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Sample records for inspiratory threshold loading

  1. Activity of latissimus dorsi muscle during inspiratory threshold loads.

    PubMed

    Orozco-Levi, M; Gea, J; Monells, J; Aran, X; Aguar, M C; Broquetas, J M

    1995-03-01

    The ability of the latissimus dorsi muscle (LD) to participate as an accessory inspiratory muscle has been the subject of controversy. Electromyographic (EGM) activity of LD was evaluated in 11 healthy subjects (aged 30 +/- 2 yrs; forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) 106 +/- 5% predicted; maximal inspiratory pressure (Pmax), 120 +/- 6 cmH2O) under different breathing conditions. The ipsilateral biceps brachii was chosen as the control muscle. The EMG was recorded from surface electrodes, but needle electrodes were also used for LD evaluation in a subset of three subjects. The EMG signal from both muscles was recorded simultaneously, rectified and integrated, with subtraction of the electrocardiographic signal. Situations evaluated were: 1) maximal voluntary contraction (MVC); 2) apnoea; and 3) breathing under progressive inspiratory threshold loads (20-100% Pmax, at 20% intervals). A close relationship was evident between LD recordings from surface and needle electrodes (r = 0.975). Activity of LD at baseline was 1.8 +/- 0.4% MVC, and showed a phasic increase during inspiration under loads. This change had a linear tendency and was significant for loads corresponding to 40, 60, 80 and 100% of Pmax when compared to the control muscle. At this latter level, LD activity was equivalent to 32 +/- 5% MVC (range 11-61%), whereas mean activity of the control muscle was less than 7.5% MVC.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7789491

  2. Theophylline increases oxygen consumption during inspiratory resistive loading.

    PubMed

    Janssens, S; Derom, E; Vanhaecke, J; Decramer, M

    1995-04-01

    The effect of theophylline on diaphragmatic blood flow (Qdi) and oxygen consumption (VO2di) was studied in eight lightly anesthetized dogs during quiet breathing and inspiratory resistive loading. Qdi was determined with the radioactive microsphere tracer technique, and VO2di was calculated as the product of Qdi and the diaphragmatic arterio-venous oxygen difference. During quiet breathing, theophylline increased minute ventilation (9.3 +/- 1.7 versus 5.1 +/- 0.4 L/min), mean inspiratory flow (547 +/- 60 versus 378 +/- 56 ml/s), and duty cycle (0.270 +/- 0.042 versus 0.192 +/- 0.024) but did not significantly alter Qdi or VO2di. Conversely, Qdi increased significantly during loaded breathing compared with quiet breathing (37 +/- 4 versus 27 +/- 3 ml/100 g/min) and was further increased by theophylline (45 +/- 7 ml/100 g/min). Theophylline did not alter the tension-time index of the diaphragm (TTdi) during inspiratory resistive loading (0.054 +/- 0.006 versus 0.056 +/- 0.004, p NS) but resulted in a disproportionate and significant increase in VO2di (2.66 +/- 0.53 versus 1.78 +/- 0.26 ml/100 g/min). Similarly, total-body oxygen consumption (VO2TB) during inspiratory loading increased significantly after theophylline (24%), but the tension-time index of the inspiratory muscles (TTi), a measure of the total respiratory load, was unchanged. We conclude that theophylline significantly increases VO2di and VO2TB at the same TTdi and TTi during resistive loading. This enhanced energy expenditure needs consideration in the clinical management of pulmonary disorders that increase the work of breathing. PMID:7697222

  3. Comparison of incremental and constant load tests of inspiratory muscle endurance in COPD.

    PubMed

    Hill, K; Jenkins, S C; Philippe, D L; Shepherd, K L; Hillman, D R; Eastwood, P R

    2007-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the relative value of incremental and constant load tests in detecting changes in inspiratory muscle endurance following high-intensity inspiratory muscle training (H-IMT) in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. In total, 16 subjects (11 males; forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV(1)) 37.4+/-12.5%) underwent H-IMT. In addition, 17 subjects (11 males; FEV(1) 36.5+/-11.5%) underwent sham inspiratory muscle training (S-IMT). Training took place three times a week for 8 weeks. Baseline and post-training measurements were obtained of maximum threshold pressure sustained during an incremental load test (P(th,max)) and time breathing against a constant load (t(lim)). Breathing pattern was unconstrained. H-IMT increased P(th,max) and t(lim) relative to baseline and to any change seen following S-IMT. The effect size for P(th,max) was greater than for t(lim). Post-training tests were accompanied by changes in breathing pattern, including decreased duty cycle, which may have served to decrease inspiratory work and thereby contribute to the increase in P(th,max) and t(lim) in both groups. When assessing inspiratory muscle function in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease via tests in which the pattern of breathing is unconstrained, the current authors recommend incremental load tests be used in preference to constant load tests. However, to attribute changes in these tests to improvements in inspiratory muscle endurance, breathing pattern should be controlled.

  4. Effect of inspiratory nasal loading on pharyngeal resistance.

    PubMed

    Gleeson, K; Zwillich, C W; Bendrick, T W; White, D P

    1986-06-01

    Nasal obstruction has been shown to increase the number of apneas during sleep in normal subjects and in some may actually cause the sleep apnea syndrome. We postulated that the pharynx may act as a Starling resistor, where increases in negative inspiratory pressure result in elevated resistance across a collapsible pharyngeal segment. To test this theory in normal subjects we studied 10 men and 10 women during wakefulness. Pharyngeal resistance (the resistance across the airway segment between the choanae and the epiglottis) was determined in the normal state and with three inspiratory loads added externally. Flow was measured using a pneumotachometer and a sealed face mask; epiglottic pressure by a latex balloon placed just above the epiglottis and choanal pressure by anterior rhinometry. Pharyngeal resistance (measured at 300 ml/s) could thus be determined. Base-line inspiratory pharnygeal resistance was 1.6 +/- 0.2 cmH2O . l-1 . s. This increased to 2.3 +/- 0.3, 2.8 +/- 0.4, and 2.9 +/- 0.4 cmH2O . l-1 . s, respectively, with the addition of 1.3, 2.7, and 6.7 cmH2O . l-1 . s inspiratory load. The resistance at each level of load was significantly different from the base-line resistance determination (P less than 0.05) but not different from each other. We conclude that added nasal resistive loads during inspiration cause an increase in pharyngeal resistance during wakefulness but that this resistance does not increase further with additional increments of load. PMID:3722059

  5. Systemic inflammation after inspiratory loading in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Fuster, Antonia; Sauleda, Jaume; Sala, Ernest; Barceló, Bernardí; Pons, Jaume; Carrera, Miguel; Noguera, Aina; Togores, Bernat; Agustí, Alvar GN

    2008-01-01

    Objective Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) present systemic inflammation. Strenuous resistive breathing induces systemic inflammation in healthy subjects. We hypothesized that the increased respiratory load that characterizes COPD can contribute to systemic inflammation in these patients. Patients and methods To test this hypothesis, we compared leukocyte numbers and levels of circulating cytokines (tumor necrosis factor alpha [TNFα], interleukin-1β [IL-1β], IL-6, IL-8, and IL-10), before and 1 hour after maximal incremental inspiratory loading in 13 patients with stable COPD (forced expiratory volume in one second [FEV1] 29 ± 2.5% ref) and in 8 healthy sedentary subjects (FEV1 98 ± 5% ref). Results We found that: (1) at baseline, patients with COPD showed higher leukocyte counts and IL-8 levels than controls (p < 0.01); and, (2) one hour after maximal inspiratory loading these values were unchanged, except for IL-10, which increased in controls (p < 0.05) but not in patients with COPD. Conclusions This study confirms the presence of systemic inflammation in COPD, shows that maximal inspiratory loading does not increase the levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, IL-8) in COPD patients or controls, but suggests that the former may be unable to mount an appropriate systemic anti-inflammatory response to exercise. PMID:18488438

  6. Effects of inspiratory loading on the chaotic dynamics of ventilatory flow in humans.

    PubMed

    Samara, Ziyad; Raux, Mathieu; Fiamma, Marie-Noëlle; Gharbi, Alexandre; Gottfried, Stewart B; Poon, Chi-Sang; Similowski, Thomas; Straus, Christian

    2009-01-01

    Human ventilation at rest exhibits complexity and chaos. The aim of this study was to determine whether suprapontine interferences with the automatic breathing control could contribute to ventilatory chaos. We conducted a post hoc analysis of a previous study performed in awake volunteers exhibiting cortical pre-motor potentials during inspiratory loading. In eight subjects, flow was recorded at rest, while breathing against inspiratory threshold loads (median 21.5 cm H(2)O) and resistive loads (50 cm H(2)Ol(-1)s(-1)) loads, and while inhaling 7% CO(2)-93% O(2). Chaos was identified through noise titration (noise limit, NL) and the sensitivity to initial conditions was assessed through the largest Lyapunov exponent (LLE). Breath-by-breath variability was evaluated using the coefficient of variation of several ventilatory variables. Chaos was consistently present in ventilatory flow recordings, but mechanical loading did not alter NL, LLE, or variability. In contrast, CO(2) altered chaos and reduced variability. In conclusion, inspiratory loading - and any resultant respiratory-related cortical activity - were not associated with changes in ventilatory chaos in this study, arguing against suprapontine contributions to ventilatory complexity. PMID:19013545

  7. When Breathing Interferes with Cognition: Experimental Inspiratory Loading Alters Timed Up-and-Go Test in Normal Humans.

    PubMed

    Nierat, Marie-Cécile; Demiri, Suela; Dupuis-Lozeron, Elise; Allali, Gilles; Morélot-Panzini, Capucine; Similowski, Thomas; Adler, Dan

    2016-01-01

    Human breathing stems from automatic brainstem neural processes. It can also be operated by cortico-subcortical networks, especially when breathing becomes uncomfortable because of external or internal inspiratory loads. How the "irruption of breathing into consciousness" interacts with cognition remains unclear, but a case report in a patient with defective automatic breathing (Ondine's curse syndrome) has shown that there was a cognitive cost of breathing when the respiratory cortical networks were engaged. In a pilot study of putative breathing-cognition interactions, the present study relied on a randomized design to test the hypothesis that experimentally loaded breathing in 28 young healthy subjects would have a negative impact on cognition as tested by "timed up-and-go" test (TUG) and its imagery version (iTUG). Progressive inspiratory threshold loading resulted in slower TUG and iTUG performance. Participants consistently imagined themselves faster than they actually were. However, progressive inspiratory loading slowed iTUG more than TUG, a finding that is unexpected with regard to the known effects of dual tasking on TUG and iTUG (slower TUG but stable iTUG). Insofar as the cortical networks engaged in response to inspiratory loading are also activated during complex locomotor tasks requiring cognitive inputs, we infer that competition for cortical resources may account for the breathing-cognition interference that is evidenced here.

  8. When Breathing Interferes with Cognition: Experimental Inspiratory Loading Alters Timed Up-and-Go Test in Normal Humans

    PubMed Central

    Nierat, Marie-Cécile; Demiri, Suela; Dupuis-Lozeron, Elise; Allali, Gilles; Morélot-Panzini, Capucine; Similowski, Thomas; Adler, Dan

    2016-01-01

    Human breathing stems from automatic brainstem neural processes. It can also be operated by cortico-subcortical networks, especially when breathing becomes uncomfortable because of external or internal inspiratory loads. How the “irruption of breathing into consciousness” interacts with cognition remains unclear, but a case report in a patient with defective automatic breathing (Ondine's curse syndrome) has shown that there was a cognitive cost of breathing when the respiratory cortical networks were engaged. In a pilot study of putative breathing-cognition interactions, the present study relied on a randomized design to test the hypothesis that experimentally loaded breathing in 28 young healthy subjects would have a negative impact on cognition as tested by “timed up-and-go” test (TUG) and its imagery version (iTUG). Progressive inspiratory threshold loading resulted in slower TUG and iTUG performance. Participants consistently imagined themselves faster than they actually were. However, progressive inspiratory loading slowed iTUG more than TUG, a finding that is unexpected with regard to the known effects of dual tasking on TUG and iTUG (slower TUG but stable iTUG). Insofar as the cortical networks engaged in response to inspiratory loading are also activated during complex locomotor tasks requiring cognitive inputs, we infer that competition for cortical resources may account for the breathing-cognition interference that is evidenced here. PMID:26978782

  9. When Breathing Interferes with Cognition: Experimental Inspiratory Loading Alters Timed Up-and-Go Test in Normal Humans.

    PubMed

    Nierat, Marie-Cécile; Demiri, Suela; Dupuis-Lozeron, Elise; Allali, Gilles; Morélot-Panzini, Capucine; Similowski, Thomas; Adler, Dan

    2016-01-01

    Human breathing stems from automatic brainstem neural processes. It can also be operated by cortico-subcortical networks, especially when breathing becomes uncomfortable because of external or internal inspiratory loads. How the "irruption of breathing into consciousness" interacts with cognition remains unclear, but a case report in a patient with defective automatic breathing (Ondine's curse syndrome) has shown that there was a cognitive cost of breathing when the respiratory cortical networks were engaged. In a pilot study of putative breathing-cognition interactions, the present study relied on a randomized design to test the hypothesis that experimentally loaded breathing in 28 young healthy subjects would have a negative impact on cognition as tested by "timed up-and-go" test (TUG) and its imagery version (iTUG). Progressive inspiratory threshold loading resulted in slower TUG and iTUG performance. Participants consistently imagined themselves faster than they actually were. However, progressive inspiratory loading slowed iTUG more than TUG, a finding that is unexpected with regard to the known effects of dual tasking on TUG and iTUG (slower TUG but stable iTUG). Insofar as the cortical networks engaged in response to inspiratory loading are also activated during complex locomotor tasks requiring cognitive inputs, we infer that competition for cortical resources may account for the breathing-cognition interference that is evidenced here. PMID:26978782

  10. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation over the supplementary motor area modifies breathing pattern in response to inspiratory loading in normal humans

    PubMed Central

    Nierat, Marie-Cécile; Hudson, Anna L.; Chaskalovic, Joël; Similowski, Thomas; Laviolette, Louis

    2015-01-01

    In awake humans, breathing depends on automatic brainstem pattern generators. It is also heavily influenced by cortical networks. For example, functional magnetic resonance imaging and electroencephalographic data show that the supplementary motor area becomes active when breathing is made difficult by inspiratory mechanical loads like resistances or threshold valves, which is associated with perceived respiratory discomfort. We hypothesized that manipulating the excitability of the supplementary motor area with repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation would modify the breathing pattern response to an experimental inspiratory load and possibly respiratory discomfort. Seven subjects (three men, age 25 ± 4) were studied. Breathing pattern and respiratory discomfort during inspiratory loading were described before and after conditioning the supplementary motor area with repetitive stimulation, using an excitatory paradigm (5 Hz stimulation), an inhibitory paradigm, or sham stimulation. No significant change in breathing pattern during loading was observed after sham conditioning. Excitatory conditioning shortened inspiratory time (p = 0.001), decreased tidal volume (p = 0.016), and decreased ventilation (p = 0.003), as corroborated by an increased end-tidal expired carbon dioxide (p = 0.013). Inhibitory conditioning did not affect ventilation, but lengthened expiratory time (p = 0.031). Respiratory discomfort was mild under baseline conditions, and unchanged after conditioning of the supplementary motor area. This is the first study to show that repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation conditioning of the cerebral cortex can alter breathing pattern. A 5 Hz conditioning protocol, known to enhance corticophrenic excitability, can reduce the amount of hyperventilation induced by inspiratory threshold loading. Further studies are needed to determine whether and under what circumstances rTMS can have an effect on dyspnoea. PMID:26483701

  11. Common drive to the upper airway muscle genioglossus during inspiratory loading.

    PubMed

    Woods, Michael J; Nicholas, Christian L; Semmler, John G; Chan, Julia K M; Jordan, Amy S; Trinder, John

    2015-11-01

    Common drive is thought to constitute a central mechanism by which the efficiency of a motor neuron pool is increased. This study tested the hypothesis that common drive to the upper airway muscle genioglossus (GG) would increase with increased respiratory drive in response to an inspiratory load. Respiration, GG electromyographic (EMG) activity, single-motor unit activity, and coherence in the 0-5 Hz range between pairs of GG motor units were assessed for the 30 s before an inspiratory load, the first and second 30 s of the load, and the 30 s after the load. Twelve of twenty young, healthy male subjects provided usable data, yielding 77 pairs of motor units: 2 Inspiratory Phasic, 39 Inspiratory Tonic, 15 Expiratory Tonic, and 21 Tonic. Respiratory and GG inspiratory activity significantly increased during the loads and returned to preload levels during the postload periods (all showed significant quadratic functions over load trials, P < 0.05). As hypothesized, common drive increased during the load in inspiratory modulated motor units to a greater extent than in expiratory/tonic motor units (significant load × discharge pattern interaction, P < 0.05). Furthermore, this effect persisted during the postload period. In conclusion, common drive to inspiratory modulated motor units was elevated in response to increased respiratory drive. The postload elevation in common drive was suggestive of a poststimulus activation effect.

  12. Reliability of an Electronic Inspiratory Loading Device for Assessing Pulmonary Function in Post-Stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kyeong-Bong; Kim, Min-Kyu; Jeong, Ju-Ri; Lee, Wan-Hee

    2016-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to examine the inter- and intra-rater reliability of an electronic inspiratory loading device for the assessment of pulmonary functions: maximum inspiratory pressure, peak inspiratory flow, and vital capacity. Material/Methods Subjects were 50 patient volunteers in a rehabilitation hospital who had experienced their first episode of unilateral stroke with hemiparesis during the previous 6 months (26 men, 24 women; mean age [±SD], 55.96 [±12.81] years), with no use of medications that could induce drowsiness, evidence of restrictive lung disease, history of asthma, use of psychotropic drugs, or alcohol consumption habit. Maximum inspiratory pressure, peak inspiratory flow, and vital capacity for pulmonary functions were assessed using an electronic inspiratory loading device (PowerBreathe, K5, 2010) by 2 examiners, with patients in an unassisted sitting position, and 1 examiner re-assessed with same patients at the same time of a day after 1 week. Intra-class correlation coefficients were used to assess reliability. Results Intra-rater reliability ranged from intra-class correlation coefficients (ICCs)=0.959 to 0.986 in variables. For the inter-rater reliability between 2 examiners, the ICCs ranged from 0.933 to 0.985. Intra-rater and inter-rater reliability were good in variables (maximal inspiratory pressure, peak inspiratory flow, and vital capacity). Conclusions The intra- and inter-examiner reliability of the pulmonary function measurements, maximum inspiratory pressure, peak inspiratory flow, and vital capacity, for the post-stroke patients was very high. The results suggest that the electronic inspiratory loading device would be useful for clinical rehabilitative assessment of pulmonary function. PMID:26782369

  13. Abdominal muscle activity during breathing with and without inspiratory and expiratory loads in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Mesquita Montes, António; Baptista, João; Crasto, Carlos; de Melo, Cristina Argel; Santos, Rita; Vilas-Boas, João Paulo

    2016-10-01

    Central Nervous System modulates the motor activities of all trunk muscles to concurrently regulate the intra-abdominal and intra-thoracic pressures. The study aims to evaluate the effect of inspiratory and expiratory loads on abdominal muscle activity during breathing in healthy subjects. Twenty-three higher education students (21.09±1.56years; 8males) breathed at a same rhythm (inspiration: two seconds; expiration: four seconds) without load and with 10% of the maximal inspiratory or expiratory pressures, in standing. Surface electromyography was performed to assess the activation intensity of rectus abdominis, external oblique and transversus abdominis/internal oblique muscles, during inspiration and expiration. During inspiration, transversus abdominis/internal oblique activation intensity was significantly lower with inspiratory load when compared to without load (p=0.009) and expiratory load (p=0.002). During expiration, the activation intensity of all abdominal muscles was significantly higher with expiratory load when compared to without load (p<0.05). The activation intensity of external oblique (p=0.036) and transversus abdominis/internal oblique (p=0.022) was significantly higher with inspiratory load when compared to without load. Transversus abdominis/internal oblique activation intensity was significantly higher with expiratory load when compared to inspiratory load (p<0.001). Transversus abdominis/internal oblique seems to be the most relevant muscle to modulate the intra-abdominal pressure for the breathing mechanics. PMID:27434376

  14. Chemoreceptor and vagal influences on genioglossal muscle responses to inspiratory resistive load.

    PubMed

    Aleksandrova, N P

    2004-09-01

    The present study was undertaken to determine the mechanisms underlying the involvement of upper airway dilating muscles in compensatory responses to added inspiratory resistive load. Experiments were performed in tracheostomized, anaesthetised rabbits. The effect of inspiratory resistive loading on the electromyographic activity of the genioglossus muscle, the major dilating muscle of the pharynx, was studied in vagotomized and vagally intact rabbits during spontaneous breathing with a hypoxic gas mixture (10% O(2) in N(2)) or oxygen. In the vagally intact animals the peak value and duration of genioglossus muscle inspiratory activity increased in the first loaded breath before any noticeable change in the arterial blood gases. Hyperoxia decreased, whereas hypoxia increased the immediate response of the genioglossus activity to inspiratory loading. Removal of vagal volume-related feedback (by vagotomy) significantly increased the genioglossus muscle activity; the increase being more under hypoxia than under hyperoxia. In contrast to vagally intact animals, there was no first-breath increase in genioglossus activity during loading. The results indicate that the immediate involvement of the genioglossus muscle in response to inspiratory resistive load is mediated by vagal-volume feedback. Baseline oxygen tension before loading modulates the immediate reflex vagal-related response of the genioglossus muscle. PMID:15611588

  15. Inspiratory and expiratory resistive load detection in normal and asthmatic subjects. A sensory decision theory analysis.

    PubMed

    Bonnel, A M; Mathiot, M J; Grimaud, C

    1985-01-01

    The ability to detect added external inspiratory and expiratory resistive loads was studied in normal and asthmatic subjects using sensory decision theory as a psychophysical method. Performances P(A)/delta R [where P(A) represents the index of sensitivity and delta R the additional resistor] were similar in normal and asthmatic subjects, but when sensitivity was expressed in relation to airway resistance [P(A)/delta R/Raw], asthmatics showed higher inspiratory and expiratory performances than normal subjects. After bronchodilation the relative sensitivity in the asthmatic group was impaired and approached that of normal subjects. Comparing inspiratory and expiratory load detection, normal subjects showed a higher sensitivity for expiratory than for inspiratory loads. In contrast, there was no difference in the asthmatic group. The response bias remained the same across conditions. If one accepts the assumption that the variability of sensitivity presented by asthmatic and normal subjects might be related to the variable state of their pulmonary function, our results can be interpreted as demonstrating a relationship between sensitivity and pulmonary distension or airway obstruction. These results are in agreement with the hypothesis that the site of perception for respiratory load detection is the chest wall. PMID:4023435

  16. Identification of human brain regions underlying responses to resistive inspiratory loading with functional magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed Central

    Gozal, D; Omidvar, O; Kirlew, K A; Hathout, G M; Hamilton, R; Lufkin, R B; Harper, R M

    1995-01-01

    Compensatory ventilatory responses to increased inspiratory loading are essential for adequate breathing regulation in a number of pulmonary diseases; however, the human brain sites mediating such responses are unknown. Midsagittal and axial images were acquired in 11 healthy volunteers during unloaded and loaded (30 cmH2O; 1 cmH2O = 98 Pa) inspiratory breathing, by using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) strategies (1.5-tesla MR; repetition time, 72 msec; echo time, 45 msec; flip angle, 30 degrees; field of view, 26 cm; slice thickness, 5 mm; number of excitations, 1; matrix, 128 x 256). Digital image subtractions and region of interest analyses revealed significantly increased fMRI signal intensity in discrete areas of the ventral and dorsal pons, interpeduncular nucleus, basal forebrain, putamen, and cerebellar regions. Upon load withdrawal, certain regions displayed a rapid fMRI signal off-transient, while in others, a slower fMRI signal decay emerged. Sustained loading elicited slow decreases in fMRI signal across activated regions, while second application of an identical load resulted in smaller signal increases compared to initial signal responses (P < 0.001). A moderate inspiratory load is associated with consistent regional activation of discrete brain locations; certain of these regions have been implicated in mediation of loaded breathing in animal models. We speculate that temporal changes in fMRI signal may indicate respiratory after-discharge and/or habituation phenomena. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 PMID:7604040

  17. Effect of sustained inspiratory loading on respiratory sensation and CO2 responsiveness in normal humans.

    PubMed

    Clague, J E; Carter, J; Pearson, M G; Calverley, P M

    1996-10-01

    1. To examine the effects of sustained resistive loading on the relationship between inspiratory effort sensation and respiratory drive (P0.1) and to determine if the change in CO2 responsiveness after sustained loading is accompanied by altered effort perception, hypercapnic responses were measured before, immediately after and 15 min after sustained resistive loading in seven subjects (six men, one woman). Sustained resistive loading was set to exceed a diaphragm tension-time index of 0.2. 2. Mean time to task failure during sustained loading was 17.7 min (range 12.5-22.5 min). The mean inspiratory effort sensation score rose from 3.4 (SEM 0.8) to 8.1 (0.8), whereas P0.1 fell from 29.5 (3.6) to 18.1 (3.6) cmH2O. 3. Immediately after loading the slopes of the ventilatory and sensory responses to CO2 fell (ventilatory response: before loading 16.7 (2.4) lmin-1kPa-1, immediately after loading 7.88 (2.18)lmin-1kPa-1; sensory response: before loading 1.95 (0.38) units/kPa; immediately after loading 1.12 (0.38) units/kPa; P < 0.05. Changes reverted to preloading levels by 15 min. 4. Sustained loading can lead to a dissociation between respiratory drive, as reflected by P0.1, and inspiratory effort sensation, and this disturbance can persist once the load is removed. Impaired sensory perception may be the primary determinant of the change in CO2 responsiveness seen after sustained resistive loading. PMID:8983879

  18. Training the inspiratory muscles improves running performance when carrying a 25 kg thoracic load in a backpack.

    PubMed

    Faghy, Mark A; Brown, Peter I

    2016-08-01

    Load carriage (LC) exercise in physically demanding occupations is typically characterised by periods of low-intensity steady-state exercise and short duration, high-intensity exercise while carrying an external mass in a backpack; this form of exercise is also known as LC exercise. This induces inspiratory muscle fatigue and reduces whole-body performance. Accordingly we investigated the effect of inspiratory muscle training (IMT, 50% maximal inspiratory muscle pressure (PImax) twice daily for six week) upon running time-trial performance with thoracic LC. Nineteen healthy males formed a pressure threshold IMT (n = 10) or placebo control group (PLA; n = 9) and performed 60 min LC exercise (6.5 km h(-1)) followed by a 2.4 km running time trial (LCTT) either side of a double-blind six week intervention. Prior to the intervention, PImax was reduced relative to baseline, post-LC and post-LCTT in both groups (pooled data: 13 ± 7% and 16 ± 8%, respectively, p < .05) and similar changes were observed post-PLA. Post-IMT only, resting PImax increased +31% (p < .05) and relative to pre-IMT was greater post-LC (+19%) and post-LCTT (+18%, p < .05), however, the relative reduction in PImax at each time point was unchanged (13 ± 11% and 17 ± 9%, respectively, p > .05). In IMT only, heart rate and perceptual responses were reduced post-LC (p < .05). Time-trial performance was unchanged post-PLA and improved 8 ± 4% after IMT (p < .05). In summary, when wearing a 25 kg backpack, IMT attenuated the cardiovascular and perceptual responses to steady-state exercise and improved high-intensity time-trial performance which we attribute in part to reduced relative work intensity of the inspiratory muscles due to improved inspiratory muscle strength. These findings have real-world implications for occupational contexts. PMID:26274785

  19. Subacute effects of inspiratory resistive loading and head-out water immersion on pulmonary function.

    PubMed

    Thorsen, E; Skogstad, M; Reed, J W

    1999-01-01

    Extrathoracic airways obstruction and scuba diving may induce pulmonary edema, probably because of increased hydrostatic transmural capillary pressure in the lung. This study was designed to examine the subacute pulmonary effects of the combined exposure to inspiratory resistive loading and immersion, as in scuba diving. Two groups each of eight healthy men were exposed to head-out water immersion in thermoneutral water for 40 min with or without an added inspiratory resistive load. At flows of 0.5 and 1.0 liter x s, the measured resistances were 4.4 and 9.0 hPa x s(-1) x liter(-1), respectively. Pulmonary function, including a flow-volume loop and transfer factor of the lung for carbon monoxide (Tlco, was measured before and 60 min after the end of the exposures. Body fluid balance was restored in the first 15 min after exposure, and Tlco was always corrected to a hemoglobin concentration of 146 g x liter(-1). There was a significant reduction in Tlco of 7.3+/-5.5% (P < 0.01) after the combined exposure to head-out water immersion and inspiratory resistive load. No changes in pulmonary function were seen after exposure to head-out water immersion or inspiratory resistive loading alone. The change in Tlco was normalized within 24 h. Submersion and resistance in breathing apparatus may contribute to the changes in pulmonary function seen immediately after dives. The nature of the exposure in these experiments and the time for recovery indicate that these changes are mechanically induced, and may not contribute to the long-term effects of diving on the lung.

  20. Inspiratory loading and limb blood flow in COPD: The modulating effects of resting lung hyperinflation.

    PubMed

    Berton, Danilo C; de Castro, Marina A; Merola, Pietro; Benedetto, Igor; Castilho, Mariah; Vieira, Paulo J C; Knorst, Marli M; Neder, J Alberto

    2016-07-01

    Inspiratory resistive loading (IRL) may have deleterious cardiocirculatory effects leading to poor peripheral perfusion in severely-hyperinflated patients with COPD. Nineteen patients (13 severely-hyperinflated with inspiratory capacity/total lung capacity ratio≤0.28) underwent calf blood flow (CBF) measurements by venous occlusion plethysmography at rest and during IRL at 60% maximal inspiratory pressure. Severely-hyperinflated patients had lower resting CBF and greater calf vascular resistance (CVR) than moderately-hyperinflated patients (p<0.05). All severely-hyperinflated patients had markedly reduced CBF (p=0.01). Opposite to our main hypothesis, however, IRL did not further reduce CBF in these patients (p>0.05). Conversely, it significantly decreased CBF and increased CVR in moderately-hyperinflated patients; in fact, end-trial CBF and CVR did not differ between the groups (p>0.05). In conclusion, marked impairments in resting appendicular blood flow in severely-hyperinflated patients with COPD were seen only after acute IRL in less hyperinflated patients. These findings set the stage for studies investigating the effects of lung deflation on peripheral hemodynamics in patients with severe hyperinflation.

  1. Subjective ratings of prolonged inspiratory resistive loaded breathing in males and females.

    PubMed

    Miller, Sarah; Davenport, Paul W

    2015-01-01

    Dyspnea and fear of suffocation are burdensome to patients with respiratory disease. Inspiratory resistive loads offer an experimental respiratory stimulus to quantify the discriminative domain of respiratory perception. Resistive (R) load magnitude estimation (ME) and subjective ratings were measured over sustained multiple breaths in healthy subjects. There was no significant group difference between the ME for Breath 1 and 20 for small R loads, but a significant gender difference for large R loads. Subjective responses of fear, fear of suffocation, displeasure, chest pressure, faintness, dizziness, fear of losing control, trembling, and tingling were significantly greater for females. These results demonstrate that ME of large resistive sustained loads elicits nonsignificant increases in ME in females, but a significant decrease in ME for males. The maintenance of ME in females co-occurs with increased aversive processing relative to males.

  2. Variability of the perception of dyspnea in healthy subjects assessed through inspiratory resistive loading*

    PubMed Central

    Ziegler, Bruna; Fernandes, Andréia Kist; Sanches, Paulo Roberto Stefani; Konzen, Glauco Luís; Dalcin, Paulo de Tarso Roth

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Few studies have evaluated the variability of the perception of dyspnea in healthy subjects. The objective of this study was to evaluate the variability of the perception of dyspnea in healthy subjects during breathing against increasing inspiratory resistive loads, as well as to assess the association between the level of perception of dyspnea and the level of physical activity. Methods: This was a cross-sectional study involving healthy individuals 16 years of age or older. Subjects underwent inspiratory resistive loading testing, in which the level of perception of dyspnea was quantified with the modified Borg scale. We also determined body mass indices (BMIs), assessed maximal respiratory pressures, performed pulmonary function tests, applied the international physical activity questionnaire (IPAQ)-long form, and conducted six-minute walk tests (6MWTs). The level of perception of dyspnea was classified as low (Borg score < 2), intermediate (Borg score, 2-5), or high (Borg score > 5). Results: We included 48 healthy subjects in the study. Forty-two subjects completed the test up to a load of 46.7 cmH2O/L/s. The level of perception of dyspnea was classified as low, intermediate, and high in 13, 19, and 10 subjects, respectively. The level of perception of dyspnea was not significantly associated with age, gender, BMI, IPAQ-long form score, maximal respiratory pressures, or pulmonary function test results. Conclusions: The scores for perceived dyspnea induced by inspiratory resistive loading in healthy subjects presented wide variability. The perception of dyspnea was classified as low in 31% of the subjects, intermediate in 45%, and high in 24%. There was no association between the level of perception of dyspnea and the level of physical activity (IPAQ or six-minute walk distance). PMID:25830380

  3. Repeatability of the Evaluation of Perception of Dyspnea in Normal Subjects Assessed Through Inspiratory Resistive Loads

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Andréia K; Ziegler, Bruna; Konzen, Glauco L; Sanches, Paulo R.S; Müller, André F; Pereira, Rosemary P; Dalcin, Paulo de Tarso R

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Study the repeatability of the evaluation of the perception of dyspnea using an inspiratory resistive loading system in healthy subjects. Methods: We designed a cross sectional study conducted in individuals aged 18 years and older. Perception of dyspnea was assessed using an inspiratory resistive load system. Dyspnea was assessed during ventilation at rest and at increasing resistive loads (0.6, 6.7, 15, 25, 46.7, 67, 78 and returning to 0.6 cm H2O/L/s). After breathing in at each level of resistive load for two minutes, the subject rated the dyspnea using the Borg scale. Subjects were tested twice (intervals from 2 to 7 days). Results: Testing included 16 Caucasian individuals (8 male and 8 female, mean age: 36 years). The median scores for dyspnea rating in the first test were 0 at resting ventilation and 0, 2, 3, 4, 5, 7, 7 and 1 point, respectively, with increasing loads. The median scores in the second test were 0 at resting and 0, 0, 2, 2, 3, 4, 4 and 0.5 points, respectively. The intra-class correlation coefficient was 0.57, 0.80, 0.74, 0.80, 0.83, 0.86, 0.91, and 0.92 for each resistive load, respectively. In a generalized linear model analysis, there was a statistically significant difference between the levels of resistive loads (p<0.001) and between tests (p=0.003). Dyspnea scores were significantly lower in the second test. Conclusion: The agreement between the two tests of the perception of dyspnea was only moderate and dyspnea scores were lower in the second test. These findings suggest a learning effect or an effect that could be at least partly attributed to desensitization of dyspnea sensation in the brain. PMID:25614771

  4. Changes in the perception of inspiratory resistive loads during partial curarization.

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, E J; Gandevia, S C; Killian, K J; Mahutte, C K; Rigg, J R

    1980-01-01

    1. The ability of normal subjects to estimate the magnitude of resistive loads and to detect resistive loads was determined using standard psychophysical techniques. The experiments were repeated during maintained partial neuromuscular blockade with D-tubocurarine. 2. During curarization the ability to detect the presence of a small inspiratory resistive load was not significantly impaired. This finding is consistent with the view that changes in the usual breath-by-breath relation between pressure and flow mediate detection. 3. The size of resistive loads was over-estimated during partial curarization. Subjects thus placed more reliance on sensing the increased motor command required during curarization than on alternative peripheral signals related to pressure, flow or resistance. 4. The exponent for the power function relating the perceived magnitude of a resistive load to its actual size (Stevens, 1957) was reduced during partial neuromuscular blockade. 5. These results suggest that detection of resistive loads depends upon sensing apparent information arising from an unexpected pressure-flow disturbance but that estimation of the size of an added load depends, in part, on sensing the outgoing motor command. PMID:7252883

  5. Inspiratory flow resistive loading improves respiratory muscle function and endurance capacity in recreational runners.

    PubMed

    Mickleborough, T D; Nichols, T; Lindley, M R; Chatham, K; Ionescu, A A

    2010-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the efficacy of inspiratory flow resistive loading (IFRL) on respiratory muscle function, exercise performance and cardiopulmonary and metabolic responses to exercise. Twenty-four recreational road runners (12 male) were randomly assigned from each gender into an IFRL group (n=8) and sham-IFRL group (n=8), which performed IFRL for 6 weeks, or a control group (n=8). Strength (+43.9%Delta), endurance (+26.6%Delta), maximum power output (+41.9%Delta) and work capacity (+38.5%Delta) of the inspiratory muscles were significantly increased (P<0.05) at rest following the study period in IFRL group only. In addition, ventilation (-25.7%Delta), oxygen consumption (-13.3%Delta), breathing frequency (-11.9%Delta), tidal volume (-16.0%Delta), heart rate (HR) (-13.1%Delta), blood lactate concentration (-38.9%Delta) and the perceptual response (-33.5%Delta) to constant workload exercise were significantly attenuated (P<0.05), concomitant with a significant improvement (P<0.05) in endurance exercise capacity (+16.4%Delta) during a treadmill run set at 80% VO2max in IFRL group only. These data suggest that IFRL can alter breathing mechanics, attenuate the oxygen cost, ventilation, HR, blood lactate and the perceptual response during constant workload exercise and improve endurance exercise performance in recreational runners.

  6. Ventilatory muscle loads and the frequency-tidal volume pattern during inspiratory pressure-assisted (pressure-supported) ventilation.

    PubMed

    MacIntyre, N R; Leatherman, N E

    1990-02-01

    Pressure support ventilation (PSV) is a new form of mechanical ventilatory support that assists a patient's spontaneous ventilatory effort with a clinician-selected amount of inspiratory pressure. In order to assess the muscle unloading effect and the ventilatory pattern response to increasing levels of this inspiratory pressure assist, we first utilized a computer respiratory system model with variable alveolar ventilation demands and impedances. From this model, we calculated ventilatory muscle loads (expressed either as the work/min or as the pressure time index) during simulated, unassisted breathing and during simulated breathing with levels of inspiratory pressure assist up to that which resulted in a VT of 800 ml and no work being performed by the muscles (defined as PSVmax for the model conditions being studied). The optimal ventilatory pattern (i.e., frequency-tidal volume) under each ventilation and impedance condition was defined as that which resulted in minimal muscle load. Under these model conditions, we found that PSVmax ranged from 5 to 41 cm H2O and that as the level of inspiratory pressure assist was increased from zero to PSVmax, there was a biphasic response of both the ventilatory muscle loading and the ventilatory pattern. Specifically, at low levels of inspiratory pressure assist, the model predicted that the applied pressure would only partially unload the ventilatory muscles. Continued muscle energy expenditure would thus still be required, whereas the ventilatory pattern would change little. Conversely, at higher levels of inspiratory pressure assist, the model predicted that the applied pressure would be sufficient to completely unload the ventilatory muscles.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  7. EMG-Derived Respiration Signal Using the Fixed Sample Entropy during an Inspiratory Load Protocol.

    PubMed

    Estrada, Luis; Torres, Abel; Sarlabous, Leonardo; Jané, Raimon

    2015-08-01

    Extracting clinical information from one single measurement represents a step forward in the assessment of the respiratory muscle function. This attracting idea entails the reduction of the instrumentation and fosters to develop new medical integrated technologies. We present the use of the fixed sample entropy (fSampEn) as a more direct method to non-invasively derive the breathing activity from the diaphragm electromyographic (EMGdi) signal, and thus to extract the respiratory rate, an important vital sign which is cumbersome and time-consuming to be measured by clinicians. fSampEn is a method to evaluate the EMGdi activity that is less sensitive to the cardiac activity (ECG) and its application has proven to be useful to evaluate the load of the respiratory muscles. The behavior of the proposed method was tested in signals from two subjects that performed an inspiratory load protocol, which consists of increments in the inspiratory mouth pressure (P mouth). Two respiratory signals were derived and compared to the P mouth signal: the ECG-derived respiration (EDR) signal from the lead-I configuration, and the EMG-derived respiration (EMGDR) signal by applying the fSampEn method over the EMGdi signal. The similitude and the lag between signals were calculated through the cross-correlation between each derived respiratory signal and the P mouth. The EMGDR signal showed higher correlation and lower lag values (≥ 0.91 and ≤ 0.70 s, respectively) than the EDR signal (≥ 0.83 and ≤ 0.99 s, respectively). Additionally, the respiratory rate was estimated with the P mouth, EDR and EMGDR signals showing very similar values. The results from this preliminary work suggest that the fSampEn method can be used to derive the respiration waveform from the respiratory muscle electrical activity.

  8. Medicinal clays improve the endurance of loaded inspiratory muscles in COPD: a randomized clinical trial of nonpharmacological treatment

    PubMed Central

    Baldi, Simonetta; Pinna, Gian Domenico; Bruschi, Claudio; Caldara, Fabrizio; Maestri, Roberto; Dacosto, Elena; Rezzani, Antonella; Popovich, Ermanno; Bellinzona, Ezio; Crotti, Paola; Montemartini, Silvia; Fracchia, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    Background Inspiratory resistive breathing (IRB) challenges affect respiratory muscle endurance in healthy individuals, which is considered to be an interleukin 6 (IL-6)–dependent mechanism. Whether nonpharmacological thermal therapies promote the endurance of loaded inspiratory muscles in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is unclear. The objectives of this study were to compare the effects of two thermal interventions on endurance time (ET) and plasma IL-6 concentration following an IRB challenge. Methods This study was a randomized, parallel-group, unblinded clinical trial in a single-center setting. Forty-two patients (aged 42–76 years) suffering from mild to severe COPD participated in this study. Both groups completed 12 sessions of the mud bath therapy (MBT) (n=22) or leisure thermal activity (LTA) (n=19) in a thermal spa center in Italy. Pre- and postintervention spirometry, maximum inspiratory pressure, and plasma mediators were obtained and ET and endurance oxygen expenditure (VO2Endur) were measured following IRB challenge at 40% of maximum inspiratory pressure. Results There was no difference in ΔIL-6 between the intervention groups. But, IRB challenge increased cytokine IL-6 plasma levels systematically. The effect size was small. A statistically significant treatment by IRB challenge effect existed in ET, which significantly increased in the MBT group (P=0.003). In analysis of covariance treatment by IRB challenge analysis with LnVO2Endur as the dependent variable, ΔIL-6 after intervention predicted LnVO2Endur in the MBT group, but not in the LTA group. Adverse events occurred in two individuals in the MBT group, but they were mainly transient. One patient in the LTA group dropped out. Conclusion MBT model improves ET upon a moderate IRB challenge, indicating the occurrence of a training effect. The LnVO2Endur/ΔIL-6 suggests a physiologic adaptive mechanism in respiratory muscles of COPD patients allocated to treatment. Both thermal

  9. Inspiratory muscle training in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: structural adaptation and physiologic outcomes.

    PubMed

    Ramirez-Sarmiento, Alba; Orozco-Levi, Mauricio; Guell, Rosa; Barreiro, Esther; Hernandez, Nuria; Mota, Susana; Sangenis, Merce; Broquetas, Joan M; Casan, Pere; Gea, Joaquim

    2002-12-01

    The present study was aimed at evaluating the effects of a specific inspiratory muscle training protocol on the structure of inspiratory muscles in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Fourteen patients (males, FEV1, 24 +/- 7% predicted) were randomized to either inspiratory muscle or sham training groups. Supervised breathing using a threshold inspiratory device was performed 30 minutes per day, five times a week, for 5 consecutive weeks. The inspiratory training group was subjected to inspiratory loading equivalent to 40 to 50% of their maximal inspiratory pressure. Biopsies from external intercostal muscles and vastus lateralis (control muscle) were taken before and after the training period. Muscle samples were processed for morphometric analyses using monoclonal antibodies against myosin heavy chain isoforms I and II. Increases in both the strength and endurance of the inspiratory muscles were observed in the inspiratory training group. This improvement was associated with increases in the proportion of type I fibers (by approximately 38%, p < 0.05) and in the size of type II fibers (by approximately 21%, p < 0.05) in the external intercostal muscles. No changes were observed in the control muscle. The study demonstrates that inspiratory training induces a specific functional improvement of the inspiratory muscles and adaptive changes in the structure of external intercostal muscles. PMID:12406842

  10. Subjecting Elite Athletes to Inspiratory Breathing Load Reveals Behavioral and Neural Signatures of Optimal Performers in Extreme Environments

    PubMed Central

    Paulus, Martin P.; Flagan, Taru; Simmons, Alan N.; Gillis, Kristine; Kotturi, Sante; Thom, Nathaniel; Johnson, Douglas C.; Van Orden, Karl F.; Davenport, Paul W.; Swain, Judith L.

    2012-01-01

    Background It is unclear whether and how elite athletes process physiological or psychological challenges differently than healthy comparison subjects. In general, individuals optimize exercise level as it relates to differences between expected and experienced exertion, which can be conceptualized as a body prediction error. The process of computing a body prediction error involves the insular cortex, which is important for interoception, i.e. the sense of the physiological condition of the body. Thus, optimal performance may be related to efficient minimization of the body prediction error. We examined the hypothesis that elite athletes, compared to control subjects, show attenuated insular cortex activation during an aversive interoceptive challenge. Methodology/Principal Findings Elite adventure racers (n = 10) and healthy volunteers (n = 11) performed a continuous performance task with varying degrees of a non-hypercapnic breathing load while undergoing functional magnetic resonance imaging. The results indicate that (1) non-hypercapnic inspiratory breathing load is an aversive experience associated with a profound activation of a distributed set of brain areas including bilateral insula, dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and anterior cingulated; (2) adventure racers relative to comparison subjects show greater accuracy on the continuous performance task during the aversive interoceptive condition; and (3) adventure racers show an attenuated right insula cortex response during and following the aversive interoceptive condition of non-hypercapnic inspiratory breathing load. Conclusions/Significance These findings support the hypothesis that elite athletes during an aversive interoceptive condition show better performance and an attenuated insular cortex activation during the aversive experience. Interestingly, differential modulation of the right insular cortex has been found previously in elite military personnel and appears to be emerging as an important

  11. Should viral load thresholds be lowered?

    PubMed Central

    Labhardt, Niklaus D.; Bader, Joëlle; Lejone, Thabo Ishmael; Ringera, Isaac; Hobbins, Michael A.; Fritz, Christiane; Ehmer, Jochen; Cerutti, Bernard; Puga, Daniel; Klimkait, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The World Health Organization (WHO) guidelines on antiretroviral therapy (ART) define treatment failure as 2 consecutive viral loads (VLs) ≥1000 copies/mL. There is, however, little evidence supporting 1000 copies as an optimal threshold to define treatment failure. Objective of this study was to assess the correlation of the WHO definition with the presence of drug-resistance mutations in patients who present with 2 consecutive unsuppressed VL in a resource-limited setting. In 10 nurse-led clinics in rural Lesotho children and adults on first-line ART for ≥6 months received a first routine VL. Those with plasma VL ≥80 copies/mL were enrolled in a prospective study, receiving enhanced adherence counseling (EAC) and a follow-up VL after 3 months. After a second unsuppressed VL genotypic resistance testing was performed. Viruses with major mutations against ≥2 drugs of the current regimen were classified as “resistant”. A total of 1563 adults and 191 children received a first routine VL. Of the 138 adults and 53 children with unsuppressed VL (≥80 copies/mL), 165 (116 adults; 49 children) had a follow-up VL after EAC; 108 (74 adults; 34 children) remained unsuppressed and resistance testing was successful. Ninety of them fulfilled the WHO definition of treatment failure (both VL ≥1000 copies/mL); for another 18 both VL were unsuppressed but with <1000 copies/mL. The positive predictive value (PPV) for the WHO failure definition was 81.1% (73/90) for the presence of resistant virus. Among the 18 with VL levels between 80 and 1000 copies/mL, thereby classified as “non-failures”, 17 (94.4%) harbored resistant viruses. Lowering the VL threshold from 1000 copies/mL to 80 copies/mL at both determinations had no negative influence on the PPV (83.3%; 90/108). The current WHO-definition misclassifies patients who harbor resistant virus at VL below 1000 c/mL as “nonfailing.” Lowering the threshold to VL ≥80

  12. Effects of hypercapnia and inspiratory flow-resistive loading on respiratory activity in chronic airways obstruction.

    PubMed Central

    Altose, M D; McCauley, W C; Kelsen, S G; Cherniack, N S

    1977-01-01

    The respiratory responses to hypercapnia alone and to hypercapnia and flow-resistive loading during inspiration were studied in normal individuals and in eucapnic and hypercapnic patients with chronic airways obstruction. Responses were assessed in terms of minute ventilation and occlusion pressure (mouth pressure during airway occlusion 100 ms after the onset of inspiration). Ventilatory responses to CO2 (deltaV/deltaPCO2) were distinctly subnormal in both groups of patients with airways obstruction. The two groups of patients, however, showed different occlusion pressure responses to CO2 (deltaP100/deltaPCO2): deltaP100/deltaPCO2 was normal in the eucapnic patients but subnormal in the hypercapnic patients. Flow-resistive loading during inspiration reduced deltaV/deltaPCO2 both in normal subjects and in patients with airways obstruction. The occlusion pressure response to CO2 increased in normal subjects during flow-resistive loading but remained unchanged in both groups of patients with chronic airways obstruction. These results indicate that while chemosensitivity as determined by deltaP100/deltaPCO2 is impaired only in hypercapnic patients with chronic airways obstruction, an acute increase in flow resistance elicits a subnormal increase in respiratory efferent activity in both eucapnic and hypercapnic patients. PMID:838862

  13. Respiratory and abdominal muscle responses to expiratory threshold loading in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Cerny, F; Armitage, L; Hirsch, J A; Bishop, B

    1992-03-01

    We hypothesized that the hyperinflation and pulmonary dysfunction of cystic fibrosis (CF) would distort feedback and therefore alter the abdominal muscle response to graded expiratory threshold loads (ETLs). We compared the respiratory and abdominal muscle responses with graded ETLs of seven CF patients with severe lung dysfunction with those of matched healthy control subjects in the supine and 60 degrees head-up positions. Breathing frequency, tidal volume, and ventilatory timing were determined from inspiratory flow recordings. Abdominal electromyograms (EMGs) were detected with surface electrodes placed unilaterally over the external and internal oblique and the rectus abdominis muscles. Thresholds, times of onset, and durations of phasic abdominal activity were determined from raw EMGs; peak amplitudes were determined from integrated EMGs. Graded ETLs were imposed by submerging a tube from the expiratory port of the breathing valve into a column of water at depths of 0-25 cmH2O. We found that breathing frequency, tidal volume, and expired minute ventilation were higher in CF patients than in control subjects during low ETLs; a change in body position did not alter these ventilatory responses in the CF patients but did in the control subjects. All CF patients, but none of the control subjects, had tonic abdominal activity while supine. CF patients recruited abdominal muscles at lower loads, earlier in the respiratory cycle, and to a higher recruitment level in both positions than the control subjects, but burst duration of phasic activity was not different between groups.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  14. LOWER ESOPHAGEAL SPHINCTER PRESSURE MEASUREMENT UNDER STANDARDIZED INSPIRATORY MANEUVEURS

    PubMed Central

    RIBEIRO, Jeany Borges e Silva; DIÓGENES, Esther Cristina Arruda Oliveira; BEZERRA, Patrícia Carvalho; COUTINHO, Tanila Aguiar Andrade; de ALMEIDA, Cícera Geórgia Félix; SOUZA, Miguel Ângelo Nobre e

    2015-01-01

    Background: Through rhythmic variations, the diaphragm influence lower esophageal sphincter (LES) pressure acting as an external sphincter. LES pressure recording is characterized by increased pressure in inspiration due to contraction of the diaphragmatic crura that involves the sphincter. Aim: To describe a method of measuring LES pressure during standardized inspiratory maneuvers with increasing loads. Methods: The study population comprised of eight healthy female volunteers (average age of 31.5 years). An esophageal high-resolution manometry and impedance system was used for measuring the LES pressure during 3-second inspiratory efforts under 12, 24 and 48 cm H2O loads (Threshold maneuvers). Results: There was a significant difference between the average maximum LES pressure and the average maximum basal LES pressure during the first (76.19±17.92 difference, p=0.0008), second (86.92±19.01 difference, p=0.0004), and third seconds of the maneuver (90.86±17.93 difference, p=0.0002), with 12, 24 and 48 cmH2O loads. Conclusion: This maneuver is a standardization of the inspiratory LES pressure and may better differentiate patients with reflux disease from healthy individuals, and may also be useful for monitoring the treatment of these patients through inspiratory muscle training. PMID:26537140

  15. Effects of inspiratory muscle training on resistance to fatigue of respiratory muscles during exhaustive exercise.

    PubMed

    Segizbaeva, M O; Timofeev, N N; Donina, Zh A; Kur'yanovich, E N; Aleksandrova, N P

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of inspiratory muscle training (IMT) on resistance to fatigue of the diaphragm (D), parasternal (PS), sternocleidomastoid (SCM) and scalene (SC) muscles in healthy humans during exhaustive exercise. Daily inspiratory muscle strength training was performed for 3 weeks in 10 male subjects (at a pressure threshold load of 60% of maximal inspiratory pressure (MIP) for the first week, 70% of MIP for the second week, and 80% of MIP for the third week). Before and after training, subjects performed an incremental cycle test to exhaustion. Maximal inspiratory pressure and EMG-analysis served as indices of inspiratory muscle fatigue assessment. The before-to-after exercise decreases in MIP and centroid frequency (fc) of the EMG (D, PS, SCM, and SC) power spectrum (P<0.05) were observed in all subjects before the IMT intervention. Such changes were absent after the IMT. The study found that in healthy subjects, IMT results in significant increase in MIP (+18%), a delay of inspiratory muscle fatigue during exhaustive exercise, and a significant improvement in maximal work performance. We conclude that the IMT elicits resistance to the development of inspiratory muscles fatigue during high-intensity exercise.

  16. Effect of inspiratory muscle unloading on arousal responses to CO2 and hypoxia in sleeping dogs.

    PubMed

    Kimoff, R J; Kozar, L F; Yasuma, F; Bradley, T D; Phillipson, E A

    1993-03-01

    Chemical respiratory stimuli can induce arousal from sleep, but the specific mechanisms involved have not been established. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that mechanoreceptor stimuli arising in the ventilatory apparatus have a role in the arousal responses to progressive hypercapnia and hypoxia by comparing arousal responses during spontaneous ventilation with those obtained when the inspiratory muscles were unloaded by mechanical ventilatory assistance. Studies were performed in three trained dogs in which the adequacy of inspiratory muscle unloading was verified by diaphragmatic electromyographic (EMG) recordings. In rapid-eye-movement (REM) sleep the arousal threshold during progressive hypercapnia increased from 68.4 +/- 0.5 (SE) mmHg during spontaneous runs to 72.3 +/- 0.8 mmHg during mechanically assisted runs (P < 0.01). In contrast there were no changes in arousal responses to hypercapnia during non-REM (NREM) sleep or to hypoxia in either NREM or REM sleep. However, during the assisted hypoxic runs, EMG activity of the transversus abdominis muscle was increased compared with the unassisted runs; therefore, the effects on arousal threshold of unloading the inspiratory muscles may have been offset by increased loading of the expiratory muscles. The findings indicate that even in the absence of added mechanical loads, mechanoreceptor stimuli probably arising in the respiratory muscles contribute to the arousal response to hypercapnia during REM sleep.

  17. Inspiratory muscle training to enhance weaning from mechanical ventilation.

    PubMed

    Bissett, B; Leditschke, I A

    2007-10-01

    This report describes the use of specific inspiratory muscle training to enhance weaning from mechanical ventilation in a patient who had failed conventional weaning strategies. A 79-year-old man remained ventilator-dependent 17 days following laparotomy. A program of daily inspiratory muscle training was initiated. The mean training threshold increased progressively during the program and simultaneously the periods of unassisted breathing achieved gradually increased. By day 27, mechanical ventilation was no longer required. Inspiratory muscle training can be implemented effectively in the difficult to wean patient and should be considered for patients who have failed conventional weaning strategies.

  18. Inspiratory muscle training in the patient with neuromuscular disease.

    PubMed

    McCool, F D; Tzelepis, G E

    1995-11-01

    Pulmonary complications due to respiratory muscle dysfunction are commonly a source of morbidity and mortality in patients with neuromuscular diseases. This review discusses the adverse effects of respiratory muscle weakness on pulmonary mechanics and examines the role that inspiratory muscle training may play in reversing pulmonary dysfunction in these individuals. In asymptomatic persons, it is well established that the inspiratory muscles can be trained to increase both force and endurance. In patients with neuromuscular diseases, the effects of training protocols on force and endurance are more controversial. This article reviews seven studies that have evaluated respiratory muscle training in a total of 75 patients with varied neuromuscular disorders. Training regimens included breathing through inspiratory resistive loads and isocapnic hyperpnea. Despite methodologic differences among studies, investigators have generally shown that the inspiratory muscles are similar to other skeletal muscle groups in that they can be trained for both force and endurance in these patients. The training-related improvements in inspiratory muscle performance are more pronounced in patients who are less severely affected by their disease. In those patients who have disease to the extent that they are already retaining carbon dioxide, there is little change in force or endurance with training. In these individuals, the inspiratory muscles may already be working at a level sufficiently severe to provide a training stimulus with each breath. No adverse effects of inspiratory muscle training were reported. Inspiratory muscle training can improve force and endurance in patients with neuromuscular weakness.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7480122

  19. Bladder contractions alter inspiratory termination by superior laryngeal and intercostal nerve stimulation.

    PubMed

    Bartlett, D; Knuth, S L

    1999-08-01

    Gradual distension of the urinary bladder evokes spontaneous bladder contractions (SBCs), which are associated with reduced inspiratory activity in the phrenic and other inspiratory motor nerves. We examined the influence of isovolumetric SBCs on the threshold for termination of phrenic inspiration by electrical stimulation of superior laryngeal and/or mid-thoracic intercostal nerves (ICN) in decerebrate, vagotomized, paralyzed, ventilated cats. Although SBCs reduced phrenic inspiratory activity, the threshold for inspiratory termination by nerve stimulation was increased. The results emphasize the complexity of the synaptic connections among brain stem neurons governing micturition and breathing.

  20. Identification and Measurement of Intellictive Load Carrying Thresholds. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siegel, Arthur I.; Williams, Allan R., Jr.

    The conjecture was investigated that the intellective load carrying capability for selected intellective functions is identifiable and measurable. Intellective load carrying failure was defined as the point at which a change in transfer function components occurs as a tracking and a scaled intellective function were concomitantly performed. The…

  1. Effects of combined inspiratory muscle and cycle ergometer training on exercise performance in patients with COPD.

    PubMed

    Wanke, T; Formanek, D; Lahrmann, H; Brath, H; Wild, M; Wagner, C; Zwick, H

    1994-12-01

    Cycle ergometer training plays an important role in the rehabilitation of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), but the usefulness of specific inspiratory muscle training as part of pulmonary rehabilitation remains uncertain. To determine whether inspiratory muscle training could intensify the known beneficial effects of cycle ergometer training on exercise performance in these patients, we compared the effect of an 8 week inspiratory muscle training combined with cycle ergometer training with that of an 8 week cycle ergometer training alone on inspiratory muscle performance and general exercise capacity. Patients were randomly assigned to the two training groups; 21 patients received additional inspiratory muscle training (Group 1) and 21 did not (Group 2). Maximal sniff assessed oesophageal and transdiaphragmatic pressures served as parameters for global inspiratory muscle strength and diaphragmatic strength, respectively. The duration for which the patient could breathe against a constant inspiratory pressure load was used as an index of inspiratory muscle endurance. Exercise capacity was determined by an incremental symptom-limited cycle ergometer test. After the training period, inspiratory muscle performance improved significantly in the patients with inspiratory muscle training, but not in those without. Both training regimens increased maximal power output and oxygen uptake, but this improvement was significantly greater in the patients with inspiratory muscle training than in those without.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  2. The effect of inspiratory muscle fatigue on breathing pattern and ventilatory response to CO2.

    PubMed Central

    Mador, M J; Tobin, M J

    1992-01-01

    1. The effects of inducing inspiratory muscle fatigue on the subsequent breathing pattern were examined during resting unstimulated breathing and during CO2 rebreathing. In addition, we examined whether induction of inspiratory muscle fatigue alters CO2 responsiveness. 2. Global inspiratory muscle fatigue and diaphragmatic fatigue were achieved by having subjects breathe against an inspiratory resistive load while generating a predetermined fraction of either their maximal mouth pressure or maximal transdiaphragmatic pressure until they were unable to generate the target pressure. 3. Induction of inspiratory muscle fatigue had no effect on the subsequent breathing pattern during either unstimulated breathing or during CO2 rebreathing. 4. Following induction of inspiratory muscle fatigue, the slope of the ventilatory response to CO2 was significantly decreased from 18.8 +/- 3.3 during control to 13.8 +/- 2.1 l min-1 (% end-tidal CO2 concentration)-1 with fatigue (P < 0.02). PMID:1484352

  3. Intermittent inspiratory muscle training induces fiber hypertrophy in rat diaphragm.

    PubMed

    Bisschop, A; Gayan-Ramirez, G; Rollier, H; Gosselink, R; Dom, R; de Bock, V; Decramer, M

    1997-05-01

    The effects of 8 wk of moderate load intermittent inspiratory resistive loading on diaphragm contractility, and histochemistry of the diaphragm, scalenes, and gastrocnemius were studied in rats. A resistance was placed in the inspiratory port of a Hans-Rudolph valve, through which each animal breathed during 30 min/d, 5 times/wk (loaded group, n = 10). These rats were compared with animals breathing through the same device without inspiratory resistance (control group, n = 10). During loading, animals generated mean inspiratory pressures of -3.2 +/- 1.7 cm H2O with a TI/Ttot of 0.69 +/- 0.06, resulting in a tension-time index of 0.050. At the end of training, the diaphragm mass increased in loaded animals (0.17 +/- 0.01% body mass) compared with control animals (0.15 +/- 0.01%, p < 0.01), while scalene and gastrocnemius mass remained unchanged. Diaphragmatic force as well as fatigue resistance were similar in both groups, whereas time to peak tension was significantly (p < 0.01) shorter in loaded rats (18.8 +/- 1.7 ms) compared with control rats (21.2 +/- 1.8 ms), half-relaxation time remaining unchanged. Finally, hypertrophy of diaphragmatic type IIa (+19%, p < 0.01) and IIx/b (+12%, p < 0.05) was present in the loaded group. Histochemistry of the scalenes remained unchanged, whereas type IIx/b hypertrophy (+12%, p < 0.001) was observed in the gastrocnemius internus. We speculate that the latter was due to multiple escape maneuvers. We conclude that intermittent inspiratory muscle training: (1) caused fast twitch fiber hypertrophy in the diaphragm; (2) did not produce any effect in the scalenes. PMID:9154861

  4. Crack Growth Behavior in the Threshold Region for High Cycle Fatigue Loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forman, R. G.; Zanganeh, M.

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the results of a research program conducted to improve the understanding of fatigue crack growth rate behavior in the threshold growth rate region and to answer a question on the validity of threshold region test data. The validity question relates to the view held by some experimentalists that using the ASTM load shedding test method does not produce valid threshold test results and material properties. The question involves the fanning behavior observed in threshold region of da/dN plots for some materials in which the low R-ratio data fans out from the high R-ratio data. This fanning behavior or elevation of threshold values in the low R-ratio tests is generally assumed to be caused by an increase in crack closure in the low R-ratio tests. Also, the increase in crack closure is assumed by some experimentalists to result from using the ASTM load shedding test procedure. The belief is that this procedure induces load history effects which cause remote closure from plasticity and/or roughness changes in the surface morphology. However, experimental studies performed by the authors have shown that the increase in crack closure is a result of extensive crack tip bifurcations that can occur in some materials, particularly in aluminum alloys, when the crack tip cyclic yield zone size becomes less than the grain size of the alloy. This behavior is related to the high stacking fault energy (SFE) property of aluminum alloys which results in easier slip characteristics. Therefore, the fanning behavior which occurs in aluminum alloys is a function of intrinsic dislocation property of the alloy, and therefore, the fanned data does represent the true threshold properties of the material. However, for the corrosion sensitive steel alloys tested in laboratory air, the occurrence of fanning results from fretting corrosion at the crack tips, and these results should not be considered to be representative of valid threshold properties because the fanning is

  5. The generation of loads in excess of the osteogenic threshold by physical movement.

    PubMed

    Shippen, James M

    2013-06-01

    This study investigates the use of physical movement to cause joint and bone loads that stimulate bone growth in order to reduce the adverse effects of osteoporosis. It has been established that stresses in bones in excess of the osteogenic threshold will stimulate bone growth; however, protocols for the generation of these stresses had not been established. Two trial movements were examined in the study: the plié and a movement requiring the subject to move a leg sequentially to 45° displaced positions - the star excursion balance test. Using inverse dynamics and an optimisation approach, the loads in the muscles crossing the hip and knee joints and the corresponding joint contact forces were calculated. It was found that the osteogenic threshold was exceeded in both these trials identifying them as suitable exercises in the maintenance of bone health. In the order of increasing bone load at the hip, and hence increasing bone growth stimulation, are the following demi plié, star excursion balance test with maximum reach criterion, grande plié and star excursion balance test with maximum speed criterion. In the order of increasing bone load at the knee are demi plié, grande plié, star excursion balance test with maximum reach criterion and star excursion balance test with maximum speed criterion. However, due to the high loads encountered, these exercises are not recommended for subjects with advanced osteoporosis although the boundary between therapeutic bone loading leading to increase in bone mineral density and loads capable of causing fracture is unclear. PMID:23636751

  6. Increased lung volume limits endurance of inspiratory muscles.

    PubMed

    Tzelepis, G; McCool, F D; Leith, D E; Hoppin, F G

    1988-05-01

    We examined the influence of lung volume on the ability of normal subjects to sustain breathing against inspiratory resistive loading. Four normal subjects breathed on a closed circuit in which inspiration was loaded by a flow resistor. Subjects were assigned a series of breathing tasks over a range of pressures and flows. In each task there was a specified resistor and also targets for either mean esophageal or airway opening pressure, respiratory frequency, and duty cycle. Endurance was assessed as the length of time to failure of the assigned task. The prime experimental variable was lung volume, which was increased by approximately 1 liter during some tasks; 8 cmH2O continuous positive airway pressure was applied to increase lung volume without increasing elastic load. As previously shown (McCool et al.J. Appl. Physiol. 60: 299-303, 1986), for tasks that could be sustained for the same time, there was an inverse linear relationship of mean esophageal pressure with inspiratory flow rate. This trade-off of pressure and flow was apparent both with and without the increase of lung volume. Comparable tasks, however, could not be sustained as long at the higher lung volumes. This effect of volume on endurance was greater for tasks characterized by high inspiratory pressures and low flow rates than for tasks that could be sustained for the same time but that had lower inspiratory pressures and higher flow rates. This is probably due to the effects of shortening of the sarcomere on fatiguability. Increased lung volume, per se, may contribute to respiratory failure because of increased inspiratory muscle fatiguability by mechanisms independent of elastic load. PMID:3391883

  7. Influence of inspiratory resistance on performance during graded exercise tests on a cycle ergometer.

    PubMed

    Heus, Ronald; den Hartog, Emiel A; Kistemaker, Lyda J A; van Dijk, Walter J; Swenker, Gerard

    2004-11-01

    Due to more stringent requirements to protect personnel against hazardous gasses, the inspiratory resistance of the present generation of respiratory protective devices tends to increase. Therefore an important question is to what extent inspiratory resistance may increase without giving problems during physical work. In this study the effects of three levels (0.24; 1.4 and 8.3 kPa s l(-1)) of inspiratory resistance were tested on maximal voluntary performance. Nine male subjects performed a graded exercise test on a cycle ergometer with and without these three levels of inspiratory resistance. Oxygen consumption, heart rate, time to exhaustion and external work were measured. The results of these experiments showed that increasing inspiratory resistance led to a reduction of time to exhaustion (TTE) on a graded exercise test(GXT). Without inspiratory resistance the mean TTE was 11.9 min, the three levels of resistance gave the following mean TTE's: 10.7, 7.8 and 2.7 min. This study showed that TTE on a GXT can be predicted when physical fitness (VO2-max) of the subject and inspiratory resistance are known. The metabolic rate of the subjects was higher with inspiratory resistance, but no differences were found between the three selected inspiratory loads. Other breathing parameters as minute ventilation, tidal volume, expiration time and breathing frequency showed no or minor differences between the inspiratory resistances. The most important conclusion of these experiments is that the overall workload increases due to an increase in inspiratory resistance by wearing respiratory protective devices.

  8. Crack Growth Behavior in the Threshold Region for High Cycle Fatigue Loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forman, Royce G.; Figert, J.; Beek, J.; Ventura, J.; Martinez, J.; Samonski, F.

    2011-01-01

    This presentation describes results obtained from a research project conducted at the NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) that was jointly supported by the FAA Technical Center and JSC. The JSC effort was part of a multi-task FAA program involving several U.S. laboratories and initiated for the purpose of developing enhanced analysis tools to assess damage tolerance of rotorcraft and aircraft propeller systems. The research results to be covered in this presentation include a new understanding of the behavior of fatigue crack growth in the threshold region. This behavior is important for structural life analysis of aircraft propeller systems and certain rotorcraft structural components (e.g., the mast). These components are often designed to not allow fatigue crack propagation to exceed an experimentally determined fatigue crack growth threshold value. During the FAA review meetings for the program, disagreements occurred between the researchers regarding the observed fanning (spread between the da/dN curves of constant R) in the threshold region at low stress ratios, R. Some participants believed that the fanning was a result of the ASTM load shedding test method for threshold testing, and thus did not represent the true characteristics of the material. If the fanning portion of the threshold value is deleted or not included in a life analysis, a significant penalty in the calculated life and design of the component would occur. The crack growth threshold behavior was previously studied and reported by several research investigators in the time period: 1970-1980. Those investigators used electron microscopes to view the crack morphology of the fatigue fracture surfaces. Their results showed that just before reaching threshold, the crack morphology often changed from a striated to a faceted or cleavage-like morphology. This change was reported to have been caused by particular dislocation properties of the material. Based on the results of these early investigations, a

  9. Crack Growth Behavior in the Threshold Region for High Cycle Fatigue Loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forman, Royce G.; Zanganehgheshlaghi, Mohannad

    2014-01-01

    The research results described in this paper presents a new understanding of the behavior of fatigue crack growth in the threshold region. It is believed by some crack growth experts that the ASTM load shedding test method does not produce true or valid threshold properties. The concern involves the observed fanning of threshold region da/dN data plots for some materials in which the low R-ratio data fans out or away from the high R-ratio data. This data fanning or elevation of threshold values is obviously caused by an increase in crack closure in the low R-ratio tested specimens. This increase in crack closure is assumed by some investigators to be caused by a plastic wake on the crack surfaces that was created during the load shedding test phase. This study shows that the increase in crack closure is the result of an extensive occurrence of crack bifurcation behavior in some materials, particularly in aluminum alloys, when the crack tip cyclic yield zone size becomes less than the grain size of the alloy. This behavior is related to the high stacking fault energy (SFE) property of aluminum alloys which results in easier slip characteristics. Therefore, the particular fanning behavior in aluminum alloys is a function of intrinsic dislocation property of the materials and that the fanned data represents valid material properties. However, for corrosion sensitive steel alloys used in this study the fanning was caused by a build-up of iron oxide at the crack tip from fretting corrosion.

  10. High-Intensity Inspiratory Protocol Increases Heart Rate Variability in Myocardial Revascularization Patients

    PubMed Central

    Caruso, Flavia Cristina Rossi; Simões, Rodrigo Polaquini; Reis, Michel Silva; Guizilini, Solange; Alves, Vera Lucia dos Santos; Papa, Valeria; Arena, Ross; Borghi-Silva, Audrey

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate heart rate variability during an inspiratory muscle endurance protocol at three different load levels [30%, 60% and 80% of maximal inspiratory pressure], in patients who had previously undergone coronary artery bypass grafting. Methods: Nineteen late postoperative myocardial revascularization patients participating in a cardiovascular rehabilitation program were studied. Maximal inspiratory pressure maneuvers were performed. An inspiratory muscle endurance protocol at 30%, 60% and 80% of maximal inspiratory pressure was applied for four minutes each, in random order. Heart rate and RR intervals were recorded and heart rate variability was analyzed by time (RMSSD-the mean of the standard deviations for all R-R intervals, and RMSM-root-mean square differences of successive R-R intervals) and frequency domains indices (high and low frequency) in normalized units. ANOVA for repeated measurements was used to compare heart rate variability indices and Student t-test was used to compare the maximal inspiratory pressure and maximal expiratory pressure values. Results: Heart rate increased during performance of maximal respiratory pressures maneuvers, and the maximal inspiratory pressure and maximal expiratory pressure mean values were significantly lower than predicted values (P<0.05). RMSSD increased significantly at 80% in relation to rest and 30% of maximal inspiratory pressure and RMSM decreased at 30% and 60% of maximal inspiratory pressure in relation to rest (P<0.05). Additionally, there was significant and progressive decrease in low frequency and increase in high frequency at 30%, 60% and 80% of maximal inspiratory pressure in relation to the resting condition. Conclusion: These results suggest that respiratory muscle training at high intensities can promote greater parasympathetic activity and it may confer important benefits during a rehabilitation program in post-coronary artery bypass grafting. PMID:27074273

  11. Effects of creatine loading on electromyographic fatigue threshold in cycle ergometry in college-age men.

    PubMed

    Walter, Ashley A; Smith, Abbie E; Herda, Trent J; Ryan, Eric D; Moon, Jordan R; Cramer, Joel T; Stout, Jeffrey R

    2008-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of 5 d of creatine (Cr) loading on the electromyographic fatigue threshold (EMG FT) in college-age men. Sixteen men (age 22.4 +/- 2.6 yr, height 177.4 +/- 6.8 cm, weight 79.5 +/- 10.6 kg; M +/- SD) participated in this double-blind study and were randomly placed into either placebo (Pl; 10 g of flavored fructose powder per packet; n = 8) or Cr (5 g dicreatine citrate plus 10 g of flavored fructose powder per packet; n = 8) loading groups. Each participant ingested 1 packet 4 times/d, totaling 20 g/d for 5 days (loading). Before and after loading, each participant performed a discontinuous cycle-ergometer test to determine his EMG FT, using bipolar surface electrodes placed on the vastus lateralis of the right thigh. Four 60-s work bouts (ranging from 200 to 400 W) were completed. Adequate rest was given between bouts to allow for the participants' heart rate (HR) to drop within 10 beats of their resting HR. The EMG amplitude was averaged over 5-s intervals for each 60-s work bout. Resulting slopes from each successive work bout were used to calculate EMG FT. A 2-way ANOVA, Group (Cr vs. Pl) x Time (pre vs. post), resulted in a nonsignificant (p > .05) interaction for supplement and time. In addition, a significant increase (p = .009) in weight was observed in the Cr group. These data suggest that there was a minimal influence of Cr loading on EMG FT for the participants in this study.

  12. Inspiratory muscle training improves antireflux barrier in GERD patients.

    PubMed

    Nobre e Souza, Miguel Ângelo; Lima, Maria Josire Vitorino; Martins, Giovanni Bezerra; Nobre, Rivianny Arrais; Souza, Marcellus Henrique Loiola Ponte; de Oliveira, Ricardo Brandt; dos Santos, Armênio Aguiar

    2013-12-01

    The crural diaphragm (CD) is an essential component of the esophagogastric junction (EGJ), and inspiratory exercises may modify its function. This study's goal is to verify if inspiratory muscle training (IMT) improves EGJ motility and gastroesophageal reflux (GER). Twelve GER disease [GERD; 7 males, 20-47 yr, 9 esophagitis, and 3 nonerosive reflex disease (NERD)] and 7 healthy volunteers (3 males, 20-41 yr) performed esophageal pH monitoring, manometry, and heart rate variability (HRV) studies. A 6-cm sleeve catheter measured average EGJ pressure during resting, peak inspiratory EGJ pressures during sinus arrhythmia maneuver (SAM) and inhalations under 17-, 35-, and 70-cmH2O loads (TH maneuvers), and along 1 h after a meal. GERD patients entered a 5-days-a-week IMT program. One author scored heartburn and regurgitation before and after IMT. IMT increased average EGJ pressure (19.7 ± 2.4 vs. 29.5 ± 2.1 mmHg; P < 0.001) and inspiratory EGJ pressure during SAM (89.6 ± 7.6 vs. 125.6 ± 13.3 mmHg; P = 0.001) and during TH maneuvers. The EGJ-pressure gain across 35- and 70-cmH2O loads was lower for GERD volunteers. The number and cumulative duration of the transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxations decreased after IMT. Proximal progression of GER decreased after IMT but not the distal acid exposure. Low-frequency power increased after IMT and the higher its increment the lower the increment of supine acid exposure. IMT decreased heartburn and regurgitation scores. In conclusion, IMT improved EGJ pressure, reduced GER proximal progression, and reduced GERD symptoms. Some GERD patients have a CD failure, and IMT may prove beneficial as a GERD add-on treatment.

  13. A New Load Residual Threshold Definition for the Evaluation of Wind Tunnel Strain-Gage Balance Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulbrich, N.; Volden, T.

    2016-01-01

    A new definition of a threshold for the detection of load residual outliers of wind tunnel strain-gage balance data was developed. The new threshold is defined as the product between the inverse of the absolute value of the primary gage sensitivity and an empirical limit of the electrical outputs of a strain{gage. The empirical limit of the outputs is either 2.5 microV/V for balance calibration or check load residuals. A reduced limit of 0.5 microV/V is recommended for the evaluation of differences between repeat load points because, by design, the calculation of these differences removes errors in the residuals that are associated with the regression analysis of the data itself. The definition of the new threshold and different methods for the determination of the primary gage sensitivity are discussed. In addition, calibration data of a six-component force balance and a five-component semi-span balance are used to illustrate the application of the proposed new threshold definition to different types of strain{gage balances. During the discussion of the force balance example it is also explained how the estimated maximum expected output of a balance gage can be used to better understand results of the application of the new threshold definition.

  14. A threshold of mechanical strain intensity for the direct activation of osteoblast function exists in a murine maxilla loading model.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Natsuki; Aoki, Kazuhiro; Marcián, Petr; Borák, Libor; Wakabayashi, Noriyuki

    2016-10-01

    The response to the mechanical loading of bone tissue has been extensively investigated; however, precisely how much strain intensity is necessary to promote bone formation remains unclear. Combination studies utilizing histomorphometric and numerical analyses were performed using the established murine maxilla loading model to clarify the threshold of mechanical strain needed to accelerate bone formation activity. For 7 days, 191 kPa loading stimulation for 30 min/day was applied to C57BL/6J mice. Two regions of interest, the AWAY region (away from the loading site) and the NEAR region (near the loading site), were determined. The inflammatory score increased in the NEAR region, but not in the AWAY region. A strain intensity map obtained from [Formula: see text] images was superimposed onto the images of the bone formation inhibitor, sclerostin-positive cell localization. The number of sclerostin-positive cells significantly decreased after mechanical loading of more than [Formula: see text] in the AWAY region, but not in the NEAR region. The mineral apposition rate, which shows the bone formation ability of osteoblasts, was accelerated at the site of surface strain intensity, namely around [Formula: see text], but not at the site of lower surface strain intensity, which was around [Formula: see text] in the AWAY region, thus suggesting the existence of a strain intensity threshold for promoting bone formation. Taken together, our data suggest that a threshold of mechanical strain intensity for the direct activation of osteoblast function and the reduction of sclerostin exists in a murine maxilla loading model in the non-inflammatory region.

  15. Fatigue crack growth threshold as a design criterion - statistical scatter and load ratio in the Kitagawa-Takahashi diagram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolitsch, S.; Gänser, H.-P.; Maierhofer, J.; Pippan, R.

    2016-03-01

    Cracks in components reduce the endurable stress so that the endurance limit obtained from common smooth fatigue specimens cannot be used anymore as a design criterion. In such cases, the Kitagawa-Takahashi diagram can be used to predict the admissible stress range for infinite life, at a given crack length and stress range. This diagram is constructed for a single load ratio R. However, in typical mechanical engineering applications, the load ratio R varies widely due to the applied load spectra and residual stresses. In the present work an extended Kitagawa-Takahashi diagram accounting for crack length, crack extension and load ratio is constructed. To describe the threshold behaviour of short cracks, a master resistance curve valid for a wide range of steels is developed using a statistical approach.

  16. Laryngomalacia and inspiratory obstruction in later childhood.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, G J; Cooper, D M

    1981-01-01

    Pulmonary function and symptoms were reviewed in 20 children in whom laryngomalacia had been diagnosed by direct laryngoscopy in infancy. Most children developed stridor in the first 2 weeks, but 3 children did not develop it until age 3 months. The mean duration of stridor was 4 years 2 months, with a range of 4 months to 12 years 7 months. Six children had marked posseting as infants. Airway dynamics were assessed by flow volume loops. All except one had normal expiratory flow volume curves. Inspiratory abnormalities were detected in 7 children; 6 were assessed as having variable extrathoracic inspiratory obstructions and 1 had a fixed obstruction consistent with subglottic stenosis. The mean ratios of maximal inspiratory flow at 50% of vital capacity divided by forced vital capacity in the laryngomalacia and control groups differed significantly, as did the mean ratios of maximal expiratory flow to maximal inspiratory flow at 50% of forced vital capacity. Laryngomalacia is not necessarily a benign disorder of limited duration; there may be persisting inspiratory obstruction in later childhood. PMID:7259255

  17. The differential effects of inspiratory, expiratory, and combined resistive breathing on healthy lung

    PubMed Central

    Loverdos, Konstantinos; Toumpanakis, Dimitrios; Litsiou, Eleni; Karavana, Vassiliki; Glynos, Constantinos; Magkou, Christina; Theocharis, Stamatios; Vassilakopoulos, Theodoros

    2016-01-01

    Combined resistive breathing (CRB) is the hallmark of obstructive airway disease pathophysiology. We have previously shown that severe inspiratory resistive breathing (IRB) induces acute lung injury in healthy rats. The role of expiratory resistance is unknown. The possibility of a load-dependent type of resistive breathing-induced lung injury also remains elusive. Our aim was to investigate the differential effects of IRB, expiratory resistive breathing (ERB), and CRB on healthy rat lung and establish the lowest loads required to induce injury. Anesthetized tracheostomized rats breathed through a two-way valve. Varying resistances were connected to the inspiratory, expiratory, or both ports, so that the peak inspiratory pressure (IRB) was 20%–40% or peak expiratory (ERB) was 40%–70% of maximum. CRB was assessed in inspiratory/expiratory pressures of 30%/50%, 40%/50%, and 40%/60% of maximum. Quietly breathing animals served as controls. At 6 hours, respiratory system mechanics were measured, and bronchoalveolar lavage was performed for measurement of cell and protein concentration. Lung tissue interleukin-6 and interleukin-1β levels were estimated, and a lung injury histological score was determined. ERB produced significant, load-independent neutrophilia, without mechanical or permeability derangements. IRB 30% was the lowest inspiratory load that provoked lung injury. CRB increased tissue elasticity, bronchoalveolar lavage total cell, macrophage and neutrophil counts, protein and cytokine levels, and lung injury score in a dose-dependent manner. In conclusion, CRB load dependently deranges mechanics, increases permeability, and induces inflammation in healthy rats. ERB is a putative inflammatory stimulus for the lung. PMID:27499619

  18. Determination of dual parameter auto-sampling trigger thresholds for pollutant load monitoring in various land uses.

    PubMed

    Nnadi, Fidelia; Gurr, Eric

    2015-05-01

    Environmental pollutants are health hazards and are typically transported during runoff events. Monitoring the loadings of these pollutants with auto-samplers require precise trigger thresholds to effectively account for total maximum daily loads (TMDLs) entering natural water bodies. Traditionally, auto-samplers are triggered by delaying the start of sampling until pollutant wave is present during rainfall event. The rainfall-related triggers are typically limited to small watersheds, where lag and travel times are consistent and predictable. However, in large and more complex watersheds, flow or stage is typically used either by a set threshold on change in instantaneous flow rate or water level. Generally, trigger thresholds are difficult to establish due to seasonal fluctuations in stream flow and variations in rainfall. This study investigated dual parameter trigger based on instantaneous change and variance from a moving average for flow and stage. Nineteen auto-samplers, installed within six watersheds of varying land uses in City of Kissimmee, FL, were evaluated over 3-year period. The results suggested that using 20- to 30-min moving average of 5-min sampling interval for both parameters was sufficient to detect pollutant waves with minimal false triggers. Also, change from average flow rate (∆Qave) and a percent change from average stage (∆Have%) were found to the preferred parameters. The ∆Have% values ranging from -0.012 to 0.20% and ∆Qave ranging from 0.014 to 0.850 m(3)/s were found to give effective results for all stations in the study area. It was also observed that these trigger thresholds varied with land use, stream flow condition, and auto-sampler locations within the watershed. PMID:25838061

  19. "Functional" Inspiratory and Core Muscle Training Enhances Running Performance and Economy.

    PubMed

    Tong, Tomas K; McConnell, Alison K; Lin, Hua; Nie, Jinlei; Zhang, Haifeng; Wang, Jiayuan

    2016-10-01

    Tong, TK, McConnell, AK, Lin, H, Nie, J, Zhang, H, and Wang, J. "Functional" inspiratory and core muscle training enhances running performance and economy. J Strength Cond Res 30(10): 2942-2951, 2016-We compared the effects of two 6-week high-intensity interval training interventions. Under the control condition (CON), only interval training was undertaken, whereas under the intervention condition (ICT), interval training sessions were followed immediately by core training, which was combined with simultaneous inspiratory muscle training (IMT)-"functional" IMT. Sixteen recreational runners were allocated to either ICT or CON groups. Before the intervention phase, both groups undertook a 4-week program of "foundation" IMT to control for the known ergogenic effect of IMT (30 inspiratory efforts at 50% maximal static inspiratory pressure [P0] per set, 2 sets per day, 6 days per week). The subsequent 6-week interval running training phase consisted of 3-4 sessions per week. In addition, the ICT group undertook 4 inspiratory-loaded core exercises (10 repetitions per set, 2 sets per day, inspiratory load set at 50% post-IMT P0) immediately after each interval training session. The CON group received neither core training nor functional IMT. After the intervention phase, global inspiratory and core muscle functions increased in both groups (p ≤ 0.05), as evidenced by P0 and a sport-specific endurance plank test (SEPT) performance, respectively. Compared with CON, the ICT group showed larger improvements in SEPT, running economy at the speed of the onset of blood lactate accumulation, and 1-hour running performance (3.04% vs. 1.57%, p ≤ 0.05). The changes in these variables were interindividually correlated (r ≥ 0.57, n = 16, p ≤ 0.05). Such findings suggest that the addition of inspiratory-loaded core conditioning into a high-intensity interval training program augments the influence of the interval program on endurance running performance and that this may be

  20. 21 CFR 868.1780 - Inspiratory airway pressure meter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Inspiratory airway pressure meter. 868.1780... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1780 Inspiratory airway pressure meter. (a) Identification. An inspiratory airway pressure meter is a device used to measure the...

  1. 21 CFR 868.1780 - Inspiratory airway pressure meter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Inspiratory airway pressure meter. 868.1780... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1780 Inspiratory airway pressure meter. (a) Identification. An inspiratory airway pressure meter is a device used to measure the...

  2. 21 CFR 868.1780 - Inspiratory airway pressure meter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Inspiratory airway pressure meter. 868.1780... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1780 Inspiratory airway pressure meter. (a) Identification. An inspiratory airway pressure meter is a device used to measure the...

  3. 21 CFR 868.1780 - Inspiratory airway pressure meter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Inspiratory airway pressure meter. 868.1780... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1780 Inspiratory airway pressure meter. (a) Identification. An inspiratory airway pressure meter is a device used to measure the...

  4. 21 CFR 868.1780 - Inspiratory airway pressure meter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Inspiratory airway pressure meter. 868.1780... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1780 Inspiratory airway pressure meter. (a) Identification. An inspiratory airway pressure meter is a device used to measure the...

  5. Groundwater and stream threshold values for targeted and differentiated output based regulation of nutrient loadings to ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinsby, Klaus; Refsgaard, Jens Christian

    2015-04-01

    Currently more than 50 % of the European surface water bodies do not meet the objective of good ecological status primarily due to excessive nutrient loadings (mainly N and P) according to recent assessments, and there is a strong need to reduce nutrient loadings to freshwater as well as marine ecosystems. This has been recognized for decades and measures and regulations in many EU member states have been able to reduce the nutrient loadings to e.g. lakes and coastal waters significantly. However, recent assessments also demonstrate that the nutrient loadings to many aquatic ecosystems are still too high. A well known example is the Baltic Sea where the BONUS program has invested significant funds in understanding and reducing nutrient loadings to the Baltic Sea, which is currently considered one of the most polluted seas, globally, and which as a consequence has the largest dead sea-floor area presently known because of eutrophication and oxygen depletion partly due to high nutrient loadings. Hence, further reduction of nutrient loadings to the Baltic Sea is required to improve the ecological status of the Baltic Sea. The new "Soils2Sea" project ("Reducing nutrient loadings from agricultural soils to the Baltic Sea via groundwater and streams") in the BONUS program for the Baltic Sea, seeks to develop new measures and management techniques that can reduce nutrient loadings to the coastal waters of the Baltic Sea to levels ensuring a future good ecological status of this ecosystem. The Soils2Sea project investigates and assesses nutrient loadings from hillslope/field and sub-catchment scale to the scale of the whole Baltic Sea catchment and focus on development on differentiated regulations and land use that take into account reduction and retention of nitrate in groundwater and surface water systems. We suggest that an important management and governance tool would be to derive groundwater and stream threshold values at both river basin, sub-catchment and perhaps

  6. The output from human inspiratory motoneurone pools

    PubMed Central

    Butler, Jane E; Gandevia, Simon C

    2008-01-01

    Survival requires adequate pulmonary ventilation which, in turn, depends on adequate contraction of muscles acting on the chest wall in the presence of a patent upper airway. Bulbospinal outputs projecting directly and indirectly to ‘obligatory’ respiratory motoneurone pools generate the required muscle contractions. Recent studies of the phasic inspiratory output of populations of single motor units to five muscles acting on the chest wall (including the diaphragm) reveal that the time of onset, the progressive recruitment, and the amount of motoneuronal drive (expressed as firing frequency) differ among the muscles. Tonic firing with an inspiratory modulation of firing rate is common in low intercostal spaces of the parasternal and external intercostal muscles but rare in the diaphragm. A new time and frequency plot has been developed to depict the behaviour of the motoneurone populations. The magnitude of inspiratory firing of motor unit populations is linearly correlated to the mechanical advantage of the intercostal muscle region at which the motor unit activity is recorded. This represents a ‘neuromechanical’ principle by which the CNS controls motoneuronal output according to mechanical advantage, presumably in addition to the Henneman's size principle of motoneurone recruitment. Studies of the genioglossus, an obligatory upper airway muscle that helps maintain airway patency, reveal that it receives simultaneous inspiratory, expiratory and tonic drives even during quiet breathing. There is much to be learned about the neural drive to pools of human inspiratory and expiratory muscles, not only during respiratory tasks but also in automatic and volitional tasks, and in diseases that alter the required drive. PMID:17974589

  7. Cardiorespiratory and Metabolic Responses to Loaded Half Squat Exercise Executed at an Intensity Corresponding to the Lactate Threshold.

    PubMed

    Maté-Muñoz, José Luis; Domínguez, Raúl; Barba, Manuel; Monroy, Antonio J; Rodríguez, Bárbara; Ruiz-Solano, Pedro; Garnacho-Castaño, Manuel V

    2015-09-01

    This study was designed to identify the blood lactate threshold (LT2) for the half squat (HS) and to examine cardiorespiratory and metabolic variables during a HS test performed at a work intensity corresponding to the LT2. Twenty-four healthy men completed 3 test sessions. In the first, their one-repetition maximum (1RM) was determined for the HS. In the second session, a resistance HS incremental-load test was performed to determine LT2. Finally, in the third session, subjects performed a constant-load HS exercise at the load corresponding to the LT2 (21 sets of 15 repetitions with 1 min of rest between sets). In this last test, blood samples were collected for lactate determination before the test and 30 s after the end of set (S) 3, S6, S9, S12, S15, S18 and S21. During the test, heart rate (HR) was telemetrically monitored and oxygen consumption (VO2), carbon dioxide production (VCO2), minute ventilation (VE), respiratory exchange ratio (RER), ventilatory equivalent for O2 (VE·VO2 (-1)) and ventilatory equivalent for CO2 (VE·VCO2 (-1)) were monitored using a breath-by-breath respiratory gas analyzer. The mean LT2 for the participants was 24.8 ± 4.8% 1RM. Blood lactate concentrations showed no significant differences between sets 3 and 21 of exercise (p = 1.000). HR failed to vary between S6 and S21 (p > 1.000). The respiratory variables VO2, VCO2, and VE·VCO2 (-1) stabilized from S3 to the end of the constant-load HS test (p = 0.471, p = 0.136, p = 1.000), while VE and VE·VO2 (-1) stabilized from S6 to S21. RER did not vary significantly across exercise sets (p = 0.103). The LT2 was readily identified in the incremental HS test. Cardiorespiratory and metabolic variables remained stable during this resistance exercise conducted at an exercise intensity corresponding to the LT2. These responses need to be confirmed for other resistance exercises and adaptations in these responses after a training program also need to be addressed. Key pointsIt can be

  8. Cardiorespiratory and Metabolic Responses to Loaded Half Squat Exercise Executed at an Intensity Corresponding to the Lactate Threshold

    PubMed Central

    Maté-Muñoz, José Luis; Domínguez, Raúl; Barba, Manuel; Monroy, Antonio J.; Rodríguez, Bárbara; Ruiz-Solano, Pedro; Garnacho-Castaño, Manuel V.

    2015-01-01

    This study was designed to identify the blood lactate threshold (LT2) for the half squat (HS) and to examine cardiorespiratory and metabolic variables during a HS test performed at a work intensity corresponding to the LT2. Twenty-four healthy men completed 3 test sessions. In the first, their one-repetition maximum (1RM) was determined for the HS. In the second session, a resistance HS incremental-load test was performed to determine LT2. Finally, in the third session, subjects performed a constant-load HS exercise at the load corresponding to the LT2 (21 sets of 15 repetitions with 1 min of rest between sets). In this last test, blood samples were collected for lactate determination before the test and 30 s after the end of set (S) 3, S6, S9, S12, S15, S18 and S21. During the test, heart rate (HR) was telemetrically monitored and oxygen consumption (VO2), carbon dioxide production (VCO2), minute ventilation (VE), respiratory exchange ratio (RER), ventilatory equivalent for O2 (VE·VO2-1) and ventilatory equivalent for CO2 (VE·VCO2-1) were monitored using a breath-by-breath respiratory gas analyzer. The mean LT2 for the participants was 24.8 ± 4.8% 1RM. Blood lactate concentrations showed no significant differences between sets 3 and 21 of exercise (p = 1.000). HR failed to vary between S6 and S21 (p > 1.000). The respiratory variables VO2, VCO2, and VE·VCO2-1 stabilized from S3 to the end of the constant-load HS test (p = 0.471, p = 0.136, p = 1.000), while VE and VE·VO2-1 stabilized from S6 to S21. RER did not vary significantly across exercise sets (p = 0.103). The LT2 was readily identified in the incremental HS test. Cardiorespiratory and metabolic variables remained stable during this resistance exercise conducted at an exercise intensity corresponding to the LT2. These responses need to be confirmed for other resistance exercises and adaptations in these responses after a training program also need to be addressed. Key points It can be identified

  9. Tonic Neuromodulation of the Inspiratory Rhythm Generator

    PubMed Central

    Peña-Ortega, Fernando

    2012-01-01

    The generation of neural network dynamics relies on the interactions between the intrinsic and synaptic properties of their neural components. Moreover, neuromodulators allow networks to change these properties and adjust their activity to specific challenges. Endogenous continuous (“tonic”) neuromodulation can regulate and sometimes be indispensible for networks to produce basal activity. This seems to be the case for the inspiratory rhythm generator located in the pre-Bötzinger complex (preBötC). This neural network is necessary and sufficient for generating inspiratory rhythms. The preBötC produces normal respiratory activity (eupnea) as well as sighs under normoxic conditions, and it generates gasping under hypoxic conditions after a reconfiguration process. The reconfiguration leading to gasping generation involves changes of synaptic and intrinsic properties that can be mediated by several neuromodulators. Over the past years, it has been shown that endogenous continuous neuromodulation of the preBötC may involve the continuous action of amines and peptides on extrasynaptic receptors. I will summarize the findings supporting the role of endogenous continuous neuromodulation in the generation and regulation of different inspiratory rhythms, exploring the possibility that these neuromodulatory actions involve extrasynaptic receptors along with evidence of glial modulation of preBötC activity. PMID:22934010

  10. [Inspiratory muscle resistance to fatigue during exercise and simulated airway obstruction].

    PubMed

    Segizbaeva, M O; Aleksandrova, N P

    2014-01-01

    Respiratory muscle fatigue can develop during simulated airway obstruction. The aim of this study was to characterize the pattern of inspiratory muscle fatigue and to assess the resistance to fatigue of diaphragm (D), parasternal (PS), sternocleidomastoid (SM) and scalene (SC). 8 healthy untrained subjects participated in this study. To identify signs of inspiratory muscles fatigue development electromyographic activity of D, PS, SCM and SC was recorded during 5-min exercise with loaded breathing (40 cm H2O/L · s(-1)). The before-to-after exercise measurements of maximal inspiratory pressure (MIP) and EMG power spectrum changes were performed. Maximal inspiratory pressure declined about 12% after exercise test compared with control, whereas the peak magnitude of integrated electrical activity of D, PS, SCM and SC during post-exercise Muller's maneuver was significantly greater than in pre-exercise test in all subjects. The extent ofinspiratory muscles fatigue was evaluated by analysis of shift in centroid frequency (fc) of EMG power spectrum. All subjects demonstrated a significant reduction in fc of PS, SCM and SC.fc of D was not changed. Diaphragm is more resistantto fatigue during obstructive breathing compared with PS, SCM and SC. The data suggest that the reduction of maximum inspiratory pressure in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease also caused primarily by the weakening of the accessory muscles, while the weakness of the diaphragm may occur in the later stages of the disease. The functional failure of accessory muscles is an additional factor, which, along with the additional breathing resistance increases the load on the diaphragm, promoting its fatigue and reduced respiratory reserve.

  11. Ammonia threshold for inhibition of anaerobic digestion of thin stillage and the importance of organic loading rate.

    PubMed

    Moestedt, Jan; Müller, Bettina; Westerholm, Maria; Schnürer, Anna

    2016-03-01

    Biogas production from nitrogen-rich feedstock results in release of ammonia (NH3), causing inhibition of the microbial process. The reported threshold ammonia value for stable biogas production varies greatly between studies, probably because of differences in operating conditions. Moreover, it is often difficult to separate the effect of ammonia inhibition from that of organic loading rate (OLR), as these two factors are often interrelated. This study attempted to distinguish the effects of ammonia and OLR by analysis of two laboratory-scale biogas reactors operating with thin stillage and subjected to an increase in free ammonia (from 0.30 to 1.1 g L(-1)) either by addition of an external nitrogen source (urea) or by increasing the OLR (3.2-6.0 g volatile solids L(-1) d(-1)). The results showed that ammonia concentration was detrimental for process performance, with the threshold for stability in both processes identified as being about 1 g NH3-N L(-1), irrespective of OLR. Analysis of the methanogenic community showed limited differences between the two reactors on order level and a clear increase in the abundance of Methanomicrobiales, particularly Methanoculleus sp., in response to increasing ammonia concentration. Further comprehensive molecular analysis revealed that diverse Methanoculleus species dominated in the reactors at a given ammonia level at different OLR. The acetogenic community was clearly affected by both ammonia concentration and OLR, suggesting that the volatile fatty acid load in relation to the higher OLR was important for the dynamics of this community. PMID:26686366

  12. Effects of expiratory flow resistance on inspiratory work of breathing.

    PubMed

    Banner, M J; Downs, J B; Kirby, R R; Smith, R A; Boysen, P G; Lampotang, S

    1988-04-01

    To minimize work of breathing, airway pressure should not fluctuate during spontaneous breathing with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP). However, flow resistance in the inspiratory limb of the breathing circuit and an inadequate continuous gas flow rate result in airway pressure fluctuation and increased work of breathing. Flow resistance of the expiratory pressure/exhalation valve also directly affects the level of airway pressure during spontaneous inhalation with CPAP (the greater the resistance of the valve, the greater the decrease in airway pressure and work of breathing). We compared this effect with three types of expiratory pressure valves: a threshold resistor with low resistance to flow, an inflatable balloon (mushroom) valve with moderate resistance to flow, and a variable-orifice flow resistor with a high resistance to flow. Work increased up to threefold with the balloon valve and more than tenfold with the flow resistor compared with the threshold resistor. To apply CPAP, expiratory pressure valves with low resistance to flow should be used to minimize fluctuations in airway pressure and, thus, in the work of spontaneous breathing. PMID:3280260

  13. Randomized Controlled Trials to Define Viral Load Thresholds for Cytomegalovirus Pre-Emptive Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Griffiths, Paul D.; Rothwell, Emily; Raza, Mohammed; Wilmore, Stephanie; Doyle, Tomas; Harber, Mark; O’Beirne, James; Mackinnon, Stephen; Jones, Gareth; Thorburn, Douglas; Mattes, Frank; Nebbia, Gaia; Atabani, Sowsan; Smith, Colette; Stanton, Anna; Emery, Vincent C.

    2016-01-01

    Background To help decide when to start and when to stop pre-emptive therapy for cytomegalovirus infection, we conducted two open-label randomized controlled trials in renal, liver and bone marrow transplant recipients in a single centre where pre-emptive therapy is indicated if viraemia exceeds 3000 genomes/ml (2520 IU/ml) of whole blood. Methods Patients with two consecutive viraemia episodes each below 3000 genomes/ml were randomized to continue monitoring or to immediate treatment (Part A). A separate group of patients with viral load greater than 3000 genomes/ml was randomized to stop pre-emptive therapy when two consecutive levels less than 200 genomes/ml (168 IU/ml) or less than 3000 genomes/ml were obtained (Part B). For both parts, the primary endpoint was the occurrence of a separate episode of viraemia requiring treatment because it was greater than 3000 genomes/ml. Results In Part A, the primary endpoint was not significantly different between the two arms; 18/32 (56%) in the monitor arm had viraemia greater than 3000 genomes/ml compared to 10/27 (37%) in the immediate treatment arm (p = 0.193). However, the time to developing an episode of viraemia greater than 3000 genomes/ml was significantly delayed among those randomized to immediate treatment (p = 0.022). In Part B, the primary endpoint was not significantly different between the two arms; 19/55 (35%) in the less than 200 genomes/ml arm subsequently had viraemia greater than 3000 genomes/ml compared to 23/51 (45%) among those randomized to stop treatment in the less than 3000 genomes/ml arm (p = 0.322). However, the duration of antiviral treatment was significantly shorter (p = 0.0012) in those randomized to stop treatment when viraemia was less than 3000 genomes/ml. Discussion The results illustrate that patients have continuing risks for CMV infection with limited time available for intervention. We see no need to alter current rules for stopping or starting pre-emptive therapy. PMID:27684379

  14. Pressure-flow effects on endurance of inspiratory muscles.

    PubMed

    McCool, F D; McCann, D R; Leith, D E; Hoppin, F G

    1986-01-01

    We examined the effects of varying inspiratory pressures and flows on inspiratory muscle endurance. Four normal subjects performed voluntary forced breathing with various assigned inspiratory tasks. Duty cycle, tidal volume, and mean lung volume were the same in all tasks. Mean esophageal pressure, analogous to a pressure-time integral (PTes), was varied over a wide range. In each task the subject maintained an assigned PTes while breathing on one of a range of inspiratory resistors, and this gave a range of inspiratory flows at any given PTes. Inspiratory muscle endurance for each task was assessed by the length of time the task could be maintained (Tlim). For a given resistor, Tlim increased as PTes decreased. At a given PTes, Tlim increased as the external resistance increased and therefore as mean inspiratory flow rate (VI) decreased. Furthermore, for a given Tlim, PTes and VI were linearly related with a negative slope. We conclude that inspiratory flow, probably because of its relationship to the velocity of muscle shortening, is an independent variable importantly influencing endurance of the inspiratory muscles. PMID:3944040

  15. Influences of NREM sleep on the activity of tonic vs. inspiratory phasic muscles in normal men.

    PubMed

    Tangel, D J; Mezzanotte, W S; Sandberg, E J; White, D P

    1992-09-01

    Studies of sleep influences on human pharyngeal and other respiratory muscles suggest that the activity of these muscles may be affected by non-rapid-eye-movement (NREM) sleep in a nonuniform manner. This variable sleep response may relate to the pattern of activation of the muscle (inspiratory phasic vs. tonic) and peripheral events occurring in the airway. Furthermore, the ability of these muscles to respond to respiratory stimuli during NREM sleep may also differ. To systematically investigate the effect of NREM sleep on respiratory muscle activity, we studied two tonic muscles [tensor palatini (TP), masseter (M)] and two inspiratory phasic ones [genioglossus (GG), diaphragm (D)], also measuring the response of these muscles to inspiratory resistive loading (12 cmH2O.l-1.s) during wakefulness and NREM sleep. Seven normal male subjects were studied on a single night with intramuscular electrodes placed in the TP and GG and surface electrodes placed over the D and M. Sleep stage, inspiratory airflow, and moving time average electromyograph (EMG) of the above four muscles were continuously recorded. The EMG of both tonic muscles fell significantly (P less than 0.05) during NREM sleep [TP awake, 4.3 +/- 0.05 (SE) arbitrary units, stage 2, 1.1 +/- 0.2; stage 3/4, 1.0 +/- 0.2. Masseter awake, 4.8 +/- 0.6; stage 2, 3.3 +/- 0.5; stage 3/4, 3.1 +/- 0.5]. On the other hand, the peak phasic EMG of both inspiratory phasic muscles (GG and D) was well maintained.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  16. Effects of inspiratory muscle training on dynamic hyperinflation in patients with COPD.

    PubMed

    Petrovic, Milos; Reiter, Michael; Zipko, Harald; Pohl, Wolfgang; Wanke, Theodor

    2012-01-01

    Dynamic hyperinflation has important clinical consequences in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Given that most of these patients have respiratory and peripheral muscle weakness, dyspnea and functional exercise capacity may improve as a result of inspiratory muscle training (IMT). The aim of the study was to analyze the effects of IMT on exercise capacity, dyspnea, and inspiratory fraction (IF) during exercise in patients with COPD. Daily inspiratory muscle strength and endurance training was performed for 8 weeks in 10 patients with COPD GOLD II and III. Ten patients with COPD II and III served as a control group. Maximal inspiratory pressure (Pimax) and endurance time during resistive breathing maneuvers (tlim) served as parameter for inspiratory muscle capacity. Before and after training, the patients performed an incremental symptom limited exercise test to maximum and a constant load test on a cycle ergometer at 75% of the peak work rate obtained in the pretraining incremental test. ET was defined as the duration of loaded pedaling. Following IMT, there was a statistically significant increase in inspiratory muscle performance of the Pimax from 7.75 ± 0.47 to 9.15 ± 0.73 kPa (P < 0.01) and of tlim from 348 ± 54 to 467 ± 58 seconds (P < 0.01). A significant increase in IF, indicating decreased dynamic hyperinflation, was observed during both exercise tests. Further, the ratio of breathing frequency to minute ventilation (bf/V'(E)) decreased significantly, indicating an improved breathing pattern. A significant decrease in perception of dyspnea was also measured. Peak work rate during the incremental cycle ergometer test remained constant, while ET during the constant load test increased significantly from 597.1 ± 80.8 seconds at baseline to 733.6 ± 74.3 seconds (P < 0.01). No significant changes during either exercise tests were measured in the control group. The present study found that in patients with COPD, IMT results in

  17. Inspiratory flow and intrapulmonary gas distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Rehder, K.; Knopp, T.J.; Brusasco, V.; Didier, E.P.

    1981-01-01

    The effect of flow of inspired gas on intrapulmonary gas distribution was examined by analysis of regional pulmonary /sup 133/Xe clearances and of total pulmonary /sup 133/Xe clearance measured at the mouth after equilibration of the lungs with /sup 133/Xe. Five awake healthy volunteers (24 to 40 yr of age) and another 5 healthy, anesthetized-paralyzed volunteers (26 to 28 yr of age) were studied while they were in the right lateral decubitus position. The awake subjects were studied at 3 inspiratory flows (0.4, 0.7, and 1.0 L/s) and the anesthetized-paralyzed subjects at 4 inspiratory flows (0.2, 0.5, 1.1, and 1.6 L/s). Interregional differences in /sup 133/Xe clearances along the vertical axis were significantly less during anesthesia-paralysis and mechanical ventilation than during spontaneous breathing in the awake state. No differences in the regional or total pulmonary /sup 133/Xe clearances were detected at these different flows in either of the two states, i.e., the difference between the awake and anesthetized-paralyzed states persisted.

  18. Effects of inspiratory muscle training on exercise responses in Paralympic athletes with cervical spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    West, C R; Taylor, B J; Campbell, I G; Romer, L M

    2014-10-01

    We asked whether specific inspiratory muscle training (IMT) improves respiratory structure and function and peak exercise responses in highly trained athletes with cervical spinal cord injury (SCI). Ten Paralympic wheelchair rugby players with motor-complete SCI (C5-C7) were paired by functional classification then randomly assigned to an IMT or placebo group. Diaphragm thickness (B-mode ultrasonography), respiratory function [spirometry and maximum static inspiratory (PI ,max ) and expiratory (PE ,max ) pressures], chronic activity-related dyspnea (Baseline and Transition Dyspnea Indices), and physiological responses to incremental arm-crank exercise were assessed before and after 6 weeks of pressure threshold IMT or sham bronchodilator treatment. Compared to placebo, the IMT group showed significant increases in diaphragm thickness (P = 0.001) and PI ,max (P = 0.016). There was a significant increase in tidal volume at peak exercise in IMT vs placebo (P = 0.048) and a strong trend toward an increase in peak work rate (P = 0.081, partial eta-squared = 0.33) and peak oxygen uptake (P = 0.077, partial eta-squared = 0.34). No other indices changed post-intervention. In conclusion, IMT resulted in significant diaphragmatic hypertrophy and increased inspiratory muscle strength in highly trained athletes with cervical SCI. The strong trend, with large observed effect, toward an increase in peak aerobic performance suggests IMT may provide a useful adjunct to training in this population.

  19. Power index of the inspiratory flow signal as a predictor of weaning in intensive care units.

    PubMed

    Chaparro, Javier A; Giraldo, Beatriz F

    2014-01-01

    Disconnection from mechanical ventilation, called the weaning process, is an additional difficulty in the management of patients in intensive care units (ICU). Unnecessary delays in the discontinuation process and a weaning trial that is undertaken too early are undesirable. In this study, we propose an extubation index based on the power of the respiratory flow signal (Pi). A total of 132 patients on weaning trials were studied: 94 patients with successful trials (group S) and 38 patients who failed to maintain spontaneous breathing and were reconnected (group F). The respiratory flow signals were processed considering the following three stages: a) zero crossing detection of the inspiratory phase, b) inflection point detection of the flow curve during the inspiratory phase, and c) calculation of the signal power on the time instant indicated by the inflection point. The zero crossing detection was performed using an algorithm based on thresholds. The inflection points were marked considering the zero crossing of the second derivative. Finally, the inspiratory power was calculated from the energy contained over the finite time interval (between the instant of zero crossing and the inflection point). The performance of this parameter was evaluated using the following classifiers: logistic regression, linear discriminant analysis, the classification and regression tree, Naive Bayes, and the support vector machine. The best results were obtained using the Bayesian classifier, which had an accuracy, sensitivity and specificity of 87%, 90% and 81% respectively. PMID:25569901

  20. Oxygen uptake kinetics and maximal aerobic power are unaffected by inspiratory muscle training in healthy subjects where time to exhaustion is extended.

    PubMed

    Edwards, A M; Cooke, C B

    2004-10-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether 4 weeks of inspiratory muscle training (IMT) would be accompanied by alteration in cardiopulmonary fitness as assessed through moderate intensity oxygen uptake (V(.)O(2)) kinetics and maximal aerobic power (V(.)O(2max)). Eighteen healthy males agreed to participate in the study [training group (Tra) n=10, control group (Con) n=8]. Measurements of spirometry and maximal static inspiratory mouth pressure ( PI(max)) were taken pre- and post-training in addition to: (1) an incremental test to volitional exhaustion, (2) three square-wave transitions from walking to running at a moderate intensity (80% ventilatory threshold) and (3) a maximal aerobic constant-load running test to volitional fatigue for the determination of time to exhaustion ( T(lim)). Training was performed using an inspiratory muscle trainer (Powerbreathe). There were no significant differences in spirometry either between the two groups or when comparing the post- to pre-training results within each group. Mean PI(max) increased significantly in Tra ( P<0.01) and showed a trend for improvement ( P<0.08) in Con. Post-training T(lim) was significantly extended in both Tra [232.4 (22.8) s and 242.8 (20.1) s] ( P<0.01) and Con [224.5 (19.6) and 233.5 (12.7) s] ( P<0.05). Post-training T(lim) was significantly extended in Tra compared to Con ( P<0.05). In conclusion, the most plausible explanation for the stability in V(.)O(2) kinetics and V(.)O(2max) following IMT is that it is due to insufficient whole-body stress to elicit either central or peripheral cardiopulmonary adaptation. The extension of post-training T(lim) suggests that IMT might be useful as a stratagem for producing greater volumes of endurance work at high ventilatory loads, which in turn could improve cardiopulmonary fitness.

  1. Cerebral cortical respiratory-related evoked potentials elicited by inspiratory occlusion in lambs.

    PubMed

    Davenport, Paul W; Hutchison, Alastair A

    2002-07-01

    Respiratory-related evoked potentials (RREP) elicited by inspiratory mechanical loads have been recorded in humans. Early RREP peaks were hypothesized to be generated by activation of neurons in the somatosensory cortex. An animal model was developed to test this hypothesis in chronically instrumented, awake, spontaneously breathing lambs. Electrocorticogram (ECoG) was recorded bilaterally with ball electrodes on the dural surface over the somatosensory region. Inspiratory occlusions were presented through a face mask or endotracheal tube as interruptions of inspiration. Occlusion-elicited evoked potentials were obtained by computer-signal averaging the ECoG activity. A short-latency positive peak was observed bilaterally in the averaged occlusion-elicited evoked potentials in all animals breathing with the facemask and 5 of 8 lambs with the endotracheal tube. Postmortem identification of the electrode location demonstrated that the ECoG was recorded in the caudal-lateral portion of the somatosensory cortex. These results demonstrate that inspiratory occlusion elicits an evoked potential in the somatosensory cortical region of awake, spontaneously breathing lambs. The lamb cortical RREP is similar to human RREP.

  2. Substitution of extracellular Ca2+ by Sr2+ prolongs inspiratory burst in pre-Bötzinger complex inspiratory neurons.

    PubMed

    Morgado-Valle, Consuelo; Fernandez-Ruiz, Juan; Lopez-Meraz, Leonor; Beltran-Parrazal, Luis

    2015-02-15

    The pre-Bötzinger complex (preBötC) underlies inspiratory rhythm generation. As a result of network interactions, preBötC neurons burst synchronously to produce rhythmic premotor inspiratory activity. Each inspiratory burst consists of action potentials (APs) on top of a 10- to 20-mV synchronous depolarization lasting 0.3-0.8 s known as inspiratory drive potential. The mechanisms underlying the initiation and termination of the inspiratory burst are unclear, and the role of Ca(2+) is a matter of intense debate. To investigate the role of extracellular Ca(2+) in inspiratory burst initiation and termination, we substituted extracellular Ca(2+) with Sr(2+). We found for the first time an ionic manipulation that significantly interferes with burst termination. In a rhythmically active slice, we current-clamped preBötC neurons (Vm ≅ -60 mV) while recording integrated hypoglossal nerve (∫XIIn) activity as motor output. Substitution of extracellular Ca(2+) with either 1.5 or 2.5 mM Sr(2+) significantly prolonged the duration of inspiratory bursts from 653.4 ± 30.7 ms in control conditions to 981.6 ± 78.5 ms in 1.5 mM Sr(2+) and 2,048.2 ± 448.5 ms in 2.5 mM Sr(2+), with a concomitant increase in decay time and area. Substitution of extracellular Ca(2+) by Sr(2+) is a well-established method to desynchronize neurotransmitter release. Our findings suggest that the increase in inspiratory burst duration is determined by a presynaptic mechanism involving desynchronization of glutamate release within the network.

  3. The VO(2)-on kinetics in constant load exercise sub-anaerobic threshold reflects endothelial function and dysfunction in muscle microcirculation.

    PubMed

    Maione, D; Cicero, A Fg; Bacchelli, S; Cosentino, E R; Degli Esposti, D; Manners, D N; Rinaldi, E R; Rosticci, M; Senaldi, R; Ambrosioni, E; Borghi, C

    2015-01-01

    To propose a test to evaluate endothelial function, based on VO(2) on-transition kinetics in sub-anaerobic threshold (AT) constant load exercise, we tested healthy subjects and patients with ischemic-hypertensive cardiopathy by two cardiopulmonary tests on a cycle ergometer endowed with an electric motor to overcome initial inertia: a pre-test and, after at least 24 h, one 6 min constant load exercise at 90 % AT. We measured net phase 3 VO(2)-on kinetics and, by phase 2 time constant (tau), valued endothelial dysfunction. We found shorter tau in repeated tests, shorter time between first and second test, by persisting endothelium-dependent arteriolar vasodilatation and/or several other mechanisms. Reducing load to 80 % and 90 % AT did not produce significant changes in tau of healthy volunteers, while in heart patients an AT load of 70 %, compared to 80 % AT, shortened tau (delta=4.38+/-1.65 s, p=0.013). In heart patients, no correlation was found between NYHA class, ejection fraction (EF), and the two variables derived from incremental cycle cardio-pulmonary exercise, as well as between EF and tau; while NYHA class groups were well correlated with tau duration (r=0.92, p=0.0001). Doxazosin and tadalafil also significantly reduced tau. In conclusion, the O(2) consumption kinetics during the on-transition of constant load exercise below the anaerobic threshold are highly sensitive to endothelial function in muscular microcirculation, and constitute a marker for the evaluation of endothelial dysfunction.

  4. Effect of acute inspiratory muscle exercise on blood flow of resting and exercising limbs and glucose levels in type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Corrêa, Ana Paula dos Santos; Antunes, Cristiano Fetter; Figueira, Franciele Ramos; de Castro, Marina Axmann; Ribeiro, Jorge Pinto; Schaan, Beatriz D'Agord

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the effects of inspiratory loading on blood flow of resting and exercising limbs in patients with diabetic autonomic neuropathy. Ten diabetic patients without cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy (DM), 10 patients with cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy (DM-CAN) and 10 healthy controls (C) were randomly assigned to inspiratory muscle load of 60% or 2% of maximal inspiratory pressure (PImax) for approximately 5 min, while resting calf blood flow (CBF) and exercising forearm blood flow (FBF) were measured. Reactive hyperemia was also evaluated. From the 20 diabetic patients initially allocated, 6 wore a continuous glucose monitoring system to evaluate the glucose levels during these two sessions (2%, placebo or 60%, inspiratory muscle metaboreflex). Mean age was 58 ± 8 years, and mean HbA1c, 7.8% (62 mmol/mol) (DM and DM-CAN). A PImax of 60% caused reduction of CBF in DM-CAN and DM (P<0.001), but not in C, whereas calf vascular resistance (CVR) increased in DM-CAN and DM (P<0.001), but not in C. The increase in FBF during forearm exercise was blunted during 60% of PImax in DM-CAN and DM, and augmented in C (P<0.001). Glucose levels decreased by 40 ± 18.8% (P<0.001) at 60%, but not at 2%, of PImax. A negative correlation was observed between reactive hyperemia and changes in CVR (Beta coefficient = -0.44, P = 0.034). Inspiratory muscle loading caused an exacerbation of the inspiratory muscle metaboreflex in patients with diabetes, regardless of the presence of neuropathy, but influenced by endothelial dysfunction. High-intensity exercise that recruits the diaphragm can abruptly reduce glucose levels.

  5. Computational prediction of probabilistic ignition threshold of pressed granular octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,2,3,5-tetrazocine (HMX) under shock loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Seokpum; Miller, Christopher; Horie, Yasuyuki; Molek, Christopher; Welle, Eric; Zhou, Min

    2016-09-01

    The probabilistic ignition thresholds of pressed granular octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,2,3,5-tetrazocine explosives with average grain sizes between 70 μm and 220 μm are computationally predicted. The prediction uses material microstructure and basic constituent properties and does not involve curve fitting with respect to or prior knowledge of the attributes being predicted. The specific thresholds predicted are James-type relations between the energy flux and energy fluence for given probabilities of ignition. Statistically similar microstructure sample sets are computationally generated and used based on the features of micrographs of materials used in actual experiments. The predicted thresholds are in general agreement with measurements from shock experiments in terms of trends. In particular, it is found that grain size significantly affects the ignition sensitivity of the materials, with smaller sizes leading to lower energy thresholds required for ignition. For example, 50% ignition threshold of the material with an average grain size of 220 μm is approximately 1.4-1.6 times that of the material with an average grain size of 70 μm in terms of energy fluence. The simulations account for the controlled loading of thin-flyer shock experiments with flyer velocities between 1.5 and 4.0 km/s, constituent elasto-viscoplasticity, fracture, post-fracture contact and friction along interfaces, bulk inelastic heating, interfacial frictional heating, and heat conduction. The constitutive behavior of the materials is described using a finite deformation elasto-viscoplastic formulation and the Birch-Murnaghan equation of state. The ignition thresholds are determined via an explicit analysis of the size and temperature states of hotspots in the materials and a hotspot-based ignition criterion. The overall ignition threshold analysis and the microstructure-level hotspot analysis also lead to the definition of a macroscopic ignition parameter (J) and a microscopic

  6. Arousal responses to added inspiratory resistance during REM and non-REM sleep in normal subjects.

    PubMed Central

    Gugger, M; Bögershausen, S; Schäffler, L

    1993-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Arousal in response to increased airflow resistance during sleep, especially rapid eye movement sleep (REM), could be an important protective mechanism against asphyxia. METHODS: The arousal response to the application of an external inspiratory resistance of 25 cm H2O/l/s was determined during REM and non-REM sleep in ten healthy men. RESULTS: The number of arousals occurring within two minutes of the load application was significantly higher during REM sleep than during either of the non-REM sleep stages 2 and 3/4, and was similar to that during stage 1. The proportion of arousals to non-arousals decreased significantly from stage 1 to stage 4. The mean time to arousal in REM was significantly shorter than in non-REM stages 1, 2 or 3/4 and increased significantly from stage 1 to stage 3/4. The duration of sleep (comparing the results of the first with the second half of the sleep period time) did not modify the arousal response in stages 2 and 3/4. CONCLUSIONS: The results show a significantly increased arousal response to an added inspiratory resistive load in REM sleep compared with non-REM sleep stages 2, 3 or 4 in normal men. In the context of previous studies these data could add support to the hypothesis that the decreased arousal response during REM sleep in patients with sleep apnoea might be due to an impairment of the normal "central processing" of this stimulus. PMID:8493624

  7. Frequency and load ratio effects on critical strain energy release rate Gc thresholds of graphite/epoxy composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, Donald F.; Zimmerman, richard S.; Odom, Edwin M.

    1987-01-01

    Graphite/epoxy composite laminates of T300/BP907 and AS6/HST-7 were axial-tension fatigue tested. Tests were conducted at 5 and 10 Hz, and at loading ratios of R = 0.1 and R = 0.5. Edge delamination was monitored as a function of number of fatigue cycles by monitoring stiffness reduction during fatigue testing. Delamination was confirmed and documented using dye-enhanced X-ray and optical photography. Critical strain energy release rates were then calculated. The composites delaminated readily, with loading ratio having a significant influence. Frequency effects were negligible.

  8. Respiratory dysfunction in ventilated patients: can inspiratory muscle training help?

    PubMed

    Bissett, B; Leditschke, I A; Paratz, J D; Boots, R J

    2012-03-01

    Respiratory muscle dysfunction is associated with prolonged and difficult weaning from mechanical ventilation. This dysfunction in ventilator-dependent patients is multifactorial: there is evidence that inspiratory muscle weakness is partially explained by disuse atrophy secondary to ventilation, and positive end-expiratory pressure can further reduce muscle strength by negatively shifting the length-tension curve of the diaphragm. Polyneuropathy is also likely to contribute to apparent muscle weakness in critically ill patients, and nutritional and pharmaceutical effects may further compound muscle weakness. Moreover, psychological influences, including anxiety, may contribute to difficulty in weaning. There is recent evidence that inspiratory muscle training is safe and feasible in selected ventilator-dependent patients, and that this training can reduce the weaning period and improve overall weaning success rates. Extrapolating from evidence in sports medicine, as well as the known effects of inspiratory muscle training in chronic lung disease, a theoretical model is proposed to describe how inspiratory muscle training enhances weaning and recovery from mechanical ventilation. Possible mechanisms include increased protein synthesis (both Type 1 and Type 2 muscle fibres), enhanced limb perfusion via dampening of a sympathetically-mediated metaboreflex, reduced lactate levels and modulation of the perception of exertion, resulting in less dyspnoea and enhanced exercise capacity.

  9. Relative activity of respiratory muscles during prescribed inspiratory muscle training in healthy people.

    PubMed

    Jung, Ju-Hyeon; Kim, Nan-Soo

    2016-03-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to determine the effects of different intensities of inspiratory muscle training on the relative respiratory muscle activity in healthy adults. [Subjects and Methods] Thirteen healthy male volunteers were instructed to perform inspiratory muscle training (0%, 40%, 60%, and 80% maximal inspiratory pressure) on the basis of their individual intensities. The inspiratory muscle training was performed in random order of intensities. Surface electromyography data were collected from the right-side diaphragm, external intercostal, and sternocleidomastoid, and pulmonary functions (forced expiratory volume in 1 s, forced vital capacity, and their ratio; peak expiratory flow; and maximal inspiratory pressure) were measured. [Results] Comparison of the relative activity of the diaphragm showed significant differences between the 60% and 80% maximal inspiratory pressure intensities and baseline during inspiratory muscle training. Furthermore, significant differences were found in sternocleidomastoid relative activity between the 60% and 80% maximal inspiratory pressure intensities and baseline during inspiratory muscle training. [Conclusion] During inspiratory muscle training in the clinic, the patients were assisted (verbally or through feedback) by therapists to avoid overactivation of their accessory muscles (sternocleidomastoid). This study recommends that inspiratory muscle training be performed at an accurate and appropriate intensity through the practice of proper deep breathing.

  10. Evaluation of viral load thresholds for predicting new WHO Stage 3 and 4 events in HIV-infected children receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy

    PubMed Central

    Siberry, George K; Harris, D. Robert; Oliveira, Ricardo Hugo; Krauss, Margot R.; Hofer, Cristina B.; Tiraboschi, Adriana Aparecida; Marques, Heloisa; Succi, Regina C.; Abreu, Thalita; Negra, Marinella Della; Mofenson, Lynne M.; Hazra, Rohan

    2012-01-01

    Background This study evaluated a wide range of viral load (VL) thresholds to identify a cut-point that best predicts new clinical events in children on stable highly-active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). Methods Cox proportional hazards modeling was used to assess the adjusted risk of World Health Organization stage 3 or 4 clinical events (WHO events) as a function of time-varying CD4, VL, and hemoglobin values in a cohort study of Latin American children on HAART ≥ 6 months. Models were fit using different VL cut-points between 400 and 50,000 copies/mL, with model fit evaluated on the basis of the minimum Akaike Information Criterion (AIC) value, a standard model fit statistic. Results Models were based on 67 subjects with WHO events out of 550 subjects on study. The VL cutpoints of > 2600 copies/mL and > 32,000 copies/mL corresponded to the lowest AIC values and were associated with the highest hazard ratios [2.0 (p = 0.015) and 2.1 (p = 0.0058), respectively] for WHO events. Conclusions In HIV-infected Latin American children on stable HAART, two distinct VL thresholds (> 2,600 copies/mL and > 32,000 copies/mL) were identified for predicting children at significantly increased risk of HIV-related clinical illness, after accounting for CD4 level, hemoglobin level, and other significant factors. PMID:22343177

  11. Forced respiration during the deeper water immersion causes the greater inspiratory muscle fatigue in healthy young men

    PubMed Central

    Yamashina, Yoshihiro; Yokoyama, Hisayo; Naghavi, Nooshin; Hirasawa, Yoshikazu; Takeda, Ryosuke; Ota, Akemi; Imai, Daiki; Miyagawa, Toshiaki; Okazaki, Kazunobu

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the effect of water immersion at different water depths on respiratory function and the effect of inspiratory load breathing (ILB) during water immersion at different water depths on respiratory muscle strength evaluated by maximum inspiratory and expiratory pressures (PImax and PEmax, respectively). [Subjects] Eight healthy men participated randomly in three trials. [Methods] All sessions were conducted with the participants in a sitting position immersed in a water bath. We evaluated respiratory function, PImax and PEmax during submersion at three different levels of water depth (umbilicus; 4th-rib; or clavicle, CL) and after subsequent 15-min ILB. [Results] Decreases in vital capacity and expiratory reserve volume from baseline by water immersion were significantly greater in the CL trial than those in the other trials. In the CL trial, PImax was immediately reduced after ILB compared to that at baseline, and the reduction was significantly greater than those in the other trials. PEmax was not affected by ILB in any of the trials. [Conclusion] Forced respiration during deeper water immersion caused greater inspiratory muscle fatigue in healthy young men. PMID:27064401

  12. Trend of tunnel magnetoresistance and variation in threshold voltage for keeping data load robustness of metal–oxide–semiconductor/magnetic tunnel junction hybrid latches

    SciTech Connect

    Ohsawa, T.; Ikeda, S.; Hanyu, T.; Ohno, H.; Endoh, T.

    2014-05-07

    The robustness of data load of metal–oxide–semiconductor/magnetic tunnel junction (MOS/MTJ) hybrid latches at power-on is examined by using Monte Carlo simulation with the variations in magnetoresistances for MTJs and in threshold voltages for MOSFETs involved in 90 nm technology node. Three differential pair type spin-transfer-torque-magnetic random access memory cells (4T2MTJ, 6T2MTJ, and 8T2MTJ) are compared for their successful data load at power-on. It is found that the 4T2MTJ cell has the largest pass area in the shmoo plot in TMR ratio (tunnel magnetoresistance ratio) and V{sub dd} in which a whole 256 kb cell array can be powered-on successfully. The minimum TMR ratio for the 4T2MTJ in 0.9 V < V{sub dd} < 1.9 V is 140%, while the 6T2MTJ and the 8T2MTJ cells require TMR ratio larger than 170%.

  13. Nerve injury reduces responses of hypoglossal motoneurones to baseline and chemoreceptor-modulated inspiratory drive in the adult rat

    PubMed Central

    González-Forero, David; Portillo, Federico; Sunico, Carmen R; Moreno-López, Bernardo

    2004-01-01

    The effects of peripheral nerve lesions on the membrane and synaptic properties of motoneurones have been extensively studied. However, minimal information exists about how these alterations finally influence discharge activity and motor output under physiological afferent drive. The aim of this work was to evaluate the effect of hypoglossal (XIIth) nerve crushing on hypoglossal motoneurone (HMN) discharge in response to the basal inspiratory afferent drive and its chemosensory modulation by CO2. The evolution of the lesion was assessed by recording the compound muscle action potential evoked by XIIth nerve stimulation, which was lost on crushing and then recovered gradually to control values from the second to fourth weeks post-lesion. Basal inspiratory activities recorded 7 days post-injury in the nerve proximal to the lesion site, and in the nucleus, were reduced by 51.6% and 35.8%, respectively. Single unit antidromic latencies were lengthened by lesion, and unusually high stimulation intensities were frequently required to elicit antidromic spikes. Likewise, inspiratory modulation of unitary discharge under conditions in which chemoreceptor drive was varied by altering end-tidal CO2 was reduced by more than 60%. Although the general recruitment scheme was preserved after XIIth nerve lesion, we noticed an increased proportion of low-threshold units and a reduced recruitment gain across the physiological range. Immunohistochemical staining of synaptophysin in the hypoglossal nuclei revealed significant reductions of this synaptic marker after nerve injury. Morphological and functional alterations recovered with muscle re-innervation. Thus, we report here that nerve lesion induced changes in the basal activity and discharge modulation of HMNs, concurrent with the loss of afferent inputs. Nevertheless, we suggest that an increase in membrane excitability, reported by others, and in the proportion of low-threshold units, could serve to preserve minimal electrical

  14. Inspiratory and expiratory aerosol deposition in the upper airway.

    PubMed

    Verbanck, S; Kalsi, H S; Biddiscombe, M F; Agnihotri, V; Belkassem, B; Lacor, C; Usmani, O S

    2011-02-01

    Aerosol deposition efficiency (DE) in the extrathoracic airways during mouth breathing is currently documented only for the inspiratory phase of respiration, and there is a need for quantification of expiratory DE. Our aim was to study both inspiratory and expiratory DE in a realistic upper airway geometry. This was done experimentally on a physical upper airway cast by scintigraphy, and numerically by computational fluid dynamic simulations using a Reynolds Averaged Navier?Stokes (RANS) method with a k-? SST turbulence model coupled with a stochastic Lagrangian approach. Experiments and simulations were carried out for particle sizes (3 and 6 μm) and flow rates (30 and 60 L/min) spanning the ranges of Stokes (Stk) and Reynolds (Re) number pertinent to therapeutic and environmental aerosols. We showed that inspiratory total deposition data obtained by scintigraphy fell onto a previously published deposition curve representative of a range of upper airway geometries. We also found that expiratory and inspiratory DE curves were almost identical. Finally, DE in different compartments of the upper airway model showed a very different distribution pattern of aerosol deposition during inspiration and expiration, with preferential deposition in oral and pharyngeal compartments, respectively. These compartmental deposition patterns were very consistent and only slightly dependent on particle size or flow rate. Total deposition for inspiration and expiration was reasonably well-mimicked by the RANS simulation method we employed, and more convincingly so in the upper range of the Stk and Re number. However, compartmental deposition patterns showed discrepancies between experiments and RANS simulations, particularly during expiration.

  15. Effect of selective diaphragmatic paralysis on the inspiratory motor drive.

    PubMed

    Teitelbaum, J; Borel, C O; Magder, S; Traystman, R J; Hussain, S N

    1993-05-01

    Using alpha-chloralose-anesthetized mechanically ventilated vagotomized dogs, we assessed the effects of selective diaphragmatic paralysis on the inspiratory motor drive. Diaphragmatic paralysis was accomplished by a bolus injection of vecuronium, a neuromuscular junction blocker, into the left phrenic artery of an in situ vascularly isolated and innervated left diaphragm. The inspiratory motor drive during spontaneous breathing attempts was assessed by measuring peak integrated electromyographic (EMG) activities of the left and right diaphragms and parasternal and alae nasi muscles. Respiratory timing parameters were measured from the integrated EMG signals of the diaphragm. Three groups of dogs were studied. In group 1 (n = 9), vecuronium was injected into the phrenic artery with the left diaphragmatic length adjusted at the functional residual capacity. Vecuronium injection (0.2 mg) resulted in a significant decline in left diaphragmatic tension and integrated EMG. Breathing frequency increased by 24% of the baseline value, whereas right diaphragm, parasternal, and alae nasi EMG activities rose to 136, 227, and 165% of their respective baseline values a few seconds after the vecuronium injection. In group 2 (n = 6), vecuronium injection in left phrenectomized animals did not alter the EMG activities of the inspiratory muscles (left EMG signal was abolished) nor did it alter respiratory timing. In group 3 (n = 4), the left diaphragm was placed in a flaccid position. Vecuronium injection in this group did not produce any changes in the EMG activities or respiratory timing. We conclude that selective diaphragmatic paralysis elicits a significant rise in the inspiratory motor drive. This effect is likely to be mediated through the inhibition of diaphragmatic Golgi tendon organ activity. PMID:8101520

  16. Systematic Review of Inspiratory Muscle Training After Cerebrovascular Accident.

    PubMed

    Martín-Valero, Rocío; De La Casa Almeida, Maria; Casuso-Holgado, Maria Jesus; Heredia-Madrazo, Alfonso

    2015-11-01

    This systematic review examines levels of evidence and recommendation grades of various therapeutic interventions of inspiratory muscle training in people who have had a stroke. Benefits from different levels of force and resistance in respiratory muscles are shown in this population. This review was conducted following the PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses) directives and was completed in November 2014. The search limits were studies published in English between 2004 and 2014. Relevant studies were searched for in MEDLINE, PEDro, OAIster, Scopus, PsycINFO, Web of Knowledge, CINAHL, SPORTDiscus, DOAJ, Cochrane, Embase, Academic Search Complete, Fuente Académica, and MedicLatina. Initially, 20 articles were identified. After analyzing all primary documents, 14 studies were excluded. Only 6 studies were relevant to this review. Three different types of interventions were found (maximum inspiratory training, controlled training, and nonintervention) in 3 different groups. One specific study compared 3 inspiratory muscle training groups with a group of breathing exercises (diaphragmatic exercises with pursed lips) and a control group. Future long-term studies with larger sample sizes are needed. It is necessary to apply respiratory muscle training as a service of the national health system and to consider its inclusion in the conventional neurological program. PMID:26493591

  17. Should viral load thresholds be lowered?: Revisiting the WHO definition for virologic failure in patients on antiretroviral therapy in resource-limited settings.

    PubMed

    Labhardt, Niklaus D; Bader, Joëlle; Lejone, Thabo Ishmael; Ringera, Isaac; Hobbins, Michael A; Fritz, Christiane; Ehmer, Jochen; Cerutti, Bernard; Puga, Daniel; Klimkait, Thomas

    2016-07-01

    The World Health Organization (WHO) guidelines on antiretroviral therapy (ART) define treatment failure as 2 consecutive viral loads (VLs) ≥1000 copies/mL. There is, however, little evidence supporting 1000 copies as an optimal threshold to define treatment failure. Objective of this study was to assess the correlation of the WHO definition with the presence of drug-resistance mutations in patients who present with 2 consecutive unsuppressed VL in a resource-limited setting.In 10 nurse-led clinics in rural Lesotho children and adults on first-line ART for ≥6 months received a first routine VL. Those with plasma VL ≥80 copies/mL were enrolled in a prospective study, receiving enhanced adherence counseling (EAC) and a follow-up VL after 3 months. After a second unsuppressed VL genotypic resistance testing was performed. Viruses with major mutations against ≥2 drugs of the current regimen were classified as "resistant".A total of 1563 adults and 191 children received a first routine VL. Of the 138 adults and 53 children with unsuppressed VL (≥80 copies/mL), 165 (116 adults; 49 children) had a follow-up VL after EAC; 108 (74 adults; 34 children) remained unsuppressed and resistance testing was successful. Ninety of them fulfilled the WHO definition of treatment failure (both VL ≥1000 copies/mL); for another 18 both VL were unsuppressed but with <1000 copies/mL. The positive predictive value (PPV) for the WHO failure definition was 81.1% (73/90) for the presence of resistant virus. Among the 18 with VL levels between 80 and 1000 copies/mL, thereby classified as "non-failures", 17 (94.4%) harbored resistant viruses. Lowering the VL threshold from 1000 copies/mL to 80 copies/mL at both determinations had no negative influence on the PPV (83.3%; 90/108).The current WHO-definition misclassifies patients who harbor resistant virus at VL below 1000 c/mL as "nonfailing." Lowering the threshold to VL ≥80 copies/mL identifies a significantly

  18. Fast rhythms in the discharges of medullary inspiratory neurons.

    PubMed

    Christakos, C N; Cohen, M I; See, W R; Barnhardt, R

    1988-11-01

    The discharges of 44 medullary inspiratory (I) neurons in decerebrate paralyzed cats were studied using interval and spectral analysis. Most neurons had a rhythm in their discharge. In 31 the rhythm was at the frequency of, and coherent to, the high-frequency oscillations (HFOs) of I nerves, and in 7 the rhythm was in the range of medium-frequency oscillations (MFOs), with no coherence to nerve MFOs. Thus, correlated HFOs are characteristic of the I system at all levels, whereas MFOs are uncommon in medullary neurons and seem to be unrelated to general mechanisms. PMID:3196923

  19. Effects of inspiratory flow waveforms on arterial blood gases and respiratory mechanics after open heart surgery.

    PubMed

    Polese, G; Lubli, P; Poggi, R; Luzzani, A; Milic-Emili, J; Rossi, A

    1997-12-01

    The clinical usefulness of inspiratory flow pattern manipulation during mechanical ventilation remains unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of different inspiratory flow waveforms, i.e. constant, sinusoidal and decelerating, on arterial blood gases and respiratory mechanics, in mechanically ventilated patients. Eight patients recovering after open heart surgery for valvular replacement and/or coronary bypass were studied. The ventilator inspiratory flow waveform was changed according to a randomized sequence, keeping constant the other variables of the ventilator settings. We measured arterial blood gases, flow, volume and pressure at the proximal (airway opening pressure (Pao)) and distal (Ptr) ends of the endotracheal tubes before and after 30 min of mechanical ventilation with each inspiratory flow waveform. We computed breathing pattern, respiratory mechanics (pressures and dynamic elastance) and inspiratory work, which was then partitioned into its elastic and resistive components. We found that: 1) arterial oxygen tension (Pa,O2) and arterial carbon dioxide tension (Pa,CO2) were not affected by changes in the inspiratory flow waveform; and 2) peak Pao and Ptr were highest with sinusoidal inspiratory flow, whilst mean Pao and Ptr and total work of breathing were least with constant inspiratory flow, mainly because of a concomitant decrease in resistive work during constant flow inflation. The effects of the inspiratory flow profile on Pao, Ptr and total inspiratory work performed by the ventilator were mainly due to the resistive properties of the endotracheal tubes. We conclude that the ventilator inspiratory flow waveform can influence patients' respiratory mechanics, but has no impact on arterial oxygen and arterial carbon dioxide tension. PMID:9493667

  20. Effects of expiratory resistive loading on the sensation of dyspnea.

    PubMed

    Chonan, T; Altose, M D; Cherniack, N S

    1990-07-01

    To determine whether an increase in expiratory motor output accentuates the sensation of dyspnea (difficulty in breathing), the following experiments were undertaken. Ten normal subjects, in a series of 2-min trials, breathed freely (level I) or maintained a target tidal volume equal to (level II) or twice the control (level III) at a breathing frequency of 15/min (similar to the control frequency) with an inspiratory load, an expiratory load, and without loads under hyperoxic normocapnia. In tests at levels II and III, end-expiratory lung volume was maintained at functional residual capacity. A linear resistance of 25 cmH2O.1(-1).s was used for both inspiratory and expiratory loading; peak mouth pressure (Pm) was measured, and the intensity of dyspnea (psi) was assessed with a visual analog scale. The sensation of dyspnea increased significantly with the magnitude of expiratory Pm during expiratory loading (level II: Pm = 9.4 +/- 1.5 (SE) cmH2O, psi = 1.26 +/- 0.35; level III: Pm = 20.3 +/- 2.8 cmH2O, psi = 2.22 +/- 0.48) and with inspiratory Pm during inspiratory loading (level II: Pm = 9.7 +/- 1.2 cmH2O, psi = 1.35 +/- 0.38; level III: Pm = 23.9 +/- 3.0 cmH2O, psi = 2.69 +/- 0.60). However, at each level of breathing, neither the intensity of dyspnea nor the magnitude of peak Pm during loading was different between inspiratory and expiratory loading. The augmentation of dyspnea during expiratory loading was not explained simply by increases in inspiratory activity. The results indicate that heightened expiratory as well as inspiratory motor output causes comparable increases in the sensation of difficulty in breathing.

  1. Pontine respiratory activity involved in inspiratory/expiratory phase transition

    PubMed Central

    Mörschel, Michael; Dutschmann, Mathias

    2009-01-01

    Control of the timing of the inspiratory/expiratory (IE) phase transition is a hallmark of respiratory pattern formation. In principle, sensory feedback from pulmonary stretch receptors (Breuer–Hering reflex, BHR) is seen as the major controller for the IE phase transition, while pontine-based control of IE phase transition by both the pontine Kölliker–Fuse nucleus (KF) and parabrachial complex is seen as a secondary or backup mechanism. However, previous studies have shown that the BHR can habituate in vivo. Thus, habituation reduces sensory feedback, so the role of the pons, and specifically the KF, for IE phase transition may increase dramatically. Pontine-mediated control of the IE phase transition is not completely understood. In the present review, we discuss existing models for ponto-medullary interaction that may be involved in the control of inspiratory duration and IE transition. We also present intracellular recordings of pontine respiratory units derived from an in situ intra-arterially perfused brainstem preparation of rats. With the absence of lung inflation, this preparation generates a normal respiratory pattern and many of the recorded pontine units demonstrated phasic respiratory-related activity. The analysis of changes in membrane potentials of pontine respiratory neurons has allowed us to propose a number of pontine-medullary interactions not considered before. The involvement of these putative interactions in pontine-mediated control of IE phase transitions is discussed. PMID:19651653

  2. Somatostatin modulates generation of inspiratory rhythms and determines asphyxia survival.

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Jarquín, Josué O; Lara-Hernández, Sergio; López-Guerrero, Juan J; Aguileta, Miguel A; Rivera-Angulo, Ana J; Sampieri, Alicia; Vaca, Luis; Ordaz, Benito; Peña-Ortega, Fernando

    2012-04-01

    Breathing and the activity of its generator (the pre-Bötzinger complex; pre-BötC) are highly regulated functions. Among neuromodulators of breathing, somatostatin (SST) is unique: it is synthesized by a subset of glutamatergic pre-BötC neurons, but acts as an inhibitory neuromodulator. Moreover, SST regulates breathing both in normoxic and in hypoxic conditions. Although it has been implicated in the neuromodulation of breathing, neither the locus of SST modulation, nor the receptor subtypes involved have been identified. In this study, we aimed to fill in these blanks by characterizing the SST-induced regulation of inspiratory rhythm generation in vitro and in vivo. We found that both endogenous and exogenous SST depress all preBötC-generated rhythms. While SST abolishes sighs, it also decreases the frequency and increases the regularity of eupnea and gasping. Pharmacological experiments showed that SST modulates inspiratory rhythm generation by activating SST receptor type-2, whose mRNA is abundantly expressed in the pre-Bötzinger complex. In vivo, blockade of SST receptor type-2 reduces gasping amplitude and consequently, it precludes auto-resuscitation after asphyxia. Based on our findings, we suggest that SST functions as an inhibitory neuromodulator released by excitatory respiratory neurons when they become overactivated in order to stabilize breathing rhythmicity in normoxic and hypoxic conditions.

  3. Adaptive Thresholds

    SciTech Connect

    Bremer, P. -T.

    2014-08-26

    ADAPT is a topological analysis code that allow to compute local threshold, in particular relevance based thresholds for features defined in scalar fields. The initial target application is vortex detection but the software is more generally applicable to all threshold based feature definitions.

  4. Sympathetic skin response following thermal, electrical, acoustic, and inspiratory gasp stimulation in familial dysautonomia patients and healthy persons.

    PubMed

    Hilz, M J; Azelrod, F B; Schweibold, G; Kolodny, E H

    1999-08-01

    To determine whether sympathetic skin response (SSR) testing evaluates afferent small or efferent sympathetic nerve fiber dysfunction, we studied SSR in patients with familial dysautonomia (FD) in whom both afferent small and efferent sympathetic fibers are largely reduced. We analyzed whether the response pattern to a combination of stimuli specific for large or small fiber activation allows differentiation between afferent and efferent small fiber dysfunction. In 52 volunteers and 13 FD patients, SSR was studied at palms and soles after warm, cold and heat as well as electrical, acoustic, and inspiratory gasp stimulation. In addition, thermal thresholds were assessed at four body sites using a Thermotest device (Somedic; Stockholm, Sweden). In volunteers, any stimulus induced reproducible SSRs. Only cold failed to evoke SSR in two volunteers. In all FD patients, electrical SSR was present, but amplitudes were reduced. Five patients had no acoustic SSR, four had no inspiratory SSR. Thermal SSR was absent in 10 patients with abnormal thermal perception and present in one patient with preserved thermal sensation. In two patients, thermal SSR was present only when skin areas with preserved temperature perception were stimulated. In patients with FD, preserved electrical SSR demonstrated the overall integrity of the SSR reflex but amplitude reduction suggested impaired sudomotor activation. SSR responses were dependent on the perception of the stimulus. In the presence of preserved electrical SSR, absent thermal SSR reflects afferent small fiber dysfunction. A combination of SSR stimulus types allows differentiation between afferent small or efferent sympathetic nerve fiber dysfunction. PMID:10574280

  5. Inspiratory Muscle Training and Functional Capacity in Patients Undergoing Cardiac Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Cordeiro, André Luiz Lisboa; de Melo, Thiago Araújo; Neves, Daniela; Luna, Julianne; Esquivel, Mateus Souza; Guimarães, André Raimundo França; Borges, Daniel Lago; Petto, Jefferson

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Cardiac surgery is a highly complex procedure which generates worsening of lung function and decreased inspiratory muscle strength. The inspiratory muscle training becomes effective for muscle strengthening and can improve functional capacity. Objective To investigate the effect of inspiratory muscle training on functional capacity submaximal and inspiratory muscle strength in patients undergoing cardiac surgery. Methods This is a clinical randomized controlled trial with patients undergoing cardiac surgery at Instituto Nobre de Cardiologia. Patients were divided into two groups: control group and training. Preoperatively, were assessed the maximum inspiratory pressure and the distance covered in a 6-minute walk test. From the third postoperative day, the control group was managed according to the routine of the unit while the training group underwent daily protocol of respiratory muscle training until the day of discharge. Results 50 patients, 27 (54%) males were included, with a mean age of 56.7±13.9 years. After the analysis, the training group had significant increase in maximum inspiratory pressure (69.5±14.9 vs. 83.1±19.1 cmH2O, P=0.0073) and 6-minute walk test (422.4±102.8 vs. 502.4±112.8 m, P=0.0031). Conclusion We conclude that inspiratory muscle training was effective in improving functional capacity submaximal and inspiratory muscle strength in this sample of patients undergoing cardiac surgery. PMID:27556313

  6. Trapping volumetric measurement by multidetector CT in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: Effect of CT threshold

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xiaohua; Yuan, Huishu; Duan, Jianghui; Du, Yipeng; Shen, Ning; He, Bei

    2013-08-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of various computed tomography (CT) thresholds on trapping volumetric measurements by multidetector CT in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).Methods: Twenty-three COPD patients were scanned with a 64-slice CT scanner in both the inspiratory and expiratory phase. CT thresholds of −950 Hu in inspiration and −950 to −890 Hu in expiration were used, after which trapping volumetric measurements were made using computer software. Trapping volume percentage (Vtrap%) under the different CT thresholds in the expiratory phase and below −950 Hu in the inspiratory phase was compared and correlated with lung function.Results: Mean Vtrap% was similar under −930 Hu in the expiratory phase and below −950 Hu in the inspiratory phase, being 13.18 ± 9.66 and 13.95 ± 6.72 (both lungs), respectively; this difference was not significant (P= 0.240). Vtrap% under −950 Hu in the inspiratory phase and below the −950 to −890 Hu threshold in the expiratory phase was moderately negatively correlated with the ratio of forced expiratory volume in one second to forced vital capacity and the measured value of forced expiratory volume in one second as a percentage of the predicted value.Conclusions: Trapping volumetric measurement with multidetector CT is a promising method for the quantification of COPD. It is important to know the effect of various CT thresholds on trapping volumetric measurements.

  7. Inspiratory muscle training improves exercise tolerance in recreational soccer players without concomitant gain in soccer-specific fitness.

    PubMed

    Guy, Joshua H; Edwards, Andrew M; Deakin, Glen B

    2014-02-01

    This study investigated whether the addition of inspiratory muscle training (IMT) to an existing program of preseason soccer training would augment performance indices such as exercise tolerance and sports-specific performance beyond the use of preseason training alone. Thirty-one men were randomized across 3 groups: experimental (EXP: n = 12), placebo (PLA: n = 9), and control (CON: n = 10). The EXP and PLA completed a 6-week preseason program (2× weekly sessions) in addition to concurrent IMT with either an IMT load (EXP) or negligible (PLA) inspiratory resistance. Control group did not use an IMT device or undertake soccer training. All participants performed the following tests before and after the 6-week period: standard spirometry; maximal inspiratory mouth pressure (MIP); multistage fitness test (MSFT); and a soccer-specific fitness test (SSFT). After 6-weeks training, EXP significantly improved: MIP (p = 0.002); MSFT distance covered (p = 0.02); and post-SSFT blood lactate (BLa) (p = 0.04). No other outcomes from the SSFT were changed. Pre- to posttraining performance outcomes for PLA and CON were unchanged. These findings suggest the addition of IMT to preseason soccer training improved exercise tolerance (MSFT distance covered) but had little effect on soccer-specific fitness indices beyond a slightly reduced posttraining SSFT BLa. In conclusion, there may be benefit for soccer players to incorporate IMT to their preseason training but the effect is not conclusive. It is likely that a greater preseason training stimulus would be particularly meaningful for this population if fitness gains are a priority and evoke a stronger IMT response.

  8. Impact of heat stress on conception rate of dairy cows in the moderate climate considering different temperature-humidity index thresholds, periods relative to breeding, and heat load indices.

    PubMed

    Schüller, L K; Burfeind, O; Heuwieser, W

    2014-05-01

    The objectives of this retrospective study were to investigate the relationship between temperature-humidity index (THI) and conception rate (CR) of lactating dairy cows, to estimate a threshold for this relationship, and to identify periods of exposure to heat stress relative to breeding in an area of moderate climate. In addition, we compared three different heat load indices related to CR: mean THI, maximum THI, and number of hours above the mean THI threshold. The THI threshold for the influence of heat stress on CR was 73. It was statistically chosen based on the observed relationship between the mean THI at the day of breeding and the resulting CR. Negative effects of heat stress, however, were already apparent at lower levels of THI, and 1 hour of mean THI of 73 or more decreased the CR significantly. The CR of lactating dairy cows was negatively affected by heat stress both before and after the day of breeding. The greatest negative impact of heat stress on CR was observed 21 to 1 day before breeding. When the mean THI was 73 or more in this period, CR decreased from 31% to 12%. Compared with the average maximum THI and the total number of hours above a threshold of more than or 9 hours, the mean THI was the most sensitive heat load index relating to CR. These results indicate that the CR of dairy cows raised in the moderate climates is highly affected by heat stress.

  9. Discharge Identity of Medullary Inspiratory Neurons is Altered during Repetitive Fictive Cough

    PubMed Central

    Segers, L. S.; Nuding, S. C.; Vovk, A.; Pitts, T.; Baekey, D. M.; O’Connor, R.; Morris, K. F.; Lindsey, B. G.; Shannon, R.; Bolser, Donald C.

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the stability of the discharge identity of inspiratory decrementing (I-Dec) and augmenting (I-Aug) neurons in the caudal (cVRC) and rostral (rVRC) ventral respiratory column during repetitive fictive cough in the cat. Inspiratory neurons in the cVRC (n = 23) and rVRC (n = 17) were recorded with microelectrodes. Fictive cough was elicited by mechanical stimulation of the intrathoracic trachea. Approximately 43% (10 of 23) of I-Dec neurons shifted to an augmenting discharge pattern during the first cough cycle (C1). By the second cough cycle (C2), half of these returned to a decrementing pattern. Approximately 94% (16 of 17) of I-Aug neurons retained an augmenting pattern during C1 of a multi-cough response episode. Phrenic burst amplitude and inspiratory duration increased during C1, but decreased with each subsequent cough in a series of repetitive coughs. As a step in evaluating the model-driven hypothesis that VRC I-Dec neurons contribute to the augmentation of inspiratory drive during cough via inhibition of VRC tonic expiratory neurons that inhibit premotor inspiratory neurons, cross-correlation analysis was used to assess relationships of tonic expiratory cells with simultaneously recorded inspiratory neurons. Our results suggest that reconfiguration of inspiratory-related sub-networks of the respiratory pattern generator occurs on a cycle-by-cycle basis during repetitive coughing. PMID:22754536

  10. Acute effects of inspiratory muscle warm-up on pulmonary function in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Özdal, Mustafa

    2016-06-15

    The acute effects of inspiratory muscle warm-up on pulmonary functions were examined in 26 healthy male subjects using the pulmonary function test (PFT) in three different trials. The control trial (CON) did not involve inspiratory muscle warm-up, while the placebo (IMWp) and experimental (IMW) trials involved inspiratory muscle warm-up. There were no significant changes between the IMWp and CON trials (p>0.05). All the PFT measurements, including slow vital capacity, inspiratory vital capacity, forced vital capacity, forced expiratory volume in one second, maximal voluntary ventilation, and maximal inspiratory pressure were significantly increased by 3.55%, 12.52%, 5.00%, 2.75%, 2.66%, and 7.03% respectively, in the subjects in the IMW trial than those in the CON trial (p<0.05). These results show that inspiratory muscle warm-up improved the pulmonary functions. The mechanisms responsible for these improvements are probably associated with the concomitant increase in the inspiratory muscle strength, and the cooperation of the upper thorax, neck, and respiratory muscles, and increased level of reactive O2 species in muscle tissue, and potentially improvement of muscle O2 delivery-to-utilization. However, further investigation is required to determine the precise mechanisms responsible from among these candidates. PMID:26903486

  11. Pre-operative inspiratory muscle training preserves postoperative inspiratory muscle strength following major abdominal surgery – a randomised pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Kulkarni, SR; Fletcher, E; McConnell, AK; Poskitt, KR; Whyman, MR

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The aim of this pilot study was to assess the effect of pre-operative inspiratory muscle training (IMT) on respiratory variables in patients undergoing major abdominal surgery. PATIENTS AND METHODS Respiratory muscle strength (maximum inspiratory [MIP] and expiratory [MEP] mouth pressure) and pulmonary functions were measured at least 2 weeks before surgery in 80 patients awaiting major abdominal surgery. Patients were then allocated randomly to one of four groups (Group A, control; Group B, deep breathing exercises; Group C, incentive spirometry; Group D, specific IMT). Patients in groups B, C and D were asked to train twice daily, each session lasting 15 min, for at least 2 weeks up to the day before surgery. Outcome measurements were made immediately pre-operatively and postop-eratively. RESULTS In groups A, B and C, MIP did not increase from baseline to pre-operative assessments. In group D, MIP increased from 51.5 cmH2O (median) pre-training to 68.5 cmH2O (median) post-training pre-operatively (P < 0.01). Postoperatively, groups A, B and C showed a fall in MIP from baseline (P < 0.01, P < 0.01) and P = 0.06, respectively). No such significant reduction in postoperative MIP was seen in group D (P = 0.36). CONCLUSIONS Pre-operative specific IMT improves MIP pre-operatively and preserves it postoperatively. Further studies are required to establish if this is associated with reduced pulmonary complications. PMID:20663275

  12. Preoperative Ambulatory Inspiratory Muscle Training in Patients Undergoing Esophagectomy. A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Agrelli, Taciana Freitas; de Carvalho Ramos, Marisa; Guglielminetti, Rachel; Silva, Alex Augusto; Crema, Eduardo

    2012-01-01

    A major decline in pulmonary function is observed on the first day after upper abdominal surgery. This decline can reduce vital and inspiratory capacity and can culminate in restrictive lung diseases that cause atelectasis, reduced diaphragm movement, and respiratory insufficiency. The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of preoperative ambulatory respiratory muscle training in patients undergoing esophagectomy. The sample consisted of 20 adult patients (14 men [70%] and 6 women [30%]) with a diagnosis of advanced chagasic megaesophagus. A significant increase in maximum inspiratory pressure was observed after inspiratory muscle training when compared with baseline values (from −55.059 ± 18.359 to −76.286 ± 16.786). Preoperative ambulatory inspiratory muscle training was effective in increasing respiratory muscle strength in patients undergoing esophagectomy and contributed to the prevention of postoperative complications. PMID:23113846

  13. Inspiratory muscles do not limit maximal incremental exercise performance in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Romer, Lee M; Miller, Jordan D; Haverkamp, Hans C; Pegelow, David F; Dempsey, Jerome A

    2007-06-15

    We investigated whether the inspiratory muscles affect maximal incremental exercise performance using a placebo-controlled, crossover design. Six cyclists each performed six incremental exercise tests. For three trials, subjects exercised with proportional assist ventilation (PAV). For the remaining three trials, subjects underwent sham respiratory muscle unloading (placebo). Inspiratory muscle pressure (P(mus)) was reduced with PAV (-35.9+/-2.3% versus placebo; P<0.05). Furthermore, V(O2) and perceptions of dyspnea and limb discomfort at submaximal exercise intensities were significantly reduced with PAV. Peak power output, however, was not different between placebo and PAV (324+/-4W versus 326+/-4W; P>0.05). Diaphragm fatigue (bilateral phrenic nerve stimulation) did not occur in placebo. In conclusion, substantially unloading the inspiratory muscles did not affect maximal incremental exercise performance. Therefore, our data do not support a role for either inspiratory muscle work or fatigue per se in the limitation of maximal incremental exercise.

  14. REDUCTION IN INSPIRATORY FLOW ATTENUATES IL-8 RELEASE AND MAPK ACTIVATION OF LUNG OVERSTRETCH

    EPA Science Inventory

    Lung overstretch involves mechanical factors, including large tidal volumes (VT), which induce inflammatory responses. The current authors hypothesised that inspiratory flow contributes to ventilator-induced inflammation. Buffer-perfused rabbit lungs were ventilated for 2 h with ...

  15. Inspiratory muscle training to enhance recovery from mechanical ventilation: a randomised trial

    PubMed Central

    Bissett, Bernie M; Leditschke, I Anne; Neeman, Teresa; Boots, Robert; Paratz, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    Background In patients who have been mechanically ventilated, inspiratory muscles remain weak and fatigable following ventilatory weaning, which may contribute to dyspnoea and limited functional recovery. Inspiratory muscle training may improve inspiratory muscle strength and endurance following weaning, potentially improving dyspnoea and quality of life in this patient group. Methods We conducted a randomised trial with assessor-blinding and intention-to-treat analysis. Following 48 hours of successful weaning, 70 participants (mechanically ventilated ≥7 days) were randomised to receive inspiratory muscle training once daily 5 days/week for 2 weeks in addition to usual care, or usual care (control). Primary endpoints were inspiratory muscle strength and fatigue resistance index (FRI) 2 weeks following enrolment. Secondary endpoints included dyspnoea, physical function and quality of life, post-intensive care length of stay and in-hospital mortality. Results 34 participants were randomly allocated to the training group and 36 to control. The training group demonstrated greater improvements in inspiratory strength (training: 17%, control: 6%, mean difference: 11%, p=0.02). There were no statistically significant differences in FRI (0.03 vs 0.02, p=0.81), physical function (0.25 vs 0.25, p=0.97) or dyspnoea (−0.5 vs 0.2, p=0.22). Improvement in quality of life was greater in the training group (14% vs 2%, mean difference 12%, p=0.03). In-hospital mortality was higher in the training group (4 vs 0, 12% vs 0%, p=0.051). Conclusions Inspiratory muscle training following successful weaning increases inspiratory muscle strength and quality of life, but we cannot confidently rule out an associated increased risk of in-hospital mortality. Trial registration number ACTRN12610001089022, results. PMID:27257003

  16. Paired inspiratory-expiratory chest CT scans to assess for small airways disease in COPD

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Gas trapping quantified on chest CT scans has been proposed as a surrogate for small airway disease in COPD. We sought to determine if measurements using paired inspiratory and expiratory CT scans may be better able to separate gas trapping due to emphysema from gas trapping due to small airway disease. Methods Smokers with and without COPD from the COPDGene Study underwent inspiratory and expiratory chest CT scans. Emphysema was quantified by the percent of lung with attenuation < −950HU on inspiratory CT. Four gas trapping measures were defined: (1) Exp−856, the percent of lung < −856HU on expiratory imaging; (2) E/I MLA, the ratio of expiratory to inspiratory mean lung attenuation; (3) RVC856-950, the difference between expiratory and inspiratory lung volumes with attenuation between −856 and −950 HU; and (4) Residuals from the regression of Exp−856 on percent emphysema. Results In 8517 subjects with complete data, Exp−856 was highly correlated with emphysema. The measures based on paired inspiratory and expiratory CT scans were less strongly correlated with emphysema. Exp−856, E/I MLA and RVC856-950 were predictive of spirometry, exercise capacity and quality of life in all subjects and in subjects without emphysema. In subjects with severe emphysema, E/I MLA and RVC856-950 showed the highest correlations with clinical variables. Conclusions Quantitative measures based on paired inspiratory and expiratory chest CT scans can be used as markers of small airway disease in smokers with and without COPD, but this will require that future studies acquire both inspiratory and expiratory CT scans. PMID:23566024

  17. Inspiratory Flow Limitation in a Normal Population of Adults in São Paulo, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Palombini, Luciana O.; Tufik, Sergio; Rapoport, David M.; Ayappa, Indu A.; Guilleminault, Christian; de Godoy, Luciana B. M.; Castro, Laura S.; Bittencourt, Lia

    2013-01-01

    Study Objectives: Inspiratory flow limitation (IFL) during sleep occurs when airflow remains constant despite an increase in respiratory effort. This respiratory event has been recognized as an important parameter for identifying sleep breathing disorders. The purpose of this study was to investigate how much IFL normal individuals can present during sleep. Design: Cross-sectional study derived from a general population sample. Setting: A “normal” asymptomatic sample derived from the epidemiological cohort of São Paulo. Patients and Participants: This study was derived from a general population study involving questionnaires and nocturnal polysomnography of 1,042 individuals. A subgroup defined as a nonsymptomatic healthy group was used as the normal group. Interventions: N/A. Measurements and Results: All participants answered several questionnaires and underwent full nocturnal polysomnography. IFL was manually scored, and the percentage of IFL of total sleep time was considered for final analysis. The distribution of the percentage of IFL was analyzed, and associated factors (age, sex, and body mass index) were calculated. There were 95% of normal individuals who exhibited IFL during less than 30% of the total sleep time. Body mass index was positively associated with IFL. Conclusions: Inspiratory flow limitation can be observed in the polysomnography of normal individuals, with an influence of body weight on percentage of inspiratory flow limitation. However, only 5% of asymptomatic individuals will have more than 30% of total sleep time with inspiratory flow limitation. This suggests that only levels of inspiratory flow limitation > 30% be considered in the process of diagnosing obstructive sleep apnea in the absence of an apnea-hypopnea index > 5 and that < 30% of inspiratory flow limitation may be a normal finding in many patients. Citation: Palombini LO; Tufik S; Rapoport DM; Ayappa IA; Guilleminault C; de Godoy LBM; Castro LS; Bittencourt L

  18. Associative conditioning with leg cycling and inspiratory resistance enhances the early exercise ventilatory response in humans.

    PubMed

    Turner, Duncan; Stewart, Jamie D

    2004-12-01

    Repeated trials of hypercapnic exercise [deltaPET CO2 = 7 (1) mmHg] augment the increase in inspired minute ventilation and tidal volume (V(T)) in the early phase of subsequent trials of unencumbered exercise alone. The increase in V(T) in the first 20 s of exercise was correlated to the increase in V(T) evoked during hypercapnic exercise trials, suggesting that the evoked increase in V(T) during conditioning may be a factor in mediating associative conditioning. To test this hypothesis, inspiratory resistive loading (IRL) was employed to evoke an increase in V(T) [deltaV(T) = 0.4 (0.1) I(BTPS)] during conditioning exercise trials [IRL + EX; deltaP(ET)CO2 = 2 (l) mmHg]. IRL + EX associative conditioning elicited a significant augmentation of the early minute ventilation (+46%) and V(T) (+100%) responses to subsequent unencumbered exercise. The latter was correlated to the evoked increase in V(T) during associative conditioning with IRL + EX. The results support the hypothesis that an evoked increase in V(T) during associative conditioning could be a factor in eliciting long-term modulation of minute ventilation in subsequent unencumbered exercise. The results further indicated that the modulation of ventilation early in exercise is not due to sensitisation to repeated trials of either IRL or exercise alone. Associative conditioning may shape the ventilatory response to exercise through a process of motor learning. Data are presented as mean (SEM) unless otherwise stated.

  19. Optogenetic excitation of preBötzinger complex neurons potently drives inspiratory activity in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Alsahafi, Zaki; Dickson, Clayton T; Pagliardini, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the sites and mechanisms underlying respiratory rhythmogenesis is of fundamental interest in the field of respiratory neurophysiology. Previous studies demonstrated the necessary and sufficient role of preBötzinger complex (preBötC) in generating inspiratory rhythms in vitro and in vivo. However, the influence of timed activation of the preBötC network in vivo is as yet unknown given the experimental approaches previously used. By unilaterally infecting preBötC neurons using an adeno-associated virus expressing channelrhodopsin we photo-activated the network in order to assess how excitation delivered in a spatially and temporally precise manner to the inspiratory oscillator influences ongoing breathing rhythms and related muscular activity in urethane-anaesthetized rats. We hypothesized that if an excitatory drive is necessary for rhythmogenesis and burst initiation, photo-activation of preBötC not only will increase respiratory rate, but also entrain it over a wide range of frequencies with fast onset, and have little effect on ongoing respiratory rhythm if a stimulus is delivered during inspiration. Stimulation of preBötC neurons consistently increased respiratory rate and entrained respiration up to fourfold baseline conditions. Furthermore, brief pulses of photostimulation delivered at random phases between inspiratory events robustly and consistently induced phase-independent (Type 0) respiratory reset and recruited inspiratory muscle activity at very short delays (∼100 ms). A 200 ms refractory period following inspiration was also identified. These data provide strong evidence for a fine control of inspiratory activity in the preBötC and provide further evidence that the preBötC network constitutes the fundamental oscillator of inspiratory rhythms. PMID:26010654

  20. Cardiovascular changes and hearing threshold shifts in men under complex exposures to noise, whole body vibrations, temperatures and competition-type psychic load.

    PubMed

    Manninen, O

    1985-01-01

    This study deals with changes in the temporary hearing threshold (TTS2), heart rate (HR), R-wave amplitude (RWA), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), systolic blood pressure (SBP), pulse pressure (PP) and reaction time (RT) in subjects (n = 108) who, while working on a choice reaction apparatus, were exposed in an exposure chamber to combinations of noise and vibration at dry bulb temperatures of 20 degrees and 30 degrees C. The study was carried out as a type 2-3-3 factorial experiment, the number of the exposure combinations thus being 18. To find out the effects of competition-type psychic stress, some of the subjects were placed in a competitive group and some in a non-competitive group. The members of the competitive group were given financial encouragement and information on their progress during the test, whereas those in the non-competitive group worked at the rate they considered best without any monetary rewards or interim information. The noise classes were: no noise, a stable broadband (bandwidth 0.2-16.0 kHz) A-weighted noise of 90 dB not related to competition, and a stable broadband A-weighted noise of 90 dB related to competition about the fastest reaction time. The vibration classes were: no vibration, sinusoidal whole body vibration (Z-axis) at a frequency of 5 Hz, and stochastic broadband (bandwidth 2.8-11.2 Hz) whole body vibration (Z-axis). The acceleration (rms) of both vibrations was 2.12 m/s2. One experiment consisted of a control period of 30 min, three consecutive exposure periods of 16 min with an interval of 4 min, and a 15-min recovery period. The variance analysis model best explained the variation in TTS2 values at 4 kHz and second best the variation in TTS2 values at 6 kHz; it explained the variation in HR values third best, the variation in SBP values fourth best and the variation in PP values fifth best. On the other hand, the model explained least well the variation in DBP and RWA values. In general, the explanatory power of the model

  1. Effects of decreasing inspiratory times during simulated bag-valve-mask ventilation.

    PubMed

    von Goedecke, Achim; Bowden, Kevin; Wenzel, Volker; Keller, Christian; Gabrielli, Andrea

    2005-03-01

    During CPR, an inspiratory time of 2 s is recommended when the airway is unprotected; indicating that approximately 30% of the resuscitation attempt is spent on ventilation, but not on chest compressions. Since survival rates may not decrease when ventilation levels are relatively low, and uninterrupted chest compressions with a constant rate of approximately 100/min have been shown to be lifesaving, it may be beneficial to cut down the time spent on ventilation, and instead, increase the time for chest compressions. In an established bench model of a simulated unprotected airway, we evaluated if inspiratory time can be decreased from 2 to 1 s at different lower oesophageal sphincter pressure (LOSP) levels during ventilation with a bag-valve-mask device. In comparison with an inspiratory time of 2 s, 1 s resulted in significantly (p < 0.001) higher peak airway pressure and peak inspiratory flow rate, while lung tidal volumes at all LOSP levels were clinically comparable. Neither ventilation strategy produced stomach inflation at 20 cmH2O LOSP, and 1 s versus 2 s inspiratory time did not produce significantly higher (mean +/- S.D.) stomach inflation at 15 (8 +/-9 ml versus 0 +/- 0 ml; p < 0.01) and 10 cmH2O LOSP (69 +/- 20 ml versus 34 +/- 18 ml; p < 0.001), and significantly lower stomach inflation at 5 cmH2O LOSP (219 +/- 16 ml versus 308 +/- 21 ml; p < 0.001) per breath. Total cumulative stomach inflation volume over constantly decreasing LOSP levels with an inspiratory time of 2 s versus 1 s was higher (6820 ml versus 5920 ml). In conclusion, in this model of a simulated unprotected airway, a reduction of inspiratory time from 2 to 1 s resulted in a significant increase of peak airway pressure and peak inspiratory flow rate, while lung tidal volumes remained clinically comparable (up to approximately 15% difference), but statistically different due to the precise measurements. Theoretically, this may increase the time available for, and consequently the actual

  2. [Measurement of the reserve function of inspiratory muscle and its clinical significance].

    PubMed

    Xiao, X; Luo, Y; Chen, W; Yuan, Y; He, T; Zeng, J

    1995-06-01

    The principles of measuring inspiratory muscle tension-time index (TTim) and the ratio of the works of inspiration over the maximal works of inspiration (Wi/Wi(max)) were investigated and their formulae were deduced, i.e. TTim = (Pi x Ti)/(MIP x Ttot) and Wi/Wi(max) = (Pi x VT)/(MIP x IC). The importance of the inspiratory pressure and the maximal inspiratory pressure (MIP) measured at function residual capacity (FRC) level was emphasized. Both TTim and Wi/Wi(max) were measured in 35 normal subjects and 89 patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The results showed that normal value of TTim was 0.0253 +/- 0.0055 which corresponds to the normal value of the diaphragm tension-time index (TTdi = 0.02-0.03) reported by Bellemare. Patients with COPD had a mean TTim much higher than that of normals (P < 0.01). The works of inspiration (Wi) in patients with COPD increased, while the maximal works of inspiration (Wi(max)) declined, so Wi/Wi(max) became significantly greater than that of normals (P < 0.01). The results also showed that there was a linear relationship between Pi/Pimax and TTim or Wi/Wimax (r = 0.7891, 0.9738, 0.6459, 0.9327, P < 0.01). Therefore, we suggest that both TTim and Wi/Wimax can be used as clinical indices to reflect the reserve function of inspiratory muscles. PMID:7490035

  3. Inspiratory muscle fatigue after race-paced swimming is not restricted to the front crawl stroke.

    PubMed

    Lomax, Mitch; Iggleden, Colin; Tourell, Alice; Castle, Sophie; Honey, Jo

    2012-10-01

    The occurrence of inspiratory muscle fatigue (IMF) has been documented after front crawl (FC) swimming of various distances. Whether IMF occurs after other competitive swimming strokes is not known. The aim of the present study was to assess the impact of all 4 competitive swimming strokes on the occurrence of IMF after race-paced swimming and to determine whether the magnitude of IMF was related to the breathing pattern adopted and hence breathing frequency (f(b)). Eleven, nationally ranked, youth swimmers completed four 200-m swims (one in each competitive stroke) on separate occasions. The order of the swims, which consisted of FC, backstroke (BK), breaststroke (BR), and butterfly (FLY), was randomized. Maximal inspiratory mouth pressure (MIP) was assessed before (after a swimming and inspiratory muscle warm-up) and after each swim with f(b) calculated post swim from recorded data. Inspiratory muscle fatigue was evident after each 200-m swim (p < 0.05) but did not differ between the 4 strokes (range 18-21%). No relationship (p > 0.05) was observed between f(b) and the change in MIP (FC: r = -0.456; BK: r = 0.218; BR: r = 0.218; and FLY: r = 0.312). These results demonstrate that IMF occurs in response to 200-m race-paced swimming in all strokes and that the magnitude of IMF is similar between strokes when breathing is ad libitum occurring no less than 1 breath (inhalation) every third stroke. PMID:22130403

  4. Impact of a Behavioral-Based Intervention on Inspiratory Muscle Training Prescription by a Multidisciplinary Team

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simms, Alanna M.; Li, Linda C.; Geddes, E. Lynne; Brooks, Dina; Hoens, Alison M.; Reid, W. Darlene

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Our goal was to compare behavioral- and information-based interventions aimed at increasing prescription of inspiratory muscle training (IMT) for people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) by interdisciplinary teams during pulmonary rehabilitation (PR). Methods: Six hospital PR programs were randomly assigned to a…

  5. [Measurement of the reserve function of inspiratory muscle and its clinical significance].

    PubMed

    Xiao, X; Luo, Y; Chen, W; Yuan, Y; He, T; Zeng, J

    1995-06-01

    The principles of measuring inspiratory muscle tension-time index (TTim) and the ratio of the works of inspiration over the maximal works of inspiration (Wi/Wi(max)) were investigated and their formulae were deduced, i.e. TTim = (Pi x Ti)/(MIP x Ttot) and Wi/Wi(max) = (Pi x VT)/(MIP x IC). The importance of the inspiratory pressure and the maximal inspiratory pressure (MIP) measured at function residual capacity (FRC) level was emphasized. Both TTim and Wi/Wi(max) were measured in 35 normal subjects and 89 patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The results showed that normal value of TTim was 0.0253 +/- 0.0055 which corresponds to the normal value of the diaphragm tension-time index (TTdi = 0.02-0.03) reported by Bellemare. Patients with COPD had a mean TTim much higher than that of normals (P < 0.01). The works of inspiration (Wi) in patients with COPD increased, while the maximal works of inspiration (Wi(max)) declined, so Wi/Wi(max) became significantly greater than that of normals (P < 0.01). The results also showed that there was a linear relationship between Pi/Pimax and TTim or Wi/Wimax (r = 0.7891, 0.9738, 0.6459, 0.9327, P < 0.01). Therefore, we suggest that both TTim and Wi/Wimax can be used as clinical indices to reflect the reserve function of inspiratory muscles.

  6. Inspiratory muscles do not limit maximal incremental exercise performance in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Romer, Lee M; Miller, Jordan D; Haverkamp, Hans C; Pegelow, David F; Dempsey, Jerome A

    2007-06-15

    We investigated whether the inspiratory muscles affect maximal incremental exercise performance using a placebo-controlled, crossover design. Six cyclists each performed six incremental exercise tests. For three trials, subjects exercised with proportional assist ventilation (PAV). For the remaining three trials, subjects underwent sham respiratory muscle unloading (placebo). Inspiratory muscle pressure (P(mus)) was reduced with PAV (-35.9+/-2.3% versus placebo; P<0.05). Furthermore, V(O2) and perceptions of dyspnea and limb discomfort at submaximal exercise intensities were significantly reduced with PAV. Peak power output, however, was not different between placebo and PAV (324+/-4W versus 326+/-4W; P>0.05). Diaphragm fatigue (bilateral phrenic nerve stimulation) did not occur in placebo. In conclusion, substantially unloading the inspiratory muscles did not affect maximal incremental exercise performance. Therefore, our data do not support a role for either inspiratory muscle work or fatigue per se in the limitation of maximal incremental exercise. PMID:17134946

  7. Inspiratory muscle fatigue after race-paced swimming is not restricted to the front crawl stroke.

    PubMed

    Lomax, Mitch; Iggleden, Colin; Tourell, Alice; Castle, Sophie; Honey, Jo

    2012-10-01

    The occurrence of inspiratory muscle fatigue (IMF) has been documented after front crawl (FC) swimming of various distances. Whether IMF occurs after other competitive swimming strokes is not known. The aim of the present study was to assess the impact of all 4 competitive swimming strokes on the occurrence of IMF after race-paced swimming and to determine whether the magnitude of IMF was related to the breathing pattern adopted and hence breathing frequency (f(b)). Eleven, nationally ranked, youth swimmers completed four 200-m swims (one in each competitive stroke) on separate occasions. The order of the swims, which consisted of FC, backstroke (BK), breaststroke (BR), and butterfly (FLY), was randomized. Maximal inspiratory mouth pressure (MIP) was assessed before (after a swimming and inspiratory muscle warm-up) and after each swim with f(b) calculated post swim from recorded data. Inspiratory muscle fatigue was evident after each 200-m swim (p < 0.05) but did not differ between the 4 strokes (range 18-21%). No relationship (p > 0.05) was observed between f(b) and the change in MIP (FC: r = -0.456; BK: r = 0.218; BR: r = 0.218; and FLY: r = 0.312). These results demonstrate that IMF occurs in response to 200-m race-paced swimming in all strokes and that the magnitude of IMF is similar between strokes when breathing is ad libitum occurring no less than 1 breath (inhalation) every third stroke.

  8. Effect of PEEP, blood volume, and inspiratory hold maneuvers on venous return.

    PubMed

    Berger, David; Moller, Per W; Weber, Alberto; Bloch, Andreas; Bloechlinger, Stefan; Haenggi, Matthias; Sondergaard, Soren; Jakob, Stephan M; Magder, Sheldon; Takala, Jukka

    2016-09-01

    According to Guyton's model of circulation, mean systemic filling pressure (MSFP), right atrial pressure (RAP), and resistance to venous return (RVR) determine venous return. MSFP has been estimated from inspiratory hold-induced changes in RAP and blood flow. We studied the effect of positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) and blood volume on venous return and MSFP in pigs. MSFP was measured by balloon occlusion of the right atrium (MSFPRAO), and the MSFP obtained via extrapolation of pressure-flow relationships with airway occlusion (MSFPinsp_hold) was extrapolated from RAP/pulmonary artery flow (QPA) relationships during inspiratory holds at PEEP 5 and 10 cmH2O, after bleeding, and in hypervolemia. MSFPRAO increased with PEEP [PEEP 5, 12.9 (SD 2.5) mmHg; PEEP 10, 14.0 (SD 2.6) mmHg, P = 0.002] without change in QPA [2.75 (SD 0.43) vs. 2.56 (SD 0.45) l/min, P = 0.094]. MSFPRAO decreased after bleeding and increased in hypervolemia [10.8 (SD 2.2) and 16.4 (SD 3.0) mmHg, respectively, P < 0.001], with parallel changes in QPA Neither PEEP nor volume state altered RVR (P = 0.489). MSFPinsp_hold overestimated MSFPRAO [16.5 (SD 5.8) vs. 13.6 (SD 3.2) mmHg, P = 0.001; mean difference 3.0 (SD 5.1) mmHg]. Inspiratory holds shifted the RAP/QPA relationship rightward in euvolemia because inferior vena cava flow (QIVC) recovered early after an inspiratory hold nadir. The QIVC nadir was lowest after bleeding [36% (SD 24%) of preinspiratory hold at 15 cmH2O inspiratory pressure], and the QIVC recovery was most complete at the lowest inspiratory pressures independent of volume state [range from 80% (SD 7%) after bleeding to 103% (SD 8%) at PEEP 10 cmH2O of QIVC before inspiratory hold]. The QIVC recovery thus defends venous return, possibly via hepatosplanchnic vascular waterfall.

  9. Effect of PEEP, blood volume, and inspiratory hold maneuvers on venous return.

    PubMed

    Berger, David; Moller, Per W; Weber, Alberto; Bloch, Andreas; Bloechlinger, Stefan; Haenggi, Matthias; Sondergaard, Soren; Jakob, Stephan M; Magder, Sheldon; Takala, Jukka

    2016-09-01

    According to Guyton's model of circulation, mean systemic filling pressure (MSFP), right atrial pressure (RAP), and resistance to venous return (RVR) determine venous return. MSFP has been estimated from inspiratory hold-induced changes in RAP and blood flow. We studied the effect of positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) and blood volume on venous return and MSFP in pigs. MSFP was measured by balloon occlusion of the right atrium (MSFPRAO), and the MSFP obtained via extrapolation of pressure-flow relationships with airway occlusion (MSFPinsp_hold) was extrapolated from RAP/pulmonary artery flow (QPA) relationships during inspiratory holds at PEEP 5 and 10 cmH2O, after bleeding, and in hypervolemia. MSFPRAO increased with PEEP [PEEP 5, 12.9 (SD 2.5) mmHg; PEEP 10, 14.0 (SD 2.6) mmHg, P = 0.002] without change in QPA [2.75 (SD 0.43) vs. 2.56 (SD 0.45) l/min, P = 0.094]. MSFPRAO decreased after bleeding and increased in hypervolemia [10.8 (SD 2.2) and 16.4 (SD 3.0) mmHg, respectively, P < 0.001], with parallel changes in QPA Neither PEEP nor volume state altered RVR (P = 0.489). MSFPinsp_hold overestimated MSFPRAO [16.5 (SD 5.8) vs. 13.6 (SD 3.2) mmHg, P = 0.001; mean difference 3.0 (SD 5.1) mmHg]. Inspiratory holds shifted the RAP/QPA relationship rightward in euvolemia because inferior vena cava flow (QIVC) recovered early after an inspiratory hold nadir. The QIVC nadir was lowest after bleeding [36% (SD 24%) of preinspiratory hold at 15 cmH2O inspiratory pressure], and the QIVC recovery was most complete at the lowest inspiratory pressures independent of volume state [range from 80% (SD 7%) after bleeding to 103% (SD 8%) at PEEP 10 cmH2O of QIVC before inspiratory hold]. The QIVC recovery thus defends venous return, possibly via hepatosplanchnic vascular waterfall. PMID:27422991

  10. EMG analysis of human inspiratory muscle resistance to fatigue during exercise.

    PubMed

    Segizbaeva, M O; Donina, Zh A; Timofeev, N N; Korolyov, Yu N; Golubev, V N; Aleksandrova, N P

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize the pattern of inspiratory muscle fatigue and to assess the resistance to fatigue of the diaphragm (D), parasternal (PS), sternocleidomastoid (SCM), and scalene (SC) muscles. Nine healthy, untrained male subjects participated in this study. Electromyographic activity (EMG) of D, PS, SCM, and SC was recorded during an incremental cycling test to exhaustion (workload of 1.0 W/kg with 0.5 W/kg increments every 5 min). The before-to-after exercise measurements of maximal inspiratory pressure (MIP) and EMG power spectrum changes were performed. The maximal inspiratory pressure declined about 8.1 % after exercise compared with that in the control condition (124.3 ± 8.5 vs. 114.2 ± 8.9 cmH2O) (P > 0.05), whereas the peak magnitude of integrated electrical activity of D, PS, SCM, and SC during the post-exercise Müller maneuver was significantly greater in all subjects than that pre-exercise. The extent of inspiratory muscles fatigue was evaluated by analysis of a shift in centroid frequency (fc) of EMG power spectrum. Exercise-induced D fatigue was present in three subjects and PS fatigue was another in two; whereas both D and PC fatigue were observed in four subjects. All subjects demonstrated a significant reduction in fc of SCM and SC. Results indicate that early signs of the fatiguing process might be detected in the D, PS, SCM, and SC muscles during exercise to exhaustion. Fatigue of either D or PS muscles develops selectively or together during exhaustive exercise, depending on the recruitment pattern of respiratory muscles. Accessory inspiratory muscles of the neck are less resistant to fatigue compared with the D and PS muscles.

  11. Increased incidence of sighs (augmented inspiratory efforts) during synchronized intermittent mandatory ventilation (SIMV) in preterm neonates.

    PubMed

    Hummler, H; Gerhardt, T; Gonzalez, A; Claure, N; Everett, R; Bancalari, E

    1997-09-01

    A reflex resulting in a deep, sigh-like inspiratory effort (augmented breath) is frequently triggered during synchronized mechanical ventilation in preterm infants. We studied the incidence of augmented inspiratory efforts and their effect on ventilation and lung compliance during conventional IMV and synchronized IMV (SIMV) in 15 preterm neonates (GA 26.7 +/- 1.5 wks (mean +/- SD), BW 925 +/- 222 g, age 1-8 days). Augmentation of spontaneous inspiratory effort was defined as an esophageal pressure deflection occurring coincident with a synchronized mechanical breath and exceeding the previous unassisted spontaneous effort by more than 50%. The incidence of augmented breaths was higher during SIMV (11.1 +/- 7.7%; P < 0.01) than during conventional IMV (5.1 +/- 6.1%). However, when the synchronized breaths were triggered late (200-300 msec) after the onset of inspiration, augmented breaths occurred no more frequently than during conventional IMV (6.0 +/- 4.7%). The incidence of augmented breaths correlated inversely with dynamic lung compliance (P = 0.014), but was not significantly influenced by a change in PEEP. Although inspiratory effort increased nearly three times during the augmented breaths, tidal volume increased only 12%. The change in tidal volume was limited because the augmented effort reached its maximal negativity only approximately 500 ms after the beginning of the synchronized, mechanical breath and at a time when the mechanical breath had already ended. For this reason the augmented effort did not contribute significantly to minute ventilation, but only prolonged inspiration. Dynamic lung compliance did not change significantly after an augmented breath. The results indicate that augmented inspiratory efforts are more common in preterm neonates ventilated with SIMV than with conventional IMV, but do not contribute significantly to ventilation.

  12. Pulmonary function tests (maximum inspiratory pressure, maximum expiratory pressure, vital capacity, forced vital capacity) predict ventilator use in late-onset Pompe disease.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Erin M; Roberts, Mark; Mozaffar, Tahseen; Young, Peter; Quartel, Adrian; Berger, Kenneth I

    2016-02-01

    In patients with Late-Onset Pompe Disease (LOPD), progressive respiratory muscle involvement leads to reduced pulmonary function, with respiratory failure the most common cause of mortality. Early disease manifestations include sleep-disordered breathing, which can be treated with non-invasive ventilation; however, progressive diurnal deficits can require invasive ventilation. To determine if pulmonary function tests (PFTs) predict the thresholds for ventilation and wheelchair use, a systematic literature review identified cross-sectional clinical patient data (N = 174) that was classified into ventilation and wheelchair cohorts. PFTs included maximum inspiratory pressure (MIP), maximum expiratory pressure (MEP), forced vital capacity (FVC), and vital capacity (VC), with vital capacities measured in the upright (-U) and supine (-S) positions. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were used to calculate cut-points (CP) and area under the curve (AUC). For all ventilation and mobility thresholds tested, ROC analyses demonstrated AUC values from 86-89% for MIP, 72-96% for MEP, and 74-96% for all vital capacity metrics. Thus, PFTs are useful in predicting the thresholds for nighttime ventilation, daytime ventilation, and wheelchair use, with MIP and VC-U having both high AUC values and consistency. The PFT mobility CPs were low (MIP CP = 0.9 kPa, MEP, CP = 2.6 kPa, VC-U CP = 19% predicted), suggesting an endurance component associated with wheelchair use.

  13. Pulmonary function tests (maximum inspiratory pressure, maximum expiratory pressure, vital capacity, forced vital capacity) predict ventilator use in late-onset Pompe disease.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Erin M; Roberts, Mark; Mozaffar, Tahseen; Young, Peter; Quartel, Adrian; Berger, Kenneth I

    2016-02-01

    In patients with Late-Onset Pompe Disease (LOPD), progressive respiratory muscle involvement leads to reduced pulmonary function, with respiratory failure the most common cause of mortality. Early disease manifestations include sleep-disordered breathing, which can be treated with non-invasive ventilation; however, progressive diurnal deficits can require invasive ventilation. To determine if pulmonary function tests (PFTs) predict the thresholds for ventilation and wheelchair use, a systematic literature review identified cross-sectional clinical patient data (N = 174) that was classified into ventilation and wheelchair cohorts. PFTs included maximum inspiratory pressure (MIP), maximum expiratory pressure (MEP), forced vital capacity (FVC), and vital capacity (VC), with vital capacities measured in the upright (-U) and supine (-S) positions. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were used to calculate cut-points (CP) and area under the curve (AUC). For all ventilation and mobility thresholds tested, ROC analyses demonstrated AUC values from 86-89% for MIP, 72-96% for MEP, and 74-96% for all vital capacity metrics. Thus, PFTs are useful in predicting the thresholds for nighttime ventilation, daytime ventilation, and wheelchair use, with MIP and VC-U having both high AUC values and consistency. The PFT mobility CPs were low (MIP CP = 0.9 kPa, MEP, CP = 2.6 kPa, VC-U CP = 19% predicted), suggesting an endurance component associated with wheelchair use. PMID:26794303

  14. [Effect of methylphenidatum on inspiratory muscles function in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and its mechanism].

    PubMed

    Wang, Y; Luo, Y; Chen, W; Yuan, Y; He, T; Zeng, J

    1997-03-01

    To have a better understanding of the effect of methylphenidatum on inspiratory muscles function, we studied the respiratory force parameters of 70 patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease by intravenous infusion methylphenidatum in a randomized controlled clinical trial. The indices of respiratory force parameter included maximal inspiratory mouth pressure (MIP), maximal midinspiratory flow (MMIF), forced inspiratory capacity (FIC), maximal works of inspiration (Wimax) and airway occlusion pressure (P0.1), etc. Aminophylline and Nikethamidi were chosen as controls. The results showed that MIP, MMIF, FIC, Wimax, P0.1 and minute ventilation (Vr) were significantly increased after administration of methylphenidatum and aminophylline. There were no significant differences in MIP, MMIF, FIC and Wimax after administration of Nikethamidi, but P0.1 was significantly increased and the increase was higher than that after administration of methylphenidatum and aminophylline groups. We conclude that methylphenidatum can significantly improve the function of inspiratory muscles as aminophylline can do. PMID:10684069

  15. [Effect of methylphenidatum on inspiratory muscles function in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and its mechanism].

    PubMed

    Wang, Y; Luo, Y; Chen, W; Yuan, Y; He, T; Zeng, J

    1997-03-01

    To have a better understanding of the effect of methylphenidatum on inspiratory muscles function, we studied the respiratory force parameters of 70 patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease by intravenous infusion methylphenidatum in a randomized controlled clinical trial. The indices of respiratory force parameter included maximal inspiratory mouth pressure (MIP), maximal midinspiratory flow (MMIF), forced inspiratory capacity (FIC), maximal works of inspiration (Wimax) and airway occlusion pressure (P0.1), etc. Aminophylline and Nikethamidi were chosen as controls. The results showed that MIP, MMIF, FIC, Wimax, P0.1 and minute ventilation (Vr) were significantly increased after administration of methylphenidatum and aminophylline. There were no significant differences in MIP, MMIF, FIC and Wimax after administration of Nikethamidi, but P0.1 was significantly increased and the increase was higher than that after administration of methylphenidatum and aminophylline groups. We conclude that methylphenidatum can significantly improve the function of inspiratory muscles as aminophylline can do.

  16. The Role of Inspiratory Pressures in Determining the Flow Rates Though Dry Powder Inhalers; A Review.

    PubMed

    Clark, Andrew R

    2015-01-01

    Dry powder inhalers are one of the most popular devices for delivering medication directly to the lungs of patients. Both for local action and when using the lungs as a portal of entry into the systemic circulation. Dry powder inhalers rely on the patient's inspiratory effort to supply the energy for the device to effectively deliver medication. In this respect they are limited by the airway pressures that a patient can generate with their respiratory muscles. In this review we focus on a simple model outlining the variables influencing respiratory pressure and review the literature on inspiratory flow rates in patients with respiratory disease. The main determinants of the capability to generate the pressure necessary to effectively use a dry powder inhaler are shown to be age and gender, not disease or disease severity.

  17. Effect of inspiratory resistance and PEEP on /sup 99m/Tc-DTPA clearance

    SciTech Connect

    O'Brodovich, H.; Coates, G.; Marrin, M.

    1986-05-01

    Experiments were performed to determine the effect of markedly negative pleural pressure (Ppl) or positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) on the pulmonary clearance (k) of technetium-99m-labeled diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (/sup 99m/Tc-DTPA). A submicronic aerosol containing /sup 99m/Tc-DTPA was insufflated into the lungs of anesthetized intubated sheep. In six experiments k was 0.44 +/- 0.46% (SD)/min during the initial 30 min and was unchanged during the subsequent 30-min interval (k = 0.21 +/- 12%/min) when there was markedly increased inspiratory resistance. A 3-mm-diam orifice in the inspiratory tubing created the resistance. It resulted on average in a 13-cmH2O decrease in inspiratory Ppl. In eight additional experiments sheep were exposed to 2, 10, and 15 cmH2O PEEP (20 min at each level). During 2 cmH2O PEEP k = 0.47 +/- 0.15%/min, and clearance increased slightly at 10 cmH2O PEEP (0.76 +/- 0.28%/min, P less than 0.01). When PEEP was increased to 15 cmH2O a marked increase in clearance occurred (k = 1.95 +/- 1.08%/min, P less than 0.001). The experiments demonstrate that markedly negative inspiratory pressures do not accelerate the clearance of /sup 99m/Tc-DTPA from normal lungs. The effect of PEEP on k is nonlinear, with large effects being seen only with very large increases in PEEP.

  18. Tolerance to external breathing resistance with particular reference to high inspiratory resistance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bentley, R. A.; Griffin, O. G.; Love, R. G.; Muir, D. C. F.; Sweetland, K. F.

    1972-01-01

    The ability of men to exercise while breathing through graded inspiratory resistances was studied in order to define acceptable respiratory mouthpiece assembly standards. Experimental results with subjects wearing breathing masks and walking for 30 min on treadmills were used to calculate expiratory work rates. It is concluded that the airflow must be appropriate to the upper limit of minute ventilation likely to be encountered in the men wearing the apparatus.

  19. Projections from inspiratory neurons of the ventral respiratory group to the subretrofacial nucleus of the cat.

    PubMed

    Pilowsky, P; Llewellyn-Smith, I J; Lipski, J; Minson, J; Arnolda, L; Chalmers, J

    1994-01-01

    Arterial blood pressure and the activity of many sympathetic nerves are known to be affected by changes in central respiratory activity. The central neurons responsible for this respiratory modulation are unknown. In the present study we have labelled inspiratory neurons (n = 24) in the rostral ventral respiratory group and Bötzinger complex in the medulla oblongata of the cat using intracellular injection of biocytin. The filled neurons were examined to see if they had axonal projections to the subretrofacial nucleus, an important brainstem nucleus in the tonic and reflex control of blood pressure. The subretrofacial nucleus was identified histologically as a cluster of neurons in the rostral ventrolateral medulla, some of which are tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactive. Varicose axons arising from labelled inspiratory neurons were mostly found dorsal to this cluster, within the area corresponding to the Bötzinger complex. A small number of axon varicosities were seen in the subretrofacial nucleus. The results suggest that a part of the respiratory modulation of sympathetic nerve activity may be due to a direct synaptic input from inspiratory neurons of the ventral respiratory group to neurons of the subretrofacial nucleus. PMID:7907937

  20. Cycle ergometer and inspiratory muscle training in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Larson, J L; Covey, M K; Wirtz, S E; Berry, J K; Alex, C G; Langbein, W E; Edwards, L

    1999-08-01

    In patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) the intensity of aerobic training is limited by dyspnea. Improving strength of the inspiratory muscles could enhance aerobic exercise training by reducing exercise-related dyspnea. We examined effects of home-based inspiratory muscle training (IMT) and cycle ergometry training (CET) in 53 patients with moderate to severe COPD (FEV(1)% pred, 50 +/- 17 [mean +/- SD]). Patients were randomly assigned to 4 mo of training in one of four groups: IMT, CET, CET + IMT, or health education (ED). Patients were encouraged to train to the limits of their dyspnea. Inspiratory muscle strength and endurance increased in IMT and CET + IMT groups compared with CET and ED groups (p < 0. 01). Peak oxygen uptake increased and heart rate, minute ventilation, dyspnea, and leg fatigue decreased at submaximal work rates in the CET and CET + IMT groups compared with the IMT and ED groups (p < 0. 01). There were no differences between the CET and CET + IMT groups. Home-based CET produced a physiological training effect and reduced exercise-related symptoms while IMT increased respiratory muscle strength and endurance. The combination of CET and IMT did not produce additional benefits in exercise performance and exercise-related symptoms. This is the first study to demonstrate a physiological training effect with home-based exercise training.

  1. Influence of peak inspiratory flow rates and pressure drops on inhalation performance of dry powder inhalers.

    PubMed

    Hira, Daiki; Okuda, Tomoyuki; Ichihashi, Mika; Mizutani, Ayano; Ishizeki, Kazunori; Okada, Toyoko; Okamoto, Hirokazu

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to reveal the relationship between human inspiratory flow patterns and the concomitant drops in pressure in different inhalation devices, and the influence of the devices on inhalation performance. As a model formulation for inhalers, a physically mixed dry powder composed of salbutamol sulfate and coarse lactose monohydrate was selected. The drops in pressure at 28.3 L/min of three inhalation devices, Single-type, Dual-type, and Reverse-type, was 1.0, 5.1, and 8.7 kPa, respectively. Measurements of human inspiratory patterns revealed that although the least resistant device (Single) had large inter- and intra-individual variation of peak flow rate (PFR), the coefficients of variation of PFR of the three devices were almost the same. In tests with a human inspiratory flow simulator in vitro, inhalation performance was higher, but the variation in inhalation performance in the range of human flow patterns was wider, for the more resistant device. To minimize the intra- and inter-individual variation in inhalation performance for the model formulation in this study, a formulation design that allows active pharmaceutical ingredient to detach from the carrier with a lower inhalation flow rate is needed.

  2. Respiratory Muscle Activity During Simultaneous Stationary Cycling and Inspiratory Muscle Training.

    PubMed

    Hellyer, Nathan J; Folsom, Ian A; Gaz, Dan V; Kakuk, Alynn C; Mack, Jessica L; Ver Mulm, Jacyln A

    2015-12-01

    Inspiratory muscle training (IMT) strengthens the muscles of respiration, improves breathing efficiency, and increases fitness. The IMT is generally performed independently of aerobic exercise; however, it is not clear whether there is added benefit of performing the IMT while simultaneously performing aerobic exercise in terms of activating and strengthening inspiratory muscles. The purpose of our study was to determine the effect of IMT on respiratory muscle electromyography (EMG) activity during stationary cycling in the upright and drops postures as compared with that when the IMT was performed alone. Diaphragm and sternocleidomastoid EMG activity was measured under different resting and cycling postures, with and without the use of the IMT at 40% maximal inspiratory pressure (n = 10; mean age 37). Cycling in an upright posture while simultaneously performing the IMT resulted in a significantly greater diaphragm EMG activity than while performing the IMT at rest in upright or drops postures (p ≤ 0.05). Cycling in drops postures while performing the IMT had a significantly greater diaphragm EMG activity than when performing the IMT at rest in either upright or drops postures (p ≤ 0.05). Sternocleidomastoid muscle activity increased with both cycling and IMT, although posture had little effect. These results support our hypothesis in that the IMT while cycling increases respiratory EMG activity to a significantly greater extent than when performing the IMT solely at rest, suggesting that the combination of IMT and cycling may provide an additive training effect. PMID:26584054

  3. P2Y1 receptor-mediated potentiation of inspiratory motor output in neonatal rat in vitro.

    PubMed

    Alvares, T S; Revill, A L; Huxtable, A G; Lorenz, C D; Funk, G D

    2014-07-15

    PreBötzinger complex inspiratory rhythm-generating networks are excited by metabotropic purinergic receptor subtype 1 (P2Y1R) activation. Despite this, and the fact that inspiratory MNs express P2Y1Rs, the role of P2Y1Rs in modulating motor output is not known for any MN pool. We used rhythmically active brainstem-spinal cord and medullary slice preparations from neonatal rats to investigate the effects of P2Y1R signalling on inspiratory output of phrenic and XII MNs that innervate diaphragm and airway muscles, respectively. MRS2365 (P2Y1R agonist, 0.1 mm) potentiated XII inspiratory burst amplitude by 60 ± 9%; 10-fold higher concentrations potentiated C4 burst amplitude by 25 ± 7%. In whole-cell voltage-clamped XII MNs, MRS2365 evoked small inward currents and potentiated spontaneous EPSCs and inspiratory synaptic currents, but these effects were absent in TTX at resting membrane potential. Voltage ramps revealed a persistent inward current (PIC) that was attenuated by: flufenamic acid (FFA), a blocker of the Ca(2+)-dependent non-selective cation current ICAN; high intracellular concentrations of BAPTA, which buffers Ca(2+) increases necessary for activation of ICAN; and 9-phenanthrol, a selective blocker of TRPM4 channels (candidate for ICAN). Real-time PCR analysis of mRNA extracted from XII punches and laser-microdissected XII MNs revealed the transcript for TRPM4. MRS2365 potentiated the PIC and this potentiation was blocked by FFA, which also blocked the MRS2365 potentiation of glutamate currents. These data suggest that XII MNs are more sensitive to P2Y1R modulation than phrenic MNs and that the P2Y1R potentiation of inspiratory output occurs in part via potentiation of TRPM4-mediated ICAN, which amplifies inspiratory inputs. PMID:24879869

  4. CARA Risk Assessment Thresholds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hejduk, M. D.

    2016-01-01

    Warning remediation threshold (Red threshold): Pc level at which warnings are issued, and active remediation considered and usually executed. Analysis threshold (Green to Yellow threshold): Pc level at which analysis of event is indicated, including seeking additional information if warranted. Post-remediation threshold: Pc level to which remediation maneuvers are sized in order to achieve event remediation and obviate any need for immediate follow-up maneuvers. Maneuver screening threshold: Pc compliance level for routine maneuver screenings (more demanding than regular Red threshold due to additional maneuver uncertainty).

  5. Immediate effect of manual therapy on respiratory functions and inspiratory muscle strength in patients with COPD

    PubMed Central

    Yilmaz Yelvar, Gul Deniz; Çirak, Yasemin; Demir, Yasemin Parlak; Dalkilinç, Murat; Bozkurt, Bülent

    2016-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to investigate the immediate effect of manual therapy (MT) on respiratory functions and inspiratory muscle strength in patients with COPD. Participants and methods Thirty patients with severe COPD (eight females and 22 males; mean age 62.4±6.8 years) referred to pulmonary physiotherapy were included in this study. The patients participated in a single session of MT to measure the short-term effects. The lung function was measured using a portable spirometer. An electronic pressure transducer was used to measure respiratory muscle strength. Heart rate, breathing frequency, and oxygen saturation were measured with a pulse oximeter. For fatigue and dyspnea perception, the modified Borg rating of perceived exertion scale was used. All measurements were taken before and immediately after the first MT session. The ease-of-breathing visual analog scale was used for rating patients’ symptoms subjectively during the MT session. Results There was a significant improvement in the forced expiratory volume in the first second, forced vital capacity, and vital capacity values (P<0.05). The maximal inspiratory pressure and maximal expiratory pressure values increased significantly after MT, compared to the pre-MT session (P<0.05). There was a significant decrease in heart rate, respiratory rate (P<0.05), and dyspnea and fatigue perception (P<0.05). Conclusion A single MT session immediately improved pulmonary function, inspiratory muscle strength, and oxygen saturation and reduced dyspnea, fatigue, and heart and respiratory rates in patients with severe COPD. MT should be added to pulmonary rehabilitation treatment as a new alternative that is fast acting and motivating in patients with COPD. PMID:27382271

  6. Horses Auto-Recruit Their Lungs by Inspiratory Breath Holding Following Recovery from General Anaesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Mosing, Martina; Waldmann, Andreas D.; MacFarlane, Paul; Iff, Samuel; Auer, Ulrike; Bohm, Stephan H.; Bettschart-Wolfensberger, Regula; Bardell, David

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the breathing pattern and distribution of ventilation in horses prior to and following recovery from general anaesthesia using electrical impedance tomography (EIT). Six horses were anaesthetised for 6 hours in dorsal recumbency. Arterial blood gas and EIT measurements were performed 24 hours before (baseline) and 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6 hours after horses stood following anaesthesia. At each time point 4 representative spontaneous breaths were analysed. The percentage of the total breath length during which impedance remained greater than 50% of the maximum inspiratory impedance change (breath holding), the fraction of total tidal ventilation within each of four stacked regions of interest (ROI) (distribution of ventilation) and the filling time and inflation period of seven ROI evenly distributed over the dorso-ventral height of the lungs were calculated. Mixed effects multi-linear regression and linear regression were used and significance was set at p<0.05. All horses demonstrated inspiratory breath holding until 5 hours after standing. No change from baseline was seen for the distribution of ventilation during inspiration. Filling time and inflation period were more rapid and shorter in ventral and slower and longer in most dorsal ROI compared to baseline, respectively. In a mixed effects multi-linear regression, breath holding was significantly correlated with PaCO2 in both the univariate and multivariate regression. Following recovery from anaesthesia, horses showed inspiratory breath holding during which gas redistributed from ventral into dorsal regions of the lungs. This suggests auto-recruitment of lung tissue which would have been dependent and likely atelectic during anaesthesia. PMID:27331910

  7. Effects of diaphragmatic control on the assessment of sniff nasal inspiratory pressure and maximum relaxation rate

    PubMed Central

    Benício, Kadja; Dias, Fernando A. L.; Gualdi, Lucien P.; Aliverti, Andrea; Resqueti, Vanessa R.; Fregonezi, Guilherme A. F.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the influence of diaphragmatic activation control (diaphC) on Sniff Nasal-Inspiratory Pressure (SNIP) and Maximum Relaxation Rate of inspiratory muscles (MRR) in healthy subjects. METHOD: Twenty subjects (9 male; age: 23 (SD=2.9) years; BMI: 23.8 (SD=3) kg/m2; FEV1/FVC: 0.9 (SD=0.1)] performed 5 sniff maneuvers in two different moments: with or without instruction on diaphC. Before the first maneuver, a brief explanation was given to the subjects on how to perform the sniff test. For sniff test with diaphC, subjects were instructed to perform intense diaphragm activation. The best SNIP and MRR values were used for analysis. MRR was calculated as the ratio of first derivative of pressure over time (dP/dtmax) and were normalized by dividing it by peak pressure (SNIP) from the same maneuver. RESULTS: SNIP values were significantly different in maneuvers with and without diaphC [without diaphC: -100 (SD=27.1) cmH2O/ with diaphC: -72.8 (SD=22.3) cmH2O; p<0.0001], normalized MRR values were not statistically different [without diaphC: -9.7 (SD=2.6); with diaphC: -8.9 (SD=1.5); p=0.19]. Without diaphC, 40% of the sample did not reach the appropriate sniff criteria found in the literature. CONCLUSION: Diaphragmatic control performed during SNIP test influences obtained inspiratory pressure, being lower when diaphC is performed. However, there was no influence on normalized MRR. PMID:26578254

  8. Preinspiratory and inspiratory hypoglossal motor output during hypoxia-induced plasticity in the rat

    PubMed Central

    Fuller, David D.

    2010-01-01

    Respiratory-related discharge in the hypoglossal (XII) nerve is composed of preinspiratory (pre-I) and inspiratory (I) activity. Our first purpose was to test the hypothesis that hypoxia-induced plasticity in XII motor output is differentially expressed in pre-I vs. I XII bursting. Short-term potentiation (STP) of XII motor output was induced in urethane-anesthetized, vagotomized, and ventilated rats by exposure to isocapnic hypoxia (PaO2 of ∼35 Torr). Both pre-I and I XII discharge abruptly increased at beginning of hypoxia (i.e., acute hypoxic response), and the relative increase in amplitude was much greater for pre-I (507 ± 46% baseline) vs. I bursting (257 ± 16% baseline; P < 0.01). In addition, STP was expressed in I but not pre-I bursting following hypoxia. Specifically, I activity remained elevated following termination of hypoxia but pre-I bursting abruptly returned to prehypoxia levels. Our second purpose was to test the hypothesis that STP of I XII activity results from recruitment of inactive or “silent” XII motoneurons (MNs) vs. rate coding of active MNs. Single fiber recordings were used to classify XII MNs as I, expiratory-inspiratory, or silent based on baseline discharge patterns. STP of I XII activity following hypoxia was associated with increased discharge frequency in active I and silent MNs but not expiratory-inspiratory MNs. We conclude that the expression of respiratory plasticity is differentially regulated between pre-I and I XII activity. In addition, both recruitment of silent MNs and rate coding of active I MNs contribute to increases in XII motor output following hypoxia. PMID:20150564

  9. Areas of the brain concerned with ventilatory load compensation in awake man

    PubMed Central

    Isaev, Gennadi; Murphy, Kevin; Guz, Abraham; Adams, Lewis

    2002-01-01

    There is broad agreement that the awake human ventilatory response to a moderate inspiratory load consists of a prolongation of inspiratory time (TI) with a maintenance of tidal volume (VT) and end-tidal PCO2 (PET,CO2), the response being severely blunted in sleep. There is no agreement on the mechanisms underlying this ventilatory response. Six naive healthy males (aged 39–44) were studied supine with their heads in a positron emission tomography (PET) scanner to allow relative regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) to be measured with H215O given intravenously. A linearised resistive load (24 cmH2O (l s−1)−1) could be added to the inspiratory limb of a breathing valve inserted into a tightly fitting facemask; inspiratory flow was measured with a pneumotachograph. The load was applied, without alerting the subject, when the radioactivity first reached the head. Six scans were performed with and without the load, in each subject. Relative rCBF contrasts between the loaded and unloaded breathing states showed significant activations in inferior parietal cortex, prefrontal cortex, midbrain, basal ganglia and multiple cerebellar sites. No activations were found in the primary sensorimotor cortex. The findings suggest that there is a pattern of motor behavioural response to the uncomfortable sensation that inspiration is impeded. This results in a prolongation of TI, the maintenance of VT and a reduction in the degree of discomfort, presumably because of the reduction of mean negative pressure in the airways. PMID:11897862

  10. Changes in frequency content of inspiratory neuron and nerve activities in the course of inspiration.

    PubMed

    Christakos, C N; Cohen, M I; See, W R; Barnhardt, R

    1989-03-20

    In decerebrate paralyzed cats, the spectra and coherences of inspiratory (I) nerve activities and of medullary I neuron discharges were compared between different stages of I. The correlated high-frequency oscillations (HFOs) in the activities had common time courses of frequency and strength, which were influenced by lung afferent input; whereas the time courses for the uncorrelated medium-frequency oscillations (MFOs) depended on individual activity patterns. These results indicate that HFOs are characteristic of the common I pattern generator, whereas MFOs are specific to individual activities. PMID:2706495

  11. Threshold quantum cryptography

    SciTech Connect

    Tokunaga, Yuuki; Okamoto, Tatsuaki; Imoto, Nobuyuki

    2005-01-01

    We present the concept of threshold collaborative unitary transformation or threshold quantum cryptography, which is a kind of quantum version of threshold cryptography. Threshold quantum cryptography states that classical shared secrets are distributed to several parties and a subset of them, whose number is greater than a threshold, collaborates to compute a quantum cryptographic function, while keeping each share secretly inside each party. The shared secrets are reusable if no cheating is detected. As a concrete example of this concept, we show a distributed protocol (with threshold) of conjugate coding.

  12. Dbx1 precursor cells are a source of inspiratory XII premotoneurons

    PubMed Central

    Revill, Ann L; Vann, Nikolas C; Akins, Victoria T; Kottick, Andrew; Gray, Paul A; Del Negro, Christopher A; Funk, Gregory D

    2015-01-01

    All behaviors require coordinated activation of motoneurons from central command and premotor networks. The genetic identities of premotoneurons providing behaviorally relevant excitation to any pool of respiratory motoneurons remain unknown. Recently, we established in vitro that Dbx1-derived pre-Bötzinger complex neurons are critical for rhythm generation and that a subpopulation serves a premotor function (Wang et al., 2014). Here, we further show that a subpopulation of Dbx1-derived intermediate reticular (IRt) neurons are rhythmically active during inspiration and project to the hypoglossal (XII) nucleus that contains motoneurons important for maintaining airway patency. Laser ablation of Dbx1 IRt neurons, 57% of which are glutamatergic, decreased ipsilateral inspiratory motor output without affecting frequency. We conclude that a subset of Dbx1 IRt neurons is a source of premotor excitatory drive, contributing to the inspiratory behavior of XII motoneurons, as well as a key component of the airway control network whose dysfunction contributes to sleep apnea. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12301.001 PMID:26687006

  13. Respiratory motor output during an inspiratory capacity maneuver is preserved despite submaximal exercise.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dong; Gong, Haihong; Lu, Gan; Guo, Hongxi; Li, Ruifa; Zhong, Nanshan; Polkey, M I; Luo, Yuanming

    2013-10-01

    It is unknown whether respiratory motor output is constrained during exhaustive exercise in healthy adults. We hypothesised that neural inhibition did occur; to test this hypothesis we measured diaphragm EMG from a maximal inspiratory capacity maneuver (EMG(di)-IC) at rest and during exercise. EMG(di)-IC was measured before and after the amplitude of the diaphragm EMG entered a plateau phase in eleven healthy adults undertaking exercise at 60% and 80% of maximal workload achieved from incremental exercise. The mean EMG(di)-IC at rest was 65 ± 16% of the maximum that could be obtained from a battery of inspiratory tasks. Before and after the plateau phase of diaphragm EMG, EMG(di)-IC was 68 ± 13% and 72 ± 12% (p > 0.05) during 60% of the maximum workload, and was 70 ± 13% and 78 ± 13% (p > 0.05) during 80% of the maximum workload achieved on an incremental test. A further sub-study in which 5 participants exercised at 90% of the maximum workload also showed that EMG(di)-IC was not diminished during exercise. Our data show that exercise condition does not reduce the magnitude of EMG(di)-IC. This argues against neural inhibition as feature of submaximal exercise in healthy adults.

  14. [Relation between neck accessory inspiratory muscle electromyographic activity and lung volume].

    PubMed

    Masubuchi, Y; Abe, T; Yokoba, M; Yamada, T; Katagiri, M; Tomita, T

    2001-04-01

    Years ago it was reported that, as lung volume increased, there was a corresponding increase in scalene EMG activity (Raper et al. J Appl Physiol 21: 497-502, 1966). Otherwise, the relationship between changing lung volume and the EMG of the respiratory muscles has not been defined. We therefore inserted fine wire electrodes into the scalene (SCLN), sternocleidomastoid (STERNO), and trapezius (TRAPEZ) muscles in 6 healthy subjects under direct vision using high-resolution ultrasound. Maximum EMG activity (EMGmax) was obtained for each muscle by a variety of respiratory and postural maneuvers. Then, in the standing posture, air flow, raw and moving average EMG signals were sampled and input to a computer during quasi-static inspiration from functional residual capacity (FRC) to total lung capacity (TLC). We found that the relationship between EMG and lung volume for SCLN, but not for STERNO or TRAPEZ, was expressed by exponential curves. The onset of SCLN, STERNO and TRAPEZ EMG occurred at 13.3 +/- 7.4 (mean +/- SE), 67.8 +/- 14.6, and 89.2 +/- 3.9% of inspiratory capacity. The EMG of SCLN, STERNO, TRAPEZ, reached 85.7 +/- 2.6, 60.7 +/- 8.6, and 11.8 +/- 5.2% of EMGmax, respectively, at TLC. We conclude that: 1) SCLN is the most, and TRAPEZ the least, active neck accessory inspiratory muscle, while STERNO is intermediate, and 2) there is a lung volume dependency of the neck accessory muscle EMG activity.

  15. Effects of Abdominal Stimulation during Inspiratory Muscle Training on Respiratory Function of Chronic Stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Ju-hyeon; Shim, Je-myung; Kwon, Hae-yeon; Kim, Ha-roo; Kim, Bo-in

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of the present study was to verify a new method for improving respiratory functions by applying both abdominal stimulation and inspiratory muscle training (IMT) to train the inspiratory muscle and the expiratory muscle simultaneously, to improve the efficiency of IMT of chronic stroke patients. [Subjects] Eighteen stroke patients were randomly assigned to an experimental group (n = 9) and a control group (n = 9). [Methods] The experimental group was administered IMT with abdominal stimulation, and the control group was administered only IMT. During the intervention period, the experimental group and control group received training 20 min/day, 3 times/wk, for 4 weeks. To examine the lung functions of the subjects, FVC, FEV1, PEF, and FEF25–75 were measured using an electronic spirometer. The diaphragm thickness ratio was calculated from measurements made with a 7.5-MHz linear probe ultrasonic imaging system. [Result] The experimental group and the control group showed significant increases in diaphragm thickness ratio on the paretic side, but not on the non-paretic side. With regard to lung function, the experimental group showed significant increases in FEV1, PEF, and FEF25–75. The changes between before and after the intervention in the two groups were compared with each other, and the results showed significant differences in FEV1 and PEF. [Conclusion] The present study identified that IMT accompanied by abdominal stimulation improved the pulmonary function of chronic stroke patients. PMID:24567679

  16. Threshold Concepts in Biochemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loertscher, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    Threshold concepts can be identified for any discipline and provide a framework for linking student learning to curricular design. Threshold concepts represent a transformed understanding of a discipline, without which the learner cannot progress and are therefore pivotal in learning in a discipline. Although threshold concepts have been…

  17. Effect of expiratory resistive loading on the noninvasive tension-time index in COPD.

    PubMed

    Thompson, W H; Carvalho, P; Souza, J P; Charan, N B

    2000-11-01

    Expiratory resistive loading (ERL) is used by chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients to improve respiratory function. We, therefore, used a noninvasive tension-time index of the inspiratory muscles (TT(mus) = I/PI(max) x TI/TT, where I is mean inspiratory pressure estimated from the mouth occlusion pressure, PI(max) is maximal inspiratory pressure, TI is inspiratory time, and TT is total respiratory cycle time) to better define the effect of ERL on COPD patients. To accomplish this, we measured airway pressures, mouth occlusion pressure, respiratory cycle flow rates, and functional residual capacity (FRC) in 14 COPD patients and 10 normal subjects with and without the application of ERL. TT(mus) was then calculated and found to drop in both COPD and normal subjects (P<0.05). The decline in TT(mus) in both groups resulted solely from a prolongation of expiratory time with ERL (P<0.001 for COPD, P<0.05 for normal subjects). In contrast to the COPD patients, normal subjects had an elevation in I and FRC, thus minimizing the decline in TT(mus). In conclusion, ERL reduces the potential for inspiratory muscle fatigue in COPD by reducing TI/TT without affecting FRC and I. PMID:11053356

  18. CONTRIBUTION OF INSPIRATORY FLOW TO ACTIVATION OF EGFR, RAS, MAPK, ATF-2 AND C-JUN DURING LUNG STRETCH

    EPA Science Inventory

    Contribution of Inspiratory Flow to Activation of EGFR, Ras, MAPK, ATF-2 and c-Jun during Lung Stretch

    R. Silbajoris 1, Z. Li 2, J. M. Samet 1 and Y. C. Huang 1. 1 NHEERL, ORD, US EPA, RTP, NC and 2 CEMALB, UNC-CH, Chapel Hill, NC .

    Mechanical ventilation with larg...

  19. Minimal inspiratory flow from dry powder inhalers according to a biphasic model of pressure vs. flow relationship.

    PubMed

    Kanabuchi, Kazuo; Kondo, Tetsuri; Tanigaki, Toshimori; Tajiri, Sakurako; Hayama, Naoki; Takahari, Yoko; Iwao, Kayoko

    2011-04-20

    Inhalation therapy using the dry powder inhaler (DPI) is now the first choice for obstructive pulmonary diseases. We previously measured relationships between inspiratory pressure (PI) and flow rate of almost all of the DPIs available in Japan, and described an importance of inspiratory efforts. In the present study, we further analyzed the data obtained in the previous study. Although there were linear relationships between PI and flow2, the slope became steeper when PI was less than a certain value (critical PI, existed between 15-20 cmH2O). When PI was less than critical PI, linear rather than parabolic regression between PI and flow yielded better fits (r > 0.90, p < 0.001). Inspiratory flows at the critical PI were 53.9 (Diskus), 65.8 (Diskhaler), 45.9 (Turbuhaler for Pulmincort), 48.6 (Turbuhaler for Symbicort) and 38.0 l/min (Twisthaler). These findings suggested that flow through the DPI becomes laminar rather than turbulent flow in the range below critical PIs. We suggest that patients should inhale from the DPIs with inspiratory pressure higher than critical PI.

  20. Diaphragmatic amplitude and accessory inspiratory muscle activity in nasal and mouth-breathing adults: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Trevisan, Maria Elaine; Boufleur, Jalusa; Soares, Juliana Corrêa; Haygert, Carlos Jesus Pereira; Ries, Lilian Gerdi Kittel; Corrêa, Eliane Castilhos Rodrigues

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the electromyographic activity of the accessory inspiratory muscles and the diaphragmatic amplitude (DA) in nasal and mouth-breathing adults. The study evaluated 38 mouth-breathing (MB group) and 38 nasal-breathing (NB group) adults, from 18 to 30years old and both sexes. Surface electromyography (sEMG) was used to evaluate the amplitude and symmetry (POC%) of the sternocleidomastoid (SCM) and upper trapezius (UT) muscles at rest, during nasal slow inspiration at Lung Total Capacity (LTC) and, during rapid and abrupt inspiration: Sniff, Peak Nasal Inspiratory Flow (PNIF) and Maximum Inspiratory Pressure (MIP). M-mode ultrasonography assessed the right diaphragm muscle amplitude in three different nasal inspirations: at tidal volume (TV), Sniff and inspiration at LTC. The SCM activity was significantly lower in the MB group during Sniff, PNIF (p<0.01, Mann-Whitney test) and MIP (p<0.01, t-test). The groups did not differ during rest and inspiration at LTC, regarding sEMG amplitude and POC%. DA was significantly lower in the MB group at TV (p<0.01, Mann-Whitney) and TLC (p=0.03, t-test). Mouth breathing reflected on lower recruitment of the accessory inspiratory muscles during fast inspiration and lower diaphragmatic amplitude, compared to nasal breathing.

  1. The Role of Inspiratory Muscle Training in the Process of Rehabilitation of Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    PubMed

    Majewska-Pulsakowska, M; Wytrychowski, K; Rożek-Piechura, K

    2016-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) adversely affects the quality of life and life expectancy of patients. Shortness of breath, cough, and fatigue in lower limbs are the main reasons limiting physical activities of patients. The lack of physical activity results in poorer muscle strength. The latest guidelines regarding breathing rehabilitation in COPD patients emphasize a significant role of inspiratory muscle exercises. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the effects of an 8-week long inspiratory muscle training, interval training on a cycle ergometer, and training combining both kinds of rehabilitation, on pulmonary function, health-related quality of life, and the tolerance to exercise in patients with COPD. The study was conducted in a group of 43 patients with diagnosed COPD stage II and III according to GOLD. They were randomly divided into four training groups: inspiratory muscle training (Group 1), cycle ergometer training (Group 2), cycle ergometer and inspiratory muscle training (Group 3), control group - patients who did not participate in any rehabilitation programs (Group 4 - control). Before the rehabilitation process and after its completion the patients were medically examined, they completed a health-related quality of life questionnaire, performed a 6-min walk test, spirometry, and a treadmill exercise test according to the modified Bruce protocol. The results demonstrate a significant improvement in the quality of life measured for Group 3 in comparison with the control group. PMID:26801148

  2. The Role of Inspiratory Muscle Training in the Process of Rehabilitation of Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    PubMed

    Majewska-Pulsakowska, M; Wytrychowski, K; Rożek-Piechura, K

    2016-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) adversely affects the quality of life and life expectancy of patients. Shortness of breath, cough, and fatigue in lower limbs are the main reasons limiting physical activities of patients. The lack of physical activity results in poorer muscle strength. The latest guidelines regarding breathing rehabilitation in COPD patients emphasize a significant role of inspiratory muscle exercises. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the effects of an 8-week long inspiratory muscle training, interval training on a cycle ergometer, and training combining both kinds of rehabilitation, on pulmonary function, health-related quality of life, and the tolerance to exercise in patients with COPD. The study was conducted in a group of 43 patients with diagnosed COPD stage II and III according to GOLD. They were randomly divided into four training groups: inspiratory muscle training (Group 1), cycle ergometer training (Group 2), cycle ergometer and inspiratory muscle training (Group 3), control group - patients who did not participate in any rehabilitation programs (Group 4 - control). Before the rehabilitation process and after its completion the patients were medically examined, they completed a health-related quality of life questionnaire, performed a 6-min walk test, spirometry, and a treadmill exercise test according to the modified Bruce protocol. The results demonstrate a significant improvement in the quality of life measured for Group 3 in comparison with the control group.

  3. How many manoeuvres should be done to measure maximal inspiratory mouth pressure in patients with chronic airflow obstruction?

    PubMed Central

    Fiz, J A; Montserrat, J M; Picado, C; Plaza, V; Agusti-Vidal, A

    1989-01-01

    To determine the number of maximal mouth pressure manoeuvres needed to obtain a reproducible value of maximal inspiratory mouth pressure (MIP), we studied 44 patients with chronic airflow obstruction, with a mean (SD) % predicted FEV1 value of 53.9 (25), who were clinically stable. Maximal inspiratory mouth pressure was determined with an anaeroid manometer during maximal inspiratory efforts in a quasi static condition at residual volume. All patients performed 20 consecutive maximal inspiratory mouth manoeuvres, each one separated by 30-40 seconds. The mean (SD) values of MIP varied from 71.5 (25.5) cm H2O at the first measurement to 80.1 (27) cm H2O at the last measurement. Maximal values of MIP were usually achieved after nine determinations. It is concluded that to obtain a reproducible MIP value in patients with chronic airflow obstruction who are untrained and unexperienced in such manoeuvres a minimum of nine technically acceptable maximal mouth pressure manoeuvres should be performed. PMID:2763242

  4. Nociceptin/orphanin FQ slows inspiratory rhythm via its direct effects on the pre-Bötzinger complex.

    PubMed

    Takita, Koichi; Morimoto, Yuji

    2015-02-01

    In a previous study, we showed that in an in vitro en bloc preparation of newborn rats perfused with standard [K(+)] (6.2mM) and high [K(+)] (11.2mM) artificial cerebrospinal fluid (aCSF), nociceptin/orphanin FQ (N/OFQ) suppresses bursting of pre-inspiratory neurons with 1:1 coupling to the fictive inspiration. However, it is unclear whether the pre-Bötzinger complex (preBötC) is involved in the N/OFQ-induced slowing. Using in vitro en bloc preparations with and without the retrotrapezoid nucleus/parafacial respiratory group (RTN/pFRG) perfused with high [K(+)] aCSF, we found the following: (1) there were no differences in the effects of N/OFQ on the inspiratory rhythm between the preparations with and without the RTN/pFRG, (2) N/OFQ decreased the input resistance of inspiratory neurons (Insps) in the preparations without the RTN/pFRG and suppressed their ectopic firing activities, and (3) N/OFQ suppressed the spontaneous firing of Insps under a chemical synaptic transmission blockade. In conclusion, it is possible that the preBötC is involved in N/OFQ-induced inspiratory rhythm slowing. PMID:25500622

  5. Three-dimensional inspiratory flow in the upper and central human airways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banko, A. J.; Coletti, F.; Schiavazzi, D.; Elkins, C. J.; Eaton, J. K.

    2015-06-01

    The steady inspiratory flow through an anatomically accurate model of the human airways was studied experimentally at a regime relevant to deep inspiration for aerosol drug delivery. Magnetic resonance velocimetry was used to obtain the three-component, mean velocity field. A strong, single-sided streamwise swirl was found in the trachea and persists up to the first bifurcation. There, the swirl and the asymmetric anatomy impact both the streamwise momentum distribution and the secondary flows in the main bronchi, with large differences compared to what is found in idealized branching tubes. In further generations, the streamwise velocity never recovers a symmetric profile and the relative intensity of the secondary flows remains strong. Overall, the results suggest that, in real human airways, both streamwise dispersion (due to streamwise gradients) and lateral dispersion (due to secondary flows) are very effective transport mechanisms. Neglecting the extrathoracic airways and idealizing the bronchial tree may lead to qualitatively different conclusions.

  6. Inspiratory and expiratory steady flow analysis in a model symmetrically bifurcating airway.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Y; Brunskill, C T; Lieber, B B

    1997-02-01

    Steady inspiratory and expiratory flow in a symmetrically bifurcating airway model was studied numerically using the finite element method (FIDAP). Flows of Reynolds number of 500 and 1000 during inspiration and a flow of Reynolds number of 500 during expiration were analyzed. Since the geometry of the bifurcation model used in this study is exactly the same as the model used in the experimental studies, the computed results were compared to the experimental findings. Results show that most of the important flow features that were observed in the experiment, such as the skewed velocity profiles in the daughter branches during inspiration and velocity peak in the parent tube during expiration, were captured in the numerical simulation. Quantitatively, the computed velocity profiles are in good agreement with the measured profiles. This comparison validates the computational simulations.

  7. Inspiratory and expiratory steady flow analysis in a model symmetrically bifurcating airway.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Y; Brunskill, C T; Lieber, B B

    1997-02-01

    Steady inspiratory and expiratory flow in a symmetrically bifurcating airway model was studied numerically using the finite element method (FIDAP). Flows of Reynolds number of 500 and 1000 during inspiration and a flow of Reynolds number of 500 during expiration were analyzed. Since the geometry of the bifurcation model used in this study is exactly the same as the model used in the experimental studies, the computed results were compared to the experimental findings. Results show that most of the important flow features that were observed in the experiment, such as the skewed velocity profiles in the daughter branches during inspiration and velocity peak in the parent tube during expiration, were captured in the numerical simulation. Quantitatively, the computed velocity profiles are in good agreement with the measured profiles. This comparison validates the computational simulations. PMID:9083849

  8. Effect of Simulated Microgravity and Lunar Gravity on Human Inspiratory Muscle Function: 'Selena-T' 2015 Study.

    PubMed

    Segizbaeva, M O; Aleksandrova, N P; Donina, Z A; Baranova, E V; Katuntsev, V P; Tarasenkov, G G; Baranov, V M

    2016-01-01

    As a part of the multi-disciplinary "SELENA-T"-2015 Bed Rest Study, we investigated the pattern of inspiratory muscles fatigue in 22 healthy male subjects during incremental exercise test to exhaustion before and after 21 days of hypokinesia evoked by bed rest. Hypokinesia consisted of head-down bed rest (HDBR) at a minus 6° angle, simulating microgravity present on orbiting spacecraft, in 10 subjects. The remaining 12 subjects spent the first 5 days of hypokinesia in HDBR position and the subsequent 16 days in head-up bed rest (HUBR) at a plus 9.6° angle, as a presumed analog of lunar gravity that is six times less than Earth's gravity. Maximal inspiratory pressure (MIP) and electromyograms (EMG) of the diaphragm (D), parasternal (PS), sternocleidomastoid (SCM), and scalene (S) muscles served as indices of inspiratory muscle function. Before both HDBR and HUBR, exercise decreased MIP and centroid frequency (fc) of EMG (D, PS, SCM, and S) power spectrum (p < 0.05). After 3 weeks of HDBR, but not HUBR, inspiratory muscles fatigue was more expressed compared with control (p < 0.05). We conclude that HDBR lowers inspiratory muscles resistance to fatigue during high-intensity exercise while HUBR has no such effect. These changes may limit maximal ventilation and may contribute to exercise intolerance observed after prolonged simulated microgravity. The physiological mechanisms of respiratory muscle dysfunction after HDBR consist primarily of postural effects, and are not due only to hypokinesia.

  9. Inspiratory activation is not required for episodic hypoxia-induced respiratory long-term facilitation in postnatal rats

    PubMed Central

    Tadjalli, Arash; Duffin, James; Li, Yan Mei; Hong, Hyunwook; Peever, John

    2007-01-01

    Episodic hypoxia causes repetitive inspiratory activation that induces a form of respiratory plasticity termed long-term facilitation (LTF). While LTF is a function of the hypoxic exposures and inspiratory activation, their relative importance in evoking LTF is unknown. The aims of this study were to: (1) dissociate the relative roles played by episodic hypoxia and respiratory activation in LTF; and (2) determine whether the magnitude of LTF varies as a function of hypoxic intensity. We did this by examining the effects of episodic hypoxia in postnatal rats (15–25 days old), which unlike adult rats exhibit a prominent hypoxia-induced respiratory depression. We quantified inspiratory phrenic nerve activity generated by the in situ working-heart brainstem before, during and for 60 min after episodic hypoxia. We demonstrate that episodic hypoxia evokes LTF despite the fact that it potently suppresses inspiratory activity during individual hypoxic exposures (P < 0.05). Specifically, we show that after episodic hypoxia (three 5 min periods of 10% O2) respiratory frequency increased to 40 ± 3.3% above baseline values over the next 60 min (P < 0.001). Continuous hypoxia (15 min of 10% O2) had no lasting effects on respiratory frequency (P > 0.05). To determine if LTF magnitude was affected by hypoxic intensity, the episodic hypoxia protocol was repeated under three different O2 tensions. We demonstrate that the magnitude and time course of LTF depend on hypoxic severity, with more intense hypoxia inducing a more potent degree of LTF. We conclude that inspiratory activation is not required for LTF induction, and that hypoxia per se is the physiological stimulus for eliciting hypoxia-induced respiratory LTF. PMID:17932158

  10. Effect of Simulated Microgravity and Lunar Gravity on Human Inspiratory Muscle Function: 'Selena-T' 2015 Study.

    PubMed

    Segizbaeva, M O; Aleksandrova, N P; Donina, Z A; Baranova, E V; Katuntsev, V P; Tarasenkov, G G; Baranov, V M

    2016-01-01

    As a part of the multi-disciplinary "SELENA-T"-2015 Bed Rest Study, we investigated the pattern of inspiratory muscles fatigue in 22 healthy male subjects during incremental exercise test to exhaustion before and after 21 days of hypokinesia evoked by bed rest. Hypokinesia consisted of head-down bed rest (HDBR) at a minus 6° angle, simulating microgravity present on orbiting spacecraft, in 10 subjects. The remaining 12 subjects spent the first 5 days of hypokinesia in HDBR position and the subsequent 16 days in head-up bed rest (HUBR) at a plus 9.6° angle, as a presumed analog of lunar gravity that is six times less than Earth's gravity. Maximal inspiratory pressure (MIP) and electromyograms (EMG) of the diaphragm (D), parasternal (PS), sternocleidomastoid (SCM), and scalene (S) muscles served as indices of inspiratory muscle function. Before both HDBR and HUBR, exercise decreased MIP and centroid frequency (fc) of EMG (D, PS, SCM, and S) power spectrum (p < 0.05). After 3 weeks of HDBR, but not HUBR, inspiratory muscles fatigue was more expressed compared with control (p < 0.05). We conclude that HDBR lowers inspiratory muscles resistance to fatigue during high-intensity exercise while HUBR has no such effect. These changes may limit maximal ventilation and may contribute to exercise intolerance observed after prolonged simulated microgravity. The physiological mechanisms of respiratory muscle dysfunction after HDBR consist primarily of postural effects, and are not due only to hypokinesia. PMID:27241510

  11. Relative Prolongation of Inspiratory Time Predicts High versus Low Resistance Categorization of Hypopneas

    PubMed Central

    Mooney, Anne M.; Abounasr, Khader K.; Rapoport, David M.; Ayappa, Indu

    2012-01-01

    Study Objectives: Sleep disordered breathing events conceptually separate into “obstructive” and “central” events. Esophageal manometry is the definitive but invasive means of classifying hypopneas. The purpose of this project was to identify noninvasive markers for discriminating high vs. low resistance hypopneas. Methods: Forty subjects with obstructive or central sleep apnea underwent diagnostic polysomnography with nasal cannula airflow and esophageal manometry; 200% resistance relative to reference breaths was used to define “high” resistance. Noninvasive parameters from 292 randomly selected hypopneas in 20 subjects were analyzed and correlated to resistance. The best parameter and cutoff for predicting high relative resistance was determined and tested prospectively in 2 test sets in the 20 remaining subjects. Test Set A: 15 randomly selected hypopneas in each subject; Test Set B: all hypopneas in 7 subjects. Results: In the development set, prolongation of inspiratory time during the 2 smallest breaths of a hypopnea (Ti) relative to baseline had the best correlation to high relative resistance. In the Test Set A, relative Ti > 110% classified obstructive events with sensitivity = 72%, specificity = 77%, PPV = 64%, NPV = 83%. Similar numbers were obtained for classification of hypopneas based on presence of flow limitation (FL) alone. When either relative Ti or presence of FL were used to define high resistance, sensitivity = 84%, specificity = 74%, PPV = 65%, NPV = 89%. Similar results were obtained for Test Set B. Conclusions: Relative prolongation of Ti is a good noninvasive predictor of high/low resistance in a dataset with both FL and NFL hypopneas. Combination of FL and relative Ti improves this classification. The use of Ti to separate obstructive and central hypopneas needs to be further tested for clinical utility (outcomes and treatment effects). Citation: Mooney AM; Abounasr KK; Rapoport DM; Ayappa I. Relative prolongation of

  12. Unidirectional Expiratory Valve Method to Assess Maximal Inspiratory Pressure in Individuals without Artificial Airway

    PubMed Central

    Grams, Samantha Torres; Kimoto, Karen Yumi Mota; Azevedo, Elen Moda de Oliveira; Lança, Marina; de Albuquerque, André Luis Pereira; de Brito, Christina May Moran; Yamaguti, Wellington Pereira

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Maximal Inspiratory Pressure (MIP) is considered an effective method to estimate strength of inspiratory muscles, but still leads to false positive diagnosis. Although MIP assessment with unidirectional expiratory valve method has been used in patients undergoing mechanical ventilation, no previous studies investigated the application of this method in subjects without artificial airway. Objectives This study aimed to compare the MIP values assessed by standard method (MIPsta) and by unidirectional expiratory valve method (MIPuni) in subjects with spontaneous breathing without artificial airway. MIPuni reproducibility was also evaluated. Methods This was a crossover design study, and 31 subjects performed MIPsta and MIPuni in a random order. MIPsta measured MIP maintaining negative pressure for at least one second after forceful expiration. MIPuni evaluated MIP using a unidirectional expiratory valve attached to a face mask and was conducted by two evaluators (A and B) at two moments (Tests 1 and 2) to determine interobserver and intraobserver reproducibility of MIP values. Intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC[2,1]) was used to determine intraobserver and interobserver reproducibility. Results The mean values for MIPuni were 14.3% higher (-117.3 ± 24.8 cmH2O) than the mean values for MIPsta (-102.5 ± 23.9 cmH2O) (p<0.001). Interobserver reproducibility assessment showed very high correlation for Test 1 (ICC[2,1] = 0.91), and high correlation for Test 2 (ICC[2,1] = 0.88). The assessment of the intraobserver reproducibility showed high correlation for evaluator A (ICC[2,1] = 0.86) and evaluator B (ICC[2,1] = 0.77). Conclusions MIPuni presented higher values when compared with MIPsta and proved to be reproducible in subjects with spontaneous breathing without artificial airway. PMID:26360255

  13. Maximal expiratory and inspiratory flow-volume curves in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Bogaard, J M; Hovestadt, A; Meerwaldt, J; vd Meché, F G; Stigt, J

    1989-03-01

    In order to investigate the type and degree of upper airway obstruction (UAO) in a group of patients with Parkinson's disease in different stages of the disease, we obtained maximal expiratory and inspiratory flow-volume (MEFV and MIFV) curves and maximal static mouth pressures. The clinical disability was indicated by a Hoehn-Yahr (H-Y) scale, ranging from III to V, and a more continuous Northwestern University Disability Scale (NUDS), ranging from zero to 50. Twelve patients were in H-Y Group III, and eleven and eight were in Groups IV and V, respectively. The pattern of the flow-volume curves was classified as either normal, or with superimposed regular or irregular oscillations (A), or with rounded-off and delayed expiratory peak appearance (B). Mean MEFV curves in Groups III and IV were not appreciably different from reference. In Group V, the mean curve showed a lower peak expiratory flow (PEF) and a more convex tail. Only the effort-dependent variables PEF, peak inspiratory flow (PIF), and maximal mouth pressures at RV and TLC (PmTLC and PmRV) appeared to be significantly correlated with the NUDS index and decreased with increasing clinical disability. The mean values of those variables were also significantly different between the H-Y groups. The number of normal curves decreased from H-Y Group III to Group V. The contribution of A and B curves was relatively equal in the groups, with only a small number of A curves.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  14. Inspiratory pressure support compensates for the additional work of breathing caused by the endotracheal tube.

    PubMed

    Brochard, L; Rua, F; Lorino, H; Lemaire, F; Harf, A

    1991-11-01

    Breathing through an endotracheal tube and a demand valve may increase the work performed by the respiratory muscles. Inspiratory pressure support (PS) is known to reduce this work and might therefore compensate for this increased requirement. To test this hypothesis, we measured the work of breathing (WOB) in 11 patients whose tracheas were intubated. Five had no intrinsic lung disease, but six had chronic obstructive lung disease. We compared WOB measurements taken under several sets of conditions: during assisted breathing at four levels of PS, during unassisted breathing and connection to a T-piece, and after extubation of the trachea. During unassisted breathing via the ventilator circuit (PS set at 0 cmH20), the WOB per minute was greater than that after extubation, with a mean increase (+/- standard deviation) of 68 +/- 38% (10.3 +/- 5.1 vs. 6.5 +/- 3.7 J.min-1, P less than 0.01). While breathing through the T-piece, the WOB was 27 +/- 18% greater than after tracheal extubation (8.2 +/- 5.1 vs. 6.5 +/- 3.7 J.min-1, P less than 0.05). The principal reason why inspiratory work decreased after extubation was that the ventilatory requirement decreased. For each patient, we determined retrospectively, after extubation, the level of PS that had reduced WOB to its postextubation value and obtained levels ranging from 3.4 to 14.4 cmH2O. The PS level at which additional WOB was compensated for, was greater in patients with chronic lung disease than in those free of lung disease (12.0 +/- 1.9 vs. 5.7 +/- 1.5 cm H2O, P less than 0.05).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  15. Bedside estimation of the inspiratory work of breathing during mechanical ventilation.

    PubMed

    Marini, J J; Rodriguez, R M; Lamb, V

    1986-01-01

    The work of chest inflation, WI, is a primary determinant of the need for ventilatory support and an integrative index of elastic and resistive impedance. Although the mechanical work performed by a ventilator in moving gas into the passive chest (WI = integral of PV dt) can be determined by measuring the area enclosed by a display of airway pressure (P) against delivered volume (V), the instrumentation required is not routinely available at the bedside. Under conditions of constant flow, however, inspiratory time represents an analog of delivered volume, and airway pressure can be recorded easily by equipment normally employed to monitor pulmonary vascular pressures. We reasoned that the area beneath the airway pressure vs time tracing should accurately reflect WI for unassisted breaths delivered by the ventilator at constant flow. We computed estimates of WI from simultaneous pressure-volume (PV) and pressure-time (PT) plots during square-wave inflation in 20 acutely ill patients. Ventilator settings were varied over the usual clinical range for tidal volume (10 to 15 ml/kg) and inspiratory flow (40 to 80 L/min). PV and PT estimates agreed closely; across the four setting combinations tested, the difference between PV and PT estimates averaged 2.4 +/- 5.6 percent (means +/- SD, r = 0.99). Furthermore, the reproducible geometric configuration of the curves generated allowed accurate estimation of WI from routine beside observations of tidal volume and peak dynamic and static inflation pressures, without the need for specialized equipment or area measurement. Such simplified estimates could serve in clinical practice to gauge the ventilatory workload and to monitor changes in respiratory impedance.

  16. Bayesian Threshold Estimation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gustafson, S. C.; Costello, C. S.; Like, E. C.; Pierce, S. J.; Shenoy, K. N.

    2009-01-01

    Bayesian estimation of a threshold time (hereafter simply threshold) for the receipt of impulse signals is accomplished given the following: 1) data, consisting of the number of impulses received in a time interval from zero to one and the time of the largest time impulse; 2) a model, consisting of a uniform probability density of impulse time…

  17. Pausing at the Threshold

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgan, Patrick K.

    2015-01-01

    Since about 2003, the notion of threshold concepts--the central ideas in any field that change how learners think about other ideas--have become difficult to escape at library conferences and in general information literacy discourse. Their visibility will likely only increase because threshold concepts figure prominently in the Framework for…

  18. Threshold Concepts in Economics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shanahan, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine threshold concepts in the context of teaching and learning first-year university economics. It outlines some of the arguments for using threshold concepts and provides examples using opportunity cost as an exemplar in economics. Design/ Methodology/Approach: The paper provides an overview of the…

  19. The perils of thresholding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Font-Clos, Francesc; Pruessner, Gunnar; Moloney, Nicholas R.; Deluca, Anna

    2015-04-01

    The thresholding of time series of activity or intensity is frequently used to define and differentiate events. This is either implicit, for example due to resolution limits, or explicit, in order to filter certain small scale physics from the supposed true asymptotic events. Thresholding the birth-death process, however, introduces a scaling region into the event size distribution, which is characterized by an exponent that is unrelated to the actual asymptote and is rather an artefact of thresholding. As a result, numerical fits of simulation data produce a range of exponents, with the true asymptote visible only in the tail of the distribution. This tail is increasingly difficult to sample as the threshold is increased. In the present case, the exponents and the spurious nature of the scaling region can be determined analytically, thus demonstrating the way in which thresholding conceals the true asymptote. The analysis also suggests a procedure for detecting the influence of the threshold by means of a data collapse involving the threshold-imposed scale.

  20. Peripheral vascular response to inspiratory breath hold in paediatric homozygous sickle cell disease

    PubMed Central

    L’Esperance, Veline S; Cox, Sharon E; Simpson, David; Gill, Carolyn; Makani, Julie; Soka, Deogratias; Mgaya, Josephine; Kirkham, Fenella J; Clough, Geraldine F

    2013-01-01

    New Findings • What is the central question of this study? Autonomic nervous dysfunction is implicated in complications of sickle cell anaemia (SCA). In healthy adults, a deep inspiratory breath hold (IBH) elicits rapid transient SNS- mediated vasoconstriction detectable using Laser Doppler Flux (LDF) assessment of the finger-tip cutaneous micovasculature. • What is the main finding and its importance? We demonstrate significantly increased resting peripheral blood flow and sympathetic activity in African children with SCA compared to sibling controls and increased sympathetic stimulation in response to vasoprovocation with DIG. This study is the first to observe an inverse association between resting peripheral blood flow and haemoglobin oxygen saturation (SpO2). These phenomena may be an adaptive response to the hypoxic exposure in SCA. There is increasing evidence that autonomic dysfunction in adults with homozygous sickle cell (haemoglobin SS) disease is associated with enhanced autonomic nervous system-mediated control of microvascular perfusion. However, it is unclear whether such differences are detectable in children with SS disease. We studied 65 children with SS disease [38 boys; median age 7.2 (interquartile range 5.1–10.6) years] and 20 control children without symptoms of SS disease [8 boys; 8.7 (5.5–10.8) years] and recorded mean arterial blood pressure (ABP) and daytime haemoglobin oxygen saturation (). Cutaneous blood flux at rest (RBF) and during the sympathetically activated vasoconstrictor response to inspiratory breath hold (IBH) were measured in the finger pulp of the non-dominant hand using laser Doppler fluximetry. Local factors mediating flow motion were assessed by power spectral density analysis of the oscillatory components of the laser Doppler signal. The RBF measured across the two study groups was negatively associated with age (r=−0.25, P < 0.0001), ABP (r=−0.27, P= 0.02) and daytime (r=−0.30, P= 0.005). Children with SS

  1. Double Photoionization Near Threshold

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wehlitz, Ralf

    2007-01-01

    The threshold region of the double-photoionization cross section is of particular interest because both ejected electrons move slowly in the Coulomb field of the residual ion. Near threshold both electrons have time to interact with each other and with the residual ion. Also, different theoretical models compete to describe the double-photoionization cross section in the threshold region. We have investigated that cross section for lithium and beryllium and have analyzed our data with respect to the latest results in the Coulomb-dipole theory. We find that our data support the idea of a Coulomb-dipole interaction.

  2. Nicotine enhances both excitatory and inhibitory synaptic inputs to inspiratory-activated airway vagal preganglionic neurons.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xujiao; Chen, Yonghua; Ge, Dengyun; Yuan, Wenjun; Wang, Jijiang

    2013-01-01

    The airway vagal preganglionic neurons (AVPNs) supply the essential excitatory drive to the postganglionic neurons and dominate the neural control of the airway both physiologically and pathophysiologically. The AVPNs express multiple subunits of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs), but the influences of exogenous nicotine and endogenous acetylcholine are unknown. This study examined the effects of nicotine and endogenous acetylcholine on retrogradely labelled, functionally identified inspiratory-activated AVPNs (IA-AVPNs) using the patch-clamp technique. Nicotine (10 μmol l(-1)) significantly increased the frequency and amplitude of the spontaneous EPSCs of IA-AVPNs, and these effects were insensitive to methyllycaconitine (MLA, 100 nmol l(-1)), an antagonist of the α7 type of nAChR, but was prevented by dihydro-β-erythroidine (DHβE, 3 μmol l(-1)), an antagonist of the α4β2 type of nAChR. Nicotine caused a tonic inward current in IA-AVPNs, which was reduced by MLA or DHβE alone, but was not abolished by co-application of MLA and DHβE. Nicotine caused a significant increase in the frequency of GABAergic and glycinergic spontaneous IPSCs and significantly increased the amplitude of glycinergic spontaneous IPSCs, all of which were prevented by DHβE. Nicotine had no effects on the miniature EPSCs or miniature IPSCs following pretreatment with TTX. Under current clamp, nicotine caused depolarization and increased the firing rate of IA-AVPNs during inspiratory intervals. Neostigmine (10 μmol l(-1)), an acetylcholinesterase inhibitor, mimicked the effects of nicotine. These results demonstrate that nicotine and endogenous ACh enhance the excitatory and inhibitory synaptic inputs of IA-AVPNs and cause a postsynaptic excitatory current and that the nicotinic effects are mediated presynaptically by activation of the α4β2 type of nAChR and postsynaptically by activation of multiple nAChRs, including α7 and α4β2 types.

  3. Inhibition of the pontine Kölliker-Fuse nucleus abolishes eupneic inspiratory hypoglossal motor discharge in rat.

    PubMed

    Bautista, T G; Dutschmann, M

    2014-05-16

    The pontine Kölliker-Fuse nucleus (KF) has established functions in the regulation of inspiratory-expiratory phase transition and the regulation of upper airway patency via laryngeal valving mechanisms. Here we studied the role of the KF in the gating and modulation of eupneic hypoglossal motor activity (HNA) using the in situ perfused brainstem preparation, which displays robust inspiratory HNA. Microinjection of glutamate into the KF area triggered complex and often biphasic modulation (excitation/inhibition or inhibition/excitation) of HNA. Subsequent transient pharmacological inhibition of KF by unilateral microinjection of GABA-A receptor agonist isoguvacine reduced HNA and while bilateral microinjections completely abolished HNA. Our results indicate that mixed and overlapping KF pre-motor neurons provide eupneic drive for inspiratory HNA and postinspiratory vagal nerve activity. Both motor activities have important functions in the regulation of upper airway patency during eupnea but also during various oro-pharyngeal behaviors. These results have potential implications in the contribution of state-dependent modulation of KF hypoglossal pre-motor neurons during sleep-wake cycle to obstructive sleep apnea. PMID:24603053

  4. The effects of chest expansion resistance exercise on chest expansion and maximal respiratory pressure in elderly with inspiratory muscle weakness.

    PubMed

    Kim, Chang-Beom; Yang, Jin-Mo; Choi, Jong-Duk

    2015-04-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to examine the effect of chest expansion resistance exercises (CERE) on chest expansion, maximal inspiratory pressure (MIP), and maximal expiratory pressure (MEP) in elderly people with inspiratory muscle weakness. [Subjects] Thirty elderly people with inspiratory muscle weakness (MIP < 80% of the predicted value) were randomly and equally assigned to a chest expansion resistance exercise (CERE) group, core conditioning exercise (CCE) group, and control group. [Methods] The intervention was applied to the CERE group and CCE group five times per week, 30 minutes each time, for six weeks. A tapeline was used to measure upper and lower chest expansion. MIP and MEP before and after the intervention were measured and compared. [Results] There was significant improvement in upper and lower chest expansion and MIP after the intervention in both the CERE group and the CCE group, whereas the control group did not show any significant difference. MEP did not significantly change in any of the three groups after the intervention. [Conclusion] The CERE group underwent greater changes than the CCE group, which proves that the CERE is more effective for improving elderly people's chest expansion capacity and MIP in elderly people. Therefore, application of the CERE by therapists is recommended if the environment and conditions are appropriate for enhancement of chest expansion capacity and MIP in elderly people.

  5. Inhibition of the pontine Kölliker-Fuse nucleus abolishes eupneic inspiratory hypoglossal motor discharge in rat.

    PubMed

    Bautista, T G; Dutschmann, M

    2014-05-16

    The pontine Kölliker-Fuse nucleus (KF) has established functions in the regulation of inspiratory-expiratory phase transition and the regulation of upper airway patency via laryngeal valving mechanisms. Here we studied the role of the KF in the gating and modulation of eupneic hypoglossal motor activity (HNA) using the in situ perfused brainstem preparation, which displays robust inspiratory HNA. Microinjection of glutamate into the KF area triggered complex and often biphasic modulation (excitation/inhibition or inhibition/excitation) of HNA. Subsequent transient pharmacological inhibition of KF by unilateral microinjection of GABA-A receptor agonist isoguvacine reduced HNA and while bilateral microinjections completely abolished HNA. Our results indicate that mixed and overlapping KF pre-motor neurons provide eupneic drive for inspiratory HNA and postinspiratory vagal nerve activity. Both motor activities have important functions in the regulation of upper airway patency during eupnea but also during various oro-pharyngeal behaviors. These results have potential implications in the contribution of state-dependent modulation of KF hypoglossal pre-motor neurons during sleep-wake cycle to obstructive sleep apnea.

  6. Temporal dynamics of lactate concentration in the human brain during acute inspiratory hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Ashley D; Roberton, Victoria H; Huckle, Danielle L; Saxena, Neeraj; Evans, C John; Murphy, Kevin; Hall, Judith E; Bailey, Damian M; Mitsis, Georgios; Edden, Richard A E; Wise, Richard G

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To demonstrate the feasibility of measuring the temporal dynamics of cerebral lactate concentration and examine these dynamics in human subjects using MRS during hypoxia. Methods A respiratory protocol consisting of 10 min baseline normoxia, 20 min inspiratory hypoxia and ending with 10 min normoxic recovery was used, throughout which lactate-edited MRS was performed. This was repeated four times in three subjects. A separate session was performed to measure blood lactate. Impulse response functions using end-tidal oxygen and blood lactate as system inputs and cerebral lactate as the system output were examined to describe the dynamics of the cerebral lactate response to a hypoxic challenge. Results The average lactate increase was 20%±15% during the last half of the hypoxic challenge. Significant changes in cerebral lactate concentration were observed after 400s. The average relative increase in blood lactate was 188%±95%. The temporal dynamics of cerebral lactate concentration was reproducibly demonstrated with 200s time bins of MRS data (coefficient of variation 0.063±0.035 between time bins in normoxia). The across subject coefficient of variation was 0.333. Conclusions The methods for measuring the dynamics of the cerebral lactate response developed here would be useful to further investigate the brain’s response to hypoxia. PMID:23197421

  7. Finger microvascular responses to deep inspiratory gasp assessed and quantified using wavelet analysis.

    PubMed

    Allen, John; Di Maria, Costanzo; Mizeva, Irina; Podtaev, Sergey

    2013-07-01

    The physiological changes following a deep inspiratory gasp (DIG) manoeuvre have been described in the literature. However, the lack of a reliable signal processing technique to visualize and quantify these physiological changes has so far limited the applicability of the test to the clinical setting. The main aim of this study was to assess the feasibility of using wavelet analysis to quantify the pulse arrival time (PAT) and its changes during the DIG manoeuvre. Vascular responses were extracted from cardiac (electrocardiogram, ECG) and peripheral pulse (photoplethysmography, PPG) waveforms. Wavelet analysis characterized their cardiovascular responses in healthy adult subjects in the time-frequency space, and for the ECG-PPG inter-relationship in terms of the PAT. PAT showed a characteristic biphasic response to gasp, with an increase of 59 ± 59 ms (p = 0.001) compared to the maximum value reached during quiet breathing, and a decrease of -38 ± 55 ms (p < 0.01) compared to the minimum value during quiet breathing. The response measures were repeatable. This pilot study has successfully shown the feasibility of using wavelet analysis to characterize the cardiovascular waveforms and quantify their changes with DIG. PMID:23771176

  8. Usefulness of inspiratory capacity measurement in COPD patients in the primary care setting

    PubMed Central

    Madueño, Antonio; Martín, Antonio; Péculo, Juan-Antonio; Antón, Esther; Paravisini, Alejandra; León, Antonio

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To determine if inspiratory capacity (IC) assessment could be useful for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patient management in the primary care setting. Methods: A descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted in 93 patients diagnosed with COPD according to Spanish Thoracic Society (SEPAR) criteria. Patients were recruited in eight primary care centers in Andalusia, Spain. Anthropometric, sociodemographic, resting lung function (forced expiratory volume in one second [FEV1], forced vital capacity, synchronized vital capacity, IC), and quality of life data based on the Spanish version of Saint George’s Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ) were obtained. Results: Lung function results expressed as percentages of the predicted values were as follows: FEV1, 49.04 (standard deviation [SD]: 16.23); IC, 61.73 (SD: 15.42). The SGRQ mean total score was 47.5 (SD 17.98). The Spearman’s Rho correlation between FEV1 and SGRQ was r = −0.36 (95% confidence interval [CI]: −0.529 to −0.166), between IC and SGRQ was r = −0.329 (95% CI −0.502 to −0.131), and between FEV1 and IC was r = −0.561. Conclusions: Measurement of IC at rest could be used as a complementary functional exploration to forced spirometry in the monitorization of patients with COPD in the primary care setting. We found a poor correlation between IC and quality of life at the same level as in FEV1. PMID:20360907

  9. Effect of inspiratory resistance to prolonged exercise in a hot environment wearing protective clothing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jetté, Maurice; Quenneville, Josée; Thoden, James; Livingstone, Sydney

    1992-09-01

    The effects of inspiratory resistance on prolonged work in a hot environment wearing a nuclear, bacteriological and chemical warfare (NBCW) mask and overgarment were assessed in 10 males. Subjects walked on a treadmill at 5 km/hr, 2% gradient, until their core temperature reached 39° C or for a duration of 90 min. Rectal temperature, heart rate, ventilation, oxygen consumption and rate of perceived breathing were measured. There were no differences between break-point time without the canister (62.2 ± 21 min) and with the canister (58.9 ± 17 min). Regression analysis indicated that the mean core temperature increased by 0.02° C for every minute of work performed and heart rate by 6 beats/min for every increase of 0.2° C in core temperature. Reduction in heat transfer brought about by wearing the protective overgarment and mask with or without the canister will significantly increase core temperature and limit the performance of moderate work to approximately 1 h in a moderately fit individual.

  10. Hydrodynamics of sediment threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Sk Zeeshan; Dey, Subhasish

    2016-07-01

    A novel hydrodynamic model for the threshold of cohesionless sediment particle motion under a steady unidirectional streamflow is presented. The hydrodynamic forces (drag and lift) acting on a solitary sediment particle resting over a closely packed bed formed by the identical sediment particles are the primary motivating forces. The drag force comprises of the form drag and form induced drag. The lift force includes the Saffman lift, Magnus lift, centrifugal lift, and turbulent lift. The points of action of the force system are appropriately obtained, for the first time, from the basics of micro-mechanics. The sediment threshold is envisioned as the rolling mode, which is the plausible mode to initiate a particle motion on the bed. The moment balance of the force system on the solitary particle about the pivoting point of rolling yields the governing equation. The conditions of sediment threshold under the hydraulically smooth, transitional, and rough flow regimes are examined. The effects of velocity fluctuations are addressed by applying the statistical theory of turbulence. This study shows that for a hindrance coefficient of 0.3, the threshold curve (threshold Shields parameter versus shear Reynolds number) has an excellent agreement with the experimental data of uniform sediments. However, most of the experimental data are bounded by the upper and lower limiting threshold curves, corresponding to the hindrance coefficients of 0.2 and 0.4, respectively. The threshold curve of this study is compared with those of previous researchers. The present model also agrees satisfactorily with the experimental data of nonuniform sediments.

  11. Single-breath diffusing capacity of NO independent of inspiratory NO concentration in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Heller, H; Schuster, K D

    1997-12-01

    Pulmonary diffusing capacity of NO (DLNO) was determined by performing single-breath experiments on six anesthetized paralyzed supine rabbits, applying inspiratory concentrations of NO (FINO) within a range of 10 parts per million (ppm) < or = FINO < or = 800 ppm. Starting from residual volume, the rabbit lungs were inflated by 50 ml of a NO-nitrogen-containing indicator gas mixture. Breath-holding time was set at 0.1, 1, 3, 5, and 7 s. Alveolar partial pressure of NO was determined by analyzing the end-tidal portion from expirates, with the use of respiratory mass spectrometry. In the six animals, pulmonary diffusing capacity of NO averaged DLNO = 1.92 +/- 0.21 ml.mmHg-1.min-1 (mean +/- SD value). Despite extreme variations in FINO, we found very similar DLNO values, and in three rabbits we found identical values even at such different FINO levels of 80 ppm or 500, 20, or 200 ppm as well as 10 or 800 ppm. There was also no dependence of DLNO on the respective duration of the single-breath maneuvers. In addition, the time course of NO removal from alveolar space was independent of applied FINO levels. These results suggest that DLNO determinations are neither affected by chemical reactions of NO in alveolar gas phase as well as in lung tissue nor biased by endogenous release of NO from pulmonary tissue. It is our conclusion that the single-breath diffusing capacity of NO is able to provide a measure of alveolar-capillary gas conductance that is not influenced by the biochemical reactions of NO.

  12. Prenatal nicotine exposure increases apnoea and reduces nicotinic potentiation of hypoglossal inspiratory output in mice

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Dean M; Peebles, Karen C; Kwok, Henry; Adams, Brandon M; Clarke, Lan-Ling; Woollard, Gerald A; Funk, Gregory D

    2002-01-01

    We examined the effects of in utero nicotine exposure on postnatal development of breathing pattern and ventilatory responses to hypoxia (7.4 % O2) using whole-body plethysmography in mice at postnatal day 0 (P0), P3, P9, P19 and P42. Nicotine delayed early postnatal changes in breathing pattern. During normoxia, control and nicotine-exposed P0 mice exhibited a high frequency of apnoea (fA) which declined by P3 in control animals (from 6.7 ± 0.7 to 2.2 ± 0.7 min−1) but persisted in P3 nicotine-exposed animals (5.4 ± 1.3 min−1). Hypoxia induced a rapid and sustained reduction in fA except in P0 nicotine-exposed animals where it fell initially and then increased throughout the hypoxic period. During recovery, fA increased above control levels in both groups at P0. By P3 this increase was reduced in control but persisted in nicotine-exposed animals. To examine the origin of differences in respiratory behaviour, we compared the activity of hypoglossal (XII) nerves and motoneurons in medullary slice preparations. The frequency and variability of the respiratory rhythm and the envelope of inspiratory activity in XII nerves and motoneurons were indistinguishable between control and nicotine-exposed animals. Activation of postsynaptic nicotine receptors caused an inward current in XII motoneurons that potentiated XII nerve burst amplitude by 25 ± 5 % in control but only 14 ± 3 % in nicotine-exposed animals. Increased apnoea following nicotine exposure does not appear to reflect changes in basal activity of rhythm or pattern-generating networks, but may result, in part, from reduced nicotinic modulation of XII motoneurons. PMID:11826179

  13. Crossing the Writing Threshold.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Carol Lea

    What pushes a writer over the edge of thought into text production--over what may be called "the writing threshold?" This is the moment when the thoughts in a writer's mind, the writing situation, and personal motivations create a momentum that results in a pattern of written words. There is evidence that not everyone crosses the writing threshold…

  14. Elaborating on Threshold Concepts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rountree, Janet; Robins, Anthony; Rountree, Nathan

    2013-01-01

    We propose an expanded definition of Threshold Concepts (TCs) that requires the successful acquisition and internalisation not only of knowledge, but also its practical elaboration in the domains of applied strategies and mental models. This richer definition allows us to clarify the relationship between TCs and Fundamental Ideas, and to account…

  15. The impact of emotion on the perception of graded magnitudes of respiratory resistive loads.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Hsiu-Wen; Chan, Pei-Ying; von Leupoldt, Andreas; Davenport, Paul W

    2013-04-01

    Emotional state can modulate the perception of respiratory loads but the range of respiratory load magnitudes affected by emotional state is unknown. We hypothesized that viewing pleasant, neutral and unpleasant affective pictures would modulate the perception of respiratory loads of different load magnitudes. Twenty-four healthy adults participated in the study. Five inspiratory resistive loads of increasing magnitude (5, 10, 15, 20, 45 cm H(2)O/L/s) were repeatedly presented for one inspiration while participants viewed pleasant, neutral and unpleasant affective picture series. Participants rated how difficult it was to breathe against the load immediately after each presentation. Only at the lowest load, magnitude estimation ratings were greater when subjects viewed the unpleasant series compared to the neutral and pleasant series. These results suggest that negative emotional state increases the sense of respiratory effort for single presentations of a low magnitude resistive load but high magnitude loads are not further modulated by emotional state.

  16. The classical Starling resistor model often does not predict inspiratory airflow patterns in the human upper airway.

    PubMed

    Owens, Robert L; Edwards, Bradley A; Sands, Scott A; Butler, James P; Eckert, Danny J; White, David P; Malhotra, Atul; Wellman, Andrew

    2014-04-15

    The upper airway is often modeled as a classical Starling resistor, featuring a constant inspiratory airflow, or plateau, over a range of downstream pressures. However, airflow tracings from clinical sleep studies often show an initial peak before the plateau. To conform to the Starling model, the initial peak must be of small magnitude or dismissed as a transient. We developed a method to simulate fast or slow inspirations through the human upper airway, to test the hypothesis that this initial peak is a transient. Eight subjects [4 obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), 4 controls] slept in an "iron lung" and wore a nasal mask connected to a continuous/bilevel positive airway pressure machine. Downstream pressure was measured using an epiglottic catheter. During non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep, subjects were hyperventilated to produce a central apnea, then extrathoracic pressure was decreased slowly (∼2-4 s) or abruptly (<0.5 s) to lower downstream pressure and create inspiratory airflow. Pressure-flow curves were constructed for flow-limited breaths, and slow vs. fast reductions in downstream pressure were compared. All subjects exhibited an initial peak and then a decrease in flow with more negative pressures, demonstrating negative effort dependence (NED). The rate of change in downstream pressure did not affect the peak to plateau airflow ratio: %NED 22 ± 13% (slow) vs. 20 ± 5% (fast), P = not significant. We conclude that the initial peak in inspiratory airflow is not a transient but rather a distinct mechanical property of the upper airway. In contrast to the classical Starling resistor model, the upper airway exhibits marked NED in some subjects. PMID:24458746

  17. The classical Starling resistor model often does not predict inspiratory airflow patterns in the human upper airway

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Bradley A.; Sands, Scott A.; Butler, James P.; Eckert, Danny J.; White, David P.; Malhotra, Atul; Wellman, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    The upper airway is often modeled as a classical Starling resistor, featuring a constant inspiratory airflow, or plateau, over a range of downstream pressures. However, airflow tracings from clinical sleep studies often show an initial peak before the plateau. To conform to the Starling model, the initial peak must be of small magnitude or dismissed as a transient. We developed a method to simulate fast or slow inspirations through the human upper airway, to test the hypothesis that this initial peak is a transient. Eight subjects [4 obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), 4 controls] slept in an “iron lung” and wore a nasal mask connected to a continuous/bilevel positive airway pressure machine. Downstream pressure was measured using an epiglottic catheter. During non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep, subjects were hyperventilated to produce a central apnea, then extrathoracic pressure was decreased slowly (∼2–4 s) or abruptly (<0.5 s) to lower downstream pressure and create inspiratory airflow. Pressure-flow curves were constructed for flow-limited breaths, and slow vs. fast reductions in downstream pressure were compared. All subjects exhibited an initial peak and then a decrease in flow with more negative pressures, demonstrating negative effort dependence (NED). The rate of change in downstream pressure did not affect the peak to plateau airflow ratio: %NED 22 ± 13% (slow) vs. 20 ± 5% (fast), P = not significant. We conclude that the initial peak in inspiratory airflow is not a transient but rather a distinct mechanical property of the upper airway. In contrast to the classical Starling resistor model, the upper airway exhibits marked NED in some subjects. PMID:24458746

  18. Peripheral chemoreceptors tune inspiratory drive via tonic expiratory neuron hubs in the medullary ventral respiratory column network.

    PubMed

    Segers, L S; Nuding, S C; Ott, M M; Dean, J B; Bolser, D C; O'Connor, R; Morris, K F; Lindsey, B G

    2015-01-01

    Models of brain stem ventral respiratory column (VRC) circuits typically emphasize populations of neurons, each active during a particular phase of the respiratory cycle. We have proposed that "tonic" pericolumnar expiratory (t-E) neurons tune breathing during baroreceptor-evoked reductions and central chemoreceptor-evoked enhancements of inspiratory (I) drive. The aims of this study were to further characterize the coordinated activity of t-E neurons and test the hypothesis that peripheral chemoreceptors also modulate drive via inhibition of t-E neurons and disinhibition of their inspiratory neuron targets. Spike trains of 828 VRC neurons were acquired by multielectrode arrays along with phrenic nerve signals from 22 decerebrate, vagotomized, neuromuscularly blocked, artificially ventilated adult cats. Forty-eight of 191 t-E neurons fired synchronously with another t-E neuron as indicated by cross-correlogram central peaks; 32 of the 39 synchronous pairs were elements of groups with mutual pairwise correlations. Gravitational clustering identified fluctuations in t-E neuron synchrony. A network model supported the prediction that inhibitory populations with spike synchrony reduce target neuron firing probabilities, resulting in offset or central correlogram troughs. In five animals, stimulation of carotid chemoreceptors evoked changes in the firing rates of 179 of 240 neurons. Thirty-two neuron pairs had correlogram troughs consistent with convergent and divergent t-E inhibition of I cells and disinhibitory enhancement of drive. Four of 10 t-E neurons that responded to sequential stimulation of peripheral and central chemoreceptors triggered 25 cross-correlograms with offset features. The results support the hypothesis that multiple afferent systems dynamically tune inspiratory drive in part via coordinated t-E neurons.

  19. Bronchodilator delivery by metered-dose inhaler in mechanically ventilated COPD patients: influence of end-inspiratory pause.

    PubMed

    Mouloudi, E; Katsanoulas, K; Anastasaki, M; Askitopoulou, E; Georgopoulos, D

    1998-07-01

    The delivery of bronchodilators with a metered-dose inhaler (MDI) and a spacer in mechanically ventilated patients has become widespread practice. However, the various ventilator settings that influence the efficacy of MDI are not well established. Application of an end-inspiratory pause (EIP) during drug delivery has been suggested as one of the factors that might increase the effectiveness of this therapy. To test this, the effect of EIP on the bronchodilation induced by beta2-agonists administered with MDI and a spacer in a group of mechanically ventilated patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) was examined. Twelve patients with COPD, mechanically ventilated on volume-controlled mode, were prospectively randomized to receive six puffs of salbutamol (100 microg x puff(-1)) either with or without EIP of 5 s duration. Salbutamol was administered with an MDI adapted to the inspiratory limb of the ventilator circuit using an aerosol cloud-enhancer spacer. After a 6 h wash-out, patients were crossed over to receive salbutamol by the alternative mode of administration. Static and dynamic airway pressures, minimum (Rmin) and maximum (Rmax) airflow resistance, the difference between Rmax and Rmin (deltaR), static end-inspiratory respiratory system compliance (Cst,rs) and cardiac frequency (fc) were measured before and at 15, 30 and 60 min after salbutamol administration. Salbutamol caused a significant decrease in dynamic and static airway pressures, Rmin and Rmax. These changes were not influenced by application of EIP and were evident at 15, 30 and 60 min after salbutamol. With and without EIP, Cst,rs,deltaR and fc did not change after salbutamol. In conclusion, salbutamol delivered with a metered-dose inhaler and a spacer device induced significant bronchodilation in mechanically ventilated patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, the magnitude of which was not affected by an end-expiratory pause of 5 s. These results do not support the

  20. A threshold lung volume for optimal mechanical effects on upper airway airflow dynamics: studies in an anesthetized rabbit model.

    PubMed

    Kairaitis, Kristina; Verma, Manisha; Amatoury, Jason; Wheatley, John R; White, David P; Amis, Terence C

    2012-04-01

    Increasing lung volume improves upper airway airflow dynamics via passive mechanisms such as reducing upper airway extraluminal tissue pressures (ETP) and increasing longitudinal tension via tracheal displacement. We hypothesized a threshold lung volume for optimal mechanical effects on upper airway airflow dynamics. Seven supine, anesthetized, spontaneously breathing New Zealand White rabbits were studied. Extrathoracic pressure was altered, and lung volume change, airflow, pharyngeal pressure, ETP laterally (ETPlat) and anteriorly (ETPant), tracheal displacement, and sternohyoid muscle activity (EMG%max) monitored. Airflow dynamics were quantified via peak inspiratory airflow, flow limitation upper airway resistance, and conductance. Every 10-ml lung volume increase resulted in caudal tracheal displacement of 2.1 ± 0.4 mm (mean ± SE), decreased ETPlat by 0.7 ± 0.3 cmH(2)O, increased peak inspiratory airflow of 22.8 ± 2.6% baseline (all P < 0.02), and no significant change in ETPant or EMG%max. Flow limitation was present in most rabbits at baseline, and abolished 15.7 ± 10.5 ml above baseline. Every 10-ml lung volume decrease resulted in cranial tracheal displacement of 2.6 ± 0.4 mm, increased ETPant by 0.9 ± 0.2 cmH(2)O, ETPlat was unchanged, increased EMG%max of 11.1 ± 0.3%, and a reduction in peak inspiratory airflow of 10.8 ± 1.0%baseline (all P < 0.01). Lung volume, resistance, and conductance relationships were described by exponential functions. In conclusion, increasing lung volume displaced the trachea caudally, reduced ETP, abolished flow limitation, but had little effect on resistance or conductance, whereas decreasing lung volume resulted in cranial tracheal displacement, increased ETP and increased resistance, and reduced conductance, and flow limitation persisted despite increased muscle activity. We conclude that there is a threshold for lung volume influences on upper airway airflow dynamics. PMID:22241061

  1. Network problem threshold

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gejji, Raghvendra, R.

    1992-01-01

    Network transmission errors such as collisions, CRC errors, misalignment, etc. are statistical in nature. Although errors can vary randomly, a high level of errors does indicate specific network problems, e.g. equipment failure. In this project, we have studied the random nature of collisions theoretically as well as by gathering statistics, and established a numerical threshold above which a network problem is indicated with high probability.

  2. Effect of the Prolonged Inspiratory to Expiratory Ratio on Oxygenation and Respiratory Mechanics During Surgical Procedures

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jin Ha; Lee, Jong Seok; Lee, Jae Hoon; Shin, Seokyung; Min, Nar Hyun; Kim, Min-Soo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Prolonged inspiratory to expiratory (I:E) ratio ventilation has been researched to reduce lung injury and improve oxygenation in surgical patients with one-lung ventilation (OLV) or carbon dioxide (CO2) pneumoperitoneum. We aimed to confirm the efficacy of the 1:1 equal ratio ventilation (ERV) compared with the 1:2 conventional ratio ventilation (CRV) during surgical procedures. Electronic databases, including PubMed, Embase, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Web of Science, and Google Scholar were searched. Prospective interventional trials that assessed the effects of prolonged I:E ratio of 1:1 during surgical procedures. Adult patients undergoing OLV or CO2 pneumoperitoneum as specific interventions depending on surgical procedures. The included studies were examined with the Cochrane Collaboration's tool. The data regarding intraoperative oxygenation and respiratory mechanics were extracted, and then pooled with standardized mean difference (SMD) using the method of Hedges. Seven trials (498 total patients, 274 with ERV) were included. From overall analysis, ERV did not improve oxygenation at 20 or 30 minutes after specific interventions (SMD 0.193, 95% confidence interval (CI): −0.094 to 0.481, P = 0.188). From subgroup analyses, ERV provided significantly improved oxygenation only with laparoscopy (SMD 0.425, 95% CI: 0.167–0.682, P = 0.001). At 60 minutes after the specific interventions, ERV improved oxygenation significantly in the overall analysis (SMD 0.447, 95% CI: 0.209–0.685, P < 0.001) as well as in the subgroup analyses with OLV (SMD 0.328, 95% CI: 0.011–0.644, P = 0.042) and laparoscopy (SMD 0.668, 95% CI: 0.052–1.285, P = 0.034). ERV provided lower peak airway pressure (Ppeak) and plateau airway pressure (Pplat) than CRV, regardless of the type of intervention. The relatively small number of the included articles and their heterogeneity could be the main limitations. ERV improved oxygenation

  3. Analysis of recurrent laryngeal inspiratory discharges in relation to fast rhythms.

    PubMed

    Christakos, C N; Cohen, M I; Sica, A L; Huang, W X; See, W R; Barnhardt, R

    1994-09-01

    1. Inspiratory (I) activities of recurrent laryngeal (RL) motoneurons and efferent nerves were studied by autospectral, interval, and coherence analyses, with emphasis on fast rhythms of two types: medium-frequency oscillations (MFO, usual range 20-50 Hz for nerve autospectral peaks) and high-frequency oscillations (HFO, usual range 50-100 Hz). 2. In decerebrate, paralyzed, and artificially ventilated cats, recordings were taken from 27 isolated single RL fibers (14 cats) and 8 identified RL motoneurons in the medulla (6 cats), together with recordings of phrenic (PHR) and RL whole-nerve activities. In another 50 cats, RL and PHR nerve discharges were recorded simultaneously. 3. The autospectra of RL units showed prominent MFO peaks with frequencies close to that of the RL nerve MFO spectral peak, indicating presence of this type of fast rhythm in the units' discharges. Spectral analysis of RL unit activity in different segments of the I phase showed that the frequency of a unit's MFO was very close to the peak (maintained) firing rate of the unit during the portion of I analyzed. Thus a motoneuron's MFO spectral peak reflected its rhythmic discharge arising from the cell's refractoriness (and possibly with the rate changing in the course of I). 4. The coherences of motoneurons' MFOs to nerve MFOs were very low or 0, indicating that correlations between unitary MFOs of the RL population were rare and/or weak. 5. In those cats (19/20) that had discernible PHR nerve HFO autospectral peaks, about half of the recorded RL motoneurons (16/34) had HFO. For these motoneurons, the unit-nerve HFO coherences were substantial, indicating widespread correlations between unitary HFOs. 6. In a fraction of cats, coherence peaks in the MFO frequency range were observed between bilateral RL nerves, and between RL and PHR nerves, at frequencies that were subharmonics of the HFO frequency. 7. In light of theoretical considerations on the generation of aggregate rhythms from

  4. The relationship between early reversibility test and maximal inspiratory pressure in patients with airway obstruction.

    PubMed

    Ozkaya, Sevket; Dirican, Adem; Kaya, Sule Ozbay; Karanfil, Rabia C; Bayrak, Merve G; Bostancı, Ozgür; Ece, Ferah

    2014-01-01

    Maximal inspiratory pressure (MIP) is a marker for assessing the degree of respiratory muscle dysfunction. Muscle dysfunction represents a pathophysiological feature of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. We aimed to determinate the MIP value in patients with airway obstruction, to evaluate the change in MIP with bronchodilator drug, and to show the relationship between the changes in MIP and disease characteristics. We evaluated 21 patients with airway obstruction at the Department of Pulmonary Medicine, Samsun Medicalpark Hospital, Samsun, Turkey. We performed pulmonary function tests, measurement of MIP values, and reversibility tests with salbutamol. The baseline spirometry results were: mean forced vital capacity (FVC), 3,017±1,020 mL and 75.8%±20.8%; mean forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1), 1,892±701 mL and 59.2%±18.2%; FEV1/FVC, 62.9%±5.5%; peak expiratory flow, 53%±19%. The pre-bronchodilator MIP value was 62.1±36.9 cmH2O. The reversibility test was found to be positive in 61.9% of patients with salbutamol. The absolute change and percentage of change in FEV1 were 318±223 mL and 19.8%±16.7%, respectively. The MIP value was increased by 5.5 cmH2O (8.8%) and was 67.7±30.3 cmH2O after bronchodilation. There was no significant relationship between age, FEV1, reversibility, and change in MIP with bronchodilator. However, the increase in MIP with bronchodilator drug was higher in patients with low body mass index (<25 kg/m(2)). We noted a 13.1% increase in FVC, a 19.8% increase in FEV1, a 20.2% increase in peak expiratory flow, and an 8.8% increase in MIP with salbutamol. In conclusion; MIP increases with bronchodilator therapy, regardless of changes in lung function, in patients with airway obstruction. The reversibilty test can be used to evaluate change in MIP with salbutamol.

  5. Inspiratory flow rates during hard work when breathing through different respirator inhalation and exhalation resistances.

    PubMed

    Coyne, Karen; Caretti, David; Scott, William; Johnson, Arthur; Koh, Frank

    2006-09-01

    There has been a long-standing debate regarding the adequacy of airflow rates used in respirator certification testing and whether these test flow rates underestimate actual values. This study investigated breath by breath inspiratory peak flow rate, minute ventilation, and instantaneous flow rates of eight young, healthy volunteers walking on a treadmill at 80-85% of maximal aerobic capacity until exhaustion while wearing an air-purifying respirator with one of eight combinations of inhalation and exhalation resistance. An analysis of variance was performed to identify differences among the eight conditions. Scheffe's post hoc analysis indicated which means differed. The group of conditions with the highest average value for each parameter was identified and considered to represent a worst-case scenario. Data was reported for these conditions. A Gaussian distribution was fit to the data and the 99.9% probability levels determined. The 99.9% probability level for the peak and instantaneous flow rates were 374 L/min and 336 L/min, respectively. The minute ventilation distribution was not Gaussian. Less than 1% of the recorded minute ventilations exceeded 135 L/min. Instantaneous flow rates exceeded the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health's respirator test standards of 64, 85, and 100 L/min constant flow 91%, 87%, and 82% of the time, respectively. The recorded minute ventilations exceeded the 40 L/min minute ventilation test standard (for tests with a sinusoidal flow pattern) 100% of the time. This study showed that young, healthy respirator wearers generated peak flow rates, minute ventilations, and instantaneous flow rates that consistently exceeded current test standards. Their flow rates should be higher than those of a respirator wearer performing occupational work and could be considered upper limits. Testing respirators and respirator cartridges using a sinusoidal breathing pattern with a minute ventilation of 135 L/min (peak flow rate

  6. Effect of the Prolonged Inspiratory to Expiratory Ratio on Oxygenation and Respiratory Mechanics During Surgical Procedures.

    PubMed

    Park, Jin Ha; Lee, Jong Seok; Lee, Jae Hoon; Shin, Seokyung; Min, Nar Hyun; Kim, Min-Soo

    2016-03-01

    Prolonged inspiratory to expiratory (I:E) ratio ventilation has been researched to reduce lung injury and improve oxygenation in surgical patients with one-lung ventilation (OLV) or carbon dioxide (CO2) pneumoperitoneum. We aimed to confirm the efficacy of the 1:1 equal ratio ventilation (ERV) compared with the 1:2 conventional ratio ventilation (CRV) during surgical procedures. Electronic databases, including PubMed, Embase, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Web of Science, and Google Scholar were searched.Prospective interventional trials that assessed the effects of prolonged I:E ratio of 1:1 during surgical procedures. Adult patients undergoing OLV or CO2 pneumoperitoneum as specific interventions depending on surgical procedures. The included studies were examined with the Cochrane Collaboration's tool. The data regarding intraoperative oxygenation and respiratory mechanics were extracted, and then pooled with standardized mean difference (SMD) using the method of Hedges. Seven trials (498 total patients, 274 with ERV) were included. From overall analysis, ERV did not improve oxygenation at 20 or 30 minutes after specific interventions (SMD 0.193, 95% confidence interval (CI): -0.094 to 0.481, P = 0.188). From subgroup analyses, ERV provided significantly improved oxygenation only with laparoscopy (SMD 0.425, 95% CI: 0.167-0.682, P = 0.001). At 60 minutes after the specific interventions, ERV improved oxygenation significantly in the overall analysis (SMD 0.447, 95% CI: 0.209-0.685, P < 0.001) as well as in the subgroup analyses with OLV (SMD 0.328, 95% CI: 0.011-0.644, P = 0.042) and laparoscopy (SMD 0.668, 95% CI: 0.052-1.285, P = 0.034). ERV provided lower peak airway pressure (Ppeak) and plateau airway pressure (Pplat) than CRV, regardless of the type of intervention. The relatively small number of the included articles and their heterogeneity could be the main limitations. ERV improved oxygenation at all of the

  7. Inspiratory muscle work in acute hypoxia influences locomotor muscle fatigue and exercise performance of healthy humans.

    PubMed

    Amann, Markus; Pegelow, David F; Jacques, Anthony J; Dempsey, Jerome A

    2007-11-01

    Our aim was to isolate the independent effects of 1) inspiratory muscle work (W(b)) and 2) arterial hypoxemia during heavy-intensity exercise in acute hypoxia on locomotor muscle fatigue. Eight cyclists exercised to exhaustion in hypoxia [inspired O(2) fraction (Fi(O(2))) = 0.15, arterial hemoglobin saturation (Sa(O(2))) = 81 +/- 1%; 8.6 +/- 0.5 min, 273 +/- 6 W; Hypoxia-control (Ctrl)] and at the same work rate and duration in normoxia (Sa(O(2)) = 95 +/- 1%; Normoxia-Ctrl). These trials were repeated, but with a 35-80% reduction in W(b) achieved via proportional assist ventilation (PAV). Quadriceps twitch force was assessed via magnetic femoral nerve stimulation before and 2 min after exercise. The isolated effects of W(b) in hypoxia on quadriceps fatigue, independent of reductions in Sa(O(2)), were revealed by comparing Hypoxia-Ctrl and Hypoxia-PAV at equal levels of Sa(O(2)) (P = 0.10). Immediately after hypoxic exercise potentiated twitch force of the quadriceps (Q(tw,pot)) decreased by 30 +/- 3% below preexercise baseline, and this reduction was attenuated by about one-third after PAV exercise (21 +/- 4%; P = 0.0007). This effect of W(b) on quadriceps fatigue occurred at exercise work rates during which, in normoxia, reducing W(b) had no significant effect on fatigue. The isolated effects of reduced Sa(O(2)) on quadriceps fatigue, independent of changes in W(b), were revealed by comparing Hypoxia-PAV and Normoxia-PAV at equal levels of W(b). Q(tw,pot) decreased by 15 +/- 2% below preexercise baseline after Normoxia-PAV, and this reduction was exacerbated by about one-third after Hypoxia-PAV (-22 +/- 3%; P = 0.034). We conclude that both arterial hypoxemia and W(b) contribute significantly to the rate of development of locomotor muscle fatigue during exercise in acute hypoxia; this occurs at work rates during which, in normoxia, W(b) has no effect on peripheral fatigue.

  8. Computerised determination of spontaneous inspiratory and expiratory times in premature neonates during intermittent positive pressure ventilation. II: Results from 20 babies.

    PubMed Central

    Ahluwalia, J S; Morley, C J; Mockridge, J N

    1994-01-01

    Twenty premature infants ventilated for respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) were studied using a new computerised technique to determine spontaneous inspiratory and expiratory times. The technique is continuous and non-invasive. Infants were studied during intermittent positive pressure ventilation for periods of up to 45 minutes. Median birth weight and gestation were 1477 g and 30 weeks. The median number of breaths analysed for each baby was 925. The median (range) for spontaneous inspiratory time was 0.30 (0.26 to 0.34) seconds and for spontaneous expiratory time it was 0.46 (0.34 to 0.66) seconds. The spontaneous inspiratory and expiratory times were different from the ventilator settings. PMID:7820709

  9. Timing of medullary late-inspiratory neuron discharges: vagal afferent effects indicate possible off-switch function.

    PubMed

    Cohen, M I; Huang, W X; Barnhardt, R; See, W R

    1993-05-01

    1. In decerebrate paralyzed cats, we observed the responses of ventral and dorsal medullary inspiratory (I) neurons to two types of vagal afferent input that shorten neural I: lung inflation and vagal electrical stimulation. 2. A study population of 15 I neurons whose firing patterns suggested involvement in the inspiratory OFF-switch (IOS) was selected on the basis of two criteria: late onset of firing and excitation by vagal inputs. 3. Firing in relation to the end of I showed two types of response to vagal inputs. The pre-expiratory onset time (time from initial spike to end of I) was either unchanged (type 1 response in 5/15 neurons) or significantly changed (type 2 response in 10/15 neurons). 4. It is suggested that type 1 neurons, whose firing patterns remain closely locked to the end of I despite considerable changes of I duration, are involved in promoting the IOS, whereas type 2 neurons are either not involved (e.g., late-onset premotor neurons) or are involved at an earlier temporal processing stage. PMID:8389840

  10. The Role of Inspiratory Muscle Training in Sickle Cell Anemia Related Pulmonary Damage due to Recurrent Acute Chest Syndrome Attacks

    PubMed Central

    Camcıoğlu, Burcu; Boşnak-Güçlü, Meral; Karadallı, Müşerrefe Nur; Akı, Şahika Zeynep; Türköz-Sucak, Gülsan

    2015-01-01

    Background. The sickling of red blood cells causes a constellation of musculoskeletal, cardiovascular, and pulmonary manifestations. A 32-year-old gentleman with sickle cell anemia (SCA) had been suffering from recurrent acute chest syndrome (ACS). Aim. To examine the effects of inspiratory muscle training (IMT) on pulmonary functions, respiratory and peripheral muscle strength, functional exercise capacity, and quality of life in this patient with SCA. Methods. Functional exercise capacity was evaluated using six-minute walk test, respiratory muscle strength using mouth pressure device, hand grip strength using hand-held dynamometer, pain using Visual Analogue Scale, fatigue using Fatigue Severity Scale, dyspnea using Modified Medical Research Council Scale, and health related quality of life using European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer QOL measurement. Results. A significant improvement has been demonstrated in respiratory muscle strength, functional exercise capacity, pain, fatigue, dyspnea, and quality of life. There was no admission to emergency department due to acute chest syndrome in the following 12 months after commencing regular erythrocytapheresis. Conclusion. This is the first report demonstrating the beneficial effects of inspiratory muscle training on functional exercise capacity, respiratory muscle strength, pain, fatigue, dyspnea, and quality of life in a patient with recurrent ACS. PMID:26060589

  11. The Role of Inspiratory Muscle Training in Sickle Cell Anemia Related Pulmonary Damage due to Recurrent Acute Chest Syndrome Attacks.

    PubMed

    Camcıoğlu, Burcu; Boşnak-Güçlü, Meral; Karadallı, Müşerrefe Nur; Akı, Şahika Zeynep; Türköz-Sucak, Gülsan

    2015-01-01

    Background. The sickling of red blood cells causes a constellation of musculoskeletal, cardiovascular, and pulmonary manifestations. A 32-year-old gentleman with sickle cell anemia (SCA) had been suffering from recurrent acute chest syndrome (ACS). Aim. To examine the effects of inspiratory muscle training (IMT) on pulmonary functions, respiratory and peripheral muscle strength, functional exercise capacity, and quality of life in this patient with SCA. Methods. Functional exercise capacity was evaluated using six-minute walk test, respiratory muscle strength using mouth pressure device, hand grip strength using hand-held dynamometer, pain using Visual Analogue Scale, fatigue using Fatigue Severity Scale, dyspnea using Modified Medical Research Council Scale, and health related quality of life using European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer QOL measurement. Results. A significant improvement has been demonstrated in respiratory muscle strength, functional exercise capacity, pain, fatigue, dyspnea, and quality of life. There was no admission to emergency department due to acute chest syndrome in the following 12 months after commencing regular erythrocytapheresis. Conclusion. This is the first report demonstrating the beneficial effects of inspiratory muscle training on functional exercise capacity, respiratory muscle strength, pain, fatigue, dyspnea, and quality of life in a patient with recurrent ACS. PMID:26060589

  12. Coloring geographical threshold graphs

    SciTech Connect

    Bradonjic, Milan; Percus, Allon; Muller, Tobias

    2008-01-01

    We propose a coloring algorithm for sparse random graphs generated by the geographical threshold graph (GTG) model, a generalization of random geometric graphs (RGG). In a GTG, nodes are distributed in a Euclidean space, and edges are assigned according to a threshold function involving the distance between nodes as well as randomly chosen node weights. The motivation for analyzing this model is that many real networks (e.g., wireless networks, the Internet, etc.) need to be studied by using a 'richer' stochastic model (which in this case includes both a distance between nodes and weights on the nodes). Here, we analyze the GTG coloring algorithm together with the graph's clique number, showing formally that in spite of the differences in structure between GTG and RGG, the asymptotic behavior of the chromatic number is identical: {chi}1n 1n n / 1n n (1 + {omicron}(1)). Finally, we consider the leading corrections to this expression, again using the coloring algorithm and clique number to provide bounds on the chromatic number. We show that the gap between the lower and upper bound is within C 1n n / (1n 1n n){sup 2}, and specify the constant C.

  13. Laser threshold magnetometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeske, Jan; Cole, Jared H.; Greentree, Andrew D.

    2016-01-01

    We propose a new type of sensor, which uses diamond containing the optically active nitrogen-vacancy (NV-) centres as a laser medium. The magnetometer can be operated at room-temperature and generates light that can be readily fibre coupled, thereby permitting use in industrial applications and remote sensing. By combining laser pumping with a radio-frequency Rabi-drive field, an external magnetic field changes the fluorescence of the NV- centres. We use this change in fluorescence level to push the laser above threshold, turning it on with an intensity controlled by the external magnetic field, which provides a coherent amplification of the readout signal with very high contrast. This mechanism is qualitatively different from conventional NV--based magnetometers which use fluorescence measurements, based on incoherent photon emission. We term our approach laser threshold magnetometer (LTM). We predict that an NV--based LTM with a volume of 1 mm3 can achieve shot-noise limited dc sensitivity of 1.86 fT /\\sqrt{{{Hz}}} and ac sensitivity of 3.97 fT /\\sqrt{{{Hz}}}.

  14. High-frequency oscillations in membrane potentials of medullary inspiratory and expiratory neurons (including laryngeal motoneurons).

    PubMed

    Huang, W X; Cohen, M I; Yu, Q; See, W R; He, Q

    1996-09-01

    1. In midcollicular decerebrate, unanesthetized, paralyzed cats ventilated with a cycle-triggered pump system, the properties of high-frequency oscillations (HFOs, 50-100 Hz) in membrane potentials (MPs) of medullary inspiratory (I) and expiratory (E) cells were studied. Simultaneous recordings were taken from bilateral phrenic and recurrent laryngeal (RL) nerves and from cells in the intermediate ventral respiratory group (intVRG, 0-1 mm rostral to the obex) or the caudal ventral respiratory group (cVRG, 2-4 mm caudal to the obex). 2. Spectral coherence analyses were used to detect the presence of HFOs during I in I and E cell MPs. Cross-correlation histograms (CCHs) between the cell and phrenic signals were used to ascertain cell-nerve HFO phase relations and to identify cells as RL motoneurons. Of the 103 cells that had significant HFOs (cell-phrenic coherences > or = 0.1), measurable HFO peak lags in the CCH were seen in 53 cells: 1) RL cells (9 I cells and 7 E cells); and 2) other types of cell (8 intVRG I cells, 18 intVRG E cells, and 11 cVRG E cells). These cells had high HFO correlations; the cell-phrenic coherence range was 0.35-0.94, with a mean HFO frequency of 58 Hz. 3. The cell-phrenic HFO lag (in ms) was measured in the CCH as the lag of the primary peak (peak located nearest to 0 lag). The phase lag was defined as (lag of primary peak in ms)/(HFO period in ms). The phase lags differed markedly between two subsets of cells: 1) RL I cells had HFO depolarization peaks that lagged the phrenic HFO peaks (average cell-phrenic phase lag = -0.18); and 2) the non-RL cells, regardless of location (intVRG or cVRG) and type (I or E), had HFO depolarization peaks leading (preceding) the phrenic HFO peaks (average cell-phrenic phase lag = 0.28). In addition, the cVRG E cells had significantly shorter cell-phrenic phase lags than the intVRG E cells (0.23 vs. 0.31, respectively). 4. These lags can be compared with the (I unit)-phrenic phase lags (average

  15. Load cell

    DOEpatents

    Spletzer, B.L.

    1998-12-15

    A load cell combines the outputs of a plurality of strain gauges to measure components of an applied load. Combination of strain gauge outputs allows measurement of any of six load components without requiring complex machining or mechanical linkages to isolate load components. An example six axis load cell produces six independent analog outputs, each directly proportional to one of the six general load components. 16 figs.

  16. Load cell

    DOEpatents

    Spletzer, Barry L.

    2001-01-01

    A load cell combines the outputs of a plurality of strain gauges to measure components of an applied load. Combination of strain gauge outputs allows measurement of any of six load components without requiring complex machining or mechanical linkages to isolate load components. An example six axis load cell produces six independent analog outputs which can be combined to determine any one of the six general load components.

  17. Load cell

    DOEpatents

    Spletzer, Barry L.

    1998-01-01

    A load cell combines the outputs of a plurality of strain gauges to measure components of an applied load. Combination of strain gauge outputs allows measurement of any of six load components without requiring complex machining or mechanical linkages to isolate load components. An example six axis load cell produces six independent analog outputs, each directly proportional to one of the six general load components.

  18. Inspiratory-phase Short Time Scale Synchrony in the Brainstem Slice is Generated Downstream of the PreBötzinger Complex

    PubMed Central

    Sebe, Joy Y.; Berger, Albert J.

    2008-01-01

    Respiratory neurons are synchronized on a long time scale to generate inspiratory and expiratory-phase activities that are critical for respiration. Long time scale synchrony within the respiratory network occurs on a time scale of more than hundreds of milliseconds to seconds. During inspiration, neurons are synchronized on a short time scale to produce synchronous oscillations, which shape the pattern of inspiratory motor output. This latter form of synchrony within the respiratory network spans a shorter time range of tens of milliseconds. In the neonatal mouse rhythmically active medullary slice preparation, we recorded bilateral inspiratory activity from hypoglossal (XII) rootlets to study where in the slice synchronous oscillations are generated. Based on previous work that proposed the origin of these oscillations, we tested the PreBötzinger Complex (PreBötC) and the XII motor nucleus. Unilateral excitation of the PreBötC, via local application of a perfusate containing high K+, increased mean inspiratory burst frequency bilaterally (296 ± 66%; n=10, p<0.01), but had no effect on the relative power of oscillations. In contrast, unilateral excitation of the XII nucleus increased both mean peak integrated activity bilaterally (ipsilateral: 41 ± 10%, p<0.01;contralateral: 17 ± 7%; p<0.05, n=10) and oscillation power in the ipsilateral (50 ± 17%, n=7, p<0.05), but not in the contralateral rootlet. Crosscorrelation analysis of control inspiratory activity recorded from the left and right XII rootlets produced crosscorrelation histograms with significant peaks centered around a time lag of zero and showed no subsidiary harmonic peaks. Coherence analysis of left and right XII rootlet recordings demonstrated that oscillations are only weakly coherent. Together, the findings from local application experiments and crosscorrelation and coherence analyses indicate that short time scale synchronous oscillations recorded in the slice are likely generated in or

  19. Dynamics and Geometry of Equilibrium Laboratory Channels Well Above Threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salter, G.; Jerolmack, D. J.

    2013-12-01

    The mechanisms governing the equilibrium channel geometry of alluvial rivers which transport sediment at well above the threshold of motion remain poorly understood. In nature, bed-load dominated gravel rivers are organized such that the channel-forming Shields stress is just at the threshold of motion on the banks. Most equilibrium channels created in laboratory experiments conform to this threshold geometry. However, sandy rivers in nature typically exhibit a Shields stress well above critical, and transport grains in suspension; this condition has not been replicated in the laboratory. The equilibrium geometry of these channels allow for sediment transport on the banks, leading to the stable channel paradox: bank stability seems incompatible with sediment transport. There must be a mechanism for delivering sediment back to the banks to counteract erosion. It is unclear whether bed-load and suspended-load rivers represent two unique stable equilibrium configurations, or whether there exists a continuum of possible geometries ranging from threshold to many times above threshold. Here we present laboratory experiments that produce a single-thread channel that transports grains at a Shields stress well above critical, using low-density acrylic sediment driven by a turbulent flow. Water and sediment are recirculated, and experiments are run at several different water discharge values to explore the transition from bed-load to suspension-dominated channels. Channel cross-section topographic scans and overhead images are used to quantify channel geometry and dynamics, and ensure that experiments reach a statistical steady state. Although statistical fluctuations are apparent, definite equilibrium channel geometries arise for each discharge. We relate channel geometry to dominant transport conditions using measured sediment flux and Shields stress values associated with steady-state dynamics, and characterize the nature of the transition from bed load to suspended load

  20. Probabilistic Threshold Criterion

    SciTech Connect

    Gresshoff, M; Hrousis, C A

    2010-03-09

    The Probabilistic Shock Threshold Criterion (PSTC) Project at LLNL develops phenomenological criteria for estimating safety or performance margin on high explosive (HE) initiation in the shock initiation regime, creating tools for safety assessment and design of initiation systems and HE trains in general. Until recently, there has been little foundation for probabilistic assessment of HE initiation scenarios. This work attempts to use probabilistic information that is available from both historic and ongoing tests to develop a basis for such assessment. Current PSTC approaches start with the functional form of the James Initiation Criterion as a backbone, and generalize to include varying areas of initiation and provide a probabilistic response based on test data for 1.8 g/cc (Ultrafine) 1,3,5-triamino-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene (TATB) and LX-17 (92.5% TATB, 7.5% Kel-F 800 binder). Application of the PSTC methodology is presented investigating the safety and performance of a flying plate detonator and the margin of an Ultrafine TATB booster initiating LX-17.

  1. Threshold fatigue and information transfer

    PubMed Central

    Lindner, Benjamin; Longtin, André

    2016-01-01

    Neurons in vivo must process sensory information in the presence of significant noise. It is thus plausible to assume that neural systems have developed mechanisms to reduce this noise. Theoretical studies have shown that threshold fatigue (i.e. cumulative increases in the threshold during repetitive firing) could lead to noise reduction at certain frequencies bands and thus improved signal transmission as well as noise increases and decreased signal transmission at other frequencies: a phenomenon called noise shaping. There is, however, no experimental evidence that threshold fatigue actually occurs and, if so, that it will actually lead to noise shaping. We analyzed action potential threshold variability in intracellular recordings in vivo from pyramidal neurons in weakly electric fish and found experimental evidence for threshold fatigue: an increase in instantaneous firing rate was on average accompanied by an increase in action potential threshold. We show that, with a minor modification, the standard Hodgkin–Huxley model can reproduce this phenomenon. We next compared the performance of models with and without threshold fatigue. Our results show that threshold fatigue will lead to a more regular spike train as well as robustness to intrinsic noise via noise shaping. We finally show that the increased/reduced noise levels due to threshold fatigue correspond to decreased/increased information transmission at different frequencies. PMID:17436067

  2. Learning foraging thresholds for lizards

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberg, L.A.; Hart, W.E.; Wilson, D.B.

    1996-01-12

    This work gives a proof of convergence for a randomized learning algorithm that describes how anoles (lizards found in the Carribean) learn a foraging threshold distance. This model assumes that an anole will pursue a prey if and only if it is within this threshold of the anole`s perch. This learning algorithm was proposed by the biologist Roughgarden and his colleagues. They experimentally confirmed that this algorithm quickly converges to the foraging threshold that is predicted by optimal foraging theory our analysis provides an analytic confirmation that the learning algorithm converses to this optimal foraging threshold with high probability.

  3. Microbial load monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caplin, R. S.; Royer, E. R.

    1978-01-01

    Attempts are made to provide a total design of a Microbial Load Monitor (MLM) system flight engineering model. Activities include assembly and testing of Sample Receiving and Card Loading Devices (SRCLDs), operator related software, and testing of biological samples in the MLM. Progress was made in assembling SRCLDs with minimal leaks and which operate reliably in the Sample Loading System. Seven operator commands are used to control various aspects of the MLM such as calibrating and reading the incubating reading head, setting the clock and reading time, and status of Card. Testing of the instrument, both in hardware and biologically, was performed. Hardware testing concentrated on SRCLDs. Biological testing covered 66 clinical and seeded samples. Tentative thresholds were set and media performance listed.

  4. Life below the threshold.

    PubMed

    Castro, C

    1991-01-01

    This article explains that malnutrition, poor health, and limited educational opportunities plague Philippine children -- especially female children -- from families living below the poverty threshold. Nearly 70% of households in the Philippines do not meet the required daily level of nutritional intake. Because it is often -- and incorrectly -- assumed that women's nutritional requirements are lower than men's, women suffer higher rates of malnutrition and poor health. A 1987 study revealed that 11.7% of all elementary students were underweight and 13.9% had stunted growths. Among elementary-school girls, 17% were malnourished and 40% suffered from anemia (among lactating mothers, more than 1/2 are anemic). A 1988 Program for Decentralized Educational Development study showed that grade VI students learn only about 1/2 of what they are supposed to learn. 30% of the children enrolled in grade school drop out before they reach their senior year. The Department of Education, Culture and Sports estimates that some 2.56 million students dropped out of school in l989. That same year, some 3.7 million children were counted as part of the labor force. In Manila alone, some 60,000 children work the streets, whether doing odd jobs or begging, or turning to crime or prostitution. the article tells the story of a 12 year-old girl named Ging, a 4th grader at a public school and the oldest child in a poor family of 6 children. The undernourished Ging dreams of a good future for her family and sees education as a way out of poverty; unfortunately, her time after school is spend working in the streets or looking after her family. She considers herself luckier than many of the other children working in the streets, since she at least has a family.

  5. The Nature of Psychological Thresholds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rouder, Jeffrey N.; Morey, Richard D.

    2009-01-01

    Following G. T. Fechner (1966), thresholds have been conceptualized as the amount of intensity needed to transition between mental states, such as between a states of unconsciousness and consciousness. With the advent of the theory of signal detection, however, discrete-state theory and the corresponding notion of threshold have been discounted.…

  6. Threshold Concepts and Information Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Townsend, Lori; Brunetti, Korey; Hofer, Amy R.

    2011-01-01

    What do we teach when we teach information literacy in higher education? This paper describes a pedagogical approach to information literacy that helps instructors focus content around transformative learning thresholds. The threshold concept framework holds promise for librarians because it grounds the instructor in the big ideas and underlying…

  7. Threshold Hypothesis: Fact or Artifact?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karwowski, Maciej; Gralewski, Jacek

    2013-01-01

    The threshold hypothesis (TH) assumes the existence of complex relations between creative abilities and intelligence: linear associations below 120 points of IQ and weaker or lack of associations above the threshold. However, diverse results have been obtained over the last six decades--some confirmed the hypothesis and some rejected it. In this…

  8. Fitness Load and Exercise Time in Secondary Physical Education Classes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Xiao Jun; Dunham, Paul, Jr.

    1993-01-01

    Investigates the effect of secondary school physical education on fitness load: the product of the mean heart rate above threshold (144 bpm) and the time duration of heart rate above that threshold. Highly and moderately skilled students achieved fitness load more frequently than their lower skilled colleagues. (GLR)

  9. Modeling the Interactions Between Multiple Crack Closure Mechanisms at Threshold

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, John A.; Riddell, William T.; Piascik, Robert S.

    2003-01-01

    A fatigue crack closure model is developed that includes interactions between the three closure mechanisms most likely to occur at threshold; plasticity, roughness, and oxide. This model, herein referred to as the CROP model (for Closure, Roughness, Oxide, and Plasticity), also includes the effects of out-of plane cracking and multi-axial loading. These features make the CROP closure model uniquely suited for, but not limited to, threshold applications. Rough cracks are idealized here as two-dimensional sawtooths, whose geometry induces mixed-mode crack- tip stresses. Continuum mechanics and crack-tip dislocation concepts are combined to relate crack face displacements to crack-tip loads. Geometric criteria are used to determine closure loads from crack-face displacements. Finite element results, used to verify model predictions, provide critical information about the locations where crack closure occurs.

  10. Bayesian estimation of dose thresholds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groer, P. G.; Carnes, B. A.

    2003-01-01

    An example is described of Bayesian estimation of radiation absorbed dose thresholds (subsequently simply referred to as dose thresholds) using a specific parametric model applied to a data set on mice exposed to 60Co gamma rays and fission neutrons. A Weibull based relative risk model with a dose threshold parameter was used to analyse, as an example, lung cancer mortality and determine the posterior density for the threshold dose after single exposures to 60Co gamma rays or fission neutrons from the JANUS reactor at Argonne National Laboratory. The data consisted of survival, censoring times and cause of death information for male B6CF1 unexposed and exposed mice. The 60Co gamma whole-body doses for the two exposed groups were 0.86 and 1.37 Gy. The neutron whole-body doses were 0.19 and 0.38 Gy. Marginal posterior densities for the dose thresholds for neutron and gamma radiation were calculated with numerical integration and found to have quite different shapes. The density of the threshold for 60Co is unimodal with a mode at about 0.50 Gy. The threshold density for fission neutrons declines monotonically from a maximum value at zero with increasing doses. The posterior densities for all other parameters were similar for the two radiation types.

  11. Effects of elastic loading and exercise on pulmonary gas exchange in dogs.

    PubMed

    Chonan, T; Hida, W; Kikuchi, Y; Shindoh, C; Taguchi, O; Miki, H; Takishima, T

    1991-06-01

    We assessed the effects of negative intrathoracic pressure induced by inspiratory elastic loading on pulmonary, gas exchange with and without electrically induced hindlimb exercise in 8 normal, anesthetized dogs. Two elastic loads (EL) were used; one of 81 and one of 140 cmH2O/liter. These are equivalent to doubling and tripling the normal elastance of the dog's respiratory system, respectively. Elastic loading decreased ventilation and caused hypoxemia and hypercapnia, but it did not affect systemic arterial pressure or heart rate. During exercise, increase in ventilation was limited, whereas increase in cardiac output was not affected by elastic loading. Alveolar-arterial O2 tension difference (A-aDO2) was not changed significantly by exercise alone. However, elastic loading accompanied by exercise increased A-aDO2. Although comparable end-inspiratory pleural pressure was achieved with large EL (-29 +/- 2 cmH2O, mean +/- SE) and small EL with exercise (-30 +/- 2 cmH2O), the latter increased A-aDO2 whereas the former did not. Large negative intrapleural pressure combined with increased cardiac output may have caused transient interstitial edema.

  12. Excess VO2 during ramp exercise is positively correlated to intercostal muscles deoxyhemoglobin levels above the gas exchange threshold in young trained cyclists.

    PubMed

    Oueslati, Ferid; Girard, Olivier; Tabka, Zouhair; Ahmaidi, Said

    2016-07-01

    We assessed respiratory muscles oxygenation responses during a ramp exercise to exhaustion and further explored their relationship with the non-linear increase of VO2 (VO2 excess) observed above the gas-exchange threshold. Ten male cyclists completed a ramp exercise to exhaustion on an electromagnetically braked cycle-ergometer with a rate of increment of 30Wmin(-1) with continuous monitoring of expired gases (breath-by-breath) and oxygenation status of intercostal muscles. Maximal inspiratory and expiratory pressure measurements were taken at rest and at exhaustion. The VO2 excess represents the difference between VO2max observed and VO2max expected using linear equation between the VO2 and the intensity before gas-exchange threshold. The deoxyhemoglobin remained unchanged until 60% of maximal aerobic power (MAP) and thereafter increased significantly by 37±18% and 40±22% at 80% and 100% of MAP, respectively. Additionally, the amplitude of deoxyhemoglobin increase between 60 and 100% of MAP positively correlated with the VO2 excess (r=0.69, p<0.05). Compared to exercise start, the oxygen tissue saturation index decreased from 80% of MAP (-4.8±3.2%, p<0.05) onwards. At exhaustion, maximal inspiratory and expiratory pressures declined by 7.8±16% and 12.6±10% (both p<0.05), respectively. In summary, our results suggest a significant contribution of respiratory muscles to the VO2 excess phenomenon.

  13. The concept of target and critical loads

    SciTech Connect

    Grigal, D.F.

    1991-09-01

    Target and critical loads were initially developed for assessment and control of acidic deposition, but are being considered for other air pollutants such as ozone and air-borne toxic compounds. These loads are based on thresholds, with damage assumed to occur above some defined level of deposition. Many of the historically proposed targets for acidic deposition were based on arbitrary interpretations of data. The concept of critical loads has recently separated from that of target loads. A critical load is the amount of pollutant deposition, determined by technical analysis, above which there is a specific deleterious ecological effect. A target load is the deposition, determined by political agreement, above which unacceptable ecological damage occurs; it may be greater than the critical load because of political or economic considerations, or less to conservatively account for uncertainty in the estimation of the critical load. Recent definitions of critical loads include recognition that each kind of ecosystem and effect may require a different load. Geographic regions contain a mosaic of aquatic and terrestrial resources. If precise knowledge leads to different critical loads for each system, then how is the regional target load established For better or worse, target and critical loads are likely to be used to regulate air pollutants. The philosophy of their establishment as thresholds, their quantitative validity, and their application in regulation all require careful examination. 36 refs., 3 figs.

  14. Parton distributions with threshold resummation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonvini, Marco; Marzani, Simone; Rojo, Juan; Rottoli, Luca; Ubiali, Maria; Ball, Richard D.; Bertone, Valerio; Carrazza, Stefano; Hartland, Nathan P.

    2015-09-01

    We construct a set of parton distribution functions (PDFs) in which fixed-order NLO and NNLO calculations are supplemented with soft-gluon (threshold) resummation up to NLL and NNLL accuracy respectively, suitable for use in conjunction with any QCD calculation in which threshold resummation is included at the level of partonic cross sections. These resummed PDF sets, based on the NNPDF3.0 analysis, are extracted from deep-inelastic scattering, Drell-Yan, and top quark pair production data, for which resummed calculations can be consistently used. We find that, close to threshold, the inclusion of resummed PDFs can partially compensate the enhancement in resummed matrix elements, leading to resummed hadronic cross-sections closer to the fixed-order calculations. On the other hand, far from threshold, resummed PDFs reduce to their fixed-order counterparts. Our results demonstrate the need for a consistent use of resummed PDFs in resummed calculations.

  15. Inspiratory and expiratory respiratory muscle training as an adjunct to concurrent strength and endurance training provides no additional 2000 m performance benefits to rowers.

    PubMed

    Bell, Gordon J; Game, Alex; Jones, Richard; Webster, Travis; Forbes, Scott C; Syrotuik, Dan

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine respiratory muscle training (RMT) combined with 9 weeks of resistance and endurance training on rowing performance and cardiopulmonary responses. Twenty-seven rowers (mean ± SD: age = 27 ± 9 years; height = 176.9 ± 10.8 cm; and body mass = 76.1 ± 12.6 kg) were randomly assigned to an inspiratory only (n = 13) or expiratory only (n = 14) training group. Both RMT programs were 3 sets of 10 reps, 6 d/wk in addition to an identical 3 d/wk resistance and 3 d/wk endurance training program. Both groups showed similar improvements in 2000 m rowing performance, cardiorespiratory fitness, strength, and maximum inspiratory (PImax) and expiratory (PEmax) pressures (p < .05). It was concluded that there were no additional benefits of 9 weeks of inspiratory or expiratory RMT on simulated 2000 m rowing performance or cardiopulmonary responses when combined with resistance and endurance training in rowers.

  16. Threshold models in radiation carcinogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Hoel, D.G.; Li, P.

    1998-09-01

    Cancer incidence and mortality data from the atomic bomb survivors cohort has been analyzed to allow for the possibility of a threshold dose response. The same dose-response models as used in the original papers were fit to the data. The estimated cancer incidence from the fitted models over-predicted the observed cancer incidence in the lowest exposure group. This is consistent with a threshold or nonlinear dose-response at low-doses. Thresholds were added to the dose-response models and the range of possible thresholds is shown for both solid tumor cancers as well as the different leukemia types. This analysis suggests that the A-bomb cancer incidence data agree more with a threshold or nonlinear dose-response model than a purely linear model although the linear model is statistically equivalent. This observation is not found with the mortality data. For both the incidence data and the mortality data the addition of a threshold term significantly improves the fit to the linear or linear-quadratic dose response for both total leukemias and also for the leukemia subtypes of ALL, AML, and CML.

  17. Face verification with balanced thresholds.

    PubMed

    Yan, Shuicheng; Xu, Dong; Tang, Xiaoou

    2007-01-01

    The process of face verification is guided by a pre-learned global threshold, which, however, is often inconsistent with class-specific optimal thresholds. It is, hence, beneficial to pursue a balance of the class-specific thresholds in the model-learning stage. In this paper, we present a new dimensionality reduction algorithm tailored to the verification task that ensures threshold balance. This is achieved by the following aspects. First, feasibility is guaranteed by employing an affine transformation matrix, instead of the conventional projection matrix, for dimensionality reduction, and, hence, we call the proposed algorithm threshold balanced transformation (TBT). Then, the affine transformation matrix, constrained as the product of an orthogonal matrix and a diagonal matrix, is optimized to improve the threshold balance and classification capability in an iterative manner. Unlike most algorithms for face verification which are directly transplanted from face identification literature, TBT is specifically designed for face verification and clarifies the intrinsic distinction between these two tasks. Experiments on three benchmark face databases demonstrate that TBT significantly outperforms the state-of-the-art subspace techniques for face verification.

  18. Toward a new methodology for measuring the threshold Shields number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rousseau, Gauthier; Dhont, Blaise; Ancey, Christophe

    2016-04-01

    A number of bedload transport equations involve the threshold Shields number (corresponding to the threshold of incipient motion for particles resting on the streambed). Different methods have been developed for determining this threshold Shields number; they usually assume that the initial streambed is plane prior to sediment transport. Yet, there are many instances in real-world scenarios, in which the initial streambed is not free of bed forms. We are interested in developing a new methodology for determining the threshold of incipient motion in gravel-bed streams in which smooth bed forms (e.g., anti-dunes) develop. Experiments were conducted in a 10-cm wide, 2.5-m long flume, whose initial inclination was 3%. Flows were supercritical and fully turbulent. The flume was supplied with water and sediment at fixed rates. As bed forms developed and migrated, and sediment transport rates exhibited wide fluctuations, measurements had to be taken over long times (typically 10 hr). Using a high-speed camera, we recorded the instantaneous bed load transport rate at the outlet of the flume by taking top-view images. In parallel, we measured the evolution of the bed slope, water depth, and shear stress by filming through a lateral window of the flume. These measurements allowed for the estimation of the space and time-averaged slope, from which we deduced the space and time-averaged Shields number under incipient bed load transport conditions. In our experiments, the threshold Shields number was strongly dependent on streambed morphology. Experiments are under way to determine whether taking the space and time average of incipient motion experiments leads to a more robust definition of the threshold Shields number. If so, this new methodology will perform better than existing approaches at measuring the threshold Shields number.

  19. Guidelines for Auditory Threshold Measurement for Significant Threshold Shift.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Kathleen; Hammill, Tanisha; Hoffer, Michael; Kil, Jonathan; Le Prell, Colleen

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide guidelines for determining a Significant Noise-Induced Threshold Shift in clinical trials involving human populations. The article reviews recommendations for the standards to be referenced for human subjects, equipment, test environment, and personnel. Additional guidelines for military populations are provided. Guidelines for the calibration of audiometers, sound booth noise levels, and immitance equipment are provided. In addition the guidance provides specific suggestions for the subjects history before study onset, and otoscopy.Test frequencies for threshold determination and methods of threshold determination are reviewed for both air conduction and bone conduction for both baseline testing and later determination of either a temporary (TTS) or permanent threshold shift (PTS). Once a Significant Noise-Induced Threshold Shift has been determined, subjects should be retested, conductive component should be ruled out or addressed, and the subject should be counseled or referred for additional medical evaluation. Guidance for reporting procedures and the computerized study database are described. Finally, experimental designs suggested for noise-induced otoprotection clinical trials are described.

  20. Guidelines for Auditory Threshold Measurement for Significant Threshold Shift.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Kathleen; Hammill, Tanisha; Hoffer, Michael; Kil, Jonathan; Le Prell, Colleen

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide guidelines for determining a Significant Noise-Induced Threshold Shift in clinical trials involving human populations. The article reviews recommendations for the standards to be referenced for human subjects, equipment, test environment, and personnel. Additional guidelines for military populations are provided. Guidelines for the calibration of audiometers, sound booth noise levels, and immitance equipment are provided. In addition the guidance provides specific suggestions for the subjects history before study onset, and otoscopy.Test frequencies for threshold determination and methods of threshold determination are reviewed for both air conduction and bone conduction for both baseline testing and later determination of either a temporary (TTS) or permanent threshold shift (PTS). Once a Significant Noise-Induced Threshold Shift has been determined, subjects should be retested, conductive component should be ruled out or addressed, and the subject should be counseled or referred for additional medical evaluation. Guidance for reporting procedures and the computerized study database are described. Finally, experimental designs suggested for noise-induced otoprotection clinical trials are described. PMID:27518134

  1. Taste Detection Thresholds of Resveratrol.

    PubMed

    Koga, Clarissa C; Becraft, Alexandra R; Lee, Youngsoo; Lee, Soo-Yeun

    2015-09-01

    Resveratrol is a polyphenol that is associated with numerous health benefits related to heart disease, cancer, diabetes, and neurological function. The addition of this compound to food products would help to deliver these health benefits to the consumer. However, bitterness associated with resveratrol may impart negative sensory qualities on the food products into which resveratrol is added; thus, decreasing consumer acceptability. This concern may be resolved by encapsulating resveratrol through spray drying, an innovative processing technique. The objectives of this research were to (1) compare taste detection thresholds of unencapsulated resveratrol and encapsulated resveratrol and (2) determine if the inclusion of anhydrous milk fat in the formulation of the encapsulation wall material affects the taste detection threshold of resveratrol within the microcapsules. Resveratrol microcapsules were produced by encapsulating resveratrol in a protein matrix through spray drying. R-index measure by the rating method was used to determine the average taste detection threshold and the pooled group taste detection threshold. The average and pooled group taste detection thresholds of unencapsulated resveratrol, sodium-caseinate-based resveratrol microcapsule without fat (SC), and sodium-caseinate-based resveratrol microcapsule with fat (SCAMF) were 90 and 47 mg resveratrol/L (unencapsulated), 313 and 103 mg resveratrol/L (SC), 334 and 108 mg resveratrol/L (SCAMF), respectively. The findings demonstrate that the encapsulation of resveratrol decreased the detection of the compound and provided a means to incorporate resveratrol into food products without imparting negative sensory properties.

  2. Physiological and performance consequences of heavy thoracic load carriage in females.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Devin B; Stickland, Michael K; Petersen, Stewart R

    2016-07-01

    The purposes of this experiment were to study physiological responses to graded exercise to exhaustion (Part I) and ventilatory responses during 45 min of exercise (Part II) with and without a 25-kg backpack. In Part I, on separate days, 24 females completed randomly ordered modified Balke treadmill tests. Analysis revealed significant decreases in absolute peak oxygen uptake (3.5%), peak power output (20%), and test duration (40%) under load. There was a significant but modest negative relationship between body mass and the change in test duration between conditions (r = -0.44). While physiological responses to peak exercise were similar, exercise performance was negatively impacted under load. On separate days in Part II, 14 females completed randomly ordered, loaded and unloaded exercise challenges of submaximal treadmill walking at matched oxygen demands. Under load, breathing frequency, dead space, and minute ventilation were increased by 19.9%, 29.8%, and 11.6% (P < 0.05), respectively, while tidal volume and end-inspiratory lung volume decreased by 13.6% and 6.0% (P < 0.05), respectively. After loaded exercise, maximal inspiratory pressure was decreased by 11.5% (P < 0.05) with no changes in maximal expiratory pressure in either condition. Despite matched oxygen uptake between loaded and unloaded exercise challenges, perceived exertion and breathing discomfort were higher (P < 0.05) under load. With heavy load carriage, the altered breathing pattern led to increased dead space and minute ventilation, which likely contributed to higher perceptions of exercise stress and breathing discomfort. These results are similar to previous research in males and underscore the impact of heavy load carriage during exercise. PMID:27337671

  3. Physiological and performance consequences of heavy thoracic load carriage in females.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Devin B; Stickland, Michael K; Petersen, Stewart R

    2016-07-01

    The purposes of this experiment were to study physiological responses to graded exercise to exhaustion (Part I) and ventilatory responses during 45 min of exercise (Part II) with and without a 25-kg backpack. In Part I, on separate days, 24 females completed randomly ordered modified Balke treadmill tests. Analysis revealed significant decreases in absolute peak oxygen uptake (3.5%), peak power output (20%), and test duration (40%) under load. There was a significant but modest negative relationship between body mass and the change in test duration between conditions (r = -0.44). While physiological responses to peak exercise were similar, exercise performance was negatively impacted under load. On separate days in Part II, 14 females completed randomly ordered, loaded and unloaded exercise challenges of submaximal treadmill walking at matched oxygen demands. Under load, breathing frequency, dead space, and minute ventilation were increased by 19.9%, 29.8%, and 11.6% (P < 0.05), respectively, while tidal volume and end-inspiratory lung volume decreased by 13.6% and 6.0% (P < 0.05), respectively. After loaded exercise, maximal inspiratory pressure was decreased by 11.5% (P < 0.05) with no changes in maximal expiratory pressure in either condition. Despite matched oxygen uptake between loaded and unloaded exercise challenges, perceived exertion and breathing discomfort were higher (P < 0.05) under load. With heavy load carriage, the altered breathing pattern led to increased dead space and minute ventilation, which likely contributed to higher perceptions of exercise stress and breathing discomfort. These results are similar to previous research in males and underscore the impact of heavy load carriage during exercise.

  4. Fatigue Crack Growth Threshold Testing of Metallic Rotorcraft Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, John A.; James, Mark A.; Johnson, William M.; Le, Dy D.

    2008-01-01

    Results are presented for a program to determine the near-threshold fatigue crack growth behavior appropriate for metallic rotorcraft alloys. Four alloys, all commonly used in the manufacture of rotorcraft, were selected for study: Aluminum alloy 7050, 4340 steel, AZ91E Magnesium, and Titanium alloy Ti-6Al-4V (beta-STOA). The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) sponsored this research to advance efforts to incorporate damage tolerance design and analysis as requirements for rotorcraft certification. Rotorcraft components are subjected to high cycle fatigue and are typically subjected to higher stresses and more stress cycles per flight hour than fixed-wing aircraft components. Fatigue lives of rotorcraft components are generally spent initiating small fatigue cracks that propagate slowly under near-threshold cracktip loading conditions. For these components, the fatigue life is very sensitive to the near-threshold characteristics of the material.

  5. On computational Gestalt detection thresholds.

    PubMed

    Grompone von Gioi, Rafael; Jakubowicz, Jérémie

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to show some recent developments of computational Gestalt theory, as pioneered by Desolneux, Moisan and Morel. The new results allow to predict much more accurately the detection thresholds. This step is unavoidable if one wants to analyze visual detection thresholds in the light of computational Gestalt theory. The paper first recalls the main elements of computational Gestalt theory. It points out a precision issue in this theory, essentially due to the use of discrete probability distributions. It then proposes to overcome this issue by using continuous probability distributions and illustrates it on the meaningful alignment detector of Desolneux et al.

  6. Thresholds in chemical respiratory sensitisation.

    PubMed

    Cochrane, Stella A; Arts, Josje H E; Ehnes, Colin; Hindle, Stuart; Hollnagel, Heli M; Poole, Alan; Suto, Hidenori; Kimber, Ian

    2015-07-01

    There is a continuing interest in determining whether it is possible to identify thresholds for chemical allergy. Here allergic sensitisation of the respiratory tract by chemicals is considered in this context. This is an important occupational health problem, being associated with rhinitis and asthma, and in addition provides toxicologists and risk assessors with a number of challenges. In common with all forms of allergic disease chemical respiratory allergy develops in two phases. In the first (induction) phase exposure to a chemical allergen (by an appropriate route of exposure) causes immunological priming and sensitisation of the respiratory tract. The second (elicitation) phase is triggered if a sensitised subject is exposed subsequently to the same chemical allergen via inhalation. A secondary immune response will be provoked in the respiratory tract resulting in inflammation and the signs and symptoms of a respiratory hypersensitivity reaction. In this article attention has focused on the identification of threshold values during the acquisition of sensitisation. Current mechanistic understanding of allergy is such that it can be assumed that the development of sensitisation (and also the elicitation of an allergic reaction) is a threshold phenomenon; there will be levels of exposure below which sensitisation will not be acquired. That is, all immune responses, including allergic sensitisation, have threshold requirement for the availability of antigen/allergen, below which a response will fail to develop. The issue addressed here is whether there are methods available or clinical/epidemiological data that permit the identification of such thresholds. This document reviews briefly relevant human studies of occupational asthma, and experimental models that have been developed (or are being developed) for the identification and characterisation of chemical respiratory allergens. The main conclusion drawn is that although there is evidence that the

  7. Influence of oxidative stress, diaphragm fatigue, and inspiratory muscle training on the plasma cytokine response to maximum sustainable voluntary ventilation.

    PubMed

    Mills, Dean E; Johnson, Michael A; McPhilimey, Martin J; Williams, Neil C; Gonzalez, Javier T; Barnett, Yvonne A; Sharpe, Graham R

    2014-04-15

    The influence of oxidative stress, diaphragm fatigue, and inspiratory muscle training (IMT) on the cytokine response to maximum sustainable voluntary ventilation (MSVV) is unknown. Twelve healthy males were divided equally into an IMT or placebo (PLA) group, and before and after a 6-wk intervention they undertook, on separate days, 1 h of (1) passive rest and (2) MSVV, whereby participants undertook volitional hyperpnea at rest that mimicked the breathing and respiratory muscle recruitment patterns commensurate with heavy cycling exercise. Plasma cytokines remained unchanged during passive rest. There was a main effect of time (P < 0.01) for plasma interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) concentrations and a strong trend (P = 0.067) for plasma interleukin-1 receptor antagonist concentration during MSVV. Plasma IL-6 concentration was reduced after IMT by 27 ± 18% (main effect of intervention, P = 0.029), whereas there was no change after PLA (P = 0.753). There was no increase in a systemic marker of oxidative stress [DNA damage in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC)], and diaphragm fatigue was not related to the increases in plasma IL-1β and IL-6 concentrations. A dose-response relationship was observed between respiratory muscle work and minute ventilation and increases in plasma IL-6 concentration. In conclusion, increases in plasma IL-1β and IL-6 concentrations during MSVV were not due to diaphragm fatigue or DNA damage in PBMC. Increases in plasma IL-6 concentration during MSVV are attenuated following IMT, and the plasma IL-6 response is dependent upon the level of respiratory muscle work and minute ventilation.

  8. Evaluation of an Impedance Threshold Device as a VIIP Countermeasure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ebert, D.; Macias, B.; Garcia, K.; Stenger, M.; Hargens, A.; Johnston, S.

    2016-01-01

    Visual Impairment /Intracranial Pressure (VIIP) is a top human spaceflight risk for which NASA does not currently have a proven mitigation strategy. Thigh cuffs (Braslets) and lower body negative pressure (LBNP; Chibis) devices have been or are currently being evaluated as a means to reduce VIIP signs and symptoms, but these methods alone may not provide sufficient relief of cephalic venous congestion and VIIP symptoms. Additionally, current LBNP devices are too large and cumbersome for their systematic use as a countermeasure. Therefore, a novel approach is needed that is easy to implement and provides specific relief of symptoms. This investigation will evaluate an impedance threshold device (ITD) as a VIIP countermeasure. The ITD works by providing up to 7 cm H2O (approximately 5 mmHg) resistance to inspiratory air flow, effectively turning the thorax into a vacuum pump upon each inhalation which lowers the intrathoracic pressure (ITP) and facilitates venous return to the heart. The ITD is FDA-approved and was developed to augment venous return to the central circulation and increase cardiac output during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and in patients with hypotension. While the effect of ITD on CPR survival outcomes is controversial, the ITD's ability to lower ITP with a concomitant decrease in intracranial pressure (ICP) is well documented. A similar concept that creates negative ITP during exhalation (intrathoracic pressure regulator; ITPR) decreased ICP in 16 of 20 patients with elevated ICP in a hospital pilot study. ITP and central venous pressure (CVP) have been shown to decrease in microgravity however ITP drops more than CVP, indicating an increased transmural CVP. This could explain the paradoxical distention of jugular veins (JV) in microgravity despite lower absolute CVP and also suggests that JV transmural pressure is not dramatically elevated. Use of an ITD may lower JV pressure enough to remove or relieve cephalic venous congestion. During

  9. Evaluation of an Impedance Threshold Device as a VIIP Countermeasure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ebert, Douglas; Macias, Brandon; Sargsyan, Ashot; Garcia, Kathleen; Stenger, Michael; Hargens, Alan; Johnston, Smith; Kemp, David; Danielson, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Visual Impairment/Intracranial Pressure (VIIP) is a top human spaceflight risk for which NASA does not currently have a proven mitigation strategy. Thigh cuffs (Braslets) and lower body negative pressure (LBNP; Chibis) devices have been or are currently being evaluated as a means to reduce VIIP signs and symptoms, but these methods alone may not provide sufficient relief of cephalic venous congestion and VIIP symptoms. Additionally, current LBNP devices are too large and cumbersome for their systematic use as a countermeasure. Therefore, a novel approach is needed that is easy to implement and provides specific relief of symptoms. This investigation will evaluate an impedance threshold device (ITD) as a VIIP countermeasure. The ITD works by providing up to 7 cm H2O (approximately 5 mmHg) resistance to inspiratory air flow, effectively turning the thorax into a vacuum pump upon each inhalation which lowers the intrathoracic pressure (ITP) and facilitates venous return to the heart. The ITD is FDA-approved and was developed to augment venous return to the central circulation and increase cardiac output during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and in patients with hypotension. While the effect of ITD on CPR survival outcomes is controversial, the ITD's ability to lower ITP with a concomitant decrease in intracranial pressure (ICP) is well documented. A similar concept that creates negative ITP during exhalation (intrathoracic pressure regulator; ITPR) decreased ICP in 16 of 20 patients with elevated ICP in a hospital pilot study. ITP and central venous pressure (CVP) have been shown to decrease in microgravity however ITP drops more than CVP, indicating an increased transmural CVP. This could explain the paradoxical distention of jugular veins (JV) in microgravity despite lower absolute CVP and also suggests that JV transmural pressure is not dramatically elevated. Use of an ITD may lower JV pressure enough to remove or relieve cephalic venous congestion. During

  10. New states above charm threshold

    SciTech Connect

    Eichten, Estia J.; Lane, Kenneth; Quigg, Chris; /Fermilab

    2005-11-01

    We revise and extend expectations for the properties of charmonium states that lie above charm threshold, in light of new experimental information. We refine the Cornell coupled-channel model for the coupling of c{bar c} levels to two-meson states, defining resonance masses and widths by pole positions in the complex energy plane, and suggest new targets for experiment.

  11. Threshold Concepts and Pedagogic Representation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, Jan H. F.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to present a brief exposure to the development of the threshold concepts framework (TCF), the intention being to illuminate for interested readers a broader landscape of research activity than that perhaps conveyed by the individual contributions to this special edition. Design/Methodology/Approach: There is…

  12. Crossing Thresholds in Academic Reading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abbott, Rob

    2013-01-01

    This paper looks at the conceptual thresholds in relation to academic reading which might be crossed by undergraduate English Literature students. It is part of a wider study following 16 students through three years of undergraduate study. It uses theoretical ideas from Bakhtin and Foucault to analyse interviews with English lecturers. It…

  13. Threshold enhancement of diphoton resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bharucha, Aoife; Djouadi, Abdelhak; Goudelis, Andreas

    2016-10-01

    We revisit a mechanism to enhance the decay width of (pseudo-)scalar resonances to photon pairs when the process is mediated by loops of charged fermions produced near threshold. Motivated by the recent LHC data, indicating the presence of an excess in the diphoton spectrum at approximately 750 GeV, we illustrate this threshold enhancement mechanism in the case of a 750 GeV pseudoscalar boson A with a two-photon decay mediated by a charged and uncolored fermion having a mass at the 1/2MA threshold and a small decay width, < 1 MeV. The implications of such a threshold enhancement are discussed in two explicit scenarios: i) the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model in which the A state is produced via the top quark mediated gluon fusion process and decays into photons predominantly through loops of charginos with masses close to 1/2MA and ii) a two Higgs doublet model in which A is again produced by gluon fusion but decays into photons through loops of vector-like charged heavy leptons. In both these scenarios, while the mass of the charged fermion has to be adjusted to be extremely close to half of the A resonance mass, the small total widths are naturally obtained if only suppressed three-body decay channels occur. Finally, the implications of some of these scenarios for dark matter are discussed.

  14. Comparison of the respiratory responses to external resistive loading and bronchoconstriction.

    PubMed Central

    Kelsen, S G; Prestel, T F; Cherniack, N S; Chester, E H; Deal, E C

    1981-01-01

    The effects of resistive loads applied at the mouth were compared to the effects of bronchospasm on ventilation, respiratory muscle force (occlusion pressure), and respiratory sensations in 6 normal and 11 asthmatic subjects breathing 100% O2. External resistive loads ranging from 0.65 to 13.33 cm H2O/liter per s were applied during both inspiration and expiration. Bronchospasm was induced by inhalation of aerosolized methacholine. Bronchospasm increased ventilation, inspiratory airflow, respiratory rate, and lowered PACO2. External resistive loading, on the other hand, reduced respiratory rate and inspiratory flow, but left ventilation and PACO2 unaltered. FRC increased to a greater extent with bronchospasm than external flow resistive loads. With both bronchospasm and external loading, occlusion pressure increased in proportion to the rise in resistance to airflow. However, the change in occlusion pressure produced by a given change in resistance and the absolute level of occlusion pressure at comparable levels of airway resistance were greater during bronchospasm than during external loading. These differences in occlusion pressure responses to the two forms of obstruction were not explained by differences in chemical drive or respiratory muscle mechanical advantage. Although the subjects' perception of the effort involved in breathing was heightened during both forms of obstruction to airflow, at any given level of resistance the sense of effort was greater with bronchospasm than external loading. Inputs from mechanoreceptors in the lungs (e.g., irritant receptors) and/or greater stimulation of chest wall mechanoreceptors as a result of increases in lung elastance may explain the differing responses elicited by the two forms of resistive loading. PMID:6787083

  15. Tuning the threshold voltage in electrolyte-gated organic field-effect transistors

    PubMed Central

    Kergoat, Loïg; Herlogsson, Lars; Piro, Benoit; Pham, Minh Chau; Horowitz, Gilles; Crispin, Xavier; Berggren, Magnus

    2012-01-01

    Low-voltage organic field-effect transistors (OFETs) promise for low power consumption logic circuits. To enhance the efficiency of the logic circuits, the control of the threshold voltage of the transistors are based on is crucial. We report the systematic control of the threshold voltage of electrolyte-gated OFETs by using various gate metals. The influence of the work function of the metal is investigated in metal-electrolyte-organic semiconductor diodes and electrolyte-gated OFETs. A good correlation is found between the flat-band potential and the threshold voltage. The possibility to tune the threshold voltage over half the potential range applied and to obtain depletion-like (positive threshold voltage) and enhancement (negative threshold voltage) transistors is of great interest when integrating these transistors in logic circuits. The combination of a depletion-like and enhancement transistor leads to a clear improvement of the noise margins in depleted-load unipolar inverters. PMID:22586088

  16. Crane-Load Contact Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Youngquist, Robert; Mata, Carlos; Cox, Robert

    2005-01-01

    impedance between the pins and the load. The instrument includes a signal generator and voltage-measuring circuitry, and is connected to the load and the base as shown in Figure 2. The output of the signal generator (typically having amplitude of the order of a volt) is applied to the load via a 50-resistor, and the voltage between the load and the pins is measured. When the load and the pins are not in contact, the impedance between them is relatively high, causing the measured voltage to exceed a threshold value. When the load and the pins are in contact, the impedance between them falls to a much lower value, causing the voltage to fall below the threshold value. The voltage-measuring circuitry turns on a red light-emitting diode (LED) to indicate the lower-voltage/ contact condition. Whenever the contact has been broken and the non-contact/higher-voltage condition has lasted for more than 2 ms, the voltage-measuring circuitry indicates this condition by blinking a green LED.

  17. Purinergic modulation of preBötzinger complex inspiratory rhythm in rodents: the interaction between ATP and adenosine.

    PubMed

    Zwicker, J D; Rajani, V; Hahn, L B; Funk, G D

    2011-09-15

    ATP signalling in the CNS is mediated by a three-part system comprising the actions of ATP (and ADP) at P2 receptors (P2Rs), adenosine (ADO) at P1 receptors (P1Rs), and ectonucleotidases that degrade ATP into ADO. ATP excites preBötzinger complex (preBötC) inspiratory rhythm-generating networks where its release attenuates the hypoxic depression of breathing. Its metabolite, ADO, inhibits breathing through unknown mechanisms that may involve the preBötC. Our objective is to understand the dynamics of this signalling system and its influence on preBötC networks. We show that the preBötC of mouse and rat is sensitive to P2Y(1) purinoceptor (P2Y(1)R) activation, responding with a >2-fold increase in frequency. Remarkably, the mouse preBötC is insensitive to ATP. Only after block of A(1) ADORs is the ATP-evoked, P2Y(1)R-mediated frequency increase observed. This demonstrates that ATP is rapidly degraded to ADO, which activates inhibitory A(1)Rs, counteracting the P2Y(1)R-mediated excitation. ADO sensitivity of mouse preBötC was confirmed by a frequency decrease that was absent in rat. Differential ectonucleotidase activities are likely to contribute to the negligible ATP sensitivity of mouse preBötC. Real-time PCR analysis of ectonucleotidase isoforms in preBötC punches revealed TNAP (degrades ATP to ADO) or ENTPDase2 (favours production of excitatory ADP) as the primary constituent in mouse and rat, respectively. These data further establish the sensitivity of this vital network to P2Y(1)R-mediated excitation, emphasizing that individual components of the three-part signalling system dramatically alter network responses to ATP. Data also suggest therapeutic potential may derive from methods that alter the ATP-ADO balance to favour the excitatory actions of ATP.

  18. Effect of rise in simulated inspiratory flow rate and carrier particle size on powder emptying from dry powder inhalers.

    PubMed

    Chavan, V; Dalby, R

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of carrier particle size and simulated inspiratory flow increase rate on emptying from dry powder inhalers (DPIs). Several flow rate ramps were created using a computer-generated voltage signal linked to an electronic proportioning valve with a fast response time. Different linear ramps were programmed to reach 30, 60, 90, and 120 L/minute over 1, 2, or 3 seconds. At the lower flow rates, 100-ms and 500-ms ramps were also investigated. Three DPIs, Spinhaler, Rotahaler, and Turbuhaler, were used to test the effect of flow rate ramp on powder emptying. To test the effect of carrier particle size, anhydrous lactose was sieved into 3 particle sizes, and 20 mg of each was introduced into #2 and #3 hard gelatin capsules for Spinhaler and Rotahaler, respectively. Emptying tests were also carried out using the on/off solenoid valve described in the United States Pharmacopeia (USP) (resulting in no ramp generation). Powder emptying increased from 9% to 46% for Rotahaler and 69% to 86% for Spinhaler from the shallowest (3 seconds to reach peak flow) to the 100-ms ramp for the 53- to 75 microm lactose size range at 30 L/minute. Similar trends were observed for larger particle size fractions at the same flow rate. However, at higher airflow rates (60, 90, and 120 L/minute), there was no significant increase in percentage of emptying within the ramps for a particular particle size range. Trends observed were similar for placebo-filled Turbuhaler and commercially available Rotacaps used with Rotahaler, with the steepest ramp demonstrating more complete emptying. Percentage of powder emptying determined by the USP solenoid valve overestimated the emitted dose compared with the ramp method at 30 L/minute for all 3 devices. Results indicate that there is a significant difference in powder emptying at 30 L/minute from the shallowest to the steepest ramp within a particular size range. Within a particular particle size range, the

  19. A threshold for dissipative fission

    SciTech Connect

    Thoennessen, M.; Bertsch, G.F.

    1993-09-21

    The empirical domain of validity of statistical theory is examined as applied to fission data on pre-fission data on pre-fission neutron, charged particle, and {gamma}-ray multiplicities. Systematics are found of the threshold excitation energy for the appearance of nonstatistical fission. From the data on systems with not too high fissility, the relevant phenomenological parameter is the ratio of the threshold temperature T{sub thresh} to the (temperature-dependent) fission barrier height E{sub Bar}(T). The statistical model reproduces the data for T{sub thresh}/E{sub Bar}(T) < 0.26 {plus_minus} 0.05, but underpredicts the multiplicities at higher T{sub thresh}/E{sub Bar}(T) independent of mass and fissility of the systems.

  20. Roots at the Percolation Threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroener, E.; Ahmed, M. A.; Kaestner, A.; Vontobel, P.; Zarebanadkouki, M.; Carminati, A.

    2014-12-01

    Much of the carbon assimilated by plants during photosynthesis is lost to the soil via rhizodepositions. One component of rhizopdeposition is mucilage, a hydrogel that dramatically alters the soil physical properties. Mucilage was assumed to explain unexpectedly low rhizosphere rewetting rates during irrigation (Carminati et al. 2010) and temporarily water repellency in the rhizosphere after severe drying (Moradi et al. 2012).Here, we present an experimental and theoretical study for the rewetting behaviour of a soil mixed with mucilage, which was used as an analogue of the rhizosphere. Our samples were made of two layers of untreated soils separated by a thin layer (ca. 1 mm) of soil treated with mucilage. We prepared soil columns of varying particle size, mucilage concentration and height of the middle layer above the water table. The dry soil columns were re-wetted by capillary rise from the bottom.The rewetting of the middle layer showed a distinct dual behavior. For mucilage concentrations lower than a certain threshold, water could cross the thin layer almost immediately after rewetting of bulk soil. At slightly higher mucilage concentrations, the thin layer was almost impermeable. The mucilage concentration at the threshold strongly depended on particle size: the smaller the particle size the larger the soil specific surface and the more mucilage was needed to cover the entire particle surface and to induce water repellency.We applied a classic pore network model to simulate the experimental observations. In the model a certain fraction of nodes were randomly disconnected to reproduce the effect of mucilage in temporarily blocking the flow. The percolation model could qualitatively reproduce well the threshold characteristics of the experiments. Our experiments, together with former observations of water dynamics in the rhizosphere, suggest that the rhizosphere is near the percolation threshold, where small variations in mucilage concentration sensitively

  1. Load controller and method to enhance effective capacity of a photovoltaic power supply using a dynamically determined expected peak loading

    DOEpatents

    Perez, Richard

    2005-05-03

    A load controller and method are provided for maximizing effective capacity of a non-controllable, renewable power supply coupled to a variable electrical load also coupled to a conventional power grid. Effective capacity is enhanced by monitoring power output of the renewable supply and loading, and comparing the loading against the power output and a load adjustment threshold determined from an expected peak loading. A value for a load adjustment parameter is calculated by subtracting the renewable supply output and the load adjustment parameter from the current load. This value is then employed to control the variable load in an amount proportional to the value of the load control parameter when the parameter is within a predefined range. By so controlling the load, the effective capacity of the non-controllable, renewable power supply is increased without any attempt at operational feedback control of the renewable supply.

  2. Respiratory signal derived from the smartphone built-in accelerometer during a Respiratory Load Protocol.

    PubMed

    Estrada, Luis; Torres, Abel; Sarlabous, Leonardo; Jané, Raimon

    2015-01-01

    The scope of our work focuses on investigating the potential use of the built-in accelerometer of the smartphones for the recording of the respiratory activity and deriving the respiratory rate. Five healthy subjects performed an inspiratory load protocol. The excursion of the right chest was recorded using the built-in triaxial accelerometer of a smartphone along the x, y and z axes and with an external uniaxial accelerometer. Simultaneously, the respiratory airflow and the inspiratory mouth pressure were recorded, as reference respiratory signals. The chest acceleration signal recorded in the z axis with the smartphone was denoised using a scheme based on the ensemble empirical mode decomposition, a noise data assisted method which decomposes nonstationary and nonlinear signals into intrinsic mode functions. To distinguish noisy oscillatory modes from the relevant modes we use the detrended fluctuation analysis. We reported a very strong correlation between the acceleration of the z axis of the smartphone and the reference accelerometer across the inspiratory load protocol (from 0.80 to 0.97). Furthermore, the evaluation of the respiratory rate showed a very strong correlation (0.98). A good agreement was observed between the respiratory rate estimated with the chest acceleration signal from the z axis of the smartphone and with the respiratory airflow signal: Bland-Altman limits of agreement between -1.44 and 1.46 breaths per minute with a mean bias of -0.01 breaths per minute. This preliminary study provides a valuable insight into the use of the smartphone and its built-in accelerometer for respiratory monitoring.

  3. LOADING DEVICE

    DOEpatents

    Ohlinger, L.A.

    1958-10-01

    A device is presented for loading or charging bodies of fissionable material into a reactor. This device consists of a car, mounted on tracks, into which the fissionable materials may be placed at a remote area, transported to the reactor, and inserted without danger to the operating personnel. The car has mounted on it a heavily shielded magazine for holding a number of the radioactive bodies. The magazine is of a U-shaped configuration and is inclined to the horizontal plane, with a cap covering the elevated open end, and a remotely operated plunger at the lower, closed end. After the fissionable bodies are loaded in the magazine and transported to the reactor, the plunger inserts the body at the lower end of the magazine into the reactor, then is withdrawn, thereby allowing gravity to roll the remaining bodies into position for successive loading in a similar manner.

  4. Airway turbulence and changes in upper airway hydraulic diameter can be estimated from the intensity of high frequency inspiratory sounds in sleeping adults

    PubMed Central

    Rembold, Christopher M; Suratt, Paul M

    2014-01-01

    Obstructive sleep disordered breathing can cause death and significant morbidity in adults and children. We previously found that children with smaller upper airways (measured by magnetic resonance imaging while awake) generated loud high frequency inspiratory sounds (HFIS, defined as inspiratory sounds > 2 kHz) while they slept. The purpose of this study was (1) to determine what characteristics of airflow predicted HFIS intensity, and (b) to determine if we could calculate changes in hydraulic diameter (D) in both an in vitro model and in the upper airways of sleeping humans. In an in vitro model, high frequency sound intensity was an estimate of airflow turbulence as reflected by the Reynold's number (Re). D of the in vitro model was calculated using Re, the pressure gradient, Swamee–Jain formula and Darcy formula. D was proportional to but smaller than the actual diameters (r2 = 0.94). In humans, we measured HFIS intensity and the pressure gradient across the upper airway (estimated with oesophageal pressure, Pes) during polysomnography in four adult volunteers and applied the same formulae to calculate D. At apnoea termination when the airway opens, we observed (1) an increase in HFIS intensity suggesting an increase in turbulence (higher Re), and (2) a larger calculated D. This method allows dynamic estimation of changes in relative upper airway hydraulic diameter (D) in sleeping humans with narrowed upper airways. PMID:24973405

  5. Carbohydrate Loading.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Csernus, Marilyn

    Carbohydrate loading is a frequently used technique to improve performance by altering an athlete's diet. The objective is to increase glycogen stored in muscles for use in prolonged strenuous exercise. For two to three days, the athlete consumes a diet that is low in carbohydrates and high in fat and protein while continuing to exercise and…

  6. 40 CFR 98.361 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Manure Management § 98.361 Reporting threshold. Livestock facilities must report GHG emissions under this subpart if the facility meets the reporting threshold as defined in...

  7. USE OF THRESHOLDS IN LANDSCAPE ASSESSMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Identification and use of thresholds are potentially important additions to interpretations of ecological monitoring data. However, there are a number of issues related to defining and using thresholds in interpreting ecological data. Most of these issues center around the pauc...

  8. Thresholds for impaired species recovery

    PubMed Central

    Hutchings, Jeffrey A.

    2015-01-01

    Studies on small and declining populations dominate research in conservation biology. This emphasis reflects two overarching frameworks: the small-population paradigm focuses on correlates of increased extinction probability; the declining-population paradigm directs attention to the causes and consequences of depletion. Neither, however, particularly informs research on the determinants, rate or uncertainty of population increase. By contrast, Allee effects (positive associations between population size and realized per capita population growth rate, rrealized, a metric of average individual fitness) offer a theoretical and empirical basis for identifying numerical and temporal thresholds at which recovery is unlikely or uncertain. Following a critique of studies on Allee effects, I quantify population-size minima and subsequent trajectories of marine fishes that have and have not recovered following threat mitigation. The data suggest that threat amelioration, albeit necessary, can be insufficient to effect recovery for populations depleted to less than 10% of maximum abundance (Nmax), especially when they remain depleted for lengthy periods of time. Comparing terrestrial and aquatic vertebrates, life-history analyses suggest that population-size thresholds for impaired recovery are likely to be comparatively low for marine fishes but high for marine mammals. Articulation of a ‘recovering population paradigm’ would seem warranted. It might stimulate concerted efforts to identify generic impaired recovery thresholds across species. It might also serve to reduce the confusion of terminology, and the conflation of causes and consequences with patterns currently evident in the literature on Allee effects, thus strengthening communication among researchers and enhancing the practical utility of recovery-oriented research to conservation practitioners and resource managers. PMID:26213739

  9. Thresholds for impaired species recovery.

    PubMed

    Hutchings, Jeffrey A

    2015-06-22

    Studies on small and declining populations dominate research in conservation biology. This emphasis reflects two overarching frameworks: the small-population paradigm focuses on correlates of increased extinction probability; the declining-population paradigm directs attention to the causes and consequences of depletion. Neither, however, particularly informs research on the determinants, rate or uncertainty of population increase. By contrast, Allee effects (positive associations between population size and realized per capita population growth rate, r(realized), a metric of average individual fitness) offer a theoretical and empirical basis for identifying numerical and temporal thresholds at which recovery is unlikely or uncertain. Following a critique of studies on Allee effects, I quantify population-size minima and subsequent trajectories of marine fishes that have and have not recovered following threat mitigation. The data suggest that threat amelioration, albeit necessary, can be insufficient to effect recovery for populations depleted to less than 10% of maximum abundance (N(max)), especially when they remain depleted for lengthy periods of time. Comparing terrestrial and aquatic vertebrates, life-history analyses suggest that population-size thresholds for impaired recovery are likely to be comparatively low for marine fishes but high for marine mammals.Articulation of a 'recovering population paradigm' would seem warranted. It might stimulate concerted efforts to identify generic impaired recovery thresholds across species. It might also serve to reduce the confusion of terminology, and the conflation of causes and consequences with patterns currently evident in the literature on Allee effects, thus strengthening communication among researchers and enhancing the practical utility of recovery-oriented research to conservation practitioners and resource managers. PMID:26213739

  10. Watershed safety and quality control by safety threshold method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Da-Wei Tsai, David; Mengjung Chou, Caroline; Ramaraj, Rameshprabu; Liu, Wen-Cheng; Honglay Chen, Paris

    2014-05-01

    Taiwan was warned as one of the most dangerous countries by IPCC and the World Bank. In such an exceptional and perilous island, we would like to launch the strategic research of land-use management on the catastrophe prevention and environmental protection. This study used the watershed management by "Safety Threshold Method" to restore and to prevent the disasters and pollution on island. For the deluge prevention, this study applied the restoration strategy to reduce total runoff which was equilibrium to 59.4% of the infiltration each year. For the sediment management, safety threshold management could reduce the sediment below the equilibrium of the natural sediment cycle. In the water quality issues, the best strategies exhibited the significant total load reductions of 10% in carbon (BOD5), 15% in nitrogen (nitrate) and 9% in phosphorus (TP). We found out the water quality could meet the BOD target by the 50% peak reduction with management. All the simulations demonstrated the safety threshold method was helpful to control the loadings within the safe range of disasters and environmental quality. Moreover, from the historical data of whole island, the past deforestation policy and the mistake economic projects were the prime culprits. Consequently, this study showed a practical method to manage both the disasters and pollution in a watershed scale by the land-use management.

  11. Compositional threshold for Nuclear Waste Glass Durability

    SciTech Connect

    Kruger, Albert A.; Farooqi, Rahmatullah; Hrma, Pavel R.

    2013-04-24

    Within the composition space of glasses, a distinct threshold appears to exist that separates "good" glasses, i.e., those which are sufficiently durable, from "bad" glasses of a low durability. The objective of our research is to clarify the origin of this threshold by exploring the relationship between glass composition, glass structure and chemical durability around the threshold region.

  12. Threshold Concepts in Finance: Student Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoadley, Susan; Kyng, Tim; Tickle, Leonie; Wood, Leigh N.

    2015-01-01

    Finance threshold concepts are the essential conceptual knowledge that underpin well-developed financial capabilities and are central to the mastery of finance. In this paper we investigate threshold concepts in finance from the point of view of students, by establishing the extent to which students are aware of threshold concepts identified by…

  13. Aerobic capacity and anaerobic threshold of wheelchair basketball players.

    PubMed

    Rotstein, A; Sagiv, M; Ben-Sira, D; Werber, G; Hutzler, J; Annenburg, H

    1994-03-01

    This study evaluated the aerobic capacity and anaerobic threshold of national level Israeli wheelchair basketball players. Subjects were tested working on a wheelchair rolling on a motor driven treadmill and on an arm cycle ergometer. Metabolic and cardiopulmonary parameters were measured during graded maximal exercise tests. Blood lactic acid (LA) concentration was measured in the intervals between loads during the test on the wheelchair. Heart rate (HR) and % heart rate reserve (%HRR) corresponding to the anaerobic threshold (4 mM blood LA) were evaluated while working on the wheelchair rolling on a motor driven treadmill. While working on the wheelchair the following peak exercise values were obtained: VO2 = 24.7 ml.kg/min, VE = 92.09 l/min HR = 181.5 b/min and R = 1.22. Values corresponding to the anaerobic threshold were found to be, HR = 139 b/min and %HRR = 57.02. Low correlations were obtained between peak exercise VO2 and VE measured while working on the wheelchair and those measured with arm cycle ergometer (r = 0.57 p = 0.137 and r = 0.4 p = 0.233 respectively). As athletes, subjects in the present study may be classified as having a low aerobic capacity and anaerobic threshold. It is also concluded that the ergometer type may have an important influence on test results.

  14. Epidemic threshold in directed networks.

    PubMed

    Li, Cong; Wang, Huijuan; Van Mieghem, Piet

    2013-12-01

    Epidemics have so far been mostly studied in undirected networks. However, many real-world networks, such as the online social network Twitter and the world wide web, on which information, emotion, or malware spreads, are directed networks, composed of both unidirectional links and bidirectional links. We define the directionality ξ as the percentage of unidirectional links. The epidemic threshold τ(c) for the susceptible-infected-susceptible (SIS) epidemic is lower bounded by 1/λ(1) in directed networks, where λ(1), also called the spectral radius, is the largest eigenvalue of the adjacency matrix. In this work, we propose two algorithms to generate directed networks with a given directionality ξ. The effect of ξ on the spectral radius λ(1), principal eigenvector x(1), spectral gap (λ(1)-|λ(2)|), and algebraic connectivity μ(N-1) is studied. Important findings are that the spectral radius λ(1) decreases with the directionality ξ, whereas the spectral gap and the algebraic connectivity increase with the directionality ξ. The extent of the decrease of the spectral radius depends on both the degree distribution and the degree-degree correlation ρ(D). Hence, in directed networks, the epidemic threshold is larger and a random walk converges to its steady state faster than that in undirected networks with the same degree distribution. PMID:24483506

  15. Computational gestalts and perception thresholds.

    PubMed

    Desolneux, Agnès; Moisan, Lionel; Morel, Jean-Michel

    2003-01-01

    In 1923, Max Wertheimer proposed a research programme and method in visual perception. He conjectured the existence of a small set of geometric grouping laws governing the perceptual synthesis of phenomenal objects, or "gestalt" from the atomic retina input. In this paper, we review this set of geometric grouping laws, using the works of Metzger, Kanizsa and their schools. In continuation, we explain why the Gestalt theory research programme can be translated into a Computer Vision programme. This translation is not straightforward, since Gestalt theory never addressed two fundamental matters: image sampling and image information measurements. Using these advances, we shall show that gestalt grouping laws can be translated into quantitative laws allowing the automatic computation of gestalts in digital images. From the psychophysical viewpoint, a main issue is raised: the computer vision gestalt detection methods deliver predictable perception thresholds. Thus, we are set in a position where we can build artificial images and check whether some kind of agreement can be found between the computationally predicted thresholds and the psychophysical ones. We describe and discuss two preliminary sets of experiments, where we compared the gestalt detection performance of several subjects with the predictable detection curve. In our opinion, the results of this experimental comparison support the idea of a much more systematic interaction between computational predictions in Computer Vision and psychophysical experiments. PMID:14766147

  16. Epidemic threshold in directed networks.

    PubMed

    Li, Cong; Wang, Huijuan; Van Mieghem, Piet

    2013-12-01

    Epidemics have so far been mostly studied in undirected networks. However, many real-world networks, such as the online social network Twitter and the world wide web, on which information, emotion, or malware spreads, are directed networks, composed of both unidirectional links and bidirectional links. We define the directionality ξ as the percentage of unidirectional links. The epidemic threshold τ(c) for the susceptible-infected-susceptible (SIS) epidemic is lower bounded by 1/λ(1) in directed networks, where λ(1), also called the spectral radius, is the largest eigenvalue of the adjacency matrix. In this work, we propose two algorithms to generate directed networks with a given directionality ξ. The effect of ξ on the spectral radius λ(1), principal eigenvector x(1), spectral gap (λ(1)-|λ(2)|), and algebraic connectivity μ(N-1) is studied. Important findings are that the spectral radius λ(1) decreases with the directionality ξ, whereas the spectral gap and the algebraic connectivity increase with the directionality ξ. The extent of the decrease of the spectral radius depends on both the degree distribution and the degree-degree correlation ρ(D). Hence, in directed networks, the epidemic threshold is larger and a random walk converges to its steady state faster than that in undirected networks with the same degree distribution.

  17. Epidemic threshold in directed networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Cong; Wang, Huijuan; Van Mieghem, Piet

    2013-12-01

    Epidemics have so far been mostly studied in undirected networks. However, many real-world networks, such as the online social network Twitter and the world wide web, on which information, emotion, or malware spreads, are directed networks, composed of both unidirectional links and bidirectional links. We define the directionality ξ as the percentage of unidirectional links. The epidemic threshold τc for the susceptible-infected-susceptible (SIS) epidemic is lower bounded by 1/λ1 in directed networks, where λ1, also called the spectral radius, is the largest eigenvalue of the adjacency matrix. In this work, we propose two algorithms to generate directed networks with a given directionality ξ. The effect of ξ on the spectral radius λ1, principal eigenvector x1, spectral gap (λ1-λ2), and algebraic connectivity μN-1 is studied. Important findings are that the spectral radius λ1 decreases with the directionality ξ, whereas the spectral gap and the algebraic connectivity increase with the directionality ξ. The extent of the decrease of the spectral radius depends on both the degree distribution and the degree-degree correlation ρD. Hence, in directed networks, the epidemic threshold is larger and a random walk converges to its steady state faster than that in undirected networks with the same degree distribution.

  18. Computational gestalts and perception thresholds.

    PubMed

    Desolneux, Agnès; Moisan, Lionel; Morel, Jean-Michel

    2003-01-01

    In 1923, Max Wertheimer proposed a research programme and method in visual perception. He conjectured the existence of a small set of geometric grouping laws governing the perceptual synthesis of phenomenal objects, or "gestalt" from the atomic retina input. In this paper, we review this set of geometric grouping laws, using the works of Metzger, Kanizsa and their schools. In continuation, we explain why the Gestalt theory research programme can be translated into a Computer Vision programme. This translation is not straightforward, since Gestalt theory never addressed two fundamental matters: image sampling and image information measurements. Using these advances, we shall show that gestalt grouping laws can be translated into quantitative laws allowing the automatic computation of gestalts in digital images. From the psychophysical viewpoint, a main issue is raised: the computer vision gestalt detection methods deliver predictable perception thresholds. Thus, we are set in a position where we can build artificial images and check whether some kind of agreement can be found between the computationally predicted thresholds and the psychophysical ones. We describe and discuss two preliminary sets of experiments, where we compared the gestalt detection performance of several subjects with the predictable detection curve. In our opinion, the results of this experimental comparison support the idea of a much more systematic interaction between computational predictions in Computer Vision and psychophysical experiments.

  19. LOADED WAVEGUIDES

    DOEpatents

    Mullett, L.B.; Loach, B.G.; Adams, G.L.

    1958-06-24

    >Loaded waveguides are described for the propagation of electromagnetic waves with reduced phase velocities. A rectangular waveguide is dimensioned so as to cut-off the simple H/sub 01/ mode at the operating frequency. The waveguide is capacitance loaded, so as to reduce the phase velocity of the transmitted wave, by connecting an electrical conductor between directly opposite points in the major median plane on the narrower pair of waveguide walls. This conductor may take a corrugated shape or be an aperature member, the important factor being that the electrical length of the conductor is greater than one-half wavelength at the operating frequency. Prepared for the Second U.N. International ConferThe importance of nuclear standards is duscussed. A brief review of the international callaboration in this field is given. The proposal is made to let the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) coordinate the efforts from other groups. (W.D.M.)

  20. Thresholds of cutaneous afferents related to perceptual threshold across the human foot sole.

    PubMed

    Strzalkowski, Nicholas D J; Mildren, Robyn L; Bent, Leah R

    2015-10-01

    Perceptual thresholds are known to vary across the foot sole, despite a reported even distribution in cutaneous afferents. Skin mechanical properties have been proposed to account for these differences; however, a direct relationship between foot sole afferent firing, perceptual threshold, and skin mechanical properties has not been previously investigated. Using the technique of microneurography, we recorded the monofilament firing thresholds of cutaneous afferents and associated perceptual thresholds across the foot sole. In addition, receptive field hardness measurements were taken to investigate the influence of skin hardness on these threshold measures. Afferents were identified as fast adapting [FAI (n = 48) or FAII (n = 13)] or slowly adapting [SAI (n = 21) or SAII (n = 20)], and were grouped based on receptive field location (heel, arch, metatarsals, toes). Overall, perceptual thresholds were found to most closely align with firing thresholds of FA afferents. In contrast, SAI and SAII afferent firing thresholds were found to be significantly higher than perceptual thresholds and are not thought to mediate monofilament perceptual threshold across the foot sole. Perceptual thresholds and FAI afferent firing thresholds were significantly lower in the arch compared with other regions, and skin hardness was found to positively correlate with both FAI and FAII afferent firing and perceptual thresholds. These data support a perceptual influence of skin hardness, which is likely the result of elevated FA afferent firing threshold at harder foot sole sites. The close coupling between FA afferent firing and perceptual threshold across foot sole indicates that small changes in FA afferent firing can influence perceptual thresholds.

  1. Threshold phenomena in soft matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Zhibin

    Although two different fields are covered, this thesis is mainly focused on some threshold behaviors in both liquid crystal field and fluid dynamic systems. A method of rubbed polyimide is used to obtain pretilt. Sufficiently strong rubbing of a polyimide (SE-1211) results in a large polar pretilt of liquid crystal director with respect to the homeotropic orientation. There exists a threshold rubbing strength required to induce nonzero pretilt. For the homologous liquid crystal series alkyl-cyanobyphenyl, we found that the threshold rubbing strength is a monotonic function of the number of methylene units. A dual easy axis model is then used to explain the results. Freedericksz transition measurements have been used to determine the quadratical and quartic coefficients associated with the molecules' tilt with respect to the layer normal in surface-induced smectic layers in the nematic phase above the smectic-A-nematic phase transition temperature. Both the quadratic and quartic coefficients are consistent with the scaling relationship as predicted in theory, and their ratio is approximately constant. A Rayleigh-Taylor instability experiment is performed by using a magnetic field gradient to draw down a low density but highly paramagnetic fluid below a more dense fluid in a Hele-Shaw cell. When turning off the magnetic field, the RT instability occurs in situ and the growth of the most unstable wavevector is measured as a function of time. The wavelength of the RT instability along with the growth rate was measured as a function of capillary number (which is related to the density difference and interfacial tension between two fluids). A theory for the instability that permits different viscosities for two immiscible fluids was developed, and good agreement was found with the experimental results. The technique of magnetic levitation promises to broaden significantly the accessible parameter space of gravitational interfacial instability experiments. A method is

  2. Detection thresholds of macaque otolith afferents.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiong-Jie; Dickman, J David; Angelaki, Dora E

    2012-06-13

    The vestibular system is our sixth sense and is important for spatial perception functions, yet the sensory detection and discrimination properties of vestibular neurons remain relatively unexplored. Here we have used signal detection theory to measure detection thresholds of otolith afferents using 1 Hz linear accelerations delivered along three cardinal axes. Direction detection thresholds were measured by comparing mean firing rates centered on response peak and trough (full-cycle thresholds) or by comparing peak/trough firing rates with spontaneous activity (half-cycle thresholds). Thresholds were similar for utricular and saccular afferents, as well as for lateral, fore/aft, and vertical motion directions. When computed along the preferred direction, full-cycle direction detection thresholds were 7.54 and 3.01 cm/s(2) for regular and irregular firing otolith afferents, respectively. Half-cycle thresholds were approximately double, with excitatory thresholds being half as large as inhibitory thresholds. The variability in threshold among afferents was directly related to neuronal gain and did not depend on spike count variance. The exact threshold values depended on both the time window used for spike count analysis and the filtering method used to calculate mean firing rate, although differences between regular and irregular afferent thresholds were independent of analysis parameters. The fact that minimum thresholds measured in macaque otolith afferents are of the same order of magnitude as human behavioral thresholds suggests that the vestibular periphery might determine the limit on our ability to detect or discriminate small differences in head movement, with little noise added during downstream processing.

  3. Epidemic thresholds for bipartite networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández, D. G.; Risau-Gusman, S.

    2013-11-01

    It is well known that sexually transmitted diseases (STD) spread across a network of human sexual contacts. This network is most often bipartite, as most STD are transmitted between men and women. Even though network models in epidemiology have quite a long history now, there are few general results about bipartite networks. One of them is the simple dependence, predicted using the mean field approximation, between the epidemic threshold and the average and variance of the degree distribution of the network. Here we show that going beyond this approximation can lead to qualitatively different results that are supported by numerical simulations. One of the new features, that can be relevant for applications, is the existence of a critical value for the infectivity of each population, below which no epidemics can arise, regardless of the value of the infectivity of the other population.

  4. Embracing thresholds for better environmental management

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Ryan P.; Erickson, Ashley L.; Mease, Lindley A.; Battista, Willow; Kittinger, John N.; Fujita, Rod

    2015-01-01

    Three decades of study have revealed dozens of examples in which natural systems have crossed biophysical thresholds (‘tipping points’)—nonlinear changes in ecosystem structure and function—as a result of human-induced stressors, dramatically altering ecosystem function and services. Environmental management that avoids such thresholds could prevent severe social, economic and environmental impacts. Here, we review management measures implemented in ecological systems that have thresholds. Using Ostrom's social–ecological systems framework, we analysed key biophysical and institutional factors associated with 51 social–ecological systems and associated management regimes, and related these to management success defined by ecological outcomes. We categorized cases as instances of prospective or retrospective management, based upon whether management aimed to avoid a threshold or to restore systems that have crossed a threshold. We find that smaller systems are more amenable to threshold-based management, that routine monitoring is associated with successful avoidance of thresholds and recovery after thresholds have been crossed, and that success is associated with the explicit threshold-based management. These findings are powerful evidence for the policy relevance of information on ecological thresholds across a wide range of ecosystems.

  5. Whole-body vibration perception thresholds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsons, K. C.; Griffin, M. J.

    1988-03-01

    This paper presents the results of a series of laboratory experiments concerned with perception thresholds for whole-body vibration. The nature of absolute perception thresholds is discussed and a method of determining vibration thresholds, based upon signal detection theory, is proposed. Thresholds of subjects exposed to x-, y- and z-axis sinusoidal vibration were determined for sitting and standing subjects (from 2 to 100 Hz). Perception thresholds have also been determined for supine subjects exposed to vertical ( x-axis) sinusoidal vibration (10-63 Hz). In additional experiments the effects of complex (e.g., random) vibration and the effects of duration on the perception thresholds were investigated. The relation between perception thresholds and vibration levels, said by subjects to be unacceptable if they occurred in their own homes, was investigated as well as the effects of subjects' personality and the visual and acoustic conditions in the laboratory. For the vertical vibration of seated subjects no significant differences were found between the responses of male and female subjects. Significant differences were found between perception thresholds for sitting and standing postures. The median threshold was approximately 0·01 m/s 2 r.m.s. between 2 and 100 Hz. Perception thresholds for x-axis and y-axis vibration were not significantly different in either sitting or standing subjects but significant differences in thresholds were found between sitting and standing positions for both x-axis and y-axis vibration. Subjects tended to be more sensitive to vibration when lying than when sitting or standing. The results suggested that the perception of random vibrations can be predicted from a knowledge of the perception of its component vibrations. The number of cycles of vibration did not affect perception thresholds for vibration durations of more than about 0·25 s. Some assessments suggested that vibration at more than twice the perception threshold may not

  6. Thresholds for Cenozoic bipolar glaciation.

    PubMed

    Deconto, Robert M; Pollard, David; Wilson, Paul A; Pälike, Heiko; Lear, Caroline H; Pagani, Mark

    2008-10-01

    The long-standing view of Earth's Cenozoic glacial history calls for the first continental-scale glaciation of Antarctica in the earliest Oligocene epoch ( approximately 33.6 million years ago), followed by the onset of northern-hemispheric glacial cycles in the late Pliocene epoch, about 31 million years later. The pivotal early Oligocene event is characterized by a rapid shift of 1.5 parts per thousand in deep-sea benthic oxygen-isotope values (Oi-1) within a few hundred thousand years, reflecting a combination of terrestrial ice growth and deep-sea cooling. The apparent absence of contemporaneous cooling in deep-sea Mg/Ca records, however, has been argued to reflect the growth of more ice than can be accommodated on Antarctica; this, combined with new evidence of continental cooling and ice-rafted debris in the Northern Hemisphere during this period, raises the possibility that Oi-1 represents a precursory bipolar glaciation. Here we test this hypothesis using an isotope-capable global climate/ice-sheet model that accommodates both the long-term decline of Cenozoic atmospheric CO(2) levels and the effects of orbital forcing. We show that the CO(2) threshold below which glaciation occurs in the Northern Hemisphere ( approximately 280 p.p.m.v.) is much lower than that for Antarctica ( approximately 750 p.p.m.v.). Therefore, the growth of ice sheets in the Northern Hemisphere immediately following Antarctic glaciation would have required rapid CO(2) drawdown within the Oi-1 timeframe, to levels lower than those estimated by geochemical proxies and carbon-cycle models. Instead of bipolar glaciation, we find that Oi-1 is best explained by Antarctic glaciation alone, combined with deep-sea cooling of up to 4 degrees C and Antarctic ice that is less isotopically depleted (-30 to -35 per thousand) than previously suggested. Proxy CO(2) estimates remain above our model's northern-hemispheric glaciation threshold of approximately 280 p.p.m.v. until approximately 25 Myr

  7. Thresholds for Cenozoic bipolar glaciation.

    PubMed

    Deconto, Robert M; Pollard, David; Wilson, Paul A; Pälike, Heiko; Lear, Caroline H; Pagani, Mark

    2008-10-01

    The long-standing view of Earth's Cenozoic glacial history calls for the first continental-scale glaciation of Antarctica in the earliest Oligocene epoch ( approximately 33.6 million years ago), followed by the onset of northern-hemispheric glacial cycles in the late Pliocene epoch, about 31 million years later. The pivotal early Oligocene event is characterized by a rapid shift of 1.5 parts per thousand in deep-sea benthic oxygen-isotope values (Oi-1) within a few hundred thousand years, reflecting a combination of terrestrial ice growth and deep-sea cooling. The apparent absence of contemporaneous cooling in deep-sea Mg/Ca records, however, has been argued to reflect the growth of more ice than can be accommodated on Antarctica; this, combined with new evidence of continental cooling and ice-rafted debris in the Northern Hemisphere during this period, raises the possibility that Oi-1 represents a precursory bipolar glaciation. Here we test this hypothesis using an isotope-capable global climate/ice-sheet model that accommodates both the long-term decline of Cenozoic atmospheric CO(2) levels and the effects of orbital forcing. We show that the CO(2) threshold below which glaciation occurs in the Northern Hemisphere ( approximately 280 p.p.m.v.) is much lower than that for Antarctica ( approximately 750 p.p.m.v.). Therefore, the growth of ice sheets in the Northern Hemisphere immediately following Antarctic glaciation would have required rapid CO(2) drawdown within the Oi-1 timeframe, to levels lower than those estimated by geochemical proxies and carbon-cycle models. Instead of bipolar glaciation, we find that Oi-1 is best explained by Antarctic glaciation alone, combined with deep-sea cooling of up to 4 degrees C and Antarctic ice that is less isotopically depleted (-30 to -35 per thousand) than previously suggested. Proxy CO(2) estimates remain above our model's northern-hemispheric glaciation threshold of approximately 280 p.p.m.v. until approximately 25 Myr

  8. Colour thresholding in video imaging.

    PubMed Central

    Fermin, C D; Degraw, S

    1995-01-01

    The basic aspects of video imaging are reviewed as they relate to measurements of histological and anatomical features, with particular emphasis on the advantages and disadvantages of colour and black-and-white imaging modes. In black-and-white imaging, calculations are based on the manipulation of picture elements (pixels) that contain 0-255 levels of information. Black is represented by the absence of light (0) and white by 255 grades of light. In colour imaging, the pixels contain variation of hues for the primary (red, green and blue) and secondary (magenta, yellow, cyan, pink) colours. Manipulation of pixels with colour information is more computer intense than that for black-and-white pixels, because there are over 16 million possible combinations of colour in a system with a 24-bit resolution. The narrow 128 possible grades of separation in black and white often makes distinction between pixels with overlapping intensities difficult. Such difficulty is greatly reduced by colour thresholding of systems that base the representation of colour on a combination of hue-saturation-intensity (HSI) format. Images Fig. 3 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 Fig. 10 Fig. 11 Fig. 12 Fig. 13 Fig. 14 Fig. 15 Fig. 16 Fig. 17 Fig. 18 Fig. 19 Fig. 20 PMID:7559121

  9. Roots at the percolation threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroener, Eva; Ahmed, Mutez Ali; Carminati, Andrea

    2015-04-01

    The rhizosphere is the layer of soil around the roots where complex and dynamic interactions between plants and soil affect the capacity of plants to take up water. The physical properties of the rhizosphere are affected by mucilage, a gel exuded by roots. Mucilage can absorb large volumes of water, but it becomes hydrophobic after drying. We use a percolation model to describe the rewetting of dry rhizosphere. We find that at a critical mucilage concentration the rhizosphere becomes impermeable. The critical mucilage concentration depends on the radius of the soil particle size. Capillary rise experiments with neutron radiography prove that for concentrations below the critical mucilage concentration water could easily cross the rhizosphere, while above the critical concentration water could no longer percolate through it. Our studies, together with former observations of water dynamics in the rhizosphere, suggest that the rhizosphere is near the percolation threshold, where small variations in mucilage concentration sensitively alter the soil hydraulic conductivity. Is mucilage exudation a plant mechanism to efficiently control the rhizosphere conductivity and the access to water?

  10. Efficient threshold for volumetric segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burdescu, Dumitru D.; Brezovan, Marius; Stanescu, Liana; Stoica Spahiu, Cosmin; Ebanca, Daniel

    2015-07-01

    Image segmentation plays a crucial role in effective understanding of digital images. However, the research on the existence of general purpose segmentation algorithm that suits for variety of applications is still very much active. Among the many approaches in performing image segmentation, graph based approach is gaining popularity primarily due to its ability in reflecting global image properties. Volumetric image segmentation can simply result an image partition composed by relevant regions, but the most fundamental challenge in segmentation algorithm is to precisely define the volumetric extent of some object, which may be represented by the union of multiple regions. The aim in this paper is to present a new method to detect visual objects from color volumetric images and efficient threshold. We present a unified framework for volumetric image segmentation and contour extraction that uses a virtual tree-hexagonal structure defined on the set of the image voxels. The advantage of using a virtual tree-hexagonal network superposed over the initial image voxels is that it reduces the execution time and the memory space used, without losing the initial resolution of the image.

  11. Roots at the percolation threshold.

    PubMed

    Kroener, Eva; Ahmed, Mutez Ali; Carminati, Andrea

    2015-04-01

    The rhizosphere is the layer of soil around the roots where complex and dynamic interactions between plants and soil affect the capacity of plants to take up water. The physical properties of the rhizosphere are affected by mucilage, a gel exuded by roots. Mucilage can absorb large volumes of water, but it becomes hydrophobic after drying. We use a percolation model to describe the rewetting of dry rhizosphere. We find that at a critical mucilage concentration the rhizosphere becomes impermeable. The critical mucilage concentration depends on the radius of the soil particle size. Capillary rise experiments with neutron radiography prove that for concentrations below the critical mucilage concentration water could easily cross the rhizosphere, while above the critical concentration water could no longer percolate through it. Our studies, together with former observations of water dynamics in the rhizosphere, suggest that the rhizosphere is near the percolation threshold, where small variations in mucilage concentration sensitively alter the soil hydraulic conductivity. Is mucilage exudation a plant mechanism to efficiently control the rhizosphere conductivity and the access to water? PMID:25974526

  12. Percolation Threshold in Polycarbonate Nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahuja, Suresh

    2014-03-01

    Nanocomposites have unique mechanical, electrical, magnetic, optical and thermal properties. Many methods could be applied to prepare polymer-inorganic nanocomposites, such as sol-gel processing, in-situ polymerization, particle in-situ formation, blending, and radiation synthesis. The analytical composite models that have been put forth include Voigt and Reuss bounds, Polymer nanocomposites offer the possibility of substantial improvements in material properties such as shear and bulk modulus, yield strength, toughness, film scratch resistance, optical properties, electrical conductivity, gas and solvent transport, with only very small amounts of nanoparticles Experimental results are compared against composite models of Hashin and Shtrikman bounds, Halpin-Tsai model, Cox model, and various Mori and Tanaka models. Examples of numerical modeling are molecular dynamics modeling and finite element modeling of reduced modulus and hardness that takes into account the modulus of the components and the effect of the interface between the hard filler and relatively soft polymer, polycarbonate. Higher nanoparticle concentration results in poor dispersion and adhesion to polymer matrix which results in lower modulus and hardness and departure from the existing composite models. As the level of silica increases beyond a threshold level, aggregates form which results in weakening of the structure. Polymer silica interface is found to be weak as silica is non-interacting promoting interfacial slip at silica-matrix junctions. Our experimental results compare favorably with those of nanocomposites of polyesters where the effect of nanoclay on composite hardness and modulus depended on dispersion of nanoclay in polyester.

  13. Invasion Threshold in Heterogeneous Metapopulation Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colizza, Vittoria; Vespignani, Alessandro

    2007-10-01

    We study the dynamics of epidemic and reaction-diffusion processes in metapopulation models with heterogeneous connectivity patterns. In susceptible-infected-removed-like processes, along with the standard local epidemic threshold, the system exhibits a global invasion threshold. We provide an explicit expression of the threshold that sets a critical value of the diffusion/mobility rate below, which the epidemic is not able to spread to a macroscopic fraction of subpopulations. The invasion threshold is found to be affected by the topological fluctuations of the metapopulation network. The results presented provide a general framework for the understanding of the effect of travel restrictions in epidemic containment.

  14. G&T adds versatile load management system

    SciTech Connect

    Nickel, J.R.; Baker, E.D.; Holt, J.W.; Chan, M.L.

    1995-04-01

    Wolverine`s load management system was designed in response to the need to reduce peak demand. The Energy Management System (EMS) prepares short term (seven day) load forecasts, based on a daily peak demand forecst, augmented by a similar day profile based on weather conditions. The software combines the similar day profile with the daily peak demand forecast to yield an hourly load forecast for an entire week. The software uses the accepted load forecast case in many application functions, including interchange scheduling, unit commitment, and transaction evaluation. In real time, the computer updates the accepted forecast hourly, based in actual changes in the weather and load. The load management program executes hourly. The program uses impact curves to calculate a load management strategy that reduces the load forecast below a desired load threshold.

  15. Declining threshold for hypoxia in the Gulf of Mexico.

    PubMed

    Stow, Craig A; Qian, Song S; Craig, J Kevin

    2005-02-01

    The northwestern Gulf of Mexico shelf has been nicknamed "The Dead Zone" due to annual summertime (May-September) bottom-water hypoxia (dissolved oxygen < or =2 mg L(-1)) that can be extensive (>20 000 km2) and last for several months. Hypoxia has been attributed to eutrophication caused by increasing nitrogen loads, although directly linking hypoxia to nitrogen is difficult. While the areal extent of hypoxia has been shown to increase with Mississippi River flow, it is unclear whether this increase results from enhanced vertical water-column stratification or from eutrophication caused by river-borne nutrients. Disentangling the relative contributions of eutrophication versus stratification has important management consequences. Our analysis indicates that the top:bottom salinity difference is an important predictor of hypoxia, exhibiting a threshold, where the probability of hypoxia increases rapidly, at approximately 4.1 ppt. Using a Bayesian change-point model, we show that this stratification threshold decreased from 1982 to 2002, indicating the degree of stratification needed to induce hypoxia has gone down. Although this declining threshold does not link hypoxia and nitrogen, it does implicate a long-term factor transcending yearly flow-induced stratification differences. Concurrently, we show that surface temperature increased, while surface dissolved oxygen decreased, suggesting that factors in addition to nitrogen may be influencing the incidence of hypoxia in the bottom water.

  16. Large Covariance Estimation by Thresholding Principal Orthogonal Complements

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Jianqing; Liao, Yuan; Mincheva, Martina

    2012-01-01

    This paper deals with the estimation of a high-dimensional covariance with a conditional sparsity structure and fast-diverging eigenvalues. By assuming sparse error covariance matrix in an approximate factor model, we allow for the presence of some cross-sectional correlation even after taking out common but unobservable factors. We introduce the Principal Orthogonal complEment Thresholding (POET) method to explore such an approximate factor structure with sparsity. The POET estimator includes the sample covariance matrix, the factor-based covariance matrix (Fan, Fan, and Lv, 2008), the thresholding estimator (Bickel and Levina, 2008) and the adaptive thresholding estimator (Cai and Liu, 2011) as specific examples. We provide mathematical insights when the factor analysis is approximately the same as the principal component analysis for high-dimensional data. The rates of convergence of the sparse residual covariance matrix and the conditional sparse covariance matrix are studied under various norms. It is shown that the impact of estimating the unknown factors vanishes as the dimensionality increases. The uniform rates of convergence for the unobserved factors and their factor loadings are derived. The asymptotic results are also verified by extensive simulation studies. Finally, a real data application on portfolio allocation is presented. PMID:24348088

  17. Interlaminar shear fracture toughness and fatigue thresholds for composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Obrien, T. Kevin; Murri, Gretchen B.; Salpekar, Satish A.

    1987-01-01

    Static and cyclic end notched flexure tests were conducted on a graphite epoxy, a glass epoxy, and graphite thermoplastic to determine their interlaminar shear fracture toughness and fatigue thresholds for delamination in terms of limiting values of the mode II strain energy release rate, G-II, for delamination growth. The influence of precracking and data reduction schemes are discussed. Finite element analysis indicated that the beam theory calculation for G-II with the transverse shear contribution included was reasonably accurate over the entire range of crack lengths. Cyclic loading significantly reduced the critical G-II for delamination. A threshold value of the maximum cyclic G-II below which no delamination occurred after one million cycles was identified for each material. Also, residual static toughness tests were conducted on glass epoxy specimens that had undergone one million cycles without delamination. A linear mixed-mode delamination criteria was used to characterize the static toughness of several composite materials; however, a total G threshold criterion appears to characterize the fatigue delamination durability of composite materials with a wide range of static toughness.

  18. Interlaminar shear fracture toughness and fatigue thresholds for composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Brien, T. Kevin; Murri, Gretchen B.; Salpekar, Satish A.

    1989-01-01

    Static and cyclic end notched flexure tests were conducted on a graphite epoxy, a glass epoxy, and graphite thermoplastic to determine their interlaminar shear fracture toughness and fatigue thresholds for delamination in terms of limiting values of the mode II strain energy release rate, G-II, for delamination growth. The influence of precracking and data reduction schemes are discussed. Finite element analysis indicated that the beam theory calculation for G-II with the transverse shear contribution included was reasonably accurate over the entire range of crack lengths. Cyclic loading significantly reduced the critical G-II for delamination. A threshold value of the maximum cyclic G-II below which no delamination occurred after one million cycles was identified for each material. Also, residual static toughness tests were conducted on glass epoxy specimens that had undergone one million cycles without delamination. A linear mixed-mode delamination criteria was used to characterize the static toughness of several composite materials; however, a total G threshold criterion appears to characterize the fatigue delamination durability of composite materials with a wide range of static toughness.

  19. Understanding the meaning of lactate threshold in resistance exercises.

    PubMed

    Garnacho-Castaño, M V; Dominguez, R; Maté-Muñoz, J L

    2015-05-01

    This study compares acute cardiorespiratory, metabolic, mechanical and rating of perceived effort (RPE) responses to 2 different prolonged constant-load exercises, half-squat (HS) and cycle ergometry, performed at a workload corresponding to the lactate threshold (LT). A total of 18 healthy subjects completed 5 exercise tests separated by 48 h rest periods: an incremental cycle ergometer test, a constant-load cycle ergometer test at LT intensity, a one-repetition maximum (1RM) HS test, an incremental HS test and a constant-load HS test at LT intensity. In both constant-load tests, cardiorespiratory, metabolic and RPE data were recorded. Mechanical responses before and after each test were assessed in terms of jump height and mean power measured in a counter movement jump (CMJ) test. In both exercises, cardiorespiratory and metabolic responses stabilized, though cardiorespiratory responses were significantly greater for cycle ergometry (P<0.001), with the exception of respiratory exchange ratio (RER), which was higher for HS (P=0.028). Mechanical fatigue was observed in only HS (P<0.001). In conclusion, different exercise modalities induced different yet stable acute cardiorespiratory and metabolic responses. Although such responses were significantly reduced in HS, greater mechanical fatigue was produced, most likely because of the particular muscle actions involved in this form of exercise.

  20. Ultralow percolation threshold in aerogel and cryogel templated composites.

    PubMed

    Irin, Fahmida; Das, Sriya; Atore, Francis O; Green, Micah J

    2013-09-10

    We demonstrate a novel concept for preparing percolating composites with ultralow filler content by utilizing nanofiller-loaded aerogel and cryogels as a conductive template. This concept is investigated for several porous systems, including resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF), silica, and polyacrylamide (PAM) gels, and both graphene and carbon nanotubes are utilized as nanofiller. In each case, a stable, aqueous nanofiller dispersion is mixed with a sol-gel precursor and polymerized to form a hydrogel, which can then be converted to an aerogel by critical point drying or cryogel by freeze-drying. Epoxy resin is infused into the pores of the gels by capillary action without disrupting the monolithic structure. We show that conductive graphene/epoxy composites are formed with a very low graphene loading; a percolation threshold as low as 0.012 vol % is obtained for graphene-RF cryogel/epoxy composite. This is the lowest reported threshold of any graphene-based nanocomposites. Similar values are achieved in other aerogel and nanofiller systems, which demonstrates the versatility of this method. PMID:23927050

  1. Prediction-based threshold for medication alert.

    PubMed

    Kawazoe, Yoshimasa; Miyo, Kengo; Kurahashi, Issei; Sakurai, Ryota; Ohe, Kazuhiko

    2013-01-01

    This study presents a prediction-based approach to determine thresholds for a medication alert in a computerized physician order entry. Traditional static thresholds can sometimes lead to physician's alert fatigue or overlook potentially excessive medication even if the doses are belowthe configured threshold. To address this problem, we applied a random forest algorithm to develop a prediction model for medication doses, and applied a boxplot to determine the thresholds based on the prediction results. An evaluation of the eight drugs most frequently causing alerts in our hospital showed that the performances of the prediction were high, except for two drugs. It was also found that using the thresholds based on the predictions would reduce the alerts to a half of those when using the static thresholds. Notably, some cases were detected only by the prediction thresholds. The significance of the thresholds should be discussed in terms of the trade-offs between gains and losses; however, our approach, which relies on physicians' collective experiences, has practical advantages. PMID:23920550

  2. 40 CFR 98.361 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Reporting threshold. 98.361 Section 98.361 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Manure Management § 98.361 Reporting threshold. Livestock facilities...

  3. 40 CFR 98.361 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Reporting threshold. 98.361 Section 98.361 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Manure Management § 98.361 Reporting threshold. Livestock facilities...

  4. 40 CFR 98.51 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Reporting threshold. 98.51 Section 98.51 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Adipic Acid Production § 98.51 Reporting threshold. You must report...

  5. 40 CFR 98.51 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Reporting threshold. 98.51 Section 98.51 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Adipic Acid Production § 98.51 Reporting threshold. You must report...

  6. 40 CFR 98.81 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Reporting threshold. 98.81 Section 98.81 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Cement Production § 98.81 Reporting threshold. You must report...

  7. Intelligence and Creativity: Over the Threshold Together?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Welter, Marisete Maria; Jaarsveld, Saskia; van Leeuwen, Cees; Lachmann, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Threshold theory predicts a positive correlation between IQ and creativity scores up to an IQ level of 120 and no correlation above this threshold. Primary school children were tested at beginning (N = 98) and ending (N = 70) of the school year. Participants performed the standard progressive matrices (SPM) and the Test of Creative…

  8. 40 CFR 98.231 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Reporting threshold. 98.231 Section 98.231 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Petroleum and Natural Gas Systems § 98.231 Reporting threshold. (a)...

  9. Applying Threshold Concepts to Finance Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoadley, Susan; Wood, Leigh N.; Tickle, Leonie; Kyng, Tim

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to investigate and identify threshold concepts that are the essential conceptual content of finance programmes. Design/Methodology/Approach: Conducted in three stages with finance academics and students, the study uses threshold concepts as both a theoretical framework and a research methodology. Findings: The…

  10. 40 CFR 98.151 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Reporting threshold. 98.151 Section 98.151 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING HCFC-22 Production and HFC-23 Destruction § 98.151 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under...

  11. 40 CFR 98.441 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Geologic Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide § 98.441 Reporting threshold. (a... amount of CO2 for long-term containment in subsurface geologic formations. There is no threshold. (b... that current monitoring and model(s) show that the injected CO2 stream is not expected to migrate...

  12. 40 CFR 98.421 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Reporting threshold. 98.421 Section 98.421 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Suppliers of Carbon Dioxide § 98.421 Reporting threshold. Any supplier...

  13. 40 CFR 98.421 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Reporting threshold. 98.421 Section 98.421 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Suppliers of Carbon Dioxide § 98.421 Reporting threshold. Any supplier...

  14. 40 CFR 98.51 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Reporting threshold. 98.51 Section 98.51 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Adipic Acid Production § 98.51 Reporting threshold. You must report...

  15. 40 CFR 98.81 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Reporting threshold. 98.81 Section 98.81 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Cement Production § 98.81 Reporting threshold. You must report...

  16. 40 CFR 98.71 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Reporting threshold. 98.71 Section 98.71 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Ammonia Manufacturing § 98.71 Reporting threshold. You must report...

  17. 40 CFR 98.111 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Reporting threshold. 98.111 Section 98.111 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Ferroalloy Production § 98.111 Reporting threshold. You must report...

  18. 40 CFR 98.71 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Reporting threshold. 98.71 Section 98.71 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Ammonia Manufacturing § 98.71 Reporting threshold. You must report...

  19. 40 CFR 98.51 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Reporting threshold. 98.51 Section 98.51 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Adipic Acid Production § 98.51 Reporting threshold. You must report...

  20. 40 CFR 98.71 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Reporting threshold. 98.71 Section 98.71 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Ammonia Manufacturing § 98.71 Reporting threshold. You must report...

  1. 40 CFR 98.341 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Reporting threshold. 98.341 Section 98.341 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Municipal Solid Waste Landfills § 98.341 Reporting threshold. You...

  2. Network Motif Basis of Threshold Responses

    EPA Science Inventory

    There has been a long-running debate over the existence of thresholds for adverse effects. The difficulty stems from two fundamental challenges: (i) statistical analysis by itself cannot prove the existence of a threshold, i.e., a dose below which there is no effect; and (ii) the...

  3. Threshold Concepts, Systems and Learning for Sustainability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sandri, Orana Jade

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a framework for understanding the role that systems theory might play in education for sustainability (EfS). It offers a sketch and critique of Land and Meyer's notion of a "threshold concept", to argue that seeing systems as a threshold concept for sustainability is useful for understanding the processes of…

  4. Effect of nitric oxide synthase inhibitor on diaphragmatic function after resistive loading.

    PubMed

    Bisnett, T; Anzueto, A; Andrade, F H; Rodney, G G; Napier, W R; Levine, S M; Maxwell, L C; Mureeba, P; Derdak, S D; Grisham, M B; Jenkinson, S G

    1998-01-01

    We studied the effect of a nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, Nomega-Nitro-L-arginine-methyl-ester (L-NAME), on in vitro diphragmatic function both at rest (control) or after inspiratory resistive loading (IRL). Sprague-Dawley rats were anesthetized, instrumented, and then the following experimental groups: (1) controls; (2) L-NAME (100 mg/kg/body weight intravenously alone); (3) IRL alone; and (4) L-NAME + IRL. The IRL protocol consisted of applying a variable resistor to the inspiratory limb of a two-way valve at 70% of maximal airway pressure until apnea. After the experiment, the animals were sacrificed and diaphragmatic strips were obtained for activity of constitutive nitric oxide synthase (cNOS) and measurements of in vitro contractile properties: tetanic (Po) and twitch tensions (Pt). cNOS activity was significantly decreased in the L-NAME and L-NAME + IRL groups (P < or = 0.05) as compared with control and IRL groups. L-NAME alone did not affect Po or Pt. However, in both IRL groups, with and without was a significant decrease in Po and Pt. This reduction was comparable in both groups. In summary, our data showed that L-NAME resulted in a significant decrease cNOS activity, but in vitro contractility was impaired. PMID:11253784

  5. Methods for automatic trigger threshold adjustment

    DOEpatents

    Welch, Benjamin J; Partridge, Michael E

    2014-03-18

    Methods are presented for adjusting trigger threshold values to compensate for drift in the quiescent level of a signal monitored for initiating a data recording event, thereby avoiding false triggering conditions. Initial threshold values are periodically adjusted by re-measuring the quiescent signal level, and adjusting the threshold values by an offset computation based upon the measured quiescent signal level drift. Re-computation of the trigger threshold values can be implemented on time based or counter based criteria. Additionally, a qualification width counter can be utilized to implement a requirement that a trigger threshold criterion be met a given number of times prior to initiating a data recording event, further reducing the possibility of a false triggering situation.

  6. Pain thresholds are elevated during pseudopregnancy.

    PubMed

    Gintzler, A R; Bohan, M C

    1990-01-22

    Increases in pain thresholds have been observed during gestation in a variety of laboratory animals and humans. The specific events that occur during pregnancy that are responsible for this increase in maternal pain threshold are not known. In order to investigate whether or not the changes in the peripheral concentration of sex steroids that are known to occur during gestation contribute to the analgesia of pregnancy, the effect of pseudopregnancy on jump thresholds was determined. Pseudopregnancy is associated with a significant increase in the mean jump threshold. In contrast, rats treated chronically with the opioid antagonist naltrexone do not manifest an increase in jump threshold during the pseudopregnant condition. These results suggest that peripheral sex steroids whose peripheral concentration profile is altered during pseudopregnancy might be important modulators of opioid systems that regulate responsiveness to aversive stimuli.

  7. A Threshold Continuum for Aeolian Sand Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swann, C.; Ewing, R. C.; Sherman, D. J.

    2015-12-01

    The threshold of motion for aeolian sand transport marks the initial entrainment of sand particles by the force of the wind. This is typically defined and modeled as a singular wind speed for a given grain size and is based on field and laboratory experimental data. However, the definition of threshold varies significantly between these empirical models, largely because the definition is based on visual-observations of initial grain movement. For example, in his seminal experiments, Bagnold defined threshold of motion when he observed that 100% of the bed was in motion. Others have used 50% and lesser values. Differences in threshold models, in turn, result is large errors in predicting the fluxes associated with sand and dust transport. Here we use a wind tunnel and novel sediment trap to capture the fractions of sand in creep, reptation and saltation at Earth and Mars pressures and show that the threshold of motion for aeolian sand transport is best defined as a continuum in which grains progress through stages defined by the proportion of grains in creep and saltation. We propose the use of scale dependent thresholds modeled by distinct probability distribution functions that differentiate the threshold based on micro to macro scale applications. For example, a geologic timescale application corresponds to a threshold when 100% of the bed in motion whereas a sub-second application corresponds to a threshold when a single particle is set in motion. We provide quantitative measurements (number and mode of particle movement) corresponding to visual observations, percent of bed in motion and degrees of transport intermittency for Earth and Mars. Understanding transport as a continuum provides a basis for revaluating sand transport thresholds on Earth, Mars and Titan.

  8. Acoustical properties of individual liposome-loaded microbubbles.

    PubMed

    Luan, Ying; Faez, Telli; Gelderblom, Erik; Skachkov, Ilya; Geers, Bart; Lentacker, Ine; van der Steen, Ton; Versluis, Michel; de Jong, Nico

    2012-12-01

    A comparison between phospholipid-coated microbubbles with and without liposomes attached to the microbubble surface was performed using the ultra-high-speed imaging camera (Brandaris 128). We investigated 73 liposome-loaded microbubbles (loaded microbubbles) and 41 microbubbles without liposome loading (unloaded microbubbles) with a diameter ranging from 3-10 μm at frequencies ranging from 0.6-3.8 MHz and acoustic pressures ranging from 5-100 kPa. The experimental data showed nearly the same shell elasticity for the loaded and unloaded bubbles, but the shell viscosity was higher for loaded bubbles compared with unloaded bubbles. For loaded bubbles, a higher pressure threshold for the bubble vibrations was noticed. In addition, an "expansion-only" behavior was observed for up to 69% of the investigated loaded bubbles, which mostly occurred at low acoustic pressures (≤30 kPa). Finally, fluorescence imaging showed heterogeneity of liposome distributions of the loaded bubbles.

  9. Sputtering Threshold Energies of Heavy Ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mantenieks, Maris A.

    1999-01-01

    Sputter erosion in ion thrusters has been measured in lifetests at discharge voltages as low as 25 V. Thruster operation at this discharge voltage results in component erosion rates sufficiently low to satisfy most mission requirements. It has been recognized that most of the internal sputtering in ion thrusters is done by doubly charged ions. Knowledge of the sputtering threshold voltage of a xenon molybdenum system would be beneficial in understanding the sputtering process as well as making more accurate calculations of the sputtering rates of ion thruster components. Sputtering threshold energies calculated from various formulations found in the literature results in values ranging from 28 to 200 eV. It is evident that some of these formulations cannot be relied upon to provide sputtering thresholds with any degree of accuracy. This paper re-examines the threshold energies measurements made in the early sixties by Askerov and Sena, and Stuart and Wehner. The threshold voltages as derived by Askerov and au have been reevaluated by using a different extrapolation method of sputter yields at low ion energies. The resulting threshold energies are in general similar to those measured by Stuart and Wehner. An empirical relationship is derived,for mercury and xenon ions for the ratio of the sputtering threshold energy to the sublimation energy as a function of the ratio of target to ion atomic mass.

  10. Microstructures, percolation thresholds, and rock physical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guéguen, Y.; Chelidze, T.; Le Ravalec, M.

    1997-09-01

    The physical properties (transport properties and mechanical properties) of porous/cracked rocks are mainly functions of their microstructure. In this connection the problem of critical (threshold) porosity for transport, elasticity and mechanical strength is especially important. Two dominant mathematical formalisms — effective medium theory (EMT) and percolation theory — pretend to give answers to this problem. Some of the EMT models do not predict any threshold (differential effective medium). Other EMT models (self-consistent models) do predict thresholds, but it is shown that these thresholds are fictitious and result from an extension of a theory beyond its limit of validity. The failure of EMT methods at high pores/crack concentrations is the result of clustering effects. The appropriate formalism to correctly describe the phenomenon of clustering of pores and cracks and the behaviour of a system close to its critical porosity is percolation theory. Percolation thresholds can be predicted in that case from classical site or bond percolation on regular or random lattices. The threshold values depend on the density and average size of pores/cracks so that porosity is not sufficient in general to characterize the threshold for a specific physical property. The general term 'critical porosity' should thus be used with caution and it is preferable to specify which property is concerned and what kind of microstructure is present. This term can be more safely used for a population of rocks which have an identical average shape of pores/cracks and for a given physical property.

  11. Load controller and method to enhance effective capacity of a photovotaic power supply using a dynamically determined expected peak loading

    DOEpatents

    Perez, Richard

    2003-04-01

    A load controller and method are provided for maximizing effective capacity of a non-controllable, renewable power supply coupled to a variable electrical load also coupled to a conventional power grid. Effective capacity is enhanced by monitoring power output of the renewable supply and loading, and comparing the loading against the power output and a load adjustment threshold determined from an expected peak loading. A value for a load adjustment parameter is calculated by subtracting the renewable supply output and the load adjustment parameter from the current load. This value is then employed to control the variable load in an amount proportional to the value of the load control parameter when the parameter is within a predefined range. By so controlling the load, the effective capacity of the non-controllable, renewable power supply is increased without any attempt at operational feedback control of the renewable supply. The expected peak loading of the variable load can be dynamically determined within a defined time interval with reference to variations in the variable load.

  12. Measurement and interpretation of threshold stress intensity factors for steels in high-pressure hydrogen gas.

    SciTech Connect

    Nibur, Kevin A.

    2010-11-01

    Threshold stress intensity factors were measured in high-pressure hydrogen gas for a variety of low alloy ferritic steels using both constant crack opening displacement and rising crack opening displacement procedures. The sustained load cracking procedures are generally consistent with those in ASME Article KD-10 of Section VIII Division 3 of the Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, which was recently published to guide design of high-pressure hydrogen vessels. Three definitions of threshold were established for the two test methods: K{sub THi}* is the maximum applied stress intensity factor for which no crack extension was observed under constant displacement; K{sub THa} is the stress intensity factor at the arrest position for a crack that extended under constant displacement; and K{sub JH} is the stress intensity factor at the onset of crack extension under rising displacement. The apparent crack initiation threshold under constant displacement, K{sub THi}*, and the crack arrest threshold, K{sub THa}, were both found to be non-conservative due to the hydrogen exposure and crack-tip deformation histories associated with typical procedures for sustained-load cracking tests under constant displacement. In contrast, K{sub JH}, which is measured under concurrent rising displacement and hydrogen gas exposure, provides a more conservative hydrogen-assisted fracture threshold that is relevant to structural components in which sub-critical crack extension is driven by internal hydrogen gas pressure.

  13. Measurement and interpretation of threshold stress intensity factors for steels in high-pressure hydrogen gas.

    SciTech Connect

    Dadfarnia, Mohsen; Nibur, Kevin A.; San Marchi, Christopher W.; Sofronis, Petros; Somerday, Brian P.; Foulk, James W., III; Hayden, Gary A.

    2010-07-01

    Threshold stress intensity factors were measured in high-pressure hydrogen gas for a variety of low alloy ferritic steels using both constant crack opening displacement and rising crack opening displacement procedures. The sustained load cracking procedures are generally consistent with those in ASME Article KD-10 of Section VIII Division 3 of the Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, which was recently published to guide design of high-pressure hydrogen vessels. Three definitions of threshold were established for the two test methods: K{sub THi}* is the maximum applied stress intensity factor for which no crack extension was observed under constant displacement; K{sub THa} is the stress intensity factor at the arrest position for a crack that extended under constant displacement; and K{sub JH} is the stress intensity factor at the onset of crack extension under rising displacement. The apparent crack initiation threshold under constant displacement, K{sub THi}*, and the crack arrest threshold, K{sub THa}, were both found to be non-conservative due to the hydrogen exposure and crack-tip deformation histories associated with typical procedures for sustained-load cracking tests under constant displacement. In contrast, K{sub JH}, which is measured under concurrent rising displacement and hydrogen gas exposure, provides a more conservative hydrogen-assisted fracture threshold that is relevant to structural components in which sub-critical crack extension is driven by internal hydrogen gas pressure.

  14. Changes in the anaerobic threshold in an annual cycle of sport training of young soccer players.

    PubMed

    Sliwowski, R; Andrzejewski, M; Wieczorek, A; Barinow-Wojewódzki, A; Jadczak, L; Adrian, S; Pietrzak, M; Wieczorek, S

    2013-06-01

    The aim of the study was to assess changes in the anaerobic threshold of young soccer players in an annual training cycle. A group of highly trained 15-18 year old players of KKS Lech Poznań were tested. The tests included an annual training macrocycle, and its individual stages resulted from the time structure of the sports training. In order to assess the level of exercise capacities of the players, a field exercise test of increasing intensity was carried out on a soccer pitch. The test made it possible to determine the 4 millimolar lactate threshold (T LA 4 mmol · l(-1)) on the basis of the lactate concentration in blood [LA], to establish the threshold running speed and the threshold heart rate [HR]. The threshold running speed at the level of the 4 millimolar lactate threshold was established using the two-point form of the equation of a straight line. The obtained indicators of the threshold running speed allowed for precise establishment of effort intensity used in individual training in developing aerobic endurance. In order to test the significance of differences in mean values between four dates of tests, a non-parametric Friedman ANOVA test was used. The significance of differences between consecutive dates of tests was determined using a post-hoc Friedman ANOVA test. The tests showed significant differences in values of selected indicators determined at the anaerobic threshold in various stages of an annual training cycle of young soccer players. The most beneficial changes in terms of the threshold running speed were noted on the fourth date of tests, when the participants had the highest values of 4.01 m · s(-1) for older juniors, and 3.80 m · s(-1) for younger juniors. This may be indicative of effective application of an individualized programme of training loads and of good preparation of teams for competition in terms of players' aerobic endurance. PMID:24744480

  15. 40 CFR 98.281 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Silicon Carbide Production § 98.281 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a silicon carbide production process...

  16. 40 CFR 98.281 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Silicon Carbide Production § 98.281 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a silicon carbide production process...

  17. 40 CFR 98.281 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Silicon Carbide Production § 98.281 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a silicon carbide production process...

  18. 40 CFR 98.281 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Silicon Carbide Production § 98.281 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a silicon carbide production process...

  19. 40 CFR 98.281 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Silicon Carbide Production § 98.281 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a silicon carbide production process...

  20. 40 CFR 98.81 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Cement Production § 98.81 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a cement production process and the facility...

  1. 40 CFR 98.331 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Zinc Production § 98.331 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a zinc production process and the facility meets...

  2. 40 CFR 98.331 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Zinc Production § 98.331 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a zinc production process and the facility meets...

  3. 40 CFR 98.331 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Zinc Production § 98.331 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a zinc production process and the facility meets...

  4. 40 CFR 98.331 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Zinc Production § 98.331 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a zinc production process and the facility meets...

  5. 40 CFR 98.41 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Electricity Generation § 98.41 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains one or more electricity generating units and...

  6. 40 CFR 98.41 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Electricity Generation § 98.41 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains one or more electricity generating units and...

  7. 40 CFR 98.41 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Electricity Generation § 98.41 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains one or more electricity generating units and...

  8. 40 CFR 98.41 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Electricity Generation § 98.41 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains one or more electricity generating units and...

  9. 40 CFR 98.41 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Electricity Generation § 98.41 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains one or more electricity generating units and...

  10. 40 CFR 98.141 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Glass Production § 98.141 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a glass production process and the facility meets...

  11. 40 CFR 98.141 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Glass Production § 98.141 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a glass production process and the facility meets...

  12. 40 CFR 98.141 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Glass Production § 98.141 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a glass production process and the facility meets...

  13. 40 CFR 98.141 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Glass Production § 98.141 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a glass production process and the facility meets...

  14. 40 CFR 98.141 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Glass Production § 98.141 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a glass production process and the facility meets...

  15. 40 CFR 98.211 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Miscellaneous Uses of Carbonate § 98.211 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions from miscellaneous uses of carbonate if your facility uses carbonates as defined...

  16. 40 CFR 98.391 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Suppliers of Petroleum Products § 98.391 Reporting threshold. Any supplier of petroleum products who meets the requirements of § 98.2(a)(4) must report GHG emissions....

  17. 40 CFR 98.341 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Municipal Solid Waste Landfills § 98.341 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a MSW landfill and the facility...

  18. 40 CFR 98.151 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING HCFC-22 Production and HFC-23 Destruction § 98.151 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains an HCFC-22 production...

  19. 40 CFR 98.221 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Nitric Acid Production § 98.221 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a nitric acid train and the facility meets...

  20. 40 CFR 98.271 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Pulp and Paper Manufacturing § 98.271 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a pulp and paper manufacturing...

  1. 40 CFR 98.191 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Lime Manufacturing § 98.191 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility is a lime manufacturing plant as defined in § 98.190 and...

  2. 40 CFR 98.381 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Suppliers of Coal-based Liquid Fuels § 98.381 Reporting threshold. Any supplier of coal-to-liquid products who meets the requirements of § 98.2(a)(4) must report GHG emissions....

  3. 40 CFR 98.31 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING General Stationary Fuel Combustion Sources § 98.31 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains one or more stationary...

  4. 40 CFR 98.61 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Aluminum Production § 98.61 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains an aluminum production process and the facility...

  5. 40 CFR 98.61 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Aluminum Production § 98.61 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains an aluminum production process and the facility...

  6. 40 CFR 98.61 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Aluminum Production § 98.61 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains an aluminum production process and the facility...

  7. 40 CFR 98.61 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Aluminum Production § 98.61 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains an aluminum production process and the facility...

  8. 40 CFR 98.61 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Aluminum Production § 98.61 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains an aluminum production process and the facility...

  9. Laser damage threshold of diamond films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albin, Sacharia; Cropper, Andre D.; Watkins, Linwood C.; Byvik, Charles E.; Buoncristiani, A. Martin

    1989-01-01

    The possibility that diamond films may inhibit laser-induced damage to optical components in laser systems films was investigated by measuring laser damage thresholds of free-standing diamond film windows, diamond films deposited on silicon substrates, and bare silicon substrate. Polycrystalline diamond films were deposited using a dc plasma-enhanced CVD process. It was found that free-standing diamond films had the highest laser damage threshold at 1064 nm. For a diamond film of 630 nm, the damage threshold was found to be 7 J/sq cm, as compared to a damage threshold of 4.5 J/sq cm for bare silicon, and a low value of 1.5 J/sq cm for the film/substrate combination. The damage mechanism is considered to involve melting or dielectric breakdown induced by laser radiation. The low value of the film/substrate combination is attributed to film stress and conditions of film deposition.

  10. 40 CFR 98.471 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Injection of Carbon Dioxide § 98.471 Reporting threshold. (a) You must... purposes of this subpart, any reference to CO2 emissions in § 98.2(i) shall mean CO2 received....

  11. 40 CFR 98.471 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Injection of Carbon Dioxide § 98.471 Reporting threshold. (a) You must... purposes of this subpart, any reference to CO2 emissions in § 98.2(i) shall mean CO2 received....

  12. 40 CFR 98.351 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ....351 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Industrial Wastewater Treatment § 98.351 Reporting threshold. You must... wastewater treatment sludge. (b) Ethanol production and food processing facilities. (1) The facility...

  13. 40 CFR 98.351 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ....351 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Industrial Wastewater Treatment § 98.351 Reporting threshold. You must... wastewater treatment sludge. (b) Ethanol production and food processing facilities. (1) The facility...

  14. 40 CFR 98.351 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ....351 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Industrial Wastewater Treatment § 98.351 Reporting threshold. You must... wastewater treatment sludge. (b) Ethanol production and food processing facilities. (1) The facility...

  15. 40 CFR 98.351 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ....351 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Industrial Wastewater Treatment § 98.351 Reporting threshold. You must... wastewater treatment sludge. (b) Ethanol production and food processing facilities. (1) The facility...

  16. 40 CFR 98.151 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING HCFC-22 Production and HFC-23 Destruction § 98.151 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains an HCFC-22 production...

  17. 40 CFR 98.151 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING HCFC-22 Production and HFC-23 Destruction § 98.151 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains an HCFC-22 production...

  18. 40 CFR 98.151 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING HCFC-22 Production and HFC-23 Destruction § 98.151 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains an HCFC-22 production...

  19. Adaptive thresholding of digital subtraction angiography images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sang, Nong; Li, Heng; Peng, Weixue; Zhang, Tianxu

    2005-10-01

    In clinical practice, digital subtraction angiography (DSA) is a powerful technique for the visualization of blood vessels in the human body. Blood vessel segmentation is a main problem for 3D vascular reconstruction. In this paper, we propose a new adaptive thresholding method for the segmentation of DSA images. Each pixel of the DSA images is declared to be a vessel/background point with regard to a threshold and a few local characteristic limits depending on some information contained in the pixel neighborhood window. The size of the neighborhood window is set according to a priori knowledge of the diameter of vessels to make sure that each window contains the background definitely. Some experiments on cerebral DSA images are given, which show that our proposed method yields better results than global thresholding methods and some other local thresholding methods do.

  20. 40 CFR 98.161 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Hydrogen Production § 98.161 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a hydrogen production process and the facility...

  1. 40 CFR 98.241 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Petrochemical Production § 98.241 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a petrochemical process as specified...

  2. 40 CFR 98.241 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Petrochemical Production § 98.241 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a petrochemical process as specified...

  3. 40 CFR 98.241 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Petrochemical Production § 98.241 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a petrochemical process as specified...

  4. 40 CFR 98.241 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Petrochemical Production § 98.241 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a petrochemical process as specified...

  5. 40 CFR 98.241 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Petrochemical Production § 98.241 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a petrochemical process as specified...

  6. 40 CFR 98.331 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Zinc Production § 98.331 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a zinc production process and the facility meets...

  7. 40 CFR 98.71 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Ammonia Manufacturing § 98.71 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains an ammonia manufacturing process and the...

  8. 40 CFR 98.71 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Ammonia Manufacturing § 98.71 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains an ammonia manufacturing process and the...

  9. 40 CFR 98.201 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Magnesium Production § 98.201 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a magnesium production process and the facility...

  10. 40 CFR 98.201 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Magnesium Production § 98.201 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a magnesium production process and the facility...

  11. 40 CFR 98.201 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Magnesium Production § 98.201 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a magnesium production process and the facility...

  12. 40 CFR 98.201 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Magnesium Production § 98.201 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a magnesium production process and the facility...

  13. 40 CFR 98.411 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Suppliers of Industrial Greenhouse Gases § 98.411 Reporting threshold. Any supplier of industrial greenhouse gases who meets the requirements of § 98.2(a)(4) must report...

  14. 40 CFR 98.411 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Suppliers of Industrial Greenhouse Gases § 98.411 Reporting threshold. Any supplier of industrial greenhouse gases who meets the requirements of § 98.2(a)(4) must report...

  15. 40 CFR 98.411 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Suppliers of Industrial Greenhouse Gases § 98.411 Reporting threshold. Any supplier of industrial greenhouse gases who meets the requirements of § 98.2(a)(4) must report...

  16. 40 CFR 98.411 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Suppliers of Industrial Greenhouse Gases § 98.411 Reporting threshold. Any supplier of industrial greenhouse gases who meets the requirements of § 98.2(a)(4) must report...

  17. 40 CFR 98.411 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Suppliers of Industrial Greenhouse Gases § 98.411 Reporting threshold. Any supplier of industrial greenhouse gases who meets the requirements of § 98.2(a)(4) must report...

  18. 40 CFR 98.311 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Titanium Dioxide Production § 98.311 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a titanium dioxide production process...

  19. 40 CFR 98.311 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Titanium Dioxide Production § 98.311 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a titanium dioxide production process...

  20. 40 CFR 98.311 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Titanium Dioxide Production § 98.311 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a titanium dioxide production process...

  1. 40 CFR 98.311 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Titanium Dioxide Production § 98.311 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a titanium dioxide production process...

  2. 40 CFR 98.311 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Titanium Dioxide Production § 98.311 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a titanium dioxide production process...

  3. 40 CFR 98.261 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Phosphoric Acid Production § 98.261 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a phosphoric acid production process...

  4. 40 CFR 98.261 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Phosphoric Acid Production § 98.261 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a phosphoric acid production process...

  5. 40 CFR 98.261 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Phosphoric Acid Production § 98.261 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a phosphoric acid production process...

  6. 40 CFR 98.181 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Lead Production § 98.181 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a lead production process and the facility meets...

  7. 40 CFR 98.171 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Iron and Steel Production § 98.171 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains an iron and steel production process...

  8. Effective theories and thresholds in particle physics

    SciTech Connect

    Gaillard, M.K.

    1991-06-07

    The role of effective theories in probing a more fundamental underlying theory and in indicating new physics thresholds is discussed, with examples from the standard model and more speculative applications to superstring theory. 38 refs.

  9. 40 CFR 98.251 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Petroleum Refineries § 98.251 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a petroleum refineries process and the facility...

  10. 40 CFR 98.251 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Petroleum Refineries § 98.251 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a petroleum refineries process and the facility...

  11. 40 CFR 98.251 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Petroleum Refineries § 98.251 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a petroleum refineries process and the facility...

  12. 40 CFR 98.251 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Petroleum Refineries § 98.251 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a petroleum refineries process and the facility...

  13. 40 CFR 98.251 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Petroleum Refineries § 98.251 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a petroleum refineries process and the facility...

  14. 40 CFR 98.171 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Iron and Steel Production § 98.171 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains an iron and steel production process...

  15. 40 CFR 98.171 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Iron and Steel Production § 98.171 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains an iron and steel production process...

  16. 40 CFR 98.291 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Soda Ash Manufacturing § 98.291 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a soda ash manufacturing process and the...

  17. 40 CFR 98.291 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Soda Ash Manufacturing § 98.291 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a soda ash manufacturing process and the...

  18. 40 CFR 98.291 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Soda Ash Manufacturing § 98.291 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a soda ash manufacturing process and the...

  19. 40 CFR 98.291 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Soda Ash Manufacturing § 98.291 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a soda ash manufacturing process and the...

  20. 40 CFR 98.291 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Soda Ash Manufacturing § 98.291 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a soda ash manufacturing process and the...

  1. 40 CFR 98.321 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Underground Coal Mines § 98.321 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains an active underground coal mine and the...

  2. 40 CFR 98.321 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Underground Coal Mines § 98.321 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains an active underground coal mine and the...

  3. 40 CFR 98.321 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Underground Coal Mines § 98.321 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains an active underground coal mine and the...

  4. 40 CFR 98.321 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Underground Coal Mines § 98.321 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains an active underground coal mine and the...

  5. 40 CFR 98.401 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Suppliers of Natural Gas and Natural Gas Liquids § 98.401 Reporting threshold. Any supplier of natural gas and natural gas liquids that meets the requirements of §...

  6. 40 CFR 98.401 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Suppliers of Natural Gas and Natural Gas Liquids § 98.401 Reporting threshold. Any supplier of natural gas and natural gas liquids that meets the requirements of §...

  7. 40 CFR 98.401 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Suppliers of Natural Gas and Natural Gas Liquids § 98.401 Reporting threshold. Any supplier of natural gas and natural gas liquids that meets the requirements of §...

  8. 40 CFR 98.401 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Suppliers of Natural Gas and Natural Gas Liquids § 98.401 Reporting threshold. Any supplier of natural gas and natural gas liquids that meets the requirements of §...

  9. 40 CFR 98.161 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Hydrogen Production § 98.161 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a hydrogen production process and the facility...

  10. 40 CFR 98.161 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Hydrogen Production § 98.161 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a hydrogen production process and the facility...

  11. 40 CFR 98.161 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Hydrogen Production § 98.161 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a hydrogen production process and the facility...

  12. 40 CFR 98.161 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Hydrogen Production § 98.161 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a hydrogen production process and the facility...

  13. [Nonlinear magnetohydrodynamics]. [Threshold unstable MHD activity

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    Theoretical predictions were compared with available data from JET on the threshold unstable MHD activity in toroidal confinement devices. In particular, questions arising as to Hartmans number and the selection of a kinematic viscosity are discussed.

  14. 40 CFR 98.261 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Phosphoric Acid Production § 98.261 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a phosphoric acid production process...

  15. 40 CFR 98.261 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Phosphoric Acid Production § 98.261 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a phosphoric acid production process...

  16. No evidence of dioxin cancer threshold.

    PubMed Central

    Mackie, David; Liu, Junfeng; Loh, Yeong-Shang; Thomas, Valerie

    2003-01-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has developed an estimate of the human cancer risk from dioxin, using the standard low-dose linear extrapolation approach. This estimate has been controversial because of concern that it may overestimate the cancer risk. An alternative approach has been published and was presented to the U.S. EPA Science Advisory Board's Dioxin Review Panel in November 2000. That approach suggests that dioxin is a threshold carcinogen and that the threshold is an order of magnitude above the exposure levels of the general population. We have reexamined the threshold analysis and found that the data have been incorrectly weighted by cohort size. In our reanalysis, without the incorrect weighting, the threshold effect disappears. PMID:12842764

  17. Threshold altitude resulting in decompression sickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, K. V.; Waligora, James M.; Calkins, Dick S.

    1990-01-01

    A review of case reports, hypobaric chamber training data, and experimental evidence indicated that the threshold for incidence of altitude decompression sickness (DCS) was influenced by various factors such as prior denitrogenation, exercise or rest, and period of exposure, in addition to individual susceptibility. Fitting these data with appropriate statistical models makes it possible to examine the influence of various factors on the threshold for DCS. This approach was illustrated by logistic regression analysis on the incidence of DCS below 9144 m. Estimations using these regressions showed that, under a noprebreathe, 6-h exposure, simulated EVA profile, the threshold for symptoms occurred at approximately 3353 m; while under a noprebreathe, 2-h exposure profile with knee-bends exercise, the threshold occurred at 7925 m.

  18. Nonlinear theory of kinetic instabilities near threshold

    SciTech Connect

    Berk, H.L.; Pekker, M.S.; Breizman, B.N. |

    1997-05-01

    A new nonlinear equation has been derived and solved for the evolution of an unstable collective mode in a kinetic system close to the threshold of linear instability. The resonant particle response produces the dominant nonlinearity, which can be calculated iteratively in the near-threshold regime as long as the mode doe snot trap resonant particles. With sources and classical relaxation processes included, the theory describes both soft nonlinear regimes, where the mode saturation level is proportional to an increment above threshold, and explosive nonlinear regimes, where the mode grows to a level that is independent of the closeness to threshold. The explosive solutions exhibit mode frequency shifting. For modes that exist in the absence of energetic particles, the frequency shift is both upward and downward. For modes that require energetic particles for their existence, there is a preferred direction of the frequency shift. The frequency shift continues even after the mode traps resonant particles.

  19. Responses of Six-Weeks Aquatic Exercise on the Autonomic Nervous System, Peak Nasal Inspiratory Flow and Lung Functions in Young Adults with Allergic Rhinitis.

    PubMed

    Janyacharoen, Taweesak; Kunbootsri, Narupon; Arayawichanon, Preeda; Chainansamit, Seksun; Sawanyawisuth, Kittisak

    2015-06-01

    Allergic rhinitis is a chronic respiratory disease. Sympathetic hypofunction is identified in all of the allergic rhinitis patients. Moreover, allergic rhinitis is associated with decreased peak nasal inspiratory flow (PNIF) and impaired lung functions. The aim of this study was to investigate effects of six-week of aquatic exercise on the autonomic nervous system function, PNIF and lung functions in allergic rhinitis patients. Twenty-six allergic rhinitis patients, 12 males and 14 females were recruited in this study. Subjects were diagnosed by a physician based on history, physical examination, and positive reaction to a skin prick test. Subjects were randomly assigned to two groups. The control allergic rhinitis group received education and maintained normal life. The aquatic group performed aquatic exercise for 30 minutes a day, three days a week for six weeks. Heart rate variability, PNIF and lung functions were measured at the beginning, after three weeks and six weeks. There were statistically significant increased low frequency normal units (LF n.u.), PNIF and showed decreased high frequency normal units (HF n.u.) at six weeks after aquatic exercise compared with the control group. Six weeks of aquatic exercise could increase sympathetic activity and PNIF in allergic rhinitis patients.

  20. Development of a Theory-Based Intervention to Increase Prescription of Inspiratory Muscle Training by Health Professionals in the Management of People with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Li, Linda C.; Reid, W. Darlene

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: The purpose of this paper is twofold: (1) to provide an overview of the literature on barriers to evidence-based practice (EBP) and the effectiveness of implementation interventions in health care; and (2) to outline the development of an implementation intervention for improving the prescription of inspiratory muscle training (IMT) by physical therapists and other health professionals for people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Summary of Key Points: Individuals, organizations, and the research itself present barriers to EBP in physical therapy. Despite the evidence supporting the use of IMT, this treatment continues to be under-used in managing COPD. Current health services research shows that traditional information-based approaches to implementation, such as didactic lectures, do not adequately address the challenges health professionals face when trying to make changes in practice. We propose the development of a theory-based intervention to improve health professionals' use of IMT in the management of COPD. It is postulated that a behavioural intervention, based on the theory of planned behaviour (TPB), may be more effective than an information-based strategy in increasing the prescription of IMT by health professionals. Conclusion: TPB may be used to understand the antecedents of health professionals' behaviour and to guide the development of implementation interventions. Further research is needed to evaluate the effectiveness of this proposed intervention in the management of people with COPD. PMID:22654237

  1. A new dual threshold time-over-threshold circuit for fast timing in PET.

    PubMed

    Grant, Alexander M; Levin, Craig S

    2014-07-01

    Time-over-threshold (ToT) is attractive as a method of combined timing and energy encoding in positron emission tomography (PET) due to its simplicity in implementation and readout. However, conventional single threshold ToT has a nonlinear response and generally suffers from a tradeoff between timing and energy resolution. The resulting poor performance is not fit for applications requiring fast timing, such as time-of-flight (ToF) PET. In this work it is shown experimentally that by replacing single threshold ToT with a dual threshold method in a new compact circuit, excellent time resolution can be achieved (154 ps FWHM for 3 × 3 × 5 mm(3) LYSO crystals), suitable for ToF. Dual threshold ToT timing results have been compared to a similar single threshold design, demonstrating that dual threshold ToT performance is far superior to that of single threshold ToT (154 ps versus 418 ps coincidence time resolution for the dual and single threshold cases, respectively). A method of correcting for nonlinearity in dual threshold ToT energy spectra is also demonstrated.

  2. Optimizing Retransmission Threshold in Wireless Sensor Networks.

    PubMed

    Bi, Ran; Li, Yingshu; Tan, Guozhen; Sun, Liang

    2016-01-01

    The retransmission threshold in wireless sensor networks is critical to the latency of data delivery in the networks. However, existing works on data transmission in sensor networks did not consider the optimization of the retransmission threshold, and they simply set the same retransmission threshold for all sensor nodes in advance. The method did not take link quality and delay requirement into account, which decreases the probability of a packet passing its delivery path within a given deadline. This paper investigates the problem of finding optimal retransmission thresholds for relay nodes along a delivery path in a sensor network. The object of optimizing retransmission thresholds is to maximize the summation of the probability of the packet being successfully delivered to the next relay node or destination node in time. A dynamic programming-based distributed algorithm for finding optimal retransmission thresholds for relay nodes along a delivery path in the sensor network is proposed. The time complexity is O n Δ · max 1 ≤ i ≤ n { u i } , where u i is the given upper bound of the retransmission threshold of sensor node i in a given delivery path, n is the length of the delivery path and Δ is the given upper bound of the transmission delay of the delivery path. If Δ is greater than the polynomial, to reduce the time complexity, a linear programming-based ( 1 + p m i n ) -approximation algorithm is proposed. Furthermore, when the ranges of the upper and lower bounds of retransmission thresholds are big enough, a Lagrange multiplier-based distributed O ( 1 ) -approximation algorithm with time complexity O ( 1 ) is proposed. Experimental results show that the proposed algorithms have better performance. PMID:27171092

  3. Computer simulation of the threshold sensitivity determinations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gayle, J. B.

    1974-01-01

    A computer simulation study was carried out to evaluate various methods for determining threshold stimulus levels for impact sensitivity tests. In addition, the influence of a number of variables (initial stimulus level, particular stimulus response curve, and increment size) on the apparent threshold values and on the corresponding population response levels was determined. Finally, a critical review of previous assumptions regarding the stimulus response curve for impact testing is presented in the light of the simulation results.

  4. Optimizing Retransmission Threshold in Wireless Sensor Networks

    PubMed Central

    Bi, Ran; Li, Yingshu; Tan, Guozhen; Sun, Liang

    2016-01-01

    The retransmission threshold in wireless sensor networks is critical to the latency of data delivery in the networks. However, existing works on data transmission in sensor networks did not consider the optimization of the retransmission threshold, and they simply set the same retransmission threshold for all sensor nodes in advance. The method did not take link quality and delay requirement into account, which decreases the probability of a packet passing its delivery path within a given deadline. This paper investigates the problem of finding optimal retransmission thresholds for relay nodes along a delivery path in a sensor network. The object of optimizing retransmission thresholds is to maximize the summation of the probability of the packet being successfully delivered to the next relay node or destination node in time. A dynamic programming-based distributed algorithm for finding optimal retransmission thresholds for relay nodes along a delivery path in the sensor network is proposed. The time complexity is OnΔ·max1≤i≤n{ui}, where ui is the given upper bound of the retransmission threshold of sensor node i in a given delivery path, n is the length of the delivery path and Δ is the given upper bound of the transmission delay of the delivery path. If Δ is greater than the polynomial, to reduce the time complexity, a linear programming-based (1+pmin)-approximation algorithm is proposed. Furthermore, when the ranges of the upper and lower bounds of retransmission thresholds are big enough, a Lagrange multiplier-based distributed O(1)-approximation algorithm with time complexity O(1) is proposed. Experimental results show that the proposed algorithms have better performance. PMID:27171092

  5. Initiation Pressure Thresholds from Three Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Souers, P C; Vitello, P

    2007-02-28

    Pressure thresholds are minimum pressures needed to start explosive initiation that ends in detonation. We obtain pressure thresholds from three sources. Run-to-detonation times are the poorest source but the fitting of a function gives rough results. Flyer-induced initiation gives the best results because the initial conditions are the best known. However, very thick flyers are needed to give the lowest, asymptotic pressure thresholds used in modern models and this kind of data is rarely available. Gap test data is in much larger supply but the various test sizes and materials are confusing. We find that explosive pressures are almost the same if the distance in the gap test spacers are in units of donor explosive radius. Calculated half-width time pulses in the spacers may be used to create a pressure-time curve similar to that of the flyers. The very-large Eglin gap tests give asymptotic thresholds comparable to extrapolated flyer results. The three sources are assembled into a much-expanded set of near-asymptotic pressure thresholds. These thresholds vary greatly with density: for TATB/LX-17/PBX 9502, we find values of 4.9 and 8.7 GPa at 1.80 and 1.90 g/cm{sup 3}, respectively.

  6. The variations in visual threshold measurement.

    PubMed

    Hallett, P E

    1969-06-01

    1. This paper presents a statistical analysis of the thresholds of test flashes viewed against zero, steady or transient backgrounds by peripheral vision. The method of threshold measurement is that of the Medical Research Council Report (Pirenne, Marriott & O'Doherty, 1957; Hartline & McDonald, 1943). The data are from the previous paper (Hallett, 1969b) and consist of k days' samples of n threshold measurements on an intensity scale of interval 0.087 log. The collection of a sample required 5-6 min and the samples were spread over a 3-month period.2. The analysis suggests that the nature of biological variations is that the ;instantaneous' frequency-of-seeing curve can occupy a variety of positions, or levels, scattered about its typical position on the log. energy axis. Change of the position of the curve for a given threshold task is most obvious when one compares threshold measurements obtained on different days, but this is not true day-to-day variation; the same sorts of change occur on the same day if the viewing conditions (independent variables) are changed and are perhaps due to shifts in the observer's signal/noise criterion K.3. Two important consequences of the analysis are (i) the errors of visual threshold functions are worse than one method of calculating error suggests and (ii) it is possible to eliminate part of the biological variations from a particular sort of frequency-of-seeing curve and thus obtain a better estimate of the instantaneous curve which is the physiological function of prime interest.4. Some possible causes of the biological variations are considered. The design of experiments is discussed. The method of the M.R.C. Report is to be recommended since it can be applied without prior assumptions about the value of the mean threshold or the nature of the errors. PMID:5784294

  7. Threshold concepts in finance: conceptualizing the curriculum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoadley, Susan; Tickle, Leonie; Wood, Leigh N.; Kyng, Tim

    2015-08-01

    Graduates with well-developed capabilities in finance are invaluable to our society and in increasing demand. Universities face the challenge of designing finance programmes to develop these capabilities and the essential knowledge that underpins them. Our research responds to this challenge by identifying threshold concepts that are central to the mastery of finance and by exploring their potential for informing curriculum design and pedagogical practices to improve student outcomes. In this paper, we report the results of an online survey of finance academics at multiple institutions in Australia, Canada, New Zealand, South Africa and the United Kingdom. The outcomes of our research are recommendations for threshold concepts in finance endorsed by quantitative evidence, as well as a model of the finance curriculum incorporating finance, modelling and statistics threshold concepts. In addition, we draw conclusions about the application of threshold concept theory supported by both quantitative and qualitative evidence. Our methodology and findings have general relevance to the application of threshold concept theory as a means to investigate and inform curriculum design and delivery in higher education.

  8. Motion parallax thresholds for unambiguous depth perception.

    PubMed

    Holmin, Jessica; Nawrot, Mark

    2015-10-01

    The perception of unambiguous depth from motion parallax arises from the neural integration of retinal image motion and extra-retinal eye movement signals. It is only recently that these parameters have been articulated in the form of the motion/pursuit ratio. In the current study, we explored the lower limits of the parameter space in which observers could accurately perform near/far relative depth-sign discriminations for a translating random-dot stimulus. Stationary observers pursued a translating random dot stimulus containing relative image motion. Their task was to indicate the location of the peak in an approximate square-wave stimulus. We measured thresholds for depth from motion parallax, quantified as motion/pursuit ratios, as well as lower motion thresholds and pursuit accuracy. Depth thresholds were relatively stable at pursuit velocities 5-20 deg/s, and increased at lower and higher velocities. The pattern of results indicates that minimum motion/pursuit ratios are limited by motion and pursuit signals, both independently and in combination with each other. At low and high pursuit velocities, depth thresholds were limited by inaccurate pursuit signals. At moderate pursuit velocities, depth thresholds were limited by motion signals.

  9. Threshold of the precedence effect in noise

    PubMed Central

    Freyman, Richard L.; Griffin, Amanda M.; Zurek, Patrick M.

    2014-01-01

    Three effects that show a temporal asymmetry in the influence of interaural cues were studied through the addition of masking noise: (1) The transient precedence effect—the perceptual dominance of a leading transient over a similar lagging transient; (2) the ongoing precedence effect—lead dominance with lead and lag components that extend in time; and (3) the onset capture effect—determination by an onset transient of the lateral position of an otherwise ambiguous extended trailing sound. These three effects were evoked with noise-burst stimuli and were compared in the presence of masking noise. Using a diotic noise masker, detection thresholds for stimuli with lead/lag interaural delays of 0/500 μs were compared to those with 500/0 μs delays. None of the three effects showed a masking difference between those conditions, suggesting that none of the effects is operative at masked threshold. A task requiring the discrimination between stimuli with 500/0 and 0/500 μs interaural delays was used to determine the threshold for each effect in noise. The results showed similar thresholds in noise (10–13 dB SL) for the transient and ongoing precedence effects, but a much higher threshold (33 dB SL) for onset capture of an ambiguous trailing sound. PMID:24815272

  10. Effects of pulse duration on magnetostimulation thresholds

    PubMed Central

    Saritas, Emine U.; Goodwill, Patrick W.; Conolly, Steven M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Medical imaging techniques such as magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic particle imaging (MPI) utilize time-varying magnetic fields that are subject to magnetostimulation limits, which often limit the speed of the imaging process. Various human-subject experiments have studied the amplitude and frequency dependence of these thresholds for gradient or homogeneous magnetic fields. Another contributing factor was shown to be number of cycles in a magnetic pulse, where the thresholds decreased with longer pulses. The latter result was demonstrated on two subjects only, at a single frequency of 1.27 kHz. Hence, whether the observed effect was due to the number of cycles or due to the pulse duration was not specified. In addition, a gradient-type field was utilized; hence, whether the same phenomenon applies to homogeneous magnetic fields remained unknown. Here, the authors investigate the pulse duration dependence of magnetostimulation limits for a 20-fold range of frequencies using homogeneous magnetic fields, such as the ones used for the drive field in MPI. Methods: Magnetostimulation thresholds were measured in the arms of six healthy subjects (age: 27 ± 5 yr). Each experiment comprised testing the thresholds at eight different pulse durations between 2 and 125 ms at a single frequency, which took approximately 30–40 min/subject. A total of 34 experiments were performed at three different frequencies: 1.2, 5.7, and 25.5 kHz. A solenoid coil providing homogeneous magnetic field was used to induce stimulation, and the field amplitude was measured in real time. A pre-emphasis based pulse shaping method was employed to accurately control the pulse durations. Subjects reported stimulation via a mouse click whenever they felt a twitching/tingling sensation. A sigmoid function was fitted to the subject responses to find the threshold at a specific frequency and duration, and the whole procedure was repeated at all relevant frequencies and pulse durations

  11. Effects of pulse duration on magnetostimulation thresholds

    SciTech Connect

    Saritas, Emine U.; Goodwill, Patrick W.; Conolly, Steven M.

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Medical imaging techniques such as magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic particle imaging (MPI) utilize time-varying magnetic fields that are subject to magnetostimulation limits, which often limit the speed of the imaging process. Various human-subject experiments have studied the amplitude and frequency dependence of these thresholds for gradient or homogeneous magnetic fields. Another contributing factor was shown to be number of cycles in a magnetic pulse, where the thresholds decreased with longer pulses. The latter result was demonstrated on two subjects only, at a single frequency of 1.27 kHz. Hence, whether the observed effect was due to the number of cycles or due to the pulse duration was not specified. In addition, a gradient-type field was utilized; hence, whether the same phenomenon applies to homogeneous magnetic fields remained unknown. Here, the authors investigate the pulse duration dependence of magnetostimulation limits for a 20-fold range of frequencies using homogeneous magnetic fields, such as the ones used for the drive field in MPI. Methods: Magnetostimulation thresholds were measured in the arms of six healthy subjects (age: 27 ± 5 yr). Each experiment comprised testing the thresholds at eight different pulse durations between 2 and 125 ms at a single frequency, which took approximately 30–40 min/subject. A total of 34 experiments were performed at three different frequencies: 1.2, 5.7, and 25.5 kHz. A solenoid coil providing homogeneous magnetic field was used to induce stimulation, and the field amplitude was measured in real time. A pre-emphasis based pulse shaping method was employed to accurately control the pulse durations. Subjects reported stimulation via a mouse click whenever they felt a twitching/tingling sensation. A sigmoid function was fitted to the subject responses to find the threshold at a specific frequency and duration, and the whole procedure was repeated at all relevant frequencies and pulse durations

  12. Viral population dynamics and virulence thresholds.

    PubMed

    Lancaster, Karen Z; Pfeiffer, Julie K

    2012-08-01

    Viral factors and host barriers influence virally induced disease, and asymptomatic versus symptomatic infection is governed by a 'virulence threshold'. Understanding modulation of virulence thresholds could lend insight into disease outcome and aid in rational therapeutic and vaccine design. RNA viruses are an excellent system to study virulence thresholds in the context of quasispecies population dynamics. RNA viruses have high error frequencies and our understanding of viral population dynamics has been shaped by quasispecies evolutionary theory. In turn, research using RNA viruses as replicons with short generation times and high mutation rates has been an invaluable tool to test models of quasispecies theory. The challenge and new frontier of RNA virus population dynamics research is to combine multiple theoretical models and experimental data to describe viral population behavior as it changes, moving within and between hosts, to predict disease and pathogen emergence. Several excellent studies have begun to undertake this challenge using novel approaches.

  13. L-H Threshold Studies in NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    Kaye, S M; Battaglia, D; Bell, R E; Chang, C S; Hosea, J; Kugel, H; LeBlanc, B P; Meyer, H; Park, G Y

    2011-09-06

    Recent experiments in the low aspect ratio National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) have been run in support of the high priority ITER and ITPA issue of access to the H-mode. Specifically, a series of experiments showed reduced power threshold values for deuterium vs helium plasmas, and for plasmas with lower current, lower triangularity and with lithium conditioning. Application of n=3 fields at the plasma edge resulted in higher power thresholds. To within the constraints of temporal and spatial resolutions, no systematic difference in T{sub e}, n{sub e}, p{sub e}, T{sub i}, v or their derivatives was found in discharges that transitioned into the H-mode versus those at slightly lower power that did not. Finally, H{sub 98y,2} {approx} 1 confinement quality could be achieved for powers just above the threshold power in ELM-free conditions.

  14. Starvation drives a threshold triggering communication.

    PubMed

    Mailleux, Anne-Catherine; Detrain, Claire; Deneubourg, Jean-Louis

    2006-11-01

    The decision for an ant forager to launch recruitment is governed by an internal response threshold. Here, we demonstrate that this threshold (the desired volume) triggering trail-laying increases under starvation. As a consequence, highly starved foragers lay a recruitment trail and bring back to the nest higher quantities of food from large unlimited resources. In contrast, when the volume of the food source is under their crop capacity, the percentage of trail-communicating foragers is lower following a prolonged period of starvation. Such starvation-dependent changes in the "desired volume" threshold explain how ants optimize recruitment and select liquid food resources in order to prevent collective exploitation of low profitability. PMID:17050837

  15. The effects of inspiratory muscle training on plasma interleukin-6 concentration during cycling exercise and a volitional mimic of the exercise hyperpnea.

    PubMed

    Mills, Dean E; Johnson, Michael A; McPhilimey, Martin J; Williams, Neil C; Gonzalez, Javier T; Barnett, Yvonne A; Sharpe, Graham R

    2013-10-15

    It is unknown whether the respiratory muscles contribute to exercise-induced increases in plasma interleukin-6 (IL-6) concentration, if this is related to diaphragm fatigue, and whether inspiratory muscle training (IMT) attenuates the plasma IL-6 response to whole body exercise and/or a volitional mimic of the exercise hyperpnea. Twelve healthy males were divided equally into an IMT or placebo (PLA) group, and before and after a 6-wk intervention they undertook, on separate days, 1 h of 1) passive rest, 2) cycling exercise at estimated maximal lactate steady state power (EX), and 3) volitional hyperpnea at rest, which mimicked the breathing and respiratory muscle recruitment patterns achieved during EX (HYPEX). Plasma IL-6 concentration remained unchanged during passive rest. The plasma IL-6 response to EX was reduced following IMT (main effect of intervention, P = 0.039) but not PLA (P = 0.272). Plasma IL-6 concentration increased during HYPEX (main effect of time, P < 0.01) and was unchanged postintervention. There was no evidence of diaphragm fatigue (measured by phrenic nerve stimulation) following each trial. In conclusion, plasma IL-6 concentration is increased during EX and HYPEX and this occurred in the absence of diaphragm fatigue. Furthermore, IMT reduced the plasma IL-6 response to EX but not HYPEX. These findings suggest that the respiratory muscles contribute to exercise-induced increases in plasma IL-6 concentration in the absence of diaphragm fatigue and that IMT can reduce the magnitude of the response to exercise but not a volitional mimic of the exercise hyperpnea. PMID:23887901

  16. Predictability of threshold exceedances in dynamical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bódai, Tamás

    2015-12-01

    In a low-order model of the general circulation of the atmosphere we examine the predictability of threshold exceedance events of certain observables. The likelihood of such binary events-the cornerstone also for the categoric (as opposed to probabilistic) prediction of threshold exceedances-is established from long time series of one or more observables of the same system. The prediction skill is measured by a summary index of the ROC curve that relates the hit- and false alarm rates. Our results for the examined systems suggest that exceedances of higher thresholds are more predictable; or in other words: rare large magnitude, i.e., extreme, events are more predictable than frequent typical events. We find this to hold provided that the bin size for binning time series data is optimized, but not necessarily otherwise. This can be viewed as a confirmation of a counterintuitive (and seemingly contrafactual) statement that was previously formulated for more simple autoregressive stochastic processes. However, we argue that for dynamical systems in general it may be typical only, but not universally true. We argue that when there is a sufficient amount of data depending on the precision of observation, the skill of a class of data-driven categoric predictions of threshold exceedances approximates the skill of the analogous model-driven prediction, assuming strictly no model errors. Therefore, stronger extremes in terms of higher threshold levels are more predictable both in case of data- and model-driven prediction. Furthermore, we show that a quantity commonly regarded as a measure of predictability, the finite-time maximal Lyapunov exponent, does not correspond directly to the ROC-based measure of prediction skill when they are viewed as functions of the prediction lead time and the threshold level. This points to the fact that even if the Lyapunov exponent as an intrinsic property of the system, measuring the instability of trajectories, determines predictability

  17. Mode instability thresholds for Tm-doped fiber amplifiers pumped at 790 nm.

    PubMed

    Smith, Arlee V; Smith, Jesse J

    2016-01-25

    We use a detailed numerical model of stimulated thermal Rayleigh scattering to compute mode instability thresholds in Tm(3+)-doped fiber amplifiers. The fiber amplifies 2040 nm light using a 790 nm pump. The cross-relaxation process is strong, permitting power efficiencies of 60%. The predicted instability thresholds are compared with those in similar Yb(3+)-doped fiber amplifiers with 976 nm pump and 1060 nm signal, and are found to be higher, even though the heat load is much higher in Tm-doped amplifiers. The higher threshold in the Tm-doped fiber is attributed to its longer signal wavelength, and to stronger gain saturation, due in part to cross-relaxation heating. PMID:26832480

  18. Mode instability thresholds for Tm-doped fiber amplifiers pumped at 790 nm.

    PubMed

    Smith, Arlee V; Smith, Jesse J

    2016-01-25

    We use a detailed numerical model of stimulated thermal Rayleigh scattering to compute mode instability thresholds in Tm(3+)-doped fiber amplifiers. The fiber amplifies 2040 nm light using a 790 nm pump. The cross-relaxation process is strong, permitting power efficiencies of 60%. The predicted instability thresholds are compared with those in similar Yb(3+)-doped fiber amplifiers with 976 nm pump and 1060 nm signal, and are found to be higher, even though the heat load is much higher in Tm-doped amplifiers. The higher threshold in the Tm-doped fiber is attributed to its longer signal wavelength, and to stronger gain saturation, due in part to cross-relaxation heating.

  19. Effect of discontinuity in the threshold distribution on the critical behavior of a random fiber bundle

    SciTech Connect

    Divakaran, Uma; Dutta, Amit

    2007-01-15

    The critical behavior of a random fiber bundle model with mixed uniform distribution of threshold strengths and global load sharing rule is studied with a special emphasis on the nature of distribution of avalanches for different parameters of the distribution. The discontinuity in the threshold strength distribution of fibers nontrivially modifies the critical stress as well as puts a restriction on the allowed values of parameters for which the recursive dynamics approach holds good. The discontinuity leads to a nonuniversal behavior in the avalanche size distribution for smaller values of avalanche size. We observe that apart from the mean field behavior for larger avalanches, a new behavior for smaller avalanche size is observed as a critical threshold distribution is approached. The phenomenological understanding of the above result is provided using the exact analytical result for the avalanche size distribution. Most interestingly, the prominence of nonuniversal behavior in avalanche size distribution depends on the system parameters.

  20. Thresholds in Xeric Hydrology and Biogeochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meixner, T.; Brooks, P. D.; Simpson, S. C.; Soto, C. D.; Yuan, F.; Turner, D.; Richter, H.

    2011-12-01

    Due to water limitation, thresholds in hydrologic and biogeochemical processes are common in arid and semi-arid systems. Some of these thresholds such as those focused on rainfall runoff relationships have been well studied. However to gain a full picture of the role that thresholds play in driving the hydrology and biogeochemistry of xeric systems a full view of the entire array of processes at work is needed. Here a walk through the landscape of xeric systems will be conducted illustrating the powerful role of hydrologic thresholds on xeric system biogeochemistry. To understand xeric hydro-biogeochemistry two key ideas need to be focused on. First, it is important to start from a framework of reaction and transport. Second an understanding of the temporal and spatial components of thresholds that have a large impact on hydrologic and biogeochemical fluxes needs to be offered. In the uplands themselves episodic rewetting and drying of soils permits accelerated biogeochemical processing but also more gradual drainage of water through the subsurface than expected in simple conceptions of biogeochemical processes. Hydrologic thresholds (water content above hygroscopic) results in a stop start nutrient spiral of material across the landscape since runoff connecting uplands to xeric perennial riparian is episodic and often only transports materials a short distance (100's of m). This episodic movement results in important and counter-intuitive nutrient inputs to riparian zones but also significant processing and uptake of nutrients. The floods that transport these biogeochemicals also result in significant input to riparian groundwater and may be key to sustaining these critical ecosystems. Importantly the flood driven recharge process itself is a threshold process dependent on flood characteristics (floods greater than 100 cubic meters per second) and antecedent conditions (losing to near neutral gradients). Floods also appear to influence where arid and semi

  1. Threshold Things That Think: Authorisation for Resharing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peeters, Roel; Kohlweiss, Markulf; Preneel, Bart

    As we are evolving towards ubiquitous computing, users carry an increasing number of mobile devices with sensitive information. The security of this information can be protected using threshold cryptography, in which secret computations are shared between multiple devices. Threshold cryptography can be made more robust by resharing protocols, which allow recovery from partial compromises. This paper introduces user-friendly and secure protocols for the authorisation of resharing protocols. We present both automatic and manual protocols, utilising a group manual authentication protocol to add a new device. We analyse the security of these protocols: our analysis considers permanent and temporary compromises, denial of service attacks and manual authentications errors of the user.

  2. Methods for threshold determination in multiplexed assays

    SciTech Connect

    Tammero, Lance F. Bentley; Dzenitis, John M; Hindson, Benjamin J

    2014-06-24

    Methods for determination of threshold values of signatures comprised in an assay are described. Each signature enables detection of a target. The methods determine a probability density function of negative samples and a corresponding false positive rate curve. A false positive criterion is established and a threshold for that signature is determined as a point at which the false positive rate curve intersects the false positive criterion. A method for quantitative analysis and interpretation of assay results together with a method for determination of a desired limit of detection of a signature in an assay are also described.

  3. Three Dimensional Constraint Effects on the Estimated (Delta)CTOD during the Numerical Simulation of Different Fatigue Threshold Testing Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seshadri, Banavara R.; Smith, Stephen W.

    2007-01-01

    Variation in constraint through the thickness of a specimen effects the cyclic crack-tip-opening displacement (DELTA CTOD). DELTA CTOD is a valuable measure of crack growth behavior, indicating closure development, constraint variations and load history effects. Fatigue loading with a continual load reduction was used to simulate the load history associated with fatigue crack growth threshold measurements. The constraint effect on the estimated DELTA CTOD is studied by carrying out three-dimensional elastic-plastic finite element simulations. The analysis involves numerical simulation of different standard fatigue threshold test schemes to determine how each test scheme affects DELTA CTOD. The American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) prescribes standard load reduction procedures for threshold testing using either the constant stress ratio (R) or constant maximum stress intensity (K(sub max)) methods. Different specimen types defined in the standard, namely the compact tension, C(T), and middle cracked tension, M(T), specimens were used in this simulation. The threshold simulations were conducted with different initial K(sub max) values to study its effect on estimated DELTA CTOD. During each simulation, the DELTA CTOD was estimated at every load increment during the load reduction procedure. Previous numerical simulation results indicate that the constant R load reduction method generates a plastic wake resulting in remote crack closure during unloading. Upon reloading, this remote contact location was observed to remain in contact well after the crack tip was fully open. The final region to open is located at the point at which the load reduction was initiated and at the free surface of the specimen. However, simulations carried out using the constant Kmax load reduction procedure did not indicate remote crack closure. Previous analysis results using various starting K(sub max) values and different load reduction rates have indicated DELTA CTOD is

  4. Comparison between intensity- duration thresholds and cumulative rainfall thresholds for the forecasting of landslide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagomarsino, Daniela; Rosi, Ascanio; Rossi, Guglielmo; Segoni, Samuele; Catani, Filippo

    2014-05-01

    This work makes a quantitative comparison between the results of landslide forecasting obtained using two different rainfall threshold models, one using intensity-duration thresholds and the other based on cumulative rainfall thresholds in an area of northern Tuscany of 116 km2. The first methodology identifies rainfall intensity-duration thresholds by means a software called MaCumBA (Massive CUMulative Brisk Analyzer) that analyzes rain-gauge records, extracts the intensities (I) and durations (D) of the rainstorms associated with the initiation of landslides, plots these values on a diagram, and identifies thresholds that define the lower bounds of the I-D values. A back analysis using data from past events can be used to identify the threshold conditions associated with the least amount of false alarms. The second method (SIGMA) is based on the hypothesis that anomalous or extreme values of rainfall are responsible for landslide triggering: the statistical distribution of the rainfall series is analyzed, and multiples of the standard deviation (σ) are used as thresholds to discriminate between ordinary and extraordinary rainfall events. The name of the model, SIGMA, reflects the central role of the standard deviations in the proposed methodology. The definition of intensity-duration rainfall thresholds requires the combined use of rainfall measurements and an inventory of dated landslides, whereas SIGMA model can be implemented using only rainfall data. These two methodologies were applied in an area of 116 km2 where a database of 1200 landslides was available for the period 2000-2012. The results obtained are compared and discussed. Although several examples of visual comparisons between different intensity-duration rainfall thresholds are reported in the international literature, a quantitative comparison between thresholds obtained in the same area using different techniques and approaches is a relatively undebated research topic.

  5. Elevation of the panting threshold of the desert iguana, Dipsosaurus dorsalis, during dehydration: potential roles of changes in plasma osmolality and body fluid volume.

    PubMed

    Dupré, R K; Crawford, E C

    1986-01-01

    Dehydration of the desert iguana, Dipsosaurus dorsalis, resulted in a progressive elevation in the magnitude of the skin temperature necessary to elicit thermal panting (i.e., the panting threshold). Panting threshold increased from 43.4 +/- 0.8 degrees C at 100% initial body weight (IBW) to 45.4 +/- 1.2 degrees C at 90% IBW to 45.7 +/- 0.9 degrees C at 80% IBW. Plasma osmolality showed no significant change with dehydration to 80% IBW. Changes in plasma osmolality, whether induced by NaCl or non-ionic sucrose loading, had a significant impact on panting threshold. Increasing plasma osmolality resulted in an elevation of panting threshold while decreasing plasma osmolality resulted in lower panting thresholds. Decreasing body fluid volume by exsanguination of 1 ml whole blood/100 g body weight resulted in a mean increase in panting threshold by 0.7 +/- 0.2 degrees C. Volume loading with 160 mM NaCl (approximately isosmotic) had no significant effect on panting threshold. These data suggest that plasma osmolality and decreases in body fluid volume may be potent modulators of panting threshold during periods of water deprivation. However, at least in desert iguanas, increases in plasma osmolality would not appear to be an important factor in the elevation of panting threshold during dehydration to 80% IBW.

  6. A piecewise model of virus-immune system with two thresholds.

    PubMed

    Tang, Biao; Xiao, Yanni; Wu, Jianhong

    2016-08-01

    The combined antiretroviral therapy with interleukin (IL)-2 treatment may not be enough to preclude exceptionally high growth of HIV virus nor rebuilt the HIV-specific CD4 or CD8 T-cell proliferative immune response for management of HIV infected patients. Whether extra inclusion of immune therapy can induce the HIV-specific immune response and control HIV replication remains challenging. Here a piecewise virus-immune model with two thresholds is proposed to represent the HIV-1 RNA and effector cell-guided therapy strategies. We first analyze the dynamics of the virus-immune system with effector cell-guided immune therapy only and prove that there exists a critical level of the intensity of immune therapy determining whether the HIV-1 RAN virus loads can be controlled below a relative low level. Our analysis of the global dynamics of the proposed model shows that the pseudo-equilibrium can be globally stable or locally bistable with order 1 periodic solution or bistable with the virus-free periodic solution under various appropriate conditions. This indicates that HIV viral loads can either be eradicated or stabilize at a previously given level or go to infinity (corresponding to the effector cells oscillating), depending on the threshold levels and the initial HIV virus loads and effector cell counts. Comparing with the single threshold therapy strategy we obtain that with two thresholds therapy strategies either virus can be eradicated or the controllable region, where HIV viral loads can be maintained below a certain value, can be enlarged.

  7. On the two steps threshold selection for over-threshold modelling of extreme events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernardara, Pietro; Mazas, Franck; Weiss, Jerome; Andreewsky, Marc; Kergadallan, Xavier; Benoit, Michel; Hamm, Luc

    2013-04-01

    The estimation of the probability of occurrence of extreme events is traditionally achieved by fitting a probability distribution on a sample of extreme observations. In particular, the extreme value theory (EVT) states that values exceeding a given threshold converge through a Generalized Pareto Distribution (GPD) if the original sample is composed of independent and identically distributed values. However, the temporal series of sea and ocean variables usually show strong temporal autocorrelation. Traditionally, in order to select independent events for the following statistical analysis, the concept of a physical threshold is introduced: events that excess that threshold are defined as "extreme events". This is the so-called "Peak Over a Threshold (POT)" sampling, widely spread in the literature and currently used for engineering applications among many others. In the past, the threshold for the statistical sampling of extreme values asymptotically convergent toward GPD and the threshold for the physical selection of independent extreme events were confused, as the same threshold was used for both sampling data and to meet the hypothesis of extreme value convergence, leading to some incoherencies. In particular, if the two steps are performed simultaneously, the number of peaks over the threshold can increase but also decrease when the threshold decreases. This is logic in a physical point of view, since the definition of the sample of "extreme events" changes, but is not coherent with the statistical theory. We introduce a two-steps threshold selection for over-threshold modelling, aiming to discriminate (i) a physical threshold for the selection of extreme and independent events, and (ii) a statistical threshold for the optimization of the coherence with the hypothesis of the EVT. The former is a physical events identification procedure (also called "declustering") aiming at selecting independent extreme events. The latter is a purely statistical optimization

  8. Potency matters: thresholds govern endocrine activity.

    PubMed

    Borgert, Christopher J; Baker, Stephen P; Matthews, John C

    2013-10-01

    Whether thresholds exist for endocrine active substances and for endocrine disrupting effects of exogenous chemicals has been posed as a question for regulatory policy by the European Union. This question arises from a concern that the endocrine system is too complex to allow estimations of safe levels of exposure to any chemical with potential endocrine activity, and a belief that any such chemical can augment, retard, or disrupt the normal background activity of endogenous hormones. However, vital signaling functions of the endocrine system require it to continuously discriminate the biological information conveyed by potent endogenous hormones from a more concentrated background of structurally similar, endogenous molecules with low hormonal potential. This obligatory ability to discriminate important hormonal signals from background noise can be used to define thresholds for induction of hormonal effects, without which normal physiological functions would be impossible. From such thresholds, safe levels of exposure can be estimated. This brief review highlights how the fundamental principles governing hormonal effects - affinity, efficacy, potency, and mass action - dictate the existence of thresholds and why these principles also define the potential that exogenous chemicals might have to interfere with normal endocrine functioning.

  9. Anaerobic threshold in total artificial heart animals.

    PubMed

    Chiang, B Y; Pantalos, G; Burns, G L; Long, J W; Khanwilkar, P S; Everett, S D; Mohammad, S F; Olsen, D B

    1994-01-01

    The anaerobic threshold represents an objective measure of functional capacity and is useful in assessment of pulmonary and cardiovascular dysfunction. This study determined the anaerobic threshold in total artificial heart animals and evaluated the performance of the total artificial heart system. Five animals with total artificial hearts were put under incremental exercise testing after exercise training. The intensity of exercise ranged from 2.0 to 4.5 km/hr, with an increment of 0.5 km/hr every 3 min. The anaerobic threshold was 6.72 +/- 0.84 ml/kg/min as detected by the lactate method, and 6.48 +/- 0.79 by the CO2 method. The value of the anaerobic threshold in total artificial heart animals implies that the performance capacity of a total artificial heart is not sufficient to meet the oxygen requirements of vigorously exercising skeletal muscle. The protocol does not allow for driving parameter changes during exercise, and this situation, combined with the manual mode of the control system used, was inadequate to allow the total artificial heart animals to exercise more vigorously. Using an automatic control mode might be helpful, as well as considering the relationship between indices of oxygen metabolism, such as oxygen delivery, oxygen consumption, and oxygen extraction rate, in the control algorithms in total artificial heart control systems.

  10. Speech reception thresholds in various interference conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carr, Suzanne P.; Colburn, H. Steven

    2001-05-01

    Speech intelligibility is integral to human verbal communication; however, our understanding of the effects of competing noise, room reverberation, and frequency range restriction is incomplete. Using virtual stimuli, the dependence of intelligibility threshold levels on the extent of room reverberation, the relative locations of speech target and masking noise, and the available frequency content of the speech and the masking noise is explored. Speech-shaped masking noise and target sentences have three spectral conditions: wideband, high pass above 2-kHz, and low pass below 2-kHz. The 2-kHz cutoff was chosen to approximately bisect the range of frequencies most important in speech, and the high pass noise condition simulates high-frequency hearing loss. Reverberation conditions include a pseudo-anechoic case, a moderately reverberant ``classroom'' case, and a very reverberant ``bathroom'' case. Both binaural and monaural intelligibility are measured. Preliminary results show that source separation decreases thresholds, reverberation increases thresholds, and low frequency noise reverberates more in the rooms, contributing to increasing thresholds along with the effects of the upward spread of masking. The energetic effects of reverberation are explored. [Work supported by NIH DC00100.

  11. Auricular electrical stimulation and dental pain threshold.

    PubMed Central

    Simmons, M. S.; Oleson, T. D.

    1993-01-01

    A modified double-blind evaluation of naloxone reversibility of dental analgesia produced by auricular electrical stimulation (AES) was examined in 40 subjects assigned randomly to one of four groups: AES followed by saline (AS), AES followed by naloxone (AN), placebo AES followed by saline (PS), and placebo AES followed by naloxone (PN). Dental pain threshold was tested using a hand-held dental pulp tester. A second investigator administered the true or placebo AES using an electrical stimulator. A third investigator injected intravenously saline or naloxone. The subjects and investigators 1 and 3 were blind to all treatment conditions. A repeated measures analysis of variance revealed a significant difference among the four groups. The AES groups exhibited a statistically significant 18% elevation of pain threshold, whereas the two placebo stimulation groups (PS and PN) remained essentially unchanged. The mean pain threshold increased to more than 23% for group AS, but fell to less than 12% for the subjects in group AN, who were given naloxone. These findings indicate a small but significant elevation of pain threshold by AES, an effect partially blocked by naloxone, suggesting an endogenous opioid system as one mechanism for AES analgesia. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:8185085

  12. Identification of Threshold Concepts for Biochemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loertscher, Jennifer; Green, David; Lewis, Jennifer E.; Lin, Sara; Minderhout, Vicky

    2014-01-01

    Threshold concepts (TCs) are concepts that, when mastered, represent a transformed understanding of a discipline without which the learner cannot progress. We have undertaken a process involving more than 75 faculty members and 50 undergraduate students to identify a working list of TCs for biochemistry. The process of identifying TCs for…

  13. A Cognitive Approach to Threshold Concepts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Guy

    2013-01-01

    This paper asks a fundamental question: what is happening inside the mind of the undergraduate during teaching and learning experiences, and how should curricula be designed to support it? A number of concepts lend themselves to providing an answer, principle among which is the relatively recent idea of Threshold Concepts. In this paper we attempt…

  14. Threshold Concepts in Finance: Conceptualizing the Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoadley, Susan; Tickle, Leonie; Wood, Leigh N.; Kyng, Tim

    2015-01-01

    Graduates with well-developed capabilities in finance are invaluable to our society and in increasing demand. Universities face the challenge of designing finance programmes to develop these capabilities and the essential knowledge that underpins them. Our research responds to this challenge by identifying threshold concepts that are central to…

  15. 40 CFR 98.431 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...-Charged Equipment or Closed-Cell Foams § 98.431 Reporting threshold. Any importer or exporter of fluorinated GHGs contained in pre-charged equipment or closed-cell foams who meets the requirements of § 98.2... or closed-cell foams....

  16. 40 CFR 98.431 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...-Charged Equipment or Closed-Cell Foams § 98.431 Reporting threshold. Any importer or exporter of fluorinated GHGs contained in pre-charged equipment or closed-cell foams who meets the requirements of § 98.2... or closed-cell foams....

  17. 40 CFR 98.431 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...-Charged Equipment or Closed-Cell Foams § 98.431 Reporting threshold. Any importer or exporter of fluorinated GHGs contained in pre-charged equipment or closed-cell foams who meets the requirements of § 98.2... or closed-cell foams....

  18. 40 CFR 98.91 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Electronics Manufacturing § 98.91 Reporting threshold. (a) You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if electronics manufacturing production processes, as defined in.... Rather than using the calculation methodologies in § 98.93 to calculate emissions from...

  19. 40 CFR 98.91 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Electronics Manufacturing § 98.91 Reporting threshold. (a) You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if electronics manufacturing production processes, as defined in.... Rather than using the calculation methodologies in § 98.93 to calculate emissions from...

  20. 40 CFR 98.91 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Electronics Manufacturing § 98.91 Reporting threshold. (a) You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if electronics manufacturing production processes, as defined in.... Rather than using the calculation methodologies in § 98.93 to calculate emissions from...

  1. 40 CFR 98.91 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Electronics Manufacturing § 98.91 Reporting threshold. (a) You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if electronics manufacturing production processes, as defined in.... Rather than using the calculation methodologies in § 98.93 to calculate emissions from...

  2. Phi Delta Kappa at the Threshold

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walling, Donovan R.

    2006-01-01

    Since its fraternal origins a century ago, Phi Delta Kappa (PDK) International has been foremost a society of individuals joined together in professional collegiality and dedicated to tenets of leadership, service, and research in education. As PDK crosses the threshold into its second century, that early spirit of association lit in 1906, like…

  3. 40 CFR 98.121 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Fluorinated Gas Production § 98.121 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a fluorinated gas production process that... in § 98.2(a)(2), calculate process emissions from fluorinated gas production using uncontrolled...

  4. 40 CFR 98.121 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Fluorinated Gas Production § 98.121 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a fluorinated gas production process that... in § 98.2(a)(2), calculate process emissions from fluorinated gas production using uncontrolled...

  5. 40 CFR 98.431 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Reporting threshold. 98.431 Section 98.431 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Importers and Exporters of Fluorinated Greenhouse Gases Contained in...

  6. 40 CFR 98.121 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Fluorinated Gas Production § 98.121 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a fluorinated gas production process that... in § 98.2(a)(2), calculate process emissions from fluorinated gas production using uncontrolled...

  7. 40 CFR 98.121 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Fluorinated Gas Production § 98.121 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a fluorinated gas production process that... in § 98.2(a)(2), calculate process emissions from fluorinated gas production using uncontrolled...

  8. Gastric Residual Volume: Rethinking the Threshold.

    PubMed

    Emami Zeydi, Amir; Sharafkhani, Mohammad; Armat, Mohammad Reza

    2016-01-01

    There are many challenges related to enteral feedings of the mechanically ventilated patient. Among the most often debated issues is the threshold for gastric residual volume before further feeding. This brief article considers the factors to be considered and reviews current thinking on the topic. PMID:27575801

  9. Photoproduction of the phi (1020) near threshold

    SciTech Connect

    D.J. Tedeschi; M. Huertas

    2000-05-12

    Photoproduction of phi mesons at photon energies below 2 GeV were measured at the CLAS detector in Hall B of Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility. Preliminary differential cross sections are reported from the proton near threshold. The measurement are extended to the region in the variable t where production mechanisms beyond that of diffraction are expected to become significant.

  10. Characterizing the Switching Thresholds of Magnetophoretic Transistors.

    PubMed

    Abedini-Nassab, Roozbeh; Joh, Daniel Y; Van Heest, Melissa A; Yi, John S; Baker, Cody; Taherifard, Zohreh; Margolis, David M; Garcia, J Victor; Chilkoti, Ashutosh; Murdoch, David M; Yellen, Benjamin B

    2015-10-28

    The switching thresholds of magnetophoretic transistors for sorting cells in microfluidic environments are characterized. The transistor operating conditions require short 20-30 mA pulses of electrical current. By demonstrating both attractive and repulsive transistor modes, a single transistor architecture is used to implement the full write cycle for importing and exporting single cells in specified array sites. PMID:26349853

  11. Near threshold behavior of photoelectron satellite intensities

    SciTech Connect

    Shirley, D.A.; Becker, U.; Heimann, P.A.; Langer, B.

    1987-09-01

    The historical background and understanding of photoelectron satellite peaks is reviewed, using He(n), Ne(1s), Ne(2p), Ar(1s), and Ar(3s) as case studies. Threshold studies are emphasized. The classification of electron correlation effects as either ''intrinsic'' or ''dynamic'' is recommended. 30 refs., 7 figs.

  12. 40 CFR 98.461 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Industrial Waste Landfills § 98.461 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains an industrial waste landfill meeting the...)(2), the emissions from the industrial waste landfill are to be determined using the...

  13. Temperature thresholds to freeze damage in cranberry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sprinkler irrigation is required for frost protection of cranberry and is arguably the most important cultural practice used in production of the crop. A study was initiated in a commercial bed of ‘Stevens’ cranberry located in Langlois, OR. The objectives are to identify temperature thresholds to...

  14. Handwriting Automaticity: The Search for Performance Thresholds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Medwell, Jane; Wray, David

    2014-01-01

    Evidence is accumulating that handwriting has an important role in written composition. In particular, handwriting automaticity appears to relate to success in composition. This relationship has been little explored in British contexts and we currently have little idea of what threshold performance levels might be. In this paper, we report on two…

  15. Mandated Reporting Thresholds for Community Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crowell, Kathryn; Levi, Benjamin H.

    2012-01-01

    This study examines how community-based mandated reporters understand and interpret "reasonable suspicion", the standard threshold for mandated reporting of suspected child abuse. Respondents were asked to identify the probability necessary for "suspicion of child abuse" to constitute "reasonable suspicion". Data were analyzed for internal…

  16. Excitable neurons, firing threshold manifolds and canards.

    PubMed

    Mitry, John; McCarthy, Michelle; Kopell, Nancy; Wechselberger, Martin

    2013-01-01

    We investigate firing threshold manifolds in a mathematical model of an excitable neuron. The model analyzed investigates the phenomenon of post-inhibitory rebound spiking due to propofol anesthesia and is adapted from McCarthy et al. (SIAM J. Appl. Dyn. Syst. 11(4):1674-1697, 2012). Propofol modulates the decay time-scale of an inhibitory GABAa synaptic current. Interestingly, this system gives rise to rebound spiking within a specific range of propofol doses. Using techniques from geometric singular perturbation theory, we identify geometric structures, known as canards of folded saddle-type, which form the firing threshold manifolds. We find that the position and orientation of the canard separatrix is propofol dependent. Thus, the speeds of relevant slow synaptic processes are encoded within this geometric structure. We show that this behavior cannot be understood using a static, inhibitory current step protocol, which can provide a single threshold for rebound spiking but cannot explain the observed cessation of spiking for higher propofol doses. We then compare the analyses of dynamic and static synaptic inhibition, showing how the firing threshold manifolds of each relate, and why a current step approach is unable to fully capture the behavior of this model. PMID:23945278

  17. Fractal Threshold Behavior in Vacuum Gravitational Collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szybka, Sebastian J.; Chmaj, Tadeusz

    2008-03-01

    We present the numerical evidence for fractal threshold behavior in the five dimensional vacuum Einstein equations satisfying the cohomogeneity-two triaxial Bianchi type-IX ansatz. In other words, we show that a flip of the wings of a butterfly may influence the process of the black hole formation.

  18. 40 CFR 98.461 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... generation corrected for oxidation as determined using Equation TT-6 of this subpart times the global warming... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Reporting threshold. 98.461 Section 98.461 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS...

  19. 40 CFR 98.461 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... generation corrected for oxidation as determined using Equation TT-6 of this subpart times the global warming... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Reporting threshold. 98.461 Section 98.461 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS...

  20. 40 CFR 98.461 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... generation corrected for oxidation as determined using Equation TT-6 of this subpart times the global warming... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Reporting threshold. 98.461 Section 98.461 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS...