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Sample records for insulin receptor loss

  1. Genetic Loss of Insulin Receptors Worsens Cardiac Efficiency in Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Bugger, Heiko; Riehle, Christian; Jaishy, Bharat; Wende, Adam R.; Tuinei, Joseph; Chen, Dong; Soto, Jamie; Pires, Karla M.; Boudina, Sihem; Theobald, Heather A.; Luptak, Ivan; Wayment, Benjamin; Wang, Xiaohui; Litwin, Sheldon E.; Weimer, Bart C.; Abel, E. Dale

    2012-01-01

    Aims To determine the contribution of insulin signaling versus systemic metabolism to metabolic and mitochondrial alterations in type 1 diabetic hearts and test the hypothesis that antecedent mitochondrial dysfunction contributes to impaired cardiac efficiency (CE) in diabetes. Methods and Results Control mice (WT) and mice with cardiomyocyte-restricted deletion of insulin receptors (CIRKO) were rendered diabetic with streptozotocin (WT-STZ and CIRKO-STZ, respectively), non-diabetic controls received vehicle (citrate buffer). Cardiac function was determined by echocardiography; myocardial metabolism, oxygen consumption (MVO2) and CE were determined in isolated perfused hearts; mitochondrial function was determined in permeabilized cardiac fibers and mitochondrial proteomics by liquid chromatography mass spectrometry. Pyruvate supported respiration and ATP synthesis were equivalently reduced by diabetes and genotype, with synergistic impairment in ATP synthesis in CIRKO-STZ. In contrast, fatty acid delivery and utilization was increased by diabetes irrespective of genotype, but not in non-diabetic CIRKO. Diabetes and genotype synergistically increased MVO2 in CIRKO-STZ, leading to reduced CE. Irrespective of diabetes, genotype impaired ATP/O ratios in mitochondria exposed to palmitoyl carnitine, consistent with mitochondrial uncoupling. Proteomics revealed reduced content of fatty acid oxidation proteins in CIRKO mitochondria, which were induced by diabetes, whereas tricarboxylic acid cycle and oxidative phosphorylation proteins were reduced both in CIRKO mitochondria and by diabetes. Conclusions Deficient insulin signaling and diabetes mediate distinct effects on cardiac mitochondria. Antecedent loss of insulin signaling markedly impairs CE when diabetes is induced, via mechanisms that may be secondary to mitochondrial uncoupling and increased FA utilization. PMID:22342406

  2. Loss of insulin receptor in osteoprogenitor cells impairs structural strength of bone.

    PubMed

    Thrailkill, Kathryn; Bunn, R Clay; Lumpkin, Charles; Wahl, Elizabeth; Cockrell, Gael; Morris, Lindsey; Kahn, C Ronald; Fowlkes, John; Nyman, Jeffry S

    2014-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1D) is associated with decreased bone mineral density, a deficit in bone structure, and subsequently an increased risk of fragility fracture. These clinical observations, paralleled by animal models of T1D, suggest that the insulinopenia of T1D has a deleterious effect on bone. To further examine the action of insulin signaling on bone development, we generated mice with an osteoprogenitor-selective (osterix-Cre) ablation of the insulin receptor (IR), designated OIRKO. OIRKO mice exhibited an 80% decrease in IR in osteoblasts. Prenatal elimination of IR did not affect fetal survival or gross morphology. However, loss of IR in mouse osteoblasts resulted in a postnatal growth-constricted phenotype. By 10-12 weeks of age, femurs of OIRKO mice were more slender, with a thinner diaphyseal cortex and, consequently, a decrease in whole bone strength when subjected to bending. In male mice alone, decreased metaphyseal trabecular bone, with thinner and more rodlike trabeculae, was also observed. OIRKO mice did not, however, exhibit abnormal glucose tolerance. The skeletal phenotype of the OIRKO mouse appeared more severe than that of previously reported bone-specific IR knockdown models, and confirms that insulin receptor expression in osteoblasts is critically important for proper bone development and maintenance of structural integrity.

  3. Deletion of 3 basepairs resulting in the loss of lysine-121 in the insulin receptor alpha-subunit in a patient with leprechaunism: binding, phosphorylation, and biological activity.

    PubMed

    Jospe, N; Zhu, J; Liu, R; Livingston, J N; Furlanetto, R W

    1994-11-01

    We have identified a novel mutation of the human insulin receptor gene in a previously unreported patient with leprechaunism, leprechaun Rochester. This mutation consists of deletion of three nucleotides (GAA) in exon 2 and results in loss of the lysine-121 in the putative ligand-binding domain of the alpha-subunit. To analyze this mutation, we prepared a corresponding mutant insulin receptor by site-directed mutagenesis and expressed the receptor in Chinese hamster ovary cells. Although the mutant receptor displayed normal insulin binding, abnormalities were found in autophosphorylation and in phosphorylation of endogenous and exogenous protein substrates. These abnormalities consisted of increased basal kinase activity, but blunted insulin-stimulated responsiveness. Importantly, cells that expressed the mutant receptor showed markedly decreased insulin- and serum-stimulated DNA synthesis compared to untransfected control cells and cells transfected with the wild-type insulin receptor. These findings suggest that deletion of lysine-121 in conjunction with a presumed, but thus far unidentified, second mutant allele contributed significantly to the lethal insulin-resistant state in this patient with leprechaunism.

  4. Developmental aspects of the rat brain insulin receptor: loss of sialic acid and fluctuation in number characterize fetal development

    SciTech Connect

    Brennan, W.A. Jr.

    1988-06-01

    In this study, I have investigated the structure of the rat brain insulin receptor during fetal development. There is a progressive decrease in the apparent molecular size of the brain alpha-subunit during development: 130K on day 16 of gestation, 126K at birth, and 120K in the adult. Glycosylation was investigated as a possible reason for the observed differences in the alpha-subunit molecular size. The results show that the developmental decrease in the brain alpha-subunit apparent molecular size is due to a parallel decrease in sialic acid content. This was further confirmed by measuring the retention of autophosphorylated insulin receptors on wheat germ agglutinin (WGA)-Sepharose. An inverse correlation between developmental age and retention of /sup 32/P-labeled insulin receptors on the lectin column was observed. Insulin binding increases 6-fold between 16 and 20 days of gestation (61 +/- 25 (+/- SE) fmol/mg protein and 364 +/- 42 fmol/mg, respectively). Thereafter, binding in brain membranes decreases to 150 +/- 20 fmol/mg by 2 days after birth, then reaches the adult level of 63 +/- 15 fmol/mg. In addition, the degree of insulin-stimulated autophosphorylation closely parallels the developmental changes in insulin binding. Between 16 and 20 days of fetal life, insulin-stimulated phosphorylation of the beta-subunit increases 6-fold. Thereafter, the extent of phosphorylation decreases rapidly, reaching adult values identical with those in 16-day-old fetal brain. These results suggest that the embryonic brain possesses competent insulin receptors whose expression changes markedly during fetal development. This information should be important in defining the role of insulin in the developing nervous system.

  5. Diabetes reduces basal retinal insulin receptor signaling: reversal with systemic and local insulin.

    PubMed

    Reiter, Chad E N; Wu, Xiaohua; Sandirasegarane, Lakshman; Nakamura, Makoto; Gilbert, Kirk A; Singh, Ravi S J; Fort, Patrice E; Antonetti, David A; Gardner, Thomas W

    2006-04-01

    Diabetic retinopathy is characterized by early onset of neuronal cell death. We previously showed that insulin mediates a prosurvival pathway in retinal neurons and that normal retina expresses a highly active basal insulin receptor/Akt signaling pathway that is stable throughout feeding and fasting. Using the streptozotocin-induced diabetic rat model, we tested the hypothesis that diabetes diminishes basal retinal insulin receptor signaling concomitantly with increased diabetes-induced retinal apoptosis. The expression, phosphorylation status, and/or kinase activity of the insulin receptor and downstream signaling proteins were investigated in retinas of age-matched control, diabetic, and insulin-treated diabetic rats. Four weeks of diabetes reduced basal insulin receptor kinase, insulin receptor substrate (IRS)-1/2-associated phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, and Akt kinase activity without altering insulin receptor or IRS-1/2 expression or tyrosine phosphorylation. After 12 weeks of diabetes, constitutive insulin receptor autophosphorylation and IRS-2 expression were reduced, without changes in p42/p44 mitogen-activated protein kinase or IRS-1. Sustained systemic insulin treatment of diabetic rats prevented loss of insulin receptor and Akt kinase activity, and acute intravitreal insulin administration restored insulin receptor kinase activity. Insulin treatment restored insulin receptor-beta autophosphorylation in rat retinas maintained ex vivo, demonstrating functional receptors and suggesting loss of ligand as a cause for reduced retinal insulin receptor/Akt pathway activity. These results demonstrate that diabetes progressively impairs the constitutive retinal insulin receptor signaling pathway through Akt and suggests that loss of this survival pathway may contribute to the initial stages of diabetic retinopathy.

  6. Loss of BMP receptor type 1A in murine adipose tissue attenuates age-related onset of insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Schulz, Tim J; Graja, Antonia; Huang, Tian Lian; Xue, Ruidan; An, Ding; Poehle-Kronawitter, Sophie; Lynes, Matthew D; Tolkachov, Alexander; O'Sullivan, Lindsay E; Hirshman, Michael F; Schupp, Michael; Goodyear, Laurie J; Mishina, Yuji; Tseng, Yu-Hua

    2016-08-01

    Adipose tissue dysfunction is a prime risk factor for the development of metabolic disease. Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) have previously been implicated in adipocyte formation. Here, we investigate the role of BMP signalling in adipose tissue health and systemic glucose homeostasis. We employed the Cre/loxP system to generate mouse models with conditional ablation of BMP receptor 1A in differentiating and mature adipocytes, as well as tissue-resident myeloid cells. Metabolic variables were assessed by glucose and insulin tolerance testing, insulin-stimulated glucose uptake and gene expression analysis. Conditional deletion of Bmpr1a using the aP2 (also known as Fabp4)-Cre strain resulted in a complex phenotype. Knockout mice were clearly resistant to age-related impairment of insulin sensitivity during normal and high-fat-diet feeding and showed significantly improved insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in brown adipose tissue and skeletal muscle. Moreover, knockouts displayed significant reduction of variables of adipose tissue inflammation. Deletion of Bmpr1a in myeloid cells had no impact on insulin sensitivity, while ablation of Bmpr1a in mature adipocytes partially recapitulated the initial phenotype from aP2-Cre driven deletion. Co-cultivation of macrophages with pre-adipocytes lacking Bmpr1a markedly reduced expression of proinflammatory genes. Our findings show that altered BMP signalling in adipose tissue affects the tissue's metabolic properties and systemic insulin resistance by altering the pattern of immune cell infiltration. The phenotype is due to ablation of Bmpr1a specifically in pre-adipocytes and maturing adipocytes rather than an immune cell-autonomous effect. Mechanistically, we provide evidence for a BMP-mediated direct crosstalk between pre-adipocytes and macrophages.

  7. Insulin receptor in Drosophila melanogaster

    SciTech Connect

    Petruzzelli, L.; Herrera, R.; Rosen, O.

    1986-05-01

    A specific, high affinity insulin receptor is present in both adult Drosophila and in Drosophila embryos. Wheat germ lectin-enriched extracts of detergent-solubilized membranes from embryos and adults bind insulin with a K/sub d/ of 15 nM. Binding is specific for insulin; micromolar concentrations of proinsulin, IGFI, and IGFII are required to displace bound /sup 125/I-insulin. Insulin-dependent protein tyrosine kinase activity appears during embryogenesis. It is evident between 6 and 12 hours of development, peaks between 12 and 18 hours and falls in the adult. During 0-6 hours of embryogenesis, and in the adult, a specific protein band (Mr = 135,000) is crosslinked to /sup 125/I-insulin. During 6-12 and 12-18 hours of embryogenesis stages in which insulin-dependent protein tyrosine kinase is high, an additional band (Mr = 100,000) becomes crosslinked to /sup 125/I-insulin. Isolation and DNA sequence analysis of genomic clones encoding the Drosophila insulin receptor will be presented as will the characterization of insulin receptor mRNA's during development.

  8. Characterization of the chicken muscle insulin receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Adamo, M.; Simon, J.; Rosebrough, R.W.; McMurtry, J.P.; Steele, N.C.; LeRoith, D.

    1987-12-01

    Insulin receptors are present in chicken skeletal muscle. Crude membrane preparations demonstrated specific /sup 125/I-insulin binding. The nonspecific binding was high (36-55% of total binding) and slightly lower affinity receptors were found than are typically observed for crude membrane insulin binding in other chicken tissues. Affinity crosslinking of /sup 125/I-insulin to crude membranes revealed insulin receptor alpha-subunits of Mr 128K, intermediate between those of liver (134K) and brain (124K). When solubilized and partially purified on wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) affinity columns, chicken muscle insulin receptors exhibited typical high affinity binding, with approximately 10(-10) M unlabeled insulin producing 50% inhibition of the specific /sup 125/I-insulin binding. WGA purified chicken muscle insulin receptors also exhibited insulin-stimulated autophosphorylation of the beta-subunit, which appeared as phosphorylated bands of 92- and 81K. Both bands were immunoprecipitated by anti-receptor antiserum (B10). WGA purified membranes also demonstrated dose-dependent insulin-stimulated phosphorylation of the exogenous substrate poly(Glu,Tyr)4:1. However, unlike chicken liver, chicken muscle insulin receptor number and tyrosine kinase activity were unaltered by 48 hr of fasting or 48 hr of fasting and 24 hr of refeeding. Thus, despite the presence of insulin receptors in chicken muscle showing normal coupling to receptor tyrosine kinase activity, nutritional alterations modulate these parameters in a tissue-specific manner in chickens.

  9. A minimized human insulin-receptor-binding motif revealed in a Conus geographus venom insulin.

    PubMed

    Menting, John G; Gajewiak, Joanna; MacRaild, Christopher A; Chou, Danny Hung-Chieh; Disotuar, Maria M; Smith, Nicholas A; Miller, Charleen; Erchegyi, Judit; Rivier, Jean E; Olivera, Baldomero M; Forbes, Briony E; Smith, Brian J; Norton, Raymond S; Safavi-Hemami, Helena; Lawrence, Michael C

    2016-10-01

    Insulins in the venom of certain fish-hunting cone snails facilitate prey capture by rapidly inducing hypoglycemic shock. One such insulin, Conus geographus G1 (Con-Ins G1), is the smallest known insulin found in nature and lacks the C-terminal segment of the B chain that, in human insulin, mediates engagement of the insulin receptor and assembly of the hormone's hexameric storage form. Removal of this segment (residues B23-B30) in human insulin results in substantial loss of receptor affinity. Here, we found that Con-Ins G1 is monomeric, strongly binds the human insulin receptor and activates receptor signaling. Con-Ins G1 thus is a naturally occurring B-chain-minimized mimetic of human insulin. Our crystal structure of Con-Ins G1 reveals a tertiary structure highly similar to that of human insulin and indicates how Con-Ins G1's lack of an equivalent to the key receptor-engaging residue Phe(B24) is mitigated. These findings may facilitate efforts to design ultrarapid-acting therapeutic insulins.

  10. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gene expression in human tissues. Effects of obesity, weight loss, and regulation by insulin and glucocorticoids.

    PubMed Central

    Vidal-Puig, A J; Considine, R V; Jimenez-Liñan, M; Werman, A; Pories, W J; Caro, J F; Flier, J S

    1997-01-01

    The peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR gamma) plays a key role in adipogenesis and adipocyte gene expression and is the receptor for the thiazolidinedione class of insulin-sensitizing drugs. The tissue expression and potential for regulation of human PPAR gamma gene expression in vivo are unknown. We have cloned a partial human PPAR gamma cDNA, and established an RNase protection assay that permits simultaneous measurements of both PPAR gamma1 and PPAR gamma2 splice variants. Both gamma1 and gamma2 mRNAs were abundantly expressed in adipose tissue. PPAR gamma1 was detected at lower levels in liver and heart, whereas both gamma1 and gamma2 mRNAs were expressed at low levels in skeletal muscle. To examine the hypothesis that obesity is associated with abnormal adipose tissue expression of PPAR gamma, we quantitated PPARgamma mRNA splice variants in subcutaneous adipose tissue of 14 lean and 24 obese subjects. Adipose expression of PPARgamma 2 mRNA was increased in human obesity (14.25 attomol PPAR gamma2/18S in obese females vs 9.9 in lean, P = 0.003). This increase was observed in both male and females. In contrast, no differences were observed in PPAR gamma1/18S mRNA expression. There was a strong positive correlation (r = 0.70, P < 0.001) between the ratio of PPAR gamma2/gamma1 and the body mass index of these patients. We also observed sexually dimorphic expression with increased expression of both PPAR gamma1 and PPAR gamma2 mRNAs in the subcutaneous adipose tissue of women compared with men. To determine the effect of weight loss on PPAR gamma mRNA expression, seven additional obese subjects were fed a low calorie diet (800 Kcal) until 10% weight loss was achieved. Mean expression of adipose PPAR gamma2 mRNA fell 25% (P = 0.0250 after a 10% reduction in body weight), but then increased to pretreatment levels after 4 wk of weight maintenance. Nutritional regulation of PPAR gamma1 was not seen. In vitro experiments revealed a synergistic effect of

  11. Phenobarbital and Insulin Reciprocate Activation of the Nuclear Receptor Constitutive Androstane Receptor through the Insulin Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Yasujima, Tomoya; Saito, Kosuke; Moore, Rick

    2016-01-01

    Phenobarbital (PB) antagonized insulin to inactivate the insulin receptor and attenuated the insulin receptor downstream protein kinase B (AKT)–forkhead box protein O1 and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 signals in mouse primary hepatocytes and HepG2 cells. Hepatic AKT began dephosphorylation in an early stage of PB treatment, and blood glucose levels transiently increased in both wild-type and constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) knockout (KO) mice. On the other hand, blood glucose levels increased in wild-type mice, but not KO mice, in later stages of PB treatment. As a result, PB, acting as an insulin receptor antagonist, elicited CAR-independent increases and CAR-dependent decreases of blood glucose levels at these different stages of treatment, respectively. Reciprocally, insulin activation of the insulin receptor repressed CAR activation and induction of its target CYP2B6 gene in HepG2 cells. Thus, PB and insulin cross-talk through the insulin receptor to regulate glucose and drug metabolism reciprocally. PMID:26994072

  12. Phenobarbital and Insulin Reciprocate Activation of the Nuclear Receptor Constitutive Androstane Receptor through the Insulin Receptor.

    PubMed

    Yasujima, Tomoya; Saito, Kosuke; Moore, Rick; Negishi, Masahiko

    2016-05-01

    Phenobarbital (PB) antagonized insulin to inactivate the insulin receptor and attenuated the insulin receptor downstream protein kinase B (AKT)-forkhead box protein O1 and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 signals in mouse primary hepatocytes and HepG2 cells. Hepatic AKT began dephosphorylation in an early stage of PB treatment, and blood glucose levels transiently increased in both wild-type and constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) knockout (KO) mice. On the other hand, blood glucose levels increased in wild-type mice, but not KO mice, in later stages of PB treatment. As a result, PB, acting as an insulin receptor antagonist, elicited CAR-independent increases and CAR-dependent decreases of blood glucose levels at these different stages of treatment, respectively. Reciprocally, insulin activation of the insulin receptor repressed CAR activation and induction of its target CYP2B6 gene in HepG2 cells. Thus, PB and insulin cross-talk through the insulin receptor to regulate glucose and drug metabolism reciprocally. Copyright © 2016 by U.S. Government work not protected by U.S. copyright.

  13. Insulin receptors in the mammary gland

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.H.

    1986-01-01

    Insulin binding studies were conducted using mammary membrane preparations to further the authors understanding of insulin's role in regulating mammary metabolism, particularly ruminant mammary metabolism. Specific objectives were to: (1) characterize insulin binding to bovine mammary microsomes and determine if the specificity and kinetics of binding indicate the presence of insulin receptors in bovine mammary gland; (2) examine and compare insulin binding by liver and mammary microsomes of the pig and dairy cow; (3) examine insulin binding to bovine milk fat globule membranes (MFGM) and evaluate this model's usefulness in assessing insulin receptor regulation in the mammary gland of the cow; (4) examine the effect of dietary fat in insulin binding by rat mammary and liver microsomes. The specificity and kinetics of /sup 125/I-insulin binding of bovine mammary microsomes indicated the presence of insulin receptors in bovine mammary gland. Bovine liver and mammary microsomes specifically bound less /sup 125/I-insulin than did the corresponding porcine microsomes, and mammary microsomes, regardless of species, specifically bound less /sup 125/I-insulin than did liver microsomes. These differences in binding suggest differences in insulin responsiveness between pigs and cattle, as well as between the liver and mammary glands.

  14. Protein kinase activity of the insulin receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Gammeltoft, S; Van Obberghen, E

    1986-01-01

    The insulin receptor is an integral membrane glycoprotein (Mr approximately 300,000) composed of two alpha-subunits (Mr approximately 130,000) and two beta-subunits (Mr approximately 95,000) linked by disulphide bonds. This oligomeric structure divides the receptor into two functional domains such that alpha-subunits bind insulin and beta-subunits possess tyrosine kinase activity. The amino acid sequence deduced from cDNA of the single polypeptide chain precursor of human placental insulin receptor revealed that alpha- and beta-subunits consist of 735 and 620 residues, respectively. The alpha-subunit is hydrophilic, disulphide-bonded, glycosylated and probably extracellular. The beta-subunit consists of a short extracellular region which links the alpha-subunit through disulphide bridges, a hydrophobic transmembrane region and a longer cytoplasmic region which is structurally homologous with other tyrosine kinases like the src oncogene product and EGF receptor kinases. The cellular function of insulin receptors is dual: transmembrane signalling and endocytosis of hormone. The binding of insulin to its receptor on the cell membrane induces transfer of signal from extracellular to cytoplasmic receptor domains leading to activation of cell metabolism and growth. In addition, hormone-receptor complexes are internalized leading to intracellular proteolysis of insulin, whereas receptors are recycled to the membrane. These phenomena are kinetically well-characterized, but their molecular mechanisms remain obscure. Insulin receptor in different tissues and animal species are homologous in their structure and function, but show also significant differences regarding size of alpha-subunits, binding kinetics, insulin specificity and receptor-mediated degradation. We suggest that this heterogeneity of receptors may be linked to the diversity in insulin effects on metabolism and growth in various cell types. The purified insulin receptor phosphorylates its own beta-subunit and

  15. Role of insulin and insulin receptor in learning and memory.

    PubMed

    Zhao, W Q; Alkon, D L

    2001-05-25

    As one of the most extensively studied protein hormones, insulin and its receptor have been known to play key roles in a variety of important biological functions. Until recent years, the functions of insulin and insulin receptor (IR) in the central nervous system (CNS) have largely remained unclear. IR is abundantly expressed in several specific brain regions that govern fundamental behaviors such as food intake, reproduction and high cognition. The IR from the periphery and CNS exhibit differences in both structure and function. In addition to that from the peripheral system, locally synthesized insulin in the brain has also been identified. Accumulated evidence has demonstrated that insulin/IR plays important roles in associative learning, as suggested by results from both interventive and correlative studies. Interruption of insulin production and IR activity causes deficits in learning and memory formation. Abnormal insulin/IR levels and activities are seen in Alzheimer's dementia, whereas administration of insulin significantly improves the cognitive performance of these patients. The synaptic bases for the action of insulin/IR include modifying neurotransmitter release processes at various types of presynaptic terminals and modulating the activities of both excitatory and inhibitory postsynaptic receptors such as NMDA and GABA receptors, respectively. At the molecular level, insulin/IR participates in regulation of learning and memory via activation of specific signaling pathways, one of which is shown to be associated with the formation of long-term memory and is composed of intracellular molecules including the shc, Grb-r/SOS, Ras/Raf, and MEK/MAP kinases. Cross-talk with another IR pathway involving IRS1, PI3 kinase, and protein kinase C, as well as with the non-receptor tyrosine kinase pp60c-src, may also be associated with memory processing.

  16. Insulin receptors in normal and disease states.

    PubMed

    Grunberger, G; Taylor, S I; Dons, R F; Gorden, P

    1983-03-01

    The binding of insulin to its receptor has been studied under various physiological and pathological conditions. Quantitative studies have involved human circulating cells such as monocytes and erythrocytes, adipocytes, placental cells, and cultured cells such as fibroblasts and transformed lymphocytes. In animals, other target tissues such as liver and muscle have been studied and correlated with the human studies. Various physiological conditions such as diurnal rhythm, diet, age, exercise and the menstrual cycle affect insulin binding; in addition, many drugs perturb the receptor interaction. Disease affecting the insulin receptor can be divided into five general categories: (1) Receptor regulation--this involves diseases characterized by hyper- or hypoinsulinaemia. Hyperinsulinaemia in the basal state usually leads to receptor 'down' regulation as seen in obesity, type II diabetes, acromegaly and islet cell tumours. Hypoinsulinaemia such as seen in anorexia nervosa or type I diabetes may lead to elevated binding. (2) Antireceptor antibodies--these immunoglobulins bind to the receptor and competitively inhibit insulin binding. They may act as agonists, antagonists or partial agonists. (3) Genetic diseases which produce fixed alterations in both freshly isolated and cultured cells. (4) Diseases of receptor specificity where insulin may bind with different affinity to its own receptor or related receptors such as receptors for insulin-like growth factors. (5) Disease of affinity modulation where physical factors such as pH, temperature, ions, etc. may modify binding. In this review, we have considered primarily abnormality in insulin receptor binding. There are numerous other functions of the receptor such as coupling and transmission of the biological signal. These mechanisms are frequently referred to as postreceptor events, but more properly should be referred to as postbinding events since the receptor subserves other functions in addition to recognition and

  17. Insulin Receptor Signaling in Cones*

    PubMed Central

    Rajala, Ammaji; Dighe, Radhika; Agbaga, Martin-Paul; Anderson, Robert E.; Rajala, Raju V.S.

    2013-01-01

    In humans, age-related macular degeneration and diabetic retinopathy are the most common disorders affecting cones. In retinitis pigmentosa (RP), cone cell death precedes rod cell death. Systemic administration of insulin delays the death of cones in RP mouse models lacking rods. To date there are no studies on the insulin receptor signaling in cones; however, mRNA levels of IR signaling proteins are significantly higher in cone-dominant neural retina leucine zipper (Nrl) knock-out mouse retinas compared with wild type rod-dominant retinas. We previously reported that conditional deletion of the p85α subunit of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) in cones resulted in age-related cone degeneration, and the phenotype was not rescued by healthy rods, raising the question of why cones are not protected by the rod-derived cone survival factors. Interestingly, systemic administration of insulin has been shown to delay the death of cones in mouse models of RP lacking rods. These observations led to the hypothesis that cones may have their own endogenous neuroprotective pathway, or rod-derived cone survival factors may be signaled through cone PI3K. To test this hypothesis we generated p85α−/−/Nrl−/− double knock-out mice and also rhodopsin mutant mice lacking p85α and examined the effect of the p85α subunit of PI3K on cone survival. We found that the rate of cone degeneration is significantly faster in both of these models compared with respective mice with competent p85α. These studies suggest that cones may have their own endogenous PI3K-mediated neuroprotective pathway in addition to the cone viability survival signals derived from rods. PMID:23673657

  18. Intracellular insulin-receptor dissociation and segregation in a rat fibroblast cell line transfected with a human insulin receptor gene

    SciTech Connect

    Levy, J.R.; Olefsky, J.M.

    1988-05-05

    The cellular processing of insulin and insulin receptors was studied using a rat fibroblast cell line that had been transfected with a normal human insulin receptor gene, expressing approximately 500 times the normal number of native fibroblasts insulin receptors. These cells bind and internalize insulin normally. Biochemically assays based on the selective precipitation by polyethylene glycol of intact insulin-receptor complexes but not of free intracellular insulin were developed to study the time course of intracellular insulin-receptor dissociation. Fibroblasts were incubated with radiolabeled insulin at 4/sup 0/C, and internalization of insulin-receptor complexes was initiated by warming the cells to 37/sup 0/C. Within 2 min, 90% of the internalized radioactivity was composed of intact insulin-receptor complexes. The dissociation of insulin from internalized insulin-receptor complexes was markedly inhibited by monensin and chloroquine. Furthermore, chloroquine markedly increased the number of cross-linkable intracellular insulin-receptor complexes, as analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis autoradiography. These findings suggest that acidification of intracellular vesicles is responsible for insulin-receptor dissociation. Physical segregation of dissociated intracellular insulin from its receptor was monitored. The results are consistent with the view that segregation of insulin and receptor occurs 5-10 min after initiation of dissociation. These studies demonstrate the intracellular itinerary of insulin-receptor complexes, including internalization, dissociation of insulin from the internalized receptor within an acidified compartment, segregation of insulin from the receptor, and subsequent ligand degradation.

  19. Autoantibodies to Insulin Receptor Spontaneously Develop as Anti-Idiotypes in Mice Immunized with Insulin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shechter, Yoram; Maron, Ruth; Elias, Dana; Cohen, Irun R.

    1982-04-01

    Mice immunized with insulin developed antibodies to both insulin and the insulin receptor. The antibodies to insulin receptor displaced labeled insulin from insulin receptors and mimicked the actions of insulin in stimulating the oxidation of glucose and its incorporation into lipids, and in inhibiting lipolysis. The antibodies to insulin receptor could be blocked by or bound to the antibodies to insulin, and therefore were identified as anti-idiotypes. Thus, immunization against a hormone may activate spontaneously an idiotype-anti-idiotype network resulting in antibodies to the hormone receptor.

  20. The ligand specificities of the insulin receptor and the insulin-like growth factor I receptor reside in different regions of a common binding site

    SciTech Connect

    Kjeldsen, T.; Andersen, A.S.; Wiberg, F.C.; Rasmussen, J.S.; Schaeffer, L.; Balschmidt, P.; Moller, K.B.; Moller, N.P.H. )

    1991-05-15

    To identify the region(s) of the insulin receptor and the insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) receptor responsible for ligand specificity (high-affinity binding), expression vectors encoding soluble chimeric insulin/IGF-I receptors were prepared. The chimeric receptors were expressed in mammalian cells and partially purified. Binding studies revealed that a construct comprising an IGF-I receptor in which the 68 N-terminal amino acids of the insulin receptor {alpha}-subunit had replaced the equivalent IGF-I receptor segment displayed a markedly increased affinity for insulin. In contrast, the corresponding IGF-I receptor sequence is not critical for high-affinity IGF-I binding. It is shown that part of the cysteine-rich domain determines IGF-I specificity. The authors have previously shown that exchanging exons 1, 2, and 3 of the insulin receptor with the corresponding IGF-I receptor sequence results in loss of high affinity for insulin and gain of high affinity for IGF-I. Consequently, it is suggested that the ligand specificities of the two receptors (i.e., the sequences that discriminate between insulin and IGF-I) reside in different regions of a binding site with common features present in both receptors.

  1. Monoclonal Antibodies to the Human Insulin Receptor that Activate Glucose Transport but not Insulin Receptor Kinase Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forsayeth, John R.; Caro, Jose F.; Sinha, Madhur K.; Maddux, Betty A.; Goldfine, Ira D.

    1987-05-01

    Three mouse monoclonal antibodies were produced that reacted with the α subunit of the human insulin receptor. All three both immunoprecipitated 125I-labeled insulin receptors from IM-9 lymphocytes and competitively inhibited 125I-labeled insulin binding to its receptor. Unlike insulin, the antibodies failed to stimulate receptor autophosphorylation in both intact IM-9 lymphocytes and purified human placental insulin receptors. Moreover, unlike insulin, the antibodies failed to stimulate receptor-mediated phosphorylation of exogenous substrates. However, like insulin, two of the three antibodies stimulated glucose transport in isolated human adipocytes. One antibody, on a molar basis, was as potent as insulin. These studies indicate, therefore, that monoclonal antibodies to the insulin receptor can mimic a major function of insulin without activating receptor kinase activity. They also raise the possibility that certain actions of insulin such as stimulation of glucose transport may not require the activation of receptor kinase activity.

  2. Amyloid beta oligomers induce impairment of neuronal insulin receptors.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Wei-Qin; De Felice, Fernanda G; Fernandez, Sara; Chen, Hui; Lambert, Mary P; Quon, Michael J; Krafft, Grant A; Klein, William L

    2008-01-01

    Recent studies have indicated an association between Alzheimer's disease (AD) and central nervous system (CNS) insulin resistance. However, the cellular mechanisms underlying the link between these two pathologies have not been elucidated. Here we show that signal transduction by neuronal insulin receptors (IR) is strikingly sensitive to disruption by soluble Abeta oligomers (also known as ADDLs). ADDLs are known to accumulate in AD brain and have recently been implicated as primary candidates for initiating deterioration of synapse function, composition, and structure. Using mature cultures of hippocampal neurons, a preferred model for studies of synaptic cell biology, we found that ADDLs caused a rapid and substantial loss of neuronal surface IRs specifically on dendrites bound by ADDLs. Removal of dendritic IRs was associated with increased receptor immunoreactivity in the cell body, indicating redistribution of the receptors. The neuronal response to insulin, measured by evoked IR tyrosine autophosphorylation, was greatly inhibited by ADDLs. Inhibition also was seen with added glutamate or potassium-induced depolarization. The effects on IR function were completely blocked by NMDA receptor antagonists, tetrodotoxin, and calcium chelator BAPTA-AM. Downstream from the IR, ADDLs induced a phosphorylation of Akt at serine473, a modification associated with neurodegenerative and insulin resistance diseases. These results identify novel factors that affect neuronal IR signaling and suggest that insulin resistance in AD brain is a response to ADDLs, which disrupt insulin signaling and may cause a brain-specific form of diabetes as part of an overall pathogenic impact on CNS synapses.

  3. Insulin receptor internalization defect in an insulin-resistant mouse melanoma cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Androlewicz, M.J.; Straus, D.S. ); Brandenburg, D.F. )

    1989-12-12

    Previous studies from this laboratory demonstrated that the PG19 mouse melanoma cell line does not exhibit a biological response to insulin, whereas melanoma x mouse embryo fibroblast hybrids do respond to insulin. To investigate the molecular basis of the insulin resistance of the PG19 melanoma cells, insulin receptors from the insulin-resistant melanoma cells and insulin-sensitive fibroblast x melanoma hybrid cells were analyzed by the technique of photoaffinity labeling using the photoprobe {sup 125}I-NAPA-DP-insulin. Photolabeled insulin receptors from the two cell types have identical molecular weights as determined by SDS gel electrophoresis under reducing and nonreducing conditions, indicating that the receptors on the two cell lines are structurally similar. Insulin receptor internalization studies revealed that the hybrid cells internalize receptors to a high degree at 37{degree}C, whereas the melanoma cells internalize receptors to a very low degree or not at all. The correlation between ability to internalize insulin receptors and sensitivity to insulin action in this system suggests that uptake of the insulin-receptor complex may be required for insulin action in these cells. Insulin receptors from the two cell lines autophosphorylate in a similar insulin-dependent manner both in vitro and in intact cells, indicating that insulin receptors on the melanoma and hybrid cells have functional tyrosine protein kinase activity. Therefore, the block in insulin action in the PG19 melanoma cells appears to reside at a step beyond insulin-stimulated receptor autophosphorylation.

  4. Binding characteristics of swine erythrocyte insulin receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Dieberg, G.; Bryan, G.S.; Sartin, J.L.; Williams, J.C.; Prince, T.J.; Kemppainen, R.J.

    1985-09-01

    Crossbred gilts had 8.8 +/- 1.1% maximum binding of ( SVI)insulin to insulin receptors on erythrocytes. The number of insulin-binding sites per cell was 137 +/- 19, with a binding affinity ranging from 7.4 X 10(7)M-1 to 11.2 X 10(7)M-1 and mean of 8.8 X 10(7)M-1. Pregnant sows had a significant increase in maximum binding due to an increase in number of receptor sites per cell. Lactating sows fed a high-fiber diet and a low-fiber diet did not develop a significant difference in maximum binding of insulin. Sows fed the low-fiber diet had a significantly higher number of binding sites and a significantly lower binding affinity than did sows fed a high-fiber diet. Receptor-binding affinity was lower in the low-fiber diet group than in cycling gilts, whereas data from sows fed the high-fiber diet did not differ from data for cycling gilts. Data from this study indicated that insulin receptors of swine erythrocytes have binding characteristics similar to those in other species. Pregnancy and diet will alter insulin receptor binding in swine.

  5. Human blood-brain barrier insulin receptor.

    PubMed

    Pardridge, W M; Eisenberg, J; Yang, J

    1985-06-01

    A new model system for characterizing the human brain capillary, which makes up the blood-brain barrier (BBB) in vivo, is described in these studies and is applied initially to the investigation of the human BBB insulin receptor. Autopsy brains were obtained from the pathologist between 22-36 h postmortem and were used to isolate human brain microvessels which appeared intact on both light and phase microscopy. The microvessels were positive for human factor 8 and for a BBB-specific enzyme marker, gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase. The microvessels avidly bound insulin with a high-affinity dissociation constant, KD = 1.2 +/- 0.5 nM. The human brain microvessels internalized insulin based on acid-wash assay, and 75% of insulin was internalized at 37 degrees C. The microvessels transported insulin to the medium at 37 degrees C with a t1/2 = approximately 70 min. Little of the 125I-insulin was metabolized by the microvessels under these conditions based on the elution profile of the medium extract over a Sephadex G-50 column. Plasma membranes were obtained from the human brain microvessels and these membranes were enriched in membrane markers such as gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase or alkaline phosphatase. The plasma membranes bound 125I-insulin with and ED50 = 10 ng/ml, which was identical to the 50% binding point in intact microvessels. The human BBB plasma membranes were solubilized in Triton X-100 and were adsorbed to a wheat germ agglutinin Sepharose affinity column, indicating the BBB insulin receptor is a glycoprotein. Affinity cross-linking of insulin to the plasma membranes revealed a 127K protein that specifically binds insulin.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  6. The neuronal insulin receptor in its environment.

    PubMed

    Gralle, Matthias

    2017-02-01

    Insulin is known mainly for its effects in peripheral tissues, such as the liver, skeletal muscles and adipose tissue, where the activation of the insulin receptor (IR) has both short-term and long-term effects. Insulin and the IR are also present in the brain, and since there is evidence that neuronal insulin signaling regulates synaptic plasticity and that it is impaired in disease, this pathway might be the key to protection or reversal of symptoms, especially in Alzheimer's disease. However, there are controversies about the importance of the neuronal IR, partly because biophysical data on its activation and signaling are much less complete than for the peripheral IR. This review briefly summarizes the neuronal IR signaling in health and disease, and then focuses on known differences between the neuronal and peripheral IR with regard to alternative splicing and glycosylation, and lack of data with respect to phosphorylation and membrane subdomain localization. Particularities in the neuronal IR itself and its environment may have consequences for downstream signaling and impact synaptic plasticity. Furthermore, establishing the relative importance of insulin signaling through IR or through hybrids with its homolog, the insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor, is crucial for evaluating the consequences of brain IR activation. An improved biophysical understanding of the neuronal IR may help predict the consequences of insulin-targeted interventions.

  7. Insulin receptor substrate 1 rescues insulin action in CHO cells expressing mutant insulin receptors that lack a juxtamembrane NPXY motif.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, D; Van Horn, D J; White, M F; Backer, J M

    1995-01-01

    Insulin signals are mediated through tyrosine phosphorylation of specific proteins such as insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS-1) and Shc by the activated insulin receptor (IR). Phosphorylation of both proteins is nearly abolished by an alanine substitution at Tyr-960 (A960) in the beta-subunit of the receptor. However, overexpression of IRS-1 in CHO cells expressing the mutant receptor (A960 cells) restored sufficient tyrosine phosphorylation of IRS-1 to rescue IRS-1/Grb-2 binding and phosphatidylinositol 3' kinase activation during insulin stimulation. Shc tyrosine phosphorylation and its binding to Grb-2 were impaired in the A960 cells and were unaffected by overexpression of IRS-1. Although overexpression of IRS-1 increased IRS-1 binding to Grb-2, ERK-1/ERK-2 activation was not rescued. These data suggest that signaling molecules other than IRS-1, perhaps including Shc, are critical for insulin stimulation of p21ras. Interestingly, overexpression of IRS-1 in the A960 cells restored insulin-stimulated mitogenesis and partially restored insulin stimulation of glycogen synthesis. Thus, IRS-1 tyrosine phosphorylation is sufficient to increase the mitogenic response to insulin, whereas insulin stimulation of glycogen synthesis appears to involve other factors. Moreover, IRS-1 phosphorylation is either not sufficient or not involved in insulin stimulation of ERK. PMID:7651388

  8. Engineering of Insulin Receptor Isoform-Selective Insulin Analogues

    PubMed Central

    Glendorf, Tine; Stidsen, Carsten E.; Norrman, Mathias; Nishimura, Erica; Sørensen, Anders R.; Kjeldsen, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Background The insulin receptor (IR) exists in two isoforms, A and B, and the isoform expression pattern is tissue-specific. The C-terminus of the insulin B chain is important for receptor binding and has been shown to contact the IR just adjacent to the region where the A and B isoforms differ. The aim of this study was to investigate the importance of the C-terminus of the B chain in IR isoform binding in order to explore the possibility of engineering tissue-specific/liver-specific insulin analogues. Methodology/Principal Findings Insulin analogue libraries were constructed by total amino acid scanning mutagenesis. The relative binding affinities for the A and B isoform of the IR were determined by competition assays using scintillation proximity assay technology. Structural information was obtained by X-ray crystallography. Introduction of B25A or B25N mutations resulted in analogues with a 2-fold preference for the B compared to the A isoform, whereas the opposite was observed with a B25Y substitution. An acidic amino acid residue at position B27 caused an additional 2-fold selective increase in affinity for the receptor B isoform for analogues bearing a B25N mutation. Furthermore, the combination of B25H with either B27D or B27E also resulted in B isoform-preferential analogues (2-fold preference) even though the corresponding single mutation analogues displayed no differences in relative isoform binding affinity. Conclusions/Significance We have discovered a new class of IR isoform-selective insulin analogues with 2–4-fold differences in relative binding affinities for either the A or the B isoform of the IR compared to human insulin. Our results demonstrate that a mutation at position B25 alone or in combination with a mutation at position B27 in the insulin molecule confers IR isoform selectivity. Isoform-preferential analogues may provide new opportunities for developing insulin analogues with improved clinical benefits. PMID:21625452

  9. Functional characterization of insulin receptor gene mutations contributing to Rabson-Mendenhall syndrome - phenotypic heterogeneity of insulin receptor gene mutations.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Shan; Fang, Qichen; Zhang, Feng; Wan, Hui; Zhang, Rong; Wang, Congrong; Bao, Yuqian; Zhang, Lei; Ma, Xiaojing; Lu, Junxi; Gao, Fei; Xiang, Kunsan; Jia, Weiping

    2011-01-01

    Rabson-Mendenhall syndrome (RMS) is a rare disorder that presents as severe insulin resistance as a result of mutations present in the insulin receptor (INSR). A Chinese girl with RMS presented with profound diabetes, hyperinsulinemia, acanthosis nigricans, hirsutism, and abnormalities of teeth and nails. Direct sequencing of the patient's INSR detected heterozygote mutations at Arg83Gln (R83Q) and Ala1028Val (A1028V), with the former representing a novel mutation. Functional studies of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells transfected with wild-type (WT) and mutant forms of INSR were performed to evaluate the effects of these mutations on receptor expression and activation. Receptor expression, insulin binding activity, and phosphorylation of the R83Q variant were comparable to WT. In contrast, expression of the A1028V receptor was much lower than that of WT INSR, and impairment of insulin binding and autophosphorylation were nearly commensurate with the decrease in expression detected. Reductions in the phosphorylation of IRS-1, Akt, and Erk1/2 (60%, 40%, and 50% of WT, respectively) indicate that the A1028V receptor contributes to impaired signal transduction. In conclusion, INSR mutations associated with RMS were identified. Moreover, the A1028V mutation associated with a decrease in expression of INSR potentially accounts for loss of function of the INSR.

  10. Transgenic silkworms expressing human insulin receptors for evaluation of therapeutically active insulin receptor agonists.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Yasuhiko; Ishii, Masaki; Ishii, Kenichi; Miyaguchi, Wataru; Horie, Ryo; Inagaki, Yoshinori; Hamamoto, Hiroshi; Tatematsu, Ken-ichiro; Uchino, Keiro; Tamura, Toshiki; Sezutsu, Hideki; Sekimizu, Kazuhisa

    2014-12-12

    We established a transgenic silkworm strain expressing the human insulin receptor (hIR) using the GAL4/UAS system. Administration of human insulin to transgenic silkworms expressing hIR decreased hemolymph sugar levels and facilitated Akt phosphorylation in the fat body. The decrease in hemolymph sugar levels induced by injection of human insulin in the transgenic silkworms expressing hIR was blocked by co-injection of wortmannin, a phosphoinositide 3-kinase inhibitor. Administration of bovine insulin, an hIR ligand, also effectively decreased sugar levels in the transgenic silkworms. These findings indicate that functional hIRs that respond to human insulin were successfully induced in the transgenic silkworms. We propose that the humanized silkworm expressing hIR is useful for in vivo evaluation of the therapeutic activities of insulin receptor agonists.

  11. Changing the insulin receptor to possess insulin-like growth factor I ligand specificity

    SciTech Connect

    Andersen, A.S.; Kjeldsen, T.; Wiberg, F.C.; Christensen, P.M.; Rasmussen, J.S.; Norris, K.; Moeller, K.B.; Moeller, N.P.H. )

    1990-08-14

    To examine the role of the N-terminal part of the insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) receptor and insulin receptor in determining ligand specificity, the authors prepared an expression vector encoding a hybrid receptor where exon 1 (encoding the signal peptide and seven amino acids of the {alpha}-subunit), exon 2, and exon 3 of the insulin receptor were replaced with the corresponding IGF-I receptor cDNA (938 nucleotides). To allow direct quantitative comparison of the binding capabilities of this hybrid receptor with those of the human IGF-I receptor and the insulin receptor, all three receptors were expressed in baby hamster kidney (BHK) cells as soluble molecules and partially purified before characterization. The hybrid IGF-I/insulin receptor bound IGF-I with an affinity comparable to that of the wild-type IGF-I receptor. In contrast, the hybrid receptor no longer displayed high-affinity binding of insulin. These results directly demonstrate that it is possible to change the specificity of the insulin receptor to that of the IGF-I receptor and, furthermore, that the binding specificity for IGF-I is encoded within the nucleotide sequence from 135 to 938 of the IGF-I receptor cDNA. Since the hybrid receptor only bound insulin with low affinity, the insulin binding region is likely to be located within exons 2 and 3 of the insulin receptor.

  12. Weight-loss diets modify glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide receptor rs2287019 genotype effects on changes in body weight, fasting glucose, and insulin resistance: the Preventing Overweight Using Novel Dietary Strategies trial.

    PubMed

    Qi, Qibin; Bray, George A; Hu, Frank B; Sacks, Frank M; Qi, Lu

    2012-02-01

    Glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide [also known as gastric inhibitory polypeptide (GIP)] and its receptor (GIPR) may link overnutrition to obesity, insulin resistance, and type 2 diabetes. A GIPR variant rs2287019 was recently associated with obesity and glucose metabolism. We aimed to examine whether weight-loss diets that vary in fat content may modify the effect of this variant on changes in body weight, fasting glucose, and insulin resistance in the Preventing Overweight Using Novel Dietary Strategies (POUNDS LOST) trial. We genotyped the GIPR rs2287019 in 737 overweight adults who were randomly assigned to 1 of 4 weight-loss diets that varied in macronutrient contents for 2 y. We assessed the percentage changes in body weight, fasting glucose, and insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) across genotypes by the low-fat and high-fat diets. At 6 mo of diet intervention, the T allele of rs2287019 was associated with greater weight loss (β ± SE: -1.05 ± 0.56%; P = 0.06) and greater decreases in fasting glucose (β ± SE: -2.33 ± 0.86%; P = 0.006), fasting insulin (β ± SE: -8.76 ± 4.13%; P = 0.03), and HOMA-IR (β ± SE: -10.52 ± 4.39%; P = 0.01) in participants who were assigned to low-fat diets, whereas there was no significant genotype effect on changes in these traits in the group assigned to the high-fat diet (all P > 0.44; P-interaction = 0.08, 0.04, 0.10, and 0.07, respectively). After correction for multiple tests (significant P = 0.008), the genotype effect on changes in fasting glucose remained significant. Sensitivity analysis in white participants showed that the interactions were more evident on changes in insulin and HOMA-IR (P-interaction < 0.008). The T allele of GIPR rs2287019 is associated with greater improvement of glucose homeostasis in individuals who choose a low-fat, high-carbohydrate, and high-fiber diet. The POUNDS LOST trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00072995.

  13. MARCH1 regulates insulin sensitivity by controlling cell surface insulin receptor levels

    PubMed Central

    Nagarajan, Arvindhan; Petersen, Max C.; Nasiri, Ali R.; Butrico, Gina; Fung, Annie; Ruan, Hai-Bin; Kursawe, Romy; Caprio, Sonia; Thibodeau, Jacques; Bourgeois-Daigneault, Marie-Claude; Sun, Lisha; Gao, Guangping; Bhanot, Sanjay; Jurczak, Michael J.; Green, Michael R.; Shulman, Gerald I.; Wajapeyee, Narendra

    2016-01-01

    Insulin resistance is a key driver of type 2 diabetes (T2D) and is characterized by defective insulin receptor (INSR) signalling. Although surface INSR downregulation is a well-established contributor to insulin resistance, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain obscure. Here we show that the E3 ubiquitin ligase MARCH1 impairs cellular insulin action by degrading cell surface INSR. Using a large-scale RNA interference screen, we identify MARCH1 as a negative regulator of INSR signalling. March1 loss-of-function enhances, and March1 overexpression impairs, hepatic insulin sensitivity in mice. MARCH1 ubiquitinates INSR to decrease cell surface INSR levels, but unlike other INSR ubiquitin ligases, MARCH1 acts in the basal state rather than after insulin stimulation. Thus, MARCH1 may help set the basal gain of insulin signalling. MARCH1 expression is increased in white adipose tissue of obese humans, suggesting that MARCH1 contributes to the pathophysiology of T2D and could be a new therapeutic target. PMID:27577745

  14. Insulin-receptor phosphotyrosyl-protein phosphatases.

    PubMed Central

    King, M J; Sale, G J

    1988-01-01

    Calmodulin-dependent protein phosphatase has been proposed to be an important phosphotyrosyl-protein phosphatase. The ability of the enzyme to attack autophosphorylated insulin receptor was examined and compared with the known ability of the enzyme to act on autophosphorylated epidermal-growth-factor (EGF) receptor. Purified calmodulin-dependent protein phosphatase was shown to catalyse the complete dephosphorylation of phosphotyrosyl-(insulin receptor). When compared at similar concentrations, 32P-labelled EGF receptor was dephosphorylated at greater than 3 times the rate of 32P-labelled insulin receptor; both dephosphorylations exhibited similar dependence on metal ions and calmodulin. Native phosphotyrosyl-protein phosphatases in cell extracts were also characterized. With rat liver, heart or brain, most (75%) of the native phosphatase activity against both 32P-labelled insulin and EGF receptors was recovered in the particulate fraction of the cell, with only 25% in the soluble fraction. This subcellular distribution contrasts with results of previous studies using artificial substrates, which found most of the phosphotyrosyl-protein phosphatase activity in the soluble fraction of the cell. Properties of particulate and soluble phosphatase activity against 32P-labelled insulin and EGF receptors are reported. The contribution of calmodulin-dependent protein phosphatase activity to phosphotyrosyl-protein phosphatase activity in cell fractions was determined by utilizing the unique metal-ion dependence of calmodulin-dependent protein phosphatase. Whereas Ni2+ (1 mM) markedly activated the calmodulin-dependent protein phosphatase, it was found to inhibit potently both particulate and soluble phosphotyrosyl-protein phosphatase activity. In fractions from rat liver, brain and heart, total phosphotyrosyl-protein phosphatase activity against both 32P-labelled receptors was inhibited by 99.5 +/- 6% (mean +/- S.E.M., 30 observations) by Ni2+. Results of Ni2+ inhibition

  15. SORLA facilitates insulin receptor signaling in adipocytes and exacerbates obesity

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Vanessa; Schulz, Nadja; Yan, Xin; Schürmann, Annette; Kempa, Stefan; Kern, Matthias; Blüher, Matthias; Poy, Matthew N.

    2016-01-01

    In humans, genetic variation of sortilin-related receptor, L(DLR class) A repeats containing (SORL1), which encodes the intracellular sorting receptor SORLA, is a major genetic risk factor for familial and sporadic forms of Alzheimer’s disease. Recent GWAS analysis has also associated SORL1 with obesity in humans and in mouse models, suggesting that this receptor may play a role in regulating metabolism. Here, using mouse models with genetic loss or tissue-specific overexpression of SORLA as well as data from obese human subjects, we observed a gene-dosage effect that links SORLA expression to obesity and glucose tolerance. Overexpression of human SORLA in murine adipose tissue blocked hydrolysis of triacylglycerides and caused excessive adiposity. In contrast, Sorl1 gene inactivation in mice accelerated breakdown of triacylglycerides in adipocytes and protected animals from diet-induced obesity. We then identified the underlying molecular mechanism whereby SORLA promotes insulin-induced suppression of lipolysis in adipocytes. Specifically, we determined that SORLA acts as a sorting factor for the insulin receptor (IR) that redirects internalized receptor molecules from endosomes to the plasma membrane, thereby enhancing IR surface expression and strengthening insulin signal reception in target cells. Our findings provide a molecular mechanism for the association of SORL1 with human obesity and confirm a genetic link between neurodegeneration and metabolism that converges on the receptor SORLA. PMID:27322061

  16. SORLA facilitates insulin receptor signaling in adipocytes and exacerbates obesity.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Vanessa; Schulz, Nadja; Yan, Xin; Schürmann, Annette; Kempa, Stefan; Kern, Matthias; Blüher, Matthias; Poy, Matthew N; Olivecrona, Gunilla; Willnow, Thomas E

    2016-07-01

    In humans, genetic variation of sortilin-related receptor, L(DLR class) A repeats containing (SORL1), which encodes the intracellular sorting receptor SORLA, is a major genetic risk factor for familial and sporadic forms of Alzheimer's disease. Recent GWAS analysis has also associated SORL1 with obesity in humans and in mouse models, suggesting that this receptor may play a role in regulating metabolism. Here, using mouse models with genetic loss or tissue-specific overexpression of SORLA as well as data from obese human subjects, we observed a gene-dosage effect that links SORLA expression to obesity and glucose tolerance. Overexpression of human SORLA in murine adipose tissue blocked hydrolysis of triacylglycerides and caused excessive adiposity. In contrast, Sorl1 gene inactivation in mice accelerated breakdown of triacylglycerides in adipocytes and protected animals from diet-induced obesity. We then identified the underlying molecular mechanism whereby SORLA promotes insulin-induced suppression of lipolysis in adipocytes. Specifically, we determined that SORLA acts as a sorting factor for the insulin receptor (IR) that redirects internalized receptor molecules from endosomes to the plasma membrane, thereby enhancing IR surface expression and strengthening insulin signal reception in target cells. Our findings provide a molecular mechanism for the association of SORL1 with human obesity and confirm a genetic link between neurodegeneration and metabolism that converges on the receptor SORLA.

  17. How insulin engages its primary binding site on the insulin receptor

    PubMed Central

    Menting, John G.; Whittaker, Jonathan; Margetts, Mai B.; Whittaker, Linda J.; Kong, Geoffrey K.-W.; Smith, Brian J.; Watson, Christopher J.; Žáková, Lenka; Kletvíková, Emília; Jiráček, Jiří; Chan, Shu Jin; Steiner, Donald F.; Dodson, Guy G.; Brzozowski, Andrzej M.; Weiss, Michael A.; Ward, Colin W.; Lawrence, Michael C.

    2013-01-01

    Insulin receptor signalling has a central role in mammalian biology, regulating cellular metabolism, growth, division, differentiation and survival1,2. Insulin resistance contributes to the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes mellitus and the onset of Alzheimer’s disease3; aberrant signalling occurs in diverse cancers, exacerbated by crosstalk with the homologous type 1 insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGF1R)4. Despite more than three decades of investigation, the three-dimensional structure of the insulin–insulin receptor complex has proved elusive, confounded by the complexity of producing the receptor protein. Here we present the first view, to our knowledge, of the interaction of insulin with its primary binding site on the insulin receptor, on the basis of four crystal structures of insulin bound to truncated insulin receptor constructs. The direct interaction of insulin with the first leucine-rich-repeat domain (L1) of insulin receptor is seen to be sparse, the hormone instead engaging the insulin receptor carboxy-terminal α-chain (αCT) segment, which is itself remodelled on the face of L1 upon insulin binding. Contact between insulin and L1 is restricted to insulin B-chain residues. The αCT segment displaces the B-chain C-terminal β-strand away from the hormone core, revealing the mechanism of a long-proposed conformational switch in insulin upon receptor engagement. This mode of hormone–receptor recognition is novel within the broader family of receptor tyrosine kinases5. We support these findings by photo-crosslinking data that place the suggested interactions into the context of the holoreceptor and by isothermal titration calorimetry data that dissect the hormone–insulin receptor interface. Together, our findings provide an explanation for a wealth of biochemical data from the insulin receptor and IGF1R systems relevant to the design of therapeutic insulin analogues. PMID:23302862

  18. Insulin receptor substrate signaling suppresses neonatal autophagy in the heart

    PubMed Central

    Riehle, Christian; Wende, Adam R.; Sena, Sandra; Pires, Karla Maria; Pereira, Renata Oliveira; Zhu, Yi; Bugger, Heiko; Frank, Deborah; Bevins, Jack; Chen, Dong; Perry, Cynthia N.; Dong, Xiaocheng C.; Valdez, Steven; Rech, Monika; Sheng, Xiaoming; Weimer, Bart C.; Gottlieb, Roberta A.; White, Morris F.; Abel, E. Dale

    2013-01-01

    The induction of autophagy in the mammalian heart during the perinatal period is an essential adaptation required to survive early neonatal starvation; however, the mechanisms that mediate autophagy suppression once feeding is established are not known. Insulin signaling in the heart is transduced via insulin and IGF-1 receptors (IGF-1Rs). We disrupted insulin and IGF-1R signaling by generating mice with combined cardiomyocyte-specific deletion of Irs1 and Irs2. Here we show that loss of IRS signaling prevented the physiological suppression of autophagy that normally parallels the postnatal increase in circulating insulin. This resulted in unrestrained autophagy in cardiomyocytes, which contributed to myocyte loss, heart failure, and premature death. This process was ameliorated either by activation of mTOR with aa supplementation or by genetic suppression of autophagic activation. Loss of IRS1 and IRS2 signaling also increased apoptosis and precipitated mitochondrial dysfunction, which were not reduced when autophagic flux was normalized. Together, these data indicate that in addition to prosurvival signaling, insulin action in early life mediates the physiological postnatal suppression of autophagy, thereby linking nutrient sensing to postnatal cardiac development. PMID:24177427

  19. Soluble receptor for advanced glycation end products as a potential biomarker to predict weight loss and improvement of insulin sensitivity by a very low calorie diet of obese human subjects.

    PubMed

    Hagen, Imke; Schulte, Dominik M; Müller, Nike; Martinsen, Jessica; Türk, Kathrin; Hedderich, Jürgen; Schreiber, Stefan; Laudes, Matthias

    2015-06-01

    Obesity is associated with low-grade systemic inflammation which is thought to trigger the development of comorbidities such as type 2 diabetes. The soluble receptor for advanced glycation end products (sRAGE) belongs to the innate immune system and has been linked to obesity, recently. The aim of the present study was to examine whether serum sRAGE concentrations are related to the grade of weight loss and improvement of insulin resistance due to a very low calorie diet (VLCD). 22 severe obese subjects (Median Body Mass Index (BMI): 44.5kg/m(2)) were included in a dietary intervention study of 6month, consisting of a very low calorie formula diet phase (VLCD: 800kcal/d) for 12 weeks and a following 12 week weight maintenance phase. Fasting glucose, fasting insulin, adiponectin, leptin and sRAGE were determined from sera. Insulin sensitivity was estimated by Homeostasis Model Assessment (HOMA) index and leptin-to-adiponectin-ratio (LAR). Mean body weight reduction by VLCD accounted to 21.7kg with a significant improvement of insulin resistance. At baseline, sRAGE serum levels were significantly inversely related to BMI (rS=-0.642, p=0.001) and HOMA (rS=-0.419, p=0.041). Of interest, sRAGE serum levels at baseline were significantly lower in study subjects with greater reduction of BMI (p=0.017). In addition, a significantly greater HOMA reduction was observed in subjects with lower sRAGE serum levels at baseline (p=0.006). Finally, correlation analysis revealed, that changes of sRAGE serum levels were significantly correlated to changes of BMI (rS=-0.650, p=0.022) during intervention. Anti-inflammatory sRAGE might be a potential future biomarker to predict weight loss and improvement of insulin resistance by a VLCD whereby lower baseline sRAGE serum levels indicate a better outcome of the dietary intervention. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Agonism and Antagonism at the Insulin Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Knudsen, Louise; Hansen, Bo Falck; Jensen, Pia; Pedersen, Thomas Åskov; Vestergaard, Kirsten; Schäffer, Lauge; Blagoev, Blagoy; Oleksiewicz, Martin B.; Kiselyov, Vladislav V.; De Meyts, Pierre

    2012-01-01

    Insulin can trigger metabolic as well as mitogenic effects, the latter being pharmaceutically undesirable. An understanding of the structure/function relationships between insulin receptor (IR) binding and mitogenic/metabolic signalling would greatly facilitate the preclinical development of new insulin analogues. The occurrence of ligand agonism and antagonism is well described for G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) and other receptors but in general, with the exception of antibodies, not for receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs). In the case of the IR, no natural ligand or insulin analogue has been shown to exhibit antagonistic properties, with the exception of a crosslinked insulin dimer (B29-B’29). However, synthetic monomeric or dimeric peptides targeting sites 1 or 2 of the IR were shown to be either agonists or antagonists. We found here that the S961 peptide, previously described to be an IR antagonist, exhibited partial agonistic effects in the 1–10 nM range, showing altogether a bell-shaped dose-response curve. Intriguingly, the agonistic effects of S961 were seen only on mitogenic endpoints (3H-thymidine incorporation), and not on metabolic endpoints (14C-glucose incorporation in adipocytes and muscle cells). The agonistic effects of S961 were observed in 3 independent cell lines, with complete concordance between mitogenicity (3H-thymidine incorporation) and phosphorylation of the IR and Akt. Together with the B29-B’29 crosslinked dimer, S961 is a rare example of a mixed agonist/antagonist for the human IR. A plausible mechanistic explanation based on the bivalent crosslinking model of IR activation is proposed. PMID:23300584

  1. Phosphorylation of insulin-like growth factor I receptor by insulin receptor tyrosine kinase in intact cultured skeletal muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Beguinot, F.; Smith, R.J.; Kahn, C.R.; Maron, R.; Moses, A.C.; White, M.F.

    1988-05-03

    The interaction between insulin and insulin-like growth factor I (IGF I) receptors was examined by determining the ability of each receptor type to phosphorylate tyrosine residues on the other receptor in intact L6 skeletal muscle cells. This was made possible through a sequential immunoprecipitation method with two different antibodies that effectively separated the phosphorylated insulin and IGF I receptors. After incubation of intact L6 cells with various concentrations of insulin or IGF I in the presence of (/sup 32/P)-orthophosphate, insulin receptors were precipitated with one of two human polyclonal anti-insulin receptor antibodies (B2 or B9). Phosphorylated IGF I receptors remained in solution and were subsequently precipitated by anti-phosphotyrosine antibodies. The identifies of the insulin and IGF I receptor ..beta..-subunits in the two immunoprecipitates were confirmed by binding affinity, by phosphopeptide mapping after trypsin digestion, and by the distinct patterns of expression of the two receptors during differentiation. Stimulated phosphorylation of the ..beta..-subunit of the insulin receptor correlated with the occupancy of the ..beta..-subunit of the insulin receptor by either insulin or IGF I as determined by affinity cross-linking. Similarly, stimulation of phosphorylation of the ..beta..-subunit of the IGF I receptor by IGF I correlated with IGF I receptor occupancy. In contrast, insulin stimulated phosphorylation of the ..beta..-subunit of the IGF I receptor at hormone concentrations that were associated with significant occupancy of the insulin receptor but negligible IGF I receptor occupancy. These findings indicate that the IGF I receptor can be a substrate for the hormone-activated insulin receptor tyrosine kinase activity in intact L6 skeletal muscle cells.

  2. Receptor-Mediated Transport of Insulin across Endothelial Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, George L.; Johnson, Sandra M.

    1985-03-01

    Hormones such as insulin are transported from the interior to the exterior of blood vessels. Whether endothelial cells, which line the inner walls of blood vessels have a role in this transport of hormones is not clear, but it is known that endothelial cells can internalize and release insulin rapidly with little degradation. The transport of iodine-125-labeled insulin was measured directly through the use of dual chambers separated by a horizontal monolayer of cultured bovine aortic endothelial cells. In this setting, endothelial cells took up and released the labeled insulin, thereby transporting it across the cells. The transport of insulin across the endothelial cells was temperature sensitive and was inhibited by unlabeled insulin and by antibody to insulin receptor in proportion to the ability of these substances to inhibit insulin binding to its receptor. More than 80 percent of the transported insulin was intact. These data suggest that insulin is rapidly transported across endothelial cells by a receptor-mediated process.

  3. [Severe type A insulin resistance syndrome due to a mutation in the insulin receptor gene].

    PubMed

    Ros, P; Colino-Alcol, E; Grasso, V; Barbetti, F; Argente, J

    2015-01-01

    Insulin resistance syndromes without lipodystrophy are an infrequent and heterogeneous group of disorders with variable clinical phenotypes, associated with hyperglycemia and hyperinsulinemia. The three conditions related to mutations in the insulin receptor gene are leprechaunism or Donohue syndrome, Rabson-Mendenhall syndrome, and Type A syndrome. A case is presented on a patient diagnosed with type A insulin resistance, defined by the triad of extreme insulin resistance, acanthosis nigricans, and hyperandrogenism, carrying a heterozygous mutation in exon 19 of the insulin receptor gene coding for its tyrosine kinase domain that is crucial for the catalytic activity of the receptor. The molecular basis of the syndrome is reviewed, focusing on the structure-function relationships of the insulin receptor, knowing that the criteria for survival are linked to residual insulin receptor function. It is also pointed out that, although type A insulin resistance appears to represent a somewhat less severe condition, these patients have a high morbidity and their treatment is still unsatisfactory.

  4. Insulin receptors: binding kinetics and structure-function relationship of insulin

    SciTech Connect

    Gammeltoft, S.

    1984-10-01

    Morphological and biochemical work suggests that internalization of the receptor-insulin complex from the plasma membrane transfers insulin to intracellular organelles like the lysosomes, the Golgi apparatus, or nucleus, where degradation by insulin protease takes place, whereas the receptor is recycled back to the membrane. Recent advances in the studies of biosynthesis and cellular dynamics of receptors indicate that intracellular processing and redistribution of binding sites may play a role in the mechanism of insulin action. Insulin receptors are widely distributed in all cell types, but evidence has accumulated that receptors show tissue and species variations in their functional properties regarding binding affinity, insulin specificity, cooperativity, and insulin degradation and in structural properties such as antigenic determinants and glycosidic composition. Perhaps these differences reflect cellular adaptations and variations in the physiological role of insulin.

  5. Is insulin binding followed by disulfide interchange between insulin and the receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, P.E.; Lipkin, E.W.; Teller, D.C.; de Haeen, C.

    1986-05-01

    The kinetics of insulin binding to rat adipocytes at 15/sup 0/C can best be described by a 2-step model. Insulin, I, first binds to the receptor, R. Occupied receptors, RI, then convert reversibly to another form, R'I, from which insulin cannot dissociate directly. At equilibrium, the R'I:RI ratio is approx.3:2. To elucidate the nature of R'I, the effects of 5,5'-dithiobis-(2-nitrobenzoate) (DTNB) on the kinetics of insulin binding were investigated. DTNB (2.5 mM) added with 1 nM /sup 125/I-iodoinsulin doubled insulin binding relative to cells without DTNB. When labeled insulin prebound to cells was dissociated with excess unlabeled insulin, DTNB added with the unlabeled insulin reduced the amount of dissociating label. Treatment of adipocytes with DTNB prior to insulin exposure did not alter the subsequent response of insulin binding to DTNB. These data suggest that the receptor exists in at least two conformational states: R, the unoccupied receptor, with a cryptic sulfhydryl group, and the occupied receptors RI and R'I, in which a sulfhydryl group is sensitive to DTNB. The authors propose that R'I formation is the result of disulfide exchange between the receptor and insulin, in accordance with the kinetics evidence that insulin cannot directly dissociate from R'I. The disulfide exchange generates a free sulfhydryl on insulin, with which DTNB reacts to trap insulin covalently bound in the R'I form.

  6. Immunological demonstration of the accumulation of insulin, but not insulin receptors, in nuclei of insulin-treated cells

    SciTech Connect

    Soler, A.P.; Thompson, K.A.; Smith, R.M.; Jarett, L. )

    1989-09-01

    Although insulin is known to regulate nuclear-related processes, such as cell growth and gene transcription, the mechanisms involved are poorly understood. Previous studies suggested that translocation of insulin or its receptor to cell nuclei might be involved in some of these processes. The present investigation demonstrated that intact insulin, but not the insulin receptor, accumulated in nuclei of insulin-treated cells. Cell fractionation studies demonstrated that the nuclear accumulation of {sup 125}I-labeled insulin was time-, temperature-, and insulin-concentration-dependent. Electron microscopic immunocytochemistry demonstrated that the insulin that accumulated in the nucleus was immunologically intact and associated with the heterochromatin. Only 1% of the {sup 125}I-labeled insulin extracted from isolated nuclei was eluted from a Sephadex G-50 column as {sup 125}I-labeled tyrosine. Plasma membrane insulin receptors were not detected in the nucleus by immuno electron microscopy or when wheat germ agglutinin-purified extracts of the nuclei were subjected to PAGE, electrotransfer, and immunoblotting with anti-insulin receptor antibodies. These results suggested that internalized insulin dissociated from its receptor and accumulated in the nucleus without its membrane receptor. The authors propose that some of insulin's effects on nuclear function may be caused by the translocation of the intact and biologically active hormone to the nucleus and its binding to nuclear components in the heterochromatin.

  7. Insulin receptor-insulin interaction kinetics using multiplex surface plasmon resonance.

    PubMed

    Subramanian, Kannan; Fee, Conan J; Fredericks, Rayleen; Stubbs, Richard S; Hayes, Mark T

    2013-12-01

    Type 2 diabetes affects millions of people worldwide, and measuring the kinetics of insulin receptor-insulin interactions is critical to improving our understanding of this disease. In this paper, we describe, for the first time, a rapid, real-time, multiplex surface plasmon resonance (SPR) assay for studying the interaction between insulin and the insulin receptor ectodomain, isoform A (eIR-A). We used a scaffold approach in which anti-insulin receptor monoclonal antibody 83-7 (Abcam, Cambridge, UK) was first immobilized on the SPR sensorchip by amine coupling, followed by eIR-A capture. The multiplex SPR system (ProteOn XPR36™, Bio-Rad Laboratories, Hercules, CA) enabled measurement of replicate interactions with a single, parallel set of analyte injections, whereas repeated regeneration of the scaffold between measurements caused variable loss of antibody activity. Interactions between recombinant human insulin followed a two-site binding pattern, consistent with the literature, with a high-affinity site (dissociation constant K(D1)  = 38.1 ± 0.9 nM) and a low-affinity site (K(D2)  = 166.3 ± 7.3 nM). The predominantly monomeric insulin analogue Lispro had corresponding dissociation constants K(D1)  = 73.2 ± 1.8 nM and K(D2)  = 148.9 ± 6.1 nM, but the fit to kinetic data was improved when we included a conformational change factor in which the high-affinity site was converted to the low-affinity site. The new SPR assay enables insulin-eIR-A interactions to be followed in real time and could potentially be extended to study the effects of humoral factors on the interaction, without the need for insulin labeling. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Quercetin suppresses insulin receptor signaling through inhibition of the insulin ligand–receptor binding and therefore impairs cancer cell proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Feng; Yang, Yong

    2014-10-03

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Quercetin inhibits insulin ligand–receptor interactions. • Quercetin reduces downstream insulin receptor signaling. • Quercetin blocks insulin induced glucose uptake. • Quercetin suppresses insulin stimulated cancer cell proliferation and tumor growth. - Abstract: Although the flavonoid quercetin is known to inhibit activation of insulin receptor signaling, the inhibitory mechanism is largely unknown. In this study, we demonstrate that quercetin suppresses insulin induced dimerization of the insulin receptor (IR) through interfering with ligand–receptor interactions, which reduces the phosphorylation of IR and Akt. This inhibitory effect further inhibits insulin stimulated glucose uptake due to decreased cell membrane translocation of glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4), resulting in impaired cancer cell proliferation. The effect of quercetin in inhibiting tumor growth was also evident in an in vivo model, indicating a potential future application for quercetin in the treatment of cancers.

  9. Inhibition of insulin receptor gene expression and insulin signaling by fatty acid: interplay of PKC isoforms therein.

    PubMed

    Dey, Debleena; Mukherjee, Mohua; Basu, Dipanjan; Datta, Malabika; Roy, Sib Sankar; Bandyopadhyay, Arun; Bhattacharya, Samir

    2005-01-01

    Fatty acids are known to play a key role in promoting the loss of insulin sensitivity causing insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. However, underlying mechanism involved here is still unclear. Incubation of rat skeletal muscle cells with palmitate followed by I(125)- insulin binding to the plasma membrane receptor preparation demonstrated a two-fold decrease in receptor occupation. In searching the cause for this reduction, we found that palmitate inhibition of insulin receptor (IR) gene expression effecting reduced amount of IR protein in skeletal muscle cells. This was followed by the inhibition of insulin-stimulated IRbeta tyrosine phosphorylation that consequently resulted inhibition of insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS 1) and IRS 1 associated phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3 Kinase), phosphoinositide dependent kinase-1 (PDK 1) phosphorylation. PDK 1 dependent phosphorylation of PKCzeta and Akt/PKB were also inhibited by palmitate. Surprisingly, although PKCepsilon phosphorylation is PDK1 dependent, palmitate effected its constitutive phosphorylation independent of PDK1. Time kinetics study showed translocation of palmitate induced phosphorylated PKCepsilon from cell membrane to nuclear region and its possible association with the inhibition of IR gene transcription. Our study suggests one of the pathways through which fatty acid can induce insulin resistance in skeletal muscle cell.

  10. Human insulin prepared by recombinant DNA techniques and native human insulin interact identically with insulin receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Keefer, L M; Piron, M A; De Meyts, P

    1981-01-01

    Human insulin synthesized from A and B chains separately produced in Escherichia coli from cloned synthetic genes (prepared by the Eli Lilly Research Laboratories, Indianapolis, IN) was characterized by examining its interaction with human cultured lymphocytes, human circulating erythrocytes in vitro, and isolated rat fat cells. The binding behavior of the biosynthetic insulin with human cells was indistinguishable from that of native human or porcine insulins, with respect to affinity, association and dissociation kinetics, negative cooperativity, and the down-regulation of lymphocyte receptors. Similarly, the biosynthetic insulin was as potent as the native insulins in stimulating lipogenesis in isolated rat fat cells. We also examined the receptor binding characteristics of 125I-labeled human and porcine insulins monoiodinated solely at Tyr-A14, which were obtained by means of high-performance liquid chromatography of the iodination reaction mixture (this material was prepared by B. Frank, Eli Lilly Research Laboratories). In all aspects studied, the pure [TyrA14-125I]iodoinsulins were superior as tracers to the monoiodoinsulin purified by the more conventional method of gel filtration. PMID:7015337

  11. Axons guided by insulin receptor in Drosophila visual system.

    PubMed

    Song, Jianbo; Wu, Lingling; Chen, Zun; Kohanski, Ronald A; Pick, Leslie

    2003-04-18

    Insulin receptors are abundant in the central nervous system, but their roles remain elusive. Here we show that the insulin receptor functions in axon guidance. The Drosophila insulin receptor (DInR) is required for photoreceptor-cell (R-cell) axons to find their way from the retina to the brain during development of the visual system. DInR functions as a guidance receptor for the adapter protein Dock/Nck. This function is independent of Chico, the Drosophila insulin receptor substrate (IRS) homolog.

  12. Hepatitis B virus inhibits insulin receptor signaling and impairs liver regeneration via intracellular retention of the insulin receptor.

    PubMed

    Barthel, Sebastian Robert; Medvedev, Regina; Heinrich, Thekla; Büchner, Sarah Manon; Kettern, Nadja; Hildt, Eberhard

    2016-11-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) causes severe liver disease but the underlying mechanisms are incompletely understood. During chronic HBV infection, the liver is recurrently injured by immune cells in the quest for viral elimination. To compensate tissue injury, liver regeneration represents a vital process which requires proliferative insulin receptor signaling. This study aims to investigate the impact of HBV on liver regeneration and hepatic insulin receptor signaling. After carbon tetrachloride-induced liver injury, liver regeneration is delayed in HBV transgenic mice. These mice show diminished hepatocyte proliferation and increased expression of fibrosis markers. This is in accordance with a reduced activation of the insulin receptor although HBV induces expression of the insulin receptor via activation of NF-E2-related factor 2. This leads to increased intracellular amounts of insulin receptor in HBV expressing hepatocytes. However, intracellular retention of the receptor simultaneously reduces the amount of functional insulin receptors on the cell surface and thereby attenuates insulin binding in vitro and in vivo. Intracellular retention of the insulin receptor is caused by elevated amounts of α-taxilin, a free syntaxin binding protein, in HBV expressing hepatocytes preventing proper targeting of the insulin receptor to the cell surface. Consequently, functional analyses of insulin responsiveness revealed that HBV expressing hepatocytes are less sensitive to insulin stimulation leading to delayed liver regeneration. This study describes a novel pathomechanism that uncouples HBV expressing hepatocytes from proliferative signals and thereby impedes compensatory liver regeneration after liver injury.

  13. Combining a GLP-1 receptor agonist and basal insulin: study evidence and practical considerations.

    PubMed

    Carris, Nicholas W; Taylor, James R; Gums, John G

    2014-12-01

    Most patients with diabetes mellitus require multiple medications to achieve glycemic goals. Considering this and the increasing incidence of type 2 diabetes worldwide, the need for effective combination therapy is pressing. Basal insulin and glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists are frequently used to treat type 2 diabetes. Though both classes of medication are exclusively injectable, which may cause initial hesitation from providers, evidence for their combined use is substantial. This review summarizes the theoretical benefit, supporting evidence, and implementation of a combined basal insulin-GLP-1 receptor agonist regimen. Basal insulin added to a GLP-1 receptor agonist reduces hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) without weight gain or significantly increased hypoglycemia. A GLP-1 receptor agonist added to basal insulin reduces HbA1c and body weight. Compared with the addition of meal-time insulin to basal insulin, a GLP-1 receptor agonist produces similar or greater reduction in HbA1c, weight loss instead of weight gain, and less hypoglycemia. Gastrointestinal adverse events are common with GLP-1 receptor agonists, especially during initiation and titration. However, combination with basal insulin is not expected to augment expected adverse events that come with using a GLP-1 receptor agonist. Basal insulin can be added to a GLP-1 receptor agonist with a slow titration to target goal fasting plasma glucose. In patients starting a GLP-1 receptor agonist, the dose of basal insulin should be decreased by 20 % in patients with an HbA1c ≤8 %. The evidence from 15 randomized prospective studies supports the combined use of a GLP-1 receptor agonist with basal insulin in a broad range of patients with uncontrolled type 2 diabetes.

  14. Simulation model of defective insulin receptors as byproducts of receptor recycling.

    PubMed

    Kurbel, B; Kurbel, S; Kristek, Z; Jakić, M; Jurić, M; Sulava, D

    1997-08-01

    Our simulation model assumes that the defective insulin-binding receptors in non-insulin-dependent diabetes (NIDDM) patients result from functional receptor recycling. The model is a short program written in MS DOS 5.0 Qbasic. MODEL DESIGN: Receptors with intracellular portions damaged in the process of recycling are considered defective since they bind insulin but do mediate insulin effects, or recycle. Their occurrence depends on the average activation rate of functional receptors. The insulin-binding receptors (defective and functional) are objects of slow and time-dependent turnover defined by the turnover rate. Recycled receptors rejoin functional receptors or enter the pool of defective receptors. The waste in the functional receptors' pool is covered by a limited amount of newly synthesized receptors. The defective receptors often accumulate in cases of increased activation of functional receptors. SIMULATION RESULTS: The insulin-binding receptor quantity is determined, in the model, only by the number of newly synthesized receptors, reflecting the intensity of insulin stimulation. Synthesis is increased following variable insulin stimulations and decreased after sustained, intensive insulin stimulation. The number of functional receptors inversely reflects the average activation rate of functional receptors compared with the insulin-binding receptors turnover rate. High activation rates can diminish the proportion of functional receptors to less than 5% of that of all insulin-binding receptors. The model predicts that cells bearing only functional receptors show progressively shortened half-lives of receptors, reflecting the receptor activation intensity. On the other hand, cells bearing both defective and functional receptors show stable receptors' half-lives (20-36% of the defective receptors' half-life). Simulation results suggest that reduced functional receptor proportions in NIDDM patients might reflect the imbalance between the activation of

  15. Threshold for Improvement in Insulin Sensitivity with Adolescent Weight Loss

    PubMed Central

    Levitt Katz, Lorraine E.; Moore, Reneé H.; Xanthopoulos, Melissa S.; Bishop-Gilyard, Chanelle T.; Wadden, Thomas A.; Berkowitz, Robert I.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To assess the association of weight loss and insulin sensitivity, glucose tolerance, and metabolic syndrome (MS) in obese adolescents following weight loss treatment, and to determine the threshold amount of weight loss required to observe improvements in these measures. Study design A randomized, controlled behavioral weight loss trial was conducted with 113 obese adolescents. Changes in fasting insulin, homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), whole body insulin sensitivity index (WBISI), body-mass index (BMI), and MS criteria were assessed at baseline and at month 4. Results There was significant improvement in all measures of insulin sensitivity at month 4. Mean fasting insulin dropped to 16.6 from 22.3 μU/mL (p<0.0001). HOMA-IR decreased significantly from 4.9 to 3.7 (p=0.001) and WBISI increased significantly from 2.87 to 3.98 (p<0.0001). An 8% reduction in BMI led to a significant improvement in WBISI (p=0.03) and was the optimal threshold. Fewer individuals met criteria for MS after weight loss (p=0.0038), although there were no significant changes in the individual features of the syndrome. Conclusions In this trial, weight loss at month 4 was associated with improved insulin sensitivity in obese adolescents. An approximate decrease in BMI of 8% was the threshold level at which insulin sensitivity improved. As more weight loss programs are designed for obese adolescents, it will be important to have reasonable weight loss goals that will yield improvements in metabolic and cardiovascular disease risk factors. PMID:23706362

  16. Homozygous nonsense mutation in the insulin receptor gene of a patient with severe congenital insulin resistance: leprechaunism and the role of the insulin-like growth factor receptor.

    PubMed

    Jospe, N; Kaplowitz, P B; Furlanetto, R W

    1996-08-01

    Severe congenital insulin resistance in the syndrome of leprechaunism is caused by mutations in the insulin receptor gene. We report a patient with leprechaunism who was homozygous for a mutation resulting in the absence of cell surface insulin receptors. To determine whether the receptor for Insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) is involved in the phenotype of leprechaunism, we studied the effect of insulin and of IGF-I on cells from this patient. The patient had a homozygous C-->T substitution at base pair 8212 in exon 12 of the insulin receptor gene, creating a premature stop codon. This nonsense mutation is in the extracellular portion of the receptor and truncates the insulin receptor proximal to its transmembrane anchor, resulting in the absence of cell surface insulin receptors. This finding indicates that complete absence of the insulin receptor is compatible with life. Secondly, DNA synthesis was studied in skin derived fibroblasts in response to increasing concentrations of either insulin or Insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I), and was assessed by 3H-thymidine incorporation. In this patient's cells, both of these hormones increased 3H-thymidine incorporation, and the effect was blocked by alpha-IR3, a monoclonal antibody that blocks activation of the IGF-I receptor. These findings confirmed the absence of the insulin receptor and indicated that insulin acts here through activation of the IGF-I receptor. These data support the contention that the phenotypic and metabolic abnormalities of leprechaunism result from the combination of lack of insulin receptor action and over-activation by insulin of the type 1 IGF receptor.

  17. Insulin-induced surface redistribution regulates internalization of the insulin receptor and requires its autophosphorylation

    SciTech Connect

    Carpentier, J.L.; Paccaud, J.P.; Orci, L. ); Gorden, P. ); Rutter, W.J. )

    1992-01-01

    The role of insulin-induced receptor autophosphorylation in its internalization was analyzed by comparing {sup 125}I-labeled insulin ({sup 125}I-insulin) internalization in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell lines transfected with normal (CHO.T) or mutated insulin receptors. In four cell lines with a defect of insulin-induced autophosphorylation, {sup 125}I-insulin internalization was impaired. By contrast, in CHO.T cells and in two other CHO cell lines with amino acid deletions or insertions that do not perturb autophosphorylation, {sup 125}I-insulin internalization was not affected. A morphological analysis showed that the inhibition is linked to the ligand-specific surface redistribution in which the insulin-receptor complexes leave microvilli and concentrate on nonvillous segments of the membrane where endocytosis occurs.

  18. Insulin-Dependent Regulation of Insulin Receptor Concentrations: A Direct Demonstration in Cell Culture

    PubMed Central

    Gavin, James R.; Roth, Jesse; Neville, David M.; De Meyts, Pierre; Buell, Donald N.

    1974-01-01

    Chronic (5-16 hr) exposure of cultured human lymphocytes to 10-8 M insulin at 37° in vitro produced a decrease in insulin receptor concentrations unaccounted for by simple occupancy of sites; acute exposure (0-2 hr) was without effect. These results reproduced observations in vivo where chronic hyperinsulinemia (e.g., 10-8 M insulin in the circulation of obese insulinresistant hyperglycemic mice) is associated with a substantial reduction in the concentration of insulin receptors per cell, while acute hyperinsulinemia in vivo has no effect on receptor concentration. These data suggest a reciprocal relationship between insulin in the extracellular fluid and the concentration of insulin receptors per cell, which is mediated at the target cell itself by intracellular insulin-sensitive regulatory processes and directly affects target-cell sensitivity to hormone. PMID:4359334

  19. Changes of insulin effect on lipogenesis and insulin binding receptors during hypokinesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macho, L.; Fickova, M.; Zorad, S.

    The effect of hypokinesia on insulin action and insulin binding to specific receptors in fat cells was studied. Male Wistar rats were exposed to hypokinesia in special adjustable plastic cages for 1, 7, 21 and 60 days, and the stimulatory effect of insulin (10 and 100 mU) on the incorporation of radiocarbon labelled glucose into lipids of fat tissue and the binding of insulin to receptors of isolated adipocytes was estimated. The stimulation of lipogenesis by insulin was slightly diminished after hypokinesia for 1 day, however, an important increase of insulin action was found in rats exposed to hypokinesia for 60 days. The decrease of insulin binding capacity of the number of binding sites per cell and of the insulin receptor density was found after 1 day of hypokinesia. In rats exposed to hypokinesia for 60 days, in agreement with the higher stimulatory affect of insulin, an increase of insulin receptor density was observed. These results showed that hypokinesia has an important influence on stimulatory action of insulin and on insulin receptors in adipocytes.

  20. Insulin receptor-related receptor as an extracellular alkali sensor.

    PubMed

    Deyev, Igor E; Sohet, Fabien; Vassilenko, Konstantin P; Serova, Oxana V; Popova, Nadezhda V; Zozulya, Sergey A; Burova, Elena B; Houillier, Pascal; Rzhevsky, Dmitry I; Berchatova, Anastasiya A; Murashev, Arkady N; Chugunov, Anton O; Efremov, Roman G; Nikol'sky, Nikolai N; Bertelli, Eugenio; Eladari, Dominique; Petrenko, Alexander G

    2011-06-08

    The insulin receptor-related receptor (IRR), an orphan receptor tyrosine kinase of the insulin receptor family, can be activated by alkaline media both in vitro and in vivo at pH >7.9. The alkali-sensing property of IRR is conserved in frog, mouse, and human. IRR activation is specific, dose-dependent and quickly reversible and demonstrates positive cooperativity. It also triggers receptor conformational changes and elicits intracellular signaling. The pH sensitivity of IRR is primarily defined by its L1F extracellular domains. IRR is predominantly expressed in organs that come in contact with mildly alkaline media. In particular, IRR is expressed in the cell subsets of the kidney that secrete bicarbonate into urine. Disruption of IRR in mice impairs the renal response to alkali loading attested by development of metabolic alkalosis and decreased urinary bicarbonate excretion in response to this challenge. We therefore postulate that IRR is an alkali sensor that functions in the kidney to manage metabolic bicarbonate excess. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Insulin receptor-related receptor as an extracellular alkali sensor

    PubMed Central

    Deyev, Igor E.; Sohet, Fabien; Vassilenko, Konstantin P.; Serova, Oxana V.; Popova, Nadezhda V.; Zozulya, Sergey A.; Burova, Elena B.; Houillier, Pascal; Rzhevsky, Dmitry I.; Berchatova, Anastasiya A.; Murashev, Arkady N.; Chugunov, Anton O.; Efremov, Roman G.; Nikol’sky, Nikolai N.; Bertelli, Eugenio; Eladari, Dominique; Petrenko, Alexander G.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY The insulin receptor-related receptor (IRR), an orphan receptor tyrosine kinase of the insulin receptor family, can be activated by alkaline media both in vitro and in vivo at pH>7.9. The alkali-sensing property of IRR is conserved in frog, mouse and human. IRR activation is specific, dose-dependent, quickly reversible and demonstrates positive cooperativity. It also triggers receptor conformational changes and elicits intracellular signaling. The pH sensitivity of IRR is primarily defined by its L1F extracellular domains. IRR is predominantly expressed in organs that come in contact with mildly alkaline media. In particular, IRR is expressed in the cell subsets of the kidney that secrete bicarbonate into urine. Disruption of IRR in mice impairs the renal response to alkali loading attested by development of metabolic alkalosis and decreased urinary bicarbonate excretion in response to this challenge. We therefore postulate that IRR is an alkali sensor that functions in the kidney to manage metabolic bicarbonate excess. PMID:21641549

  2. Mutations at the dimer, hexamer, and receptor-binding surfaces of insulin independently affect insulin-insulin and insulin-receptor interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Shoelson, S.E.; Zixian Lu; Parlautan, L.; Lynch, C.S.; Weiss, M.A. )

    1992-02-18

    Mutagenesis of the dimer- and hexamer-forming surfaces of insulin yields analogues with reduced tendencies to aggregate and dramatically altered pharmacokinetic properties. The authors recently showed that one such analogue, HisB1- {yields} Asp, ProB28 {yields} Lys, LysB29 {yields} Pro human insulin (DKP-insulin), has enhanced affinity for the insulin receptor and is useful for studying the structure of the insulin monomer under physiologic solvent conditions. DKP-insulin retains native secondary and tertiary structure in solution and may therefore provide an appropriate baseline for further studies of related analogues containing additional substitutions within the receptor-binding surface of insulin. To test this, they prepared a family of DKP analogues having potency-altering substitutions at the B24 and B25 positions using a streamlined approach to enzymatic semisynthesis which negates the need for amino-group protection. For comparison, similar analogues of native human insulin were prepared by standard semisynthetic methods. The DKP analogues show a reduced tendency to self-associate, as indicated by {sup 1}H-NMR resonance line widths. Such 'template independence' reflects an absence of functional interactions between the B24 and B25 sites and additional substitutions in DKP-insulin and demonstrates that mutations in discrete surfaces of insulin have independent effects on protein structure and function. In particular, the respective receptor-recognition (PheB24, PheB25), hexamer-forming (HisB10), and dimer-forming (ProB28, LysB29) surfaces of insulin may be regarding as independent targets for protein design. DKP-insulin provides an appropriate biophysical model for defining structure-function relationships in a monomeric template.

  3. Insulin phosphorylates calmodulin in preparations of solubilized rat hepatocyte insulin receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Sacks, D.B.; McDonald, J.M.

    1987-05-01

    It has previously been shown that insulin stimulates the phosphorylation of calmodulin in adipocyte insulin receptor preparations. Here they demonstrate that insulin also stimulates the phosphorylation of calmodulin in wheat germ lectin-enriched insulin receptor preparations obtained from rat hepatocytes. Standard phosphorylation assays were performed at 30C in the presence of 50mM Tris-HCl (pH 7.5), 0.1% (v/v) Triton X-100, 1mM EGTA, 50 M (el-TSP)ATP, 5mM MgCl2, 0.25 M polylysine, 1.2 M calmodulin and various CaS and insulin concentrations. The phosphorylation of calmodulin was determined by SDS-PAGE and autoradiography. Phosphorylation of calmodulin had an absolute requirement for insulin receptors, insulin and certain basic proteins. Phosphorylation was maximal above 13 nM insulin and at submicromolar CaS concentrations, whereas supramicromolar CaS concentrations were inhibitory. As was observed in the adipocyte insulin receptor system, calmodulin phosphorylation was dependent upon the presence of co-factors, such as polylysine, histone H/sub f/2b and protamine sulfate. The role played by these co-factors has not yet been established. These data suggest that both CaS and calmodulin participate in post receptor insulin events in hepatocytes.

  4. Equine insulin receptor and insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor expression in digital lamellar tissue and insulin target tissues.

    PubMed

    Kullmann, A; Weber, P S; Bishop, J B; Roux, T M; Norby, B; Burns, T A; McCutcheon, L J; Belknap, J K; Geor, R J

    2016-09-01

    Hyperinsulinaemia is implicated in the pathogenesis of endocrinopathic laminitis. Insulin can bind to different receptors: two insulin receptor isoforms (InsR-A and InsR-B), insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF-1R) and InsR/IGF-1R hybrid receptor (Hybrid). Currently, mRNA expression of these receptors in equine tissues and the influence of body type and dietary carbohydrate intake on expression of these receptors is not known. The study objectives were to characterise InsR-A, InsR-B, IGF-1R and Hybrid expression in lamellar tissue (LT) and insulin responsive tissues from horses and examine the effect of dietary nonstructural carbohydrate (NSC) on mRNA expression of these receptors in LT, skeletal muscle, liver and two adipose tissue (AT) depots of lean and obese ponies. In vivo experiment. Lamellar tissue samples were evaluated by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) for receptor mRNA expression (n = 8) and immunoblotting for protein expression (n = 3). Archived LT, skeletal muscle, liver and AT from lean and obese mixed-breed ponies fed either a low (~7% NSC as dry matter; 5 lean, 5 obese) or high NSC diet (~42% NSC as dry matter; 6 lean, 6 obese) for 7 days were evaluated by RT-qPCR to determine the effect of body condition and diet on expression of the receptors in different tissues. Significance was set at P≤0.05. Lamellar tissue expresses both InsR isoforms, IGF-1R and Hybrid. LT IGF-1R gene expression was greater than either InsR isoform and InsR-A expression was greater than InsR-B (P≤0.05). Obesity significantly lowered IGF-1R, InsR-A and InsR-B mRNA expression in LT and InsR-A in tailhead AT. High NSC diet lowered expression of all three receptor types in liver; IGF-1R and InsR-A in LT and InsR-A in tailhead AT. Lamellar tissue expresses IGF-1R, InsR isoforms and Hybrids. The functional characteristics of these receptors and their role in endocrinopathic laminitis warrants further investigation. © 2015 EVJ

  5. Insulin receptor: Interaction with nonreceptor glycoprotein from liver cell membranes

    PubMed Central

    Maturo, Joseph M.; Hollenberg, Morley D.

    1978-01-01

    In crude receptor preparations (either particulate or soluble) of rat liver membranes, the insulin receptor exhibits complicated binding kinetics (two binding plateaus, half-saturated at approximately 60 pM and 700 pM insulin) and an apparent chromatographic heterogeneity, suggested by the presence of two detectable, soluble insulin-binding components with apparent Stokes radii of 72 Å and 38 Å. In contrast, the insulin receptor isolated by affinity chromatography exhibits a simple binding isotherm (half-maximal saturation of binding at 700 pM insulin) without evidence for negative cooperativity and behaves as a single component (apparent Stokes radius of 38 Å) upon chromatography on Sepharose 6B. The apparent discrepancies between the properties of the unpurified insulin receptor and the affinity-purified receptor can be attributed to the presence in crude preparations of a nonreceptor constituent(s) having properties consistent with those of a membrane glycoprotein. A glycoprotein fraction from such crude soluble membrane preparations, freed from insulin receptor and subsequently partially purified using concanavalin-A-agarose, when combined with affinity-purified insulin receptor, causes both a reappearance of the complicated binding kinetics and an increase in the receptor's apparent Stokes radius from 38 Å to 72 Å. Similar results are observed for a glycoprotein fraction obtained from rat adipocyte membranes but are not observed for an identical fraction isolated from human erythrocyte membranes. We conclude that the insulin receptor in rat liver membranes can interact with another nonreceptor membrane glycoprotein that may represent either a nonrecognition moiety of the receptor oligomer or an effector molecule to the biological action of insulin. PMID:277909

  6. [A case of leprechaunism with extreme insulin resistance due to a primary defect in insulin receptors].

    PubMed

    Goji, K; Takata, Y; Kobayashi, M

    1985-09-20

    This report describes a 3-month-old female infant with the typical physical features of leprechaunism. The patient demonstrated glucose intolerance and marked hyperinsulinemia (4600 microU/ml). Since an intravenous insulin injection (actrapid insulin: 0.15 U/kg) caused no significant decrease in the blood glucose level, the presence of insulin resistance was suggested. Neither insulin antibodies nor insulin receptor antibodies were were found in the patient's plasma, and other circulating insulin antagonists such as glucagon, growth hormone, and cortisol were within normal limits. [125I]Insulin binding to the erythrocytes from the patient was as low as 1.02% (control infants: 4.89 +/- 1.08% [mean +/- SD]). [125I]Insulin binding to the cultured transformed lymphocytes from the patient was similarly reduced to 3.58% (control: 20.9 +/- 2.71% [mean +/- SD]). From these findings we concluded that the insulin resistance was due to a primary defect in insulin receptors. Interestingly, transient remissions of the patient's glucose intolerance and hyperinsulinemia were observed during a year of follow-up study. The insulin tolerance test which was performed at the remission period showed an improvement in insulin resistance. However, the insulin binding defect to erythrocytes remained unchanged even at the remission period. The exact cause of these remissions was not clear and remained to be elucidated.

  7. Identification of nuclear hormone receptor pathways causing insulin resistance by transcriptional and epigenomic analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Sona; Tsai, Linus T.; Zhou, Yiming; Evertts, Adam; Xu, Su; Griffin, Michael J.; Issner, Robbyn; Whitton, Holly J.; Garcia, Benjamin A.; Epstein, Charles B.; Mikkelsen, Tarjei S.; Rosen, Evan D.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Insulin resistance is a sine qua non of Type 2 diabetes (T2D) and a frequent complication of multiple clinical conditions, including obesity, aging, and steroid use, among others. How such a panoply of insults can result in a common phenotype is incompletely understood. Furthermore, very little is known about the transcriptional and epigenetic basis of this disorder, despite evidence that such pathways are likely to play a fundamental role. Here, we compare cell autonomous models of insulin resistance induced by the cytokine tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF) or by the steroid dexamethasone (Dex) to construct detailed transcriptional and epigenomic maps associated with cellular insulin resistance. These data predict that the glucocorticoid receptor and vitamin D receptor are common mediators of insulin resistance, which we validate using gain- and loss-of-function studies. These studies define a common transcriptional and epigenomic signature in cellular insulin resistance enabling the identification of pathogenic mechanisms. PMID:25503565

  8. Estradiol Binds to Insulin and Insulin Receptor Decreasing Insulin Binding in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Root-Bernstein, Robert; Podufaly, Abigail; Dillon, Patrick F.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale: Insulin (INS) resistance associated with hyperestrogenemias occurs in gestational diabetes mellitus, polycystic ovary syndrome, ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome, estrogen therapies, metabolic syndrome, and obesity. The mechanism by which INS and estrogen interact is unknown. We hypothesize that estrogen binds directly to INS and the insulin receptor (IR) producing INS resistance. Objectives: To determine the binding constants of steroid hormones to INS, the IR, and INS-like peptides derived from the IR; and to investigate the effect of estrogens on the binding of INS to its receptor. Methods: Ultraviolet spectroscopy, capillary electrophoresis, and NMR demonstrated estrogen binding to INS and its receptor. Horse-radish peroxidase-linked INS was used in an ELISA-like procedure to measure the effect of estradiol on binding of INS to its receptor. Measurements: Binding constants for estrogens to INS and the IR were determined by concentration-dependent spectral shifts. The effect of estradiol on INS binding to its receptor was determined by shifts in the INS binding curve. Main Results: Estradiol bound to INS with a Kd of 12 × 10−9 M and to the IR with a Kd of 24 × 10−9 M, while other hormones had significantly less affinity. Twenty-two nanomolars of estradiol shifted the binding curve of INS to its receptor 0.8 log units to the right. Conclusion: Estradiol concentrations in hyperestrogenemic syndromes may interfere with INS binding to its receptor producing significant INS resistance. PMID:25101056

  9. Analysis of insulin receptor substrate signaling dynamics on microstructured surfaces.

    PubMed

    Lanzerstorfer, Peter; Yoneyama, Yosuke; Hakuno, Fumihiko; Müller, Ulrike; Höglinger, Otmar; Takahashi, Shin-Ichiro; Weghuber, Julian

    2015-03-01

    Insulin receptor substrates (IRS) are phosphorylated by activated insulin/insulin-like growth factor I receptor tyrosine kinases, with this comprising an initial key event for downstream signaling and bioactivities. Despite the structural similarities, increasing evidence shows that IRS family proteins have nonredundant functions. Although the specificity of insulin/insulin-like growth factor signaling and biological responses partly reflects which IRS proteins are dominantly phosphorylated by the receptors, the precise properties of the respective IRS interaction with the receptors remain elusive. In the present study, we utilized a technique that combines micropatterned surfaces and total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy for the quantitative analysis of the interaction between IRS proteins and insulin/insulin-like growth factor in living cells. Our experimental set-up enabled the measurement of equilibrium associations and interaction dynamics of these molecules with high specificity. We revealed that several domains of IRS including pleckstrin homology and phosphotyrosine binding domains critically determine the turnover rate of the receptors. Furthermore, we found significant differences among IRS proteins in the strength and kinetic stability of the interaction with the receptors, suggesting that these interaction properties could account for the diverse functions of IRS. In addition, our analyses using fluorescent recovery after photobleaching revealed that kinases such as c-Jun N-terminal kinase and IκB kinase β, which phosphorylate serine/threonine residues of IRS and contribute to insulin resistance, altered the interaction kinetics of IRS with insulin receptor. Collectively, our experimental set-up is a valuable system for quantitifying the physiological interaction of IRS with the receptors in insulin/insulin-like growth factor signaling. © 2015 FEBS.

  10. A 3-basepair in-frame deletion ({Delta}Leu{sup 999}) in exon 17 of the insulin receptor gene in a family with insulin resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Awata, T.; Matsumoto, C.; Iwamoto, Y.

    1994-12-01

    We studied a woman with acanthosis nigricans and insulin resistance. The patient`s Epstein-Barr virus-transformed lymphocytes revealed slightly decreased insulin binding and markedly decreased insulin-stimulated autophosphorylation of the insulin receptor. The nucleotide sequence analysis of the patient`s genomic DNA revealed a 3-basepair in-frame deletion of one allele, resulting in the loss of leucine at position 999 of the insulin receptor ({Delta}Leu{sup 999}). The messenger ribonucleic acid transcripts from the mutant allele in the patient`s lymphocytes were not decreased. Insulin-stimulated autophosphorylation of the insulin receptor from cells expressing {Delta}Leu{sup 999} mutant insulin receptor complementary DNA was markedly decreased. The proband, her mother, elder brother, and younger brother, who were heterozygous for this mutation, showed moderate or marked hyperinsulinemia during oral glucose tolerance tests. Although fasting glucose levels were normal and fasting insulin values were preserved in all subjects with the mutation for the 8-yr period of observation, a tendancy of progressive increase in postload glucose levels were observed. These results suggest that the {Delta}Leu{sup 999} mutation, which reduces tyrosine kinase activity, was responsible for insulin resistance and contributed to postload hyperglycemia. 27 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Insulin Mimetic Peptide Disrupts the Primary Binding Site of the Insulin Receptor*

    PubMed Central

    Lawrence, Callum F.; Margetts, Mai B.; Menting, John G.; Smith, Nicholas A.; Smith, Brian J.; Ward, Colin W.; Lawrence, Michael C.

    2016-01-01

    Sets of synthetic peptides that interact with the insulin receptor ectodomain have been discovered by phage display and reported in the literature. These peptides were grouped into three classes termed Site 1, Site 2, and Site 3 based on their mutual competition of binding to the receptor. Further refinement has yielded, in particular, a 36-residue Site 2-Site 1 fusion peptide, S519, that binds the insulin receptor with subnanomolar affinity and exhibits agonist activity in both lipogenesis and glucose uptake assays. Here, we report three-dimensional crystallographic detail of the interaction of the C-terminal, 16-residue Site 1 component (S519C16) of S519 with the first leucine-rich repeat domain (L1) of the insulin receptor. Our structure shows that S519C16 binds to the same site on the L1 surface as that occupied by a critical component of the primary binding site, namely the helical C-terminal segment of the insulin receptor α-chain (termed αCT). In particular, the two phenylalanine residues within the FYXWF motif of S519C16 are seen to engage the insulin receptor L1 domain surface in a fashion almost identical to the respective αCT residues Phe701 and Phe705. The structure provides a platform for the further development of peptidic and/or small molecule agents directed toward the insulin receptor and/or the type 1 insulin-like growth factor receptor. PMID:27281820

  12. [Peroxisome proliferator activated receptors (PPAR) and insulin sensitivity: experimental studies].

    PubMed

    Haluzík, M M; Haluzík, M

    2006-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator activated receptors (PPARs) belong to the nuclear receptor superfamily, which act as transcription factors. PPARs affect expression of many genes, which products are involved in lipid and carbohydrates metabolism, cell proliferation and differentiation and numerous other processes. Three different subtypes (isoforms) of PPARs have been identified: PPAR-alpha, PPAR-gamma, PPAR-delta. PPAR-alpha receptors play an important role in the regulation of lipid metabolism: they decrease circulating fatty acids and triglyceride levels. Recently, the ability of PPAR-alpha receptors to improve insulin sensitivity in rodent model of insulin resistance have been documented and numerous studies have focused on this topic. One of the possible mechanisms of its action on the insulin sensitivity is lowering of ectopic lipids in liver and muscle tissues with subsequent heightening of insulin signalling cascade. Here we summarize the experimental studies focusing on the role of PPAR-alpha in the regulation of insulin sensitivity and discuss possible mechanisms involved.

  13. Insulin and Insulin-like Growth Factor II Differentially Regulate Endocytic Sorting and Stability of Insulin Receptor Isoform A*

    PubMed Central

    Morcavallo, Alaide; Genua, Marco; Palummo, Angela; Kletvikova, Emilia; Jiracek, Jiri; Brzozowski, Andrzej M.; Iozzo, Renato V.; Belfiore, Antonino; Morrione, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    The insulin receptor isoform A (IR-A) binds both insulin and insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-II, although the affinity for IGF-II is 3–10-fold lower than insulin depending on a cell and tissue context. Notably, in mouse embryonic fibroblasts lacking the IGF-IR and expressing solely the IR-A (R−/IR-A), IGF-II is a more potent mitogen than insulin. As receptor endocytosis and degradation provide spatial and temporal regulation of signaling events, we hypothesized that insulin and IGF-II could affect IR-A biological responses by differentially regulating IR-A trafficking. Using R−/IR-A cells, we discovered that insulin evoked significant IR-A internalization, a process modestly affected by IGF-II. However, the differential internalization was not due to IR-A ubiquitination. Notably, prolonged stimulation of R−/IR-A cells with insulin, but not with IGF-II, targeted the receptor to a degradative pathway. Similarly, the docking protein insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS-1) was down-regulated after prolonged insulin but not IGF-II exposure. Similar results were also obtained in experiments using [NMeTyrB26]-insulin, an insulin analog with IR-A binding affinity similar to IGF-II. Finally, we discovered that IR-A was internalized through clathrin-dependent and -independent pathways, which differentially regulated the activation of downstream effectors. Collectively, our results suggest that a lower affinity of IGF-II for the IR-A promotes lower IR-A phosphorylation and activation of early downstream effectors vis à vis insulin but may protect IR-A and IRS-1 from down-regulation thereby evoking sustained and robust mitogenic stimuli. PMID:22318726

  14. Role of insulin receptor and insulin signaling on αPS2CβPS integrins' lateral diffusion.

    PubMed

    Mainali, Dipak; Syed, Aleem; Arora, Neha; Smith, Emily A

    2014-12-01

    Integrins are ubiquitous transmembrane receptors with adhesion and signaling properties. The influence of insulin receptor and insulin signaling on αPS2CβPS integrins' lateral diffusion was studied using single particle tracking in S2 cells before and after reducing the insulin receptor expression or insulin stimulation. Insulin signaling was monitored by Western blotting for phospho-Akt expression. The expression of the insulin receptor was reduced using RNA interference (RNAi). After insulin receptor RNAi, four significant changes were measured in integrin diffusion properties: (1) there was a 24% increase in the mobile integrin population, (2) 14% of the increase was represented by integrins with Brownian diffusion, (3) for integrins that reside in confined zones of diffusion, there was a 45% increase in the diameter of the confined zone, and (4) there was a 29% increase in the duration integrins spend in confined zones of diffusion. In contrast to reduced expression of the insulin receptor, which alters integrin diffusion properties, insulin stimulation alone or insulin stimulation under conditions of reduced insulin receptor expression have minimal effects on altering the measured integrin diffusion properties. The differences in integrin diffusion measured after insulin receptor RNAi in the presence or absence of insulin stimulation may be the result of other insulin signaling pathways that are activated at reduced insulin receptor conditions. No change in the average integrin diffusion coefficient was measured for any conditions included in this study.

  15. Metabolic, anabolic, and mitogenic insulin responses: A tissue-specific perspective for insulin receptor activators.

    PubMed

    Bedinger, Daniel H; Adams, Sean H

    2015-11-05

    Insulin acts as the major regulator of the fasting-to-fed metabolic transition by altering substrate metabolism, promoting energy storage, and helping activate protein synthesis. In addition to its glucoregulatory and other metabolic properties, insulin can also act as a growth factor. The metabolic and mitogenic responses to insulin are regulated by divergent post-receptor signaling mechanisms downstream from the activated insulin receptor (IR). However, the anabolic and growth-promoting properties of insulin require tissue-specific inter-relationships between the two pathways, and the nature and scope of insulin-regulated processes vary greatly across tissues. Understanding the nuances of this interplay between metabolic and growth-regulating properties of insulin would have important implications for development of novel insulin and IR modulator therapies that stimulate insulin receptor activation in both pathway- and tissue-specific manners. This review will provide a unique perspective focusing on the roles of "metabolic" and "mitogenic" actions of insulin signaling in various tissues, and how these networks should be considered when evaluating selective pharmacologic approaches to prevent or treat metabolic disease. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Identification of Host Insulin Binding Sites on Schistosoma japonicum Insulin Receptors.

    PubMed

    Stephenson, Rachel J; Toth, Istvan; Liang, Jiening; Mangat, Amanjot; McManus, Donald P; You, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Schistosoma japonicum insulin receptors (SjIRs) have been identified as encouraging vaccine candidates. Interrupting or blocking the binding between host insulin and the schistosome insulin receptors (IRs) may result in reduced glucose uptake leading to starvation and stunting of worms with a reduction in egg output. To further understand how schistosomes are able to exploit host insulin for development and growth, and whether these parasites and their mammalian hosts compete for the same insulin source, we identified insulin binding sites on the SjIRs. Based on sequence analysis and the predicted antigenic structure of the primary sequences of the SjIRs, we designed nine and eleven peptide analogues from SjIR-1 and SjIR-2, respectively. Using the Octet RED system, we identified analogues derived from SjIR-1 (10) and SjIR-2 (20, 21 and 22) with insulin-binding sequences specific for S. japonicum. Nevertheless, the human insulin receptor (HIR) may compete with the SjIRs in binding human insulin in other positions which are important for HIR binding to insulin. However, no binding occurred between insulin and parasite analogues derived from SjIR-1 (2, 7 and 8) and SjIR-2 (14, 16 and 18) at the same locations as HIR sequences which have been shown to have strong insulin binding affinities. Importantly, we found two analogues (1 and 3), derived from SjIR-1, and two analogues (13 and 15) derived from SjIR-2, were responsible for the major insulin binding affinity in S. japonicum. These peptide analogues were shown to have more than 10 times (in KD value) stronger binding capacity for human insulin compared with peptides derived from the HIR in the same sequence positions. Paradoxically, analogues 1, 3, 13 and 15 do not appear to contain major antigenic determinants which resulted in poor antibody responses to native S. japonicum protein. This argues against their future development as peptide-vaccine candidates.

  17. The insulin receptor concept and its relation to the treatment of diabetes.

    PubMed

    Ward, G M

    1987-02-01

    The initial step in insulin action is binding to specific receptors. Two covalent receptor modifications possibly involved in producing pharmacodynamic effects as a result of insulin receptor binding are autophosphorylation and disulphide insulin binding. Insulin receptor numbers are 'down regulated' by insulin, but this effect may be minimised by pulsatile insulin secretion. Insulin receptor affinity is modulated rapidly by fasting, exercise and dietary composition. In non-insulin-dependent diabetes coupling of receptor binding to bioeffects is impaired. Binding is also reduced in those subjects with hyperinsulinaemia and non-insulin-dependent diabetes. Insulin-dependent diabetics have reduced insulin sensitivity, which is only partially reversed by conventional insulin therapy. 'Post-binding defects' in some diabetics could be related to defective covalent receptor modifications resulting from genetic receptor defects. High carbohydrate diets improve diabetes control through effects on the binding and coupling defects. In addition to stimulating insulin secretion, oral hypoglycaemics stimulate post-binding insulin action in vivo and in vitro. Insulin therapy in diabetes also tends to reverse post-binding defects. Pulsatile insulin delivery is more effective in lowering blood sugar than continuous administration, and produces less 'down regulation' of receptors. Combined insulin and sulphonylurea drugs reduce insulin requirements only in insulin-dependent diabetics with some endogenous insulin secretion, whereas metformin reduces insulin requirement in C-peptide negative insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus.

  18. Insulin Receptor Signaling in Normal and Insulin-Resistant States

    PubMed Central

    Boucher, Jérémie; Kleinridders, André; Kahn, C. Ronald

    2014-01-01

    In the wake of the worldwide increase in type-2 diabetes, a major focus of research is understanding the signaling pathways impacting this disease. Insulin signaling regulates glucose, lipid, and energy homeostasis, predominantly via action on liver, skeletal muscle, and adipose tissue. Precise modulation of this pathway is vital for adaption as the individual moves from the fed to the fasted state. The positive and negative modulators acting on different steps of the signaling pathway, as well as the diversity of protein isoform interaction, ensure a proper and coordinated biological response to insulin in different tissues. Whereas genetic mutations are causes of rare and severe insulin resistance, obesity can lead to insulin resistance through a variety of mechanisms. Understanding these pathways is essential for development of new drugs to treat diabetes, metabolic syndrome, and their complications. PMID:24384568

  19. Defect in cooperativity in insulin receptors from a patient with a congenital form of extreme insulin resistance.

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, S I; Leventhal, S

    1983-01-01

    Previously, we have described a novel qualitative defect in insulin receptors from a patient with a genetic form of extreme insulin resistance (leprechaunism). Receptors from this insulin-resistant child are characterized by two abnormalities: (a) an abnormally high binding affinity for insulin, and (b) a markedly reduced sensitivity of 125I-insulin binding to alterations in pH and temperature. In this paper, we have investigated the kinetic mechanism of this abnormality in steady-state binding. The increased binding affinity for 125I-insulin results from a decrease in the dissociation rate of the hormone-receptor complex. In addition, the cooperative interactions among insulin binding sites are defective with insulin receptors from this child with leprechaunism. With insulin receptors on cultured lymphocytes from normal subjects, both negative and positive cooperativity may be observed. Porcine insulin accelerates the dissociation of the hormone-receptor complex (negative cooperativity). In contrast, certain insulin analogs such as desoctapeptide-insulin and desalanine-desasparagine-insulin retard the dissociation of the hormone-receptor complex (positive cooperativity). With insulin receptors from the leprechaun child, positive cooperativity could not be demonstrated, although negative cooperativity appeared to be normal. It seems likely that the same genetic defect may be responsible for the abnormalities in both insulin sensitivity and positive cooperativity. PMID:6345588

  20. Biological effects of insulin and its analogs on cancer cells with different insulin family receptor expression.

    PubMed

    Sciacca, Laura; Cassarino, Maria Francesca; Genua, Marco; Vigneri, Paolo; Giovanna Pennisi, Maria; Malandrino, Pasqualino; Squatrito, Sebastiano; Pezzino, Vincenzo; Vigneri, Riccardo

    2014-11-01

    Hyperinsulinemia is a likely cause of the increased cancer incidence and mortality in diabetic patients, but its role is difficult to define in vivo. Previous in vitro studies testing the mitogenic potential of insulin and its analogs provided incomplete and sometimes contradictory results. To better evaluate cancer cell responsiveness to insulin, to its analogs and to IGF-I, we measured under identical experimental conditions cell proliferation, invasiveness, and foci formation in six cancer cell lines with different insulin receptor family expression levels. The cancer cells studied have a different expression of insulin receptor (IR), its isoforms (IR-A and IR-B), and of the IGF-I receptor. The data indicate that insulin stimulates proliferation in all cancer cell lines, invasiveness in some, and foci formation in none. Cancer cell responses to insulin (and IGF-I) are not related to receptor expression levels; moreover, hormone-stimulated proliferation and invasiveness are not correlated. IGF-I is a more potent stimulator than insulin in most but not all cancer cell lines. Insulin analogs including M1 and M2 Glargine metabolites stimulate cancer cells similar to insulin. However, exceptions occur for specific analogs in particular cancer cells. In conclusion, in vitro insulin is an effective growth factor for all cancer cells but the biological response to insulin cannot be predicted on the basis of receptor expression levels. In the clinical setting, these observations should be taken in account when deciding treatment for diabetic patients who are at risk of undiscovered cancer or survivors of oncological diseases. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. β-Adrenergic Receptor and Insulin Resistance in the Heart.

    PubMed

    Mangmool, Supachoke; Denkaew, Tananat; Parichatikanond, Warisara; Kurose, Hitoshi

    2017-01-01

    Insulin resistance is characterized by the reduced ability of insulin to stimulate tissue uptake and disposal of glucose including cardiac muscle. These conditions accelerate the progression of heart failure and increase cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in patients with cardiovascular diseases. It is noteworthy that some conditions of insulin resistance are characterized by up-regulation of the sympathetic nervous system, resulting in enhanced stimulation of β-adrenergic receptor (βAR). Overstimulation of βARs leads to the development of heart failure and is associated with the pathogenesis of insulin resistance in the heart. However, pathological consequences of the cross-talk between the βAR and the insulin sensitivity and the mechanism by which βAR overstimulation promotes insulin resistance remain unclear. This review article examines the hypothesis that βARs overstimulation leads to induction of insulin resistance in the heart.

  2. β-Adrenergic Receptor and Insulin Resistance in the Heart

    PubMed Central

    Mangmool, Supachoke; Denkaew, Tananat; Parichatikanond, Warisara; Kurose, Hitoshi

    2017-01-01

    Insulin resistance is characterized by the reduced ability of insulin to stimulate tissue uptake and disposal of glucose including cardiac muscle. These conditions accelerate the progression of heart failure and increase cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in patients with cardiovascular diseases. It is noteworthy that some conditions of insulin resistance are characterized by up-regulation of the sympathetic nervous system, resulting in enhanced stimulation of β-adrenergic receptor (βAR). Over-stimulation of βARs leads to the development of heart failure and is associated with the pathogenesis of insulin resistance in the heart. However, pathological consequences of the cross-talk between the βAR and the insulin sensitivity and the mechanism by which βAR over-stimulation promotes insulin resistance remain unclear. This review article examines the hypothesis that βARs over-stimulation leads to induction of insulin resistance in the heart. PMID:28035081

  3. Insulin Receptor Signaling in POMC, but Not AgRP, Neurons Controls Adipose Tissue Insulin Action.

    PubMed

    Shin, Andrew C; Filatova, Nika; Lindtner, Claudia; Chi, Tiffany; Degann, Seta; Oberlin, Douglas; Buettner, Christoph

    2017-06-01

    Insulin is a key regulator of adipose tissue lipolysis, and impaired adipose tissue insulin action results in unrestrained lipolysis and lipotoxicity, which are hallmarks of the metabolic syndrome and diabetes. Insulin regulates adipose tissue metabolism through direct effects on adipocytes and through signaling in the central nervous system by dampening sympathetic outflow to the adipose tissue. Here we examined the role of insulin signaling in agouti-related protein (AgRP) and pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons in regulating hepatic and adipose tissue insulin action. Mice lacking the insulin receptor in AgRP neurons (AgRP IR KO) exhibited impaired hepatic insulin action because the ability of insulin to suppress hepatic glucose production (hGP) was reduced, but the ability of insulin to suppress lipolysis was unaltered. To the contrary, in POMC IR KO mice, insulin lowered hGP but failed to suppress adipose tissue lipolysis. High-fat diet equally worsened glucose tolerance in AgRP and POMC IR KO mice and their respective controls but increased hepatic triglyceride levels only in POMC IR KO mice, consistent with impaired lipolytic regulation resulting in fatty liver. These data suggest that although insulin signaling in AgRP neurons is important in regulating glucose metabolism, insulin signaling in POMC neurons controls adipose tissue lipolysis and prevents high-fat diet-induced hepatic steatosis. © 2017 by the American Diabetes Association.

  4. Human Y-79 Retinoblastoma Cells Exhibit Specific Insulin Receptors.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-01-01

    receptor. The Scatchard plot of, inulin competition data was curvilinear and was resolved in a high affinity Kd M) - low capacity ( ~ 3,000 sites/cell...containing insulin receptor antibodies (Flier et al 1977) was a gift of Dr. Philip Gorden, Diabetes Branch, NIADDK, NIH. Eagle’s minimum essential medium...Houten, M., Posner, B.I., White, R.J., Ohgaku, S., Horvat, A., and Hemmelgarn, E. (1983) Binding of insulin by monkey and pig hypothalamus. Diabetes 32

  5. Recycling of photoaffinity-labeled insulin receptors in rat adipocytes. Dissociation of insulin-receptor complexes is not required for receptor recycling

    SciTech Connect

    Huecksteadt, T.; Olefsky, J.M.; Brandenberg, D.; Heidenreich, K.A.

    1986-07-05

    We have used an iodinated, photoreactive analog of insulin, /sup 125/I-B2(2-nitro-4-azidophenylacetyl)-des-PheB1-insulin, to covalently label insulin receptors on the cell surface of isolated rat adipocytes. Following internalization of the labeled insulin-receptor complexes at 37/sup 0/C, we measured the rate and extent of recycling of these complexes using trypsin to distinguish receptors on the cell surface from those inside the cell. The return of internalized photoaffinity-labeled receptors to the cell surface was very rapid at 37/sup 0/C proceeding with an apparent t 1/2 of 6 min. About 95% of the labeled receptors present in the cell 20 min after the initiation of endocytosis returned to the cell surface by 40 min. Recycling was slower at 25 and 16/sup 0/C compared to 37/sup 0/C and essentially negligible at 12/sup 0/C or in the presence of energy depleters. Addition of excess unlabeled insulin had no effect on the recycling of photoaffinity-labeled insulin receptor complexes, whereas monensin, chloroquine, and Tris partially inhibited this process. These data indicate that dissociation of insulin from internalized receptors is not necessary for insulin receptor recycling. Furthermore, agents which have been shown to prevent vesicular acidification inhibit the recycling of insulin receptors by a mechanism other than prevention of ligand dissociation.

  6. Insulin Action is Blocked by a Monoclonal Antibody That Inhibits the Insulin Receptor Kinase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, David O.; Ho, Lisa; Korn, Laurence J.; Roth, Richard A.

    1986-01-01

    Thirty-six monoclonal antibodies to the human insulin receptor were produced. Thirty-four bound the intracellular domain of the receptor β subunit, the domain containing the tyrosine-specific kinase activity. Of these 34 antibodies, 33 recognized the rat receptor and 1 was shown to precipitate the receptors from mice, chickens, and frogs with high affinity. Another of the antibodies inhibited the kinase activities of the human and frog receptors with equal potencies. This antibody inhibited the kinase activities of these receptors by more than 90%, whereas others had no effect on either kinase activity. Microinjection of the inhibiting antibody into Xenopus oocytes blocked the ability of insulin to stimulate oocyte maturation. In contrast, this inhibiting antibody did not block the ability of progesterone to stimulate the same response. Furthermore, control immunoglobulin and a noninhibiting antibody to the receptor β subunit did not block this response to insulin. These results strongly support a role for the tyrosine-specific kinase activity of the insulin receptor in mediating this biological effect of insulin.

  7. Insulin action is blocked by a monoclonal antibody that inhibits insulin receptor kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, D.O.; Ho, L.; Korn, L.J.; Roth, R.A.

    1986-01-01

    Thirty-six monoclonal antibodies to the human insulin receptor were produced. Thirty-four bound the intracellular domain of the receptor ..beta.. subunit, the domain containing the tyrosine-specific kinase activity. Of these 34 antibodies, 33 recognized the rat receptor and 1 was shown to precipitate the receptors from mice, chickens and frogs with high affinity. Another of the antibodies inhibited the kinase activities of the human and frog receptors with equal potencies. This antibody inhibited the kinase activities of these receptors by more than 90%, whereas others had no effect on either kinase activity. Microinjection of the inhibiting antibody into Xenopus oocytes blocked the ability of insulin to stimulate oocyte maturation. In contrast, this inhibiting antibody did not block the ability of progesterone to stimulate the same response. Furthermore, control immunoglobulin and a noninhibiting antibody to the receptor ..beta.. subunit did not block this response to insulin. These results strongly support a role for the tyrosine-specific kinase activity of the insulin receptor in mediating this biological effect of insulin.

  8. Insulin-like Receptor and Insulin-like Peptide Are Localized at Neuromuscular Junctions in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Gorczyca, Michael; Augart, Carolyn; Budnik, Vivian

    2015-01-01

    Insulin and insulin-like growth factor (IGF) receptors are members of the tyrosine kinase family of receptors, and are thought to play an important role in the development and differentiation of neurons. Here we report the presence of an insulin-like peptide and an insulin receptor (dlnsR) at the body wall neuromuscular junction of developing Drosophila larvae. dlnsR-like immunoreactivity was found in all body wall muscles at the motor nerve branching regions, where it surrounded synaptic boutons. The identity of this immunoreactivity as a dlnsR was confirmed by two additional schemes, in vivo binding of labeled insulin and immunolocalization of phosphotyrosine. Both methods produced staining patterns markedly similar to dlnsR-like immunoreactivity. The presence of a dlnsR in whole larvae was also shown by receptor binding assays. This receptor was more specific for insulin (>25-fold) than for IGF II, and did not appear to bind IGF I. Among the 30 muscle fibers per hemisegment, insulin-like immunoreactivity was found only on one fiber, and was localized to a subset of morphologically distinct synaptic boutons. Staining in the CNS was limited to several cell bodies in the brain lobes and in a segmental pattern throughout most of the abdominal ganglia, as well as in varicosities along the neuropil areas of the ventral ganglion and brain lobes. Insulin-like peptide and dlnsR were first detected by early larval development, well after neuromuscular transmission begins. The developmental significance of an insulin-like peptide and its receptor at the neuromuscular junction is discussed. PMID:8366341

  9. Loss of CTRP5 improves insulin action and hepatic steatosis.

    PubMed

    Lei, Xia; Rodriguez, Susana; Petersen, Pia S; Seldin, Marcus M; Bowman, Caitlyn E; Wolfgang, Michael J; Wong, G William

    2016-06-01

    The gene that encodes C1q/TNF-related protein 5 (CTRP5), a secreted protein of the C1q family, is mutated in individuals with late-onset retinal degeneration. CTRP5 is widely expressed outside the eye and also circulates in plasma. Its physiological role in peripheral tissues, however, has yet to be elucidated. Here, we show that Ctrp5 expression is modulated by fasting and refeeding, and by different diets, in mice. Adipose expression of CTRP5 was markedly upregulated in obese and diabetic humans and in genetic and dietary models of obesity in rodents. Furthermore, human CTRP5 expression in the subcutaneous fat depot positively correlated with BMI. A genetic loss-of-function mouse model was used to address the metabolic function of CTRP5 in vivo. On a standard chow diet, CTRP5-deficient mice had reduced fasting insulin but were otherwise comparable with wild-type littermate controls in body weight and adiposity. However, when fed a high-fat diet, CTRP5-deficient animals had attenuated hepatic steatosis and improved insulin action. Loss of CTRP5 also improved the capacity of chow-fed aged mice to respond to subsequent high-fat feeding, as evidenced by decreased insulin resistance. In cultured adipocytes and myotubes, recombinant CTRP5 treatment attenuated insulin-stimulated Akt phosphorylation. Our results provide the first genetic and physiological evidence for CTRP5 as a negative regulator of glucose metabolism and insulin sensitivity. Inhibition of CTRP5 action may result in the alleviation of insulin resistance associated with obesity and diabetes.

  10. Clarification of signaling pathways mediated by insulin and insulin-like growth factor I receptors in fibroblasts from patients with specific defect in insulin receptor.

    PubMed

    Sasaoka, T; Kobayashi, M; Takata, Y; Ishibashi, O; Iwasaki, M; Shigeta, Y; Goji, K; Hisatomi, A

    1988-11-01

    Receptor binding and biological action of insulin and insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) were studied in fibroblasts from a patient with leprechaunism and a patient with type A syndrome of insulin resistance. Insulin binding was reduced to 18.8 and 27.7% of control value, respectively. In contrast, IGF-I binding was normal in both patients. In competitive binding studies, IGF-I had 0.2% of the ability of insulin to compete with 125I-labeled insulin binding, and insulin had 0.1% of the ability of IGF-I to compete with 125I-labeled IGF-I binding in control subjects and patient fibroblasts. The dose-response curves of insulin stimulation assessed by glucose incorporation and alpha-aminoisobutyric acid uptake showed normal responsiveness, and ED50 was significantly shifted to the right in fibroblasts from both patients. However, normal responsiveness and sensitivity were observed in thymidine incorporation studies. For IGF-I, dose-response curves of glucose incorporation, alpha-aminoisobutyric acid uptake, and thymidine incorporation were all normal in both patients. These results indicate that 1) the defect is specific to the insulin-receptor binding in these patients, 2) insulin and IGF-I activate glucose incorporation and alpha-aminoisobutyric acid uptake mainly through their own specific receptors, but 3) the IGF-I receptor appears to have a more important role in stimulating thymidine incorporation than the insulin receptor in physiological condition or, alternatively, an unknown postreceptor process with cascade signal transmission may overcome the decreased insulin-receptor binding to produce a normal dose-response curve.

  11. Antagonistic effects of a covalently dimerized insulin derivative on insulin receptors in 3T3-L1 adipocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Weiland, M.; Joost, H.G. ); Brandenburg, C.; Brandenburg, D. )

    1990-02-01

    In the present study the authors describe the antagonistic effects of the covalently dimerized insulin derivative B29,B29{prime}-suberoyl-insulin on insulin receptors in 3T3-L1 mouse cells. In differentiated 3T3-L1 adipocytes, the derivative fully inhibits binding of {sup 125}I-labeled insulin to its receptor with about the same affinity as unlabeled insulin. In contrast, the dimerized derivative only partially (approximately 20%) mimics insulin's effects on glucose transport and DNA synthesis in the absence of insulin. In the presence of insulin, the agent competitively inhibits insulin-stimulated DNA synthesis (({sup 3}H)thymidine incorporation into total DNA), glucose transport activity (2-deoxyglucose uptake rate), and insulin receptor tyrosine kinase activity. In rat adipocytes, in contrast, the dimerized derivative stimulates glucose transport (initial 3-O-methylglucose as well as 2-deoxyglucose uptake rates) to the same extent as insulin does, and it fails to inhibit the effect of insulin. The data indicate that the dimerized insulin derivative B29,B29{prime}-suberoyl-insulin is an insulin receptor antagonist (partial agonist) which retains a moderate intrinsic activity. The effects of this agent reveal a striking difference in insulin receptor-mediated stimulation of glucose transport between 3T3-L1 fatty fibroblasts and the mature rat adipocyte.

  12. Hepatic structural enhancement and insulin resistance amelioration due to AT1 receptor blockade.

    PubMed

    Souza-Mello, Vanessa

    2017-01-18

    Over the last decade, the role of renin-angiotensin system (RAS) on the development of obesity and its comorbidities has been extensively addressed. Both circulating and local RAS components are up-regulated in obesity and involved in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease onset. Pharmacological manipulations of RAS are viable strategies to tackle metabolic impairments caused by the excessive body fat mass. Renin inhibitors rescue insulin resistance, but do not have marked effects on hepatic steatosis. However, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin receptor blockers (ARB) yield beneficial hepatic remodeling. ARBs elicit body mass loss and normalize insulin levels, tackling insulin resistance. Also, this drug class increases adiponectin levels, besides countering interleukin-6, tumoral necrosis factor-alpha, and transforming growth factor-beta 1. The latter is essential to prevent from liver fibrosis. When conjugated with peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-alpha activation, ARB fully rescues fatty liver. These effects might be orchestrated by an indirect up-regulation of MAS receptor due to angiotensin II receptor type 1 (AT1R) blockade. These associations of ARB with PPAR activation and ACE2-angiotensin (ANG) (1-7)-MAS receptor axis deserve a better understanding. This editorial provides a brief overview of the current knowledge regarding AT1R blockade effects on sensitivity to insulin and hepatic structural alterations as well as the intersections of AT1R blockade with peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor activation and ACE2-ANG (1-7) - MAS receptor axis.

  13. Hepatic structural enhancement and insulin resistance amelioration due to AT1 receptor blockade

    PubMed Central

    Souza-Mello, Vanessa

    2017-01-01

    Over the last decade, the role of renin-angiotensin system (RAS) on the development of obesity and its comorbidities has been extensively addressed. Both circulating and local RAS components are up-regulated in obesity and involved in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease onset. Pharmacological manipulations of RAS are viable strategies to tackle metabolic impairments caused by the excessive body fat mass. Renin inhibitors rescue insulin resistance, but do not have marked effects on hepatic steatosis. However, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin receptor blockers (ARB) yield beneficial hepatic remodeling. ARBs elicit body mass loss and normalize insulin levels, tackling insulin resistance. Also, this drug class increases adiponectin levels, besides countering interleukin-6, tumoral necrosis factor-alpha, and transforming growth factor-beta 1. The latter is essential to prevent from liver fibrosis. When conjugated with peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-alpha activation, ARB fully rescues fatty liver. These effects might be orchestrated by an indirect up-regulation of MAS receptor due to angiotensin II receptor type 1 (AT1R) blockade. These associations of ARB with PPAR activation and ACE2-angiotensin (ANG) (1-7)-MAS receptor axis deserve a better understanding. This editorial provides a brief overview of the current knowledge regarding AT1R blockade effects on sensitivity to insulin and hepatic structural alterations as well as the intersections of AT1R blockade with peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor activation and ACE2-ANG (1-7) - MAS receptor axis. PMID:28144388

  14. Correlation between insulin-induced estrogen receptor methylation and atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Min, Jia; Weitian, Zhong; Peng, Cai; Yan, Peng; Bo, Zhang; Yan, Wang; Yun, Bai; Xukai, Wang

    2016-11-10

    Hyperinsulinemia and insulin resistance have been recently recognized as an important cause of atherosclerosis. Clinical studies have also found that expression of the estrogen receptor is closely related to the incidence of atherosclerosis. This study investigate the effects of insulin and estrogen receptor α (ER-α) in atherosclerosis. Double knockout ApoE/Lepr mice were given intraperitoneal injections of insulin, and their aortae were harvested for hematoxylin-eosin staining and immunohistochemical analysis. In addition, vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) were treated with insulin or infected with a lentivirus encoding exogenous ER-α, and changes in gene expression were detected by real-time polymerase chain reaction and western blotting. The methylation levels of the ER-α gene were tested using bisulfite sequencing PCR, and flow cytometry and EdU assay were used to measure VSMCs proliferation. Our results showed that insulin can induce the formation of atherosclerosis. Gene expression analysis revealed that insulin promotes the expression of DNA methyltransferases and inhibits ER-α expression, while 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine can inhibit this effect of insulin. Bisulfite sequencing PCR analysis showed that methylation of the ER-α second exon region increased in VSMCs treated with insulin. The results also showed that ER-α can inhibit VSMCs proliferation. Our data suggest that insulin promotes the expression of DNA methyltransferases, induces methylation of ER-α second exon region and decreases the expression of ER-α, thereby interfering with estrogen regulation of VSMCs proliferation, resulting in atherosclerosis.

  15. Grb10 mediates insulin-stimulated degradation of the insulin receptor: a mechanism of negative regulation.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Fresnida J; Langlais, Paul R; Hu, Derong; Dong, Lily Q; Liu, Feng

    2006-06-01

    Growth factor receptor-bound protein 10 (Grb10) is an adapter protein that interacts with a number of tyrosine-phosphorylated growth factor receptors, including the insulin receptor (IR). To investigate the role of Grb10 in insulin signaling, we generated cell lines in which the expression levels of Grb10 are either overexpressed by stable transfection or suppressed by RNA interference. We found that suppressing endogenous Grb10 expression led to increased IR protein levels, whereas overexpression of Grb10 led to reduced IR protein levels. Altering Grb10 expression levels had no effect on the mRNA levels of IR, suggesting that the modulation occurs at the protein level. Reduced IR levels were also observed in cells with prolonged insulin treatment, and this reduction was inhibited in Grb10-deficient cells. The insulin-induced IR reduction was greatly reversed by MG-132, a proteasomal inhibitor, but not by chloroquine, a lysosomal inhibitor. IR underwent insulin-stimulated ubiquitination in cells, and this ubiquitination was inhibited in the Grb10-suppressed cell line. Together, our results suggest that, in addition to inhibiting IR kinase activity by directly binding to the IR, Grb10 also negatively regulates insulin signaling by mediating insulin-stimulated degradation of the receptor.

  16. Loss-of-function myostatin mutation increases insulin sensitivity and browning of white fat in Meishan pigs.

    PubMed

    Cai, Chunbo; Qian, Lili; Jiang, Shengwang; Sun, Youde; Wang, Qingqing; Ma, Dezun; Xiao, Gaojun; Li, Biao; Xie, Shanshan; Gao, Ting; Chen, Yaoxing; Liu, Jie; An, Xiaorong; Cui, Wentao; Li, Kui

    2017-05-23

    Myostatin-deficient mice showed a remarkable hypertrophy of skeletal muscle, with a decreased fat mass and enhanced insulin sensitivity. Currently, it is unclear if the inhibition of myostatin could be used as an approach to treat human obesity and insulin resistance. In this study, we investigated if the inhibition of porcine myostatin has any effect on fat deposition and insulin sensitivity using genetically engineered Meishan pigs containing a myostatin loss-of-function mutation (Mstn -/- ). Our results indicated that, when compared with wild-type pigs, the amount of subcutaneous fat and leaf fat of Mstn -/- pigs were significantly decreased mainly due to the browning of subcutaneous adipose tissue. Additionally, the serum insulin level decreased and the insulin sensitivity increased significantly in Mstn -/- pigs. Moreover, we found a significant increase in levels of insulin receptor and insulin receptor substrate proteins in skeletal muscle of Mstn -/- pigs, which then activating the insulin signaling pathway. Irisin-mediated regulation is not the only pathway for the activation of insulin signal in Mstn -/- skeletal muscle. This study provides valuable insight for the treatment of human obesity and diabetes mellitus.

  17. Loss-of-function myostatin mutation increases insulin sensitivity and browning of white fat in Meishan pigs

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Chunbo; Qian, Lili; Jiang, Shengwang; Sun, Youde; Wang, Qingqing; Ma, Dezun; Xiao, Gaojun; Li, Biao; Xie, Shanshan; Gao, Ting; Chen, Yaoxing; Liu, Jie; An, Xiaorong; Cui, Wentao; Li, Kui

    2017-01-01

    Myostatin-deficient mice showed a remarkable hypertrophy of skeletal muscle, with a decreased fat mass and enhanced insulin sensitivity. Currently, it is unclear if the inhibition of myostatin could be used as an approach to treat human obesity and insulin resistance. In this study, we investigated if the inhibition of porcine myostatin has any effect on fat deposition and insulin sensitivity using genetically engineered Meishan pigs containing a myostatin loss-of-function mutation (Mstn −/− ). Our results indicated that, when compared with wild-type pigs, the amount of subcutaneous fat and leaf fat of Mstn −/− pigs were significantly decreased mainly due to the browning of subcutaneous adipose tissue. Additionally, the serum insulin level decreased and the insulin sensitivity increased significantly in Mstn −/− pigs. Moreover, we found a significant increase in levels of insulin receptor and insulin receptor substrate proteins in skeletal muscle of Mstn −/− pigs, which then activating the insulin signaling pathway. Irisin-mediated regulation is not the only pathway for the activation of insulin signal in Mstn −/− skeletal muscle. This study provides valuable insight for the treatment of human obesity and diabetes mellitus. PMID:28432282

  18. Insulin receptor substrate 1 is required for insulin-mediated mitogenic signal transduction.

    PubMed Central

    Rose, D W; Saltiel, A R; Majumdar, M; Decker, S J; Olefsky, J M

    1994-01-01

    Insulin treatment of mammalian cells immediately stimulates the tyrosine phosphorylation of a cellular protein of 185 kDa referred to as pp185 or IRS-1 (insulin receptor substrate 1). The potential role of the IRS-1 protein in insulin signaling has been examined by microinjecting affinity-purified antibodies into living cells. Stably transfected Rat-1 fibroblasts, which overexpress the human insulin receptor, were microinjected and subsequently stimulated with insulin or other growth factors. Progression through the cell cycle was monitored by using a single-cell assay, which employs bromodeoxyuridine labeling of DNA and analysis with immunofluorescence microscopy. Microinjection of anti-IRS-1 antibody completely inhibited incorporation of bromodeoxyuridine into the nuclei of cells stimulated with insulin or insulin-like growth factor I but did not affect cells stimulated with serum or a variety of purified growth factors. These studies indicate that IRS-1 is a critical component of the insulin and insulin-like growth factor I signaling pathways, which lead to DNA synthesis and cell growth. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:8290602

  19. Leptin down-regulates insulin action through phosphorylation of serine-318 in insulin receptor substrate 1.

    PubMed

    Hennige, Anita M; Stefan, Norbert; Kapp, Katja; Lehmann, Rainer; Weigert, Cora; Beck, Alexander; Moeschel, Klaus; Mushack, Joanne; Schleicher, Erwin; Häring, Hans-Ulrich

    2006-06-01

    Insulin resistance in skeletal muscle is found in obesity and type 2 diabetes. A mechanism for impaired insulin signaling in peripheral tissues is the inhibition of insulin action through serine phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate (Irs) proteins that abolish the coupling of Irs proteins to the activated insulin receptor. Recently, we described serine-318 as a protein kinase C (PKC)-dependent phosphorylation site in Irs1 (Ser-318) activated by hyperinsulinemia. Here we show in various cell models that the adipose hormone leptin, a putative mediator in obesity-related insulin resistance, promotes phosphorylation of Ser-318 in Irs1 by a janus kinase 2, Irs2, and PKC-dependent pathway. Mutation of Ser-318 to alanine abrogates the inhibitory effect of leptin on insulin-induced Irs1 tyrosine phosphorylation and glucose uptake in L6 myoblasts. In C57Bl/6 mice, Ser-318 phosphorylation levels in muscle tissue were enhanced by leptin and insulin administration in lean animals while in diet-induced obesity Ser-318 phosphorylation levels were already up-regulated in the basal state, and further stimulation was diminished. In analogy, in lymphocytes of obese hyperleptinemic human subjects basal Ser-318 phosphorylation levels were increased compared to lean individuals. During a hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp, the increment in Ser-318 phosphorylation observed in lean individuals was absent in obese. In summary, these data suggest that phosphorylation of Ser-318 in Irs1 mediates the inhibitory signal of leptin on the insulin-signaling cascade in obese subjects.

  20. Solubilized placental membrane protein inhibits insulin receptor tyrosine kinase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Strout, H.V. Jr.; Slater, E.E.

    1987-05-01

    Regulation of insulin receptor (IR) tyrosine kinase (TK) activity may be important in modulating insulin action. Utilizing an assay which measures IR phosphorylation of angiotensin II (AII), the authors investigated whether fractions of TX-100 solubilized human placental membranes inhibited IR dependent AII phosphorylation. Autophosphorylated IR was incubated with membrane fractions before the addition of AII, and kinase inhibition measured by the loss of TSP incorporated in AII. An inhibitory activity was detected which was dose, time, and temperature dependent. The inhibitor was purified 200-fold by sequential chromatography on wheat germ agglutinin, DEAE, and hydroxyapatite. This inhibitory activity was found to correlate with an 80 KD protein which was electroeluted from preparative slab gels and rabbit antiserum raised. Incubation of membrane fractions with antiserum before the IRTK assay immunoprecipitated the inhibitor. Protein immunoblots of crude or purified fractions revealed only the 80 KD protein. Since IR autophosphorylation is crucial to IRTK activity, the authors investigated the state of IR autophosphorylation after treatment with inhibitor; no change was detected by phosphoamino acid analysis.

  1. Insulin Mimetic Peptide Disrupts the Primary Binding Site of the Insulin Receptor.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, Callum F; Margetts, Mai B; Menting, John G; Smith, Nicholas A; Smith, Brian J; Ward, Colin W; Lawrence, Michael C

    2016-07-22

    Sets of synthetic peptides that interact with the insulin receptor ectodomain have been discovered by phage display and reported in the literature. These peptides were grouped into three classes termed Site 1, Site 2, and Site 3 based on their mutual competition of binding to the receptor. Further refinement has yielded, in particular, a 36-residue Site 2-Site 1 fusion peptide, S519, that binds the insulin receptor with subnanomolar affinity and exhibits agonist activity in both lipogenesis and glucose uptake assays. Here, we report three-dimensional crystallographic detail of the interaction of the C-terminal, 16-residue Site 1 component (S519C16) of S519 with the first leucine-rich repeat domain (L1) of the insulin receptor. Our structure shows that S519C16 binds to the same site on the L1 surface as that occupied by a critical component of the primary binding site, namely the helical C-terminal segment of the insulin receptor α-chain (termed αCT). In particular, the two phenylalanine residues within the FYXWF motif of S519C16 are seen to engage the insulin receptor L1 domain surface in a fashion almost identical to the respective αCT residues Phe(701) and Phe(705) The structure provides a platform for the further development of peptidic and/or small molecule agents directed toward the insulin receptor and/or the type 1 insulin-like growth factor receptor. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  2. Insulin-Insulin-like Growth Factors Hybrids as Molecular Probes of Hormone:Receptor Binding Specificity.

    PubMed

    Křížková, Květoslava; Chrudinová, Martina; Povalová, Anna; Selicharová, Irena; Collinsová, Michaela; Vaněk, Václav; Brzozowski, Andrzej M; Jiráček, Jiří; Žáková, Lenka

    2016-05-31

    Insulin, insulin-like growth factors 1 and 2 (IGF-1 and -2, respectively), and their receptors (IR and IGF-1R) are the key elements of a complex hormonal system that is essential for the development and functioning of humans. The C and D domains of IGFs (absent in insulin) likely play important roles in the differential binding of IGF-1 and -2 to IGF-1R and to the isoforms of IR (IR-A and IR-B) and specific activation of these receptors. Here, we attempted to probe the impact of IGF-1 and IGF-2 D domains (DI and DII, respectively) and the IGF-2 C domain (CII) on the receptor specificity of these hormones. For this, we made two types of insulin hybrid analogues: (i) with the C-terminus of the insulin A chain extended by the amino acids from the DI and DII domains and (ii) with the C-terminus of the insulin B chain extended by some amino acids derived from the CII domain. The receptor binding affinities of these analogues and their receptor autophosphorylation potentials were characterized. Our results indicate that the DI domain has a more negative impact than the DII domain does on binding to IR, and that the DI domain Pro-Leu-Lys residues are important factors for a different IR-A versus IR-B binding affinity of IGF-1. We also showed that the additions of amino acids that partially "mimic" the CII domain, to the C-terminus of the insulin B chain, change the binding and autophosphorylation specificity of insulin in favor of the "metabolic" IR-B isoform. This opens new venues for rational enhancement of insulin IR-B specificity by modifications beyond the C-terminus of its B chain.

  3. Prediction of a novel internal rearrangement of the insulin receptor.

    PubMed

    Sit, Kei C; van Lonkhuyzen, Derek; Walsh, Terry; Croll, Tristan

    2017-03-01

    The insulin receptor (IR) plays critical roles in metabolism and growth, directed by the binding of insulin. Decades of research to understand the mechanism of insulin binding and activation of the IR have identified a region of the receptor, the C-terminal (CT) peptide, to be crucial for insulin binding. In particular, a truncated IR consisting of the first three domains fused to the CT peptide was found to bind insulin with nanomolar affinity, with undetectable binding in the absence of fused or soluble CT peptide. Problematically, all current crystal structures of the IR indicate the fusion point of the CT peptide to the three domains is located far from the position of the CT peptide as resolved in such structures. We have attempted to address this problem using molecular modelling and dynamics simulations. The results led to the identification of a potential inter-domain interaction between the L2 domain and the CT peptide that is not observed in any of the crystal structures of the IR. Investigations into this new interaction found a conformational change that could potentially be in response to insulin binding. Additionally, further simulation work with the new conformation demonstrated its compatibility with the position and orientation of insulin from the latest insulin-bound IR crystal structure.

  4. Recombinant canine single chain insulin analogues: insulin receptor binding capacity and ability to stimulate glucose uptake.

    PubMed

    Adams, Jamie P; Holder, Angela L; Catchpole, Brian

    2014-12-01

    Virtually all diabetic dogs require exogenous insulin therapy to control their hyperglycaemia. In the UK, the only licensed insulin product currently available is a purified porcine insulin preparation. Recombinant insulin is somewhat problematic in terms of its manufacture, since the gene product (preproinsulin) undergoes substantial post-translational modification in pancreatic β cells before it becomes biologically active. The aim of the present study was to develop recombinant canine single chain insulin (SCI) analogues that could be produced in a prokaryotic expression system and which would require minimal processing. Three recombinant SCI constructs were developed in a prokaryotic expression vector, by replacing the insulin C-peptide sequence with one encoding a synthetic peptide (GGGPGKR), or with one of two insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-2 C-peptide coding sequences (human: SRVSRRSR; canine: SRVTRRSSR). Recombinant proteins were expressed in the periplasmic fraction of Escherichia coli and assessed for their ability to bind to the insulin and IGF-1 receptors, and to stimulate glucose uptake in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. All three recombinant SCI analogues demonstrated preferential binding to the insulin receptor compared to the IGF-1 receptor, with increased binding compared to recombinant canine proinsulin. The recombinant SCI analogues stimulated glucose uptake in 3T3-L1 adipocytes compared to negligible uptake using recombinant canine proinsulin, with the canine insulin/cIGF-2 chimaeric SCI analogue demonstrating the greatest effect. Thus, biologically-active recombinant canine SCI analogues can be produced relatively easily in bacteria, which could potentially be used for treatment of diabetic dogs.

  5. Hypoglycemic effect of insulin-like growth factor-1 in mice lacking insulin receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Di Cola, G; Cool, M H; Accili, D

    1997-01-01

    We have investigated the metabolic actions of recombinant human IGF-1 in mice genetically deficient of insulin receptors (IR-/-). After intraperitoneal administration, IGF-1 caused a prompt and sustained decrease of plasma glucose levels in IR-/- mice. Plasma free fatty acid concentrations were unaffected. Interestingly, the effects of IGF-1 were identical in normal mice (IR+/+) and in IR-/- mice. Despite decreased glucose levels, IR-/- mice treated with IGF-1 died within 2-3 d of birth, like sham-treated IR-/- controls. In skeletal muscle, IGF-1 treatment caused phosphorylation of IGF-1 receptors and increased the levels of the phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase p85 subunit detected in antiphosphotyrosine immunoprecipitates, consistent with the possibility that IGF-1 stimulates glucose uptake in a phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase-dependent manner. IGF-1 receptor phosphorylation and coimmunoprecipitation of phosphatidylinositol3-kinase by antiphosphotyrosine antibodies was also observed in liver, and was associated with a decrease in mRNA levels of the key gluconeogenetic enzyme phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase. Thus, the effect of IGF-1 on plasma glucose levels may be accounted for by increased peripheral glucose use and by inhibition of hepatic gluconeogenesis. These data indicate that IGF-1 can mimic insulin's effects on glucose metabolism by acting through its own receptor. The failure of IGF-1 to rescue the lethal phenotype due to lack of insulin receptors suggests that IGF-1 receptors cannot effectively mediate all the metabolic actions of insulin receptors. PMID:9153298

  6. Identification of insulin as a novel retinoic acid receptor-related orphan receptor α target gene.

    PubMed

    Kuang, Jiangying; Hou, Xiaoming; Zhang, Jinlong; Chen, Yulong; Su, Zhiguang

    2014-03-18

    Insulin plays an important role in regulation of lipid and glucose metabolism. Retinoic acid receptor-related orphan receptor α (RORα) modulates physiopathological processes such as dyslipidemia and diabetes. In this study, we found overexpression of RORα in INS1 cells resulted in increased expression and secretion of insulin. Suppression of endogenous RORα caused a decrease of insulin expression. Luciferase and electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) assays demonstrated that RORα activated insulin transcription via direct binding to its promoter. RORα was also observed to regulate BETA2 expression, which is one of the insulin active transfactors. In vivo analyses showed that the insulin transcription is increased by the synthetic RORα agonist SR1078. These findings identify RORα as a transcriptional activator of insulin and suggest novel therapeutic opportunities for management of the disease. Copyright © 2014 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Differential hepatic distribution of insulin receptor substrates causes selective insulin resistance in diabetes and obesity

    PubMed Central

    Kubota, Naoto; Kubota, Tetsuya; Kajiwara, Eiji; Iwamura, Tomokatsu; Kumagai, Hiroki; Watanabe, Taku; Inoue, Mariko; Takamoto, Iseki; Sasako, Takayoshi; Kumagai, Katsuyoshi; Kohjima, Motoyuki; Nakamuta, Makoto; Moroi, Masao; Sugi, Kaoru; Noda, Tetsuo; Terauchi, Yasuo; Ueki, Kohjiro; Kadowaki, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Hepatic insulin signalling involves insulin receptor substrates (Irs) 1/2, and is normally associated with the inhibition of gluconeogenesis and activation of lipogenesis. In diabetes and obesity, insulin no longer suppresses hepatic gluconeogenesis, while continuing to activate lipogenesis, a state referred to as ‘selective insulin resistance'. Here, we show that ‘selective insulin resistance' is caused by the differential expression of Irs1 and Irs2 in different zones of the liver. We demonstrate that hepatic Irs2-knockout mice develop ‘selective insulin resistance', whereas mice lacking in Irs1, or both Irs1 and Irs2, develop ‘total insulin resistance'. In obese diabetic mice, Irs1/2-mediated insulin signalling is impaired in the periportal zone, which is the primary site of gluconeogenesis, but enhanced in the perivenous zone, which is the primary site of lipogenesis. While hyperinsulinaemia reduces Irs2 expression in both the periportal and perivenous zones, Irs1 expression, which is predominantly in the perivenous zone, remains mostly unaffected. These data suggest that ‘selective insulin resistance' is induced by the differential distribution, and alterations of hepatic Irs1 and Irs2 expression. PMID:27708333

  8. Differential hepatic distribution of insulin receptor substrates causes selective insulin resistance in diabetes and obesity.

    PubMed

    Kubota, Naoto; Kubota, Tetsuya; Kajiwara, Eiji; Iwamura, Tomokatsu; Kumagai, Hiroki; Watanabe, Taku; Inoue, Mariko; Takamoto, Iseki; Sasako, Takayoshi; Kumagai, Katsuyoshi; Kohjima, Motoyuki; Nakamuta, Makoto; Moroi, Masao; Sugi, Kaoru; Noda, Tetsuo; Terauchi, Yasuo; Ueki, Kohjiro; Kadowaki, Takashi

    2016-10-06

    Hepatic insulin signalling involves insulin receptor substrates (Irs) 1/2, and is normally associated with the inhibition of gluconeogenesis and activation of lipogenesis. In diabetes and obesity, insulin no longer suppresses hepatic gluconeogenesis, while continuing to activate lipogenesis, a state referred to as 'selective insulin resistance'. Here, we show that 'selective insulin resistance' is caused by the differential expression of Irs1 and Irs2 in different zones of the liver. We demonstrate that hepatic Irs2-knockout mice develop 'selective insulin resistance', whereas mice lacking in Irs1, or both Irs1 and Irs2, develop 'total insulin resistance'. In obese diabetic mice, Irs1/2-mediated insulin signalling is impaired in the periportal zone, which is the primary site of gluconeogenesis, but enhanced in the perivenous zone, which is the primary site of lipogenesis. While hyperinsulinaemia reduces Irs2 expression in both the periportal and perivenous zones, Irs1 expression, which is predominantly in the perivenous zone, remains mostly unaffected. These data suggest that 'selective insulin resistance' is induced by the differential distribution, and alterations of hepatic Irs1 and Irs2 expression.

  9. Insulin receptor changes in type 2 diabetes after short term insulin treatment.

    PubMed

    Rizkalla, S W; Weissbrodt, P; Tchobroutsky, G; Slama, G

    1985-10-01

    We have studied erythrocyte insulin receptor changes before and after 8 days of continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion by a pump in 11 uncontrolled obese non-insulin-dependent diabetics (type 2), diet and drug resistant for at least three months previously. All the patients were hospitalized. On day 1 of the study, their oral hypoglycemic agents were stopped and hypocaloric diet (1000 Kcal/day) was maintained (strictly reinforced). This period of reinforced treatment was not accompanied by correction of hyperglycemia. On day 9 patients were placed for 12 hours on artificial pancreas in order to bring their fasting blood glucose levels down to normal values. Then they were submitted to a continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) for the following 8 days. There was a significant decrease in mean fasting plasma glucose (P less than 0.001) and a rise in insulin (P less than 0.05) levels after insulin treatment. Mean specific insulin binding was also significantly increased (P less than 0.01). The increase in binding (with insulin therapy) correlated with the fall in fasting hyperglycemia (r = 0.786, P less than 0.01). In addition, the increase in binding correlated negatively with changes in fasting plasma insulin levels (r = -0.867, P less than 0.01), under treatment, on one hand and with the dose of exogenous insulin administered (r = -0.681, P less than 0.05) on the other hand. There was no correlation between binding and fasting plasma insulin levels (before and after insulin therapy), or between diabetes duration and any of the previous parameters.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  10. Degradation of pro-insulin-receptor proteins by proteasomes.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Miguel; Velasco, Eduardo; Kumate, Jesús

    2004-01-01

    Type-2 diabetes is characterized by hyperinsulinemia, peripheral insulin resistance, and diminished tyrosine phosphorylation activity. It has been recently shown that proteasomes are implicated in the degradation of the insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1) but not in that of the insulin receptor (IR). However, it is unknown whether proteasomes are involved in pro-IR degradation. We used CHO-IR and the 3T3-L1 cells treated with insulin at different concentrations and compared the proteasome activity of IRS-1, IR, and pro-IR degradation either in presence or in absence of lactacystin. A total of 100 nM of insulin allowed degradation of IRS-1 after 6 h of incubation. At 1,000 nM of insulin, pro-IR degradation began at 1 h of incubation, similar to IRS-1 degradation. Surprisingly, at a higher concentration (10 microM) of insulin, a drastic decrease of proteins was observed from the first minute of incubation. This activity was blocked by lactacystin, a specific proteasome inhibitor. According to these results, we propose that pro-IR is degraded by proteasomes.

  11. Phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate 1 by glycogen synthase kinase 3 impairs insulin action

    PubMed Central

    Eldar-Finkelman, Hagit; Krebs, Edwin G.

    1997-01-01

    The phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS-1) on tyrosine residues by the insulin receptor (IR) tyrosine kinase is involved in most of the biological responses of insulin. IRS-1 mediates insulin signaling by recruiting SH2 proteins through its multiple tyrosine phosphorylation sites. The phosphorylation of IRS-1 on serine/threonine residues also occurs in cells; however, the particular protein kinase(s) promoting this type of phosphorylation are unknown. Here we report that glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK-3) is capable of phosphorylating IRS-1 and that this modification converts IRS-1 into an inhibitor of IR tyrosine kinase activity in vitro. Expression of wild-type GSK-3 or an “unregulated” mutant of the kinase (S9A) in CHO cells overexpressing IRS-1 and IR, resulted in increased serine phosphorylation levels of IRS-1, suggesting that IRS-1 is a cellular target of GSK-3. Furthermore, insulin-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of IRS-1 and IR was markedly suppressed in cells expressing wild-type or the S9A mutant, indicating that expression of GSK-3 impairs IR tyrosine kinase activity. Taken together, our studies suggest a new role for GSK-3 in attenuating insulin signaling via its phosphorylation of IRS-1 and may provide new insight into mechanisms important in insulin resistance. PMID:9275179

  12. Signal transduction through the IL-4 and insulin receptor families.

    PubMed

    Wang, L M; Keegan, A; Frankel, M; Paul, W E; Pierce, J H

    1995-07-01

    Activation of tyrosine kinase-containing receptors and intracellular tyrosine kinases by ligand stimulation is known to be crucial for mediating initial and subsequent events involved in mitogenic signal transduction. Receptors for insulin and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) contain cytoplasmic tyrosine kinase domains that undergo autophosphorylation upon ligand stimulation. Activation of these receptors also leads to pronounced and rapid tyrosine phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS-1) in cells of connective tissue origin. A related substrate, designated 4PS, is similarly phosphorylated by insulin and IGF-1 stimulation in many hematopoietic cell types. IRS-1 and 4PS possess a number of tyrosine phosphorylation sites that are within motifs that bind specific SH2-containing molecules known to be involved in mitogenic signaling such as PI-3 kinase, SHPTP-2 (Syp) and Grb-2. Thus, they appear to act as docking substrates for a variety of signaling molecules. The majority of hematopoietic cytokines bind to receptors that do not possess intrinsic kinase activity, and these receptors have been collectively termed as members of the hematopoietin receptor superfamily. Despite their lack of tyrosine kinase domains, stimulation of these receptors has been demonstrated to activate intracellular kinases leading to tyrosine phosphorylation of multiple substrates. Recent evidence has demonstrated that activation of different members of the Janus family of tyrosine kinases is involved in mediating tyrosine phosphorylation events by specific cytokines. Stimulation of the interleukin 4 (IL-4) receptor, a member of the hematopoietin receptor superfamily, is thought to result in activation of Jak1, Jak3, and/or Fes tyrosine kinases.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  13. Insulin receptor substrates 1 and 2 but not Shc can activate the insulin receptor independent of insulin and induce proliferation in CHO-IR cells

    SciTech Connect

    Niessen, Markus . E-mail: markus.niessen@usz.ch; Jaschinski, Frank; Item, Flurin; McNamara, Morgan P.; Spinas, Giatgen A.; Trueb, Thomas

    2007-02-15

    Ligand-activated insulin receptor (IR) attracts and phosphorylates various substrates such as insulin receptor substrates 1-4 (IRS) and Shc. To investigate how binding affinity for substrate affects signalling we generated chimeric receptors with the {beta}-chain of the insulin receptor containing NPXY motives with different affinities for receptor substrates. We found that the extent of receptor tyrosine phosphorylation positively correlates with binding affinity towards IRS1/2 but not towards Shc. Moreover, overexpression of IRS1 or IRS2 but not of Shc increased IR tyrosine phosphorylation in a dose-dependent manner, also independent of insulin. Molecular truncations of IRS1 revealed that neither the isolated PH and PTB domains nor the C-terminus with the tyrosine phosphorylation sites alone are sufficient for substrate-dependent receptor activation. Overexpression of IRS1 and IRS2 impaired insulin-induced internalization of the IR in a dose-dependent manner suggesting that IRS proteins prevent endosome-associated receptor dephosphorylation/inactivation. IRS1 and IRS2 could therefore target the activated IR to different cellular compartments. Overexpression of IRS1 and IRS2 inhibited insulin-stimulated activation of the MAP kinases Erk1/2 while it increased/induced activation of Akt/PKB. Finally, overexpression of IRS1 and IRS2 but not of Shc induced DNA synthesis in starved CHO-IR cells independent of exogenous growth factors. Our results demonstrate that variations in cellular IRS1 and IRS2 concentration affect insulin signalling both upstream and downstream and that IRS proteins could play instructive rather than just permissive roles in signal transmission.

  14. Internalized insulin-receptor complexes are unidirectionally translocated to chloroquine-sensitive degradative sites. Dependence on metabolic energy

    SciTech Connect

    Berhanu, P.

    1988-04-25

    Insulin receptors on the surface of isolated rat adipocytes were photoaffinity labeled at 12 degrees C with the iodinated photoreactive insulin analogue, 125I-B2 (2-nitro-4-azidophenylacetyl)-des-PheB1-insulin, and the pathways in the intracellular processing of the labeled receptors were studied at 37 degrees C. During 37 degrees C incubations, the labeled 440-kDa insulin receptors were continuously internalized (as assessed by trypsin inaccessibility) and degraded such that up to 50% of the initially labeled receptors were lost by 120 min. Metabolic poisons (0.125-0.75 mM 2,4-dinitrophenol (DNP) and 1-10 mM NaF), which led to dose-dependent depletion of adipocyte ATP pools, inhibited receptor loss, and caused up to 3-fold increase in intracellular receptor accumulation. This effect was due to inhibition of intracellular receptor degradation, and there was no apparent effect of the metabolic poisons on initial internalization of the receptors. Following maximal intracellular accumulation of labeled insulin receptors in the presence of NaF or DNP, removal of these agents resulted in a subsequent, time-dependent degradation of the accumulated receptors. However, when the lysosomotropic agent, chloroquine (0.2 mM), was added immediately following removal of the metabolic poisons, further degradation of the intracellularly accumulated receptors was prevented, suggesting that the chloroquine-sensitive degradation of insulin receptors occurs distal to the site of inhibition by NaF or DNP. To confirm this, maximal intracellular accumulation of labeled receptors was first allowed to occur in the presence of chloroquine and the cells were then washed and reincubated in chloroquine-free media in the absence or presence of NaF or DNP. Under these conditions, degradation of the intracellularly accumulated receptors continued to occur, and NaF or DNP failed to block the degradation.

  15. Saturated fatty acids inhibit hepatic insulin action by modulating insulin receptor expression and post-receptor signalling.

    PubMed

    Ruddock, Mark W; Stein, Andrew; Landaker, Edwin; Park, Jun; Cooksey, Robert C; McClain, Donald; Patti, Mary-Elizabeth

    2008-11-01

    Free fatty acids (FFAs) are proposed to play a pathogenic role in both peripheral and hepatic insulin resistance. We have examined the effect of saturated FFA on insulin signalling (100 nM) in two hepatocyte cell lines. Fao hepatoma cells were treated with physiological concentrations of sodium palmitate (0.25 mM) (16:0) for 0.25-48 h. Palmitate decreased insulin receptor (IR) protein and mRNA expression in a dose- and time-dependent manner (35% decrease at 12 h). Palmitate also reduced insulin-stimulated IR and IRS-2 tyrosine phosphorylation, IRS-2-associated PI 3-kinase activity, and phosphorylation of Akt, p70 S6 kinase, GSK-3 and FOXO1A. Palmitate also inhibited insulin action in hepatocytes derived from wild-type IR (+/+) mice, but was ineffective in IR-deficient (-/-) cells. The effects of palmitate were reversed by triacsin C, an inhibitor of fatty acyl CoA synthases, indicating that palmitoyl CoA ester formation is critical. Neither the non-metabolized bromopalmitate alone nor the medium chain fatty acid octanoate (8:0) produced similar effects. However, the CPT-1 inhibitor (+/-)-etomoxir and bromopalmitate (in molar excess) reversed the effects of palmitate. Thus, the inhibition of insulin signalling by palmitate in hepatoma cells is dependent upon oxidation of fatty acyl-CoA species and requires intact insulin receptor expression.

  16. Insulin Receptor Substrate 2 Is a Negative Regulator of Memory Formation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Irvine, Elaine E.; Drinkwater, Laura; Radwanska, Kasia; Al-Qassab, Hind; Smith, Mark A.; O'Brien, Melissa; Kielar, Catherine; Choudhury, Agharul I.; Krauss, Stefan; Cooper, Jonathan D.; Withers, Dominic J.; Giese, Karl Peter

    2011-01-01

    Insulin has been shown to impact on learning and memory in both humans and animals, but the downstream signaling mechanisms involved are poorly characterized. Insulin receptor substrate-2 (Irs2) is an adaptor protein that couples activation of insulin- and insulin-like growth factor-1 receptors to downstream signaling pathways. Here, we have…

  17. Insulin Receptor Substrate 2 Is a Negative Regulator of Memory Formation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Irvine, Elaine E.; Drinkwater, Laura; Radwanska, Kasia; Al-Qassab, Hind; Smith, Mark A.; O'Brien, Melissa; Kielar, Catherine; Choudhury, Agharul I.; Krauss, Stefan; Cooper, Jonathan D.; Withers, Dominic J.; Giese, Karl Peter

    2011-01-01

    Insulin has been shown to impact on learning and memory in both humans and animals, but the downstream signaling mechanisms involved are poorly characterized. Insulin receptor substrate-2 (Irs2) is an adaptor protein that couples activation of insulin- and insulin-like growth factor-1 receptors to downstream signaling pathways. Here, we have…

  18. Mechanical stretch augments insulin-induced vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation by insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Gang; Hitomi, Hirofumi; Hosomi, Naohisa; Lei, Bai; Nakano, Daisuke; Deguchi, Kazushi; Mori, Hirohito; Masaki, Tsutomu; Ma, Hong; Griendling, Kathy K.; Nishiyama, Akira

    2011-10-15

    Insulin resistance and hypertension have been implicated in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease; however, little is known about the roles of insulin and mechanical force in vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) remodeling. We investigated the contribution of mechanical stretch to insulin-induced VSMC proliferation. Thymidine incorporation was stimulated by insulin in stretched VSMCs, but not in un-stretched VSMCs. Insulin increased 2-deoxy-glucose incorporation in both stretched and un-stretched VSMCs. Mechanical stretch augmented insulin-induced extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and Akt phosphorylation. Inhibitors of epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor tyrosine kinase and Src attenuated insulin-induced ERK and Akt phosphorylation, as well as thymidine incorporation, whereas 2-deoxy-glucose incorporation was not affected by these inhibitors. Moreover, stretch augmented insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-1 receptor expression, although it did not alter the expression of insulin receptor and insulin receptor substrate-1. Insulin-induced ERK and Akt activation, and thymidine incorporation were inhibited by siRNA for the IGF-1 receptor. Mechanical stretch augments insulin-induced VSMC proliferation via upregulation of IGF-1 receptor, and downstream Src/EGF receptor-mediated ERK and Akt activation. Similar to in vitro experiment, IGF-1 receptor expression was also augmented in hypertensive rats. These results provide a basis for clarifying the molecular mechanisms of vascular remodeling in hypertensive patients with hyperinsulinemia. -- Highlights: {yields} Mechanical stretch augments insulin-induced VSMC proliferation via IGF-1 receptor. {yields} Src/EGFR-mediated ERK and Akt phosphorylation are augmented in stretched VSMCs. {yields} Similar to in vitro experiment, IGF-1 receptor is increased in hypertensive rats. {yields} Results provide possible mechanisms of vascular remodeling in hypertension with DM.

  19. Dysregulation of Insulin Secretion in Children With Congenital Hyperinsulinism due to Sulfonylurea Receptor Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Grimberg, A.; Ferry, R.J.; Kelly, A.; Koo-McCoy, S.; Polonsky, K.; Glaser, B.; Permutt, M.A.; Aguilar-Bryan, L.; Stafford, D.; Thornton, P.S.; Baker, L.; Stanley, Charles A.

    2012-01-01

    Mutations in the high-affinity sulfonylurea receptor (SUR)-1 cause one of the severe recessively inherited diffuse forms of congenital hyperinsulinism or, when associated with loss of heterozygosity, focal adenomatosis. We hypothesized that SUR1 mutations would render the β-cell insensitive to sulfonylureas and to glucose. Stimulated insulin responses were compared among eight patients with diffuse hyperinsulinism (two mutations), six carrier parents, and ten normal adults. In the patients with diffuse hyperinsulinism, the acute insulin response to intravenous tolbutamide was absent and did not overlap with the responses seen in either adult group. There was positive, albeit significantly blunted, acute insulin response to intravenous dextrose in the patients with diffuse hyperinsulinism. Graded infusions of glucose, to raise and then lower plasma glucose concentrations over 4 h, caused similar rises in blood glucose but lower peak insulin levels in the hyperinsulinemic patients. Loss of acute insulin response to tolbutamide can identify children with diffuse SUR1 defects. The greater response to glucose than to tolbutamide indicates that ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channel–independent pathways are involved in glucose-mediated insulin release in patients with diffuse SUR1 defects. The diminished glucose responsiveness suggests that SUR1 mutations and lack of KATP channel activity may contribute to the late development of diabetes in patients with hyperinsulinism independently of subtotal pancreatectomy. PMID:11272143

  20. The Interactions of Proinsulin with Insulin Receptors on the Plasma Membrane of the Liver

    PubMed Central

    Freychet, Pierre

    1974-01-01

    The interactions of proinsulin with the insulin-specific receptors were investigated in purified rat liver plasma membranes. These studies were designed to characterize the binding of proinsulin to the insulin receptors, to search for proinsulin-specific receptor sites, and to examine the possibility of proinsulin conversion at the insulin receptor site. Proinsulin was only 3-5% as potent as insulin in binding to insulin receptors. Proinsulin reacted with all of the insulin-specific receptors, and direct binding studies of [125I]porcine proinsulin and [125I]rat proinsulin did not reveal proinsulin-specific receptor sites other than the insulin receptors in rat liver membranes. Quantitative data derived from steady-state and transient-state comparative binding studies of both [125I]proinsulin and [125I]insulin indicated that a 20-fold lower association rate constant essentially accounts for the reduced affinity of proinsulin for the insulin receptors. The possibility of proinsulin conversion at the insulin receptor sites was investigated. Material recovered from the membranes upon dissociation of the proinsulin-receptor complex was intact proinsulin and did not exhibit any conversion by a variety of analytical methods. These results indicate that the lower affinity of proinsulin for the insulin receptor in the liver is an intrinsic property of the proinsulin molecule. The lower uptake of proinsulin by the insulin receptor represents, in addition to a slower degradation of the prohormone, a further mechanism by which proinsulin exerts prolonged, albeit reduced, action in vivo. PMID:4421396

  1. Combination therapy with GLP-1 receptor agonists and basal insulin: a systematic review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Balena, R; Hensley, I E; Miller, S; Barnett, A H

    2013-01-01

    Treatment algorithms for type 2 diabetes call for intensification of therapy over time as the disease progresses and glycaemic control worsens. If diet, exercise and oral antihyperglycaemic medications (OAMs) fail to maintain glycaemic control then basal insulin is added and ultimately prandial insulin may be required. However, such an intensification strategy carries risk of increased hypoglycaemia and weight gain, both of which are associated with worse long-term outcomes. An alternative strategy is to intensify therapy by the addition of a short-acting glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist (GLP-1 RA) rather than prandial insulin. Short-acting GLP-1 RAs such as exenatide twice daily are particularly effective at reducing postprandial glucose while basal insulin has a greater effect on fasting glucose, providing a physiological rationale for this complementary approach. This review analyzes the latest randomized controlled clinical trials of insulin/GLP-1 RA combination therapy and examines results from ‘real-world’ use of the combinations as reported through observational and clinical practice studies. The most common finding across all types of studies was that combination therapy improved glycaemic control without weight gain or an increased risk of hypoglycaemia. Many studies reported weight loss and a reduction in insulin use when a GLP-1 RA was added to existing insulin therapy. Overall, the relative degree of benefit to glycaemic control and weight was influenced by the insulin titration employed in conjunction with the GLP-1 RA. The greatest glycaemic benefits were observed in studies with structured titration of insulin to glycaemic targets while the greatest weight benefits were observed in studies with a protocol-specified focus on insulin sparing. The adverse event profile of GLP-1 RAs in the reviewed trials was similar to that reported with GLP-1 RAs as monotherapy or in combination with OAMs with gastrointestinal events being the most commonly

  2. Toll-like receptor 2 deficiency improves insulin sensitivity and hepatic insulin signalling in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Kuo, L-H; Tsai, P-J; Jiang, M-J; Chuang, Y-L; Yu, L; Lai, K-T A; Tsai, Y-S

    2011-01-01

    Substantial evidence suggests a link between elevated inflammation and development of insulin resistance. Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) recognises a large number of lipid-containing molecules and transduces inflammatory signalling in a variety of cell types, including insulin-responsive cells. Considering the contribution of the fatty acid composition in TLR2-depedent signalling, we hypothesised that the inflammatory signals transduced by TLR2 contribute to insulin resistance. Mice deficient in TLR2 were used to investigate the in vivo roles of TLR2 in initiating and maintaining inflammation-associated insulin resistance and energy homeostasis. We first recapitulated the observation with elevated expression of TLR2 and inflammatory cytokines in white adipose tissue and liver of ob/ob mice. Aged or high-fat-fed TLR2-deficient mice were protected from obesity and adipocyte hypertrophy compared with wild-type mice. Moreover, mice lacking TLR2 exhibited improved glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity regardless of feeding them regular chow or a high-fat diet. This is accompanied by reductions in expression of inflammatory cytokines and activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) in a liver-specific manner. The attenuated hepatic inflammatory cytokine expression and related signalling are correlated with increased insulin action specifically in the liver in TLR2-deficient mice, reflected by increased insulin-stimulated protein kinase B (Akt) phosphorylation and IRS1 tyrosine phosphorylation and increased insulin-suppressed hepatocyte glucose production. The absence of TLR2 attenuates local inflammatory cytokine expression and related signalling and increases insulin action specifically in the liver. Thus, our work has identified TLR2 as a key mediator of hepatic inflammation-related signalling and insulin resistance.

  3. Cloning and Characterisation of Schistosoma japonicum Insulin Receptors

    PubMed Central

    You, Hong; Zhang, Wenbao; Jones, Malcolm K.; Gobert, Geoffrey N.; Mulvenna, Jason; Rees, Glynn; Spanevello, Mark; Blair, David; Duke, Mary; Brehm, Klaus; McManus, Donald P.

    2010-01-01

    Background Schistosomes depend for growth and development on host hormonal signals, which may include the insulin signalling pathway. We cloned and assessed the function of two insulin receptors from Schistosoma japonicum in order to shed light on their role in schistosome biology. Methodology/Principal Findings We isolated, from S. japonicum, insulin receptors 1 (SjIR-1) and 2 (SjIR-2) sharing close sequence identity to their S. mansoni homologues (SmIR-1 and SmIR-2). SjIR-1 is located on the tegument basal membrane and the internal epithelium of adult worms, whereas SjIR-2 is located in the parenchyma of males and the vitelline tissue of females. Phylogenetic analysis showed that SjIR-2 and SmIR-2 are close to Echinococcus multilocularis insulin receptor (EmIR), suggesting that SjIR-2, SmIR-2 and EmIR share similar roles in growth and development in the three taxa. Structure homology modelling recovered the conserved structure between the SjIRs and Homo sapiens IR (HIR) implying a common predicted binding mechanism in the ligand domain and the same downstream signal transduction processing in the tyrosine kinase domain as in HIR. Two-hybrid analysis was used to confirm that the ligand domains of SjIR-1 and SjIR-2 contain the insulin binding site. Incubation of adult worms in vitro, both with a specific insulin receptor inhibitor and anti-SjIRs antibodies, resulted in a significant decrease in worm glucose levels, suggesting again the same function for SjIRs in regulating glucose uptake as described for mammalian cells. Conclusions Adult worms of S. japonicum possess insulin receptors that can specifically bind to insulin, indicating that the parasite can utilize host insulin for development and growth by sharing the same pathway as mammalian cells in regulating glucose uptake. A complete understanding of the role of SjIRs in the biology of S. japonicum may result in their use as new targets for drug and vaccine development against schistosomiasis. PMID:20352052

  4. ANP system activity predicts variability of fat mass reduction and insulin sensitivity during weight loss.

    PubMed

    Brachs, Maria; Wiegand, Susanna; Leupelt, Verena; Ernert, Andrea; Kintscher, Ulrich; Jumpertz von Schwarzenberg, Reiner; Decker, Anne-Marie; Bobbert, Thomas; Hübner, Norbert; Chen, Wei; Krude, Heiko; Spranger, Joachim; Mai, Knut

    2016-06-01

    In weight loss trials, a considerable inter-individual variability in reduction of fat mass and changes of insulin resistance is observed, even under standardized study conditions. The underlying mechanisms are not well understood. Given the metabolic properties of the atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) system, we hypothesized that ANP signaling might be involved in this phenomenon by changes of ANP secretion or receptor balance. Therefore, we investigated the impact of systemic, adipose and myocellular ANP system on metabolic and anthropometric improvements during weight loss. We comprehensively investigated 143 subjects (31 male, 112 female) before and after a 3 month-standardized weight loss program. The time course of BMI, fat mass, insulin sensitivity, circulating mid-regional proANP (MR-proANP) levels as well as adipose and myocellular natriuretic receptor A (NPR-A) and C (NPR-C) mRNA expression were investigated. BMI decreased by -12.6±3.7%. This was accompanied by a remarkable decrease of adipose NPR-C expression (1005.0±488.4 vs. 556.7±465.6; p<0.001) as well as a tendency towards increased adipose NPR-A expression (4644.7±946.8 vs. 4877.6±869.8; p=0.051). Weight loss induced changes in NPR-C (ΔNPR-C) was linked to relative reduction of total fat mass (ΔFM) (r=0.281; p<0.05), reduction of BMI (r=0.277; p<0.01), and increase of free fatty acids (ΔFFA) (r=-0.258; p<0.05). Basal NPR-C expression and weight loss induced ΔNPR-C independently explained 22.7% of ΔFM. In addition, ΔMR-proANP was independently associated with improvement of insulin sensitivity (standardized ß=0.246, p<0.01). ANP receptor expression predicted the degree of weight loss induced fat mass reduction. Our comprehensive human data support that peripheral ANP signalling is involved in control of adipose tissue plasticity and function during weight loss. (Funded by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (KFO281/2), the Berlin Institute of Health (BIH) and the German Centre for

  5. Insulin Resistance Induced by Hyperinsulinemia Coincides with a Persistent Alteration at the Insulin Receptor Tyrosine Kinase Domain

    PubMed Central

    Catalano, Karyn J.; Maddux, Betty A.; Szary, Jaroslaw; Youngren, Jack F.; Goldfine, Ira D.; Schaufele, Fred

    2014-01-01

    Insulin resistance, the diminished response of target tissues to insulin, is associated with the metabolic syndrome and a predisposition towards diabetes in a growing proportion of the worldwide population. Under insulin resistant states, the cellular response of the insulin signaling pathway is diminished and the body typically responds by increasing serum insulin concentrations to maintain insulin signaling. Some evidence indicates that the increased insulin concentration may itself further dampen insulin response. If so, insulin resistance would worsen as the level of circulating insulin increases during compensation, which could contribute to the transition of insulin resistance to more severe disease. Here, we investigated the consequences of excess insulin exposure to insulin receptor (IR) activity. Cells chronically exposed to insulin show a diminished the level of IR tyrosine and serine autophosphorylation below that observed after short-term insulin exposure. The diminished IR response did not originate with IR internalization since IR amounts at the cell membrane were similar after short- and long-term insulin incubation. Förster resonance energy transfer between fluorophores attached to the IR tyrosine kinase (TK) domain showed that a change in the TK domain occurred upon prolonged, but not short-term, insulin exposure. Even though the altered ‘insulin refractory’ IR TK FRET and IR autophosphorylation levels returned to baseline (non-stimulated) levels after wash-out of the original insulin stimulus, subsequent short-term exposure to insulin caused immediate re-establishment of the insulin-refractory levels. This suggests that some cell-based ‘memory’ of chronic hyperinsulinemic exposure acts directly at the IR. An improved understanding of that memory may help define interventions to reset the IR to full insulin responsiveness and impede the progression of insulin resistance to more severe disease states. PMID:25259572

  6. Protective hinge in insulin opens to enable its receptor engagement.

    PubMed

    Menting, John G; Yang, Yanwu; Chan, Shu Jin; Phillips, Nelson B; Smith, Brian J; Whittaker, Jonathan; Wickramasinghe, Nalinda P; Whittaker, Linda J; Pandyarajan, Vijay; Wan, Zhu-li; Yadav, Satya P; Carroll, Julie M; Strokes, Natalie; Roberts, Charles T; Ismail-Beigi, Faramarz; Milewski, Wieslawa; Steiner, Donald F; Chauhan, Virander S; Ward, Colin W; Weiss, Michael A; Lawrence, Michael C

    2014-08-19

    Insulin provides a classical model of a globular protein, yet how the hormone changes conformation to engage its receptor has long been enigmatic. Interest has focused on the C-terminal B-chain segment, critical for protective self-assembly in β cells and receptor binding at target tissues. Insight may be obtained from truncated "microreceptors" that reconstitute the primary hormone-binding site (α-subunit domains L1 and αCT). We demonstrate that, on microreceptor binding, this segment undergoes concerted hinge-like rotation at its B20-B23 β-turn, coupling reorientation of Phe(B24) to a 60° rotation of the B25-B28 β-strand away from the hormone core to lie antiparallel to the receptor's L1-β2 sheet. Opening of this hinge enables conserved nonpolar side chains (Ile(A2), Val(A3), Val(B12), Phe(B24), and Phe(B25)) to engage the receptor. Restraining the hinge by nonstandard mutagenesis preserves native folding but blocks receptor binding, whereas its engineered opening maintains activity at the price of protein instability and nonnative aggregation. Our findings rationalize properties of clinical mutations in the insulin family and provide a previously unidentified foundation for designing therapeutic analogs. We envisage that a switch between free and receptor-bound conformations of insulin evolved as a solution to conflicting structural determinants of biosynthesis and function.

  7. Protective hinge in insulin opens to enable its receptor engagement

    PubMed Central

    Menting, John G.; Yang, Yanwu; Chan, Shu Jin; Phillips, Nelson B.; Smith, Brian J.; Whittaker, Jonathan; Wickramasinghe, Nalinda P.; Whittaker, Linda J.; Pandyarajan, Vijay; Wan, Zhu-li; Yadav, Satya P.; Carroll, Julie M.; Strokes, Natalie; Roberts, Charles T.; Ismail-Beigi, Faramarz; Milewski, Wieslawa; Steiner, Donald F.; Chauhan, Virander S.; Ward, Colin W.; Weiss, Michael A.; Lawrence, Michael C.

    2014-01-01

    Insulin provides a classical model of a globular protein, yet how the hormone changes conformation to engage its receptor has long been enigmatic. Interest has focused on the C-terminal B-chain segment, critical for protective self-assembly in β cells and receptor binding at target tissues. Insight may be obtained from truncated “microreceptors” that reconstitute the primary hormone-binding site (α-subunit domains L1 and αCT). We demonstrate that, on microreceptor binding, this segment undergoes concerted hinge-like rotation at its B20-B23 β-turn, coupling reorientation of PheB24 to a 60° rotation of the B25-B28 β-strand away from the hormone core to lie antiparallel to the receptor's L1–β2 sheet. Opening of this hinge enables conserved nonpolar side chains (IleA2, ValA3, ValB12, PheB24, and PheB25) to engage the receptor. Restraining the hinge by nonstandard mutagenesis preserves native folding but blocks receptor binding, whereas its engineered opening maintains activity at the price of protein instability and nonnative aggregation. Our findings rationalize properties of clinical mutations in the insulin family and provide a previously unidentified foundation for designing therapeutic analogs. We envisage that a switch between free and receptor-bound conformations of insulin evolved as a solution to conflicting structural determinants of biosynthesis and function. PMID:25092300

  8. Direct Demonstration of Separate Receptors for Growth and Metabolic Activities of Insulin and Multiplication-stimulating Activity (an Insulinlike Growth Factor) Using Antibodies to the Insulin Receptor

    PubMed Central

    King, George L.; Kahn, C. Ronald; Rechler, Matthew M.; Nissley, S. Peter

    1980-01-01

    Insulin and such insulinlike growth factors as multiplication stimulating activity (MSA) are related polypeptides that have common biological activities. Both insulin and MSA produce acute metabolic responses (stimulation of glucose oxidation in isolated fat cells) as well as growth effects (stimulation of [3H]thymidine incorporation into DNA in cultured fibroblasts). In addition, most cells have separate receptors for insulin and insulinlike growth factors, and both peptides have weaker affinity for each other's specific receptors than for their own. To determine, therefore, whether these effects are mediated by receptors for insulin, insulinlike growth factors, or both, we have selectively blocked insulin receptors with a specific antagonist, namely Fab fragments derived from naturally occurring antibodies to the insulin receptor. In rat adipocytes, 10 μg/ml of antireceptor Fab inhibited insulin binding by 90%, whereas it inhibited MSA binding <5%. The anti-insulin receptor Fab is without intrinsic biological activity, but acts as a competitive inhibitor of insulin receptors. Blockade of insulin receptors with Fab fragments produced a 30-fold rightward shift in the dose response for stimulation of glucose oxidation by both insulin and MSA. The dose-response curves for stimulation of oxidation by vitamin K5 and spermine, agents that stimulate glucose oxidation through noninsulin receptor pathways, were not affected by the blockade of insulin receptors with Fab antibody fragments. These data suggest that this acute metabolic effect of both insulin and MSA is mediated via the insulin receptor. In cultured human fibroblasts, 10 μg/ml of Fab inhibited insulin binding by 90% and MSA binding by 15%. In fibroblasts, however, blockade of the insulin receptor did not alter the dose response for stimulation of thymidine incorporation into DNA by either insulin or MSA. Furthermore, intact antireceptor antibody immunoglobulin (Ig)G, which produces multiple other insulinlike

  9. Safety and efficacy of a glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist added to basal insulin therapy versus basal insulin with or without a rapid-acting insulin in patients with type 2 diabetes: results of a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Wysham, Carol H; Lin, Jay; Kuritzky, Louis

    2017-05-01

    To consolidate the evidence from randomized controlled trials evaluating the use of glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists (GLP-1 RAs) as add-on to basal insulin therapy in type 2 diabetes (T2D) patients. We searched the EMBASE® and NCBI PubMed (Medline) databases and relevant congress abstracts for randomized controlled trials evaluating the efficacy and safety of GLP-1 RAs as add-on to basal insulin compared with basal insulin with or without rapid-acting insulin (RAI) through 23 May 2016. The pooled data were analyzed using a random-effects meta-analysis model. A subanalysis was performed for trials investigating basal insulin plus GLP-1 RAs versus basal insulin plus RAI. Of the 2617 retrieved records, 19 randomized controlled trials enrolling 7,053 patients with T2D were included. Compared with basal insulin ± RAI, reduction in glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) from baseline (difference in means: -0.48% [95% confidence interval (CI), -0.67 to -0.30]; p < 0.0001) and weight loss (-2.60 kg [95% CI, -3.32 to -1.89]; p < 0.0001) were significantly greater with basal insulin plus GLP-1 RA. The subanalysis similarly showed significant results for change in HbA1c from baseline and for weight loss, as well as a significantly lower risk of symptomatic hypoglycemia in patients treated with basal insulin plus GLP-1 RA versus basal insulin plus RAI (odds ratio, 0.52 [95% CI, 0.42 to 0.64]; p < 0.0001). Addition of GLP-1 RA to basal insulin provided improved glycemic control, led to weight reduction and similar hypoglycemia rates versus an intensified insulin strategy; however, symptomatic hypoglycemia rates were significantly lower when compared with a basal insulin plus RAI.

  10. Signaling-competent receptor chimeras allow mapping of major insulin receptor binding domain determinants.

    PubMed

    Schumacher, R; Soos, M A; Schlessinger, J; Brandenburg, D; Siddle, K; Ullrich, A

    1993-01-15

    Chimeric receptors were generated in which structurally defined subdomains of the insulin receptor (IR) and insulin growth factor-I receptor (IGF-1R) alpha-subunits were exchanged between their respective receptor backbone structures. Upon expression in human fibroblasts, nine IR/IGF-1R chimeras were transported to the cell surface, where they formed binding sites with differential properties. One IGF-1R/IR chimera (C3') exhibited to some extent high insulin specificity, demonstrating the presence of major insulin binding determinants within the amino acid 325-524 region of the IR alpha-subunit. Complementation of this region with subdomain 1 (amino acids 1-137) reconstituted full insulin binding potential within an IGF-1R framework. In addition, both the IGF-1R/IR C3' chimera and another chimera (C13') displayed high affinity binding properties for IGF-1, which suggests distinct locations for major insulin and IGF-1 binding determinants in their respective receptors, in agreement with our previous findings (Schumacher, R., Mosthaf, L., Schlessinger, J., Brandenburg, D., and Ullrich, A. (1991) J. Biol. Chem. 266, 19288-19295). The binding characteristics of all receptor chimeras correlated directly with the ability of the ligands to regulate their tyrosine kinase activity in intact cells. These results demonstrate direct coupling of ligand binding affinity and capacity for tyrosine kinase activation.

  11. A mutation in the insulin receptor gene that impairs transport of the receptor to the plasma membrane and causes insulin-resistant diabetes.

    PubMed Central

    Accili, D; Frapier, C; Mosthaf, L; McKeon, C; Elbein, S C; Permutt, M A; Ramos, E; Lander, E; Ullrich, A; Taylor, S I

    1989-01-01

    Insulin binds to a receptor on the cell surface, thereby triggering a biological response within the target cell. Mutations in the insulin receptor gene can render the cell resistant to the biological action of insulin. We have studied a family in which two sisters have a genetic form of insulin-resistant diabetes mellitus. The technique of homozygosity mapping has been used to demonstrate that the mutation causing diabetes in this consanguineous family is genetically linked to the insulin receptor gene. The two insulin-resistant sisters are homozygous for a mutation encoding substitution of valine for phenylalanine at position 382 in the alpha-subunit of the insulin receptor. Transfection of mutant insulin receptor cDNA into NIH3T3 cells demonstrated that the Val382 mutation impaired post-translational processing and retarded transport of the insulin receptor to the plasma membrane. Thus, the mutation causes insulin resistance by decreasing the number of insulin receptors on the surface of the patients' cells. Images PMID:2573522

  12. p75 neurotrophin receptor regulates glucose homeostasis and insulin sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Baeza-Raja, Bernat; Li, Pingping; Le Moan, Natacha; Sachs, Benjamin D.; Schachtrup, Christian; Davalos, Dimitrios; Vagena, Eirini; Bridges, Dave; Kim, Choel; Saltiel, Alan R.; Olefsky, Jerrold M.; Akassoglou, Katerina

    2012-01-01

    Insulin resistance is a key factor in the etiology of type 2 diabetes. Insulin-stimulated glucose uptake is mediated by the glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4), which is expressed mainly in skeletal muscle and adipose tissue. Insulin-stimulated translocation of GLUT4 from its intracellular compartment to the plasma membrane is regulated by small guanosine triphosphate hydrolases (GTPases) and is essential for the maintenance of normal glucose homeostasis. Here we show that the p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR) is a regulator of glucose uptake and insulin resistance. p75NTR knockout mice show increased insulin sensitivity on normal chow diet, independent of changes in body weight. Euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp studies demonstrate that deletion of the p75NTR gene increases the insulin-stimulated glucose disposal rate and suppression of hepatic glucose production. Genetic depletion or shRNA knockdown of p75NTR in adipocytes or myoblasts increases insulin-stimulated glucose uptake and GLUT4 translocation. Conversely, overexpression of p75NTR in adipocytes decreases insulin-stimulated glucose transport. In adipocytes, p75NTR forms a complex with the Rab5 family GTPases Rab5 and Rab31 that regulate GLUT4 trafficking. Rab5 and Rab31 directly interact with p75NTR primarily via helix 4 of the p75NTR death domain. Adipocytes from p75NTR knockout mice show increased Rab5 and decreased Rab31 activities, and dominant negative Rab5 rescues the increase in glucose uptake seen in p75NTR knockout adipocytes. Our results identify p75NTR as a unique player in glucose metabolism and suggest that signaling from p75NTR to Rab5 family GTPases may represent a unique therapeutic target for insulin resistance and diabetes. PMID:22460790

  13. D1-like receptors inhibit insulin-induced vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation via down-regulation of insulin receptor expression

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Chunyu; Han, Yu; Huang, Hefei; Yu, Changqing; Ren, Hongmei; Shi, Weibin; He, Duofen; Huang, Lan; Yang, Chengming; Wang, Xukai; Zhou, Lin; Jose, Pedro A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) proliferation is central to the development of vascular diseases, including hypertension, which is regulated by numerous hormones and humoral factors. Our previous study showed that the stimulatory effect of norepinephrine on VSMC proliferation is inhibited by D1-like receptors and the D3 dopamine receptor, a member of the D2-like receptor family. Insulin is a proliferative hormone but it is not known if there is any interaction between insulin and D1-like receptors. We hypothesized that Dl-like receptors may have an inhibitory effect on the insulin-induced VSMC proliferation; aberrant insulin and Dl-like receptor functions could be involved in the pathogenesis of essential hypertension. Methods VSMC proliferation was determined by [3H]-thymidine incorporation; insulin receptor mRNA and protein expressions were determined by RT-PCR, immunoblotting, and immunohistochemistry. Results Insulin increased VSMC proliferation in immortalized aortic A10 cells, determined by [3H]-thymidine incorporation. Although the D1-like receptor, by itself, had no effect on VSMC proliferation, stimulation with fenoldopam, a D1-like receptor agonist, inhibited the stimulatory effect of insulin. The inhibitory effect of fenoldopam on insulin-mediated VSMC proliferation was receptor specific, because its effect could be blocked by SCH23390, a D1-like receptor antagonist. Fenoldopam also inhibited insulin receptor mRNA and protein expression, which was time dependent and concentration dependent. A PKC or MAP kinase inhibitor blocked the inhibitory effect of fenoldopam on insulin receptor expression, indicating that PKC and MAP kinase were involved in the signaling pathway. Conclusion The inhibitory effect of D1-like receptors on insulin-mediated VSMC proliferation may play an important role in the regulation of blood pressure. PMID:19293728

  14. Direct method for detection and characterization of cell surface receptors for insulin by means of 125I-labeled autoantibodies against the insulin receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Jarrett, D B; Roth, J; Kahn, C R; Flier, J S

    1976-01-01

    Autoantibodies directed against the cell surface receptors for insulin are found in some patients with extreme insulin resistance. These antibodies specifically inhibit the binding of insulin to its receptor. A purified IgG fraction from one patient's plasma was labeled with 125I. The 125I-labeled antireceptor antibody, which initially represented about 0.3% of the total 125I-IgG, was enriched by selective adsorption and subsequent elution from cells rich in insulin receptors. The 125I-antireceptor antibody bound to cells and the binding was inhibited by whole plasma and purified IgG from this patient, as well as whole plasma from another patient with autoantibodies to the insulin receptor. Insulins that differed 300-fold in biological potency and affinity inhibited binding of 125I-antireceptor antibody in direct proportion to their ability to bind to the insulin receptor. The binding of 125I-antireceptor antibody was closely correlated with the binding of 125I-insulin over a wide range of receptor concentrations on different cell types. Experimentally induced reduction of the insulin receptor concentration was associated with parallel decreases in the binding of 125I-antireceptor antibody and 125I-insulin. The preparation of 125I-antireceptor antibody with a high specific activity by cytoadsorption and elution has provided a sensitive method for the detection of receptors and autoantibodies to cell surface components. PMID:1069300

  15. Weight-loss changes PPAR expression, reduces atherosclerosis and improves cardiovascular function in obese insulin-resistant mice

    SciTech Connect

    Verreth, Wim; Verhamme, Peter; Pelat, Michael; Ganame, Javier; Bielicki, John K.; Mertens, Ann; Quarck, Rozenn; Benhabiles, Nora; Marguerie, Gerard; Mackness, Bharti; Mackness, Mike; Ninio, Ewa; Herregods, Marie-Christine; Balligand, Jean-Luc; Holvoet, Paul

    2003-09-01

    Weight-loss in obese insulin-resistant, but not in insulin-sensitive, persons reduces CHD risk. It is not known to what extent changes in the adipose gene expression profile are important for reducing CHD risk. We studied the effect of diet restriction-induced weight-loss on gene expression in adipose tissue, atherosclerosis and cardiovascular function in mice with combined leptin and LDL-receptor deficiency. Obesity, hypertriglyceridemia and insulin-resistance are associated with hypertension, impaired left ventricle function and accelerated atherosclerosis in those mice. Diet restriction during 12 weeks caused a 45% weight-loss and changes in the gene expression in adipose tissue of PPARa and PPAR? and of key genes regulating glucose transport and insulin sensitivity, lipid metabolism, oxidative stress and inflammation, most of which are under the transcriptional control of PPARs. These changes were associated with increased insulin-sensitivity, decreased hypertriglyceridemia, reduced mean 24-hour blood pressure and heart rate, restored circadian variations of blood pressure and heart rate, increased ejection fraction, and reduced atherosclerosis. Thus, induction of PPARa and PPAR? in adipose tissue is a key mechanism for reducing atherosclerosis and improving cardiovascular function resulting from weight-loss. Our observations point to the critical role of PPARs in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular features of the metabolic syndrome.

  16. Structural Dynamics of Insulin Receptor and Transmembrane Signaling.

    PubMed

    Tatulian, Suren A

    2015-09-15

    The insulin receptor (IR) is a (αβ)2-type transmembrane tyrosine kinase that plays a central role in cell metabolism. Each αβ heterodimer consists of an extracellular ligand-binding α-subunit and a membrane-spanning β-subunit that comprises the cytoplasmic tyrosine kinase (TK) domain and the phosphorylation sites. The α- and β-subunits are linked via a single disulfide bridge, and the (αβ)2 tetramer is formed by disulfide bonds between the α-chains. Insulin binding induces conformational changes in IR that reach the intracellular β-subunit followed by a protein phosphorylation and activation cascade. Defects in this signaling process, including IR dysfunction caused by mutations, result in type 2 diabetes. Rational drug design aimed at treatment of diabetes relies on knowledge of the detailed structure of IR and the dynamic structural transformations during transmembrane signaling. Recent X-ray crystallographic studies have provided important clues about the mode of binding of insulin to IR, the resulting structural changes and their transmission to the TK domain, but a complete understanding of the structural basis underlying insulin signaling has not been achieved. This review presents a critical analysis of the current status of the structure-function relationship of IR, with a comparative assessment of the other IR family receptors, and discusses potential advancements that may provide insight into the molecular mechanism of insulin signaling.

  17. Thrombin stimulates insulin secretion via protease-activated receptor-3.

    PubMed

    Hänzelmann, Sonja; Wang, Jinling; Güney, Emre; Tang, Yunzhao; Zhang, Enming; Axelsson, Annika S; Nenonen, Hannah; Salehi, Albert S; Wollheim, Claes B; Zetterberg, Eva; Berntorp, Erik; Costa, Ivan G; Castelo, Robert; Rosengren, Anders H

    2015-01-01

    The disease mechanisms underlying type 2 diabetes (T2D) remain poorly defined. Here we aimed to explore the pathophysiology of T2D by analyzing gene co-expression networks in human islets. Using partial correlation networks we identified a group of co-expressed genes ('module') including F2RL2 that was associated with glycated hemoglobin. F2Rl2 is a G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) that encodes protease-activated receptor-3 (PAR3). PAR3 is cleaved by thrombin, which exposes a 6-amino acid sequence that acts as a 'tethered ligand' to regulate cellular signaling. We have characterized the effect of PAR3 activation on insulin secretion by static insulin secretion measurements, capacitance measurements, studies of diabetic animal models and patient samples. We demonstrate that thrombin stimulates insulin secretion, an effect that was prevented by an antibody that blocks the thrombin cleavage site of PAR3. Treatment with a peptide corresponding to the PAR3 tethered ligand stimulated islet insulin secretion and single β-cell exocytosis by a mechanism that involves activation of phospholipase C and Ca(2+) release from intracellular stores. Moreover, we observed that the expression of tissue factor, which regulates thrombin generation, was increased in human islets from T2D donors and associated with enhanced β-cell exocytosis. Finally, we demonstrate that thrombin generation potential in patients with T2D was associated with increased fasting insulin and insulinogenic index. The findings provide a previously unrecognized link between hypercoagulability and hyperinsulinemia and suggest that reducing thrombin activity or blocking PAR3 cleavage could potentially counteract the exaggerated insulin secretion that drives insulin resistance and β-cell exhaustion in T2D.

  18. Cannabinoids Inhibit Insulin Receptor Signaling in Pancreatic β-Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Wook; Doyle, Máire E.; Liu, Zhuo; Lao, Qizong; Shin, Yu-Kyong; Carlson, Olga D.; Kim, Hee Seung; Thomas, Sam; Napora, Joshua K.; Lee, Eun Kyung; Moaddel, Ruin; Wang, Yan; Maudsley, Stuart; Martin, Bronwen; Kulkarni, Rohit N.; Egan, Josephine M.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Optimal glucose homeostasis requires exquisitely precise adaptation of the number of insulin-secreting β-cells in the islets of Langerhans. Insulin itself positively regulates β-cell proliferation in an autocrine manner through the insulin receptor (IR) signaling pathway. It is now coming to light that cannabinoid 1 receptor (CB1R) agonism/antagonism influences insulin action in insulin-sensitive tissues. However, the cells on which the CB1Rs are expressed and their function in islets have not been firmly established. We undertook the current study to investigate if intraislet endogenous cannabinoids (ECs) regulate β-cell proliferation and if they influence insulin action. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We measured EC production in isolated human and mouse islets and β-cell line in response to glucose and KCl. We evaluated human and mouse islets, several β-cell lines, and CB1R-null (CB1R−/−) mice for the presence of a fully functioning EC system. We investigated if ECs influence β-cell physiology through regulating insulin action and demonstrated the therapeutic potential of manipulation of the EC system in diabetic (db/db) mice. RESULTS ECs are generated within β-cells, which also express CB1Rs that are fully functioning when activated by ligands. Genetic and pharmacologic blockade of CB1R results in enhanced IR signaling through the insulin receptor substrate 2-AKT pathway in β-cells and leads to increased β-cell proliferation and mass. CB1R antagonism in db/db mice results in reduced blood glucose and increased β-cell proliferation and mass, coupled with enhanced IR signaling in β-cells. Furthermore, CB1R activation impedes insulin-stimulated IR autophosphorylation on β-cells in a Gαi-dependent manner. CONCLUSIONS These findings provide direct evidence for a functional interaction between CB1R and IR signaling involved in the regulation of β-cell proliferation and will serve as a basis for developing new therapeutic interventions to

  19. Hepatocyte insulin receptor is a calmodulin binding protein and is functionally inhibited by calmidazolium

    SciTech Connect

    Arnold, T.P.; Pollet, R.J.

    1986-05-01

    Insulin-induced autophosphorylation of the insulin receptor and changes in intracellular Ca/sup + +/ have been proposed as possible mediators of insulin action in target tissues. The authors have investigated the association of the 17kD calcium binding protein calmodulin with the insulin receptor solubilized from rat liver plasma membranes. Insulin receptors solubilized in 0.1% Triton X-100 exhibited strong binding to calmodulin-agarose affinity columns in the presence of 100..mu..M calcium and could be eluded with 100..mu..M ethelene glycol-bis (amino ethel ether) Tetra Acetic Acid (EGTA) with an 80% yield in insulin binding activity. In addition, /sup 125/I-Calmodulin was shown to bind to wheat germ agglutinin purified solubilized receptors, was specifically inhibited by EGTA (100 ..mu..M) and/or calmidazolium (10 ..mu..M) and was found to be insulin-dependent (max 10/sup -10/ M insulin). SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis data suggests that /sup 125/I-calmodulin may be associated with the 92 kD beta-subunit of the insulin receptor, consistent with the cytoplasmic domain of this subunit. While they have confirmed previous reports that the addition of calcium and calmodulin to solubilized insulin receptors preparations produces no demonstrable change in receptor phosphorylation, the addition of the calmodulin inhibitor calmidazolium did show more than 50% inhibition of insulin stimulated receptor phosphorylation, suggesting that a domain of the calmodulin molecule may be very tightly associated with the insulin receptor. These results indicate that calmodulin binds tightly and specifically to the insulin receptor of the hepatocyte and is insulin dependent. The findings also suggest that this interaction may be functionally significant in mediating insulin-induced receptor phosphorylation as well as other insulin actions. Thus, calmodulin may play a major role as an intracellular contributor to insulin action.

  20. Nature and regulation of the receptors for insulin-like growth factors

    SciTech Connect

    Rechler, M.M.; Nissley, S.P.

    1985-01-01

    Two subtypes of IGF receptors have been identified. Type I IGF receptors have a Mr greater than 300,000 and are composed of disulfide-linked 130,000-dalton (alpha) and approximately 90,000-dalton (beta) subunits. Type I receptors preferentially bind IGF-I but also bind IGF-II and, more weakly, insulin. Type II IGF receptors consist of a 250,000-dalton protein that contains internal disulfide bonds but is not linked to other membrane components. Type II receptors bind IGF-II with higher affinity than IGF-I. They do not interact with even very high concentrations of insulin. Type I IGF receptors and insulin receptors are homologous structures. Type II IGF receptors do not appear to be homologous to type I receptors. Type II receptors do not appear to be downregulated. Insulin acutely upregulates type II IGF receptors in intact rat adipose cells by effecting a redistribution of receptors cycling between a large intracellular pool and the plasma membrane. Insulin and the IGFs elicit the same biological responses, either by cross-reacting with one of the receptors for the heterologous ligand or by concurrent activation of convergent effector pathways by binding to the homologous receptor. Which mechanism is utilized appears to depend more on the tissue than on the biological response. Insulin desensitizes rat hepatoma cells to the actions of insulin and IGFs, mediated by both insulin and IGF receptors, by mechanisms distal to hormone binding and possibly common to IGF and insulin effector pathways.

  1. Brain Deletion of Insulin Receptor Substrate 2 Disrupts Hippocampal Synaptic Plasticity and Metaplasticity

    PubMed Central

    Costello, Derek A.; Claret, Marc; Al-Qassab, Hind; Plattner, Florian; Irvine, Elaine E.; Choudhury, Agharul I.; Giese, K. Peter; Withers, Dominic J.; Pedarzani, Paola

    2012-01-01

    Objective Diabetes mellitus is associated with cognitive deficits and an increased risk of dementia, particularly in the elderly. These deficits and the corresponding neurophysiological structural and functional alterations are linked to both metabolic and vascular changes, related to chronic hyperglycaemia, but probably also defects in insulin action in the brain. To elucidate the specific role of brain insulin signalling in neuronal functions that are relevant for cognitive processes we have investigated the behaviour of neurons and synaptic plasticity in the hippocampus of mice lacking the insulin receptor substrate protein 2 (IRS-2). Research Design and Methods To study neuronal function and synaptic plasticity in the absence of confounding factors such as hyperglycaemia, we used a mouse model with a central nervous system- (CNS)-restricted deletion of IRS-2 (NesCreIrs2KO). Results We report a deficit in NMDA receptor-dependent synaptic plasticity in the hippocampus of NesCreIrs2KO mice, with a concomitant loss of metaplasticity, the modulation of synaptic plasticity by the previous activity of a synapse. These plasticity changes are associated with reduced basal phosphorylation of the NMDA receptor subunit NR1 and of downstream targets of the PI3K pathway, the protein kinases Akt and GSK-3β. Conclusions These findings reveal molecular and cellular mechanisms that might underlie cognitive deficits linked to specific defects of neuronal insulin signalling. PMID:22383997

  2. Transmembrane signaling by a chimera of the Escherichia coli aspartate receptor and the human insulin receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Moe, G R; Bollag, G E; Koshland, D E

    1989-01-01

    Since many receptors apparently contain only one or two membrane-spanning segments, their transmembrane topology should be similar. This feature suggests that these receptors share common mechanisms of transmembrane signaling. To test the degree of conservation of signaling properties, a chimeric receptor containing the ligand-binding extracellular domain of the Escherichia coli aspartate chemoreceptor and the cytosolic portion of the human insulin receptor was constructed. This chimeric receptor is active as a tyrosine kinase, and aspartate stimulates its activity. Some interesting differences are noted in the target proteins phosphorylated by the chimera compared to the wild-type insulin receptor. These results indicate that features of the signaling mechanisms used by these diverse receptors are conserved, but that interesting changes in the protein properties are caused by differences in the neighboring domains. Images PMID:2548185

  3. Monoclonal antibodies to insulin and to the insulin receptor (anti-ID) modify the morphologies of insulin crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markman, Ofer; Elias, Dana; Addadi, Lia; Cohen, Irun R.; Berkovitch-Yellin, Ziva

    1992-08-01

    Crystallization of bovine and porcine insulin in the presence of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) yielded crystals of morphologies which differed from that of insulin crystals grown without the antibodies in solution. The anti-insulin monoclonal antibody ID 7 induced the formation of square plates. The anti-receptor antibodies 312 and A-40 induced deposition of crystals with totally different habit, polar prisms. Four other control mAbs did not have any morphological effect. Systematic work on the growth of crystals of organic and inorganic molecules has shown that morphological modifications, induced when crystals are grown in the presence of selected additives, originate from stereoselective interactions of the additives with the growing crystal faces. The induced morphological modifications can serve as a sensitive tool for the study of these interactions.

  4. Efficacy and safety of insulin-GLP-1 receptor agonists combination in type 2 diabetes mellitus: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Cimmaruta, D; Maiorino, M I; Scavone, C; Sportiello, L; Rossi, F; Giugliano, D; Esposito, K; Capuano, A

    2016-12-01

    Attaining optimal glycemic targets in patients with type 2 diabetes is often hard and compromised by the shortcomings of the several treatments. Areas covered: When glycemic levels are not adequately controlled, an association of GLP-1 receptor agonists and insulin therapy can be adopted. In order to assess the benefit/risk profile of this combination therapy, a literature search of randomized clinical trials was performed.Eighteen trials matched the inclusion criteria. In 10 studies, GLP-1 receptor agonists were added on to an existing regimen, whereas insulin added to an existing GLP-1 receptor agonists regimen occurred in 2 studies. Six studies compared GLP-1 receptor agonists with short acting insulin as a treatment strategy to intensify basal insulin therapy. Expert opinion: Clinical trials herein reviewed demonstrated the safety and the efficacy of combining GLP-1 receptor agonists with basal insulin, with most studies showing equal or slightly superior efficacy, as compared with the addition of prandial insulin, associated with weight loss and less hypoglycemia.

  5. Targeting Insulin Receptor with a Novel Internalizing Aptamer

    PubMed Central

    Iaboni, Margherita; Fontanella, Raffaela; Rienzo, Anna; Capuozzo, Maria; Nuzzo, Silvia; Santamaria, Gianluca; Catuogno, Silvia; Condorelli, Gerolama; de Franciscis, Vittorio; Esposito, Carla Lucia

    2016-01-01

    Nucleic acid-based aptamers are emerging as therapeutic antagonists of disease-associated proteins such as receptor tyrosine kinases. They are selected by an in vitro combinatorial chemistry approach, named Systematic Evolution of Ligands by Exponential enrichment (SELEX), and thanks to their small size and unique chemical characteristics, they possess several advantages over antibodies as diagnostics and therapeutics. In addition, aptamers that rapidly internalize into target cells hold as well great potential for their in vivo use as delivery tools of secondary therapeutic agents. Here, we describe a nuclease resistant RNA aptamer, named GL56, which specifically recognizes the insulin receptor (IR). Isolated by a cell-based SELEX method that allows enrichment for internalizing aptamers, GL56 rapidly internalizes into target cells and is able to discriminate IR from the highly homologous insulin-like growth factor receptor 1. Notably, when applied to IR expressing cancer cells, the aptamer inhibits IR dependent signaling. Given the growing interest in the insulin receptor as target for cancer treatment, GL56 reveals a novel molecule with great translational potential as inhibitor and delivery tool for IR-dependent cancers. PMID:27648925

  6. Human diabetes associated with defects in nuclear regulatory proteins for the insulin receptor gene.

    PubMed Central

    Brunetti, A; Brunetti, L; Foti, D; Accili, D; Goldfine, I D

    1996-01-01

    The control of gene transcription is mediated by sequence-specific DNA-binding proteins (trans-acting factors) that bind to upstream regulatory elements (cis elements). We have previously identified two DNA-binding proteins that specifically interact with two unique AT-rich sequences of the 5' regulatory region of the insulin receptor gene which have in vivo promoter activity. Herein we have investigated the expression of these DNA-binding proteins in cells from two unrelated patients with insulin resistance and non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. In these patients, the insulin receptor gene was normal. In EBV-transformed lymphoblasts from both patients, insulin receptor mRNA levels and insulin receptor expression were decreased. The expression of nuclear-binding proteins for the 5' regulatory region of the insulin receptor gene was markedly reduced, and this defect paralleled the decrease in insulin receptor protein expression. These studies indicate that DNA-binding proteins to the regulatory region of the insulin receptor gene are important for expression of the insulin receptor. Further, they suggest that in affected individuals, defects in the expression of these proteins may cause decreased insulin receptor expression and insulin resistance. PMID:8550844

  7. Non-small cell lung cancer cell survival crucially depends on functional insulin receptors.

    PubMed

    Frisch, Carolin Maria; Zimmermann, Katrin; Zilleßen, Pia; Pfeifer, Alexander; Racké, Kurt; Mayer, Peter

    2015-08-01

    Insulin plays an important role as a growth factor and its contribution to tumor proliferation is intensely discussed. It acts via the cognate insulin receptor (IR) but can also activate the IGF1 receptor (IGF1R). Apart from increasing proliferation, insulin might have additional effects in lung cancer. Therefore, we investigated insulin action and effects of IR knockdown (KD) in three (NCI-H292, NCI-H226 and NCI-H460) independent non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines. All lung cancer lines studied were found to express IR, albeit with marked differences in the ratio of the two variants IR-A and IR-B. Insulin activated the classical signaling pathway with IR autophosphorylation and Akt phosphorylation. Moreover, activation of MAPK was observed in H292 cells, accompanied by enhanced proliferation. Lentiviral shRNA IR KD caused strong decrease in survival of all three lines, indicating that the effects of insulin in lung cancer go beyond enhancing proliferation. Unspecific effects were ruled out by employing further shRNAs and different insulin-responsive cells (human pre-adipocytes) for comparison. Caspase assays demonstrated that IR KD strongly induced apoptosis in these lung cancer cells, providing the physiological basis of the rapid cell loss. In search for the underlying mechanism, we analyzed alterations in the gene expression profile in response to IR KD. A strong induction of certain cytokines (e.g. IL20 and tumour necrosis factor) became obvious and it turned out that these cytokines trigger apoptosis in the NSCLC cells tested. This indicates a novel role of IR in tumor cell survival via suppression of pro-apoptotic cytokines.

  8. Loss of Hepatic CEACAM1: A Unifying Mechanism Linking Insulin Resistance to Obesity and Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Heinrich, Garrett; Ghadieh, Hilda E.; Ghanem, Simona S.; Muturi, Harrison T.; Rezaei, Khadijeh; Al-Share, Qusai Y.; Bowman, Thomas A.; Zhang, Deqiang; Garofalo, Robert S.; Yin, Lei; Najjar, Sonia M.

    2017-01-01

    The pathogenesis of human non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) remains unclear, in particular in the context of its relationship to insulin resistance and visceral obesity. Work on the carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 1 (CEACAM1) in mice has resolved some of the related questions. CEACAM1 promotes insulin clearance by enhancing the rate of uptake of the insulin-receptor complex. It also mediates a negative acute effect of insulin on fatty acid synthase activity. This positions CEACAM1 to coordinate the regulation of insulin and lipid metabolism. Fed a regular chow diet, global null mutation of Ceacam1 manifest hyperinsulinemia, insulin resistance, obesity, and steatohepatitis. They also develop spontaneous chicken-wire fibrosis, characteristic of non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. Reduction of hepatic CEACAM1 expression plays a significant role in the pathogenesis of diet-induced metabolic abnormalities, as bolstered by the protective effect of hepatic CEACAM1 gain-of-function against the metabolic response to dietary fat. Together, this emphasizes that loss of hepatic CEACAM1 links NAFLD to insulin resistance and obesity. PMID:28184213

  9. Loss of Hepatic CEACAM1: A Unifying Mechanism Linking Insulin Resistance to Obesity and Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Heinrich, Garrett; Ghadieh, Hilda E; Ghanem, Simona S; Muturi, Harrison T; Rezaei, Khadijeh; Al-Share, Qusai Y; Bowman, Thomas A; Zhang, Deqiang; Garofalo, Robert S; Yin, Lei; Najjar, Sonia M

    2017-01-01

    The pathogenesis of human non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) remains unclear, in particular in the context of its relationship to insulin resistance and visceral obesity. Work on the carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 1 (CEACAM1) in mice has resolved some of the related questions. CEACAM1 promotes insulin clearance by enhancing the rate of uptake of the insulin-receptor complex. It also mediates a negative acute effect of insulin on fatty acid synthase activity. This positions CEACAM1 to coordinate the regulation of insulin and lipid metabolism. Fed a regular chow diet, global null mutation of Ceacam1 manifest hyperinsulinemia, insulin resistance, obesity, and steatohepatitis. They also develop spontaneous chicken-wire fibrosis, characteristic of non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. Reduction of hepatic CEACAM1 expression plays a significant role in the pathogenesis of diet-induced metabolic abnormalities, as bolstered by the protective effect of hepatic CEACAM1 gain-of-function against the metabolic response to dietary fat. Together, this emphasizes that loss of hepatic CEACAM1 links NAFLD to insulin resistance and obesity.

  10. Metformin (Glucophage) inhibits tyrosine phosphatase activity to stimulate the insulin receptor tyrosine kinase.

    PubMed

    Holland, William; Morrison, Thomas; Chang, Ying; Wiernsperger, Nicholas; Stith, Bradley J

    2004-06-01

    Metformin is a commonly used anti-diabetic but whether its mechanism involves action on the insulin receptor or on downstream events is still controversial. With a time course that was slow compared with insulin action, metformin increased tyrosine phosphorylation of the regulatory domain of the insulin receptor (specifically, tyrosine residues 1150 and 1151). In a direct action, therapeutic levels of metformin stimulated the tyrosine kinase activity of the soluble intracellular portion of the beta subunit of the human insulin receptor toward a substrate derived from the insulin receptor regulatory domain. However, metformin did not alter the order of substrate phosphorylation by the insulin receptor kinase. Using a Xenopus oocyte preparation, we simultaneously recorded tyrosine kinase and phosphatase activities that regulate the insulin receptor by measuring the tyrosine phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of peptides derived from the regulatory domain of the human insulin receptor. In an indirect stimulation of the insulin receptor, metformin inhibited endogenous tyrosine phosphatases and purified human protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B that dephosphorylate and inhibit the insulin receptor kinase. Thus, there was evidence that metformin acted directly upon the insulin receptor and indirectly through inhibition of tyrosine phosphatases.

  11. Corticosterone-induced insulin resistance is not associated with alterations of insulin receptor number and kinase activity in chicken kidney.

    PubMed

    Bisbis, S; Taouis, M; Derouet, M; Chevalier, B; Simon, J

    1994-12-01

    Chicken renal insulin receptors have been recently characterized; their number and kinase activities vary in response to altered nutritional status. In the present study, the effect of chronic corticosterone treatment was examined in 5-week-old chickens. The development of an insulin resistance following corticosterone was suggested after 1 and 2 weeks of treatment by a significant increases in plasma insulin levels (1.63 +/- 0.13 vs 0.56 +/- 0.14 ng insulin/ml in controls) and in renal cytosolic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase activity (17.2 +/- 0.8 vs 13.7 +/- 0.7 nm/mn/mg tissue in controls). No significant changes were present at the level of insulin receptor number and kinase activity. Therefore, in kidney and, as previously observed, in muscles, corticosterone can induce insulin resistance at postreceptor steps in the cascade of events leading to insulin action.

  12. Adipocyte insulin receptor activity maintains adipose tissue mass and lifespan.

    PubMed

    Friesen, Max; Hudak, Carolyn S; Warren, Curtis R; Xia, Fang; Cowan, Chad A

    2016-08-05

    Type 2 diabetes follows a well-defined progressive pathogenesis, beginning with insulin resistance in metabolic tissues such as the adipose. Intracellular signaling downstream of insulin receptor activation regulates critical metabolic functions of adipose tissue, including glucose uptake, lipogenesis, lipolysis and adipokine secretion. Previous studies have used the aP2 promoter to drive Cre recombinase expression in adipose tissue. Insulin receptor (IR) knockout mice created using this aP2-Cre strategy (FIRKO mice) were protected from obesity and glucose intolerance. Later studies demonstrated the promiscuity of the aP2 promoter, casting doubts upon the tissue specificity of aP2-Cre models. It is our goal to use the increased precision of the Adipoq promoter to investigate adipocyte-specific IR function. Towards this end we generated an adipocyte-specific IR knockout (AIRKO) mouse using an Adipoq-driven Cre recombinase. Here we report AIRKO mice are less insulin sensitive throughout life, and less glucose tolerant than wild-type (WT) littermates at the age of 16 weeks. In contrast to WT littermates, the insulin sensitivity of AIRKO mice is unaffected by age or dietary regimen. At any age, AIRKO mice are comparably insulin resistant to old or obese WT mice and have a significantly reduced lifespan. Similar results were obtained when these phenotypes were re-examined in FIRKO mice. We also found that the AIRKO mouse is protected from high-fat diet-induced weight gain, corresponding with a 90% reduction in tissue weight of major adipose depots compared to WT littermates. Adipose tissue mass reduction is accompanied by hepatomegaly and increased hepatic steatosis. These data indicate that adipocyte IR function is crucial to systemic energy metabolism and has profound effects on adiposity, hepatic homeostasis and lifespan. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. Obesity, Insulin Resistance and Diabetes: Sex Differences and Role of Estrogen Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Matthias R.; Clegg, Deborah J.; Prossnitz, Eric R.; Barton, Matthias

    2010-01-01

    Obesity increases the risk of coronary artery disease through insulin resistance, diabetes, arterial hypertension, and dyslipidemia. The prevalence of obesity has increased worldwide and is particularly high among middle-aged women and men. After menopause, women are at an increased risk to develop visceral obesity due to the loss of endogenous ovarian hormone production. Effects of estrogens are classically mediated by the two nuclear estrogen receptors (ERs) α and β. In addition, more recent research has shown that the intracellular transmembrane G protein-coupled estrogen receptor, GPER, originally designated as GPR30, also mediates some of the actions attributed to estrogens. Estrogen and its receptors are important regulators of body weight and insulin sensitivity not only in women, but also in men as demonstrated by ER mutations in rodents and humans. This article reviews the role of sex hormones and estrogen receptors in the context of obesity, insulin sensitivity and diabetes as well as the related clinical issues in females and males. PMID:21281456

  14. Insulin Receptor Isoform Variations in Prostate Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Perks, Claire M.; Zielinska, H. A.; Wang, Jing; Jarrett, Caroline; Frankow, A.; Ladomery, Michael R.; Bahl, Amit; Rhodes, Anthony; Oxley, Jon; Holly, Jeff M. P.

    2016-01-01

    Men who develop prostate cancer (PCa) increasingly have one of the co-morbidities associated with a Western lifestyle that are characterized by hyperinsulinemia, hyperglycemia and increased expression of insulin-like growth factors-I (IGF-I) and IGF-II. Each have been associated with poor prognosis and more aggressive cancers that exhibit increased metabolism and increased glucose uptake. The insulin receptor (IR) has two splice isoforms IR-A and IR-B: IR-A has a higher affinity for IGF-II comparable to that for insulin, whereas the IR-B isoform predominantly just binds to insulin. In this study, we assessed alterations in the IR-A and IR-B isoform ratio and associated changes in cell proliferation and migration of PCa cell lines following exposure to altered concentrations of glucose and treatment with IGF-II and insulin. We observed that where IR-B predominated insulin had a greater effect on migration than IGF-II and IGF-II was more effective when IR-A was the main isoform. With regard to proliferation IGF-II was more effective than insulin regardless of which isoform was dominant. We assessed the abundance of the IR isoforms both in vivo and in vitro and observed that the majority of the tissue samples and cell lines expressed more IR-A than IR-B. Alterations in the isoforms in response to changes in their hormonal milieu could have a profound impact on how malignant cells behave and play a role in promoting carcinogenesis. A greater understanding of the mechanisms underlying changes in alternative splicing of the IR may provide additional targets for future cancer therapies. PMID:27733843

  15. Molecular Recognition of Insulin by a Synthetic Receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Chinai, Jordan M.; Taylor, Alexander B.; Ryno, Lisa M.; Hargreaves, Nicholas D.; Morris, Christopher A.; Hart, P. John; Urbach, Adam R.

    2011-08-29

    The discovery of molecules that bind tightly and selectively to desired proteins continues to drive innovation at the interface of chemistry and biology. This paper describes the binding of human insulin by the synthetic receptor cucurbit[7]uril (Q7) in vitro. Isothermal titration calorimetry and fluorescence spectroscopy experiments show that Q7 binds to insulin with an equilibrium association constant of 1.5 x 10{sup 6} M{sup -1} and with 50-100-fold selectivity versus proteins that are much larger but lack an N-terminal aromatic residue, and with >1000-fold selectivity versus an insulin variant lacking the N-terminal phenylalanine (Phe) residue. The crystal structure of the Q7{center_dot}insulin complex shows that binding occurs at the N-terminal Phe residue and that the N-terminus unfolds to enable binding. These findings suggest that site-selective recognition is based on the properties inherent to a protein terminus, including the unique chemical epitope presented by the terminal residue and the greater freedom of the terminus to unfold, like the end of a ball of string, to accommodate binding. Insulin recognition was predicted accurately from studies on short peptides and exemplifies an approach to protein recognition by targeting the terminus.

  16. Insulin receptor Thr1160 phosphorylation mediates lipid-induced hepatic insulin resistance

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Max C.; Madiraju, Anila K.; Gassaway, Brandon M.; Marcel, Michael; Nasiri, Ali R.; Butrico, Gina; Marcucci, Melissa J.; Zhang, Dongyan; Abulizi, Abudukadier; Zhang, Xian-Man; Philbrick, William; Hubbard, Stevan R.; Samuel, Varman T.; Rinehart, Jesse

    2016-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a risk factor for type 2 diabetes (T2D), but whether NAFLD plays a causal role in the pathogenesis of T2D is uncertain. One proposed mechanism linking NAFLD to hepatic insulin resistance involves diacylglycerol-mediated (DAG-mediated) activation of protein kinase C-ε (PKCε) and the consequent inhibition of insulin receptor (INSR) kinase activity. However, the molecular mechanism underlying PKCε inhibition of INSR kinase activity is unknown. Here, we used mass spectrometry to identify the phosphorylation site Thr1160 as a PKCε substrate in the functionally critical INSR kinase activation loop. We hypothesized that Thr1160 phosphorylation impairs INSR kinase activity by destabilizing the active configuration of the INSR kinase, and our results confirmed this prediction by demonstrating severely impaired INSR kinase activity in phosphomimetic T1160E mutants. Conversely, the INSR T1160A mutant was not inhibited by PKCε in vitro. Furthermore, mice with a threonine-to-alanine mutation at the homologous residue Thr1150 (InsrT1150A mice) were protected from high fat diet–induced hepatic insulin resistance. InsrT1150A mice also displayed increased insulin signaling, suppression of hepatic glucose production, and increased hepatic glycogen synthesis compared with WT controls during hyperinsulinemic clamp studies. These data reveal a critical pathophysiological role for INSR Thr1160 phosphorylation and provide further mechanistic links between PKCε and INSR in mediating NAFLD-induced hepatic insulin resistance. PMID:27760050

  17. RETRACTED: Quercetin suppresses insulin receptor signaling through inhibition of the insulin ligand-receptor binding and therefore impairs cancer cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Feng; Yang, Yong

    2014-10-03

    Although the flavonoid quercetin is known to inhibit activation of insulin receptor signaling, the inhibitory mechanism is largely unknown. In this study, we demonstrate that quercetin suppresses insulin induced dimerization of the insulin receptor (IR) through interfering with ligand-receptor interactions, which reduces the phosphorylation of IR and Akt. This inhibitory effect further inhibits insulin stimulated glucose uptake due to decreased cell membrane translocation of glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4), resulting in impaired cancer cell proliferation. The effect of quercetin in inhibiting tumor growth was also evident in an in vivo model, indicating a potential future application for quercetin in the treatment of cancers. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Insulin receptor binding and protein kinase activity in muscles of trained rats

    SciTech Connect

    Dohm, G.L.; Sinha, M.K.; Caro, J.F.

    1987-02-01

    Exercise has been shown to increase insulin sensitivity, and muscle is quantitatively the most important tissue of insulin action. Since the first step in insulin action is the binding to a membrane receptor, the authors postulated that exercise training would change insulin receptors in muscle and in this study they have investigated this hypothesis. Female rats initially weighing approx. 100 g were trained by treadmill running for 2 h/day, 6 days/wk for 4 wk at 25 m/min (0 grade). Insulin receptors from vastus intermedius muscles were solubilized by homogenizing in a buffer containing 1% Triton X-100 and then partially purified by passing the soluble extract over a wheat germ agglutinin column. The 4 wk training regimen resulted in a 65% increase in citrate synthase activity in red vastus lateralis muscle, indicating an adaptation to exercise ( SVI). Insulin binding by the partially purified receptor preparations was approximately doubled in muscle of trained rats at all insulin concentrations, suggesting an increase in the number of receptors. Training did not alter insulin receptor structure as evidenced by electrophoretic mobility under reducing and nonreducing conditions. Basal insulin receptor protein kinase activity was higher in trained than untrained animals and this was likely due to the greater number of receptors. However, insulin stimulation of the protein kinase activity was depressed by training. These results demonstrate that endurance training does alter receptor number and function in muscle and these changes may be important in increasing insulin sensitivity after exercise training.

  19. Insulin receptor phosphorylation, insulin receptor substrate-1 phosphorylation, and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase activity are decreased in intact skeletal muscle strips from obese subjects.

    PubMed Central

    Goodyear, L J; Giorgino, F; Sherman, L A; Carey, J; Smith, R J; Dohm, G L

    1995-01-01

    To determine whether the impaired insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in obese individuals is associated with altered insulin receptor signaling, we measured both glucose uptake and early steps in the insulin action pathway in intact strips of human skeletal muscle. Biopsies of rectus abdominus muscle were taken from eight obese and eight control subjects undergoing elective surgery (body mass index 52.9 +/- 3.6 vs 25.7 +/- 0.9). Insulin-stimulated 2-deoxyglucose uptake was 53% lower in muscle strips from obese subjects. Additional muscle strips were incubated in the basal state or with 10(-7) M insulin for 2, 15, or 30 min. In the lean subjects, tyrosine phosphorylation of the insulin receptor and insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1), measured by immunoblotting with anti-phosphotyrosine antibodies, was significantly increased by insulin at all time points. In the skeletal muscle from the obese subjects, insulin was less effective in stimulating tyrosine phosphorylation (maximum receptor and IRS-1 phosphorylation decreased by 35 and 38%, respectively). Insulin stimulation of IRS-1 immunoprecipitable phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI 3-kinase) activity also was markedly lower in obese subjects compared with controls (10- vs 35-fold above basal, respectively). In addition, the obese subjects had a lower abundance of the insulin receptor, IRS-1, and the p85 subunit of PI 3-kinase (55, 54, and 64% of nonobese, respectively). We conclude that impaired insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in skeletal muscle from severely obese subjects is accompanied by a deficiency in insulin receptor signaling, which may contribute to decreased insulin action. Images PMID:7537758

  20. Deletion of exon 3 of the insulin receptor gene in a kindred with a familial form of insulin resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Wertheimer, E.; Barbetti, F.; Accili, D.; Taylor, S.I.; Litvin, Y.; Ebstein, R.P.; Bennet, E.R.

    1994-05-01

    Molecular scanning techniques, such as denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE), greatly facilitate screening candidate genes for mutations. The authors have used DGGE to screen for mutations in the insulin receptor gene in a family in which four of five daughters were affected by type A insulin resistance in association with acanthosis nigricans and hyperandrogenism. DGGE did not detect mutations in any of the 22 exons of the insulin receptor gene. Nevertheless, Southern blot analysis suggested that there was a deletion of exon 3 in the other paternal allele of the insulin receptor gene. Analysis of the father`s cDNA confirmed that exon 3 was deleted from mRNA molecules derived from one of his two alleles of the insulin receptor gene. Furthermore, the father was found to be hemizygous for a polymorphic sequence (GAC{sup Asp} at codon 234) in exon 3 that was not inherited by any of the five daughters. Instead, all five daughters inherited the paternal allele with the deletion mutation. They did not detect mutations in the mother`s insulin receptor gene. Furthermore, the clinical syndrome did not segregate with either of the mother`s two alleles of the insulin receptor gene. Although the youngest daughter inherited the mutant allele from her father, she was not clinically affected. The explanation for the incomplete penetrance is not known. These results emphasize the importance of specifically searching for deletion mutations when screening candidate genes for mutations. Furthermore, the existence of apparently asymptomatic carriers of mutations in the insulin receptor gene, such as the father in the present study, suggests that the prevalence of mutations in the insulin receptor gene may be higher than would be predicted on the basis of the observed prevalence of patients with extreme insulin resistance. 34 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Dual pathways for the intracellular processing of insulin. Relationship between retroendocytosis of intact hormone and the recycling of insulin receptors.

    PubMed

    Marshall, S

    1985-11-05

    Adipocytes process insulin through either of two pathways: a retroendocytotic pathway that culminates in the release of intact insulin, and a degradative pathway that terminates in the intracellular catabolism and release of degraded ligand. Mechanistically, these pathways were found to differ in several ways. First, temporal differences were found in the rate at which intact and degraded products were extruded. After 125I-insulin was preloaded into the cell interior, intact ligand was completely released during the first 10 min (t 1/2 = 2 min), whereas degraded insulin was released at a much slower rate over 1 h (t 1/2 greater than 8 min). Secondly, it was found that chloroquine profoundly inhibited the insulin degradative pathway, resulting in the intracellular accumulation of intact ligand and a reduction in the release of degraded products. In contrast, however, chloroquine was without effect on the retroendocytotic processing of insulin. Based on the known actions of chloroquine, it appears that retroendocytosis of insulin does not involve vesicular acidification or dissociation of the insulin-receptor complex and that insulin is most likely carried to the cell exterior in the same vesicles (either receptor-bound or free) as those mediating recycling receptors. Interestingly, accumulation of undergraded insulin within chloroquine-treated cells did not result in the release of additional intact ligand, suggesting that once insulin enters the degradative compartment it is committed to catabolism and cannot exit the cell through the retroendocytotic pathway. A third difference was revealed by the finding that extracellular unlabeled insulin (100 ng/ml) markedly accelerated the rate at which preloaded 125I-insulin was released from adipocytes (t 1/2 of 3 min versus 7 min in controls cells). Analysis of the composition of the released products revealed that extracellular insulin rapidly augmented (over 10 min) in a dose-dependent manner (5-200 ng/ml) the amount of

  2. Impaired insulin signaling and mechanisms of memory loss.

    PubMed

    Bloemer, Jenna; Bhattacharya, Subhrajit; Amin, Rajesh; Suppiramaniam, Vishnu

    2014-01-01

    Insulin is secreted from the β-cells of the pancreas and helps maintain glucose homeostasis. Although secreted peripherally, insulin also plays a profound role in cognitive function. Increasing evidence suggests that insulin signaling in the brain is necessary to maintain health of neuronal cells, promote learning and memory, decrease oxidative stress, and ultimately increase neuronal survival. This chapter summarizes the different facets of insulin signaling necessary for learning and memory and additionally explores the association between cognitive impairment and central insulin resistance. The role of impaired insulin signaling in the advancement of cognitive dysfunction is relevant to the current debate of whether the shared pathophysiological mechanisms between diabetes and cognitive impairment implicate a direct relationship. Here, we summarize a vast amount of literature that suggests a strong association between impaired brain insulin signaling and cognitive impairment.

  3. Sleep deprivation alters energy homeostasis through non-compensatory alterations in hypothalamic insulin receptors in Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Moraes, Danilo Alves; Venancio, Daniel Paulino; Suchecki, Deborah

    2014-11-01

    Studies have shown a gradual reduction of sleep time in the general population, accompanied by increased food intake, representing a risk for developing obesity, type II diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Rats subjected to paradoxical sleep deprivation (PSD) exhibit feeding and metabolic alterations, both of which are regulated by the communication between peripheral signals and the hypothalamus. This study aimed to investigate the daily change of 96 h of PSD-induced food intake, body weight, blood glucose, plasma insulin and leptin concentrations and the expression of their receptors in the hypothalamus of Wistar rats. Food intake was assessed during the light and dark phases and was progressively increased in sleep-deprived animals, during the light phase. PSD produced body weight loss, particularly on the first day, and decreased plasma insulin and leptin levels, without change in blood glucose levels. Reduced leptin levels were compensated by increased expression of leptin receptors in the hypothalamus, whereas no compensations occurred in insulin receptors. The present results on body weight loss and increased food intake replicate previous studies from our group. The fact that reduced insulin levels did not lead to compensatory changes in hypothalamic insulin receptors, suggests that this hormone may be, at least in part, responsible for PSD-induced dysregulation in energy metabolism.

  4. Direct demonstration of rapid insulin-like growth factor II receptor internalization and recycling in rat adipocytes. Insulin stimulates SVI-insulin-like growth factor II degradation by modulating the IGF-II receptor recycling process

    SciTech Connect

    Oka, Y.; Rozek, L.M.; Czech, M.P.

    1985-08-05

    The photoactive insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-II analogue 4-azidobenzoyl- SVI-IGF-II was synthesized and used to label specifically and covalently the Mr = 250,000 Type II IGF receptor. When rat adipocytes are irradiated after a 10-min incubation with 4-azidobenzoyl- SVI-IGF-II at 10 degrees C and immediately homogenized, most of the labeled IGF-II receptors are associated with the plasma membrane fraction, indicating that receptors accessible to the labeling reagent at low temperature are on the cell surface. However, when the photolabeled cells are incubated at 37 degrees C for various times before homogenization, labeled IGF-II receptors are rapidly internalized with a half-time of 3.5 min as evidenced by a loss from the plasma membrane fraction and a concomitant appearance in the low density microsome fraction. The steady state level of cell surface IGF-II receptors in the presence or absence of IGF-II remains constant under these conditions, demonstrating that IGF-II receptors rapidly recycle back to the cell surface at the same rate as receptor internalization. Using the above methodology, it is shown that acute insulin action: 1) increases the steady state number of cell surface IGF-II receptors; 2) increases the number of ligand-bound IGF-II receptors that are internalized per unit of time; and 3) increases the rate of cellular SVI-IGF-II degradation by a process that is blocked by anti-IGF-II receptor antibody.

  5. Inhibition of D4 Dopamine Receptors on Insulin Receptor Expression and Effect in Renal Proximal Tubule Cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ye; Ren, Hongmei; Lu, Xi; He, Duofen; Han, Yu; Wang, Hongyong; Zeng, Chunyu; Shi, Weibin

    2016-04-22

    Ion transport in the renal proximal tubule (RPT), which is increased in essential hypertension, is regulated by numerous hormones and humoral factors, including insulin and dopamine. Activation of dopamine receptor inhibits sodium reabsorption, whereas activation of insulin receptor increases sodium reabsorption in RPTs, and hyperinsulinemic animals and patients have defective renal dopaminergic system. We presume that there is an inhibition of D4 receptor on insulin receptor expression and effect, and the regulation is lost in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs). Insulin receptor expression was determined by immunoblotting, and Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase activity was detected in both Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) and SHR RPT cells. Stimulation of D4 receptor with PD168077 decreased expression of insulin receptors, which was blocked in the presence of the calcium-channel blocker, nicardipine (10(-6) mol/L per 24 hours), in cell culture medium without calcium or in the presence of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) receptor blocker (2-aminoethyl diphenylborinate [2-ADB]; 10(-6) mol/L per 24 hours), indicating that extracellular calcium entry and calcium release from the endoplasmic reticulum were involved in the signal pathway. Stimulation of the insulin receptor stimulated Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase activity, whereas pretreatment with PD168077 for 24 hours decreased the inhibitory effects of insulin receptor on Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase activity in WKY cells. However, in SHR cells, inhibition of D4 receptor on insulin receptor expression and effect were lost. Activation of D4 receptor inhibits insulin receptor expression in RPT cells from WKY rats. The aberrant inhibition of D4 receptor on insulin receptor expression and effect might be involved in the pathogenesis of essential hypertension. © 2016 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley Blackwell.

  6. A novel insulin receptor-signaling platform and its link to insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Alghamdi, Farah; Guo, Merry; Abdulkhalek, Samar; Crawford, Nicola; Amith, Schammim Ray; Szewczuk, Myron R

    2014-06-01

    Insulin-induced insulin receptor (IR) tyrosine kinase activation and insulin cell survival responses have been reported to be under the regulation of a membrane associated mammalian neuraminidase-1 (Neu1). The molecular mechanism(s) behind this process is unknown. Here, we uncover a novel Neu1 and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) cross-talk in alliance with neuromedin B G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR), which is essential for insulin-induced IR activation and cellular signaling. Neu1, MMP-9 and neuromedin B GPCR form a complex with IRβ subunit on the cell surface. Oseltamivir phosphate (Tamiflu®), anti-Neu1 antibodies, broad range MMP inhibitors piperazine and galardin (GM6001), MMP-9 specific inhibitor (MMP-9i), and GPCR neuromedin B specific antagonist BIM-23127 dose-dependently inhibited Neu1 activity associated with insulin stimulated rat hepatoma cells (HTCs) that overly express human IRs (HTC-IR). Tamiflu, anti-Neu1 antibodies and MMP-9i attenuated phosphorylation of IRβ and insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS1) associated with insulin-stimulated cells. Olanzapine, an antipsychotic agent associated with insulin resistance, induced Neu3 sialidase activity in WG544 or 1140F01 human sialidosis fibroblast cells genetically defective in Neu1. Neu3 antagonist 2-deoxy-2,3-didehydro-N-acetylneuraminic acid (DANA) and anti-Neu3 antibodies inhibited sialidase activity associated with olanzapine treated murine Neu4 knockout macrophage cells. Olanzapine attenuated phosphorylation of IGF-R and IRS1 associated with insulin-stimulated human wild-type fibroblast cells. Our findings identify a novel insulin receptor-signaling platform that is critically essential for insulin-induced IRβ tyrosine kinase activation and cellular signaling. Olanzapine-induced Neu3 sialidase activity attenuated insulin-induced IGF-R and IRS1 phosphorylation contributing to insulin resistance. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. Differential Roles of Insulin and IGF-1 Receptors in Adipose Tissue Development and Function

    PubMed Central

    Boucher, Jeremie; Softic, Samir; El Ouaamari, Abdelfattah; Krumpoch, Megan T.; Kleinridders, Andre; Kulkarni, Rohit N.; O’Neill, Brian T.

    2016-01-01

    To determine the roles of insulin and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) action in adipose tissue, we created mice lacking the insulin receptor (IR), IGF-1 receptor (IGF1R), or both using Cre-recombinase driven by the adiponectin promoter. Mice lacking IGF1R only (F-IGFRKO) had a ∼25% reduction in white adipose tissue (WAT) and brown adipose tissue (BAT), whereas mice lacking both IR and IGF1R (F-IR/IGFRKO) showed an almost complete absence of WAT and BAT. Interestingly, mice lacking only the IR (F-IRKO) had a 95% reduction in WAT, but a paradoxical 50% increase in BAT with accumulation of large unilocular lipid droplets. Both F-IRKO and F-IR/IGFRKO mice were unable to maintain body temperature in the cold and developed severe diabetes, ectopic lipid accumulation in liver and muscle, and pancreatic islet hyperplasia. Leptin treatment normalized blood glucose levels in both groups. Glucose levels also improved spontaneously by 1 year of age, despite sustained lipodystrophy and insulin resistance. Thus, loss of IR is sufficient to disrupt white fat formation, but not brown fat formation and/or maintenance, although it is required for normal BAT function and temperature homeostasis. IGF1R has only a modest contribution to both WAT and BAT formation and function. PMID:27207537

  8. Enhanced insulin sensitivity in successful, long-term weight loss maintainers compared with matched controls with no weight loss history

    PubMed Central

    Clamp, L D; Hume, D J; Lambert, E V; Kroff, J

    2017-01-01

    Background: Weight gain is associated with deterioration in metabolic health, whereas weight loss improves insulin sensitivity. This study assesses the impact of long-term, successfully maintained weight loss and weight-loss relapse on measures of insulin sensitivity and identifies factors that explain variability in insulin sensitivity. Methods: Women (20–45 years) were recruited into four groups: reduced-overweight/obese (RED, n=15); body mass index (BMI)-matched controls (stable low-weight, n=19), BMI⩽27 kg m−2; relapsed-overweight/obese subjects (REL, n=11); and BMI-matched controls (obese stable weight, n=11), BMI⩾27 kg m−2. A 75 g oral glucose tolerance test determined fasting and 2 h plasma glucose and insulin. Homeostatic Model Assessment (HOMA-IR) and insulin sensitivity index (ISI(0,120)) assessed insulin sensitivity. Anthropometric measurements, fasting resting metabolic rate (RMR) and respiratory quotient (RQ) were measured. Questionnaires and dietary intake were recorded, and physical activity was measured using accelerometers. Results: RED were more insulin sensitive, characterised by lower fasting (P=0.001) and 2 h insulin (P=0.003) levels compared with all other groups. There were no significant differences in dietary intake, sedentary, light and moderate activity, RMR or RQ in the RED compared with the other three groups. % Body weight (BW) lost (P<0.001), % BW regained (P<0.05), body fat %, light activity (P<0.05, only log HOMA), vigorous activity (P<0.05) and RQ (P<0.01) predicted 61.4% and 59.7% of variability in log HOMA and log ISI(0,120), respectively, in multiple linear regression models. Conclusion: This study showed sustained enhanced insulin sensitivity in successful weight loss maintainers compared with BMI-matched controls with no weight loss history. Weight-loss-relapsed individuals were indistinguishable from controls. Weight loss itself was the strongest predictor of improved insulin sensitivity, whereas

  9. Linking Functional Domains of the Human Insulin Receptor with the Bacterial Aspartate Receptor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, Leland; Morgan, David O.; Koshland, Daniel E.; Clauser, Eric; Moe, Gregory R.; Bollag, Gideon; Roth, Richard A.; Rutter, William J.

    1986-11-01

    A hybrid receptor has been constructed that is composed of the extracellular domain of the human insulin receptor fused to the transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains of the bacterial aspartate chemoreceptor. This hybrid protein can be expressed in rodent (CHO) cells and displays several functional features comparable to wild-type insulin receptor. It is localized to the cell surface, binds insulin with high affinity, forms oligomers, and is recognized by conformation-specific monoclonal antibodies. Although most of the expressed protein accumulates as a 180-kDa proreceptor, some processed 135-kDa receptor can be detected on the cell surface by covalent cross-linking. Expression of the hybrid receptor inhibits the insulin-activated uptake of 2-deoxyglucose by CHO cells. Thus, this hybrid is partially functional and can be processed; however, it is incapable of native transmembrane signaling. The results indicate that the intact domains of different types of receptors can retain some of the native features in a hybrid molecule but specific requirements will need to be satisfied for transmembrane signaling.

  10. L-Citrulline increases hepatic sensitivity to insulin by reducing the phosphorylation of serine 1101 in insulin receptor substrate-1.

    PubMed

    Yoshitomi, Hisae; Momoo, Maki; Ma, Xiao; Huang, Yewei; Suguro, Shiori; Yamagishi, Yoshie; Gao, Ming

    2015-06-18

    Insulin resistance is characterized by deficient responses to insulin in its target tissues. In the present study, we examined the effects of L-Citrulline (L-Cit) on insulin sensitivity and signaling cascades in rat hepatoma H4IIE cells and SHRSP.Z-Leprfa/IzmDmcr rats. H4IIE cells were pretreated in the presence or absence of 250 μM L-Cit in serum-free medium and then incubated in the presence or absence of 0.1 nM insulin. Rats were allocated into 2 groups; a control group (not treated) and L-Cit group (2 g/kg/day, L-Cit) and treated for 8 weeks. L-Cit enhanced the insulin-induced phosphorylation of Akt in H4IIE cells. Moreover, the inhibited expression of Dex/cAMP-induced PEPCK mRNA by insulin was enhanced by the L-Cit treatment. The phosphorylation of tyrosine, which is upstream of Akt, in insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1) was increased by the L-Cit treatment. The L-Cit-induced enhancement in insulin signaling was not related to the binding affinity of insulin to the insulin receptor or to the expression of the insulin receptor, but to a decrease in the phosphorylation of serine 1101 in IRS-1. These results were also confirmed in animal experiments. In the livers of L-Cit-treated rats, PI3K/Akt signaling was improved by decreases in the phosphorylation of serine 1101. We herein demonstrated for the first time the beneficial effects of L-Cit on improved insulin resistance associated with enhanced insulin sensitivity. These results may have clinical applications for insulin resistance and the treatment of type-2 diabetes.

  11. Amplification and analysis of promoter region of insulin receptor gene in a patient with leprechaunism associated with severe insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Haruta, T; Imamura, T; Iwanishi, M; Egawa, K; Goji, K; Kobayashi, M

    1995-04-01

    A patient with leprechaunism associated with severe insulin resistance was studied to identify the molecular and genetic basis for insulin resistance. Insulin binding and surface labeling of transformed lymphocytes prepared from the patient showed a significantly decreased insulin receptor number on the cell surface. Southern blot analysis of the insulin receptor gene showed no evidence of large insertions or deletions. Furthermore, direct sequencing of all 22 exons and exon-intron junctions of the insulin receptor gene failed to show any missense mutations, nonsense mutations, or mutations at exon-intron junctions. However, Northern blot analysis indicated significantly decreased insulin receptor mRNA expression in the patient's cells. Moreover, restriction endonuclease digestion of the amplified cDNA suggested that the expression levels of one allele were less efficient than the other. These findings suggested that the regulatory region of the insulin receptor gene might have abnormalities. Therefore, we examined the 5' flanking region of the insulin receptor gene. Southern blot analysis showed no major deletions or insertions between positions -1,823 and -2 relative to the translation initiation site. A 5' flanking region of the insulin receptor gene spanning positions -881 approximately +7 was amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and introduced into a reporter plasmid carrying the human growth hormone (hGH) gene. The nucleotide sequence of the amplified fragment showed two polymorphic sites at positions -603 and -500 in the patient, as well as in normal subjects. No other abnormal sequence was found in the patient. Promoter activity measured by hGH expression in transfected mouse L cells was not influenced by the polymorphism at position -603 located in a cluster of GC boxes.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  12. Relationship of Insulin Dynamics to Body Composition and Resting Energy Expenditure following Weight Loss

    PubMed Central

    Hron, Bridget M.; Ebbeling, Cara B.; Feldman, Henry A.; Ludwig, David S.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To examine associations of baseline insulin dynamics with changes in body composition and resting energy expenditure (REE) following weight loss. Methods Twenty-one participants with overweight or obesity achieved 10-15% weight loss and then received 3 weight-loss maintenance diets (high-carbohydrate, moderate-carbohydrate, low-carbohydrate) in random order, each for 4 weeks. Body composition was measured at baseline and after weight loss. Insulin 30 minutes after glucose consumption (insulin-30; insulin response), C-peptide deconvolution analysis, HOMA, hepatic insulin sensitivity (IS), and REE were assessed at baseline and after each maintenance diet. Results Insulin-30, but not maximal insulin secretion, hepatic IS or HOMA, predicted changes in fat mass (standardized β=0.385, 1.7 kg difference between 10th-90th centile of insulin-30, P=0.04) after weight loss. Insulin-30 (β=−0.341, −312 kcal/d, P=0.008), maximal insulin secretion (β=−0.216, −95 kcal/d, P=0.0002), HOMA (β=−0.394,−350 kcal/d, P=0.002) and hepatic IS (β=0.217, 225 kcal/d, P=0.0003) predicted change in REE during weight-loss maintenance, independent of changes in body composition. The inverse relationship between insulin-30 and REE was substantially attenuated when the low-carbohydrate diet was consumed first. Conclusions These findings distinguish a novel phenotype, characterized by high insulin response, at risk for weight regain, and identify a dietary approach to ameliorate this risk. PMID:26373701

  13. Relationship of insulin dynamics to body composition and resting energy expenditure following weight loss.

    PubMed

    Hron, Bridget M; Ebbeling, Cara B; Feldman, Henry A; Ludwig, David S

    2015-11-01

    To examine associations of baseline insulin dynamics with changes in body composition and resting energy expenditure (REE) following weight loss. Twenty-one participants with overweight or obesity achieved 10-15% weight loss and then received 3 weight loss maintenance diets (high-carbohydrate, moderate-carbohydrate, and low-carbohydrate) in random order, each for 4 weeks. Body composition was measured at baseline and after weight loss. Insulin 30 min after glucose consumption (insulin-30; insulin response), C-peptide deconvolution analysis, HOMA, hepatic insulin sensitivity (IS), and REE were assessed at baseline and after each maintenance diet. Insulin-30, but not maximal insulin secretion, hepatic IS, or HOMA, predicted changes in fat mass (standardized β = 0.385, 1.7 kg difference between 10th and 90th centile of insulin-30, P = 0.04) after weight loss. Insulin-30 (β = -0.341, -312 kcal day(-1) , P = 0.008), maximal insulin secretion (β = -0.216, -95 kcal day(-1) , P = 0.0002), HOMA (β = -0.394, -350 kcal day(-1) , P = 0.002), and hepatic IS (β = 0.217, 225 kcal day(-1) , P = 0.0003) predicted change in REE during weight loss maintenance, independent of changes in body composition. The inverse relationship between insulin-30 and REE was substantially attenuated when the low-carbohydrate diet was consumed first. These findings distinguish a novel phenotype, characterized by high insulin response, at risk for weight regain, and identify a dietary approach to ameliorate this risk. © 2015 The Obesity Society.

  14. APPL1 potentiates insulin sensitivity by facilitating the binding of IRS1/2 to the insulin receptor.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Jiyoon; Galan, Amanda K; Xin, Xiaoban; Dong, Feng; Abdul-Ghani, Muhammad A; Zhou, Lijun; Wang, Changhua; Li, Cuiling; Holmes, Bekke M; Sloane, Lauren B; Austad, Steven N; Guo, Shaodong; Musi, Nicolas; DeFronzo, Ralph A; Deng, Chuxia; White, Morris F; Liu, Feng; Dong, Lily Q

    2014-05-22

    Binding of insulin receptor substrate proteins 1 and 2 (IRS1/2) to the insulin receptor (IR) is essential for the regulation of insulin sensitivity and energy homeostasis. However, the mechanism of IRS1/2 recruitment to the IR remains elusive. Here, we identify adaptor protein APPL1 as a critical molecule that promotes IRS1/2-IR interaction. APPL1 forms a complex with IRS1/2 under basal conditions, and this complex is then recruited to the IR in response to insulin or adiponectin stimulation. The interaction between APPL1 and IR depends on insulin- or adiponectin-stimulated APPL1 phosphorylation, which is greatly reduced in insulin target tissues in obese mice. appl1 deletion in mice consistently leads to systemic insulin resistance and a significant reduction in insulin-stimulated IRS1/2, but not IR, tyrosine phosphorylation, indicating that APPL1 sensitizes insulin signaling by acting at a site downstream of the IR. Our study uncovers a mechanism regulating insulin signaling and crosstalk between the insulin and adiponectin pathways.

  15. High-affinity insulin binding to an atypical insulin-like growth factor-I receptor in human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed Central

    Milazzo, G; Yip, C C; Maddux, B A; Vigneri, R; Goldfine, I D

    1992-01-01

    We studied the nature of insulin receptor binding in MCF-7 breast cancer cells. In both intact cells and solubilized receptor preparations, high-affinity insulin binding was seen. However, unlabeled insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) was five-fold more potent in inhibiting 125I-insulin binding than insulin itself. With monoclonal antibodies to the insulin receptor, 30% of 125I-insulin binding was inhibited. In contrast when alpha-IR3, a monoclonal antibody that recognizes typical IGF-I receptor, was employed over 60% of 125I-insulin binding was inhibited. The B29-MAB-125I-insulin photoprobe was then cross-linked to MCF-7 membranes. Cross-linking was inhibited by both unlabeled insulin and IGF-I. Further, the B29-MAB-125I-insulin photoprobe cross-linked to MCF-7 membranes was strongly immunoprecipitated by alpha-IR3. Employing sequential affinity chromatography with insulin-Affi-gel followed by insulin receptor monoclonal antibody agarose, atypical insulin binding activity was separated from insulin receptor binding activity. This atypical receptor had intrinsic tyrosine kinase activity. Both insulin and IGF-I stimulated the phosphorylation of the receptor's beta subunit. In MCF-7 cells both IGF-I and insulin stimulated [3H]thymidine incorporation; alpha-IR3 blocked all of the IGF-I effect but only 50-60% of the insulin effect. This study demonstrates in MCF-7 cells that, in addition to typical insulin and IGF-I receptors, there is another receptor that binds both insulin and IGF-I with high affinity. Images PMID:1311720

  16. Sweet-taste receptors, low-energy sweeteners, glucose absorption and insulin release.

    PubMed

    Renwick, Andrew G; Molinary, Samuel V

    2010-11-01

    The present review explores the interactions between sweeteners and enteroendocrine cells, and consequences for glucose absorption and insulin release. A combination of in vitro, in situ, molecular biology and clinical studies has formed the basis of our knowledge about the taste receptor proteins in the glucose-sensing enteroendocrine cells and the secretion of incretins by these cells. Low-energy (intense) sweeteners have been used as tools to define the role of intestinal sweet-taste receptors in glucose absorption. Recent studies using animal and human cell lines and knockout mice have shown that low-energy sweeteners can stimulate intestinal enteroendocrine cells to release glucagon-like peptide-1 and glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide. These studies have given rise to major speculations that the ingestion of food and beverages containing low-energy sweeteners may act via these intestinal mechanisms to increase obesity and the metabolic syndrome due to a loss of equilibrium between taste receptor activation, nutrient assimilation and appetite. However, data from numerous publications on the effects of low-energy sweeteners on appetite, insulin and glucose levels, food intake and body weight have shown that there is no consistent evidence that low-energy sweeteners increase appetite or subsequent food intake, cause insulin release or affect blood pressure in normal subjects. Thus, the data from extensive in vivo studies in human subjects show that low-energy sweeteners do not have any of the adverse effects predicted by in vitro, in situ or knockout studies in animals.

  17. Mechanisms of insulin resistance in human obesity: evidence for receptor and postreceptor defects.

    PubMed Central

    Kolterman, O G; Insel, J; Saekow, M; Olefsky, J M

    1980-01-01

    To assess the mechanisms of the insulin resistance in human obesity, we have determined, using a modification of the euglycemic glucose clamp technique, the shape of the in vivo insulin-glucose disposal dose-response curves in 7 control and 13 obese human subjects. Each subject had at least three euglycemic studies performed at insulin infusion rates of 15, 40, 120, 240, or 1,200 mU/M2/min. The glucose disposal rate was decreased in all obese subjects compared with controls (101 +/- 16 vs. 186 +/- 16 mg/M2/min) during the 40 mU/M2/min insulin infusion. The mean dose-response curve for the obese subjects was displaced to the right, i.e., the half-maximally effective insulin concentration was 270 +/- 27 microU/ml for the obese compared with 130 +/- 10 microU/ml for controls. In nine of the obese subjects, the dose-response curves were shifted to the right, and maximal glucose disposal rates (at a maximally effective insulin concentration) were markedly decreased, indicating both a receptor and a postreceptor defect. On the other hand, four obese patients had right-shifted dose-response curves but reached normal maximal glucose disposal rates, consistent with decreased insulin receptors as the only abnormality. When the individual data were analyzed, it was found that the lease hyperinsulinemic, least insulin-resistant patients displayed only the receptor defect, whereas those with the greatest hyperinsulinemia exhibited the largest post-receptor defect, suggesting a continuous spectrum of defects as one advances from mild to severe insulin resistance. When insulin's ability to suppress hepatic glucose output was assessed, hyperinsulinemia produced total suppresssion in all subjects. The dose-response curve for the obese subjects was shifted to the right, indicating a defect in insulin receptors. Insulin binding to isolated adipocytes obtained from the obese subjects was decreased, and a highly significant inverse linear relationship was demonstrated between insulin

  18. Insulin/insulin-like growth factor (IGF) stimulation abrogates an association between a deubiquitinating enzyme USP7 and insulin receptor substrates (IRSs) followed by proteasomal degradation of IRSs.

    PubMed

    Yoshihara, Hidehito; Fukushima, Toshiaki; Hakuno, Fumihiko; Saeki, Yasushi; Tanaka, Keiji; Ito, Akihiro; Yoshida, Minoru; Iemura, Shun-ichiro; Natsume, Tohru; Asano, Tomoichiro; Chida, Kazuhiro; Girnita, Leonard; Takahashi, Shin-Ichiro

    2012-06-22

    Insulin receptor substrates (IRSs) play central roles in insulin/insulin-like growth factor (IGF) signaling and mediate a variety of their bioactivities. IRSs are tyrosine-phosphorylated by activated insulin receptor/IGF-I receptor tyrosine kinase in response to insulin/IGF, and are recognized by signaling molecules possessing the SH2 domain such as phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K), leading to the activation of downstream pathways. Recent studies have suggested that degradation of IRSs by the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway leads to impaired insulin/IGF signaling, but the precise mechanism underlying the process is still unclear. In this study, we identified deubiquitinating enzyme ubiquitin specific protease 7 (USP7) as an IRS-2-interacting protein and demonstrated that deubiquitinase activity of USP7 plays important roles in IRS-2 stabilization through the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. In addition, insulin treatment dissociated USP7 from IRS-2, leading to degradation of IRS-2. This dissociation was prevented by treatment with LY294002, a PI3K inhibitor, indicating that insulin activation of the PI3K pathway leads to dissociation of IRS-2 from USP7 and IRS-2 degradation. We obtained similar results for IRS-1 in cells treated with insulin and for IRS-2 in cells treated with IGF-I. Taken together, this is the first report demonstrating that USP7 is an IRS-1/2 deubiquitinating enzyme forming a negative feedback loop in insulin/IGF signaling. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. S961, an insulin receptor antagonist causes hyperinsulinemia, insulin-resistance and depletion of energy stores in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Vikram, Ajit; Jena, Gopabandhu

    2010-07-23

    Research highlights: {yields}Insulin receptor antagonist S961 causes hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia and insulin resistance in rats. {yields}Peroxysome-proliferator-activated-receptor-gamma agonist pioglitazone improves S961 induced hyperglycemia and glucose intolerance. {yields}Long term treatment with insulin receptor antagonist S961 results in the decreased adiposity and hepatic glycogen content. {yields}Improvement in the hyperglycemia and glucose intolerance by pioglitazone clearly demonstrates that S961 treated rats can be successfully used to screen the novel therapeutic interventions having potential to improve glucose disposal through receptor independent mechanisms. -- Abstract: Impairment in the insulin receptor signaling and insulin mediated effects are the key features of type 2 diabetes. Here we report that S961, a peptide insulin receptor antagonist induces hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia ({approx}18-fold), glucose intolerance and impairment in the insulin mediated glucose disposal in the Sprague-Dawley rats. Further, long-term S961 treatment (15 day, 10 nM/kg/day) depletes energy storage as evident from decrease in the adiposity and hepatic glycogen content. However, peroxysome-proliferator-activated-receptor-gamma (PPAR{gamma}) agonist pioglitazone significantly (P < 0.001) restored S961 induced hyperglycemia (196.73 {+-} 16.32 vs. 126.37 {+-} 27.07 mg/dl) and glucose intolerance ({approx}78%). Improvement in the hyperglycemia and glucose intolerance by pioglitazone clearly demonstrates that S961 treated rats can be successfully used to screen the novel therapeutic interventions having potential to improve glucose disposal through receptor independent mechanisms. Further, results of the present study reconfirms and provide direct evidence to the crucial role of insulin receptor signaling in the glucose homeostasis and fuel metabolism.

  20. Dual pathways for the intracellular processing of insulin. Relationship between retroendocytosis of intact hormone and the recycling of insulin receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, S.

    1985-11-05

    Adipocytes process insulin through either of two pathways: a retroendocytotic pathway that culminates in the release of intact insulin, and a degradative pathway that terminates in the intracellular catabolism and release of degraded ligand. Mechanistically, these pathways were found to differ in several ways. First, temporal differences were found in the rate at which intact and degraded products were extruded. After SVI-insulin was preloaded into the cell interior, intact ligand was completely released during the first 10 min (t 1/2 = 2 min), whereas degraded insulin was released at a much slower rate over 1 h (t 1/2 greater than 8 min). Secondly, it was found that chloroquine profoundly inhibited the insulin degradative pathway, resulting in the intracellular accumulation of intact ligand and a reduction in the release of degraded products. In contrast, however, chloroquine was without effect on the retroendocytotic processing of insulin. Based on the known actions of chloroquine, it appears that retroendocytosis of insulin does not involve vesicular acidification or dissociation of the insulin-receptor complex and that insulin is most likely carried to the cell exterior in the same vesicles (either receptor-bound or free) as those mediating recycling receptors. Interestingly, accumulation of undergraded insulin within chloroquine-treated cells did not result in the release of additional intact ligand, suggesting that once insulin enters the degradative compartment it is committed to catabolism and cannot exit the cell through the retroendocytotic pathway. A third difference was revealed by the finding that extracellular unlabeled insulin (100 ng/ml) markedly accelerated the rate at which preloaded SVI-insulin was released from adipocytes (t 1/2 of 3 min versus 7 min in controls cells).

  1. Insulin and insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) receptor phosphorylation in µ-calpain knockout mice

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Numerous cellular processes are controlled by insulin and IGF-I signaling pathways. Due to previous work in our laboratories, we hypothesized that insulin (IR) and type 1 IGF-I (IGF-IR) receptor signaling is decreased due to increased protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) activity. C57BL/6J mice...

  2. Basal Insulin Use With GLP-1 Receptor Agonists.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Sarah L; Trujillo, Jennifer M

    2016-08-01

    IN BRIEF The combination of basal insulin and a glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor agonist is becoming increasingly common and offers several potential benefits to patients with type 2 diabetes. Clinical studies have demonstrated improved glycemic control and low risks of hypoglycemia and weight gain with the combination, which provides a safe and effective alternative to basal-bolus insulin with less treatment burden. Fixed-ratio combination products that administer both agents in a single injection are in the pipeline and will offer additional options for clinicians and patients. This review focuses on the rationale for, clinical evidence on, and implications of using this combination of therapies in the treatment of type 2 diabetes.

  3. Characterization of insulin receptors in chicken kidneys: effect of nutritional status.

    PubMed

    Bisbis, S; Derouet, M; Simon, J

    1994-10-01

    In chickens, the kidneys actively contribute to gluconeogenesis. A cytosolic form of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) is present in this tissue but is absent in liver. Cytosolic renal PEPCK is nutritionally and hormonally controlled which indicates a likely contribution of insulin in the control of this enzyme (and other renal functions). The present studies characterize renal insulin receptors in the chicken. The effects of the following nutritional conditions were examined: fed, 48 hr fasted, and 24 hr refed following a 48-hr fast. PEPCK activity was increased by the 48-hr fast and returned to normal after refeeding. Specific binding of 125I-insulin to renal membranes was time-, temperature-, and protein-dependent. Unlabeled insulin was more potent than IGF-1 in inhibiting 125I-insulin binding; the ratio of potencies for insulin and IGF-1, however, was dependent upon the nutritional state. Insulin binding was significantly higher (P < 0.05) following 48 hr fasting and lower (P < 0.05) following refeeding compared to ad libitum feeding. Receptor affinity was similar irrespective of the nutritional state. Solubilized and wheat germ agglutinin purified renal insulin receptors were devoid of ATPase activity in contrast to hepatic receptors. The sizes of alpha- and beta-subunits of renal receptors were similar to those of hepatic receptors: 135 and 95 kDa, respectively. Insulin-stimulated autophosphorylation of the beta-subunit was decreased, although not significantly, by prolonged fasting. Phosphorylation of artificial substrate: poly(Glu-Tyr) 4:1 was significantly decreased by the 48-hr fast at high insulin concentrations (10 and 100 nM). Kinase activities of renal insulin receptors from fed or refed chickens were very similar. In conclusion, typical insulin receptors are present in chicken kidneys. These receptors exhibit a regulation at the level of their number and kinase activity in a fashion similar to that found for hepatic receptors. The present

  4. Pharmacologic inhibition of ghrelin receptor signaling is insulin sparing and promotes insulin sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Longo, Kenneth A; Govek, Elizabeth K; Nolan, Anna; McDonagh, Thomas; Charoenthongtrakul, Soratree; Giuliana, Derek J; Morgan, Kristen; Hixon, Jeffrey; Zhou, Chaoseng; Kelder, Bruce; Kopchick, John J; Saunders, Jeffrey O; Navia, Manuel A; Curtis, Rory; DiStefano, Peter S; Geddes, Brad J

    2011-10-01

    Ghrelin influences a variety of metabolic functions through a direct action at its receptor, the GhrR (GhrR-1a). Ghrelin knockout (KO) and GhrR KO mice are resistant to the negative effects of high-fat diet (HFD) feeding. We have generated several classes of small-molecule GhrR antagonists and evaluated whether pharmacologic blockade of ghrelin signaling can recapitulate the phenotype of ghrelin/GhrR KO mice. Antagonist treatment blocked ghrelin-induced and spontaneous food intake; however, the effects on spontaneous feeding were absent in GhrR KO mice, suggesting target-specific effects of the antagonists. Oral administration of antagonists to HFD-fed mice improved insulin sensitivity in both glucose tolerance and glycemic clamp tests. The insulin sensitivity observed was characterized by improved glucose disposal with dramatically decreased insulin secretion. It is noteworthy that these results mimic those obtained in similar tests of HFD-fed GhrR KO mice. HFD-fed mice treated for 56 days with antagonist experienced a transient decrease in food intake but a sustained body weight decrease resulting from decreased white adipose, but not lean tissue. They also had improved glucose disposal and a striking reduction in the amount of insulin needed to achieve this. These mice had reduced hepatic steatosis, improved liver function, and no evidence of systemic toxicity relative to controls. Furthermore, GhrR KO mice placed on low- or high-fat diets had lifespans similar to the wild type, emphasizing the long-term safety of ghrelin receptor blockade. We have therefore demonstrated that chronic pharmacologic blockade of the GhrR is an effective and safe strategy for treating metabolic syndrome.

  5. Fatty acylated caveolin-2 is a substrate of insulin receptor tyrosine kinase for insulin receptor substrate-1-directed signaling activation.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Hayeong; Lee, Jaewoong; Jeong, Kyuho; Jang, Donghwan; Pak, Yunbae

    2015-05-01

    Here, we demonstrate that insulin receptor (IR) tyrosine kinase catalyzes Tyr-19 and Tyr-27 phosphorylation of caveolin-2 (cav-2), leading to stimulation of signaling proteins downstream of IR, and that the catalysis is dependent on fatty acylation status of cav-2, promoting its interaction with IR. Cav-2 is myristoylated at Gly-2 and palmitoylated at Cys-109, Cys-122, and Cys-145. The fatty acylation deficient mutants are unable to localize in the plasma membrane and not phosphorylated by IR tyrosine kinase. IR interacts with the C-terminal domain of cav-2 containing the cysteines for palmitoylation. IR mutants, Y999F and K1057A, but not W1220S, fail interaction with cav-2. Insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1) is recruited to interact with the IR-catalyzed phospho-tyrosine cav-2, which facilitates IRS-1 association with and activation by IR to initiate IRS-1-mediated downstream signaling. Cav-2 fatty acylation and tyrosine phosphorylation are necessary for the IRS-1-dependent PI3K-Akt and ERK activations responsible for glucose uptake and cell survival and proliferation. In conclusion, fatty acylated cav-2 is a new substrate of IR tyrosine kinase, and the fatty acylation and phosphorylation of cav-2 present novel mechanisms by which insulin signaling is activated. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. [Differences in dynamics of insulin and insulin-like growth I (IGF-I) receptors internalization in isolated rat hepatocytes].

    PubMed

    Kolychev, A P; Ternovskaya, E E; Arsenieva, A V; Shapkina, E V

    2013-01-01

    Insulin and IGF-I are two related peptides performing in the mammalian body functionally different roles of the metabolic and growth hormones, respectively. Internalization of the insulin-receptor complex (IRC) is the most important chain of mechanism of the action of hormone. To elucidate differences in the main stages of internalization of the two related hormones, the internalization dynamics of 125I-insulin and 125I-IGF-I was traced in isolated rat hepatocytes at 37 and 12 degrees C. There were established marked differences in the process of internalization of labeled hormones, which is stimulated by insulin and IGF-I. At 37 degrees C the insulin-stimulated internalization, unlike the process initiated by IGF-I, did not reach the maximal level for 1 h of incubation. However, essential differences in the internalization course of these two related peptide were obvious at the temperature of 12 degrees C. The internalization level of insulin receptors at 12 degrees C decreased by one third in spite of a significant increase of the insulin receptor binding on the hepatocytes plasma membrane. At 12 degrees C a slight decrease of the proportion of intracellular 125I-IGF-I correlated with a decrease in the 125I-IGF-I binding to receptors on the cell membrane. Internalization of IGF-I receptors was not affected by low temperature, as neither its level, nor the rate changed at 12 degrees C. The paradoxical decrease of the insulin-stimulated internalization at low temperature seems to represent a peculiar "inhibition mechanism" of immersion of IRC into the cell, which leads to accumulation of the complexes on the cell surface and possibly to a readjustment of the insulin biological activity. The resistance of internalization of the IGF-I receptor to cold seems to be related to the more ancient origin of this mechanism in the poikilothermal vertebrates.

  7. Regulation of Glucose Uptake and Enteroendocrine Function by the Intestinal Epithelial Insulin Receptor.

    PubMed

    Ussar, Siegfried; Haering, Max-Felix; Fujisaka, Shiho; Lutter, Dominik; Lee, Kevin Y; Li, Ning; Gerber, Georg K; Bry, Lynn; Kahn, C Ronald

    2017-04-01

    Insulin receptors (IRs) and IGF-I receptors (IGF-IR) are major regulators of metabolism and cell growth throughout the body; however, their roles in the intestine remain controversial. Here we show that genetic ablation of the IR or IGF-IR in intestinal epithelial cells of mice does not impair intestinal growth or development or the composition of the gut microbiome. However, the loss of IRs alters intestinal epithelial gene expression, especially in pathways related to glucose uptake and metabolism. More importantly, the loss of IRs reduces intestinal glucose uptake. As a result, mice lacking the IR in intestinal epithelium retain normal glucose tolerance during aging compared with controls, which show an age-dependent decline in glucose tolerance. Loss of the IR also results in a reduction of glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) expression from enteroendocrine K-cells and decreased GIP release in vivo after glucose ingestion but has no effect on glucagon-like peptide 1 expression or secretion. Thus, the IR in the intestinal epithelium plays important roles in intestinal gene expression, glucose uptake, and GIP production, which may contribute to pathophysiological changes in individuals with diabetes, metabolic syndrome, and other insulin-resistant states. © 2017 by the American Diabetes Association.

  8. Characterization of the growth of murine fibroblasts that express human insulin receptors. II. Interaction of insulin with other growth factors

    SciTech Connect

    Randazzo, P.A.; Jarett, L. )

    1990-09-01

    The effects of insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), epidermal growth factor (EGF), platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), and insulin on DNA synthesis were studied in murine fibroblasts transfected with an expression vector containing human insulin receptor cDNA (NIH 3T3/HIR) and the parental NIH 3T3 cells. In NIH 3T3/HIR cells, individual growth factors in serum-free medium stimulated DNA synthesis with the following relative efficacies: insulin greater than or equal to 10% fetal calf serum greater than PDGF greater than IGF-1 much greater than EGF. In comparison, the relative efficacies of these factors in stimulating DNA synthesis by NIH 3T3 cells were 10% fetal calf serum greater than PDGF greater than EGF much greater than IGF-1 = insulin. In NIH 3T3/HIR cells, EGF was synergistic with 1-10 ng/ml insulin but not with 100 ng/ml insulin or more. Synergy of PDGF or IGF-1 with insulin was not detected. In the parental NIH 3T3 cells, insulin and IGF-1 were found to be synergistic with EGF (1 ng/ml), PDGF (100 ng/ml), and PDGF plus EGF. In NIH 3T3/HIR cells, the lack of interaction of insulin with other growth factors was also observed when the percentage of cells synthesizing DNA was examined. Despite insulin's inducing only 60% of NIH 3T3/HIR cells to incorporate thymidine, addition of PDGF, EGF, or PDGF plus EGF had no further effect. In contrast, combinations of growth factors resulted in 95% of the parental NIH 3T3 cells synthesizing DNA. The independence of insulin-stimulated DNA synthesis from other mitogens in the NIH 3T3/HIR cells is atypical for progression factor-stimulated DNA synthesis and is thought to be partly the result of insulin receptor expression in an inappropriate context or quantity.

  9. Insulin dose adjustments with add-on glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) agonists in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Artigas, Carla Francés; Stokes, Victoria; Tan, Garry D; Theodorakis, Michael J

    2015-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists (GLP-1RAs) are gaining ground as therapeutic modalities in combination with insulin in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Exploiting the multiple benefits of incretin-based therapies in certain patient populations, especially in those who would benefit most from potential weight loss or prevention of body weight gain, has provided a valuable add-on option in diabetes management. However, caution needs to be exercised when initiating such a double injectable therapy, as evidence indicates that, in most instances, the insulin dose needs to be re-adjusted. The majority of published studies suggest reduction of insulin dose, especially related to the 'bolus' component; however, some have also recommended that insulin dose should actually be increased, but we found no credible evidence to support the latter. An important determinant of the titration process is the insulin formulation already in use at baseline. As more potent and long-acting GLP-1RAs are introduced, optimal insulin dose scaling is a major challenge, especially in a primary setting. We provide an overview of the current knowledge in this rapidly changing field. Based on currently reported evidence, a reduction of basal insulin by 10% and a decrease of prandial insulin by 30 - 40% is recommended on addition of GLP-1RAs.

  10. Comparison of solubilized and purified plasma membrane and nuclear insulin receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, K.Y.; Hawley, D.; Vigneri, R.; Goldfine, I.D.

    1988-01-12

    Prior studies have detected biochemical and immunological differences between insulin receptors in plasma membranes and isolated nuclei. To further investigate these receptors, they were solubilized in Triton X-100 partially purified by wheat germ agglutinin-agarose chromatography. In these preparations, the nuclear and plasma membrane receptors had very similar pH optima (pH 8.0) and reactivities to a group of polyclonal antireceptor antibodies. Further, both membrane preparations had identical binding activities when labeled insulin was competed for by unlabeled insulin (50% inhibition at 800 pM). Next, nuclear and plasma membranes were solubilized and purified to homogeneity by wheat germ agglutinin-agarose and insulin-agarose chromatography. In both receptors, labeled insulin was covalently cross-linked to a protein of 130 kilodaltons representing the insulin receptor ..cap alpha.. subunit. When preparations of both receptors were incubated with insulin and then adenosine 5'-(..gamma..-/sup 32/P)triphosphate, a protein of 95 kilodaltons representing the insulin receptor ..beta.. subunit was phosphorylated in a dose-dependent manner. These studies indicate, therefore, that solubilized plasma membrane and nuclear insulin receptors have similar structures and biochemical properties, and they suggest that they are the same (or very similar) proteins.

  11. Insulin treatment normalizes retinal neuroinflammation but not markers of synapse loss in diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Masser, Dustin R; VanGuilder Starkey, Heather D; Bixler, Georgina V; Dunton, Wendy; Bronson, Sarah K; Freeman, Willard M

    2014-08-01

    Diabetic retinopathy is one of the leading causes of blindness in developed countries, and a majority of patients with type I and type II diabetes will develop some degree of vision loss despite blood glucose control regimens. The effects of different insulin therapy regimens on early metabolic, inflammatory and neuronal retinal disease processes such as retinal neuroinflammation and synapse loss have not been extensively investigated. This study compared 3 months non-diabetic and streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic Sprague Dawley rats. Diabetic rats received either no insulin treatment, systemic insulin treatment beginning after 1 week uncontrolled diabetes (early intervention, 11 weeks on insulin), or after 1.5 months uncontrolled diabetes (late intervention, 6 weeks on insulin). Changes in both whole animal metabolic and retinal inflammatory markers were prevented by early initiation of insulin treatment. These metabolic and inflammatory changes were also normalized by the later insulin intervention. Insulin treatment begun 1 week after diabetes induction ameliorated loss of retinal synapse markers. Synapse markers and presumably synapse numbers were equivalent in uncontrolled diabetes and when insulin treatment began at 1.5 months of diabetes. These findings are in agreement with previous demonstrations that retinal synapses are lost within 1 month of uncontrolled diabetes and suggest that synapses are not regained with glycemic control and restoration of insulin signaling. However, increased expression of metabolic and inflammatory markers associated with diabetes was reversed in both groups of insulin treatment. This study also emphasizes the need for insulin treatment groups in diabetic retinopathy studies to provide a more faithful modeling of the human condition. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Substitution of isoleucine for methionine at position 1153 in the beta-subunit of the human insulin receptor. A mutation that impairs receptor tyrosine kinase activity, receptor endocytosis, and insulin action.

    PubMed

    Cama, A; Quon, M J; de la Luz Sierra, M; Taylor, S I

    1992-04-25

    The intracellular domain of the insulin receptor possesses activity as a tyrosine-specific protein kinase. The receptor tyrosine kinase is stimulated by insulin binding to the extracellular domain of the receptor. Previously, we have identified a patient with a genetic form of insulin resistance who is heterozygous for a mutation substituting Ile for Met1153 in the tyrosine kinase domain of the receptor near the cluster of the three major autophosphorylation sites (Tyr1158, Tyr1162, and Tyr1163). In this investigation, the Ile1153 mutant receptor was expressed by transfection of mutant cDNA into NIH-3T3 cells. The mutation impairs receptor tyrosine kinase activity and also inhibits the ability of insulin to stimulate 2-deoxyglucose uptake and thymidine incorporation. These data support the hypothesis that the receptor tyrosine activity plays a necessary role in the ability of the receptor to mediate insulin action in vivo. Furthermore, expression of the Ile1153 mutant receptor exerted a dominant negative effect to inhibit the ability of endogenous murine receptors for insulin and insulin-like growth factor I to mediate their actions upon the cell. This observation is consistent with previous suggestions that mutant receptors dimerize with wild type receptors, thereby creating hybrid molecules which lack biological activity. The dominant negative effect of the mutant receptor may explain the dominant mode of inheritance of insulin resistance caused by the Ile1153 mutation. Finally, the mutation inhibits the ability of insulin to stimulate receptor endocytosis. This may explain the normal number of insulin receptors on the surface of the patient's cells in vivo. Despite the presence of markedly elevated levels of insulin in the patient's plasma, the receptors were resistant to down-regulation.

  13. Reciprocal regulation of hepatic and adipose lipogenesis by liver X receptors in obesity and insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Beaven, Simon W; Matveyenko, Aleksey; Wroblewski, Kevin; Chao, Lily; Wilpitz, Damien; Hsu, Tu Wen; Lentz, Jacob; Drew, Brian; Hevener, Andrea L; Tontonoz, Peter

    2013-07-02

    Liver X receptors (LXRs) regulate lipogenesis and inflammation, but their contribution to the metabolic syndrome is unclear. We show that LXRs modulate key aspects of the metabolic syndrome in mice. LXRαβ-deficient-ob/ob (LOKO) mice remain obese but show reduced hepatic steatosis and improved insulin sensitivity compared to ob/ob mice. Impaired hepatic lipogenesis in LOKO mice is accompanied by reciprocal increases in adipose lipid storage, reflecting tissue-selective effects on the SREBP, PPARγ, and ChREBP lipogenic pathways. LXRs are essential for obesity-driven SREBP-1c and ChREBP activity in liver, but not fat. Furthermore, loss of LXRs in obesity promotes adipose PPARγ and ChREBP-β activity, leading to improved insulin sensitivity. LOKO mice also exhibit defects in β cell mass and proliferation despite improved insulin sensitivity. Our data suggest that sterol sensing by LXRs in obesity is critically linked with lipid and glucose homeostasis and provide insight into the complex relationships between LXR and insulin signaling. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Insulin Receptor Signaling in Long-Term Memory Consolidation Following Spatial Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dou, Jing-Tao; Chen, Min; Dufour, Franck; Alkon, Daniel L.; Zhao, Wei-Qin

    2005-01-01

    Evidence has shown that the insulin and insulin receptor (IR) play a role in cognitive function. However, the detailed mechanisms underlying insulin's action on learning and memory are not yet understood. Here we investigated changes in long-term memory-associated expression of the IR and downstream molecules in the rat hippocampus. After…

  15. [Insulin and glucocorticoid binding by blood cell receptors after hydrocortisone administration in rabbits].

    PubMed

    Tikhonova, N E; Tatarinova, G Sh

    1989-07-01

    Repeated i.v. administration of hydrocortisone (10 mg/kg) revealed an increase in the resistance against insulin although endogenous corticosterone was decreased in 33 male rabbits. The insulin- and dexamethasone-binding receptors of erythrocytes and mononuclear leucocytes. changed after 3-7 hydrocortisone injections, the binding increasing for insulin and diminishing for dexamethasone.

  16. Insulin Receptor Signaling in Long-Term Memory Consolidation Following Spatial Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dou, Jing-Tao; Chen, Min; Dufour, Franck; Alkon, Daniel L.; Zhao, Wei-Qin

    2005-01-01

    Evidence has shown that the insulin and insulin receptor (IR) play a role in cognitive function. However, the detailed mechanisms underlying insulin's action on learning and memory are not yet understood. Here we investigated changes in long-term memory-associated expression of the IR and downstream molecules in the rat hippocampus. After…

  17. Cellular mechanisms of insulin resistance: role of stress-regulated serine kinases and insulin receptor substrates (IRS) serine phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Tanti, Jean-François; Jager, Jennifer

    2009-12-01

    Insulin receptor substrates (IRS) serine phosphorylation is a time-controlled physiological feedback mechanism in insulin signaling that is hijacked by metabolic and inflammatory stresses to promote insulin resistance. Kinases, including IKKbeta, JNK, ERK, mTOR, and S6K, activated by the inducers of insulin resistance induce uncontrolled IRS serine phosphorylation. Studies with genetically modified mice reveal that these kinases integrate signals from metabolic and inflammatory stresses in adipose tissue, liver, and hypothalamus leading to peripheral and central insulin resistance. Moreover, IKKbeta/NF-kappaB and JNK1 pathways in myeloid cells represent a core mechanism involved in inflammation linked to obesity. These kinases are thus potential drug targets against insulin resistance and the targeting of the IKKbeta/NF-kappaB or the JNK pathway may evolve into future diabetes medication.

  18. Hyperinsulinemia is Associated with Increased Soluble Insulin Receptors Release from Hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Hiriart, Marcia; Sanchez-Soto, Carmen; Diaz-Garcia, Carlos Manlio; Castanares, Diana T; Avitia, Morena; Velasco, Myrian; Mas-Oliva, Jaime; Macias-Silva, Marina; González-Villalpando, Clicerio; Delgado-Coello, Blanca; Sosa-Garrocho, Marcela; Vidaltamayo, Román; Fuentes-Silva, Deyanira

    2014-01-01

    It has been generally assumed that insulin circulates freely in blood. However it can also interact with plasma proteins. Insulin receptors are located in the membrane of target cells and consist of an alpha and beta subunits with a tyrosine kinase cytoplasmic domain. The ectodomain, called soluble insulin receptor (SIR) has been found elevated in patients with diabetes mellitus. We explored if insulin binds to SIRs in circulation under physiological conditions and hypothesize that this SIR may be released by hepatocytes in response to high insulin concentrations. The presence of SIR in rat and human plasmas and the culture medium of hepatocytes was explored using Western blot analysis. A purification protocol was performed to isolated SIR using affinity, gel filtration, and ion exchange chromatographies. A modified reverse hemolytic plaque assay was used to measure SIR release from cultured hepatocytes. Incubation with 1 nmol l(-1) insulin induces the release of the insulin receptor ectodomains from normal rat hepatocytes. This effect can be partially prevented by blocking protease activity. Furthermore, plasma levels of SIR were higher in a model of metabolic syndrome, where rats are hyperinsulinemic. We also found increased SIR levels in hyperinsulinemic humans. SIR may be an important regulator of the amount of free insulin in circulation. In hyperinsulinemia, the amount of this soluble receptor increases and this could lead to higher amounts of insulin bound to this receptor, rather than free insulin, which is the biologically active form of the hormone. This observation could enlighten the mechanisms of insulin resistance.

  19. Hyperinsulinemia is Associated with Increased Soluble Insulin Receptors Release from Hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Hiriart, Marcia; Sanchez-Soto, Carmen; Diaz-Garcia, Carlos Manlio; Castanares, Diana T.; Avitia, Morena; Velasco, Myrian; Mas-Oliva, Jaime; Macias-Silva, Marina; González-Villalpando, Clicerio; Delgado-Coello, Blanca; Sosa-Garrocho, Marcela; Vidaltamayo, Román; Fuentes-Silva, Deyanira

    2014-01-01

    It has been generally assumed that insulin circulates freely in blood. However it can also interact with plasma proteins. Insulin receptors are located in the membrane of target cells and consist of an alpha and beta subunits with a tyrosine kinase cytoplasmic domain. The ectodomain, called soluble insulin receptor (SIR) has been found elevated in patients with diabetes mellitus. We explored if insulin binds to SIRs in circulation under physiological conditions and hypothesize that this SIR may be released by hepatocytes in response to high insulin concentrations. The presence of SIR in rat and human plasmas and the culture medium of hepatocytes was explored using Western blot analysis. A purification protocol was performed to isolated SIR using affinity, gel filtration, and ion exchange chromatographies. A modified reverse hemolytic plaque assay was used to measure SIR release from cultured hepatocytes. Incubation with 1 nmol l−1 insulin induces the release of the insulin receptor ectodomains from normal rat hepatocytes. This effect can be partially prevented by blocking protease activity. Furthermore, plasma levels of SIR were higher in a model of metabolic syndrome, where rats are hyperinsulinemic. We also found increased SIR levels in hyperinsulinemic humans. SIR may be an important regulator of the amount of free insulin in circulation. In hyperinsulinemia, the amount of this soluble receptor increases and this could lead to higher amounts of insulin bound to this receptor, rather than free insulin, which is the biologically active form of the hormone. This observation could enlighten the mechanisms of insulin resistance. PMID:24995000

  20. Increased abundance of insulin/insulin-like growth factor-I hybrid receptors in skeletal muscle of obese subjects is correlated with in vivo insulin sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Federici, M; Porzio, O; Lauro, D; Borboni, P; Giovannone, B; Zucaro, L; Hribal, M L; Sesti, G

    1998-08-01

    We reported that in noninsulin-dependent diabetes melitus (NIDDM) patients expression of insulin/insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) hybrid receptors is increased in insulin target tissues. Whether this is a defect associated with NIDDM or represents a generalized abnormality associated with insulin resistant states is still unsettled. To address this, we applied a microwell-based immunoassay to measure abundance of insulin receptors, type 1 IGF receptors, and hybrid receptors in muscle of eight normal and eight obese subjects. Maximal insulin binding to insulin receptors was lower in obese than in control subjects (B/T = 1.8 +/- 0.20 and 2.6 +/- 0.30; P < 0.03, respectively) and was negatively correlated with insulinemia (r = -0.60; P < 0.01). Maximal IGF-I binding to type 1 IGF receptors was higher in obese than in controls (B/T = 1.9 +/- 0.20 and 0.86 +/- 0.10; P < 0.0001, respectively) and was negatively correlated with plasma IGF-I levels (r = -0.69; P < 0.003). Hybrid receptor abundance was higher in obese than in normal subjects (B/T = 1.21 +/- 0.14 and 0.44 +/- 0.06; P < 0.0003, respectively) and was negatively correlated with insulin binding (r = -0.60; P < 0.01) and positively correlated with IGF-I binding (r = 0.92; P < 0.0001). Increased abundance of hybrids was correlated with insulinemia (r = 0.70; P < 0.002) and body mass index (r = 0.71; P < 0.0019), whereas it was negatively correlated with in vivo insulin sensitivity measured by ITT (r = -0.67; P < 0.016). These results indicate that downregulation of insulin receptors or upregulation of type 1 IGF receptors because of changes in plasma insulin and IGF-I levels may result in modifications in hybrid receptor abundance.

  1. Dissociation of insulin receptor phosphorylation and stimulation of glucose transport in BC3H-1 myocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Mojsilovic, L.P.; Standaert, M.L.; Rosic, N.K.; Pollet, R.J.

    1986-05-01

    The authors have investigated insulin receptor phosphorylation in differentiated cultured BC3H-1 myocytes. As for other insulin-responsive cell systems in partially purified wheat germ agglutinin receptor preparations, insulin stimulates the phosphorylation of its own receptor (95K ..beta..-subunits) in a dose dependent manner (0-400 nM), as identified by immunoprecipitation with antiinsulin receptor antibodies and SDS-PAGE. In the same preparations they show that 12-0-tetradecanyl phorbol acetate (TPA), which in many respect ..beta..-subunits in the same dose dependent manner (0-5 ..mu..M). In addition, antiinsulin receptor antibodies (B-10) also induced phosphorylation of mimics insulin action, also induced phosphorylation of the insulin receptor and HPLC tryptic maps of the /sup 32/P-labeled ..beta..-subunit were identical to those for insulin-induced receptor phosphorylation. However, while insulin and TPA are potent stimulators of glucose transport in these muscle cells, the antireceptor antibodies alone failed to provoke glucose transport at any concentration. The specificity and activity of these antibodies were confirmed in their system by their ability to inhibit insulin binding and insulin-stimulated glucose transport in a concentration-dependent manner. Their results indicate that phosphorylation of insulin receptor is not a crucial event in mediating insulin action, at least with respect to glucose transport. While the effects of the B-10 antibody in the BC3H-1 myocyte differ from those in the adipocyte, their results provide independent confirmation of their essential conclusion that phosphorylation of the insulin receptor may not be necessary nor sufficient for its acute action in promoting glucose transport.

  2. Ligand-dependent intersubunit association with the insulin receptor complex activates its intrinsic kinase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Boeni-Schnetzler, M.; Kaligian, A.; DelVecchio, R.; Pilch, P.F.

    1988-05-15

    Insulin receptor halves (..cap alpha beta..) were obtained upon selective reduction of the holoreceptor (..cap alpha../sub 2/..beta../sub 2/) and were isolated in concentrated form. Autophosphorylation of concentrated ..cap alpha beta.. receptor halves can be stimulated by insulin an average of 4.0-fold, whereas nonreduced holoreceptor can be stimulated 5.4-fold. If ..cap alpha beta.. half-receptors are immobilized on wheat germ agglutinin-agarose, no insulin-stimulated autophosphorylation is observed, whereas immobilized holoreceptor retains insulin responsiveness. Treatment of ..cap alpha beta.. half-receptors with glutathione in the presence of insulin results in reoxidation to the holoreceptor form (..cap alpha../sub 2/..beta../sub 2/) with an efficiency of 60-70% as visualized by immunoblotting, thus providing evidence that two ..cap alpha beta.. halves are in close physical proximity. This reoxidation reaction, which is evident prior to autophosphorylation, is rapid and strictly dependent on the presence of insulin, consistent with the hypothesis that insulin promotes the association of two ..cap alpha beta.. halves. Furthermore, the insulin-induced reoxidation reaction and the insulin-induced autophosphorylation show the same dose dependence suggesting that the noncovalent association of ..cap alpha beta.. half-receptors upon insulin binding is a prerequisite for insulin-stimulated autophosphorylation in concentrated ..gamma beta.. half-receptor preparations. If the ..cap alpha beta.. half-receptor forms are phosphorylated in the presence of an anti-phosphotyrosine antibody and separated from nonphosphorylated ..cap alpha beta.. receptors, we observe that the phosphorylated ..cap alpha beta.. receptor halves contain bound insulin.

  3. Role of insulin receptor phosphorylation in the insulinomimetic effects of hydrogen peroxide

    SciTech Connect

    Hayes, G.R.; Lockwood, D.H.

    1987-11-01

    The oxidant H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ has many insulin-like effects in rat adipocytes. To determine whether these effects could be mediated by the tyrosine kinase activity of the insulin receptor, the ability of H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ to stimulate receptor phosphorylation in intact adipocytes and partially purified insulin receptors has been examined. Phosphorylation of the ..beta.. subunit of the insulin receptor was increased. Stimulation of receptor phosphorylation was rapid, reaching maximal levels within 5 min, and preceded activation of glucose transport. Phosphoamino acid analysis of insulin receptors from H/sub 2/O/sub 2/-treated adipocytes showed that /sup 32/P incorporation into phosphotyrosine and phosphoserine residues of the ..beta.. subunit was enhanced. Furthermore, partially purified receptors from H/sub 2/O/sub 2/-treated cells exhibit increased tyrosine kinase activity, as measured by phosphorylation of the peptide Glu/sub 80/Tyr/sub 20/. To define the factors involved in H/sub 2/O/sub 2/'s effect, the authors have examined receptor phosphorylation in fat cell homogenates and purified plasma membranes. Although insulin stimulated receptor phosphorylation in both of these systems, H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ was only effective in the cell homogenates. These data demonstrate that, under certain conditions, H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ stimulates insulin receptor phosphorylation and tyrosine kinase activity, suggesting that the insulin-like effects of H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ may be mediated by stimulation of insulin receptor phosphorylation. This does not appear to be a direct effect of H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ on the insulin receptor and requires nonplasma membrane cellular constituents.

  4. Comparative effects of several simple carbohydrates on erythrocyte insulin receptors in obese subjects.

    PubMed

    Rizkalla, S W; Baigts, F; Fumeron, F; Rabillon, B; Bayn, P; Ktorza, A; Spielmann, D; Apfelbaum, M

    1986-09-01

    The effects of simple carbohydrates on erythrocyte insulin receptors, plasma insulin and plasma glucose were studied during four hypocaloric, hyperproteic, diets. One diet contained no carbohydrate; the other three contained 36 g of either glucose, galactose or fructose. These diets were given for a 14-day period to groups of moderately obese subjects. The hypocaloric carbohydrate-free diet produced a decrease in plasma insulin and glucose concentrations concomitant with an increase in the number of insulin receptors. A similar increase in insulin receptor number was found when the diet was supplemented with glucose or galactose, but not with fructose. The presence of fructose in the diet prevented any increase in insulin receptor number.

  5. Interplay and Effects of Temporal Changes in the Phosphorylation State of Serine-302, -307, and -318 of Insulin Receptor Substrate-1 on Insulin Action in Skeletal Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Weigert, Cora; Kron, Matthias; Kalbacher, Hubert; Pohl, Ann Kathrin; Runge, Heike; Häring, Hans-Ulrich; Schleicher, Erwin; Lehmann, Rainer

    2008-01-01

    Transduction of the insulin signal is mediated by multisite Tyr and Ser/Thr phosphorylation of the insulin receptor substrates (IRSs). Previous studies on the function of single-site phosphorylation, particularly phosphorylation of Ser-302, -307, and -318 of IRS-1, showed attenuating as well as enhancing effects on insulin action. In this study we investigated a possible cross talk of these opposedly acting serine residues in insulin-stimulated skeletal muscle cells by monitoring phosphorylation kinetics, and applying loss of function, gain of function, and combination mutants of IRS-1. The phosphorylation at Ser-302 was rapid and transient, followed first by Ser-318 phosphorylation and later by phosphorylation of Ser-307, which remained elevated for 120 min. Mutation of Ser-302 to alanine clearly reduced the subsequent protein kinase C-ζ-mediated Ser-318 phosphorylation. The Ser-307 phosphorylation was independent of Ser-302 and/or Ser-318 phosphorylation status. The functional consequences of these phosphorylation patterns were studied by the expression of IRS-1 mutants. The E302A307E318 mutant simulating the early phosphorylation pattern resulted in a significant increase in Akt and glycogen synthase kinase 3 phosphorylation. Furthermore, glucose uptake was enhanced. Because the down-regulation of the insulin signal was not affected, this phosphorylation pattern seems to be involved in the enhancement but not in the termination of the insulin signal. This enhancing effect was completely absent when Ser-302 was unphosphorylated and Ser-307 was phosphorylated as simulated by the A302E307E318 mutant. Phospho-Ser-318, sequentially phosphorylated at least by protein kinase C-ζ and a mammalian target of rapamycin/raptor-dependent kinase, was part of the positive as well as of the subsequent negative phosphorylation pattern. Thus we conclude that insulin stimulation temporally generates different phosphorylation statuses of the same residues that exert different

  6. Cannabinoids induce pancreatic β-cell death by directly inhibiting insulin receptor activation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Wook; Lao, Qizong; Shin, Yu-Kyong; Carlson, Olga D; Lee, Eun Kyung; Gorospe, Myriam; Kulkarni, Rohit N; Egan, Josephine M

    2012-03-20

    Cannabinoid 1 (CB1) receptors have been previously detected in pancreatic β cells, where they attenuate insulin action. We now report that CB1 receptors form a heteromeric complex with insulin receptors and the heterotrimeric guanosine triphosphate-binding protein α subunit Gα(i). Gα(i) inhibited the kinase activity of the insulin receptor in β cells by directly binding to the activation loop in the tyrosine kinase domain of the receptor. Consequently, phosphorylation of proapoptotic protein Bad was reduced and its apoptotic activity was stimulated, leading to β-cell death. Pharmacological blockade or genetic deficiency of CB1 receptors enhanced insulin receptor signaling after injury, leading to reduced blood glucose concentrations and activation of Bad, which increased β-cell survival. These findings provide direct evidence of physical and functional interactions between CB1 and insulin receptors and suggest a mechanism whereby peripherally acting CB1 receptor antagonists improve insulin action in insulin-sensitive tissues independent of the other metabolic effects of CB1 receptors.

  7. Changes in erythrocyte insulin receptors in normal dogs and keeshond dogs with inheritable, early onset, insulin dependent diabetes mellitus

    SciTech Connect

    Klaassen, J.K.

    1986-01-01

    Validation of a procedure to evaluate insulin receptors on erythrocytes (RBC-IR) in dogs is described. The specific binding of (/sup 125/I)iodoinsulin to RBC-IR of normal dogs is significantly greater than binding in keeshonds with an inheritable form of early onset diabetes mellitus. This decreased binding was due to a significant decrease in RBC-IR affinity in the diabetic keeshonds. To determine the effect on RBC-IR, normal dogs were treated with either dexamethasone (0.1 mg/kg) or prednisone (0.3 mg/kg) for 10 days: concentrations of plasma cortisol, glucose, and insulin, plus binding characteristics of RBC-IR were determined. In the dexamethasone treated group, plasma glucose concentrations were elevated significantly by day 6 and continued through day 10. Insulin concentrations were elevated significantly by day 3 and remained elevated through day 10. In the prednisone treated group, glucose concentrations were elevated significantly by day 3, while insulin concentrations were elevated significantly by day 8. Maximum binding of RBC-IR was unaffected by prednisone and neither affinities nor receptor numbers were significantly different from day 1. No changes in plasma cortisol concentration were seen. Diabetic keeshonds on daily insulin treatment were removed from exogenous insulin therapy for 48 hours. Significant increases in glucose concentrations were observed, but no significant changes in cortisol, insulin, average receptor binding affinity, or RBC-IR number per cell occurred.

  8. Genomic organization and expression of insulin receptors in grass carp, Ctenopharyngodon idellus.

    PubMed

    Cai, Wenjing; Liang, Xu-fang; Yuan, Xiaochen; Li, Aixuan; He, Yuhui; He, Shan

    2016-01-01

    Insulin receptors have been demonstrated to be involved in embryogenesis, food intake regulation and glucose metabolism in several fish, while more researchis needed for further understanding. In this study, the complete coding sequence (CDS) of insulin receptor a (insra) gene and insulin receptor b (insrb) gene in grass carp were obtained, the CDS were 4068 bp and 4514 bp in length, encoding 1355 aa protein and 1351 aa protein. Both of insra and insrb in grass carp showed high amino acid identities with other fish. Insra and insrb genes were widely expressed in all tested tissues with an overlapping but distinct expressions. The high levels of insra mRNA were distributed in hindgut and heart tissues. The insrb gene showed the highest expression levels in liver and hindgut. We also proved that two forms of grass carp insulin receptors participate in the regulation of blood glucose and might act differently. Phylogenetic analysis confirmed that different isoforms of fish insulin receptors are derived from two distinct genes, which was inconsistent with the generation of mammalian insulin receptors. Synteny analyses of insulin receptor genes showed that genes surrounding the insulin receptor genes were conserved in fish. Arhgef18, PEX11G, humanC19orf45 genes were highly conserved among mammal species. However, no conserved synteny was observed among fish, mammals, avians and amphibians.

  9. Insulin receptors and downstream substrates associate with membrane microdomains after treatment with insulin or chromium(III) picolinate.

    PubMed

    Al-Qatati, Abeer; Winter, Peter W; Wolf-Ringwall, Amber L; Chatterjee, Pabitra B; Van Orden, Alan K; Crans, Debbie C; Roess, Deborah A; Barisas, B George

    2012-04-01

    We have examined the association of insulin receptors (IR) and downstream signaling molecules with membrane microdomains in rat basophilic leukemia (RBL-2H3) cells following treatment with insulin or tris(2-pyridinecarbxylato)chromium(III) (Cr(pic)(3)). Single-particle tracking demonstrated that individual IR on these cells exhibited reduced lateral diffusion and increased confinement within 100 nm-scale membrane compartments after treatment with either 200 nM insulin or 10 μM Cr(pic)(3). These treatments also increased the association of native IR, phosphorylated insulin receptor substrate 1 and phosphorylated AKT with detergent-resistant membrane microdomains of characteristically high buoyancy. Confocal fluorescence microscopic imaging of Di-4-ANEPPDHQ labeled RBL-2H3 cells also showed that plasma membrane lipid order decreased following treatment with Cr(pic)(3) but was not altered by insulin treatment. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy demonstrated that Cr(pic)(3) did not affect IR cell-surface density or compete with insulin for available binding sites. Finally, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy indicated that Cr(pic)(3) likely associates with the lipid interface in reverse-micelle model membranes. Taken together, these results suggest that activation of IR signaling in a cellular model system by both insulin and Cr(pic)(3) involves retention of IR in specialized nanometer-scale membrane microdomains but that the insulin-like effects of Cr(pic)(3) are due to changes in membrane lipid order rather than to direct interactions with IR.

  10. Activation of islet 5-HT4 receptor regulates glycemic control through promoting insulin secretion.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hui; Hong, Feng; Chen, Ye; Li, Ji; Yao, Yuan-Sheng; Zhang, Yue; Zheng, Li-Fei; Zhu, Jin-Xia

    2016-10-15

    Mosapride, a gastrointestinal prokinetic drug, is an agonist of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) receptor 4 that also reduces blood glucose. Whether 5-HT4 receptor is distributed in pancreatic islets and whether mosapride can directly stimulate insulin secretion is unclear. In the present study, the protein expression and cellular location of 5-HT4 receptor in pancreas was detected through western blotting and immunofluorescence. The acute effects of 5-HT4 receptor agonists, mosapride and prucalopride, on insulin secretion were investigated in vivo and in vitro in normal and alloxan-induced diabetes rats. The results indicated that 5-HT4 receptor immunoreactivity was co-existed in the islets insulin-immunoreactive cells of rat, mouse, pig and human. However the immunoreactive cells of insulin and 5-HT4 receptor and the protein expression of 5-HT4 receptor were significantly decreased in the pancreas of alloxan-induced diabetes rats. In normal rats, mosapride and prucalopride decreased blood glucose and increased insulin secretion during glucose tolerance test, in association with an increase in glucose-stimulated insulin secretion, which was abolished by the 5-HT4 receptor antagonist GR113808. In diabetes rats, mosapride and prucalopride failed to improve blood glucose and insulin levels in the group of 180mg/kg alloxan, but increased glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in the group of 120mg/kg alloxan in vitro. We conclude that 5-HT4 receptor is distributed in the islet β cell. Activation of 5-HT4 receptor is able to stimulate insulin secretion directly, thereby reduce blood glucose. The study provides important experimental evidences for the 5-HT4 receptor regulating insulin secretion and acting as a potential drug target in diabetes treatment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Insulin receptor downregulation in isolated hepatocytes of river lamprey (Lampetra fluviatilis).

    PubMed

    Leibush, B N; Lappova, Y L

    1995-10-01

    Insulin receptor downregulation in the isolated hepatocytes of lamprey (Lampetra fluviatilis) was studied at the ambient temperature for this species. Preincubation of hepatocytes with 10(-9)-10(-8) M unlabeled insulin decreased insulin binding capacity to 43, 37, and 34% at 4, 15, and 25 degrees, respectively. Preincubation of hepatocytes in the presence of 10(-10) M unlabeled insulin had no effect on the 125I-insulin binding. The maximal decrease in the 125I-insulin binding was reached after 10 min of preincubation and was then maintained at a constant level for 2 hr. Competitive binding assays demonstrated that preincubation with unlabeled insulin resulted in a 45% decline in the number of binding sites. In rat adipocytes and frog hepatocytes used for the comparison, preincubation with insulin caused a 65% decrease in cell-surface receptors, while intracellular (internalized receptors) increased proportionally. In contrast, in the lamprey hepatocytes both cell-surface and intracellular receptors decreased. We conclude that insulin receptors of the lamprey hepatocytes could be down-regulated at the ambient temperature for the species and at the physiological concentrations of insulin (10(-9)-10(-8) M).

  12. Tyrosine phosphorylation of phosphoinositide-dependent kinase 1 by the insulin receptor is necessary for insulin metabolic signaling.

    PubMed

    Fiory, Francesca; Alberobello, Anna Teresa; Miele, Claudia; Oriente, Francesco; Esposito, Iolanda; Corbo, Vincenzo; Ruvo, Menotti; Tizzano, Barbara; Rasmussen, Thomas E; Gammeltoft, Steen; Formisano, Pietro; Beguinot, Francesco

    2005-12-01

    In L6 myoblasts, insulin receptors with deletion of the C-terminal 43 amino acids (IR(Delta43)) exhibited normal autophosphorylation and IRS-1/2 tyrosine phosphorylation. The L6 cells expressing IR(Delta43) (L6(IRDelta43)) also showed no insulin effect on glucose uptake and glycogen synthase, accompanied by a >80% decrease in insulin induction of 3-phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase 1 (PDK-1) activity and tyrosine phosphorylation and of protein kinase B (PKB) phosphorylation at Thr(308). Insulin induced the phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase-dependent coprecipitation of PDK-1 with wild-type IR (IR(WT)), but not IR(Delta43). Based on overlay blotting, PDK-1 directly bound IR(WT), but not IR(Delta43). Insulin-activated IR(WT), and not IR(Delta43), phosphorylated PDK-1 at tyrosines 9, 373, and 376. The IR C-terminal 43-amino-acid peptide (C-terminal peptide) inhibited in vitro PDK-1 tyrosine phosphorylation by the IR. Tyr-->Phe substitution prevented this inhibitory action. In the L6(hIR) cells, the C-terminal peptide coprecipitated with PDK-1 in an insulin-stimulated fashion. This peptide simultaneously impaired the insulin effect on PDK-1 coprecipitation with IR(WT), on PDK-1 tyrosine phosphorylation, on PKB phosphorylation at Thr(308), and on glucose uptake. Upon insulin exposure, PDK-1 membrane persistence was significantly reduced in L6(IRDelta43) compared to control cells. In L6 cells expressing IR(WT), the C-terminal peptide also impaired insulin-dependent PDK-1 membrane persistence. Thus, PDK-1 directly binds to the insulin receptor, followed by PDK-1 activation and insulin metabolic effects.

  13. Increased levels of insulin and insulin-like growth factor-1 hybrid receptors and decreased glycosylation of the insulin receptor alpha- and beta-subunits in scrapie-infected neuroblastoma N2a cells.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Daniel; Gyllberg, Hanna; Ostlund, Pernilla; Bergman, Tomas; Bedecs, Katarina

    2004-06-01

    We have previously shown that ScN2a cells (scrapie-infected neuroblastoma N2a cells) express 2-fold- and 4-fold-increased levels of IR (insulin receptor) and IGF-1R (insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor) respectively. In addition, the IR alpha- and beta-subunits are aberrantly processed, with apparent molecular masses of 128 and 85 kDa respectively, as compared with 136 and 95 kDa in uninfected N2a cells. Despite the 2-fold increase in IR protein, the number of (125)I-insulin-binding sites was slightly decreased in ScN2a cells [Ostlund, Lindegren, Pettersson and Bedecs (2001) Brain Res. 97, 161-170]. In order to determine the cellular localization of IR in ScN2a cells, surface biotinylation was performed, showing a correct IR trafficking and localization to the cell surface. The present study shows for the first time that neuroblastoma N2a cells express significant levels of IR-IGF-1R hybrid receptors, and in ScN2a cells the number of hybrid receptors was 2-fold higher than that found in N2a cells, potentially explaining the apparent loss of insulin-binding sites due to a lower affinity for insulin compared with the homotypic IR. Furthermore, the decreased molecular mass of IR subunits in ScN2a cells is not caused by altered phosphorylation or proteolytic processing, but rather by altered glycosylation. Enzymic deglycosylation of immunoprecipitated IR from N2a and ScN2a cells with endoglycosidase H, peptide N-glycosidase F and neuraminidase all resulted in subunits with increased electrophoretic mobility; however, the 8-10 kDa shift remained. Combined enzymic or chemical deglycosylation using anhydrous trifluoromethane sulphonic acid treatment ultimately showed that the IR alpha- and beta-subunits from ScN2a cells are aberrantly glycosylated. The increased formation of IR-IGF-1R hybrids in ScN2a cells may be part of a neuroprotective response to prion infection. The degree and functional significance of aberrantly glycosylated proteins in ScN2a cells remain to be

  14. Activation of insulin signal transduction pathway and anti-diabetic activity of small molecule insulin receptor activators.

    PubMed

    Qureshi, S A; Ding, V; Li, Z; Szalkowski, D; Biazzo-Ashnault, D E; Xie, D; Saperstein, R; Brady, E; Huskey, S; Shen, X; Liu, K; Xu, L; Salituro, G M; Heck, J V; Moller, D E; Jones, A B; Zhang, B B

    2000-11-24

    We recently described the identification of a non-peptidyl fungal metabolite (l-783,281, compound 1), which induced activation of human insulin receptor (IR) tyrosine kinase and mediated insulin-like effects in cells, as well as decreased blood glucose levels in murine models of Type 2 diabetes (Zhang, B., Salituro, G., Szalkowski, D., Li, Z., Zhang, Y., Royo, I., Vilella, D., Diez, M. T. , Pelaez, F., Ruby, C., Kendall, R. L., Mao, X., Griffin, P., Calaycay, J., Zierath, J. R., Heck, J. V., Smith, R. G. & Moller, D. E. (1999) Science 284, 974-977). Here we report the characterization of an active analog (compound 2) with enhanced IR kinase activation potency and selectivity over related receptors (insulin-like growth factor I receptor, epidermal growth factor receptor, and platelet-derived growth factor receptor). The IR activators stimulated tyrosine kinase activity of partially purified native IR and recombinant IR tyrosine kinase domain. Administration of the IR activators to mice was associated with increased IR tyrosine kinase activity in liver. In vivo oral treatment with compound 2 resulted in significant glucose lowering in several rodent models of diabetes. In db/db mice, oral administration of compound 2 elicited significant correction of hyperglycemia. In a streptozotocin-induced diabetic mouse model, compound 2 potentiated the glucose-lowering effect of insulin. In normal rats, compound 2 improved oral glucose tolerance with significant reduction in insulin release following glucose challenge. A structurally related inactive analog (compound 3) was not effective on insulin receptor activation or glucose lowering in db/db mice. Thus, small molecule IR activators exert insulin mimetic and sensitizing effects in cells and in animal models of diabetes. These results have implications for the future development of new therapies for diabetes mellitus.

  15. Glucose-induced phosphorylation of the insulin receptor. Functional effects and characterization of phosphorylation sites.

    PubMed Central

    Pillay, T S; Xiao, S; Olefsky, J M

    1996-01-01

    Elevated glucose concentrations have been reported to inhibit insulin receptor kinase activity. We studied the effects of high glucose on insulin action in Rat1 fibroblasts transfected with wild-type human insulin receptor (HIRcB) and a truncated receptor lacking the COOH-terminal 43 amino acids (delta CT). In both cell lines, 25 mM glucose impaired receptor and insulin receptor substrate-1 phosphorylation by 34%, but IGF-1 receptor phosphorylation was unaffected. Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase activity and bromodeoxyuridine uptake were decreased by 85 and 35%, respectively. This was reversed by coincubation with a protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor or microinjection of a PKC inhibitor peptide. Phosphopeptide mapping revealed that high glucose or PMA led to serine/threonine phosphorylation of similar peptides. Inhibition of the microtubule-associated protein (MAP) kinase cascade by the MAP kinase kinase inhibitor PD98059 did not reverse the impaired phosphorylation. We conclude that high glucose inhibits insulin action by inducing serine phosphorylation through a PKC-mediated mechanism at the level of the receptor at sites proximal to the COOH-terminal 43 amino acids. This effect is independent of activation of the MAP kinase cascade. Proportionately, the impairment of insulin receptor substrate-1 tyrosine phosphorylation is greater than that of the insulin receptor resulting in attenuated phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase activation and mitogenic signaling. PMID:8609215

  16. Myeloid cell-restricted insulin receptor deficiency protects against obesity-induced inflammation and systemic insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Mauer, Jan; Chaurasia, Bhagirath; Plum, Leona; Quast, Thomas; Hampel, Brigitte; Blüher, Matthias; Kolanus, Waldemar; Kahn, C Ronald; Brüning, Jens C

    2010-05-06

    A major component of obesity-related insulin resistance is the establishment of a chronic inflammatory state with invasion of white adipose tissue by mononuclear cells. This results in the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines, which in turn leads to insulin resistance in target tissues such as skeletal muscle and liver. To determine the role of insulin action in macrophages and monocytes in obesity-associated insulin resistance, we conditionally inactivated the insulin receptor (IR) gene in myeloid lineage cells in mice (IR(Deltamyel)-mice). While these animals exhibit unaltered glucose metabolism on a normal diet, they are protected from the development of obesity-associated insulin resistance upon high fat feeding. Euglycemic, hyperinsulinemic clamp studies demonstrate that this results from decreased basal hepatic glucose production and from increased insulin-stimulated glucose disposal in skeletal muscle. Furthermore, IR(Deltamyel)-mice exhibit decreased concentrations of circulating tumor necrosis factor (TNF) alpha and thus reduced c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) activity in skeletal muscle upon high fat feeding, reflecting a dramatic reduction of the chronic and systemic low-grade inflammatory state associated with obesity. This is paralleled by a reduced accumulation of macrophages in white adipose tissue due to a pronounced impairment of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) 9 expression and activity in these cells. These data indicate that insulin action in myeloid cells plays an unexpected, critical role in the regulation of macrophage invasion into white adipose tissue and in the development of obesity-associated insulin resistance.

  17. Berberine reduces insulin resistance through protein kinase C-dependent up-regulation of insulin receptor expression.

    PubMed

    Kong, Wei-Jia; Zhang, Hao; Song, Dan-Qing; Xue, Rong; Zhao, Wei; Wei, Jing; Wang, Yue-Ming; Shan, Ning; Zhou, Zhen-Xian; Yang, Peng; You, Xue-Fu; Li, Zhuo-Rong; Si, Shu-Yi; Zhao, Li-Xun; Pan, Huai-Ning; Jiang, Jian-Dong

    2009-01-01

    Natural product berberine (BBR) has been reported to have hypoglycemic and insulin-sensitizing activities; however, its mechanism remains unclear. This study was designed to investigate the molecular mechanism of BBR against insulin resistance. Here, we identify insulin receptor (InsR) as a target of BBR to increase insulin sensitivity. In cultured human liver cells, BBR increased InsR messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein expression in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Berberine increased InsR expression in the L6 rat skeletal muscle cells as well. Berberine-enhanced InsR expression improved cellular glucose consumption only in the presence of insulin. Silencing InsR gene with small interfering RNA or blocking the phosphoinositol-3-kinase diminished this effect. Berberine induced InsR gene expression through a protein kinase C (PKC)-dependent activation of its promoter. Inhibition of PKC abolished BBR-caused InsR promoter activation and InsR mRNA transcription. In animal models, treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus rats with BBR lowered fasting blood glucose and fasting serum insulin, increased insulin sensitivity, and elevated InsR mRNA as well as PKC activity in the liver. In addition, BBR lowered blood glucose in KK-Ay type 2 but not in NOD/LtJ type 1 diabetes mellitus mice that were insulin deficient. Our results suggest that BBR is a unique natural medicine against insulin resistance in type 2 diabetes mellitus and metabolic syndrome.

  18. Phorbol ester-induced serine phosphorylation of the insulin receptor decreases its tyrosine kinase activity.

    PubMed

    Takayama, S; White, M F; Kahn, C R

    1988-03-05

    The effect of 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) on the function of the insulin receptor was examined in intact hepatoma cells (Fao) and in solubilized extracts purified by wheat germ agglutinin chromatography. Incubation of ortho[32P]phosphate-labeled Fao cells with TPA increased the phosphorylation of the insulin receptor 2-fold after 30 min. Analysis of tryptic phosphopeptides from the beta-subunit of the receptor by reverse-phase high performance liquid chromatography and determination of their phosphoamino acid composition suggested that TPA predominantly stimulated phosphorylation of serine residues in a single tryptic peptide. Incubation of the Fao cells with insulin (100 nM) for 1 min stimulated 4-fold the phosphorylation of the beta-subunit of the insulin receptor. Prior treatment of the cells with TPA inhibited the insulin-stimulated tyrosine phosphorylation by 50%. The receptors extracted with Triton X-100 from TPA-treated Fao cells and purified on immobilized wheat germ agglutinin retained the alteration in kinase activity and exhibited a 50% decrease in insulin-stimulated tyrosine autophosphorylation and phosphotransferase activity toward exogenous substrates. This was due primarily to a decrease in the Vmax for these reactions. TPA treatment also decreased the Km of the insulin receptor for ATP. Incubation of the insulin receptor purified from TPA-treated cells with alkaline phosphatase decreased the phosphate content of the beta-subunit to the control level and reversed the inhibition, suggesting that the serine phosphorylation of the beta-subunit was responsible for the decreased tyrosine kinase activity. Our results support the notion that the insulin receptor is a substrate for protein kinase C in the Fao cell and that the increase in serine phosphorylation of the beta-subunit of the receptor produced by TPA treatment inhibited tyrosine kinase activity in vivo and in vitro. These data suggest that protein kinase C may regulate the function

  19. Long-term intermittent feeding, but not caloric restriction, leads to redox imbalance, insulin receptor nitration, and glucose intolerance.

    PubMed

    Cerqueira, Fernanda M; da Cunha, Fernanda M; Caldeira da Silva, Camille C; Chausse, Bruno; Romano, Renato L; Garcia, Camila C M; Colepicolo, Pio; Medeiros, Marisa H G; Kowaltowski, Alicia J

    2011-10-01

    Calorie restriction is a dietary intervention known to improve redox state, glucose tolerance, and animal life span. Other interventions have been adopted as study models for caloric restriction, including nonsupplemented food restriction and intermittent, every-other-day feedings. We compared the short- and long-term effects of these interventions to ad libitum protocols and found that, although all restricted diets decrease body weight, intermittent feeding did not decrease intra-abdominal adiposity. Short-term calorie restriction and intermittent feeding presented similar results relative to glucose tolerance. Surprisingly, long-term intermittent feeding promoted glucose intolerance, without a loss in insulin receptor phosphorylation. Intermittent feeding substantially increased insulin receptor nitration in both intra-abdominal adipose tissue and muscle, a modification associated with receptor inactivation. All restricted diets enhanced nitric oxide synthase levels in the insulin-responsive adipose tissue and skeletal muscle. However, whereas calorie restriction improved tissue redox state, food restriction and intermittent feedings did not. In fact, long-term intermittent feeding resulted in largely enhanced tissue release of oxidants. Overall, our results show that restricted diets are significantly different in their effects on glucose tolerance and redox state when adopted long-term. Furthermore, we show that intermittent feeding can lead to oxidative insulin receptor inactivation and glucose intolerance.

  20. Differential Roles of Insulin and IGF-1 Receptors in Adipose Tissue Development and Function.

    PubMed

    Boucher, Jeremie; Softic, Samir; El Ouaamari, Abdelfattah; Krumpoch, Megan T; Kleinridders, Andre; Kulkarni, Rohit N; O'Neill, Brian T; Kahn, C Ronald

    2016-08-01

    To determine the roles of insulin and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) action in adipose tissue, we created mice lacking the insulin receptor (IR), IGF-1 receptor (IGF1R), or both using Cre-recombinase driven by the adiponectin promoter. Mice lacking IGF1R only (F-IGFRKO) had a ∼25% reduction in white adipose tissue (WAT) and brown adipose tissue (BAT), whereas mice lacking both IR and IGF1R (F-IR/IGFRKO) showed an almost complete absence of WAT and BAT. Interestingly, mice lacking only the IR (F-IRKO) had a 95% reduction in WAT, but a paradoxical 50% increase in BAT with accumulation of large unilocular lipid droplets. Both F-IRKO and F-IR/IGFRKO mice were unable to maintain body temperature in the cold and developed severe diabetes, ectopic lipid accumulation in liver and muscle, and pancreatic islet hyperplasia. Leptin treatment normalized blood glucose levels in both groups. Glucose levels also improved spontaneously by 1 year of age, despite sustained lipodystrophy and insulin resistance. Thus, loss of IR is sufficient to disrupt white fat formation, but not brown fat formation and/or maintenance, although it is required for normal BAT function and temperature homeostasis. IGF1R has only a modest contribution to both WAT and BAT formation and function. © 2016 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered.

  1. Insulin-independent role of adiponectin receptor signaling in Drosophila germline stem cell maintenance.

    PubMed

    Laws, Kaitlin M; Sampson, Leesa L; Drummond-Barbosa, Daniela

    2015-03-15

    Adipocytes have key endocrine roles, mediated in large part by secreted protein hormones termed adipokines. The adipokine adiponectin is well known for its role in sensitizing peripheral tissues to insulin, and several lines of evidence suggest that adiponectin might also modulate stem cells/precursors. It remains unclear, however, how adiponectin signaling controls stem cells and whether this role is secondary to its insulin-sensitizing effects or distinct. Drosophila adipocytes also function as an endocrine organ and, although no obvious adiponectin homolog has been identified, Drosophila AdipoR encodes a well-conserved homolog of mammalian adiponectin receptors. Here, we generate a null AdipoR allele and use clonal analysis to demonstrate an intrinsic requirement for AdipoR in germline stem cell (GSC) maintenance in the Drosophila ovary. AdipoR null GSCs are not fully responsive to bone morphogenetic protein ligands from the niche and have a slight reduction in E-cadherin levels at the GSC-niche junction. Conversely, germline-specific overexpression of AdipoR inhibits natural GSC loss, suggesting that reduction in adiponectin signaling might contribute to the normal decline in GSC numbers observed over time in wild-type females. Surprisingly, AdipoR is not required for insulin sensitization of the germline, leading us to speculate that insulin sensitization is a more recently acquired function than stem cell regulation in the evolutionary history of adiponectin signaling. Our findings establish Drosophila female GSCs as a new system for future studies addressing the molecular mechanisms whereby adiponectin receptor signaling modulates stem cell fate.

  2. Tissue localization of Drosophila melanogaster insulin receptor transcripts during development.

    PubMed Central

    Garofalo, R S; Rosen, O M

    1988-01-01

    The Drosophila melanogaster insulin receptor (Drosophila insulin receptor homolog [dIRH]) is similar to its mammalian counterpart in deduced amino acid sequence, subunit structure, and ligand-stimulated protein tyrosine kinase activity. The function of this receptor in D. melanogaster is not yet known. However, a role in development is suggested by the observations that levels of insulin-stimulated kinase activity and expression of dIRH mRNA are maximal during Drosophila midembryogenesis. In this study, a 2.9-kilobase (kb) cDNA clone corresponding to both the dIRH tyrosine kinase domain and some of the 3' untranslated sequence was used to determine the tissue distribution of dIRH mRNA during development. Two principal mRNAs of 11 and 8.6 kb hybridized with the dIRH cDNA in Northern (RNA) blot analysis. The abundance of the 8.6-kb mRNA increased transiently in early embryos, whereas the 11-kb species was most abundant during midembryogenesis. A similar pattern of expression was previously determined by Northern analysis, using a dIRH genomic clone (L. Petruzzelli, R. Herrera, R. Arenas-Garcia, R. Fernandez, M. J. Birnbaum, and O. M. Rosen, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 83:4710-4714, 1986). In situ hybridization revealed dIRH transcripts in the ovaries of adult flies, in which the transcripts appeared to be synthesized by nurse cells for eventual storage as maternal RNA in the mature oocyte. Throughout embryogenesis, dIRH transcripts were ubiquitously expressed, although after midembryogenesis, higher levels were detected in the developing nervous system. Nervous system expression remained elevated throughout the larval stages and persisted in the adult, in which the cortex of the brain and ganglion cells were among the most prominently labeled tissues. In larvae, the imaginal disk cells exhibited comparatively high levels of dIRH mRNA expression. The broad distribution of dIRH mRNA in embryos and imaginal disks is compatible with a role for dIRH in anabolic processes

  3. Oligomers of grape-seed procyanidin extract activate the insulin receptor and key targets of the insulin signaling pathway differently from insulin.

    PubMed

    Montagut, Gemma; Onnockx, Sheela; Vaqué, Montserrat; Bladé, Cinta; Blay, Mayte; Fernández-Larrea, Juan; Pujadas, Gerard; Salvadó, M Josepa; Arola, Lluís; Pirson, Isabelle; Ardévol, Anna; Pinent, Montserrat

    2010-06-01

    Procyanidins are bioactive flavonoid compounds from fruits and vegetables that possess insulinomimetic properties, decreasing hyperglycaemia in streptozotocin-diabetic rats and stimulating glucose uptake in insulin-sensitive cell lines. Here we show that the oligomeric structures of a grape-seed procyanidin extract (GSPE) interact and induce the autophosphorylation of the insulin receptor in order to stimulate the uptake of glucose. However, their activation differs from insulin activation and results in differences in the downstream signaling. Oligomers of GSPE phosphorylate protein kinase B at Thr308 lower than insulin does, according to the lower insulin receptor activation by procyanidins. On the other hand, they phosphorylate Akt at Ser473 to the same extent as insulin. Moreover, we found that procyanidins phosphorylate p44/p42 and p38 MAPKs much more than insulin does. These results provide further insight into the molecular signaling mechanisms used by procyanidins, pointing to Akt and MAPK proteins as key points for GSPE-activated signaling pathways. Moreover, the differences between GSPE and insulin might help us to understand the wide range of biological effects that procyanidins have. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Biphasic modulation of insulin receptor substrate-1 during goitrogenesis.

    PubMed

    Grozovsky, R; Morales, M M; Carvalho, D P

    2007-05-01

    Insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1) is the main intracellular substrate for both insulin and insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) receptors and is critical for cell mitogenesis. Thyrotropin is able to induce thyroid cell proliferation through the cyclic AMP intracellular cascade; however, the presence of either insulin or IGF-I is required for the mitogenic effect of thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) to occur. The aim of the present study was to determine whether thyroid IRS-1 content is modulated by TSH in vivo. Strikingly, hypothyroid goitrous rats, which have chronically high serum TSH levels (control, C = 2.31 +/- 0.28; methimazole (MMI) 21d = 51.02 +/- 6.02 ng/mL, N = 12 rats), when treated with 0.03% MMI in drinking water for 21 days, showed significantly reduced thyroid IRS-1 mRNA content. Since goiter was already established in these animals by MMI for 21 days, we also evaluated IRS-1 expression during goitrogenesis. Animals treated with MMI for different periods of time showed a progressive increase in thyroid weight (C = 22.18 +/- 1.21; MMI 5d = 32.83 +/- 1.48; MMI 7d = 31.1 +/- 3.25; MMI 10d = 33.8 +/- 1.25; MMI 14d = 45.5 +/- 2.56; MMI 18d = 53.0 +/- 3.01; MMI 21d = 61.9 +/- 3.92 mg, N = 9-15 animals per group) and serum TSH levels (C = 1.57 +/- 0.2; MMI 5d = 9.95 +/- 0.74; MMI 7d = 10.38 +/- 0.84; MMI 10d = 17.72 +/- 1.47; MMI 14d = 25.65 +/- 1.23; MMI 18d = 35.38 +/- 3.69; MMI 21d = 31.3 +/- 2.7 ng/mL, N = 9-15 animals per group). Thyroid IRS-1 mRNA expression increased progressively during goitrogenesis, being significantly higher by the 14th day of MMI treatment, and then started to decline, reaching the lowest values by the 21st day, when a significant reduction was detected. In the liver of these animals, however, a significant decrease of IRS-1 mRNA was detected after 14 days of MMI treatment, a mechanism probably involved in the insulin resistance that occurs in hypothyroidism. The increase in IRS-1 expression during goitrogenesis may represent

  5. Arg972 insulin receptor substrate-1 enhances tumor necrosis factor-α-induced apoptosis in osteoblasts.

    PubMed

    You, Yunhui; Liu, Shiqing; Peng, Lijuan; Long, Mei; Deng, Hongxiang; Zhao, Hongjun

    2015-07-01

    The presence of Arg972 insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1) is associated with impaired insulin/IRS-1 signaling to activate phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3K). Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), an inflammatory cytokine with a central role in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), induces apoptosis in osteoblasts, which are the principal cell type responsible for bone loss in RA. In our previous study, an association between Arg972 IRS-1 and a high risk and severity of RA was identified. In the present study, the effects of Arg972 IRS-1 and IRS-1 on TNF-α-induced apoptosis in human osteoblasts were examined. Normal and RA osteoblasts were stably transfected with Arg972 IRS-1 and IRS-1. In addition, cells were stably transduced with IRS-1-shRNA to knock down IRS1. Following stimulation with 10 nM insulin for 30 min, the stable overexpression of Arg972 IRS-1 and knock down of IRS-1 significantly decreased IRS-1-associated PI3K activity and Akt activation/phosphorylation at serine 473 (ser473) and enhanced TNF-α-induced apoptosis in normal and in RA osteoblasts. By contrast, the stable overexpression of IRS-1 significantly increased the levels of IRS-1-associated PI3K activity and Akt phosphorylation (ser473) and inhibited TNF-α-induced apoptosis, which was eliminated by pretreatment with 50 µn BJM120, a selective PI3K inhibitor, for 30 min. In conclusion, the present study provided the first evidence, to the best of our knowledge, that insulin stimulation of Arg972 IRS-1 and IRS-1 enhanced and inhibited TNF-α-induced apoptosis, respectively in normal and RA osteoblasts by a PI3K‑dependent mechanism. These findings suggest that insulin/IRS-1 signaling is important in the pathogenesis of RA.

  6. Endothelial Fcγ Receptor IIB Activation Blunts Insulin Delivery to Skeletal Muscle to Cause Insulin Resistance in Mice.

    PubMed

    Tanigaki, Keiji; Chambliss, Ken L; Yuhanna, Ivan S; Sacharidou, Anastasia; Ahmed, Mohamed; Atochin, Dmitriy N; Huang, Paul L; Shaul, Philip W; Mineo, Chieko

    2016-07-01

    Modest elevations in C-reactive protein (CRP) are associated with type 2 diabetes. We previously revealed in mice that increased CRP causes insulin resistance and mice globally deficient in the CRP receptor Fcγ receptor IIB (FcγRIIB) were protected from the disorder. FcγRIIB is expressed in numerous cell types including endothelium and B lymphocytes. Here we investigated how endothelial FcγRIIB influences glucose homeostasis, using mice with elevated CRP expressing or lacking endothelial FcγRIIB. Whereas increased CRP caused insulin resistance in mice expressing endothelial FcγRIIB, mice deficient in the endothelial receptor were protected. The insulin resistance with endothelial FcγRIIB activation was due to impaired skeletal muscle glucose uptake caused by attenuated insulin delivery, and it was associated with blunted endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) activation in skeletal muscle. In culture, CRP suppressed endothelial cell insulin transcytosis via FcγRIIB activation and eNOS antagonism. Furthermore, in knock-in mice harboring constitutively active eNOS, elevated CRP did not invoke insulin resistance. Collectively these findings reveal that by inhibiting eNOS, endothelial FcγRIIB activation by CRP blunts insulin delivery to skeletal muscle to cause insulin resistance. Thus, a series of mechanisms in endothelium that impairs insulin movement has been identified that may contribute to type 2 diabetes pathogenesis. © 2016 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered.

  7. Short-term in vivo inhibition of insulin receptor substrate-1 expression leads to insulin resistance, hyperinsulinemia, and increased adiposity.

    PubMed

    Araújo, Eliana P; De Souza, Cláudio T; Gasparetti, Alessandra L; Ueno, Mirian; Boschero, Antonio C; Saad, Mário J A; Velloso, Lício A

    2005-03-01

    Insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1) has an important role as an early intermediary between the insulin and IGF receptors and downstream molecules that participate in insulin and IGF-I signal transduction. Here we employed an antisense oligonucleotide (IRS-1AS) to inhibit whole-body expression of IRS-1 in vivo and evaluate the consequences of short-term inhibition of IRS-1 in Wistar rats. Four days of treatment with IRS-1AS reduced the expression of IRS-1 by 80, 75, and 65% (P < 0.05) in liver, skeletal muscle, and adipose tissue, respectively. This was accompanied by a 40% (P < 0.05) reduction in the constant of glucose decay during an insulin tolerance test, a 78% (P < 0.05) reduction in glucose consumption during a hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp, and a 90% (P < 0.05) increase in basal plasma insulin level. The metabolic effects produced by IRS-1AS were accompanied by a significant reduction in insulin-induced [Ser (473)] Akt phosphorylation in liver (85%, P < 0.05), skeletal muscle (40%, P < 0.05), and adipose tissue (85%, P < 0.05) and a significant reduction in insulin-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of ERK in liver (20%, P < 0.05) and skeletal muscle (30%, P < 0.05). However, insulin-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of ERK was significantly increased (60%, P < 0.05) in adipose tissue of IRS-1AS-treated rats. In rats treated with IRS-1AS for 8 d, a 100% increase (P < 0.05) in relative epididymal fat weight and a 120% (P < 0.05) increase in nuclear expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma were observed. Thus, acute inhibition of IRS-1 expression in rats leads to insulin resistance accompanied by activation of a growth-related pathway exclusively in white adipose tissue.

  8. The Impact of Low-Dose Insulin on Peripheral Nerve Insulin Receptor Signaling in Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Sugimoto, Kazuhiro; Baba, Masayuki; Suzuki, Susumu; Yagihashi, Soroku

    2013-01-01

    Background The precise mechanisms of the neuroprotective effects of insulin in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic animals remain unknown, but altered peripheral nerve insulin receptor signaling due to insulin deficiency might be one cause. Methodology and Principal Findings Diabetes was induced in 10-week-old, male Wistar rats by injecting them with STZ (45 mg/kg). They were assigned to one group that received half of an insulin implant (∼1 U/day; I-group, n = 11) or another that remained untreated (U-group, n = 10) for 6 weeks. The controls were age- and sex-matched, non-diabetic Wistar rats (C-group, n = 12). Low-dose insulin did not change haemoglobin A1c, which increased by 136% in the U-group compared with the C-group. Thermal hypoalgesia and mechanical hyperalgesia developed in the U-group, but not in the I-group. Sensory and motor nerve conduction velocities decreased in the U-group, whereas sensory nerve conduction velocity increased by 7% (p = 0.0351) in the I-group compared with the U-group. Western blots showed unaltered total insulin receptor (IR), but a 31% decrease and 3.1- and 4.0-fold increases in phosphorylated IR, p44, and p42 MAPK protein levels, respectively, in sciatic nerves from the U-group compared with the C-group. Phosphorylated p44/42 MAPK protein decreased to control levels in the I-group (p<0.0001). Conclusions and Significance Low-dose insulin deactivated p44/42 MAPK and ameliorated peripheral sensory nerve dysfunction in rats with STZ-induced diabetes. These findings support the notion that insulin deficiency per se introduces impaired insulin receptor signaling in type 1 diabetic neuropathy. PMID:24023699

  9. 4PS/insulin receptor substrate (IRS)-2 is the alternative substrate of the insulin receptor in IRS-1-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Patti, M E; Sun, X J; Bruening, J C; Araki, E; Lipes, M A; White, M F; Kahn, C R

    1995-10-20

    Insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1) is the major cytoplasmic substrate of the insulin and insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-1 receptors. Transgenic mice lacking IRS-1 are resistant to insulin and IGF-1, but exhibit significant residual insulin action which corresponds to the presence of an alternative high molecular weight substrate in liver and muscle. Recently, Sun et al. (Sun, X.-J., Wang, L.-M., Zhang, Y., Yenush, L. P., Myers, M. G., Jr., Glasheen, E., Lane, W.S., Pierce, J. H., and White, M. F. (1995) Nature 377, 173-177) purified and cloned 4PS, the major substrate of the IL-4 receptor-associated tyrosine kinase in myeloid cells, which has significant structural similarity to IRS-1. To determine if 4PS is the alternative substrate of the insulin receptor in IRS-1-deficient mice, we performed immunoprecipitation, immunoblotting, and phosphatidylinositol (PI) 3-kinase assays using specific antibodies to 4PS. Following insulin stimulation, 4PS is rapidly phosphorylated in liver and muscle, binds to the p85 subunit of PI 3-kinase, and activates the enzyme. Insulin stimulation also results in the association of 4PS with Grb 2 in both liver and muscle. In IRS-1-deficient mice, both the phosphorylation of 4PS and associated PI 3-kinase activity are enhanced, without an increase in protein expression. Immunodepletion of 4PS from liver and muscle homogenates removes most of the phosphotyrosine-associated PI 3-kinase activity in IRS-1-deficient mice. Thus, 4PS is the primary alternative substrate, i.e. IRS-2, which plays a major role in physiologic insulin signal transduction via both PI 3-kinase activation and Grb 2/Sos association. In IRS-1-deficient mice, 4PS/IRS-2 provides signal transduction to these two major pathways of insulin signaling.

  10. Understanding the Mechanism of Insulin and Insulin-Like Growth Factor (IGF) Receptor Activation by IGF-II

    PubMed Central

    Alvino, Clair L.; Ong, Shee Chee; McNeil, Kerrie A.; Delaine, Carlie; Booker, Grant W.; Wallace, John C.; Forbes, Briony E.

    2011-01-01

    Background Insulin-like growth factor-II (IGF-II) promotes cell proliferation and survival and plays an important role in normal fetal development and placental function. IGF-II binds both the insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGF-1R) and insulin receptor isoform A (IR-A) with high affinity. Interestingly both IGF-II and the IR-A are often upregulated in cancer and IGF-II acts via both receptors to promote cancer proliferation. There is relatively little known about the mechanism of ligand induced activation of the insulin (IR) and IGF-1R. The recently solved IR structure reveals a folded over dimer with two potential ligand binding pockets arising from residues on each receptor half. Site-directed mutagenesis has mapped receptor residues important for ligand binding to two separate sites within the ligand binding pocket and we have recently shown that the IGFs have two separate binding surfaces which interact with the receptor sites 1 and 2. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study we describe a series of partial IGF-1R and IR agonists generated by mutating Glu12 of IGF-II. By comparing receptor binding affinities, abilities to induce negative cooperativity and potencies in receptor activation, we provide evidence that residue Glu12 bridges the two receptor halves leading to receptor activation. Conclusions/Significance This study provides novel insight into the mechanism of receptor binding and activation by IGF-II, which may be important for the future development of inhibitors of its action for the treatment of cancer. PMID:22140443

  11. Decreased autophosphorylation of EGF receptor in insulin-deficient diabetic rats

    SciTech Connect

    Okamoto, M.; Kahn, C.R.; Maron, R.; White, M.F. )

    1988-04-01

    The authors have previously reported that despite an increase in receptor concentration, there is a decrease in autophosphorylation and tyrosine kinase activity of the insulin receptor in insulin-deficient diabetic rats. To determine if other tyrosine kinases might be altered, they have studied the epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor kinase in wheat germ agglutinin-purified, Triton X-100-solubilized liver membranes from streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats and the insulin-deficient BB rat. They find that autophosphorylation of EGF receptor is decreased in proportion to the severity of the diabetic state in STZ rats with a maximal decrease of 67%. A similar decrease in autophosphorylation was observed in diabetic BB rats that was partially normalized by insulin treatment. Separation of tryptic phosphopeptides by reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography revealed a decrease in labeling at all sites of autophosphorylation. A parallel decrease in EGF receptor phosphorylation was also found by immunoblotting with an antiphosphotyrosine antibody. EGF receptor concentration, determined by Scatchard analysis of {sup 125}I-labeled EGF binding, was decreased by 39% in the STZ rat and 27% in the diabetic BB rat. Thus autophosphorylation of EGF receptor, like that of the insulin receptor, is decreased in insulin-deficient rat liver. In the case of EGF receptor, this is due in part to a decrease in receptor number and in part to a decrease in the specific activity of the kinase.

  12. Tyrosine phosphorylation of the insulin receptor is not required for receptor internalization: studies in 2,4-dinitrophenol-treated cells

    SciTech Connect

    Backer, J.M.; Kahn, C.R.; White, M.F.

    1989-05-01

    The relation between insulin-stimulated autophosphorylation of the insulin receptor and internalization of the receptor was studied in Fao rat hepatoma cells. Treatment of Fao cells with 2,4-dinitrophenol for 45 min depleted cellular ATP by 80% and equally inhibited insulin-stimulated receptor autophosphorylation, as determined by immunoprecipitation of surface-iodinated or (/sup 32/P)phosphate-labeled cells with anti-phosphotyrosine antibody. In contrast, internalization of the insulin receptor and internalization and degradation of /sup 125/I-labeled insulin by 2,4-dinitrophenol-treated cells were normal. These data show that autophosphorylation of the insulin receptor is not required for the receptor-mediated internalization of insulin in Fao cells and suggest that insulin receptor recycling is independent of autophosphorylation.

  13. Central Resistin Overexposure Induces Insulin Resistance Through Toll-Like Receptor 4

    PubMed Central

    Benomar, Yacir; Gertler, Arieh; De Lacy, Pamela; Crépin, Delphine; Ould Hamouda, Hassina; Riffault, Laure; Taouis, Mohammed

    2013-01-01

    Resistin promotes both inflammation and insulin resistance associated with energy homeostasis impairment. However, the resistin receptor and the molecular mechanisms mediating its effects in the hypothalamus, crucial for energy homeostasis control, and key insulin-sensitive tissues are still unknown. In the current study, we report that chronic resistin infusion in the lateral cerebral ventricle of normal rats markedly affects both hypothalamic and peripheral insulin responsiveness. Central resistin treatment inhibited insulin-dependent phosphorylation of insulin receptor (IR), AKT, and extracellular signal–related kinase 1/2 associated with reduced IR expression and with upregulation of suppressor of cytokine signaling-3 and phosphotyrosine phosphatase 1B, two negative regulators of insulin signaling. Additionally, central resistin promotes the activation of the serine kinases Jun NH2-terminal kinase and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, enhances the serine phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate-1, and increases the expression of the proinflammatory cytokine interleukin-6 in the hypothalamus and key peripheral insulin-sensitive tissues. Interestingly, we also report for the first time, to our knowledge, the direct binding of resistin to Toll-like receptor (TLR) 4 receptors in the hypothalamus, leading to the activation of the associated proinflammatory pathways. Taken together, our findings clearly identify TLR4 as the binding site for resistin in the hypothalamus and bring new insight into the molecular mechanisms involved in resistin-induced inflammation and insulin resistance in the whole animal. PMID:22961082

  14. Differences in the sites of phosphorylation of the insulin receptor in vivo and in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    White, M.F.; Takayama, S.; Kahn, C.R.

    1985-08-05

    Phosphorylation of the insulin receptor was studied in intact well differentiated hepatoma cells (Fao) and in a solubilized and partially purified receptor preparation obtained from these cells by affinity chromatography on wheat germ agglutinin agarose. Tryptic peptides containing the phosphorylation sites of the beta-subunit of the insulin receptor were analyzed by reverse-phase high performance liquid chromatography. Phosphoamino acid content of these peptides was determined by acid hydrolysis and high voltage electrophoresis. Separation of the phosphopeptides from unstimulated Fao cells revealed one major and two minor phosphoserine-containing peptides and a single minor phosphothreonine-containing peptide. Insulin (10(-7) M) increased the phosphorylation of the beta-subunit of the insulin receptor 3- to 4-fold in the intact Fao cell. After insulin stimulation, two phosphotyrosine-containing peptides were identified. Tyrosine phosphorylation reached a steady state within 20 s after the addition of insulin and remained nearly constant for 1 h. Under our experimental conditions, no significant change in the amount of (TSP)phosphoserine or (TSP)phosphothreonine associated with the beta-subunit was found during the initial response of cells to insulin. When the insulin receptor was extracted from the Fao cells and incubated in vitro with (gamma-TSP)ATP and MnS , very little phosphorylation occurred in the absence of insulin.

  15. Quantitative Proteomics of Intestinal Mucosa From Male Mice Lacking Intestinal Epithelial Insulin Receptors.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Stina Rikke; Schoof, Erwin M; Wheeler, Sarah E; Hvid, Henning; Ahnfelt-Rønne, Jonas; Hansen, Bo Falck; Nishimura, Erica; Olsen, Grith Skytte; Kislinger, Thomas; Brubaker, Patricia L

    2017-08-01

    The goal of the present study was to determine whether loss of the insulin receptor alters the molecular landscape of the intestinal mucosa, using intestinal-epithelial insulin receptor knockout (IE-irKO) mice and both genetic (IRfl/fl and Villin-cre) controls. Quantitative proteomic analysis by liquid chromatography mass spectrometry was applied to jejunal and colonic mucosa from mice fed a normal chow diet and mice fed a Western diet (WD). Jejunal mucosa from IE-irKO mice demonstrated alterations in all intestinal cell lineages: Paneth, goblet, absorptive, and enteroendocrine cells. Only goblet and absorptive cells were affected in the colon. Also, a marked effect of WD consumption was found on the gut proteome. A substantial reduction was detected in Paneth cell proteins with antimicrobial activity, including lysozyme C-1, angiogenin-4, cryptdin-related sequence 1C-3 and -2, α-defensin 17, and intelectin-1a. The key protein expressed by goblet cells, mucin-2, was also reduced in the IE-irKO mice. Proteins involved in lipid metabolism, including aldose reductase-related protein 1, 15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase, apolipoprotein A-II, and pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase isozyme 4, were increased in the mucosa of WD-fed IE-irKO mice compared with controls. In contrast, expression of the nutrient-responsive gut hormones, glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide and neurotensin, was reduced in the jejunal mucosa of IE-irKO mice, and the expression of proteins of the P-type adenosine triphosphatases and the solute carrier-transporter family was reduced in the colon of WD-fed IE-irKO mice. In conclusion, IE-irKO mice display a distinct molecular phenotype, suggesting a biological role of insulin and its receptor in determining differentiated cell specificity in the intestinal epithelium. Copyright © 2017 Endocrine Society.

  16. Nerve Growth Factor Receptor TrkA, a New Receptor in Insulin Signaling Pathway in PC12 Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Geetha, Thangiah; Rege, Shraddha D.; Mathews, Salome E.; Meakin, Susan O.; White, Morris F.; Babu, Jeganathan Ramesh

    2013-01-01

    TrkA is a cell surface transmembrane receptor tyrosine kinase for nerve growth factor (NGF). TrkA has an NPXY motif and kinase regulatory loop similar to insulin receptor (INSR) suggesting that NGF→TrkA signaling might overlap with insulin→INSR signaling. During insulin or NGF stimulation TrkA, insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1), INSR (and presumably other proteins) forms a complex in PC12 cells. In PC12 cells, tyrosine phosphorylation of INSR and IRS-1 is dependent upon the functional TrkA kinase domain. Moreover, expression of TrkA kinase-inactive mutant blocked the activation of Akt and Erk5 in response to insulin or NGF. Based on these data, we propose that TrkA participates in insulin signaling pathway in PC12 cells. PMID:23749991

  17. Nerve growth factor receptor TrkA, a new receptor in insulin signaling pathway in PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Geetha, Thangiah; Rege, Shraddha D; Mathews, Salome E; Meakin, Susan O; White, Morris F; Babu, Jeganathan Ramesh

    2013-08-16

    TrkA is a cell surface transmembrane receptor tyrosine kinase for nerve growth factor (NGF). TrkA has an NPXY motif and kinase regulatory loop similar to insulin receptor (INSR) suggesting that NGF→TrkA signaling might overlap with insulin→INSR signaling. During insulin or NGF stimulation TrkA, insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1), INSR (and presumably other proteins) forms a complex in PC12 cells. In PC12 cells, tyrosine phosphorylation of INSR and IRS-1 is dependent upon the functional TrkA kinase domain. Moreover, expression of TrkA kinase-inactive mutant blocked the activation of Akt and Erk5 in response to insulin or NGF. Based on these data, we propose that TrkA participates in insulin signaling pathway in PC12 cells.

  18. In situ autoradiography and ligand-dependent tyrosine kinase activity reveal insulin receptors and insulin-like growth factor I receptors in prepancreatic chicken embryos.

    PubMed Central

    Girbau, M; Bassas, L; Alemany, J; de Pablo, F

    1989-01-01

    We previously reported specific cross-linking of 125I-labeled insulin and 125I-labeled insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) to the alpha subunit of their respective receptors in chicken embryos of 20 somites and older. To achieve adequate sensitivity and localize spatially the receptors in younger embryos, we adapted an autoradiographic technique using whole-mounted chicken blastoderms. Insulin receptors and IGF-I receptors were expressed and could be localized as early as gastrulation, before the first somite is formed. Relative density was analyzed by a computer-assisted image system, revealing overall slightly higher binding of IGF-I than of insulin. Structures rich in both types of receptors were predominantly of ectodermal origin: Hensen's node in gastrulating embryos and neural folds, neural tube and optic vesicles during neurulation. The signal transduction capability of the receptors in early organogenesis was assessed by their ability to phosphorylate the exogenous substrate poly(Glu80Tyr20). Ligand-dependent tyrosine phosphorylation was demonstrable with both insulin and IGF-I in glycoprotein-enriched preparations from embryos at days 2 through 6 of embryogenesis. There was a developmentally regulated change in ligand-dependent tyrosine kinase activity, with a sharp increase from day 2 to day 4, in contrast with a small increase in the ligand binding. Binding of 125I-labeled IGF-I was, with the solubilized receptors, severalfold higher than binding of 125I-labeled insulin. However, the insulin-dependent phosphorylation was as high as the IGF-I-dependent phosphorylation at each developmental stage. Images PMID:2548191

  19. Nuclear Receptors Resolve Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress to Improve Hepatic Insulin Resistance

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Chronic endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress culminating in proteotoxicity contributes to the development of insulin resistance and progression to type 2 diabetes mellitus. Pharmacologic interventions targeting several different nuclear receptors have emerged as potential treatments for insulin resistance. The mechanistic basis for these antidiabetic effects has primarily been attributed to multiple metabolic and inflammatory functions. Here we review recent advances in our understanding of the association of ER stress with insulin resistance and the role of nuclear receptors in promoting ER stress resolution and improving insulin resistance in the liver. PMID:28236381

  20. Functionally significant insulin-like growth factor I receptor mutations in centenarians

    PubMed Central

    Suh, Yousin; Atzmon, Gil; Cho, Mi-Ook; Hwang, David; Liu, Bingrong; Leahy, Daniel J.; Barzilai, Nir; Cohen, Pinchas

    2008-01-01

    Rather than being a passive, haphazard process of wear and tear, lifespan can be modulated actively by components of the insulin/insulin-like growth factor I (IGFI) pathway in laboratory animals. Complete or partial loss-of-function mutations in genes encoding components of the insulin/IGFI pathway result in extension of life span in yeasts, worms, flies, and mice. This remarkable conservation throughout evolution suggests that altered signaling in this pathway may also influence human lifespan. On the other hand, evolutionary tradeoffs predict that the laboratory findings may not be relevant to human populations, because of the high fitness cost during early life. Here, we studied the biochemical, phenotypic, and genetic variations in a cohort of Ashkenazi Jewish centenarians, their offspring, and offspring-matched controls and demonstrated a gender-specific increase in serum IGFI associated with a smaller stature in female offspring of centenarians. Sequence analysis of the IGF1 and IGF1 receptor (IGF1R) genes of female centenarians showed overrepresentation of heterozygous mutations in the IGF1R gene among centenarians relative to controls that are associated with high serum IGFI levels and reduced activity of the IGFIR as measured in transformed lymphocytes. Thus, genetic alterations in the human IGF1R that result in altered IGF signaling pathway confer an increase in susceptibility to human longevity, suggesting a role of this pathway in modulation of human lifespan. PMID:18316725

  1. Adipocyte Dynamics and Reversible Metabolic Syndrome in Mice with an Inducible Adipocyte-Specific Deletion of the Insulin Receptor.

    PubMed

    Sakaguchi, Masaji; Fujisaka, Shiho; Cai, Weikang; Winnay, Jonathon N; Konishi, Masahiro; O'Neill, Brian T; Li, Mengyao; García-Martín, Rubén; Takahashi, Hirokazu; Hu, Jiang; Kulkarni, Rohit N; Kahn, C Ronald

    2017-02-07

    Insulin and IGF1 signaling are important for adipose tissue development and function; however, their role in mature adipocytes is unclear. Mice with a tamoxifen-inducible knockout of insulin and/or IGF1 receptors (IR/IGF1R) demonstrate a rapid loss of white and brown fat due to increased lipolysis and adipocyte apoptosis. This results in insulin resistance, glucose intolerance, hepatosteatosis, islet hyperplasia with hyperinsulinemia, and cold intolerance. This phenotype, however, resolves over 10-30 days due to a proliferation of preadipocytes and rapid regeneration of both brown and white adipocytes as identified by mTmG lineage tracing. This cycle can be repeated with a second round of receptor inactivation. Leptin administration prior to tamoxifen treatment blocks development of the metabolic syndrome without affecting adipocyte loss or regeneration. Thus, IR is critical in adipocyte maintenance, and this loss of adipose tissue stimulates regeneration of brown/white fat and reversal of metabolic syndrome associated with fat loss. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Knockout of Vasohibin-1 Gene in Mice Results in Healthy Longevity with Reduced Expression of Insulin Receptor, Insulin Receptor Substrate 1, and Insulin Receptor Substrate 2 in Their White Adipose Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Takeda, Eichi; Suzuki, Yasuhiro; Yamada, Tetsuya; Katagiri, Hideki

    2017-01-01

    Vasohibin-1 (Vash1), originally isolated as an endothelium-derived angiogenesis inhibitor, has a characteristic of promoting stress tolerance in endothelial cells (ECs). We therefore speculated that the lack of the vash1 gene would result in a short lifespan. However, to our surprise, vash1−/− mice lived significantly longer with a milder senescence phenotype than wild-type (WT) mice. We sought the cause of this healthy longevity and found that vash1−/− mice exhibited mild insulin resistance along with reduced expression of the insulin receptor (insr), insulin receptor substrate 1 (irs-1), and insulin receptor substrate 2 (irs-2) in their white adipose tissue (WAT) but not in their liver or skeletal muscle. The expression of vash1 dominated in the WAT among those 3 organs. Importantly, vash1−/− mice did not develop diabetes even when fed a high-fat diet. These results indicate that the expression of vash1 was required for the normal insulin sensitivity of the WAT and that the target molecules for this activity were insr, irs1, and irs2. The lack of vash1 caused mild insulin resistance without the outbreak of overt diabetes and might contribute to healthy longevity. PMID:28367331

  3. Regulation of insulin-like growth factor II receptors by growth hormone and insulin in rat adipocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Loennroth, P.; Assmundsson, K.; Eden, S.; Enberg, G.; Gause, I.; Hall, K.; Smith, U.

    1987-06-01

    The acute and long-term effects of growth hormone (GH) on the binding of insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II) were evaluated in adipose cells from hypophysectomized rats given replacement therapy with thyroxine and hydrocortisone and in cells from their sham-operated littermates. After the cells were incubated with insulin and/or GH, the recycling of /sup 125/I-labeled IGF-II receptors was metabolically inhibited by treating the cells with KCN. IGF-II binding was 100 +/- 20% higher in cells from GH-deficient animals when compared with sham-operated controls. These GH-deficient cells also showed an increased sensitivity for insulin as compared with control cells (the EC/sub 50/ for insulin was 0.06 ng/ml in GH-deficient cells and 0.3 ng/ml in control cells.). However, the maximal incremental effect of insulin on IGH-II binding was reduced approx. = 27% by hypophysectomy. GH added to the incubation medium increased the number of IGF-II binding sites by 100 +/- 18% in cells from hypophysectomized animals. This increase was rapidly induced, but the time course was slower than that for the stimulatory effect of insulin. Half-maximal effect of GH on IGF-II binding was obtained at approx. = 30 ng/ml. Thus, GH added in vitro exerted a rapid insulin-like effect on the number of IGH-II receptors. GH also appears to play a regulating role for maintaining the cellular number of IGH-II receptors and, in addition, modulates the stimulatory effect of insulin on IGF-II binding.

  4. The R3 receptor-like protein tyrosine phosphatase subfamily inhibits insulin signalling by dephosphorylating the insulin receptor at specific sites.

    PubMed

    Shintani, Takafumi; Higashi, Satoru; Takeuchi, Yasushi; Gaudio, Eugenio; Trapasso, Francesco; Fusco, Alfredo; Noda, Masaharu

    2015-09-01

    The autophosphorylation of specific tyrosine residues occurs in the cytoplasmic region of the insulin receptor (IR) upon insulin binding, and this in turn initiates signal transduction. The R3 subfamily (Ptprb, Ptprh, Ptprj and Ptpro) of receptor-like protein tyrosine phosphatases (RPTPs) is characterized by an extracellular region with 6-17 fibronectin type III-like repeats and a cytoplasmic region with a single phosphatase domain. We herein identified the IR as a substrate for R3 RPTPs by using the substrate-trapping mutants of R3 RPTPs. The co-expression of R3 RPTPs with the IR in HEK293T cells suppressed insulin-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of the IR. In vitro assays using synthetic phosphopeptides revealed that R3 RPTPs preferentially dephosphorylated a particular phosphorylation site of the IR: Y960 in the juxtamembrane region and Y1146 in the activation loop. Among four R3 members, only Ptprj was co-expressed with the IR in major insulin target tissues, such as the skeletal muscle, liver and adipose tissue. Importantly, the activation of IR and Akt by insulin was enhanced, and glucose and insulin tolerance was improved in Ptprj-deficient mice. These results demonstrated Ptprj as a physiological enzyme that attenuates insulin signalling in vivo, and indicate that an inhibitor of Ptprj may be an insulin-sensitizing agent. © The Authors 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Japanese Biochemical Society. All rights reserved.

  5. Molecular Basis of Signaling Specificity of Insulin and IGF Receptors: Neglected Corners and Recent Advances

    PubMed Central

    Siddle, Kenneth

    2011-01-01

    Insulin and insulin-like growth factor (IGF) receptors utilize common phosphoinositide 3-kinase/Akt and Ras/extracellular signal-regulated kinase signaling pathways to mediate a broad spectrum of “metabolic” and “mitogenic” responses. Specificity of insulin and IGF action in vivo must in part reflect expression of receptors and responsive pathways in different tissues but it is widely assumed that it is also determined by the ligand binding and signaling mechanisms of the receptors. This review focuses on receptor-proximal events in insulin/IGF signaling and examines their contribution to specificity of downstream responses. Insulin and IGF receptors may differ subtly in the efficiency with which they recruit their major substrates (IRS-1 and IRS-2 and Shc) and this could influence effectiveness of signaling to “metabolic” and “mitogenic” responses. Other substrates (Grb2-associated binder, downstream of kinases, SH2Bs, Crk), scaffolds (RACK1, β-arrestins, cytohesins), and pathways (non-receptor tyrosine kinases, phosphoinositide kinases, reactive oxygen species) have been less widely studied. Some of these components appear to be specifically involved in “metabolic” or “mitogenic” signaling but it has not been shown that this reflects receptor-preferential interaction. Very few receptor-specific interactions have been characterized, and their roles in signaling are unclear. Signaling specificity might also be imparted by differences in intracellular trafficking or feedback regulation of receptors, but few studies have directly addressed this possibility. Although published data are not wholly conclusive, no evidence has yet emerged for signaling mechanisms that are specifically engaged by insulin receptors but not IGF receptors or vice versa, and there is only limited evidence for differential activation of signaling mechanisms that are common to both receptors. Cellular context, rather than intrinsic receptor activity, therefore appears

  6. Insulin and Metabolic Stress Stimulate Multisite Serine/Threonine Phosphorylation of Insulin Receptor Substrate 1 and Inhibit Tyrosine Phosphorylation*

    PubMed Central

    Hançer, Nancy J.; Qiu, Wei; Cherella, Christine; Li, Yedan; Copps, Kyle D.; White, Morris F.

    2014-01-01

    IRS1 and IRS2 are key substrates of the insulin receptor tyrosine kinase. Mass spectrometry reveals more than 50 phosphorylated IRS1 serine and threonine residues (Ser(P)/Thr(P) residues) in IRS1 from insulin-stimulated cells or human tissues. We investigated a subset of IRS1 Ser(P)/Thr(P) residues using a newly developed panel of 25 phospho-specific monoclonal antibodies (αpS/TmAbIrs1). CHO cells overexpressing the human insulin receptor and rat IRS1 were stimulated with insulin in the absence or presence of inhibitors of the PI3K → Akt → mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) → S6 kinase or MEK pathways. Nearly all IRS1 Ser(P)/Thr(P) residues were stimulated by insulin and significantly suppressed by PI3K inhibition; fewer were suppressed by Akt or mTOR inhibition, and none were suppressed by MEK inhibition. Insulin-stimulated Irs1 tyrosine phosphorylation (Tyr(P)Irs1) was enhanced by inhibition of the PI3K → Akt → mTOR pathway and correlated with decreased Ser(P)-302Irs1, Ser(P)-307Irs1, Ser(P)-318Irs1, Ser(P)-325Irs1, and Ser(P)-346Irs1. Metabolic stress modeled by anisomycin, thapsigargin, or tunicamycin increased many of the same Ser(P)/Thr(P) residues as insulin, some of which (Ser(P)-302Irs1, Ser(P)-307Irs1, and four others) correlated significantly with impaired insulin-stimulated Tyr(P)Irs1. Thus, IRS1 Ser(P)/Thr(P) is an integrated response to insulin stimulation and metabolic stress, which associates with reduced Tyr(P)Irs1 in CHOIR/IRS1 cells. PMID:24652289

  7. Insulin and metabolic stress stimulate multisite serine/threonine phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate 1 and inhibit tyrosine phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Hançer, Nancy J; Qiu, Wei; Cherella, Christine; Li, Yedan; Copps, Kyle D; White, Morris F

    2014-05-02

    IRS1 and IRS2 are key substrates of the insulin receptor tyrosine kinase. Mass spectrometry reveals more than 50 phosphorylated IRS1 serine and threonine residues (Ser(P)/Thr(P) residues) in IRS1 from insulin-stimulated cells or human tissues. We investigated a subset of IRS1 Ser(P)/Thr(P) residues using a newly developed panel of 25 phospho-specific monoclonal antibodies (αpS/TmAb(Irs1)). CHO cells overexpressing the human insulin receptor and rat IRS1 were stimulated with insulin in the absence or presence of inhibitors of the PI3K → Akt → mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) → S6 kinase or MEK pathways. Nearly all IRS1 Ser(P)/Thr(P) residues were stimulated by insulin and significantly suppressed by PI3K inhibition; fewer were suppressed by Akt or mTOR inhibition, and none were suppressed by MEK inhibition. Insulin-stimulated Irs1 tyrosine phosphorylation (Tyr(P)(Irs1)) was enhanced by inhibition of the PI3K → Akt → mTOR pathway and correlated with decreased Ser(P)-302(Irs1), Ser(P)-307(Irs1), Ser(P)-318(Irs1), Ser(P)-325(Irs1), and Ser(P)-346(Irs1). Metabolic stress modeled by anisomycin, thapsigargin, or tunicamycin increased many of the same Ser(P)/Thr(P) residues as insulin, some of which (Ser(P)-302(Irs1), Ser(P)-307(Irs1), and four others) correlated significantly with impaired insulin-stimulated Tyr(P)(Irs1). Thus, IRS1 Ser(P)/Thr(P) is an integrated response to insulin stimulation and metabolic stress, which associates with reduced Tyr(P)(Irs1) in CHO(IR)/IRS1 cells.

  8. The effects of digestive enzymes on characteristics of placental insulin receptor. Comparison of particulate and soluble receptor preparations.

    PubMed Central

    Clark, S; DeLuise, M; Larkins, R G; Melick, R A; Harrison, L C

    1978-01-01

    The role of the surrounding membrane structure on the binding characteristics of the insulin receptor was studied by using several digestive enzymes. The effects observed with particulate membrane preparations are compared with those from soluble receptor preparations. beta-Galactosidase and neuraminidase had no effect on insulin binding to either particulate or soluble receptors from human placentae. Exposure to 2 units of phospholipase C/ml increased insulin binding to particulate membranes, but was without effect on the soluble receptor preparation. The increase in binding to particulate membranes was shown to be due to an increase in apparent receptor number. After 5 min exposure to 500 microgram of trypsin/ml there was an increase in insulin binding to the particulate membrane fraction, owing to an increase in receptor affinity. After 15 min exposure to this amount of trypsin, binding decreased, owing to a progressive decrease in receptor availability. In contrast, this concentration of trypsin had no effect on the solubilized receptor preparation. Because of the differential effects of phospholipase C and trypsin on the particulate compared with the solubilized receptor preparations, it is concluded that the effects of these enzymes were due to an effect on the surrounding membrane structure. Changes in receptor configuration due to alterations within the adjoining membrane provide a potential mechanism for mediating short-term alterations in receptor function. PMID:100106

  9. Effects of weight loss and insulin reduction on arterial stiffness in the SAVE trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Chronic arterial stiffness contributes to the negative health effects of obesity and insulin resistance, which include hypertension, stroke, and increased cardiovascular and all-cause mortality. Weight loss and improved insulin sensitivity are individually associated with improved central arterial stiffness; however, their combined effects on arterial stiffness are poorly understood. The purpose of this study was to determine how insulin levels modify the improvements in arterial stiffness seen with weight loss in overweight and obese young adults. Methods To assess the effects of weight loss and decreased fasting insulin on vascular stiffness, we studied 339 participants in the Slow the Adverse Effects of Vascular Aging (SAVE) trial. At study entry, the participants were aged 20–45, normotensive, non-diabetic, and had a body-mass index of 25–39.9 kg/m2. Measures of pulse wave velocity (PWV) in the central (carotid-femoral (cfPWV)), peripheral (femoral-ankle (faPWV)), and mixed (brachial-ankle (baPWV)) vascular beds were collected at baseline and 6 months. The effects of 6-month change in weight and insulin on measures of PWV were estimated using multivariate regression. Results After adjustment for baseline risk factors and change in systolic blood pressure, 6-month weight loss and 6-month change in fasting insulin independently predicted improvement in baPWV but not faPWV or cfPWV. There was a significant interaction between 6-month weight change and change in fasting insulin when predicting changes in baPWV (p < 0.001). Individuals experiencing both weight loss and insulin reductions showed the greatest improvement in baPWV. Conclusions Young adults with excess weight who both lower their insulin levels and lose weight see the greatest improvement in vascular stiffness. This improvement in vascular stiffness with weight loss and insulin declines may occur throughout the vasculature and may not be limited to individual vascular beds. Trial

  10. Insulin Dissociates the Effects of Liver X Receptor on Lipogenesis, Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress, and Inflammation*

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xiaowei; Haas, Mary E.; Miao, Ji; Mehta, Abhiruchi; Graham, Mark J.; Crooke, Rosanne M.; de Barros, Jean-Paul Pais; Wang, Jian-Guo; Aikawa, Masanori; Masson, David; Biddinger, Sudha B.

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes is characterized by increased lipogenesis as well as increased endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and inflammation. The nuclear hormone receptor liver X receptor (LXR) is induced by insulin and is a key regulator of lipid metabolism. It promotes lipogenesis and cholesterol efflux, but suppresses endoplasmic reticulum stress and inflammation. The goal of these studies was to dissect the effects of insulin on LXR action. We used antisense oligonucleotides to knock down Lxrα in mice with hepatocyte-specific deletion of the insulin receptor and their controls. We found, surprisingly, that knock-out of the insulin receptor and knockdown of Lxrα produced equivalent, non-additive effects on the lipogenic genes. Thus, insulin was unable to induce the lipogenic genes in the absence of Lxrα, and LXRα was unable to induce the lipogenic genes in the absence of insulin. However, insulin was not required for LXRα to modulate the phospholipid profile, or to suppress genes in the ER stress or inflammation pathways. These data show that insulin is required specifically for the lipogenic effects of LXRα and that manipulation of the insulin signaling pathway could dissociate the beneficial effects of LXR on cholesterol efflux, inflammation, and ER stress from the negative effects on lipogenesis. PMID:26511317

  11. Insulin Dissociates the Effects of Liver X Receptor on Lipogenesis, Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress, and Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiaowei; Haas, Mary E; Miao, Ji; Mehta, Abhiruchi; Graham, Mark J; Crooke, Rosanne M; Pais de Barros, Jean-Paul; Wang, Jian-Guo; Aikawa, Masanori; Masson, David; Biddinger, Sudha B

    2016-01-15

    Diabetes is characterized by increased lipogenesis as well as increased endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and inflammation. The nuclear hormone receptor liver X receptor (LXR) is induced by insulin and is a key regulator of lipid metabolism. It promotes lipogenesis and cholesterol efflux, but suppresses endoplasmic reticulum stress and inflammation. The goal of these studies was to dissect the effects of insulin on LXR action. We used antisense oligonucleotides to knock down Lxrα in mice with hepatocyte-specific deletion of the insulin receptor and their controls. We found, surprisingly, that knock-out of the insulin receptor and knockdown of Lxrα produced equivalent, non-additive effects on the lipogenic genes. Thus, insulin was unable to induce the lipogenic genes in the absence of Lxrα, and LXRα was unable to induce the lipogenic genes in the absence of insulin. However, insulin was not required for LXRα to modulate the phospholipid profile, or to suppress genes in the ER stress or inflammation pathways. These data show that insulin is required specifically for the lipogenic effects of LXRα and that manipulation of the insulin signaling pathway could dissociate the beneficial effects of LXR on cholesterol efflux, inflammation, and ER stress from the negative effects on lipogenesis. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  12. Adipose tissue INSR splicing in humans associates with fasting insulin level and is regulated by weight loss.

    PubMed

    Kaminska, Dorota; Hämäläinen, Maija; Cederberg, Henna; Käkelä, Pirjo; Venesmaa, Sari; Miettinen, Pekka; Ilves, Imre; Herzig, Karl-Heinz; Kolehmainen, Marjukka; Karhunen, Leila; Kuusisto, Johanna; Gylling, Helena; Laakso, Markku; Pihlajamäki, Jussi

    2014-02-01

    The insulin receptor (INSR) has two protein isoforms based on alternative splicing of exon 11. INSR-A promotes cell growth whereas INSR-B predominantly regulates glucose homeostasis. In this study we investigated whether weight loss regulates INSR alternative splicing and the expression of splicing factors in adipose tissue. To determine the relative ratio of the INSR splice variants, we implemented the PCR-capillary electrophoresis method with adipose tissue samples from two weight-loss-intervention studies, the Kuopio Obesity Surgery study (KOBS, n = 108) and a very low calorie diet (VLCD) intervention (n = 32), and from the population-based Metabolic Syndrome in Men study (METSIM, n = 49). Expression of INSR-B mRNA variant increased in response to weight loss induced by both bariatric surgery (p = 1 × 10(-5)) and the VLCD (p = 1 × 10(-4)). The adipose tissue expression of INSR-B correlated negatively with fasting insulin levels in the pooled data of the three studies (p = 3 × 10(-22)). Finally, expression of several splicing factors correlated negatively with the expression of the INSR-B variant. The strongest correlation was with HNRNPA1 (p = 1 × 10(-5)), a known regulator of INSR exon 11 splicing. INSR splicing is regulated by weight loss and associates with insulin levels. The effect of weight loss on INSR splicing could be mediated by changes in the expression of splicing factors.

  13. Involvement of Insulin Receptor Substrate 2 in Mammary Tumor Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Nagle, Julie A.; Ma, Zhefu; Byrne, Maura A.; White, Morris F.; Shaw, Leslie M.

    2004-01-01

    The insulin receptor substrate (IRS) proteins are adaptor molecules that integrate signals generated by receptors that are implicated in human breast cancer. We investigated the specific contribution of IRS-2 to mammary tumor progression using transgenic mice that express the polyoma virus middle T antigen (PyV-MT) in the mammary gland and IRS-2-null (IRS-2−/−) mice. PyV-MT-induced tumor initiation and growth were similar in wild-type (WT) and IRS-2−/− mice. However, the latency and incidence of metastasis were significantly decreased in the absence of IRS-2 expression. The contribution of IRS-2 to metastasis is intrinsic to the tumor cells, because IRS-2−/− mammary tumor cells did not metastasize when grown orthotopically in the mammary fat pads of WT mice. WT and IRS-2−/− tumors contained similar numbers of mitotic cells, but IRS-2−/− tumors had a higher incidence of apoptosis than did WT tumors. In vitro, IRS-2−/− mammary tumor cells were less invasive and more apoptotic in response to growth factor deprivation than their WT counterparts. In contrast, IRS-1−/− tumor cells, which express only IRS-2, were highly invasive and were resistant to apoptotic stimuli. Collectively, our findings reveal an important contribution of IRS-2 to breast cancer metastasis. PMID:15509777

  14. Pleiotropic effects of insulin and GLP-1 receptor agonists: Potential benefits of the association.

    PubMed

    Cariou, B

    2015-12-01

    The combination of basal insulin and glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists (GLP-1RAs) is an emerging option for patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D). GLP-1RAs have been shown to improve glycaemic control with a low risk of hypoglycaemia and to promote body weight loss. However, GLP-1 receptors (GLP-1Rs) are widely expressed in extrapancreatic tissues and could sustain pleiotropic actions of GLP-1RAs beyond glycaemic control. The underlying molecular mechanisms maintaining these extrapancreatic actions of GLP-1 are complex, and involve GLP-1R signalling in both the brain and several peripheral tissues. The present review focuses specifically on the role of GLP-1RAs in the cardiovascular system and liver. Preclinical data in rodents and pilot studies in humans suggest that GLP-1RAs may have potential beneficial effects on heart function, blood pressure, postprandial lipaemia, liver steatosis and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Long-term studies are now warranted to determine the safety and clinical relevance of the association between insulin and GLP-1RAs in T2D.

  15. Arsenite and insulin exhibit opposing effects on epidermal growth factor receptor and keratinocyte proliferative potential

    SciTech Connect

    Patterson, Timothy J.; Rice, Robert H. . E-mail: rhrice@ucdavis.edu

    2007-05-15

    Previous work has suggested that arsenic exposure contributes to skin carcinogenesis by preserving the proliferative potential of human epidermal keratinocytes, thereby slowing the exit of putative target stem cells into the differentiation pathway. To find a molecular basis for this action, present work has explored the influence of arsenite on keratinocyte responses to epidermal growth factor (EGF). The ability of cultured keratinocytes to found colonies upon passaging several days after confluence was preserved by arsenite and EGF in an additive fashion, but neither was effective when the receptor tyrosine kinase activity was inhibited. Arsenite prevented the loss of EGF receptor protein and phosphorylation of tyrosine 1173, preserving its capability to signal. The level of nuclear {beta}-catenin was higher in cells treated with arsenite and EGF in parallel to elevated colony forming ability, and expression of a dominant negative {beta}-catenin suppressed the increase in both colony forming ability and yield of putative stem cells induced by arsenite and EGF. As judged by expression of three genes regulated by {beta}-catenin, this transcription factor had substantially higher activity in the arsenite/EGF-treated cells. Trivalent antimony exhibited the same effects as arsenite. A novel finding is that insulin in the medium induced the loss of EGF receptor protein, which was largely prevented by arsenite exposure.

  16. Monoclonal antibodies to the insulin receptor stimulate the intrinsic tyrosine kinase activity by cross-linking receptor molecules.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, R M; Soos, M A; Siddle, K

    1987-12-20

    The effect of monoclonal anti-insulin receptor antibodies on the intrinsic kinase activity of solubilized receptor was investigated. Antibodies for six distinct epitopes stimulated receptor autophosphorylation and kinase activity towards exogenous substrates. This effect of antibodies was seen only within a narrow concentration range and monovalent antibody fragments were ineffective. Evidence was obtained by sucrose density-gradient centrifugation for the formation of antibody-receptor complexes which involved both inter- and intra-molecular cross-linking, although stimulation of autophosphorylation appeared to be preferentially associated with the latter. There was partial additivity between the effects of insulin and antibodies in stimulating autophosphorylation, although the sites of phosphorylation appeared identical on two-dimensional peptide maps. Antibodies for two further epitopes failed to activate receptor kinase, but inhibited its stimulation by insulin. The effects of antibodies on kinase activity paralleled their metabolic effects on adipocytes, except for one antibody which was potently insulin-like in its metabolic effects, but which antagonized insulin stimulation of kinase activity. It is concluded that antibodies activate the receptor by cross-linking subunits rather than by reacting at specific epitopes. The ability of some antibodies to activate receptor may depend on receptor environment as well as the disposition of epitopes.

  17. RNA metabolism in myotonic dystrophy: patient muscle shows decreased insulin receptor RNA and protein consistent with abnormal insulin resistance.

    PubMed Central

    Morrone, A; Pegoraro, E; Angelini, C; Zammarchi, E; Marconi, G; Hoffman, E P

    1997-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy is a dominantly inherited clinically variable multisystemic disorder, and has been found to be caused by heterozygosity for a trinucleotide repeat expansion mutation in the 3' untranslated region of a protein kinase gene (DM kinase). The mechanisms by which the expanded repeat in DNA results in a dominant biochemical defect and the varied clinical phenotype, is not known. We have recently proposed a model where disease pathogenesis may occur at the RNA level in myotonic dystrophy: the mutant DM kinase RNA with the expansion mutation may disrupt cellular RNA metabolism in some general manner, as evidenced by defects in RNA processing of the normal DM kinase gene in heterozygous patients (dominant negative RNA mutation). Here we further test this hypothesis by measuring RNA metabolism of other genes in patient muscle biopsies (nine adult onset myotonic dystrophy patients, two congenital muscular dystrophy patients, four normal controls, and four myopathic controls). We focused on the insulin receptor gene because of the documented insulin resistance of DM patients. We show that there is a significant decrease in insulin receptor RNA in both total RNA and RNA polyA+ pools relative to normal and myopathic control muscles (P < 0.002), measured relative to both dystrophin RNA and muscle sodium channel RNA. We also show reductions in insulin receptor protein. Our results reinforce the concept of a generalized RNA metabolism defect in myotonic dystrophy, and offer a possible molecular mechanism for the increased insulin resistance observed in many myotonic dystrophy patients. PMID:9120013

  18. Effects of sleep restriction on glucose control and insulin secretion during diet-induced weight loss

    PubMed Central

    Nedeltcheva, A. V.; Imperial, J. G.; Penev, P. D.

    2012-01-01

    Insufficient sleep is associated with changes in glucose tolerance, insulin secretion, and insulin action. Despite widespread use of weight-loss diets for metabolic risk reduction, the effects of insufficient sleep on glucose regulation in overweight dieters are not known. To examine the consequences of recurrent sleep restriction on 24-hour blood glucose control during diet-induced weight loss, 10 overweight and obese adults (3F/7M; mean [SD] age 41 [5] y; BMI 27.4 [2.0] kg/m2) completed two 14-day treatments with hypocaloric diet and 8.5 or 5.5-h nighttime sleep opportunity in random order 7 [3] months apart. Oral and intravenous glucose tolerance test (IVGTT) data, fasting lipids and free-fatty acids (FFA), and 24-hour blood glucose, insulin, C-peptide, and counter-regulatory hormone measurements were collected after each treatment. Participants had comparable weight loss (1.0 [0.3] BMI units) during each treatment. Bedtime restriction reduced sleep by 131 [30] min/day. Recurrent sleep curtailment decreased 24-hour serum insulin concentrations (i.e. enhanced 24-hour insulin economy) without changes in oral glucose tolerance and 24-hour glucose control. This was accompanied by a decline in fasting blood glucose, increased fasting FFA which suppressed normally following glucose ingestion, and lower total and LDL cholesterol concentrations. Sleep-loss-related changes in counter-regulatory hormone secretion during the IVGTT limited the utility of the test in this study. In conclusion, sleep restriction enhanced 24-hour insulin economy without compromising glucose homeostasis in overweight individuals placed on a balanced hypocaloric diet. The changes in fasting blood glucose, insulin, lipid and FFA concentrations in sleep-restricted dieters resembled the pattern of human metabolic adaptation to reduced carbohydrate availability. PMID:22513492

  19. Insulin stimulates the biosynthesis of chiro-inositol-containing phospholipids in a rat fibroblast line expressing the human insulin receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Pak, Y; Paule, C R; Bao, Y D; Huang, L C; Larner, J

    1993-01-01

    HIRc-B cells (rat fibroblasts expressing the human insulin receptor) were incubated with myo-[3H]inositol for 48 hr, and the biosynthesis of chiro-[3H]inositol was investigated in the absence and presence of insulin following a time course up to 60 min. After phase separation, treatment with insulin for 15 min caused a 2.2-fold increase in the specific radioactivity of chiro-[3H]inositol-containing phospholipids in contrast to a 1.2-fold increase in the specific radioactivity of myo-[3H]inositol-containing phospholipids. No insulin-mediated change in the specific radioactivity was observed in the inositol phosphates or free inositols. Further detailed analysis of individual [3H]inositol-containing phospholipids demonstrated marked increases in specific activity of the chiro-[3H]inositol phospholipids after 15 min of incubation with insulin: phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate and 4,5-bisphosphate, 4.2-fold; lysophosphatidylinositol, 1.5-fold; phosphatidylinositol, 3.2-fold. In contrast, myo-[3H]inositol-containing phospholipids demonstrated relatively small increases (1.1- to 1.4-fold) after 5 min of incubation with insulin. These findings indicate that insulin stimulates de novo synthesis of chiro-inositol-containing phospholipids at the inositol phospholipid level. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:8356081

  20. Sulfonylurea Receptor 1 Mutations That Cause Opposite Insulin Secretion Defects with Chemical Chaperone Exposure*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Pratt, Emily B.; Yan, Fei-Fei; Gay, Joel W.; Stanley, Charles A.; Shyng, Show-Ling

    2009-01-01

    The β-cell ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channel composed of sulfonylurea receptor SUR1 and potassium channel Kir6.2 serves a key role in insulin secretion regulation by linking glucose metabolism to cell excitability. Mutations in SUR1 or Kir6.2 that decrease channel function are typically associated with congenital hyperinsulinism, whereas those that increase channel function are associated with neonatal diabetes. Here we report that two hyperinsulinism-associated SUR1 missense mutations, R74W and E128K, surprisingly reduce channel inhibition by intracellular ATP, a gating defect expected to yield the opposite disease phenotype neonatal diabetes. Under normal conditions, both mutant channels showed poor surface expression due to retention in the endoplasmic reticulum, accounting for the loss of channel function phenotype in the congenital hyperinsulinism patients. This trafficking defect, however, could be corrected by treating cells with the oral hypoglycemic drugs sulfonylureas, which we have shown previously to act as small molecule chemical chaperones for KATP channels. The R74W and E128K mutants thus rescued to the cell surface paradoxically exhibited ATP sensitivity 6- and 12-fold lower than wild-type channels, respectively. Further analyses revealed a nucleotide-independent decrease in mutant channel intrinsic open probability, suggesting the mutations may reduce ATP sensitivity by causing functional uncoupling between SUR1 and Kir6.2. In insulin-secreting cells, rescue of both mutant channels to the cell surface led to hyperpolarized membrane potentials and reduced insulin secretion upon glucose stimulation. Our results show that sulfonylureas, as chemical chaperones, can dictate manifestation of the two opposite insulin secretion defects by altering the expression levels of the disease mutants. PMID:19151370

  1. Sulfonylurea receptor 1 mutations that cause opposite insulin secretion defects with chemical chaperone exposure.

    PubMed

    Pratt, Emily B; Yan, Fei-Fei; Gay, Joel W; Stanley, Charles A; Shyng, Show-Ling

    2009-03-20

    The beta-cell ATP-sensitive potassium (K(ATP)) channel composed of sulfonylurea receptor SUR1 and potassium channel Kir6.2 serves a key role in insulin secretion regulation by linking glucose metabolism to cell excitability. Mutations in SUR1 or Kir6.2 that decrease channel function are typically associated with congenital hyperinsulinism, whereas those that increase channel function are associated with neonatal diabetes. Here we report that two hyperinsulinism-associated SUR1 missense mutations, R74W and E128K, surprisingly reduce channel inhibition by intracellular ATP, a gating defect expected to yield the opposite disease phenotype neonatal diabetes. Under normal conditions, both mutant channels showed poor surface expression due to retention in the endoplasmic reticulum, accounting for the loss of channel function phenotype in the congenital hyperinsulinism patients. This trafficking defect, however, could be corrected by treating cells with the oral hypoglycemic drugs sulfonylureas, which we have shown previously to act as small molecule chemical chaperones for K(ATP) channels. The R74W and E128K mutants thus rescued to the cell surface paradoxically exhibited ATP sensitivity 6- and 12-fold lower than wild-type channels, respectively. Further analyses revealed a nucleotide-independent decrease in mutant channel intrinsic open probability, suggesting the mutations may reduce ATP sensitivity by causing functional uncoupling between SUR1 and Kir6.2. In insulin-secreting cells, rescue of both mutant channels to the cell surface led to hyperpolarized membrane potentials and reduced insulin secretion upon glucose stimulation. Our results show that sulfonylureas, as chemical chaperones, can dictate manifestation of the two opposite insulin secretion defects by altering the expression levels of the disease mutants.

  2. Receptors for and effects of insulin and IGF-I in rat glomerular mesangial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Arnqvist, H.J.; Ballermann, B.J.; King, G.L. Univ. of Linkoping )

    1988-03-01

    Receptors for and biological effects of insulin and insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) were studied in cultured rat renal mesangial cells. Specific binding of {sup 125}I-IGF was over 200-fold greater than the specific binding of {sup 125}I-insulin. Fifty percent inhibition of {sup 126}I-insulin binding was obtained with 8 {times} 10{sup {minus}9} M unlabeled insulin. For {sup 125}I-IGF-I, 50% inhibition required 1.8 {times} 10{sup {minus}9} M unlabeled IGF-I. {sup 125}I-IGF-I was also displaced by IGF-II and insulin but at 10- and 100-fold lower potencies, respectively, than IGF-I. Cross-linking of {sup 125}I-insulin and {sup 125}I-IGF-I to their receptors, using disuccinimidyl suberate (DSS), and identification of the receptor with sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and autoradiography showed a band with a molecular mass of 135 kDa, probably corresponding to the {alpha}-subunit of the insulin receptor and a major band with a molecular mass of 145 kDa for the {alpha}-subunit of the IGF-I receptor. Both insulin and IGF-I stimulated the incorporation of ({sup 3}H)thymidine into DNA. A half-maximal effect was obtained at 1.6 {times} 10{sup {minus}8} M for insulin and 1.2 {times} 10{sup {minus}9} M for IGF-I. No additive effect on DNA synthesis was observed. Insulin at 8 {times} 10{sup {minus}10} M increased the accumulation of ({sup 14}C)glucose in mesangial cells, whereas IGF-I was 10-fold less potent.

  3. Insulin/receptor binding: the last piece of the puzzle? What recent progress on the structure of the insulin/receptor complex tells us (or not) about negative cooperativity and activation.

    PubMed

    De Meyts, Pierre

    2015-04-01

    Progress in solving the structure of insulin bound to its receptor has been slow and stepwise, but a milestone has now been reached with a refined structure of a complex of insulin with a "microreceptor" that contains the primary binding site. The insulin receptor is a dimeric allosteric enzyme that belongs to the family of receptor tyrosine kinases. The insulin binding process is complex and exhibits negative cooperativity. Biochemical evidence suggested that insulin, through two distinct binding sites, crosslinks two receptor sites located on each α subunit. The structure of the unliganded receptor ectodomain showed a symmetrical folded-over conformation with an antiparallel disposition. Further work resolved the detailed structure of receptor site 1, both without and with insulin. Recently, a missing piece in the puzzle was added: the C-terminal portion of insulin's B-chain known to be critical for binding and negative cooperativity. Here I discuss these findings and their implications.

  4. Expression, receptor binding, and biophysical characterization of guinea pig insulin desB30: a monomeric insulin variant.

    PubMed

    Engholm, Ebbe; Hansen, Thomas H; Johansson, Eva; Strauss, Holger M; Vinther, Tine N; Jensen, Knud J; Hubálek, Frantisek; Kjeldsen, Thomas B

    2015-04-13

    Here we report, for the first time, the heterologous expression of desB30 guinea pig insulin (GI desB30) in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The affinities of GI desB30 for the insulin receptor A and the IGF-I receptor were also quantified for the first time. Small-angle X-ray scattering and analytical ultracentrifugation studies confirmed that GI desB30 did not form dimers or hexamers, in contrast to human insulin. Size-exclusion chromatography connected to inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry revealed that GI desB30 has affinity towards several divalent metal ions. These studies did not indicate the formation of any larger structures of GI desB30 in the presence of various divalent metal ions, but did indicate that GI desB30 has an affinity towards Mn, Co, and Cu ions. Finally, the low affinity for the insulin receptor and the very low affinity for the IGF-I receptor by GI desB30 were quantified. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Adipose tissue monomethyl branched chain fatty acids and insulin sensitivity: effects of obesity and weight loss

    PubMed Central

    Su, Xiong; Magkos, Faidon; Zhou, Dequan; Eagon, J. Christopher; Fabbrini, Elisa; Okunade, Adewole L.; Klein, Samuel

    2014-01-01

    Objective An increase in circulating branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) is associated with insulin resistance. Adipose tissue is a potentially important site for BCAA metabolism. We evaluated whether monomethyl branched chain fatty acids (mmBCFA) in adipose tissue, which are likely derived from BCAA catabolism, are associated with insulin sensitivity. Design and Methods Insulin-stimulated glucose disposal was determined by using the hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp procedure with stable isotope glucose tracer infusion, in 9 lean and 9 obese subjects, and in a separate group of 9 obese subjects before and 1 year after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) surgery (38% weight loss). Adipose tissue mmBCFA content was measured in tissue biopsies taken in the basal state. Results Total adipose tissue mmBCFA content was ~30% lower in obese than lean subjects (P = 0.02), and increased by ~65% after weight loss in the RYGB group (P = 0.01). Adipose tissue mmBCFA content correlated positively with skeletal muscle insulin sensitivity (R2 = 35%, P = 0.01, n = 18). Conclusions These results demonstrate a novel association between adipose tissue mmBCFA content and obesity-related insulin resistance. Additional studies are needed to determine whether the association between adipose tissue mmBCFA and muscle insulin sensitivity is causal or a simple association. PMID:25328153

  6. Differential Effects of Camel Milk on Insulin Receptor Signaling – Toward Understanding the Insulin-Like Properties of Camel Milk

    PubMed Central

    Abdulrahman, Abdulrasheed O.; Ismael, Mohammad A.; Al-Hosaini, Khaled; Rame, Christelle; Al-Senaidy, Abdulrahman M.; Dupont, Joëlle; Ayoub, Mohammed Akli

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies on the Arabian camel (Camelus dromedarius) showed beneficial effects of its milk reported in diverse models of human diseases, including a substantial hypoglycemic activity. However, the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in such effects remain completely unknown. In this study, we hypothesized that camel milk may act at the level of human insulin receptor (hIR) and its related intracellular signaling pathways. Therefore, we examined the effect of camel milk on the activation of hIR transiently expressed in human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK293) cells using bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) technology. BRET was used to assess, in live cells and real-time, the physical interaction between hIR and insulin receptor signaling proteins (IRS1) and the growth factor receptor-bound protein 2 (Grb2). Our data showed that camel milk did not promote any increase in the BRET signal between hIR and IRS1 or Grb2 in the absence of insulin stimulation. However, it significantly potentiated the maximal insulin-promoted BRET signal between hIR and Grb2 but not IRS1. Interestingly, camel milk appears to differentially impact the downstream signaling since it significantly activated ERK1/2 and potentiated the insulin-induced ERK1/2 but not Akt activation. These observations are to some extent consistent with the BRET data since ERK1/2 and Akt activation are known to reflect the engagement of Grb2 and IRS1 pathways, respectively. The preliminary fractionation of camel milk suggests the peptide/protein nature of the active component in camel milk. Together, our study demonstrates for the first time an allosteric effect of camel milk on insulin receptor conformation and activation with differential effects on its intracellular signaling. These findings should help to shed more light on the hypoglycemic activity of camel milk with potential therapeutic applications. PMID:26858689

  7. Differential Effects of Camel Milk on Insulin Receptor Signaling - Toward Understanding the Insulin-Like Properties of Camel Milk.

    PubMed

    Abdulrahman, Abdulrasheed O; Ismael, Mohammad A; Al-Hosaini, Khaled; Rame, Christelle; Al-Senaidy, Abdulrahman M; Dupont, Joëlle; Ayoub, Mohammed Akli

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies on the Arabian camel (Camelus dromedarius) showed beneficial effects of its milk reported in diverse models of human diseases, including a substantial hypoglycemic activity. However, the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in such effects remain completely unknown. In this study, we hypothesized that camel milk may act at the level of human insulin receptor (hIR) and its related intracellular signaling pathways. Therefore, we examined the effect of camel milk on the activation of hIR transiently expressed in human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK293) cells using bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) technology. BRET was used to assess, in live cells and real-time, the physical interaction between hIR and insulin receptor signaling proteins (IRS1) and the growth factor receptor-bound protein 2 (Grb2). Our data showed that camel milk did not promote any increase in the BRET signal between hIR and IRS1 or Grb2 in the absence of insulin stimulation. However, it significantly potentiated the maximal insulin-promoted BRET signal between hIR and Grb2 but not IRS1. Interestingly, camel milk appears to differentially impact the downstream signaling since it significantly activated ERK1/2 and potentiated the insulin-induced ERK1/2 but not Akt activation. These observations are to some extent consistent with the BRET data since ERK1/2 and Akt activation are known to reflect the engagement of Grb2 and IRS1 pathways, respectively. The preliminary fractionation of camel milk suggests the peptide/protein nature of the active component in camel milk. Together, our study demonstrates for the first time an allosteric effect of camel milk on insulin receptor conformation and activation with differential effects on its intracellular signaling. These findings should help to shed more light on the hypoglycemic activity of camel milk with potential therapeutic applications.

  8. Hepatocyte Toll-like receptor 4 regulates obesity-induced inflammation and insulin resistance

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Chronic low-grade inflammation is a hallmark of obesity and thought to contribute to the development of obesity-related insulin resistance. Toll-like receptor 4 (Tlr4) is a key mediator of pro-inflammatory responses. Mice lacking Tlr4s are protected from diet-induced insulin resistance and inflammat...

  9. Options for intensification of basal insulin in type 2 diabetes: Premeal insulin or short-acting GLP-1 receptor agonists?

    PubMed

    Darmon, P; Raccah, D

    2015-12-01

    Type 2 diabetes is an evolutive disease with a progressive defect of beta-cell insulin secretion. This characteristic points to a need for treatment that takes into account such a natural history. When oral antidiabetic drugs fail to achieve the patient's target HbA1c level, basal insulin treatment is usually initiated and titrated in association with oral drugs to manage fasting hyperglycaemia. Over a period of time, it is enough to simply achieve the HbA1c target. However, when even a good fasting blood glucose level is no longer sufficient to control overall glycaemia, then prandial treatment must be combined with the titrated basal insulin to deal with the postprandial hyperglycaemia responsible for the elevation of HbA1c. Of the different therapeutic options now available for this, rapid-acting insulins and GLP-1 receptor agonists (RAs) can be used. Rapid-acting insulins can be added either at each meal, achieving full insulin supplementation with a basal-bolus regimen, or at the main meal only as a "basal-plus" regimen. Compared with the full basal-bolus, the basal-plus strategy is associated with fewer injections, yet provides similar efficacy in terms of HbA1c improvement, but with less weight gain and lower hypoglycaemic risk. As for GLP-1 RAs, numerous studies, and especially those using short-acting GLP-1 RAs, have demonstrated more pronounced effects on postprandial hyperglycaemia, good complementary effects with basal insulin, and significant improvement of HbA1c with no weight gain and a low risk of hypoglycaemia. Similarly, direct and indirect comparisons of the use of rapid-acting insulins and GLP-1 RAs to intensify basal insulin have shown comparable efficacy in terms of HbA1c control, but with less weight gain and fewer hypoglycaemic episodes with GLP-1 RAs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Changes in subcutaneous fat cell volume and insulin sensitivity after weight loss.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Daniel P; Eriksson Hogling, Daniel; Thorell, Anders; Toft, Eva; Qvisth, Veronica; Näslund, Erik; Thörne, Anders; Wirén, Mikael; Löfgren, Patrik; Hoffstedt, Johan; Dahlman, Ingrid; Mejhert, Niklas; Rydén, Mikael; Arner, Erik; Arner, Peter

    2014-07-01

    Large subcutaneous fat cells associate with insulin resistance and high risk of developing type 2 diabetes. We investigated if changes in fat cell volume and fat mass correlate with improvements in the metabolic risk profile after bariatric surgery in obese patients. Fat cell volume and number were measured in abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue in 62 obese women before and 2 years after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB). Regional body fat mass by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry; insulin sensitivity by hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp; and plasma glucose, insulin, and lipid profile were assessed. RYGB decreased body weight by 33%, which was accompanied by decreased adipocyte volume but not number. Fat mass in the measured regions decreased and all metabolic parameters were improved after RYGB (P < 0.0001). Whereas reduced subcutaneous fat cell size correlated strongly with improved insulin sensitivity (P = 0.0057), regional changes in fat mass did not, except for a weak correlation between changes in visceral fat mass and insulin sensitivity and triglycerides. The curve-linear relationship between fat cell size and fat mass was altered after weight loss (P = 0.03). After bariatric surgery in obese women, a reduction in subcutaneous fat cell volume associates more strongly with improvement of insulin sensitivity than fat mass reduction per se. An altered relationship between adipocyte size and fat mass may be important for improving insulin sensitivity after weight loss. Fat cell size reduction could constitute a target to improve insulin sensitivity. © 2014 by the American Diabetes Association.

  11. Characterization of a second ligand binding site of the insulin receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Hao Caili; Whittaker, Linda; Whittaker, Jonathan . E-mail: jonathan.whittaker@case.edu

    2006-08-18

    Insulin binding to its receptor is characterized by high affinity, curvilinear Scatchard plots, and negative cooperativity. These properties may be the consequence of binding of insulin to two receptor binding sites. The N-terminal L1 domain and the C-terminus of the {alpha} subunit contain one binding site. To locate a second site, we examined the binding properties of chimeric receptors in which the L1 and L2 domains and the first Fibronectin Type III repeat of the insulin-like growth factor-I receptor were replaced by corresponding regions of the insulin receptor. Substitutions of the L2 domain and the first Fibronectin Type III repeat together with the L1 domain produced 80- and 300-fold increases in affinity for insulin. Fusion of these domains to human immunoglobulin Fc fragment produced a protein which bound insulin with a K {sub d} of 2.9 nM. These data strongly suggest that these domains contain an insulin binding site.

  12. Insulin

    MedlinePlus

    ... Information by Audience For Women Women's Health Topics Insulin Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... medicines. You can do it. Back to Top Insulin Safety Tips Never drink insulin. Do not share ...

  13. Role of β-Adrenergic Receptor Regulation of TNF-α and Insulin Signaling in Retinal Müller Cells

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Robert J.; Anderson, Nancy M.; Jiang, Youde; Bahouth, Suleiman

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. The goal of this study was to determine the relationship of TNF-α and the downregulation of insulin receptor signaling in retinal Müller cells cultured under hyperglycemic conditions and the role of β-adrenergic receptors in regulating these responses. Methods. Retinal Müller cells were cultured in normal (5 mM) or high (25 mM) glucose until 80% confluent and then were reduced to 2% serum for 18 to 24 hours. The cells were then treated with 10 μM salmeterol followed by Western blot analysis or ELISA. For TNF-α inhibitory studies, the cells were treated with 5 ng/mL of TNF-α for 30 minutes or by a 30-minute pretreatment with TNF-α followed by salmeterol for 6 hours. In the TNF-α short hairpin (sh)RNA experiments, the cells were cultured until 90% confluent, followed by transfection with TNF-α shRNA for 18 hours. Results. TNF-α-only treatments of Müller cells resulted in significant decreases of tyrosine phosphorylation of the insulin receptor and Akt in high-glucose conditions. Salmeterol (10 μM), a β-2-adrenergic receptor agonist, significantly increased phosphorylation of both insulin receptor and Akt. TNF-α shRNA significantly decreased phosphorylation of IRS-1Ser307, which was further decreased after salmeterol+TNF-α shRNA. Both TNF-α shRNA and salmeterol significantly reduced death of the retinal Müller cells. Conclusions. These studies demonstrate that β-adrenergic receptor agonists in vitro can restore the loss of insulin receptor activity noted in diabetes. By decreasing the levels of TNF-α and decreasing the phosphorylation of IRS-1Ser307 while increasing tyrosine phosphorylation of insulin receptor, these results suggest a possible mechanism by which restoration of β-adrenergic receptor signaling may protect the retina against diabetes-induced damage. PMID:22110065

  14. Decreased Insulin Receptors but Normal Glucose Metabolism in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Pirro, Roberto; Lauro, Renato; Testa, Ivano; Ferretti, Ginofabrizio; de Martinis, Carlo; Dellantonio, Renzo

    1982-04-01

    Compared to matched controls, 17 patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy showed decreased insulin binding to monocytes due to decreased receptor concentration. These patients showed no signs of altered glucose metabolism and retrospective analysis of the clinical records of a further 56 such patients revealed no modification in carbohydrate metabolism. These data suggest that reduced insulin receptor number does not produce overt modifications of glucose metabolism in Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

  15. Antibodies to the. cap alpha. -subunit of insulin receptor from eggs of immunized hens

    SciTech Connect

    Song, C.; Yu, J.; Bai, D.H.; Hester, P.Y.; Kim, K.

    1985-11-01

    Simple methods for the generation, purification, and assay of antibodies to the ..cap alpha..-subunit of insulin receptor from eggs of immunized hen have been described. Chicken antibodies against the ..cap alpha..-subunit inhibit insulin binding to the receptor and stimulate glucose oxidation as well as autophosphorylation of the ..beta..-subunit. Thus the properties of chicken antibodies are very similar to those of antibodies found in human autoimmune diseases and different from rabbit antibodies obtained against the same antigen.

  16. Restoration of insulin secretion in pancreatic islets of protein-deficient rats by reduced expression of insulin receptor substrate (IRS)-1 and IRS-2.

    PubMed

    Araujo, E P; Amaral, M E C; Filiputti, E; De Souza, C T; Laurito, T L; Augusto, V D; Saad, M J A; Boschero, A C; Velloso, L A; Carneiro, E M

    2004-04-01

    Autocrine and paracrine insulin signaling may participate in the fine control of insulin secretion. In the present study, tissue distribution and protein amounts of the insulin receptor and its major substrates, insulin receptor substrate (IRS)-1 and IRS-2, were evaluated in a model of impaired glucose-induced insulin secretion, the protein-deficient rat. Immunoblot and RT-PCR studies showed that the insulin receptor and IRS-2 expression are increased, whilst IRS-1 protein and mRNA contents are decreased in pancreatic islets of protein-deficient rats. Immunohistochemical studies revealed that the insulin receptor and IRS-1 and -2 are present in the great majority of islet cells; however, the greatest staining was localized at the periphery, suggesting a co-localization with non-insulin-secreting cells. Exogenous insulin stimulation of isolated islets promoted higher insulin receptor and IRS-1 and -2 tyrosine phosphorylation in islets from protein-deficient rats, as compared with controls. Moreover, insulin-induced IRS-1- and IRS-2-associated phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase activity are increased in islets of protein-deficient rats. The reduction of IRS-1 and IRS-2 protein expression in islets isolated from protein-deficient rats by the use of antisense IRS-1 or IRS-2 phosphorthioate-modified oligonucleotides partially restored glucose-induced insulin secretion. Thus, the impairment of insulin cell signaling through members of the IRS family of proteins in isolated rat pancreatic islets improves glucose-induced insulin secretion. The present data reinforced the role of insulin paracrine and autocrine signaling in the control of its own secretion.

  17. Designing peptide inhibitor of insulin receptor to induce diabetes mellitus type 2 in animal model Mus musculus.

    PubMed

    Permatasari, Galuh W; Utomo, Didik H; Widodo

    2016-10-01

    A designing peptide as agent for inducing diabetes mellitus type 2 (T2DM) in an animal model is challenging. The computational approach provides a sophisticated tool to design a functional peptide that may block the insulin receptor activity. The peptide that able to inhibit the binding between insulin and insulin receptor is a warrant for inducing T2DM. Therefore, we designed a potential peptide inhibitor of insulin receptor as an agent to generate T2DM animal model by bioinformatics approach. The peptide has been developed based on the structure of insulin receptor binding site of insulin and then modified it to obtain the best properties of half life, hydrophobicity, antigenicity, and stability binding into insulin receptor. The results showed that the modified peptide has characteristics 100h half-life, high-affinity -95.1±20, and high stability 28.17 in complex with the insulin receptor. Moreover, the modified peptide has molecular weight 4420.8g/Mol and has no antigenic regions. Based on the molecular dynamic simulation, the complex of modified peptide-insulin receptor is more stable than the commercial insulin receptor blocker. This study suggested that the modified peptide has the promising performance to block the insulin receptor activity that potentially induce diabetes mellitus type 2 in mice. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Design of an insulin analog with enhanced receptor binding selectivity: rationale, structure, and therapeutic implications.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ming; Wan, Zhu-li; Whittaker, Linda; Xu, Bin; Phillips, Nelson B; Katsoyannis, Panayotis G; Ismail-Beigi, Faramarz; Whittaker, Jonathan; Weiss, Michael A

    2009-11-13

    Insulin binds with high affinity to the insulin receptor (IR) and with low affinity to the type 1 insulin-like growth factor (IGF) receptor (IGFR). Such cross-binding, which reflects homologies within the insulin-IGF signaling system, is of clinical interest in relation to the association between hyperinsulinemia and colorectal cancer. Here, we employ nonstandard mutagenesis to design an insulin analog with enhanced affinity for the IR but reduced affinity for the IGFR. Unnatural amino acids were introduced by chemical synthesis at the N- and C-capping positions of a recognition alpha-helix (residues A1 and A8). These sites adjoin the hormone-receptor interface as indicated by photocross-linking studies. Specificity is enhanced more than 3-fold on the following: (i) substitution of Gly(A1) by D-Ala or D-Leu, and (ii) substitution of Thr(A8) by diaminobutyric acid (Dab). The crystal structure of [D-Ala(A1),Dab(A8)]insulin, as determined within a T(6) zinc hexamer to a resolution of 1.35 A, is essentially identical to that of human insulin. The nonstandard side chains project into solvent at the edge of a conserved receptor-binding surface shared by insulin and IGF-I. Our results demonstrate that modifications at this edge discriminate between IR and IGFR. Because hyperinsulinemia is typically characterized by a 3-fold increase in integrated postprandial insulin concentrations, we envisage that such insulin analogs may facilitate studies of the initiation and progression of cancer in animal models. Future development of clinical analogs lacking significant IGFR cross-binding may enhance the safety of insulin replacement therapy in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus at increased risk of colorectal cancer.

  19. Structural insights into ligand-induced activation of the insulin receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, C.; Lawrence, M.; Streltsov, V.; Garrett, T.; McKern, N.; Lou, M.-Z.; Lovrecz, G.; Adams, T.

    2008-04-29

    The current model for insulin binding to the insulin receptor proposes that there are two binding sites, referred to as sites 1 and 2, on each monomer in the receptor homodimer and two binding surfaces on insulin, one involving residues predominantly from the dimerization face of insulin (the classical binding surface) and the other residues from the hexamerization face. High-affinity binding involves one insulin molecule using its two surfaces to make bridging contacts with site 1 from one receptor monomer and site 2 from the other. Whilst the receptor dimer has two identical site 1-site 2 pairs, insulin molecules cannot bridge both pairs simultaneously. Our structures of the insulin receptor (IR) ectodomain dimer and the L1-CR-L2 fragments of IR and insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGF-1R) explain many of the features of ligand-receptor binding and allow the two binding sites on the receptor to be described. The IR dimer has an unexpected folded-over conformation which places the C-terminal surface of the first fibronectin-III domain in close juxtaposition to the known L1 domain ligand-binding surface suggesting that the C-terminal surface of FnIII-1 is the second binding site involved in high-affinity binding. This is very different from previous models based on three-dimensional reconstruction from scanning transmission electron micrographs. Our single-molecule images indicate that IGF-1R has a morphology similar to that of IR. In addition, the structures of the first three domains (L1-CR-L2) of the IR and IGF-1R show that there are major differences in the two regions governing ligand specificity. The implications of these findings for ligand-induced receptor activation will be discussed. This review summarizes the key findings regarding the discovery and characterization of the insulin receptor, the identification and arrangement of its structural domains in the sequence and the key features associated with ligand binding. The remainder of the review

  20. Loss of prion protein is associated with the development of insulin resistance and obesity.

    PubMed

    de Brito, Giovanna; Lupinacci, Fernanda C; Beraldo, Flávio H; Santos, Tiago G; Roffé, Martín; Lopes, Marilene H; de Lima, Vladmir C; Martins, Vilma R; Hajj, Glaucia N

    2017-08-17

    Prion protein (PrP(C)) was initially described due to its involvement in transmissible spongiform encephalopathies. It was subsequently demonstrated to be a cell surface molecule involved in many physiological processes, such as vesicle trafficking. Here, we investigated the roles of PrP(C) in the response to insulin and obesity development. Two independent PrP(C) knockout (KO) and one PrP(C) overexpressing (TG20) mouse models were fed high-fat diets, and the development of insulin resistance and obesity was monitored. PrP(C) KO mice fed high-fat diets presented all of the symptoms associated with the development of insulin resistance: hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, and obesity. Conversely, TG20 animals fed high-fat diets showed reduced weight and insulin resistance. Accordingly, the expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) was reduced in PrP(C) KO mice and increased in TG20 animals. PrP(C) KO cells also presented reduced glucose uptake upon insulin stimulation, due to reduced translocation of the glucose transporter Glut4. Thus, our results suggest that PrP(C) reflects susceptibility to the development of insulin resistance and metabolic syndrome. © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  1. Activation of transforming potential of the human insulin receptor gene

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, L.H.; Lin, B.; Jong, S.M.J.; Dixon, D.; Ellis, L.; Roth, R.A.; Rutter, W.J.

    1987-08-01

    A retrovirus containing part of the human insulin receptor (hIR) gene was constructed by replacing ros sequences in the avian sarcoma virus UR2 with hIR cDNA sequences coding for 46 amino acids of the extracellular domain and the entire transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains of the ..beta.. subunit of hIR. The resulting virus, named UIR, contains the hIR sequence fused to the 5' portion of the UR2 gag gene coding for p19. UIR is capable of transforming chicken embryo fibroblasts and promoting formation of colonies in soft agar; however, it does not form tumors in vivo. A variant that arose from the parental UIR is capable of efficiently inducing sarcomas in vivo. UIR-transformed cells exhibit higher rates of glucose uptake and growth than normal cells. The 4-kilobase UIR genome codes for a membrane-associated, glycosylated gag-hIR fusion protein of 75 kDa designated P75/sup gag-hir/. P75/sup gag-hir/ contains a protein tyrosine kinase activity that is capable of undergoing autophosphorylation and of phosphorylating foreign substrates in vitro; it is phosphorylated at both serine and tyrosine residues in vivo

  2. Novel method demonstrates differential ligand activation and phosphatase-mediated deactivation of insulin receptor tyrosine-specific phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Cieniewicz, Anne M; Cooper, Philip R; McGehee, Jennifer; Lingham, Russell B; Kihm, Anthony J

    2016-08-01

    Insulin receptor signaling is a complex cascade leading to a multitude of intracellular functional responses. Three natural ligands, insulin, IGF1 and IGF2, are each capable of binding with different affinities to the insulin receptor, and result in variable biological responses. However, it is likely these affinity differences alone cannot completely explain the myriad of diverse cellular outcomes. Ligand binding initiates activation of a signaling cascade resulting in phosphorylation of the IR itself and other intracellular proteins. The direct catalytic activity along with the temporally coordinated assembly of signaling proteins is critical for insulin receptor signaling. We hypothesized that determining differential phosphorylation among individual tyrosine sites activated by ligand binding or dephosphorylation by phosphatases could provide valuable insight into insulin receptor signaling. Here, we present a sensitive, novel immunoassay adapted from Meso Scale Discovery technology to quantitatively measure changes in site-specific phosphorylation levels on endogenous insulin receptors from HuH7 cells. We identified insulin receptor phosphorylation patterns generated upon differential ligand activation and phosphatase-mediated deactivation. The data demonstrate that insulin, IGF1 and IGF2 elicit different insulin receptor phosphorylation kinetics and potencies that translate to downstream signaling. Furthermore, we show that insulin receptor deactivation, regulated by tyrosine phosphatases, occurs distinctively across specific tyrosine residues. In summary, we present a novel, quantitative and high-throughput assay that has uncovered differential ligand activation and site-specific deactivation of the insulin receptor. These results may help elucidate some of the insulin signaling mechanisms, discriminate ligand activity and contribute to a better understanding of insulin receptor signaling. We propose this methodology as a powerful approach to characterize

  3. Insulin-receptor activity in nondiabetic and diabetic urbanized South African black women.

    PubMed

    Panz, V R; Joffe, B I; Wing, J R; Raal, F J; Seftel, H C

    1992-02-01

    To evaluate insulin receptor binding characteristics of urbanized South African black women with normal glucose tolerance and of patients with newly diagnosed untreated non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM). Four groups of 10 subjects each were selected by the following criteria: group A, young (20-39 yr) nonobese (body mass index [BMI] 19.0-24.9 kg/m2) nondiabetic women; group B, middle-aged (40-60 yr) nonobese nondiabetic women; group C, middle-aged obese (BMI greater than 30.0 kg/m2) nondiabetic women; and group D, middle-aged obese newly diagnosed but untreated female patients with NIDDM. Insulin binding to monocyte receptors was determined by radioreceptor assay. Fasting plasma samples were analyzed for glucose, insulin, C-peptide, and nonesterified fatty acids. In the four groups studied, maximum specific binding and receptor concentration were highest in group A, with a progressive and significant decrease in values through groups B and C to group D. Significant inverse correlations were obtained between maximum specific binding, 50% inhibition dose, and total receptor concentration on the one hand and glucose, insulin, and NEFA on the other. Our study of urban South African black women showed decreasing insulin-receptor activity with obesity and glucose intolerance. In patients with NIDDM, hyperglycemia and beta-cell dysfunction were associated with a reduction in receptor concentration. In this regard, our findings in South African blacks are consistent with results of similar studies of NIDDM in other communities.

  4. Structure of the insulin receptor ectodomain reveals a folded-over conformation.

    PubMed

    McKern, Neil M; Lawrence, Michael C; Streltsov, Victor A; Lou, Mei-Zhen; Adams, Timothy E; Lovrecz, George O; Elleman, Thomas C; Richards, Kim M; Bentley, John D; Pilling, Patricia A; Hoyne, Peter A; Cartledge, Kellie A; Pham, Tam M; Lewis, Jennifer L; Sankovich, Sonia E; Stoichevska, Violet; Da Silva, Elizabeth; Robinson, Christine P; Frenkel, Maurice J; Sparrow, Lindsay G; Fernley, Ross T; Epa, V Chandana; Ward, Colin W

    2006-09-14

    The insulin receptor is a phylogenetically ancient tyrosine kinase receptor found in organisms as primitive as cnidarians and insects. In higher organisms it is essential for glucose homeostasis, whereas the closely related insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGF-1R) is involved in normal growth and development. The insulin receptor is expressed in two isoforms, IR-A and IR-B; the former also functions as a high-affinity receptor for IGF-II and is implicated, along with IGF-1R, in malignant transformation. Here we present the crystal structure at 3.8 A resolution of the IR-A ectodomain dimer, complexed with four Fabs from the monoclonal antibodies 83-7 and 83-14 (ref. 4), grown in the presence of a fragment of an insulin mimetic peptide. The structure reveals the domain arrangement in the disulphide-linked ectodomain dimer, showing that the insulin receptor adopts a folded-over conformation that places the ligand-binding regions in juxtaposition. This arrangement is very different from previous models. It shows that the two L1 domains are on opposite sides of the dimer, too far apart to allow insulin to bind both L1 domains simultaneously as previously proposed. Instead, the structure implicates the carboxy-terminal surface of the first fibronectin type III domain as the second binding site involved in high-affinity binding.

  5. Analysis of the environmental impact of insulin infusion sets based on loss of resources with waste.

    PubMed

    Pfützner, Andreas; Musholt, Petra B; Malmgren-Hansen, Bjoern; Nilsson, Nils H; Forst, Thomas

    2011-07-01

    Insulin pump therapy [continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII)] requires regular change of infusion sets every 2-3 days in order to minimize the risk of skin irritations or other adverse events. This has been discussed to be a potential burden to the environment. The purpose of this analysis was to perform an environmental assessment of insulin pump infusion sets based on loss of resources occurring during incineration of the discarded products and by means of a lifecycle concept used to weight a material in relation to its rareness on earth and its consumption. In addition to five infusion sets (Inset30, InsetII, Comfort, Quick-set, and Cleo), a patch pump (Omnipod) was also included in this analysis. The annual loss in waste of the so called "person reserve" of 3 days of catheter use was compared with daily consumption of a cup of coffee in a disposable paper cup and to a soft drink in an aluminum can. The weight-based loss in resources through waste for the infusion sets (except for Cleo) corresponded to 70-200% of the loss of resources for a coffee cup (Cleo, 320%; Omnipod, 1,821,600%) and to 1-3% of the loss from an aluminum soft drink can (Cleo, 5%; Omnipod, 31,200%). The loss or resources by use of infusion sets used in insulin pump therapy appears to be low and is similar to the burden induced by the uptake of one cup of coffee per day. The loss or resources with regular CSII is considerably lower than the loss or resources induced by patch pumps. © 2011 Diabetes Technology Society.

  6. Intracellular presence of insulin and its phosphorylated receptor in non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Mattarocci, Stefano; Abbruzzese, Claudia; Mileo, Anna M; Visca, Paolo; Antoniani, Barbara; Alessandrini, Gabriele; Facciolo, Francesco; Felsani, Armando; Radulescu, Razvan T; Paggi, Marco G

    2009-12-01

    Insulin has been known for a long time to influence the growth and differentiation of normal and transformed cells. In order to delineate the role of insulin specifically in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), we have now searched by immunohistochemistry (IHC) for the presence of insulin in NSCLC samples. Among the 112 samples we studied, 30 were found to contain insulin, which was detected in the form of intracytoplasmic granula. Moreover, its expression significantly correlated with (a) the morphological/histopathological subtype of NSCLC, being more frequent in adenocarcinomas; (b) the grade of tumor differentiation, displaying an increase in low-grade carcinomas; (c) tumor size, occurring predominantly in smaller tumors; (d) the presence of phosphorylated, activated insulin receptor; (e) the median patient age, being present in relatively younger individuals. Furthermore and interestingly, surrounding atypical adenomatous hyperplastic areas and normal alveolar pneumocytes scored insulin-positive in some of the insulin-negative tumors. In addition, PCR exploration for insulin transcripts in some samples positive for immunoreactive insulin was negative, indicating a possibly exogenous origin for the intracellular insulin in our NSCLC cohort. Taken together, our data suggest that an intracellular insulin activity is important for the progression of low-grade human lung adenocarcinomas.

  7. MG53-IRS-1 (Mitsugumin 53-Insulin Receptor Substrate-1) Interaction Disruptor Sensitizes Insulin Signaling in Skeletal Muscle.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyun; Park, Jung-Jin; Nguyen, Nga; Park, Jun Sub; Hong, Jin; Kim, Seung-Hyeob; Song, Woon Young; Kim, Hak Joong; Choi, Kwangman; Cho, Sungchan; Lee, Jae-Seon; Kim, Bong-Woo; Ko, Young-Gyu

    2016-12-23

    Mitsugumin 53 (MG53) is an E3 ligase that interacts with and ubiquitinates insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1) in skeletal muscle; thus, an MG53-IRS-1 interaction disruptor (MID), which potentially sensitizes insulin signaling with an elevated level of IRS-1 in skeletal muscle, is an excellent candidate for treating insulin resistance. To screen for an MID, we developed a bimolecular luminescence complementation system using an N-terminal luciferase fragment fused with IRS-1 and a C-terminal luciferase fragment fused with an MG53 C14A mutant that binds to IRS-1 but does not have E3 ligase activity. An MID, which was discovered using the bimolecular luminescence complementation system, disrupted the molecular association of MG53 with IRS-1, thus abolishing MG53-mediated IRS-1 ubiquitination and degradation. Thus, the MID sensitized insulin signaling and increased insulin-elicited glucose uptake with an elevated level of IRS-1 in C2C12 myotubes. These data indicate that this MID holds promise as a drug candidate for treating insulin resistance. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  8. Chronic insulin therapy reduces adipose tissue macrophage content in LDL-receptor-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Yoon, J; Subramanian, S; Ding, Y; Wang, S; Goodspeed, L; Sullivan, B; Kim, J; O'Brien, K D; Chait, A

    2011-05-01

    Insulin has anti-inflammatory effects in short-term experiments. However, the effects of chronic insulin administration on inflammation are unknown. We hypothesised that chronic insulin administration would beneficially alter adipose tissue inflammation and several circulating inflammatory markers. We administered two forms of long-acting insulin, insulin glargine (A21Gly,B31Arg,B32Arg human insulin) and insulin detemir (B29Lys[ε-tetradecanoyl],desB30 human insulin), to LDL-receptor-deficient mice. After 8 weeks on a diet that causes obesity, hyperglycaemia, adipose tissue macrophage accumulation and atherosclerosis, the mice received subcutaneous glargine, detemir or NaCl (control) for 12 weeks. Serum amyloid A (SAA) and serum amyloid P (SAP), metabolic variables, adipose tissue macrophages and aortic atherosclerosis were evaluated. Weight gain was equivalent in all groups. The glycated haemoglobin level fell equivalently in both insulin-treated groups. Plasma cholesterol and triacylglycerol levels, and hepatic triacylglycerol level significantly improved in the glargine compared with the detemir or control groups. Levels of mRNA expression for monocyte chemotactic protein-1 and F4/80, a macrophage marker, in adipose tissue were decreased only in the glargine group (p < 0.05). Visceral adipose tissue macrophage content decreased in both insulin groups (p < 0.05), whereas atherosclerosis decreased only in the glargine group. Circulating SAA and SAP did not decrease in either insulin-treated group, but IL-6 levels fell in the glargine-treated mice. While chronic insulin administration did not decrease SAA and SAP, administration of glargine but not detemir insulin improved dyslipidaemia, IL-6 levels and atherosclerosis, and both insulins reduced macrophage accumulation in visceral adipose tissue. Thus, chronic insulin therapy has beneficial tissue effects independent of circulating inflammatory markers in this murine model of diet-induced obesity and

  9. Deficiency of the leukotriene B4 receptor, BLT-1, protects against systemic insulin resistance in diet-induced obesity.

    PubMed

    Spite, Matthew; Hellmann, Jason; Tang, Yunan; Mathis, Steven P; Kosuri, Madhavi; Bhatnagar, Aruni; Jala, Venkatakrishna R; Haribabu, Bodduluri

    2011-08-15

    Chronic inflammation is an underlying factor linking obesity with insulin resistance. Diet-induced obesity promotes an increase in circulating levels of inflammatory monocytes and their infiltration into expanding adipose tissue. Nevertheless, the endogenous pathways that trigger and sustain chronic low-grade inflammation in obesity are incompletely understood. In this study, we report that a high-fat diet selectively increases the circulating levels of CD11b(+) monocytes in wild-type mice that express leukotriene B(4) receptor, BLT-1, and that this increase is abolished in BLT-1-null mice. The accumulation of classically activated (M1) adipose tissue macrophages (ATMs) and the expression of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines (i.e., IL-6 and Ccl2) was largely blunted in adipose tissue of obese BLT-1(-/-) mice, whereas the ratio of alternatively activated (M2) ATMs to M1 ATMs was increased. Obese BLT-1(-/-) mice were protected from systemic glucose and insulin intolerance and this was associated with a decrease in inflammation in adipose tissue and liver and a decrease in hepatic triglyceride accumulation. Deletion of BLT-1 prevented high fat-induced loss of insulin signaling in liver and skeletal muscle. These observations elucidate a novel role of chemoattractant receptor, BLT-1, in promoting monocyte trafficking to adipose tissue and promoting chronic inflammation in obesity and could lead to the identification of new therapeutic targets for treating insulin resistance in obesity.

  10. Targeting Anti-Insulin B Cell Receptors Improves Receptor Editing in Type 1 Diabetes-Prone Mice1, 2, 3

    PubMed Central

    Bonami, Rachel H.; Thomas, James W.

    2015-01-01

    Autoreactive B lymphocytes that commonly arise in the developing repertoire can be salvaged by receptor editing, a central tolerance mechanism that alters BCR specificity through continued L chain rearrangement. It is unknown whether autoantigens with weak cross-linking potential, such as insulin, elicit receptor editing, or if this process is dysregulated in related autoimmunity. To resolve these issues, an editing-competent model was developed in which anti-insulin Vκ125 was targeted to the Igκ locus and paired with anti-insulin VH125Tg. Physiologic, circulating insulin increased RAG-2 expression and was associated with BCR replacement that eliminated autoantigen recognition in a proportion of developing anti-insulin B lymphocytes. The proportion of anti-insulin B cells that underwent receptor editing was reduced in the type 1 diabetes-prone NOD strain relative to a non-autoimmune strain. Resistance to editing was associated with increased surface IgM expression on immature (but not transitional or mature) anti-insulin B cells in the NOD strain. The actions of mAb123 on central tolerance were also investigated, as selective targeting of insulin-occupied BCR by mAb123 eliminates anti-insulin B lymphocytes and prevents type 1 diabetes. Autoantigen-targeting by mAb123 increased RAG-2 expression and dramatically enhanced BCR replacement in newly developed B lymphocytes. Administering F(ab’)2123 induced IgM downregulation and reduced the frequency of anti-insulin B lymphocytes within the polyclonal repertoire of VH125Tg/NOD mice, suggesting enhanced central tolerance by direct BCR interaction. These findings indicate that weak or faulty checkpoints for central tolerance can be overcome by autoantigen-specific immunomodulatory therapy. PMID:26432895

  11. All-Atom Structural Models of the Transmembrane Domains of Insulin and Type 1 Insulin-Like Growth Factor Receptors.

    PubMed

    Mohammadiarani, Hossein; Vashisth, Harish

    2016-01-01

    The receptor tyrosine kinase superfamily comprises many cell-surface receptors including the insulin receptor (IR) and type 1 insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGF1R) that are constitutively homodimeric transmembrane glycoproteins. Therefore, these receptors require ligand-triggered domain rearrangements rather than receptor dimerization for activation. Specifically, binding of peptide ligands to receptor ectodomains transduces signals across the transmembrane domains for trans-autophosphorylation in cytoplasmic kinase domains. The molecular details of these processes are poorly understood in part due to the absence of structures of full-length receptors. Using MD simulations and enhanced conformational sampling algorithms, we present all-atom structural models of peptides containing 51 residues from the transmembrane and juxtamembrane regions of IR and IGF1R. In our models, the transmembrane regions of both receptors adopt helical conformations with kinks at Pro961 (IR) and Pro941 (IGF1R), but the C-terminal residues corresponding to the juxtamembrane region of each receptor adopt unfolded and flexible conformations in IR as opposed to a helix in IGF1R. We also observe that the N-terminal residues in IR form a kinked-helix sitting at the membrane-solvent interface, while homologous residues in IGF1R are unfolded and flexible. These conformational differences result in a larger tilt-angle of the membrane-embedded helix in IGF1R in comparison to IR to compensate for interactions with water molecules at the membrane-solvent interfaces. Our metastable/stable states for the transmembrane domain of IR, observed in a lipid bilayer, are consistent with a known NMR structure of this domain determined in detergent micelles, and similar states in IGF1R are consistent with a previously reported model of the dimerized transmembrane domains of IGF1R. Our all-atom structural models suggest potentially unique structural organization of kinase domains in each receptor.

  12. The Macrophage A2b Adenosine Receptor Regulates Tissue Insulin Sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Koupenova, Milka; Carroll, Shannon; Ravid, Katya

    2014-01-01

    High fat diet (HFD)-induced type 2 diabetes continues to be an epidemic with significant risk for various pathologies. Previously, we identified the A2b adenosine receptor (A2bAR), an established regulator of inflammation, as a regulator of HFD-induced insulin resistance. In particular, HFD was associated with vast upregulation of liver A2bAR in control mice, and while mice lacking this receptor showed augmented liver inflammation and tissue insulin resistance. As the A2bAR is expressed in different tissues, here, we provide the first lead to cellular mechanism by demonstrating that the receptor's influence on tissue insulin sensitivity is mediated via its expression in macrophages. This was shown using a newly generated transgenic mouse model expressing the A2bAR gene in the macrophage lineage on an otherwise A2bAR null background. Reinstatement of macrophage A2bAR expression in A2bAR null mice fed HFD restored insulin tolerance and tissue insulin signaling to the level of control mice. The molecular mechanism for this effect involves A2bAR-mediated changes in cyclic adenosine monophosphate in macrophages, reducing the expression and release of inflammatory cytokines, which downregulate insulin receptor-2. Thus, our results illustrate that macrophage A2bAR signaling is needed and sufficient for relaying the protective effect of the A2bAR against HFD-induced tissue inflammation and insulin resistance in mice. PMID:24892847

  13. Insulin receptor substrate signaling controls cardiac energy metabolism and heart failure.

    PubMed

    Guo, Cathy A; Guo, Shaodong

    2017-06-01

    The heart is an insulin-dependent and energy-consuming organ in which insulin and nutritional signaling integrates to the regulation of cardiac metabolism, growth and survival. Heart failure is highly associated with insulin resistance, and heart failure patients suffer from the cardiac energy deficiency and structural and functional dysfunction. Chronic pathological conditions, such as obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus, involve various mechanisms in promoting heart failure by remodeling metabolic pathways, modulating cardiac energetics and impairing cardiac contractility. Recent studies demonstrated that insulin receptor substrates 1 and 2 (IRS-1,-2) are major mediators of both insulin and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) signaling responsible for myocardial energetics, structure, function and organismal survival. Importantly, the insulin receptor substrates (IRS) play an important role in the activation of the phosphatidylinositide-3-dependent kinase (PI-3K) that controls Akt and Foxo1 signaling cascade, regulating the mitochondrial function, cardiac energy metabolism and the renin-angiotensin system. Dysregulation of this branch in signaling cascades by insulin resistance in the heart through the endocrine system promotes heart failure, providing a novel mechanism for diabetic cardiomyopathy. Therefore, targeting this branch of IRS→PI-3K→Foxo1 signaling cascade and associated pathways may provide a fundamental strategy for the therapeutic and nutritional development in control of metabolic and cardiovascular diseases. In this review, we focus on insulin signaling and resistance in the heart and the role energetics play in cardiac metabolism, structure and function. © 2017 Society for Endocrinology.

  14. Insulin-induced myosin light-chain phosphorylation during receptor capping in IM-9 human B-lymphoblasts.

    PubMed Central

    Majercik, M H; Bourguignon, L Y

    1988-01-01

    We have examined further the interaction between insulin surface receptors and the cytoskeleton of IM-9 human lymphoblasts. Using immunocytochemical techniques, we determined that actin, myosin, calmodulin and myosin light-chain kinase (MLCK) are all accumulated directly underneath insulin-receptor caps. In addition, we have now established that the concentration of intracellular Ca2+ (as measured by fura-2 fluorescence) increases just before insulin-induced receptor capping. Most importantly, we found that the binding of insulin to its receptor induces phosphorylation of myosin light chain in vivo. Furthermore, a number of drugs known to abolish the activation properties of calmodulin, such as trifluoperazine (TFP) or W-7, strongly inhibit insulin-receptor capping and myosin light-chain phosphorylation. These data imply that an actomyosin cytoskeletal contraction, regulated by Ca2+/calmodulin and MLCK, is involved in insulin-receptor capping. Biochemical analysis in vitro has revealed that IM-9 insulin receptors are physically associated with actin and myosin; and most interestingly, the binding of insulin-receptor/cytoskeletal complex significantly enhances the phosphorylation of the 20 kDa myosin light chain. This insulin-induced phosphorylation is inhibited by calmodulin antagonists (e.g. TFP and W-7), suggesting that the phosphorylation is catalysed by MLCK. Together, these results strongly suggest that MLCK-mediated myosin light-chain phosphorylation plays an important role in regulating the membrane-associated actomyosin contraction required for the collection of insulin receptors into caps. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 4. PMID:3048249

  15. Structural Basis for Inhibition of the Insulin Receptor by the Adaptor Protein Grb14

    SciTech Connect

    Depetris,R.; Hu, J.; Gimpelevich, I.; Holt, L.; Daly, R.; Hubbard, S.

    2005-01-01

    Grb14, a member of the Grb7 adaptor protein family, possesses a pleckstrin homology (PH) domain, a C-terminal Src homology-2 (SH2) domain, and an intervening stretch of {approx}45 residues known as the BPS region, which is unique to this adaptor family. Previous studies have demonstrated that Grb14 is a tissue-specific negative regulator of insulin receptor signaling and that inhibition is mediated by the BPS region. We have determined the crystal structure of the Grb14 BPS region in complex with the tyrosine kinase domain of the insulin receptor. The structure reveals that the N-terminal portion of the BPS region binds as a pseudosubstrate inhibitor in the substrate peptide binding groove of the kinase. Together with the crystal structure of the SH2 domain, we present a model for the interaction of Grb14 with the insulin receptor, which indicates how Grb14 functions as a selective protein inhibitor of insulin signaling.

  16. Assembly of high-affinity insulin receptor agonists and antagonists from peptide building blocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schäffer, Lauge; Brissette, Renee E.; Spetzler, Jane C.; Pillutla, Renuka C.; Østergaard, Søren; Lennick, Michael; Brandt, Jakob; Fletcher, Paul W.; Danielsen, Gillian M.; Hsiao, Ku-Chuan; Andersen, Asser S.; Dedova, Olga; Ribel, Ulla; Hoeg-Jensen, Thomas; Hertz Hansen, Per; Blume, Arthur J.; Markussen, Jan; Goldstein, Neil I.

    2003-04-01

    Insulin is thought to elicit its effects by crosslinking the two extracellular -subunits of its receptor, thereby inducing a conformational change in the receptor, which activates the intracellular tyrosine kinase signaling cascade. Previously we identified a series of peptides binding to two discrete hotspots on the insulin receptor. Here we show that covalent linkage of such peptides into homodimers or heterodimers results in insulin agonists or antagonists, depending on how the peptides are linked. An optimized agonist has been shown, both in vitro and in vivo, to have a potency close to that of insulin itself. The ability to construct such peptide derivatives may offer a path for developing agonists or antagonists for treatment of a wide variety of diseases.

  17. The association of phosphoinositide 3-kinase enhancer A with hepatic insulin receptor enhances its kinase activity.

    PubMed

    Chan, Chi Bun; Liu, Xia; He, Kunyan; Qi, Qi; Jung, Dae Y; Kim, Jason K; Ye, Keqiang

    2011-07-01

    Dysfunction of hepatic insulin receptor tyrosine kinase (IRTK) causes the development of type 2 diabetes. However, the molecular mechanism regulating IRTK activity in the liver remains poorly understood. Here, we show that phosphoinositide 3-kinase enhancer A (PIKE-A) is a new insulin-dependent enhancer of hepatic IRTK. Liver-specific Pike-knockout (LPKO) mice display glucose intolerance with impaired hepatic insulin sensitivity. Specifically, insulin-provoked phosphoinositide 3-kinase/Akt signalling is diminished in the liver of LPKO mice, leading to the failure of insulin-suppressed gluconeogenesis and hyperglycaemia. Thus, hepatic PIKE-A has a key role in mediating insulin signal transduction and regulating glucose homeostasis in the liver.

  18. Metabolism of covalent receptor-insulin complexes by 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Synthesis and use of photosensitive insulin analogs to study insulin receptor metabolism in cell culture.

    PubMed

    Reed, B C

    1983-04-10

    To facilitate labeling cell surface insulin receptors and analyzing their metabolism by 3T3-L1 adipocytes, a characterization of both the interaction of photosensitive insulin analogs with 3T3-L1 adipocytes and the conditions for photocross-linking these derivatives to the insulin receptor are described. The synthesis and purification of two photoaffinity analogs of insulin are presented. Both B29-lysine- and A1-glycine-substituted N-(2-nitro-4-azidophenyl)glycyl insulin compete with 125I-insulin for binding to 3T3-L1 adipocytes, and the B29-derivative retains a biological activity similar to that for native insulin. An apparatus developed for these studies permits photolysis of cells in monolayer culture using the visible region of the lamp emission spectrum. Activation of the photoderivative by this apparatus occurs with a half-life of approximately 15 s and permits rapid photolabeling of a single species of receptor of 300,000 Da. The conditions for photolabeling permit a measurement of the turnover of covalent receptor-insulin complexes by 3T3-L1 adipocytes in monolayer culture. Degradation of this complex occurs as an apparent first order process with a half-life of 7 h. A comparison with previous studies (Reed, B. C., Ronnett, G. V., Clements, P. R., and Lane, M. D. (1981) J. Biol. Chem 256, 3917-3925; Ronnett, G. V., Knutson, V. P., and Lane, M. D. (1982) J. Biol. Chem. 257, 4285-4291) indicates that in a "down-regulated" state, 3T3-L1 adipocytes degrade covalent receptor-hormone complexes with kinetics similar to those for the degradation of dissociable receptor-hormone complexes.

  19. Loss of cortical actin filaments in insulin-resistant skeletal muscle cells impairs GLUT4 vesicle trafficking and glucose transport

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, Alicia M.; Spisak, Kristen O.; Brozinick, Joseph T.; Elmendorf, Jeffrey S.

    2008-01-01

    Study has demonstrated an essential role of cortical filamentous actin (F-actin) in insulin-regulated glucose uptake by skeletal muscle. Here, we tested whether perturbations in F-actin contributed to impaired insulin responsiveness provoked by hyperinsulinemia. In L6 myo-tubes stably expressing GLUT4 that carries an exofacial myc-epitope tag, acute insulin stimulation (20 min, 100 nM) increased GLUT4myc translocation and glucose uptake by ~2-fold. In contrast, a hyperinsulinemic state, induced by inclusion of 5 nM insulin in the medium for 12 h decreased the ability of insulin to stimulate these processes. Defects in insulin signaling did not readily account for the observed disruption. In contrast, hyperinsulinemia reduced cortical F-actin. This occurred concomitant with a loss of plasma membrane phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2), a lipid involved in cytoskeletal regulation. Restoration of plasma membrane PIP2 in hyperinsulinemic cells restored F-actin and insulin responsiveness. Consistent with these in vitro observations suggesting that the hyperinsulinemic state negatively affects cortical F-actin structure, epitrochlearis skeletal muscle from insulin-resistant hyperinsulinemic Zucker fatty rats displayed a similar loss of F-actin structure compared with that in muscle from lean insulin-sensitive littermates. We propose that a component of insulin-induced insulin resistance in skeletal muscle involves defects in PIP2/F-actin structure essential for insulin-regulated glucose transport. PMID:16774991

  20. Loss of cortical actin filaments in insulin-resistant skeletal muscle cells impairs GLUT4 vesicle trafficking and glucose transport.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Alicia M; Spisak, Kristen O; Brozinick, Joseph T; Elmendorf, Jeffrey S

    2006-11-01

    Study has demonstrated an essential role of cortical filamentous actin (F-actin) in insulin-regulated glucose uptake by skeletal muscle. Here, we tested whether perturbations in F-actin contributed to impaired insulin responsiveness provoked by hyperinsulinemia. In L6 myotubes stably expressing GLUT4 that carries an exofacial myc-epitope tag, acute insulin stimulation (20 min, 100 nM) increased GLUT4myc translocation and glucose uptake by approximately 2-fold. In contrast, a hyperinsulinemic state, induced by inclusion of 5 nM insulin in the medium for 12 h decreased the ability of insulin to stimulate these processes. Defects in insulin signaling did not readily account for the observed disruption. In contrast, hyperinsulinemia reduced cortical F-actin. This occurred concomitant with a loss of plasma membrane phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP(2)), a lipid involved in cytoskeletal regulation. Restoration of plasma membrane PIP(2) in hyperinsulinemic cells restored F-actin and insulin responsiveness. Consistent with these in vitro observations suggesting that the hyperinsulinemic state negatively affects cortical F-actin structure, epitrochlearis skeletal muscle from insulin-resistant hyperinsulinemic Zucker fatty rats displayed a similar loss of F-actin structure compared with that in muscle from lean insulin-sensitive littermates. We propose that a component of insulin-induced insulin resistance in skeletal muscle involves defects in PIP(2)/F-actin structure essential for insulin-regulated glucose transport.

  1. mTOR partly mediates insulin resistance by phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate-1 on serine(307) residues after burn.

    PubMed

    Xin-Long, Chen; Zhao-Fan, Xia; Dao-Feng, Ben; Wei, Duo

    2011-02-01

    Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is an important mediator for cross talk between nutritional signals and metabolic signals of insulin by downregulating insulin receptor substrate proteins. Therefore, mTOR inhibition could become a therapeutic strategy in insulin-resistant states, including insulin resistance induced by burn. We tested this hypothesis in the rat model of 30% TBSA full thickness burn, using the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin. Rapamycin (0.4 mg/kg, i.p.) was injected 2 h before euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic glucose clamps at 4 days after burn. IRS-1, phospho-serine³⁰⁷, phospho-tyrosine of IRS-1 and phospho-mTOR in muscle tissue were determined by immunoprecipitation and Western blot analysis or immunohistochemistry. Plasma TNF-α, insulin and C-peptide were determined before and after euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic glucose clamps. Our data showed that TNF-α, insulin and C-peptide significantly increased in the early stage after burn (P < 0.01). The infused rates of total 10% glucose (GIR, mg/kg min) significantly decreased at 4 days after burn. The level of IRS-1 serine³⁰⁷ phosphorylation in muscle in vivo significantly increased after burn (P < 0.01), while insulin-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of IRS-1 significantly decreased (P < 0.01). Inhibition of mTOR by rapamycin inhibited the phosphorylation of mTOR, reduced serine³⁰⁷ phosphorylation, elevated tyrosine phosphorylation and partly prevented the decrease of GIR after burn. However, TNF-α, insulin and C-peptide were not decreased by rapamycin treatment postburn. Taken together, these results indicate that the mTOR pathway is an important modulator of the signals involved in the acute regulation of insulin-stimulated glucose metabolism, and at least, partly contributes to burn-induced insulin resistance. mTOR inhibition may become a therapeutic strategy in insulin-resistant states after burn. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  2. Coordinate phosphorylation of insulin-receptor kinase and its 175,000-Mr endogenous substrate in rat hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, M; Karasik, A; White, M F; Kahn, C R

    1991-01-01

    To investigate the early events in insulin signal transmission in liver, isolated rat hepatocytes were labeled with 32P, and proteins phosphorylated in response to insulin were detected by immunoprecipitation with anti-phosphotyrosine and anti-receptor antibodies and analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and autoradiography. In these cells, insulin rapidly stimulated tyrosine phosphorylation of the 95,000-Mr beta-subunit of the insulin receptor and a 175,000-Mr phosphoprotein (pp175). Both proteins were precipitated by anti-phosphotyrosine antibody, whereas only the insulin receptor was recognized with anti-insulin-receptor antibody. In the insulin-stimulated state, both pp175 and the receptor beta-subunit were found to be phosphorylated on tyrosine and serine residues. Based on precipitation by the two antibodies, receptor phosphorylation was biphasic with an initial increase in tyrosine phosphorylation followed by a more gradual increase in serine phosphorylation over the first 30 min of stimulation. The time course of phosphorylation of pp175 was rapid and paralleled that of the beta-subunit of the insulin receptor. The pp175 was clearly distinguished from the insulin receptor, because it was detected only when boiling SDS was used to extract cellular phosphoproteins, whereas the insulin receptor was extracted with either Triton X-100 or SDS. In addition, the tryptic peptide maps of the two proteins were distinct. The dose-response curve for insulin stimulation was shifted slightly to the left of the insulin receptor, suggesting some signal amplification at this step. These data suggest that pp175 is a major endogenous substrate of the insulin receptor in liver and may be a cytoskeletal-associated protein.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  3. Coordinate phosphorylation of insulin-receptor kinase and its 175,000-Mr endogenous substrate in rat hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Okamoto, M.; Karasik, A.; White, M.F.; Kahn, C.R. )

    1991-01-01

    To investigate the early events in insulin signal transmission in liver, isolated rat hepatocytes were labeled with {sup 32}P, and proteins phosphorylated in response to insulin were detected by immunoprecipitation with anti-phosphotyrosine and anti-receptor antibodies and analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and autoradiography. In these cells, insulin rapidly stimulated tyrosine phosphorylation of the 95,000-Mr beta-subunit of the insulin receptor and a 175,000-Mr phosphoprotein (pp175). Both proteins were precipitated by anti-phosphotyrosine antibody, whereas only the insulin receptor was recognized with anti-insulin-receptor antibody. In the insulin-stimulated state, both pp175 and the receptor beta-subunit were found to be phosphorylated on tyrosine and serine residues. Based on precipitation by the two antibodies, receptor phosphorylation was biphasic with an initial increase in tyrosine phosphorylation followed by a more gradual increase in serine phosphorylation over the first 30 min of stimulation. The time course of phosphorylation of pp175 was rapid and paralleled that of the beta-subunit of the insulin receptor. The pp175 was clearly distinguished from the insulin receptor, because it was detected only when boiling SDS was used to extract cellular phosphoproteins, whereas the insulin receptor was extracted with either Triton X-100 or SDS. In addition, the tryptic peptide maps of the two proteins were distinct. The dose-response curve for insulin stimulation was shifted slightly to the left of the insulin receptor, suggesting some signal amplification at this step. These data suggest that pp175 is a major endogenous substrate of the insulin receptor in liver and may be a cytoskeletal-associated protein.

  4. Melatonin improves insulin sensitivity independently of weight loss in old obese rats.

    PubMed

    Zanuto, Ricardo; Siqueira-Filho, Mário A; Caperuto, Luciana C; Bacurau, Reury F P; Hirata, Emiko; Peliciari-Garcia, Rodrigo A; do Amaral, Fernanda Gaspar; Marçal, Anderson C; Ribeiro, Luciene M; Camporez, João P G; Carpinelli, Angelo Rafael; Bordin, Silvana; Cipolla-Neto, José; Carvalho, Carla R O

    2013-09-01

    In aged rats, insulin signaling pathway (ISP) is impaired in tissues that play a pivotal role in glucose homeostasis, such as liver, skeletal muscle, and adipose tissue. Moreover, the aging process is also associated with obesity and reduction in melatonin synthesis from the pineal gland and other organs. The aim of the present work was to evaluate, in male old obese Wistar rats, the effect of melatonin supplementation in the ISP, analyzing the total protein amount and the phosphorylated status (immunoprecipitation and immunoblotting) of the insulin cascade components in the rat hypothalamus, liver, skeletal muscle, and periepididymal adipose tissue. Melatonin was administered in the drinking water for 8- and 12 wk during the night period. Food and water intake and fasting blood glucose remained unchanged. The insulin sensitivity presented a 2.1-fold increase both after 8- and 12 wk of melatonin supplementation. Animals supplemented with melatonin for 12 wk also presented a reduction in body mass. The acute insulin-induced phosphorylation of the analyzed ISP proteins increased 1.3- and 2.3-fold after 8- and 12 wk of melatonin supplementation. The total protein content of the insulin receptor (IR) and the IR substrates (IRS-1, 2) remained unchanged in all investigated tissues, except for the 2-fold increase in the total amount of IRS-1 in the periepididymal adipose tissue. Therefore, the known age-related melatonin synthesis reduction may also be involved in the development of insulin resistance and the adequate supplementation could be an important alternative for the prevention of insulin signaling impairment in aged organisms.

  5. Importance of the character and configuration of residues B24, B25, and B26 in insulin-receptor interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Mirmira, R.G.; Nakagawa, S.H.; Tager, H.S. )

    1991-01-25

    By use of isolated canine hepatocytes and insulin analogs prepared by trypsin-catalyzed semisynthesis, we have investigated the importance of the aromatic triplet PheB24-PheB25-TyrB26 of the COOH-terminal B-chain domain of insulin in directing the affinity of insulin-receptor interactions. Analysis of the receptor binding potencies of analogs bearing transpositions or replacements (by Tyr, D-Tyr or their corresponding 3,5-diiodo derivatives) in this region demonstrates a wide divergence in the acceptance both of configurational change (with (D-TyrB24,PheB26)insulin and (D-TyrB25,PheB26)insulin exhibiting 160 and 0.1% of the receptor binding potency of insulin, respectively) and of detailed side chain structure (with (TyrB24,PheB26)insulin and (TyrB25,PheB26)insulin exhibiting 2 and 80% of the receptor binding potency of insulin, respectively). Additional experiments addressed the solvent accessibilities of the 4 tyrosine residues of insulin and the insulin analogs at selected peptide concentrations by use of analytical radioiodination. Whereas two analogs ((TyrB25,PheB26)insulin and (D-TyrB24,PheB26)insulin) were found to undergo self aggregation, no strict correlation was found between the ability of an analog to aggregate and its potency for interaction with the insulin receptor. Related findings are discussed in terms of the interplay between side chain and main chain structure in the COOH-terminal domain of the insulin B-chain and the structural attributes of insulin that determine the affinity of insulin-receptor interactions.

  6. Evidence that insulin and guanosine triphosphate regulate dephosphorylation of the beta-subunit of the insulin receptor in sarcolemma membranes isolated from skeletal muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Horn, R S; Lystad, E; Adler, A; Walaas, O

    1986-01-01

    When sarcolemma membranes isolated from rat skeletal muscle were incubated with [gamma-32P]ATP, a membrane protein of apparent Mr 95,000 was rapidly phosphorylated, with the 32P content reaching a maximum within 2 s. On the basis of immunoprecipitation with anti-insulin-receptor antiserum, phosphoamino acid analysis and Mr, this protein probably represents the beta-subunit of the insulin receptor. Similarly, on incubation of the membrane with adenosine 5'-[gamma-[35S]thio] triphosphate the 95 kDa protein was thiophosphorylated, indicating thiophosphorylation of the beta-subunit of the insulin receptor on the basis of immunoprecipitation studies. The effect of insulin on the phosphorylation of this protein in the membrane was studied. Insulin induced a 20% decrease in the 32P labelling of the protein when the membranes were phosphorylated for 10 s. This insulin effect was dose-dependent, with half-maximal effect obtained at 2-3 nM-insulin. Addition of GTP, but not GDP or guanosine 5'-[beta, gamma-imido]triphosphate, enhanced the effect to 35% inhibition, with half-maximal effect of GTP obtained at 0.5 microM. GTP had no effect on the phosphorylation of the protein in the absence of insulin. Analysis of this insulin effect showed that insulin increased the rate of dephosphorylation of the 95 kDa protein in the membrane. In contrast, insulin had no effect on thiophosphorylation of the 95 kDa membrane protein after incubation with adenosine 5'-[gamma-[35S]thio]triphosphate. Since thiophosphorylated proteins are less sensitive to phosphatase action, these investigations suggest that insulin stimulated a protein phosphatase activity in a GTP-dependent manner. The possibility that GTP-regulatory proteins are involved in the action of insulin on the phosphorylation of the insulin receptor and other membrane proteins is discussed. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 3. PMID:3521589

  7. Blockade of the Renin-Angiotensin system improves insulin receptor signaling and insulin-stimulated skeletal muscle glucose transport in burn injury.

    PubMed

    Kasper, Sherry O; Phillips, Erin E; Castle, Scott M; Daley, Brian J; Enderson, Blaine L; Karlstad, Michael D

    2011-01-01

    Burn injury is associated with a decline in glucose utilization and insulin sensitivity due to alterations in postreceptor insulin signaling pathways. We have reported that blockade of the renin-angiotensin system with losartan, an angiotensin II type 1 (AT1) receptor blocker, improves whole body insulin sensitivity and glucose metabolism after burn injury. This study examines whether losartan improves insulin signaling pathways and insulin-stimulated glucose transport in skeletal muscle in burn-injured rats. Rats were injured by a 30% full-skin-thickness scalding burn and treated with losartan or placebo for 3 days after burn. Insulin signaling pathways were investigated in rectus abdominus muscle taken before and 90 s after intraportal insulin injection (10 U·kg). Insulin-stimulated insulin receptor substrate 1-associated phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase and plasma membrane-associated GLUT4 transporter were substantially increased with losartan treatment in burn-injured animals (59% above sham). Serine phosphorylated AKT/PKB was decreased with burn injury, and this decrease was attenuated with losartan treatment. In a separate group of rats, the effect of insulin on 2-deoxyglucose transport was significantly impaired in burned as compared with sham soleus muscles, in vitro; however, treatment of burned rats with losartan completely abolished the reduction of insulin-stimulated 2-deoxyglucose transport. These findings demonstrate a cross talk between the AT1 and insulin receptor that negatively modulates insulin receptor signaling and suggest a potential role of renin-angiotensin system blockade as a therapeutic strategy for enhancing insulin sensitivity in skeletal muscle and improving whole-body glucose homeostasis in burn injury.

  8. Effect of H1- and H2-histamine receptor blockade on postexercise insulin sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Pellinger, Thomas K; Dumke, Breanna R; Halliwill, John R

    2013-01-01

    Following a bout of dynamic exercise, humans experience sustained postexercise vasodilatation in the previously exercised skeletal muscle which is mediated by activation of histamine (H1 and H2) receptors. Skeletal muscle glucose uptake is also enhanced following dynamic exercise. Our aim was to determine if blunting the vasodilatation during recovery from exercise would have an adverse effect on blood glucose regulation. Thus, we tested the hypothesis that insulin sensitivity following exercise would be reduced with H1- and H2-receptor blockade versus control (no blockade). We studied 20 healthy young subjects (12 exercise; eight nonexercise sham) on randomized control and H1- and H2-receptor blockade (fexofenadine and ranitidine) days. Following 60 min of upright cycling at 60% VO2 peak or nonexercise sham, subjects consumed an oral glucose tolerance beverage (1.0 g/kg). Blood glucose was determined from “arterialized” blood samples (heated hand vein). Postexercise whole-body insulin sensitivity (Matsuda insulin sensitivity index) was reduced 25% with H1- and H2-receptor blockade (P < 0.05), whereas insulin sensitivity was not affected by histamine receptor blockade in the sham trials. These results indicate that insulin sensitivity following exercise is blunted by H1- and H2-receptor blockade and suggest that postexercise H1- and H2-receptor–mediated skeletal muscle vasodilatation benefits glucose regulation in healthy humans. PMID:24303118

  9. A Comparative Structural Bioinformatics Analysis of the Insulin Receptor Family Ectodomain Based on Phylogenetic Information

    PubMed Central

    Rentería, Miguel E.; Gandhi, Neha S.; Vinuesa, Pablo; Helmerhorst, Erik; Mancera, Ricardo L.

    2008-01-01

    The insulin receptor (IR), the insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF1R) and the insulin receptor-related receptor (IRR) are covalently-linked homodimers made up of several structural domains. The molecular mechanism of ligand binding to the ectodomain of these receptors and the resulting activation of their tyrosine kinase domain is still not well understood. We have carried out an amino acid residue conservation analysis in order to reconstruct the phylogeny of the IR Family. We have confirmed the location of ligand binding site 1 of the IGF1R and IR. Importantly, we have also predicted the likely location of the insulin binding site 2 on the surface of the fibronectin type III domains of the IR. An evolutionary conserved surface on the second leucine-rich domain that may interact with the ligand could not be detected. We suggest a possible mechanical trigger of the activation of the IR that involves a slight ‘twist’ rotation of the last two fibronectin type III domains in order to face the likely location of insulin. Finally, a strong selective pressure was found amongst the IRR orthologous sequences, suggesting that this orphan receptor has a yet unknown physiological role which may be conserved from amphibians to mammals. PMID:18989367

  10. Metabolic, anabolic, and mitogenic insulin responses: A tissue-specific perspective for insulin receptor activators

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Insulin acts as the major regulator of the fasting-to-fed metabolic transition by altering substrate metabolism, promoting energy storage, and helping activate protein synthesis. In addition to its glucoregulatory and other metabolic properties, insulin can also act as a growth factor. The metabolic...

  11. Identification of common ligand binding determinants of the insulin and insulin-like growth factor 1 receptors. Insights into mechanisms of ligand binding.

    PubMed

    Mynarcik, D C; Williams, P F; Schaffer, L; Yu, G Q; Whittaker, J

    1997-07-25

    Insulin and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) are peptides that share nearly 50% sequence homology. However, although their cognate receptors also exhibit significant overall sequence homology, the affinity of each peptide for the non-cognate receptor is 2-3 orders of magnitude lower than for the cognate receptor. The molecular basis for this discrimination is unclear, as are the molecular mechanisms underlying ligand binding. We have recently identified a major ligand binding site of the insulin receptor by alanine scannning mutagenesis. These studies revealed that a number of amino acids critical for insulin binding are conserved in the IGF-1 receptor, suggesting that they may play a role in ligand binding. We therefore performed alanine mutagenesis of these amino acids to determine whether this is the case. cDNAs encoding alanine-substituted secreted recombinant IGF-1 receptors were expressed in 293 EBNA cells, and the ligand binding properties of the expressed proteins were evaluated. Mutation of Phe701 resulted in a receptor with undetectable IGF-1 binding; alanine substitution of the corresponding amino acid of the insulin receptor, Phe714, produces a 140-fold reduction in affinity for insulin. Mutation of Asp8, Asn11, Phe58, Phe692, Glu693, His697, and Asn698 produces a 3.5-6-fold reduction in affinity for IGF-1. In contrast, alanine mutation of the corresponding amino acids of the insulin receptor with the exception of Asp12 produces reductions in affinity that are 50-fold or greater. The affinity of insulin for these mutants relative to wild type receptor was similar to that of their relative affinity for IGF-1 with two exceptions; the IC50 values for insulin binding to the mutants of Arg10, which has normal affinity for IGF-1, and His697, which has a 6-fold reduction in affinity for IGF-1, were both at least 2 orders of magnitude greater than for wild type receptor. The Kd values for insulin of the corresponding alanine mutants of the insulin receptor

  12. Removal of melatonin receptor type 1 induces insulin resistance in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Contreras-Alcantara, Susana; Baba, Kenkichi; Tosini, Gianluca

    2010-09-01

    The incidence of obesity, insulin resistance, and type 2 diabetes (T2D) is increasing at an alarming rate worldwide. Emerging experimental evidence suggests that the hormone melatonin plays an important role in the regulation of glucose metabolisms. In this study, we report that removal of melatonin receptor type 1 (MT1) significantly impairs the ability of mice to metabolize glucose and such inability is probably due to an increased insulin resistance in these mice. Our data suggest that MT1 receptors are implicated in the pathogenesis of T2D and open the door for a detailed exploration on the mechanisms by which MT1 receptors signaling may affect glucose metabolism.

  13. Receptors for insulin-like growth factors I and II: autoradiographic localization in rat brain and comparison to receptors for insulin

    SciTech Connect

    Lesniak, M.A.; Hill, J.M.; Kiess, W.; Rojeski, M.; Pert, C.B.; Roth, J.

    1988-10-01

    Receptors for insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) in rat brain were visualized using autoradiography with (125I)IGF-I. The binding of the labeled peptide was competed for fully by high concentrations of unlabeled IGF-I. At intermediate concentrations of unlabeled peptide the binding of (125I)IGF-I was competed for by unlabeled IGF-I more effectively than by IGF-II or insulin, which is typical of receptors for IGF-I. Essentially every brain section shows specific binding of IGF-I, and the pattern of binding of IGF-I to its receptors correlated well with the cytoarchitectonic structures. In parallel studies we showed that (125I)IGF-II was bound to tissue sections of rat brain and that the binding was competed for by an excess of unlabeled IGF-II. However, intermediate concentrations of unlabeled peptides gave inconclusive results. To confirm that the binding of (125I)IGF-II was to IGF-II receptors, we showed that antibodies specific for the IGF-II receptor inhibited the binding of labeled IGF-II. Furthermore, the binding of the antibody to regions of the brain section, visualized by the application of (125I)protein-A, gave patterns indistinguishable from those obtained with (125I)IGF-II alone. Again, the binding was very widely distributed throughout the central nervous system, and the patterns of distribution corresponded well to the underlying neural structures. Densitometric analysis of the receptors enabled us to compare the distribution of IGF-I receptors with that of IGF-II receptors as well as retrospectively with that of insulin receptors.

  14. B Cell Receptor Affinity for Insulin Dictates Autoantigen Acquisition and B Cell Functionality in Autoimmune Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Packard, Thomas A.; Smith, Mia J.; Conrad, Francis J.; Johnson, Sara A.; Getahun, Andrew; Lindsay, Robin S.; Hinman, Rochelle M.; Friedman, Rachel S.; Thomas, James W.; Cambier, John C.

    2016-01-01

    B cells have been strongly implicated in the development of human type 1 diabetes and are required for disease in the NOD mouse model. These functions are dependent on B cell antigen receptor (BCR) specificity and expression of MHC, implicating linked autoantigen recognition and presentation to effector T cells. BCR-antigen affinity requirements for participation in disease are unclear. We hypothesized that BCR affinity for the autoantigen insulin differentially affects lymphocyte functionality, including tolerance modality and the ability to acquire and become activated in the diabetogenic environment. Using combined transgenic and retrogenic heavy and light chain to create multiple insulin-binding BCRs, we demonstrate that affinity for insulin is a critical determinant of the function of these autoreactive cells. We show that both BCR affinity for insulin and genetic background affect tolerance induction in immature B cells. We also find new evidence that may explain the enigmatic ability of B cells expressing 125 anti-insulin BCR to support development of TID in NOD mice despite a reported affinity beneath requirements for binding insulin at in vivo concentrations. We report that when expressed as an antigen receptor the affinity of 125 is much higher than determined by measurements of the soluble form. Finally, we show that in vivo acquisition of insulin requires both sufficient BCR affinity and permissive host/tissue environment. We propose that a confluence of BCR affinity, pancreas environment, and B cell tolerance-regulating genes in the NOD animal allows acquisition of insulin and autoimmunity. PMID:27834793

  15. Structural basis of the aberrant receptor binding properties of hagfish and lamprey insulins.

    PubMed

    Sajid, Waseem; Holst, Patricia A; Kiselyov, Vladislav V; Andersen, Asser S; Conlon, J Michael; Kristensen, Claus; Kjeldsen, Thomas; Whittaker, Jonathan; Chan, Shu J; De Meyts, Pierre

    2009-12-01

    The insulin from the Atlantic hagfish (Myxine glutinosa) has been one of the most studied insulins from both a structural and a biological viewpoint; however, some aspects of its biology remain controversial, and there has been no satisfying structural explanation for its low biological potency. We have re-examined the receptor binding kinetics, as well as the metabolic and mitogenic properties, of this phylogenetically ancient insulin, as well as that from another extant representative of the ancient chordates, the river lamprey (Lampetra fluviatilis). Both insulins share unusual binding kinetics and biological properties with insulin analogues that have single mutations at residues that contribute to the hexamerization surface. We propose and demonstrate by reciprocal amino acid substitutions between hagfish and human insulins that the reduced biological activity of hagfish insulin results from unfavorable substitutions, namely, A10 (Ile to Arg), B4 (Glu to Gly), B13 (Glu to Asn), and B21 (Glu to Val). We likewise suggest that the altered biological activity of lamprey insulin may reflect substitutions at A10 (Ile to Lys), B4 (Glu to Thr), and B17 (Leu to Val). The substitution of Asp at residue B10 in hagfish insulin and of His at residue A8 in both hagfish and lamprey insulins may help compensate for unfavorable changes in other regions of the molecules. The data support the concept that the set of unusual properties of insulins bearing certain mutations in the hexamerization surface may reflect those of the insulins evolutionarily closer to the ancestral insulin gene product.

  16. Reduced insulin-receptor mediated modulation of striatal dopamine release by basal insulin as a possible contributing factor to hyperdopaminergia in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Caravaggio, Fernando; Hahn, Margaret; Nakajima, Shinichiro; Gerretsen, Philip; Remington, Gary; Graff-Guerrero, Ariel

    2015-10-01

    Schizophrenia is a severe and chronic neuropsychiatric disorder which affects 1% of the world population. Using the brain imaging technique positron emission tomography (PET) it has been demonstrated that persons with schizophrenia have greater dopamine transmission in the striatum compared to healthy controls. However, little progress has been made as to elucidating other biological mechanisms which may account for this hyperdopaminergic state in this disease. Studies in animals have demonstrated that insulin receptors are expressed on midbrain dopamine neurons, and that insulin from the periphery acts on these receptors to modify dopamine transmission in the striatum. This is pertinent given that several lines of evidence suggest that insulin receptor functioning may be abnormal in the brains of persons with schizophrenia. Post-mortem studies have shown that persons with schizophrenia have less than half the number of cortical insulin receptors compared to healthy persons. Moreover, these post-mortem findings are unlikely due to the effects of antipsychotic treatment; studies in cell lines and animals suggest antipsychotics enhance insulin receptor functioning. Further, hyperinsulinemia - even prior to antipsychotic use - seems to be related to less psychotic symptoms in patients with schizophrenia. Collectively, these data suggest that midbrain insulin receptor functioning may be abnormal in persons with schizophrenia, resulting in reduced insulin-mediated regulation of dopamine transmission in the striatum. Such a deficit may account for the hyperdopaminergic state observed in these patients and would help guide the development of novel treatment strategies. We hypothesize that, (i) insulin receptor expression and/or function is reduced in midbrain dopamine neurons in persons with schizophrenia, (ii) basal insulin should reduce dopaminergic transmission in the striatum via these receptors, and (iii) this modulation of dopaminergic transmission by basal insulin

  17. Insulin-Independent GABAA Receptor-Mediated Response in the Barrel Cortex of Mice with Impaired Met Activity

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Fu-Sun; Erzurumlu, Reha S.

    2016-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a neurodevelopmental disorder caused by genetic variants, susceptibility alleles, and environmental perturbations. The autism associated gene MET tyrosine kinase has been implicated in many behavioral domains and endophenotypes of autism, including abnormal neural signaling in human sensory cortex. We investigated somatosensory thalamocortical synaptic communication in mice deficient in Met activity in cortical excitatory neurons to gain insights into aberrant somatosensation characteristic of ASD. The ratio of excitation to inhibition is dramatically increased due to decreased postsynaptic GABAA receptor-mediated inhibition in the trigeminal thalamocortical pathway of mice lacking active Met in the cerebral cortex. Furthermore, in contrast to wild-type mice, insulin failed to increase GABAA receptor-mediated response in the barrel cortex of mice with compromised Met signaling. Thus, lacking insulin effects may be a risk factor in ASD pathogenesis. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT A proposed common cause of neurodevelopmental disorders is an imbalance in excitatory neural transmission, provided by the glutamatergic neurons, and the inhibitory signals from the GABAergic interneurons. Many genes associated with autism spectrum disorders impair synaptic transmission in the expected cell type. Previously, inactivation of the autism-associated Met tyrosine kinase receptor in GABAergic interneurons led to decreased inhibition. In thus report, decreased Met signaling in glutamatergic neurons had no effect on excitation, but decimated inhibition. Further experiments indicate that loss of Met activity downregulates GABAA receptors on glutamatergic neurons in an insulin independent manner. These data provide a new mechanism for the loss of inhibition and subsequent abnormal excitation/inhibition balance and potential molecular candidates for treatment or prevention. PMID:27030755

  18. Identification of a Small Molecular Insulin Receptor Agonist With Potent Antidiabetes Activity

    PubMed Central

    Qiang, Guifen; Xue, Shenghui; Yang, Jenny J.; Du, Guanhua; Pang, Xiaobin; Li, Xiaoting; Goswami, Devrishi; Griffin, Patrick R.; Ortlund, Eric A.; Chan, Chi Bun; Ye, Keqiang

    2014-01-01

    Insulin replacement therapy is a widely adopted treatment for all patients with type 1 diabetes and some with type 2 diabetes. However, injection of insulin has suffered from problems such as tissue irritation, abscesses, discomfort, and inconvenience. The use of orally bioactive insulin mimetics thus represents an ideal treatment alternative. Here we show that a chaetochromin derivative (4548-G05) acts as a new nonpeptidyl insulin mimetic. 4548-G05 selectively activates an insulin receptor (IR) but not insulin-like growth factor receptor-I or other receptor tyrosine kinases. Through binding to the extracellular domain of the IR, 4548-G05 induces activation of the receptor and initiates the downstream Akt and extracellular signal–related kinase pathways to trigger glucose uptake in C2C12 myotubes. Moreover, it displays a potent blood glucose-lowering effect when administrated orally in normal, type 1 diabetic, and type 2 diabetic mice models. Therefore, 4548-G05 may represent a novel pharmacological agent for antidiabetes drug development. PMID:24651808

  19. Structural and Biochemical Characterization of the KRLB Region in Insulin Receptor Substrate-2

    SciTech Connect

    Wu,J.; Tseng, Y.; Xu, C.; Neubert, T.; White, M.; Hubbard, S.

    2008-01-01

    Insulin receptor substrates 1 and 2 (IRS1 and -2) are crucial adaptor proteins in mediating the metabolic and mitogenic effects of insulin and insulin-like growth factor 1. These proteins consist of a pleckstrin homology domain, a phosphotyrosine binding domain and a C-terminal region containing numerous sites of tyrosine, serine and threonine phosphorylation. Previous yeast two-hybrid studies identified a region unique to IRS2, termed the kinase regulatory-loop binding (KRLB) region, which interacts with the tyrosine kinase domain of the insulin receptor. Here we present the crystal structure of the insulin receptor kinase in complex with a 15-residue peptide from the KRLB region. In the structure, this segment of IRS2 is bound in the kinase active site with Tyr628 positioned for phosphorylation. Although Tyr628 was phosphorylated by the insulin receptor, its catalytic turnover was poor, resulting in kinase inhibition. Our studies indicate that the KRLB region functions to limit tyrosine phosphorylation of IRS2.

  20. The insulin receptor juxtamembrane region contains two independent tyrosine/beta-turn internalization signals

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    We have investigated the role of tyrosine residues in the insulin receptor cytoplasmic juxtamembrane region (Tyr953 and Tyr960) during endocytosis. Analysis of the secondary structure of the juxtamembrane region by the Chou-Fasman algorithms predicts that both the sequences GPLY953 and NPEY960 form tyrosine-containing beta-turns. Similarly, analysis of model peptides by 1-D and 2-D NMR show that these sequences form beta-turns in solution, whereas replacement of the tyrosine residues with alanine destabilizes the beta-turn. CHO cell lines were prepared expressing mutant receptors in which each tyrosine was mutated to phenylalanine or alanine, and an additional mutant contained alanine at both positions. These mutations had no effect on insulin binding or receptor autophosphorylation. Replacements with phenylalanine had no effect on the rate of [125I]insulin endocytosis, whereas single substitutions with alanine reduced [125I]insulin endocytosis by 40-50%. Replacement of both tyrosines with alanine reduced internalization by 70%. These data suggest that the insulin receptor contains two tyrosine/beta-turns which contribute independently and additively to insulin-stimulated endocytosis. PMID:1500426

  1. Detecting intentional insulin omission for weight loss in girls with type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Pinhas-Hamiel, Orit; Hamiel, Uri; Greenfield, Yuval; Boyko, Valentina; Graph-Barel, Chana; Rachmiel, Marianna; Lerner-Geva, Liat; Reichman, Brian

    2013-12-01

    Intentional insulin omission is a unique inappropriate compensatory behavior that occurs in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus, mostly in females, who omit or restrict their required insulin doses in order to lose weight. Diagnosis of this underlying disorder is difficult. We aimed to use clinical and laboratory criteria to create an algorithm to assist in the detection of intentional insulin omission. The distribution of HbA1c levels from 287 (181 females) patients with type 1 diabetes were used as reference. Data from 26 patients with type 1 diabetes and intentional insulin omission were analysed. The Weka (Waikato Environment for Knowledge Analysis) machine learning software, decision tree classifier with 10-fold cross validation was used to developed prediction models. Model performance was assessed by cross-validation in a further 43 patients. Adolescents with intentional insulin omission were discriminated by: female sex, HbA1c>9.2%, more than 20% of HbA1c measurements above the 90th percentile, the mean of 3 highest delta HbA1c z-scores>1.28, current age and age at diagnosis. The models developed showed good discrimination (sensitivity and specificity 0.88 and 0.74, respectively). The external test dataset revealed good performance of the model with a sensitivity and specificity of 1.00 and 0.97, respectively. Using data mining methods we developed a clinical prediction model to determine an individual's probability of intentionally omitting insulin. This model provides a decision support system for the detection of intentional insulin omission for weight loss in adolescent females with type 1 diabetes mellitus. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. G Protein–Coupled Receptor Kinase 2 Plays a Relevant Role in Insulin Resistance and Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Guerra, Lucia; Nieto-Vazquez, Iria; Vila-Bedmar, Rocio; Jurado-Pueyo, María; Zalba, Guillermo; Díez, Javier; Murga, Cristina; Fernández-Veledo, Sonia; Mayor, Federico; Lorenzo, Margarita

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Insulin resistance is associated with the pathogenesis of metabolic disorders as type 2 diabetes and obesity. Given the emerging role of signal transduction in these syndromes, we set out to explore the possible role that G protein–coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2), first identified as a G protein–coupled receptor regulator, could have as a modulator of insulin responses. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We analyzed the influence of GRK2 levels in insulin signaling in myoblasts and adipocytes with experimentally increased or silenced levels of GRK2, as well as in GRK2 hemizygous animals expressing 50% lower levels of this kinase in three different models of insulin resistance: tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) infusion, aging, and high-fat diet (HFD). Glucose transport, whole-body glucose and insulin tolerance, the activation status of insulin pathway components, and the circulating levels of important mediators were measured. The development of obesity and adipocyte size with age and HFD was analyzed. RESULTS Altering GRK2 levels markedly modifies insulin-mediated signaling in cultured adipocytes and myocytes. GRK2 levels are increased by ∼2-fold in muscle and adipose tissue in the animal models tested, as well as in lymphocytes from metabolic syndrome patients. In contrast, hemizygous GRK2 mice show enhanced insulin sensitivity and do not develop insulin resistance by TNF-α, aging, or HFD. Furthermore, reduced GRK2 levels induce a lean phenotype and decrease age-related adiposity. CONCLUSIONS Overall, our data identify GRK2 as an important negative regulator of insulin effects, key to the etiopathogenesis of insulin resistance and obesity, which uncovers this protein as a potential therapeutic target in the treatment of these disorders. PMID:20627936

  3. G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 plays a relevant role in insulin resistance and obesity.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Guerra, Lucia; Nieto-Vazquez, Iria; Vila-Bedmar, Rocio; Jurado-Pueyo, María; Zalba, Guillermo; Díez, Javier; Murga, Cristina; Fernández-Veledo, Sonia; Mayor, Federico; Lorenzo, Margarita

    2010-10-01

    Insulin resistance is associated with the pathogenesis of metabolic disorders as type 2 diabetes and obesity. Given the emerging role of signal transduction in these syndromes, we set out to explore the possible role that G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2), first identified as a G protein-coupled receptor regulator, could have as a modulator of insulin responses. We analyzed the influence of GRK2 levels in insulin signaling in myoblasts and adipocytes with experimentally increased or silenced levels of GRK2, as well as in GRK2 hemizygous animals expressing 50% lower levels of this kinase in three different models of insulin resistance: tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) infusion, aging, and high-fat diet (HFD). Glucose transport, whole-body glucose and insulin tolerance, the activation status of insulin pathway components, and the circulating levels of important mediators were measured. The development of obesity and adipocyte size with age and HFD was analyzed. Altering GRK2 levels markedly modifies insulin-mediated signaling in cultured adipocytes and myocytes. GRK2 levels are increased by ∼2-fold in muscle and adipose tissue in the animal models tested, as well as in lymphocytes from metabolic syndrome patients. In contrast, hemizygous GRK2 mice show enhanced insulin sensitivity and do not develop insulin resistance by TNF-α, aging, or HFD. Furthermore, reduced GRK2 levels induce a lean phenotype and decrease age-related adiposity. Overall, our data identify GRK2 as an important negative regulator of insulin effects, key to the etiopathogenesis of insulin resistance and obesity, which uncovers this protein as a potential therapeutic target in the treatment of these disorders.

  4. Nuclear SREBP-1a causes loss of pancreatic {beta}-cells and impaired insulin secretion

    SciTech Connect

    Iwasaki, Yuko; Iwasaki, Hitoshi; Yatoh, Shigeru; Ishikawa, Mayumi; Kato, Toyonori; Matsuzaka, Takashi; Nakagawa, Yoshimi; Yahagi, Naoya; Kobayashi, Kazuto; Takahashi, Akimitsu; Suzuki, Hiroaki; Yamada, Nobuhiro; Shimano, Hitoshi

    2009-01-16

    Transgenic mice expressing nuclear sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1a under the control of the insulin promoter were generated to determine the role of SREBP-1a in pancreatic {beta}-cells. Only low expressors could be established, which exhibited mild hyperglycemia, impaired glucose tolerance, and reduced plasma insulin levels compared to C57BL/6 controls. The islets isolated from the transgenic mice were fewer and smaller, and had decreased insulin content and unaltered glucagon staining. Both glucose- and potassium-stimulated insulin secretions were decreased. The transgenic islets consistently expressed genes for fatty acids and cholesterol synthesis, resulting in accumulation of triglycerides but not cholesterol. PDX-1, {beta}{epsilon}{tau}{alpha}2, MafA, and IRS-2 were suppressed, partially explaining the loss and dysfunction of {beta}-cell mass. The transgenic mice on a high fat/high sucrose diet still exhibited impaired insulin secretion and continuous {beta}-cell growth defect. Therefore, nuclear SREBP-1a, even at a low level, strongly disrupts {beta}-cell mass and function.

  5. Design of a selective insulin receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor and its effect on glucose uptake and metabolism in intact cells

    SciTech Connect

    Saperstein, R.; Vicario, P.P.; Strout, H.V.; Brady, E.; Slater, E.E.; Greenlee, W.J.; Onedyka, D.L.; Patchett, A.A.; Hangauer, D.G. )

    1989-06-27

    An inhibitor of the insulin receptor tyrosine kinase (IRTK), (hydroxy-2-napthalenylmethyl)phosphonic acid, was designed and synthesized and was shown to be an inhibitor of the biological effects of insulin in vitro. With a wheat germ purified human placental insulin receptor preparation, this compound inhibited the insulin-stimulated autophosphorylation of the 95-kDa {beta}-subunit of the insulin receptor. The ability of the kinase to phosphorylate an exogenous peptide substrate, angiotensin II, was also inhibited. Half-maximal inhibition of basal and insulin-stimulated human placental IRTK activity was found at concentrations of 150 and 100 {mu}M, respectively, with 2 mM angiotensin II as the peptide substrate. The inhibitor was found to be specific for tyrosine kinases over serine kinases and noncompetitive with ATP. The inhibitor was converted into various (acyloxy)methyl prodrugs in order to achieve permeability through cell membranes. These prodrugs inhibited insulin-stimulated autophosphorylation of the insulin receptor 95-kDa {beta}-subunit in intact CHO cells transfected with human insulin receptor. Inhibition of insulin-stimulated glucose oxidation in isolated rat adipocytes and 2-deoxyglucose uptake into CHO cells was observed with these prodrugs. The data provide additional evidence for the involvement of the insulin receptor tyrosine kinase in the regulation of glucose uptake and metabolism. These results and additional data reported herein suggest that this class of prodrugs and inhibitors will be useful for modulating the activity of a variety of tyrosine kinases.

  6. Human insulin analogues modified at the B26 site reveal a hormone conformation that is undetected in the receptor complex

    SciTech Connect

    Žáková, Lenka; Kletvíková, Emília; Lepšík, Martin; Collinsová, Michaela; Watson, Christopher J.; Turkenburg, Johan P.; Jiráček, Jiří; Brzozowski, Andrzej M.

    2014-10-01

    [AsnB26]- and [GlyB26]-insulin mutants attain a B26-turn like fold without assistance of chemical modifications. Their structures match the insulin receptor interface and expand the spectrum of insulin conformations. The structural characterization of the insulin–insulin receptor (IR) interaction still lacks the conformation of the crucial B21–B30 insulin region, which must be different from that in its storage forms to ensure effective receptor binding. Here, it is shown that insulin analogues modified by natural amino acids at the TyrB26 site can represent an active form of this hormone. In particular, [AsnB26]-insulin and [GlyB26]-insulin attain a B26-turn-like conformation that differs from that in all known structures of the native hormone. It also matches the receptor interface, avoiding substantial steric clashes. This indicates that insulin may attain a B26-turn-like conformation upon IR binding. Moreover, there is an unexpected, but significant, binding specificity of the AsnB26 mutant for predominantly the metabolic B isoform of the receptor. As it is correlated with the B26 bend of the B-chain of the hormone, the structures of AsnB26 analogues may provide the first structural insight into the structural origins of differential insulin signalling through insulin receptor A and B isoforms.

  7. Cytoplasmic domains determine signal specificity, cellular routing characteristics and influence ligand binding of epidermal growth factor and insulin receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Riedel, H; Dull, T J; Honegger, A M; Schlessinger, J; Ullrich, A

    1989-01-01

    The cell surface receptors for insulin and epidermal growth factor (EGF) both employ a tyrosine-specific protein kinase activity to fulfil their distinct biological roles. To identify the structural domains responsible for various receptor activities, we have generated chimeric receptor polypeptides consisting of major EGF and insulin receptor structural domains and examined their biochemical properties and cellular signalling activities. The EGF-insulin receptor hybrids are properly synthesized and transported to the cell surface, where they form binding competent structures that are defined by the origin of their extracellular domains. While their ligand binding affinities are altered, we find that these chimeric receptors are fully functional in transmitting signals across the plasma membrane and into the cell. Thus, EGF receptor and insulin receptor cytoplasmic domain signalling capabilities are independent of their new heterotetrameric or monomeric environments respectively. Furthermore, the cytoplasmic domains carry the structural determinants that define kinase specificity, mitogenic and transforming potential, and receptor routing. Images PMID:2583088

  8. Insulin receptor activation and down-regulation by cationic lipid transfection reagents.

    PubMed

    Pramfalk, Camilla; Lanner, Johanna; Andersson, Monica; Danielsson, Eva; Kaiser, Christina; Renström, Ing-Marie; Warolén, Malin; James, Stephen R

    2004-01-26

    Transfection agents comprised of cationic lipid preparations are widely used to transfect cell lines in culture with specific recombinant complementary DNA molecules. We have found that cells in culture are often resistant to stimulation with insulin subsequent to treatment with transfection agents such as LipofectAMINE 2000 and FuGENE-6. This is seen with a variety of different readouts, including insulin receptor signalling, glucose uptake into muscle cells, phosphorylation of protein kinase B and reporter gene activity in a variety of different cell types We now show that this is due in part to the fact that cationic lipid agents activate the insulin receptor fully during typical transfection experiments, which is then down-regulated. In attempts to circumvent this problem, we investigated the effects of increasing concentrations of LipofectAMINE 2000 on insulin receptor phosphorylation in Chinese hamster ovary cells expressing the human insulin receptor. In addition, the efficiency of transfection that is supported by the same concentrations of transfection reagent was studied by using a green fluorescent protein construct. Our data indicate that considerably lower concentrations of LipofectAMINE 2000 can be used than are recommended by the manufacturers. This is without sacrificing transfection efficiency markedly and avoids the problem of reducing insulin receptor expression in the cells. Widely-used cationic lipid transfection reagents cause a state of insulin unresponsiveness in cells in culture due to fully activating and subsequently reducing the expression of the receptor in cells. This phenomenon can be avoided by reducing the concentration of reagent used in the transfection process.

  9. Insulin receptor aggregation and autophosphorylation in the presence of cationic polyamino acids

    SciTech Connect

    Kohanski, R.A. )

    1989-12-15

    Aggregation and autophosphorylation of the insulin receptor-protein kinase, from cultured 3T3-L1 adipocytes, were studied in the presence of cationic polyamino acids. Poly-L-lysine and poly-L-arginine produced the following effects with the purified receptor: first, the autophosphorylation rate was increased by polycations. Half-maximal stimulation was proportional to polymer length. The rate enhancement was greater at lower ATP concentrations. Second, near-endpoint (equilibrium) autophosphorylation was greater in the presence of the polycations. Polycations inhibited the reverse reaction: ADP + phosphoreceptor yielding ATP + aporeceptor. Third, the (32P)phosphopeptides generated by trypsin digestion of the 32P-beta-subunit, showed that no new autophosphorylation sites resulted from the presence of polycations. Fourth, the polycations, but not insulin, promoted receptor aggregation, and phosphoreceptor aggregated more readily than aporeceptor. Insulin receptor enriched through the wheat germ agglutinin eluate step was compared with purified receptor. Higher concentrations of poly-L-arginine were required to stimulate autophosphorylation and to promote aggregation. Finally, several polycation-dependent substrates present in the wheat germ agglutinin eluate co-aggregated with the insulin receptor. Polycation-stimulated receptor autophosphorylation is linked to a lower KM,app for ATP, but substrate phosphorylation may require the aggregation.

  10. Differing effects of antiinsulin serum and antiinsulin receptor serum on 123I-insulin metabolism in rats.

    PubMed Central

    Sodoyez, J C; Sodoyez Goffaux, F; von Frenckell, R; De Vos, C J; Treves, S; Kahn, C R

    1985-01-01

    Anesthetized rats were treated with saline, antiinsulin receptor serum, or antiinsulin serum, and the biodistribution of high pressure liquid chromatography-purified 123I-Tyr A14-insulin was studied by scintillation scanning. Time activity curves over organs of interest were calibrated by sacrificing the rats at the end of the experiment and directly determining the radioactivity in the blood, liver, and kidneys. Saline-treated rats exhibited normal insulin biodistribution. The highest concentration of 123I-insulin was found in the liver, and reached 30% of total injected dose between 3 and 5 min after injection. After this peak, activity rapidly decreased with a t1/2 of 6 min. Activity of 123I-insulin in kidney showed a more gradual rise and fall and was approximately 15% of injected dose at its maximum. In rats treated with antiinsulin antiserum, insulin biodistribution was markedly altered. Peak liver activity increased with increasing antibody concentration with up to 90% of injected dose appearing in the liver. In addition, there was no clearance of the liver 123I-insulin over 30 min. Autoradiographic studies demonstrated that in contrast to the normal rats in which radioactivity was associated with hepatocytes, in rats passively immunized with anti-insulin serum, 125I-insulin was associated primarily with the Kuppfer cells. In contrast, antibodies to the insulin receptor markedly inhibited 123I-insulin uptake by the liver. Kidney activity increased, reflecting the amount of free 123I-insulin that reached this organ. This is similar to the pattern observed when insulin receptors are saturated with a high concentration of unlabeled insulin. Thus, both insulin antibodies and anti-receptor antibodies alter the distribution of insulin, but with very different patterns. The use of 123I-insulin and scintillation scanning allows one to study specific alterations in insulin distribution in animal models of insulin-resistant states, and should also be useful in human

  11. Human specific loss of olfactory receptor genes

    PubMed Central

    Gilad, Yoav; Man, Orna; Pääbo, Svante; Lancet, Doron

    2003-01-01

    Olfactory receptor (OR) genes constitute the basis for the sense of smell and are encoded by the largest mammalian gene superfamily of >1,000 genes. In humans, >60% of these are pseudogenes. In contrast, the mouse OR repertoire, although of roughly equal size, contains only ≈20% pseudogenes. We asked whether the high fraction of nonfunctional OR genes is specific to humans or is a common feature of all primates. To this end, we have compared the sequences of 50 human OR coding regions, regardless of their functional annotations, to those of their putative orthologs in chimpanzees, gorillas, orangutans, and rhesus macaques. We found that humans have accumulated mutations that disrupt OR coding regions roughly 4-fold faster than any other species sampled. As a consequence, the fraction of OR pseudogenes in humans is almost twice as high as in the non-human primates, suggesting a human-specific process of OR gene disruption, likely due to a reduced chemosensory dependence relative to apes. PMID:12612342

  12. Tyrosine-specific phosphorylation of calmodulin by the insulin receptor kinase purified from human placenta.

    PubMed Central

    Sacks, D B; Fujita-Yamaguchi, Y; Gale, R D; McDonald, J M

    1989-01-01

    It has previously been demonstrated that calmodulin can be phosphorylated in vitro and in vivo by both tyrosine-specific and serine/threonine protein kinase. We demonstrate here that the insulin receptor tyrosine kinase purified from human placenta phosphorylates calmodulin. The highly purified receptors (prepared by insulin-Sepharose chromatography) were 5-10 times more effective in catalysing the phosphorylation of calmodulin than an equal number of partially purified receptors (prepared by wheat-germ agglutinin-Sepharose chromatography). Phosphorylation occurred exclusively on tyrosine residues, up to a maximum of 1 mol [0.90 +/- 0.14 (n = 5)] of phosphate incorporated/mol of calmodulin. Phosphorylation of calmodulin was dependent on the presence of certain basic proteins and divalent cations. Some of these basic proteins, i.e. polylysine, polyarginine, polyornithine, protamine sulphate and histones H1 and H2B, were also able to stimulate the phosphorylation of calmodulin via an insulin-independent activation of the receptor tyrosine kinase. Addition of insulin further increased incorporation of 32P into calmodulin. The magnitude of the effect of insulin was dependent on the concentration and type of basic protein used, ranging from 0.5- to 9.0-fold stimulation. Maximal phosphorylation of calmodulin was obtained at an insulin concentration of 10(-10) M, with half-maximal effect at 10(-11) M. Either Mg2+ or Mn2+ was necessary to obtain phosphorylation, but Mg2+ was far more effective than Mn2+. In contrast, maximal phosphorylation of calmodulin was observed in the absence of Ca2+. Inhibition of phosphorylation was observed as free Ca2+ concentration exceeded 0.1 microM, with almost complete inhibition at 30 microM free Ca2+. The Km for calmodulin was approx. 0.1 microM. To gain further insight into the effects of basic proteins in this system, we examined the binding of calmodulin to the insulin receptor and the polylysine. Calmodulin binds to the insulin

  13. Defective insulin secretion in pancreatic β cells lacking type 1 IGF receptor

    PubMed Central

    Xuan, Shouhong; Kitamura, Tadahiro; Nakae, Jun; Politi, Katerina; Kido, Yoshiaki; Fisher, Peter E.; Morroni, Manrico; Cinti, Saverio; White, Morris F.; Herrera, Pedro L.; Accili, Domenico; Efstratiadis, Argiris

    2002-01-01

    Defective insulin secretion is a feature of type 2 diabetes that results from inadequate compensatory increase of β cell mass and impaired glucose-dependent insulin release. β cell proliferation and secretion are thought to be regulated by signaling through receptor tyrosine kinases. In this regard, we sought to examine the potential proliferative and/or antiapoptotic role of IGFs in β cells by tissue-specific conditional mutagenesis ablating type 1 IGF receptor (IGF1R) signaling. Unexpectedly, lack of functional IGF1R did not affect β cell mass, but resulted in age-dependent impairment of glucose tolerance, associated with a decrease of glucose- and arginine-dependent insulin release. These observations reveal a requirement of IGF1R-mediated signaling for insulin secretion. PMID:12370279

  14. Conjugated Linoleic Acids Mediate Insulin Release through Islet G Protein-coupled Receptor FFA1/GPR40*

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Johannes; Liebscher, Kathrin; Merten, Nicole; Grundmann, Manuel; Mielenz, Manfred; Sauerwein, Helga; Christiansen, Elisabeth; Due-Hansen, Maria E.; Ulven, Trond; Ullrich, Susanne; Gomeza, Jesús; Drewke, Christel; Kostenis, Evi

    2011-01-01

    Among dietary components, conjugated linoleic acids (CLAs) have attracted considerable attention as weight loss supplements in the Western world because they reduce fat stores and increase muscle mass. However, a number of adverse effects are also ascribed to the intake of CLAs such as aggravation of insulin resistance and the risk of developing diabetes. However, the mechanisms accounting for the effects of CLAs on glucose homeostasis are incompletely understood. Herein we provide evidence that CLAs specifically activate the cell surface receptor FFA1, an emerging therapeutic target to treat type 2 diabetes. Using different recombinant cellular systems engineered to stably express FFA1 and a set of diverse functional assays including the novel, label-free non-invasive dynamic mass redistribution technology (Corning® Epic® biosensor), both CLA isomers cis-9, trans-11-CLA and trans-10, cis-12-CLA were found to activate FFA1 in vitro at concentrations sufficient to also account for FFA1 activation in vivo. Each CLA isomer markedly increased glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in insulin-producing INS-1E cells that endogenously express FFA1 and in primary pancreatic β-cells of wild type but not FFA1−/− knock-out mice. Our findings establish a clear mechanistic link between CLAs and insulin production and identify the cell surface receptor FFA1 as a molecular target for CLAs, explaining their acute stimulatory effects on insulin secretion in vivo. CLAs are also revealed as insulinotropic components in widely used nutraceuticals, a finding with significant implication for development of FFA1 modulators to treat type 2 diabetes. PMID:21339298

  15. Insulin-receptor kinase is enhanced in placentas from non-insulin-dependent diabetic women with large-for-gestational-age babies.

    PubMed

    Takayama-Hasumi, S; Yoshino, H; Shimisu, M; Minei, S; Sanaka, M; Omori, Y

    1994-01-01

    The function of insulin receptor and IGF-1 receptor was investigated in placentas from 10 healthy control mothers, 8 diabetic mothers with appropriate-for-gestational-age babies (AGA group) and 9 diabetic mothers with large-for-gestational-age babies (LGA group). None of the diabetic mothers were obese before pregnancy; their blood glucose was well controlled during pregnancy and glycosylated HbA1c was 6.52 +/- 0.71% (M +/- S.E.). Insulin and IGF-1 receptors were partially purified from placentas using wheat germ agglutinin chromatography. The insulin-binding capacity was significantly increased in both the AGA and the LGA groups compared to the control, whereas the IGF-1 binding capacity was similar in the three groups. Autophosphorylation studies were performed with partially purified receptors equalized for similar binding capacity, then immunoprecipitated with anti-insulin receptor antibody or anti-IGF-1 receptor antibody. Insulin-stimulated 32P-incorporation into the insulin receptor beta-subunit was increased by 133% in the LGA group versus the control, whereas incorporation in the AGA group was equivalent to the control. Insulin-stimulated tyrosine kinase activity of the receptor preparation for histone H2B phosphorylation was also significantly increased in the LGA group compared to the control. 32P-incorporation into beta-subunit IGF-1 receptor and IGF-1-stimulated tyrosine kinase activity did not show any significant differences among the three groups. The data in the present study suggest that elevated insulin receptor kinase might be involved in fetal overgrowth in diabetic mothers.

  16. All-atom structural models of insulin binding to the insulin receptor in the presence of a tandem hormone-binding element.

    PubMed

    Vashisth, Harish; Abrams, Cameron F

    2013-06-01

    Insulin regulates blood glucose levels in higher organisms by binding to and activating insulin receptor (IR), a constitutively homodimeric glycoprotein of the receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) superfamily. Therapeutic efforts in treating diabetes have been significantly impeded by the absence of structural information on the activated form of the insulin/IR complex. Mutagenesis and photo-crosslinking experiments and structural information on insulin and apo-IR strongly suggest that the dual-chain insulin molecule, unlike the related single-chain insulin-like growth factors, binds to IR in a very different conformation than what is displayed in storage forms of the hormone. In particular, hydrophobic residues buried in the core of the folded insulin molecule engage the receptor. There is also the possibility of plasticity in the receptor structure based on these data, which may in part be due to rearrangement of the so-called CT-peptide, a tandem hormone-binding element of IR. These possibilities provide opportunity for large-scale molecular modeling to contribute to our understanding of this system. Using various atomistic simulation approaches, we have constructed all-atom structural models of hormone/receptor complexes in the presence of CT in its crystallographic position and a thermodynamically favorable displaced position. In the "displaced-CT" complex, many more insulin-receptor contacts suggested by experiments are satisfied, and our simulations also suggest that R-insulin potentially represents the receptor-bound form of hormone. The results presented in this work have further implications for the design of receptor-specific agonists/antagonists.

  17. Label-Free Proteomic Identification of Endogenous, Insulin-Stimulated Interaction Partners of Insulin Receptor Substrate-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geetha, Thangiah; Langlais, Paul; Luo, Moulun; Mapes, Rebekka; Lefort, Natalie; Chen, Shu-Chuan; Mandarino, Lawrence J.; Yi, Zhengping

    2011-03-01

    Protein-protein interactions are key to most cellular processes. Tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS)-based proteomics combined with co-immunoprecipitation (CO-IP) has emerged as a powerful approach for studying protein complexes. However, a majority of systematic proteomics studies on protein-protein interactions involve the use of protein overexpression and/or epitope-tagged bait proteins, which might affect binding stoichiometry and lead to higher false positives. Here, we report an application of a straightforward, label-free CO-IP-MS/MS method, without the use of protein overexpression or protein tags, to the investigation of changes in the abundance of endogenous proteins associated with a bait protein, which is in this case insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1), under basal and insulin stimulated conditions. IRS-1 plays a central role in the insulin signaling cascade. Defects in the protein-protein interactions involving IRS-1 may lead to the development of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. HPLC-ESI-MS/MS analyses identified eleven novel endogenous insulin-stimulated IRS-1 interaction partners in L6 myotubes reproducibly, including proteins play an important role in protein dephosphorylation [protein phosphatase 1 regulatory subunit 12A, (PPP1R12A)], muscle contraction and actin cytoskeleton rearrangement, endoplasmic reticulum stress, and protein folding, as well as protein synthesis. This novel application of label-free CO-IP-MS/MS quantification to assess endogenous interaction partners of a specific protein will prove useful for understanding how various cell stimuli regulate insulin signal transduction.

  18. Analysis of in vitro interactions of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B with insulin receptors.

    PubMed

    Wang, X Y; Bergdahl, K; Heijbel, A; Liljebris, C; Bleasdale, J E

    2001-02-28

    One strategy to treat the insulin resistance that is central to type II diabetes mellitus may be to maintain insulin receptors (IR) in the active (tyrosine phosphorylated) form. Because protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) binds and subsequently dephosphorylates IR, inhibitors of PTP1B-IR binding are potential insulin 'sensitizers.' A Scintillation Proximity Assay (SPA) was developed to characterize and quantitate PTP1B-IR binding. Human IR were solubilized and captured on wheat germ agglutinin (WGA)-coated SPA beads. Subsequent binding of human, catalytically inactive [35S] PTP1B Cys(215)/Ser (PTP1B(C215S)) to the lectin-anchored IR results in scintillation from the SPA beads that can be quantitated. Binding of PTP1B to IR was pH- and divalent cation-sensitive. Ca(2+) and Mn(2+), but not Mg(2+), dramatically attenuated the loss of PTP1B-IR binding observed when pH was raised from 6.2 to 7.8. PTP1B binding to IR from insulin-stimulated cells was much greater than to IR from unstimulated cells and was inhibited by either an antiphosphotyrosine antibody or treatment of IR with alkaline phosphatase, suggesting that tyrosine phosphorylation of IR is required for PTP1B binding. Phosphopeptides modeled after various IR phosphotyrosine domains each only partially inhibited PTP1B-IR binding, indicating that multiple domains of IR are likely involved in binding PTP1B. However, competitive displacement of [35S]PTP1B(C215S) by PTP1B(C215S) fitted best to a single binding site with a K(d) in the range 100-1000 nM, depending upon pH and divalent cations. PNU-200898, a potent and selective inhibitor of PTP1B whose orientation in the active site of PTP1B has been solved, competitively inhibited catalysis and PTP1B-IR binding with equal potency. The results of this novel assay for PTP1B-IR binding suggest that PTP1B binds preferentially to tyrosine phosphorylated IR through its active site and that binding may be susceptible to therapeutic disruption by small molecules.

  19. Insulin receptor kinase-independent signaling via tyrosine phosphorylation of phosphatase PHLPP1.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Manchao; Riedel, Heimo

    2009-05-01

    Most insulin responses correlate well with insulin receptor (IR) Tyr kinase activation; however, critical exceptions to this concept have been presented. Specific IR mutants and stimulatory IR antibodies demonstrate a lack of correlation between IR kinase activity and specific insulin responses in numerous independent studies. IR conformation changes in response to insulin observed with various IR antibodies define an IR kinase-independent signal that alters the C-terminus. IR-related receptors in lower eukaryotes that lack a Tyr kinase point to an alternative mechanism of IR signaling earlier in evolution. However, the implied IR kinase-independent signaling mechanism remained obscure at the molecular level. Here we begin to define the molecular basis of an IR-dependent but IR kinase-independent insulin signal that is equally transmitted by a kinase-inactive mutant IR. This insulin signal results in Tyr phosphorylation and catalytic activation of phosphatase PHLPP1 via a PI 3-kinase-independent, wortmannin-insensitive signaling pathway. Dimerized SH2B1/PSM is a critical activator of the IR kinase and the resulting established insulin signal. In contrast it is an inhibitor of the IR kinase-independent insulin signal and disruption of SH2B1/PSM dimer binding to IR potentiates this signal. Dephosphorylation of Akt2 by PHLPP1 provides an alternative, SH2B1/PSM-regulated insulin-signaling pathway from IR to Akt2 of opposite polarity and distinct from the established PI 3-kinase-dependent signaling pathway via IRS proteins. In combination, both pathways should allow the opposing regulation of Akt2 activity at two phosphorylation sites to specifically define the insulin signal in the background of interfering Akt-regulating signals, such as those controlling cell proliferation and survival.

  20. Context-dependent regulation of feeding behaviour by the insulin receptor, DAF-2, in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Dillon, James; Holden-Dye, Lindy; O'Connor, Vincent; Hopper, Neil A

    2016-06-01

    Insulin signalling plays a significant role in both developmental programmes and pathways modulating the neuronal signalling that controls adult behaviour. Here, we have investigated insulin signalling in food-associated behaviour in adult C. elegans by scoring locomotion and feeding on and off bacteria, the worm's food. This analysis used mutants (daf-2, daf-18) of the insulin signalling pathway, and we provide evidence for an acute role for insulin signalling in the adult nervous system distinct from its impact on developmental programmes. Insulin receptor daf-2 mutants move slower than wild type both on and off food and showed impaired locomotory responses to food deprivation. This latter behaviour is manifest as a failure to instigate dispersal following prolonged food deprivation and suggests a role for insulin signalling in this adaptive response. Insulin receptor daf-2 mutants are also deficient in pharyngeal pumping on food and off food. Pharmacological analysis showed the pharynx of daf-2 is selectively compromised in its response to 5-HT compared to the excitatory neuropeptide FLP-17. By comparing the adaptive pharyngeal behaviour in intact worms and isolated pharyngeal preparations, we determined that an insulin-dependent signal extrinsic to the pharyngeal system is involved in feeding adaptation. Hence, we suggest that reactive insulin signalling modulates both locomotory foraging and pharyngeal pumping as the animal adapts to the absence of food. We discuss this in the context of insulin signalling directing a shift in the sensitivity of neurotransmitter systems to regulate the worm's response to changes in food availability in the environment.

  1. Phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate-1 serine 307 correlates with JNK activity in atrophic skeletal muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilder, Thomas L.; Tou, Janet C L.; Grindeland, Richard E.; Wade, Charles E.; Graves, Lee M.

    2003-01-01

    c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase (JNK) has been shown to negatively regulate insulin signaling through serine phosphorylation of residue 307 within the insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1) in adipose and liver tissue. Using a rat hindlimb suspension model for muscle disuse atrophy, we found that JNK activity was significantly elevated in atrophic soleus muscle and that IRS-1 was phosphorylated on Ser(307) prior to the degradation of the IRS-1 protein. Moreover, we observed a corresponding reduction in Akt activity, providing biochemical evidence for the development of insulin resistance in atrophic skeletal muscle.

  2. Phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate-1 serine 307 correlates with JNK activity in atrophic skeletal muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilder, Thomas L.; Tou, Janet C L.; Grindeland, Richard E.; Wade, Charles E.; Graves, Lee M.

    2003-01-01

    c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase (JNK) has been shown to negatively regulate insulin signaling through serine phosphorylation of residue 307 within the insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1) in adipose and liver tissue. Using a rat hindlimb suspension model for muscle disuse atrophy, we found that JNK activity was significantly elevated in atrophic soleus muscle and that IRS-1 was phosphorylated on Ser(307) prior to the degradation of the IRS-1 protein. Moreover, we observed a corresponding reduction in Akt activity, providing biochemical evidence for the development of insulin resistance in atrophic skeletal muscle.

  3. Mitochondrial H2O2 as an enable signal for triggering autophosphorylation of insulin receptor in neurons

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Insulin receptors are widely distributed in the brain, where they play roles in synaptic function, memory formation, and neuroprotection. Autophosphorylation of the receptor in response to insulin stimulation is a critical step in receptor activation. In neurons, insulin stimulation leads to a rise in mitochondrial H2O2 production, which plays a role in receptor autophosphorylation. However, the kinetic characteristics of the H2O2 signal and its functional relationships with the insulin receptor during the autophosphorylation process in neurons remain unexplored to date. Results Experiments were carried out in culture of rat cerebellar granule neurons. Kinetic study showed that the insulin-induced H2O2 signal precedes receptor autophosphorylation and represents a single spike with a peak at 5–10 s and duration of less than 30 s. Mitochondrial complexes II and, to a lesser extent, I are involved in generation of the H2O2 signal. The mechanism by which insulin triggers the H2O2 signal involves modulation of succinate dehydrogenase activity. Insulin dose–response for receptor autophosphorylation is well described by hyperbolic function (Hill coefficient, nH, of 1.1±0.1; R2=0.99). N-acetylcysteine (NAC), a scavenger of H2O2, dose-dependently inhibited receptor autophosphorylation. The observed dose response is highly sigmoidal (Hill coefficient, nH, of 8.0±2.3; R2=0.97), signifying that insulin receptor autophosphorylation is highly ultrasensitive to the H2O2 signal. These results suggest that autophosphorylation occurred as a gradual response to increasing insulin concentrations, only if the H2O2 signal exceeded a certain threshold. Both insulin-stimulated receptor autophosphorylation and H2O2 generation were inhibited by pertussis toxin, suggesting that a pertussis toxin-sensitive G protein may link the insulin receptor to the H2O2-generating system in neurons during the autophosphorylation process. Conclusions In this study, we demonstrated for

  4. Mammary tumorigenesis and metastasis caused by overexpression of insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS-1) or IRS-2

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Insulin receptor substrates (IRSs) are signaling adaptors that play a major role in the metabolic and mitogenic actions of insulin and insulin-like growth factors. Reports have recently noted increased levels, or activity, of IRSs in many human cancers, and some have linked this to poor patient prog...

  5. Solution structure of human insulin-like growth factor II; recognition sites for receptors and binding proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Terasawa, H; Kohda, D; Hatanaka, H; Nagata, K; Higashihashi, N; Fujiwara, H; Sakano, K; Inagaki, F

    1994-01-01

    The three-dimensional structure of human insulin-like growth factor II was determined at high resolution in aqueous solution by NMR and simulated annealing based calculations. The structure is quite similar to those of insulin and insulin-like growth factor I, which consists of an alpha-helix followed by a turn and a strand in the B-region and two antiparallel alpha-helices in the A-region. However, the regions of Ala1-Glu6, Pro31-Arg40 and Thr62-Glu67 are not well-defined for lack of distance constraints, possibly due to motional flexibility. Based on the resultant structure and the results of structure-activity relationships, we propose the interaction sites of insulin-like growth factor II with the type 2 insulin-like growth factor receptor and the insulin-like growth factor binding proteins. These sites partially overlap with each other at the opposite side of the putative binding surface to the insulin receptor and the type 1 insulin-like growth factor receptor. We also discuss the interaction modes of insulin-like growth factor II with the insulin receptor and the type 1 insulin-like growth factor receptor. Images PMID:7527339

  6. Replacement of insulin receptor tyrosine residues 1162 and 1163 does not alter the mitogenic effect of the hormone

    SciTech Connect

    Debant, A.; Clauser, E.; Ponzio, G.; Filloux, C.; Auzan, C.; Contreres, J.O.; Rossi, B. )

    1988-11-01

    Chinese hamster ovary transfectants that express insulin receptors in which tyrosine residues 1162 and 1163 were replaced by phenylalanine exhibit a total inhibition of the insulin-mediated tyrosine kinase activity toward exogenous substrates; this latter activity is associated with total inhibition of the hypersensitivity reported for insulin in promoting 2-deoxyglucose uptake. The authors now present evidence that the twin tyrosines also control the insulin-mediated stimulation of glycogen synthesis. Surprisingly, this type of Chinese hamster ovary transfectant is as hypersensitive to insulin for its mitogenic effect as are Chinese hamster ovary cells expressing many intact insulin receptors. Such data suggest that (i) the insulin mitogenic effect routes through a different pathway than insulin uses to activate the transport and metabolism of glucose and (ii) the mitogenic effect of insulin is not controlled by the twin tyrosines. At the molecular level, the solubilized mutated receptor has not insulin-dependent tyrosine kinase activity, whereas this receptor displays measurable insulin-stimulated phosphorylation of its {beta} subunit in {sup 32}P-labeled cells. The authors therefore propose that the autocatalytic phosphorylating activity of the receptor reports a cryptic tyrosine kinase activity that cannot be visualized by the use of classical exogenous substrates.

  7. Insulin Excites Anorexigenic Proopiomelanocortin Neurons via Activation of Canonical Transient Receptor Potential Channels

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Jian; Zhang, Chunguang; Borgquist, Amanda; Nestor, Casey C; Smith, Arik W.; Bosch, Martha A.; Ku, Stephen; Wagner, Edward J.; Rønnekleiv, Oline K.; Kelly, Martin J.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Proopiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons within the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus are vital anorexigenic neurons. Although both the leptin receptor and insulin receptor are coupled to activation of phosphatidylinositide3-kinase (PI3K) in POMC neurons, they are thought to have disparate actions on POMC excitability. Using whole-cell recording and selective pharmacological tools, we have found that similar to leptin, purified insulin depolarized POMC, and adjacent kisspeptin neurons via activation of TRPC5 channels, which are highly expressed in these neurons. In contrast, insulin hyperpolarized and inhibited NPY/AgRP neurons via activation of KATP channels. Moreover, Zn2+, which is found in insulin formulations at nanomolar concentrations, inhibited POMC neurons via activation of KATP channels. Finally as predicted, insulin given intracerebroventrically robustly inhibited food intake and activated c-fos expression in arcuate POMC neurons. Our results show that purified insulin excites POMC neurons in the arcuate nucleus, which we propose is a major mechanism by which insulin regulates energy homeostasis. PMID:24703699

  8. Ultrastructural evidence for the accumulation of insulin in nuclei of intact 3T3-L1 adipocytes by an insulin-receptor mediated process

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R.M.; Jarett, L.

    1987-01-01

    Monomeric ferritin-labeled insulin (F/sub m/-Ins), a biologically active, electron-dense marker of occupied insulin receptors, was used to characterize the internalization of insulin in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. F/sub m/-Ins bound specifically to insulin receptors and was internalized in a time- and temperature-dependent manner. In the nucleus, several F/sub m/-Ins particles usually were found in the same general location-near nuclear pores, associated with the periphery of the condensed chromatin. Addition of a 250-fold excess of unlabeled insulin or incubation at 15/sup 0/C reduced the number of F/sub m/-Ins particles found in nuclei after 90 min by 99% or 92%, respectively. Nuclear accumulation of unlabeled ferritin was only 2% of that found with F/sub m/-Ins after 90 min at 37/sup 0/C. Biochemical experiments utilizing /sup 125/I-labeled insulin and subcellular fractionation indicated that intact 3T3-L1 adipocytes internalized insulin rapidly and that approx. = 3% of the internalized ligand accumulated in nuclei after 1 hr. These data provide biochemical and high-resolution ultrastructural evidence that 3T3-L1 adipocytes accumulate potentially significant amounts of insulin in nuclei by an insulin receptor-mediated process. The transport of insulin or the insulin-receptor complex to nuclei in this cell or in others may be directly involved in the long-term biological effects of insulin - in particular, in the control of DNA and RNA synthesis.

  9. The role of insulin receptor substrate (IRS) proteins in oncogenic transformation.

    PubMed

    Gorgisen, G; Gulacar, I M; Ozes, O N

    2017-01-30

    Insulin Receptor Substrate (IRS) proteins are the main cytoplasmic adaptor molecules involved in transducing extracellular signals from receptors to downstream proteins. This protein family have pivotal roles on maintenance, distribution and regulation of signaling networks. Since IRS1/2 interact with and transmits signals from the receptors of insulin, Insulin Like Growth Factor 1 (IGF1), prolactin, growth hormone (GH), leptin, Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF), TrkB, ALK and integrins this promoted scientist to think that IRS1 may have functions in cell proliferation, tumorigenesis and metastasis. Therefore, over the past decade, studies on IRS proteins and their functions in cancer has been increased and these studies provided valuable results claiming the involvement of IRS1/2 in cancer development. In this review, we discuss the function and contributions of IRS1 and IRS2 in development of  breast cancer.

  10. The insulin and IGF1 receptor kinase domains are functional dimers in the activated state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabail, M. Zulema; Li, Shiqing; Lemmon, Eric; Bowen, Mark E.; Hubbard, Stevan R.; Miller, W. Todd

    2015-03-01

    The insulin receptor (IR) and insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF1R) are highly related receptor tyrosine kinases with a disulfide-linked homodimeric architecture. Ligand binding to the receptor ectodomain triggers tyrosine autophosphorylation of the cytoplasmic domains, which stimulates catalytic activity and creates recruitment sites for downstream signalling proteins. Whether the two phosphorylated tyrosine kinase domains within the receptor dimer function independently or cooperatively to phosphorylate protein substrates is not known. Here we provide crystallographic, biophysical and biochemical evidence demonstrating that the phosphorylated kinase domains of IR and IGF1R form a specific dimeric arrangement involving an exchange of the juxtamembrane region proximal to the kinase domain. In this dimer, the active position of α-helix C in the kinase N lobe is stabilized, which promotes downstream substrate phosphorylation. These studies afford a novel strategy for the design of small-molecule IR agonists as potential therapeutic agents for type 2 diabetes.

  11. The insulin and IGF1 receptor kinase domains are functional dimers in the activated state.

    PubMed

    Cabail, M Zulema; Li, Shiqing; Lemmon, Eric; Bowen, Mark E; Hubbard, Stevan R; Miller, W Todd

    2015-03-11

    The insulin receptor (IR) and insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF1R) are highly related receptor tyrosine kinases with a disulfide-linked homodimeric architecture. Ligand binding to the receptor ectodomain triggers tyrosine autophosphorylation of the cytoplasmic domains, which stimulates catalytic activity and creates recruitment sites for downstream signalling proteins. Whether the two phosphorylated tyrosine kinase domains within the receptor dimer function independently or cooperatively to phosphorylate protein substrates is not known. Here we provide crystallographic, biophysical and biochemical evidence demonstrating that the phosphorylated kinase domains of IR and IGF1R form a specific dimeric arrangement involving an exchange of the juxtamembrane region proximal to the kinase domain. In this dimer, the active position of α-helix C in the kinase N lobe is stabilized, which promotes downstream substrate phosphorylation. These studies afford a novel strategy for the design of small-molecule IR agonists as potential therapeutic agents for type 2 diabetes.

  12. Theoretical and Computational Studies of Peptides and Receptors of the Insulin Family

    PubMed Central

    Vashisth, Harish

    2015-01-01

    Synergistic interactions among peptides and receptors of the insulin family are required for glucose homeostasis, normal cellular growth and development, proliferation, differentiation and other metabolic processes. The peptides of the insulin family are disulfide-linked single or dual-chain proteins, while receptors are ligand-activated transmembrane glycoproteins of the receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) superfamily. Binding of ligands to the extracellular domains of receptors is known to initiate signaling via activation of intracellular kinase domains. While the structure of insulin has been known since 1969, recent decades have seen remarkable progress on the structural biology of apo and liganded receptor fragments. Here, we review how this useful structural information (on ligands and receptors) has enabled large-scale atomically-resolved simulations to elucidate the conformational dynamics of these biomolecules. Particularly, applications of molecular dynamics (MD) and Monte Carlo (MC) simulation methods are discussed in various contexts, including studies of isolated ligands, apo-receptors, ligand/receptor complexes and intracellular kinase domains. The review concludes with a brief overview and future outlook for modeling and computational studies in this family of proteins. PMID:25680077

  13. Selection of an RNA molecule that mimics a major autoantigenic epitope of human insulin receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Doudna, J A; Cech, T R; Sullenger, B A

    1995-01-01

    Autoimmunity often involves the abnormal targeting of self-antigens by antibodies, leading to tissue destruction and other pathologies. This process could potentially be disrupted by small ligands that bind specifically to autoantibodies and inhibit their interaction with the target antigen. Here we report the identification of an RNA sequence that binds a mouse monoclonal antibody specific for an autoantigenic epitope of human insulin receptor. The RNA ligand binds specifically and with high affinity (apparent Kd congruent to 2 nM) to the anti-insulin receptor antibody and not to other mouse IgGs. The RNA can also act as a decoy, blocking the antibody from binding the insulin receptor. Thus, it probably binds near the combining site on the antibody. Strikingly, the RNA cross-reacts with autoantibodies from patients with extreme insulin resistance. One simple explanation is that the selected RNA may structurally mimic the antigenic epitope on the insulin receptor protein. These results suggest that decoy RNAs may be used in the treatment of autoimmune diseases. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:7534420

  14. A phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt/mTOR pathway mediates and PTEN antagonizes tumor necrosis factor inhibition of insulin signaling through insulin receptor substrate-1

    PubMed Central

    Ozes, Osman Nidai; Akca, Hakan; Mayo, Lindsey D.; Gustin, Jason A.; Maehama, Tomohiko; Dixon, Jack E.; Donner, David B.

    2001-01-01

    Tyrosine phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1) by the insulin receptor permits this docking protein to interact with signaling proteins that promote insulin action. Serine phosphorylation uncouples IRS-1 from the insulin receptor, thereby inhibiting its tyrosine phosphorylation and insulin signaling. For this reason, there is great interest in identifying serine/threonine kinases for which IRS-1 is a substrate. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) inhibited insulin-promoted tyrosine phosphorylation of IRS-1 and activated the Akt/protein kinase B serine-threonine kinase, a downstream target for phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI 3-kinase). The effect of TNF on insulin-promoted tyrosine phosphorylation of IRS-1 was blocked by inhibition of PI 3-kinase and the PTEN tumor suppessor, which dephosphorylates the lipids that mediate PI 3-kinase functions, whereas constitutively active Akt impaired insulin-promoted IRS-1 tyrosine phosphorylation. Conversely, TNF inhibition of IRS-1 tyrosine phosphorylation was blocked by kinase dead Akt. Inhibition of IRS-1 tyrosine phosphorylation by TNF was blocked by rapamycin, an inhibitor of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), a downstream target of Akt. mTOR induced the serine phosphorylation of IRS-1 (Ser-636/639), and such phosphorylation was inhibited by rapamycin. These results suggest that TNF impairs insulin signaling through IRS-1 by activation of a PI 3-kinase/Akt/mTOR pathway, which is antagonized by PTEN. PMID:11287630

  15. Insulin, insulin-like growth factor–1, insulin receptor, and insulin-like growth factor–1 receptor expression in the chick eye and their regulation with imposed myopic or hyperopic defocus

    PubMed Central

    Penha, Alexandra Marcha; Schaeffel, Frank

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Insulin stimulates eye growth in chicks and this effect is greatly enhanced if the retinal image is degraded by the defocus of either sign. However, it is unclear whether the insulin receptor (IR) is expressed at all in the chicken retina in animals 1–2 weeks post-hatching. We have investigated IR expression and whether IR transcript abundance varies in the fundal layers. To elucidate the possible role of insulin and insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-1 signaling in eye growth regulation, mRNA (mRNA) levels were measured for insulin, IGF-1, IR, and IGF-1 receptor (IGF-1R) during imposed negative or positive defocus. Methods Chicks were treated binocularly with positive or negative spectacle lenses for 4 or 24 h, or they remained untreated (n=6, for each treatment group). Northern blot analyses were performed to screen for transcription variants in the different fundal layers of untreated animals. Real-time PCR was used to quantify IR, IGF-1R, IGF-1, and insulin mRNA levels in the different fundal layers of the chick eye in the three treatment groups. Results IR mRNA was found in all the studied tissues, although there is evidence of tissue-specific transcript variations. Three major transcripts were detected for IR. The brain, retina, and choroid showed the longest transcript (4.3 kb), which was not present in the liver. Nevertheless, the liver and brain showed a second transcript (2.6 kb) not present in the retina and choroid. A short transcript (1.3 kb) was the predominant form in the liver and choroid, and it seems to be present in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) and sclera as well. In the retina, no significant gene expression changes were found when defocus was imposed. Interestingly, in the RPE, both IR and IGF-1R were already downregulated after short periods (4 h) of positive lens wear. In contrast, IR and IGF-1R were upregulated in the choroid and fibrous sclera during treatment with negative, but not positive, lenses. Conclusions Differences

  16. Mapping surface structures of the human insulin receptor with monoclonal antibodies: localization of main immunogenic regions to the receptor kinase domain.

    PubMed

    Morgan, D O; Roth, R A

    1986-03-25

    A panel of 37 monoclonal antibodies to the human insulin receptor has been used to characterize the receptor's major antigenic regions and their relationship to receptor functions. Three antibodies recognized extracellular surface structures, including the insulin binding site and a region not associated with insulin binding. The remaining 34 monoclonal antibodies were directed against the cytoplasmic domain of the receptor beta subunit. Competitive binding studies demonstrated that four antigenic regions (beta 1, beta 2, beta 3, and beta 4) are found on this domain. Sixteen of the antibodies were found to be directed against beta 1, nine against beta 2, seven against beta 3, and two against beta 4. Antibodies to all four regions inhibited the receptor-associated protein kinase activity to some extent, although antibodies directed against the beta 2 region completely inhibited the kinase activity of the receptor both in the autophosphorylation reaction and in the phosphorylation of an exogenous substrate, histone. Antibodies to the beta 2 region also did not recognize autophosphorylated receptor. In addition, antibodies to this same region recognized the receptor for insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) as well as the insulin receptor. In contrast, antibodies to other cytoplasmic regions did not recognize the IGF-I receptor as well as the insulin receptor. These results indicate that the major immunogenic regions of the insulin receptor are located on the cytoplasmic domain of the receptor beta subunit and are associated with the tyrosine-specific kinase activity of the receptor. In addition, these results suggest that a portion of the insulin receptor is highly homologous to that of the IGF-I receptor.

  17. The type I interferon receptor mediates tyrosine phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate 2.

    PubMed

    Platanias, L C; Uddin, S; Yetter, A; Sun, X J; White, M F

    1996-01-05

    Binding of interferon alpha (IFN alpha) to its receptor induces activation of the Tyk-2 and Jak-1 tyrosine kinases and tyrosine phosphorylation of multiple downstream signaling elements, including the Stat components of the interferon-stimulated gene factor 3 (ISGF-3). IFN alpha also induces tyrosine phosphorylation of IRS-1, the principle substrate of the insulin receptor. In this study we demonstrate that various Type I IFNs rapidly stimulate tyrosine phosphorylation of IRS-2. This is significant since IRS-2 is the major IRS protein found in hematopoietic cells. The IFN alpha-induced phosphorylated form of IRS-2 associates with the p85 regulatory subunit of the phosphatidylinositol 3'-kinase, suggesting that this kinase participates in an IFN alpha-signaling cascade downstream of IRS-2. We also provide evidence for an interaction of IRS-2 with Tyk-2, suggesting that Tyk-2 is the kinase that phosphorylates this protein during IFN alpha stimulation. A conserved region in the pleckstrin homology domain of IRS-2 may be required for the interaction of IRS-2 with Tyk-2, as shown by the selective binding of glutathione S-transferase (GST) fusion proteins containing the IRS-2-IH1PH or IRS-1-IH1PH domains to Tyk-2 but not other Janus kinases in vitro.

  18. The insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor in cancer: old focus, new future.

    PubMed

    Hartog, Hermien; Wesseling, Jelle; Boezen, H Marike; van der Graaf, Winette T A

    2007-09-01

    The importance of insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF-1R) signalling in malignant behaviour of tumour cells is well established. Currently, development of drugs targeting the IGF-1R as anticancer treatment is emerging. Several IGF-1R targeting strategies are being investigated in phases I and II clinical trials. Interactions of IGF-1R with insulin receptor, however, might complicate efficiency and tolerability of such drugs. This review describes mechanisms, recent developments and potential limitations of IGF-1R antibodies and tyrosine kinase inhibitors.

  19. Fluctuations in the affinity and concentration of insulin receptors on circulating monocytes of obese patients: effects of starvation, refeeding, and dieting.

    PubMed Central

    Bar, R S; Gorden, P; Roth, J; Kahn, C R; De Meyts, P

    1976-01-01

    The binding of 125I-insulin to insulin receptors on circulating monocytes of obese patients and normal volunteers has been determined under various dietary states. In the basal, fed state the monocytes of obese patients with clinical insulin resistance (n= 6) bound less insulin than normals (n =10) because of a decrease in insulin receptor concentration (obese = 6,000-13,000 sites per monocyte versus normals 15,000-28,000 sites per monocyte). The single obese patient without evidence of clinical insulin resistance demonstrated normal binding of insulin with 16,000 sites per monocyte. In all patients, the total receptor concentration was inversely related to the circulating levels of insulin measured at rest after an overnight fast. For the obese patients with basally depressed insulin binding, a 48-72-h fast lowered circulating insulin and increased binding to normal levels but only at low hormone concentrations; this limited normalization of 125I-insulin binding was associated with increased receptor affinity for insulin without change in receptor concentration. Refeeding after the acute fasting periods resulted in return to the elevated plasma insulin levels, the basal receptor affinity, and the depressed insulin binding observed in the basal, fed state. Chronic diet restored plasma insulin levels, insulin binding, and receptor concentration to normal without change in affinity. When the data from this study are coupled with previous in vivo and in vitro findings they suggest that the insulin receptor of human monocytes is more sensitive to regulation by ambient insulin than the receptors of obese mice and cultured human lymphocytes. The results further indicate than an insulin receptor undergoes in vivo modulation of its interaction with insulin by changing receptor concentration and by altering the affinity of existing receptors. Images PMID:993336

  20. Association of the insulin-receptor variant Met-985 with hyperglycemia and non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus in the Netherlands: A population-based study

    SciTech Connect

    `t Hart, L.M.; Maassen, J.A.; Does, F.E.E. van der

    1996-11-01

    One of the characteristics of non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) is the presence of insulin. Most NIDDM patients have a normal sequence of the insulin receptor, indicating that, if insulin-receptor mutations contribute to the development of NIDDM, they will be present only in a minor fraction of the NIDDM population. The goal of the present study was to examine whether insulin-receptor mutations contribute to the development of NIDDM. We examined 161 individuals with NIDDM and 538 healthy controls from the population-based Rotterdam study for the presence of mutations in the insulin-receptor gene by SSCP. A heterozygous mutation changing valine-985 into methionine was detected in 5.6% of diabetic subjects and in 1.3% of individuals with normal oral glucose tolerance test. Adjusted for age, gender, and body-mass index, this revealed a relative risk for diabetes of 4.49 (95% confidence interval 1.59-12.25) for Met-985 carriers. When the total study group was analyzed, the prevalence of the mutation increased with increasing serum glucose levels (test for trend P < .005). We conclude that the Met-985 insulin-receptor variant associates with hyperglycemia and represents a risk factor for NIDDM. 30 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Targeting colorectal cancer via its microenvironment by inhibiting IGF-1 Receptor-insulin receptor substrate and STAT3 signaling

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez-Lopez, Elsa; Flashner-Abramson, Efrat; Shalapour, Shabnam; Zhong, Zhenyu; Taniguchi, Koji; Levitzki, Alexander; Karin, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The tumor microenvironment (TME) exerts critical pro-tumorigenic effects through cytokines and growth factors that support cancer cell proliferation, survival, motility and invasion. Insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) and Signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) stimulate colorectal cancer (CRC) development and progression via cell autonomous and microenvironmental effects. Using a unique inhibitor, NT157, which targets both IGF-1 receptor (IGF-1R) and STAT3, we show that these pathways regulate many TME functions associated with sporadic colonic tumorigenesis in CPC-APC mice, in which cancer development is driven by loss of the Apc tumor suppressor gene. NT157 causes a substantial reduction in tumor burden by affecting cancer cells, cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAF) and myeloid cells. Decreased cancer cell proliferation and increased apoptosis were accompanied by inhibition of CAF activation and decreased inflammation. Furthermore, NT157 inhibited expression of pro-tumorigenic cytokines, chemokines and growth factors, including IL-6, IL-11 and IL-23 as well as CCL2, CCL5, CXCL7, CXCL5, ICAM1 and TGFβ; decreased cancer cell migratory activity and reduced their proliferation in the liver. NT157 represents a new class of anti-cancer drugs that affect both the malignant cell and its supportive microenvironment. PMID:26364612

  2. Regulation of ENaC in mice lacking renal insulin receptors in the collecting duct

    PubMed Central

    Pavlov, Tengis S.; Ilatovskaya, Daria V.; Levchenko, Vladislav; Li, Lijun; Ecelbarger, Carolyn M.; Staruschenko, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    The epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) is one of the central effectors involved in regulation of salt and water homeostasis in the kidney. To study mechanisms of ENaC regulation, we generated knockout mice lacking the insulin receptor (InsR KO) specifically in the collecting duct principal cells. Single-channel analysis in freshly isolated split-open tubules demonstrated that the InsR-KO mice have significantly lower ENaC activity compared to their wild-type (C57BL/6J) littermates when animals were fed either normal or sodium-deficient diets. Immunohistochemical and Western blot assays demonstrated no significant changes in expression of ENaC subunits in InsR-KO mice compared to wild-type littermates. Insulin treatment caused greater ENaC activity in split-open tubules isolated from wild-type mice but did not have this effect in the InsR-KO mice. Thus, these results suggest that insulin increases ENaC activity via its own receptor affecting the channel open probability. To further determine the mechanism of the action of insulin on ENaC, we used mouse mpkCCDc14 principal cells. Insulin significantly augmented amiloride-sensitive transepithelial flux in these cells. Pretreatment of the mpkCCDc14 cells with phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (LY294002; 10 μM) or mTOR (PP242; 100 nM) inhibitors precluded this effect. This study provides new information about the importance of insulin receptors expressed in collecting duct principal cells for ENaC activity.—Pavlov, T. S., Ilatovskaya, D. V., Levchenko, V., Li, L., Ecelbarger, C. M., Staruschenko, A. Regulation of ENaC in mice lacking renal insulin receptors in the collecting duct. PMID:23558339

  3. A model for the quaternary structure of human placental insulin receptor deduced from electron microscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Christiansen, K; Tranum-Jensen, J; Carlsen, J; Vinten, J

    1991-01-01

    Electrophoretically pure and functionally intact human placental insulin receptor was studied by electron microscopy with negative-staining techniques. The quaternary structure of the detergent-solubilized receptor was determined. The receptor had the shape of a letter T approximately 24 nm in height and 18 nm in width with a thickness of the stem and the crossbar of 3-4 nm. No consistent change in ultrastructure of the receptor could be detected after the addition of insulin alone or insulin and Mn2+/Mg2+/ATP. After partial reduction of the alpha 2 beta 2 heterotetrameric receptor into alpha beta heterodimers, the electron micrographs showed a clear reduction in average size of the molecule with disappearance of the T profiles characteristic of the alpha 2 beta 2 heterotetramers. By incubation of the heterodimers in a phosphorylation medium containing insulin, a reassociation to molecules with molecular weights of the alpha 2 beta 2 heterotetramer took place judged from SDS/PAGE. Electron microscopy showed that the molecule formed larger aggregates, and only a few solitary T-shaped copies were seen. Images PMID:1986371

  4. Circadian Misalignment Augments Markers of Insulin Resistance and Inflammation, Independently of Sleep Loss

    PubMed Central

    Leproult, Rachel; Holmbäck, Ulf; Van Cauter, Eve

    2014-01-01

    Shift workers, who are exposed to irregular sleep schedules resulting in sleep deprivation and misalignment of circadian rhythms, have an increased risk of diabetes relative to day workers. In healthy adults, sleep restriction without circadian misalignment promotes insulin resistance. To determine whether the misalignment of circadian rhythms that typically occurs in shift work involves intrinsic adverse metabolic effects independently of sleep loss, a parallel group design was used to study 26 healthy adults. Both interventions involved 3 inpatient days with 10-h bedtimes, followed by 8 inpatient days of sleep restriction to 5 h with fixed nocturnal bedtimes (circadian alignment) or with bedtimes delayed by 8.5 h on 4 of the 8 days (circadian misalignment). Daily total sleep time (SD) during the intervention was nearly identical in the aligned and misaligned conditions (4 h 48 min [5 min] vs. 4 h 45 min [6 min]). In both groups, insulin sensitivity (SI) significantly decreased after sleep restriction, without a compensatory increase in insulin secretion, and inflammation increased. In male participants exposed to circadian misalignment, the reduction in SI and the increase in inflammation both doubled compared with those who maintained regular nocturnal bedtimes. Circadian misalignment that occurs in shift work may increase diabetes risk and inflammation, independently of sleep loss. PMID:24458353

  5. The first three domains of the insulin receptor differ structurally from the insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor in the regions governing ligand specificity

    PubMed Central

    Lou, Meizhen; Garrett, Thomas P. J.; McKern, Neil M.; Hoyne, Peter A.; Epa, V. Chandana; Bentley, John D.; Lovrecz, George O.; Cosgrove, Leah J.; Frenkel, Maurice J.; Ward, Colin W.

    2006-01-01

    The insulin receptor (IR) and the type-1 insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGF1R) are homologous multidomain proteins that bind insulin and IGF with differing specificity. Here we report the crystal structure of the first three domains (L1–CR–L2) of human IR at 2.3 Å resolution and compare it with the previously determined structure of the corresponding fragment of IGF1R. The most important differences seen between the two receptors are in the two regions governing ligand specificity. The first is at the corner of the ligand-binding surface of the L1 domain, where the side chain of F39 in IR forms part of the ligand binding surface involving the second (central) β-sheet. This is very different to the location of its counterpart in IGF1R, S35, which is not involved in ligand binding. The second major difference is in the sixth module of the CR domain, where IR contains a larger loop that protrudes further into the ligand-binding pocket. This module, which governs IGF1-binding specificity, shows negligible sequence identity, significantly more α-helix, an additional disulfide bond, and opposite electrostatic potential compared to that of the IGF1R. PMID:16894147

  6. The first three domains of the insulin receptor differ structurally from the insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor in the regions governing ligand specificity.

    PubMed

    Lou, Meizhen; Garrett, Thomas P J; McKern, Neil M; Hoyne, Peter A; Epa, V Chandana; Bentley, John D; Lovrecz, George O; Cosgrove, Leah J; Frenkel, Maurice J; Ward, Colin W

    2006-08-15

    The insulin receptor (IR) and the type-1 insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGF1R) are homologous multidomain proteins that bind insulin and IGF with differing specificity. Here we report the crystal structure of the first three domains (L1-CR-L2) of human IR at 2.3 A resolution and compare it with the previously determined structure of the corresponding fragment of IGF1R. The most important differences seen between the two receptors are in the two regions governing ligand specificity. The first is at the corner of the ligand-binding surface of the L1 domain, where the side chain of F39 in IR forms part of the ligand binding surface involving the second (central) beta-sheet. This is very different to the location of its counterpart in IGF1R, S35, which is not involved in ligand binding. The second major difference is in the sixth module of the CR domain, where IR contains a larger loop that protrudes further into the ligand-binding pocket. This module, which governs IGF1-binding specificity, shows negligible sequence identity, significantly more alpha-helix, an additional disulfide bond, and opposite electrostatic potential compared to that of the IGF1R.

  7. Insulin Restores Gestational Diabetes Mellitus–Reduced Adenosine Transport Involving Differential Expression of Insulin Receptor Isoforms in Human Umbilical Vein Endothelium

    PubMed Central

    Westermeier, Francisco; Salomón, Carlos; González, Marcelo; Puebla, Carlos; Guzmán-Gutiérrez, Enrique; Cifuentes, Fredi; Leiva, Andrea; Casanello, Paola; Sobrevia, Luis

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine whether insulin reverses gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM)–reduced expression and activity of human equilibrative nucleoside transporters 1 (hENT1) in human umbilical vein endothelium cells (HUVECs). RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Primary cultured HUVECs from full-term normal (n = 44) and diet-treated GDM (n = 44) pregnancies were used. Insulin effect was assayed on hENT1 expression (protein, mRNA, SLC29A1 promoter activity) and activity (initial rates of adenosine transport) as well as endothelial nitric oxide (NO) synthase activity (serine1177 phosphorylation, l-citrulline formation). Adenosine concentration in culture medium and umbilical vein blood (high-performance liquid chromatography) as well as insulin receptor A and B expression (quantitative PCR) were determined. Reactivity of umbilical vein rings to adenosine and insulin was assayed by wire myography. Experiments were in the absence or presence of l-NG-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME; NO synthase inhibitor) or ZM-241385 (an A2A-adenosine receptor antagonist). RESULTS Umbilical vein blood adenosine concentration was higher, and the adenosine- and insulin-induced NO/endothelium-dependent umbilical vein relaxation was lower in GDM. Cells from GDM exhibited increased insulin receptor A isoform expression in addition to the reported NO–dependent inhibition of hENT1-adenosine transport and SLC29A1 reporter repression, and increased extracellular concentration of adenosine and NO synthase activity. Insulin reversed all these parameters to values in normal pregnancies, an effect blocked by ZM-241385 and l-NAME. CONCLUSIONS GDM and normal pregnancy HUVEC phenotypes are differentially responsive to insulin, a phenomenon where insulin acts as protecting factor for endothelial dysfunction characteristic of this syndrome. Abnormal adenosine plasma levels, and potentially A2A-adenosine receptors and insulin receptor A, will play crucial roles in this phenomenon in GDM. PMID:21515851

  8. Insulin restores gestational diabetes mellitus-reduced adenosine transport involving differential expression of insulin receptor isoforms in human umbilical vein endothelium.

    PubMed

    Westermeier, Francisco; Salomón, Carlos; González, Marcelo; Puebla, Carlos; Guzmán-Gutiérrez, Enrique; Cifuentes, Fredi; Leiva, Andrea; Casanello, Paola; Sobrevia, Luis

    2011-06-01

    To determine whether insulin reverses gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM)-reduced expression and activity of human equilibrative nucleoside transporters 1 (hENT1) in human umbilical vein endothelium cells (HUVECs). Primary cultured HUVECs from full-term normal (n = 44) and diet-treated GDM (n = 44) pregnancies were used. Insulin effect was assayed on hENT1 expression (protein, mRNA, SLC29A1 promoter activity) and activity (initial rates of adenosine transport) as well as endothelial nitric oxide (NO) synthase activity (serine(1177) phosphorylation, l-citrulline formation). Adenosine concentration in culture medium and umbilical vein blood (high-performance liquid chromatography) as well as insulin receptor A and B expression (quantitative PCR) were determined. Reactivity of umbilical vein rings to adenosine and insulin was assayed by wire myography. Experiments were in the absence or presence of l-N(G)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME; NO synthase inhibitor) or ZM-241385 (an A(2A)-adenosine receptor antagonist). Umbilical vein blood adenosine concentration was higher, and the adenosine- and insulin-induced NO/endothelium-dependent umbilical vein relaxation was lower in GDM. Cells from GDM exhibited increased insulin receptor A isoform expression in addition to the reported NO-dependent inhibition of hENT1-adenosine transport and SLC29A1 reporter repression, and increased extracellular concentration of adenosine and NO synthase activity. Insulin reversed all these parameters to values in normal pregnancies, an effect blocked by ZM-241385 and l-NAME. GDM and normal pregnancy HUVEC phenotypes are differentially responsive to insulin, a phenomenon where insulin acts as protecting factor for endothelial dysfunction characteristic of this syndrome. Abnormal adenosine plasma levels, and potentially A(2A)-adenosine receptors and insulin receptor A, will play crucial roles in this phenomenon in GDM.

  9. Pinitol Supplementation Does Not Affect Insulin-Mediated Glucose Metabolism and Muscle Insulin Receptor Content and Phosphorylation in Older Humans12

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Wayne W.; Haub, Mark D.; Fluckey, James D.; Ostlund, Richard E.; Thyfault, John P.; Morse-Carrithers, Hannah; Hulver, Matthew W.; Birge, Zonda K.

    2008-01-01

    This study assessed the effect of oral pinitol supplementation on oral and intravenous glucose tolerances and on skeletal muscle insulin receptor content and phosphorylation in older people. Fifteen people (6 men, 9 women; age 66 ± 8 y; BMI 27.9 ± 3.3 kg/m2; hemoglobin A1c 5.39 ± 0.46%, mean ± SD) completed a 7-wk protocol. Subjects were randomly assigned to groups that during wk 2−7 consumed twice daily either a non-nutritive beverage (Placebo group, n = 8) or the same beverage with 1000 mg pinitol dissolved into it (Pinitol group, n = 7, total dose = 2000 mg pinitol/d). Testing was done at wk 1 and wk 7. In the Pinitol group with supplementation, 24-h urinary pinitol excretion increased 17-fold. The fasting concentrations of glucose, insulin, and C-peptide, and the 180-min area under the curve for these compounds, in response to oral (75 g) and intravenous (300 mg/kg) glucose tolerance challenges, were unchanged from wk 1 to wk 7 and were not influenced by pinitol. Also, pinitol did not affect indices of hepatic and whole-body insulin sensitivity from the oral glucose tolerance test and indices of insulin sensitivity, acute insulin response to glucose, and glucose effectiveness from the intravenous glucose tolerance test, estimated using minimal modeling. Pinitol did not differentially affect total insulin receptor content and insulin receptor phosphotyrosine 1158 and insulin receptor phosphotyrosine 1162/1163 activation in vastus lateralis samples taken during an oral-glucose–induced hyperglycemic and hyperinsulinemic state. These data suggest that pinitol supplementation does not influence whole-body insulin-mediated glucose metabolism and muscle insulin receptor content and phosphorylation in nondiabetic, older people. PMID:15514265

  10. Mapping of the insulin-like growth factor II binding site of the Type I insulin-like growth factor receptor by alanine scanning mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Sørensen, Heidi; Whittaker, Linda; Hinrichsen, Jane; Groth, Andreas; Whittaker, Jonathan

    2004-05-07

    The Type I insulin-like growth factor receptor is a physiological receptor for insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II). To characterize the molecular basis of the receptor's ligand binding properties, we have examined the effects of alanine mutations of residues in the ligand binding site of the receptor on its affinity for IGF-II. The functional epitope for IGF-II comprises residues in the N-terminal L1 domain and residues at the C-terminus of the alpha subunit. Cysteine rich domain residues do not appear to be critical for IGF-II binding.

  11. Characterization of the growth of murine fibroblasts that express human insulin receptors. I. The effect of insulin in the absence of other growth factors

    SciTech Connect

    Randazzo, P.A.; Morey, V.A.; Polishook, A.K.; Jarett, L. )

    1990-09-01

    The effect of insulin on the growth of murine fibroblasts transfected with an expression vector containing human insulin receptor cDNA (NIH 3T3/HIR) and the parental cells (NIH/3T3) was characterized. Insulin in the absence of other mitogens increased the rate of incorporation of thymidine into NIH 3T3/HIR cells with a half-maximal response occurring at an insulin concentration of 35 ng/ml and a maximal response that was equivalent to that elicited by 10% fetal calf serum. The thymidine incorporation rate was increased by 12 h, was maximal at approximately 16 h, and returned to basal rates at 24 h after the addition of insulin. Insulin induced a maximum of 65% of cells to incorporate thymidine. The increased DNA synthesis was accompanied by net growth. Addition of insulin to the NIH 3T3/HIR cells resulted in increased DNA content with a half-maximal response occurring at approximately 30 ng/ml insulin and a maximal response equivalent to that elicited by serum. An increase in cell number detected after the addition of insulin to the NIH 3T3/HIR suggests that the cells had progressed through mitosis. Insulin did not increase the rate of thymidine incorporation, DNA content, or number of the parental NIH 3T3 cells. These data show that insulin, in the absence of a second mitogen, is able to induce NIH 3T3/HIR fibroblasts to traverse the cell cycle.

  12. Naturally occurring amino acid substitutions at Arg1174 in the human insulin receptor result in differential effects on receptor biosynthesis and hybrid formation, leading to discordant clinical phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Rau, H; Kocova, M; O'Rahilly, S; Whitehead, J P

    2000-07-01

    Missense mutations in the tyrosine kinase domain of the human insulin receptor frequently result in a dominantly inherited form of insulin resistance. We noted a marked disparity in the clinical phenotypes of our study subjects with different missense mutations at the same residue (Arg1174) of the insulin receptor. Subjects with a tryptophan substitution (W) were only moderately hyperinsulinemic, whereas those with a glutamine substitution (Q) had severe clinical and biochemical insulin resistance. Studies were undertaken to explore the molecular mechanisms underlying these differences. Both W and Q mutant receptors bound insulin normally but were kinase inactive. The W mutation resulted in more rapid degradation of newly synthesized mutant receptor, which contrasted with the near-normal biosynthesis of the Q receptor. The propensity of the W receptor to form hybrids with the cotransfected wild-type (WT) receptor was also markedly impaired compared with the Q receptor, to an extent greater than could be explained by lower steady-state expression. Thus, the more clinically benign consequences of the heterozygous W mutant receptor are likely to relate to its impaired biosynthesis and/or reduced capacity to form hybrids with WT receptors. In addition to providing an explanation for the milder phenotype of 1174W versus 1174Q carriers, these studies provide further support for the notion that the dominant-negative effect of insulin receptor tyrosine kinase mutations involves the competition between inactive mutant homodimers and WT/mutant hybrids with active WT homodimers for both ligands and intracellular substrates.

  13. Insulin receptor isoform A ameliorates long-term glucose intolerance in diabetic mice

    PubMed Central

    Diaz-Castroverde, Sabela; Gómez-Hernández, Almudena; Fernández, Silvia; García-Gómez, Gema; Di Scala, Marianna; González-Aseguinolaza, Gloria; Fernández-Millán, Elisa; González-Rodríguez, Águeda; García-Bravo, María; Chambon, Pierre; Álvarez, Carmen; Perdomo, Liliana; Beneit, Nuria; Benito, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a complex metabolic disease and its pathogenesis involves abnormalities in both peripheral insulin action and insulin secretion. Previous in vitro data showed that insulin receptor isoform A, but not B, favours basal glucose uptake through its specific association with endogenous GLUT1/2 in murine hepatocytes and beta cells. With this background, we hypothesized that hepatic expression of insulin receptor isoform A in a mouse model of type 2 diabetes could potentially increase the glucose uptake of these cells, decreasing the hyperglycaemia and therefore ameliorating the diabetic phenotype. To assure this hypothesis, we have developed recombinant adeno-associated viral vectors expressing insulin receptor isoform A (IRA) or isoform B (IRB) under the control of a hepatocyte­-specific promoter. Our results demonstrate that in the long term, hepatic expression of IRA in diabetic mice is more efficient than IRB in ameliorating glucose intolerance. Consequently, it impairs the induction of compensatory mechanisms through beta cell hyperplasia and/or hypertrophy that finally lead to beta cell failure, reverting the diabetic phenotype in about 8 weeks. Our data suggest that long-term hepatic expression of IRA could be a promising therapeutic approach for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus. PMID:27562101

  14. Insulin receptor isoform A ameliorates long-term glucose intolerance in diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Diaz-Castroverde, Sabela; Gómez-Hernández, Almudena; Fernández, Silvia; García-Gómez, Gema; Di Scala, Marianna; González-Aseguinolaza, Gloria; Fernández-Millán, Elisa; González-Rodríguez, Águeda; García-Bravo, María; Chambon, Pierre; Álvarez, Carmen; Perdomo, Liliana; Beneit, Nuria; Escribano, Oscar; Benito, Manuel

    2016-11-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a complex metabolic disease and its pathogenesis involves abnormalities in both peripheral insulin action and insulin secretion. Previous in vitro data showed that insulin receptor isoform A, but not B, favours basal glucose uptake through its specific association with endogenous GLUT1/2 in murine hepatocytes and beta cells. With this background, we hypothesized that hepatic expression of insulin receptor isoform A in a mouse model of type 2 diabetes could potentially increase the glucose uptake of these cells, decreasing the hyperglycaemia and therefore ameliorating the diabetic phenotype. To assure this hypothesis, we have developed recombinant adeno-associated viral vectors expressing insulin receptor isoform A (IRA) or isoform B (IRB) under the control of a hepatocyte--specific promoter. Our results demonstrate that in the long term, hepatic expression of IRA in diabetic mice is more efficient than IRB in ameliorating glucose intolerance. Consequently, it impairs the induction of compensatory mechanisms through beta cell hyperplasia and/or hypertrophy that finally lead to beta cell failure, reverting the diabetic phenotype in about 8 weeks. Our data suggest that long-term hepatic expression of IRA could be a promising therapeutic approach for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  15. Regression of acanthosis nigricans correlates with disappearance of anti-insulin receptor autoantibodies and achievement of euglycemia in type B insulin resistance syndrome.

    PubMed

    Fareau, Gilbert G; Maldonado, Mario; Oral, Elif; Balasubramanyam, Ashok

    2007-05-01

    Autoantibodies directed against specific epitopes in the insulin receptor are rarely the cause of either recurrent hypoglycemia or a severe form of insulin resistance (type B insulin resistance). Type B insulin resistance occurs more commonly in women of African heritage and is frequently associated with a history of other autoimmune diseases. We present the unusual case of a 61-year-old African American woman with a background of autoimmune hypothyroidism and autoimmune hepatitis who developed type 2 diabetes mellitus and marked facial acanthosis nigricans (AN) over a period of weeks. Despite treatment with multiple oral antidiabetic agents, she rapidly developed severe, recalcitrant hyperglycemia and ketoacidosis, requiring hospitalization and intravenous insulin administration for 4 weeks at rates of up to 180 U/h. Immunologic testing revealed a high titer of anti-insulin receptor autoantibodies of both immunoglobulin G and immunoglobulin A classes. After a recurrence of diabetic ketoacidosis despite aggressive management, the patient was treated with a short course of cyclophosphamide; within 10 weeks, she experienced striking improvement of her hyperglycemia as well as marked regression of the AN lesions. Subsequently, the patient also experienced episodes of fasting hypoglycemia, which resolved with a brief course of glucocorticoids. She has since remained euglycemic with no therapy for 5 years. We have documented, for the first time, regression of AN in temporal association with disappearance of circulating anti-insulin receptor autoantibodies and achievement of euglycemia in a patient with type B insulin resistance.

  16. Insulin receptor-like ectodomain genes and splice variants are found in both arthropods and human brain cDNA

    PubMed Central

    VÄSTERMARK, Åke; RASK-ANDERSEN, Mathias; SAWANT, Rahul S.; REITER, Jill L.; SCHIÖTH, Helgi B.; WILLIAMS, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Truncated receptor ectodomains have been described for several classes of cell surface receptors, including those that bind to growth factors, cytokines, immunoglobulins, and adhesion molecules. Soluble receptor isoforms are typically generated by proteolytic cleavage of the cell surface receptor or by alternative splicing of RNA transcripts arising from the same gene encoding the full-length receptor. Both the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and the insulin receptor (INSR) families produce soluble receptor splice variants in vertebrates and truncated forms of insulin receptor-like sequences have previously been described in Drosophila. The EGFR and INSR ectodomains share significant sequence homology with each other suggestive of a common evolutionary origin. We discovered novel truncated insulin receptor-like variants in several arthropod species. We performed a phylogenetic analysis of the conserved extracellular receptor L1 and L2 subdomains in invertebrate species. While the segregation of insulin receptor-like L1 and L2 domains indicated that an internal domain duplication had occurred only once, the generation of truncated insulin receptor-like sequences has occurred multiple times. The significance of this work is the previously unknown and widespread occurrence of truncated isoforms in arthropods, signifying that these isoforms play an important functional role, potentially related to such isoforms in mammals. PMID:27375681

  17. Dietary Weight-Loss and Exercise Effects on Insulin Resistance in Postmenopausal Women

    PubMed Central

    Mason, Caitlin; Foster-Schubert, Karen E.; Imayama, Ikuyo; Kong, Angela; Xiao, Liren; Bain, Carolyn; Campbell, Kristin L.; Wang, Ching-Yun; Duggan, Catherine R.; Ulrich, Cornelia M.; Alfano, Catherine M.; Blackburn, George L.; McTiernan, Anne

    2011-01-01

    Background Comprehensive lifestyle interventions are effective in preventing diabetes and restoring glucose regulation; however, the key stimulus for change has not been identified and effects in older individuals are not established. The aim of the study was to investigate the independent and combined effects of dietary weight-loss and exercise on insulin sensitivity and restoration of normal fasting glucose in mid-aged and older women. Design Four-arm RCT, conducted between 2005 and 2009 and data analyzed in 2010. Setting/participants 439 inactive, overweight/obese postmenopausal women. Interventions: Women were assigned to: dietary weight loss (n=118), exercise (n=117), exercise+diet (n=117), or control (n=87). The diet intervention was a group-based reduced-calorie program with a 10% weight-loss goal. The exercise intervention was 45 min/day, 5 days/week of moderate-to-vigorous intensity aerobic activity. Main outcome measures 12-month change in serum insulin, C-peptide, fasting glucose, and whole body insulin resistance (HOMA-IR). Results A significant improvement in HOMA-IR was detected in the diet (−24%, p<0.001) and exercise+ diet (−26%, p<0.001) groups, but not in the exercise (−9%, p=0.22) group compared to controls (−2%); these effects were similar in middle-aged (50–60 years) and older women (aged 60–75 years). Among those with impaired fasting glucose (5.6–6.9 mmol/L) at baseline (n=143; 33%), the odds (95% CI) of regressing to normal fasting glucose after adjusting for weight loss and baseline levels were: 2.5 (0.8, 8.4), 2.76 (0.8, 10.0), and 3.1 (1.0, 9.9) in the diet, exercise+diet, and exercise group, respectively, compared to controls. Conclusions Dietary weight loss, with or without exercise, significantly improved insulin resistance. Older women derived as much benefit as did the younger postmenopausal women. PMID:21961463

  18. Protective Effect of Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-Bisphosphate against Cortical Filamentous Actin Loss and Insulin Resistance Induced by Sustained Exposure of 3T3-L1 Adipocytes to Insulin*

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Guoli; Raman, Priya; Bhonagiri, Padma; Strawbridge, Andrew B.; Pattar, Guruprasad R.; Elmendorf, Jeffrey S.

    2008-01-01

    Muscle and fat cells develop insulin resistance when cultured under hyperinsulinemic conditions for sustained periods. Recent data indicate that early insulin signaling defects do not fully account for the loss of insulin action. Given that cortical filamentous actin (F-actin) represents an essential aspect of insulin regulated glucose transport, we tested to see whether cortical F-actin structure was compromised during chronic insulin treatment. The acute effect of insulin on GLUT4 translocation and glucose uptake was diminished in 3T3-L1 adipocytes exposed to a physiological level of insulin (5 nM) for 12 h. This insulin-induced loss of insulin responsiveness was apparent under both low (5.5 mM) and high (25 mM) glucose concentrations. Microscopic and biochemical analyses revealed that the hyperinsulinemic state caused a marked loss of cortical F-actin. Since recent data link phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) to actin cytoskeletal mechanics, we tested to see whether the insulin-resistant condition affected PIP2 and found a noticeable loss of this lipid from the plasma membrane. Using a PIP2 delivery system, we replenished plasma membrane PIP2 in cells following the sustained insulin treatment and observed a restoration in cortical F-actin and insulin responsiveness. These data reveal a novel molecular aspect of insulin-induced insulin resistance involving defects in PIP2/actin regulation. PMID:15277534

  19. Protective effect of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate against cortical filamentous actin loss and insulin resistance induced by sustained exposure of 3T3-L1 adipocytes to insulin.

    PubMed

    Chen, Guoli; Raman, Priya; Bhonagiri, Padma; Strawbridge, Andrew B; Pattar, Guruprasad R; Elmendorf, Jeffrey S

    2004-09-17

    Muscle and fat cells develop insulin resistance when cultured under hyperinsulinemic conditions for sustained periods. Recent data indicate that early insulin signaling defects do not fully account for the loss of insulin action. Given that cortical filamentous actin (F-actin) represents an essential aspect of insulin regulated glucose transport, we tested to see whether cortical F-actin structure was compromised during chronic insulin treatment. The acute effect of insulin on GLUT4 translocation and glucose uptake was diminished in 3T3-L1 adipocytes exposed to a physiological level of insulin (5 nm) for 12 h. This insulin-induced loss of insulin responsiveness was apparent under both low (5.5 mm) and high (25 mm) glucose concentrations. Microscopic and biochemical analyses revealed that the hyperinsulinemic state caused a marked loss of cortical F-actin. Since recent data link phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP(2)) to actin cytoskeletal mechanics, we tested to see whether the insulin-resistant condition affected PIP(2) and found a noticeable loss of this lipid from the plasma membrane. Using a PIP(2) delivery system, we replenished plasma membrane PIP(2) in cells following the sustained insulin treatment and observed a restoration in cortical F-actin and insulin responsiveness. These data reveal a novel molecular aspect of insulin-induced insulin resistance involving defects in PIP(2)/actin regulation.

  20. Down-regulation of cell surface insulin receptor and insulin receptor substrate-1 phosphorylation by inhibitor of 90-kDa heat-shock protein family: endoplasmic reticulum retention of monomeric insulin receptor precursor with calnexin in adrenal chromaffin cells.

    PubMed

    Saitoh, Tomokazu; Yanagita, Toshihiko; Shiraishi, Seiji; Yokoo, Hiroki; Kobayashi, Hideyuki; Minami, Shin-Ichi; Onitsuka, Toshio; Wada, Akihiko

    2002-10-01

    Treatment (>/=6 h) of cultured bovine adrenal chromaffin cells with geldanamycin (GA) or herbimycin A (HA), an inhibitor of the 90-kDa heat-shock protein (Hsp90) family, decreased cell surface (125)I-insulin binding. The effect of GA was concentration (EC(50) = 84 nM)- and time (t(1/2) = 8.5 h)-dependent; GA (1 microM for 24 h) lowered the B(max) value of (125)I-insulin binding by 80%, without changing the K(d) value. Western blot analysis showed that GA (>/=3 h) lowered insulin receptor (IR) level by 83% (t(1/2) = 7.4 h; EC(50) = 74 nM), while raising IR precursor level by 100% (t(1/2) = 7.9 h; EC(50) = 300 nM). Pulse-label followed by reducing and nonreducing sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis revealed that monomeric IR precursor (~190 kDa) developed into the homodimeric IR precursor (approximately 380 kDa) and the mature alpha(2)beta(2) IR (~410 kDa) in nontreated cells, but not in GA-treated cells; in GA-treated cells, the homodimerization-incompetent form of monomeric IR precursor was degraded via endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-associated protein degradation. Immunoprecipitation followed by immunoblot analysis showed that IR precursor was associated with calnexin (CNX) to a greater extent in GA-treated cells, compared with nontreated cells. GA had no effect on IR mRNA levels and internalization rate of cell surface IRs. In GA-treated cells, insulin-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1) was attenuated by 77%, with no change in IRS-1 level. Thus, inhibition of the Hsp90 family by GA or HA interrupts homodimerization of monomeric IR precursor in the ER and increases retention of monomeric IR precursor with CNX; this event retards cell surface expression of IR and attenuates insulin-induced activation of IRS-1.

  1. Insulin receptor autophosphorylation in cultured myoblasts correlates to glucose disposal in Pima Indians.

    PubMed

    Youngren, J F; Goldfine, I D; Pratley, R E

    1999-05-01

    In a previous study [Youngren, J. F., I. D. Goldfire, and R. E. Pratley. Am. J. Physiol. 273 (Endocrinol. Metab. 36): E276-E283, 1997] of skeletal muscle biopsies from insulin-resistant, nondiabetic Pima Indians, we demonstrated that diminished insulin receptor (IR) autophosphorylation correlated with in vivo insulin resistance. In the present study, to determine whether decreased IR function is a primary trait of muscle, and not secondary to an altered in vivo environment, we cultured myoblasts from 17 nondiabetic Pima Indians in whom insulin-stimulated glucose disposal (M) was measured during hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic glucose clamps. Myoblast IR autophosphorylation was determined by a highly sensitive ELISA. IR autophosphorylation directly correlated with M (r = 0.56, P = 0.02) and inversely correlated with the fasting plasma insulin (r = -0.58, P < 0.05). The relationship between M and IR autophosphorylation remained significant after M was adjusted for the effects of percent body fat (partial r = 0.53, P < 0.04). The relationship between insulin resistance and the capacity for myoblast IR autophosphorylation in nondiabetic Pima Indians suggests that variations in IR-signaling capacity may be intrinsic characteristics of muscle that contribute to the genetic component determining insulin action in this population.

  2. A receptor state space model of the insulin signalling system in glucose transport.

    PubMed

    Gray, Catheryn W; Coster, Adelle C F

    2015-12-01

    Insulin is a potent peptide hormone that regulates glucose levels in the blood. Insulin-sensitive cells respond to insulin stimulation with the translocation of glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) to the plasma membrane (PM), enabling the clearance of glucose from the blood. Defects in this process can give rise to insulin resistance and ultimately diabetes. One widely cited model of insulin signalling leading to glucose transport is that of Sedaghat et al. (2002) Am. J. Physiol. Endocrinol. Metab. 283, E1084-E1101. Consisting of 20 deterministic ordinary differential equations (ODEs), it is the most comprehensive model of insulin signalling to date. However, the model possesses some major limitations, including the non-conservation of key components. In the current work, we detail mathematical and sensitivity analyses of the Sedaghat model. Based on the results of these analyses, we propose a reduced state space model of the insulin receptor subsystem. This reduced model maintains the input-output relation of the original model but is computationally more efficient, analytically tractable and resolves some of the limitations of the Sedaghat model. © The Authors 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications. All rights reserved.

  3. Aptamer-based single-molecule imaging of insulin receptors in living cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Minhyeok; Kwon, Mijin; Kim, Sooran; Yunn, Na-Oh; Kim, Daehyung; Ryu, Sung Ho; Lee, Jong-Bong

    2014-05-01

    We present a single-molecule imaging platform that quantitatively explores the spatiotemporal dynamics of individual insulin receptors in living cells. Modified DNA aptamers that specifically recognize insulin receptors (IRs) with a high affinity were selected through the SELEX process. Using quantum dot-labeled aptamers, we successfully imaged and analyzed the diffusive motions of individual IRs in the plasma membranes of a variety of cell lines (HIR, HEK293, HepG2). We further explored the cholesterol-dependent movement of IRs to address whether cholesterol depletion interferes with IRs and found that cholesterol depletion of the plasma membrane by methyl-β-cyclodextrin reduces the mobility of IRs. The aptamer-based single-molecule imaging of IRs will provide better understanding of insulin signal transduction through the dynamics study of IRs in the plasma membrane.

  4. Insilico docking study of compounds elucidated from helicteres isora fruits with ampkinase- insulin receptor

    PubMed Central

    Vennila, Subramanium; Bupesh, Giridharan; Saravanamurali, Krishnan; SenthilKumar, Viajayan; SenthilRaja, Ramalingam; Saran, Natarajan; Magesh, Sachidanandam

    2014-01-01

    Insulin receptor (IR) proteins were essential intracellular signaling peptides in the insulin action cascade. Insulin receptor substrate proteins (IRS-1and IRS-2) serve and regulate the insulin level in the normal insulin action. The broad role of IRS-1 and IRS-2 in cell growth and survival reveals a common regulatory pathway linking development, somatic growth, fertility, neuronal proliferation, and aging to the core mechanisms used by vertebrates for nutrient sensing. Such type of proteins were cyclic adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase, this proteins play a key role in the insulin response and regulation. Type -2 Diabetes mellitus occurs during prolonged periods of peripheral insulin resistance due to inactivation of IRS proteins. The compounds isolated from the medicinal plants were safer than synthetic drugs and possess high bio activity. In the present study, four compounds were elucidated from fruits of Helicteres isora. The elucidated compounds were evaluated for the antidiabetic activity using in silico docking study. The receptor was analyzed for the active site and pocket finder tools. The aminoacids such as Phenylalanine, Lysine, Glutamic acid and Asparigine were predicted as active site binding residues. Docking studies were done through Autodock 4 software. All the compounds from fruits of Helicteres isora showed good docking profiles with AMP Kinase, except compound-3 (1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-1,5,6,8-tetramethyl-7-(2-methylprop-1-enylnaphthalene-4-ylpivalate). Finally the result from the study demonstrates that the HS-1, HS-2 and HS-4 posses potent anti diabetic activity against type-2 diabetes mellitus through drug action on AMP kinase cascade system. PMID:24966532

  5. Insilico docking study of compounds elucidated from helicteres isora fruits with ampkinase- insulin receptor.

    PubMed

    Vennila, Subramanium; Bupesh, Giridharan; Saravanamurali, Krishnan; SenthilKumar, Viajayan; SenthilRaja, Ramalingam; Saran, Natarajan; Magesh, Sachidanandam

    2014-01-01

    Insulin receptor (IR) proteins were essential intracellular signaling peptides in the insulin action cascade. Insulin receptor substrate proteins (IRS-1and IRS-2) serve and regulate the insulin level in the normal insulin action. The broad role of IRS-1 and IRS-2 in cell growth and survival reveals a common regulatory pathway linking development, somatic growth, fertility, neuronal proliferation, and aging to the core mechanisms used by vertebrates for nutrient sensing. Such type of proteins were cyclic adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase, this proteins play a key role in the insulin response and regulation. Type -2 Diabetes mellitus occurs during prolonged periods of peripheral insulin resistance due to inactivation of IRS proteins. The compounds isolated from the medicinal plants were safer than synthetic drugs and possess high bio activity. In the present study, four compounds were elucidated from fruits of Helicteres isora. The elucidated compounds were evaluated for the antidiabetic activity using in silico docking study. The receptor was analyzed for the active site and pocket finder tools. The aminoacids such as Phenylalanine, Lysine, Glutamic acid and Asparigine were predicted as active site binding residues. Docking studies were done through Autodock 4 software. All the compounds from fruits of Helicteres isora showed good docking profiles with AMP Kinase, except compound-3 (1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-1,5,6,8-tetramethyl-7-(2-methylprop-1-enylnaphthalene-4-ylpivalate). Finally the result from the study demonstrates that the HS-1, HS-2 and HS-4 posses potent anti diabetic activity against type-2 diabetes mellitus through drug action on AMP kinase cascade system.

  6. Mice with Deletion of Neuromedin B Receptor Exhibit Decreased Oral Glucose-Stimulated Insulin Release.

    PubMed

    Paula, G S M; Souza, L L; Bressane, N O S; Maravalhas, R; Wilieman, M; Bento-Bernardes, T; Silva, K R; Mendonca, L S; Oliveira, K J; Pazos-Moura, C C

    2016-12-01

    Neuromedin B (NB) and gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP) are bombesin-like peptides, found in the gastrointestinal tube and pancreas, among other tissues. Consistent data proposed that GRP stimulates insulin secretion, acting directly in pancreatic cells or in the release of gastrointestinal hormones that are incretins. However, the role of NB remains unclear. We examined the glucose homeostasis in mice with deletion of NB receptor (NBR-KO). Female NBR-KO exhibited similar fasting basal glucose with lower insulinemia (48.4%) and lower homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance index (50.5%) than wild type (WT). Additionally, they were more tolerant to oral glucose, demonstrated by a decrease in the area under the glucose curve (18%). In addition, 15 min after an oral glucose load, female and male NBR-KO showed lower insulin serum levels (45.6 and 26.8%, respectively) than WT, even though blood glucose rose to similar levels in both groups. Single injection of NB, one hour before the oral glucose administration, tended to induce higher serum insulin in WT (28.9%, p=0.3), however the same did not occur in NBR-KO. They showed no changes in fasting insulin content in pancreatic islets by immunohistochemistry, however, the fasting serum levels of glucagon-like peptide, a potent incretin, exhibited a strong trend to reduction (40%, p=0.07). Collectively, mice with deletion of NB receptor have lower insulinemia, especially in response to oral glucose, and females also exhibited a better glucose tolerance, suggesting the involvement of NB and its receptor in regulation of insulin secretion induced by incretins, and also, in insulin sensitivity. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  7. An exon variant in insulin receptor gene is associated with susceptibility to colorectal cancer in women.

    PubMed

    Mahmoudi, Touraj; Majidzadeh-A, Keivan; Karimi, Khatoon; Karimi, Negar; Farahani, Hamid; Dabiri, Reza; Nobakht, Hossein; Dolatmoradi, Hesamodin; Arkani, Maral; Zali, Mohammad Reza

    2015-05-01

    Given the role of insulin resistance in colorectal cancer (CRC), we explored whether genetic variants in insulin (INS), insulin receptor (INSR), insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS1), insulin receptor substrate 2 (IRS2), insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1), and insulin-like growth factor binding protein 3 (IGFBP3) genes were associated with CRC risk. A total of 600 subjects, including 261 cases with CRC and 339 controls, were enrolled in this case-control study. Six polymorphisms in INS (rs689), INSR (rs1799817), IRS1 (rs1801278), IRS2 (rs1805097), IGF1 (rs5742612), and IGFBP3 (rs2854744) genes were genotyped using PCR-RFLP method. No significant difference was observed for INS, INSR, IRS1, IRS2, IGF1, and IGFBP3 genes between the cases and controls. However, the INSR rs1799817 "TT + CT" genotype and "CT" genotype compared with "CC" genotype occurred more frequently in the women with CRC than women controls (P = 0.007; OR = 1.93, 95 %CI = 1.20-3.11 and P = 0.002, OR = 2.15, 95 %CI = 1.31-3.53, respectively), and the difference remained significant after adjustment for confounding factors including age, BMI, smoking status, NSAID use, and family history of CRC (P = 0.018; OR = 1.86, 95 %CI = 1.11-3.10 and P = 0.004, OR = 2.18, 95 %CI = 1.28-3.71, respectively). In conclusion, to our knowledge, this study indicated for the first time that the INSR rs1799817 TT + CT genotype and CT genotype compared with the CC genotype had 1.86-fold and 2.18-fold increased risks for CRC among women, respectively. Furthermore, this finding is in line with previous studies which found significant associations between other variants of the INSR gene and CRC risk. Nevertheless, further studies are required to confirm our findings.

  8. Hyperinsulinemia: effect on cardiac mass/function, angiotensin II receptor expression, and insulin signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Samuelsson, Anne-Maj; Bollano, Entela; Mobini, Reza; Larsson, Britt-Mari; Omerovic, Elmir; Fu, Michael; Waagstein, Finn; Holmäng, Agneta

    2006-08-01

    To investigate the association between hyperinsulinemia and cardiac hypertrophy, we treated rats with insulin for 7 wk and assessed effects on myocardial growth, vascularization, and fibrosis in relation to the expression of angiotensin II receptors (AT-R). We also characterized insulin signaling pathways believed to promote myocyte growth and interact with proliferative responses mediated by G protein-coupled receptors, and we assessed myocardial insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1) and p110 alpha catalytic and p85 regulatory subunits of phospatidylinositol 3 kinase (PI3K), Akt, MEK, ERK1/2, and S6 kinase-1 (S6K1). Left ventricular (LV) geometry and performance were evaluated echocardiographically. Insulin decreased AT1a-R mRNA expression but increased protein levels and increased AT2-R mRNA and protein levels and phosphorylation of IRS-1 (Ser374/Tyr989), MEK1/2 (Ser218/Ser222), ERK1/2 (Thr202/Tyr204), S6K1 (Thr421/Ser424/Thr389), Akt (Thr308/Thr308), and PI3K p110 alpha but not of p85 (Tyr508). Insulin increased LV mass and relative wall thickness and reduced stroke volume and cardiac output. Histochemical examination demonstrated myocyte hypertrophy and increases in interstitial fibrosis. Metoprolol plus insulin prevented the increase in relative wall thickness, decreased fibrosis, increased LV mass, and improved function seen with insulin alone. Thus our data demonstrate that chronic hyperinsulinemia decreases AT1a-to-AT2 ratio and increases MEK-ERK1/2 and S6K1 pathway activity related to hypertrophy. These changes might be crucial for increased cardiovascular growth and fibrosis and signs of impaired LV function.

  9. Localization of the mosquito insulin receptor homolog (MIR) in reproducing yellow fever mosquitoes (Aedes aegypti).

    PubMed

    Helbling, P; Graf, R

    1998-12-01

    The female mosquito takes a blood meal to produce a batch of eggs. Initiation of egg maturation and growth of oocytes is governed by several endocrine factors. Peptide factors from the brain are involved in this process and some are also responsible for the induction of ecdysone secretion. The latter appears to be required to maintain a high rate of vitellogenin synthesis. By analogy with the known functions of insulin-like molecules (e.g. bombyxins) which in insects activate the secretion of ecdysteroids, we have postulated that there is an insulin receptor homolog responsible for activation of endysone secretion in the ovary. We have recently cloned the mosquito homolog (MIR) and are now investigating its spatial and temporal distribution. Here, we have localized the insulin receptor (MIR) both at the mRNA and protein level using in situ-hybridization and immunocytochemistry. The receptor is expressed before a blood meal mainly in the nurse cells of ovaries. After a meal, follicle and nurse cells contain mRNA coding for the receptor. The intensity of expression rises in the follicle cells until they degenerate during choriogenesis. Immunocytochemical localization confirms the in situ data: the protein is present before and after a meal. Both methods confirm our previous findings by Northern blot analysis, in which the ovary was found to be the main source of the receptor mRNA. The dynamics of receptor mRNA are related to the dynamics of ecdysone secretion and its action on physiological processes.

  10. Insulin-regulated expression of adiponectin receptors in muscle and fat cells.

    PubMed

    Sattar, Akm A; Sattar, Rifat

    2012-01-01

    Adp (adiponectin), an adipocyte-secreted hormone, exerts its effect via its specific receptors, AdipoR1 and AdipoR2 (adiponectin receptors 1 and 2), on insulin-sensitive cells in muscle, liver and adipose tissues, and plays an important role in lipid and glucose metabolisms. The study has investigated the effect of insulin on AdipoRs expression in muscle and fat cells. Differentiated fat [3T3-L1 (mouse adipocytes)], L6 (skeletal muscle) and vascular smooth muscle (PAC1) cells were serum starved and exposed to 100 nM insulin for 1-24 h. AdipoR1 and AdipoR2 mRNAs expression was monitored by real-time PCR. The results demonstrate that insulin down-regulates both AdipoR1 and AdipoR2 mRNAs levels in a biphasic manner in L6 and PAC1 cells. Insulin had little or no effect in the regulation of AdipoR1 expression in 3T3-L1 cells, but significantly up-regulated AdipoR2 mRNA level in a biphasic manner. The fact that insulin differentially regulates the expression of AdipoR1 and AdipoR2 in muscle and fat cells suggests this is also dependent on the availability of the endogenous ligand, such as Adp for AdipoR1 and AdipoR2 in fat cells. The effects of globular Adp were also tested on insulin-regulated expression of AdipoRs in L6 cells, and found to up-regulate and counter insulin-mediated suppression of AdipoRs expression in L6 cells.

  11. A new EcoRI polymorphism for the insulin receptor gene

    SciTech Connect

    Accili, D.; Elbein, S.; McKeon, C.; Taylor, S.I. )

    1989-01-25

    A 550 bp BamHI-Pst I fragment encompassing bp 1,926-2,476 of the human insulin receptor cDNA was obtained. EcoRI identifies a two allele polymorphism, with bands of 5.8 and 5.5 kb. Co-dominant segregation was demonstrated in one Venezuelan pedigree.

  12. Insulin receptor substrate-3, interacting with Bcl-3, enhances p50 NF-{kappa}B activity

    SciTech Connect

    Kabuta, Tomohiro; Hakuno, Fumihiko; Cho, Yoshitake; Yamanaka, Daisuke; Chida, Kazuhiro; Asano, Tomoichiro; Wada, Keiji; Takahashi, Shin-Ichiro

    2010-04-09

    The insulin receptor substrate (IRS) proteins are major substrates of both insulin receptor and insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I receptor tyrosine kinases. Previously, we reported that IRS-3 is localized to both cytosol and nucleus, and possesses transcriptional activity. In the present study, we identified Bcl-3 as a novel binding protein to IRS-3. Bcl-3 is a nuclear protein, which forms a complex with the homodimer of p50 NF-{kappa}B, leading to enhancement of transcription through p50 NF-{kappa}B. We found that Bcl-3 interacts with the pleckstrin homology domain and the phosphotyrosine binding domain of IRS-3, and that IRS-3 interacts with the ankyrin repeat domain of Bcl-3. In addition, IRS-3 augmented the binding activity of p50 to the NF-{kappa}B DNA binding site, as well as the tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-{alpha}-induced transcriptional activity of NF-{kappa}B. Lastly, IRS-3 enhanced NF-{kappa}B-dependent anti-apoptotic gene induction and consequently