muscle strength should be assessed and potential weakness should be addressed in shoulder rehabilitation programs. PMID:27390435

  17. Cycle training induces muscle hypertrophy and strength gain: strategies and mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Ozaki, Hayao; Loenneke, J P; Thiebaud, R S; Abe, T

    2015-03-01

    Cycle training is widely performed as a major part of any exercise program seeking to improve aerobic capacity and cardiovascular health. However, the effect of cycle training on muscle size and strength gain still requires further insight, even though it is known that professional cyclists display larger muscle size compared to controls. Therefore, the purpose of this review is to discuss the effects of cycle training on muscle size and strength of the lower extremity and the possible mechanisms for increasing muscle size with cycle training. It is plausible that cycle training requires a longer period to significantly increase muscle size compared to typical resistance training due to a much slower hypertrophy rate. Cycle training induces muscle hypertrophy similarly between young and older age groups, while strength gain seems to favor older adults, which suggests that the probability for improving in muscle quality appears to be higher in older adults compared to young adults. For young adults, higher-intensity intermittent cycling may be required to achieve strength gains. It also appears that muscle hypertrophy induced by cycle training results from the positive changes in muscle protein net balance.

  18. Relation between systemic inflammatory markers, peripheral muscle mass, and strength in limb muscles in stable COPD patients

    PubMed Central

    Ferrari, Renata; Caram, Laura MO; Faganello, Marcia M; Sanchez, Fernanda F; Tanni, Suzana E; Godoy, Irma

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the association between systemic inflammatory mediators and peripheral muscle mass and strength in COPD patients. Fifty-five patients (69% male; age: 64±9 years) with mild/very severe COPD (defined as forced expiratory volume in the first second [FEV1] =54%±23%) were evaluated. We evaluated serum concentrations of IL-8, CRP, and TNF-α. Peripheral muscle mass was evaluated by computerized tomography (CT); midthigh cross-sectional muscle area (MTCSA) and midarm cross-sectional muscle area (MACSA) were obtained. Quadriceps, triceps, and biceps strength were assessed through the determination of the one-repetition maximum. The multiple regression results, adjusted for age, sex, and FEV1%, showed positive significant association between MTCSA and leg extension (0.35 [0.16, 0.55]; P=0.001), between MACSA and triceps pulley (0.45 [0.31, 0.58]; P=0.001), and between MACSA and biceps curl (0.34 [0.22, 0.47]; P=0.001). Plasma TNF-α was negatively associated with leg extension (−3.09 [−5.99, −0.18]; P=0.04) and triceps pulley (−1.31 [−2.35, −0.28]; P=0.01), while plasma CRP presented negative association with biceps curl (−0.06 [−0.11, −0.01]; P=0.02). Our results showed negative association between peripheral muscle mass (evaluated by CT) and muscle strength and that systemic inflammation has a negative influence in the strength of specific groups of muscles in individuals with stable COPD. This is the first study showing association between systemic inflammatory markers and strength in upper limb muscles. PMID:26345641

  19. Relation between systemic inflammatory markers, peripheral muscle mass, and strength in limb muscles in stable COPD patients.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, Renata; Caram, Laura M O; Faganello, Marcia M; Sanchez, Fernanda F; Tanni, Suzana E; Godoy, Irma

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the association between systemic inflammatory mediators and peripheral muscle mass and strength in COPD patients. Fifty-five patients (69% male; age: 64±9 years) with mild/very severe COPD (defined as forced expiratory volume in the first second [FEV1] =54%±23%) were evaluated. We evaluated serum concentrations of IL-8, CRP, and TNF-α. Peripheral muscle mass was evaluated by computerized tomography (CT); midthigh cross-sectional muscle area (MTCSA) and midarm cross-sectional muscle area (MACSA) were obtained. Quadriceps, triceps, and biceps strength were assessed through the determination of the one-repetition maximum. The multiple regression results, adjusted for age, sex, and FEV1%, showed positive significant association between MTCSA and leg extension (0.35 [0.16, 0.55]; P=0.001), between MACSA and triceps pulley (0.45 [0.31, 0.58]; P=0.001), and between MACSA and biceps curl (0.34 [0.22, 0.47]; P=0.001). Plasma TNF-α was negatively associated with leg extension (-3.09 [-5.99, -0.18]; P=0.04) and triceps pulley (-1.31 [-2.35, -0.28]; P=0.01), while plasma CRP presented negative association with biceps curl (-0.06 [-0.11, -0.01]; P=0.02). Our results showed negative association between peripheral muscle mass (evaluated by CT) and muscle strength and that systemic inflammation has a negative influence in the strength of specific groups of muscles in individuals with stable COPD. This is the first study showing association between systemic inflammatory markers and strength in upper limb muscles.

  20. Responsiveness of muscle size and strength to physical training in very elderly people: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Stewart, V H; Saunders, D H; Greig, C A

    2014-02-01

    The purpose of this review was to determine whether very elderly muscle (>75 years) hypertrophies in response to physical training. The databases MEDLINE; EMBASE; CINAHL Plus and SPORTDiscus were systematically literature searched with reference lists of all included studies and relevant reviews. Controlled trials (inactive elderly control group) involving healthy elderly participants over 75 years participating in an intervention complying with an established definition of physical training were included. Data extraction and quality assessment were performed using the PEDro scale. Data analysis was performed on muscle size and strength using RevMan (software version 5.1). Four studies were included of which four of four measured changes in gross muscle size. Training induced increases in muscle size from 1.5%-15.6% were reported in three of four studies, and one of four studies reported a decrease in muscle size (3%). The greatest gain in muscle mass was observed in a study of whole body vibration training. Meta-analysis of three studies found an increase of thigh muscle cross-sectional area (mean difference 2.31 cm(2) or 0.2%, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.62 to 4.00; P = 0.008) and muscle strength (standardized mean difference 1.04, 95% CI: 0.65 to 1.43; P < 0.001). Physical training when delivered as resistance training has the ability to elicit hypertrophy and increase muscle strength in very elderly muscle.

  1. Relationships among the muscle strength properties as assessed through various tests and variables

    PubMed Central

    Prebeg, Goran; Cuk, Ivan; Suzovic, Dejan; Stojiljkovic, Stanimir; Mitic, Dusan; Jaric, Slobodan

    2012-01-01

    We tested the hypotheses that the individual strength properties depend on the applied test and the variable extracted, rather than on the muscle group tested. Flexor and extensor muscles acting in the knee and elbow joint were tested in 58 participants. The standard strength test (SST; based on sustained maximum contraction) and alternating consecutive maximum contractions (ACMC; alternating contractions of antagonistic muscles) performed under static conditions were separately applied to provide the maximum force (F) and the rate of force development (RFD) of each tested muscle. The principal component analysis applied on all 16 variables revealed 3 factors that explained 85.5% of the total variance. Contrary to our hypotheses, the individual factors were loaded with the variables recorded from individual muscles, rather than with either the particular variables or tests. The present findings suggest that recording both F and RFD in routine strength testing procedures could be redundant since they may assess the same strength property of the tested muscle. In addition, ACMC may be a feasible alternative to SST since it could assess the same strength properties from two antagonist muscles through a single trial, while being based on relatively low and transient forces. PMID:23182793

  2. Mouse Plantar Flexor Muscle Size and Strength After Inactivity and Training

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-07-01

    suspension. Keywords: eccentric contraction , microgravity , exercise . SPACEFLIGHT CAUSES atrophy and strength loss in antigravity skeletal muscles...isometric, concentric, and eccentric contractions pre- served muscle mass in the rat medial gastrocnemius ( 2 ), the use of isometric resistance exercise ...Adams GR , Haddad F , Bodell PW , Tran PD , Baldwin KM . Com- bined isometric, concentric, and eccentric resistance exercise prevents

  3. Reduced Neck Muscle Strength and Altered Muscle Mechanical Properties in Cervical Dystonia Following Botulinum Neurotoxin Injections: A Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Mustalampi, Sirpa; Ylinen, Jari; Korniloff, Katariina; Weir, Adam; Häkkinen, Arja

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate changes in the strength and mechanical properties of neck muscles and disability in patients with cervical dystonia (CD) during a 12-week period following botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) injections. Methods Eight patients with CD volunteered for this prospective clinical cohort study. Patients had received BoNT injections regularly in neck muscles at three-month intervals for several years. Maximal isometric neck strength was measured by a dynamometer, and the mechanical properties of the splenius capitis were evaluated using two myotonometers. Clinical assessment was performed using the Toronto Western Spasmodic Torticollis Rating Scale (TWSTRS) before and at 2, 4, 8, and 12 weeks after the BoNT injections. Results Mean maximal isometric neck strength at two weeks after the BoNT injections decreased by 28% in extension, 25% in rotation of the affected side and 17% in flexion. At four weeks, muscle stiffness of the affected side decreased by 17% and tension decreased by 6%. At eight weeks, the muscle elasticity on the affected side increased by 12%. At two weeks after the BoNT injections, the TWSTRS-severity and TWSTRS-total scores decreased by 4.3 and 6.4, respectively. The strength, muscle mechanical properties and TWSTRS scores returned to baseline values at 12 weeks. Conclusions Although maximal neck strength and muscle tone decreased after BoNT injections, the disability improved. The changes observed after BoNT injections were temporary and returned to pre-injection levels within twelve weeks. Despite having a possible negative effect on function and decreasing neck strength, the BoNT injections improved the patients reported disability. PMID:26828215

  4. Evaluation of peripheral muscle strength of patients undergoing elective cardiac surgery: a longitudinal study

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Kelli Maria Souza; de Cerqueira Neto, Manoel Luiz; Carvalho, Vitor Oliveira; de Santana Filho, Valter Joviniano; da Silva Junior, Walderi Monteiro; Araújo Filho, Amaro Afrânio; Cerqueira, Telma Cristina Fontes; Cacau, Lucas de Assis Pereira

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Peripheral muscle strength has been little explored in the literature in the context of cardiac rehabilitation. Objective To evaluate the peripheral muscle strength of patients undergoing elective cardiac surgery. Methods This was a longitudinal observational study. The peripheral muscle strength was measured using isometric dynamometry lower limb (knee extensors and flexors) at three different times: preoperatively (M1), the day of discharge (M2) and hospital discharge (M3). Participants received physiotherapy pre and postoperatively during the days of hospitalization during the morning and afternoon. Results Twenty-two patients were evaluated. The values of peripheral muscle strength of knee extensors preoperative found were about 50% lower than those predicted for the healthy population. When comparing muscle strength prior (M1), with the remaining evaluation, found himself in a fall of 29% for the movement of knee extension and 25% for knee flexion in M2 and a decrease of 10% movement for knee extension and 13% for knee flexion in M3 when comparing with M1. Conclusion The values of peripheral muscle strength prior of the study patients were lower than predicted for the healthy population of the same age. After the surgical event this reduction is even more remarkable, being reestablished until the time of discharge, to values close to baseline. PMID:25372909

  5. Inspiratory flow pattern in humans.

    PubMed

    Lafortuna, C L; Minetti, A E; Mognoni, P

    1984-10-01

    The theoretical estimation of the mechanical work of breathing during inspiration at rest is based on the common assumption that the inspiratory airflow wave is a sine function of time. Different analytical studies have pointed out that from an energetic point of view a rectangular wave is more economical than a sine wave. Visual inspection of inspiratory flow waves recorded during exercise in humans and various animals suggests that a trend toward a rectangular flow wave may be a possible systematic response of the respiratory system. To test this hypothesis, the harmonic content of inspiratory flow waves that were recorded in six healthy subjects at rest, during exercise hyperventilation, and during a maximum voluntary ventilation (MVV) maneuver were evaluated by a Fourier analysis, and the results were compared with those obtained on sinusoidal and rectangular models. The dynamic work inherent in the experimental waves and in the sine-wave model was practically the same at rest; during exercise hyperventilation and MVV, the experimental wave was approximately 16-20% more economical than the sinusoidal one. It was concluded that even though at rest the sinusoidal model is a reasonably good approximation of inspiratory flow, during exercise and MVV, a physiological controller is probably operating in humans that can select a more economical inspiratory pattern. Other peculiarities of airflow wave during hyperventilation and some optimization criteria are also discussed.

  6. Deficits in muscle strength, mass, quality, and mobility in people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Roig, M; Eng, JJ; MacIntyre, DL; Road, JD; Reid, WD.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Mid-thigh intramuscular fat (IF), a feature of reduced muscle quality, is an important predictor of self-reported mobility loss in the elderly. This study compared measures of muscle strength, mass, IF, and mobility in people with COPD and healthy subjects. Associations between measures of muscle strength, mass, IF and mobility were explored. Methods Knee extensors muscle strength was assessed with an isokinetic dynamometer. Cross-sectional area (CSA) and IF of the thigh muscles were measured with computerized tomography. Mobility was assessed with the Repetitive Sit-To-Stand (RSTS), Self-Selected Gait Speed (SSGS) and Six-Minute Walk Distance (6MWT) tests. Results Twenty-one people of mean ± SD age 71.3 ± 8.1 years with COPD and a percentage predicted force expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) of 47.2 ± 12.9 and 21 healthy subjects matched for age (67.4 ± 8.6), gender and body mass participated in the study. People with COPD showed reduced average knee extensors strength (29%;p=0.016) CSA of the thigh muscles (17%;p=0.007) and mobility measures (~23%;p≤0.001). Knee extensors and flexors IF was twofold greater in people with COPD (p≤0.005). Measures of knee extensors muscle strength, mass and IF were not associated with mobility measures. Conclusions Compared with healthy controls, people with moderate to severe COPD show marked deficits in muscle strength, mass, quality as well as mobility. More studies with larger sample size are required to elucidate whether any of these muscle deficits can explain mobility impairments in COPD. PMID:21037481

  7. Inspiratory Resistance Maintains Arterial Pressure During Central Hypovolemia: Implications For Treatment Of Combat Casualties With Severe Hemorrhage

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-11-01

    INSPIRATORY RESISTANCE MAINTAINS ARTERIAL PRESSURE DURING CENTRAL HYPOVOLEMIA: IMPLICATIONS FOR TREATMENT OF COMBAT CASUALTIES WITH SEVERE...threshold device” (ITD) has recently been developed that acutely increases central blood volume by forcing the thoracic muscles to develop increased...supports further consideration of using inspiratory resistance as a countermeasure against circulatory collapse associated with orthostatic instability

  8. Effect of Loquat Leaf Extract on Muscle Strength, Muscle Mass, and Muscle Function in Healthy Adults: A Randomized, Double-Blinded, and Placebo-Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Choe, Sangmin; Lee, Chang-Hyung; Shin, Jin-Hong

    2016-01-01

    Ursolic acid (UA) is the major active component of the loquat leaf extract (LLE) and several previous studies have indicated that UA may have the ability to prevent skeletal muscle atrophy. Therefore, we conducted a randomized, double-blind, and placebo-controlled study to investigate the effects of the LLE on muscle strength, muscle mass, muscle function, and metabolic markers in healthy adults; the safety of the compound was also evaluated. We examined the peak torque/body weight at 60°/s knee extension, handgrip strength, skeletal muscle mass, physical performance, and metabolic parameters at baseline, as well as after 4 and 12 weeks of intervention. Either 500 mg of LLE (50.94 mg of UA) or a placebo was administered to fifty-four healthy adults each day for 12 weeks; no differences in muscle strength, muscle mass, and physical performance were observed between the two groups. However, the right-handgrip strength of female subjects in the LLE group was found to be significantly better than that of subjects in the control group (P = 0.047). Further studies are required to determine the optimal dose and duration of LLE supplementation to confirm the first-stage study results for clinical application. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier is NCT02401113. PMID:27999607

  9. No Decrease in Muscle Strength after Botulinum Neurotoxin-A Injection in Children with Cerebral Palsy

    PubMed Central

    Eek, Meta N.; Himmelmann, Kate

    2016-01-01

    Spasticity and muscle weakness is common in children with cerebral palsy (CP). Spasticity can be treated with botulinum neurotoxin-A (BoNT-A), but this drug has also been reported to induce muscle weakness. Our purpose was to describe the effect on muscle strength in the lower extremities after BoNT-A injections in children with CP. A secondary aim was to relate the effect of BoNT-A to gait pattern and range of motion. Twenty children with spastic CP were included in the study, 8 girls and 12 boys (mean age 7.7 years). All were able to walk without support, but with increased muscle tone interfering with motor function and gait pattern. Sixteen children had unilateral spastic CP and four bilateral spastic CP. Twenty-four legs received injections with BoNT-A in the plantar flexor muscles. The children were tested before treatment, around 6 weeks after at the peak effect of BoNT-A, and at 6 months after treatment, with measurement of muscle strength, gait analysis, and range of motion. There were no differences in muscle strength in plantar flexors of treated legs at peak effect compared to baseline. Six months after treatment, there was still no change in untreated plantar flexor muscles, but an increasing trend in plantar flexor strength in legs treated with BoNT-A. Parents reported positive effects in all children, graded as: small in three children, moderate in eight, and large in nine children. The gait analysis showed a small improvement in knee extension at initial contact, and there was a small increase in passive range of motion for ankle dorsiflexion. Two children had a period with transient weakness and pain. We found that voluntary force production in plantar flexor muscles did not decrease after BoNT-A, instead there was a trend to increased muscle strength at follow-up. The increase may be explained as an effect of the blocking of involuntary nerve impulses, leading to an opportunity to using and training the muscles with voluntary control. Adequate

  10. 25(OH) Vitamin D is Associated with Greater Muscle Strength in Healthy Men and Women

    PubMed Central

    Grimaldi, Adam S.; Parker, Beth A.; Capizzi, Jeffrey A.; Clarkson, Priscilla M.; Pescatello, Linda S.; White, C. Michael; Thompson, Paul D.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of the study was to examine the relationship between serum 25-hydroxy vitamin D (25(OH)D) levels and muscle strength in 419 healthy men and women over a broad age range (20-76 years of age). Methods Isometric and isokinetic strength of the arms and legs was measured using computerized dynamometry and its relation to vitamin D was tested in multivariate models controlling for age, gender, resting heart rate (HR), systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), body mass index (BMI), maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max,), physical activity counts, and season of vitamin D measurement. Results Vitamin D was significantly associated with arm and leg muscle strength when controlling for age and gender. When controlling for other covariates listed above, vitamin D remained directly related to both isometric and isokinetic arm strength but only to isometric leg strength. Conclusion These data suggests that there may be a differential effect of vitamin D on upper and lower body strength. The mechanism for this difference remains unclear but could be related to differences in androgenic effects or to differences in vitamin D receptor expression. Our study supports a direct relationship between vitamin D and muscle strength and suggests that vitamin D supplementation be evaluated to determine if it is an effective therapy to preserve muscle strength in adults. PMID:22895376

  11. Quantitative grip strength assessment as a means of evaluating muscle relaxation in mice.

    PubMed

    Nevins, M E; Nash, S A; Beardsley, P M

    1993-01-01

    The effects of various centrally acting drugs and some peripherally acting agents on the forelimb grip strength of CD-1 mice were explored. Forelimb grip strength was assessed by use of a strain gauge to measure the lateral pull force, in grams, exerted by mice as an index of muscle relaxation. The muscle relaxants, diazepam, midazolam, baclofen, methocarbamol, dantrolene sodium and the neuromuscular blocking agents, succinylcholine and pancuronium bromide, dose-dependently reduced forelimb grip strength. 2-Amino-7-phosphonoheptanoic acid (AP7), which has also been shown to have muscle relaxant effects, also reduced grip strength. Pentobarbital, ethanol, phencyclidine, ketamine and chlorpromazine reduced grip strength at doses which produced behavioral impairments. Lithium chloride, a toxic compound used to induce taste aversions, and clonidine, at doses which affect blood pressure, body temperature and locomotor activity, did not affect grip strength. In addition, stimulant doses of amphetamine and caffeine, but not of morphine, increased grip strength in a dose-dependent manner. These results extend previous findings and suggest that this forelimb grip strength procedure may be a useful screening test for the identification of the potential muscle relaxant properties of drugs.

  12. Effects of Different Environment Temperatures on Some Motor Characteristics and Muscle Strength

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Çakir, Ergün; Yüksek, Selami; Asma, Bülent; Arslanoglu, Erkal

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was determine the effects of different environment temperatures on motor characteristics and muscle strength. 15 athletes participated to study. Flexibility, vertical jump, hand grip-leg strength, 30m sprint, 20-meter shuttle run and coordination-agility tests were measured in five different environment temperatures. (22°C,…

  13. Behavioral inspiratory inhibition: inactivated and activated respiratory cells.

    PubMed

    Orem, J

    1989-11-01

    1. Eleven adult cats were trained to stop inspiration in response to a conditioning stimulus. The conditioning stimuli were presented at the onset of inspiration at intervals of approximately 20-30 s. Intratracheal pressures, diaphragmatic activity, and the extracellular activity of single medullary respiratory neurons were recorded while the animals performed this response. 2. Inactivation of the diaphragm to the conditioning stimuli occurred at latencies that varied from 40 to 110 ms and averaged 74 +/- 32 (SD) ms. 3. The subjects of this report are 38 inspiratory neurons that were inactivated and 19 cells that were activated when inspiration was stopped behaviorally. These cells were located in the region of n. ambiguus and the ventrolateral n. of tractus solitarius. 4. The inspiratory cells that were inactivated behaviorally had the following characteristics: 1) Most had an augmenting inspiratory profile with (n = 14) or without (n = 9) postinspiratory activity. Other types were inspiratory throughout (n = 5), decrementing inspiratory (n = 3), tonic inspiratory (n = 4), early inspiratory (n = 2), and expiratory-inspiratory (n = 1). 2) Their mean discharge rate was 39 +/- 2.7 (SE) Hz. 3) The latency of their inactivation in response to the task averaged 81 +/- 4.9 (SE) ms, and 4) Their activity corresponded closely to breathing not only during the behavioral response but also during eupnea (eta 2 = 0.62 +/- 0.04, mean +/- SE) and respiratory acts such as sneezing, sniffing, meowing, and purring. 5. The cells that were activated when inspiration was stopped behaviorally had the following characteristics. 1) As a group, they had discharge profiles related to every phase of the respiratory cycle. 2) They were recorded in the same region as, and often simultaneously with, respiratory cells that were inactivated. 3) Their activity patterns were highly variable such that the signal strength and consistency of the respiratory component of that activity were weak (eta 2

  14. The relationship between hamstring length and gluteal muscle strength in individuals with sacroiliac joint dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Massoud Arab, Amir; Reza Nourbakhsh, Mohammad; Mohammadifar, Ali

    2011-01-01

    It has been suggested that tight hamstring muscle, due to its anatomical connections, could be a compensatory mechanism for providing sacroiliac (SI) joint stability in patients with gluteal muscle weakness and SIJ dysfunction. The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between hamstring muscle length and gluteal muscle strength in subjects with sacroiliac joint dysfunction. A total of 159 subjects with and without low back pain (LBP) between the ages of 20 and 65 years participate in the study. Subjects were categorized into three groups: LBP without SIJ involvement (n = 53); back pain with SIJ dysfunction (n = 53); and no low back pain (n = 53). Hamstring muscle length and gluteal muscle strength were measured in all subjects. The number of individuals with gluteal weakness was significantly (P = 0.02) higher in subjects with SI joint dysfunction (66%) compared to those with LBP without SI joint dysfunctions (34%). In pooled data, there was no significant difference (P = 0.31) in hamstring muscle length between subjects with SI joint dysfunction and those with back pain without SI involvement. In subjects with SI joint dysfunction, however, those with gluteal muscle weakness had significantly (P = 0.02) shorter hamstring muscle length (mean = 158±11°) compared to individuals without gluteal weakness (mean = 165±10°). There was no statistically significant difference (P>0.05) in hamstring muscle length between individuals with and without gluteal muscle weakness in other groups. In conclusion, hamstring tightness in subjects with SI joint dysfunction could be related to gluteal muscle weakness. The slight difference in hamstring muscle length found in this study, although statistically significant, was not sufficient for making any definite conclusions. Further studies are needed to establish the role of hamstring muscle in SI joint stability. PMID:22294848

  15. The relationship between hamstring length and gluteal muscle strength in individuals with sacroiliac joint dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Massoud Arab, Amir; Reza Nourbakhsh, Mohammad; Mohammadifar, Ali

    2011-02-01

    It has been suggested that tight hamstring muscle, due to its anatomical connections, could be a compensatory mechanism for providing sacroiliac (SI) joint stability in patients with gluteal muscle weakness and SIJ dysfunction. The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between hamstring muscle length and gluteal muscle strength in subjects with sacroiliac joint dysfunction. A total of 159 subjects with and without low back pain (LBP) between the ages of 20 and 65 years participate in the study. Subjects were categorized into three groups: LBP without SIJ involvement (n = 53); back pain with SIJ dysfunction (n = 53); and no low back pain (n = 53). Hamstring muscle length and gluteal muscle strength were measured in all subjects. The number of individuals with gluteal weakness was significantly (P = 0.02) higher in subjects with SI joint dysfunction (66%) compared to those with LBP without SI joint dysfunctions (34%). In pooled data, there was no significant difference (P = 0.31) in hamstring muscle length between subjects with SI joint dysfunction and those with back pain without SI involvement. In subjects with SI joint dysfunction, however, those with gluteal muscle weakness had significantly (P = 0.02) shorter hamstring muscle length (mean = 158±11°) compared to individuals without gluteal weakness (mean = 165±10°). There was no statistically significant difference (P>0.05) in hamstring muscle length between individuals with and without gluteal muscle weakness in other groups. In conclusion, hamstring tightness in subjects with SI joint dysfunction could be related to gluteal muscle weakness. The slight difference in hamstring muscle length found in this study, although statistically significant, was not sufficient for making any definite conclusions. Further studies are needed to establish the role of hamstring muscle in SI joint stability.

  16. Loss of skeletal muscle strength by ablation of the sarcoplasmic reticulum protein JP45.

    PubMed

    Delbono, Osvaldo; Xia, Jinyu; Treves, Susan; Wang, Zhong-Min; Jimenez-Moreno, Ramon; Payne, Anthony M; Messi, María Laura; Briguet, Alexandre; Schaerer, Florian; Nishi, Miyuki; Takeshima, Hiroshi; Zorzato, Francesco

    2007-12-11

    Skeletal muscle constitutes approximately 40% of the human body mass, and alterations in muscle mass and strength may result in physical disability. Therefore, the elucidation of the factors responsible for muscle force development is of paramount importance. Excitation-contraction coupling (ECC) is a process during which the skeletal muscle surface membrane is depolarized, causing a transient release of calcium from the sarcoplasmic reticulum that activates the contractile proteins. The ECC machinery is complex, and the functional role of many of its protein components remains elusive. This study demonstrates that deletion of the gene encoding the sarcoplasmic reticulum protein JP45 results in decreased muscle strength in young mice. Specifically, this loss of muscle strength in JP45 knockout mice is caused by decreased functional expression of the voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channel Ca(v)1.1, which is the molecule that couples membrane depolarization and calcium release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum. These results point to JP45 as one of the molecules involved in the development or maintenance of skeletal muscle strength.

  17. Blockade of Metallothioneins 1 and 2 Increases Skeletal Muscle Mass and Strength.

    PubMed

    Summermatter, Serge; Bouzan, Anais; Pierrel, Eliane; Melly, Stefan; Stauffer, Daniela; Gutzwiller, Sabine; Nolin, Erin; Dornelas, Christina; Fryer, Christy; Leighton-Davies, Juliet; Glass, David J; Fournier, Brigitte

    2017-03-01

    Metallothioneins are proteins that are involved in intracellular zinc storage and transport. Their expression levels have been reported to be elevated in several settings of skeletal muscle atrophy. We therefore investigated the effect of metallothionein blockade on skeletal muscle anabolism in vitro and in vivo We found that concomitant abrogation of metallothioneins 1 and 2 results in activation of the Akt pathway and increases in myotube size, in type IIb fiber hypertrophy, and ultimately in muscle strength. Importantly, the beneficial effects of metallothionein blockade on muscle mass and function was also observed in the setting of glucocorticoid addition, which is a strong atrophy-inducing stimulus. Given the blockade of atrophy and the preservation of strength in atrophy-inducing settings, these results suggest that blockade of metallothioneins 1 and 2 constitutes a promising approach for the treatment of conditions which result in muscle atrophy.

  18. FKBP12 deficiency reduces strength deficits after eccentric contraction-induced muscle injury.

    PubMed

    Corona, Benjamin T; Rouviere, Clement; Hamilton, Susan L; Ingalls, Christopher P

    2008-08-01

    Strength deficits associated with eccentric contraction-induced muscle injury stem, in part, from excitation-contraction uncoupling. FKBP12 is a 12-kDa binding protein known to bind to the skeletal muscle sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ release channel [ryanodine receptor (RyR1)] and plays an important role in excitation-contraction coupling. To assess the effects of FKBP12 deficiency on muscle injury and recovery, we measured anterior crural muscle (tibialis anterior and extensor digitorum longus muscles) strength in skeletal muscle-specific FKBP12-deficient and wild-type (WT) mice before and after a single bout of 150 eccentric contractions, as well as before and after the performance of six injury bouts. Histological damage of the tibialis anterior muscle was assessed after injury. Body weight and peak isometric and eccentric torques were lower in FKBP12-deficient mice compared with WT mice. There were no differences between FKBP12-deficient and WT mice in preinjury peak isometric and eccentric torques when normalized to body weight, and no differences in the relative decreases in eccentric torque with a single or multiple injury bouts. After a single injury bout, FKBP12-deficient mice had less initial strength deficits and recovered faster (especially females) than WT mice, despite no differences in the degree of histological damage. After multiple injury bouts, FKBP12-deficient mice recovered muscle strength faster than WT mice and exhibited significantly less histological muscle damage than WT mice. In summary, FKBP12 deficiency results in less initial strength deficits and enhanced recovery from single (especially females) and repeated bouts of injury than WT mice.

  19. Clinical evaluator reliability for quantitative and manual muscle testing measures of strength in children.

    PubMed

    Escolar, D M; Henricson, E K; Mayhew, J; Florence, J; Leshner, R; Patel, K M; Clemens, P R

    2001-06-01

    Measurements of muscle strength in clinical trials of Duchenne muscular dystrophy have relied heavily on manual muscle testing (MMT). The high level of intra- and interrater variability of MMT compromises clinical study results. We compared the reliability of 12 clinical evaluators in performing MMT and quantitative muscle testing (QMT) on 12 children with muscular dystrophy. QMT was reliable, with an interclass correlation coefficient (ICC) of >0.9 for biceps and grip strength, and >0.8 for quadriceps strength. Training of both subjects and evaluators was easily accomplished. MMT was not as reliable, and required repeated training of evaluators to bring all groups to an ICC >0.75 for shoulder abduction, elbow and hip flexion, knee extension, and ankle dorsiflexion. We conclude that QMT shows greater reliability and is easier to implement than MMT. Consequently, QMT will be a superior measure of strength for use in pediatric, neuromuscular, multicenter clinical trials.

  20. Gene transcripts associated with muscle strength: a CHARGE meta-analysis of 7,781 persons

    PubMed Central

    Joehanes, R.; Kacprowski, T.; Peters, M.; Jansen, R.; Karasik, D.; Kiel, D. P.; Harries, L. W.; Teumer, A.; Powell, J.; Levy, D.; Lin, H.; Lunetta, K.; Munson, P.; Bandinelli, S.; Henley, W.; Hernandez, D.; Singleton, A.; Tanaka, T.; van Grootheest, G.; Hofman, A.; Uitterlinden, A. G.; Biffar, R.; Gläser, S.; Homuth, G.; Malsch, C.; Völker, U.; Penninx, B.; van Meurs, J. B. J.; Ferrucci, L.; Kocher, T.; Murabito, J.

    2015-01-01

    Lower muscle strength in midlife predicts disability and mortality in later life. Blood-borne factors, including growth differentiation factor 11 (GDF11), have been linked to muscle regeneration in animal models. We aimed to identify gene transcripts associated with muscle strength in adults. Meta-analysis of whole blood gene expression (overall 17,534 unique genes measured by microarray) and hand-grip strength in four independent cohorts (n = 7,781, ages: 20–104 yr, weighted mean = 56), adjusted for age, sex, height, weight, and leukocyte subtypes. Separate analyses were performed in subsets (older/younger than 60, men/women). Expression levels of 221 genes were associated with strength after adjustment for cofactors and for multiple statistical testing, including ALAS2 (rate-limiting enzyme in heme synthesis), PRF1 (perforin, a cytotoxic protein associated with inflammation), IGF1R, and IGF2BP2 (both insulin like growth factor related). We identified statistical enrichment for hemoglobin biosynthesis, innate immune activation, and the stress response. Ten genes were associated only in younger individuals, four in men only and one in women only. For example, PIK3R2 (a negative regulator of PI3K/AKT growth pathway) was negatively associated with muscle strength in younger (<60 yr) individuals but not older (≥60 yr). We also show that 115 genes (52%) have not previously been linked to muscle in NCBI PubMed abstracts. This first large-scale transcriptome study of muscle strength in human adults confirmed associations with known pathways and provides new evidence for over half of the genes identified. There may be age- and sex-specific gene expression signatures in blood for muscle strength. PMID:26487704

  1. The effects of kinesio taping on architecture, strength and pain of muscles in delayed onset muscle soreness of biceps brachii.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yong Sin; Bae, Sea Hyun; Hwang, Jin Ah; Kim, Kyung Yoon

    2015-02-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to confirm the effects of kinesio taping (KT) on muscle function and pain due to delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) of the biceps brachii. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty-seven subjects with induced DOMS were randomized into either Group I (control, n=19) or Group II (KT, n=18). Outcome measures were recorded before the intervention (application of KT) and at 24, 48, and 72 hours after the intervention. DOMS was induced, and muscle thickness was measured using ultrasonic radiography. Maximal voluntary isometric contraction (%MVIC) was measured via electromyography (EMG). Subjective pain was measured using a visual analogue scale (VAS). [Results] Group I exhibited a positive correlation between muscle thickness and elapsed time from intervention (24, 48, and 72 hours post induction of DOMS); they also showed a significant decrease in MVIC(%). Group II showed significant increases in muscle thickness up to the 48-hour interval post induction of DOMS, along with a significant decrease in MVIC (%). However, in contrast to Group I, Group II did not show a significant difference in muscle thickness or MVIC (%) at the 72-hour interval in comparison with the values prior to DOMS induction. [Conclusion] In adults with DOMS, activation of muscles by applying KT was found to be an effective and faster method of recovering muscle strength than rest alone.

  2. The effects of kinesio taping on architecture, strength and pain of muscles in delayed onset muscle soreness of biceps brachii

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yong Sin; Bae, Sea Hyun; Hwang, Jin Ah; Kim, Kyung Yoon

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to confirm the effects of kinesio taping (KT) on muscle function and pain due to delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) of the biceps brachii. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty-seven subjects with induced DOMS were randomized into either Group I (control, n=19) or Group II (KT, n=18). Outcome measures were recorded before the intervention (application of KT) and at 24, 48, and 72 hours after the intervention. DOMS was induced, and muscle thickness was measured using ultrasonic radiography. Maximal voluntary isometric contraction (%MVIC) was measured via electromyography (EMG). Subjective pain was measured using a visual analogue scale (VAS). [Results] Group I exhibited a positive correlation between muscle thickness and elapsed time from intervention (24, 48, and 72 hours post induction of DOMS); they also showed a significant decrease in MVIC(%). Group II showed significant increases in muscle thickness up to the 48-hour interval post induction of DOMS, along with a significant decrease in MVIC (%). However, in contrast to Group I, Group II did not show a significant difference in muscle thickness or MVIC (%) at the 72-hour interval in comparison with the values prior to DOMS induction. [Conclusion] In adults with DOMS, activation of muscles by applying KT was found to be an effective and faster method of recovering muscle strength than rest alone. PMID:25729190

  3. Shank Muscle Strength Training Changes Foot Behaviour during a Sudden Ankle Supination

    PubMed Central

    Hagen, Marco; Lescher, Stephanie; Gerhardt, Andreas; Lahner, Matthias; Felber, Stephan; Hennig, Ewald M.

    2015-01-01

    Background The peroneal muscles are the most effective lateral stabilisers whose tension braces the ankle joint complex against excessive supination. The purpose of this study was to identify the morphological and biomechanical effects of two machine-based shank muscle training methods. Methods Twenty-two healthy male recreationally active sports students performed ten weeks of single-set high resistance strength training with 3 training sessions per week. The subjects conducted subtalar pronator/supinator muscle training (ST) with the right leg by using a custom-made apparatus; the left foot muscles were exercised with machine-based talocrural plantar and dorsiflexor training (TT). Muscle strength (MVIC), muscle volume and foot biomechanics (rearfoot motion, ground reaction forces, muscle reaction times) during a sudden ankle supination were recorded before and after the intervention. Results Compared to TT, ST resulted in significantly higher pronator (14% vs. 8%, P<0.01) and supinator MVIC (25% vs. 12%, P<0.01). During sudden foot inversions, both ST and TT resulted in reduced supination velocity (-12%; P<0.01). The muscle reaction onset time was faster after the training in peroneus longus (PL) (P<0.01). Muscle volume of PL (P<0.01) and TA (P<0.01) increased significantly after both ST and TT. Conclusion After both ST and TT, the ankle joint complex is mechanically more stabilised against sudden supinations due to the muscle volume increase of PL and TA. As the reduced supination velocities indicate, the strength training effects are already present during free-fall. According to a sudden ankle supination in standing position, both machine-based dorsiflexor and pronator strength training is recommended for enhancing the mechanical stability of the ankle. PMID:26110847

  4. Effect of strength training with blood flow restriction on muscle power and submaximal strength in eumenorrheic women.

    PubMed

    Gil, Ana L S; Neto, Gabriel R; Sousa, Maria S C; Dias, Ingrid; Vianna, Jeferson; Nunes, Rodolfo A M; Novaes, Jefferson S

    2017-03-01

    Blood flow restriction (BFR) training stimulates muscle size and strength by increasing muscle activation, accumulation of metabolites and muscle swelling. This method has been used in different populations, but no studies have evaluated the effects of training on muscle power and submaximal strength (SS) in accounted for the menstrual cycle. The aim of this study was to analyse the effect of strength training (ST) with BFR on the muscle power and SS of upper and lower limbs in eumenorrheic women. Forty untrained women (18-40 years) were divided randomly and proportionally into four groups: (i) high-intensity ST at 80% of 1RM (HI), (ii) low-intensity ST at 20% of 1RM combined with partial blood flow restriction (LI + BFR), (iii) low-intensity ST at 20% of 1RM (LI) and d) control group (CG). Each training group performed eight training sessions. Tests with a medicine ball (MB), horizontal jump (HJ), vertical jump (VJ), biceps curls (BC) and knee extension (KE) were performed during the 1st day follicular phase (FP), 14th day (ovulatory phase) and 26-28th days (luteal phase) of the menstrual cycle. There was no significant difference among groups in terms of the MB, HJ, VJ or BC results at any time point (P>0·05). SS in the KE exercise was significantly greater in the LI + BFR group compared to the CG group (P = 0·014) during the LP. Therefore, ST with BFR does not appear to improve the power of upper and lower limbs and may be an alternative to improve the SS of lower limbs of eumenorrheic women.

  5. Longer Interset Rest Periods Enhance Muscle Strength and Hypertrophy in Resistance-Trained Men.

    PubMed

    Schoenfeld, Brad J; Pope, Zachary K; Benik, Franklin M; Hester, Garrett M; Sellers, John; Nooner, Josh L; Schnaiter, Jessica A; Bond-Williams, Katherine E; Carter, Adrian S; Ross, Corbin L; Just, Brandon L; Henselmans, Menno; Krieger, James W

    2016-07-01

    Schoenfeld, BJ, Pope, ZK, Benik, FM, Hester, GM, Sellers, J, Nooner, JL, Schnaiter, JA, Bond-Williams, KE, Carter, AS, Ross, CL, Just, BL, Henselmans, M, and Krieger, JW. Longer interset rest periods enhance muscle strength and hypertrophy in resistance-trained men. J Strength Cond Res 30(7): 1805-1812, 2016-The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of short rest intervals normally associated with hypertrophy-type training versus long rest intervals traditionally used in strength-type training on muscular adaptations in a cohort of young, experienced lifters. Twenty-one young resistance-trained men were randomly assigned to either a group that performed a resistance training (RT) program with 1-minute rest intervals (SHORT) or a group that employed 3-minute rest intervals (LONG). All other RT variables were held constant. The study period lasted 8 weeks with subjects performing 3 total body workouts a week comprised 3 sets of 8-12 repetition maximum (RM) of 7 different exercises per session. Testing was performed prestudy and poststudy for muscle strength (1RM bench press and back squat), muscle endurance (50% 1RM bench press to failure), and muscle thickness of the elbow flexors, triceps brachii, and quadriceps femoris by ultrasound imaging. Maximal strength was significantly greater for both 1RM squat and bench press for LONG compared to SHORT. Muscle thickness was significantly greater for LONG compared to SHORT in the anterior thigh, and a trend for greater increases was noted in the triceps brachii (p = 0.06) as well. Both groups saw significant increases in local upper body muscle endurance with no significant differences noted between groups. This study provides evidence that longer rest periods promote greater increases in muscle strength and hypertrophy in young resistance-trained men.

  6. Using a stopwatch to assess pelvic muscle strength in the urine stream interruption test.

    PubMed

    Sampselle, C M

    1993-01-01

    Pelvic muscle strength is important in maintaining urinary continence. The urine stream interruption test provides a simple measure of pelvic muscle strength. This study evaluated the accuracy of the test as adapted for clinical use. Women (n = 75) were tested according to standardized protocol. The test was simultaneously timed using a uroflowmeter (for research purposes) and a stopwatch (a technique more feasible in the practice setting). The stopwatch-timed urine stream interruption test was consistent with the uroflowmeter score (r = 0.90, p < 0.00) and demonstrated adequate repeatability (r = -0.69, p < 0.00). The stopwatch test was related to a digital measure of pelvic muscle strength (r = -0.49, p = 0.00), i.e., women with greater pelvic muscle strength were able to interrupt the stream of urine more quickly. Significantly less involuntary urine loss was seen in women whose stopwatch test score was two seconds or less as compared with those whose scores were greater than two seconds (t = -4.83, p = < 0.00, df = 73). Clinicians can use the urine stream interruption test as a baseline measure and as a tool to assess changes in pelvic muscle strength.

  7. Effects of increasing physical activity on foot structure and ankle muscle strength in adults with obesity

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xiaoguang; Tsujimoto, Takehiko; Kim, Bokun; Katayama, Yasutomi; Wakaba, Kyousuke; Wang, Zhennan; Tanaka, Kiyoji

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of increasing physical activity on foot structure and ankle muscle strength in adults with obesity and to verify whether the rate of change in foot structure is related to that in ankle muscle strength. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-seven adults with obesity completed a 12-week program in which the intensity of physical activity performed was gradually increased. Physical activity was monitored using a three-axis accelerometer. Foot structure was assessed using a three-dimensional foot scanner, while ankle muscle strength was measured using a dynamometry. [Results] With the increasing physical activity, the participants’ feet became thinner (the rearfoot width, instep height, and girth decreased) and the arch became higher (the arch height index increased) and stiffer (the arch stiffness index increased); the ankle muscle strength also increased after the intervention. Additionally, the changes in the arch height index and arch stiffness index were not associated with changes in ankle muscle strength. [Conclusion] Increasing physical activity may be one possible approach to improve foot structure and function in individuals with obesity. PMID:27630426

  8. The effects of new taping methods designed to increase muscle strength

    PubMed Central

    Fukui, Tsutomu; Otake, Yuko; Kondo, Takashi

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] Although there are several studies on the use of elastic tape to influence muscle strength, results are contradictory and controversial. Our previous studies based on the sliding mechanism between superficial fascia and subcutaneous tissue may help the muscle strength. The purpose of this study was to confirm the effects of new taping methods on muscle strength. [Subjects and Methods] Sixteen healthy male participants took part in this study. Tape was applied on the right gluteus maximus and hip extension strength was determined by an isokinetic evaluation (30°/sec, concentric mode, four conditions). Condition 1: Tape was applied from the muscle insertion to origin; Condition 2: Tape was applied from the origin to insertion; Condition 3: Dummy tape with no direction; Condition 4: No tape was applied. [Results] The mean value of conditions 1–4 were 398.2 ± 24.3 Newton (N), 343.7 ± 25.9 N, 363.7 ± 26.4 N, and 371.3 ± 26.3 N, respectively (mean ± SE). The result of condition 1 was significantly greater compared with the other conditions. [Conclusion] This new method corresponded to a tape direction of insertion-rigin may help to increase the muscle strength. PMID:28210042

  9. Experience in resistance training does not prevent reduction in muscle strength evoked by passive static stretching.

    PubMed

    Serra, Andrey J; Silva, José A; Marcolongo, Alessandra A; Manchini, Martha T; Oliveira, João V A; Santos, Luis F N; Rica, Roberta L; Bocalini, Danilo S

    2013-08-01

    This study examined whether passive static stretching reduces the maximum muscle strength achieved by different body segments in untrained and resistance-trained subjects. Twenty adult men were assigned to 1 of the following groups: untrained (UT, N = 9) and resistance-trained (RT, N = 11) groups. The subjects performed six 1 repetition maximum (1RM) load tests of the following exercises: horizontal bench press, lat pull-downs, bicep curls, and 45° leg press. The results achieved in the last two 1RM tests were used for statistical analyses. A passive static stretching program was incorporated before the sixth 1RM test. The body fat content was significantly higher in the UT group compared with the RT group (p < 0.0001). Moreover, the RT group showed significantly higher proportion of lean body mass compared with the UT group (p < 0.0001). Maximum muscle strength on all 4 exercises was significantly reduced in both groups after stretching (p < 0.01). Furthermore, the magnitude of muscle strength reduction was similar for the UT and the RT groups. The exception was for barbell curls, in which the muscle strength depression was significantly higher in the UT group compared with the RT group (p < 0.0001). In conclusion, the passive static stretching program was detrimental to upper- and lower-body maximal muscle strength performance in several body segments. The negative effects of stretching were similar for subjects participating in resistance training regimens.

  10. Inspiratory flow reserve in boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    De Bruin, P F; Ueki, J; Bush, A; Y Manzur, A; Watson, A; Pride, N B

    2001-06-01

    Patients with advanced muscular dystrophy frequently develop ventilatory failure. Currently respiratory impairment usually is assessed by measuring vital capacity and the mouth pressure generated during a maximal inspiratory maneuver (PI,max), neither of which directly measures ventilatory capacity. We assessed inspiratory flow reserve in 26 boys [mean (SD) age 12.8 (3.8) years] with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) without ventilatory failure and in 28 normal boys [mean (SD) age 12.6 (1.9) years] by analyzing the ratio between the largest inspiratory flow during tidal breathing (V'I,max(t)) and during a forced vital capacity maneuver (V'I,max(FVC), (V'I,max(t)/V'I,maxFVC). We have compared this ratio with the forced vital capacity FVC and PI,max measured at functional residual capacity. Mean PI,max was -90(30)cmH2O, average 112% (range 57-179%) of predicted values in control boys and -31(11)cmH2O, average 40% predicted values in DMD boys (control vs DMD, P < 0.001). FVC was reduced in DMD boys [59(20)% predicted values vs 86(10)% predicted values in controls, P < 0.01]. Absolute V'I,max(FVC) was strongly related to FVC in both control and DMD boys; V'I,max(FVC) (expressed as FVC. s(-1)) was not related to PI,max in either group. The mean V'I,max(t)/V'I,max(FVC); ratio was higher in DMD 0.22 (0.08) than in controls 0.12 (0.03) (P < 0.001) indicating a reduction in inspiratory flow reserve in DMD. Inspiratory flow reserve was within the normal range in 8 of 19 DMD patients with PI,max less than 50% of predicted values. We conclude that measurement of inspiratory flow reserve (V'I,max(t)/V'I,maxFVC ratio) provides a simple and direct assessment of dynamic inspiratory muscle function which is not replicated by static measurement of PI,max or vital capacity and might be useful in assessment of respiratory impairment in boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Follow-up studies are required to establish whether measures of inspiratory flow reserve are of clinical value

  11. Sex difference in strength and size ratios between reciprocal muscle groups in the lower leg.

    PubMed

    Akagi, R; Tohdoh, Y; Takahashi, H

    2013-05-01

    This study compared strength and size of reciprocal muscle groups in the lower leg between sexes. 20 young men and 14 young women volunteered as subjects. Joint torques developed during isometric maximal voluntary plantar flexion (TQPF) and dorsiflexion (TQDF) were measured using a dynamometer. Muscle volumes of plantar flexors (MVPF) and dorsiflexors (MVDF) were determined by magnetic resonance imaging. In each of the muscle groups, joint torque was significantly correlated with muscle volume in young men and women (r=0.610-0.848) and the y-intercept of the regression line between them was not significantly different from zero. Based on these observations, the dependencies of muscle strength ratio on muscle size ratio between the plantar flexors and dorsiflexors were investigated using joint torque and muscle volume. The correlations between the MVPF per MVDF and the TQPF per TQDF were significant both in young men (r=0.608) and women (r=0.773), suggesting that strength ratio is strongly affected by size ratio between the plantar flexors and dorsiflexors in young men and women.

  12. Characteristics of isometric and dynamic strength loss following eccentric exercise-induced muscle damage.

    PubMed

    Byrne, C; Eston, R G; Edwards, R H

    2001-06-01

    Angle-specific isometric strength and angular velocity-specific concentric strength of the knee extensors were studied in eight subjects (5 males and 3 females) following a bout of muscular damaging exercise. One hundred maximal voluntary eccentric contractions of the knee extensors were performed in the prone position through a range of motion from 40 degrees to 140 degrees (0 degrees = full extension) at 1.57 rads(-1). Isometric peak torque was measured whilst seated at 10 degrees and 80 degrees knee flexion, corresponding to short and optimal muscle length, respectively. Isokinetic concentric peak torque was measured at 0.52 and 3.14 rad x s(-1). Plasma creatine kinase (CK) activity was also measured from a fingertip blood sample. These measures were taken before, immediately after and on days 1, 2, 4, and 7 following the eccentric exercise. The eccentric exercise protocol resuited in a greater relative loss of strength (P< 0.05) at short muscle length (76.3 +/- 2.5% of pre-exercise values) compared to optimal length (82.1 +/- 2.7%). There were no differences in the relative strength loss between isometric strength at optimal length and isokinetic concentric strength at 0.52 and 3.14 rad x s(-1). CK activity was significantly elevated above baseline at days 4 (P < 0.01) and 7 (P < 0.01). The greater relative strength loss at short muscle length appeared to persist throughout the seven-day testing period and provides indirect evidence of a shift in the angle-torque relationship towards longer muscle lengths. The results lend partial support to the popping sarcomere hypothesis of muscle damage, but could also be explained by an impairment of activation at short muscle lengths.

  13. Long-term aerobic exercise is associated with greater muscle strength throughout the life span.

    PubMed

    Crane, Justin D; Macneil, Lauren G; Tarnopolsky, Mark A

    2013-06-01

    Aging is associated with a progressive decline in muscle strength, muscle mass, and aerobic capacity, which reduces mobility and impairs quality of life in elderly adults. Exercise is commonly employed to improve muscle function in individuals of all ages; however, chronic aerobic exercise is believed to largely impact cardiovascular function and oxidative metabolism, with minimal effects on muscle mass and strength. To study the effects of long-term aerobic exercise on muscle strength, we recruited 74 sedentary (SED) or highly aerobically active (ACT) men and women from within three distinct age groups (young: 20-39 years, middle: 40-64 years, and older: 65-86 years) and tested their aerobic capacity, isometric grip and knee extensor strength, and dynamic 1 repetition maximum knee extension. As expected, ACT subjects had greater maximal oxygen uptake and peak aerobic power output compared with SED subjects (p < .05). Grip strength relative to body weight declined with age (p < .05) and was greater in ACT compared with SED subjects in both hands (p < .05). Similarly, relative maximal isometric knee extension torque declined with age (p < .05) and was higher in ACT versus SED individuals in both legs (p < .05). Absolute and relative 1 repetition maximum knee extension declined with age (p < .05) and were greater in ACT versus SED groups (p < .05). Knee extensor strength was associated with a greater amount of leg lean mass in the ACT subjects (p < .05). In summary, long-term aerobic exercise appears to attenuate age-related reductions in muscle strength in addition to its cardiorespiratory and metabolic benefits.

  14. Differences in Muscle Strength in Parkinsonian Patients Affected on the Right and Left Side

    PubMed Central

    Frazzitta, Giuseppe; Ferrazzoli, Davide; Maestri, Roberto; Rovescala, Roberta; Guaglio, Gabriele; Bera, Rossana; Volpe, Daniele; Pezzoli, Gianni

    2015-01-01

    Background Muscular weakness is a frequent cause of instability that contributes to falls in Parkinson’s disease (PD). Isokinetic dynamometry is a method of muscle assessment useful to measure the muscular strength giving a quantification of the weakness, but only few studies about isokinetic assessment were performed in PD. The aims of the study were to evaluate the muscle strength in PD and to investigate the differences in patients affected on the right and left side. Methods Knee flexor and extensor muscles strength was assessed using an isokinetic dynamometer in 25 patients in stage 3 H&Y and in 15 healthy controls. Subjects were tested in both legs at three fixed angular velocities: 90°/s, 120°/s, 180°/s. Results Considering the whole population of Parkinsonians, no difference in strength was observed with respect to controls. Considering the side, patients affected on the right side showed a clear tendency to be weaker than patients affected on the left side and controls. Conclusions PD patients affected on the right side, but not those affected on the left side, had a reduction in muscle strength as compared to controls. We postulate a central origin deficit in muscle strength in PD. It is known that dopamine transporter binding is more severely reduced in the left posterior putamen and our results suggest that the control of the muscle strength in PD is linked to the right–left hemispheric asymmetry of the functional organization of basal ganglia and with their connections to cortical motor and pre-motor areas. PMID:25806509

  15. Effects of Massage on Muscular Strength and Proprioception After Exercise-Induced Muscle Damage.

    PubMed

    Shin, Mal-Soon; Sung, Yun-Hee

    2015-08-01

    Exercise-induced muscle damage (EIMD), which is commonly associated with eccentric exercise, unaccustomed exercise, and resistance training, may lead to delayed onset muscle soreness, swelling, decreased muscle strength, and range of motion. Many researchers have evaluated various interventions to treat the signs and symptoms of EIMD. However, the effects of massage after EIMD are unclear. Here, we investigated the effect of massage on muscle strength and proprioception after EIMD. All subjects randomly were divided into an EIMD-treated control group (n = 10) and a massage-treated after EIMD experimental group (n = 11). Exercise-induced muscle damage was induced by repeated exercise. Massage treatment was provided by physiotherapist for 15 minutes. It consists of light stroking, milking, friction, and skin rolling. Lactate was evaluated by Lactate Pro analyzer in pre- and postexercise. Surface electromyography (muscle activity) and sonography (muscle thickness) were used to confirm the muscular characteristics. Proprioception was investigated by dual inclinometer. As a result, massage treatment on the gastrocnemius after EIMD increased activation of the medial gastrocnemius during contraction (p ≤ 0.05). In the lateral and medial gastrocnemius, the θs, which is the angle between muscle fibers and superficial aponeurosis, showed a significant change (p ≤ 0.05). However, there are no differences in the θd, which is the angle between muscle fibers and deep aponeurosis. We also found that proprioceptive acuity in the ankle joint was significantly greater in the massage-treated experimental group compared with that in the control group (p ≤ 0.05). These findings suggest that massage of the gastrocnemius after EIMD can improve muscle strength and proprioception by influencing the superficial layer of the gastrocnemius.

  16. Targeted ablation of IKK2 improves skeletal muscle strength, maintains mass, and promotes regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Mourkioti, Foteini; Kratsios, Paschalis; Luedde, Tom; Song, Yao-Hua; Delafontaine, Patrick; Adami, Raffaella; Parente, Valeria; Bottinelli, Roberto; Pasparakis, Manolis; Rosenthal, Nadia

    2006-01-01

    NF-κB is a major pleiotropic transcription factor modulating immune, inflammatory, cell survival, and proliferative responses, yet the relevance of NF-κB signaling in muscle physiology and disease is less well documented. Here we show that muscle-restricted NF-κB inhibition in mice, through targeted deletion of the activating kinase inhibitor of NF-κB kinase 2 (IKK2), shifted muscle fiber distribution and improved muscle force. In response to denervation, IKK2 depletion protected against atrophy, maintaining fiber type, size, and strength, increasing protein synthesis, and decreasing protein degradation. IKK2-depleted mice with a muscle-specific transgene expressing a local Igf-1 isoform (mIgf-1) showed enhanced protection against muscle atrophy. In response to muscle damage, IKK2 depletion facilitated skeletal muscle regeneration through enhanced satellite cell activation and reduced fibrosis. Our results establish IKK2/NF-κB signaling as an important modulator of muscle homeostasis and suggest a combined role for IKK inhibitors and growth factors in the therapy of muscle diseases. PMID:17080195

  17. The association between premature plantarflexor muscle activity, muscle strength, and equinus gait in patients with various pathologies.

    PubMed

    Schweizer, Katrin; Romkes, Jacqueline; Brunner, Reinald

    2013-09-01

    This study provides an overview on the association between premature plantarflexor muscle activity (PPF), muscle strength, and equinus gait in patients with various pathologies. The purpose was to evaluate whether muscular weakness and biomechanical alterations are aetiological factors for PPF during walking, independent of the underlying pathology. In a retrospective design, 716 patients from our clinical database with 46 different pathologies (orthopaedic and neurologic) were evaluated. Gait analysis data of the patients included kinematics, kinetics, electromyographic activity (EMG) data, and manual muscle strength testing. All patients were clustered three times. First, patients were grouped according to their primary pathology. Second, all patients were again clustered, this time according to their impaired joints. Third, groups of patients with normal EMG or PPF, and equinus or normal foot contact were formed to evaluate the association between PPF and equinus gait. The patient groups derived by the first two cluster methods were further subdivided into patients with normal or reduced muscle strength. Additionally, the phi correlation coefficient was calculated between PPF and equinus gait. Independent of the clustering, PPF was present in all patient groups. Weak patients revealed PPF more frequently. The correlations of PPF and equinus gait were lower than expected, due to patients with normal EMG during loading response and equinus. These patients, however, showed higher gastrocnemius activity prior to foot strike together with lower peak tibialis anterior muscle activity in loading response. Patients with PPF and a normal foot contact possibly apply the plantarflexion-knee extension couple during loading response. While increased gastrocnemius activity around foot strike seems essential for equinus gait, premature gastrocnemius activity does not necessarily produce an equinus gait. We conclude that premature gastrocnemius activity is strongly associated

  18. The reliability of evaluation of hip muscle strength in rehabilitation robot walking training.

    PubMed

    Huang, Qiuchen; Zhou, Yue; Yu, Lili; Gu, Rui; Cui, Yao; Hu, Chunying

    2015-10-01

    [Purpose] The primary purpose of this study was to evaluate the intraclass correlation coefficient in obtaining the torque of the hip muscle strength during a robot-assisted rehabilitation treatment. [Subjects] Twenty-four patients (15 males, 9 females) with spinal cord injury participated in the study. [Methods] The subjects were asked to walk during robot-assisted rehabilitation, and the torque of the muscle strength which was measured at hip joint flexion angles of -15, -10, -5, 0, 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, and 30 degrees. [Results] The intraclass correlation coefficient of the torque of the hip muscle strength measured by the rehabilitation training robot was excellent. [Conclusion] Our results show that measurement of torque can be used as an objective assessment of treatment with RAT.

  19. The reliability of evaluation of hip muscle strength in rehabilitation robot walking training

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Qiuchen; Zhou, Yue; Yu, Lili; Gu, Rui; Cui, Yao; Hu, Chunying

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The primary purpose of this study was to evaluate the intraclass correlation coefficient in obtaining the torque of the hip muscle strength during a robot-assisted rehabilitation treatment. [Subjects] Twenty-four patients (15 males, 9 females) with spinal cord injury participated in the study. [Methods] The subjects were asked to walk during robot-assisted rehabilitation, and the torque of the muscle strength which was measured at hip joint flexion angles of −15, −10, −5, 0, 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, and 30 degrees. [Results] The intraclass correlation coefficient of the torque of the hip muscle strength measured by the rehabilitation training robot was excellent. [Conclusion] Our results show that measurement of torque can be used as an objective assessment of treatment with RAT. PMID:26644646

  20. Weight loss may be a better approach for managing musculoskeletal conditions than increasing muscle mass and strength

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Bokun; Tsujimoto, Takehiko; So, Rina; Zhao, Xiaoguang; Suzuki, Shun; Kim, Taeho; Tanaka, Kiyoji

    2015-01-01

    To prevent or remedy musculoskeletal conditions, the relationship between obesity and the characteristics of muscle mass and strength need to be clarified. [Subjects and Methods] A total of 259 Japanese males aged 30–64 years were classified into 4 groups according to the Japanese obesity criteria. Body composition was evaluated, and handgrip strength and knee extensor strength were measured for the upper and lower extremities, respectively. Physical performance was evaluated with a jump test. [Results] Obesity was positively correlated with skeletal muscle mass index, percentage of whole-body fat, and leg muscle strength and negatively correlated with the percentage of muscle mass index, body weight-normalized handgrip strength, and knee extensor strength, and the jump test results. [Conclusion] Weight loss may be a better approach than increasing muscle mass and strength to improve musculoskeletal conditions in obese adult males. PMID:26834353

  1. Effects of high-intensity interval cycling performed after resistance training on muscle strength and hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Tsitkanou, S; Spengos, K; Stasinaki, A-N; Zaras, N; Bogdanis, G; Papadimas, G; Terzis, G

    2016-09-23

    Aim of the study was to investigate whether high-intensity interval cycling performed immediately after resistance training would inhibit muscle strength increase and hypertrophy expected from resistance training per se. Twenty-two young men were assigned into either resistance training (RE; N = 11) or resistance training plus high-intensity interval cycling (REC; N = 11). Lower body muscle strength and rate of force development (RFD), quadriceps cross-sectional area (CSA) and vastus lateralis muscle architecture, muscle fiber type composition and capillarization, and estimated aerobic capacity were evaluated before and after 8 weeks of training (2 times per week). Muscle strength and quadriceps CSA were significantly and similarly increased after both interventions. Fiber CSA increased significantly and similarly after both RE (type I: 13.6 ± 3.7%, type IIA: 17.6 ± 4.4%, type IIX: 23.2 ± 5.7%, P < 0.05) and REC (type I: 10.0 ± 2.7%, type IIA: 14.8 ± 4.3% type IIX: 20.8 ± 6.0%, P < 0.05). In contrast, RFD decreased and fascicle angle increased (P < 0.05) only after REC. Capillary density and estimated aerobic capacity increased (P < 0.05) only after REC. These results suggest that high-intensity interval cycling performed after heavy-resistance exercise may not inhibit resistance exercise-induced muscle strength/hypertrophy after 2 months of training, while it prompts aerobic capacity and muscle capillarization. The addition of high-intensity cycling after heavy-resistance exercise may decrease RFD partly due to muscle architectural changes.

  2. To what extent is mean EMG frequency during gait a reflection of functional muscle strength in children with cerebral palsy?

    PubMed

    Van Gestel, L; Wambacq, H; Aertbeliën, E; Meyns, P; Bruyninckx, H; Bar-On, L; Molenaers, G; De Cock, P; Desloovere, K

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the current paper was to analyze the potential of the mean EMG frequency, recorded during 3D gait analysis (3DGA), for the evaluation of functional muscle strength in children with cerebral palsy (CP). As walking velocity is known to also influence EMG frequency, it was investigated to which extent the mean EMG frequency is a reflection of underlying muscle strength and/or the applied walking velocity. Surface EMG data of the lateral gastrocnemius (LGAS) and medial hamstrings (MEH) were collected during 3DGA. For each muscle, 20 CP children characterized by a weak and 20 characterized by a strong muscle (LGAS or MEH) were selected. A weak muscle was defined as a manual muscle testing score <3; a strong muscle was defined as a manual muscle testing score ≥4. Patient selection was based on the following inclusion criteria: (a) predominantly spastic type of CP (3-15 years old), (b) either (near) normal muscle strength or muscle weakness in at least one of the studied lower limb muscles, (c) no lower limb Botulinum Toxin-A treatment within 6 months prior to the 3DGA, (d) no history of lower limb surgery, and (e) high-quality noise-free EMG-data. For each muscle, twenty age-related typically developing (TD) children were included as controls. In both muscles a consistent pattern of increasing mean EMG frequency with decreasing muscle strength was observed. This was significant in the LGAS (TD versus weak CP). Walking velocity also had a significant effect on mean EMG frequency in the LGAS. Furthermore, based on R(2) and partial correlations, it could be concluded that both walking velocity and muscle strength have an impact on EMG, but the contribution of muscle strength was always higher. These findings underscore the potential of the mean EMG frequency recorded during 3DGA, for the evaluation of functional muscle strength in children with CP.

  3. Fall- and BBS-related differences in muscle strength and postural balance of the elderly.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jin-Seung; Kang, Dong-Won; Seo, Jeong-Woo; Kim, Dae-Hyeok; Yang, Seung-Tae; Tack, Gye-Rae

    2016-09-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to compare the differences in muscle strength and postural balance between fallers and non-fallers. We also compared the difference between normal and impaired balance groups using the same subjects and the same variables. [Subjects and Methods] Seventy-one healthy elderly females (age: 75.1 ± 75 years; weight: 57.3 ± 57 kg; height: 150.1 ± 15 cm) who had high levels of physical activity participated [25 fallers (FG) vs. 46 non-fallers (NG); and 52 healthy balance group (HBG) and 19 impaired balance group (IBG) subjects]. To compare the groups, the muscle strengths of 9 muscle groups, and 20 variables of the instrumented standing balance assessment (2 area variables, 9 time-domain variables, and 9 frequency-domain variables) were assessed. [Results] The FG and NG could only be categorized based on the frequency-domain variables of the instrumented standing balance assessment. On the other hand, there were significant differences between HBG and IBG in height, 6 muscle strength, and 2 time-domain variables of the instrumented standing balance assessment. [Conclusion] These results suggest that muscle strength and standing balance are reflected in physical balance ability (i.e., BBS); however they are in sufficient for determining the actual occurrence of falls.

  4. Fall- and BBS-related differences in muscle strength and postural balance of the elderly

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jin-Seung; Kang, Dong-Won; Seo, Jeong-Woo; Kim, Dae-Hyeok; Yang, Seung-Tae; Tack, Gye-Rae

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to compare the differences in muscle strength and postural balance between fallers and non-fallers. We also compared the difference between normal and impaired balance groups using the same subjects and the same variables. [Subjects and Methods] Seventy-one healthy elderly females (age: 75.1 ± 75 years; weight: 57.3 ± 57 kg; height: 150.1 ± 15 cm) who had high levels of physical activity participated [25 fallers (FG) vs. 46 non-fallers (NG); and 52 healthy balance group (HBG) and 19 impaired balance group (IBG) subjects]. To compare the groups, the muscle strengths of 9 muscle groups, and 20 variables of the instrumented standing balance assessment (2 area variables, 9 time-domain variables, and 9 frequency-domain variables) were assessed. [Results] The FG and NG could only be categorized based on the frequency-domain variables of the instrumented standing balance assessment. On the other hand, there were significant differences between HBG and IBG in height, 6 muscle strength, and 2 time-domain variables of the instrumented standing balance assessment. [Conclusion] These results suggest that muscle strength and standing balance are reflected in physical balance ability (i.e., BBS); however they are in sufficient for determining the actual occurrence of falls. PMID:27799709

  5. Decrease of muscle fiber conduction velocity correlates with strength loss after an endurance run.

    PubMed

    Boccia, Gennaro; Dardanello, Davide; Tarperi, Cantor; Rosso, Valeria; Festa, Luca; La Torre, Antonio; Pellegrini, Barbara; Schena, Federico; Rainoldi, Alberto

    2017-02-01

    Monitoring surface electromyographic (EMG) signals can provide useful insights for characterizing muscle fatigue, which is defined as an exercise-induced strength loss. This experiment investigated the muscle fiber conduction velocity (CV) changes induced by an endurance run. The day before and immediately after a half-marathon run (21.097 km) 11 amateur runners performed maximum voluntary contractions (MVCs) of knee extensor muscles. During the MVC, multichannel EMG was recorded from the vastus lateralis and EMG amplitude and CV were calculated. After the run, knee extensors showed a decreased strength (-13  ±  9%, p  =  0.001) together with a reduction in EMG amplitude (-13  ±  10%, p  =  0.003) and in CV (-6  ±  8%, p  =  0.032). Knee extensor strength loss positively correlated with vastus lateralis CV differences (r  =  0.76, p  =  0.006). Thus, the exercises-induced muscle fatigue was associated not only with a decrease in EMG amplitude, but also with a reduction in CV. This finding suggests that muscle fibers with higher CV (i.e. those with greater fiber size) were the most impaired during strength production after an endurance run.

  6. Preferential reduction of quadriceps over respiratory muscle strength and bulk after lung transplantation for cystic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Pinet, C; Scillia, P; Cassart, M; Lamotte, M; Knoop, C; Melot, C; Estenne, M

    2004-01-01

    Background: In the absence of complications, recipients of lung transplants for cystic fibrosis have normal pulmonary function but the impact of the procedure on the strength and bulk of respiratory and limb muscles has not been studied. Methods: Twelve stable patients who had undergone lung transplantation for cystic fibrosis 48 months earlier (range 8–95) and 12 normal subjects matched for age, height, and sex were studied. The following parameters were measured: standard lung function, peak oxygen uptake by cycle ergometry, diaphragm surface area by computed tomographic (CT) scanning, diaphragm and abdominal muscle thickness by ultrasonography, twitch transdiaphragmatic and gastric pressures, quadriceps isokinetic strength, and quadriceps cross section by CT scanning, and lean body mass. Diaphragm mass was computed from diaphragm surface area and thickness. Results: Twitch transdiaphragmatic and gastric pressures, diaphragm mass, and abdominal muscle thickness were similar in the two groups but quadriceps strength and cross section were decreased by nearly 30% in the patients. Patients had preserved quadriceps strength per unit cross section but reduced quadriceps cross section per unit lean body mass. The cumulative dose of corticosteroids was an independent predictor of quadriceps atrophy. Peak oxygen uptake showed positive correlations with quadriceps strength and cross section in the two groups, but peak oxygen uptake per unit quadriceps strength or cross section was reduced in the patient group. Conclusions: The diaphragm and abdominal muscles have preserved strength and bulk in patients transplanted for cystic fibrosis but the quadriceps is weak due to muscle atrophy. This atrophy is caused in part by corticosteroid therapy and correlates with the reduction in exercise capacity. PMID:15333856

  7. Shoulder muscle strength in paraplegics before and after kayak ergometer training.

    PubMed

    Bjerkefors, Anna; Jansson, Anna; Thorstensson, Alf

    2006-07-01

    The purpose was to investigate if shoulder muscle strength in post-rehabilitated persons with spinal cord injury (SCI) was affected by kayak ergometer training and to compare shoulder strength in persons with SCI and able-bodied persons. Ten persons with SCI (7 males and 3 females, injury levels T3-T12) performed 60 min kayak ergometer training three times a week for 10 weeks with progressively increased intensity. Maximal voluntary concentric contractions were performed during six shoulder movements: flexion and extension (range of motion 65 degrees ), abduction and adduction (65 degrees ), and external and internal rotation (60 degrees ), with an angular velocity of 30 degrees s(-1). Position specific strength was assessed at three shoulder angles (at the beginning, middle and end of the range of motion) in the respective movements. Test-retests were performed for all measurements before the training and the mean intraclass correlation coefficient was 0.941 (95% CI 0.928-0.954). There was a main effect of kayak ergometer training with increased shoulder muscle strength after training in persons with SCI. The improvements were independent of shoulder movement, and occurred in the beginning and middle positions. A tendency towards lower shoulder muscle strength was observed in the SCI group compared to a matched reference group of able-bodied persons. Thus, it appears that post-rehabilitated persons with SCI have not managed to fully regain/maintain their shoulder muscle strength on a similar level as that of able-bodied persons, and are able to improve their shoulder muscle strength after a period of kayak ergometer training.

  8. [Peripheral muscle strength in stable COPD patients: correlation with respiratory function variables and quality of life].

    PubMed

    Toral Marín, J; Ortega, F; Cejudo, P; Elías, T; Sánchez, H; Montemayor, T

    1999-03-01

    The aim of this study was to assess peripheral muscle strength in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) using a simple test and to look for correlation with function variables, physiological strength variables and quality of life parameters. Twenty-three COPD patients with moderate to severe air-flow limitation (FEV1 = 39 +/- 12%) in stable phase but displaying inability to carry out daily tasks were enrolled. Peripheral muscle strength was assessed in all patients by measuring the maximum load in a single repetition of five simple upper and lower extremity exercises performed at a multi-gymnastics station. Results were compared to respiratory function variables (FVC, FEV1, FEV1/FVC and gasometry), to results of an exercise test on a cycle ergometer with monitoring of respiratory gases (VEmax, VO2max and Wmax), to endurance (minutes) to dyspnea (Mahler's scale) and to quality of life (Chronic Respiratory Disease Questionnaire-CRDQ). No relation between functional parameters and endurance in minutes was found. Minute ventilation (VE) proved to be significantly related to oxygen intake (VO) and maximum work in the stress test. Dyspnea on Mahler's scale was unrelated, but fatigue variables and emotional function variables on the CRDQ were related. We conclude that peripheral muscle strength is unrelated to level of flow limitation or exercise tolerance in COPD patients. Peripheral muscle strength is related, however, to maximum work load and some aspects of quality of life.

  9. Workability and Muscle Strength in Patients With Seropositive Rheumatoid Arthritis: Survey Study Protocol

    PubMed Central

    Erlacher, Ludwig; Quittan, Michael; Fenzl, Karl Heinrich; Dorner, Thomas Ernst

    2017-01-01

    Background Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and other rheumatic conditions not only fundamentally affect patients’ quality of life and physiological needs but are also negatively associated with work ability. The costs of poor work ability, which, in sum, are more than treatment costs, pose an economic burden to society and patients. Work ability in RA appears to be multifactorial; symptoms such as pain, swelling, and stiffness play a major role, as these directly affect functional disability. Also, RA patients typically suffer from reduced muscle strength. Lower extremity function and grip strengths especially impair their quality of life. However, the role of muscle strength and disease activity as determinants of work ability have not yet been studied. Objective The primary objective of this study is to compare work ability in working-age participants with seropositive RA and with high and low disease activity; the secondary objective is to evaluate the association of muscle strength, functional ability, and frailty with work ability. Methods This monocentric cross-sectional study will be conducted at a rheumatologic outpatient clinic and day hospital with approximately 100 seropositive RA patients aged <65 years. A clinical disease activity index as a measure for rheumatoid disease activity will be assessed during the patients’ routine visits at the clinic. Work ability, frailty, and functional disability will be evaluated with (self-reported) questionnaires as well as with physical tests (Work Ability Index/Score; Health Assessment Questionnaire Disability Index; Survey of Health, Ageing, and Retirement in Europe Frailty Instrument; Short Physical Performance Battery). Muscle strength will be determined with dynamometer measurements of isometric hand grip strength and quadriceps femoris muscle contraction strength. Sleep quality (Medical Outcomes Study Sleep Scale) and sexual functioning as physiological needs will additionally be determined with self

  10. A Technique for Establishing True Levels of Muscle Strength Exertion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-01-01

    performed -"aximal or submaximal isometric strength exertions. The exertions tested were elbow flexion, finger flexion, knee flexion and knee...190.1 167.11 17.3350 Buttock-Knee Length (cm) 54.1 66.7 59.29 3.2106 Knee Height, sitting (cm) 46.5 58.7 52.91 2.8737 Shoulder- Elbow Length (cm) 29.3...propped the elbow of the right arm on the arm rest, extended the fore- arm directly forward so that the cuff was exactly above the load cell, with

  11. A Maximum Muscle Strength Prediction Formula Using Theoretical Grade 3 Muscle Strength Value in Daniels et al.'s Manual Muscle Test, in Consideration of Age: An Investigation of Hip and Knee Joint Flexion and Extension

    PubMed Central

    Matsumura, Masashi; Ichikawa, Kazuna; Takei, Hitoshi

    2017-01-01

    This study attempted to develop a formula for predicting maximum muscle strength value for young, middle-aged, and elderly adults using theoretical Grade 3 muscle strength value (moment fair: Mf)—the static muscular moment to support a limb segment against gravity—from the manual muscle test by Daniels et al. A total of 130 healthy Japanese individuals divided by age group performed isometric muscle contractions at maximum effort for various movements of hip joint flexion and extension and knee joint flexion and extension, and the accompanying resisting force was measured and maximum muscle strength value (moment max, Mm) was calculated. Body weight and limb segment length (thigh and lower leg length) were measured, and Mf was calculated using anthropometric measures and theoretical calculation. There was a linear correlation between Mf and Mm in each of the four movement types in all groups, excepting knee flexion in elderly. However, the formula for predicting maximum muscle strength was not sufficiently compatible in middle-aged and elderly adults, suggesting that the formula obtained in this study is applicable in young adults only. PMID:28133549

  12. A Maximum Muscle Strength Prediction Formula Using Theoretical Grade 3 Muscle Strength Value in Daniels et al.'s Manual Muscle Test, in Consideration of Age: An Investigation of Hip and Knee Joint Flexion and Extension.

    PubMed

    Usa, Hideyuki; Matsumura, Masashi; Ichikawa, Kazuna; Takei, Hitoshi

    2017-01-01

    This study attempted to develop a formula for predicting maximum muscle strength value for young, middle-aged, and elderly adults using theoretical Grade 3 muscle strength value (moment fair: Mf )-the static muscular moment to support a limb segment against gravity-from the manual muscle test by Daniels et al. A total of 130 healthy Japanese individuals divided by age group performed isometric muscle contractions at maximum effort for various movements of hip joint flexion and extension and knee joint flexion and extension, and the accompanying resisting force was measured and maximum muscle strength value (moment max, Mm ) was calculated. Body weight and limb segment length (thigh and lower leg length) were measured, and Mf was calculated using anthropometric measures and theoretical calculation. There was a linear correlation between Mf and Mm in each of the four movement types in all groups, excepting knee flexion in elderly. However, the formula for predicting maximum muscle strength was not sufficiently compatible in middle-aged and elderly adults, suggesting that the formula obtained in this study is applicable in young adults only.

  13. Degree of Contracture Related to Residual Muscle Shoulder Strength in Children with Obstetric Brachial Plexus Lesions

    PubMed Central

    van Gelein Vitringa, Valerie M.; van Noort, Arthur; Ritt, Marco J. P. F.; van Royen, Barend J.; van der Sluijs, Johannes A.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives  Little is known about the relation between residual muscle strength and joint contracture formation in neuromuscular disorders. This study aimed to investigate the relation between residual muscle strength and shoulder joint contractures in children with sequelae of obstetric brachial plexus lesion (OBPL). In OBPL a shoulder joint contracture is a frequent finding. We hypothesize that residual internal and external rotator strength and their balance are related to the extent of shoulder joint contracture. Methods  Clinical assessment was performed in 34 children (mean 10.0 years) with unilateral OBPL and Narakas classes I–III. External and internal rotation strengths were measured with the shoulder in neutral position using a handheld dynamometer. Strength on the affected side was given as percentage of the normal side. Contracture was assessed by passive internal and external rotations in degrees (in 0° abduction). Mallet classification was used for active shoulder function. Results  External and internal rotation strengths on the affected side were approximately 50% of the normal side and on average both equally affected: 56% (SD 18%) respectively 51% (SD 27%); r = 0.600, p = 0.000. Residual strengths were not related to passive internal or external rotation (p > 0.200). Internal rotation strength (r =  − 0.425, p <0.05) was related to Narakas class. Mallet score was related to external and internal rotation strengths (r = 0.451 and r = 0.515, respectively; p < 0.01). Conclusion  The intuitive notion that imbalances in residual muscle strength influence contracture formation cannot be confirmed in this study. Our results are of interest for the understanding of contracture formation in OBPL. PMID:27917235

  14. Motor effort training with low exercise intensity improves muscle strength and descending command in aging.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Changhao; Ranganathan, Vinoth K; Zhang, Junmei; Siemionow, Vlodek; Yue, Guang H

    2016-06-01

    This study explored the effect of high mental effort training (MET) and conventional strength training (CST) on increasing voluntary muscle strength and brain signal associated with producing maximal muscle force in healthy aging. Twenty-seven older adults (age: 75 ± 7.9 yr, 8 women) were assigned into 1 of 3 groups: MET group-trained with low-intensity (30% maximal voluntary contraction [MVC]) physical exercise combined with MET, CST group-trained with high-intensity muscle contractions, or control (CTRL) group-no training of any kind. MET and CST lasted for 12 weeks (5 sessions/week). The participants' elbow flexion strength of the right arm, electromyography (EMG), and motor activity-related cortical potential (MRCP) directly related to the strength production were measured before and after training. The CST group had the highest strength gain (17.6%, P <0.001), the MET group also had significant strength gain (13.8%, P <0.001), which was not statistically different from that of the CST group even though the exercise intensity for the MET group was only at 30% MVC level. The CTRL group did not have significant strength changes. Surprisingly, only the MET group demonstrated a significant augmentation in the MRCP (29.3%, P <0.001); the MRCP increase in CST group was at boarder-line significance level (12.11%, P = 0.061) and that for CTRL group was only 4.9% (P = 0.539). These results suggest that high mental effort training combined with low-intensity physical exercise is an effective method for voluntary muscle strengthening and this approach is especially beneficial for those who are physically weak and have difficulty undergoing conventional strength training.

  15. Motor effort training with low exercise intensity improves muscle strength and descending command in aging

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Changhao; Ranganathan, Vinoth K.; Zhang, Junmei; Siemionow, Vlodek; Yue, Guang H.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This study explored the effect of high mental effort training (MET) and conventional strength training (CST) on increasing voluntary muscle strength and brain signal associated with producing maximal muscle force in healthy aging. Twenty-seven older adults (age: 75 ± 7.9 yr, 8 women) were assigned into 1 of 3 groups: MET group—trained with low-intensity (30% maximal voluntary contraction [MVC]) physical exercise combined with MET, CST group—trained with high-intensity muscle contractions, or control (CTRL) group—no training of any kind. MET and CST lasted for 12 weeks (5 sessions/week). The participants’ elbow flexion strength of the right arm, electromyography (EMG), and motor activity-related cortical potential (MRCP) directly related to the strength production were measured before and after training. The CST group had the highest strength gain (17.6%, P <0.001), the MET group also had significant strength gain (13.8%, P <0.001), which was not statistically different from that of the CST group even though the exercise intensity for the MET group was only at 30% MVC level. The CTRL group did not have significant strength changes. Surprisingly, only the MET group demonstrated a significant augmentation in the MRCP (29.3%, P <0.001); the MRCP increase in CST group was at boarder-line significance level (12.11%, P = 0.061) and that for CTRL group was only 4.9% (P = 0.539). These results suggest that high mental effort training combined with low-intensity physical exercise is an effective method for voluntary muscle strengthening and this approach is especially beneficial for those who are physically weak and have difficulty undergoing conventional strength training. PMID:27310942

  16. Adaptive strength gains in dystrophic muscle exposed to repeated bouts of eccentric contraction.

    PubMed

    Call, Jarrod A; Eckhoff, Michael D; Baltgalvis, Kristen A; Warren, Gordon L; Lowe, Dawn A

    2011-12-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the functional recovery and adaptation of dystrophic muscle to multiple bouts of contraction-induced injury. Because lengthening (i.e., eccentric) contractions are extremely injurious for dystrophic muscle, it was considered that repeated bouts of such contractions would exacerbate the disease phenotype in mdx mice. Anterior crural muscles (tibialis anterior and extensor digitorum longus) and posterior crural muscles (gastrocnemius, soleus, and plantaris) from mdx mice performed one or five repeated bouts of 100 electrically stimulated eccentric contractions in vivo, and each bout was separated by 10-18 days. Functional recovery from one bout was achieved 7 days after injury, which was in contrast to a group of wild-type mice, which still showed a 25% decrement in electrically stimulated isometric torque at that time point. Across bouts there was no difference in the immediate loss of strength after repeated bouts of eccentric contractions for mdx mice (-70%, P = 0.68). However, after recovery from each bout, dystrophic muscle had greater torque-generating capacity such that isometric torque was increased ∼38% for both anterior and posterior crural muscles at bout 5 compared with bout 1 (P < 0.001). Moreover, isolated extensor digitorum longus muscles excised from in vivo-tested hindlimbs 14-18 days after bout 5 had greater specific force than contralateral control muscles (12.2 vs. 10.4 N/cm(2), P = 0.005) and a 20% greater maximal relaxation rate (P = 0.049). Additional adaptations due to the multiple bouts of eccentric contractions included rapid recovery and/or sparing of contractile proteins, enhanced parvalbumin expression, and a decrease in fiber size variability. In conclusion, eccentric contractions are injurious to dystrophic skeletal muscle; however, the muscle recovers function rapidly and adapts to repeated bouts of eccentric contractions by improving strength.

  17. Muscle strength enhancement following home-based virtual cycling training in ambulatory children with cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chia-Ling; Hong, Wei-Hsien; Cheng, Hsin-Yi Kathy; Liaw, Mei-Yun; Chung, Chia-Ying; Chen, Chung-Yao

    2012-01-01

    This study is the first well-designed randomized controlled trial to assess the effects of a novel home-based virtual cycling training (hVCT) program for improving muscle strength in children with spastic cerebral palsy (CP). Twenty-eight ambulatory children with spastic CP aged 6-12 years were randomly assigned to an hVCT group (n=13) or a control group (n=15). Outcome measures, including gross motor function of the Bruininks-Oseretsky Test of Motor Proficiency (BOTMP) and muscle strength (isokinetic torque of knee extensor and flexor muscle), were administered before and immediately after the 12-week intervention. Analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) at post-treatment showed that, compared to the control group, the hVCT group had significantly higher isokinetic torque in the knee extensor and flexor muscles at 60°/s and 120°/s angular velocities (p<0.05). At post-treatment, the hVCT group also showed greater isokinetic strength improvement in the knee flexor than in the knee extensor at 60°/s (knee flexor: 41%; knee extensor: 19%) and at 120°/s (knee flexor: 36%; knee extensor: 30%). However, the BOTMP scores at post-treatment did not differ between the two groups. Although the proposed 12-week hVCT protocol does not improve gross motor function, it enhances knee muscle strength in children with CP. The protocol obtains larger gains in the knee flexor than in the knee extensor at different angular velocities. The study findings will help clinicians to provide more effective and efficient strategies for muscle strength training in children with CP.

  18. Comparison of pelvic floor muscle strength evaluations in nulliparous and primiparous women: a prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Gameiro, Mônica Orsi; Sousa, Vanessa Oliveira; Gameiro, Luiz Felipe; Muchailh, Rosana Carneiro; Padovani, Carlos Roberto; Amaro, João Luiz

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to compare the pelvic floor muscle strength of nulliparous and primiparous women. METHODS: A total of 100 women were prospectively distributed into two groups: Group 1 (G1) (n = 50) included healthy nulliparous women, and Group 2 (G2) (n = 50) included healthy primiparous women. Pelvic floor muscle strength was subjectively evaluated using transvaginal digital palpation. Pelvic floor muscle strength was objectively assessed using a portable perineometer. All of the parameters were evaluated simultaneously in G1 and were evaluated in G2 during the 20th and 36th weeks of pregnancy and 45 days after delivery. RESULTS: In G2, 14 women were excluded because they left the study before the follow-up evaluation. The median age was 23 years in G1 and 22 years in G2; there was no significant difference between the groups. The average body mass index was 21.7 kg/m2 in G1 and 25.0 kg/m2 in G2; there was a significant difference between the groups (p = 0.0004). In G2, transvaginal digital palpation evaluation showed significant impairments of pelvic floor muscle strength at the 36th week of pregnancy (p = 0.0006) and 45 days after vaginal delivery (p = 0.0001) compared to G1. Objective evaluations of pelvic floor muscle strength in G2 revealed a significant decrease 45 days after vaginal delivery compared to nulliparous patients. CONCLUSION: Pregnancy and vaginal delivery may cause weakness of the pelvic floor muscles. PMID:21915489

  19. Effects of combined endurance and strength training on muscle strength, power and hypertrophy in 40-67-year-old men.

    PubMed

    Karavirta, L; Häkkinen, A; Sillanpää, E; García-López, D; Kauhanen, A; Haapasaari, A; Alen, M; Pakarinen, A; Kraemer, W J; Izquierdo, M; Gorostiaga, E; Häkkinen, K

    2011-06-01

    Both strength and endurance training have several positive effects on aging muscle and physical performance of middle-aged and older adults, but their combination may compromise optimal adaptation. This study examined the possible interference of combined strength and endurance training on neuromuscular performance and skeletal muscle hypertrophy in previously untrained 40-67-year-old men. Maximal strength and muscle activation in the upper and lower extremities, maximal concentric power, aerobic capacity and muscle fiber size and distribution in the vastus lateralis muscle were measured before and after a 21-week training period. Ninety-six men [mean age 56 (SD 7) years] completed high-intensity strength training (S) twice a week, endurance training (E) twice a week, combined training (SE) four times per week or served as controls (C). SE and S led to similar gains in one repetition maximum strength of the lower extremities [22 (9)% and 21 (8)%, P<0.001], whereas E and C showed minor changes. Cross-sectional area of type II muscle fibers only increased in S [26 (22)%, P=0.002], while SE showed an inconsistent, non-significant change [8 (35)%, P=0.73]. Combined training may interfere with muscle hypertrophy in aging men, despite similar gains in maximal strength between the strength and the combined training groups.

  20. Effects of creatine supplementation and resistance training on muscle strength and weightlifting performance.

    PubMed

    Rawson, Eric S; Volek, Jeff S

    2003-11-01

    Creatine monohydrate has become the supplement of choice for many athletes striving to improve sports performance. Recent data indicate that athletes may not be using creatine as a sports performance booster per se but instead use creatine chronically as a training aid to augment intense resistance training workouts. Although several studies have evaluated the combined effects of creatine supplementation and resistance training on muscle strength and weightlifting performance, these data have not been analyzed collectively. The purpose of this review is to evaluate the effects of creatine supplementation on muscle strength and weightlifting performance when ingested concomitant with resistance training. The effects of gender, interindividual variability, training status, and possible mechanisms of action are discussed. Of the 22 studies reviewed, the average increase in muscle strength (1, 3, or 10 repetition maximum [RM]) following creatine supplementation plus resistance training was 8% greater than the average increase in muscle strength following placebo ingestion during resistance training (20 vs. 12%). Similarly, the average increase in weightlifting performance (maximal repetitions at a given percent of maximal strength) following creatine supplementation plus resistance training was 14% greater than the average increase in weightlifting performance following placebo ingestion during resistance training (26 vs. 12%). The increase in bench press 1RM ranged from 3 to 45%, and the improvement in weightlifting performance in the bench press ranged from 16 to 43%. Thus there is substantial evidence to indicate that creatine supplementation during resistance training is more effective at increasing muscle strength and weightlifting performance than resistance training alone, although the response is highly variable.

  1. Comparison of muscle strength imbalance in powerlifters and jumpers.

    PubMed

    Luk, Hui-Ying; Winter, Christa; O'Neill, Elizabeth; Thompson, Brian A

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine the bilateral and unilateral force production difference in powerlifters (bilateral) and field jumpers (unilateral) to determine the existence of leg dominance. Nineteen powerlifters (PL; n = 11) and field jumpers (J; n = 8) were included in the study. Five different no arm swing countermovement jumps were randomized for testing: (a) double-leg jump; (b) dominant leg-specified double-leg jump; (c) nondominant leg-specified double-leg jump; (d) dominant leg-specified single-leg jump; and (e) nondominant leg-specified single-leg jump. The force, velocity, and power were measured via a forceplate. The Limb Symmetry Index (LSI% = (1 - ND limb/D limb) × 100%) was calculated for force imbalance between the dominant (N) and nondominant (ND) limb between PL and J. Based on the analysis, PL (mean = 2.75 ± 2.45%) had a lower LSI (p < 0.05) than J (mean = 6.81 ± 5.16%). The single-leg jumps show a (p < 0.05) significantly higher force and power and a significantly lower velocity than double-leg jump for both D and ND leg than double-leg jump. Finally, the ratio between bilateral and unilateral exercise for PL and J is 2.36:1.36 and 2.38:1, respectively. In summary, sport-specific demands between PL and J may contribute to the occurrence of the imbalance force production between limbs. This phenomenon is important for the strength coach to acknowledge, to perform an appropriate strength balance test during the off-season, and to implement a training program to reduce the force disparity between limbs. Neglecting the development of force imbalance between limbs may predispose healthy players to injury.

  2. Effect of Expiratory Resistive Loading in Expiratory Muscle Strength Training on Orbicularis Oris Muscle Activity

    PubMed Central

    Yanagisawa, Yukio; Matsuo, Yoshimi; Shuntoh, Hisato; Horiuchi, Noriaki

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to elucidate the effect of expiratory resistive loading on orbicularis oris muscle activity. [Subjects] Subjects were 23 healthy individuals (11 males, mean age 25.5±4.3 years; 12 females, mean age 25.0±3.0 years). [Methods] Surface electromyography was performed to measure the activity of the orbicularis oris muscle during maximum lip closure and resistive loading at different expiratory pressures. Measurement was performed at 10%, 30%, 50%, and 100% of maximum expiratory pressure (MEP) for all subjects. The t-test was used to compare muscle activity between maximum lip closure and 100% MEP, and analysis of variance followed by multiple comparisons was used to compare the muscle activities observed at different expiratory pressures. [Results] No significant difference in muscle activity was observed between maximum lip closure and 100% MEP. Analysis of variance with multiple comparisons revealed significant differences among the different expiratory pressures. [Conclusion] Orbicularis oris muscle activity increased with increasing expiratory resistive loading. PMID:24648644

  3. Rejuvenation of the muscle stem cell population restores strength to injured aged muscles.

    PubMed

    Cosgrove, Benjamin D; Gilbert, Penney M; Porpiglia, Ermelinda; Mourkioti, Foteini; Lee, Steven P; Corbel, Stephane Y; Llewellyn, Michael E; Delp, Scott L; Blau, Helen M

    2014-03-01

    The elderly often suffer from progressive muscle weakness and regenerative failure. We demonstrate that muscle regeneration is impaired with aging owing in part to a cell-autonomous functional decline in skeletal muscle stem cells (MuSCs). Two-thirds of MuSCs from aged mice are intrinsically defective relative to MuSCs from young mice, with reduced capacity to repair myofibers and repopulate the stem cell reservoir in vivo following transplantation. This deficiency is correlated with a higher incidence of cells that express senescence markers and is due to elevated activity of the p38α and p38β mitogen-activated kinase pathway. We show that these limitations cannot be overcome by transplantation into the microenvironment of young recipient muscles. In contrast, subjecting the MuSC population from aged mice to transient inhibition of p38α and p38β in conjunction with culture on soft hydrogel substrates rapidly expands the residual functional MuSC population from aged mice, rejuvenating its potential for regeneration and serial transplantation as well as strengthening of damaged muscles of aged mice. These findings reveal a synergy between biophysical and biochemical cues that provides a paradigm for a localized autologous muscle stem cell therapy for the elderly.

  4. Rejuvenation of the aged muscle stem cell population restores strength to injured aged muscles

    PubMed Central

    Cosgrove, Benjamin D.; Gilbert, Penney M.; Porpiglia, Ermelinda; Mourkioti, Foteini; Lee, Steven P.; Corbel, Stephane Y.; Llewellyn, Michael E.; Delp, Scott L.; Blau, Helen M.

    2014-01-01

    The aged suffer from progressive muscle weakness and regenerative failure. We demonstrate that muscle regeneration is impaired with aging due in part to a cell-autonomous functional decline in skeletal muscle stem cells (MuSCs). Two-thirds of aged MuSCs are intrinsically defective relative to young MuSCs, with reduced capacity to repair myofibers and repopulate the stem cell reservoir in vivo following transplantation due to a higher incidence of cells that express senescence markers and that have elevated p38α/β MAPK activity. We show that these limitations cannot be overcome by transplantation into the microenvironment of young recipient muscles. In contrast, subjecting the aged MuSC population to transient inhibition of p38α/β in conjunction with culture on soft hydrogel substrates rapidly expands the residual functional aged MuSC population, rejuvenating its potential for regeneration, serial transplantation, and strengthening damaged muscles of aged mice. These findings reveal a synergy between biophysical and biochemical cues that provides a paradigm for a localized autologous muscle stem cell therapy in aged individuals. PMID:24531378

  5. Relationships of ultrasound measures of intrinsic foot muscle cross-sectional area and muscle volume with maximum toe flexor muscle strength and physical performance in young adults

    PubMed Central

    Abe, Takashi; Tayashiki, Kota; Nakatani, Miyuki; Watanabe, Hironori

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] To investigate the relationships between toe flexor muscle strength with (TFS-5-toes) and without (TFS-4-toes) the contribution of the great toe, anatomical and physiological muscle cross-sectional areas (CSA) of intrinsic toe flexor muscle and physical performance were measured. [Subjects] Seventeen men (82% sports-active) and 17 women (47% sports-active), aged 20 to 35 years, volunteered. [Methods] Anatomical CSA was measured in two intrinsic toe flexor muscles (flexor digitorum brevis [FDB] and abductor hallucis) by ultrasound. Muscle volume and muscle length of the FDB were also estimated, and physiological CSA was calculated. [Results] Both TFS-5-toes and TFS-4-toes correlated positively with walking speed in men (r=0.584 and r=0.553, respectively) and women (r=0.748 and r=0.533, respectively). Physiological CSA of the FDB was significantly correlated with TFS-5-toes (r=0.748) and TFS-4-toes (r=0.573) in women. In men, physiological CSA of the FDB correlated positively with TFS-4-toes (r=0.536), but not with TFS-5-toes (r=0.333). [Conclusion] Our results indicate that physiological CSA of the FDB is moderately associated with TFS-4-toes while toe flexor strength correlates with walking performance. PMID:26957721

  6. Strength training at high versus low external resistance in older adults: effects on muscle volume, muscle strength, and force-velocity characteristics.

    PubMed

    Van Roie, Evelien; Delecluse, Christophe; Coudyzer, Walter; Boonen, Steven; Bautmans, Ivan

    2013-11-01

    Muscle adaptations can be induced by high-resistance exercise. Despite being potentially more suitable for older adults, low-resistance exercise protocols have been less investigated. We compared the effects of high- and low-resistance training on muscle volume, muscle strength, and force-velocity characteristics. Fifty-six older adults were randomly assigned to 12 weeks of leg press and leg extension training at either HIGH (2×10-15 repetitions at 80% of one repetition maximum (1RM)), LOW (1×80-100 repetitions at 20% of 1RM), or LOW+ (1×60 repetitions at 20% of 1RM, followed by 1×10-20 repetitions at 40% of 1RM). All protocols ended with muscle failure. Leg press and leg extension of 1RM were measured at baseline and post intervention and before the first training session in weeks 5 and 9. At baseline and post intervention, muscle volume (MV) was measured by CT-scan. A Biodex dynamometer evaluated knee extensor static peak torque in different knee angles (PT(stat90°), PT(stat120°), PT(stat150°)), dynamic peak torque at different speeds (PT(dyn60°s)(-1), PT(dyn180°s)(-1), PT(dyn240°s)(-1)), and speed of movement at 20% (S20), 40% (S40), and 60% (S60) of PTstat90°. HIGH and LOW+ resulted in greater improvements in 1RM strength than LOW (p<0.05). These differences were already apparent after week 5. Similar gains were found between groups in MV, PT(stat), PT(dyn60°s)(-1), and PT(dyn180°s)(-1). No changes were reported in speed of movement. HIGH tended to improve PT(dyn240°s)(-1) more than LOW or LOW+ (p=0.064). In conclusion, high- and low-resistance exercises ending with muscle failure may be similarly effective for hypertrophy. High-resistance training led to a higher increase in 1RM strength than low-resistance training (20% of 1RM), but this difference disappeared when using a mixed low-resistance protocol in which the resistance was intensified within a single exercise set (40% of 1RM). Our findings support the need for more research on low

  7. Heritability estimates of muscle strength-related phenotypes: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Zempo, H; Miyamoto-Mikami, E; Kikuchi, N; Fuku, N; Miyachi, M; Murakami, H

    2016-11-23

    The purpose of this study was to clarify the heritability estimates of human muscle strength-related phenotypes (H(2) -msp). A systematic literature search was conducted using PubMed (through August 22, 2016). Studies reporting the H(2) -msp for healthy subjects in a sedentary state were included. Random-effects models were used to calculate the weighted mean heritability estimates. Moreover, subgroup analyses were performed based on phenotypic categories (eg, grip strength, isotonic strength, jumping ability). Sensitivity analyses were also conducted to investigate potential sources of heterogeneity of H(2) -msp, which included age and sex. Twenty-four articles including 58 measurements were included in the meta-analysis. The weighted mean H(2) -msp for all 58 measurements was 0.52 (95% confidence intervals [CI]: 0.48-0.56), with high heterogeneity (I(2) =91.0%, P<.001). Subgroup analysis showed that the heritability of isometric grip strength, other isometric strength, isotonic strength, isokinetic strength, jumping ability, and other power measurements was 0.56 (95% CI: 0.46-0.67), 0.49 (0.47-0.52), 0.49 (0.32-0.67), 0.49 (0.37-0.61), 0.55 (0.45-0.65), and 0.51 (0.31-0.70), respectively. The H(2) -msp decreased with age (P<.05). In conclusion, our results indicate that the influence of genetic and environmental factors on muscle strength-related phenotypes is comparable. Moreover, the role of environmental factors increased with age. These findings may contribute toward an understanding of muscle strength-related phenotypes.

  8. Effects of 5 weeks of lower limb suspension on muscle size and strength

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tesch, P. A.; Ploutz, L. L.; Dudley, G. A.

    1994-01-01

    Lack of weight-bearing, as occurs in space, appears to be associated with reductions in strength and mass of skeletal muscle. Very limited data, however, is at hand describing changes in skeletal muscle size and function following manned space missions. Our current knowledge therefore is mainly based on studies of space flown rats. It is obvious though that this information, only in part can be extrapolated to humans. A few bed rest studies have demonstrated that decreases in strength and muscle size are substantial. At this time, however, the magnitude or time course of such changes either in response to space flight or simulations of microgravity have not been defined. In the last few years we have employed a human model to simulate unloading of lower limb skeletal muscles that occurs in microgravity. This model was essentially adopted from the rat hindlimb suspension technique. The purpose of this study was to assess the magnitude of decreases in muscle strength and size as a result of five weeks of unilateral lower limb suspension.

  9. Effects of strength training on muscle strength characteristics, functional capabilities, and balance in middle-aged and older women.

    PubMed

    Holviala, Jarkko H S; Sallinen, Janne M; Kraemer, William J; Alen, Markku J; Häkkinen, Keijo K T

    2006-05-01

    Progressive strength training can lead to substantial increases in maximal strength and mass of trained muscles, even in older women and men, but little information is available about the effects of strength training on functional capabilities and balance. Thus, the effects of 21 weeks of heavy resistance training--including lower loads performed with high movement velocities--twice a week on isometric maximal force (ISOmax) and force-time curve (force produced in 500 milliseconds, F0-500) and dynamic 1 repetition maximum (1RM) strength of the leg extensors, 10-m walking time (10WALK) and dynamic balance test (DYN.D) were investigated in 26 middle-aged (MI; 52.8 +/- 2.4 years) and 22 older women (O; 63.8 +/- 3.8 years). 1RM, ISOmax, and F0-500 increased significantly in MI by 28 +/- 10%, 20 +/- 19%, 31 +/- 34%, and in O by 27 +/- 8%, 20 +/- 16%, 18 +/- 45%, respectively. 10WALK (MI and O, p < 0.001) shortened and DYN.D improved (MI and O, p < 0.001). The present strength-training protocol led to large increases in maximal and explosive strength characteristics of leg extensors and in walking speed, as well to an improvement in the present dynamic balance test performance in both age groups. Although training-induced increase in explosive strength is an important factor for aging women, there are other factors that contribute to improvements in dynamic balance capacity. This study indicates that total body heavy resistance training, including explosive dynamic training, may be applied in rehabilitation or preventive exercise protocols in aging women to improve dynamic balance capabilities.

  10. Influence of Body Composition on Lung Function and Respiratory Muscle Strength in Children With Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Costa Junior, Dirceu; Peixoto-Souza, Fabiana S.; Araujo, Poliane N.; Barbalho-Moulin, Marcela C.; Alves, Viviane C.; Gomes, Evelim L. F. D.; Costa, Dirceu

    2016-01-01

    Background Obesity affects lung function and respiratory muscle strength. The aim of the present study was to assess lung function and respiratory muscle strength in children with obesity and determine the influence of body composition on these variables. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted involving 75 children (40 with obesity and 35 within the ideal weight range) aged 6 - 10 years. Body mass index, z score, waist circumference, body composition (tetrapolar bioimpedance), respiratory muscle strength and lung function (spirometry) were evaluated. Results Children with obesity exhibited larger quantities of both lean and fat mass in comparison to those in the ideal weight range. No significant differences were found between groups regarding the respective reference values for respiratory muscle strength. Male children with obesity demonstrated significantly lower lung function values (forced expiratory volume in the first second % (FEV1%) and FEV1/forced vital capacity % (FVC%) : 93.76 ± 9.78 and 92.29 ± 3.8, respectively) in comparison to males in the ideal weight range (99.87 ± 9.72 and 96.31 ± 4.82, respectively). The regression models demonstrated that the spirometric variables were influenced by all body composition variables. Conclusion Children with obesity demonstrated a reduction in lung volume and capacity. Thus, anthropometric and body composition characteristics may be predictive factors for altered lung function. PMID:26767078

  11. Relationships between Respiratory Muscle Strength and Daily Living Function in Children with Cerebral Palsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Hui-Yi; Chen, Chien-Chih; Hsiao, Shih-Fen

    2012-01-01

    Cerebral palsy (CP) is a common childhood disorder characterized by motor disability. Children with CP are at risk of developing significant respiratory problems associated with insufficient respiratory muscle strength. It is crucial to identify important factors which are associated with the limitations in daily living function in such children.…

  12. The Effects of a 10-Kilometer Run on Muscle Strength and Power.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gomez, Ana L.; Radzwich, Robert J.; Denegar, Craig R.; Volek, Jeff S.; Rubin, Martyn R.; Bush, Jill A.; Doan, Brandon K.; Wickham, Robbin B.; Mazzetti, Scott A.; Newton, Robert U.; French, Duncan N.; Hakkinen, Keijo; Ratamess, Nicholas A.; Kraemer, William J.

    2002-01-01

    Investigated recovery of maximal force and power following a 10-km race. Data collected on 10 healthy male distance runners pre-race, immediately post-race, and 48 hours later indicated that strength and power capabilities of these 10-km runners were for the most part restored 48 hours after the race. Only the hamstring muscle group was not fully…

  13. Effects of trunk stability on isometric knee extension muscle strength measurement while sitting.

    PubMed

    Hirano, Masahiro; Gomi, Masahiro; Katoh, Munenori

    2016-09-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to investigate the effect of trunk stability on isometric knee extension muscle strength measurement while sitting by performing simultaneous measurements with a handheld dynamometer (HHD) and an isokinetic dynamometer (IKD) in the same seated condition. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were 30 healthy volunteers. Isometric knee extension muscle strength was simultaneously measured with a HHD and an IKD by using an IKD-specific chair. The measurement was performed twice. Measurement instrument variables and the number of measurements were examined by using the analysis of variance and correlation tests. [Results] The measurement instrument variables and the number of measurements were not significantly different. The correlation coefficients between the HHD and IKD measurements were ≥0.96. [Conclusion] Isometric knee extension muscle strength measurement using the HHD in the sitting position resulted in a lower value than that using the IKD, presumably because of the effect of trunk stability on the measurement. In the same seated posture with trunk stability, no significant difference in measurement values was observed between the HHD and IKD. The present findings suggest that trunk stability while seated during isometric knee extension muscle strength measurement influenced the HHD measurement.

  14. Test-retest reliability of isometric shoulder muscle strength measurement with a handheld dynamometer and belt.

    PubMed

    Katoh, Munenori

    2015-06-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to develop a method of measuring isometric shoulder joint muscle strength using a handheld dynamometer with a belt and investigate its test-retest reliability. [Subjects] The subjects comprised 40 healthy adults. [Methods] Six types of isometric shoulder muscle strength were measured twice, and reliability was assessed. [Results] The intraclass correlation coefficient (1, 1) values ranged from 0.976 to 0.902. The result of a Bland-Altman analysis showed differences in the types of errors between measurement items. [Conclusion] The relative reliability of isometric shoulder muscle measurement using a handheld dynamometer with a belt was high. However, analysis of absolute reliability revealed errors that may affect interpretation of values; therefore, it was considered that adapting the greater of two measurement values is appropriate.

  15. Association between ultrasound measurements of muscle thickness, pennation angle, echogenicity and skeletal muscle strength in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Strasser, Eva Maria; Draskovits, Thomas; Praschak, Markus; Quittan, Michael; Graf, Alexandra

    2013-12-01

    The increase of elderly in our society requires simple tools for quantification of sarcopenia in inpatient and outpatient settings. The aim of this study was to compare parameters determined with musculoskeletal ultrasound (M-US) with muscle strength in young and elderly patients. In this prospective, randomised and observer blind study, 26 young (24.2 ± 3.7 years) and 26 old (age 67.8 ± 4.8 years) patients were included. Muscle thickness, pennation angle and echogenicity of all muscles of musculus quadriceps were measured by M-US and correlated with isometric maximum voluntary contraction force (MVC) of musculus quadriceps. Reproducibility of M-US measurements as well as simple and multiple regression models were calculated. Of all measured M-US variables the highest reproducibility was found for measurements of thickness (intraclass correlation coefficients, 85-97%). Simple regression analysis showed a highly significant correlation of thickness measurements of all muscles of musculus quadriceps with MVC in the elderly and in the young. Multiple regression analysis revealed that thickness of musculus vastus medialis had the best correlation with MVC in the elderly. This study showed that measurement of muscle thickness, especially of musculus vastus medialis, by M-US is a reliable, bedside method for monitoring the extent of sarcopenia.

  16. Strength and muscle activity of shoulder external rotation of subjects with and without scapular dyskinesis

    PubMed Central

    Uga, Daisuke; Nakazawa, Rie; Sakamoto, Masaaki

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to clarify the relationship between scapular dyskinesis and shoulder external rotation strength and muscle activity. [Subjects and Methods] Both shoulders of 20 healthy males were evaluated. They were classified into 19 normal, 8 subtly abnormal, and 13 obviously abnormal shoulders using the scapular dyskinesis test. Subtly abnormal shoulders were subsequently excluded from the analysis. Shoulder external rotation strength and muscle activity (infraspinatus, serratus anterior, upper, middle, and lower trapezius) were measured in 2 positions using a handheld dynamometer and surface electromyography while sitting in a chair with shoulder 0° abduction and flexion (1st position), and while lying prone on the elbows with the shoulders elevated in the zero position (zero position). The strength ratio was calculated to quantify the change in strength between the positions (zero position / 1st position). [Results] In the obviously abnormal shoulder group, the strength in the 1st position was significantly stronger, the strength ratio was significantly smaller, and the serratus anterior in the zero position showed significantly lower activity than the normal shoulder group. [Conclusion] In shoulder external rotation in the zero position, in obviously abnormal shoulders, the serratus anterior is poorly recruited, weakening the shoulder external rotation strength. PMID:27190434

  17. Creatine but not betaine supplementation increases muscle phosphorylcreatine content and strength performance.

    PubMed

    del Favero, Serena; Roschel, Hamilton; Artioli, Guilherme; Ugrinowitsch, Carlos; Tricoli, Valmor; Costa, André; Barroso, Renato; Negrelli, Ana Lua; Otaduy, Maria Concepción; da Costa Leite, Cláudia; Lancha-Junior, Antonio Herbert; Gualano, Bruno

    2012-06-01

    We aimed to investigate the role of betaine supplementation on muscle phosphorylcreatine (PCr) content and strength performance in untrained subjects. Additionally, we compared the ergogenic and physiological responses to betaine versus creatine supplementation. Finally, we also tested the possible additive effects of creatine and betaine supplementation. This was a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled study. Subjects were assigned to receive betaine (BET; 2 g/day), creatine (CR; 20 g/day), betaine plus creatine (BET+CR; 2+20 g/day, respectively) or placebo (PL). At baseline and after 10 days of supplementation, we assessed muscle strength and power, muscle PCr content, and body composition. The CR and BET+CR groups presented greater increase in muscle PCr content than PL (p=0.004 and p=0.006, respectively). PCr content was comparable between BET versus PL (p=0.78) and CR versus BET+CR (p=0.99). CR and BET+CR presented greater muscle power output than PL in the squat exercise following supplementation (p=0.003 and p=0.041, respectively). Similarly, bench press average power was significantly greater for the CR-supplemented groups. CR and BET+CR groups also showed significant pre- to post-test increase in 1-RM squat and bench press (CR: p=0.027 and p<0.0001; BET+CR: p=0.03 and p<0.0001 for upper- and lower-body assessments, respectively) No significant differences for 1-RM strength and power were observed between BET versus PL and CR versus BET+CR. Body composition did not differ between the groups. In conclusion, we reported that betaine supplementation does not augment muscle PCr content. Furthermore, we showed that betaine supplementation combined or not with creatine supplementation does not affect strength and power performance in untrained subjects.

  18. How does back muscle strength change after posterior lumbar interbody fusion?

    PubMed

    Lee, Chong-Suh; Kang, Kyung-Chung; Chung, Sung-Soo; Park, Won-Hah; Shin, Won-Ju; Seo, Yong-Gon

    2017-02-01

    OBJECTIVE There is a lack of evidence of how back muscle strength changes after lumbar fusion surgery and how exercise influences these changes. The aim of this study was to evaluate changes in back muscle strength after posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) and to measure the effects of a postoperative exercise program on muscle strength and physical and mental health outcomes. METHODS This prospective study enrolled 59 women (mean age 58 years) who underwent PLIF at 1 or 2 spinal levels. To assess the effects of a supervised lumbar stabilization exercise (LSE), the authors allocated the patients to an LSE (n = 26) or a control (n = 33) group. The patients in the LSE group performed the LSEs between 3 and 6 months postoperatively. Back extensor strength, visual analog scale (VAS) scores in back pain, and physical component summary (PCS) and mental component summary (MCS) scores on the 36-Item Short Form Health Survey were determined for the both groups. RESULTS Mean strength of the back muscles tended to slightly decrease by 7.5% from preoperatively to 3 months after PLIF (p = 0.145), but it significantly increased thereafter and was sustained until the last follow-up (38.1%, p < 0.001). The mean back muscle strength was similar in the LSE and control groups preoperatively, but it increased significantly more in the LSE group (64.2%) than in the control group (21.7%) at the last follow-up 12 months after PLIF (p = 0.012). At the last follow-up, decreases in back pain VAS scores were more significant among LSE group patients, who had a pain reduction on average of 58.2%, than among control group patients (reduction of 26.1%) (p = 0.013). The patients in the LSE group also had greater improvement in both PCS (39.9% improvement) and MCS (20.7% improvement) scores than the patients in the control group (improvement of 18.0% and 1.1%, p = 0.042 and p = 0.035, respectively). CONCLUSIONS After PLIF, strength in back muscles decreased until 3 months postoperatively but

  19. Quantitative analysis of the features of fasciculation potentials and their relation with muscle strength in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Bokuda, Kota; Shimizu, Toshio; Kimura, Hideki; Yamazaki, Toshihiro; Kamiyama, Tsutomu; Watabe, Kazuhiko; Kawata, Akihiro; Hayashi, Masaharu; Isozaki, Eiji

    2016-12-01

    This study aimed to quantitatively analyze fasciculation potentials (FPs) and to investigate their relationship with muscle strength in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Fifty-one patients with sporadic ALS or progressive muscular atrophy (25 men, 26 women, mean age of 68 years) underwent needle EMG. We determined the duration, phase number, and amplitude of FPs from three muscles (upper trapezius, biceps brachii, and tibialis anterior) and examined their relations with muscle strength. In total, 878 FPs were analyzed. FP duration displayed a significant negative relation with the strength of all three muscles; the weaker muscles showed longer durations of FPs than the muscles with normal strength. The amplitude and phase number were not related with muscle strength, but there were significant correlations between the duration and amplitude of FPs in the trapezius and tibialis anterior muscles. The longer duration of FPs in muscles with weak strength suggests that the morphological changes of FPs were caused by temporal dispersion through progressively degenerating and/or immature reinnervating motor branches, and were observed uniformly in different muscles along with disease progression.

  20. Whey protein isolate attenuates strength decline after eccentrically-induced muscle damage in healthy individuals

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background We examined the effects of short-term consumption of whey protein isolate on muscle proteins and force recovery after eccentrically-induced muscle damage in healthy individuals. Methods Seventeen untrained male participants (23 ± 5 yr, 180 ± 6 cm, 80 ± 11 kg) were randomly separated into two supplement groups: i) whey protein isolate (WPH; n = 9); or ii) carbohydrate (CHO; n = 8). Participants consumed 1.5 g/kg.bw/day supplement (~30 g consumed immediately, and then once with breakfast, lunch, in the afternoon and after the evening meal) for a period of 14 days following a unilateral eccentric contraction-based resistance exercise session, consisting of 4 sets of 10 repetitions at 120% of maximum voluntary contraction on the leg press, leg extension and leg flexion exercise machine. Plasma creatine kinase and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) levels were assessed as blood markers of muscle damage. Muscle strength was examined by voluntary isokinetic knee extension using a Cybex dynamometer. Data were analyzed using repeated measures ANOVA with an alpha of 0.05. Results Isometric knee extension strength was significantly higher following WPH supplementation 3 (P < 0.05) and 7 (P < 0.01) days into recovery from exercise-induced muscle damage compared to CHO supplementation. In addition, strong tendencies for higher isokinetic forces (extension and flexion) were observed during the recovery period following WPH supplementation, with knee extension strength being significantly greater (P < 0.05) after 7 days recovery. Plasma LDH levels tended to be lower (P = 0.06) in the WPH supplemented group during recovery. Conclusions The major finding of this investigation was that whey protein isolate supplementation attenuated the impairment in isometric and isokinetic muscle forces during recovery from exercise-induced muscle injury. PMID:20860817

  1. Validity and test–retest reliability of a novel simple back extensor muscle strength test

    PubMed Central

    Harding, Amy T; Weeks, Benjamin Kurt; Horan, Sean A; Little, Andrew; Watson, Steven L; Beck, Belinda Ruth

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: To develop and determine convergent validity and reliability of a simple and inexpensive clinical test to quantify back extensor muscle strength. Methods: Two testing sessions were conducted, 7 days apart. Each session involved three trials of standing maximal isometric back extensor muscle strength using both the novel test and isokinetic dynamometry. Lumbar spine bone mineral density was examined by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Validation was examined with Pearson correlations (r). Test–retest reliability was examined with intraclass correlation coefficients and limits of agreement. Pearson correlations and intraclass correlation coefficients are presented with corresponding 95% confidence intervals. Linear regression was used to examine the ability of peak back extensor muscle strength to predict indices of lumbar spine bone mineral density and strength. Results: A total of 52 healthy adults (26 men, 26 women) aged 46.4 ± 20.4 years were recruited from the community. A strong positive relationship was observed between peak back extensor strength from hand-held and isokinetic dynamometry (r = 0.824, p < 0.001). For the novel back extensor strength test, short- and long-term reliability was excellent (intraclass correlation coefficient = 0.983 (95% confidence interval, 0.971–0.990), p < 0.001 and intraclass correlation coefficient = 0.901 (95% confidence interval, 0.833–0.943), p < 0.001, respectively). Limits of agreement for short-term repeated back extensor strength measures with the novel back extensor strength protocol were −6.63 to 7.70 kg, with a mean bias of +0.71 kg. Back extensor strength predicted 11% of variance in lumbar spine bone mineral density (p < 0.05) and 9% of lumbar spine index of bone structural strength (p < 0.05). Conclusion: Our novel hand-held dynamometer method to determine back extensor muscle strength is quick, relatively inexpensive, and reliable; demonstrates

  2. Anti-myostatin antibody increases muscle mass and strength and improves insulin sensitivity in old mice

    PubMed Central

    Camporez, João-Paulo G.; Petersen, Max C.; Abudukadier, Abulizi; Moreira, Gabriela V.; Jurczak, Michael J.; Friedman, Glenn; Haqq, Christopher M.; Petersen, Kitt Falk; Shulman, Gerald I.

    2016-01-01

    Sarcopenia, or skeletal muscle atrophy, is a debilitating comorbidity of many physiological and pathophysiological processes, including normal aging. There are no approved therapies for sarcopenia, but the antihypertrophic myokine myostatin is a potential therapeutic target. Here, we show that treatment of young and old mice with an anti-myostatin antibody (ATA 842) for 4 wk increased muscle mass and muscle strength in both groups. Furthermore, ATA 842 treatment also increased insulin-stimulated whole body glucose metabolism in old mice, which could be attributed to increased insulin-stimulated skeletal muscle glucose uptake as measured by a hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp. Taken together, these studies provide support for pharmacological inhibition of myostatin as a potential therapeutic approach for age-related sarcopenia and metabolic disease. PMID:26858428

  3. Anti-myostatin antibody increases muscle mass and strength and improves insulin sensitivity in old mice.

    PubMed

    Camporez, João-Paulo G; Petersen, Max C; Abudukadier, Abulizi; Moreira, Gabriela V; Jurczak, Michael J; Friedman, Glenn; Haqq, Christopher M; Petersen, Kitt Falk; Shulman, Gerald I

    2016-02-23

    Sarcopenia, or skeletal muscle atrophy, is a debilitating comorbidity of many physiological and pathophysiological processes, including normal aging. There are no approved therapies for sarcopenia, but the antihypertrophic myokine myostatin is a potential therapeutic target. Here, we show that treatment of young and old mice with an anti-myostatin antibody (ATA 842) for 4 wk increased muscle mass and muscle strength in both groups. Furthermore, ATA 842 treatment also increased insulin-stimulated whole body glucose metabolism in old mice, which could be attributed to increased insulin-stimulated skeletal muscle glucose uptake as measured by a hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp. Taken together, these studies provide support for pharmacological inhibition of myostatin as a potential therapeutic approach for age-related sarcopenia and metabolic disease.

  4. Relationships Between Lower-Body Muscle Structure and Lower-Body Strength, Power, and Muscle-Tendon Complex Stiffness.

    PubMed

    Secomb, Josh L; Lundgren, Lina E; Farley, Oliver R L; Tran, Tai T; Nimphius, Sophia; Sheppard, Jeremy M

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether any relationships were present between lower-body muscle structure and strength and power qualities. Fifteen elite male surfing athletes performed a battery of lower-body strength and power tests, including countermovement jump (CMJ), squat jump (SJ), isometric midthigh pull (IMTP), and had their lower-body muscle structure assessed with ultrasonography. In addition, lower-body muscle-tendon complex (MTC) stiffness and dynamic strength deficit (DSD) ratio were calculated from the CMJ and IMTP. Significant relationships of large to very large strength were observed between the vastus lateralis (VL) thickness of the left (LVL) and right (RVL) leg and peak force (PF) (r = 0.54-0.77, p < 0.01-0.04), peak velocity (PV) (r = 0.66-0.83, p < 0.01), and peak jump height (r = 0.62-0.80, p < 0.01) in the CMJ and SJ, as well as IMTP PF (r = 0.53-0.60, p = 0.02-0.04). Furthermore, large relationships were found between left lateral gastrocnemius (LG) pennation angle and SJ and IMTP PF (r = 0.53, p = 0.04, and r = 0.70, p < 0.01, respectively) and between LG and IMTP relative PF (r = 0.63, p = 0.01). Additionally, large relationships were identified between lower-body MTC stiffness and DSD ratio (r = 0.68, p < 0.01), right (LG) pennation angle (r = 0.51, p = 0.05), CMJ PF (r = 0.60, p = 0.02), and jump height (r = 0.53, p = 0.04). These results indicate that greater VL thickness and increased LG pennation angle are related to improved performance in the CMJ, SJ, and IMTP. Furthermore, these results suggest that lower-body MTC stiffness explains a large amount of variance in determining an athlete's ability to rapidly apply force during a dynamic movement.

  5. CL316,243, a β3-adrenergic receptor agonist, induces muscle hypertrophy and increased strength

    PubMed Central

    Puzzo, Daniela; Raiteri, Roberto; Castaldo, Clotilde; Capasso, Raffaele; Pagano, Ester; Tedesco, Mariateresa; Gulisano, Walter; Drozd, Lisaveta; Lippiello, Pellegrino; Palmeri, Agostino; Scotto, Pietro; Miniaci, Maria Concetta

    2016-01-01

    Studies in vitro have demonstrated that β3-adrenergic receptors (β3-ARs) regulate protein metabolism in skeletal muscle by promoting protein synthesis and inhibiting protein degradation. In this study, we evaluated whether activation of β3-ARs by the selective agonist CL316,243 modifies the functional and structural properties of skeletal muscles of healthy mice. Daily injections of CL316,243 for 15 days resulted in a significant improvement in muscle force production, assessed by grip strength and weight tests, and an increased myofiber cross-sectional area, indicative of muscle hypertrophy. In addition, atomic force microscopy revealed a significant effect of CL316,243 on the transversal stiffness of isolated muscle fibers. Interestingly, the expression level of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) downstream targets and neuronal nitric oxide synthase (NOS) was also found to be enhanced in tibialis anterior and soleus muscles of CL316,243 treated mice, in accordance with previous data linking β3-ARs to mTOR and NOS signaling pathways. In conclusion, our data suggest that CL316,243 systemic administration might be a novel therapeutic strategy worthy of further investigations in conditions of muscle wasting and weakness associated with aging and muscular diseases. PMID:27874066

  6. Side-Alternating Vibration Training for Balance and Ankle Muscle Strength in Untrained Women

    PubMed Central

    Spiliopoulou, Styliani I.; Amiridis, Ioannis G.; Tsigganos, Georgios; Hatzitaki, Vassilia

    2013-01-01

    Context: Side-alternating vibration (SAV) may help reduce the risk of falling by improving body balance control. Such training has been promoted as a strength-training intervention because it can increase muscle activation through an augmented excitatory input from the muscle spindles. Objective: To determine the effect of SAV training on static balance during 3 postural tasks of increasing difficulty and lower limb strength. Design: Randomized controlled clinical trial. Setting: Laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: A total of 21 healthy women were divided into training (n = 11; age = 43.35 ± 4.12 years, height = 169 ± 6.60 cm, mass = 68.33 ± 11.90 kg) and control (n = 10; age = 42.31 ± 3.73 years, height = 167 ± 4.32 cm, mass = 66.29 ± 10.74 kg) groups. Intervention(s): The training group completed a 9-week program during which participants performed 3 sessions per week of ten 15-second isometric contractions with a 30-second active rest of 3 exercises (half-squat, wide-stance squat, 1-legged half-squat) on an SAV plate (acceleration = 0.91–16.3g). The control group did not participate in any form of exercise over the 9-week period. Main Outcome Measure(s): We evaluated isokinetic and isometric strength of the knee extensors and flexors and ankle plantar flexors, dorsiflexors, and evertors. Static balance was assessed using 3 tasks of increasing difficulty (quiet bipedal stance, tandem stance, 1-legged stance). The electromyographic activity of the vastus lateralis, semitendinosus, medial gastrocnemius, tibialis anterior, and peroneus longus was recorded during postural task performance, baseline and pretraining, immediately posttraining, and 15 days posttraining. Results: After training in the training group, ankle muscle strength improved (P = .03), whereas knee muscle strength remained unaltered (P = .13). Improved ankle-evertor strength was observed at all angular velocities (P = .001). Postural sway decreased in both directions but was greater

  7. Body Composition, Muscle Strength, and Physical Function of Patients with Bethlem Myopathy and Ullrich Congenital Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Miscione, Maria Teresa; Bruno, Francesca; Ripamonti, Claudio; Nervuti, Giuliana; Orsini, Riccardo; Faldini, Cesare; Pellegrini, Massimo; Cocchi, Daniela; Merlini, Luciano

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To determine the contributions of body mass, adiposity, and muscularity to physical function and muscle strength in adult patients with Bethlem myopathy (BM) and Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy (UCMD). Materials and Methods. Evaluation involved one UCMD and 7 BM patients. Body composition was determined by body mass index (BMI) and dual-energy-X-ray-absorptiometry (DXA), muscle strength by dynamometry, physical function by the distance walked in 6 minutes (6MWD), forced vital capacity (FVC) by a spirometer. Results. Six participants were of normal weight and 2 overweight based on BMI; all were sarcopenic based on appendicular fat free mass index (AFFMI); and 7 were sarcopenic obese based on AFFMI and % fat mass. Average muscle strength was reduced below 50% of normal. The 6MWD was in BM patients 30% less than normal. FVC was reduced in 4 of the BM patients. Muscle strength had a good correlation with the physical function variables. Correlation between muscle strength and BMI was poor; it was very high with AFFMI. AFFMI was the best single explicator of muscle strength and physical function. Conclusion. Muscle mass determined by DXA explains most of the variability of the measures of muscle strength and physical function in patients with BM and UCMD. PMID:24163611

  8. Influence of recreational activity and muscle strength on ulnar bending stiffness in men

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myburgh, K. H.; Charette, S.; Zhou, L.; Steele, C. R.; Arnaud, S.; Marcus, R.

    1993-01-01

    Bone bending stiffness (modulus of elasticity [E] x moment of inertia [I]), a measure of bone strength, is related to its mineral content (BMC) and geometry and may be influenced by exercise. We evaluated the relationship of habitual recreational exercise and muscle strength to ulnar EI, width, and BMC in 51 healthy men, 28-61 yr of age. BMC and width were measured by single photon absorptiometry and EI by mechanical resistance tissue analysis. Maximum biceps strength was determined dynamically (1-RM) and grip strength isometrically. Subjects were classified as sedentary (S) (N = 13), moderately (M) (N = 18), or highly active (H) (N = 20) and exercised 0.2 +/- 0.2; 2.2 +/- 1.3; and 6.8 +/- 2.3 h.wk-1 (P < 0.001). H had greater biceps (P < 0.0005) and grip strength (P < 0.05), ulnar BMC (P < 0.05), and ulnar EI (P = 0.01) than M or S, who were similar. Amount of activity correlated with grip and biceps strength (r = 0.47 and 0.49; P < 0.001), but not with bone measurements, whereas muscle strength correlated with both EI and BMC (r = 0.40-0.52, P < 0.005). EI also correlated significantly with both BMC and ulnar width (P < 0.0001). Ulnar width and biceps strength were the only independent predictors of EI (r2 = 0.67, P < 0.0001). We conclude that levels of physical activity sufficient to increase arm strength influence ulnar bending stiffness.

  9. Effects of Vibration Training and Detraining on Balance and Muscle Strength in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Marín, Pedro J.; Martín-López, Aurora; Vicente-Campos, Davinia; Angulo-Carrere, MT; García-Pastor, Teresa; Garatachea, Nuria; Chicharro, José L.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the effects of 2 days/week versus 4 days/week of Whole Body Vibration (WBV) during eight weeks of WBV training on health-related quality of life (SF-36), balance and lower body strength, as well as short-term detraining (3 weeks) on balance and lower body strength among older adults. Thirty-four older adults were randomly assigned to a control group (Control; n = 11) or to one of the vibration training groups: WBV 2 days/week (WBV_2d; n = 11) or WBV 4 days/week (WBV_4d; n = 12). The WBV groups exercised for 8 weeks, following 3 weeks of detraining. Lower body strength increased significantly (p < 0.05) for both groups, WBV_2d and WBV_4d, after 8-week training. A significant reduction in strength was observed following 3 weeks of detraining only in WBV_2d group (p < 0.05). All variables of the SF-36 and the balance test did not change after intervention in any group. 2 days/week and 4 days/week of WBV during 8 weeks showed the same improvements on muscle strength. 3 weeks of detraining did not reverse the gains in strength made during 32 sessions of WBV. Key points 2 days and 4 days per week of WBV training during 8 weeks showed the same improvements on muscle strength. 3 weeks of detraining did not reverse the gains in strength made during 32 sessions of WBV exercise. 3 weeks of detraining did reverse the gains in strength made during 16 sessions of WBV exercise. PMID:24150633

  10. Effects of Kinesio Tape application to quadriceps muscles on isokinetic muscle strength, gait, and functional parameters in patients with stroke.

    PubMed

    Ekiz, Timur; Aslan, Meryem Doğan; Özgirgin, Neşe

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of Kinesio Tape (KT) application to quadriceps muscles on isokinetic muscle strength, gait, and functional parameters in patients with stroke. Twenty-four patients were allocated into KT and control groups. All patients participated in the same conventional rehabilitation program 5 times/wk for 4 wk. In addition, KT was applied to quadriceps muscles bilaterally to the patients in the KT group. Compared with baseline, peak torque levels increased significantly in both groups (all p < 0.05). However, change levels were significantly higher in the KT group than the control group at 60 degrees/second angular velocity (AV) in extension (p = 0.04) and 60 and 180 degrees/second AV in flexion (both p = 0.02) on the paretic side. Moreover, the change levels were more prominent in the KT group at 60 and 180 degrees/second AV in extension (p = 0.03 and p = 0.04, respectively) on the nonparetic side. Gait, balance, mobility, and quality of life values improved significantly in both groups (all p < 0.05), yet the change levels between the groups did not reach significance (p > 0.05). KT application to quadriceps muscles in addition to conventional exercises for 4 wk is effective on isokinetic but not functional parameters.

  11. Muscle Strength, Physical Activity, and Functional Limitations in Older Adults with Central Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Germain, Cassandra M.; Batsis, John A.; Vasquez, Elizabeth; McQuoid, Douglas R.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Obesity and muscle weakness are independently associated with increased risk of physical and functional impairment in older adults. It is unknown whether physical activity (PA) and muscle strength combined provide added protection against functional impairment. This study examines the association between muscle strength, PA, and functional outcomes in older adults with central obesity. Methods. Prevalence and odds of physical (PL), ADL, and IADL limitation were calculated for 6,388 community dwelling adults aged ≥ 60 with central obesity. Individuals were stratified by sex-specific hand grip tertiles and PA. Logistic models were adjusted for age, education, comorbidities, and body-mass index and weighted. Results. Overall prevalence of PL and ADL and IADL limitations were progressively lower by grip category. Within grip categories, prevalence was lower for individuals who were active than those who were inactive. Adjusted models showed significantly lower odds of PL OR 0.42 [0.31, 0.56]; ADL OR 0.60 [0.43, 0.84], and IADL OR 0.46 [0.35, 0.61] for those in the highest grip strength category as compared to those in the lowest grip category. Conclusion. Improving grip strength in obese elders who are not able to engage in traditional exercise is important for reducing odds of physical and functional impairment. PMID:27034833

  12. Characteristics of Body Composition and Muscle Strength of North Korean Refugees during South Korean Stay

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Sun Wook; Koh, Eun Sil; Kim, Si Eun; Kim, Seok Joong

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to investigate the changes of body composition and muscle strength of North Korean refugees (NKRs) according to their duration of stay in South Korea. Methods NKRs who volunteered and were living in South Korea, aged 20 to 75 years were recruited. Body compositions were analyzed by bioelectrical impedance analysis. Muscle strength was measured with the hand grip test. Demographic and migration information was obtained with a questionnaire. Results A total of 158 volunteers were recruited at a mean age of 48.3±11.4 years. The mean time from when they escaped from North Korea and arrived in South Korea was 5.8±4.3 years. Height, weight, and body surface area were significantly smaller in all NKRs compared to South Korean controls, except for women aged over 50 years. In females of younger ages (<50 years), NKRs with more than a 4-year stay in South Korea had a higher weight and fat mass than that of those who had a shorter stay (less than 4 years) in South Korea. All NKRs had a weaker grip strength than that of the age-matched controls from South Korea. Conclusion The NKRs showed relatively smaller physiques and weaker muscle strength than that of the South Korean controls. In younger female NKRs, shorter South Korean stay group showed small body weight and fat mass than that of longer South Korean stay group. Specific health support programs might be needed. PMID:26485471

  13. Effects of mate tea consumption on muscle strength and oxidative stress markers after eccentric exercise.

    PubMed

    Panza, Vilma Pereira; Diefenthaeler, Fernando; Tamborindeguy, Aline Cavalheiro; Camargo, Carolina de Quadros; de Moura, Bruno Monteiro; Brunetta, Henver Simionato; Sakugawa, Raphael Luiz; de Oliveira, Marina Vieira; Puel, Emiliana de Oliveira; Nunes, Everson Araújo; da Silva, Edson Luiz

    2016-04-01

    Dietary phytochemical supplementation may improve muscle recovery from exercise. In this study, we investigated the effect of mate tea (MT) consumption - a phenol-rich beverage - on muscle strength and oxidative stress biomarkers after eccentric exercise. In a randomised, cross-over design, twelve men were assigned to drink either MT or water (control; CON) for 11 d. On the 8th day, subjects performed three sets of twenty maximal eccentric elbow flexion exercises. Maximal isometric elbow flexion force was measured before and at 0, 24, 48 and 72 h after exercise. Blood samples were obtained before and at 24, 48 and 72 h after exercise and analysed for total phenolics, GSH, GSSG, GSH:GSSG ratio and lipid hydroperoxides (LOOH). After eccentric exercise, muscle strength was significantly reduced over time, regardless of treatments. However, MT improved the rate of strength recovery by 8·6 % on the 1st day after exercise (P<0·05). Plasma concentration of total phenolic compounds was higher in MT than in CON at all time points (P<0·05) but decreased significantly at 72 h after exercise in both trials (P<0·05). Blood levels of GSH were significantly decreased at 48 and 72 h after exercise in CON (P<0·05) but did not change over time in MT. No significant changes were observed for GSSG, GSH:GSSG ratio and LOOH levels. MT intake did not influence muscle strength at all time points assessed but hastened the strength recovery over 24 h after exercise. MT also favoured the concentration of blood antioxidant compounds.

  14. Effects of an 8-Month Yoga Intervention on Arterial Compliance and Muscle Strength In Premenopausal Women

    PubMed Central

    Kim, SoJung; Bemben, Michael G.; Bemben, Debra A.

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies have indicated that Yoga exercise has a positive effect on reducing blood pressure and heart rate. However, no randomized controlled studies to date have investigated its effects on arterial compliance. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of an 8-month Yoga intervention on arterial compliance and muscle strength in normal premenopausal women 35-50 years of age. Thirty-four women were randomly assigned either to a Yoga exercise group (YE, n = 16) or a control group (CON, n = 18). Participants in YE group performed 60 minutes of an Ashtanga Yoga series 2 times/week with one day between sessions for 8 months. Each Yoga session consisted of 15 minutes of warm-up exercises, 35 minutes of Ashtanga Yoga postures and 10 minutes of cool-down with relaxation; and the session intensity was progressively increased during the 8 months. Participants in CON were encouraged to maintain their normal daily lifestyles monitored by the bone-specific physical activity questionnaire at 2 month intervals for 8 months. Arterial compliance (pulse contour analysis) and muscle strength (1 Repetition Maximum) were assessed at baseline and after the intervention. Arterial compliance of the large and small arteries was not affected by the 8 month Yoga training (p > 0.05). Also, there were no significant (p > 0.05) group, time, or group × time interaction effects for cardiovascular variables. YE group significantly (p < 0.01) improved leg press muscle strength compared to CON (11.4% vs. -6.5%). Eight months of Ashtanga Yoga training was beneficial for improving leg press strength, but not arterial compliance in premenopausal women. Key pointsThe 8 month Yoga training did not affect arterial compliance of the large and small arteries.None of the cardiovascular variables were changed by the Yoga intervention.Isotonic muscle strength was not altered by the Yoga intervention, with the exception of leg press. PMID:24149206

  15. Levels of muscle activation in strength and conditioning exercises and dynamometer hiking in junior sailors.

    PubMed

    Burnett, Angus F; Wee, Wing K; Xie, Wei; Oh, Paul W; Lim, Julian J H; Tan, Kelvin W W

    2012-04-01

    Although strength and conditioning exercises have been prescribed to enhance performance and prevent injury in sailors, little is known about these exercises in comparison to the demands placed on the sailor's musculature while hiking maximally. Because of the difficulty in collecting hiking-related data on water, a 3-minute maximal hiking test (HM180) has been previously developed for use in the laboratory setting. There were 2 aims of this study. The first aim was to determine whether discriminative validity could be shown for the HM180 test in a group of junior sailors of differing ability level and gender. The second aim was to determine whether differences in muscle activation existed between selected strength and conditioning exercises and the HM180 test. Twenty-nine adolescent boy and girl sailors aged between 14 and 16 years from the Singaporean National Byte Class training squad (n = 12) and the Singapore High Participation Group (n = 17) were recruited for this study. The average levels of normalized muscle activation in selected lower limb and trunk muscles in 4 selected strength and conditioning exercises (leg extension, back squat, and back extension exercises, a 30-second hiking hold) and a maximal 3-minute hiking test (the HM180 test) were quantified. Discriminative validity of the HM180 test was shown, and it was confirmed that the strength and conditioning exercises provide an overload stimulus for the HM180 test. Further, similar levels of muscle activation were found for the vastus lateralis in the leg extension and back squat exercises, and the superficial lumbar multifidus in the back extension and back squat exercises. This study has the potential to inform the design of strength and conditioning programs for junior sailors.

  16. Effects of different strength training frequencies during reduced training period on strength and muscle cross-sectional area.

    PubMed

    Tavares, Lucas Duarte; de Souza, Eduardo Oliveira; Ugrinowitsch, Carlos; Laurentino, Gilberto Candido; Roschel, Hamilton; Aihara, André Yui; Cardoso, Fabiano Nassar; Tricoli, Valmor

    2017-03-19

    This study investigated the effects of different reduced strength training (RST) frequencies on half-squat 1 RM and quadriceps cross-sectional area (QCSA). Thirty-three untrained males (24.7 ± 3.9 years; 1.73 ± 0.08 m; 74.6 ± 8.4 kg) underwent a 16-week experimental period (i.e. eight weeks of strength training [ST] followed by additional eight weeks of RST). During the ST period, the participants performed 3-4 sets of 6-12 RM, three sessions/week in half-squat and knee extension exercises. Following ST, the participants were randomly allocated to one of three groups: reduced strength training with one (RST1) or two sessions per week (RST2), and ceased training (CT). Both RST1 and RST2 groups had their training frequency and total training volume-load (i.e. RST1 = 50.3% and RST2 = 57.1%) reduced, while the CT group stopped training completely. Half-squat 1 RM (RST1 = 27.9%; RST2 = 26.7%; and CT = 28.4%) and QCSA (RST1 = 6.1%; RST2 = 6.9%; and CT = 5.8%) increased significantly (p < .05) in all groups after eight weeks of ST. No significant changes were observed in 1 RM and QCSA for RST1 and RST2 groups after the RST period, while the CT group demonstrated a decrease in half-squat 1 RM (22.6%) and QCSA (5.4%) when compared to the ST period (p < .05). In conclusion, different RST frequencies applied were able to maintain muscle mass and strength performance obtained over the regular ST period. Thus, it appears that RST frequency does not affect the maintenance of muscle mass and strength in untrained males, as long as volume-load is equated between frequencies.

  17. Clustering of strength, physical function, muscle and adiposity characteristics and risk of disability in older adults

    PubMed Central

    Cawthon, Peggy M.; Fox, Kathleen M.; Gandra, Shravanthi. R.; Delmonico, Matthew J.; Chiou, Chiun-Fang; Anthony, Mary S.; Caserotti, Paolo; Kritchevsky, Stephen B.; Newman, Anne B.; Goodpaster, Bret H.; Satterfield, Suzanne; Cummings, Steven R.; Harris, Tamara B.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Strength, physical performance, adiposity and lean mass may be independent risk factors for disability in older adults. The aim of this study was to empirically identify groupings of these interrelated measures and test how such groupings may relate to disability risk. Design Prospective Health, Aging and Body Composition Study (Health ABC) Setting Two US clinical centers Participants 1,263 women and 1,221 men Measurements Weight, strength (knee extension, grip); walking speed; chair stands; dual x-ray absorptiometry (fat and lean mass for total body, arm, and leg; percent fat); and thigh computed tomography scans (muscle area, muscle density). Analyses were stratified by sex. Factor analysis reduced these variables into a smaller number of components, and proportional hazards models assessed risk of major disability for the components identified. Results In both sexes, factor analysis reduced the 14 individual variables into three components that explained 76–77% of the data variance: Factor 1, an adiposity component, with strong loading by fat mass, weight and muscle density; Factor 2, a strength/lean body size component with strong loading by lean mass, weight and strength; Factor 3, a physical performance component with positive loading by walking speed and chair stands performance. Factor 1 (adiposity) and Factor 3 (performance), but not Factor 2 (strength/lean body size), were associated with disability over 6.1 (± 2.6 SD) years. Conclusion Adiposity and physical performance constructs, but not the strength/lean body size construct, were associated with disability risk, suggesting that adiposity and performance should be considered as risk factors for disability. PMID:21568948

  18. Age-related changes in muscle strength and spinal kyphosis angles in an elderly Japanese population

    PubMed Central

    Kasukawa, Yuji; Miyakoshi, Naohisa; Hongo, Michio; Ishikawa, Yoshinori; Kudo, Daisuke; Suzuki, Masazumi; Mizutani, Takashi; Kimura, Ryouta; Ono, Yuichi; Shimada, Yoichi

    2017-01-01

    Lumbar kyphosis and the decreased mobility of the lumbar spine increase the risk of falls and impair both the quality of life and the ability to perform activities of daily living. However, in the elderly Japanese population, little is known about the age-related changes and sex-related differences in muscle strength, including of the upper and lower extremities and back extensors. An adequate kyphotic or lordotic angle has also not been determined. In this study, we evaluated the age-related changes in muscle strength and spinal kyphosis in 252 males and 320 females ≥50 years of age. Grip, back extensor, hip flexor, and knee extensor strength; thoracic and lumbar kyphosis; and spinal inclination in the neutral standing position were assessed, together with the range of motion of the thoracic and lumbar spine and spinal inclination. Grip strength, back extensor strength, and the strength of the hip flexors and knee extensors decreased significantly with aging, both in males (P<0.0001) and in females (P=0.0015 to P<0.0001). The lumbar but not the thoracic kyphosis angle decreased significantly with aging, only in females (P<0.0001). Spinal inclination increased significantly with aging in both males (P=0.002) and females (P<0.0001). Back extensor strength and the thoracic kyphosis angle were significant variables influencing the lumbar kyphosis angle in both sexes. Spinal inclination correlated significantly with both the lumbar kyphosis angle and hip flexor strength in males, as well as with the lumbar kyphosis angle in females. PMID:28260870

  19. Age-related changes in muscle strength and spinal kyphosis angles in an elderly Japanese population.

    PubMed

    Kasukawa, Yuji; Miyakoshi, Naohisa; Hongo, Michio; Ishikawa, Yoshinori; Kudo, Daisuke; Suzuki, Masazumi; Mizutani, Takashi; Kimura, Ryouta; Ono, Yuichi; Shimada, Yoichi

    2017-01-01

    Lumbar kyphosis and the decreased mobility of the lumbar spine increase the risk of falls and impair both the quality of life and the ability to perform activities of daily living. However, in the elderly Japanese population, little is known about the age-related changes and sex-related differences in muscle strength, including of the upper and lower extremities and back extensors. An adequate kyphotic or lordotic angle has also not been determined. In this study, we evaluated the age-related changes in muscle strength and spinal kyphosis in 252 males and 320 females ≥50 years of age. Grip, back extensor, hip flexor, and knee extensor strength; thoracic and lumbar kyphosis; and spinal inclination in the neutral standing position were assessed, together with the range of motion of the thoracic and lumbar spine and spinal inclination. Grip strength, back extensor strength, and the strength of the hip flexors and knee extensors decreased significantly with aging, both in males (P<0.0001) and in females (P=0.0015 to P<0.0001). The lumbar but not the thoracic kyphosis angle decreased significantly with aging, only in females (P<0.0001). Spinal inclination increased significantly with aging in both males (P=0.002) and females (P<0.0001). Back extensor strength and the thoracic kyphosis angle were significant variables influencing the lumbar kyphosis angle in both sexes. Spinal inclination correlated significantly with both the lumbar kyphosis angle and hip flexor strength in males, as well as with the lumbar kyphosis angle in females.

  20. Excess coenzyme A reduces skeletal muscle performance and strength in mice overexpressing human PANK2.

    PubMed

    Corbin, Deborah R; Rehg, Jerold E; Shepherd, Danielle L; Stoilov, Peter; Percifield, Ryan J; Horner, Linda; Frase, Sharon; Zhang, Yong-Mei; Rock, Charles O; Hollander, John M; Jackowski, Suzanne; Leonardi, Roberta

    2017-02-03

    Coenzyme A (CoA) is a cofactor that is central to energy metabolism and CoA synthesis is controlled by the enzyme pantothenate kinase (PanK). A transgenic mouse strain expressing human PANK2 was derived to determine the physiological impact of PANK overexpression and elevated CoA levels. The Tg(PANK2) mice expressed high levels of the transgene in skeletal muscle and heart; however, CoA was substantially elevated only in skeletal muscle, possibly associated with the comparatively low endogenous levels of acetyl-CoA, a potent feedback inhibitor of PANK2. Tg(PANK2) mice were smaller, had less skeletal muscle mass and displayed significantly impaired exercise tolerance and grip strength. Skeletal myofibers were characterized by centralized nuclei and aberrant mitochondria. Both the content of fully assembled complex I of the electron transport chain and ATP levels were reduced, while markers of oxidative stress were elevated in Tg(PANK2) skeletal muscle. These abnormalities were not detected in the Tg(PANK2) heart muscle, with the exception of spotty loss of cristae organization in the mitochondria. The data demonstrate that excessively high CoA may be detrimental to skeletal muscle function.

  1. Apple Pomace Extract Improves Endurance in Exercise Performance by Increasing Strength and Weight of Skeletal Muscle.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Ji-Woong; Shim, Jae-Jung; Choi, Il-Dong; Kim, Sung-Hwan; Ra, Jehyeon; Ku, Hyung Keun; Lee, Dong Eun; Kim, Tae-Youl; Jeung, Woonhee; Lee, Jung-Hee; Lee, Ki Won; Huh, Chul-Sung; Sim, Jae-Hun; Ahn, Young-Tae

    2015-12-01

    Ursolic acid is a lipophilic pentacyclic triterpenoid found in many fruits and herbs and is used in several herbal folk medicines for diabetes. In this study, we evaluated the effects of apple pomace extract (APE; ursolic acid content, 183 mg/g) on skeletal muscle atrophy. To examine APE therapeutic potential in muscle atrophy, we investigated APE effects on the expression of biomarkers associated with muscle atrophy and hypertrophy. We found that APE inhibited atrophy, while inducing hypertrophy in C2C12 myotubes by decreasing the expression of atrophy-related genes and increasing the expression of hypertrophy-associated genes. The in vivo experiments using mice fed a diet with or without APE showed that APE intake increased skeletal muscle mass, as well as grip strength and exercise capacity. In addition, APE significantly improved endurance in the mice, as evidenced by increased exhaustive running time and muscle weight, and reduced the expression of the genes involved in the development of muscle atrophy. APE also decreased the concentration of serum lactate and lactate dehydrogenase, inorganic phosphate, and creatinine, the indicators of accumulated fatigue and exercise-induced stress. These results suggest that APE may be useful as an ergogenic functional food or dietary supplement.

  2. Muscle activation and strength in squat and Bulgarian squat on stable and unstable surface.

    PubMed

    Andersen, V; Fimland, M S; Brennset, O; Haslestad, L R; Lundteigen, M S; Skalleberg, K; Saeterbakken, A H

    2014-12-01

    The aim of the study was to compare muscle activity using the same relative resistance in squats and Bulgarian squats on stable and unstable surface. Muscle strength and activity were assessed by 6-repetition maximum and concomitant surface electromyography. A cohort of 15 resistance-trained males performed the exercises on the floor or a foam cushion in randomized order. The muscle activity was greater in biceps femoris (63-77%, p<0.01) and core muscle external obliques (58-62%, p<0.05) for the Bulgarian squat compared to regular squats, but lower for rectus femoris (16-21%, p<0.05). Only Bulgarian squat showed differences concerning the surface, e. g. the unstable surface reduced the activation of erector spinae (10%, p<0.05) and biceps femoris (10%, p<0.05) compared to a stable surface. There were similar activations in the vasti muscles and rectus abdominis between the different exercises (p=0.313-0.995). Unstable surfaces resulted in a load decrement of 7% and 10% compared to stable surfaces (p<0.001). In conclusion, the squat was somewhat favorable for the activation of agonists, whereas Bulgarian squat was advantageous for the antagonist and somewhat for core muscles. Bulgarian- and regular squats complement each other, and it may be useful to include both in a periodized resistance training program.

  3. Respiratory and peripheral muscle function in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Lands, L C; Heigenhauser, G J; Jones, N L

    1993-04-01

    Respiratory muscle strength (RMS) and endurance are often preserved in cystic fibrosis (CF) despite malnutrition, chronic airflow limitation, and hyperinflation. Inspiratory muscle function may be relatively preserved due to a selective "training stimulus" from chronic lung disease. Respiratory and peripheral muscle function were evaluated in 14 stable CF patients and 16 healthy control subjects. RMS was measured using static maximal pressures performed at FRC. Respiratory fatigue (RF) was assessed using 18 repeated static efforts (10 s on/5 s off) over 4.5 min. Peripheral function was evaluated by leg strength (LS) and leg fatigue (LF) measured during sprint efforts on an isokinetic cycle ergometer. Despite a lower weight (mean +/- SD, 94 +/- 9.6% ideal wt for CF patients versus 107 +/- 14.6% for controls) and elevated residual volume (RV)/TLC ratio (38 +/- 13.0 versus 22 +/- 5.3), the CF group maintained RMS (inspiratory 96 +/- 23.2 versus 114 +/- 33.2; expiratory 105 +/- 28.3 versus 123 +/- 40.9 cm H2O) but had decreased LS (590 +/- 201.7 versus 813 +/- 167.1 W). There were no differences between the groups with respect to RF or LF. For the control group, inspiratory and expiratory RMS correlated with LS (p < 0.01) and lean body mass (p < 0.01). For the CF group, while expiratory RMS (p < 0.05) and LS (p < 0.01) correlated with lean body mass and each other (p < 0.01), inspiratory RMS was independent of lean body mass and LS (p > 0.1). Female CF patients appeared to have a better preservation of inspiratory RMS than males with CF.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  4. Effects of a shoulder injury prevention strength training program on eccentric external rotator muscle strength and glenohumeral joint imbalance in female overhead activity athletes.

    PubMed

    Niederbracht, Yvonne; Shim, Andrew L; Sloniger, Mark A; Paternostro-Bayles, Madeline; Short, Thomas H

    2008-01-01

    Imbalance of the eccentrically-activated external rotator cuff muscles versus the concentrically-activated internal rotator cuff muscles is a primary risk factor for glenohumeral joint injuries in overhead activity athletes. Nonisokinetic dynamometer based strength training studies, however, have focused exclusively on resulting concentric instead of applicable eccentric strength gains of the external rotator cuff muscles. Furthermore, previous strength training studies did not result in a reduction in glenoumeral joint muscle imbalance, thereby suggesting that currently used shoulder strength training programs do not effectively reduce the risk of shoulder injury to the overhead activity athlete. Two collegiate women tennis teams, consisting of 12 women, participated in this study throughout their preseason training. One team (n = 6) participated in a 5-week, 4 times a week, external shoulder rotator muscle strength training program next to their preseason tennis training. The other team (n = 6) participated in a comparable preseason tennis training program, but did not conduct any upper body strength training. Effects of this strength training program were evaluated by comparing pre- and posttraining data of 5 maximal eccentric external immediately followed by concentric internal contractions on a Kin-Com isokinetic dynamometer (Chattecx Corp., Hixson, Tennessee). Overall, the shoulder strength training program significantly increased eccentric external total work without significant effects on concentric internal total work, concentric internal mean peak force, or eccentric external mean peak force. In conclusion, by increasing the eccentric external total exercise capacity without a subsequent increase in the concentric internal total exercise capacity, this strength training program potentially decreases shoulder rotator muscle imbalances and the risk for shoulder injuries to overhead activity athletes.

  5. Multimedia-Based Therapy Model for Non-Pharmacological Stroke with Decrease Impaired Muscle Strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hajar Puji Sejati, Rr; Muhimmah, Izzati; Mahtarami, Affan

    2016-01-01

    Stroke patients who experience a decrease in muscle strength need to do exercises so that they can increase their muscle strength. In order to enable the patient does exercise independently the multimedia-based stroke therapy model is needed. These exercises can be done independently, with supervision of the family member at home. So, we develop prototype of the multimedia-based therapy for the family member so that they can assist patients performing exercises without attending therapy session in hospital. This model was built according to the advices from physiotherapist and a medical rehabilitation doctor. This model has been evaluated through focused group discussion by physiotherapists. And they gave positive responses to this proposed model.

  6. Behavioural changes and muscle strength in Rattus norvegicus experimentally infected with Toxocara cati and T. canis.

    PubMed

    Santos, S V; Moura, J V L; Lescano, S A Z; Castro, J M; Ribeiro, M C S A; Chieffi, P P

    2015-07-01

    Toxocara canis and Toxocara cati are nematode parasites in dogs and cats, respectively, transmitted by ingestion of embryonated eggs, transmammary and transplacental (T. canis) routes and paratenic host predation. Many parasites use mechanisms that change the behaviour of their hosts to ensure continued transmission. Several researchers have demonstrated behavioural changes in mouse models as paratenic hosts for T. canis. However, there have been no studies on behavioural changes in laboratory rats (Rattus norvegicus) experimentally infected with T. cati. This study investigated behavioural changes and muscle strength in male and female rats experimentally infected with T. cati or T. canis in acute and chronic phases of infection. Regardless of sex, rats infected with T. cati showed a greater decrease in muscle strength 42 days post infection compared to rats infected with T. canis. However, behavioural changes were only observed in female rats infected with T. canis.

  7. Isotretinoin treatment in patients with acne vulgaris: does it impact muscle strength, fatigue, and endurance?

    PubMed

    Yıldızgören, Mustafa Turgut; Rifaioğlu, Emine Nur; Demirkapı, Musa; Ekiz, Timur; Micooğulları, Ahmet; Şen, Tuğba; Turhanoğlu, Ayşe Dicle

    2015-07-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of isotretinoin on muscle strength, fatigue, and endurance in patients with acne vulgaris. The study included 27 patients with acne vulgaris who underwent treatment with isotretinoin as well as 26 control patients for comparison. Participants in the treatment group received oral isotretinoin 0.5 mg/kg once daily for 1 month followed by an increased dose of 1 mg/kg once daily for 2 months. Isokinetic measurements were obtained from the hamstrings and quadriceps on the nondominant side of the body at baseline and 3-month follow-up using an isokinetic dynamometer. Results indicated that systemic isotretinoin did not significantly alter muscle strength, fatigue, and endurance.

  8. Effects of phosphatidic acid supplementation on muscle thickness and strength in resistance-trained men.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Adam M; Sell, Katie M; Ghigiarelli, Jamie J; Kelly, Christopher F; Shone, Edward W; Accetta, Matthew R; Baum, Jamie B; Mangine, Gerald T

    2017-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of phosphatidic acid (PA) supplementation on muscle thickness and strength following an 8 week supervised resistance-training program. Fifteen resistance trained men (22.8 ± 3.5 years; 80.6 ± 8.7 kg; 178.1 ± 5.6 cm; 14.6% ± 8.8% body fat) were randomly assigned to a group that either consumed 750 mg of PA or a placebo (PL). Testing was carried out before (PRE) and after (POST) training/supplementation for muscle thickness and strength. Muscle thickness of the rectus femoris (RF), vastus lateralis (VL), biceps brachii (BB), and triceps brachii (TB) muscles were measured via ultrasonography, along with 1 repetition maximum (1RM) of squat, deadlift, and bench press. Analysis of covariance (ANCOVA), using PRE values as the covariate, did not reveal any group differences for measures of muscle thickness in the RF (PA: 3.6% ± 5.2%; PL: 3.2% ± 4.2%, p = 0.97), VL (PA: 23.4% ± 18.1%, PL: 12.5% ± 15.4%, p = 0.37), BB (PA: 3.7% ± 6.4%, PL: 9.6% ± 12.4%, p = 0.86), or TB (PA: 15.1% ± 17.9%, PL: 10.7% ± 19.3%, p = 0.79). Likewise, no group differences were observed in changes in squat (PA: 8.4% ± 4.1%, PL: 8.1% ± 4.2%, p = 0.79), deadlift (PA: 10.1% ± 10.1%, PL: 8.9% ± 9.5%, p = 0.66), or bench press (PA: 5.7% ± 5.5%, PL: 5.1% ± 3.0%, p = 0.76) exercises. Collectively, however, all participants experienced significant (p < 0.05) improvements in each measure of muscle thickness and strength. Results of this study suggest that PA supplementation, in combination with a 3 days·week(-1) resistance-training program for 8 weeks, did not have a differential effect compared with PL on changes in muscle thickness or 1RM strength.

  9. Respiratory muscle training with the incentive spirometer resistive breathing device.

    PubMed

    Larson, M; Kim, M J

    1984-07-01

    Utilizing the conceptual scheme of Kim, this study focused on the effect of inspiratory muscle training on the strength of the respiratory muscles, exercise performance, clinical manifestations, and activities of daily living. Unlike previous studies, inspiratory muscle training was performed by the use of an ISRBD that gave alinear inspiratory resistance of 50 cm H2O/L/sec at 1 L/sec flow. Subjects used an ISRBD twice a day for 15 minutes each day for 4 weeks. Strength of respiratory muscles as measured by PImax and sputum expectoration improved significantly (P less than 0.05) but there was no significant change in exercise performance (12-minute walk distance), other clinical signs and symptoms, or activities of daily living. Visual feedback given by the bellows of the ISRBD that inflated and deflated with inspiration and expiration apparently served as a positive reinforcer and motivator for most subjects. Daily logs of clinical signs and symptoms and activities of daily living, along with weekly telephone conferences with each subject, provided comprehensive data and may have contributed to the high compliance rate (98%) in this study.

  10. Hip flexor muscle size, strength and recruitment pattern in patients with acetabular labral tears compared to healthy controls.

    PubMed

    Mendis, M Dilani; Wilson, Stephen J; Hayes, David A; Watts, Mark C; Hides, Julie A

    2014-10-01

    Acetabular labral tears are a source of hip pain and are considered to be a precursor to hip osteoarthritis. Hip flexor muscles contribute to hip joint stability and function but it is unknown if their size and function is altered in the presence of labral pathology. This study aimed to investigate hip flexor muscle size, strength and recruitment pattern in patients with hip labral pathology compared to control subjects. 12 subjects diagnosed with an unilateral acetabular labral tear were compared to 12 control subjects matched for age and gender. All subjects underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of their lumbo-pelvic region. Average muscle cross-sectional area (CSA) of the iliacus, psoas, iliopsoas, sartorius, tensor fascia latae and rectus femoris muscles were measured. Hip flexion strength was measured by an externally fixed dynamometer. Individual muscle recruitment pattern during a resisted hip flexion exercise task was measured by muscle functional MRI. Hip flexor muscle strength was found to be decreased in patients with labral pathology compared to control subjects (p < 0.01). No difference between groups or sides was found for hip flexor muscle size (all p > 0.17) and recruitment pattern (all p > 0.53). Decreased hip flexor muscle strength may affect physical function in patients with hip labral pathology by contributing to altered gait patterns and functional tasks. Clinical rehabilitation of these patients may need to include strengthening exercises for the hip flexor muscles.

  11. Immediate effects of forearm elastic and nonelastic taping on wrist flexor muscle and grip strength of normal adults

    PubMed Central

    Cha, Hyun-Gyu; Kim, Myoung-Kwon; Shin, Young-Jun

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of forearm elastic taping on grip and wrist flexor muscle strength. [Subjects and Methods] This was a single-blind, crossover study. This study selected 40 healthy subjects with no history of orthopedic disorders and was conducted after consent to participate was obtained. Grip and wrist flexor muscle strength of subjects were assessed by a handheld dynamometer and a Commander Muscle Tester, respectively, with forearm elastic taping or nonelastic taping. [Results] After application of forearm elastic taping, grip strength and wrist flexor muscle strength significantly increased compared with the nonelastic taping group. [Conclusion] Application of forearm elastic taping is considered to have positive effects on improving wrist and grip strength. PMID:27821932

  12. Muscle Strength Enhancement Following Home-Based Virtual Cycling Training in Ambulatory Children with Cerebral Palsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Chia-Ling; Hong, Wei-Hsien; Cheng, Hsin-Yi Kathy; Liaw, Mei-Yun; Chung, Chia-Ying; Chen, Chung-Yao

    2012-01-01

    This study is the first well-designed randomized controlled trial to assess the effects of a novel home-based virtual cycling training (hVCT) program for improving muscle strength in children with spastic cerebral palsy (CP). Twenty-eight ambulatory children with spastic CP aged 6-12 years were randomly assigned to an hVCT group (n = 13) or a…

  13. Expression of genes related to muscle plasticity after strength and power training regimens.

    PubMed

    Lamas, L; Aoki, M S; Ugrinowitsch, C; Campos, G E R; Regazzini, M; Moriscot, A S; Tricoli, V

    2010-04-01

    The purpose of our study was to compare the effects of 8-week progressive strength and power training regimens on strength gains and muscle plasticity [muscle fiber hypertrophy and phenotype shift, mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), regulatory-associated protein of mTOR (RAPTOR), rapamycin-insensitive companion of m-TOR (RICTOR), calcineurin and calcipressin gene expression]. Twenty-nine physically active subjects were divided into three groups: strength training (ST), power training (PT) and control (C). Squat 1 RM and muscle biopsies were obtained before and after the training period. Strength increased similarly for both ST and PT groups (P<0.001). Fiber types I, IIa and IIb presented hypertrophy main time effect (P<0.05). Only type IIb percentage decreased from pre- to post-test (main time effect, P<0.05). mTOR and RICTOR mRNA expression increased similarly from pre- to post-test (P<0.01). RAPTOR increased after training for both groups (P<0.0001), but to a greater extent in the ST (P<0.001) than in the PT group. 4EBP-1 decreased after training when the ST and PT groups were pooled (P<0.05). Calcineurin levels did not change after training, while calcipressin increased similarly from pre- to post-test (P<0.01). In conclusion, our data indicate that these training regimens produce similar performance improvements; however, there was a trend toward greater hypertrophy-related gene expression and muscle fiber hypertrophy in the ST group.

  14. Measuring hip muscle strength in patients with femoroacetabular impingement and other hip pathologies

    PubMed Central

    Mayne, E.; Memarzadeh, A.; Raut, P.; Arora, A.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to systematically review the literature on measurement of muscle strength in patients with femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) and other pathologies and to suggest guidelines to standardise protocols for future research in the field. Methods The Cochrane and PubMed libraries were searched for any publications using the terms ‘hip’, ‘muscle’, ‘strength’, and ‘measurement’ in the ‘Title, Abstract, Keywords’ field. A further search was performed using the terms ‘femoroacetabular’ or ‘impingement’. The search was limited to recent literature only. Results A total of 29 articles were reviewed to obtain information on a number of variables. These comprised the type of device used for measurement, rater standardisation, the type of movements tested, body positioning and comparative studies of muscle strength in FAI versus normal controls. The studies found that hip muscle strength is lower in patients with FAI; this is also true for the asymptomatic hip in patients with FAI. Conclusions Current literature on this subject is limited and examines multiple variables. Our recommendations for achieving reproducible results include stabilising the patient, measuring isometric movements and maximising standardisation by using a single tester and familiarising the participants with the protocol. Further work must be done to demonstrate the reliability of any new testing method. Cite this article: E. Mayne, A. Memarzadeh, P. Raut, A. Arora, V. Khanduja. Measuring hip muscle strength in patients with femoroacetabular impingement and other hip pathologies: A systematic review. Bone Joint Res 2017;6:66–72. DOI: 10.1302/2046-3758.61.BJR-2016-0081. PMID:28108483

  15. Assessing the accuracy of subject-specific, muscle-model parameters determined by optimizing to match isometric strength.

    PubMed

    DeSmitt, Holly J; Domire, Zachary J

    2016-12-01

    Biomechanical models are sensitive to the choice of model parameters. Therefore, determination of accurate subject specific model parameters is important. One approach to generate these parameters is to optimize the values such that the model output will match experimentally measured strength curves. This approach is attractive as it is inexpensive and should provide an excellent match to experimentally measured strength. However, given the problem of muscle redundancy, it is not clear that this approach generates accurate individual muscle forces. The purpose of this investigation is to evaluate this approach using simulated data to enable a direct comparison. It is hypothesized that the optimization approach will be able to recreate accurate muscle model parameters when information from measurable parameters is given. A model of isometric knee extension was developed to simulate a strength curve across a range of knee angles. In order to realistically recreate experimentally measured strength, random noise was added to the modeled strength. Parameters were solved for using a genetic search algorithm. When noise was added to the measurements the strength curve was reasonably recreated. However, the individual muscle model parameters and force curves were far less accurate. Based upon this examination, it is clear that very different sets of model parameters can recreate similar strength curves. Therefore, experimental variation in strength measurements has a significant influence on the results. Given the difficulty in accurately recreating individual muscle parameters, it may be more appropriate to perform simulations with lumped actuators representing similar muscles.

  16. Improved knee extensor strength with resistance training associates with muscle specific miRNAs in older adults.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tan; Birbrair, Alexander; Wang, Zhong-Min; Messi, María L; Marsh, Anthony P; Leng, Iris; Nicklas, Barbara J; Delbono, Osvaldo

    2015-02-01

    Regular exercise, particularly resistance training (RT), is the only therapy known to consistently improve muscle strength and quality (force per unit of mass) in older persons, but there is considerable variability in responsiveness to training. Identifying sensitive diagnostic biomarkers of responsiveness to RT may inform the design of a more efficient exercise regimen to improve muscle strength in older adults. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs that regulate gene expression. We quantified six muscle specific miRNAs (miR-1, -133a, -133b, -206, -208b and -499) in both muscle tissue and blood plasma, and their relationship with knee extensor strength in seven older (age=70.5 ± 2.5 years) adults before and after 5 months of RT. MiRNAs differentially responded to RT; muscle miR-133b decreased, while all plasma miRNAs tended to increase. Percent changes in knee extensor strength with RT showed strong positive correlations with percent changes in muscle miR-133a, -133b, and -206 and with percent changes in plasma and plasma/muscle miR-499 ratio. Baseline level of plasma or plasma/muscle miR-499 ratio further predicts muscle response to RT, while changes in muscle miR-133a, -133b, and -206 may correlate with muscle TNNT1 gene alternative splicing in response to RT. Our results indicate that RT alters muscle specific miRNAs in muscle and plasma, and that these changes account for some of the variation in strength responses to RT in older adults.

  17. Improved Knee Extensor Strength with Resistance Training Associates with Muscle Specific miRNAs in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Tan; Birbrair, Alexander; Wang, Zhong-Min; Messi, María L.; Marsh, Anthony P.; Leng, Iris; Nicklas, Barbara J.; Delbono, Osvaldo

    2015-01-01

    Regular exercise, particularly resistance training (RT), is the only therapy known to consistently improve muscle strength and quality (force per unit of mass) in older persons, but there is considerable variability in responsiveness to training. Identifying sensitive diagnostic biomarkers of responsiveness to RT may inform the design of a more efficient exercise regimen to improve muscle strength in older adults. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs that regulate gene expression. We quantified six muscle specific miRNAs (miR-1, -133a, -133b, -206, -208b and -499) in both muscle tissue and blood plasma, and their relationship with knee extensor strength in seven older (age = 70.5 ± 2.5 years) adults before and after 5 months of RT. MiRNAs differentially responded to RT; muscle miR-133b decreased, while all plasma miRNAs tended to increase. Percent changes in knee extensor strength with RT showed strong positive correlations with percent changes in muscle miR-133a, -133b, -206 and with percent changes in plasma and plasma/muscle miR-499 ratio. Baseline level of plasma or plasma/muscle miR-499 ratio further predicts muscle response to RT, while changes in muscle miR-133a, -133b, -206 may correlate with muscle TNNT1gene alternative splicing in response to RT. Our results indicate that RT alters muscle specific miRNAs in muscle and plasma, and that these changes account for some of the variation in strength responses to RT in older adults. PMID:25560803

  18. The effects of accentuated eccentric loading on strength, muscle hypertrophy, and neural adaptations in trained individuals.

    PubMed

    Brandenburg, Jason P; Docherty, David

    2002-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the strength and neuromuscular adaptations for dynamic constant external resistance (DCER) training and dynamic accentuated external resistance (DAER) training (resistance training employing an accentuated load during eccentric actions). Male subjects active in resistance training were assigned to either a DCER training group (n = 10) or a DAER training group (n = 8) for 9 weeks. Subjects in the DCER group performed 4 sets of 10 repetitions with a load of 75% concentric 1 repetition maximum (RM). Subjects in the DAER group performed 3 sets of 10 repetitions with a concentric load of 75% of 1RM and an eccentric load of approximately 120% of concentric 1RM. Three measures reflecting adaptation of elbow flexors and extensors were recorded pretraining and posttraining: concentric 1RM, muscle cross-sectional area (CSA), and specific tension. Strength was assessed at midtraining periods. No significant changes in muscle CSA were observed in either group. Both training groups experienced significant increases in concentric 1RM and specific tension of both the elbow flexors and extensors, but compared with DCER training, DAER training produced significantly greater increases in concentric 1RM of the elbow extensors. These results suggest that, for some exercises, DAER training may be more effective than DCER training in developing strength within a 9-week training phase. However, for trained subjects, neither protocol is effective in eliciting muscle hypertrophy.

  19. Accelerometer‐determined physical activity, muscle mass, and leg strength in community‐dwelling older adults

    PubMed Central

    Foong, Yi Chao; Chherawala, Nabil; Aitken, Dawn; Winzenberg, Tania; Jones, Graeme

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Introduction The aim of this study was to describe the relationship between accelerometer‐determined physical activity (PA), muscle mass, and lower‐limb strength in community‐dwelling older adults. Methods Six hundred thirty‐six community‐dwelling older adults (66 ± 7 years) were studied. Muscle mass was measured using dual‐energy x‐ray absorptiometry, whilst lower limb strength was measured via dynamometry. We measured minutes/day spent in sedentary, light, moderate, and vigorous intensity activity using Actigraph GT1M accelerometers. Results Participants spent a median of 583(Interquartile ratio (IQR) 522–646), 225(176–271), 27(12–45) and 0(0–0) min in sedentary, light, moderate, and vigorous activity, respectively. PA intensity was positively associated with both lean mass percentage and lower limb strength in a dose–response fashion. Sedentary activity was negatively associated with lean mass percentage, but not lower‐limb strength. There was a positive association between PA and appendicular lean mass in men only. There was an interaction between age and activity; as age increased, the magnitude of the association of PA with lean mass percentage decreased. Those who adhered to the Australian Department of Health PA guidelines (moderate/vigorous PA >/=150 min/week) had greater lean mass percentage, appendicular lean mass, and lower limb strength. Conclusions Using accelerometer technology, both the amount and intensity of accelerometer‐determined PA had an independent, dose–response relationship with lean mass percentage and lower limb strength, with the largest effect for vigorous activity. Time spent in sedentary activity was negatively associated with lean mass percentage, but was not associated with lower limb strength. The magnitude of the association between PA and lean mass percentage decreased with age, suggesting that PA programmes may need to be modified with increasing age. PMID:27239404

  20. Effect of neuromuscular electrical stimulation on facial muscle strength and oral function in stroke patients with facial palsy

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jong-Bae

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of neuromuscular electrical stimulation on facial muscle strength and oral function in stroke patients with facial palsy. [Subjects and Methods] Nine subjects received the electrical stimulation and traditional dysphagia therapy. Electrical stimulation was applied to stimulate each subject’s facial muscles 30 minutes a day, 5 days a week, for 4 weeks. [Results] Subjects showed significant improvement in cheek and lip strength and oral function after the intervention. [Conclusion] This study demonstrates that electrical stimulation improves facial muscle strength and oral function in stroke patients with dysphagia. PMID:27799689

  1. Relationships between Isometric Muscle Strength, Gait Parameters, and Gross Motor Function Measure in Patients with Cerebral Palsy

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Hyung-Ik; Sung, Ki Hyuk; Chung, Chin Youb; Lee, Kyoung Min; Lee, Seung Yeol; Lee, In Hyeok

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study investigated the correlation between isometric muscle strength, gross motor function, and gait parameters in patients with spastic cerebral palsy and to find which muscle groups play an important role for gait pattern in a flexed knee gait. Materials and Methods Twenty-four ambulatory patients (mean age, 10.0 years) with spastic cerebral palsy who were scheduled for single event multilevel surgery, including distal hamstring lengthening, were included. Preoperatively, peak isometric muscle strength was measured for the hip flexor, hip extensor, knee flexor, and knee extensor muscle groups using a handheld dynamometer, and three-dimensional (3D) gait analysis and gross motor function measure (GMFM) scoring were also performed. Correlations between peak isometric strength and GMFM, gait kinematics, and gait kinetics were analyzed. Results Peak isometric muscle strength of all muscle groups was not related to the GMFM score and the gross motor function classification system level. Peak isometric strength of the hip extensor and knee extensor was significantly correlated with the mean pelvic tilt (r=-0.588, p=0.003 and r=-0.436, p=0.033) and maximum pelvic obliquity (r=-0.450, p=0.031 and r=-0.419, p=0.041). There were significant correlations between peak isometric strength of the knee extensor and peak knee extensor moment in early stance (r=0.467, p=0.021) and in terminal stance (r=0.416, p=0.043). Conclusion There is no correlation between muscle strength and gross motor function. However, this study showed that muscle strength, especially of the extensor muscle group of the hip and knee joints, might play a critical role in gait by stabilizing pelvic motion and decreasing energy consumption in a flexed knee gait. PMID:26632404

  2. Test-retest reliabilities of hand-held dynamometer for lower-limb muscle strength in intellectual disabilities.

    PubMed

    Wuang, Yee-Pay; Chang, Jyh-Jong; Wang, Min-Hung; Lin, Hsiu-Ching

    2013-08-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to investigate the test-retest reliabilities of hand-held dynamometer (HDD) for measuring lower-limb muscle strength in intellectual disabilities (ID). The other purposes were to: (1) compare the lower-limb muscle strength between children with and without ID; (2) probe the relationship between the muscle forces and agility performance in ID; and (3) explore the factors associated with muscle strength in ID. Sixty-one participants (30 boys and 31 girls; mean age=14.1 ± 3.3 year) were assessed by the HDD using a "make" test. The comparative group consisted of 63 typically developing children (33 boys and 30 girls; mean age=14.9 ± 2.1 year). The ID group demonstrated lower muscle groups than in typically developing group. Except for the ankle plantarflexors (ICC=0.69, SEM=0.72), test-retest analysis showed good intrarater reliability with ICC ranging from 0.81 to 0.96, and intrarater SEM values ranged from 0.40 to 0.57. The HDD has the potential to be a reliable tool for strength measurement in ID. Muscle strength was positively related to agility performance. Regression analysis indicated that height, weight, BMI, and activity level were significant predictors of muscle strength in ID.

  3. 25(OH)D3 Levels Relative to Muscle Strength and Maximum Oxygen Uptake in Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Zagrodna, Aleksandra; Dziubek, Wioletta; Pietraszewski, Bogdan; Ochmann, Bartosz; Słowińska – Lisowska, Małgorzata

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Vitamin D is mainly known for its effects on the bone and calcium metabolism. The discovery of Vitamin D receptors in many extraskeletal cells suggests that it may also play a significant role in other organs and systems. The aim of our study was to assess the relationship between 25(OH)D3 levels, lower limb isokinetic strength and maximum oxygen uptake in well-trained professional football players. We enrolled 43 Polish premier league soccer players. The mean age was 22.7±5.3 years. Our study showed decreased serum 25(OH)D3 levels in 74.4% of the professional players. The results also demonstrated a lack of statistically significant correlation between 25(OH)D3 levels and lower limb muscle strength with the exception of peak torque of the left knee extensors at an angular velocity of 150°/s (r=0.41). No significant correlations were found between hand grip strength and maximum oxygen uptake. Based on our study we concluded that in well-trained professional soccer players, there was no correlation between serum levels of 25(OH)D3 and muscle strength or maximum oxygen uptake. PMID:28149343

  4. Impaired exercise capacity after lung transplantation is related to delayed recovery of muscle strength.

    PubMed

    Walsh, James R; Chambers, Daniel C; Davis, Rebecca J; Morris, Norman R; Seale, Helen E; Yerkovich, Stephanie T; Hopkins, Peter M A

    2013-01-01

    Lung transplant recipients report reduced exercise capacity despite satisfactory graft function. We analysed changes in lung function, six-min walk distance (6MWD), and quadriceps strength in the first 26-wk post-transplant and examined what factors predict 6MWD recovery. All lung transplant recipients at a single institution between June 2007 and January 2011 were considered for inclusion. Lung function, 6MWD, and quadriceps strength corrected for body weight (QS%) were recorded pre- and two-, six-, 13-, and 26-wk post-transplant. Fifty recipients, of mean (± SD) age 42 (± 13) yr, were studied. Mean FEV1 % and 6MWD improved from 26.4% to 88.9% and from 397 to 549 m at 26 wk, respectively (both p < 0.001). QS% declined in the first two wk but had improved to above pre-transplant levels by 26 wk (p = 0.027). On multivariate analysis (n = 35), lower pre-transplant exercise capacity and greater recovery in muscle strength explained most of the improvement in exercise capacity. Delayed recovery of exercise capacity after lung transplantation is unrelated to delay in improvement in graft function, but occurs secondary to the slow recovery of muscle strength. Our findings show that additional controlled trials are needed to better understand the influence of exercise rehabilitation on improvement in exercise capacity post-transplantation.

  5. Live strong and prosper: the importance of skeletal muscle strength for healthy ageing.

    PubMed

    McLeod, Michael; Breen, Leigh; Hamilton, D Lee; Philp, Andrew

    2016-06-01

    Due to improved health care, diet and infrastructure in developed countries, since 1840 life expectancy has increased by approximately 2 years per decade. Accordingly, by 2050, a quarter of Europe's population will be over 65 years, representing a 10 % rise in half a century. With this rapid rise comes an increased prevalence of diseases of ageing and associated healthcare expenditure. To address the health consequences of global ageing, research in model systems (worms, flies and mice) has indicated that reducing the rate of organ growth, via reductions in protein synthetic rates, has multi-organ health benefits that collectively lead to improvements in lifespan. In contrast, human pre-clinical, clinical and large cohort prospective studies demonstrate that ageing leads to anabolic (i.e. growth) impairments in skeletal muscle, which in turn leads to reductions in muscle mass and strength, factors directly associated with mortality rates in the elderly. As such, increasing muscle protein synthesis via exercise or protein-based nutrition maintains a strong, healthy muscle mass, which in turn leads to improved health, independence and functionality. The aim of this review is to critique current literature relating to the maintenance of muscle mass across lifespan and discuss whether maintaining or reducing protein synthesis is the most logical approach to support musculoskeletal function and by extension healthy human ageing.

  6. Vitamin D: A Review on Its Effects on Muscle Strength, the Risk of Fall, and Frailty

    PubMed Central

    Halfon, Matthieu; Phan, Olivier; Teta, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Vitamin D is the main hormone of bone metabolism. However, the ubiquitary nature of vitamin D receptor (VDR) suggests potential for widespread effects, which has led to new research exploring the effects of vitamin D on a variety of tissues, especially in the skeletal muscle. In vitro studies have shown that the active form of vitamin D, calcitriol, acts in myocytes through genomic effects involving VDR activation in the cell nucleus to drive cellular differentiation and proliferation. A putative transmembrane receptor may be responsible for nongenomic effects leading to rapid influx of calcium within muscle cells. Hypovitaminosis D is consistently associated with decrease in muscle function and performance and increase in disability. On the contrary, vitamin D supplementation has been shown to improve muscle strength and gait in different settings, especially in elderly patients. Despite some controversies in the interpretation of meta-analysis, a reduced risk of falls has been attributed to vitamin D supplementation due to direct effects on muscle cells. Finally, a low vitamin D status is consistently associated with the frail phenotype. This is why many authorities recommend vitamin D supplementation in the frail patient. PMID:26000306

  7. Experimentally Reduced Hip-Abductor Muscle Strength and Frontal-Plane Biomechanics During Walking

    PubMed Central

    Pohl, Michael B.; Kendall, Karen D.; Patel, Chirag; Wiley, J. Preston; Emery, Carolyn; Ferber, Reed

    2015-01-01

    Context: Researchers have postulated that reduced hip-abductor muscle strength may have a role in the progression of knee osteoarthritis by increasing the external knee-adduction moment. However, the relationship between hip-abductor strength and frontal-plane biomechanics remains unclear. Objective: To experimentally reduce hip-abduction strength and observe the subsequent changes in frontal-plane biomechanics. Design: Descriptive laboratory study. Setting: Research laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: Eight healthy, recreationally active men (age = 27 ± 6 years, height = 1.75 ± 0.11 m, mass = 76.1 ± 10.0 kg). Intervention(s): All participants underwent a superior gluteal nerve block injection to reduce the force output of the hip-abductor muscle group. Main Outcome Measure(s): Maximal isometric hip-abduction strength and gait biomechanical data were collected before and after the injections. Gait biomechanical variables collected during walking consisted of knee- and hip-adduction moments and impulses and the peak angles of contralateral pelvic drop, hip adduction, and ipsilateral trunk lean. Results: Hip-abduction strength was reduced after the injection (P = .001) and remained lower than baseline values at the completion of the postinjection gait data collection (P = .02). No alterations in hip- or knee-adduction moments (hip: P = .11; knee: P = .52) or impulses (hip: P = .16; knee: P = .41) were found after the nerve block. Similarly, no changes in angular kinematics were observed for contralateral pelvic drop (P = .53), ipsilateral trunk lean (P = .78), or hip adduction (P = .48). Conclusions A short-term reduction in hip-abductor strength was not associated with alterations in the frontal-plane gait biomechanics of young, healthy men. Further research is needed to determine whether a similar relationship is true in older adults with knee osteoarthritis. PMID:25875071

  8. Molecular impact of clenbuterol and isometric strength training on rat EDL muscles.

    PubMed

    Mounier, Rémi; Cavalié, Hélian; Lac, Gérard; Clottes, Eric

    2007-01-01

    Clenbuterol, a beta2-adrenergic-receptor agonist, is known to provoke muscle hypertrophy and a slow-to-fast phenotype change. A more glycolytic phenotype should be paralleled by changes in muscle glycolytic metabolism. Two groups (n=16 for each) of 3-month-old male Wistar rats (UCL: untrained clenbuterol, and ECL: exercised clenbuterol) received a chronic administration of clenbuterol (2 mg/kg body weight/day). Two other groups of animals (U: untrained and E: exercised), were given a 0.9% NaCl solution instead of clenbuterol. E and ECL animals followed an 8-week progressive isometric force strength-training program. Both clenbuterol administration and training resulted in an increase in extensor digitorum longus (EDL) mass despite the fact that this muscle was indirectly mobilised during isometric force strength training. Clenbuterol and training induced a consistent slow-to-fast phenotype change without drastically increasing specific activities of glycolytic enzymes. Except for GAPDH and hexokinase, modifications in glycolytic-enzyme-specific activities were not explained by transcriptional changes. Lactate dehydrogenase activity was not affected by clenbuterol but was strongly augmented by training. In EDL of ECL rats, both treatments presented an opposite effect compensating each other. GLUT1 mRNA expression was augmented in EDL of UCL and ECL animals, whereas monocarboxylate transporter 1 mRNA amounts were decreased in EDL of UCL rats. Citrate synthase activity was reduced by clenbuterol treatment but remained unchanged in EDL of E animals. Creatine kinase activity was enhanced only by clenbuterol alone. These data show that clenbuterol-induced muscle hypertrophy and slow-to-fast phenotype changes are not associated with a glycolytic-enzyme-activity increase. They also suggest that in EDL isometric force strength training can reverse clenbuterol-induced molecular adaptations.

  9. Correlation between manual muscle strength and interleukin-6 (IL-6) plasma levels in elderly community-dwelling women.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Leani Souza Máximo; Narciso, Fabrícia Mendes Silva; Oliveira, Daniela Matos Garcia; Coelho, Fernanda Matos; Souza, Danielle da Glória de; Dias, Rosângela Corrêa

    2009-01-01

    Sarcopenia is a loss of muscle mass related to aging and leads to muscle performance decline. An increase in inflammatory mediator levels, especially of IL-6, has been associated to reduced muscle strength in the elderly. The aim of the present cross-sectional study was to correlate IL-6 plasma levels with manual muscle strength (MMS) in 63 community-dwelling elderly women. (71.2+/-7.4years). IL-6 was measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and MMS was measured using the JAMAR dynamometer. Pearson's test was used to explore the relationship between the outcomes at the significance level of alpha=0.05. IL-6 levels (2.56+/-3.44pg/ml) and MMS (22.86+/-4.62kgf) exhibited an inverse correlation (r=-0.2673 and p=0.0373). The increase in IL-6 plasma levels possibly contributed toward the reduction in manual muscle strength among the elderly women studied.

  10. Unidirectional Expiratory Valve Method to Assess Maximal Inspiratory Pressure in Individuals without Artificial Airway

    PubMed Central

    Grams, Samantha Torres; Kimoto, Karen Yumi Mota; Azevedo, Elen Moda de Oliveira; Lança, Marina; de Albuquerque, André Luis Pereira; de Brito, Christina May Moran; Yamaguti, Wellington Pereira

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Maximal Inspiratory Pressure (MIP) is considered an effective method to estimate strength of inspiratory muscles, but still leads to false positive diagnosis. Although MIP assessment with unidirectional expiratory valve method has been used in patients undergoing mechanical ventilation, no previous studies investigated the application of this method in subjects without artificial airway. Objectives This study aimed to compare the MIP values assessed by standard method (MIPsta) and by unidirectional expiratory valve method (MIPuni) in subjects with spontaneous breathing without artificial airway. MIPuni reproducibility was also evaluated. Methods This was a crossover design study, and 31 subjects performed MIPsta and MIPuni in a random order. MIPsta measured MIP maintaining negative pressure for at least one second after forceful expiration. MIPuni evaluated MIP using a unidirectional expiratory valve attached to a face mask and was conducted by two evaluators (A and B) at two moments (Tests 1 and 2) to determine interobserver and intraobserver reproducibility of MIP values. Intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC[2,1]) was used to determine intraobserver and interobserver reproducibility. Results The mean values for MIPuni were 14.3% higher (-117.3 ± 24.8 cmH2O) than the mean values for MIPsta (-102.5 ± 23.9 cmH2O) (p<0.001). Interobserver reproducibility assessment showed very high correlation for Test 1 (ICC[2,1] = 0.91), and high correlation for Test 2 (ICC[2,1] = 0.88). The assessment of the intraobserver reproducibility showed high correlation for evaluator A (ICC[2,1] = 0.86) and evaluator B (ICC[2,1] = 0.77). Conclusions MIPuni presented higher values when compared with MIPsta and proved to be reproducible in subjects with spontaneous breathing without artificial airway. PMID:26360255

  11. Reduced Appendicular Lean Body Mass, Muscle Strength, and Size of Type II Muscle Fibers in Patients with Spondyloarthritis versus Healthy Controls: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. The purpose of this study was to investigate body composition, muscle function, and muscle morphology in patients with spondyloarthritis (SpA). Methods. Ten male SpA patients (mean ± SD age 39 ± 4.1 years) were compared with ten healthy controls matched for sex, age, body mass index, and self-reported level of physical exercise. Body composition was measured by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry. Musculus quadriceps femoris (QF) strength was assessed by maximal isometric contractions prior to test of muscular endurance. Magnetic resonance imaging of QF was used to measure muscle size and calculate specific muscle strength. Percutaneous needle biopsy samples were taken from m. vastus lateralis. Results. SpA patients presented with significantly lower appendicular lean body mass (LBM) (p = 0.02), but there was no difference in bone mineral density, fat mass, or total LBM. Absolute QF strength was significantly lower in SpA patients (p = 0.03) with a parallel trend for specific strength (p = 0.08). Biopsy samples from the SpA patients revealed significantly smaller cross-sectional area (CSA) of type II muscle fibers (p = 0.04), but no difference in CSA type I fibers. Conclusions. Results indicate that the presence of SpA disease is associated with reduced appendicular LBM, muscle strength, and type II fiber CSA. PMID:27672678

  12. Reduced Appendicular Lean Body Mass, Muscle Strength, and Size of Type II Muscle Fibers in Patients with Spondyloarthritis versus Healthy Controls: A Cross-Sectional Study.

    PubMed

    Røren Nordén, Kristine; Dagfinrud, Hanne; Løvstad, Amund; Raastad, Truls

    Introduction. The purpose of this study was to investigate body composition, muscle function, and muscle morphology in patients with spondyloarthritis (SpA). Methods. Ten male SpA patients (mean ± SD age 39 ± 4.1 years) were compared with ten healthy controls matched for sex, age, body mass index, and self-reported level of physical exercise. Body composition was measured by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry. Musculus quadriceps femoris (QF) strength was assessed by maximal isometric contractions prior to test of muscular endurance. Magnetic resonance imaging of QF was used to measure muscle size and calculate specific muscle strength. Percutaneous needle biopsy samples were taken from m. vastus lateralis. Results. SpA patients presented with significantly lower appendicular lean body mass (LBM) (p = 0.02), but there was no difference in bone mineral density, fat mass, or total LBM. Absolute QF strength was significantly lower in SpA patients (p = 0.03) with a parallel trend for specific strength (p = 0.08). Biopsy samples from the SpA patients revealed significantly smaller cross-sectional area (CSA) of type II muscle fibers (p = 0.04), but no difference in CSA type I fibers. Conclusions. Results indicate that the presence of SpA disease is associated with reduced appendicular LBM, muscle strength, and type II fiber CSA.

  13. Associations between Muscle Strength Asymmetry and Impairments in Gait and Posture in Young Brain-Injured Patients.

    PubMed

    Drijkoningen, David; Caeyenberghs, Karen; Vander Linden, Catharine; Van Herpe, Katrin; Duysens, Jacques; Swinnen, Stephan P

    2015-09-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) can lead to deficits in gait and posture, which are often asymmetric. A possible factor mediating these deficits may be asymmetry in strength of the leg muscles. However, muscle strength in the lower extremities has rarely been investigated in (young) TBI patients. Here, we investigated associations between lower-extremity muscle weakness, strength asymmetry, and impairments in gait and posture in young TBI patients. A group of young patients with moderate-to-severe TBI (n=19; age, 14 years 11 months ±2 years) and a group of typically developing subjects (n=31; age, 14 years 1 month±3 years) participated in this study. A force platform was used to measure postural sway to quantify balance control during normal standing and during conditions of compromised visual and/or somatosensory feedback. Spatiotemporal gait parameters were assessed during comfortable and fast-speed walking, using an electronic walkway. Muscle strength in four lower-extremity muscle groups was measured bilaterally using a handheld dynamometer. Findings revealed that TBI patients had poorer postural balance scores across all sensory conditions, as compared to typically developing subjects. During comfortable and fast gait, TBI patients demonstrated a lower gait velocity, longer double-support phase, and increased step-length asymmetry. Further, TBI patients had a reduced strength of leg muscles and an increased strength asymmetry. Correlation analyses revealed that asymmetry in muscle strength was predictive of a poorer balance control and a more variable and asymmetric gait. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to measure strength asymmetry in leg muscles of a sample of TBI patients and illustrate the importance of muscular asymmetry as a potential marker and possible risk factor of impairments in control of posture and gait.

  14. Post-exercise cold water immersion attenuates acute anabolic signalling and long-term adaptations in muscle to strength training

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Llion A; Raastad, Truls; Markworth, James F; Figueiredo, Vandre C; Egner, Ingrid M; Shield, Anthony; Cameron-Smith, David; Coombes, Jeff S; Peake, Jonathan M

    2015-01-01

    Abstract We investigated functional, morphological and molecular adaptations to strength training exercise and cold water immersion (CWI) through two separate studies. In one study, 21 physically active men strength trained for 12 weeks (2 days per week), with either 10 min of CWI or active recovery (ACT) after each training session. Strength and muscle mass increased more in the ACT group than in the CWI group (P < 0.05). Isokinetic work (19%), type II muscle fibre cross-sectional area (17%) and the number of myonuclei per fibre (26%) increased in the ACT group (all P < 0.05), but not the CWI group. In another study, nine active men performed a bout of single-leg strength exercises on separate days, followed by CWI or ACT. Muscle biopsies were collected before and 2, 24 and 48 h after exercise. The number of satellite cells expressing neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) (10−30%) and paired box protein (Pax7) (20−50%) increased 24–48 h after exercise with ACT. The number of NCAM+ satellite cells increased 48 h after exercise with CWI. NCAM+- and Pax7+-positive satellite cell numbers were greater after ACT than after CWI (P < 0.05). Phosphorylation of p70S6 kinaseThr421/Ser424 increased after exercise in both conditions but was greater after ACT (P < 0.05). These data suggest that CWI attenuates the acute changes in satellite cell numbers and activity of kinases that regulate muscle hypertrophy, which may translate to smaller long-term training gains in muscle strength and hypertrophy. The use of CWI as a regular post-exercise recovery strategy should be reconsidered. Key points Cold water immersion is a popular strategy to recover from exercise. However, whether regular cold water immersion influences muscle adaptations to strength training is not well understood. We compared the effects of cold water immersion and active recovery on changes in muscle mass and strength after 12 weeks of strength training. We also examined the effects of these

  15. The effects of gluteus muscle strengthening exercise and lumbar stabilization exercise on lumbar muscle strength and balance in chronic low back pain patients

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Ui-Cheol; Sim, Jae-Heon; Kim, Cheol-Yong; Hwang-Bo, Gak; Nam, Chan-Woo

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to examine the effects of exercise to strengthen the muscles of the hip together with lumbar segmental stabilization exercise on the lumbar disability index, lumbar muscle strength, and balance. [Subjects and Methods] This study randomly and equally assigned 40 participants who provided written consent to participate in this study to a lumbar segmental stabilization exercise plus exercise to strengthen the muscles of the gluteus group (SMG + LES group) and a lumbar segmental stabilization exercise group. [Results] Each evaluation item showed a statistically significant effect. [Conclusion] Clinical application of exercise in this study showed that lumbar segmental stabilization exercise plus exercise to strengthen the muscles of the gluteus resulted in a greater decrease in low back pain disability index and increase in lumbar muscle strength and balance ability than lumbar segmental stabilization exercise in chronic low back pain patients receiving the exercise treatments during the same period. PMID:26834359

  16. Effect of isokinetic training on muscle strength and postural balance in children with Down's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Eid, Mohamed A; Aly, Sobhy M; Huneif, Mohamed A; Ismail, Dina K

    2017-01-31

    Children with Down's syndrome (DS) often have greater postural sway and delay in motor development. Muscle weakness and hypotonia, particularly of the lower extremities, are theorized to impair their overall physical health and ability to perform daily activities. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the effects of isokinetic training on muscle strength and postural balance in children with DS. Thirty-one children with DS ranging in age from 9 to 12 years were assigned randomly into two groups. The control group received the conventional physical therapy, whereas the study group received the same therapy as the control group in addition to the isokinetic training 3 days a week for 12 weeks. Measurement of stability indices using the Biodex Stability System as well as peak torque of knee flexors and extensors of both sides using the isokinetic dynamometer was performed before and after 12 weeks of the treatment program. Each group showed significant improvements in postural balance and peak torque of knee flexors and extensors (P<0.05), with significantly greater improvements observed in the study group compared with the control group (P<0.05). These outcomes indicated that participation in the isokinetic training program induced greater improvements in muscle strength and postural balance in children with DS.

  17. Contribution of Muscle Strength and Integration of Afferent Input to Postural Instability in Persons with Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Marigold, Daniel S.; Eng, Janice J.; Tokuno, Craig D.; Donnelly, Catherine A.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To determine the relationship of muscle strength to postural sway in persons with stroke under standing conditions in which vision and ankle proprioception were manipulated. Methods Forty persons with stroke and 40 healthy older adult controls were recruited from the community and underwent balance testing consisting of six conditions that manipulate vision and somatosensory information while standing. Postural sway was measured during each condition. In addition, lower extremity joint torques and cutaneous sensation from the plantar surface of the foot were assessed. Results Postural sway was increased with more challenging standing conditions (i.e. when multiple sensory systems were manipulated) to a greater extent with the group with stroke compared to controls. Muscle strength was only correlated to sway during the most challenging conditions. Furthermore, a greater number of persons with stroke fell during the balance testing compared to controls. Conclusions Impairments in re-weighting/integrating afferent information, in addition to muscle weakness appear to contribute to postural instability and falls in persons with stroke. These findings can be used by clinicians to design effective interventions for improving postural control following stroke. PMID:15537993

  18. Influence of resistance training on cardiorespiratory endurance and muscle power and strength in young athletes.

    PubMed

    Ignjatovic, Aleksandar; Radovanovic, D; Stankovic, R; Marković, Z; Kocic, J

    2011-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of additional resistance training on cardiorespiratory endurance in young (15.8 ± 0.8 yrs) male basketball players. Experimental group subjects (n=23) trained twice per week for 12 weeks using a variety of general free-weight and machine exercises designed for strength acquisition, beside ongoing regular basketball training program. Control group subject (n=23) participated only in basketball training program. Oxygen uptake (VO(2max)) and related gas exchange measures were determined continuously during maximal exercise test using an automated cardiopulmonary exercise system. Muscle power of the extensors and flexors was measured by a specific computerized tensiometer. Results from the experimental group (VO(2max) 51.6 ± 5.7 ml.min(-1).kg(-1) pre vs. 50.9 ± 5.4 ml.min(-1).kg(-1) post resistance training) showed no change (p>0.05) in cardiorespiratory endurance, while muscle strength and power of main muscle groups increased significantly. These data demonstrate no negative cardiorespiratory performance effects on adding resistance training to ongoing regular training program in young athletes.

  19. Age associated declines in muscle mass, strength, power, and physical performance: impact on fear of falling and quality of life

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    SUMMARY: This 3 year longitudinal study among older adults showed that declining muscle mass, strength, power, and physical performance are independent contributing factors to increased fear of falling, while declines of muscle mass and physical performance contribute to deterioration of quality of ...

  20. Treadmill Training with Virtual Reality Improves Gait, Balance, and Muscle Strength in Children with Cerebral Palsy.

    PubMed

    Cho, Chunhee; Hwang, Wonjeong; Hwang, Sujin; Chung, Yijung

    2016-01-01

    Independent walking is an important goal of clinical and community-based rehabilitation for children with cerebral palsy (CP). Virtual reality-based rehabilitation therapy is effective in motivating children with CP. This study investigated the effects of treadmill training with virtual reality on gait, balance, muscular strength, and gross motor function in children with CP. Eighteen children with spastic CP were randomly divided into the virtual reality treadmill training (VRTT) group (9 subjects, mean age, 10.2 years) and treadmill training (TT) group (9 subjects, mean age, 9.4 years). The groups performed their respective programs as well as conventional physical therapy 3 times/week for 8 weeks. Muscle strength was assessed using a digitalized manual muscle tester. Gross motor function was assessed using the Gross Motor Functional Measure (GMFM). Balance was assessed using the Pediatric Balance Scale (PBS). Gait speed was assessed using the 10-meter walk test (10MWT), and gait endurance was assessed using the 2-minute walk test (2MWT). After training, gait and balance was improved in the VRTT compared to the TT group (P < 0.05). Muscular strength was significantly greater in the VRTT group than the TT group, except for right hamstring strength. The improvements in GMFM (standing) and PBS scores were greater in the VRTT group than the TT group (P < 0.05). Furthermore, the VRTT group showed the higher values of 10MWT and 2MWT compared to the TT group (P < 0.05). In conclusion, VRTT programs are effective for improving gait, balance, muscular strength, and gross motor function in children with CP.

  1. Adaptations to long-term strength training of ankle joint muscles in old age.

    PubMed

    Simoneau, Emilie; Martin, Alain; Van Hoecke, Jacques

    2007-07-01

    The aim of this study was to enquire whether older adults, who continue plantar-flexion (PF) strength training for an additional 6-month period, would achieve further improvements in neuromuscular performance, in the ankle PFs, and in the antagonist dorsi-flexors (DFs). Twenty-three healthy older volunteers (mean age 77.4 +/- 3.7 years) took part in this investigation and 12 of them followed a 1-year strength-training program. Both neural and muscular factors were examined during isometric maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) torques in ankle PF and DF pre-training, post 6 and post 12 months. The main finding was that 6 months of additional strength training of the PFs, beyond 6 months, allowed further improvements in neuromuscular performance at the ankle joint in older adults. Indeed, during the first 6 months of progressive resistance training, there was an increase in the PF MVC torque of 11.1 +/- 19.9 N m, and then of 11.1 +/- 17.9 N m in the last 6-month period. However, it was only after 1 year that there was an improvement in the evoked contraction at rest in PF (+ 8%). The strength training of the agonist PF muscles appeared to have an impact on the maximal resultant torque in DF. However, it appeared that this gain was first due to modifications occurring in the trained PFs muscles, then, it seemed that the motor drive of the DFs per se was altered. In conclusion, long-term strength training of the PFs resulted in continued improvements in neuromuscular performance at the ankle joint in older adults, beyond the initial 6 months.

  2. Muscle mechanical properties of strength and endurance athletes and changes after one week of intensive training.

    PubMed

    de Paula Simola, Rauno Álvaro; Raeder, Christian; Wiewelhove, Thimo; Kellmann, Michael; Meyer, Tim; Pfeiffer, Mark; Ferrauti, Alexander

    2016-10-01

    The study investigates whether tensiomyography (TMG) is sensitive to differentiate between strength and endurance athletes, and to monitor fatigue after either one week of intensive strength (ST) or endurance (END) training. Fourteen strength (24.1±2.0years) and eleven endurance athletes (25.5±4.8years) performed an intensive training period of 6days of ST or END, respectively. ST and END groups completed specific performance tests as well as TMG measurements of maximal radial deformation of the muscle belly (Dm), deformation time between 10% and 90% Dm (Tc), rate of deformation development until 10% Dm (V10) and 90% Dm (V90) before (baseline), after training period (post1), and after 72h of recovery (post2). Specific performance of both groups decreased from baseline to post1 (P<0.05) and returned to baseline values at post2 (P<0.05). The ST group showed higher countermovement jump (P<0.05) and shorter Tc (P<0.05) at baseline. After training, Dm, V10, and V90 were reduced in the ST (P<0.05) while TMG changes were less pronounced in the END. TMG could be a useful tool to differentiate between strength and endurance athletes, and to monitor fatigue and recovery especially in strength training.

  3. Changes in muscle strength, relaxation rate and fatiguability during the human menstrual cycle.

    PubMed Central

    Sarwar, R; Niclos, B B; Rutherford, O M

    1996-01-01

    1. The effect of the different phases of the menstrual cycle on skeletal muscle strength, contractile properties and fatiguability was investigated in ten young, healthy females. Results were compared with a similar group on the combined (non-phasic) oral contraceptive pill (OC). Cycle phases were divided into the early and mid-follicular, mid-cycle (ovulatory) and mid- and late luteal. Cycle phases were estimated from the first day of the menstrual bleed. 2. Subjects were studied weekly through two complete cycles. Measurements included quadriceps and handgrip maximum voluntary isometric force and the relaxation times, force-frequency relationship and fatigue index of the quadriceps during percutaneous stimulation at a range of frequencies from 1 to 100 Hz. 3. In the women not taking the OC there was a significant increase of about 11% in quadriceps and handgrip strength at mid-cycle compared with both the follicular and luteal phases. Accompanying the increases in strength there was a significant slowing of relaxation and increase in fatiguability at mid-cycle. No changes in any parameter were found in the women taking the OC. 4. The changes in muscle function at mid-cycle may be due to the increase in oestrogen that occurs prior to ovulation. PMID:8735711

  4. Effects of strength training with eccentric overload on muscle adaptation in male athletes.

    PubMed

    Friedmann-Bette, Birgit; Bauer, Timm; Kinscherf, Ralf; Vorwald, Silke; Klute, Konstanze; Bischoff, Dirk; Müller, Helmut; Weber, Marc-André; Metz, Jürgen; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich; Bärtsch, Peter; Billeter, Rudolf

    2010-03-01

    In classic concentric/eccentric exercise, the same absolute load is applied in concentric and eccentric actions, which infers a smaller relative eccentric load. We compared the effects of 6 weeks of classic concentric/eccentric quadriceps strength training (CON/ECC, 11 subjects) to eccentric overload training (CON/ECC+, 14 subjects) in athletes accustomed to regular strength training. The parameters determined included functional tests, quadriceps and fibre cross-sectional area (CSA), fibre type distribution by ATPase staining, localisation of myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoform mRNAs by situ hybridization and the steady-state levels of 48 marker mRNAs (RT-PCR) in vastus lateralis biopsies taken before and after training. Both training forms had anabolic effects with significant increases in quadriceps CSA, maximal strength, ribosomal RNA content and the levels of mRNAs involved in growth and regeneration. Only the CON/ECC+ training led to significantly increased height in a squat jump test. This was accompanied by significant increases in IIX fibre CSA, in the percentage of type IIA fibres expressing MHC IIx mRNA, in the level of mRNAs preferentially expressed in fast, glycolytic fibres, and in post-exercise capillary lactate. The enhanced eccentric load apparently led to a subtly faster gene expression pattern and induced a shift towards a faster muscle phenotype plus associated adaptations that make a muscle better suited for fast, explosive movements.

  5. Motor unit synchronization in FDI and biceps brachii muscles of strength-trained males.

    PubMed

    Fling, Brett W; Christie, Anita; Kamen, Gary

    2009-10-01

    Motor unit (MU) synchronization is the simultaneous or near-simultaneous firing of two MUs which occurs more often than would be expected by chance. The present study sought to investigate the effects of exercise training, muscle group, and force level, by comparing the magnitude of synchronization in the biceps brachii (BB) and first dorsal interosseous (FDI) muscles of untrained and strength-trained college-aged males at two force levels, 30% of maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) and 80% MVC. MU action potentials were recorded directly via an intramuscular needle electrode. The magnitude of synchronization was assessed using previously-reported synchronization indices: k', E, and CIS. Synchronization was significantly higher in the FDI than in the BB. Greater synchronization was observed in the strength-trained group with CIS, but not with E or k'. Also, synchronization was significantly greater at 80% MVC than at 30% MVC with E, but only moderately greater with CIS and there was no force difference with k'. Synchronization prevalence was found to be greater in the BB (80.1%) than in the FDI (71.5%). Thus, although the evidence is a bit equivocal, it appears that MU synchronization is greater at higher forces, and greater in strength-trained individuals than in untrained subjects.

  6. Analysis of isokinetic muscle strength for sports physiotherapy research in Korean ssireum athletes

    PubMed Central

    Noh, Ji-Woong; Park, Byoung-Sun; Kim, Mee-Young; Lee, Lim-Kyu; Yang, Seung-Min; Lee, Won-Deok; Shin, Yong-Sub; Kim, Ju-Hyun; Lee, Jeong-Uk; Kwak, Taek-Yong; Lee, Tae-Hyun; Kim, Ju-Young; Park, Jaehong; Kim, Junghwan

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of the present study was to elucidate the muscle conditions such as the isokinetic muscle of Korean ssireum athletes. [Subjects and Methods] This study enrolled 25 elite ssireum athletes. We measured body composition and peak torque at an angular speed at 60°/s using an isokinetic muscle strength dynamometer. [Results] The lean body mass of the left upper limb was significantly higher than that of the right upper limb. However, the lean body mass of the left lower limb was significantly lower than that of the right lower limb. The peak torque for left elbow flexion was significantly higher than that for right elbow flexion. Conversely, the peak torque for left elbow extension was significantly lower than that for right elbow extension. Furthermore, the peak torque for the left knee was significantly lower than that for the right knee for both flexion and extension. [Conclusion] The data from this study elucidate in part the muscle conditions of Korean ssireum athletes, which can be used to establish a reference for the scientific study of sports physiotherapy. PMID:26644679

  7. Muscle conduction velocity, strength, neural activity, and morphological changes after eccentric and concentric training.

    PubMed

    Cadore, E L; González-Izal, M; Pallarés, J G; Rodriguez-Falces, J; Häkkinen, K; Kraemer, W J; Pinto, R S; Izquierdo, M

    2014-10-01

    This study compared the effects of concentric and eccentric training on neuromuscular adaptations in young subjects. Twenty-two men and women were assigned to one of two groups: concentric (CON, n = 11) and eccentric (ECC, n = 11) training. Training consisted of 6 weeks of isokinetic exercise, performed twice weekly, starting with two sets of eight repetitions, and progressing to five sets of 10 repetitions. Subjects were tested in strength variables [concentric, eccentric, and isometric peak torque (PT), and rate of force development (RFD)], muscle conduction velocity (CV), neuromuscular activity, vastus lateralis (VL) muscle thickness, and echo intensity as determined by ultrasonography. There were similar increases in the concentric and eccentric PTs in both the CON and ECC groups (P < 0.01), but only the ECC group showed an increase in isometric PT (P < 0.001). Similarly, both groups exhibited increased VL muscle thickness, CV, and RFD, and reduced VL echo intensity (P < 0.05). Significant correlations were observed among the relative changes in the neuromuscular outcomes and training variables (e.g., total work, average PT) (r = 0.68-0.75, P < 0.05). The results showed that both training types similarly improved dynamic PT, CV, RFD, and muscle thickness and quality during the early weeks of training.

  8. Mechanisms regulating the specificity and strength of muscle afferent inputs in the spinal cord

    PubMed Central

    Mentis, George Z.; Alvarez, Francisco J.; Shneider, Neil A.; Siembab, Valerie C.; O'Donovan, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    We investigated factors controlling the development of connections between muscle spindle afferents, spinal motor neurons and inhibitory Renshaw cells. Several mutants were examined to establish the role of muscle spindles, muscle spindle-derived NT3 and excess NT3 in determining the specificity and strength of these connections. The findings suggest that although spindle-derived factors are not necessary for the initial formation and specificity of the synapses, spindle-derived NT3 seems necessary for strengthening homonymous connections between Ia afferents and motor neurons during the second postnatal week. We also found evidence for functional monosynaptic connections between sensory afferents and neonatal Renshaw cells although the density of these synapses decreases at P15. We conclude that muscle spindle synapses are weakened on Renshaw cells while they are strengthened on motor neurons. Interestingly, the loss of sensory synapses on Renshaw cells was reversed in mice over-expresssing NT3 in the periphery, suggesting that different levels of NT3 are required for functional maintenance and strengthening of spindle afferent inputs on motor neurons and Renshaw cells. PMID:20536937

  9. Mechanisms regulating the specificity and strength of muscle afferent inputs in the spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Mentis, George Z; Alvarez, Francisco J; Shneider, Neil A; Siembab, Valerie C; O'Donovan, Michael J

    2010-06-01

    We investigated factors controlling the development of connections between muscle spindle afferents, spinal motor neurons, and inhibitory Renshaw cells. Several mutants were examined to establish the role of muscle spindles, muscle spindle-derived NT3, and excess NT3 in determining the specificity and strength of these connections. The findings suggest that although spindle-derived factors are not necessary for the initial formation and specificity of the synapses, spindle-derived NT3 seems necessary for strengthening homonymous connections between Ia afferents and motor neurons during the second postnatal week. We also found evidence for functional monosynaptic connections between sensory afferents and neonatal Renshaw cells although the density of these synapses decreases at P15. We conclude that muscle spindle synapses are weakened on Renshaw cells while they are strengthened on motor neurons. Interestingly, the loss of sensory synapses on Renshaw cells was reversed in mice overexpressing NT3 in the periphery, suggesting that different levels of NT3 are required for functional maintenance and strengthening of spindle afferent inputs on motor neurons and Renshaw cells.

  10. Muscle stiffness, strength loss, swelling and soreness following exercise-induced injury in humans.

    PubMed Central

    Howell, J N; Chleboun, G; Conatser, R

    1993-01-01

    1. In order to study injury-related changes in muscle stiffness, injury to the elbow flexors of thirteen human subjects was induced by a regimen of eccentric exercise. 2. Passive stiffness over an intermediate range of elbow angles was measured with a device which held the relaxed arm of the subject in the horizontal plane and stepped it through the range of elbow angles from 90 deg to near full extension at 180 deg. The relation between static torque and elbow angle was quite linear over the first 50 deg and was taken as stiffness. 3. Stiffness over this range of angles more than doubled immediately after exercise and remained elevated for about 4 days, and may result from low level myofibrillar activation induced by muscle stretch. 4. Arm swelling was biphasic; arm circumference increased by about 3% immediately after exercise, fell back toward normal, then increased by as much as 9% and remained elevated for as long as 9 days. 5. Ultrasound imaging showed most of the swelling immediately following the exercise to be localized to the flexor muscle compartment; subsequent swelling involved other tissue compartments as well. 6. Muscle strength declined by almost 40% after the exercise and recovery was only slight 10 days later; the half-time of recovery appeared to be as long as 5-6 weeks. PMID:8229798

  11. Effects of functional movement strength training on strength, muscle size, kinematics, and motor function in cerebral palsy: a 3-month follow-up.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jung Ah; You, Joshua H; Kim, Dong A; Lee, Min Jin; Hwang, Pil Woo; Lee, Nam Gi; Park, Jeong Joon; Lee, Dong Ryul; Kim, Hyun-Kyung

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the long-term effects of comprehensive hand repetitive intensive strengthening training (CHRIST) on strength, morphological muscle size, kinematics, and associated motor functional changes in children with cerebral palsy (CP). Ten children (5 boys, 5 girls; age range, 6-11 years, mean age, 8.6 years) participated in the study. The children were classified according to the Manual Ability Classification System: 5 were Level II, 2 were Level III, and 3 were Level IV. Quantitative biomechanical measurements were performed to determine muscle strength, muscle size, kinematics (normalized jerk score), and motor function using a dynamometer, ultrasound, Vicon motion analysis, and standardized clinical tests (Quality of Upper Extremity Skills Test, Jebsen-Taylor Hand Function Test, Functional Independence Measure, and Pediatric Motor Activity Log), respectively. Muscle strength, muscle size, kinematics, and motor function significantly improved after a 10-week intervention (3 times a week), and the long-term effects remained even at the 3-month follow-up. In conclusion, this is the first study highlighting the long-term efficacy of upper extremity strength training using the novel CHRIST system in children with CP, which will potentially open up new horizons for effective management in pediatric neurorehabilitation.

  12. Efficiency of muscle strength training on motor function in patients with coronary artery disease: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yu-Jie; He, Xiao-Hua; Guo, Hai-Ying; Wang, Xue-Qiang; Zhu, Yi

    2015-01-01

    Background: Existing literature has shown that patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) can benefit greatly from the strength training; therefore, the strength training should play a more important role in cardiac rehabilitation. However, the medical community may still have conservation to apply the strength training owing to no comprehensive study so far to compare the effectiveness of the strength training to the other trainings, such as aerobic training. Objective: To evaluate the effect of strength training on motor function in patients with CAD. Methods: Published articles from the earliest date available to July 2015 were identified using electronic searches. Two reviewers selected independently relevant randomized controlled trials (RCTs) investigating exercise program with strength training versus control interventions (exercise without strength training, including aerobic training and no exercise group) for the treatment of CAD patients. We examined effects of exercise with strength training versus control interventions on peak oxygen uptake (VO2peak), duration of exercise test and muscle strength. Two reviewers extracted data independently. Results: Twenty seven trials that represented 1151 participants passed the selection criteria and were evaluated for the effects of strength training in CAD patients. For improving VO2peak [SMD (95%CI) = 0.58 (0.11, 1.06)] and muscle strength [upper limb, SMD (95% CI) =0.44 (0.34, 0.55); lower limb, SMD (95% CI) =0.33 (0.16, 0.50)], exercise program with strength training were significantly more effective than one without it. But there is no significantly difference on duration of exercise test [SMD (95%CI) = 0.17 (-0.04, 0.39)] in strength training group than in control group. Conclusions: We conclude strength training is effective in improving muscle strength and VO2peak, in CAD patients, when compared to patients with control group. Furthermore, our evaluations suggest that strength training does not compromise

  13. Effect of very low-intensity resistance training with slow movement on muscle size and strength in healthy older adults.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Yuya; Madarame, Haruhiko; Ogasawara, Riki; Nakazato, Koichi; Ishii, Naokata

    2014-11-01

    We previously reported that low-intensity [50% of one repetition maximum (1RM)] resistance training with slow movement and tonic force generation (LST) causes muscle hypertrophy and strength gain in older participants. The aim of this study was to determine whether resistance training with slow movement and much more reduced intensity (30%1RM) increases muscle size and strength in older adults. Eighteen participants (60-77 years) were randomly assigned to two groups. One group performed very low-intensity (30% 1RM) knee extension exercise with continuous muscle contraction (LST: 3-s eccentric, 3-s concentric, and 1-s isometric actions with no rest between each repetition) twice a week for 12 weeks. The other group underwent intermitted muscle contraction (CON: 1-s concentric and 1-s eccentric actions with 1-s rest between each repetition) for the same time period. The 1RM, isometric and isokinetic strengths, and cross-sectional image of the mid-thigh obtained by magnetic resonance imaging were examined before and after the intervention. LST significantly increased the cross-sectional area of the quadriceps muscle (5.0%, P<0.001) and isometric and isokinetic knee extension strengths (P<0.05). CON failed to increase muscle size (1.1%, P = 0.12), but significantly improved its strength (P<0.05). These results indicate that even if the intensity is as low as 30% 1RM, LST can increase muscle size and strength in healthy older adults. The large total contraction time may be related to muscle hypertrophy and strength gain. LST would be useful for preventing sarcopenia in older individuals.

  14. Low ponderal index is associated with decreased muscle strength and fatigue resistance in college-aged women

    PubMed Central

    Brutsaert, Tom D.; Tamvada, Kelli H.; Kiyamu, Melisa; White, Daniel D.; Gage, Timothy B

    2011-01-01

    Poor fetal growth is associated with decrements in muscle strength likely due to changes during myogenesis. We investigated the association of poor fetal growth with muscle strength, fatigue resistance, and the response to training in the isolated quadriceps femoris. Females (20.6 yrs) born to term but below the 10th percentile of ponderal index (PI)-for-gestational-age (LOWPI, n=14) were compared to controls (HIGHPI, n=14), before and after an 8-week training. Muscle strength was assessed as grip-strength and as the maximal isometric voluntary contraction (MVC) of the quadriceps femoris. Muscle fatigue was assessed during knee extension eercise. Body composition and the maximal oxygen consumption (VO2max) were also measured. Controlling for fat free mass (FFM), LOWPI versus HIGHPI women had ~11% lower grip-strength (P=0.023), 9–24% lower MVC values (P=0.042 pre-trained; P=0.020 post-trained), a higher rate of fatigue (pre- and post-training), and a diminished training response (P=0.016). Statistical control for FFM increased rather than decreased strength differences between PI groups. The PI was not associated with VO2max or measures of body composition. Strength and fatigue decrements strongly suggest that poor fetal growth affects the pathway of muscle force generation. This could be due to neuromotor and/or muscle morphologic changes during development e.g., fiber number, fiber type, etc. Muscle from LOWPI women may also be less responsive to training. Indirectly, results also implicate muscle as a potential mediator between poor fetal growth and adult chronic disease, given muscle’s direct role in determining insulin resistance, type II diabetes, physical activity, and so forth. PMID:21641734

  15. Ursolic Acid-Induced Elevation of Serum Irisin Augments Muscle Strength During Resistance Training in Men

    PubMed Central

    Bang, Hyun Seok; Seo, Dae Yun; Chung, Yong Min; Oh, Kyoung-Mo; Park, Jung Jun; Arturo, Figueroa; Jeong, Seung-Hun; Kim, Nari

    2014-01-01

    Ursolic acid (UA), a type of pentacyclic triterpenoid carboxylic acid purified from natural plants, can promote skeletal muscle development. We measured the effect of resistance training (RT) with/without UA on skeletal muscle development and related factors in men. Sixteen healthy male participants (age, 29.37±5.14 years; body mass index=27.13±2.16 kg/m2) were randomly assigned to RT (n=7) or RT with UA (RT+UA, n=9) groups. Both groups completed 8 weeks of intervention consisting of 5 sets of 26 exercises, with 10~15 repetitions at 60~80% of 1 repetition maximum and a 60~90-s rest interval between sets, performed 6 times/week. UA or placebo was orally ingested as 1 capsule 3 times/day for 8 weeks. The following factors were measured pre-and post-intervention: body composition, insulin, insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), irisin, and skeletal muscle strength. Body fat percentage was significantly decreased (p<0.001) in the RT+UA group, despite body weight, body mass index, lean body mass, glucose, and insulin levels remaining unchanged. IGF-1 and irisin were significantly increased compared with baseline levels in the RT+UA group (p<0.05). Maximal right and left extension (p<0.01), right flexion (p<0.05), and left flexion (p<0.001) were significantly increased compared with baseline levels in the RT+UA group. These findings suggest that UA-induced elevation of serum irisin may be useful as an agent for the enhancement of skeletal muscle strength during RT. PMID:25352765

  16. Intrinsic muscle strength and voluntary activation of both lower limbs and functional performance after stroke.

    PubMed

    Horstman, Astrid M; Beltman, Marijke J; Gerrits, Karin H; Koppe, Peter; Janssen, Thomas W; Elich, Peter; de Haan, Arnold

    2008-07-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the nature of muscle weakness in both legs after stroke compared with able-bodied control individuals and to examine whether there is a relationship between the degree of muscle weakness and coactivation of knee extensors and flexors as well as voluntary activation capacity of knee extensors of both paretic and non-paretic legs and indices of functional performance. Maximal voluntary isometric torques of knee extensors (MVCe) and flexors (MVCf) were determined in 14 patients (bilaterally) and 12 able-bodied controls. Simultaneous measurements were made of torque and surface EMG from agonist and antagonist muscles. Coactivation was calculated. Supramaximal triplets were evoked with electrical stimulation to estimate maximal torque capacity and degree of voluntary activation of knee extensors. MVCs, activation and coactivation parameters were correlated to scores of seven functional performance tests. MVCe, MVCf and voluntary activation were lower in paretic lower limb (PL) compared with both non-paretic lower limb (NL) and control. Besides, all these parameters of NL were also lower than control. Electrically evoked torque capacity of knee extensors of PL was about 60% of both NL and control, which were not significantly different from each other. Strong significant correlations between strength, as well as voluntary activation, and functional performance were found. Coactivation did not correlate well with functional performance. Thus, whereas for NL activation failure can explain weakness, for PL both activation failure and reduced intrinsic torque capacity are responsible for the severe weakness. Activation capacity and muscle strength correlated strongly to functional performance, while coactivation did not.

  17. Influences of Fascicle Length During Isometric Training on Improvement of Muscle Strength.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Hiroki; Ikezoe, Tome; Umehara, Jun; Nakamura, Masatoshi; Umegaki, Hiroki; Kobayashi, Takuya; Nishishita, Satoru; Fujita, Kosuke; Araki, Kojiro; Ichihashi, Noriaki

    2016-11-01

    Tanaka, H, Ikezoe, T, Umehara, J, Nakamura, M, Umegaki, H, Kobayashi, T, Nishishita, S, Fujita, K, Araki, K, and Ichihashi, N. Influences of fascicle length during isometric training on improvement of muscle strength. J Strength Cond Res 30(11): 3249-3255, 2016-This study investigated whether low-intensity isometric training would elicit a greater improvement in maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) at the same fascicle length, rather than the joint angle, adopted during training. Sixteen healthy women (21.8 ± 1.5 years) were randomly divided into an intervention group and a control group. Before (Pre) and after (Post) training, isometric plantarflexion MVCs were measured every 10° through the range of ankle joint position from 20° dorsiflexion to 30° plantarflexion (i.e., 6 ankle angles). Medial gastrocnemius fascicle length was also measured at each position, using B-mode ultrasound under 3 conditions of muscle activation: at rest, 30%MVC at respective angles, and MVC. Plantarflexion resistance training at an angle of 20° plantarflexion was performed 3 days a week for 4 weeks at 30%MVC using 3 sets of twenty 3-second isometric contractions. Maximum voluntary contraction in the intervention group increased at 0 and 10° plantarflexion (0°; Pre: 81.2 ± 26.5 N·m, Post: 105.0 ± 21.6 N·m, 10°; Pre: 63.0 ± 23.6 N·m, Post: 81.3 ± 20.3 N·m), which was not the angle used in training (20°). However, the fascicle length adopted in training at 20° plantarflexion and 30%MVC was similar to the value at 0 or 10° plantarflexion at MVC. Low-intensity isometric training at a shortened muscle length may be effective for improving MVC at a lengthened muscle length because of specificity of the fascicle length than the joint angle.

  18. Effects of resistance training under hypoxic conditions on muscle hypertrophy and strength.

    PubMed

    Kurobe, Kazumichi; Huang, Zhong; Nishiwaki, Masato; Yamamoto, Masayoshi; Kanehisa, Hiroaki; Ogita, Futoshi

    2015-05-01

    It has been reported that exercise under hypoxic conditions elevates acute growth hormone secretion after exercise compared with that under normoxic conditions. This study examined the influence of resistance training under moderate hypoxic conditions on muscle thickness, strength and hormonal responses. Thirteen healthy men were assigned into two groups matched for physical fitness level and then randomized into two groups that performed exercise under normoxic (FiO2  = 20·9%) or hypoxic (FiO2  = 12·7%) conditions. Three sets of elbow extensions with unilateral arm were performed to exhaustion at a workload of a 10 repetition maximum with 1-minute intervals for 3 days per week for 8 weeks. The thickness of the biceps and triceps brachii was determined using B-mode ultrasound before and after training. Blood sampling was carried out before and after exercise, as well as during the first and last training sessions. Increase in the thickness of the triceps brachii in trained arm was significantly greater in the hypoxic group than in the normoxic group. The 10 repetition maximum was significantly increased not only in the trained arm but also in the untrained arm in both groups. Serum growth hormone concentrations after exercise were significantly higher in the hypoxic group than in the normoxic group on both the first and last training sessions. These findings suggest that hypoxic resistance training elicits more muscle hypertrophy associated with a higher growth hormone secretion, but that the greater muscle hypertrophy did not necessarily contribute a greater gain of muscle strength.

  19. Supplementation with a polyphenolic blend improves post-exercise strength recovery and muscle soreness

    PubMed Central

    Herrlinger, Kelli A.; Chirouzes, Diana M.; Ceddia, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Exercise can initiate a cascade of inflammatory and oxidative stress–related events leading to delayed onset muscle soreness. Polyphenols possess antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. Objective The current study examined the effects of a proprietary polyphenolic blend (PB), containing catechins and theaflavins, on exercise performance and recovery following an eccentric exercise challenge. Design Male participants (18–35 years of age) received placebo or PB at a low dose (PB-L, 1,000 mg/d) or high dose (PB-H, 2,000 mg/d) for 13 weeks. During the 13th week of supplementation, participants completed an eccentric exercise (40 min downhill treadmill run) followed by a strength assessment (peak torque on isokinetic leg extensions) pre-exercise, and 24, 48, and 96 h post-exercise. Muscle soreness (subjective questionnaire), markers of muscle stress (cortisol and creatine phosphokinase [CK]), and antioxidant capacity (ferric reducing ability of plasma [FRAP]) were also assessed. Results PB-H attenuated the decrease in peak torque observed in the placebo group from pre-exercise to 48 h (p=0.012) and 96 h (p=0.003) post-exercise. At 48 h post-exercise, PB-H reduced whole body and hamstring soreness (p=0.029) versus placebo. Chronic consumption of PB improved serum FRAP (p=0.039). As expected, serum cortisol and CK increased from pre- to post-exercise in all groups; however, by 96 h, cortisol and CK levels returned to pre-exercise levels following PB supplementation. At 96 h, the change in cortisol from pre- to post-exercise was significantly greater in placebo versus PB-H (p=0.039). Conclusion These findings show that chronic consumption of PB improved antioxidant status, reduced markers of muscle stress, and promoted strength recovery post-exercise. PMID:26689317

  20. Physiological, anthropometric, strength, and muscle power characteristics correlates with running performance in young runners.

    PubMed

    Dellagrana, Rodolfo A; Guglielmo, Luiz G A; Santos, Bruno V; Hernandez, Sara G; da Silva, Sérgio G; de Campos, Wagner

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between physiological, anthropometric, strength, and muscle power variables and a 5-km time trial (5kmT) in young runners. Twenty-three runners volunteered to participate in this study. Height, body mass, body fat, and fat-free mass (FFM) were measured. The subjects underwent laboratory testing to determine maximal oxygen uptake ((Equation is included in full-text article.)), velocity at ventilatory threshold (VVT), running economy (RE), velocity associated with maximal oxygen uptake ((Equation is included in full-text article.)), and peak velocity (PV). Peak torque, total work, and power were measured by an isokinetic dynamometer at 60°·s(-1) and 240°·s(-1) angular velocities. Right and left knee flexor and extensor torques were evaluated. Finally, the participants performed a 5kmT. Multiple regression and correlation analysis were used to determine the variables that significantly related to 5kmT. Strength and muscle power variables did not correlate with 5kmT. However, most physiological variables were associated with 5kmT. Velocity at ventilatory threshold alone explains 40% of the variance in 5kmT. The addition of the RE at speed 11.2 km·h(-1) (RE11.2) and FFM to the prediction equation allowed for 71% of the adjusted variance in 5kmT to be predicted. These results show that strength and muscle power variables are not good predictors of 5kmT; however, the physiological variables presented high prediction capacity in the 5kmT. Moreover, the anthropometric measures showed significant influence in performance prediction.

  1. PHYSIOLOGICAL, ANTHROPOMETRIC, STRENGTH, AND MUSCLE POWER CHARACTERISTICS CORRELATE WITH RUNNING PERFORMANCE IN YOUNG RUNNERS.

    PubMed

    Dellagrana, Rodolfo A; Guglielmo, Luiz Guilherme A; Santos, Bruno V; Hernandez, Sara G; Silva, SÉrgio G; Campos, Wagner DE

    2014-12-02

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between physiological, anthropometric, strength, and muscle power variables and a 5 km time trial (5kmT) in young runners. Twenty-three runners volunteered to participate in this study. Height, body mass (BM), body fat (BF), and fat-free mass (FFM) were measured. The subjects underwent laboratory testing to determine maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max), velocity at ventilatory threshold (VVT), running economy (RE), velocity associated with maximal oxygen uptake (vVO2max), and peak velocity (PV). Peak torque (PT), total work (TW), and power (PW) were measured by an isokinetic dynamometer at 60°·s and 240° s angular velocities. Right and left knee flexor and extensor torques were evaluated. Finally, the participants performed a 5kmT. Multiple regression and correlation analysis were used to determine the variables that significantly related to 5kmT. Strength and muscle power variables did not correlate with 5kmT. On the other hand, most physiological variables were associated with 5kmT. VVT alone explains 40% of the variance in 5kmT. The addition of the RE at speed 11.2 km.h (RE11.2) and FFM to the prediction equation allowed for 71% of the adjusted variance in 5kmT to be predicted. These results show that strength and muscle power variables are not good predictors of 5kmT; however, the physiological variables presented high prediction capacity in the 5kmT. Moreover, the anthropometric measures showed significant influence in performance prediction.

  2. Characteristics of upper extremity’s muscle strength in Turkish national wheelchair basketball players team

    PubMed Central

    Akınoğlu, Bihter; Kocahan, Tuğba

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study was to reveal characteristics of muscle strength of upper extremities of wheelchair (WC) basketball players and to ensure more-specific training program preparation. Isokinetic muscle strength of 12 WC basketball players were assessed by ISOMED 2000 device. The assessment protocol was evaluated at 60°/sec velocity with 5 times repeated force and at 240°/sec with 15 times repeated force. This protocol was carried out individually for shoulder flexion-extension and wrist flexion-extension movements at the right and left extremities. The flexion/extension ratio was determined to be outside of the ratios accepted as normal for primarily shoulder joint and for wrist joint. The extension movement was stronger than flexion movement in the shoulders at both velocities and the flexion movement was stronger than ex-tension movement in the wrist. The repeat times where the peak torque occurred were 2–3 repeats at 60°/sec velocity during flexion and extension movements for the wrist and shoulders, and the peak torque occurred at an average of 5–6 repeats in the shoulders at 240°/sec velocity and it occurred at 3–4 repeats in the wrist. The angles where the peak torque of the shoulder flexion and extension occurred varied between 80°–115° at both velocities, and it varied between 5°–30° angles for the wrist. As this study revealed, determination of muscle strength characteristics of WC athletes and especially using objective isokinetic devices will guide the planning of the appropriate training and exercise programs and preventing sports injuries in long term. PMID:28349035

  3. Ageing influence in the evolution of strength and muscle mass in women with fibromyalgia: the al-Ándalus project.

    PubMed

    Latorre-Román, Pedro Ángel; Segura-Jiménez, Víctor; Aparicio, Virginia A; Santos E Campos, María Aparecida; García-Pinillos, Felipe; Herrador-Colmenero, Manuel; Álvarez-Gallardo, Inmaculada C; Delgado-Fernández, Manuel

    2015-07-01

    Fibromyalgia is associated with physical disabilities in daily activities. Moreover, patients with fibromyalgia present similar levels of functional capacity and physical condition than elderly people. The aim of this study was to analyse the evolution of strength and muscle mass in women with fibromyalgia along ageing. A total sample of 492 fibromyalgia patients and 279 healthy control women were included in the study. Participants in each group were further divided into four age subgroups: subgroup 1: 30-39 years old, subgroup 2: 40-49 years old, subgroup 3: 50-59 years old and subgroup 4: 60-69 years old. Standardized field-based fitness tests were used to assess muscle strength (30-s chair stand, handgrip strength and arm curl tests). Fibromyalgia patients did not show impairment on muscle mass along ageing, without values of skeletal muscle mass index below 6.76 kg/m(2) in any group. However, in all variables of muscle strength, the fibromyalgia group showed less strength than the healthy group (p < 0.05) for all age groups. As expected, handgrip strength test showed differences along ageing only in the fibromyalgia group (p < 0.001). Age was inversely associated with skeletal muscle mass (r = -0.155, p < 0.01) and handgrip strength (r = -0.230, p < 0.001) in the FM group. Women with fibromyalgia showed a reduction in muscle strength along ageing process, with significantly lower scores than healthy women for each age group, representing a risk of dynapenia.

  4. Pelvic floor muscle strength in primiparous women according to the delivery type: cross-sectional study 1

    PubMed Central

    Mendes, Edilaine de Paula Batista; de Oliveira, Sonia Maria Junqueira Vasconcellos; Caroci, Adriana de Souza; Francisco, Adriana Amorim; Oliveira, Sheyla Guimaraes; da Silva, Renata Luana

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives: to compare the pelvic floor muscle strength in primiparous women after normal birth and cesarean section, related to the socio-demographic characteristics, nutritional status, dyspareunia, urinary incontinence, perineal exercise in pregnancy, perineal condition and weight of the newborn. Methods: this was a cross-sectional study conducted after 50 - 70 postpartum days, with 24 primiparous women who underwent cesarean delivery and 72 who had a normal birth. The 9301 PeritronTM was used for analysis of muscle strength. The mean muscle strength was compared between the groups by two-way analysis of variance. Results: the pelvic floor muscle strength was 24.0 cmH2O (±16.2) and 25.4 cmH2O (±14.7) in postpartum primiparous women after normal birth and cesarean section, respectively, with no significant difference. The muscular strength was greater in postpartum women with ≥ 12 years of study (42.0 ±26.3 versus 14.6 ±7.7 cmH2O; p= 0.036) and in those who performed perineal exercises (42.6±25.4 11.8±4.9 vs. cmH2O; p = 0.010), compared to caesarean. There was no difference in muscle strength according to delivery type regarding nutritional status, dyspareunia, urinary incontinence, perineal condition or newborn weight. Conclusion: pelvic floor muscle strength does not differ between primiparous women based on the type of delivery. Postpartum women with normal births, with higher education who performed perineal exercise during pregnancy showed greater muscle strength. PMID:27533267

  5. Comparison of Lower Extremity Strength, Power and Muscle Area between Healthy Subjects and Mobility-Limited Elders

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study compared muscle strength, power and cross sectional area (CSA) in healthy middle-aged adults (mean age: 47.3 +/- 5 yrs, n = 26), healthy older adults (73.8 +/- 4 yrs, n = 21), and older adults with mobility impairments (77.1 +/- 5 yrs, n = 21). One repetition maximum strength (1RM) and pe...

  6. Effect of vibration on muscle strength imbalance in lower extremity using multi-control whole body vibration platform.

    PubMed

    Yu, Chang Ho; Seo, Shin Bae; Kang, Seung Rok; Kim, Kyung; Kwon, Tae Kyu

    2015-01-01

    This study shows the improvement of muscle activity and muscle strength imbalance in the lower extremities through independent exercise loads in vibration platform. Twenty females of age 20 participated in this study. The subjects were divided into WBV group, with more than 10% of muscle strength imbalance between left and right the lower extremities, and control group, with less than 10% of muscle strength imbalance between left and right the lower extremities. As the prior experiment showed, different exercise postures provide different muscular activities. As a result, the highest muscular activity was found to be in the low squat posture. Therefore, the LS posture was selected for the exercise in this experiment. Vibration intensities were applied to dominant muscle and non-dominant muscle, and the vibration frequency was fixed at 25Hz for the WBV group. The control group was asked to perform the same exercise as the WBV group, without stimulated vibration. This exercise was conducted for a total of 4 weeks. As a result, the WBV group which showed an average deviation of 16% before the experiment, tended to decrease approximately to 5%. In this study, vibration exercise using load deviation is shown to be effective in improving the muscle strength imbalance.

  7. Effect of traditional resistance and power training using rated perceived exertion for enhancement of muscle strength, power, and functional performance.

    PubMed

    Tiggemann, Carlos Leandro; Dias, Caroline Pieta; Radaelli, Regis; Massa, Jéssica Cassales; Bortoluzzi, Rafael; Schoenell, Maira Cristina Wolf; Noll, Matias; Alberton, Cristine Lima; Kruel, Luiz Fernando Martins

    2016-04-01

    The present study compared the effects of 12 weeks of traditional resistance training and power training using rated perceived exertion (RPE) to determine training intensity on improvements in strength, muscle power, and ability to perform functional task in older women. Thirty healthy elderly women (60-75 years) were randomly assigned to traditional resistance training group (TRT; n = 15) or power training group (PT; n = 15). Participants trained twice a week for 12 weeks using six exercises. The training protocol was designed to ascertain that participants exercised at an RPE of 13-18 (on a 6-20 scale). Maximal dynamic strength, muscle power, and functional performance of lower limb muscles were assessed. Maximal dynamic strength muscle strength leg press (≈58 %) and knee extension (≈20 %) increased significantly (p < 0.001) and similarly in both groups after training. Muscle power also increased with training (≈27 %; p < 0.05), with no difference between groups. Both groups also improved their functional performance after training period (≈13 %; p < 0.001), with no difference between groups. The present study showed that TRT and PT using RPE scale to control intensity were significantly and similarly effective in improving maximal strength, muscle power, and functional performance of lower limbs in elderly women.

  8. Polyclonal neural cell adhesion molecule antibody prolongs the effective duration time of botulinum toxin in decreasing muscle strength.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yan; Pan, Lizhen; Liu, Wuchao; Pan, Yougui; Nie, Zhiyu; Jin, Lingjing

    2015-11-01

    This study aimed to investigate if the effective duration time of botulinum toxin A (Btx-A) could be prolonged by polyclonal neural cell adhesion molecule antibody (P-NCAM-Ab). 175 male SD rats were randomly divided into three major groups: control group (n = 25), Btx-A group (n = 25), and P-NCAM-Ab groups. P-NCAM-Ab groups were composed of five sub-groups, with 25 rats each in the dose-response study. Muscle strength of rat lower limbs was determined using a survey system. The expressions of muscle-specific receptor tyrosine kinase (MuSK) and neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) were determined by real-time polymerase chain reactions (RT-PCR) and western blotting (WB). The muscle strength was significantly decreased by Btx-A in Btx-A/P-NCAM-Ab groups compared with normal control group. Besides, the muscle strength of P-NCAM-Ab group was significantly decreased compared with the Btx-A group. The recovery time of muscle strength in P-NCAM-Ab group was significantly longer compared with Btx-A group. RT-PCR and WB assay showed that PNCAM-Ab delayed the increase of MuSK and NCAM after Btx-A injection. P-NCAM-Ab prolongs the effective duration time of Btx-A in decreasing muscle strength, which could provide a novel enhancement in clinical application.

  9. Comparison of pulmonary function and back muscle strength according to the degree of spinal curvature of healthy adults.

    PubMed

    You, Jae Eung; Lee, Hye Young; Kim, Kyoung

    2015-06-01

    [Purpose] Degree of curvature on the spine is known to affect respiratory function and back muscle activation. We compared pulmonary function and back muscle strength according to the degree of curvature of the spine of healthy adults. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-three healthy volunteers were enrolled. They were divided into two groups according to the degree of curvature of the spine: the below 2° group, and the above 2° group. The degree of curvature was assessed using the Adams forward bending test and a scoliometer. A pulmonary function test (PFT) was conducted, and back muscle strength was measured. [Results] No significant differences in PFT were found between the below 2° group and the above 2° group, in terms of forced vital capacity (FVC), forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1), ratio of forced expiratory volume in one second to forced vital capacity (FEV1/FVC), or peak expiratory flow (PEF). However, back muscle strength in the below 2 group was significantly higher than that of the above 2 group. [Conclusion] Our findings indicate that the degree of curvature of the spine is associated with back muscle strength in subjects who have spinal curvature within the normal range. Therefore, evaluation and treatment of back muscle strength might be helpful for preventing the progress of curvature of the spine in adolescents with potential scoliosis.

  10. Effects of a Fall Prevention Exercise Program on Muscle Strength and Balance of the Old-old Elderly.

    PubMed

    Cho, Seong-Il; An, Duk-Hyun

    2014-11-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of an 8-week balance exercise and elastic-resistance exercise program on muscle strength and balance of the old-old elderly (over the age of 75). [Subjects and Methods] Fifty-five elderly persons were recruited from the community and assigned to three groups for convenience: balance exercise (intervention group 1; INT 1), resistance exercise (intervention group 2; INT 2), and control (CON) groups. The intervention was performed twice a week at a senior center and three times a week at home for 8 weeks. Muscle strength and balance were evaluated before and at the end of the trial, using a PowertrackIIand Tetrax. [Results] There were significant improvements in the strength of all seven muscle groups and balance in the INT 2 group. In the INT 1 group, there were significant improvements in the strength of all muscle groups except for the knee flexor and ankle plantar flexor muscle groups. [Conclusion] This study demonstrated that an intervention using balance exercises or elastic-resistance exercises is effective at improving the muscle strength and balance of the old-old elderly. These type of exercises should be appropriate for the physical characteristics of the subjects.

  11. Effects of a Fall Prevention Exercise Program on Muscle Strength and Balance of the Old-old Elderly

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Seong-Il; An, Duk-Hyun

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of an 8-week balance exercise and elastic-resistance exercise program on muscle strength and balance of the old-old elderly (over the age of 75). [Subjects and Methods] Fifty-five elderly persons were recruited from the community and assigned to three groups for convenience: balance exercise (intervention group 1; INT 1), resistance exercise (intervention group 2; INT 2), and control (CON) groups. The intervention was performed twice a week at a senior center and three times a week at home for 8 weeks. Muscle strength and balance were evaluated before and at the end of the trial, using a PowertrackIIand Tetrax. [Results] There were significant improvements in the strength of all seven muscle groups and balance in the INT 2 group. In the INT 1 group, there were significant improvements in the strength of all muscle groups except for the knee flexor and ankle plantar flexor muscle groups. [Conclusion] This study demonstrated that an intervention using balance exercises or elastic-resistance exercises is effective at improving the muscle strength and balance of the old-old elderly. These type of exercises should be appropriate for the physical characteristics of the subjects. PMID:25435697

  12. Quantifying Quadriceps Muscle Strength in Patients With ACL Injury, Focal Cartilage Lesions, and Degenerative Meniscus Tears

    PubMed Central

    Eitzen, Ingrid; Grindem, Hege; Nilstad, Agnethe; Moksnes, Håvard; Risberg, May Arna

    2016-01-01

    Background: Reduced quadriceps strength influences knee function and increases the risk of knee osteoarthritis. Thus, it is of significant clinical relevance to precisely quantify strength deficits in patients with knee injuries. Purpose: To evaluate isokinetic concentric quadriceps muscle strength torque values, assessed both from peak torque and at specific knee flexion joint angles, in patients with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury, focal cartilage lesions, and degenerative meniscus tears. Study Design: Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: Data were synthesized from patients included in 3 previously conducted research projects: 2 prospective cohort studies and 1 randomized controlled trial. At the time of inclusion, all patients were candidates for surgery. Isokinetic concentric quadriceps muscle strength measurements (60 deg/s) were performed at baseline (preoperative status) and after a period of progressive supervised exercise therapy (length of rehabilitation period: 5 weeks for ACL injury, 12 weeks for cartilage lesions and degenerative meniscus). Outcome measures were peak torque and torque at specific knee flexion joint angles from 20° to 70°. All patients had unilateral injuries, and side-to-side deficits were calculated. For comparisons between and within groups, we utilized 1-way analysis of variance and paired t tests, respectively. Results: In total, 250 patients were included. At baseline, cartilage patients had the most severe deficit (39.7% ± 24.3%; P < .001). Corresponding numbers for ACL and degenerative meniscus subjects were 21.7% (±13.2%) and 20.7% (±16.3%), respectively. At retest, there was significant improvement in all groups (P < .001), with remaining deficits of 24.7% (±18.5%) for cartilage, 16.8% (±13.9%) for ACL, and 3.3% (±17.8%) for degenerative meniscus. Peak torque was consistently measured at 60° of knee flexion, whereas the largest mean deficits were measured at 30° at baseline and 70° at retest for the

  13. Attenuated maximal muscle strength and peak power in children with sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Dougherty, Kelly A; Schall, Joan I; Rovner, Alisha J; Stallings, Virginia A; Zemel, Babette S

    2011-03-01

    Dominant hand maximal handgrip strength evaluated with a handgrip dynamometer and peak power evaluated with a force plate, adjusted for body size and composition, were compared in African-American children aged 5 to 13 years, with and without type SS sickle cell disease (SCD-SS). Children with SCD-SS (n = 35; age, 9.0 ± 2.0 y) compared with healthy control children (n = 103; age, 8.6 ± 1.8 y) did not differ by age, sex, or pubertal status, yet had significantly lower Z scores for height, weight, body mass index, upper arm muscle area, upper arm fat area, fat mass-for-height and lean mass-for-height. Children with SCD-SS had significantly lower handgrip strength (12.7 ± 3.3 vs. 15.2 ± 5.1 kg, P < 0.008), peak power (882 ± 298 vs. 1167 ± 384 W, P < 0.001), and growth and body composition adjusted Z scores for handgrip strength (0.6 ± 1.3 standard deviations, P < 0.004) and peak power (male children = 1.0 ± 0.8 standard deviations, P < 0.0002; female children = 1.0 ± 1.7 standard deviations, P < 0.006). Maximal muscle strength and peak power are attenuated in children with SCD-SS compared with healthy control children beyond expectation for growth and body composition deficits suggesting that additional factors contribute to attenuation in anaerobic performance.

  14. Effect of recovery from muscle strength imbalance in lower limb using four point weight bearing reduction system.

    PubMed

    Yu, Chang Ho; Kang, Seung Rok; Jeong, Ho Choon; Kim, Kyung; Kwon, Tae Kyu

    2014-01-01

    This study was performed to assess the improvement of muscle strength imbalance in the lower limbs using a four point weight bearing reduction system with a two-belt treadmill. Participants, each having differences in muscle function of the left and right legs of over 20%, were divided into two groups of ten. The participants were involved in experiments progressing 40 minutes per day, 3 days per week, during a period of 4 weeks. The maximal peak torque and average power were measured for testing joint torque in the hip, knee and ankle. The results showed the improvement of muscle imbalance as assessed by the maximal muscle strength was the most effective in the hip joint, while the improvement of muscular reaction was the most effective in the knee joint. We suggest that the method of weight bearing reduction could be sufficient to reduce muscle imbalance in the lower limbs.

  15. Do Muscle Strength Deficits of the Uninvolved Hip and Knee Exist in Young Athletes Before Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction?

    PubMed Central

    Hannon, Joseph; Wang-Price, Sharon; Goto, Shiho; Garrison, J. Craig; Bothwell, James M.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Muscle strength of the involved limb is known to be decreased after injury. Comparison with the uninvolved limb has become standard of practice to measure progress and for calculation of limb symmetry indices (LSIs) to determine readiness to return to sport. However, some literature suggests strength changes in the uninvolved limb also are present after lower extremity injury. Purpose: To examine the uninvolved limb strength in a population of adolescent athletes after an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury and compare strength values with those of the dominant limb in a healthy control group. Study Design: Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: A total of 64 athletes were enrolled in this study, including 31with injured ACLs (mean age, 15.6 ± 1.4 years) and 33 healthy controls (mean age, 14.9 ± 1.9 years). The median time from injury to testing was 23 days for the ACL-injured group. Participants underwent Biodex isokinetic strength testing at 60 deg/s to assess quadriceps and hamstring strength. Isometric hip strength (abduction, extension, external rotation) was measured using a handheld dynamometer. The muscle strength of the uninvolved limb of the ACL-injured group was compared with that of the dominant limb of the healthy control group. Results: The results showed a significant difference in quadriceps muscle strength between the 2 study groups (P < .001). Isokinetic quadriceps strength of the uninvolved limb in the ACL group was significantly decreased by 25.5% (P < .001) when compared with the dominant limb of the control group. Conclusion: The results of this study demonstrate a decreased isokinetic strength of the quadriceps muscle in the uninvolved limb after ACL injury as compared with healthy controls. Consideration should be taken when using the uninvolved limb for comparison when assessing quadriceps strength in a population with an ACL injury. PMID:28203600

  16. Effect of caffeine ingestion on maximal voluntary contraction strength in upper- and lower-body muscle groups.

    PubMed

    Timmins, Tomas D; Saunders, David H

    2014-11-01

    The effect of caffeine on strength-power performance is equivocal, especially with regard to maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) strength. This is partly related to differences in upper- and lower-body musculature. However, there is no evidence to suggest whether this is a product of muscle group location, muscle group size, or both. Consequently, the primary aim of this study was to establish whether the effect of caffeine ingestion on MVC strength in upper- and lower-body muscle groups is significantly different, and if so, to determine whether this is a product of muscle group size. In a randomized, subject-blind crossover manner, 16 resistance-trained men (estimated caffeine intake [mean ± SD] 95.4 ± 80.0 mg·d) received either 6 mg·kg of caffeine (CAF) or a placebo (PLA). Isokinetic peak torque of the knee extensors, ankle plantar flexors, elbow flexors and wrist flexors were measured at an angular velocity of 60°·s. Statistical analyses revealed a significant increase in isokinetic peak torque from PLA to CAF (p = 0.011) and a significant difference in isokinetic peak torque between muscle groups (p < 0.001). However, there was no significant treatment × muscle group interaction (p = 0.056). Nonetheless, the %improvement in isokinetic peak torque with caffeine increased with muscle group size. In conclusion, a moderate dose of caffeine improves MVC strength in resistance-trained men regardless of muscle group location, whereas the influence of muscle group size remains uncertain. This research may be useful for competitive and recreational athletes aiming to increase strength-power performance.

  17. Increased muscle size and strength from slow-movement, low-intensity resistance exercise and tonic force generation.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Yuya; Tanimoto, Michiya; Ohgane, Akane; Sanada, Kiyoshi; Miyachi, Motohiko; Ishii, Naokata

    2013-01-01

    The authors investigated the effects of low-intensity resistance training on muscle size and strength in older men and women. Thirty-five participants (age 59-76 yr) were randomly assigned to 2 groups and performed low-intensity (50% of 1-repetition maximum) knee-extension and -flexion exercises with either slow movement and tonic force generation (LST; 3-s eccentric, 3-s concentric, and 1-s isometric actions with no rest between repetitions) or normal speed (LN; 1-s concentric and 1-s eccentric actions with 1-s rests between repetitions) twice a week for 12 wk (2-wk preparation and 10-wk intervention). The LST significantly increased thigh-muscle thickness, as well as isometric knee-extension and -flexion strength. The LN significantly improved strength, but its hypertrophic effect was limited. These results indicate that even for older individuals, the LST can be an effective method for gaining muscle mass and strength.

  18. Knee muscle strength at varying angular velocities and associations with gross motor function in ambulatory children with cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Hong, Wei-Hsien; Chen, Hseih-Ching; Shen, I-Hsuan; Chen, Chung-Yao; Chen, Chia-Ling; Chung, Chia-Ying

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationships of muscle strength at different angular velocities and gross motor functions in ambulatory children with cerebral palsy (CP). This study included 33 ambulatory children with spastic CP aged 6-15 years and 15 children with normal development. Children with CP were categorized into level I (n=17) or level II (n=16) according to Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS) levels. All children underwent curl-up test and isokinetic tests of the knee extensor and flexor muscle. Children with CP underwent the gross motor function assessments, including the Gross Motor Function Measure (GMFM-66) and the gross motor subtests of Bruininks-Oseretsky Test of Motor Proficiency (BOTMP). The hamstring-quadriceps ratio (HQ ratio) was calculated as 100%×(isokinetic peak torque of hamstring (knee flexor)/isokinetic peak torque of quadriceps (knee extensor)). Children with GMFCS level II had lower BOTMP and GMFM-66 scores, curl-up scores, HQ ratio, and knee muscle strength, especially knee flexor, compared to those with GMFCS level I. The regression analysis showed that knee flexor torques at 60 and 90°/s are mainly related to balance (r(2)=0.167, p=0.011) and strength (r(2)=0.243, p=0.002) while knee flexor torques at 120°/s mainly contribute to running speed and agility (r(2)=0.372, p<0.001). These findings suggest that children with CP had knee strength deficits, especially knee flexor. Postural muscle (knee flexor) strength dominated gross motor function than antigravity muscle strength (knee extensor). The knee flexor strength at different angular velocities was associated with various gross motor tasks. The HQ ratio may be used as a potential biomarker to probe the therapeutic effectiveness for muscle strengthening in these children. These data may allow clinician for formulating effective muscle strengthening strategies for these children.

  19. An Investigation into Reliability of Knee Extension Muscle Strength Measurements, and into the Relationship between Muscle Strength and Means of Independent Mobility in the Ward: Examinations of Patients Who Underwent Femoral Neck Fracture Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Katoh, Munenori; Kaneko, Yoshihiro

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of the present study was to investigate the reliability of isometric knee extension muscle strength measurement of patients who underwent femoral neck fracture surgery, as well as the relationship between independent mobility in the ward and knee muscle strength. [Subjects] The subjects were 75 patients who underwent femoral neck fracture surgery. [Methods] We used a hand-held dynamometer and a belt to measure isometric knee extension muscle strength three times, and used intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) to investigate the reliability of the measurements. We used a receiver operating characteristic curve to investigate the cutoff values for independent walking with walking sticks and non-independent mobility. [Results] ICCs (1, 1) were 0.9 or higher. The cutoff value for independent walking with walking sticks was 0.289 kgf/kg on the non-fractured side, 0.193 kgf/kg on the fractured side, and the average of both limbs was 0.238 kgf/kg. [Conclusion] We consider that the test-retest reliability of isometric knee extension muscle strength measurement of patients who have undergone femoral neck fracture surgery is high. We also consider that isometric knee extension muscle strength is useful for investigating means of independent mobility in the ward. PMID:24567667

  20. Eldecalcitol improves muscle strength and dynamic balance in postmenopausal women with osteoporosis: an open-label randomized controlled study.

    PubMed

    Saito, Kimio; Miyakoshi, Naohisa; Matsunaga, Toshiki; Hongo, Michio; Kasukawa, Yuji; Shimada, Yoichi

    2016-09-01

    The antifracture efficacy of vitamin D in osteoporosis is due to its direct action on bones and indirect extraskeletal effects to prevent falls. Eldecalcitol is an analog of active vitamin D3 that improves bone mineral density and reduces the risk of osteoporotic fractures. However, the effects of eldecalcitol on muscle strength and static and dynamic postural balance are unclear. In this open-label randomized controlled study, we assessed the effects of eldecalcitol on muscle strength and static and dynamic postural balance in 50 postmenopausal women (mean age 74 years) with osteoporosis treated with bisphosphonate. Participants were randomly divided into a bisphosphonate group (alendronate at 35 mg/week; n = 25) or an eldecalcitol group (eldecalcitol at 0.75 μg/day and alendronate at 35 mg/week; n = 25) and were followed up for 6 months. Trunk muscle strength, including back extensor strength and iliopsoas muscle strength, was measured. Static standing balance was evaluated and the one leg standing test was performed to assess static postural balance. Dynamic sitting balance was evaluated and the 10-m walk test, functional reach test, and timed up and go test were performed to assess dynamic postural balance. At 6 months, there were no significant changes in any measure of muscle strength or balance in the bisphosphonate group, whereas eldecalcitol significantly increased back extensor strength (p = 0.012) and iliopsoas muscle strength (p = 0.035). Eldecalcitol also significantly improved findings on the timed up and go test (p = 0.001) and dynamic sitting balance (p = 0.015) at 6 months. These results with eldecalcitol may have an impact on prevention of falls.

  1. Comparison of knee laxity and isokinetic muscle strength in patients with a posterior cruciate ligament injury.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Kyoungkyu

    2016-03-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to compare knee laxity and isokinetic muscle strength in patients with an isolated posterior cruciate ligament injury. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty high school rugby players with a previous posterior cruciate ligament injury and abnormal findings higher than surgical grade I were included. Laxity with 132 N of pressure was measured using Kneelax 3 to assess the stability of the posterior cruciate ligament, and flexor and extensor torques were measured at 60°/sec, 180°/sec, and 240°/sec to measure the isokinetic muscle strength of the knee joint. The average and standard deviation values were extracted from all data to assess the measured data. [Results] Regarding the ipsilateral and contralateral laxity, the deviation value at the peak force and maximum manual drawer was statistically significant. The peak torque and peak torque per body weight in isokinetic measurements were significantly different only for knee extensor torque at 60°/sec, 180°/sec, and 240°/sec. [Conclusion] Return to normal activities post injury is important. Thus base data gathered by comparing patients' ipsilateral and contralateral sides will serve as essential criteria for structuring future rehabilitation programs to facilitate functional improvements.

  2. Physical Performance, Balance, Mobility, and Muscle Strength Decline at Different Rates in Elderly People

    PubMed Central

    Nakano, Márcia Mariko; Otonari, Thais Satie; Takara, Kelly Sayuri; Carmo, Carolina M; Tanaka, Clarice

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to verify the decline in functionality of elderly people. [Subjects and Methods] The study subjects comprised 152 individuals (96 women; 56 men) divided into 3 groups: G1 (60 to 69 years, n=53); G2 (70 to 79 years, n=65); and G3 (80 years or older, n=34). Physical performance, balance, mobility, and muscle strength were assessed using Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB), Berg Balance Scale (BERG), Timed Up and Go (TUG) test, and leg press test, respectively. Comparison among age-stratified groups (G1, G2 and G3) and between genders were examined using analysis of variance with Tukey’s test as a post hoc test or the Kruskal-Wallis test with Bonferroni correction. [Results] SPPB and BERG scores decreased significantly in comparison between G1 and G3, and between G2 and G3 in women. TUG and leg press scores decreased significantly in comparison between G1 and G3 and between G2 and G3. [Conclusion] People in their 60s and 70s have similar functional characteristics (physical performance, balance, mobility and muscle strength for both genders), and functionality starts to decline when people are in their 80s. PMID:24764638

  3. Absolute reliability of shoulder joint horizontal adductor muscle strength measurements using a handheld dynamometer.

    PubMed

    Hirano, Masahiro; Katoh, Munenori

    2015-07-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to verify the absolute reliability of shoulder joint horizontal adductor muscle strength measurements using a handheld dynamometer (HHD). [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were 33 healthy college students. The measurements were made three times with the HHD fixed using a belt (BFHHD) or with the examiner's hand (conventional method; HFHHD). The absolute reliability of measurements was verified using Bland-Altman analysis, both in the all subjects group and a group of subjects showing measurements less than a fixed limit of 30 kgf. [Results] In the <30 kgf group, a systematic bias was not observed, and BFHHD values were greater than HFHHD values. BFHHD values in the all subjects group showed a systematic bias; the 3rd measurement value was less than the maximum value obtained during the 1st and 2nd measurements. [Conclusion] For obtaining an acceptable value during clinical measurements of horizontal adductor muscle strength, single measurements obtained using an HFHHD in the case of a <30 kgf group and the maximum value of two measurements obtained using a BFHHD are reliable.

  4. Comparison of knee laxity and isokinetic muscle strength in patients with a posterior cruciate ligament injury

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Kyoungkyu

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to compare knee laxity and isokinetic muscle strength in patients with an isolated posterior cruciate ligament injury. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty high school rugby players with a previous posterior cruciate ligament injury and abnormal findings higher than surgical grade I were included. Laxity with 132 N of pressure was measured using Kneelax 3 to assess the stability of the posterior cruciate ligament, and flexor and extensor torques were measured at 60°/sec, 180°/sec, and 240°/sec to measure the isokinetic muscle strength of the knee joint. The average and standard deviation values were extracted from all data to assess the measured data. [Results] Regarding the ipsilateral and contralateral laxity, the deviation value at the peak force and maximum manual drawer was statistically significant. The peak torque and peak torque per body weight in isokinetic measurements were significantly different only for knee extensor torque at 60°/sec, 180°/sec, and 240°/sec. [Conclusion] Return to normal activities post injury is important. Thus base data gathered by comparing patients’ ipsilateral and contralateral sides will serve as essential criteria for structuring future rehabilitation programs to facilitate functional improvements. PMID:27134367

  5. Effects of a Six-Month Local Vibration Training on Bone Density, Muscle Strength, Muscle Mass, and Physical Performance in Postmenopausal Women.

    PubMed

    Tankisheva, Ekaterina; Bogaerts, An; Boonen, Steven; Delecluse, Christophe; Jansen, Paul; Verschueren, Sabine M P

    2015-09-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the effect of 6 months' local vibration training on bone mineral density (BMD), muscle strength, muscle mass, and physical performance in postmenopausal women (66-88 years). The study was organized as a randomized controlled trial for postmenopausal women who lived in daily care service flats and rest homes. Thirty-five postmenopausal women were randomly assigned to either a vibration (n = 17) or a control group (n = 18). The vibration group received 6-month local vibration treatment with frequency between 30 and 45 Hz and acceleration between 1.71 and 3.58g. The vibration was applied on the midthigh and around the hip in supine-lying position once per day, 5 d·wk. The participants of the control group continued their usual activities and were not involved in any additional training program. The primary outcome variables were the isometric and dynamic quadriceps muscle strength and the BMD of the hip. We assessed the muscle mass of the quadriceps and physical performance. Additionally, the feasibility, side effects, and compliance were evaluated after 6 months of local vibration training. Overall, the results showed a net benefit of 13.84% in isometric muscle strength at 60° knee angle in favor of the vibration group compared with controls (p < 0.01). No changes in BMD, muscle mass, or physical performance were found in both groups (p > 0.05). Six months of local vibration training improved some aspects of muscle strength but had no effect on BMD, muscle mass, and physical performance in postmenopausal women. The specific vibration protocol used in this study can be considered as safe and suitable for a local vibration training program.

  6. Motor imagery muscle contraction strength influences spinal motor neuron excitability and cardiac sympathetic nerve activity.

    PubMed

    Bunno, Yoshibumi; Suzuki, Toshiaki; Iwatsuki, Hiroyasu

    2015-12-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to investigate the changes in spinal motor neuron excitability and autonomic nervous system activity during motor imagery of isometric thenar muscle activity at 10% and 50% maximal voluntary contraction (MVC). [Methods] The F-waves and low frequency/high frequency (LF/HF) ratio were recorded at rest, during motor imagery, and post-trial. For motor imagery trials, subjects were instructed to imagine thenar muscle activity at 10% and 50% MVC while holding the sensor of a pinch meter for 5 min. [Results] The F-waves and LF/HF ratio during motor imagery at 50% MVC were significantly increased compared with those at rest, whereas those during motor imagery at 10% MVC were not significantly different from those at rest. The relative values of the F/M amplitude ratio during motor imagery at 50% MVC were significantly higher than those at 10% MVC. The relative values of persistence and the LF/HF ratio during motor imagery were similar during motor imagery at the two muscle contraction strengths. [Conclusion] Motor imagery can increase the spinal motor neuron excitability and cardiac sympathetic nerve activity. Motor imagery at 50% MVC may be more effective than motor imagery at 10% MVC.

  7. Effects of a 10-week resistance exercise program on soccer kick biomechanics and muscle strength.

    PubMed

    Manolopoulos, Evaggelos; Katis, Athanasios; Manolopoulos, Konstantinos; Kalapotharakos, Vasileios; Kellis, Eleftherios

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine the effects of a resistance exercise program on soccer kick biomechanics. Twenty male amateur soccer players were divided in the experimental group (EG) and the control group (CG), each consisting of 10 players. The EG followed a 10-week resistance exercise program mainly for the lower limb muscles. Maximal instep kick kinematics, electromyography, and ground reaction forces (GRFs) as well as maximum isometric leg strength were recorded before and after training. A 2-way analysis of variance showed significantly higher ball speed values only for the EG (26.14 ± 1.17 m·s vs. 27.59 ± 1.49 m·s before and after training, respectively), whereas no significant differences were observed for the CG. The EG showed a decline in joint angular velocities and an increase in biceps femoris electromyography of the swinging leg during the backswing phase followed by a significant increase in segmental and joint velocities and muscle activation of the same leg during the forward swing phase (p < 0.05). The EG also showed significantly higher vertical GRFs and rectus femoris and gastrocnemius activation of the support leg (p < 0.05). Similarly, maximum and explosive isometric force significantly increased after training only for the EG (p < 0.05). These results suggest that increases in soccer kicking performance after a 10-week resistance training program were accompanied by increases in maximum strength and an altered soccer kick movement pattern, characterized by a more explosive backward-forward swinging movement and higher muscle activation during the final kicking phase.

  8. Resistance Training and Vibration Improve Muscle Strength and Functional Capacity in Female Patients with Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Eftekhari, Elham; Mostahfezian, Mina; Etemadifar, Masoud; Zafari, Ardeshir

    2012-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of an eight-week progressive resistance training and vibration program on strength and ambulatory function in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients. Methods Twenty-Four female MS patients with the following demographics: age 27-45 years, and expanded disability status scale (EDSS) 2-4, participated in this study. The subjects were randomly allocated to one of two groups. The exercise group (n = 12) trained according to a progressive program, mainly consisting of resistance training and vibration, three times a week for eight weeks and compared with subjects in the control group (n = 12) that received no intervention. Subjects completed one set of 5-12 reps at%50-70 maximal voluntary contraction (MVC). After 5-10 minutes rest, six postures on plate vibration were done. Isotonic MVC of knee extensors, abduction of the scapula and downward rotation of the scapular girdle muscle groups were predicted by using the Brzycki formula. Right leg balance (RLB), left leg balance (LLB), and walking speed (10-Meter Walk Test) were assessed before and after the training program. Descriptive statistics and Co-variance were used for analyzing data. Results After eight weeks of training the exercise group showed significant increase in MVC of Knee extensors (32.3%), Abduction of the scapula (24.7%) and Downward Rotation Scapular (39.1%) muscle groups, RLB (33.5%), LLB (9.5%), and decrease in 10-Meter Walk Test (10MWT) (9.3%), (P<0.05). Conclusions The results of this study indicated this type of training can cause improvements in muscle strength and functional capacity in patients with multiple sclerosis. PMID:23342227

  9. Longitudinal decline of lower extremity muscle power in healthy and mobility-limited older adults: influence of muscle mass, strength, composition, neuromuscular activation and single fiber contractile properties

    PubMed Central

    Reid, Kieran F.; Pasha, Evan; Doros, Gheorghe; Clark, David J.; Patten, Carolynn; Phillips, Edward M.; Frontera, Walter R.; Fielding, Roger A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose This longitudinal study examined the major physiological mechanisms that determine the age-related loss of lower extremity muscle power in two distinct groups of older humans. We hypothesized that after ~ 3 years of follow-up, mobility-limited older adults (mean age: 77.2 ± 4, n = 22, 12 females) would have significantly greater reductions in leg extensor muscle power compared to healthy older adults (74.1 ± 4, n = 26, 12 females). Methods Mid-thigh muscle size and composition were assessed using computed tomography. Neuromuscular activation was quantified using surface electromyography and vastus lateralis single muscle fibers were studied to evaluate intrinsic muscle contractile properties. Results At follow-up, the overall magnitude of muscle power loss was similar between groups: mobility-limited: −8.5% vs. healthy older: −8.8%, P > 0.8. Mobility-limited elders had significant reductions in muscle size (−3.8%, P< 0.01) and strength (−5.9%, P< 0.02), however, these parameters were preserved in healthy older (P ≥ 0.7). Neuromuscular activation declined significantly within healthy older but not in mobility-limited participants. Within both groups, the cross sectional areas of type I and type IIA muscle fibers were preserved while substantial increases in single fiber peak force ( > 30%), peak power (> 200%) and unloaded shortening velocity (>50%) were elicited at follow-up. Conclusion Different physiological mechanisms contribute to the loss of lower extremity muscle power in healthy older and mobility-limited older adults. Neuromuscular changes may be the critical early determinant of muscle power deficits with aging. In response to major whole muscle decrements, major compensatory mechanisms occur within the contractile properties of surviving single muscle fibers in an attempt to restore overall muscle power and function with advancing age. PMID:24122149

  10. Sarcopenia, Dynapenia, and the Impact of Advancing Age on Human Skeletal Muscle Size and Strength; a Quantitative Review

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, W. Kyle; Williams, John; Atherton, Philip; Larvin, Mike; Lund, John; Narici, Marco

    2012-01-01

    Changing demographics make it ever more important to understand the modifiable risk factors for disability and loss of independence with advancing age. For more than two decades there has been increasing interest in the role of sarcopenia, the age-related loss of muscle or lean mass, in curtailing active and healthy aging. There is now evidence to suggest that lack of strength, or dynapenia, is a more constant factor in compromised wellbeing in old age and it is apparent that the decline in muscle mass and the decline in strength can take quite different trajectories. This demands recognition of the concept of muscle quality; that is the force generating per capacity per unit cross-sectional area (CSA). An understanding of the impact of aging on skeletal muscle will require attention to both the changes in muscle size and the changes in muscle quality. The aim of this review is to present current knowledge of the decline in human muscle mass and strength with advancing age and the associated risk to health and survival and to review the underlying changes in muscle characteristics and the etiology of sarcopenia. Cross-sectional studies comparing young (18–45 years) and old (>65 years) samples show dramatic variation based on the technique used and population studied. The median of values of rate of loss reported across studies is 0.47% per year in men and 0.37% per year in women. Longitudinal studies show that in people aged 75 years, muscle mass is lost at a rate of 0.64–0.70% per year in women and 0.80–00.98% per year in men. Strength is lost more rapidly. Longitudinal studies show that at age 75 years, strength is lost at a rate of 3–4% per year in men and 2.5–3% per year in women. Studies that assessed changes in mass and strength in the same sample report a loss of strength 2–5 times faster than loss of mass. Loss of strength is a more consistent risk for disability and death than is loss of muscle mass. PMID:22934016

  11. Highlights from the Functional Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms Associated with Human Muscle Size and Strength or FAMuSS Study

    PubMed Central

    Pescatello, Linda S.; Devaney, Joseph M.; Hubal, Monica J.; Thompson, Paul D.; Hoffman, Eric P.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the Functional Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms Associated with Human Muscle Size and Strength study or FAMuSS was to identify genetic factors that dictated the response of health-related fitness phenotypes to resistance exercise training (RT). The phenotypes examined were baseline muscle strength and muscle, fat, and bone volume and their response to RT. FAMuSS participants were 1300 young (24 years), healthy men (42%) and women (58%) that were primarily of European-American descent. They were genotyped for ~500 polymorphisms and completed the Paffenbarger Physical Activity Questionnaire to assess energy expenditure and time spent in light, moderate, and vigorous intensity habitual physical activity and sitting. Subjects then performed a 12-week progressive, unilateral RT program of the nondominant arm with the dominant arm used as a comparison. Before and after RT, muscle strength was measured with the maximum voluntary contraction and one repetition maximum, while MRI measured muscle, fat, and bone volume. We will discuss the history of how FAMuSS originated, provide a brief overview of the FAMuSS methods, and summarize our major findings regarding genotype associations with muscle strength and size, body composition, cardiometabolic biomarkers, and physical activity. PMID:24455711

  12. [Manual and quantitative muscle testing in neuromuscular disorders. How to assess the consistency of strength measurements in clinical trials?].

    PubMed

    Hogrel, J Y; Ollivier, G; Desnuelle, C

    2006-04-01

    Evaluation of functional capacities of patients suffering of neuromuscular disorders, particularly muscle strength, is a critical issue for their diagnosis and follow-up. Within the framework of the natural history of any given disease, such an evaluation may improve the clinician's knowledge of the pathophysiological processes involved, and may help to anticipate and sometimes prevent deleterious consequences as the disease progresses. It is also helpful for identifying correlation between the severity of organic damage and the functional impact of the disease. The measurement of functional capacities must be done with accuracy, sensitivity and reliability, essentially when used as an outcome measure for therapeutic trials. Several evaluation tools for measuring muscle strength are available. They are usually classified into two groups: manual muscle testing (MMT) methods and quantified muscle testing (QMT) methods. In this article, we present the principles of strength measurements, and the different tools and materials that are commonly used in clinical settings. Their limitations and drawbacks are illustrated through several examples. Although QMT is theoretically and potentially more consistent than MMT to precisely follow the muscle capacities of the patients, precise and robust procedures must be elaborated and validated for each tested muscle function. Strength measurements must be performed by trained and experimented clinical evaluators. This issue is critical in the follow up of multicentric therapeutic trials. Inter-rater reliability must be assessed to guarantee the statistical power of the trial.

  13. Effects of 8 Weeks’ Specific Physical Training on the Rotator Cuff Muscle Strength and Technique of Javelin Throwers

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyeyoung; Lee, Youngsun; Shin, Insik; Kim, Kitae; Moon, Jeheon

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] For maximum efficiency and to prevent injury during javelin throwing, it is critical to maintain muscle balance and coordination of the rotator cuff and the glenohumeral joint. In this study, we investigated the change in the rotator cuff muscle strength, throw distance and technique of javelin throwers after they had performed a specific physical training that combined elements of weight training, function movement screen training, and core training. [Subjects] Ten javelin throwers participated in this study: six university athletes in the experimental group and four national-level athletes in the control group. [Methods] The experimental group performed 8 weeks of the specific physical training. To evaluate the effects of the training, measurements were performed before and after the training for the experimental group. Measurements comprised anthropometry, isokinetic muscle strength measurements, the function movement screen test, and movement analysis. [Results] After the specific physical training, the function movement screen score and external and internal rotator muscle strength showed statistically significant increases. Among kinematic factors, only pull distance showed improvement after training. [Conclusion] Eight weeks of specific physical training for dynamic stabilizer muscles enhanced the rotator cuff muscle strength, core stability, throw distance, and flexibility of javelin throwers. These results suggest that specific physical training can be useful for preventing shoulder injuries and improving the performance for javelin throwers. PMID:25364111

  14. Do Golgi tendon organs really inhibit muscle activity at high force levels to save muscles from injury, and adapt with strength training?

    PubMed

    Chalmers, Gordon

    2002-07-01

    Introductory textbooks commonly state that Golgi tendon organs (GTOs) are responsible for a reflex response that inhibits a muscle producing dangerously high tension (autogenic inhibition). Review of the relevant data from animal studies demonstrates that there is wide variability in the magnitude of, and even the presence of, GTO autogenic effects among locomotor hindlimb muscles, and that data on GTO effects under conditions of voluntary maximal muscle activation are lacking. A single available study on GTO function in humans, during a moderate contraction, surprisingly shows a reduction in autogenic inhibition during muscle-force production. Further, it is not possible to find experimental evidence supporting the idea that strength training may produce a decrease in GTO mediated autogenic inhibition, allowing greater muscle activation levels and hence greater force production.

  15. Enhanced dihydropyridine receptor calcium channel activity restores muscle strength in JP45/CASQ1 double knockout mice

    PubMed Central

    Mosca, Barbara; Delbono, Osvaldo; Messi, Maria Laura; Bergamelli, Leda; Wang, Zhong-Min; Vukcevic, Mirko; Lopez, Ruben; Treves, Susan; Nishi, Miyuki; Takeshima, Hiroshi; Paolini, Cecilia; Martini, Marta; Rispoli, Giorgio; Protasi, Feliciano; Zorzato, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Muscle strength declines with age in part due to a decline of Ca2+ release from sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium stores. Skeletal muscle dihydropyridine receptors (Cav1.1) initiate muscle contraction by activating ryanodine receptors in the sarcoplasmic reticulum. Cav1.1 channel activity is enhanced by a retrograde stimulatory signal delivered by the ryanodine receptor. JP45 is a membrane protein interacting with Cav1.1 and the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ storage protein calsequestrin (CASQ1). Here we show that JP45 and CASQ1 strengthen skeletal muscle contraction by modulating Cav1.1 channel activity. Using muscle fibres from JP45 and CASQ1 double knockout mice, we demonstrate that Ca2+ transients evoked by tetanic stimulation are the result of massive Ca2+ influx due to enhanced Cav1.1 channel activity, which restores muscle strength in JP45/CASQ1 double knockout mice. We envision that JP45 and CASQ1 may be candidate targets for the development of new therapeutic strategies against decay of skeletal muscle strength caused by a decrease in sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ content. PMID:23443569

  16. Increases in muscle volume after plantarflexor strength training in children with spastic cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    McNee, Anne E; Gough, Martin; Morrissey, Matt C; Shortland, Adam P

    2009-06-01

    Children with spastic cerebral palsy (CP) have small, weak muscles. However, change in muscle size due to resistance training in this group is unknown. We investigated the effect of plantarflexor strengthening on muscle volume, gait, and function in 13 ambulant children with spastic CP (seven males, six females; mean age 10 y 11 mo, SD 3 y 0 mo, range 6 y 11 mo-16 y 11 mo; eight with diplegia, five with hemiplegia; Gross Motor Function Classification System level I, six; level II, five; level III, two). Assessments were performed before training, 5 and 10 weeks into training, and at a 3-month follow-up. Medial and lateral gastrocnemius volumes were computed from three-dimensional ultrasound images. The number of unilateral heel raises able to be achieved on each side was assessed. Function was measured using three-dimensional gait analysis, the 'timed up and go' test, the Gillette Functional Assessment Questionnaire, and the Functional Mobility Scale. Training involved heel raises or Thera-Band resistance, 4 times a week for 10 weeks. Medial and lateral gastrocnemius volumes increased by 17 and 14% at week 5 (p=0.03, p=0.028). This increase was maintained at week 10 and follow-up (medial gastrocnemius p=0.001, p<0.001; lateral gastrocnemius p=0.006, p=0.007). Heel raises (mean number) increased by week 5 (p=0.002). This was maintained at week 10 and follow-up (p<0.001; p<0.001). No significant change in measured function was observed. Muscle volume increased in response to training in children with spastic CP. The role of progressive strength training in maintaining long-term function is discussed.

  17. Changes in muscle activation following ankle strength training in children with spastic cerebral palsy: an electromyography feasibility case report.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Jamie E; Ross, Sandy A; Foreman, Matthew H; Engsberg, Jack R

    2013-05-01

    ABSTRACT Children with cerebral palsy (CP) are likely to experience decreased participation in activities and less competence in activities of daily living. Studies of children with spastic CP have shown that strengthening programs produce positive results in strength, gait, and functional outcomes (measured by the Gross Motor Function Measure). No investigations have analyzed electromyography (EMG) activity before and after strength training to determine whether any changes occur in the GMFM.  This feasibility case report quantified dorsiflexor and plantarflexor muscle activation changes during performance of 3-5 selected GMFM items following a plantarflexor strength training in two children with cerebral palsy. Increased plantarflexor strength and increased ability to selectively activate muscles were found. Little carryover to performance on GMFM items was observed. It is feasible to use EMG during performance on selected GMFM items to evaluate motor control changes following strength training in children with CP.

  18. Respiratory muscle function and control of breathing in patients with acromegaly.

    PubMed

    Iandelli, I; Gorini, M; Duranti, R; Bassi, F; Misuri, G; Pacini, F; Rosi, E; Scano, G

    1997-05-01

    Increase in lung size has been described in acromegalic patients, but data on respiratory muscle function and control of breathing are relatively scarce. Lung volumes, arterial blood gas tensions, and respiratory muscle strength and activation during chemical stimulation were investigated in a group of 10 patients with acromegaly, and compared with age- and sex-matched normal controls. Inspiratory muscle force was evaluated by measuring pleural (Ppl,sn) and transdiaphragmatic (Pdi,sn) pressures during maximal sniffs. Dynamic pleural pressure swing (Ppl,sw) was expressed both as absolute value and as percentage of Ppl,sn. Expiratory muscle force was assessed in terms of maximal expiratory pressure (MEP). In 8 of the 10 patients, ventilatory and respiratory muscle responses to hyperoxic progressive hypercapnia and to isocapnic progressive hypoxia were also evaluated. Large lungs, defined as total lung capacity (TLC) greater than predicted (above 95% confidence limits), were found in five patients. Inspiratory or expiratory muscle force was below normal limits in all but three patients. During unstimulated tidal breathing, respiratory frequency (fR) and mean inspiratory flow (tidal volume/inspiratory time (VT/tI)) were greater, while inspiratory time (tI) was shorter than in controls. Minute ventilation (V'E) and mean inspiratory flow response slopes to hypercapnia were normal In contrast, four patients had reduced delta(VT/tI)/arterial oxygen saturation (Sa,O2) and three had reduced deltaV'E/Sa,O2. Ppl,sw(%Ppl,sn) response slopes to increasing end-tidal carbon dioxide tension (PET,CO2) and decreasing Sa,O2 did not differ from the responses of the normal subjects, suggesting normal central chemoresponsiveness. At a PET,CO2 of 8 kPa or an Sa,O2 of 80%, patients had greater fR and lower tI compared with controls. Pdi,sn and Ppl,sn related both to deltaV'E/deltaSa,O2 (r=0.729 and r=0.776, respectively) and delta(VT/tI)/deltaSa,O2 (r=0.860 and r=0.90, respectively). Pdi

  19. Evaluation of pelvic floor muscle strength before and after robotic-assisted radical prostatectomy and early outcomes on urinary continence.

    PubMed

    Manley, Lauren; Gibson, Luke; Papa, Nathan; Beharry, Bhawanie Koonj; Johnson, Liana; Lawrentschuk, Nathan; Bolton, Damien M

    2016-12-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of pelvic floor muscle (PFM) assessment and training before and after robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (RARP) in improving PFM strength and urinary continence. We performed an analysis of a database of patients who underwent robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (RARP) performed by two urologists from 2011 to 2013. Pelvic floor muscle (PFM) activation and strength were graded by a trained pelvic floor physiotherapist. Patients were given an exercise program, grouped according to the strength of their pelvic floor as graded by assessment, to complete before and after surgery. PFM strength was recorded preoperatively, 4 days post-catheter removal and 4 weeks post-catheter removal. Continence was recorded at 4 weeks postop and was defined as the requirement of no continence aids. A total of 98 patients had RARP and a preoperative physiotherapy assessment plus postoperative appointments at around 1 and 4 weeks post-RARP. The majority of men improved their PFM strength regardless of preoperative strength with no significant predictors of postoperative strength found. Age was the only significant predictor of postoperative incontinence. In this pilot study, a majority of patients increased their pelvic floor strength with time. Pelvic floor physiotherapy is an important modifiable patient factor, which does have an impact in improving patients' urinary continence by strengthening the pelvic floor muscles. Patient age influences response to pelvic floor physiotherapy.

  20. The Effects of Eccentric Contraction Duration on Muscle Strength, Power Production, Vertical Jump, and Soreness.

    PubMed

    Mike, Jonathan N; Cole, Nathan; Herrera, Chris; VanDusseldorp, Trisha; Kravitz, Len; Kerksick, Chad M

    2017-03-01

    Mike, JN, Cole, N, Herrera, C, VanDusseldorp, T, Kravitz, L, and Kerksick, CM. The effects of eccentric contraction duration on muscle strength, power production, vertical jump, and soreness. J Strength Cond Res 31(3): 773-786, 2017-Previous research has investigated the effects of either eccentric-only training or comparing eccentric and concentric exercise on changes related to strength and power expression, but no research to date has investigated the impact of altering the duration of either the concentric or the eccentric component on these parameters. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to assess the duration of eccentric (i.e., 2-second, 4-second vs. 6-second) muscle contractions and their effect on muscle strength, power production, vertical jump, and soreness using a plate-loaded barbell Smith squat exercise. Thirty college-aged men (23 ± 3.5 years, 178 ± 6.8 cm, 82 ± 12 kg, and 11.6 ± 5.1% fat) with 3.0 ± 1.0 years of resistance training experience and training frequency of 4.3 ± 0.9 days per week were randomized and assigned to 1 of 3 eccentric training groups that incorporated different patterns of contraction. For every repetition, all 3 groups used 2-second concentric contractions and paused for 1 second between the concentric and eccentric phases. The control group (2S) used 2-second eccentric contractions, whereas the 4S group performed 4-second eccentric contractions and the 6S group performed 6-second eccentric contractions. All repetitions were completed using the barbell Smith squat exercise. All participants completed a 4-week training protocol that required them to complete 2 workouts per week using their prescribed contraction routine for 4 sets of 6 repetitions at an intensity of 80-85% one repetition maximum (1RM). For all performance data, significant group × time (G × T) interaction effects were found for average power production across all 3 sets of a squat jump protocol (p = 0.04) while vertical jump did not reach

  1. Muscle soreness, swelling, stiffness and strength loss after intense eccentric exercise.

    PubMed

    Cleak, M J; Eston, R G

    1992-12-01

    High-intensity eccentric contractions induce performance decrements and delayed onset muscle soreness. The purpose of this investigation was to study the magnitude and time course of such decrements and their interrelationships in 26 young women of mean(s.d.) age 21.4(3.3) years. Subjects performed 70 maximal eccentric contractions of the elbow flexors on a pulley system, specially designed for the study. The non-exercised arm acted as the control. Measures of soreness, tenderness, swelling (SW), relaxed elbow joint angle (RANG) and isometric strength (STR) were taken before exercise, immediately after exercise (AE), analysis of variance and at 24-h intervals for 11 days. There were significant (P < 0.01, analysis of variance) changes in all factors. Peak effects were observed between 24 and 96 h AE. With the exception of STR, which remained lower (P < 0.01), all variables returned to baseline levels by day 11. A non-significant correlation between pain and STR indicated that pain was not a major factor in strength loss. Also, although no pain was evident, RANG was decreased immediately AE. There was no relationship between SW, RANG and pain. The prolonged nature of these symptoms indicates that repair to damaged soft tissue is a slow process. Strength loss is considered particularly important as it continues when protective pain and tenderness have disappeared. This has implications for the therapeutic management of patients with myopathologies and those receiving eccentric exercise for rehabilitation.

  2. Muscle soreness, swelling, stiffness and strength loss after intense eccentric exercise.

    PubMed Central

    Cleak, M J; Eston, R G

    1992-01-01

    High-intensity eccentric contractions induce performance decrements and delayed onset muscle soreness. The purpose of this investigation was to study the magnitude and time course of such decrements and their interrelationships in 26 young women of mean(s.d.) age 21.4(3.3) years. Subjects performed 70 maximal eccentric contractions of the elbow flexors on a pulley system, specially designed for the study. The non-exercised arm acted as the control. Measures of soreness, tenderness, swelling (SW), relaxed elbow joint angle (RANG) and isometric strength (STR) were taken before exercise, immediately after exercise (AE), analysis of variance and at 24-h intervals for 11 days. There were significant (P < 0.01, analysis of variance) changes in all factors. Peak effects were observed between 24 and 96 h AE. With the exception of STR, which remained lower (P < 0.01), all variables returned to baseline levels by day 11. A non-significant correlation between pain and STR indicated that pain was not a major factor in strength loss. Also, although no pain was evident, RANG was decreased immediately AE. There was no relationship between SW, RANG and pain. The prolonged nature of these symptoms indicates that repair to damaged soft tissue is a slow process. Strength loss is considered particularly important as it continues when protective pain and tenderness have disappeared. This has implications for the therapeutic management of patients with myopathologies and those receiving eccentric exercise for rehabilitation. PMID:1490222

  3. Klotho, a new marker for osteoporosis and muscle strength in β-thalassemia major.

    PubMed

    Baldan, Alessandro; Giusti, Andrea; Bosi, Cristina; Malaventura, Cristina; Musso, Marco; Forni, Gian Luca; Volpato, Stefano; Zuliani, Giovanni; Borgna-Pignatti, Caterina

    2015-12-01

    Aim of this study was to compare plasma levels of the secreted protein Klotho in β-thalassemia major patients and in healthy controls. Also, we examined the existence of correlations between the protein level and osteoporosis, poor muscle strength and fractures. A total of 106 patients with β-thalassemia major and 95 healthy blood donors were enrolled. Klotho level in plasma was measured by mean of an ELISA test and the hand-grip strength using a dynamometer. Intact parathyroid hormone (PTH), 25-hydroxy vitamin D (Vitamin D), serum calcium (Ca), phosphate (P), total alkaline phosphatase (ALP), ferritin, creatinine were measured by standard clinical techniques. DXA was used to measure bone mineral density (BMD) at the lumbar spine (L2-L4), femoral neck and total hip. We found that the Klotho protein concentration was lower in the blood of patients with β-thalassemia major than in healthy controls, and it was directly correlated to the hand-grip strength. In β-thalassemia major patients, the secreted Klotho was lower than in healthy controls. The preliminary investigation into the correlation between markers of osteo- and sarcopenia and Klotho demonstrated a decreased Klotho concentration in β-TM patients and a higher probability of having had fragility fractures.

  4. Higher Daily Physical Activities Continue to Preserve Muscle Strength After Mid-Life, But Not Muscle Mass After Age of 75

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, An-chun; Zhan, Yu-Rui; Lee, Wei-Ju; Peng, Li-Ning; Chen, Liang-Yu; Lin, Ming-Hsien; Liu, Li-Kuo; Chen, Liang-Kung

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The objective of this study is to explore the impact of aging and daily physical activities (PA) on muscle mass and muscle strength among community-dwelling people in Taiwan. The design is a cross-sectional study. Setting is a population-based community study. One thousand eight hundred thirty-nine community-dwelling people aged 50 years and older in Taiwan participated in the study. Measurements include demographic characteristics, Charlson Comorbidity Index (CCI) for multimorbidity, mini-nutritional assessment (MNA) for nutritional evaluation, functional autonomy measurement system (SMAF) for functional capacity, Chinese version mini mental state examination (MMSE), 5-item Taiwan Geriatric Depression Scale (TGDS-5), Chinese version of International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ), height-adjusted skeletal muscle index (SMI) by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, handgrip strength, timed 6-m walking test for usual gait speed. Laboratory measurements include testosterone, sex-hormone binding globulin (SHBG), dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEA-S), insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP), 25-OH vitamin D, and insulin resistance. After adjusted for age, the lowest PA tertile was associated with multimorbidity, poorer functional capacity and nutritional status, more depressive symptoms, lower SMI and lower handgrip strength, and lower free androgen index (FAI) in men. The negative association between PA and low SMI was more significant among subjects aged younger than 65 and the association decreased with older age. For subjects aged younger than 65, moderate daily PA (Q2) group had lower risk of low SMI compared with Q1 participants (OR: 0.62, 95% CI = 0.39–0.98, P = 0.040). For muscle strength, higher daily PA was associated with lower risk of low handgrip strength after age of 65 and the effect was dose-dependent. The effect was attenuated by potential confounders during age 65 to 74, while after

  5. Higher Daily Physical Activities Continue to Preserve Muscle Strength After Mid-Life, But Not Muscle Mass After Age of 75.

    PubMed

    Hwang, An-Chun; Zhan, Yu-Rui; Lee, Wei-Ju; Peng, Li-Ning; Chen, Liang-Yu; Lin, Ming-Hsien; Liu, Li-Kuo; Chen, Liang-Kung

    2016-05-01

    The objective of this study is to explore the impact of aging and daily physical activities (PA) on muscle mass and muscle strength among community-dwelling people in Taiwan.The design is a cross-sectional study. Setting is a population-based community study.One thousand eight hundred thirty-nine community-dwelling people aged 50 years and older in Taiwan participated in the study.Measurements include demographic characteristics, Charlson Comorbidity Index (CCI) for multimorbidity, mini-nutritional assessment (MNA) for nutritional evaluation, functional autonomy measurement system (SMAF) for functional capacity, Chinese version mini mental state examination (MMSE), 5-item Taiwan Geriatric Depression Scale (TGDS-5), Chinese version of International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ), height-adjusted skeletal muscle index (SMI) by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, handgrip strength, timed 6-m walking test for usual gait speed. Laboratory measurements include testosterone, sex-hormone binding globulin (SHBG), dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEA-S), insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP), 25-OH vitamin D, and insulin resistance.After adjusted for age, the lowest PA tertile was associated with multimorbidity, poorer functional capacity and nutritional status, more depressive symptoms, lower SMI and lower handgrip strength, and lower free androgen index (FAI) in men. The negative association between PA and low SMI was more significant among subjects aged younger than 65 and the association decreased with older age. For subjects aged younger than 65, moderate daily PA (Q2) group had lower risk of low SMI compared with Q1 participants (OR: 0.62, 95% CI = 0.39-0.98, P = 0.040). For muscle strength, higher daily PA was associated with lower risk of low handgrip strength after age of 65 and the effect was dose-dependent. The effect was attenuated by potential confounders during age 65 to 74, while after age 75, the

  6. Association between peripheral muscle strength, exercise performance, and physical activity in daily life in patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Resistance training of peripheral muscles has been recommended in order to increase muscle strength in patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD). However, whether peripheral muscle strength is associated with exercise performance (EP) and physical activity in daily life (PADL) in these patients needs to be investigated. The aim of this study is to evaluate whether strength of the quadriceps muscle (QS) is associated with EP and daily PADL in patients with COPD. Methods We studied patients with COPD (GOLD A-D) and measured maximal isometric strength of the left QS. PADL was measured for 7 days with a SenseWear-Pro® accelerometer. EP was quantified by the 6-minute walk distance (6MWD), the number of stands in the Sit-to-Stand Test (STST), and the handgrip-strength. Univariate and multivariate analyses were used to examine possible associations between QS, PADL and EP. Results In 27 patients with COPD with a mean (SD) FEV1 of 37.6 (17.6)% predicted, QS was associated with 6MWD, STST, and handgrip-strength but not with PADL. Multiple linear regression analyses showed that QS was independently associated with the 6MWD (β = 0.42, 95% CI 0.09 to 0.84, p = 0.019), STST (β = 0.50, 95% CI 0.11 to 0.86, p = 0.014) and with handgrip-strength (β = 0.45, 95% CI 0.05 to 0.84, p = 0.038). Conclusions Peripheral muscle strength may be associated with exercise performance but not with physical activity in daily life. This may be due to the fact that EP tests evaluate patients’ true abilities while PADL accelerometers may not. PMID:25013723

  7. Distensibility and Strength of the Pelvic Floor Muscles of Women in the Third Trimester of Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Petricelli, Carla Dellabarba; Resende, Ana Paula Magalhães; Elito Júnior, Julio; Araujo Júnior, Edward; Alexandre, Sandra Maria; Zanetti, Miriam Raquel Diniz; Nakamura, Mary Uchiyama

    2014-01-01

    Objective. The objective of this study was to compare the role of the pelvic floor muscles between nulliparous and multiparous women in the third trimester of pregnancy, by analyzing the relationship between electrical activity (surface electromyography—EMG), vaginal palpation (modified Oxford scale), and perineal distensibility (Epi-no). Methods. This was an observational cross-sectional study on a sample of 60 healthy pregnant women with no cervical dilation, single fetus, gestational age between 35 and 40 weeks, and maternal age ranging from 15 to 40 years. The methods used were bidigital palpation (modified Oxford scale, graded 0–5), surface EMG (electrical activity during maximal voluntary contraction), and perineal distensibility (Epi-no device). The Pearson correlation coefficient (r) was used to analyze the Epi-no values and the surface EMG findings. The Kruskal-Wallis test was used to compare the median values from surface EMG and Epi-no, using the modified Oxford scale scores. Results. Among the 60 patients included in this study, 30 were nulliparous and 30 multiparous. The average maternal age and gestational age were 26.06 (±5.58) and 36.56 (±1.23), respectively. It was observed that nulliparous women had both higher perineal muscle strength (2.53 ± 0.57 versus 2.06 ± 0.64; P = 0.005) and higher electrical activity (45.35 ± 12.24 μV versus 35.79 ± 11.66 μV; P = 0.003), while among the multiparous women, distensibility was higher (19.39 ± 1.92 versus 18.05 ± 2.14; P = 0.013). We observed that there was no correlation between perineal distensibility and electrical activity during maximal voluntary contraction (r = − 0.193; P = 0.140). However, we found a positive relationship between vaginal palpation and surface electromyography (P = 0.008), but none between Epi-no values (P = 0.785). Conclusion. The electrical activity and muscle strength of the pelvic floor muscles of the multiparous women were damaged, in relation to the

  8. Effect of heavy strength training on muscle thickness, strength, jump performance, and endurance performance in well-trained Nordic Combined athletes.

    PubMed

    Rønnestad, Bent R; Kojedal, Oystein; Losnegard, Thomas; Kvamme, Bent; Raastad, Truls

    2012-06-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effect of supplemental heavy strength training on muscle thickness and determinants of performance in well-trained Nordic Combined athletes. Seventeen well-trained Nordic Combined athletes were assigned to either usual training supplemented with heavy strength training (STR; n = 8) or to usual training without heavy strength training (CON; n = 9). The strength training performed by STR consisted of one lower-body exercise and two upper-body exercises [3-5 repetition maximum (RM) sets of 3-8 repetitions], which were performed twice a week for 12 weeks. Architectural changes in m. vastus lateralis, 1RM in squat and seated pull-down, squat jump (SJ) height, maximal oxygen consumption (VO(2max)), work economy during submaximal treadmill skate rollerskiing, and performance in a 7.5-km rollerski time trial were measured before and after the intervention. STR increased 1RM in squat and seated pull-down, muscle thickness, and SJ performance more than CON (p < 0.05). There was no difference between groups in change in work economy. The two groups showed no changes in total body mass, VO(2max), or time-trial performance. In conclusion, 12 weeks of supplemental strength training improved determinants of performance in Nordic Combined by improving the athletes' strength and vertical jump ability without increasing total body mass or compromising the development of VO(2max).

  9. Effects of training using video games on the muscle strength, muscle tone, and activities of daily living of chronic stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Lee, Gyuchang

    2013-05-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of training using video games played on the Xbox Kinect on the muscle strength, muscle tone, and activities of daily living of post-stroke patients. [Subjects] Fourteen stroke patients were recruited. They were randomly allocated into two groups; the experimental group (n=7) and the control group (n=7). [Methods] The experimental group performed training using video games played on the Xbox Kinect together with conventional occupational therapy for 6 weeks (1 hour/day, 3 days/week), and the control group received conventional occupational therapy only for 6 weeks (30 min/day, 3 days/week). Before and after the intervention, the participants were measured for muscle strength, muscle tone, and performance of activities of daily living. [Results] There were significant differences pre- and post-test in muscle strength of the upper extremities, except the wrist, and performance of activities of daily living in the experimental group. There were no significant differences between the two groups at post-test. [Conclusion] The training using video games played on the Xbox Kinect had a positive effect on the motor function and performance of activities of daily living. This study showed that training using video games played on the Xbox Kinect may be an effective intervention for the rehabilitation of stroke patients.

  10. The effect of hip abductor exercise on muscle strength and trunk stability after an injury of the lower extremities

    PubMed Central

    Kak, Hwang-Bo; Park, Sun-Ja; Park, Byun-Joon

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The gluteus medius, a hip abductor, controls femoral movement and stabilizes the pelvis during lower extremity mobilization. [Subjects] This study enrolled 24 subjects into control and experimental groups. [Methods] This randomized controlled study included patients who underwent arthroscopy after meniscus injury and started a rehabilitative exercise program 8 weeks after surgery. Subjects were divided into the experimental gluteus medius resistance exercise group (n=12) and the control group (n=12). The study investigated muscle strength and balance of the flexors, extensors, and abductors of the knee for 8 weeks. [Results] Strengths of knee extensors in patients who underwent rehabilitative exercise for 8 weeks were measured. Strength of the knee extensors of the experimental and control groups increased by 40% and 31%, respectively; strength of the hip flexors of the experimental and control groups increased by 31% and 18%, respectively. Strength of the hip joint muscles showed a 40% increase in the experimental group and a 14% increase in the control group. However, there was a significant difference (18%) in muscle strength of the hip abductors between the groups. Measurements of trunk lateral flexion showed a difference within a group, but no intergroup difference was found. [Conclusion] This study investigated the effect of hip abductor exercise on muscular strength and trunk stability in patients with a meniscus injury. PMID:27134387

  11. Relationships Between Lower-Body Muscle Structure and, Lower-Body Strength, Explosiveness and Eccentric Leg Stiffness in Adolescent Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Secomb, Josh L.; Nimphius, Sophia; Farley, Oliver R.L.; Lundgren, Lina E.; Tran, Tai T.; Sheppard, Jeremy M.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to determine whether any relationships were present between lower-body muscle structure and, lower-body strength, variables measured during a countermovement jump (CMJ) and squat jump (SJ), and eccentric leg stiffness, in adolescent athletes. Thirty junior male (n = 23) and female (n = 7) surfing athletes (14.8 ± 1.7 y; 1.63 ± 0.09 m; 54.8 ± 12.1 kg) undertook lower-body muscle structure assessment with ultrasonography and performed a; CMJ, SJ and an isometric mid-thigh pull (IMTP). In addition, eccentric leg stiffness was calculated from variables of the CMJ and IMTP. Moderate to very large relationships (r = 0.46-0.73) were identified between the thickness of the vastus lateralis (VL) and lateral gastrocnemius (LG) muscles, and VL pennation angle and; peak force (PF) in the CMJ, SJ and IMTP. Additionally, moderate to large relationships (r = 0.37-0.59) were found between eccentric leg stiffness and; VL and LG thickness, VL pennation angle, and LG fascicle length, with a large relationship (r = 0.59) also present with IMTP PF. These results suggest that greater thickness of the VL and LG were related to improved maximal dynamic and isometric strength, likely due to increased hypertrophy of the extensor muscles. Furthermore, this increased thickness was related to greater eccentric leg stiffness, as the associated enhanced lower-body strength likely allowed for greater neuromuscular activation, and hence less compliance, during a stretch-shortening cycle. Key points Greater thickness of the VL and LG muscles were significantly related to an enhanced ability to express higher levels of isometric and dynamic strength, and explosiveness in adolescent athletes. Isometric strength underpinned performance in the CMJ and SJ in these athletes. Greater lower-body isometric strength was significantly related to eccentric leg stiffness, which is potentially the result of greater neuromuscular activation in the muscle-tendon unit. PMID

  12. The effect of training during treatment with chemotherapy on muscle strength and endurance capacity: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Van Moll, Christel C A; Schep, Goof; Vreugdenhil, Art; Savelberg, Hans H C M; Husson, Olga

    2016-05-01

    Background Treatment of cancer with chemotherapy decreases endurance capacity and muscle strength. Training during chemotherapy might prevent this. There are no clear guidelines concerning which type of training and which training dose are effective. This review aims to gain insight into the different training modalities during chemotherapy and the effects of such training to improve endurance capacity and muscle strength in order to obtain the knowledge to compose a future training program which trains cancer patients in the most effective way. Material and methods A systematic search of PubMed was carried out. In total, 809 studies of randomized controlled trials studying the effects of training during chemotherapy on endurance capacity and muscle strength were considered. Only 14 studies met all the inclusion criteria. The studies were assessed on methodological quality by using Cochrane criteria for randomized controlled trials. Results The quality of the studies was generally poor and the study populations varied considerably as the training programs were very heterogeneous. Variables of endurance capacity reported beneficial effects in 10 groups (59%). Increases due to training ranged from 8% to 31%. Endurance capacity decreased in nine of 13 control groups (69%), which ranged from 1% to 32%. Muscle strength improved significantly in 17 of 18 intervention groups (94%), ranging from 2% to 38%. Muscle strength also improved in 11 of 14 control groups (79%), but this increase was only minimal, ranging from 1.3% to 6.5%. Conclusions This review indicates that training during chemotherapy may help in preventing the decrease in muscle strength and endurance capacity. It is important to know which training intensity and duration is the most effective in training cancer patients, to provide a training program suitable for every cancer patient. Training should be based on good research and should be implemented into international guidelines and daily practice. More

  13. Relationships Between Lower-Body Muscle Structure and, Lower-Body Strength, Explosiveness and Eccentric Leg Stiffness in Adolescent Athletes.

    PubMed

    Secomb, Josh L; Nimphius, Sophia; Farley, Oliver R L; Lundgren, Lina E; Tran, Tai T; Sheppard, Jeremy M

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of the present study was to determine whether any relationships were present between lower-body muscle structure and, lower-body strength, variables measured during a countermovement jump (CMJ) and squat jump (SJ), and eccentric leg stiffness, in adolescent athletes. Thirty junior male (n = 23) and female (n = 7) surfing athletes (14.8 ± 1.7 y; 1.63 ± 0.09 m; 54.8 ± 12.1 kg) undertook lower-body muscle structure assessment with ultrasonography and performed a; CMJ, SJ and an isometric mid-thigh pull (IMTP). In addition, eccentric leg stiffness was calculated from variables of the CMJ and IMTP. Moderate to very large relationships (r = 0.46-0.73) were identified between the thickness of the vastus lateralis (VL) and lateral gastrocnemius (LG) muscles, and VL pennation angle and; peak force (PF) in the CMJ, SJ and IMTP. Additionally, moderate to large relationships (r = 0.37-0.59) were found between eccentric leg stiffness and; VL and LG thickness, VL pennation angle, and LG fascicle length, with a large relationship (r = 0.59) also present with IMTP PF. These results suggest that greater thickness of the VL and LG were related to improved maximal dynamic and isometric strength, likely due to increased hypertrophy of the extensor muscles. Furthermore, this increased thickness was related to greater eccentric leg stiffness, as the associated enhanced lower-body strength likely allowed for greater neuromuscular activation, and hence less compliance, during a stretch-shortening cycle. Key pointsGreater thickness of the VL and LG muscles were significantly related to an enhanced ability to express higher levels of isometric and dynamic strength, and explosiveness in adolescent athletes.Isometric strength underpinned performance in the CMJ and SJ in these athletes.Greater lower-body isometric strength was significantly related to eccentric leg stiffness, which is potentially the result of greater neuromuscular activation in the muscle-tendon unit.

  14. Effects of aquatic exercise on muscle strength and functional performance of individuals with osteoarthritis: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Mattos, Fernanda de; Leite, Neiva; Pitta, Arthur; Bento, Paulo Cesar Barauce

    Water-based exercises are recommended for people with osteoarthritis (OA), due to the beneficial effects on physical function, quality of life and symptom reduction. However, the effects on muscle strength are still controversial. The aim of this review was to assess and compare the effects of aquatic exercise programs on muscle strength and physical function in people with OA. A systematic search was performed at Pubmed, Scopus and Web of Science databases. Clinical trials with interventions involving aquatic exercises for individuals with OA were included. The methodological quality of the studies was evaluated using the PEDro scale. 296 studies were found and twelve were selected: six studies comparing water-based exercises with land-based exercise, and six comparing water-based exercise groups with the control group. Exercise programs included muscle strengthening, aerobic, balance, flexibility and stretching exercises. Duration of the program, weekly frequency, intensity and progression varied between studies. Beneficial effects of aquatic exercise were found on physical function. However, only two of five studies that assessed muscle strength observed positive effect of aquatic exercise. Although it is difficult to compare studies and establish guidelines for the standardized protocol formulation, it was observed that water-based exercises can be effective on improving physical function and increasing muscle strength, since they are well-structured, with exercise intensity and overload controlled.

  15. Effects of aquatic exercise on muscle strength and functional performance of individuals with osteoarthritis: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Mattos, Fernanda de; Leite, Neiva; Pitta, Arthur; Bento, Paulo Cesar Barauce

    2016-09-28

    Water-based exercises are recommended for people with osteoarthritis (OA), due to the beneficial effects on physical function, quality of life and symptom reduction. However, the effects on muscle strength are still controversial. The aim of this review was to assess and compare the effects of Aquatic Exercise Programs on muscle strength and physical function in people with OA. A systematic search was performed at Pubmed, Scopus and Web of Science databases. Clinical trials with interventions involving Aquatic Exercises for individuals with OA were included. The methodological quality of the studies was evaluated using the PEDro scale. 296 studies were found and twelve were selected: six studies comparing water-based exercises with land-based exercise, and six comparing water-based exercise groups with the control group. Exercise programs included muscle strengthening, aerobic, balance, flexibility and stretching exercises. Duration of the program, weekly frequency, intensity and progression varied between studies. Beneficial effects of aquatic exercise were found on physical function. However, only two of five studies that assessed muscle strength observed positive effect of aquatic exercise. Although it is difficult to compare studies and establish guidelines for the standardized protocol formulation, it was observed that water-based exercises can be effective on improving physical function and increasing muscle strength, since they are well-structured, with exercise intensity and overload controlled.

  16. SLC30A8 nonsynonymous variant is associated with recovery following exercise and skeletal muscle size and strength.

    PubMed

    Sprouse, Courtney; Gordish-Dressman, Heather; Orkunoglu-Suer, E Funda; Lipof, Jason S; Moeckel-Cole, Stephanie; Patel, Ronak R; Adham, Kasra; Larkin, Justin S; Hubal, Monica J; Kearns, Amy K; Clarkson, Priscilla M; Thompson, Paul D; Angelopoulos, Theodore J; Gordon, Paul M; Moyna, Niall M; Pescatello, Linda S; Visich, Paul S; Zoeller, Robert F; Hoffman, Eric P; Tosi, Laura L; Devaney, Joseph M

    2014-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies have identified thousands of variants that are associated with numerous phenotypes. One such variant, rs13266634, a nonsynonymous single nucleotide polymorphism in the solute carrier family 30 (zinc transporter) member eight gene, is associated with a 53% increase in the risk of developing type 2 diabetes (T2D). We hypothesized that individuals with the protective allele against T2D would show a positive response to short-term and long-term resistance exercise. Two cohorts of young adults-the Eccentric Muscle Damage (EMD; n = 156) cohort and the Functional Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms Associated with Muscle Size and Strength Study (FAMuSS; n = 874)-were tested for association of the rs13266634 variant with measures of skeletal muscle response to resistance exercise. Our results were sexually dimorphic in both cohorts. Men in the EMD study with two copies of the protective allele showed less post-exercise bout strength loss, less soreness, and lower creatine kinase values. In addition, men in the FAMuSS, homozygous for the protective allele, showed higher pre-exercise strength and larger arm skeletal muscle volume, but did not show a significant difference in skeletal muscle hypertrophy or strength with resistance training.

  17. Effect of hyperinflation on inspiratory function of the diaphragm.

    PubMed

    Minh, V D; Dolan, G F; Konopka, R F; Moser, K M

    1976-01-01

    The inspiratory efficiency of the diaphragm during unilateral and bilateral phrenic stimulation (UEPS and BEPS) with constant stimulus was studied in seven dogs from FRC to 120% TLC. Alveolar pressures (PAl) were recorded during relaxation, BEPS and UEPS at each lung volume in the closed respiratory system. From the PAl-lung volume curves, tidal volume (VT), and pressure developed by the diaphragm (Pmus) were derived. Results are summarized below. a) Hyperinflation impaired the inspiratory efficiency of the diaphragm which behaved as an expiratory muscle beyond the lung volume of 103.7% TLC (Vinef). b) The diaphragm during UEPS became expiratory at the same Vinef as during (BEPS. C) The VT-lung volume relationship was linear during BEPS, allowing simple quantitation of VT loss with hyperinflation and prediction of Vinef. d) With only one phrenic nerve stimulated, the functional loss is less pronounced in VT than in Pmus, as compared to BEPS, indicating that the respiratory system was more compliant during UEPS than BEPS. This compliance difference from UEPS to BEPS diminished with severe hyperinflation.

  18. Optogenetic excitation of preBötzinger complex neurons potently drives inspiratory activity in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Alsahafi, Zaki; Dickson, Clayton T; Pagliardini, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the sites and mechanisms underlying respiratory rhythmogenesis is of fundamental interest in the field of respiratory neurophysiology. Previous studies demonstrated the necessary and sufficient role of preBötzinger complex (preBötC) in generating inspiratory rhythms in vitro and in vivo. However, the influence of timed activation of the preBötC network in vivo is as yet unknown given the experimental approaches previously used. By unilaterally infecting preBötC neurons using an adeno-associated virus expressing channelrhodopsin we photo-activated the network in order to assess how excitation delivered in a spatially and temporally precise manner to the inspiratory oscillator influences ongoing breathing rhythms and related muscular activity in urethane-anaesthetized rats. We hypothesized that if an excitatory drive is necessary for rhythmogenesis and burst initiation, photo-activation of preBötC not only will increase respiratory rate, but also entrain it over a wide range of frequencies with fast onset, and have little effect on ongoing respiratory rhythm if a stimulus is delivered during inspiration. Stimulation of preBötC neurons consistently increased respiratory rate and entrained respiration up to fourfold baseline conditions. Furthermore, brief pulses of photostimulation delivered at random phases between inspiratory events robustly and consistently induced phase-independent (Type 0) respiratory reset and recruited inspiratory muscle activity at very short delays (∼100 ms). A 200 ms refractory period following inspiration was also identified. These data provide strong evidence for a fine control of inspiratory activity in the preBötC and provide further evidence that the preBötC network constitutes the fundamental oscillator of inspiratory rhythms. PMID:26010654

  19. The contribution of the palmaris longus muscle to the strength of thumb abduction.

    PubMed

    Gangata, Hope; Ndou, Robert; Louw, Graham

    2010-05-01

    The palmaris longus muscle (PLM) is described as a weak flexor of the wrist and a tensor of the palmar aponeurosis, but not a thumb abductor. The PLM is believed to aid thumb abduction through its insertion onto the thenar eminence. Two groups, both right hand dominant, were selected from 1,200 sampled participants. The first group comprised of 38 subjects with unilateral presence of the PLM and was used to determine the strength of thumb abduction. The second group comprised of 30 subjects, with bilateral presence of the PLM, and it was used to calculate the effects of hand dominance. A significant number of subjects with bilateral absence of the PLM were observed and undocumented. Using a dynamometer in subjects with unilateral presence of the PLM, the force of thumb abduction was significantly greater on the hand with a PLM than the one without it (P = 0.014), irrespective of hand dominance. In the second sample with bilateral PLM, thumb abduction on the dominant hand was 10% stronger than on the nondominant hand and was similar to the universally accepted average of 10% increase in grip strength of the dominant hand. Thus, 10% was deducted from all the dominant hands, and the force of thumb abduction remained greater on the hand with PLM than the hand without it (P = 0.049). The results of this study demonstrated the PLM to be involved in thumb abduction, and the authors therefore recommend that this action of the muscle be universally accepted by anatomists and hand surgeons.

  20. Comparative assessment of knee extensor and flexor muscle strength measured using a hand-held vs. isokinetic dynamometer

    PubMed Central

    Muff, Guillaume; Dufour, Stéphane; Meyer, Alain; Severac, François; Favret, Fabrice; Geny, Bernard; Lecocq, Jehan; Isner-Horobeti, Marie-Eve

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] To compare measurements of knee extensor and flexor muscle strength performed using a hand-held dynamometer and an isokinetic dynamometer in apparently healthy subjects. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty adult volunteers underwent knee muscle strength evaluation using an isokinetic or a hand-held dynamometer. [Results] Strong positive correlations were found between the 2 methods, with correlation coefficients r ranging from 0.72 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.48−0.86) to 0.87 (95% CI, 0.75−0.94), depending on the muscle group and the isokinetic evaluation mode. The reproducibility of the hand-held dynamometer findings was good, judged by a coefficient of variation of 3.2–4.2%. However, the correlation between the 2 methods for the assessment of flexor/extensor ratios ranged from −0.04 to 0.46. [Conclusion] Knee extensor and flexor muscle strength recorded with a hand-held dynamometer is reproducible and significantly correlated with the isokinetic values, indicating that this method may in some cases be a useful replacement for isokinetic strength measurement. However, for strength ratio assessment, and when judged against the isokinetic standard, a hand-held dynamometer is not a valid option. PMID:27799667

  1. Comparative assessment of knee extensor and flexor muscle strength measured using a hand-held vs. isokinetic dynamometer.

    PubMed

    Muff, Guillaume; Dufour, Stéphane; Meyer, Alain; Severac, François; Favret, Fabrice; Geny, Bernard; Lecocq, Jehan; Isner-Horobeti, Marie-Eve

    2016-09-01

    [Purpose] To compare measurements of knee extensor and flexor muscle strength performed using a hand-held dynamometer and an isokinetic dynamometer in apparently healthy subjects. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty adult volunteers underwent knee muscle strength evaluation using an isokinetic or a hand-held dynamometer. [Results] Strong positive correlations were found between the 2 methods, with correlation coefficients r ranging from 0.72 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.48-0.86) to 0.87 (95% CI, 0.75-0.94), depending on the muscle group and the isokinetic evaluation mode. The reproducibility of the hand-held dynamometer findings was good, judged by a coefficient of variation of 3.2-4.2%. However, the correlation between the 2 methods for the assessment of flexor/extensor ratios ranged from -0.04 to 0.46. [Conclusion] Knee extensor and flexor muscle strength recorded with a hand-held dynamometer is reproducible and significantly correlated with the isokinetic values, indicating that this method may in some cases be a useful replacement for isokinetic strength measurement. However, for strength ratio assessment, and when judged against the isokinetic standard, a hand-held dynamometer is not a valid option.

  2. Limits of the manipulative-fixed method for measurement of shoulder joint horizontal adduction muscle strength using a handheld dynamometer.

    PubMed

    Hirano, Masahiro; Katoh, Munenori

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to verify the limit of isometric muscle strength of shoulder joint horizontal adduction using handheld dynamometer (HHD) manipulated by hand (referred to as the manipulative-fixed method). [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were 33 healthy college students. The examiner was a healthy college student. Shoulder joint horizontal adductor muscle strength was measured using HHD with the subject in the supine position. The belt-fixed and manipulative-fixed methods were used to secure the HHD sensor unit. The limitations of the manipulative-fixed method were assessed by simple regression analysis, in which the participants were divided into 2 groups according to a branch point. The slope of the straight line of the graph was visualized. [Results] Single regression analysis of the <30 kgf group revealed significant results. The results of single regression of the >30 kgf group were not significant. [Conclusion] The manipulative-fixed method is simple to perform. However, there exists the possibility that the actual muscle strength is not measurable by this method. The measurement limit of the shoulder horizontal adduction strength with the manipulative-fixed method was 30 kgf in the case of the examiner in the present study. The fixed limit was also found to influence in the muscle strength of the upper limbs.

  3. Hamstrings-to-quadriceps strength and size ratios of male professional soccer players with muscle imbalance.

    PubMed

    Denadai, Benedito Sérgio; de Oliveira, Felipe Bruno Dias; Camarda, Sérgio Ricardo de Abreu; Ribeiro, Leandro; Greco, Camila Coelho

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the correlation between the concentric hamstrings/quadriceps muscle strength (Hcon :Qcon ) and cross-sectional area ratios (Hcsa :Qcsa ) in professional soccer players with Hcon :Qcon imbalance. Nine male professional soccer players (25·3 ± 4·1 years) performed five maximal concentric contractions of the knee extensors (KE) and flexors (KF) at 60 s(-1) to assess Hcon :Qcon . The test was performed using the dominant (preferred kicking), and non-dominant limb with a 5-min recovery period was allowed between them. Only players with Hcon :Qcon < 0·60 (range: 0·45-0·59) in both limbs were included in this study. The muscle cross-sectional area (CSA) of KE and KF was determined by magnetic resonance imaging. The correlations between Hcon :Qcon and Hcsa :Qcsa in the dominant leg (r = -0·33), non-dominant leg (r = 0·19) and in the both legs combined (r = 0·28) were not statistically significant (P>0·05). Thus, the Hcon :Qcon seems not to be determined by Hcsa :Qcsa in professional soccer players with Hcon :Qcon imbalance.

  4. 21 CFR 868.1780 - Inspiratory airway pressure meter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Inspiratory airway pressure meter. 868.1780... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1780 Inspiratory airway pressure meter. (a) Identification. An inspiratory airway pressure meter is a device used to measure the...

  5. 21 CFR 868.1780 - Inspiratory airway pressure meter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Inspiratory airway pressure meter. 868.1780... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1780 Inspiratory airway pressure meter. (a) Identification. An inspiratory airway pressure meter is a device used to measure the...

  6. 21 CFR 868.1780 - Inspiratory airway pressure meter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Inspiratory airway pressure meter. 868.1780... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1780 Inspiratory airway pressure meter. (a) Identification. An inspiratory airway pressure meter is a device used to measure the...

  7. 21 CFR 868.1780 - Inspiratory airway pressure meter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Inspiratory airway pressure meter. 868.1780... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1780 Inspiratory airway pressure meter. (a) Identification. An inspiratory airway pressure meter is a device used to measure the...

  8. 21 CFR 868.1780 - Inspiratory airway pressure meter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Inspiratory airway pressure meter. 868.1780... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1780 Inspiratory airway pressure meter. (a) Identification. An inspiratory airway pressure meter is a device used to measure the...

  9. Effects of blood flow restricted low-intensity concentric or eccentric training on muscle size and strength.

    PubMed

    Yasuda, Tomohiro; Loenneke, Jeremy P; Thiebaud, Robert S; Abe, Takashi

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the acute and chronic effects of low-intensity concentric or eccentric resistance training with blood flow restriction (BFR) on muscle size and strength. Ten young men performed 30% of concentric one repetition maximal dumbbell curl exercise (four sets, total 75 reps) 3 days/week for 6 weeks. One arm was randomly chosen for concentric BFR (CON-BFR) exercise only and the other arm performed eccentric BFR (ECC-BFR) exercise only at the same exercise load. During the exercise session, iEMG for biceps brachii muscles increased progressively during CON-BFR, which was greater (p<0.05) than that of the ECC-BFR. Immediately after the exercise, muscle thickness (MTH) of the elbow flexors acutely increased (p<0.01) with both CON-BFR and ECC-BFR, but was greater with CON-BFR (11.7%) (p<0.01) than ECC-BFR (3.9%) at 10-cm above the elbow joint. Following 6-weeks of training, MRI-measured muscle cross-sectional area (CSA) at 10-cm position and mid-upper arm (12.0% and 10.6%, respectively) as well as muscle volume (12.5%) of the elbow flexors were increased (p<0.01) with CON-BFR. Increases in muscle CSA and volume were lower in ECC-BFR (5.1%, 0.8% and 2.9%, respectively) than in the CON-BFR and only muscle CSA at 10-cm position increased significantly (p<0.05) after the training. Maximal voluntary isometric strength of elbow flexors was increased (p<0.05) in CON-BFR (8.6%), but not in ECC (3.8%). These results suggest that CON-BFR training leads to pronounced acute changes in muscle size, an index of muscle cell swelling, the response to which may be an important factor for promoting muscle hypertrophy with BFR resistance training.

  10. Reduced bone mass and muscle strength in male 5α-reductase type 1 inactivated mice.

    PubMed

    Windahl, Sara H; Andersson, Niklas; Börjesson, Anna E; Swanson, Charlotte; Svensson, Johan; Movérare-Skrtic, Sofia; Sjögren, Klara; Shao, Ruijin; Lagerquist, Marie K; Ohlsson, Claes

    2011-01-01

    Androgens are important regulators of bone mass but the relative importance of testosterone (T) versus dihydrotestosterone (DHT) for the activation of the androgen receptor (AR) in bone is unknown. 5α-reductase is responsible for the irreversible conversion of T to the more potent AR activator DHT. There are two well established isoenzymes of 5α-reductase (type 1 and type 2), encoded by separate genes (Srd5a1 and Srd5a2). 5α-reductase type 2 is predominantly expressed in male reproductive tissues whereas 5α-reductase type 1 is highly expressed in liver and moderately expressed in several other tissues including bone. The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of 5α-reductase type 1 for bone mass using Srd5a1⁻/⁻ mice. Four-month-old male Srd5a1⁻/⁻ mice had reduced trabecular bone mineral density (-36%, p<0.05) and cortical bone mineral content (-15%, p<0.05) but unchanged serum androgen levels compared with wild type (WT) mice. The cortical bone dimensions were reduced in the male Srd5a1⁻/⁻ mice as a result of a reduced cortical periosteal circumference compared with WT mice. T treatment increased the cortical periosteal circumference (p<0.05) in orchidectomized WT mice but not in orchidectomized Srd5a1⁻/⁻ mice. Male Srd5a1⁻/⁻ mice demonstrated a reduced forelimb muscle grip strength compared with WT mice (p<0.05). Female Srd5a1⁻/⁻ mice had slightly increased cortical bone mass associated with elevated circulating levels of androgens. In conclusion, 5α-reductase type 1 inactivated male mice have reduced bone mass and forelimb muscle grip strength and we propose that these effects are due to lack of 5α-reductase type 1 expression in bone and muscle. In contrast, the increased cortical bone mass in female Srd5a1⁻/⁻ mice, is an indirect effect mediated by elevated circulating androgen levels.