Science.gov

Sample records for institute collaborative radiological

  1. Overview of Sandia National Laboratories and Khlopin Radium Institute collaborative radiological accident consequence analysis efforts

    SciTech Connect

    Young, M.L.; Carlson, D.D.; Lazarev, L.N.; Petrov, B.F.; Romanovskiy, V.N.

    1997-05-01

    In January, 1995 a collaborative effort to improve radiological consequence analysis methods and tools was initiated between the V.G. Khlopin Institute (KRI) and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). The purpose of the collaborative effort was to transfer SNL`s consequence analysis methods to KRI and identify opportunities for collaborative efforts to solve mutual problems relating to the safety of radiochemical facilities. A second purpose was to improve SNL`s consequence analysis methods by incorporating the radiological accident field experience of KRI scientists (e.g. the Chernobyl and Kyshtym accidents). The initial collaborative effort focused on the identification of: safety criteria that radiochemical facilities in Russia must meet; analyses/measures required to demonstrate that safety criteria have been met; and data required to complete the analyses/measures identified to demonstrate the safety basis of a facility.

  2. Fixation of Radiological Contamination; International Collaborative Development

    SciTech Connect

    Rick Demmer

    2013-03-01

    A cooperative international project was conducted by the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and the United Kingdom’s National Nuclear Laboratory (NNL) to integrate a capture coating with a high performance atomizing process. The initial results were promising, and lead to further trials. The somewhat longer testing and optimization process has resulted in a product that could be demonstrated in the field to reduce airborne radiological dust and contamination.

  3. WE-D-16A-01: ACR Radiology Leadership Institute

    SciTech Connect

    Rubin, G

    2014-06-15

    The Radiology Leadership Institute (RLI) was established in 2011 by the American College of Radiology with a mission to prepare leaders who will shape the future of radiology to ensure quality, elevate service and deliver extraordinary patient care. Leadership skills are critical to medical physicists in order for them to assure that imaging and therapy are safe and of the highest quality possible. This session will provide an introduction to the RLI and its programs with an emphasis on how medical physicists can get involved and what they might expect to gain through their engagement with the RLI. The session will also provide a framework for leadership in healthcare with an emphasis on roles and opportunities for medical physicists to enhance their effectiveness as members of the healthcare, medical education, and research communities.

  4. Multi-institutional Collaboration to Promote Undergraduate Clinical Research Nursing.

    PubMed

    Garner, Shelby L; Spencer, Becky; Beal, Claudia C

    2016-01-01

    Clinical research nursing is distinct from nursing research and includes the coordination and delivery of care for patients enrolled in clinical research trials. An innovative elective in clinical research nursing was developed collaboratively by stakeholders at a university, research institute, and national organization to provide experiential learning for undergraduate nursing students. The multi-institutional collaborative process, course overview, and precepted experience are described.

  5. Collaborative Environmental Institutions: All Talk and No Action?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lubell, Mark

    2004-01-01

    Many analysts view collaborative institutions that attempt to forge consensus and build cooperation among conflicting stakeholders as a potential remedy to the pathologies of conventional environmental policy. However, few analyses have demonstrated that collaborative institutions actually increase levels of cooperation, and critics accuse…

  6. The Role of the IR Office: Collaborating across the Institution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kroc, Rick

    2015-01-01

    This chapter describes a framework to guide collaboration between institutional research and other campus offices. Three examples are then provided to illustrate how the framework was applied successfully to actual projects.

  7. Environmental protection: researches in National Institute of Radiological Sciences.

    PubMed

    Fuma, Shoichi; Ban-nai, Tadaaki; Doi, Masahiro; Fujimori, Akira; Ishii, Nobuyoshi; Ishikawa, Yuji; Kawaguchi, Isao; Kubota, Yoshihisa; Maruyama, Kouichi; Miyamoto, Kiriko; Nakamori, Taizo; Takeda, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Yoshito; Yanagisawa, Kei; Yasuda, Takako; Yoshida, Satoshi

    2011-07-01

    Some studies for radiological protection of the environment have been made at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS). Transfer of radionuclides and related elements has been investigated for dose estimation of non-human biota. A parameter database and radionuclide transfer models have been also developed for the Japanese environments. Dose (rate)-effect relationships for survival, growth and reproduction have been investigated in conifers, Arabidopsis, fungi, earthworms, springtails, algae, duckweeds, daphnia and medaka. Also genome-wide gene expression analysis has been carried out by high coverage expression profiling (HiCEP). Effects on aquatic microbial communities have been studied in experimental ecosystem models, i.e., microcosms. Some effects were detected at a dose rate of 1 Gy day(-1) and were likely to arise from interspecies interactions. The results obtained at NIRS have been used in development of frameworks for environmental protection by some international bodies, and will contribute to environmental protection in Japan and other Asian countries. PMID:21502302

  8. Multi-institutional Collaboration to Promote Undergraduate Clinical Research Nursing.

    PubMed

    Garner, Shelby L; Spencer, Becky; Beal, Claudia C

    2016-01-01

    Clinical research nursing is distinct from nursing research and includes the coordination and delivery of care for patients enrolled in clinical research trials. An innovative elective in clinical research nursing was developed collaboratively by stakeholders at a university, research institute, and national organization to provide experiential learning for undergraduate nursing students. The multi-institutional collaborative process, course overview, and precepted experience are described. PMID:26164323

  9. Crossing Borders, Breaking Boundaries: Collaboration among Higher Education Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duffield, Stacy; Olson, Alan; Kerzman, Renee

    2013-01-01

    Partnerships and collaboration have become popular in higher education; and partnerships with community agencies, K-12 schools, and businesses are common. However, formal and sustained partnerships among institutions of higher education are not nearly as widespread. This article presents a model for collaboration in higher education focused on a…

  10. Status of ion sources at National Institute of Radiological Sciences.

    PubMed

    Kitagawa, A; Fujita, T; Goto, A; Hattori, T; Hamano, T; Hojo, S; Honma, T; Imaseki, H; Katagiri, K; Muramatsu, M; Sakamoto, Y; Sekiguchi, M; Suda, M; Sugiura, A; Suya, N

    2012-02-01

    The National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS) maintains various ion accelerators in order to study the effects of radiation of the human body and medical uses of radiation. Two electrostatic tandem accelerators and three cyclotrons delivered by commercial companies have offered various life science tools; these include proton-induced x-ray emission analysis (PIXE), micro beam irradiation, neutron exposure, and radioisotope tracers and probes. A duoplasmatron, a multicusp ion source, a penning ion source (PIG), and an electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS) are in operation for these purposes. The Heavy-Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC) is an accelerator complex for heavy-ion radiotherapy, fully developed by NIRS. HIMAC is utilized not only for daily treatment with the carbon beam but also for fundamental experiments. Several ECRISs and a PIG at HIMAC satisfy various research and clinical requirements.

  11. CHORUS: a computer-based radiology handbook for international collaboration via the World Wide Web.

    PubMed

    Kahn, C E

    1995-07-01

    To facilitate collaboration among physicians, a computer-based radiology handbook was developed and published electronically via the World Wide Web on the Internet. This system, called CHORUS (Collaborative Hypertext of Radiology), allows physicians without computer expertise to read documents, contribute knowledge, and critically review the handbook's content by using a simple, graphical user interface from virtually any type of computer system. CHORUS contains 1,168 "note-card" documents that describe radiologic findings; differential diagnoses; technical information; and pertinent anatomy, pathology, and physiology. Documents are indexed by title and by organ system and are linked to related documents. Data entry forms allow physicians to comment on published documents, submit new documents, and review submitted documents. CHORUS uses public-domain technologies to present useful, easily accessible knowledge for education and clinical decision making, and it provides a medium for international medical collaboration via the Internet.

  12. Exploring Teacher Induction: Collaborative Self-Studies across Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Déirdre; Engemann, Joe

    2015-01-01

    Educators from eight institutions engaged in collaborative self-studies of their own practices to gain deeper insight into the significance of narrative-based writing supporting the process of teacher induction. A series of teacher induction institutes based on narrative writing processes provided the context for critical exploration of the lived…

  13. Fingering a murderer: a successful anthropological and radiological collaboration.

    PubMed

    Brogdon, B G; Sorg, Marcella H; Marden, Kerriann

    2010-01-01

    We illustrate an interdisciplinary approach to identify a victim in a case with complex taphonomic and procedural issues. Burning, fragmentation, species commingling, and examination by multiple experts required anthropological preparation and analysis combined with radiographic adaptations to image and match trabecular patterns in unusually small, burned specimens. A missing person was last seen in the company of a reclusive female on a remote rural property. A warranted search found several burn sites containing human and animal bones. Fragment preparation, analysis, and development of a biological profile by anthropologists enabled examination by the odontologist, molecular biologist, and radiologist, and justified use of antemortem radiographs from one potential victim. Visual and radiological comparison resulted in a positive (later confirmed) identification of the victim by radiological matches of three carpal phalanges. Although some dimensional changes are expected with burning, morphological details were preserved, aided by selection of relatively intact, small bones for comparison. PMID:20002275

  14. Asian Radiology Forum 2015 for Building an Asian Friendship: A Step toward the Vigorous Intersociety Collaboration in Asia

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ho Sung; Choi, Jung-Ah

    2016-01-01

    According to the reports presented at the Asian Radiology Forum 2015, organized by the Korean Society of Radiology (KSR) during the Korean Congress of Radiology (KCR) in September 2015 in Seoul, there is an increasing need to promote international exchange and collaboration amongst radiology societies in Asian countries. The Asian Radiology Forum was first held by KSR and the national delegates of Asian radiological partner societies, who attended this meeting with the aim of discussing selected subjects of global relevance in radiology. In 2015, current stands, pros and cons, and future plans for inter-society collaboration between each Asian radiological partner societies were primarily discussed. The Asian radiology societies have international collaborations with each other through various activities, such as joint symposia, exchange programs, social exchange, and international membership. The advantages of continuing inter-society collaboration in most of the Asian radiology societies include international speakers, diverse clinical research, and cutting edge technology; while limited range of financial and human resources, language barrier, differences in goals and expectations are claimed as disadvantages. With regard to the future, most of the Asian radiology societies focus on expanding partner societies and enhancing globalization and collaboration programs through various international meetings and exchange programs. PMID:26957902

  15. GRDC. A Collaborative Framework for Radiological Background and Contextual Data Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Brian J. Quiter; Ramakrishnan, Lavanya; Mark S. Bandstra

    2015-12-01

    The Radiation Mobile Analysis Platform (RadMAP) is unique in its capability to collect both high quality radiological data from both gamma-ray detectors and fast neutron detectors and a broad array of contextual data that includes positioning and stance data, high-resolution 3D radiological data from weather sensors, LiDAR, and visual and hyperspectral cameras. The datasets obtained from RadMAP are both voluminous and complex and require analyses from highly diverse communities within both the national laboratory and academic communities. Maintaining a high level of transparency will enable analysis products to further enrich the RadMAP dataset. It is in this spirit of open and collaborative data that the RadMAP team proposed to collect, calibrate, and make available online data from the RadMAP system. The Berkeley Data Cloud (BDC) is a cloud-based data management framework that enables web-based data browsing visualization, and connects curated datasets to custom workflows such that analysis products can be managed and disseminated while maintaining user access rights. BDC enables cloud-based analyses of large datasets in a manner that simulates real-time data collection, such that BDC can be used to test algorithm performance on real and source-injected datasets. Using the BDC framework, a subset of the RadMAP datasets have been disseminated via the Gamma Ray Data Cloud (GRDC) that is hosted through the National Energy Research Science Computing (NERSC) Center, enabling data access to over 40 users at 10 institutions.

  16. Annual report of the National Institute of Radiological Sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1992-01-01

    The annual report for the activities of the National Institute of Radiological Sciences in Japan in the fiscal year 1990 is presented. The activities are divided into research, technical aids, training, medical services, management affairs at the Nakaminato Laboratory Branch Office, library or editing, international cooperation, and general affairs. Research activities are described under the following sections: (1) special researches covering biological risk evaluation in public exposure and exposure assessment in the environment and the public involved in food chain, medical use of accelerated heavy ions, and survey for the demonstration of dose-response relationships in low dose irradiation; (2) five assigned researches; (3) ordinary researches concerning physics, pharmacochemistry, biology, genetics, pathology and physiology, cell biology, internal exposure, environmental science, clinical research, clinical research for radiation injuries, medical use of heavy particles, environmental radiation ecology, and aquatic radiation ecology; (4) risk estimation of radiation; (5) survey for radiation response phenomena in fish and in immunity associated with low dose irradiation; (6) actual surveys for Bikini victims, population doses of medical and occupational exposure, and thorotrast exposure; (7) project research; (8) integrated atomic energy-based technological research; (9) radioactivity survey; (10) research supported by Science and Technology Agency aids; (11) International research cooperation; and (12) government-private joint cooperative study. Appendices include the personnel list and the bibliography of articles reported by the staff.

  17. Activities of the National Institute of Radiological Sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1994-01-01

    This annual report presents activities at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS) in Japan during the period April 1992-March 1993. The activities are divided into research, technical aids, training, medical services, management, library or editing, and international cooperation. Research activities are arranged with twelve sections. The first section on special researches deals with continuing research projects entitled: (1) 'Biological Risk Evaluation in Public Exposure'; (2) 'Exposure Assessment in the Environment and the Public Through Food Chain'; (3) 'Medical Use of Accelerated Heavy Ions'; and (4) 'Preliminary Study for the Demonstration of Dose-Response Relationships in Low-Dose Range'. All projects except for project (4) will be finished up to March 1993. The section of assigned researches covers four titles. The section of ordinary researches covers physics (four titles), pharmacochemistry (four), biology (three), genetics (four), physiopathology (four), cytological radiation injuries (three), internal exposure (four), environmental science (four), clinical research (four), clinical research for radiation injuries (three), medical use of heavy particles (three), environmental radiation ecology (three), and aquatic radiation ecology (two). The section on technical aids gives an overview of technical services, radiation safety, animal and plant management, and cyclotron management. Appendices give the information on personnel in NIRS.

  18. An inter-institutional collaboration: transforming education through interprofessional simulations.

    PubMed

    King, Sharla; Drummond, Jane; Hughes, Ellen; Bookhalter, Sharon; Huffman, Dan; Ansell, Dawn

    2013-09-01

    An inter-institutional partnership of four post-secondary institutions and a health provider formed a learning community with the goal of developing, implementing and evaluating interprofessional learning experiences in simulation-based environments. The organization, education and educational research activities of the learning community align with the institutional and instructional reforms recommended by the Lancet Commission on Health Professional Education for the 21st century. This article provides an overview of the inter-institutional collaboration, including the interprofessional simulation learning experiences, instructor development activities and preliminary results from the evaluation.

  19. Multi-Institutional Collaborative Astronomy Education Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slater, T. F.; Slater, S. J.

    2011-09-01

    ASP, AAS, APS, and AAPT advocate that scientists should be engaged and acknowledged for successfully engaging in astronomy and physics education research and the scholarship of teaching because these efforts serve to improve pedagogical techniques and the evaluation of teaching. However, scientists have had the opportunity to pursue formal training in how to meaningfully engage in astronomy education research as an important scholarly endeavor. This special interest session for college and university physics and astronomy faculty, post-docs, and graduate students provided a forum to discuss the motivations, strategies, methodology, and publication routes for improving astronomy education through conducting rigorous science education research. Topics for discussion targeted the value of various education research questions, strengths and weaknesses of several different research design methodologies, strategies to successfully obtain Institutional Review Board approval to conduct education research on human subjects, and become more aware of how education research articles are created for publication in journals such as the Astronomy Education Review.

  20. Mutual benefits of research collaborations between zoos and academic institutions.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, Eduardo J; Timberlake, William

    2008-11-01

    Zoos focus on welfare, conservation, education, and research related to animals they keep. Academic institutions emphasize description, experimentation, modeling, and teaching of general and specific animal biology and behavior through work in both laboratory and field. The considerable overlap in concerns and methods has increased interest in collaborative projects, but there is ample room for closer and more extensive interactions. The purpose of this article is to increase awareness of potential research collaborations in three areas: (1) control and analysis of behavior, (2) conservation and propagation of species, and (3) education of students and the general public. In each area, we outline (a) research in zoos, (b) research in academics, and (c) potential collaborative efforts. Zoo Biol 27:470-487, 2008. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  1. Creating Catalytic Collaborations between Theater Artists, Scientists, and Research Institutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wise, Debra

    2012-02-01

    Catalyst Collaborative@MIT (CC@MIT) is a collaboration between MIT and Underground Railway Theater (URT), a company with 30 years experience creating theater through interdisciplinary inquiry and engaging community. CC@MIT is dedicated to creating and presenting plays that deepen public understanding about science, while simultaneously providing artistic and emotional experiences not available in other forms of dialogue about science. CC@MIT engages audiences in thinking about themes in science of social and ethical concern; provides insight into the culture of science and the impact of that culture on society; and examines the human condition through the lens of science that intersects our lives and the lives of scientists. Original productions range from Einstein's Dreams to From Orchids to Octopi -- an evolutionary love story; classics re-framed include The Life of Galileo and Breaking the Code (about Alan Turing). CC@MIT commissions playwrights and scientists to create plays; engages audiences with scientists; performs at MIT and a professional venue near the campus; collaborates with the Cambridge Science Festival and MIT Museum; engages MIT students, as well as youth and children. Artistic Director Debra Wise will address how the collaboration developed, what opportunities are provided by collaborations between theaters and scientific research institutions, and lessons learned of value to the field.

  2. Minority Institutions Collaboration in Geoscience Education and Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, P. A.; Austin, S. A.; Johnson, L. P.; Salgado, C.; Walter, D. K.

    2007-12-01

    The Minority University Consortium for Earth and Space Sciences (MUCESS) is a collaboration among four diverse minority institutions to increase the number of underrepresented students pursuing professional and research careers in Earth and Atmospheric Science and Space Science. The institutions that comprise MUCESS include the University of Houston-Downtown (Hispanic Serving Institution), Medgar Evers College (Other Minority University), Norfolk State University (Historically Black College/University) and South Carolina State University (Historically Black College/University). MUCESS collaborations span a range of projects in research, education and outreach in Earth and Space Science. This includes faculty research, undergraduate internships and student exchanges among our institutions as well as outreach to K-12 schools and the general public. MUCESS has recently received an award from the National Science Foundation under Solicitation NSF 04-590 "Opportunities for Enhancing Diversity in the Geosciences (OEDG)". Under this award faculty and students will be engaged in research (both undergraduate and graduate) in atmospheric science through ozonesonde launches to better understand the distribution and transport of ozone in the lower troposphere. Faculty and students will also participate in ozone observations for validation of instruments onboard the NASA Aura satellite. Additional balloon payloads will include instruments such as temperature and data logger sensors, carbon dioxide detectors, Geiger counters and digital and analog cameras. Launches will originate from Texas, New York, Vermont, South Carolina and elsewhere. This presentation describes the formation of MUCESS and the collaborative undergraduate research and outreach projects spanning six or more years. It also describes the evolution of the joint ozone investigation as well as planned activities supported by the NSF Geoscience Diversity award. Funding for the work described has been provided by

  3. The General Electric-Association of University Radiologists Radiology Research Academic Fellowship (GERRAF). An industry-academic collaboration to improve clinical research in radiology.

    PubMed

    Hillman, B J; Fryback, D G; Holden, R W; McNeil, B J; Molitor, R M; Moss, A A; Peck, P V; Putman, C E; Thompson, W M

    1993-05-01

    The association of GE Medical Systems and the AUR represents a unique collaboration between academic radiology and industry that bears important potential for elevating the quality of clinical research in radiology and developing a cadre of high-quality radiologist researchers for the future. The establishment of the GERRAF is especially timely given the new imperatives of the rapidly changing health care environment, with its emphasis on expenditure reduction. The ultimate goals of GERRAF are to develop research leaders for radiology that will provide guidance for appropriate clinical practice, better train future researchers, and secure the role of radiologists in caring for patients.

  4. Design Issues in a Cross-Institutional Collaboration on a Distance Education Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Xuemei; Dannenhoffer, John F. III; Davidson, Barry D.; Spector, J. Michael

    2005-01-01

    Collaborative learning has been gaining momentum as a promising pedagogy in higher education. Research on student collaboration is increasing. However, one arena is often overlooked--faculty collaboration. In this article, a cross-institutional faculty collaboration is presented. The context is faculty collaboration on the design of an…

  5. Collaborative Research in Teaching: Collaboration between Laboratory Courses at Neighboring Institutions

    PubMed Central

    Yates, Jennifer R.; Curtis, Nancy; Ramus, Seth J.

    2006-01-01

    The concept of collaboration is central to many scientific endeavors. Here we present a model for collaborative research between laboratory courses in behavioral neuroscience at different institutions (or for that matter, multiple classrooms at a single institution). This course design engages undergraduate students in novel scientific research inside the classroom, and in discussion of that research between classrooms. In addition to exposing students to scientific collaboration, teaching these courses in tandem allows for the sharing of a number of resources while allowing collection of potentially publishable data and training students to conduct continuing independent research. For the 2003 and 2004 school years, we have run in collaboration the Laboratory in Brain and Behavior course at Colby College and the Laboratory in Behavioral Neuroscience: Learning and Memory course at Bowdoin College. The students enrolled in these courses have conducted primary, novel research projects designed by the instructors using animal subjects. Students learn experimental design, and surgery, behavioral testing, and histological techniques. Enrollments are limited in these courses, so having both groups of students perform the same protocols increases the number of subjects in these studies, and therefore, the statistical power of the experiment. The physical distance between the schools requires that technology be used to bring students in the two courses together. We have used threaded discussion groups accessible to students at both schools for everyday exchange of methodological information and have used videoconferencing for “lab meetings” addressing methodological issues and data analysis. PMID:23493811

  6. Teaching interprofessional collaboration: using online education across institutions.

    PubMed

    Myers, Christine Teeters; O'Brien, Shirley Peganoff

    2015-04-01

    Interdisciplinary courses among students in occupational therapy, physical therapy, and speech-language pathology are important for addressing teamwork, communication, and understanding of professional roles, especially in pre-service training for early intervention and school-based practice where collaboration is essential. Although interprofessional education (IPE) as a part of higher education in the health sciences has been strongly encouraged, IPE courses are difficult to schedule and implement. This article discusses the challenges of developing and delivering two IPE courses in an online format, specifically the innovation that addresses logistics, time factors, and social presence for the IPE courses across two institutions. PMID:25821890

  7. Teaching interprofessional collaboration: using online education across institutions.

    PubMed

    Myers, Christine Teeters; O'Brien, Shirley Peganoff

    2015-04-01

    Interdisciplinary courses among students in occupational therapy, physical therapy, and speech-language pathology are important for addressing teamwork, communication, and understanding of professional roles, especially in pre-service training for early intervention and school-based practice where collaboration is essential. Although interprofessional education (IPE) as a part of higher education in the health sciences has been strongly encouraged, IPE courses are difficult to schedule and implement. This article discusses the challenges of developing and delivering two IPE courses in an online format, specifically the innovation that addresses logistics, time factors, and social presence for the IPE courses across two institutions.

  8. Presenting Bionic: Broader Impacts and Outreach Network for Institutional Collaboration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Storm, K.

    2014-12-01

    Broader Impact plans are required of all NSF proposals. In 2011 the National Science Board, which oversees NSF, reconfirmed NSF's commitment to Broader Impacts in its task force report on the merit review system. At many institutions there are professionals that focus their work on supporting the Broader Impact work of researchers. This session will share the Broader Impacts and Outreach Network for Institutional Collaboration (BIONIC) plan to create a professional network of individuals and offices committed to planning and carrying out effective Broader Impact programming. BIONIC is an NSF Research Coordination Network that is recommended for funding through the Biology Directorate. In this session we will share the goals of BIONIC, and the progress to date in reaching those goals (of which one aspect is the curating of effective Broader Impact initiatives).

  9. Collaborative Oceanographic Research Opportunities with Schmidt Ocean Institute

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zykov, V.

    2014-12-01

    Schmidt Ocean Institute (http://www.schmidtocean.org/) was founded by Dr. Eric Schmidt and Wendy Schmidt in 2009 to support frontier oceanographic research and exploration to expand the understanding of the world's oceans through technological advancement, intelligent, data-rich observation and analysis, and open sharing of information. Schmidt Ocean Institute operates a state-of-the-art globally capable research vessel Falkor (http://www.schmidtocean.org/story/show/47). After two years of scientific operations in the Atlantic Ocean, Gulf of Mexico, Caribbean, Eastern and Central Pacific, R/V Falkor is now preparing to support research in the Western Pacific and Eastern Indian Oceans in 2015 and 2016. As part of the long term research program development for Schmidt Ocean Institute, we aim to identify initiatives and projects that demonstrate strong alignment with our strategic interests. We focus on scientific opportunities that highlight effective use of innovative technologies to better understand the oceans, such as, for example, research enabled with remotely operated and autonomous vehicles, acoustics, in-situ sensing, telepresence, etc. Our technology-first approach to ocean science gave rise to infrastructure development initiatives, such as the development of a new full ocean depth Hybrid Remotely Operated Vehicle, new 6000m scientific Autonomous Underwater Vehicle, live HD video streaming from the ship to YouTube, shipboard high performance supercomputing, etc. We also support projects focusing on oceanographic technology research and development onboard R/V Falkor. We provide our collaborators with access to all of R/V Falkor's facilities and instrumentation in exchange for a commitment to make the resulting scientific data openly available to the international oceanographic community. This presentation aims to expand awareness about the interests and capabilities of Schmidt Ocean Institute and R/V Falkor among our scientific audiences and further

  10. Necessarily Cumbersome, Messy, and Slow: Community Collaborative Work within Art Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Filipovic, Yaël

    2013-01-01

    Building relationships and community collaborations--especially on an institutional level--is a slow and long-term process. These types of innovative, experimental, and long-term collaborations with community organizations and groups often lead art institutions to reflect on the value and place of their institutional structures when engaging in…

  11. Visualizing and Evaluating the Growth of Multi-Institutional Collaboration Based on Research Network Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Jake; Pelfrey, Clara; Zhang, Guo-Qiang

    2014-01-01

    Research collaboration plays an important role in scientific productivity and academic innovation. Multi-institutional collaboration has become a vital approach for integrating multidisciplinary resources and expertise to enhance biomedical research. There is an increasing need for analyzing the effect of multi-institutional research collaboration. In this paper, we present a collaboration analysis pipeline based on research networks constructed from publication co-authorship relationship. Such research networks can be effectively used to render and analyze large-scale institutional collaboration. The co-authorship networks of the Cleveland Clinical and Translational Science Collaborative (CTSC) were visualized and analyzed. SciVal Expert™ was used to extract publication data of the CTSC members. The network was presented in informative and aesthetically appealing diagrams using the open source visualization package Gephi. The analytic result demonstrates the effectiveness of our approach, and it also indicates the substantial growth of research collaboration among the CTSC members crossing its partner institutions. PMID:25954579

  12. Visualizing and evaluating the growth of multi-institutional collaboration based on research network analysis.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jake; Pelfrey, Clara; Zhang, Guo-Qiang

    2014-01-01

    Research collaboration plays an important role in scientific productivity and academic innovation. Multi-institutional collaboration has become a vital approach for integrating multidisciplinary resources and expertise to enhance biomedical research. There is an increasing need for analyzing the effect of multi-institutional research collaboration. In this paper, we present a collaboration analysis pipeline based on research networks constructed from publication co-authorship relationship. Such research networks can be effectively used to render and analyze large-scale institutional collaboration. The co-authorship networks of the Cleveland Clinical and Translational Science Collaborative (CTSC) were visualized and analyzed. SciVal Expert™ was used to extract publication data of the CTSC members. The network was presented in informative and aesthetically appealing diagrams using the open source visualization package Gephi. The analytic result demonstrates the effectiveness of our approach, and it also indicates the substantial growth of research collaboration among the CTSC members crossing its partner institutions.

  13. Exploring Metaphoric Language Use to Assess Collaboration between Educational Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newberry, Melissa; Richardson, Michael

    2015-01-01

    In this single case study of a school and university collaborative project, positioning theory was used to deconstruct the metaphors expressed in descriptions of roles of 23 participants. Present in the metaphors were discrepancies in understandings of collaboration that revealed ways that collaboration was inhibited as participants positioned…

  14. External Collaboration Patterns of Research Institutions Using Shared Publications in the Web of Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toral, Sergio Luis; Bessis, Nik; Martinez-Torres, Maria del Rocio

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: During recent decades, research institutions have increased collaboration with other institutions since it is recognized as a good practice that improves their performance. However, they do not usually consider external collaborations as a strategic issue despite their benefits. The purpose of this paper consists of identifying different…

  15. Opportunities across Boundaries: Lessons from a Collaboratively Delivered Cross-Institution Master's Programme

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Róiste, Mairéad; Breetzke, Gregory; Reitsma, Femke

    2015-01-01

    Advances in technology have created opportunities for collaborative multi-institution programme delivery which are increasingly attractive within a constrained financial environment. This paper details the development of a cross-institution collaboratively delivered masters and postgraduate diploma programme in Geographical Information Science in…

  16. Are Mergers a Win-Win Strategic Model? A Content Analysis of Inter-Institutional Collaboration between Higher Education Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ripoll-Soler, Carlos; de-Miguel-Molina, María

    2014-01-01

    The main goal of this paper, based on a content analysis of the literature about models of inter-institutional collaboration between higher education institutions, is to establish the characteristics that set them apart, contextualize each of these models in terms of the features of the setting in which they are implemented, and ascertain their…

  17. Provincial Coordination and Inter-Institutional Collaboration in British Columbia's College, University College and Institute System. Monograph Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaber, Devron

    This document addresses a study that aimed to better understand the historical development of British Columbia community college, university college, and institute system with special attention given to recent changes in inter-institutional collaboration in relation to provincial coordination. The study also addresses centralization and…

  18. The study of multi-institutional collaborations in high-energy physics

    SciTech Connect

    Warnow-Blewett, Joan

    1991-01-01

    Since World War II, the organizational framework for scientific research is increasingly the multi-institutional collaboration, especially in high-energy physics. A broad preliminary survey, into the functioning of research collaborations involving three or more institutions is described. The study is designed to identify patterns of collaborations, define the scope of the documentation problems, field-test possible solutions, recommend future actions, and build an archives of oral history interviews and other resources for scholarly use. Once the study is completed, its findings will be used to promote systems to document significant collaborative research.

  19. Collaborative Learning in a Boundary Zone: A Case Study of Innovative Inter-Institutional Collaboration in Israel

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tabak, Edith; Margolin, Ilana

    2013-01-01

    This qualitative study focused on the collaboration between a school district and a college of education in Israel and aimed to explore how the participants created common understanding in order to promote educational change. The theoretical approach involved analyzing the institutional interconnections based on boundary practices and boundary…

  20. A Case Study of Organizational Collaboration in an Institution of Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmaltz, Sarah Katherine Abrams

    2010-01-01

    The study, A Case Study of Organizational Collaboration in an Institution of Higher Education, is a look into what is working and what is not working inside a collaborative initiative at the University of Virginia called the Partners for Leadership in Education. The Partners for Leadership in Education is one of the longest lasting collaborations…

  1. Redesigning for Collaboration within Higher Education Institutions: An Exploration into the Developmental Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kezar, Adrianna

    2005-01-01

    As a result of both the external pressures and the known benefits of collaboration, many higher education institutions are trying to create learning communities, service and community-based learning, and interdisciplinary research and teaching. However, over 50% of collaborations fail. There has been virtually no research on how to enable higher…

  2. Overcoming diverse security protocols across institutions to enable convenient file-sharing and videoconferencing among collaborators.

    PubMed

    Parks, David V; Wahi, Monika M

    2005-01-01

    The use of videoconferencing and file sharing tools among colleagues at large institutions has traditionally been confounded by differing security policies in place at each location. Building an electronic collaboration infrastructure based upon the lowest-common-denominator security configuration expected to be encountered will yield an accessible collaboration environment previously unavailable to geographically diverse researchers and clinicians.

  3. International Multidisciplinary Learning: An Account of a Collaborative Effort among Three Higher Education Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poh, Paul S. H.; Soetanto, Robby; Austin, Stephen; Adamu, Zulkifar A.

    2014-01-01

    Requiring students to complete their course assignments in partnership and in collaboration with students from other institutions is not commonplace teaching pedagogy. Even less so when they transcend disciplines and international borders. This paper presents a brief account of an ongoing collaborative effort between Ryerson University, Coventry…

  4. A Survey of Collaborative Projects of Maryland Postsecondary Institutions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maryland State Higher Education Commission, Annapolis.

    This report, prepared at the request of an informal Maryland higher education workgroup called "A United Voice for Higher Education," is a summary of various campus collaborative activities. Activities were grouped in the following categories: academic, including joint degree programs, articulation programs, and distance learning partnerships;…

  5. Developing Student Collaborations across Disciplines, Distances, and Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knisley, Jeff; Behravesh, Esfandiar

    2010-01-01

    Because quantitative biology requires skills and concepts from a disparate collection of different disciplines, the scientists of the near future will increasingly need to rely on collaborations to produce results. Correspondingly, students in disciplines impacted by quantitative biology will need to be taught how to create and engage in such…

  6. The Institute for Johns Hopkins Nursing: A Collaborative Model for Nursing Practice and Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sabatier, Kathleen Hartman

    2002-01-01

    The Institute for Johns Hopkins Nursing was developed collaboratively by the Johns Hopkins University School of Nursing and the Johns Hopkins Hospital Department of Nursing. The institute prepares nurses for practice, keeps practitioners current, and provides nursing staff development programs. (Contains 11 references.) (JOW)

  7. [Radiologic medical desktop conferences--clinical evaluation of the KAMEDIN teleradiology system in routine practice of a radiologic institute].

    PubMed

    Bolte, R; Lehmann, K J; Walz, M; Loose, R; Lütgemeier, J; Seibert, F; Busch, C; Schinkmann, M; Georgi, M

    1996-07-01

    KAMEDIN is a teleradiology project of "Deutsche Telekom". ISDN based image transfer, visualisation and online-presentation of digital radiological images is performed. In this study the suitability of the KAMEDIN-system has been tested in a clinical environment. The software has been adapted to the requirements of radiological image visualisation. During 6 months over 50 conferences took place with an average of 36 CT-slices per patient. The amount of time was approximately 10 min for conference preparation, 20 min for image transfer and 8 min for conferencing. Software problems occurred and were solved. Image quality on the monitor as well as online presentation including "simultaneous cursors" showed high performance and achieved high acceptance by the clinicians. Thus KAMEDIN is a useful teleradiology system, especially if the system is adapted to the requirements of radiology departments. PMID:8924455

  8. Maximizing Institutional Research Impact through Building Relationships and Collaborating within the Institution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirby, Yvonne Kochera; Floyd, Nancy D.

    2015-01-01

    Building and maintaining relationships within the institution with shared goals for preserving compliance and presenting an accurate portrait of the institution is critical for effective external reporting. It can also provide immeasurable internal benefit to information stakeholders.

  9. 76 FR 45825 - Center for Devices and Radiological Health 510(k) Clearance Process; Institute of Medicine Report...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-01

    .... The report was issued on August 5, 2010 (75 FR 47307). After reviewing public comment, CDRH issued a... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Center for Devices and Radiological Health 510(k) Clearance Process; Institute of Medicine Report: ``Medical Devices and the Public's Health, The FDA 510(k)...

  10. Institution-level collaboration in cardiovascular research in sub-Saharan Africa

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The contribution of sub-Saharan Africa to scientific knowledge on cardiovascular disease (CVD) prevention and care is very limited compared to other regions of the world. This underlies the challenge of understanding and addressing the high prevalence of risk factors for CVD in sub-Saharan Africa. The patterns of collaboration between institutions in the region in the area of cardiovascular research are not well documented, although there is evidence of significant collaboration in health research between Africa-based researchers and those in countries outside the region. This study focuses on mapping the linkages between institutions in this region using co-authorship of publications in cardiovascular research from 2005 to 2014. The key institutions in sub-Saharan Africa which engaged in collaboration are identified and the potential of these networks for stimulating the growth of research capacity in this field is discussed. PMID:26331114

  11. Percolation on the institute-enterprise R&D collaboration networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chenguang; Zhang, Yongan

    2015-01-01

    Realistic network-like systems are usually composed of multiple networks with interacting relations such as school-enterprise research and development (R&D) collaboration networks. Here, we study the percolation properties of a special class of R&D collaboration network, namely institute-enterprise R&D collaboration networks (IERDCNs). We introduce two actual IERDCNs to show their structural properties, and we present a mathematical framework based on generating functions for analyzing an interacting network with any connection probability. Then,we illustrate the percolation threshold and structural parameter arithmetic in the sub-critical and supercritical regimes.We compare the predictions of our mathematical framework and arithmetic to data for two real R&D collaboration networks and a number of simulations. We find that our predictions are in remarkable agreement with the data. We show applications of the framework to electronics R&D collaboration networks

  12. A Factor Analysis on Teamwork Performance: An Empirical Study of Inter-Instituted Collaboration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Mingchang; Chen, Ya-Hsueh

    2014-01-01

    Problem Statement: Inter-instituted collaboration has attracted broad attention for educational quality improvement in the last decade. The team performance of these innovative team projects received foremost attention, particularly with knowledge-sharing, emotional intelligence, and team conflicts. Purpose of Study: The purpose of the study was…

  13. The Impact of Institutional Collaborations on the Earnings of Adult Workforce Education Completers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawley, Joshua D.; Sommers, Dixie; Melendez, Edwin

    2005-01-01

    This article reports findings from a mixed-methods study of the impact of collaborations between adult education organizations and nonprofit or business partners on the earnings of program participants. The project uses survey data collected from a network of state-sponsored educational institutions and unemployment insurance data from program…

  14. Collaborative Co-Mentored Dissertations Spanning Institutions: Influences on Student Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGee, Richard; DeLong, Mary J.

    2007-01-01

    The Graduate Partnerships Program (GPP), established in 2000, links universities with National Institutes of Health (NIH) laboratories for predoctoral training. Several partnerships required that students create collaborative dissertations between at least one NIH and one university research mentor. More than 60 students have entered into these…

  15. Collaborative Teaching and Learning through Multi-Institutional Integrated Group Projects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Long, Suzanna K.; Carlo, Héctor J.

    2013-01-01

    This teaching brief describes an innovative multi-institutional initiative through which integrated student groups from different courses collaborate on a common course project. In this integrated group project, students are asked to design a decentralized manufacturing organization for a company that will manufacture industrial Proton-Exchange…

  16. Opportunistic Collaboration: Unlocking the Archives of the Birmingham Institute of Art and Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Everitt, Sian

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To review a small specialist repository's strategic and opportunistic approach to utilising collaborative regional and national digital initiatives to increase access. The Birmingham Institute of Art and Design (BIAD) Archives activity is evaluated to determine whether a project-based approach recognises and meets the needs of historians,…

  17. A Model for Strengthening Collaborative Research Capacity: Illustrations from the Atlanta Clinical Translational Science Institute

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodgers, Kirsten C.; Akintobi, Tabia; Thompson, Winifred Wilkins; Evans, Donoria; Escoffery, Cam; Kegler, Michelle C.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Community-engaged research is effective in addressing health disparities but may present challenges for both academic institutions and community partners. Therefore, the need to build capacity for conducting collaborative research exists. The purpose of this study is to present a model for building research capacity in…

  18. Joint Authorship: Faculty Members from Six Institutions Collaborate to Measure Writing Competence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kleniewski, Nancy

    2007-01-01

    Southeastern Massachusetts is home to six public institutions of higher education. In 2003, at the invitation of Bridgewater President Dana Mohler-Faria, five of them joined together to form a regional collaborative called CONNECT. (The original members were Bridgewater State College, Bristol, Cape Cod and Massasoit community colleges, and the…

  19. Collaboration-Focused Workshop for Interdisciplinary, Inter-Institutional Teams of College Science Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanson, Pamela K.; Stultz, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Many science educators know of the pedagogical benefits of inquiry- and research-based labs, yet numerous barriers to implementation exist. In this article we describe a faculty development workshop that explored interdisciplinary and inter-institutional collaborations as potential mechanisms for overcoming barriers to curricular innovation.

  20. The Role of International Research Collaboration in Enhancing Global Presence of an Institution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ao, Fiona Ka Wa

    2012-01-01

    In recent decades, higher education institutions have steadily increased their international involvement in response to globalization. High-level research is generally a key component in efforts to increase international visibility (Armstrong, 2007). International research collaborations are perceived to be an important way to enhance global…

  1. A Successful Model of Collaborative Undergraduate Research: A Multi-Faculty, Multi-Project, Multi-Institution Team Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodzicka, Julie A.; Ford, Thomas E.; Caudill, Abbie; Ohanmamooreni, Alyna

    2015-01-01

    A collaborative research grant from the National Science Foundation allowed the first two authors to provide students at primarily undergraduate institutions with a multi-faculty, multi-institution team research experience. Teams of undergraduate students at Western Carolina University and Washington and Lee University collaborated with one…

  2. Effective Collaboration between a Research Center and a Minority-Serving Institution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalbotten, D.; Camarena, C.; Ruiz, J.; Ren, J.; Marr, J.; Hondzo, M.; Power, M.

    2005-12-01

    In order to increase opportunities for research collaboration between the National Center for Earth-surface Dynamics (NCED) and Minority Serving Institution (MSI), a Faculty-to-Faculty program was designed at NCED. This presentation discusses one such initiative, which brought researchers from Texas A&M University Kingsville (TAMUK) to the St. Anthony Falls Laboratory, headquarters of NCED. The research team is composed of a faculty member and two graduate students from Texas A&M University and three researchers from NCED. The two graduate students from TAMUK are Celina Camarena and Jessica Ruiz. The collaborative research was about the uptake of heavy metals by alder trees. Celina and Jessica spent five weeks at the St. Anthony Falls Laboratory. They toured various research facilities at the laboratory. Experiments were also set up by the students with the help of Jeff Marr and Miki Hondzo from NCED to grow the alder trees hydroponically and traditionally. Soil, water, and plant tissue samples were collected for investigation of the potential uptake of metals by alder trees. Both students got well trained with various research facilities and enjoyed the short visit. It is anticipated that the results from this collaboration will form the basis for continuous research collaboration between Jianhong Ren, faculty from MSI, and professors at NCED. This successful initiative demonstrates the possibilities for new types of collaborations between institutions.

  3. [Virtual organization in the digital age of radiology - principle and solution for radiologic research?].

    PubMed

    Leppek, R; Krass, S; Bourquain, H; Lang, M; Wein, B; Mildenberger, P; Schaller, S; Klose, K J; Peitgen, H-O

    2003-11-01

    The research project "VICORA - Virtual Institute for Computer-Assisted Radiology", funded by the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research, was initiated in the year 2000. Its virtual organization brings together physical science, engineering, information technology, clinical radiology and the medical technology industry. In the German radiology research domain VICORA serves as a model for interdisciplinary collaboration for the changing radiology paradigm illustrated by a "radiologycube". The project does not only aim at scientific goals but also considers the infrastructure, components and human resource management within a virtual organization. The common rapid prototyping platform ILAB 4 ensures user-friendly and time-efficient software that assists with the routine radiology work-flow including full DICOM functionality. By offering a new work environment and collaborative culture based on telematics and knowledge exchange in radiology research, VICORA overcomes limitations of traditional research organization. PMID:14610709

  4. Building and sustaining community-institutional partnerships for prevention research: findings from a national collaborative.

    PubMed

    Seifer, Sarena D

    2006-11-01

    The Examining Community-Institutional Partnerships for Prevention Research Project began in October 2002 with funding from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Research Center Program Office through a cooperative agreement between the Association of Schools of Public Health and the CDC. The three-year project aimed to synthesize knowledge about community-institutional partnerships for prevention research and to build community and institutional capacity for participatory research. These ten organizations collaborated on the project because they were all involved in community-institutional partnerships for prevention research, had access to research and evaluation data on these partnerships, and believed that the shared learning and action that would result through a collaborative effort could significantly advance collective knowledge about partnerships and lead to substantive capacity-building responses: the Community Health Scholars Program, Community-Based Public Health Caucus of the American Public Health Association, Community-Campus Partnerships for Health, Detroit Community-Academic Urban Research Center, Harlem Health Promotion Center, National Community Committee of the CDC Prevention Research Centers Program, New York Urban Research Center, Seattle Partners for Healthy Communities, Yale-Griffin Prevention Research Center and the Wellesley Institute. This paper reports on the project's findings, including common characteristics of successful partnerships and recommendations for strengthening emerging and established partnerships.

  5. The Spanish Protocol for radiological surveillance of metal recycling: a collaboration of government and industry.

    PubMed

    Cadierno, Juan Pedro García; Renedo, J I Serrano; Lopez, E Gil

    2006-11-01

    The presence of radioactive materials in scrap metal has been detected relatively often in recent years. As a result of an accidental melting of a 137Cs source in a Spanish steel mill (Acerinox) in 1998, the national authorities, the involved private companies, and the main trade unions drafted a protocol for prevention of and responding to such events ("Spanish Protocol"). The Protocol was signed in 1999. The number of subscribing companies is 90. The Protocol is a voluntary agreement defining the radiological surveillance of scrap metal and its products and the duties and rights of the signatories. From the effective date of the Protocol to December 2004, 461 pieces of ferric scrap were detected including sources of radiation and contaminated metal. Four melting incidents have happened in different companies. PMID:17033458

  6. A collaboration of labs: The Institute for Atom-Efficient Chemical Transformations (IACT)

    ScienceCinema

    Lobo, Rodrigo; Marshall, Chris; Cheng, Lei; Stair, Peter; Wu, Tianpan; Ray, Natalie; O'Neil, Brandon; Dietrich, Paul

    2016-07-12

    The Institute for Atom-Efficient Chemical Transformations (IACT) is an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy. IACT focuses on advancing the science of catalysis to improve the efficiency of producing fuels from biomass and coal. IACT is a collaborative effort that brings together a diverse team of scientists from Argonne National Laboratory, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Northwestern University, Purdue University and the University of Wisconsin. For more information, visit www.iact.anl.gov

  7. Research and collaboration overview of Institut Pasteur International Network: a bibliometric approach toward research funding decisions

    PubMed Central

    Mostafavi, Ehsan; Bazrafshan, Azam

    2014-01-01

    Background: Institut Pasteur International Network (IPIN), which includes 32 research institutes around the world, is a network of research and expertise to fight against infectious diseases. A scientometric approach was applied to describe research and collaboration activities of IPIN. Methods: Publications were identified using a manual search of IPIN member addresses in Science Citation Index Expanded (SCIE) between 2006 and 2011. Total publications were then subcategorized by geographic regions. Several scientometric indicators and the H-index were employed to estimate the scientific production of each IPIN member. Subject and geographical overlay maps were also applied to visualize the network activities of the IPIN members. Results: A total number of 12667 publications originated from IPIN members. Each author produced an average number of 2.18 papers and each publication received an average of 13.40 citations. European Pasteur Institutes had the largest amount of publications, authored papers, and H-index values. Biochemistry and molecular biology, microbiology, immunology and infectious diseases were the most important research topics, respectively. Geographic mapping of IPIN publications showed wide international collaboration among IPIN members around the world. Conclusion: IPIN has strong ties with national and international authorities and organizations to investigate the current and future health issues. It is recommended to use scientometric and collaboration indicators as measures of research performance in IPIN future policies and investment decisions. PMID:24596896

  8. The study of multi-institutional collaborations in high-energy physics. Progress report, January 1989--March 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-12-31

    Since World War II, the organizational framework for scientific research is increasingly the multi-institutional collaboration, especially in high-energy physics. A broad preliminary survey, into the functioning of research collaborations involving three or more institutions is described. The study is designed to identify patterns of collaborations, define the scope of the documentation problems, field-test possible solutions, recommend future actions, and build an archives of oral history interviews and other resources for scholarly use. Once the study is completed, its findings will be used to promote systems to document significant collaborative research.

  9. Delivering health information statewide via the Internet in a collaborative environment: impact on individual member institutions.

    PubMed Central

    McCray, J C

    1999-01-01

    The Arizona Health Information Network (AZHIN) is a statewide member-driven organization committed to improving access to information for health sciences students and practitioners. Members include several hospitals and hospital systems, an academic health sciences center, and other diverse health care organizations. AZHIN offers its members unlimited Web access to ten well-known health sciences databases. This paper explores the impact that AZHIN has had on its member institutions. A survey asked members to reflect on AZHIN and its possible effects on the visibility of the librarian within the institution, relative dollars spent on AZHIN and range of resources available, Internet connectivity within their institution, access to AZHIN and other Internet resources, teaching, and benefits of collaboration. Results indicated that AZHIN members have access to a wider range of resources than they would otherwise. There are financial savings for some. Internet connectivity and AZHIN membership can provide the librarian with a broadened role and increased visibility. The availability of MEDLINE and other AZHIN resources encouraged some institutions to install Internet connectivity more quickly. Teaching library users has increased. Overall, AZHIN members recognized many benefits of their collaboration. PMID:10427425

  10. Delivering health information statewide via the Internet in a collaborative environment: impact on individual member institutions.

    PubMed

    McCray, J C

    1999-07-01

    The Arizona Health Information Network (AZHIN) is a statewide member-driven organization committed to improving access to information for health sciences students and practitioners. Members include several hospitals and hospital systems, an academic health sciences center, and other diverse health care organizations. AZHIN offers its members unlimited Web access to ten well-known health sciences databases. This paper explores the impact that AZHIN has had on its member institutions. A survey asked members to reflect on AZHIN and its possible effects on the visibility of the librarian within the institution, relative dollars spent on AZHIN and range of resources available, Internet connectivity within their institution, access to AZHIN and other Internet resources, teaching, and benefits of collaboration. Results indicated that AZHIN members have access to a wider range of resources than they would otherwise. There are financial savings for some. Internet connectivity and AZHIN membership can provide the librarian with a broadened role and increased visibility. The availability of MEDLINE and other AZHIN resources encouraged some institutions to install Internet connectivity more quickly. Teaching library users has increased. Overall, AZHIN members recognized many benefits of their collaboration. PMID:10427425

  11. Coauthorship and Institutional Collaborations on Cost-Effectiveness Analyses: A Systematic Network Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Catalá-López, Ferrán; Alonso-Arroyo, Adolfo; Aleixandre-Benavent, Rafael; Ridao, Manuel; Bolaños, Máxima; García-Altés, Anna; Sanfélix-Gimeno, Gabriel; Peiró, Salvador

    2012-01-01

    Background Cost-Effectiveness Analysis (CEA) has been promoted as an important research methodology for determining the efficiency of healthcare technology and guiding medical decision-making. Our aim was to characterize the collaborative patterns of CEA conducted over the past two decades in Spain. Methods and Findings A systematic analysis was carried out with the information obtained through an updated comprehensive literature review and from reports of health technology assessment agencies. We identified CEAs with outcomes expressed as a time-based summary measure of population health (e.g. quality-adjusted life-years or disability-adjusted life-years), conducted in Spain and published between 1989 and 2011. Networks of coauthorship and institutional collaboration were produced using PAJEK software. One-hundred and thirty-one papers were analyzed, in which 526 authors and 230 institutions participated. The overall signatures per paper index was 5.4. Six major groups (one with 14 members, three with 7 members and two with 6 members) were identified. The most prolific authors were generally affiliated with the private-for-profit sector (e.g. consulting firms and the pharmaceutical industry). The private-for-profit sector mantains profuse collaborative networks including public hospitals and academia. Collaboration within the public sector (e.g. healthcare administration and primary care) was weak and fragmented. Conclusions This empirical analysis reflects critical practices among collaborative networks that contributed substantially to the production of CEA, raises challenges for redesigning future policies and provides a framework for similar analyses in other regions. PMID:22666435

  12. Inter-Institutional Partnerships Propel A Successful Collaborative Undergraduate Degree Program In Chemistry.

    PubMed

    D'Souza, Malcolm J; Wang, Qiquan

    2012-10-01

    Small private liberal arts colleges are increasingly tuition-dependent and mainly attract students by creating student-centered learning communities. On the other hand, larger universities tend to be trendsetters where its faculty tend to seek intellectual independence and are involved in career focused cutting-edge research. The Institutional Development Awards (IDeA) and Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research (EPSCoR) are federal-state-university partnerships that builds basic research infrastructure and coax the state-wide higher education institutions to collaborate with each other in order to enhance their competitiveness. As a result in Delaware, Wesley College instituted curricular and operational changes to launch an undergraduate program in biological chemistry where its students take three upper division chemistry courses and can choose to participate in annual summer undergraduate internships at nearby Delaware State University. PMID:24273464

  13. Inter-Institutional Partnerships Propel A Successful Collaborative Undergraduate Degree Program In Chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qiquan

    2013-01-01

    Small private liberal arts colleges are increasingly tuition-dependent and mainly attract students by creating student-centered learning communities. On the other hand, larger universities tend to be trendsetters where its faculty tend to seek intellectual independence and are involved in career focused cutting-edge research. The Institutional Development Awards (IDeA) and Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research (EPSCoR) are federal-state-university partnerships that builds basic research infrastructure and coax the state-wide higher education institutions to collaborate with each other in order to enhance their competitiveness. As a result in Delaware, Wesley College instituted curricular and operational changes to launch an undergraduate program in biological chemistry where its students take three upper division chemistry courses and can choose to participate in annual summer undergraduate internships at nearby Delaware State University. PMID:24273464

  14. Inter-Institutional Partnerships Propel A Successful Collaborative Undergraduate Degree Program In Chemistry.

    PubMed

    D'Souza, Malcolm J; Wang, Qiquan

    2012-10-01

    Small private liberal arts colleges are increasingly tuition-dependent and mainly attract students by creating student-centered learning communities. On the other hand, larger universities tend to be trendsetters where its faculty tend to seek intellectual independence and are involved in career focused cutting-edge research. The Institutional Development Awards (IDeA) and Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research (EPSCoR) are federal-state-university partnerships that builds basic research infrastructure and coax the state-wide higher education institutions to collaborate with each other in order to enhance their competitiveness. As a result in Delaware, Wesley College instituted curricular and operational changes to launch an undergraduate program in biological chemistry where its students take three upper division chemistry courses and can choose to participate in annual summer undergraduate internships at nearby Delaware State University.

  15. The Armed Forces Research Institute of Medical Sciences: five decades of collaborative medical research.

    PubMed

    Brown, Arthur; Nitayaphan, Sorachai

    2011-05-01

    The Armed Forces Research Institute of Medical Sciences (AFRIMS) is a 50-year-old joint institute of the US and Royal Thai Army Medical Departments located in Bangkok, Thailand. Investigators from the Institute have carried out research in Thailand and the region, in collaboration with many partners, focused on a large number of tropical infectious diseases. In celebration of the 50th anniversary, this paper summarizes highlights of this research, focusing on malaria, Japanese encephalitis, dengue, diarrhea and HIV. In addition, research done in support of the medical problems of refugees and of the health of Thai peace-keeping forces are summarized. The research carried out by AFRIMS and added to the scientific literature has contributed significantly to advancement in multiple areas of tropical infectious disease.

  16. Reciprocal capacity building for collaborative disability research between disabled people's organizations, communities and higher education institutions.

    PubMed

    Lorenzo, Theresa; Joubert, Robin

    2011-12-01

    This paper focuses on the reciprocal capacity building that occurred through collaborative research between occupational therapy departments from six higher education institutions in South Africa, community-based organizations and a disabled people's organization on disabled youth and their livelihoods. The authors aimed to identify principles for collaboration and capacity building from the pilot phase and first phase of the main study. Occupational therapy departments place students in communities for service learning experience, but little collaboration with disabled people's organizations and communities in research processes occurs that could enrich such partnerships and inform relevant curriculum development. Secondary data from different sources including a transcript of a focus-group interview with the researchers in the pilot phase, workshop reports, and transcripts of free-writing exercises done by researchers were analysed thematically, both inductively and deductively. Two themes are explored: first, reciprocal building of organizational capacity and, second, generating collaborative relationships. The principles that were identified are integral to the strengths and challenges faced when multiple organizations work together over a wide geographical area on a complex research topic that also builds capacity reciprocally. PMID:21073368

  17. Radiation exposure and chromosome abnormalities. Human cytogenetic studies at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Japan, 1963-1988

    SciTech Connect

    Ishihara, T.; Kohno, S.; Minamihisamatsu, M. )

    1990-03-01

    The results of human cytogenetic studies performed at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS), Chiba, Japan for about 25 years are described. The studies were pursued primarily under two major projects: one involving people exposed to radiation under various conditions and the other involving patients with malignant diseases, especially leukemias. Whereas chromosome abnormalities in radiation-exposed people are excellent indicators of radiation exposure, their behavior in bone marrow provide useful information for a better understanding of chromosome abnormalities in leukemias and related disorders. The role of chromosome abnormalities in the genesis and development of leukemia and related disorders is considered, suggesting a view for future studies in this field.

  18. Collaboration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Michelle L.

    2010-01-01

    This article explores collaboration between library media educators and regular classroom teachers. The article focuses on the context of the issue, positions on the issue, the impact of collaboration, and how to implement effective collaboration into the school system. Various books and professional journals are used to support conclusions…

  19. Office Civilian Waste Management Transportation Institutional Program Update on Collaborative Efforts with Key Stakeholders

    SciTech Connect

    E. Saris; P. Austin; J.J. Offner

    2004-12-29

    The Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) created the Office of National Transportation in 2003 recognizing the need to revitalize and accelerate development of the transportation system. The Department has made a commitment to work through a collaborative planning process before developing specific policies and procedures and making transportation decisions. OCRWM has begun to build the institutional framework to support development of this transportation system. Interactions with stakeholders have been initiated. The authors describe the key stakeholders, identified issues, regional and national planning activities, and mechanisms for interaction.

  20. The Australian Institute of Nuclear Science & Engineering - a model for University-National Laboratory collaboration

    SciTech Connect

    Gammon, R.B.

    1994-12-31

    This paper describes the aims and activities of the Australian Institute of Nuclear Science and Engineering (AINSE), from its foundation in 1958 through to 1993. The philosophy, structure and funding of the Institute are briefly reviewed, followed by an account of the development of national research facilities at the Lucas Heights Research Laboratories, with particular emphasis on nuclear techniques of analysis using neutron scattering instruments and particle accelerators. AINSE`s program of Grants, Fellowships and Studentships are explained with many examples given of projects having significance in the context of Australia`s national goals. Conference and training programs are also included. The achievements during these years demonstrate that AINSE has been an efficient and cost- effective model for collaboration between universities and a major national laboratory. In recent years, industry, government organisations and the tertiary education system have undergone major re-structuring and rationalization. A new operational structure for AINSE has evolved in response to these changes and is described.

  1. Une experience de collaboration entre la BBC et des etablissements d'enseignement superieur britanniques (Collaboration Experiences between BBC and Some British Higher Education Institutions).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Brian

    1980-01-01

    Describes the BBC French language program and the activities that have resulted from BBC's collaboration with institutions such as the Brighton Polytechnic. These activites include the organization of intensive courses, the publication of instructional materials for teachers, and the development of correspondence studies. (MES)

  2. Enhancing GIS Instruction at 1890 Institutions and HBCUs through Collaboration with the University of Alaska Fairbanks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prakash, A.; Sriharan, S.; Ozbay, G.; SanJuan, F.; Fan, C.; David, V.

    2013-12-01

    A cohort of 1890 land-grant institutions [Virginia State University (VSU) and Delaware State University (DSU)] and Historically Black Colleges and Universities [Elizabeth City State University (ECSU), Bethune-Cookman University (BCU), and Morgan State University (MSU)] have been collaborating for nearly a decade with a land grant institution [University of Alaska Fairbanks (UAF)] for enhancing the instruction of Remote Sensing and Geographic Information System. The specific objectives included curriculum design, faculty development, student experiential learning, community outreach, and networking. Through a series of workshops funded by the US Department of Agriculture - National Institute for Food and Agriculture from 2004-2013 at UAF, the faculty members of the cohort institutions gained experience in integrating newer geospatial techniques in instruction. In particular participants learned how to collect differential GPS measurements and incorporate GPS observations onto web enabled maps. They also learned how to collect ground-truth data over a wide spectral range. In the optical wavelengths participants acquired high resolution photographs and measured the reflected components of various vegetation using photosynthetically active radiometer (PAR) sensors operating in the 400-700nm range. Faculty members used an ASD Spectrometer operating in 350-2500nm range to record reflectance spectra over a variety of natural targets. In the thermal infrared part of the spectrum they recorded emitted energy in the 7.5 - 13 micro-m broadband range from hot geothermal waters to cold ice targets. These experiences were used to enrich curricula materials offered at the cohort institutions. The early workshops were tailored for training only the faculty members from the cohort. The most recent workshop in 2013 for the first time brought together a faculty-student team from each member university for hands-on learning experiences in field data collection and image analysis

  3. Promoting Regionally-Based Climate Change Education through Collaborations with Formal and Informal Education Institutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stylinski, C.; Griswold, M.

    2012-12-01

    Improving climate literacy is necessary to effectively respond to climate change impacts. However, climate change education efforts face significant hurdles both in the classroom and in out-of-school settings. These include addressing uncertainity and the complex mix of drivers and impacts that occur over large spatial and temporal scales. These efforts are further hampered by audiences who are disinterested and resisant to discussions of anthropogenic climate change. Bridging formal and informal education experiences focused on climate change offers a potentially powerful strategy to tackle these challenges. In this session, we will describe our NSF-funded Maryland-Delaware Climate Change Education, Assessment and Research (MADE-CLEAR) project, which applies a comprehensive regional partnership among scientists, education researchers, K-12 and informal education practitioners, and other stakeholders to improve public and student understanding of and engagement in climate change issues and solutions. To better understand gaps and opportunities, we have conducted surveys and interviews with K-12, informal, and undergraduate educators and administrators. We found that climate change education aligns with most institutions' missions and efforts, that most educators do not face institutional barriers to climate change education, and that climate change is typically incorporated as part of a host of environmental issues. Despite this, climate change education is still quite limited with few institutions explicitly focusing on climate change in their programming. Additionally, there is little apparent communication among these institutions with regard to this issue. In response to these needs, we have focused the MADE-CLEAR project on creating and providing regionally-relevant resouces and professional development on climate change science, impacts and solutions for both formal and informal educators. Our approach is collaborative and includes strategies to promote

  4. Repeat film analysis and its implications for quality assurance in dental radiology: An institutional case study

    PubMed Central

    Acharya, Shruthi; Pai, Keerthilatha M.; Acharya, Shashidhar

    2015-01-01

    Context: The goal of any radiologist is to produce the highest quality diagnostic radiographs, while keeping patient exposure as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA). Aims: The aim of this study was to describe the reasons for radiograph rejections through a repeat film analysis in an Indian dental school. Settings and Design: An observational study conducted in the Department of Oral Medicine and Radiology, Manipal College of Dental Sciences, Manipal. Materials and Methods: During a 6-month study period, a total of 9,495 intra-oral radiographs and 2339 extraoral radiographs taken in the Radiology Department were subjected to repeat film analysis. Statistical Analysis Used: SPSS Version 16. Descriptive analysis used. Results: The results showed that the repeat rates were 7.1% and 5.86% for intraoral and extraoral radiographs, respectively. Among the causes for errors reported, positioning error (38.7%) was the most common, followed by improper angulations (26.1%), and improper film placement (11.2%) for intra-oral radiographs. The study found that the maximum frequency of repeats among extraoral radiographs was for panoramic radiographs (49%) followed by lateral cephalogram (33%), and paranasal sinus view (14%). It was also observed that repeat rate of intraoral radiographs was highest for internees (44.7%), and undergraduate students (28.2%). Conclusions: The study pointed to a need for more targeted interventions to achieve the goal of keeping patient exposure ALARA in a dental school setting. PMID:26321841

  5. Status of a compact electron cyclotron resonance ion source for National Institute of Radiological Sciences-930 cyclotron.

    PubMed

    Hojo, S; Katagiri, K; Nakao, M; Sugiura, A; Muramatsu, M; Noda, A; Okada, T; Takahashi, Y; Komiyama, A; Honma, T; Noda, K

    2014-02-01

    The Kei-source is a compact electron cyclotron resonance ion source using only permanent magnets and a frequency of 10 GHz. It was developed at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS) for producing C(4+) ions oriented for high-energy carbon therapy. It has also been used as an ion source for the NIRS-930 cyclotron. Its microwave band region for the traveling-wave-tube amplifier and maximum output power are 8-10 GHz and 350 W, respectively. Since 2006, it has provided various ion beams such as proton, deuteron, carbon, oxygen, and neon with sufficient intensity (200 μA for proton and deuteron, 50 μA for C(4+), for example) and good stability for radioisotope production, tests of radiation damage, and basic research experiments. Its horizontal and vertical emittances were measured using a screen monitor and waist-scan. The present paper reports the current status of the Kei-source.

  6. Status of a compact electron cyclotron resonance ion source for National Institute of Radiological Sciences-930 cyclotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hojo, S.; Katagiri, K.; Nakao, M.; Sugiura, A.; Muramatsu, M.; Noda, A.; Okada, T.; Takahashi, Y.; Komiyama, A.; Honma, T.; Noda, K.

    2014-02-01

    The Kei-source is a compact electron cyclotron resonance ion source using only permanent magnets and a frequency of 10 GHz. It was developed at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS) for producing C4+ ions oriented for high-energy carbon therapy. It has also been used as an ion source for the NIRS-930 cyclotron. Its microwave band region for the traveling-wave-tube amplifier and maximum output power are 8-10 GHz and 350 W, respectively. Since 2006, it has provided various ion beams such as proton, deuteron, carbon, oxygen, and neon with sufficient intensity (200 μA for proton and deuteron, 50 μA for C4+, for example) and good stability for radioisotope production, tests of radiation damage, and basic research experiments. Its horizontal and vertical emittances were measured using a screen monitor and waist-scan. The present paper reports the current status of the Kei-source.

  7. [Implementation of the quality management system ISO/CD2 9001-2000 in a radiology institute].

    PubMed

    Fleisch, M; Hergan, K; Oser, W

    2000-02-01

    Quality assurance in health care, a relatively new discipline, has developed rapidly over the last years and is now required by law. The Quality Management System (QMS) ISO 9001 aims at the definition of requirements necessary in order to achieve perfect products and continuous quality improvement. Implementation of this QMS necessitates the analysis and written documentation of all working processes and modes of operation. Furthermore, potential improvement possibilities are defined to guarantee highly qualified, generally applicable and standardised procedures. Time-consuming data assessment is an instrument to enable disclosure and analysis of existing errors as well as to show possibilities of optimization, thus forming the basis for continuous improvement. The new ISO NORM 9001-2000 is process-orientated with an organisational structure strongly recommendable for service institutions and therefore also for a department of radiology.

  8. Status of a compact electron cyclotron resonance ion source for National Institute of Radiological Sciences-930 cyclotron.

    PubMed

    Hojo, S; Katagiri, K; Nakao, M; Sugiura, A; Muramatsu, M; Noda, A; Okada, T; Takahashi, Y; Komiyama, A; Honma, T; Noda, K

    2014-02-01

    The Kei-source is a compact electron cyclotron resonance ion source using only permanent magnets and a frequency of 10 GHz. It was developed at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS) for producing C(4+) ions oriented for high-energy carbon therapy. It has also been used as an ion source for the NIRS-930 cyclotron. Its microwave band region for the traveling-wave-tube amplifier and maximum output power are 8-10 GHz and 350 W, respectively. Since 2006, it has provided various ion beams such as proton, deuteron, carbon, oxygen, and neon with sufficient intensity (200 μA for proton and deuteron, 50 μA for C(4+), for example) and good stability for radioisotope production, tests of radiation damage, and basic research experiments. Its horizontal and vertical emittances were measured using a screen monitor and waist-scan. The present paper reports the current status of the Kei-source. PMID:24593538

  9. Global health education programming as a model for inter-institutional collaboration in interprofessional health education.

    PubMed

    Peluso, Michael J; Hafler, Janet P; Sipsma, Heather; Cherlin, Emily

    2014-07-01

    While global health (GH) opportunities have expanded at schools of medicine, nursing, and public health, few examples of interprofessional approaches to GH education have been described. The elective GH program at our university serves as an important opportunity for high-quality interprofessional education. We undertook a qualitative study to examine the experience of student, faculty and administrative leaders of the program. We used content analysis to code responses and analyze data. Among the leadership, key themes fell within the categories of interprofessional education, student-faculty collaboration, professional development, and practical considerations for the development of such programs. The principles described could be considered by institutions seeking to develop meaningful partnerships in an effort to develop or refine interprofessional global health education programs.

  10. The Effect of a Bidirectional Exchange on Faculty and Institutional Development in a Global Health Collaboration

    PubMed Central

    Bodnar, Benjamin E.; Claassen, Cassidy W.; Solomon, Julie; Mayanja-Kizza, Harriet; Rastegar, Asghar

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The MUYU Collaboration is a partnership between Mulago Hospital-Makerere University College of Health Sciences (M-MakCHS), in Kampala, Uganda, and the Yale University School of Medicine. The program allows Ugandan junior faculty to receive up to 1 year of subspecialty training within the Yale hospital system. The authors performed a qualitative study to assess the effects of this program on participants, as well as on M-MakCHS as an institution. Methods Data was collected via semi-structured interviews with exchange participants. Eight participants (67% of those eligible as of 4/2012) completed interviews. Study authors performed data analysis using standard qualitative data analysis techniques. Results Analysis revealed themes addressing the benefits, difficulties, and opportunities for improvement of the program. Interviewees described the main benefit of the program as its effect on their fund of knowledge. Participants also described positive effects on their clinical practice and on medical education at M-MakCHS. Most respondents cited financial issues as the primary difficulty of participation. Post-participation difficulties included resource limitations and confronting longstanding institutional and cultural habits. Suggestions for programmatic improvement included expansion of the program, ensuring appropriate management of pre-departure expectations, and refinement of program mentoring structures. Participants also voiced interest in expanding post-exchange programming to ensure both the use of and the maintenance of new capacity. Conclusions The MUYU Collaboration has benefitted both program participants and M-MakCHS, though these benefits remain difficult to quantify. This study supports the assertion that resource-poor to resource-rich exchanges have the potential to provide significant benefits to the resource-poor partner. PMID:25799567

  11. University of Toronto Institute for Optical Sciences collaborative program in optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Istrate, Emanuel; Helmy, Amr S.; Sipe, John E.; Goh, M. Cynthia; Miller, R. J. Dwayne

    2007-06-01

    We describe the activities of the Institute for Optical Sciences (IOS) at the University of Toronto towards the establishment of a Master's Program in Optics. The IOS was formed as a collaboration between faculty members interested in optics from the four departments of Physics, Chemistry, Electrical and Computer Engineering and Materials Science and Engineering. One of its goals is to serve as unifying entity for graduate and undergraduate programs in optical sciences. The details of the proposed graduate program will be discussed. It will be set up in the form of a collaborative university program, where students must satisfy the requirements of one of the four home departments, as well as a set of IOS-specific requirements of the program. IOS-specific activities include attending the Distinguished Visiting Scientist Series, participation in a best-research-practice mini-course, where essential research skills are discussed, as well as participation in an annual internal conference. The benefits of this interdisciplinary program, for students, faculty and relevant industries are discussed. The students will benefit from a wider exposure and a more coherent curriculum. The IOS will also serve as local community within the campus to which students could belong and network. Faculty, on the other hand, will benefit from a reduced teaching load, as redundancies among the departments will be removed.

  12. St George's University's Medical Student Research Institute: A Novel, Virtual Programme for Medical Research Collaboration

    PubMed Central

    Chamberlain, RS; Klaassen, Z; Meadows, MC; Weitzman, S; Loukas, M

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Medical student research involvement has evolved to be a core component of medical education and is becoming increasingly vital to success in the United States residency match. We sought to develop a research website allowing students and research faculty to collaborate and complete projects online. Methods: The Medical Student Research Institute (MSRI) was developed by the St George's University School of Medicine in 2009 to encourage, support, facilitate and centralize medical student research. Results: There are 63 active students in the MSRI (22 students in basic science and 41 students in clinical rotations). The mean GPA for basic science student members was 3.81 ± 0.27 and was 3.80 ± 0.20 for clinical student members. The mean United States Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE) Step 1 score was 241.6 ± 17.5. Since 2009, MSRI students have published 87 manuscripts in 33 different journals and have presented at 14 different national and international conferences. Conclusion: A web-based MSRI provides a virtual, entirely online resource for coordinating remote research collaboration between medical students and faculty whose opportunities would be otherwise limited. Initial experiences with the programme have been positive and the framework and concept of the MSRI provides a platform for university and medical schools to provide research opportunities to students who may not have face-to-face access to research faculty. PMID:25303200

  13. Collaboration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonald, Meme; Pryor, Boori Monty

    2000-01-01

    Describes, in the words of two Australian authors (one Aboriginal and one European-Australian), how they work together when they write books together, and how their collaboration goes beyond the two of them. (SR)

  14. The Development of Web-Based Collaborative Training Model for Enhancing Human Performances on ICT for Students in Banditpattanasilpa Institute

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pumipuntu, Natawut; Kidrakarn, Pachoen; Chetakarn, Somchock

    2015-01-01

    This research aimed to develop the model of Web-based Collaborative (WBC) Training model for enhancing human performances on ICT for students in Banditpattanasilpa Institute. The research is divided into three phases: 1) investigating students and teachers' training needs on ICT web-based contents and performance, 2) developing a web-based…

  15. Institutions' Needs and Donors' Dreams: A Case Study of Successful Student Affairs Fundraising Collaboration at Three Private Research Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sonn, Andrew C.

    2009-01-01

    While facing difficult financial times, student affairs divisions and their leaders are increasingly considering collaborating with development officers and other institutional partners to raise funds for student services, activities, and facilities. Student affairs leaders, however, do not have proven strategies based on empirical data for making…

  16. Reflections on Online Learning Designs and Cross-Institutional Research Collaborations: Revisiting "Classrooms without Walls" in Two Australian Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rossi, Dolene; van Rensburg, Henriette; Clark, Damien; Harreveld, R. E.; Beer, Colin; Danaher, P. A.

    2015-01-01

    The article on which this paper reflects ["Exploring a Cross-Institutional Research Collaboration and Innovation: Deploying Social Software and Web 2.0 Technologies to Investigate Online Learning Designs and Interactions in Two Australian Universities"] presented elements of a research project investigating learning interactions in…

  17. Ensuring Student Success through Collaboration: Summer Institute Papers and Recommendations of the Council of Chief State School Officers, 1992.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council of Chief State School Officers, Washington, DC.

    This volume contains papers that were commissioned for the 1992 Council of Chief State School Officers (CCSSO) Summer Institute. These papers form the basis for the CCSSO's study of school-community collaboration, which focuses on the role of the community in ensuring the success of all students. Following the acknowledgements and introduction,…

  18. Collaboration Among Institutions to Bring Geospatial Technology to an Underserved Rural Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, T.

    2012-12-01

    The University of Maine at Machias and Washington County Community College, the two smallest and most remote public institutions in Maine, provide important education and workforce development services in a rural and economically-challenged region. Through an innovative collaboration supported by the National Science Foundation, the two institutions have developed geospatial technology (GST) programs designed to meet the specific workforce needs of the region, affording students with the opportunity to pursue degrees, certificates and minors. Prior to this effort, neither school had the resources to maintain a GST laboratory or to offer courses consistently. The region had almost no GST capacity with which to manage critical environmental resources and grapple with economic, public safety, and public health challenges. Several statewide studies had shown a growing need for more GST technicians and training for incumbent workers. The new programs are designed to produce a small number of specialist technicians with associate's degrees and a large number of ancillary users with significant GST expertise from courses, certificates or minors. Course content is shaped by workforce research in Maine and elsewhere, and all courses are offered in either blended, online or short-term intensive formats to provide access to incumbent workers and extend the geographic reach of the programs. Through the university's Geographic Information Systems (GIS) Service Center, students from both institutions engage in real-world projects, and are linked with employers via internships. This has the added plus of providing low-cost and no-cost GIS services to area clients, generating demand. Many of these projects and internships lead to work for graduates, even through the economic downturn. By creating courses that serve multiple audiences, each contributing a small number to the total enrollment, the programs constitute a sustainable model that serves the growing needs of the region

  19. Compilation of presentations: LANL-NRSS-Institute of Physics: radiological source technical cooperation

    SciTech Connect

    Streeper, Charles; Fanning, Michael; Feldman, Alex

    2011-01-20

    A workshop was held in Tibilisi, Republic of Georgia February 7-8,2011 to discuss and train personnel on various instrumentation provided to the Nuclear Radiation Service and the Institute of Physics by the United States Global Threat Reduction Initiative. Instruments provided have been reviewed and approved via the local customs office. The instruments include: (1) Ludlum 3030E Smear Counters; (2) Ludlum 2360 Rate meter/Scalars; (3) Ludlum model 4310 detectors; (4) Arrow Tech Direct Reading Dosimeters and chargers; (5) ThermoFisher Scientific Mk2 Electronic Personal Dosimeter (EPD); (6) ThermoFisher Scientific EASYEPD2 configuration software; and (7) Associated support equipment, cables, planchets, etc. During the course of the training several power point briefs will be delivered. These briefs include theory of operation, operation, maintenance, calibration and configuration of the instruments described above. Several table top scenarios will be conducted during the training to reinforce the training material presented in the slides.

  20. Pluripotent stem cells in translation: a Food and Drug Administration-National Institutes of Health collaboration.

    PubMed

    Kleitman, Naomi; Rao, Mahendra S; Owens, David F

    2013-07-01

    Recently, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), the U.S. National Institutes of Health, and the stem cell research community have collaborated on a series of workshops that address moving pluripotent stem cell therapies into the clinic. The first two workshops in the series focused on preclinical science, and a third, future workshop will focus on clinical trials. This summary addresses major points from both of the recent preclinically focused meetings. When entering into a therapeutics developmental program based on pluripotent cells, investigators must make decisions at the very early stages that will have major ramifications during later phases of development. Presentations and discussions from both invited participants and FDA staff described the need to characterize and document the quality, variability, and suitability of the cells and commercial reagents used at every translational stage. This requires consideration of future regulatory requirements, ranging from donor eligibility of the original source material to the late-stage manufacturing protocols. Federal, industrial, and academic participants agreed that planning backward is the best way to anticipate what evidence will be needed to justify human testing of novel therapeutics and to eliminate wasted efforts.

  1. Status of a compact electron cyclotron resonance ion source for National Institute of Radiological Sciences-930 cyclotron

    SciTech Connect

    Hojo, S. Katagiri, K.; Nakao, M.; Sugiura, A.; Muramatsu, M.; Noda, A.; Noda, K.; Okada, T.; Takahashi, Y.; Komiyama, A.; Honma, T.

    2014-02-15

    The Kei-source is a compact electron cyclotron resonance ion source using only permanent magnets and a frequency of 10 GHz. It was developed at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS) for producing C{sup 4+} ions oriented for high-energy carbon therapy. It has also been used as an ion source for the NIRS-930 cyclotron. Its microwave band region for the traveling-wave-tube amplifier and maximum output power are 8–10 GHz and 350 W, respectively. Since 2006, it has provided various ion beams such as proton, deuteron, carbon, oxygen, and neon with sufficient intensity (200 μA for proton and deuteron, 50 μA for C{sup 4+}, for example) and good stability for radioisotope production, tests of radiation damage, and basic research experiments. Its horizontal and vertical emittances were measured using a screen monitor and waist-scan. The present paper reports the current status of the Kei-source.

  2. Strengthening Institutional Research Administration in Uganda: A Case Study on Developing Collaborations among Academic and Research Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kakande, Nelson; Namirembe, Regina; Kaye, Dan K.; Mugyenyi, Peter N.

    2012-01-01

    Despite the presence of several funded research projects at academic and research institutions in sub-Saharan Africa, the quality of the pre/post grant award process in these institutions is inadequate. There is a need to strengthen research administration through infrastructural, organizational, and human resource development to match the dynamic…

  3. Initial results from a multi-institutional collaboration to monitor harmful algal blooms in South Carolina.

    PubMed

    Lewitus, Alan J; Holland, A Fred

    2003-01-01

    The rapid rate of development in the South Carolina (SC) coastal zone has heightened public concern for the condition of the state's estuaries, and alerted scientists to the potential that novel and adverse effects on estuarine ecosystems may result. Although well-developed databases from long-term monitoring programs exist for many variables valuable in predicting and following system responses, information on phytoplankton distributions in SC estuaries has lagged. Knowledge of the dynamical relationship between environmental (e.g., nutrient quantity and quality) and biological (e.g., grazing) regulation, and phytoplankton biomass and composition is critical to understanding estuarine susceptibility to eutrophication or harmful algal blooms (HABs). Recently, SC scientists from federal, state, and academic institutions established a collaborative monitoring program to assess HAB distribution and ecology statewide. The South Carolina Harmful Algal Bloom Program includes: a) intensive temporal monitoring at areas of known HAB occurrence or those exhibiting symptoms potentially related to HABs (e.g., prevalent fish lesions), b) extensive spatial monitoring in coordination with existing statewide efforts, c) a citizen volunteer monitoring network, d) nutrient response bioassays, and e) laboratory-based physiological experiments on HAB isolates. By combining "trip-wire" surveillance and rapid response systems, routine monitoring of environmental parameters and HAB distribution, and process-oriented studies examining the physiological functioning of HAB species, an enhanced understanding of the impact and environmental control of HABs in SC estuaries will be achieved. The application of this approach to studies on the distribution and physiological ecology of a new widespread SC red tide, and to the discovery of several potentially toxic blooms (including Pfiesteria) in SC holding ponds, are described.

  4. Case Study in the Power of Collaboration: Planning Process for the Kansas Educational Leadership Institute

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Devin, Mary

    2013-01-01

    This article reports on the collaborative efforts undertaken for systematic statewide support for the recruitment, development, and retention of quality leaders in schools and school districts in Kansas, USA. The author presents the case of a strong sense of "collaboration" that made the difference and stimulated movement from vision…

  5. Creating and Benefiting from Institutional Collaboration: Models for Success. New Directions for Community Colleges, Number 103.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGrath, Dennis, Ed.

    1998-01-01

    This volume offers a variety of examples of long-term collaborative efforts within schools that began with external funding. Articles include: (1) "Lessons from a Long-Term Collaboration," (Lindsay M. Wright and Rona Middleberg); (2) "Creating Structural Change: Best Practices," (Janet E. Lieberman); (3) "An Urban Intervention That Works: The…

  6. Bilingual Education: A Collaborative Process Between Institutions of Higher Education, Local Educational Agencies and the Community.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prewitt-Diaz, Joseph O.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    The six articles in this issue demonstrate how collaborative education efforts can be useful in meeting the needs of bilingual communities. The first article describes a Community Based Education model derived from experience in developing, implementing, and evaluating it. The article details the collaborative efforts between a bilingual school…

  7. Promoting Entrepreneurial Culture in the University: The Institutional Collaborative Model at the Universidad Autonoma de Madrid

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Pablo, Isidro; Alfaro, Fernando; Rodriguez, Miriam; Valdes, Esperanza

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a case of collaboration between different types of public services and the private sector for the promotion of an entrepreneurial culture. This collaboration is achieved by means of a centre established and developed by the Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, the Centro de Iniciativas Emprendedoras (the Centre for Entrepreneurial…

  8. Business, Social Agencies, and Education Institutions: Collaboration for Urban Education Needs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akron Univ., OH.

    The College of Education at the University of Akron (Ohio) approaches program delivery, service, research, and student diversity through collaborative efforts, which are complementary to and facilitated by an urban education program. The Decker Family Development Center is a collaborative project involving the university, the school district, a…

  9. A Development of a Collaborative Blended Learning Model to Enhance Learning Achievement and Thinking Ability of Undergraduate Students at the Institute of Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kingpum, Peerasak; Ruangsuwan, Chaiyot; Chaicharoen, Sumalee

    2015-01-01

    This research aimed to develop a model of a collaborative blended learning (CoBl) to develop learning achievement and thinking ability of undergraduate students in the Institute of Physical Education. The research is divided into three phases using the blended learning model via collaborative learning with thinking abilities approach as follows:…

  10. Pharmacoeconomic research--facilitating collaboration among academic institutions, managed-care organizations, and the pharmaceutical industry: a conference report.

    PubMed

    Draugalis, J R; Coons, S J

    1995-01-01

    To provide a venue to allow for the exchange of information among parties interested in pharmacoeconomic research opportunities within managed-care organizations, an invitational conference was conducted by The University of Arizona's Center for Pharmaceutical Economics on January 20 and 21, 1994, in Tucson, Arizona. The purpose of the conference was to bring together representatives from managed-care organizations, academic institutions, and the pharmaceutical industry to discuss opportunities for collaboration, as well as consider the barriers to conducting pharmacoeconomic research in the managed-care setting. Challenges to collaboration include database development, the need for an integrated perspective, sensitivity to marketing matters, and a variety of technical and organizational barriers. To overcome these barriers, the interested groups must develop trust, recognize common ground, share risk, and communicate effectively. This article describes the emerging themes of the conference based on transcripts of formal presentations and participants' comments. PMID:7758064

  11. Collaborative Learning Strategies for the 90s in the Development of Institutional Effectiveness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nicodemus, Karen

    Participation in a Title III consortium grant has brought about many changes at Cochise College in Arizona, and has helped create an institutional culture that embraces change and supports faculty and staff efforts to improve the institution. In December, 1993, a Planning Task Force (PTF) was established, composed of 23 members, about one-half of…

  12. Collaborative Life History: Different Experiences of Spending Time in an Institution in Iceland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hreinsdottir, Eyglo Ebba; Stefansdottir, Gourun

    2010-01-01

    This article was first written as a presentation to the International Seminar held at the Open University in July 2008. It is based on cooperation between two women, Eyglo Ebba Hreinsdottir and Gudrun Stefansdottir, one who lived at an institution and another who worked there. Ebba moved to an institution in 1969 when she was 19 years old. Gudrun…

  13. Fulfilling the Mission of ICIE: Industry and Institutions Develop Collaborative Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swaffield, Bruce C.

    1999-01-01

    Examines trends in the increasing partnerships between industry and institutions of higher education in light of the mission and activities of the International Council for Innovation in Higher Education (ICIE). Cites examples of such partnerships involving various industries and types of institutions. Stresses the need for colleges and…

  14. Transdisciplinary Collaborations for Sustainability Education: Institutional and Intragroup Challenges and Opportunities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Tina Lynn

    2015-01-01

    This article takes as its point of departure the many converging crises of sustainability and the responsibility of higher education institutions and faculty members to participate in mitigating these crises to any extent possible. The author characterizes sustainability education as transdisciplinary praxis, explores the institutional and…

  15. Collaborating on State-Level Institutional Research in New Hampshire: NH PAPER

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lemaire, Ingrid; Knapp, Judith A.; Lowe, Sarah

    2008-01-01

    In 2001, the grant and research coordinator of the Community College System of New Hampshire (CCSNH) was inspired to create an informal collaborative with representatives from other organizations who had similar interests in collecting and sharing data that related to postsecondary education aspirations and participation. Representatives were…

  16. Assessing Online Collaboration among Language Teachers: A Cross-Institutional Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnold, Nike; Ducate, Lara; Lomicka, Lara; Lord, Gillian

    2009-01-01

    This paper focuses on computer-supported collaborative learning (CSCL) among foreign language (FL) graduate students from three universities, who worked together to create a wiki. In order to investigate the nature of CSCL among participants, this qualitative case study used the Curtis and Lawson framework (2001) to conduct a content analysis of…

  17. Meeting Public Expectations through Networks: The Collaborative Advantage of a Multi-Institutional Teaching Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kihl, Brenda Kay

    2010-01-01

    In a world of complex problems, where public funding is decreasing and demand for public services is increasing, public entities are turning to collaborative networks to find solutions. This dissertation explores the development of one such network in Collin County, Texas. The researcher presents a case study describing and analyzing the…

  18. Insights into Implementing Research Collaborations between Research-Intensive Universities and Minority-Serving Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thao, Mao; Lawrenz, Frances; Brakke, Mary; Sherman, Jamie; Matute, Martin

    2016-01-01

    With the high demand to build the science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) workforce and the disparity of underrepresented minorities in STEM fields, there have been increased educational efforts to diversify STEM fields. This article describes what works in research collaborations between research-intensive universities (RIUs) and…

  19. Objective structured clinical examination in radiology

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Anurag; Batra, Bipin; Sood, AK; Ramakantan, Ravi; Bhargava, Satish K; Chidambaranathan, N; Indrajit, IK

    2010-01-01

    There is a growing need for introducing objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) as a part of radiology practical examinations in India. OSCE is an established, reliable, and effective multistation test for the assessment of practical professional skills in an objective and a transparent manner. In India, it has been successfully initiated and implemented in specialties like pediatrics, ophthalmology, and otolaryngology. Each OSCE station needs to have a pre-agreed “key-list” that contains a list of objective steps prepared for uniformly assessing the tasks given to students. Broadly, OSCE stations are classified as “manned” or “unmanned” stations. These stations may include procedure or pictorial or theory stations with clinical oriented contents. This article is one of a series of measures to initiate OSCE in radiology; it analyzes the attributes of OSCE stations and outlines the steps for implementing OSCE. Furthermore, important issues like the advantages of OSCE, its limitations, a strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats (SWOT) analysis, and the timing of introduction of OSCE in radiology are also covered. The OSCE format in radiology and its stations needs to be validated, certified, and finalized before its use in examinations. This will need active participation and contribution from the academic radiology fraternity and inputs from faculty members of leading teaching institutions. Many workshops/meetings need to be conducted. Indeed, these collaborative measures will effectively sensitize universities, examiners, organizers, faculty, and students across India to OSCE and help successfully usher in this new format in radiology practical examinations. PMID:20607015

  20. Objective structured clinical examination in radiology.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Anurag; Batra, Bipin; Sood, Ak; Ramakantan, Ravi; Bhargava, Satish K; Chidambaranathan, N; Indrajit, Ik

    2010-05-01

    There is a growing need for introducing objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) as a part of radiology practical examinations in India. OSCE is an established, reliable, and effective multistation test for the assessment of practical professional skills in an objective and a transparent manner. In India, it has been successfully initiated and implemented in specialties like pediatrics, ophthalmology, and otolaryngology. Each OSCE station needs to have a pre-agreed "key-list" that contains a list of objective steps prepared for uniformly assessing the tasks given to students. Broadly, OSCE stations are classified as "manned" or "unmanned" stations. These stations may include procedure or pictorial or theory stations with clinical oriented contents. This article is one of a series of measures to initiate OSCE in radiology; it analyzes the attributes of OSCE stations and outlines the steps for implementing OSCE. Furthermore, important issues like the advantages of OSCE, its limitations, a strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats (SWOT) analysis, and the timing of introduction of OSCE in radiology are also covered. The OSCE format in radiology and its stations needs to be validated, certified, and finalized before its use in examinations. This will need active participation and contribution from the academic radiology fraternity and inputs from faculty members of leading teaching institutions. Many workshops/meetings need to be conducted. Indeed, these collaborative measures will effectively sensitize universities, examiners, organizers, faculty, and students across India to OSCE and help successfully usher in this new format in radiology practical examinations.

  1. Student Perceptions of Educational Quality in Radiologic Technology Programs: A Comparative Analysis of Specialized and Institutional Accreditation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vander Hoek, Nancy

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if students' perceptions of quality differed between Joint Review Committee on Education in Radiologic Technology (JRCERT) accredited and non JRCERT-accredited radiography programs using the quality dimensions of curriculum, faculty, facilities and equipment, integrity, student outcomes, and overall…

  2. Accelerating cancer therapy development: the importance of combination strategies and collaboration. Summary of an Institute of Medicine workshop.

    PubMed

    LoRusso, Patricia M; Canetta, Renzo; Wagner, John A; Balogh, Erin P; Nass, Sharyl J; Boerner, Scott A; Hohneker, John

    2012-11-15

    Cancer cells contain multiple genetic changes in cell signaling pathways that drive abnormal cell survival, proliferation, invasion, and metastasis. Unfortunately, patients treated with single agents inhibiting only one of these pathways--even if showing an initial response--often develop resistance with subsequent relapse or progression of their cancer, typically via the activation of an alternative uninhibited pathway. Combination therapies offer the potential for inhibiting multiple targets and pathways simultaneously to more effectively kill cancer cells and prevent or delay the emergence of drug resistance. However, there are many unique challenges to developing combination therapies, including devising and applying appropriate preclinical tests and clinical trial designs, prioritizing which combination therapies to test, avoiding overlapping toxicity of multiple agents, and overcoming legal, cultural, and regulatory barriers that impede collaboration among multiple companies, organizations, and/or institutions. More effective strategies to efficiently develop combination cancer therapies are urgently needed. Thus, the Institute of Medicine's National Cancer Policy Forum recently convened a workshop with the goal of identifying barriers that may be impeding the development of combination investigational cancer therapies, as well as potential solutions to overcome those barriers, improve collaboration, and ultimately accelerate the development of promising combinations of investigational cancer therapies.

  3. Radiological Assessment for the Vance Road Facility Source Vault, Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    J. R. Morton

    2000-09-01

    From the 1950s, the Vance Road laboratories had been used for a broad range of nuclear medicine research involving numerous radionuclides. These radionuclides were stored in the a source vault located on the first floor of the facility. The Environmental Survey and Site Assessment Program (ESSAP) of ORISE performed a radiological assessment survey of the source vault after it had been remediated and in preparation for converting the area to office space.

  4. Collaboration and Interconnectivity: Nottinghamshire Fire and Rescue Services and Higher Education Institutions in Nottingham

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Peter; Greenhalgh, Kirsten; Parkin, Craig

    2013-01-01

    This article will describe the developing relationship between Nottinghamshire Fire and Rescue Services and the two higher education institutions in Nottingham. It will chronicle how a very traditional relationship has been transformed, initially by a simple consultancy project, into a much closer working relationship characterised by a much…

  5. Collaborating for Academic Success: A Tri-Institutional Information Literacy Program for High School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Angell, Katelyn; Tewell, Eamon

    2013-01-01

    This article describes a nearly decade-long partnership between three institutions representing school, public, and academic settings in Westchester County, New York. The program, designed to improve the academic performance of local high school students, is unique due to the extensive contact students have with academic librarians during the…

  6. A Case of Problem Based Learning for Cross-Institutional Collaboration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nerantzi, Chrissi

    2012-01-01

    The idea of moving away from battery-type Academic Development Activities and silo modules and programmes towards open cross-institutional approaches in line with OEP are explored within this paper based on a recent small-scale, fully-online study. This brought together academics and other professionals who support learning, from different…

  7. Determining the Influence of Heterogeneity in Graduate Institutions on University-Industry Collaboration Policy in Taiwan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weng, Hung-Jen; Chang, Dian-Fu

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we assumed that organizational heterogeneity is a key factor influencing the effects of university-industry cooperation policy in higher education institutes. Gender difference, faculty position, faculty member nationality, and diversity in academic expertise were considered as the indicators of heterogeneity. One-hundred graduate…

  8. Common Alzheimer's Disease Research Ontology: National Institute on Aging and Alzheimer's Association collaborative project.

    PubMed

    Refolo, Lorenzo M; Snyder, Heather; Liggins, Charlene; Ryan, Laurie; Silverberg, Nina; Petanceska, Suzana; Carrillo, Maria C

    2012-07-01

    Alzheimer's disease is recognized as a public health crisis worldwide. As public and private funding agencies around the world enhance and expand their support of Alzheimer's disease research, there is an urgent need to coordinate funding strategies and leverage resources to maximize the impact on public health and avoid duplication of effort and inefficiency. Such coordination requires a comprehensive assessment of the current landscape of Alzheimer's disease research in the United States and internationally. To this end, the National Institute on Aging at the National Institutes of Health and the Alzheimer's Association developed the Common Alzheimer's Disease Research Ontology (CADRO) as a dynamic portfolio analysis tool that can be used by funding agencies worldwide for strategic planning and coordination.

  9. The Jefferson Scale of Attitudes Toward Interprofessional Collaboration (JeffSATIC): development and multi-institution psychometric data.

    PubMed

    Hojat, Mohammadreza; Ward, Julia; Spandorfer, John; Arenson, Christine; Van Winkle, Lon J; Williams, Brett

    2015-05-01

    This study was designed to develop a psychometrically sound instrument to measure attitudes toward interprofessional collaboration in health profession students and practitioners regardless of their professions and areas of practice. Based on a review of the literature a list of 27 items was generated, 12 faculty judged the face validity of the items, and 124 health profession faculty examined the content validity of the items. The preliminary version of the instrument was administered to 1976 health profession students in three universities (Thomas Jefferson University, n = 510; Midwestern University, n = 392; and Monash University, n = 1074). Twenty items that survived the psychometric scrutiny were included in the Jefferson Scale of Attitudes Toward Interprofessional Collaboration (JeffSATIC). Two constructs of "working relationships" and "accountability" emerged from factor analysis of the JeffSATIC. Cronbach's α coefficients for the JeffSATIC ranged from 0.84 to 0.90 in the three samples. Women obtained significantly higher JeffSATIC mean scores than men. Medical students obtained lower mean score on the JeffSATIC than most other health profession students at the same university. Psychometric support from a relatively large sample size of students in a variety of health profession programs in this multi-institutional study is encouraging which adds to the credibility of the JeffSATIC.

  10. IMRT credentialing for prospective trials using institutional virtual phantoms: results of a joint European Organization for the Research and Treatment of Cancer and Radiological Physics Center project

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background and purpose Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) credentialing for a EORTC study was performed using an anthropomorphic head phantom from the Radiological Physics Center (RPC; RPCPH). Institutions were retrospectively requested to irradiate their institutional phantom (INSTPH) using the same treatment plan in the framework of a Virtual Phantom Project (VPP) for IMRT credentialing. Materials and methods CT data set of the institutional phantom and measured 2D dose matrices were requested from centers and sent to a dedicated secure EORTC uploader. Data from the RPCPH and INSTPH were thereafter centrally analyzed and inter-compared by the QA team using commercially available software (RIT; ver.5.2; Colorado Springs, USA). Results Eighteen institutions participated to the VPP. The measurements of 6 (33%) institutions could not be analyzed centrally. All other centers passed both the VPP and the RPC ±7%/4 mm credentialing criteria. At the 5%/5 mm gamma criteria (90% of pixels passing), 11(92%) as compared to 12 (100%) centers pass the credentialing process with RPCPH and INSTPH (p = 0.29), respectively. The corresponding pass rate for the 3%/3 mm gamma criteria (90% of pixels passing) was 2 (17%) and 9 (75%; p = 0.01), respectively. Conclusions IMRT dosimetry gamma evaluations in a single plane for a H&N prospective trial using the INSTPH measurements showed agreement at the gamma index criteria of ±5%/5 mm (90% of pixels passing) for a small number of VPP measurements. Using more stringent, criteria, the RPCPH and INSTPH comparison showed disagreement. More data is warranted and urgently required within the framework of prospective studies. PMID:24885438

  11. Comparison of structural allograft and traditional autograft technique in occipitocervical fusion: radiological and clinical outcomes from a single institution.

    PubMed

    Godzik, Jakub; Ravindra, Vijay M; Ray, Wilson Z; Schmidt, Meic H; Bisson, Erica F; Dailey, Andrew T

    2015-08-01

    OBJECT The authors' objectives were to compare the rate of fusion after occipitoatlantoaxial arthrodesis using structural allograft with the fusion rate from using autograft, to evaluate correction of radiographic parameters, and to describe symptom relief with each graft technique. METHODS The authors assessed radiological fusion at 6 and 12 months after surgery and obtained radiographic measurements of C1-2 and C2-7 lordotic angles, C2-7 sagittal vertical alignments, and posterior occipitocervical angles at preoperative, postoperative, and final follow-up examinations. Demographic data, intraoperative details, adverse events, and functional outcomes were collected from hospitalization records. Radiological fusion was defined as the presence of bone trabeculation and no movement between the graft and the occiput or C-2 on routine flexion-extension cervical radiographs. Radiographic measurements were obtained from lateral standing radiographs with patients in the neutral position. RESULTS At the University of Utah, 28 adult patients underwent occipitoatlantoaxial arthrodesis between 2003 and 2010 using bicortical allograft, and 11 patients were treated using iliac crest autograft. Mean follow-up for all patients was 20 months (range 1-108 months). Of the 27 patients with a minimum of 12 months of follow-up, 18 (95%) of 19 in the allograft group and 8 (100%) of 8 in the autograft group demonstrated evidence of bony fusion shown by imaging. Patients in both groups demonstrated minimal deterioration of sagittal vertical alignment at final follow-up. Operative times were comparable, but patients undergoing occipitocervical fusion with autograft demonstrated greater blood loss (316 ml vs 195 ml). One (9%) of 11 patients suffered a significant complication related to autograft harvesting. CONCLUSIONS The use of allograft in occipitocervical fusion allows a high rate of successful arthrodesis yet avoids the potentially significant morbidity and pain associated with

  12. Salvage Radical Prostatectomy for Radiation-recurrent Prostate Cancer: A Multi-institutional Collaboration

    PubMed Central

    Chade, Daher C.; Shariat, Shahrokh F.; Cronin, Angel M.; Savage, Caroline J.; Karnes, R. Jeffrey; Blute, Michael L.; Briganti, Alberto; Montorsi, Francesco; van derPoel, Henk G.; Van Poppel, Hendrik; Joniau, Steven; Godoy, Guilherme; Hurtado-Coll, Antonio; Gleave, Martin E.; Dall’Oglio, Marcos; Srougi, Miguel; Scardino, Peter T.; Eastham, James A.

    2011-01-01

    Background Oncologic outcomes in men with radiation-recurrent prostate cancer (PCa) treated with salvage radical prostatectomy (SRP) are poorly defined. Objective To identify predictors of biochemical recurrence (BCR), metastasis, and death following SRP to help select patients who may benefit from SRP. Design, setting, and participants This is a retrospective, international, multi-institutional cohort analysis. There was a median follow-up of 4.4 yr following SRP performed on 404 men with radiation-recurrent PCa from 1985 to 2009 in tertiary centers. Intervention Open SRP. Measurements BCR after SRP was defined as a serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) ≥0.1 or ≥0.2 ng/ml (depending on the institution). Secondary end points included progression to metastasis and cancer-specific death. Results and limitations Median age at SRP was 65 yr of age, and median pre-SRP PSA was 4.5 ng/ml. Following SRP, 195 patients experienced BCR, 64 developed metastases, and 40 died from PCa. At 10 yr after SRP, BCR-free survival, metastasis-free survival, and cancer-specific survival (CSS) probabilities were 37% (95% confidence interval [CI], 31–43), 77% (95% CI, 71–82), and 83% (95% CI, 76–88), respectively. On preoperative multivariable analysis, pre-SRP PSA and Gleason score at postradiation prostate biopsy predicted BCR (p = 0.022; global p < 0.001) and metastasis (p = 0.022; global p < 0.001). On postoperative multivariable analysis, pre-SRP PSA and pathologic Gleason score at SRP predicted BCR (p = 0.014; global p < 0.001) and metastasis (p < 0.001; global p < 0.001). Lymph node involvement (LNI) also predicted metastasis (p = 0.017). The main limitations of this study are its retrospective design and the follow-up period. Conclusions In a select group of patients who underwent SRP for radiation-recurrent PCa, freedom from clinical metastasis was observed in >75% of patients 10 yr after surgery. Patients with lower pre-SRP PSA levels and lower postradiation prostate

  13. Radiation-Therapeutic Agent Clinical Trials: Leveraging Advantages of a National Cancer Institute Programmatic Collaboration.

    PubMed

    Takebe, Naoko; Ahmed, Mansoor M; Vikram, Bhadrasain; Bernhard, Eric J; Zwiebel, James; Norman Coleman, C; Kunos, Charles A

    2016-10-01

    A number of oncology phase II radiochemotherapy trials with promising results have been conducted late in the overall experimental therapeutic agent development process. Accelerated development and approval of experimental therapeutic agents have stimulated further interest in much earlier radiation-agent studies to increase the likelihood of success in phase III trials. To sustain this interest, more forward-thinking preclinical radiobiology experimental designs are needed to improve discovery of promising radiochemotherapy plus agent combinations for clinical trial testing. These experimental designs should better inform next-step radiation-agent clinical trial dose, schedule, exposure, and therapeutic effect. Recognizing the need for a better strategy to develop preclinical data supporting radiation-agent phase I or II trials, the National Cancer Institute (NCI)-Cancer Therapy Evaluation Program (CTEP) and the NCI-Molecular Radiation Therapeutics Branch of the Radiation Research Program have partnered to promote earlier radiobiology studies of CTEP portfolio agents. In this Seminars in Radiation Oncology article, four key components of this effort are discussed. First, we outline steps for accessing CTEP agents for preclinical testing. Second, we propose radiobiology studies that facilitate transition from preclinical testing to early phase trial activation. Third, we navigate steps that walk through CTEP agent strategic development paths available for radiation-agent testing. Fourth, we highlight a new NCI-sponsored cooperative agreement grant supporting in vitro and in vivo radiation-CTEP agent testing that informs early phase trial designs. Throughout the article, we include contemporary examples of successful radiation-agent development initiatives.

  14. Ethical principles for project collaboration between academic professionals or institutions and the biomedical industry.

    PubMed

    Riis, Povl

    2012-01-01

    Ethics in biomedical research cannot be defined by etymology, and need a semantic definition based on national and contemporary values. In a Nordic cultural and historic context, key values are solidarity with one's fellow man, equality, truth, justice, responsibility, freedom, and professionalism. In contemporary medical research, such ethics are further subgrouped into research ethics, researcher ethics, societal ethics, and distributive ethics. Lately, public and academic debates have addressed the necessary strengthening of the ethical concerns and interests of patients and society. Despite considerable progress, common ethical definitions and control systems still lack uniformity or indeed do not exist. Among the cooperative partners involved, the pharmaceutical industry have preserved an important role. The same is true for the overall judgments reflected by the European Forum for Good Clinical Practice, leading peer-reviewed journals, the Nuffield Council on Bioethics for developing nations, and the latest global initiative, the Singapore Statement on Research Integrity. To help both institutions and countries, it will be valuable to include the following information in academia-industry protocols before starting a project: international authorship names; fixed agendas and time schedules for project meetings; chairperson shifts, meeting reports, and project plan changes; future author memberships; equal blinding and data distribution from disciplinary groups; an equal plan for exchange of project manuscripts at the proofing stage; contractual descriptions of all procedures, disagreements, publishing rights, prevention, and controls for suspected dishonesty; and a detailed description of who is doing what in the working process.

  15. Collaborating with Alexander Scriabine and the Miles Institute for Preclinical Pharmacology.

    PubMed

    Janis, Ronald A

    2015-11-15

    This article represents a timely opportunity to express my affection, admiration and gratitude to Professor David Triggle. David was my Ph.D. advisor as well as a key consultant in the 1980s and early 1990s for research programs at Miles Institute for Preclinical Pharmacology in West Haven, CT, the U.S. research operation of Bayer AG, in the areas of Ca(2+) and K(+) channel ligands. The binding methodology developed in his laboratory was used to search for an endogenous ligand for L-type Ca(2+) channels. We did not find the substance that we were searching for, a genetically-determined, competitive inhibitor for the 1,4-dihydropyridine binding site, but instead isolated the endogenous ligand for the brain's own marijuana, anandamide. Devane, Mechoulam and coworkers first discovered that this compound was the endogenous ligand for delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol, the active substance in cannabis. The endogenous endocannabinoid system is now the target of many exciting new approaches to drug discovery. PMID:26119821

  16. A collaborative institutional model for integrating computer applications in the medical curriculum.

    PubMed

    Friedman, C P; Oxford, G S; Juliano, E L

    1991-01-01

    The introduction and promotion of information technology in an established medical curriculum with existing academic and technical support structures poses a number of challenges. The UNC School of Medicine has developed the Taskforce on Educational Applications in Medicine (TEAM), to coordinate this effort. TEAM works as a confederation of existing research and support units with interests in computers and education, along with a core of interested faculty with curricular responsibilities. Constituent units of the TEAM confederation include the medical center library, medical television studios, basic science teaching laboratories, educational development office, microcomputer and network support groups, academic affairs administration, and a subset of course directors and teaching faculty. Among our efforts have been the establishment of (1) a mini-grant program to support faculty initiated development and implementation of computer applications in the curriculum, (2) a symposium series with visiting speakers to acquaint faculty with current developments in medical informatics and related curricular efforts at other institution, (3) 20 computer workstations located in the multipurpose teaching labs where first and second year students do much of their academic work, (4) a demonstration center for evaluation of courseware and technologically advanced delivery systems. The student workstations provide convenient access to electronic mail, University schedules and calendars, the CoSy computer conferencing system, and several software applications integral to their courses in pathology, histology, microbiology, biochemistry, and neurobiology. The progress achieved toward the primary goal has modestly exceeded our initial expectations, while the collegiality and interest expressed toward TEAM activities in the local environment stand as empirical measures of the success of the concept. PMID:1807705

  17. Radiation-Therapeutic Agent Clinical Trials: Leveraging Advantages of a National Cancer Institute Programmatic Collaboration.

    PubMed

    Takebe, Naoko; Ahmed, Mansoor M; Vikram, Bhadrasain; Bernhard, Eric J; Zwiebel, James; Norman Coleman, C; Kunos, Charles A

    2016-10-01

    A number of oncology phase II radiochemotherapy trials with promising results have been conducted late in the overall experimental therapeutic agent development process. Accelerated development and approval of experimental therapeutic agents have stimulated further interest in much earlier radiation-agent studies to increase the likelihood of success in phase III trials. To sustain this interest, more forward-thinking preclinical radiobiology experimental designs are needed to improve discovery of promising radiochemotherapy plus agent combinations for clinical trial testing. These experimental designs should better inform next-step radiation-agent clinical trial dose, schedule, exposure, and therapeutic effect. Recognizing the need for a better strategy to develop preclinical data supporting radiation-agent phase I or II trials, the National Cancer Institute (NCI)-Cancer Therapy Evaluation Program (CTEP) and the NCI-Molecular Radiation Therapeutics Branch of the Radiation Research Program have partnered to promote earlier radiobiology studies of CTEP portfolio agents. In this Seminars in Radiation Oncology article, four key components of this effort are discussed. First, we outline steps for accessing CTEP agents for preclinical testing. Second, we propose radiobiology studies that facilitate transition from preclinical testing to early phase trial activation. Third, we navigate steps that walk through CTEP agent strategic development paths available for radiation-agent testing. Fourth, we highlight a new NCI-sponsored cooperative agreement grant supporting in vitro and in vivo radiation-CTEP agent testing that informs early phase trial designs. Throughout the article, we include contemporary examples of successful radiation-agent development initiatives. PMID:27619249

  18. A Perspective on the Intersection of Institutional Identity and Collaborative Research: Toward More Effective Partnering With Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harkless, John

    2013-03-01

    Science departments at historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs) play important roles in providing quality education in a distinctive environment. The presenter is an HBCU alumnus who earned his doctorate from a primarily majority institution (PMI) and has had experience as both PMI and HBCU faculty. This experience frames and informs the observations shared in this presentation about the unique challenges and opportunities across an array of HBCU departments. Resources available, demographics impacted, current challenges, and the value of the institution to students, external partners, and the community-at-large will be discussed, with a focus on development of dialogue on the cultural and collaborative competencies necessary to working across institutional types.

  19. Ultrasound-Guided Radiological Placement of Central Venous Port via the Subclavian Vein: A Retrospective Analysis of 500 Cases at a Single Institute

    SciTech Connect

    Sakamoto, Noriaki Arai, Yasuaki Takeuchi, Yoshito Takahashi, Masahide Tsurusaki, Masakatsu; Sugimura, Kazuro

    2010-10-15

    The purpose of this study was to assess the technical success rate and adverse events (AEs) associated with ultrasound (US)-guided radiological placement (RP) of a central venous port (CVP) via the subclavian vein (SCV). Between April 2006 and May 2007, a total of 500 US-guided RPs of a CVP via the SCV were scheduled in 486 cancer patients (mean age {+-} SD, 54.1 {+-} 18.1 years) at our institute. Referring to the interventional radiology report database and patients' records, technical success rate and AEs relevant to CVP placement were evaluated retrospectively. The technical success rate was 98.6% (493/500). AEs occurred in 26 cases (5.2%) during follow-up (range, 1-1080 days; mean {+-} SD, 304.0 {+-} 292.1 days). AEs within 24 h postprocedure occurred in five patients: pneumothorax (n = 2), arterial puncture (n = 1), hematoma formation at the pocket site (n = 2), and catheter tip migration into the internal mammary vein (n = 1). There were seven early AEs: hematoma formation at the pocket site (n = 2), fibrin sheath formation around the indwelling catheter (n = 2), and catheter-related infections (n = 3). There were 13 delayed AEs: catheter-related infections (n = 7), catheter detachments (n = 3), catheter occlusion (n = 1), symptomatic thrombus in the SCV (n = 1), and catheter migration (n = 1). No major AEs, such as procedure-related death, air embolism, or events requiring surgical intervention, were observed. In conclusion, US-guided RP of a CVP via the SCV is highly appropriate, based on its high technical success rate and the limited number of AEs.

  20. Research Infrastructure for Collaborative Team Science: Challenges in Technology-Supported Workflows in and Across Laboratories, Institutions, and Geographies.

    PubMed

    Mirel, Barbara; Luo, Airong; Harris, Marcelline

    2015-05-01

    Collaborative research has many challenges. One under-researched challenge is how to align collaborators' research practices and evolving analytical reasoning with technologies and configurations of technologies that best support them. The goal of such alignment is to enhance collaborative problem solving capabilities in research. Toward this end, we draw on our own research and a synthesis of the literature to characterize the workflow of collaborating scientists in systems-level renal disease research. We describe the various phases of a hypothetical workflow among diverse collaborators within and across laboratories, extending from their primary analysis through secondary analysis. For each phase, we highlight required technology supports, and. At time, complementary organizational supports. This survey of supports matching collaborators' analysis practices and needs in research projects to technological support is preliminary, aimed ultimately at developing a research capability framework that can help scientists and technologists mutually understand workflows and technologies that can help enable and enhance them. PMID:26215866

  1. Collaborative Practitioners, Collaborative Schools. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pugach, Marleen C.; Johnson, Lawrence J.

    This book discusses collaboration as it occurs in all of its varying contexts in schools, such as consultation between special education and general classroom teachers, collaboration among classroom teachers, collaboration between university faculty in special and general education, and collaboration between institutions of higher education and…

  2. Two-frequency heating technique at the 18 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source of the National Institute of Radiological Sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biri, S.; Kitagawa, A.; Muramatsu, M.; Drentje, A. G.; Rácz, R.; Yano, K.; Kato, Y.; Sasaki, N.; Takasugi, W.

    2014-02-01

    The two-frequency heating technique was studied to increase the beam intensities of highly charged ions provided by the high-voltage extraction configuration (HEC) ion source at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS). The observed dependences on microwave power and frequency suggested that this technique improved plasma stability but it required precise frequency tuning and more microwave power than was available before 2013. Recently, a new, high-power (1200 W) wide band-width (17.1-18.5 GHz) travelling-wave-tube amplifier (TWTA) was installed. After some single tests with klystron and TWT amplifiers the simultaneous injection of the two microwaves has been successfully realized. The dependence of highly charged ions (HCI) currents on the superposed microwave power was studied by changing only the output power of one of the two amplifiers, alternatively. While operating the klystron on its fixed 18.0 GHz, the frequency of the TWTA was swept within its full limits (17.1-18.5 GHz), and the effect of this frequency on the HCI-production rate was examined under several operation conditions. As an overall result, new beam records of highly charged argon, krypton, and xenon beams were obtained at the NIRS-HEC ion source by this high-power two-frequency operation mode.

  3. Two-frequency heating technique at the 18 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source of the National Institute of Radiological Sciences.

    PubMed

    Biri, S; Kitagawa, A; Muramatsu, M; Drentje, A G; Rácz, R; Yano, K; Kato, Y; Sasaki, N; Takasugi, W

    2014-02-01

    The two-frequency heating technique was studied to increase the beam intensities of highly charged ions provided by the high-voltage extraction configuration (HEC) ion source at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS). The observed dependences on microwave power and frequency suggested that this technique improved plasma stability but it required precise frequency tuning and more microwave power than was available before 2013. Recently, a new, high-power (1200 W) wide band-width (17.1-18.5 GHz) travelling-wave-tube amplifier (TWTA) was installed. After some single tests with klystron and TWT amplifiers the simultaneous injection of the two microwaves has been successfully realized. The dependence of highly charged ions (HCI) currents on the superposed microwave power was studied by changing only the output power of one of the two amplifiers, alternatively. While operating the klystron on its fixed 18.0 GHz, the frequency of the TWTA was swept within its full limits (17.1-18.5 GHz), and the effect of this frequency on the HCI-production rate was examined under several operation conditions. As an overall result, new beam records of highly charged argon, krypton, and xenon beams were obtained at the NIRS-HEC ion source by this high-power two-frequency operation mode. PMID:24593510

  4. Two-frequency heating technique at the 18 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source of the National Institute of Radiological Sciences

    SciTech Connect

    Biri, S.; Rácz, R.; Sasaki, N.; Takasugi, W.

    2014-02-15

    The two-frequency heating technique was studied to increase the beam intensities of highly charged ions provided by the high-voltage extraction configuration (HEC) ion source at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS). The observed dependences on microwave power and frequency suggested that this technique improved plasma stability but it required precise frequency tuning and more microwave power than was available before 2013. Recently, a new, high-power (1200 W) wide band-width (17.1–18.5 GHz) travelling-wave-tube amplifier (TWTA) was installed. After some single tests with klystron and TWT amplifiers the simultaneous injection of the two microwaves has been successfully realized. The dependence of highly charged ions (HCI) currents on the superposed microwave power was studied by changing only the output power of one of the two amplifiers, alternatively. While operating the klystron on its fixed 18.0 GHz, the frequency of the TWTA was swept within its full limits (17.1–18.5 GHz), and the effect of this frequency on the HCI-production rate was examined under several operation conditions. As an overall result, new beam records of highly charged argon, krypton, and xenon beams were obtained at the NIRS-HEC ion source by this high-power two-frequency operation mode.

  5. Librarians as Part of Cross-Disciplinary, Multi-Institutional Team Projects: Experiences from the VIVO Collaboration

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Milian, Rolando; Norton, Hannah F.; Auten, Beth; Davis, Valrie I.; Holmes, Kristi L.; Johnson, Margeaux; Tennant, Michele R.

    2013-01-01

    Cross-disciplinary, team-based collaboration is essential for addressing today’s complex research questions, and librarians are increasingly entering into such collaborations. This study identifies skills needed as librarians integrate into cross-disciplinary teams, based on the experiences of librarians involved in the development and implementation of VIVO, a research discovery and collaboration platform. Participants discussed the challenges, skills gained, and lessons learned throughout the project. Their responses were analyzed in the light of the science of team science literature, and factors affecting collaboration on the VIVO team were identified. Skills in inclusive thinking, communication, perseverance, adaptability, and leadership were found to be essential. PMID:23833333

  6. Activities carried out by the American College of Radiology in cooperation with the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-09-28

    Activities carried out by the American College of Radiology are described. Guidelines on radiographic techniques for radiological technicians were developed. Annual training sessions for technologists and physicians were conducted by the American College of Radiology Task Force on Pneumoconiosis. Regulations for performing chest x rays were reviewed. Program activities such as the 12-point International Labor Organization (ILO) classification scale for diagnosis of coal workers' pneumoconiosis, and the reporting form for use of the 1980 ILO classification system were reviewed. The American College of Radiology maintained liaison between NIOSH and other medical specialty societies such as the American College of Chest Physicians, the College of American Pathologists, the American Medical Association, and the American Osteopathic College of Radiology. The American College of Radiology assisted NIOSH with the initiation, development, and maintenance of a quality control method to monitor and advise physicians on the reading of radiographs.

  7. Category III chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome: insights from the National Institutes of Health Chronic Prostatitis Collaborative Research Network studies.

    PubMed

    Nickel, J Curtis; Alexander, Richard B; Anderson, Rodney; Berger, Richard; Comiter, Craig V; Datta, Nand S; Fowler, Jackson E; Krieger, John N; Landis, J Richard; Litwin, Mark S; McNaughton-Collins, Mary; O'Leary, Michael P; Pontari, Michel A; Schaeffer, Anthony J; Shoskes, Daniel A; White, Paige; Kusek, John; Nyberg, Leroy

    2008-07-01

    Chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome remains an enigmatic medical condition. Creation of the National Institutes of Health-funded Chronic Prostatitis Collaborative Research Network (CPCRN) has stimulated a renewed interest in research on and clinical aspects of chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome. Landmark publications of the CPCRN document a decade of progress. Insights from these CPCRN studies have improved our management of chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome and offer hope for continued progress. PMID:18765132

  8. Writing Back to Writers: Inter-Institutional Collaboration and Preliminary Research on the Value of Substantive Response in Writing Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Randel D.; Fjelstad, Per Even Tor

    This paper records two different professors' thoughts and experiences as recipients of fellowships for school-university collaboration. The first recipient, after hearing about program models in education, is changing how he thinks about education and the possible mission of the university. In the paper, he explains that the collaborative project…

  9. Barriers to Private Sector Public School Collaboration. A Set of Exploratory Papers Commissioned by the National Institute of Education and the American Enterprise Institute for Public Policy Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Enterprise Inst. for Public Policy Research, Washington, DC.

    Six exploratory papers by different authors from both the corporate sector and the public school systems present several relevant perspectives on business/education collaboration. The first, by Dr. Marsha Levine (who also provides the introduction to the collection), suggests three analytic frameworks for planning and implementing public/private…

  10. Look Who's Talking - The Role of the IARPC Collaborations Website in Supporting Mutli-Institution Dialog on Arctic Research Imperatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starkweather, S.; Stephenson, S. N.; Rohde, J. A.; Bowden, S.

    2015-12-01

    The IARPC Collaborations website (www.iarpccollaborations.org) was developed to support collaborative implementation of the Interagency Arctic Research Policy Committee's (IARPC) 5-Year Plan for Arctic Research. The Plan describes an ambitious agenda for advancing understanding of the changing Arctic, a challenge that requires innovative approaches to integrate disparate research activities. IARPC was created by Congress to address this integration with a mandate that includes developing interagency collaboration and outside partnerships, specifically those with the State of Alaska, indigenous communities, academia, industry and non-governmental organizations. The IARPC Collaborations website was introduced in October of 2014 as an innovative means to address IARPC's mandate. It is an open, social networking platform with member-driven content and features to support dialog and milestone tracking. In its first year, IARPC Collaborations has attracted more than 600 members. Member-supplied content added to the site includes more than 575 research planning documents and scientific presentations and 300 updates on research plans and resources; all content is tagged with descriptive keywords to expedite discovery and elucidate connectivity across members and topics. Applying a social network analysis to metadata from the site reveals the strength and nature of this connectivity. This analysis demonstrates that Collaboration Team phone meetings remain the dominant form of communication. Dialog on the site through comment forums has been slow to emerge despite its merits of persistence and transparency. While more than 80 members have used the comment features at least once, the strong centrality of the IARPC Secretariat to website dialog is apparent. An analysis of content keywords demonstrates the potential for improved dialog based on overlapping interests as revealed by trending topics like "sea ice prediction", "traditional knowledge" and "permafrost carbon". Less

  11. Radiologic Technology Program Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Georgia Univ., Athens. Dept. of Vocational Education.

    This guide presents the standard curriculum for technical institutes in Georgia. The curriculum addresses the minimum competencies for a radiologic technology program. The guide contains four major sections. The General Information section contains an introduction giving an overview and defining purpose and objectives; a program description,…

  12. National Institute of Nursing Research Centers of Excellence: a logic model for sustainability, leveraging resources, and collaboration to accelerate cross-disciplinary science.

    PubMed

    Dorsey, Susan G; Schiffman, Rachel; Redeker, Nancy S; Heitkemper, Margaret; McCloskey, Donna Jo; Weglicki, Linda S; Grady, Patricia A

    2014-01-01

    The National Institute of Nursing Research (NINR) Centers of Excellence program is a catalyst enabling institutions to develop infrastructure and administrative support for creating cross-disciplinary teams that bring multiple strategies and expertise to bear on common areas of science. Centers are increasingly collaborative with campus partners and reflect an integrated team approach to advance science and promote the development of scientists in these areas. The purpose of this paper is to present the NINR Logic Model for Center Sustainability. The components of the logic model were derived from the presentations and robust discussions at the 2013 NINR center directors' meeting focused on best practices for leveraging resources and collaboration as methods to promote center sustainability. Collaboration through development and implementation of cross-disciplinary research teams is critical to accelerate the generation of new knowledge for solving fundamental health problems. Sustainability of centers as a long-term outcome beyond the initial funding can be enhanced by thoughtful planning of inputs, activities, and leveraging resources across multiple levels.

  13. University Curriculums and Fellowships in Radiological Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Villforth, John C.

    This booklet describes the academic programs funded through the Radiological Health Training Grants Program. Graduate Programs for the training of radiological health specialists at 28 universities and undergraduate (two year and four year) radiological technical programs at seven institutions are described. Program descriptions include degree(s)…

  14. Kavli Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Peking University: A New International Center of Excellence and a Forum for Exchanges and Collaborations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Douglas

    2009-01-01

    The goals of the Kavli Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics at Peking University are to build up a center of excellent and a platform for intellectual exchange of ideas. With English as its working language, KIAA conducts global faculty and postdoc recruitments. In addition, it will organize a series of workshops and thematic programs aiming at across-the-border collaboration and interdisciplinary interactions. It will also actively engage graduate students and postdocs to participate in ongoing research programs and close collaborations with other Chinese scientific organizations. The main foci of KIAA will be cosmology and galaxy formation, high energy astro astrophysics and active galactic nuclei, star and planet formation and evolution. I will describe its present status.

  15. The Rise of Institutional Effectiveness: IR Competitor, Customer, Collaborator, or Replacement? Professional File. Number 120, Spring 2011

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leimer, Christina

    2011-01-01

    As Institutional Research (IR) moves beyond its fiftieth anniversary, a new profession, called Institutional Effectiveness (IE), is emerging. In some respects, IR and IE are similar. IE, though, appears to be taking the leadership role. What are the structure, purpose, and responsibilities of IE offices? What are the implications for the IR field…

  16. Recent progress in Open Data production and consumption - examples from a Governmental institute (SMHI) and a collaborative EU research project (SWITCH-ON)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arheimer, Berit; Falkenroth, Esa

    2014-05-01

    The Swedish Meteorological and Hydrological Institute (SMHI) has a long tradition both in producing and consuming open data on a national, European and global scale. It is also promoting community building among water scientists in Europe by participating in and initiating collaborative projects. This presentation will exemplify the contemporary European movement imposed by the INSPIRE directive and the Open Data Strategy, by showing the progress in openness and shift in attitudes during the last decade when handling Research Data and Public Sector Information at a national European institute. Moreover, the presentation will inform about a recently started collaborative project (EU FP7 project No 603587) coordinated by SMHI and called SWITCH-ON http://water-switch-on.eu/. The project addresses water concerns and currently untapped potential of open data for improved water management across the EU. The overall goal of the project is to make use of open data, and add value to society by repurposing and refining data from various sources. SWITCH-ON will establish new forms of water research and facilitate the development of new products and services based on principles of sharing and community building in the water society. The SWITCH-ON objectives are to use open data for implementing: 1) an innovative spatial information platform with open data tailored for direct water assessments, 2) an entirely new form of collaborative research for water-related sciences, 3) fourteen new operational products and services dedicated to appointed end-users, 4) new business and knowledge to inform individual and collective decisions in line with the Europe's smart growth and environmental objectives. The presentation will discuss challenges, progress and opportunities with the open data strategy, based on the experiences from working both at a Governmental institute and being part of the global research community.

  17. Collaboration between a US Academic Institution and International Ministry of Health to develop a culturally appropriate palliative care navigation curriculum.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Ritabelle; Riklon, Sheldon; Langidrik, Justina R; Williams, Shellie N; Kabua, Neiar

    2014-12-01

    Implementation lessons: (1) The development and testing of a culturally appropriate palliative care navigation curriculum for countries facing high cancer and non-communicable diseases burden requires collaboration with the local Ministry of Health. (2) Lay volunteers from non-governmental and faith-based organizations are potential candidates to provide patient navigation services. PMID:26250636

  18. Evaluating Multi-Institutional Partnership Sustainability: A Case Study of Collaborative Workforce Development in Renewable Energy Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diaz, John M.; Stallings, Kevin D.; KC, Birendra; Seekamp, Erin

    2015-01-01

    Partnership evaluation typically occurs during the final stages either to assess why a collaborative effort did not work or to identify the indicators of success. Partnerships are rarely evaluated at their incipient stage, which is a critical time to assess their potential for long-term sustainability. In this paper, we present an early-stage…

  19. Teaching, Learning, and Collaborating in the Cloud: Applications of Cloud Computing for Educators in Post-Secondary Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aaron, Lynn S.; Roche, Catherine M.

    2012-01-01

    "Cloud computing" refers to the use of computing resources on the Internet instead of on individual personal computers. The field is expanding and has significant potential value for educators. This is discussed with a focus on four main functions: file storage, file synchronization, document creation, and collaboration--each of which has…

  20. Developing Knowledgeable Teachers: A Framework for Standards-Based Teacher Education Supported by Institutional Collaboration. The STEP Reports.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garvin, Patty, Ed.

    This collection of papers describes the process of creating a standards-based teacher education program through strong collaboration among arts and science, education, and P-12 faculty members and administrators. The Standards-based Teacher Education Project (STEP) was designed to help teacher education programs ensure that their graduates know…

  1. Reformulation of a clinical-dose system for carbon-ion radiotherapy treatment planning at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Japan.

    PubMed

    Inaniwa, Taku; Kanematsu, Nobuyuki; Matsufuji, Naruhiro; Kanai, Tatsuaki; Shirai, Toshiyuki; Noda, Koji; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Kamada, Tadashi; Tsujii, Hirohiko

    2015-04-21

    At the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS), more than 8,000 patients have been treated for various tumors with carbon-ion (C-ion) radiotherapy in the past 20 years based on a radiobiologically defined clinical-dose system. Through clinical experience, including extensive dose escalation studies, optimum dose-fractionation protocols have been established for respective tumors, which may be considered as the standards in C-ion radiotherapy. Although the therapeutic appropriateness of the clinical-dose system has been widely demonstrated by clinical results, the system incorporates several oversimplifications such as dose-independent relative biological effectiveness (RBE), empirical nuclear fragmentation model, and use of dose-averaged linear energy transfer to represent the spectrum of particles. We took the opportunity to update the clinical-dose system at the time we started clinical treatment with pencil beam scanning, a new beam delivery method, in 2011. The requirements for the updated system were to correct the oversimplifications made in the original system, while harmonizing with the original system to maintain the established dose-fractionation protocols. In the updated system, the radiation quality of the therapeutic C-ion beam was derived with Monte Carlo simulations, and its biological effectiveness was predicted with a theoretical model. We selected the most used C-ion beam with αr = 0.764 Gy(-1) and β = 0.0615 Gy(-2) as reference radiation for RBE. The C-equivalent biological dose distribution is designed to allow the prescribed survival of tumor cells of the human salivary gland (HSG) in entire spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP) region, with consideration to the dose dependence of the RBE. This C-equivalent biological dose distribution is scaled to a clinical dose distribution to harmonize with our clinical experiences with C-ion radiotherapy. Treatment plans were made with the original and the updated clinical-dose systems, and both

  2. Orthopaedic radiology

    SciTech Connect

    Park, W.M.; Hughes, S.P.F.

    1987-01-01

    This book is an account of the principles of modern diagnostic imaging techniques and their applications in orthopedics. The aim is to show radiology as a dynamic subject. Orthopaedic Radiology is divided into two sections with the first part focusing on the principles of diagnostic imaging and interpretation and the second applying this information to practical clinical problems.

  3. Ethics of international collaboration

    PubMed Central

    Mandal, Jharna; Dinoop, KP; Parija, Subhash Chandra

    2015-01-01

    Education and research together are vital components of academic institutions and globalization has improved health care education and research in numerous ways, one of which is multinational/transnational research/international collaboration. Usually academic institutions of high-income countries and institutions in low-income countries participate in collaboration. These collaborative research are guided by international ethics codes proposed by the international ethics committee to avoid stringent follow/unethical practices. PMID:25709946

  4. Efforts to Improve Undergraduate Student Retention Rates at a Hispanic Serving Institution: Building Collaborative Relationships for the Common Good

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Nancy K.; Meyer, Kristi

    2010-01-01

    This article describes efforts to improve retention and graduation rates at the University of Texas at San Antonio, a large Hispanic serving institution (HSI). One college within the university is focusing on increasing retention and graduation rates primarily by building relationships and capitalizing on university resources. In addition to…

  5. De-Colonising International Collaboration: The University of Kwazulu-Natal-Mauritius Institute of Education Cohort PhD Programme

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Samuel, Michael Anthony; Mariaye, Hyleen

    2014-01-01

    This paper explores the setting up of the partnership across the Mauritian and South African higher education contexts with respect to the development of a postgraduate PhD doctoral studies programme. The Mauritian Institute of Education (MIE) aims to develop staffing capacities through engagement with doctoral studies, especially in the context…

  6. Assessment of Assistance in Smoking Cessation Therapy by Pharmacies in Collaboration with Medical Institutions- Implementation of a Collaborative Drug Therapy Management Protocol Based on a Written Agreement between Physicians and Pharmacists.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Fumiyuki; Shinohara, Kuniko; Dobashi, Akira; Amagai, Kenji; Hara, Kazuo; Kurata, Kaori; Iizima, Hideo; Shimakawa, Kiyoshi; Shimada, Masahiko; Abe, Sakurako; Takei, Keiji; Kamei, Miwako

    2016-01-01

    This study built a protocol for drug therapy management (hereinafter "the protocol") that would enable continuous support from the decision making of smoking cessation therapy to the completion of therapy through the collaboration of physicians and community pharmacists, after which we evaluated whether the use of this protocol would be helpful to smoking cessation therapy. This study utilized the "On the Promotion of Team-Based Medical Care", a Notification by the Health Policy Bureau as one of the resources for judgment, and referred to collaborative drug therapy management (CDTM) in the United States. After the implementation of this protocol, the success rate of smoking cessation at the participating medical institutions rose to approximately 70%, approximately 28-point improvement compared to the rate before the implementation. In addition to the benefits of the standard smoking cessation program, this result may have been affected by the intervention of pharmacists, who assisted in continuing cessation by advising to reduce drug dosage as necessary approximately one week after the smoking cessation, when side effects and the urge to smoke tend to occur. Additionally, the awareness survey for the intervention group revealed that all respondents, including patients who failed to quit smoking, answered that they were satisfied to the question on general satisfaction. The question about the reason for successful cessation revealed that the support by pharmacists was as important as, or more important than, that by physicians and nurses. This infers that the pharmacists' active engagement in drug therapy for individual patients was favorably acknowledged.

  7. Assessment of Assistance in Smoking Cessation Therapy by Pharmacies in Collaboration with Medical Institutions- Implementation of a Collaborative Drug Therapy Management Protocol Based on a Written Agreement between Physicians and Pharmacists.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Fumiyuki; Shinohara, Kuniko; Dobashi, Akira; Amagai, Kenji; Hara, Kazuo; Kurata, Kaori; Iizima, Hideo; Shimakawa, Kiyoshi; Shimada, Masahiko; Abe, Sakurako; Takei, Keiji; Kamei, Miwako

    2016-01-01

    This study built a protocol for drug therapy management (hereinafter "the protocol") that would enable continuous support from the decision making of smoking cessation therapy to the completion of therapy through the collaboration of physicians and community pharmacists, after which we evaluated whether the use of this protocol would be helpful to smoking cessation therapy. This study utilized the "On the Promotion of Team-Based Medical Care", a Notification by the Health Policy Bureau as one of the resources for judgment, and referred to collaborative drug therapy management (CDTM) in the United States. After the implementation of this protocol, the success rate of smoking cessation at the participating medical institutions rose to approximately 70%, approximately 28-point improvement compared to the rate before the implementation. In addition to the benefits of the standard smoking cessation program, this result may have been affected by the intervention of pharmacists, who assisted in continuing cessation by advising to reduce drug dosage as necessary approximately one week after the smoking cessation, when side effects and the urge to smoke tend to occur. Additionally, the awareness survey for the intervention group revealed that all respondents, including patients who failed to quit smoking, answered that they were satisfied to the question on general satisfaction. The question about the reason for successful cessation revealed that the support by pharmacists was as important as, or more important than, that by physicians and nurses. This infers that the pharmacists' active engagement in drug therapy for individual patients was favorably acknowledged. PMID:27592827

  8. Earthquake Education and Public Information Centers: A Collaboration Between the Earthquake Country Alliance and Free-Choice Learning Institutions in California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degroot, R. M.; Springer, K.; Brooks, C. J.; Schuman, L.; Dalton, D.; Benthien, M. L.

    2009-12-01

    collaboration, and lessons learned from interacting with free-choice learning institutions.

  9. Survey of the WHO-REMPAN network's capability for strengthening preparedness for radiological and nuclear emergencies.

    PubMed

    Kumagai, Atsushi; Carr, Zhanat; Akira, Ohtsuru; Christie, Derek; Yamashita, Shunichi

    2012-10-01

    This paper investigates the capacity of the World Health Organization (WHO)-REMPAN network in responding to radiological incidents and nuclear emergencies. A survey developed by the WHO Secretariat and Nagasaki University was sent to all 40 WHO-REMPAN collaborating centres and liaison institutes in order to verify the current situation of the network, identify needs and collect suggestions for future improvements. Most of the responding institutions said they were satisfied with the current status of the network. However, several responses to the survey indicate that better internal communication is needed, as well as a position document to specify the roles, rights and responsibilities of the network members. PMID:22972795

  10. Case study for underground workers at an electric utility: how a research institution, university, and industry collaboration improved occupational health through ergonomics.

    PubMed

    Stone, Amy; Usher, Debra; Marklin, Richard; Seeley, Patricia; Yager, Janice W

    2006-08-01

    This article describes a collaboration between a research institution, a university, and a medium-sized electric power utility. Two ergonomics teams were created at the host utility to identify tasks with risk factors for musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) and propose ergonomic interventions for these tasks. Both ergonomics teams focused on tasks performed by underground workers: one team focused on manhole-vault tasks, and the other team focused on direct-buried cable job tasks. Several of the ergonomic interventions were tested in the ergonomics laboratory at the university. The results of one of the laboratory experiments indicated that a 2nd class lever tool reduced muscle forces required to remove and replace a manhole cover as compared with a T-handle attached to a hook and chain. The results of another laboratory experiment demonstrated that a battery-powered cutter reduced muscle forces to cut cable as compared to a manual cutting tool. A collaborative ergonomics effort is an effective method for identifying problematic tasks for workers in a particular industry, evaluating those tasks, and developing best work practices for that type of industry. This approach could be used by other industries in their effort to reduce the incidence, cost, and severity of MSDs in the workplace. PMID:16766475

  11. The Colorado MESA Program and CU-LASP: A Model for After School Program/Research Institution Collaboratives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, G.; Cobabe-Ammann, E.

    2004-12-01

    Colorado MESA is an after school program operating throughout the state with a long track record in promoting science, math and engineering education to largely underserved K-12 student populations. Currently, 81 percent of MESA students are from groups underrepresented in the math/science careers, and 85 percent of MESA students come from low- and moderate-income families. Through a combination of weekly student programs, field trips to universities and industry partners, family orientations, individual academic counseling and required curriculum, Colorado MESA offers an opportunity for students to explore STEM subjects and careers that they might not otherwise have access to - with tangible results. In the Colorado MESA Class of 2003, 97 percent of students planned on entering college this fall, with 86 percent indicating that they will enroll in math/science-based majors. In the last year, the University of Colorado's Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics, a large space and earth sciences institute, has relied on the Colorado MESA program as its primary K-12 partner in Education and Public Outreach. LASP incorporates MESA into its proposal writing opportunities, from E/PO additions to individual research proposals to mission-level educational programs. In addition to funding opportunities, LASP provides scientists and engineers in a variety of contexts and content areas, while MESA works to incorporate those resources into their after school programs. The interface between the after school programs and the research institution requires ongoing communication and coordination in order to evaluate and fine-tune curriculum and activities based on feedback from MESA advisors and teachers. Currently, the MESA/LASP partnership has funded programs in astrobiology, planetary sciences and engineering.

  12. CranialCloud: A cloud-based architecture to support trans-institutional collaborative efforts in neuro-degenerative disorders

    PubMed Central

    D’Haese, Pierre-Francois; Konrad, Peter E.; Pallavaram, Srivatsan; Li, Rui; Prassad, Priyanka; Rodriguez, William; Dawant, Benoit M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Neurological diseases have a devastating impact on millions of individuals and their families. These diseases will continue to constitute a significant research focus for this century. The search for effective treatments and cures requires multiple teams of experts in clinical neurosciences, neuroradiology, engineering and industry. Hence, the need to communicate a large amount of information with accuracy and precision is more necessary than ever for this specialty. Method In this paper, we present a distributed system that supports this vision, which we call the CranialVault Cloud (CranialCloud). It consists in a network of nodes, each with the capability to store and process data, that share the same spatial normalization processes, thus guaranteeing a common reference space. We detail and justify design choices, the architecture and functionality of individual nodes, the way these nodes interact, and how the distributed system can be used to support inter-institutional research. Results We discuss the current state of the system that gathers data for more than 1,600 patients and how we envision it to grow. Conclusions We contend that the fastest way to find and develop promising treatments and cures is to permit teams of researchers to aggregate data, spatially normalize these data, and share them. The Cranialvault system is a system that supports this vision. PMID:25861055

  13. Interventional radiology

    SciTech Connect

    Castaneda-Zuniga, W.R.

    1987-01-01

    This reference gives a step-by-step presentation of the elements of interventional radiology. CONTENTS: Introduction; Radiation protection; Embolotherapy; Interventional techniques in the management of gastrointestinal bleeding; Transluminal angioplasty; Thrombolytic therapy; Foreign body removal; Inferior vena cava filter placement; Percutaneous uroradiologic techniques; Interventional techniques in the biliary tract; Nonvascular gastrointestinal tract dilations; Percutaneous biopsy techniques; Drainage of abscess fluid collections in the abdomen.

  14. Orthopaedic radiology

    SciTech Connect

    Park, W.M.; Hughes, S.P.F.

    1985-01-01

    This book provides an account of the principles of modern diagnostic imaging techniques and their applications in orthopedics. The aim of the book is to show radiology as a dynamic subject which can help clinicians, while at the same time assisting radiologists to understand the needs of the orthopedic surgeon.

  15. Importance of mentoring in Australian radiology training.

    PubMed

    Rhodes, Alexander

    2013-10-01

    Mentoring is widely accepted as a fundamental component of a number of professions; however, mentoring is underutilized, and its practice is poorly instituted in most Australian radiology training programmes. This article highlights the benefits of mentoring within the radiology training context. Potential barriers to successful mentoring are elucidated, and future pathways for improved implementation and application of mentor programmes with radiology training programmes are presented.

  16. Helical Tomotherapy Versus Single-Arc Intensity-Modulated Arc Therapy: A Collaborative Dosimetric Comparison Between Two Institutions

    SciTech Connect

    Rong Yi; Tang, Grace; Welsh, James S.; Mohiuddin, Majid M.; Paliwal, Bhudatt; Yu, Cedric X.

    2011-09-01

    Purpose: Both helical tomotherapy (HT) and single-arc intensity-modulated arc therapy (IMAT) deliver radiation using rotational beams with multileaf collimators. We report a dual-institution study comparing dosimetric aspects of these two modalities. Methods and Materials: Eight patients each were selected from the University of Maryland (UMM) and the University of Wisconsin Cancer Center Riverview (UWR), for a total of 16 cases. Four cancer sites including brain, head and neck (HN), lung, and prostate were selected. Single-arc IMAT plans were generated at UMM using Varian RapidArc (RA), and HT plans were generated at UWR using Hi-Art II TomoTherapy. All 16 cases were planned based on the identical anatomic contours, prescriptions, and planning objectives. All plans were swapped for analysis at the same time after final approval. Dose indices for targets and critical organs were compared based on dose-volume histograms, the beam-on time, monitor units, and estimated leakage dose. After the disclosure of comparison results, replanning was done for both techniques to minimize diversity in optimization focus from different operators. Results: For the 16 cases compared, the average beam-on time was 1.4 minutes for RA and 4.8 minutes for HT plans. HT provided better target dose homogeneity (7.6% for RA and 4.2% for HT) with a lower maximum dose (110% for RA and 105% for HT). Dose conformation numbers were comparable, with RA being superior to HT (0.67 vs. 0.60). The doses to normal tissues using these two techniques were comparable, with HT showing lower doses for more critical structures. After planning comparison results were exchanged, both techniques demonstrated improvements in dose distributions or treatment delivery times. Conclusions: Both techniques created highly conformal plans that met or exceeded the planning goals. The delivery time and total monitor units were lower in RA than in HT plans, whereas HT provided higher target dose uniformity.

  17. 2015 RAD-AID Conference on International Radiology for Developing Countries: The Evolving Global Radiology Landscape.

    PubMed

    Kesselman, Andrew; Soroosh, Garshasb; Mollura, Daniel J

    2016-09-01

    Radiology in low- and middle-income (developing) countries continues to make progress. Research and international outreach projects presented at the 2015 annual RAD-AID conference emphasize important global themes, including (1) recent slowing of emerging market growth that threatens to constrain the advance of radiology, (2) increasing global noncommunicable diseases (such as cancer and cardiovascular disease) needing radiology for detection and management, (3) strategic prioritization for pediatric radiology in global public health initiatives, (4) continuous expansion of global health curricula at radiology residencies and the RAD-AID Chapter Network's participating institutions, and (5) technologic innovation for recently accelerated implementation of PACS in low-resource countries. PMID:27233909

  18. National Weather Service, Emergency Medical Services, Scripps Institution of Oceanography/UCSD and California EPA Collaboration on Heat Health Impact and Public Notification for San Diego County

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tardy, A. O.; Corcus, I.; Guirguis, K.

    2015-12-01

    The National Weather Service (NWS) has issued official heat alerts in the form of either a heat advisory or excessive heat warning product to the public and core partners for many years. This information has traditionally been developed through the use of triggers for heat indices which combine humidity and temperature. The criteria typically used numeric thresholds and did not consider impact from a particular heat episode, nor did it factor seasonality or population acclimation. In 2013, the Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California, San Diego in collaboration with the Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment, of the California Environmental Protection Agency and the NWS completed a study of heat health impact in California, while the NWS San Diego office began modifying their criteria towards departure from climatological normal with much less dependence on humidity or heat index. The NWS changes were based on initial findings from the California Department of Public Health, EpiCenter California Injury Data Online system which documents heat health impacts. Results from the UCSD study were finalized and published in 2014; they supported the need for significant modification of the traditional criteria. In order to better understand the impacts of heat on community health, medical outcome data were provided by the County of San Diego Emergency Medical Services Branch, which is charged by the County's Public Health Officer to monitor heat-related illness and injury daily from June through September. The data were combined with UCSD research to inform the modification of local NWS heat criteria and establish trigger points to pilot new procedures for the issuance of heat alerts. Finally, practices and procedures were customized for each of the county health departments in the NWS area of responsibility across extreme southwest California counties in collaboration with their Office of Emergency Services. The end result of the

  19. International collaborative research on infectious diseases by Japanese universities and institutes in Asia and Africa, with a special emphasis on J-GRID.

    PubMed

    Shinoda, Sumio; Imamura, Daisuke; Mizuno, Tamaki; Miyoshi, Shin-Ichi; Ramamurthy, Thandavrayan

    2015-01-01

    Institute of Cholera and Enteric Disease, Kolkata, India. Major projects of CRCOUI are concerned with diarrheal diseases such as, 1) active surveillance of diarrheal patients, 2) development of dysentery vaccines, 3) viable but nonculturable (VBNC) Vibrio cholerae, and 4) pathogenic mechanisms of various diarrhogenic microorganisms.  This review article outlines project of J-GRID and CRCOUI which the authors carried out collaboratively with NICED staff members.

  20. International collaborative research on infectious diseases by Japanese universities and institutes in Asia and Africa, with a special emphasis on J-GRID.

    PubMed

    Shinoda, Sumio; Imamura, Daisuke; Mizuno, Tamaki; Miyoshi, Shin-Ichi; Ramamurthy, Thandavrayan

    2015-01-01

    Institute of Cholera and Enteric Disease, Kolkata, India. Major projects of CRCOUI are concerned with diarrheal diseases such as, 1) active surveillance of diarrheal patients, 2) development of dysentery vaccines, 3) viable but nonculturable (VBNC) Vibrio cholerae, and 4) pathogenic mechanisms of various diarrhogenic microorganisms.  This review article outlines project of J-GRID and CRCOUI which the authors carried out collaboratively with NICED staff members. PMID:26133505

  1. [Bibliometric study of the activity, structure, and evolution of radiology in Spain].

    PubMed

    Miguel-Dasit, A

    2006-01-01

    From a bibliometric perspective, we reviewed: 1) the scientific activity in the field of diagnostic imaging in Spain, based on the percentage of presentations at the SERAM congresses (1994-1998) later published as articles in scientific journals. The value obtained (15%) is low in comparison with other international congresses, although similar to values for other national congresses in radiology. Both in national and international congresses, collaboration among radiologists from different institutions or countries and between radiologists and clinicians increases the percentage of publications, thus confirming the positive correlation between collaboration and scientific productivity. 2) We also examined the relationship between scientific productivity and the hierarchical structure of Spanish radiology departments (resident, associate, section chief, and department chief). Hierarchical groupings with the participation of residents were found to be more stable from year to year in scientific production, and the group residents + associates had the highest percentage of authorship (21%). 3) Finally, we reviewed the literature to assess the visibility and dissemination of the journal Radiología, estimating the impact factor that the journal would obtain if it were included in the Journal Citation Reports (JRC) database. We emphasize the importance of the inclusion of Radiología both in Medline, the best known and most widely used source of information in the health sciences, and in the JCR.

  2. Genitourinary radiology

    SciTech Connect

    McClennan, B.L.

    1982-01-01

    A literature review of genitourinary radiology highlights new findings in the field that have occurred in the past year. The physiology of contrast media, and the occasional life-threatening contrast medial reaction are discussed. Common urologic problems such as stones, infection, and obstruction are examined in order to interpret static radiographs in a more meaningful way. The field of interventional uroradiology continues to expand, with new procedures being tried and new indications for old procedures being developed. (KRM)

  3. "We're Not Housed in an Institution, We're Housed in the Community": Possibilities and Consequences of Neighborhood-Based Interagency Collaboration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Capper, Colleen, A.

    1994-01-01

    Explores neighborhood-based, interagency collaboration, using qualitative research methodology. Interagency participants believed that neighborhood-based collaboration provided treatment at the core of student struggles, shared responsibility among service providers for student problems, increased accessibility of services, and personalized…

  4. National Institutes of Health, Rodent 4 (NIH.R4); Calcium Metabolism and Vascular Function After Spaceflight: A Collaborative Series with NASA and NIH

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reiss-Bubenheim, Debra; Steele, Marianne; Aquillina, Rudy; Savage, Paul D. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    The NIH.R4 payload was a collaborative experiment conducted by NASA's Ames Research Center in conjunction with the National Institutes of Health (NIH). This middeck payload was the fourth in a series of experiments focusing on developmental biology and the effects of microgravity on mammalian systems. The NIH.R4 payload was flown onboard STS-80, which launched November 19, 1996, and landed at Kennedy Space Center on December 7, 1996, and was the longest shuttle mission to date. Fourteen male Spontaneously Hypertensive rats (SHR) were flown; seven in each of two Animal Enclosure Modules (AEM) in the shuttle middeck. The flight animals were exposed to 18 days of microgravity. Two synchronous control groups were utilized for this study in addition to an asynchronous post-flight AEM control study conducted at the PI lab. The animals were fed two different calcium diets in the NASA food bar (2.0% and 0.2%) three weeks prior to launch and insight. Blood pressures were taken at pre-determined intervals and were the basis for flight selection. Upon recovery Dwight animals blood pressure was measured and a variety of tissues were collected. Project testing and data will be presented.

  5. Radiology Rounds

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    The following represents the second part of the radiology cases which were presented in the June issue of JCCA. The radiographic findings and a brief discussion of the cases are provided for your interest. These cases were presented as part of a research study that dealt with radiographic interpretation by chiropractors. This research has been funded by the Chiropractic College of Radiologists (CCR). The Journal of the Canadian Chiropractic Association has also assisted in this project with the publication of these cases. It is our hope that everyone has enjoyed the case challenge, even if your were not selected as a participant in our study. ImagesCASE ICASE IICASE IIICASE IVCASE V

  6. Health Care Delivery Meets Hospitality: A Pilot Study in Radiology.

    PubMed

    Steele, Joseph Rodgers; Jones, A Kyle; Clarke, Ryan K; Shoemaker, Stowe

    2015-06-01

    The patient experience has moved to the forefront of health care-delivery research. The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center Department of Diagnostic Radiology began collaborating in 2011 with the University of Houston Conrad N. Hilton College of Hotel and Restaurant Management, and in 2013 with the University of Nevada, Las Vegas, William F. Harrah College of Hotel Administration, to explore the application of service science to improving the patient experience. A collaborative pilot study was undertaken by these 3 institutions to identify and rank the specific needs and expectations of patients undergoing imaging procedures in the MD Anderson Department of Diagnostic Radiology. We first conducted interviews with patients, providers, and staff to identify factors perceived to affect the patient experience. Next, to confirm these factors and determine their relative importance, we surveyed more than 6,000 patients by e-mail. All factors considered important in the interviews were confirmed as important in the surveys. The surveys showed that the most important factors were acknowledgment of the patient's concerns, being treated with respect, and being treated like a person, not a "number"; these factors were more important than privacy, short waiting times, being able to meet with a radiologist, and being approached by a staff member versus having one's name called out in the waiting room. Our work shows that it is possible to identify and rank factors affecting patient satisfaction using techniques employed by the hospitality industry. Such factors can be used to measure and improve the patient experience.

  7. Health Care Delivery Meets Hospitality: A Pilot Study in Radiology.

    PubMed

    Steele, Joseph Rodgers; Jones, A Kyle; Clarke, Ryan K; Shoemaker, Stowe

    2015-06-01

    The patient experience has moved to the forefront of health care-delivery research. The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center Department of Diagnostic Radiology began collaborating in 2011 with the University of Houston Conrad N. Hilton College of Hotel and Restaurant Management, and in 2013 with the University of Nevada, Las Vegas, William F. Harrah College of Hotel Administration, to explore the application of service science to improving the patient experience. A collaborative pilot study was undertaken by these 3 institutions to identify and rank the specific needs and expectations of patients undergoing imaging procedures in the MD Anderson Department of Diagnostic Radiology. We first conducted interviews with patients, providers, and staff to identify factors perceived to affect the patient experience. Next, to confirm these factors and determine their relative importance, we surveyed more than 6,000 patients by e-mail. All factors considered important in the interviews were confirmed as important in the surveys. The surveys showed that the most important factors were acknowledgment of the patient's concerns, being treated with respect, and being treated like a person, not a "number"; these factors were more important than privacy, short waiting times, being able to meet with a radiologist, and being approached by a staff member versus having one's name called out in the waiting room. Our work shows that it is possible to identify and rank factors affecting patient satisfaction using techniques employed by the hospitality industry. Such factors can be used to measure and improve the patient experience. PMID:25533732

  8. A Multi-Institutional Big Data Collaboration to Estimate Long Term Terrestrial Net Carbon Uptake from Remote Sensing and Hydrological Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halem, M.; Dorband, J.; Rao, R.; Lomonaco, S.; Chapman, D. R.; LeMoigne, J.; Nearing, G. S.; Pelissier, C. S.; Simpson, D. G.; Clune, T.

    2014-12-01

    Recent aircraft measurements from scattered records have shown long-term, global, seasonal photosynthetic CO2 uptake over land accelerating over the past 50 years. The successful launch of the sun-synchronous Orbiting Carbon Observatory 2 (OCO-2) on July 2, 2014 is expected to provide global, high spatial and spectral resolution datasets of vertical CO2 concentrations with surface spectral resolutions capable of yielding accurate CO2 flux profiles. It is unclear whether the biosphere will continue to act as a sink for anthropogenic CO2 loading of the atmosphere. Since current climate models with detailed terrestrial ecosystems are unable to simulate the observed increase in net ecosystem production (NEP), we will conduct assimilation studies with the derived CO2 fluxes in the GSFC Land Information System hydrological model to validate the generated NEP uptake. Further, we plan to use the OCO-2 CO2 concentrations to train a neural network to enable the calculation of long term trends from a decade of AIRS CO2 concentration data to produce regional NEP. To address this important Big Data science issue, a multi-institutional collaboration was formed to leverage their combined resources and the expertise of the researchers at the NASA GSFC, the Lamont Doherty Earth Observatory and UMBC. We will employ a high speed 10Gb network to connect the collaborating researchers and provide them with remote access to dedicated computational hybrid multicore resources at UMBC, as well as access to an archive containing more than a decade of readily accessible continuous daily gridded AIRS data and ten years of daily MODIS data for each September. The status of the following research efforts is planned to be presented; (i) acquisition and processing of the expected CO2 profile data from OCO-2 for two test sites, a low latitude region over the Amazon and a Boral forest at high latitude, (ii) initial impact of 3-D data assimilation of CO2 fluxes with the advanced Goddard LIS

  9. Renewal of radiological equipment.

    PubMed

    2014-10-01

    In this century, medical imaging is at the heart of medical practice. Besides providing fast and accurate diagnosis, advances in radiology equipment offer new and previously non-existing options for treatment guidance with quite low morbidity, resulting in the improvement of health outcomes and quality of life for the patients. Although rapid technological development created new medical imaging modalities and methods, the same progress speed resulted in accelerated technical and functional obsolescence of the same medical imaging equipment, consequently creating a need for renewal. Older equipment has a high risk of failures and breakdowns, which might cause delays in diagnosis and treatment of the patient, and safety problems both for the patient and the medical staff. The European Society of Radiology is promoting the use of up-to-date equipment, especially in the context of the EuroSafe Imaging Campaign, as the use of up-to-date equipment will improve quality and safety in medical imaging. Every healthcare institution or authority should have a plan for medical imaging equipment upgrade or renewal. This plan should look forward a minimum of 5 years, with annual updates. Teaching points • Radiological equipment has a definite life cycle span, resulting in unavoidable breakdown and decrease or loss of image quality which renders equipment useless after a certain time period.• Equipment older than 10 years is no longer state-of-the art equipment and replacement is essential. Operating costs of older equipment will be high when compared with new equipment, and sometimes maintenance will be impossible if no spare parts are available.• Older equipment has a high risk of failure and breakdown, causing delays in diagnosis and treatment of the patient and safety problems both for the patient and the medical staff.• Every healthcare institution or authority should have a plan for medical imaging equipment upgrade or replacement. This plan should look forward a

  10. Renewal of radiological equipment.

    PubMed

    2014-10-01

    In this century, medical imaging is at the heart of medical practice. Besides providing fast and accurate diagnosis, advances in radiology equipment offer new and previously non-existing options for treatment guidance with quite low morbidity, resulting in the improvement of health outcomes and quality of life for the patients. Although rapid technological development created new medical imaging modalities and methods, the same progress speed resulted in accelerated technical and functional obsolescence of the same medical imaging equipment, consequently creating a need for renewal. Older equipment has a high risk of failures and breakdowns, which might cause delays in diagnosis and treatment of the patient, and safety problems both for the patient and the medical staff. The European Society of Radiology is promoting the use of up-to-date equipment, especially in the context of the EuroSafe Imaging Campaign, as the use of up-to-date equipment will improve quality and safety in medical imaging. Every healthcare institution or authority should have a plan for medical imaging equipment upgrade or renewal. This plan should look forward a minimum of 5 years, with annual updates. Teaching points • Radiological equipment has a definite life cycle span, resulting in unavoidable breakdown and decrease or loss of image quality which renders equipment useless after a certain time period.• Equipment older than 10 years is no longer state-of-the art equipment and replacement is essential. Operating costs of older equipment will be high when compared with new equipment, and sometimes maintenance will be impossible if no spare parts are available.• Older equipment has a high risk of failure and breakdown, causing delays in diagnosis and treatment of the patient and safety problems both for the patient and the medical staff.• Every healthcare institution or authority should have a plan for medical imaging equipment upgrade or replacement. This plan should look forward a

  11. Engineering approaches to energy balance and obesity: opportunities for novel collaborations and research: report of a joint national science foundation and national institutes of health workshop.

    PubMed

    Ershow, Abby G; Ortega, Alfonso; Timothy Baldwin, J; Hill, James O

    2007-01-01

    Energy balance disorders account for a large public health burden. The obesity epidemic in particular is one of the most rapidly evolving public health problems of our day. At present, two-thirds of American adults and one-sixth of American children and adolescents are considered either overweight or obese. Public health concern about obesity is high because of the increased risk and increased mortality of cardiovascular disease, Type 2 diabetes, many forms of cancer, gallbladder disease, and osteoarthritis. These risks increase with the severity of the obesity. Excess adipose tissue, representing fat storage, ultimately derives from an imbalance between energy intake and energy expenditure. Conversely, undesirable and inadvertent loss of body weight and muscle mass, as seen in aging and cachectic states of chronic diseases such as heart failure and cancer, have serious clinical and functional consequences without satisfactory clinical or behavioral solutions. Innovative engineering technologies could help to address unresolved problems in energy balance, intake, and expenditure. Novel sensors, devices, imaging technologies, nanotechnologies, biomaterials, technologies to detect biochemical markers of energy balance, mathematical modeling, systems biology, and other approaches could be developed, evaluated, and leveraged through multidisciplinary collaborations. Engineers, physical scientists, and mathematicians can work with scientists from other relevant disciplines who possess expertise in obesity and nutrition. Furthermore, the possibility of re-engineering the "built environment" to encourage higher levels of physical activity has been suggested as another promising and important approach to which engineers can contribute (see http://www.obesityresearch.nih.gov). Ultimately, systematic application of the "Engineering Approach" can help in developing the needed technologies and tools to facilitate research and eventually support therapeutic advances and

  12. Engineering Approaches to Energy Balance and Obesity: Opportunities for Novel Collaborations and Research: Report of a Joint National Science Foundation and National Institutes of Health Workshop

    PubMed Central

    Ershow, Abby G.; Ortega, Alfonso; Timothy Baldwin, J.; Hill, James O.

    2007-01-01

    Energy balance disorders account for a large public health burden. The obesity epidemic in particular is one of the most rapidly evolving public health problems of our day. At present, two-thirds of American adults and one-sixth of American children and adolescents are considered either overweight or obese. Public health concern about obesity is high because of the increased risk and increased mortality of cardiovascular disease, Type 2 diabetes, many forms of cancer, gallbladder disease, and osteoarthritis. These risks increase with the severity of the obesity. Excess adipose tissue, representing fat storage, ultimately derives from an imbalance between energy intake and energy expenditure. Conversely, undesirable and inadvertent loss of body weight and muscle mass, as seen in aging and cachectic states of chronic diseases such as heart failure and cancer, have serious clinical and functional consequences without satisfactory clinical or behavioral solutions. Innovative engineering technologies could help to address unresolved problems in energy balance, intake, and expenditure. Novel sensors, devices, imaging technologies, nanotechnologies, biomaterials, technologies to detect biochemical markers of energy balance, mathematical modeling, systems biology, and other approaches could be developed, evaluated, and leveraged through multidisciplinary collaborations. Engineers, physical scientists, and mathematicians can work with scientists from other relevant disciplines who possess expertise in obesity and nutrition. Furthermore, the possibility of re-engineering the “built environment” to encourage higher levels of physical activity has been suggested as another promising and important approach to which engineers can contribute (see http://www.obesityresearch.nih.gov). Ultimately, systematic application of the “Engineering Approach” can help in developing the needed technologies and tools to facilitate research and eventually support therapeutic advances and

  13. A Collaboration on Collaboration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cobleigh, Brent

    2004-01-01

    NASA's 2003-2004 Leadership Development Program class recognized that effective collaborations are often the key to achieving mission success. Personal connections and common goals were key elements of their work together and key findings of their collaboration benchmarking within the agency.

  14. (Collaboration with the Institut de Physique Nucleaire, Universite de Paris Sud, on use of skull melting techniques to grow ZrO/sub 2/ crystals doped with divalent ions, Orsay, France, March 2--6, 1989): Foreign trip report

    SciTech Connect

    Finch, C.B.

    1989-07-21

    The traveler collaborated with Michel Genet and others at the Institut de Physique Nucleaire to grow CaO-stabilized ZrO/sub 2/ single crystals by the skull technique. This effort was the initial state of a program to produce rare-earth-doped ZrO/sub 2/ single-crystal specimens to be used in spectroscopic studies at both IPN and ORNL. Because of a re-direction in the research priorities at the IPN and the accompanying dearth of funding for this project, this assignment was terminated with the mutual consent of the two institutions.

  15. Battlefield radiology

    PubMed Central

    Graham, R N J

    2012-01-01

    With the increasing tempo of military conflicts in the last decade, much has been learnt about imaging battlefield casualties in the acute setting. Ultrasound in the form of focused abdominal sonography in trauma (FAST) has proven invaluable in emergency triage of patients for immediate surgery. Multidetector CT allows accurate determination of battlefield trauma injuries. It permits the surgeons and anaesthetists to plan their interventions more thoroughly and to be made aware of clinically occult injuries. There are common injury patterns associated with blast injury, gunshot wounds and blunt trauma. While this body of knowledge is most applicable to the battlefield, there are parallels with peacetime radiology, particularly in terrorist attacks and industrial accidents. This pictorial review is based on the experiences of a UK radiologist deployed in Afghanistan in 2010. PMID:22806621

  16. Conceptions and Expectations of Research Collaboration in the European Social Sciences: Research Policies, Institutional Contexts and the Autonomy of the Scientific Field

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lebeau, Yann; Papatsiba, Vassiliki

    2016-01-01

    This paper investigates the interactions between policy drivers and academic practice in international research collaboration. It draws on the case of the Open Research Area (ORA), a funding scheme in the social sciences across four national research agencies, seeking to boost collaboration by supporting "integrated" projects. The paper…

  17. Workflow management systems in radiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wendler, Thomas; Meetz, Kirsten; Schmidt, Joachim

    1998-07-01

    In a situation of shrinking health care budgets, increasing cost pressure and growing demands to increase the efficiency and the quality of medical services, health care enterprises are forced to optimize or complete re-design their processes. Although information technology is agreed to potentially contribute to cost reduction and efficiency improvement, the real success factors are the re-definition and automation of processes: Business Process Re-engineering and Workflow Management. In this paper we discuss architectures for the use of workflow management systems in radiology. We propose to move forward from information systems in radiology (RIS, PACS) to Radiology Management Systems, in which workflow functionality (process definitions and process automation) is implemented through autonomous workflow management systems (WfMS). In a workflow oriented architecture, an autonomous workflow enactment service communicates with workflow client applications via standardized interfaces. In this paper, we discuss the need for and the benefits of such an approach. The separation of workflow management system and application systems is emphasized, and the consequences that arise for the architecture of workflow oriented information systems. This includes an appropriate workflow terminology, and the definition of standard interfaces for workflow aware application systems. Workflow studies in various institutions have shown that most of the processes in radiology are well structured and suited for a workflow management approach. Numerous commercially available Workflow Management Systems (WfMS) were investigated, and some of them, which are process- oriented and application independent, appear suitable for use in radiology.

  18. [Radiological media and modern supporting tools in radiology].

    PubMed

    Sachs, A; Pokieser, P

    2014-01-01

    Radiology is a field with a high demand on information. Nowadays, a huge variety of electronic media and tools exists in addition to the classical media. Asynchronous and synchronous e-learning are constantly growing and support radiology with case collections, webinars and online textbooks. Various internet resources, social media and online courses have been established. Dynamic websites show a variety of interactive elements and it is easier and faster to access large amounts of data. Social media have an exponentially growing number of users and enable an efficient collaboration as well as forming professional networks. Massive open online courses (MOOCs) complete the offer of education and increase the opportunity to take part in educational activities. Apart from the existing variety of resources it is essential to focus on a critical selection for using these radiological media. It is reasonable to combine classical and electronic media instead of a one-sided use. As dynamic as the progress in the field of radiological media and its tools may be, the personal contact remains and should be maintained. PMID:24449282

  19. [Radiological media and modern supporting tools in radiology].

    PubMed

    Sachs, A; Pokieser, P

    2014-01-01

    Radiology is a field with a high demand on information. Nowadays, a huge variety of electronic media and tools exists in addition to the classical media. Asynchronous and synchronous e-learning are constantly growing and support radiology with case collections, webinars and online textbooks. Various internet resources, social media and online courses have been established. Dynamic websites show a variety of interactive elements and it is easier and faster to access large amounts of data. Social media have an exponentially growing number of users and enable an efficient collaboration as well as forming professional networks. Massive open online courses (MOOCs) complete the offer of education and increase the opportunity to take part in educational activities. Apart from the existing variety of resources it is essential to focus on a critical selection for using these radiological media. It is reasonable to combine classical and electronic media instead of a one-sided use. As dynamic as the progress in the field of radiological media and its tools may be, the personal contact remains and should be maintained.

  20. The European Society of Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology-European Institute of Radiotherapy (ESTRO-EIR) report on 3D CT-based in-room image guidance systems: a practical and technical review and guide.

    PubMed

    Korreman, Stine; Rasch, Coen; McNair, Helen; Verellen, Dirk; Oelfke, Uwe; Maingon, Philippe; Mijnheer, Ben; Khoo, Vincent

    2010-02-01

    The past decade has provided many technological advances in radiotherapy. The European Institute of Radiotherapy (EIR) was established by the European Society of Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (ESTRO) to provide current consensus statement with evidence-based and pragmatic guidelines on topics of practical relevance for radiation oncology. This report focuses primarily on 3D CT-based in-room image guidance (3DCT-IGRT) systems. It will provide an overview and current standing of 3DCT-IGRT systems addressing the rationale, objectives, principles, applications, and process pathways, both clinical and technical for treatment delivery and quality assurance. These are reviewed for four categories of solutions; kV CT and kV CBCT (cone-beam CT) as well as MV CT and MV CBCT. It will also provide a framework and checklist to consider the capability and functionality of these systems as well as the resources needed for implementation. Two different but typical clinical cases (tonsillar and prostate cancer) using 3DCT-IGRT are illustrated with workflow processes via feedback questionnaires from several large clinical centres currently utilizing these systems. The feedback from these clinical centres demonstrates a wide variability based on local practices. This report whilst comprehensive is not exhaustive as this area of development remains a very active field for research and development. However, it should serve as a practical guide and framework for all professional groups within the field, focussed on clinicians, physicists and radiation therapy technologists interested in IGRT.

  1. Radiological Control Manual

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-04-01

    This manual has been prepared by Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory to provide guidance for site-specific additions, supplements, and clarifications to the DOE Radiological Control Manual. The guidance provided in this manual is based on the requirements given in Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations Part 835, Radiation Protection for Occupational Workers, DOE Order 5480.11, Radiation Protection for Occupational Workers, and the DOE Radiological Control Manual. The topics covered are (1) excellence in radiological control, (2) radiological standards, (3) conduct of radiological work, (4) radioactive materials, (5) radiological health support operations, (6) training and qualification, and (7) radiological records.

  2. Leadership Perspectives on the Effectiveness of Interinstitutional Collaborations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lightcap, Stephen J.

    2013-01-01

    Collaboration among institutions is deeply engrained in the culture of higher education, but little is known about how leaders of institutions engaged in inter-institutional collaborations gain understanding about the effectiveness of their collaborations. Most research about higher education collaboration focuses on either understanding why…

  3. PearlTrees web-based interface for teaching informatics in the radiology residency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Licurse, Mindy Y.; Cook, Tessa S.

    2014-03-01

    Radiology and imaging informatics education have rapidly evolved over the past few decades. With the increasing recognition that future growth and maintenance of radiology practices will rely heavily on radiologists with fundamentally sound informatics skills, the onus falls on radiology residency programs to properly implement and execute an informatics curriculum. In addition, the American Board of Radiology may choose to include even more informatics on the new board examinations. However, the resources available for didactic teaching and guidance most especially at the introductory level are widespread and varied. Given the breadth of informatics, a centralized web-based interface designed to serve as an adjunct to standardized informatics curriculums as well as a stand-alone for other interested audiences is desirable. We present the development of a curriculum using PearlTrees, an existing web-interface based on the concept of a visual interest graph that allows users to collect, organize, and share any URL they find online as well as to upload photos and other documents. For our purpose, the group of "pearls" includes informatics concepts linked by appropriate hierarchal relationships. The curriculum was developed using a combination of our institution's current informatics fellowship curriculum, the Practical Imaging Informatics textbook1 and other useful online resources. After development of the initial interface and curriculum has been publicized, we anticipate that involvement by the informatics community will help promote collaborations and foster mentorships at all career levels.

  4. Leadership and management in quality radiology.

    PubMed

    Lau, Ls

    2007-07-01

    The practice of medical imaging and interventional radiology are undergoing rapid change in recent years due to technological advances, workload escalation, workforce shortage, globalisation, corporatisation, commercialisation and commoditisation of healthcare. These professional and economical changes are challenging the established norm but may bring new opportunities. There is an increasing awareness of and interest in the quality of care and patient safety in medical imaging and interventional radiology. Among the professional organisations, a range of quality systems are available to address individual, facility and system needs. To manage the limited resources successfully, radiologists and professional organisations must be leaders and champion for the cause of quality care and patient safety. Close collaboration with other stakeholders towards the development and management of proactive, long-term, system-based strategies and infrastructures will underpin a sustainable future in quality radiology. The International Radiology Quality Network can play a useful facilitating role in this worthwhile but challenging endeavour.

  5. Impact: development of a radiological mummy database.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Andrew John; Wade, Andrew David

    2015-06-01

    The Internet Mummy Picture Archiving and Communication Technology (IMPACT) radiological and context database, is a large-scale, multi-institutional, collaborative research project devoted to the digital preservation and scientific study of mummified remains, and the mummification traditions that produced them, using non-destructive medical imaging technologies. Owing to the importance of non-destructive analyses to the study of mummified human remains, the IMPACT database, website, and wiki provide a basis for anthropological and palaeopathological investigations, grounded in the most current technological imaging and communication standards, accessible through any internet connection, and protected against rapidly changing media standards. Composed of paired online radiographic and contextual databases, the IMPACT project is intended to provide researchers with large-scale primary data samples for anthropological and palaeopathological investigations. IMPACT addresses the limitations of the case-study approach to mummified human remains and contributes to the development of standards of practice in imaging of mummified remains. Furthermore, IMPACT allows researchers a greater appreciation of, and engagement with, patterns of health and disease in ancient times as well as the variability present in the mummification traditions of ancient Egypt and other cultures that sought to preserve their dead for eternity. PMID:25998630

  6. How Can 29 Colleges/Institutes/School Boards Collaborate Nationally? Lessons Learned from CAMPE-CARS Collaboration in the Automotive Sector. An Association of Canadian Community Colleges Sponsored Sectoral Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2001

    This paper reports on the status of collaboration and cooperation in the Canadian automotive industry, specifically between the Canadian Association of Motive Power Educators (CAMPE) and the Canadian Automotive Repair and Service (CARS) Council. Together, these two organizations aim to address many of the core labor market issues that have plagued…

  7. White Paper Report of the RAD-AID Conference on International Radiology for Developing Countries: identifying challenges, opportunities, and strategies for imaging services in the developing world.

    PubMed

    Mollura, Daniel J; Azene, Ezana M; Starikovsky, Anna; Thelwell, Aduke; Iosifescu, Sarah; Kimble, Cary; Polin, Ann; Garra, Brian S; DeStigter, Kristen K; Short, Brad; Johnson, Benjamin; Welch, Christian; Walker, Ivy; White, David M; Javadi, Mehrbod S; Lungren, Matthew P; Zaheer, Atif; Goldberg, Barry B; Lewin, Jonathan S

    2010-07-01

    The RAD-AID Conference on International Radiology for Developing Countries was an assembly of individuals and organizations interested in improving access to medical imaging services in developing countries where the availability of radiology has been inadequate for both patient care and public health programs. The purpose of the meeting was to discuss data, experiences, and models pertaining to radiology in the developing world and to evaluate potential opportunities for future collaboration. Conference participants included radiologists, technologists, faculty members of academic medical institutions, and leadership of nongovernmental organizations involved in international health care and social entrepreneurship. Four main themes from the conference are presented in this white paper as important factors for the implementation and optimization of radiology in the developing world: (1) ensuring the economic sustainability of radiologic services through financial and administrative training support of health care personnel; (2) designing, testing, and deploying clinical strategies adapted for regions with limited resources; (3) structuring and improving the role of American radiology residents interested in global health service projects; and (4) implementing information technology models to support digital imaging in the developing world. PMID:20630383

  8. White Paper Report of the RAD-AID Conference on International Radiology for Developing Countries: identifying challenges, opportunities, and strategies for imaging services in the developing world.

    PubMed

    Mollura, Daniel J; Azene, Ezana M; Starikovsky, Anna; Thelwell, Aduke; Iosifescu, Sarah; Kimble, Cary; Polin, Ann; Garra, Brian S; DeStigter, Kristen K; Short, Brad; Johnson, Benjamin; Welch, Christian; Walker, Ivy; White, David M; Javadi, Mehrbod S; Lungren, Matthew P; Zaheer, Atif; Goldberg, Barry B; Lewin, Jonathan S

    2010-07-01

    The RAD-AID Conference on International Radiology for Developing Countries was an assembly of individuals and organizations interested in improving access to medical imaging services in developing countries where the availability of radiology has been inadequate for both patient care and public health programs. The purpose of the meeting was to discuss data, experiences, and models pertaining to radiology in the developing world and to evaluate potential opportunities for future collaboration. Conference participants included radiologists, technologists, faculty members of academic medical institutions, and leadership of nongovernmental organizations involved in international health care and social entrepreneurship. Four main themes from the conference are presented in this white paper as important factors for the implementation and optimization of radiology in the developing world: (1) ensuring the economic sustainability of radiologic services through financial and administrative training support of health care personnel; (2) designing, testing, and deploying clinical strategies adapted for regions with limited resources; (3) structuring and improving the role of American radiology residents interested in global health service projects; and (4) implementing information technology models to support digital imaging in the developing world.

  9. [Telecommunications, health and radiology: potential synergies for the new millennium].

    PubMed

    Lagalla, R

    2001-01-01

    (AINR) was received with great satisfaction and is proof that we are working towards common goals. As on other occasions, this was reflected in the excellent collaboration between the National Radiologists' Union (SNR), the Italian Association of Medical Physics (AIFM) and the National Federation of Radiology Technicians (F.N.C.TSRM) in drafting the document. The document aims to highlight the potentialities and limitations in the use of Teleradiology and to provide a set of recommendations/guidelines, which are not, however, to be intended as strict, absolute rules. Because this field is continually evolving both in structural and regulatory terms, and because it is very difficult to establish universal criteria to rigidly define behavioural models for implementing and managing Teleradiology-related activities (which in any case fall into the category of radiological medical acts), the recommendations/guidelines proposed necessarily have an informative rather than prescriptive nature. The document starts by defining the meaning of the following currently used terms: Teleconsultation; Telediagnosis; Teledidactics. It then goes on to analyse the following aspects of Teleradiology: Technological requirements; Qualifications and training of Medical Personnel; Qualifications, training and competences of Radiology Technicians. Based on the regulations in force in Italy, these recommendations are structured in terms of rationale and possible professional issues arising from the use of Teleradiology. A section is devoted to data security and confidentiality, including legal implications, an area which is currently evolving and being studied in Italy and abroad. Finally, the professional liabilities of all the healthcare providers involved in Teleradiology (imprudence, incompetence, negligence) are outlined, as well as the responsibilities related to the necessary maintenance of equipment. The aim of the document is to propose recommendations/guidelines for the correct use and

  10. Programs in Practice. Collaborative Planning: Transition from School to Work. National Leadership Institute for Personnel in Education and Rehabilitation of the Blind and Visually Handicapped.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simpson, Frank, Ed.; And Others

    Developed as part of a project to encourage state-wide collaborative agreements between education and rehabilitation agencies involved in the transition of blind and visually handicapped students (ages 16-25) from school into the work force, the report describes 18 programs diverse in location, design, funding, philosophy, and administration that…

  11. Collaboration in Distance Education. International Case Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moran, Louise, Ed.; Mugridge, Ian, Ed.

    This book contains nine case studies of collaboration in distance education. The case studies focus on such aspects of collaboration in distance education as the following: roles of individual institutional partners; importance of personal relationships; benefits of collaboration to individual partners; conflicts between collaboration and…

  12. Society of Interventional Radiology

    MedlinePlus

    ... comments to CMS on two MACRA coding issues; society is engaged with CMS as they develop codes ... radiology case studies Developed by ACR Copyright © 2016 Society of Interventional Radiology. All rights reserved. 3975 Fair ...

  13. Common Interventional Radiology Procedures

    MedlinePlus

    ... of common interventional techniques is below. Common Interventional Radiology Procedures Angiography An X-ray exam of the ... into the vertebra. Copyright © 2016 Society of Interventional Radiology. All rights reserved. 3975 Fair Ridge Drive • Suite ...

  14. Radiology uses of the Internet.

    PubMed

    Krug, H; Cheng, D

    1995-01-01

    The Internet promises to be an essential resource for radiology administrators. In addition to offering remarkable access to colleagues all over the world, the Internet offers specialized information resources for radiology, many of which are described in this article. The Internet is many networks that communicate with each other and whose general purpose is to share information. Although there are several consortium organizations that support and regulate it, no single body or organization "owns" the Internet. Many employees and students at large teaching centers already have access to the Internet through their institution's connection. Individuals and small institutions can contract with independent service providers for Internet access. Internet functions covered in this article include: e-mail, listservs, newsgroups, file transfer protocols, Gopher, and the World Wide Web. The rapid pace of information exchange is making the world of radiology smaller and more intimate. Communication and knowledge are becoming so accessible that individuals are privy to the most minute happenings in the industry. Sharing information on the Internet will benefit not only individual users and the industry, but also patients.

  15. OGC Collaborative Platform undercover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buehler, G.; Arctur, D. K.; Bermudez, L. E.

    2012-12-01

    The mission of the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) is to serve as a global forum for the collaboration of developers and users of spatial data products and services, and to advance the development of international standards for geospatial interoperability. The OGC coordinates with over 400 institutions in the development of geospatial standards. OGC has a dedicated staff supported by a Collaborative Web Platform to enable sophisticated and successful coordination among its members. Since its origins in the early 1990s, the OGC Collaborative Web Platform has evolved organically to be the collaboration hub for standards development in the exchange of geospatial and related types of information, among a global network of thousands of technical, scientific and management professionals spanning numerous disparate application domains. This presentation describes the structure of this collaboration hub, the relationships enabled (both among and beyond OGC members), and how this network fits in a broader ecosystem of technology development and information standards organizations.

  16. Collaborative Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levy-Reiner, Sherry, Ed.

    1985-01-01

    Descriptions of 10 college programs involving collaborative learning are presented, along with Karen T. Romer's essay, "Collaboration: New Forms of Learning, New Ways of Thinking." The essay identifies various kinds of collaborative learning as well as the benefits of collaborative models. The following programs and schools are described: the…

  17. Collaborations: Challenging, but Key

    SciTech Connect

    Wiley, H. S.

    2009-10-01

    Collaborations are becoming increasing important in biology because of the need to apply multiple technologies to tackle the most complex current problems. The U.S. National Institutes of Health recognizes this need, and has created the “multi-investigator” granting mechanism to facilitate this process. I have reviewed a number of proposals that utilize the multi-investigator mechanism and have generally found them to be superior to individual investigator grants. Setting up a good collaboration, however, can be extremely difficult. Like any relationship, collaborations take time and energy. Still, there is nothing that can accelerate your research faster or expand your intellectual horizons more.

  18. Nurse-physician collaboration.

    PubMed

    Taylor-Seehafer, M

    1998-09-01

    The literature indicates that collaboration between nurses and physicians has become more sophisticated as these relationships have become collegial in nature and as nurses have become assertive, autonomous, and accountable. On an individual level, physicians and nurses now entering collaborative relationships are successful at minimizing the obstacles of turf and territoriality as well as at managing practice boundaries. However, both need to consciously examine their patterns of communication in order to effect clinical interaction styles that maintain unequal or hierarchical relationships. Studies of interprofessional communication, including style of clinical interaction, conflict resolution, use of humor, and negotiation, contribute support for nurses and physicians in collaborative relationships (Balzer, 1993; Campbell, Mauksch, Neikirk, & Hosokawa, 1990; Feiger & Schmitt, 1979; Lenkman & Gribbins, 1994; Pike, 1991). Research on differences in health outcomes of patients cared for in the traditional and collaborative models of health care delivery, identification of the unique product of collaborative practice models, and further identification of the type of attitudinal climate in which collaborative relationships can be nurtured should be undertaken if the elusive nature of collaboration is to be captured (Siegler, Whitney, & Schmitt, 1994). Providing collaborative, interdisciplinary clinical experiences for students, as well as role modeling of collaborative relationships in nurse-physician faculty practice, can contribute to a greater understanding and acceptance of each professional's role in health care delivery (Campbell, 1993; Forbes & Fitzsimons, 1993; Larson, 1995). Tradition and professionalism and progressive concern about practice boundaries continue to be obstacles to collaborative practice. These need to be addressed by medical and nursing professionals on the institutional level and in the political arena. Collaboration between nurses and

  19. Radiological Scoping Survey of the Scotia Depot Scotia, New York

    SciTech Connect

    E. N. Bailey

    2005-02-05

    At the request of the Defense Logistics Agency, the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education conducted radiological scoping surveys of the Scotia Depot during the period of September 24 through 27, 2007. The scoping survey included visual inspections and limited radiological surveys performed in accordance with area classification that included surface scans, total and removable activity measurements, and soil sampling.

  20. Institute for Advanced Study in Vocational-Technical Education: Collaborative Roles and Functions of Occupational Education Programs (Honolulu, Hawaii, October 1972-June 1973). Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zane, Lawrence F. H., Ed.

    The overall purpose of this institute was to provide opportunity for participants to update their knowledge of national, regional, and local occupational programs and trends and to provide an opportunity for them to meet and share program content and prepare written articulation agreements between the community colleges and the State Department of…

  1. Interventional radiology residency: steps to implementation.

    PubMed

    Marx, M Victoria; Sabri, Saher S

    2015-08-01

    Implementation of an interventional radiology (IR) residency program requires significant planning, as well as clear communication and consensus among departmental and institutional stakeholders. The goal of this short article is to highlight key decisions and steps that are needed to launch an IR residency, and to illustrate a possible timeline for implementation of the integrated and independent IR residency models.

  2. Slovenian experience from diagnostic angiography to interventional radiology

    PubMed Central

    Pavcnik, Dusan

    2014-01-01

    Background The purpose of writing this article is to document the important events and people in the first 50 years of diagnostic angiography and interventional radiology in Slovenia. During this period not only did the name of the institutions and departments change, but also its governance. Conclusions This depicted the important roles different people played at various times in the cardiovascular divisions inside and outside of the diagnostic and interventional radiology. Historical data show that Slovenian radiology has relatively immediately introduced the new methods of interventional radiology in clinical practice. PMID:25435857

  3. NASA Explorer Institutes: Exploring the Possibilities for Collaboration with the Informal Education Community. Report of the NASA Explorer Institutes--Focus Groups and Pilot Workshops, September 2004-March 2005; Planning and Evaluation Meeting, March 14-17, 2005

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallaway, Debbie; Freeman, Jason; Walker, Gretchen; Davis, Hilarie

    2005-01-01

    This report contains summary information and conclusions from the pilot workshops, focus groups, and the NEI (NASA Explorer Institutes) Planning and Evaluation Conference which united representatives of the workshops, focus groups, and NASA education. The culmination of these NEI pilot initiatives resulted in the identification of strategies that…

  4. Collaborative Arrangements.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cota-Robles, Eugene; Doby, Winston

    Two conference papers describing various collaborative arrangements within the educational community among teachers, students and others are presented in this document. The first paper, "Successful Collaborations" (Eugene Cota-Robles), describes the following projects in California that seek to forge collaborations to improve the education of…

  5. Collaborative Inquiry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    David, Jane L.

    2009-01-01

    Teachers can make better use of data when they work together than when they do it alone. Creating the conditions for such collaboration is a tall order. This article describes the idea behind the collaborative inquiry approach. It also mentions several studies that indicate its effectiveness. Tips on how collaborative inquiry can be implemented…

  6. Socioeconomic trends in radiology.

    PubMed

    Barneveld Binkhuysen, F H

    1998-01-01

    For radiology the socioeconomic environment is a topic of increasing importance. In addition to the well-known important scientific developments in radiology such as interventional MRI, several other major trends can be recognized: (1) changes in the delivery of health care, in which all kinds of managed care are developing and will influence the practice of radiology, and (2) the process of computerization and digitization. The socioeconomic environment of radiology will be transformed by the developments in managed care, teleradiology and the integration of information systems. If radiologists want to manage future radiology departments they must have an understanding of the changes in the fields of economics and politics that are taking place and that will increasingly influence radiology. Some important and recognizable aspects of these changes will be described here. PMID:9477292

  7. Machine learning and radiology.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shijun; Summers, Ronald M

    2012-07-01

    In this paper, we give a short introduction to machine learning and survey its applications in radiology. We focused on six categories of applications in radiology: medical image segmentation, registration, computer aided detection and diagnosis, brain function or activity analysis and neurological disease diagnosis from fMR images, content-based image retrieval systems for CT or MRI images, and text analysis of radiology reports using natural language processing (NLP) and natural language understanding (NLU). This survey shows that machine learning plays a key role in many radiology applications. Machine learning identifies complex patterns automatically and helps radiologists make intelligent decisions on radiology data such as conventional radiographs, CT, MRI, and PET images and radiology reports. In many applications, the performance of machine learning-based automatic detection and diagnosis systems has shown to be comparable to that of a well-trained and experienced radiologist. Technology development in machine learning and radiology will benefit from each other in the long run. Key contributions and common characteristics of machine learning techniques in radiology are discussed. We also discuss the problem of translating machine learning applications to the radiology clinical setting, including advantages and potential barriers.

  8. Machine Learning and Radiology

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shijun; Summers, Ronald M.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we give a short introduction to machine learning and survey its applications in radiology. We focused on six categories of applications in radiology: medical image segmentation, registration, computer aided detection and diagnosis, brain function or activity analysis and neurological disease diagnosis from fMR images, content-based image retrieval systems for CT or MRI images, and text analysis of radiology reports using natural language processing (NLP) and natural language understanding (NLU). This survey shows that machine learning plays a key role in many radiology applications. Machine learning identifies complex patterns automatically and helps radiologists make intelligent decisions on radiology data such as conventional radiographs, CT, MRI, and PET images and radiology reports. In many applications, the performance of machine learning-based automatic detection and diagnosis systems has shown to be comparable to that of a well-trained and experienced radiologist. Technology development in machine learning and radiology will benefit from each other in the long run. Key contributions and common characteristics of machine learning techniques in radiology are discussed. We also discuss the problem of translating machine learning applications to the radiology clinical setting, including advantages and potential barriers. PMID:22465077

  9. Imaging and radiology

    MedlinePlus

    ... imaging or a PET scan Ultrasound INTERVENTIONAL RADIOLOGY Interventional radiologists are doctors that use imaging such as CT, ultrasound, MRI and fluoroscopy to help guide procedures. The imaging ...

  10. Radiological evaluation of dysphagia

    SciTech Connect

    Ott, D.J.; Gelfand, D.W.; Wu, W.C.; Chen, Y.M.

    1986-11-21

    Dysphagia is a common complaint in patients presenting for radiological or endoscopic examination of the esophagus and is usually due to functional or structural abnormalities of the esophageal body or esophagogastric region. The authors review the radiological evaluation of the esophagus and esophagogastric region in patients with esophageal dysphagia and discuss the roentgenographic techniques used, radiological efficacy for common structural disorders, and evaluation of esophageal motor function. Comparison is made with endoscopy in assessing dysphagia, with the conclusion that the radiological examination be used initially in patients with this complaint.

  11. [Digital library for archiving files of radiology and medical imaging].

    PubMed

    Duvauferrier, R; Rambeau, M; Moulène, F

    1993-01-01

    The Conseil des Enseignants de Radiologie de France in collaboration with the Ilab-TSI company and Schering laboratories has developed a computer programme allowing the storage and consultation of radiological teaching files. This programme, developed on Macintosh from standard Hypercard and Quicktime applications, allows, in consultation mode, the multicriteria search and visualisation of selected radiological files. In the author mode, new files can be included after digitalizing the author's own images or after obtaining images from another image library. This programme, which allows juxtaposition of digitalised radiological files, is designed to be extremely open and can be easily combined with other computer-assisted teaching or computer-assisted presentation applications.

  12. History and Organizations for Radiological Protection

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), an independent international organization established in 1925, develops, maintains, and elaborates radiological protection standards, legislation, and guidelines. United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR) provides scientific evidence. World Health Organization (WHO) and International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) utilise the ICRP recommendations to implement radiation protection in practice. Finally, radiation protection agencies in each country adopt the policies, and adapt them to each situation. In Korea, Nuclear Safety and Security Commission is the governmental body for nuclear safety regulation and Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety is a public organization for technical support and R&D in nuclear safety and radiation protection. PMID:26908987

  13. History and Organizations for Radiological Protection.

    PubMed

    Kang, Keon Wook

    2016-02-01

    International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), an independent international organization established in 1925, develops, maintains, and elaborates radiological protection standards, legislation, and guidelines. United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR) provides scientific evidence. World Health Organization (WHO) and International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) utilise the ICRP recommendations to implement radiation protection in practice. Finally, radiation protection agencies in each country adopt the policies, and adapt them to each situation. In Korea, Nuclear Safety and Security Commission is the governmental body for nuclear safety regulation and Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety is a public organization for technical support and R&D in nuclear safety and radiation protection.

  14. Dento-maxillofacial radiology as a specialty.

    PubMed

    Kamburoğlu, Kıvanç

    2015-05-28

    This editorial discusses a relatively new specialty in dental and medical field namely dentomaxillofacial radiology. As a relatively newborn specialty it is obvious that there is a long way to go before dentomaxillofacial radiology is commonly known and respected by the society. All over the world, assigned committees work on the development of the training curriculum, determination of scientific and physical standards for institutions offering specialty training and arrangement of dental codes for reimbursement issues. Furthermore, adjustment of educational, scientific and legal regulations and prospective benefits are expected to boost this specialty's attractiveness to colleagues' worldwide. PMID:26029350

  15. Collaborative Attack vs. Collaborative Defense

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Shouhuai

    We have witnessed many attacks in the cyberspace. However, most attacks are launched by individual attackers even though an attack may involve many compromised computers. In this paper, we envision what we believe to be the next generation cyber attacks — collaborative attacks. Collaborative attacks can be launched by multiple attackers (i.e., human attackers or criminal organizations), each of which may have some specialized expertise. This is possible because cyber attacks can become very sophisticated and specialization of attack expertise naturally becomes relevant. To counter collaborative attacks, we might need collaborative defense because each “chain” in a collaborative attack may be only adequately dealt with by a different defender. In order to understand collaborative attack and collaborative defense, we present a high-level abstracted framework for evaluating the effectiveness of collaborative defense against collaborative attacks. As a first step towards realizing and instantiating the framework, we explore a characterization of collaborative attacks and collaborative defense from the relevant perspectives.

  16. Error in radiology.

    PubMed

    Goddard, P; Leslie, A; Jones, A; Wakeley, C; Kabala, J

    2001-10-01

    The level of error in radiology has been tabulated from articles on error and on "double reporting" or "double reading". The level of error varies depending on the radiological investigation, but the range is 2-20% for clinically significant or major error. The greatest reduction in error rates will come from changes in systems.

  17. Radiological Defense. Textbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Defense Civil Preparedness Agency (DOD), Washington, DC.

    This textbook has been prepared under the direction of the Defense Civil Preparedness Agency (DCPA) Staff College for use as a student reference manual in radiological defense (RADEF) courses. It provides much of the basic technical information necessary for a proper understanding of radiological defense and summarizes RADEF planning and expected…

  18. BioGrid Australia facilitates collaborative medical and bioinformatics research across hospitals and medical research institutes by linking data from diverse disease and data types.

    PubMed

    Merriel, Robert B; Gibbs, Peter; O'Brien, Terence J; Hibbert, Marienne

    2011-05-01

    BioGrid Australia is a federated data linkage and integration infrastructure that uses the Internet to enable patient specific information to be utilized for research in a privacy protected manner, from multiple databases of various data types (e.g. clinical, treatment, genomic, image, histopathology and outcome), from a range of diseases (oncological, neurological, endocrine and respiratory) and across more than 20 health services, universities and medical research institutes. BioGrid has demonstrated an ability to facilitate powerful research into the causation of human disease and the prediction of disease and treatment outcomes. BioGrid has successfully implemented technology and processes that allow researchers to efficiently extract data from multiple sources, without compromising data security and privacy. This article reviews BioGrid's first seven years and how it has overcome 9 of its top 10 challenges. PMID:21309032

  19. Engineering and Language Discourse Collaboration: Practice Realities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harran, Marcelle

    2011-01-01

    This article describes a situated engineering project at a South African HE institution which is underpinned by collaboration between Applied Language Studies (DALS) and Mechanical Engineering. The collaboration requires language practitioners and engineering experts to negotiate and collaborate on academic literacies practices, discourse…

  20. [Is the PACS feasible for a large radiological department? Reflections on the image data volume of the Medical Radiation Institute of the University of Tübingen in 1983. Picture Archiving and Communication System].

    PubMed

    Bautz, W; Kolbe, J

    1986-06-01

    Picture Archiving and Communication Systems (PACS) are getting more and more important for departments of radiology with the increasing spread of digital imaging methods. To determine the demands made on such systems, we calculated the digital image data volume for all examinations carried out in 1983 at the Department of Medical Radiology of the University of Tübingen. 20.37% of all examinations were performed with digitalised equipment. Plain radiography takes the lion's share among the total number of image data. If digitalisation is based on a spatial resolution of 8 Lp/mm, the share is 98.4% of the total image data volume of 7 123 GByte. This figure is far in excess of the estimates stated in literature. The possibilities of image data reduction and feasibility of a major PACS are discussed. PMID:3524963

  1. Advanced Neutron Source radiological design criteria

    SciTech Connect

    Westbrook, J.L.

    1995-08-01

    The operation of the proposed Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) facility will present a variety of radiological protection problems. Because it is desired to design and operate the ANS according to the applicable licensing standards of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), it must be demonstrated that the ANS radiological design basis is consistent not only with state and Department of Energy (DOE) and other usual federal regulations, but also, so far as is practicable, with NRC regulations and with recommendations of such organizations as the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations (INPO) and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI). Also, the ANS radiological design basis is in general to be consistent with the recommendations of authoritative professional and scientific organizations, specifically the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) and the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). As regards radiological protection, the principal goals of DOE regulations and guidance are to keep occupational doses ALARA [as low as (is) reasonably achievable], given the current state of technology, costs, and operations requirements; to control and monitor contained and released radioactivity during normal operation to keep public doses and releases to the environment ALARA; and to limit doses to workers and the public during accident conditions. Meeting these general design objectives requires that principles of dose reduction and of radioactivity control by employed in the design, operation, modification, and decommissioning of the ANS. The purpose of this document is to provide basic radiological criteria for incorporating these principles into the design of the ANS. Operations, modification, and decommissioning will be covered only as they are affected by design.

  2. Interagency Collaboration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tonelson, Stephen W.; Waters, Rebecca

    This chapter, from a guide for designing, implementing, and evaluating instruction and services for students with disabilities, acquaints the education administrator with the what, why, and how of interagency collaboration. System-level interagency collaboration involves joint planning, joint implementation, and joint evaluation between…

  3. Collaborative Hierarchy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maris, Mariann

    The University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee writing program is collaborative, not divisionary, as some, such as Jeanne Gunner, have suggested. Three terms are useful in understanding the relationships and ethics governing operations at Wisconsin-Milwaukee: (1) authority and collaboration; (2) hierarchical difference; (3) professional respect. "Authority…

  4. Model for collaboration: a rural medicine and academic health center teleradiology project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Slyke, Mark A.; Eggli, Douglas F.; Prior, Fred W.; Salmon, William; Pappas, Gregory; Vanatta, Fred; Goldfetter, Warren; Hashem, Said

    1996-05-01

    A pilot project was developed to explore the role of subspecialty radiology support to rural medicine sites over a long-distance network. A collaborative relationship between 2 rural radiology practices and an academic health was established. Project objectives included: (1) Does the subspecialty consultation significantly change diagnosis patterns at the rural site? (2) Is there value added as measured by improved clinical care or an overall decreased cost of care? (3) Can a collaborative model be economically self-supportive? (4) Does the collaborative model encourage and support education and collegial relationships? Two rural hospitals were selected based on the level of imaging technology and willingness to cooperate. Image capture and network technology was chosen to make the network process transparent to the users. DICOM standard interfaces were incorporated into existing CT and MRI scanners and a film digitizer. Nuclear medicine images were transferred and viewed using a proprietary vendor protocol. Relevant clinical data was managed by a custom designed PC based Lotus Notes application (Patient Study Tracking System: PaSTS) (Pennsylvania Blue Shield Institute). All data was transferred over a Frame Relay network and managed by the Pennsylvania Commonwealth sponsored PA Health Net. Images, other than nuclear medicine, were viewed on a GE Advantage viewing station using a pair of 2 X 2.5 K gray scale monitors. Patient text data was managed by the PaSTS PC and displayed on a separate 15' color monitor. A total of 476 radiology studies were networked into the AHC. Randomly chosen research studies comprised 82% of the case work. Consultative and primary read cases comprised 17% and 1% respectively. The exercise was judged effective by both rural sites. Significant findings and diagnoses were confirmed in 73% of cases with discrepant findings in only 4%. One site benefited by adopting more advanced imaging techniques increasing the sophistication of radiology

  5. Hazard control indices for radiological and non-radiological materials

    SciTech Connect

    Boothe, G.F.

    1994-12-21

    This document devises a method of comparing radiological and non-radiological hazard control levels. Such a comparison will be useful in determining the design control features for facilities that handle radioactive mixed waste. The design control features of interest are those that assure the protection of workers and the environment from unsafe airborne levels of radiological or non-radiological hazards.

  6. The disaggregation of radiology.

    PubMed

    Brant-Zawadzki, Michael N; Enzmann, Dieter R

    2008-12-01

    The authors discuss certain market and political forces buffeting the traditional structure of radiology, both in practice and in the academic setting. These forces can be, to a certain degree, disruptive and produce fragmentation of what are now integrated radiology services and specialties. The potential fallout from the current rapidly changing environment of health care, including strategies for delivering care along service lines or within discrete episodes of care, may have a profound impact on the future of radiology. Understanding the dynamics of the current environment may help plan strategies for dealing with the potential impact on our specialty. PMID:19027680

  7. Adaptation in Collaborative Governance Regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emerson, Kirk; Gerlak, Andrea K.

    2014-10-01

    Adaptation and the adaptive capacity of human and environmental systems have been of central concern to natural and social science scholars, many of whom characterize and promote the need for collaborative cross-boundary systems that are seen as flexible and adaptive by definition. Researchers who study collaborative governance systems in the public administration, planning and policy literature have paid less attention to adaptive capacity specifically and institutional adaptation in general. This paper bridges the two literatures and finds four common dimensions of capacity, including structural arrangements, leadership, knowledge and learning, and resources. In this paper, we focus on institutional adaptation in the context of collaborative governance regimes and try to clarify and distinguish collaborative capacity from adaptive capacity and their contributions to adaptive action. We posit further that collaborative capacities generate associated adaptive capacities thereby enabling institutional adaptation within collaborative governance regimes. We develop these distinctions and linkages between collaborative and adaptive capacities with the help of an illustrative case study in watershed management within the National Estuary Program.

  8. Adaptation in collaborative governance regimes.

    PubMed

    Emerson, Kirk; Gerlak, Andrea K

    2014-10-01

    Adaptation and the adaptive capacity of human and environmental systems have been of central concern to natural and social science scholars, many of whom characterize and promote the need for collaborative cross-boundary systems that are seen as flexible and adaptive by definition. Researchers who study collaborative governance systems in the public administration, planning and policy literature have paid less attention to adaptive capacity specifically and institutional adaptation in general. This paper bridges the two literatures and finds four common dimensions of capacity, including structural arrangements, leadership, knowledge and learning, and resources. In this paper, we focus on institutional adaptation in the context of collaborative governance regimes and try to clarify and distinguish collaborative capacity from adaptive capacity and their contributions to adaptive action. We posit further that collaborative capacities generate associated adaptive capacities thereby enabling institutional adaptation within collaborative governance regimes. We develop these distinctions and linkages between collaborative and adaptive capacities with the help of an illustrative case study in watershed management within the National Estuary Program.

  9. Radiology capital asset management.

    PubMed

    Wagener, G N; Pridlides, A J

    1993-01-01

    Radiology administrators are expected not only to take on the ultimate accountability for meeting the needs and challenges of present day-to-day operations, but also to plan for the future. Computer Aided Facility Management (CAFM), as a tool, enables radiology managers to obtain up-to-date data to manage their services. Using Autocad on a unix-based minicomputer as the graphical base generator and integrating information from a MUMPS-based minicomputer, the CAFM process can define areas to be studied for productivity and life cycle costs. From an analysis of radiology service, management was able to make solid judgement calls for equipment replacement and facility project renovation to effectively manage radiology resources.

  10. Radiologic Technology Program Standards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Georgia Univ., Athens. Dept. of Vocational Education.

    This publication contains statewide standards for the radiologic technology program in Georgia. The standards are divided into 12 categories; Foundations (philosophy, purpose, goals, program objectives, availability, evaluation); Admissions (admission requirements, provisional admission requirements, recruitment, evaluation and planning); Program…

  11. Successful Transformational Radiology Leaders.

    PubMed

    Douget, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Transformational radiology leaders elevate subordinates, expand self-awareness, develop lasting relationships, strive to exceed expectations, and uphold the vision and goals of the organization. In order for radiology leaders to become more transformational in their leadership style there are four fundamental elements they must learn: idealized influence, individualized consideration, inspirational motivation, and intellectual stimulation. Leaders can utilize personality and self-assessments to learn more about themselves, identify areas of strengths and weaknesses, and learn to be more effective when leading employees.

  12. Basic bone radiology

    SciTech Connect

    Griffiths, H.J.

    1987-01-01

    This clinical book surveys the skeletal system as seen through radiological imaging. It emphasizing abnormalities, disease, and trauma, and includes vital information on bones, bone growth, and the cells involved in bone pathology. It covers many bone diseases and injuries which are rarely covered in medical texts, as well as descriptions of radiologic procedures that specifically relate to the skeleton. This edition includes many illustrations, information on MR imaging and CT scanning, and discussions of osteoporosis, dysplasias, and metabolic bone disease.

  13. Distance collaborations with industry

    SciTech Connect

    Peskin, A.; Swyler, K.

    1998-06-01

    The college industry relationship has been identified as a key policy issue in Engineering Education. Collaborations between academic institutions and the industrial sector have a long history and a bright future. For Engineering and Engineering Technology programs in particular, industry has played a crucial role in many areas including advisement, financial support, and practical training of both faculty and students. Among the most important and intimate interactions are collaborative projects and formal cooperative education arrangements. Most recently, such collaborations have taken on a new dimension, as advances in technology have made possible meaningful technical collaboration at a distance. There are several obvious technology areas that have contributed significantly to this trend. Foremost is the ubiquitous presence of the Internet. Perhaps almost as important are advances in computer based imaging. Because visual images offer a compelling user experience, it affords greater knowledge transfer efficiency than other modes of delivery. Furthermore, the quality of the image appears to have a strongly correlated effect on insight. A good visualization facility offers both a means for communication and a shared information space for the subjects, which are among the essential features of both peer collaboration and distance learning.

  14. ALICE Collaboration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abelev, B.; Adam, J.; Adamová, D.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Aglieri Rinella, G.; Agnello, M.; Agostinelli, A.; Agrawal, N.; Ahammed, Z.; Ahmad, N.; Ahmed, I.; Ahn, S. U.; Ahn, S. A.; Aimo, I.; Aiola, S.; Ajaz, M.; Akindinov, A.; Alam, S. N.; Aleksandrov, D.; Alessandro, B.; Alexandre, D.; Alici, A.; Alkin, A.; Alme, J.; Alt, T.; Altinpinar, S.; Altsybeev, I.; Alves Garcia Prado, C.; Andrei, C.; Andronic, A.; Anguelov, V.; Anielski, J.; Antičić, T.; Antinori, F.; Antonioli, P.; Aphecetche, L.; Appelshäuser, H.; Arcelli, S.; Armesto, N.; Arnaldi, R.; Aronsson, T.; Arsene, I. C.; Arslandok, M.; Augustinus, A.; Averbeck, R.; Awes, T. C.; Azmi, M. D.; Bach, M.; Badalà, A.; Baek, Y. W.; Bagnasco, S.; Bailhache, R.; Bala, R.; Baldisseri, A.; Baltasar Dos Santos Pedrosa, F.; Baral, R. C.; Barbera, R.; Barile, F.; Barnaföldi, G. G.; Barnby, L. S.; Barret, V.; Bartke, J.; Basile, M.; Bastid, N.; Basu, S.; Bathen, B.; Batigne, G.; Batista Camejo, A.; Batyunya, B.; Batzing, P. C.; Baumann, C.; Bearden, I. G.; Beck, H.; Bedda, C.; Behera, N. K.; Belikov, I.; Bellini, F.; Bellwied, R.; Belmont, R.; Belmont-Moreno, E.; Belyaev, V.; Bencedi, G.; Beole, S.; Berceanu, I.; Bercuci, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Berenyi, D.; Berger, M. E.; Bertens, R. A.; Berzano, D.; Betev, L.; Bhasin, A.; Bhat, I. R.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattacharjee, B.; Bhom, J.; Bianchi, L.; Bianchi, N.; Bianchin, C.; Bielčík, J.; Bielčíková, J.; Bilandzic, A.; Bjelogrlic, S.; Blanco, F.; Blau, D.; Blume, C.; Bock, F.; Bogdanov, A.; Bøggild, H.; Bogolyubsky, M.; Böhmer, F. V.; Boldizsár, L.; Bombara, M.; Book, J.; Borel, H.; Borissov, A.; Bossú, F.; Botje, M.; Botta, E.; Böttger, S.; Braun-Munzinger, P.; Bregant, M.; Breitner, T.; Broker, T. A.; Browning, T. A.; Broz, M.; Bruna, E.; Bruno, G. E.; Budnikov, D.; Buesching, H.; Bufalino, S.; Buncic, P.; Busch, O.; Buthelezi, Z.; Caffarri, D.; Cai, X.; Caines, H.; Calero Diaz, L.; Caliva, A.; Calvo Villar, E.; Camerini, P.; Carena, F.; Carena, W.; Castillo Castellanos, J.; Casula, E. A. R.; Catanescu, V.; Cavicchioli, C.; Ceballos Sanchez, C.; Cepila, J.; Cerello, P.; Chang, B.; Chapeland, S.; Charvet, J. L.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chelnokov, V.; Cherney, M.; Cheshkov, C.; Cheynis, B.; Chibante Barroso, V.; Chinellato, D. D.; Chochula, P.; Chojnacki, M.; Choudhury, S.; Christakoglou, P.; Christensen, C. H.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chung, S. U.; Cicalo, C.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Cleymans, J.; Colamaria, F.; Colella, D.; Collu, A.; Colocci, M.; Conesa Balbastre, G.; Conesa del Valle, Z.; Connors, M. E.; Contreras, J. G.; Cormier, T. M.; Corrales Morales, Y.; Cortese, P.; Cortés Maldonado, I.; Cosentino, M. R.; Costa, F.; Crochet, P.; Cruz Albino, R.; Cuautle, E.; Cunqueiro, L.; Dainese, A.; Danu, A.; Das, D.; Das, I.; Das, K.; Das, S.; Dash, A.; Dash, S.; De, S.; Delagrange, H.; Deloff, A.; Dénes, E.; D'Erasmo, G.; De Caro, A.; de Cataldo, G.; de Cuveland, J.; De Falco, A.; De Gruttola, D.; De Marco, N.; De Pasquale, S.; de Rooij, R.; Diaz Corchero, M. A.; Dietel, T.; Dillenseger, P.; Divià, R.; Di Bari, D.; Di Liberto, S.; Di Mauro, A.; Di Nezza, P.; Djuvsland, Ø.; Dobrin, A.; Dobrowolski, T.; Domenicis Gimenez, D.; Dönigus, B.; Dordic, O.; Dørheim, S.; Dubey, A. K.; Dubla, A.; Ducroux, L.; Dupieux, P.; Dutta Majumdar, A. K.; Hilden, T. E.; Ehlers, R. J.; Elia, D.; Engel, H.; Erazmus, B.; Erdal, H. A.; Eschweiler, D.; Espagnon, B.; Esposito, M.; Estienne, M.; Esumi, S.; Evans, D.; Evdokimov, S.; Fabris, D.; Faivre, J.; Falchieri, D.; Fantoni, A.; Fasel, M.; Fehlker, D.; Feldkamp, L.; Felea, D.; Feliciello, A.; Feofilov, G.; Ferencei, J.; Fernández Téllez, A.; Ferreiro, E. G.; Ferretti, A.; Festanti, A.; Figiel, J.; Figueredo, M. A. S.; Filchagin, S.; Finogeev, D.; Fionda, F. M.; Fiore, E. M.; Floratos, E.; Floris, M.; Foertsch, S.; Foka, P.; Fokin, S.; Fragiacomo, E.; Francescon, A.; Frankenfeld, U.; Fuchs, U.; Furget, C.; Furs, A.; Fusco Girard, M.; Gaardhøje, J. J.; Gagliardi, M.; Gago, A. M.; Gallio, M.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Ganoti, P.; Gao, C.; Garabatos, C.; Garcia-Solis, E.; Gargiulo, C.; Garishvili, I.; Gerhard, J.; Germain, M.; Gheata, A.; Gheata, M.; Ghidini, B.; Ghosh, P.; Ghosh, S. K.; Gianotti, P.; Giubellino, P.; Gladysz-Dziadus, E.; Glässel, P.; Gomez Ramirez, A.; González-Zamora, P.; Gorbunov, S.; Görlich, L.; Gotovac, S.; Graczykowski, L. K.; Grelli, A.; Grigoras, A.; Grigoras, C.; Grigoriev, V.; Grigoryan, A.; Grigoryan, S.; Grinyov, B.; Grion, N.; Grosse-Oetringhaus, J. F.; Grossiord, J.-Y.; Grosso, R.; Guber, F.; Guernane, R.; Guerzoni, B.; Guilbaud, M.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gulkanyan, H.; Gumbo, M.; Gunji, T.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, R.; Khan, K. H.; Haake, R.; Haaland, Ø.; Hadjidakis, C.; Haiduc, M.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamar, G.; Hanratty, L. D.; Hansen, A.; Harris, J. W.; Hartmann, H.; Harton, A.; Hatzifotiadou, D.; Hayashi, S.; Heckel, S. T.; Heide, M.; Helstrup, H.; Herghelegiu, A.; Herrera Corral, G.; Hess, B. A.; Hetland, K. F.; Hippolyte, B.; Hladky, J.; Hristov, P.; Huang, M.; Humanic, T. J.; Hussain, N.; Hussain, T.; Hutter, D.; Hwang, D. S.; Ilkaev, R.; Ilkiv, I.; Inaba, M.; Innocenti, G. M.; Ionita, C.; Ippolitov, M.; Irfan, M.; Ivanov, M.; Ivanov, V.; Jachołkowski, A.; Jacobs, P. M.; Jahnke, C.; Jang, H. J.; Janik, M. A.; Jayarathna, P. H. S. Y.; Jena, C.; Jena, S.; Jimenez Bustamante, R. T.; Jones, P. G.; Jung, H.; Jusko, A.; Kadyshevskiy, V.; Kalinak, P.; Kalweit, A.; Kamin, J.; Kang, J. H.; Kaplin, V.; Kar, S.; Karasu Uysal, A.; Karavichev, O.; Karavicheva, T.; Karpechev, E.; Kebschull, U.; Keidel, R.; Keijdener, D. L. D.; Keil SVN, M.; Khan, M. M.; Khan, P.; Khan, S. A.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kharlov, Y.; Kileng, B.; Kim, B.; Kim, D. W.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, J. S.; Kim, M.; Kim, M.; Kim, S.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, T.; Kirsch, S.; Kisel, I.; Kiselev, S.; Kisiel, A.; Kiss, G.; Klay, J. L.; Klein, J.; Klein-Bösing, C.; Kluge, A.; Knichel, M. L.; Knospe, A. G.; Kobdaj, C.; Kofarago, M.; Köhler, M. K.; Kollegger, T.; Kolojvari, A.; Kondratiev, V.; Kondratyeva, N.; Konevskikh, A.; Kovalenko, V.; Kowalski, M.; Kox, S.; Koyithatta Meethaleveedu, G.; Kral, J.; Králik, I.; Kravčáková, A.; Krelina, M.; Kretz, M.; Krivda, M.; Krizek, F.; Kryshen, E.; Krzewicki, M.; Kučera, V.; Kucheriaev, Y.; Kugathasan, T.; Kuhn, C.; Kuijer, P. G.; Kulakov, I.; Kumar, J.; Kurashvili, P.; Kurepin, A.; Kurepin, A. B.; Kuryakin, A.; Kushpil, S.; Kweon, M. J.; Kwon, Y.; Ladron de Guevara, P.; Lagana Fernandes, C.; Lakomov, I.; Langoy, R.; Lara, C.; Lardeux, A.; Lattuca, A.; La Pointe, S. L.; La Rocca, P.; Lea, R.; Leardini, L.; Lee, G. R.; Legrand, I.; Lehnert, J.; Lemmon, R. C.; Lenti, V.; Leogrande, E.; Leoncino, M.; León Monzón, I.; Lévai, P.; Li, S.; Lien, J.; Lietava, R.; Lindal, S.; Lindenstruth, V.; Lippmann, C.; Lisa, M. A.; Ljunggren, H. M.; Lodato, D. F.; Loenne, P. I.; Loggins, V. R.; Loginov, V.; Lohner, D.; Loizides, C.; Lopez, X.; López Torres, E.; Lu, X.-G.; Luettig, P.; Lunardon, M.; Luparello, G.; Ma, R.; Maevskaya, A.; Mager, M.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Mahmood, S. M.; Maire, A.; Majka, R. D.; Malaev, M.; Maldonado Cervantes, I.; Malinina, L.; Mal'Kevich, D.; Malzacher, P.; Mamonov, A.; Manceau, L.; Manko, V.; Manso, F.; Manzari, V.; Marchisone, M.; Mareš, J.; Margagliotti, G. V.; Margotti, A.; Marín, A.; Markert, C.; Marquard, M.; Martashvili, I.; Martin, N. A.; Martinengo, P.; Martínez, M. I.; Martínez García, G.; Martin Blanco, J.; Martynov, Y.; Mas, A.; Masciocchi, S.; Masera, M.; Masoni, A.; Massacrier, L.; Mastroserio, A.; Matyja, A.; Mayer, C.; Mazer, J.; Mazzoni, M. A.; Meddi, F.; Menchaca-Rocha, A.; Meninno, E.; Mercado Pérez, J.; Meres, M.; Miake, Y.; Mikhaylov, K.; Milano, L.; Milosevic, J.; Mischke, A.; Mishra, A. N.; Miśkowiec, D.; Mitra, J.; Mitu, C. M.; Mlynarz, J.; Mohammadi, N.; Mohanty, B.; Molnar, L.; Montaño Zetina, L.; Montes, E.; Morando, M.; Moreira De Godoy, D. A.; Moretto, S.; Morreale, A.; Morsch, A.; Muccifora, V.; Mudnic, E.; Mühlheim, D.; Muhuri, S.; Mukherjee, M.; Müller, H.; Munhoz, M. G.; Murray, S.; Musa, L.; Musinsky, J.; Nandi, B. K.; Nania, R.; Nappi, E.; Naru, M. U.; Nattrass, C.; Nayak, K.; Nayak, T. K.; Nazarenko, S.; Nedosekin, A.; Nicassio, M.; Niculescu, M.; Niedziela, J.; Nielsen, B. S.; Nikolaev, S.; Nikulin, S.; Nikulin, V.; Nilsen, B. S.; Noferini, F.; Nomokonov, P.; Nooren, G.; Norman, J.; Nyanin, A.; Nystrand, J.; Oeschler, H.; Oh, S.; Oh, S. K.; Okatan, A.; Okubo, T.; Olah, L.; Oleniacz, J.; Oliveira Da Silva, A. C.; Onderwaater, J.; Oppedisano, C.; Ortiz Velasquez, A.; Oskarsson, A.; Otwinowski, J.; Oyama, K.; Ozdemir, M.; Sahoo, P.; Pachmayer, Y.; Pachr, M.; Pagano, P.; Paić, G.; Pajares, C.; Pal, S. K.; Palmeri, A.; Pant, D.; Papikyan, V.; Pappalardo, G. S.; Pareek, P.; Park, W. J.; Parmar, S.; Passfeld, A.; Patalakha, D. I.; Paticchio, V.; Paul, B.; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Pereira Da Costa, H.; Pereira De Oliveira Filho, E.; Peresunko, D.; Pérez Lara, C. E.; Pesci, A.; Peskov, V.; Pestov, Y.; Petráček, V.; Petran, M.; Petris, M.; Petrovici, M.; Petta, C.; Piano, S.; Pikna, M.; Pillot, P.; Pinazza, O.; Pinsky, L.; Piyarathna, D. B.; Płoskoń, M.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Pochybova, S.; Podesta-Lerma, P. L. M.; Poghosyan, M. G.; Pohjoisaho, E. H. O.; Polichtchouk, B.; Poljak, N.; Pop, A.; Porteboeuf-Houssais, S.; Porter, J.; Potukuchi, B.; Prasad, S. K.; Preghenella, R.; Prino, F.; Pruneau, C. A.; Pshenichnov, I.; Puccio, M.; Puddu, G.; Pujahari, P.; Punin, V.; Putschke, J.; Qvigstad, H.; Rachevski, A.; Raha, S.; Rajput, S.; Rak, J.; Rakotozafindrabe, A.; Ramello, L.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Räsänen, S. S.; Rascanu, B. T.; Rathee, D.; Rauf, A. W.; Razazi, V.; Read, K. F.; Real, J. S.; Redlich, K.; Reed, R. J.; Rehman, A.; Reichelt, P.; Reicher, M.; Reidt, F.; Renfordt, R.; Reolon, A. R.; Reshetin, A.; Rettig, F.; Revol, J.-P.; Reygers, K.; Riabov, V.; Ricci, R. A.; Richert, T.; Richter, M.; Riedler, P.; Riegler, W.; Riggi, F.; Rivetti, A.; Rocco, E.; Rodríguez Cahuantzi, M.; Rodriguez Manso, A.; Røed, K.; Rogochaya, E.; Rohni, S.; Rohr, D.; Röhrich, D.; Romita, R.; Ronchetti, F.; Ronflette, L.; Rosnet, P.; Rossi, A.; Roukoutakis, F.; Roy, A.; Roy, C.; Roy, P.; Rubio Montero, A. J.; Rui, R.; Russo, R.; Ryabinkin, E.; Ryabov, Y.; Rybicki, A.; Sadovsky, S.; Šafařík, K.; Sahlmuller, B.; Sahoo, R.; Sahu, P. K.; Saini, J.; Sakai, S.; Salgado, C. A.; Salzwedel, J.; Sambyal, S.; Samsonov, V.; Sanchez Castro, X.; Sánchez Rodríguez, F. J.; Šándor, L.; Sandoval, A.; Sano, M.; Santagati, G.; Sarkar, D.; Scapparone, E.; Scarlassara, F.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schiaua, C.; Schicker, R.; Schmidt, C.; Schmidt, H. R.; Schuchmann, S.; Schukraft, J.; Schulc, M.; Schuster, T.; Schutz, Y.; Schwarz, K.; Schweda, K.; Scioli, G.; Scomparin, E.; Scott, R.; Segato, G.; Seger, J. E.; Sekiguchi, Y.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Senosi, K.; Seo, J.; Serradilla, E.; Sevcenco, A.; Shabetai, A.; Shabratova, G.; Shahoyan, R.; Shangaraev, A.; Sharma, A.; Sharma, N.; Sharma, S.; Shigaki, K.; Shtejer, K.; Sibiriak, Y.; Siddhanta, S.; Siemiarczuk, T.; Silvermyr, D.; Silvestre, C.; Simatovic, G.; Singaraju, R.; Singh, R.; Singha, S.; Singhal, V.; Sinha, B. C.; Sinha, T.; Sitar, B.; Sitta, M.; Skaali, T. B.; Skjerdal, K.; Slupecki, M.; Smirnov, N.; Snellings, R. J. M.; Søgaard, C.; Soltz, R.; Song, J.; Song, M.; Soramel, F.; Sorensen, S.; Spacek, M.; Spiriti, E.; Sputowska, I.; Spyropoulou-Stassinaki, M.; Srivastava, B. K.; Stachel, J.; Stan, I.; Stefanek, G.; Steinpreis, M.; Stenlund, E.; Steyn, G.; Stiller, J. H.; Stocco, D.; Stolpovskiy, M.; Strmen, P.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Sugitate, T.; Suire, C.; Suleymanov, M.; Sultanov, R.; Šumbera, M.; Susa, T.; Symons, T. J. M.; Szabo, A.; Szanto de Toledo, A.; Szarka, I.; Szczepankiewicz, A.; Szymanski, M.; Takahashi, J.; Tangaro, M. A.; Tapia Takaki, J. D.; Tarantola Peloni, A.; Tarazona Martinez, A.; Tariq, M.; Tarzila, M. G.; Tauro, A.; Tejeda Muñoz, G.; Telesca, A.; Terasaki, K.; Terrevoli, C.; Thäder, J.; Thomas, D.; Tieulent, R.; Timmins, A. R.; Toia, A.; Trubnikov, V.; Trzaska, W. H.; Tsuji, T.; Tumkin, A.; Turrisi, R.; Tveter, T. S.; Ullaland, K.; Uras, A.; Usai, G. L.; Vajzer, M.; Vala, M.; Valencia Palomo, L.; Vallero, S.; Vande Vyvre, P.; Van Der Maarel, J.; Van Hoorne, J. W.; van Leeuwen, M.; Vargas, A.; Vargyas, M.; Varma, R.; Vasileiou, M.; Vasiliev, A.; Vechernin, V.; Veldhoen, M.; Velure, A.; Venaruzzo, M.; Vercellin, E.; Vergara Limón, S.; Vernet, R.; Verweij, M.; Vickovic, L.; Viesti, G.; Viinikainen, J.; Vilakazi, Z.; Villalobos Baillie, O.; Vinogradov, A.; Vinogradov, L.; Vinogradov, Y.; Virgili, T.; Vislavicius, V.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vodopyanov, A.; Völkl, M. A.; Voloshin, K.; Voloshin, S. A.; Volpe, G.; von Haller, B.; Vorobyev, I.; Vranic, D.; Vrláková, J.; Vulpescu, B.; Vyushin, A.; Wagner, B.; Wagner, J.; Wagner, V.; Wang, M.; Wang, Y.; Watanabe, D.; Weber, M.; Weber, S. G.; Wessels, J. P.; Westerhoff, U.; Wiechula, J.; Wikne, J.; Wilde, M.; Wilk, G.; Wilkinson, J.; Williams, M. C. S.; Windelband, B.; Winn, M.; Yaldo, C. G.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yang, H.; Yang, P.; Yang, S.; Yano, S.; Yasnopolskiy, S.; Yi, J.; Yin, Z.; Yoo, I.-K.; Yushmanov, I.; Zaborowska, A.; Zaccolo, V.; Zach, C.; Zaman, A.; Zampolli, C.; Zaporozhets, S.; Zarochentsev, A.; Závada, P.; Zaviyalov, N.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zgura, I. S.; Zhalov, M.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Y.; Zhao, C.; Zhigareva, N.; Zhou, D.; Zhou, F.; Zhou, Y.; Zhou, Zhuo; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, X.; Zichichi, A.; Zimmermann, A.; Zimmermann, M. B.; Zinovjev, G.; Zoccarato, Y.; Zyzak, M.

    2014-11-01

    The ALICE Collaboration would like to thank all its engineers and technicians for their invaluable contributions to the construction of the experiment and the CERN accelerator teams for the outstanding performance of the LHC complex.

  15. Distributed data collection for a database of radiological image interpretations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, L. Rodney; Ostchega, Yechiam; Goh, Gin-Hua; Thoma, George R.

    1997-01-01

    The National Library of Medicine, in collaboration with the National Center for Health Statistics and the National Institute for Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, has built a system for collecting radiological interpretations for a large set of x-ray images acquired as part of the data gathered in the second National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. This system is capable of delivering across the Internet 5- and 10-megabyte x-ray images to Sun workstations equipped with X Window based 2048 X 2560 image displays, for the purpose of having these images interpreted for the degree of presence of particular osteoarthritic conditions in the cervical and lumbar spines. The collected interpretations can then be stored in a database at the National Library of Medicine, under control of the Illustra DBMS. This system is a client/server database application which integrates (1) distributed server processing of client requests, (2) a customized image transmission method for faster Internet data delivery, (3) distributed client workstations with high resolution displays, image processing functions and an on-line digital atlas, and (4) relational database management of the collected data.

  16. Organizational decentralization in radiology.

    PubMed

    Aas, I H Monrad

    2006-01-01

    At present, most hospitals have a department of radiology where images are captured and interpreted. Decentralization is the opposite of centralization and means 'away from the centre'. With a Picture Archiving and Communication System (PACS) and broadband communications, transmitting radiology images between sites will be far easier than before. Qualitative interviews of 26 resource persons were performed in Norway. There was a response rate of 90%. Decentralization of radiology interpretations seems less relevant than centralization, but several forms of decentralization have a role to play. The respondents mentioned several advantages, including exploitation of capacity and competence. They also mentioned several disadvantages, including splitting professional communities and reduced contact between radiologists and clinicians. With the new technology decentralization and centralization of image interpretation are important possibilities in organizational change. This will be important for the future of teleradiology.

  17. Organizational centralization in radiology.

    PubMed

    Aas, I H Monrad

    2006-01-01

    Traditionally, hospitals have a radiology department, where images are taken and interpretation occurs. Teleradiology makes it possible to capture images in one location and transmit them elsewhere for interpretation. Organizational centralization of radiology interpretations is therefore of interest. Empirical data have been collected in qualitative interviews of 26 resource persons with substantial experience with picture archiving and communication systems and teleradiology, from 12 departments of radiology in Norway. The response rate was 90%. A total of 21 theoretically possible types of centralization of image interpretation were identified, representing combinations of three categories of geographical centralization, and seven categories of centralization according to function. Various advantages and disadvantages of centralization were identified. Organizational changes may be decisive for the future of teleradiology, but it may be wise to plan for change in small steps, since we know little about how broad future organizational changes based on teleradiology will be, or what will decide how far particular organizations will go. PMID:16438776

  18. Organizational decentralization in radiology.

    PubMed

    Aas, I H Monrad

    2006-01-01

    At present, most hospitals have a department of radiology where images are captured and interpreted. Decentralization is the opposite of centralization and means 'away from the centre'. With a Picture Archiving and Communication System (PACS) and broadband communications, transmitting radiology images between sites will be far easier than before. Qualitative interviews of 26 resource persons were performed in Norway. There was a response rate of 90%. Decentralization of radiology interpretations seems less relevant than centralization, but several forms of decentralization have a role to play. The respondents mentioned several advantages, including exploitation of capacity and competence. They also mentioned several disadvantages, including splitting professional communities and reduced contact between radiologists and clinicians. With the new technology decentralization and centralization of image interpretation are important possibilities in organizational change. This will be important for the future of teleradiology. PMID:16884560

  19. Radiology's value chain.

    PubMed

    Enzmann, Dieter R

    2012-04-01

    A diagnostic radiology value chain is constructed to define its main components, all of which are vulnerable to change, because digitization has caused disaggregation of the chain. Some components afford opportunities to improve productivity, some add value, while some face outsourcing to lower labor cost and to information technology substitutes, raising commoditization risks. Digital image information, because it can be competitive at smaller economies of scale, allows faster, differential rates of technological innovation of components, initiating a centralization-to-decentralization technology trend. Digitization, having triggered disaggregation of radiology's professional service model, may soon usher in an information business model. This means moving from a mind-set of "reading images" to an orientation of creating and organizing information for greater accuracy, faster speed, and lower cost in medical decision making. Information businesses view value chain investments differently than do small professional services. In the former model, producing a better business product will extend image interpretation beyond a radiologist's personal fund of knowledge to encompass expanding external imaging databases. A follow-on expansion with integration of image and molecular information into a report will offer new value in medical decision making. Improved interpretation plus new integration will enrich and diversify radiology's key service products, the report and consultation. A more robust, information-rich report derived from a "systems" and "computational" radiology approach will be facilitated by a transition from a professional service to an information business. Under health care reform, radiology will transition its emphasis from volume to greater value. Radiology's future brightens with the adoption of a philosophy of offering information rather than "reads" for decision making. Staunchly defending the status quo via turf wars is unlikely to constitute a

  20. Westinghouse radiological containment guide

    SciTech Connect

    Aitken, S.B.; Brown, R.L.; Cantrell, J.R.; Wilcox, D.P.

    1994-03-01

    This document provides uniform guidance for Westinghouse contractors on the implementation of radiological containments. This document reflects standard industry practices and is provided as a guide. The guidance presented herein is consistent with the requirements of the DOE Radiological Control Manual (DOE N 5480.6). This guidance should further serve to enable and encourage the use of containments for contamination control and to accomplish the following: Minimize personnel contamination; Prevent the spread of contamination; Minimize the required use of protective clothing and personal protective equipment; Minimize the generation of waste.

  1. Successful Transformational Radiology Leaders.

    PubMed

    Douget, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Transformational radiology leaders elevate subordinates, expand self-awareness, develop lasting relationships, strive to exceed expectations, and uphold the vision and goals of the organization. In order for radiology leaders to become more transformational in their leadership style there are four fundamental elements they must learn: idealized influence, individualized consideration, inspirational motivation, and intellectual stimulation. Leaders can utilize personality and self-assessments to learn more about themselves, identify areas of strengths and weaknesses, and learn to be more effective when leading employees. PMID:26710553

  2. Radiological worker training

    SciTech Connect

    1998-10-01

    This Handbook describes an implementation process for core training as recommended in Implementation Guide G441.12, Radiation Safety Training, and as outlined in the DOE Radiological Control Standard (RCS). The Handbook is meant to assist those individuals within the Department of Energy, Managing and Operating contractors, and Managing and Integrating contractors identified as having responsibility for implementing core training recommended by the RCS. This training is intended for radiological workers to assist in meeting their job-specific training requirements of 10 CFR 835. While this Handbook addresses many requirements of 10 CFR 835 Subpart J, it must be supplemented with facility-specific information to achieve full compliance.

  3. Improving Field Supervision through Collaborative Supervision Institutes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harvey, Virginia Smith; Amador, Andria; Finer, Diana; Gotthelf, David; Hintze, John; Kruger, Lou; Li, Chieh; Lichtenstein, Bob; Rogers, Laura; Struzziero, Joan; Wandle, Caroline

    2010-01-01

    Adequate and appropriate supervision of interns is frequently identified as a significant problem by training programs while, on their part, field placement sites often indicate that training programs generate expectations for interns that are not always "in synch" with district expectations of school psychologists. As a result of an increasing…

  4. 324 Building Baseline Radiological Characterization

    SciTech Connect

    R.J. Reeder, J.C. Cooper

    2010-06-24

    This report documents the analysis of radiological data collected as part of the characterization study performed in 1998. The study was performed to create a baseline of the radiological conditions in the 324 Building.

  5. Collaborative Spaces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lippman, Peter C.

    2013-01-01

    When architects discuss the educational facilities of the next century and beyond, the conversation turns to collaborative spaces. They envision flexible and fluid spaces that will encourage creative and critical thinking, and free students to communicate clearly about the task at hand. While these are admirable ideals, there are some fundamental…

  6. Collaboration Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harlow, Danielle; Otero, Valerie K.

    2005-01-01

    What happens when university curriculum developers are mixed with motivated elementary teachers? ? An awesome learning collaboration that benefits researchers, teachers, and students! That's what the authors discovered when they--university researchers involved in the Physics for Elementary Teachers (PET) project--teamed up with local elementary…

  7. Collaborative Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Broderick, Debora

    2014-01-01

    This practitioner research study investigates the power of multimodal texts within a real-world context and argues that a participatory culture focused on literary arts offers marginalized high school students opportunities for collaborative design and authoring. Additionally, this article invites educators to rethink the at-risk label. This…

  8. Paediatric musculoskeletal interventional radiology.

    PubMed

    Natali, Gian L; Paolantonio, Guglielmo; Fruhwirth, Rodolfo; Alvaro, Giuseppe; Parapatt, George K; Toma', Paolo; Rollo, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    Interventional radiology technique is now well established and widely used in the adult population. Through minimally invasive procedures, it increasingly replaces surgical interventions that involve higher percentages of invasiveness and, consequently, of morbidity and mortality. For these advantageous reasons, interventional radiology in recent years has spread to the paediatric age as well. The aim of this study was to review the literature on the development, use and perspectives of these procedures in the paediatric musculoskeletal field. Several topics are covered: osteomuscle neoplastic malignant and benign pathologies treated with invasive diagnostic and/or therapeutic procedures such as radiofrequency ablation in the osteoid osteoma; invasive and non-invasive procedures in vascular malformations; treatment of aneurysmal bone cysts; and role of interventional radiology in paediatric inflammatory and rheumatic inflammations. The positive results that have been generated with interventional radiology procedures in the paediatric field highly encourage both the development of new ad hoc materials, obviously adapted to young patients, as well as the improvement of such techniques, in consideration of the fact that childrens' pathologies do not always correspond to those of adults. In conclusion, as these interventional procedures have proven to be less invasive, with lower morbidity and mortality rates as well, they are becoming a viable and valid alternative to surgery in the paediatric population.

  9. Dosimetry in diagnostic radiology.

    PubMed

    Meghzifene, Ahmed; Dance, David R; McLean, Donald; Kramer, Hans-Michael

    2010-10-01

    Dosimetry is an area of increasing importance in diagnostic radiology. There is a realisation amongst health professionals that the radiation dose received by patients from modern X-ray examinations and procedures can be at a level of significance for the induction of cancer across a population, and in some unfortunate instances, in the acute damage to particular body organs such as skin and eyes. The formulation and measurement procedures for diagnostic radiology dosimetry have recently been standardised through an international code of practice which describes the methodologies necessary to address the diverging imaging modalities used in diagnostic radiology. Common to all dosimetry methodologies is the measurement of the air kerma from the X-ray device under defined conditions. To ensure the accuracy of the dosimetric determination, such measurements need to be made with appropriate instrumentation that has a calibration that is traceable to a standards laboratory. Dosimetric methods are used in radiology departments for a variety of purposes including the determination of patient dose levels to allow examinations to be optimized and to assist in decisions on the justification of examination choices. Patient dosimetry is important for special cases such as for X-ray examinations of children and pregnant patients. It is also a key component of the quality control of X-ray equipment and procedures. PMID:20655679

  10. Radiological Safety Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Army Ordnance Center and School, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD.

    Written to be used concurrently with the U.S. Army's Radiological Safety Course, this publication discusses the causes, sources, and detection of nuclear radiation. In addition, the transportation and disposal of radioactive materials are covered. The report also deals with the safety precautions to be observed when working with lasers, microwave…

  11. Radiological Defense Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Defense Civil Preparedness Agency (DOD), Washington, DC.

    Originally prepared for use as a student textbook in Radiological Defense (RADEF) courses, this manual provides the basic technical information necessary for an understanding of RADEF. It also briefly discusses the need for RADEF planning and expected postattack emergency operations. There are 14 chapters covering these major topics: introduction…

  12. Radiology Technician (AFSC 90370).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sobczak, James

    This five-volume student text is designed for use by Air Force personnel enrolled in a self-study extension course for radiology technicians. Covered in the individual volumes are radiographic fundamentals (x-ray production; primary beams; exposure devices; film, film holders, and darkrooms; control of film quality; and environmental safety);…

  13. Radiology of spinal curvature

    SciTech Connect

    De Smet, A.A.

    1985-01-01

    This book offers the only comprehensive, concise summary of both the clinical and radiologic features of thoracic and lumbar spine deformity. Emphasis is placed on idiopathic scoliosis, which represents 85% of all patients with scoliosis, but less common areas of secondary scoliosis, kyphosis and lordosis are also covered.

  14. Research Training in Radiology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Inst. of General Medical Sciences (NIH), Bethesda, MD.

    Radiology today is a major clinical specialty of medicine in terms of the number and complexity of patient examinations, and the financial resources, physician manpower, and supporting personnel required for performing its functions. It reached its present status because it provides accurate methods of diagnosis for so many diseases. However, this…

  15. Profile of Participants and Genotype Distributions of 108 Polymorphisms in a Cross-Sectional Study of Associations of Genotypes With Lifestyle and Clinical Factors: A Project in the Japan Multi-Institutional Collaborative Cohort (J-MICC) Study

    PubMed Central

    Wakai, Kenji; Hamajima, Nobuyuki; Okada, Rieko; Naito, Mariko; Morita, Emi; Hishida, Asahi; Kawai, Sayo; Nishio, Kazuko; Yin, Guang; Asai, Yatami; Matsuo, Keitaro; Hosono, Satoyo; Ito, Hidemi; Watanabe, Miki; Kawase, Takakazu; Suzuki, Takeshi; Tajima, Kazuo; Tanaka, Keitaro; Higaki, Yasuki; Hara, Megumi; Imaizumi, Takeshi; Taguchi, Naoto; Nakamura, Kazuyo; Nanri, Hinako; Sakamoto, Tatsuhiko; Horita, Mikako; Shinchi, Koichi; Kita, Yoshikuni; Turin, Tanvir Chowdhury; Rumana, Nahid; Matsui, Kenji; Miura, Katsuyuki; Ueshima, Hirotsugu; Takashima, Naoyuki; Nakamura, Yasuyuki; Suzuki, Sadao; Ando, Ryosuke; Hosono, Akihiro; Imaeda, Nahomi; Shibata, Kiyoshi; Goto, Chiho; Hattori, Nami; Fukatsu, Mitsuru; Yamada, Tamaki; Tokudome, Shinkan; Takezaki, Toshiro; Niimura, Hideshi; Hirasada, Kazuyo; Nakamura, Akihiko; Tatebo, Masaya; Ogawa, Shin; Tsunematsu, Noriko; Chiba, Shirabe; Mikami, Haruo; Kono, Suminori; Ohnaka, Keizo; Takayanagi, Ryoichi; Watanabe, Yoshiyuki; Ozaki, Etsuko; Shigeta, Masako; Kuriyama, Nagato; Yoshikawa, Aya; Matsui, Daisuke; Watanabe, Isao; Inoue, Kaoru; Ozasa, Kotaro; Mitani, Satoko; Arisawa, Kokichi; Uemura, Hirokazu; Hiyoshi, Mineyoshi; Takami, Hidenobu; Yamaguchi, Miwa; Nakamoto, Mariko; Takeda, Hideo; Kubo, Michiaki; Tanaka, Hideo

    2011-01-01

    Background Most diseases are thought to arise from interactions between environmental factors and the host genotype. To detect gene–environment interactions in the development of lifestyle-related diseases, and especially cancer, the Japan Multi-institutional Collaborative Cohort (J-MICC) Study was launched in 2005. Methods We initiated a cross-sectional study to examine associations of genotypes with lifestyle and clinical factors, as assessed by questionnaires and medical examinations. The 4519 subjects were selected from among participants in the J-MICC Study in 10 areas throughout Japan. In total, 108 polymorphisms were chosen and genotyped using the Invader assay. Results The study group comprised 2124 men and 2395 women with a mean age of 55.8 ± 8.9 years (range, 35–69 years) at baseline. Among the 108 polymorphisms examined, 4 were not polymorphic in our study population. Among the remaining 104 polymorphisms, most variations were common (minor allele frequency ≥0.05 for 96 polymorphisms). The allele frequencies in this population were comparable with those in the HapMap-JPT data set for 45 Japanese from Tokyo. Only 5 of 88 polymorphisms showed allele-frequency differences greater than 0.1. Of the 108 polymorphisms, 32 showed a highly significant difference in minor allele frequency among the study areas (P < 0.001). Conclusions This comprehensive data collection on lifestyle and clinical factors will be useful for elucidating gene–environment interactions. In addition, it is likely to be an informative reference tool, as free access to genotype data for a large Japanese population is not readily available. PMID:21467728

  16. Ethical problems in radiology: radiological consumerism.

    PubMed

    Magnavita, N; Bergamaschi, A

    2009-10-01

    One of the causes of the increasing request for radiological examinations occurring in all economically developed countries is the active role played by the patient-consumer. Consumerism places the radiologist in an ethical dilemma, between the principle of autonomy on the one hand and the ethical principles of beneficence, nonmaleficence and justice on the other. The choice made by radiologists in moral dilemmas is inspired by an adherence to moral principles, which in Italy and elsewhere refer to the Judaeo-Christian tradition or to neo-Darwinian relativism. Whatever the choice, the radiologist is bound to adhere to that choice and to provide the patient with all the relevant information regarding his or her state of health.

  17. NCI collaborates with Multiple Myeloma Research Foundation

    Cancer.gov

    The National Cancer Institute (NCI) announced a collaboration with the Multiple Myeloma Research Foundation (MMRF) to incorporate MMRF's wealth of genomic and clinical data on the disease into the NCI Genomic Data Commons (GDC), a publicly available datab

  18. International Collaboration in Mental Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Bertram S., Ed.; Torrey, E. Fuller, Ed.

    Presented in five parts on research, services, training, drug abuse, and alcohol abuse are 31 reports of mental health studies and programs supported by the U.S. and other countries. Explained in the introduction are reasons the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) has supported international collaboration. The following are among subjects…

  19. The Efficient Windows Collaborative

    SciTech Connect

    Petermann, Nils

    2006-03-31

    The Efficient Windows Collaborative (EWC) is a coalition of manufacturers, component suppliers, government agencies, research institutions, and others who partner to expand the market for energy efficient window products. Funded through a cooperative agreement with the U.S. Department of Energy, the EWC provides education, communication and outreach in order to transform the residential window market to 70% energy efficient products by 2005. Implementation of the EWC is managed by the Alliance to Save Energy, with support from the University of Minnesota and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory.

  20. Collaborative Strategic Planning: Myth or Reality?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mbugua, Flora; Rarieya, Jane F. A.

    2014-01-01

    The concept and practice of strategic planning, while entrenched in educational institutions in the West, is just catching on in Kenya. While literature emphasizes the importance of collaborative strategic planning, it does not indicate the challenges presented by collaboratively engaging in strategic planning. This article reports on findings of…

  1. Collaborative Strategic Planning in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanaghan, Patrick

    2009-01-01

    This book outlines a simple, five-phase collaborative approach to strategic planning that has worked effectively on many campuses. Specifically, Collaborative Strategic Planning (CSP) refers to the disciplined and thoughtful process of meaningfully engaging relevant stakeholders in creating a shared future vision and goals for their institution.…

  2. Messy Collaboration: Learning from a Learning Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adamson, Bob; Walker, Elizabeth

    2011-01-01

    Messy collaboration refers to complexity, unpredictability and management dilemmas when educators work together. Such messiness was evident in a Hong Kong English Learning Study, a structured cyclical process in which teachers and researcher-participants from a teacher education institution work collaboratively on effective student learning. This…

  3. Data mining in radiology.

    PubMed

    Kharat, Amit T; Singh, Amarjit; Kulkarni, Vilas M; Shah, Digish

    2014-04-01

    Data mining facilitates the study of radiology data in various dimensions. It converts large patient image and text datasets into useful information that helps in improving patient care and provides informative reports. Data mining technology analyzes data within the Radiology Information System and Hospital Information System using specialized software which assesses relationships and agreement in available information. By using similar data analysis tools, radiologists can make informed decisions and predict the future outcome of a particular imaging finding. Data, information and knowledge are the components of data mining. Classes, Clusters, Associations, Sequential patterns, Classification, Prediction and Decision tree are the various types of data mining. Data mining has the potential to make delivery of health care affordable and ensure that the best imaging practices are followed. It is a tool for academic research. Data mining is considered to be ethically neutral, however concerns regarding privacy and legality exists which need to be addressed to ensure success of data mining. PMID:25024513

  4. Data mining in radiology

    PubMed Central

    Kharat, Amit T; Singh, Amarjit; Kulkarni, Vilas M; Shah, Digish

    2014-01-01

    Data mining facilitates the study of radiology data in various dimensions. It converts large patient image and text datasets into useful information that helps in improving patient care and provides informative reports. Data mining technology analyzes data within the Radiology Information System and Hospital Information System using specialized software which assesses relationships and agreement in available information. By using similar data analysis tools, radiologists can make informed decisions and predict the future outcome of a particular imaging finding. Data, information and knowledge are the components of data mining. Classes, Clusters, Associations, Sequential patterns, Classification, Prediction and Decision tree are the various types of data mining. Data mining has the potential to make delivery of health care affordable and ensure that the best imaging practices are followed. It is a tool for academic research. Data mining is considered to be ethically neutral, however concerns regarding privacy and legality exists which need to be addressed to ensure success of data mining. PMID:25024513

  5. [Emphysematous pyelonephritis: radiologic diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Kably, M I; Elamraoui, F; Chikhaoui, N

    2003-10-01

    Emphysematous pyelonephritis (EPN) is a rare and severe form of acute pyelonephritis. Escherichia coli accounts for 60% of the cases. Predisposing factors are: diabetus mellitus, recent urinary tract infection and obstruction. There is a female predominance (2/1). Conventional radiography reveals the renal emphysema in 85% of the cases. Ultrasonography shows hyperechoic areas corresponding to the gaz. CT scan is the best technique, allowing the exact localization of the gaz inside the renal parenchyma. The natural course of the disease allows its radiologic classification in 4 grades. EPN has a poor prognosis if only a medical treatment is initiated. Every urinary tract infection, in a diabetic patient must be treated, and must lead to a radiologic exploration, which allows an early detection of severe forms of the disease. PMID:14606307

  6. Data mining in radiology.

    PubMed

    Kharat, Amit T; Singh, Amarjit; Kulkarni, Vilas M; Shah, Digish

    2014-04-01

    Data mining facilitates the study of radiology data in various dimensions. It converts large patient image and text datasets into useful information that helps in improving patient care and provides informative reports. Data mining technology analyzes data within the Radiology Information System and Hospital Information System using specialized software which assesses relationships and agreement in available information. By using similar data analysis tools, radiologists can make informed decisions and predict the future outcome of a particular imaging finding. Data, information and knowledge are the components of data mining. Classes, Clusters, Associations, Sequential patterns, Classification, Prediction and Decision tree are the various types of data mining. Data mining has the potential to make delivery of health care affordable and ensure that the best imaging practices are followed. It is a tool for academic research. Data mining is considered to be ethically neutral, however concerns regarding privacy and legality exists which need to be addressed to ensure success of data mining.

  7. The radiology conglomerate: optimizing the structure and function of the 50-plus radiology organizations--a summary of the 2010 Intersociety Conference.

    PubMed

    Dodd, Gerald D

    2011-08-01

    There has been a substantial proliferation in the number of radiology organizations over the past 30 years. This has occurred without integrated planning or the development of a central administration. Although each of the 50-plus organizations was created for specific reasons, the lack of coordination among them has led to considerable duplication of missions, services, and resources. The majority of the members attending the 2010 meeting of the Intersociety Conference believe that radiology as a whole would benefit from collaboration and consolidation of our organizations. Specific opportunities for collaboration include joint annual meetings between 2 or more organizations, the creation of a clearinghouse for meeting scheduling that would minimize meeting conflicts, coordinated development of self-assessment modules, the development of an online site for "one-stop shopping" for paying dues and making foundation contributions, consolidation of the 15-plus radiology foundations to increase the investment corpus and allow larger targeted investments in specific research projects that would benefit radiology as a whole, and the creation of a new Web site that would link all radiology organizations to facilitate information access and collaboration. To move forward with meaningful and successful collaboration or consolidation will require an accurate database of the mission, structure, and function of our organizations; a careful analysis of potential synergies; and, full buy-in by the participating organizations. PMID:21807346

  8. The radiology conglomerate: optimizing the structure and function of the 50-plus radiology organizations--a summary of the 2010 Intersociety Conference.

    PubMed

    Dodd, Gerald D

    2011-08-01

    There has been a substantial proliferation in the number of radiology organizations over the past 30 years. This has occurred without integrated planning or the development of a central administration. Although each of the 50-plus organizations was created for specific reasons, the lack of coordination among them has led to considerable duplication of missions, services, and resources. The majority of the members attending the 2010 meeting of the Intersociety Conference believe that radiology as a whole would benefit from collaboration and consolidation of our organizations. Specific opportunities for collaboration include joint annual meetings between 2 or more organizations, the creation of a clearinghouse for meeting scheduling that would minimize meeting conflicts, coordinated development of self-assessment modules, the development of an online site for "one-stop shopping" for paying dues and making foundation contributions, consolidation of the 15-plus radiology foundations to increase the investment corpus and allow larger targeted investments in specific research projects that would benefit radiology as a whole, and the creation of a new Web site that would link all radiology organizations to facilitate information access and collaboration. To move forward with meaningful and successful collaboration or consolidation will require an accurate database of the mission, structure, and function of our organizations; a careful analysis of potential synergies; and, full buy-in by the participating organizations.

  9. Pulmonary Alveolar Microlithiasis: AIRP Best Cases in Radiologic-Pathologic Correlation.

    PubMed

    Delic, Joseph A; Fuhrman, Carl R; Trejo Bittar, Humberto E

    2016-01-01

    Editor's Note.-RadioGraphics continues to publish radiologic-pathologic case material selected from the American Institute for Radiologic Pathology (AIRP) "best case" presentations. The AIRP conducts a 4-week Radiologic Pathology Correlation Course, which is offered five times per year. On the penultimate day of the course, the best case presentation is held at the American Film Institute Silver Theater and Cultural Center in Silver Spring, Md. The AIRP faculty identifies the best cases, from each organ system, brought by the resident attendees. One or more of the best cases from each of the five courses are then solicited for publication in RadioGraphics. These cases emphasize the importance of radiologic-pathologic correlation in the imaging evaluation and diagnosis of diseases encountered at the institute and its predecessor, the Armed Forces Institute of Pathology (AFIP). PMID:27618319

  10. Immunoglobulin G4 -related Sclerosing Mastitis: AIRP Best Cases in Radiologic-Pathologic Correlation.

    PubMed

    Zalaquett, Eugenio; Razmilic, Dravna; Oddo, David

    2016-01-01

    Editor's Note.-RadioGraphics continues to publish radiologic-pathologic case material selected from the American Institute for Radiologic Pathology (AIRP) "best case" presentations. The AIRP conducts a 4-week Radiologic Pathology Correlation Course, which is offered five times per year. On the penultimate day of the course, the best case presentation is held at the American Film Institute Silver Theater and Cultural Center in Silver Spring, Md. The AIRP faculty identifies the best cases, from each organ system, brought by the resident attendees. One or more of the best cases from each of the five courses are then solicited for publication in RadioGraphics. These cases emphasize the importance of radiologic-pathologic correlation in the imaging evaluation and diagnosis of diseases encountered at the institute and its predecessor, the Armed Forces Institute of Pathology (AFIP). PMID:27399235

  11. Desmoplastic Small Round Cell Tumor of the Kidney: AIRP Best Cases in Radiologic-Pathologic Correlation.

    PubMed

    Walton, William J; Flores, Raina R

    2016-01-01

    Editor's Note.-RadioGraphics continues to publish radiologic-pathologic case material selected from the American Institute for Radiologic Pathology (AIRP) "best case" presentations. The AIRP conducts a 4-week Radiologic Pathology Correlation Course, which is offered five times per year. On the penultimate day of the course, the best case presentation is held at the American Film Institute Silver Theater and Cultural Center in Silver Spring, Md. The AIRP faculty identifies the best cases, from each organ system, brought by the resident attendees. One or more of the best cases from each of the five courses are then solicited for publication in RadioGraphics. These cases emphasize the importance of radiologic-pathologic correlation in the imaging evaluation and diagnosis of diseases encountered at the institute and its predecessor, the Armed Forces Institute of Pathology (AFIP). PMID:27618327

  12. Benign Multicystic Peritoneal Mesothelioma: AIRP Best Cases in Radiologic-Pathologic Correlation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ruri; Tong, Angela; Kurtis, Boaz; Gilet, Anthony G

    2016-01-01

    RadioGraphics continues to publish radiologic-pathologic case material selected from the American Institute for Radiologic Pathology (AIRP) "best case" presentations. The AIRP conducts a 4-week Radiologic Pathology Correlation Course, which is offered five times per year. On the penultimate day of the course, the best case presentation is held at the American Film Institute Silver Theater and Cultural Center in Silver Spring, Md. The AIRP faculty identifies the best cases, from each organ system, brought by the resident attendees. One or more of the best cases from each of the five courses are then solicited for publication in RadioGraphics. These cases emphasize the importance of radiologic-pathologic correlation in the imaging evaluation and diagnosis of diseases encountered at the institute and its predecessor, the Armed Forces Institute of Pathology (AFIP). PMID:26963453

  13. 77 FR 47117 - Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear (CBRN) Protective Ensemble Standard, Certification...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-07

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Office of Justice Programs Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear (CBRN) Protective Ensemble Standard, Certification Program Requirements, and Selection and Application Guide AGENCY: National Institute of...

  14. Desmoplastic Small Round Cell Tumor of the Kidney: AIRP Best Cases in Radiologic-Pathologic Correlation.

    PubMed

    Walton, William J; Flores, Raina R

    2016-01-01

    Editor's Note.-RadioGraphics continues to publish radiologic-pathologic case material selected from the American Institute for Radiologic Pathology (AIRP) "best case" presentations. The AIRP conducts a 4-week Radiologic Pathology Correlation Course, which is offered five times per year. On the penultimate day of the course, the best case presentation is held at the American Film Institute Silver Theater and Cultural Center in Silver Spring, Md. The AIRP faculty identifies the best cases, from each organ system, brought by the resident attendees. One or more of the best cases from each of the five courses are then solicited for publication in RadioGraphics. These cases emphasize the importance of radiologic-pathologic correlation in the imaging evaluation and diagnosis of diseases encountered at the institute and its predecessor, the Armed Forces Institute of Pathology (AFIP).

  15. Unsupervised Topic Modeling in a Large Free Text Radiology Report Repository.

    PubMed

    Hassanpour, Saeed; Langlotz, Curtis P

    2016-02-01

    Radiology report narrative contains a large amount of information about the patient's health and the radiologist's interpretation of medical findings. Most of this critical information is entered in free text format, even when structured radiology report templates are used. The radiology report narrative varies in use of terminology and language among different radiologists and organizations. The free text format and the subtlety and variations of natural language hinder the extraction of reusable information from radiology reports for decision support, quality improvement, and biomedical research. Therefore, as the first step to organize and extract the information content in a large multi-institutional free text radiology report repository, we have designed and developed an unsupervised machine learning approach to capture the main concepts in a radiology report repository and partition the reports based on their main foci. In this approach, radiology reports are modeled in a vector space and compared to each other through a cosine similarity measure. This similarity is used to cluster radiology reports and identify the repository's underlying topics. We applied our approach on a repository of 1,899,482 radiology reports from three major healthcare organizations. Our method identified 19 major radiology report topics in the repository and clustered the reports accordingly to these topics. Our results are verified by a domain expert radiologist and successfully explain the repository's primary topics and extract the corresponding reports. The results of our system provide a target-based corpus and framework for information extraction and retrieval systems for radiology reports.

  16. Unsupervised Topic Modeling in a Large Free Text Radiology Report Repository.

    PubMed

    Hassanpour, Saeed; Langlotz, Curtis P

    2016-02-01

    Radiology report narrative contains a large amount of information about the patient's health and the radiologist's interpretation of medical findings. Most of this critical information is entered in free text format, even when structured radiology report templates are used. The radiology report narrative varies in use of terminology and language among different radiologists and organizations. The free text format and the subtlety and variations of natural language hinder the extraction of reusable information from radiology reports for decision support, quality improvement, and biomedical research. Therefore, as the first step to organize and extract the information content in a large multi-institutional free text radiology report repository, we have designed and developed an unsupervised machine learning approach to capture the main concepts in a radiology report repository and partition the reports based on their main foci. In this approach, radiology reports are modeled in a vector space and compared to each other through a cosine similarity measure. This similarity is used to cluster radiology reports and identify the repository's underlying topics. We applied our approach on a repository of 1,899,482 radiology reports from three major healthcare organizations. Our method identified 19 major radiology report topics in the repository and clustered the reports accordingly to these topics. Our results are verified by a domain expert radiologist and successfully explain the repository's primary topics and extract the corresponding reports. The results of our system provide a target-based corpus and framework for information extraction and retrieval systems for radiology reports. PMID:26353748

  17. Demystifying radiology information systems.

    PubMed

    Swearingen, R

    2000-01-01

    Selecting the right radiology information system (RIS) can be a difficult and tedious task for radiology managers. Sometimes the information systems department ends up selecting the RIS. As a radiology manager, you can help yourself and your department greatly by becoming more educated concerning the technology and terminology of radiology information systems. You can then participate in one of the most important decisions that will ever be made regarding your department. There is much confusion about the meanings of the terms interfaced and integrated. Two applications are generally considered integrated if they freely access and update each other's databases. Two applications are generally considered interfaced if they pass data to each other but don't directly access nor update the other's databases. Two more terms are centralized and decentralized. Centralized is the concept of "putting all of your eggs in one basket." Decentralization means you spread your resources out. The main difference between centralized and decentralized is that all components of a centralized system share the same fate (good or bad), while decentralized components operate independently and aren't affected directly by failures in another system. Another significant term relevant to RIS systems is HL7, which is a standardized data format that allows one application to pass data to another application in a format that the receiving application understands. RIS vendors generally fall in three categories: single-source vendors, multiproduct vendors and single-product vendors. Single-product vendors include best-of-breed vendors. No one approach is necessarily better than the others; which you choose will depend on your needs. When considering the purchase of an RIS system, there are important questions to ask yourself, the vendor and the vendors' customers as you gather information and prepare to make a decision.

  18. Disabling Radiological Dispersal Terror

    SciTech Connect

    Hart, M

    2002-11-08

    Terror resulting from the use of a radiological dispersal device (RDD) relies upon an individual's lack of knowledge and understanding regarding its significance. Disabling this terror will depend upon realistic reviews of the current conservative radiation protection regulatory standards. It will also depend upon individuals being able to make their own informed decisions merging perceived risks with reality. Preparation in these areas will reduce the effectiveness of the RDD and may even reduce the possibility of its use.

  19. [Digital library for archiving files of radiology and medical imaging].

    PubMed

    Duvauferrier, R; Rambeau, M; Moulène, F

    1993-01-01

    The Conseil des Enseignants de Radiologie de France in collaboration with the Ilab-TSI company and Schering laboratories has developed a computer programme allowing the storage and consultation of radiological teaching files. This programme, developed on Macintosh from standard Hypercard and Quicktime applications, allows, in consultation mode, the multicriteria search and visualisation of selected radiological files. In the author mode, new files can be included after digitalizing the author's own images or after obtaining images from another image library. This programme, which allows juxtaposition of digitalised radiological files, is designed to be extremely open and can be easily combined with other computer-assisted teaching or computer-assisted presentation applications. PMID:7509583

  20. Strategic Expansion Models in Academic Radiology.

    PubMed

    Natesan, Rajni; Yang, Wei T; Tannir, Habib; Parikh, Jay

    2016-03-01

    In response to economic pressures, academic institutions in the United States and their radiology practices, are expanding into the community to build a larger network, thereby driving growth and achieving economies of scale. These economies of scale are being achieved variously via brick-and-mortar construction, community practice acquisition, and partnership-based network expansion. We describe and compare these three expansion models within a 4-part framework of: (1) upfront investment; (2) profitability impact; (3) brand impact; and (4) risk of execution. PMID:26786029

  1. Establishing a new radiology residency research track.

    PubMed

    Costello, James R; Mullins, Mark E; Votaw, John R; Karolyi, Dan R; Kalb, Bobby; Gonzales, Patrick; Fornwalt, Brandon; Meltzer, Carolyn C

    2013-02-01

    The authors describe the establishment of a radiology residency research track at their institution. Based on growing biomedical technology needs and the tremendous increase in imaging-based research, the importance of training and cultivating future clinical investigators continues to grow. Within the framework of a supportive environment, a residency research track exposes motivated radiologists-in-training to the tools, challenges, and successes of a career in academics. The authors describe their program's design, admissions process, curriculum, and expectations. Lastly, the authors share the insight of their experience and seek feedback from readers who have been involved in similar endeavors.

  2. Strategic Expansion Models in Academic Radiology.

    PubMed

    Natesan, Rajni; Yang, Wei T; Tannir, Habib; Parikh, Jay

    2016-03-01

    In response to economic pressures, academic institutions in the United States and their radiology practices, are expanding into the community to build a larger network, thereby driving growth and achieving economies of scale. These economies of scale are being achieved variously via brick-and-mortar construction, community practice acquisition, and partnership-based network expansion. We describe and compare these three expansion models within a 4-part framework of: (1) upfront investment; (2) profitability impact; (3) brand impact; and (4) risk of execution.

  3. Mayo Clinic Jacksonville electronic radiology practice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morin, Richard L.; Berquist, Thomas H.; Rueger, Wolfgang

    1996-05-01

    We have begun a project to implement an Electronic (Filmless) Radiology Practice (ERP) at Mayo Clinic Jacksonville. This project is integrated with the implementation of a project (Automated Clinical Practice--ACP) to eliminate circulation and archival of the current paper Medical Record. The ERP will result in elimination of screen/film radiography and the transmittal of film throughout the institution by the end of 1996. In conjunction with the ACP, paper and film will not circulate within the clinic by the end of this year.

  4. Pitfalls in radiology informatics when deploying an enterprise solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindsköld, L.; Wintell, M.; Lundberg, N.

    2010-03-01

    In the Region Vastra Gotaland (VGR), Sweden, sharing of data from 4 PACS system has been done through the Radiology Information Infrastructure that where deployed in 2007, and during 2008 and 2009 also including the information obtained from three different RIS systems installed in the region. The RIS information stored in the Radiology Information Infrastructure is Structured Reports (SR) objects that derivatives from the regional information model. In practice, the Enterprise solution now offers new ways of social collaboration through information sharing within a region. Interoperability was developed according to the IHE mission, i.e. applying standards such as digital imaging and communication in medicine (DICOM) and Health Level 7 (HL7) to address specific clinical communication needs and support optimal patient care. Applying standards and information has shown to be suitable for interoperability, but not appropriate for implementing social collaboration i.e. first and second opinion, as there is no user services related to the standards. The need for social interaction leads to a common negotiated interface and in contrary with interoperability the approach will be a common defined semantic model. Radiology informatics is the glue between the technical standards, information models,semantics, social ruleworks and regulations used within radiology and their customers to share information and services.

  5. Using Collaborative Engineering to Inform Collaboration Engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, Lynne P.

    2012-01-01

    Collaboration is a critical competency for modern organizations as they struggle to compete in an increasingly complex, global environment. A large body of research on collaboration in the workplace focuses both on teams, investigating how groups use teamwork to perform their task work, and on the use of information systems to support team processes ("collaboration engineering"). This research essay presents collaboration from an engineering perspective ("collaborative engineering"). It uses examples from professional and student engineering teams to illustrate key differences in collaborative versus collaboration engineering and investigates how challenges in the former can inform opportunities for the latter.

  6. Symbiosis on Campus: Collaborations of Scientists and Science Educators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duggan-Haas, Don; Moscovici, Hedy; McNulty, Brendan; Gilmer, Penny J.; Eick, Charles J.; Wilson, John

    This symposium will provide insights into collaborations among scientists and science educators in a variety of contexts-large research universities, small state and private institutions, and collaborations involving both pre- service and in-service programs. The session will begin with a brief framing of these collaborations as management of the…

  7. University Industry Collaboration and Graduates' Unemployment in Ondo State, Nigeria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adepoju, O. O.; Adedeji, A. O

    2015-01-01

    Research evidence shows that university industry collaboration presents a wide range of benefits to industries, higher institutions, and to the development of a nation. This study investigated the existence of university industry collaboration, the factors militating against the collaboration, and the extent to which university industry…

  8. Digital Library Collaboration: A Service-Oriented Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buchanan, Steven; Gibb, Forbes; Simmons, Susan; McMenemy, David

    2012-01-01

    Collaboration in the digital domain offers an opportunity to provide enhanced digital services and extended reach to the community. This article adopts a service-oriented perspective through which it considers environmental drivers for digital library collaboration; discusses emergent collaborative partnerships across UK educational institutions,…

  9. Radiological Toolbox User's Manual

    SciTech Connect

    Eckerman, KF

    2004-07-01

    A toolbox of radiological data has been assembled to provide users access to the physical, chemical, anatomical, physiological and mathematical data relevant to the radiation protection of workers and member of the public. The software runs on a PC and provides users, through a single graphical interface, quick access to contemporary data and the means to extract these data for further computations and analysis. The numerical data, for the most part, are stored within databases in SI units. However, the user can display and extract values using non-SI units. This is the first release of the toolbox which was developed for the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission.

  10. Smart Radiological Dosimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Kosslow, William J.; Bandzuch, Gregory S.

    2004-07-20

    A radiation dosimeter providing an indication of the dose of radiation to which the radiation sensor has been exposed. The dosimeter contains features enabling the monitoring and evaluating of radiological risks so that a user can concentrate on the task at hand. The dosimeter provides an audible alarm indication that a predetermined time period has elapsed, an audible alarm indication reminding the user to check the dosimeter indication periodically, an audible alarm indicating that a predetermined accumulated dose has been prematurely reached, and an audible alarm indication prior or to reaching the 3/4 scale point.

  11. University-Industry Research Collaborations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duke, Charles

    2000-03-01

    University-industry research collaborations take many forms. Perhaps the simplest is unsponsored one-on-one collaborations between individuals. A more formal but less intimate arrangement is industrial sponsorship of individual or collective work on campus, e.g., via an outright gift or membership in an industrial affiliates consortium. A more intimate institutional collaboration is a mutually sanctioned joint project, sponsored by either a governmental funding agency or an industrial entity, the terms and conditions of which (funds flows, reports, intellectual property ownership, etc.) are governed by formal arrangements. Partnerships, e.g., support of an on-campus joint venture funded in part by one or more firms and in part by a third party, are the most intimate and complex form of such collaborations. During the past two decades Xerox has engaged in all four forms of collaborations. I give examples of each, and indicate the attributes which distinguish the more successful from the less successful collaborations, as well as recent trends in their nature and purposes.

  12. Patient-centered Radiology.

    PubMed

    Itri, Jason N

    2015-10-01

    Patient-centered care (ie, care organized around the patient) is a model in which health care providers partner with patients and families to identify and satisfy patients' needs and preferences. In this model, providers respect patients' values and preferences, address their emotional and social needs, and involve them and their families in decision making. Radiologists have traditionally been characterized as "doctor-to-doctor" consultants who are distanced from patients and work within a culture that does not value patient centeredness. As medicine becomes more patient driven and the trajectory of health care is toward increasing patient self-reliance, radiologists must change the perception that they are merely consultants and become more active participants in patient care by embracing greater patient interaction. The traditional business model for radiology practices, which devalues interaction between patients and radiologists, must be transformed into a patient-centered model in which radiologists are reintegrated into direct patient care and imaging processes are reorganized around patients' needs and preferences. Expanding radiology's core assets to include direct patient care may be the most effective deterrent to the threat of commoditization. As the assault on the growth of Medicare spending continues, with medical imaging as a highly visible target, radiologists must adapt to the changing landscape by focusing on their most important consumer: the patient. This may yield substantial benefits in the form of improved quality and patient safety, reduced costs, higher-value care, improved patient outcomes, and greater patient and provider satisfaction. PMID:26466190

  13. Radiological sinonasal anatomy

    PubMed Central

    Alrumaih, Redha A.; Ashoor, Mona M.; Obidan, Ahmed A.; Al-Khater, Khulood M.; Al-Jubran, Saeed A.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To assess the prevalence of common radiological variants of sinonasal anatomy among Saudi population and compare it with the reported prevalence of these variants in other ethnic and population groups. Methods: This is a retrospective cross-sectional study of 121 computerized tomography scans of the nose and paranasal sinuses of patients presented with sinonasal symptoms to the Department of Otorhinolarngology, King Fahad Hospital of the University, Khobar, Saudi Arabia, between January 2014 and May 2014. Results: Scans of 121 patients fulfilled inclusion criteria were reviewed. Concha bullosa was found in 55.4%, Haller cell in 39.7%, and Onodi cell in 28.9%. Dehiscence of the internal carotid artery was found in 1.65%. Type-1 and type-2 optic nerve were the prevalent types. Type-II Keros classification of the depth of olfactory fossa was the most common among the sample (52.9%). Frontal cells were found in 79.3%; type I was the most common. Conclusions: There is a difference in the prevalence of some radiological variants of the sinonasal anatomy between Saudi population and other study groups. Surgeon must pay special attention in the preoperative assessment of patients with sinonasal pathology to avoid undesirable complications. PMID:27146614

  14. Hanford Radiological Protection Support Services Annual Report for 1998

    SciTech Connect

    DE Bihl; JA MacLellan; ML Johnson; RK Piper; TP Lynch

    1999-05-14

    During calendar year (CY) 1998, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) performed its customary radiological protection support services in support of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Richland Operations OffIce (RL) and the Hanford contractors. These services included: 1) external dosimetry, 2) internal dosimetry, 3) in vivo measurements, 4) radiological records, 5) instrument calibra- tion and evaluation, and 6) calibration of radiation sources traceable to the National Institute of Standards and Technology (MST). The services were provided under a number of projects as summarized here.

  15. Hanford Radiological Protection Support Services Annual Report for 2000

    SciTech Connect

    Lynch, Timothy P.; Bihl, Donald E.; Johnson, Michelle L.; Maclellan, Jay A.; Piper, Roman K.

    2001-05-07

    During calendar year 2000, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory performed its customary radiological protection support services in support of the U.S. Department of Energy Richland Operations Office and the Hanford contractors. These services included: 1) external dosimetry, 2) internal dosimetry, 3) in vivo monitoring, 4) radiological records, 5) instrument calibration and evaluation, and 6) calibration of radiation sources traceable to the National Institute of Standards and Technology. Each program summary describes the routine operations, program changes and improvements, program assessments, supporting technical studies, and professional activities.

  16. American College of Radiology

    MedlinePlus

    ... Young Physician Volunteering Research Center for Research and Innovation Health Policy Institute News & Publications News Publications Tools ... Items Practice Leaders Forum Drive New Value Through Innovation, Teamwork and Quality Care Learn more JACR Imaging ...

  17. Radiological Worker Computer Based Training

    2003-02-06

    Argonne National Laboratory has developed an interactive computer based training (CBT) version of the standardized DOE Radiological Worker training program. This CD-ROM based program utilizes graphics, animation, photographs, sound and video to train users in ten topical areas: radiological fundamentals, biological effects, dose limits, ALARA, personnel monitoring, controls and postings, emergency response, contamination controls, high radiation areas, and lessons learned.

  18. Radiological diagnosis of gallbladder disease

    SciTech Connect

    Berk, R.N.; Ferrucci, J.T.; Fordtran, J.S.

    1981-10-01

    Changes in the radiological diagnosis of gallbladder disease are occurring at a remarkable rate. In this symposium, several recognized authorities place the various diagnostic modalities and their interrelation in modern perspective. The present and future roles of oral cholecystography and intravenous cholangiography, the radiological diagnosis of chronic acalculous cholecystits, and the use of ultrasonography and cholescintigraphy are analyzed.

  19. Fermilab-Latin America collaboration

    SciTech Connect

    Rubinstein, R.

    1994-12-31

    Fermilab`s program of collaboration with Latin America was initiated by then-Director Leon Lederman about 1980. His goal was to aid Latin American physics, and particularly its particle physics; this latter aim is in keeping with the Laboratory`s particle physics mission. The reasons for collaboration between institutions in the US and Latin America are many, including geographic and cultural, together with the existence of many talented scientists and many centers of excellence in the region. There are also broader reasons; for example, it has been stated frequently that physics is the basis of much technology, and advanced technology is a necessity for a country`s development. There is nothing unique about Fermilab`s program; other US institutions can carry out similar activities, and some have carried out individual items in the past. On the Latin American side, such collaboration enables institutions there to carry out forefront physics research, and also to have the advantages of particle physics spin-offs, both in expertise in related technologies and in scientist training. In addition to particle physics, collaboration is possible in many other related areas. Although particle physics is frequently viewed as {open_quotes}big science{close_quotes}, all of the large research groups in the field are composed of many small university groups, each of which contributes to the experiment, the analysis and the physics. Fermilab is an international laboratory, open to all users; a research proposal is accepted on scientific merit and technical competence, not on the country of origin of the scientists making the proposal. Currently, of Fermilab`s approximately 1400 users, about 30% are from non-US institutions. It should be noted here that Fermilab`s funds, which come from the US government, are for particle physics only; however, there is some flexibility in interpretation of this.

  20. 75 FR 65365 - National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-22

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney... Kidney Diseases Special Emphasis Panel, Genetics of Nephropathy Ancillary Studies. Date: November 15... Digestive and Kidney Diseases Special Emphasis Panel, Consortium for Radiologic Imaging Studies...

  1. PHENIX Collaboration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adare, A.; Afanasiev, S.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Akiba, Y.; Akimoto, R.; Al-Bataineh, H.; Al-Ta'ani, H.; Alexander, J.; Alfred, M.; Andrews, K. R.; Angerami, A.; Aoki, K.; Apadula, N.; Aphecetche, L.; Appelt, E.; Aramaki, Y.; Armendariz, R.; Aronson, S. H.; Asai, J.; Asano, H.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Atomssa, E. T.; Averbeck, R.; Awes, T. C.; Azmoun, B.; Babintsev, V.; Bai, M.; Bai, X.; Baksay, G.; Baksay, L.; Baldisseri, A.; Bandara, N. S.; Bannier, B.; Barish, K. N.; Barnes, P. D.; Barnes, P. D.; Bassalleck, B.; Basye, A. T.; Bathe, S.; Batsouli, S.; Baublis, V.; Baumann, C.; Baumgart, S.; Bazilevsky, A.; Beaumier, M.; Beckman, S.; Belikov, S.; Belmont, R.; Ben-Benjamin, J.; Bennett, R.; Berdnikov, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Bhom, J. H.; Bickley, A. A.; Bing, X.; Black, D.; Blau, D. S.; Boissevain, J. G.; Bok, J.; Bok, J. S.; Borel, H.; Boyle, K.; Brooks, M. L.; Broxmeyer, D.; Bryslawskyj, J.; Buesching, H.; Bumazhnov, V.; Bunce, G.; Butsyk, S.; Camacho, C. M.; Campbell, S.; Caringi, A.; Castera, P.; Chang, B. S.; Chang, W. C.; Charvet, J.-L.; Chen, C.-H.; Chernichenko, S.; Chi, C. Y.; Chiba, J.; Chiu, M.; Choi, I. J.; Choi, J. B.; Choi, S.; Choudhury, R. K.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chung, P.; Churyn, A.; Chvala, O.; Cianciolo, V.; Citron, Z.; Cleven, C. R.; Cole, B. A.; Comets, M. P.; Conesa del Valle, Z.; Connors, M.; Constantin, P.; Cronin, N.; Crossette, N.; Csanád, M.; Csörgő, T.; Dahms, T.; Dairaku, S.; Danchev, I.; Das, K.; Datta, A.; Daugherity, M. S.; David, G.; Dayananda, M. K.; Deaton, M. B.; DeBlasio, K.; Dehmelt, K.; Delagrange, H.; Denisov, A.; d'Enterria, D.; Deshpande, A.; Desmond, E. J.; Dharmawardane, K. V.; Dietzsch, O.; Ding, L.; Dion, A.; Do, J. H.; Donadelli, M.; Drapier, O.; Drees, A.; Drees, K. A.; Dubey, A. K.; Durham, J. M.; Durum, A.; Dutta, D.; Dzhordzhadze, V.; D'Orazio, L.; Edwards, S.; Efremenko, Y. V.; Egdemir, J.; Ellinghaus, F.; Emam, W. S.; Engelmore, T.; Enokizono, A.; En'yo, H.; Esumi, S.; Eyser, K. O.; Fadem, B.; Feege, N.; Fields, D. E.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Fleuret, F.; Fokin, S. L.; Fraenkel, Z.; Frantz, J. E.; Franz, A.; Frawley, A. D.; Fujiwara, K.; Fukao, Y.; Fusayasu, T.; Gadrat, S.; Gainey, K.; Gal, C.; Gallus, P.; Garg, P.; Garishvili, A.; Garishvili, I.; Ge, H.; Giordano, F.; Glenn, A.; Gong, H.; Gong, X.; Gonin, M.; Gosset, J.; Goto, Y.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Grau, N.; Greene, S. V.; Grim, G.; Grosse Perdekamp, M.; Gu, Y.; Gunji, T.; Guo, L.; Guragain, H.; Gustafsson, H.-Å.; Hachiya, T.; Hadj Henni, A.; Haegemann, C.; Haggerty, J. S.; Hahn, K. I.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamblen, J.; Han, R.; Han, S. Y.; Hanks, J.; Harada, H.; Harper, C.; Hartouni, E. P.; Haruna, K.; Hasegawa, S.; Hashimoto, K.; Haslum, E.; Hayano, R.; Hayashi, S.; He, X.; Heffner, M.; Hemmick, T. K.; Hester, T.; Hiejima, H.; Hill, J. C.; Hobbs, R.; Hohlmann, M.; Hollis, R. S.; Holzmann, W.; Homma, K.; Hong, B.; Horaguchi, T.; Hori, Y.; Hornback, D.; Hoshino, T.; Huang, J.; Huang, S.; Ichihara, T.; Ichimiya, R.; Ide, J.; Iinuma, H.; Ikeda, Y.; Imai, K.; Imazu, Y.; Imrek, J.; Inaba, M.; Inoue, Y.; Iordanova, A.; Isenhower, D.; Isenhower, L.; Ishihara, M.; Isinhue, A.; Isobe, T.; Issah, M.; Isupov, A.; Ivanischev, D.; Ivanishchev, D.; Iwanaga, Y.; Jacak, B. V.; Javani, M.; Jeon, S. J.; Jezghani, M.; Jia, J.; Jiang, X.; Jin, J.; Jinnouchi, O.; John, D.; Johnson, B. M.; Jones, T.; Joo, E.; Joo, K. S.; Jouan, D.; Jumper, D. S.; Kajihara, F.; Kametani, S.; Kamihara, N.; Kamin, J.; Kanda, S.; Kaneta, M.; Kaneti, S.; Kang, B. H.; Kang, J. H.; Kang, J. S.; Kanou, H.; Kapustinsky, J.; Karatsu, K.; Kasai, M.; Kawall, D.; Kawashima, M.; Kazantsev, A. V.; Kempel, T.; Key, J. A.; Khachatryan, V.; Khandai, P. K.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kihara, K.; Kijima, K. M.; Kikuchi, J.; Kim, A.; Kim, B. I.; Kim, C.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, E.; Kim, E.-J.; Kim, H.-J.; Kim, H. J.; Kim, K.-B.; Kim, M.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y.-J.; Kim, Y. K.; Kinney, E.; Kiriluk, K.; Kiss, Á.; Kistenev, E.; Kiyomichi, A.; Klatsky, J.; Klay, J.; Klein-Boesing, C.; Kleinjan, D.; Kline, P.; Koblesky, T.; Kochenda, L.; Kochetkov, V.; Kofarago, M.; Komatsu, Y.; Komkov, B.; Konno, M.; Koster, J.; Kotchetkov, D.; Kotov, D.; Kozlov, A.; Král, A.; Kravitz, A.; Krizek, F.; Kubart, J.; Kunde, G. J.; Kurihara, N.; Kurita, K.; Kurosawa, M.; Kweon, M. J.; Kwon, Y.; Kyle, G. S.; Lacey, R.; Lai, Y. S.; Lajoie, J. G.; Layton, D.; Lebedev, A.; Lee, B.; Lee, D. M.; Lee, G. H.; Lee, J.; Lee, K.; Lee, K. B.; Lee, K. S.; Lee, M. K.; Lee, S. H.; Lee, S. R.; Lee, T.; Leitch, M. J.; Leite, M. A. L.; Leitgab, M.; Leitner, E.; Lenzi, B.; Lewis, B.; Li, X.; Lichtenwalner, P.; Liebing, P.; Lim, S. H.; Linden Levy, L. A.; Liška, T.; Litvinenko, A.; Liu, H.; Liu, M. X.; Love, B.; Luechtenborg, R.; Lynch, D.; Maguire, C. F.; Makdisi, Y. I.; Maai, M.; Malakhov, A.; Malik, M. D.; Manion, A.; Manko, V. I.; Mannel, E.; Mao, Y.; Maruyama, T.; Mašek, L.; Masui, H.; Masumoto, S.; Matathias, F.; McCumber, M.; McGaughey, P. L.; McGlinchey, D.; McKinney, C.; Means, N.; Meles, A.; Mendoza, M.; Meredith, B.; Miake, Y.; Mibe, T.; Midori, J.; Mignerey, A. C.; Mikeš, P.; Miki, K.; Miller, A. J.; Miller, T. E.; Milov, A.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mishra, D. K.; Mishra, M.; Mitchell, J. T.; Mitrovski, M.; Miyachi, Y.; Miyasaka, S.; Mizuno, S.; Mohanty, A. K.; Montuenga, P.; Moon, H. J.; Moon, T.; Morino, Y.; Morreale, A.; Morrison, D. P.; Moskowitz, M.; Motschwiller, S.; Moukhanova, T. V.; Mukhopadhyay, D.; Murakami, T.; Murata, J.; Mwai, A.; Nagae, T.; Nagamiya, S.; Nagata, Y.; Nagle, J. L.; Naglis, M.; Nagy, M. I.; Nakagawa, I.; Nakagomi, H.; Nakamiya, Y.; Nakamura, K. R.; Nakamura, T.; Nakano, K.; Nam, S.; Nattrass, C.; Nederlof, A.; Netrakanti, P. K.; Newby, J.; Nguyen, M.; Nihashi, M.; Niida, T.; Norman, B. E.; Nouicer, R.; Novak, T.; Novitzky, N.; Nukariya, A.; Nyanin, A. S.; Oakley, C.; Obayashi, H.; O'Brien, E.; Oda, S. X.; Ogilvie, C. A.; Ohnishi, H.; Oide, H.; Oka, M.; Okada, K.; Omiwade, O. O.; Onuki, Y.; Orjuela Koop, J. D.; Oskarsson, A.; Ouchida, M.; Ozaki, H.; Ozawa, K.; Pak, R.; Pal, D.; Palounek, A. P. T.; Pantuev, V.; Papavassiliou, V.; Park, B. H.; Park, I. H.; Park, J.; Park, S.; Park, S. K.; Park, W. J.; Pate, S. F.; Patel, L.; Patel, M.; Pei, H.; Peng, J.-C.; Pereira, H.; Perepelitsa, D. V.; Perera, G. D. N.; Peresedov, V.; Peressounko, D. Yu.; Perry, J.; Petti, R.; Pinkenburg, C.; Pinson, R.; Pisani, R. P.; Proissl, M.; Purschke, M. L.; Purwar, A. K.; Qu, H.; Rak, J.; Rakotozafindrabe, A.; Ravinovich, I.; Read, K. F.; Rembeczki, S.; Reuter, M.; Reygers, K.; Reynolds, D.; Riabov, V.; Riabov, Y.; Richardson, E.; Riveli, N.; Roach, D.; Roche, G.; Rolnick, S. D.; Romana, A.; Rosati, M.; Rosen, C. A.; Rosendahl, S. S. E.; Rosnet, P.; Rowan, Z.; Rubin, J. G.; Rukoyatkin, P.; Ružička, P.; Rykov, V. L.; Ryu, M. S.; Sahlmueller, B.; Saito, N.; Sakaguchi, T.; Sakai, S.; Sakashita, K.; Sakata, H.; Sako, H.; Samsonov, V.; Sano, M.; Sano, S.; Sarsour, M.; Sato, S.; Sato, T.; Savastio, M.; Sawada, S.; Schaefer, B.; Schmoll, B. K.; Sedgwick, K.; Seele, J.; Seidl, R.; Sekiguchi, Y.; Semenov, A. Yu.; Semenov, V.; Sen, A.; Seto, R.; Sett, P.; Sexton, A.; Sharma, D.; Shaver, A.; Shein, I.; Shevel, A.; Shibata, T.-A.; Shigaki, K.; Shim, H. H.; Shimomura, M.; Shoji, K.; Shukla, P.; Sickles, A.; Silva, C. L.; Silvermyr, D.; Silvestre, C.; Sim, K. S.; Singh, B. K.; Singh, C. P.; Singh, V.; Skolnik, M.; Skutnik, S.; Slunečka, M.; Sodre, T.; Solano, S.; Soldatov, A.; Soltz, R. A.; Sondheim, W. E.; Sorensen, S. P.; Soumya, M.; Sourikova, I. V.; Sparks, N. A.; Staley, F.; Stankus, P. W.; Steinberg, P.; Stenlund, E.; Stepanov, M.; Ster, A.; Stoll, S. P.; Stone, M. R.; Sugitate, T.; Suire, C.; Sukhanov, A.; Sumita, T.; Sun, J.; Sziklai, J.; Tabaru, T.; Takagi, S.; Takagui, E. M.; Takahara, A.; Taketani, A.; Tanabe, R.; Tanaka, Y.; Taneja, S.; Tanida, K.; Tannenbaum, M. J.; Tarafdar, S.; Taranenko, A.; Tarján, P.; Tennant, E.; Themann, H.; Thomas, D.; Thomas, T. L.; Timilsina, A.; Todoroki, T.; Togawa, M.; Toia, A.; Tojo, J.; Tomášek, L.; Tomášek, M.; Tomita, Y.; Torii, H.; Towell, M.; Towell, R.; Towell, R. S.; Tram, V.-N.; Tserruya, I.; Tsuchimoto, Y.; Tsuji, T.; Utsunomiya, K.; Vale, C.; Valle, H.; van Hecke, H. W.; Vargyas, M.; Vazquez-Zambrano, E.; Veicht, A.; Velkovska, J.; Vértesi, R.; Vinogradov, A. A.; Virius, M.; Voas, B.; Vossen, A.; Vrba, V.; Vznuzdaev, E.; Wagner, M.; Walker, D.; Wang, X. R.; Watanabe, D.; Watanabe, K.; Watanabe, Y.; Watanabe, Y. S.; Wei, F.; Wei, R.; Wessels, J.; Whitaker, S.; White, S. N.; Winter, D.; Wolin, S.; Wood, J. P.; Woody, C. L.; Wright, R. M.; Wysocki, M.; Xia, B.; Xie, W.; Xue, L.; Yalcin, S.; Yamaguchi, Y. L.; Yamaura, K.; Yang, R.; Yanovich, A.; Yasin, Z.; Ying, J.; Yokkaichi, S.; Yoo, J. S.; Yoon, I.; You, Z.; Young, G. R.; Younus, I.; Yushmanov, I. E.; Zajc, W. A.; Zaudtke, O.; Zelenski, A.; Zhang, C.; Zhou, S.; Zimányi, J.; Zolin, L.

    2014-11-01

    We thank the staff of the Collider-Accelerator and Physics Departments at Brookhaven National Laboratory and the staff of the other PHENIX participating institutions for their vital contributions. We acknowledge support from the Office of Nuclear Physics in the Office of Science of the Department of Energy, the National Science Foundation, a sponsored research grant from Renaissance Technologies LLC, Abilene Christian University Research Council, Research Foundation of SUNY, and Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences, Vanderbilt University (USA), Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science, and Technology and the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (Japan), Conselho Nacional de Desenvolvimento Científico e Tecnológico and Fundaç ao de Amparo à Pesquisa do Estado de São Paulo (Brazil), Natural Science Foundation of China (People's Republic of China), Ministry of Science, Education, and Sports (Croatia), Ministry of Education, Youth and Sports (Czech Republic), Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Commissariat à l'Énergie Atomique, and Institut National de Physique Nucléaire et de Physique des Particules (France), Bundesministerium für Bildung und Forschung, Deutscher Akademischer Austausch Dienst, and Alexander von Humboldt Stiftung (Germany), OTKA NK 101 428 grant and the Ch. Simonyi Fund (Hungary), Department of Atomic Energy and Department of Science and Technology (India), Israel Science Foundation (Israel), National Research Foundation and WCU program of the Ministry Education Science and Technology (Korea), Physics Department, Lahore University of Management Sciences (Pakistan), Ministry of Education and Science, Russian Academy of Sciences, Federal Agency of Atomic Energy (Russia), VR and Wallenberg Foundation (Sweden), the US Civilian Research and Development Foundation for the Independent States of the Former Soviet Union, and the US-Israel Binational Science Foundation.

  2. PHENIX Collaboration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adare, A.; Afanasiev, S.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Akiba, Y.; Akimoto, R.; Al-Bataineh, H.; Al-Ta'ani, H.; Alexander, J.; Alfred, M.; Andrews, K. R.; Angerami, A.; Aoki, K.; Apadula, N.; Aphecetche, L.; Appelt, E.; Aramaki, Y.; Armendariz, R.; Aronson, S. H.; Asai, J.; Asano, H.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Atomssa, E. T.; Averbeck, R.; Awes, T. C.; Azmoun, B.; Babintsev, V.; Bai, M.; Bai, X.; Baksay, G.; Baksay, L.; Baldisseri, A.; Bandara, N. S.; Bannier, B.; Barish, K. N.; Barnes, P. D.; Bassalleck, B.; Basye, A. T.; Bathe, S.; Batsouli, S.; Baublis, V.; Baumann, C.; Baumgart, S.; Bazilevsky, A.; Beaumier, M.; Beckman, S.; Belikov, S.; Belmont, R.; Ben-Benjamin, J.; Bennett, R.; Berdnikov, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Bhom, J. H.; Bickley, A. A.; Bing, X.; Black, D.; Blau, D. S.; Boissevain, J. G.; Bok, J. S.; Borel, H.; Boyle, K.; Brooks, M. L.; Broxmeyer, D.; Bryslawskyj, J.; Buesching, H.; Bumazhnov, V.; Bunce, G.; Butsyk, S.; Camacho, C. M.; Campbell, S.; Caringi, A.; Castera, P.; Chang, B. S.; Chang, W. C.; Charvet, J.-L.; Chen, C.-H.; Chernichenko, S.; Chi, C. Y.; Chiba, J.; Chiu, M.; Choi, I. J.; Choi, J. B.; Choi, S.; Choudhury, R. K.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chung, P.; Churyn, A.; Chvala, O.; Cianciolo, V.; Citron, Z.; Cleven, C. R.; Cole, B. A.; Comets, M. P.; Conesa del Valle, Z.; Connors, M.; Constantin, P.; Cronin, N.; Crossette, N.; Csanád, M.; Csörgő, T.; Dahms, T.; Dairaku, S.; Danchev, I.; Das, K.; Datta, A.; Daugherity, M. S.; David, G.; Dayananda, M. K.; Deaton, M. B.; DeBlasio, K.; Dehmelt, K.; Delagrange, H.; Denisov, A.; d'Enterria, D.; Deshpande, A.; Desmond, E. J.; Dharmawardane, K. V.; Dietzsch, O.; Ding, L.; Dion, A.; Do, J. H.; Donadelli, M.; Drapier, O.; Drees, A.; Drees, K. A.; Dubey, A. K.; Durham, J. M.; Durum, A.; Dutta, D.; Dzhordzhadze, V.; D'Orazio, L.; Edwards, S.; Efremenko, Y. V.; Egdemir, J.; Ellinghaus, F.; Emam, W. S.; Engelmore, T.; Enokizono, A.; En'yo, H.; Esumi, S.; Eyser, K. O.; Fadem, B.; Feege, N.; Fields, D. E.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Fleuret, F.; Fokin, S. L.; Fraenkel, Z.; Frantz, J. E.; Franz, A.; Frawley, A. D.; Fujiwara, K.; Fukao, Y.; Fusayasu, T.; Gadrat, S.; Gainey, K.; Gal, C.; Gallus, P.; Garg, P.; Garishvili, A.; Garishvili, I.; Ge, H.; Giordano, F.; Glenn, A.; Gong, H.; Gong, X.; Gonin, M.; Gosset, J.; Goto, Y.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Grau, N.; Greene, S. V.; Grim, G.; Grosse Perdekamp, M.; Gu, Y.; Gunji, T.; Guo, L.; Guragain, H.; Gustafsson, H.-Å.; Hachiya, T.; Hadj Henni, A.; Haegemann, C.; Haggerty, J. S.; Hahn, K. I.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamblen, J.; Han, R.; Han, S. Y.; Hanks, J.; Harada, H.; Harper, C.; Hartouni, E. P.; Haruna, K.; Hasegawa, S.; Hashimoto, K.; Haslum, E.; Hayano, R.; Hayashi, S.; He, X.; Heffner, M.; Hemmick, T. K.; Hester, T.; Hiejima, H.; Hill, J. C.; Hobbs, R.; Hohlmann, M.; Hollis, R. S.; Holzmann, W.; Homma, K.; Hong, B.; Horaguchi, T.; Hori, Y.; Hornback, D.; Hoshino, T.; Huang, J.; Huang, S.; Ichihara, T.; Ichimiya, R.; Ide, J.; Iinuma, H.; Ikeda, Y.; Imai, K.; Imazu, Y.; Imrek, J.; Inaba, M.; Inoue, Y.; Iordanova, A.; Isenhower, D.; Isenhower, L.; Ishihara, M.; Isinhue, A.; Isobe, T.; Issah, M.; Isupov, A.; Ivanischev, D.; Ivanishchev, D.; Iwanaga, Y.; Jacak, B. V.; Javani, M.; Jeon, S. J.; Jezghani, M.; Jia, J.; Jiang, X.; Jin, J.; Jinnouchi, O.; John, D.; Johnson, B. M.; Jones, T.; Joo, E.; Joo, K. S.; Jouan, D.; Jumper, D. S.; Kajihara, F.; Kametani, S.; Kamihara, N.; Kamin, J.; Kanda, S.; Kaneta, M.; Kaneti, S.; Kang, B. H.; Kang, J. H.; Kang, J. S.; Kanou, H.; Kapustinsky, J.; Karatsu, K.; Kasai, M.; Kawall, D.; Kawashima, M.; Kazantsev, A. V.; Kempel, T.; Key, J. A.; Khachatryan, V.; Khandai, P. K.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kihara, K.; Kijima, K. M.; Kikuchi, J.; Kim, A.; Kim, B. I.; Kim, C.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, E.; Kim, E.-J.; Kim, H.-J.; Kim, H. J.; Kim, K.-B.; Kim, M.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y.-J.; Kim, Y. K.; Kinney, E.; Kiriluk, K.; Kiss, Á.; Kistenev, E.; Kiyomichi, A.; Klatsky, J.; Klay, J.; Klein-Boesing, C.; Kleinjan, D.; Kline, P.; Koblesky, T.; Kochenda, L.; Kochetkov, V.; Kofarago, M.; Komatsu, Y.; Komkov, B.; Konno, M.; Koster, J.; Kotchetkov, D.; Kotov, D.; Kozlov, A.; Král, A.; Kravitz, A.; Krizek, F.; Kubart, J.; Kunde, G. J.; Kurihara, N.; Kurita, K.; Kurosawa, M.; Kweon, M. J.; Kwon, Y.; Kyle, G. S.; Lacey, R.; Lai, Y. S.; Lajoie, J. G.; Layton, D.; Lebedev, A.; Lee, B.; Lee, D. M.; Lee, G. H.; Lee, J.; Lee, K.; Lee, K. B.; Lee, K. S.; Lee, M. K.; Lee, S. H.; Lee, S. R.; Lee, T.; Leitch, M. J.; Leite, M. A. L.; Leitgab, M.; Leitner, E.; Lenzi, B.; Lewis, B.; Li, X.; Lichtenwalner, P.; Liebing, P.; Lim, S. H.; Linden Levy, L. A.; Liška, T.; Litvinenko, A.; Liu, H.; Liu, M. X.; Love, B.; Luechtenborg, R.; Lynch, D.; Maguire, C. F.; Makdisi, Y. I.; Ma, M.; Malakhov, A.; Malik, M. D.; Manion, A.; Manko, V. I.; Mannel, E.; Mao, Y.; Maruyama, T.; Mašek, L.; Masui, H.; Masumoto, S.; Matathias, F.; McCumber, M.; McGaughey, P. L.; McGlinchey, D.; McKinney, C.; Means, N.; Meles, A.; Mendoza, M.; Meredith, B.; Miake, Y.; Mibe, T.; Midori, J.; Mignerey, A. C.; Mikeš, P.; Miki, K.; Miller, A. J.; Miller, T. E.; Milov, A.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mishra, D. K.; Mishra, M.; Mitchell, J. T.; Mitrovski, M.; Miyachi, Y.; Miyasaka, S.; Mizuno, S.; Mohanty, A. K.; Montuenga, P.; Moon, H. J.; Moon, T.; Morino, Y.; Morreale, A.; Morrison, D. P.; Moskowitz, M.; Motschwiller, S.; Moukhanova, T. V.; Mukhopadhyay, D.; Murakami, T.; Murata, J.; Mwai, A.; Nagae, T.; Nagamiya, S.; Nagata, Y.; Nagle, J. L.; Naglis, M.; Nagy, M. I.; Nakagawa, I.; Nakagomi, H.; Nakamiya, Y.; Nakamura, K. R.; Nakamura, T.; Nakano, K.; Nam, S.; Nattrass, C.; Nederlof, A.; Netrakanti, P. K.; Newby, J.; Nguyen, M.; Nihashi, M.; Niida, T.; Norman, B. E.; Nouicer, R.; Novak, T.; Novitzky, N.; Nukariya, A.; Nyanin, A. S.; Oakley, C.; Obayashi, H.; O'Brien, E.; Oda, S. X.; Ogilvie, C. A.; Ohnishi, H.; Oide, H.; Oka, M.; Okada, K.; Omiwade, O. O.; Onuki, Y.; Orjuela Koop, J. D.; Oskarsson, A.; Ouchida, M.; Ozaki, H.; Ozawa, K.; Pak, R.; Pal, D.; Palounek, A. P. T.; Pantuev, V.; Papavassiliou, V.; Park, B. H.; Park, I. H.; Park, J.; Park, S.; Park, S. K.; Park, W. J.; Pate, S. F.; Patel, L.; Patel, M.; Pei, H.; Peng, J.-C.; Pereira, H.; Perepelitsa, D. V.; Perera, G. D. N.; Peresedov, V.; Peressounko, D. Yu.; Perry, J.; Petti, R.; Pinkenburg, C.; Pinson, R.; Pisani, R. P.; Proissl, M.; Purschke, M. L.; Purwar, A. K.; Qu, H.; Rak, J.; Rakotozafindrabe, A.; Ravinovich, I.; Read, K. F.; Rembeczki, S.; Reuter, M.; Reygers, K.; Reynolds, D.; Riabov, V.; Riabov, Y.; Richardson, E.; Riveli, N.; Roach, D.; Roche, G.; Rolnick, S. D.; Romana, A.; Rosati, M.; Rosen, C. A.; Rosendahl, S. S. E.; Rosnet, P.; Rowan, Z.; Rubin, J. G.; Rukoyatkin, P.; Ružička, P.; Rykov, V. L.; Ryu, M. S.; Sahlmueller, B.; Saito, N.; Sakaguchi, T.; Sakai, S.; Sakashita, K.; Sakata, H.; Sako, H.; Samsonov, V.; Sano, M.; Sano, S.; Sarsour, M.; Sato, S.; Sato, T.; Savastio, M.; Sawada, S.; Schaefer, B.; Schmoll, B. K.; Sedgwick, K.; Seele, J.; Seidl, R.; Sekiguchi, Y.; Semenov, A. Yu.; Semenov, V.; Sen, A.; Seto, R.; Sett, P.; Sexton, A.; Sharma, D.; Shaver, A.; Shein, I.; Shevel, A.; Shibata, T.-A.; Shigaki, K.; Shim, H. H.; Shimomura, M.; Shoji, K.; Shukla, P.; Sickles, A.; Silva, C. L.; Silvermyr, D.; Silvestre, C.; Sim, K. S.; Singh, B. K.; Singh, C. P.; Singh, V.; Skolnik, M.; Skutnik, S.; Slunečka, M.; Sodre, T.; Solano, S.; Soldatov, A.; Soltz, R. A.; Sondheim, W. E.; Sorensen, S. P.; Soumya, M.; Sourikova, I. V.; Sparks, N. A.; Staley, F.; Stankus, P. W.; Steinberg, P.; Stenlund, E.; Stepanov, M.; Ster, A.; Stoll, S. P.; Stone, M. R.; Sugitate, T.; Suire, C.; Sukhanov, A.; Sumita, T.; Sun, J.; Sziklai, J.; Tabaru, T.; Takagi, S.; Takagui, E. M.; Takahara, A.; Taketani, A.; Tanabe, R.; Tanaka, Y.; Taneja, S.; Tanida, K.; Tannenbaum, M. J.; Tarafdar, S.; Taranenko, A.; Tarján, P.; Tennant, E.; Themann, H.; Thomas, D.; Thomas, T. L.; Timilsina, A.; Todoroki, T.; Togawa, M.; Toia, A.; Tojo, J.; Tomášek, L.; Tomášek, M.; Tomita, Y.; Torii, H.; Towell, M.; Towell, R.; Towell, R. S.; Tram, V.-N.; Tserruya, I.; Tsuchimoto, Y.; Tsuji, T.; Utsunomiya, K.; Vale, C.; Valle, H.; van Hecke, H. W.; Vargyas, M.; Vazquez-Zambrano, E.; Veicht, A.; Velkovska, J.; Vértesi, R.; Vinogradov, A. A.; Virius, M.; Voas, B.; Vossen, A.; Vrba, V.; Vznuzdaev, E.; Wagner, M.; Walker, D.; Wang, X. R.; Watanabe, D.; Watanabe, K.; Watanabe, Y.; Watanabe, Y. S.; Wei, F.; Wei, R.; Wessels, J.; Whitaker, S.; White, S. N.; Winter, D.; Wolin, S.; Wood, J. P.; Woody, C. L.; Wright, R. M.; Wysocki, M.; Xia, B.; Xie, W.; Xue, L.; Yalcin, S.; Yamaguchi, Y. L.; Yamaura, K.; Yang, R.; Yanovich, A.; Yasin, Z.; Ying, J.; Yokkaichi, S.; Yoo, J. S.; Yoon, I.; You, Z.; Young, G. R.; Younus, I.; Yushmanov, I. E.; Zajc, W. A.; Zaudtke, O.; Zelenski, A.; Zhang, C.; Zhou, S.; Zimányi, J.; Zolin, L.

    2014-12-01

    We thank the staff of the Collider-Accelerator and Physics Departments at Brookhaven National Laboratory and the staff of the other PHENIX participating institutions for their vital contributions. We acknowledge support from the Office of Nuclear Physics in the Office of Science of the Department of Energy, the National Science Foundation, a sponsored research grant from Renaissance Technologies LLC, Abilene Christian University Research Council, Research Foundation of SUNY, and Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences, Vanderbilt University (USA), Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science, and Technology and the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (Japan), Conselho Nacional de Desenvolvimento Científico e Tecnológico and Fundação de Amparo à Pesquisa do Estado de São Paulo (Brazil), Natural Science Foundation of China, (People's Republic of China), Ministry of Science, Education, and Sports (Croatia), Ministry of Education, Youth and Sports (Czech Republic), Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Commissariat à l'Énergie Atomique, and Institut National de Physique Nucléaire et de Physique des Particules (France), Bundesministerium für Bildung und Forschung, Deutscher Akademischer Austausch Dienst, and Alexander von Humboldt Stiftung (Germany), OTKA NK 101 428 grant and the Ch. Simonyi Fund (Hungary), Department of Atomic Energy and Department of Science and Technology (India), Israel Science Foundation (Israel), National Research Foundation and WCU program of the Ministry Education Science and Technology (Republic of Korea), Physics Department, Lahore University of Management Sciences (Pakistan), Ministry of Education and Science, Russian Academy of Sciences, Federal Agency of Atomic Energy (Russia), VR and Wallenberg Foundation (Sweden), the US Civilian Research and Development Foundation for the Independent States of the Former Soviet Union, and the US-Israel Binational Science Foundation.

  3. Magnetized Target Fusion collaboration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Intrator, Thomas

    2004-11-01

    Magnetized Target Fusion (MTF) may be a low cost path to fusion, in a regime that is intermediate between magnetic and inertial fusion energy. It requires compression of a magnetized target plasma and consequent heating to fusion relevant conditions inside a converging flux conserver. We hope to demonstrate the physics basis for MTF, with a Field Reversed Configuration (FRC) target plasma to be translated axially to a compression region. We show recent and improved FRC formation data, example deformable liner implosions, and a conceptual design for the upcoming translation experiments, and describe a multi institution collaboration. The FRC is an elongated, compact toroid equilibrium that is extreme among magnetic configurations, and relaxed to a non force free state. There is high plasma beta, small toroidal field, cross-field diamagnetic current and flows, vanishing rotational transform, magnetic shear, helicity and anomalously large resistivity. Scientific issues include MTF with and without FRC's, and fundamental plasma physics beyond MHD, relevant to geophysical and astrophysical phenomena.

  4. Case based dental radiology.

    PubMed

    Niemiec, Brook A

    2009-02-01

    Dental radiology is quickly becoming integral to the standard of care in veterinary dentistry. This is not only because it is critical for proper patient care, but also because client expectations have increased. Furthermore, providing dental radiographs as a routine service can create significant practice income. This article details numerous conditions that are indications for dental radiographs. As you will see, dental radiographs are often critical for proper diagnosis and treatment. These conditions should not be viewed as unusual; they are present within all of our practices. When you choose not to radiograph these teeth, you leave behind painful pathology. Utilizing the knowledge gained from dental radiographs will both improve patient care and increase acceptance of treatment recommendations. Consequently, this leads to increased numbers of dental procedures performed at your practice. PMID:19410233

  5. AERIAL RADIOLOGICAL SURVEYS

    SciTech Connect

    Proctor, A.E.

    1997-06-09

    Measuring terrestrial gamma radiation from airborne platforms has proved to be a useful method for characterizing radiation levels over large areas. Over 300 aerial radiological surveys have been carried out over the past 25 years including U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites, commercial nuclear power plants, Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program/Uranium Mine Tailing Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP/UMTRAP) sites, nuclear weapons test sites, contaminated industrial areas, and nuclear accident sites. This paper describes the aerial measurement technology currently in use by the Remote Sensing Laboratory (RSL) for routine environmental surveys and emergency response activities. Equipment, data-collection and -analysis methods, and examples of survey results are described.

  6. Standardized radiological dose evaluations

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, V.L.; Stahlnecker, E.

    1996-05-01

    Following the end of the Cold War, the mission of Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site changed from production of nuclear weapons to cleanup. Authorization baseis documents for the facilities, primarily the Final Safety Analysis Reports, are being replaced with new ones in which accident scenarios are sorted into coarse bins of consequence and frequency, similar to the approach of DOE-STD-3011-94. Because this binning does not require high precision, a standardized approach for radiological dose evaluations is taken for all the facilities at the site. This is done through a standard calculation ``template`` for use by all safety analysts preparing the new documents. This report describes this template and its use.

  7. State Technologies Advancement Collaborative

    SciTech Connect

    David S. Terry

    2012-01-30

    The U. S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Association of State Energy Officials (NASEO), and Association of State Energy Research and Technology Transfer Institutions (ASERTTI) signed an intergovernmental agreement on November 14, 2002, that allowed states and territories and the Federal Government to better collaborate on energy research, development, demonstration and deployment (RDD&D) projects. The agreement established the State Technologies Advancement Collaborative (STAC) which allowed the states and DOE to move RDD&D forward using an innovative competitive project selection and funding process. A cooperative agreement between DOE and NASEO served as the contracting instrument for this innovative federal-state partnership obligating funds from DOE's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy and Office of Fossil Energy to plan, fund, and implement RDD&D projects that were consistent with the common priorities of the states and DOE. DOE's Golden Field Office provided Federal oversight and guidance for the STAC cooperative agreement. The STAC program was built on the foundation of prior Federal-State efforts to collaborate on and engage in joint planning for RDD&D. Although STAC builds on existing, successful programs, it is important to note that it was not intended to replace other successful joint DOE/State initiatives such as the State Energy Program or EERE Special Projects. Overall the STAC process was used to fund, through three competitive solicitations, 35 successful multi-state research, development, deployment, and demonstration projects with an overall average non-federal cost share of 43%. Twenty-two states were awarded at least one prime contract, and organizations in all 50 states and some territories were involved as subcontractors in at least one STAC project. Projects were funded in seven program areas: (1) Building Technologies, (2) Industrial Technologies, (3) Transportation Technologies, (4) Distributed Energy Resources, (5

  8. The German Radiological Society and the Protagonists of Radiology during the Time of National Socialism--State of Research, Explanation Attempts, Desiderata and Research Prospects.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, M; Winzen, T; Groß, D

    2015-06-01

    The intention of the authors is the recognition and critical analysis of efforts to study the history of the German Radiological Society during the time of National Socialism from 1933 to 1945 with the goal of determining existing desiderata and identifying the resulting research prospects. There is a need to study concrete individual biographies of radiologists (members of the German Radiological Society, perpetrators, and victims) and their careers before and after 1945 as well as the importance of the interdisciplinarity of the discipline and the lack of institutional involvement during the "Third Reich". Moreover, the comparatively difficult starting situation of the study of the history of the German Radiological Society is discussed.

  9. Collaboration rules.

    PubMed

    Evans, Philip; Wolf, Bob

    2005-01-01

    Corporate leaders seeking to boost growth, learning, and innovation may find the answer in a surprising place: the Linux open-source software community. Linux is developed by an essentially volunteer, self-organizing community of thousands of programmers. Most leaders would sell their grandmothers for workforces that collaborate as efficiently, frictionlessly, and creatively as the self-styled Linux hackers. But Linux is software, and software is hardly a model for mainstream business. The authors have, nonetheless, found surprising parallels between the anarchistic, caffeinated, hirsute world of Linux hackers and the disciplined, tea-sipping, clean-cut world of Toyota engineering. Specifically, Toyota and Linux operate by rules that blend the self-organizing advantages of markets with the low transaction costs of hierarchies. In place of markets' cash and contracts and hierarchies' authority are rules about how individuals and groups work together (with rigorous discipline); how they communicate (widely and with granularity); and how leaders guide them toward a common goal (through example). Those rules, augmented by simple communication technologies and a lack of legal barriers to sharing information, create rich common knowledge, the ability to organize teams modularly, extraordinary motivation, and high levels of trust, which radically lowers transaction costs. Low transaction costs, in turn, make it profitable for organizations to perform more and smaller transactions--and so increase the pace and flexibility typical of high-performance organizations. Once the system achieves critical mass, it feeds on itself. The larger the system, the more broadly shared the knowledge, language, and work style. The greater individuals' reputational capital, the louder the applause and the stronger the motivation. The success of Linux is evidence of the power of that virtuous circle. Toyota's success is evidence that it is also powerful in conventional companies. PMID

  10. Collaboration rules.

    PubMed

    Evans, Philip; Wolf, Bob

    2005-01-01

    Corporate leaders seeking to boost growth, learning, and innovation may find the answer in a surprising place: the Linux open-source software community. Linux is developed by an essentially volunteer, self-organizing community of thousands of programmers. Most leaders would sell their grandmothers for workforces that collaborate as efficiently, frictionlessly, and creatively as the self-styled Linux hackers. But Linux is software, and software is hardly a model for mainstream business. The authors have, nonetheless, found surprising parallels between the anarchistic, caffeinated, hirsute world of Linux hackers and the disciplined, tea-sipping, clean-cut world of Toyota engineering. Specifically, Toyota and Linux operate by rules that blend the self-organizing advantages of markets with the low transaction costs of hierarchies. In place of markets' cash and contracts and hierarchies' authority are rules about how individuals and groups work together (with rigorous discipline); how they communicate (widely and with granularity); and how leaders guide them toward a common goal (through example). Those rules, augmented by simple communication technologies and a lack of legal barriers to sharing information, create rich common knowledge, the ability to organize teams modularly, extraordinary motivation, and high levels of trust, which radically lowers transaction costs. Low transaction costs, in turn, make it profitable for organizations to perform more and smaller transactions--and so increase the pace and flexibility typical of high-performance organizations. Once the system achieves critical mass, it feeds on itself. The larger the system, the more broadly shared the knowledge, language, and work style. The greater individuals' reputational capital, the louder the applause and the stronger the motivation. The success of Linux is evidence of the power of that virtuous circle. Toyota's success is evidence that it is also powerful in conventional companies.

  11. Partnership for Excellence. School/College Collaboration and Building Integrated Teacher Education Systems Statewide. Proceedings of the Summer Institute of the Council of Chief State School Officers (Delavan, Wisconsin, July 28-August 2, 1985).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yount, Rebecca, Ed.; And Others

    Papers and panel discussions contained in this proceedings examine various aspects of educational collaboration and other closely related topics. Titles and authors of the papers, and subjects of the panel discussions, are as follows: (1) "A Look at the Research/Demographics: What Do They Tell us About Integrating Statewide Systems for Teacher…

  12. Distributed Interoperable Metadata Registry; How Do Physicists Use an E-Print Archive? Implications for Institutional E-Print Services; A Framework for Building Open Digital Libraries; Implementing Digital Sanborn Maps for Ohio: OhioLINK and OPLIN Collaborative Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blanchi, Christophe; Petrone, Jason; Pinfield, Stephen; Suleman, Hussein; Fox, Edward A.; Bauer, Charly; Roddy, Carol Lynn

    2001-01-01

    Includes four articles that discuss a distributed architecture for managing metadata that promotes interoperability between digital libraries; the use of electronic print (e-print) by physicists; the development of digital libraries; and a collaborative project between two library consortia in Ohio to provide digital versions of Sanborn Fire…

  13. [The internationalization of scientific production in the fields of radiology and neuroimaging in Spain (1996-2003)].

    PubMed

    Bordons, M; Morillo, F; Fernández, M T; Gómez, I

    2006-01-01

    The situation of Research in radiology in Spain is analysed by examining the number of publications by Spanish authors in main stream international journals. The scientific production of Spanish researchers in journals included in the Science Citation Index (SCI) under the headings "Radiology, Nuclear Medicine, and Medical Imaging" and "Neuroimaging" during the years 1996-2003. During this period the scientific production in these fields comprised 1,562 documents (3.5% of the total production for Spanish clinical medicine); scientific production in these fields increased by 40% in this period in comparison to 24% for all clinical medicine. The bulk of the production was concentrated in the autonomous communities of Catalonia (35%), Madrid (28%), and Valencia (10%). The autonomous communities of Navarra and Cantabria had a high relative production after the results were adjusted for population. The healthcare sector is the most active, with the Hospital de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau, the Hospital Clinic de Barcelona, and the Hospital Vall d'Hebron being outstanding in that they not only lead the country in the number of publications but also publish more in journals with high impact factors. Among centers other than hospitals, the Center for Research in Energy, the Environment, and Technologies (CIEMAT) and the Medical School of the Universidad Complutense de Madrid are the most important. A high degree of collaboration is evident: 68% of the documents were produced by more than one institution, foreign centers were involved in 20%, and the documents were signed by an average of six authors. Conclusions. In summary, the data show that Spanish radiological research is becomin increasingly international, although this process is still in the initial stage, with the percentage of documents published in the most prestigious journals for this specialty being lower than in other disciplines. The relative activity and production of Spain is slightly below the average of the

  14. Collaborative Learning with Screen-Based Simulation in Health Care Education: An Empirical Study of Collaborative Patterns and Proficiency Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, L. O.; Soderstrom, T.; Ahlqvist, J.; Nilsson, T.

    2011-01-01

    This article is about collaborative learning with educational computer-assisted simulation (ECAS) in health care education. Previous research on training with a radiological virtual reality simulator has indicated positive effects on learning when compared to a more conventional alternative. Drawing upon the field of Computer-Supported…

  15. RADRELAY RADIOLOGICAL DATA LINK DEVICE

    SciTech Connect

    Harpring, L; Frank Heckendorn, F

    2007-11-06

    The RadRelay effort developed small, field appropriate, portable prototype devices that allow radiological spectra to be downloaded from field radiological detectors, like the identiFINDER-U, and transmitted to land based experts. This communications capability was designed for the U. S. Coast Guard (USCG) but is also applicable to the Customs and Border Protection (CBP) personnel working in remote locations. USCG Level II personnel currently use the identiFINDER-U Hand-Held Radioisotope ID Devices (HHRIID) to detect radiological materials during specific boarding operations. These devices will detect not only radiological emissions but will also evaluate those emissions against a table of known radiological spectra. The RadRelay has been developed to significantly improve the functionality of HHRIID, by providing the capability to download radiological spectra and then transmit them using satellite or cell phone technology. This remote wireless data transfer reduces the current lengthy delay often encountered between the shipboard detection of unknown radiological material and the evaluation of that data by technical and command personnel. That delay is reduced from hours to minutes and allows the field located personnel to remain on station during the inspection and evaluation process.

  16. Multilateral Collaborations in Analog Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cromwell, R. l.

    2016-01-01

    International collaborations in studies utilizing ground-based space flight analogs are an effective means for answering research questions common to participating agencies. These collaborations bring together worldwide experts to solve important space research questions. By collaborating unnecessary duplication of science is reduced, and the efficiency of analog use is improved. These studies also share resources among agencies for cost effective solutions to study implementation. Recently, NASA has engaged in collaborations with international partners at a variety of analog sites. The NASA Human Exploration Research Analog (HERA) is currently hosting investigator studies from NASA and from the German Space Agency (DLR). These isolation studies will answer questions in the areas of team cohesion, sleep and circadian rhythms, and neurobehavioral correlates to function. Planning for the next HERA campaign is underway as proposal selections are being made from the International Life Sciences Research Announcement (ILSRA). Studies selected from the ILSRA will be conducted across 4 HERA missions in 2017. NASA is planning collaborative studies with DLR at the :envihab facility in Cologne, Germany. Investigations were recently selected to study the effects of 0.5% CO2 exposure over 30 days of bed rest. These studies will help to determine the fidelity of this ground-based analog for studying the visual impairment intracranial pressure syndrome. NASA is also planning a multilateral collaboration at :envihab with DLR and the European Space Agency (ESA) to examine artificial gravity as a countermeasure to mitigate the effects of 60 days of bed rest. NASA is also considering collaborations with the Russian Institute for Biomedical Problems (IBMP) in studies that will utilize their Ground-based Experimental Facility (NEK). The NEK is comprised of 4 interconnected modules and a Martian surface simulator. This isolation analog can support 3 -10 crew members for long duration

  17. 100 classic papers of interventional radiology: A citation analysis

    PubMed Central

    Crockett, Matthew T; Browne, Ronan FJ; MacMahon, Peter J; Lawler, Leo

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To define the 100 citation classic papers of interventional radiology. METHODS: Using the database of Journal Citation Reports the 40 highest impact factor radiology journals were chosen. From these journals the 100 most cited interventional radiology papers were chosen and analysed. RESULTS: The top paper received 2497 citations and the 100th paper 200 citations. The average number of citations was 320. Dates of publication ranged from 1953 - 2005. Most papers originated in the United States (n = 67) followed by Italy (n = 20) and France (n = 10). Harvard University (n = 18) and Osped Civile (n = 11) were the most prolific institutions. Ten journals produced all of the top 100 papers with “Radiology” and “AJR” making up the majority. SN Goldberg and T Livraghi were the most prolific authors. Nearly two thirds of the papers (n = 61) were published after 1990. CONCLUSION: This analysis identifies many of the landmark interventional radiology papers and provides a fascinating insight into the changing discourse within the field. It also identifies topics, authors and institutions which have impacted greatly on the specialty. PMID:25918585

  18. CBM Collaboration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ablyazimov, T.; Abuhoza, A.; Adak, R.; Adamczewski-Musch, J.; Adamczyk, M.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Ahmad, F.; Ahmad, N.; Ahmad, S.; Akindinov, A.; Akishin, P.; Akishina, E.; Akishina, T.; Akishina, V.; Al-Turany, M.; Alexandrov, E.; Alexandrov, I.; Amar-Youcef, S.; Anđelić, M.; Andreeva, O.; Andrei, C.; Andronic, A.; Anisimov, Yu.; Appelshäuser, H.; Arend, A.; Argintaru, D.; Atkin, E.; Avdeev, S.; Averbeck, R.; Azmi, M. D.; Baban, V.; Bach, M.; Badura, E.; Baginyan, S.; Balle, T.; Balog, T.; Bandyopadhyay, S.; Banerjee, P.; Baranova, N.; Barczyk, T.; Bartoş, D.; Bashir, S.; Basrak, Z.; Baszczyk, M.; Batenkov, O.; Baublis, V.; Baumann, C.; Baznat, M.; Becker, K.-H.; Bel, T.; Belogurov, S.; Bendarouach, J.; Berceanu, I.; Bercuci, A.; Berdermann, E.; Berdnikov, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Berendes, R.; Bergmann, C.; Bertini, D.; Bertini, O.; Beşliu, C.; Bezshyyko, O.; Bhaduri, P. P.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattacharjee, B.; Bhattacharyya, A.; Bhattacharyya, T. K.; Biswas, S.; Blau, D.; Blume, C.; Bocharov, Yu.; Böttger, S.; Borysova, M.; Breitner, T.; Brüning, U.; Brzychczyk, J.; Bubak, A.; Büsching, H.; Bychkov, A.; Byszuk, A.; Cai, Xu; Cãlin, M.; Cao, Ping; Čaplar, R.; Caragheorgheopol, G.; Carević, I.; Cătănescu, V.; Chakrabarti, A.; Chatterji, S.; Chattopadhyay, Sanatan; Chattopadhyay, Subhasis; Chen, Hongfang; Cheng, Jianping; Chepurnov, V.; Chernenko, S.; Chernogorov, A.; Choi, Kyung-Eon; Ciobanu, M. I.; Claus, G.; Constantin, F.; Covlea, V.; Csanád, M.; D'Ascenzo, N.; Das, S.; Davkov, K.; Davkov, V.; de Cuveland, J.; Debnath, B.; Dementiev, D.; Deng, Zhi; Deppe, H.; Deppner, I.; Derenovskaya, O.; Deveaux, C. A.; Deveaux, M.; Dey, K.; Dey, M.; Dillenseger, P.; Dobyrn, V.; Doering, D.; Dorokhov, A.; Drozd, A.; Dubey, A. K.; Dubnichka, S.; Dubnichkova, A.; Dürr, M.; Dulinski, W.; Dutka, L.; Dželalija, M.; Emschermann, D.; Engel, H.; Eremin, V.; Eşanu, T.; Eschke, J.; Eschweiler, D.; Eum, Jongsik; Fan, Huanhuan; Fateev, O.; Filozova, I.; Finogeev, D.; Fischer, P.; Flemming, H.; Frankenfeld, U.; Friese, V.; Friske, E.; Fröhlich, I.; Frühauf, J.; Fülöp, Á.; Gajda, J.; Galatyuk, T.; Galkin, A.; Galkin, V.; Gangopadhyay, G.; García Chávez, C.; Gašparić, I.; Gebelein, J.; Ghosh, P.; Ghosh, S. K.; Goffe, M.; Golinka-Bezshyyko, L.; Golovatyuk, V.; Golovnya, S.; Golovtsov, V.; Golubeva, M.; Golubkov, D.; Gómez Ramírez, A.; Gorbunov, S.; Gorokhov, S.; Gottschalk, D.; Gryboś, P.; Grzeszczuk, A.; Guber, F.; Gudima, K.; Gupta, A.; Gusakov, Yu.; Haldar, A.; Haldar, S.; Hartmann, H.; Hehner, J.; Heidel, K.; Heine, N.; Hellbär, E.; Herghelegiu, A.; Herrmann, N.; Heß, B.; Heuser, J. M.; Himmi, A.; Höhne, C.; Holzmann, R.; Huang, Guangming; Huang, Xinjie; Hutsch, J.; Hutter, D.; Iakovleva, E.; Ierusalimov, A.; Ilgenfritz, E.-M.; Irfan, M.; Ivanov, M.; Ivanov, Valery; Ivanov, Victor; Ivanov, Vladimir; Ivashkin, A.; Jaaskelainen, K.; Jahan, H.; Jain, V.; Jakovlev, V.; Janson, T.; Jipa, A.; Kadenko, I.; Kämpfer, B.; Kalcher, S.; Kalinin, V.; Kampert, K.-H.; Kang, Tae Im; Kaptur, E.; Karabowicz, R.; Karavichev, O.; Karavicheva, T.; Karmanov, D.; Karnaukhov, V.; Karpechev, E.; Kasiński, K.; Kasprowicz, G.; Kaur, M.; Kazantsev, A.; Kebschull, U.; Kekelidze, G.; Khan, M. M.; Khan, S. A.; Khanzadeev, A.; Khasanov, F.; Khvorostukhin, A.; Kirakosyan, V.; Kirejczyk, M.; Kiryakov, A.; Kiš, M.; Kisel, I.; Kisel, P.; Kiselev, S.; Kiss, A.; Kiss, T.; Klaus, P.; Kłeczek, R.; Klein-Bösing, Ch.; Kleipa, V.; Kmon, P.; Koch, K.; Kochenda, L.; Koczoń, P.; König, W.; Kohn, M.; Kolb, B. W.; Kolosova, A.; Komkov, B.; Kopfer, J. M.; Korolev, M.; Korolko, I.; Kotte, R.; Kotynia, A.; Kovalchuk, A.; Kowalski, S.; Koziel, M.; Kozlov, G.; Kravtsov, P.; Krebs, E.; Kreidl, C.; Kresan, D.; Kretschmar, G.; Kretz, M.; Krieger, M.; Kryshen, E.; Kucewicz, W.; Kudin, L.; Kugler, A.; Kulakov, I.; Kunkel, J.; Kurepin, A.; Kurilkin, P.; Kushpil, V.; Kyva, V.; Ladygin, V.; Lara, C.; Larionov, P.; Laso Garcia, A.; Lavrik, E.; Lazanu, I.; Lebedev, A.; Lebedev, S.; Lebedeva, E.; Lehnert, J.; Lehrbach, J.; Lemke, F.; Li, Cheng; Li, Jin; Li, Qiyan; Li, Yuanjing; Li, Yulan; Lindenstruth, V.; Linev, S.; Linnik, B.; Litvinenko, E.; Liu, Feng; Lobanov, I.; Lobanova, E.; Löchner, S.; Loizeau, P.-A.; Lucio Martínez, J. A.; Lymanets, A.; Maevskaya, A.; Mahajan, S.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Mahmoud, T.; Maj, P.; Majka, Z.; Malakhov, A.; Malankin, E.; Malkevich, D.; Malyatina, O.; Malygina, H.; Mandal, S.; Manko, V.; Manz, S.; Marin, V.; Marin Garcia, A. M.; Markert, J.; Masciocchi, S.; Matulewicz, T.; Merkin, M.; Mialkovski, V.; Michel, J.; Miftakhov, N.; Mikhailov, K.; Mikhaylov, V.; Milanović, B.; Militsija, V.; Mir, M. F.; Miskowiec, D.; Morhardt, T.; Müller, W. F. J.; Müntz, C.; Murin, Yu.; Najman, R.; Naumann, L.; Nayak, T.; Nedosekin, A.; Neumann, B.; Niebur, W.; Nikulin, V.; Normanov, D.; Nüssle, M.; Oancea, A.; Oh, Kunsu; Onishchuk, Y.; Osipov, D.; Ososkov, G.; Ossetski, D.; Otfinowski, P.; Ovcharenko, E.; Pal, S.; Panasenko, I.; Panda, N. R.; Parzhitskiy, S.; Pauly, C.; Peng, Haiping; Peric, I.; Peshekhonov, D.; Peshekhonov, V.; Petráček, V.; Petriş, M.; Petrovici, A.; Petrovici, M.; Petrovskiy, A.; Petukhov, O.; Piasecki, K.; Pieper, J.; Pietraszko, J.; Płaneta, R.; Plekhanov, E.; Plotnikov, V.; Plujko, V.; Pluta, J.; Poliakov, V.; Polozov, P.; Pop, A.; Popov, V.; Pospisil, V.; Potukuchi, B. V. K. S.; Pouryamout, J.; Poźniak, K.; Prakash, A.; Prokudin, M.; Pshenichnov, I.; Pugach, M.; Pugatch, V.; Querchfeld, S.; Radulescu, L.; Raha, S.; Raja, W.; Rami, F.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Raportirenko, A.; Rautenberg, J.; Rauza, J.; Ray, R.; Razin, S.; Reichelt, P.; Reinecke, S.; Reshetin, A.; Ristea, C.; Ristea, O.; Roether, F.; Romaniuk, R.; Rost, A.; Rostchin, E.; Rostovtseva, I.; Roy, A.; Rożynek, J.; Ryabov, Yu.; Rykalin, V.; Sadovsky, A.; Sadovsky, S.; Sahoo, R.; Sahu, P. K.; Saini, J.; Samanta, S.; Sambyal, S. S.; Samsonov, V.; Sánchez Rosado, J.; Sau, S.; Saveliev, V.; Schatral, S.; Schiaua, C.; Schmidt, C. J.; Schmidt, H. R.; Schmidt, K.; Schweda, K.; Scurtu, A.; Seck, F.; Seddiki, S.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Semennikov, A.; Senger, A.; Senger, P.; Shabunov, A.; Shao, Ming; Sharma, M. K.; Shumeiko, N.; Shumikhin, V.; Sikora, B.; Simakov, A.; Simon, C.; Simons, C.; Singaraju, R. N.; Singh, A. K.; Singh, B. K.; Singh, C. P.; Singhal, V.; Siwek-Wilczyńska, K.; Škoda, L.; Skwira-Chalot, I.; Som, I.; Song, Jihye; Sorokin, I.; Sosin, Z.; Soyk, D.; Staszel, P.; Stavinskiy, A.; Stephan, E.; Storozhyk, D.; Strikhanov, M.; Strohauer, S.; Stroth, J.; Sturm, C.; Sultanov, R.; Sun, Yongjie; Svoboda, O.; Szczygieł, R.; Talukdar, R.; Tang, Zebo; Tanha, M.; Tarasiuk, J.; Tarassenkova, O.; Târzilă, M.-G.; Tiflov, V.; Tischler, T.; Tlustý, P.; Toia, A.; Tolyhi, T.; Topil'skaya, N.; Trageser, C.; Trivedy, P.; Tsakov, I.; Tsyupa, Yu.; Turowiecki, A.; Uhlig, F.; Usenko, E.; Valin, I.; Vasiliev, T.; Vassiliev, I.; Verbitskaya, E.; Verhoeven, W.; Veshikov, A.; Visinka, R.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Volkov, S.; Volkov, Yu.; Vorobiev, A.; Voronin, A.; Vovchenko, V.; Vznuzdaev, E.; Vznuzdaev, M.; Wang, Dong; Wang, Yaping; Yi, Wang; Wendisch, C.; Wessels, J. P.; Wiebusch, M.; Wiechula, J.; Wiedemann, B.; Wielanek, D.; Wieloch, A.; Winckler, N.; Winter, M.; Wiśniewski, K.; Wohlfeld, D.; Wolf, Gy.; Sanguk, Won; Wüstenfeld, J.; Xiang, Changzhou; Nu, Xu; Yi, Jun-Gyu; Yin, Zhongbao; Yoo, In-Kwon; Yue, Qian; Yuldashev, B.; Yushmanov, I.; Zabołotny, W.; Zaitsev, Yu.; Zanevsky, Yu.; Zhalov, M.; Zhang, Ya Peng; Zhang, Yifei; Zhou, Daicui; Zhu, Xianglei; Zinchenko, A.; Zipper, W.; Żoładź, M.; Zrelov, P.; Zryuev, V.; Zumbruch, P.; Zyzak, M.

    2014-11-01

    We acknowledge support by the Seventh Framework Programme (FP7) of the European Commission through projects AIDA, CRISP and HadronPhysics3; the Bundesministerium für Bildung und Forschung, Germany, through the grants 05P09PXFC5, 05P12PXFCE, 05P12RFFC7, 05P12RFFCM, 05P12RFFCP, 05P12RGFCG,05P12RGGHM, 05P12VHFCE, 05P12VHFCF, 05PRVHFC7, and 06HD9123I; the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft, Germany, grant GRK 1039; the Hessian Loewe Initiative through the Helmholtz International Center for FAIR (HIC4FAIR); the Helmholtz Graduate School HIRe; the Helmholtz Research School H-QM; the GSI Helmholzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung mbH, Germany, through F&E cooperations with Goethe-Universität Frankfurt, Justus-Liebig-Universität Gießen and Bergische Universität Wuppertal (WKAMPE1012); the Department of Science and Technology, Government of India; the Department of Atomic Energy, Government of India; the Council of Scientific and Industrial Research, Government of India; the University Grants Commission, Government of India; the Indo-FAIR Co-ordination Centre, Bose Institute, Kolkata, India; the Strategic Grants POSDRU/89/1.5/S/58852 and PN-II-ID-PCE-IDEI 34/05.10.2011, Romania; the NASR/CAPACITATI-Modul III, Romania, contract nr. 179EU; the NASR/NUCLEU Project PN09370103, Romania; the FAIR Russia Research Center (FRRC), Russia; and the Federal Agency for Atomic Research (Rosatom), Russia.

  19. Self-citation: comparison between Radiología, European Radiology and Radiology for 1997-1998.

    PubMed

    Miguel, Alberto; Martí-Bonmatí, Luis

    2002-01-01

    Self-citation, considered as the number of times a paper cites other papers in the same journal, is an important criteria of journal quality. Our objective is to evaluate the self-citation in the official journal of the Spanish Society of Radiology (Radiología), and to compare it with the European Radiology and Radiology journals. Papers published in Radiología, European Radiology, and Radiology during 1997 and 1998 were analyzed. The Self Citation Index, considered as the ratio between self-references and total number of references per article, for the journals Radiología (SCIR), European Radiology (SCIER), and Radiology (SCIRY), were obtained and expressed as percentages. Also, the number of references to Radiología in European Radiology and Radiology papers were calculated. Stratification of the index per thematic area and article type was also performed. Mean SCIR, SCIER, and SCIRY values were compared with the ANOVA and the Student-Newman-Keuls tests. The self-citation index was statistically higher in Radiology (23.2%; p<0.0001) than in Radiología (1.8%) and European Radiology (0.8%). There were no statistically significant differences between SCIR and SCIER indexes ( p=0.25). In the stratification per thematic areas and article type, self-citation in Radiology was statistically higher ( p<0.0001), with the only exception of "Radioprotection" area ( p=0.2), to SCIR and SCIER. Although there were no statistically significant differences, by thematic areas SCIR was always larger than SCIER, with the only exception of the "Genitourinary imaging" area, and by article type SCIR also went greater to SCIER, except in review articles. Radiología, The Spanish official radiological journal, although not included in Index Medicus and its database Medline, had a larger number of self-citing than European Radiology in the period 1997-1998.

  20. Environmental Tools and Radiological Assessment

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation details two tools (SADA and FRAMES) available for use in environmental assessments of chemicals that can also be used for radiological assessments of the environment. Spatial Analysis and Decision Assistance (SADA) is a Windows freeware program that incorporate...

  1. The Radiological Research Accelerator Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, E.J.

    1992-05-01

    The Radiological Research Accelerator Facility (RARAF) is based on a 4-MV Van de Graaff accelerator, which is used to generate a variety of well-characterized radiation beams for research in radiobiology, radiological physics, and radiation chemistry. It is part of the Center for Radiological Research (CRR) -- formerly the Radiological Research Laboratory (RRL) -- of Columbia University, and its operation is supported as a National Facility by the US Department of Energy (DOE). As such, RARAF is available to all potential users on an equal basis, and scientists outside the CRR are encouraged to submit proposals for experiments at RARAF. The operation of the Van de Graaff is supported by the DOE, but the research projects themselves must be supported separately. Experiments performed from May 1991--April 1992 are described.

  2. The Radiological Research Accelerator Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, E.J.; Marino, S.A.

    1993-05-01

    The Radiological Research Accelerator Facility (RARAF) is based on a 4-MV Van de Graaff accelerator, which is used to generate a variety of well-characterized radiation beams for research in radiobiology, radiological physics, and radiation chemistry. It is part of the Center for Radiological Research (CRR) - formerly the Radiological Research Laboratory of Columbia University, and its operation is supported as a National Facility by the US Department of Energy (DOE). As such, RARAF is available to all potential users on an equal basis and scientists outside the CRR are encouraged to submit proposals for experiments at RARAF. The operation of the Van de Graaff is supported by the DOE, but the research projects themselves must be supported separately. This report provides a listing and brief description of experiments performed at RARAF during the May 1, 1992 through April 30, 1993.

  3. Estimate Radiological Dose for Animals

    1997-12-18

    Estimate Radiological dose for animals in ecological environment using open literature values for parameters such as body weight, plant and soil ingestion rate, rad. halflife, absorbed energy, biological halflife, gamma energy per decay, soil-to-plant transfer factor, ...etc

  4. Education and training for radiation scientists: radiation research program and American Society of Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology Workshop, Bethesda, Maryland, May 12-14, 2003.

    PubMed

    Coleman, C Norman; Stone, Helen B; Alexander, George A; Barcellos-Hoff, Mary Helen; Bedford, Joel S; Bristow, Robert G; Dynlacht, Joseph R; Fuks, Zvi; Gorelic, Lester S; Hill, Richard P; Joiner, Michael C; Liu, Fei-Fei; McBride, William H; McKenna, W Gillies; Powell, Simon N; Robbins, Michael E C; Rockwell, Sara; Schiff, Peter B; Shaw, Edward G; Siemann, Dietmar W; Travis, Elizabeth L; Wallner, Paul E; Wong, Rosemary S L; Zeman, Elaine M

    2003-12-01

    Current and potential shortfalls in the number of radiation scientists stand in sharp contrast to the emerging scientific opportunities and the need for new knowledge to address issues of cancer survivorship and radiological and nuclear terrorism. In response to these challenges, workshops organized by the Radiation Research Program (RRP), National Cancer Institute (NCI) (Radiat. Res. 157, 204-223, 2002; Radiat. Res. 159, 812-834, 2003), and National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) (Nature, 421, 787, 2003) have engaged experts from a range of federal agencies, academia and industry. This workshop, Education and Training for Radiation Scientists, addressed the need to establish a sustainable pool of expertise and talent for a wide range of activities and careers related to radiation biology, oncology and epidemiology. Although fundamental radiation chemistry and physics are also critical to radiation sciences, this workshop did not address workforce needs in these areas. The recommendations include: (1) Establish a National Council of Radiation Sciences to develop a strategy for increasing the number of radiation scientists. The strategy includes NIH training grants, interagency cooperation, interinstitutional collaboration among universities, and active involvement of all stakeholders. (2) Create new and expanded training programs with sustained funding. These may take the form of regional Centers of Excellence for Radiation Sciences. (3) Continue and broaden educational efforts of the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (ASTRO), the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR), the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA), and the Radiation Research Society (RRS). (4) Foster education and training in the radiation sciences for the range of career opportunities including radiation oncology, radiation biology, radiation epidemiology, radiation safety, health/government policy, and industrial research. (5) Educate other

  5. Education and training for radiation scientists: radiation research program and American Society of Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology Workshop, Bethesda, Maryland, May 12-14, 2003.

    PubMed

    Coleman, C Norman; Stone, Helen B; Alexander, George A; Barcellos-Hoff, Mary Helen; Bedford, Joel S; Bristow, Robert G; Dynlacht, Joseph R; Fuks, Zvi; Gorelic, Lester S; Hill, Richard P; Joiner, Michael C; Liu, Fei-Fei; McBride, William H; McKenna, W Gillies; Powell, Simon N; Robbins, Michael E C; Rockwell, Sara; Schiff, Peter B; Shaw, Edward G; Siemann, Dietmar W; Travis, Elizabeth L; Wallner, Paul E; Wong, Rosemary S L; Zeman, Elaine M

    2003-12-01

    Current and potential shortfalls in the number of radiation scientists stand in sharp contrast to the emerging scientific opportunities and the need for new knowledge to address issues of cancer survivorship and radiological and nuclear terrorism. In response to these challenges, workshops organized by the Radiation Research Program (RRP), National Cancer Institute (NCI) (Radiat. Res. 157, 204-223, 2002; Radiat. Res. 159, 812-834, 2003), and National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) (Nature, 421, 787, 2003) have engaged experts from a range of federal agencies, academia and industry. This workshop, Education and Training for Radiation Scientists, addressed the need to establish a sustainable pool of expertise and talent for a wide range of activities and careers related to radiation biology, oncology and epidemiology. Although fundamental radiation chemistry and physics are also critical to radiation sciences, this workshop did not address workforce needs in these areas. The recommendations include: (1) Establish a National Council of Radiation Sciences to develop a strategy for increasing the number of radiation scientists. The strategy includes NIH training grants, interagency cooperation, interinstitutional collaboration among universities, and active involvement of all stakeholders. (2) Create new and expanded training programs with sustained funding. These may take the form of regional Centers of Excellence for Radiation Sciences. (3) Continue and broaden educational efforts of the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (ASTRO), the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR), the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA), and the Radiation Research Society (RRS). (4) Foster education and training in the radiation sciences for the range of career opportunities including radiation oncology, radiation biology, radiation epidemiology, radiation safety, health/government policy, and industrial research. (5) Educate other

  6. Radiological design guide

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, R.A.

    1994-08-16

    The purpose of this design guide is to provide radiological safety requirements, standards, and information necessary for designing facilities that will operate without unacceptable risk to personnel, the public, or the environment as required by the US Department of Energy (DOE). This design guide, together with WHC-CM-4-29, Nuclear Criticality Safety, WHC-CM-4-46, Nonreactor Facility Safety Analysis, and WHC-CM-7-5, Environmental Compliance, covers the radiation safety design requirements at Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC). This design guide applies to the design of all new facilities. The WHC organization with line responsibility for design shall determine to what extent this design guide shall apply to the modifications to existing facilities. In making this determination, consideration shall include a cost versus benefit study. Specifically, facilities that store, handle, or process radioactive materials will be covered. This design guide replaces WHC-CM-4-9 and is designated a living document. This design guide is intended for design purposes only. Design criteria are different from operational criteria and often more stringent. Criteria that might be acceptable for operations might not be adequate for design.

  7. [Controlling in outpatient radiology].

    PubMed

    Baum, T

    2015-12-01

    Radiology is among the medical disciplines which require the highest investment costs in the healthcare system. The need to design efficient workflows to ensure maximum utilization of the equipment has long been known. In order to be able to establish a sound financial plan prior to a project or equipment purchase, the costs of an examination have to be broken down by modality and compared with the reimbursement rates. Obviously, the same holds true for operative decisions when scarce human resources have to be allocated. It is the task of controlling to review the economic viability of the different modalities and ideally, the results are incorporated into the management decision-making processes. The main section of this article looks at the recognition and allocation of direct and indirect costs in a medical center (Medizinisches Versorgungszentrum - MVZ) in the German North Rhine region. The profit contribution of each examination is determined by deducting the costs from the income generated by the treatment of patients with either private or statutory health insurance. PMID:26538134

  8. Radiological Control Manual. Revision 0, January 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-04-01

    This manual has been prepared by Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory to provide guidance for site-specific additions, supplements, and clarifications to the DOE Radiological Control Manual. The guidance provided in this manual is based on the requirements given in Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations Part 835, Radiation Protection for Occupational Workers, DOE Order 5480.11, Radiation Protection for Occupational Workers, and the DOE Radiological Control Manual. The topics covered are (1) excellence in radiological control, (2) radiological standards, (3) conduct of radiological work, (4) radioactive materials, (5) radiological health support operations, (6) training and qualification, and (7) radiological records.

  9. Radiological training for tritium facilities

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-01

    This program management guide describes a recommended implementation standard for core training as outlined in the DOE Radiological Control Manual (RCM). The standard is to assist those individuals, both within DOE and Managing and Operating contractors, identified as having responsibility for implementing the core training recommended by the RCM. This training may also be given to radiological workers using tritium to assist in meeting their job specific training requirements of 10 CFR 835.

  10. Radiological emergency preparedness (REP) program

    SciTech Connect

    Kwiatkowski, D.H.

    1995-12-31

    This talk focuses on the accomplishments of Radiological Emergency Preparedness Program. Major topics include the following: strengthening the partnership between FEMA, the States, and the Industry; the Standard Exercise Report Format (SERF); Multi-year performance partnership agreement (MYPPA); new REP Program guidance; comprehensive exercise program; federal radiological emergency response plan (FRERP); international interest; REP user fee; implementation EPA PAGs and Dose Limits; Contamination monitoring standard for portal monitors; guidance documents and training.

  11. Financial accounting for radiology executives.

    PubMed

    Seidmann, Abraham; Mehta, Tushar

    2005-03-01

    The authors review the role of financial accounting information from the perspective of a radiology executive. They begin by introducing the role of pro forma statements. They discuss the fundamental concepts of accounting, including the matching principle and accrual accounting. The authors then explore the use of financial accounting information in making investment decisions in diagnostic medical imaging. The paper focuses on critically evaluating the benefits and limitations of financial accounting for decision making in a radiology practice.

  12. FDH radiological design review guidelines

    SciTech Connect

    Millsap, W.J.

    1998-09-29

    These guidelines discuss in more detail the radiological design review process used by the Project Hanford Management Contractors as described in HNF-PRO-1622, Radiological Design Review Process. They are intended to supplement the procedure by providing background information on the design review process and providing a ready source of information to design reviewers. The guidelines are not intended to contain all the information in the procedure, but at points, in order to maintain continuity, they contain some of the same information.

  13. Radiology of congenital heart disease

    SciTech Connect

    Amplatz, K.

    1986-01-01

    This is a text on the radiologic diagnosis of congenital heart disease and its clinical manifestations. The main thrust of the book is the logical approach which allows an understanding of the complex theory of congenital heart disease. The atlas gives a concise overview of the entire field of congenital heart disease. Emphasis is placed on the understanding of the pathophysiology and its clinical and radiological consequences. Surgical treatment is included since it provides a different viewpoint of the anatomy.

  14. Academic Radiology in the New Healthcare Delivery Environment

    PubMed Central

    Qayyum, Aliya; Yu, John-Paul J.; Kansagra, Akash P.; von Fischer, Nathaniel; Costa, Daniel; Heller, Matthew; Kantartzis, Stamatis; Plowman, R. Scooter; Itri, Jason

    2014-01-01

    Ongoing concerns over the rising cost of health care are driving large-scale changes in the way that health care is practiced and reimbursed in the United States. To effectively implement and thrive within this new health care delivery environment, academic medical institutions will need to modify financial and business models and adapt institutional cultures. In this paper, we review the expected features of the new health care environment from the perspective of academic radiology departments. Our review will include background on Accountable Care Organizations, identify challenges associated with the new managed care model, and outline key strategies—including expanding the use of existing information technology infrastructure, promoting continued medical innovation, balancing academic research with clinical care, and exploring new roles for radiologists in efficient patient management—that will ensure continued success for academic radiology. PMID:24200477

  15. Network Collaboration with UNIX.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horn, Wm. Dennis

    1993-01-01

    Discusses networking as a collaboration tool in the teaching of technical writing. Argues that some degree of collaboration is innate to all writing, that word processing already facilitates that collaboration, and that networking is the next enhancement to the collaborative process. (RS)

  16. Areas for US-India civilian nuclear cooperation to prevent/mitigate radiological events.

    SciTech Connect

    Balachandran, Gopalan; Forden, Geoffrey Ethan

    2013-01-01

    Over the decades, India and the United States have had very little formal collaboration on nuclear issues. Partly this was because neither country needed collaboration to make progress in the nuclear field. But it was also due, in part, to the concerns both countries had about the others intentions. Now that the U.S.-India Deal on nuclear collaboration has been signed and the Hyde Act passed in the United States, it is possible to recognize that both countries can benefit from such nuclear collaboration, especially if it starts with issues important to both countries that do not touch on strategic systems. Fortunately, there are many noncontroversial areas for collaboration. This study, funded by the U.S. State Department, has identified a number of areas in the prevention of and response to radiological incidents where such collaboration could take place.

  17. Joint Genome Institute's Automation Approach and History

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, Simon

    2006-07-05

    Department of Energy/Joint Genome Institute (DOE/JGI) collaborates with DOE national laboratories and community users, to advance genome science in support of the DOE missions of clean bio-energy, carbon cycling, and bioremediation.

  18. Interorganizational collaboration in public health data sharing.

    PubMed

    Casey, Colleen; Li, Jianling; Berry, Michele

    2016-09-19

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to analyze the institutional and social forces that influence collaborative data sharing practices in cross-sector interorganizational networks. The analysis focusses on the data sharing practices between professionals in the transportation and public health sectors, areas prioritized for collaborative action to improve public health. Design/methodology/approach A mixed methods design is utilized. Electronic surveys were sent to 57 public health and 157 transportation professionals in a large major metropolitan area in the USA (response rate 39.7 percent). Focus groups were held with 12 organizational leaders representing professionals in both sectors. Findings The application of the institutional-social capital framework suggests that professional specialization and organizational forces make it challenging for professionals to develop the cross-sector relationships necessary for cross-sector collaborative data sharing. Research limitations/implications The findings suggest that developing the social relationships necessary for cross-sector collaboration may be resource intensive. Investments are necessary at the organizational level to overcome the professional divides that limit the development of cross-sector relationships critical for collaborative data sharing. The results are limited to the data sharing practices of professionals in one metropolitan area. Originality/value Despite mandates and calls for increased cross-sector collaboration to improve public health, such efforts often fail to produce true collaboration. The study's value is that it adds to the theoretical conceptualization of collaboration and provides a deeper understanding as to why collaborative action remains difficult to achieve. Future study of collaboration must consider the interaction between professional specialization and the social relationships necessary for success.

  19. Interorganizational collaboration in public health data sharing.

    PubMed

    Casey, Colleen; Li, Jianling; Berry, Michele

    2016-09-19

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to analyze the institutional and social forces that influence collaborative data sharing practices in cross-sector interorganizational networks. The analysis focusses on the data sharing practices between professionals in the transportation and public health sectors, areas prioritized for collaborative action to improve public health. Design/methodology/approach A mixed methods design is utilized. Electronic surveys were sent to 57 public health and 157 transportation professionals in a large major metropolitan area in the USA (response rate 39.7 percent). Focus groups were held with 12 organizational leaders representing professionals in both sectors. Findings The application of the institutional-social capital framework suggests that professional specialization and organizational forces make it challenging for professionals to develop the cross-sector relationships necessary for cross-sector collaborative data sharing. Research limitations/implications The findings suggest that developing the social relationships necessary for cross-sector collaboration may be resource intensive. Investments are necessary at the organizational level to overcome the professional divides that limit the development of cross-sector relationships critical for collaborative data sharing. The results are limited to the data sharing practices of professionals in one metropolitan area. Originality/value Despite mandates and calls for increased cross-sector collaboration to improve public health, such efforts often fail to produce true collaboration. The study's value is that it adds to the theoretical conceptualization of collaboration and provides a deeper understanding as to why collaborative action remains difficult to achieve. Future study of collaboration must consider the interaction between professional specialization and the social relationships necessary for success. PMID:27681021

  20. Radiological modeling software for underground uranium mines

    SciTech Connect

    Bjorndal, B.; Moridi, R.

    1999-07-01

    The Canadian Institute for Radiation Safety (CAIRS) has developed computer simulation software for modeling radiological parameters in underground uranium mines. The computer program, called 3d RAD, allows radiation protection professionals and mine ventilation engineers to quickly simulate radon and radon progeny activity concentrations and potential alpha energy concentrations in complex mine networks. The simulation component of 3d RAD, called RSOLVER, is an adaptation of an existing modeling program called VENTRAD, originally developed at Queen's University, Ontario. Based on user defined radiation source terms and network physical properties, radiological parameters in the network are calculated iteratively by solving Bateman's Equations in differential form. The 3d RAD user interface was designed in cooperation with the Canada Centre for Mineral and Energy Technology (CANMET) to improve program functionality and to make 3d RAD compatible with the CANMET ventilation simulation program, 3d CANVENT. The 3d RAD program was tested using physical data collected in Canadian uranium mines. 3d RAD predictions were found to agree well with theoretical calculations and simulation results obtained from other modeling programs such as VENTRAD. Agreement with measured radon and radon progeny levels was also observed. However, the level of agreement was found to depend heavily on the precision of source term data, and on the measurement protocol used to collect radon and radon progeny levels for comparison with the simulation results. The design and development of 3d RAD was carried out under contract with the Saskatchewan government.

  1. Radiology practice models: the 2008 ACR Forum.

    PubMed

    Gunderman, Richard B; Weinreb, Jeffrey C; Van Moore, Arl; Hillman, Bruce J; Neiman, Harvey L; Thrall, James H

    2008-09-01

    The 2008 ACR Forum brought together a diverse group of participants from clinical radiology, radiology leadership and practice management, managed care, economics, law, and entrepreneurship in Washington, DC, in January 2008 to discuss current models of radiology practice and anticipate new ones. It addressed what forces shape the practice of radiology, how these forces are changing, and how radiology practices can most effectively respond to them in the future.

  2. Radiological digital teaching file development: an overview.

    PubMed

    Scarsbrook, A F; Foley, P T; Perriss, R W; Graham, R N J

    2005-08-01

    Radiologists are collectors of interesting films for teaching purposes or for use in presentations and publications. Traditionally, hard copies of films have been stored in an organized fashion, usually in a filing cabinet or film library. This system has inherent limitations, such as the physical space required. Many of the shortcomings can be circumvented by development of an electronic teaching file. Whereas the implementation of an institutional radiological digital image database can require significant developmental effort and programming expertise, there are a number of web-based solutions which are freely available and can be relatively easily employed to establish a contemporary electronic image library. This article will review the various options and discuss the process of developing a digital image database.

  3. DOE standard: Radiological control

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1999-07-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has developed this Standard to assist line managers in meeting their responsibilities for implementing occupational radiological control programs. DOE has established regulatory requirements for occupational radiation protection in Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations, Part 835 (10 CFR 835), ``Occupational Radiation Protection``. Failure to comply with these requirements may lead to appropriate enforcement actions as authorized under the Price Anderson Act Amendments (PAAA). While this Standard does not establish requirements, it does restate, paraphrase, or cite many (but not all) of the requirements of 10 CFR 835 and related documents (e.g., occupational safety and health, hazardous materials transportation, and environmental protection standards). Because of the wide range of activities undertaken by DOE and the varying requirements affecting these activities, DOE does not believe that it would be practical or useful to identify and reproduce the entire range of health and safety requirements in this Standard and therefore has not done so. In all cases, DOE cautions the user to review any underlying regulatory and contractual requirements and the primary guidance documents in their original context to ensure that the site program is adequate to ensure continuing compliance with the applicable requirements. To assist its operating entities in achieving and maintaining compliance with the requirements of 10 CFR 835, DOE has established its primary regulatory guidance in the DOE G 441.1 series of Guides. This Standard supplements the DOE G 441.1 series of Guides and serves as a secondary source of guidance for achieving compliance with 10 CFR 835.

  4. AQUATIC ECOSYSTEM PROTECTION AND FISHERIES MANAGEMENT IN THE MID-ATLANTIC HIGHLANDS (USA) USING WHAT IF: A COLLABORATION OF THE CANAAN VALLEY INSTITUTE, THE OFFICE OF RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT AND REGION III

    EPA Science Inventory

    As described in its Highlands Action Program, the Canaan Valley Institute (CVI) partnered with the US EPA to develop a watershed assessment and management tool that allows managers to evaluate riparian restoration actions to improve instream habitat quality and aquatic community ...

  5. Institution Closures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayden, Mary F., Ed.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    This newsletter theme issue focuses on the need to accelerate the closing of institutions for people with mental retardation. Articles are by both current and former residents of institutions and by professionals, and include: "The Realities of Institutions" (Tia Nelis); "I Cry Out So That I Won't Go Insane" (Mary F. Hayden); "Trends in…

  6. The logic of collaboration in education and the human services.

    PubMed

    Lawson, Hal

    2004-08-01

    Collaboration is a complex intervention with multiple components. It is both a process innovation and a product innovation, and it entails institutional development and change. These and other defining features implicate its contingencies. For example, collaboration is tailor made for needs, problems, and opportunities that manifest novelty, complexity, uncertainty, and interdependent relationships. Contingencies like these signal important constraints. For example, collaboration exacts steep transaction costs. Its potential benefits justify these costs and serve as incentives for its development. In fact, collaboration may be a defining feature of competent and optimal practice, and the failure to collaborate may be indicative of negligence and malpractice. PMID:15369966

  7. Library Collaboration Aids Global Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hicks, G. J.; Howard, A. L.; Sommer, S.

    2005-12-01

    In the geosciences, organizational libraries and information centers are local sources for scientists, students, and members of the general public who are searching for current or historic information in their fields. They offer focused collections, rare materials, and knowledgeable librarians, but often issues caused by isolation and limited resources impede their ability to fulfill the researchers' needs. Unlike the local university libraries, these small special information centers are usually housed in the same building as their scientists' offices. To help overcome these problems of limited resources and isolation, while retaining the organizational focus and unique collections that are its strengths, the National Snow & Ice Data Center (NSIDC) Information Center has begun to collaborate with similar libraries and information centers. This project has three major steps: 1. Catalog sharing through internet-based links. 2. Resource sharing. 3. Expansion of collaboration. NSIDC is creating catalog links with a sister library, the Institute of Arctic and Alpine Research (INSTAAR) Information Center. Once the links are established, the two libraries will develop a plan for resource sharing and coordinated purchasing. This small collaborative effort will serve as a template for a network of special libraries within Colorado. Ultimately, they hope to expand the collaborative effort to small libraries with a similar focus around the globe. This poster will outline and graphically illustrate these steps, as well as provide a template for future expansion of the project.

  8. A comparative analysis of radiological and surgical placement of central venous catheters

    SciTech Connect

    McBride, Kieran D.; Fisher, Ross; Warnock, Neil; Winfield, David A.; Reed, Malcolm W.; Gaines, Peter A.

    1997-01-15

    Purpose. To compare the differences in practice and outcome of all radiologically and surgically placed central venous catheters retrospectively over a 2-year period simultaneously, at a single institution. Methods.A total of 253 Hickman catheters were inserted in 209 patients; 120 were placed radiologically in 102 patients and 133 were placed surgically in 107 patients. The indication was chemotherapy in 76% of radiological and in 47% of surgical cases; the remainder were for total parenteral nutrition and venous access. Results. There were 6 (4.5%) primary surgical failures and a further 17 (13%) surgical cases requiring multiple placement attempts. Pneumothorax occurred once (0.8%) surgically and four times (3.3%) radiologically. There were no radiological primary misplacements but there were five (3.7%) surgical ones. Catheter or central vein thrombosis occurred in four (3.3%) radiological and five (3.7%) surgical cases. The rate of infection per 1000 catheter-days was 1.9 in radiologically placed catheters and 4.0 in surgically placed ones (p<0.001). Average catheter life-span was similar for the two placement methods (100{+-}23 days). Conclusion. Radiological placement is consistently more reliable than surgical placement. There are fewer placement complications and fewer catheter infections overall.

  9. A web-based flexible communication system in radiology.

    PubMed

    Rybkin, Alexander Valentine; Wilson, Mark

    2011-10-01

    A web-based system for rapid multidirectional communication has been created in the Radiology department at San Francisco General Hospital. The system allows messaging among radiology attendings, residents, and technologists, as well as other members of the hospital community, such as Emergency Department physicians and nurses. Instead of being tied to a particular workflow, this system provides a flexible communication infrastructure which can be easily adapted for different functions and user roles. The system has so far been configured to successfully support the standard "wet reading" workflow, to support marking and tracking of critical results, as well as multiple educational and quality improvement workflows. In the 19 months of operation, the system has gained over 1,800 users (virtually all providers at our institution), it has been accessed by radiologists over 39,000 times and by non-radiologists over 34,000 times. It has become an integral part of the radiology department operations and non-radiology clinical workflows. Unlike most existing softwares, our system is not a task-specific application, but a multipurpose communication system. It is able to effectively accommodate multiple workflows and user roles through configuration (without additional programming). This flexibility has helped this system to be rapidly and widely adopted within our enterprise. The extended reach of the system enables improved monitoring and documentation of workflows, helping with management decision making, and quality assurance. We report a successful radiology communication system based on the principles of flexibility and inclusiveness of users inside and outside the radiology department.

  10. Improving Communication of Diagnostic Radiology Findings through Structured Reporting

    PubMed Central

    Panicek, David M.; Berk, Alexandra R.; Li, Yuelin; Hricak, Hedvig

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the content, clarity, and clinical usefulness of conventional (ie, free-form) and structured radiology reports of body computed tomographic (CT) scans, as evaluated by referring physicians, attending radiologists, and radiology fellows at a tertiary care cancer center. Materials and Methods: The institutional review board approved the study as a quality improvement initiative; no written consent was required. Three radiologists, three radiology fellows, three surgeons, and two medical oncologists evaluated 330 randomly selected conventional and structured radiology reports of body CT scans. For nonradiologists, reports were randomly selected from patients with diagnoses relevant to the physician’s area of specialization. Each physician read 15 reports in each format and rated both the content and clarity of each report from 1 (very dissatisfied or very confusing) to 10 (very satisfied or very clear). By using a previously published radiology report grading scale, physicians graded each report’s effectiveness in advancing the patient’s position on the clinical spectrum. Mixed-effects models were used to test differences between report types. Results: Mean content satisfaction ratings were 7.61 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 7.12, 8.16) for conventional reports and 8.33 (95% CI: 7.82, 8.86) for structured reports, and the difference was significant (P < .0001). Mean clarity satisfaction ratings were 7.45 (95% CI: 6.89, 8.02) for conventional reports and 8.25 (95% CI: 7.68, 8.82) for structured reports, and the difference was significant (P < .0001). Grade ratings did not differ significantly between conventional and structured reports. Conclusion: Referring clinicians and radiologists found that structured reports had better content and greater clarity than conventional reports. © RSNA, 2011 Supplemental material: http://radiology.rsna.org/lookup/suppl/doi:10.1148/radiol.11101913/-/DC1 PMID:21518775

  11. 75 FR 29773 - National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-27

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney... Kidney Diseases Special Emphasis Panel, Collaborative Interdisciplinary Team Science--Nuclear Receptors... Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases Special Emphasis Panel, Metabolic Disease...

  12. White paper report of the 2012 RAD-AID Conference on International Radiology for Developing Countries: planning the implementation of global radiology.

    PubMed

    Mollura, Daniel J; Mazal, Jonathan; Everton, Kathryn L; Azene, Ezana M; Collaros, Phelosha; Dabek, Filip; DeStigter, Kristen K; El-Shayal, Tarek S; Garra, Brian S; Gill, Tariq; Hayes, Carrie; Iosifescu, Sarah; Jimenez, Pablo; Khandelwal, Niranjan; Kenney, Philip; Lexa, Frank; Lewin, Jonathan S; Lungren, Matthew P; Mayo-Smith, William; Medlen, Kayiba; Nordvig, Anna S; O'Hara-Rusckowski, Deborah; Quansah, Seth; Silfen, Eric; Singh, Tulika; Sydnor, Ryan; Tahvildari, Ali; Teninty, Bill; Timmreck, Emily J; Watson, Liana

    2013-08-01

    The RAD-AID Conference on International Radiology for Developing Countries is a yearly forum addressing global shortages of radiology that contribute to health care disparity. In this paper, the authors present key issues and consensus positions related to the planning, analyzing, implementing, and monitoring of radiology in limited-resource areas on the basis of presentations at the 2012 RAD-AID conference, to advocate for (1) economic development to build health care capacity, (2) multidisciplinary educational strategies, (3) innovative epidemiologic and infrastructural solutions tailored to community needs, (4) advanced technical solutions leveraging the widespread use of wireless telecommunications and phone-based portable devices, and (5) improved dialog across radiology and public health institutions for coordinating global health strategies. PMID:23583085

  13. Radiological impacts of phosphogypsum.

    PubMed

    Al Attar, Lina; Al-Oudat, Mohammad; Kanakri, Salwa; Budeir, Youssef; Khalily, Hussam; Al Hamwi, Ahmad

    2011-09-01

    This study was carried out to assess the radiological impact of Syrian phosphogypsum (PG) piles in the compartments of the surrounding ecosystem. Estimating the distribution of naturally occurring radionuclides (i.e. (226)Ra, (238)U, (232)Th, (210)Po and (210)Pb) in the raw materials, product and by-product of the Syrian phosphate fertilizer industry was essential. The data revealed that the concentrations of the radionuclides were enhanced in the treated phosphate ore. In PG, (226)Ra content had a mean activity of 318 Bq kg(-1). The uranium content in PG was low, ca. 33 Bq kg(-1), because uranium remained in the phosphoric acid produced. Over 80% of (232)Th, (210)Po and (210)Pb present partitioned in PG. The presence of PG piles did not increase significantly the concentration of (222)Rn or gamma rays exposure dose in the area studied. The annual effective dose was only 0.082 mSv y(-1). The geometric mean of total suspended air particulates (TSP) ca. 85 μg m(-3). The activity concentration of the radionuclides in filtrates and runoff waters were below the detection limits (ca. 0.15 mBq L(-1) for (238)U, 0.1 mBq L(-1) for (232)Th and 0.18 mBq L(-1) for both of (210)Po and (210)Pb); the concentration of the radionuclides in ground water samples and Qattina Lake were less than the permissible limits set for drinking water by the World Health Organisation, WHO, (10, 1 and 0.1 Bq L(-1) for (238)U, (232)Th and both of (210)Po and (210)Pb, respectively). Eastern sites soil samples of PG piles recorded the highest activity concentrations, i.e. 26, 33, 28, 61 and 40 Bq kg(-1) for (226)Ra, (238)U, (232)Th, (210)Po and (210)Pb, respectively, due to the prevailing western and north-western wind in the area, but remained within the natural levels reported in Syrian soil (13-32 Bq kg(-1) for (226)Ra, 24.9-62.2 Bq kg(-1) for (238)U and 10-32 Bq kg(-1) for (232)Th). The impact of PG piles on plants varied upon the plant species. Higher concentrations of the radionuclides were

  14. Radiological impacts of phosphogypsum.

    PubMed

    Al Attar, Lina; Al-Oudat, Mohammad; Kanakri, Salwa; Budeir, Youssef; Khalily, Hussam; Al Hamwi, Ahmad

    2011-09-01

    This study was carried out to assess the radiological impact of Syrian phosphogypsum (PG) piles in the compartments of the surrounding ecosystem. Estimating the distribution of naturally occurring radionuclides (i.e. (226)Ra, (238)U, (232)Th, (210)Po and (210)Pb) in the raw materials, product and by-product of the Syrian phosphate fertilizer industry was essential. The data revealed that the concentrations of the radionuclides were enhanced in the treated phosphate ore. In PG, (226)Ra content had a mean activity of 318 Bq kg(-1). The uranium content in PG was low, ca. 33 Bq kg(-1), because uranium remained in the phosphoric acid produced. Over 80% of (232)Th, (210)Po and (210)Pb present partitioned in PG. The presence of PG piles did not increase significantly the concentration of (222)Rn or gamma rays exposure dose in the area studied. The annual effective dose was only 0.082 mSv y(-1). The geometric mean of total suspended air particulates (TSP) ca. 85 μg m(-3). The activity concentration of the radionuclides in filtrates and runoff waters were below the detection limits (ca. 0.15 mBq L(-1) for (238)U, 0.1 mBq L(-1) for (232)Th and 0.18 mBq L(-1) for both of (210)Po and (210)Pb); the concentration of the radionuclides in ground water samples and Qattina Lake were less than the permissible limits set for drinking water by the World Health Organisation, WHO, (10, 1 and 0.1 Bq L(-1) for (238)U, (232)Th and both of (210)Po and (210)Pb, respectively). Eastern sites soil samples of PG piles recorded the highest activity concentrations, i.e. 26, 33, 28, 61 and 40 Bq kg(-1) for (226)Ra, (238)U, (232)Th, (210)Po and (210)Pb, respectively, due to the prevailing western and north-western wind in the area, but remained within the natural levels reported in Syrian soil (13-32 Bq kg(-1) for (226)Ra, 24.9-62.2 Bq kg(-1) for (238)U and 10-32 Bq kg(-1) for (232)Th). The impact of PG piles on plants varied upon the plant species. Higher concentrations of the radionuclides were

  15. Research collaboration in health management research communities

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background This study uses scientometrics methodology to reveal the status quo and emerging issues of collaboration in health management. Methods We searched all the articles with the keyword “health management” in the period 1999–2011 in Web of Knowledge, then 3067 articles were found. Methods such as Social network analysis (SNA), co-authorship, co-word analysis were used in this study. Results Analysis of the past 13 years of research in the field of health management indicates that, whether the production of scientific research, or authors, institutions and scientific research collaboration at the national level, collaboration behavior has been growing steadily across all collaboration types. However, the international scientific research cooperation about health management study between countries needs to be further encouraged. 17 researchers can be seen as the academic leaders in this field. 37 research institutions play a vital role in the information dissemination and resources control in health management. The component analysis found that 22 research groups can be regarded as the backbone in this field. The 8 institution groups consisting of 33 institutions form the core of this field. USA, UK and Australia lie in the center by cohesive subgroup analysis; Based on keywords analysis, 44 keywords with high frequency such as care, disease, system and model were involved in the health management field. Conclusions This study demonstrates that although it is growing steadily, collaboration behavior about health management study needs to be enhanced, especially between different institutions or countries/regions, which would promote the progress and internationalization of health management. Besides, researchers should pay attention to the cooperation of representative scholars and institutions, as well as the hot areas of research, because their experience would help us promote the research development of our nation. PMID:23617236

  16. Radiological Work Planning and Procedure

    SciTech Connect

    KURTZ, J.E.

    2000-01-01

    Each facility is tasked with maintaining personnel radiation exposure as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA). A continued effort is required to meet this goal by developing and implementing improvements to technical work documents (TWDs) and work performance. A review of selected TWDs from most facilities shows there is a need to incorporate more radiological control requirements into the TWD. The Radioactive Work Permit (RWP) provides a mechanism to place some of the requirements but does not provide all the information needed by the worker as he/she is accomplishing the steps of the TWD. Requiring the engineers, planners and procedure writers to put the radiological control requirements in the work steps would be very easy if all personnel had a strong background in radiological work planning and radiological controls. Unfortunately, many of these personnel do not have the background necessary to include these requirements without assistance by the Radiological Control organization at each facility. In addition, there seems to be confusion as to what should be and what should not be included in the TWD.

  17. How to design and implement palliative care public health programmes: foundation measures. An operational paper by the WHO Collaborating Centre for Public Health Palliative Care Programmes at the Catalan Institute of Oncology.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Batiste, Xavier; Stjernsward, Jan; Espinosa, Jose; Martínez-Muñoz, Marisa; Trelis, Jordi; Constante, Carles

    2013-03-01

    This paper summarises the recommendations of the WHO Collaborating Centre for Palliative Care Public Health Programmes with respect to design and implementation of palliative care national or regional public health palliative care programmes in their initial phases. We describe the elements of a programme (leadership and aims; needs and context assessment; definition of the target patients; general measures in conventional services; specialist services in different settings; sectorised networks; education and training; availability and accessibility of opioids and essential drugs; legislation; standards; budget; valuation and improvement of quality; and evaluation of results and indicators) and the specific recommendations to implement the first steps of each component. Palliative care planning needs to be systematic, inserted in all levels of the healthcare system and adapted to the cultural and organisational status of the system. Coverage for all types of patients in need, together with equity and quality, are the main aims of programmes. PMID:24644323

  18. Radiological control manual. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Kloepping, R.

    1996-05-01

    This Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Radiological Control Manual (LBNL RCM) has been prepared to provide guidance for site-specific additions, supplements and interpretation of the DOE Radiological Control Manual. The guidance provided in this manual is one methodology to implement the requirements given in Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations Part 835 (10 CFR 835) and the DOE Radiological Control Manual. Information given in this manual is also intended to provide demonstration of compliance to specific requirements in 10 CFR 835. The LBNL RCM (Publication 3113) and LBNL Health and Safety Manual Publication-3000 form the technical basis for the LBNL RPP and will be revised as necessary to ensure that current requirements from Rules and Orders are represented. The LBNL RCM will form the standard for excellence in the implementation of the LBNL RPP.

  19. Implications Of Computer Assisted Radiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemke, Heinz U.

    1989-10-01

    Within the field of radiology, assistance with computer and communication systems may be applied to generation, storing, transmission, viewing, analyzing and interpreting of images. As a result, digital image management and communication systems will be applied at various levels in the health care system. Four groups of people are somehow involved or affected by this process. These are, first of all, the patients and the medical personnel, but also the scientific-engineering community and the group of professions involved with financing and/or administering these systems. Each group approaches computer assisted radiology from a particular point of view. The paper outlines some aspects as regards the different perceptions of these groups, which need to be clarified in order to successfully realise computer assisted radiology.

  20. Social radiology: Where to now?

    PubMed

    Ho, Elm

    2012-01-01

    Radiology is a relatively high-cost and high-maintenance aspect of medicine. Expertise is constantly required, from acquisition to its use and quality assurance programmes. However, it is an integral part of healthcare practice, from disease diagnosis, surveillance and prevention to treatment monitoring. It is alarming that two thirds of the world is deficient in or lacks even basic diagnostic imaging. Developing and underdeveloped countries need help in improving medical imaging. Help is coming from various organisations, which are extending hands-on teaching and imparting knowledge, as well as training trainers to increase the pool of skilled practitioners in the use of imaging equipment and other aspects of radiology services. The scene for social radiology is changing and set to positively impact the world in the (near) future. PMID:22970065

  1. When do researchers collaborate? Toward a model of collaboration propensity in science and engineering research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birnholtz, Jeremy P.

    Geographically distributed and multidisciplinary collaborations have proven invaluable in answering a range of important scientific questions, such as understanding and controlling disease threats like SARS and AIDS or exploring the nature of matter in particle physics. Despite this, however, collaboration can often be problematic. There are institutional obstacles, collaboration tools may be poorly designed, and group coordination is difficult. To better design technologies to support research activities, we need an improved understanding of why scientists collaborate and how their collaborations work. To achieve this improved understanding, this study compares two theoretical approaches to collaboration propensity---that is, the extent to which collaboration is perceived as useful by individual researchers. On one hand, cultural comparisons of disciplines suggest that collaboration propensity will be higher in disciplinary cultures that have a more collectivist orientation, as indicated by low levels of competition for individual recognition and few concerns about secrecy related to commercialization and intellectual property. In contrast, an approach based on social and organizational psychology suggests that collaboration propensity will vary as a function of resource concentration, fieldwide focus on a well-defined set of problems, and the need for and availability of help when difficult problems are encountered in day-to-day work. To explore this question, a mail survey of 900 academic researchers in three fields was conducted, along with 100 interviews with practicing researchers at 17 sites in the field. Results support a social and organizational psychological interpretation of collaboration propensity. That is, cultural factors such as competition for individual recognition and concerns about intellectual property were not perceived as significant impediments to collaboration. Instead, characteristics like resource concentration and frequent help

  2. Confronting Globalisation: Learning from Intercontinental Collaboration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larsson, Staffan; Boud, David; Dahlgren, Madeleine Abrandt; Walters, Shirley; Sork, Tom

    2005-01-01

    Higher education institutions are responding to globalisation in various ways. This study describes and analyses challenges encountered in a recent case of global collaboration between four universities on different continents in developing a web-based master's program. The key issue was how to develop programs in a way that is fair for the…

  3. Collaborative Graduate Education across Multiple Campuses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, J. R.; Hess, G. R.; Bowman, T. A.; Magnusdottir, H.; Stubbs-Gipson, C. E.; Groom, M.; Miller, J. R.; Steelman, T. A.; Stokes, D. L.

    2009-01-01

    Multi-institutional approaches to graduate education continue to emerge as a way to better prepare students for collaborative work. In this article, we describe a graduate course designed to investigate application of conservation biology principles by local land use planners. "Where is Conservation Science in Local Planning?" was offered jointly…

  4. Collaborating for Social Justice through Service Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DePaola, Tom

    2014-01-01

    This chapter explores elements that should be included in a service learning style internship program in urban community colleges. It provides theoretical background and descriptions of best practices for forming community partnerships, collaboratively developing learning outcomes, and aligning program design with institutional general education…

  5. Collaborative Education To Ensure Patient Safety.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Advisory Council on Nurse Education and Practice, Rockville, MD.

    Results of a joint meeting between national advisory councils in medicine and nursing on physician-nurse collaboration to enhance patient safety are reported. Recommendations on which participants reached consensus are organized by these Institute of Medicine (IOM) themes: establish a national focus to create leadership through research and…

  6. Everybody Leads: A Model for Collaborative Leadership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maxfield, C. Robert; Klocko, Barbara A.

    2010-01-01

    This mixed-methods case study analyzes the perceptions of participants in a year-long collaborative leadership initiative conducted at a small school district situated between larger urban districts and multiple suburban districts in a midwestern state. The initiative was facilitated by the Galileo Institute for Teacher Leadership in cooperation…

  7. Global Collaborative STEM Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meabh Kelly, Susan; Smith, Walter

    2016-04-01

    Global Collaborative STEM Education, as the name suggests, simultaneously supports two sets of knowledge and skills. The first set is STEM -- science, technology, engineering and math. The other set of content knowledge and skills is that of global collaboration. Successful global partnerships require awareness of one's own culture, the biases embedded within that culture, as well as developing awareness of the collaborators' culture. Workforce skills fostered include open-mindedness, perseverance when faced with obstacles, and resourceful use of technological "bridges" to facilitate and sustain communication. In respect for the 2016 GIFT Workshop focus, Global Collaborative STEM Education projects dedicated to astronomy research will be presented. The projects represent different benchmarks within the Global Collaborative STEM Education continuum, culminating in an astronomy research experience that fully reflects how the global STEM workforce collaborates. To facilitate wider engagement in Global Collaborative STEM Education, project summaries, classroom resources and contact information for established international collaborative astronomy research projects will be disseminated.

  8. Theme: Collaborative Relationships.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Briers, Gary E.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Seven articles present models for collaboration between business and education, agriscience and extension, agribusiness and agricultural education, as well as a collaborative waterfowl refuge project and the political process and public relations. (SK)

  9. Collaboration in Agricultural Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Roland L.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Theme articles discuss environment, food, agriculture, and renewal resources as they relate to science education, learning partnerships, collaboration in Kyrghyzstan, leadership development, opportunities for collaboration, networking, and the creation of a shared course between agribusiness and biology. (JOW)

  10. Is This Collaboration?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerlach, Jeanne Marcum

    1994-01-01

    The nature of collaborative learning is examined, including some discussion of the role of the instructor. A collaborative learning situation in a women's studies course is described as an example of integration of the approach into content area instruction. (MSE)

  11. Managing Generational Differences in Radiology.

    PubMed

    Eastland, Robin; Clark, Kevin R

    2015-01-01

    Diversity can take many forms. One type of recent focus is generational differences and intergenerational issues. Much research exists regarding generational differences in the workplace and in healthcare as a whole. Very little has been done on generational differences within the field of radiology. An analysis of current research of generational differences within radiology, nursing, and healthcart in general was performed to identify current trends and establish similarities and discordance in available studies. An emphasis was placed on how generational differences influence education, teamwork, and patient care, along with what challenges and opportunities exist for managers, leaders, and organizations.

  12. Managing Generational Differences in Radiology.

    PubMed

    Eastland, Robin; Clark, Kevin R

    2015-01-01

    Diversity can take many forms. One type of recent focus is generational differences and intergenerational issues. Much research exists regarding generational differences in the workplace and in healthcare as a whole. Very little has been done on generational differences within the field of radiology. An analysis of current research of generational differences within radiology, nursing, and healthcart in general was performed to identify current trends and establish similarities and discordance in available studies. An emphasis was placed on how generational differences influence education, teamwork, and patient care, along with what challenges and opportunities exist for managers, leaders, and organizations. PMID:26314182

  13. Interventional Radiology in Liver Transplantation

    SciTech Connect

    Karani, John B. Yu, Dominic F.Q.C.; Kane, Pauline A.

    2005-04-15

    Radiology is a key specialty within a liver transplant program. Interventional techniques not only contribute to graft and recipient survival but also allow appropriate patient selection and ensure that recipients with severe liver decompensation, hepatocellular carcinoma or portal hypertension are transplanted with the best chance of prolonged survival. Equally inappropriate selection for these techniques may adversely affect survival. Liver transplantation is a dynamic field of innovative surgical techniques with a requirement for interventional radiology to parallel these developments. This paper reviews the current practice within a major European center for adult and pediatric transplantation.

  14. Research education in Europe: an opinion paper by the European Society of Radiology.

    PubMed

    2015-04-01

    Research is a major positive driver for radiology. Therefore, research education needs to be a major topic for the radiology leadership, including the research committee of the ESR. Professional (radiological and non-radiological) and scientific publications as well as Research Committee questionnaires provide the basis for this opinion paper. Although radiology is well-positioned to deal with current and future challenges, there are still some gaps, such as the presence of radiology in basic research, radiology-specific research versus research services for other disciplines, need of adaptation to new research topics, general attitude towards research, issues of career planning, lack of incentives for researchers, gender issues with loss of women from the researcher pipeline, limited financing of research education and variability between countries and institutions. There is no easy answer to such challenges. However, all stakeholders, from the ESR to subspecialty societies, university departments, general radiology departments and the individual radiologist must recognise and promote research within their competencies. Many means and structures are already available but need to be used more extensively and systematically. Additional means need to be developed, scientific and professional trends must be actively followed, and minimal standards in research education should be maintained throughout Europe. Main Messages • Radiology research includes a broad spectrum, from basic to health services research. • Research education needs to be widely available and systematically promoted. • Existing means such as the European Institute for Biomedical Imaging Research (EIBIR) need to be advanced. • New developments in research topics and professional life must be continuously monitored and evaluated. PMID:25763995

  15. Research education in Europe: an opinion paper by the European Society of Radiology.

    PubMed

    2015-04-01

    Research is a major positive driver for radiology. Therefore, research education needs to be a major topic for the radiology leadership, including the research committee of the ESR. Professional (radiological and non-radiological) and scientific publications as well as Research Committee questionnaires provide the basis for this opinion paper. Although radiology is well-positioned to deal with current and future challenges, there are still some gaps, such as the presence of radiology in basic research, radiology-specific research versus research services for other disciplines, need of adaptation to new research topics, general attitude towards research, issues of career planning, lack of incentives for researchers, gender issues with loss of women from the researcher pipeline, limited financing of research education and variability between countries and institutions. There is no easy answer to such challenges. However, all stakeholders, from the ESR to subspecialty societies, university departments, general radiology departments and the individual radiologist must recognise and promote research within their competencies. Many means and structures are already available but need to be used more extensively and systematically. Additional means need to be developed, scientific and professional trends must be actively followed, and minimal standards in research education should be maintained throughout Europe. Main Messages • Radiology research includes a broad spectrum, from basic to health services research. • Research education needs to be widely available and systematically promoted. • Existing means such as the European Institute for Biomedical Imaging Research (EIBIR) need to be advanced. • New developments in research topics and professional life must be continuously monitored and evaluated.

  16. Online Teacher Development: Collaborating in a Virtual Learning Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ernest, Pauline; Guitert Catasús, Montse; Hampel, Regine; Heiser, Sarah; Hopkins, Joseph; Murphy, Linda; Stickler, Ursula

    2013-01-01

    Over recent years, educational institutions have been making increasing use of virtual environments to set up collaborative activities for learners. While it is recognized that teachers play an important role in facilitating learner collaboration online, they may not have the necessary skills to do so successfully. Thus, a small-scale professional…

  17. Complicated Spaces: Negotiating Collaborative Teaching and Interdisciplinarity in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryant, Lauren H.; Niewolny, Kim; Clark, Susan; Watson, C. Edward

    2014-01-01

    This study focused on the socially-constructed meanings, implications, and institutional factors that influence the extent to which faculty members engage in collaborative teaching at a research university. Drawing upon theoretical foundations of interdisciplinarity and collaborative teaching and in-depth findings from faculty focus groups, we…

  18. Lessons Learned from a Practitioner-Academician Collaboration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macduff, Nancy; Netting, F. Ellen

    2000-01-01

    Describes a four-year collaboration between a practitioner and an academician and discusses the opportunities it presented to draw from practical experience and academic expertise. Suggests that there are fundamental organizational and institutional issues that must be considered even in successful collaborations. (JOW)

  19. Writing: A Collaboration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fleming, Margaret, Ed.

    1983-01-01

    Noting that while collaborative writing is commonplace in the "real" world it is seldom practiced in classrooms, the articles in this focused journal explore the place of collaboration in the writing process and the ways in which collaboration can be fostered in an instructional setting. Following an introduction by the editor, which describes…

  20. Dreaming of Collaboration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnston-Parsons, Marilyn

    2010-01-01

    Marilyn Johnston-Parsons writes about collaboration. She describes several university-school collaborations with which she has been involved in terms of the tensions and the dialogue that has been associated with them. While she worries about the state of collaboration in this educational age, she admits to "cautious optimism" that more…

  1. North Carolina School Nurse Leadership Institute

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guttu, Martha

    2007-01-01

    Recognizing that school nurse leaders are essential to the development of school nurses, the North Carolina School Nurse Leadership Institute was developed to enable school nurse leaders to update and advance their leadership skills. The Institute was a collaborative endeavor between the North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services,…

  2. Fostering a Disability-Friendly Institutional Climate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huger, Marianne S.

    2011-01-01

    The increase of students with disabilities on college campuses requires institutions to reenvision how to serve this population. The partnership and collaboration of institutional departments will offer students with disabilities increased opportunities for academic and social integration. This increased integration has ripple effects that will…

  3. Radiological services throughout the world.

    PubMed

    Brederhoff, J; Racoveanu, N T

    1982-01-01

    WHO's statistics show the doctor-to-population ratio in the Third World to have changed very little over the past decade, with radiological services among the least developed medical branches of a developing country's health care system. Data is presented on population/machine/personnel ratios, morbidity patterns, number of X-ray examinations per population and films taken, percentage of wasted film, and breakdown of types of procedures. Data collected from 89 countries show that of a total population of 1.2 billion, only 220 million have access to adequate diagnostic X-ray services. A well-structured diagnostic X-ray service at the country level should form a pyramid consisting of three levels of sophistication: (1) Basic Radiological Service (BRS), the broad base of the pyramid and available to the mass of the population requiring uncomplicated radiographic examinations; (2) General Purpose Radiological Service (GPRS), at the intermediate level, functioning as a backup service for the BRS facility and a filter station for the sophisticated department at the top; (3) Specialized Radiological Service (SRS), performing specialized radiodiagnostic procedures, and undertaking research and training. This pyramid structure does not at present exist in the majority of countries. Adequate coverage of the population cannot be achieved unless X-ray facilities are made available in places near to where the majority of the population live. The BRS comprises a technical concept and teaching/learning programme representing a solution to the present unsatisfactory situation.

  4. International Data on Radiological Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Martha Finck; Margaret Goldberg

    2010-07-01

    ABSTRACT The mission of radiological dispersal device (RDD) nuclear forensics is to identify the provenance of nuclear and radiological materials used in RDDs and to aid law enforcement in tracking nuclear materials and routes. The application of databases to radiological forensics is to match RDD source material to a source model in the database, provide guidance regarding a possible second device, and aid the FBI by providing a short list of manufacturers and distributors, and ultimately to the last legal owner of the source. The Argonne/Idaho National Laboratory RDD attribution database is a powerful technical tool in radiological forensics. The database (1267 unique vendors) includes all sealed sources and a device registered in the U.S., is complemented by data from the IAEA Catalogue, and is supported by rigorous in-lab characterization of selected sealed sources regarding physical form, radiochemical composition, and age-dating profiles. Close working relationships with global partners in the commercial sealed sources industry provide invaluable technical information and expertise in the development of signature profiles. These profiles are critical to the down-selection of potential candidates in either pre- or post- event RDD attribution. The down-selection process includes a match between an interdicted (or detonated) source and a model in the database linked to one or more manufacturers and distributors.

  5. Radiologic Technology Occupations. Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reneau, Fred; And Others

    This guide delineates the tasks and performance standards for radiologic technology occupations. It includes job seeking skills, work attitudes, energy conservation practices, and safety. The guide is centered around the three domains of learning: psychomotor, cognitive, and affective. For each duty, the following are provided: task, standard of…

  6. Radiological Defense Officer. Student Workbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Defense Civil Preparedness Agency (DOD), Washington, DC.

    This student workbook includes the necessary administrative materials, briefs, exercises and answer sheets for the quizzes and final course examination as needed by the students during the conduct of the Radiological Defense Officer course. Among the briefs included are the following: (1) Reporting Forms; (2) Forecasting Dose Rates; (3) Dose…

  7. [Institutional Renewal].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Peggy, Ed.

    1983-01-01

    The theme of this journal issue is "Institutional Renewal." Projects designed to address the issues of the 1980s at 18 colleges are described, and 15 definitions of institutional renewal are presented. Participating colleges were provided expert advice through the Association of American College's (AAC) Project Lodestar (renamed Consultation and…

  8. Institutional History.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kohlstedt, Sally Gregory

    1985-01-01

    Discusses recent work on scientific institutions in the United States, indicating that although historians have explored the origins of institutions, few have pursued these organizations into their later and perhaps equally complex years. Learned/professional organizations, museums, publications, and philanthropy are among the major topic areas…

  9. 21 CFR 892.1980 - Radiologic table.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Radiologic table. 892.1980 Section 892.1980 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1980 Radiologic table. (a) Identification. A...

  10. 21 CFR 892.1980 - Radiologic table.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Radiologic table. 892.1980 Section 892.1980 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1980 Radiologic table. (a) Identification. A...

  11. 21 CFR 892.1980 - Radiologic table.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Radiologic table. 892.1980 Section 892.1980 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1980 Radiologic table. (a) Identification. A...

  12. 21 CFR 892.1980 - Radiologic table.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Radiologic table. 892.1980 Section 892.1980 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1980 Radiologic table. (a) Identification. A...

  13. Network oriented radiological and medical archive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferraris, M.; Frixione, P.; Squarcia, S.

    2001-10-01

    In this paper the basic ideas of NORMA (Network Oriented Radiological and Medical Archive) are discussed. NORMA is an original project built by a team of physicists in collaboration with radiologists in order to select the best Treatment Planning in radiotherapy. It allows physicians and health physicists, working in different places, to discuss on interesting clinical cases visualizing the same diagnostic images, at the same time, and highlighting zones of interest (tumors and organs at risk). NORMA has a client/server architecture in order to be platform independent. Applying World Wide Web technologies, it can be easily used by people with no specific computer knowledge providing a verbose help to guide the user through the right steps of execution. The client side is an applet while the server side is a Java application. In order to optimize execution the project also includes a proprietary protocol, lying over TCP/IP suite, that organizes data exchanges and control messages. Diagnostic images are retrieved from a relational database or from a standard DICOM (Digital Images and COmmunications in Medicine) PACS through the DICOM-WWW gateway allowing connection of the usual Web browsers, used by the NORMA system, to DICOM applications via the HTTP protocol. Browser requests are sent to the gateway from the Web server through CGI (Common Gateway Interface). DICOM software translates the requests in DICOM messages and organizes the communication with the remote DICOM Application.

  14. Informatics in radiology: web-based preliminary reporting system for radiology residents with PACS integration.

    PubMed

    O'Connell, Timothy; Chang, Debra

    2012-01-01

    While on call, radiology residents review imaging studies and issue preliminary reports to referring clinicians. In the absence of an integrated reporting system at the training sites of the authors' institution, residents were typing and faxing preliminary reports. To partially automate the on-call resident workflow, a Web-based system for resident reporting was developed by using the free open-source xAMP Web application framework and an open-source DICOM (Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine) software toolkit, with the goals of reducing errors and lowering barriers to education. This reporting system integrates with the picture archiving and communication system to display a worklist of studies. Patient data are automatically entered in the preliminary report to prevent identification errors and simplify the report creation process. When the final report for a resident's on-call study is available, the reporting system queries the report broker for the final report, and then displays the preliminary report side by side with the final report, thus simplifying the review process and encouraging review of all of the resident's reports. The xAMP Web application framework should be considered for development of radiology department informatics projects owing to its zero cost, minimal hardware requirements, ease of programming, and large support community. PMID:22929149

  15. Hanford radiological protection support services annual report for 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Lyon, M.; Fix, J.J.; Kenoyer, J.L.; Leonowich, J.A.; Palmer, H.E.; Sula, M.J.

    1989-06-01

    The report documents the performance of certain radiological protection sitewide services during calendar year (CY) 1988 by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) in support of the US Department of Energy-Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL) and contractor activities on the Hanford Site. The routine program for each service is discussed along with any significant program changes and tasks, investigations, and studies performed in support of each program. Other related activities such as publications, presentations, and memberships on standard or industry committees are also listed. The programs covered provide services in the areas of (1) internal dosimetry, (2) in vivo measurements, (3) external dosimetry, (4) instrument calibration and evaluation, (5) calibration of radiation sources traceable to the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) (formerly the National Bureau of Standards), and (6) radiological records. 23 refs., 15 figs., 15 tabs.

  16. Radiological impact of composite food served at PINSTECH.

    PubMed

    Jabbar, T; Akhter, P; Khan, K; Jabbar, A; Saleem, K

    2009-06-01

    To determine radiological impact of composite food served at Pakistan Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology (PINSTECH) on its worker, cooked meals were collected during 2000-2007 and analysed by gamma and beta radiometry techniques for naturally occurring radionuclides and fission fragments. The only measurable radionuclide was naturally occurring (40)K. Its activity range was 40+/-1.5 to 182.4+/-3.8 Bq kg(-1) with cumulative average value of 89.4+/-35.1 Bq kg(-1). Based on annual meals taken by the worker in cafeteria, the measured value gives committed effective dose of 74 microSv and estimated cancer risk factor of 1.5 x 10(-4) that is a minor fraction of the total risk of 5 x 10(-3). It depicts that food served at PINSTECH cafeteria is radiologically safe for consumption.

  17. CSCAPES Institute

    SciTech Connect

    Alex Pothen

    2008-10-26

    We report on the progress made by researchers of the CSCAPES Institute at Old Dominion University for the years 2007 and 2008 in the areas of research, software creation, education and training, and outreach activities.

  18. The NMDB collaboration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steigies, C. T.

    2015-12-01

    Since the International Geophysical Year (IGY) in 1957-58 cosmic rays areroutinely measured by many ground-based Neutron Monitors (NM) around theworld. The World Data Center for Cosmic Rays (WDCCR) was established as apart of this activity and is providing a database of cosmic-ray neutronobservations in unified formats. However, that standard data comprises onlyof one hour averages, whereas most NM stations have been enhanced at the endof the 20th century to provide data in one minute resolution or even better.This data was only available on the web-sites of the institutes operatingthe station, and every station invented their own data format for thehigh-resolution measurements. There were some efforts to collect data fromseveral stations, to make this data available on FTP servers, however noneof these efforts could provide real-time data for all stations.The EU FP7 project NMDB (real-time database for high-resolution NeutronMonitor measurements, http://nmdb.eu) was funded by the European Commission,and a new database was set up by several Neutron Monitor stations in Europeand Asia to store high-resolution data and to provide access to the data inreal-time (i.e. less than five minute delay). By storing the measurements ina database, a standard format for the high-resolution measurements isenforced. This database is complementary to the WDCCR, as it does not (yet)provide all historical data, but the creation of this effort has spurred anew collaboration between Neutron Monitor scientists worldwide, (new)stations have gone online (again), new projects are building on the resultsof NMDB, new users outside of the Cosmic Ray community are starting to useNM data for new applications like soil moisture measurements using cosmicrays. These applications are facilitated by the easy access to the data withthe http://nest.nmdb.eu interface that offers access to all NMDB data forall users.

  19. [Radiation protection in interventional radiology].

    PubMed

    Adamus, R; Loose, R; Wucherer, M; Uder, M; Galster, M

    2016-03-01

    The application of ionizing radiation in medicine seems to be a safe procedure for patients as well as for occupational exposition to personnel. The developments in interventional radiology with fluoroscopy and dose-intensive interventions require intensified radiation protection. It is recommended that all available tools should be used for this purpose. Besides the options for instruments, x‑ray protection at the intervention table must be intensively practiced with lead aprons and mounted lead glass. A special focus on eye protection to prevent cataracts is also recommended. The development of cataracts might no longer be deterministic, as confirmed by new data; therefore, the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) has lowered the threshold dose value for eyes from 150 mSv/year to 20 mSv/year. Measurements show that the new values can be achieved by applying all X‑ray protection measures plus lead-containing eyeglasses.

  20. Thalamic Lesions: A Radiological Review

    PubMed Central

    Renard, Dimitri; Campello, Chantal; Bouly, Stephane; Le Floch, Anne; Thouvenot, Eric; Waconge, Anne; Taieb, Guillaume

    2014-01-01

    Background. Thalamic lesions are seen in a multitude of disorders including vascular diseases, metabolic disorders, inflammatory diseases, trauma, tumours, and infections. In some diseases, thalamic involvement is typical and sometimes isolated, while in other diseases thalamic lesions are observed only occasionally (often in the presence of other typical extrathalamic lesions). Summary. In this review, we will mainly discuss the MRI characteristics of thalamic lesions. Identification of the origin of the thalamic lesion depends on the exact localisation inside the thalamus, the presence of extrathalamic lesions, the signal changes on different MRI sequences, the evolution of the radiological abnormalities over time, the history and clinical state of the patient, and other radiological and nonradiological examinations. PMID:25100900

  1. An atlas of radiological anatomy

    SciTech Connect

    Weir, J.; Abrahams, P.

    1986-01-01

    This book contains a wealth of radiologic images of normal human anatomy; plain radiographs, contrast-enhanced radiographs, and computed tomography (CT) scans. There are 18 pages of magnetic resonance (MR) images, most on the brain and spinal cord, so that there are only two pages on MR imaging of the heart and two pages on abdominal and pelvic MR imaging. Twelve pages of ultrasound (US) images are included. This book has the radiologic image paired with an explanatory drawing; the image is on the left with a paragraph or two of text, and the drawing is on the right with legends. This book includes images of the brain and spinal cord obtained with arteriography, venography, myelography, encephalography, CT, and MR imaging.

  2. Radiology applications of financial accounting.

    PubMed

    Leibenhaut, Mark H

    2005-03-01

    A basic knowledge of financial accounting can help radiologists analyze business opportunities and examine the potential impacts of new technology or predict the adverse consequences of new competitors entering their service area. The income statement, balance sheet, and cash flow statement are the three basic financial statements that document the current financial position of the radiology practice and allow managers to monitor the ongoing financial operations of the enterprise. Pro forma, or hypothetical, financial statements can be generated to predict the financial impact of specific business decisions or investments on the profitability of the practice. Sensitivity analysis, or what-if scenarios, can be performed to determine the potential impact of changing key revenue, investment, operating cost or financial assumptions. By viewing radiology as both a profession and a business, radiologists can optimize their use of scarce economic resources and maximize the return on their financial investments.

  3. Radiology applications of financial accounting.

    PubMed

    Leibenhaut, Mark H

    2005-03-01

    A basic knowledge of financial accounting can help radiologists analyze business opportunities and examine the potential impacts of new technology or predict the adverse consequences of new competitors entering their service area. The income statement, balance sheet, and cash flow statement are the three basic financial statements that document the current financial position of the radiology practice and allow managers to monitor the ongoing financial operations of the enterprise. Pro forma, or hypothetical, financial statements can be generated to predict the financial impact of specific business decisions or investments on the profitability of the practice. Sensitivity analysis, or what-if scenarios, can be performed to determine the potential impact of changing key revenue, investment, operating cost or financial assumptions. By viewing radiology as both a profession and a business, radiologists can optimize their use of scarce economic resources and maximize the return on their financial investments. PMID:17411807

  4. Local area networks for radiology.

    PubMed

    Dwyer, S J; Mankovich, N J; Cox, G G; Bauman, R A

    1988-11-01

    This article is a tutorial on local area networks (LAN) for radiology applications. LANs are being implemented in radiology departments for the management of text and images, replacing the inflexible point-to-point wiring between two devices (computer-to-terminal). These networks enable the sharing of computers and computer devices, reduce equipment costs, and provide improved reliability. Any LAN must include items from the following four categories: transmission medium, topology, data transmission mode, and access protocol. Media for local area networks are twisted pair, coaxial, and optical fiber cables. The topology of these networks include the star, ring, bus, tree, and circuit-switching. Data transmission modes are either analog signals or digital signals. Access protocol methods include the broadcast bus system and the ring system. A performance measurement for a LAN is the throughput rate as a function of the number of active computer nodes. Standards for LANs help to ensure that products purchased from multiple manufacturers will operate successfully.

  5. 48 CFR Appendix F to Chapter 7 - Use of Collaborative Assistance Method for Title XII Activities

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... collaboration between all participating parties (USAID, host country, and contractor) at important stages... collaboration with eligible Title XII institutions and LDC counterparts for a problem-solving type activity to... identification. After the host government has indicated a desire for U.S. collaboration on a particular...

  6. Radiology of occupational chest disease

    SciTech Connect

    Solomon, A. ); Kreel, L.

    1989-01-01

    Radiologic manifestations of occupational lung disease are summarized and classified in this book according to the ILO system. The interpretation of chest roentgenograms outlines the progression of each disease and is accompanied with clinically-oriented explanations. Some of the specific diseases covered include asbestosis, coal worker's pneumoconiosis, silicosis, non-mining inhalation of silica and silicates, beryllium induced disease, inhalation of organics and metallics, and occupationally induced asthma.

  7. Otologic radiology with clinical correlations

    SciTech Connect

    Ruenes, R.; De la Cruz, A.

    1986-01-01

    This manual covers developments in the radiologic diagnosis of otologic problems. To demonstrate the appearance of each disorder comprehensively, a large number of radiographs are included, many of them annotated to highlight both diagnostic signs and the subtle aspects of normal pathologic anatomy. Contents: X-ray and Imaging Techniques and Anatomy. Congenital Malformations. Middle and External Ear Infections. Otosclerosis and Otospongiosis. Temporal Bone Fractures. The Facial Nerve. Tumors of the Temporal Bone and Skull Base. Tumors of the Cerebellopontine Angle. Cochlear Implants.

  8. Online social networking for radiology.

    PubMed

    Auffermann, William F; Chetlen, Alison L; Colucci, Andrew T; DeQuesada, Ivan M; Grajo, Joseph R; Heller, Matthew T; Nowitzki, Kristina M; Sherry, Steven J; Tillack, Allison A

    2015-01-01

    Online social networking services have changed the way we interact as a society and offer many opportunities to improve the way we practice radiology and medicine in general. This article begins with an introduction to social networking. Next, the latest advances in online social networking are reviewed, and areas where radiologists and clinicians may benefit from these new tools are discussed. This article concludes with several steps that the interested reader can take to become more involved in online social networking.

  9. Telemetry of Aerial Radiological Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    H. W. Clark, Jr.

    2002-10-01

    Telemetry has been added to National Nuclear Security Administration's (NNSA's) Aerial Measuring System (AMS) Incident Response aircraft to accelerate availability of aerial radiological mapping data. Rapid aerial radiological mapping is promptly performed by AMS Incident Response aircraft in the event of a major radiological dispersal. The AMS airplane flies the entire potentially affected area, plus a generous margin, to provide a quick look at the extent and severity of the event. The primary result of the AMS Incident Response over flight is a map of estimated exposure rate on the ground along the flight path. Formerly, it was necessary to wait for the airplane to land before the map could be seen. Now, while the flight is still in progress, data are relayed via satellite directly from the aircraft to an operations center, where they are displayed and disseminated. This permits more timely utilization of results by decision makers and redirection of the mission to optimize its value. The current telemetry capability can cover all of North America. Extension to a global capability is under consideration.

  10. Design requirements for radiology workstations.

    PubMed

    Moise, Adrian; Atkins, M Stella

    2004-06-01

    This article stresses the importance of capturing feedback from representative users in the early stages of product development. We present our solution to producing quality requirement specifications for radiology workstations, specifications that remain valid over time because we successfully anticipated the industry trends and the user's needs. We present the results from a user study performed in December 1999 in a radiology clinic equipped with state-of-the-art Picture Archiving and Communications Systems (PACS) and imaging scanners. The study involved eight radiologists who answered questions and provided comments on three complementary research topics. First, we asked our subjects to enumerate the advantages and the disadvantages for both softcopy and hardcopy reading. We identified the two major factors for productivity improvement through the use of PACS workstations: workflow re-engineering and process automation. Second, we collected radiologist feedback on the use of hanging protocols (HPs). The results indicated the high importance of automatic image organization through HPs, with the potential effect of reducing the interpretation time by 10-20%. Our subjects estimated that 10-15 HPs would cover about 85%-95% of the regular radiological examinations. Third, we investigated the impact of the display devices on the radiologist's workflow. Our results indicated that the number and the properties of the monitors is a modality-specific requirement. The main results from this study on key functional requirements for softcopy interpretation only recently were incorporated in most of the current, successful PACS workstations.

  11. Understanding Mechanisms of Radiological Contamination

    SciTech Connect

    Rick Demmer; John Drake; Ryan James, PhD

    2014-03-01

    Over the last 50 years, the study of radiological contamination and decontamination has expanded significantly. This paper addresses the mechanisms of radiological contamination that have been reported and then discusses which methods have recently been used during performance testing of several different decontamination technologies. About twenty years ago the Idaho Nuclear Technology Engineering Center (INTEC) at the INL began a search for decontamination processes which could minimize secondary waste. In order to test the effectiveness of these decontamination technologies, a new simulated contamination, termed SIMCON, was developed. SIMCON was designed to replicate the types of contamination found on stainless steel, spent fuel processing equipment. Ten years later, the INL began research into methods for simulating urban contamination resulting from a radiological dispersal device (RDD). This work was sponsored by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) and included the initial development an aqueous application of contaminant to substrate. Since 2007, research sponsored by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has advanced that effort and led to the development of a contamination method that simulates particulate fallout from an Improvised Nuclear Device (IND). The IND method diverges from previous efforts to create tenacious contamination by simulating a reproducible “loose” contamination. Examining these different types of contamination (and subsequent decontamination processes), which have included several different radionuclides and substrates, sheds light on contamination processes that occur throughout the nuclear industry and in the urban environment.

  12. [Technological advances: the coming radiology].

    PubMed

    García, César; Ortega, Dulia

    2002-06-01

    We are living in a changing world, acknowledging all kinds of changes: social, technological, and ethical. This is the environment encircling medical and radiological work: demanding, with high expectations and a cohort of amazing technological advances, in all areas of human knowledge. We need to make the necessary reflections about these faster and faster changes. Radiology, as an important part of clinical work, is facing no minor challenges: technological and other most prevalent like: Who will be specialists in the next future? How are we prepared to face the radiological teaching and formation of radiologists? How to finance this technological developments? Meanwhile, in our context of an underdeveloped country, this sounds as far as the Moon, but changes will reach us sooner or later. We must resolve some problems that are a little bit more basic, such as a good level of education and health care for our people, then we will be ready to incorporate some of these amazing new technologies. PMID:12194695

  13. Development of automated detection of radiology reports citing adrenal findings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zopf, Jason; Langer, Jessica; Boonn, William; Kim, Woojin; Zafar, Hanna

    2011-03-01

    Indeterminate incidental findings pose a challenge to both the radiologist and the ordering physician as their imaging appearance is potentially harmful but their clinical significance and optimal management is unknown. We seek to determine if it is possible to automate detection of adrenal nodules, an indeterminate incidental finding, on imaging examinations at our institution. Using PRESTO (Pathology-Radiology Enterprise Search tool), a newly developed search engine at our institution that mines dictated radiology reports, we searched for phrases used by attendings to describe incidental adrenal findings. Using these phrases as a guide, we designed a query that can be used with the PRESTO index. The results were refined using a modified version of NegEx to eliminate query terms that have been negated within the report text. In order to validate these findings we used an online random date generator to select two random weeks. We queried our RIS database for all reports created on those dates and manually reviewed each report to check for adrenal incidental findings. This survey produced a ground- truth dataset of reports citing adrenal incidental findings against which to compare query performance. We further reviewed the false positives and negatives identified by our validation study, in an attempt to improve the performance query. This algorithm is an important step towards automating the detection of incidental adrenal nodules on cross sectional imaging at our institution. Subsequently, this query can be combined with electronic medical record data searches to determine the clinical significance of these findings through resultant follow-up.

  14. AWOB: A Collaborative Workbench for Astronomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, J. W.; Lemson, G.; Bulatovic, N.; Makarenko, V.; Vogler, A.; Voges, W.; Yao, Y.; Kiefl, R.; Koychev, S.

    2015-09-01

    We present the Astronomers Workbench (AWOB1), a web-based collaboration and publication platform for a scientific project of any size, developed in collaboration between the Max-Planck institutes of Astrophysics (MPA) and Extra-terrestrial Physics (MPE) and the Max-Planck Digital Library (MPDL). AWOB facilitates the collaboration between geographically distributed astronomers working on a common project throughout its whole scientific life cycle. AWOB does so by making it very easy for scientists to set up and manage a collaborative workspace for individual projects, where data can be uploaded and shared. It supports inviting project collaborators, provides wikis, automated mailing lists, calendars and event notification and has a built in chat facility. It allows the definition and tracking of tasks within projects and supports easy creation of e-publications for the dissemination of data and images and other resources that cannot be added to submitted papers. AWOB extends the project concept to larger scale consortia, within which it is possible to manage working groups and sub-projects. The existing AWOB instance has so far been limited to Max-Planck members and their collaborators, but will be opened to the whole astronomical community. AWOB is an open-source project and its source code is available upon request. We intend to extend AWOB's functionality also to other disciplines, and would greatly appreciate contributions from the community.

  15. Polish Medical Society of Radiology and Polish Society of Rheumatology Recommendations for Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Musculoskeletal Disorders in Rheumatology

    PubMed Central

    Sudoł-Szopińska, Iwona; Urbanik, Andrzej; Wojciechowski, Wadim; Warczyńska, Agnieszka; Kapuścińska, Katarzyna; Korkosz, Mariusz; Jeka, Sławomir; Kwiatkowska, Brygida

    2015-01-01

    Summary This document presents the recommendations of the Polish Medical Society of Radiology (PLTR) and the Polish Society of Polish Society of Rheumatology (PTR) regarding the standards of collaboration between radiologists and rheumatologists so as to optimize the diagnostics and treatment of patients with rheumatic diseases of the musculoskeletal system, including rheumatoid arthritis and spondyloarthropathies. PMID:26082818

  16. The Petascale Data Storage Institute

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, Garth; Long, Darrell; Honeyman, Peter; Grider, Gary; Kramer, William; Shalf, John; Roth, Philip; Felix, Evan; Ward, Lee

    2013-07-01

    Petascale computing infrastructures for scientific discovery make petascale demands on information storage capacity, performance, concurrency, reliability, availability, and manageability.The Petascale Data Storage Institute focuses on the data storage problems found in petascale scientific computing environments, with special attention to community issues such as interoperability, community buy-in, and shared tools.The Petascale Data Storage Institute is a collaboration between researchers at Carnegie Mellon University, National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratory, Los Alamos National Laboratory, University of Michigan, and the University of California at Santa Cruz.

  17. Toward Collaboration Sensing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schneider, Bertrand; Pea, Roy

    2014-01-01

    We describe preliminary applications of network analysis techniques to eye-tracking data collected during a collaborative learning activity. This paper makes three contributions: first, we visualize collaborative eye-tracking data as networks, where the nodes of the graph represent fixations and edges represent saccades. We found that those…

  18. Design for Collaboration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blake, Canan; Scanlon, Eileen

    2013-01-01

    Online learning environments offer new opportunities for learning and over the last decade or so a variety of online learning environments have been developed by researchers to facilitate collaborative learning among students. In this paper we will present a case study of a successful collaborative learning design. This involves a near synchronous…

  19. Solo Librarians Working Collaboratively

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nickel, Robbie

    2011-01-01

    The Elko County School District in Nevada has elementary school librarians that are "solo" librarians. Over the last several years they have worked to collaborate on meeting monthly--even though the district covers 17,100 square miles--and on providing professional development face to face and online. Sharing and collaboration help them to problem…

  20. Collaboration: Assumed or Taught?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaplan, Sandra N.

    2014-01-01

    The relationship between collaboration and gifted and talented students often is assumed to be an easy and successful learning experience. However, the transition from working alone to working with others necessitates an understanding of issues related to ability, sociability, and mobility. Collaboration has been identified as both an asset and a…

  1. The Excitement of Collaboration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCoy, Claire W.

    2000-01-01

    Describes the project called "U2U," a collaboration among the University of Minnesota School of Music, The University of Minnesota dance department, and two urban public school districts in Minneapolis-St. Paul (Minnesota). Presents strategies for collaboratively developing an interdisciplinary curriculum around William Walton's "Facade." Includes…

  2. Proficiency and Collaborative Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shokouhi, Hossein; Alishaei, Zahra

    2009-01-01

    This study reports on the effect of different levels of proficiency on the students' achievements in collaborative learning instruction among 30 Persian-speaking EFL college students. Having been divided into dyads with different levels of proficiency, these subjects participated in nine sessions of collaborative instruction based on the…

  3. Advances in Collaborative Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodriguez-Campos, Liliana

    2012-01-01

    Collaborative evaluation is an approach that offers, among others, many advantages in terms of access to information, quality of information gathered, opportunities for creative problem-solving, and receptivity to findings. In the last decade, collaborative evaluation has grown in popularity along with similar participatory, empowerment, and…

  4. Developing Collaborative Workstations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gabbard, Ralph B.; Kaiser, Anthony; Kaunelis, David

    2007-01-01

    Anyone who spends time on a university campus will notice the number of students working collaboratively on projects. These students often encounter problems finding a place with both space and equipment to support their work. Collaboration usually is also a bit noisier than other coursework. Although the library is often a main meeting place…

  5. University of Delaware Energy Institute

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, Michael T

    2012-09-30

    The main goal of this project funded through this DOE grant is to help in the establishment of the University of Delaware Energy Institute (UDEI) which is designed to be a long-term, on-going project. The broad mission of UDEI is to develop collaborative programs encouraging research activities in the new and emerging energy technologies and to partner with industry and government in meeting the challenges posed by the nation's pressing energy needs.

  6. Electronic Collaboration Logbook

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gysin, Suzanne; Mandrichenko, Igor; Podstavkov, Vladimir; Vittone, Margherita

    2012-12-01

    In HEP, scientific research is performed by large collaborations of organizations and individuals. The logbook of a scientific collaboration is an important part of the collaboration record. Often it contains experimental data. At Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), we developed an Electronic Collaboration Logbook (ECL) application, which is used by about 20 different collaborations, experiments and groups at FNAL. The ECL is the latest iteration of the project formerly known as the Control Room Logbook (CRL). We have been working on mobile (IOS and Android) clients for the ECL. We will present the history, current status and future plans of the project, as well as design, implementation and support solutions made by the project.

  7. Radiological dosimetry measurements in Costa Rica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    León, M.; Santos, F.

    2016-07-01

    The main cause of human exposure to artificial radiation corresponds to medical applications, so it is essential to reduce the dose to patients, workers and consequently the entire population [1]. Although there is no dose limit for patients, is necessary to reduce it to a minimum possible while still getting all the necessary diagnostic information, taking economic and social factors into account [2]. Based on this proposal, agencies such as the International Atomic Energy Agency has been dedicated to providing guidelines levels, whose function is to serve as standards for the optimization of the medical exposure [3]. This research was created as a preliminary survey with the claim of eventually determine the guidance levels in Costa Rica for three different studies of general radiology: Lumbar Spine-AP, Chest - PA and Thoracic Spine - AP (for screens with speeds of 400 and 800), and cranio-caudal study in mammography, applied to Costa Rica's adult population, perform properly in the institutions of Caja Costarricense del Seguro Social (CCSS).

  8. Adapting the U.S. Domestic Radiological Emergency Response Process to an Overseas Incident: FRMAC Without the F

    SciTech Connect

    Blumenthal, Daniel J.; Bowman, David R.; Remick, Alan

    2012-05-01

    The earthquake and resulting tsunami in Japan led to a radiological release from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plan, which in turn resulted in the rapid activation and deployment by the U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA) emergency response teams. These teams and those from other federal agencies are typically coordinated through the Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC) when responding to radiological incidents in the U.S. FRMAC is the body through which the collection, analysis, and assessment of environmental radiological data are coordinated and products released to decision makers. This article discusses DOE/NNSA’s role in the U.S. response to the Fukushima accident as it implemented its components of FRMAC in a foreign country, coordinated its assets, integrated with its federal partners, and collaborated with the Government of Japan. The technical details of the various data collections and analyses are covered in other articles of this issue.

  9. Development of a statewide hospital plan for radiologic emergencies.

    PubMed

    Dainiak, Nicholas; Delli Carpini, Domenico; Bohan, Michael; Werdmann, Michael; Wilds, Edward; Barlow, Agnus; Beck, Charles; Cheng, David; Daly, Nancy; Glazer, Peter; Mas, Peter; Nath, Ravinder; Piontek, Gregory; Price, Kenneth; Albanese, Joseph; Roberts, Kenneth; Salner, Andrew L; Rockwell, Sara

    2006-05-01

    Although general guidelines have been developed for triage of victims in the field and for hospitals to plan for a radiologic event, specific information for clinicians and administrators is not available for guidance in efficient management of radiation victims during their early encounter in the hospital. A consensus document was developed by staff members of four Connecticut hospitals, two institutions of higher learning, and the State of Connecticut Department of Environmental Protection and Office of Emergency Preparedness, with assistance of the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology. The objective was to write a practical manual for clinicians (including radiation oncologists, emergency room physicians, and nursing staff), hospital administrators, radiation safety officers, and other individuals knowledgeable in radiation monitoring that would be useful for evaluation and management of radiation injury. The rationale for and process by which the radiation response plan was developed and implemented in the State of Connecticut are reviewed. Hospital admission pathways are described, based on classification of victims as exposed, contaminated, and/or physically injured. This manual will be of value to those involved in planning the health care response to a radiologic event.

  10. Interventional Radiology Techniques for Provision of Enteral Feeding

    SciTech Connect

    Given, M.F.; Hanson, J.J.; Lee, M.J.

    2005-12-15

    Gastrostomy placement in patients who are unable to maintain their nutrition orally has been attempted using a variety of techniques over the past century. This includes surgical, endoscopic, and, more recently, percutaneous radiologically guided methods. Surgical gastrostomy placement was the method of choice for almost a century, but has since been superseded by both endoscopic and radiological placement. There are a number of indications for gastrostomy placement in clinical practice today, with fewer contraindications due to the recent innovations in technique placement and gastrostomy catheter type. We describe the technique of gastrostomy placement, which we use in our institution, along with appropriate indications and contraindications. In addition, we will discuss the wide variety of catheter types available and their perceived advantages. There remains some debate with regard to gastropexy performance and the use of primary gastrojejunal catheters, which we will address. In addition, we will discuss the advantages and disadvantages of the three major types of gastrostomy placement currently available (i.e., surgical, endoscopic, and radiological) and their associated complications.

  11. Development of a statewide hospital plan for radiologic emergencies

    SciTech Connect

    Dainiak, Nicholas . E-mail: pndain@bpthosp.org; Delli Carpini, Domenico; Bohan, Michael; Werdmann, Michael; Wilds, Edward; Barlow, Agnus; Beck, Charles; Cheng, David; Daly, Nancy; Glazer, Peter; Mas, Peter; Nath, Ravinder; Piontek, Gregory; Price, Kenneth; Albanese, Joseph; Roberts, Kenneth; Salner, Andrew L.; Rockwell, Sara

    2006-05-01

    Although general guidelines have been developed for triage of victims in the field and for hospitals to plan for a radiologic event, specific information for clinicians and administrators is not available for guidance in efficient management of radiation victims during their early encounter in the hospital. A consensus document was developed by staff members of four Connecticut hospitals, two institutions of higher learning, and the State of Connecticut Department of Environmental Protection and Office of Emergency Preparedness, with assistance of the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology. The objective was to write a practical manual for clinicians (including radiation oncologists, emergency room physicians, and nursing staff), hospital administrators, radiation safety officers, and other individuals knowledgeable in radiation monitoring that would be useful for evaluation and management of radiation injury. The rationale for and process by which the radiation response plan was developed and implemented in the State of Connecticut are reviewed. Hospital admission pathways are described, based on classification of victims as exposed, contaminated, and/or physically injured. This manual will be of value to those involved in planning the health care response to a radiologic event.

  12. Evaluating collaborations in comparative effectiveness research: opportunities and challenges for social network analysis.

    PubMed

    Zickafoose, Joseph S; Kimmey, Laura D; Tomas, Amber; Esposito, Dominick; Rich, Eugene

    2014-11-01

    Multidisciplinary, multi-institutional collaboration has become a key feature of comparative effectiveness research (CER), and CER funders have made promotion of these types of collaboration an implicit, and sometimes explicit, goal of funding. An important challenge in evaluating CER programs is understanding if and how different forms of collaboration are associated with successful CER projects. This article explores the potential use of social network analysis to address research questions about the associations between collaboration and the success of CER projects. PMID:25494573

  13. [Interventional radiology: current problems and new directions].

    PubMed

    Santos Martín, E; Crespo Vallejo, E

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, vascular and interventional radiology has become one of the fastest growing diagnostic and therapeutic specialties. This growth has been based on a fundamental concept: performing minimally invasive procedures under imaging guidance. This attractive combination has led to the interest of professionals from other clinical specialties outside radiology in performing this type of intervention. The future of vascular and interventional radiology, although uncertain, must be linked to clinical practice and multidisciplinary teamwork.

  14. Institution Morphisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goguen, Joseph; Rosu, Grigore; Norvig, Peter (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Institutions formalize the intuitive notion of logical system, including both syntax and semantics. A surprising number of different notions of morphisim have been suggested for forming categories with institutions as objects, and a surprising variety of names have been proposed for them. One goal of this paper is to suggest a terminology that is both uniform and informative to replace the current rather chaotic nomenclature. Another goal is to investigate the properties and interrelations of these notions. Following brief expositions of indexed categories, twisted relations, and Kan extensions, we demonstrate and then exploit the duality between institution morphisms in the original sense of Goguen and Burstall, and the 'plain maps' of Meseguer, obtaining simple uniform proofs of completeness and cocompleteness for both resulting categories; because of this duality, we prefer the name 'comorphism' over 'plain map.' We next consider 'theoroidal' morphisms and comorphisims, which generalize signatures to theories, finding that the 'maps' of Meseguer are theoroidal comorphisms, while theoroidal morphisms are a new concept. We then introduce 'forward' and 'semi-natural' morphisms, and appendices discuss institutions for hidden algebra, universal algebra, partial equational logic, and a variant of order sorted algebra supporting partiality.

  15. Institutional betrayal.

    PubMed

    Smith, Carly Parnitzke; Freyd, Jennifer J

    2014-09-01

    A college freshman reports a sexual assault and is met with harassment and insensitive investigative practices leading to her suicide. Former grade school students, now grown, come forward to report childhood abuse perpetrated by clergy, coaches, and teachers--first in trickles and then in waves, exposing multiple perpetrators with decades of unfettered access to victims. Members of the armed services elect to stay quiet about sexual harassment and assault during their military service or risk their careers by speaking up. A Jewish academic struggles to find a name for the systematic destruction of his people in Nazi Germany during the Holocaust. These seemingly disparate experiences have in common trusted and powerful institutions (schools, churches, military, government) acting in ways that visit harm upon those dependent on them for safety and well-being. This is institutional betrayal. The purpose of this article is to describe psychological research that examines the role of institutions in traumatic experiences and psychological distress following these experiences. We demonstrate the ways in which institutional betrayal has been left unseen by both the individuals being betrayed as well as the field of psychology and introduce means by which to identify and address this betrayal. PMID:25197837

  16. Undignifying institutions

    PubMed Central

    Seedhouse, D; Gallagher, A

    2002-01-01

    Declarations of the importance of dignity in health care are commonplace in codes of practice and other mission statements, yet these documents never clarify dignity's meaning. Their vague aspirations are compared to comments from staff and patients about opportunities for and barriers against the promotion of dignity in elderly care institutions. These suggest that while nurses and health care assistants have an intuitive understanding of dignity, they either do not or cannot always bring it about in practice. Thus, despite stated intentions to promote dignity, it appears that the circumstances of at least some elderly care institutions cause patients to experience avoidable indignities. Such institutions are "undignifying institutions" because they fail to acknowledge dignity's basic components, focus excessively on quantifiable priorities, and have insufficient resources available to assure consistently dignifying care. As a partial solution, we argue that health workers should be taught to understand and specify the components of dignity, which will better prepare them to challenge undignifying practices and to recognise opportunities for dignity promotion. PMID:12468656

  17. PACS support: the radiology approach.

    PubMed

    Hasley, Tom

    2002-01-01

    In 1999, Rex Healthcare, a 394-bed facility located in Raleigh, N.C., faced a growing problem. The radiology department was performing a total of 130,000 procedures a year, running out of space to store the film, and having trouble managing the file room. While the IT department was focused on the Y2K scare, radiology forged ahead with a plan to implement PACS on its own at Rex Hospital. Rex had installed a mini-PACS system for ultrasound in 1996, but there was no internal support for the system's hardware or software. Being the first in the area to implement PACS, Rex wasn't able to recruit anyone locally to support the system, so they decided to take two areas that PACS had a great impact on and use their own people. The director of radiology asked the RIS analyst and the Film Library manager, both of whom were registered technologists, to implement and support the PAC system. The key to PACS support is not computer knowledge, although it helps. The key is to understand the radiology department as a whole and the workflow from within, which makes it hard to fully support from an IT perspective. The current PACS team at Rex is composed of a PACS analyst, system support specialist and an electronic imaging center manager. When we went live with PACS, it was obvious that not all of the existing file room personnel would make the technology leap, which they realized themselves. We didn't push anybody out, but we did raise the bar of expectations. By redefining job descriptions and having the EITs (electronic imaging technologists) become more involved, increased respect was quite evident among the hospital staff. The clerks that once only hung and filed films are now troubleshooting CD burners, teaching physicians the PACS, and filming necessary exams. The final key to success is to take ownership of your system. By taking ownership, I mean that a PACS team should be established to do troubleshooting and first-line support, know the servers and application, and feel

  18. [Server World-Wide Web on the Internet for the provision of clinical cases and digital radiologic images for training and continuing education in radiology].

    PubMed

    Sparacia, G; Tartamella, M; Finazzo, M; Bartolotta, T; Brancatelli, G; Banco, A; Lo Casto, A; La Tona, G; Bentivegna, E

    1997-06-01

    The Internet, as a global computer network, provides opportunities to make available multimedia educational materials, such as teaching files and image databases, that can be accessed using "World-Wide Web" client browser to provide continuing medical education. Since August, 1995, at the Institute of Radiology-University of Palermo, we developed a World-Wide Web server on the Internet to provide a collection of interactive radiology educational resources such as teaching files and image database for continuing medical education in radiology. Our server is based on a UNIX workstation connected to the Internet via our campus Ethernet network and reachable at the uniform resource locator (URL) address: http:/(/)mbox.unipa.it/approximately radpa/ radpa.html. Digital CT and MR images for teaching files and image database are downloaded through an Ethernet local area network from a GE Advantage Windows workstation. US images will be acquired on-line through a video digitizing board. Radiographs will be digitized by means of a Charge Coupled Device (CCD) scanner. To set up teaching files, image database and all other documents, we use the standard "HyperText Markup Language" (HTML) to edit the documents, and the Graphics Interchange Format (GIF) or Joint Photographic Expert Group (JPEG) format to store the images. Nine teaching files are presently available on the server, together with 49 images in the database, a list of international radiological servers, a section devoted to the museum of radiology hosted by our Institute, the electronic version of the Journal Eido Electa. In the first 12 months of public access through the Internet, 12,280 users accessed the server worldwide: 45% of them to retrieve teaching files; 35% to retrieve images from the database; the remaining 20% to retrieve other documents. Placing teaching files and image database on a World-Wide Web server makes these cases more available to residents and radiologists to provide continuing medical

  19. The role of radiology in influenza: novel H1N1 and lessons learned from the 1918 pandemic.

    PubMed

    Mollura, Daniel J; Morens, David M; Taubenberger, Jeffery K; Bray, Mike

    2010-09-01

    The pandemic of swine-origin H1N1 influenza that began in early 2009 has provided evidence that radiology can assist in the early diagnosis of severe cases, raising new opportunities for the further development of infectious disease imaging. To help define radiology's role in present and future influenza outbreaks, it is important to understand how radiologists have responded to past epidemics and how these outbreaks influenced the development of imaging science. The authors review the role of radiology in the most severe influenza outbreak in history, the "great pandemic" of 1918, which arrived only 23 years after the discovery of x-rays. In large part because of the coincidental increase in the radiologic capacity of military hospitals for World War I, the 1918 pandemic firmly reinforced the role of radiologists as collaborators with clinicians and pathologists at an early stage in radiology's development, in addition to producing a radical expansion of radiologic research on pulmonary infections. Radiology's solid foundation from the 1918 experience in medical practice and research now affords significant opportunities to respond to the current H1N1 pandemic and future epidemics through similar interdisciplinary strategies that integrate imaging science with pathology, virology, and clinical studies. The broad range of current imaging capabilities will make it possible to study influenza at the cellular level, in animal models, and in human clinical trials to elucidate the pathogenesis of severe illness and improve clinical outcomes.

  20. Radiological Assistance Program Flight Planning Tool

    2011-12-19

    The Radiological Assitance Program (RAP) is the National Nuclear Security Administration's (NNSA) first responder to radiological emergencies. RAP's mission is to identify and minimize radiological hazards, as well as provide radiological emergency response and technical advice to decision makers. One tool commonly used is aerial radiation detection equipment. During a response getting this equipment in the right place quickly is critical. The RAP Flight Planning Tool (a ArcGIS 10 Desktop addin) helps minimize this responsemore » time and provides specific customizable flight path information to the flight staff including maps, coordinates, and azimuths.« less

  1. Implementation of a Radiological Safety Coach program

    SciTech Connect

    Konzen, K.K.; Langsted, J.M.

    1998-02-01

    The Safe Sites of Colorado Radiological Safety program has implemented a Safety Coach position, responsible for mentoring workers and line management by providing effective on-the-job radiological skills training and explanation of the rational for radiological safety requirements. This position is significantly different from a traditional classroom instructor or a facility health physicist, and provides workers with a level of radiological safety guidance not routinely provided by typical training programs. Implementation of this position presents a challenge in providing effective instruction, requiring rapport with the radiological worker not typically developed in the routine radiological training environment. The value of this unique training is discussed in perspective with cost-savings through better radiological control. Measures of success were developed to quantify program performance and providing a realistic picture of the benefits of providing one-on-one or small group training. This paper provides a description of the unique features of the program, measures of success for the program, a formula for implementing this program at other facilities, and a strong argument for the success (or failure) of the program in a time of increased radiological safety emphasis and reduced radiological safety budgets.

  2. Radiological Assistance Program Flight Planning Tool

    SciTech Connect

    Messick, C.; Pham, M.; Ridgeway, J.; Smith, R.

    2011-12-19

    The Radiological Assitance Program (RAP) is the National Nuclear Security Administration's (NNSA) first responder to radiological emergencies. RAP's mission is to identify and minimize radiological hazards, as well as provide radiological emergency response and technical advice to decision makers. One tool commonly used is aerial radiation detection equipment. During a response getting this equipment in the right place quickly is critical. The RAP Flight Planning Tool (a ArcGIS 10 Desktop addin) helps minimize this response time and provides specific customizable flight path information to the flight staff including maps, coordinates, and azimuths.

  3. Performance Assessment Institute-NV

    SciTech Connect

    Lombardo, Joesph

    2012-12-31

    The National Supercomputing Center for Energy and the Environment’s intention is to purchase a multi-purpose computer cluster in support of the Performance Assessment Institute (PA Institute). The PA Institute will serve as a research consortium located in Las Vegas Nevada with membership that includes: national laboratories, universities, industry partners, and domestic and international governments. This center will provide a one-of-a-kind centralized facility for the accumulation of information for use by Institutions of Higher Learning, the U.S. Government, and Regulatory Agencies and approved users. This initiative will enhance and extend High Performance Computing (HPC) resources in Nevada to support critical national and international needs in "scientific confirmation". The PA Institute will be promoted as the leading Modeling, Learning and Research Center worldwide. The program proposes to utilize the existing supercomputing capabilities and alliances of the University of Nevada Las Vegas as a base, and to extend these resource and capabilities through a collaborative relationship with its membership. The PA Institute will provide an academic setting for interactive sharing, learning, mentoring and monitoring of multi-disciplinary performance assessment and performance confirmation information. The role of the PA Institute is to facilitate research, knowledge-increase, and knowledge-sharing among users.

  4. Essential radiology for head injury

    SciTech Connect

    Mok, D.W.H.; Kreel, L.

    1988-01-01

    The book covers the guidelines established by the Royal College of Radiologists for the radiographic evaluation of head injuries. It presents a chapter reviewing the normal radiologic anatomy of the skull in six different projections. The advantages and limitations of each projection are addressed. The third chapter, contains 43 radiographs dedicated to the calcified pineal gland and other intracranial calcifications. The book reports on specific types of fractures: linear fractures of the vault, depressed fractures of the vault, fractures in children, fractures of the base of the skull, and fractures of the facial bones.

  5. Mammography 1984: challenge to radiology

    SciTech Connect

    McLelland, R.

    1984-07-01

    Mammography has made major contributions in the detection and diagnosis of breast cancer. It is the only reliable means of detecting nonpalpable cancers and can detect many small breast cancers in early stages, when they may be curable. It should be applied more widely, especially in screening asymptomatic women aged 40 or over. Restraints on its optimal application to the control of breast cancer are the expense of examination and the lack of properly trained and committed radiologists. These are challenges to radiology that must be addressed.

  6. Increasing diversity in radiologic technology.

    PubMed

    Carwile, Laura

    2003-01-01

    Diversity is increasingly important in the radiologic technology workplace. For significant changes to occur in work force diversity, educators must first recruit and retain students from a wide variety of backgrounds. This article examines personality, race and gender as factors affecting career choice and how educators can use these factors to increase diversity in their programs. An overview of the ASRT's efforts to improve diversity within the profession is presented, along with suggestions for developing effective recruitment and retention plans to increase diversity. PMID:14671827

  7. Childhood arthritis: classification and radiology.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Karl; Gardner-Medwin, Janet

    2002-01-01

    Childhood arthritis has now been reclassified into a single internationally recognized entity of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Radiology provides an important role in the management of JIA, in helping in the differential diagnosis, monitoring disease progression and detecting complications. Traditionally, plain radiographs have been the imaging investigation of choice but magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and ultrasound are now providing a more effective and safer alternative. The appropriate use of sequences in MR imaging is important in the early detection of joint abnormalities in JIA. PMID:11798203

  8. Techniques and indications in radiology

    SciTech Connect

    Lange, S.

    1987-01-01

    The stated purpose of this book is to review modern radiologic diagnostic techniques as applied to the study of the kidney and urinary tract, and their pertinent indications. This goal is partially accomplished in the first two segments of the book, which consist of about 100 pages. These include a synoptic description of various techniques - including classic uroradiologic studies such as excretory urography and retrograde pyelography, plus sonography, computed tomography, angiography, and nuclear medicine. The diagnostic signs and the differential diagnoses are fairly well described, aided by a profusion of tables and diagrams. The overall quality of the reproduction of the illustrations is good.

  9. Managerial accounting applications in radiology.

    PubMed

    Lexa, Frank James; Mehta, Tushar; Seidmann, Abraham

    2005-03-01

    We review the core issues in managerial accounting for radiologists. We introduce the topic and then explore its application to diagnostic imaging. We define key terms such as fixed cost, variable cost, marginal cost, and marginal revenue and discuss their role in understanding the operational and financial implications for a radiology facility by using a cost-volume-profit model. Our work places particular emphasis on the role of managerial accounting in understanding service costs, as well as how it assists executive decision making.

  10. Collaboration in experiential therapy.

    PubMed

    Berdondini, Lucia; Elliott, Robert; Shearer, Joan

    2012-02-01

    We offer a view of the nature and role of client-therapist collaboration in experiential psychotherapy, focusing on Gestalt and emotion-focused therapy (EFT). We distinguish between the necessary condition of mutual trust (the emotional bond between client and therapist) and effective collaboration (regarding the goals and tasks of therapy). Using a case study of experiential therapy for social anxiety, we illustrate how the development of collaboration can be both complex and pivotal for therapeutic success, and how it can involve client and therapist encountering one another through taking risks by openly and nonjudgementally disclosing difficult experiences in order to enrich and advance the work. PMID:23616296

  11. University - industry collaborations: models, drivers and cultures.

    PubMed

    Ehrismann, Dominic; Patel, Dhavalkumar

    2015-01-01

    The way academic institutions and pharmaceutical companies have been approaching collaborations has changed significantly in recent years. A multitude of interaction models were tested and critical factors that drive successful collaborations have been proposed. Based on this experience the current consensus in the pharmaceutical industry is to pursue one of two strategies: an open innovation approach to source discoveries wherever they occur, or investing selectively into scientific partnerships that churn out inventions that can be translated from bench to bedside internally. While these strategies may be intuitive, to form and build sustainable relationships between academia and large multinational healthcare enterprises is proving challenging. In this article we explore some of the more testing aspects of these collaborations, approaches that various industrial players have taken and provide our own views on the matter. We found that understanding and respecting each other's organisational culture and combining the intellectual and technological assets to answer big scientific questions accelerates and improves the quality of every collaboration. Upon discussing the prevailing cooperation models in the university - industry domain, we assert that science-driven collaborations where risks and rewards are shared equally without a commercial agenda in mind are the most impactful. PMID:25658854

  12. Collaborative Electronic Network Building.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiMauro, Vanessa; Jacobs, Gloria

    1995-01-01

    Addresses research questions related to purposeful collaboration as a mechanism for successful teacher professional development in the process of designing a telecommunications network with users. (19 references) (Author/MKR)

  13. 75 FR 9231 - National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney... Kidney Diseases Special Emphasis Panel; Metabolic Dysfunction Collaborative Interdisciplinary Science... Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases Special Emphasis Panel; CAMUS Trial. Date: April 2, 2010....

  14. The Rome Paris collaboration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Signore, M.

    2007-03-01

    Since the first "Twinning CEE Project" between the Group of Francesco Mechiorri and our Laboratory at Observatoire de Paris and Ecole Normale Supérieure, and then through several European Networks and NASA Collaborations on the Cosmic Microwave Background, a long-term and fruitful cooperation has existed between Rome and Paris. This contribution will focus on the human story, the principal results and the possible prospects of this wonderful collaboration.

  15. Collaboration in social networks

    PubMed Central

    Dall’Asta, Luca; Marsili, Matteo; Pin, Paolo

    2012-01-01

    The very notion of social network implies that linked individuals interact repeatedly with each other. This notion allows them not only to learn successful strategies and adapt to them, but also to condition their own behavior on the behavior of others, in a strategic forward looking manner. Game theory of repeated games shows that these circumstances are conducive to the emergence of collaboration in simple games of two players. We investigate the extension of this concept to the case where players are engaged in a local contribution game and show that rationality and credibility of threats identify a class of Nash equilibria—that we call “collaborative equilibria”—that have a precise interpretation in terms of subgraphs of the social network. For large network games, the number of such equilibria is exponentially large in the number of players. When incentives to defect are small, equilibria are supported by local structures whereas when incentives exceed a threshold they acquire a nonlocal nature, which requires a “critical mass” of more than a given fraction of the players to collaborate. Therefore, when incentives are high, an individual deviation typically causes the collapse of collaboration across the whole system. At the same time, higher incentives to defect typically support equilibria with a higher density of collaborators. The resulting picture conforms with several results in sociology and in the experimental literature on game theory, such as the prevalence of collaboration in denser groups and in the structural hubs of sparse networks. PMID:22383559

  16. On the Internationalization of Higher Education Institutions in China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Jun; Dai, Zhongxin

    2012-01-01

    This paper discusses issues concerning the internalization of higher education institutions in China. Internationalization of a university involves the internationalization of the curriculum, the administration and management, collaborative academic research, and exchange of students and staff.

  17. 10 CFR 835.501 - Radiological areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION PROTECTION Entry Control Program § 835.501 Radiological areas. (a) Personnel entry control shall be maintained for each radiological area. (b) The degree of control shall be... methods shall be used to ensure control: (1) Signs and barricades; (2) Control devices on entrances;...

  18. 10 CFR 835.501 - Radiological areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION PROTECTION Entry Control Program § 835.501 Radiological areas. (a) Personnel entry control shall be maintained for each radiological area. (b) The degree of control shall be... methods shall be used to ensure control: (1) Signs and barricades; (2) Control devices on entrances;...

  19. 10 CFR 835.501 - Radiological areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION PROTECTION Entry Control Program § 835.501 Radiological areas. (a) Personnel entry control shall be maintained for each radiological area. (b) The degree of control shall be... methods shall be used to ensure control: (1) Signs and barricades; (2) Control devices on entrances;...

  20. 10 CFR 835.501 - Radiological areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION PROTECTION Entry Control Program § 835.501 Radiological areas. (a) Personnel entry control shall be maintained for each radiological area. (b) The degree of control shall be... methods shall be used to ensure control: (1) Signs and barricades; (2) Control devices on entrances;...

  1. 10 CFR 835.501 - Radiological areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION PROTECTION Entry Control Program § 835.501 Radiological areas. (a) Personnel entry control shall be maintained for each radiological area. (b) The degree of control shall be... methods shall be used to ensure control: (1) Signs and barricades; (2) Control devices on entrances;...

  2. Radiological health aspects of uranium milling

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, D.R.; Stoetzel, G.A.

    1983-05-01

    This report describes the operation of conventional and unconventional uranium milling processes, the potential for occupational exposure to ionizing radiation at the mill, methods for radiological safety, methods of evaluating occupational radiation exposures, and current government regulations for protecting workers and ensuring that standards for radiation protection are adhered to. In addition, a survey of current radiological health practices is summarized.

  3. 10 CFR 835.4 - Radiological units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Radiological units. 835.4 Section 835.4 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION PROTECTION General Provisions § 835.4 Radiological units. Unless otherwise specified, the quantities used in the records required by this part shall be clearly indicated...

  4. 10 CFR 835.4 - Radiological units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Radiological units. 835.4 Section 835.4 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION PROTECTION General Provisions § 835.4 Radiological units. Unless otherwise specified, the quantities used in the records required by this part shall be clearly indicated...

  5. 10 CFR 835.4 - Radiological units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Radiological units. 835.4 Section 835.4 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION PROTECTION General Provisions § 835.4 Radiological units. Unless otherwise specified, the quantities used in the records required by this part shall be clearly indicated...

  6. 10 CFR 835.4 - Radiological units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Radiological units. 835.4 Section 835.4 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION PROTECTION General Provisions § 835.4 Radiological units. Unless otherwise specified, the quantities used in the records required by this part shall be clearly indicated...

  7. 10 CFR 835.4 - Radiological units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Radiological units. 835.4 Section 835.4 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION PROTECTION General Provisions § 835.4 Radiological units. Unless otherwise specified, the quantities used in the records required by this part shall be clearly indicated...

  8. INL@Work Radiological Search & Response Training

    SciTech Connect

    Turnage, Jennifer

    2010-01-01

    Dealing with radiological hazards is just part of the job for many INL scientists and engineers. Dodging bullets isn't. But some Department of Defense personnel may have to do both. INL employee Jennifer Turnage helps train soldiers in the art of detecting radiological and nuclear material. For more information about INL's research projects, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  9. Nevada Test Site Radiological Control Manual

    SciTech Connect

    Radiological Control Managers' Council - Nevada Test Site

    2009-10-01

    This document supersedes DOE/NV/11718--079, “NV/YMP Radiological Control Manual,” Revision 5 issued in November 2004. Brief Description of Revision: A complete revision to reflect the recent changes in compliance requirements with 10 CFR 835, and for use as a reference document for Tenant Organization Radiological Protection Programs.

  10. INL@Work Radiological Search & Response Training

    ScienceCinema

    Turnage, Jennifer

    2016-07-12

    Dealing with radiological hazards is just part of the job for many INL scientists and engineers. Dodging bullets isn't. But some Department of Defense personnel may have to do both. INL employee Jennifer Turnage helps train soldiers in the art of detecting radiological and nuclear material. For more information about INL's research projects, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  11. New trends in radiology workstation design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moise, Adrian; Atkins, M. Stella

    2002-05-01

    In the radiology workstation design, the race for adding more features is now morphing into an iterative user centric design with the focus on ergonomics and usability. The extent of the list of features for the radiology workstation used to be one of the most significant factors for a Picture Archiving and Communication System (PACS) vendor's ability to sell the radiology workstation. Not anymore is now very much the same between the major players in the PACS market. How these features work together distinguishes different radiology workstations. Integration (with the PACS/Radiology Information System (RIS) systems, with the 3D tool, Reporting Tool etc.), usability (user specific preferences, advanced display protocols, smart activation of tools etc.) and efficiency (what is the output a radiologist can generate with the workstation) are now core factors for selecting a workstation. This paper discusses these new trends in radiology workstation design. We demonstrate the importance of the interaction between the PACS vendor (software engineers) and the customer (radiologists) during the radiology workstation design. We focus on iterative aspects of the workstation development, such as the presentation of early prototypes to as many representative users as possible during the software development cycle and present the results of a survey of 8 radiologists on designing a radiology workstation.

  12. Radiological assistance program: Region I. Part I

    SciTech Connect

    Musolino, S.V.; Kuehner, A.V.; Hull, A.P.

    1985-07-15

    The purpose of the Radiological Assistance Program (RAP) is to make DOE resources available and provide emergency assistance to state and local agencies in order to control radiological hazards, protect the public health and safety, and minimize the loss of property. This plan is an integral part of a nationwide program of radiological assistance established by the US DOE, and is implemented on a regional basis. The Brookhaven Area Office (BHO) Radiological Assistance Program is applicable to DOE Region I, which consists of the New England States, New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Delaware, Maryland and the District of Columbia. The BHO RAP-1 has been developed to: (a) ensure the availability of an effective radiological assistance capability to ensure the protection of persons and property; (b) provide guidelines to RAP-1 Team personnel for the evaluation of radiological incidents and implementation of corrective actions; (c) maintain liaison with other DOE installations, Federal, State and local organizations which may become involved in radiological assistance operations in Region I; and (d) encourage development of a local capability to cope with radiological incidents.

  13. Curricular Guidelines for Dental Auxiliary Radiology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Dental Education, 1981

    1981-01-01

    AADS curricular guidelines suggest objectives for these areas of dental auxiliary radiology: physical principles of X-radiation in dentistry, related radiobiological concepts, principles of radiologic health, radiographic technique, x-ray films and intensifying screens, factors contributing to film quality, darkroom, and normal variations in…

  14. Radiological Defense. Planning and Operations Guide. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Civil Defense (DOD), Washington, DC.

    This guide is a reprint of published and draft materials from the Federal Civil Defense Guide. This guide is intended to assist the student in planning, developing, implementing and operating a local, county, or state radiological defense (RADEF) system. The state and local radiological defense program objectives are to create an effective and…

  15. Radiology Aide. Instructor Key [and] Student Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartwein, Jon; Dunham, John

    This manual can be used independently by students in secondary health occupations programs or by persons receiving on-the-job training in a radiology department. The manual includes an instructor's key that provides answers to the activity sheets and unit evaluations. The manual consists of the following five units: (1) orientation to radiology;…

  16. Advances in the radiology of jaundice: a symposium and review

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrucci, J.T. Jr.; Mueller, P.R.; Adson, M.A.; Stanley, R.J.; Stewart, E.T.

    1983-07-01

    New radiologic imaging and interventional techniques have transformed the clinical management of biliary obstruction. Selected aspects of their application were reviewed in a symposium conducted at the 12th annual meeting of the Society of Gastrointestinal Radiologists held recently at Banff, Alberta, Canada. There is a consensus that sonography is the preferred initial screening procedure for bile duct dilatation because of its accuracy and sensitivity although computed tomograph more precisely displays the level and cause of obstruction. Transhepatic drainage provides effective decompression for malignant obstruction, but the high rate of postprocedure catheter dysfunction suggests that an indwelling endoprosthesis may be more suitable for short-term palliation. Endoscopic papillotomy has proven to be successful nonoperative therapy for choledocholithiasis and also permits retrograde placement of transpapillary stents. Communication and collaboration among the radiologist, endoscopist, and biliary surgeon are essential if these new methods are to be applied optimally to the various clinical problems encountered with bile duct obstruction.

  17. Advanced Collaborative Emissions Study (ACES)

    SciTech Connect

    Greenbaum, Daniel; Costantini, Maria; Van Erp, Annemoon; Shaikh, Rashid; Bailey, Brent; Tennant, Chris; Khalek, Imad; Mauderly, Joe; McDonald, Jacob; Zielinska, Barbara; Bemis, Jeffrey; Storey, John; Hallberg, Lance; Clark, Nigel

    2013-12-31

    The objective of the Advanced Collaborative Emissions Study (ACES) was to determine before widespread commercial deployment whether or not the new, energy-efficient, heavy duty diesel engines (2007 and 2010 EPA Emissions Standards Compliant) may generate anticipated toxic emissions that could adversely affect the environment and human health. ACES was planned to take place in three phases. In Phase 1, extensive emissions characterization of four production-intent prototype engine and control systems designed to meet 2007 standards for nitrogen oxides (NOx) and particulate matter (PM) was conducted at an existing emissions characterization facility: Southwest Research Institute (SwRI). One of the tested engines was selected (at random, after careful comparison of results) for health testing in Phase 3. In Phase 2, extensive emission characterization of three production-intent prototype engine and control systems meeting the 2010 standards (including more advanced NOx controls to meet the more stringent 2010 NOx standards) was conducted at the same test facility. In Phase 3, one engine/aftertreatment system selected from Phase 1 was further characterized during health effects studies (at an existing inhalation toxicology laboratory: Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute, [LRRI]) to form the basis of the ACES safety assessment. The Department of Energy (DOE) award provided funding for emissions characterization in Phases 1 and 2 as well as exposure characterization in Phase 3. The main health analyses in Phase 3 were funded separately and are not reported here.

  18. [Co-authorship and collaboration networks in Spanish research into multiple sclerosis (1996-2010)].

    PubMed

    Aleixandre-Benavent, R; Alonso-Arroyo, A; Gonzalez de Dios, J; Sempere, A P; Castello-Cogollos, L; Bolanos-Pizarro, M; Valderrama-Zurian, J C

    2013-08-16

    INTRODUCTION. Scientific collaboration is vital for to the advance of knowledge and is especially important in health sciences. The aim of this study is to identify scientific collaboration indicators and co-authorship networks of researchers and Spanish institutions that publish on multiple sclerosis (MS) during the period 1996-2010. MATERIALS AND METHODS. The analyzed papers were obtained from Web of Science and Scopus international databases, and IBECS and IME national databases, applying specific search profiles in each one of them. In order to identify collaboration networks all signed papers were quantified and co-authored measures were obtained, as the different indexes, degree, intermediation and closeness. RESULTS. 1,613 articles were published in the period 1996-2010, 92% of them in collaboration. With 10 or more works signed in collaboration, 20 Spanish research groups in MS were identified. 64.23% of the papers were published in collaboration between Spanish institutions, and 33.85% were in collaboration with foreign institutions. The institutional participation analysis has identified a large network of institutional partnerships that integrates 27 institutions, with the Hospital Vall d'Hebron in a central position. International collaboration is headed by the U.S. and European countries, most notably the UK and Italy. CONCLUSION. The most collaborative authors, institutions, and work groups in Spanish research in MS have been identified. Despite these indicators that characterize the collaboration in this area, it is necessary to enhance cooperation between them, since this collaboration is positively related to the quality and impact of research and publications. PMID:23884870

  19. [Co-authorship and collaboration networks in Spanish research into multiple sclerosis (1996-2010)].

    PubMed

    Aleixandre-Benavent, R; Alonso-Arroyo, A; Gonzalez de Dios, J; Sempere, A P; Castello-Cogollos, L; Bolanos-Pizarro, M; Valderrama-Zurian, J C

    2013-08-16

    INTRODUCTION. Scientific collaboration is vital for to the advance of knowledge and is especially important in health sciences. The aim of this study is to identify scientific collaboration indicators and co-authorship networks of researchers and Spanish institutions that publish on multiple sclerosis (MS) during the period 1996-2010. MATERIALS AND METHODS. The analyzed papers were obtained from Web of Science and Scopus international databases, and IBECS and IME national databases, applying specific search profiles in each one of them. In order to identify collaboration networks all signed papers were quantified and co-authored measures were obtained, as the different indexes, degree, intermediation and closeness. RESULTS. 1,613 articles were published in the period 1996-2010, 92% of them in collaboration. With 10 or more works signed in collaboration, 20 Spanish research groups in MS were identified. 64.23% of the papers were published in collaboration between Spanish institutions, and 33.85% were in collaboration with foreign institutions. The institutional participation analysis has identified a large network of institutional partnerships that integrates 27 institutions, with the Hospital Vall d'Hebron in a central position. International collaboration is headed by the U.S. and European countries, most notably the UK and Italy. CONCLUSION. The most collaborative authors, institutions, and work groups in Spanish research in MS have been identified. Despite these indicators that characterize the collaboration in this area, it is necessary to enhance cooperation between them, since this collaboration is positively related to the quality and impact of research and publications.

  20. Institutional Change in Higher Education: Innovation and Collaboration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hrabowski, Freeman A., III.

    2014-01-01

    To remain globally competitive and increase the number of young people completing two- and four-year college degrees, America needs to expand access to higher education and focus attention on the success of those who enroll. Expertise in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) will be particularly important for maintaining a…