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Sample records for instruments viii catheters

  1. Intracranial ventricular catheter placement with a smartphone assisted instrument.

    PubMed

    Thomale, Ulrich-W

    2015-01-01

    Mobile technology has recently been introduced for blood pressure measurements or glucose level controls. In surgical disciplines the use of smartphone applications is mostly restricted as training tools or knowledge resources. Simple surgical procedures which are performed often in certain disciplines may be performed with limited accuracy since routine and overwork of medical staff lead to less awareness to possible mistakes. In these cases simple and effective means are necessary to achieve better patient safety.In this context, a surgical instrument for ventricular catheter placement in neurosurgical patients was designed which is assisted by measurements undertaken in a smartphone software application specifically visualizing the use of this instrument and achieving better accuracy for catheter positioning. On theoretical ground, the angulation of the catheter trajectory towards the surface of the skull in a coronal reconstructed CT or MR image is determined as the simplified but the most relevant individual parameter for correct ventricular catheter placement. Transfer of a CT/MRI image onto the smartphone can be performed via mail as anonymous file. Using this image, the trajectory measurement can be performed individually in a few steps by calibration of the image size, definition of the frontal entry point, and virtual placement of the instrument on the surface of the skull. Then the angulation can be adjusted and measured to place the catheter's trajectory towards the ipsilateral ventricle and the catheter length is determined. The parameters are now given by the app and visualized on the image in order to be applied to the surgical site of the patient.The tool represents a widely available and cost-effective solution as navigation technique which is simple to apply in order to achieve better accuracy in ventricular catheter placement for higher safety in a large cohort of neurosurgical patients. PMID:25626554

  2. Chronic swine instrumentation techniques utilizing the GOR-REX peritoneal catheter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, C. C.; White, F. C.; Crisman, R. P.; Wisniewski, J.; McKirnan, D.

    1985-05-01

    The GORE-TEX peritoneal catheter interface is an effective skin interface device for many types of instrumentation in the swine. When properly utilized, the interface allows the development of a stable and effective biological seal which will reduce or eliminate sinus tract formation and resultant systemic infection. The interface is suitable for running any wire or catheter (up to about 2.5mm diameter) through the integument of the animal, thus increasing the possibilities for chronic instrumentation while maintaining a healthy animal. The lack of evidence of any growth phenomenon acting to extrude the interface segment, similar to that observed using other synthetic materials, and the superior biological seal which the interface develops, may allow many chronic studies which were previously not feasible. Using special catheter adapter stubs and an intermittent infusion plug, a sterile, sealed catheter system has decreased the possibilities for introducing pathogens while allowing ready access to the blood stream. Detailed descriptions of surgical implantation techniques and catheter set up and maintenance techniques are included.

  3. Catheter-based photoacoustic endoscope for use in the instrument channel of a clinical video endoscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Joon-Mo; Li, Chiye; Chen, Ruimin; Zhou, Qifa; Shung, K. K.; Wang, Lihong V.

    2015-03-01

    We have successfully developed a fully-sheathed, flexible shaft-based, mechanical scanning photoacoustic endoscopy (PAE) system for imaging the human gastrointestinal tract via the instrument channel of a clinical video endoscope. The endoscopic system uses a single element ultrasonic transducer and flexible shaft-based proximal actuation mechanism, and it has a 2.5 m long and 3.2 mm diameter catheter section, which can be accommodated in the 3.7 mm diameter instrument channel of a clinical video endoscope. Here, we demonstrate the intra-instrument channel workability and in vivo imaging capability of the PAE system.

  4. Development and Testing of an Instrument to Measure Short Peripheral Catheter Insertion Confidence.

    PubMed

    Schuster, Catherine; Stahl, Brian; Murray, Connie; Glover, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    The Peripheral Intravenous Insertion Confidence Assessment for short peripheral catheters is a 10-item, 5-point Likert scale, self-administered tool to measure a person's confidence in his or her personal intravenous insertion skills, including site selection and assessment, procedure, dressing, and documentation. Expert opinion validity was obtained from a panel of 3 infusion therapy leaders. Two-day test-retest reliability and internal consistency were determined using 22 practicing nurses. Individual question correlations ranged from r = 0.93 to 0.16, and the total score correlation was r = 0.96. Using first-test results only, internal consistency was 0.85 (α = 0.85, n = 22). Overall, the insertion confidence assessment is valid and, in the present study, a reliable tool to measure the short peripheral catheter insertion confidence of staff nurses. PMID:27074992

  5. Urinary catheters

    MedlinePlus

    ... provider's office. An indwelling catheter has a small balloon inflated on the end of it. This prevents ... When the catheter needs to be removed, the balloon is deflated. CONDOM CATHETERS Condom catheters can be ...

  6. 21 CFR 876.5090 - Suprapubic urological catheter and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    .... This generic type of device includes the suprapubic catheter and tube, Malecot catheter, catheter punch... (performance standards). (2) Class I for the catheter punch instrument, nondisposable cannula and trocar,...

  7. 21 CFR 876.5090 - Suprapubic urological catheter and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    .... This generic type of device includes the suprapubic catheter and tube, Malecot catheter, catheter punch... (performance standards). (2) Class I for the catheter punch instrument, nondisposable cannula and trocar,...

  8. 21 CFR 876.5090 - Suprapubic urological catheter and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    .... This generic type of device includes the suprapubic catheter and tube, Malecot catheter, catheter punch... (performance standards). (2) Class I for the catheter punch instrument, nondisposable cannula and trocar,...

  9. 21 CFR 876.5090 - Suprapubic urological catheter and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    .... This generic type of device includes the suprapubic catheter and tube, Malecot catheter, catheter punch... (performance standards). (2) Class I for the catheter punch instrument, nondisposable cannula and trocar,...

  10. Umbilical catheters

    MedlinePlus

    ... pregnancy. Two arteries and one vein in the umbilical cord carry blood back and forth. If the ... catheter is a long, soft, hollow tube. An umbilical artery catheter (UAC) allows blood to be taken ...

  11. Factor VIII and glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Ekberg, M; Nilsson, I M

    1975-05-17

    To find out if determination of factor VIII,which most probably is synthetised in the intima of blood-vessesls, is of value for predicting the severity of vessel damge in glomerulonephritis, factor-VIII activity, factor-VIII-related antigen, and glomerular filtration-ratewere esto,ated om 85 patients with early glomerulonephritis on admission, and in 70 of these at follow-up for up to 4 years. The levels of factor-VIII activity and factor-VIII-related antigen on admission were normal in those patients who recovered. Where renal function was impaired on admission or becaome so during follow-up, factor VIII was high. Determination of factor VIII might thus be of prognostic value in early glomerulonephritis. PMID:49471

  12. Urinary catheters

    MedlinePlus

    ... that you use a catheter if you have: Urinary incontinence (leaking urine or being unable to control when ... Surgery Bladder Diseases Spinal Cord Injuries Urethral Disorders Urinary Incontinence Urine and Urination Browse the Encyclopedia A.D. ...

  13. Catheter Angiography

    MedlinePlus

    ... Catheter Angiography? Angiography is a minimally invasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. Angiography uses one of three imaging technologies and, in most cases, a contrast material injection ...

  14. Catheter-based photoacoustic endoscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Joon-Mo; Li, Chiye; Chen, Ruimin; Zhou, Qifa; Shung, K. Kirk; Wang, Lihong V.

    2014-06-01

    We report a flexible shaft-based mechanical scanning photoacoustic endoscopy (PAE) system that can be potentially used for imaging the human gastrointestinal tract via the instrument channel of a clinical video endoscope. The development of such a catheter endoscope has been an important challenge to realize the technique's benefits in clinical settings. We successfully implemented a prototype PAE system that has a 3.2-mm diameter and 2.5-m long catheter section. As the instrument's flexible shaft and scanning tip are fully encapsulated in a plastic catheter, it easily fits within the 3.7-mm diameter instrument channel of a clinical video endoscope. Here, we demonstrate the intra-instrument channel workability and in vivo animal imaging capability of the PAE system.

  15. Central venous catheters - ports

    MedlinePlus

    Central venous catheter - subcutaneous; Port-a-Cath; InfusaPort; PasPort; Subclavian port; Medi - port; Central venous line - port ... catheter is attached to a device called a port that will be under your skin. The port ...

  16. Cytometric Catheter for Neurosurgical Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Evans III, Boyd Mccutchen; Allison, Stephen W; Fillmore, Helen; Broaddus, William C; Dyer, Rachel L; Gillies, George

    2010-01-01

    Implantation of neural progenitor cells into the central nervous system has attracted strong interest for treatment of a variety of pathologies. For example, the replacement of dopamine-producing (DA) neural cells in the brain appears promising for the treatment of patients affected by Parkinson's disease. Previous studies of cell-replacement strategies have shown that less than 90% of implanted cells survive longer than 24 - 48 hours following the implantation procedure. However, it is unknown if these cells were viable upon delivery, or if they were affected by other factors such as brain pathology or an immune response. An instrumented cell-delivery catheter has been developed to assist in answering these questions by facilitating quantification and monitoring of the viability of the cells delivered. The catheter uses a fiber optic probe to perform flourescence-based cytometric measurments on cells exiting the port at the catheter tip. The current implementation of this design is on a 3.2 mm diameter catheter with 245 micrometer diameter optical fibers. Results of fluorescence testing data are presented and show that the device can characterize the quantity of cell densities ranging from 60,000 cells/ml to 600,000 cells/ml with a coefficient of determination of 0.93.

  17. [Suprapubic catheter insertion].

    PubMed

    Neumann, Eva; Schwentner, Christian

    2016-01-01

    The suprapubic catheter enables a percutaneous drainage of urine. The insertion is made superior of the pubic bone through the abdominal wall into the bladder. It allows a permanent drainage of urine bypassing the urethra. The insertion of a suprapubic catheter requires knowledge and expertise. This paper summarizes the basic background and allows to follow the practical application step by step. PMID:26800072

  18. Medical catheters thermally manipulated by fiber optic bundles

    DOEpatents

    Chastagner, Philippe

    1992-01-01

    A maneuverable medical catheter comprising a flexible tube having a functional tip. The catheter is connected to a control source. The functional tip of the catheter carries a plurality of temperature activated elements arranged in parallel and disposed about the functional tip and held in spaced relation at each end. These elements expand when they are heated. A plurality of fiber optic bundles, each bundle having a proximal end attached to the control source and a distal end attached to one of the elements carry light into the elements where the light is absorbed as heat. By varying the optic fiber that is carrying the light and the intensity of the light, the bending of the elements can be controlled and thus the catheter steered. In an alternate embodiment, the catheter carries a medical instrument for gathering a sample of tissue. The instrument may also be deployed and operated by thermal expansion and contraction of its moving parts.

  19. Medical catheters thermally manipulated by fiber optic bundles

    DOEpatents

    Chastagner, P.

    1992-10-06

    A maneuverable medical catheter comprising a flexible tube having a functional tip is described. The catheter is connected to a control source. The functional tip of the catheter carries a plurality of temperature activated elements arranged in parallel and disposed about the functional tip and held in spaced relation at each end. These elements expand when they are heated. A plurality of fiber optic bundles, each bundle having a proximal end attached to the control source and a distal end attached to one of the elements carry light into the elements where the light is absorbed as heat. By varying the optic fiber that is carrying the light and the intensity of the light, the bending of the elements can be controlled and thus the catheter steered. In an alternate embodiment, the catheter carries a medical instrument for gathering a sample of tissue. The instrument may also be deployed and operated by thermal expansion and contraction of its moving parts. 10 figs.

  20. Advanced Imaging Catheter: Final Project Report

    SciTech Connect

    Krulevitch, P; Colston, B; DaSilva, L; Hilken, D; Kluiwstra, J U; Lee, A P; London, R; Miles, R; Schumann, D; Seward, K; Wang, A

    2001-07-20

    Minimally invasive surgery (MIS) is an approach whereby procedures conventionally performed with large and potentially traumatic incisions are replaced by several tiny incisions through which specialized instruments are inserted. Early MIS, often called laparoscopic surgery, used video cameras and laparoscopes to visualize and control the medical devices, which were typically cutting or stapling tools. More recently, catheter-based procedures have become a fast growing sector of all surgeries. In these procedures, small incisions are made into one of the main arteries (e.g. femoral artery in the thigh), and a long thin hollow tube is inserted and positioned near the target area. The key advantage of this technique is that recovery time can be reduced from months to a matter of days. In the United States, over 700,000 catheter procedures are performed annually representing a market of over $350 million. Further growth in this area will require significant improvements in the current catheter technology. In order to effectively navigate a catheter through the tortuous vessels of the body, two capabilities must exist: imaging and positioning. In most cases, catheter procedures rely on radiography for visualization and manual manipulation for positioning of the device. Radiography provides two-dimensional, global images of the vasculature and cannot be used continuously due to radiation exposure to both the patient and physician. Intravascular ultrasound devices are available for continuous local imaging at the catheter tip, but these devices cannot be used simultaneously with therapeutic devices. Catheters are highly compliant devices, and manipulating the catheter is similar to pushing on a string. Often, a guide wire is used to help position the catheter, but this procedure has its own set of problems. Three characteristics are used to describe catheter maneuverability: (1) pushability -- the amount of linear displacement of the distal end (inside body) relative to

  1. Auditing urinary catheter care.

    PubMed

    Dailly, Sue

    Urinary catheters are the main cause of hospital-acquired urinary tract infections among inpatients. Healthcare staff can reduce the risk of patients developing an infection by ensuring they give evidence-based care and by removing the catheter as soon as it is no longer necessary. An audit conducted in a Hampshire hospital demonstrated there was poor documented evidence that best practice was being carried out. Therefore a urinary catheter assessment and monitoring tool was designed to promote best practice and produce clear evidence that care had been provided. PMID:22375340

  2. Sinuplasty (Balloon Catheter Dilation)

    MedlinePlus

    ... development of the balloon dilating catheter and its adaptation to sinus surgery. In the 1980s, the field ... used in endoscopic sinus surgery. It is the adaptation or application of minimally-invasive balloon technology to ...

  3. Indwelling catheter care

    MedlinePlus

    ... Common reasons to have an indwelling catheter are urinary incontinence (leakage), urinary retention (not being able to urinate), ... gov/pubmed/22094023 . Read More Radical prostatectomy Stress urinary incontinence Transurethral resection of the prostate Urge incontinence Urinary ...

  4. Suprapubic catheter care

    MedlinePlus

    ... You may need a catheter because you have urinary incontinence (leakage), urinary retention (not being able to urinate), ... vaginal wall repair Inflatable artificial sphincter Radical prostatectomy Urinary incontinence - injectable implant Urinary incontinence - retropubic suspension Urinary incontinence - ...

  5. Suprapubic catheter care

    MedlinePlus

    ... store. Other supplies you will need are sterile gloves, a catheter pack, syringes, sterile solution to clean ... your back. Put on two pairs of sterile gloves, one over the other. Then: Make sure your ...

  6. Central venous catheter - flushing

    MedlinePlus

    ... To flush your catheter, you will need: Clean paper towels Saline syringes (clear), and maybe heparin syringes ( ... your fingers before washing. Dry with a clean paper towel. Set up your supplies on a clean ...

  7. [Urinary catheter biofilm infections].

    PubMed

    Holá, V; Růzicka, F

    2008-04-01

    Urinary tract infections, most of which are biofilm infections in catheterized patients, account for more than 40% of hospital infections. Bacterial colonization of the urinary tract and catheters causes not only infection but also other complications such as catheter blockage by bacterial encrustation, urolithiasis and pyelonephritis. About 50% of long-term catheterized patients face urinary flow obstruction due to catheter encrustation, but no measure is currently available to prevent it. Encrustation has been known either to result from metabolic dysfunction or to be of microbial origin, with urease positive bacterial species implicated most often. Infectious calculi account for about 15-20% of all cases of urolithiasis and are often associated with biofilm colonization of a long-term indwelling urinary catheter or urethral stent. The use of closed catheter systems is helpful in reducing such problems; nevertheless, such a system only delays the inevitable, with infections emerging a little later. Various coatings intended to prevent the bacterial adhesion to the surface of catheters and implants and thus also the emergence of biofilm infections, unfortunately, do not inhibit the microbial adhesion completely and permanently and the only reliable method for biofilm eradication remains the removal of the foreign body from the patient. PMID:18578409

  8. Molecular structural studies of human factor VIII.

    PubMed

    McKee, P A; Andersen, J C; Switzer, M E

    1975-01-20

    Neither normal nor hemophilic factor VIII protein enters a 5% sosium dodecyl sulfate gel; on reduction, however, a single 195 000-molecular-weight peptide is observed. Hemophilic and normal factor VIII contain carbohydrate and appear identical in subunit molecular weight, electrical charge, and major antigenic determinants. Thrombin activation and inactivation of factor VIII does not detectably change the subunit molecular weight. Trypsin causes similar activity changes and obviously cleaves the factor VIII subunit. Human plasmin destroys factor VIII procoagulant activity and degrades the factor VIII subunit to 103 000-, 88 000-, and 17 000-molecular-weight peptides. Both normal and hemophilic factor VIII as well as thrombin-inactivated factor VIII support ristocetin-induced platelet aggregation. Purified factor VIII chromatographed on 4% agarose in 1.0 M sodium chloride shows no dissociation of the procoagulant activity from the void volume protein. Gel chromatography on 4% agarose in 0.25 M calcium chloride results in a procoagulant activity peak removed from the void volume protein; both peaks contain protein which does not enter a 5% SDS gel, but on reduction a 195 000-molecular-weight subunit band is observed for each. Both the void volume protein peak and the procoagulant activity peak from the 0.25 M calcium chloride-agarose gel column support ristocetin-induced platelet aggregation. After removal of calcium, a small amount of procoagulant activity is present only in the void volume peak. These data suggest that both the procoagulant and von Willebrand activities are on the same molecule. Thus our previous conclusion remains the same: human factor VIII is a large glycoprotein composed of identical 195 000-molecular-weight subunits jointed by disulfide bonds and is responsible for both antihemophilic and von Willebrand activities in human plasma. PMID:122889

  9. Laser welding of balloon catheters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flanagan, Aidan J.

    2003-03-01

    The balloon catheter is one of the principal instruments of non-invasive vascular surgery. It is used most commonly for angioplasty (and in recent years for delivering stents) at a multitude of different sites in the body from small arteries in the heart to the bilary duct. It is composed of a polymer balloon that is attached to a polymer shaft at two points called the distal and proximal bonds. The diverse utility of balloon catheters means a large range of component sizes and materials are used during production; this leads to a complexity of bonding methods and technology. The proximal and distal bonds have been conventionally made using cyanoacrylate or UV curing glue, however with performance requirements of bond strength, flexibility, profile, and manufacturing costs these bonds are increasingly being made by welding using laser, RF, and Hot Jaw methods. This paper describes laser welding of distal and proximal balloon bonds and details beam delivery, bonding mechanisms, bond shaping, laser types, and wavelength choice.

  10. Peripherally inserted central catheter - insertion

    MedlinePlus

    ... central catheters and nontunneled central venous catheters. In: Mauro MA, Murphy KPJ, Thomson KR, et al., eds. ... Procedures . 2nd ed. Philadelphia, PA: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins; 2007:chap 4. Mansour JC, Neiderhuber JE. Establishing and ...

  11. Indwelling catheter care

    MedlinePlus

    ... clean between your fingers and under your nails. Wet one of the washcloths with warm water and soap it up. Gently wash all around the area where the catheter goes in with the soapy washcloth. Females should wipe from front to back. Males should wipe from ...

  12. Catheter-related bloodstream infection.

    PubMed

    Goede, Matthew R; Coopersmith, Craig M

    2009-04-01

    Catheter-related bloodstream infections (CR-BSIs) are a common, frequently preventable complication of central venous catheterization. CR-BSIs can be prevented by strict attention to insertion and maintenance of central venous catheters and removing unneeded catheters as soon as possible. Antiseptic- or antibiotic-impregnated catheters are also an effective tool to prevent infections. The diagnosis of CR-BSI is made largely based on culture results. CR-BSIs should always be treated with antibiotics, and except in rare circumstances the infected catheter needs to be removed. PMID:19281894

  13. Catheter associated urinary tract infections

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Urinary tract infection attributed to the use of an indwelling urinary catheter is one of the most common infections acquired by patients in health care facilities. As biofilm ultimately develops on all of these devices, the major determinant for development of bacteriuria is duration of catheterization. While the proportion of bacteriuric subjects who develop symptomatic infection is low, the high frequency of use of indwelling urinary catheters means there is a substantial burden attributable to these infections. Catheter-acquired urinary infection is the source for about 20% of episodes of health-care acquired bacteremia in acute care facilities, and over 50% in long term care facilities. The most important interventions to prevent bacteriuria and infection are to limit indwelling catheter use and, when catheter use is necessary, to discontinue the catheter as soon as clinically feasible. Infection control programs in health care facilities must implement and monitor strategies to limit catheter-acquired urinary infection, including surveillance of catheter use, appropriateness of catheter indications, and complications. Ultimately, prevention of these infections will require technical advances in catheter materials which prevent biofilm formation. PMID:25075308

  14. Distributed pressure sensors for a urethral catheter.

    PubMed

    Ahmadi, Mahdi; Rajamani, Rajesh; Timm, Gerald; Sezen, A S

    2015-08-01

    A flexible strip that incorporates multiple pressure sensors and is capable of being fixed to a urethral catheter is developed. The urethral catheter thus instrumented will be useful for measurement of pressure in a human urethra during urodynamic testing in a clinic. This would help diagnose the causes of urinary incontinence in patients. Capacitive pressure sensors are fabricated on a flexible polyimide-copper substrate using surface micromachining processes and alignment/assembly of the top and bottom portions of the sensor strip. The developed sensor strip is experimentally evaluated in an in vitro test rig using a pressure chamber. The sensor strip is shown to have adequate sensitivity and repeatability. While the calibration factors for the sensors on the strip vary from one sensor to another, even the least sensitive sensor has a resolution better than 0.1 psi. PMID:26738054

  15. Bispecific antibody mimicking factor VIII.

    PubMed

    Nogami, Keiji

    2016-05-01

    There are some issues in the current factor (F)VIII replacement therapy for severe hemophilia A. One is mental and physical burden for the multiple intravenous infusions, and the other is difficulty in the hemostatic treatment for the patients with FVIII inhibitor. The development of novel drug with fully hemostatic effect, simply procedure, and long-acting reaction has been expected. Recently, FVIIIa-mimicking humanized recombinant bispecific antibody (ACE910) against FIXa and FX was developed. In the non-human clinical study, primate model of acquired hemophilia A demonstrated that the ACE910 was effective on both on-going and spontaneous bleedings. A phase I clinical study was conducted in healthy adults by single subcutaneous infusion of ACE910, followed by the patients' part study, Japanese patients with severe hemophilia A without or with inhibitor were treated with once-weekly subcutaneous injection of ACE910 at three dose levels for 12 successive weeks. There was no significant adverse event related to ACE910 in the clinical and laboratorial findings, and t1/2 of ACE910 was ∼30 days. The median annual bleeding rates were reduced very markedly dose-dependently, independently of inhibitor. Furthermore, among the patients with dose escalation, bleeding rate was decreased as ACE910 dose was increased. In conclusion, ACE910 would have a number of promising features: its high subcutaneous bioavailability and long half-life make the patients possible to be injected subcutaneously with a once-a-week or less frequency. In addition, ACE910 would provide the bleeding prophylactic efficacy, independently of inhibitor. PMID:27207420

  16. FAQs about Catheter-Associated Bloodstream Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... Wear a mask, cap, sterile gown, and sterile gloves when putting in the catheter to keep it ... putting in the catheter. • Clean their hands, wear gloves, and clean the catheter opening with an antiseptic ...

  17. Permcath Catheter Embolization: a Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Yousefshahi, Hadi; Bina, Payvand; Yousefshahi, Fardin

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Nowadays, many types of intravascular devices and catheters are used in order to diagnose and treat diseases. Complications related to these instruments are the costs that doctors and patients have to pay to benefit from their advantages. Catheter embolization is one of these side effects. Patients with devices in their cardiopulmonary system are at risk for severe complications such as arrhythmias, pulmonary embolism, myocardial injuries, hemoptysis, thrombosis and perforation. Case Presentation: A 50-years-old woman, with a history of breast cancer, had a PermCath emplacement in right subclavian vein for a course of chemotherapy. The treatment for cancer seemed to be successful and the PermCath had remained in its position without complication, for a couple of years however, the catheter was founded broken and embolized to the right ventricle and the main left pulmonary artery, diagnosed by a chest X-ray study incidentally. Conclusions: It is better to remove the unused devices safely to prevent and decrease their possible complications. PMID:25964881

  18. 12 CFR 611.1137 - Title VIII service corporations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Title VIII service corporations. 611.1137 Section 611.1137 Banks and Banking FARM CREDIT ADMINISTRATION FARM CREDIT SYSTEM ORGANIZATION Service Organizations § 611.1137 Title VIII service corporations. (a) What is a title VIII service corporation? A...

  19. Heart catheter cable and connector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrison, D. R.; Cota, F. L.; Sandler, H.

    1972-01-01

    Ultraminiature catheter cables that are stiff enough for intravenous insertion yet flexible at the tip, sterilizable, and economical are fabricated entirely from commercially available parts. Assembly includes air passageway for reference pressures and coaxial cable for transmission of signals from the tip of catheter.

  20. A novel method for measuring catheter lock spillage: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Polaschegg, Hans-Dietrich

    2012-09-01

    Catheters are widely used for blood purification, parenteral nutrition, and for the infusion of drugs. Previous work on catheter lock spillage has focused on the theory and in vitro demonstration of catheter lock spillage caused by the laminar flow profile and by fluid exchange caused by density differences. This work describes an in vitro test with a method that potentially allows measurement of catheter lock spillage in vivo without sampling. The method is based on the change of the electrical resistance of the catheter when the lock solution is injected. This method was tested in vitro with human blood at 36°C using 46.7% trisodium citrate as catheter lock solution. The catheter tip was placed in a beaker filled with whole blood. A stainless steel rod in the beaker served as one electrode and an Arrow-Johans ECG adapter, which was placed on the distal end of the catheter, served as a second electrode. Conductivity was measured with a 5V (rms) 310 Hz sinus voltage and a 10 kOhm resistor in series to the catheter. The driving voltage and the voltage drop at the catheter was continuously measured with a program written under LabView (National Instruments), and the results were converted into mean trisodium citrate concentrations. Within 20 min, the mean trisodium citrate concentration in the catheter decreased to less than 5%. Unlike the previous methods used for catheter lock spillage measurement, this principle can be employed to measure the time course of catheter lock spillage in vivo. PMID:22639886

  1. Microwave catheter design.

    PubMed

    Nevels, R D; Arndt, G D; Raffoul, G W; Carl, J R; Pacifico, A

    1998-07-01

    A microwave antenna system for transcatheter ablation of cardiac tissue is investigated. A numerical model based on the finite-difference time-domain method incorporating a Gaussian pulse excitation has been constructed and frequency domain electric and magnetic fields are obtained through Fourier transformation. Results are presented for a coaxial line fed monopole catheter which is modified by the successive inclusion of a Teflon sheath outer coating, a terminating disk at the tip of the antenna, a sleeve choke, and a high dielectric constant cylinder surrounding the monopole antenna. The effects of these design features are characterized in terms of specific absorption rate (SAR) and return loss (RL). Numerical calculations are confirmed by comparing with the RL measurement of a Teflon-coated monopole containing a disk and choke. PMID:9644897

  2. Balloon catheter coronary angioplasty

    SciTech Connect

    Angelini, P.

    1987-01-01

    The author has produced a reference and teaching book on balloon angioplasty. Because it borders in surgery and is performed on an awake patient without circulatory assistance, it is a complex and demanding procedure that requires thorough knowledge before it is attempted. The text is divided into seven sections. The first section describes coronary anatomy and pathophysiology, defines the objectives and mechanisms of the procedure and lists four possible physiologic results. The next section describes equipment in the catheterization laboratory, catheters, guidewires and required personnel. The following section is on the procedure itself and includes a discussion of examination, testing, technique and follow-up. The fourth section details possible complications that can occur during the procedure, such as coronary spasms, occlusion, thrombosis, perforations and ruptures, and also discusses cardiac surgery after failed angioplasty. The fifth section details complex or unusual cases that can occur. The sixth and seventh sections discuss radiation, alternative procedures and the future of angioplasty.

  3. Indication of increase of the lecithin/sphingomyelin (L/S) ratio in lung fluid of lambs maternally treated with metabolite VIII of Bisolvon.

    PubMed

    Egberts, J; Fontijne, P; Wamsteker, K

    1976-01-01

    Metabolite VIII of Bisolvon (Met. VIII) was administered to six pregnant ewes (i.m. daily 5 or 10 mg/kg for 7-9 days). The treatment was started at the 116th/117th or 117th/118th day of gestation and in one case the drug was given to the fetus (i.v. 2 mg/ml/h). Fetal lung fluid obtained from chronically implanted catheters was used for the estimation of the lecithin/sphingomyelin ratio. The maternal treatment with Met. VIII resulted in a significantly increased growth of the L/S ratio compared to the control group (n=4). In three lambs a sharp increase of the L/S ratio was noticed during the last days of Met. VIII treatment. The time gap between first treatment and noticeable effect was 6-8 days. It is postulated that the noticed increase of L/S ratio is the consequence of Met. VIII treatment and very unlikely the result of a release of glucocorticoticoids. PMID:974190

  4. [Catheter-related infections: microbiology].

    PubMed

    Timsit, J F

    2005-03-01

    Coagulase negative staphylococci, Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas sp. are the most frequent microorganisms responsible for catheter-related infections. A relative frequency of microorganisms varies according to the countries, microenvironment and outbreaks of multiresistant bacterias. Infections due to fungi, S. aureus and Pseudomonas sp. are associated with the more severe complications. Recent data suggest that chlorhexidine, either used for cutaneous antisepsis or for catheter impregnation decreases infections due to gram positive cocci. Ecological data should be taken into account when deciding a probabilistic treatment in case of suspicion of catheter-related infection. PMID:15792563

  5. Central venous catheter - dressing change

    MedlinePlus

    ... will need: Sterile gloves Cleaning solution A special sponge A special patch, called a Biopatch A clear ... around the catheter. Clean the skin with the sponge and cleaning solution. Air dry after cleaning. Place ...

  6. Percutaneously inserted central catheter - infants

    MedlinePlus

    PICC - infants; PQC - infants; Pic line - infants; Per-Q cath - infants ... A percutaneously inserted central catheter (PICC) is a long, very thin, soft plastic tube that is put into a small blood vessel. This article addresses PICCs in ...

  7. Peripherally inserted central catheter - flushing

    MedlinePlus

    ... To flush your catheter, you will need: Clean paper towels Saline syringes (clear), and maybe heparin syringes ( ... your fingers before washing. Dry with a clean paper towel. Set up your supplies on a clean ...

  8. A 4-DOF Robot for Positioning Ultrasound Imaging Catheters

    PubMed Central

    Loschak, Paul M.; Degirmenci, Alperen; Tenzer, Yaroslav; Howe, Robert D.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we present the design, fabrication, and testing of a robot for automatically positioning ultrasound imaging catheters. Our system will point ultrasound (US) catheters to provide real-time imaging of anatomical structures and working instruments during minimally invasive surgeries. Manually navigating US catheters is difficult and requires extensive training in order to aim the US imager at desired targets. Therefore, a four DOF robotic system was developed to automatically navigate US imaging catheters for enhanced imaging. A rotational transmission enables three DOF for pitch, yaw, and roll of the imager. This transmission is translated by the fourth DOF. An accuracy analysis was conducted to calculate the maximum allowable joint motion error. Rotational joints must be accurate to within 1.5° and the translational joint must be accurate within 1.4 mm. Motion tests were then conducted to validate the accuracy of the robot. The average resulting errors in positioning of the rotational joints were measured to be 0.28°-0.38° with average measured backlash error 0.44°. Average translational positioning and backlash errors were measured to be significantly lower than the reported accuracy of the position sensor. The resulting joint motion errors were well within the required specifications for accurate robot motion. Such effective navigation of US imaging catheters will enable better visualization in various procedures ranging from cardiac arrhythmia treatment to tumor removal in urological cases. PMID:26925468

  9. 21 CFR 870.1210 - Continuous flush catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1210 Continuous flush catheter. (a) Identification. A continuous flush catheter is an attachment to a catheter-transducer...

  10. 21 CFR 870.1210 - Continuous flush catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1210 Continuous flush catheter. (a) Identification. A continuous flush catheter is an attachment to a catheter-transducer...

  11. 21 CFR 870.1210 - Continuous flush catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1210 Continuous flush catheter. (a) Identification. A continuous flush catheter is an attachment to a catheter-transducer...

  12. 21 CFR 870.1210 - Continuous flush catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1210 Continuous flush catheter. (a) Identification. A continuous flush catheter is an attachment to a catheter-transducer...

  13. 21 CFR 870.1210 - Continuous flush catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1210 Continuous flush catheter. (a) Identification. A continuous flush catheter is an attachment to a catheter-transducer...

  14. Compensation for Unconstrained Catheter Shaft Motion in Cardiac Catheters

    PubMed Central

    Degirmenci, Alperen; Loschak, Paul M.; Tschabrunn, Cory M.; Anter, Elad; Howe, Robert D.

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac catheterization with ultrasound (US) imaging catheters provides real time US imaging from within the heart, but manually navigating a four degree of freedom (DOF) imaging catheter is difficult and requires extensive training. Existing work has demonstrated robotic catheter steering in constrained bench top environments. Closed-loop control in an unconstrained setting, such as patient vasculature, remains a significant challenge due to friction, backlash, and physiological disturbances. In this paper we present a new method for closed-loop control of the catheter tip that can accurately and robustly steer 4-DOF cardiac catheters and other flexible manipulators despite these effects. The performance of the system is demonstrated in a vasculature phantom and an in vivo porcine animal model. During bench top studies the robotic system converged to the desired US imager pose with sub-millimeter and sub-degree-level accuracy. During animal trials the system achieved 2.0 mm and 0.65° accuracy. Accurate and robust robotic navigation of flexible manipulators will enable enhanced visualization and treatment during procedures. PMID:27525170

  15. Per-catheter ASD closure.

    PubMed

    Latson, L A

    1998-01-01

    Per-catheter devices for atrial septal defect (ASD) closure have been evolving since 1974. The four major devices available for use on a limited basis in early 1997 are reviewed. These include (in alphabetical order) the Angel Wing device, the ASDOS device, the Buttoned device, and the CardioSeal device (successor to the Clamshell). Sufficient data have been collected to indicate that transcatheter ASD closure is a viable alternative to surgery in selected patients. The advantages of the concept of per-catheter closure over surgical closure should lead to the continued development of devices and techniques for per-catheter treatment of ASD and other septal defects in the years to come. PMID:9396853

  16. A novel guide catheter enabling intracranial placement.

    PubMed

    Hurley, Michael C; Sherma, Arun K; Surdell, Daniel; Shaibani, Ali; Bendok, Bernard R

    2009-11-15

    We describe use of a novel guide, catheter with a soft and pliable, 6-cm or 12-cm distal segment that enables distal, including intracranial, placement--the Neuron guide catheter (Penumbra, San Leandro, CA)--in the treatment of 11 cases with a range of neuroendovascular lesions. We were able to advance the Neuron guide catheter to the intended level in each case and suffered no complications related to catheter spasm, dissection, thrombosis or thromboembolism. PMID:19670314

  17. Hemodialysis Catheter Care: Identifying Best Cleansing Agents.

    PubMed

    Stupak, Deborah M; Trubilla, Jennifer A; Groller, Susann R

    2016-01-01

    In an attempt to create a standardized resource for cleansing both non-tunneled and tunneled hemodialysis catheters, it was discovered that all disinfectants are not compatible with all catheters. This article describes the process used to identify best practices for hemodialysis catheter care and steps taken to standardize practice throughout a hospital network. Standardized evidence-based practice preserves the integrity of catheters while allowing nurses to provide quality care to patients. PMID:27254970

  18. 21 CFR 876.5090 - Suprapubic urological catheter and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    .... This generic type of device includes the suprapubic catheter and tube, Malecot catheter, catheter punch... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Suprapubic urological catheter and accessories... Suprapubic urological catheter and accessories. (a) Identification. A suprapubic urological catheter...

  19. 32 CFR 2003.8 - Records (Article VIII).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Records (Article VIII). 2003.8 Section 2003.8 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense INFORMATION SECURITY OVERSIGHT OFFICE...) BYLAWS, RULES, AND APPEAL PROCEDURES Bylaws § 2003.8 Records (Article VIII). (a) Integrity of...

  20. 32 CFR 2003.8 - Records (Article VIII).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Records (Article VIII). 2003.8 Section 2003.8 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense INFORMATION SECURITY OVERSIGHT OFFICE...) BYLAWS, RULES, AND APPEAL PROCEDURES Bylaws § 2003.8 Records (Article VIII). (a) Integrity of...

  1. 77 FR 64401 - Order of Succession for HUD Region VIII

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-19

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Order of Succession for HUD Region VIII AGENCY: Office of Field Policy and Management, HUD. ACTION: Notice of Order of Succession. SUMMARY: In this notice, the Assistant Deputy Secretary... Succession for the Denver Regional Office and its Field Offices (Region VIII). This Order of...

  2. Possible Pasts: Historiography and Legitimation in "Henry VIII."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kamps, Ivo

    1996-01-01

    Aims to rehabilitate the reputation of Shakespeare's "Henry VIII" and emphasizes its potential usefulness in the classroom by reconsidering it in the context of Renaissance history writing. Shows how "Henry VIII" can be taught as a commentary on or seen as a continuation of incipient themes in "The Tempest" and "Henry V." (TB)

  3. Blood Clotting Factor VIII: From Evolution to Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Orlova, N. A.; Kovnir, S. V.; Vorobiev, I. I.; Gabibov, A. G.; Vorobiev, A. I.

    2013-01-01

    Recombinant blood clotting factor VIII is one of the most complex proteins for industrial manufacturing due to the low efficiency of its gene transcription, massive intracellular loss of its proprotein during post-translational processing, and the instability of the secreted protein. Improvement in hemophilia A therapy requires a steady increase in the production of factor VIII drugs despite tightening standards of product quality and viral safety. More efficient systems for heterologous expression of factor VIII can be created on the basis of the discovered properties of its gene transcription, post-translational processing, and behavior in the bloodstream. The present review describes the deletion variants of factor VIII protein with increased secretion efficiency and the prospects for the pharmaceutical development of longer acting variants and derivatives of factor VIII. PMID:23819034

  4. Patency and Complications of Translumbar Dialysis Catheters.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fanna; Bennett, Stacy; Arrigain, Susana; Schold, Jesse; Heyka, Robert; McLennan, Gordon; Navaneethan, Sankar D

    2015-01-01

    Translumbar tunneled dialysis catheter (TLDC) is a temporary dialysis access for patients exhausted traditional access for dialysis. While few small studies reported successes with TLDC, additional studies are warranted to understand the short- and long-term patency and safety of TLDC. We conducted a retrospective analysis of adult patients who received TLDC for hemodialysis access from June 2006 to June 2013. Patient demographics, comorbid conditions, dialysis details, catheter insertion procedures and associated complications, catheter patency, and patient survival data were collected. Catheter patency was studied using Kaplan-Meier curve; catheter functionality was assessed with catheter intervals and catheter-related complications were used to estimate catheter safety. There were 84 TLDCs inserted in 28 patients with 28 primary insertions and 56 exchanges. All TLDC insertions were technically successful with good blood flow during dialysis (>300 ml/minute) and no immediate complications (major bleeding or clotting) were noted. The median number of days in place for initial catheter, secondary catheter, and total catheter were 65, 84, and 244 respectively. The catheter patency rate at 3, 6, and 12 months were 43%, 25%, and 7% respectively. The main complications were poor blood flow (40%) and catheter-related infection (36%), which led to 30.8% and 35.9% catheter removal, respectively. After translumbar catheter, 42.8% of the patients were successfully converted to another vascular access or peritoneal dialysis. This study data suggest that TLDC might serve as a safe, alternate access for dialysis patients in short-term who have exhausted conventional vascular access. PMID:25800550

  5. Minimizing the complications associated with migrating catheters.

    PubMed

    Billington, A; Crane, C; Jownally, S; Kirkwood, L; Roodhouse, A

    2008-11-01

    This article seeks to explore the clinical practice of urinary catheter fixation. Traditionally, this area of practice has been neglected and nurses are familiar with tension lesions and dermal problems associated with inappropriate or incorrect urinary catheter fixation. A novel solution to this problem is a catheter fixation device. This device secures the catheter safely, making clinical practice safer and the experience of catheterization more tolerable for the patient. An example of a urinary catheter fixation device available in the UK is Bard's StatLock. PMID:18981965

  6. Modified Thoracoscopic Hepatectomy For Segment VIII

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hongyu; Wei, Yonggang; Li, Bo; Peng, Bing

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Although previous studies have reported the use of total thoracoscopic hepatectomy (TH) for malignant liver tumors, it is technically impossible to perform intraoperative ultrasonography (IUSO) to exclude intrahepatic metastasis for the whole liver via a thoracic approach. Therefore, total TH may be inappropriate for these patients. We here report the first case of modified TH for a malignant liver tumor in China. The patient was a 26-year-old man with a 10-year HBV infection. Preoperative CT showed a 1.2 cm × 0.9 cm mass located in segment VIII. His alpha-fetal protein level was 444 ng/mL. Child–Pugh was Grade (A, 6), whereas an ICG-15 test yielded 2.7%. HCC was diagnosed preoperatively. The indications for TH were difficult tumor location, HCC, and a young patient with good resilience. The modified TH included 2 steps: (1) the patient was placed in a supine position. IUSO was used to locate the tumor in segment VIII and determine that intrahepatic metastasis had not occurred. The hepatoduodenal ligament was hanged over using a Pringle maneuver; (2) patient was then placed in the left-lateral position with single-lung ventilation. Three trocars were placed into the right thoracic cavity. The intra-thoracic space was observed using a regular 10-mm rigid scope. The diaphragm was transected and retracted. IUSO was used again to confirm the tumor location. Under the Pringle maneuver (once every 10 min), the superficial portion of the liver was transected by ultrasonic shears, whereas the deeper tissue was transected by LigaSure. Bipolar was used for hemostasis. The specimen was put into a retrieval bag and removed from the abdominal trocar. The diaphragm was repaired by running suturing. The operation time was 260 minutes and estimated blood loss was 30 mL. The patient was discharged on postoperative day 5 with normal liver function. No complications arose. Total TH may be inappropriate for malignant liver tumors due to the limitation of IUSO

  7. Sensitivity of the reaction time of the resonance thrombogram for factor VIII:C and factor IX deficiencies in the blood of dogs with haemophilia A or B.

    PubMed

    Mischke, R

    2000-09-01

    The sensitivity of the reaction time of the resonance thrombogram (RTG-r) was examined for two instruments based on 105 canine samples with a reduced factor VIII:C activity and 26 samples with a reduced factor IX activity. These samples were taken from dogs suffering from haemophilia A (n=18) or B (n=3) before and at different times after the substitution therapy with fresh frozen plasma. The RTG-r sensitivity was low; with reference to the total of all examined samples, it was between 0.39 and 0.65 for the factor VIII:C activity and between 0.46 and 0.62 for the factor IX activity, depending on the instrument and the testing procedure used. Low sensitivity was shown especially by the fact that even some of the samples with a factor VIII:C activity < 5% showed false negative results. Moreover, the correlation found between RTG-r and factor VIII:C activity (Spearman's rank correlation coefficient, r(S)=-0.556 to -0.700) as well as between factor IX activity and RTG-r (r(S)=-0.380 to -0.612) was only moderate. The low sensitivity of the RTG towards a reduced activity of the haemophilia factors VIII:C and IX contradicts the exclusive use of the RTG for monitoring haemophilic dogs as well as a global screening test for the haemostasis of dogs. PMID:11012705

  8. Indwelling catheters for the management of refractory malignant ascites: a systematic literature overview and retrospective chart review.

    PubMed

    Fleming, Nicole D; Alvarez-Secord, Angeles; Von Gruenigen, Vivian; Miller, Michael J; Abernethy, Amy P

    2009-09-01

    The safety and efficacy of indwelling intraperitoneal (IP) catheters for the management of refractory malignant ascites is unclear. A systematic literature overview and retrospective chart review of patients with malignant refractory ascites who underwent indwelling IP catheter placement was performed. Standardized literature abstraction and chart review templates were used to ensure that consistent information was collected. Fifteen publications met literature search criteria, representing 221 patients. Tenckhoff (Quinton Instrument Company, Seattle, WA, USA), Pleurex (Denver Biomedical Inc., Golden, CO, USA), and peritoneal catheters were used, along with IP ports. A median 5.9% of cases (range: 2.5%-34%) had documented peritonitis. In the literature, untunneled catheters were most commonly associated with infections. Our chart review added 19 cases from two academic institutions to this literature (median age: 60 years [range: 31-85]; females: 17 [89%]; gynecological malignancies: 14 [73%]). Palliative management before catheter placement included diuretics (n=4 [21%]) and multiple paracenteses (n=11 [58%] had two or more taps [range: 2-8]). Median time from diagnosis to catheter placement was 25 months (range: 1-77). Interventions were: French pigtail catheters (n=16 [84%]), Tenckhoff catheter (n=1 [5%]), and Port-A-Caths (Smith Medical MD, St. Paul, MN, USA) (n=2; 11%). Four (21%) catheters were tunneled. Prophylactic antibiotics were prescribed in six cases (32%). Two cases (11%) had documented infections, seven catheters (37%) became occluded, and two leaked (11%). The median time from catheter until death was 36 days (range: 4-660). Nine patients (47%) were admitted to hospice. In these retrospective studies, indwelling IP catheters appear to be a safe and effective palliative strategy to manage refractory malignant ascites, without overwhelming infection rates. PMID:19328648

  9. 40 CFR Appendix Viii to Part 268 - LDR Effective Dates of Injected Prohibited Hazardous Wastes

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false LDR Effective Dates of Injected Prohibited Hazardous Wastes VIII Appendix VIII to Part 268 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) LAND DISPOSAL RESTRICTIONS Pt. 268, App. VIII Appendix VIII to Part 268—LDR Effective Dates...

  10. 40 CFR Appendix Viii to Part 268 - LDR Effective Dates of Injected Prohibited Hazardous Wastes

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false LDR Effective Dates of Injected Prohibited Hazardous Wastes VIII Appendix VIII to Part 268 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) LAND DISPOSAL RESTRICTIONS Pt. 268, App. VIII Appendix VIII to Part 268—LDR Effective Dates...

  11. 19 CFR Annex Viii-B to Part 351 - Schedule for Expedited Sunset Reviews

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Schedule for Expedited Sunset Reviews VIII Annex VIII-B to Part 351 Customs Duties INTERNATIONAL TRADE ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE ANTIDUMPING AND COUNTERVAILING DUTIES Pt. 351, Annex VIII-B Annex VIII-B to Part 351—Schedule for...

  12. 19 CFR Annex Viii-C to Part 351 - Schedule for Full Sunset Reviews

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Schedule for Full Sunset Reviews VIII Annex VIII-C to Part 351 Customs Duties INTERNATIONAL TRADE ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE ANTIDUMPING AND COUNTERVAILING DUTIES Pt. 351, Annex VIII-C Annex VIII-C to Part 351—Schedule for Full Sunset Reviews Day 1...

  13. 19 CFR Annex Viii-A to Part 351 - Schedule for 90-Day Sunset Reviews

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Schedule for 90-Day Sunset Reviews VIII Annex VIII-A to Part 351 Customs Duties INTERNATIONAL TRADE ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE ANTIDUMPING AND COUNTERVAILING DUTIES Pt. 351, Annex VIII-A Annex VIII-A to Part 351—Schedule for 90-Day...

  14. 19 CFR Annex Viii-B to Part 351 - Schedule for Expedited Sunset Reviews

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Schedule for Expedited Sunset Reviews VIII Annex VIII-B to Part 351 Customs Duties INTERNATIONAL TRADE ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE ANTIDUMPING AND COUNTERVAILING DUTIES Pt. 351, Annex VIII-B Annex VIII-B to Part 351—Schedule for...

  15. 19 CFR Annex Viii-A to Part 351 - Schedule for 90-Day Sunset Reviews

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Schedule for 90-Day Sunset Reviews VIII Annex VIII-A to Part 351 Customs Duties INTERNATIONAL TRADE ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE ANTIDUMPING AND COUNTERVAILING DUTIES Pt. 351, Annex VIII-A Annex VIII-A to Part 351—Schedule for 90-Day...

  16. 19 CFR Annex Viii-C to Part 351 - Schedule for Full Sunset Reviews

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Schedule for Full Sunset Reviews VIII Annex VIII-C to Part 351 Customs Duties INTERNATIONAL TRADE ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE ANTIDUMPING AND COUNTERVAILING DUTIES Pt. 351, Annex VIII-C Annex VIII-C to Part 351—Schedule for Full Sunset Reviews Day 1...

  17. Factoring in Factor VIII With Acute Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Siegler, James E.; Samai, Alyana; Albright, Karen C.; Boehme, Amelia K.; Martin-Schild, Sheryl

    2016-01-01

    There is growing research interest into the etiologies of cryptogenic stroke, in particular as it relates to hypercoagulable states. An elevation in serum levels of the procoagulant factor VIII is recognized as one such culprit of occult cerebral infarctions. It is the objective of the present review to summarize the molecular role of factor VIII in thrombogenesis and its clinical use in the diagnosis and prognosis of acute ischemic stroke. We also discuss the utility of screening for serum factor VIII levels among patients at risk for, or those who have experienced, ischemic stroke. PMID:25669199

  18. Calcium phosphate in catheter encrustation.

    PubMed

    Cox, A J; Harries, J E; Hukins, D W; Kennedy, A P; Sutton, T M

    1987-02-01

    Encrusted catheters from nine female patients were the source of samples of deposits which were examined by X-ray diffraction, atomic absorption spectroscopy, infra-red spectroscopy and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy. In eight samples the only crystalline phase which could be clearly distinguished by X-ray diffraction was ammonium magnesium orthophosphate hexahydrate, NH4MgPO4 X 6H2O, which occurs naturally as the mineral struvite. However, atomic absorption spectroscopy revealed an appreciable concentration of calcium in all samples. Calcium phosphates have previously been detected in catheter deposits. Infra-red and EXAFS spectra were consistent with the calcium phosphate being present as a poorly crystalline hydroxyapatite. Thus the deposits appear to consist of a mixture of crystalline struvite and a form of hydroxyapatite which is not fully crystalline. PMID:3030487

  19. Optimization of dialysis catheter function.

    PubMed

    Gallieni, Maurizio; Giordano, Antonino; Rossi, Umberto; Cariati, Maurizio

    2016-03-01

    Central venous catheters (CVCs) are essential in the management of hemodialysis patients, but they also carry unintended negative consequences and in particular thrombosis and infection, adversely affecting patient morbidity and mortality. This review will focus on the etiology, prevention, and management of CVC-related dysfunction, which is mainly associated with inadequate blood flow. CVC dysfunction is a major cause of inadequate depuration. Thrombus, intraluminal and extrinsic, as well as fibrous connective tissue sheath (traditionally indicated as fibrin sheath) formation play a central role in establishing CVC dysfunction. Thrombolysis with urokinase or recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rTPA) can be undertaken in the dialysis unit, restoring adequate blood flow in most patients, preserving the existing catheter, and avoiding an interventional procedure. If thrombolytics fail, mainly because of the presence of fibrous connective tissue sheath, catheter exchange with fibrin sheath disruption may be successful and preserve the venous access site. Prevention of CVC dysfunction is important for containing costly pharmacologic and interventional treatments, which also affect patients' quality of life. Prevention is based on the use of anticoagulant and/or thrombolytic CVC locks, which are only partially effective. Chronic oral anticoagulation with warfarin has also been proposed, but its use for this indication is controversial and its overall risk-benefit profile has not been clearly established. PMID:26951903

  20. Central vascular catheters and infections.

    PubMed

    Dioni, Elisabetta; Franceschini, Renata; Marzollo, Roberto; Oprandi, Daniela; Chirico, Gaetano

    2014-03-01

    Newborn infants in critical conditions require a permanent intra-venous line to allow for the administration of fluids, parenteral nutrition and drugs. The use of central venous catheters, however, is associated with an increased risk of infections, leading to prolongation of length of stay and higher hospitalization costs, particularly in extremely preterm infants. Dwell time is a significant factor for complications, with a predicted risk of catheter related infections of about 4 per 1000 catheter-days. To reduce the incidence of complications, several requirements must be met, including adequate staff and resources to provide education, training, and quality improvement programs, within a culture of communication and teamwork. Rigorous reporting schedule on line care and the implementation of unique bundle elements, the use of health care failure mode and effect analysis, the judicious use of antibiotics through an antimicrobial stewardship strategy, the application of specific antifungal prophylaxis are among the most effective interventions, while the addition of heparin to parenteral solution, or the use of antibiotic plus heparin lock therapy are under evaluation. Nursing assistance plays a fundamental role in managing central venous lines and in reducing or preventing the incidence of infection, by the application of several complex professional strategies. PMID:24709460

  1. Tensile set behavior of Foley catheter balloons.

    PubMed

    Joseph, R; Ramesh, P; Sivakumar, R

    1999-01-01

    The removal of indwelling urinary balloon catheters from patients is usually associated with many problems. The problems such as balloon deflation failure; encrustations on balloons, eyes, and lumen; and catheter associated infections are widely discussed in the literature. The tensile set exhibited by the catheter balloon material could also play a role and further complicate the removal process. This article addresses this issue by comparing the tensile set behavior of the balloon material from three commercially available Foley catheters. The balloon materials were subjected to aging in synthetic urine at 37 degrees C for 28 days to simulate clinical conditions. The deflation time of catheter balloons aged in similar conditions were also measured. It was found that different brands of catheters exhibited statistically significant differences in their properties. The tensile set data of the aged samples could be correlated with the deflation time of the balloons. The clinical significance of the tensile set is also highlighted. PMID:10029146

  2. Position Control of Motion Compensation Cardiac Catheters.

    PubMed

    Kesner, Samuel B; Howe, Robert D

    2011-07-21

    Robotic catheters have the potential to revolutionize cardiac surgery by enabling minimally invasive structural repairs within the beating heart. This paper presents an actuated catheter system that compensates for the fast motion of cardiac tissue using 3D ultrasound image guidance. We describe the design and operation of the mechanical drive system and catheter module and analyze the catheter performance limitations of friction and backlash in detail. To mitigate these limitations, we propose and evaluate mechanical and control system compensation methods, including inverse and model-based backlash compensation, to improve the system performance. Finally, in vivo results are presented that demonstrate that the catheter can track the cardiac tissue motion with less than 1 mm RMS error. The ultimate goal of this research is to create a fast and dexterous robotic catheter system that can perform surgery on the delicate structures inside of the beating heart. PMID:21874124

  3. Accidental Entrapment of Electrical Mapping Catheter by Chiari's Network in Right Atrium during Catheter Ablation Procedure

    PubMed Central

    Sakamoto, Atsushi; Urushida, Tsuyoshi; Sakakibara, Tomoaki; Sano, Makoto; Suwa, Kenichiro; Saitoh, Takeji; Saotome, Masao; Katoh, Hideki; Satoh, Hiroshi; Hayashi, Hideharu

    2016-01-01

    A 78-year-old male was admitted to our hospital due to frequent palpitation. His electrocardiogram (ECG) presented regular narrow QRS tachycardia with 170 bpm, and catheter ablation was planned. During electroanatomical mapping of the right atrium (RA) with a multiloop mapping catheter, the catheter head was entrapped nearby the ostium of inferior vena cava. Rotation and traction of the catheter failed to detach the catheter head from the RA wall. Exfoliation of connective tissue twined around catheter tip by forceps, which were designed for endomyocardial biopsy, succeeded to retract and remove the catheter. Postprocedural echocardiography and pathologic examination proved the existence of Chiari's network. The handling of complex catheters in the RA has a potential risk of entrapment with Chiari's network. PMID:27366332

  4. Translumbar placement of paired hemodialysis catheters (Tesio Catheters) and follow-up in 10 patients

    SciTech Connect

    Biswal, Rajiv; Nosher, John L.; Siegel, Randall L.; Bodner, Leonard J.

    2000-01-15

    For lack of other suitable access, 10 consecutive patients received paired hemodialysis catheters for long-term hemodialysis using a translumbar approach to the inferior vena cava (IVC). All attempts were successful. Five paired catheters were placed using the single-puncture technique, and five using the dual-puncture technique. Catheters were in place for a total of 2252 catheter days. The average duration of catheter placement was 250 days (range 30-580 days). All catheters were functioning up to the time the study was completed or the patient died. The most common complication was partial dislodgment of the catheter in 3 of 23 catheters (13%), all occurring in obese patients. One episode of retroperitoneal hemorrhage was noted in a patient having the single-access technique. There were no episodes of infection or IVC thrombosis.

  5. Anisotropic Bianchi types VIII and IX locally rotationally symmetric cosmologies

    SciTech Connect

    Assad, M.J.D.; Soares, I.D.

    1983-10-15

    We present a class of exact cosmological solutions of Einstein-Maxwell equations, which are anisotropic and spatially homogeneous of Bianchi types VIII and IX, and class IIIb in the Stewart-Ellis classification of locally rotationally symmetric models. If we take the electromagnetic field equal to zero, a class of Bianchi types VIII/IX spatially homogeneous anisotropic cosmological solutions with perfect fluid is obtained.

  6. Tumbling and spaceflight: the Gemini VIII experience.

    PubMed

    Mohler, S R; Nicogossian, A E; McCormack, P D; Mohler, S R

    1990-01-01

    A malfunctioning orbital flight attitude thruster during the flight of Gemini VIII led to acceleration forces on astronauts Neil Armstrong (commander) and David Scott (pilot) that created the potential for derogation of oculo-vestibular and eye-hand coordination effects. The spacecraft attained an axial tumbling rotation of 50 rpm and would have exceeded this had not the commander accurately diagnosed the problem and taken immediate corrective action. By the time counter-measure controls were applied, both astronauts were experiencing vertigo and the physiological effects of the tumbling acceleration. Data from the recorders reveal that one astronaut experienced -Gy of 0.92 G-units, and the other +Gy of 0.92 for approximately 46 s. Both received a -Gz of 0.89 G-units from the waist up with a +Gz of 0.05 from the waist down. A substantial increase of time and/or an increase in rpm would ultimately have produced incapacitation of both astronauts. NASA corrected the Gemini thruster problem by changing the ignition system wiring. Future space-craft undertaking long-term missions could be equipped with unambiguous thruster fault displays and could have computer-controlled automatic cutoffs to control excessive thruster burns. PMID:2302130

  7. Hunting down factor VIII in the immunopeptidome.

    PubMed

    Hartholt, Robin B; Peyron, Ivan; Voorberg, Jan

    2016-03-01

    Major histocompatibility complex class II (MHCII)-restricted peptide presentation is crucial for the selection and subsequent proliferation of antigen specific CD4+ T cells. While selection of antigen-specific CD4+ T cells is beneficial in the context of vaccination, emergence of antigen CD4+ T cells following administration of therapeutic proteins like factor VIII (FVIII) is not desirable. The mechanism of uptake, processing and presentation of FVIII by antigen-presenting cells (APCs) has been the subject of intense study over the past 10 years. Multiple receptors have been implicated in the uptake of FVIII by APCs. A crucial determinant directing its entry in APCs resides in the C1 domain of FVIII. Until recently, our knowledge on the repertoire of FVIII derived presented on MHCII was limited. Peptide sequences on FVIII recognized by CD4+ T cells have been identified using MHCII tetramers as well as by directly monitoring peptide-induced proliferation of CD4+ T cells. More recently, the repertoire of naturally presented peptides derived from FVIII has been identified by pulsing of immature dendritic cells with FVIII. In a complementary approach HLA-DRB1(∗)15 transgenic mice were used to identify HLA-DRB1(∗)15 restricted CD4+ T cells reactive towards human FVIII. In this review we summarize our current knowledge on FVIII derived peptides that are presented on MHCII and discuss the relevance of these findings for the etiology of inhibitor development in patients with hemophilia A. PMID:26610639

  8. Genetic map of Salmonella typhimurium, edition VIII.

    PubMed Central

    Sanderson, K E; Hessel, A; Rudd, K E

    1995-01-01

    We present edition VIII of the genetic map of Salmonella typhimurium LT2. We list a total of 1,159 genes, 1,080 of which have been located on the circular chromosome and 29 of which are on pSLT, the 90-kb plasmid usually found in LT2 lines. The remaining 50 genes are not yet mapped. The coordinate system used in this edition is neither minutes of transfer time in conjugation crosses nor units representing "phage lengths" of DNA of the transducing phage P22, as used in earlier editions, but centisomes and kilobases based on physical analysis of the lengths of DNA segments between genes. Some of these lengths have been determined by digestion of DNA by rare-cutting endonucleases and separation of fragments by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. Other lengths have been determined by analysis of DNA sequences in GenBank. We have constructed StySeq1, which incorporates all Salmonella DNA sequence data known to us. StySeq1 comprises over 548 kb of nonredundant chromosomal genomic sequences, representing 11.4% of the chromosome, which is estimated to be just over 4,800 kb in length. Most of these sequences were assigned locations on the chromosome, in some cases by analogy with mapped Escherichia coli sequences. PMID:7603411

  9. 21 CFR 870.1200 - Diagnostic intravascular catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... intracardiac pressures, to sample blood, and to introduce substances into the heart and vessels. Included in this generic device are right-heart catheters, left-heart catheters, and angiographic catheters,...

  10. 21 CFR 870.1200 - Diagnostic intravascular catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... intracardiac pressures, to sample blood, and to introduce substances into the heart and vessels. Included in this generic device are right-heart catheters, left-heart catheters, and angiographic catheters,...

  11. 21 CFR 870.1200 - Diagnostic intravascular catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... intracardiac pressures, to sample blood, and to introduce substances into the heart and vessels. Included in this generic device are right-heart catheters, left-heart catheters, and angiographic catheters,...

  12. 21 CFR 870.1200 - Diagnostic intravascular catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... intracardiac pressures, to sample blood, and to introduce substances into the heart and vessels. Included in this generic device are right-heart catheters, left-heart catheters, and angiographic catheters,...

  13. 21 CFR 870.1200 - Diagnostic intravascular catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... intracardiac pressures, to sample blood, and to introduce substances into the heart and vessels. Included in this generic device are right-heart catheters, left-heart catheters, and angiographic catheters,...

  14. Renal infarction and immune-mediated glomerulonephritis in sheep (Ovis aries) chronically implanted with indwelling catheters.

    PubMed

    Rao, Varada P; Poutahidis, Theofilos; Marini, Robert P; Holcombe, Hilda; Rogers, Arlin B; Fox, James G

    2006-07-01

    Microbial infections are common sequelae in humans and animals implanted with long-term intravascular catheters. Understanding the pathophysiology of infectious morbidity is critical to improving quality of care in catheterized subjects. Here, we describe findings in 6 clinically healthy, male sheep implanted with indwelling aortic or cardiac catheters for 6 to 10 mo. We isolated multiple bacterial species including Serratia spp., Enterobacter agglomerans, Eschericia coli, Klebsiella oxytoca, and K. pneumoniae in aerobic cultures from catheter tips. Although sheep were clinically asymptomatic, 1 or both kidneys from all animals contained wedge-shaped infarcts of varying size and number. Microscopic examination revealed (a) marked fibrosis with mild inflammatory cell infiltrate consistent with chronic foreign body reaction around catheters; (b) moderate to severe, diffuse, subacute to chronic membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis and mild, multifocal chronic interstitial nephritis; and (c) mesangial immune-complex deposition as demonstrated by direct immunofluorescence technique. The finding of bacterial colonization of catheters together with chronic glomerulonephritis and immune-complex deposits in kidneys in clinically asymptomatic sheep underscores the need for close microbiologic monitoring of catheter implants and assessment of kidney function in animals instrumented for long-term vascular access. PMID:16884173

  15. Tandem balloon catheter for coronary angioplasty.

    PubMed

    Finci, L; Meier, B; Steffenino, G; Rutishauser, W

    1986-01-01

    The Tandem balloon catheter is a triple lumen steerable catheter for coronary angioplasty with two separately inflatable balloons of different diameters. Indications and results of 26 consecutive patients treated with a Tandem balloon catheter are reviewed. Adequate distal pressure measurements were obtained in 71% of the cases. In ten patients, the Tandem balloon catheter was selected for two stenoses in different segments of the same coronary artery. Angioplasty was successful for all lesions in five and for at least the strategic lesions in five patients (in one only after changing to a single-balloon catheter). In the seven patients with stenoses in two different coronary arteries of various calibers, angioplasty was successful for both vessels in three and for one vessel in four patients. In the six patients with a very tight stenosis, where the Tandem balloon catheter was selected to predilate with the small balloon, the procedure was technically successful in all, but there was a myocardial infarction in one patient. In the three patients with a chronic total occlusion, where the stiffness of the Tandem balloon was the reason for selection, one recanalization was successful. The Tandem balloon catheter provides a handy tool for complex coronary angioplasty. It offers comparable ease in manipulation and pressure transmission and may save time, money, and radiation exposure by avoiding catheter exchanges. PMID:2949848

  16. 21 CFR 874.4175 - Nasopharyngeal catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Nasopharyngeal catheter. 874.4175 Section 874.4175 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Surgical Devices § 874.4175 Nasopharyngeal catheter....

  17. 21 CFR 874.4175 - Nasopharyngeal catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Nasopharyngeal catheter. 874.4175 Section 874.4175 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Surgical Devices § 874.4175 Nasopharyngeal catheter....

  18. 21 CFR 874.4175 - Nasopharyngeal catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Nasopharyngeal catheter. 874.4175 Section 874.4175 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Surgical Devices § 874.4175 Nasopharyngeal catheter....

  19. 21 CFR 874.4175 - Nasopharyngeal catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Nasopharyngeal catheter. 874.4175 Section 874.4175 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Surgical Devices § 874.4175 Nasopharyngeal catheter....

  20. 21 CFR 874.4175 - Nasopharyngeal catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Nasopharyngeal catheter. 874.4175 Section 874.4175 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Surgical Devices § 874.4175 Nasopharyngeal catheter....

  1. Automated Pointing of Cardiac Imaging Catheters

    PubMed Central

    Loschak, Paul M.; Brattain, Laura J.; Howe, Robert D.

    2013-01-01

    Intracardiac echocardiography (ICE) catheters enable high-quality ultrasound imaging within the heart, but their use in guiding procedures is limited due to the difficulty of manually pointing them at structures of interest. This paper presents the design and testing of a catheter steering model for robotic control of commercial ICE catheters. The four actuated degrees of freedom (4-DOF) are two catheter handle knobs to produce bi-directional bending in combination with rotation and translation of the handle. An extra degree of freedom in the system allows the imaging plane (dependent on orientation) to be directed at an object of interest. A closed form solution for forward and inverse kinematics enables control of the catheter tip position and the imaging plane orientation. The proposed algorithms were validated with a robotic test bed using electromagnetic sensor tracking of the catheter tip. The ability to automatically acquire imaging targets in the heart may improve the efficiency and effectiveness of intracardiac catheter interventions by allowing visualization of soft tissue structures that are not visible using standard fluoroscopic guidance. Although the system has been developed and tested for manipulating ICE catheters, the methods described here are applicable to any long thin tendon-driven tool (with single or bi-directional bending) requiring accurate tip position and orientation control. PMID:24683501

  2. Automated Pointing of Cardiac Imaging Catheters.

    PubMed

    Loschak, Paul M; Brattain, Laura J; Howe, Robert D

    2013-12-31

    Intracardiac echocardiography (ICE) catheters enable high-quality ultrasound imaging within the heart, but their use in guiding procedures is limited due to the difficulty of manually pointing them at structures of interest. This paper presents the design and testing of a catheter steering model for robotic control of commercial ICE catheters. The four actuated degrees of freedom (4-DOF) are two catheter handle knobs to produce bi-directional bending in combination with rotation and translation of the handle. An extra degree of freedom in the system allows the imaging plane (dependent on orientation) to be directed at an object of interest. A closed form solution for forward and inverse kinematics enables control of the catheter tip position and the imaging plane orientation. The proposed algorithms were validated with a robotic test bed using electromagnetic sensor tracking of the catheter tip. The ability to automatically acquire imaging targets in the heart may improve the efficiency and effectiveness of intracardiac catheter interventions by allowing visualization of soft tissue structures that are not visible using standard fluoroscopic guidance. Although the system has been developed and tested for manipulating ICE catheters, the methods described here are applicable to any long thin tendon-driven tool (with single or bi-directional bending) requiring accurate tip position and orientation control. PMID:24683501

  3. Spontaneous Intravesical Knotting of Urethral Catheter

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Infant feeding tubes (IFT) have been universally used as urethral catheters in neonates and children for several decades. Though generally a safe procedure, it may cause significant morbidity if the catheter spontaneously knots inside the bladder. We report this complication in three children including a neonate. PMID:22953288

  4. Use of ultrasound guidance to remove entrapped stimulating popliteal catheters

    PubMed Central

    Hulin, James B.; Daniels, Don J.

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral nerve catheters are beneficial for continuous pain relief following surgery or trauma to an extremity. However, spring-loaded peripheral nerve catheters can become uncoiled and entrapped, resulting in difficulty in catheter removal. We present two cases where ultrasound guidance provided significant assistance in the safe removal of entrapped peripheral nerve catheters without neurologic sequelae. One of the catheters was adhered to nearby tissue, and one had become uncoiled and anchored in place by the distal tip. Guidelines for the safe management of entrapped catheters are suggested, including the use of saline injections through the catheter under ultrasound guidance to assist in the evaluation and removal of the catheters. PMID:27034548

  5. In vivo quantitative assessment of catheter patency in rats

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jun; Maarek, Jean-Michel I; Holschneider, Daniel P

    2014-01-01

    Summary Formation of fibrin sleeves around catheter tips is a central factor in catheter failure during chronic implantation, and such tissue growth can occur despite administration of anticoagulants. We developed a novel method for monitoring catheter patency. This method recognizes the progressive nature of catheter occlusion, and tracks this process over time through measurement of changes in catheter resistance to a standardized 1 mL bolus infusion from a pressurized reservoir. Two indirect measures of catheter patency were used: (a) reservoir residual pressure and (b) reservoir discharge time. This method was applied to the study of catheter patency in rats comparing the effect of catheter material (silastic, polyurethane, Microrenathane™), lock solution (heparin, heparin/dexamethasone) and two different cannulation sites (superior vena cava via the external jugular vein, inferior vena cava via the femoral vein). Our findings reveal that application of flexible smaller-size silastic catheters and a dexamethasone lock solution resulted in prolonged catheter patency. Patency could be maintained over nine weeks with the femoral vein catheters, compared with five weeks with the external jugular vein catheters. The current method for measuring catheter patency provides a useful index for the assessment of tissue growth around the catheter tip. The method also provides an objective and quantitative way of comparing changes in catheter patency for different surgical methods and catheter types. Our method improves on the conventional method of assessing catheter occlusion by judging the ability to aspirate from the catheter. PMID:16004684

  6. Development of Bend Sensor for Catheter Tip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagano, Yoshitaka; Sano, Akihito; Fujimoto, Hideo

    Recently, a minimally invasive surgery which makes the best use of the catheter has been becoming more popular. In endovascular coil embolization for a cerebral aneurysm, the observation of the catheter's painting phenomenon is very important to execute the appropriate manipulation of the delivery wire and the catheter. In this study, the internal bend sensor which consists of at least two bending enhanced plastic optical fibers was developed in order to measure the curvature of the catheter tip. Consequently, the painting could be more sensitively detected in the neighborhood of the aneurysm. In this paper, the basic characteristics of the developed sensor system are described and its usefulness is confirmed from the comparison of the insertion force of delivery wire and the curvature of catheter tip in the experiment of coil embolization.

  7. Nonoperative replacement of a jejunostomy feeding catheter.

    PubMed

    Stogdill, B J; Page, C P; Pestana, C

    1984-02-01

    Nonoperative replacement of lost or occluded jejunal feeding catheters proved successful in 8 of 11 patients. This technique is recommended as a nonoperative means of replacing a needle catheter jejunostomy when it is accidentally lost or becomes occluded. Adherence to sterile technique and gentle advancement of the guide wire to avoid injury to the bowel are important. Since the technique depends on an established tract between the skin and the bowel, catheter replacement should not be attempted when the feeding catheter is lost or becomes occluded in the immediate postoperative period. In addition, confirmation of catheter patency and intraluminal position with sterile water-soluble contrast medium is critical to the safe use of this technique. PMID:6421183

  8. Radiological Interventions for Correction of Central Venous Port Catheter Migrations

    SciTech Connect

    Gebauer, Bernhard Teichgraeber, Ulf Karl; Podrabsky, Petr; Werk, Michael; Haenninen, Enrique Lopez; Felix, Roland

    2007-07-15

    Purpose. The purpose of this study was to evaluate radiological-interventional central venous port catheter corrections in migrated/malpositioned catheter tips. Materials and Methods. Thirty patients with migrated/malpositioned port catheter tips were included in this retrospective analysis. To visualize the catheter patency a contrast-enhanced port catheter series was performed, followed by transfemoral port catheter correction with various 5-F angiographic catheters (pigtail; Sos Omni), gooseneck snares, or combinations thereof. Results. One patient showed spontaneous reposition of the catheter tip. In 27 of 29 patients (93%), radiological-interventional port catheter correction was successful. In two patients port catheter malposition correction was not possible, because of the inability to catch either the catheter tip or the catheter in its course, possibly due to fibrin sheath formation with attachment of the catheter to the vessel wall. No disconnection or port catheter dysfunction was observed after correction. Conclusions. We conclude that in migrated catheter tips radiological-interventional port catheter correction is a minimally invasive alternative to port extraction and reimplantation. In patients with a fibrin sheath and/or thrombosis port catheter correction is often more challenging.

  9. ATLS: Catheter and tube placement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gosbee, John; Krupa, Debra T.; Pepper, L.; Orsak, Debra

    1991-01-01

    The specific objectives of this experiment are: to evaluate the rack mounted equipment and medical supplies necessary for medical procedures; to evaluate the attachments, mounting points, and inner drawer assemblies for the medical supplies; and to evaluate the procedures for performing medical scenarios. The resources available in the HMF miniracks to accomplish medical scenarios and/or procedures include: medical equipment mounted in the racks; a patch panel with places to attach tubing and catheters; self contained drawers full of critical care medical supplies; and an ALS 'backpack' for deploying supplies. The attachment lines, tubing and associated medical supplies will be deployed and used with the equipment and a patient mannequin. Data collection is provided by direct observations by the inflight experimenters, and analysis of still and video photography.

  10. Catheters for optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atif, M.; Ullah, H.; Hamza, M. Y.; Ikram, M.

    2011-09-01

    The objective of this review article is to overview technology, clinical evidence, and future applications to date optical coherence tomography (OCT) probes to yield the diagnostic purpose. We have reviewed the designing, construction and working of different categories of OCT probes developed for optical diagnostics having a potential for non invasive and improved detection of different types of cancer as well as other neoplasm. Rotational and balloon catheters, imaging needles and hand-held, linear scanning, multichannel, micro electro mechanical systems (MEMS) technology based, dynamic focusing, forward view imaging, and common path interferometer based probes have been discussed in details. The fiber probes have shown excellent performance for two dimensional and three dimensional higher resolution, cross-sectional imaging of interior and exterior body tissues that can be compared with histopathology to provide the information about the angiogenesis and other lesions in the tissue. The MEMS-technology based probes are found to be more suitable for three dimensional morphological imaging.

  11. Catheter associated infections in hemodialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Sanavi, Suzan; Ghods, Ahad; Afshar, Reza

    2007-03-01

    Hemodialysis catheter related infections (HCRI) are one of the major causes of increasing mortality, morbidity and cost of therapy in hemodialysis patients. Prevention of HCRI requires the identification of predisposing risk factors. To determine the frequency of HCRI risk factors, we studied 116 patients (54% male, mean age of 49.5+/-16 years) patients with HCRI between 2003-2004. Forty one percent of the patients were diabetic. There was a history of previous catheter placement and infection in 41% and 32% of patients, respectively. Pathogenic organisms isolated from blood cultures included Staphylococcus-aureus 42%, Coagulase-negative Staphylococci 20%, E. Coli 19%, Enterococci 7%, Streptococcus D 7%, Pseudomonas aeruginosa 4%, and Klebsiella 1%. Bacterial resistance to vancomycin and amikacin was present in 7% and 4% of the cases, respectively. Hemodialysis catheter related blood borne infections comprised 67% of the total blood-borne infections in our hospital. No significant statistical association was found between HCRI and age, gender, diabetes mellitus, serum albumin level <30 g/L, leukocyte count, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, anatomical location of catheter, mean duration of antibiotic therapy, mean catheter duration, frequency of hemodialysis sessions, pathogenic organisms, and history of previous catheter infection. We conclude that the prevalence of pathogenic organisms of HCRI were similar to previous studies. However, bacterial resistance to antibiotics was low. The mean duration of catheter usage was longer than previously reported. PMID:17237890

  12. 40 CFR Appendix Viii to Part 85 - Vehicle and Engine Parameters and Specifications

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF AIR POLLUTION FROM MOBILE SOURCES Pt. 85, App. VIII Appendix VIII to Part 85—Vehicle and Engine Parameters and Specifications a. light duty vehicle parameters...

  13. 40 CFR Appendix Viii to Part 266 - Organic Compounds for Which Residues Must Be Analyzed

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... SPECIFIC TYPES OF HAZARDOUS WASTE MANAGEMENT FACILITIES Pt. 266, App. VIII Appendix VIII to Part 266... residues collected from areas downstream of the combustion chamber (e.g., ductwork, boiler tubes,...

  14. Transmed Transect VIII: from Laurussia to Gondwana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephenson, R. A.; Mart, Y.; Okay, A.; Robertson, A.; Stovba, S.; Khriachtchevskaia, O.

    2003-04-01

    TransMed transect VIII crosses the easternmost Mediterranean Sea. Some 2600 km long, it runs from Laurussia in the north (Ukrainian Shield) to Gondwana in the south (Arabian Shield). The Late Palaeozoic aged intracratonic Dniepr-Donets rift basin lies near the northern end of the transect and the modern intracratonic Red Sea rift lies at the southern end. Intervening tectonic units, north to south, include the Scythian Platform and Crimean Orogen in Ukraine; the Black Sea; the Pontides, Kirsehir Massif, and Taurides in Turkey; Cyprus with the Troodos complex; the Levant Basin and distal parts of the Nile Delta in the eastern Mediterranean; and the Sinai in Egypt. Deep structure, including crustal thickness and affinity, is poorly known along much of the transect. Although all available crustal scale seismic data have been considered, much of the deeper parts of the transect are inferred from the exposed geology and how this can be modelled in terms of regional paleotectonics and are, accordingly, speculative. Palaeozoic and younger sediments of the Scythian Platform overlie basement that is surmised to be younger than the adjoining Archean Ukrainian Shield. The whole of the crust of the Crimean Orogen, underlying thrust nappes emplaced during the early Mesozoic, is speculated to comprise an accretionary complex of mainly Triassic age that is correlated with the Sakarya Zone of northern Turkey. The Black Sea is a back-arc rift basin that opened in Late Cretacous-Tertiary times but the margins of the Black Sea intersected by the transect are not conjugate. The Pontide margin of the Black Sea, in northern Turkey, is formed by the Istanbul Zone, with Proterozoic-aged basement correlative with Moesian crust found in southern Romania and Bulgaria. The Kirsehir Massif is made up of Cretaceous metamorphic and granitic rocks, and represents the deeper parts of a magmatic arc. The Taurides form a south-vergent thrust-stack involving Palaeozoic to Eocene sediments. The

  15. Freeze-dried activated substrate for factor VIII assays.

    PubMed

    Margolis, J

    1987-01-01

    Factor VIII-deficient plasma (natural or artificial) mixed with kaolin and phospholipid can be lyophilized to provide ready-to-use substrate which is stable for months at 4 degrees C and usable after many weeks at room temperature. Factor VIII assays are much simplified and more reproducible using this reagent and can be quantified with the aid of a programmable calculator according to the equation (formula; see text) as % of standard and X, S and B are clotting times of test, standard and blank samples respectively. The slope of the log/log function (k) is approximately--6.5. PMID:3111909

  16. [Catheter-associated urinary tract infections].

    PubMed

    Liedl, B

    2015-09-01

    In patients with indwelling urethral catheters significant bacteriuria develops within 4 weeks of indwelling time in practically 100% of the cases. Catheter encrustation and obstruction can occur in approximately 40% of patients. Symptomatic ascending urinary tract infections, urethral complications and urolithiasis can occur in significant numbers in the long term. Regular educational and surveillance programs in nursing homes, hospitals and in home care are important to instruct personnel in hygiene procedures, to learn the indications for catheterization, to keep the indwelling time of catheters as short as possible, to detect any complications early and to initiate appropriate diagnostics and therapy by the urologist. PMID:26275988

  17. [Pericardial tamponade due to malpositioned cooling catheter].

    PubMed

    Löwer, C; Niedeggen, A; Janssens, U

    2016-05-01

    The case of a 60-year-old woman who received prehospital cardiopulmonary resuscitation for cardiopulmonary arrest is reported. In the hospital, coronary angiography was performed including percutaneous coronary intervention of the left anterior descending artery and placement of a cooling catheter. After approximately 30 min, severe hypotension progressively developed. Pericardial tamponade was identified and treated by pericardial puncture. Clear fluid was drained. Transesophageal echocardiography detected a perforation of the right atrial roof by the cooling catheter. Open surgery was performed immediately and the catheter was removed. The patient was discharged from the hospital without any further complication 10 days later. PMID:26065384

  18. Retained Urethral Catheter Secondary to Placement in Proximal Ureter

    PubMed Central

    Sharda, Rajan

    2016-01-01

    We present an unusual complication secondary to indwelling urethral catheter placement. Routine catheter placement by the obstetrics team in a postpartum female leads to retention of the catheter and inability of its removal by both the obstetrics and urology teams. Although a retained urinary catheter is relatively common, inability to remove a catheter secondary to placement inadvertently into a ureter is extremely rare. In this paper we will discuss the options in removing a retained catheter and present our case of a retained catheter secondary to placement within the right proximal ureter. PMID:27144050

  19. 40 CFR Appendix Viii to Part 600 - Fuel Economy Label Formats

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Fuel Economy Label Formats VIII Appendix VIII to Part 600 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) ENERGY POLICY FUEL ECONOMY AND CARBON-RELATED EXHAUST EMISSIONS OF MOTOR VEHICLES Pt. 600, App. VIII...

  20. 40 CFR Appendix Viii to Part 600 - Fuel Economy Label Formats

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Fuel Economy Label Formats VIII... POLICY FUEL ECONOMY AND CARBON-RELATED EXHAUST EMISSIONS OF MOTOR VEHICLES Pt. 600, App. VIII Appendix VIII to Part 600—Fuel Economy Label Formats EC01MY92.117 EC01MY92.118 EC01MY92.119...

  1. Dialysis catheter fibrin sheath stripping: a useful technique after failed catheter exchange.

    PubMed

    Mohamad Ali, Af; Uhwut, E; Liew, Sk

    2012-01-01

    Fibrin sheath formation around long-term haemodialysis catheter is a common cause of failed dialysis access. Treatment options include pharmacological and mechanical methods. This paper reports a case of failed dialysis access due to fibrin sheath encasement. Pharmacologic thrombolysis, mechanical disruption using guide wire and catheter exchange had failed to address the issue. Eventually, fibrin sheath stripping using the loop snare technique was able to successfully restore the catheter function. PMID:22970064

  2. Design and Demonstration of a Miniature Catheter for a Confocal Microendoscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouse, Andrew R.; Kano, Angelique; Udovich, Joshua A.; Kroto, Shona M.; Gmitro, Arthur F.

    2004-11-01

    The fluorescence confocal microendoscope provides high-resolution, in vivo imaging of cellular pathology during optical biopsy. The confocal microendoscope employs a flexible fiber-optic catheter coupled to a custom-built slit-scan confocal microscope. The catheter consists of a fiber-optic imaging bundle linked to a miniature objective and focus assembly. The 3-mm-diameter catheter may be used on its own or routed though the instrument channel of a commercial endoscope, adding microscopic imaging capability to conventional endoscopy. The design and performance of the miniature objective and focus assembly are discussed. Primary applications of the system include diagnosis of disease in the gastrointestinal tract and female reproductive system.

  3. Antimicrobial-impregnated catheters for the prevention of catheter-related bloodstream infections

    PubMed Central

    Lorente, Leonardo

    2016-01-01

    Central venous catheters are commonly used in critically ill patients. Such catheterization may entail mechanical and infectious complications. The interest in catheter-related infection lies in the morbidity, mortality and costs that it involved. Numerous contributions have been made in the prevention of catheter-related infection and the current review focuses on the possible current role of antimicrobial impregnated catheters to reduce catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBSI). There is evidence that the use of chlorhexidine-silver sulfadiazine (CHSS), rifampicin-minocycline, or rifampicin-miconazol impregnated catheters reduce the incidence of CRBSI and costs. In addition, there are some clinical circumstances associated with higher risk of CRBSI, such as the venous catheter access and the presence of tracheostomy. Current guidelines for the prevention of CRBSI recommended the use of a CHSS or rifampicin-minocycline impregnated catheter in patients whose catheter is expected to remain in place > 5 d and if the CRBSI rate has not decreased after implementation of a comprehensive strategy to reduce it. PMID:27152256

  4. Antimicrobial-impregnated catheters for the prevention of catheter-related bloodstream infections.

    PubMed

    Lorente, Leonardo

    2016-05-01

    Central venous catheters are commonly used in critically ill patients. Such catheterization may entail mechanical and infectious complications. The interest in catheter-related infection lies in the morbidity, mortality and costs that it involved. Numerous contributions have been made in the prevention of catheter-related infection and the current review focuses on the possible current role of antimicrobial impregnated catheters to reduce catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBSI). There is evidence that the use of chlorhexidine-silver sulfadiazine (CHSS), rifampicin-minocycline, or rifampicin-miconazol impregnated catheters reduce the incidence of CRBSI and costs. In addition, there are some clinical circumstances associated with higher risk of CRBSI, such as the venous catheter access and the presence of tracheostomy. Current guidelines for the prevention of CRBSI recommended the use of a CHSS or rifampicin-minocycline impregnated catheter in patients whose catheter is expected to remain in place > 5 d and if the CRBSI rate has not decreased after implementation of a comprehensive strategy to reduce it. PMID:27152256

  5. Stuck suction catheter in endotracheal tube.

    PubMed

    Raut, Monish S; Joshi, Sandeep; Maheshwari, Arun

    2015-02-01

    Endotracheal tube (ETT) suction is essential to clear secretions so that airway patency can be maintained. Stuck suction catheter in ETT is an uncommon event, and it can be dangerous in patients with difficult airway cases. PMID:25722554

  6. Stuck suction catheter in endotracheal tube

    PubMed Central

    Raut, Monish S.; Joshi, Sandeep; Maheshwari, Arun

    2015-01-01

    Endotracheal tube (ETT) suction is essential to clear secretions so that airway patency can be maintained. Stuck suction catheter in ETT is an uncommon event, and it can be dangerous in patients with difficult airway cases. PMID:25722554

  7. Catheter Ablation of Arrhythmia During Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Driver, Kevin; Chisholm, Christian A; Darby, Andrew E; Malhotra, Rohit; Dimarco, John P; Ferguson, John D

    2015-06-01

    Cardiac arrhythmia as a complication of pregnancy can be problematic to maternal health and fetal life and development. Catheter ablation of tachyarrhythmias during pregnancy has been successfully performed in selected patients with limited experience. Techniques to limit maternal and fetal radiation exposure, including intracardiac echo and electroanatomic mapping systems, are particularly important in this setting. Specific accommodations are necessary in the care of the gravid patient during catheter ablation. PMID:25828853

  8. 40 CFR Appendixes Vii-Viii to Part... - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false VII Appendixes VII-VIII to Part 264 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS FOR OWNERS AND OPERATORS OF HAZARDOUS WASTE TREATMENT, STORAGE, AND DISPOSAL FACILITIES Appendixes...

  9. Lymphocyte subset ratios and factor VIII usage in haemophilia.

    PubMed Central

    Beddall, A C; Al-Rubei, K; Williams, M D; Hill, F G

    1985-01-01

    Type and quantity of replacement treatment, together with haematological and immunological parameters were determined in 37 boys with severe haemophilia A and 41 children with other bleeding disorders. The quantity of factor VIII concentrate given to boys with severe haemophilia A (mean U/year) showed a significant inverse correlation with total white cell counts, lymphocyte counts, platelet counts, and the ratio of monoclonal antibody defined T lymphocyte subsets, T4 and T8 (T4:T8). Of the boys with severe haemophilia A, 49% had inversed T4:T8 ratios and 24% had thrombocytopenia. Treatment with high dose factor VIII concentrate (more than 25 000 U/year) was associated with low platelet counts, low lymphocyte counts, low T4:T8 ratios, and hypergammaglobulinaemia. In addition, six patients with severe haemophilia A and factor VIII inhibitors had inversed T4:T8 ratios. Patients treated exclusively with cryoprecipitate or prothrombin complex concentrates had normal T4:T8 ratios and platelet counts. The severity of the haematological and immunological abnormalities observed seems to be associated with high usage of factor VIII concentrates. Similar abnormalities have been described in patients with the acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). Prospective study of haemophiliacs is required to assess long term sequelae of factor concentrate usage, including the possible development of AIDS. PMID:3925894

  10. Academics 2000: Cycle VIII Evaluation Report, 2001-2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huskey, Barton

    This report presents evaluation findings regarding the implementation and effectiveness of the Academics 2000, Cycle VIII grant in the Austin Independent School District (AISD), Texas. The purpose of Academics 2000 was to raise the level of academic achievement of all Texas students by ensuring that each child achieves early mastery of the…

  11. 10. Historic American Buildings Survey Photocopy of Plate VIII (dated ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. Historic American Buildings Survey Photocopy of Plate VIII (dated 1889) in John Calvin Stevens and Albert Winslow Cobb, Examples of American Domestic Architecture, New York, William T. Comstock, 1889 PLANS AND INTERIOR DETAILS, 1889 - John Calvin Stevens House, 52 Bowdoin Street, Portland, Cumberland County, ME

  12. Mechanical properties and imaging characteristics of remanufactured intravascular ultrasound catheters.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, R; Haager, P; Mintz, G; Klues, H

    2000-02-01

    Intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) as a routine device in interventional cardiology is handicapped by its high price. 19 factory-made, 'remanufactured' IVUS catheters which consist of sterilized, used phased-array IVUS transducers inserted into a new catheter shaft were compared with 23 new IVUS catheters. 3 mechanical and 4 imaging characteristics were assessed on a 5 point scale (1 = unacceptable, 5 = excellent). Mechanical as well as imaging properties of 'remanufactured' IVUS catheter were comparable to new catheters with excellent ratings for each of the evaluated characteristics in 38 to 94% of 'remanufactured' catheters and 50 to 96% of new catheters. The initial failure rate for 'remanufactured' IVUS catheters was 31.6% vs. 4.3% for new catheters (P < 0.05). Overall failure rate was 47.3% for "remanufactured" catheters vs. 8.7% for new catheters (P < 0.05). The failure was due to an electronic connecting problem occurring during mechanical stress to the IVUS catheter. In conclusion, 'remanufactured' IVUS catheters offer mechanical and imaging characteristics which are comparable to new catheters. Improvements in the 'remanufacturing' process to resolve the high rate of electronic connecting problems may make this a promising approach to substantially lower the price of IVUS catheters. PMID:10832621

  13. Haemolyzed samples: responsibility of short catheters.

    PubMed

    Raisky, F; Gauthier, C; Marchal, A; Blum, D

    1994-01-01

    The haemolysis of blood samples is a source of error in the electrolytic and enzymatic determination in clinical biochemistry. This circumstance seems dependent on the material used for the venepuncture. In this study we compared three kinds of material in 350 patients who were sampled in the emergency department. This randomized study compared the haemolysis of blood samples collected with stainless steel needles and short catheters, either Teflon FEP (Cathlon Critikon) or polyurethane Vialon (Insyte Becton-Dickinson). Quantification of hemolysis was performed by assay of the optical density of plasma haemoglobin. Results were analysed, after verification of the randomization, by one-way analysis of variance by ranks. This study demonstrated a highly significant relation between occurrence of haemolysis and the sampling material, used according to its technical obligations. Haemolysis occurred frequently when short catheters were used in 42% and 55% of cases with the Teflon and Vialon catheters, respectively. Haemolysis was much less frequent with stainless steel needles (12%). This difference was even more marked for haemoglobin levels above 1.5 milligrams of plasma, where the incidence was 4.2%, 9% and 30%, respectively, for the stainless steel needles, the Teflon catheter and the Vialon catheter. This study induced our emergency department to take more blood samples with a needle, even if an infusion was to be given subsequently, or to take them using a Teflon catheter. PMID:7840428

  14. Magnetocardiographically-guided catheter ablation.

    PubMed

    Fenici, R R; Covino, M; Cellerino, C; Di Lillo, M; De Filippo, M C; Melillo, G

    1995-12-01

    After more than 30 years since the first magnetocardiographic (MCG) recording was carried out with induction coils, MCG is now approaching the threshold of clinical use. During the last 5 years, in fact, there has been a growing interest of clinicians in this new method which provides an unrivalled accuracy for noninvasive, three-dimensional localization of intracardiac source. An increasing number of laboratories are reporting data validating the use of MCG as an effective method for preoperative localization of arrhythmogenic substrates and for planning the best catheter ablation approach for different arrhythmogenic substrates. In this article, available data from literature have been reviewed. We consider the clinical use of MCG to localize arrhythmogenic substrates in patients with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome and in patients with ventricular tachycardia in order to assess the state-of-the-art of the method on a large number of patients. This article also addresses some suggestions for industrial development of more compact, medically oriented MCG equipments at reasonable cost. PMID:10159774

  15. Survival of 125iodine-labeled Factor VIII in normals and patients with classic hemophilia. Observations on the heterogeneity of human Factor VIII.

    PubMed Central

    Over, J; Sixma, J J; Bruïne, M H; Trieschnigg, M C; Vlooswijk, R A; Beeser-Visser, N H; Bouma, B N

    1978-01-01

    Radiolabeled human Factor VIII was used to study its survival in normals and patients with classic hemophilia, and to study the heterogeneity of Factor VIII; Purified Factor VIII was radiolabeled with 125iodine (125I-VIII) without loss of its structural integrity. The survival of 125I-VIII was studied in six normals and six hemophiliacs of whom four of the hemophiliacs had received transfusions with normal cryoprecipitate before the 125I-VIII infusion. No significant difference was observed between the disappearance of Factor VIII coagulant activity and radioactivity in these hemophiliacs. 125I-VIII in plasma showed a biphasic disappearance with an average t1/2 of 2.9 +/- 0.4 h (SEM) for the first phase and 18.6 +/- 0.7 h (SEM) for the second phase, respectively. The survival of 125I-VIII was similar comparing normals and hemophiliacs. The highest molecular weight forms of Factor VIII disappear more rapidly than the lower molecular weight ones. This was established by analysis of the fractions obtained by gel chromatography of plasma collected at several times after infusion and by analysis of the in vivo disappearance of three subfractions of Factor VIII. The fraction of 125I-VIII binding to platelets in the presence of ristocetin (containing the highest molecular weight forms of Factor VIII including the ristocetin cofactor) represented about 50% of the radioactivity present in plasma after infusion and showed a t 1/2 of 11.7 +/- 0.9 h (SEM) for the second phase. The fraction, which was recovered in cryoprecipitate of the recipient's plasma, represented about 90% of the initial radioactivity and showed a t 1/2 of 16.3 +/- 0.8 h (SEM) for the second phase. The fraction of 125I-VIII remaining in the cryosupernatant plasma (containing low molecular weight forms of Factor (VIII) showed a t 1/2 of 27.2 +/- 1.1 h (SEM). The first phase of the disappearance of 125I-VIII is caused in part by the disappearance of the highest molecular weight forms, which are possibly

  16. Reducing inappropriate urinary catheter use: quality care initiatives.

    PubMed

    Buckley, Catherine; Clements, Charlotte; Hopper, Adrian

    Healthcare-acquired urinary infection presents a substantial burden for patients and the healthcare system. Urinary tract infections have not gained the same level of media attention as other healthcare-associated infections, yet interventions to reduce urinary catheter use are one of the top ten recommended patient safety strategies. To improve practice around urinary catheter placement and removal requires interventions to change the expectations and habits of nurses, medical teams and patients regarding the need for a urinary catheter. In the authors' trust, a redesign of the existing urinary catheter device record was undertaken to help avoid unnecessary placement of catheters, and resulted in a reduction of urinary catheters in situ longer than 48 hours. Other strategies included implementation of catheter rounds in a high-usage area, and credit-card-sized education cards. A catheter 'passport' was introduced for patients discharged with a catheter to ensure information for insertion and ongoing use were effectively communicated. PMID:25978469

  17. Strategies for the control of catheter encrustation.

    PubMed

    Stickler, D J; Evans, A; Morris, N; Hughes, G

    2002-06-01

    Two general strategies have been adopted to develop catheter materials that resist encrustaion by bacterial biofilms: (a) the incorporation of antimicrobial agents into the polymers and (b) the production of materials with surface properties which prevent the adherence of bacterial cells. Our experience to develop non-adherent surfaces which abstracts design from nature is reported. Compounds based on 2-methacryloloxyethylphosphorylcholine co-polymerised with long-chain alkyl methacrylates have been produced which have structural and surface properties similar to those of the outer membranes of erythrocytes. These PC-coatings have been applied onto catheter base materials where they produce polar surfaces that are extremely hydrophilic. In experiments using a laboratory model of the catheterised bladder we found that the PC-coatings did not reduce colonisation of latex or silicone catheters by crystalline Proteus mirabilis biofilm. There were no significant difference between the amounts of calcium and magnesium salts deposited on coated and non-coated catheters. In a further set of experiments the PC-coatings did not significantly increase the mean times for which catheters drained freely. In a parallel clinical study, the performance of PC-coated ureteral stents was investigated. Scanning electron microscopy and bacteriological analysis on 44 PC-coated stents that had been implanted in patients for 12-week periods and 28 control stents suggested that the PC-coated devices were less vulnerable to encrustation and colonisation by bacterial biofilm than normal stents. It was of interest that in contrast to encrusted catheters, urease producing species such as P. mirabilis were rarely isolated from the stents. The main organisms colonising the stents were enterococci and coagulase-negative staphylococci. These results suggest that the mechanisms of catheter and stent encrustation may be different and require different strategies for control. PMID:12135840

  18. Conversion of Non-Tunneled to Tunneled Hemodialysis Catheters

    SciTech Connect

    Ha, Thuong G. Van Fimmen, Derek; Han, Laura; Funaki, Brian S.; Santeler, Scott; Lorenz, Jonathan

    2007-04-15

    Purpose. To determine the safety and efficacy of conversion of non-tunneled (temporary) catheters to tunneled catheters in hemodialysis patients. Methods. A retrospective review of 112 consecutive conversions in 111 patients was performed over a period of 4 years. Fourteen patients were lost to follow-up. The remaining 97 patients had clinical follow-up. Temporary catheters were converted to tunneled catheters utilizing the same internal jugular venotomy sites and a modified over-the-wire technique with use of a peel-away sheath . Follow-up clinical data were reviewed. Results. Technical success was achieved in all 112 procedures. None of the 97 patients with follow-up suffered early infection within 30 days. The total number of follow-up catheter days was 13,659 (range 2-790). Cases of confirmed and suspected bacteremia requiring catheter removal occurred at a frequency of 0.10 per 100 catheter days. Suspected catheter infection treated with antibiotics but not requiring catheter intervention occurred at a frequency of 0.04 per 100 catheter days. Frequency of all suspected or confirmed infections was 0.14 per 100 catheter days. Catheter interventions as a result of poor blood flow, inadvertent removal, catheter fracture, or kinking occurred at a rate of 0.18 per 100 catheter days. Life table analysis revealed primary patency rates of 86%, 64%, and 39% at 30 days, 90 days, and 180 days, respectively. Conclusion. Conversion of temporary catheters to tunneled catheters using the pre-existing venotomy sites is safe and has low rates of infection and malfunction. These rates are comparable to previously published rates for tunneled catheters placed de novo and tunneled catheter exchanges.

  19. [Swan Ganz catheter. Experts opinion].

    PubMed

    Cohen Arazi, Hernán; Nani, Sebastián; Giorgi, Mariano; Guardiani, Fernando; Caturla, Nicolás; Benzadón, Mariano

    2014-01-01

    Investigators have raised doubts as to the safety of the Swan Ganz catheter (SGC). In order to define the point of view of cardiologists in our country, the Argentine Society of Cardiology's Emergency Council organized a meeting to analyze their views in different settings (non-cardiac surgery, cardiac surgery, acute coronary syndromes and heart failure) using the RAND-UCLA appropriateness method. A detailed review with the scientific evidence was sent to the experts in cardiology prior to the meeting in the SAC auditorium where the panellists selected the clinical variables create the specific situations. These hypothetic situations were resent to the panellists at a second stage for their individual evaluation, rating the benefit-to-harm ratio of the procedure on a scale of 1 to 9 (1 meant that the expected harms greatly outweighed the expected benefits, and 9 that the expected benefits greatly outweighed the expected harms, 5 could mean either that the harms and benefits were roughly equal). Two experts analyzed the results, describing the agreement/disagreement ratio. Finally, each indication was classified as "appropriate" "uncertain" or "inappropriate" ,for the procedure in accordance with the panelists' median score: median scores in the 1-3 range were classified as inappropriate, those in the 4-6 range as uncertain, and those in the 7-9 range as appropriate. We observed high disagreement rates in SGC indications between cardiologists. However, the panelists were in favor of SGC use when situations included shock and myocardial dysfunction, especially in the presence of organic dysfunction. There were some situations when panelists considered SGC not useful, in patients without organ failure. PMID:25188663

  20. How to manage an arterial catheter.

    PubMed

    Parry, Andrew; Higginson, Ray

    2016-03-16

    Rationale and key points This article provides nurses with information on the safe and effective use and management of arterial catheters, the gold standard for accurate blood pressure measurement and routine serial blood gas sampling in critical care. Arterial catheters are used when real-time blood pressure monitoring is required, such as when there is a risk of significant blood loss. ▶ Arterial catheters provide real-time blood pressure monitoring, enabling rapid identification of changes in blood pressure and guiding fluid resuscitation. ▶ Arterial catheters can be used to take blood samples without having to perform multiple arterial or venous punctures. Reflective activity Clinical skills articles can help update your practice and ensure it remains evidence based. Apply this article to your practice. Reflect on and write a short account of: 1. How this article will change your practice when managing a patient with an arterial catheter. 2. Any further learning needs you have identified. Subscribers can upload their reflective accounts at: rcni.com/portfolio . PMID:26982866

  1. Catheter-associated urinary tract infections.

    PubMed

    Liedl, B

    2001-01-01

    In the past few years it has been clearly demonstrated that the concept of bacterial biofilm production permits an understanding and provides some explanation of the pathogenesis, diagnosis and treatment of catheter-associated urinary tract infections. This concept describes the colonization of catheter surfaces and the movement of bacteria against the urinary flow. It explains the antibacterial resistance of these matrix-enclosed sessile populations of bacteria. The catheter encrustation can be observed as mineralizing bacterial biofilm. The differentiation in swarming cells exposing a much higher activity of the enzyme urease is responsible for the predominant role of Proteus mirabilis in obstructing encrustations. The guidelines for the prevention of catheter-associated urinary tract infections were developed over the past decades by clinicians and are still valid. They can now be better understood taking into consideration these new theories. As overuse of urethral catheters and non-compliance of their recommended use are still apparent, educational and surveillance programmes are needed to help maintain good standards of care. PMID:11148750

  2. Nonholonomic catheter path reconstruction using electromagnetic tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lugez, Elodie; Sadjadi, Hossein; Akl, Selim G.; Fichtinger, Gabor

    2015-03-01

    Catheter path reconstruction is a necessary step in many clinical procedures, such as cardiovascular interventions and high-dose-rate brachytherapy. To overcome limitations of standard imaging modalities, electromagnetic tracking has been employed to reconstruct catheter paths. However, tracking errors pose a challenge in accurate path reconstructions. We address this challenge by means of a filtering technique incorporating the electromagnetic measurements with the nonholonomic motion constraints of the sensor inside a catheter. The nonholonomic motion model of the sensor within the catheter and the electromagnetic measurement data were integrated using an extended Kalman filter. The performance of our proposed approach was experimentally evaluated using the Ascension's 3D Guidance trakStar electromagnetic tracker. Sensor measurements were recorded during insertions of an electromagnetic sensor (model 55) along ten predefined ground truth paths. Our method was implemented in MATLAB and applied to the measurement data. Our reconstruction results were compared to raw measurements as well as filtered measurements provided by the manufacturer. The mean of the root-mean-square (RMS) errors along the ten paths was 3.7 mm for the raw measurements, and 3.3 mm with manufacturer's filters. Our approach effectively reduced the mean RMS error to 2.7 mm. Compared to other filtering methods, our approach successfully improved the path reconstruction accuracy by exploiting the sensor's nonholonomic motion constraints in its formulation. Our approach seems promising for a variety of clinical procedures involving reconstruction of a catheter path.

  3. Stereotactic catheter placement for Ommaya reservoirs.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Benjamin C; Brown, Lauren T; Komotar, Ricardo J; McKhann, Guy M

    2016-05-01

    Ommaya reservoirs are an important surgical therapy for the chronic intrathecal administration of chemotherapy for patients with leptomeningeal carcinomatosis. Surgical accuracy is paramount in these patients with typically normal sized ventricles, and may be improved with stereotactic guidance. This paper aimed to review a large series of stereotactic Ommaya catheter placements, examining accuracy and complications. We conducted a retrospective review of 109 consecutive adult patients who underwent stereotactic Ommaya catheter placement for leptomeningeal carcinomatosis or central nervous system lymphoma at Columbia University Medical Center, USA, from 1998-2013. The rate of accurate placement in the ventricular system was 99%, with the only poor catheter position due to post-placement migration. The rate of peri-operative complications was 6.4%. Hemorrhagic complications occurred in patients with thrombocytopenia or therapeutic anti-coagulation pre-operatively or during the post-operative period. Use of stereotaxy for catheter placement of Ommaya reservoirs is safe and effective, and should be considered when placing a catheter into non-hydrocephalic ventricles. PMID:26778516

  4. Model-based lasso catheter tracking in monoplane fluoroscopy for 3D breathing motion compensation during EP procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Rui

    2010-02-01

    Radio-frequency catheter ablation (RFCA) of the pulmonary veins (PVs) attached to the left atrium (LA) is usually carried out under fluoroscopy guidance. Overlay of detailed anatomical structures via 3-D CT and/or MR volumes onto the fluoroscopy helps visualization and navigation in electrophysiology procedures (EP). Unfortunately, respiratory motion may impair the utility of static overlay of the volume with fluoroscopy for catheter navigation. In this paper, we propose a B-spline based method for tracking the circumferential catheter (lasso catheter) in monoplane fluoroscopy. The tracked motion can be used for the estimation of the 3-D trajectory of breathing motion and for subsequent motion compensation. A lasso catheter is typically used during EP procedures and is pushed against the ostia of the PVs to be ablated. Hence this method does not require additional instruments, and achieves motion estimation right at the site of ablation. The performance of the proposed tracking algorithm was evaluated on 340 monoplane frames with an average error of 0.68 +/- 0.36 mms. Our contributions in this work are twofold. First and foremost, we show how to design an effective, practical, and workflow-friendly 3-D motion compensation scheme for EP procedures in a monoplane setup. In addition, we develop an efficient and accurate method for model-based tracking of the circumferential lasso catheter in the low-dose EP fluoroscopy.

  5. Henry VIII, McLeod syndrome and Jacquetta's curse.

    PubMed

    Stride, P; Lopes Floro, K

    2013-01-01

    The mental decline of King Henry VIII from being a jovial, charismatic and athletic young man into an increasingly paranoid, brutal tyrant in later life, ever more concerned at his lack of one or more male heirs, has attracted many medical diagnostic theories. Previous hypotheses have included diabetes, syphilis and hypothyroidism, among others. However, these inadequately explain Henry's failure to produce a male heir, despite multiple pairings. The latest postulated diagnoses for Henry are the coexistence of both Kell blood group antigenicity (possibly inherited from Jacquetta Woodville, Henry's maternal great grandmother) causing related impaired fertility, and McLeod syndrome, causing psychotic changes. As the mutated McLeod protein of the syndrome significantly reduces the expression, effectively inactivating the Kell antigen, we critically review this theory, examining in detail the pathophysiology of these conditions and assessing the genealogy of Henry VIII and its effect in subsequent generations. PMID:24350322

  6. Catheter tip force transducer for cardiovascular research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feldstein, C.; Lewis, G. W.; Silver, R. H.; Culler, V. H. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    A force transducer for measuring dynamic force activity within the heart of a subject essentially consists of a U-shaped beam of low elastic compliance material. Two lines extend from the beams's legs and a long coil spring is attached to the beam. A strain gauge is coupled to one of the beam's legs to sense deflections thereof. The beam with the tines and most of the spring are surrounded by a flexible tube, defining a catheter, which is insertable into a subject's heart through an appropriate artery. The tines are extractable from the catheter for implantation into the myocardium by pushing on the end of the spring which extends beyond the external end of the catheter.

  7. Left Atrial Anatomy Relevant to Catheter Ablation

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Quintana, Damián; Cabrera, José Angel; Saremi, Farhood

    2014-01-01

    The rapid development of interventional procedures for the treatment of arrhythmias in humans, especially the use of catheter ablation techniques, has renewed interest in cardiac anatomy. Although the substrates of atrial fibrillation (AF), its initiation and maintenance, remain to be fully elucidated, catheter ablation in the left atrium (LA) has become a common therapeutic option for patients with this arrhythmia. Using ablation catheters, various isolation lines and focal targets are created, the majority of which are based on gross anatomical, electroanatomical, and myoarchitectual patterns of the left atrial wall. Our aim was therefore to review the gross morphological and architectural features of the LA and their relations to extracardiac structures. The latter have also become relevant because extracardiac complications of AF ablation can occur, due to injuries to the phrenic and vagal plexus nerves, adjacent coronary arteries, or the esophageal wall causing devastating consequences. PMID:25057427

  8. The importance of effective catheter securement.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Jayne

    This article examines the importance of securing/fixing indwelling urinary catheters. The Oxford English dictionary interlinks the two words-'secure' and 'fix'-as having the same meaning. To secure the catheter should not be confused with 'support', whereby the weight of the urine drainage bag is supported with the use of velcro straps or a sleeve. The author introduces the need for the concept of this practice to be at the forefront of nurses' minds in all settings, and this is demonstrated through the use of case studies. Current guidance in this area is reviewed, as well as the problems that can arise when catheters are not secured properly and the available products for health professionals to use. PMID:20948482

  9. Everting (toposcopic) catheter for broad clinical application.

    PubMed

    Shook, D R; Doppman, J L; Cattau, E L; Goldstein, S R

    1986-05-01

    The advanced development of the clinical everting (toposcopic) catheter is described. A detailed discussion of the design and outline of the fabrication techniques are followed by a thorough performance evaluation and summary of the first two clinical applications. The everting element is a low-durometer thermoplastic polyurethane elastomer. Surface treatments include the bonding of a hydrophilic polymeric coating, optimized for lubricity, to the sliding internal surfaces of the catheter. Eversion pressures and infusion/aspiration flow rates have been measured under various conditions and the infusate-in-blood mixing potential investigated. A preliminary assessment is given of the clinical performance of the catheter in the vascular delivery of chemotherapy and standard endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography. PMID:3724105

  10. Zwitterionic Group VIII transition metal initiators supported by olefin ligands

    SciTech Connect

    Bazan, Guillermo C.; Chen, Yaofeng

    2011-10-25

    A zwitterionic Group VIII transition metal complex containing the simple and relatively small 3-(arylimino)-but-1-en-2-olato ligand that catalyzes the formation of polypropylene and high molecular weight polyethylene. A novel feature of this catalyst is that the active species is stabilized by a chelated olefin adduct. The present invention also provides methods of polymerizing olefin monomers using zwitterionic catalysts, particularly polypropylene and high molecular weight polyethylene.

  11. Experimental Excitation Rate Coefficients for Ne VIII Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, C. C.; Greve, P.; Kolk, K.-H.; Kunze, H.-J.

    1984-02-01

    From the line emission of a pure neon plasma produced in a theta pinch discharge rate coefficients for the excitation of the n = 3 and 4 levels in Ne VIII ions are derived and compared with theoretical calculations and previous measurements. The general agreement between theory and all measurements is rather satisfactory for the excitation to the n = 3 levels, the measured rate coefficients to the 4p and 4d levels, however, being consistently too low.

  12. Water excitation MPRAGE MRI of VII and VIII cranial nerves

    SciTech Connect

    Litt, A.W.; Licata, P.; Knopp, E.A.; Thomasson, D.M.

    1996-03-01

    Our goal was to compare magnetization prepared rapid gradient echo-water excitation (MPR-AGE-WE) with conventional spin echo (CSE) in the evaluation of the VII and VIII cranial nerves. One hundred three consecutive patients with symptoms referable to the VII/VIII nerves were studied with CSE T1 and MPRAGE-WE following intravenous gadolinium, contrast agent. Each right and left nerve pair was independently evaluated for the presence of an enhancing mass and for visualization of the nerves. On the CSE images, 26 definite and 2 possible lesions were identified, whereas 28 definite and 2 possible abnormalities were seen on the MPRAGE-WE. Four cases were better identified on the MPRAGE-WE and one better seen on the CSE. This difference was not statistically significant (p = 0. 19). CSE demonstrated the nerves partially in 23 instances and completely in 6; MPRAGE-WE showed the nerves partially in 35 and completely in 73. This was highly significant (p < 0.001). With equivalent or slightly improved lesion detection and better visualization of the nerves, MPRAGE-WE may replace CSE in studying the VII/VIII nerves. 14 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  13. Characterization of five partial deletions of the factor VIII gene

    SciTech Connect

    Youssoufian, H.; Antonarakis, S.E.; Aronis, S.; Tsiftis, G.; Phillips, D.G.; Kazazian, H.H. Jr.

    1987-06-01

    Hemophilia A is an X-linked disorder of coagulation caused by a deficiency of factor VIII. By using cloned DNA probes, the authors have characterized the following five different partial deletions of the factor VIII gene from a panel of 83 patients with hemophilia A: (i) a 7-kilobase (kb) deletion that eliminates exon 6; (ii) a 2.5-kb deletion that eliminates 5' sequences of exon 14; (iii) a deletion of at least 7 kb that eliminates exons 24 and 25; (iv) a deletion of at least 16 kb that eliminates exons 23-25; and (v) a 5.5-kb deletion that eliminates exon 22. The first four deletions are associated with severe hemophilia A. By contrast, the last deletion is associated with moderate disease, possibly because of in-frame splicing from adjacent exons. None of those patients with partial gene deletions had circulating inhibitors to factor VIII. One deletion occurred de novo in a germ cell of the maternal grandmother, while a second deletion occurred in a germ cell of the maternal grandfather. These observations demonstrate that de novo deletions of X-linked genes can occur in either male or female gametes.

  14. Catheter-related bacteremia by Cupriavidus metallidurans.

    PubMed

    D'Inzeo, Tiziana; Santangelo, Rosaria; Fiori, Barbara; De Angelis, Giulia; Conte, Viola; Giaquinto, Alessia; Palucci, Ivana; Scoppettuolo, Giancarlo; Di Florio, Viviana; Giani, Tommaso; Sanguinetti, Maurizio; Rossolini, Gian Maria; Spanu, Teresa

    2015-01-01

    Cupriavidus bacteremia is a rare infection and identification of the pathogen is difficult. We present four cases of bacteremia by Cupriavidus metallidurans that were initially identified to the genus level by both Bruker and Vitek matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry and later identified to the species level by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. To our knowledge, these are the first cases of C. metallidurans catheter-related infections. Patients were successfully treated with antibiotic therapy and catheter removal. PMID:25446890

  15. [Phlebitogenicity of venous catheters of Vialon].

    PubMed

    Fassolt, A

    1985-12-01

    During three days 132 surgical patients with postoperative infusion treatment were checked on the frequency of venous reactions in the arms when catheters/cannulas of 4 different materials were used and the outcome compared. A significant result was obtained in connection with the I-cath catheter made of vialon (a polyurethanelike resin polymer) and the L-cath of polyurethane. Phlebitis was decreased to 27.3% resp. 24.2% - approximately half of its usual frequency - when I-cath of polyvinyl-chloride and FEP-teflon vasofix cannulas were applied (both 51.5%). The different predisposing factors of infusion phlebitis are under discussion. PMID:4093198

  16. Ventriculoperitoneal Shunt Peritoneal Catheter Knot Formation

    PubMed Central

    Ul-Haq, Anwar; Al-Otaibi, Faisal; Alshanafey, Saud; Sabbagh, Mohamed Diya; Al Shail, Essam

    2013-01-01

    The ventriculoperitoneal (VP) shunt is a common procedure in pediatric neurosurgery that carries a risk of complications at cranial and abdominal sites. We report on the case of a child with shunt infection and malfunction. The peritoneal catheter was tethered within the abdominal cavity, precluding its removal. Subsequently, laparoscopic exploration identified a knot at the distal end of the peritoneal catheter around the omentum. A new VP shunt was inserted after the infection was healed. This type of complication occurs rarely, so there are a limited number of case reports in the literature. This report is complemented by a literature review. PMID:24109528

  17. Catheter ablation of inappropriate sinus tachycardia.

    PubMed

    Gianni, Carola; Di Biase, Luigi; Mohanty, Sanghamitra; Gökoğlan, Yalçın; Güneş, Mahmut F; Horton, Rodney; Hranitzky, Patrick M; Burkhardt, J David; Natale, Andrea

    2016-06-01

    Catheter ablation for inappropriate sinus tachycardia (IST) is recommended for patients symptomatic for palpitations and refractory to other treatments. The current approach consists in sinus node modification (SNM), achieved by ablation of the cranial part of the sinus node to eliminate faster sinus rates while trying to preserve chronotropic competence. This approach has a limited efficacy, with a very modest long-term clinical success. To overcome this, proper patient selection is crucial and an epicardial approach should always be considered. This brief review will discuss the current role and limitations of catheter ablation in the management of patients with IST. PMID:26310299

  18. Central Venous Access Catheters (CVAC) and Gastrostomy (Feeding) Tubes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Membership Directory (SIR login) Interventional Radiology Central Venous Access Catheters (CVAC) and Gastrostomy (Feeding) Tubes People with ... without surgery by an interventional radiologist. Central Venous Access Catheters (CVAC) A CVAC is a tube that ...

  19. Proteus mirabilis biofilms and the encrustation of urethral catheters.

    PubMed

    Stickler, D; Ganderton, L; King, J; Nettleton, J; Winters, C

    1993-01-01

    Bacterial biofilms were observed on 69 of 75 catheters taken from patients undergoing long-term bladder management. Ten catheters were colonized by pure cultures of Proteus mirabilis. In each of these cases the bacteria formed layers on the catheter surface, underlying encrustations of struvite and hydroxyapatite which partially or completely occluded the catheter lumen. Encrustation was also apparent on catheters colonized by P. mirabilis plus other species, but was rarely seen on catheters colonized by non-urease-producing species. These observations support the hypothesis that catheter encrustation is brought about by the activity of urease-producing biofilms and confirms that the main target in the control of catheter encrustation should be P. mirabilis. PMID:8171763

  20. Comparison of catheter tip migration using flexible and stimulating catheters inserted into the adductor canal in a cadaver model.

    PubMed

    Webb, Christopher A J; Kim, T Edward; Funck, Natasha; Howard, Steven K; Harrison, T Kyle; Ganaway, Toni; Keng, Heidi; Mariano, Edward R

    2015-06-01

    Use of adductor canal blocks and catheters for perioperative pain management following total knee arthroplasty is becoming increasingly common. However, the optimal equipment, timing of catheter insertion, and catheter dislodgement rate remain unknown. A previous study has suggested, but not proven, that non-tunneled stimulating catheters may be at increased risk for catheter migration and dislodgement after knee manipulation. We designed this follow-up study to directly compare tip migration of two catheter types after knee range of motion exercises. In a male unembalmed human cadaver, 30 catheter insertion trials were randomly assigned to one of two catheter types: flexible or stimulating. All catheters were inserted using an ultrasound-guided short-axis in-plane technique. Intraoperative knee manipulation similar to that performed during surgery was simulated by five sequential range of motion exercises. A blinded regional anesthesiologist performed caliper measurements on the ultrasound images before and after exercise. Changes in catheter tip to nerve distance (p = 0.547) and catheter length within the adductor canal (p = 0.498) were not different between groups. Therefore, catheter type may not affect the risk of catheter tip migration when placed prior to knee arthroplasty. PMID:25510467

  1. Reduced intravascular catheter-related infection by routine use of antibiotic-bonded catheters in a surgical intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Kamal, G D; Divishek, D; Kumar, G C; Porter, B R; Tatman, D J; Adams, J R

    1998-03-01

    We report a comparative analysis of intravascular catheter-related infection before and after routine use of antibiotic-bonded catheters in an intensive care unit. Cefazolin-bonded catheters were placed in patients requiring catheterization for at least 3 days, or with remote infection, standard catheters at other times. One thousand forty-five catheters (259 patients) over 6 months were compared with 801 (236 antibiotic-bonded, 565 standard) catheters (239 patients) the next 6 months. After use of antibiotic-bonded catheters, we found: 1.7% catheters infected versus 3.7% (p = 0.01); catheter-associated bacteremia 0.1% versus 1.3% (p < 0.005); catheter-related infection rate 4.39 versus 10.73 per 1000 patient days (p < 0.005), and 5.06 versus 11.47 per 1000 catheter days (p < 0.01); and cumulative risk of infection decreased (p < 0.005). Antibiotic-bonded catheters were used with more remote infections (52% versus 27%, p < 0.001), had longer indwelling time (4.4 versus 3.1 days, p = 0.0001), and more were inserted over a guide wire (66% vs. 28%, p < 0.001). In conclusion routine use of antibiotic-bonded catheters was associated with a significant reduction in infectious complications. PMID:9572020

  2. Small Bowel Obstruction Due to Suprapubic Catheter Placement.

    PubMed

    Bonasso, Patrick C; Lucke-Wold, Brandon; Khan, Uzer

    2016-07-01

    Suprapubic catheter placement has associated complications such as bowel injury, bladder injury, or bleeding. This case describes the management of an elderly patient who had suprapubic catheter placement complicated by small bowel obstruction. The catheter had continued production of urine. Further patient treatment required abdominal exploration and bowel resection. PMID:27335801

  3. 21 CFR 868.5350 - Nasal oxygen catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Nasal oxygen catheter. 868.5350 Section 868.5350...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5350 Nasal oxygen catheter. (a) Identification. A nasal oxygen catheter is a device intended to be inserted through a patient's nostril...

  4. 21 CFR 868.5350 - Nasal oxygen catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Nasal oxygen catheter. 868.5350 Section 868.5350...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5350 Nasal oxygen catheter. (a) Identification. A nasal oxygen catheter is a device intended to be inserted through a patient's nostril...

  5. 21 CFR 868.5350 - Nasal oxygen catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Nasal oxygen catheter. 868.5350 Section 868.5350...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5350 Nasal oxygen catheter. (a) Identification. A nasal oxygen catheter is a device intended to be inserted through a patient's nostril...

  6. 21 CFR 868.5350 - Nasal oxygen catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Nasal oxygen catheter. 868.5350 Section 868.5350...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5350 Nasal oxygen catheter. (a) Identification. A nasal oxygen catheter is a device intended to be inserted through a patient's nostril...

  7. 21 CFR 868.5350 - Nasal oxygen catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Nasal oxygen catheter. 868.5350 Section 868.5350...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5350 Nasal oxygen catheter. (a) Identification. A nasal oxygen catheter is a device intended to be inserted through a patient's nostril...

  8. 21 CFR 870.1330 - Catheter guide wire.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Catheter guide wire. 870.1330 Section 870.1330...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1330 Catheter guide wire. (a) Identification. A catheter guide wire is a coiled wire that is designed to fit inside...

  9. 21 CFR 884.6110 - Assisted reproduction catheters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Assisted reproduction catheters. 884.6110 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OBSTETRICAL AND GYNECOLOGICAL DEVICES Assisted Reproduction Devices § 884.6110 Assisted reproduction catheters. (a) Identification. Assisted reproduction catheters are devices used in...

  10. 21 CFR 884.6110 - Assisted reproduction catheters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Assisted reproduction catheters. 884.6110 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OBSTETRICAL AND GYNECOLOGICAL DEVICES Assisted Reproduction Devices § 884.6110 Assisted reproduction catheters. (a) Identification. Assisted reproduction catheters are devices used in...

  11. 21 CFR 884.6110 - Assisted reproduction catheters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Assisted reproduction catheters. 884.6110 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OBSTETRICAL AND GYNECOLOGICAL DEVICES Assisted Reproduction Devices § 884.6110 Assisted reproduction catheters. (a) Identification. Assisted reproduction catheters are devices used in...

  12. 21 CFR 884.6110 - Assisted reproduction catheters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Assisted reproduction catheters. 884.6110 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OBSTETRICAL AND GYNECOLOGICAL DEVICES Assisted Reproduction Devices § 884.6110 Assisted reproduction catheters. (a) Identification. Assisted reproduction catheters are devices used in...

  13. 21 CFR 884.6110 - Assisted reproduction catheters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Assisted reproduction catheters. 884.6110 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OBSTETRICAL AND GYNECOLOGICAL DEVICES Assisted Reproduction Devices § 884.6110 Assisted reproduction catheters. (a) Identification. Assisted reproduction catheters are devices used in...

  14. 21 CFR 868.5120 - Anesthesia conduction catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Anesthesia conduction catheter. 868.5120 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5120 Anesthesia conduction catheter. (a) Identification. An anesthesia conduction catheter is a flexible tubular device used to...

  15. 21 CFR 868.5120 - Anesthesia conduction catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Anesthesia conduction catheter. 868.5120 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5120 Anesthesia conduction catheter. (a) Identification. An anesthesia conduction catheter is a flexible tubular device used to...

  16. 21 CFR 868.5120 - Anesthesia conduction catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Anesthesia conduction catheter. 868.5120 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5120 Anesthesia conduction catheter. (a) Identification. An anesthesia conduction catheter is a flexible tubular device used to...

  17. 21 CFR 868.5120 - Anesthesia conduction catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Anesthesia conduction catheter. 868.5120 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5120 Anesthesia conduction catheter. (a) Identification. An anesthesia conduction catheter is a flexible tubular device used to...

  18. 21 CFR 868.5120 - Anesthesia conduction catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Anesthesia conduction catheter. 868.5120 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5120 Anesthesia conduction catheter. (a) Identification. An anesthesia conduction catheter is a flexible tubular device used to...

  19. 21 CFR 870.1240 - Flow-directed catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Flow-directed catheter. 870.1240 Section 870.1240...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1240 Flow-directed catheter. (a) Identification. A flow-directed catheter is a device that incorporates a gas-filled balloon...

  20. Activity of sparfloxacin on Staphylococcus epidermidis attached to plastic catheters.

    PubMed

    Pascual, A; García, I; Ramirez de Arellano, E; Perea, E J

    1995-08-01

    The activity of sparfloxacin on Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilms on different plastic catheters was evaluated. Sparfloxacin showed high bactericidal activity against S. epidermidis biofilms on Vialon and polyvinylchloride catheters. The combination of sparfloxacin with amikacin or rifampicin significantly increased its activity against bacterial biofilms on polyurethane and Teflon catheters. PMID:8522473

  1. 21 CFR 870.1290 - Steerable catheter control system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Steerable catheter control system. 870.1290... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1290 Steerable catheter control system. (a) Identification. A steerable catheter control system is a device that...

  2. 21 CFR 870.1290 - Steerable catheter control system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Steerable catheter control system. 870.1290... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1290 Steerable catheter control system. (a) Identification. A steerable catheter control system is a device that...

  3. 21 CFR 870.1290 - Steerable catheter control system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Steerable catheter control system. 870.1290... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1290 Steerable catheter control system. (a) Identification. A steerable catheter control system is a device that...

  4. 21 CFR 870.1290 - Steerable catheter control system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Steerable catheter control system. 870.1290... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1290 Steerable catheter control system. (a) Identification. A steerable catheter control system is a device that...

  5. 21 CFR 870.1290 - Steerable catheter control system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Steerable catheter control system. 870.1290... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1290 Steerable catheter control system. (a) Identification. A steerable catheter control system is a device that...

  6. 21 CFR 876.4020 - Fiberoptic light ureteral catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Fiberoptic light ureteral catheter. 876.4020... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 876.4020 Fiberoptic light ureteral catheter. (a) Identification. A fiberoptic light ureteral catheter is a device that consists of...

  7. 21 CFR 876.4020 - Fiberoptic light ureteral catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Fiberoptic light ureteral catheter. 876.4020... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 876.4020 Fiberoptic light ureteral catheter. (a) Identification. A fiberoptic light ureteral catheter is a device that consists of...

  8. 21 CFR 876.4020 - Fiberoptic light ureteral catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Fiberoptic light ureteral catheter. 876.4020... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 876.4020 Fiberoptic light ureteral catheter. (a) Identification. A fiberoptic light ureteral catheter is a device that consists of...

  9. Ultrasound assessment of caudal catheter position in infants.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Stephen A; Galvez, Ignacio

    2005-05-01

    The positioning of caudally inserted epidural catheters is crucial to their effectiveness. However, level assessment can be difficult and time consuming. We report the use of ultrasound to assess the catheter position in three patients aged between 1 and 10 months. The advantages and disadvantages of this technique are discussed in relation to other methods of assessing caudal catheter placement. PMID:15828997

  10. 21 CFR 876.4020 - Fiberoptic light ureteral catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Fiberoptic light ureteral catheter. 876.4020... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 876.4020 Fiberoptic light ureteral catheter. (a) Identification. A fiberoptic light ureteral catheter is a device that consists of...

  11. Differential proteolytic activation of factor VIII-von Willebrand factor complex by thrombin

    SciTech Connect

    Hill-Eubanks, D.C.; Parker, C.G.; Lollar, P. )

    1989-09-01

    Blood coagulation factor VIII (fVIII) is a plasma protein that is decreased or absent in hemophilia A. It is isolated as a mixture of heterodimers that contain a variably sized heavy chain and a common light chain. Thrombin catalyzes the activation of fVIII in a reaction that is associated with cleavages in both types of chain. The authors isolated a serine protease from Bothrops jararacussu snake venom that catalyzes thrombin-like heavy-chain cleavage but not light-chain cleavage in porcine fVIII as judged by NaDodSO{sub 4}/PAGE and N-terminal sequence analysis. Using a plasma-free assay of the ability of activated {sup 125}I-fVIII to function as a cofactor in the activation of factor X by factor IXa, they found that fVIII is activated by the venom enzyme. The venom enzyme-activated fVIII was isolated in stable form by cation-exchange HPLC. von Willebrand factor inhibited venom enzyme-activated fVIII but not thrombin-activated fVIII. These results suggest that the binding of fVIII to von Willebrand factor depends on the presence of an intact light chain and that activated fVIII must dissociate from von Willebrand factor to exert its cofactor effect. Thus, proteolytic activation of fVIII-von Willebrand factor complex appears to be differentially regulated by light-chain cleavage to dissociate the complex and heavy-chain cleavage to activate the cofactor function.

  12. A comparison of the priming properties of two central venous catheters and one pulmonary artery catheter.

    PubMed

    Sanderson, P M

    1995-01-01

    The time taken to prime the individual lumina of two multilumen central venous catheters (Viggo-Spectramed 14G 20 cm Hydrocath and Vialon 14G 20 cm Deltacath) and one pulmonary artery catheter (Viggo-Spectramed 110 cm 7.5F Pentacath) at flows between 5 ml.h-1 and 99 ml.h-1 is reported. The catheters supplied by different manufacturers but of identical length and gauge have significantly different priming times (p < 0.001). A protocol which may be used to prime the individual lumina of the three catheters studied is described. By means of an in vitro test the accuracy of this protocol is validated. PMID:7702147

  13. Lymphatic Leak Complicating Central Venous Catheter Insertion

    SciTech Connect

    Barnacle, Alex M. Kleidon, Tricia M.

    2005-12-15

    Many of the risks associated with central venous access are well recognized. We report a case of inadvertent lymphatic disruption during the insertion of a tunneled central venous catheter in a patient with raised left and right atrial pressures and severe pulmonary hypertension, which led to significant hemodynamic instability. To our knowledge, this rare complication is previously unreported.

  14. [Drug administration through enteral feeding catheters].

    PubMed

    Goñi Viguria, R; Sánchez Sanz, L; Asiain Erro, M; Baztán Indave, A

    2001-01-01

    Because of easiness and accessibility, the oral route of administration is usually the route of choice for medication delivery, as long as the oral drug form is available and the patients' circumstances allow it.In patients admitted to the intensive care unit this route is frequently altered. This provokes difficulties in swallowing and consequently an enteral feeding catheter must be inserted to supply the patient's nutritional requirements. This catheter is also used for the drug administration, which necessitates opening capsules or crushing pills before dilution. When added to drug-nutrient interactions, this process alters the drug's properties and modifies its pharmacokinetic profile, its pharmacological effect and the intensity of side effects. It can also provoke catheter obstruction. The aim of this study was to establish guidelines for drug administration through enteral feeding catheters. We provide a thorough review of the literature, describe oral drug forms, present a protocol for correct drug administration and provide a guide to the most commonly used drugs in our unit. For each of these drugs we include recommendations on administration and possible alternatives. PMID:11459545

  15. 21 CFR 870.1340 - Catheter introducer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Catheter introducer. 870.1340 Section 870.1340 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... the skin into a vein or artery. (b) Classification. Class II (performance standards)....

  16. 21 CFR 870.1250 - Percutaneous catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Percutaneous catheter. 870.1250 Section 870.1250 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... through the skin using a dilator and a sheath (introducer) or guide wire. (b) Classification. Class...

  17. A new catheter system for coronary angioplasty.

    PubMed

    Simpson, J B; Baim, D S; Robert, E W; Harrison, D C

    1982-04-01

    A new catheter system has been designed for percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty. An independently movable, flexible-tipped guide wire within the balloon dilation catheter facilitates selection of the involved vessel. This guide wire can be passed slowly and carefully beyond the coronary stenosis, permitting safe advancement of the balloon catheter. After testing in animal and cadaver hearts, this system was used in 53 patients (56 stenoses) with single vessel coronary artery disease, with an overall primary success rate of 64 percent. In the last 41 of these 56 cases, use of a balloon catheter with a smaller deflated diameter increased the success rate to 73 percent. In patients with lesions of the left anterior descending coronary artery, the success rate was 89 percent. Three (6 percent) of the 53 patients had complications during coronary arterial dilation that necessitated emergency coronary arterial bypass graft surgery. There were no procedure-related or late cardiac deaths. During the mean follow-up period of 8 months (range 1 to 21), there were one late death (of noncardiac causes) and no late myocardial infarctions. Clinical status was persistently improved in 31 of the 36 patients who had successful dilation. The remaining five patients experienced restenosis at the angioplasty site and return of angina pectoris within 3 months of dilation. Two of these patients had repeat coronary angioplasty with restoration of asymptomatic status, and three had elective coronary bypass graft surgery. PMID:6461241

  18. Ultraminiature manometer-tipped cardiac catheter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coon, G. W.

    1967-01-01

    Miniature diaphragm-type capacitance transducer capable of being mounted on the end of a cardiac catheter has been developed for measurement of intravascular pressures. The transducer can be inserted in small ducts /arteries and veins/ without disturbing the flow characteristics. It is very useful for making measurements in babies.

  19. [Candida catheter related-blood stream infection].

    PubMed

    Kadowaki, Masako; Shimono, Nobuyuki

    2014-02-01

    Candida catheter-related bloodstream infection (CRBSI) is a biofilm-related disease, which is usually refractory because antifungals show limited effect. With medical development and increase in number of compromised hosts, CRBSI became more frequent. Candida, which is one of the opportunistic pathogens, ranks the fourth causative organism of bacteremia. The onset of bacteremia is greatly associated with the presence of catheter. Repeated blood cultures and the central venous catheter (CVC) tip culture are done for the definitive diagnosis of Candida CRBSI. Additionally serological examinations such as (1 --> 3)-beta-D-glucan and mannan antigen are also useful for early diagnosis. It is important for the appropriate treatment to remove CVC, which is an artificial contaminated material, and administer antifungals promptly. As to the choice of antifungals, we should also take into account the ability of antibiofilm effect of antifungals as well as immunological state of host including neutropenia, prior administration of azoles, isolated or estimated Candida species, sensitivity against antifungals, administration route, pharmacokinetics (bioavailability, metabolic and excretion pathway, distribution) and drug interaction. As to complication of Candida bacteremia, first we should check endophthalmitis, which occurs frequently and leads to the loss of eyesight, as well as infective endocarditis, arthritis, metastatic infections such as embolic pneumonia and suppurative thrombotic phlebitis of catheter insertion site. Lastly we emphasize that the appropriate treatment based on the character of Candida bacteremia and biofilm leads to favorable prognosis. PMID:24809204

  20. The risks and benefits of suprapubic catheters.

    PubMed

    Yates, Ann

    Suprapubic catheterisation can improve some patients' quality of life but the insertion procedure, as well as changing and managing the catheter, carry risks of infection and other negative patient outcomes. This article highlights the advantages and disadvantages, indications and contraindications, and the potential benefits, so health professionals can understand the relevant issues and assess and inform patients accordingly. PMID:27017651

  1. 21 CFR 882.4100 - Ventricular catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...) Identification. A ventricular catheter is a device used to gain access to the cavities of the brain for injection of material into, or removal of material from, the brain. (b) Classification. Class II...

  2. 21 CFR 882.4100 - Ventricular catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...) Identification. A ventricular catheter is a device used to gain access to the cavities of the brain for injection of material into, or removal of material from, the brain. (b) Classification. Class II...

  3. 21 CFR 882.4100 - Ventricular catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...) Identification. A ventricular catheter is a device used to gain access to the cavities of the brain for injection of material into, or removal of material from, the brain. (b) Classification. Class II...

  4. 21 CFR 882.4100 - Ventricular catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...) Identification. A ventricular catheter is a device used to gain access to the cavities of the brain for injection of material into, or removal of material from, the brain. (b) Classification. Class II...

  5. 21 CFR 882.4100 - Ventricular catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...) Identification. A ventricular catheter is a device used to gain access to the cavities of the brain for injection of material into, or removal of material from, the brain. (b) Classification. Class II...

  6. Abnormal factor VIII coagulant antigen in patients with renal dysfunction and in those with disseminated intravascular coagulation.

    PubMed Central

    Weinstein, M J; Chute, L E; Schmitt, G W; Hamburger, R H; Bauer, K A; Troll, J H; Janson, P; Deykin, D

    1985-01-01

    Factor VIII antigen (VIII:CAg) exhibits molecular weight heterogeneity in normal plasma. We have compared the relative quantities of VIII:CAg forms present in normal individuals (n = 22) with VIII:CAg forms in renal dysfunction patients (n = 19) and in patients with disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC; n = 7). In normal plasma, the predominant VIII: CAg form, detectable by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, was of molecular weight 2.4 X 10(5), with minor forms ranging from 8 X 10(4) to 2.6 X 10(5) D. A high proportion of VIII:CAg in renal dysfunction patients, in contrast, was of 1 X 10(5) mol wt. The patients' high 1 X 10(5) mol wt VIII: CAg level correlated with increased concentrations of serum creatinine, F1+2 (a polypeptide released upon prothrombin activation), and with von Willebrand factor. Despite the high proportion of the 1 X 10(5) mol wt VIII:CAg form, which suggests VIII:CAg proteolysis, the ratio of Factor VIII coagulant activity to total VIII:CAg concentration was normal in renal dysfunction patients. These results could be simulated in vitro by thrombin treatment of normal plasma, which yielded similar VIII:CAg gel patterns and Factor VIII coagulant activity to antigen ratios. DIC patients with high F1+2 levels but no evidence of renal dysfunction had an VIII:CAg gel pattern distinct from renal dysfunction patients. DIC patients had elevated concentrations of both the 1 X 10(5) and 8 X 10(4) mol wt VIII:CAg forms. We conclude that an increase in a particular VIII:CAg form correlates with the severity of renal dysfunction. The antigen abnormality may be the result of VIII:CAg proteolysis by a thrombinlike enzyme and/or prolonged retention of proteolyzed VIII:CAg fragments. Images PMID:3932466

  7. The Transurethral Suprapubic endo-Cystostomy (T-SPeC): A Novel Suprapubic Catheter Insertion Device

    PubMed Central

    Egerdie, R. Blair; Albala, David M.; Flynn, Brian J.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background and Purpose Current methods of suprapubic cystostomy (SPC) catheter insertion may be difficult for patients in poor health and can result in significant morbidity and mortality. These include a highly invasive open procedure, as well as the use of the percutaneous trocar punch methods, commonly associated with short-term SPC. We present the first human experience with the Transurethral Suprapubic endo-Cystostomy (T-SPeC®) device, a novel disposable device used for introducing a suprapubic catheter via a retrourethral (inside-to-out) approach similar to the Lowsley technique. Patients and Methods Four men at St. Mary's General Hospital in Kitchener Ontario, Canada, received the T-SPeC device (model T7) under general anesthesia. Results Patients had no complications from catheterization using the T-SPeC T7 Surgical System. The mean surgical time of the four procedures was 9.7 minutes, with a range of 7.9 to 13.5 minutes, including instrument preparation and cystoscopy. All four procedures were highly accurate and rapid. There were no complications and minimal blood loss from the procedure. Conclusions We found that the T-SPeC device allows for efficient and safe insertion of a suprapubic catheter in an outpatient setting and may be a useful addition to the urologic armamentarium. The T-SPeC Surgical System facilitates rapid and precise suprapubic catheter placement. PMID:23488708

  8. Urethral catheters: can we reduce use?

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Indwelling urinary catheters are the main cause of healthcare-associated urinary tract infections. It can be expected that reduction of the use of urinary catheters will lead to decreased numbers of urinary tract infection. Methods The efficacy of an intervention programme to improve adherence to recommendations to reduce the use of urethral catheters was studied in a before-after comparison in ten Dutch hospitals. The programme detected barriers and facilitators and each individual facility was supported with developing their own intervention strategy. Outcome was evaluated by the prevalence of catheters, alternatives such as diapers, numbers of urinary tract infections, the percentage of correct indications and the duration of catheterization. The costs of the implementation as well as the catheterization were evaluated. Results Of a population of 16,495 hospitalized patients 3335 patients of whom 2943 were evaluable for the study, had a urethral catheter. The prevalence of urethral catheters decreased insignificantly in neurology (OR 0.93; 95% CI 0.77 - 1.13) and internal medicine wards (OR 0.97; 95% CI 0.83 - 1.13), decreased significantly in surgical wards (OR 0.84; 95% CI 0.75 - 0.96), but increased significantly in intensive care (IC) and coronary care (CC) units (OR 1.48; 95% CI 1.01 - 2.17). The use of alternatives was limited and remained so after the intervention. Duration of catheterization decreased insignificantly in IC/CC units (ratio after/before 0.95; 95% CI 0.78 - 1.16) and neurology (ratio 0.97; 95% CI 0.80 - 1.18) and significantly in internal medicine (ratio 0.81; 95% CI 0.69 - 0.96) and surgery wards (ratio 0.80; 95% CI 0.71 - 0.90). The percentage of correct indications on the day of inclusion increased from 50 to 67% (p < 0.0001). The prevalence of urinary tract infections in catheterized patients did not change. The mean cost saved per 100 patients was € 537. Conclusion Targeted implementation of recommendations from an

  9. Azygos catheter placement as a cause of failure of dialysis.

    PubMed

    Stewart, G D; Jackson, A; Beards, S C

    1993-11-01

    Common complications of venous dialysis catheters include sepsis and accidental removal. Angiographic demonstration of dialysis lines is only rarely requested usually to confirm the presence of clot or stenosis as a cause for poor dialysis flow. Poor flow can also be due to inadvertent placement of the catheter in the azygos system. The use of dialysis catheters with a long venous limb which extends beyond the arterial port may predispose to such placement as their lumen is lateral to the central axis of the catheter. In those patients with poor venous access catheter placement under angiographic control may be helpful. PMID:8258225

  10. Causes and nursing countermeasures in pediatric PICC catheter complications.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Mingli; Li, Na; Yi, Lan; Liu, Bin

    2016-01-01

    To analyze the complications and nursing countermeasures of PICC (Peripherally Inserted Central Catheter) catheters using children PICC catheter technique 40 cases, complications were observed, and analyze the original causes, in order to propose a solution. There were 10 cases of catheter blockage, 5 cases of catheter infection, 6 cases of phlebitis, 5 cases of puncture difficulties, 2 cases of poor feeding tube, 2 cases of bleeding puncture site with the continuous exploration and research of nursing intervention, the production of clinical complications from PICC has been used in children were greatly reduced. PMID:27005500

  11. Prevention of urinary catheter incrustations by acetohydroxamic acid.

    PubMed

    Burns, J R; Gauthier, J F

    1984-09-01

    Acetohydroxamic acid was administered in 5 patients to determine its effect in reducing urinary catheter incrustations. All patients had chronic indwelling catheters that required frequent changes because of severe incrustations and catheter occlusion. Incrustations were analyzed chemically for calcium, magnesium, ammonia nitrogen and phosphorus. The degree of incrustation before and during acetohydroxamic acid therapy was compared in each patient and was decreased significantly (average 81 per cent) during therapy (p less than 0.05). Catheter changes were required less frequently during therapy in all patients. Acetohydroxamic acid is effective in preventing catheter incrustations and should be considered in patients with this problem. PMID:6381758

  12. Chronic peritoneal dialysis catheters: challenges and design solutions.

    PubMed

    Ash, S R

    2006-01-01

    Although highly successful as transcutaneous access devices, today's peritoneal dialysis catheters still have imperfect hydraulic function, biocompatibility and resistance to infection. Success of Tenckhoff catheters is greatly improved by the proper positioning of deep and subcutaneous cuffs and intraperitoneal segment. Newer peritoneal catheter designs are intended to improve hydraulic function, avoid outflow failure, and diminish exit site infection. These catheter designs serve as excellent alternatives for patients with various types of failure of Tenckhoff catheters. Catheters have been designed for Continuous Flow Peritoneal Dialysis, and have generally been successful in providing high peritoneal dialysis flow rate, but not always successful in optimally distributing flow of peritoneal fluid. Improvements in catheter design may expand the use of peritoneal dialysis as a successful home dialysis therapy. PMID:16485243

  13. A major determinant of the immunogenicity of factor VIII in a murine model is independent of its procoagulant function

    PubMed Central

    Meeks, Shannon L.; Cox, Courtney L.; Healey, John F.; Parker, Ernest T.; Doshi, Bhavya S.; Gangadharan, Bagirath; Barrow, Rachel T.

    2012-01-01

    A main complication of treatment of patients with hemophilia A is the development of anti–factor VIII (fVIII) antibodies. The immunogenicity of fVIII potentially is a function of its procoagulant activity, which may result in danger signals that drive the immune response. Alternatively, intrinsic structural elements in fVIII may be particularly immunogenic. Finally, VWF, the carrier protein for fVIII in plasma, may play a role in immune recognition. We compared the immunogenicity of wild-type (wt) B domain–deleted fVIII and 2 inactive fVIII molecules, R372A/R1689A fVIII and V634M fVIII in fVIII−/− and fVIII−/−/VWF−/− mice. R372A/R1689A fVIII lacks proteolytic recognition sites and is not released from VWF. In contrast, V634M fVIII undergoes proteolytic cleavage and dissociation from VWF. No significant difference was observed in the immunogenicity of wt fVIII and V634M fVIII. R372A/R1689A fVIII was slightly less immunogenic in a subset of immunization regimens tested. High doses of wt fVIII were required to produce an immune response in fVIII−/−/VWF−/− mice. Our results indicate that a main component of the immune response to fVIII is independent of its procoagulant function, is both positively and negatively affected by its association with VWF, and may involve intrinsic elements of fVIII structure. PMID:22855607

  14. Different subcellular localizations and functions of Arabidopsis myosin VIII

    PubMed Central

    Golomb, Lior; Abu-Abied, Mohamad; Belausov, Eduard; Sadot, Einat

    2008-01-01

    Background Myosins are actin-activated ATPases that use energy to generate force and move along actin filaments, dragging with their tails different cargos. Plant myosins belong to the group of unconventional myosins and Arabidopsis myosin VIII gene family contains four members: ATM1, ATM2, myosin VIIIA and myosin VIIIB. Results In transgenic plants expressing GFP fusions with ATM1 (IQ-tail truncation, lacking the head domain), fluorescence was differentially distributed: while in epidermis cells at the root cap GFP-ATM1 equally distributed all over the cell, in epidermal cells right above this region it accumulated in dots. Further up, in cells of the elongation zone, GFP-ATM1 was preferentially positioned at the sides of transversal cell walls. Interestingly, the punctate pattern was insensitive to brefeldin A (BFA) while in some cells closer to the root cap, ATM1 was found in BFA bodies. With the use of different markers and transient expression in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves, it was found that myosin VIII co-localized to the plasmodesmata and ER, colocalized with internalized FM4-64, and partially overlapped with the endosomal markers ARA6, and rarely with ARA7 and FYVE. Motility of ARA6 labeled organelles was inhibited whenever associated with truncated ATM1 but motility of FYVE labeled organelles was inhibited only when associated with large excess of ATM1. Furthermore, GFP-ATM1 and RFP-ATM2 (IQ-tail domain) co-localized to the same spots on the plasma membrane, indicating a specific composition at these sites for myosin binding. Conclusion Taken together, our data suggest that myosin VIII functions differently in different root cells and can be involved in different steps of endocytosis, BFA-sensitive and insensitive pathways, ER tethering and plasmodesmatal activity. PMID:18179725

  15. Conservative Treatment of Lung Perforation Secondary to Retained Catheter in an Extremely Low-Birth-Weight Premature Infant.

    PubMed

    Arda, Mehmet Surhan; Hamrick, Miller C; Kane, Timothy D

    2015-12-01

    Airway injury may occur during the use of any instrumentation in premature infants. A surgical approach for the treatment of lung perforation in extremely low-birth-weight infants has been recommended in the past. Here, we present a case of lung perforation in an ex-28-week, 730-g premature infant, who sustained lung perforation, secondary to an 8-Fr suction catheter used to administer surfactant, in which the broken catheter was retained in the airway. Following removal of catheter by endoscopy, tension pneumothorax had occurred. Attempts were made to treat the patient with single chest tube, unfortunately as it was not efficacious, the second one was placed on the ipsilateral side of hemithorax and the patient recovered without further surgery. PMID:26788450

  16. Effectiveness of Mind Mapping in English Teaching among VIII Standard Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hallen, D.; Sangeetha, N.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study is to find out the effectiveness of mind mapping technique over conventional method in teaching English at high school level (VIII), in terms of Control and Experimental group. The sample of the study comprised, 60 VIII Standard students in Tiruchendur Taluk. Mind Maps and Achievement Test (Pretest & Posttest) were…

  17. 40 CFR Appendix Viii to Part 86 - Aging Bench Equipment and Procedures

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Aging Bench Equipment and Procedures.... VIII Appendix VIII to Part 86—Aging Bench Equipment and Procedures This appendix provides specifications for standard aging bench equipment and aging procedures which may be used to conduct bench...

  18. 40 CFR Appendix Viii to Part 86 - Aging Bench Equipment and Procedures

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Aging Bench Equipment and Procedures.... 86, App. VIII Appendix VIII to Part 86—Aging Bench Equipment and Procedures This appendix provides specifications for standard aging bench equipment and aging procedures which may be used to conduct bench...

  19. 40 CFR Appendix Viii to Part 86 - Aging Bench Equipment and Procedures

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Aging Bench Equipment and Procedures.... 86, App. VIII Appendix VIII to Part 86—Aging Bench Equipment and Procedures This appendix provides specifications for standard aging bench equipment and aging procedures which may be used to conduct bench...

  20. 40 CFR Appendix Viii to Part 86 - Aging Bench Equipment and Procedures

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Aging Bench Equipment and Procedures.... 86, App. VIII Appendix VIII to Part 86—Aging Bench Equipment and Procedures This appendix provides specifications for standard aging bench equipment and aging procedures which may be used to conduct bench...

  1. 40 CFR Appendix Viii to Part 86 - Aging Bench Equipment and Procedures

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Aging Bench Equipment and Procedures.... 86, App. VIII Appendix VIII to Part 86—Aging Bench Equipment and Procedures This appendix provides specifications for standard aging bench equipment and aging procedures which may be used to conduct bench...

  2. 40 CFR Appendix Viii to Part 266 - Organic Compounds for Which Residues Must Be Analyzed

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Organic Compounds for Which Residues Must Be Analyzed VIII Appendix VIII to Part 266 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS FOR THE MANAGEMENT OF SPECIFIC HAZARDOUS WASTES AND SPECIFIC TYPES OF HAZARDOUS WASTE...

  3. Paducah-Louisville Consortium; Project VIII: Focus on Dropouts... a New Design. Final Evaluation Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paducah Public Schools, KY.

    Project VIII is an innovative behavioral science oriented educational program, funded under Title VIII Elementary Secondary Education Act, designed to attack the personal, social, and educational problems of children whose previous record of school failure and frustration has indicated high dropout potential. The program is operated as a…

  4. 40 CFR Appendix Viii to Part 85 - Vehicle and Engine Parameters and Specifications

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF AIR POLLUTION FROM MOBILE SOURCES Pt. 85, App. VIII Appendix VIII.... Air Inlet System. 1. Temperature control system calibration. IV. Fuel System. 1. General. a. Engine idle speed. b. Engine idle mixture. 2. Carburetion. a. Air-fuel flow calibration. b....

  5. 40 CFR Appendix Viii to Part 85 - Vehicle and Engine Parameters and Specifications

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF AIR POLLUTION FROM MOBILE SOURCES Pt. 85, App. VIII Appendix VIII.... Air Inlet System. 1. Temperature control system calibration. IV. Fuel System. 1. General. a. Engine idle speed. b. Engine idle mixture. 2. Carburetion. a. Air-fuel flow calibration. b....

  6. 40 CFR Appendix Viii to Part 85 - Vehicle and Engine Parameters and Specifications

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF AIR POLLUTION FROM MOBILE SOURCES Pt. 85, App. VIII Appendix VIII.... Air Inlet System. 1. Temperature control system calibration. IV. Fuel System. 1. General. a. Engine idle speed. b. Engine idle mixture. 2. Carburetion. a. Air-fuel flow calibration. b....

  7. 40 CFR Appendix Viii to Part 85 - Vehicle and Engine Parameters and Specifications

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF AIR POLLUTION FROM MOBILE SOURCES Pt. 85, App. VIII Appendix VIII.... Air Inlet System. 1. Temperature control system calibration. IV. Fuel System. 1. General. a. Engine idle speed. b. Engine idle mixture. 2. Carburetion. a. Air-fuel flow calibration. b....

  8. 40 CFR Appendix Viii to Part 266 - Organic Compounds for Which Residues Must Be Analyzed

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Organic Compounds for Which Residues Must Be Analyzed VIII Appendix VIII to Part 266 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS FOR THE MANAGEMENT OF SPECIFIC HAZARDOUS WASTES AND SPECIFIC TYPES OF HAZARDOUS WASTE...

  9. Pancreas tumor interstitial pressure catheter measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieskoski, Michael D.; Gunn, Jason; Marra, Kayla; Trembly, B. Stuart; Pogue, Brian W.

    2016-03-01

    This paper highlights the methodology in measuring interstitial pressure in pancreatic adenocarcinoma tumors. A Millar Mikrotip pressure catheter (SPR-671) was used in this study and a system was built to amplify and filter the output signal for data collection. The Millar pressure catheter was calibrated prior to each experiment in a water column at 37°C, range of 0 to 60 inH2O (112 mmHg), resulting in a calibration factor of 33 mV / 1 inH2O. The interstitial pressures measured in two orthotopically grown pancreatic adenocarcinoma tumor were 57 mmHg and 48 mmHg, respectively. Verteporfin uptake into the pancreatic adenocarcinoma tumor was measured using a probe-based experimental dosimeter.

  10. Bowel Perforation During Peritoneal Dialysis Catheter Placement.

    PubMed

    Abreo, Kenneth; Sequeira, Adrian

    2016-08-01

    Interventional nephrologists and radiologists place peritoneal dialysis catheters using the percutaneous fluoroscopic technique in both the inpatient and outpatient setting. Nephrologists caring for such patients may have to diagnose and manage the complications resulting from these procedures. Abdominal pain can occur following peritoneal dialysis catheter placement when the local and systemic analgesia wears off. However, abdominal pain with hypotension is suggestive of a serious complication. Bleeding into the abdomen and perforation of the colon or bladder should be considered in the differential diagnosis. In the case reported here, the peritoneogram showed contrast in the bowel, and correct interpretation by the interventionist would have prevented this complication. The characteristic pattern of peritoneogram images in this case will guide interventionists to avoid this complication, and the discussion of the differential diagnosis and management will assist nephrologists in taking care of such patients. PMID:26857647

  11. Retrograde Epidural Catheter Relieves Intractable Sacral Pain.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Ruchir; Shodhan, Shivam; Hosny, Amr

    2016-01-01

    Pain caused by tumor infiltration of the sacral area remains a major clinical challenge. Patients with poor pain control despite comprehensive medical management may be treated with neuraxial techniques such as continuous epidural or spinal anesthetic. We report a case in which a patient with metastatic breast cancer experienced inadequate pain relief after multiple intravenous pain management regimens as well as intrathecal (IT) drug delivery. The concentration of local anesthetics delivered via the IT catheter was limited due to the patient's baseline motor weakness which would be exacerbated with higher concentrations of local anesthetics. Thus, a decision was made to insert an epidural catheter via a retrograde technique to provide the patient with a "band of anesthesia" which would provide profound sensory blockade without concomitant motor weakness. Pain refractory to other modalities of pain control was successfully treated with the epidural technique. PMID:27162431

  12. Live volumetric imaging (LVI) intracardiac ultrasound catheter.

    PubMed

    Dausch, David E; Castellucci, John B; Gilchrist, Kristin H; Carlson, James B; Hall, Stephen D; von Ramm, Olaf T

    2013-01-01

    The Live Volumetric Imaging (LVI) catheter is capable of real-time 3D intracardiac echo (ICE) imaging, uniquely providing full volume sectors with deep penetration depth and high volume frame rate. The key enabling technology in this catheter is an integrated piezoelectric micromachined ultrasound transducer (pMUT), a novel matrix phased array transducer fabricated using semiconductor microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) manufacturing techniques. This technology innovation may enable better image guidance to improve accuracy, reduce risk, and reduce procedure time for transcatheter intracardiac therapies which are currently done with limited direct visualization of the endocardial tissue. Envisioned applications for LVI include intraprocedural image guidance of cardiac ablation therapies as well as transcatheter mitral and aortic valve repair. PMID:23773496

  13. Retrograde Epidural Catheter Relieves Intractable Sacral Pain

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Ruchir; Shodhan, Shivam; Hosny, Amr

    2016-01-01

    Pain caused by tumor infiltration of the sacral area remains a major clinical challenge. Patients with poor pain control despite comprehensive medical management may be treated with neuraxial techniques such as continuous epidural or spinal anesthetic. We report a case in which a patient with metastatic breast cancer experienced inadequate pain relief after multiple intravenous pain management regimens as well as intrathecal (IT) drug delivery. The concentration of local anesthetics delivered via the IT catheter was limited due to the patient's baseline motor weakness which would be exacerbated with higher concentrations of local anesthetics. Thus, a decision was made to insert an epidural catheter via a retrograde technique to provide the patient with a “band of anesthesia” which would provide profound sensory blockade without concomitant motor weakness. Pain refractory to other modalities of pain control was successfully treated with the epidural technique. PMID:27162431

  14. Reduction of Factor VIII Inhibitor Titers During Immune Tolerance Induction With Recombinant Factor VIII-Fc Fusion Protein.

    PubMed

    Groomes, Charles L; Gianferante, David M; Crouch, Gary D; Parekh, Dina S; Scott, David W; Lieuw, Kenneth

    2016-05-01

    The development of inhibitors toward factor VIII (FVIII) is a common and serious complication of hemophilia A (HA) therapy. Patients with hemophilia who develop inhibitors often undergo time- and resource-intensive immune tolerance induction (ITI) protocols. We report a 15-month-old male with severe HA and a high-titer inhibitor that occurred while receiving prophylactic treatment with recombinant FVIII (rFVIII), in whom significant inhibitor titer reduction was achieved with thrice weekly infusions of a new, prolonged half-life rFVIII-Fc fusion protein product (trade name Eloctate). Further studies are warranted to explore the potential of Eloctate in ITI protocols. PMID:26739399

  15. Soft robotic concepts in catheter design: an on-demand fouling-release urinary catheter.

    PubMed

    Levering, Vrad; Wang, Qiming; Shivapooja, Phanindhar; Zhao, Xuanhe; López, Gabriel P

    2014-10-01

    Infectious biofilms are problematic in many healthcare-related devices and are especially challenging and ubiquitous in urinary catheters. This report presents an on-demand fouling-release methodology to mechanically disrupt and remove biofilms, and proposes this method for the active removal of infectious biofilms from the previously inaccessible main drainage lumen of urinary catheters. Mature Proteus mirabilis crystalline biofilms detach from silicone elastomer substrates upon application of strain to the substrate, and increasing the strain rate increases biofilm detachment. The study presents a quantitative relationship between applied strain rate and biofilm debonding through an analysis of biofilm segment length and the driving force for debonding. Based on this mechanism, hydraulic and pneumatic elastomer actuation is used to achieve surface strain selectively within the lumen of prototypes of sections of a fouling-release urinary catheter. Proof-of-concept prototypes of sections of active, fouling-release catheters are constructed using techniques typical to soft robotics including 3D printing and replica molding, and those prototypes demonstrate release of mature P. mirabilis crystalline biofilms (e.g., ≈90%) from strained surfaces. These results provide a basis for the development of a new urinary catheter technology in which infectious biofilms are effectively managed through new methods that are entirely complementary to existing approaches. PMID:24668920

  16. Incidence of phlebitis associated with the use of peripheral IV catheter and following catheter removal

    PubMed Central

    Urbanetto, Janete de Souza; Peixoto, Cibelle Grassmann; May, Tássia Amanda

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: to investigate the incidence of phlebitis and its association with risk factors when using peripheral IV catheters (PIC) and following their removal - (post-infusion phlebitis) in hospitalized adults. Method: a cohort study of 171 patients using PIC, totaling 361 punctures. Sociodemographic variables and variables associated with the catheter were collected. Descriptive and analytical statistical analyses were performed. Results: average patient age was 56.96 and 51.5% of the sample population was male. The incidence of phlebitis was 1.25% while using PIC, and 1.38% post-infusion. The incidence of phlebitis while using PIC was associated with the length of time the catheter remained in place, whereas post-infusion phlebitis was associated with puncture in the forearm. Ceftriaxone, Clarithromycin and Oxacillin are associated with post-infusion phlebitis. Conclusions: this study made it possible to investigate the association between risk factors and phlebitis during catheter use and following its removal. The frequency of post-infusion phlebitis was larger than the incidence of phlebitis with the catheter in place, with Phlebitis Grade III and II being the most frequently found in each of these situations, respectively. Aspects related to post-infusion phlebitis can be explained, given the limited number of studies addressing this theme from this perspective. PMID:27508916

  17. Soft Robotic Concepts in Catheter Design: an On-demand Fouling-release Urinary Catheter

    PubMed Central

    Leveri, Vrad; Wang, Qiming; Shivapooja, Phanindhar; Zhao, Xuanhe; L00F3;pez, Gabriel P.

    2014-01-01

    Infectious biofilms are problematic in many healthcare-related devices, and are especially challenging and ubiquitous in urinary catheters. This report presents an on-demand fouling-release methodology to mechanically disrupt and remove biofilms, and proposes this method for the active removal of infectious biofilms from the previously-inaccessible main drainage lumen of urinary catheters. Mature Proteus mirabilis crystalline biofilms detach from silicone elastomer substrates upon application of strain to the substrate, and increasing the strain rate increases biofilm detachment. The study presents a quantitative relationship between applied strain rate and biofilm debonding through an analysis of biofilm segment length and the driving force for debonding. Based on this mechanism, hydraulic and pneumatic elastomer actuation was used to achieve surface strain selectively within the lumen of prototypes of sections of a fouling-release urinary catheter. Proof-of-concept prototypes of sections of active, fouling-release catheters were constructed using techniques typical to soft robotics including 3D printing and replica molding, and those prototypes demonstrate release of mature P. mirabilis crystalline biofilms (e.g., ≈90%) from strained surfaces. These results provide a basis for the development of a new urinary catheter technology in which infectious biofilms are effectively managed through new methods that are entirely complementary to existing approaches. PMID:24668920

  18. Atomic data for astrophysics: improved collision strengths for Fe viii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Zanna, G.; Badnell, N. R.

    2014-10-01

    We describe, and present the results of, a new large-scale R-matrix scattering calculation for the electron collisional excitation of Fe viii. We first discuss the limitations of the previous calculations, in particular concerning some strong EUV lines observed in the solar corona by the Hinode EUV Imaging Spectrometer. We then present a new target which represents an improvement over the previous ones for this particularly complex ion. We developed a new method, based on the use of term energy corrections within the intermediate coupling frame transformation method, to calculate the collision strengths. We compare predicted and observed line intensities using laboratory and solar spectra, finding excellent agreement for all the main soft X-ray and extreme ultraviolet (EUV) transitions, using the present atomic data. In particular, we show that Fe viii EUV lines observed by Hinode EIS can now be used to provide reliable electron temperatures for the solar corona. The full dataset (energies, transition probabilities and rates) is only available in electronic form at our APAP website (http://www.apap-network.org) as well as at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/570/A56

  19. Ultrasound catheters for circumferential cardiac ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diederich, Chris J.; Nau, William H.; Taylor, Kevin; Maguire, Mark T.; Picazo, Guillermo; Gangu, Madhuri; Lesh, Michael D.

    1999-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate performance characteristics of a catheter-based ultrasound applicator intended for circumferential ablation of cardiac tissue. The catheter design integrates a cylindrical ultrasound transducer within a distendable water filled balloon in order to produce circumferential lesions at sites in the atria (i.e., pulmonary vein ostia), intended for treatment of certain atrial arrhythmias. Biothermal simulations were used to investigate thermal lesion depths corresponding to variations in applied power, duration, balloon diameter, and acoustic efficiency. Prototype applicators of varying frequency (7 - 12 MHz) and balloon diameter were constructed and characterized using measurements of acoustic efficiency and rotational beam plots. In vitro studies were performed in freshly excised beef hearts to characterize the radial penetration, axial length, and angular uniformity of thermal lesions produced by these applicators. Selected applicators were tested in vivo within pulmonary veins, coronary sinus, and atrial appendage of canine and porcine hearts. These preliminary efforts have indicated that circumferential ablation of cardiac tissue using ultrasound balloon catheters is feasible, and devices between 7 - 12 MHz with balloon diameters of 1.5 - 2.0 cm are capable of producing uniform lesions between 1 - 5 mm depth or greater for treatment durations of 120 seconds or less.

  20. Catheter-related mortality among ESRD patients.

    PubMed

    Wasse, Haimanot

    2008-01-01

    Hemodialysis access-related complications remain one of the most important sources of morbidity and cost among persons with end-stage renal disease, with total annual costs exceeding $1 billion annually. In this context, the creation and maintenance of an effective hemodialysis vascular access is essential for safe and adequate hemodialysis therapy. Multiple reports have documented the type of vascular access used for dialysis and associated risk of infection and mortality. Undoubtedly, the central venous catheter (CVC) is associated with the greatest risk of infection-related and all-cause mortality compared with the autogenous arteriovenous fistula (AVF) or synthetic graft (AVG). The AVF has the lowest risk of infection, longer patency rates, greater quality of life, and lower all-cause mortality compared with the AVG or CVC. It is for these reasons that the National Kidney Foundation's Kidney Disease Outcome Quality Initiative Clinical Practice Guidelines for Vascular Access recommend the early placement and use of the AVF among at least 50% of incident hemodialysis patients. This report presents catheter-related mortality and calls for heightened awareness of catheter-related complications. PMID:19000119

  1. Lights, camera and action in the implementation of central venous catheter dressing1

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Maria Verônica Ferrareze; de Godoy, Simone; de Góes, Fernanda dos Santos Nogueira; Rossini, Fernanda de Paula; de Andrade, Denise

    2015-01-01

    Objective: to develop and validate an educational digital video on changing the dressing of short-term, non-cuffed, non-tunneled central venous catheters in hospitalized adult patients. Method: this is a descriptive, methodological study based on Paulo Freire's assumptions. The development of the script and video storyboard were based on scientific evidence, on the researchers' experience, and that of nurse experts, as well as on a virtual learning environment. Results: the items related to the script were approved by 97.2% of the nurses and the video was approved by 96.1%. Conclusion: the educational instrument was considered to be appropriate and we believe it will contribute to professional training in the nursing field, the updating of human resources, focusing on the educational process, including distance education. We believe it will consequently improve the quality of care provided to patients with central venous catheters. PMID:26626011

  2. Comparison between qualitative and semiquantitative catheter-tip cultures: laboratory diagnosis of catheter-related infection in newborns

    PubMed Central

    Marconi, Camila; de Lourdes RS Cunha, Maria; Lyra, João C; Bentlin, Maria R; Batalha, Jackson EN; Sugizaki, Maria Fátima; Rugolo, Lígia MSS

    2008-01-01

    This prospective study evaluated semiquantitative and qualitative catheter-culture methods for diagnosis of catheter-related infection (CRI) in newborns. Catheter tips from newborns admitted to the Neonatal Unit of the University Hospital of the Botucatu Medical School, UNESP were included in the study. Catheter cultures were performed with both semiquantitative and qualitative techniques. For CRI diagnosis, microorganisms isolated from catheter cultures and from peripheral blood cultures were identified and submitted to agent susceptibility test. The gold standard was the certain CRI diagnosis when same microorganism (specie and profile of susceptibility to agents) was isolated from both catheter tips and peripheral blood culture. A total of 85 catheters from 63 newborns were included in the study. The semiquantitative culture method, despite presenting lower sensitivity (90%), showed higher specificity (71%) when compared to 100% of sensitivity and 60% of specificity in the qualitative method. The identification of the microorganisms obtained from the catheter cultures showed a prevalence of coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS) species. The specie Staphylococcus epidermidis (77.5%) was the prevalent in the catheters with positive semiquantitative cultures. Among 11 episodes with CRI diagnosis, 8 (72.7%) were associated with CNS species, of which 6 were S. epidermidis. Two episodes of CRI by S. aureus and one by Candida parapsilosis were also detected. The semiquantitative catheter-culture method showed advantages for CRI diagnosis in newborns when compared to the conservative qualitative method. PMID:24031213

  3. Value of Superficial Cultures for Prediction of Catheter-Related Bloodstream Infection in Long-Term Catheters: a Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Martín-Rabadán, P.; Echenagusia, A.; Camúñez, F.; Rodríguez-Rosales, G.; Simó, G.; Echenagusia, M.; Bouza, E.

    2013-01-01

    Cultures taken from the skin and from the hubs of short-term central venous catheters can help us to predict catheter-related bloodstream infections (C-RBSIs). The value of these cultures for such predictions has not been assessed in long-term catheters. Our objective was to assess the value of superficial cultures for the prediction of C-RBSI among patients with long-term catheters. Over a 2-year period, we prospectively obtained cultures from the skin overlying reservoir ports (group A) and from the skin insertion site and hubs of all tunneled catheters (group B). This routine was performed by vascular and interventional radiologists immediately before catheter removal (irrespective of the reason for withdrawal). Swabs were processed semiquantitatively. Catheter tips from both groups were cultured using Maki's semiquantitative technique and sonication. We also performed cultures of the reservoir ports at different sites. C-RBSI was defined as the isolation of the same species of microorganism(s) both in the colonized catheter and in at least 1 peripheral blood culture. We included 372 catheters (group A, 223; group B, 149) during the study period. The catheter colonization rate was 23.4% (87/372), and 28 patients had C-RBSI. Validity index values for the capacity of surface cultures to predict C-RBSI in groups A and B were, respectively, as follows: sensitivity, 23.5% and 45.5%; specificity, 59.7% and 63.0%; positive predictive value, 4.6% and 8.9%; and negative predictive value, 90.4% and 93.5%. Superficial cultures of patients with long-term catheters could help us to rule out the catheter as the portal of entry of bloodstream infections. Superficial cultures (from skin and hubs) proved to be a useful conservative diagnostic tool for ruling out C-RBSI among patients with long-term tunneled catheters and totally implantable venous access ports. PMID:23850957

  4. Is it feasible to diagnose catheter-related candidemia without catheter withdrawal?

    PubMed

    Fernández-Cruz, Ana; Martín-Rabadán, Pablo; Suárez-Salas, Marisol; Rojas-Wettig, Loreto; Pérez, María Jesús; Guinea, Jesús; Guembe, María; Peláez, Teresa; Sánchez-Carrillo, Carlos; Bouza, Emilio

    2014-07-01

    Many bloodstream infections (BSI) in patients with central venous catheters (CVC) are not catheter-related (CR). Assessment of catheter involvement without catheter withdrawal has not been studied in candidemia. We assessed the value of conservative techniques to evaluate catheters as the origin of candidemia in patients with CVC in a prospective cohort study (superficial Gram stain and culture, Kite technique (Gram stain and culture of the first 1 cm blood drawn from the CVC), proportion of positive blood cultures (PPBCs), differential time to positivity (DTP), and minimal time to positivity (MTP)). All catheters were cultured at withdrawal. From June 2008 to January 2012, 22 cases fulfilled the inclusion criteria. CR-candidemia (CRC) was confirmed in 10. Validity values for predicting CRC were: superficial Gram stain (S, 30%; Sp, 81.83%; PPV, 60%; NPV, 56.3%; Ac, 57.1%), superficial cultures (S, 40%; Sp, 75%; PPV, 57.1%; NPV, 60%; Ac, 59.1%), Kite Gram stain (S, 33.3%; Sp, 66.7%; PPV, 50%; NPV, 50%; Ac, 50%), Kite culture (S, 80%; Sp, 66.7%; PPV, 66.7%; NPV, 80%; Ac, 72.7%), PPBC (S, 50%; Sp, 41.7%; PPV, 41.7%; NPV, 50.0%; Ac, 45.5%), DTP (S, 100%; Sp, 33.3%; PPV, 55.6%; NPV, 100%; Ac, 63.6%), and MTTP (S, 70%; Sp, 58.3%; PPV, 58.3%; NPV, 70%; Ac, 63.6%). While combinations of two tests improved sensitivity and NPV, more than two tests did not improve validity values. Classic tests to assess CR-BSI caused by bacteria cannot be reliably used to diagnose CRC. Combinations of tests could be useful, but more and larger studies are required. PMID:24847039

  5. In vitro and ex vivo activities of minocycline and EDTA against microorganisms embedded in biofilm on catheter surfaces.

    PubMed

    Raad, Issam; Chatzinikolaou, Ioannis; Chaiban, Gassan; Hanna, Hend; Hachem, Ray; Dvorak, Tanya; Cook, Guy; Costerton, William

    2003-11-01

    Minocycline-EDTA (M-EDTA) flush solution has been shown to prevent catheter-related infection and colonization in a rabbit model and in hemodialysis patients. We undertook this study in order to determine the activities of M-EDTA against organisms embedded in fresh biofilm (in vitro) and mature biofilm (ex vivo). For the experiment with the in vitro model, a modified Robbin's device (MRD) was used whereby 25 catheter segments were flushed for 18 h with 10(6) CFU of biofilm-producing Staphylococcus epidermidis, Staphylococcus aureus, and Candida albicans per ml. Subsequently, each of the catheter segments was incubated in one of the following solutions: (i) streptokinase, (ii) heparin, (iii) broth alone, (iv) vancomycin, (v) vancomycin-heparin, (vi) EDTA, (vii) minocycline (high-dose alternating with low-dose), or (viii) M-EDTA (low-dose minocycline alternating with high-dose minocycline were used to study the additive and synergistic activities of M-EDTA). All segments were cultured quantitatively by scrape sonication. For the experiment with the ex vivo model, 54 catheter tip segments removed from patients and colonized with bacterial organisms by roll plate were longitudinally cut into two equal segments and exposed to either saline, heparin, EDTA, or M-EDTA (with high-dose minocycline). Subsequently, all segments were examined by confocal laser electron microscopy. In the in vitro MRD model, M-EDTA (with a low concentration of minocycline) was significantly more effective than any other agent in reducing colonization of S. epidermidis, S. aureus, and C. albicans (P < 0.01). M-EDTA (with a high concentration of minocycline) eradicated all staphylococcal and C. albicans organisms embedded in the biofilm. In the ex vivo model, M-EDTA (with a high concentration of minocycline) reduced bacterial colonization more frequently than EDTA or heparin (P < 0.01). We concluded that M-EDTA is highly active in eradicating microorganisms embedded in fresh and mature biofilm

  6. [Catheter ablation of atrial flutter and paroxysmal atrial fibrillation].

    PubMed

    Márquez, Manlio F

    2003-01-01

    Radiofrequency catheter ablation has emerged as a curative therapy for atrial flutter based on studies demonstrating the role of the cavotricuspid isthmus. With a high rate of success and minimal complications, catheter ablation is the therapy of choice for patients with the common type of atrial flutter. Left atrial flutter, non-cavotricuspid isthmus dependent, and those associated with heart disease have a worst outcome with catheter ablation. Radiofrequency catheter ablation has also emerged as a curative therapy for paroxysmal atrial fibrillation based on studies demonstrating the role of triggering foci in the pulmonary veins for the initiation of atrial fibrillation. Catheter ablation is performed by a transseptal approach using radiofrequency energy at the ostium of each pulmonary vein. Mapping is guided by special catheters. Sequential radiofrequency applications eliminates or dissociates pulmonary vein muscle activity. Although complications exists, this is the only curative method for these patients. PMID:12966653

  7. Radiographically guided percutaneous catheter drainage of pleural fluid collections.

    PubMed

    Merriam, M A; Cronan, J J; Dorfman, G S; Lambiase, R E; Haas, R A

    1988-12-01

    We reviewed the outcome of guided percutaneous catheter drainage of pleural fluid collections in 18 patients over a 5-year period. Catheter positioning was guided by fluoroscopy in 10 (56%) cases, CT in seven (39%), and sonography in one (6%). Included were 16 patients with empyemas and one each with a sterile hematoma and transudate. In nine of the patients, previous surgical chest tube drainage had been unsuccessful. The majority of collections were treated with a 12- or 14-French catheter and closed underwater seal drainage. Twelve (80%) of the 15 patients who had an adequate trial of guided drainage were cured. Propyliodone oil suspension contrast sinography after catheter placement showed two clinically unsuspected bronchopleural fistulas. Although an extensive multilocular pleural collection was a contraindication to percutaneous catheter drainage, the thick fibrous peel of a chronic empyema was not. Drainage of pleural fluid collections with radiographic guidance ensures proper catheter placement and is successful in a high percentage of cases. PMID:3055887

  8. Modified Thoracoscopic Hepatectomy For Segment VIII: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongyu; Wei, Yonggang; Li, Bo; Peng, Bing

    2016-05-01

    Although previous studies have reported the use of total thoracoscopic hepatectomy (TH) for malignant liver tumors, it is technically impossible to perform intraoperative ultrasonography (IUSO) to exclude intrahepatic metastasis for the whole liver via a thoracic approach. Therefore, total TH may be inappropriate for these patients. We here report the first case of modified TH for a malignant liver tumor in China.The patient was a 26-year-old man with a 10-year HBV infection. Preoperative CT showed a 1.2 cm × 0.9 cm mass located in segment VIII. His alpha-fetal protein level was 444 ng/mL. Child-Pugh was Grade (A, 6), whereas an ICG-15 test yielded 2.7%. HCC was diagnosed preoperatively. The indications for TH were difficult tumor location, HCC, and a young patient with good resilience.The modified TH included 2 steps: (1) the patient was placed in a supine position. IUSO was used to locate the tumor in segment VIII and determine that intrahepatic metastasis had not occurred. The hepatoduodenal ligament was hanged over using a Pringle maneuver; (2) patient was then placed in the left-lateral position with single-lung ventilation. Three trocars were placed into the right thoracic cavity. The intra-thoracic space was observed using a regular 10-mm rigid scope. The diaphragm was transected and retracted. IUSO was used again to confirm the tumor location. Under the Pringle maneuver (once every 10 min), the superficial portion of the liver was transected by ultrasonic shears, whereas the deeper tissue was transected by LigaSure. Bipolar was used for hemostasis. The specimen was put into a retrieval bag and removed from the abdominal trocar. The diaphragm was repaired by running suturing. The operation time was 260 minutes and estimated blood loss was 30 mL. The patient was discharged on postoperative day 5 with normal liver function. No complications arose.Total TH may be inappropriate for malignant liver tumors due to the limitation of IUSO for the whole

  9. Epidural catheter with integrated light guides for spectroscopic tissue characterization

    PubMed Central

    Soto-Astorga, R. P.; West, S.; Putnis, S.; Hebden, J. C.; Desjardins, A. E.

    2013-01-01

    Epidural catheters are used to deliver anesthetics and opioids for managing pain in many clinical scenarios. Currently, epidural catheter insertion is performed without information about the tissues that are directly ahead of the catheter. As a result, the catheter can be incorrectly positioned within a blood vessel, which can cause toxicity. Recent studies have shown that optical reflectance spectroscopy could be beneficial for guiding needles that are used to insert catheters. In this study, we investigate the whether this technique could benefit the placement of catheters within the epidural space. We present a novel optical epidural catheter with integrated polymer light guides that allows for optical spectra to be acquired from tissues at the distal tip. To obtain an initial indication of the information that could be obtained, reflectance values and photon penetration depth were estimated using Monte Carlo simulations, and optical reflectance spectra were acquired during a laminectomy of a swine ex vivo. Large differences between the spectra acquired from epidural adipose tissue and from venous blood were observed. The optical catheter has the potential to provide real-time detection of intravascular catheter placement that could reduce the risk of complications. PMID:24298420

  10. Use of tunnelled catheters in haematological malignancy patients with neutropenia.

    PubMed

    Sariosmanoglu, N; Uğurlu, B; Turgut, N H; Demirkan, F; Ozsan, H; Ergor, G; Gulay, Z; Hazan, E; Oto, O

    2008-01-01

    This prospective study analysed 83 patients (age 45 +/- 17 years) with haematological neoplasms, implanted with 93 tunnelled catheters, who were neutropenic or developed neutropenia during treatment. Catheters were implanted in the right (n = 82) or left (n = 11) jugular vein by the same surgical team using the same technique. They remained in place for 124 +/- 88 days: 29% were removed due to infection; 18% due to treatment termination and 2% due to mechanical problems. Seventeen patients died with catheters in place. At 30, 60, 90, 120 and 200 days mean catheter duration rates were 82%, 75%, 65%, 60% and 35%, respectively, and freedom from catheter removal due to infection was 92%, 88%, 80%, 77% and 67%, respectively. Patient diagnosis and history of previous catheter infection did not increase catheter infection risk, but patients undergoing stem cell transplantation had an increased infection risk. Tunnelled catheters can be used in high-risk patients with neutropenia. Systemic infections can be managed in most patients without catheter removal. PMID:18831907

  11. [Incidence and risk factors for infections from hemodialysis catheters].

    PubMed

    Jean, G

    2001-01-01

    We report here a revue of hemodialysis catheter-related infections data published since 1985. The reported prevalence of bacteremia is 1 to 20% of catheters, and incidence is 0.72 to 9/1000 catheter-days. Local infection is reported in 6 to 63% of catheters and in 1 to 5/1000 catheter-days. Tunneled catheters and implantables chambers reported less infection rate. The most severe complication is endocarditis (4% rate). Death occurs in 8 to 20% of cases. Reported microbial data show that Staphylococcus aureus (SA) is responsible for most infections ahead of non-aureus Staphylococcus. SA skin colonisation is a risk factor for catheter colonisation and the first step of infection. On the other hand, the host immunity impairment in hemodialysis patients seems a significant risk factor. Iron overload, specially after blood transfusions, older age, diabetes mellitus, low serum albumin level, previous history of bacteremia and immunosuppressive treatment have been frequently involved. Other catheter-related factors are time of use, absence of tunnel and use for parenteral nutrition. Nurses plans, dressing type and frequency, nurses work experience are also important. In spite of recent progress in risk factor understanding, hemodialysis-related infection remains frequent. Multicentre studies are necessary to better evaluated care protocols and new catheter material. PMID:11811006

  12. Encrusted and incarcerated urinary bladder catheter: what are the options?

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Christopher C.K.; Khandasamy, Yugasaravanan; Singam, Praveen; Hong Goh, Eng; Zainuddin, Zulkifli M.

    2010-01-01

    Urinary bladder catheter encrustations are known complications of long-term urinary catheterisation, which is commonly seen in clinical practice. These encrustations can impede deflation of the balloon and therefore cause problems in the removal of the catheter. The options in managing an encrusted and incarcerated urinary bladder catheter include extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy and lithoclast. We describe here another technique of dealing with a stuck and encrustated catheter, via direct crushing of the encrustations with a rigid cystoscope inserted through a suprapubic cystostomy tract. PMID:21483557

  13. Multifunctional Catheters Combining Intracardiac Ultrasound Imaging and Electrophysiology Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Stephens, Douglas N.; Cannata, Jonathan; Liu, Ruibin; Zhao, Jian Zhong; Shung, K. Kirk; Nguyen, Hien; Chia, Raymond; Dentinger, Aaron; Wildes, Douglas; Thomenius, Kai E.; Mahajan, Aman; Shivkumar, Kalyanam; Kim, Kang; O’Donnell, Matthew; Nikoozadeh, Amin; Oralkan, Omer; Khuri-Yakub, Pierre T.; Sahn, David J.

    2015-01-01

    A family of 3 multifunctional intracardiac imaging and electrophysiology (EP) mapping catheters has been in development to help guide diagnostic and therapeutic intracardiac EP procedures. The catheter tip on the first device includes a 7.5 MHz, 64-element, side-looking phased array for high resolution sector scanning. The second device is a forward-looking catheter with a 24-element 14 MHz phased array. Both of these catheters operate on a commercial imaging system with standard software. Multiple EP mapping sensors were mounted as ring electrodes near the arrays for electrocardiographic synchronization of ultrasound images and used for unique integration with EP mapping technologies. To help establish the catheters’ ability for integration with EP interventional procedures, tests were performed in vivo in a porcine animal model to demonstrate both useful intracardiac echocardiographic (ICE) visualization and simultaneous 3-D positional information using integrated electroanatomical mapping techniques. The catheters also performed well in high frame rate imaging, color flow imaging, and strain rate imaging of atrial and ventricular structures. The companion paper of this work discusses the catheter design of the side-looking catheter with special attention to acoustic lens design. The third device in development is a 10 MHz forward-looking ring array that is to be mounted at the distal tip of a 9F catheter to permit use of the available catheter lumen for adjunctive therapy tools. PMID:18986948

  14. Synthesis, processing, and secretion of recombinant human factor VIII expressed in mammalian cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kaufman, R.J.; Wasley, L.C.; Dorner, A.J.

    1988-05-05

    The synthesis, processing, and secretion of factor VIII expressed from heterologous genes introduced into Chinese hamster ovary cells has been studied. The results show factor VIII to be synthesized as a primary translation product of approximately 230 kDa that can be detected in the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum. In this compartment, the majority of the factor VIII is in a complex with a resident protein of the endoplasmic reticulum, binding protein, and may never appear in the medium. Some factor VIII transits the endoplasmic reticulum to the Golgi apparatus, where it is cleaved to generate the mature heavy and light chains. In the absence of von Willebrand factor in the medium, the secreted heavy and light chains are unassociated and subsequently degraded. In the presence of von Willebrand factor in the medium, the heavy and light chains are secreted as a stable complex and activity accumulates linearly with time. The utilization and complexity of asparagine-linked carbohydrate present on the secreted recombinant-derived factor VIII and human plasma-derived factor VIII were compared and found to be very similar. In both cases, the asparagine-linked carbohydrate moieties on the heavy chain are primarily of the hybrid or complex-type. In contrast, the factor VIII from both sources contains a high-mannose type of asparagine-linked carbohydrate on the light chain.

  15. Influence of catheter orientation on lesion formation in bovine myocardium by using an open-irrigated laser ablation catheter.

    PubMed

    Sagerer-Gerhardt, Michaela; Weber, Helmut P

    2016-09-01

    Lesion sizes and quality are crucial for successful catheter ablation procedures. We sought to test the influence of catheter orientation towards the endocardial surface on lesion formation in bovine myocardium by using an open-irrigated laser ablation catheter. Continuous wave 1064-nm laser catheter applications at 15 W (4.5 W/mm²)/30 s, (135 J/mm²), irrigation flow 30 mL/min, were aimed at the left ventricular endocardial surface of bovine myocardium. The catheter was kept in vertical, in slanting (67.5°, 45°, 22.5°), and in flat positions; in flat position, also 60 s of radiation times were applied (n = 10, each). Lesions were evaluated morphometrically. Maximum depth of lesion was achieved with the catheter in a vertical orientation. Catheter inclination of <22.5 showed a highly significant decrease of lesion depth from 5.6 ± 1.1 to 3.7 ± 0.5 mm (p = 0.0001). In a flat catheter position, laser radiation of 30 s achieved the smallest lesions. However, after 60 s of radiation, the flat lesions were similar in depth (p = 087) and were larger in width (p = 0.0004) and in volumes (p = 0.0025) as compared to the lesions achieved with the catheter in vertical position after 30 s of radiation. Steam-pop with intramural cavitation or tissue vaporization with crater formation did not occur. Longer radiation times can achieve larger lesions regardless of catheter orientation. Catheter orientation is not a major determinant for laser ablation lesion size and quality, and a steerable support may not be needed when using the open-irrigated electrode-laser mapping and ablation (ELMA) catheter RytmoLas. PMID:27286865

  16. Advancement of epidural catheter from lumbar to thoracic space in children: Comparison between 18G and 23G catheters

    PubMed Central

    Baidya, Dalim Kumar; Pawar, Dilip Kumar; Dehran, Maya; Gupta, Arun Kumar

    2012-01-01

    Backgrounds and Objectives: Lumbar-to-thoracic advancement of epidural catheter is a safe alternative to direct thoracic placement in children. In this prospective randomized study, success rate of advancement of two different types and gauges of catheter from lumbar-to-thoracic space were studied. Materials and Methods: Forty ASA I and II children (up to 6 years) undergoing thoracic or upper-abdominal surgery were allocated to either Group I (18G catheter) or Group II (23G catheter). After induction of general anesthesia a pre-determined length of catheter was inserted. Successful catheter placement was defined as the catheter tip within two segment of surgical incision in radio-contrast study. Intra-operative analgesia was provided by epidural bupivacaine and intravenous morphine. Post-operative analgesia was provided with epidural infusion of 0.1% bupivacaine+1mcg/ml fentanyl. Observations and Results: Catheter advancement was successful in 3 cases in Group I and 2 cases in Group II. Five different types of catheter positions were found on X-ray. Negative correlation was found between age and catheter advancement [significance (2-tailed) =0.03]. However, satisfactory post-operative analgesia was obtained in 35 cases. Positive correlation was found between infusion rate, the number of segment of gap between desired level and the level reached [significance (2-tailed) =0.00]. 23G catheter use was associated with more technical complications. Conclusion: Advancement of epidural catheter from lumbar to thoracic level was successful in only 10-15% cases but satisfactory analgesia could be provided by increasing the infusion rates. PMID:22345940

  17. [The role of the interventional radiologist in central venous catheter dysfunction (pictorial essay)].

    PubMed

    Altunel, Ekrem; Oran, Ismail; Parildar, Mustafa; Memiş, Ahmet

    2004-03-01

    Failure to aspirate blood from the lumen of venous catheters, inadequate blood flow and/or high resistance pressures during hemodialysis were accepted as catheter dysfunction. Other correctable problems such as residual lumen thrombus, external fibrin catheter sheath or malpositioned catheter tip were identified by contrast injection. Catheter malpositions were corrected by snare-mediated catheter repositioning or by exchange of the catheter over a guidewire. Catheters of inadequate length were exchanged over a guidewire to the appropriate position or replaced. Treatment of fibrin sheath formation included fibrin sheath stripping, guidewire catheter exchange, and urokinase infusion. Early catheter dysfunction is frequently due to mechanical problems such as inadequate positioning, kinking, or constriction. Delayed dysfunction usually results from thrombus formation, either within the lumen, around the catheter ("fibrin sleeve"), or in the host vein. In the management of catheter malfunctions and complications, interventional radiological techniques are safe and effective alternatives to standard surgical techniques. PMID:15054708

  18. Pulmonary artery catheter entrapment in cardiac surgery: a simple percutaneous solution.

    PubMed

    Divakaran, Vijay; Caldera, Angel; Stephens, Jack; Gonzalez, Rafael

    2015-10-01

    Pulmonary artery catheter entrapment is a reported complication after cardiac surgery from inadvertent suturing of the catheter to the vena-caval wall during surgery. This article reports a simple percutaneous technique to retrieve the trapped catheter. PMID:25547257

  19. Cardiac Pressure-Volume Loop Analysis Using Conductance Catheters in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Abraham, Dennis; Mao, Lan

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac pressure-volume loop analysis is the “gold-standard” in the assessment of load-dependent and load-independent measures of ventricular systolic and diastolic function. Measures of ventricular contractility and compliance are obtained through examination of cardiac response to changes in afterload and preload. These techniques were originally developed nearly three decades ago to measure cardiac function in large mammals and humans. The application of these analyses to small mammals, such as mice, has been accomplished through the optimization of microsurgical techniques and creation of conductance catheters. Conductance catheters allow for estimation of the blood pool by exploiting the relationship between electrical conductance and volume. When properly performed, these techniques allow for testing of cardiac function in genetic mutant mouse models or in drug treatment studies. The accuracy and precision of these studies are dependent on careful attention to the calibration of instruments, systematic conduct of hemodynamic measurements and data analyses. We will review the methods of conducting pressure-volume loop experiments using a conductance catheter in mice. PMID:26436838

  20. Cardiac Pressure-Volume Loop Analysis Using Conductance Catheters in Mice.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Dennis; Mao, Lan

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac pressure-volume loop analysis is the "gold-standard" in the assessment of load-dependent and load-independent measures of ventricular systolic and diastolic function. Measures of ventricular contractility and compliance are obtained through examination of cardiac response to changes in afterload and preload. These techniques were originally developed nearly three decades ago to measure cardiac function in large mammals and humans. The application of these analyses to small mammals, such as mice, has been accomplished through the optimization of microsurgical techniques and creation of conductance catheters. Conductance catheters allow for estimation of the blood pool by exploiting the relationship between electrical conductance and volume. When properly performed, these techniques allow for testing of cardiac function in genetic mutant mouse models or in drug treatment studies. The accuracy and precision of these studies are dependent on careful attention to the calibration of instruments, systematic conduct of hemodynamic measurements and data analyses. We will review the methods of conducting pressure-volume loop experiments using a conductance catheter in mice. PMID:26436838

  1. Surgical Placement of Catheters for Long-term Cardiovascular Exercise Testing in Swine.

    PubMed

    De Wijs-Meijler, Daphne P M; Stam, Kelly; van Duin, Richard W B; Verzijl, Annemarie; Reiss, Irwin K; Duncker, Dirk J; Merkus, Daphne

    2016-01-01

    This protocol describes the surgical procedure to chronically instrument swine and the procedure to exercise swine on a motor-driven treadmill. Early cardiopulmonary dysfunction is difficult to diagnose, particularly in animal models, as cardiopulmonary function is often measured invasively, requiring anesthesia. As many anesthetic agents are cardiodepressive, subtle changes in cardiovascular function may be masked. In contrast, chronic instrumentation allows for measurement of cardiopulmonary function in the awake state, so that measurements can be obtained under quiet resting conditions, without the effects of anesthesia and acute surgical trauma. Furthermore, when animals are properly trained, measurements can also be obtained during graded treadmill exercise. Flow probes are placed around the aorta or pulmonary artery for measurement of cardiac output and around the left anterior descending coronary artery for measurement of coronary blood flow. Fluid-filled catheters are implanted in the aorta, pulmonary artery, left atrium, left ventricle and right ventricle for pressure measurement and blood sampling. In addition, a 20 G catheter is positioned in the anterior interventricular vein to allow coronary venous blood sampling. After a week of recovery, swine are placed on a motor-driven treadmill, the catheters are connected to pressure and flow meters, and swine are subjected to a five-stage progressive exercise protocol, with each stage lasting 3 min. Hemodynamic signals are continuously recorded and blood samples are taken during the last 30 sec of each exercise stage. The major advantage of studying chronically instrumented animals is that it allows serial assessment of cardiopulmonary function, not only at rest but also during physical stress such as exercise. Moreover, cardiopulmonary function can be assessed repeatedly during disease development and during chronic treatment, thereby increasing statistical power and hence limiting the number of animals

  2. Comparison of Standard Catheters Versus Radial Artery-Specific Catheter in Patients Who Underwent Coronary Angiography Through Transradial Access.

    PubMed

    Chen, On; Goel, Sunny; Acholonu, Michael; Kulbak, Guy; Verma, Shivani; Travlos, Efstratios; Casazza, Richard; Borgen, Elliot; Malik, Bilal; Friedman, Michael; Moskovits, Norbert; Frankel, Robert; Shani, Jacob; Ayzenberg, Sergey

    2016-08-01

    In this prospective, randomized controlled study, we aim to compare the performance outcomes of standard catheters with the radial artery-specific catheter. Over the past decade, transradial cardiac catheterization has gained widespread popularity because of its low complication rates compared with transfemoral access. Operators have the choice of using either standard catheters (used for both transfemoral and transradial approach, with need for separate catheter use for either right or left coronary artery engagement) or a dedicated radial artery catheter, which is specifically designed to engage both coronary arteries through radial artery access. A total of 110 consecutive patients who underwent coronary angiography at our institution from March 2015 to April 2015 were prospectively randomized to either radial artery-specific Tiger catheter (5Fr; Terumo Interventional Systems, Somerset, New Jersey) versus standard Judkins left and right catheters (5Fr R4, L4; Cordis Corporation, Miami, Florida). The end points of the study included fluoroscopy time, dose-area product, contrast volume used, and total procedure time for the coronary angiography. A total of 57 patients (52%) were randomized to radial artery-specific catheter and 53 (48%) to the standard catheter. Tiger catheter was associated with significantly lower fluoroscopy time (184 ± 91 vs 238 ± 131 seconds, p = 0.015), which was statistically significant. Other outcome measures such as dose-area product (2,882.4 ± 1,471.2 vs 3,524.6 ± 2,111.7 Gy·cm(2), p = 0.07), total contrast volume (48.1 ± 16.1 vs 53.4 ± 18.5 ml, p = 0.114), and total procedure time (337 ± 382 vs 434 ± 137 seconds, p = 0.085) were also lower in single-catheter group, but it did not reach statistical significance. A total of 8 patients (14%) were crossed over from radial-specific catheter arm to standard catheter arm because of substandard image quality and difficulty in coronary engagement. Six patients had to be

  3. Catheter-Based Sensing In The Airways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fouke, J. M.; Saunders, K. G.

    1988-04-01

    Studies attempting to define the role of the respiratory tract in heating and humidifying inspired air point to the need for sensing many variables including airway wall and airstream temperatures, humidity, and surface fluid pH and osmolarity. In order to make such measurements in vivo in human volunteers, catheter based technologies must be exploited both to assure subject safety and subject comfort. Miniturization of the electrodes or sensors becomes a top priority. This paper describes the use of thin-film microelectronic technology to fabricate a miniature, flexible sensor which can be placed directly onto the surface of the airway to measure the electrical conductance of the fluids present. From this information the osmolarity of the surface fluid was calculated. Physiologic evaluation of the device and corroboration of the calculations was performed in mongrel dogs. We also describe the successful application of current thermistor technology for the thermal mapping of the airways in humans in order to characterize the dynamic intrathoracic events that occur during breathing. The thermal probe consisted of a flexible polyvinyl tube that contained fourteen small thermistors fixed into the catheter. Data have been obtained in dozens of people, both normal subjects and asthmatic patients, under a variety of interventions. These data have substantively advanced the study of asthma, a particularly troublesome chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder.

  4. Engineering Considerations Of Catheters For Intravascular Ultrasonic Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Roy W.; Johnson, Christopher C.

    1989-08-01

    The mechanical properties of commonly used fluid transfusion or pressure monitoring catheters are similar to the properties required of catheters which include sensing devices. Consequently, bending and torsional stiffness of commercial catheters and tubes were measured at both room and body temperature. Five of these usually placed with the aid of fluoroscopy had an average Young's modulus of 5714x101 dyne/cm at 21°C which decreased 29% at body temperature; a shear modulus of 70.5x101 dyne/cm 4 at 21°C which decreased 13% at body temperature, and plastic deformation of 8% when loaded for 1 minute at 37°. Four of these were composed of a composite material. Catheters which are balloon directed during insertion had moduli values approximately 1/3 of these or less. The drag forces produced on balloons used on such catheters were measured for fluid velocities ranging from 10-50 cm/sec. Using this information the average force applied to a balloon throughout a cardiac cycle was calculated; values of 1280 dynes for a .6 ml balloon and 2490 dynes for a 1 ml balloon were found. The maximum wall thicknesses to catheter radii for single lumen catheters were determined for various material moduli which would allow the catheter tip to be directed by a balloon during its passage into the right heart.

  5. Device for Catheter Placement of External Ventricular Drain

    PubMed Central

    Ann, Jae-Min; Oh, Jae-Sang; Yoon, Seok-Mann

    2016-01-01

    To introduce a new device for catheter placement of an external ventricular drain (EVD) of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). This device was composed of three portions, T-shaped main body, rectangular pillar having a central hole to insert a catheter and an arm pointing the tragus. The main body has a role to direct a ventricular catheter toward the right or left inner canthus and has a shallow longitudinal opening to connect the rectangular pillar. The arm pointing the tragus is controlled by back and forth movement and turn of the pillar attached to the main body. Between April 2012 and December 2014, 57 emergency EVDs were performed in 52 patients using this device in the operating room. Catheter tip located in the frontal horn in 52 (91.2%), 3rd ventricle in 2 (3.5%) and in the wall of the frontal horn of the lateral ventricle in 3 EVDs (5.2%). Small hemorrhage along to catheter tract occurred in 1 EVD. CSF was well drained through the all EVD catheters. The accuracy of the catheter position and direction using this device were 91% and 100%, respectively. This device for EVD guides to provide an accurate position of catheter tip safely and easily. PMID:27226870

  6. 21 CFR 870.2870 - Catheter tip pressure transducer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Catheter tip pressure transducer. 870.2870 Section... pressure transducer. (a) Identification. A catheter tip pressure transducer is a device incorporated into... change in relation to changes in blood pressure. These changes are transmitted to accessory equipment...

  7. 21 CFR 870.2870 - Catheter tip pressure transducer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Catheter tip pressure transducer. 870.2870 Section... pressure transducer. (a) Identification. A catheter tip pressure transducer is a device incorporated into... change in relation to changes in blood pressure. These changes are transmitted to accessory equipment...

  8. 21 CFR 870.2870 - Catheter tip pressure transducer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Catheter tip pressure transducer. 870.2870 Section... pressure transducer. (a) Identification. A catheter tip pressure transducer is a device incorporated into... change in relation to changes in blood pressure. These changes are transmitted to accessory equipment...

  9. Delayed Onset of Subdural Hematoma following Epidural Catheter Breakage

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, Yoshimoto; Imagama, Shiro; Ito, Zenya; Ando, Kei; Gotoh, Momokazu; Nishiwaki, Kimitoshi; Nagao, Yoshimasa; Ishiguro, Naoki

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Case report. Objectives To describe a case of delayed-onset spinal hematoma following the breakage of a spinal epidural catheter. Methods The authors describe the clinical case review. Results A 64-year-old woman had undergone epidural anesthesia 18 years before she was referred to our hospital because of lower-back pain and lower neurologic deficit with leg pain. The clinical examination showed the presence of a fragment of an epidural catheter in the thoracolumbar canal, as assessed by computed tomography, and a spinal hematoma that compressed the spinal cord at the same spinal level, as assessed by magnetic resonance imaging. Surgical removal of the epidural catheter and decompression surgery were performed. The patient exhibited substantial clinical improvement 1 month after surgery; she achieved a steady gait without the need for a cane and had no leg pain. Conclusion This is the first report of delayed onset of spinal hematoma following the breakage of an epidural catheter. Generally, when the breakage of an epidural catheter occurs without symptoms, follow-up alone is recommended. However, because spinal hematoma might exhibit a late onset, the possibility of this complication should be considered when deciding whether to remove the catheter fragment. We believe that in our patient, there could be a relationship between the catheter fragment and subdural hematoma, and catheter breakage could have been a risk factor for the spinal hematoma. PMID:26835209

  10. Urinary catheters: history, current status, adverse events and research agenda

    PubMed Central

    Feneley, Roger C. L.; Hopley, Ian B.; Wells, Peter N. T.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract For more than 3500 years, urinary catheters have been used to drain the bladder when it fails to empty. For people with impaired bladder function and for whom the method is feasible, clean intermittent self-catheterization is the optimal procedure. For those who require an indwelling catheter, whether short- or long-term, the self-retaining Foley catheter is invariably used, as it has been since its introduction nearly 80 years ago, despite the fact that this catheter can cause bacterial colonization, recurrent and chronic infections, bladder stones and septicaemia, damage to the kidneys, the bladder and the urethra, and contribute to the development of antibiotic resistance. In terms of medical, social and economic resources, the burden of urinary retention and incontinence, aggravated by the use of the Foley catheter, is huge. In the UK, the harm resulting from the use of the Foley catheter costs the National Health Service between £1.0–2.5 billion and accounts for ∼2100 deaths per year. Therefore, there is an urgent need for the development of an alternative indwelling catheter system. The research agenda is for the new catheter to be easy and safe to insert, either urethrally or suprapubically, to be retained reliably in the bladder and to be withdrawn easily and safely when necessary, to mimic natural physiology by filling at low pressure and emptying completely without damage to the bladder, and to have control mechanisms appropriate for all users. PMID:26383168

  11. Diagnosis and Rescue of a Kinked Pulmonary Artery Catheter

    PubMed Central

    Mouawad, Nicolas J.; Stein, Erica J.; Moran, Kenneth R.; Go, Michael R.; Papadimos, Thomas J.

    2015-01-01

    Invasive hemodynamic monitoring with a pulmonary catheter has been relatively routine in cardiovascular and complex surgical operations as well as in the management of critical illnesses. However, due to multiple potential complications and its invasive nature, its use has decreased over the years and less invasive methods such as transesophageal echocardiography and hemodynamic sensors have gained widespread favor. Unlike these less invasive forms of hemodynamic monitoring, pulmonary artery catheters require an advanced understanding of cardiopulmonary physiology, anatomy, and the potential for complications in order to properly place, manage, and interpret the device. We describe a case wherein significant resistance was encountered during multiple unsuccessful attempts at removing a patient's catheter secondary to kinking and twisting of the catheter tip. These attempts to remove the catheter serve to demonstrate potential rescue options for such a situation. Ultimately, successful removal of the catheter was accomplished by simultaneous catheter retraction and sheath advancement while gently pulling both objects from the cannulation site. In addition to being skilled in catheter placement, it is imperative that providers comprehend the risks and complications of this invasive monitoring tool. PMID:26075106

  12. Intrapleural migration of a percutaneous transhepatic hemodialysis catheter.

    PubMed

    Kwan, Sharon W; Kerlan, Robert K

    2012-01-01

    Percutaneous transhepatic catheters are a form of nonconventional access for patients requiring hemodialysis. We report a complication of these catheters which has not been previously described in the literature. The mechanism for intrapleural migration and a way to avoid this potential complication are discussed. PMID:21786242

  13. 21 CFR 870.2870 - Catheter tip pressure transducer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... change in relation to changes in blood pressure. These changes are transmitted to accessory equipment for... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Catheter tip pressure transducer. 870.2870 Section... pressure transducer. (a) Identification. A catheter tip pressure transducer is a device incorporated...

  14. Urinary catheters: history, current status, adverse events and research agenda.

    PubMed

    Feneley, Roger C L; Hopley, Ian B; Wells, Peter N T

    2015-01-01

    For more than 3500 years, urinary catheters have been used to drain the bladder when it fails to empty. For people with impaired bladder function and for whom the method is feasible, clean intermittent self-catheterization is the optimal procedure. For those who require an indwelling catheter, whether short- or long-term, the self-retaining Foley catheter is invariably used, as it has been since its introduction nearly 80 years ago, despite the fact that this catheter can cause bacterial colonization, recurrent and chronic infections, bladder stones and septicaemia, damage to the kidneys, the bladder and the urethra, and contribute to the development of antibiotic resistance. In terms of medical, social and economic resources, the burden of urinary retention and incontinence, aggravated by the use of the Foley catheter, is huge. In the UK, the harm resulting from the use of the Foley catheter costs the National Health Service between £1.0-2.5 billion and accounts for ∼2100 deaths per year. Therefore, there is an urgent need for the development of an alternative indwelling catheter system. The research agenda is for the new catheter to be easy and safe to insert, either urethrally or suprapubically, to be retained reliably in the bladder and to be withdrawn easily and safely when necessary, to mimic natural physiology by filling at low pressure and emptying completely without damage to the bladder, and to have control mechanisms appropriate for all users. PMID:26383168

  15. Percutaneous Management of Postoperative Duodenal Stump Leakage with Foley Catheter

    SciTech Connect

    Oh, Jung Suk Lee, Hae Giu Chun, Ho Jong; Choi, Byung Gil; Lee, Sang Hoon; Hahn, Seong Tai; Ohm, Joon Young

    2013-10-15

    Purpose: This study was designed to evaluate retrospectively the safety and efficacy of the percutaneous management of duodenal stump leakage with a Foley catheter after subtotal gastrectomy. Methods: Ten consecutive patients (M:F = 9:1, median age: 64 years) were included in this retrospective study. The duodenal stump leakages were diagnosed in all the patients within a median of 10 days (range, 6-20). At first, the patients underwent percutaneous drainage on the day of or the day after confirmation of the presence of duodenal stump leakage, and then the Foley catheters were replaced at a median of 9 days (range, 6-38) after the percutaneous drainage. Results: Foley catheters were placed successfully in the duodenal lumen of all the patients under a fluoroscopic guide. No complication was observed during and after the procedures in all the patients. All of the patients started a regular diet 1 day after the Foley catheter placement. The patients were discharged at a median of 7 days (range, 5-14) after the Foley catheter placement. The catheters were removed in an outpatient clinic 10-58 days (median, 28) after the Foley catheter placement. Conclusions: Fluoroscopy-guided percutaneous Foley catheter placement may be a safe and effective treatment option for postoperative duodenal stump leakage and may allow for shorter hospital stays, earlier oral intake, and more effective control of leakage sites.

  16. Endovascular Removal of Long-Term Hemodialysis Catheters

    SciTech Connect

    Foley, Peter T.; Carter, Ranjana M.; Uberoi, Raman

    2007-09-15

    Central venous catheters that have been in place for a long time can become fixed to the vein wall, making them impossible to pull out. Leaving them in situ is undesirable because of the risk that they could act as a nidus for thrombosis. Moreover, inserting new catheters alongside the old ones might compromise flow in the superior vena cava, further predisposing to thrombosis. Surgical removal is likewise undesirable, as this would necessitate thoracotomy with the attendant risks. We describe a novel technique, which we were able to use to remove retained long-term hemodialysis catheters in a patient who needed new catheters and who would have been a high-risk candidate for surgery. The right internal jugular vein was punctured adjacent to the site of insertion and a guide wire was used to form a snare, which was passed around the catheters and used to saw through the fibrous attachments to the vein wall. The midsection of one catheter could not be freed but the snare was used to cut off the proximal and distal ends, which could then be removed, the latter via the femoral vein. New catheters were then inserted via the left internal jugular vein. This technique enabled successful catheter extraction and replacement in a patient who would have been a poor candidate for cardiothoracic surgery.

  17. Duration and Adverse Events of Non-cuffed Catheter in Patients With Hemodialysis

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-10-09

    Renal Failure Chronic Requiring Hemodialysis; Central Venous Catheterization; Inadequate Hemodialysis Blood Flow; Venous Stenosis; Venous Thrombosis; Infection Due to Central Venous Catheter; Central Venous Catheter Thrombosis

  18. Gyroscopic Instruments for Instrument Flying

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brombacher, W G; Trent, W C

    1938-01-01

    The gyroscopic instruments commonly used in instrument flying in the United States are the turn indicator, the directional gyro, the gyromagnetic compass, the gyroscopic horizon, and the automatic pilot. These instruments are described. Performance data and the method of testing in the laboratory are given for the turn indicator, the directional gyro, and the gyroscopic horizon. Apparatus for driving the instruments is discussed.

  19. Timing of catheter drainage in infected necrotizing pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    van Grinsven, Janneke; van Santvoort, Hjalmar C; Boermeester, Marja A; Dejong, Cornelis H; van Eijck, Casper H; Fockens, Paul; Besselink, Marc G

    2016-05-01

    Acute pancreatitis is the most common gastrointestinal indication for hospital admission, and infected pancreatic and/or extrapancreatic necrosis is a potentially lethal complication. Current standard treatment of infected necrosis is a step-up approach, consisting of catheter drainage followed, if necessary, by minimally invasive necrosectomy. International guidelines recommend postponing catheter drainage until the stage of 'walled-off necrosis' has been reached, a process that typically takes 4 weeks after onset of acute pancreatitis. This recommendation stems from the era of primary surgical necrosectomy. However, postponement of catheter drainage might not be necessary, and earlier detection and subsequent earlier drainage of infected necrosis could improve outcome. Strong data and consensus among international expert pancreatologists are lacking. Future clinical, preferably randomized, studies should focus on timing of catheter drainage in patients with infected necrotizing pancreatitis. In this Perspectives, we discuss challenges in the invasive treatment of patients with infected necrotizing pancreatitis, focusing on timing of catheter drainage. PMID:26956064

  20. In vivo method for the evaluation of catheter thrombogenicity

    SciTech Connect

    Solomon, D.D.; Arnold, W.L.; Martin, N.D.; Lentz, D.J.

    1987-01-01

    A new method has been developed to evaluate the relative thrombogenicity of vascular catheters. The technique provides a means to quantitatively differentiate between catheters made from different polymeric materials. Autologous In-111 labeled platelets were infused into a dog model and catheters were then inserted into the external jugular vein of the dog. The neck region was scanned using gamma camera imaging. Comparisons between catheter materials were made using computer generated uptake slopes during the first 40 min of the scan. In addition to scintigraphy, visual assessment of thrombus deposition, thrombus weight, platelet deposition, and scanning electron microscopy were used to validate the technique. Poly(vinyl chloride), polyurethane, heparinized polyurethane, and silicone catheter materials were tested. It was found that heparinized polyurethane was the least thrombogenic of all materials evaluated.

  1. Catheter Obstruction of Intrathecal Drug Administration System -A Case Report-

    PubMed Central

    Rhee, Seok Myeon; Choi, Eun Joo; Lee, Pyung Bok

    2012-01-01

    Intrathecal drug administration system (ITDAS) can reduce the side effects while increasing the effectiveness of opioids compared to systemic opioid administration. Therefore, the use of ITDAS has increased in the management of cancer pain and chronic intractable pain. Catheter obstruction is a serious complication of ITDAS. Here, we present a case of catheter obstruction by a mass formed at the side hole and in the lumen. A 37-year-old man suffering from failed back surgery syndrome received an ITDAS implantation, and the ITDAS was refilled with morphine every 3 months. When the patient visited the hospital 18 months after ITDAS implantation for a refill, the amount of delivered morphine sulfate was much less than expected. Movement of the pump rotor was examined with fluoroscopy; however, it was normal. CSF aspiration through the catheter access port was impossible. When the intrathecal catheter was removed, we observed that the side hole and lumen of the catheter was plugged. PMID:22259717

  2. Management of Dysfunctional Catheters and Tubes Inserted by Interventional Radiology

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Steven Y.; Engstrom, Bjorn I.; Lungren, Matthew P.; Kim, Charles Y.

    2015-01-01

    Minimally invasive percutaneous interventions are often used for enteral nutrition, biliary and urinary diversion, intra-abdominal fluid collection drainage, and central venous access. In most cases, radiologic and endoscopic placement of catheters and tubes has replaced the comparable surgical alternative. As experience with catheters and tubes grows, it becomes increasingly evident that the interventional radiologist needs to be an expert not only on device placement but also on device management. Tube dysfunction represents the most common complication requiring repeat intervention, which can be distressing for patients and other health care professionals. This manuscript addresses the etiologies and solutions to leaking and obstructed feeding tubes, percutaneous biliary drains, percutaneous catheter nephrostomies, and drainage catheters, including abscess drains. In addition, we will address the obstructed central venous catheter. PMID:26038615

  3. Efficacy of preventing hemodialysis catheter infections with citrate lock.

    PubMed

    Silva, Jorge; Antunes, Jorge; Carvalho, Telmo; Ponce, Pedro

    2012-10-01

    Prevalent use of tunneled dialysis catheters can reach 30%. Infection remains the most serious catheter-related problem. Catheter locks are increasingly used for prevention, but are not yet recommended either by the Food and Drug Association or European Medicines Agency, on the basis of increasing bacterial resistance or lock toxicity. The aim was to test safety and effectiveness of citrate. A prospective, interventional study was conducted to assess the safety and efficacy of a 30% citrate lock in preventing catheter-related bacteremia (CRB). A total of 157 prevalent tunneled catheters were locked with citrate and prospectively followed during a 1-year period. The primary endpoint was first CRB diagnosed according to two of the diagnostic criteria for Catheter Infection of Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), namely definite and probable infection. The CDC criterion of possible but not proved infection was not considered. This citrate lock cohort (n = 157) had 10 episodes of CRB. We observed 0.49 CRB episodes/1000 patient-days and the mean infection-free catheter day was 130.6 ± 100.9. No clinically relevant adverse events were observed. No proved tunnel or exit site infection was observed and no patients died because of CRB. Catheter obstruction episodes were reported on 69 occasions out of 14 catheters. These results were compared with an historical cohort from a previous study of catheter locking with low-dose gentamicin and did not show significant difference in efficacy. Citrate lock is effective in preventing CRB. No toxicity was observed. The use of citrate lock may have advantages over antibiotic locks: no reported bacterial resistance, lower industrial cost, and less manipulation. PMID:22515732

  4. A subset of high-titer anti–factor VIII A2 domain antibodies is responsive to treatment with factor VIII

    PubMed Central

    Eubanks, Joshua; Baldwin, W. Hunter; Markovitz, Rebecca; Parker, Ernest T.; Cox, Courtney; Kempton, Christine L.

    2016-01-01

    The primary B-cell epitopes of factor VIII (fVIII) are in the A2 and C2 domains. Within the C2 domain, antibody epitope and kinetics are more important than inhibitor titer in predicting pathogenicity in a murine bleeding model. To investigate this within the A2 domain, the pathogenicity of a diverse panel of antihuman fVIII A2 domain monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) was tested in the murine model. MAbs were injected into hemophilia A mice, followed by injection of human B domain-deleted fVIII. Blood loss after a 4-mm tail snip was measured. The following anti-A2 MAbs were tested: high-titer type 1 inhibitors 4A4, 2-76, and 1D4; 2-54, a high-titer type 2 inhibitor; B94, a type 2 inhibitor; and noninhibitory MAbs GMA-012, 4C7, and B25. All high-titer type 1 MAbs produced blood loss that was significantly greater than control mice, whereas all non-inhibitory MAbs produced blood loss that was similar to control. The type 2 MAbs were not pathogenic despite 2-54 having an inhibitor titer of 34 000 BU/mg immunoglobulin G. In addition, a patient with a high-titer type 2 anti-A2 inhibitor who is responsive to fVIII is reported. The discrepancy between inhibitor titer and bleeding phenotype combined with similar findings in the C2 domain stress the importance of inhibitor properties not detected in the standard Bethesda assay in predicting response to fVIII therapy. PMID:26825708

  5. Extrahepatic sources of factor VIII potentially contribute to the coagulation cascade correcting the bleeding phenotype of mice with hemophilia A

    PubMed Central

    Zanolini, Diego; Merlin, Simone; Feola, Maria; Ranaldo, Gabriella; Amoruso, Angela; Gaidano, Gianluca; Zaffaroni, Mauro; Ferrero, Alessandro; Brunelleschi, Sandra; Valente, Guido; Gupta, Sanjeev; Prat, Maria; Follenzi, Antonia

    2015-01-01

    A large fraction of factor VIII in blood originates from liver sinusoidal endothelial cells although extrahepatic sources also contribute to plasma factor VIII levels. Identification of cell-types other than endothelial cells with the capacity to synthesize and release factor VIII will be helpful for therapeutic approaches in hemophilia A. Recent cell therapy and bone marrow transplantation studies indicated that Küpffer cells, monocytes and mesenchymal stromal cells could synthesize factor VIII in sufficient amount to ameliorate the bleeding phenotype in hemophilic mice. To further establish the role of blood cells in expressing factor VIII, we studied various types of mouse and human hematopoietic cells. We identified factor VIII in cells isolated from peripheral and cord blood, as well as bone marrow. Co-staining for cell type-specific markers verified that factor VIII was expressed in monocytes, macrophages and megakaryocytes. We additionally verified that factor VIII was expressed in liver sinusoidal endothelial cells and endothelial cells elsewhere, e.g., in the spleen, lungs and kidneys. Factor VIII was well expressed in sinusoidal endothelial cells and Küpffer cells isolated from human liver, whereas by comparison isolated human hepatocytes expressed factor VIII at very low levels. After transplantation of CD34+ human cord blood cells into NOD/SCIDγNull-hemophilia A mice, fluorescence activated cell sorting of peripheral blood showed >40% donor cells engrafted in the majority of mice. In these animals, plasma factor VIII activity 12 weeks after cell transplantation was up to 5% and nine of 12 mice survived after a tail clip-assay. In conclusion, hematopoietic cells, in addition to endothelial cells, express and secrete factor VIII: this information should offer further opportunities for understanding mechanisms of factor VIII synthesis and replenishment. PMID:25911555

  6. Comparison of Heparin-Coated and Conventional Split-Tip Hemodialysis Catheters

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, Timothy W. I. Jacobs, David; Charles, Hearns W.; Kovacs, Sandor; Aquino, Theresa; Erinjeri, Joseph; Benstein, Judith A.

    2009-07-15

    Catheter coatings have the potential to decrease infection and thrombosis in patients with chronic dialysis catheters. We report our midterm experience with a heparin-coated dialysis catheter. This retrospective, case-control study was approved by our Institutional Review Board. A total of 88 tunneled dialysis catheters were inserted over a 13-month period via the internal jugular vein. Thirty-eight uncoated split-tip catheters and 50 heparin-coated catheters were inserted. Primary catheter patency was compared between the two groups using the log rank test, with infection and/or thrombosis considered as catheter failures. Dialysis parameters during the first and last dialysis sessions, including pump speed, actual blood flow, and arterial port pressures, were compared using unpaired t-tests. Primary patency of the uncoated catheters was 86.0 {+-} 6.5% at 30 days and 76.1 {+-} 8.9% at 90 days. Primary patency of heparin-coated catheters was 92.0 {+-} 6.2% at 30 days and 81.6 {+-} 8.0% at 90 days (p = 0.87, log rank test). Infection requiring catheter removal occurred in four patients with uncoated catheters and two patients with heparin-coated catheters (p = 0.23). Catheter thrombosis requiring catheter replacement or thrombolysis occurred in one patient with an uncoated catheter and two patients with heparin-coated catheters (p = 0.9). No differences in catheter function during hemodialysis were seen between the two groups. In conclusion, the heparin-coated catheter did not show a significantly longer patency compared to the uncoated catheter. The flow characteristics of this device were comparable to those of the conventional uncoated catheter. A demonstrable benefit of the heparin-coated catheter in randomized trials is needed before a recommendation for routine implementation can be made.

  7. Distributed parameter statics of magnetic catheters.

    PubMed

    Tunay, Ilker

    2011-01-01

    We discuss how to use special Cosserat rod theory for deriving distributed-parameter static equilibrium equations of magnetic catheters. These medical devices are used for minimally-invasive diagnostic and therapeutic procedures and can be operated remotely or controlled by automated algorithms. The magnetic material can be lumped in rigid segments or distributed in flexible segments. The position vector of the cross-section centroid and quaternion representation of an orthonormal triad are selected as DOF. The strain energy for transversely isotropic, hyperelastic rods is augmented with the mechanical potential energy of the magnetic field and a penalty term to enforce the quaternion unity constraint. Numerical solution is found by 1D finite elements. Material properties of polymer tubes in extension, bending and twist are determined by mechanical and magnetic experiments. Software experiments with commercial FEM software indicate that the computational effort with the proposed method is at least one order of magnitude less than standard 3D FEM. PMID:22256282

  8. Analysis of factor VIII mediated suppression of lentiviral vector titres.

    PubMed

    Radcliffe, P A; Sion, C J M; Wilkes, F J; Custard, E J; Beard, G L; Kingsman, S M; Mitrophanous, K A

    2008-02-01

    Effective gene therapy for haemophilia A necessitates a vector system that is not subject to a pre-existing immune response, has adequate coding capacity, gives long-term expression and preferably can target non-dividing cells. Vector systems based on lentiviruses such as equine infectious anaemia virus (EIAV) fulfil these criteria for the delivery of factor VIII (FVIII). We have found that B domain-deleted (BDD) FVIII protein inhibits functional viral particle production when co-expressed with the EIAV vector system. Although particle numbers (as measured by reverse transcriptase activity) are near normal, RNA genome levels are reduced and measurement of integrated copies revealed the virus is severely defective in its ability to transduce target cells. This is due to the absence of sufficient vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein (VSV-G) envelope on viral particles derived from cells expressing FVIII. By using an internal tissue-specific promoter, that has low activity in the producer cells, to drive expression of FVIII we have overcome this inhibitory effect allowing us to generate titres approaching those obtained with vector genomes encoding reporter genes. Furthermore, we report that codon optimization of the full-length FVIII gene increased vector titres approximately 10-fold in addition to substantially improving expression per integrated vector copy. PMID:18046428

  9. A study of reported factor VIII use around the world.

    PubMed

    Stonebraker, J S; Brooker, M; Amand, R E; Farrugia, A; Srivastava, A

    2010-01-01

    The effect of replacement therapy has significantly improved the morbidity and mortality of people with haemophilia A in high income countries, a recent socio-economic development as the availability of safe concentrates has been matched by a willingness for their provision through reimbursement. In the developing world, however, this state has not been achieved, primarily because of the low visibility of haemophilia coupled with its expense, leading to inadequate treatment with its sequelae of severe pain, joint deformities, arthropathy, disabilities, and even death in childhood or early adult life. The objective of this paper was to study the reported factor VIII (FVIII) use on a country-by-country basis. Data on the reported FVIII use for 104 countries were obtained from the Marketing Research Bureau, Inc. and the World Federation of Hemophilia. The results show that FVIII use varies considerably among countries, even among the wealthiest of countries. The use of FVIII concentrate increases as economic capacity increases; in addition, consumption of FVIII has been increasing at a greater rate in high income countries. Given these trends, there probably will be a global increase in FVIII concentrates usage. Such information is critical for national healthcare agencies to determine realistic budget priorities in planning for an increased allocation of resources required to improve the treatment of patients with haemophilia A. This information is also important for pharmaceutical manufacturers to adequately plan for increased production of FVIII concentrates. PMID:19845774

  10. Unexpected postpartum hemorrhage due to an acquired factor VIII inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Paidas, Michael J; Hossain, Nazli

    2014-09-01

    Unexplained postpartum hemorrhage (PPH) refractory to standard hemostatic measures should trigger a heightened clinical suspicion of an acquired bleeding disorder. When hemostatic medical interventions and surgical procedures fail to control the bleeding, then significant postoperative blood loss, debilitating morbidity, loss of fertility, and death may occur. In the setting of an autoantibody inhibitor to factor VIII (FVIII), control of life-threatening PPH and avoidance of subsequent bleeding episodes depends on a timely and accurate diagnosis, prompt hemostatic treatment and eradication of FVIII inhibitors, and appropriate long-term patient care and management. Acquired postpartum hemophilia due to a FVIII inhibitor is a rare cause of PPH; however, delayed treatment can lead to increased maternal morbidity and mortality. Acquired FVIII inhibitors also pose an emerging bleeding threat to the neonate as a result of possible transplacental transfer of FVIII autoantibodies to the fetus during the last trimester of pregnancy. The purpose of this review is to increase awareness among hematologists and obstetricians/gynecologists regarding the occurrence of FVIII neutralizing autoantibodies as a cause of PPH, and emphasize the importance of collaboration between obstetrician/gynecologists and hematology specialists to optimize the diagnostic evaluation, treatment, and long-term management of women who experience PPH due to an acquired FVIII inhibitor. PMID:24338123

  11. Immunogenicity of long-lasting recombinant factor VIII products.

    PubMed

    Ing, Mathieu; Gupta, Nimesh; Teyssandier, Maud; Maillère, Bernard; Pallardy, Marc; Delignat, Sandrine; Lacroix-Desmazes, Sébastien

    2016-03-01

    Replacement therapy for patients with hemophilia A using plasma-derived or recombinant factor VIII (FVIII) is complicated by the short half-life of the FVIII products and by the occurrence of neutralizing antibodies in a substantial number of patients. In the recent years, enormous efforts have been invested to develop new generations of coagulation factors with extended half-lives. Presumably, the use of long-lasting FVIII products should reduce the frequency of administration to the patients and drastically improve their quality of life. The question of their immunogenicity remains however unanswered as yet. The present review proposes a summary of the different strategies developed to enhance the half-life of FVIII, including fusion of FVIII to the Fc fragment of the human IgG1 or to human serum albumin, or attachment of polyethylene glycol. Based on the available literature, we hypothesize on the potential benefits or risks associated with each of the latter strategies in terms of immunogenicity of the newly derived hemostatic drugs. PMID:26723503

  12. [Hypertension in rural communities. Study in the VIII Region, Chile].

    PubMed

    Fasce, E; Pérez, H; Boggiano, G; Ibáñez, P; Nieto, C

    1993-09-01

    The aim of this work was to study the prevalence of hypertension in rural populations of the VIII region of Chile. Six thousand twenty four non institutionalized subjects. 14 years old or older, coming from eight randomly chosen rural communities were studied. Blood pressure was measured by trained personnel in two occasions within 30 minutes; in those classified as hypertensive, a third measurement was performed within 24 hours, eliminating alcohol intake and medications. Results show prevalence rates in the first, second and third measurement of 38.5, 30.8 and 22.8% respectively. The elimination of alcohol intake and medications decreased the prevalence in 3.9%. All the chosen communities has similar rates (19.8 to 21.2%) except Arauco, that had a significantly higher frequency of 31.9%. Zones of extreme ruralness had higher rates than small towns (23.8 vs 21.7%). There was a secular increase in the prevalence of hypertension from 4.9 in the 15 to 24 years old group to 57.8% among people 75 years old or older. Forty three percent of hypertensives were aware of such condition, 26.1% were receiving treatment and in 8.2% it was successful; all these figures were slightly better among women. PMID:8191159

  13. Domain Organization of Membrane-Bound Factor VIII

    PubMed Central

    Stoilova-McPhie, Svetla; Lynch, Gillian C.; Ludtke, Steven; Pettitt, B. Montgomery

    2014-01-01

    Factor VIII (FVIII) is the blood coagulation protein which when defective or deficient causes for hemophilia A, a severe hereditary bleeding disorder. Activated FVIII (FVIIIa) is the cofactor to the serine protease factor IXa (FIXa) within the membrane-bound Tenase complex, responsible for amplifying its proteolytic activity more than 100,000 times, necessary for normal clot formation. FVIII is composed of two noncovalently linked peptide chains: a light chain (LC) holding the membrane interaction sites and a heavy chain (HC) holding the main FIXa interaction sites. The interplay between the light and heavy chains (HCs) in the membrane-bound state is critical for the biological efficiency of FVIII. Here, we present our cryo-electron microscopy (EM) and structure analysis studies of human FVIII-LC, when helically assembled onto negatively charged single lipid bilayer nanotubes. The resolved FVIII-LC membrane-bound structure supports aspects of our previously proposed FVIII structure from membrane-bound two-dimensional (2D) crystals, such as only the C2 domain interacts directly with the membrane. The LC is oriented differently in the FVIII membrane-bound helical and 2D crystal structures based on EM data, and the existing X-ray structures. This flexibility of the FVIII-LC domain organization in different states is discussed in the light of the FVIIIa-FIXa complex assembly and function. PMID:23616213

  14. Transgenic pigs produce functional human factor VIII in milk.

    PubMed

    Paleyanda, R K; Velander, W H; Lee, T K; Scandella, D H; Gwazdauskas, F C; Knight, J W; Hoyer, L W; Drohan, W N; Lubon, H

    1997-10-01

    Deficiency or abnormality of coagulation factor VIII (FVIII) causes a bleeding disorder called hemophilia A. Treatment involves FVIII concentrates prepared from pooled human plasma or recombinant FVIII (rFVIII) prepared from mammalian cell culture. The cost of highly purified FVIII or rFVIII is a major factor in hemophilia therapy and restricts prophylaxis. We have sought to generate a new source of rFVIII by targeting expression of the human FVIII cDNA to the mammary gland of transgenic pigs using the regulatory sequences of the mouse whey acidic protein gene. The identity of processed heterodimeric rFVIII was confirmed using specific antibodies, by thrombin digestion and activity assays. The secretion of as much as 2.7 micrograms/ml of rFVIII in milk was over tenfold higher than in normal plasma. Up to 0.62 U/ml of rFVIII was detected in an assay in which rFVIII restored normal clotting activity to FVIII-deficient human plasma. PMID:9335047

  15. Modified multipurpose catheter enhances clinical utility for cardiac catheterizations.

    PubMed

    Mannino, S C; Scavina, M; Palmer, S

    1994-10-01

    The Multipurpose technique for coronary arteriography employs a single catheter. The benefits are a reduction in the cost of the procedure and a shorter procedural time by experienced operators. To enhance the performance of these catheters, a modification was made in the materials and tip design, and these modifications were clinically evaluated in a small study. Compared to the control group of patients (n = 41), patients catheterized with the Multipurpose-SM (n = 43) were shown to have a shorter procedural time as measured by a reduced fluoroscopy time (7.08 min vs. 9.52 min, P = .007). This difference is statistically significant at a 95% confidence level and resulted in less radiation exposure to the operator and cath lab staff. The procedural time was significantly reduced by fewer catheter exchanges (19% study vs. 46% control; P = .006), which were needed to successfully complete the procedure. The new Multipurpose-SM catheter also demonstrated enhanced flexibility for cannulating coronary arteries with superior or anterior takeoffs. This study concludes that the utilization of a modified Multipurpose-SM catheter is safe and effective in cannulating both the left and right coronary arteries, bypass grafts, and performing left ventriculography. The primary benefits of using this modified catheter are reduced fluoroscopy time and the need for fewer catheter exchanges. PMID:7834732

  16. Magnetic Catheter Manipulation in the Interventional MRI Environment

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Mark W.; Martin, Alastair B.; Lillaney, Prasheel; Losey, Aaron D.; Yee, Erin J.; Bernhardt, Anthony; Malba, Vincent; Evans, Lee; Sincic, Ryan; Saeed, Maythem; Arenson, Ronald L.; Hetts, Steven W.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate deflection capability of a prototype endovascular catheter, which is remotely magnetically steerable, for use in the interventional MRI environment. Materials and Methods Copper coils were mounted on the tips of commercially available 2.3 – 3.0 Fr microcatheters. The coils were fabricated in a novel manner by plasma vapor deposition of a copper layer followed by laser lithography of the layer into coils. Orthogonal helical (solenoid) and saddle-shaped (Helmholtz) coils were mounted on a single catheter tip. Microcatheters were tested in water bath phantoms in a 1.5T clinical MRI scanner, with variable simultaneous currents applied to the coils. Catheter tip deflection was imaged in the axial plane utilizing a “real-time” steady-state free precession (SSFP) MRI sequence. Degree of deflection and catheter tip orientation were measured for each current application. Results The catheter tip was clearly visible in the longitudinal and axial planes. Magnetic field artifacts were visible when the orthogonal coils at the catheter tip were energized. Variable amounts of current applied to a single coil demonstrated consistent catheter deflection in all water bath experiments. Changing current polarity reversed the observed direction of deflection, whereas current applied to two different coils resulted in deflection represented by the composite vector of individual coil activations. Microcatheter navigation through the vascular phantom was successful through control of applied current to one or more coils. Conclusion Controlled catheter deflection is possible with laser lithographed multi-axis coil tipped catheters in the MRI environment. PMID:23707097

  17. Bacteria on Catheters in Patients Undergoing Peritoneal Dialysis

    PubMed Central

    Pihl, Maria; Davies, Julia R.; Johansson, Ann-Cathrine; Svensäter, Gunnel

    2013-01-01

    ♦ Background: Peritonitis is the leading cause of morbidity for peritoneal dialysis (PD) patients, and microbial biofilms have previously been identified on catheters from infected patients. However, few studies of catheters from patients without clinical signs of infection have been undertaken. The aim of the present study was to investigate the extent to which bacteria are present on catheters from PD patients with no symptoms of infection. ♦ Methods: Microbiologic culturing under aerobic and anaerobic conditions and confocal laser scanning microscopy were used to determine the distribution of bacteria on PD catheters from 15 patients without clinical signs of infection and on catheters from 2 infected patients. The 16S rRNA gene sequencing technique was used to identify cultured bacteria. ♦ Results: Bacteria were detected on 12 of the 15 catheters from patients without signs of infection and on the 2 catheters from infected patients. Single-species and mixed-microbial communities containing up to 5 species were present on both the inside and the outside along the whole length of the colonized catheters. The bacterial species most commonly found were the skin commensals Staphylococcus epidermidis and Propionibacterium acnes, followed by S. warneri and S. lugdunensis. The strains of these micro-organisms, particularly those of S. epidermidis, varied in phenotype with respect to their tolerance of the major classes of antibiotics. ♦ Conclusions: Bacteria were common on catheters from patients without symptoms of infection. Up to 4 different bacterial species were found in close association and may represent a risk factor for the future development of peritonitis in patients hosting such micro-organisms. PMID:22855889

  18. Videolaparoscopic Catheter Placement Reduces Contraindications to Peritoneal Dialysis

    PubMed Central

    Santarelli, Stefano; Zeiler, Matthias; Monteburini, Tania; Agostinelli, Rosa Maria; Marinelli, Rita; Degano, Giorgio; Ceraudo, Emilio

    2013-01-01

    ♦ Background: Videolaparoscopy is considered the reference method for peritoneal catheter placement in patients with previous abdominal surgery. The placement procedure is usually performed with at least two access sites: one for the catheter and the second for the laparoscope. Here, we describe a new one-port laparoscopic procedure that uses only one abdominal access site in patients not eligible for laparotomic catheter placement. ♦ Method: We carried out one-port laparoscopic placement in 21 patients presenting contraindications to blind surgical procedures because of prior abdominal surgery. This technique consists in the creation of a single mini-laparotomy access through which laparoscopic procedures and placement are performed. The catheter, rectified by an introducer, is inserted inside the port. Subsequently, the port is removed, leaving the catheter in pelvic position. The port is reintroduced laterally to the catheter, confirming or correcting its position. Laparotomic placement was performed in a contemporary group of 32 patients without contraindications to blind placement. Complications and long-term catheter outcome in the two groups were evaluated. ♦ Results: Additional interventions during placement were necessary in 12 patients of the laparoscopy group compared with 5 patients of the laparotomy group (p = 0.002). Laparoscopy documented adhesions in 13 patients, with need for adhesiolysis in 6 patients. Each group had 1 intraoperative complication: leakage in the laparoscopy group, and intestinal perforation in the laparotomy group. During the 2-year follow-up period, laparoscopic revisions had to be performed in 6 patients of the laparoscopy group and in 5 patients of the laparotomy group (p = 0.26). The 1-year catheter survival was similar in both groups. Laparoscopy increased by 40% the number of patients eligible to receive peritoneal dialysis. ♦ Conclusions: Videolaparoscopy placement in patients not eligible for blind surgical

  19. Steerable Catheter Microcoils for Interventional MRI: Reducing Resistive Heating

    PubMed Central

    Bernhardt, Anthony; Wilson, Mark W.; Settecase, Fabio; Evans, Leland; Malba, Vincent; Martin, Alastair J.; Saeed, Maythem; Roberts, Timothy P. L.; Arenson, Ronald L.; Hetts, Steven W.

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE To assess resistive heating of microwires used for remote catheter steering in interventional magnetic resonance imaging. To investigate the use of alumina to facilitate heat transfer to saline flowing in the catheter lumen. MATERIALS AND METHODS A microcoil was fabricated using a laser lathe onto polyimide-tipped or alumina-tipped endovascular catheters. In vitro testing was performed in a 1.5 T MR system using a vessel phantom, body RF coil, and steady state pulse sequence. Resistive heating was measured with water flowing over a polyimide tip catheter, or saline flowing through the lumen of an alumina-tip catheter. Preliminary in vivo testing in porcine common carotid arteries was conducted with normal blood flow or after arterial ligation when current was applied to an alumnia-tip catheter for up to 5 minutes. RESULTS After application of up to 1 W of DC power, clinically significant temperature increases were noted with the polyimide-tip catheter: 23°C/W at zero flow, 13°C/W at 0.28 cc/s, and 7.9°C/W at 1 cc/s. Using the alumina-tip catheter, the effluent temperature rise using the lowest flow rate (0.12 cc/s) was 2.3°C/W. In vivo testing demonstrated no thermal injury to vessel walls at normal and zero arterial flow. CONCLUSION Resistive heating in current carrying wire pairs can be dissipated by saline coolant flowing within the lumen of a catheter tip composed of material that facilitates heat transfer. PMID:21075017

  20. Thromboresistance Characterization of Extruded Nitric Oxide-Releasing Silicone Catheters

    PubMed Central

    Amoako, Kagya A.; Archangeli, Christopher; Handa, Hitesh; Major, Terry; Meyerhoff, Mark E.; Annich, Gail M.; Bartlett, Robert H.

    2013-01-01

    Intravascular catheters used in clinical practice can activate platelets, leading to thrombus formation and stagnation of blood flow. Nitric oxide (NO)-releasing polymers have been shown previously to reduce clot formation on a number of blood contacting devices. In this work, trilaminar NO-releasing silicone catheters were fabricated and tested for their thrombogenicity. All catheters had specifications of L = 6 cm, inner diameter = 21 gauge (0.0723 cm), outer diameter = 12 gauge (0.2052 cm), and NO-releasing layer thickness = 200 ± 11 μm. Control and NO-releasing catheters were characterized in vitro for their NO flux and NO release duration by gas phase chemiluminescence measurements. The catheters were then implanted in the right and left internal jugular veins of (N = 6 and average weight = 3 kg) adult male rabbits for 4 hours thrombogenicity testing. Platelet counts and function, methemoglobin (metHb), hemoglobin (Hb), and white cell counts and functional time (defined as patency time of catheter) were monitored as measured outcomes. Nitric oxide-releasing catheters (N = 6) maintained an average flux above (2 ± 0.5) × 10−10 mol/min/cm2 for more than 24 hours, whereas controls showed no NO release. Methemoglobin, Hb, white cell, and platelet counts and platelet function at 4 hours were not significantly different from baseline (α = 0.05). However, clots on controls were visibly larger and prevented blood draws at a significantly (p < 0.05) earlier time (2.3 ± 0.7 hours) into the experiment, whereas all NO-releasing catheters survived the entire 4 hours test period. Results indicate that catheter NO flux levels attenuated thrombus formation in a short-term animal model. PMID:22395119

  1. The effect of elastic modulus on ablation catheter contact area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camp, Jon J.; Linte, Cristian A.; Rettmann, Maryam E.; Sun, Deyu; Packer, Douglas L.; Robb, Richard A.; Holmes, David R.

    2015-03-01

    Cardiac ablation consists of navigating a catheter into the heart and delivering RF energy to electrically isolate tissue regions that generate or propagate arrhythmia. Besides the challenges of accurate and precise targeting of the arrhythmic sites within the beating heart, limited information is currently available to the cardiologist regarding intricate electrodetissue contact, which directly impacts the quality of produced lesions. Recent advances in ablation catheter design provide intra-procedural estimates of tissue-catheter contact force, but the most direct indicator of lesion quality for any particular energy level and duration is the tissue-catheter contact area, and that is a function of not only force, but catheter pose and material elasticity as well. In this experiment, we have employed real-time ultrasound (US) imaging to determine the complete interaction between the ablation electrode and tissue to accurately estimate contact, which will help to better understand the effect of catheter pose and position relative to the tissue. By simultaneously recording tracked position, force reading and US image of the ablation catheter, the differing material properties of polyvinyl alcohol cryogel[1] phantoms are shown to produce varying amounts of tissue depression and contact area (implying varying lesion quality) for equivalent force readings. We have shown that the elastic modulus significantly affects the surface-contact area between the catheter and tissue at any level of contact force. Thus we provide evidence that a prescribed level of catheter force may not always provide sufficient contact area to produce an effective ablation lesion in the prescribed ablation time.

  2. Catheter Related Escherichia hermannii Sepsis in a Haemodialysis Patient

    PubMed Central

    Rank, Cecilie Utke; Lommer Kristensen, Peter; Schrøder Hansen, Dennis; Brandi, Lisbet

    2016-01-01

    Escherichia hermannii is an extremely rare etiological agent of invasive infection, and thus, the bacterium was initially considered non-pathogenic. However, in five previously reported case reports E. hermannii has been implicated as the sole pathogen. Our case report describes blood stream infection with E. hermannii in a haemodialysis patient with persisting symptoms, high fever and inflammatory markers despite appropriate antibiotic treatment until replacement of the dialysis catheter. We suspect biofilm formation to be a crucial pathogenic feature for E. hermannii in the maintenance of an infection, which stresses the necessity of antibiotic treatment along with catheter replacement in bloodstream- and catheter-related infection with E. hermannii. PMID:27006723

  3. Ion beam sputter-etched ventricular catheter for hydrocephalus shunt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, B. A. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A cerebrospinal fluid shunt in the form of a ventricular catheter for controlling the condition of hydrocephalus by relieving the excessive cerebrospinal fluid pressure is described. A method for fabrication of the catheter and shunting the cerebral fluid from the cerebral ventricles to other areas of the body is also considered. Shunt flow failure occurs if the ventricle collapse due to improper valve function causing overdrainage. The ventricular catheter comprises a multiplicity of inlet microtubules. Each microtubule has both a large openings at its inlet end and a multiplicity of microscopic openings along its lateral surfaces.

  4. Management of catheter-associated upper extremity deep venous thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Crawford, Jeffrey D; Liem, Timothy K; Moneta, Gregory L

    2016-07-01

    Central venous catheters or peripherally inserted central catheters are major risk factors for upper extremity deep venous thrombosis (UEDVT). The body and quality of literature evaluating catheter-associated (CA) UEDVT have increased, yet strong evidence on screening, diagnosis, prevention, and optimal treatment is limited. We herein review the current evidence of CA UEDVT that can be applied clinically. Principally, we review the anatomy and definition of CA UEDVT, identification of risk factors, utility of duplex ultrasound as the preferred diagnostic modality, preventive strategies, and an algorithm for management of CA UEDVT. PMID:27318061

  5. Malposition of Subclavian Venous Catheter Leading to Chest Complications

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Amarjit; Sidhu, Kuldeep Singh; Kaur, Avleen

    2016-01-01

    Although Central Venous Catheter (CVC) placement is a relatively simple procedure but its insertion and maintenance are associated with significant risks. Malposition (defined as any CVC tip position outside the superior vena cava) may be associated with catheter insertion and may require immediate intervention. It may result in complications like haemothorax, pleural effusions, pneumothorax, sepsis, thrombosis and cardiac tamponade. This case report presents timely detection of the complication after placement of CVC. Everyone should be aware of the complications and monitor consistently appropriate position of catheter tips.

  6. Spiculated Bladder Calculi: The Culprit for Repeated Catheter Failure

    PubMed Central

    Wek, C.; Fox, T. P.; Muir, G. H.

    2013-01-01

    We report on the case of a frustrated 90-year-old gentleman who was seen in the Accident and Emergency department for the third time in four days with failure of his long-term urethral catheter. He reported that the catheter simply “fell out” with the balloon deflated. On each occasion previously, the catheter had been reinserted in A&E and the patient discharged home. These repeated visits to A&E were understandably a source of much frustration for the patient and his family. On the third presentation, plain abdominal radiography demonstrated a large spiculated bladder calculus. PMID:23984173

  7. Catheterization in the community: converting to the Foley catheter tray.

    PubMed

    Yates, Ann

    2011-11-01

    With the aim of minimizing clinical incidents and improving clinical practice, the Cardiff and Vale University Health Board carried out a trial of a Foley catheter tray to be carried by district nurses as emergency boot stock. As part of the trial all nurses had to undergo training on the Foley catheter tray prior to use. The district nurses using the tray reported improvement in confidence, efficiency, convenience and patient experience. Owing to the success of the initiative, use of the Foley catheter tray as emergency boot stock is now standard practice for District Nursing/Acute Response and out-of-hours care in the Cardiff and Vale area. PMID:22067568

  8. Hemiballismus as a complication of an intratumoral chemotherapy catheter.

    PubMed

    Zuccarelli, Britton; Aalbers, Brian; Grabb, Paul

    2016-08-01

    We report an unusual case of delayed bilateral, right greater than left hemiballismus in a 15-year-old female patient with a history of a craniopharyngioma 2years following the insertion of a right intratumoral chemotherapy catheter. Following cyst decompression, the catheter was found to have changed position, traversing the basal ganglia structures, namely the right subthalamic nucleus. Her movement disorder near-completely resolved immediately following removal of the catheter. A review of the current literature and proposed pathophysiological mechanisms are discussed. PMID:26964474

  9. Percutaneous Untying of a Knot in a Retained Swan-Ganz Catheter

    SciTech Connect

    Bhatti, Waqar A.; Sinha, Sankar; Rowlands, Peter

    2000-03-15

    A patient was referred to us with a tightly knotted Swan-Ganz catheter. The catheter could not be removed by conventional simple methods. We describe a minimally invasive means of removal of the catheter using an Amplatz gooseneck snare and an angioplasty balloon. This allowed the catheter to be removed without trauma.

  10. Patency of Femoral Tunneled Hemodialysis Catheters and Factors Predictive of Patency Failure

    SciTech Connect

    Burton, Kirsteen R.; Guo, Lancia L. Q.; Tan, Kong T.; Simons, Martin E.; Sniderman, Kenneth W.; Kachura, John R.; Beecroft, John R.; Rajan, Dheeraj K.

    2012-12-15

    Purpose: To determine the patency rates of and factors associated with increased risk of patency failure in patients with femoral vein tunneled hemodialysis catheters. Methods: All femoral tunneled catheter insertions from 1996 to 2006 were reviewed, during which time 123 catheters were inserted. Of these, 66 were exchanges. Patients with femoral catheter failure versus those with femoral catheter patency were compared. Confounding factors, such as demographic and procedural factors, were incorporated and assessed using univariate and multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression analyses. Results: Mean catheter primary patency failure time was 96.3 days (SE 17.9 days). Primary patency at 30, 60, 90, and 180 days was 53.8%, 45.4%, 32.1%, and 27.1% respectively. Crude rates of risk of catheter failure did not suggest a benefit for patients receiving catheters introduced from one side versus the other, but more cephalad location of catheter tip was associated with improved patency. Multivariate analysis showed that patients whose catheters were on the left side (p = 0.009), were of increasing age at the time of insertion (p = 0.002) and that those who had diabetes (p = 0.001) were at significantly greater risk of catheter failure. The catheter infection rate was 1.4/1000 catheter days. Conclusion: Patients who were of a more advanced age and had diabetes were at greater risk of femoral catheter failure, whereas those who received femoral catheters from the right side were less at risk of catheter failure.

  11. von Willebrand factor binds to the surface of dendritic cells and modulates peptide presentation of factor VIII

    PubMed Central

    Sorvillo, Nicoletta; Hartholt, Robin B.; Bloem, Esther; Sedek, Magdalena; Brinke, Anja ten; van der Zwaan, Carmen; van Alphen, Floris P.; Meijer, Alexander B.; Voorberg, Jan

    2016-01-01

    It has been proposed that von Willebrand factor might affect factor VIII immunogenicity by reducing factor VIII uptake by antigen presenting cells. Here we investigate the interaction of recombinant von Willebrand factor with immature monocyte-derived dendritic cells using flow cytometry and confocal microscopy. Surprisingly, von Willebrand factor was not internalized by immature dendritic cells, but remained bound to the cell surface. As von Willebrand factor reduces the uptake of factor VIII, we investigated the repertoire of factor VIII presented peptides when in complex with von Willebrand factor. Interestingly, factor VIII-derived peptides were still abundantly presented on major histocompatibility complex class II molecules, even though a reduction of factor VIII uptake by immature dendritic cells was observed. Inspection of peptide profiles from 5 different donors showed that different core factor VIII peptide sequences were presented upon incubation with factor VIII/von Willebrand factor complex when compared to factor VIII alone. No von Willebrand factor peptides were detected when immature dendritic cells were pulsed with different concentrations of von Willebrand factor, confirming lack of von Willebrand factor endocytosis. Several von Willebrand factor derived peptides were recovered when cells were pulsed with von Willebrand factor/factor VIII complex, suggesting that factor VIII promotes endocytosis of small amounts of von Willebrand factor by immature dendritic cells. Taken together, our results establish that von Willebrand factor is poorly internalized by immature dendritic cells. We also show that von Willebrand factor modulates the internalization and presentation of factor VIII-derived peptides on major histocompatibility complex class II. PMID:26635035

  12. Idiotypes of murine monoclonal antibodies to clotting factor VIII:C

    SciTech Connect

    Pechet, L.; Tiarks, C.Y.; Ghalili, K.; Humphreys, R.E.

    1986-03-05

    The authors goal is to study idiotypic immunoregulation of inhibitors to clotting factor VIII:C. To this end, they used monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) against VIII:C: Synbiotics, C7F7, and C5, directed against epitopes on the C terminal fragment of VIII:C; C2, C6, C8 directed against epitopes on the N terminal fragment of VIII:C; C10, directed against a non-functional epitope; IB3, Chemicon and Hybritech, to undetermined epitopes. Anti-idiotypic antibodies against C7F7, C8, Synbiotics and Hybritech were produced in rabbits. Competitive radioimmunoassays (RIA) tested cross-reactivity between each immunogen and the other MoAbs. Synbiotics cross-reacted with Chemicon and IB3, indicating they were directed against the same epitope on the C terminal fragment of VIII:C. They did not cross-react with Hybritech, C7F7, C2, C5, C6, C8, or C10. C7F7 showed no cross-reactivities. C8 cross-reacted with C6 but not with C2, C5, C10, C7F7, Synbiotics, or Hybritech. Hybritech did not did not cross-react with any of the other MoAbs. In conclusion, with four anti-idiotypic antibodies and ten MoAbs to VIII:C, they defined at least five functional epitopes and one non-functional epitope on the factor VIII:C molecule to which inhibitors may develop: C2, C6-C8 (N terminal), C7F7, C5, Synbiotics (C terminal), Hybritech (undetermined epitope) and C10 (non-functional).

  13. Response of protein C and protein C inhibitor to warfarin therapy in patient with combined deficiency of Factors V and VIII.

    PubMed

    Bern, M M; Suzuki, K; Mann, K; Tracy, P; Hoyer, L; Jensen, W; Gallivan, M; Arkin, C; Davis, G

    1984-12-15

    The role of Protein C in combined factor V/VIII deficiency was examined by reducing the Protein C concentration using warfarin therapy in a patient with the combined deficiency. The factor VIII deficiency was like Hemophilia-A, with deficiency of VIII:C and VIII:C(Ag), but normal VIIIR:Ag and VIIIR:cof. The factor V deficiency was due to loss of the V antigen. During warfarin therapy the Protein C level was reduced, but concentrations of factors V and VIII did not change. Protein C Inhibitor was normal throughout. Thus combined factor V/VIII deficiency is not related to Protein C levels. PMID:6098970

  14. Three Dimensional Modeling of an MRI Actuated Steerable Catheter System

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Taoming; Çavuşoğlu, M. Cenk

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the three dimensional kinematic modeling of a novel steerable robotic ablation catheter system. The catheter, embedded with a set of current-carrying micro-coils, is actuated by the magnetic forces generated by the magnetic field of the MRI scanner. This paper develops a 3D model of the MRI actuated steerable catheter system by using finite differences approach. For each finite segment, a quasi-static torque-deflection equilibrium equation is calculated using beam theory. By using the deflection displacements and torsion angles, the kinematic modeling of the catheter system is derived. The proposed models are evaluated by comparing the simulation results of the proposed model with the experimental results of a proof-of-concept prototype. PMID:25328804

  15. FAQs about Catheter-Associated Urinary Tract Infection

    MedlinePlus

    ... Tract Infection” What is “catheter-associated urinary tract infection”? A urinary tract infection (also called “UTI”) is an infection in the urinary system, which includes the bladder (which stores the ...

  16. Review of advanced catheter technologies in radiation oncology brachytherapy procedures

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jun; Zamdborg, Leonid; Sebastian, Evelyn

    2015-01-01

    The development of new catheter and applicator technologies in recent years has significantly improved treatment accuracy, efficiency, and outcomes in brachytherapy. In this paper, we review these advances, focusing on the performance of catheter imaging and reconstruction techniques in brachytherapy procedures using magnetic resonance images and electromagnetic tracking. The accuracy of catheter reconstruction, imaging artifacts, and other notable properties of plastic and titanium applicators in gynecologic treatments are reviewed. The accuracy, noise performance, and limitations of electromagnetic tracking for catheter reconstruction are discussed. Several newly developed applicators for accelerated partial breast irradiation and gynecologic treatments are also reviewed. New hypofractionated high dose rate treatment schemes in prostate cancer and accelerated partial breast irradiation are presented. PMID:26203277

  17. Three Dimensional Modeling of an MRI Actuated Steerable Catheter System.

    PubMed

    Liu, Taoming; Cavuşoğlu, M Cenk

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the three dimensional kinematic modeling of a novel steerable robotic ablation catheter system. The catheter, embedded with a set of current-carrying micro-coils, is actuated by the magnetic forces generated by the magnetic field of the MRI scanner. This paper develops a 3D model of the MRI actuated steerable catheter system by using finite differences approach. For each finite segment, a quasi-static torque-deflection equilibrium equation is calculated using beam theory. By using the deflection displacements and torsion angles, the kinematic modeling of the catheter system is derived. The proposed models are evaluated by comparing the simulation results of the proposed model with the experimental results of a proof-of-concept prototype. PMID:25328804

  18. 21 CFR 882.5150 - Intravascular occluding catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    .... Class III (premarket approval). (c) Date PMA or notice of completion of a PDP is required. A PMA or a... intravascular occluding catheter shall have an approved PMA or a declared completed PDP in effect before...

  19. 21 CFR 882.5150 - Intravascular occluding catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    .... Class III (premarket approval). (c) Date PMA or notice of completion of a PDP is required. A PMA or a... intravascular occluding catheter shall have an approved PMA or a declared completed PDP in effect before...

  20. [Cardiac tamponade after withdrawal of a peripheral access central catheter].

    PubMed

    García-Galiana, E; Sanchis-Gil, V; Martínez-Navarrete, M Á

    2015-03-01

    Central venous catheterization is a very common technique, although its complications can be multiple and sometimes fatal. A case is presented of cardiac tamponade by parenteral nutrition a few hours after moving a central venous catheter peripherally inserted a few days before. The diagnosis was made by echocardiography, and an emergency pericardiocentesis was performed, achieving complete recovery of the patient. Peripherally inserted central venous catheters are more likely to change their position secondary to the movements of the patient's arm, thus it is important to use soft catheters, make sure the tip lies above the carina to avoid perforation of the pericardial reflexion, and fix it well to the skin. Diagnosis must be made as soon as possible, given the high mortality rate of this complication, and the essential diagnostic tool is echocardiography. Elective treatment consists of early catheter withdrawal and emergency pericardiocentesis. PMID:24929256

  1. The use of radiofrequency catheter ablation to cure dilated cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, S B; Lobban, J H; Reddy, S; Hoelper, M; Palmer, D L

    1997-01-01

    Incessant supraventricular tachycardia can cause a dilated cardiomyopathy. This article discusses the case of a 55-year-old woman whose cardiomyopathy was reversed when she underwent successful radiofrequency catheter ablation of a unifocal atrial tachycardia. PMID:9197188

  2. Right atrial indwelling catheter for patients requiring long-term intravenous therapy.

    PubMed

    Ivey, M F; Adam, S M; Hickman, R O; Gibson, D L

    1978-12-01

    The use of a central venous catheter for long-term intravenous therapy is described. The catheter's history, physical description, and uses are discussed. Also reviewed are complications from use of the catheter, the pharmacist's role in patient teaching, and the procedure for administering medications through the catheter. A listing of drugs administered through the catheter, incompatibility data and patient teaching instructions are also included. PMID:717409

  3. Dosimetric equivalence of nonstandard HDR brachytherapy catheter patterns

    SciTech Connect

    Cunha, J. A. M.; Hsu, I-C.; Pouliot, J.

    2009-01-15

    Purpose: To determine whether alternative high dose rate prostate brachytherapy catheter patterns can result in similar or improved dose distributions while providing better access and reducing trauma. Materials and Methods: Standard prostate cancer high dose rate brachytherapy uses a regular grid of parallel needle positions to guide the catheter insertion. This geometry does not easily allow the physician to avoid piercing the critical structures near the penile bulb nor does it provide position flexibility in the case of pubic arch interference. This study used CT datasets with 3 mm slice spacing from ten previously treated patients and digitized new catheters following three hypothetical catheter patterns: conical, bi-conical, and fireworks. The conical patterns were used to accommodate a robotic delivery using a single entry point. The bi-conical and fireworks patterns were specifically designed to avoid the critical structures near the penile bulb. For each catheter distribution, a plan was optimized with the inverse planning algorithm, IPSA, and compared with the plan used for treatment. Irrelevant of catheter geometry, a plan must fulfill the RTOG-0321 dose criteria for target dose coverage (V{sub 100}{sup Prostate}>90%) and organ-at-risk dose sparing (V{sub 75}{sup Bladder}<1 cc, V{sub 75}{sup Rectum}<1 cc, V{sub 125}{sup Urethra}<<1 cc). Results: The three nonstandard catheter patterns used 16 nonparallel, straight divergent catheters, with entry points in the perineum. Thirty plans from ten patients with prostate sizes ranging from 26 to 89 cc were optimized. All nonstandard patterns fulfilled the RTOG criteria when the clinical plan did. In some cases, the dose distribution was improved by better sparing the organs-at-risk. Conclusion: Alternative catheter patterns can provide the physician with additional ways to treat patients previously considered unsuited for brachytherapy treatment (pubic arch interference) and facilitate robotic guidance of

  4. Cordless Instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1981-01-01

    Black & Decker's new cordless lightweight battery powered precision instruments, adapted from NASA's Apollo Lunar Landing program, have been designed to give surgeons optimum freedom and versatility in the operating room. Orthopedic instrument line includes a drill, a driver/reamer and a sagittal saw. All provide up to 20 minutes on a single charge. Power pack is the instrument's handle which is removable for recharging. Microprocessor controlled recharging unit can recharge two power packs together in 30 minutes. Instruments can be gas sterilized, steam-sterilized in an autoclave or immersed for easy cleaning.

  5. Monitoring Instruments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environmental Science and Technology (Environmental Control Issue), 1977

    1977-01-01

    This section contains a listing of the manufacturers of environmental monitoring instruments. The manufacturers are listed alphabetically under product headings. Addresses are included in a different section. (MA)

  6. Urinary catheter with polyurethane coating modified by ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondyurina, I.; Nechitailo, G. S.; Svistkov, A. L.; Kondyurin, A.; Bilek, M.

    2015-01-01

    A low friction urinary catheter that could be used without a lubricant is proposed in this work. A polyurethane coating was synthesised on the surface of a metal guide wire catheter. Ion implantation was applied to surface modify the polyurethane coating. FTIR ATR, wetting angle, AFM and friction tests were used for analysis. Low friction was found to be provided by the formation of a hard carbonised layer on the polyurethane surface.

  7. Catheter steering using a Magnetic Resonance Imaging system.

    PubMed

    Lalande, Viviane; Gosselin, Frederick P; Martel, Sylvain

    2010-01-01

    A catheter is successfully bent and steered by applying magnetic gradients inside a Magnetic Resonance Imaging system (MRI). One to three soft ferromagnetic spheres are attached at the distal tip of the catheter with different spacing between the spheres. Depending on the interactions between the spheres, progressive or discontinuous/jumping displacement was observed for increasing magnetic load. This phenomenon is accurately predicted by a simple theoretical dipole interaction model. PMID:21096567

  8. Type VIII Collagen Mediates Vessel Wall Remodeling after Arterial Injury and Fibrous Cap Formation in Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Lopes, Joshua; Adiguzel, Eser; Gu, Steven; Liu, Shu-Lin; Hou, Guangpei; Heximer, Scott; Assoian, Richard K.; Bendeck, Michelle P.

    2014-01-01

    Collagens in the atherosclerotic plaque signal regulation of cell behavior and provide tensile strength to the fibrous cap. Type VIII collagen, a short-chain collagen, is up-regulated in atherosclerosis; however, little is known about its functions in vivo. We studied the response to arterial injury and the development of atherosclerosis in type VIII collagen knockout mice (Col8−/− mice). After wire injury of the femoral artery, Col8−/− mice had decreased vessel wall thickening and outward remodeling when compared with Col8+/+ mice. We discovered that apolipoprotein E (ApoE) is an endogenous repressor of the Col8a1 chain, and, therefore, in ApoE knockout mice, type VIII collagen was up-regulated. Deficiency of type VIII collagen in ApoE−/− mice (Col8−/−;ApoE−/−) resulted in development of plaques with thin fibrous caps because of decreased smooth muscle cell migration and proliferation and reduced accumulation of fibrillar type I collagen. In contrast, macrophage accumulation was not affected, and the plaques had large lipid-rich necrotic cores. We conclude that in atherosclerosis, type VIII collagen is up-regulated in the absence of ApoE and functions to increase smooth muscle cell proliferation and migration. This is an important mechanism for formation of a thick fibrous cap to protect the atherosclerotic plaque from rupture. PMID:23567639

  9. Peripherally Inserted Central Catheters Complicated by Vascular Erosion in Neonates.

    PubMed

    Blackwood, Brian P; Farrow, Kathryn N; Kim, Stan; Hunter, Catherine J

    2016-08-01

    Peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs) are widely used in the pediatric population, and their use continues to grow in popularity. These catheters provide a reliable source of venous access to neonatal patients but can also be the cause of life-threatening complications. There are several well-documented complications such as infections, catheter thrombosis, vascular extravasations, and fractured catheters. However, the complication of vascular erosion into the pleural space using both small and silicone-based catheters is rarely described. After obtaining institutional review board approval, we identified 4 cases to review of PICCs complicated by vascular erosions in the past 2 years. Herein, we also review the current literature of PICC complications. Getting the catheter tip as close to the atrial-caval junction as possible and confirmation of this placement are of the utmost importance. The thick wall of the vena cava near the atrium seems to be less likely to perforate; in addition, this position provides increased volume and turbulence to help dilute the hyperosmolar fluid, which seems to also be a factor in this complication. A daily screening chest x-ray in patients with upper extremity PICCs and ongoing parenteral nutrition (PN) are not necessary at this time given the overall low rate of vascular erosion and concerns regarding excessive radiation exposure in pediatric populations. However, a low threshold for chest x-ray imaging in patients with even mild respiratory symptoms in the setting of upper extremity PN is recommended. PMID:25700180

  10. Continuous shoulder analgesia via an indwelling axillary brachial plexus catheter.

    PubMed

    Reuben, S S; Steinberg, R B

    2000-09-01

    Continuous interscalene brachial plexus blockade can provide anesthesia and analgesia in the shoulder region. Difficulty accessing the interscalene space and premature displacement of interscalene catheters may preclude their use in certain situations. We present two case reports in which a catheter was advanced from the axilla along the brachial plexus sheath to the interscalene space to provide continuous cervicobrachial plexus analgesia. In the first case report, previous neck surgery made the anatomic landmarks for performing an interscalene block very difficult. An epidural catheter was advanced from the axillary brachial plexus sheath to the interscalene space under fluoroscopic guidance. This technique provided both intraoperative analgesia for shoulder surgery as well as 24-hour postoperative analgesia by an infusion of 0.125% bupivacaine. In the second case report, a catheter was inserted in a similar fashion from the axillary to the interscalene space to provide 14 days of continuous analgesia in the management of complex regional pain syndrome. We have found that this technique allows us to secure the catheter more easily than with the traditional interscalene approach and thus prevents premature dislodgment. This approach may be a suitable alternative when either an interscalene or an infraclavicular catheter may not be inserted. PMID:11090734

  11. Digital Subtraction MR Angiography Roadmapping for Magnetic Steerable Catheter Tracking

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Alastair J.; Lillaney, Prasheel; Saeed, Maythem; Losey, Aaron D.; Settecase, Fabio; Evans, Lee; Arenson, Ronald L.; Wilson, Mark W.; Hetts, Steven W.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To develop a high temporal resolution MR imaging technique that could be employed with magnetically-assisted remote control (MARC) endovascular catheters. Materials and Methods A technique is proposed based on selective intra-arterial injections of dilute MR contrast at the beginning of a fluoroscopic MR angiography acquisition. The initial bolus of contrast is used to establish a vascular roadmap upon which MARC catheters can be tracked. The contrast to noise ratio of the achieved roadmap was assessed in phantoms and in a swine animal model. The ability of the technique to permit navigation of activated MARC catheters through arterial branch points was evaluated. Results The roadmapping mode proved effective in phantoms for tracking objects and achieved a contrast to noise ratio of 35.7 between the intra and extra-vascular space. In vivo, the intra-arterial enhancement strategy produced roadmaps with a contrast to noise ratio of 42.0. The artifact produced by MARC catheter activation provided signal enhancement patterns on the roadmap that experienced interventionalists could track through vascular structures. Conclusion A roadmapping approach with intra-arterial CE-MRA is introduced for navigating the MARC catheter. The technique mitigates the artifact produced by the MARC catheter, greatly limits the required SAR, permits regular roadmap updates due to the low contrast agent requirements, and proved effective in the in vivo setting. PMID:24797218

  12. Active catheter driven by a thermo-hydraulic actuation.

    PubMed

    Horovitz, Yonatan; Kosa, Gabor

    2015-01-01

    Catheters and flexible endoscopes are usually steered by mechanical wires that are driven from their base. Due to friction and buckling there is a need to place the driving actuator of the catheter at the catheter's tip. Such active catheter's manoeuvrability is much higher than wire-driven ones. A problem with active catheters is the difficulty to create high enough bending using micro-actuators placed at the catheter's tip. Our actuation method is an attempt to overcome this difficulty by using a novel thermo-hydraulic actuation method. The magnitude of the bending torque of our actuator is created by internal hydraulic pressure in the tube and the steering direction is controlled by the thermal micro-actuator embedded in the wall of the tube. In this paper we present the modelling, optimization, design and testing of an initial prototype of such an actuator. We found that a 4 mm OD actuator made of TPU can bend to ±12°. PMID:26738094

  13. Electromagnetically tracked placement of a peripherally inserted central catheter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sacolick, Laura; Patel, Neilesh; Tang, Jonathan; Levy, Elliot; Cleary, Kevin R.

    2004-05-01

    This paper describes a computer program to utilize electromagnetic tracking guidance during insertion of peripherally inserted central catheters. Placement of a Peripherally Inserted Central Catheter (PICC) line is a relatively simple, routine procedure in which a catheter is inserted into the veins of the lower arm and threaded up the arm to the vena cava to sit just above the heart. However, the procedure requires x-ray verification of the catheter position and is usually done under continuous fluoroscopic guidance. The computer program is designed to replace fluoroscopic guidance in this procedure and make PICC line placement a bedside procedure. This would greatly reduce the time and resources dedicated to this procedure. The physician first goes through a quick registration procedure to register the patient space with the computer screen coordinates. Once registration is completed, the program provides a continuous, real-time display of the position of the catheter tip overlaid on an x-ray image of the patient on an adjacent computer screen. Both the position and orientation of the catheter tip is shown. The display is very similar to that shown when using fluoroscopy.

  14. Migration of Central Venous Catheters in Neonates: A Radiographic Assessment.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Ruby; Drendel, Amy L; Hoffmann, Raymond G; Quijano, Carla V; Uhing, Michael R

    2016-05-01

    Objective This study aims to determine the frequency that umbilical venous catheters (UVCs) and peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs) migrate into the cardiothymic silhouette after initial verification of correct placement. Study Design This is a single-center, retrospective study in neonates in whom a PICC or UVC was placed. The frequency of catheter tip migration into the cardiothymic silhouette requiring catheter manipulation was determined radiographically at 1 and 24 hours, respectively, after insertion. Results At 1 and 24 hours, 36 and 23% of UVCs (n = 41) migrated into the cardiothymic silhouette, respectively. At 1 and 24 hours, 23 and 11% of PICCs (n = 63) migrated into the cardiothymic silhouette, respectively. Migration was not associated with birth weight, weight at insertion, or postnatal age at insertion. Conclusion UVCs and PICCs frequently migrate into the cardiothymic silhouette increase the risk for development of a pericardial effusion. Serial radiographic assessment of catheter tip location is needed to assess catheter migration within the first 24 hours of line placement. PMID:26731179

  15. Important aspects of the colonization of central venous catheter.

    PubMed

    Andreoli-Pinto, T J; Graziano, K U

    1999-01-01

    This study comprises five different kind of venous central catheters, 103 in total, made of Polyurethane Tecoflex, Polyurethane Vialon, PTFE and PVC, and the influence of their raw material on the microbial colonization. Patients age and sex, besides their clinical conditions, were taken into account, and neither considered as a sample vicious, nor associated with colonization. When the tips of the catheters were asseptically inoculated in Tryptic Soy Broth and Tioglicolate, colonization was detected in 15.5% of the catheters. Coagulase negative Staphylococcus, some of which with biofilm, were the predominant organisms found, although some bacillus have also been detected: Enterobacter aerogenes, Hafnia alvei, Pseudomonas cepacia, Xanthomonas maltophilia and Aeromonas sobria. It was not possible to notice any association between the colonization of the catheters and their raw material, probably due to the influence of a previous contact and linking with blood components. This contact causes a thin coating on the surface of the cathether, which makes all the catheters similar in respect of the attachment of a bacterial cell. So, the colonization depends on the virulence of the organism, much more then on the nature of the catheter. PMID:10326311

  16. Bacterial biofilms in patients with indwelling urinary catheters.

    PubMed

    Stickler, David J

    2008-11-01

    Bacteria have a basic survival strategy: to colonize surfaces and grow as biofilm communities embedded in a gel-like polysaccharide matrix. The catheterized urinary tract provides ideal conditions for the development of enormous biofilm populations. Many bacterial species colonize indwelling catheters as biofilms, inducing complications in patients' care. The most troublesome complications are the crystalline biofilms that can occlude the catheter lumen and trigger episodes of pyelonephritis and septicemia. The crystalline biofilms result from infection by urease-producing bacteria, particularly Proteus mirabilis. Urease raises the urinary pH and drives the formation of calcium phosphate and magnesium phosphate crystals in the biofilm. All types of catheter are vulnerable to encrustation by these biofilms, and clinical prevention strategies are clearly needed, as bacteria growing in the biofilm mode are resistant to antibiotics. Evidence indicates that treatment of symptomatic, catheter-associated urinary tract infection is more effective if biofilm-laden catheters are changed before antibiotic treatment is initiated. Infection with P. mirabilis exposes the many faults of currently available catheters, and plenty of scope exists for improvement in both their design and production; manufacturers should take up the challenge to improve patient outcomes. PMID:18852707

  17. Migrating lumbar intrathecal catheter fragment associated with intracranial subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Hnenny, Luke; Sabry, Hatem A; Raskin, Jeffrey S; Liu, Jesse J; Roundy, Neil E; Dogan, Aclan

    2015-01-01

    Intrathecal catheter placement into the lumbar cistern has varied indications, including drug delivery and CSF diversion. These Silastic catheters are elastic and durable; however, catheter-associated malfunctions are well reported in the literature. Fractured catheters are managed with some variability, but entirely intradural retained fragments are often managed conservatively with observation. The authors describe a case of a 70-year-old man with an implanted intrathecal morphine pump for failed back surgery syndrome who presented to an outside hospital with a history of headache, neck pain, nausea, and photophobia of 3 days' duration. He also described mild weakness and intermittent numbness of both legs. Unenhanced head CT demonstrated subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). A right C-5 hemilaminectomy was performed. This case is unique in that there was no indication that the lumbar intrathecal catheter had fractured prior to the patient's presentation with SAH. This case demonstrates that intrathecal catheter fragments are mobile and can precipitate intracranial morbidity. Extrication of known fragments is safe and should be attempted to prevent further neurosurgical morbidity. PMID:25360531

  18. Cryo-balloon catheter localization in fluoroscopic images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurzendorfer, Tanja; Brost, Alexander; Jakob, Carolin; Mewes, Philip W.; Bourier, Felix; Koch, Martin; Kurzidim, Klaus; Hornegger, Joachim; Strobel, Norbert

    2013-03-01

    Minimally invasive catheter ablation has become the preferred treatment option for atrial fibrillation. Although the standard ablation procedure involves ablation points set by radio-frequency catheters, cryo-balloon catheters have even been reported to be more advantageous in certain cases. As electro-anatomical mapping systems do not support cryo-balloon ablation procedures, X-ray guidance is needed. However, current methods to provide support for cryo-balloon catheters in fluoroscopically guided ablation procedures rely heavily on manual user interaction. To improve this, we propose a first method for automatic cryo-balloon catheter localization in fluoroscopic images based on a blob detection algorithm. Our method is evaluated on 24 clinical images from 17 patients. The method successfully detected the cryoballoon in 22 out of 24 images, yielding a success rate of 91.6 %. The successful localization achieved an accuracy of 1.00 mm +/- 0.44 mm. Even though our methods currently fails in 8.4 % of the images available, it still offers a significant improvement over manual methods. Furthermore, detecting a landmark point along the cryo-balloon catheter can be a very important step for additional post-processing operations.

  19. Post-procedural evaluation of catheter contact force characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, Martin; Brost, Alexander; Kiraly, Atilla; Strobel, Norbert; Hornegger, Joachim

    2012-03-01

    Minimally invasive catheter ablation of electric foci, performed in electrophysiology labs, is an attractive treatment option for atrial fibrillation (AF) - in particular if drug therapy is no longer effective or tolerated. There are different strategies to eliminate the electric foci inducing the arrhythmia. Independent of the particular strategy, it is essential to place transmural lesions. The impact of catheter contact force on the generated lesion quality has been investigated recently, and first results are promising. There are different approaches to measure catheter-tissue contact. Besides traditional haptic feedback, there are new technologies either relying on catheter tip-to-tissue contact force or on local impedance measurements at the tip of the catheter. In this paper, we present a novel tool for post-procedural ablation point evaluation and visualization of contact force characteristics. Our method is based on localizing ablation points set during AF ablation procedures. The 3-D point positions are stored together with lesion specific catheter contact force (CF) values recorded during the ablation. The force records are mapped to the spatial 3-D positions, where the energy has been applied. The tracked positions of the ablation points can be further used to generate a 3-D mesh model of the left atrium (LA). Since our approach facilitates visualization of different force characteristics for post-procedural evaluation and verification, it has the potential to improve outcome by highlighting areas where lesion quality may be less than desired.

  20. Catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation: Radiofrequency catheter ablation for redo procedures after cryoablation

    PubMed Central

    Kettering, Klaus; Gramley, Felix

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the effectiveness of two different strategies using radiofrequency catheter ablation for redo procedures after cryoablation of atrial fibrillation. METHODS: Thirty patients (paroxysmal atrial fibrillation: 22 patients, persistent atrial fibrillation: 8 patients) had to undergo a redo procedure after initially successful circumferential pulmonary vein (PV) isolation with the cryoballoon technique (Arctic Front Balloon, CryoCath Technologies/Medtronic). The redo ablation procedures were performed using a segmental approach or a circumferential ablation strategy (CARTO; Biosense Webster) depending on the intra-procedural findings. After discharge, patients were scheduled for repeated visits at the arrhythmia clinic. A 7-day Holter monitoring was performed at 3, 12 and 24 mo after the ablation procedure. RESULTS: During the redo procedure, a mean number of 2.9 re-conducting pulmonary veins (SD ± 1.0 PVs) were detected (using a circular mapping catheter). In 20 patients, a segmental approach was sufficient to eliminate the residual pulmonary vein conduction because there were only a few recovered pulmonary vein fibres. In the remaining 10 patients, a circumferential ablation strategy was used because of a complete recovery of the PV-LA conduction. All recovered pulmonary veins could be isolated successfully again. At 2-year follow-up, 73.3% of all patients were free from an arrhythmia recurrence (22/30). There were no major complications. CONCLUSION: In patients with an initial circumferential pulmonary vein isolation using the cryoballoon technique, a repeat ablation procedure can be performed safely and effectively using radiofrequency catheter ablation. PMID:24009817

  1. The Tego™ needleless connector for hemodialysis catheters may protect against catheter colonization.

    PubMed

    Guembe, M; Pérez-Granda, M J; Cruces, R; Alcalá, L; Bouza, E

    2016-08-01

    Catheter connectors used in hemodialysis patients are those with open caps to manage high blood flows. However, current guidelines for the prevention of catheter infections recommend closed connectors. Tego™ is a closed connector designed to enable high blood flows. We used an in vitro model to compare the efficacy of Tego™ against contamination with that of standard caps in a real-life practice scenario. The model consisted of 200 blood culture bottles (BCB) with an inserted cannula closed either with Tego™ (100) or with open caps (100). BCB were manipulated using two different methods: under aseptic conditions and with gloves contaminated with a 0.05 McFarland Staphylococcus aureus solution. The BCB were incubated at 37 °C under continuous shaking for up to 7 days or until positive. When a BCB turned positive, 100 μL of the fluid was cultured. The positivity rate and time to positivity of the BCB in each method were compared. Overall, 4.0 % of BCB with Tego™ and 52.0 % of BCB with open caps were positive in the sterile model (p < 0.001), whereas all BCB in the contamination model were positive. We did not find differences regarding the median time (hours) to positivity between Tego™ and the standard cap in the contamination model (19.04 vs. 17.87, p = 0.465). In our model, Tego™ proved to be better than the standard cap for the prevention of contamination when the device was handled under optimal conditions. Moreover, it was as efficient as the standard catheter cap in the contamination model. PMID:27189077

  2. Fast integrated intravascular photoacoustic/ultrasound catheter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Changhoon; Cho, Seunghee; Kim, Taehoon; Park, Sungjo; Park, Hyoeun; Kim, Jinmoo; Lee, Seunghoon; Kang, Yeonsu; Jang, Kiyuk; Kim, Chulhong

    2016-03-01

    In cardiology, a vulnerable plaque is considered to be a key subject because it is strongly related to atherosclerosis and acute myocardial infarction. Because conventional intravascular imaging devices exhibit several limitations with regard to vulnerable plaque detection, the need for an effective lipid imaging modality has been continuously suggested. Photoacoustic (PA) imaging is a medical imaging technique with a high level of ultrasound (US) resolution and strong optical contrast. In this study, we successfully developed an integrated intravascular photoacoustic/ultrasound (IV-PAUS) imaging system with a catheter diameter of 1.2 mm for lipid-rich atherosclerosis imaging. An Nd:YAG pulsed laser with an excitation wavelength of 1064 nm was utilized. IV-PAUS offers 5-mm depth penetration and axial and lateral PA imaging resolutions of 94 μm and 203 μm, respectively, as determined by imaging a 6-μm carbon fiber. We initially obtained 3-dimensional (3D) co-registered PA/US images of metal stents. Subsequently, we successfully obtained 3D coregistered PA/US ex vivo images using an iliac artery from a rabbit atherosclerosis model. Accordingly, lipid-rich plaques were sufficiently differentiated from normal tissue in the ex vivo experiment. We validated these findings histologically to confirm the lipid content.

  3. Catheter guided by optical coherence domain reflectometry

    DOEpatents

    Everett, Matthew; Colston, Billy W.; Da Silva, Luiz B.; Matthews, Dennis

    2002-01-01

    A guidance and viewing system based on multiplexed optical coherence domain reflectometry is incorporated into a catheter, endoscope, or other medical device to measure the location, thickness, and structure of the arterial walls or other intra-cavity regions at discrete points on the medical device during minimally invasive medical procedures. The information will be used both to guide the device through the body and to evaluate the tissue through which the device is being passed. Multiple optical fibers are situated along the circumference of the device. Light from the distal end of each fiber is directed onto the interior cavity walls via small diameter optics (such as gradient index lenses and mirrored corner cubes). Both forward viewing and side viewing fibers can be included. The light reflected or scattered from the cavity walls is then collected by the fibers and multiplexed at the proximal end to the sample arm of an optical low coherence reflectometer. The system may also be implemented in a nonmedical inspection device.

  4. Fiber optic pressure catheter for cardiovascular applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yuping; Sawatari, Takeo; Hartley, Craig J.

    1998-07-01

    We developed a fiber optic pressure catheter which has the potential to exceed the performance and cost-effectiveness of any currently available pressure measurement system in cardiovascular applications. Our design is based on a movable metallic ribbon, which works as a reflector, to transform the pressure into a light signal. The sensor has a diameter of 0.8 mm and is covered by medical grade polyurethane. In the laboratory tests, our sensors consistently showed high sensitivity and low noise (about 1 mmHg) over the pressure range of 0 to 300 mmHg. The time constant of the sensor, which is limited by the current software is about 20 mseconds (50 Hz). Using a mechanical heart simulator to generate pressure pulses, the pressure reading was independent of temperature change over a 30 degree Celsius range, and the drift was minimal during the 72-hour pressure pulse tests. A preliminary animal test was carried out with our sensors inserted into the artery of a dog. The comparison with an external reference sensor showed basic sensor performance. The sensor can also be used in brain, lung, and bladder pressure measurement applications.

  5. SURVEY INSTRUMENT

    DOEpatents

    Borkowski, C J

    1954-01-19

    This pulse-type survey instrument is suitable for readily detecting {alpha} particles in the presence of high {beta} and {gamma} backgrounds. The instruments may also be used to survey for neutrons, {beta} particles and {gamma} rays by employing suitably designed interchangeable probes and selecting an operating potential to correspond to the particular probe.

  6. Permanent cell line expressing human factor VIII-related antigen established by hybridization.

    PubMed Central

    Edgell, C J; McDonald, C C; Graham, J B

    1983-01-01

    A permanent human cell line, EA . hy 926, has been established that expresses at least one highly differentiated function of vascular endothelium, factor VIII-related antigen. This line was derived by fusing human umbilical vein endothelial cells with the permanent human cell line A549. Hybrid cells that survived in selective medium had more chromosomes than either progenitor cell type and included a marker chromosome from the A549 line. Factor VIII-related antigen can be identified intracellularly in the hybrids by immunofluorescence and accumulates in the culture fluid. Expression of factor VIII-related antigen by these hybrid cells has been maintained for more than 100 cumulative population doublings, including more than 50 passages and three cloning steps. This is evidence that EA . hy 926 represents a permanent line. Images PMID:6407019

  7. Practical cystoscopy: care of the instruments and preparation for a cystoscopic examination.

    PubMed

    Pilcher, Paul M

    2004-04-01

    Periodically, a look at the past helps health care professionals see how much practice has changed as well as how some concepts and practices remain similar to the original rationales and techniques. Two chapters from a 1911 textbook on cystoscopy have been reprinted that describe catheter and instrument care and preprocedure requirements for cystoscopy performed in the hospital, office, or home. Sterilization methods and instruments for cystoscopy have improved in the century since this book was written but the rationale for the procedure and concepts guiding the instrumentation have some similarity with the practices performed nearly 100 years ago. Some comments also provide a bit of comic relief. One example, "this undoubtedly shortens the life of the catheter, but it lengthens the life of the patient" appears in the discussion about catheter cleaning after use in a pus case. PMID:15131921

  8. The diversity of the immune response to the A2 domain of human factor VIII

    PubMed Central

    Markovitz, Rebecca C.; Healey, John F.; Parker, Ernest T.; Meeks, Shannon L.

    2013-01-01

    Approximately 30% of patients with severe hemophilia A develop inhibitory anti–factor VIII (fVIII) antibodies (Abs). We characterized 29 anti-human A2 monoclonal Abs (mAbs) produced in a murine hemophilia A model. A basis set of nonoverlapping mAbs was defined by competition enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, producing 5 major groups. The overlapping epitopes covered nearly the entire A2 surface when mapped by homolog-scanning mutagenesis. Most group A mAbs recognized a previously described epitope bounded by Arg484-Ile508 in the N-terminal A2 subdomain, resulting in binding to activated fVIII and noncompetitive inhibition of the intrinsic fXase complex. Group B and C mAbs displayed little or no inhibitory activity. Group D and E mAbs recognized epitopes in the C-terminal A2 subdomain. A subset of group D mAbs inhibited the activation of fVIII by interfering with thrombin-catalyzed cleavage at Arg372 at the A1-A2 domain junction. Other group D mAbs displayed indeterminate or no inhibitory activity despite inhibiting cleavage at Arg740 at the A2-B domain junction. Group E mAbs inhibited fVIII light-chain cleavage at Arg1689. Inhibition of cleavages at Arg372 and Arg1689 represent novel mechanisms of inhibitor function and, along with the extensive epitope spectrum identified in this study, reveal hitherto unrecognized complexity in the immune response to fVIII. PMID:23349389

  9. 77 FR 41782 - American River Power VIII, LLC; Notice of Preliminary Permit Application Accepted for Filing and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-16

    ... Hydroelectric Water Power Project No. 14391, to be located at the existing Upper Appleton Dam on the Fox River... Energy Regulatory Commission American River Power VIII, LLC; Notice of Preliminary Permit Application..., 2012, American River Power VIII, LLC filed an application for a preliminary permit under section...

  10. Direct characterization of factor VIII in plasma: detection of a mutation altering a thrombin cleavage site (arginine-372----histidine).

    PubMed Central

    Arai, M; Inaba, H; Higuchi, M; Antonarakis, S E; Kazazian, H H; Fujimaki, M; Hoyer, L W

    1989-01-01

    An immunoadsorbent method has been developed for the direct analysis of normal and variant plasma factor VIII. Using this method, the molecular defect responsible for mild hemophilia A has been identified for a patient whose plasma factor VIII activity is 0.05 unit/ml, even though the factor VIII antigen content is 3.25 units/ml. Although the variant factor VIII has an apparently normal molecular mass and chain composition, the 92-kDa heavy chain accumulates when the variant protein is incubated with thrombin and the 44-kDa heavy chain fragment cannot be detected. In contrast, thrombin cleavage of the 80-kDa light chain to the 72-kDa fragment is normal. As these data indicate a loss of factor VIII cleavage by thrombin at arginine-372, the genetic defect was determined by polymerase-chain-reaction amplification of exon 8 of the factor VIII gene and direct sequencing of the amplified product. A single-base substitution (guanine----adenine) was identified that produces an arginine to histidine substitution at amino acid residue 372. These data identify the molecular basis of an abnormal factor VIII, "factor VIII-Kumamoto," that lacks procoagulant function because of impaired thrombin activation. Images PMID:2498882

  11. 77 FR 10740 - Lock+ Hydro Friends Fund VIII, FFP Project 92, LLC, Riverbank Hydro No. 24, LLC; Notice...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-23

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Lock+ Hydro Friends Fund VIII, FFP Project 92, LLC, Riverbank Hydro No. 24... Madison Counties, Kentucky. The applications were filed by Lock+ Hydro Friends Fund VIII for Project...

  12. 75 FR 27770 - Lock+ Hydro Friends Fund VIII; Notice of Preliminary Permit Application Accepted for Filing and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-18

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Lock+ Hydro Friends Fund VIII; Notice of Preliminary Permit... 11, 2010. On April 13, 2010 Lock+ Hydro Friends Fund VIII filed an application for a...

  13. 78 FR 47315 - Solar Partners VIII, LLC; Supplemental Notice That Initial Market-Based Rate Filing Includes...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-05

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Solar Partners VIII, LLC; Supplemental Notice That Initial Market-Based Rate...-referenced proceeding, of Solar Partners VIII, LLC's application for market-based rate authority, with an... proceeding(s) are accessible in the Commission's eLibrary system by clicking on the appropriate link in...

  14. Intracardiac echocardiography guided transeptal catheter injection of microspheres for assessment of cerebral microcirculation in experimental models.

    PubMed

    Bellapart, Judith; Dunster, Kimble R; Diab, Sara; Platts, David G; Raffel, Christopher; Gabrielian, Levon; Maybauer, Marc O; Barnett, Adrian; Boots, Robert James; Fraser, John F

    2013-01-01

    The use of microspheres for the determination of regional microvascular blood flow (RMBF) has previously used different approaches. This study presents for the first time the intracardiac injection of microspheres using transeptal puncture under intracardiac echocardiography guidance. Five Merino sheep were instrumented and cardiovascularly supported according to local guidelines. Two catheter sheaths into the internal jugular vein facilitated the introduction of an intracardiac probe and transeptal catheter, respectively. Five million colour coded microspheres were injected into the left atrium via this catheter. After euthanasia the brain was used as proof of principle and the endpoint for determination of microcirculation at different time points. Homogeneous allocation of microspheres to different regions of the brain was found over time. Alternate slices from both hemispheres showed the following flow ranges: for slice 02; 0.57-1.02 mL/min/g, slice 04; 0.45-1.42 mL/min/g, slice 06; 0.35-1.87 mL/min/g, slice 08; 0.46-1.77 mL/min/g, slice 10; 0.34-1.28 mL/min/g. A mixed effect regression model demonstrated that the confidence interval did include zero suggesting that the apparent variability intra- and intersubject was not statistically significant, supporting the stability and reproducibility of the injection technique. This study demonstrates the feasibility of the transeptal injection of microspheres, showing a homogeneous distribution of blood flow through the brain unchanged over time and has established a new interventional model for the measurement of RMBF in ovine models. PMID:24102032

  15. A prospective randomized controlled trial of Wallace and Rocket embryo transfer catheters.

    PubMed

    El-Shawarby, Salem A; Ravhon, Amir; Skull, Jonathan; Ellenbogen, Adrian; Trew, Geoffrey; Lavery, Stuart

    2008-10-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of two embryo transfer catheters: Wallace and Rocket Embryon in an IVF programme of a tertiary referral university centre. A total of 308 patients undergoing embryo transfer were prospectively randomized to either a transfer with the Wallace catheter or a transfer with the Rocket catheter. The main outcome measure in this study was the clinical pregnancy rate, and secondary outcome measures included implantation rate, visibility of the catheter under ultrasound, number of retained embryos post transfer, and whether change of catheter was required. In addition, patient discomfort during the procedure was recorded. Pregnancy and implantation rates were similar when Wallace or Rocket catheters were used. However, for the Rocket catheter, the tip was more often clearly seen on ultrasound and it had a lower rate of retained embryos in the catheter after transfer (P < 0.05). Experience with different transfer catheters is recommended for difficult cases. PMID:18854110

  16. A comparison of epidural catheters with or without subcutaneous injection ports for treatment of cancer pain.

    PubMed

    de Jong, P C; Kansen, P J

    1994-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the incidence of technical complications of epidural catheters with subcutaneous injection ports to percutaneous epidural catheters without ports, fixed only by adhesive dressing. We reviewed 149 patients who received 250 epidural catheters for treatment of cancer pain during a 3 1/2-yr period from January 1, 1989, to June 30, 1992. Of the 250 catheters, 52 were provided with subcutaneous injection ports and 198 were percutaneous catheters. Of the 198 percutaneous catheters, 41 were tunneled for a short distance; the remainder entered the skin at the dorsal midline. In the percutaneous group 21% of the catheters became dislodged. In the injection port group, there were no catheter dislodgements. The overall incidence of infections was similar in both groups (13.6%). When we indexed the infection rate to catheter-days, the number of infections per 1000 catheter-days in the injection port group was half that of the percutaneous group (2.86 infections versus 5.97 for percutaneous catheters). No injection port became infected during the first 70 days of treatment, whereas in the percutaneous group infections occurred as early as the first week. Within the percutaneous group the complication rate in the tunneled epidural catheters was as high as in the nontunneled. We conclude that injection ports reduce the complication rate of epidural catheters, particularly catheter dislodgement and early infections. PMID:8267188

  17. Local Intravascular Drug Delivery: In Vitro Comparison of Three Catheter Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Alfke, Heiko; Wagner, Hans-Joachim; Calmer, Christian; Klose, Klaus Jochen

    1998-01-15

    Purpose: The aim of this in vitro study was to compare different catheter systems for local drug delivery with respect to the penetration depth of a biotin marker solution delivered into the vessel wall. Methods: Post-mortem carotid arteries from pigs were locally infused with a biotin solution using three different catheter systems. With all catheters (microporous balloon catheter, hydrogel-coated balloon catheter, and spiral balloon catheter) we used the same pressure of 405 kPa (4 atm) and infusion times of 60, 90, and 300 sec. After infusion the arteries were histologically prepared and stained using a biotin-specific method. With a light microscope an observer, blinded to the catheter type, scored the amount of biotin within the vessel wall, measured as staining intensity, and the penetration depth of the biotin. Results: Delivery with the hydrogel-coated balloon catheter was limited to the intima and the innermost parts of the media. The spiral balloon and microporous balloon catheter showed both a deeper penetration and a larger amount of delivered biotin compared with the hydrogel catheter, with a slightly deeper penetration using the microporous catheter. The penetration depth showed a correlation with infusion time for the spiral balloon and microporous catheters, but not for the hydrogel-coated catheter. Conclusion: Different catheter designs lead to different patterns of local drug delivery. The differences in penetration depth and amount of the substance delivered to the vessel wall should be known and might be useful for targeting specific areas within the vessel wall.

  18. Epidural catheter fixation. A comparison of subcutaneous tunneling versus device fixation technique

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Ashima; Parasa, Sujay Kumar; Tejvath, Kiran; Ramachandran, Gopinath

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: The technique of securing the epidural catheter has a major bearing on the efficacy of epidural analgesia. Specific fixator devices, for e.g., Lockit epidural catheter clamp, which successfully prevents catheter migration, are available. The possibility of catheter snapping and surgical retrieval has been reported with tunneling of catheters. These techniques have not been compared for safety, efficacy and appropriateness of achieving secure epidural catheter fixation in the postoperative period. Material and Methods: A total of 200 patients who required postoperative epidural analgesia were included. They were randomized into two groups: Group I (n = 100) in whom epidural catheters were tunneled vertically in the paravertebral subcutaneous tissue and group II (n = 100) wherein a Lockit device was used to fix the catheter. Likert score was used to quantify patient's comfort during procedure. The techniques were compared for migration, catheter dislodgement, local trauma, catheter snapping and catheter obstruction. Results: 12% of tunneled catheters had migrated significantly outward. 22% of patients had erythema and 77% had significant procedural discomfort in group I. In group II, 3% catheters had kinked and 14% had erythema from device adhesive. Conclusion: Our results support the use of Lockit device as a safe and comfortable fixation device compared to subcutaneous tunneling of catheters. PMID:27006544

  19. Non-infected hemodialysis catheters are associated with increased inflammation compared to arteriovenous fistulas.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Stuart L; Ikizler, T Alp; Zappitelli, Michael; Silverstein, Douglas M; Ayus, Juan C

    2009-11-01

    Although hemodialysis catheters predispose to infection which, in turn, causes inflammation, we studied whether they induce inflammation independent of infection. We compared the level of the inflammatory marker C-reactive protein (CRP) in maintenance hemodialysis patients, comparing those dialyzed using a non-infected catheter to those using arteriovenous fistulas. All incident patients had catheters and fistula placement at dialysis initiation. In 35 patients the fistulas matured, the catheters were removed and the patients were evaluated at 6 months (catheter-fistula). These results were compared to 15 patients in whom the fistula did not mature and catheter use persisted for 6 months (catheter-catheter). There was a significant 82% reduction in the CRP level in the catheter-fistula group but a 16% increase in the catheter-catheter group at 6 months. The changes in CRP did not differ by gender, diabetes status, or by race, and was not correlated with a change in phosphorus, age, or urea reduction ratio at 1 month following hemodialysis initiation. Decreased CRP was associated with increased hemoglobin and albumin. Patients with persistent fistula use from dialysis initiation through 6 months had consistently low CRP levels over that time period. Our study shows that catheters might contribute to increased inflammation independent of infection, and supports avoidance of catheters and a timely conversion to fistulas with catheter removal. PMID:19675528

  20. Concurrent acquired inhibitors to factor VIII and IX, a laboratory artifact: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Doma, Saša Anžej; Hillarp, Andreas; Pajič, Tadej; Andoljšek, Dušan; Černelč, Peter; Preldžnik Zupan, Irena

    2016-01-01

    Acquired inhibitors to coagulation factors other than factor VIII are extremely rare. We describe a case of a 59-year-old woman with abnormal bleeding, diagnosed with concurrent inhibitor antibodies to factor VIII and IX by Bethesda testing. We demonstrate that anti-FVIII antibodies of a very high titre are capable of disturbing the aPTT-based Bethesda assay, resulting in falsely-positive antibodies to factor IX. The case also illustrates the usefulness of the immunological assay (ELISA) in complementing the inhibitor diagnosis. PMID:27346976

  1. To clear or to fear: An innate perspective on factor VIII immunity.

    PubMed

    Lai, Jesse Derek; Georgescu, Maria Teofana; Hough, Christine; Lillicrap, David

    2016-03-01

    The enigma that is factor VIII immunogenicity remains ever pertinent in the treatment of hemophilia A. Development of neutralizing antibodies against the therapeutic protein in 25-30% of patients likely depends on the appropriate activation of the innate immune response shortly following antigen encounter. Our understanding of this important immunological synapse remains ill-defined. In this review, we examine the three distinct factors contributing to the fate of factor VIII almost immediately after infusion: the characteristics of the protein, the cell, and the microenvironment. We propose a continuum between clearance and antigen presentation that facilitates removal of FVIII from circulation leading to either tolerance or immunity. PMID:26547364

  2. Cryo-balloon catheter position planning using AFiT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleinoeder, Andreas; Brost, Alexander; Bourier, Felix; Koch, Martin; Kurzidim, Klaus; Hornegger, Joachim; Strobel, Norbert

    2012-02-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AFib) is the most common heart arrhythmia. In certain situations, it can result in life-threatening complications such as stroke and heart failure. For paroxsysmal AFib, pulmonary vein isolation (PVI) by catheter ablation is the recommended choice of treatment if drug therapy fails. During minimally invasive procedures, electrically active tissue around the pulmonary veins is destroyed by either applying heat or cryothermal energy to the tissue. The procedure is usually performed in electrophysiology labs under fluoroscopic guidance. Besides radio-frequency catheter ablation devices, so-called single-shot devices, e.g., the cryothermal balloon catheters, are receiving more and more interest in the electrophysiology (EP) community. Single-shot devices may be advantageous for certain cases, since they can simplify the creation of contiguous (gapless) lesion sets around the pulmonary vein which is needed to achieve PVI. In many cases, a 3-D (CT, MRI, or C-arm CT) image of a patient's left atrium is available. This data can then be used for planning purposes and for supporting catheter navigation during the procedure. Cryo-thermal balloon catheters are commercially available in two different sizes. We propose the Atrial Fibrillation Planning Tool (AFiT), which visualizes the segmented left atrium as well as multiple cryo-balloon catheters within a virtual reality, to find out how well cryo-balloons fit to the anatomy of a patient's left atrium. First evaluations have shown that AFiT helps physicians in two ways. First, they can better assess whether cryoballoon ablation or RF ablation is the treatment of choice at all. Second, they can select the proper-size cryo-balloon catheter with more confidence.

  3. Factor VIII A3 domain substitution N1922S results in hemophilia A due to domain-specific misfolding and hyposecretion of functional protein

    PubMed Central

    Summers, Ryan J.; Meeks, Shannon L.; Healey, John F.; Brown, Harrison C.; Parker, Ernest T.; Kempton, Christine L.; Doering, Christopher B.

    2011-01-01

    A point mutation leading to amino acid substitution N1922S in the A3 domain of factor VIII (fVIII) results in moderate to severe hemophilia A. A heterologous expression system comparing N1922S-fVIII and wild-type fVIII (wt-fVIII) demonstrated similar specific coagulant activities but poor secretion of N1922S-fVIII. Immunocytochemical analysis revealed that intracellular levels of N1922S-fVIII were similar to those of wt-fVIII. The specific activity of intracellular N1922S-fVIII was 10% of that of wt-fVIII, indicating the presence of large amounts of a nonfunctional N1922S-fVIII–folding intermediate. wt-fVIII colocalized with both endoplasmic reticulum (ER)– and Golgi-resident proteins. In contrast, N1922S-fVIII colocalized only with ER-resident proteins, indicating a block in transit from the ER to the Golgi. A panel of conformation-dependent monoclonal antibodies was used to determine native or nonnative folding of N1922S-fVIII. Intracellular N1922S-fVIII but not secreted N1922S-fVIII displayed abnormal folding in the A3 and C1 domains, indicating that the A1, A2, and C2 domains fold independently into antigenically intact tertiary structures, but that folding is stalled in the mutant A3 and its contiguous C1 domain. In summary, the N1922S substitution results in poor secretion of a functional protein, and the domain-specific defect in folding and intracellular trafficking of N1922S-fVIII is a novel mechanism for secretion defects leading to hemophilia A. PMID:21217077

  4. Instrumentation '79.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chemical and Engineering News, 1979

    1979-01-01

    Surveys the state of commerical development of analytical instrumentation as reflected by the Pittsburgh Conference on Analytical Chemistry and Applied Spectroscopy. Includes optical spectroscopy, liquid chromatography, magnetic spectrometers, and x-ray. (Author/MA)

  5. Astronomical instruments.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rai, R. N.

    Indian astronomers have devised a number of instruments and the most important of these is the armillary sphere. The earliest armillary spheres were very simple instruments. Ptolemy in his Almagest enumerates at least three. The simplest of all was the equinoctial armilla. They had also the solstitial armilla which was a double ring, erected in the plane of the meridian with a rotating inner circle. This was used to measure the solar altitude.

  6. Oceanographic Instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Developed under NASA contract, the Fast Repetition Rate (FRR) fluorometer is a computer-controlled instrument for measuring the fluorescence of phytoplankton, microscopic plant forms that provide sustenance for animal life in the oceans. The fluorometer sensor is towed by ship through the water and the resulting printouts are compared with satellite data. The instrument is non-destructive and can be used in situ, providing scientific information on ocean activity and productivity.

  7. Thrombus on Indwelling Central Venous Catheters: The Histopathology of 'Fibrin Sheaths'

    SciTech Connect

    Suojanen, James Norman; Brophy, David Paul; Nasser, Imad

    2000-03-15

    Purpose: Central venous catheters (CVC) may fail for many reasons, though 'fibrin sheaths' blocking catheter ports are usually implicated. We examined the sheaths removed from dialysis catheters to determine their histopathology.Methods: Ten catheter strippings were performed and the removed material was studied grossly and microscopically.Results: The histologic specimens showed thrombus both with and without a proteinaceous sheath.Conclusion: Dialysis catheters fail because of thrombus formation. This can occur in either the absence or presence of a protein coating on the catheter, the so-called 'fibrin sheath.'.

  8. Hemodialysis Catheter Heat Transfer for Biofilm Prevention and Treatment.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Ian P; Sturtevant, Rachael; Heung, Michael; Solomon, Michael J; Younger, John G; VanEpps, J Scott

    2016-01-01

    Central line-associated bloodstream infections (CLABSIs) are not easily treated, and many catheters (e.g., hemodialysis catheters) are not easily replaced. Biofilms (the source of infection) on catheter surfaces are notoriously difficult to eradicate. We have recently demonstrated that modest elevations of temperature lead to increased staphylococcal susceptibility to vancomycin and significantly soften the biofilm matrix. In this study, using a combination of microbiological, computational, and experimental studies, we demonstrate the efficacy, feasibility, and safety of using heat as an adjuvant treatment for infected hemodialysis catheters. Specifically, we show that treating with heat in the presence of antibiotics led to additive killing of Staphylococcus epidermidis with similar trends seen for Staphylococcus aureus and Klebsiella pneumoniae. The magnitude of temperature elevation required is relatively modest (45-50°C) and similar to that used as an adjuvant to traditional cancer therapy. Using a custom-designed benchtop model of a hemodialysis catheter, positioned with tip in the human vena cava as well as computational fluid dynamic simulations, we demonstrate that these temperature elevations are likely achievable in situ with minimal increased in overall blood temperature. PMID:26501916

  9. Effect of plastic catheter material on bacterial adherence and viability.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Lopez, G; Pascual, A; Perea, E J

    1991-06-01

    The kinetics of adherence of single isolates of Staphylococcus aureus, S. epidermidis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli to catheters made of polyvinyl chloride (PVC), Teflon, siliconised latex, polyurethane and Vialon was evaluated by a radiometric assay. Radiolabelled bacteria (10(8) cfu/ml) were incubated in vials containing 1-cm lengths of catheter for up to 3 days. The peak of maximal adherence to each biomaterial was reached after 24 h for P. aeruginosa and after 72 h for the other strains. Bacterial adherence to PVC and siliconised latex was significantly higher (2-6 times; p less than 0.05) than to the other biomaterials for all the strains. The lowest values of adherence were observed with polyurethane and Vialon for the staphylococci but with Teflon for E. coli and P. aeruginosa. Bacterial viability and growth was evaluated in eluates obtained from incubation of segments of each catheter in buffer for 24 h. None of the eluates affected the viability of the staphylococci. However, all of them, significantly increased the growth of E. coli and P. aeruginosa with the exception of the eluate from siliconised latex, in which the inoculum count was reduced to an undetectable level for E. coli. We conclude that bacterial adherence to catheters may depend in part on the nature of the biomaterial and that certain substances eluted from the catheters may affect the viability and growth of different micro-organisms. PMID:1905357

  10. How to deal with dialysis catheters in the ICU setting

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Acute kidney insufficiency (AKI) occurs frequently in intensive care units (ICU). In the management of vascular access for renal replacement therapy (RRT), several factors need to be taken into consideration to achieve an optimal RRT dose and to limit complications. In the medium and long term, some individuals may become chronic dialysis patients and so preserving the vascular network is of major importance. Few studies have focused on the use of dialysis catheters (DC) in ICUs, and clinical practice is driven by the knowledge and management of long-term dialysis catheter in chronic dialysis patients and of central venous catheter in ICU patients. This review describes the appropriate use and management of DCs required to obtain an accurate RRT dose and to reduce mechanical and infectious complications in the ICU setting. To deliver the best RRT dose, the length and diameter of the catheter need to be sufficient. In patients on intermittent hemodialysis, the right internal jugular insertion is associated with a higher delivered dialysis dose if the prescribed extracorporeal blood flow is higher than 200 ml/min. To prevent DC colonization, the physician has to be vigilant for the jugular position when BMI < 24 and the femoral position when BMI > 28. Subclavian sites should be excluded. Ultrasound guidance should be used especially in jugular sites. Antibiotic-impregnated dialysis catheters and antibiotic locks are not recommended in routine practice. The efficacy of ethanol and citrate locks has yet to be demonstrated. Hygiene procedures must be respected during DC insertion and manipulation. PMID:23174157

  11. Radiofrequency catheter ablation of accessory pathways in infants.

    PubMed Central

    Benito, F.; Sánchez, C.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the indications, results and complications of radiofrequency catheter ablation in small infants with supraventricular tachycardia due to an accessory atrioventricular pathway. METHODS: Five infants less than 9 months old underwent radiofrequency catheter ablation of accessory pathways. Ablation was done for medically refractory tachyarrhythmia associated with aborted sudden death in two patients, left ventricular dysfunction in one, failure of antiarrhythmic drugs in one, and planned cardiac surgery in one. All five patients underwent a single successful procedure. Three left free wall pathways were ablated by transseptal approach, a right posteroseptal pathway was ablated from the inferior vena cava, and a left posteroseptal pathway was approached from the inferior vena cava into the coronary sinus. A deflectable 5F bipolar electrode catheter with a 3 mm tip was used. RESULTS: A sudden increment in impedance indicative of coagulum formation was observed in two procedures. One patient developed a transient ischaemic complication after ablation of a left lateral accessory pathway by transseptal approach. This patient had mild pericardial effusion after the procedure. Moderate pericardial effusion was also noted in another patient. After a mean follow up of 18.4 months all patients are symptom free without treatment. CONCLUSIONS: Radiofrequency catheter ablation can be performed successfully in infants. Temperature monitoring in 5F ablation catheters would be desirable to prevent the development of coagulum. Echocardiography must be performed after the ablation procedure to investigate pericardial effusion. Images PMID:9326990

  12. Heparin Leakage in Central Venous Catheters by Hemodynamic Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbour, Michael; McGah, Patrick; Gow, Kenneth; Aliseda, Alberto

    2014-11-01

    Central venous catheters (CVCs), placed in the superior vena cava for hemodialysis, are routinely filled with heparin, an anticoagulant, while not in use to maintain patency and prevent thrombus formation at the catheter tip. However, the heparin-lock procedure places the patient at risk for systemic bleeding incidences, as heparin is known to leak into the blood stream. We propose that the driving mechanism behind heparin leakage is advective-diffusive transport due to the pulsatile blood flow surrounding the catheter tip. This novel hypothesis is based on Planar Laser Induced Fluorescence (PLIF) measurements of heparin transport from a CVC placed inside an in vitro pulsatile flow loop and validated with CFD simulations. The results show an initial, fast (<10s), advection-dominated phase that rapidly depletes the concentration of heparin at the CVC tip, followed by a slow, diffusion-limited phase inside the catheter lumen, where concentration is still high, that is insufficient at replenishing the lost heparin at the tip. These results, which estimate leakage rates consistent with published in vivo data, predict that the concentration of heparin at the catheter tip is effectively zero for the majority of the interdialytic phase, rendering the heparin lock ineffective.

  13. Electron impact excitation of Mg VIII . Collision strengths, transition probabilities and theoretical EUV and soft X-ray line intensities for Mg VIII

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grieve, M. F. R.; Ramsbottom, C. A.; Keenan, F. P.

    2013-08-01

    Context. Mg viii emission lines are observed in a range of astronomical objects such as the Sun, other cool stars and in the coronal line region of Seyfert galaxies. Under coronal conditions Mg viii emits strongly in the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) and soft X-ray spectral regions which makes it an ideal ion for plasma diagnostics. Aims: Two theoretical atomic models, consisting of 125 fine structure levels, are developed for the Mg viii ion. The 125 levels arise from the 2s22p, 2s2p2, 2p3, 2s23s, 2s23p, 2s23d, 2s2p3s, 2s2p3p, 2s2p3d, 2p23s, 2p23p and 2p23d configurations. Electron impact excitation collision strengths and radiative transition probabilities are calculated for both Mg viii models, compared with existing data, and the best model selected to generate a set of theoretical emission line intensities. The EUV lines, covering 312-790 Å, are compared with existing solar spectra (SERTS-89 and SUMER), while the soft X-ray transitions (69-97 Å) are examined for potential density diagnostic line ratios and also compared with the limited available solar and stellar observational data. Methods: The R-matrix codes Breit-Pauli RMATRXI and RMATRXII are utilised, along with the PSTGF code, to calculate the collision strengths for two Mg viii models. Collision strengths are averaged over a Maxwellian distribution to produce the corresponding effective collision strengths for use in astrophysical applications. Transition probabilities are also calculated using the CIV3 atomic structure code. The best data are then incorporated into the modelling code CLOUDY and line intensities generated for a range of electron temperatures and densities appropriate to solar and stellar coronal plasmas. Results: The present effective collision strengths are compared with two previous calculations. Good levels of agreement are found with the most recent, but there are large differences with the other for forbidden transitions. The resulting line intensities compare favourably with the

  14. Use of heparin-coated central venous lines to prevent catheter-related bloodstream infection.

    PubMed

    Abdelkefi, Abderrahman; Achour, Wafa; Ben Othman, Tarek; Ladeb, Saloua; Torjman, Lamia; Lakhal, Amel; Ben Hassen, Assia; Hsairi, Mohamed; Ben Abdeladhim, Abdeladhim

    2007-06-01

    Bloodstream infections related to the use of central venous catheters are an important cause of patient morbidity, mortality, and increased health care costs. Catheter-related infection may be due to fibrin deposition associated with catheters. Interventions designed to decrease fibrin deposition have the potential to reduce catheter-related infections. This study was a randomized, controlled trial in which 246 patients with nontunneled central venous catheters were randomly assigned to receive a heparin-coated catheter with 50 mL/d of normal saline solution as a continuous infusion (heparin-coated group) or a noncoated catheter with a continuous infusion of low-dose unfractionated heparin (control group: continuous infusion of 100 U/kg/d). Catheter-related bloodstream infection occurred in 2.5% (3/120 catheters) in the heparin-coated group (0.9 events per 1,000 days) and in 9.1% (11/120 catheters) in the control group (3.5 events per 1,000 days; P = 0.027). No other risk factors were found for the development of catheter-related bloodstream infection. Six and seven patients experienced severe bleeding in the heparin-coated and control groups, respectively (P = 1.00). We did not observe heparin-induced thrombocytopenia. The use of heparin-coated catheters can be a safe and effective approach to the prevention of catheter-related bloodstream infection in patients with hematooncologic disease. PMID:17624052

  15. Compatibility of electrolytically produced sodium hypochlorite solutions on long- term implanted dialysis catheters.

    PubMed

    Mishkin, G J

    2007-01-01

    More than 20% of the world's population use a catheter for dialysis, despite guidelines limiting their use. Although the structure and design of the catheters differ by manufacturer, the material used in central venous catheters and peritoneal dialysis catheters are the same across manufacturers. Given the long-term use of these catheters in the dialysis population, the good compatibility of the antiseptics and disinfectants used on the catheters is imperative to prevent failure and cracking of the catheter material. Tensile strengths of commercially available catheters were measured after exposure to commonly used disinfectants. The tensile strength was then compared between the catheters by analyzing the displacement vs. force (N) curves produced during the evaluation. A total of 44 catheter lumens were evaluated. The electrolytically produced sodium hypochlorite solution, Alcavis 50/ExSept Plus, was the only solution shown to be compatible with all three catheter materials resulting in a deviation of less than 10% for each of the different catheter types. Electrolytically produced sodium hypochlorite solutions were the only solutions in this study that did not alter the physical properties of any of the catheters after long-term exposure. PMID:17099302

  16. Comparison of outcomes between surgically placed and percutaneously placed peritoneal dialysis catheters: A retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Sivaramakrishnan, R.; Gupta, S.; Agarwal, S. K.; Bhowmik, D.; Mahajan, S.

    2016-01-01

    There is lack of adequate data on comparison of outcomes between percutaneously placed peritoneal dialysis (PD) catheters inserted by nephrologists and PD catheters placed by surgeons. The aim of this study is to retrospectively analyze the outcomes of PD catheters inserted by surgeons (by open surgical or laparoscopic technique) and compare them with those inserted by nephrologists among ESRD patients who underwent elective PD catheter insertions between January 2009 and December 2012. The primary outcome measure was the proportion of catheters removed because of primary nonfunction. The secondary outcome measures were catheter survival, patient survival, and incidence of complications of catheter insertion. A total of 143 PD catheter insertions (88 by surgeons and 55 by nephrologists) performed in 132 patients were considered for the analysis. The primary nonfunction rate of PD catheter insertions in both groups was comparable (18.2% and 7.3%, P = 0.08). Break-in period was shorter in Group N (p = <0.001). No differences were noted in patient or catheter survival. Percutaneously placed PD catheters performed by nephrologists have comparable outcomes with surgically placed PD catheters among selected cases and have the advantage of lower costs, avoidance of operation theater scheduling issues, smaller incision length, and shorter break-in period. Therefore, more nephrologists should acquire the expertise on percutaneous PD catheter placement as it leads to lesser waiting times and better utilization of PD. PMID:27512299

  17. Comparison of outcomes between surgically placed and percutaneously placed peritoneal dialysis catheters: A retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Sivaramakrishnan, R; Gupta, S; Agarwal, S K; Bhowmik, D; Mahajan, S

    2016-01-01

    There is lack of adequate data on comparison of outcomes between percutaneously placed peritoneal dialysis (PD) catheters inserted by nephrologists and PD catheters placed by surgeons. The aim of this study is to retrospectively analyze the outcomes of PD catheters inserted by surgeons (by open surgical or laparoscopic technique) and compare them with those inserted by nephrologists among ESRD patients who underwent elective PD catheter insertions between January 2009 and December 2012. The primary outcome measure was the proportion of catheters removed because of primary nonfunction. The secondary outcome measures were catheter survival, patient survival, and incidence of complications of catheter insertion. A total of 143 PD catheter insertions (88 by surgeons and 55 by nephrologists) performed in 132 patients were considered for the analysis. The primary nonfunction rate of PD catheter insertions in both groups was comparable (18.2% and 7.3%, P = 0.08). Break-in period was shorter in Group N (p = <0.001). No differences were noted in patient or catheter survival. Percutaneously placed PD catheters performed by nephrologists have comparable outcomes with surgically placed PD catheters among selected cases and have the advantage of lower costs, avoidance of operation theater scheduling issues, smaller incision length, and shorter break-in period. Therefore, more nephrologists should acquire the expertise on percutaneous PD catheter placement as it leads to lesser waiting times and better utilization of PD. PMID:27512299

  18. Analysis of mutations in the entire coding sequence of the factor VIII gene

    SciTech Connect

    Bidichadani, S.I.; Lanyon, W.G.; Connor, J.M.

    1994-09-01

    Hemophilia A is a common X-linked recessive disorder of bleeding caused by deleterious mutations in the gene for clotting factor VIII. The large size of the factor VIII gene, the high frequency of de novo mutations and its tissue-specific expression complicate the detection of mutations. We have used a combination of RT-PCR of ectopic factor VIII transcripts and genomic DNA-PCRs to amplify the entire essential sequence of the factor VIII gene. This is followed by chemical mismatch cleavage analysis and direct sequencing in order to facilitate a comprehensive search for mutations. We describe the characterization of nine potentially pathogenic mutations, six of which are novel. In each case, a correlation of the genotype with the observed phenotype is presented. In order to evaluate the pathogenicity of the five missense mutations detected, we have analyzed them for evolutionary sequence conservation and for their involvement of sequence motifs catalogued in the PROSITE database of protein sites and patterns.

  19. Photoelectric polarimetry of the tail of comet Ikey-Seki (1975 VIII)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinberg, J. L.; Beeson, D. E.

    1976-01-01

    Post-perihelion measurements of Comet 1965 VIII made on four nights in October-November 1965 using a Fabry photometer atop 3,052 m Mt. Haleakala, Hawaii are described. Detailed results of observations at 5300A on October 29, 1965 are presented.

  20. Thermal management for LLNL/UC/SSRL bending magnet beamline VIII at Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Berglin, E.J.; Younger, F.C.

    1986-05-01

    All the important heat loads on the elements of Beamline VIII are cataloged. The principal elements are identified and their heat loads tabulated for various loading scenarios. The expected heat loads are those from normal operations including the anticipated performance improvements planned for the SPEAR ring and from abnormal operations due to positional perturbations of the electron beam. (LEW)

  1. 25 CFR 36.23 - Standard VIII-Junior high/middle school instructional program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Standard VIII-Junior high/middle school instructional program. 36.23 Section 36.23 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR EDUCATION MINIMUM ACADEMIC STANDARDS FOR THE BASIC EDUCATION OF INDIAN CHILDREN AND NATIONAL CRITERIA FOR DORMITORY SITUATIONS Minimum Program of Instruction...

  2. Nurse Training. Title VIII--Public Health Service Act. The Complete Law.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1972

    To keep the nursing profession and other interested groups informed of the new provisions in nurse training legislation, this publication contains the complete text of Title VIII of the Public Health Service Act, as of November 18, 1971. Major provisions of the Act cover: (1) Grants for Expansion and Improvement of Nurse Training, (2) Assistance…

  3. SURVEY OF STRAWBERRY VIRUSES IN FRAGARIA X ANNANASA AND FRAGARIA CHILOENSIS IN THE VIII REGION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In April 2004, a survey was conducted of strawberry plants with symptoms in two areas (Los Angeles and Contulmo) of Chilean Region VIII. Three types of plantings were sampled: nurseries, commercial fields of Fragaria annanasa and commercial fields of Fragaria chiloensis. Nursery plants were sample...

  4. Visualizing the Life and Legacy of Henry VIII: Guiding Students with Eight Types of Graphic Organizers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallavan, Nancy P.; Kottler, Ellen

    2010-01-01

    Delving into the life and legacy of Henry VIII is both complex and captivating. People seem compelled to learn more abut his critical contributions and controversial conduct that range from the significant to the scandalous. Reflecting on the history of the world would be incomplete without investigating the events and escapades associated with…

  5. [Molecular biologic study and the factor VIII gene in hemophilia A].

    PubMed

    Bock, I; Melegh, B; Nagy, A; Losonczy, H; Csete, B; Schröder, W; Kardos, M; István, L; Jager, R; Tóth, A M; Tóth, A; Falko, H; Mózsik, G

    1996-11-17

    Results of inversion in the intron 22 region of the VIII factor gene studied by Southern blot are presented. Inversion was found in 20 of 46 patients. In 14 cases (70%) distal and in 6 cases (30%) proximal type of inversion was detected. The significance of the positive result in genetic counseling and in presymptomatic diagnosis of Haemophilia A is emphasized. PMID:9005386

  6. Challenges and Opportunities of Information Technology in the 90s. Track VIII: Managing Distributed Computing Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CAUSE, Boulder, CO.

    Six papers from the 1990 CAUSE Conference Track VIII: Managing Distributed Computing are presented. Authors discuss the challenges and opportunities involved in providing user managers with direct access to institutional databases to support their decision making and planning activities. Papers and their authors are as follows: "Rendering an…

  7. Exemplary Project Region VIII Workshop (Riverton, Wyoming, July 12-14, 1972).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lutz, Richard

    To discuss common problems and plan for their solution, this meeting of personnel from the Office of Education, the State Department of Education in Region VIII, and career Education Projects in the Rocky Mountain region was held. Specific goals included efforts to: (1) identify new approaches and alternatives in an effort to continue examplary…

  8. III-V nanowire growth mechanism: V/III ratio and temperature effects.

    PubMed

    Dayeh, Shadi A; Yu, Edward T; Wang, Deli

    2007-08-01

    We have studied the dependence of Au-assisted InAs nanowire (NW) growth on InAs(111)B substrates as a function of substrate temperature and input V/III precursor ratio using organometallic vapor-phase epitaxy. Temperature-dependent growth was observed within certain temperature windows that are highly dependent on input V/III ratios. This dependence was found to be a direct consequence of the drop in NW nucleation and growth rate with increasing V/III ratio at a constant growth temperature due to depletion of indium at the NW growth sites. The growth rate was found to be determined by the local V/III ratio, which is dependent on the input precursor flow rates, growth temperature, and substrate decomposition. These studies advance understanding of the key processes involved in III-V NW growth, support the general validity of the vapor-liquid-solid growth mechanism for III-V NWs, and improve rational control over their growth morphology. PMID:17608541

  9. 7 CFR 1901.203 - Title VIII of the Civil Rights Act of 1968.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 12 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Title VIII of the Civil Rights Act of 1968. 1901.203 Section 1901.203 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL HOUSING SERVICE, RURAL BUSINESS-COOPERATIVE SERVICE, RURAL UTILITIES SERVICE, AND FARM SERVICE AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PROGRAM...

  10. Evaluation of ESEA Title VIII Dropout Prevention Program, "Project KAPS," School Year 1970-71.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cutter, N. Craig; Jones, Earl R.

    The KAPS (or Keeping All Pupils in School) program was initiated by the Baltimore City Public Schools in 1969, using funds provided under Title VIII of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act. This evaluation deals with the academic year 1970-71, the second full year of the project's evaluation. Most important among the goals of Project KAPS is…

  11. Severe hypernatremia associated catheter malposition in an intensive care patient.

    PubMed

    Silahli, Musa; Gökdemir, Mahmut; Duman, Enes; Gökmen, Zeynel

    2016-09-01

    We present a catheter related severe hypernatremia in a 2-month-old baby who was admitted to the pediatric intensive care. Imbalance of plasma sodium is commonly seen in pediatric intensive care patients. The water and sodium balance is a complex process. Especially, brain and kidneys are the most important organs that affect the water and sodium balance. Other mechanisms of the cellular structure include osmoreceptors, Na-K ATPase systems, and vasopressin. Hypernatremia is usually an iatrogenic condition in hospitalized patients due to mismanagement of water electrolyte imbalance. Central venous catheterization is frequently used in pediatric intensive care patients. Complications of central venous catheter placement still continue despite the usage of ultrasound guidance. Malposition of central venous catheter in the brain veins should be kept in mind as a rare cause of iatrogenic hypernatremia. PMID:27555161

  12. The use of multiple intraosseous catheters in combat casualty resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Debjeet; Philbeck, Thomas

    2009-02-01

    During the current military engagements in Iraq and Afghanistan, establishing intravenous (IV) access for resuscitation of critically injured casualties remains a persistent challenge. Intraosseous (IO) access has emerged as a viable alternative in resuscitation. In this case report, a 19 year-old male soldier was severely wounded by a roadside bomb in Iraq. Given the heavy initial blood loss, anatomic location of the injuries and gross wound contamination, peripheral IV access could not be established. Instead, multiple IO catheters were used to initiate fluid resuscitation prior to transfer to a combat support hospital. To our knowledge, this is the first report of such extensive usage of IO catheters. Multiple IO catheters can be placed rapidly and safely and may help solve the challenge of establishing vascular access for resuscitation of critically injured casualties. PMID:19317188

  13. Best practice for indwelling catheter in the home setting.

    PubMed

    Emr, Kathleen; Ryan, Rosemary

    2004-12-01

    Although there is ample research-based evidence regarding indwelling urinary catheter management in acute and long-term care settings, there is limited home care information. This article describes how a home health agency, using available research and then extrapolating and applying it to home care, implemented a successful catheter management program.Hackensack University Medical Center Home Health Agency (HUMC) is among the largest certified home health agencies in New Jersey, providing community-based services to more than 10,000 patients annually. The present climate of limited fiscal and human resources necessitate an efficient and cost-effective use of all services to remain viable, including initiatives in urinary catheter management. PMID:15597002

  14. Novel catheter enabling simultaneous radiofrequency ablation and optical coherence reflectometry

    PubMed Central

    Herranz, D.; Lloret, Juan; Jiménez-Valero, Santiago; Rubio-Guivernau, J. L.; Margallo-Balbás, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    A novel radiofrequency ablation catheter has been developed with integrated custom designed optics, enabling real-time monitoring of radiofrequency ablation procedures through polarization-sensitive optical coherence reflectometry. The optics allow for proper tissue illumination through a view-port machined in the catheter tip, thus providing lesion depth control over the RF ablation treatment. The system was verified in an in-vitro model of swine myocardium. Optical performance and thermal stability was confirmed after more than 25 procedures, without any damage to the optical assembly induced by thermal stress or material degradation. The use of this catheter in RF ablation treatments may make possible to assess lesion depth during therapy, thus translating into a reduction of potential complications on the procedure. PMID:26417499

  15. The Hunter Pulmonary Angiography Catheter for a Brachiocephalic Vein Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Rosen, Galia Kowalik, Karen J.; Ganguli, Suverano; Hunter, David W.

    2006-12-15

    The purpose of this work was to describe our experience in performing pulmonary angiography using the Hunter pulmonary catheter, manufactured by Cook, Inc., which is a modified 6F pigtail catheter with a 'C-shaped' curve, designed for a brachiocephalic vein approach. One hundred twenty-three patients underwent pulmonary angiograms using the Hunter catheter between August 1997 and January 2002. Operator comments were gathered in 86 (70%) of the cases. The operator was, if possible, the most junior resident on the service. Thirty-nine operators participated in the survey. Efficacy, safety, and ease of use of the catheter were determined by operators' comments and ECG observations during the procedure. Corroborating clinical data were gathered from medical records. In 68 (79%) of the procedures that were commented upon, the operator described insertion into the pulmonary artery (PA) as easy; only 2 (2%) indicated difficulty in accessing the PA. In 41 (63%) of the bilateral angiograms that were commented upon, the operator described accessing the left PA from the right PA as easy; only 6 (9%) rated it as difficult and all were with an older technique in which the catheter was withdrawn to the pulmonary bifurcation without a wire or with only the soft tip of the wire in the pigtail and then rotated to the left main pulmonary artery. Thirty-one of the 41 patients who demonstrated premature ventricular contractions (PVCs) had a previous history of heart disease. Nineteen of the 39 patients who did not have PVCs had a history of heart disease (p = 0.018). The maneuverability and shape of the Hunter catheter make pulmonary angiography an easy procedure, even for operators with minimal experience and limited technical proficiency. PVCs demonstrated a statistically significant correlation with a positive patient history for cardiac disease, rather than being a universal risk.

  16. Central Venous Catheter Intravascular Malpositioning: Causes, Prevention, Diagnosis, and Correction

    PubMed Central

    Roldan, Carlos J.; Paniagua, Linda

    2015-01-01

    Despite the level of skill of the operator and the use of ultrasound guidance, central venous catheter (CVC) placement can result in CVC malpositioning, an unintended placement of the catheter tip in an inadequate vessel. CVC malpositioning is not a complication of central line insertion; however, undiagnosed CVC malpositioning can be associated with significant morbidity and mortality. The objectives of this review were to describe factors associated with intravascular malpositioning of CVCs inserted via the neck and chest and to offer ways of preventing, identifying, and correcting such malpositioning. A literature search of PubMed, Cochrane Library, and MD Consult was performed in June 2014. By searching for “Central line malposition” and then for “Central venous catheters intravascular malposition,” we found 178 articles written in English. Of those, we found that 39 were relevant to our objectives and included them in our review. According to those articles, intravascular CVC malpositioning is associated with the presence of congenital and acquired anatomical variants, catheter insertion in left thoracic venous system, inappropriate bevel orientation upon needle insertion, and patient’s body habitus variants. Although plain chest radiography is the standard imaging modality for confirming catheter tip location, signs and symptoms of CVC malpositioning even in presence of normal or inconclusive conventional radiography findings should prompt the use of additional diagnostic methods to confirm or rule out CVC malpositioning. With very few exceptions, the recommendation in cases of intravascular CVC malpositioning is to remove and relocate the catheter. Knowing the mechanisms of CVC malpositioning and how to prevent, identify, and correct CVC malpositioning could decrease harm to patients with this condition. PMID:26587087

  17. Lumbar Catheter Placement Using Paramedian Approach Under Fluoroscopic Guidance

    PubMed Central

    Qureshi, Adnan I.; Khan, Asif A.; Malik, Ahmed A.; Afzal, Mohammad Rauf; Herial, Nabeel A.; Qureshi, Mushtaq H.; Suri, M. Fareed K.

    2016-01-01

    Background Lumbar catheter placement under fluoroscopic guidance may reduce the rate of technical failures and associated complications seen with insertion guided by manually palpable landmarks. Methods We reviewed our experience with 43 attempted lumbar catheter placements using paramedian approach under fluoroscopic guidance and ascertained rates of technical success, and clinical events. Results Among the 43 patients, 18, 1, and 1 patients were on aspirin (with dipyrimadole in 2), clopidogrel, and combination of both, respectively. Lumbar catheter placement was successful in 42 of 43 attempted placements. Floroscopic guidance was critical in three patients; one patient had severe cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) depletion (empty thecal sac phenomenon) following pituitary surgery leading to no cerebrospinal fluid return despite correct placement confirmation under fluoroscopy. Two patients had spinal needle placement at the junction between epidural and cerebrospinal fluid spaces (junctional position) leading to cerebrospinal fluid return but inability to introduce the lumbar catheter. After confirmation of position by the injection of contrast or radiographic landmarks the needle was advanced by indenting the subcutaneous tissue or reinserting at a spinal level above the first insertion. The lumbar catheter remained in position over a mean period (±standard deviation) of 4.1(±2.3) days. Improvement in hydrocephalus was seen in two patients with intracranial mass lesions. One patient developed cerebrospinal fluid leakage through the insertion track following removal of catheter and required skin suturing at the site of insertion. Conclusions We observed a high technical success rate with low rate of complications even in patients with intracranial mass lesions, those on ongoing antiplatelet medications or in whom insertion would not be possible guided by manually palpable landmarks. PMID:26958156

  18. Motion compensation by registration-based catheter tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brost, Alexander; Wimmer, Andreas; Liao, Rui; Hornegger, Joachim; Strobel, Norbert

    2011-03-01

    The treatment of atrial fibrillation has gained increasing importance in the field of computer-aided interventions. State-of-the-art treatment involves the electrical isolation of the pulmonary veins attached to the left atrium under fluoroscopic X-ray image guidance. Due to the rather low soft-tissue contrast of X-ray fluoroscopy, the heart is difficult to see. To overcome this problem, overlay images from pre-operative 3-D volumetric data can be used to add anatomical detail. Unfortunately, these overlay images are static at the moment, i.e., they do not move with respiratory and cardiac motion. The lack of motion compensation may impair X-ray based catheter navigation, because the physician could potentially position catheters incorrectly. To improve overlay-based catheter navigation, we present a novel two stage approach for respiratory and cardiac motion compensation. First, a cascade of boosted classifiers is employed to segment a commonly used circumferential mapping catheter which is firmly fixed at the ostium of the pulmonary vein during ablation. Then, a 2-D/2-D model-based registration is applied to track the segmented mapping catheter. Our novel hybrid approach was evaluated on 10 clinical data sets consisting of 498 fluoroscopic monoplane frames. We obtained an average 2-D tracking error of 0.61 mm, with a minimum error of 0.26 mm and a maximum error of 1.62 mm. These results demonstrate that motion compensation using registration-based catheter tracking is both feasible and accurate. Using this approach, we can only estimate in-plane motion. Fortunately, compensating for this is often sufficient for EP procedures where the motion is governed by breathing.

  19. Nosocomial sepsis in neonates with single lumen vascular catheters.

    PubMed

    Bhandari, V; Eisenfeld, L; Lerer, T; Holman, M; Rowe, J

    1997-01-01

    Catheter-related sepsis is commonly encountered in the neonatal intensive care unit. We retrospectively studied infants with vascular catheters at 2 NICUs. Data were obtained from the computerised admission records available at both the hospitals. Our aims were to describe the clinical and microbial profile of nosocomial sepsis in infants with vascular catheters [umbilical artery (UA), umbilical venous (UV), central venous Broviac (CV), percutaneously placed central venous (PC), peripheral artery (PA)], and to determine the association between catheter type, duration and sepsis in a subset of the population. Nosocomial sepsis (positive blood culture after the 3rd postnatal day) occurred in 217 of 2091 (10.4%) infants. Infected infants, in contrast to non-infected, had a significantly (P < 0.001) greater number of multiple catheters (2.3 vs 1.4) had lower birth weights (1.2 vs 2.1 kg), were younger (28 vs 33 weeks) and had lower 1 and 5 minute Apgar scores (4.3 and 6.7 vs 5.5 and 7.4). The most common organism was coagulase negative Staphylococcus. In a subset population as analyses revealed, longer duration of UA use was associated with higher infection rates [13.6% with UA use for > or = 8 days vs 1.3% for < or = 7 days (P < 0.0001)]. PC use had a lower rate of sepsis than CV use (5.1% vs 15.2%; P < 0.05). Use of intravascular catheters should be balanced between the need for vascular access and the risk of sepsis. PMID:10771883

  20. [Catheter-related thrombosis during intravascular temperature management].

    PubMed

    Kerz, T; Beyer, C; Oswald, S; Moringlane, R

    2016-07-01

    We report on a case of catheter-related thrombosis after 7‑day catheter placement during intravascular temperature management (IVTM), in spite of the use of prophylactic anticoagulants. There were no clinical sequelae. According to the literature, occult thrombosis during ITVM could be more frequent than previously reported and dedicated monitoring for potential thrombosis may be indicated. However, a study comparing IVTM with surface cooling found no differences in clinical outcome. Therefore, n either of the methods can be recommended over the other. Further studies should evaluate the rate of occult thrombosis during the use of both cooling methods. PMID:27316589

  1. A retrospective study of central venous catheters GCRI experience

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Sachin A.; Shukla, Shilin N.; Talati, Shailesh S.; Parikh, Sonia K.; Bhatt, Shivani J.; Maka, Vinayak

    2013-01-01

    Background: The use of central venous catheters (CVCs) has greatly improved the quality-of-care in cancer patients, yet these catheters may cause serious infectious and thrombotic complications. The aim of this retrospective study was to study the various types of CVCs and their complications. Materials and Methods: We studied retrospectively 213 cases of CVCs in our institute with their indications, type and complications from August 2010 to July 2011. Results: A total of 213 CVCs were inserted in patients with hematological (62%) and solid organ malignancies (38%). Ninety-eight patients (46%) had peripheral inserted central catheter (PICC), 90 (42%) patients had Hickman catheters and 25 (12%) had a port. The median duration of retention of Hickman catheters was 104 days (3-365 days), for the peripherally inserted central catheters was 59 days (3-100 days) and for the port it was 280 days (45-365 days). Non-infective complications were more than infective (12% vs. 7%). The most common complication was non-infective occlusion and thrombophlebitis. In one patient with PICC thrombosis occurred in the cephalic, radial and ulnar vein and in one patient with port thrombosis occurred in the superior vena cava. Organisms were isolated in 60% (12 out of 20) of cultures. Common organisms isolated were Pseudomonas aeruginosa in 5 (42%), Staphylococcus aureus in 2 (16%), Escherichia coli in 2 (16%) and Aspergillus in 3 (25%) patients. 7 out of 12 infected patients had negative blood cultures within 7 days of antibiotic treatment, 5 patients remained positive for more than 7 days with antibiotics. In 155 patients (73%), the desired treatment protocol was completed and at present there are still 28 patients (13%) with catheters. 5 patients (2.3%) died of febrile neutropenia and septicemia with multi-organ failure. In 5 patients (2.3%), the catheters (1 Port, 1 Hickman and 3 PICC) were prematurely removed because of thrombosis. Conclusion: CVCs are better options to facilitate

  2. Conservative Management of Left Atrial Intramural Hematoma after Catheter Ablation

    PubMed Central

    Oraii, Saeed; Roshanali, Farideh; Ghorbanisharif, Alireza; Mikaeili, Javad; Tahraei, Mahmood

    2016-01-01

    Left atrial intramural hematoma is a very rare complication of radiofrequency ablation procedures. A patient with tachyarrhythmia underwent radiofrequency catheter ablation. Echocardiography performed the following morning showed a large mass in the left atrium, suggestive of intramural hematoma formation. The patient was in a stable condition; therefore, it was decided that follow-up should be conservative and her anticoagulation therapy was continued. The size of the hematoma decreased significantly over the following 50 days. This case highlights a rare complication of a complex catheter ablation procedure in the left atrium that was managed via a noninvasive approach, with which all interventionists should be familiar. PMID:27482270

  3. Sagittal vein thrombosis caused by central vein catheter.

    PubMed

    Sabzi, Feridoun; Karim, Hosein; Heydar Pour, Behzad; Faraji, Reza

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral venous thrombosis, including thrombosis of cerebral veins and major dural sinuses, is an uncommon disorder in the general population. However, it has a higher frequency among patients younger than 40 years of age, patients with thrombophilia, pregnant patients or those receiving hormonal contraceptive therapy or has foreign body such as catheter in their veins or arterial system. In this case report, we described clinical and radiological findings in a patient with protein C-S deficiency and malposition of central vein catheter. PMID:25796028

  4. Central Venous Catheter-related Fungemia Caused by Rhodotorula glutinis.

    PubMed

    Miglietta, Fabio; Letizia Faneschi, Maria; Braione, Adele; Palumbo, Claudio; Rizzo, Adriana; Lobreglio, Giambattista; Pizzolante, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Bloodstream infection due to Rhodotorula glutinis is extremely rare and mostly associated with underlying immunosuppression or cancer. Vascular access devices provide the necessary surfaces for biofilm formation and are currently responsible for a significant percentage of human infections. In this work, we describe a rare case of central venous catheter-related Rhodotorula glutinis fungemia in a female patient with acute myelogenous leukemia in remission. The timely removal of central venous catheter was an essential element for overcoming this CVC-related Rhodotorula fungemia. PMID:26329371

  5. VIII Olimpíada Brasileira de Astronomia e Astronáutica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia Canalle, João Batista; Villas da Rocha, Jaime Fernando; Wuensche de Souza, Carlos Alexandre; Pereira Ortiz, Roberto; Aguilera, Nuricel Villalonga; Padilha, Maria De Fátima Catta Preta; Pessoa Filho, José Bezerra; Soares Rodrigues, Ivette Maria

    2007-07-01

    Neste trabalho apresentamos as motivações pelas quais organizamos, em conjunto, pela primeira vez, a Olimpíada Brasileira de Astronomia incluindo a Astronáutica, em colaboração com a Agência Espacial Brasileira. Esta ampliação contribuiu para atrair ainda mais alunos, professores, escolas e patrocinadores para participarem desta Olimpíada. Em 2005 participaram da VIII Olimpíada Brasileira de Astronomia e Astronáutica (VIII OBA) 187.726 alunos distribuídos por 3.229 escolas, pertencentes a todos os estados brasileiros, incluindo o Distrito Federal. O crescimento em número de alunos participantes foi 52,4% maior do que em 2004. Em abril de 2005 organizamos, em Itapecerica da Serra, SP, um curso para os 50 alunos previamente selecionados e participantes da VII OBA e ao final selecionamos, dentre eles, uma equipe de 5 alunos, os quais representaram o Brasil na X Olimpíada Internacional de Astronomia, na China, em outubro de 2005. Ganhamos, pela primeira vez, uma medalha de ouro naquele evento. Em Agosto de 2005, organizamos a VIII Escola de Agosto para 50 alunos e respectivos professores, em Águas de Lindóia, SP, juntamente com a XXXI reunião anual da Sociedade Astronômica Brasileira (SAB). Em novembro de 2005 realizamos a I Jornada Espacial, em São José dos Campos, com 22 alunos e 22 professores selecionados dentre os participantes que melhores resultados obtiveram nas questões de Astronáutica da VIII OBA. Neste trabalho detalhamos os resultados da VIII OBA bem como as ações subseqüentes.

  6. [Indications and complications of central venous catheters in hematologic oncology: report of 81 cases].

    PubMed

    Abdelkefi, A; Ladeb, S; Ben Othman, T; Torjman, L; Jeddi, R; Ben Hassen, A; Ben Abdeladhim, A

    2000-11-01

    From february 1998 to july 1999, 81 central venous catheters were placed in 41 patients 28 years old (5 to 51 years). We used the subclavicular anatomic way (Aubaniac) in all cases. The total duration of catheter placement was 2905 days (median of 31 days, range 1 to 165 days). We observed 1 pneumothorax (1.2%), 3 venous thrombosis (3.7%) and 1 arterial puncture (1.2%). Catheter-related infections were seen in 8 catheters (2.7 per 1000 catheter-days). Candida was encountered in 4 cases (50%), Gram-positive cocci in 2 cases (25%), and Gram-negative bacilli in 2 cases (25%). The improvement of preventive ways, diagnosis techniques (simultaneous quantitative cultures, differential positivity time), and therapeutic methods (treatment without removal of the catheter, antibiotic lock technique, catheter exchange by guidewire) should allow a better treatment of catheter-related infections. PMID:11155387

  7. Central venous catheters for chemotherapy of solid tumors--our results in the last 5 years.

    PubMed

    Zganjer, Mirko; Cizmić, Ante; Butković, Diana; Matolić, Martina; Karaman-Ilić, Maja; Stepan, Jasminka

    2008-09-01

    Central venous catheters provide an easy access for intravenous medications. Having a central line in place will relieve a child from the discomfort and danger of multiple regular intravenous lines for chemotherapy. The use of indwelling central venous catheters has become commonplace in the management of children undergoing oncological treatment. There are two types of central lines commonly used. There are Broviac catheters and Port-A-Cath (PAC) catheters. In the last 5 years we inserted 194 catheters in 175 children. We inserted 121 Broviac catheters and 73 PAC catheters. During the follow up of 39382 catheter days 44 complications were observed. In Broviac group the median follow up was 155 days and in PAC group was 230 days. We observed differences in the incidence between two devices. In Broviac group infections were more frequent and in PAC group other complications were more frequent than infections. PMID:18982750

  8. Effect of plastic catheters on the phagocytic activity of human polymorphonuclear leukocytes.

    PubMed

    López-López, G; Pascual, A; Perea, E J

    1990-05-01

    The effect of five kinds of plastic catheters (polyvinyl chloride, Teflon, polyurethane, Vialon and siliconized latex) on the phagocytic and bactericidal function of human polymorphonuclear leukocytes was evaluated. In the presence of the polyvinyl chloride, Teflon and siliconized latex catheters, superoxide radical production by polymorphonuclear leukocytes was significantly inhibited. The effect of the siliconized latex catheter was presumably mediated by products eluted from the catheter into the medium, since the incubation of polymorphonuclear leukocytes in eluates obtained from the incubation of this catheter in buffer induced a similar inhibitory effect. This phenomenon was not observed with polyurethane or Vialon catheters. Neither the catheters evaluated nor their eluates affected the uptake of opsonized Staphylococcus aureus by human polymorphonuclear leukocytes. It is concluded that the polyvinyl chloride, Teflon and siliconized latex catheters used in this study could impair the respiratory burst of human polymorphonuclear leukocytes. PMID:2164932

  9. Adjacent central venous catheters can result in immediate aspiration of infused drugs during renal replacement therapy.

    PubMed

    Kam, K Y R; Mari, J M; Wigmore, T J

    2012-02-01

    Dual-lumen haemodiafiltration catheters enable continuous renal replacement therapy in the critically ill and are often co-located with central venous catheters used to infuse drugs. The extent to which infusions are immediately aspirated by an adjacent haemodiafiltration catheter remains unknown. A bench model was constructed to evaluate this effect. A central venous catheter and a haemodiafiltration catheter were inserted into a simulated central vein and flow generated using centrifugal pumps within the simulated vein and haemodiafiltration circuit. Ink was used as a visual tracer and creatinine solution as a quantifiable tracer. Tracers were completely aspirated by the haemodiafiltration catheter unless the infusion was at least 1 cm downstream to the arterial port. No tracer was aspirated from catheters infusing at least 2 cm downstream. Orientation of side ports did not affect tracer elimination. Co-location of central venous and haemodiafiltration catheters may lead to complete aspiration of infusions into the haemodiafilter with resultant drug under-dosing. PMID:22059378

  10. Balloon Dilatation for Removal of an Irretrievable Permanent Hemodialysis Catheter: The Safest Approach.

    PubMed

    Garcarek, Jerzy; Gołębiowski, Tomasz; Letachowicz, Krzysztof; Kusztal, Mariusz; Szymczak, Maciej; Madziarska, Katarzyna; Jakuszko, Katarzyna; Zmonarski, Sławomir; Guziński, Maciej; Weyde, Wacław; Klinger, Marian

    2016-05-01

    Long-term hemodialysis catheter dwell time in the central vein predisposes to fibrin sheath development, which subsequently causes catheter malfunction or occlusion. In very rare cases, the catheter can be overgrown with fibrin and rigidly connected with the vein or heart structures. This makes its removal almost impossible and dangerous because of the possibility of serious complications, namely vein and heart wall perforation, bleeding, or catheter abruption in deep tissues. We describe two cases in which standard retrieval of long-term catheters was not possible. Balloon dilatation of catheter lumens was successfully used to increase the catheter diameter with simultaneous tearing of the fibrin sheath surrounding it. This allowed the catheter to be set free safely. Based on this experience, we present recent literature and our point of view. PMID:26684390

  11. Research Instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The GENETI-SCANNER, newest product of Perceptive Scientific Instruments, Inc. (PSI), rapidly scans slides, locates, digitizes, measures and classifies specific objects and events in research and diagnostic applications. Founded by former NASA employees, PSI's primary product line is based on NASA image processing technology. The instruments karyotype - a process employed in analysis and classification of chromosomes - using a video camera mounted on a microscope. Images are digitized, enabling chromosome image enhancement. The system enables karyotyping to be done significantly faster, increasing productivity and lowering costs. Product is no longer being manufactured.

  12. Instrumented SSH

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, Scott; Campbell, Scott

    2009-05-27

    NERSC recently undertook a project to access and analyze Secure Shell (SSH) related data. This includes authentication data such as user names and key fingerprints, interactive session data such as keystrokes and responses, and information about noninteractive sessions such as commands executed and files transferred. Historically, this data has been inaccessible with traditional network monitoring techniques, but with a modification to the SSH daemon, this data can be passed directly to intrusion detection systems for analysis. The instrumented version of SSH is now running on all NERSC production systems. This paper describes the project, details about how SSH was instrumented, and the initial results of putting this in production.

  13. Geoscience instrumentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolff, E. A. (Editor); Mercanti, E. P.

    1974-01-01

    Geoscience instrumentation systems are considered along with questions of geoscience environment, signal processing, data processing, and design problems. Instrument platforms are examined, taking into account ground platforms, airborne platforms, ocean platforms, and space platforms. In situ and laboratory sensors described include acoustic wave sensors, age sensors, atmospheric constituent sensors, biological sensors, cloud particle sensors, electric field sensors, electromagnetic field sensors, precision geodetic sensors, gravity sensors, ground constituent sensors, horizon sensors, humidity sensors, ion and electron sensors, magnetic field sensors, tide sensors, and wind sensors. Remote sensors are discussed, giving attention to sensing techniques, acoustic echo-sounders, gamma ray sensors, optical sensors, radar sensors, and microwave radiometric sensors.

  14. Disconnection of chamber and catheter as a complication of central venous catheter type port-a-cath.

    PubMed

    Kostic, S; Kovcin, V; Granić, M; Jevdic, D; Stanisavljevic, N

    2011-12-01

    The use of a central vein catheter (CVC) type port-a-cath (VPS), apart from the comfort it provides to the patient undergoing chemotherapy, also carries certain complications. In this study, our patient was subjected to chemotherapy after a radical breast cancer operation and was given a CVC type VPS. After further care, a rare complication was verified--disconnection of the chamber and catheter, which one was visually identified in the right heart chamber. As the patient was vitally endangered, she was immediately hospitalized and the catheter was removed by catheterization of the right femoral vein, with scopic imaging. Early diagnosis and localization of the problem prevented more severe complications and mortality. PMID:20607455

  15. Neonatal PICC: one unit's six-year experience with limiting catheter complications.

    PubMed

    Corzine, Marie; Willett, Lynne D

    2010-01-01

    Safe dressing techniques for neonatal peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs) remain controversial in the literature. This article describes one unit's experience with the placement and management of 491 PICCs during a six-year period with more than 5,600 catheter days. The dressing technique described in this article differs from that seen in the literature with the addition of a protective base layer. Catheter complication rates are low, and catheter dressing changes are minimized with this dressing technique. PMID:20472533

  16. Reducing unnecessary urinary catheter use and other strategies to prevent catheter-associated urinary tract infection: an integrative review

    PubMed Central

    Meddings, Jennifer; Rogers, Mary A M; Krein, Sarah L; Fakih, Mohamad G; Olmsted, Russell N; Saint, Sanjay

    2014-01-01

    Background Catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CAUTI) are costly, common and often preventable by reducing unnecessary urinary catheter (UC) use. Methods To summarise interventions to reduce UC use and CAUTIs, we updated a prior systematic review (through October 2012), and a meta-analysis regarding interventions prompting UC removal by reminders or stop orders. A narrative review summarises other CAUTI prevention strategies including aseptic insertion, catheter maintenance, antimicrobial UCs, and bladder bundle implementation. Results 30 studies were identified and summarised with interventions to prompt removal of UCs, with potential for inclusion in the meta-analyses. By meta-analysis (11 studies), the rate of CAUTI (episodes per 1000 catheter-days) was reduced by 53% (rate ratio 0.47; 95% CI 0.30 to 0.64, p<0.001) using a reminder or stop order, with five studies also including interventions to decrease initial UC placement. The pooled (nine studies) standardised mean difference (SMD) in catheterisation duration (days) was −1.06 overall (p=0.065) including a statistically significant decrease in stop-order studies (SMD −0.37; p<0.001) but not in reminder studies (SMD, −1.54; p=0.071). No significant harm from catheter removal strategies is supported. Limited research is available regarding the impact of UC insertion and maintenance technique. A recent randomised controlled trial indicates antimicrobial catheters provide no significant benefit in preventing symptomatic CAUTIs. Conclusions UC reminders and stop orders appear to reduce CAUTI rates and should be used to improve patient safety. Several evidence-based guidelines have evaluated CAUTI preventive strategies as well as emerging evidence regarding intervention bundles. Implementation strategies are important because reducing UC use involves changing well-established habits. PMID:24077850

  17. Weather Instruments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brantley, L. Reed, Sr.; Demanche, Edna L.; Klemm, E. Barbara; Kyselka, Will; Phillips, Edwin A.; Pottenger, Francis M.; Yamamoto, Karen N.; Young, Donald B.

    This booklet presents some activities to measure various weather phenomena. Directions for constructing a weather station are included. Instruments including rain gauges, thermometers, wind vanes, wind speed devices, humidity devices, barometers, atmospheric observations, a dustfall jar, sticky-tape can, detection of gases in the air, and pH of…

  18. RHIC instrumentation

    SciTech Connect

    Shea, T. J.; Witkover, R. L.

    1998-12-10

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) consists of two 3.8 km circumference rings utilizing 396 superconducting dipoles and 492 superconducting quadrupoles. Each ring will accelerate approximately 60 bunches of 10{sup 11} protons to 250 GeV, or 10{sup 9} fully stripped gold ions to 100 GeV/nucleon. Commissioning is scheduled for early 1999 with detectors for some of the 6 intersection regions scheduled for initial operation later in the year. The injection line instrumentation includes: 52 beam position monitor (BPM) channels, 56 beam loss monitor (BLM) channels, 5 fast integrating current transformers and 12 video beam profile monitors. The collider ring instrumentation includes: 667 BPM channels, 400 BLM channels, wall current monitors, DC current transformers, ionization profile monitors (IPMs), transverse feedback systems, and resonant Schottky monitors. The use of superconducting magnets affected the beam instrumentation design. The BPM electrodes must function in a cryogenic environment and the BLM system must prevent magnet quenches from either fast or slow losses with widely different rates. RHIC is the first superconducting accelerator to cross transition, requiring close monitoring of beam parameters at this time. High space-charge due to the fully stripped gold ions required the IPM to collect magnetically guided electrons rather than the conventional ions. Since polarized beams will also be accelerated in RHIC, additional constraints were put on the instrumentation. The orbit must be well controlled to minimize depolarizing resonance strengths. Also, the position monitors must accommodate large orbit displacements within the Siberian snakes and spin rotators. The design of the instrumentation will be presented along with results obtained during bench tests, the injection line commissioning, and the first sextant test.

  19. RHIC instrumentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shea, T. J.; Witkover, R. L.

    1998-12-01

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) consists of two 3.8 km circumference rings utilizing 396 superconducting dipoles and 492 superconducting quadrupoles. Each ring will accelerate approximately 60 bunches of 1011 protons to 250 GeV, or 109 fully stripped gold ions to 100 GeV/nucleon. Commissioning is scheduled for early 1999 with detectors for some of the 6 intersection regions scheduled for initial operation later in the year. The injection line instrumentation includes: 52 beam position monitor (BPM) channels, 56 beam loss monitor (BLM) channels, 5 fast integrating current transformers and 12 video beam profile monitors. The collider ring instrumentation includes: 667 BPM channels, 400 BLM channels, wall current monitors, DC current transformers, ionization profile monitors (IPMs), transverse feedback systems, and resonant Schottky monitors. The use of superconducting magnets affected the beam instrumentation design. The BPM electrodes must function in a cryogenic environment and the BLM system must prevent magnet quenches from either fast or slow losses with widely different rates. RHIC is the first superconducting accelerator to cross transition, requiring close monitoring of beam parameters at this time. High space-charge due to the fully stripped gold ions required the IPM to collect magnetically guided electrons rather than the conventional ions. Since polarized beams will also be accelerated in RHIC, additional constraints were put on the instrumentation. The orbit must be well controlled to minimize depolarizing resonance strengths. Also, the position monitors must accommodate large orbit displacements within the Siberian snakes and spin rotators. The design of the instrumentation will be presented along with results obtained during bench tests, the injection line commissioning, and the first sextant test.

  20. RHIC instrumentation

    SciTech Connect

    Shea, T.J.; Witkover, R.L.

    1998-12-01

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) consists of two 3.8 km circumference rings utilizing 396 superconducting dipoles and 492 superconducting quadrupoles. Each ring will accelerate approximately 60 bunches of 10{sup 11} protons to 250 GeV, or 10{sup 9} fully stripped gold ions to 100 GeV/nucleon. Commissioning is scheduled for early 1999 with detectors for some of the 6 intersection regions scheduled for initial operation later in the year. The injection line instrumentation includes: 52 beam position monitor (BPM) channels, 56 beam loss monitor (BLM) channels, 5 fast integrating current transformers and 12 video beam profile monitors. The collider ring instrumentation includes: 667 BPM channels, 400 BLM channels, wall current monitors, DC current transformers, ionization profile monitors (IPMs), transverse feedback systems, and resonant Schottky monitors. The use of superconducting magnets affected the beam instrumentation design. The BPM electrodes must function in a cryogenic environment and the BLM system must prevent magnet quenches from either fast or slow losses with widely different rates. RHIC is the first superconducting accelerator to cross transition, requiring close monitoring of beam parameters at this time. High space-charge due to the fully stripped gold ions required the IPM to collect magnetically guided electrons rather than the conventional ions. Since polarized beams will also be accelerated in RHIC, additional constraints were put on the instrumentation. The orbit must be well controlled to minimize depolarizing resonance strengths. Also, the position monitors must accommodate large orbit displacements within the Siberian snakes and spin rotators. The design of the instrumentation will be presented along with results obtained during bench tests, the injection line commissioning, and the first sextant test. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  1. Thrombolytic Therapy Using Urokinase for Management of Central Venous Catheter Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Son, Jung Tack; Min, Sun Young; Kim, Jae Il; Choi, Pyong Wha; Heo, Tae Gil; Lee, Myung Soo; Kim, Chul-Nam; Kim, Hong-Yong; Yi, Seong Yoon; Lee, Hye Ran; Roh, Young-Nam

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The management of central venous catheters (CVCs) and catheter thrombosis vary among centers, and the efficacy of the methods of management of catheter thrombosis in CVCs is rarely reported. We investigated the efficacy of bedside thrombolysis with urokinase for the management of catheter thrombosis. Materials and Methods: We retrospectively reviewed data from patients who had undergone CVC insertion by a single surgeon in a single center between April 2012 and June 2014. We used a protocol for the management of CVCs and when catheter thrombosis was confirmed, 5,000 U urokinase was infused into the catheter. Results: A total of 137 CVCs were inserted in 126 patients. The most common catheter-related complication was thrombosis (12, 8.8%) followed by infection (8, 5.8%). Nine of the 12 patients (75%) with catheter thrombosis were recanalized successfully with urokinase. The rate of CVC recanalization was higher in the peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC) group (87.5%) than the chemoport group (50%). Reintervention for catheter-related thrombosis was needed in only 2.2% of patients when thrombolytic therapy using urokinase was applied. Age <60 years (P=0.035), PICC group (P=0.037) and location of the catheter tip above the superior vena cava (P=0.044) were confirmed as independent risk factors for catheter thrombosis. Conclusion: Thrombolysis therapy using urokinase could successfully manage CVC thrombosis. Reintervention was rarely needed when a protocol using urokinase was applied for the management of CVC thromboses. PMID:26217634

  2. Clinical biodurability of aliphatic polyether based polyurethanes as peritoneal dialysis catheters.

    PubMed

    Crabtree, John H

    2003-01-01

    Thermoplastic polyurethane elastomers are the most important implantable grade polyurethanes in medical applications. An aliphatic polyether based polyurethane, Tecoflex (TF; Thermedics, Inc., Woburn, MA), is used in the construction of a proprietary peritoneal dialysis (PD) catheter. Information is limited regarding the biostability of the TF polymer in the clinical environment as a PD catheter. This report presents the clinical experience regarding the biodurability of 104 catheter implants. The extracorporeal tubing segments of all TF catheters eventually developed aesthetically offensive discoloration, opaqueness, and surface tackiness. Catheter breaks in the external segment occurred in 27% of devices that survived longer than 28 months. Mupirocin ointment at the catheter skin exit site caused swelling and deformity of the TF in one case. Three catheters extruded as a result of Dacron cuffs separating from the tubing wall. Catheters removed for other reasons were frequently found to have loose cuffs, especially if the devices were implanted for several years. Causes and possible mechanisms for observed failures are discussed. The durability of biomaterials used in construction of PD catheters is of vital importance for successful long-term functioning. The TF polymer embodied as a PD catheter represents a mismatch of the material and its mission. Fabrication of PD catheters from higher grade polyurethanes possessing greater biostability should be explored. Silicone rubber appears to remain the most durable material to date for PD catheter construction. PMID:12790378

  3. Use of an alteplase algorithm for the management of hemodialysis catheter dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Abdelmoneim, Ahmed S; Miller, Lisa M; Armstrong, Sean; Sood, Manish M; Wazny, Lori; Chateau, Dan; Vercaigne, Lavern M

    2012-04-01

    Hemodialysis (HD) catheter dysfunction compromises HD adequacy and increases the cost of patient care. Repeated administration of alteplase in HD catheters typically produces only short-term benefits. The purpose of this study was to design, implement, and evaluate the efficacy of an experimental alteplase algorithm to manage HD catheter dysfunction. This was a two-part prospective nonrandomized study. Baseline data of alteplase use and catheter exchange were collected during part 1 of the study. Part 2 consisted of the alteplase algorithm implementation and repeat collection of catheter data. Rates of alteplase use and catheter exchange per 1000 catheter-days were the primary and secondary outcomes of the study. One hundred and seventy-two catheters in 131 patients were followed prospectively during the course of the study. The adjusted relative rate (RR) of alteplase use showed no significant difference between both parts of the study, adjusted RR: 1.10, 95% confidence interval (CI) (0.73-1.65). Similarly, catheter exchange rates were not significantly different over the duration of the study (1.12 vs. 1.03 per 1000 catheter-days). However, waiting time for catheter exchange increased from 20.36 ± 14 days in part 1 to 38.42 ± 28 days in part 2 (P < 0.05). The alteplase algorithm did not significantly reduce alteplase use. This may be partially explained by repeated use of alteplase in part 2, due to longer waiting times for catheter exchange procedures. PMID:22098698

  4. Successful Management of Atrio-Esophageal Fistula after Cardiac Radiofrequency Catheter Ablation

    PubMed Central

    Shim, Hun Bo; Kim, Chilsung; Kim, Hong-Kwan

    2013-01-01

    An increase in cardiac radiofrequency catheter ablation for treating refractory atrial fibrillation has resulted in an increased prevalence of complications. Among numerous complications of radiofrequency catheter ablation, atrio-esophageal fistula, although rare, is known to have fatal results. We report a case of successful management of an atrio-esophageal fistula as a complication of cardiac radiofrequency catheter ablation. PMID:23614102

  5. Efficacy of dicloxacillin-coated polyurethane catheters in preventing subcutaneous Staphylococcus aureus infection in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Sherertz, R J; Forman, D M; Solomon, D D

    1989-01-01

    In a mouse model, dicloxacillin-coated polyurethane catheters or control (uncoated) catheters were placed subcutaneously and then Staphylococcus aureus was inoculated at the time of insertion, 24 or 48 h later. The in vivo half-life of the antibiotic was 11 to 16 h. When 10(5) CFU of S. aureus were inoculated at the time of catheter insertion, dicloxacillin-coated catheters kept the number of S. aureus removed from catheters by sonication below 10(2) CFU at 12, 24, 48, and 96 h after inoculation compared with titers greater than 10(3.5) CFU for control catheters (P less than 0.05). When S. aureus was inoculated 24 h after catheter insertion, control catheters averaged greater than 10(2) CFU of S. aureus removed compared with less than 10(1.5) CFU for the dicloxacillin-coated catheters (P less than 0.05). No difference was found between coated and control catheters when S. aureus was inoculated 48 h after catheter insertion, but S. aureus titers averaged less than 10(2) CFU for all experimental groups. Our data suggest that in mice, regional prophylaxis of S. aureus subcutaneous space infection is feasible with catheters coated with dicloxacillin and that the presence of antibiotic is only necessary for the first 24 to 48 h. PMID:2802545

  6. The Michigan Appropriateness Guide for Intravenous Catheters (MAGIC) initiative: A summary and review of peripherally inserted central catheter and venous catheter appropriate use.

    PubMed

    Woller, Scott C; Stevens, Scott M; Evans, R Scott

    2016-04-01

    Peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs) are being selected for venous access more frequently today than ever before. Often the choice of a PICC, when compared with other vascular access devices (VADs), is attractive because of perceived safety, availability, and ease of insertion. However, complications associated with PICCs exist, and there is a paucity of evidence to guide clinician choice for PICC selection and valid use. An international panel with expertise in the arena of venous access and populations associated with these devices was convened to clarify approaches for the optimal use of PICCs and VADs. Here we present for the busy hospital-based practitioner the methodology, key outcomes, and recommendations of the Michigan Appropriateness Guide for Intravenous Catheters (MAGIC) panelists for the appropriate use of VADs. Journal of Hospital Medicine 2016;11:306-310. © 2015 Society of Hospital Medicine. PMID:26662622

  7. Excimer laser lead extraction catheter with increased laser parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coe, M. Sean; Taylor, Kevin D.; Lippincott, Rebecca A.; Sorokoumov, Oleg; Papaioannou, Thanassis

    2001-05-01

    A fiber optic catheter connected to a pulsed excimer laser (308 nm) is currently used to extract chronically implanted pacemaker and defibrillator leads at Fluence of 60 mJ/mm2 and repetition rate of 40 Hz. The object of this study was to determine the effect of higher repetition rates (80 Hz) in the catheter's cutting performance. The penetration rate (micrometers /sec), and the associated mechanical and thermal effects were measured in soft (porcine myocardium) and hard tissue (bovine tendon) at 60 mJ/mm2-80 Hz, and were compared to the corresponding values at commercially available laser parameters (60 mJ/mm2-40 Hz). Ablation rates were measured with perforation experiments and the extent of thermal and mechanical damage was measured under polarized light microscopy. For hard (soft) tissue, the laser catheter demonstrated penetration speed of 106 +/- 32 (302 +/- 101) micrometers /sec at 40 Hz and 343 +/- 120 (830 +/- 364) micrometers /sec at 80 Hz. Maximum extent of thermal effects at 40 Hz and 80 Hz was 114 +/- 35 micrometers (72 +/- 18) and 233 +/- 63 micrometers (71 +/- 16) respectively. Maximum extent of mechanical effects at 40 Hz and 80 Hz was 188 +/- 63 micrometers (590 +/- 237) and 386 +/- 100 micrometers (767 +/- 160) respectively. In vitro testing of the laser catheter with 80 Hz laser parameters has demonstrated increased penetration speed in both soft and hard fibrous tissue, while maintaining associated thermal and mechanical effects within limited ranges.

  8. Multifiber excimer laser catheter design strategies for various medical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verdaasdonck, Rudolf M.; van Swol, Christiaan F. P.; van Leeuwen, Ton G. J. M.; Tulleken, Cees A. F.; Boon, Tom A.

    1994-07-01

    For the XeCl Excimer laser (308 nm, 115 ns), special design multifiber laser catheters were developed and theoretically as well as experimentally evaluated. Monte Carlo simulations showed that the penetration depth of 308 nm XeCl excimer light varied from 50 to 200 micrometers for fiber diameters from 50 to 550 micrometers and larger. Tissue ablation is expected to be restricted to this irradiated area. In order to ablate larger tissue areas, a flexible bundle of fibers is used introducing gaps in the irradiance distribution due to dead space in between the individual fibers. Multifiber catheters were developed for a unique neurosurgery bypass procedure and for urethra stricture surgery. Real-time, close-up, high speed video imaging showed that tissue ablation mechanism of these catheters is predominately governed by explosive short-life vapor bubbles fragmenting the tissue to small particles. In order to temper the ablation process, laser energy was delivered in 8 pulses divided over 8 sectors of a multifiber catheter (multiplexing), keeping the same fluence instead of one pulse addressing all the fibers at once.

  9. Technique of pulmonary vein isolation by catheter ablation

    PubMed Central

    Wittkampf, F.H.M.; Derksen, R.; Wever, E.F.D.; Simmers, T.A.; Boersma, L.V.A.; Vonken, E.P.A.; Velthuis, B.K.; Sreeram, N.; Rensing, B.J.; Cramer, M.J.

    2002-01-01

    In selected patients with atrial fibrillation, the fibrillation episodes may be initiated by single or short bursts of ectopy often originating from one or more pulmonary veins (PVs). Therefore, electrical isolation of these veins by catheter ablation is currently being explored as a treatment modality for patients with paroxysmal and even more permanent types of atrial fibrillation. At present, two different techniques are used: 1) selective ablation of electrical connections between left atrium and myocardial sleeves inside the PVs; and 2) contiguous encircling lesions around and outside the PV ostia. With both techniques, moderate to high success rates have been reported with a limited follow-up duration. Both types of procedure are very complex and require a highly skilful team. With the variable anatomy of the PVs, non-invasively acquired angiographic images may serve as a roadmap for catheter manipulation. Modern three-dimensional catheter navigation techniques can be applied to facilitate accurate catheter positioning with limited fluoroscopic exposure. Experimental and clinical research is needed to define patient selection criteria. ImagesFigure 2Figures 3 and 4Figure 5 PMID:25696100

  10. 21 CFR 870.1350 - Catheter balloon repair kit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... effect the repair or replacement. (b) Classification. Class III (premarket approval). (c) Date PMA or notice of completion of a PDP is required. A PMA or notice of completion of a PDP is required to be filed... distribution before May 28, 1976. Any other catheter balloon repair kit shall have an approved PMA or...

  11. 21 CFR 870.1350 - Catheter balloon repair kit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... effect the repair or replacement. (b) Classification. Class III (premarket approval). (c) Date PMA or notice of completion of a PDP is required. A PMA or notice of completion of a PDP is required to be filed... distribution before May 28, 1976. Any other catheter balloon repair kit shall have an approved PMA or...

  12. Pneumothorax as a complication of central venous catheter insertion

    PubMed Central

    Tsotsolis, Nikolaos; Tsirgogianni, Katerina; Kioumis, Ioannis; Pitsiou, Georgia; Baka, Sofia; Papaiwannou, Antonis; Karavergou, Anastasia; Rapti, Aggeliki; Trakada, Georgia; Katsikogiannis, Nikolaos; Tsakiridis, Kosmas; Karapantzos, Ilias; Karapantzou, Chrysanthi; Barbetakis, Nikos; Zissimopoulos, Athanasios; Kuhajda, Ivan; Andjelkovic, Dejan; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos

    2015-01-01

    The central venous catheter (CVC) is a catheter placed into a large vein in the neck [internal jugular vein (IJV)], chest (subclavian vein or axillary vein) or groin (femoral vein). There are several situations that require the insertion of a CVC mainly to administer medications or fluids, obtain blood tests (specifically the “central venous oxygen saturation”), and measure central venous pressure. CVC usually remain in place for a longer period of time than other venous access devices. There are situations according to the drug administration or length of stay of the catheter that specific systems are indicated such as; a Hickman line, a peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC) line or a Port-a-Cath may be considered because of their smaller infection risk. Sterile technique is highly important here, as a line may serve as a port of entry for pathogenic organisms, and the line itself may become infected with organisms such as Staphylococcus aureus and coagulase-negative Staphylococci. In the current review we will present the complication of pneumothorax after CVC insertion. PMID:25815301

  13. 21 CFR 870.1230 - Fiberoptic oximeter catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ....1230 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... saturation of the blood. It consists of two fiberoptic bundles that conduct light at a desired wavelength through blood and detect the reflected and scattered light at the distal end of the catheter....

  14. 21 CFR 876.4020 - Fiberoptic light ureteral catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Fiberoptic light ureteral catheter. 876.4020 Section 876.4020 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 876.4020 Fiberoptic...

  15. Pneumothorax as a complication of central venous catheter insertion.

    PubMed

    Tsotsolis, Nikolaos; Tsirgogianni, Katerina; Kioumis, Ioannis; Pitsiou, Georgia; Baka, Sofia; Papaiwannou, Antonis; Karavergou, Anastasia; Rapti, Aggeliki; Trakada, Georgia; Katsikogiannis, Nikolaos; Tsakiridis, Kosmas; Karapantzos, Ilias; Karapantzou, Chrysanthi; Barbetakis, Nikos; Zissimopoulos, Athanasios; Kuhajda, Ivan; Andjelkovic, Dejan; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos; Zarogoulidis, Paul

    2015-03-01

    The central venous catheter (CVC) is a catheter placed into a large vein in the neck [internal jugular vein (IJV)], chest (subclavian vein or axillary vein) or groin (femoral vein). There are several situations that require the insertion of a CVC mainly to administer medications or fluids, obtain blood tests (specifically the "central venous oxygen saturation"), and measure central venous pressure. CVC usually remain in place for a longer period of time than other venous access devices. There are situations according to the drug administration or length of stay of the catheter that specific systems are indicated such as; a Hickman line, a peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC) line or a Port-a-Cath may be considered because of their smaller infection risk. Sterile technique is highly important here, as a line may serve as a port of entry for pathogenic organisms, and the line itself may become infected with organisms such as Staphylococcus aureus and coagulase-negative Staphylococci. In the current review we will present the complication of pneumothorax after CVC insertion. PMID:25815301

  16. Enhanced photocoagulation with catheter-based diffusing optical device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Hyun Wook; Kim, Jeehyun; Oh, Jungwhan

    2012-11-01

    A novel balloon catheter-based diffusing optical device was designed and evaluated to assist in treating excessive menstrual bleeding. A synthetic fused-silica fiber was micro-machined precisely to create scattering segments on a 25 mm long fiber tip for uniform light distribution. A visible wavelength (λ=532 nm) was used to specifically target the endometrium due to the high vascularity of the uterine wall. Optical simulation presented 30% wider distribution of photons along with approximately 40% higher irradiance induced by addition of a glass cap to the diffuser tip. Incorporation of the optical diffuser with a polyurethane balloon catheter considerably enhanced coagulation depth and area (i.e., 3.5 mm and 18.9 cm2 at 1 min irradiation) in tissue in vitro. The prototype device demonstrated the coagulation necrosis of 2.8±1.2 mm (n=18) and no thermal damage to myometrium in in vivo caprine models. A prototype 5 cm long balloon catheter-assisted optical diffuser was also evaluated with a cadaveric human uterus to confirm the coagulative response of the uterine tissue as well as to identify the further design improvement and clinical applicability. The proposed catheter-based diffusing optical device can be a feasible therapeutic tool to photocoagulate endometrial cell layers in an efficient and safe manner.

  17. 21 CFR 876.5030 - Continent ileostomy catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Continent ileostomy catheter. 876.5030 Section 876.5030 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 876.5030 Continent...

  18. 21 CFR 876.5010 - Biliary catheter and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Biliary catheter and accessories. 876.5010 Section 876.5010 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 876.5010 Biliary...

  19. 21 CFR 876.5130 - Urological catheter and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Urological catheter and accessories. 876.5130 Section 876.5130 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 876.5130...

  20. Complications of indwelling pleural catheter use and their management

    PubMed Central

    Lui, Macy M S; Thomas, Rajesh; Lee, Y C Gary

    2016-01-01

    The growing utilisation of indwelling pleural catheters (IPCs) has put forward a new era in the management of recurrent symptomatic pleural effusions. IPC use is safe compared to talc pleurodesis, though complications can occur. Pleural infection affects <5% of patients, and is usually responsive to antibiotic treatment without requiring catheter removal or surgery. Pleural loculations develop over time, limiting drainage in 10% of patients, which can be improved with intrapleural fibrinolytic therapy. Catheter tract metastasis can occur with most tumours but is more common in mesothelioma. The metastases usually respond to analgaesics and/or external radiotherapy. Long-term intermittent drainage of exudative effusions or chylothorax can potentially lead to loss of nutrients, though no data exist on any clinical impact. Fibrin clots within the catheter lumen can result in blockage. Chest pain following IPC insertion is often mild, and adjustments in analgaesics and drainage practice are usually all that are required. As clinical experience with the use of IPC accumulates, the profile and natural course of complications are increasingly described. We aim to summarise the available literature on IPC-related complications and the evidence to support specific strategies. PMID:26870384

  1. 6DoF catheter detection, application to intracardiac echocardiography.

    PubMed

    Ralovich, Kristóf; John, Matthias; Camus, Estelle; Navab, Nassir; Heimann, Tobias

    2014-01-01

    Hybrid imaging systems, consisting of fluoroscopy and echocardiography, are increasingly selected for intra-operative support of minimally invasive cardiac interventions. Intracardiac echocardiograpy (ICE) is an emerging modality with the promise of removing sedation or general anesthesia associated with transesophageal echocardiography (TEE). We introduce a novel 6 degrees of freedom (DoF) pose estimation approach for catheters (equipped with radiopaque ball markers) in single X-Ray fluoroscopy projection and investigate the method's application to a prototype ICE catheter. Machine learning based catheter detection is implemented in a Bayesian hypothesis fusion framework, followed by refinement of ball marker locations through template matching. Marker correspondence and 3D pose estimation are solved through iterative optimization. The method registers the ICE volume to the C-arm coordinate system. Experiments are performed on synthetic and porcine in-vivo data. Target registration error (TRE), defined in the echo cone, is the basis of our preliminary evaluation. The method reached 8.06 ± 7.2 mm TRE on 703 cases. Potential uses of our hybrid system include structural heart disease interventions and electrophysiologycal mapping or catheter ablation procedures. PMID:25485433

  2. Peritoneo-vulvar catheter extrusion after shunt operation.

    PubMed

    Nagulic, M; Djordjevic, M; Samardzic, M

    1996-04-01

    We report an unusual case of catheter extrusion through the external genitalia. between the labium majus and the labium minus, in a 6-month-old hydrocephalic baby. The event occurred 5 months after placement of a ventriculoperitoneal shunt. PMID:8739410

  3. Catheter-tip force transducer for cardiovascular research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feldstein, C.; Lewis, G. W.; Silver, R. H.; Culler, V. H.

    1975-01-01

    Sensor can be installed in left ventricle by means of procedures available for inserting catheter into an artery at body's extremities and manipulating it through vessel and past aortic valve. Metallic tines of device can be used as internal electrode for electrocardiogram.

  4. Central venous catheter-related Corynebacterium minutissimum bacteremia.

    PubMed

    Rupp, M E; Stiles, K G; Tarantolo, S; Goering, R V

    1998-10-01

    Although Corynebacterium minutissimum is well-known as the cause of erythrasma, it is noted as the etiologic agent of nondermatologic disease only rarely. We document this organism as a cause of central venous catheter-associated bacteremia and report the use of pulsed-field gel electrophoresis to characterize its molecular epidemiology. PMID:9801290

  5. 21 CFR 876.5010 - Biliary catheter and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Biliary catheter and accessories. 876.5010 Section 876.5010 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 876.5010 Biliary...

  6. 21 CFR 876.5130 - Urological catheter and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Urological catheter and accessories. 876.5130 Section 876.5130 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 876.5130...

  7. 21 CFR 876.5030 - Continent ileostomy catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Continent ileostomy catheter. 876.5030 Section 876.5030 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 876.5030 Continent...

  8. Intraperitoneal catheter placement for pharmacological imaging studies in conscious mice

    PubMed Central

    Boudreau, Eilis; Chen, Gang; Li, Xin; Buck, Kari; Hitzemann, Robert; Hickman, Debra

    2016-01-01

    Imaging studies that use rodents sometimes involve intraperitoneal administration of pharmacological compounds. To facilitate such studies, the authors developed a simple and easily mastered technique for placing an intraperitoneal catheter in a conscious mouse. This technique eliminates the need to remove the animal from the scanner to administer a drug through the intraperitoneal route. PMID:20023678

  9. 21 CFR 870.1230 - Fiberoptic oximeter catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ....1230 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... saturation of the blood. It consists of two fiberoptic bundles that conduct light at a desired wavelength through blood and detect the reflected and scattered light at the distal end of the catheter....

  10. Fiber photo-catheters for laser treatment of atrial fibrillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peshko, Igor; Rubtsov, Vladimir; Vesselov, Leonid; Sigal, Gennady; Laks, Hillel

    2007-04-01

    A fiber photo-catheter has been developed for surgical treatment of atrial fibrillation with laser radiation. Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a heart rhythm abnormality, which involves irregular and rapid heartbeats. Recent studies demonstrate the superiority of treating AF disease with optical radiation of the near-infrared region. To produce long continuous transmural lesions, solid-state lasers and laser diodes, along with end-emitting fiber catheters, have been used experimentally. The absence of side-emitting flexible catheters with the ability to produce long continuous lesions limits the further development of this technology. In this research, a prototype of an optical catheter, consisting of a flexible 10-cm fiber diffuser has been used to make continuous photocoagulation lesions for effective maze procedure treatments. The system also includes a flexible optical reflector, a series of openings for rapid self-attachment to the tissue, and an optional closed-loop irrigating chamber with circulating saline to cool the optical diffuser and irrigate the tissue.

  11. Hemodynamics of Central Venous Catheters: experiments and simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbour, Michael; McGah, Patrick; Clark, Alicia; Ng, Chin Hei; Gow, Kenneth; Aliseda, Alberto

    2013-11-01

    Central venous catheters (CVC) are used to provide vascular access during hemodialysis in patients with end-stage kidney disease. Despite several advantages and widespread use, CVCs have a high incidence rate of clot formation during the interdialytic phase (48 hrs). In an attempt the prevent clot formation, hospitals routinely administer heparin, an anticoagulant, into the catheter after a dialysis session. It has been reported, however, that up to 40% of the heparin solution will leak into the blood stream during the interdialytic phase, placing the patient at risk for systemic bleeding incidences. The aim of this study is to determine the role that advective-diffusive transport plays in the heparin leaking process. Numerical simulations of heparin convective mass transfer have been conducted, showing that while advective losses may be significant at the tip, previous studies may be overestimating the total amount of heparin leakage. To validate the quantitative prediction from the simulations, P.L.I.F. is used to experimentally measure heparin transport from CVCs placed in an idealized Superior Vena Cava with physically accurate pulsatile flow conditions. Improved understanding of flow near the catheter tip is applied to improve catheter design and heparin locking procedures.

  12. Steam-deformed Judkins-left guiding catheter with use of the GuideLiner® catheter to deliver stents for anomalous right coronary artery

    PubMed Central

    Kuno, Toshiki; Fujisawa, Taishi; Yamazaki, Hiroyuki; Motoda, Hiroyuki; Kodaira, Masaki; Numasawa, Yohei

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Percutaneous coronary intervention for anomalous right coronary artery (RCA) originating from the left coronary cusp is challenging because of our current inability to coaxially engage the guiding catheter. Methods: We report a case of an 88-year-old woman with non-ST segment elevation myocardial infarction, with an anomalous RCA origin. Using either the Judkins-Left catheter or Amplatz-Left catheter was difficult because of RCA ostium tortuosity. Thus, we used steam to deform the Judkins-Left catheter, but back-up support was insufficient to deliver the stent. Results: We used GuideLiner®, a novel pediatric catheter with rapid exchange/monorail systems, to enhance back-up support. Conclusions: We were able to successfully stent with both the deformed Judkins-Left guiding catheter and GuideLiner® for an anomalous RCA origin. PMID:27489700

  13. Microbiology of Non-Tunnelled Catheter-Related Infections

    PubMed Central

    Mallya, Shrikara P.; Bhat, Ashok; Baliga, Shrikala

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Aerobic bacterial infections often complicate vascular access in patients receiving haemodialysis, leading to Catheter-Related Blood Stream Infections (CRBSI). Various studies report Gram - positive bacteria, Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) in particular, as the most common aetiologic agent. Studies on microbiological analysis in this subset of population from India are very few. Aim To examine clinical and bacteriological profiles of haemodialysis patients developing CRBSI, the antibiotic susceptibility of the bacteria isolated from these patients and determine nasal carriage of S. aureus in the study subjects. Materials and Methods Using a prospective observational design 127 patients receiving haemodialysis (84 males; 43 females) from October 2011 to March 2013 were enrolled in this study. At each dialysis session, catheters were examined for any evidence of infection. In case of suspicion for infection, pus swab, blood culture and the catheter tips were sent to microbiology laboratory for site specific investigations. Vancomycin injection was empirically administered to these patients pending culture results. Data obtained was examined for relationship of CRBSI with clinical and socio-demographic risk factors. Results Out of 127 patients, 19 developed CRBSI, 10 developed exit-site infections and 33 patients were noted to have colonization of their catheters. The most common organisms included S. aureus in 24 (45.2%) catheter tips, followed by Pseudomonas aeruginosa in 9 (17%), Acinetobacter spp. in 5 (9%), Enterobacter spp. in 4 (7.5%) and Klebsiella pneumoniae in 3 (5.6%) catheter tips. Bacteraemia was found in 19 (20.7%) patients and P. aeruginosa was the most commonly isolated organism amongst them (38.8%). Staphylococcal nasal carriage was seen in 60 (69%) patients and 36 (41.4%) of these isolates were methicillin-resistant. Significant factors associated with CRBSI included history of bacteraemia, presence of diabetes mellitus, long duration

  14. NE VIII lambda 774 and time variable associated absorption in the QSO UM 675

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamann, Fred; Barlow, Thomas A.; Beaver, E. A.; Burbidge, E. M.; Cohen, Ross D.; Junkkarinen, Vesa; Lyons, R.

    1995-01-01

    We discuss measurements of Ne VIII lambda 774 absorption and the time variability of other lines in the z(sub a) approximately equal z(sub e) absorption system of the z(sub e) = 2.15 QSO UM 675 (0150-203). The C IV lambda 1549 and N V 1240 doublets at z(sub a) = 2.1340 (shifted approximately 1500 km/s from z(sub e) strengthened by a factor of approximately 3 between observations by Sargent, Boksenberg and Steidel (1981 November) and our earliest measurements (1990 November and December). We have no information on changes in other z(sub a) approximately equal z(sub e) absorption lines. Continued monitoring since 1990 November shows no clear changes in any of the absorptions between approximately 1100 and 1640 A rest. The short timescale of the variability (less than or approximately equal to 2.9 yr rest) strongly suggests that the clouds are dense, compact, close to the QSO, and photoionized by the QSO continuum. If the line variability is caused by changes in the ionization, the timescale requires densities greater than approximately 4000/cu cm. Photoionization calculations place the absorbing clouds within approximately 200 pc of the continuum source. The full range of line ionizations (from Ne VIII lambda 774 to C III lambda 977) in optically thin gas (no Lyman limit) implies that the absorbing regions span a factor of more than approximately 10 in distance or approximately 100 in density. Across these regions, the total hydrogen (H I + H II) column ranges from a few times 10(exp 18)/sq cm in the low-ionization gas to approximately 10(exp 20)/sq cm where the Ne VIII doublet forms. The metallicity is roughly solar or higher, with nitrogen possibly more enhanced by factors of a few. The clouds might contribute significant line emission if they nearly envelop the QSO. The presence of highly ionized Ne VIII lambda 774 absorption near the QSO supports recent studies that link z(sub a) approximately equal to z(sub e) systems with X-ray 'wamr absorbers. We show that the

  15. Staphylococcus-Infected Tunneled Dialysis Catheters: Is Over-the-Wire Exchange an Appropriate Management Option?

    SciTech Connect

    Langer, Jessica M.; Cohen, Raphael M.; Berns, Jeffrey S.; Chittams, Jesse; Cooper, Emily T.; Trerotola, Scott O.

    2011-12-15

    Purpose: Over-the-wire exchange of tunneled dialysis catheters is the standard of care per K/DOQI guidelines for treating catheter-related bacteremia. However, Gram-positive bacteremia, specifically with staphylococcus species, may compromise over-the-wire exchange due to certain biological properties. This study addressed the effectiveness of over-the-wire exchange of staphylococcus-infected tunneled dialysis catheters compared with non-staphylococcus-infected tunneled dialysis catheters. Methods: Patients who received over-the-wire exchange of their tunneled dialysis catheter due to documented or suspected bacteremia were identified from a QA database. Study patients (n = 61) had positive cultures for Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, or coagulase-negative staphylococcus not otherwise specified. Control patients (n = 35) received over-the-wire exchange of their tunneled dialysis catheter due to infection with any organism besides staphylococcus. Overall catheter survival and catheter survival among staphylococcal species were assessed. Results: There was no difference in tunneled dialysis catheter survival between study and control groups (P = 0.46). Median survival time was 96 days for study catheters and 51 days for controls; survival curves were closely superimposed. There also was no difference among the three staphylococcal groups in terms of catheter survival (P = 0.31). The median time until catheter removal was 143 days for SE, 67 days for CNS, and 88 days for SA-infected catheters. Conclusions: There is no significant difference in tunneled dialysis catheter survival between over-the-wire exchange of staphylococcus-infected tunneled dialysis catheters and those infected with other organisms.

  16. Gamma radiation-sterilized, triple-lumen catheters coated with a low concentration of chlorhexidine were not efficacious at preventing catheter infections in intensive care unit patients.

    PubMed Central

    Sherertz, R J; Heard, S O; Raad, I I; Gentry, L; Bowton, D; Scuderi, P; Hu, J; Carruth, W; Satishchandra, B; Pepe, J; Mosenthal, A; Burke, T; Dupuis, J

    1996-01-01

    In a randomized, double-blind trial, gamma radiation-sterilized, chlorhexidine-coated triple-lumen catheters were compared with uncoated control catheters for their ability to prevent catheter infection in 254 intensive care unit patients. The chlorhexidine coating was not efficacious, and a rabbit model demonstrated that reduction of chlorhexidine activity by gamma radiation sterilization was the likely explanation for the failure. PMID:8878569

  17. An Electromagnetic Catheter Blood Flow Meter of Minimal Lateral Dimensions*

    PubMed Central

    Kolin, Alexander

    1970-01-01

    A method is described to reduce the lateral dimensions of an electromagnetic catheter blood flow meter to the maximum possible extent. To achieve this, the magnetic field is generated by a magnet placed outside the subject. Thus, only the electrodes and a minimal supporting structure have to be introduced into the blood vessel to pick up the electromotive force induced in the blood streaming at right angles to the magnetic field. To suppress induction of a transformer electromotive force in the electrode leads, the latter form a co-axial lead system of small gauge. One electrode is at the tip of the insulated external tube of this lead system (a gauge no. 28 hypodermic tube) and is insulated from it. The other electrode is a bare section of the external tube about 2 cm from its tip. The tube is bent at an angle of about 30° just below the second electrode. Thus, this bent section places the two electrodes near two diametrically opposite wall sections of the blood vessels after insertion of the fine catheter via a hollow catheter through a branch blood vessel into the main vessel. The catheter is rotated until the plane containing the bent section is perpendicular to the magnetic field. The potential difference between the two electrodes measures the volume rate of flow through the blood vessel. This principle can be used to monitor the flow in the major blood vessels as well as in their branches. Catheter flow meters down to about 0.5 mm in external diameter have thus been made and much smaller ones can be made without excessive difficulty. Images PMID:5273901

  18. Modulation of crystalline Proteus mirabilis biofilm development on urinary catheters.

    PubMed

    Stickler, David J; Morgan, Sheridan D

    2006-05-01

    The crystalline biofilms formed by Proteus mirabilis can seriously complicate the care of patients undergoing long-term bladder catheterization. The generation of alkaline urine by the bacterial urease causes calcium and magnesium phosphates to precipitate from urine and accumulate in the catheter biofilm, blocking the flow of urine from the bladder. The pH at which these salts crystallize from a urine sample, the nucleation pH (pH(n)), can be elevated by diluting the urine and by increasing its citrate content. The aim of this study was to examine whether manipulation of pH(n) in these ways modulated the rate at which crystalline biofilm developed. Experiments in laboratory models of the catheterized bladder infected with P. mirabilis showed that when the bladder was supplied with a concentrated urine (pH(n) 6.7) at a low fluid output (720 ml per 24 h), catheters blocked at 19-31 h. Diluting this urine 1:4 increased the pH(n) to 7.5 and models supplied with this urine at 2880 ml per 24 h took 110-137 h to block. When models were supplied with urine containing citrate at 1.5 mg ml(-1) or above (pH(n) 8.3-9.1), the catheters drained freely for the full 7 day experimental period. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that the catheter biofilms that developed in urine with high pH(n) values were devoid of crystalline formations. These observations should encourage a clinical trial to examine the effect of increasing a patient's fluid intake with citrate-containing drinks on the encrustation and blockage of catheters. PMID:16585633

  19. Planck 2013 results. VIII. HFI photometric calibration and mapmaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Planck Collaboration; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Armitage-Caplan, C.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Atrio-Barandela, F.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoît, A.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernard, J.-P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bertincourt, B.; Bielewicz, P.; Bobin, J.; Bock, J. J.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Boulanger, F.; Bridges, M.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Cardoso, J.-F.; Catalano, A.; Challinor, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chary, R.-R.; Chen, X.; Chiang, H. C.; Chiang, L.-Y.; Christensen, P. R.; Church, S.; Clements, D. L.; Colombi, S.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Combet, C.; Couchot, F.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B. P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Danese, L.; Davies, R. D.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Delouis, J.-M.; Désert, F.-X.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Filliard, C.; Finelli, F.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Franceschi, E.; Galeotta, S.; Ganga, K.; Giard, M.; Giardino, G.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gratton, S.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Hansen, F. K.; Hanson, D.; Harrison, D.; Helou, G.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W. A.; Hornstrup, A.; Hovest, W.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jaffe, T. R.; Jones, W. C.; Juvela, M.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T. S.; Kneissl, R.; Knoche, J.; Knox, L.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lamarre, J.-M.; Lasenby, A.; Laureijs, R. J.; Lawrence, C. R.; Le Jeune, M.; Lellouch, E.; Leonardi, R.; Leroy, C.; Lesgourgues, J.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maffei, B.; Mandolesi, N.; Maris, M.; Marshall, D. J.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Massardi, M.; Matarrese, S.; Matthai, F.; Maurin, L.; Mazzotta, P.; McGehee, P.; Meinhold, P. R.; Melchiorri, A.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschênes, M.-A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Moreno, R.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J. A.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Netterfield, C. B.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Osborne, S.; Oxborrow, C. A.; Paci, F.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paladini, R.; Paoletti, D.; Partridge, B.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Pearson, T. J.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrotta, F.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Pietrobon, D.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Ponthieu, N.; Popa, L.; Poutanen, T.; Pratt, G. W.; Prézeau, G.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J.-L.; Rachen, J. P.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Ricciardi, S.; Riller, T.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Roudier, G.; Rusholme, B.; Santos, D.; Savini, G.; Scott, D.; Shellard, E. P. S.; Spencer, L. D.; Starck, J.-L.; Stolyarov, V.; Stompor, R.; Sudiwala, R.; Sunyaev, R.; Sureau, F.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A.-S.; Sygnet, J.-F.; Tauber, J. A.; Tavagnacco, D.; Techene, S.; Terenzi, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Tucci, M.; Umana, G.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Vittorio, N.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.

    2014-11-01

    This paper describes the methods used to produce photometrically calibrated maps from the Planck High Frequency Instrument (HFI) cleaned, time-ordered information. HFI observes the sky over a broad range of frequencies, from 100 to 857 GHz. To obtain the best calibration accuracy over such a large range, two different photometric calibration schemes have to be used. The 545 and 857 GHz data are calibrated by comparing flux-density measurements of Uranus and Neptune with models of their atmospheric emission. The lower frequencies (below 353 GHz) are calibrated using the solar dipole. A component of this anisotropy is time-variable, owing to the orbital motion of the satellite in the solar system. Photometric calibration is thus tightly linked to mapmaking, which also addresses low-frequency noise removal. By comparing observations taken more than one year apart in the same configuration, we have identified apparent gain variations with time. These variations are induced by non-linearities in the read-out electronics chain. We have developed an effective correction to limit their effect on calibration. We present several methods to estimate the precision of the photometric calibration. We distinguish relative uncertainties (between detectors, or between frequencies) and absolute uncertainties. Absolute uncertainties lie in the range from 0.54% to 10% from 100 to 857 GHz. We describe the pipeline used to produce the maps from the HFI timelines, based on the photometric calibration parameters, and the scheme used to set the zero level of the maps a posteriori. We also discuss the cross-calibration between HFI and the SPIRE instrument on board Herschel. Finally we summarize the basic characteristics of the set of HFI maps included in the 2013 Planck data release.

  20. Catheter selection for ablation of the cavotricuspid isthmus for treatment of typical atrial flutter.

    PubMed

    Da Costa, Antoine; Jamon, Yann; Romeyer-Bouchard, Cécile; Thévenin, Jérôme; Messier, Marc; Isaaz, Karl

    2006-11-01

    Radiofrequency catheter ablation (RFA) represents the first line therapy of the cavotricuspid isthmus-dependent atrial flutter (CTI-AFL) with a high efficacy and low secondary effects. RFA of CTI-dependent AFL can be performed by using various types of ablation catheters. Recent evaluations comparing externally cooled tip RFA (ecRFA) catheters and large-tip (8 mm) catheters have revealed that these catheters have a higher efficacy for CTI-AFL ablation compared to 4-mm catheters. The reliability of RFA catheters for AFL is variable and an optimal catheter selection may enhance the RFA effectiveness. The main goal of this article is to review the elements that improve the management of CTI RFA. Preliminary examinations of histopathologic and anatomical elements that may interfere with conventional CTI RFA are presented. Experimental studies concerning the electrobiology of large-tip and cooled-tip catheters are compared. The different catheter designs between cooled-tip and 8-mm-tip catheters are examined (size of the deflectable curve, rotation stability, and size of the distal nonsteerable catheter part) because of their critical role in CTI RFA results. A thorough review of clinical trials of each catheter is presented, and comparison of both catheters in this clinical setting is analyzed. In addition, the role of CTI morphology on AFL RF duration is underlined such as the value of right atrial angiography as an adjunct tool for CTI RFA catheter selection. Based on randomized studies, 8-mm-tip catheters seem to be more effective for ablation in case of straight angiographic isthmus morphology. On the other hand, ecRFA catheters appear to be more effective in cases of complex CTI anatomy or difficult CTI RFA. To reduce X-ray exposition and RFA application time, few studies report that CTI angiographic evaluation before RFA allows a catheter selection based on both CTI morphology and length. Moreover, preliminary data of randomized studies showed that an

  1. 75 FR 4340 - Notice of New Recreation Fee Site; Federal Lands Recreation Enhancement Act, (Title VIII, Pub. L...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-27

    ... Forest Supervisor. BILLING CODE 3410-11-M ... Forest Service Notice of New Recreation Fee Site; Federal Lands Recreation Enhancement Act, (Title VIII, Pub. L. 108-447) AGENCY: Caribou-Targhee National Forest, USDA Forest Service. ACTION: Notice of...

  2. 75 FR 26196 - Notice of Proposed New Recreation Fee Site; Federal Lands Recreation Enhancement Act, (Title VIII...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-11

    ..., (Title VIII, Pub. L. 108-447) AGENCY: National Forests in Mississippi, Forest Service, USDA. ACTION... 39269. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The Federal Recreation Lands Enhancement Act (Title VII, Pub. L....

  3. Controlled trial of a continuous irrigation suction catheter vs conventional intermittent suction catheter in clearing bronchial secretions from ventilated patients.

    PubMed

    Isea, J O; Poyant, D; O'Donnell, C; Faling, L J; Karlinsky, J; Celli, B R

    1993-04-01

    Continuous irrigation-suction catheter (Irri-cath) is a double-lumen device that allows for simultaneous saline solution infusion and aspiration. This system may theoretically be more effective than conventional dry intermittent suction due to its vortex principle. To test this hypothesis, we performed 200 suction maneuvers in 20 ventilated patients. Identically shaped catheters were used in a randomized sequence. For the same individual, we used equal instilled saline solution volume (40 ml), vacuum pressure (-180 cm H2O), and ventilatory parameters. Effectiveness of suction was determined by measuring the total aspirated volume, the dry lyophilized weight of secretion, the corrected dry weight (dry weight-weight of instilled salt), and protein concentration. No difference in heart rate, respiratory frequency, O2 saturation, systemic blood pressure, peak inspiratory pressure, or patient discomfort was found when the two modalities were compared; however, the total volume of secretions collected, the dry weight, the corrected dry weight, and the protein concentration were significantly higher with continuous irrigation suction catheter when compared with the conventional method (p < 0.05). The suction time was shorter with the Irri-cath (p < 0.05). We conclude that the Irri-Cath is more effective than conventional intermittent suction catheter in clearing bronchial secretions in patients on mechanical ventilation. PMID:8131470

  4. Complete Genome Sequence of Clostridium sp. Strain DL-VIII, a Novel Solventogenic Clostridium Species Isolated from Anaerobic Sludge

    PubMed Central

    Taghavi, Safiyh; Izquierdo, Javier A.

    2013-01-01

    We report the genome sequence of Clostridium sp. strain DL-VIII, a novel Gram-positive, endospore-forming, solventogenic bacterium isolated from activated anaerobic sludge of a wastewater treatment plant. Aside from a complete sol operon, the 6,477,357-bp genome of DL-VIII reveals genes for several unique enzymes with applications in lignocellulose degradation, including two phenolic acid decarboxylases. PMID:23929491

  5. Heuristic estimation of electromagnetically tracked catheter shape for image-guided vascular procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mefleh, Fuad N.; Baker, G. Hamilton; Kwartowitz, David M.

    2014-03-01

    In our previous work we presented a novel image-guided surgery (IGS) system, Kit for Navigation by Image Focused Exploration (KNIFE).1,2 KNIFE has been demonstrated to be effective in guiding mock clinical procedures with the tip of an electromagnetically tracked catheter overlaid onto a pre-captured bi-plane fluoroscopic loop. Representation of the catheter in KNIFE differs greatly from what is captured by the fluoroscope, due to distortions and other properties of fluoroscopic images. When imaged by a fluoroscope, catheters can be visualized due to the inclusion of radiopaque materials (i.e. Bi, Ba, W) in the polymer blend.3 However, in KNIFE catheter location is determined using a single tracking seed located in the catheter tip that is represented as a single point overlaid on pre-captured fluoroscopic images. To bridge the gap in catheter representation between KNIFE and traditional methods we constructed a catheter with five tracking seeds positioned along the distal 70 mm of the catheter. We have currently investigated the use of four spline interpolation methods for estimation of true catheter shape and have assesed the error in their estimation of true catheter shape. In this work we present a method for the evaluation of interpolation algorithms with respect to catheter shape determination.

  6. Flushing and Locking of Venous Catheters: Available Evidence and Evidence Deficit

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Flushing and locking of intravenous catheters are thought to be essential in the prevention of occlusion. The clinical sign of an occlusion is catheter malfunction and flushing is strongly recommended to ensure a well-functioning catheter. Therefore fluid dynamics, flushing techniques, and sufficient flushing volumes are important matters in adequate flushing in all catheter types. If a catheter is not in use, it is locked. For years, it has been thought that the catheter has to be filled with an anticoagulant to prevent catheter occlusion. Heparin has played a key role in locking venous catheters. However, the high number of risks associated with heparin forces us to look for alternatives. A long time ago, 0.9% sodium chloride was already introduced as locking solution in peripheral cannulas. More recently, a 0.9% sodium chloride lock has also been investigated in other types of catheters. Thrombolytic agents have also been studied as a locking solution because their antithrombotic effect was suggested as superior to heparin. Other catheter lock solutions focus on the anti-infective properties of the locks such as antibiotics and chelating agents. Still, the most effective locking solution will depend on the catheter type and the patient's condition. PMID:26075094

  7. Minimally invasive catheter implantation for regional chemotherapy of the liver: A new percutaneous transsubclavian approach

    SciTech Connect

    Wacker, Frank K.; Boese-Landgraf, Jochen; Wagner, Armin; Albrecht, Dirk; Wolf, Karl-Juergen; Fobbe, Franz

    1997-03-15

    Purpose. Development of a percutaneously implantable catheter system for regional chemotherapy of liver metastases and its application in patients with surgically implanted but dislocated catheters. Methods. Thirty-three patients with liver metastases of colorectal tumors were submitted to percutaneous puncture of the subclavian artery and insertion of a catheter whose tip was placed in the proper hepatic artery and whose end was subcutaneously connected with an infusion pump. Results. The mean duration of therapy via the percutaneously inserted catheter was 27 weeks ({+-}14 weeks). The most frequent complication was disconnection of the therapy catheter from the tube of the infusion pump. Eighty percent of all complications were corrected by reintervention. The therapy drop-out rate due to catheter-associated complications was 9%. Conclusion. Percutaneous insertion of a catheter for regional chemotherapy of the liver is a relatively uncomplicated method with high patient acceptance and simple access for reintervention.

  8. Development of Active Catheter,Active Guide Wire and Micro Sensor Systems

    PubMed Central

    Haga, Y.; Mineta, T.; Totsu, K.; Makishi, W.; Esashi, M.

    2001-01-01

    Summary Active catheters and active guide wires which move like a snake have been developed for catheter-based minimally invasive diagnosis and therapy. Communication and control IC chips in the active catheter reduce the number of lead wires for control. The active catheter can be not only bent but also torsioned and extended. An ultra minature fiber-optic pressure sensor; a forward-looking ultrasonic probe and a magnetic position and orientation sensor have been developed for catheters and guide wires. These moving mechanisms and several sensors which are fitted near the tip of the catheter and the guide wire will provide detailed information near the tip and enable delicate and effective catheter intervention. PMID:20663389

  9. Neonatal peripherally inserted central catheters: recommendations for prevention of insertion and postinsertion complications.

    PubMed

    Paulson, Pamela R; Miller, Kellee M

    2008-01-01

    Peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs) continue to be necessary in neonatal care. They benefit many premature infants and those needing long-term intravenous access. An experienced inserter, early recognition of PICC candidates, early PICC placement, knowledge of anatomy, and correct choice of vein all increase placement success. As with any invasive procedure, there are risks. These include pain, difficulty advancing the catheter, damage to vessels, catheter malposition, and bleeding. Utilizing assessment skills, following the product manufacturer's instructions, and carefully placing the catheter should minimize most of these risks. Additional risks include postinsertion complications such as occlusions, thrombosis, catheter failure, infection, and catheter malposition. Proper nursing care--which includes controlling infection, properly securing the catheter, and changing the dressing as needed--is key to preventing complications and maintaining the PICC until treatment has been completed. PMID:18697655

  10. Experience of on table modified standard catheters for directed arterial and venous thrombolysis.

    PubMed

    Ram, Bhavin; Baliga, Kapil; Rajesh, S; George, Robbie K

    2016-07-01

    To describe an on-table modification of standard angiography catheters for use in directed arterial and venous thrombolysis. An angiogram is performed and the length of thrombosed vessel (artery or vein) is measured. A 5 or 6 Fr catheter (preferably straight/multi- purpose/vertebral catheter) is modified on table for use by making multiple holes with 23 G needle. After testing ex vivo with saline injection, the on table modified catheter is placed over a wire into the thrombosed segment of the vessel and thrombolytic agent infusion is commenced utilizing a syringe driver after giving a bolus dose of thrombolytic agent. Median duration of thrombolysis was 24 h in our study. We have utilized this method in twenty thrombosed vessels, without any catheter related complications. In our experience, this modification of a standard catheter as a multi-hole catheter is a readily available, simple, cheap, versatile and effective device for directed thrombolysis. PMID:26719163

  11. Structure and electrical characterization of gallium arsenide nanowires with different V/III ratio growth parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Muhammad, R.; Ahamad, R.; Ibrahim, Z.; Othaman, Z.

    2014-03-05

    Gallium arsenide (GaAs) nanowires were grown vertically on GaAs(111)B substrate by gold-assisted using metal-organic chemical vapour deposition. Field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and conductivity atomic force microscopy (CAFM) analysis were carried out to investigate the effects of V/III ratio on structural properties and current-voltage changes in the wires. Results show that GaAs NWs grow preferably in the wurtzite crystal structure than zinc blende crystal structure with increasing V/III ratio. Additionally, CAFM studies have revealed that zincblende nanowires indicate ohmic characteristic compared to oscillation current occurred for wurtzite structures. The GaAs NWs with high quality structures are needed in solar cells technology for trapping energy that directly converts of sunlight into electricity with maximum capacity.

  12. SK-HEP cells and lentiviral vector for production of human recombinant factor VIII.

    PubMed

    da Rosa, Nathalia Gonsales; Swiech, Kamilla; Picanço-Castro, Virgínia; Russo-Carbolante, Elisa Maria de Sousa; Soares Neto, Mario Abreu; de Castilho-Fernandes, Andrielle; Faça, Vitor Marcel; Fontes, Aparecida Maria; Covas, Dimas Tadeu

    2012-08-01

    Hemophilia A is caused by a deficiency in coagulation factor VIII. Recombinant factor VIII can be used as an alternative although it is unavailable for most patients. Here, we describe the production of a human recombinant B-domain-deleted FVIII (rBDDFVIII) by the human cell line SK-HEP-1, modified by a lentiviral vector rBDDFVIII was produced by recombinant SK-HEP cells (rSK-HEP) at 1.5-2.1 IU/10(6) in 24 h. The recombinant factor had increased in vitro stability when compared to commercial pdFVIII. The functionality of rBDDFVIII was shown by its biological activity and by tail-clip challenge in hemophilia A mice. The rSK-HEP cells grew in a scalable system and produced active rBDDFVIII, indicating that this platform production can be optimized to meet the commercial production scale needs. PMID:22488441

  13. Prediction of Giant Thermoelectric Power Factor in Type-VIII Clathrate Si46

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norouzzadeh, Payam; Myles, Charles W.; Vashaee, Daryoosh

    2014-11-01

    Clathrate materials have been the subject of intense interest and research for thermoelectric application. Nevertheless, from the very large number of conceivable clathrate structures, only a small fraction of them have been examined. Since the thermal conductivity of clathrates is inherently small due to their large unit cell size and open-framework structure, the current research on clathrates is focused on finding the ones with large thermoelectric power factor. Here we predict an extraordinarily large power factor for type-VIII clathrate Si46. We show the existence of a large density of closely packed elongated ellipsoidal carrier pockets near the band edges of this so far hypothetical material structure, which is higher than that of the best thermoelectric materials known today. The high crystallographic symmetry near the energy band edges for Si46-VIII clathrates is responsible for the formation of such a large number of carrier pockets.

  14. Prediction of giant thermoelectric power factor in type-VIII clathrate Si46.

    PubMed

    Norouzzadeh, Payam; Myles, Charles W; Vashaee, Daryoosh

    2014-01-01

    Clathrate materials have been the subject of intense interest and research for thermoelectric application. Nevertheless, from the very large number of conceivable clathrate structures, only a small fraction of them have been examined. Since the thermal conductivity of clathrates is inherently small due to their large unit cell size and open-framework structure, the current research on clathrates is focused on finding the ones with large thermoelectric power factor. Here we predict an extraordinarily large power factor for type-VIII clathrate Si(46). We show the existence of a large density of closely packed elongated ellipsoidal carrier pockets near the band edges of this so far hypothetical material structure, which is higher than that of the best thermoelectric materials known today. The high crystallographic symmetry near the energy band edges for Si(46)-VIII clathrates is responsible for the formation of such a large number of carrier pockets. PMID:25391971

  15. Studies of the human factor VIII/von Willebrand factor protein. III. Qualitative defects in von Willebrand's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Gralnick, H R; Coller, B S; Sultan, Y

    1975-01-01

    The Factor VIII/von Willebrand factor protein was characterized in two unrelated patients with von Willebrand's disease in whom procoagulant and Factor VIII/von Willebrand factor antigen levels were normal. In both patients evidence of an abnormal protein was observed on crossed antigen-antibody electrophoresis. In one patient the Factor VIII/von Willebrand factor protein eluted from Sepharose 4B in a position and distribution identical to normal with normal levels of procoagulant activity and antigen. However, the partially purified Factor VIII/von Willebrand factor protein had markedly reduced von Willebrand factor activity in a ristocetin assay. In the second patient the peak of Factor VIII/von Willebrand factor protein, antigen, and procoagulant activity eluted from a Sepharose 4B column with an estimated molecular weight of approximately half that of normal. This protein had no von Willebrand factor activity. In both patients the reduced Factor VIII/von Willebrand factor protein subunit was indistinguishable from normal on polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. These studies indicate that in some patients with von Willebrand's disease there is a qualitative defect of the Factor VII/von Willebrand factor protein; the total amount of protein, antigen, and procoagulant activity are normal while the von Willebrand factor activity is deficient. Images PMID:1080491

  16. Neonatal helper-dependent adenoviral vector gene therapy mediates correction of hemophilia A and tolerance to human factor VIII

    PubMed Central

    Cela, Racel G.; Suzuki, Masataka; Lee, Brendan; Lipshutz, Gerald S.

    2011-01-01

    Neonatal gene therapy is a promising strategy for treating a number of congenital diseases diagnosed shortly after birth as expression of therapeutic proteins during postnatal life may limit the pathologic consequences and result in a potential “cure.” Hemophilia A is often complicated by the development of antibodies to recombinant protein resulting in treatment failure. Neonatal administration of vectors may avoid inhibitory antibody formation to factor VIII (FVIII) by taking advantage of immune immaturity. A helper-dependent adenoviral vector expressing human factor VIII was administered i.v. to neonatal hemophilia A knockout mice. Three days later, mice produced high levels of FVIII. Levels declined rapidly with animal growth to 5 wk of age with stable factor VIII expression thereafter to >1 y of age. Decline in factor VIII expression was not related to cell-mediated or humoral responses with lack of development of antibodies to capsid or human factor VIII proteins. Subsequent readministration and augmentation of expression was possible as operational tolerance was established to factor VIII without development of inhibitors; however, protective immunity to adenovirus remained. PMID:21245323

  17. LIMITS ON THE EMISSION FROM FE VIII-XII IN THE HOT LOCAL INTERSTELLAR MEDIUM.

    SciTech Connect

    Bloch, J. J.; Roussel-Dupre, D.; Theiler, J. P.; Johnson, E. M.

    2001-01-01

    The majority of the emitted power from an optically thin million degree plasma (such as the one thought to produce the soft xray background) originates in the EUV band at wavelengths longer than 170 degrees A. Lines from Fe VIII - Fe XII dominate the emission in this wavelength region. This paper describes work in progress on the analysis of three years of data from the ALEXIS mission in search of this flux.

  18. Search for plasma shifts of C VI, N VII, and O VIII resonance lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldsmith, S.; Griem, H. R.; Cohen, L.

    1984-01-01

    The resonance lines of the hydrogenlike ions C VI, N VII, and O VIII were observed in laser-produced plasmas with electron densities in the range 10 to the 21st - 10 to the 22nd per cu cm and electron temperatures between about 70 and 100 eV. The lines of the hydrogenlike ions were recorded photographically with a 3-m grazing-incidence spectrograph. No significant plasma line shift was observed.

  19. FUNDAMENTALS OF AMHARIC (REVISED EDITION), UNITS VIII-IX. DIALOGUES FOR CONVERSATION, AMHARIC SCRIPT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BARTON, DONALD K.; AND OTHERS

    THIS IS THE THIRD AND FINAL VOLUME OF A NINE-UNIT COURSE IN BASIC AMHARIC. VOLUMES ONE AND TWO DEAL WITH THE PROBLEMS OF PRONUNCIATION AND THE ORAL-AURAL MASTERY OF BASIC GRAMMATICAL CONSTRUCTIONS. AT THE END OF EACH VOLUME ARE APPENDED ENGLISH-AMHARIC AND AMHARIC-ENGLISH GLOSSARIES. VOLUME THREE (UNITS VIII-IX) IS DIVIDED INTO TWO PARTS. PART I…

  20. Ionospheric Results with Sounding Rockets and the Explorer VIII Satellite (1960 )

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bourdeau, R. E.

    1961-01-01

    A review is made of ionospheric data reported since the IGY from rocket and satellite-borne ionospheric experiments. These include rocket results on electron density (RF impedance probe), D-region conductivity (Gerdien condenser), and electron temperature (Langmuir probe). Also included are data in the 1000 kilometer region on ion concentration (ion current monitor) and electron temperature from the Explorer VIII Satellite (1960 xi). The review includes suggestions for second generation experiments and combinations thereof particularly suited for small sounding rockets.

  1. DR-07TARGETING EGFR-VIII WITH DICHLOROACETATE IN TEMOZOLOMIDE RESISTANT GLIOBLASTOMA MODELS

    PubMed Central

    Velpula, Kiran Kumar; Asuthkar, Swapna; Lathia, Justin D.; Tsung, Andrew J.

    2014-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene amplification and its subsequent over-expression is the most frequent genetic alteration associated with glioblastoma (GBM) approximating 40%. EGFR amplification is accompanied by a gene rearrangement that overexpresses the receptor variant III (EGFRvIII) characterized by an in-frame deletion of 801 bp of coding sequence from exons 2-7. Our in vitro preliminary studies conducted using U373 cell lines stably expressing EGFRvIII (U373vIII) conferred increased proliferation and invasiveness when compared to control. Temozolomide (TMZ) resistance in this context is a well-known concept, where high initial response is met with eventual failure and tumor propagation. We thus generated an aggressive TMZ resistance model for U373vIII cells (U373vIII-TMZ-R) by continual exposure to 150uM TMZ for 6 months. After the initial phase of cell death in the majority and prolonged lag in replication, the eventual surviving U373vIII-TMZ-R colonies showed identical morphology and proliferation potential of the parent U373vIII. This resulted in a cell line mimicking the actual growth potential of recurrent GBM. We have previously shown that dichloroacetic acid (DCA) reduces EGFR expression in GBMs. Since EGFRvIII expression displays an aggressive phenotype yet remains tumor specific, we hypothesize studying DCA alone or in combination with dasatinib, an inhibitor of EGFR subcellular translocation, in U373vIII and U373vIII-TMZ-R cell lines. By more accurately depicting the status of GBM at the time of recurrence after standard of care chemotherapy treatment, the investigation of DCA will augment and possibly redefine our current understanding of resistance mechanisms and establish novel methods of circumventing this pervasive phenomena.

  2. Construction of a mouse model of factor VIII deficiency by gene targeting

    SciTech Connect

    Bi, L.; Lawler, A.; Gearhart, J.

    1994-09-01

    To develop a small animal model of hemophilia A for gene therapy experiments, we set out to construct a mouse model for factor VIII deficiency by gene targeting. First, we screened a mouse liver cDNA library using a human FVIII cDNA probe. We cloned a 2.6 Kb partial mouse factor VIII cDNA which extends from 800 base pairs of the 3{prime} end of exon 14 to the 5{prime} end of exon 26. A mouse genomic library made from strain 129 was then screened to obtain genomic fragments covering the exons desired for homologous recombination. Two genomic clones were obtained, and one covering exon 15 through 22 was used for gene targeting. To make gene targeting constructs, a 5.8 Kb genomic DNA fragment covering exons 15 to 19 of the mouse FVIII gene was subcloned, and the neo expression cassette was inserted into exons 16 and 17 separately by different strategies. These two constructs were named MFVIIIC-16 and MFVIIIC-17. The constructs were linearized and transfected into strain 129 mouse ES cells by electroporation. Factor VIII gene-knockout ES cell lines were selected by G-418 and screened by genomic Southern blots. Eight exon 16 targeted cell lines and five exon 17 targeted cell lines were obtained. Three cell lines from each construct were injected into blastocysts and surgically transferred into foster mothers. Multiple chimeric mice with 70-90% hair color derived from the ES-cell genotype were seen with both constructs. Germ line transmission of the ES-cell genotype has been obtained for the MFVIIIC-16 construct, and multiple hemophilia A carrier females have been identified. Factor VIII-deficient males will be conceived soon.

  3. A Hematological Menace: Multiple Venous Thrombosis Complicated by Acquired Factor VIII Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Paudel, Robin; Dominguez, Luis W.; Dogra, Prerna; Suman, Saurav; Badin, Simon; Wasserman, Carrie

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Male, 21 Final Diagnosis: Acquired Factor VIII Deficiency Symptoms: Abdominal hematoma • DVT • life threatening bleeding Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Life saving medical therapy Specialty: Hematology Objective: Rare disease Background: Acquired hemophilia A (AHA) classically presents with spontaneous bleeding of mucosal sites, GI tract, and sub-cutaneous tissues, often leading to large hematomas and ecchymosis. Among documented cases, 50% are idiopathic and few have been associated with trauma or surgery. We present a case of life-threatening bleeding caused by AHA, following trauma and complicated by multiple venous thrombi. Case Report: A 21-year-old man presented with multiple injuries secondary to trauma leading to extensive life-saving surgery. Two weeks post-operatively, he developed multiple deep venous thrombi and was started on anticoagulation. Twenty-four days post-operatively, he started bleeding from multiple mucosal sites and developed an abdominal hematoma. Anticoagulation was stopped, with administration of fresh frozen plasma and vitamin K. Diagnosis of AHA was made based on low factor VIII level and presence of factor VIII inhibitors after an appropriate battery of tests ruled out other possible diagnoses. He was started on steroids and recombinant factor VIIa, leading to immediate improvement. Once stable, Rituximab infusions resulted in decreasing factor VIII inhibitor levels, with gradual normalization of PTT. Conclusions: AHA remains a diagnostic challenge because of its rarity, leading to delay in diagnosis and causing significant morbidity and mortality. Elevated PTT relative to PT/INR is a strong clue which should be followed by mixing studies. Very few cases have been associated with surgery or trauma and relatively few large, controlled trials have compared different treatment modalities for AHA. Growing evidence supports anti-CD20 (Rituximab) as an effective treatment option, as in this case. PMID:27040655

  4. Molecular Characterization and Subcellular Localization of Arabidopsis Class VIII Myosin, ATM1*

    PubMed Central

    Haraguchi, Takeshi; Tominaga, Motoki; Matsumoto, Rie; Sato, Kei; Nakano, Akihiko; Yamamoto, Keiichi; Ito, Kohji

    2014-01-01

    Land plants possess myosin classes VIII and XI. Although some information is available on the molecular properties of class XI myosins, class VIII myosins are not characterized. Here, we report the first analysis of the enzymatic properties of class VIII myosin. The motor domain of Arabidopsis class VIII myosin, ATM1 (ATM1-MD), and the motor domain plus one IQ motif (ATM1-1IQ) were expressed in a baculovirus system and characterized. ATM1-MD and ATM1-1IQ had low actin-activated Mg2+-ATPase activity (Vmax = 4 s−1), although their affinities for actin were high (Kactin = 4 μm). The actin-sliding velocities of ATM1-MD and ATM1-1IQ were 0.02 and 0.089 μm/s, respectively, from which the value for full-length ATM1 is calculated to be ∼0.2 μm/s. The results of actin co-sedimentation assay showed that the duty ratio of ATM1 was ∼90%. ADP dissociation from the actin·ATM1 complex (acto-ATM1) was extremely slow, which accounts for the low actin-sliding velocity, low actin-activated ATPase activity, and high duty ratio. The rate of ADP dissociation from acto-ATM1 was markedly biphasic with fast and slow phase rates (5.1 and 0.41 s−1, respectively). Physiological concentrations of free Mg2+ modulated actin-sliding velocity and actin-activated ATPase activity by changing the rate of ADP dissociation from acto-ATM1. GFP-fused full-length ATM1 expressed in Arabidopsis was localized to plasmodesmata, plastids, newly formed cell walls, and actin filaments at the cell cortex. Our results suggest that ATM1 functions as a tension sensor/generator at the cell cortex and other structures in Arabidopsis. PMID:24637024

  5. Inhibitors of propagation of coagulation (factors VIII, IX and XI): a review of current therapeutic practice

    PubMed Central

    Franchini, Massimo; Mannucci, Pier Mannuccio

    2011-01-01

    The management of patients with congenital haemophilia who develop alloantibodies against factors of the propagation phase of blood coagulation, commonly known as inhibitors, is the most important challenge facing haemophilia caregivers at present, as this complication not only compromises the efficacy of replacement therapy but also consumes an enormous amount of economic resources. Development of inhibitors further complicates the clinical course of severe haemophilia, with a prevalence of up to 30% in patients with haemophilia A (factor VIII deficiency) and up to 5% in those with haemophilia B (factor IX deficiency) and haemophilia C (factor XI deficiency). While the short-term goal of treatment of patients who develop alloantibodies is the control of bleeding, the eradication of the inhibitor is the main long-term goal. The management of severe bleeding episodes and the eradication of the autoantibody are also the mainstays of treatment of patients with acquired haemophilia, a rare but life-threatening haemorrhagic condition characterized by the development of inhibitory autoantibodies against coagulation factor VIII. The most recent options available for treating patients with congenital haemophilia complicated by inhibitors and acquired haemophilia because of autoantibodies against factor VIII are summarized in this review article. PMID:21204915

  6. Ab initio studies on the lattice thermal conductivity of silicon clathrate frameworks II and VIII

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Härkönen, Ville J.; Karttunen, Antti J.

    2016-01-01

    The lattice thermal conductivities of silicon clathrate frameworks II and VIII are investigated by using ab initio lattice dynamics and an iterative solution of the linearized Boltzmann transport equation (BTE) for phonons. Within the temperature range 100-350 K, the clathrate structures II and VIII were found to have lower lattice thermal conductivity values than the silicon diamond structure (d -Si) by factors of 1/2 and 1/3, respectively. The main reason for the lower lattice thermal conductivity of the clathrate structure II in comparison to d -Si was found to be the harmonic phonon spectra, while in the case of the clathrate structure VIII, the difference is mainly due to the harmonic phonon spectra and partly due to the shorter relaxation times of phonons. In the studied clathrate frameworks, the anharmonic effects have larger impact on the lattice thermal conductivity than the size of the unit cell. For the structure II, the predicted lattice thermal conductivity differs approximately by a factor of 20 from the previous experimental results obtained for a polycrystalline sample at room temperature.

  7. Mutations and a polymorphism in the factor VIII gene discovered by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis

    SciTech Connect

    Kogan, S.; Gitschier, J. )

    1990-03-01

    Hemophilia A results from mutations in the gene coding for coagulation factor VIII. The authors gradient gel electrophoresis to screen for mutations in the region of the factor VIII gene coding for the first acidic domain. Amplification primers were designed employing the MELTMAP computer program to optimize the ability to detect mutations. Screening of amplified DNA from 228 unselected hemophilia A patients revealed two mutations and one polymorphism. Rescreening the same population by making heteroduplexes between amplified patient and control samples prior to electrophoresis revealed one additional mutation. The mutations include two missense and one 4-base-pair deletion, and each mutation was found in patients with severe hemophilia. The polymorphism, located adjacent to the adenine branch site in intron 7, is useful for genetic prediction in some cases where the Bcl I and Xba I polymorphisms are uninformative. These results suggest that DNA amplification and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis should be an excellent strategy for identifying mutations and polymorphisms in defined regions of the factor VIII gene and other large genes.

  8. Intragenic integration in DLC1 sustains factor VIII expression in primary human cells without insertional oncogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Sivalingam, J; Phan, T T; Kon, O L

    2014-01-01

    Techniques enabling precise genome modifications enhance the safety of gene-based therapy. DLC1 is a hot spot for phiC31 integrase-mediated transgene integration in vitro and in vivo. Here we show that integration of a coagulation factor VIII transgene into intron 7 of DLC1 supports durable expression of factor VIII in primary human umbilical cord-lining epithelial cells. Oligoclonal cells with factor VIII transgene integrated in DLC1 did not have altered expression of DLC1 or neighbouring genes within a 1-Mb interval. Only 1.9% of all expressed genes were transcriptionally altered; most were downregulated and mapped to cell cycle and DNA repair pathways. DLC1-integrated cells were not tumourigenic in vivo and were normal by high-resolution genomic DNA copy number analysis. Our data identify DLC1 as a locus for durable transgene expression that does not incur features of insertional oncogenesis, thus expanding options for developing ex vivo cell therapy mediated by site-specific integration methods. PMID:24553346

  9. Factor VIII gene (F8) mutation and risk of inhibitor development in nonsevere hemophilia A.

    PubMed

    Eckhardt, Corien L; van Velzen, Alice S; Peters, Marjolein; Astermark, Jan; Brons, Paul P; Castaman, Giancarlo; Cnossen, Marjon H; Dors, Natasja; Escuriola-Ettingshausen, Carmen; Hamulyak, Karly; Hart, Daniel P; Hay, Charles R M; Haya, Saturnino; van Heerde, Waander L; Hermans, Cedric; Holmström, Margareta; Jimenez-Yuste, Victor; Keenan, Russell D; Klamroth, Robert; Laros-van Gorkom, Britta A P; Leebeek, Frank W G; Liesner, Ri; Mäkipernaa, Anne; Male, Christoph; Mauser-Bunschoten, Evelien; Mazzucconi, Maria G; McRae, Simon; Meijer, Karina; Mitchell, Michael; Morfini, Massimo; Nijziel, Marten; Oldenburg, Johannes; Peerlinck, Kathelijne; Petrini, Pia; Platokouki, Helena; Reitter-Pfoertner, Sylvia E; Santagostino, Elena; Schinco, Piercarla; Smiers, Frans J; Siegmund, Berthold; Tagliaferri, Annarita; Yee, Thynn T; Kamphuisen, Pieter Willem; van der Bom, Johanna G; Fijnvandraat, Karin

    2013-09-12

    Neutralizing antibodies (inhibitors) toward factor VIII form a severe complication in nonsevere hemophilia A, profoundly aggravating the bleeding pattern. Identification of high-risk patients is hampered by lack of data that take exposure days to therapeutic factor VIII concentrates into account. In the INSIGHT study, we analyzed the association between F8 mutation and inhibitor development in patients with nonsevere hemophilia A (factor VIII 2-40 IU/dL). This analysis included 1112 nonsevere hemophilia A patients from 14 centers in Europe and Australia that had genotyped at least 70% of their patients. Inhibitor risk was calculated as Kaplan-Meier incidence with cumulative number of exposure days as the time variable. During 44 800 exposure days (median, 24 exposure days per patient; interquartile range [IQR], 7-90), 59 of the 1112 patients developed an inhibitor; cumulative incidence of 5.3% (95% confidence interval [CI], 4.0-6.6) after a median of 28 exposure days (IQR, 12-71). The inhibitor risk at 50 exposure days was 6.7% (95% CI, 4.5-8.9) and at 100 exposure days the risk further increased to 13.3% (95% CI, 9.6-17.0). Among a total of 214 different F8 missense mutations 19 were associated with inhibitor development. These results emphasize the importance of F8 genotyping in nonsevere hemophilia A. PMID:23926300

  10. The Mid-Infrared Instrument for the James Webb Space Telescope, VIII: The MIRI Focal Plane System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ressler, M. E.; Sukhatme, K. G.; Franklin, B. R.; Mahoney, J. C.; Thelen, M. P.; Bouchet, P.; Colbert, J. W.; Cracraft, Misty; Dicken, D.; Gastaud, R.; Goodson, G. B.; Eccleston, Paul; Moreau, V.; Rieke, G. H.; Schneider, Analyn

    2015-07-01

    We describe the layout and unique features of the focal plane system for MIRI. We begin with the detector array and its readout integrated circuit (combining the amplifier unit cells and the multiplexer), the electronics, and the steps by which the data collection is controlled and the output signals are digitized and delivered to the JWST spacecraft electronics system. We then discuss the operation of this MIRI data system, including detector readout patterns, operation of subarrays, and data formats. Finally, we summarize the performance of the system, including remaining anomalies that need to be corrected in the data pipeline.

  11. Irrigated Tip Catheters for Radiofrequency Ablation in Ventricular Tachycardia

    PubMed Central

    Grothoff, Matthias; Dinov, Borislav; Kosiuk, Jedrzej; Richter, Sergio; Sommer, Philipp; Breithardt, Ole A.; Bollmann, Andreas; Arya, Arash; Hindricks, Gerhard

    2015-01-01

    Radiofrequency (RF) ablation with irrigated tip catheters decreases the likelihood of thrombus and char formation and enables the creation of larger lesions. Due to the potential dramatic consequences, the prevention of thromboembolic events is of particular importance for left-sided procedures. Although acute success rates of ventricular tachycardia (VT) ablation are satisfactory, recurrence rate is high. Apart from the progress of the underlying disease, reconduction and the lack of effective transmural lesions play a major role for VT recurrences. This paper reviews principles of lesion formation with radiofrequency and the effect of tip irrigation as well as recent advances in new technology. Potential areas of further development of catheter technology might be the improvement of mapping by better substrate definition and resolution, the introduction of bipolar and multipolar ablation techniques into clinical routine, and the use of alternative sources of energy. PMID:25705659

  12. Development of a Novel Shock Wave Catheter Ablation System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, H.; Hasebe, Yuhi; Kondo, Masateru; Fukuda, Koji; Takayama, Kazuyoshi; Shimokawa, Hiroaki

    Although radio-frequency catheter ablation (RFCA) is quite effective for the treatment tachyarrhythmias, it possesses two fundamental limitations, including limited efficacy for the treatment of ventricular tachyarrhythmias of epicardial origin and the risk of thromboembolism. Consequently, new method is required, which can eradicate arrhythmia source in deep part of cardiac muscle without heating. On the other hand, for a medical application of shock waves, extracorporeal shock wave lithotripter (ESWL) has been established [1]. It was demonstrated that the underwater shock focusing is one of most efficient method to generate a controlled high pressure in a small region [2]. In order to overcome limitations of existing methods, we aimed to develop a new catheter ablation system with underwater shock waves that can treat myocardium at arbitrary depth without causing heat.

  13. Irrigated tip catheters for radiofrequency ablation in ventricular tachycardia.

    PubMed

    Müssigbrodt, Andreas; Grothoff, Matthias; Dinov, Borislav; Kosiuk, Jedrzej; Richter, Sergio; Sommer, Philipp; Breithardt, Ole A; Rolf, Sascha; Bollmann, Andreas; Arya, Arash; Hindricks, Gerhard

    2015-01-01

    Radiofrequency (RF) ablation with irrigated tip catheters decreases the likelihood of thrombus and char formation and enables the creation of larger lesions. Due to the potential dramatic consequences, the prevention of thromboembolic events is of particular importance for left-sided procedures. Although acute success rates of ventricular tachycardia (VT) ablation are satisfactory, recurrence rate is high. Apart from the progress of the underlying disease, reconduction and the lack of effective transmural lesions play a major role for VT recurrences. This paper reviews principles of lesion formation with radiofrequency and the effect of tip irrigation as well as recent advances in new technology. Potential areas of further development of catheter technology might be the improvement of mapping by better substrate definition and resolution, the introduction of bipolar and multipolar ablation techniques into clinical routine, and the use of alternative sources of energy. PMID:25705659

  14. S-Nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine (SNAP) Impregnated Silicone Foley Catheters: A Potential Biomaterial/Device To Prevent Catheter-Associated Urinary Tract Infections

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Urinary Foley catheters are utilized for management of hospitalized patients and are associated with high rates of urinary tract infections (UTIs). Nitric oxide (NO) potently inhibits microbial biofilm formation, which is the primary cause of catheter associated UTIs (CAUTIs). Herein, commercial silicone Foley catheters are impregnated via a solvent swelling method with S-nitroso-N-acetyl-D-penicillamine (SNAP), a synthetic NO donor that exhibits long-term NO release and stability when incorporated into low water-uptake polymers. The proposed catheters generate NO surface-fluxes >0.7 × 10–10 mol min–1 cm–2 for over one month under physiological conditions, with minimal SNAP leaching. These biomedical devices are demonstrated to significantly decrease formation of biofilm on the surface of the catheter tubings over 3, 7, and 14 day periods by microbial species (Staphylococcus epidermidis and Proteus mirabilis) commonly causing CAUTIs. Toxicity assessment demonstrates that the SNAP-impregnated catheters are fully biocompatible, as extracts of the catheter tubings score 0 on a 3-point grading scale using an accepted mouse fibroblast cell-line toxicity model. Consequently, SNAP-impregnated silicone Foley catheters can likely provide an efficient strategy to greatly reduce the occurrence of nosocomial CAUTIs. PMID:26462294

  15. Percutaneous Catheter Drainage in Infected Pancreatitis Necrosis: a Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Ke, Lichi; Li, Junhua; Hu, Peihong; Wang, Lianqun; Chen, Haiming; Zhu, Yaping

    2016-06-01

    The primary aim of this study was to present the outcomes of percutaneous catheter drainage (PCD) in patients with infected pancreatitis necrosis. A second aim was to focus on disease severity, catheter size, and additional surgical intervention. A literature search of the PubMed/MEDLINE/Cochrane Library (January 1998 to February 2015) databases was conducted. All randomized, non-randomized, and retrospective studies with data on PCD techniques and outcomes in patients with infected pancreatitis necrosis were included. Studies that reported data on PCD along with other interventions without the possibility to discriminate results specific to PCD were excluded. The main outcomes were mortality, major complications, and definitive successful treatment with percutaneous catheter drainage alone. Fifteen studies of 577 patients were included. There was only one randomized, controlled trial, and most others were retrospective case series. Organ failure before PCD occurred in 55.3 % of patients. With PCD alone, definitive successful treatment was 56.2 % of patients. Additional surgical intervention was required after PCD in 38.5 % of patients. The overall mortality rate was 18 % (104 of 577 patients). Complications occurred in 25.1 % of patients, and fistula was the most common complication. PCD is an efficient tool for treatment in the majority of patients with infected pancreatitis necrosis as the only intervention. Multiple organ failures before PCD are negative parameters for the outcome of the disease. Large catheters fail to prove to be more effective for draining necrotic tissue. However, in the extent of multi-morbid patients, to determine one single prognostic factor seems to be difficult. PMID:27358518

  16. Catheter-related blood stream infection caused by Raoultella ornithinolytica.

    PubMed

    Sękowska, Alicja; Dylewska, Katarzyna; Gospodarek, Eugenia; Bogiel, Tomasz

    2015-11-01

    Raoultella spp. representatives are Gram-negative capsulated, nonmotile rods. These bacteria are found in the natural environment: plants, water, soil and insects. R. ornithinolytica is one of the three species of Raoultella. R. ornithinolytica is the only species within the genus which has the ability to produce ornithine decarboxylase. Human infections related to R. ornithinolytica are exceedingly rare. The present case report describes catheter-related blood stream infection caused by R. ornithinolytica and successfully treated with antibiotic therapy. PMID:25894520

  17. Determination of lesion size by ultrasound during radiofrequency catheter ablation.

    PubMed

    Awad, S; Eick, O

    2003-01-01

    The catheter tip temperature that is used to control the radiofrequency generator output poorly correlates to lesion size. We, therefore, evaluated lesions created in vitro using a B-mode ultrasound imaging device as a potential means to assess lesion generation during RF applications non-invasively. Porcine ventricular tissue was immersed in saline solution at 37 degrees C. The catheter was fixed in a holder and positioned in a parallel orientation to the tissue with an array transducer (7.5 MHz) app. 3 cm above the tissue. Lesions were produced either in a temperature controlled mode with a 4-mm tip catheter with different target temperatures (50, 60, 70 and 80 degrees C, 80 W maximum output) or in a power controlled mode (25, 50 and 75 W, 20 ml/min irrigation flow) using an irrigated tip catheter. Different contact forces (0.5 N, 1.0 N) were tested, and RF was delivered for 60 s. A total of 138 lesions was produced. Out of these, 128 could be identified on the ultrasound image. The lesion depth and volume was on average 4.1 +/- 1.6 mm and 52 +/- 53 mm3 as determined by ultrasound and 3.9 +/- 1.7 mm and 52 +/- 55 mm3 as measured thereafter, respectively. A linear correlation between the lesion size determined by ultrasound and that measured thereafter was demonstrated with a correlation coefficient of r = 0.87 for lesion depth and r = 0.93 for lesion volume. We conclude that lesions can be assessed by B-mode ultrasound imaging. PMID:12910859

  18. Catheter-related infections in pediatric patients with cancer.

    PubMed

    Cecinati, V; Brescia, L; Tagliaferri, L; Giordano, P; Esposito, S

    2012-11-01

    Central venous catheters (CVCs) are essential in the management of pediatric patients receiving antineoplastic therapy or bone marrow transplants, and have significantly improved their quality of life, but CVC-related infectious complications are a major source of morbidity. It has been estimated that 14-51 % of the CVCs implanted in children with malignancies may be complicated by bacteremia, and that the incidence of infections is 1.4-1.9 episodes per 1,000 CVC days. However, there are few recent data concerning the epidemiology of CVC-related infections, the prevalence of antimicrobial resistance in their etiology, or the main factors associated with an increased risk of infection by type of catheter, patient age, the type of cancer, or the presence of neutropenia. Moreover, although various new strategies have been proposed in an attempt to reduce the risk of CVC-related infections, such as catheters impregnated with antiseptics/antibiotics, lock antibiotic prophylaxis, the use of ointments at the exit site, and antithrombotic prophylaxis, their real efficacy in children has not yet been demonstrated. The management of CVC-related infections remains difficult, mainly because of the number of still open questions (including the choice of optimal antimicrobial therapy because of the increasing isolation of multiresistant bacterial strains, treatment duration, whether catheters should be removed or not, the feasibility of guidewire exchange, and the usefulness of antibiotic lock therapy) and the lack of studies of children with cancer. Only well-designed, prospective clinical trials involving pediatric cancer patients can clarify optimal prevention and treatment strategies for CVC-related infections in this population. PMID:22661169

  19. Cohort Study: Central Venous Catheter-Related Complications in Children with Hematologic Diseases at a Single Center

    PubMed Central

    Pektaş, Ayhan; Kara, Ateş; Gurgey, Aytemiz

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study aims to document and analyze the central venous catheter (CVC)-related complications in children with hematological diseases who were treated within a single institution. Materials and Methods: A retrospective investigation was conducted in 106 pediatric patients in whom 203 CVCs were inserted. A total of 175 catheter-related complications occurred in 5 years. Results: The rates of clinical catheter infections, local catheter infections, venous thromboembolism, bleeding, and mechanical complications were 2.6, 1.1, 0.2, 0.2, and 0.2 per 1000 catheter days. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus epidermidis was the predominant infectious organism in blood and catheter cultures. The children with leukemia had a significantly higher frequency of clinical catheter infections (p=0.046). The children who underwent bone marrow transplantation had a significantly lower frequency of clinical catheter infections (p=0.043) and higher frequency of local catheter infections (p=0.003). The children with implanted catheters had a significantly lower frequency of clinical catheter infections (p=0.048). The children with thrombocytopenia had significantly fewer local catheter infections and significantly more clinical catheter infections and catheter-related bleeding (respectively p=0.001, p=0.042, and p=0.024). Conclusion: Leukemia, bone marrow transplantation, and thrombocytopenia are risk factors for CVC-associated complications. The relatively higher number of interventions performed via permanent catheters may be responsible for the significantly increased incidence of systemic infections and mechanical injury. PMID:26316482

  20. Impact of Hemodialysis Catheter Dysfunction on Dialysis and Other Medical Services: An Observational Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Griffiths, Robert I.; Newsome, Britt B.; Leung, Grace; Block, Geoffrey A.; Herbert, Robert J.; Danese, Mark D.

    2012-01-01

    Practice guidelines define hemodialysis catheter dysfunction as blood flow rate (BFR) <300 mL/min. We conducted a study using data from DaVita and the United States Renal Data System to evaluate the impact of catheter dysfunction on dialysis and other medical services. Patients were included if they had ≥8 consecutive weeks of catheter dialysis between 8/2004 and 12/2006. Actual BFR <300 mL/min despite planned BFR ≥300 mL/min was used to define catheter dysfunction during each dialysis session. Among 9,707 patients, the average age was 62,53% were female, and 40% were black. The median duration of catheter dialysis was 190 days, and the cohort accounted for 1,075,701 catheter dialysis sessions. There were 70,361 sessions with catheter dysfunction, and 6,33 1 (65.2%) patients had at least one session with catheter dysfunction. In multivariate repeated measures analysis, catheter dysfunction was associated with increased odds of missing a dialysis session due to access problems (Odds ratio [OR] 2.50; P < 0.001), having an access-related procedure (OR 2.10; P < 0.001), and being hospitalized (OR 1.10; P = 0.001). Catheter dysfunction defined according to NKF vascular access guidelines results in disruptions of dialysis treatment and increased use of other medical services. PMID:22518313