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Sample records for insulin secretory dysfunction

  1. Yeast secretory expression of insulin precursors.

    PubMed

    Kjeldsen, T

    2000-09-01

    Since the 1980s, recombinant human insulin for the treatment of diabetes mellitus has been produced using either the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae or the prokaryote Escherichia coli. Here, development of the insulin secretory expression system in S. cerevisiae and its subsequent optimisation is described. Expression of proinsulin in S. cerevisiae does not result in efficient secretion of proinsulin or insulin. However, expression of a cDNA encoding a proinsulin-like molecule with deletion of threonine(B30) as a fusion protein with the S. cerevisiae alpha-factor prepro-peptide (leader), followed either by replacement of the human proinsulin C-peptide with a small C-peptide (e.g. AAK), or by direct fusion of lysine(B29) to glycine(A1), results in the efficient secretion of folded single-chain proinsulin-like molecules to the culture supernatant. The secreted single-chain insulin precursor can then be purified and subsequently converted to human insulin by tryptic transpeptidation in organic aqueous medium in the presence of a threonine ester. The leader confers secretory competence to the insulin precursor, and constructed (synthetic) leaders have been developed for efficient secretory expression of the insulin precursor in the yeasts S. cerevisiae and Pichia pastories. The Kex2 endoprotease, specific for dibasic sites, cleaves the leader-insulin precursor fusion protein in the late secretory pathway and the folded insulin precursor is secreted to the culture supernatant. However, the Kex2 endoprotease processing of the pro-peptide-insulin precursor fusion protein is incomplete and a significant part of the pro-peptide-insulin precursor fusion protein is secreted to the culture supernatant in a hyperglycosylated form. A spacer peptide localised between the leader and the insulin precursor has been developed to optimise Kex2 endoprotease processing and insulin precursor fermentation yield. PMID:11030562

  2. Insulin dysfunction and Tau pathology

    PubMed Central

    El Khoury, Noura B.; Gratuze, Maud; Papon, Marie-Amélie; Bretteville, Alexis; Planel, Emmanuel

    2013-01-01

    The neuropathological hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD) include senile plaques of β-amyloid (Aβ) peptides (a cleavage product of the Amyloid Precursor Protein, or APP) and neurofibrillary tangles (NFT) of hyperphosphorylated Tau protein assembled in paired helical filaments (PHF). NFT pathology is important since it correlates with the degree of cognitive impairment in AD. Only a small proportion of AD is due to genetic variants, whereas the large majority of cases (~99%) is late onset and sporadic in origin. The cause of sporadic AD is likely to be multifactorial, with external factors interacting with biological or genetic susceptibilities to accelerate the manifestation of the disease. Insulin dysfunction, manifested by diabetes mellitus (DM) might be such factor, as there is extensive data from epidemiological studies suggesting that DM is associated with an increased relative risk for AD. Type 1 diabetes (T1DM) and type 2 diabetes (T2DM) are known to affect multiple cognitive functions in patients. In this context, understanding the effects of diabetes on Tau pathogenesis is important since Tau pathology show a strong relationship to dementia in AD, and to memory loss in normal aging and mild cognitive impairment. Here, we reviewed preclinical studies that link insulin dysfunction to Tau protein pathogenesis, one of the major pathological hallmarks of AD. We found more than 30 studies reporting Tau phosphorylation in a mouse or rat model of insulin dysfunction. We also payed attention to potential sources of artifacts, such as hypothermia and anesthesia, that were demonstrated to results in Tau hyperphosphorylation and could major confounding experimental factors. We found that very few studies reported the temperature of the animals, and only a handful did not use anesthesia. Overall, most published studies showed that insulin dysfunction can promote Tau hyperphosphorylation and pathology, both directly and indirectly, through hypothermia. PMID:24574966

  3. SORCS1 is necessary for normal insulin secretory granule biogenesis in metabolically stressed β cells.

    PubMed

    Kebede, Melkam A; Oler, Angie T; Gregg, Trillian; Balloon, Allison J; Johnson, Adam; Mitok, Kelly; Rabaglia, Mary; Schueler, Kathryn; Stapleton, Donald; Thorstenson, Candice; Wrighton, Lindsay; Floyd, Brendan J; Richards, Oliver; Raines, Summer; Eliceiri, Kevin; Seidah, Nabil G; Rhodes, Christopher; Keller, Mark P; Coon, Joshua L; Audhya, Anjon; Attie, Alan D

    2014-10-01

    We previously positionally cloned Sorcs1 as a diabetes quantitative trait locus. Sorcs1 belongs to the Vacuolar protein sorting-10 (Vps10) gene family. In yeast, Vps10 transports enzymes from the trans-Golgi network (TGN) to the vacuole. Whole-body Sorcs1 KO mice, when made obese with the leptin(ob) mutation (ob/ob), developed diabetes. β Cells from these mice had a severe deficiency of secretory granules (SGs) and insulin. Interestingly, a single secretagogue challenge failed to consistently elicit an insulin secretory dysfunction. However, multiple challenges of the Sorcs1 KO ob/ob islets consistently revealed an insulin secretion defect. The luminal domain of SORCS1 (Lum-Sorcs1), when expressed in a β cell line, acted as a dominant-negative, leading to SG and insulin deficiency. Using syncollin-dsRed5TIMER adenovirus, we found that the loss of Sorcs1 function greatly impairs the rapid replenishment of SGs following secretagogue challenge. Chronic exposure of islets from lean Sorcs1 KO mice to high glucose and palmitate depleted insulin content and evoked an insulin secretion defect. Thus, in metabolically stressed mice, Sorcs1 is important for SG replenishment, and under chronic challenge by insulin secretagogues, loss of Sorcs1 leads to diabetes. Overexpression of full-length SORCS1 led to a 2-fold increase in SG content, suggesting that SORCS1 is sufficient to promote SG biogenesis. PMID:25157818

  4. SORCS1 is necessary for normal insulin secretory granule biogenesis in metabolically stressed β cells

    PubMed Central

    Kebede, Melkam A.; Oler, Angie T.; Gregg, Trillian; Balloon, Allison J.; Johnson, Adam; Mitok, Kelly; Rabaglia, Mary; Schueler, Kathryn; Stapleton, Donald; Thorstenson, Candice; Wrighton, Lindsay; Floyd, Brendan J.; Richards, Oliver; Raines, Summer; Eliceiri, Kevin; Seidah, Nabil G.; Rhodes, Christopher; Keller, Mark P.; Coon, Joshua L.; Audhya, Anjon; Attie, Alan D.

    2014-01-01

    We previously positionally cloned Sorcs1 as a diabetes quantitative trait locus. Sorcs1 belongs to the Vacuolar protein sorting-10 (Vps10) gene family. In yeast, Vps10 transports enzymes from the trans-Golgi network (TGN) to the vacuole. Whole-body Sorcs1 KO mice, when made obese with the leptinob mutation (ob/ob), developed diabetes. β Cells from these mice had a severe deficiency of secretory granules (SGs) and insulin. Interestingly, a single secretagogue challenge failed to consistently elicit an insulin secretory dysfunction. However, multiple challenges of the Sorcs1 KO ob/ob islets consistently revealed an insulin secretion defect. The luminal domain of SORCS1 (Lum-Sorcs1), when expressed in a β cell line, acted as a dominant-negative, leading to SG and insulin deficiency. Using syncollin-dsRed5TIMER adenovirus, we found that the loss of Sorcs1 function greatly impairs the rapid replenishment of SGs following secretagogue challenge. Chronic exposure of islets from lean Sorcs1 KO mice to high glucose and palmitate depleted insulin content and evoked an insulin secretion defect. Thus, in metabolically stressed mice, Sorcs1 is important for SG replenishment, and under chronic challenge by insulin secretagogues, loss of Sorcs1 leads to diabetes. Overexpression of full-length SORCS1 led to a 2-fold increase in SG content, suggesting that SORCS1 is sufficient to promote SG biogenesis. PMID:25157818

  5. Pancreatic β-Cell Adaptive Plasticity in Obesity Increases Insulin Production but Adversely Affects Secretory Function.

    PubMed

    Alarcon, Cristina; Boland, Brandon B; Uchizono, Yuji; Moore, Patrick C; Peterson, Bryan; Rajan, Suryalekha; Rhodes, Olivia S; Noske, Andrew B; Haataja, Leena; Arvan, Peter; Marsh, Bradly J; Austin, Jotham; Rhodes, Christopher J

    2016-02-01

    Pancreatic β-cells normally produce adequate insulin to control glucose homeostasis, but in obesity-related diabetes, there is a presumed deficit in insulin production and secretory capacity. In this study, insulin production was assessed directly in obese diabetic mouse models, and proinsulin biosynthesis was found to be contrastingly increased, coupled with a significant expansion of the rough endoplasmic reticulum (without endoplasmic reticulum stress) and Golgi apparatus, increased vesicular trafficking, and a depletion of mature β-granules. As such, β-cells have a remarkable capacity to produce substantial quantities of insulin in obesity, which are then made available for immediate secretion to meet increased metabolic demand, but this comes at the price of insulin secretory dysfunction. Notwithstanding, it can be restored. Upon exposing isolated pancreatic islets of obese mice to normal glucose concentrations, β-cells revert back to their typical morphology with restoration of regulated insulin secretion. These data demonstrate an unrealized dynamic adaptive plasticity of pancreatic β-cells and underscore the rationale for transient β-cell rest as a treatment strategy for obesity-linked diabetes. PMID:26307586

  6. Insulin granules. Insulin secretory granules control autophagy in pancreatic β cells.

    PubMed

    Goginashvili, Alexander; Zhang, Zhirong; Erbs, Eric; Spiegelhalter, Coralie; Kessler, Pascal; Mihlan, Michael; Pasquier, Adrien; Krupina, Ksenia; Schieber, Nicole; Cinque, Laura; Morvan, Joëlle; Sumara, Izabela; Schwab, Yannick; Settembre, Carmine; Ricci, Romeo

    2015-02-20

    Pancreatic β cells lower insulin release in response to nutrient depletion. The question of whether starved β cells induce macroautophagy, a predominant mechanism maintaining energy homeostasis, remains poorly explored. We found that, in contrast to many mammalian cells, macroautophagy in pancreatic β cells was suppressed upon starvation. Instead, starved β cells induced lysosomal degradation of nascent secretory insulin granules, which was controlled by protein kinase D (PKD), a key player in secretory granule biogenesis. Starvation-induced nascent granule degradation triggered lysosomal recruitment and activation of mechanistic target of rapamycin that suppressed macroautophagy. Switching from macroautophagy to insulin granule degradation was important to keep insulin secretion low upon fasting. Thus, β cells use a PKD-dependent mechanism to adapt to nutrient availability and couple autophagy flux to secretory function.

  7. Mitochondrial Dysfunction Induces Senescence with a Distinct Secretory Phenotype.

    PubMed

    Wiley, Christopher D; Velarde, Michael C; Lecot, Pacome; Liu, Su; Sarnoski, Ethan A; Freund, Adam; Shirakawa, Kotaro; Lim, Hyung W; Davis, Sonnet S; Ramanathan, Arvind; Gerencser, Akos A; Verdin, Eric; Campisi, Judith

    2016-02-01

    Cellular senescence permanently arrests cell proliferation, often accompanied by a multi-faceted senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP). Loss of mitochondrial function can drive age-related declines in the function of many post-mitotic tissues, but little is known about how mitochondrial dysfunction affects mitotic tissues. We show here that several manipulations that compromise mitochondrial function in proliferating human cells induce a senescence growth arrest with a modified SASP that lacks the IL-1-dependent inflammatory arm. Cells that underwent mitochondrial dysfunction-associated senescence (MiDAS) had lower NAD+/NADH ratios, which caused both the growth arrest and prevented the IL-1-associated SASP through AMPK-mediated p53 activation. Progeroid mice that rapidly accrue mtDNA mutations accumulated senescent cells with a MiDAS SASP in vivo, which suppressed adipogenesis and stimulated keratinocyte differentiation in cell culture. Our data identify a distinct senescence response and provide a mechanism by which mitochondrial dysfunction can drive aging phenotypes. PMID:26686024

  8. Determination of Insulin Secretory Defect and Insulin Sensitivity in Type 2 Diabetic Subjects in Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Ferdous, J; Ahmed, S; Laila, R; Islam, M T; Rahaman, M F; Snigdha, K R; Sarkar, S; Khan, A S; Sarkar, A K

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is defined as a group of metabolic diseases characterized by hyperglycemia resulting from defects in insulin secretion, insulin action, or both. This study was undertaken to explore the basic defect in type 2 diabetes patients in Bangladesh. This was an observational study with case control design, was conducted in the Biomedical Research Group, Research Division, Bangladesh Institute of Research and Rehabilitation in Diabetes, Endocrine Metabolic Disorders (BIRDEM), Dhaka, Bangladesh, during the period of July 2008 to June 2009. A total of 153 subjects were included in study of which 63 belonged to type 2 diabetes mellitus group and 90 were healthy controls. Fasting and 2 hours postprandial blood glucose, serum insulin, HOMA%B, HOMA%S, QuickI, Glucose /insulin ratio, TG were measured and age, BMI, WHR were recorded. Waist-hip ratio (WHR), was significantly higher in T2DM as compared to control subjects [WHR, mean±SD, 0.94±0.12 vs. 0.88±0.06, p<0.001]; Glucose and insulin ratio of T2DM was significantly higher as compared to control subject [Glu: Ins, Median (range) of 0.54 (0.17-2.33) vs. 0.37(0.06-1.52)]. Insulin secretion (HOMA%B) was significantly lower in diabetic as compared to control subjects [HOMA%B, median (range), 71(4.90-391) vs. 180(59-634) p<0.001]; The quantitative insulin sensitivity check Index (QUICKI) of diabetic subjects were significantly higher as compared to control [QUICKI median (range) 39.90(4.80-138.10) vs. 0.55(0.36-0.85), <0.001]. Triglyceride (TG) and cholesterol (Chol) were significantly higher [(mg/dl), (mean±SD), TG (142±80.14) vs. (142±80.14); Chol (189±50.76) vs. (172±45), p=0.029] in T2DM as compared to control subjects. Those with diabetes showed significant association with insulin secretory defect (HOMA%B, p=0.006) and insulin resistance as assessed by GINR (p<0.001) and QuickI (p<0.001) but not by HOMA%S (p=0.127). The present data suggest that both insulin secretory defect and insulin

  9. Mitochondrial dysfunction and insulin resistance: an update

    PubMed Central

    Montgomery, Magdalene K; Turner, Nigel

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction has been implicated in the development of insulin resistance (IR); however, a large variety of association and intervention studies as well as genetic manipulations in rodents have reported contrasting results. Indeed, even 39 years after the first publication describing a relationship between IR and diminished mitochondrial function, it is still unclear whether a direct relationship exists, and more importantly if changes in mitochondrial capacity are a cause or consequence of IR. This review will take a journey through the past and summarise the debate about the occurrence of mitochondrial dysfunction and its possible role in causing decreased insulin action in obesity and type 2 diabetes. Evidence is presented from studies in various human populations, as well as rodents with genetic manipulations of pathways known to affect mitochondrial function and insulin action. Finally, we have discussed whether mitochondria are a potential target for the treatment of IR. PMID:25385852

  10. [Cytokines, endothelial dysfunction, and insulin resistance].

    PubMed

    de Carvalho, Maria Helena C; Colaço, André Luiz; Fortes, Zuleica Bruno

    2006-04-01

    Endothelial dysfunction is associated with several vascular conditions as atherosclerosis, hypertension, hyperlipidemia and diabetes mellitus. In all these conditions insulin resistance (IR) is present. Cytokines are low molecular weight proteins with several endocrine and metabolic functions that participate of inflammation and immune response. Several of these cytokines are independent risk factors for cerebrovascular and coronary artery disease. The major sources of cytokines (adipokines) are the visceral and subcutaneous adipose tissues. Thus, increased adipose tissue mass is associated with alteration in adipokine production as over expression of tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukin 6, plasminogen activator inhibitor 1, and under expression of adiponectin in adipocite tissue. The pro-inflammatory status associated with these changes provides a potential link between IR and endothelial dysfunction, the early stage in the atherosclerotic process, in obese individuals, and type 2 diabetic patients. Reduction of adipose tissue mass through weight reduction in association with exercise reduces TNF-alpha, IL-6, and PAI-1, increases adiponectin, and is associated with improved insulin sensitivity and endothelial function. This review will focus on the evidence for regulation of endothelial function by insulin and the adypokines such as adyponectin, leptin, resistin, IL-6 and TNF-alpha. Interaction between insulin signaling and adypokines will be discussed, as well as the concept that aberrant adypokine secretion in IR and/or obesity impairs endothelial function and contributes further to reduce insulin sensitivity.

  11. Insulin Secretory Defect and Insulin Resistance in Isolated Impaired Fasting Glucose and Isolated Impaired Glucose Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Aoyama-Sasabe, Sae; Fukushima, Mitsuo; Xin, Xin; Taniguchi, Ataru; Nakai, Yoshikatsu; Mitsui, Rie; Takahashi, Yoshitaka; Tsuji, Hideaki; Yabe, Daisuke; Yasuda, Koichiro; Kurose, Takeshi; Inagaki, Nobuya; Seino, Yutaka

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To investigate the characteristics of isolated impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) and isolated impaired fasting glucose (IFG), we analyzed the factors responsible for elevation of 2-hour postchallenge plasma glucose (2 h PG) and fasting plasma glucose (FPG) levels. Methods. We investigated the relationship between 2 h PG and FPG levels who underwent 75 g OGTT in 5620 Japanese subjects at initial examination for medical check-up. We compared clinical characteristics between isolated IGT and isolated IFG and analyzed the relationships of 2 h PG and FPG with clinical characteristics, the indices of insulin secretory capacity, and insulin sensitivity. Results. In a comparison between isolated IGT and isolated IFG, insulinogenic index was lower in isolated IGT than that of isolated IFG (0.43 ± 0.34 versus 0.50 ± 0.47, resp.; p < 0.01). ISI composite was lower in isolated IFG than that of isolated IGT (6.87 ± 3.38 versus 7.98 ± 4.03, resp.; p < 0.0001). In isolated IGT group, insulinogenic index showed a significant correlation with 2 h PG (r = −0.245, p < 0.0001) and had the strongest correlation with 2 h PG (β = −0.290). In isolated IFG group, ISI composite showed a significant correlation with FPG (r = −0.162, p < 0.0001) and had the strongest correlation with FPG (β = −0.214). Conclusions. We have elucidated that decreased early-phase insulin secretion is the most important factor responsible for elevation of 2 h PG levels in isolated IGT subjects, and decreased insulin sensitivity is the most important factor responsible for elevation of FPG levels in isolated IFG subjects. PMID:26788515

  12. Dynamin-2 Function and Dysfunction Along the Secretory Pathway

    PubMed Central

    González-Jamett, Arlek M.; Momboisse, Fanny; Haro-Acuña, Valentina; Bevilacqua, Jorge A.; Caviedes, Pablo; Cárdenas, Ana María

    2013-01-01

    Dynamin-2 is a ubiquitously expressed mechano-GTPase involved in different stages of the secretory pathway. Its most well-known function relates to the scission of nascent vesicles from the plasma membrane during endocytosis; however, it also participates in the formation of new vesicles from the Golgi network, vesicle trafficking, fusion processes and in the regulation of microtubule, and actin cytoskeleton dynamics. Over the last 8 years, more than 20 mutations in the dynamin-2 gene have been associated to two hereditary neuromuscular disorders: Charcot–Marie–Tooth neuropathy and centronuclear myopathy. Most of these mutations are grouped in the pleckstrin homology domain; however, there are no common mutations associated with both disorders, suggesting that they differently impact on dynamin-2 function in diverse tissues. In this review, we discuss the impact of these disease-related mutations on dynamin-2 function during vesicle trafficking and endocytotic processes. PMID:24065954

  13. Neurexin-1α contributes to insulin-containing secretory granule docking.

    PubMed

    Mosedale, Merrie; Egodage, Sonya; Calma, Rei C; Chi, Nai-Wen; Chessler, Steven D

    2012-02-24

    Neurexins are a family of transmembrane, synaptic adhesion molecules. In neurons, neurexins bind to both sub-plasma membrane and synaptic vesicle-associated constituents of the secretory machinery, play a key role in the organization and stabilization of the presynaptic active zone, and help mediate docking of synaptic vesicles. We have previously shown that neurexins, like many other protein constituents of the neurotransmitter exocytotic machinery, are expressed in pancreatic β cells. We hypothesized that the role of neurexins in β cells parallels their role in neurons, with β-cell neurexins helping to mediate insulin granule docking and secretion. Here we demonstrate that β cells express a more restricted pattern of neurexin transcripts than neurons, with a clear predominance of neurexin-1α expressed in isolated islets. Using INS-1E β cells, we found that neurexin-1α interacts with membrane-bound components of the secretory granule-docking machinery and with the granule-associated protein granuphilin. Decreased expression of neurexin-1α, like decreased expression of granuphilin, reduces granule docking at the β-cell membrane and improves insulin secretion. Perifusion of neurexin-1α KO mouse islets revealed a significant increase in second-phase insulin secretion with a trend toward increased first-phase secretion. Upon glucose stimulation, neurexin-1α protein levels decrease. This glucose-induced down-regulation may enhance glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. We conclude that neurexin-1α is a component of the β-cell secretory machinery and contributes to secretory granule docking, most likely through interactions with granuphilin. Neurexin-1α is the only transmembrane component of the docking machinery identified thus far. Our findings provide new insights into the mechanisms of insulin granule docking and exocytosis.

  14. Molecular Events Linking Oxidative Stress and Inflammation to Insulin Resistance and β-Cell Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Keane, Kevin Noel; Cruzat, Vinicius Fernandes; Carlessi, Rodrigo; de Bittencourt, Paulo Ivo Homem; Newsholme, Philip

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of diabetes mellitus (DM) is increasing worldwide, a consequence of the alarming rise in obesity and metabolic syndrome (MetS). Oxidative stress and inflammation are key physiological and pathological events linking obesity, insulin resistance, and the progression of type 2 DM (T2DM). Unresolved inflammation alongside a “glucolipotoxic” environment of the pancreatic islets, in insulin resistant pathologies, enhances the infiltration of immune cells which through secretory activity cause dysfunction of insulin-secreting β-cells and ultimately cell death. Recent molecular investigations have revealed that mechanisms responsible for insulin resistance associated with T2DM are detected in conditions such as obesity and MetS, including impaired insulin receptor (IR) signalling in insulin responsive tissues, oxidative stress, and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. The aim of the present review is to describe the evidence linking oxidative stress and inflammation with impairment of insulin secretion and action, which result in the progression of T2DM and other conditions associated with metabolic dysregulation. PMID:26257839

  15. Isocitrate-to-SENP1 signaling amplifies insulin secretion and rescues dysfunctional β cells

    PubMed Central

    Ferdaoussi, Mourad; Dai, Xiaoqing; Jensen, Mette V.; Wang, Runsheng; Peterson, Brett S.; Huang, Chao; Ilkayeva, Olga; Smith, Nancy; Miller, Nathanael; Hajmrle, Catherine; Spigelman, Aliya F.; Wright, Robert C.; Plummer, Gregory; Suzuki, Kunimasa; Mackay, James P.; van de Bunt, Martijn; Gloyn, Anna L.; Ryan, Terence E.; Norquay, Lisa D.; Brosnan, M. Julia; Trimmer, Jeff K.; Rolph, Timothy P.; Kibbey, Richard G.; Manning Fox, Jocelyn E.; Colmers, William F.; Shirihai, Orian S.; Neufer, P. Darrell; Yeh, Edward T.H.; Newgard, Christopher B.; MacDonald, Patrick E.

    2015-01-01

    Insulin secretion from β cells of the pancreatic islets of Langerhans controls metabolic homeostasis and is impaired in individuals with type 2 diabetes (T2D). Increases in blood glucose trigger insulin release by closing ATP-sensitive K+ channels, depolarizing β cells, and opening voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels to elicit insulin exocytosis. However, one or more additional pathway(s) amplify the secretory response, likely at the distal exocytotic site. The mitochondrial export of isocitrate and engagement with cytosolic isocitrate dehydrogenase (ICDc) may be one key pathway, but the mechanism linking this to insulin secretion and its role in T2D have not been defined. Here, we show that the ICDc-dependent generation of NADPH and subsequent glutathione (GSH) reduction contribute to the amplification of insulin exocytosis via sentrin/SUMO-specific protease-1 (SENP1). In human T2D and an in vitro model of human islet dysfunction, the glucose-dependent amplification of exocytosis was impaired and could be rescued by introduction of signaling intermediates from this pathway. Moreover, islet-specific Senp1 deletion in mice caused impaired glucose tolerance by reducing the amplification of insulin exocytosis. Together, our results identify a pathway that links glucose metabolism to the amplification of insulin secretion and demonstrate that restoration of this axis rescues β cell function in T2D. PMID:26389676

  16. Isocitrate-to-SENP1 signaling amplifies insulin secretion and rescues dysfunctional β cells.

    PubMed

    Ferdaoussi, Mourad; Dai, Xiaoqing; Jensen, Mette V; Wang, Runsheng; Peterson, Brett S; Huang, Chao; Ilkayeva, Olga; Smith, Nancy; Miller, Nathanael; Hajmrle, Catherine; Spigelman, Aliya F; Wright, Robert C; Plummer, Gregory; Suzuki, Kunimasa; Mackay, James P; van de Bunt, Martijn; Gloyn, Anna L; Ryan, Terence E; Norquay, Lisa D; Brosnan, M Julia; Trimmer, Jeff K; Rolph, Timothy P; Kibbey, Richard G; Manning Fox, Jocelyn E; Colmers, William F; Shirihai, Orian S; Neufer, P Darrell; Yeh, Edward T H; Newgard, Christopher B; MacDonald, Patrick E

    2015-10-01

    Insulin secretion from β cells of the pancreatic islets of Langerhans controls metabolic homeostasis and is impaired in individuals with type 2 diabetes (T2D). Increases in blood glucose trigger insulin release by closing ATP-sensitive K+ channels, depolarizing β cells, and opening voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels to elicit insulin exocytosis. However, one or more additional pathway(s) amplify the secretory response, likely at the distal exocytotic site. The mitochondrial export of isocitrate and engagement with cytosolic isocitrate dehydrogenase (ICDc) may be one key pathway, but the mechanism linking this to insulin secretion and its role in T2D have not been defined. Here, we show that the ICDc-dependent generation of NADPH and subsequent glutathione (GSH) reduction contribute to the amplification of insulin exocytosis via sentrin/SUMO-specific protease-1 (SENP1). In human T2D and an in vitro model of human islet dysfunction, the glucose-dependent amplification of exocytosis was impaired and could be rescued by introduction of signaling intermediates from this pathway. Moreover, islet-specific Senp1 deletion in mice caused impaired glucose tolerance by reducing the amplification of insulin exocytosis. Together, our results identify a pathway that links glucose metabolism to the amplification of insulin secretion and demonstrate that restoration of this axis rescues β cell function in T2D.

  17. Deletion of glutamate dehydrogenase in beta-cells abolishes part of the insulin secretory response not required for glucose homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Carobbio, Stefania; Frigerio, Francesca; Rubi, Blanca; Vetterli, Laurène; Bloksgaard, Maria; Gjinovci, Asllan; Pournourmohammadi, Shirin; Herrera, Pedro L; Reith, Walter; Mandrup, Susanne; Maechler, Pierre

    2009-01-01

    Insulin exocytosis is regulated in pancreatic ss-cells by a cascade of intracellular signals translating glucose levels into corresponding secretory responses. The mitochondrial enzyme glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) is regarded as a major player in this process, although its abrogation has not been tested yet in animal models. Here, we generated transgenic mice, named betaGlud1(-/-), with ss-cell-specific GDH deletion. Our results show that GDH plays an essential role in the full development of the insulin secretory response. In situ pancreatic perfusion revealed that glucose-stimulated insulin secretion was reduced by 37% in betaGlud1(-/-). Furthermore, isolated islets with either constitutive or acute adenovirus-mediated knock-out of GDH showed a 49 and 38% reduction in glucose-induced insulin release, respectively. Adenovirus-mediated re-expression of GDH in betaGlud1(-/-) islets fully restored glucose-induced insulin release. Thus, GDH appears to account for about 40% of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion and to lack redundant mechanisms. In betaGlud1(-/-) mice, the reduced secretory capacity resulted in lower plasma insulin levels in response to both feeding and glucose load, while body weight gain was preserved. The results demonstrate that GDH is essential for the full development of the secretory response in beta-cells. However, maximal secretory capacity is not required for maintenance of glucose homeostasis in normo-caloric conditions.

  18. [Analysis of the effect of diabetes type 2 duration on beta cell secretory function and insulin resistance].

    PubMed

    Popović, Ljiljana; Zamaklar, Miroslava; Lalić, Katarina; Vasović, Olga

    2006-01-01

    Diabetes type 2 is a chronic metabolic disorder. Pathogenesis of diabetes type 2 results from the impaired insulin secretion, impaired insulin action and increased endogenous glucose production. Diabetes evolves through several phases characterized by qualitative and quantitative changes of beta cell secretory function. The aim of our study was to analyze the impact of diabetes duration on beta cell secretory function and insulin resistance. The results indicated significant negative correlation of diabetes duration and fasting insulinemia, as well as beta cell secretory function assessed by HOMA beta index. Our study also found significant negative correlation of diabetes duration and insulin resistance assessed by HOMA IR index. Significant positive correlation was established between beta cell secretory capacity (fasting insulinemia and HOMA beta) and insulin resistance assessed by HOMA IR index, independently of diabetes duration. These results indicate that: beta cell secretory capacity, assessed by HOMA beta index, significantly decreases with diabetes duration. In parallel with decrease of fasting insulinemia, reduction of insulin resistance assessed by HOMA IR index was found as well.

  19. Human islet preparations distributed for research exhibit a variety of insulin-secretory profiles

    PubMed Central

    Kayton, Nora S.; Poffenberger, Gregory; Henske, Joseph; Dai, Chunhua; Thompson, Courtney; Aramandla, Radhika; Shostak, Alena; Nicholson, Wendell; Brissova, Marcela; Bush, William S.

    2015-01-01

    Human islet research is providing new insights into human islet biology and diabetes, using islets isolated at multiple US centers from donors with varying characteristics. This creates challenges for understanding, interpreting, and integrating research findings from the many laboratories that use these islets. In what is, to our knowledge, the first standardized assessment of human islet preparations from multiple isolation centers, we measured insulin secretion from 202 preparations isolated at 15 centers over 11 years and noted five distinct patterns of insulin secretion. Approximately three quarters were appropriately responsive to stimuli, but one quarter were dysfunctional, with unstable basal insulin secretion and/or an impairment in stimulated insulin secretion. Importantly, the patterns of insulin secretion by responsive human islet preparations (stable Baseline and Fold stimulation of insulin secretion) isolated at different centers were similar and improved slightly over the years studied. When all preparations studied were considered, basal and stimulated insulin secretion did not correlate with isolation center, biological differences of the islet donor, or differences in isolation, such as Cold Ischemia Time. Dysfunctional islet preparations could not be predicted from the information provided by the isolation center and had altered expression of genes encoding components of the glucose-sensing pathway, but not of insulin production or cell death. These results indicate that insulin secretion by most preparations from multiple centers is similar but that in vitro responsiveness of human islets cannot be predicted, necessitating preexperimental human islet assessment. These results should be considered when one is designing, interpreting, and integrating experiments using human islets. PMID:25648831

  20. Insulin Secretory Capacity and Insulin Resistance in Korean Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Patients

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    It is well known that many Korean patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) were non-obese and had decreased insulin secretion in past. However, during the past three decades, lifestyles in Korea have been westernized. As a result, the prevalence of obesity, the main cause of diabetes has increased. Thus, there is still a question as to whether the main pathophysiology of current Korean T2DM is insulin resistance or an insulin secretion defect. Because various anti-diabetes medications having different mechanisms of action are currently used as therapeutics, it is important to understand which of these factors is the main physiology in the development of diabetes in Koreans. In this review, we review changes in obesity prevalence, insulin resistance and insulin secretion defects in Korean T2DM during three decades. PMID:27546870

  1. Effect of low temperature cultivation on insulin secretory of human pancreatic islets.

    PubMed

    Nikolic, D M; Djordjevic, P B; Lackovic, V B; Stojiljkovic, V; Stanojevic, B

    2013-01-01

    The experiment compared the physiological function (insulin secretory capacity) and membrane integrity of human adult pancreatic islets incubated in culture at 37°C and 24°C. Pancreatic tissue was digested with Collagenase XI, using a non-automated method. Cultures were incubated at 37°C and 24°C. Secretory capacity of the islets is determined by measuring of the stimulation index (SI) on the 1st, 3rd and 7th day of cultivation. Membrane integrity of the islets was determined by dithizone staining. Both groups of examined cultures show a slight increase in SI during the incubation. However islets incubated at 24°C show higher SI values than those incubated at 37°C on the 1st, 3rd and 7th day of incubation. And on the first day of incubation, this difference was statistically significant (p <0.05). Islets incubated at 37°C showed preservation of membrane integrity, the islets are regular spherical shape, while those incubated at 24°C lose such an organization. During the seven-day cultivation, islets incubated at a standard temperature of 37°C show less preserve physiological functions in relation to cultures incubated at 24°C, but islets incubated at 37°C show more regular morphological forms. PMID:23489685

  2. Mitochondrial dysfunction has divergent, cell type-dependent effects on insulin action.

    PubMed

    Martin, Sheree D; Morrison, Shona; Konstantopoulos, Nicky; McGee, Sean L

    2014-07-01

    The contribution of mitochondrial dysfunction to insulin resistance is a contentious issue in metabolic research. Recent evidence implicates mitochondrial dysfunction as contributing to multiple forms of insulin resistance. However, some models of mitochondrial dysfunction fail to induce insulin resistance, suggesting greater complexity describes mitochondrial regulation of insulin action. We report that mitochondrial dysfunction is not necessary for cellular models of insulin resistance. However, impairment of mitochondrial function is sufficient for insulin resistance in a cell type-dependent manner, with impaired mitochondrial function inducing insulin resistance in adipocytes, but having no effect, or insulin sensitising effects in hepatocytes. The mechanism of mitochondrial impairment was important in determining the impact on insulin action, but was independent of mitochondrial ROS production. These data can account for opposing findings on this issue and highlight the complexity of mitochondrial regulation of cell type-specific insulin action, which is not described by current reductionist paradigms.

  3. Mitochondrial dysfunction has divergent, cell type-dependent effects on insulin action

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Sheree D.; Morrison, Shona; Konstantopoulos, Nicky; McGee, Sean L.

    2014-01-01

    The contribution of mitochondrial dysfunction to insulin resistance is a contentious issue in metabolic research. Recent evidence implicates mitochondrial dysfunction as contributing to multiple forms of insulin resistance. However, some models of mitochondrial dysfunction fail to induce insulin resistance, suggesting greater complexity describes mitochondrial regulation of insulin action. We report that mitochondrial dysfunction is not necessary for cellular models of insulin resistance. However, impairment of mitochondrial function is sufficient for insulin resistance in a cell type-dependent manner, with impaired mitochondrial function inducing insulin resistance in adipocytes, but having no effect, or insulin sensitising effects in hepatocytes. The mechanism of mitochondrial impairment was important in determining the impact on insulin action, but was independent of mitochondrial ROS production. These data can account for opposing findings on this issue and highlight the complexity of mitochondrial regulation of cell type-specific insulin action, which is not described by current reductionist paradigms. PMID:24944900

  4. The role of secretory granules in radiation-induced dysfunction of rat salivary glands

    SciTech Connect

    Peter, B.; Van Waarde, M.A.W.H.; Konings, A.W.T.; Vissink, A. |; `s-Gravenmade, E.J.

    1995-02-01

    To investigate the possible role of secretory granules in radiation-induced salivary gland dysfunction, rats were pretreated with isoproterenol (5 mg/kg intraperitoneally) to degranulate salivary gland acini. At maximal depletion, salivary glands were locally irradiated with a single dose of 15 Gy of X rays. Parotid and submandibular/sublingual saliva samples were collected before and 1-10 days after irradiation. The lag phase, flow rate, concentrations of potassium and sodium, and amylase secretion were determined. Sham-treated, isoproterenol-treated and irradiated animals provided reference data. In the parotid gland, but not in the submandibular gland, protection against radiation-induced changes in flow rate and composition of saliva occurred after pretreatment with isoproterenol. Combining morphological data from a previous study with data from the current study, it is suggested that improvement of parotid gland function is attributed predominantly to a proliferative stimulus on acinar cells by isoproterenol and not to its degranulation effect. After pretreatment with isoproterenol, an earlier expression of radiation-induced acinar cell damage leading to death was observed, followed by a faster tissue recovery. Thus the proliferative stimulus on acinar cells may accelerate the unmasking of latent lethal damage, resulting in the earlier replacement of dead cells by new, functionally intact cells. 33 refs., 2 figs.

  5. The challenge of improved secretory production of active pharmaceutical ingredients in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: a case study on human insulin analogs.

    PubMed

    Kazemi Seresht, Ali; Palmqvist, Eva A; Schluckebier, Gerd; Pettersson, Ingrid; Olsson, Lisbeth

    2013-10-01

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has widely been used as a host for the production of heterologous proteins. Great attention has been put on improved secretory production of active pharmaceutical ingredients, and the secretory pathway of this eukaryotic host has been the playground of diverse strain engineering studies, aiming at enhanced cellular capacities for folding and trafficking of the target proteins. However, the cellular quality assessment for secretory proteins remains mostly unpredictable, and different target proteins often do not picture similar secretion yields, underlining the dependency of efficient secretion on the physicochemical properties of the protein of interest. In this study, two human insulin analog precursors (IAPs) with minor differences in their amino acid sequences were used as model secretory proteins. No differences between cells expressing these two proteins were found in the IAP transcript levels, gene copy numbers, or intra-cellularly accumulated proteins, yet a more than sevenfold difference in their secretion yields was found. Physiological characterization of cells expressing these proteins in batch processes revealed no significant difference in their specific growth rate, but an altered overflow metabolism. Global transcriptome analysis carried out in chemostat experiments pinpointed distinct steps during the protein maturation pathway to be differentially regulated and indicated an increased degradation of the IAP with the low secretion yield. In silico protein structure modeling of the IAPs suggested a difference in conformational stability, induced by the amino acid substitution, which most likely resulted in disparity in trafficking through the secretory pathway and thus a large difference in secretion yields. PMID:23592021

  6. Roles of mitochondrial fragmentation and reactive oxygen species in mitochondrial dysfunction and myocardial insulin resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, Tomoyuki; Saotome, Masao; Nobuhara, Mamoru; Sakamoto, Atsushi; Urushida, Tsuyoshi; Katoh, Hideki; Satoh, Hiroshi; Funaki, Makoto; Hayashi, Hideharu

    2014-05-01

    Purpose: Evidence suggests an association between aberrant mitochondrial dynamics and cardiac diseases. Because myocardial metabolic deficiency caused by insulin resistance plays a crucial role in heart disease, we investigated the role of dynamin-related protein-1 (DRP1; a mitochondrial fission protein) in the pathogenesis of myocardial insulin resistance. Methods and Results: DRP1-expressing H9c2 myocytes, which had fragmented mitochondria with mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨ{sub m}) depolarization, exhibited attenuated insulin signaling and 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2-DG) uptake, indicating insulin resistance. Treatment of the DRP1-expressing myocytes with Mn(III)tetrakis(1-methyl-4-pyridyl)porphyrin pentachloride (TMPyP) significantly improved insulin resistance and mitochondrial dysfunction. When myocytes were exposed to hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}), they increased DRP1 expression and mitochondrial fragmentation, resulting in ΔΨ{sub m} depolarization and insulin resistance. When DRP1 was suppressed by siRNA, H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and insulin resistance were restored. Our results suggest that a mutual enhancement between DRP1 and reactive oxygen species could induce mitochondrial dysfunction and myocardial insulin resistance. In palmitate-induced insulin-resistant myocytes, neither DRP1-suppression nor TMPyP restored the ΔΨ{sub m} depolarization and impaired 2-DG uptake, however they improved insulin signaling. Conclusions: A mutual enhancement between DRP1 and ROS could promote mitochondrial dysfunction and inhibition of insulin signal transduction. However, other mechanisms, including lipid metabolite-induced mitochondrial dysfunction, may be involved in palmitate-induced insulin resistance. - Highlights: • DRP1 promotes mitochondrial fragmentation and insulin-resistance. • A mutual enhancement between DRP1 and ROS ipromotes insulin-resistance. • Palmitate increases DRP1 expression and induces insulin

  7. Complex mechanisms linking neurocognitive dysfunction to insulin resistance and other metabolic dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Stoeckel, Luke E.; Arvanitakis, Zoe; Gandy, Sam; Small, Dana; Kahn, C. Ronald; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro; Pawlyk, Aaron; Sherwin, Robert; Smith, Philip

    2016-01-01

    Scientific evidence has established several links between metabolic and neurocognitive dysfunction, and epidemiologic evidence has revealed an increased risk of Alzheimer’s disease and vascular dementia in patients with diabetes. In July 2015, the National Institute of Diabetes, Digestive, and Kidney Diseases gathered experts from multiple clinical and scientific disciplines, in a workshop entitled “The Intersection of Metabolic and Neurocognitive Dysfunction”, to clarify the state-of-the-science on the mechanisms linking metabolic dysfunction, and insulin resistance and diabetes in particular, to neurocognitive impairment and dementia. This perspective is intended to serve as a summary of the opinions expressed at this meeting, which focused on identifying gaps and opportunities to advance research in this emerging area with important public health relevance. PMID:27303627

  8. Glucose metabolism and glutamate analog acutely alkalinize pH of insulin secretory vesicles of pancreatic beta-cells.

    PubMed

    Eto, Kazuhiro; Yamashita, Tokuyuki; Hirose, Kenzo; Tsubamoto, Yoshiharu; Ainscow, Edward K; Rutter, Guy A; Kimura, Satoshi; Noda, Mitsuhiko; Iino, Masamitsu; Kadowaki, Takashi

    2003-08-01

    We studied acute changes of secretory vesicle pH in pancreatic beta-cells with a fluorescent pH indicator, lysosensor green DND-189. Fluorescence was decreased by 0.66 +/- 0.10% at 149 +/- 16 s with 22.2 mM glucose stimulation, indicating that vesicular pH was alkalinized by approximately 0.016 unit. Glucose-responsive pH increase was observed when cytosolic Ca2+ influx was blocked but disappeared when an inhibitor of glycolysis or mitochondrial ATP synthase was present. Glutamate dimethyl ester (GME), a plasma membrane-permeable analog of glutamate, potentiated glucose-stimulated insulin secretion at 5 mM without changing cellular ATP content or cytosolic Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]). Application of GME at basal glucose concentration decreased DND-189 fluorescence by 0.83 +/- 0.19% at 38 +/- 2 s. These results indicated that the acutely alkalinizing effect of glucose on beta-cell secretory vesicle pH was dependent on glucose metabolism but independent of modulations of cytosolic [Ca2+]. Moreover, glutamate derived from glucose may be one of the mediators of this alkalinizing effect of glucose, which may have potential relevance to the alteration of secretory function by glutamate.

  9. Insulin-degrading enzyme secretion from astrocytes is mediated by an autophagy-based unconventional secretory pathway in Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Son, Sung Min; Cha, Moon-Yong; Choi, Heesun; Kang, Seokjo; Choi, Hyunjung; Lee, Myung-Shik; Park, Sun Ah; Mook-Jung, Inhee

    2016-05-01

    The secretion of proteins that lack a signal sequence to the extracellular milieu is regulated by their transition through the unconventional secretory pathway. IDE (insulin-degrading enzyme) is one of the major proteases of amyloid beta peptide (Aβ), a presumed causative molecule in Alzheimer disease (AD) pathogenesis. IDE acts in the extracellular space despite having no signal sequence, but the underlying mechanism of IDE secretion extracellularly is still unknown. In this study, we found that IDE levels were reduced in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of patients with AD and in pathology-bearing AD-model mice. Since astrocytes are the main cell types for IDE secretion, astrocytes were treated with Aβ. Aβ increased the IDE levels in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. Moreover, IDE secretion was associated with an autophagy-based unconventional secretory pathway, and depended on the activity of RAB8A and GORASP (Golgi reassembly stacking protein). Finally, mice with global haploinsufficiency of an essential autophagy gene, showed decreased IDE levels in the CSF in response to an intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) injection of Aβ. These results indicate that IDE is secreted from astrocytes through an autophagy-based unconventional secretory pathway in AD conditions, and that the regulation of autophagy is a potential therapeutic target in addressing Aβ pathology.

  10. Insulin Resistance and Endothelial Dysfunction Constitute a Common Therapeutic Target in Cardiometabolic Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Mazur, G.

    2016-01-01

    Insulin resistance and other risk factors for atherosclerosis, such as hypertension and hypercholesterolemia, promote endothelial dysfunction and lead to development of metabolic syndrome which constitutes an introduction to cardiovascular disease. The insulin resistance and endothelial dysfunction cross talk between each other by numerous metabolic pathways. Hence, targeting one of these pathologies with pleiotropic treatment exerts beneficial effect on another one. Combined and expletive treatment of hypertension, lipid disorders, and insulin resistance with nonpharmacological interventions and conventional pharmacotherapy may inhibit the transformation of metabolic disturbances to fully developed cardiovascular disease. This paper summarises the common therapeutic targets for insulin resistance, endothelial dysfunction, and vascular inflammatory reaction at molecular level and analyses the potential pleiotropic effects of drugs used currently in management of cardiovascular disease, metabolic syndrome, and diabetes. PMID:27413253

  11. β2-Syntrophin Is a Cdk5 Substrate That Restrains the Motility of Insulin Secretory Granules

    PubMed Central

    Schubert, Sandra; Knoch, Klaus-Peter; Ouwendijk, Joke; Mohammed, Shabaz; Bodrov, Yury; Jäger, Melanie; Altkrüger, Anke; Wegbrod, Carolin; Adams, Marvin E.; Kim, Yong; Froehner, Stanley C.; Jensen, Ole N.; Kalaidzidis, Yannis; Solimena, Michele

    2010-01-01

    The molecular basis for the interaction of insulin granules with the cortical cytoskeleton of pancreatic β-cells remains unknown. We have proposed that binding of the granule protein ICA512 to the PDZ domain of β2-syntrophin anchors granules to actin filaments and that the phosphorylation/dephosphorylation of β2-syntrophin regulates this association. Here we tested this hypothesis by analyzing INS-1 cells expressing GFP-β2-syntrophin through the combined use of biochemical approaches, imaging studies by confocal and total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy as well as electron microscopy. Our results support the notion that β2-syntrophin restrains the mobility of cortical granules in insulinoma INS-1 cells, thereby reducing insulin secretion and increasing insulin stores in resting cells, while increasing insulin release upon stimulation. Using mass spectrometry, in vitro phosphorylation assays and β2-syntrophin phosphomutants we found that phosphorylation of β2-syntrophin on S75 near the PDZ domain decreases its binding to ICA512 and correlates with increased granule motility, while phosphorylation of S90 has opposite effects. We further show that Cdk5, which regulates insulin secretion, phosphorylates S75. These findings provide mechanistic insight into how stimulation displaces insulin granules from cortical actin, thus promoting their motility and exocytosis. PMID:20886068

  12. Genipin ameliorates age-related insulin resistance through inhibiting hepatic oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Guan, Lili; Feng, Haiyan; Gong, Dezheng; Zhao, Xu; Cai, Li; Wu, Qiong; Yuan, Bo; Yang, Mei; Zhao, Jie; Zou, Yuan

    2013-12-01

    Insulin resistance (IR) increases with age and plays a key role in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction are supposed to be major factors leading to age-related IR. Genipin, an extract from Gardenia jasminoides Ellis fruit, has been reported to stimulate insulin secretion in pancreatic islet cells by regulating mitochondrial function. In this study, we first investigated the effects of genipin on insulin sensitivity and the potential mitochondrial mechanisms in the liver of aging rats. The rats were randomly assigned to receive intraperitoneal injections of either 25mg/kg genipin or vehicle once daily for 12days. The aging rats showed hyperinsulinemia and hyperlipidemia, and insulin resistance as examined by the decreased glucose decay constant rate during insulin tolerance test (kITT). The hepatic tissues showed steatosis and reduced glycogen content. Hepatic malondialdehyde level and mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) were higher, and levels of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) and ATP were lower as compared with the normal control rats. Administration of genipin ameliorated systemic and hepatic insulin resistance, alleviated hyperinsulinemia, hyperglyceridemia and hepatic steatosis, relieved hepatic oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction in aging rats. Furthermore, genipin not only improved insulin sensitivity by promoting insulin-stimulated glucose consumption and glycogen synthesis, inhibited cellular ROS overproduction and alleviated the reduction of levels of MMP and ATP, but also reversed oxidative stress-associated JNK hyperactivation and reduced Akt phosphorylation in palmitate-treated L02 hepatocytes. In conclusion, genipin ameliorates age-related insulin resistance through inhibiting hepatic oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction. PMID:24041487

  13. Sirtuin3 Dysfunction Is the Key Determinant of Skeletal Muscle Insulin Resistance by Angiotensin II

    PubMed Central

    Macconi, Daniela; Perico, Luca; Longaretti, Lorena; Morigi, Marina; Cassis, Paola; Buelli, Simona; Perico, Norberto; Remuzzi, Giuseppe; Benigni, Ariela

    2015-01-01

    Background Angiotensin II promotes insulin resistance. The mechanism underlying this abnormality, however, is still poorly defined. In a different setting, skeletal muscle metabolism and insulin signaling are regulated by Sirtuin3. Objective Here, we investigate whether angiotensin II-induced insulin resistance in skeletal muscle is associated with Sirtuin3 dysregulation and whether pharmacological manipulation of Sirtuin3 confers protection. Study Design Parental and GLUT4-myc L6 rat skeletal muscle cells exposed to angiotensin II are used as in vitro models of insulin resistance. GLUT4 translocation, glucose uptake, intracellular molecular signals such as mitochondrial reactive oxygen species, Sirtuin3 protein expression and activity, along with its downstream targets and upstream regulators, are analyzed both in the absence and presence of acetyl-L-carnitine. The role of Sirtuin3 in GLUT4 translocation and intracellular molecular signaling is also studied in Sirtuin3-silenced as well as over-expressing cells. Results Angiotensin II promotes insulin resistance in skeletal muscle cells via mitochondrial oxidative stress, resulting in a two-fold increase in superoxide generation. In this context, reactive oxygen species open the mitochondrial permeability transition pore and significantly lower Sirtuin3 levels and activity impairing the cell antioxidant defense. Angiotensin II-induced Sirtuin3 dysfunction leads to the impairment of AMP-activated protein kinase/nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase signaling. Acetyl-L-carnitine, by lowering angiotensin II-induced mitochondrial superoxide formation, prevents Sirtuin3 dysfunction. This phenomenon implies the restoration of manganese superoxide dismutase antioxidant activity and AMP-activated protein kinase activation. Acetyl-L-carnitine protection is abrogated by specific Sirtuin3 siRNA. Conclusions Our data demonstrate that angiotensin II-induced insulin resistance fosters mitochondrial superoxide generation, in

  14. SIRT1 attenuates high glucose-induced insulin resistance via reducing mitochondrial dysfunction in skeletal muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hao-Hao; Ma, Xiao-Jun; Wu, Li-Na; Zhao, Yan-Yan; Zhang, Peng-Yu; Zhang, Ying-Hui; Shao, Ming-Wei; Liu, Fei; Li, Fei

    2015-01-01

    Insulin resistance is often characterized as the most critical factor contributing to the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Sustained high glucose is an important extracellular environment that induces insulin resistance. Acquired insulin resistance is associated with reduced insulin-stimulated mitochondrial activity as a result of increased mitochondrial dysfunction. Silent information regulator 1 (SIRT1) is one member of the SIRT2 (Sir2)-like family of proteins involved in glucose homeostasis and insulin secretion in mammals. Although SIRT1 has a therapeutic effect on metabolic deterioration in insulin resistance, it is still not clear how SIRT1 is involved in the development of insulin resistance. Here, we demonstrate that pcDNA3.1 vector-mediated overexpression of SIRT1 attenuates insulin resistance in the high glucose-induced insulin-resistant skeleton muscle cells. These beneficial effects were associated with ameliorated mitochondrial dysfunction. Further studies have demonstrated that SIRT1 restores mitochondrial complex I activity leading to decreased oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction. Furthermore, SIRT1 significantly elevated the level of another SIRT which is named SIRT3, and SIRT3 siRNA-suppressed SIRT1-induced mitochondria complex activity increments. Taken together, these results showed that SIRT1 improves insulin sensitivity via the amelioration of mitochondrial dysfunction, and this is achieved through the SIRT1–SIRT3–mitochondrial complex I pathway. PMID:25710929

  15. Reduced Melanocortin Production Causes Sexual Dysfunction in Male Mice With POMC Neuronal Insulin and Leptin Insensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Faulkner, Latrice D.; Dowling, Abigail R.; Stuart, Ronald C.; Nillni, Eduardo A.

    2015-01-01

    Proopiomelanocortin (POMC)-derived peptides like α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (MSH) substantially improve hepatic insulin sensitivity and regulate energy expenditure. Melanocortinergic agents are also powerful inducers of sexual arousal that are being investigated for a possible therapeutic role in erectile dysfunction. It is currently unclear whether reduced melanocortin (MC) activity may contribute to the sexual dysfunction accompanying obesity and type 2 diabetes. Male rodents with leptin and insulin resistance targeted to POMC neurons (leptin receptor [LepR]/insulin receptor [IR]POMC mice) exhibit obesity, hyperinsulinemia, hyperglycemia, and systemic insulin resistance. In this study, we demonstrate that LepR/IRPOMC males are also subfertile due to dramatic alterations in sexual behavior. Remarkably, these reproductive changes are accompanied by decreased α-MSH production not present when a single receptor type is deleted. Unexpectedly, behavioral sensitivity to α-MSH and MC receptor expression are also reduced in LepR/IRPOMC males, a potential adaptation of the MC system to altered α-MSH production. Together, these results suggest that concurrent insulin and leptin resistance in POMC neurons in individuals with obesity or type 2 diabetes can reduce endogenous α-MSH levels and impair sexual function. PMID:25590244

  16. Garlic extract attenuates brain mitochondrial dysfunction and cognitive deficit in obese-insulin resistant rats.

    PubMed

    Pintana, Hiranya; Sripetchwandee, Jirapas; Supakul, Luerat; Apaijai, Nattayaporn; Chattipakorn, Nipon; Chattipakorn, Siriporn

    2014-12-01

    Oxidative stress in the obese-insulin resistant condition has been shown to affect cognitive as well as brain mitochondrial functions. Garlic extract has exerted a potent antioxidant effect. However, the effects of garlic extract on the brain of obese-insulin resistant rats have never been investigated. We hypothesized that garlic extract improves cognitive function and brain mitochondrial function in obese-insulin resistant rats induced by long-term high-fat diet (HFD) consumption. Male Wistar rats were fed either normal diet or HFD for 16 weeks (n = 24/group). At week 12, rats in each dietary group received either vehicle or garlic extract (250 and 500 mg·kg(-1)·day(-1)) for 28 days. Learning and memory behaviors, metabolic parameters, and brain mitochondrial function were determined at the end of treatment. HFD led to increased body weight, visceral fat, plasma insulin, cholesterol, and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels, indicating the development of insulin resistance. Furthermore, HFD rats had cognitive deficit and brain mitochondrial dysfunction. HFD rats treated with both doses of garlic extract had decreased body weight, visceral fat, plasma cholesterol, and MDA levels. Garlic extract also improved cognitive function and brain mitochondrial function, which were impaired in obese-insulin resistant rats caused by HFD consumption.

  17. Contribution of mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum dysfunction in insulin resistance: Distinct or interrelated roles?

    PubMed

    Rieusset, J

    2015-11-01

    Mitochondria and the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) regulate numerous cellular processes, and are critical contributors to cellular and whole-body homoeostasis. More important, mitochondrial dysfunction and ER stress are both closely associated with hepatic and skeletal muscle insulin resistance, thereby playing crucial roles in altered glucose homoeostasis in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). The accumulated evidence also suggests a potential interrelationship between alterations in both types of organelles, as mitochondrial dysfunction could participate in activation of the unfolded protein response, whereas ER stress could influence mitochondrial function. The fact that mitochondria and the ER are physically and functionally interconnected via mitochondria-associated membranes (MAMs) supports their interrelated roles in the pathophysiology of T2DM. However, the mechanisms that coordinate the interplay between mitochondrial dysfunction and ER stress, and its relevance to the control of glucose homoeostasis, are still unknown. This review evaluates the involvement of mitochondria and ER independently in the development of peripheral insulin resistance, as well as their potential roles in the disruption of organelle crosstalk at MAM interfaces in the alteration of insulin signalling.

  18. Proteasome Dysfunction Associated to Oxidative Stress and Proteotoxicity in Adipocytes Compromises Insulin Sensitivity in Human Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Díaz-Ruiz, Alberto; Guzmán-Ruiz, Rocío; Moreno, Natalia R.; García-Rios, Antonio; Delgado-Casado, Nieves; Membrives, Antonio; Túnez, Isaac; El Bekay, Rajaa; Fernández-Real, José M.; Tovar, Sulay; Diéguez, Carlos; Tinahones, Francisco J.; Vázquez-Martínez, Rafael; López-Miranda, José

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Obesity is characterized by a low-grade systemic inflammatory state and adipose tissue (AT) dysfunction, which predispose individuals to the development of insulin resistance (IR) and metabolic disease. However, a subset of obese individuals, referred to as metabolically healthy obese (MHO) individuals, are protected from obesity-associated metabolic abnormalities. Here, we aim at identifying molecular factors and pathways in adipocytes that are responsible for the progression from the insulin-sensitive to the insulin-resistant, metabolically unhealthy obese (MUHO) phenotype. Results: Proteomic analysis of paired samples of adipocytes from subcutaneous (SC) and omental (OM) human AT revealed that both types of cells are altered in the MUHO state. Specifically, the glutathione redox cycle and other antioxidant defense systems as well as the protein-folding machinery were dysregulated and endoplasmic reticulum stress was increased in adipocytes from IR subjects. Moreover, proteasome activity was also compromised in adipocytes of MUHO individuals, which was associated with enhanced accumulation of oxidized and ubiquitinated proteins in these cells. Proteasome activity was also impaired in adipocytes of diet-induced obese mice and in 3T3-L1 adipocytes exposed to palmitate. In line with these data, proteasome inhibition significantly impaired insulin signaling in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Innovation: This study provides the first evidence of the occurrence of protein homeostasis deregulation in adipocytes in human obesity, which, together with oxidative damage, interferes with insulin signaling in these cells. Conclusion: Our results suggest that proteasomal dysfunction and impaired proteostasis in adipocytes, resulting from protein oxidation and/or misfolding, constitute major pathogenic mechanisms in the development of IR in obesity. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 23, 597–612. PMID:25714483

  19. High fat diet induces central obesity, insulin resistance and microvascular dysfunction in hamsters.

    PubMed

    Costa, Rute R S; Villela, Nivaldo Ribeiro; Souza, Maria das Graças C; Boa, Beatriz C S; Cyrino, Fátima Z G A; Silva, Simone V; Lisboa, Patricia C; Moura, Egberto G; Barja-Fidalgo, Thereza Christina; Bouskela, Eliete

    2011-11-01

    Microvascular dysfunction is an early finding in obesity possibly related to co-morbidities like diabetes and hypertension. Therefore we have investigated changes on microvascular function, body composition, glucose and insulin tolerance tests (GTT and ITT) on male hamsters fed either with high fat (HFD, n=20) or standard (Control, n=21) diet during 16 weeks. Total body fat and protein content were determined by carcass analysis, aorta eNOS and iNOS expression by immunoblotting assay and mean blood pressure (MAP) and heart rate (HR) by an arterial catheter. Microvascular reactivity in response to acetylcholine and sodium nitroprusside, functional capillary density (FCD), capillary recruitment induced by a hyperinsulinemic status and macromolecular permeability after 30 min ischemia was assessed on either cheek pouch or cremaster muscle preparations. Compared to Control, HFD animals have shown increased visceral fat (6.0 ± 0.8 vs. 13.8 ± 0.6g/100g BW), impaired endothelial dependent vasodilatation, decreased FCD (11.3 ± 1.3 vs. 6.8 ± 1.2/field) and capillary recruitment during hyperinsulinemia and increased macromolecular permeability after ischemia/reperfusion (86.4 ± 5.2 vs.105.2 ± 5.1 leaks/cm(2)), iNOS expression and insulin resistance. MAP, HR, endothelial independent vasodilatation and eNOS expression were not different between groups. Our results have shown that HFD elicits an increase on visceral fat deposition, microvascular dysfunction and insulin resistance in hamsters.

  20. Levocetirizine ameliorates high fructose diet-induced insulin resistance, vascular dysfunction and hepatic steatosis in rats.

    PubMed

    Shawky, Noha M; Shehatou, George S G; Abdel Rahim, Mona; Suddek, Ghada M; Gameil, Nariman M

    2014-10-01

    This study investigates the possible protective effects of levocetirizine against fructose-induced insulin resistance, hepatic steatosis and vascular dysfunction, in comparison to pioglitazone, a standard insulin sensitizer. Male Sprague Dawley rats (150-200 g) were divided into 4 groups. Three groups were fed on high fructose diets (HFD) containing 60% w/w fructose, while the fourth control group was fed on standard laboratory food for 8 weeks. AUCOGTT, AUCITT, fasting glucose, HOMA-IR, hepatic glutathione (GSH) and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels, serum total cholesterol, LDL-C, C-reactive protein (CRP) level and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity and liver steatosis scores were significantly higher in HFD group compared to control group. Moreover, body weight gain, food intake, feeding efficiency, HOMA-β, Emax and pEC50 of acetylcholine-induced relaxations of aortic rings and hepatic superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity were significantly lower in HFD group than in control group. Treatment with levocetirizine caused significant decreases in AUCOGTT, AUCITT, HOMA-IR, hepatic GSH and MDA levels and serum CRP level and LDH activity and significant increases in hepatic SOD activity and HOMA-β when compared with the HFD group. Although levocetirizine failed to alter TC and LDL-C levels, it produced a significant increase in HDL-C level relative to control group. Levocetirizine was also able to improve acetylcholine-induced relaxations of aortic rings, indicating a protective effect against insulin resistance-induced endothelial damage comparable to that offered by pioglitazone. Moreover, levocetirizine substantially attenuated insulin resistance-associated liver macrovesicular steatosis. These findings demonstrate that levocetirizine ameliorates insulin resistance, improves glucose tolerance and attenuates insulin resistance-linked hepatic steatosis and vascular damage. PMID:25064340

  1. Withaferin A protects against palmitic acid-induced endothelial insulin resistance and dysfunction through suppression of oxidative stress and inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Batumalaie, Kalaivani; Amin, Muhammad Arif; Murugan, Dharmani Devi; Sattar, Munavvar Zubaid Abdul; Abdullah, Nor Azizan

    2016-01-01

    Activation of inflammatory pathways via reactive oxygen species (ROS) by free fatty acids (FFA) in obesity gives rise to insulin resistance and endothelial dysfunction. Withaferin A (WA), possesses both antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties and therefore would be a good strategy to suppress palmitic acid (PA)-induced oxidative stress and inflammation and hence, insulin resistance and dysfunction in the endothelium. Effect of WA on PA-induced insulin resistance in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) was determined by evaluating insulin signaling mechanisms whilst effect of this drug on PA-induced endothelial dysfunction was determined in acetylcholine-mediated relaxation in isolated rat aortic preparations. WA significantly inhibited ROS production and inflammation induced by PA. Furthermore, WA significantly decreased TNF-α and IL-6 production in endothelial cells by specifically suppressing IKKβ/NF-κβ phosphorylation. WA inhibited inflammation-stimulated IRS-1 serine phosphorylation and improved the impaired insulin PI3-K signaling, and restored the decreased nitric oxide (NO) production triggered by PA. WA also decreased endothelin-1 and plasminogen activator inhibitor type-1 levels, and restored the impaired endothelium-mediated vasodilation in isolated aortic preparations. These findings suggest that WA inhibited both ROS production and inflammation to restore impaired insulin resistance in cultured endothelial cells and improve endothelial dysfunction in rat aortic rings. PMID:27250532

  2. Withaferin A protects against palmitic acid-induced endothelial insulin resistance and dysfunction through suppression of oxidative stress and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Batumalaie, Kalaivani; Amin, Muhammad Arif; Murugan, Dharmani Devi; Sattar, Munavvar Zubaid Abdul; Abdullah, Nor Azizan

    2016-01-01

    Activation of inflammatory pathways via reactive oxygen species (ROS) by free fatty acids (FFA) in obesity gives rise to insulin resistance and endothelial dysfunction. Withaferin A (WA), possesses both antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties and therefore would be a good strategy to suppress palmitic acid (PA)-induced oxidative stress and inflammation and hence, insulin resistance and dysfunction in the endothelium. Effect of WA on PA-induced insulin resistance in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) was determined by evaluating insulin signaling mechanisms whilst effect of this drug on PA-induced endothelial dysfunction was determined in acetylcholine-mediated relaxation in isolated rat aortic preparations. WA significantly inhibited ROS production and inflammation induced by PA. Furthermore, WA significantly decreased TNF-α and IL-6 production in endothelial cells by specifically suppressing IKKβ/NF-κβ phosphorylation. WA inhibited inflammation-stimulated IRS-1 serine phosphorylation and improved the impaired insulin PI3-K signaling, and restored the decreased nitric oxide (NO) production triggered by PA. WA also decreased endothelin-1 and plasminogen activator inhibitor type-1 levels, and restored the impaired endothelium-mediated vasodilation in isolated aortic preparations. These findings suggest that WA inhibited both ROS production and inflammation to restore impaired insulin resistance in cultured endothelial cells and improve endothelial dysfunction in rat aortic rings. PMID:27250532

  3. Secretory function of adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Kuryszko, J; Sławuta, P; Sapikowski, G

    2016-01-01

    There are two kinds of adipose tissue in mammals: white adipose tissue - WAT and brown adipose tissue - BAT. The main function of WAT is accumulation of triacylglycerols whereas the function of BAT is heat generation. At present, WAT is also considered to be an endocrine gland that produces bioactive adipokines, which take part in glucose and lipid metabolism. Considering its endocrine function, the adipose tissue is not a homogeneous gland but a group of a few glands which act differently. Studies on the secretory function of WAT began in 1994 after discovery of leptin known as the satiation hormone, which regulates body energy homeostasis and maintainence of body mass. Apart from leptin, the following belong to adipokines: adiponectin, resistin, apelin, visfatin and cytokines: TNF and IL 6. Adiponectin is a polypeptide hormone of antidiabetic, anti-inflammatory and anti-atherogenic activity. It plays a key role in carbohydrate and fat metabolism. Resistin exerts a counter effect compared to adiponectin and its physiological role is to maintain fasting glycaemia. Visfatin stimulates insulin secretion and increases insulin sensitivity and glucose uptake by muscle cells and adipocytes. Apelin probably increases the insulin sensitivity of tissues. TNF evokes insulin resistance by blocking insulin receptors and inhibits insulin secretion. Approximately 30% of circulating IL 6 comes from adipose tissue. It causes insulin resistance by decreasing the expression of insulin receptors, decreases adipogenesis and adiponectin and visfatin secretion, and stimulates hepatic gluconeogenesis. In 2004, Bays introduced the notion of adiposopathy, defined as dysfunction of the adipose tissue, whose main feature is insulin and leptin resistance as well as the production of inflammatory cytokines: TNF and IL 6 and monocyte chemoattractant protein. This means that excess of adipose tissue, especially visceral adipose tissue, leads to the development of a chronic subclinical

  4. Resveratrol prevents high-fructose corn syrup-induced vascular insulin resistance and dysfunction in rats.

    PubMed

    Babacanoglu, C; Yildirim, N; Sadi, G; Pektas, M B; Akar, F

    2013-10-01

    Dietary intake of fructose and sucrose can cause development of metabolic and cardiovascular disorders. The consequences of high-fructose corn syrup (HFCS), a commonly consumed form of fructose and glucose, have poorly been examined. Therefore, in this study, we investigated whether HFCS intake (10% and 20% beverages for 12 weeks) impacts vascular reactivity to insulin and endothelin-1 in conjunction with insulin receptor substrate-1(IRS-1), endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and inducible NOS (iNOS) mRNA/proteins levels in aorta of rats. At challenge, we tested the effectiveness of resveratrol (28-30 mg/kg body weight/day) on outcomes of HFCS feeding. HFCS (20%) diet feeding increased plasma triglyceride, VLDL, cholesterol, insulin and glucose levels, but not body weights of rats. Impaired nitric oxide-mediated relaxation to insulin (10⁻⁹ to 3×10⁻⁶ M), and enhanced contraction to endothelin-1 (10⁻¹¹ to 10⁻⁸ M) were associated with decreased expression of IRS-1 and eNOS mRNA and protein, but increased expression of iNOS, in aortas of rats fed with HFCS. Resveratrol supplementation restored many features of HFCS-induced disturbances, probably by regulating eNOS and iNOS production. In conclusion, dietary HFCS causes vascular insulin resistance and endothelial dysfunction through attenuating IRS-1 and eNOS expressions as well as increasing iNOS in rats. Resveratrol has capability to recover HFCS-induced disturbances. PMID:23872130

  5. Resveratrol prevents high-fructose corn syrup-induced vascular insulin resistance and dysfunction in rats.

    PubMed

    Babacanoglu, C; Yildirim, N; Sadi, G; Pektas, M B; Akar, F

    2013-10-01

    Dietary intake of fructose and sucrose can cause development of metabolic and cardiovascular disorders. The consequences of high-fructose corn syrup (HFCS), a commonly consumed form of fructose and glucose, have poorly been examined. Therefore, in this study, we investigated whether HFCS intake (10% and 20% beverages for 12 weeks) impacts vascular reactivity to insulin and endothelin-1 in conjunction with insulin receptor substrate-1(IRS-1), endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and inducible NOS (iNOS) mRNA/proteins levels in aorta of rats. At challenge, we tested the effectiveness of resveratrol (28-30 mg/kg body weight/day) on outcomes of HFCS feeding. HFCS (20%) diet feeding increased plasma triglyceride, VLDL, cholesterol, insulin and glucose levels, but not body weights of rats. Impaired nitric oxide-mediated relaxation to insulin (10⁻⁹ to 3×10⁻⁶ M), and enhanced contraction to endothelin-1 (10⁻¹¹ to 10⁻⁸ M) were associated with decreased expression of IRS-1 and eNOS mRNA and protein, but increased expression of iNOS, in aortas of rats fed with HFCS. Resveratrol supplementation restored many features of HFCS-induced disturbances, probably by regulating eNOS and iNOS production. In conclusion, dietary HFCS causes vascular insulin resistance and endothelial dysfunction through attenuating IRS-1 and eNOS expressions as well as increasing iNOS in rats. Resveratrol has capability to recover HFCS-induced disturbances.

  6. Low Adiponectin Concentration in Pregnancy Predicts Postpartum Insulin Resistance, Beta-cell Dysfunction, and Fasting Glycaemia

    PubMed Central

    Retnakaran, R; Qi, Y; Connelly, PW; Sermer, M; Hanley, AJ; Zinman, B

    2010-01-01

    Aims/Hypothesis The postpartum following gestational diabetes (GDM) is characterized by subtle metabolic defects, including beta-cell dysfunction that is believed to mediate the increased future risk of type 2 diabetes in this patient population. Recently, low circulating levels of adiponectin and increased leptin and C-reactive protein (CRP) have emerged as novel diabetic risk factors, although their relevance to GDM and subsequent diabetes has not been characterized. Thus, we sought to determine whether adiponectin, leptin and CRP in pregnancy relate to the postpartum metabolic defects linking GDM with type 2 diabetes. Methods 487 women underwent metabolic characterization, including oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT), in pregnancy and at 3-months postpartum. Based on the antepartum OGTT, there were 137 women with GDM, 91 with gestational impaired glucose tolerance, and 259 with normal glucose tolerance. Results Adiponectin levels were lowest (p<0.0001) and CRP levels highest (p=0.0008) in women with GDM. Leptin did not differ between the glucose tolerance groups (p=0.4483). Adiponectin (r=0.41,p<0.0001), leptin (r=−0.36,p<0.0001) and CRP (r=−0.30,p<0.0001) in pregnancy were all associated with postpartum insulin sensitivity (ISOGTT). Intriguingly, adiponectin was also related to postpartum beta-cell function (insulinogenic index/HOMA-IR) (r=0.16,p=0.0009). Indeed, on multiple linear regression analyses, adiponectin in pregnancy independently predicted both postpartum insulin sensitivity (t=3.97,p<0.0001) and beta-cell function (t=2.37,p=0.0181), even after adjustment for GDM. Furthermore, adiponectin emerged as a significant negative independent determinant of postpartum fasting glucose (t=−3.01,p=0.0027). Conclusions Hypoadiponectinemia in pregnancy predicts postpartum insulin resistance, beta-cell dysfunction, and fasting glycaemia, and hence may be relevant to the pathophysiology relating GDM with type 2 diabetes. PMID:19937225

  7. Vascular wall dysfunction in JCR:LA-cp rats: effects of age and insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    O'brien, S F; Russell, J C; Davidge, S T

    1999-11-01

    We tested the hypothesis that aging and insulin resistance interact to increase vascular dysfunction by comparing the function of isolated mesenteric resistance arteries in obese, insulin-resistant JCR:LA-cp rats and lean, insulin-sensitive rats of the same strain at 3, 6, 9, and 12 mo of age. The peak constrictor responses to norepinephrine, phenylephrine, and high potassium were elevated in arteries from obese rats. Responses to these agents increased with age in both obese and lean rats. An eicosanoid constrictor contributed substantially to vasoconstriction in the arteries from both lean and obese animals. Inhibition of nitric oxide synthase increased the vasoconstrictor response to norepinephrine in both obese and lean rats. This effect increased with age in lean rats only. Vascular relaxation in response to acetylcholine and sodium nitroprusside was impaired in the obese rats and did not alter with age. The results suggest that obese JCR:LA-cp rats have enhanced maximal constriction, which originates in the arterial smooth muscle and increases with age. There is evidence that the ability of the arteries to compensate for the enhanced contractility is impaired in obese rats, particularly with advanced age.

  8. Pentoxifylline alleviates cardiac ischemia and dysfunction following experimental angina in insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Azhar, Ahmad; El-Bassossy, Hany M

    2014-01-01

    We have previously shown that pentoxifylline (PTX) protects from vascular complications associated with insulin resistance (IR). Here, we investigated the protective effect of PTX against cardiac ischemia and dysfunction following experimental angina in IR. IR, along with its accompanying cardiac dysfunction, was induced in rats by a high-fructose (10% in drinking water) high-fat diet for 12 weeks. PTX was administered daily (30 mg⋅kg(-1)) during the last 4 weeks of the study. Experimental angina was induced by isoproterenol (10 µg⋅kg(-1)) administered by intravenous injection. Both before (baseline) and after the experimental angina, cardiac contractility was assessed by continuous recording in anesthetized rats via a microtip catheter inserted in the left ventricle, and cardiac conductivity was determined by a surface electrocardiograph. Serum glucose, insulin, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα), and adiponectin levels and lipid profile were also determined. Feeding the rats a high-fructose high-fat diet produced IR, as evidenced by significant hyperinsulinemia and hyperglycemia, and PTX administration did not affect this IR. When subjected to experimental angina, IR hearts were less resistant to the ischemia following induction of angina (reflected by the large ST height depression) compared with controls, and PTX completely prevented the excessive ST height depression in IR animals. In addition, left ventricular pressure development was largely attenuated during and after induction of angina in IR animals compared with controls. PTX administration prevented the excessive attenuation in ventricular pressure development in IR animals. IR was associated with elevated levels of the inflammatory cytokine TNFα, whereas PTX treatment elevated the serum level of the anti-inflammatory cytokine adiponectin. PTX alleviates cardiac ischemia and dysfunction following experimental angina in IR directly through inhibition of the low-grade inflammation that accompanies IR.

  9. Insulin-like growth factor 1 treatment of MSCs attenuates inflammation and cardiac dysfunction following MI.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jun; Zheng, Dong; Li, Wen-feng; Li, Hai-rui; Zhang, Ai-dong; Li, Zi-cheng

    2014-12-01

    It has been reported that insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) promoted migration of endothelial cells and cardiac resident progenitor cells. In the previous study, we found the time-dependent and dose-dependent effects of IGF-1 treatment on the CXCR4 expression in MSCs in vitro, but it is still not clear whether IGF-1 pretreatment of MSCs may play anti-apoptotic and anti-inflammation role in myocardial infarction. In this study, we demonstrated that IGF-1-treated MSCs' transplantation attenuate cardiac dysfunction, increase the survival of engrafted cells in the ischemic heart, decrease myocardium cells apoptosis, and inhibit protein production and gene expression of inflammation cytokines tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), interleukin (IL)-1β, and IL-6. IGF-1 pretreatment of MSCs may play anti-apoptotic and anti-inflammation roles in post-myocardial infarction.

  10. Secretory autophagy.

    PubMed

    Ponpuak, Marisa; Mandell, Michael A; Kimura, Tomonori; Chauhan, Santosh; Cleyrat, Cédric; Deretic, Vojo

    2015-08-01

    Autophagy, once viewed exclusively as a cytoplasmic auto-digestive process, has its less intuitive but biologically distinct non-degradative roles. One manifestation of these functions of the autophagic machinery is the process termed secretory autophagy. Secretory autophagy facilitates unconventional secretion of the cytosolic cargo such as leaderless cytosolic proteins, which unlike proteins endowed with the leader (N-terminal signal) peptides cannot enter the conventional secretory pathway normally operating via the endoplasmic reticulum and the Golgi apparatus. Secretory autophagy may also export more complex cytoplasmic cargo and help excrete particulate substrates. Autophagic machinery and autophagy as a process also affect conventional secretory pathways, including the constitutive and regulated secretion, as well as promote alternative routes for trafficking of integral membrane proteins to the plasma membrane. Thus, autophagy and autophagic factors are intimately intertwined at many levels with secretion and polarized sorting in eukaryotic cells. PMID:25988755

  11. Tranilast alleviates endothelial dysfunctions and insulin resistance via preserving glutathione peroxidase 1 in rats fed a high-fat emulsion.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xuan; Feng, Lei; Li, Changjiang; Li, Yu

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the effects of treatment with tranilast on vascular and metabolic dysfunction induced by a high-fat emulsion intragastric administration. Wistar rats were randomized to receive water or high-fat emulsion with or without tranilast treatment (400 mg/kg per day) for 4 weeks. Insulin sensitivity was determined with a hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp experiment and short insulin tolerance test. Vascular reactivity was evaluated using aortic rings in organ chambers. Glutathione peroxidase 1 (GPX1) expressions, eNOS phosphorylation and activity, MCP-1, H2O2 formation, and NO production were determined in vascular or soleus tissues. Tranilast treatment was found to prevent alterations in vascular reactivity and insulin sensitivity and to prevent increases in plasma glucose and insulin noted in the high-fat emulsion-treated rats. These were associated with increased antioxidant enzyme GPX1 expression, eNOS phosphorylation and activity, and NO production, but reductions in H2O2 accumulation. Moreover, tranilast preserved GPX1 expression in palmitic acid (PA)-treated endothelial cells with a consequent decreased ROS formation and increased eNOS phosphorylation and NO production. Therefore, oxidative stress induced by a relatively short-term high-fat diet could cause the early development of vascular and metabolic abnormalities in rats, and tranilast has a beneficial effect in vascular dysfunctions and insulin resistance via preserving GPX1 and alleviating oxidative stress. PMID:24389817

  12. Resveratrol supplementation restores high-fat diet-induced insulin secretion dysfunction by increasing mitochondrial function in islet

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Wen; Zheng, Juan; Zhang, Hao-hao; Hu, Xiang; Zeng, Tian-shu; Hu, Di

    2015-01-01

    Resveratrol (RSV), a natural compound, is known for its effects on energy homeostasis. Here we investigated the effects of RSV and possible mechanism in insulin secretion of high-fat diet rats. Rats were randomly divided into three groups as follows: NC group (animals were fed ad libitum with normal chow for 8 weeks), HF group (animals were fed ad libitum with high-fat diet for 8 weeks), and HFR group (animals were treated with high-fat diet and administered with RSV for 8 weeks). Insulin secretion ability of rats was assessed by hyperglycemic clamp. Mitochondrial biogenesis genes, mitochondrial respiratory chain activities, reactive oxidative species (ROS), and several mitochondrial antioxidant enzyme activities were evaluated in islet. We found that HF group rats clearly showed low insulin secretion and mitochondrial complex dysfunction. Expression of silent mating type information regulation 2 homolog- 1 (SIRT1) and related mitochondrial biogenesis were significantly decreased. However, RSV administration group (HFR) showed a marked potentiation of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. This effect was associated with elevated SIRT1 protein expression and antioxidant enzyme activities, resulting in increased mitochondrial respiratory chain activities and decreased ROS level. This study suggests that RSV may increase islet mitochondrial complex activities and antioxidant function to restore insulin secretion dysfunction induced by high-fat diet. PMID:25228148

  13. α-Cell Dysfunctions and Molecular Alterations in Male Insulinopenic Diabetic Mice Are Not Completely Corrected by Insulin.

    PubMed

    Dusaulcy, Rodolphe; Handgraaf, Sandra; Heddad-Masson, Mounia; Visentin, Florian; Vesin, Christian; Reimann, Franck; Gribble, Fiona; Philippe, Jacques; Gosmain, Yvan

    2016-02-01

    Glucagon and α-cell dysfunction are critical in the development of hyperglycemia during diabetes both in humans and rodents. We hypothesized that α-cell dysfunction leading to dysregulated glucagon secretion in diabetes is due to both a lack of insulin and intrinsic defects. To characterize α-cell dysfunction in diabetes, we used glucagon-Venus transgenic male mice and induced insulinopenic hyperglycemia by streptozotocin administration leading to alterations of glucagon secretion. We investigated the in vivo impact of insulinopenic hyperglycemia on glucagon-producing cells using FACS-sorted α-cells from control and diabetic mice. We demonstrate that increased glucagonemia in diabetic mice is mainly due to increases of glucagon release and biosynthesis per cell compared with controls without changes in α-cell mass. We identified genes coding for proteins involved in glucagon biosynthesis and secretion, α-cell differentiation, and potential stress markers such as the glucagon, Arx, MafB, cMaf, Brain4, Foxa1, Foxa3, HNF4α, TCF7L2, Glut1, Sglt2, Cav2.1, Cav2.2, Nav1.7, Kir6.2/Sur1, Pten, IR, NeuroD1, GPR40, and Sumo1 genes, which were abnormally regulated in diabetic mice. Importantly, insulin treatment partially corrected α-cell function and expression of genes coding for proglucagon, or involved in glucagon secretion, glucose transport and insulin signaling but not those coding for cMAF, FOXA1, and α-cell differentiation markers as well as GPR40, NEUROD1, CAV2.1, and SUMO1. Our results indicate that insulinopenic diabetes induce marked α-cell dysfunction and molecular alteration, which are only partially corrected by in vivo insulin treatment. PMID:26696123

  14. Inflammation, defective insulin signaling, and mitochondrial dysfunction as common molecular denominators connecting type 2 diabetes to Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    De Felice, Fernanda G; Ferreira, Sergio T

    2014-07-01

    A growing body of evidence supports an intriguing clinical/epidemiological connection between Alzheimer disease (AD) and type 2 diabetes (T2D). T2D patients have significantly increased risk of developing AD and vice versa. Recent studies have begun to reveal common pathogenic mechanisms shared by AD and metabolic disorders, notably obesity and T2D. In T2D and obesity, low-grade chronic inflammation is a key mechanism leading to peripheral insulin resistance, which progressively causes tissue deterioration and overall health decline. In the brain, proinflammatory signaling was recently found to mediate impaired neuronal insulin signaling, synapse deterioration, and memory loss. Here, we review evidence indicating that inflammation, insulin resistance, and mitochondrial dysfunction are common features in AD and T2D. We further propose the hypothesis that dementia and its underlying neuronal dysfunction are exacerbated or driven by peripheral inflammation. Identification of central and peripheral inflammation as potential mediators of brain dysfunction in AD may lead to the development of effective treatments for this devastating disease.

  15. Inflammation, defective insulin signaling, and mitochondrial dysfunction as common molecular denominators connecting type 2 diabetes to Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    De Felice, Fernanda G; Ferreira, Sergio T

    2014-07-01

    A growing body of evidence supports an intriguing clinical/epidemiological connection between Alzheimer disease (AD) and type 2 diabetes (T2D). T2D patients have significantly increased risk of developing AD and vice versa. Recent studies have begun to reveal common pathogenic mechanisms shared by AD and metabolic disorders, notably obesity and T2D. In T2D and obesity, low-grade chronic inflammation is a key mechanism leading to peripheral insulin resistance, which progressively causes tissue deterioration and overall health decline. In the brain, proinflammatory signaling was recently found to mediate impaired neuronal insulin signaling, synapse deterioration, and memory loss. Here, we review evidence indicating that inflammation, insulin resistance, and mitochondrial dysfunction are common features in AD and T2D. We further propose the hypothesis that dementia and its underlying neuronal dysfunction are exacerbated or driven by peripheral inflammation. Identification of central and peripheral inflammation as potential mediators of brain dysfunction in AD may lead to the development of effective treatments for this devastating disease. PMID:24931033

  16. GGPPS-mediated Rab27A geranylgeranylation regulates β cell dysfunction during type 2 diabetes development by affecting insulin granule docked pool formation.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Shan; Shen, Di; Jia, Wen-Jun; Han, Xiao; Shen, Ning; Tao, Weiwei; Gao, Xiang; Xue, Bin; Li, Chao-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Loss of first-phase insulin secretion associated with β cell dysfunction is an independent predictor of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) onset. Here we found that a critical enzyme involved in protein prenylation, geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate synthase (GGPPS), is required to maintain first-phase insulin secretion. GGPPS shows a biphasic expression pattern in islets of db/db mice during the progression of T2DM: GGPPS is increased during the insulin compensatory period, followed by a decrease during β cell dysfunction. Ggpps deletion in β cells results in typical T2DM β cell dysfunction, with blunted glucose-stimulated insulin secretion and consequent insulin secretion insufficiency. However, the number and size of islets and insulin biosynthesis are unaltered. Transmission electron microscopy shows a reduced number of insulin granules adjacent to the cellular membrane, suggesting a defect in docked granule pool formation, while the reserve pool is unaffected. Ggpps ablation depletes GGPP and impairs Rab27A geranylgeranylation, which is responsible for the docked pool deficiency in Ggpps-null mice. Moreover, GGPPS re-expression or GGPP administration restore glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in Ggpps-null islets. These results suggest that GGPPS-controlled protein geranylgeranylation, which regulates formation of the insulin granule docked pool, is critical for β cell function and insulin release during the development of T2DM.

  17. Ciliary dysfunction impairs beta-cell insulin secretion and promotes development of type 2 diabetes in rodents.

    PubMed

    Gerdes, Jantje M; Christou-Savina, Sonia; Xiong, Yan; Moede, Tilo; Moruzzi, Noah; Karlsson-Edlund, Patrick; Leibiger, Barbara; Leibiger, Ingo B; Östenson, Claes-Göran; Beales, Philip L; Berggren, Per-Olof

    2014-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is affecting more than 382 million people worldwide. Although much progress has been made, a comprehensive understanding of the underlying disease mechanism is still lacking. Here we report a role for the β-cell primary cilium in type 2 diabetes susceptibility. We find impaired glucose handling in young Bbs4(-/-) mice before the onset of obesity. Basal body/ciliary perturbation in murine pancreatic islets leads to impaired first phase insulin release ex and in vivo. Insulin receptor is recruited to the cilium of stimulated β-cells and ciliary/basal body integrity is required for activation of downstream targets of insulin signalling. We also observe a reduction in the number of ciliated β-cells along with misregulated ciliary/basal body gene expression in pancreatic islets in a diabetic rat model. We suggest that ciliary function is implicated in insulin secretion and insulin signalling in the β-cell and that ciliary dysfunction could contribute to type 2 diabetes susceptibility. PMID:25374274

  18. The Potential Protective Action of Vitamin D in Hepatic Insulin Resistance and Pancreatic Islet Dysfunction in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Leung, Po Sing

    2016-03-01

    Vitamin D deficiency (i.e., hypovitaminosis D) is associated with increased insulin resistance, impaired insulin secretion, and poorly controlled glucose homeostasis, and thus is correlated with the risk of metabolic diseases, including type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). The liver plays key roles in glucose and lipid metabolism, and its dysregulation leads to abnormalities in hepatic glucose output and triglyceride accumulation. Meanwhile, the pancreatic islets are constituted in large part by insulin-secreting β cells. Consequently, islet dysfunction, such as occurs in T2DM, produces hyperglycemia. In this review, we provide a critical appraisal of the modulatory actions of vitamin D in hepatic insulin sensitivity and islet insulin secretion, and we discuss the potential roles of a local vitamin D signaling in regulating hepatic and pancreatic islet functions. This information provides a scientific basis for establishing the benefits of the maintenance, or dietary manipulation, of adequate vitamin D status in the prevention and management of obesity-induced T2DM and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. PMID:26959059

  19. The Potential Protective Action of Vitamin D in Hepatic Insulin Resistance and Pancreatic Islet Dysfunction in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Leung, Po Sing

    2016-03-05

    Vitamin D deficiency (i.e., hypovitaminosis D) is associated with increased insulin resistance, impaired insulin secretion, and poorly controlled glucose homeostasis, and thus is correlated with the risk of metabolic diseases, including type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). The liver plays key roles in glucose and lipid metabolism, and its dysregulation leads to abnormalities in hepatic glucose output and triglyceride accumulation. Meanwhile, the pancreatic islets are constituted in large part by insulin-secreting β cells. Consequently, islet dysfunction, such as occurs in T2DM, produces hyperglycemia. In this review, we provide a critical appraisal of the modulatory actions of vitamin D in hepatic insulin sensitivity and islet insulin secretion, and we discuss the potential roles of a local vitamin D signaling in regulating hepatic and pancreatic islet functions. This information provides a scientific basis for establishing the benefits of the maintenance, or dietary manipulation, of adequate vitamin D status in the prevention and management of obesity-induced T2DM and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

  20. The Potential Protective Action of Vitamin D in Hepatic Insulin Resistance and Pancreatic Islet Dysfunction in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Po Sing

    2016-01-01

    Vitamin D deficiency (i.e., hypovitaminosis D) is associated with increased insulin resistance, impaired insulin secretion, and poorly controlled glucose homeostasis, and thus is correlated with the risk of metabolic diseases, including type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). The liver plays key roles in glucose and lipid metabolism, and its dysregulation leads to abnormalities in hepatic glucose output and triglyceride accumulation. Meanwhile, the pancreatic islets are constituted in large part by insulin-secreting β cells. Consequently, islet dysfunction, such as occurs in T2DM, produces hyperglycemia. In this review, we provide a critical appraisal of the modulatory actions of vitamin D in hepatic insulin sensitivity and islet insulin secretion, and we discuss the potential roles of a local vitamin D signaling in regulating hepatic and pancreatic islet functions. This information provides a scientific basis for establishing the benefits of the maintenance, or dietary manipulation, of adequate vitamin D status in the prevention and management of obesity-induced T2DM and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. PMID:26959059

  1. High-fat diet is associated with obesity-mediated insulin resistance and β-cell dysfunction in Mexican Americans.

    PubMed

    Black, Mary Helen; Watanabe, Richard M; Trigo, Enrique; Takayanagi, Miwa; Lawrence, Jean M; Buchanan, Thomas A; Xiang, Anny H

    2013-04-01

    Consumption of energy-dense, nutrient-poor foods has contributed to the rising incidence of obesity and may underlie insulin resistance and β-cell dysfunction. Macronutrient intake patterns were examined in relation to anthropometric and metabolic traits in participants of BetaGene, a family-based study of obesity, insulin resistance, and β-cell dysfunction in Mexican Americans. Dietary intake, body composition, insulin sensitivity (SI), and β-cell function [Disposition Index (DI)] were assessed by food-frequency questionnaires, dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, and intravenous glucose-tolerance tests, respectively. Patterns of macronutrient intake were identified by using a K-means model based on the proportion of total energy intake per day attributable to carbohydrate, fat, and protein and were tested for association with anthropometric and metabolic traits. Among 1150 subjects aged 18-65 y (73% female), tertiles of fat intake were associated with greater adiposity and lower SI, after adjustment for age, sex, and daily energy intake. Moreover, 3 distinct dietary patterns were identified: "high fat" (35% fat, 44% carbohydrate, 21% protein; n = 238), "moderate fat" (28% fat, 54% carbohydrate, 18% protein; n = 520), and "low fat" (20% fat, 65% carbohydrate, 15% protein; n = 392). Compared with the low-fat group, the high-fat group had higher age- and sex-adjusted mean body mass index, body fat percentage, and trunk fat and lower SI and DI. Further adjustment for daily energy intake by matching individuals across dietary pattern groups yielded similar results. None of the observed associations were altered after adjustment for physical activity; however, associations with SI and DI were attenuated after adjustment for adiposity. These findings suggest that high-fat diets may contribute to increased adiposity and concomitant insulin resistance and β-cell dysfunction in Mexican Americans.

  2. Renal scintigraphy in insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus: Early glomerular and urologic dysfunction

    SciTech Connect

    Poirier, J.Y.; Moisan, A.; Le Cloirec, J.; Siemen, C.; Yaouanq, J.; Edan, G.; Herry, J.Y. )

    1990-07-01

    Glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and renal plasma flow (RPF) were measured by intravenous injection of 99mTc-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) and 131I-Hippuran in 115 insulin-dependent diabetic patients with albumin excretion rates (AER) less than 200 micrograms/min, and in 45 normal subjects. Separate kidney function and urinary elimination were estimated by renography. GFR was increased in the diabetic patients (152 +/- 24 ml/min/1.73 m2 vs. 128 +/- 15) and correlated significantly with RPF (r = 0.5; p less than 10(-9)). No relationship was found between GFR and the duration of diabetes, blood glucose, HbA1c, or AER. Fifty patients were hyperfiltering with RPF and filtration fraction higher than those in the normofiltering group. Slow intrarenal or pyeloureteral elimination, either unilateral or bilateral, was observed in 3 controls and 60 diabetic subjects (24 hyperfiltering; 36 normofiltering) and did not disappear with the patient in the standing position. In these 60 patients, mean age, duration of diabetes, blood glucose, HbA1c, 24 h albumin excretion rate, and frequency of peripheral or autonomic neuropathy did not differ from patients with normal scintigraphy; GFR was lower in the group with slow elimination, but not significantly so. 99mTc-DTPA renal uptake was symmetric in all the controls; asymmetric renal uptake with asymmetric GFR was observed in 13 patients (7 hyperfiltering; 6 normofiltering) and often associated with slower elimination. No evidence for renal stenotic atheroma or parenchymatous disease was found on the angiopyleoureterography. The results suggest that incipient uropathy is a very common phenomenon that occurs irrespective of glomerular dysfunction.

  3. Attenuation of Ca2+ homeostasis, oxidative stress, and mitochondrial dysfunctions in diabetic rat heart: insulin therapy or aerobic exercise?

    PubMed

    da Silva, Márcia F; Natali, Antônio J; da Silva, Edson; Gomes, Gilton J; Teodoro, Bruno G; Cunha, Daise N Q; Drummond, Lucas R; Drummond, Filipe R; Moura, Anselmo G; Belfort, Felipe G; de Oliveira, Alessandro; Maldonado, Izabel R S C; Alberici, Luciane C

    2015-07-15

    We tested the effects of swimming training and insulin therapy, either alone or in combination, on the intracellular calcium ([Ca(2+)]i) homeostasis, oxidative stress, and mitochondrial functions in diabetic rat hearts. Male Wistar rats were separated into control, diabetic, or diabetic plus insulin groups. Type 1 diabetes mellitus was induced by streptozotocin (STZ). Insulin-treated groups received 1 to 4 UI of insulin daily for 8 wk. Each group was divided into sedentary or exercised rats. Trained groups were submitted to swimming (90 min/day, 5 days/wk, 8 wk). [Ca(2+)]i transient in left ventricular myocytes (LVM), oxidative stress in LV tissue, and mitochondrial functions in the heart were assessed. Diabetes reduced the amplitude and prolonged the times to peak and to half decay of the [Ca(2+)]i transient in LVM, increased NADPH oxidase-4 (Nox-4) expression, decreased superoxide dismutase (SOD), and increased carbonyl protein contents in LV tissue. In isolated mitochondria, diabetes increased Ca(2+) uptake, susceptibility to permeability transition pore (MPTP) opening, uncoupling protein-2 (UCP-2) expression, and oxygen consumption but reduced H2O2 release. Swimming training corrected the time course of the [Ca(2+)]i transient, UCP-2 expression, and mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake. Insulin replacement further normalized [Ca(2+)]i transient amplitude, Nox-4 expression, and carbonyl content. Alongside these benefits, the combination of both therapies restored the LV tissue SOD and mitochondrial O2 consumption, H2O2 release, and MPTP opening. In conclusion, the combination of swimming training with insulin replacement was more effective in attenuating intracellular Ca(2+) disruptions, oxidative stress, and mitochondrial dysfunctions in STZ-induced diabetic rat hearts. PMID:25997948

  4. Endothelial and vascular dysfunctions and insulin resistance in rats fed a high-fat, high-sucrose diet.

    PubMed

    Bourgoin, Frédéric; Bachelard, Hélène; Badeau, Mylène; Mélançon, Sébastien; Pitre, Maryse; Larivière, Richard; Nadeau, André

    2008-09-01

    This study was designed to examine the effects of a high-fat, high-sucrose (HFHS) diet on vascular and metabolic actions of insulin. Male rats were randomized to receive an HFHS or regular chow diet for 4 wk. In a first series of experiments, the rats had pulsed Doppler flow probes and intravascular catheters implanted to measure blood pressure, heart rate, and regional blood flows. Insulin sensitivity and vascular responses to insulin were assessed during a euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp performed in conscious rats. In a second series of experiments, new groups of rats were used to examine skeletal muscle glucose transport activity and to determine in vitro vascular reactivity, endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) protein expression in muscle and vascular tissues and endothelin content, nitrotyrosine formation, and NAD(P)H oxidase protein expression in vascular tissues. The HFHS-fed rats displayed insulin resistance, hyperinsulinemia, hypertriglyceridemia, hyperlipidemia, elevated blood pressure, and impaired insulin-mediated renal and skeletal muscle vasodilator responses. A reduction in endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation, accompanied by a decreased eNOS protein expression in muscles and blood vessel endothelium, and increased vascular endothelin-1 protein content were also noted in HFHS-fed rats compared with control rats. Furthermore, the HFHS diet induced a reduced insulin-stimulated glucose transport activity in muscles and increased levels of NAD(P)H oxidase protein and nitrotyrosine formation in vascular tissues. These findings support the importance of eNOS protein in linking metabolic and vascular disease and indicate the ability of a Westernized diet to induce endothelial dysfunction and to alter metabolic and vascular homeostasis.

  5. Hyperandrogenism and Insulin Resistance, Not Changes in Body Weight, Mediate the Development of Endothelial Dysfunction in a Female Rat Model of Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS).

    PubMed

    Hurliman, Amanda; Keller Brown, Jennifer; Maille, Nicole; Mandala, Maurizio; Casson, Peter; Osol, George

    2015-11-01

    This study was designed to differentiate the contributions of hyperandrogenism, insulin resistance (IR), and body weight to the development of endothelial dysfunction in polycystic ovary syndrome and determine the effectiveness of insulin sensitization and antiandrogenic therapy after the establishment of vascular and metabolic dysfunction using a rat model of polycystic ovary syndrome. We hypothesized that the observed endothelial dysfunction was a direct steroidal effect, as opposed to changes in insulin sensitivity or body weight. Prepubertal female rats were randomized to the implantation of a pellet containing DHT or sham procedure. In phase 1, DHT-exposed animals were randomized to pair feeding to prevent weight gain or metformin, an insulin-sensitizing agent, from 5 to 14 weeks. In phase 2, DHT-exposed animals were randomized to treatment with metformin or flutamide, a nonsteroidal androgen receptor blocker from 12 to 16 weeks. Endothelial function was assessed by the vasodilatory response of preconstricted arteries to acetylcholine. Serum steroid levels were analyzed in phase 1 animals. Fasting blood glucose and plasma insulin were analyzed and homeostasis model assessment index calculated in all animals. Our data confirm the presence of endothelial dysfunction as well as increased body weight, hypertension, hyperinsulinemia, and greater IR among DHT-treated animals. Even when normal weight was maintained through pair feeding, endothelial dysfunction, hyperinsulinemia, and IR still developed. Furthermore, despite weight gain, treatment with metformin and flutamide improved insulin sensitivity and blood pressure and restored normal endothelial function. Therefore, the observed endothelial dysfunction is most likely a direct result of hyperandrogenism-induced reductions in insulin sensitivity, as opposed to weight gain.

  6. Insulin

    MedlinePlus

    ... pump is connected to your body by a flexible tube that has a tip that sticks under your skin. A cartridge of insulin is put in the pump. The insulin flows through the tube into your body. The pump controls how much insulin goes into your body. The ...

  7. Why can insulin resistance be a natural consequence of thyroid dysfunction?

    PubMed

    Brenta, Gabriela

    2011-01-01

    Evidence for a relationship between T4 and T3 and glucose metabolism appeared over 100 years ago when the influence of thyroid hormone excess in the deterioration of glucose metabolism was first noticed. Since then, it has been known that hyperthyroidism is associated with insulin resistance. More recently, hypothyroidism has also been linked to decreased insulin sensitivity. The explanation to this apparent paradox may lie in the differential effects of thyroid hormones at the liver and peripheral tissues level. The purpose of this paper is to explore the effects of thyroid hormones in glucose metabolism and analyze the mechanisms whereby alterations of thyroid hormones lead to insulin resistance. PMID:21941681

  8. Why can insulin resistance be a natural consequence of thyroid dysfunction?

    PubMed

    Brenta, Gabriela

    2011-01-01

    Evidence for a relationship between T4 and T3 and glucose metabolism appeared over 100 years ago when the influence of thyroid hormone excess in the deterioration of glucose metabolism was first noticed. Since then, it has been known that hyperthyroidism is associated with insulin resistance. More recently, hypothyroidism has also been linked to decreased insulin sensitivity. The explanation to this apparent paradox may lie in the differential effects of thyroid hormones at the liver and peripheral tissues level. The purpose of this paper is to explore the effects of thyroid hormones in glucose metabolism and analyze the mechanisms whereby alterations of thyroid hormones lead to insulin resistance.

  9. Why Can Insulin Resistance Be a Natural Consequence of Thyroid Dysfunction?

    PubMed Central

    Brenta, Gabriela

    2011-01-01

    Evidence for a relationship between T4 and T3 and glucose metabolism appeared over 100 years ago when the influence of thyroid hormone excess in the deterioration of glucose metabolism was first noticed. Since then, it has been known that hyperthyroidism is associated with insulin resistance. More recently, hypothyroidism has also been linked to decreased insulin sensitivity. The explanation to this apparent paradox may lie in the differential effects of thyroid hormones at the liver and peripheral tissues level. The purpose of this paper is to explore the effects of thyroid hormones in glucose metabolism and analyze the mechanisms whereby alterations of thyroid hormones lead to insulin resistance. PMID:21941681

  10. Evaluation of Usefulness of Serum Insulin as Sensitive Predictor of Cardiovascular Dysfunction in Obese Individuals with Normal Lipid Profile

    PubMed Central

    Bavikar, Jayashree S.; Asegaonkar, Shilpa B.; Bardapurkar, Jayashree S.; Domple, Vijay; Rai, Pooja SK; Pawar, Smita

    2014-01-01

    Background: Prevalence of obesity and its subsequent cardiometabolic complications is on exponential rise. Hyperinsulinemia develops in obese individuals long before other metabolic derangements of obesity take place and may be a common pathophysiological factor tying together various components of cardiometabolic dysfunction. Aim: Present study was aimed at evaluating the role of insulin as a sensitive and independent cardiovascular risk marker in apparently healthy overweight and obese individuals with normal lipid profile. Settings and design: This was an opd based case Control study including 100 overweight and obese individuals with normal lipid profile & 100 age and sex matched normal weight healthy controls. Materials and Methods: Participants were evaluated based on detailed history, clinical examination and laboratory investigations. Blood samples were collected after overnight fast. Serum insulin was estimated by chemiluminescence method, glucose and lipid profile (CHOLESTEROL, HDL, TG, LDL) by chemical assays on a fully automated analyser system. Statistical analysis: Results were analyzed by unpaired t-test, p-value was determined & Correlation coefficient was calculated amongst various parameters. Results: Significant difference was noted in mean values of BMI (29.69±1.28 VS 23.47±1.09), waist / hip ratio (0.91±0.07 VS 0.79±0.05) and serum insulin (10.54±2.5 VS 5.94±1.53) (p<0.01) in cases as compared to controls respectively. Glucose levels were high in cases (89.58±8.0 mg/dl) as compared to controls (88.8±7.56 mg/dl) but the difference was statistically insignificant (p=0.11). Hyperinsulinemia was observed in 41 cases & 4 controls. Serum insulin highly correlated with Waist/ hip ratio (R=0.53) than BMI (R=0.26). Conclusion: Study suggests Insulin; a simple, sensitive & independent cardiovascular risk predictor in obesity even with normal lipid profile with a potential to reveal hidden burden of metabolic dysfunction and offers a hope that

  11. Insulin-dependent (type I) diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed Central

    Rodger, W

    1991-01-01

    Insulin-dependent (type I) diabetes mellitus is a chronic disease characterized by hyperglycemia, impaired metabolism and storage of important nutrients, evidence of autoimmunity, and long-term vascular and neurologic complications. Insulin secretory function is limited. Cell membrane binding is not primarily involved. The goal of treatment is to relieve symptoms and to achieve blood glucose levels as close to normal as possible without severe hypoglycemia. However, even with education and self-monitoring of the blood glucose level, attaining recommended target values (plasma glucose level less than 8.0 mmol/L before main meals for adults) remains difficult. Human insulin offers no advantage in glycemic control but is important in the management and prevention of immune-related clinical problems (e.g., injection-site lipoatrophy, insulin resistance and allergy) associated with the use of beef or pork insulin. Therapy with one or two injections per day of mixed short-acting or intermediate-acting insulin preparations is a compromise between convenience and the potential for achieving target plasma glucose levels. Intensive insulin therapy with multiple daily injections or continuous infusion with an insulin pump improves mean glycated hemoglobin levels; however, it increases rates of severe hypoglycemia and has not been shown to decrease the incidence of clinically significant renal, retinal or neurologic dysfunction. Future prospects include automated techniques of insulin delivery, immunosuppression to preserve endogenous insulin secretion and islet transplantation. PMID:1933705

  12. Chronic Exposure to the Herbicide, Atrazine, Causes Mitochondrial Dysfunction and Insulin Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Soo; Ahn, Sun Young; Song, In Chan; Chung, Myung Hee; Jang, Hak Chul; Park, Kyong Soo; Lee, Ki-Up; Pak, Youngmi Kim; Lee, Hong Kyu

    2009-01-01

    There is an apparent overlap between areas in the USA where the herbicide, atrazine (ATZ), is heavily used and obesity-prevalence maps of people with a BMI over 30. Given that herbicides act on photosystem II of the thylakoid membrane of chloroplasts, which have a functional structure similar to mitochondria, we investigated whether chronic exposure to low concentrations of ATZ might cause obesity or insulin resistance by damaging mitochondrial function. Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 48) were treated for 5 months with low concentrations (30 or 300 µg kg−1 day−1) of ATZ provided in drinking water. One group of animals was fed a regular diet for the entire period, and another group of animals was fed a high-fat diet (40% fat) for 2 months after 3 months of regular diet. Various parameters of insulin resistance were measured. Morphology and functional activities of mitochondria were evaluated in tissues of ATZ-exposed animals and in isolated mitochondria. Chronic administration of ATZ decreased basal metabolic rate, and increased body weight, intra-abdominal fat and insulin resistance without changing food intake or physical activity level. A high-fat diet further exacerbated insulin resistance and obesity. Mitochondria in skeletal muscle and liver of ATZ-treated rats were swollen with disrupted cristae. ATZ blocked the activities of oxidative phosphorylation complexes I and III, resulting in decreased oxygen consumption. It also suppressed the insulin-mediated phosphorylation of Akt. These results suggest that long-term exposure to the herbicide ATZ might contribute to the development of insulin resistance and obesity, particularly where a high-fat diet is prevalent. PMID:19365547

  13. A novel assay in vitro of human islet amyloid polypeptide amyloidogenesis and effects of insulin secretory vesicle peptides on amyloid formation.

    PubMed Central

    Kudva, Y C; Mueske, C; Butler, P C; Eberhardt, N L

    1998-01-01

    Human islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP) is a 37-residue peptide that is co-secreted with insulin by the beta-cell and might be involved in the pathogenesis of non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. We developed an improved assay in vitro based on the fluorescence of bound thioflavin T to study factors affecting amyloidogenesis. Monomeric IAPP formed amyloid fibrils, as detected by increased fluorescence and by electron microscopy. Fluorimetric analysis revealed that the initial rate of amyloid formation was: (1) proportional to the peptide monomer concentration, (2) maximal at pH 9.5, (3) maximal at 200 mMKCl, and (4) proportional to temperature from 4 to 37 degreesC. We found that 5-fold and 10-fold molar excesses of proinsulin inhibited fibril formation by 39% and 59% respectively. Insulin was somewhat more potent with 5-fold and 10-fold molar excesses inhibiting fibril formation by 69% and 73% respectively, whereas C-peptide had no effect at these concentrations. Thus at physiological ratios of IAPP to insulin, insulin and proinsulin, but not C-peptide, can retard amyloidogenesis. Because insulin resistance or hyperglycaemia increase the IAPP-to-insulin ratio, increased intracellular IAPP compared with insulin expression in genetically predisposed individuals might contribute to intracellular amyloid formation, beta-cell death and the genesis of non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. PMID:9560308

  14. Association of Bactericidal Dysfunction of Paneth Cells in Streptozocin-Induced Diabetic Mice with Insulin Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Yu, Tao; Yang, Hong-Sheng; Lu, Xi-Ji; Xia, Zhong-Sheng; Ouyang, Hui; Shan, Ti-Dong; Huang, Can-Ze; Chen, Qi-Kui

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) is associated with increased risks of enteric infection. Paneth cells constitute the first line of the gut defense. Little is known about the impact of T1DM on the bactericidal function of intestinal Paneth cells. MATERIAL AND METHODS A T1DM mouse model was induced by intraperitoneal injection of streptozocin. The analysis of intestinal microbiota and the mucosal bactericidal assay were conducted to evaluate intestinal innate defense. Numbers of Paneth cells and their expression of related antimicrobial peptides were analyzed. Expression of total insulin receptor (IR) mRNA and relative levels of IR-A/IR-B were analyzed. The primary mouse small intestinal crypt culture was used to analyze the effect of insulin and glucose on the expression of related antimicrobial peptides of Paneth cells. RESULTS In T1DM mice, bacterial loads were increased and there was an alteration in the composition of the intestinal microflora. Exogenous bacteria had better survival in the small bowel of the T1DM mice. The expression of Paneth cell-derived antimicrobial peptides was significantly decreased in the T1DM mice, although the number of Paneth cells was increased. Relative levels of IR-A/IR-B in Paneth cells of diabetic mice were elevated, but the total IR mRNA did not change. Insulin treatment restored the expression of antimicrobial peptides and normalized the microbiota in the gut of T1DM mice. Subsequently, in vitro culture assay demonstrated that insulin rather than glucose was essential for the optimal expression of Paneth cell-derived antimicrobial peptides. CONCLUSIONS The bactericidal function of intestinal Paneth cells was impaired in STZ-induced diabetic mice, resulting in the altered intestinal flora, and insulin was essential for the optimal expression of Paneth cell-derived antimicrobial peptides. PMID:27572949

  15. Association of Bactericidal Dysfunction of Paneth Cells in Streptozocin-Induced Diabetic Mice with Insulin Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Tao; Yang, Hong-Sheng; Lu, Xi-Ji; Xia, Zhong-Sheng; Ouyang, Hui; Shan, Ti-Dong; Huang, Can-Ze; Chen, Qi-Kui

    2016-01-01

    Background Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) is associated with increased risks of enteric infection. Paneth cells constitute the first line of the gut defense. Little is known about the impact of T1DM on the bactericidal function of intestinal Paneth cells. Material/Methods A T1DM mouse model was induced by intraperitoneal injection of streptozocin. The analysis of intestinal microbiota and the mucosal bactericidal assay were conducted to evaluate intestinal innate defense. Numbers of Paneth cells and their expression of related antimicrobial peptides were analyzed. Expression of total insulin receptor (IR) mRNA and relative levels of IR-A/IR-B were analyzed. The primary mouse small intestinal crypt culture was used to analyze the effect of insulin and glucose on the expression of related antimicrobial peptides of Paneth cells. Results In T1DM mice, bacterial loads were increased and there was an alteration in the composition of the intestinal microflora. Exogenous bacteria had better survival in the small bowel of the T1DM mice. The expression of Paneth cell-derived antimicrobial peptides was significantly decreased in the T1DM mice, although the number of Paneth cells was increased. Relative levels of IR-A/IR-B in Paneth cells of diabetic mice were elevated, but the total IR mRNA did not change. Insulin treatment restored the expression of antimicrobial peptides and normalized the microbiota in the gut of T1DM mice. Subsequently, in vitro culture assay demonstrated that insulin rather than glucose was essential for the optimal expression of Paneth cell-derived antimicrobial peptides. Conclusions The bactericidal function of intestinal Paneth cells was impaired in STZ-induced diabetic mice, resulting in the altered intestinal flora, and insulin was essential for the optimal expression of Paneth cell-derived antimicrobial peptides. PMID:27572949

  16. Insulin resistance is associated with altered amino acid metabolism and adipose tissue dysfunction in normoglycemic women

    PubMed Central

    Wiklund, Petri; Zhang, Xiaobo; Pekkala, Satu; Autio, Reija; Kong, Lingjia; Yang, Yifan; Keinänen-Kiukaanniemi, Sirkka; Alen, Markku; Cheng, Sulin

    2016-01-01

    Insulin resistance is associated adiposity, but the mechanisms are not fully understood. In this study, we aimed to identify early metabolic alterations associated with insulin resistance in normoglycemic women with varying degree of adiposity. One-hundred and ten young and middle-aged women were divided into low and high IR groups based on their median HOMA-IR (0.9 ± 0.4 vs. 2.8 ± 1.2). Body composition was assessed using DXA, skeletal muscle and liver fat by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy, serum metabolites by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and adipose tissue and skeletal muscle gene expression by microarrays. High HOMA-IR subjects had higher serum branched-chain amino acid concentrations (BCAA) (p < 0.05 for both). Gene expression analysis of subcutaneous adipose tissue revealed significant down-regulation of genes related to BCAA catabolism and mitochondrial energy metabolism and up-regulation of several inflammation-related pathways in high HOMA-IR subjects (p < 0.05 for all), but no differentially expressed genes in skeletal muscle were found. In conclusion, in normoglycemic women insulin resistance was associated with increased serum BCAA concentrations, down-regulation of mitochondrial energy metabolism and increased expression of inflammation-related genes in the adipose tissue. PMID:27080554

  17. Insulin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The manipulation of organic materials--cells, tissues, and even living organisms--offers many exciting possibilities for the future from organic computers to improved aquaculture. Commercial researchers are using the microgravity environment to produce large near perfect protein crystals Research on insulin has yielded crystals that far surpass the quality of insulin crystals grown on the ground. Using these crystals industry partners are working to develop new and improved treatments for diabetes. Other researchers are exploring the possibility of producing antibiotics using plant cell cultures which could lead to both orbital production and the improvement of ground-based antibiotic production.

  18. The insulin secretory action of novel polycyclic guanidines: discovery through open innovation phenotypic screening, and exploration of structure-activity relationships.

    PubMed

    Shaghafi, Michael B; Barrett, David G; Willard, Francis S; Overman, Larry E

    2014-02-15

    We report the discovery of the glucose-dependent insulin secretogogue activity of a novel class of polycyclic guanidines through phenotypic screening as part of the Lilly Open Innovation Drug Discovery platform. Three compounds from the University of California, Irvine, 1-3, having the 3-arylhexahydropyrrolo[1,2-c]pyrimidin-1-amine scaffold acted as insulin secretagogues under high, but not low, glucose conditions. Exploration of the structure-activity relationship around the scaffold demonstrated the key role of the guanidine moiety, as well as the importance of two lipophilic regions, and led to the identification of 9h, which stimulated insulin secretion in isolated rat pancreatic islets in a glucose-dependent manner.

  19. Neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio, insulin resistance, and endothelial dysfunction in patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Turkmen, K.; Tufan, F.; Selçuk, E.; Akpınar, T.; Oflaz, H.; Ecder, T.

    2013-01-01

    Endothelial dysfunction (ED), insulin resistance (IR), and inflammation are risk factors for increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). ADPKD patients may have increased carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT) and decreased coronary flow velocity reserve (CFVR). The neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR) was introduced as a marker to determine inflammation in various disorders. We aimed to investigate the relationship between NLR and IR, CFVR, CIMT, and the left ventricular mass index (LVMI) in normotensive ADPKD patients. Twentynine ADPKD patients (age 38.8 ± 10.2 years; 8 men and 21 women) and 19 healthy controls (age 33.8 ± 7.4 years; 8 men and 11 women) were included in this cross-sectional study. CFVR was calculated with echocardiography as the ratio of hyperemic to baseline diastolic peak coronary flow velocities. CIMT was measured in the distal common carotid artery by using a 10-MHz linear echocardiography probe. HOMA-IR was calculated NLR was calculated as the ratio of the neutrophil and lymphocyte counts. Age, sex, body mass index, and levels of glucose, creatinine, low-density lipoprotein (LDL)-cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol, triglycerides, C-reactive protein (CRP), microalbuminuria, and creatinine clearance were similar between ADPKD patients and healthy subjects. NLR, CIMT, LVMI, and HOMA-IR were significantly higher and CFVR values were significantly lower in patients with ADPKD compared to that in healthy subjects. NLR showed positive correlation with CIMT, HOMA, insulin, glucose, and HDL cholesterol levels, while it was inversely correlated with CFVR and albumin level in all subjects. In patients with ADPKD, NLR showed positive correlation with HDL cholesterol level and inverse correlation with LVMI and albumin level. NLR that was found to be increased in patients with ADPKD may be a readily available marker of inflammation and ED. PMID:23580803

  20. Effects of spinach nitrate on insulin resistance, endothelial dysfunction markers and inflammation in mice with high-fat and high-fructose consumption

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ting; Lu, Xinshan; Sun, Yanfei; Yang, Xingbin

    2016-01-01

    Background Insulin resistance, which is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, has become a leading nutrition problem. Inorganic nitrate enriched in spinach has been demonstrated to reverse the pathological features of insulin resistance and endothelial dysfunction. However, the effects of a direct intake of nitrate-enriched spinach on insulin resistance and endothelial dysfunction have not been studied. Objective To investigate the effects of spinach nitrate on insulin resistance, lipid metabolism, endothelial function, and inflammation in mice fed with a high-fat and high-fructose diet. Design A diet intervention of spinach with or without nitrate was performed in mice. A high-fat and high-fructose diet was used to cause insulin resistance, endothelial dysfunction, and inflammation in mice. The impacts of spinach nitrate on lipid profile, insulin resistance, markers of endothelial function, and inflammation were determined in mice. Results Spinach nitrate improved the vascular endothelial function of the mice with high-fat and high-fructose consumption, as evidenced by the elevated plasma nitrite level, increased serum nitric oxide (NO) level and decreased serum ET-1 level after spinach nitrate intervention. Spinach nitrate also reduced serum triglycerides, total cholesterol, and low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol levels and elevated serum high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol levels in the mice fed with a high-fat and high-fructose diet. Mice receiving spinach with 60 mg/kg of nitrate (1.02±0.34) showed a significantly low homeostasis model assessment-insulin resistance index as compared with the model mice (2.05±0.58), which is indicating that spinach nitrate could effectively improve the insulin resistance. In addition, spinach nitrate remarkably decreased the elevated serum C-reactive protein, tumor necrosis factor α, and interleukin-6 levels induced by a high-fat and high-fructose diet. Conclusions The intake of

  1. Chronic Insulin Exposure Induces ER Stress and Lipid Body Accumulation in Mast Cells at the Expense of Their Secretory Degranulation Response

    PubMed Central

    Balajadia, Januaria; Shimoda, Lori M. N.; Sung, Carl; Turner, Helen

    2015-01-01

    Lipid bodies (LB) are reservoirs of precursors to inflammatory lipid mediators in immunocytes, including mast cells. LB numbers are dynamic, increasing dramatically under conditions of immunological challenge. We have previously shown in vitro that insulin-influenced lipogenic pathways induce LB biogenesis in mast cells, with their numbers attaining steatosis-like levels. Here, we demonstrate that in vivo hyperinsulinemia resulting from high fat diet is associated with LB accumulation in murine mast cells and basophils. We characterize the lipidome of purified insulin-induced LB, and the shifts in the whole cell lipid landscape in LB that are associated with their accumulation, in both model (RBL2H3) and primary mast cells. Lipidomic analysis suggests a gain of function associated with LB accumulation, in terms of elevated levels of eicosanoid precursors that translate to enhanced antigen-induced LTC4 release. Loss-of-function in terms of a suppressed degranulation response was also associated with LB accumulation, as were ER reprogramming and ER stress, analogous to observations in the obese hepatocyte and adipocyte. Taken together, these data suggest that chronic insulin elevation drives mast cell LB enrichment in vitro and in vivo, with associated effects on the cellular lipidome, ER status and pro-inflammatory responses. PMID:26263026

  2. Insulin Resistance: A Proinflammatory State Mediated by Lipid-Induced Signaling Dysfunction and Involved in Atherosclerotic Plaque Instability

    PubMed Central

    Montecucco, Fabrizio; Steffens, Sabine; Mach, François

    2008-01-01

    The dysregulation of the insulin-glucose axis represents the crucial event in insulin resistance syndrome. Insulin resistance increases atherogenesis and atherosclerotic plaque instability by inducing proinflammatory activities on vascular and immune cells. This condition characterizes several diseases, such as type 2 diabetes, impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), impaired fasting glucose (IFG), obesity, hypertension, dyslipidemia, and other endocrinopathies, but also cancer. Recent studies suggest that the pathophysiology of insulin resistance is closely related to interferences with insulin-mediated intracellular signaling on skeletal muscle cells, hepatocytes, and adipocytes. Strong evidence supports the role of free fatty acids (FFAs) in promoting insulin resistance. The FFA-induced activation of protein kinase C (PKC) delta, inhibitor kappaB kinase (IKK), or c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) modulates insulin-triggered intracellular pathway (classically known as PI3-K-dependent). Therefore, reduction of FFA levels represents a selective target for modulating insulin resistance. PMID:18604303

  3. Effects of tempol on endothelial and vascular dysfunctions and insulin resistance induced by a high-fat high-sucrose diet in the rat.

    PubMed

    Bourgoin, Frédéric; Bachelard, Hélène; Badeau, Mylène; Larivière, Richard; Nadeau, André; Pitre, Maryse

    2013-07-01

    We investigated the effects of treatment with tempol (an antioxidant) on vascular and metabolic dysfunction induced by a high-fat high-sucrose (HFHS) diet. Rats were randomized to receive an HFHS or chow diet with or without tempol treatment (1.5 mmol·(kg body mass)(-1)·day(-1)) for 4 weeks. Blood pressure, heart rate, and blood flow were measured in the rats by using intravascular catheters and Doppler flow probes. Insulin sensitivity and vascular responses to insulin were assessed during a euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp. In-vitro studies were performed to evaluate vascular reactivity and endothelial and inducible nitric oxide synthase (eNOS; iNOS) expression in vascular and muscle tissues. Endothelin, nitrotyrosine, and NAD(P)H oxidase expressions were determined in vascular tissues, and glucose transport activity and glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) expression were examined in muscles. Tempol treatment was found to prevent alterations in insulin sensitivity, glucose transport activity, GLUT4 expression, and vascular reactivity, and to prevent increases in plasma insulin, blood pressure, and heart rate noted in the untreated HFHS-fed rats. These were associated with increased levels of eNOS expression in vascular and muscle tissues, but reductions in nitrotyrosine, endothelin, NAD(P)H oxidase, and iNOS expressions. Therefore, oxidative stress induced by a relatively short-term HFHS diet could contribute to the early development of vascular and metabolic abnormalities in rats.

  4. Endothelin-1 contributes to endothelial dysfunction and enhanced vasoconstriction through augmented superoxide production in penile arteries from insulin-resistant obese rats: role of ETA and ETB receptors

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez, A; Martínez, P; Muñoz, M; Benedito, S; García-Sacristán, A; Hernández, M; Prieto, D

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose We assessed whether endothelin-1 (ET-1) inhibits NO and contributes to endothelial dysfunction in penile arteries in a model of insulin resistance-associated erectile dysfunction (ED). Experimental Approach Vascular function was assessed in penile arteries, from obese (OZR) and lean (LZR) Zucker rats, mounted in microvascular myographs. Changes in basal and stimulated levels of superoxide (O2−) were detected by lucigenin-enhanced chemiluminescence and ET receptor expression was determined by immunohistochemistry. Key Results ET-1 stimulated acute O2− production that was blunted by tempol and the NADPH oxidase inhibitor, apocynin, but markedly enhanced in obese animals. ET-1 inhibited the vasorelaxant effects of ACh and of the NO donor S-nitroso-N-acetyl-DL-penicillamine in arteries from both LZR and OZR. Selective ETA (BQ123) or ETB receptor (BQ788) antagonists reduced both basal and ET-1-stimulated superoxide generation and reversed ET-1-induced inhibition of NO-mediated relaxations in OZR, while only BQ-123 antagonized ET-1 actions in LZR. ET-1-induced vasoconstriction was markedly enhanced by NO synthase blockade and reduced by endothelium removal and apocynin. In endothelium-denuded penile arteries, apocynin blunted augmented ET-1-induced contractions in OZR. Both ETA and ETB receptors were expressed in smooth muscle and the endothelial layer and up-regulated in arteries from OZR. Conclusions and Implications ET-1 stimulates ETA-mediated NADPH oxidase-dependent ROS generation, which inhibits endothelial NO bioavailability and contributes to ET-1-induced contraction in healthy penile arteries. Enhanced vascular expression of ETB receptors contributes to augmented ROS production, endothelial dysfunction and increased vasoconstriction in erectile tissue from insulin-resistant obese rats. Hence, antagonism of ETB receptors might improve the ED associated with insulin-resistant states. PMID:25091502

  5. Soluble and Cell-Associated Insulin Receptor Dysfunction Correlates with Severity of HAND in HIV-Infected Women

    PubMed Central

    Gerena, Yamil; Skolasky, Richard L.; Velez, Joyce M.; Toro-Nieves, Dianedis; Mayo, Raul; Nath, Avindra; Wojna, Valerie

    2012-01-01

    Background Blood sugar metabolism abnormalities have been identified in HIV-infected individuals and associated with HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND). These abnormalities may occur as a result of chronic HIV infection, long-term use of combined antiretroviral treatment (CART), aging, genetic predisposition, or a combination of these factors, and may increase morbidity and mortality in this population. Objective To determine if changes in soluble and cell-associated insulin receptor (IR) levels, IR substrate-1 (IRS-1) levels, and IRS-1 tyrosine phosphorylation are associated with the presence and severity of HAND in a cohort of HIV-seropositive women. Methods and Results This is a retrospective cross-sectional study using patient database information and stored samples from 34 HIV-seropositive women and 10 controls without history of diabetes from the Hispanic-Latino Longitudinal Cohort of Women. Soluble IR subunits [sIR, ectodomain (α) and full-length or intact (αβ)] were assayed in plasma and CSF samples by ELISA. Membrane IR levels, IRS-1 levels, and IRS-1 tyrosine phosphorylation were analyzed in CSF white cell pellets (WCP) using flow cytometry. HIV-seropositive women had significantly increased levels of intact or full-length sIR in plasma (p<0.001) and CSF (p<0.005) relative to controls. Stratified by HAND, increased levels of full-length sIR in plasma were associated with the presence (p<0.001) and severity (p<0.005) of HAND. A significant decrease in IRS-1 tyrosine-phosphorylation in the WCP was also associated with the presence (p<0.02) and severity (p<0.02) of HAND. Conclusions This study provides evidence that IR secretion is increased in HIV-seropositive women, and increased IR secretion is associated with cognitive impairment in these women. Thus, IR dysfunction may have a role in the progression of HAND and could represent a biomarker for the presence and severity of HAND. PMID:22629383

  6. Role of Neural NO Synthase (nNOS) Uncoupling in the Dysfunctional Nitrergic Vasorelaxation of Penile Arteries from Insulin-Resistant Obese Zucker Rats

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez, Ana; Contreras, Cristina; Martínez, María Pilar; Climent, Belén; Benedito, Sara; García-Sacristán, Albino; Hernández, Medardo; Prieto, Dolores

    2012-01-01

    Objective Erectile dysfunction (ED) is considered as an early sign of vascular disease due to its high prevalence in patients with cardiovascular risk factors. Endothelial and neural dysfunction involving nitric oxide (NO) are usually implicated in the pathophysiology of the diabetic ED, but the underlying mechanisms are unclear. The present study assessed the role of oxidative stress in the dysfunctional neural vasodilator responses of penile arteries in the obese Zucker rat (OZR), an experimental model of metabolic syndrome/prediabetes. Methods and Results Electrical field stimulation (EFS) under non-adrenergic non-cholinergic (NANC) conditions evoked relaxations that were significantly reduced in penile arteries of OZR compared with those of lean Zucker rats (LZR). Blockade of NO synthase (NOS) inhibited neural relaxations in both LZR and OZR, while saturating concentrations of the NOS substrate L-arginine reversed the inhibition and restored relaxations in OZR to levels in arteries from LZR. nNOS expression was unchanged in arteries from OZR compared to LZR and nNOS selective inhibition decreased the EFS relaxations in LZR but not in OZR, while endothelium removal did not alter these responses in either strain. Superoxide anion production and nitro-tyrosine immunostaining were elevated in the erectile tissue from OZR. Treatment with the NADPH oxidase inhibitor apocynin or acute incubation with the NOS cofactor tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) restored neural relaxations in OZR to levels in control arteries, while inhibition of the enzyme of BH4 synthesis GTP-cyclohydrolase (GCH) reduced neural relaxations in arteries from LZR but not OZR. The NO donor SNAP induced decreases in intracellular calcium that were impaired in arteries from OZR compared to controls. Conclusions The present study demonstrates nitrergic dysfunction and impaired neural NO signalling due to oxidative stress and nNOS uncoupling in penile arteries under conditions of insulin resistance. This

  7. Stability of proICA512/IA-2 and its targeting to insulin secretory granules require β4-sheet-mediated dimerization of its ectodomain in the endoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed

    Torkko, Juha M; Primo, M Evangelina; Dirkx, Ronald; Friedrich, Anne; Viehrig, Antje; Vergari, Elisa; Borgonovo, Barbara; Sönmez, Anke; Wegbrod, Carolin; Lachnit, Martina; Münster, Carla; Sica, Mauricio P; Ermácora, Mario R; Solimena, Michele

    2015-03-01

    The type 1 diabetes autoantigen ICA512/IA-2/RPTPN is a receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase of the insulin secretory granules (SGs) which regulates the size of granule stores, possibly via cleavage/signaling of its cytosolic tail. The role of its extracellular region remains unknown. Structural studies indicated that β2- or β4-strands in the mature ectodomain (ME ICA512) form dimers in vitro. Here we show that ME ICA512 prompts proICA512 dimerization in the endoplasmic reticulum. Perturbation of ME ICA512 β2-strand N-glycosylation upon S508A replacement allows for proICA512 dimerization, O-glycosylation, targeting to granules, and conversion, which are instead precluded upon G553D replacement in the ME ICA512 β4-strand. S508A/G553D and N506A/G553D double mutants dimerize but remain in the endoplasmic reticulum. Removal of the N-terminal fragment (ICA512-NTF) preceding ME ICA512 allows an ICA512-ΔNTF G553D mutant to exit the endoplasmic reticulum, and ICA512-ΔNTF is constitutively delivered to the cell surface. The signal for SG sorting is located within the NTF RESP18 homology domain (RESP18-HD), whereas soluble NTF is retained in the endoplasmic reticulum. Hence, we propose that the ME ICA512 β2-strand fosters proICA512 dimerization until NTF prevents N506 glycosylation. Removal of this constraint allows for proICA512 β4-strand-induced dimerization, exit from the endoplasmic reticulum, O-glycosylation, and RESP18-HD-mediated targeting to granules. PMID:25561468

  8. Stability of proICA512/IA-2 and Its Targeting to Insulin Secretory Granules Require β4-Sheet-Mediated Dimerization of Its Ectodomain in the Endoplasmic Reticulum

    PubMed Central

    Torkko, Juha M.; Primo, M. Evangelina; Dirkx, Ronald; Friedrich, Anne; Viehrig, Antje; Vergari, Elisa; Borgonovo, Barbara; Sönmez, Anke; Wegbrod, Carolin; Lachnit, Martina; Münster, Carla; Sica, Mauricio P.; Ermácora, Mario R.

    2014-01-01

    The type 1 diabetes autoantigen ICA512/IA-2/RPTPN is a receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase of the insulin secretory granules (SGs) which regulates the size of granule stores, possibly via cleavage/signaling of its cytosolic tail. The role of its extracellular region remains unknown. Structural studies indicated that β2- or β4-strands in the mature ectodomain (ME ICA512) form dimers in vitro. Here we show that ME ICA512 prompts proICA512 dimerization in the endoplasmic reticulum. Perturbation of ME ICA512 β2-strand N-glycosylation upon S508A replacement allows for proICA512 dimerization, O-glycosylation, targeting to granules, and conversion, which are instead precluded upon G553D replacement in the ME ICA512 β4-strand. S508A/G553D and N506A/G553D double mutants dimerize but remain in the endoplasmic reticulum. Removal of the N-terminal fragment (ICA512-NTF) preceding ME ICA512 allows an ICA512-ΔNTF G553D mutant to exit the endoplasmic reticulum, and ICA512-ΔNTF is constitutively delivered to the cell surface. The signal for SG sorting is located within the NTF RESP18 homology domain (RESP18-HD), whereas soluble NTF is retained in the endoplasmic reticulum. Hence, we propose that the ME ICA512 β2-strand fosters proICA512 dimerization until NTF prevents N506 glycosylation. Removal of this constraint allows for proICA512 β4-strand-induced dimerization, exit from the endoplasmic reticulum, O-glycosylation, and RESP18-HD-mediated targeting to granules. PMID:25561468

  9. Prognosis of hormone-dependent breast cancers: implications of the presence of dysfunctional transcriptional networks activated by insulin via the immune transcription factor T-bet.

    PubMed

    McCune, Kasi; Bhat-Nakshatri, Poornima; Thorat, Mangesh A; Nephew, Kenneth P; Badve, Sunil; Nakshatri, Harikrishna

    2010-01-15

    Estrogen receptor alpha (ERalpha)-positive breast cancers that co-express transcription factors GATA-3 and FOXA1 have a favorable prognosis. These transcription factors form an autoregulatory hormonal network that influences estrogen responsiveness and sensitivity to hormonal therapy. Disruption of this network may be a mechanism whereby ERalpha-positive breast cancers become resistant to therapy. The transcription factor T-bet is a negative regulator of GATA-3 in the immune system. In this study, we report that insulin increases the expression of T-bet in breast cancer cells, which correlates with reduced expression of GATA-3, FOXA1, and the ERalpha:FOXA1:GATA-3 target gene GREB-1. The effects of insulin on GATA-3 and FOXA1 could be recapitulated through overexpression of T-bet in MCF-7 cells (MCF-7-T-bet). Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays revealed reduced ERalpha binding to GREB-1 enhancer regions in MCF-7-T-bet cells and in insulin-treated MCF-7 cells. MCF-7-T-bet cells were resistant to tamoxifen in the presence of insulin and displayed prolonged extracellular signal-regulated kinase and AKT activation in response to epidermal growth factor treatment. ERalpha-positive cells with intrinsic tamoxifen resistance as well as MCF-7 cells with acquired tamoxifen and fulvestrant resistance expressed elevated levels of T-bet and/or reduced levels of FOXA1 and GATA-3. Analysis of publicly available databases revealed ERalpha-positive/T-bet-positive breast cancers expressing lower levels of FOXA1 (P = 0.0137) and GATA-3 (P = 0.0063) compared with ERalpha-positive/T-bet-negative breast cancers. Thus, T-bet expression in primary tumors and circulating insulin levels may serve as surrogate biomarkers to identify ERalpha-positive breast cancers with a dysfunctional hormonal network, enhanced growth factor signaling, and resistance to hormonal therapy.

  10. Hyperglycemia, acute insulin resistance, and renal dysfunction in the early phase of ST-elevation myocardial infarction without previously known diabetes: impact on long-term prognosis.

    PubMed

    Lazzeri, Chiara; Valente, Serafina; Chiostri, Marco; Attanà, Paola; Mattesini, Alessio; Nesti, Martina; Gensini, Gian Franco

    2014-11-01

    We evaluated the relationship between admission renal function (as assessed by estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR)), hyperglycemia, and acute insulin resistance, indicated by the homeostatic model assessment (HOMA) index, and their impact on long-term prognosis in 825 consecutive patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) without previously known diabetes who underwent primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Admission eGFR showed a significant indirect correlation with admission glycemia (Spearman's ρ -0.23, P < 0.001) and insulin values (Spearman's ρ -0.11, P = 0.002). The incidence of patients with admission glycemia ≥140 mg/dl was significantly higher in patients with eGFR <60 ml/min/m(2) (P < 0.001) as well as the incidence of HOMA positivity (P = 0.002). According to our data, a relationship between renal function and glucose values and acute insulin resistance in the early phase of STEMI was detectable, since a significant, indirect correlation between eGFR, insulin values, and glycemia was observed. Patients with renal dysfunction (eGFR <60 ml/min/1.73 m(2)) exhibited higher glucose values and a higher incidence of acute insulin resistance (as assessed by HOMA index) than those with normal renal function (eGFR ≥60 ml/min/1.73 m(2)). The prognostic role of glucose values for 1-year mortality was confined to patients with eGFR ≥60 ml/min/m(2), who represent the large part of our population and are thought to be at lower risk. In these patients, an independent relationship between 1-year mortality and glucose values was detectable not only for admission glycemia but also for glucose values measured at discharge.

  11. The Roles of Adipokines, Proinflammatory Cytokines, and Adipose Tissue Macrophages in Obesity-Associated Insulin Resistance in Modest Obesity and Early Metabolic Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Kang, Yea Eun; Kim, Ji Min; Joung, Kyong Hye; Lee, Ju Hee; You, Bo Ram; Choi, Min Jeong; Ryu, Min Jeong; Ko, Young Bok; Lee, Min A; Lee, Junguee; Ku, Bon Jeong; Shong, Minho; Lee, Ki Hwan; Kim, Hyun Jin

    2016-01-01

    The roles of adipokines, proinflammatory cytokines, and adipose tissue macrophages in obesity-associated insulin resistance have been explored in both animal and human studies. However, our current understanding of obesity-associated insulin resistance relies on studies of artificial metabolic extremes. The purpose of this study was to explore the roles of adipokines, proinflammatory cytokines, and adipose tissue macrophages in human patients with modest obesity and early metabolic dysfunction. We obtained omental adipose tissue and fasting blood samples from 51 females undergoing gynecologic surgery. We investigated serum concentrations of proinflammatory cytokines and adipokines as well as the mRNA expression of proinflammatory and macrophage phenotype markers in visceral adipose tissue using ELISA and quantitative RT-PCR. We measured adipose tissue inflammation and macrophage infiltration using immunohistochemical analysis. Serum levels of adiponectin and leptin were significantly correlated with HOMA-IR and body mass index. The levels of expression of MCP-1 and TNF-α in visceral adipose tissue were also higher in the obese group (body mass index ≥ 25). The expression of mRNA MCP-1 in visceral adipose tissue was positively correlated with body mass index (r = 0.428, p = 0.037) but not with HOMA-IR, whereas TNF-α in visceral adipose tissue was correlated with HOMA-IR (r = 0.462, p = 0.035) but not with body mass index. There was no obvious change in macrophage phenotype or macrophage infiltration in patients with modest obesity or early metabolic dysfunction. Expression of mRNA CD163/CD68 was significantly related to mitochondrial-associated genes and serum inflammatory cytokine levels of resistin and leptin. These results suggest that changes in the production of inflammatory biomolecules precede increased immune cell infiltration and induction of a macrophage phenotype switch in visceral adipose tissue. Furthermore, serum resistin and leptin have specific

  12. The Roles of Adipokines, Proinflammatory Cytokines, and Adipose Tissue Macrophages in Obesity-Associated Insulin Resistance in Modest Obesity and Early Metabolic Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ji Min; Joung, Kyong Hye; Lee, Ju Hee; You, Bo Ram; Choi, Min Jeong; Ryu, Min Jeong; Ko, Young Bok; Lee, Min A.; Lee, Junguee; Ku, Bon Jeong; Shong, Minho; Lee, Ki Hwan; Kim, Hyun Jin

    2016-01-01

    The roles of adipokines, proinflammatory cytokines, and adipose tissue macrophages in obesity-associated insulin resistance have been explored in both animal and human studies. However, our current understanding of obesity-associated insulin resistance relies on studies of artificial metabolic extremes. The purpose of this study was to explore the roles of adipokines, proinflammatory cytokines, and adipose tissue macrophages in human patients with modest obesity and early metabolic dysfunction. We obtained omental adipose tissue and fasting blood samples from 51 females undergoing gynecologic surgery. We investigated serum concentrations of proinflammatory cytokines and adipokines as well as the mRNA expression of proinflammatory and macrophage phenotype markers in visceral adipose tissue using ELISA and quantitative RT-PCR. We measured adipose tissue inflammation and macrophage infiltration using immunohistochemical analysis. Serum levels of adiponectin and leptin were significantly correlated with HOMA-IR and body mass index. The levels of expression of MCP-1 and TNF-α in visceral adipose tissue were also higher in the obese group (body mass index ≥ 25). The expression of mRNA MCP-1 in visceral adipose tissue was positively correlated with body mass index (r = 0.428, p = 0.037) but not with HOMA-IR, whereas TNF-α in visceral adipose tissue was correlated with HOMA-IR (r = 0.462, p = 0.035) but not with body mass index. There was no obvious change in macrophage phenotype or macrophage infiltration in patients with modest obesity or early metabolic dysfunction. Expression of mRNA CD163/CD68 was significantly related to mitochondrial-associated genes and serum inflammatory cytokine levels of resistin and leptin. These results suggest that changes in the production of inflammatory biomolecules precede increased immune cell infiltration and induction of a macrophage phenotype switch in visceral adipose tissue. Furthermore, serum resistin and leptin have specific

  13. Dysfunctionally phosphorylated type 1 insulin receptor substrate in neural-derived blood exosomes of preclinical Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Kapogiannis, Dimitrios; Boxer, Adam; Schwartz, Janice B; Abner, Erin L; Biragyn, Arya; Masharani, Umesh; Frassetto, Lynda; Petersen, Ronald C; Miller, Bruce L; Goetzl, Edward J

    2015-02-01

    Insulin resistance causes diminished glucose uptake in similar regions of the brain in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2). Brain tissue studies suggested that insulin resistance is caused by low insulin receptor signaling attributable to its abnormal association with more phospho (P)-serine-type 1 insulin receptor substrate (IRS-1) and less P-tyrosine-IRS-1. Plasma exosomes enriched for neural sources by immunoabsorption were obtained once from 26 patients with AD, 20 patients with DM2, 16 patients with frontotemporal dementia (FTD), and matched case control subjects. At 2 time points, they were obtained from 22 others when cognitively normal and 1 to 10 yr later when diagnosed with AD. Mean exosomal levels of extracted P-serine 312-IRS-1 and P-pan-tyrosine-IRS-1 by ELISA and the ratio of P-serine 312-IRS-1 to P-pan-tyrosine-IRS-1 (insulin resistance factor, R) for AD and DM2 and P-serine 312-IRS-1 and R for FTD were significantly different from those for case control subjects. The levels of R for AD were significantly higher than those for DM2 or FTD. Stepwise discriminant modeling showed correct classification of 100% of patients with AD, 97.5% of patients with DM2, and 84% of patients with FTD. In longitudinal studies of 22 patients with AD, exosomal levels of P-serine 312-IRS-1, P-pan-tyrosine-IRS-1, and R were significantly different 1 to 10 yr before and at the time of diagnosis compared with control subjects. Insulin resistance reflected in R values from this blood test is higher for patients with AD, DM2, and FTD than case control subjects; higher for patients with AD than patients with DM2 or FTD; and accurately predicts development of AD up to 10 yr prior to clinical onset. PMID:25342129

  14. Associations of visceral adiposity and exercise participation with C-reactive protein, insulin resistance, and endothelial dysfunction in Korean healthy adults.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kijin; Valentine, Rudy J; Shin, Yoonjung; Gong, Kyungmin

    2008-09-01

    The aim of the current study was to examine the associations of visceral adiposity and exercise participation with C-reactive protein (CRP), insulin resistance, and endothelial dysfunction in Korean adults selected from the general population. We studied 160 Korean adults (aged 41.3 +/- 13.0 years; n = 38 men and n = 122 women) who volunteered in a health promotion program. Subjects were divided into 2 groups based upon spontaneous exercise participation for using a cross-sectional approach. We measured anthropometric factors (body mass index [BMI], percentage body fat, waist-hip ratio [WHR], and abdominal fat area by computed tomographic scanning), blood pressure (BP), blood levels of glucose, lipids, fibrinogen, CRP, leptin, hemoglobin A(1c), homeostasis model assessment (HOMA), and carotid intima media thickness (IMT; via ultrasonography). Associations among the variables were assessed by Pearson partial correlation and linear regression, controlling for age and sex. Independent t tests were used to assess differences between exercise participants and nonparticipants. Significance was accepted at P < .05. As expected, the measures of adiposity (BMI, percentage body fat, WHR, abdominal fat area) were highly correlated with each other (r = .49-.86, P < .01). Blood levels of high-sensitivity CRP (hsCRP), leptin, and HOMA were modestly correlated with all measures of adiposity. Visceral fat area was the most important predictor of hsCRP, explaining 19.6% of the variance using stepwise linear regression analysis (P < .01). As visceral fat area tertiles increased from low to high, a significant stepwise increment in blood levels of CRP (P < .001), HOMA (P = .005), and left carotid IMT (P = .035) was observed. However, hsCRP and HOMA were not significantly different when compared across whole-body fat tertiles. Systolic BP, diastolic BP, and left carotid IMT were modestly correlated with WHR and visceral fat area (P < .05); but systolic BP and diastolic BP were also

  15. Adaptation of β-Cell and Endothelial Function to Carbohydrate Loading: Influence of Insulin Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Hurwitz, Barry E.; Schneiderman, Neil; Marks, Jennifer B.; Mendez, Armando J.; Gonzalez, Alex; Llabre, Maria M.; Smith, Steven R.; Bizzotto, Roberto; Santini, Eleonora; Manca, Maria Laura; Skyler, Jay S.; Mari, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    High-carbohydrate diets have been associated with β-cell strain, dyslipidemia, and endothelial dysfunction. We examined how β-cell and endothelial function adapt to carbohydrate overloading and the influence of insulin resistance. On sequential days in randomized order, nondiabetic subjects (classified as insulin-sensitive [IS] [n = 64] or insulin-resistant [IR] [n = 79] by euglycemic clamp) received four mixed meals over 14 h with either standard (300 kcal) or double carbohydrate content. β-Cell function was reconstructed by mathematical modeling; brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (FMD) was measured before and after each meal. Compared with IS, IR subjects showed higher glycemia and insulin hypersecretion due to greater β-cell glucose and rate sensitivity; potentiation of insulin secretion, however, was impaired. Circulating free fatty acids (FFAs) were less suppressed in IR than IS subjects. Baseline FMD was reduced in IR, and postprandial FMD attenuation occurred after each meal, particularly with high carbohydrate, similarly in IR and IS. Throughout the two study days, higher FFA levels were significantly associated with lower (incretin-induced) potentiation and impaired FMD. In nondiabetic individuals, enhanced glucose sensitivity and potentiation upregulate the insulin secretory response to carbohydrate overloading. With insulin resistance, this adaptation is impaired. Defective suppression of endogenous FFA is one common link between impaired potentiation and vascular endothelial dysfunction. PMID:25754957

  16. Dynamin 2 regulates biphasic insulin secretion and plasma glucose homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Fan; Ji, Chen; Wu, Yumei; Ferguson, Shawn M.; Tamarina, Natalia; Philipson, Louis H.; Lou, Xuelin

    2015-01-01

    Alterations in insulin granule exocytosis and endocytosis are paramount to pancreatic β cell dysfunction in diabetes mellitus. Here, using temporally controlled gene ablation specifically in β cells in mice, we identified an essential role of dynamin 2 GTPase in preserving normal biphasic insulin secretion and blood glucose homeostasis. Dynamin 2 deletion in β cells caused glucose intolerance and substantial reduction of the second phase of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS); however, mutant β cells still maintained abundant insulin granules, with no signs of cell surface expansion. Compared with control β cells, real-time capacitance measurements demonstrated that exocytosis-endocytosis coupling was less efficient but not abolished; clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME) was severely impaired at the step of membrane fission, which resulted in accumulation of clathrin-coated endocytic intermediates on the plasma membrane. Moreover, dynamin 2 ablation in β cells led to striking reorganization and enhancement of actin filaments, and insulin granule recruitment and mobilization were impaired at the later stage of GSIS. Together, our results demonstrate that dynamin 2 regulates insulin secretory capacity and dynamics in vivo through a mechanism depending on CME and F-actin remodeling. Moreover, this study indicates a potential pathophysiological link between endocytosis and diabetes mellitus. PMID:26413867

  17. Microcystin-LR induces dysfunction of insulin secretion in rat insulinoma (INS-1) cells: Implications for diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yanyan; Shi, Kun; Su, Xiaomei; Xie, Liqiang; Yan, Yunjun

    2016-08-15

    Microcystins (MCs) are the most frequent cyanobacterial toxins observed in freshwater systems. Accumulating evidence suggests that MCs pose a serious threat to public health. However, the contributions of the exposure of MCs to the occurrence of human diseases remain largely unknown. This study provides the evidence of the effects of MC-LR on pancreatic β-cell function through the exposure of rat insulinoma (INS-1) cells to 0, 10, 20, or 40μM MC-LR for 72h and explores the underlying molecular mechanisms. Our results demonstrate that exposure to MC-LR for 72h suppresses cell viability, disturbs glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS), and decreases the expression of insulin protein. Moreover, MC-LR disrupts the cell cycle distribution and increases cell apoptosis at 20 or 40μM for 72h, respectively, indicating that the β-cell mass would be decreased by MC-LR exposure. A transcriptomic analysis revealed several key genes (e.g., Pdx-1, Neurod1, and Abcc8) involved in insulin secretion are significantly differentially expressed in INS-1 cells in response to MC-LR exposure. In addition, several signal transduction pathways associated with diabetes (e.g., type 1 and 2 diabetes) were also identified compared with the control cells. We recommend that MC be considered as a new environmental factor that promotes diabetes development. The identified key genes or pathways may potentially contribute to the future therapies in the environmental contaminants induced β-cell damage. PMID:27107231

  18. Insulin deficiency induces rat renal mesangial cell dysfunction via activation of IGF-1/IGF-1R pathway

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Ya-li; Shen, Yang; Ni, Jun; Shao, De-cui; Miao, Nai-jun; Xu, Jin-lan; Zhou, Li; Xue, Hong; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Xiao-xia; Lu, Li-min

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Diabetic nephropathy is one of the major complications of diabetes and the major cause of end-stage renal disease. In this study we investigated the insulin deficiency (ID) induced changes in renal mesangial cells (MCs) and in the kidney of STZ-induced diabetic rats. Methods: Cultured rat renal MCs were incubated in ID media. Cell proliferation was analyzed using BrdU incorporation assay. The expression of insulin receptor (IR), insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF-1R), phosphorylated IGF-1R, fibronectin, and collagen IV was determined with Western blot analysis. STZ-induced diabetic rats were treated with an IGF-1R antagonist picropodophyllin (PPP, 20 mg·kg−1·d−1, po) for 8 weeks. After the rats were euthanized, plasma and kidneys were collected. IGF-1 levels in renal cortex were measured with RT-PCR or ELISA. The morphological changes in the kidneys were also examined. Results: Incubation in ID media significantly increased cell proliferation, the synthesis of fibronectin and collagen IV, and the expression of IGF-1 and IGF-1R and phosphorylated IGF-1R in renal MCs. Pretreatment of the cells with PPP (50 nmol/L) blocked ID-induced increases in cell proliferation and the synthesis of fibronectin and collagen IV; knockdown of IGF-1R showed a similar effect as PPP did. In contrast, treatment of the cells with IGF-1 (50 ng/mL) exacerbated ID-induced increases in cell proliferation. In the kidneys of diabetic rats, the expression of IGF-1, IGF-1R and phosphorylated IGF-1R were significantly elevated. Treatment of diabetic rats with PPP did not lower the blood glucose levels, but significantly suppressed the expression of TGF-β, fibronectin and collagen IV in the kidneys, the plasma levels of urinary nitrogen and creatinine, and the urinary protein excretion. Conclusion: Insulin deficiency increases the expression of IGF-1 and IGF-1R in renal MCs and the kidney of diabetic rats, which contributes to the development of diabetic nephropathy. PMID

  19. The Secretory Pathway Kinases

    PubMed Central

    Sreelatha, Anju; Kinch, Lisa N.; Tagliabracci, Vincent S.

    2015-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation is a nearly universal post-translation modification involved in a plethora of cellular events. Even though phosphorylation of extracellular proteins had been observed, the identity of the kinases that phosphorylate secreted proteins remained a mystery until recently. Advances in genome sequencing and genetic studies have paved the way for the discovery of a new class of kinases that localize within the endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi apparatus and the extracellular space. These novel kinases phosphorylate proteins and proteoglycans in the secretory pathway and appear to regulate various extracellular processes. Mutations in these kinases cause human disease, thus underscoring the biological importance of phosphorylation within the secretory pathway. PMID:25862977

  20. DNA Damage and the Activation of the p53 Pathway Mediate Alterations in Metabolic and Secretory Functions of Adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Vergoni, Bastien; Cornejo, Pierre-Jean; Gilleron, Jérôme; Djedaini, Mansour; Ceppo, Franck; Jacquel, Arnaud; Bouget, Gwennaelle; Ginet, Clémence; Gonzalez, Teresa; Maillet, Julie; Dhennin, Véronique; Verbanck, Marie; Auberger, Patrick; Froguel, Philippe; Tanti, Jean-François; Cormont, Mireille

    2016-10-01

    Activation of the p53 pathway in adipose tissue contributes to insulin resistance associated with obesity. However, the mechanisms of p53 activation and the effect on adipocyte functions are still elusive. Here we found a higher level of DNA oxidation and a reduction in telomere length in adipose tissue of mice fed a high-fat diet and an increase in DNA damage and activation of the p53 pathway in adipocytes. Interestingly, hallmarks of chronic DNA damage are visible at the onset of obesity. Furthermore, injection of lean mice with doxorubicin, a DNA damage-inducing drug, increased the expression of chemokines in adipose tissue and promoted its infiltration by proinflammatory macrophages and neutrophils together with adipocyte insulin resistance. In vitro, DNA damage in adipocytes increased the expression of chemokines and triggered the production of chemotactic factors for macrophages and neutrophils. Insulin signaling and effect on glucose uptake and Glut4 translocation were decreased, and lipolysis was increased. These events were prevented by p53 inhibition, whereas its activation by nutlin-3 reproduced the DNA damage-induced adverse effects. This study reveals that DNA damage in obese adipocytes could trigger p53-dependent signals involved in alteration of adipocyte metabolism and secretory function leading to adipose tissue inflammation, adipocyte dysfunction, and insulin resistance. PMID:27388216

  1. Syzygium cumini ameliorates insulin resistance and β-cell dysfunction via modulation of PPAR, dyslipidemia, oxidative stress, and TNF-α in type 2 diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Ashok Kumar; Bharti, Saurabh; Kumar, Rajiv; Krishnamurthy, Bhaskar; Bhatia, Jagriti; Kumari, Santosh; Arya, Dharamvir Singh

    2012-01-01

    Syzygium cumini (SC) is well known for its anti-diabetic potential, but the mechanism underlying its amelioration of type 2 diabetes is still elusive. Therefore, for the first time, we investigated whether SC aqueous seed extract (100, 200, or 400 mg/kg) exerts any beneficial effects on insulin resistance (IR), serum lipid profile, antioxidant status, and/or pancreatic β-cell damage in high-fat diet / streptozotocin-induced (HFD-STZ) diabetic rats. Wistar albino rats were fed with HFD (55% of calories as fat) during the experiment to induce IR and on the 10th day were injected with STZ (40 mg/kg, i.p.) to develop type 2 diabetes. Subsequently, after confirmation of hyperglycemia on the 14th day (fasting glucose level > 13.89 mM), diabetic rats were treated with SC for the next 21 days. Diabetic rats showed increased serum glucose, insulin, IR, TNF-α, dyslipidemia, and pancreatic thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances with a concomitant decrease in β-cell function and pancreatic superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase antioxidant enzyme activities. Microscopic examination of their pancreas revealed pathological changes in islets and β-cells. These alterations reverted to near-normal levels after treatment with SC at 400 mg/kg. Moreover, hepatic tissue demonstrated increased PPARγ and PPARα protein expressions. Thus, our study demonstrated the beneficial effect of SC seed extract on IR and β-cell dysfunction in HFD-STZ-induced type 2 diabetic rats. PMID:22786584

  2. Toll-like receptor 4-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress contributes to endothelial dysfunction

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Impairment of vasodilator action of insulin is associated with endothelial dysfunction and insulin resistance. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is implicated as one of the mechanisms for pathophysiology of various cardiometabolic syndromes, including insulin resistance and endothelial dysfunction. ...

  3. A psychometric evaluation of adult patients with type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetes mellitus: prevalence of psychological dysfunction and relationship to demographic variables, metabolic control and complications.

    PubMed

    Winocour, P H; Main, C J; Medlicott, G; Anderson, D C

    1990-08-01

    The relationship between psychosocial traits and glycaemic control and complications was examined in 130 adults (83 men, 47 women) with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. Abnormal depression ratings were observed in more women (19.1%) than men (12.0%), p less than 0.01, whilst obsessive symptoms were recorded more frequently in men (41.0 v 21.3%, p less than 0.01). Abnormal anxiety ratings were present in roughly 8-13% of men and women, although a notably low feeling of insecurity rating was observed more frequently in men (56.5%) than in women (38.3% of cases), p less than 0.05. Psychological scores were related to age, employment status and social class, but not to duration of diabetes or glycaemic control. The anxiety, depression and obsessive ratings correlated with one another (rs range 0.24-0.62, all p less than 0.001). Higher anxiety and depression ratings or overt psychological dysfunction was recorded in patients with neuropathic symptoms and signs, impotence, macrovascular disease or proliferative retinopathy. It is concluded that the presence of diabetic complications and adverse social circumstances are more relevant to psychological status than glycaemic control. PMID:2132190

  4. Mammary Analogue Secretory Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Todd M; Parekh, Vishwas

    2016-09-01

    Mammary analogue secretory carcinoma (MASC) is a recently described salivary gland tumor that shares the same histologic appearance and ETV6 gene (12p13) rearrangement as secretory carcinoma of the breast. Prior to its recognition, MASC cases were commonly labeled acinic cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma, not otherwise specified. Despite distinctive histologic features, MASC may be difficult to distinguish from other salivary gland tumors, in particular zymogen-poor acinic cell carcinoma and low-grade salivary duct carcinoma. Although characteristic morphologic and immunohistochemical features form the basis of a diagnosis of MASC, the presence of an ETV6-NTRK3 gene fusion is confirmatory. Given its recent recognition the true prognostic import of MASC is not yet clearly defined. PMID:27575269

  5. Dietary Salba (Salvia hispanica L) seed rich in α-linolenic acid improves adipose tissue dysfunction and the altered skeletal muscle glucose and lipid metabolism in dyslipidemic insulin-resistant rats.

    PubMed

    Oliva, M E; Ferreira, M R; Chicco, A; Lombardo, Y B

    2013-10-01

    This work reports the effect of dietary Salba (chia) seed rich in n-3 α-linolenic acid on the morphological and metabolic aspects involved in adipose tissue dysfunction and the mechanisms underlying the impaired glucose and lipid metabolism in the skeletal muscle of rats fed a sucrose-rich diet (SRD). Rats were fed a SRD for 3 months. Thereafter, half the rats continued with SRD while in the other half, corn oil (CO) was replaced by chia seed for 3 months (SRD+chia). In control group, corn starch replaced sucrose. The replacement of CO by chia seed in the SRD reduced adipocyte hypertrophy, cell volume and size distribution, improved lipogenic enzyme activities, lipolysis and the anti-lipolytic action of insulin. In the skeletal muscle lipid storage, glucose phosphorylation and oxidation were normalized. Chia seed reversed the impaired insulin stimulated glycogen synthase activity, glycogen, glucose-6-phosphate and GLUT-4 protein levels as well as insulin resistance and dyslipidemia.

  6. Clinical utility of insulin and insulin analogs

    PubMed Central

    Sanlioglu, Ahter D.; Altunbas, Hasan Ali; Balci, Mustafa Kemal; Griffith, Thomas S.; Sanlioglu, Salih

    2013-01-01

    Diabetes is a pandemic disease characterized by autoimmune, genetic and metabolic abnormalities. While insulin deficiency manifested as hyperglycemia is a common sequel of both Type-1 and Type-2 diabetes (T1DM and T2DM), it does not result from a single genetic defect—rather insulin deficiency results from the functional loss of pancreatic β cells due to multifactorial mechanisms. Since pancreatic β cells of patients with T1DM are destroyed by autoimmune reaction, these patients require daily insulin injections. Insulin resistance followed by β cell dysfunction and β cell loss is the characteristics of T2DM. Therefore, most patients with T2DM will require insulin treatment due to eventual loss of insulin secretion. Despite the evidence of early insulin treatment lowering macrovascular (coronary artery disease, peripheral arterial disease and stroke) and microvascular (diabetic nephropathy, neuropathy and retinopathy) complications of T2DM, controversy exists among physicians on how to initiate and intensify insulin therapy. The slow acting nature of regular human insulin makes its use ineffective in counteracting postprandial hyperglycemia. Instead, recombinant insulin analogs have been generated with a variable degree of specificity and action. Due to the metabolic variability among individuals, optimum blood glucose management is a formidable task to accomplish despite the presence of novel insulin analogs. In this article, we present a recent update on insulin analog structure and function with an overview of the evidence on the various insulin regimens clinically used to treat diabetes. PMID:23584214

  7. Endocrine dysfunction in hereditary hemochromatosis.

    PubMed

    Pelusi, C; Gasparini, D I; Bianchi, N; Pasquali, R

    2016-08-01

    Hereditary hemochromatosis (HH) is a genetic disorder of iron overload and subsequent organ damage. Five types of HH are known, classified by age of onset, genetic cause, clinical manifestations and mode of inheritance. Except for the rare form of juvenile haemochromatosis, symptoms do not usually appear until after decades of progressive iron loading and may be triggered by environmental and lifestyle factors. Despite the last decades discovery of genetic and phenotype diversity of HH, early studies showed a frequent involvement of the endocrine glands where diabetes and hypogonadism are the most common encountered endocrinopathies. The pathogenesis of diabetes is still relatively unclear, but the main mechanisms include the loss of insulin secretory capacity and insulin resistance secondary to liver damage. The presence of obesity and/or genetic predisposition may represent addictive risk factor for the development of this metabolic disease. Although old cases of primary gonad involvement are described, hypogonadism is mainly secondary to selective deposition of iron on the gonadotropin-producing cells of the pituitary gland, leading to hormonal impaired secretion. Cases of hypopituitarism or selected tropin defects, and abnormalities of adrenal, thyroid and parathyroid glands, even if rare, are reported. The prevalence of individual gland dysfunction varies enormously within studies for several bias due to small numbers of and selected cases analyzed, mixed genotypes and missing data on medical history. Moreover, in the last few years early screening and awareness of the disease among physicians have allowed hemochromatosis to be diagnosed in most cases at early stages when patients have no symptoms. Therefore, the clinical presentation of this disease has changed significantly and the recognized common complications are encountered less frequently. This review summarizes the current knowledge on HH-associated endocrinopathies. PMID:26951056

  8. Endocrine dysfunction in hereditary hemochromatosis.

    PubMed

    Pelusi, C; Gasparini, D I; Bianchi, N; Pasquali, R

    2016-08-01

    Hereditary hemochromatosis (HH) is a genetic disorder of iron overload and subsequent organ damage. Five types of HH are known, classified by age of onset, genetic cause, clinical manifestations and mode of inheritance. Except for the rare form of juvenile haemochromatosis, symptoms do not usually appear until after decades of progressive iron loading and may be triggered by environmental and lifestyle factors. Despite the last decades discovery of genetic and phenotype diversity of HH, early studies showed a frequent involvement of the endocrine glands where diabetes and hypogonadism are the most common encountered endocrinopathies. The pathogenesis of diabetes is still relatively unclear, but the main mechanisms include the loss of insulin secretory capacity and insulin resistance secondary to liver damage. The presence of obesity and/or genetic predisposition may represent addictive risk factor for the development of this metabolic disease. Although old cases of primary gonad involvement are described, hypogonadism is mainly secondary to selective deposition of iron on the gonadotropin-producing cells of the pituitary gland, leading to hormonal impaired secretion. Cases of hypopituitarism or selected tropin defects, and abnormalities of adrenal, thyroid and parathyroid glands, even if rare, are reported. The prevalence of individual gland dysfunction varies enormously within studies for several bias due to small numbers of and selected cases analyzed, mixed genotypes and missing data on medical history. Moreover, in the last few years early screening and awareness of the disease among physicians have allowed hemochromatosis to be diagnosed in most cases at early stages when patients have no symptoms. Therefore, the clinical presentation of this disease has changed significantly and the recognized common complications are encountered less frequently. This review summarizes the current knowledge on HH-associated endocrinopathies.

  9. Tubal function in chronic secretory otitis media in children.

    PubMed

    Poulsen, G; Tos, M

    1977-01-01

    In 100 children (150 ears) with chronic secretory otitis media the function of the Eustachian tube during treatment with grommet was investigated by air equalisation methods. Tubal function proved poor in the great majority at the beginning of the treatment, but towards its completion there was some improvement. After extrusion of the grommet, tubal function was investigated on the same material by tympanometry. 34% had normal middle-ear pressure initially, and 43% 12-18 months after closure of the perforation. There was no relation between tubal function shown by air equalisation methods and by tympanometry, and the air equalisation methods proved of less value than tympanometry in assessing the course and prognosis of secretory otitis. The pathogenetic theories - the ex vacuo and the secretory theory - are discussed in relation to the chronic tubal dysfunction found to be the most common direct cause of the disease.

  10. Impairment of glucose-induced insulin secretion in human pancreatic islets transplanted to diabetic nude mice.

    PubMed

    Jansson, L; Eizirik, D L; Pipeleers, D G; Borg, L A; Hellerström, C; Andersson, A

    1995-08-01

    Hyperglycemia-induced beta-cell dysfunction may be an important component in the pathogenesis of non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. However, most available data in this field were obtained from rodent islets. To investigate the relevance of this hypothesis for human beta-cells in vivo, human pancreatic islets were transplanted under the renal capsule of nude mice. Experimental groups were chosen so that grafted islets were exposed to either hyper- or normoglycemia or combinations of these for 4 or 6 wk. Grafts of normoglycemic recipients responded with an increased insulin release to a glucose stimulus during perfusion, whereas grafts of hyperglycemic recipients failed to respond to glucose. The insulin content of the grafts in the latter groups was only 10% of those observed in controls. Recipients initially hyperglycemic (4 wk), followed by 2 wk of normoglycemia regained a normal graft insulin content, but a decreased insulin response to glucose remained. No ultrastructural signs of beta-cell damage were observed, with the exception of increased glycogen deposits in animals hyperglycemic at the time of killing. It is concluded that prolonged exposure to a diabetic environment induces a long-term secretory defect in human beta-cells, which is not dependent on the size of the islet insulin stores.

  11. Growth hormone (GH) secretory dynamics in a case of acromegalic gigantism associated with hyperprolactinemia: nonpulsatile secretion of GH may induce elevated insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) and IGF-binding protein-3 levels.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, T; Shimatsu, A; Sakane, N; Hizuka, N; Horikawa, R; Tanaka, T

    1996-01-01

    We describe a case of pituitary gigantism with low levels of growth hormone (GH), elevated insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I), and IGF-binding protein-3 (IGF-BP-3). The patient had characteristic clinical features of gigantism and acromegaly. The basal serum GH levels ranged from 1.2-1.9 micrograms/L, which were considered to be within normal limits. Serum GH response to either insulin-induced hypoglycemia or GH-releasing hormone was blunted. Frequent blood samplings during daytime and at night showed nonpulsatile GH secretion. Serum prolactin, IGF-I and IGF-binding protein-3 levels were elevated. After unsuccessful surgery, bromocryptine treatment normalized serum prolactin without affecting serum GH and IGF-I levels. Combined administration of octreotide and bromocryptine reduced serum GH and IGF-I levels. GH bioactivity as measured by Nb2 cell proliferation assay was within reference range. In the present case, nonpulsatile GH secretion and enhanced tissue sensitivity to GH may induce hypersecretion of IGF-I and IGF-BP-3 and cause clinical acromegalic gigantism. PMID:8550769

  12. Epigenetics: The missing link to understanding β-cell dysfunction in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, Elizabeth R.; Liu, Dongmin

    2012-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is a growing health problem worldwide. While peripheral insulin resistance is common during obesity and aging in both animals and people, progression to T2D is largely due to insulin secretory dysfunction and significant apoptosis of functional β-cells, leading to an inability to compensate for insulin resistance. It is recognized that environmental factors and nutrition play an important role in the pathogenesis of diabetes. However, our knowledge surrounding molecular mechanisms by which these factors trigger β-cell dysfunction and diabetes is still limited. Recent discoveries raise the possibility that epigenetic changes in response to environmental stimuli may play an important role in the development of diabetes. In this paper, we review emerging knowledge regarding epigenetic mechanisms that may be involved in β-cell dysfunction and pathogenesis of diabetes, including the role of nutrition, oxidative stress and inflammation. We will mainly focus on the role of DNA methylation and histone modifications but will also briefly review data on miRNA effects on the pancreatic islets. Further studies aimed at better understanding how epigenetic regulation of gene expression controls β-cell function may reveal potential therapeutic targets for prevention and treatment of diabetes. PMID:22810088

  13. Urinary Dysfunction

    MedlinePlus

    ... PCF Spotlight Glossary African American Men Living with Prostate Cancer Urinary Dysfunction Side Effects Urinary Dysfunction Bowel Dysfunction ... dysfunction is normal following initial therapy for localized prostate cancer. But it’s important to realize that not all ...

  14. Insulin and Insulin Resistance

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    As obesity and diabetes reach epidemic proportions in the developed world, the role of insulin resistance and its consequences are gaining prominence. Understanding the role of insulin in wide-ranging physiological processes and the influences on its synthesis and secretion, alongside its actions from the molecular to the whole body level, has significant implications for much chronic disease seen in Westernised populations today. This review provides an overview of insulin, its history, structure, synthesis, secretion, actions and interactions followed by a discussion of insulin resistance and its associated clinical manifestations. Specific areas of focus include the actions of insulin and manifestations of insulin resistance in specific organs and tissues, physiological, environmental and pharmacological influences on insulin action and insulin resistance as well as clinical syndromes associated with insulin resistance. Clinical and functional measures of insulin resistance are also covered. Despite our incomplete understanding of the complex biological mechanisms of insulin action and insulin resistance, we need to consider the dramatic social changes of the past century with respect to physical activity, diet, work, socialisation and sleep patterns. Rapid globalisation, urbanisation and industrialisation have spawned epidemics of obesity, diabetes and their attendant co-morbidities, as physical inactivity and dietary imbalance unmask latent predisposing genetic traits. PMID:16278749

  15. A biosynthetic regulated secretory pathway in constitutive secretory cells

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    It has frequently been proposed that while the constitutive secretory pathway is present in all cells, the regulated secretory pathway is found only in specialized cells such as neuronal, endocrine, or exocrine types. In this study we provide evidence that suggests that this distinction is not as restrictive as proposed. We have identified a population of post-Golgi storage vesicles in several constitutive secretory cells using [35S]SO4-labeled glycosaminoglycan (GAG) chains as a marker. A fraction of this pool of vesicles can undergo exocytosis in response to stimuli such as cytoplasmic Ca2+ and phorbol esters. The effect of Ca2+ was demonstrated both in intact cells in the presence of the ionophore A23187 and in streptolysin-O-permeabilized semi-intact cells. N-ethylmaleiimide, under conditions known to block regulated and constitutive secretion, inhibited the stimulated secretion from these cells, suggesting that the observed release of labeled GAG chains was not due to a leakage artefact. Subcellular fractionation revealed that the stored GAG chains were in low-density membrane granules (d approximately 1.12 g/ml), whose size was greater than that of synaptic- like vesicles found in PC12 cells. In addition, in CHO cells that express epitope-tagged rab 3D, the labeled GAG chains were found to cofractionate with the exogenous rab protein. When expressed in the regulated cell line AtT-20, this tagged rab protein was found to colocalize with ACTH-containing dense-core granules by indirect immunofluorescence. Taken together, these results provide evidence for the presence of a cryptic regulated secretory pathway in "constitutive" cells and suggest that the regulated secretory pathway is more widespread amongst different cell types than previously believed. PMID:8682857

  16. Proteolysis in the secretory pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Guzowski, D.E.; Bienkowski, R.S.

    1987-05-01

    Many secretory proteins are degraded intracellularly rather than secreted, however the location of this catabolic process is not known. The authors have tested the hypothesis that the degradation occurs in the organelles of the secretory pathway. Slices of rat liver were incubated with (/sup 14/C)leucine for 3 h and then incubated under chase conditions for 30 min. The tissue was homogenized and the Golgi apparatus, smooth endoplasmic reticulum (sER) and rough endoplasmic reticulum (rER) were isolated by ultracentrifugation on a discontinuous sucrose gradient. The organelles were incubated in 0.3M sucrose-50 mM citrate (pH 4) for 8-12 h at 37 C; control samples were incubated at 4 C. Percent degradation was calculated as the amount of acid soluble radioactivity released relative to total radioactivity in the sample. Proteolysis in the organelles incubated at 37 C was as follows: Golgi: 15-25%; sER: 10-20%; rER: 10-20%. Proteolysis at 4 C was negligible in all cases. These results support the hypothesis that the compartments of the secretory pathway are capable of degrading newly synthesized secretory proteins.

  17. Neuroendocrine secretory protein 7B2: structure, expression and functions.

    PubMed Central

    Mbikay, M; Seidah, N G; Chrétien, M

    2001-01-01

    7B2 is an acidic protein residing in the secretory granules of neuroendocrine cells. Its sequence has been elucidated in many phyla and species. It shows high similarity among mammals. A Pro-Pro-Asn-Pro-Cys-Pro polyproline motif is its most conserved feature, being carried by both vertebrate and invertebrate sequences. It is biosynthesized as a precursor protein that is cleaved into an N-terminal fragment and a C-terminal peptide. In neuroendocrine cells, 7B2 functions as a specific chaperone for the proprotein convertase (PC) 2. Through the sequence around its Pro-Pro-Asn-Pro-Cys-Pro motif, it binds to an inactive proPC2 and facilitates its transport from the endoplasmic reticulum to later compartments of the secretory pathway where the zymogen is proteolytically matured and activated. Its C-terminal peptide can inhibit PC2 in vitro and may contribute to keep the enzyme transiently inactive in vivo. The PC2-7B2 model defines a new neuroendocrine paradigm whereby proteolytic activation of prohormones and proneuropeptides in the secretory pathway is spatially and temporally regulated by the dynamics of interactions between converting enzymes and their binding proteins. Interestingly, unlike PC2-null mice, which are viable, 7B2-null mutants die early in life from Cushing's disease due to corticotropin ('ACTH') hypersecretion by the neurointermediate lobe, suggesting a possible involvement of 7B2 in secretory granule formation and in secretion regulation. The mechanism of this regulation is yet to be elucidated. 7B2 has been shown to be a good marker of several neuroendocrine cell dysfunctions in humans. The possibility that anomalies in its structure and expression could be aetiological causes of some of these dysfunctions warrants investigation. PMID:11439082

  18. Insulin and glucose regulation.

    PubMed

    Ralston, Sarah L

    2002-08-01

    Abnormally high or low blood glucose and insulin concentrations after standardized glucose tolerance tests can reflect disorders such as pituitary dysfunction, polysaccharide storage myopathies, and other clinical disorders. Glucose and insulin responses, however, are modified by the diet to which the animal has adapted, time since it was last fed, and what it was fed. Body fat (obesity), fitness level, physiologic status, and stress also alter glucose and insulin metabolism. Therefore, it is important to consider these factors when evaluating glucose and insulin tests, especially if only one sample it taken. This article describes the factors affecting glucose and insulin metabolism in horses and how they might influence the interpretation of standardized tests of glucose tolerance.

  19. FTO Is Increased in Muscle During Type 2 Diabetes, and Its Overexpression in Myotubes Alters Insulin Signaling, Enhances Lipogenesis and ROS Production, and Induces Mitochondrial Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Bravard, Amélie; Lefai, Etienne; Meugnier, Emmanuelle; Pesenti, Sandra; Disse, Emmanuel; Vouillarmet, Julien; Peretti, Nöel; Rabasa-Lhoret, Rémi; Laville, Martine; Vidal, Hubert; Rieusset, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE A strong association between genetic variants and obesity was found for the fat mass and obesity-associated gene (FTO). However, few details are known concerning the expression and function of FTO in skeletal muscle of patients with metabolic diseases. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We investigated basal FTO expression in skeletal muscle from obese nondiabetic subjects and type 1 and type 2 diabetic patients, compared with age-matched control subjects, and its regulation in vivo by insulin, glucose, or rosiglitazone. The function of FTO was further studied in myotubes by overexpression experiments. RESULTS We found a significant increase of FTO mRNA and protein levels in muscle from type 2 diabetic patients, whereas its expression was unchanged in obese or type 1 diabetic patients. Moreover, insulin or glucose infusion during specific clamps did not regulate FTO expression in skeletal muscle from control or type 2 diabetic patients. Interestingly, rosiglitazone treatment improved insulin sensitivity and reduced FTO expression in muscle from type 2 diabetic patients. In myotubes, adenoviral FTO overexpression increased basal protein kinase B phosphorylation, enhanced lipogenesis and oxidative stress, and reduced mitochondrial oxidative function, a cluster of metabolic defects associated with type 2 diabetes. CONCLUSIONS This study demonstrates increased FTO expression in skeletal muscle from type 2 diabetic patients, which can be normalized by thiazolidinedione treatment. Furthermore, in vitro data support a potential implication of FTO in oxidative metabolism, lipogenesis and oxidative stress in muscle, suggesting that it could be involved in the muscle defects that characterize type 2 diabetes. PMID:20943749

  20. Bowel Dysfunction

    MedlinePlus

    ... PCF Spotlight Glossary African American Men Living with Prostate Cancer Bowel Dysfunction Side Effects Urinary Dysfunction Bowel Dysfunction ... rectal worse. Back to Side Effects Print | Understanding Prostate Cancer Research Faces of Prostate Cancer About PCF Take ...

  1. HID-1 is required for homotypic fusion of immature secretory granules during maturation

    PubMed Central

    Du, Wen; Zhou, Maoge; Zhao, Wei; Cheng, Dongwan; Wang, Lifen; Lu, Jingze; Song, Eli; Feng, Wei; Xue, Yanhong; Xu, Pingyong; Xu, Tao

    2016-01-01

    Secretory granules, also known as dense core vesicles, are generated at the trans-Golgi network and undergo several maturation steps, including homotypic fusion of immature secretory granules (ISGs) and processing of prehormones to yield active peptides. The molecular mechanisms governing secretory granule maturation are largely unknown. Here, we investigate a highly conserved protein named HID-1 in a mouse model. A conditional knockout of HID-1 in pancreatic β cells leads to glucose intolerance and a remarkable increase in the serum proinsulin/insulin ratio caused by defective proinsulin processing. Large volume three-dimensional electron microscopy and immunofluorescence imaging reveal that ISGs are much more abundant in the absence of HID-1. We further demonstrate that HID-1 deficiency prevented secretory granule maturation by blocking homotypic fusion of immature secretory granules. Our data identify a novel player during the early maturation of immature secretory granules. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.18134.001 PMID:27751232

  2. Insulin Resistance in Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Dineley, Kelly T; Jahrling, Jordan B; Denner, Larry

    2014-01-01

    Insulin is a key hormone regulating metabolism. Insulin binding to cell surface insulin receptors engages many signaling intermediates operating in parallel and in series to control glucose, energy, and lipids while also regulating mitogenesis and development. Perturbations in the function of any of these intermediates, which occur in a variety of diseases, cause reduced sensitivity to insulin and insulin resistance with consequent metabolic dysfunction. Chronic inflammation ensues which exacerbates compromised metabolic homeostasis. Since insulin has a key role in learning and memory as well as directly regulating ERK, a kinase required for the type of learning and memory compromised in early Alzheimer's disease (AD), insulin resistance has been identified as a major risk factor for the onset of AD. Animal models of AD or insulin resistance or both demonstrate that AD pathology and impaired insulin signaling form a reciprocal relationship. Of note are human and animal model studies geared toward improving insulin resistance that have led to the identification of the nuclear receptor and transcription factor, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) as an intervention tool for early AD. Strategic targeting of alternate nodes within the insulin signaling network has revealed disease-stage therapeutic windows in animal models that coalesce with previous and ongoing clinical trial approaches. Thus, exploiting the connection between insulin resistance and AD provides powerful opportunities to delineate therapeutic interventions that slow or block the pathogenesis of AD. PMID:25237037

  3. Hydrogen sulfide alleviates cardiac contractile dysfunction in an Akt2-knockout murine model of insulin resistance: role of mitochondrial injury and apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Nan; Dong, Maolong

    2014-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is a toxic gas now being recognized as an endogenous signaling molecule in multiple organ systems, in particular, the cardiovascular system. H2S is known to regulate cardiac function and protect against ischemic injury. However, little information is available regarding the effect of H2S on cardiac function in insulin resistance. This study was designed to examine the impact of H2S supplementation on cardiac function using an Akt2 knockout model of insulin resistance. Wild-type and Akt2 knockout mice were treated with NaHS (50 μM·kg−1·day−1 ip for 10 days) prior to evaluation of echocardiographic, cardiomyocyte contractile, and intracellular Ca2+ properties, apoptosis, and mitochondrial damage. Our results revealed that Akt2 ablation led to overtly enlarged ventricular end-systolic diameter, reduced myocardial and cardiomyocyte contractile function, and disrupted intracellular Ca2+ homeostasis and apoptosis, the effects of which were ameliorated by H2S. Furthermore, Akt2 knockout displayed upregulated apoptotic protein markers (Bax, caspase-3, caspase-9, and caspace-12) and mitochondrial damage (reduced aconitase activity and NAD+, elevated cytochrome-c release from mitochondria) along with reduced phosphorylation of PTEN, Akt, and GSK3β in the absence of changes in pan protein expression, the effects of which were abolished or significantly ameliorated by H2S treatment. In vitro data revealed that H2S-induced beneficial effect against Akt2 ablation was obliterated by mitochondrial uncoupling. Taken together, our findings suggest the H2S may reconcile Akt2 knockout-induced myocardial contractile defect and intracellular Ca2+ mishandling, possibly via attenuation of mitochondrial injury and apoptosis. PMID:24622975

  4. Salivary Secretory Disorders, Inducing Drugs, and Clinical Management

    PubMed Central

    Miranda-Rius, Jaume; Brunet-Llobet, Lluís; Lahor-Soler, Eduard; Farré, Magí

    2015-01-01

    Background: Salivary secretory disorders can be the result of a wide range of factors. Their prevalence and negative effects on the patient's quality of life oblige the clinician to confront the issue. Aim: To review the salivary secretory disorders, inducing drugs and their clinical management. Methods: In this article, a literature search of these dysfunctions was conducted with the assistance of a research librarian in the MEDLINE/PubMed Database. Results: Xerostomia, or dry mouth syndrome, can be caused by medication, systemic diseases such as Sjögren's Syndrome, glandular pathologies, and radiotherapy of the head and neck. Treatment of dry mouth is aimed at both minimizing its symptoms and preventing oral complications with the employment of sialogogues and topical acting substances. Sialorrhea and drooling, are mainly due to medication or neurological systemic disease. There are various therapeutic, pharmacologic, and surgical alternatives for its management. The pharmacology of most of the substances employed for the treatment of salivary disorders is well-known. Nevertheless, in some cases a significant improvement in salivary function has not been observed after their administration. Conclusion: At present, there are numerous frequently prescribed drugs whose unwanted effects include some kind of salivary disorder. In addition, the differing pathologic mechanisms, and the great variety of existing treatments hinder the clinical management of these patients. The authors have designed an algorithm to facilitate the decision making process when physicians, oral surgeons, or dentists face these salivary dysfunctions. PMID:26516310

  5. Secretory breast cancer. Case report

    PubMed Central

    LOMBARDI, A.; MAGGI, S.; BERSIGOTTI, L.; LAZZARIN, G.; NUCCETELLI, E.; AMANTI, C.

    2013-01-01

    Summary: Secretory carcinoma of the breast is a rare tumor initially described in children but occurring equally in adult population. This unusual breast cancer subtype has a generally favorable prognosis, although several cases have been described in adults with increased aggressiveness and a risk of metastases. However, surgery is still considered the most appropriate treatment for this pathology. We describe the case of a 50 – year-old woman who has undergone a breast conservative surgery for a little tumor, preoperatively diagnosticated by a fine needle aspiration biopsy (FNAB) as a well differentiated infiltrating carcinoma. PMID:23660165

  6. Secretory breast cancer. Case report.

    PubMed

    Lombardi, A; Maggi, S; Bersigotti, L; Lazzarin, G; Nuccetelli, E; Amanti, C

    2013-04-01

    Secretory carcinoma of the breast is a rare tumor initially described in children but occurring equally in adult population. This unusual breast cancer subtype has a generally favorable prognosis, although several cases have been described in adults with increased aggressiveness and a risk of metastases. However, surgery is still considered the most appropriate treatment for this pathology. We describe the case of a 50 -year-old woman who has undergone a breast conservative surgery for a little tumor, preoperatively diagnosticated by a fine needle aspiration biopsy (FNAB) as a well differentiated infiltrating carcinoma.

  7. Favorable outcomes of hydroxychloroquine in insulin resistance may be accomplished by adjustment of the endothelial dysfunction as well as the skewed balance of adipokines.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Hamid, Ahmed A M; Firgany, Alaa El-Din L

    2016-07-01

    Hydroxychloroquine (HCQ) has been demonstrated to reduce the risk to develop diabetes mellitus (DM). However no previous experimental study had investigated its effect on the structure of the endocrine pancreas, islets of Langerhans (IOL), in insulin resistance (IR). In addition, the mechanism by which HCQ can prevent DM is not well understood. In this study, we hypothesized that the possible favorable outcome of HCQ may be partly achieved by its molecular effect on the endothelial stress markers as well as on the imparied balance of the adipokines that usually accompanies IR. A total of 54 rats were divided equally into; control, high fat diet (HFD) and HFD+HCQ groups (received standard chow, HFD and HFD+HCQ respectively). After 12 weeks, samples from pancreas as well as visceral adipose tissue (VAT) were histologically studied for the consequent changes. In the HFD group, there were mild degenerative changes and expansion of the IOL accompanied with a significantly increased (p<0.05) β-cell area%, mass, proliferation and neogenesis as well as a significantly decreased (p<0.05) α-cell area% compared with the other groups. On combining HCQ with HFD, reversal of these changes along with correction of the impaired adipokines levels (leptin, adiponectin, resistin, visfatin and lipocalin-2) and significant decrease (p<0.05) of the vascular endothelial stress markers (sE-selectin, sICAM and sVICAM) were manifested compared with the HFD group. Therefore, HCQ favorable effects in IR may be attributed to relieving of the endothelial stress as well as normalization of the skewed balance of adipokines. PMID:27320898

  8. Decreases in Gap Junction Coupling Recovers Ca2+ and Insulin Secretion in Neonatal Diabetes Mellitus, Dependent on Beta Cell Heterogeneity and Noise

    PubMed Central

    Westacott, Matthew J.; Hraha, Thomas H.; Pozzoli, Marina; Benninger, Richard K. P.

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes is caused by dysfunction to β-cells in the islets of Langerhans, disrupting insulin secretion and glucose homeostasis. Gap junction-mediated electrical coupling between β-cells in the islet plays a major role in coordinating a pulsatile secretory response at elevated glucose and suppressing insulin secretion at basal glucose. Previously, we demonstrated that a critical number of inexcitable cells can rapidly suppress the overall islet response, as a result of gap junction coupling. This was demonstrated in a murine model of Neonatal Diabetes Mellitus (NDM) involving expression of ATP-insensitive KATP channels, and by a multi-cellular computational model of islet electrical activity. Here we examined the mechanisms by which gap junction coupling contributes to islet dysfunction in NDM. We first verified the computational model against [Ca2+] and insulin secretion measurements in islets expressing ATP-insensitive KATP channels under different levels of gap junction coupling. We then applied this model to predict how different KATP channel mutations found in NDM suppress [Ca2+], and the role of gap junction coupling in this suppression. We further extended the model to account for stochastic noise and insulin secretion dynamics. We found experimentally and in the islet model that reductions in gap junction coupling allow progressively greater glucose-stimulated [Ca2+] and insulin secretion following expression of ATP-insensitive KATP channels. The model demonstrated good correspondence between suppression of [Ca2+] and clinical presentation of different NDM mutations. Significant recoveries in [Ca2+] and insulin secretion were predicted for many mutations upon reductions in gap junction coupling, where stochastic noise played a significant role in the recoveries. These findings provide new understanding how the islet functions as a multicellular system and for the role of gap junction channels in exacerbating the effects of decreased cellular excitability

  9. Insulin Signaling and Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Riehle, Christian; Abel, E Dale

    2016-04-01

    Heart failure is associated with generalized insulin resistance. Moreover, insulin-resistant states such as type 2 diabetes mellitus and obesity increases the risk of heart failure even after adjusting for traditional risk factors. Insulin resistance or type 2 diabetes mellitus alters the systemic and neurohumoral milieu, leading to changes in metabolism and signaling pathways in the heart that may contribute to myocardial dysfunction. In addition, changes in insulin signaling within cardiomyocytes develop in the failing heart. The changes range from activation of proximal insulin signaling pathways that may contribute to adverse left ventricular remodeling and mitochondrial dysfunction to repression of distal elements of insulin signaling pathways such as forkhead box O transcriptional signaling or glucose transport, which may also impair cardiac metabolism, structure, and function. This article will review the complexities of insulin signaling within the myocardium and ways in which these pathways are altered in heart failure or in conditions associated with generalized insulin resistance. The implications of these changes for therapeutic approaches to treating or preventing heart failure will be discussed. PMID:27034277

  10. Insulin Signaling and Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Riehle, Christian; Abel, E Dale

    2016-04-01

    Heart failure is associated with generalized insulin resistance. Moreover, insulin-resistant states such as type 2 diabetes mellitus and obesity increases the risk of heart failure even after adjusting for traditional risk factors. Insulin resistance or type 2 diabetes mellitus alters the systemic and neurohumoral milieu, leading to changes in metabolism and signaling pathways in the heart that may contribute to myocardial dysfunction. In addition, changes in insulin signaling within cardiomyocytes develop in the failing heart. The changes range from activation of proximal insulin signaling pathways that may contribute to adverse left ventricular remodeling and mitochondrial dysfunction to repression of distal elements of insulin signaling pathways such as forkhead box O transcriptional signaling or glucose transport, which may also impair cardiac metabolism, structure, and function. This article will review the complexities of insulin signaling within the myocardium and ways in which these pathways are altered in heart failure or in conditions associated with generalized insulin resistance. The implications of these changes for therapeutic approaches to treating or preventing heart failure will be discussed.

  11. Potent Insulin Secretagogue from Scoparia dulcis Linn of Nepalese Origin.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Khaga Raj; Adhikari, Achyut; Hafizur, Rahman M; Hameed, Abdul; Raza, Sayed Ali; Kalauni, Surya Kant; Miyazaki, Jun-Ichi; Choudhary, M Iqbal

    2015-10-01

    Ethno-botanical inspired isolation from plant Scoparia dulcis Linn. (Sweet Broomweed) yielded six compounds, coixol (1), glutinol (2), glutinone (3), friedelin (4), betulinic acid (5), and tetratriacontan-1-ol (6). There structures were identified using mass and 1D- and 2D-NMR spectroscopy techniques. Compounds 1-6 were evaluated for their insulin secretory activity on isolated mice islets and MIN-6 pancreatic β-cell line, and compounds 1 and 2 were found to be potent and mildly active, respectively. Compound 1 was further evaluated for insulin secretory activity on MIN-6 cells. Compound 1 was subjected to in vitro cytotoxicity assay against MIN-6, 3T3 cell lines, and islet cells, and in vivo acute toxicity test in mice that was found to be non-toxic. The insulin secretory activity of compounds 1 and 2 supported the ethno-botanic uses of S. dulcis as an anti-diabetic agent. PMID:26178652

  12. Insulin Signaling And Insulin Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Beale, Elmus G.

    2013-01-01

    Insulin resistance or its sequelae may be the common etiology of maladies associated with metabolic syndrome (e.g., hypertension, type 2 diabetes, atherosclerosis, heart attack, stroke and kidney failure). It is thus important to understand those factors that affect insulin sensitivity. This review stems from the surprising discovery that interference with angiotensin signaling improves insulin sensitivity and it provides a general overview of insulin action and factors that control insulin sensitivity. PMID:23111650

  13. The role of chemiosmotic lysis in the exocytotic release of insulin.

    PubMed

    Pace, C S; Smith, J S

    1983-09-01

    The role of chemiosmotic lysis in the exocytotic release of insulin has been studied using perifused rat pancreatic islets of Langerhans. Established criteria for osmotic lysis of secretory granules requires proton translocation across the secretory granule membrane and the influx of a permeant anion. The consequent increase in granule osmolarity induces water entry and granule lysis. A proton gradient has been previously established to exist across the insulin secretory granule membrane. We have examined the sensitivity of insulin release to 1) hyperosmolar solutions, 2) replacement of medium Cl-, 3) replacement of medium Na+, and 4) anion transport inhibitors. The addition of 200-600 mM sucrose resulted in a 32-69% inhibition of insulin release due to 16.7 mM glucose. Replacement of Cl- by isethionate or SO4--reversibly inhibited glucose-induced insulin release by 47% and 78%, respectively. Na+ replacement by choline did not influence the secretory response. 4,4'-Diisothiocyano-2,2'-stilbene disulfonic acid (500 microM) and probenecid (10 mM) inhibited insulin release by 73% and 79%, respectively. These drugs are known to inhibit anion exchange in erythrocytes and may be influencing Cl- entry into the secretory granule fused to the plasma membrane by a similar mechanism. Furosemide inhibits NaKCl2 cotransport in erythrocytes, but had no influence on glucose-induced insulin release, suggesting that Cl- does not enter the secretory granule by this pathway. The primary criteria for the participation of a chemiosmotic mechanism subserving lysis of the insulin secretory granule are fulfilled by these results.

  14. Secretory diarrhoea: mechanisms and emerging therapies

    PubMed Central

    Thiagarajah, Jay R.; Donowitz, Mark; Verkman, Alan S.

    2016-01-01

    Diarrhoeal disease remains a major health burden worldwide. Secretory diarrhoeas are caused by certain bacterial and viral infections, inflammatory processes, drugs and genetic disorders. Fluid secretion across the intestinal epithelium in secretory diarrhoeas involves multiple ion and solute transporters, as well as activation of cyclic nucleotide and Ca2+ signalling pathways. In many secretory diarrhoeas, activation of Cl− channels in the apical membrane of enterocytes, including the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator and Ca2+-activated Cl− channels, increases fluid secretion, while inhibition of Na+ transport reduces fluid absorption. Current treatment of diarrhoea includes replacement of fluid and electrolyte losses using oral rehydration solutions, and drugs targeting intestinal motility or fluid secretion. Therapeutics in the development pipeline target intestinal ion channels and transporters, regulatory proteins and cell surface receptors. This Review describes pathogenic mechanisms of secretory diarrhoea, current and emerging therapeutics, and the challenges in developing antidiarrhoeal therapeutics. PMID:26122478

  15. Protein targeting via the "constitutive-like" secretory pathway in isolated pancreatic islets: passive sorting in the immature granule compartment

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    We have suggested the existence of a novel "constitutive-like" secretory pathway in pancreatic islets, which preferentially conveys a fraction of newly synthesized C-peptide, insulin, and proinsulin, and is related to the presence of immature secretory granules (IGs). Regulated exocytosis of IGs results in an equimolar secretion of C- peptide and insulin; however an assay of the constitutive-like secretory pathway recently demonstrated that this route conveys newly synthesized C-peptide in molar excess of insulin (Arvan, P., R. Kuliawat, D. Prabakaran, A.-M. Zavacki, D. Elahi, S. Wang, and D. Pilkey. J. Biol. Chem. 266:14171-14174). We now use this assay to examine the kinetics of constitutive-like secretion. Though its duration is much shorter than the life of mature granules under physiologic conditions, constitutive-like secretion appears comparatively slow (t1/2 approximately equal to 1.5 h) compared with the rate of proinsulin traffic through the ER and Golgi stacks. We have examined whether this slow rate is coupled to the rate of IG exit from the trans-Golgi network (TGN). Escape from the 20 degrees C temperature block reveals a t1/2 less than or equal to 12 min from TGN exit to stimulated release of IGs; the time required for IG formation is too rapid to be rate limiting for constitutive-like secretion. Further, conditions are described in which constitutive-like secretion is blocked yet regulated discharge of IGs remains completely intact. Thus, constitutive-like secretion appears to represent an independent secretory pathway that is kinetically restricted to a specific granule maturation period. The data support a model in which passive sorting due to insulin crystallization results in enrichment of C-peptide in membrane vesicles that bud from IGs to initiate the constitutive-like secretory pathway. PMID:1639842

  16. Erectile dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Shamloul, Rany; Ghanem, Hussein

    2013-01-12

    Erectile dysfunction is a common clinical entity that affects mainly men older than 40 years. In addition to the classical causes of erectile dysfunction, such as diabetes mellitus and hypertension, several common lifestyle factors, such as obesity, limited or an absence of physical exercise, and lower urinary tract symptoms, have been linked to the development of erectile dysfunction. Substantial steps have been taken in the study of the association between erectile dysfunction and cardiovascular disease. Erectile dysfunction is a strong predictor for coronary artery disease, and cardiovascular assessment of a non-cardiac patient presenting with erectile dysfunction is now recommended. Substantial advances have occurred in the understanding of the pathophysiology of erectile dysfunction that ultimately led to the development of successful oral therapies, namely the phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors. However, oral phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors have limitations, and present research is thus investigating cutting-edge therapeutic strategies including gene and cell-based technologies with the aim of discovering a cure for erectile dysfunction.

  17. Porosome: The Universal Secretory Portal in Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jena, Bhanu

    2012-10-01

    In the past 50 years it was believed that during cell secretion, membrane-bound secretory vesicles completely merge at the cell plasma membrane resulting in the diffusion of intra-vesicular contents to the cell exterior and the compensatory retrieval of the excess membrane by endocytosis. This explanation made no sense or logic, since following cell secretion partially empty vesicles accumulate as demonstrated in electron micrographs. Furthermore, with the ``all or none'' mechanism of cell secretion by complete merger of secretory vesicle membrane at the cell plasma membrane, the cell is left with little regulation and control of the amount of content release. Moreover, it makes no sense for mammalian cells to possess such `all or none' mechanism of cell secretion, when even single-cell organisms have developed specialized and sophisticated secretory machinery, such as the secretion apparatus of Toxoplasma gondii, the contractile vacuoles in paramecium, or the various types of secretory structures in bacteria. Therefore, in 1993 in a News and Views article in Nature, E. Neher wrote ``It seems terribly wasteful that, during the release of hormones and neurotransmitters from a cell, the membrane of a vesicle should merge with the plasma membrane to be retrieved for recycling only seconds or minutes later.'' This conundrum in the molecular mechanism of cell secretion was finally resolved in 1997 following discovery of the ``Porosome,'' the universal secretory machinery in cells. Porosomes are supramolecular lipoprotein structures at the cell plasma membrane, where membrane-bound secretory vesicles transiently dock and fuse to release inravesicular contents to the outside during cell secretion. In the past decade, the composition of the porosome, its structure and dynamics at nm resolution and in real time, and its functional reconstitution into artificial lipid membrane, have all been elucidated. Since porosomes in exocrine and neuroendocrine cells measure 100-180 nm

  18. PICK1 Deficiency Impairs Secretory Vesicle Biogenesis and Leads to Growth Retardation and Decreased Glucose Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Jansen, Anna M.; Jin, Chunyu; Rickhag, Mattias; Lund, Viktor K.; Jensen, Morten; Bhatia, Vikram; Sørensen, Gunnar; Madsen, Andreas N.; Xue, Zhichao; Møller, Siri K.; Woldbye, David; Qvortrup, Klaus; Huganir, Richard; Stamou, Dimitrios; Kjærulff, Ole; Gether, Ulrik

    2013-01-01

    Secretory vesicles in endocrine cells store hormones such as growth hormone (GH) and insulin before their release into the bloodstream. The molecular mechanisms governing budding of immature secretory vesicles from the trans-Golgi network (TGN) and their subsequent maturation remain unclear. Here, we identify the lipid binding BAR (Bin/amphiphysin/Rvs) domain protein PICK1 (protein interacting with C kinase 1) as a key component early in the biogenesis of secretory vesicles in GH-producing cells. Both PICK1-deficient Drosophila and mice displayed somatic growth retardation. Growth retardation was rescued in flies by reintroducing PICK1 in neurosecretory cells producing somatotropic peptides. PICK1-deficient mice were characterized by decreased body weight and length, increased fat accumulation, impaired GH secretion, and decreased storage of GH in the pituitary. Decreased GH storage was supported by electron microscopy showing prominent reduction in secretory vesicle number. Evidence was also obtained for impaired insulin secretion associated with decreased glucose tolerance. PICK1 localized in cells to immature secretory vesicles, and the PICK1 BAR domain was shown by live imaging to associate with vesicles budding from the TGN and to possess membrane-sculpting properties in vitro. In mouse pituitary, PICK1 co-localized with the BAR domain protein ICA69, and PICK1 deficiency abolished ICA69 protein expression. In the Drosophila brain, PICK1 and ICA69 co-immunoprecipitated and showed mutually dependent expression. Finally, both in a Drosophila model of type 2 diabetes and in high-fat-diet-induced obese mice, we observed up-regulation of PICK1 mRNA expression. Our findings suggest that PICK1, together with ICA69, is critical during budding of immature secretory vesicles from the TGN and thus for vesicular storage of GH and possibly other hormones. The data link two BAR domain proteins to membrane remodeling processes in the secretory pathway of peptidergic endocrine

  19. Diastolic Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Euy-Myoung; Dudley, Samuel C.

    2016-01-01

    Despite the growing number of patients affected, the understanding of diastolic dysfunction and heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) is still poor. Clinical trials, largely based on successful treatments for systolic heart failure, have been disappointing, suggesting that HFpEF has a different pathology to that of systolic dysfunction. In this review, general concepts, epidemiology, diagnosis, and treatment of diastolic dysfunction are summarized, with an emphasis on new experiments suggesting that oxidative stress plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of at least some forms of the disease. This observation has lead to potential new diagnostics and therapeutics for diastolic dysfunction and heart failure caused by diastolic dysfunction. PMID:25746522

  20. [Novel insulins].

    PubMed

    Eriksson, Johan G; Laine, Merja K

    2016-01-01

    Novel insulins have entered the market during recent years. The ultra-long acting insulins, insulin degludek and insulin glargine, the latter having a strength of 300 U/ml, exhibit a steady and predictable action curve. Studies have indicated that significantly fewer hypoglycemiae occur when using degludek in patients with either type 1 or type 2 diabetes, whereas similar evidence about glargine (300 U/mI) has been obtained in the treatment of type 2 diabetes. The long duration of action of both insulins brings long-needed flexibility to.their dosing. PMID:27089618

  1. Liraglutide prevents fast weight gain and β-cell dysfunction in male catch-up growth rats

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Juan; Chen, Ting; Zhu, Ying; Li, Hui-Qing; Deng, Xiu-Ling; Wang, Qing-Hua; Zhang, Jiao-Yue

    2015-01-01

    We reported recently that after a nutritional growth retardation, rats showed significant weight gain, central fat accumulation, dyslipidemia, and β-cell dysfunction during a catch-up growth (CUG) phase. Here, we investigated whether glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) ameliorated the rapid weight gain, central fat deposition, and β-cell dysfunction during the CUG in rats. Sixty-four male Sprague Dawley rats were stratified into four groups including normal control group, CUG group, catch-up growth with liraglutide treatment group, and catch-up growth with liraglutide and exendin 9–39 treatment group. Energy intake, body weight, and body length were monitored. Fat mass percentage was analyzed by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry scan. Plasma triglyceride and non-esterified fatty acid were measured. The β-cell mass was analyzed by morphometric analysis and signaling molecules were examined by Western blot and real-time PCR. Insulin secretion capability was evaluated by hyperglycemic clamp test. Liraglutide prevented weight gain and improved lipid and glucose metabolism in rats under CUG conditions, which were associated with reduced fasting insulin levels and improved glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. Improved β-cell function is found to be associated with increased β-cell replication as determined by β-cell density and insulin-Ki67 dual staining. Furthermore, liraglutide increased islet pancreatic duodenal homeobox-1 (Pdx-1) and B-cell lymphoma-2 transcript and protein expression, and reduced Procaspase-3 transcript and Caspase-3 p11 subunit protein expression, suggesting that expression of Pdx-1 and reduction of apoptosis may be the mechanisms involved. The therapeutic effects were attenuated in rats co-administered with exendin 9–39, suggesting a GLP-1 receptor-dependent mechanism. These studies revealed that incretin therapy effectively prevented fast weight gain and β-cell dysfunction in rats under conditions of nutrition restriction followed by

  2. Liraglutide prevents fast weight gain and β-cell dysfunction in male catch-up growth rats.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Juan; Chen, Ting; Zhu, Ying; Li, Hui-Qing; Deng, Xiu-Ling; Wang, Qing-Hua; Zhang, Jiao-Yue; Chen, Lu-Lu

    2015-09-01

    We reported recently that after a nutritional growth retardation, rats showed significant weight gain, central fat accumulation, dyslipidemia, and β-cell dysfunction during a catch-up growth (CUG) phase. Here, we investigated whether glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) ameliorated the rapid weight gain, central fat deposition, and β-cell dysfunction during the CUG in rats. Sixty-four male Sprague Dawley rats were stratified into four groups including normal control group, CUG group, catch-up growth with liraglutide treatment group, and catch-up growth with liraglutide and exendin 9-39 treatment group. Energy intake, body weight, and body length were monitored. Fat mass percentage was analyzed by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry scan. Plasma triglyceride and non-esterified fatty acid were measured. The β-cell mass was analyzed by morphometric analysis and signaling molecules were examined by Western blot and real-time PCR. Insulin secretion capability was evaluated by hyperglycemic clamp test. Liraglutide prevented weight gain and improved lipid and glucose metabolism in rats under CUG conditions, which were associated with reduced fasting insulin levels and improved glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. Improved β-cell function is found to be associated with increased β-cell replication as determined by β-cell density and insulin-Ki67 dual staining. Furthermore, liraglutide increased islet pancreatic duodenal homeobox-1 (Pdx-1) and B-cell lymphoma-2 transcript and protein expression, and reduced Procaspase-3 transcript and Caspase-3 p11 subunit protein expression, suggesting that expression of Pdx-1 and reduction of apoptosis may be the mechanisms involved. The therapeutic effects were attenuated in rats co-administered with exendin 9-39, suggesting a GLP-1 receptor-dependent mechanism. These studies revealed that incretin therapy effectively prevented fast weight gain and β-cell dysfunction in rats under conditions of nutrition restriction followed by nutrition

  3. Biosimilar Insulins

    PubMed Central

    Hompesch, Marcus

    2014-01-01

    Until now most of the insulin used in developed countries has been manufactured and distributed by a small number of multinational companies. Beyond the established insulin manufacturers, a number of new players have developed insulin manufacturing capacities based on modern biotechnological methods. Because the patents for many of the approved insulin formulations have expired or are going to expire soon, these not yet established companies are increasingly interested in seeking market approval for their insulin products as biosimilar insulins (BI) in highly regulated markets like the EU and the United States. Differences in the manufacturing process (none of the insulin manufacturing procedures are 100% identical) can lead to insulins that to some extent may differ from the originator insulin. The key questions are if subtle differences in the structure of the insulins, purity, and so on are clinically relevant and may result in different biological effects. The aim of this article is to introduce and discuss basic aspects that may be of relevance with regard to BI. PMID:24876530

  4. [Gonadal dysfunction].

    PubMed

    Tahara, R; Toma, Y; Yanaihara, T

    1997-11-01

    Function of hypothalamic-pituitary-ovarian axis is an essential factor for the maintenance of regular cycles in mature women. The disturbance of function of those organs causes gonadal dysfunction such as anovulation, amenorrhea and menstrual disorders. Therefore, the correct diagnosis for the assessment of CNS and ovarian function is clinically important to treat the patients those who have an menstrual disorders. In this review, the mechanism of normal gonadal cycles and the diagnostic method and the treatment of gonadal dysfunction are described.

  5. Quality control in the secretory assembly line.

    PubMed Central

    Helenius, A

    2001-01-01

    As a rule, only proteins that have reached a native, folded and assembled structure are transported to their target organelles and compartments within the cell. In the secretory pathway of eukaryotic cells, this type of sorting is particularly important. A variety of molecular mechanisms are involved that distinguish between folded and unfolded proteins, modulate their intracellular transport, and induce degradation if they fail to fold. This phenomenon, called quality control, occurs at several levels and involves different types of folding sensors. The quality control system provides a stringent and versatile molecular sorting system that guaranties fidelity of protein expression in the secretory pathway. PMID:11260794

  6. Myosin Va Transports Dense Core Secretory Vesicles in Pancreatic MIN6 β-CellsV⃞

    PubMed Central

    Varadi, Aniko; Tsuboi, Takashi; Rutter, Guy A.

    2005-01-01

    The role of unconventional myosins in neuroendocrine cells is not fully understood, with involvement suggested in the movement of both secretory vesicles and mitochondria. Here, we demonstrate colocalization of myosin Va (MyoVa) with insulin in pancreatic β-cells and show that MyoVa copurifies with insulin in density gradients and with the vesicle marker phogrin-enhanced green fluorescent protein upon fluorescence-activated sorting of vesicles. By contrast, MyoVa immunoreactivity was poorly colocalized with mitochondrial or other markers. Demonstrating an important role for MyoVa in the recruitment of secretory vesicles to the cell surface, a reduction of MyoVa protein levels achieved by RNA interference caused a significant decrease in glucose- or depolarization-stimulated insulin secretion. Similarly, expression of the dominant-negative–acting globular tail domain of MyoVa decreased by ∼50% the number of vesicles docked at the plasma membrane and by 87% the number of depolarization-stimulated exocytotic events detected by total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy. We conclude that MyoVa-driven movements of vesicles along the cortical actin network are essential for the terminal stages of regulated exocytosis in β-cells. PMID:15788565

  7. Insulin oedema.

    PubMed Central

    Evans, D. J.; Pritchard-Jones, K.; Trotman-Dickenson, B.

    1986-01-01

    A 35 year old markedly underweight woman presented with uncontrolled diabetes. Following insulin therapy she developed gross fluid retention with extensive peripheral oedema, bilateral pleural effusions and weight gain of 18.8 kg in 22 days, accompanied by a fall in plasma albumin. She responded well to treatment with diuretics and salt-poor albumin, losing 10.3 kg in 6 days without recurrence of oedema. Severe insulin oedema is an uncommon complication of insulin therapy and may be due to effects of insulin on both vascular permeability and the renal tubule. Images Figure 2 PMID:3529068

  8. Mitochondrial function and insulin secretion.

    PubMed

    Maechler, Pierre

    2013-10-15

    In the endocrine fraction of the pancreas, the β-cell rapidly reacts to fluctuations in blood glucose concentrations by adjusting the rate of insulin secretion. Glucose-sensing coupled to insulin exocytosis depends on transduction of metabolic signals into intracellular messengers recognized by the secretory machinery. Mitochondria play a central role in this process by connecting glucose metabolism to insulin release. Mitochondrial activity is primarily regulated by metabolic fluxes, but also by dynamic morphology changes and free Ca(2+) concentrations. Recent advances of mitochondrial Ca(2+) homeostasis are discussed; in particular the roles of the newly-identified mitochondrial Ca(2+) uniporter MCU and its regulatory partner MICU1, as well as the mitochondrial Na(+)-Ca(2+) exchanger. This review describes how mitochondria function both as sensors and generators of metabolic signals; such as NADPH, long chain acyl-CoA, glutamate. The coupling factors are additive to the Ca(2+) signal and participate to the amplifying pathway of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion.

  9. The esters of carboxylic nutrients as insulinotropic tools in non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Malaisse, W J

    1995-10-01

    1. In non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, the pancreatic B-cell displays a preferential impairment of its secretory response to D-glucose. 2. A number of agents could be used to restore secretory activity in the diseased B-cell. 3. In this respect, esters of carboxylic nutrients, such as succinic or glutamic acid, present the advantages of stimulating both proinsulin biosynthesis and insulin release, remaining efficient in models of B-cell glucotoxicity, augmenting the secretory response to hypoglycemic pharmacological agents, protecting the B-cell against cytotoxic aggressions, and exerting a long-term beneficial effect upon the secretory potential of the endocrine pancreas. 4. Potential limitations of this new therapeutical approach, such as the generation of methanol from the esters, their postulated inefficacy after enteral administration, or the occurrence of extrapancreatic metabolic effects may be circumvented. 5. The esters of carboxylic nutrients could even be used in other cells endangered by ATP depletion. PMID:7590101

  10. [Meibomian gland dysfunction].

    PubMed

    Finis, D; Schrader, S; Geerling, G

    2012-05-01

    Meibomian gland dysfunction (MGD) is a chronic disease, usually caused by obstruction of the secretory Meibomian glands. The subsequent reduction of gland secretion results in a decreased amount of lipids in the tear film. This results in a faster evaporation of the tear film and thus an evaporative dry eye. MGD alone is responsible for about 60% of all cases in combination with aqueous deficiency for a further 20% of dry eyes. While in Europe up to 20% of the population are suffering from MDD, this is true in Asia for over 60% of the population. MGD is more common in women and it incidence increases with age. It is influenced by the hormonal status as well as chemical and mechanical noxious stimuli. Additional risk factors include various skin diseases such as rosacea, acne or atopy. To diagnose MGD, particular attention should be paid to changes in the lid margin such as plugging or pouting of the ducts, thickening and telangiectasia. However, most important is the diagnostic expression of the glands. At first it should be assessed whether secretion can be caused by pressure to the eyelid against the globe and secondly the quality of the expressed secretions should be evaluated. MGD should be treated according to the severity of the disease. While in mild stages instructions for lid margin hygiene, warming and massage in combination with artificial tears might be sufficient, in more severe stages oral tetracyclin derivatives and anti-inflammatory eye drops such as steroids or CSA are necessary for successful treatment.

  11. Gustatory dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Maheswaran, T.; Abikshyeet, P.; Sitra, G.; Gokulanathan, S.; Vaithiyanadane, V.; Jeelani, S.

    2014-01-01

    Tastes in humans provide a vital tool for screening soluble chemicals for food evaluation, selection, and avoidance of potentially toxic substances. Taste or gustatory dysfunctions are implicated in loss of appetite, unintended weight loss, malnutrition, and reduced quality of life. Dental practitioners are often the first clinicians to be presented with complaints about taste dysfunction. This brief review provides a summary of the common causes of taste disorders, problems associated with assessing taste function in a clinical setting and management options available to the dental practitioner. PMID:25210380

  12. [Perspectives in the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Role of insulin therapy?].

    PubMed

    Bringer, J; Renard, E; Galtier Dereure, F; Jaffiol, C

    1994-01-01

    Independently of its initial mechanism, Type 2 diabetes associates in various degrees disorders in insulin sensibility and secretion. The dissociated insulin resistance among tissues explains the predictable imperfection of insulin therapy in this disease due to frequent weight increase and the potential risks of insulin on atherogenesis raised on the basis of experimental studies. All diabetic subjects are not equally insulin resistant and do not have the same insulin secretory capacity evaluated in practice by means of the response of insulin or C peptide plasma levels to various secreting agents. Intensity and duration of hyperglycaemia, muscular mass, physical activity and way of life, age, weight and fat patterning, the presence of complications, acceptance, education feasibility and compliance are essential in selecting towards insulin therapy. Meanwhile, as the results of the prospective studies in progress become available, it seems that insulin should be restricted to the smallest useful dosage possible and that weight change should be carefully checked within the weeks following initiation of insulin. The future of insulin therapy in Type 2 diabetes requires (1) better selection of patients showing a demonstrated beneficial effect of insulin, (2) the association of insulin with new molecules capable of reducing its dosage and preventing its deleterious effects, (3) a change in the mode of insulin administration, with an appropriate balance between comfort and efficacy, (4) change in the insulin structure towards analogues or compounds related to insulin but with less perverted effects.

  13. Erectile Dysfunction

    MedlinePlus

    ... or vascular problems, will have a more difficult time returning to pre-treatment function. Management of Erectile Dysfunction When a man is sexually aroused, the erectile nerves running alongside the penis stimulate the ... blood to rush in. At the same time, tiny valves at the base of the penis ...

  14. Sensory Dysfunction

    MedlinePlus

    ... to Web version Sensory Dysfunction Overview Why are smell and taste important? Your senses of smell and taste let you fully enjoy the scents ... bitter and sour. Flavor involves both taste and smell. For example, because a person is able to ...

  15. Insulin Protects against Hepatic Damage Postburn

    PubMed Central

    Jeschke, Marc G; Kraft, Robert; Song, Juquan; Gauglitz, Gerd G; Cox, Robert A; Brooks, Natasha C; Finnerty, Celeste C; Kulp, Gabriela A; Herndon, David N; Boehning, Darren

    2011-01-01

    Burn injury causes hepatic dysfunction associated with endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and induction of the unfolded protein response (UPR). ER stress/UPR leads to hepatic apoptosis and activation of the Jun-N-terminal kinase (JNK) signaling pathway, leading to vast metabolic alterations. Insulin has been shown to attenuate hepatic damage and to improve liver function. We therefore hypothesized that insulin administration exerts its effects by attenuating postburn hepatic ER stress and subsequent apoptosis. Male Sprague Dawley rats received a 60% total body surface area (TBSA) burn injury. Animals were randomized to receive saline (controls) or insulin (2.5 IU/kg q. 24 h) and euthanized at 24 and 48 h postburn. Burn injury induced dramatic changes in liver structure and function, including induction of the ER stress response, mitochondrial dysfunction, hepatocyte apoptosis, and up-regulation of inflammatory mediators. Insulin decreased hepatocyte caspase-3 activation and apoptosis significantly at 24 and 48 h postburn. Furthermore, insulin administration decreased ER stress significantly and reversed structural and functional changes in hepatocyte mitochondria. Finally, insulin attenuated the expression of inflammatory mediators IL-6, MCP-1, and CINC-1. Insulin alleviates burn-induced ER stress, hepatocyte apoptosis, mitochondrial abnormalities, and inflammation leading to improved hepatic structure and function significantly. These results support the use of insulin therapy after traumatic injury to improve patient outcomes. PMID:21267509

  16. Modest hyperglycemia prevents interstitial dispersion of insulin in skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Kolka, Cathryn M.; Castro, Ana Valeria B.; Kirkman, Erlinda L.; Bergman, Richard N.

    2014-01-01

    Insulin injected directly into skeletal muscle diffuses rapidly through the interstitial space to cause glucose uptake, but this is blocked in insulin resistance. As glucotoxicity is associated with endothelial dysfunction, the observed hyperglycemia in diet-induced obese dogs may inhibit insulin access to muscle cells, and exacerbate insulin resistance. Here we asked whether interstitial insulin diffusion is reduced in modest hyperglycemia, similar to that induced by a high fat diet. METHODS During normoglycemic (100mg/dl) and moderately hyperglycemic (120mg/dl) clamps in anesthetized canines, sequential doses of insulin were injected into the vastus medialis of one hindlimb; the contra-lateral limb served as a control. Plasma samples were collected and analyzed for insulin content. Lymph vessels of the hind leg were also catheterized, and lymph samples were analyzed as an indicator of interstitial insulin concentration. RESULTS Insulin injection increased lymph insulin in normoglycemic animals, but not in hyperglycemic animals. Muscle glucose uptake was elevated in response to hyperglycemia, however the insulin-mediated glucose uptake in normoglycemic controls was not observed in hyperglycemia. Modest hyperglycemia prevented intra-muscularly injected insulin from diffusing through the interstitial space reduced insulin-mediated glucose uptake. CONCLUSION Hyperglycemia prevents the appearance of injected insulin in the interstitial space, thus reducing insulin action on skeletal muscle cells. PMID:25468139

  17. [Usefulness and limitations of basal insulin replacement in type 2 diabetes].

    PubMed

    Hirata, Erina; Ohmori, Kazuno; Nagai, Sou

    2015-03-01

    In the earlier stage of type 2 diabetes, the disease can be managed by life-style modification with or without oral antidiabetic agents. However, as the disease progress, most patients eventually require insulin treatment to maintain good glycemic/control. Optimal insulin therapy should mimic the normal physiologic secretory pattern. As for ideal basal insulin, to maintain desirable pre-prandial glucose levels, duration of action should be long enough, profiles such as flat time-action and less day-to-day variation would be mandatory. This article discusses the usefulness and limitations of basal insulin therapy in type 2 diabetes comparing NPH insulin, insulin detemir, insulin glargin and insulin degludec. PMID:25812373

  18. Docking of Secretory Vesicles Is Syntaxin Dependent

    PubMed Central

    de Wit, Heidi; Cornelisse, L. Niels; Toonen, Ruud F.G.; Verhage, Matthijs

    2006-01-01

    Secretory vesicles dock at the plasma membrane before they undergo fusion. Molecular docking mechanisms are poorly defined but believed to be independent of SNARE proteins. Here, we challenged this hypothesis by acute deletion of the target SNARE, syntaxin, in vertebrate neurons and neuroendocrine cells. Deletion resulted in fusion arrest in both systems. No docking defects were observed in synapses, in line with previous observations. However, a drastic reduction in morphologically docked secretory vesicles was observed in chromaffin cells. Syntaxin-deficient chromaffin cells showed a small reduction in total and plasma membrane staining for the docking factor Munc18-1, which appears insufficient to explain the drastic reduction in docking. The sub-membrane cortical actin network was unaffected by syntaxin deletion. These observations expose a docking role for syntaxin in the neuroendocrine system. Additional layers of regulation may have evolved to make syntaxin redundant for docking in highly specialized systems like synaptic active zones. PMID:17205130

  19. Secretory IgA synthesis in Kwashiorkor.

    PubMed

    Beatty, D W; Napier, B; Sinclair-Smith, C C; McCabe, K; Hughes, E J

    1983-09-01

    The synthesis of intestinal secretory IgA was studied in in vitro cultures of duodenal mucosal biopsies from children with Kwashiorkor. Production of secretory IgA was measured by the incorporation of radioactive label and visualized following PAGE and autoradiography. Results obtained before and after nutritional rehabilitation demonstrate an enhanced synthesis of sIgA in children with acute Kwashiorkor. Histological examination of plasma cells in the biopsy tissue confirms a twofold increase in IgA staining plasma cells in acute Kwashiorkor. Peripheral blood B lymphocytes in acute Kwashiorkor however, showed a reduction in IgA synthesis in the acute stage. These results suggest an effective mucosal sIgA response to the increased intestinal antigen load in Kwashiorkor.

  20. Insulin Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... people with type 2 diabetes , polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) , prediabetes or heart disease , or metabolic syndrome . A ... resistance), especially in obese individuals and those with PCOS . This test involves an IV-infusion of insulin, ...

  1. Islet secretory granules contain cytochrome b561.

    PubMed

    Mackin, R B; Jones, D P; Noe, B D

    1986-08-01

    A cytochrome has been detected in secretory granules prepared from anglerfish islets of Langerhans. The heme moiety was determined to be of the b type, and the dithionite-reduced cytochrome exhibited an alpha-band maximum at 561 nm with an extinction coefficient of 13.8 mM-1 X cm-1. The protein was present at a concentration of 40 +/- 4 pmol/mg of secretory granule protein. The cytochrome was found to be an integral membrane protein and to be reduced by ascorbic acid but not by NADH, NADPH, reduced glutathione (GSH), or succinate. Because of the similarity to previously characterized secretory granule cytochrome b561's from neuroendocrine tissues, this cytochrome is also referred to as cytochrome b561. Although its function has not yet been elucidated, the apparent specificity for ascorbate suggests that it may be a component of the ascorbate-dependent peptidyl-glycine alpha-amidating monooxygenase system that functions in the amidation of islet hormones. PMID:3525285

  2. RFP tags for labeling secretory pathway proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Liyang; Zhao, Yanhua; Xu, Pingyong; Huan, Shuangyan

    2014-05-09

    Highlights: • Membrane protein Orai1 can be used to report the fusion properties of RFPs. • Artificial puncta are affected by dissociation constant as well as pKa of RFPs. • Among tested RFPs mOrange2 is the best choice for secretory protein labeling. - Abstract: Red fluorescent proteins (RFPs) are useful tools for live cell and multi-color imaging in biological studies. However, when labeling proteins in secretory pathway, many RFPs are prone to form artificial puncta, which may severely impede their further uses. Here we report a fast and easy method to evaluate RFPs fusion properties by attaching RFPs to an environment sensitive membrane protein Orai1. In addition, we revealed that intracellular artificial puncta are actually colocalized with lysosome, thus besides monomeric properties, pKa value of RFPs is also a key factor for forming intracellular artificial puncta. In summary, our current study provides a useful guide for choosing appropriate RFP for labeling secretory membrane proteins. Among RFPs tested, mOrange2 is highly recommended based on excellent monomeric property, appropriate pKa and high brightness.

  3. Mitochondrial efficiency and insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Crescenzo, Raffaella; Bianco, Francesca; Mazzoli, Arianna; Giacco, Antonia; Liverini, Giovanna; Iossa, Susanna

    2014-01-01

    Insulin resistance, "a relative impairment in the ability of insulin to exert its effects on glucose, protein and lipid metabolism in target tissues," has many detrimental effects on metabolism and is strongly correlated to deposition of lipids in non-adipose tissues. Mitochondria are the main cellular sites devoted to ATP production and fatty acid oxidation. Therefore, a role for mitochondrial dysfunction in the onset of skeletal muscle insulin resistance has been proposed and many studies have dealt with possible alteration in mitochondrial function in obesity and diabetes, both in humans and animal models. Data reporting evidence of mitochondrial dysfunction in type two diabetes mellitus are numerous, even though the issue that this reduced mitochondrial function is causal in the development of the disease is not yet solved, also because a variety of parameters have been used in the studies carried out on this subject. By assessing the alterations in mitochondrial efficiency as well as the impact of this parameter on metabolic homeostasis of skeletal muscle cells, we have obtained results that allow us to suggest that an increase in mitochondrial efficiency precedes and therefore can contribute to the development of high-fat-induced insulin resistance in skeletal muscle. PMID:25601841

  4. Ionic and secretory response of pancreatic islet cells to minoxidil sulfate

    SciTech Connect

    Antoine, M.H.; Hermann, M.; Herchuelz, A.; Lebrun, P. )

    1991-07-01

    Minoxidil sulfate is an antihypertensive agent belonging to the new class of vasodilators, the K+ channel openers. The present study was undertaken to characterize the effects of minoxidil sulfate on ionic and secretory events in rat pancreatic islets. The drug unexpectedly provoked a concentration-dependent decrease in 86Rb outflow. This inhibitory effect was reduced in a concentration-dependent manner by glucose and tolbutamide. Minoxidil sulfate did not affect 45Ca outflow from islets perfused in the presence of extracellular Ca++ and absence or presence of glucose. However, in islets exposed to a medium deprived of extracellular Ca++, the drug provoked a rise in 45Ca outflow. Whether in the absence or presence of extracellular Ca++, minoxidil sulfate increased the cytosolic free Ca++ concentration of islet cells. Lastly, minoxidil sulfate increased the release of insulin from glucose-stimulated pancreatic islets. These results suggest that minoxidil sulfate reduces the activity of the ATP-sensitive K+ channels and promotes an intracellular translocation of Ca++. The latter change might account for the effect of the drug on the insulin-releasing process. However, the secretory response to minoxidil sulfate could also be mediated, at least in part, by a modest Ca++ entry.

  5. Hypertension Management and Microvascular Insulin Resistance in Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Seung-Hyun; Cao, Wenhong; Liu, Zhenqi

    2011-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes is in essence a vascular disease and is frequently associated with hypertension, macrovascular events, and microvascular complications. Microvascular dysfunction, including impaired recruitment and capillary rarefaction, has been implicated in the pathogenesis of diabetic complications. Microvascular insulin resistance and renin-angiotensin system upregulation are present in diabetes, and each contributes to the development of hypertension and microvascular dysfunction. In the insulin-sensitive state, insulin increases microvascular perfusion by increasing endothelial nitric oxide production, but this effect is abolished by insulin resistance. Angiotensin II, acting via the type 1 receptors, induces inflammation and oxidative stress, leading to impaired insulin signaling, reduced nitric oxide availability, and vasoconstriction. Conversely, it acts on the type 2 receptors to cause vasodilatation. Because substrate and hormonal exchanges occur in the microvasculature, antihypertensive agents targeted to improve microvascular insulin sensitivity and function may have beneficial effects beyond their capacity to lower blood pressure in patients with diabetes. PMID:20582734

  6. Insulin release in type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Efendic, S; Khan, A; Ostenson, C G

    1994-01-01

    Impaired insulin response is a characteristic feature of Type 2 diabetes. Overt diabetes develops when beta-cells fail to release enough insulin to compensate for decreased insulin sensitivity. However, a subgroup of normal weight patients demonstrates a pronounced beta-cell secretory defect and a normal insulin sensitivity. The molecular basis behind the impaired insulin response in Type 2 diabetes is not clear. Our studies in two animal models of this disease (GK rat and ob/ob mouse) suggest that an impaired glucose metabolism may be a primary defect in the stimulus-secretion coupling in the beta-cells in Type 2 diabetes. In the GK rat, three major alterations in the islet metabolism of glucose have been demonstrated: 1) increased glucose utilization but unchanged glucose oxidation; 2) increased glucose cycling and 3) decreased activity of the glycerol phosphate shuttle. In ob/ob animals we have found an increased rate of glucose cycling. These derangements might result in an incomplete closure of ATP-sensitive K(+)-channels with a decreased insulin response as a consequence.

  7. Memory Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, Brandy R.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of Review: This article highlights the dissociable human memory systems of episodic, semantic, and procedural memory in the context of neurologic illnesses known to adversely affect specific neuroanatomic structures relevant to each memory system. Recent Findings: Advances in functional neuroimaging and refinement of neuropsychological and bedside assessment tools continue to support a model of multiple memory systems that are distinct yet complementary and to support the potential for one system to be engaged as a compensatory strategy when a counterpart system fails. Summary: Episodic memory, the ability to recall personal episodes, is the subtype of memory most often perceived as dysfunctional by patients and informants. Medial temporal lobe structures, especially the hippocampal formation and associated cortical and subcortical structures, are most often associated with episodic memory loss. Episodic memory dysfunction may present acutely, as in concussion; transiently, as in transient global amnesia (TGA); subacutely, as in thiamine deficiency; or chronically, as in Alzheimer disease. Semantic memory refers to acquired knowledge about the world. Anterior and inferior temporal lobe structures are most often associated with semantic memory loss. The semantic variant of primary progressive aphasia (svPPA) is the paradigmatic disorder resulting in predominant semantic memory dysfunction. Working memory, associated with frontal lobe function, is the active maintenance of information in the mind that can be potentially manipulated to complete goal-directed tasks. Procedural memory, the ability to learn skills that become automatic, involves the basal ganglia, cerebellum, and supplementary motor cortex. Parkinson disease and related disorders result in procedural memory deficits. Most memory concerns warrant bedside cognitive or neuropsychological evaluation and neuroimaging to assess for specific neuropathologies and guide treatment. PMID:26039844

  8. Erectile dysfunction.

    PubMed

    McMahon, C G

    2014-01-01

    In the past 30 years, advances in basic science have been instrumental in the evolution of the male sexual health treatment paradigm from a psychosexual model to a new model, which includes oral and intracavernosal injection pharmacotherapy, vacuum constriction devices and penile prostheses for the treatment of erectile dysfunction. This progress has coincided with an increased understanding of the nature of male sexual health problems, and epidemiological data that confirm that these problems are widely prevalent and the source of considerable morbidity, both for individuals and within relationships.

  9. Direct Evidence that Myocardial Insulin Resistance following Myocardial Ischemia Contributes to Post-Ischemic Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Fu, Feng; Zhao, Kun; Li, Jia; Xu, Jie; Zhang, Yuan; Liu, Chengfeng; Yang, Weidong; Gao, Chao; Li, Jun; Zhang, Haifeng; Li, Yan; Cui, Qin; Wang, Haichang; Tao, Ling; Wang, Jing; Quon, Michael J; Gao, Feng

    2015-12-14

    A close link between heart failure (HF) and systemic insulin resistance has been well documented, whereas myocardial insulin resistance and its association with HF are inadequately investigated. This study aims to determine the role of myocardial insulin resistance in ischemic HF and its underlying mechanisms. Male Sprague-Dawley rats subjected to myocardial infarction (MI) developed progressive left ventricular dilation with dysfunction and HF at 4 wk post-MI. Of note, myocardial insulin sensitivity was decreased as early as 1 wk after MI, which was accompanied by increased production of myocardial TNF-α. Overexpression of TNF-α in heart mimicked impaired insulin signaling and cardiac dysfunction leading to HF observed after MI. Treatment of rats with a specific TNF-α inhibitor improved myocardial insulin signaling post-MI. Insulin treatment given immediately following MI suppressed myocardial TNF-α production and improved cardiac insulin sensitivity and opposed cardiac dysfunction/remodeling. Moreover, tamoxifen-induced cardiomyocyte-specific insulin receptor knockout mice exhibited aggravated post-ischemic ventricular remodeling and dysfunction compared with controls. In conclusion, MI induces myocardial insulin resistance (without systemic insulin resistance) mediated partly by ischemia-induced myocardial TNF-α overproduction and promotes the development of HF. Our findings underscore the direct and essential role of myocardial insulin signaling in protection against post-ischemic HF.

  10. Diabetes and Insulin

    MedlinePlus

    ... years, but may eventually need insulin to maintain glucose control. What are the different types of insulin? Different ... glulisine • Short-acting: regular human insulin Basal insulin. Controls blood glucose levels between meals and throughout the night. This ...

  11. Insulin and Insulin-Sensitizing Drugs in Neurodegeneration: Mitochondria as Therapeutic Targets

    PubMed Central

    Cardoso, Susana; Santos, Renato; Correia, Sonia; Carvalho, Cristina; Zhu, Xiongwei; Lee, Hyoung-Gon; Casadesus, Gemma; Smith, Mark A.; Perry, George; Moreira, Paula I.

    2009-01-01

    Insulin, besides its glucose lowering effects, is involved in the modulation of lifespan, aging and memory and learning processes. As the population ages, neurodegenerative disorders become epidemic and a connection between insulin signaling dysregulation, cognitive decline and dementia has been established. Mitochondria are intracellular organelles that despite playing a critical role in cellular metabolism are also one of the major sources of reactive oxygen species. Mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress and neuroinflammation, hallmarks of neurodegeneration, can result from impaired insulin signaling. Insulin-sensitizing drugs such as the thiazolidinediones are a new class of synthetic compounds that potentiate insulin action in the target tissues and act as specific agonists of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR-γ). Recently, several PPAR agonists have been proposed as novel and possible therapeutic agents for neurodegenerative disorders. Indeed, the literature shows that these agents are able to protect against mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative damage, inflammation and apoptosis. This review discusses the role of mitochondria and insulin signaling in normal brain function and in neurodegeneration. Furthermore, the potential protective role of insulin and insulin sensitizers in Alzheimer´s, Parkinson´s and Huntington´s diseases and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis will be also discussed.

  12. Insulin and Insulin-Sensitizing Drugs in Neurodegeneration: Mitochondria as Therapeutic Targets

    PubMed Central

    Cardoso, Susana; Santos, Renato; Correia, Sonia; Carvalho, Cristina; Zhu, Xiongwei; Lee, Hyoung-Gon; Casadesus, Gemma; Smith, Mark A.; Perry, George; Moreira, Paula I.

    2009-01-01

    Insulin, besides its glucose lowering effects, is involved in the modulation of lifespan, aging and memory and learning processes. As the population ages, neurodegenerative disorders become epidemic and a connection between insulin signaling dysregulation, cognitive decline and dementia has been established. Mitochondria are intracellular organelles that despite playing a critical role in cellular metabolism are also one of the major sources of reactive oxygen species. Mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress and neuroinflammation, hallmarks of neurodegeneration, can result from impaired insulin signaling. Insulin-sensitizing drugs such as the thiazolidinediones are a new class of synthetic compounds that potentiate insulin action in the target tissues and act as specific agonists of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR-γ). Recently, several PPAR agonists have been proposed as novel and possible therapeutic agents for neurodegenerative disorders. Indeed, the literature shows that these agents are able to protect against mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative damage, inflammation and apoptosis. This review discusses the role of mitochondria and insulin signaling in normal brain function and in neurodegeneration. Furthermore, the potential protective role of insulin and insulin sensitizers in Alzheimer´s, Parkinson´s and Huntington´s diseases and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis will be also discussed. PMID:27713238

  13. Influence of experimental hypokinesia on gastric secretory function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markova, O. O.; Vavryshchuk, V. I.; Rozvodovskyy, V. I.; Proshcheruk, V. A.

    1980-01-01

    The gastric secretory function of rats was studied in 4, 8, 16 and 30 day hypokinesia. Inhibition of both the gastric juice secretory and acid producing functions was found. The greatest inhibition was observed on day 8 of limited mobility. By days 16 and 30 of the experiment, a tendency of the gastric secretory activity to return to normal was observed, although it remained reduced.

  14. Executive Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Rabinovici, Gil D.; Stephens, Melanie L.; Possin, Katherine L.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of Review: Executive functions represent a constellation of cognitive abilities that drive goal-oriented behavior and are critical to the ability to adapt to an ever-changing world. This article provides a clinically oriented approach to classifying, localizing, diagnosing, and treating disorders of executive function, which are pervasive in clinical practice. Recent Findings: Executive functions can be split into four distinct components: working memory, inhibition, set shifting, and fluency. These components may be differentially affected in individual patients and act together to guide higher-order cognitive constructs such as planning and organization. Specific bedside and neuropsychological tests can be applied to evaluate components of executive function. While dysexecutive syndromes were first described in patients with frontal lesions, intact executive functioning relies on distributed neural networks that include not only the prefrontal cortex, but also the parietal cortex, basal ganglia, thalamus, and cerebellum. Executive dysfunction arises from injury to any of these regions, their white matter connections, or neurotransmitter systems. Dysexecutive symptoms therefore occur in most neurodegenerative diseases and in many other neurologic, psychiatric, and systemic illnesses. Management approaches are patient specific and should focus on treatment of the underlying cause in parallel with maximizing patient function and safety via occupational therapy and rehabilitation. Summary: Executive dysfunction is extremely common in patients with neurologic disorders. Diagnosis and treatment hinge on familiarity with the clinical components and neuroanatomic correlates of these complex, high-order cognitive processes. PMID:26039846

  15. Differences in insulin biosynthesis pathway between small and large islets do not correspond to insulin secretion

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Han-Hung; Stehno-Bittel, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    In a variety of mammalian species, small islets secrete more insulin per volume than large islets. This difference may be due to diffusional limitations of large islets, or inherent differences in the insulin production pathways. The purpose of this study was to identify possible differences in the early phase of glucose-stimulated insulin biosynthesis between large and small islets. Isolated small and large rat islets were challenged with 30 minutes of high glucose. The expression of insulin gene transcription factors (MafA, NeuroD/ Beta2, and PDX-1), preproinsulin mRNA, proinsulin and insulin were compared between large and small islets. Under basal (low glucose) conditions, MafA and NeuroD had higher mRNA levels and greater protein amounts in large islets compared to small when normalized to GAPDH levels. 30 minutes of high glucose stimulation failed to alter the mRNA or subsequent protein levels of either gene. However, 30 minutes of high glucose suppressed activated PDX-1 protein levels in both small and large islets. High glucose stimulation did not statistically alter the preproinsulin mRNA (insulin 1 and insulin 2) levels. At the translational level, high glucose increased the proinsulin levels, and large islets showed a higher proinsulin content per cell than small islets. Insulin content per cell was not significantly different between small and large islets under basal or high glucose levels. The results fail to explain the higher level of insulin secretion noted in small versus large islets and may suggest that possible differences lie downstream in the secretory pathway rather than insulin biosynthesis. PMID:26752360

  16. Molecular targets of a human HNF1 alpha mutation responsible for pancreatic beta-cell dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Wang, H; Antinozzi, P A; Hagenfeldt, K A; Maechler, P; Wollheim, C B

    2000-08-15

    The reverse tetracycline-dependent transactivator system was employed in insulinoma INS-1 cells to achieve controlled inducible expression of hepatocyte nuclear factor-1 alpha (HNF1 alpha)-P291fsinsC, the most common mutation associated with subtype 3 of maturity-onset diabetes of the young (MODY3). Nuclear localized HNF1 alpha-P291fsinsC protein exerts its dominant-negative effects by competing with endogenous HNF1 alpha for the cognate DNA-binding site. HNF1 alpha controls multiple genes implicated in pancreatic beta-cell function and notably in metabolism- secretion coupling. In addition to reduced expression of the genes encoding insulin, glucose transporter-2, L-pyruvate kinase, aldolase B and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase, induction of HNF1 alpha-P291fsinsC also significantly inhibits expression of mitochondrial 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase (OGDH) E1 subunit mRNA and protein. OGDH enzyme activity and [(14)C]pyruvate oxidation were also reduced. In contrast, the mRNA and protein levels of mitochondrial uncoupling protein-2 were dramatically increased by HNF1 alpha-P291fsinsC induction. As predicted from this altered gene expression profile, HNF1 alpha-P291fsinsC also inhibits insulin secretory responses to glucose and leucine, correlated with impaired nutrient-evoked mitochondrial ATP production and mitochondrial membrane hyperpolarization. These unprecedented results suggest the molecular mechanism of HNF1 alpha-P291fsinsC causing beta-cell dysfunction. PMID:10944108

  17. Isotonic water transport in secretory epithelia.

    PubMed

    Swanson, C H

    1977-01-01

    The model proposed by Diamond and Bossert [1] for isotonic water transport has received wide acceptance in recent years. It assumes that the local driving force for water transport is a standing osmotic gradient produced in the lateral intercellular spaces of the epithelial cell layer by active solute transport. While this model is based on work done in absorptive epithelia where the closed to open direction of the lateral space and the direction of net transport are the same, it has been proposed that the lateral spaces could also serve as the site of the local osmotic gradients for water transport in secretory epithelia, where the closed to open direction of the lateral space and net transport are opposed, by actively transporting solute out of the space rather than into it. Operation in the backward direction, however, requires a lower than ambient hydrostatic pressure within the lateral space which would seem more likely to cause the space to collapse with loss of function. On the other hand, most secretory epithelia are characterized by transport into a restricted ductal system which is similar to the lateral intercellular space in the absorptive epithelia in that its closed to open direction is the same as that of net transport. In vitro micropuncture studies on the exocrine pancreas of the rabbit indicate the presence of a small but statistically significant increase in juice osmolality, 6 mOsm/kg H(2)O, at the site of electrolyte and water secretion in the smallest extralobular ducts with secretin stimulation which suggests that the ductal system in the secretory epithelia rather than the lateral intercellular space is the site of the local osmotic gradients responsible for isotonic water transport. PMID:331693

  18. Psychological distress and salivary secretory immunity.

    PubMed

    Engeland, C G; Hugo, F N; Hilgert, J B; Nascimento, G G; Junges, R; Lim, H-J; Marucha, P T; Bosch, J A

    2016-02-01

    Stress-induced impairments of mucosal immunity may increase susceptibility to infectious diseases. The present study investigated the association of perceived stress, depressive symptoms, and loneliness with salivary levels of secretory immunoglobulin A (S-IgA), the subclasses S-IgA1, S-IgA2, and their transporter molecule Secretory Component (SC). S-IgA/SC, IgA1/SC and IgA2/SC ratios were calculated to assess the differential effects of stress on immunoglobulin transport versus availability. This study involved 113 university students, in part selected on high scores on the UCLA Loneliness Scale and/or the Beck Depression Inventory. Stress levels were assessed using the Perceived Stress Scale. Unstimulated saliva was collected and analysed for total S-IgA and its subclasses, as well as SC and total salivary protein. Multiple linear regression analyses, adjusted for gender, age, health behaviours, and concentration effects (total protein) revealed that higher perceived stress was associated with lower levels of IgA1 but not IgA2. Perceived stress, loneliness and depressive symptoms were all associated with lower IgA1/SC ratios. Surprisingly, higher SC levels were associated with loneliness and depressive symptoms, indicative of enhanced transport activity, which explained a lower IgA1/SC ratio (loneliness and depression) and IgA2/SC ratio (depression). This is the first study to investigate the effects of protracted psychological stress across S-IgA subclasses and its transporter SC. Psychological stress was negatively associated with secretory immunity, specifically IgA1. The lower immunoglobulin/transporter ratio that was associated with higher loneliness and depression suggested a relative immunoglobulin depletion, whereby availability was not keeping up with enhanced transport demand.

  19. DPP4-inhibitor improves neuronal insulin receptor function, brain mitochondrial function and cognitive function in rats with insulin resistance induced by high-fat diet consumption.

    PubMed

    Pipatpiboon, Noppamas; Pintana, Hiranya; Pratchayasakul, Wasana; Chattipakorn, Nipon; Chattipakorn, Siriporn C

    2013-03-01

    High-fat diet (HFD) consumption has been demonstrated to cause peripheral and neuronal insulin resistance, and brain mitochondrial dysfunction in rats. Although the dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor, vildagliptin, is known to improve peripheral insulin sensitivity, its effects on neuronal insulin resistance and brain mitochondrial dysfunction caused by a HFD are unknown. We tested the hypothesis that vildagliptin prevents neuronal insulin resistance, brain mitochondrial dysfunction, learning and memory deficit caused by HFD. Male rats were divided into two groups to receive either a HFD or normal diet (ND) for 12 weeks, after which rats in each group were fed with either vildagliptin (3 mg/kg/day) or vehicle for 21 days. The cognitive function was tested by the Morris Water Maze prior to brain removal for studying neuronal insulin receptor (IR) and brain mitochondrial function. In HFD rats, neuronal insulin resistance and brain mitochondrial dysfunction were demonstrated, with impaired learning and memory. Vildagliptin prevented neuronal insulin resistance by restoring insulin-induced long-term depression and neuronal IR phosphorylation, IRS-1 phosphorylation and Akt/PKB-ser phosphorylation. It also improved brain mitochondrial dysfunction and cognitive function. Vildagliptin effectively restored neuronal IR function, increased glucagon-like-peptide 1 levels and prevented brain mitochondrial dysfunction, thus attenuating the impaired cognitive function caused by HFD.

  20. Immunomodulatory action of mycobacterial secretory proteins.

    PubMed

    Trajkovic, Vladimir; Natarajan, Krishnamurthy; Sharma, Pawan

    2004-04-01

    The recently discovered RD1 locus encodes proteins that are actively secreted by pathogenic mycobacteria, including Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Since they are missing in non-tuberculous mycobacteria, these proteins are promising not only as candidates for vaccination and diagnostic tests, but also in understanding mycobacterial evasion of protective immunity in susceptible individuals. Here we analyze the possible role of M. tuberculosis secretory proteins in immunity against tuberculosis, with emphasis on their immunomodulatory action and the potential involvement in mycobacterial subversion of the host immune defense.

  1. "Secretory" Carcinoma of the Skin Mimicking Secretory Carcinoma of the Breast: Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Huang, Sixia; Liu, Yan; Su, Jing; Liu, Jianying; Guo, Xiaoning; Mei, Fang; Zheng, Jie; Liao, Songlin

    2016-09-01

    Secretory carcinoma is a unique kind of adenocarcinoma. It has distinct histological features and a special genetic change, that is, t (12; 15) (p13; q25) translocation which leads to the expression of the ETV6-NTRK3 fusion gene. Secretory carcinoma has been found to occur both in the breast and salivary gland. Here the authors present a case of 22-year-old woman with a unique cutaneous neoplasm located at the axilla. The tumor was characterized histologically with the formation of round to ovoid microcysts and papillary structure, which was similar to the secretory carcinoma of the breast and salivary gland. Furthermore, the gene sequence analysis of reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction products demonstrated the expression of the ETV6-NTRK3 fusion gene. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first case of secretory carcinoma from the skin which has the same genetic change as those from the breast and salivary gland. Local excision was performed on this patient. She had been followed up for nearly 1 year. No recurrence or metastasis was found yet. PMID:26981741

  2. Endothelial Dysfunction in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Dhananjayan, R; Koundinya, K S Srivani; Malati, T; Kutala, Vijay Kumar

    2016-10-01

    Endothelial dysfunction is an imbalance in the production of vasodilator factors and when this balance is disrupted, it predisposes the vasculature towards pro-thrombotic and pro-atherogenic effects. This results in vasoconstriction, leukocyte adherence, platelet activation, mitogenesis, pro-oxidation, impaired coagulation and nitric oxide production, vascular inflammation, atherosclerosis and thrombosis. Endothelial dysfunction is focussed as it is a potential contributor to the pathogenesis of vascular disease in diabetes mellitus. Under physiological conditions, there is a balanced release of endothelial-derived relaxing and contracting factors, but this delicate balance is altered in diabetes mellitus and atherosclerosis, thereby contributing to further progression of vascular and end-organ damage. This review focuses on endothelial dysfunction in atherosclerosis, insulin resistance, metabolic syndrome, oxidative stress associated with diabetes mellitus, markers and genetics that are implicated in endothelial dysfunction.

  3. Endothelial Dysfunction in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Dhananjayan, R; Koundinya, K S Srivani; Malati, T; Kutala, Vijay Kumar

    2016-10-01

    Endothelial dysfunction is an imbalance in the production of vasodilator factors and when this balance is disrupted, it predisposes the vasculature towards pro-thrombotic and pro-atherogenic effects. This results in vasoconstriction, leukocyte adherence, platelet activation, mitogenesis, pro-oxidation, impaired coagulation and nitric oxide production, vascular inflammation, atherosclerosis and thrombosis. Endothelial dysfunction is focussed as it is a potential contributor to the pathogenesis of vascular disease in diabetes mellitus. Under physiological conditions, there is a balanced release of endothelial-derived relaxing and contracting factors, but this delicate balance is altered in diabetes mellitus and atherosclerosis, thereby contributing to further progression of vascular and end-organ damage. This review focuses on endothelial dysfunction in atherosclerosis, insulin resistance, metabolic syndrome, oxidative stress associated with diabetes mellitus, markers and genetics that are implicated in endothelial dysfunction. PMID:27605734

  4. Cocoa, glucose tolerance, and insulin signaling: cardiometabolic protection.

    PubMed

    Grassi, Davide; Desideri, Giovambattista; Mai, Francesca; Martella, Letizia; De Feo, Martina; Soddu, Daniele; Fellini, Emanuela; Veneri, Mariangela; Stamerra, Cosimo A; Ferri, Claudio

    2015-11-18

    Experimental and clinical evidence reported that some polyphenol-rich natural products may offer opportunities for the prevention and treatment of type 2 diabetes, due to their biological properties. Natural products have been suggested to modulate carbohydrate metabolism by various mechanisms, such as restoring β-cell integrity and physiology and enhancing insulin-releasing activity and glucose uptake. Endothelium is fundamental in regulating arterial function, whereas insulin resistance plays a pivotal role in pathophysiological mechanisms of prediabetic and diabetic states. Glucose and insulin actions in the skeletal muscle are improved by insulin-dependent production of nitric oxide, favoring capillary recruitment, vasodilatation, and increased blood flow. Endothelial dysfunction, with decreased nitric oxide bioavailability, is a critical step in the development of atherosclerosis. Furthermore, insulin resistance has been described, at least in part, to negatively affect endothelial function. Consistent with this, conditions of insulin resistance are usually linked to endothelial dysfunction, and the exposure of the endothelial cells to cardiovascular risk factors such as hypertension, dyslipidemia, and hyperglycemia is associated with reduced nitric oxide bioavailability, resulting in impaired endothelial-dependent vasodilatation. Moreover, endothelial dysfunction has been described as an independent predictor of cardiovascular risk and events. Cocoa and cocoa flavonoids may positively affect the pathophysiological mechanisms involved in insulin resistance and endothelial dysfunction with possible benefits in the prevention of cardiometabolic diseases. PMID:26126077

  5. Cocoa, glucose tolerance, and insulin signaling: cardiometabolic protection.

    PubMed

    Grassi, Davide; Desideri, Giovambattista; Mai, Francesca; Martella, Letizia; De Feo, Martina; Soddu, Daniele; Fellini, Emanuela; Veneri, Mariangela; Stamerra, Cosimo A; Ferri, Claudio

    2015-11-18

    Experimental and clinical evidence reported that some polyphenol-rich natural products may offer opportunities for the prevention and treatment of type 2 diabetes, due to their biological properties. Natural products have been suggested to modulate carbohydrate metabolism by various mechanisms, such as restoring β-cell integrity and physiology and enhancing insulin-releasing activity and glucose uptake. Endothelium is fundamental in regulating arterial function, whereas insulin resistance plays a pivotal role in pathophysiological mechanisms of prediabetic and diabetic states. Glucose and insulin actions in the skeletal muscle are improved by insulin-dependent production of nitric oxide, favoring capillary recruitment, vasodilatation, and increased blood flow. Endothelial dysfunction, with decreased nitric oxide bioavailability, is a critical step in the development of atherosclerosis. Furthermore, insulin resistance has been described, at least in part, to negatively affect endothelial function. Consistent with this, conditions of insulin resistance are usually linked to endothelial dysfunction, and the exposure of the endothelial cells to cardiovascular risk factors such as hypertension, dyslipidemia, and hyperglycemia is associated with reduced nitric oxide bioavailability, resulting in impaired endothelial-dependent vasodilatation. Moreover, endothelial dysfunction has been described as an independent predictor of cardiovascular risk and events. Cocoa and cocoa flavonoids may positively affect the pathophysiological mechanisms involved in insulin resistance and endothelial dysfunction with possible benefits in the prevention of cardiometabolic diseases.

  6. Insulin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... to control blood sugar in people who have type 1 diabetes (condition in which the body does not make insulin and therefore cannot control the amount of sugar in the blood) or in people who have type 2 diabetes (condition in which the blood sugar ...

  7. Secretory pattern of canine growth hormone

    SciTech Connect

    French, M.B.; Vaitkus, P.; Cukerman, E.; Sirek, A.; Sirek, O.V.

    1987-02-01

    The aim of this paper was to define the secretory pattern of growth hormone (GH) under basal conditions in fasted, conscious, male dogs accustomed to handling. Blood samples were withdrawn from a cephalic vein at 15-min intervals. In this way, any ultradian rhythms, if present, could be detected within the frequency range of 0.042-2 cycles/h. In addition, samples were drawn at either 1- or 2.5-min intervals for 2.5 or 5 h to determine whether frequency components greater than 2 cycles/h were present. GH was measured by radioimmunoassay and the raw data were submitted to time series analysis employing power spectral estimation by means of fast Fourier transformation techniques. Peak plasma levels were up to 12 times higher than the baseline concentration of approx. 1 ng/ml. Spectral analysis revealed an endogenous frequency of 0.22 cycles/h, i.e., a periodicity of 4.5 h/cycle. The results indicate that under basal conditions the secretory bursts of canine GH are limited to one peak every 4.5 h.

  8. ATP: The crucial component of secretory vesicles.

    PubMed

    Estévez-Herrera, Judith; Domínguez, Natalia; Pardo, Marta R; González-Santana, Ayoze; Westhead, Edward W; Borges, Ricardo; Machado, José David

    2016-07-12

    The colligative properties of ATP and catecholamines demonstrated in vitro are thought to be responsible for the extraordinary accumulation of solutes inside chromaffin cell secretory vesicles, although this has yet to be demonstrated in living cells. Because functional cells cannot be deprived of ATP, we have knocked down the expression of the vesicular nucleotide carrier, the VNUT, to show that a reduction in vesicular ATP is accompanied by a drastic fall in the quantal release of catecholamines. This phenomenon is particularly evident in newly synthesized vesicles, which we show are the first to be released. Surprisingly, we find that inhibiting VNUT expression also reduces the frequency of exocytosis, whereas the overexpression of VNUT drastically increases the quantal size of exocytotic events. To our knowledge, our data provide the first demonstration that ATP, in addition to serving as an energy source and purinergic transmitter, is an essential element in the concentration of catecholamines in secretory vesicles. In this way, cells can use ATP to accumulate neurotransmitters and other secreted substances at high concentrations, supporting quantal transmission.

  9. Spiperone: evidence for uptake into secretory granules.

    PubMed Central

    Dannies, P S; Rudnick, M S; Fishkes, H; Rudnick, G

    1984-01-01

    Spiperone, a dopamine antagonist widely used as a specific ligand for dopamine and serotonin receptors, is actively accumulated into the F4C1 strain of rat pituitary tumor cells. The accumulation of 10 nM [3H]spiperone was linear for 3 min and reached a steady state after 10 min. Spiperone accumulation was reduced 50% by preincubation with 5 microM reserpine, an inhibitor of biogenic amine transport into secretory granules, and was also blocked by monensin and ammonium chloride, both of which increase the pH of intracellular storage organelles. Uptake was not affected by replacing sodium in the buffer with lithium at equimolar concentrations. Spiperone at 1 microM inhibited by over 50% serotonin transport into membrane vesicles isolated from platelet dense granules; this concentration inhibited the Na+-dependent plasma membrane transport system less than 10%. The data indicate spiperone specifically interacts with the secretory granule amine transport system and suggest that this transport system is found in the F4C1 pituitary cell strain as well as in platelets and neurons. The data also suggest that experiments utilizing spiperone to measure dopamine and serotonin receptors be interpreted with caution. PMID:6584920

  10. Copper trafficking to the secretory pathway.

    PubMed

    Lutsenko, Svetlana

    2016-09-01

    Copper (Cu) is indispensible for growth and development of human organisms. It is required for such fundamental and ubiquitous processes as respiration and protection against reactive oxygen species. Cu also enables catalytic activity of enzymes that critically contribute to the functional identity of many cells and tissues. Pigmentation, production of norepinephrine by the adrenal gland, the key steps in the formation of connective tissue, neuroendocrine signaling, wound healing - all these processes require Cu and depend on Cu entering the secretory pathway. To reach the Cu-dependent enzymes in a lumen of the trans-Golgi network and various vesicular compartments, Cu undertakes a complex journey crossing the extracellular and intracellular membranes and staying firmly on course while traveling in a cytosol. The proteins that assist Cu in this journey by mediating its entry, distribution, and export, have been identified. The accumulating data also indicate that the current model of cellular Cu homeostasis is still a "skeleton" that has to be fleshed out with many new details. This review summarizes recent data on the mechanisms responsible for Cu transfer to the secretory pathway. The emerging new concepts and gaps in our knowledge are discussed. PMID:27603756

  11. Characterization of proinsulin- and proglucagon-converting activities in isolated islet secretory granules.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, D J; Quigley, J P; Bauer, G E; Noe, B D

    1981-08-01

    The conversion of proglucagon and proinsulin by secretory granules isolated from both prelabeled and unlabeled anglerfish islets was investigated. Either granules isolated from tissue labeled with [3H]tryptophan and [14C]isoleucine or [35S]cysteine, or lysed granules from unlabeled tissue to which exogenously labeled prohormones had been added were incubated under various conditions. Acetic acid extracts of these granule preparations were analyzed for prohormone and hormone content by gel filtration. Both prelabeled and lysed, unlabeled secretory granules converted radiolabeled precursor peptides (Mr 8,000-15,000) to labeled insulin and glucagon. The accuracy of the cleavage process was established by demonstrating comigration of products obtained from in vitro cleavage with insulin and glucagon extracted from intact islets using electrophoresis and high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC). The pH optimum for granule-mediated conversion was found to be in the range of pH 4.5-5.5. Conversion of both proglucagon and proinsulin by secretory granules was significantly inhibited in the presence of antipain, leupeptin, p-chloromercuribenzoate (PCMB) or dithiodipyridine (DDP) but not chloroquine, diisopropyl fluorophosphate, EDTA, p-nitrophenyl guanidinobenzoate, soybean trypsin inhibitor, or N-p-tosyl-L-lysine chloromethyl ketone HCl. The inhibitory action of PCMB and DDP was reversed in the presence of dithiothreitol. Both membranous and soluble components of the secretory granules possessed significant converting activity. HPLC and electrophoretic analysis of cleavage products demonstrated that the converting activities of the membranous and soluble components were indistinguishable. The amount of inhibition of proinsulin and proglucagon conversion caused by 600 micrograms/ml porcine proinsulin was significantly lower than that caused by the same concentration of unlabeled anglerfish precursor peptides. These results indicate that the proinsulin and proglucagon

  12. Maladaptive immune and inflammatory pathways lead to cardiovascular insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Aroor, Annayya R; McKarns, Susan; Demarco, Vincent G; Jia, Guanghong; Sowers, James R

    2013-11-01

    Insulin resistance is a hallmark of obesity, the cardiorenal metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). The progression of insulin resistance increases the risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD). The significance of insulin resistance is underscored by the alarming rise in the prevalence of obesity and its associated comorbidities in the Unites States and worldwide over the last 40-50 years. The incidence of obesity is also on the rise in adolescents. Furthermore, premenopausal women have lower CVD risk compared to men, but this protection is lost in the setting of obesity and insulin resistance. Although systemic and cardiovascular insulin resistance is associated with impaired insulin metabolic signaling and cardiovascular dysfunction, the mechanisms underlying insulin resistance and cardiovascular dysfunction remain poorly understood. Recent studies show that insulin resistance in obesity and diabetes is linked to a metabolic inflammatory response, a state of systemic and tissue specific chronic low grade inflammation. Evidence is also emerging that there is polarization of macrophages and lymphocytes towards a pro-inflammatory phenotype that contributes to progression of insulin resistance in obesity, cardiorenal metabolic syndrome and diabetes. In this review, we provide new insights into factors, such as, the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, sympathetic activation and incretin modulators (e.g., DPP-4) and immune responses that mediate this inflammatory state in obesity and other conditions characterized by insulin resistance.

  13. Maladaptive immune and inflammatory pathways lead to cardiovascular insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Aroor, Annayya R; McKarns, Susan; Demarco, Vincent G; Jia, Guanghong; Sowers, James R

    2013-11-01

    Insulin resistance is a hallmark of obesity, the cardiorenal metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). The progression of insulin resistance increases the risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD). The significance of insulin resistance is underscored by the alarming rise in the prevalence of obesity and its associated comorbidities in the Unites States and worldwide over the last 40-50 years. The incidence of obesity is also on the rise in adolescents. Furthermore, premenopausal women have lower CVD risk compared to men, but this protection is lost in the setting of obesity and insulin resistance. Although systemic and cardiovascular insulin resistance is associated with impaired insulin metabolic signaling and cardiovascular dysfunction, the mechanisms underlying insulin resistance and cardiovascular dysfunction remain poorly understood. Recent studies show that insulin resistance in obesity and diabetes is linked to a metabolic inflammatory response, a state of systemic and tissue specific chronic low grade inflammation. Evidence is also emerging that there is polarization of macrophages and lymphocytes towards a pro-inflammatory phenotype that contributes to progression of insulin resistance in obesity, cardiorenal metabolic syndrome and diabetes. In this review, we provide new insights into factors, such as, the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, sympathetic activation and incretin modulators (e.g., DPP-4) and immune responses that mediate this inflammatory state in obesity and other conditions characterized by insulin resistance. PMID:23932846

  14. Fatty acid-induced mitochondrial uncoupling in adipocytes as a key protective factor against insulin resistance and beta cell dysfunction: a new concept in the pathogenesis of obesity-associated type 2 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Romijn, J. A.; Heine, R. J.

    2007-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes is associated with excessive food intake and a sedentary lifestyle. Local inflammation of white adipose tissue induces cytokine-mediated insulin resistance of adipocytes. This results in enhanced lipolysis within these cells. The fatty acids that are released into the cytosol can be removed by mitochondrial β-oxidation. The flux through this pathway is normally limited by the rate of ADP supply, which in turn is determined by the metabolic activity of the adipocyte. It is expected that the latter does not adapt to an increased rate of lipolysis. We propose that elevated fatty acid concentrations in the cytosol of adipocytes induce mitochondrial uncoupling and thereby allow mitochondria to remove much larger amounts of fatty acids. By this, release of fatty acids out of adipocytes into the circulation is prevented. When the rate of fatty acid release into the cytosol exceeds the β-oxidation capacity, cytosolic fatty acid concentrations increase and induce mitochondrial toxicity. This results in a decrease in β-oxidation capacity and the entry of fatty acids into the circulation. Unless these released fatty acids are removed by mitochondrial oxidation in active muscles, these fatty acids result in ectopic triacylglycerol deposits, induction of insulin resistance, beta cell damage and diabetes. Thiazolidinediones improve mitochondrial function within adipocytes and may in this way alleviate the burden imposed by the excessive fat accumulation associated with the metabolic syndrome. Thus, the number and activity of mitochondria within adipocytes contribute to the threshold at which fatty acids are released into the circulation, leading to insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. PMID:17712547

  15. Anti-insulin antibody test

    MedlinePlus

    Insulin antibodies - serum; Insulin Ab test; Insulin resistance - insulin antibodies; Diabetes - insulin antibodies ... Normally, there are no antibodies against insulin in your blood. ... different laboratories. Some labs use different measurements or ...

  16. 21 CFR 866.5380 - Free secretory component immuno-logical test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... immunochemical techniques free secretory component (normally a portion of the secretory IgA antibody molecule) in body fluids. Measurement of free secretory component (protein molecules) aids in the diagnosis...

  17. 21 CFR 866.5380 - Free secretory component immuno-logical test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... immunochemical techniques free secretory component (normally a portion of the secretory IgA antibody molecule) in body fluids. Measurement of free secretory component (protein molecules) aids in the diagnosis...

  18. Associations of age with serum insulin, proinsulin and the proinsulin-to-insulin ratio: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Insulin responses and insulin levels seem to decline with age. However, the question of beta cell impairment attributable to ageing has been sparsely addressed in population-based studies. Non-fasting insulin levels are determined by the ambient degree of insulin resistance together with the capacity of beta cells to compensate by insulin secretion to prevent hyperglycaemia. A raised proinsulin-to-insulin ratio (proinsulin/insulin) due to impaired processing of proinsulin is an early marker of beta cell dysfunction. We hypothesised that in a general population, signs of beta cell failure with advancing age manifest not only by decreases in random insulin, but also with a corresponding increase in its precursor proinsulin. Methods In the Tromsø Study 1994-95 we measured insulin and proinsulin concentrations in random blood samples from 6212 persons without self-reported diabetes mellitus and plotted the levels as percentiles according to age. In regression analyses we assessed the relationships between age and insulin, proinsulin, and proinsulin/insulin, while adjusting for the concomitant measurements of glucose and other metabolic variables, and the time since the last meal. Results Median insulin concentrations declined significantly with advancing age group in men, but not in women. Proinsulin levels and proinsulin/insulin increased across age groups in both genders. After adjustment, greater age was associated with lower log10(insulin) and higher log10(proinsulin) and log10(proinsulin/insulin) (p = 0.0001 for all). Conclusions Negative associations of age with random insulin levels, together with positive associations of age with proinsulin and proinsulin/insulin, point towards a loss of beta cell function inherent in the ageing process. PMID:21162746

  19. Progressive enhancement in the secretory functions of the digestive system of the rat in the course of cold acclimation.

    PubMed

    Harada, E; Kanno, T

    1976-09-01

    1. The secretory function of the exocrine pancreas and the stomach have been studied in the course of cold acclimation of rats that had been fed at an ambient temperature of 1 degree C in a climatic room. 2. The secretory responses of pancreatic enzymes evoked by continuous infusion of pancreozymin (PZ, 2-5 mu./kg. hr) and a rapid single injection of PZ (1.7 mu./kg) reached a maximum in the group of rats fed at 1 degree C for 4 weeks, and fell to the control levels after 8 weeks. The increase in the flow of pancreatic juice evoked by single injection of PZ was maximal at 4 weeks and slightly decreased after 8 weeks. 3. The insulin (3-0 i.u./kg) evoked secretion of pancreatic enzymes gradually increased after cold exposure, reached a maximum at 4 weeks and fell to the control levels after 8 weeks. The flow of pancreatic juice after insulin injection was almost the same in every group throughout the course of cold exposure. 4. The ratio of amylase to the total amount of the protein in the pancreatic juice decreased abruptly, in contrast to an increase in the ratio of protease in the process of cold acclimation. The change in the ratio of enzyme activity in the pancreatic juice may reflect parallel changes in enzyme activity in the exocrine pancreas. 5. The gastric secretion in response to insulin and bile secretion in the group fed at 1 degree C for 7 weeks was significantly higher than that in the control group. 6. It was thus concluded that the secretory activities of digestive system were enhanced by prolonged cold exposure and then returned to control level, and that the activites of the pancreatic enzymes were altered in the process of cold acclimation in rats.

  20. Molecular mechanisms involved in secretory vesicle recruitment to the plasma membrane in beta-cells.

    PubMed

    Varadi, Aniko; Ainscow, E K; Allan, V J; Rutter, G A

    2002-04-01

    Glucose stimulates the release of insulin in part by activating the recruitment of secretory vesicles to the cell surface. While this movement is known to be microtubule-dependent, the molecular motors involved are undefined. Active kinesin was found to be essential for vesicle translocation in live beta-cells, since microinjection of cDNA encoding dominant-negative KHC(mut) (motor domain of kinesin heavy chain containing a Thr(93)-->Asn point mutation) blocked vesicular movements. Moreover, expression of KHC(mut) strongly inhibited the sustained, but not acute, stimulation of secretion by glucose. Thus, vesicles released during the first phase of insulin secretion exist largely within a translocation-independent pool. Kinesin-driven anterograde movement of vesicles is then necessary for the sustained (second phase) of insulin release. Kinesin may, therefore, represent a novel target for increases in intracellular ATP concentrations in response to elevated extracellular glucose and may be involved in the ATP-sensitive K+channel-independent stimulation of secretion by the sugar.

  1. Altered synthesis of some secretory proteins in pancreatic lobules isolated from streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats

    SciTech Connect

    Duan, R.D.; Erlanson-Albertsson, C. )

    1990-03-01

    The in vitro incorporation of (35S)cysteine into lipase, colipase, amylase, procarboxypeptidase A and B, and the serine proteases and total proteins was studied in pancreatic lobules isolated from normal and diabetic rats with or without insulin treatment. The incorporation of (35S)cysteine into total proteins was 65% greater in pancreatic lobules from diabetic animals than from normal rats. The increased incorporation was partly reversed by insulin treatment (2 U/100 g/day for 5 days) of diabetic rats. The relative rates of biosynthesis for amylase and the procarboxypeptidases in diabetic pancreatic lobules were decreased by 75 and 25%, respectively, after 1 h of incubation, while those for lipase, colipase, and the serine proteases were increased by 90, 85, and 35%, respectively. The absolute rates of synthesis for these enzymes changed in the same direction as the relative rates in diabetic lobules, except that for the procarboxypeptidases, which did not change. The changed rates of biosynthesis for the pancreatic enzymes were reversed by insulin treatment of the diabetic rats. Kinetic studies showed that the incorporation of (35S)cysteine into amylase, lipase, and colipase was linear until up to 2 h of incubation in normal pancreatic lobules, while in the diabetic lobules the incorporation into lipase and colipase was accelerated, reaching a plateau level already after 1 h of incubation. It is concluded that the biosynthesis of pancreatic secretory proteins in diabetic rats is greatly changed both in terms of quantity and kinetics.

  2. Insulin pumps.

    PubMed

    Pickup, J

    2010-02-01

    Insulin pump therapy is now more than 30 years old, and is an established part of the routine care of selected people with type 1 diabetes. Nevertheless, there are still significant areas of concern, particularly how pumps compare with modern injection therapy, whether the increasingly sophisticated pump technologies like onboard calculators and facility for computer download offer any real benefit, and whether we have a consensus on the clinical indications. The following papers offer some insight into these and other current questions.

  3. Ovarian serous carcinogenesis from tubal secretory cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenjing; Wei, Linxuan; Li, Lingmin; Yang, Binlie; Kong, Beihua; Yao, Guang; Zheng, Wenxin

    2015-11-01

    Due to a poor understanding of tumorigenesis, ovarian cancers remain the most lethal gynecologic malignancy and cause horrific deaths. In the last decade, a new dualistic model for ovarian cancer was proposed, wherein ovarian serous cancers are classified as either high-grade or low-grade, with each having different tumorigenic processes, and pathologic and clinical features. Surprisingly, both high- and low-grade ovarian serous cancers were recently found to originate not in the ovaries, but rather from the secretory cells of the fallopian tube, mostly from the tubal fimbriated ends. In this article, we review the evidentiary basis for the aforementioned paradigm shift in the cell origin of ovarian serous cancers, as well as its potential clinical implications. PMID:26174492

  4. Some features of secretory systems in plants.

    PubMed

    Juniper, B E; Gilchrist, A J; Robins, R J

    1977-09-01

    Recent work on secretion in plants is reviewed, with emphasis on the anatomy and physiology of root cap cells in higher plants, the stalked glands of Drosera capensis, and the secretory mechanism of Dionaea muscipula. Cells of the root cap of higher plants switch from a geo-perceptive role to one of mucilage secretion at maturation. Features of this process, the role of the Golgi and the pathway for mucilage distribution are reviewed. In contrast, the stalked glands of the leaves of Drosera capensis are much longer lived and have a complex anatomy. The mechanisms for mucilage secretion, protein absorption and the role of the cell membranes in the internal secretion of the protein are described, using data from X-ray microscopv. The secretion of fluid and protein by Dionaea is stimulated by various nitrogen-containing compounds. Uric acid, often excreted by captured insects, is particularly effective in this respect.

  5. Secretory component: a glandular epithelial cell marker.

    PubMed Central

    Harris, J. P.; South, M. A.

    1981-01-01

    Secretory component (SC) has been demonstrated to be produced by both normal and malignantly transformed glandular epithelial cells. By an indirect immunofluorescent technique, this study surveys tumors of varied cellular origin in order to determine the reliability of SC as a marker for tumor cells derived from glandular epithelium. Both primary and metastatic tumors of glandular epithelial origin demonstrated SC fluorescence, while nonglandular epithelial tumors did not. This observation was extended to live single-cell preparations, which demonstrated intense cell-surface fluorescence only when glandular epithelial tumors cells were examined. Additionally, fixed, cytocentrifuged, single-cell preparations of glandular epithelial tumors demonstrated cytoplasmic SC fluorescence. When breast carcinoma was examined, all cases demonstrated SC, regardless of the degree of differentiation. This assay appears to have useful clinical application in that the finding of SC provides indication of the glandular epithelial origin of a malignantly transformed cell. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:6271014

  6. Secretory vesicle swelling by atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Cho, Sang-Joon; Jena, Bhanu P

    2006-01-01

    The swelling of secretory vesicles has been implicated in exocytosis, but the underlying mechanism of vesicle swelling remained unknown. Earlier studies from our laboratory demonstrated the association of the alpha-subunit of heterotrimeric GTP-binding protein G(alphai3) with zymogen granule membrane and implicated its involvement in vesicle swelling. Mas7, an active mastoparan analog known to stimulate Gi proteins, was found to stimulate the GTPase activity of isolated zymogen granules and cause swelling. Increase in vesicle size in the presence of GTP, NaF, and Mas7 were irreversible and found to be KCl sensitive. However, Ca2+ had no effect on zymogen granule size. Taken together, these results indicated that zymogen granules, the membrane-bound secretory vesicles in exocrine pancreas, swell in response to GTP mediated by a G(alphai3) protein. Subsequently, our studies demonstrated that the water channel aquaporin-1 (AQP1) is also present at the zymogen granule membrane and participates in rapid GTP-induced and G(alphai3)-mediated vesicular water gating and swelling. Isolated zymogen granules exhibit low basal water permeability. However, exposure of granules to GTP results in a marked potentiation of water entry. Treatment of zymogen granules with the known water channel inhibitor Hg2+ is accompanied by a reversible loss in both the basal and GTP-stimulable water entry and vesicle swelling. Introduction of AQP1-specific antibody raised against the carboxy-terminal domain of AQP1 blocked GTP-stimulable swelling of vesicles. Our results demonstrate that AQPI associated at the zymogen granule membrane is involved in basal GTP-induced and G(alphai3)-mediated rapid gating of water into zymogen granules of the exocrine pancreas.

  7. Absence of Shb impairs insulin secretion by elevated FAK activity in pancreatic islets.

    PubMed

    Alenkvist, Ida; Dyachok, Oleg; Tian, Geng; Li, Jia; Mehrabanfar, Saba; Jin, Yang; Birnir, Bryndis; Tengholm, Anders; Welsh, Michael

    2014-12-01

    The Src homology-2 domain containing protein B (SHB) has previously been shown to function as a pleiotropic adapter protein, conveying signals from receptor tyrosine kinases to intracellular signaling intermediates. The overexpression of Shb in β-cells promotes β-cell proliferation by increased insulin receptor substrate (IRS) and focal adhesion kinase (FAK) activity, whereas Shb deficiency causes moderate glucose intolerance and impaired first-peak insulin secretion. Using an array of techniques, including live-cell imaging, patch-clamping, immunoblotting, and semi-quantitative PCR, we presently investigated the causes of the abnormal insulin secretory characteristics in Shb-knockout mice. Shb-knockout islets displayed an abnormal signaling signature with increased activities of FAK, IRS, and AKT. β-catenin protein expression was elevated and it showed increased nuclear localization. However, there were no major alterations in the gene expression of various proteins involved in the β-cell secretory machinery. Nor was Shb deficiency associated with changes in glucose-induced ATP generation or cytoplasmic Ca(2+) handling. In contrast, the glucose-induced rise in cAMP, known to be important for the insulin secretory response, was delayed in the Shb-knockout compared with WT control. Inhibition of FAK increased the submembrane cAMP concentration, implicating FAK activity in the regulation of insulin exocytosis. In conclusion, Shb deficiency causes a chronic increase in β-cell FAK activity that perturbs the normal insulin secretory characteristics of β-cells, suggesting multi-faceted effects of FAK on insulin secretion depending on the mechanism of FAK activation.

  8. Scanning electron microscopy of the endometrium during the secretory phase.

    PubMed Central

    Motta, P M; Andrews, P M

    1976-01-01

    Scanning electron microscopy was used to study the surface morphology of the rabbit endometrium during the secretory phase of the oestrous cycle. The free surfaces of ciliated and of inactive active secretory cells are described. Changes in secretory cell surface morphology resulting from accumulation and secretion of material involve the apparent retraction of microvilli and the formation of one or more bulbous protrusions of the cell's apical surface. These protrusions may be relatively smooth surfaced or exhibit long slender micro-extensions. The protrusions grow in size and are eventually pinched off. Loss of the bulbous protrusions often leaves behind crater-like invaginations of the cell's surface. Secretory cells adjacent to the endometrial glands are the first to exhibit signs of mucin accumulation and secretion. The single cilium of a secretory cell is not apparently affected by the secretory process. Signs of ciliated and secretory cell degeneration, and possible sloughing, are also described. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 PMID:1033932

  9. Estrogens prevent metabolic dysfunctions induced by circadian disruptions in female mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Circadian disruption has become a significant factor contributing to the epidemics of obesity and insulin resistance. However, interventions to treat metabolic dysfunctions induced by circadian disruptions are limited. The ovarian hormone, estrogen, produces important antiobesity and antidiabetic ef...

  10. Proteomic analysis of the palmitate-induced myotube secretome reveals involvement of the annexin A1-formyl peptide receptor 2 (FPR2) pathway in insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Jong Hyuk; Kim, Dayea; Jang, Jin-Hyeok; Ghim, Jaewang; Park, Soyeon; Song, Parkyong; Kwon, Yonghoon; Kim, Jaeyoon; Hwang, Daehee; Bae, Yoe-Sik; Suh, Pann-Ghill; Berggren, Per-Olof; Ryu, Sung Ho

    2015-04-01

    Elevated levels of the free fatty acid palmitate are found in the plasma of obese patients and induce insulin resistance. Skeletal muscle secretes myokines as extracellular signaling mediators in response to pathophysiological conditions. Here, we identified and characterized the skeletal muscle secretome in response to palmitate-induced insulin resistance. Using a quantitative proteomic approach, we identified 36 secretory proteins modulated by palmitate-induced insulin resistance. Bioinformatics analysis revealed that palmitate-induced insulin resistance induced cellular stress and modulated secretory events. We found that the decrease in the level of annexin A1, a secretory protein, depended on palmitate, and that annexin A1 and its receptor, formyl peptide receptor 2 agonist, played a protective role in the palmitate-induced insulin resistance of L6 myotubes through PKC-θ modulation. In mice fed with a high-fat diet, treatment with the formyl peptide receptor 2 agonist improved systemic insulin sensitivity. Thus, we identified myokine candidates modulated by palmitate-induced insulin resistance and found that the annexin A1- formyl peptide receptor 2 pathway mediated the insulin resistance of skeletal muscle, as well as systemic insulin sensitivity. PMID:25616869

  11. Giving an insulin injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... want. Put the needle into and through the rubber top of the insulin bottle. Push the plunger ... longer-acting insulin. Put the needle into the rubber top of that insulin bottle. Push the plunger ...

  12. Proinsulin C-peptide interferes with insulin fibril formation

    SciTech Connect

    Landreh, Michael; Stukenborg, Jan-Bernd; Willander, Hanna; Soeder, Olle; Johansson, Jan; Joernvall, Hans

    2012-02-17

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Insulin and C-peptide can interact under insulin fibril forming conditions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer C-peptide is incorporated into insulin aggregates and alters aggregation lag time. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer C-peptide changes insulin fibril morphology and affects backbone accessibility. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer C-peptide may be a regulator of fibril formation by {beta}-cell granule proteins. -- Abstract: Insulin aggregation can prevent rapid insulin uptake and cause localized amyloidosis in the treatment of type-1 diabetes. In this study, we investigated the effect of C-peptide, the 31-residue peptide cleaved from proinsulin, on insulin fibrillation at optimal conditions for fibrillation. This is at low pH and high concentration, when the fibrils formed are regular and extended. We report that C-peptide then modulates the insulin aggregation lag time and profoundly changes the fibril appearance, to rounded clumps of short fibrils, which, however, still are Thioflavine T-positive. Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry also indicates that C-peptide interacts with aggregating insulin and is incorporated into the aggregates. Hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry further reveals reduced backbone accessibility in insulin aggregates formed in the presence of C-peptide. Combined, these effects are similar to those of C-peptide on islet amyloid polypeptide fibrillation and suggest that C-peptide has a general ability to interact with amyloidogenic proteins from pancreatic {beta}-cell granules. Considering the concentrations, these peptide interactions should be relevant also during physiological secretion, and even so at special sites post-secretory or under insulin treatment conditions in vivo.

  13. Mitochondrial involvement in skeletal muscle insulin resistance: A case of imbalanced bioenergetics.

    PubMed

    Affourtit, Charles

    2016-10-01

    Skeletal muscle insulin resistance in obesity associates with mitochondrial dysfunction, but the causality of this association is controversial. This review evaluates mitochondrial models of nutrient-induced muscle insulin resistance. It transpires that all models predict that insulin resistance arises as a result of imbalanced cellular bioenergetics. The nature and precise origin of the proposed insulin-numbing molecules differ between models but all species only accumulate when metabolic fuel supply outweighs energy demand. This observation suggests that mitochondrial deficiency in muscle insulin resistance is not merely owing to intrinsic functional defects, but could instead be an adaptation to nutrient-induced changes in energy expenditure. Such adaptive effects are likely because muscle ATP supply is fully driven by energy demand. This market-economic control of myocellular bioenergetics offers a mechanism by which insulin-signalling deficiency can cause apparent mitochondrial dysfunction, as insulin resistance lowers skeletal muscle anabolism and thus dampens ATP demand and, consequently, oxidative ATP synthesis. PMID:27473535

  14. [Inhaled insulin, new perspective for insulin therapy].

    PubMed

    Radermecker, R P; Sélam, J L

    2005-01-01

    Since the discovery of insulin and its use in diabetes care, patients, physicians and nurses dream of another way of insulin administration than the subcutaneous injections actually used. Different types of insulin administration have been evaluated and, particularly, that using the pulmonary route. The use of this alternative method to deliver insulin may result in improved patient compliance, facilitate intensified therapies and avoid the delay of initiating insulin administration because patient's reluctance. The different insulin pulmonary delivering devices actually studied will be presented. Preliminary data comparing this way of administration and the subcutaneous injection of human regular insulin are good, but sufficient data comparing inhaled insulin with the new short-acting insulin analogues are not yet available. Among various difficulties of the pulmonary insulin delivery, the finding of an effective promoter, capable of increasing the bioavailability of insulin, is a crucial issue. The cost of such insulin administration might also be a problem. Finally, careful studies concerning the safety of this kind of administration, particularly potential long-term pulmonary toxicity, are mandatory. Nevertheless, inhaled insulin is an attractive topic in which most important pharmaceutical companies are currently involved.

  15. Atorvastatin ameliorates endothelium-specific insulin resistance induced by high glucose combined with high insulin.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ou; Li, Jinliang; Chen, Haiyan; Li, Jie; Kong, Jian

    2016-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to establish an endothelial cell model of endothelium-specific insulin resistance to evaluate the effect of atorvastatin on insulin resistance-associated endothelial dysfunction and to identify the potential pathway responsible for its action. Cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were pretreated with different concentrations of glucose with, or without, 10‑5 M insulin for 24 h, following which the cells were treated with atorvastatin. The tyrosine phosphorylation of insulin receptor (IR) and insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS‑1), the production of nitric oxide (NO), the activity and phosphorylation level of endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) on serine1177, and the mRNA levels of endothelin‑1 (ET‑1) were assessed during the experimental procedure. Treatment of the HUVECs with 30 mM glucose and 10‑5 M insulin for 24 h impaired insulin signaling, with reductions in the tyrosine phosphorylation of IR and protein expression of IRS‑1 by almost 75 and 65%, respectively. This, in turn, decreased the activity and phosphorylation of eNOS on serine1177, and reduced the production of NO by almost 80%. By contrast, the mRNA levels of ET‑1 were upregulated. All these changes were ameliorated by atorvastatin. Taken together, these results demonstrated that high concentrations of glucose and insulin impaired insulin signaling leading to endothelial dysfunction, and that atorvastatin ameliorated these changes, acting primarily through the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt/eNOS signaling pathway. PMID:27484094

  16. Vasorelaxation responses to insulin in laminar vessel rings from healthy, lean horses.

    PubMed

    Wooldridge, A A; Waguespack, R W; Schwartz, D D; Venugopal, C S; Eades, S C; Beadle, R E

    2014-10-01

    Hyperinsulinemia causes laminitis experimentally and is a risk factor for naturally occurring laminitis. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of insulin on laminar vascular relaxation and to induce insulin-associated vascular dysfunction in vitro. Relaxation responses of isolated laminar arterial and venous rings to acetylcholine and insulin were evaluated. To alter vascular function in response to insulin, all vessel rings were incubated with insulin or vehicle, submaximally contracted, administered insulin again and relaxation responses recorded. Laminar arteries were also incubated with the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) inhibitor, PD-98059. Relaxation in response to acetylcholine was not different between arteries and veins, but veins relaxed less in response to insulin than arteries. In arteries incubated with insulin, the subsequent relaxation response to insulin was blunted. Veins had minimal relaxation to insulin regardless of incubation. Arteries incubated with PD-98059 relaxed more in response to insulin than arteries not exposed to PD-98059, indicating that MAPK plays a role in maintenance of basal tone in laminar arteries. A differing response of laminar veins and arteries to insulin-induced relaxation may be important in understanding the link between hyperinsulinemia and laminitis. In vitro induction of vascular dysfunction in response to insulin in laminar arteries may be useful for testing therapeutic interventions and for understanding the pathophysiology of laminitis. PMID:25155219

  17. Concentrated insulins: the new basal insulins

    PubMed Central

    Lamos, Elizabeth M; Younk, Lisa M; Davis, Stephen N

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Insulin therapy plays a critical role in the treatment of type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus. However, there is still a need to find basal insulins with 24-hour coverage and reduced risk of hypoglycemia. Additionally, with increasing obesity and insulin resistance, the ability to provide clinically necessary high doses of insulin at low volume is also needed. Areas covered This review highlights the published reports of the pharmacokinetic (PK) and glucodynamic properties of concentrated insulins: Humulin-R U500, insulin degludec U200, and insulin glargine U300, describes the clinical efficacy, risk of hypoglycemic, and metabolic changes observed, and finally, discusses observations about the complexity of introducing a new generation of concentrated insulins to the therapeutic market. Conclusion Humulin-R U500 has a similar onset but longer duration of action compared with U100 regular insulin. Insulin glargine U300 has differential PK/pharmacodynamic effects when compared with insulin glargine U100. In noninferiority studies, glycemic control with degludec U200 and glargine U300 is similar to insulin glargine U100 and nocturnal hypoglycemia is reduced. Concentrated formulations appear to behave as separate molecular entities when compared with earlier U100 insulin analog compounds. In the review of available published data, newer concentrated basal insulins may offer an advantage in terms of reduced intraindividual variability as well as reducing the injection burden in individuals requiring high-dose and large volume insulin therapy. Understanding the PK and pharmacodynamic properties of this new generation of insulins is critical to safe dosing, dispensing, and administration. PMID:27022271

  18. [Aspartame--the sweet-tasting dipeptide--does not affect the pancreatic insulin-secreting function].

    PubMed

    Sadovnikova, N V; Fedotov, V P; Aleshina, L V; Shvachkin, Iu P; Girin, S K

    1984-01-01

    The action of a synthetic dipeptide aspartam (150 to 180 times as sweet as glucose) on pancreatic insulin-secretory function of rats was studied in vivo and in vitro. The drug was given orally while drinking (300 mg/kg body weight) or was added to the incubation medium of cultivated pancreatic cells (20 mM). It was shown that insulin content in the rat blood serum remained unchanged 10 and 35 minutes after aspartam administration. The drug did not exert any stimulating effect upon insulin secretion following the addition to the pancreatic cell culture medium. It is concluded that aspartam exhibits no direct or mediated action on pancreatic insulin-secretory function.

  19. A Novel Mutation of DAX-1 Associated with Secretory Azoospermia

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Lihua; Liu, Yuchen; Diao, Ruiying; Cai, Zhiming; Li, Honggang; Gui, Yaoting

    2015-01-01

    Secretory azoospermia is a severe form of male infertility caused by unknown factors. DAX-1 is predominantly expressed in mammalian reproductive tissues and plays an important role in spermatogenesis because Dax-1 knockout male mice show spermatogenesis defects. To examine whether DAX-1 is involved in the pathogenesis of secretory azoospermia in humans, we sequenced all of the exons of DAX-1 in 776 patients diagnosed with secretory azoospermia and 709 proven fertile men. A number of coding mutations unique to the patient group, including two synonymous mutations and six missense mutations, were identified. Of the missense mutations, our functional assay demonstrated that the V385L mutation caused the reduced functioning of DAX-1. This novel mutation (p. V385L) of DAX-1 is the first to be identified in association with secretory azoospermia, thereby highlighting the important role of DAX-1 in spermatogenesis. PMID:26207377

  20. A Novel Mutation of DAX-1 Associated with Secretory Azoospermia.

    PubMed

    Mou, Lisha; Xie, Nie; Yang, Lihua; Liu, Yuchen; Diao, Ruiying; Cai, Zhiming; Li, Honggang; Gui, Yaoting

    2015-01-01

    Secretory azoospermia is a severe form of male infertility caused by unknown factors. DAX-1 is predominantly expressed in mammalian reproductive tissues and plays an important role in spermatogenesis because Dax-1 knockout male mice show spermatogenesis defects. To examine whether DAX-1 is involved in the pathogenesis of secretory azoospermia in humans, we sequenced all of the exons of DAX-1 in 776 patients diagnosed with secretory azoospermia and 709 proven fertile men. A number of coding mutations unique to the patient group, including two synonymous mutations and six missense mutations, were identified. Of the missense mutations, our functional assay demonstrated that the V385L mutation caused the reduced functioning of DAX-1. This novel mutation (p. V385L) of DAX-1 is the first to be identified in association with secretory azoospermia, thereby highlighting the important role of DAX-1 in spermatogenesis. PMID:26207377

  1. Potential of yeast secretory vesicles in biodelivery systems.

    PubMed

    Kutralam-Muniasamy, Gurusamy; Flores-Cotera, Luis B; Perez-Guevara, Fermin

    2015-06-01

    Membranous vesicular organelles (MVOs), such as secretory vesicles and exosomes, perform a variety of biological functions ranging from secretion to cellular communication in eukaryotic cells. Exosomes, particularly those of mammalian cells, have been widely studied as potential carriers in human therapeutic applications. However, no study has yet demonstrated the use of yeast secretory vesicles for such applications. Therefore, we explore here the current state of knowledge on yeast secretory vesicles and their potential use in therapeutic delivery systems. We focus on the characteristics shared by exosomes and yeast secretory vesicles to provide insights into the use of the latter as delivery vehicles. From this perspective, we speculate on the potential application of post-Golgi vesicles (PGVs) in the biomedical field. PMID:25843637

  2. Secretory protein trafficking in Giardia intestinalis.

    PubMed

    Hehl, Adrian B; Marti, Matthias

    2004-07-01

    Early diverged extant organisms, which may serve as convenient laboratory models to look for and study evolutionary ancient features of eukaryotic cell biology, are rare. The diplomonad Giardia intestinalis, a protozoan parasite known to cause diarrhoeal disease, has become an increasingly popular object of basic research in cell biology, not least because of a genome sequencing project nearing completion. Commensurate with its phylogenetic status, the Giardia trophozoite has a very basic secretory system and even lacks hallmark structures such as a morphologically identifiable Golgi apparatus. The cell's capacity for protein sorting is nevertheless unimpeded, exemplified by its ability to cope with massive amounts of newly synthesized cyst wall proteins and glycans, which are sorted to dedicated Golgi-like compartments termed encystation-specific vesicles (ESVs) generated from endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-derived transport intermediates. This soluble bulk cargo is kept strictly separate from constitutively transported variant surface proteins during export, a function that is dependent on the stage-specific recognition of trafficking signals. Encysting Giardia therefore provide a unique system for the study of unconventional, Golgi-independent protein trafficking mechanisms in the broader context of eukaryotic endomembrane organization and evolution. PMID:15225300

  3. Mammary analogue secretory carcinoma mimicking salivary adenoma.

    PubMed

    Williams, Lindsay; Chiosea, Simion I

    2013-12-01

    Mammary analogue secretory carcinoma (MASC) is a recently described salivary gland tumor characterized by ETV6 translocation. It appears that prior studies have identified MASC by reviewing salivary gland carcinomas, such as acinic cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma, not otherwise specified. To address the possibility of MASC mimicking benign salivary neoplasms we reviewed 12 salivary gland (cyst)adenomas diagnosed prior to the discovery of MASC. One encapsulated (cyst)adenoma of the parotid gland demonstrated features of MASC. The diagnosis was confirmed by fluorescence in situ hybridization with an ETV6 break-apart probe. An unusual complex pattern of ETV6 rearrangement with duplication of the telomeric/distal ETV6 probe was identified. This case illustrates that MASC may mimic salivary (cyst)adenomas. To more accurately assess true clinical and morphologic spectrum of MASC, future studies may have to include review of salivary (cyst)adenomas. The differential diagnosis of MASC may have to be expanded to include cases resembling salivary (cyst)adenomas.

  4. Methods to Purify and Assay Secretory Pathway Kinases.

    PubMed

    Tagliabracci, Vincent S; Wen, Jianzhong; Xiao, Junyu

    2016-01-01

    Members of the four-jointed and VLK families of secretory pathway kinases appear to be responsible for the phosphorylation of secreted proteins and proteoglycans. These enzymes have been implicated in many biological processes and mutations in several of these kinases cause human diseases. Here, we describe methods to purify and assay two members of the four-jointed family of secretory kinases: the Fam20C protein kinase and the Fam20B proteoglycan kinase. PMID:27632012

  5. Mutational analysis of VAMP domains implicated in Ca2+-induced insulin exocytosis.

    PubMed Central

    Regazzi, R; Sadoul, K; Meda, P; Kelly, R B; Halban, P A; Wollheim, C B

    1996-01-01

    Vesicle-associated membrane protein-2 (VAMP-2) and cellubrevin are associated with the membrane of insulin-containing secretory granules and of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-containing synaptic-like vesicles of pancreatic beta-cells. We found that a point mutation in VAMP-2 preventing targeting to synaptic vesicles also impairs the localization on insulin-containing secretory granules, suggesting a similar requirement for vesicular targeting. Tetanus toxin (TeTx) treatment of permeabilized HIT-T15 cells leads to the proteolytic cleavage of VAMP-2 and cellubrevin and causes the inhibition of Ca2+-triggered insulin exocytosis. Transient transfection of HIT-T15 cells with VAMP-1, VAMP-2 or cellubrevin made resistant to the proteolytic action of TeTx by amino acid replacements in the cleavage site restored Ca2+-stimulated secretion. Wild-type VAMP-2, wild-type cellubrevin or a mutant of VAMP-2 resistant to TeTx but not targeted to secretory granules were unable to rescue Ca2+-evoked insulin release. The transmembrane domain and the N-terminal region of VAMP-2 were not essential for the recovery of stimulated exocytosis, but deletions preventing the binding to SNAP-25 and/or to syntaxin I rendered the protein inactive in the reconstitution assay. Mutations of putative phosphorylation sites or of negatively charged amino acids in the SNARE motif recognized by clostridial toxins had no effect on the ability of VAMP-2 to mediate Ca2+-triggered secretion. We conclude that: (i) both VAMP-2 and cellubrevin can participate in the exocytosis of insulin; (ii) the interaction of VAMP-2 with syntaxin and SNAP-25 is required for docking and/or fusion of secretory granules with the plasma membrane; and (iii) the phosphorylation of VAMP-2 is not essential for Ca2+-stimulated insulin exocytosis. Images PMID:9003771

  6. Secretory pathway of cellulase: a mini-review

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Cellulase plays an important role in modern industry and holds great potential in biofuel production. Many different types of organisms produce cellulase, which go through secretory pathways to reach the extracellular space, where enzymatic reactions take place. Secretory pathways in various cells have been the focus of many research fields; however, there are few studies on secretory pathways of cellulases in the literature. It is therefore necessary and important to review the current knowledge on the secretory pathways of cellulases. In this mini-review, we address the subcellular locations of cellulases in different organisms, discuss the secretory pathways of cellulases in different organisms, and examine the secretory mechanisms of cellulases. These sections start with a description of general secreted proteins, advance to the situation of cellulases, and end with the knowledge of cellulases, as documented in UniProt Knowledgebase (UniProtKB). Finally, gaps in existing knowledge are highlighted, which may shed light on future studies for biofuel engineering. PMID:24295495

  7. Childhood obesity and cardiovascular dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Cote, Anita T; Harris, Kevin C; Panagiotopoulos, Constadina; Sandor, George G S; Devlin, Angela M

    2013-10-01

    Obesity-related cardiovascular disease in children is becoming more prevalent in conjunction with the rise in childhood obesity. Children with obesity are predisposed to an increased risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in adulthood. Importantly, research in children with obesity over the last decade has demonstrated that children may exhibit early signs of cardiovascular dysfunction as a result of their excess adiposity, often independent of other obesity-related comorbidities such as dyslipidemia and insulin resistance. The clinical evidence is accumulating to suggest that the cardiovascular damage, once observed only in adults, is also occurring in obese children. The objective of this review is to provide a synopsis of the current research on cardiovascular abnormalities in children with obesity and highlight the importance and need for early detection and prevention programs to mitigate this potentially serious health problem.

  8. Failure of Homeostatic Model Assessment of Insulin Resistance to Detect Marked Diet-Induced Insulin Resistance in Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Ader, Marilyn; Stefanovski, Darko; Richey, Joyce M.; Kim, Stella P.; Kolka, Cathryn M.; Ionut, Viorica; Kabir, Morvarid; Bergman, Richard N.

    2014-01-01

    Accurate quantification of insulin resistance is essential for determining efficacy of treatments to reduce diabetes risk. Gold-standard methods to assess resistance are available (e.g., hyperinsulinemic clamp or minimal model), but surrogate indices based solely on fasting values have attractive simplicity. One such surrogate, the homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), is widely applied despite known inaccuracies in characterizing resistance across groups. Of greater significance is whether HOMA-IR can detect changes in insulin sensitivity induced by an intervention. We tested the ability of HOMA-IR to detect high-fat diet–induced insulin resistance in 36 healthy canines using clamp and minimal model analysis of the intravenous glucose tolerance test (IVGTT) to document progression of resistance. The influence of pancreatic function on HOMA-IR accuracy was assessed using the acute insulin response during the IVGTT (AIRG). Diet-induced resistance was confirmed by both clamp and minimal model (P < 0.0001), and measures were correlated with each other (P = 0.001). In striking contrast, HOMA-IR ([fasting insulin (μU/mL) × fasting glucose (mmol)]/22.5) did not detect reduced sensitivity induced by fat feeding (P = 0.22). In fact, 13 of 36 animals showed an artifactual decrease in HOMA-IR (i.e., increased sensitivity). The ability of HOMA-IR to detect diet-induced resistance was particularly limited under conditions when insulin secretory function (AIRG) is less than robust. In conclusion, HOMA-IR is of limited utility for detecting diet-induced deterioration of insulin sensitivity quantified by glucose clamp or minimal model. Caution should be exercised when using HOMA-IR to detect insulin resistance when pancreatic function is compromised. It is necessary to use other accurate indices to detect longitudinal changes in insulin resistance with any confidence. PMID:24353184

  9. Nitric Oxide Directly Promotes Vascular Endothelial Insulin Transport

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hong; Wang, Aileen X.; Aylor, Kevin; Barrett, Eugene J.

    2013-01-01

    Insulin resistance strongly associates with decreased nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability and endothelial dysfunction. In the vasculature, NO mediates multiple processes that affect insulin delivery, including dilating both resistance and terminal arterioles in skeletal muscle in vivo. However, whether NO directly regulates vascular endothelial cell (EC) insulin uptake and its transendothelial transport (TET) is unknown. We report in this article that l-NG-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME) pretreatment blocked, whereas l-arginine and sodium nitroprusside (SNP) each enhanced, EC uptake of fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-labeled insulin. SNP also partly or fully reversed the inhibition of EC insulin uptake caused by l-NAME, wortmannin, the Src inhibitor PP1, and tumor necrosis factor-α. In addition, SNP promoted [125I]TyrA14insulin TET by ∼40%. Treatment with insulin with and without SNP did not affect EC cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) levels, and the cGMP analog 8-bromo-cGMP did not affect FITC-insulin uptake. In contrast, treatment with insulin and SNP significantly increased EC protein S-nitrosylation, the colocalization of S-nitrosothiol (S-NO) and protein-tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B), and Akt phosphorylation at Ser473 and inhibited PTP1B activity. Moreover, a high-fat diet significantly inhibited EC insulin-stimulated Akt phosphorylation and FITC-insulin uptake that was partially reversed by SNP in rats. Finally, inhibition of S-nitrosylation by knockdown of thioredoxin-interacting protein completely eliminated SNP-enhanced FITC-insulin uptake. We conclude that NO directly promotes EC insulin transport by enhancing protein S-nitrosylation. NO also inhibits PTP1B activity, thereby enhancing insulin signaling. PMID:23863813

  10. Sexual Dysfunction and Infertility

    MedlinePlus

    ... American Society for Reproductive Medicine Sexual dysfunction and infertility What is sexual dysfunction and how common is ... and 40% of women. For couples dealing with infertility, it is even more common. Often, people ignore ...

  11. Insulin resistance: pathophysiology and rationale for treatment.

    PubMed

    Muntoni, Sergio; Muntoni, Sandro

    2011-01-01

    After binding to its receptor and activating the β-subunit, insulin is faced with two divergent pathways: one is phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI 3-K) dependent, while another is dependent upon activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAP-K). The former is absolutely necessary for mediating most metabolic and antiapoptotic effects; the latter is linked to nonmetabolic, proliferative and mitogenic effects. In obese patients, especially with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2), only the PI 3-K, but not the MAP-K, is resistant to insulin stimulation: hence insulin resistance is better defined as metabolic insulin resistance. The resulting 'compensatory hyperinsulinemia' is an unsuccessful attempt to overcome the inhibition of the metabolic pathway at the price of unopposed stimulation of the MAP-K pathway, and the administration of exogenous insulin might worsen the metabolic dysfunction. As the preferential activation of the MAP-K pathway in insulin-resistant patients has atherogenic and mitogenic properties, this leads to atherosclerosis and cancer. Metformin may carry out direct protective action on human β cells, inasmuch as it improves both primary and secondary endpoints through selective inhibition of fatty acyl oxidation. PMID:21304221

  12. [Smoking, insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes].

    PubMed

    Magis, D; Geronooz, I; Scheen, A J

    2002-09-01

    Smoking is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease. It is associated with endothelial dysfunction and lipid disorders similar to those found in the insulin resistance syndrome. Studies have thus tried to demonstrate a relationship between smoking and insulin resistance, and between smoking and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Even if their results may sometimes differ, smoking does seem to be associated with an impaired insulin sensitivity that is proportional to tobacco consumption. Nicotine replacement therapies seem also to generate a certain, though lower, degree of insulin resistance. If there is no major weight gain after smoking cessation, the latter is accompanied by a progressive return to normal insulin sensitivity. Several large epidemiological studies recently demonstrated that smoking could increase the risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus, with a relative risk between 1.5 and 3.0. Finally, among type 2 diabetic patients, smoking has a harmful effect on metabolic control and long-term complications of the disease, at least partially by increasing the components of the insulin resistance syndrome. All these observations represent further argument to promote smoking cessation in the general population, and more particularly in individuals at risk to develop type 2 diabetes, as well as in the diabetic population. PMID:12440345

  13. Interventions for the metabolic dysfunction in polycystic ovary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bozdag, Gurkan; Yildiz, Bulent O

    2013-08-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is associated with metabolic disturbances including obesity, insulin resistance, diabetes and dyslipidemia. Cardiometabolic risk should be assessed at regular intervals starting from diagnosis. A comprehensive clinical evaluation includes determination of body mass index, waist circumference, blood pressure and measurement of serum lipid and glucose levels in all women with PCOS. A standard 2-h 75g oral glucose tolerance test is required for women with a body mass index over 25kg/m(2) and with other risk factors for glucose intolerance. No long-term data are available for the risk or benefit of any medical intervention for metabolic dysfunction of PCOS. For the initial management of metabolic dysfunction in PCOS, available guidelines recommend lifestyle intervention which improves androgen excess and insulin resistance without significant effect on glucose intolerance or dyslipidemia. Pharmacological interventions include insulin sensitizing agents and statins. Metformin is the most commonly prescribed insulin sensitizer in PCOS. Available randomized controlled trials suggest that metformin improves insulin resistance without any effect on body mass index, fasting glucose or lipid levels. Short term use of statins alone or in combination with metformin decreases total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol and triglycerides in PCOS patients with dyslipidemia. Low dose oral contraception in PCOS appears not to be associated with clinically significant metabolic dysfunction.

  14. Insulin resistance uncoupled from dyslipidemia due to C-terminal PIK3R1 mutations

    PubMed Central

    Huang-Doran, Isabel; Tomlinson, Patsy; Payne, Felicity; Gast, Alexandra; Sleigh, Alison; Bottomley, William; Harris, Julie; Daly, Allan; Rocha, Nuno; Rudge, Simon; Clark, Jonathan; Kwok, Albert; Romeo, Stefano; McCann, Emma; Müksch, Barbara; Dattani, Mehul; Zucchini, Stefano; Wakelam, Michael; Foukas, Lazaros C.; Savage, David B.; Murphy, Rinki; O’Rahilly, Stephen; Semple, Robert K.

    2016-01-01

    Obesity-related insulin resistance is associated with fatty liver, dyslipidemia, and low plasma adiponectin. Insulin resistance due to insulin receptor (INSR) dysfunction is associated with none of these, but when due to dysfunction of the downstream kinase AKT2 phenocopies obesity-related insulin resistance. We report 5 patients with SHORT syndrome and C-terminal mutations in PIK3R1, encoding the p85α/p55α/p50α subunits of PI3K, which act between INSR and AKT in insulin signaling. Four of 5 patients had extreme insulin resistance without dyslipidemia or hepatic steatosis. In 3 of these 4, plasma adiponectin was preserved, as in insulin receptor dysfunction. The fourth patient and her healthy mother had low plasma adiponectin associated with a potentially novel mutation, p.Asp231Ala, in adiponectin itself. Cells studied from one patient with the p.Tyr657X PIK3R1 mutation expressed abundant truncated PIK3R1 products and showed severely reduced insulin-stimulated association of mutant but not WT p85α with IRS1, but normal downstream signaling. In 3T3-L1 preadipocytes, mutant p85α overexpression attenuated insulin-induced AKT phosphorylation and adipocyte differentiation. Thus, PIK3R1 C-terminal mutations impair insulin signaling only in some cellular contexts and produce a subphenotype of insulin resistance resembling INSR dysfunction but unlike AKT2 dysfunction, implicating PI3K in the pathogenesis of key components of the metabolic syndrome. PMID:27766312

  15. Insulin signaling controls neurotransmission via the 4eBP-dependent modification of the exocytotic machinery.

    PubMed

    Mahoney, Rebekah Elizabeth; Azpurua, Jorge; Eaton, Benjamin A

    2016-01-01

    Altered insulin signaling has been linked to widespread nervous system dysfunction including cognitive dysfunction, neuropathy and susceptibility to neurodegenerative disease. However, knowledge of the cellular mechanisms underlying the effects of insulin on neuronal function is incomplete. Here, we show that cell autonomous insulin signaling within the Drosophila CM9 motor neuron regulates the release of neurotransmitter via alteration of the synaptic vesicle fusion machinery. This effect of insulin utilizes the FOXO-dependent regulation of the thor gene, which encodes the Drosophila homologue of the eif-4e binding protein (4eBP). A critical target of this regulatory mechanism is Complexin, a synaptic protein known to regulate synaptic vesicle exocytosis. We find that the amounts of Complexin protein observed at the synapse is regulated by insulin and genetic manipulations of Complexin levels support the model that increased synaptic Complexin reduces neurotransmission in response to insulin signaling. PMID:27525480

  16. Effect of insulin on the inflammatory and acute phase response after burn injury.

    PubMed

    Jeschke, Marc G; Boehning, Darren F; Finnerty, Celeste C; Herndon, David N

    2007-09-01

    After a severe burn, the liver plays a pivotal role by modulating inflammatory processes, metabolic pathways, immune functions, and the acute phase response. Therefore, liver integrity and function are important for recovery. A thermal injury, however, causes hepatic damage by inducing hepatic edema, fatty infiltration, hepatocyte apoptosis, and metabolic derangements associated with insulin resistance and impaired insulin signaling. In preliminary studies, we found that these pathophysiological processes are related to hepatic inflammation, altered intracellular signaling, and mitochondrial dysfunction. We hypothesize that modulation of these processes with insulin could improve hepatic structure and function and, therefore, outcome of burned and critically ill patients. Insulin administration improves survival and decreases the rate of infections in severely burned and critically ill patients. Here, we show that insulin administration decreases the synthesis of proinflammatory cytokines and signal transcription factors and improves hepatic structure and function after a severe burn injury; insulin also restores hepatic homeostasis and improves hepatic dysfunction postburn via alterations in the signaling cascade.

  17. Bicarbonate transport in sheep parotid secretory cells.

    PubMed Central

    Steward, M C; Poronnik, P; Cook, D I

    1996-01-01

    1. Intracellular pH (pH1) was measured by microfluorimetry in secretory endpieces isolated from sheep parotid glands and loaded with the pH-sensitive fluoroprobe 2', 7'-bis(2-carboxyethyl)-5(6)-carboxyfluorescein (BCECF). 2. Stimulation with 1 microM acetylcholine (ACh) caused a large, transient decrease in pH1 of 0.37 +/- 0.02 pH units followed by a slower recovery. The transient, which was reduced by 60% in the absence of HCO3-, could be attributed mainly to HCO3- efflux. During sustained stimulation, pH1 increased to a value that exceeded the resting value by 0.083 +/- 0.023 pH units after 20 min. 3. The anion channel blocker NPPB (0.1 mM) reduced the transient acidification in response to ACh by 48% and raised pH1 during sustained stimulation. Simultaneous application of NPPB and ACh accelerated the re-alkalinization following the initial acidification, indicating that NPPB inhibits HCO3- efflux. 4. The stilbene derivative H2DIDS (0.5 mM) reduced the transient acidification in response to ACh by 76% but caused a marked decrease in pH1 during sustained stimulation. Simultaneous application of H2DIDS and ACh slowed the re-alkalinization following the initial acidification, indicating that the main effect of H2DIDS was to inhibit HCO3- accumulation. 5. In the absence of HCO3-, the recovery from an acid load was unaffected by ACh stimulation. Acid extrusion, although dependent on Na+, was not inhibited by amiloride (1 mM), clonidine (1 mM) or H2DIDS (0.5 mM) and was therefore provisionally attributed to a Na(+)-H+ exchanger isoform other than NHE1 or NHE2. 6. In the presence of HCO3-, the rate of recovery from an acid load was reduced during ACh stimulation, probably as a result of the increased efflux of HCO3-. Acid extrusion was dependent on Na+ and was significantly inhibited by H2DIDS. 7. We conclude that ACh-evoked HCO3- secretion in the sheep parotid gland differs from that in many other salivary glands by being driven predominantly by basolateral Na(+)-HCO3

  18. Stress modulates intestinal secretory immunoglobulin A

    PubMed Central

    Campos-Rodríguez, Rafael; Godínez-Victoria, Marycarmen; Abarca-Rojano, Edgar; Pacheco-Yépez, Judith; Reyna-Garfias, Humberto; Barbosa-Cabrera, Reyna Elizabeth; Drago-Serrano, Maria Elisa

    2013-01-01

    Stress is a response of the central nervous system to environmental stimuli perceived as a threat to homeostasis. The stress response triggers the generation of neurotransmitters and hormones from the hypothalamus pituitary adrenal axis, sympathetic axis and brain gut axis, and in this way modulates the intestinal immune system. The effects of psychological stress on intestinal immunity have been investigated mostly with the restraint/immobilization rodent model, resulting in an up or down modulation of SIgA levels depending on the intensity and time of exposure to stress. SIgA is a protein complex formed by dimeric (dIgA) or polymeric IgA (pIgA) and the secretory component (SC), a peptide derived from the polymeric immunoglobulin receptor (pIgR). The latter receptor is a transmembrane protein expressed on the basolateral side of gut epithelial cells, where it uptakes dIgA or pIgA released by plasma cells in the lamina propria. As a result, the IgA-pIgR complex is formed and transported by vesicles to the apical side of epithelial cells. pIgR is then cleaved to release SIgA into the luminal secretions of gut. Down modulation of SIgA associated with stress can have negative repercussions on intestinal function and integrity. This can take the form of increased adhesion of pathogenic agents to the intestinal epithelium and/or an altered balance of inflammation leading to greater intestinal permeability. Most studies on the molecular and biochemical mechanisms involved in the stress response have focused on systemic immunity. The present review analyzes the impact of stress (mostly by restraint/immobilization, but also with mention of other models) on the generation of SIgA, pIgR and other humoral and cellular components involved in the intestinal immune response. Insights into these mechanisms could lead to better therapies for protecting against pathogenic agents and avoiding epithelial tissue damage by modulating intestinal inflammation. PMID:24348350

  19. Opiate-prostaglandin interactions in the regulation of insulin secretion from rat islets of Langerhans in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Green, I.C.; Tadayyon, M.

    1988-01-01

    The inadequate insulin secretory response to glucose stimulation in non-insulin dependent diabetes has been attributed to many factors including high PGE/sub 2/ levels blunting the secretory response, and to the existence of inhibitory opiate activity in vivo. The purpose of the present work was to see if there was a connection between these two independent theories. Radioimmunoassayable PGE/sub 2/ in islets of Langerhans was found to be proportional to islet number and protein content and was typically 4 to 5pg/..mu..g islet protein. Indomethacin sodium salicylate and chlorpropamide all lowered islet PGE/sub 2/ levels and stimulated insulin release in vitro. Dynorphin stimulated insulin release at a concentration of 6 x 10/sup -9/M, while lowering islet PGE/sub 2/. Conversely, at a higher concentration, dynorphin had no stimulatory effect on insulin secretion and did not lower PGE/sub 2/ levels in islets or in the incubation media. The stimulatory effects of dynorphin and sodium salicylate on insulin secretion were blocked by exogenous PGE/sub 2/. PGE/sub 2/ at a lower concentration did not exert any inhibitory effect on dynorphin- or sodium salicylate-induced insulin release. This concentration of exogenous PGE/sub 2/ stimulated insulin release in the presence of 6mM glucose.

  20. Insulin resistance in penile arteries from a rat model of metabolic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Contreras, Cristina; Sánchez, Ana; Martínez, Pilar; Raposo, Rafaela; Climent, Belén; García-Sacristán, Albino; Benedito, Sara; Prieto, Dolores

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Metabolic and cardiovascular abnormalities accompanying metabolic syndrome, such as obesity, insulin resistance and hypertension, are all associated with endothelial dysfunction and are independent risk factors for erectile dysfunction. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the vascular effects of insulin in penile arteries and whether these effects are impaired in a rat model of insulin resistance and metabolic syndrome. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Penile arteries from obese Zucker rats (OZR) and their counterpart, lean Zucker rats (LZR), were mounted on microvascular myographs and the effects of insulin were assessed in the absence and presence of endothelium and of specific inhibitors of nitric oxide (NO) synthesis, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). Insulin-induced changes in intracellular Ca2+ concentration [Ca2+]i were also examined. KEY RESULTS OZR exhibited mild hyperglycaemia, hypercholesterolemia, hypertryglyceridemia and hyperinsulinemia. Insulin induced endothelium- and NO-dependent relaxations in LZR that were impaired in OZR. Inhibition of PI3K reduced relaxation induced by insulin and by the β-adrenoceptor agonist isoprenaline, mainly in arteries from LZR. Antagonism of endothelin 1 (ET-1) receptors did not alter insulin-induced relaxation in either LZR or OZR, but MAPK blockade increased the responses in OZR. Insulin decreased [Ca2+]i, a response impaired in OZR. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Insulin-induced relaxation was impaired in penile arteries of OZR due to altered NO release through the PI3K pathway and unmasking of a MAPK-mediated vasoconstriction. This vascular insulin resistance is likely to contribute to the endothelial dysfunction and erectile dysfunction associated with insulin resistant states. PMID:20735420

  1. VAMP-2 and cellubrevin are expressed in pancreatic beta-cells and are essential for Ca(2+)-but not for GTP gamma S-induced insulin secretion.

    PubMed Central

    Regazzi, R; Wollheim, C B; Lang, J; Theler, J M; Rossetto, O; Montecucco, C; Sadoul, K; Weller, U; Palmer, M; Thorens, B

    1995-01-01

    VAMP proteins are important components of the machinery controlling docking and/or fusion of secretory vesicles with their target membrane. We investigated the expression of VAMP proteins in pancreatic beta-cells and their implication in the exocytosis of insulin. cDNA cloning revealed that VAMP-2 and cellubrevin, but not VAMP-1, are expressed in rat pancreatic islets and that their sequence is identical to that isolated from rat brain. Pancreatic beta-cells contain secretory granules that store and secrete insulin as well as synaptic-like microvesicles carrying gamma-aminobutyric acid. After subcellular fractionation on continuous sucrose gradients, VAMP-2 and cellubrevin were found to be associated with both types of secretory vesicle. The association of VAMP-2 with insulin-containing granules was confirmed by confocal microscopy of primary cultures of rat pancreatic beta-cells. Pretreatment of streptolysin-O permeabilized insulin-secreting cells with tetanus and botulinum B neurotoxins selectively cleaved VAMP-2 and cellubrevin and abolished Ca(2+)-induced insulin release (IC50 approximately 15 nM). By contrast, the pretreatment with tetanus and botulinum B neurotoxins did not prevent GTP gamma S-stimulated insulin secretion. Taken together, our results show that pancreatic beta-cells express VAMP-2 and cellubrevin and that one or both of these proteins selectively control Ca(2+)-mediated insulin secretion. Images PMID:7796801

  2. Adventures with Insulin in the Islets of Langerhans

    PubMed Central

    Steiner, Donald F.

    2011-01-01

    Insulin is a small but beautifully organized protein with a unique two-chain structure, the first protein to be sequenced. The mechanism of its biosynthesis invited much initial speculation but was finally clarified by the discovery of proinsulin, its single-chain precursor. The rich present-day field of protein precursor processing via post-translational proteolysis within the secretory pathway arose in the early 1970s as an offshoot of studies on insulin biosynthesis, which provided a novel paradigm for the generation of many other small neuroendocrine peptides. Before long, this mechanism was also found to play a role in the production of a much wider spectrum of proteins traversing the secretory pathway (receptors, growth factors, blood-clotting components, and even many viral envelope proteins) occurring in almost all eukaryotic cells. Indeed, yeast provided a key clue in the search for the proprotein convertases, the endoproteases that work along with carboxypeptidases and other modifying enzymes, such as the amidating enzyme complex (PAM), in converting inactive or less active precursor proteins into their fully active peptide products. In this “Reflections” article, I have tried to recount the people and events in my life that led to my involvement first in basic biochemical research and then on to insulin, proinsulin, and many relevant related areas that continue to fascinate and challenge my colleagues and me, as well as many other biomedical scientists today, as diabetes mellitus increasingly threatens human health throughout our contemporary world. PMID:21454641

  3. Cytoplasmic calcium stimulates exocytosis in a plant secretory cell

    PubMed Central

    Tester, Mark; Zorec, Robert

    1992-01-01

    Although exocytosis is likely to occur in plant cells, the control of this process is the subject of speculation, as no direct measurements of vesicle fusion to the plasma membrane have been made. We used the patch clamp technique to monitor the secretory activity of single aleurone protoplasts by measuring membrane capacitance (Cm), while dialyzing the cytosol with different Ca2+ containing solutions. Secretory activity increased with [Ca2+]i ∼ 1 μM. This demonstrates directly the existence of exocytosis in plant cells, and suggests that both plant and animal cells share common mechanisms (cytosolic Ca2+) for the control of exocytotic secretion. PMID:19431846

  4. Insulin Human Inhalation

    MedlinePlus

    ... insulin and therefore cannot control the amount of sugar in the blood). It is also used in ... normally and, therefore, cannot control the amount of sugar in the blood) who need insulin to control ...

  5. Insulin Lispro Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... insulin and therefore cannot control the amount of sugar in the blood). It is also used to ... normally and therefore cannot control the amount of sugar in the blood) who need insulin to control ...

  6. Insulin pump (image)

    MedlinePlus

    The catheter at the end of the insulin pump is inserted through a needle into the abdominal ... with diabetes. Dosage instructions are entered into the pump's small computer and the appropriate amount of insulin ...

  7. High-mix insulins

    PubMed Central

    Kalra, Sanjay; Farooqi, Mohammad Hamed; El-Houni, Ali E.

    2015-01-01

    Premix insulins are commonly used insulin preparations, which are available in varying ratios of different molecules. These drugs contain one short- or rapid-acting, and one intermediate- or long-acting insulin. High-mix insulins are mixtures of insulins that contain 50% or more than 50% of short-acting insulin. This review describes the clinical pharmacology of high-mix insulins, including data from randomized controlled trials. It suggests various ways, in which high-mix insulin can be used, including once daily, twice daily, thrice daily, hetero-mix, and reverse regimes. The authors provide a rational framework to help diabetes care professionals, identify indications for pragmatic high-mix use. PMID:26425485

  8. Sexual dysfunction in epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Morrell, M J

    1991-01-01

    Sexual dysfunction may arise more frequently in men and women with epilepsy than with other chronic illnesses, manifesting primarily as diminished sexual desire and potency. Studies using retrospective self-report of sexual attitude and behavior find an incidence of sexual dysfunction ranging from 14-66%. Sexual dysfunction may be more common in partial than in generalized epilepsies. Sexual dysfunction in epilepsy may result from a disturbance in social or psychological factors affecting sexual responsiveness. Alternatively, epileptiform discharges may disrupt the function of structures mediating sexual behavior, particularly the limbic cortex, or alter the release of hypothalamic or pituitary hormones. Antiepileptic drugs modulate hormone release from the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis and may have direct inhibitory effects on sexual behavior. Evidence both supports and refutes each of these etiologies in the sexual dysfunction seen with epilepsy. Specific evaluation and treatment protocols for patients with sexual dysfunction are available.

  9. Phospholipase C-related catalytically inactive protein (PRIP) controls KIF5B-mediated insulin secretion

    PubMed Central

    Asano, Satoshi; Nemoto, Tomomi; Kitayama, Tomoya; Harada, Kae; Zhang, Jun; Harada, Kana; Tanida, Isei; Hirata, Masato; Kanematsu, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT We previously reported that phospholipase C-related catalytically inactive protein (PRIP)-knockout mice exhibited hyperinsulinemia. Here, we investigated the role of PRIP in insulin granule exocytosis using Prip-knockdown mouse insulinoma (MIN6) cells. Insulin release from Prip-knockdown MIN6 cells was higher than that from control cells, and Prip knockdown facilitated movement of GFP-phogrin-labeled insulin secretory vesicles. Double-immunofluorescent staining and density step-gradient analyses showed that the KIF5B motor protein co-localized with insulin vesicles in Prip-knockdown MIN6 cells. Knockdown of GABAA-receptor-associated protein (GABARAP), a microtubule-associated PRIP-binding partner, by Gabarap silencing in MIN6 cells reduced the co-localization of insulin vesicles with KIF5B and the movement of vesicles, resulting in decreased insulin secretion. However, the co-localization of KIF5B with microtubules was not altered in Prip- and Gabarap-knockdown cells. The presence of unbound GABARAP, freed either by an interference peptide or by Prip silencing, in MIN6 cells enhanced the co-localization of insulin vesicles with microtubules and promoted vesicle mobility. Taken together, these data demonstrate that PRIP and GABARAP function in a complex to regulate KIF5B-mediated insulin secretion, providing new insights into insulin exocytic mechanisms. PMID:24812354

  10. Insulin, insulin analogues and diabetic retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Chantelau, Ernst; Kimmerle, Renate; Meyer-Schwickerath, Rolf

    2008-02-01

    Insulin is absolutely vital for living beings. It is not only involved in metabolism, but also in the regulation of growth factors, e.g. IGF-1. In this review we address the role insulin has in the natural evolution of diabetic retinopathy. On the one hand, chronic deficiency of insulin and IGF-1 at the retina is thought to cause capillary degeneration, with subsequent ischaemia. On the other hand, acute abundance of (exogenously administered) insulin and IGF-1 enhances ischaemia-induced VEGF expression. A critical ratio of tissue VEGF-susceptibility: VEGF-availability triggers vascular proliferation (i.e. of micro-aneurysms and/or abnormal vessels). The patent-protected insulin analogues Lispro, Glulisine, Aspart, Glargine and Detemir are artificial insulin derivatives with altered biological responses compared to natural insulin (e.g. divergent insulin and /or IGF-1 receptor-binding characteristics, signalling patterns, and mitogenicity). Their safety profiles concerning diabetic retinopathy remain to be established by randomised controlled trials. Anecdotal reports and circumstantial evidence suggest that Lispro and Glargine might worsen diabetic retinopathy.

  11. Adherence to Insulin Therapy.

    PubMed

    Sarbacker, G Blair; Urteaga, Elizabeth M

    2016-08-01

    IN BRIEF Six million people with diabetes use insulin either alone or in combination with an oral medication. Many barriers exist that lead to poor adherence with insulin. However, there is an underwhelming amount of data on interventions to address these barriers and improve insulin adherence. Until pharmacological advancements create easier, more acceptable insulin regimens, it is imperative to involve patients in shared decision-making. PMID:27574371

  12. Inflammation-induced microvascular insulin resistance is an early event in diet-induced obesity.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lina; Fu, Zhuo; Wu, Jing; Aylor, Kevin W; Barrett, Eugene J; Cao, Wenhong; Liu, Zhenqi

    2015-12-01

    Endothelial dysfunction and vascular insulin resistance usually coexist and chronic inflammation engenders both. In the present study, we investigate the temporal relationship between vascular insulin resistance and metabolic insulin resistance. We assessed insulin responses in all arterial segments, including aorta, distal saphenous artery and the microvasculature, as well as the metabolic insulin responses in muscle in rats fed on a high-fat diet (HFD) for various durations ranging from 3 days to 4 weeks with or without sodium salicylate treatment. Compared with controls, HFD feeding significantly blunted insulin-mediated Akt (protein kinase B) and eNOS [endothelial nitric oxide (NO) synthase] phosphorylation in aorta in 1 week, blunted vasodilatory response in small resistance vessel in 4 weeks and microvascular recruitment in as early as 3 days. Insulin-stimulated whole body glucose disposal did not begin to progressively decrease until after 1 week. Salicylate treatment fully inhibited vascular inflammation, prevented microvascular insulin resistance and significantly improved muscle metabolic responses to insulin. We conclude that microvascular insulin resistance is an early event in diet-induced obesity and insulin resistance and inflammation plays an essential role in this process. Our data suggest microvascular insulin resistance contributes to the development of metabolic insulin resistance in muscle and muscle microvasculature is a potential therapeutic target in the prevention and treatment of diabetes and its related complications.

  13. Excessive secretion of insulin precursors characterizes and predicts gestational diabetes.

    PubMed

    Swinn, R A; Wareham, N J; Gregory, R; Curling, V; Clark, P M; Dalton, K J; Edwards, O M; O'Rahilly, S

    1995-08-01

    Using assays that specifically measure insulin, intact proinsulin, and 32,33 split proinsulin, we examined the beta-cell secretory response to an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) in 64 women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) and 154 pregnant normoglycemic control subjects of comparable age and body mass index. Women with GDM were characterized by a lower 30-min insulin increment (40.8 [34.9-47.6] vs. 58.6 [53.6-64] pmol insulin/mmol glucose, P < 0.001; geometric mean [95% confidence interval]) and a higher plasma insulin level at 120 min (702 [610-808] vs. 444 [400-492] pmol/l, P < 0.001). 32,33 split proinsulin levels were elevated in GDM patients in both fasting (9.1 [7.3-11.4] vs. 6.7 [6.0-7.5] pmol/l, P < 0.02) and 120-min (75.2 [62.9-90.0] vs. 52.2 [46.7-58.3] pmol/l, P < 0.001) samples, respectively. Intact proinsulin levels were significantly elevated at 120 min in the women with GDM (21.3 [18.1-25.1] vs. 14.8 [13.4-16.3] pmol/l, P < 0.001). Thus, the qualitative abnormalities of insulin secretion in GDM patients (low 30-min insulin increment, high 120-min plasma insulin, and elevated 32,33 split proinsulin) are similar to those seen in nonpregnant subjects with impaired glucose tolerance. To determine whether measures of proinsulin-like molecules (PLMs) might assist in the prediction of GDM, women who had a 1-h glucose level of > 7.7 mmol/l after a 50-g glucose challenge at 28-32 weeks' gestation had insulin and PLMs measured in the 1-h sample.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  14. Chromium improves insulin response to glucose in rats.

    PubMed

    Striffler, J S; Law, J S; Polansky, M M; Bhathena, S J; Anderson, R A

    1995-10-01

    The effects of chromium (Cr) supplementation on insulin secretion and glucose clearance (KG) during intravenous glucose tolerance tests (IVGTTS) were assessed in rats with impaired glucose tolerance due to dietary Cr deficiency. Male Wistar rats were maintained after weaning on a basal low-Cr diet containing 55% sucrose, 15% lard, 25% casein. American Institute of Nutrition (AIN)-recommended levels of vitamins, no added Cr, and an altered mineral content as required to produce Cr deficiency and impaired glucose tolerance. The Cr-supplemented group ([+Cr] n = 6) were provided with 5 ppm Cr as CrCl3 in the drinking water, and the Cr-deficient group ([-Cr]n = 5) received purified drinking water. At 12 weeks on the diet, both groups of rats were hyperinsulinemic (+Cr, 103 +/- 13; -Cr, 59 +/- 12 microU/mL) and normoglycemic (+Cr, 127 +/- 7; -Cr, 130 +/- 4 mg/dL), indicating insulin resistance. After 24 weeks, insulin levels were normal (+Cr, 19 +/- 5; -Cr, 21 +/- 3 microU/mL) and all rats remained normoglycemic (+Cr, 124 +/- 8; -Cr, 131 +/- 6 mg/dL). KG values during IVGTTS were lower in -Cr rats (KG = 3.58%/min) than in +Cr rats (KG = 5.29%/min), correlating with significantly greater 40-minute glucose areas in the -Cr group (P < .01). Comparisons of 40-minute insulin areas indicated marked insulin hyperresponsiveness in the -Cr group, with insulin-secretory responses increased nearly twofold in -Cr animals (P < .05). Chromium deficiency also led to significant decreases in cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)-dependent phosphodiesterase (PDE) activity in spleen and testis (P < .01). In these studies, Cr deficiency was characterized by both beta-cell hypersecretion of insulin and tissue insulin resistance that were associated with decreased tissue levels of cAMP PDE activity.

  15. Insulin therapy in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Kalra, Sanjay; Jawad, Fatema

    2016-09-01

    Insulin is the mainstay of pharmacotherapy in pregnancy complicated by diabetes. This review covers the various insulin regimes and preparations, explaining how to use them, and decide appropriate doses in pregnancy. It approaches insulin treatment from a patient - centred, as well as physician and obstetrician friendly viewpoint, providing pragmatic guidance for management of diabetes in pregnancy. PMID:27582152

  16. Involvement of conventional kinesin in glucose-stimulated secretory granule movements and exocytosis in clonal pancreatic beta-cells.

    PubMed

    Varadi, Aniko; Ainscow, Edward K; Allan, Victoria J; Rutter, Guy A

    2002-11-01

    Recruitment of secretory vesicles to the cell surface is essential for the sustained secretion of insulin in response to glucose. At present, the molecular motors involved in this movement, and the mechanisms whereby they may be regulated, are undefined. To investigate the role of kinesin family members, we labelled densecore vesicles in clonal beta-cells using an adenovirally expressed, vesicle-targeted green fluorescent protein (phogrin.EGFP), and employed immunoadsorption to obtain highly purified insulin-containing vesicles. Whereas several kinesin family members were expressed in this cell type, only conventional kinesin heavy chain (KHC) was detected in vesicle preparations. Expression of a dominant-negative KHC motor domain (KHC(mut)) blocked all vesicular movements with velocity >0.4 micro m second(-1), which demonstrates that kinesin activity was essential for vesicle motility in live beta-cells. Moreover, expression of KHC(mut) strongly inhibited the sustained, but not acute, stimulation of secretion by glucose. Finally, vesicle movement was stimulated by ATP dose-dependently in permeabilized cells, which suggests that glucose-induced increases in cytosolic [ATP] mediate the effects of the sugar in vivo, by enhancing kinesin activity. These data therefore provide evidence for a novel mechanism whereby glucose may enhance insulin release.

  17. Diapause is associated with a change in the polarity of secretion of insulin-like peptides

    PubMed Central

    Matsunaga, Yohei; Honda, Yoko; Honda, Shuji; Iwasaki, Takashi; Qadota, Hiroshi; Benian, Guy M.; Kawano, Tsuyoshi

    2016-01-01

    The insulin/IGF-1 signalling (IIS) pathway plays an important role in the regulation of larval diapause, the long-lived growth arrest state called dauer arrest, in Caenorhabditis elegans. In this nematode, 40 insulin-like peptides (ILPs) have been identified as putative ligands of the IIS pathway; however, it remains unknown how ILPs modulate larval diapause. Here we show that the secretory polarity of INS-35 and INS-7, which suppress larval diapause, is changed in the intestinal epithelial cells at larval diapause. These ILPs are secreted from the intestine into the body cavity during larval stages. In contrast, they are secreted into the intestinal lumen and degraded during dauer arrest, only to be secreted into the body cavity again when the worms return to developmental growth. The process that determines the secretory polarity of INS-35 and INS-7, thus, has an important role in the modulation of larval diapause. PMID:26838180

  18. Clinical applications of the radioimmunoassay of secretory tuberculoprotein.

    PubMed Central

    Straus, E; Wu, N; Quraishi, M A; Levine, S

    1981-01-01

    A radioimmunoassay that measures a specific secretory tuberculoprotein was used to detect Mycobacterium tuberculosis in 9 of 30 liquid cultures of sputum. The accumulation of immunoreactive material in liquid cultures containing isoniazid was shown to reflect in vitro susceptibility of mycobacteria to the antibiotic effects of the drug. PMID:6789332

  19. The ubiquitin ligase Mindbomb 1 coordinates gastrointestinal secretory cell maturation

    PubMed Central

    Capoccia, Benjamin J.; Jin, Ramon U.; Kong, Young-Yun; Peek, Richard M.; Fassan, Matteo; Rugge, Massimo; Mills, Jason C.

    2013-01-01

    After cell fate specification, differentiating cells must amplify the specific subcellular features required for their specialized function. How cells regulate such subcellular scaling is a fundamental unanswered question. Here, we show that the E3 ubiquitin ligase Mindbomb 1 (MIB1) is required for the apical secretory apparatus established by gastric zymogenic cells as they differentiate from their progenitors. When Mib1 was deleted, death-associated protein kinase–1 (DAPK1) was rerouted to the cell base, microtubule-associated protein 1B (MAP1B) was dephosphorylated, and the apical vesicles that normally support mature secretory granules were dispersed. Consequently, secretory granules did not mature. The transcription factor MIST1 bound the first intron of Mib1 and regulated its expression. We further showed that loss of MIB1 and dismantling of the apical secretory apparatus was the earliest quantifiable aberration in zymogenic cells undergoing transition to a precancerous metaplastic state in mouse and human stomach. Our results reveal a mechanistic pathway by which cells can scale up a specific, specialized subcellular compartment to alter function during differentiation and scale it down during disease. PMID:23478405

  20. Interactions of pathogen-containing compartments with the secretory pathway.

    PubMed

    Canton, Johnathan; Kima, Peter E

    2012-11-01

    A subgroup of intracellular pathogens reside and replicate within membrane-bound compartments often termed pathogen-containing compartments (PCC). PCCs navigate around a wide range of host cell vesicles and organelles. In light of the perils of engaging with vesicles of the endocytic pathway, most PCCs modulate their interactions with endocytic vesicles while a few avoid those interactions. The secretory pathway constitutes another important grouping of vesicles and organelles in host cells. Although the negative consequences of engaging with the secretory pathway are not known, there is evidence that PCCs interact differentially with vesicles and organelles in this pathway as well. In this review, we consider three prokaryote pathogens and two protozoan parasites for which there is information on the interactions of their PCCs with the secretory pathway. Current understandings of the molecular interactions as well as the metabolic benefits that accompany those interactions are discussed. Not unexpectedly, our understanding of the extent of these interactions is variable. An underlying theme that is brought to the fore is that PCCs establish preferential interactions with distinct compartments of the secretory pathway.

  1. Separation of rat pituitary secretory granules by continuous flow electrophoresis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayes, Daniel; Exton, Carrie; Salada, Thomas; Shellenberger, Kathy; Waddle, Jenny; Hymer, W. C.

    1990-01-01

    The separation of growth hormone-containing cytoplasmic secretory granules from the rat pituitary gland by continuous flow electrophoresis is described. The results are consistent with the hypothesis that granule subpopulations can be separated due to differences in surface charge; these, in turn, may be related to the oligomeric state of the hormone.

  2. Medical management of secretory syndromes related to gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumours.

    PubMed

    Dimitriadis, Georgios K; Weickert, Martin O; Randeva, Harpal S; Kaltsas, Gregory; Grossman, Ashley

    2016-09-01

    Although recent epidemiological evidence indicates that the prevalence of non-functioning gastroenteropancreatic (GEP) neuroendocrine tumours (NETs) is rising, a significant number of GEP-NETs still present with symptoms related to the secretion of biologically active substances leading to the development of distinct clinical syndromes. In the past, these syndromes were associated with substantial morbidity and mortality due to the lack of specific therapies; however, since the introduction of long-acting somatostatin analogues and medications such as proton pump inhibitors, their control has been greatly improved. As a result, nowadays, the main cause of morbidity and mortality in GEP-NETs is mostly directly related to tumour growth and the extent of metastatic disease. However, in some patients with functioning tumours and extensive disease, control of the secretory syndrome still remains problematic, necessitating the employment of several cytoreductive techniques, which may not always be sufficient. Recently, new agents directed against tumour growth, or exerting increased binding activity to receptors expressed in these tumours, or interfering with the synthetic pathway of some of the compounds secreted by these tumours, have been developed. Since there are no specific guidelines addressing the totality of the management of the secretory syndromes related to GEP-NETs, this review aims at critically analysing the medical management of previously recognised secretory syndromes; it also addresses areas of uncertainty, assesses the newer therapeutic developments and also addresses recently described but poorly characterised secretory syndromes related to GEP-NETs. PMID:27461388

  3. Oral Insulin Reloaded

    PubMed Central

    Heinemann, Lutz; Plum-Mörschel, Leona

    2014-01-01

    Optimal coverage of insulin needs is the paramount aim of insulin replacement therapy in patients with diabetes mellitus. To apply insulin without breaking the skin barrier by a needle and/or to allow a more physiological provision of insulin are the main reasons triggering the continuous search for alternative routes of insulin administration. Despite numerous attempts over the past 9 decades to develop an insulin pill, no insulin for oral dosing is commercially available. By way of a structured approach, we aim to provide a systematic update on the most recent developments toward an orally available insulin formulation with a clear focus on data from clinical-experimental and clinical studies. Thirteen companies that claim to be working on oral insulin formulations were identified. However, only 6 of these companies published new clinical trial results within the past 5 years. Interestingly, these clinical data reports make up a mere 4% of the considerably high total number of publications on the development of oral insulin formulations within this time period. While this picture clearly reflects the rising research interest in orally bioavailable insulin formulations, it also highlights the fact that the lion’s share of research efforts is still allocated to the preclinical stages. PMID:24876606

  4. Insulin-derived amyloidosis

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Yashdeep; Singla, Gaurav; Singla, Rajiv

    2015-01-01

    Amyloidosis is the term for diseases caused by the extracellular deposition of insoluble polymeric protein fibrils in tissues and organs. Insulin-derived amyloidosis is a rare, yet significant complication of insulin therapy. Insulin-derived amyloidosis at injection site can cause poor glycemic control and increased insulin dose requirements because of the impairment in insulin absorption, which reverse on change of injection site and/or excision of the mass. This entity should be considered and assessed by histopathology and immunohistochemistry, in patients with firm/hard local site reactions, which do not regress after cessation of insulin injection at the affected site. Search strategy: PubMed was searched with terms “insulin amyloidosis”. Full text of articles available in English was reviewed. Relevant cross references were also reviewed. Last search was made on October 15, 2014. PMID:25593849

  5. Diazoxide unmasks glucose inhibition of insulin release by counteracting entry of Ca sup 2+

    SciTech Connect

    Bergsten, P.; Gylfe, E.; Wesslen, N.; Hellman, B. )

    1988-10-01

    The interaction of diazoxide with the effects of glucose on the insulin-releasing mechanism was analyzed in {beta}-cell-rich pancreatic islets isolated from ob/ob mice. When added at a concentration of 400 {mu}M to a medium containing 1.28 mM Ca{sup 2+}, diazoxide converted glucose stimulation of insulin release into inhibition. Further addition of 2 mM theophylline restored the insulin secretory response to glucose. The paradoxical glucose inhibition of insulin release was accounted for by a diazoxide interaction with the entry of Ca{sup 2+}, unmasking a capacity of the sugar to lower cytoplasmic Ca{sup 2+} below its resting concentration.

  6. Insulin resistance and hyperinsulinaemia in diabetic cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Guanghong; DeMarco, Vincent G.; Sowers, James R.

    2016-01-01

    Insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes mellitus and associated hyperinsulinaemia can promote the development of a specific form of cardiomyopathy that is independent of coronary artery disease and hypertension. Termed diabetic cardiomyopathy, this form of cardiomyopathy is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in developed nations, and the prevalence of this condition is rising in parallel with increases in the incidence of obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Of note, female patients seem to be particularly susceptible to the development of this complication of metabolic disease. The diabetic cardiomyopathy observed in insulin-resistant or hyperinsulinaemic states is characterized by impaired myocardial insulin signalling, mitochondrial dysfunction, endoplasmic reticulum stress, impaired calcium homeostasis, abnormal coronary microcirculation, activation of the sympathetic nervous system, activation of the renin–angiotensin–aldosterone system and maladaptive immune responses. These pathophysiological changes result in oxidative stress, fibrosis, hypertrophy, cardiac diastolic dysfunction and eventually systolic heart failure. This Review highlights a surge in diabetic cardiomyopathy research, summarizes current understanding of the molecular mechanisms underpinning this condition and explores potential preventive and therapeutic strategies. PMID:26678809

  7. Metabolic Actions of Angiotensin II and Insulin: A Microvascular Endothelial Balancing Act

    PubMed Central

    Muniyappa, Ranganath; Yavuz, Shazene

    2012-01-01

    Metabolic actions of insulin to promote glucose disposal are augmented by nitric oxide (NO)-dependent increases in microvascular blood flow to skeletal muscle. The balance between NO-dependent vasodilator actions and endothelin-1-dependent vasoconstrictor actions of insulin is regulated by phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-dependent (PI3K) - and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)-dependent signaling in vascular endothelium, respectively. Angiotensin II acting on AT2 receptor increases capillary blood flow to increase insulin-mediated glucose disposal. In contrast, AT1 receptor activation leads to reduced NO bioavailability, impaired insulin signaling, vasoconstriction, and insulin resistance. Insulin-resistant states are characterized by dysregulated local renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS). Under insulin-resistant conditions, pathway-specific impairment in PI3K-dependent signaling may cause imbalance between production of NO and secretion of endothelin-1, leading to decreased blood flow, which worsens insulin resistance. Similarly, excess AT1 receptor activity in the microvasculature may selectively impair vasodilation while simultaneously potentiating the vasoconstrictor actions of insulin. Therapeutic interventions that target pathway-selective impairment in insulin signaling and the imbalance in AT1 and AT2 receptor signaling in microvascular endothelium may simultaneously ameliorate endothelial dysfunction and insulin resistance. In the present review, we discuss molecular mechanisms in the endothelium underlying microvascular and metabolic actions of insulin and Angiotensin II, the mechanistic basis for microvascular endothelial dysfunction and insulin resistance in RAAS dysregulated clinical states, and the rationale for therapeutic strategies that restore the balance in vasodilator and constrictor actions of insulin and Angiotensin II in the microvasculature. PMID:22684034

  8. Genetics Home Reference: surfactant dysfunction

    MedlinePlus

    ... Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions surfactant dysfunction surfactant dysfunction Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Surfactant dysfunction is a lung disorder that causes breathing ...

  9. Role of aquaporins and regulation of secretory vesicle volume in cell secretion.

    PubMed

    Sugiya, H; Matsuki-Fukushima, M; Hashimoto, S

    2008-01-01

    In exocrine glands, secretory proteins synthesized in the rough endoplasmic reticulum (RER) exhibit vectorial transport from ER through a succession of membrane-bounded components such as Golgi complex, condensing vacuoles and secretory granules. The secretory granules migrate to particular locations within the cell close to the apical membrane prior to the release of their contents into the acinar lumen. Currently, to release intragranular contents, secretory granules have been demonstrated to transiently dock and fuse at 'porosome', a permanent cup-shaped structures at the cell membranes. Then swelling of secretory granules occurs to allow explusion of intragranular contents. In this process, water and ion fluxes in the granule membrane appear to contribute to maintain secretory granule integrity and morphology via osmoregulation in secretory granules. Aquaporins (AQPs) are a family of small, hydrophobic, integral membrane proteins, which function as channels to permeate water and small solutes. The AQPs reside constitutively at the plasma membrane in most cell types. However, recent studies have demonstrated that the AQPs are present in secretory granules in exocrine glands, synaptic vesicles and intracellular vesicles in liver and kidney, implying that AQPs in secretory granules and vesicles are involved in their volume regulation. This paper reviews the possible role of AQPs on secretory granules, especially in exocrine glands, in secretory function.

  10. Defective insulin signaling and mitochondrial dynamics in diabetic cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Westermeier, Francisco; Navarro-Marquez, Mario; López-Crisosto, Camila; Bravo-Sagua, Roberto; Quiroga, Clara; Bustamante, Mario; Verdejo, Hugo E.; Zalaquett, Ricardo; Ibacache, Mauricio; Parra, Valentina; Castro, Pablo F.; Rothermel, Beverly A.; Hill, Joseph A.; Lavandero, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic cardiomyopathy (DCM) is a common consequence of longstanding type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and encompasses structural, morphological, functional, and metabolic abnormalities in the heart. Myocardial energy metabolism depends on mitochondria, which must generate sufficient ATP to meet the high energy demands of the myocardium. Dysfunctional mitochondria are involved in the pathophysiology of diabetic heart disease. A large body of evidence implicates myocardial insulin resistance in the pathogenesis of DCM. Recent studies show that insulin signaling influences myocardial energy metabolism by impacting cardiomyocyte mitochondrial dynamics and function under physiological conditions. However, comprehensive understanding of molecular mechanisms linking insulin signaling and changes in the architecture of the mitochondrial network in diabetic cardiomyopathy is lacking. This review summarizes our current understanding of how defective insulin signaling impacts cardiac function in diabetic cardiomyopathy and discusses the potential role of mitochondrial dynamics. PMID:25686534

  11. [Adipose tissue secretory function: implication in metabolic and cardiovascular complications of obesity].

    PubMed

    Guerre-Millo, Michèle

    2006-01-01

    The adipose tissue exerts a double function that is crucial for energy homeostasis. On the one hand, it is the only organ suited to stock triglycerides in highly specialized cells, the adipocytes. On the other hand, the adipose tissue produces biologically active molecules, collectively named "adipokines", which have been implicated in energy balance and glucose and lipid metabolism. Both adipocytes and cells of the stromal fraction participate in this function of secretion. The adipokines acts locally, in an autocrine or paracrine manner, and distantly (endocrine), on various targets, including muscles, the liver and the hypothalamus. Some adipokines, as TNFalpha and IL6, promote insulin resistance and inflammation, whereas others, as leptin and adiponectin, are required for energy and glucose homeostasis. In obesity, adipose cell hypertrophy and the recruitment of macrophages alter the secretory function and induce an inflammatory profile in the adipose tissue. Analyses of gene expression suggest that hypoxia is one of the factors favoring the attraction of the macrophages. The local and systemic consequences of interactions between macrophages and adipocytes are currently actively studied, to understand their potential implication in the metabolic and cardiovascular complications associated with obesity.

  12. [Obesity--significant risk factor for erectile dysfunction in men].

    PubMed

    Skrypnik, Damian; Bogdański, Paweł; Musialik, Katarzyna

    2014-02-01

    The obesity affects around 312 million people over the world. In The United States it causes more than 300 000 deaths per year. It leads to many complications, such as ischemic heart disease, hypertension, dyslipidemia, atherosclerosis and abnormal carbohydrate metabolism. It was proven recently that obesity is also an independent risk factor for erectile dysfunction in men. 79% of men presenting erectile disorders have BMI of 25 kg/m2 or greater. BMI in the range 25-30 kg/m2 is associated with 1,5 times, and in the range of over 30 kg/m2 with 3 times greater risk of sexual dysfunction. The occurrence of erectile dysfunction in patients with obesity is caused by a number of complications which are characteristic for an excessive amount of fat tissue, in example: cardiovascular diseases, diabetes or dyslipidemia. In the United States diabetes and obesity are responsible for 8 million cases of erectile dysfunction. Scientific evidence indicates that excessive body weight should be considered as an independent risk factor for erectile dysfunction. This risk increases with increasing BMI. Erectile disorders correlate with the occurrence of obesity at any time during the patient's life. Obesity leads to erectile dysfunction in a considerably greater extent than aging. Mechanisms responsible for the independent influence of obesity on the erectile dysfunction are: hormonal imbalance, endothelial dysfunction, insulin resistance, psychological factors and physical inactivity. The basis for erectile dysfunction treatment in obesity is body weight loss. Erectile disorders in obese men are significantly more frequent than in general population. Obesity is beyond any doubts an independent risk factor of erectile dysfunction.

  13. Evaluation of sexual dysfunction in women with type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Vafaeimanesh, Jamshid; Raei, Mehdi; Hosseinzadeh, Fatemeh; Parham, Mahmoud

    2014-01-01

    Background: Sexual dysfunction is a common complication of diabetes that adversely affects their quality of life. Its prevalence is known to be higher in diabetic men with and it is estimated to affect 20-85% of patients but the problem is probably less common in diabetic women. This study investigated the prevalence of sexual dysfunction and its risk factors among women with diabetes. Materials and Methods: This descriptive-analytic study was performed during May 2012 to Feb 2013 at Diabetes clinic of Shahid Beheshti Hospital of Qom and The Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI) was used for evaluation of sexual dysfunction. Conclusion: In this study, 59 (53.6%) women had sexual dysfunction. The mean age of patients with sexual dysfunction and healthy people was 48.22 ± 6.61 and 48.14 ± 5.37 years respectively and it was not statistically different in both groups (P = 0.94). Also, there was no significant difference between two groups in average duration of diabetes, fasting blood sugar (FBS), glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) level, insulin resistance, abdominal circumference and body mass index BMI. Although the history of hypertension, coronary artery disease and exercise levels were not significantly associated with sexual dysfunction, but there was a significant association between albuminuria and sexual dysfunction (P = 0.001). Retinopathy and sexual dysfunction had statistically significant relationship (P = 0.007) while no association was found between diabetic neuropathy and sexual dysfunction (P = 0.79). Results: Sexual dysfunction is a common complication in diabetic patients which accompanies with some complications of diabetes and should be considered especially in patients with nephropathy or retinopathy. PMID:24741512

  14. Biosimilar Insulin and Costs

    PubMed Central

    Heinemann, Lutz

    2015-01-01

    The costs for insulin treatment are high, and the steady increase in the number of patients with diabetes on insulin presents a true challenge to health care systems. Therefore, all measures to lower these costs are welcomed by patients, physicians, and health care providers. The market introduction of biosimilar insulins presents an option to lower treatment costs as biosimilars are usually offered at a lower price than the originator product. However, the assumption that a drastic reduction in insulin prices will take place, as was observed with many generic drugs, is most probably not realistic. As the first biosimilar insulin has now been approved in the EU, this commentary discusses a number of aspects that are relevant when it comes to the potential cost reduction we will see with the use of biosimilar insulins. PMID:26350722

  15. A major secretory defect of tumour-infiltrating T lymphocytes due to galectin impairing LFA-1-mediated synapse completion.

    PubMed

    Petit, Anne-Elisabeth; Demotte, Nathalie; Scheid, Benoît; Wildmann, Claude; Bigirimana, René; Gordon-Alonso, Monica; Carrasco, Javier; Valitutti, Salvatore; Godelaine, Danièle; van der Bruggen, Pierre

    2016-07-22

    Surface galectin has been shown to contribute to dysfunctions of human tumour-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs). We show here that galectin-covered CD8 TILs produce normal amounts of intracellular cytokines, but fail to secrete them because of defective actin rearrangements at the synapse. The non-secreting TILs also display reduced adhesion to their targets, together with defective LFA-1 recruitment and activation at the synapse. These defects are relieved by releasing surface galectin. As mild LFA-1 blockade on normal blood T cells emulate the defects of galectin-covered TILs, we conclude that galectin prevents the formation of a functional secretory synapse by preventing optimal LFA-1 triggering. Our results highlight a major secretory defect of TILs that is not revealed by widely used intracellular cytokine immunomonitoring assays. They also provide additional insights into the T-cell response, by showing that different thresholds of LFA-1 triggering are required to promote the intracellular production of cytokines and their secretion.

  16. A major secretory defect of tumour-infiltrating T lymphocytes due to galectin impairing LFA-1-mediated synapse completion

    PubMed Central

    Petit, Anne-Elisabeth; Demotte, Nathalie; Scheid, Benoît; Wildmann, Claude; Bigirimana, René; Gordon-Alonso, Monica; Carrasco, Javier; Valitutti, Salvatore; Godelaine, Danièle; van der Bruggen, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Surface galectin has been shown to contribute to dysfunctions of human tumour-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs). We show here that galectin-covered CD8 TILs produce normal amounts of intracellular cytokines, but fail to secrete them because of defective actin rearrangements at the synapse. The non-secreting TILs also display reduced adhesion to their targets, together with defective LFA-1 recruitment and activation at the synapse. These defects are relieved by releasing surface galectin. As mild LFA-1 blockade on normal blood T cells emulate the defects of galectin-covered TILs, we conclude that galectin prevents the formation of a functional secretory synapse by preventing optimal LFA-1 triggering. Our results highlight a major secretory defect of TILs that is not revealed by widely used intracellular cytokine immunomonitoring assays. They also provide additional insights into the T-cell response, by showing that different thresholds of LFA-1 triggering are required to promote the intracellular production of cytokines and their secretion. PMID:27447355

  17. Tea enhances insulin activity.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Richard A; Polansky, Marilyn M

    2002-11-20

    The most widely known health benefits of tea relate to the polyphenols as the principal active ingredients in protection against oxidative damage and in antibacterial, antiviral, anticarcinogenic, and antimutagenic activities, but polyphenols in tea may also increase insulin activity. The objective of this study was to determine the insulin-enhancing properties of tea and its components. Tea, as normally consumed, was shown to increase insulin activity >15-fold in vitro in an epididymal fat cell assay. Black, green, and oolong teas but not herbal teas, which are not teas in the traditional sense because they do not contain leaves of Camellia senensis, were all shown to increase insulin activity. High-performance liquid chromatography fractionation of tea extracts utilizing a Waters SymmetryPrep C18 column showed that the majority of the insulin-potentiating activity for green and oolong teas was due to epigallocatechin gallate. For black tea, the activity was present in several regions of the chromatogram corresponding to, in addition to epigallocatechin gallate, tannins, theaflavins, and other undefined compounds. Several known compounds found in tea were shown to enhance insulin with the greatest activity due to epigallocatechin gallate followed by epicatechin gallate, tannins, and theaflavins. Caffeine, catechin, and epicatechin displayed insignificant insulin-enhancing activities. Addition of lemon to the tea did not affect the insulin-potentiating activity. Addition of 5 g of 2% milk per cup decreased the insulin-potentiating activity one-third, and addition of 50 g of milk per cup decreased the insulin-potentiating activity approximately 90%. Nondairy creamers and soy milk also decreased the insulin-enhancing activity. These data demonstrate that tea contains in vitro insulin-enhancing activity and the predominant active ingredient is epigallocatechin gallate. PMID:12428980

  18. Secretory function in subplate neurons during cortical development

    PubMed Central

    Kondo, Shinichi; Al-Hasani, Hannah; Hoerder-Suabedissen, Anna; Wang, Wei Zhi; Molnár, Zoltán

    2015-01-01

    Subplate cells are among the first generated neurons in the mammalian cerebral cortex and have been implicated in the establishment of cortical wiring. In rodents some subplate neurons persist into adulthood. Here we would like to highlight several converging findings which suggest a novel secretory function of subplate neurons during cortical development. Throughout the postnatal period in rodents, subplate neurons have highly developed rough endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and are under an ER stress condition. By comparing gene expression between subplate and layer 6, we found that several genes encoding secreted proteins are highly expressed in subplate neurons. One of these secreted proteins, neuroserpin, encoded by the serpini1 gene, is localized to the ER in subplate cells. We propose that subplate might influence cortical circuit formation through a transient secretory function. PMID:25859180

  19. Abnormal apocrine secretory cell mitochondria in a Huntington disease patient.

    PubMed

    Sidiropoulos, Christos; LeWitt, Peter; Hashimoto, Ken

    2012-12-15

    Over two decades, a 42-year old woman experienced the gradual onset of choreic involuntary movements, dystonia, and tics. Decreased caudate nucleus metabolism on 2-deoxyglucose PET scan and a heterozygous 49-CAG repeat expansion within the HTT gene established the diagnosis of HD, although no other family history was known. An axillary skin biopsy revealed a distinctive abnormality of mitochondria limited to the apocrine secretory cells on electron microscopy. All mitochondria were transformed into rounded structures with disrupted cristae and prominent myelin figures; many were enlarged up to 4 times the normal. Cytoplasm of apocrine secretory cells showed an abundance of lipid vacuoles, empty vesicles, and dense bodies. Biopsied skeletal muscle histology (light microscopy) was normal, as was a mitochondrial metabolism study. Biopsies from other HD patients have shown similar mitochondrial changes in cerebral neurons, muscle, fibroblasts, and lymphoblasts, adding to evidence for a systemic disturbance of mitochondria in HD.

  20. Novelties in secretory structures and anatomy of Rhynchosia (Fabaceae).

    PubMed

    De Vargas, Wanderleia; Sartori, Ângela L B; Dias, Edna S

    2015-03-01

    A comparative anatomical study was carried out on the secretory structures of leaflets from taxa belonging to the genus Rhynchosia - taxa difficult to delimit because of uncertain interspecific relations - in order to evaluate the potential diagnostic value of these anatomical traits for taxonomic assignment. A further objective was to establish consensual denomination for these secretory structures. The new anatomical features found in these taxa were sufficiently consistent to separate the species evaluated. The presence and localization of glandular-punctate structures bulbous-based trichomes, the number of layers in the palisade parenchyma and the arrangement of vascular units distinguish the taxa investigated and these characteristics can be extended to other species of Papilionoideae. The trichomes analyzed were described and classified into five types. Depicted in diagrams, photomicrographs, and by scanning electron microscopy, and listed for the first time at the genus and species levels. The information obtained served to effectively distinguish the taxa investigated among species of Papilonoideae.

  1. Recent advances and new perspectives in targeting CFTR for therapy of cystic fibrosis and enterotoxin-induced secretory diarrheas

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Weiqiang; Fujii, Naoaki; Naren, Anjaparavanda P

    2012-01-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is a cAMP-regulated chloride channel localized primarily at the apical surfaces of epithelial cells lining airway, gut and exocrine glands, where it is responsible for transepithelial salt and water transport. Several human diseases are associated with an altered channel function of CFTR. Cystic fibrosis (CF) is caused by the loss or dysfunction of CFTR-channel activity resulting from the mutations on the gene; whereas enterotoxin-induced secretory diarrheas are caused by the hyperactivation of CFTR channel function. CFTR is a validated target for drug development to treat these diseases. Significant progress has been made in developing CFTR modulator therapy by means of high-throughput screening followed by hit-to-lead optimization. Several oral administrated investigational drugs are currently being evaluated in clinical trials for CF. Also importantly, new ideas and methodologies are emerging. Targeting CFTR-containing macromolecular complexes is one such novel approach. PMID:22393940

  2. Phenotypical heterogeneity linked to adipose tissue dysfunction in patients with Type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Barchetta, Ilaria; Angelico, Francesco; Del Ben, Maria; Di Martino, Michele; Cimini, Flavia Agata; Bertoccini, Laura; Polimeni, Licia; Catalano, Carlo; Fraioli, Antonio; Del Vescovo, Riccardo; Morini, Sergio; Baroni, Marco Giorgio; Cavallo, Maria Gisella

    2016-10-01

    Adipose tissue (AT) inflammation leads to increased free fatty acid (FFA) efflux and ectopic fat deposition, but whether AT dysfunction drives selective fat accumulation in specific sites remains unknown. The aim of the present study was to investigate the correlation between AT dysfunction, hepatic/pancreatic fat fraction (HFF, PFF) and the associated metabolic phenotype in patients with Type 2 diabetes (T2D). Sixty-five consecutive T2D patients were recruited at the Diabetes Centre of Sapienza University, Rome, Italy. The study population underwent clinical examination and blood sampling for routine biochemistry and calculation of insulin secretion [homoeostasis model assessment of insulin secretion (HOMA-β%)] and insulin-resistance [homoeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) and adipose tissue insulin resistance (ADIPO-IR)] indexes. Subcutaneous (SAT) and visceral (VAT) AT area, HFF and PFF were determined by magnetic resonance. Some 55.4% of T2D patients had non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD); they were significantly younger and more insulin-resistant than non-NAFLD subjects. ADIPO-IR was the main determinant of HFF independently of age, sex, HOMA-IR, VAT, SAT and predicted severe NAFLD with the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUROC)=0.796 (95% confidence interval: 0.65-0.94, P=0.001). PFF was independently associated with increased total adiposity but did not correlate with AT dysfunction, insulin resistance and secretion or NAFLD. The ADIPO-IR index was capable of predicting NAFLD independently of all confounders, whereas it did not seem to be related to intrapancreatic fat deposition; unlike HFF, higher PFF was not associated with relevant alterations in the metabolic profile. In conclusion, the presence and severity of AT dysfunction may drive ectopic fat accumulation towards specific targets, such as VAT and liver, therefore evaluation of AT dysfunction may contribute to the identification of different

  3. Temporomandibular Joint Dysfunction

    MedlinePlus

    The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) connects your jaw to the side of your head. When it works well, it enables you to ... For people with TMJ dysfunction, problems with the joint and muscles around it may cause Pain that ...

  4. Chronic pelvic floor dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Dee; Sarton, Julie

    2014-10-01

    The successful treatment of women with vestibulodynia and its associated chronic pelvic floor dysfunctions requires interventions that address a broad field of possible pain contributors. Pelvic floor muscle hypertonicity was implicated in the mid-1990s as a trigger of major chronic vulvar pain. Painful bladder syndrome, irritable bowel syndrome, fibromyalgia, and temporomandibular jaw disorder are known common comorbidities that can cause a host of associated muscular, visceral, bony, and fascial dysfunctions. It appears that normalizing all of those disorders plays a pivotal role in reducing complaints of chronic vulvar pain and sexual dysfunction. Though the studies have yet to prove a specific protocol, physical therapists trained in pelvic dysfunction are reporting success with restoring tissue normalcy and reducing vulvar and sexual pain. A review of pelvic anatomy and common findings are presented along with suggested physical therapy management.

  5. Velopharyngeal function and dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Jones, D L

    1991-01-01

    The concepts regarding velopharyngeal function, the production of disordered nasalization, and the management of velopharyngeal dysfunction can be summarized as follows: 1. Although the function of the velopharyngeal mechanism is critical to the control of oral-nasal balance, the configuration and function of the speech articulatory system as a whole will determine the degree of nasalized speech that is produced. 2. Velopharyngeal dysfunction can be related to one or a combination of structural and motor limitations within the velopharyngeal mechanism. 3. There are two perceptual manifestations of velopharyngeal dysfunction. One is acoustic (nasality); the other is aerodynamic (nasal emission). For any given speaker, it is possible to hear both, and it is possible to hear one and not the other. 4. Velopharyngeal dysfunction can be treated in a variety of ways. The method of treatment should be determined by the structural characteristics of the velopharyngeal mechanism and the speech-motor abilities of the patient.

  6. Isolation of intact sub-dermal secretory cavities from Eucalyptus

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The biosynthesis of plant natural products in sub-dermal secretory cavities is poorly understood at the molecular level, largely due to the difficulty of physically isolating these structures for study. Our aim was to develop a protocol for isolating live and intact sub-dermal secretory cavities, and to do this, we used leaves from three species of Eucalyptus with cavities that are relatively large and rich in essential oils. Results Leaves were digested using a variety of commercially available enzymes. A pectinase from Aspergillus niger was found to allow isolation of intact cavities after a relatively short incubation (12 h), with no visible artifacts from digestion and no loss of cellular integrity or cavity contents. Several measurements indicated the potential of the isolated cavities for further functional studies. First, the cavities were found to consume oxygen at a rate that is comparable to that estimated from leaf respiratory rates. Second, mRNA was extracted from cavities, and it was used to amplify a cDNA fragment with high similarity to that of a monoterpene synthase. Third, the contents of the cavity lumen were extracted, showing an unexpectedly low abundance of volatile essential oils and a sizeable amount of non-volatile material, which is contrary to the widely accepted role of secretory cavities as predominantly essential oil repositories. Conclusions The protocol described herein is likely to be adaptable to a range of Eucalyptus species with sub-dermal secretory cavities, and should find wide application in studies of the developmental and functional biology of these structures, and the biosynthesis of the plant natural products they contain. PMID:20807444

  7. Secretory pattern and regulatory mechanism of growth hormone in cattle

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The ultradian rhythm of growth hormone (GH) secretion has been known in several animal species for years and has recently been observed in cattle. Although the physiological significance of the rhythm is not yet fully understood, it appears essential for normal growth. In this review, previous studies concerning the GH secretory pattern in cattle, including its ultradian rhythm, are introduced and the regulatory mechanism is discussed on the basis of recent findings. PMID:26260675

  8. Does Insulin Explain the Relation between Maternal Obesity and Poor Lactation Outcomes? An Overview of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Nommsen-Rivers, Laurie A

    2016-03-01

    It is well established that obese women are at increased risk of delayed lactogenesis and short breastfeeding duration, but the underlying causal contributors remain unclear. This review summarizes the literature examining the role of insulin in lactation outcomes. Maternal obesity is a strong risk factor for insulin resistance and prediabetes, but until recently a direct role for insulin in milk production had not been elucidated. Over the past 6 y, studies in both animal models and humans have shown insulin-sensitive gene expression to be dramatically upregulated specifically during the lactation cycle. Insulin is now considered to play a direct role in lactation, including essential roles in secretory differentiation, secretory activation, and mature milk production. At the same time, emerging clinical research suggests an important association between suboptimal glucose tolerance and lactation difficulty. To develop effective interventions to support lactation success in obese women further research is needed to identify how, when, and for whom maternal insulin secretion and sensitivity affect lactation ability. PMID:26980825

  9. Mitochondrial Dysfunction Meets Senescence.

    PubMed

    Gallage, Suchira; Gil, Jesús

    2016-03-01

    Cellular senescence and mitochondrial dysfunction are hallmarks of ageing, but until now their relationship has not been clear. Recent work by Wiley et al. shows that mitochondrial defects can cause a distinct senescence phenotype termed MiDAS (mitochondrial dysfunction-associated senescence). MiDAS has a specific secretome that is able to drive some of the aging phenotypes. These findings suggest novel therapeutic opportunities for treating age-related pathologies. PMID:26874922

  10. Male endocrine dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Hotaling, James M; Patel, Zamip

    2014-02-01

    Evaluation for endocrine function is a pivotal part of the male infertility workup. Endocrine dysfunction may result from endogenous and exogenous sources. This article describes the traditional roles that the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal endocrine axis plays in spermatogenesis and testicular dysfunction, as well as other insults that may contribute to hypospermatogenesis. Recent research into the role alternative hormonal axes play in spermatogenesis and promising new technologies that may correct inborn or acquired endocrinopathies leading to impaired sperm growth and maturation are discussed.

  11. Interactions between spontaneous and provoked cortisol secretory episodes in man.

    PubMed

    Brandenberger, G; Follénius, M; Muzet, A

    1984-09-01

    This study describes the interactions between cortisol peaks due to spontaneous episodic release and peaks provoked by external stimuli. Successive and equidistant transitory rises of similar amplitude and duration were produced either by muscular exercise (30 min, 75% VO2max) or by injecting ACTH1-24 (Synacthen: 250 ng) before and after the midday meal-related peak. ACTH1-24 was also injected during sleep before the nocturnal sequence of the major secretory episodes. In all instances, cortisol levels had reverted to basal levels when the second stimulus was applied. ACTH-induced cortisol peaks depressed the subsequent meal-related peaks, the exercise-induced peaks, and the spontaneous secretory episodes at the end of the night, and thus had a strong depressor capacity. When exercise was the prior stimulus, the subsequent meal-related peaks were depressed, but the response to later exercise was not affected. Meal-related peaks and the spontaneous diurnal or nocturnal peaks did not depress the subsequent secretory episodes. These quantitatively comparable cortisol episodes were preceded by ACTH rises whose amplitude and duration were not identical: spontaneous and meal-related ACTH peaks were smaller than the provoked one; exercise-induced ACTH peaks were of longer duration than those after ACTH1-24 injection. The different depressor capacities of similar sized cortisol episodes and the lack of proportionality between spontaneous and provoked ACTH and cortisol peaks suggest that there are separate adrenocortical activation channels, which depend on the origin of the stimulation.

  12. Souffle/Spastizin Controls Secretory Vesicle Maturation during Zebrafish Oogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Riedel, Dietmar; Schomburg, Christoph; Cerdà, Joan; Vollack, Nadine; Dosch, Roland

    2014-01-01

    During oogenesis, the egg prepares for fertilization and early embryogenesis. As a consequence, vesicle transport is very active during vitellogenesis, and oocytes are an outstanding system to study regulators of membrane trafficking. Here, we combine zebrafish genetics and the oocyte model to identify the molecular lesion underlying the zebrafish souffle (suf) mutation. We demonstrate that suf encodes the homolog of the Hereditary Spastic Paraplegia (HSP) gene SPASTIZIN (SPG15). We show that in zebrafish oocytes suf mutants accumulate Rab11b-positive vesicles, but trafficking of recycling endosomes is not affected. Instead, we detect Suf/Spastizin on cortical granules, which undergo regulated secretion. We demonstrate genetically that Suf is essential for granule maturation into secretion competent dense-core vesicles describing a novel role for Suf in vesicle maturation. Interestingly, in suf mutants immature, secretory precursors accumulate, because they fail to pinch-off Clathrin-coated buds. Moreover, pharmacological inhibition of the abscission regulator Dynamin leads to an accumulation of immature secretory granules and mimics the suf phenotype. Our results identify a novel regulator of secretory vesicle formation in the zebrafish oocyte. In addition, we describe an uncharacterized cellular mechanism for Suf/Spastizin activity during secretion, which raises the possibility of novel therapeutic avenues for HSP research. PMID:24967841

  13. Unremitting Cell Proliferation in the Secretory Phase of Eutopic Endometriosis

    PubMed Central

    Franco-Murillo, Yanira; Miranda-Rodríguez, José Antonio; Rendón-Huerta, Erika; Montaño, Luis F.; Cornejo, Gerardo Velázquez; Gómez, Lucila Poblano; Valdez-Morales, Francisco Javier; Gonzalez-Sanchez, Ignacio

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Endometriosis is linked to altered cell proliferation and stem cell markers c-kit/stem cell factor (SCF) in ectopic endometrium. Our aim was to investigate whether c-kit/SCF also plays a role in eutopic endometrium. Design: Eutopic endometrium obtained from 35 women with endometriosis and 25 fertile eumenorrheic women was analyzed for in situ expression of SCF/c-kit, Ki67, RAC-alpha serine/threonine-protein kinase (Akt), phosphorylated RAC-alpha serine/threonin-protein kinase (pAkt), Glycogen synthase kinase 3 beta (GSK3β), and phosphorylated glycogen synthase kinase 3 beta (pGSK3β), throughout the menstrual cycle. Results: Expression of Ki67 and SCF was higher in endometriosis than in control tissue (P < .05) and greater in secretory rather than proliferative (P < .01) endometrium in endometriosis. Expression of c-kit was also higher in endometriosis although similar in both phases. Expression of Akt and GSK3β was identical in all samples and cycle phases, whereas pAkt and pGSK3β, opposed to control tissue, remained overexpressed in the secretory phase in endometriosis. Conclusion: Unceasing cell proliferation in the secretory phase of eutopic endometriosis is linked to deregulation of c-kit/SCF-associated signaling pathways. PMID:25194152

  14. A secretory kinase complex regulates extracellular protein phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Jixin; Xiao, Junyu; Tagliabracci, Vincent S; Wen, Jianzhong; Rahdar, Meghdad; Dixon, Jack E

    2015-01-01

    Although numerous extracellular phosphoproteins have been identified, the protein kinases within the secretory pathway have only recently been discovered, and their regulation is virtually unexplored. Fam20C is the physiological Golgi casein kinase, which phosphorylates many secreted proteins and is critical for proper biomineralization. Fam20A, a Fam20C paralog, is essential for enamel formation, but the biochemical function of Fam20A is unknown. Here we show that Fam20A potentiates Fam20C kinase activity and promotes the phosphorylation of enamel matrix proteins in vitro and in cells. Mechanistically, Fam20A is a pseudokinase that forms a functional complex with Fam20C, and this complex enhances extracellular protein phosphorylation within the secretory pathway. Our findings shed light on the molecular mechanism by which Fam20C and Fam20A collaborate to control enamel formation, and provide the first insight into the regulation of secretory pathway phosphorylation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06120.001 PMID:25789606

  15. Alterations in hepatic pericanalicular cytoplasm during enhanced bile secretory activity.

    PubMed

    Jones, A L; Schmucker, D L; Mooney, J S; Ockner, R K; Adler, R D

    1979-04-01

    In an attempt to demonstrate the morphology of the bile secretory apparatus, male rats were restrained and maintained on an isocaloric diet with (experimental) and without (control) taurocholate, which was continuously infused via a duodenal cannula. This method of taurocholate administration promotes a 2-fold increase in the bile acid pool size and bile secretory rate and increases the transport maximum of taurocholate by approximately 50%. After 48 hours, the livers from both the control and experimental animals were perfusion-fixed and whole hepatocytes as well as pericanalicular cytoplasm (defined as a 1-micron. wide zone of cytoplasm adjacent to the bile canaliculus) in both centrolobular and periportal cells were subjected to a stereologic analysis. Although taurocholate infusion produced relatively few changes in the amounts of organelles or inclusionswithin hepatocytes, it caused highly significant increases in the amount ofGolgi-rich area, Golgi membranes, and the number of vesicles with diameters greater than 1000 A in the pericanalicular area of cytoplasm. In addition to these changes, which occurred in both central and periportal zones, decreases in the volume of lysosomes and the surface area of smooth surfaced endoplasmic reticulum were observed. These data provide new evidence that the "bile secretory apparatus" may encompass several hepatocellular components which include the Golgi complex and a vesicular transport system.

  16. RNAi knockdown of parafusin inhibits the secretory pathway.

    PubMed

    Liu, Li; Wyroba, Elzbieta; Satir, Birgit H

    2011-10-01

    Several glycolytic enzymes and their isoforms have been found to be important in cell signaling unrelated to glycolysis. The involvement of parafusin (PFUS), a member of the phosphoglucomutase (PGM) superfamily with no phosphoglucomutase activity, in Ca(2+)-dependent exocytosis has been controversial. This protein was first described in Paramecium tetraurelia, but is widely found. Earlier work showed that parafusin is a secretory vesicle scaffold component with unusual post-translational modifications (cyclic phosphorylation and phosphoglucosylation) coupled to stages in the exocytic process. Using RNAi, we demonstrate that parafusin synthesis can be reversibly blocked, with minor or no effect on other PGM isoforms. PFUS knockdown produces an inhibition of dense core secretory vesicle (DCSV) synthesis leading to an exo(-) phenotype. Although cell growth is unaffected, vesicle content is not packaged properly and no new DCSVs are formed. We conclude that PFUS and its orthologs are necessary for proper scaffold maturation. Because of this association, parafusin is an important signaling component for regulatory control of the secretory pathway.

  17. Insulin resistance: Is it time for primary prevention?

    PubMed

    Mercurio, Valentina; Carlomagno, Guido; Fazio, Valeria; Fazio, Serafino

    2012-01-26

    Insulin resistance is a clinical condition characterized by a decrease in sensitivity and responsiveness to the metabolic actions of insulin, so that a given concentration of insulin produces a less-than-expected biological effect. As a result, higher levels of insulin are needed to maintain normal glucose tolerance. Hyperinsulinemia, indeed, is one of the principal characteristics of insulin resistance states. This feature is common in several pathologic conditions, such as type 2 diabetes, obesity, and dyslipidemia, and it is also a prominent component of hypertension, coronary heart disease, and atherosclerosis. The presence of endothelial dysfunction, related to insulin resistance, plays a key role in the development and progression of atherosclerosis in all of these disorders. Insulin resistance represents the earliest detectable abnormality in type 2 diabetes, and is one of the major underlying mechanisms of hypertension and cardiovascular diseases. Its early detection could be of great importance, in order to set a therapeutic attack and to counteract the higher risk of diabetes and cardiovascular diseases.

  18. Insulin decreases atherosclerosis by inducing endothelin receptor B expression

    PubMed Central

    Park, Kyoungmin; Mima, Akira; Li, Qian; Rask-Madsen, Christian; He, Pingnian; Mizutani, Koji; Katagiri, Sayaka; Maeda, Yasutaka; Wu, I-Hsien; Khamaisi, Mogher; Preil, Simone Rordam; Sørensen, Ditte; Huang, Paul L.; King, George L.

    2016-01-01

    Endothelial cell (EC) insulin resistance and dysfunction, caused by diabetes, accelerates atherosclerosis. It is unknown whether specifically enhancing EC-targeted insulin action can decrease atherosclerosis in diabetes. Accordingly, overexpressing insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS1) in the endothelia of Apoe–/– mice (Irs1/Apoe–/–) increased insulin signaling and function in the aorta. Atherosclerosis was significantly reduced in Irs1/ApoE–/– mice on diet-induced hyperinsulinemia and hyperglycemia. The mechanism of insulin’s enhanced antiatherogenic actions in EC was related to remarkable induction of NO action, which increases endothelin receptor B (EDNRB) expression and intracellular [Ca2+]. Using the mice with knockin mutation of eNOS, which had Ser1176 mutated to alanine (AKI), deleting the only known mechanism for insulin to activate eNOS/NO pathway, we observed that IRS1 overexpression in the endothelia of Aki/ApoE–/– mice significantly decreased atherosclerosis. Interestingly, endothelial EDNRB expression was selectively reduced in intima of arteries from diabetic patients and rodents. However, endothelial EDNRB expression was upregulated by insulin via P13K/Akt pathway. Finally EDNRB deletion in EC of Ldlr–/– and Irs1/Ldlr–/– mice decreased NO production and accelerated atherosclerosis, compared with Ldlr–/– mice. Accelerated atherosclerosis in diabetes may be reduced by improving insulin signaling selectively via IRS1/Akt in the EC by inducing EDNRB expression and NO production. PMID:27200419

  19. Insulin decreases atherosclerosis by inducing endothelin receptor B expression

    PubMed Central

    Park, Kyoungmin; Mima, Akira; Li, Qian; Rask-Madsen, Christian; He, Pingnian; Mizutani, Koji; Katagiri, Sayaka; Maeda, Yasutaka; Wu, I-Hsien; Khamaisi, Mogher; Preil, Simone Rordam; Maddaloni, Ernesto; Sørensen, Ditte; Rasmussen, Lars Melholt; Huang, Paul L.; King, George L.

    2016-01-01

    Endothelial cell (EC) insulin resistance and dysfunction, caused by diabetes, accelerates atherosclerosis. It is unknown whether specifically enhancing EC-targeted insulin action can decrease atherosclerosis in diabetes. Accordingly, overexpressing insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS1) in the endothelia of Apoe−/− mice (Irs1/Apoe−/−) increased insulin signaling and function in the aorta. Atherosclerosis was significantly reduced in Irs1/ApoE−/− mice on diet-induced hyperinsulinemia and hyperglycemia. The mechanism of insulin’s enhanced antiatherogenic actions in EC was related to remarkable induction of NO action, which increases endothelin receptor B (EDNRB) expression and intracellular [Ca2+]. Using the mice with knockin mutation of eNOS, which had Ser1176 mutated to alanine (AKI), deleting the only known mechanism for insulin to activate eNOS/NO pathway, we observed that IRS1 overexpression in the endothelia of Aki/ApoE−/− mice significantly decreased atherosclerosis. Interestingly, endothelial EDNRB expression was selectively reduced in intima of arteries from diabetic patients and rodents. However, endothelial EDNRB expression was upregulated by insulin via P13K/Akt pathway. Finally EDNRB deletion in EC of Ldlr−/− and Irs1/Ldlr−/− mice decreased NO production and accelerated atherosclerosis, compared with Ldlr−/− mice. Accelerated atherosclerosis in diabetes may be reduced by improving insulin signaling selectively via IRS1/Akt in the EC by inducing EDNRB expression and NO production. PMID:27200419

  20. Insulin and GLP-1 infusions demonstrate the onset of adipose-specific insulin resistance in a large fasting mammal: potential glucogenic role for GLP-1.

    PubMed

    Viscarra, Jose A; Rodriguez, Ruben; Vazquez-Medina, Jose Pablo; Lee, Andrew; Tift, Michael S; Tavoni, Stephen K; Crocker, Daniel E; Ortiz, Rudy M

    2013-08-01

    Prolonged food deprivation increases lipid oxidation and utilization, which may contribute to the onset of the insulin resistance associated with fasting. Because insulin resistance promotes the preservation of glucose and oxidation of fat, it has been suggested to be an adaptive response to food deprivation. However, fasting mammals exhibit hypoinsulinemia, suggesting that the insulin resistance-like conditions they experience may actually result from reduced pancreatic sensitivity to glucose/capacity to secrete insulin. To determine whether fasting results in insulin resistance or in pancreatic dysfunction, we infused early- and late-fasted seals (naturally adapted to prolonged fasting) with insulin (0.065 U/kg), and a separate group of late-fasted seals with low (10 pM/kg) or high (100 pM/kg) dosages of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) immediately following a glucose bolus (0.5g/kg), and measured the systemic and cellular responses. Because GLP-1 facilitates glucose-stimulated insulin secretion, these infusions provide a method to assess pancreatic insulin-secreting capacity. Insulin infusions increased the phosphorylation of insulin receptor and Akt in adipose and muscle of early and late fasted seals; however the timing of the signaling response was blunted in adipose of late fasted seals. Despite the dose-dependent increases in insulin and increased glucose clearance (high dose), both GLP-1 dosages produced increases in plasma cortisol and glucagon, which may have contributed to the glucogenic role of GLP-1. Results suggest that fasting induces adipose-specific insulin resistance in elephant seal pups, while maintaining skeletal muscle insulin sensitivity, and therefore suggests that the onset of insulin resistance in fasting mammals is an evolved response to cope with prolonged food deprivation. PMID:23997935

  1. Pathophysiology of insulin secretion.

    PubMed

    Scheen, A J

    2004-02-01

    Defects in pancreatic islet beta-cell function play a major role in the development of diabetes mellitus. Type 1 diabetes is caused by a more or less rapid destruction of pancreatic beta cells, and the autoimmune process begins years before the beta-cell destruction becomes complete, thereby providing a window of opportunity for intervention. During the preclinical period and early after diagnosis, much of the insulin deficiency may be the result of functional inhibition of insulin secretion that may be at least partially and transiently reversible. Type 2 diabetes is characterized by a progressive loss of beta-cell function throughout the course of the disease. The pattern of loss is an initial (probably of genetic origin) defect in acute or first-phase insulin secretion, followed by a decreasing maximal capacity of insulin secretion. Last, a defective steady-state and basal insulin secretion develops, leading to almost complete beta-cell failure requiring insulin treatment. Because of the reciprocal relation between insulin secretion and insulin sensitivity, valid representation of beta-cell function requires interpretation of insulin responses in the context of the prevailing degree of insulin sensitivity. This appropriate approach highlights defects in insulin secretion at the various stages of the natural history of type 2 diabetes and already present in individuals at risk to develop the disease. To date none of the available therapies can stop the progressive beta-cell defect and the progression of the metabolic disorder. The better understanding of the pathophysiology of the disease should lead to the development of new strategies to preserve beta-cell function in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  2. Brain Insulin Resistance at the Crossroads of Metabolic and Cognitive Disorders in Humans.

    PubMed

    Kullmann, Stephanie; Heni, Martin; Hallschmid, Manfred; Fritsche, Andreas; Preissl, Hubert; Häring, Hans-Ulrich

    2016-10-01

    Ever since the brain was identified as an insulin-sensitive organ, evidence has rapidly accumulated that insulin action in the brain produces multiple behavioral and metabolic effects, influencing eating behavior, peripheral metabolism, and cognition. Disturbances in brain insulin action can be observed in obesity and type 2 diabetes (T2D), as well as in aging and dementia. Decreases in insulin sensitivity of central nervous pathways, i.e., brain insulin resistance, may therefore constitute a joint pathological feature of metabolic and cognitive dysfunctions. Modern neuroimaging methods have provided new means of probing brain insulin action, revealing the influence of insulin on both global and regional brain function. In this review, we highlight recent findings on brain insulin action in humans and its impact on metabolism and cognition. Furthermore, we elaborate on the most prominent factors associated with brain insulin resistance, i.e., obesity, T2D, genes, maternal metabolism, normal aging, inflammation, and dementia, and on their roles regarding causes and consequences of brain insulin resistance. We also describe the beneficial effects of enhanced brain insulin signaling on human eating behavior and cognition and discuss potential applications in the treatment of metabolic and cognitive disorders.

  3. Insulin Resistance in Human iPS Cells Reduces Mitochondrial Size and Function

    PubMed Central

    Burkart, Alison M.; Tan, Kelly; Warren, Laura; Iovino, Salvatore; Hughes, Katelyn J.; Kahn, C. Ronald; Patti, Mary-Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Insulin resistance, a critical component of type 2 diabetes (T2D), precedes and predicts T2D onset. T2D is also associated with mitochondrial dysfunction. To define the cause-effect relationship between insulin resistance and mitochondrial dysfunction, we compared mitochondrial metabolism in induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) from 5 healthy individuals and 4 patients with genetic insulin resistance due to insulin receptor mutations. Insulin-resistant iPSC had increased mitochondrial number and decreased mitochondrial size. Mitochondrial oxidative function was impaired, with decreased citrate synthase activity and spare respiratory capacity. Simultaneously, expression of multiple glycolytic enzymes was decreased, while lactate production increased 80%. These perturbations were accompanied by an increase in ADP/ATP ratio and 3-fold increase in AMPK activity, indicating energetic stress. Insulin-resistant iPSC also showed reduced catalase activity and increased susceptibility to oxidative stress. Thus, insulin resistance can lead to mitochondrial dysfunction with reduced mitochondrial size, oxidative activity, and energy production. PMID:26948272

  4. Compensatory islet response to insulin resistance revealed by quantitative proteomics

    SciTech Connect

    El Ouaamari, Abdelfattah; Zhou, Jian -Ying; Liew, Chong Wee; Shirakawa, Jun; Dirice, Ercument; Gedeon, Nicholas; Kahraman, Sevim; De Jesus, Dario F.; Bhatt, Shweta; Kim, Jong -Seo; Clauss, Therese R. W.; Camp, II, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Qian, Wei -Jun; Kulkarni, Rohit N.

    2015-07-07

    Compensatory islet response is a distinct feature of the pre-diabetic insulin resistant state in humans and rodents. To identify alterations in the islet proteome that characterize the adaptive response, we analyzed islets from five-month-old male control, high-fat diet fed (HFD) or obese ob/ob mice by LC-MS(/MS) and quantified ~1,100 islet proteins (at least two peptides) with a false discovery rate <1%. Significant alterations in abundance were observed for ~350 proteins between groups. A majority of alterations were common to both models, and the changes of a subset of ~40 proteins and 12 proteins were verified by targeted quantification using selected reaction monitoring and Western blots, respectively. The insulin resistant islets in both groups exhibited reduced expression of proteins controlling energy metabolism, oxidative phosphorylation, hormone processing, and secretory pathways. Conversely, an increased expression of molecules involved in protein synthesis and folding suggested effects in endoplasmic reticulum stress response, cell survival, and proliferation in both insulin resistant models. In conclusion, we report a unique comparison of the islet proteome that is focused on the compensatory response in two insulin resistant rodent models that are not overtly diabetic. In conclusion, these data provide a valuable resource of candidate proteins to the scientific community to undertake further studies aimed at enhancing β-cell mass in patients with diabetes. The data are available via the MassIVE repository, with accession MSV000079093.

  5. Compensatory islet response to insulin resistance revealed by quantitative proteomics

    DOE PAGESBeta

    El Ouaamari, Abdelfattah; Zhou, Jian -Ying; Liew, Chong Wee; Shirakawa, Jun; Dirice, Ercument; Gedeon, Nicholas; Kahraman, Sevim; De Jesus, Dario F.; Bhatt, Shweta; Kim, Jong -Seo; et al

    2015-07-07

    Compensatory islet response is a distinct feature of the pre-diabetic insulin resistant state in humans and rodents. To identify alterations in the islet proteome that characterize the adaptive response, we analyzed islets from five-month-old male control, high-fat diet fed (HFD) or obese ob/ob mice by LC-MS(/MS) and quantified ~1,100 islet proteins (at least two peptides) with a false discovery rate <1%. Significant alterations in abundance were observed for ~350 proteins between groups. A majority of alterations were common to both models, and the changes of a subset of ~40 proteins and 12 proteins were verified by targeted quantification using selectedmore » reaction monitoring and Western blots, respectively. The insulin resistant islets in both groups exhibited reduced expression of proteins controlling energy metabolism, oxidative phosphorylation, hormone processing, and secretory pathways. Conversely, an increased expression of molecules involved in protein synthesis and folding suggested effects in endoplasmic reticulum stress response, cell survival, and proliferation in both insulin resistant models. In conclusion, we report a unique comparison of the islet proteome that is focused on the compensatory response in two insulin resistant rodent models that are not overtly diabetic. In conclusion, these data provide a valuable resource of candidate proteins to the scientific community to undertake further studies aimed at enhancing β-cell mass in patients with diabetes. The data are available via the MassIVE repository, with accession MSV000079093.« less

  6. Chronic Glucocorticoid-Rich Milieu and Liver Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Castro, María Cecilia

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the impact of chronic hypercorticosteronemia (due to neonatal monosodium L-glutamate, MSG, and treatment) on liver oxidative stress (OS), inflammation, and carbohydrate/lipid metabolism in adult male rats. We evaluated the peripheral concentrations of several metabolic and OS markers and insulin resistance indexes. In liver we assessed (a) OS (GSH and protein carbonyl groups) and inflammatory (IL-1b, TNFa, and PAI-1) biomarkers and (b) carbohydrate and lipid metabolisms. MSG rats displayed degenerated optic nerves, hypophagia, low body and liver weights, and enlarged adipose tissue mass; higher peripheral levels of glucose, triglycerides, insulin, uric acid, leptin, corticosterone, transaminases and TBARS, and peripheral and liver insulin resistance; elevated liver OS, inflammation markers, and glucokinase (mRNA/activity) and fructokinase (mRNA). Additionally, MSG liver phosphofructokinase-2, glucose-6-phosphatase (mRNA and activity) and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, Chrebp, Srebp1c, fatty acid synthase, and glycerol-3-phosphate (mRNAs) were increased. In conclusion adult MSG rats developed an insulin-resistant state and increased OS and serious hepatic dysfunction characterized by inflammation and metabolic signs suggesting increased lipogenesis. These features, shared by both metabolic and Cushing's syndrome human phenotypes, support that a chronic glucocorticoid-rich endogenous environment mainly impacts on hepatic glucose cycle, displacing local metabolism to lipogenesis. Whether correcting the glucocorticoid-rich environment ameliorates such dysfunctions requires further investigation.

  7. Chronic Glucocorticoid-Rich Milieu and Liver Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Castro, María Cecilia

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the impact of chronic hypercorticosteronemia (due to neonatal monosodium L-glutamate, MSG, and treatment) on liver oxidative stress (OS), inflammation, and carbohydrate/lipid metabolism in adult male rats. We evaluated the peripheral concentrations of several metabolic and OS markers and insulin resistance indexes. In liver we assessed (a) OS (GSH and protein carbonyl groups) and inflammatory (IL-1b, TNFa, and PAI-1) biomarkers and (b) carbohydrate and lipid metabolisms. MSG rats displayed degenerated optic nerves, hypophagia, low body and liver weights, and enlarged adipose tissue mass; higher peripheral levels of glucose, triglycerides, insulin, uric acid, leptin, corticosterone, transaminases and TBARS, and peripheral and liver insulin resistance; elevated liver OS, inflammation markers, and glucokinase (mRNA/activity) and fructokinase (mRNA). Additionally, MSG liver phosphofructokinase-2, glucose-6-phosphatase (mRNA and activity) and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, Chrebp, Srebp1c, fatty acid synthase, and glycerol-3-phosphate (mRNAs) were increased. In conclusion adult MSG rats developed an insulin-resistant state and increased OS and serious hepatic dysfunction characterized by inflammation and metabolic signs suggesting increased lipogenesis. These features, shared by both metabolic and Cushing's syndrome human phenotypes, support that a chronic glucocorticoid-rich endogenous environment mainly impacts on hepatic glucose cycle, displacing local metabolism to lipogenesis. Whether correcting the glucocorticoid-rich environment ameliorates such dysfunctions requires further investigation. PMID:27597864

  8. Chronic Glucocorticoid-Rich Milieu and Liver Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Villagarcía, Hernán Gonzalo; Sabugo, Vanesa; Castro, María Cecilia; Schinella, Guillermo; Castrogiovanni, Daniel; Spinedi, Eduardo; Massa, María Laura; Francini, Flavio

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the impact of chronic hypercorticosteronemia (due to neonatal monosodium L-glutamate, MSG, and treatment) on liver oxidative stress (OS), inflammation, and carbohydrate/lipid metabolism in adult male rats. We evaluated the peripheral concentrations of several metabolic and OS markers and insulin resistance indexes. In liver we assessed (a) OS (GSH and protein carbonyl groups) and inflammatory (IL-1b, TNFa, and PAI-1) biomarkers and (b) carbohydrate and lipid metabolisms. MSG rats displayed degenerated optic nerves, hypophagia, low body and liver weights, and enlarged adipose tissue mass; higher peripheral levels of glucose, triglycerides, insulin, uric acid, leptin, corticosterone, transaminases and TBARS, and peripheral and liver insulin resistance; elevated liver OS, inflammation markers, and glucokinase (mRNA/activity) and fructokinase (mRNA). Additionally, MSG liver phosphofructokinase-2, glucose-6-phosphatase (mRNA and activity) and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, Chrebp, Srebp1c, fatty acid synthase, and glycerol-3-phosphate (mRNAs) were increased. In conclusion adult MSG rats developed an insulin-resistant state and increased OS and serious hepatic dysfunction characterized by inflammation and metabolic signs suggesting increased lipogenesis. These features, shared by both metabolic and Cushing's syndrome human phenotypes, support that a chronic glucocorticoid-rich endogenous environment mainly impacts on hepatic glucose cycle, displacing local metabolism to lipogenesis. Whether correcting the glucocorticoid-rich environment ameliorates such dysfunctions requires further investigation. PMID:27597864

  9. A senescence secretory switch mediated by PI3K/AKT/mTOR activation controls chemoprotective endothelial secretory responses.

    PubMed

    Bent, Eric H; Gilbert, Luke A; Hemann, Michael T

    2016-08-15

    Cancer therapy targets malignant cells that are surrounded by a diverse complement of nonmalignant stromal cells. Therapy-induced damage of normal cells can alter the tumor microenvironment, causing cellular senescence and activating cancer-promoting inflammation. However, how these damage responses are regulated (both induced and resolved) to preserve tissue homeostasis and prevent chronic inflammation is poorly understood. Here, we detail an acute chemotherapy-induced secretory response that is self-limiting in vitro and in vivo despite the induction of cellular senescence. We used tissue-specific knockout mice to demonstrate that endothelial production of the proinflammatory cytokine IL-6 promotes chemoresistance and show that the chemotherapeutic doxorubicin induces acute IL-6 release through reactive oxygen species-mediated p38 activation in vitro. Doxorubicin causes endothelial senescence but, surprisingly, without a typical senescence secretory response. We found that endothelial cells repress senescence-associated inflammation through the down-regulation of PI3K/AKT/mTOR signaling and that reactivation of this pathway restores senescence-associated inflammation. Thus, we describe a mechanism by which damage-associated paracrine secretory responses are restrained to preserve tissue homeostasis and prevent chronic inflammation. PMID:27566778

  10. Importance of transcapillary insulin transport on insulin action in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Y.J.

    1989-01-01

    The relationship between transcapillary insulin transport and insulin action was examined in normal conscious dogs. Plasma and thoracic duct lymph insulin, and insulin action were simultaneously measured during euglycemic clamps and intravenous glucose tolerance tests. During the clamps, while {sup 14}C-inulin reached an equilibrium, steady-state (ss) plasma insulin was higher than lymph and the ratio of 3:2 was maintained during basal, activation and deactivation phases: 18 {+-} 2 vs. 12 {+-} 1, 51 {+-} 2 vs. 32 {+-} 1, and 18 {+-} 3 vs. 13 {+-} 1 {mu}U/ml. In addition, it took longer for lymph insulin to reach ss than plasma insulin during activation and deactivation: 11 {+-} 2 vs. 31 {+-} 5 and 8 {+-} 2 vs. 32 {+-} 6 min. During IVGTT, plasma insulin peaked within 5 {+-} 2 min; lymph insulin rose slowly to a lower peak. The significant gradient and delay between plasma and lymph insulin concentrations suggest a restricted transcapillary insulin transport.

  11. Protein Crystal Bovine Insulin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The comparison of protein crystal, Bovine Insulin space-grown (left) and earth-grown (right). Facilitates the incorporation of glucose into cells. In diabetics, there is either a decrease in or complete lack of insulin, thereby leading to several harmful complications. Principal Investigator is Larry DeLucas.

  12. β-Cell dysfunction in diabetes: a crisis of identity?

    PubMed

    Brereton, M F; Rohm, M; Ashcroft, F M

    2016-09-01

    Type 2 diabetes is characterized by insulin resistance and a progressive loss of β-cell function induced by a combination of both β-cell loss and impaired insulin secretion from remaining β-cells. Here, we review the fate of the β-cell under chronic hyperglycaemic conditions with regard to β-cell mass, gene expression, hormone content, secretory capacity and the ability to de- or transdifferentiate into other cell types. We compare data from various in vivo and in vitro models of diabetes with a novel mouse model of inducible, reversible hyperglycaemia (βV59M mice). We suggest that insulin staining using standard histological methods may not always provide an accurate estimation of β-cell mass or number. We consider how β-cell identity is best defined, and whether expression of transcription factors normally found in islet progenitor cells, or in α-cells, implies that mature β-cells have undergone dedifferentiation or transdifferentiation. We propose that even in long-standing diabetes, β-cells predominantly remain β-cells-but not as we know them. PMID:27615138

  13. A Unifying Organ Model of Pancreatic Insulin Secretion

    PubMed Central

    De Gaetano, Andrea; Gaz, Claudio; Palumbo, Pasquale; Panunzi, Simona

    2015-01-01

    The secretion of insulin by the pancreas has been the object of much attention over the past several decades. Insulin is known to be secreted by pancreatic β-cells in response to hyperglycemia: its blood concentrations however exhibit both high-frequency (period approx. 10 minutes) and low-frequency oscillations (period approx. 1.5 hours). Furthermore, characteristic insulin secretory response to challenge maneuvers have been described, such as frequency entrainment upon sinusoidal glycemic stimulation; substantial insulin peaks following minimal glucose administration; progressively strengthened insulin secretion response after repeated administration of the same amount of glucose; insulin and glucose characteristic curves after Intra-Venous administration of glucose boli in healthy and pre-diabetic subjects as well as in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus. Previous modeling of β-cell physiology has been mainly directed to the intracellular chain of events giving rise to single-cell or cell-cluster hormone release oscillations, but the large size, long period and complex morphology of the diverse responses to whole-body glucose stimuli has not yet been coherently explained. Starting with the seminal work of Grodsky it was hypothesized that the population of pancreatic β-cells, possibly functionally aggregated in islets of Langerhans, could be viewed as a set of independent, similar, but not identical controllers (firing units) with distributed functional parameters. The present work shows how a single model based on a population of independent islet controllers can reproduce very closely a diverse array of actually observed experimental results, with the same set of working parameters. The model’s success in reproducing a diverse array of experiments implies that, in order to understand the macroscopic behaviour of the endocrine pancreas in regulating glycemia, there is no need to hypothesize intrapancreatic pacemakers, influences between different islets of Langerhans

  14. Soybean diet improves insulin secretion through activation of cAMP/PKA pathway in rats.

    PubMed

    Veloso, Roberto V; Latorraca, Márcia Q; Arantes, Vanessa C; Reis, Marise A B; Ferreira, Fabiano; Boschero, Antonio C; Carneiro, Everardo M

    2008-11-01

    Maternal malnutrition leads to permanent alterations in insulin secretion of offspring and the soybean diet contributes to improve insulin release. At least a soy component, genistein, seems to increase the insulin secretion by activating the cAMP/PKA and PLC/PKC pathways. Here, we investigated the effect of the soybean diet on the expression of PKAalpha and PKCalpha, and insulin secretion in response to glucose and activators of adenylate cyclase and PKC in adult pancreatic rat islets. Rats from mothers fed with 17% or 6% protein (casein) during pregnancy and lactation were maintained with 17% casein (CC and CR groups) or soybean (SC and SR groups) diet until 90 days of life. The soybean diet improved the insulin response to a physiological concentration of glucose in control islets, but only in the presence of supra-physiological concentrations of glucose in islets from CR and SR groups. PMA also improved the insulin response in islets of SC and SR groups. The expression of PKCalpha was similar in all groups. Forskolin increased the insulin secretion; however, the magnitude of the increment was lower in islets from CR and SR groups than in control animals and in those from rats maintained with soybean diet than in rats fed with casein diet. The PKAalpha expression was similar between SR and CR groups and lower in SC than in CC islets. Thus, soybean diet improved the secretory pattern of beta cells, at least in part, by activating the cAMP/PKA-signaling cascade. PMID:18430554

  15. Insulin Resistance of Puberty.

    PubMed

    Kelsey, Megan M; Zeitler, Philip S

    2016-07-01

    Puberty is a time of considerable metabolic and hormonal change. Notably, puberty is associated with a marked decrease in insulin sensitivity, on par with that seen during pregnancy. In otherwise healthy youth, there is a nadir in insulin sensitivity in mid-puberty, and then it recovers at puberty completion. However, there is evidence that insulin resistance (IR) does not resolve in youth who are obese going into puberty and may result in increased cardiometabolic risk. Little is known about the underlying pathophysiology of IR in puberty, and how it might contribute to increased disease risk (e.g., type 2 diabetes). In this review, we have outlined what is known about the IR in puberty in terms of pattern, potential underlying mechanisms and other mediating factors. We also outline other potentially related metabolic changes that occur during puberty, and effects of underlying insulin resistant states (e.g., obesity) on pubertal changes in insulin sensitivity. PMID:27179965

  16. Autophagy-independent senescence and genome instability driven by targeted telomere dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Mar, Florie A; Debnath, Jayanta; Stohr, Bradley A

    2015-01-01

    Telomere dysfunction plays a complex role in tumorigenesis. While dysfunctional telomeres can block the proliferation of incipient cancer clones by inducing replicative senescence, fusion of dysfunctional telomeres can drive genome instability and oncogenic genomic rearrangements. Therefore, it is important to define the regulatory pathways that guide these opposing effects. Recent work has shown that the autophagy pathway regulates both senescence and genome instability in various contexts. Here, we apply models of acute telomere dysfunction to determine whether autophagy modulates the resulting genome instability and senescence responses. While telomere dysfunction rapidly induces autophagic flux in human fibroblast cell lines, inhibition of the autophagy pathway does not have a significant impact upon the transition to senescence, in contrast to what has previously been reported for oncogene-induced senescence. Our results suggest that this difference may be explained by disparities in the development of the senescence-associated secretory phenotype. We also show that chromosome fusions induced by telomere dysfunction are comparable in autophagy-proficient and autophagy-deficient cells. Altogether, our results highlight the complexity of the senescence-autophagy interface and indicate that autophagy induction is unlikely to play a significant role in telomere dysfunction-driven senescence and chromosome fusions.

  17. Restoring the Secretory Function of Irradiation-Damaged Salivary Gland by Administrating Deferoxamine in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Junye; Cui, Lei; Xu, Minhua; Zheng, Yuanli

    2014-01-01

    Objectives One of the major side effects of radiotherapy for treatments of the head and neck cancer is the radiation-induced dysfunction of salivary glands. The aim of the present study is to investigate the efficacy of deferoxamine (DFO) to restore the secretory function of radiation-damaged salivary glands in mice. Methods DFO (50 mg/kg/d) was administered intraperitoneally in C57BL/6 mice for 3 days before and/or after point-fixed irradiation (18 Gy) of submandibular glands. The total 55 mice were randomly divided into: (1) Normal group: mice received no treatment (n = 5); (2) Irradiation group (IR): mice only received irradiation (n = 5); (3) Pre-DFO group (D+IR) (n = 10); (4) Pre+Post DFO group (D+IR+D) (n = 10); (5) Post-DFO group (IR+D) (n = 10); (6) For each DFO-treated group, the mice were intraperitoneally injected with 0.1 ml sterilized water alone (by which DFO was dissolved) for 3 days before and/or after irradiation, and served as control. Sham1: Pre-sterilized water group (n = 5); sham2: Pre+Post sterilized water group (n = 5); sham3: Post-sterilized water group (n = 5). The salivary flow rate (SFR) was assessed at 30th, 60th and 90th day after irradiation, respectively. After 90 days, all mice were sacrificed and their submandibular glands were removed for further examinations. Results The salivary glands showed remarkable dysfunction and tissue damage after irradiation. DFO restored SFR in the irradiated glands to a level comparable to that in normal glands and angiogenesis in damaged tissue was greatly increased. DFO also increased the expression levels of HIF-1α and VEGF while reduced apoptotic cells. Furthermore, Sca-1+cells were preserved in the salivary glands treated with DFO before IR. Conclusions Our results indicate DFO could prevent the radiation-induced dysfunction of salivary glands in mice. The mechanism of this protective effect may involve increased angiogenesis, reduced apoptosis of acinar cells and

  18. Quantification of endocrine cells and ultrastructural study of insulin granules in the large intestine of opossum Didelphis aurita (Wied-Neuwied, 1826).

    PubMed

    dos Santos, Daiane Cristina Marques; Cupertino, Marli do Carmo; Fialho, Maria do Carmo Queiroz; Barbosa, Alfredo Jose Afonso; Fonseca, Cláudio Cesar; Sartori, Sirlene Souza Rodrigues; da Matta, Sérgio Luis Pinto

    2014-02-01

    This study aimed to investigate the distribution of argyrophil, argentaffin, and insulin-immunoreactive endocrine cells in the large intestine of opossums (Didelphis aurita) and to describe the ultrastructure of the secretory granules of insulin-immunoreactive endocrine cells. Fragments of the large intestine of 10 male specimens of D. aurita were collected, processed, and subjected to staining, immunohistochemistry, and transmission electron microscopy. The argyrophil, the argentaffin, and the insulin-immunoreactive endocrine cells were sparsely distributed in the intestinal glands of the mucous layer, among other cell types of the epithelium in all regions studied. Proportionally, the argyrophil, the argentaffin, and the insulin-immunoreactive endocrine cells represented 62.75%, 36.26%, and 0.99% of the total determined endocrine cells of the large intestine, respectively. Quantitatively, there was no difference between the argyrophil and the argentaffin endocrine cells, whereas insulin-immunoreactive endocrine cells were less numerous. The insulin-immunoreactive endocrine cells were elongated or pyramidal, with rounded nuclei of irregularly contoured, and large amounts of secretory granules distributed throughout the cytoplasm. The granules have different sizes and electron densities and are classified as immature and mature, with the mature granules in predominant form in the overall granular population. In general, the granule is shown with an external electron-lucent halo and electron-dense core. The ultrastructure pattern in the granules of the insulin-immunoreactive endocrine cells was similar to that of the B cells of pancreatic islets in rats.

  19. Insulin resistance in young, lean male subjects with essential hypertension.

    PubMed

    Penesova, A; Cizmarova, E; Belan, V; Blazicek, P; Imrich, R; Vlcek, M; Vigas, M; Selko, D; Koska, J; Radikova, Z

    2011-06-01

    Impaired insulin action, frequently found in essential hypertension (HT), is modified by other factors, such as higher age, accumulation of body fat, dyslipidaemia, impaired glucose metabolism and endothelial dysfunction. In addition, antihypertensive and insulin-sensitizing medication itself may significantly affect cardiovascular and metabolic milieu. The aim of this study was to assess insulin sensitivity, acute insulin response, lipidaemic status and the adipokines' concentrations with regard to abdominal fat distribution in young, lean male subjects with treatment-naïve essential HT and in matched healthy normotensive (NT) subjects. We studied 27 HT patients (age: 19.9±0.6 years; body mass index (BMI): 22.9±0.5 kg m(-2)) and 15 NT controls (age: 22.3±1.0 years; BMI: 23.7±0.6 kg m(-2)). The subjects underwent an oral and an intravenous glucose tolerance test (OGTT, IVGTT) on separate days in random order. Higher fasting insulin (P<0.001), non-esterified fatty acids (P<0.05) and plasminogen activator inhibitor factor 1 concentrations (P<0.05) were found in HT patients when compared with NT patients. Despite comparable anthropometric parameters and body fat distribution assessed by magnetic resonance imaging in both groups, newly diagnosed untreated young hypertensive male subjects showed decreased insulin sensitivity, augmented insulin response to both oral and intravenous glucose load (P<0.01; P<0.05 respectively) and 'higher still normal' 2-h plasma glucose levels during OGTT. Untreated, young, lean hypertensive male subjects, with distribution of abdominal adipose tissue and lipid profile comparable with their healthy NT matched counterparts, showed considerable signs of insulin resistance and hyperinsulinaemia. We hypothesize that insulin resistance is the initial feature, which is influenced by several environmental factors, and HT is one of their common consequences. PMID:20631738

  20. Protein malnutrition potentiates the amplifying pathway of insulin secretion in adult obese mice.

    PubMed

    Leite, Nayara Carvalho; de Paula, Flávia; Borck, Patrícia Cristine; Vettorazzi, Jean Franciesco; Branco, Renato Chaves Souto; Lubaczeuski, Camila; Boschero, Antonio Carlos; Zoppi, Claudio Cesar; Carneiro, Everardo Magalhães

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic beta cell (β) dysfunction is an outcome of malnutrition. We assessed the role of the amplifying pathway (AMP PATH) in β cells in malnourished obese mice. C57Bl-6 mice were fed a control (C) or a low-protein diet (R). The groups were then fed a high-fat diet (CH and RH). AMP PATH contribution to insulin secretion was assessed upon incubating islets with diazoxide and KCl. CH and RH displayed increased glucose intolerance, insulin resistance and glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. Only RH showed a higher contribution of the AMP PATH. The mitochondrial membrane potential of RH was decreased, and ATP flux was unaltered. In RH islets, glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) protein content and activity increased, and the AMP PATH contribution was reestablished when GDH was blunted. Thus, protein malnutrition induces mitochondrial dysfunction in β cells, leading to an increased contribution of the AMP PATH to insulin secretion through the enhancement of GDH content and activity.

  1. Protein malnutrition potentiates the amplifying pathway of insulin secretion in adult obese mice

    PubMed Central

    Leite, Nayara Carvalho; de Paula, Flávia; Borck, Patrícia Cristine; Vettorazzi, Jean Franciesco; Branco, Renato Chaves Souto; Lubaczeuski, Camila; Boschero, Antonio Carlos; Zoppi, Claudio Cesar; Carneiro, Everardo Magalhães

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic beta cell (β) dysfunction is an outcome of malnutrition. We assessed the role of the amplifying pathway (AMP PATH) in β cells in malnourished obese mice. C57Bl-6 mice were fed a control (C) or a low-protein diet (R). The groups were then fed a high-fat diet (CH and RH). AMP PATH contribution to insulin secretion was assessed upon incubating islets with diazoxide and KCl. CH and RH displayed increased glucose intolerance, insulin resistance and glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. Only RH showed a higher contribution of the AMP PATH. The mitochondrial membrane potential of RH was decreased, and ATP flux was unaltered. In RH islets, glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) protein content and activity increased, and the AMP PATH contribution was reestablished when GDH was blunted. Thus, protein malnutrition induces mitochondrial dysfunction in β cells, leading to an increased contribution of the AMP PATH to insulin secretion through the enhancement of GDH content and activity. PMID:27633083

  2. Protein malnutrition potentiates the amplifying pathway of insulin secretion in adult obese mice.

    PubMed

    Leite, Nayara Carvalho; de Paula, Flávia; Borck, Patrícia Cristine; Vettorazzi, Jean Franciesco; Branco, Renato Chaves Souto; Lubaczeuski, Camila; Boschero, Antonio Carlos; Zoppi, Claudio Cesar; Carneiro, Everardo Magalhães

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic beta cell (β) dysfunction is an outcome of malnutrition. We assessed the role of the amplifying pathway (AMP PATH) in β cells in malnourished obese mice. C57Bl-6 mice were fed a control (C) or a low-protein diet (R). The groups were then fed a high-fat diet (CH and RH). AMP PATH contribution to insulin secretion was assessed upon incubating islets with diazoxide and KCl. CH and RH displayed increased glucose intolerance, insulin resistance and glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. Only RH showed a higher contribution of the AMP PATH. The mitochondrial membrane potential of RH was decreased, and ATP flux was unaltered. In RH islets, glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) protein content and activity increased, and the AMP PATH contribution was reestablished when GDH was blunted. Thus, protein malnutrition induces mitochondrial dysfunction in β cells, leading to an increased contribution of the AMP PATH to insulin secretion through the enhancement of GDH content and activity. PMID:27633083

  3. MicroRNA-34a Induces Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells Senescence by SIRT1 Downregulation and Promotes the Expression of Age-Associated Pro-inflammatory Secretory Factors.

    PubMed

    Badi, Ileana; Burba, Ilaria; Ruggeri, Clarissa; Zeni, Filippo; Bertolotti, Matteo; Scopece, Alessandro; Pompilio, Giulio; Raucci, Angela

    2015-11-01

    Arterial aging is a major risk factor for the occurrence of cardiovascular diseases. The aged artery is characterized by endothelial dysfunction and vascular smooth muscle cells altered physiology together with low-grade chronic inflammation. MicroRNA-34a (miR-34a) has been recently implicated in cardiac, endothelial, and endothelial progenitor cell senescence; however, its contribution to aging-associated vascular smooth muscle cells phenotype has not been explored so far. We found that miR-34a was highly expressed in aortas isolated from old mice. Moreover, its well-known target, the longevity-associated protein SIRT1, was significantly downregulated during aging in both endothelial cells and vascular smooth muscle cells. Increased miR-34a as well as decreased SIRT1 expression was also observed in replicative-senescent human aortic smooth muscle cells. miR-34a overexpression in proliferative human aortic smooth muscle cells caused cell cycle arrest along with enhanced p21 protein levels and evidence of cell senescence. Furthermore, miR-34a ectopic expression induced pro-inflammatory senescence-associated secretory phenotype molecules. Finally, SIRT1 protein significantly decreased upon miR-34a overexpression and restoration of its levels rescued miR-34a-dependent human aortic smooth muscle cells senescence, but not senescence-associated secretory phenotype factors upregulation. Taken together, our findings suggest that aging-associated increase of miR-34a expression levels, by promoting vascular smooth muscle cells senescence and inflammation through SIRT1 downregulation and senescence-associated secretory phenotype factors induction, respectively, may lead to arterial dysfunctions.

  4. Meibomian gland dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Driver, P J; Lemp, M A

    1996-01-01

    Blepharitis is probably the most common disease entity seen in the general ophthalmologist's office. A significant proportion of these cases are secondary to meibomian gland disease. This review outlines our knowledge of the histopathology, lipid abnormalities and role of microorganisms in meibomian gland dysfunction. We will also review the physiology of meibomian gland secretion and present models of meibomian gland dysfunction which have enhanced our knowledge of this condition. The importance of diagnosing associated conditions such as aqueous tear deficiency, contact lens intolerance, rosacea, and seborrheic dermatitis is emphasized. Although this condition causes significant morbidity in the population, there are effective treatments available and these will be discussed.

  5. Postpartum thyroid dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Browne-Martin, K; Emerson, C H

    1997-03-01

    Four disorders of the postpartum period are associated with thyroid dysfunction. The most common is PPT. Although recovery from thyroid dysfunction often occurs in PPT, many patients eventually develop permanent hypothyroidism. Postpartum Graves' Disease is less common than PPT, but it is not unusual. Whereas antithyroid drugs are indicated for postpartum Graves' Disease, they are not useful in PPT. Although they are rare, lymphocytic hypophysitis and postpartum pituitary infarction are important entities because they cause deficiencies of many critical hormones. The autoimmune nature of PPT, postpartum Graves' disease, and lymphocytic hypophysitis highlights the unique effects of pregnancy on the immune system.

  6. [Insulin and physical exercise].

    PubMed

    Louis-Sylvestre, J

    1987-04-01

    Secretion of some pituitary hormones and sympatho-adrenal activity increase very early during exercise. Sympathetic activation is of major importance in cardiovascular adaptation, thermoregulation, etc. Furthermore among the hormonal consequences of such activation those related to insulin are capital. In animal and human subjects basal insulin level decrease during prolonged and progressive exercise. With habitual exercise, both basal and stimulated insulin levels are reduced. It seems that the reduced basal level could be due to alpha-adrenergic inhibition of the islets of Langerhans, while the reduced stimulated response could be the consequence of increased clearance. In trained subjects, in spite of reduced insulin secretion tolerance to glucose is normal due to increased sensitivity to insulin. Sensitivity to insulin is particularly enhanced at the muscular tissue level; it is accompanied by increased hexokinase and glycogen synthetase activity. As a consequence glucose uptake remains optimal at the muscular level. In the liver, both insulin sensitivity and glucokinase activity are reduced, so that glucose is spared and the muscular glycogen store can be restored. At the adipocyte level, metabolic adaptations are such that triglyceride turnover is greatly increased, favouring fuel supply and resaturation of stores.

  7. [Alleged suicide by insulin].

    PubMed

    Birngruber, Christoph G; Krüll, Ralf; Dettmeyer, Reinhard; Verhoff, Marcel A

    2015-01-01

    A 26-year-old man, who was on probation, was found dead in his home by his mother. Insulin vials and 2 insulin pens, which the man's stepfather (an insulin-dependent diabetic) had been missing for over a week, were found next to the deceased. The circumstances suggested suicide by an injected insulin overdose. At the time of the autopsy, the corpse showed already marked signs of autolysis. Clinical chemical tests confirmed the injection of insulin, but indicated hyperglycemia at the time of death. Toxicological analyses revealed that the man had consumed amphetamine, cannabinoids, and tramadol in the recent past. Histological examination finally revealed extensive bronchopneumonia as the cause of death. The most plausible explanation for the results of the autopsy and the additional examinations was an injection of insulin as a failed attempt of self-treatment. It is conceivable that the man had discovered by a rapid test that he was a diabetic, but had decided not to go to a doctor to avoid disclosure of parole violation due to continued drug abuse. He may have misinterpreted the symptoms caused by his worsening bronchitis and the developing bronchopneumonia as symptoms of a diabetic metabolic status and may have felt compelled to treat himself with insulin. PMID:26419091

  8. Tagging insulin in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dobeck, Michael; Nelson, Ronald S.

    1992-01-01

    Knowing the exact subcellular sites of action of insulin in the body has the potential to give basic science investigators a basis from which a cause and cure for this disease can be approached. The goal of this project is to create a test reagent that can be used to visualize these subcellular sites. The unique microgravity environment of the Shuttle will allow the creation of a reagent that has the possibility of elucidating the subcellular sites of action of insulin. Several techniques have been used in an attempt to isolate the sites of action of items such as insulin. One of these is autoradiography in which the test item is obtained from animals fed radioactive materials. What is clearly needed is to visualize individual insulin molecules at their sites of action. The insulin tagging process to be used on G-399 involves the conjugation of insulin molecules with ferritin molecules to create a reagent that will be used back on Earth in an attempt to elucidate the sites of action of insulin.

  9. The effects and mechanisms of insulin on systemic inflammatory response and immune cells in severe trauma, burn injury, and sepsis.

    PubMed

    Deng, Hu-Ping; Chai, Jia-Ke

    2009-10-01

    Insulin resistance, hyperglycemia, inflammatory disorders and immune dysfunction cause high morbidity and mortality in patients with severe trauma, burn injuries, or sepsis. Many studies have shown that intensive insulin therapy can combat insulin resistance, decrease blood glucose levels, and induce anabolic processes, thus, decreasing morbidity and mortality. Moreover, in recent years, it has been proven that insulin can attenuate systemic inflammatory responses and modulate the proliferation, apoptosis, differentiation and immune functions of certain immune cells, especially monocytes/macrophages, neutrophils, and T cells associated with severe trauma, burn injury, or sepsis. This effect of insulin may expand our understanding of intensive insulin therapy in critically ill patients. This review attempts to summarize studies on the modulatory effects and mechanisms of insulin therapy on systemic inflammation and immune cells in severe trauma, burn injury and sepsis, and further propose some questions for future studies.

  10. Amelogenins as Potential Buffers during Secretory-stage Amelogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Guo, J.; Lyaruu, D.M.; Takano, Y.; Gibson, C.W.; DenBesten, P.K.

    2015-01-01

    Amelogenins are the most abundant protein species in forming dental enamel, taken to regulate crystal shape and crystal growth. Unprotonated amelogenins can bind protons, suggesting that amelogenins could regulate the pH in enamel in situ. We hypothesized that without amelogenins the enamel would acidify unless ameloblasts were buffered by alternative ways. To investigate this, we measured the mineral and chloride content in incisor enamel of amelogenin-knockout (AmelX-/-) mice and determined the pH of enamel by staining with methyl-red. Ameloblasts were immunostained for anion exchanger-2 (Ae2), a transmembrane pH regulator sensitive for acid that secretes bicarbonate in exchange for chloride. The enamel of AmelX-/- mice was 10-fold thinner, mineralized in the secretory stage 1.8-fold more than wild-type enamel and containing less chloride (suggesting more bicarbonate secretion). Enamel of AmelX-/- mice stained with methyl-red contained no acidic bands in the maturation stage as seen in wild-type enamel. Secretory ameloblasts of AmelX-/- mice, but not wild-type mice, were immunopositive for Ae2, and stained more intensely in the maturation stage compared with wild-type mice. Exposure of AmelX-/- mice to fluoride enhanced the mineral content in the secretory stage, lowered chloride, and intensified Ae2 immunostaining in the enamel organ in comparison with non-fluorotic mutant teeth. The results suggest that unprotonated amelogenins may regulate the pH of forming enamel in situ. Without amelogenins, Ae2 could compensate for the pH drop associated with crystal formation. PMID:25535204

  11. Secretory immunity with special reference to the oral cavity

    PubMed Central

    Brandtzaeg, Per

    2013-01-01

    The two principal antibody classes present in saliva are secretory IgA (SIgA) and IgG; the former is produced as dimeric IgA by local plasma cells (PCs) in the stroma of salivary glands and is transported through secretory epithelia by the polymeric Ig receptor (pIgR), also named membrane secretory component (SC). Most IgG in saliva is derived from the blood circulation by passive leakage mainly via gingival crevicular epithelium, although some may be locally produced in the gingiva or salivary glands. Gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT) and nasopharynx-associated lymphoid tissue (NALT) do not contribute equally to the pool of memory/effector B cells differentiating to mucosal PCs throughout the body. Thus, enteric immunostimulation may not be the best way to activate the production of salivary IgA antibodies although the level of specific SIgA in saliva may still reflect an intestinal immune response after enteric immunization. It remains unknown whether the IgA response in submandibular/sublingual glands is better related to B-cell induction in GALT than the parotid response. Such disparity is suggested by the levels of IgA in submandibular secretions of AIDS patients, paralleling their highly upregulated intestinal IgA system, while the parotid IgA level is decreased. Parotid SIgA could more consistently be linked to immune induction in palatine tonsils/adenoids (human NALT) and cervical lymph nodes, as supported by the homing molecule profile observed after immune induction at these sites. Several other variables influence the levels of antibodies in salivary secretions. These include difficulties with reproducibility and standardization of immunoassays, the impact of flow rate, acute or chronic stress, protein loss during sample handling, and uncontrolled admixture of serum-derived IgG and monomeric IgA. Despite these problems, saliva is an easily accessible biological fluid with interesting scientific and clinical potentials. PMID:23487566

  12. Orchestration of secretory protein folding by ER chaperones

    PubMed Central

    Gidalevitz, Tali; Stevens, Fred; Argon, Yair

    2013-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum is a major compartment of protein biogenesis in the cell, dedicated to production of secretory, membrane and organelle proteins. The secretome has distinct structural and post-translational characteristics, since folding in the ER occurs in an environment that is distinct in terms of its ionic composition, dynamics and requirements for quality contol. The folding machinery in the ER therefore includes chaperones and folding enzymes that introduce, monitor and react to disulfide bonds, glycans, and fluctuations of luminal calcium. We describe the major chaperone networks in the lumen and discuss how they have distinct modes of operation that enable cells to accomplish highly efficient production of the secretome. PMID:23507200

  13. Insulin and the law.

    PubMed

    Marks, Vincent

    2015-11-01

    Hypoglycaemia, if it can be proved, may be used as a defence against almost any criminal charge provided it can be established that the perpetrator was in a state of neuroglycopenic (hypoglycaemic) automatism at the time of the offence. Hypoglycaemia produced by exogenous insulin can also be used as a suicidal or homicidal weapon. This paper discusses some of the pitfalls confronting the investigator of suspected insulin misuse including problems arising from the increasing prevalence of insulin analogues and the unreliability of immunoassays for their detection and measurement in the forensic context. PMID:26092979

  14. Distinct Actions of Rab3 and Rab27 GTPases on Late Stages of Exocytosis of Insulin

    PubMed Central

    Cazares, Victor A.; Subramani, Arasakumar; Saldate, Johnny J.; Hoerauf, Widmann; Stuenkel, Edward L.

    2014-01-01

    Rab GTPases associated with insulin containing secretory granules are key in targeting, docking and assembly of molecular complexes governing pancreatic β-cell exocytosis. Four Rab3 isoforms along with Rab27A are associated with insulin granules, yet elucidation of the distinct roles of these Rab families on exocytosis remains unclear. To define specific actions of these Rab families we employ Rab3GAP and/or EPI64A GTPase activating protein overexpression in β-cells from wild-type or Ashen mice to selectively transit the entire Rab3 family or Rab27A to a GDP-bound state. Ashen mice carry a spontaneous mutation that eliminates Rab27A expression. Using membrane capacitance measurements we find that GTP/GDP nucleotide cycling of Rab27A is essential for generation of the functionally defined immediately releasable pool and central to regulating the size of the readily releasable pool. By comparison, nucleotide cycling of Rab3 GTPases, but not of Rab27A, is essential for a kinetically rapid filling of the readily releasable pool with secretory granules. Aside from these distinct functions, Rab3 and Rab27A GTPases demonstrate considerable functional overlap in building the readily releasable granule pool. Hence, while Rab3 and Rab27A cooperate to generate release-ready secretory granules in β-cells, they also direct unique kinetic and functional properties of the exocytotic pathway. PMID:24909540

  15. Insulin inhalation: NN 1998.

    PubMed

    2004-01-01

    Aradigm Corporation has developed an inhaled form of insulin using its proprietary AERx drug delivery system. The system uses liquid insulin that is converted into an aerosol containing very small particles (1-3 micro in diameter), and an electronic device suitable for either the rapid transfer of molecules of insulin into the bloodstream or localised delivery within the lung. The AERx insulin Diabetes Management System (iDMS), AERx iDMS, instructs the user on breathing technique to achieve the best results. Aradigm Corporation and Novo Nordisk have signed an agreement to jointly develop a pulmonary delivery system for insulin [AERx iDMS, NN 1998]. Under the terms of the agreement, Novo Nordisk has exclusive rights for worldwide marketing of any products resulting from the development programme. Aradigm Corporation will initially manufacture the product covered by the agreement, and in return will receive a share of the overall gross profits from Novo Nordisk's sales. Novo Nordisk will cover all development costs incurred by Aradigm Corporation while both parties will co-fund final development of the AERx device. Both companies will explore the possibilities of the AERx platform to deliver other compounds for the regulation of blood glucose levels. Additionally, the agreement gives Novo Nordisk an option to develop the technology for delivery of agents outside the diabetes area. In April 2001, Aradigm Corporation received a milestone payment from Novo Nordisk related to the completion of certain clinical and product development stages of the AERx drug delivery system. Profil, a CRO in Germany, is cooperating with Aradigm and Novo Nordisk in the development of inhaled insulin. Aradigm and Novo Nordisk initiated a pivotal phase III study with inhaled insulin formulation in September 2002. This 24-month, 300-patient trial is evaluating inhaled insulin in comparison with insulin aspart. Both medications will be given three times daily before meals in addition to basal

  16. HAP1 helps to regulate actin-based transport of insulin-containing granules in pancreatic β cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhiyong; Peng, Ting; Wu, Hongnian; He, Jun; Li, He

    2015-07-01

    Huntingtin-associated protein 1 (HAP1) is enriched in neurons and binds to polyglutamine-expanded huntingtin. It consists of two alternatively spliced isoforms, HAP1A and HAP1B, which differ only in their short C-terminal sequences. Both HAP1A and HAP1B have been also detected in pancreatic β cells, where the loss of HAP1 impairs glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. Here, we use time-lapse laser scanning confocal microscopy to provide direct evidence that HAP1A, but not HAP1B, co-localizes and co-migrates with insulin-containing vesicles and actin-based myosin Va motor protein in the INS-1 pancreatic β cell line. Knocking down HAP1 expression using small interfering RNA significantly inhibited actin-based transport of insulin vesicles following glucose stimulation. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments demonstrated interaction between HAP1A, myosin Va, and phogrin, a transmembrane protein in insulin-containing vesicles. Stimulating INS-1 cells with glucose increased the association of HAP1A with myosin Va, while silencing HAP1 expression reduced the association of myosin Va with phogrin after glucose stimulation, without affecting levels of myosin Va or actin. Our results provide real-time evidence in living cells that HAP1 may help regulate transport of insulin-containing secretory granules along cortical actin filaments. This also raises the possibility that HAP1 may play an important role in actin-based secretory vesicle trafficking in neurons. PMID:25744490

  17. Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Boland, Michelle L.; Chourasia, Aparajita H.; Macleod, Kay F.

    2013-01-01

    A mechanistic understanding of how mitochondrial dysfunction contributes to cell growth and tumorigenesis is emerging beyond Warburg as an area of research that is under-explored in terms of its significance for clinical management of cancer. Work discussed in this review focuses less on the Warburg effect and more on mitochondria and how dysfunctional mitochondria modulate cell cycle, gene expression, metabolism, cell viability, and other established aspects of cell growth and stress responses. There is increasing evidence that key oncogenes and tumor suppressors modulate mitochondrial dynamics through important signaling pathways and that mitochondrial mass and function vary between tumors and individuals but the significance of these events for cancer are not fully appreciated. We explore the interplay between key molecules involved in mitochondrial fission and fusion and in apoptosis, as well as in mitophagy, biogenesis, and spatial dynamics of mitochondria and consider how these distinct mechanisms are coordinated in response to physiological stresses such as hypoxia and nutrient deprivation. Importantly, we examine how deregulation of these processes in cancer has knock on effects for cell proliferation and growth. We define major forms of mitochondrial dysfunction and address the extent to which the functional consequences of such dysfunction can be determined and exploited for cancer diagnosis and treatment. PMID:24350057

  18. Perceptual-Motor Dysfunction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pyfer, Jean L.

    Discussed are theoretical and treatment aspects of perceptual motor dysfunction and rehabilitation in 4- to 12-year-old academically failing children involved in a 3-year investigation at the University of Kansas. The program is said to stress increasing the amount of stimulation received by sensory receptors of the vestibular, reflex, and haptic…

  19. Shared Parenting Dysfunction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turkat, Ira Daniel

    2002-01-01

    Joint custody of children is the most prevalent court ordered arrangement for families of divorce. A growing body of literature indicates that many parents engage in behaviors that are incompatible with shared parenting. This article provides specific criteria for a definition of the Shared Parenting Dysfunction. Clinical aspects of the phenomenon…

  20. Insulin Delivery System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    When Programmable Implantable Medication System (PIMS) is implanted in human body, it delivers precise programmed amounts of insulin over long periods of time. Mini-Med Technologies has been refining the Technologies since initial development at APL. The size of a hockey puck, and encased in titanium shell, PIMS holds about 2 1/2 teaspoons of insulin at a programmed basal rate. If a change in measured blood sugar level dictates a different dose, the patient can vary the amount of insulin delivered by holding a small radio transceiver over the implanted system and dialing in a specific program held in the PIMS computer memory. Insulin refills are accomplished approximately 4 times a year by hypodermic needle.

  1. All about Insulin Resistance

    MedlinePlus

    ... news is that cutting calories, being active, and losing weight can reverse insulin resistance and lower your ... you’ll lose weight. Studies have shown that losing even 7% of your weight, may help. For ...

  2. Calcium dynamics in the secretory granules of neuroendocrine cells.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Javier

    2012-01-01

    Cellular Ca(2+)signaling results from a complex interplay among a variety of Ca(2+) fluxes going across the plasma membrane and across the membranes of several organelles, together with the buffering effect of large numbers of Ca(2+)-binding sites distributed along the cell architecture. Endoplasmic and sarcoplasmic reticulum, mitochondria and even nucleus have all been involved in cellular Ca(2+) signaling, and the mechanisms for Ca(2+) uptake and release from these organelles are well known. In neuroendocrine cells, the secretory granules also constitute a very important Ca(2+)-storing organelle, and the possible role of the stored Ca(2+) as a trigger for secretion has attracted considerable attention. However, this possibility is frequently overlooked, and the main reason for that is that there is still considerable uncertainty on the main questions related with granular Ca(2+) dynamics, e.g., the free granular [Ca(2+)], the physical state of the stored Ca(2+) or the mechanisms for Ca(2+) accumulation and release from the granules. This review will give a critical overview of the present state of knowledge and the main conflicting points on secretory granule Ca(2+) homeostasis in neuroendocrine cells.

  3. Widespread occurrence of expressed fungal secretory peroxidases in forest soils.

    PubMed

    Kellner, Harald; Luis, Patricia; Pecyna, Marek J; Barbi, Florian; Kapturska, Danuta; Krüger, Dirk; Zak, Donald R; Marmeisse, Roland; Vandenbol, Micheline; Hofrichter, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Fungal secretory peroxidases mediate fundamental ecological functions in the conversion and degradation of plant biomass. Many of these enzymes have strong oxidizing activities towards aromatic compounds and are involved in the degradation of plant cell wall (lignin) and humus. They comprise three major groups: class II peroxidases (including lignin peroxidase, manganese peroxidase, versatile peroxidase and generic peroxidase), dye-decolorizing peroxidases, and heme-thiolate peroxidases (e.g. unspecific/aromatic peroxygenase, chloroperoxidase). Here, we have repeatedly observed a widespread expression of all major peroxidase groups in leaf and needle litter across a range of forest ecosystems (e.g. Fagus, Picea, Acer, Quercus, and Populus spp.), which are widespread in Europe and North America. Manganese peroxidases and unspecific peroxygenases were found expressed in all nine investigated forest sites, and dye-decolorizing peroxidases were observed in five of the nine sites, thereby indicating biological significance of these enzymes for fungal physiology and ecosystem processes. Transcripts of selected secretory peroxidase genes were also analyzed in pure cultures of several litter-decomposing species and other fungi. Using this information, we were able to match, in environmental litter samples, two manganese peroxidase sequences to Mycena galopus and Mycena epipterygia and one unspecific peroxygenase transcript to Mycena galopus, suggesting an important role of this litter- and coarse woody debris-dwelling genus in the disintegration and transformation of litter aromatics and organic matter formation.

  4. Auxilin facilitates membrane traffic in the early secretory pathway.

    PubMed

    Ding, Jingzhen; Segarra, Verónica A; Chen, Shuliang; Cai, Huaqing; Lemmon, Sandra K; Ferro-Novick, Susan

    2016-01-01

    Coat protein complexes contain an inner shell that sorts cargo and an outer shell that helps deform the membrane to give the vesicle its shape. There are three major types of coated vesicles in the cell: COPII, COPI, and clathrin. The COPII coat complex facilitates vesicle budding from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), while the COPI coat complex performs an analogous function in the Golgi. Clathrin-coated vesicles mediate traffic from the cell surface and between the trans-Golgi and endosome. While the assembly and structure of these coat complexes has been extensively studied, the disassembly of COPII and COPI coats from membranes is less well understood. We describe a proteomic and genetic approach that connects the J-domain chaperone auxilin, which uncoats clathrin-coated vesicles, to COPII and COPI coat complexes. Consistent with a functional role for auxilin in the early secretory pathway, auxilin binds to COPII and COPI coat subunits. Furthermore, ER-Golgi and intra-Golgi traffic is delayed at 15°C in swa2Δ mutant cells, which lack auxilin. In the case of COPII vesicles, we link this delay to a defect in vesicle fusion. We propose that auxilin acts as a chaperone and/or uncoating factor for transport vesicles that act in the early secretory pathway.

  5. Secretory immunity and the bacterial IgA proteases.

    PubMed

    Kornfeld, S J; Plaut, A G

    1981-01-01

    The characteristics and functions of microbial IgA proteases are reviewed. These enzymes represent a structurally heterogeneous group of proteins that are secreted into the extracellular environment by bacteria capable of causing human disease. The IgA proteases, which vary in their requirements for metal ions, are neutral endopeptidases whose role in the infectious process is not known but whose pronounced substrate specificity for human proteins of the IgA1 subclass has repeatedly been demonstrated. As reagents, the IgA proteases are useful in cleaving IgA molecules to yield intact Fc alpha and Fab alpha fragments that will allow the study of the structure and function of the two large regions of IgA immunoglobulin proteins. The role, if any, of these enzymes in promoting infection by pathogenic members of the genera Neisseria, Hemophilus, and Streptococcus is not known, although the secretory immune system is primarily mediated by antibodies of the IgA isotype, among which are IgA1 subclass proteins, and these proteins are susceptible to cleavage by IgA protease. The determination of the role of these enzymes in the pathogenesis of human infection must await clearer understanding of antigenicity and antibody function at secretory sites and of the relative roles of the two subclasses of human IgA in immune defense.

  6. Acid-induced secretory cell metaplasia in hamster bronchi

    SciTech Connect

    Christensen, T.G.; Lucey, E.C.; Breuer, R.; Snider, G.L.

    1988-02-01

    Hamsters were exposed to an intratracheal instillation of 0.5 ml of 0.08 N nitric, hydrochloric, or sulfuric acid to determine their airway epithelial response. Three weeks after exposure, the left intrapulmonary bronchi in Alcian blue/PAS-strained paraffin sections were evaluated for the amount of secretory product in the airway epithelium as a measure of secretory cell metaplasia (SCM). Compared to saline-treated control animals, all three acids caused statistically significant SCM. In addition to the bronchial lesion, all three acids caused similar interstitial fibrosis, bronchiolectasis, and bronchiolization of alveoli that varied in individual animals from mild to severe. In a separate experiment to study the persistence of the SCM, hamsters treated with a single instillation of 0.1 N nitric acid showed significant SCM 3, 7, and 17 weeks after exposure. There was a high correlation (r = 0.96) between a subjective assessment of SCM and objective assessment using a digital image-analysis system. We conclude that protons induce SCM independently of the associated anion; the SCM persists at least 17 weeks. Sulfuric acid is an atmospheric pollutant and nitric acid may form locally on the mucosa of lungs exposed to nitrogen dioxide. These acids may contribute to the development of maintenance of the SCM seen in the conducting airways of humans with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

  7. Widespread Occurrence of Expressed Fungal Secretory Peroxidases in Forest Soils

    PubMed Central

    Kellner, Harald; Luis, Patricia; Pecyna, Marek J.; Barbi, Florian; Kapturska, Danuta; Krüger, Dirk; Zak, Donald R.; Marmeisse, Roland; Vandenbol, Micheline; Hofrichter, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Fungal secretory peroxidases mediate fundamental ecological functions in the conversion and degradation of plant biomass. Many of these enzymes have strong oxidizing activities towards aromatic compounds and are involved in the degradation of plant cell wall (lignin) and humus. They comprise three major groups: class II peroxidases (including lignin peroxidase, manganese peroxidase, versatile peroxidase and generic peroxidase), dye-decolorizing peroxidases, and heme-thiolate peroxidases (e.g. unspecific/aromatic peroxygenase, chloroperoxidase). Here, we have repeatedly observed a widespread expression of all major peroxidase groups in leaf and needle litter across a range of forest ecosystems (e.g. Fagus, Picea, Acer, Quercus, and Populus spp.), which are widespread in Europe and North America. Manganese peroxidases and unspecific peroxygenases were found expressed in all nine investigated forest sites, and dye-decolorizing peroxidases were observed in five of the nine sites, thereby indicating biological significance of these enzymes for fungal physiology and ecosystem processes. Transcripts of selected secretory peroxidase genes were also analyzed in pure cultures of several litter-decomposing species and other fungi. Using this information, we were able to match, in environmental litter samples, two manganese peroxidase sequences to Mycena galopus and Mycena epipterygia and one unspecific peroxygenase transcript to Mycena galopus, suggesting an important role of this litter- and coarse woody debris-dwelling genus in the disintegration and transformation of litter aromatics and organic matter formation. PMID:24763280

  8. Characterization of a Secretory Annexin in Echinococcus granulosus.

    PubMed

    Song, Xingju; Hu, Dandan; Zhong, Xiuqin; Wang, Ning; Gu, Xiaobin; Wang, Tao; Peng, Xuerong; Yang, Guangyou

    2016-03-01

    Cystic echinococcosis, caused by Echinococcus granulosus, is a widespread parasitic zoonosis causing economic loss and public health problems. Annexins are important proteins usually present in the plasma membrane, but previous studies have shown that an annexin B33 protein of E. granulosus (Eg-ANX) could be detected in the excretory/secretory products and cyst fluid. In this study, we cloned and characterized Eg-ANX. In silico analysis showed that the amino acid sequence of Eg-ANX was conserved and lacked any signal peptides. The phospholipid-binding activity of recombinant Eg-ANX (rEg-ANX) was tested; liposomes could bind to rEg-ANX only in the presence of Ca(2+). In addition, we performed western blotting and immunohistochemical analyses to further validate the secretory properties of Eg-ANX. The protein could be detected in the cyst fluid of E. granulosus and was also present in the intermediate host tissues, which suggested that Eg-ANX might play an important role in parasite-host interaction.

  9. Aging and secretory reserve capacity of major salivary glands.

    PubMed

    Ghezzi, E M; Ship, J A

    2003-10-01

    A loss of acinar cells occurs with aging, while salivary production remains age-stable in healthy adults. It is hypothesized that a secretory reserve exists to preserve function despite a loss of acinar cells in normal aging. The purpose of this double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study was to determine age-related differences in salivary response to an anti-sialogogue (glycopyrrolate). Thirty-six healthy subjects (18 young--20-38 yrs; 18 older--60-77 yrs) received 4.0 microg/kg i.v. glycopyrrolate. Parotid and submandibular/sublingual saliva samples and xerostomia questionnaire responses were collected. Variables calculated for each subject were: times to initial and maximum suppression and xerostomic complaint; time to recovery; and durations of suppression and complaint. Salivary function was more adversely affected in older persons. There were no consistent age-associated questionnaire response differences. These findings suggest that salivary gland output is more adversely affected by an anti-sialogogue in healthy older vs. younger adults, supporting the secretory reserve hypothesis of salivary function. PMID:14514768

  10. Insulin signaling and addiction

    PubMed Central

    Daws, Lynette C.; Avison, Malcolm J.; Robertson, Sabrina D.; Niswender, Kevin D.; Galli, Aurelio; Saunders, Christine

    2012-01-01

    Across species, the brain evolved to respond to natural rewards such as food and sex. These physiological responses are important for survival, reproduction and evolutionary processes. It is no surprise, therefore, that many of the neural circuits and signaling pathways supporting reward processes are conserved from Caenorhabditis elegans to Drosophilae, to rats, monkeys and humans. The central role of dopamine (DA) in encoding reward and in attaching salience to external environmental cues is well recognized. Less widely recognized is the role of reporters of the “internal environment”, particularly insulin, in the modulation of reward. Insulin has traditionally been considered an important signaling molecule in regulating energy homeostasis and feeding behavior rather than a major component of neural reward circuits. However, research over recent decades has revealed that DA and insulin systems do not operate in isolation from each other, but instead, work together to orchestrate both the motivation to engage in consummatory behavior and to calibrate the associated level of reward. Insulin signaling has been found to regulate DA neurotransmission and to affect the ability of drugs that target the DA system to exert their neurochemical and behavioral effects. Given that many abused drugs target the DA system, the elucidation of how dopaminergic, as well as other brain reward systems, are regulated by insulin will create opportunities to develop therapies for drug and potentially food addiction. Moreover, a more complete understanding of the relationship between DA neurotransmission and insulin may help to uncover etiological bases for “food addiction” and the growing epidemic of obesity. This review focuses on the role of insulin signaling in regulating DA homeostasis and DA signaling, and the potential impact of impaired insulin signaling in obesity and psychostimulant abuse. PMID:21420985

  11. Cortisol and GH secretory dynamics, and their interrelationships, in healthy aged women and men.

    PubMed

    Gusenoff, J A; Harman, S M; Veldhuis, J D; Jayme, J J; St Clair, C; Münzer, T; Christmas, C; O'Connor, K G; Stevens, T E; Bellantoni, M F; Pabst, K; Blackman, M R

    2001-04-01

    We studied 130 healthy aged women (n = 57) and men (n = 73), age 65-88 yr, with age-related reductions in insulin-like growth factor I and gonadal steroid levels to assess the interrelationships between cortisol and growth hormone (GH) secretion and whether these relationships differ by sex. Blood was sampled every 20 min from 8:00 PM to 8:00 AM; cortisol was measured by RIA and GH by immunoradiometric assay, followed by deconvolution analyses of hormone secretory parameters and assessment of approximate entropy (ApEn) and cross-ApEn. Cortisol mass/burst, cortisol production rate, and mean and integrated serum cortisol concentrations (P < 0.0005), and overnight basal GH secretion (P < 0.05), were elevated in women vs. men. Integrated cortisol concentrations were directly related to most measures of GH secretion in women (P < 0.01) and with mean and integrated GH concentrations in men (P < 0.05). Integrated GH concentrations were directly related to mean and integrated cortisol levels in women (P < 0.005) and men (P < 0.05), with no sex differences. There were no sex differences in cortisol or GH ApEn values; however, the cross-ApEn score was greater in women (P < 0.05), indicating reduced GH-cortisol pattern synchrony in aged women vs. men. There were no significant relationships of integrated cortisol secretion with GH ApEn, or vice versa, in either sex. Thus postmenopausal women appear to maintain elevated cortisol production in patterns that are relatively uncoupled from those of GH, whereas mean hormone outputs remain correlated.

  12. Moving toward the ideal insulin for insulin pumps.

    PubMed

    Cengiz, Eda; Bode, Bruce; Van Name, Michelle; Tamborlane, William V

    2016-01-01

    Advances in insulin formulations have been important for diabetes management and achieving optimal glycemic control. Rapid-acting insulin analogs provide a faster time-action profile than regular insulin and are approved for use in pumps. However, the need remains for therapy to deliver a more physiologic insulin profile. New insulin formulations and delivery methods are in development, with the aim of accelerating insulin absorption to accomplish ultra-fast-acting insulin time-action profiles. Furthermore, the integration of continuous glucose monitoring with insulin pump therapy enables on-going adjustment of insulin delivery to optimize glycemic control throughout the day and night. These technological and pharmacological advances are likely to facilitate the development of closed-loop pump systems (i.e., artificial pancreas), and improve glycemic control and quality of life for patients with diabetes. PMID:26560137

  13. The Effect of Capsaicin on Salivary Gland Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Shin, Yong-Hwan; Kim, Jin Man; Park, Kyungpyo

    2016-01-01

    Capsaicin (trans-8-methyl-N-vanilyl-6-nonenamide) is a unique alkaloid isolated from hot chili peppers of the capsicum family. Capsaicin is an agonist of transient receptor potential vanilloid subtype 1 (TRPV1), which is expressed in nociceptive sensory neurons and a range of secretory epithelia, including salivary glands. Capsaicin has analgesic and anti-inflammatory properties in sensory neurons. Recently, increasing evidence has indicated that capsaicin also affects saliva secretion and inflammation in salivary glands. Applying capsaicin increases salivary secretion in human and animal models. Capsaicin appears to increase salivation mainly by modulating the paracellular pathway in salivary glands. Capsaicin activates TRPV1, which modulates the permeability of tight junctions (TJ) by regulating the expression and function of putative intercellular adhesion molecules in an ERK (extracelluar signal-regulated kinase) -dependent manner. Capsaicin also improved dysfunction in transplanted salivary glands. Aside from the secretory effects of capsaicin, it has anti-inflammatory effects in salivary glands. The anti-inflammatory effect of capsaicin is, however, not mediated by TRPV1, but by inhibition of the NF-κB pathway. In conclusion, capsaicin might be a potential drug for alleviating dry mouth symptoms and inflammation of salivary glands. PMID:27347918

  14. The Effect of Capsaicin on Salivary Gland Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Shin, Yong-Hwan; Kim, Jin Man; Park, Kyungpyo

    2016-01-01

    Capsaicin (trans-8-methyl-N-vanilyl-6-nonenamide) is a unique alkaloid isolated from hot chili peppers of the capsicum family. Capsaicin is an agonist of transient receptor potential vanilloid subtype 1 (TRPV1), which is expressed in nociceptive sensory neurons and a range of secretory epithelia, including salivary glands. Capsaicin has analgesic and anti-inflammatory properties in sensory neurons. Recently, increasing evidence has indicated that capsaicin also affects saliva secretion and inflammation in salivary glands. Applying capsaicin increases salivary secretion in human and animal models. Capsaicin appears to increase salivation mainly by modulating the paracellular pathway in salivary glands. Capsaicin activates TRPV1, which modulates the permeability of tight junctions (TJ) by regulating the expression and function of putative intercellular adhesion molecules in an ERK (extracelluar signal-regulated kinase) -dependent manner. Capsaicin also improved dysfunction in transplanted salivary glands. Aside from the secretory effects of capsaicin, it has anti-inflammatory effects in salivary glands. The anti-inflammatory effect of capsaicin is, however, not mediated by TRPV1, but by inhibition of the NF-κB pathway. In conclusion, capsaicin might be a potential drug for alleviating dry mouth symptoms and inflammation of salivary glands.

  15. Oxidative stress, insulin resistance, dyslipidemia and type 2 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Tangvarasittichai, Surapon

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress is increased in metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and this appears to underlie the development of cardiovascular disease, T2DM and diabetic complications. Increased oxidative stress appears to be a deleterious factor leading to insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, β-cell dysfunction, impaired glucose tolerance and ultimately leading to T2DM. Chronic oxidative stress, hyperglycemia and dyslipidemia are particularly dangerous for β-cells from lowest levels of antioxidant, have high oxidative energy requirements, decrease the gene expression of key β-cell genes and induce cell death. If β-cell functioning is impaired, it results in an under production of insulin, impairs glucose stimulated insulin secretion, fasting hyperglycemia and eventually the development of T2DM. PMID:25897356

  16. Insulin crystallization depends on zinc transporter ZnT8 expression, but is not required for normal glucose homeostasis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Lemaire, K.; Ravier, M. A.; Schraenen, A.; Creemers, J. W. M.; Van de Plas, R.; Granvik, M.; Van Lommel, L.; Waelkens, E.; Chimienti, F.; Rutter, G. A.; Gilon, P.; Veld, P. A. in't; Schuit, F. C.

    2009-01-01

    Zinc co-crystallizes with insulin in dense core secretory granules, but its role in insulin biosynthesis, storage and secretion is unknown. In this study we assessed the role of the zinc transporter ZnT8 using ZnT8-knockout (ZnT8−/−) mice. Absence of ZnT8 expression caused loss of zinc release upon stimulation of exocytosis, but normal rates of insulin biosynthesis, normal insulin content and preserved glucose-induced insulin release. Ultrastructurally, mature dense core insulin granules were rare in ZnT8−/− beta cells and were replaced by immature, pale insulin “progranules,” which were larger than in ZnT8+/+ islets. When mice were fed a control diet, glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity were normal. However, after high-fat diet feeding, the ZnT8−/− mice became glucose intolerant or diabetic, and islets became less responsive to glucose. Our data show that the ZnT8 transporter is essential for the formation of insulin crystals in beta cells, contributing to the packaging efficiency of stored insulin. Interaction between the ZnT8−/− genotype and diet to induce diabetes is a model for further studies of the mechanism of disease of human ZNT8 gene mutations. PMID:19706465

  17. Snapin mediates incretin action and augments glucose-dependent insulin secretion.

    PubMed

    Song, Woo-Jin; Seshadri, Madhav; Ashraf, Uzair; Mdluli, Thembi; Mondal, Prosenjit; Keil, Meg; Azevedo, Monalisa; Kirschner, Lawrence S; Stratakis, Constantine A; Hussain, Mehboob A

    2011-03-01

    Impaired insulin secretion contributes to the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Treatment with the incretin hormone glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) potentiates insulin secretion and improves metabolic control in humans with T2DM. GLP-1 receptor-mediated signaling leading to insulin secretion occurs via cyclic AMP stimulated protein kinase A (PKA)- as well as guanine nucleotide exchange factor-mediated pathways. However, how these two pathways integrate and coordinate insulin secretion remains poorly understood. Here we show that these incretin-stimulated pathways converge at the level of snapin, and that PKA-dependent phosphorylation of snapin increases interaction among insulin secretory vesicle-associated proteins, thereby potentiating glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS). In diabetic islets with impaired GSIS, snapin phosphorylation is reduced, and expression of a snapin mutant, which mimics site-specific phosphorylation, restores GSIS. Thus, snapin is a critical node in GSIS regulation and provides a potential therapeutic target to improve β cell function in T2DM. PMID:21356520

  18. What Is a Dysfunctional School?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergman, M. M.

    2013-01-01

    Whether or not a school is dysfunctional depends largely on how dysfunctionality in schools is defined and measured. Dysfunctionality, as any construct, is subject to definition and interpretation, and it is thus always marked by perspectivism. But regardless of the definition games occasionally played by academics, some form of reality takes…

  19. Discovery and characterization of secretory IgD in rainbow trout: secretory IgD is produced through a novel splicing mechanism

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ramirez-Gomez, F.; Greene, W.; Rego, K.; Hansen, J.D.; Costa, G.; Kataria, P.; Bromage, E.S.

    2012-01-01

    The gene encoding IgH δ has been found in all species of teleosts studied to date. However, catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) is the only species of fish in which a secretory form of IgD has been characterized, and it occurs through the use of a dedicated δ-secretory exon, which is absent from all other species examined. Our studies have revealed that rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) use a novel strategy for the generation of secreted IgD. The trout secretory δ transcript is produced via a run-on event in which the splice donor site at the end of the last constant domain exon (D7) is ignored and transcription continues until a stop codon is reached 33 nt downstream of the splice site, resulting in the production of an in-frame, 11-aa secretory tail at the end of the D7 domain. In silico analysis of several published IgD genes suggested that this unique splicing mechanism may also be used in other species of fish, reptiles, and amphibians. Alternative splicing of the secretory δ transcript resulted in two δ-H chains, which incorporated Cμ1 and variable domains. Secreted IgD was found in two heavily glycosylated isoforms, which are assembled as monomeric polypeptides associated with L chains. Secretory δ mRNA and IgD+ plasma cells were detected in all immune tissues at a lower frequency than secretory IgM. Our data demonstrate that secretory IgD is more prevalent and widespread across taxa than previously thought, and thus illustrate the potential that IgD may have a conserved role in immunity.

  20. Impact of obesity and insulin-resistance on cirrhosis and portal hypertension.

    PubMed

    Berzigotti, Annalisa; Abraldes, Juan G

    2013-10-01

    Obesity is sharply rising worldwide and is increasingly recognized in patients with cirrhosis. This review summarizes the available data documenting a detrimental role of obesity and insulin-resistance on the risk of appearance of clinical events in patients with cirrhosis. Molecular pathways explaining the harmful effect of obesity and insulin resistance in the natural history of cirrhosis are largely unknown. Increasing knowledge of mechanisms leading to white adipose tissue dysfunction on one side, and to portal hypertension on the other side, allow hypothesizing that a link between the pathophysiology of obesity, insulin resistance and portal hypertension in cirrhosis exists. Mechanisms likely involved in this interplay are discussed in this article.

  1. Nilotinib exacerbates diabetes mellitus by decreasing secretion of endogenous insulin.

    PubMed

    Ito, Yoshikiyo; Miyamoto, Toshihiro; Chong, Yong; Maki, Toshinobu; Akashi, Koichi; Kamimura, Tomohiko

    2013-01-01

    We report a 74-year-old female with chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) in accelerated phase with pre-existing severe type 2 diabetes (T2D) and hemorrhagic gastric ulcers who was successfully treated with nilotinib. We first considered second-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors for the treatment of this patient, as they elicit a superior response compared with imatinib. We next selected nilotinib, rather than dasatinib, since the increased risk of bleeding associated with dasatinib represented a greater risk of fatality than aggravation of T2D with nilotinib. After improvement of hemorrhagic gastric ulcers and T2D with exogenous insulin therapy, we began nilotinib administration; insulin dose was increased to maintain her glucose levels whereas urine C-peptide level decreased. Conversely, when nilotinib was discontinued due to liver dysfunction, the dosage of injected insulin was decreased and urine C-peptide levels increased. After re-starting nilotinib, the required dose of insulin gradually increased again, and urine C-peptide level decreased, indicating that nilotinib may have impaired secretion of endogenous insulin. The patient obtained a complete cytogenetic response after 3 months of nilotinib treatment. Her T2D has since been well controlled by insulin therapy. To our knowledge, this is the first report that nilotinib treatment for patients with severe T2D may induce a reversible decrease in endogenous insulin secretion, although the precise underlying mechanisms remain unknown. We highly recommend sufficient screening and early intervention with exogenous insulin therapy for diabetic CML patients who receive nilotinib.

  2. Imaging dynamic insulin release using a fluorescent zinc indicator for monitoring induced exocytotic release (ZIMIR).

    PubMed

    Li, Daliang; Chen, Shiuhwei; Bellomo, Elisa A; Tarasov, Andrei I; Kaut, Callan; Rutter, Guy A; Li, Wen-hong

    2011-12-27

    Current methods of monitoring insulin secretion lack the required spatial and temporal resolution to adequately map the dynamics of exocytosis of native insulin granules in intact cell populations in three dimensions. Exploiting the fact that insulin granules contain a high level of Zn(2+), and that Zn(2+) is coreleased with insulin during secretion, we have developed a fluorescent, cell surface-targeted zinc indicator for monitoring induced exocytotic release (ZIMIR). ZIMIR displayed a robust fluorescence enhancement on Zn(2+) chelation and bound Zn(2+) with high selectivity against Ca(2+) and Mg(2+). When added to cultured β cells or intact pancreatic islets at low micromolar concentrations, ZIMIR labeled cells rapidly, noninvasively, and stably, and it reliably reported changes in Zn(2+) concentration near the sites of granule fusion with high sensitivity that correlated well with membrane capacitance measurement. Fluorescence imaging of ZIMIR-labeled β cells followed the dynamics of exocytotic activity at subcellular resolution, even when using simple epifluorescence microscopy, and located the chief sites of insulin release to intercellular junctions. Moreover, ZIMIR imaging of intact rat islets revealed that Zn(2+)/insulin release occurred largely in small groups of adjacent β cells, with each forming a "secretory unit." Concurrent imaging of ZIMIR and Fura-2 showed that the amplitude of cytosolic Ca(2+) elevation did not necessarily correlate with insulin secretion activity, suggesting that events downstream of Ca(2+) signaling underlie the cell-cell heterogeneity in insulin release. In addition to studying stimulation-secretion coupling in cells with Zn(2+)-containing granules, ZIMIR may find applications in β-cell engineering and screening for molecules regulating insulin secretion on high-throughput platforms. PMID:22160693

  3. Imaging dynamic insulin release using a fluorescent zinc indicator for monitoring induced exocytotic release (ZIMIR)

    PubMed Central

    Li, Daliang; Chen, Shiuhwei; Bellomo, Elisa A.; Tarasov, Andrei I.; Kaut, Callan; Rutter, Guy A.; Li, Wen-hong

    2011-01-01

    Current methods of monitoring insulin secretion lack the required spatial and temporal resolution to adequately map the dynamics of exocytosis of native insulin granules in intact cell populations in three dimensions. Exploiting the fact that insulin granules contain a high level of Zn2+, and that Zn2+ is coreleased with insulin during secretion, we have developed a fluorescent, cell surface-targeted zinc indicator for monitoring induced exocytotic release (ZIMIR). ZIMIR displayed a robust fluorescence enhancement on Zn2+ chelation and bound Zn2+ with high selectivity against Ca2+ and Mg2+. When added to cultured β cells or intact pancreatic islets at low micromolar concentrations, ZIMIR labeled cells rapidly, noninvasively, and stably, and it reliably reported changes in Zn2+ concentration near the sites of granule fusion with high sensitivity that correlated well with membrane capacitance measurement. Fluorescence imaging of ZIMIR-labeled β cells followed the dynamics of exocytotic activity at subcellular resolution, even when using simple epifluorescence microscopy, and located the chief sites of insulin release to intercellular junctions. Moreover, ZIMIR imaging of intact rat islets revealed that Zn2+/insulin release occurred largely in small groups of adjacent β cells, with each forming a “secretory unit.” Concurrent imaging of ZIMIR and Fura-2 showed that the amplitude of cytosolic Ca2+ elevation did not necessarily correlate with insulin secretion activity, suggesting that events downstream of Ca2+ signaling underlie the cell-cell heterogeneity in insulin release. In addition to studying stimulation-secretion coupling in cells with Zn2+-containing granules, ZIMIR may find applications in β-cell engineering and screening for molecules regulating insulin secretion on high-throughput platforms. PMID:22160693

  4. 21 CFR 866.5380 - Free secretory component immuno-logical test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Free secretory component immuno-logical test system. 866.5380 Section 866.5380 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... Systems § 866.5380 Free secretory component immuno-logical test system. (a) Identification. A...

  5. Mammary analogue secretory carcinoma (MASC) of the salivary gland: A new tumor entity

    PubMed Central

    Damjanov, Ivan; Skenderi, Faruk; Vranic, Semir

    2016-01-01

    Mammary analogue secretory carcinoma (MASC) is a recently described low-grade malignant tumor of the salivary glands, biologically and morphologically equivalent to secretory breast carcinoma. We give a brief overview of this new entity, including morphological, immunohistochemical, molecular-genetic, clinical, epidemiologic features, differential diagnosis, and outcome results.

  6. The secretory pathway of protists: spatial and functional organization and evolution.

    PubMed Central

    Becker, B; Melkonian, M

    1996-01-01

    All cells secrete a diversity of macromolecules to modify their environment or to protect themselves. Eukaryotic cells have evolved a complex secretory pathway consisting of several membrane-bound compartments which contain specific sets of proteins. Experimental work on the secretory pathway has focused mainly on mammalian cell lines or on yeasts. Now, some general principles of the secretory pathway have become clear, and most components of the secretory pathway are conserved between yeast cells and mammalian cells. However, the structure and function of the secretory system in protists have been less extensively studied. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge about the secretory pathway of five different groups of protists: Giardia lamblia, one of the earliest lines of eukaryotic evolution, kinetoplastids, the slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum, and two lineages within the "crown" of eukaryotic cell evolution, the alveolates (ciliates and Plasmodium species) and the green algae. Comparison of these systems with the mammalian and yeast system shows that most elements of the secretory pathway were presumably present in the earliest eukaryotic organisms. However, one element of the secretory pathway shows considerable variation: the presence of a Golgi stack and the number of cisternae within a stack. We suggest that the functional separation of the plasma membrane from the nucleus-endoplasmic reticulum system during evolution required a sorting compartment, which became the Golgi apparatus. Once a Golgi apparatus was established, it was adapted to the various needs of the different organisms. PMID:8987360

  7. Mammary Analogue Secretory Carcinoma (MASC) of the salivary gland: A new tumor entity.

    PubMed

    Damjanov, Ivan; Skenderi, Faruk; Vranic, Semir

    2016-08-01

    Mammary analogue secretory carcinoma (MASC) is a recently described low-grade malignant tumor of the salivary glands, biologically and morphologically equivalent to secretory breast carcinoma. We give a brief overview of this new entity, including morphological, immunohistochemical, molecular-genetic, clinical, epidemiologic features, differential diagnosis, and outcome results. PMID:27483184

  8. The secretory pathway of protists: spatial and functional organization and evolution.

    PubMed

    Becker, B; Melkonian, M

    1996-12-01

    All cells secrete a diversity of macromolecules to modify their environment or to protect themselves. Eukaryotic cells have evolved a complex secretory pathway consisting of several membrane-bound compartments which contain specific sets of proteins. Experimental work on the secretory pathway has focused mainly on mammalian cell lines or on yeasts. Now, some general principles of the secretory pathway have become clear, and most components of the secretory pathway are conserved between yeast cells and mammalian cells. However, the structure and function of the secretory system in protists have been less extensively studied. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge about the secretory pathway of five different groups of protists: Giardia lamblia, one of the earliest lines of eukaryotic evolution, kinetoplastids, the slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum, and two lineages within the "crown" of eukaryotic cell evolution, the alveolates (ciliates and Plasmodium species) and the green algae. Comparison of these systems with the mammalian and yeast system shows that most elements of the secretory pathway were presumably present in the earliest eukaryotic organisms. However, one element of the secretory pathway shows considerable variation: the presence of a Golgi stack and the number of cisternae within a stack. We suggest that the functional separation of the plasma membrane from the nucleus-endoplasmic reticulum system during evolution required a sorting compartment, which became the Golgi apparatus. Once a Golgi apparatus was established, it was adapted to the various needs of the different organisms.

  9. Insulin pump therapy in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Kesavadev, Jothydev

    2016-09-01

    Control of blood glucose during pregnancy is difficult because of wide variations, ongoing hormonal changes and mood swings. The need for multiple injections, pain at the injection site, regular monitoring and skillful handling of the syringes/pen further makes insulin therapy inconvenient. Insulin pump is gaining popularity in pregnancy because it mimics the insulin delivery of a healthy human pancreas. Multiple guidelines have also recommended the use of insulin pump in pregnancy to maintain the glycaemic control. The pump can release small doses of insulin continuously (basal), or a bolus dose close to mealtime to control the spike in blood glucose after a meal and the newer devices can shut down insulin delivery before the occurrence of hypoglycaemia. Pump insulin of choice is rapid acting analogue insulin. This review underscores the role of insulin pump in pregnancy, their usage, advantages and disadvantages in the light of existing literature and clinic experience. PMID:27582150

  10. Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Metabolic Syndrome and Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Mabalirajan, Ulaganathan; Ghosh, Balaram

    2013-01-01

    Though severe or refractory asthma merely affects less than 10% of asthma population, it consumes significant health resources and contributes significant morbidity and mortality. Severe asthma does not fell in the routine definition of asthma and requires alternative treatment strategies. It has been observed that asthma severity increases with higher body mass index. The obese-asthmatics, in general, have the features of metabolic syndrome and are progressively causing a significant burden for both developed and developing countries thanks to the westernization of the world. As most of the features of metabolic syndrome seem to be originated from central obesity, the underlying mechanisms for metabolic syndrome could help us to understand the pathobiology of obese-asthma condition. While mitochondrial dysfunction is the common factor for most of the risk factors of metabolic syndrome, such as central obesity, dyslipidemia, hypertension, insulin resistance, and type 2 diabetes, the involvement of mitochondria in obese-asthma pathogenesis seems to be important as mitochondrial dysfunction has recently been shown to be involved in airway epithelial injury and asthma pathogenesis. This review discusses current understanding of the overlapping features between metabolic syndrome and asthma in relation to mitochondrial structural and functional alterations with an aim to uncover mechanisms for obese-asthma. PMID:23840225

  11. Mitochondrial dysfunction in metabolic syndrome and asthma.

    PubMed

    Mabalirajan, Ulaganathan; Ghosh, Balaram

    2013-01-01

    Though severe or refractory asthma merely affects less than 10% of asthma population, it consumes significant health resources and contributes significant morbidity and mortality. Severe asthma does not fell in the routine definition of asthma and requires alternative treatment strategies. It has been observed that asthma severity increases with higher body mass index. The obese-asthmatics, in general, have the features of metabolic syndrome and are progressively causing a significant burden for both developed and developing countries thanks to the westernization of the world. As most of the features of metabolic syndrome seem to be originated from central obesity, the underlying mechanisms for metabolic syndrome could help us to understand the pathobiology of obese-asthma condition. While mitochondrial dysfunction is the common factor for most of the risk factors of metabolic syndrome, such as central obesity, dyslipidemia, hypertension, insulin resistance, and type 2 diabetes, the involvement of mitochondria in obese-asthma pathogenesis seems to be important as mitochondrial dysfunction has recently been shown to be involved in airway epithelial injury and asthma pathogenesis. This review discusses current understanding of the overlapping features between metabolic syndrome and asthma in relation to mitochondrial structural and functional alterations with an aim to uncover mechanisms for obese-asthma. PMID:23840225

  12. The cone dysfunction syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Aboshiha, Jonathan; Dubis, Adam M; Hardcastle, Alison J; Michaelides, Michel

    2016-01-01

    The cone dysfunction syndromes are a heterogeneous group of inherited, predominantly stationary retinal disorders characterised by reduced central vision and varying degrees of colour vision abnormalities, nystagmus and photophobia. This review details the following conditions: complete and incomplete achromatopsia, blue-cone monochromatism, oligocone trichromacy, bradyopsia and Bornholm eye disease. We describe the clinical, psychophysical, electrophysiological and imaging findings that are characteristic to each condition in order to aid their accurate diagnosis, as well as highlight some classically held notions about these diseases that have come to be challenged over the recent years. The latest data regarding the genetic aetiology and pathological changes observed in the cone dysfunction syndromes are discussed, and, where relevant, translational avenues of research, including completed and anticipated interventional clinical trials, for some of the diseases described herein will be presented. Finally, we briefly review the current management of these disorders. PMID:25770143

  13. [Erectile and Ejaculatory Dysfunction].

    PubMed

    Gross, Oliver; Sulser, Tullio; Eberli, Daniel

    2015-11-25

    The inability to achieve an erection of the penis sufficient for sexual activity is called erectile dysfunction (ED). In most cases, the diagnosis can be made by medical history. The prevalence of ED in men at the age of 65 has been reported to be up to 50%. Premature ejaculation has a prevalence, up to 20% and is the most frequent ejaculatory dysfunction. The etiology of ED can involve psychological, vascular, neurogenic, hormonal or urogenital pathologies. The main pathophysiological mechanisms of ED are vascular disorders such as diabetes mellitus and atherosclerosis. Because of the common pathophysiology, patients diagnosed with ED should have a diagnostic work-up for systemic vascular pathologies to prevent concomitant cardiac events. Treatment options include invasive and non-invasive procedures. PMID:26602851

  14. Influence of anti-insulin antibodies on insulin immunoassays in the autoimmune insulin syndrome.

    PubMed

    Casesnoves, A; Mauri, M; Dominguez, J R; Alfayate, R; Picó, A M

    1998-11-01

    The autoimmune insulin syndrome (AIS) is a rare, benign syndrome characterized by hyperinsulinaemia and hypoglycaemia associated with the presence of autoantibodies to insulin in patients who have not been treated with insulin. We report here the case of a 52-year-old patient with recurrent attacks of severe postprandial hypoglycaemia and we also present the effect of anti-insulin antibodies on insulin immunoassays. The patient was submitted to the following diagnostic tests: 5-h oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT), a prolonged 72-h fast and an insulin tolerance test (ITT). Serum glucose, total and free insulin, C-peptide, proinsulin, insulin antibodies and other autoantibodies were measured. Insulin concentrations were measured by two methods: a double antibody radioimmunoassay (RIA) and an immunoradiometric assay (IRMA). Insulin concentration measured by RIA was extremely high in the OGTT and 72-h fast. In contrast, insulin concentrations measured by IRMA were between 120 and 888 pmol/L in the OGTT and between 37 and 133 pmol/L during the 72-h fast. Fasting free-insulin concentrations measured by RIA were between 2224 and 2669 pmol/L, whereas free-insulin concentrations measured by IRMA ranged between 93 and 237 pmol/L. Total insulin concentrations measured by RIA and IRMA were 57,615 and 94,021 pmol/L, respectively. The C-peptide concentrations were moderately high in the three tests. Serum insulin antibody concentrations were extremely high (62-71%), compared with less than 3% in normal serum samples. In conclusion, the high insulin concentrations measured by RIA were caused by insulin autoantibodies. However, insulin concentrations measured by IRMA were not influenced by them. We conclude that IRMA is the more accurate method for measuring insulin concentrations in such cases.

  15. Development and Essential Oil Content of Secretory Glands of Sage (Salvia officinalis) 1

    PubMed Central

    Venkatachalam, K. V.; Kjonaas, Robert; Croteau, Rodney

    1984-01-01

    Scanning electron microscopy of sage (Salvia officinalis L.) leaves confirmed the presence of two basic types of glandular trichomes consisting of a capitate stalked form containing a multicellular stalk and surmounted by a unicellular secretory head, and a capitate sessile form containing a unicellular stalk and unicellular, or multicellular, secretory head. In the latter type, secretory activity and filling of the subcuticular cavity may begin at virtually any stage of the division cycle affording fully developed glands containing from one to twelve cells in the secretory head. Gas liquid chromatographic analysis of the oil content of the most numerous gland species (capitate stalked, capitate sessile with one and with eight secretory cells) indicated only minor quantitative differences in essential oil composition. Thus, each gland type is capable of producing the four major monoterpene families (p-menthanes, pinanes, bornanes and thujanes) characteristic of sage. Images Fig. 1 PMID:16663786

  16. Development and essential oil content of secretory glands of sage (Salvia officinalis)

    SciTech Connect

    Venkatachalam, K.V.; Kjonaas, R.; Croteau, R.

    1984-09-01

    Scanning electron microscopy of sage (Salvia officinalis L.) leave confirmed the presence of two basic types of glandular trichomes consisting of a capitate stalked form containing a multicellular stalk and surmounted by a unicellular secretory head, and a capitate sessile form containing a unicellular stalk and unicellular, or multicellular, secretory head. In the latter type, secretory activity and filling of the subcuticular cavity may begin at virtually any stage of the division cycle affording fully developed glands containing from one to twelve cells in the secretory head. Gas liquid chromatographic analysis of the oil content of the most numerous gland species (capitate stalked, capitate sessile with one and with eight secretory cells) indicated only minor quantitative differences in essential oil composition. Thus, each gland type is capable of producing the four major monoterpene families (p-menthanes, pinanes, bornanes and thujanes) characteristic of sage. 21 references, 2 figures.

  17. Development and Essential Oil Content of Secretory Glands of Sage (Salvia officinalis).

    PubMed

    Venkatachalam, K V; Kjonaas, R; Croteau, R

    1984-09-01

    Scanning electron microscopy of sage (Salvia officinalis L.) leaves confirmed the presence of two basic types of glandular trichomes consisting of a capitate stalked form containing a multicellular stalk and surmounted by a unicellular secretory head, and a capitate sessile form containing a unicellular stalk and unicellular, or multicellular, secretory head. In the latter type, secretory activity and filling of the subcuticular cavity may begin at virtually any stage of the division cycle affording fully developed glands containing from one to twelve cells in the secretory head. Gas liquid chromatographic analysis of the oil content of the most numerous gland species (capitate stalked, capitate sessile with one and with eight secretory cells) indicated only minor quantitative differences in essential oil composition. Thus, each gland type is capable of producing the four major monoterpene families (p-menthanes, pinanes, bornanes and thujanes) characteristic of sage. PMID:16663786

  18. The evolution of plant secretory structures and emergence of terpenoid chemical diversity.

    PubMed

    Lange, Bernd Markus

    2015-01-01

    Secretory structures in terrestrial plants appear to have first emerged as intracellular oil bodies in liverworts. In vascular plants, internal secretory structures, such as resin ducts and laticifers, are usually found in conjunction with vascular bundles, whereas subepidermal secretory cavities and epidermal glandular trichomes generally have more complex tissue distribution patterns. The primary function of plant secretory structures is related to defense responses, both constitutive and induced, against herbivores and pathogens. The ability to sequester secondary (or specialized) metabolites and defense proteins in secretory structures was a critical adaptation that shaped plant-herbivore and plant-pathogen interactions. Although this review places particular emphasis on describing the evolution of pathways leading to terpenoids, it also assesses the emergence of other metabolite classes to outline the metabolic capabilities of different plant lineages. PMID:25621517

  19. Secretory phospholipase A2 inhibitor PX-18 preserves microvascular reactivity after cerebral ischemia in piglets.

    PubMed

    Domoki, Ferenc; Zimmermann, Alíz; Lenti, Laura; Tóth-Szuki, Valéria; Pardeike, Jana; Müller, Rainer H; Bari, Ferenc

    2009-09-01

    Cerebral ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) results in cellular energy failure and dysfunction of the neurovascular unit that contribute to subsequent neuronal cell death in the neonate. PX-18 is a putative neuroprotective inhibitor of secretory phospholipase A(2) (sPLA(2)) but its in vivo testing has been limited by its poor solubility. Our purpose was to assess whether PX-18 preserved neuronal-vascular reactivity to I/R-sensitive endothelium-dependent (hypercapnia, bradykinin) and/or neuron-dependent (N-methyl-D-aspartate; NMDA) stimuli. To make the drug available for in vivo studies, PX-18 was formulated as a 3% nanosuspension applying high pressure homogenization. Newborn piglets (1-day old, n=40) were anesthetized and ventilated, and cerebrovascular reactivity to the above stimuli was determined by measuring changes in pial arteriolar diameters using the closed cranial window/intravital videomicroscopy technique. Intravenous infusion of PX-18 nanosuspension (6 mg/kg, 20 min) did not affect baseline arteriolar diameters, or hypercapnia-, bradykinin-, or NMDA-induced pial arteriolar vasodilation under normoxic conditions. Global cerebral ischemia (10 min) followed by 1 h of reperfusion significantly attenuated hypercapnia-, bradykinin-, and NMDA-induced vasodilation in untreated or vehicle-treated controls. However, PX-18 resulted in nearly full preservation of cerebrovascular reactivity to all these stimuli. In conclusion, inhibition of sPLA(2) by PX-18 improves neurovascular function both at the neuronal and the microvascular level following I/R. This effect of PX-18 likely contributes to its neuroprotective effect. PMID:19555699

  20. Insulin-producing cells.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, Insa S; Kania, Gabriela; Blyszczuk, Przemyslaw; Wobus, Anna M

    2006-01-01

    Embryonic stem (ES) cells offer great potential for cell replacement and tissue engineering therapies because of their almost unlimited proliferation capacity and the potential to differentiate into cellular derivatives of all three primary germ layers. This chapter describes a strategy for the in vitro differentiation of mouse ES cells into insulin-producing cells. The three-step protocol does not select for nestin-expressing cells as performed in previous differentiation systems. It includes (1) the spontaneous differentiation of ES cells via embryoid bodies and (2) the formation of progenitor cells of all three primary germ layers (multilineage progenitors) followed by (3) directed differentiation into the pancreatic lineage. The application of growth and extracellular matrix factors, including laminin, nicotinamide, and insulin, leads to the development of committed pancreatic progenitors, which subsequently differentiate into islet-like clusters that release insulin in response to glucose. During differentiation, transcript levels of pancreas-specific transcription factors (i.e., Pdx1, Pax4) and of genes specific for early and mature beta cells, including insulin, islet amyloid pancreatic peptide, somatostatin, and glucagon, are upregulated. C-peptide/insulin-positive islet-like clusters are formed, which release insulin in response to high glucose concentrations at terminal stages. The differentiated cells reveal functional properties with respect to voltage-activated Na+ and ATP-modulated K+ channels and normalize blood glucose levels in streptozotocin-treated diabetic mice. In conclusion, we demonstrate the efficient differentiation of murine ES cells into insulin-producing cells, which may help in the future to establish ES cell-based therapies in diabetes mellitus.

  1. EEG dysfunction in geropsychiatry.

    PubMed

    van Sweden, B

    1987-07-01

    Electro-clinical correlations are reported in 200 elderly patients admitted to a psychiatric ward of a general hospital. Normal EEG characteristics were generally associated with functional psychiatric disorder. Abnormal EEG features correlated with organic brain syndromes (O.B.S.). The diagnostic and pathogenetic considerations and restrictions of EEG foci, intermittent rhythmic delta activity (Irda) and diffuse EEG slowing are discussed. The informative value of EEG dysfunction in geropsychiatry is emphasised.

  2. Sexual dysfunction in diabetes.

    PubMed

    Tamás, Várkonyi; Kempler, Peter

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to summarize the etiology, clinical characteristics, diagnosis, and possible treatment options of sexual dysfunction in diabetic patients of both sexes. Details of dysfunction in diabetic women are less conclusive than in men due to the lack of standardized evaluation of sexual function in women. Male sexual dysfunction is a common complication of diabetes, including abnormalities of orgasmic/ejaculatory function and desire/libido in addition to penile erection. The prevalence of erectile dysfunction (ED) among diabetic men varies from 35% to 75%. Diabetes-induced ED has a multifactorial etiology including metabolic, neurologic, vascular, hormonal, and psychological components. ED should be regarded as the first sign of cardiovascular disease because it can be present before development of symptomatic coronary artery disease, as larger coronary vessels better tolerate the same amount of plaque compared to smaller penile arteries. The diagnosis of ED is based on validated questionnaires and determination of functional and organic abnormalities. First-, second- and third-line therapy may be applied. Phosphodiesterase-5 (PDE-5) inhibitor treatment from the first-line options leads to smooth muscle relaxation in the corpus cavernosum and enhancement in blood flow, resulting in erection during sexual stimulus. The use of PDE-5 inhibitors in the presence of oral nitrates is strictly contraindicated in diabetic men, as in nondiabetic subjects. All PDE-5 inhibitors have been evaluated for ED in diabetic patients with convincing efficacy data. Second-line therapy includes intracavernosal, trans- or intraurethral administration of vasoactive drugs or application of a vacuum device. Third-line therapies are the implantation of penile prosthesis and penile revascularization. PMID:25410225

  3. Thyroid dysfunction and subfertility.

    PubMed

    Cho, Moon Kyoung

    2015-12-01

    The thyroid hormones act on nearly every cell in the body. Moreover, the thyroid gland continuously interacts with the ovaries, and the thyroid hormones are involved in almost all phases of reproduction. Thyroid dysfunctions are relatively common among women of reproductive age, and can affect fertility in various ways, resulting in anovulatory cycles, high prolactin levels, and sex hormone imbalances. Undiagnosed and untreated thyroid disease can be a cause of subfertility. Subclinical hypothyroidism (SCH), also known as mild thyroid failure, is diagnosed when peripheral thyroid hormone levels are within the normal reference laboratory range, but serum thyroid-stimulating hormone levels are mildly elevated. Thyroid autoimmunity (TAI) is characterized by the presence of anti-thyroid antibodies, which include anti-thyroperoxidase and anti-thyroglobulin antibodies. SCH and TAI may remain latent, asymptomatic, or even undiagnosed for an extended period. It has also been demonstrated that controlled ovarian hyperstimulation has a significant impact on thyroid function, particularly in women with TAI. In the current review, we describe the interactions between thyroid dysfunctions and subfertility, as well as the proper work-up and management of thyroid dysfunctions in subfertile women. PMID:26816871

  4. Thyroid dysfunction and subfertility

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The thyroid hormones act on nearly every cell in the body. Moreover, the thyroid gland continuously interacts with the ovaries, and the thyroid hormones are involved in almost all phases of reproduction. Thyroid dysfunctions are relatively common among women of reproductive age, and can affect fertility in various ways, resulting in anovulatory cycles, high prolactin levels, and sex hormone imbalances. Undiagnosed and untreated thyroid disease can be a cause of subfertility. Subclinical hypothyroidism (SCH), also known as mild thyroid failure, is diagnosed when peripheral thyroid hormone levels are within the normal reference laboratory range, but serum thyroid-stimulating hormone levels are mildly elevated. Thyroid autoimmunity (TAI) is characterized by the presence of anti-thyroid antibodies, which include anti-thyroperoxidase and anti-thyroglobulin antibodies. SCH and TAI may remain latent, asymptomatic, or even undiagnosed for an extended period. It has also been demonstrated that controlled ovarian hyperstimulation has a significant impact on thyroid function, particularly in women with TAI. In the current review, we describe the interactions between thyroid dysfunctions and subfertility, as well as the proper work-up and management of thyroid dysfunctions in subfertile women. PMID:26816871

  5. Fallopian tube secretory cell expansion: a sensitive biomarker for ovarian serous carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yiying; Li, Li; Wang, Yue; Tang, Sarah Ngocvi; Zheng, Wenxin

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances suggest that precancerous lesions of pelvic serous carcinoma originate from tubal secretory cells. The purpose of our study was to determine if an increased number of secretory cells vary with age or location in the fallopian tube and to examine its association with serous neoplasia. Three groups (benign control, high-risk, and pelvic serous carcinoma) of age-matched patients were studied. The age data were stratified into 10-year intervals ranging from 20-29 to older than 80. The number of secretory and ciliated cells from both tubal fimbria and ampulla segments was counted by microscopy and immunohistochemical staining methods. The data were analyzed by standard contingency table and Poisson distribution methods after age justification. We found that the absolute number of tubal secretory cells increased significantly with age in all three groups. But a more dramatic increase of secretory cells was observed in high-risk and pelvic serous carcinoma patients. Secretory cell expansion is more prevalent than secretory cell outgrowth in both fimbria and ampulla tubal segments and is significantly associated with serous neoplasia (p < 0.001). Furthermore, age remained a significant risk factor for serous neoplasia after age adjustment. These findings suggest that secretory cell expansion could serve as a potential sensitive biomarker for early serous carcinogenesis within the fallopian tube. The study also supports a relationship between serous neoplasia and increased secretory to ciliated cell ratios, and the relationship between frequency of secretory cell expansion within the fallopian tube and increasing age and-more significantly-presence of high-risk factors or co-existing serous cancers. PMID:27069556

  6. Endocrine dysfunction in sepsis: a beneficial or deleterious host response?

    PubMed

    Gheorghiţă, Valeriu; Barbu, Alina Elena; Gheorghiu, Monica Livia; Căruntu, Florin Alexandru

    2015-03-01

    Sepsis is a systemic, deleterious inflammatory host response triggered by an infective agent leading to severe sepsis, septic shock and multi-organ failure. The host response to infection involves a complex, organized and coherent interaction between immune, autonomic, neuroendocrine and behavioral systems. Recent data have confirmed that disturbances of the autonomic nervous and neuroendocrine systems could contribute to sepsis-induced organ dysfunction. Through this review, we aimed to summarize the current knowledge about the endocrine dysfunction as response to sepsis, specifically addressed to vasopressin, copeptin, cortisol, insulin and leptin. We searched the following readily accessible, clinically relevant databases: PubMed, UpToDate, BioMed Central. The immune system could be regarded as a "diffuse sensory organ" that signals the presence of pathogens to the brain through different pathways, such as the vagus nerve, endothelial activation/dysfunction, cytokines and neurotoxic mediators and the circumventricular organs, especially the neurohypophysis. The hormonal profile changes substantially as a consequence of inflammatory mediators and microorganism products leading to inappropriately low levels of vasopressin, sick euthyroid syndrome, reduced adrenal responsiveness to ACTH, insulin resistance, hyperglycemia as well as hyperleptinemia. In conclusion, clinical diagnosis of this "pan-endocrine illness" is frequently challenging due to the many limiting factors. The most important benefits of endocrine markers in the management of sepsis may be reflected by their potential to be used as biomarkers in different scoring systems to estimate the severity of the disease and the risk of death.

  7. Ca(2+) handling alterations and vascular dysfunction in diabetes.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Velasco, María; Ruiz-Hurtado, Gema; Gómez, Ana M; Rueda, Angélica

    2014-11-01

    More than 65% of patients with diabetes mellitus die from cardiovascular disease or stroke. Hyperglycemia, due to either reduced insulin secretion or reduced insulin sensitivity, is the hallmark feature of diabetes mellitus. Vascular dysfunction is a distinctive phenotype found in both types of diabetes and could be responsible for the high incidence of stroke, heart attack, and organ damage in diabetic patients. In addition to well-documented endothelial dysfunction, Ca(2+) handling alterations in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) play a key role in the development and progression of vascular complications in diabetes. VSMCs provide not only structural integrity to the vessels but also control myogenic arterial tone and systemic blood pressure through global and local Ca(2+) signaling. The Ca(2+) signalosome of VSMCs is integrated by an extensive number of Ca(2+) handling proteins (i.e. channels, pumps, exchangers) and related signal transduction components, whose function is modulated by endothelial effectors. This review summarizes recent findings concerning alterations in endothelium and VSMC Ca(2+) signaling proteins that may contribute to the vascular dysfunction found in the diabetic condition.

  8. Molecular characterization of insulin resistance and glycolytic metabolism in the rat uterus

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuehui; Sun, Xue; Sun, Xiaoyan; Meng, Fanci; Hu, Min; Li, Xin; Li, Wei; Wu, Xiao-Ke; Brännström, Mats; Shao, Ruijin; Billig, Håkan

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral insulin resistance and hyperandrogenism are the primary features of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). However, how insulin resistance and hyperandrogenism affect uterine function and contribute to the pathogenesis of PCOS are open questions. We treated rats with insulin alone or in combination with human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) and showed that peripheral insulin resistance and hyperandrogenism alter uterine morphology, cell phenotype, and cell function, especially in glandular epithelial cells. These defects are associated with an aberration in the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway that is used as an indicator for the onset of insulin resistance in classical metabolic tissues. Concomitantly, increased GSK3β (Ser-9) phosphorylation and decreased ERK1/2 phosphorylation in rats treated with insulin and hCG were also observed. We also profiled the expression of glucose transporter (Glut) isoform genes in the uterus under conditions of insulin resistance and/or hyperandrogenism. Finally, we determined the expression pattern of glycolytic enzymes and intermediates during insulin resistance and hyperandrogenism in the uterus. These findings suggest that the PI3K/Akt and MAPK/ERK signaling pathways play a role in the onset of uterine insulin resistance, and they also suggest that changes in specific Glut isoform expression and alterations to glycolytic metabolism contribute to the endometrial dysfunction observed in PCOS patients. PMID:27461373

  9. Molecular characterization of insulin resistance and glycolytic metabolism in the rat uterus.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuehui; Sun, Xue; Sun, Xiaoyan; Meng, Fanci; Hu, Min; Li, Xin; Li, Wei; Wu, Xiao-Ke; Brännström, Mats; Shao, Ruijin; Billig, Håkan

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral insulin resistance and hyperandrogenism are the primary features of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). However, how insulin resistance and hyperandrogenism affect uterine function and contribute to the pathogenesis of PCOS are open questions. We treated rats with insulin alone or in combination with human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) and showed that peripheral insulin resistance and hyperandrogenism alter uterine morphology, cell phenotype, and cell function, especially in glandular epithelial cells. These defects are associated with an aberration in the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway that is used as an indicator for the onset of insulin resistance in classical metabolic tissues. Concomitantly, increased GSK3β (Ser-9) phosphorylation and decreased ERK1/2 phosphorylation in rats treated with insulin and hCG were also observed. We also profiled the expression of glucose transporter (Glut) isoform genes in the uterus under conditions of insulin resistance and/or hyperandrogenism. Finally, we determined the expression pattern of glycolytic enzymes and intermediates during insulin resistance and hyperandrogenism in the uterus. These findings suggest that the PI3K/Akt and MAPK/ERK signaling pathways play a role in the onset of uterine insulin resistance, and they also suggest that changes in specific Glut isoform expression and alterations to glycolytic metabolism contribute to the endometrial dysfunction observed in PCOS patients. PMID:27461373

  10. Stress-impaired transcription factor expression and insulin secretion in transplanted human islets

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Chunhua; Kayton, Nora S.; Shostak, Alena; Poffenberger, Greg; Cyphert, Holly A.; Aramandla, Radhika; Thompson, Courtney; Papagiannis, Ioannis G.; Shiota, Masakazu; Stafford, John M.; Greiner, Dale L.; Herrera, Pedro L.; Shultz, Leonard D.; Stein, Roland; Powers, Alvin C.

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes is characterized by insulin resistance, hyperglycemia, and progressive β cell dysfunction. Excess glucose and lipid impair β cell function in islet cell lines, cultured rodent and human islets, and in vivo rodent models. Here, we examined the mechanistic consequences of glucotoxic and lipotoxic conditions on human islets in vivo and developed and/or used 3 complementary models that allowed comparison of the effects of hyperglycemic and/or insulin-resistant metabolic stress conditions on human and mouse islets, which responded quite differently to these challenges. Hyperglycemia and/or insulin resistance impaired insulin secretion only from human islets in vivo. In human grafts, chronic insulin resistance decreased antioxidant enzyme expression and increased superoxide and amyloid formation. In human islet grafts, expression of transcription factors NKX6.1 and MAFB was decreased by chronic insulin resistance, but only MAFB decreased under chronic hyperglycemia. Knockdown of NKX6.1 or MAFB expression in a human β cell line recapitulated the insulin secretion defect seen in vivo. Contrary to rodent islet studies, neither insulin resistance nor hyperglycemia led to human β cell proliferation or apoptosis. These results demonstrate profound differences in how excess glucose or lipid influence mouse and human insulin secretion and β cell activity and show that reduced expression of key islet-enriched transcription factors is an important mediator of glucotoxicity and lipotoxicity. PMID:27064285

  11. Heart Rate Variability, Insulin Resistance, and Insulin Sensitivity in Japanese Adults: The Toon Health Study

    PubMed Central

    Saito, Isao; Hitsumoto, Shinichi; Maruyama, Koutatsu; Nishida, Wataru; Eguchi, Eri; Kato, Tadahiro; Kawamura, Ryoichi; Takata, Yasunori; Onuma, Hiroshi; Osawa, Haruhiko; Tanigawa, Takeshi

    2015-01-01

    Background Although impaired cardiac autonomic function is associated with an increased risk of type 2 diabetes in Caucasians, evidence in Asian populations with a lower body mass index is limited. Methods Between 2009–2012, the Toon Health Study recruited 1899 individuals aged 30–79 years who were not taking medication for diabetes. A 75-g oral glucose tolerance test was used to diagnose type 2 diabetes, and fasting and 2-h-postload glucose and insulin concentrations were measured. We assessed the homeostasis model assessment index for insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) and Gutt’s insulin sensitivity index (ISI). Pulse was recorded for 5 min, and time-domain heart rate variability (HRV) indices were calculated: the standard deviation of normal-to-normal intervals (SDNN) and the root mean square of successive difference (RMSSD). Power spectral analysis provided frequency domain measures of HRV: high frequency (HF) power, low frequency (LF) power, and the LF:HF ratio. Results Multivariate-adjusted logistic regression models showed decreased SDNN, RMSSD, and HF, and increased LF:HF ratio were associated significantly with increased HOMA-IR and decreased ISI. When stratified by overweight status, the association of RMSSD, HF, and LF:HF ratio with decreased ISI was also apparent in non-overweight individuals. The interaction between LF:HF ratio and decreased ISI in overweight individuals was significant, with the odds ratio for decreased ISI in the highest quartile of LF:HF ratio in non-overweight individuals being 2.09 (95% confidence interval, 1.41–3.10). Conclusions Reduced HRV was associated with insulin resistance and lower insulin sensitivity. Decreased ISI was linked with parasympathetic dysfunction, primarily in non-overweight individuals. PMID:26277879

  12. New Insulins and New Aspects in Insulin Delivery.

    PubMed

    Woo, Vincent C

    2015-08-01

    The major abnormality in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes is insulin deficiency. The methods of replacing insulin have improved throughout the decades, but hypoglycemia is still the limiting factor for many individuals with diabetes, and it prevents them from achieving ideal glycemic targets. New insulin and newer delivery systems are being developed that can improve some of the limitations of current insulins or make the delivery of insulins more acceptable for some patients. Extending the duration of action of basal insulins and shortening the peak of fast-acting insulins may have advantages for individuals with diabetes. Different delivery systems may make insulin more acceptable to patients and may have other advantages, which may aid in attaining better glycemic control.

  13. New Insulins and New Aspects in Insulin Delivery.

    PubMed

    Woo, Vincent C

    2015-08-01

    The major abnormality in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes is insulin deficiency. The methods of replacing insulin have improved throughout the decades, but hypoglycemia is still the limiting factor for many individuals with diabetes, and it prevents them from achieving ideal glycemic targets. New insulin and newer delivery systems are being developed that can improve some of the limitations of current insulins or make the delivery of insulins more acceptable for some patients. Extending the duration of action of basal insulins and shortening the peak of fast-acting insulins may have advantages for individuals with diabetes. Different delivery systems may make insulin more acceptable to patients and may have other advantages, which may aid in attaining better glycemic control. PMID:26233724

  14. Molecular Mechanisms of Insulin Secretion and Insulin Action.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flatt, Peter R.; Bailey, Clifford J.

    1991-01-01

    Information and current ideas on the factors regulating insulin secretion, the mechanisms underlying the secretion and biological actions of insulin, and the main characteristics of diabetes mellitus are presented. (Author)

  15. Secretory IgA: Arresting Microbial Pathogens at Epithelial Borders

    PubMed Central

    Mantis, Nicholas J.; Forbes, Stephen J.

    2013-01-01

    Secretory IgA (SIgA), the predominant class of antibody found in intestinal secretions. While SIgA’s role in protecting the intestinal epithelium from the enteric pathogen and toxins has long been recognized, surprisingly little is known about the molecular mechanisms by which this is achieved. The present review summarizes the current understanding of how SIgA functions to prevent microbial pathogens and toxins from gaining access to the intestinal epithelium. We also discuss recent work from our laboratory examining the interaction of a particular protective monoclonal IgA with Salmonella and propose, based on this work, that SIgA has a previously unrecognized capacity to directly interfere with microbial virulence at mucosal surfaces. PMID:20450284

  16. Characterization of Mast Cell Secretory Granules and Their Cell Biology

    PubMed Central

    Azouz, Nurit Pereg; Hammel, Ilan

    2014-01-01

    Exocytosis and secretion of secretory granule (SG) contained inflammatory mediators is the primary mechanism by which mast cells exert their protective immune responses in host defense, as well as their pathological functions in allergic reactions and anaphylaxis. Despite their central role in mast cell function, the molecular mechanisms underlying the biogenesis and secretion of mast cell SGs remain largely unresolved. Early studies have established the lysosomal nature of the mast cell SGs and implicated SG homotypic fusion as an important step occurring during both their biogenesis and compound secretion. However, the molecular mechanisms that account for key features of this process largely remain to be defined. A novel high-resolution imaging based methodology allowed us to screen Rab GTPases for their phenotypic and functional impact and identify Rab networks that regulate mast cell secretion. This screen has identified Rab5 as a novel regulator of homotypic fusion of the mast cell SGs that thereby regulates their size and cargo composition. PMID:24988214

  17. Secretory expression of a heterologous nattokinase in Lactococcus lactis.

    PubMed

    Liang, Xiaobo; Zhang, Lixin; Zhong, Jin; Huan, Liandong

    2007-05-01

    Nattokinase has been reported as an oral health product for the prevention of atherosclerosis. We developed a novel strategy to express a nattokinase from Bacillus subtilis in a live delivery vehicle, Lactococcus lactis. Promoter P( nisZ) and signal peptide SP(Usp) were used for inducible and secretory expression of nattokinase in L. lactis. Western blotting analysis demonstrated that nattokinase was successfully expressed, and about 94% of the enzyme was secreted to the culture. The recombinant nattokinase showed potent fibrinolytic activity, equivalent to 41.7 urokinase units per milliliter culture. Expression and delivery of such a fibrinolytic enzyme in the food-grade vehicle L. lactis would facilitate the widespread application of nattokinase in the control and prevention of thrombosis diseases.

  18. Spontaneous decrease in gastric secretory response to humoral stimuli.

    PubMed

    Waterfall, W

    1969-11-22

    The gastric response to pentagastrin was studied over a period of seven months in a healthy 25-year-old man without symptoms or history of gastrointestinal disease. An abrupt impairment of the gastric response to several stimulants was observed one month after starting the tests. Periodic testing since that time has shown no reversion to the type of response seen during the initial period of testing. A second subject with proved chronic duodenal ulceration presented an identical change in pattern of gastric response to stimulants.This study suggests that such a variation in the response to gastric stimulation in a subject with a normal stomach should be borne in mind when interpreting results of gastric secretory studies.

  19. Secretory otitis media and phonology when starting school.

    PubMed

    Lous, J

    1990-01-01

    The relationship between previous middle ear disease, the presence of secretory otitis media, and phonology was investigated in 99% of a cohort of 387 unselected 7-year-old children from two Danish municipalities. All the pupils were tested with a phonological sentence repetition test called SITO, when starting school. The social and otological backgrounds were obtained from the parents. When using an analysis of variance, there was an association between phonology and tympanogram type in the better ear. No association with otological history or pure-tone screening was found. The correlation between tympanogram type and phonology was confirmed in a stepwise multiple regression analysis with nine possible confounding variables. In the statistical model, the tympanogram type could 'explain' 2-3% of the variation in phonology compared with the most important background variable, the social group of the mothers 'explaining' about 4-5% of the variation. About 15% of the variation could be 'explained' by the included variables.

  20. Silent reading and secretory otitis media in school children.

    PubMed

    Lous, J

    1993-01-01

    In an unselected cohort of 366 8-year-old children, the relationship between secretory otitis media and reading achievement was investigated. The children underwent 10 impedance audiometries and 5 pure tone audiometries during their first year at school. At the beginning of the second grade they all had a Silent Reading Word Test (OS-400). The background parameters were recorded by an interview with one of the parents. There was a significant but small correlation between type B tympanograms in the first grade and silent word reading. No association between silent reading score and otological history or pure tone screening was found. In a stepwise multiple regression model, 37% of the variance could be 'explained' by the included variables. The 'classroom factor' could 'explain' about 17% of the variance, followed by phonology at the start of school (6%), gender (5%), social group of the mother (4%), type B tympanogram (2%), absence from school (2%) and allergy (1%).

  1. Early endothelial dysfunction as a marker of vasculogenic erectile dysfunction in young habitual cannabis users.

    PubMed

    Aversa, A; Rossi, F; Francomano, D; Bruzziches, R; Bertone, C; Santiemma, V; Spera, G

    2008-01-01

    Aim of the study was to evaluate whether endothelial dysfunction is a marker of erectile dysfunction (ED) in recreational drug abuse. Sixty-four non-consecutive men complaining of ED from at least 3 months were included. All patients underwent detailed history about recreational drug abuse and were then submitted to dynamic penile duplex ultrasound (PDU). According to pharmaco-stimulated peak systolic velocity (PSV) cutoff at 35 cm s(-1), patients were divided into two groups: organic (O; n=30) and non-organic (NO; n=34) ED. All subjects and 7 healthy age-matched subjects as controls, underwent veno-occlusive plethysmography (VOP) for the evaluation of endothelium-dependent dilatation of brachial arteries. Blood pressure, total and free testosterone, prolactin, estradiol, low-density lipoprotein and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol were also evaluated; patients were classified with regard to insulin resistance through the HOMA-IR index. Cannabis smoking was more frequent in O-ED vs NO-ED (78% vs 3%, P<0.001) in the absence of any concomitant risk factor or comorbidity for ED. VOP studies revealed impaired endothelium-dependent vasodilatation in O-ED but not in NO-ED and controls (12+/-6 vs 32+/-4 and 34+/-5 ml min(-1), respectively; P=0.003). Overall patients showed a direct relationship between HOMA-IR and PSV (r(2)=0.47, P<0.0001), which was maintained in men with organic ED (r(2)=0.62, P<0.0001). In cannabis consumers, a direct relationship between HOMA-IR and VOP was also found (r(2)=0.74, P<0.0001). Receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis revealed that VOP values below 17.22 ml min(-1) were suggestive for vasculogenic ED. We conclude that early endothelial damage may be induced by chronic cannabis use (and endocannabinoid system activation); insulin resistance may be the hallmark of early endothelial dysfunction and may concur to determine vascular ED in the absence of obesity. Further studies are warranted to establish a direct relationship

  2. Inter-domain tagging implicates caveolin-1 in insulin receptor trafficking and Erk signaling bias in pancreatic beta-cells

    PubMed Central

    Boothe, Tobias; Lim, Gareth E.; Cen, Haoning; Skovsø, Søs; Piske, Micah; Li, Shu Nan; Nabi, Ivan R.; Gilon, Patrick; Johnson, James D.

    2016-01-01

    Objective The role and mechanisms of insulin receptor internalization remain incompletely understood. Previous trafficking studies of insulin receptors involved fluorescent protein tagging at their termini, manipulations that may be expected to result in dysfunctional receptors. Our objective was to determine the trafficking route and molecular mechanisms of functional tagged insulin receptors and endogenous insulin receptors in pancreatic beta-cells. Methods We generated functional insulin receptors tagged with pH-resistant fluorescent proteins between domains. Confocal, TIRF and STED imaging revealed a trafficking pattern of inter-domain tagged insulin receptors and endogenous insulin receptors detected with antibodies. Results Surprisingly, interdomain-tagged and endogenous insulin receptors in beta-cells bypassed classical Rab5a- or Rab7-mediated endocytic routes. Instead, we found that removal of insulin receptors from the plasma membrane involved tyrosine-phosphorylated caveolin-1, prior to trafficking within flotillin-1-positive structures to lysosomes. Multiple methods of inhibiting caveolin-1 significantly reduced Erk activation in vitro or in vivo, while leaving Akt signaling mostly intact. Conclusions We conclude that phosphorylated caveolin-1 plays a role in insulin receptor internalization towards lysosomes through flotillin-1-positive structures and that caveolin-1 helps bias physiological beta-cell insulin signaling towards Erk activation. PMID:27110488

  3. Metabolic disturbances and defects in insulin secretion in rats with streptozotocin-nicotinamide-induced diabetes.

    PubMed

    Szkudelski, T; Zywert, A; Szkudelska, K

    2013-01-01

    Rats with diabetes induced by streptozotocin (STZ) and nicotinamide (NA) are often used in animal studies concerning various aspects of diabetes. In this experimental model, the severity of diabetes is different depending on doses of STZ and NA. Moreover, diabetic changes in rats with STZ-NA-induced diabetes are not fully characterized. In our present study, metabolic changes and insulin secretion were investigated in rats with diabetes induced by administration of 60 mg of STZ and 90 mg of NA per kg body weight. Four to six weeks after diabetes induction, insulin, glucagon and some metabolic parameters were determined to evaluate the severity of diabetes. Moreover, insulin secretory capacity of pancreatic islets isolated from control and diabetic rats was compared. It was demonstrated that administration of 60 mg of STZ and 90 mg of NA per kg body weight induced relatively mild diabetes, since insulin, glucagon and other analyzed parameters were only slightly affected in diabetic rats compared with control animals. In vitro studies revealed that insulin secretory response was preserved in pancreatic islets of diabetic rats, however, was lower than in islets of control animals. This effect was observed in the presence of different stimuli. Insulin secretion induced by 6.7 and 16.7 mmol/l glucose was moderately reduced in islets of diabetic rats compared with control islets. In the presence of leucine with glutamine, insulin secretion appeared to be also decreased in islets of rats with STZ-NA-induced diabetes. Insulinotropic action of 6.7 mmol/l glucose with forskolin was also deteriorated in diabetic islets. Moreover, it was demonstrated that at a non-stimulatory glucose, pharmacological depolarization of plasma membrane with a concomitant activation of protein kinase C evoked significant rise in insulin release in islets of control and diabetic rats. However, in diabetic islets, this effect was attenuated. These results indicate that impairment in insulin

  4. Insulin C-peptide test

    MedlinePlus

    C-peptide ... the test depends on the reason for the C-peptide measurement. Ask your health care provider if ... C-peptide is measured to tell the difference between insulin the body produces and insulin someone injects ...

  5. Methionine restriction improves renal insulin signalling in aged kidneys.

    PubMed

    Grant, Louise; Lees, Emma K; Forney, Laura A; Mody, Nimesh; Gettys, Thomas; Brown, Paul A J; Wilson, Heather M; Delibegovic, Mirela

    2016-07-01

    Dietary methionine restriction (MR) leads to loss of adiposity, improved insulin sensitivity and lifespan extension. The possibility that dietary MR can protect the kidney from age-associated deterioration has not been addressed. Aged (10-month old) male and female mice were placed on a MR (0.172% methionine) or control diet (0.86% methionine) for 8-weeks and blood glucose, renal insulin signalling, and gene expression were assessed. Methionine restriction lead to decreased blood glucose levels compared to control-fed mice, and enhanced insulin-stimulated phosphorylation of PKB/Akt and S6 in kidneys, indicative of improved glucose homeostasis. Increased expression of lipogenic genes and downregulation of PEPCK were observed, suggesting that kidneys from MR-fed animals are more insulin sensitive. Interestingly, renal gene expression of the mitochondrial uncoupling protein UCP1 was upregulated in MR-fed animals, as were the anti-ageing and renoprotective genes Sirt1, FGF21, klotho, and β-klotho. This was associated with alterations in renal histology trending towards reduced frequency of proximal tubule intersections containing vacuoles in mice that had been on dietary MR for 190days compared to control-fed mice, which exhibited a pre-diabetic status. Our results indicate that dietary MR may offer therapeutic potential in ameliorating the renal functional decline related to ageing and other disorders associated with metabolic dysfunction by enhancing renal insulin sensitivity and renoprotective gene expression. PMID:27453066

  6. Traumatic brain injury and obesity induce persistent central insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Karelina, Kate; Sarac, Benjamin; Freeman, Lindsey M; Gaier, Kristopher R; Weil, Zachary M

    2016-04-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI)-induced impairments in cerebral energy metabolism impede tissue repair and contribute to delayed functional recovery. Moreover, the transient alteration in brain glucose utilization corresponds to a period of increased vulnerability to the negative effects of a subsequent TBI. In order to better understand the factors contributing to TBI-induced central metabolic dysfunction, we examined the effect of single and repeated TBIs on brain insulin signalling. Here we show that TBI induced acute brain insulin resistance, which resolved within 7 days following a single injury but persisted until 28 days following repeated injuries. Obesity, which causes brain insulin resistance and neuroinflammation, exacerbated the consequences of TBI. Obese mice that underwent a TBI exhibited a prolonged reduction of Akt (also known as protein kinase B) signalling, exacerbated neuroinflammation (microglial activation), learning and memory deficits, and anxiety-like behaviours. Taken together, the transient changes in brain insulin sensitivity following TBI suggest a reduced capacity of the injured brain to respond to the neuroprotective and anti-inflammatory actions of insulin and Akt signalling, and thus may be a contributing factor for the damaging neuroinflammation and long-lasting deficits that occur following TBI. PMID:26833850

  7. Insulin tolerance in laminitic ponies.

    PubMed Central

    Coffman, J R; Colles, C M

    1983-01-01

    Sensitivity to insulin was assessed in ponies episodically affected with chronic laminitis by measurement of blood glucose and arterial blood pressure during insulin tolerance tests. In terms of blood glucose values, laminitic ponies were significantly less sensitive to insulin than controls. Conversely, a post-insulin decline in diastolic, systolic and mean blood pressure values was significantly greater in laminitic ponies than in controls. PMID:6357412

  8. Subthreshold α₂-adrenergic activation counteracts glucagon-like peptide-1 potentiation of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion.

    PubMed

    Pan, Minglin; Yang, Guang; Cui, Xiuli; Yang, Shao-Nian

    2011-01-01

    The pancreatic β cell harbors α₂-adrenergic and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptors on its plasma membrane to sense the corresponding ligands adrenaline/noradrenaline and GLP-1 to govern glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. However, it is not known whether these two signaling systems interact to gain the adequate and timely control of insulin release in response to glucose. The present work shows that the α₂-adrenergic agonist clonidine concentration-dependently depresses glucose-stimulated insulin secretion from INS-1 cells. On the contrary, GLP-1 concentration-dependently potentiates insulin secretory response to glucose. Importantly, the present work reveals that subthreshold α₂-adrenergic activation with clonidine counteracts GLP-1 potentiation of glucose-induced insulin secretion. This counteractory process relies on pertussis toxin- (PTX-) sensitive Gi proteins since it no longer occurs following PTX-mediated inactivation of Gi proteins. The counteraction of GLP-1 potentiation of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion by subthreshold α₂-adrenergic activation is likely to serve as a molecular mechanism for the delicate regulation of insulin release.

  9. Pathogenesis of NIDDM--a disease of deficient insulin secretion.

    PubMed

    Turner, R C; Matthews, D R; Clark, A; O'Rahilly, S; Rudenski, A S; Levy, J

    1988-05-01

    Type 2 diabetes is a familial disease and studies of both Caucasian and Japanese families have raised the possibility that a major susceptibility gene is involved. The majority of patients have both beta cell dysfunction and impaired insulin sensitivity but studies of relatives of Type 2 diabetic patients suggest that beta cell dysfunction is an early feature of the disease. Impaired insulin sensitivity, from acromegaly, Cushing's disease or steroid therapy, induces diabetes only in a small proportion of the population, and they may be those who have an inherited cell defect. We postulate that a single beta cell defect gene, on its own, may be insufficient to cause overt diabetes and would lead to life-long glucose intolerance unless associated with other defects such as impaired insulin sensitivity. The nature of such a postulated beta cell defect is uncertain. Whilst it has been reported to be specific to glucose, and not to non-glucose stimuli, this feature may be secondary to hyperglycaemia. The occurrence of islet amyloid in 70-90% of Type 2 diabetic patients, and rarely in the normal population, raises the possibility that amyloid deposition causing disruption of the islet is a factor which might affect beta cell function. Amyloid formation may be a primary abnormality or could be secondary to beta cell dysfunction induced by hyperglycaemia. A major susceptibility gene might predispose a proportion, perhaps 10-15%, of a Caucasian population towards diabetes. The subsequent development of diabetes in a particular patient is likely to depend on many factors including other genetic factors, a sedentary life style and obesity. In different populations different genetic influences may operate, including abnormalities of insulin receptor genes and glucose transporter genes, which may allow a beta cell abnormality to become expressed clinically. PMID:3075895

  10. Central insulin and leptin-mediated autonomic control of glucose homeostasis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Largely as a result of rising obesity rates, the incidence of type 2 diabetes is escalating rapidly. Type 2 diabetes results from multi-organ dysfunctional glucose metabolism. Recent publications have highlighted hypothalamic insulin- and adipokine-sensing as a major determinant of peripheral glucos...

  11. Oral Insulin and Buccal Insulin: A Critical Reappraisal

    PubMed Central

    Heinemann, Lutz; Jacques, Yves

    2009-01-01

    Despite the availability of modern insulin injection devices with needles that are so sharp and thin that practically no injection pain takes place, it is still the dream of patients with diabetes to, for example, swallow a tablet with insulin. This is not associated with any pain and would allow more discretion. Therefore, availability of oral insulin would not only ease insulin therapy, it would certainly increase compliance. However, despite numerous attempts to develop such a “tablet” in the past 85 years, still no oral insulin is commercially available. Buccal insulin is currently in the last stages of clinical development by one company and might become available in the United States and Europe in the coming years (it is already on the market in some other countries). The aim of this review is to critically describe the different approaches that are currently under development. Optimal coverage of prandial insulin requirements is the aim with both routes of insulin administration (at least with most approaches). The speed of onset of metabolic effect seen with some oral insulin approaches is rapid, but absorption appears to be lower when the tablet is taken immediately prior to a meal. With all approaches, considerable amounts of insulin have to be applied in order to induce therapeutically relevant increases in the metabolic effect because of the low relative biopotency of buccal insulin. Unfortunately, the number of publications about clinical–experimental and clinical studies is surprisingly low. In addition, there is no study published in which the variability of the metabolic effect induced (with and without a meal) was studied adequately. In summary, after the failure of inhaled insulin, oral insulin and buccal insulin are hot candidates to come to the market as the next alternative routes of insulin administration. PMID:20144297

  12. Sorting and storage during secretory granule biogenesis: looking backward and looking forward.

    PubMed Central

    Arvan, P; Castle, D

    1998-01-01

    Secretory granules are specialized intracellular organelles that serve as a storage pool for selected secretory products. The exocytosis of secretory granules is markedly amplified under physiologically stimulated conditions. While granules have been recognized as post-Golgi carriers for almost 40 years, the molecular mechanisms involved in their formation from the trans-Golgi network are only beginning to be defined. This review summarizes and evaluates current information about how secretory proteins are thought to be sorted for the regulated secretory pathway and how these activities are positioned with respect to other post-Golgi sorting events that must occur in parallel. In the first half of the review, the emerging role of immature secretory granules in protein sorting is highlighted. The second half of the review summarizes what is known about the composition of granule membranes. The numerous similarities and relatively limited differences identified between granule membranes and other vesicular carriers that convey products to and from the plasmalemma, serve as a basis for examining how granule membrane composition might be established and how its unique functions interface with general post-Golgi membrane traffic. Studies of granule formation in vitro offer additional new insights, but also important challenges for future efforts to understand how regulated secretory pathways are constructed and maintained. PMID:9620860

  13. Lipids implicated in the journey of a secretory granule: from biogenesis to fusion.

    PubMed

    Tanguy, Emeline; Carmon, Ophélie; Wang, Qili; Jeandel, Lydie; Chasserot-Golaz, Sylvette; Montero-Hadjadje, Maité; Vitale, Nicolas

    2016-06-01

    The regulated secretory pathway begins with the formation of secretory granules by budding from the Golgi apparatus and ends by their fusion with the plasma membrane leading to the release of their content into the extracellular space, generally following a rise in cytosolic calcium. Generation of these membrane-bound transport carriers can be classified into three steps: (i) cargo sorting that segregates the cargo from resident proteins of the Golgi apparatus, (ii) membrane budding that encloses the cargo and depends on the creation of appropriate membrane curvature, and (iii) membrane fission events allowing the nascent carrier to separate from the donor membrane. These secretory vesicles then mature as they are actively transported along microtubules toward the cortical actin network at the cell periphery. The final stage known as regulated exocytosis involves the docking and the priming of the mature granules, necessary for merging of vesicular and plasma membranes, and the subsequent partial or total release of the secretory vesicle content. Here, we review the latest evidence detailing the functional roles played by lipids during secretory granule biogenesis, recruitment, and exocytosis steps. In this review, we highlight evidence supporting the notion that lipids play important functions in secretory vesicle biogenesis, maturation, recruitment, and membrane fusion steps. These effects include regulating various protein distribution and activity, but also directly modulating membrane topology. The challenges ahead to understand the pleiotropic functions of lipids in a secretory granule's journey are also discussed. This article is part of a mini review series on Chromaffin cells (ISCCB Meeting, 2015).

  14. Transcriptional regulation of secretory capacity by bZip transcription factors

    PubMed Central

    FOX, Rebecca M.

    2015-01-01

    Cells of specialized secretory organs expand their secretory pathways to accommodate the increased protein load necessary for their function. The endoplasmic reticulum (ER), the Golgi apparatus and the secretory vesicles, expand not only the membrane components but also the protein machinery required for increased protein production and transport. Increased protein load causes an ER stress response akin to the Unfolded Protein Response (UPR). Recent work has implicated several bZip transcription factors in the regulation of protein components of the early secretory pathway necessary to alleviate this stress. Here, we highlight eight bZip transcription factors in regulating secretory pathway component genes. These include components of the three canonical branches of the UPR–ATF4, XBP1, and ATF6, as well as the five members of the Creb3 family of transcription factors. We review findings from both invertebrate and vertebrate model systems suggesting that all of these proteins increase secretory capacity in response to increased protein load. Finally, we propose that the Creb3 family of factors may have a dual role in secretory cell differentiation by also regulating the pathways necessary for cell cycle exit during terminal differentiation. PMID:25821458

  15. Ryanodine receptor type I and nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate receptors mediate Ca2+ release from insulin-containing vesicles in living pancreatic beta-cells (MIN6).

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Kathryn J; Lai, F Anthony; Rutter, Guy A

    2003-03-28

    We have demonstrated recently (Mitchell, K. J., Pinton, P., Varadi, A., Tacchetti, C., Ainscow, E. K., Pozzan, T., Rizzuto, R., and Rutter, G. A. (2001) J. Cell Biol. 155, 41-51) that ryanodine receptors (RyR) are present on insulin-containing secretory vesicles. Here we show that pancreatic islets and derived beta-cell lines express type I and II, but not type III, RyRs. Purified by subcellular fractionation and membrane immuno-isolation, dense core secretory vesicles were found to possess a similar level of type I RyR immunoreactivity as Golgi/endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membranes but substantially less RyR II than the latter. Monitored in cells expressing appropriately targeted aequorins, dantrolene, an inhibitor of RyR I channels, elevated free Ca(2+) concentrations in the secretory vesicle compartment from 40.1 +/- 6.7 to 90.4 +/- 14.8 microm (n = 4, p < 0.01), while having no effect on ER Ca(2+) concentrations. Furthermore, nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAADP), a novel Ca(2+)-mobilizing agent, decreased dense core secretory vesicle but not ER free Ca(2+) concentrations in permeabilized MIN6 beta-cells, and flash photolysis of caged NAADP released Ca(2+) from a thapsigargin-insensitive Ca(2+) store in single MIN6 cells. Because dantrolene strongly inhibited glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (from 3.07 +/- 0.51-fold stimulation to no significant glucose effect; n = 3, p < 0.01), we conclude that RyR I-mediated Ca(2+)-induced Ca(2+) release from secretory vesicles, possibly potentiated by NAADP, is essential for the activation of insulin secretion.

  16. Comparison of several insulin sensitivity indices derived from basal plasma insulin and glucose levels with minimal model indices.

    PubMed

    García-Estévez, D A; Araújo-Vilar, D; Fiestras-Janeiro, G; Saavedra-González, A; Cabezas-Cerrato, J

    2003-01-01

    Some techniques for the evaluation of insulin resistance (IR), such as the clamp technique, are not viable for the study of large populations; and for this reason, alternative approaches based on fasting plasma glucose (FPG) and plasma insulin (FPI) have been proposed. The aim of this study was to compare the IR calculations obtained from FPI and FPG values with the insulin sensitivity (IS) index derived from the minimal model. Eighty-seven healthy subjects with a wide range of body mass index (18 - 44 kg x m -2) and 16 DM2 non-obese patients were included in the study. All of the patients underwent a frequently sampled intravenous glucose tolerance test (FSIGTT), and the minimal model of glucose was used for the estimation of insulin sensitivity (IS MINIMAL ). The HOMA-IR index, the Avignon index, and the quotient FPG/FPI were used to calculate basal steady-state IR. The basal IR value that best correlated with IS was Log (1/HOMA-IR) (r = 0.70, p < 0.001). All of the basal indices showed a high correlation with each other. In conclusions, insulin sensitivity indices as determined from the basal glycaemia and insulinemia values are not good estimators for metabolic reality from the perspective of the minimal model. Nevertheless, they might well have an IR screening value for epidemiological studies, as long as there is no pancreatic beta-cell dysfunction. PMID:12669265

  17. Testosterone deprivation accelerates cardiac dysfunction in obese male rats.

    PubMed

    Pongkan, Wanpitak; Pintana, Hiranya; Sivasinprasasn, Sivaporn; Jaiwongkam, Thidarat; Chattipakorn, Siriporn C; Chattipakorn, Nipon

    2016-06-01

    Low testosterone level is associated with increased risks of cardiovascular diseases. As obese-insulin-resistant condition could impair cardiac function and that the incidence of obesity is increased in aging men, a condition of testosterone deprivation could aggravate the cardiac dysfunction in obese-insulin-resistant subjects. However, the mechanism underlying this adverse effect is unclear. This study investigated the effects of obesity on metabolic parameters, heart rate variability (HRV), left ventricular (LV) function, and cardiac mitochondrial function in testosterone-deprived rats. Orchiectomized or sham-operated male Wistar rats (n=36per group) were randomly divided into groups and were given either a normal diet (ND, 19.77% of energy fat) or a high-fat diet (HFD, 57.60% of energy fat) for 12weeks. Metabolic parameters, HRV, LV function, and cardiac mitochondrial function were determined at 4, 8, and 12weeks after starting each feeding program. We found that insulin resistance was observed after 8weeks of the consumption of a HFD in both sham (HFS) and orchiectomized (HFO) rats. Neither the ND sham (NDS) group nor ND orchiectomized (NDO) rats developed insulin resistance. The development of depressed HRV, LV contractile dysfunction, and increased cardiac mitochondrial reactive oxygen species production was observed earlier in orchiectomized (NDO and HFO) rats at week 4, whereas HFS rats exhibited these impairments later at week 8. These findings suggest that testosterone deprivation accelerates the impairment of cardiac autonomic regulation and LV function via increased oxidative stress and impaired cardiac mitochondrial function in obese-orchiectomized male rats. PMID:27000685

  18. [Epilepsy with higher brain dysfunction].

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Azusa; Midorikawa, Akira; Koyama, Shinichi; Futamura, Akinori; Kuroda, Takeshi; Fujita, Kazuhisa; Itaya, Kazuhiro; Ishigaki, Seiichiro; Kawamura, Mitsuru

    2013-02-01

    Acquired higher brain dysfunction is for the most part due to cerebral vascular disease, but epilepsy may also be a cause. In this study with five patients, we discuss the advantages of anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs) for persistent higher brain dysfunction. The patients showed chronic amnesia or acute aphasia, with associated symptoms like personality change. All five cases affected automatism or convulsive attack, though only after the emergence of higher brain dysfunction and administration of AEDs. There were underlying diseases like cerebral arteriovenous malformation in four cases, but the other patient had none. Electroencephalogram and single photon emission computed tomography revealed one case of aphasia epilepsy with higher brain dysfunction. These results suggest the potential therapeutic efficacy of AEDs for persistent higher brain dysfunction, and we must differentiate epilepsy with higher brain dysfunction from dementia or cerebral vascular disease. PMID:23399676

  19. Transient sinus node dysfunction with acute hepatitis of unknown etiology.

    PubMed

    Al-Fagih, Ahmed R; Al-Ghamdi, Saleh A; Dagriri, Khaled G; Al-Malki, Ahmed S

    2010-05-01

    We reported a case of a 72-year-old male, known diabetic on insulin, referred because of complete atrioventricular block. He was found to have acute hepatitis during which he developed transient atrial arrhythmia, and sinus node dysfunction. His cardiac symptoms disappeared completely after hepatitis improvement. All of his cardiac investigations were normal including electrocardiogram, echocardiography and thalium stress test. At 3 and 6 months follow up, his Holter monitoring did not show any further arrhythmia, and he denied any further episodes of palpitation or pre-syncope. We reviewed the literature regarding the relationship between hepatitis and atrial arrhythmia. PMID:20464052

  20. Cysteine analogues potentiate glucose-induced insulin release in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Ammon, H.P.; Hehl, K.H.; Enz, G.; Setiadi-Ranti, A.; Verspohl, E.J.

    1986-12-01

    In rat pancreatic islets, cysteine analogues, including glutathione, acetylcysteine, cysteamine, D-penicillamine, L-cysteine ethyl ester, and cysteine-potentiated glucose (11.1 mM) induced insulin secretion in a concentration-dependent manner. Their maximal effects were similar and occurred at approximately 0.05, 0.05, 0.1, 0.5, 1.0, 1.0 mM, respectively. At substimulatory glucose levels (2.8 mM), insulin release was not affected by these compounds. In contrast, thiol compounds, structurally different from cysteine and its analogues, such as mesna, tiopronin, meso-2,3-dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA), dimercaprol (BAL), beta-thio-D-glucose, as well as those cysteine analogues that lack a free-thiol group, including L-cystine, cystamine, D-penicillamine disulfide, S-carbocysteine, and S-carbamoyl-L-cysteine, did not enhance insulin release at stimulatory glucose levels (11.1 mM); cystine (5 mM) was inhibitory. These in vitro data indicate that among the thiols tested here, only cysteine and its analogues potentiate glucose-induced insulin secretion, whereas thiols that are structurally not related to cysteine do not. This suggests that a cysteine moiety in the molecule is necessary for the insulinotropic effect. For their synergistic action to glucose, the availability of a sulfhydryl group is also a prerequisite. The maximal synergistic action is similar for all cysteine analogues tested, whereas the potency of action is different, suggesting similarity in the mechanism of action but differences in the affinity to the secretory system.

  1. Insulin resistance in the liver: Deficiency or excess of insulin?

    PubMed Central

    Bazotte, Roberto B; Silva, Lorena G; Schiavon, Fabiana PM

    2014-01-01

    In insulin-resistant states (obesity, pre-diabetes, and type 2 diabetes), hepatic production of glucose and lipid synthesis are heightened in concert, implying that insulin deficiency and insulin excess coexists in this setting. The fact that insulin may be inadequate or excessive at any one point in differing organs and tissues has many biologic ramifications. In this context the concept of metabolic compartmentalization in the liver is offered herein as one perspective of this paradox. In particular, we focus on the hypothesis that insulin resistance accentuates differences in periportal and perivenous hepatocytes, namely periportal glucose production and perivenous lipid synthesis. Subsequently, excessive production of glucose and accumulation of lipids could be expected in the livers of patients with obesity and insulin resistance. Overall, in this review, we provide our integrative perspective regarding how excessive production of glucose in periportal hepatocytes and accumulation of lipids in perivenous hepatocytes interact in insulin resistant states. PMID:25486190

  2. Animal models of erectile dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Kapoor, Mandeep Singh; Khan, Samsroz Ahmad; Gupta, Sanjay Kumar; Choudhary, Rajesh; Bodakhe, Surendra H

    2015-01-01

    Erectile dysfunction (ED) is a prevalent male sexual dysfunction with profound adverse effects on the physical and the psychosocial health of men and, subsequently, on their partners. The expanded use of various types of rodent models has produced some advances in the study of ED, and neurophysiological studies using various animal models have provided important insights into human sexual dysfunction. At present, animal models play a key role in exploring and screening novel drugs designed to treat ED.

  3. Female sexual dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Aslan, Erdogan; Fynes, Michelle

    2008-02-01

    Female sexual dysfunction is a common problem with detrimental effects on woman's quality of life. It also has an economical and societal impact. It is defined as disorders of sexual desire, arousal, orgasm, and sexual pain, which lead to personal distress. The etiology of sexual dysfunction is frequently multifactorial as it relates to general physical and mental well-being, quality of relationship, past sexual functioning, social class, education, employment, life stressors, personality factors, the presence of a sexual partner, and partner's age and health. It is very important to adopt the most efficient approach to gather information, and this may be achieved via standardized questionnaires or open-ended questions. Therapy should be tailored according to the patient's needs and may involve a multidisciplinary team approach including psychosexual counselor/sexologist/therapist and the physician. There is still more work needed to optimize the care of women with this problem. Priority should be given to international standardization and training of health care professionals.

  4. Sexual dysfunction in uremia.

    PubMed

    Palmer, B F

    1999-06-01

    In summary, sexual dysfunction is a common finding in both men and women with chronic renal failure. Common disturbances include erectile dysfunction in men, menstrual abnormalities in women, and decreased libido and fertility in both sexes. These abnormalities are primarily organic in nature and are related to uremia as well as the other comorbid conditions that frequently accompany the chronic renal failure patient. Fatigue and psychosocial factors related to the presence of a chronic disease are also contributory factors. Disturbances in the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis can be detected before the need for dialysis but continue to worsen once dialytic therapy is initiated. Impaired gonadal function is prominent in uremic men, whereas the disturbances in the hypothalamicpituitary axis are more subtle. By contrast, central disturbances are more prominent in uremic women. Therapy is initially directed toward optimizing the delivery of dialysis, correcting anemia with recombinant erythropoietin, and controlling the degree of secondary hyperparathyroidism with vitamin D. For many practicing nephrologists, sildenafil has become the first-line therapy in the treatment of impotence. In the hypogonadal man whose only complaint is decreased libido, testosterone may be of benefit. Regular gynecologic follow-up is required in uremic women to guard against potential complications of unopposed estrogen effect. Uremic women should be advised against pregnancy while on dialysis. Successful transplantation is the most effective means of restoring normal sexual function in both men and women with chronic renal failure.

  5. New Insulin Delivery Recommendations.

    PubMed

    Frid, Anders H; Kreugel, Gillian; Grassi, Giorgio; Halimi, Serge; Hicks, Debbie; Hirsch, Laurence J; Smith, Mike J; Wellhoener, Regine; Bode, Bruce W; Hirsch, Irl B; Kalra, Sanjay; Ji, Linong; Strauss, Kenneth W

    2016-09-01

    Many primary care professionals manage injection or infusion therapies in patients with diabetes. Few published guidelines have been available to help such professionals and their patients manage these therapies. Herein, we present new, practical, and comprehensive recommendations for diabetes injections and infusions. These recommendations were informed by a large international survey of current practice and were written and vetted by 183 diabetes experts from 54 countries at the Forum for Injection Technique and Therapy: Expert Recommendations (FITTER) workshop held in Rome, Italy, in 2015. Recommendations are organized around the themes of anatomy, physiology, pathology, psychology, and technology. Key among the recommendations are that the shortest needles (currently the 4-mm pen and 6-mm syringe needles) are safe, effective, and less painful and should be the first-line choice in all patient categories; intramuscular injections should be avoided, especially with long-acting insulins, because severe hypoglycemia may result; lipohypertrophy is a frequent complication of therapy that distorts insulin absorption, and, therefore, injections and infusions should not be given into these lesions and correct site rotation will help prevent them; effective long-term therapy with insulin is critically dependent on addressing psychological hurdles upstream, even before insulin has been started; inappropriate disposal of used sharps poses a risk of infection with blood-borne pathogens; and mitigation is possible with proper training, effective disposal strategies, and the use of safety devices. Adherence to these new recommendations should lead to more effective therapies, improved outcomes, and lower costs for patients with diabetes. PMID:27594187

  6. [Insulin therapy of diabetes].

    PubMed

    Lechleitner, Monika; Roden, Michael; Weitgasser, Raimund; Ludvik, Bernhard; Fasching, Peter; Hoppichler, Friedrich; Kautzky-Willer, Alexandra; Schernthaner, Guntram; Prager, Rudolf; Wascher, Thomas C

    2016-04-01

    Hyperglycemia contributes to morbidity and mortality in patients with diabetes. Thus, reaching treatment targets with regard to control of glycemia is a central goal in the therapy of diabetic patients. The present article represents the recommendations of the Austrian Diabetes Association for the practical use of insulin according to current scientific evidence and clinical studies. PMID:27052221

  7. New Insulin Delivery Recommendations.

    PubMed

    Frid, Anders H; Kreugel, Gillian; Grassi, Giorgio; Halimi, Serge; Hicks, Debbie; Hirsch, Laurence J; Smith, Mike J; Wellhoener, Regine; Bode, Bruce W; Hirsch, Irl B; Kalra, Sanjay; Ji, Linong; Strauss, Kenneth W

    2016-09-01

    Many primary care professionals manage injection or infusion therapies in patients with diabetes. Few published guidelines have been available to help such professionals and their patients manage these therapies. Herein, we present new, practical, and comprehensive recommendations for diabetes injections and infusions. These recommendations were informed by a large international survey of current practice and were written and vetted by 183 diabetes experts from 54 countries at the Forum for Injection Technique and Therapy: Expert Recommendations (FITTER) workshop held in Rome, Italy, in 2015. Recommendations are organized around the themes of anatomy, physiology, pathology, psychology, and technology. Key among the recommendations are that the shortest needles (currently the 4-mm pen and 6-mm syringe needles) are safe, effective, and less painful and should be the first-line choice in all patient categories; intramuscular injections should be avoided, especially with long-acting insulins, because severe hypoglycemia may result; lipohypertrophy is a frequent complication of therapy that distorts insulin absorption, and, therefore, injections and infusions should not be given into these lesions and correct site rotation will help prevent them; effective long-term therapy with insulin is critically dependent on addressing psychological hurdles upstream, even before insulin has been started; inappropriate disposal of used sharps poses a risk of infection with blood-borne pathogens; and mitigation is possible with proper training, effective disposal strategies, and the use of safety devices. Adherence to these new recommendations should lead to more effective therapies, improved outcomes, and lower costs for patients with diabetes.

  8. Insulin Resistance and Prediabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... to be used in most health care providers' offices. The clamp is a research tool used by scientists to learn more about glucose metabolism. Research has shown that if blood tests indicate prediabetes, insulin ... care provider's office or commercial facility and sending the sample to ...

  9. Acute overexpression of lactate dehydrogenase-A perturbs beta-cell mitochondrial metabolism and insulin secretion.

    PubMed

    Ainscow, E K; Zhao, C; Rutter, G A

    2000-07-01

    Islet beta-cells express low levels of lactate dehydrogenase and have high glycerol phosphate dehydrogenase activity. To determine whether this configuration favors oxidative glucose metabolism via mitochondria in the beta-cell and is important for beta-cell metabolic signal transduction, we have determined the effects on glucose metabolism and insulin secretion of acute overexpression of the skeletal muscle isoform of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH)-A. Monitored in single MIN6 beta-cells, LDH hyperexpression (achieved by intranuclear cDNA microinjection or adenoviral infection) diminished the response to glucose of both phases of increases in mitochondrial NAD(P)H, as well as increases in mitochondrial membrane potential, cytosolic free ATP, and cystolic free Ca2+. These effects were observed at all glucose concentrations, but were most pronounced at submaximal glucose levels. Correspondingly, adenoviral vector-mediated LDH-A overexpression reduced insulin secretion stimulated by 11 mmol/l glucose and the subsequent response to stimulation with 30 mmol/l glucose, but it was without significant effect when the concentration of glucose was raised acutely from 3 to 30 mmol/l. Thus, overexpression of LDH activity interferes with normal glucose metabolism and insulin secretion in the islet beta-cell type, and it may therefore be directly responsible for insulin secretory defects in some forms of type 2 diabetes. The results also reinforce the view that glucose-derived pyruvate metabolism in the mitochondrion is critical for glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in the beta-cell.

  10. Insulin-mediated pseudoacromegaly: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Yaqub, Abid; Yaqub, Nadia

    2008-01-01

    A 23 year old female patient presented with oligoamenorrhea. She had excessive weight gain and had noticed hirsutism, enlargement of the jaw, increase in her ring and shoe size, increased sweating and darkening of her skin in flexural areas. Examination revealed a large framed woman with coarse facial features, large hands and feet, prognathism, acanthosis nigricans, hirsutism, acne and many skin tags. GH and IGF-1 were normal. MRI of pituitary showed a 7mm microadenoma, believed to be non-secretory with normal pituitary hormonal workup. She had marked elevation of serum insulin, elevated testosterone and mixed hyperlipidemia. The occurrence of acromegaloid manifestations is an unusual phenomenon seen in a subset of patients with insulin resistance. In vitro studies in fibroblasts obtained from such patients have revealed impairment of metabolic, but preservation of mitogenic insulin signaling. Insulin-mediated pseudoacromegaly is an unusual syndrome that combines severe insulin resistance and an acromegaloid phenotype. Physicians should consider this possibility while evaluating patients with similar clinical and laboratory features. PMID:18846753

  11. Olfactory dysfunction in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Zou, Yong-Ming; Lu, Da; Liu, Li-Ping; Zhang, Hui-Hong; Zhou, Yu-Ying

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a common neurodegenerative disorder with the earliest clinical symptom of olfactory dysfunction, which is a potential clinical marker for AD severity and progression. However, many questions remain unanswered. This article reviews relevant research on olfactory dysfunction in AD and evaluates the predictive value of olfactory dysfunction for the epidemiological, pathophysiological, and clinical features of AD, as well as for the conversion of cognitive impairment to AD. We summarize problems of existing studies and provide a useful reference for further studies in AD olfactory dysfunction and for clinical applications of olfactory testing. PMID:27143888

  12. Autonomic dysfunction in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Racosta, Juan Manuel; Kimpinski, Kurt; Morrow, Sarah Anne; Kremenchutzky, Marcelo

    2015-12-01

    Autonomic dysfunction is a prevalent and significant cause of disability among patients with multiple sclerosis. Autonomic dysfunction in multiple sclerosis is usually explained by lesions within central nervous system regions responsible for autonomic regulation, but novel evidence suggests that other factors may be involved as well. Additionally, the interactions between the autonomic nervous system and the immune system have generated increased interest about the role of autonomic dysfunction in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis. In this paper we analyze systematically the most relevant signs and symptoms of autonomic dysfunction in MS, considering separately their potential causes and implications.

  13. Insulin therapy and exercise.

    PubMed

    Kourtoglou, Georgios I

    2011-08-01

    Medical nutrition therapy and physical exercise are the cornerstones of the diabetes management. Patients with type 1 DM always need exogenous insulin administration, recently available in the form of insulin analogs. In type 2 DM, characterized by increased insulin resistance and progressive decline of the beta-cell function, various antidiabetic medications are used. Most of the subjects with type 2 DM will finally need insulin. The main site of insulin action is the skeletal muscle, while the liver is the main site of glucose storage in the form of glycogen. With the modern diabetes therapies it is possible to rapidly reach and maintain normoglycemia in both types of DM but with the cost of higher incidence of hypoglycemia, especially related to exercise. Regular physical exercise causes a lot of beneficial effects in healthy as well as diabetic subjects of all age groups. In type 1 DM physical exercise is a fundamental element for both physical and mental development. In type 2 DM it has a main role in diabetes control. The increased hepatic glucose production and the increased muscular glucose uptake during exercise are closely interrelated in all exercise intensities. In diabetes mellitus there is a disturbed energy substrate use during exercise leading to either hypo- or hyperglycemia. The influence of low or moderate intensity aerobic exercise on diabetes control has been well studied. The inappropriately high insulinemia combined with the low glucose levels can lead to severe hypoglycemia if proper measures are not taken. Prolonged exercise can also predispose to decreased glucose counter regulation. It is better for the type 1 diabetic subject to postpone the exercise session in very high (>300 mg/dl) or very low (<70 mg/dl) BG levels. Every insulin treated subject is recommended to be checked for any existing diabetic complication before the start of every exercise program. Glucose measurement with glucose meters or sometimes with Continuous Glucose

  14. Brugia malayi soluble and excretory-secretory proteins attenuate development of streptozotocin-induced type 1 diabetes in mice.

    PubMed

    Amdare, N; Khatri, V; Yadav, R S P; Tarnekar, A; Goswami, K; Reddy, M V R

    2015-12-01

    Understanding the modulation of the host-immune system by pathogens-like filarial parasites offers an alternate approach to prevent autoimmune diseases. In this study, we have shown that treatment with filarial proteins prior to or after the clinical onset of streptozotocin-induced type-1 diabetes (T1D) can ameliorate the severity of disease in BALB/c mice. Pre-treatment with Brugia malayi adult soluble (Bm A S) or microfilarial excretory-secretory (Bm mf ES) or microfilarial soluble (Bm mf S) antigens followed by induction of diabetes led to lowering of fasting blood glucose levels with as many as 57.5-62.5% of mice remaining nondiabetic. These proteins were more effective when they were used to treat the mice with established T1D as 62.5-71.5% of the mice turned to be nondiabetic. Histopathological examination of pancreas of treated mice showed minor inflammatory changes in pancreatic islet cell architecture. The therapeutic effect was found to be associated with the decreased production of cytokines TNF-α & IFN-γ and increased production of IL-10 in the culture supernatants of splenocytes of treated mice. A switch in the production of anti-insulin antibodies from IgG2a to IgG1 isotype was also seen. Together these results provide a proof towards utilizing the filarial derived proteins as novel anti-diabetic therapeutics.

  15. Unraveling Biochemical Pathways Affected by Mitochondrial Dysfunctions Using Metabolomic Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Demine, Stéphane; Reddy, Nagabushana; Renard, Patricia; Raes, Martine; Arnould, Thierry

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction(s) (MDs) can be defined as alterations in the mitochondria, including mitochondrial uncoupling, mitochondrial depolarization, inhibition of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, mitochondrial network fragmentation, mitochondrial or nuclear DNA mutations and the mitochondrial accumulation of protein aggregates. All these MDs are known to alter the capacity of ATP production and are observed in several pathological states/diseases, including cancer, obesity, muscle and neurological disorders. The induction of MDs can also alter the secretion of several metabolites, reactive oxygen species production and modify several cell-signalling pathways to resolve the mitochondrial dysfunction or ultimately trigger cell death. Many metabolites, such as fatty acids and derived compounds, could be secreted into the blood stream by cells suffering from mitochondrial alterations. In this review, we summarize how a mitochondrial uncoupling can modify metabolites, the signalling pathways and transcription factors involved in this process. We describe how to identify the causes or consequences of mitochondrial dysfunction using metabolomics (liquid and gas chromatography associated with mass spectrometry analysis, NMR spectroscopy) in the obesity and insulin resistance thematic. PMID:25257998

  16. Nutrient-Induced Inflammation in Polycystic Ovary Syndrome: Role in the Development of Metabolic Aberration and Ovarian Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    González, Frank

    2015-07-01

    A pathophysiology paradigm shift has emerged with the discovery that polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a proinflammatory state. Despite the dogma that the compensatory hyperinsulinemia of insulin resistance is the promoter of hyperandrogenism, physiological insulin infusion has no effect on androgen levels in PCOS. The dogma also does not explain the cause of hyperandrogenism and ovarian dysfunction in the 30 to 50% of women with PCOS who are of normal weight and lack insulin resistance. Inflammation is the underpinning of insulin resistance in obesity and type 2 diabetes, and may also be the cause of insulin resistance when present in PCOS. The origin of inflammation in PCOS has been ascribed to excess abdominal adiposity or frank obesity. However, nutrients such as glucose and saturated fat can incite inflammation from circulating mononuclear cells (MNC) of women with PCOS independent of excess adiposity and insulin resistance, and can also promote atherogenesis. Hyperandrogenism activates MNC in the fasting state to increase MNC sensitivity to nutrients, and is a potential mechanism for initiating inflammation in PCOS. However, chronic ovarian androgen suppression does not reduce inflammation in normal-weight women with PCOS. Direct exposure of ovarian theca cells to proinflammatory stimuli in vitro increases androgen production. These findings may be corroborated in vivo with anti-inflammatory therapy to normal-weight insulin-sensitive women with PCOS without abdominal adiposity to observe for amelioration of ovarian dysfunction.

  17. [Clinical effects of the alterations that emerge in the signaling mechanisms of the insulin receptor].

    PubMed

    Hernández-Valencia, Marcelino

    2006-01-01

    Phosphorilation of subunit beta from insulin receptor induced mainly by insulin, it begins a series of intracellular complex signaling in cascade. Through this way establish multiple effects, which permits to the cell initiate its biological activity. This activity include the glucose metabolism, the regulation of ions and amino acids transport, lipids metabolism, glycogen synthesis, genetic transcription, mRNA expression, synthesis and degradation of proteins, as well as synthesis of DNA. Therefore, a modification in anyone of the proteins involved in the insulin signaling, can take place a dysfunction in the glucose metabolism. The impaired glucose can be due because there are many proteins, ions and enzymes that participate in the downstream pathways of the insulin signaling, it has become difficult to find a single phatophysiologic level as cause of diabetes. In spite of the advances in the study of this disease, it has been reached the conclusion that the glucose control is not enough to impede the complications that characterize to type 2 diabetes, since the organic worsening does not stop, which indicates that insulin signaling dysfunction is directly involved in all cellular process, and a better understanding in the communication ways of this hormone will take to new forms of treatment to impaired insulin response.

  18. Inflammation and Oxidative Stress: The Molecular Connectivity between Insulin Resistance, Obesity, and Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Verdile, Giuseppe; Keane, Kevin N.; Cruzat, Vinicius F.; Medic, Sandra; Sabale, Miheer; Rowles, Joanne; Wijesekara, Nadeeja; Martins, Ralph N.; Fraser, Paul E.; Newsholme, Philip

    2015-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2DM), Alzheimer's disease (AD), and insulin resistance are age-related conditions and increased prevalence is of public concern. Recent research has provided evidence that insulin resistance and impaired insulin signalling may be a contributory factor to the progression of diabetes, dementia, and other neurological disorders. Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common subtype of dementia. Reduced release (for T2DM) and decreased action of insulin are central to the development and progression of both T2DM and AD. A literature search was conducted to identify molecular commonalities between obesity, diabetes, and AD. Insulin resistance affects many tissues and organs, either through impaired insulin signalling or through aberrant changes in both glucose and lipid (cholesterol and triacylglycerol) metabolism and concentrations in the blood. Although epidemiological and biological evidence has highlighted an increased incidence of cognitive decline and AD in patients with T2DM, the common molecular basis of cell and tissue dysfunction is rapidly gaining recognition. As a cause or consequence, the chronic inflammatory response and oxidative stress associated with T2DM, amyloid-β (Aβ) protein accumulation, and mitochondrial dysfunction link T2DM and AD. PMID:26693205

  19. Insulin signaling controls neurotransmission via the 4eBP-dependent modification of the exocytotic machinery

    PubMed Central

    Mahoney, Rebekah Elizabeth; Azpurua, Jorge; Eaton, Benjamin A

    2016-01-01

    Altered insulin signaling has been linked to widespread nervous system dysfunction including cognitive dysfunction, neuropathy and susceptibility to neurodegenerative disease. However, knowledge of the cellular mechanisms underlying the effects of insulin on neuronal function is incomplete. Here, we show that cell autonomous insulin signaling within the Drosophila CM9 motor neuron regulates the release of neurotransmitter via alteration of the synaptic vesicle fusion machinery. This effect of insulin utilizes the FOXO-dependent regulation of the thor gene, which encodes the Drosophila homologue of the eif-4e binding protein (4eBP). A critical target of this regulatory mechanism is Complexin, a synaptic protein known to regulate synaptic vesicle exocytosis. We find that the amounts of Complexin protein observed at the synapse is regulated by insulin and genetic manipulations of Complexin levels support the model that increased synaptic Complexin reduces neurotransmission in response to insulin signaling. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.16807.001 PMID:27525480

  20. Lipid droplets hypertrophy: a crucial determining factor in insulin regulation by adipocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanjabi, Bahram; Dashty, Monireh; Özcan, Behiye; Akbarkhanzadeh, Vishtaseb; Rahimi, Mehran; Vinciguerra, Manlio; van Rooij, Felix; Al-Lahham, Saad; Sheedfar, Fareeba; van Kooten, Theo G.; Spek, C. Arnold; Rowshani, Ajda T.; van der Want, Johannes; Klaassen, Rene; Sijbrands, Eric; Peppelenbosch, Maikel P.; Rezaee, Farhad

    2015-03-01

    Lipid droplets (LDs) hypertrophy in adipocytes is the main cause of energy metabolic system dysfunction, obesity and its afflictions such as T2D. However, the role of adipocytes in linking energy metabolic disorders with insulin regulation is unknown in humans. Human adipocytes constitutively synthesize and secrete insulin, which is biologically functional. Insulin concentrations and release are fat mass- and LDs-dependent respectively. Fat reduction mediated by bariatric surgery repairs obesity-associated T2D. The expression of genes, like PCSK1 (proinsulin conversion enzyme), GCG (Glucagon), GPLD1, CD38 and NNAT, involved in insulin regulation/release were differentially expressed in pancreas and adipose tissue (AT). INS (insulin) and GCG expression reduced in human AT-T2D as compared to AT-control, but remained unchanged in pancreas in either state. Insulin levels (mRNA/protein) were higher in AT derived from prediabetes BB rats with destructed pancreatic β-cells and controls than pancreas derived from the same rats respectively. Insulin expression in 10 human primary cell types including adipocytes and macrophages is an evidence for extrapancreatic insulin-producing cells. The data suggest a crosstalk between AT and pancreas to fine-tune energy metabolic system or may minimize the metabolic damage during diabetes. This study opens new avenues towards T2D therapy with a great impact on public health.

  1. Evidence against extrapancreatic insulin synthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Eng, J; Yalow, R S

    1981-01-01

    Labeled and unlabeled insulin in acid/ethanol tissue extracts can be concentrated up to 100-fold by using a hydrophobic adsorption technique. After adsorption to and elution from an octadecylsilyl silica column, insulin is recovered in yields greater than 75%. By using this method of concentration, insulin in brain tissues of three of four fed rats and one rabbit was found to be less than 20% of plasma concentration. The kidney is the only extrapancreatic organ in which insulin is observed to be markedly above plasma levels. Porcine-insulin-like material was not detectable in guinea pig tissues (less than 0.02 ng/g). It is concluded that insulin is not synthesized in brain or other extrapancreatic tissues and that other mammalian insulins are not found in guinea pig tissues. PMID:6270683

  2. Insulin degludec for diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    2013-07-01

    Over the last few years there has been a steady increase in the number of prescriptions dispensed in primary care for intermediate and long-acting insulin analogues and a reduction in prescriptions for biphasic isophane insulin. For example, in England, the volume of intermediate and long-acting insulin analogues in general practice has risen from approximately 650,000 prescriptions per quarter in 2007 to over 850,000 per quarter in 2012.(1) ▾Insulin degludec (Tresiba, Novo Nordisk) is a new long acting basal insulin analogue for the management of diabetes mellitus in adults.(2) Two strengths of insulin degludec (100 units/mL and 200 units/mL) were launched in the UK in February 2013. Here we discuss evidence for the effectiveness and safety of insulin degludec. PMID:23842634

  3. Aged insulin granules display reduced microtubule-dependent mobility and are disposed within actin-positive multigranular bodies

    PubMed Central

    Hoboth, Peter; Müller, Andreas; Ivanova, Anna; Mziaut, Hassan; Dehghany, Jaber; Sönmez, Anke; Lachnit, Martina; Meyer-Hermann, Michael; Kalaidzidis, Yannis; Solimena, Michele

    2015-01-01

    Insulin secretion is key for glucose homeostasis. Insulin secretory granules (SGs) exist in different functional pools, with young SGs being more mobile and preferentially secreted. However, the principles governing the mobility of age-distinct SGs remain undefined. Using the time-reporter insulin-SNAP to track age-distinct SGs we now show that their dynamics can be classified into three components: highly dynamic, restricted, and nearly immobile. Young SGs display all three components, whereas old SGs are either restricted or nearly immobile. Both glucose stimulation and F-actin depolymerization recruit a fraction of nearly immobile young, but not old, SGs for highly dynamic, microtubule-dependent transport. Moreover, F-actin marks multigranular bodies/lysosomes containing aged SGs. These data demonstrate that SGs lose their responsiveness to glucose stimulation and competence for microtubule-mediated transport over time while changing their relationship with F-actin. PMID:25646459

  4. [Thyroid dysfunction in pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Führer, D; Mann, K; Feldkamp, J; Krude, H; Spitzweg, C; Kratzsch, J; Schott, M

    2014-10-01

    Thyroid dysfunction may impair fertility, course of pregnancy and fetal development. Physiological alterations of thyroid function parameters, that occur during pregnancy need to be distinguished from pathophysiological states of hypo- and hyperthyroidism. We performed a literature search (PubMed 1990-2013) and review relevant publications as well as consensus and practice guidelines of international thyroid/endocrine societies. Interpretation of thyroid function values in pregnancy must be based on trimester-specific TSH and T4 ranges. Alterations in thyroid function are present in up to 15% of pregnancies (0.4% overt hypothyroidism, 0.1-0.4% hyperthyroidism) and may lead to preventable complications in the pregnant woman and the fetus. Hypothyroidism is associated with an increased risk for abortion, premature delivery and stillbirth, besides impairment of neurocognitive development. The latter has also been shown in situations of grave iodine deficiency. In addition to new-born screening directed at early recognition of congenital hypothyroidism (incidence 0.03%), universal screening of all pregnant women should be implemented in health care guidelines. Newly diagnosed overt hypothyroidism in a pregnant woman requires immediate levothyroxine substitution at adequate doses. In subclinical hypothyroidism thyroid hormone replacement should be considered. Iodine supplementation is strongly recommended in all pregnant and breast-feeding women. Pregnancy causes a number of, that need to be of thyroid dysfunction. Both hypothyroidism and thyrotoxicosis may impair the course of pregnancy and may negatively affect the fetus. In particular, maternal hypothyroidism may lead to irreparable and detrimental deficits in the neurocognitive development of the fetus. Autoimmune thyroid disease is the most common cause of thyroid dysfunction in pregnancy. Hashimoto's thyroiditis is associated with impaired fertility and miscarriage, and may first manifest in pregnancy due to the

  5. [Low molecular weight regulators of the intracellular insulin signal transduction as a correction method of the insulin resistance in the treatment of type 2 diabetes].

    PubMed

    Galenova, T I; Kyznetsova, M Y; Savchuk, O N; Ostapchenco, L I

    2016-01-01

    Insulin resistance is the characteristic feature of type 2 diabetes. This condition is manifested in the reduction of peripheral tissues sensitivity to the biological action of insulin and is expressed in the inhibition of cellular glucose absorption and metabolism in response to hormonal stimulation. At the cellular level, disorders which are realized both at the receptor and the postreceptor levels can serve a prerequisite to the formation of insulin resistance and are associated with a change in the amount or dysfunction of major molecular signaling cascade. Thus, the insulin receptor, as well as the other related signaling molecules can be considered as ideal therapeutic targets for the correction of insulin resistance and thus low molecular weight effectors which act on the individual links of insulin signaling cascade may be positioned as a new generation of anti-diabetic agents. This report provides information on the regulators of insulin receptor cascade, main advantages and disadvantages of their impact on biological targets and prospects for their therapeutic use as anti-diabetic drugs. PMID:26973184

  6. Mapping organelle motion reveals a vesicular conveyor belt spatially replenishing secretory vesicles in stimulated chromaffin cells.

    PubMed

    Maucort, Guillaume; Kasula, Ravikiran; Papadopulos, Andreas; Nieminen, Timo A; Rubinsztein-Dunlop, Halina; Meunier, Frederic A

    2014-01-01

    How neurosecretory cells spatially adjust their secretory vesicle pools to replenish those that have fused and released their hormonal content is currently unknown. Here we designed a novel set of image analyses to map the probability of tracked organelles undergoing a specific type of movement (free, caged or directed). We then applied our analysis to time-lapse z-stack confocal imaging of secretory vesicles from bovine Chromaffin cells to map the global changes in vesicle motion and directionality occurring upon secretagogue stimulation. We report a defined region abutting the cortical actin network that actively transports secretory vesicles and is dissipated by actin and microtubule depolymerizing drugs. The directionality of this "conveyor belt" towards the cell surface is activated by stimulation. Actin and microtubule networks therefore cooperatively probe the microenvironment to transport secretory vesicles to the periphery, providing a mechanism whereby cells globally adjust their vesicle pools in response to secretagogue stimulation. PMID:24489879

  7. Cytodiagnosis of secretory carcinoma of the breast: a report on two cases.

    PubMed

    Jena, Madhusmita; Shariff, Shameem

    2010-12-01

    Secretory carcinoma of the breast is a rare (<1%) low grade breast carcinoma which shows distinct features at histology. Diagnosis of this carcinoma at fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC) is difficult. Two cases of secretory carcinoma of the breast presenting as a breast mass, one in a 24-year-old female and the other in a 40-year-old female are reported, highlighting their appearance at FNAC. In both the cases the aspirates were cellular and consisted of clusters and single cells with uniform round nuclei showing minimal nuclear atypia. Most of the cells had moderate to abundant cytoplasm with prominent intracytoplasmic vacuoles. Many cells showed a plasmacytoid appearance and others were binucleate. A typical amphophilic bubbly cytoplasm of the tumor cells was observed. Both cases were confirmed as secretory carcinoma on histology. The differences in cell morphology at FNAC of secretory carcinoma of the breast from other breast carcinomas, and its utility of making a preoperative diagnosis are discussed.

  8. Glucose intolerance and reduced islet blood flow in transgenic mice expressing the FRK tyrosine kinase under the control of the rat insulin promoter.

    PubMed

    Annerén, Cecilia; Welsh, Michael; Jansson, Leif

    2007-04-01

    The FRK tyrosine kinase has previously been shown to transduce beta-cell cytotoxic signals in response to cytokines and streptozotocin and to promote beta-cell proliferation and an increased beta-cell mass. We therefore aimed to further evaluate the effects of overexpression of FRK tyrosine kinase in beta-cells. A transgenic mouse expressing kinase-active FRK under control of the insulin promoter (RIP-FRK) was studied with regard to islet endocrine function and vascular morphology. Mild glucose intolerance develops in RIP-FRK male mice of at least 4 mo of age. This effect is accompanied by reduced glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in vivo and reduced second-phase insulin secretion in response to glucose and arginine upon pancreas perfusion. Islets isolated from the FRK transgenic mice display a glucose-induced insulin secretory response in vitro similar to that of control islets. However, islet blood flow per islet volume is decreased in the FRK transgenic mice. These mice also exhibit a reduced islet capillary lumen diameter as shown by electron microscopy. Total body weight and pancreas weight are not significantly affected, but the beta-cell mass is increased. The data suggest that long-term expression of active FRK in beta-cells causes an in vivo insulin-secretory defect, which may be the consequence of islet vascular abnormalities that yield a decreased islet blood flow.

  9. [Revisiting meibomian gland dysfunction].

    PubMed

    Baudouin, C

    2014-12-01

    Meibomian gland dysfunctions (MGD) are frequent affections, sometimes asymptomatic, more often responsible for disabling, potentially severe, manifestations. MGD is indeed the most frequent cause of dry eye, through the induction of tear film instability. However, eyelid inflammation, microbial proliferation that modifies melting temperature of meibum, frequent association with skin diseases, as well as potentially severe corneal complications make them complex multifactorial disorders. Complementary mechanisms combine to actually result in a vicious circle, or more accurately a double vicious cycle. The first one is self-stimulated by the microbiological changes, which create their own conditions for MGD development. The second one is related to tear film instability that results from MGD and is also self-stimulated through hyperosmolarity and inflammatory phenomena, which are both consequence and cause of dry eye. We herein propose a new pathophysiological schema on MGD, in order to better identify mechanisms and more efficiently target therapeutics.

  10. Investigation of erectile dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Patel, D V; Halls, J; Patel, U

    2012-11-01

    Erectile dysfunction (ED) represents a common and debilitating condition with a wide range of organic and non-organic causes. Physical aetiologies can be divided into disorders affecting arterial inflow, the venous occlusion mechanism or the penile structure itself. Various imaging modalities can be utilised to investigate the physical causes of ED, but penile Doppler sonography (PDS) is the most informative technique, indicated in those patients with ED who do not respond to oral pharmacological agents (e.g. phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors). This review will examine the anatomical and physiological basis of penile erection, the method for performing PDS and features of specific causes of ED, and will also consider the alternative imaging modalities available.

  11. Telomere dysfunction and chromothripsis.

    PubMed

    Ernst, Aurélie; Jones, David T W; Maass, Kendra K; Rode, Agata; Deeg, Katharina I; Jebaraj, Billy Michael Chelliah; Korshunov, Andrey; Hovestadt, Volker; Tainsky, Michael A; Pajtler, Kristian W; Bender, Sebastian; Brabetz, Sebastian; Gröbner, Susanne; Kool, Marcel; Devens, Frauke; Edelmann, Jennifer; Zhang, Cindy; Castelo-Branco, Pedro; Tabori, Uri; Malkin, David; Rippe, Karsten; Stilgenbauer, Stephan; Pfister, Stefan M; Zapatka, Marc; Lichter, Peter

    2016-06-15

    Chromothripsis is a recently discovered form of genomic instability, characterized by tens to hundreds of clustered DNA rearrangements resulting from a single dramatic event. Telomere dysfunction has been suggested to play a role in the initiation of this phenomenon, which occurs in a large number of tumor entities. Here, we show that telomere attrition can indeed lead to catastrophic genomic events, and that telomere patterns differ between cells analyzed before and after such genomic catastrophes. Telomere length and telomere stabilization mechanisms diverge between samples with and without chromothripsis in a given tumor subtype. Longitudinal analyses of the evolution of chromothriptic patterns identify either stable patterns between matched primary and relapsed tumors, or loss of the chromothriptic clone in the relapsed specimen. The absence of additional chromothriptic events occurring between the initial tumor and the relapsed tumor sample points to telomere stabilization after the initial chromothriptic event which prevents further shattering of the genome. PMID:26856307

  12. [Revisiting meibomian gland dysfunction].

    PubMed

    Baudouin, C

    2014-12-01

    Meibomian gland dysfunctions (MGD) are frequent affections, sometimes asymptomatic, more often responsible for disabling, potentially severe, manifestations. MGD is indeed the most frequent cause of dry eye, through the induction of tear film instability. However, eyelid inflammation, microbial proliferation that modifies melting temperature of meibum, frequent association with skin diseases, as well as potentially severe corneal complications make them complex multifactorial disorders. Complementary mechanisms combine to actually result in a vicious circle, or more accurately a double vicious cycle. The first one is self-stimulated by the microbiological changes, which create their own conditions for MGD development. The second one is related to tear film instability that results from MGD and is also self-stimulated through hyperosmolarity and inflammatory phenomena, which are both consequence and cause of dry eye. We herein propose a new pathophysiological schema on MGD, in order to better identify mechanisms and more efficiently target therapeutics. PMID:25455142

  13. Observing secretory granules with a multiangle evanescent wave microscope.

    PubMed Central

    Rohrbach, A

    2000-01-01

    In total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRFM), fluorophores near a surface can be excited with evanescent waves, which decay exponentially with distance from the interface. Penetration depths of evanescent waves from 60 nm to 300 nm were generated by varying the angle of incidence of a laser beam. With a novel telecentric multiangle evanescent wave microscope, we monitored and investigated both single secretory granules and pools of granules in bovine chromaffin cells. By measuring the fluorescence intensity as a function of penetration depth, it is possible through a Laplace transform to obtain the fluorophore distribution as a function of axial position. We discuss the extent to which it is possible to determine distances and diameters of granules with this microscopy technique by modeling the fluorescent volumes of spheres in evanescent fields. The anisotropic near-field detection of fluorophores and the influence of the detection point-spread function are considered. The diameters of isolated granules between 70 nm and 300 nm have been reconstructed, which is clearly beyond the resolution limit of a confocal microscope. Furthermore, the paper demonstrates how evanescent waves propagate along surfaces and scatter at objects with a higher refractive index. TIRFM will have a limited applicability for quantitative measurements when the parameters used to define evanescent waves are not optimally selected. PMID:10777760

  14. Secretory phospholipase A2 in patients with coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Lima, Luciana Moreira; Carvalho, Maria das Graças; da Fonseca Neto, Cirilo Pereira; Garcia, José Carlos Faria; Sousa, Marinez Oliveira

    2010-04-01

    This study investigated the correlation of sPLA2 (secretory phospholipase A2) activity with the atheromatosis extent in subjects with coronary artery disease (CAD) undergoing coronary angiography. We analyzed 123 patients, including 35 subjects with angiographically normal coronary arteries (controls), 31 with mild/moderate atheromatosis (stenosis of 30-70% of the luminal diameter in one or more coronary arteries) and 57 with severe atheromatosis (>70% stenosis). Plasma sPLA2 activity was significantly higher in subjects with severe [127.7 U/ml (102.3-162.7); p < 0.0001] and mild/moderate [112.0 U/ml (100.6-146.9); p < 0.0001] atheromatosis than in controls [19.8 U/ml (15.1-32.1)]. In a multiple logistic regression model, adjusted for age, gender, body mass index, tabagism, hypertension, sedentarism, family history for coronary artery disease, diabetes mellitus, total cholesterol, HDLc, LDLc, triglycerides, high sensitivity C-reactive protein and phospholipase A2, only sPLA2 was observed to be independently associated with severe CAD (>70% of stenosis) (p < 0.0001). PMID:19449149

  15. Gut Microbial Succession Follows Acute Secretory Diarrhea in Humans

    PubMed Central

    David, Lawrence A.; Weil, Ana; Ryan, Edward T.; Calderwood, Stephen B.; Harris, Jason B.; Chowdhury, Fahima; Begum, Yasmin; Qadri, Firdausi

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Disability after childhood diarrhea is an important burden on global productivity. Recent studies suggest that gut bacterial communities influence how humans recover from infectious diarrhea, but we still lack extensive data and mechanistic hypotheses for how these bacterial communities respond to diarrheal disease and its treatment. Here, we report that after Vibrio cholerae infection, the human gut microbiota undergoes an orderly and reproducible succession that features transient reversals in relative levels of enteric Bacteroides and Prevotella. Elements of this succession may be a common feature in microbiota recovery from acute secretory diarrhea, as we observed similar successional dynamics after enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) infection. Our metagenomic analyses suggest that multiple mechanisms drive microbial succession after cholera, including bacterial dispersal properties, changing enteric oxygen and carbohydrate levels, and phage dynamics. Thus, gut microbiota recovery after cholera may be predictable at the level of community structure but is driven by a complex set of temporally varying ecological processes. Our findings suggest opportunities for diagnostics and therapies targeting the gut microbiota in humans recovering from infectious diarrhea. PMID:25991682

  16. Role of NBCe1 and AE2 in Secretory Ameloblasts

    PubMed Central

    Paine, Michael L.; Snead, Malcolm L.; Wang, HongJun; Abuladze, Natalia; Pushkin, Alexander; Liu, Weixin; Kao, Li Yo; Wall, Susan M.; Kim, Young-Hee; Kurtz, Ira

    2008-01-01

    The H+/base transport processes that control the pH of the microenvironment adjacent to ameloblasts are not currently well understood. Mice null for the AE2 anion exchanger have abnormal enamel. In addition, patients with mutations in the electrogenic sodium bicarbonate cotransporter NBCe1 and mice lacking NBCe1 have enamel abnormalities. These observations suggest that AE2 and NBCe1 play important roles in amelogenesis. The present study aimed to understand the roles of AE2 and NBC1 in ameloblasts. The data showed that NBCe1 is expressed at the basolateral membrane of secretory ameloblasts, whereas AE2 is expressed at the apical membrane. Transcripts for AE2a and NBCe1-B were detected in RNA isolated from cultured ameloblast-like LS8 cells. Our data are the first evidence that AE2 and NBCe1 are expressed in ameloblasts in vivo in a polarized fashion thereby providing a mechanism for ameloblast transcellular bicarbonate secretion in the process of enamel formation and maturation. PMID:18362326

  17. Small molecules intercept Notch signaling and the early secretory pathway.

    PubMed

    Krämer, Andreas; Mentrup, Torben; Kleizen, Bertrand; Rivera-Milla, Eric; Reichenbach, Daniela; Enzensperger, Christoph; Nohl, Richard; Täuscher, Eric; Görls, Helmar; Ploubidou, Aspasia; Englert, Christoph; Werz, Oliver; Arndt, Hans-Dieter; Kaether, Christoph

    2013-11-01

    Notch signaling has a pivotal role in numerous cell-fate decisions, and its aberrant activity leads to developmental disorders and cancer. To identify molecules that influence Notch signaling, we screened nearly 17,000 compounds using automated microscopy to monitor the trafficking and processing of a ligand-independent Notch-enhanced GFP (eGFP) reporter. Characterization of hits in vitro by biochemical and cellular assays and in vivo using zebrafish led to five validated compounds, four of which induced accumulation of the reporter at the plasma membrane by inhibiting γ-secretase. One compound, the dihydropyridine FLI-06, disrupted the Golgi apparatus in a manner distinct from that of brefeldin A and golgicide A. FLI-06 inhibited general secretion at a step before exit from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), which was accompanied by a tubule-to-sheet morphological transition of the ER, rendering FLI-06 the first small molecule acting at such an early stage in secretory traffic. These data highlight the power of phenotypic screening to enable investigations of central cellular signaling pathways. PMID:24077179

  18. Secretory immunity in defense against cariogenic mutans streptococci.

    PubMed

    Russell, M W; Hajishengallis, G; Childers, N K; Michalek, S M

    1999-01-01

    Specific immune defense against cariogenic mutans streptococci is provided largely by salivary secretory IgA antibodies, which are generated by the common mucosal immune system. This system is functional in newborn infants, who develop salivary IgA antibodies as they become colonized by oral microorganisms. The mechanisms of action of salivary IgA antibodies include interference with sucrose-independent and sucrose- dependent attachment of mutans streptococci to tooth surfaces, as well as possible inhibition of metabolic activities. The goal of protecting infants against colonization by mutans streptococci might be accomplished by applying new strategies of mucosal immunization that would induce salivary IgA antibodies without the complications of parenteral immunization. Strategies of mucosal immunization against mutans streptococci currently under development include the use of surface adhesins and glucosyltransferase as key antigens, which are being incorporated into novel mucosal vaccine delivery systems and adjuvants. The oral application of preformed, genetically engineered antibodies to mutans streptococcal antigens also offers new prospects for passive immunization against dental caries. PMID:9831775

  19. Secretory phospholipase A2 induces dendritic cell maturation

    PubMed Central

    Perrin-Cocon, Laure; Agaugué, Sophie; Coutant, Frédéric; Masurel, Aurélie; Bezzine, Sofiane; Lambeau, Gérard; André, Patrice; Lotteau, Vincent

    2004-01-01

    High level of phospholipase A2 (PLA2) activity is found in serum and biological fluids during the acute phase response (APR). Extracellular PLA2 in fluids of patients with inflammatory diseases such as sepsis, acute pancreatitis or rheumatoid arthritis is also associated with propagation of inflammation. PLA2 activity is involved in the release of both pro- and anti-inflammatory lipid mediators from phospholipids of cellular membranes or circulating lipoproteins. PLA2 may thus generate signals that influence immune responses. Here, group III secretory PLA2s were tested for their ability to promote generation of functionally mature human dendritic cells (DC). PLA2 treatment of differentiating monocytes in the presence of GM-CSF and IL-4 yielded cells with phenotypical and functional characteristics of mature DC. This maturation was dependent on the dose of PLA2 and PLA2-generated DC stimulated interferon gamma secretion by allogeneic T cells. The effects of PLA2 on DC maturation was mainly dependent on enzyme activity and correlated with the activation of NF-κB, AP-1 and NFAT. The data suggest that transient increase in PLA2 activity generates signals that promote transition of innate to adaptive immunity during the APR. PMID:15259027

  20. The complete general secretory pathway in gram-negative bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Pugsley, A P

    1993-01-01

    The unifying feature of all proteins that are transported out of the cytoplasm of gram-negative bacteria by the general secretory pathway (GSP) is the presence of a long stretch of predominantly hydrophobic amino acids, the signal sequence. The interaction between signal sequence-bearing proteins and the cytoplasmic membrane may be a spontaneous event driven by the electrochemical energy potential across the cytoplasmic membrane, leading to membrane integration. The translocation of large, hydrophilic polypeptide segments to the periplasmic side of this membrane almost always requires at least six different proteins encoded by the sec genes and is dependent on both ATP hydrolysis and the electrochemical energy potential. Signal peptidases process precursors with a single, amino-terminal signal sequence, allowing them to be released into the periplasm, where they may remain or whence they may be inserted into the outer membrane. Selected proteins may also be transported across this membrane for assembly into cell surface appendages or for release into the extracellular medium. Many bacteria secrete a variety of structurally different proteins by a common pathway, referred to here as the main terminal branch of the GSP. This recently discovered branch pathway comprises at least 14 gene products. Other, simpler terminal branches of the GSP are also used by gram-negative bacteria to secrete a more limited range of extracellular proteins. PMID:8096622

  1. Characterization of excretory/secretory antigen from Toxocara vitulorum larvae.

    PubMed

    Starke-Buzetti, Wilma A; Ferreira, Fabiano P

    2004-10-01

    Toxocara vitulorum is a nematode parasite of the small intestine of cattle and water buffalo, particularly buffalo calves between one and three months of age, causing high morbidity and mortality. The purpose of this research was to characterize the excretory/secretory (ES) antigens of T. vitulorum larvae by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) and Western blot (WB), using immune sera and colostrum of buffalo naturally infected by T. vitulorum. The parasitological status of the buffalo calves was also evaluated using sequential fecal examinations. The results showed that the ES antigen revealed eight (190, 150, 110, 90, 64, 56, 48, and 19 kDa) protein bands by SDS-PAGE. The majority of these bands were recognized in the sera and colostrum of infected buffalo with T. vitulorum when analyzed by WB. However, particularly fractions of high molecular weight (190, 150, 110, and 90 kDa) were represented in more prominent bands and persisted in the groups of buffalo calves at the peak of egg output, as well as during the period of rejection of T. vitulorum by the feces of the calves. During the period of post-rejection of the worms (between the day 118 and 210 of age) the serum antibodies did not react with any protein bands. On the other hand, sera from buffalo calves at one day of age (after suckling the colostrum and at the beginning of infection) reacted with the same bands detected in the serum and colostrum of the buffalo cows.

  2. Endothelins & erectile dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Ritchie, Robert; Sullivan, Mark

    2011-06-01

    Erectile dysfunction (ED) is common and a significant contributor to poor quality of life and psychosocial morbidity in men. Normal erectile function requires effective co-ordination between a number of complex neural pathways. Penile tumescence occurs in response to rapid arterial inflow to the corpora cavernosa with simultaneous venous outflow restriction due to expansion of the lacunar spaces. This process is under both central and local neuromediation. Endothelins are potent vasoconstrictor peptides that cause strong, slowly developing but sustained contraction of trabecular smooth muscles cells of the corpora cavernosa. Multiple mechanisms of action are proposed, including transmembrane calcium flux, mobilisation of inositol triphosphate sensitive intracellular calcium stores and calcium sensitisation through the Rho-Rho kinase pathway. The exact role of endothelins in the pathogenesis of ED currently remains unclear. Elevated endothelin-1 levels are found in patients with diabetes mellitus and this alone may be sufficient to cause ED. However, this is not borne out in clinical studies. The resultant elevated intracellular calcium may, however, modulate gene expression sufficiently to cause smooth muscle proliferation. Alternatively, alterations in endothelin receptor sensitivity in conditions such as diabetes and hypertension may enhance vasoconstrictor processes. Currently there is contradictory evidence for the role of endothelin receptor antagonists in ED. Animals studies suggest they inhibit corporal vasoconstriction, improve erectile function and protect against diabetes-induced smooth muscle apoptosis. However, the results of clinical studies in ED have been less promising. Uncertainty regarding the exact role of endothelin in penile erection hampers progress in this area. It is possible that the endothelin system may only be relevant to ED in certain conditions where global endothelial dysfunction exists (e.g. diabetes mellitus, systemic sclerosis) and

  3. NADPH oxidase NOX2 defines a new antagonistic role for reactive oxygen species and cAMP/PKA in the regulation of insulin secretion.

    PubMed

    Li, Ning; Li, Bin; Brun, Thierry; Deffert-Delbouille, Christine; Mahiout, Zahia; Daali, Youssef; Ma, Xiao-Juan; Krause, Karl-Heinz; Maechler, Pierre

    2012-11-01

    In insulin-secreting cells, expression of NADPH oxidase (NOX), a potent source of ROS, has been reported, along with controversial findings regarding its function. Here, the role of NOXs was investigated: first by expression and cellular localization in mouse and human pancreatic islets, and then by functional studies in islets isolated from Nox isoform-specific knockout mice. Both human and mouse β-cells express NOX, in particular NOX2. With use of Nox isoform-specific knockout mice, functional analysis revealed Nox2 as the predominant isoform. In human islets, NOX2 colocalized with both insulin granules and endosome/lysosome membranes. Nox2-deficient islets stimulated with 22.8 mmol/L glucose exhibited potentiation of insulin release compared with controls, an effect confirmed with in vitro knockdown of Nox2. The enhanced secretory function in Nox2-deficient islets was associated with both lower superoxide levels and elevated cAMP concentrations. In control islets, GLP-1 and other cAMP inducers suppressed glucose-induced ROS production similarly to Nox2 deficiency. Inhibiting cAMP-dependent protein kinase reduced the secretory response in Nox2-null islets, although not in control islets. This study ascribes a new role for NOX2 in pancreatic β-cells as negative modulator of the secretory response, reducing cAMP/PKA signaling secondary to ROS generation. Results also show reciprocal inhibition between the cAMP/PKA pathway and ROS.

  4. NADPH Oxidase NOX2 Defines a New Antagonistic Role for Reactive Oxygen Species and cAMP/PKA in the Regulation of Insulin Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ning; Li, Bin; Brun, Thierry; Deffert-Delbouille, Christine; Mahiout, Zahia; Daali, Youssef; Ma, Xiao-Juan; Krause, Karl-Heinz; Maechler, Pierre

    2012-01-01

    In insulin-secreting cells, expression of NADPH oxidase (NOX), a potent source of ROS, has been reported, along with controversial findings regarding its function. Here, the role of NOXs was investigated: first by expression and cellular localization in mouse and human pancreatic islets, and then by functional studies in islets isolated from Nox isoform–specific knockout mice. Both human and mouse β-cells express NOX, in particular NOX2. With use of Nox isoform–specific knockout mice, functional analysis revealed Nox2 as the predominant isoform. In human islets, NOX2 colocalized with both insulin granules and endosome/lysosome membranes. Nox2-deficient islets stimulated with 22.8 mmol/L glucose exhibited potentiation of insulin release compared with controls, an effect confirmed with in vitro knockdown of Nox2. The enhanced secretory function in Nox2-deficient islets was associated with both lower superoxide levels and elevated cAMP concentrations. In control islets, GLP-1 and other cAMP inducers suppressed glucose-induced ROS production similarly to Nox2 deficiency. Inhibiting cAMP-dependent protein kinase reduced the secretory response in Nox2-null islets, although not in control islets. This study ascribes a new role for NOX2 in pancreatic β-cells as negative modulator of the secretory response, reducing cAMP/PKA signaling secondary to ROS generation. Results also show reciprocal inhibition between the cAMP/PKA pathway and ROS. PMID:22933115

  5. Bladder Dysfunction and Vesicoureteral Reflux

    PubMed Central

    Sillén, Ulla

    2008-01-01

    In this overview the influence of functional bladder disturbances and of its treatment on the resolution of vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) in children is discussed. Historically both bladder dysfunction entities, the overactive bladder (OAB) and the dysfunctional voiding (DV), have been described in conjunction with VUR. Treatment of the dysfunction was also considered to influence spontaneous resolution in a positive way. During the last decades, however, papers have been published which could not support these results. Regarding the OAB, a prospective study with treatment of the bladder overactivity with anticholinergics, did not influence spontaneous resolution rate in children with a dysfunction including also the voiding phase, DV and DES (dysfunctional elimination syndrome), most studies indicate a negative influence on the resolution rate of VUR in children, both before and after the age for bladder control, both with and without treatment. However, a couple of uncontrolled studies indicate that there is a high short-term resolution rate after treatment with flow biofeedback. It should be emphasized that the voiding phase dysfunctions (DV and DES) are more severe than the genuine filling phase dysfunction (OAB), with an increased frequency of UTI and renal damage in the former groups. To be able to answer the question if treatment of bladder dysfunction influence the resolution rate of VUR in children, randomized controlled studies must be performed. PMID:19009037

  6. Oil Secretory System in Vegetative Organs of Three Arnica Taxa: Essential Oil Synthesis, Distribution and Accumulation.

    PubMed

    Kromer, Krystyna; Kreitschitz, Agnieszka; Kleinteich, Thomas; Gorb, Stanislav N; Szumny, Antoni

    2016-05-01

    Arnica, a genus including the medicinal species A. montana, in its Arbo variety, and A. chamissonis, is among the plants richest in essential oils used as pharmaceutical materials. Despite its extensive use, the role of anatomy and histochemistry in the internal secretory system producing the essential oil is poorly understood. Anatomical sections allowed differentiation between two forms of secretory structures which differ according to their distribution in plants. The first axial type is connected to the vascular system of all vegetative organs and forms canals lined with epithelial cells. The second cortical type is represented by elongated intercellular spaces filled with oil formed only between the cortex cells of roots and rhizomes at maturity, with canals lacking an epithelial layer.Only in A. montana rhizomes do secretory structures form huge characteristic reservoirs. Computed tomography illustrates their spatial distribution and fusiform shape. The axial type of root secretory canals is formed at the interface between the endodermis and cortex parenchyma, while, in the stem, they are located in direct contact with veinal parenchyma. The peripheral phloem parenchyma cells are arranged in strands around sieve tube elements which possess a unique ability to accumulate large amounts of oil bodies. The cells of phloem parenchyma give rise to the aforementioned secretory structures while the lipid components (triacylglycerols) stored there support the biosynthesis of essential oils by later becoming a medium in which these oils are dissolved. The results indicate the integrity of axial secretory structures forming a continuous system in vegetative plant organs. PMID:26936790

  7. Oil Secretory System in Vegetative Organs of Three Arnica Taxa: Essential Oil Synthesis, Distribution and Accumulation.

    PubMed

    Kromer, Krystyna; Kreitschitz, Agnieszka; Kleinteich, Thomas; Gorb, Stanislav N; Szumny, Antoni

    2016-05-01

    Arnica, a genus including the medicinal species A. montana, in its Arbo variety, and A. chamissonis, is among the plants richest in essential oils used as pharmaceutical materials. Despite its extensive use, the role of anatomy and histochemistry in the internal secretory system producing the essential oil is poorly understood. Anatomical sections allowed differentiation between two forms of secretory structures which differ according to their distribution in plants. The first axial type is connected to the vascular system of all vegetative organs and forms canals lined with epithelial cells. The second cortical type is represented by elongated intercellular spaces filled with oil formed only between the cortex cells of roots and rhizomes at maturity, with canals lacking an epithelial layer.Only in A. montana rhizomes do secretory structures form huge characteristic reservoirs. Computed tomography illustrates their spatial distribution and fusiform shape. The axial type of root secretory canals is formed at the interface between the endodermis and cortex parenchyma, while, in the stem, they are located in direct contact with veinal parenchyma. The peripheral phloem parenchyma cells are arranged in strands around sieve tube elements which possess a unique ability to accumulate large amounts of oil bodies. The cells of phloem parenchyma give rise to the aforementioned secretory structures while the lipid components (triacylglycerols) stored there support the biosynthesis of essential oils by later becoming a medium in which these oils are dissolved. The results indicate the integrity of axial secretory structures forming a continuous system in vegetative plant organs.

  8. AP-1 and clathrin are essential for secretory granule biogenesis in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Burgess, Jason; Jauregui, Miluska; Tan, Julie; Rollins, Janet; Lallet, Sylvie; Leventis, Peter A.; Boulianne, Gabrielle L.; Chang, Henry C.; Le Borgne, Roland; Krämer, Helmut; Brill, Julie A.

    2011-01-01

     Regulated secretion of hormones, digestive enzymes, and other biologically active molecules requires the formation of secretory granules. Clathrin and the clathrin adaptor protein complex 1 (AP-1) are necessary for maturation of exocrine, endocrine, and neuroendocrine secretory granules. However, the initial steps of secretory granule biogenesis are only minimally understood. Powerful genetic approaches available in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster were used to investigate the molecular pathway for biogenesis of the mucin-containing “glue granules” that form within epithelial cells of the third-instar larval salivary gland. Clathrin and AP-1 colocalize at the trans-Golgi network (TGN) and clathrin recruitment requires AP-1. Furthermore, clathrin and AP-1 colocalize with secretory cargo at the TGN and on immature granules. Finally, loss of clathrin or AP-1 leads to a profound block in secretory granule formation. These findings establish a novel role for AP-1– and clathrin-dependent trafficking in the biogenesis of mucin-containing secretory granules. PMID:21490149

  9. Excretory/secretory products from in vitro-cultured Echinococcus granulosus protoscoleces.

    PubMed

    Virginio, Veridiana G; Monteiro, Karina M; Drumond, Fernanda; de Carvalho, Marcos O; Vargas, Daiani M; Zaha, Arnaldo; Ferreira, Henrique B

    2012-05-01

    Cystic hydatid disease (CHD) is caused by infection with Echinococcus granulosus metacestodes and affects humans and livestock. Proteins secreted or excreted by protoscoleces, pre-adult worms found in the metacestode, are thought to play fundamental roles in the host-parasite relationship. In this work, we performed an LC-MS/MS proteomic analysis of the excretory-secretory products obtained from the first 48 h of an in vitro culture of the protoscoleces. We identified 32 proteins, including 18 that were never detected previously in metacestode proteomic studies. Among the novel identified excretory-secretory products are antigenic proteins, such as EG19 and P-29 and a calpain protease. We also identified other important protoscolex excretory-secretory products, such as thioredoxin peroxidase and 14-3-3 proteins, which are potentially involved in evasion mechanisms adopted by parasites to establish infection. Several intracellular proteins were found in the excretory-secretory products, revealing a set of identified proteins not previously thought to be exposed at the host-parasite interface. Additionally, immunological analyses established the antigenic profiles of the newly identified excretory-secretory products and revealed, for the first time, the in vitro secretion of the B antigen by protoscoleces. Considering that the excretory-secretory products obtained in vitro might reflect the products released and exposed to the host in vivo, our results provide valuable information on parasite survival strategies in adverse host environments and on the molecular mechanisms underpinning CHD immunopathology.

  10. Epithelial Cell Culture from Human Adenoids: A Functional Study Model for Ciliated and Secretory Cells

    PubMed Central

    González, Claudia; Espinosa, Marisol; Sánchez, María Trinidad; Droguett, Karla; Ríos, Mariana; Fonseca, Ximena; Villalón, Manuel

    2013-01-01

    Background. Mucociliary transport (MCT) is a defense mechanism of the airway. To study the underlying mechanisms of MCT, we have both developed an experimental model of cultures, from human adenoid tissue of ciliated and secretory cells, and characterized the response to local chemical signals that control ciliary activity and the secretion of respiratory mucins in vitro. Materials and Methods. In ciliated cell cultures, ciliary beat frequency (CBF) and intracellular Ca2+ levels were measured in response to ATP, UTP, and adenosine. In secretory cultures, mucin synthesis and secretion were identified by using immunodetection. Mucin content was taken from conditioned medium and analyzed in the presence or absence of UTP. Results. Enriched ciliated cell monolayers and secretory cells were obtained. Ciliated cells showed a basal CBF of 10.7 Hz that increased significantly after exposure to ATP, UTP, or adenosine. Mature secretory cells showed active secretion of granules containing different glycoproteins, including MUC5AC. Conclusion. Culture of ciliated and secretory cells grown from adenoid epithelium is a reproducible and feasible experimental model, in which it is possible to observe ciliary and secretory activities, with a potential use as a model to understand mucociliary transport control mechanisms. PMID:23484122

  11. The organization of the secretory machinery in chromaffin cells as a major factor in modeling exocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Villanueva, José; Torregrosa-Hetland, Cristina J.; Gil, Amparo; González-Vélez, Virginia; Segura, Javier; Viniegra, Salvador; Gutiérrez, Luis M.

    2010-01-01

    The organization of cytoplasm in excitable cells was a largely ignored factor when mathematical models were developed to understand intracellular calcium and secretory behavior. Here we employed a combination of fluorescent evanescent and transmitted light microscopy to explore the F-actin cytoskeletal organization in the vicinity of secretory sites in cultured bovine chromaffin cells. This technique and confocal fluorescent microscopy show chromaffin granules associated with the borders of cortical cytoskeletal cages forming an intricate tridimensional network. Furthermore, the overexpression of SNAP-25 in these cells also reveals the association of secretory machinery clusters with the borders of these cytoskeletal cages. The importance of these F-actin cage borders is stressed when granules appear to interact and remain associated during exocytosis visualized in acridin orange loaded vesicles. These results will prompt us to propose a model of cytoskeletal cages, where the secretory machinery is associated with its borders. Both the calcium level and the secretory response are enhanced in this geometrical arrangement when compared with a random distribution of the secretory machinery that is not restricted to the borders of the cage. PMID:20885775

  12. “Inflammaging” as a Druggable Target: A Senescence-Associated Secretory Phenotype—Centered View of Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Procopio, Antonio Domenico; Olivieri, Fabiola

    2016-01-01

    Aging is a complex phenomenon driven by a variety of molecular alterations. A relevant feature of aging is chronic low-grade inflammation, termed “inflammaging.” In type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), many elements of aging appear earlier or are overrepresented, including consistent inflammaging. T2DM patients have an increased death rate, associated with an incremented inflammatory score. The source of this inflammation is debated. Recently, the senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP) has been proposed as the main origin of inflammaging in both aging and T2DM. Different pathogenic mechanisms linked to T2DM progression and complications development have been linked to senescence and SASP, that is, oxidative stress and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. Here we review the latest data connecting oxidative and ER stress with the SASP in the context of aging and T2DM, with emphasis on endothelial cells (ECs) and endothelial dysfunction. Moreover, since current medical practice is insufficient to completely suppress the increased death rate of diabetic patients, we propose a SASP-centered view of T2DM as a futuristic therapeutic option, possibly opening new prospects by moving the attention from one-organ studies of diabetes complications to a wider targeting of the aging process. PMID:27340505

  13. Does salmon brain produce insulin?

    PubMed

    Plisetskaya, E M; Bondareva, V M; Duan, C; Duguay, S J

    1993-07-01

    To address the question whether fish brain can produce insulin, pink salmon (Oncorhynchus gorbusha) brains were extracted and processed according to the procedure developed for purification of pancreatic insulin (Rusakov and Bondareva, 1979). Biological and immunological activity of the resulting material was evaluated respectively by a cartilage sulfation assay and by radioimmunoassay homologous for salmon insulin. Preparations from salmon brain stimulated the [35S]sulfate uptake into salmon branchial cartilage with a potency comparable to pure mammalian or salmon insulins but lower than that of mammalian insulin-like growth factor (IGF-I). In contrast, only trace amounts of radioimmunoreactive insulin could be detected by homologous radioimmunoassay. To determine whether insulin mRNA was present in salmon brain, primers specific for salmon proinsulin and salmon prepro-IGF-I were designed to amplify corresponding cDNA regions by reverse transcriptase-PCR. Insulin mRNA was found only in the endocrine pancreas (Brockmann body) while IGF-I mRNA was detected in the brain, liver, and the Brockmann body. Our results suggest that in fish pancreatic-type insulin is most likely produced only in the endocrine pancreas and then transported to the brain through blood/cerebrospinal fluid system. However, it does not exclude a possibility that some yet unknown insulin-like substances may be expressed in the neural system of ectotherm vertebrates.

  14. Insulin receptor in Drosophila melanogaster

    SciTech Connect

    Petruzzelli, L.; Herrera, R.; Rosen, O.

    1986-05-01

    A specific, high affinity insulin receptor is present in both adult Drosophila and in Drosophila embryos. Wheat germ lectin-enriched extracts of detergent-solubilized membranes from embryos and adults bind insulin with a K/sub d/ of 15 nM. Binding is specific for insulin; micromolar concentrations of proinsulin, IGFI, and IGFII are required to displace bound /sup 125/I-insulin. Insulin-dependent protein tyrosine kinase activity appears during embryogenesis. It is evident between 6 and 12 hours of development, peaks between 12 and 18 hours and falls in the adult. During 0-6 hours of embryogenesis, and in the adult, a specific protein band (Mr = 135,000) is crosslinked to /sup 125/I-insulin. During 6-12 and 12-18 hours of embryogenesis stages in which insulin-dependent protein tyrosine kinase is high, an additional band (Mr = 100,000) becomes crosslinked to /sup 125/I-insulin. Isolation and DNA sequence analysis of genomic clones encoding the Drosophila insulin receptor will be presented as will the characterization of insulin receptor mRNA's during development.

  15. Treating insulin resistance: future prospects.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Clifford J

    2007-03-01

    Insulin resistance typically reflects multiple defects of insulin receptor and post-receptor signalling that impair a diverse range of metabolic and vascular actions. Many potential intervention targets and compounds with therapeutic activity have been described. Proof of principle for a non-peptide insulin mimetic has been demonstrated by specific activation of the intracellular B-subunit of the insulin receptor. Potentiation of insulin action has been achieved with agents that enhance phosphorylation and prolong the tyrosine kinase activity of the insulin receptor and its protein substrates after activation by insulin. These include inhibitors of phosphatases and serine kinases that normally prevent or terminate tyrosine kinase signalling. Additional approaches involve increasing the activity of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase and other downstream components of the insulin signalling pathways. Experimental interventions to remove signalling defects caused by cytokines, certain adipocyte hormones, excess fatty acids, glucotoxicity and negative feedback by distal signalling steps have also indicated therapeutic possibilities. Several hormones, metabolic enzymes, minerals, co-factors and transcription co-activators have shown insulin-sensitising potential. Since insulin resistance affects many metabolic and cardiovascular diseases, it provides an opportunity for simultaneous therapeutic attack on a broad front.

  16. Endothelial Mineralocorticoid Receptor Deletion Prevents Diet-Induced Cardiac Diastolic Dysfunction in Females.

    PubMed

    Jia, Guanghong; Habibi, Javad; DeMarco, Vincent G; Martinez-Lemus, Luis A; Ma, Lixin; Whaley-Connell, Adam T; Aroor, Annayya R; Domeier, Timothy L; Zhu, Yi; Meininger, Gerald A; Barrett Mueller, Katelee; Jaffe, Iris Z; Sowers, James R

    2015-12-01

    Overnutrition and insulin resistance are especially prominent risk factors for the development of cardiac diastolic dysfunction in females. We recently reported that consumption of a Western diet (WD) containing excess fat (46%), sucrose (17.5%), and high fructose corn syrup (17.5%) for 16 weeks resulted in cardiac diastolic dysfunction and aortic stiffening in young female mice and that these abnormalities were prevented by mineralocorticoid receptor blockade. Herein, we extend those studies by testing whether WD-induced diastolic dysfunction and factors contributing to diastolic impairment, such as cardiac fibrosis, hypertrophy, inflammation, and impaired insulin signaling, are modulated by excess endothelial cell mineralocorticoid receptor signaling. Four-week-old female endothelial cell mineralocorticoid receptor knockout and wild-type mice were fed mouse chow or WD for 4 months. WD feeding resulted in prolonged relaxation time, impaired diastolic septal wall motion, and increased left ventricular filling pressure indicative of diastolic dysfunction. This occurred in concert with myocardial interstitial fibrosis and cardiomyocyte hypertrophy that were associated with enhanced profibrotic (transforming growth factor β1/Smad) and progrowth (S6 kinase-1) signaling, as well as myocardial oxidative stress and a proinflammatory immune response. WD also induced cardiomyocyte stiffening, assessed ex vivo using atomic force microscopy. Conversely, endothelial cell mineralocorticoid receptor deficiency prevented WD-induced diastolic dysfunction, profibrotic, and progrowth signaling, in conjunction with reductions in macrophage proinflammatory polarization and improvements in insulin metabolic signaling. Therefore, our findings indicate that increased endothelial cell mineralocorticoid receptor signaling associated with consumption of a WD plays a key role in the activation of cardiac profibrotic, inflammatory, and growth pathways that lead to diastolic dysfunction in

  17. Developmental androgen excess programs sympathetic tone and adipose tissue dysfunction and predisposes to a cardiometabolic syndrome in female mice.

    PubMed

    Nohara, Kazunari; Waraich, Rizwana S; Liu, Suhuan; Ferron, Mathieu; Waget, Aurélie; Meyers, Matthew S; Karsenty, Gérard; Burcelin, Rémy; Mauvais-Jarvis, Franck

    2013-06-15

    Among women, the polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) is considered a form of metabolic syndrome with reproductive abnormalities. Women with PCOS show increased sympathetic tone, visceral adiposity with enlarged adipocytes, hypoadiponectinemia, insulin resistance, glucose intolerance, increased inactive osteocalcin, and hypertension. Excess fetal exposure to androgens has been hypothesized to play a role in the pathogenesis of PCOS. Previously, we showed that neonatal exposure to the androgen testosterone (NT) programs leptin resistance in adult female mice. Here, we studied the impact of NT on lean and adipose tissues, sympathetic tone in cardiometabolic tissues, and the development of metabolic dysfunction in mice. Neonatally androgenized adult female mice (NTF) displayed masculinization of lean tissues with increased cardiac and skeletal muscle as well as kidney masses. NTF mice showed increased and dysfunctional white adipose tissue with increased sympathetic tone in both visceral and subcutaneous fat as well as increased number of enlarged and insulin-resistant adipocytes that displayed altered expression of developmental genes and hypoadiponectinemia. NTF exhibited dysfunctional brown adipose tissue with increased mass and decreased energy expenditure. They also displayed decreased undercarboxylated and active osteocalcin and were predisposed to obesity during chronic androgen excess. NTF showed increased renal sympathetic tone associated with increased blood pressure, and they developed glucose intolerance and insulin resistance. Thus, developmental exposure to testosterone in female mice programs features of cardiometabolic dysfunction, as can be observed in women with PCOS, including increased sympathetic tone, visceral adiposity, insulin resistance, prediabetes, and hypertension.

  18. Modeling phasic insulin release: immediate and time-dependent effects of glucose.

    PubMed

    Nesher, Rafael; Cerasi, Erol

    2002-02-01

    The cellular and molecular mechanisms of insulin secretion are being intensively investigated, yet most researchers are seemingly unaware of the complexity of the dynamic regulation of the secretion. In this article, we summarize studies of the physiology of insulin secretion performed over several decades. The insulin response of perifused islets of rats, perfused rat pancreas, or that of a human, to a square-wave glucose stimulus is biphasic, a transient first-phase response of 4- to 10-min duration followed by a gradual rise in secretion rates (second-phase response). Several hypotheses have been proposed to account for the phasic nature of insulin secretion; they are briefly discussed in this review. We have favored the hypothesis that nutrient stimulators such as glucose, in addition to a primary and almost immediate secretory signal, with time induce both stimulatory and inhibitory messages in the beta-cell, and those messages modulate the primary insulinogenic signal. Indeed, studies in the rat pancreas and in humans have demonstrated that short stimulations with glucose generate a state of refractoriness of the insulin secretion, which we have termed time-dependent inhibition (TDI). Nonnutrient secretagogues such as arginine induce strong TDI independent of the duration of stimulation. Once the agent is removed, TDI persists for a considerable period. In contrast, prolonged stimulations with glucose (and other nutrients) lead to the amplification of the insulin response to subsequent stimuli; this can be demonstrated in the perfused rat pancreas, in perifused islets from several rodents, and in humans. We have termed this stimulatory signal time-dependent potentiation (TDP). The generation of TDP requires higher glucose concentrations and prolonged stimulation; the effect is retained for some time after cessation of the stimulus. Of major interest is the observation that, while the acute insulin response to glucose is severely reduced in glucose

  19. Transplantation of insulin-secreting cells differentiated from human adipose tissue-derived stem cells into type 2 diabetes mice.

    PubMed

    Nam, Ji Sun; Kang, Hyun Mi; Kim, Jiyoung; Park, Seah; Kim, Haekwon; Ahn, Chul Woo; Park, Jin Oh; Kim, Kyung Rae

    2014-01-10

    Currently, there are limited ways to preserve or recover insulin secretory capacity in human pancreas. We evaluated the efficacy of cell therapy using insulin-secreting cells differentiated from human eyelid adipose tissue-derived stem cells (hEAs) into type 2 diabetes mice. After differentiating hEAs into insulin-secreting cells (hEA-ISCs) in vitro, cells were transplanted into a type 2 diabetes mouse model. Serum levels of glucose, insulin and c-peptide were measured, and changes of metabolism and inflammation were assessed in mice that received undifferentiated hEAs (UDC group), differentiated hEA-ISCs (DC group), or sham operation (sham group). Human gene expression and immunohistochemical analysis were done. DC group mice showed improved glucose level, and survival up to 60 days compared to those of UDC and sham group. Significantly increased levels of human insulin and c-peptide were detected in sera of DC mice. RT-PCR and immunohistochemical analysis showed human gene expression and the presence of human cells in kidneys of DC mice. When compared to sham mice, DC mice exhibited lower levels of IL-6, triglyceride and free fatty acids as the control mice. Transplantation of hEA-ISCs lowered blood glucose level in type 2 diabetes mice by increasing circulating insulin level, and ameliorating metabolic parameters including IL-6.

  20. Diabetes mellitus, a complex and heterogeneous disease, and the role of insulin resistance as a determinant of diabetic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Karalliedde, Janaka; Gnudi, Luigi

    2016-02-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is increasingly recognized as a heterogeneous condition. The individualization of care and treatment necessitates an understanding of the individual patient's pathophysiology of DM that underpins their DM classification and clinical presentation. Classical type-2 diabetes mellitus is due to a combination of insulin resistance and an insulin secretory defect. Type-1 diabetes is characterized by a near-absolute deficiency of insulin secretion. More recently, advances in genetics and a better appreciation of the atypical features of DM has resulted in more categories of diabetes. In the context of kidney disease, patients with DM and microalbuminuria are more insulin resistant, and insulin resistance may be a pathway that results in accelerated progression of diabetic kidney disease. This review summarizes the updated classification of DM, including more rarer categories and their associated renal manifestations that need to be considered in patients who present with atypical features. The benefits and limitations of the tests utilized to make a diagnosis of DM are discussed. We also review the putative pathways and mechanisms by which insulin resistance drives the progression of diabetic kidney disease.

  1. [Intensified insulin therapy and insulin micro-pumps during pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Galuppi, V

    1994-06-01

    Before conception and during pregnancy in diabetic patients, every possible effort should be made in order to obtain a good, if not perfect, metabolic control and to warrant maternal and fetal health. Multiple daily injections are required to achieve a very strict glucose regulation in pregnant patients with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. The most usual intensive insulin administration patterns require 3 premeal doses of short-acting insulin and 1 (at bedtime) or 2 (one in the morning and one at bedtime) injections of intermediate or slow-acting insulin. As an alternative choice, insulin pumps allow a continuous subcutaneous infusion with short-acting insulin according to a basal rate which cover the insulin need during the night and between meals. Premeal and presnack surges of insulin are administrated by the patient herself. Home glucose monitoring must be used to adjust insulin doses. Target glucose levels every diabetic pregnant woman should try to achieve are lower than in non-pregnant women: fasting glycaemia should be below 100 mg/dl, 1 hour post-prandial value below 140 mg/dl and 2 hour post-prandial level below 120 mg/dl. The stricter the control and treatment goals are, the more frequently hypoglycaemia may occur. Hypoglycaemia may be harmful especially for patients with severe diabetic complications and may affect the fetus. Therefore, every pregnant diabetic woman should receive individualized treatment and glycaemic goals according to her clinical features, her compliance and her social and cultural background.

  2. Clinical Use and Evaluation of Insulin Pens

    PubMed Central

    Ginsberg, Barry H.

    2015-01-01

    Insulin pens are more accurate and easier to teach than other methods of insulin delivery. They also do not suffer from the risk of mismatch of insulin concentration and type of insulin syringe. The ISO standard used to test insulin pens, however, needs to be updated to reflect their clinical use. PMID:26323484

  3. Insulin Degludec, The New Generation Basal Insulin or Just another Basal Insulin?

    PubMed Central

    Nasrallah, Sami N.; Reynolds, L. Raymond

    2012-01-01

    The advances in recombinant DNA technology have led to an improvement in the properties of currently available long-acting insulin analogs. Insulin degludec, a new generation ultra-long-acting basal insulin, currently in phase 3 clinical trials, has a promising future in clinical use. When compared to its rival basal insulin analogs, a longer duration of action and lower incidence of hypoglycemic events in both type 1 and type 2 diabetic patients has been demonstrated.1,2 Its unique mechanism of action is based on multihexamer formation after subcutaneous injection. This reportedly allows for less pharmacodynamic variability and within-subject variability than currently available insulin analogs, and a duration of action that is over 24 hours.3 The lack of proof of carcinogenicity with insulin degludec is yet another factor that would be taken into consideration when choosing the optimal basal insulin for a diabetic individual.4 A formulation of insulin degludec with insulin aspart, Insulin degludec 70%/aspart 30%, may permit improved flexibly of dosing without compromising glycemic control or safety.5 PMID:22879797

  4. Extrapancreatic insulin effect of glibenclamide.

    PubMed

    Mulder, H; Schopman, W; van der Lely, A J

    1991-01-01

    In eight patients with uncomplicated non insulin dependent diabetes mellitus, serum insulin levels, serum C-peptide levels and blood glucose levels were measured before and after oral administration of glibenclamide 0.1 mg/kg body weight and a test meal, or after a test meal alone. The rise in serum insulin levels persisted longer after glibenclamide. The initial rise in serum insulin was of the same magnitude in both situations, as was the rise in serum C-peptide levels during the entire 5 h study. It is concluded that glibenclamide is able to maintain a more prolonged increase in serum insulin levels by inhibiting the degradation of insulin in the vascular endothelial cells of the liver. The inhibition contributes to the blood glucose lowering effect of glibenclamide. PMID:1904820

  5. Regulation of secretory granule size by the precise generation and fusion of unit granules

    PubMed Central

    Hammel, Ilan; Lagunoff, David; Galli, Stephen J

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Morphometric evidence derived from studies of mast cells, pancreatic acinar cells and other cell types supports a model in which the post-Golgi processes that generate mature secretory granules can be resolved into three steps: (1) fusion of small, Golgi-derived progranules to produce immature secretory granules which have a highly constrained volume; (2) transformation of such immature granules into mature secretory granules, a process often associated with a reduction in the maturing granule’s volume, as well as changes in the appearance of its content and (3) fusion of secretory granules of the smallest size, termed ‘unit granules’, forming granules whose volumes are multiples of the unit granule’s volume. Mutations which perturb this process can cause significant pathology. For example, Chediak–Higashi syndrome / lysosomal trafficking regulator (CHS)/(Lyst) mutations result in giant secretory granules in a number of cell types in human beings with the Chediak–Higashi syndrome and in ‘beige’ (Lystbg/Lystbg) mice. Analysis of the secretory granules of mast cells and pancreatic acinar cells in Lyst-deficient beige mice suggests that beige mouse secretory granules retain the ability to fuse randomly with other secretory granules no matter what the size of the fusion partners. By contrast, in normal mice, the pattern of granule–granule fusion occurs exclusively by the addition of unit granules, either to each other or to larger granules. The normal pattern of fusion is termed unit addition and the fusion evident in cells with CHS/Lyst mutations is called random addition. The proposed model of secretory granule formation has several implications. For example, in neurosecretory cells, the secretion of small amounts of cargo in granules constrained to a very narrow size increases the precision of the information conveyed by secretion. By contrast, in pancreatic acinar cells and mast cells, large granules composed of multiple unit granules

  6. Genetic Forms of Severe Insulin Resistance: What Endocrinologists Should Know

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Victoria E. R.; Semple, Robert K.

    2015-01-01

    Insulin resistance” is a widely used clinical term. It is usually defined as a state characterised by reduced glucose-lowering activity of insulin, but is also sometimes used as a shorthand label for a clinical syndrome encompassing major pathologies such as type 2 diabetes, polycystic ovary syndrome, fatty liver disease, and atherosclerosis. Nevertheless the precise cellular origins of insulin resistance (IR), the causal links among these phenomena, and the mechanisms underlying them, remain poorly understood or contentious. Prevalent IR usually results from a genetic predisposition interacting with acquired obesity, however even in some lean individuals very severe degrees of IR are seen. It is important to identify these people as they often harbour identifiable single gene defects, and they may benefit from molecular diagnosis, genetic counselling, and sometimes tailored therapies. Observation of people with known single gene defects also offers the opportunity to make inferences about the mechanistic links between IR and common pathologies. We now summarise the currently known monogenic forms of severe IR, with an emphasis on practical aspects of their recognition, diagnosis and management. In particular, we draw distinctions among the biochemical subphenotypes of IR that arise from primary adipose tissue dysfunction or from primary insulin signalling defects, and discuss the implications of this dichotomy for management. PMID:23857978

  7. Short-term cholinergic desensitization of rat pancreatic secretory response

    SciTech Connect

    Asselin, J.; Larose, L.; Morisset, J.

    1987-03-01

    Dispersed pancreatic acini were first exposed to carbamylcholine (10/sup -7/-10/sup -4/ M) for 60 min, washed, and reexposed to this same agonist (10/sup -8/-10/sup -3/ M) for 15 min. During this second incubation, the functional secretory capacity of these acini was evaluated by measuring amylase release. Acini preexposed to concentrations of carbamylcholine of 10/sup -6/ M or greater showed shifts to the right in the subsequent carbamylcholine dose-response curves of amylase release. A 3-h recovery period (without carbamylcholine) did not restore the altered carbamylcholine dose-response curve. Ca/sup 2 +/ concentrations of 10/sup -7/ M or 2.5 x 10/sup -3/ M instead of 0.5 x 10/sup -3/ M during the 60-min preincubation did not affect the desensitization process. With use of N-(/sup 3/H)methylscopolamine to evaluate muscarinic receptors, the only changes observed after desensitization were a significant decrease in the high-affinity and an equivalent increase in that of the low-affinity receptors. After cholinergic exposure amylase release stimulated by caerulein was only slightly modified, whereas amylase release in response to a phorbol ester 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate and to the ionophore A23187 was not altered. These data indicate that short-term desensitization with a cholinergic agent is relatively specific to muscarinic agonists, causes changes in the muscarinic receptor high-and low-affinity concentration but does not alter intracellular steps after calcium mobilization or protein kinase C activation known to be involved in the secretion process.

  8. Myosin Vc Is Specialized for Transport on a Secretory Superhighway.

    PubMed

    Sladewski, Thomas E; Krementsova, Elena B; Trybus, Kathleen M

    2016-08-22

    A hallmark of the well-studied vertebrate class Va myosin is its ability to take multiple steps on actin as a single molecule without dissociating, a feature called "processivity." Therefore, it was surprising when kinetic and single-molecule assays showed that human myosin Vc (MyoVc) was not processive on single-actin filaments [1-3]. We explored the possibility that MyoVc is processive only under conditions that resemble its biological context. Recently, it was shown that zymogen vesicles are transported on actin "superhighways" composed of parallel actin cables nucleated by formins from the plasma membrane [4]. Loss of these cables compromises orderly apical targeting of vesicles. MyoVc has been implicated in transporting secretory vesicles to the apical membrane [5]. We hypothesized that actin cables regulate the processive properties of MyoVc. We show that MyoVc is unique in taking variable size steps, which are frequently in the backward direction. Results obtained with chimeric constructs implicate the lever arm/rod of MyoVc as being responsible for these properties. Actin bundles allow single MyoVc motors to move processively. Remarkably, even teams of MyoVc motors require actin bundles to move continuously at physiological ionic strength. The irregular stepping pattern of MyoVc, which may result from flexibility in the lever arm/rod of MyoVc, appears to be a unique structural adaptation that allows the actin track to spatially restrict the activity of MyoVc to specialized actin cables in order to co-ordinate and target the final stages of vesicle secretion. PMID:27498562

  9. Myosin Vc Is Specialized for Transport on a Secretory Superhighway.

    PubMed

    Sladewski, Thomas E; Krementsova, Elena B; Trybus, Kathleen M

    2016-08-22

    A hallmark of the well-studied vertebrate class Va myosin is its ability to take multiple steps on actin as a single molecule without dissociating, a feature called "processivity." Therefore, it was surprising when kinetic and single-molecule assays showed that human myosin Vc (MyoVc) was not processive on single-actin filaments [1-3]. We explored the possibility that MyoVc is processive only under conditions that resemble its biological context. Recently, it was shown that zymogen vesicles are transported on actin "superhighways" composed of parallel actin cables nucleated by formins from the plasma membrane [4]. Loss of these cables compromises orderly apical targeting of vesicles. MyoVc has been implicated in transporting secretory vesicles to the apical membrane [5]. We hypothesized that actin cables regulate the processive properties of MyoVc. We show that MyoVc is unique in taking variable size steps, which are frequently in the backward direction. Results obtained with chimeric constructs implicate the lever arm/rod of MyoVc as being responsible for these properties. Actin bundles allow single MyoVc motors to move processively. Remarkably, even teams of MyoVc motors require actin bundles to move continuously at physiological ionic strength. The irregular stepping pattern of MyoVc, which may result from flexibility in