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Sample records for insulinoma cell xenograft

  1. Insulinoma

    MedlinePlus

    An insulinoma is a tumor in the pancreas that produces too much insulin. ... The pancreas is an organ in the abdomen. The pancreas makes several enzymes and hormones, including the hormone insulin. ...

  2. Beta-cell gene expression and functional characterisation of the human insulinoma cell line CM.

    PubMed

    Baroni, M G; Cavallo, M G; Mark, M; Monetini, L; Stoehrer, B; Pozzilli, P

    1999-04-01

    Animal insulinoma cell lines are widely used to study physiological and pathophysiological mechanisms involved in glucose metabolism and to establish in vitro models for studies on beta-cells. In contrast, human insulinoma cell lines are rarely used because of difficulties in obtaining and culturing them for long periods. The aim of our study was to investigate, under different experimental conditions, the capacity of the human insulinoma cell line CM to retain beta-cell function, particularly the expression of constitutive beta-cell genes (insulin, the glucose transporters GLUT1 and GLUT2, glucokinase), intracellular and secreted insulin, beta-cell granules, and cAMP content. Results showed that CM cells from an early-passage express specific beta-cell genes in response to glucose stimulation, in particular the insulin and GLUT genes. Such capacity is lost at later passages when cells are cultured at standard glucose concentrations. However, if cultured at lower glucose concentration (0.8 mM) for a longer time, CM cells re-acquire the capacity to respond to glucose stimulation, as shown by the increased expression of beta-cell genes (insulin, GLUT2, glucokinase). Nonetheless, insulin secretion could not be restored under such experimental conditions despite the presence of intracellular insulin, although cAMP response to a potent activator of adenylate cyclase, forskolin, was present indicating a viable system. In conclusion, these data show that the human insulinoma cell line CM, at both early-passage and late-passage, posseses a functional glucose-signalling pathway and insulin mRNA expression similar to normal beta-cells, representing, therefore, a good model for studies concerning the signalling and expression of beta-cells. Furthermore, we have previously shown that it is also a good model for immunological studies. In this respect it is important to note that the CM cell line is one of the very few existing human beta-cell lines in long-term culture.

  3. Preventing T cell rejection of pig xenografts.

    PubMed

    Higginbotham, Laura; Ford, Mandy L; Newell, Kenneth A; Adams, Andrew B

    2015-11-01

    Xenotransplantation is a potential solution to the limited supply of donor organs. While early barriers to xenograft acceptance, such as hyperacute rejection, are now largely avoided through genetic engineering, the next frontier in successful xenograft survival will require prevention of T cell-mediated rejection. Most successful immunosuppressive regimens in xenotransplantation utilize T cell depletion with antibody therapy. Additionally, the use of T cell costimulatory blockade - specifically blockade of the CD40-CD154 pathway - shows promise with several reports of long-term xenograft survival. Additional therapies, such as transgenic expression of T cell coinhibitory molecules or transfer of immunomodulatory cells to promote tolerance, may be necessary to achieve reliable long-term xenograft acceptance. Further studies in pre-clinical models are essential in order to optimize these regimens prior to trials in patients.

  4. The imidazoline compound RX871024 promotes insulinoma cell death independent of AMP-activated protein kinase inhibition.

    PubMed

    Zaitseva, Irina I; Zaitsev, Sergei V; Berggren, Per-Olof

    2016-08-01

    We have previously shown that the insulinotropic imidazoline compound RX871024 induces death of insulinoma MIN6 cells, an effect involving stimulation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and caspase 3. It has also been reported that AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activates JNK and induces β-cell death. Here we show that RX871024, but not another insulinotropic imidazoline compound (BL11282), suppressed AMPK activity in MIN6 cells. The inhibitory effect of RX871024 on AMPK was supported by the observation that the imidazoline induced lipid droplet formation in the cytoplasm of MIN6 cells. This reflects stimulation of anabolic pathways and inhibition of catabolic pathways in the cell that happen under conditions when AMPK is inhibited. Activation of AMPK by 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide riboside (AICAR) elevated basal and cytokine-induced death in primary β-cells and in insulinoma MIN6 cells. RX871024 aggravated AICAR-induced insulinoma MIN6 cell death regardless of the presence of pro-inflammatory cytokines. The specific cytotoxic effect of imidazoline compound RX871024 on insulinoma cell death but not primary β-cell death is independent of its action on AMPK and may suggest the possibility of using this type of compound in the treatment of insulinomas. PMID:27221730

  5. ActivinB Is Induced in Insulinoma To Promote Tumor Plasticity through a β-Cell-Induced Dedifferentiation

    PubMed Central

    Ripoche, Doriane; Charbord, Jérémie; Hennino, Ana; Teinturier, Romain; Bonnavion, Rémy; Jaafar, Rami; Goehrig, Delphine; Cordier-Bussat, Martine; Ritvos, Olli; Zhang, Chang X.; Andersson, Olov

    2015-01-01

    Loss of pancreatic β-cell maturity occurs in diabetes and insulinomas. Although both physiological and pathological stresses are known to promote β-cell dedifferentiation, little is known about the molecules involved in this process. Here we demonstrate that activinB, a transforming growth factor β (TGF-β)-related ligand, is upregulated during tumorigenesis and drives the loss of insulin expression and β-cell maturity in a mouse insulinoma model. Our data further identify Pax4 as a previously unknown activinB target and potent contributor to the observed β-cell dedifferentiation. More importantly, using compound mutant mice, we found that deleting activinB expression abolishes tumor β-cell dedifferentiation and, surprisingly, increases survival without significantly affecting tumor growth. Hence, this work reveals an unexpected role for activinB in the loss of β-cell maturity, islet plasticity, and progression of insulinoma through its participation in β-cell dedifferentiation. PMID:26711255

  6. Effects of intercellular junction protein expression on intracellular ice formation in mouse insulinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Higgins, Adam Z; Karlsson, Jens O M

    2013-11-01

    The development of cryopreservation procedures for tissues has proven to be difficult in part because cells within tissue are more susceptible to intracellular ice formation (IIF) than are isolated cells. In particular, previous studies suggest that cell-cell interactions increase the likelihood of IIF by enabling propagation of ice between neighboring cells, a process thought to be mediated by gap junction channels. In this study, we investigated the effects of cell-cell interactions on IIF using three genetically modified strains of the mouse insulinoma cell line MIN6, each of which expressed key intercellular junction proteins (connexin-36, E-cadherin, and occludin) at different levels. High-speed video cryomicroscopy was used to visualize the freezing process in pairs of adherent cells, revealing that the initial IIF event in a given cell pair was correlated with a hitherto unrecognized precursor phenomenon: penetration of extracellular ice into paracellular spaces at the cell-cell interface. Such paracellular ice penetration occurred in the majority of cell pairs observed, and typically preceded and colocalized with the IIF initiation events. Paracellular ice penetration was generally not observed at temperatures >-5.65°C, which is consistent with a penetration mechanism via defects in tight-junction barriers at the cell-cell interface. Although the maximum temperature of paracellular penetration was similar for all four cell strains, genetically modified cells exhibited a significantly higher frequency of ice penetration and a higher mean IIF temperature than did wild-type cells. A four-state Markov chain model was used to quantify the rate constants of the paracellular ice penetration process, the penetration-associated IIF initiation process, and the intercellular ice propagation process. In the initial stages of freezing (>-15°C), junction protein expression appeared to only have a modest effect on the kinetics of propagative IIF, and even cell strains

  7. Reg2 protects mouse insulinoma cells from streptozotocin-induced mitochondrial disruption and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lu; Liu, Jun-Li; Srikant, Coimbatore B

    2010-10-01

    We reported previously that pancreas-specific ablation of IGF-I in mice induced an increased expression of regenerating family proteins Reg2 and Reg3β in the pancreas and protected them from streptozotocin (Stz)-induced β-cell damage. We, therefore, assessed the effect of ectopically introduced Reg2 on Stz-induced apoptosis in MIN6 mouse insulinoma cells and report here that Reg2 protects MIN6 cells from Stz-induced apoptosis by attenuating its ability to disrupt mitochondrial membrane integrity, activate caspase-3 and promote poly-ADP ribose polymerase cleavage, and induce apoptosis. These changes correlated with suppression of c-jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) phosphorylation by Stz. Reg2 inhibited Stz-induced proapoptotic events as well as the inactivation of JNK. Inclusion of chemical inhibitor of JNK to Reg2 expressing cells rendered them sensitive to Stz. These data demonstrate that Reg2 protects insulin-producing cells against Stz-induced apoptosis by interfering with its cytotoxic signaling upstream of the intrinsic proapoptotic events by preventing its ability to inactivate JNK.

  8. mReg2 inhibits nuclear entry of apoptosis-inducing factor in mouse insulinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lu; Chowdhury, Subrata; Uppal, Sadaf; Fang, Xin; Liu, Jun-Li; Srikant, Coimbatore B

    2015-02-01

    We have reported earlier that murine-regenerating gene mReg2 protects MIN6 mouse insulinoma cells from ER stress and caspase-mediated apoptosis. In apoptotic cells, DNA damage is induced by the nuclear translocation of mitochondrial apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF). Here we tested the hypothesis that mReg2 may regulate Scythe and/or hsp70 which influence the nuclear import of AIF. Treatment with thapsigargin (Tg) or doxorubicin induced an increase in nuclear AIF in MIN6 cells carrying the empty transfection vector (MIN6-VC) but not in cells overexpressing mReg2 (MIN6-mReg2). On one hand, nuclear Scythe was higher in the nucleus of MIN6-mReg2 compared with that in MIN6-VC cells. mReg2 did not alter the expression of AIF or Scythe. On the other hand, mReg2 induced the expression of hsp70 which is known to promote cytosolic retention of AIF. We conclude that mReg2 inhibits AIF-mediated apoptosis by promoting the nuclear presence of Scythe and inducing hsp70.

  9. Thioredoxin-mimetic peptides (TXM) reverse auranofin induced apoptosis and restore insulin secretion in insulinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Cohen-Kutner, Moshe; Khomsky, Lena; Trus, Michael; Aisner, Yonatan; Niv, Masha Y; Benhar, Moran; Atlas, Daphne

    2013-04-01

    The thioredoxin reductase/thioredoxin system (TrxR/Trx1) plays a major role in protecting cells from oxidative stress. Disruption of the TrxR-Trx1 system keeps Trx1 in the oxidized state leading to cell death through activation of the ASK1-Trx1 apoptotic pathway. The potential mechanism and ability of tri- and tetra-oligopeptides derived from the canonical -CxxC- motif of the Trx1-active site to mimic and enhance Trx1 cellular activity was examined. The Trx mimetics peptides (TXM) protected insulinoma INS 832/13 cells from oxidative stress induced by selectively inhibiting TrxR with auranofin (AuF). TXM reversed the AuF-effects preventing apoptosis, and increasing cell-viability. The TXM peptides were effective in inhibiting AuF-induced MAPK, JNK and p38(MAPK) phosphorylation, in correlation with preventing caspase-3 cleavage and thereby PARP-1 dissociation. The ability to form a disulfide-bridge-like conformation was estimated from molecular dynamics simulations. The TXM peptides restored insulin secretion and displayed Trx1 denitrosylase activity. Their potency was 10-100-fold higher than redox reagents like NAC, AD4, or ascorbic acid. Unable to reverse ERK1/2 phosphorylation, TXM-CB3 (NAc-Cys-Pro-Cys amide) appeared to function in part, through inhibiting ASK1-Trx dissociation. These highly effective anti-apoptotic effects of Trx1 mimetic peptides exhibited in INS 832/13 cells could become valuable in treating adverse oxidative-stress related disorders such as diabetes. PMID:23327993

  10. Global Conservation of Protein Status between Cell Lines and Xenografts.

    PubMed

    Biau, Julian; Chautard, Emmanuel; Court, Frank; Pereira, Bruno; Verrelle, Pierre; Devun, Flavien; De Koning, Leanne; Dutreix, Marie

    2016-08-01

    Common preclinical models for testing anticancer treatment include cultured human tumor cell lines in monolayer, and xenografts derived from these cell lines in immunodeficient mice. Our goal was to determine how similar the xenografts are compared with their original cell line and to determine whether it is possible to predict the stability of a xenograft model beforehand. We studied a selection of 89 protein markers of interest in 14 human cell cultures and respective subcutaneous xenografts using the reverse-phase protein array technology. We specifically focused on proteins and posttranslational modifications involved in DNA repair, PI3K pathway, apoptosis, tyrosine kinase signaling, stress, cell cycle, MAPK/ERK signaling, SAPK/JNK signaling, NFκB signaling, and adhesion/cytoskeleton. Using hierarchical clustering, most cell culture-xenograft pairs cluster together, suggesting a global conservation of protein signature. Particularly, Akt, NFkB, EGFR, and Vimentin showed very stable protein expression and phosphorylation levels highlighting that 4 of 10 pathways were highly correlated whatever the model. Other proteins were heterogeneously conserved depending on the cell line. Finally, cell line models with low Akt pathway activation and low levels of Vimentin gave rise to more reliable xenograft models. These results may be useful for the extrapolation of cell culture experiments to in vivo models in novel targeted drug discovery. PMID:27567954

  11. Regulation of ATP-sensitive K sup + channels in insulinoma cells: Activation by somatostatin and protein kinase C and the role of cAMP

    SciTech Connect

    De Weille, J.R.; Schmid-Antomarchi, H.; Fosset, M.; Lazdunski, M. )

    1989-04-01

    The actions of somatostatin and of the phorbol ester 4{beta}-phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) were studied in rat insulinoma (RINm5F) cells by electrophysiological and {sup 86}Rb{sup +} flux techniques. Both PMA and somatostatin hyperpolarize insulinoma cells by activating ATP-sensitive K{sup +} channels. The presence of intracellular GTP is required for the somatostatin effects. PMA- and somatostatin-induced hyperpolarization and channel activity are inhibited by the sulfonylurea glibenclamide. Glibenclamide-sensitive {sup 86}Rb{sup +} efflux from insulinoma cells is stimulated by somatostatin in a dose-dependent manner (half maximal effect at 0.7 nM) and abolished by pertussis toxin pretreatment. Mutual roles of a GTP-binding protein, of protein kinase C, and of cAMP in the regulation of ATP-sensitive K{sup +} channels are discussed.

  12. Leptin rapidly suppresses insulin release from insulinoma cells, rat and human islets and, in vivo, in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Kulkarni, R N; Wang, Z L; Wang, R M; Hurley, J D; Smith, D M; Ghatei, M A; Withers, D J; Gardiner, J V; Bailey, C J; Bloom, S R

    1997-01-01

    Obesity is associated with diabetes, and leptin is known to be elevated in obesity. To investigate whether leptin has a direct effect on insulin secretion, isolated rat and human islets and cultured insulinoma cells were studied. In all cases, mouse leptin inhibited insulin secretion at concentrations within the plasma range reported in humans. Insulin mRNA expression was also suppressed in the cultured cells and rat islets. The long form of the leptin receptor (OB-Rb) mRNA was present in the islets and insulinoma cell lines. To determine the significance of these findings in vivo, normal fed mice were injected with two doses of leptin. A significant decrease in plasma insulin and associated rise in glucose concentration were observed. Fasted normal and leptin receptor-deficient db/db mice showed no response to leptin. A dose of leptin, which mimicked that found in normal mice, was administered to leptin-deficient, hyperinsulinemic ob/ob mice. This caused a marked lowering of plasma insulin concentration and a doubling of plasma glucose. Thus, leptin has a powerful acute inhibitory effect on insulin secretion. These results suggest that the action of leptin may be one mechanism by which excess adipose tissue could acutely impair carbohydrate metabolism. PMID:9389736

  13. Interaction of sulfonylurea-conjugated polymer with insulinoma cell line of MIN6 and its effect on insulin secretion.

    PubMed

    Park, K H; Kim, S W; Bae, Y H

    2001-04-01

    A carboxylated derivative of sulfonylurea (SU), an insulinotropic agent, was synthesized and grafted onto a water-soluble polymer as a biospecific and stimulating polymer for insulin secretion. To evaluate the effect of the SU-conjugated polymer on insulin secretion, its solution in dimethyl sulfoxide was added to the culture of insulinoma cell line of MIN6 cells to make 10 nM of SU units in the medium and incubated for 3 h at 37 degrees C. The culture medium was conditioned with glucose concentration of 3.3 or 25 mM. To verify the specific interaction between the SU (K+ channel closer)-conjugated polymer and MIN6 cells, the cells were pretreated with diazoxide, an agonist of adenosine triphosphate-sensitive K+ channel (K+ channel opener), before adding the SU-conjugated polymer to the cell culture medium. This treatment suppressed the action of SUs on MIN6 cells. Fluorescence-labeled polymer with rodamine-B isothiocyanate was used to visualize the interactions, and we found that the labeled polymer strongly absorbed to MIN6 cells, probably owing to its specific interaction mediated by SU receptors on the cell membrane. The fluorescence intensity on the cells significantly increased with an increase in incubation time and polymer concentration. A confocal laser microscopic study further confirmed this interaction. The results from this study provided evidence that SU-conjugated copolymer stimulates insulin secretion by specific interactions of SU moieties in the polymer with MIN6 cells.

  14. Attenuation of unfolded protein response and apoptosis by mReg2 induced GRP78 in mouse insulinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lu; Chowdhury, Subrata; Fang, Xin; Liu, Jun-Li; Srikant, Coimbatore B

    2014-05-29

    Murine regenerating (mReg) genes have been implicated in preserving islet cell biology. Expanding on our previous work showing that overexpression of mReg2 protects MIN6 insulinoma cells against streptozotocin-induced apoptosis, we now demonstrate that mReg2 induces glucose-regulated peptide 78 (GRP78) expression via the Akt-mTORC1 axis and protects MIN6 cells against ER stress induced by thapsigargin and glucolipotoxicity. Activation of mTORC1 activity results from both mReg2-induced increased mTOR phosphorylation as well as increased expression of Raptor and GβL. Inhibition of Akt and mTORC1 blunted the ability of mReg2 to induce GRP78 and attenuate unfolded protein response (UPR). Knockdown of GRP78 sensitized the cells overexpressing mReg2 to UPR without affecting its ability to activate Akt-mTORC1 signaling. Induced expression of mReg2 may protect insulin producing cells from ER stress in diabetes.

  15. PDX-1 is a therapeutic target for pancreatic cancer, insulinoma and islet neoplasia using a novel RNA interference platform.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shi-He; Rao, Donald D; Nemunaitis, John; Senzer, Neil; Zhou, Guisheng; Dawson, David; Gingras, Marie-Claude; Wang, Zhaohui; Gibbs, Richard; Norman, Michael; Templeton, Nancy S; Demayo, Francesco J; O'Malley, Bert; Sanchez, Robbi; Fisher, William E; Brunicardi, F Charles

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic and duodenal homeobox-1 (PDX-1) is a transcription factor that regulates insulin expression and islet maintenance in the adult pancreas. Our recent studies demonstrate that PDX-1 is an oncogene for pancreatic cancer and is overexpressed in pancreatic cancer. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate that PDX-1 is a therapeutic target for both hormonal symptoms and tumor volume in mouse models of pancreatic cancer, insulinoma and islet neoplasia. Immunohistochemistry of human pancreatic and islet neoplasia specimens revealed marked PDX-1 overexpression, suggesting PDX-1 as a "drugable" target within these diseases. To do so, a novel RNA interference effector platform, bifunctional shRNA(PDX-1), was developed and studied in mouse and human cell lines as well as in mouse models of pancreatic cancer, insulinoma and islet neoplasia. Systemic delivery of bi-shRNA(humanPDX-1) lipoplexes resulted in marked reduction of tumor volume and improved survival in a human pancreatic cancer xenograft mouse model. bi-shRNA(mousePDX-1) lipoplexes prevented death from hyperinsulinemia and hypoglycemia in an insulinoma mouse model. shRNA(mousePDX-1) lipoplexes reversed hyperinsulinemia and hypoglycemia in an immune-competent mouse model of islet neoplasia. PDX-1 was overexpressed in pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors and nesidioblastosis. These data demonstrate that PDX-1 RNAi therapy controls hormonal symptoms and tumor volume in mouse models of pancreatic cancer, insulinoma and islet neoplasia, therefore, PDX-1 is a potential therapeutic target for these pancreatic diseases.

  16. Introduction of exogenous growth hormone receptors augments growth hormone-responsive insulin biosynthesis in rat insulinoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Billestrup, N.; Moeldrup, A.; Serup, P.; Nielsen, J.H. ); Mathews, L.S.; Norstedt, G. )

    1990-09-01

    The stimulation of insulin biosynthesis in the pancreatic insulinoma cell line RIN5-AH by growth hormone (GH) is initiated by GH binding to specific receptors. To determine whether the recently cloned rat hepatic GH receptor is able to mediate the insulinotropic effect of GH, the authors have transfected a GH receptor cDNA under the transcriptional control of the human metallothionein promoter into RIN5-AH cells. The transfected cells were found to exhibit an increased expression of GH receptors and to contain a specific GH receptor mRNA that was not expressed in the parent cell line. The expression of GH receptors in one clone (1.24) selected for detailed analysis was increased 2.6-fold compared to untransfected cells. The increased GH receptor expression was accompanied by an increased responsiveness to GH. Thus, the maximal GH-stimulated increase of insulin biosynthesis was 4.1-fold in 1.24 cells compared to 1.9-fold in the nontransfected RIN5-AH cells. The expression of the transfected receptor was stimulated 1.6- and 2.3-fold when cells were cultured in the presence of 25 or 50 {mu}M Zn{sup 2+} was associated with an increased magnitude of GH-stimulated insulin biosynthesis. A close stoichiometric relationship between the level of receptor expression and the level of GH-stimulated insulin biosynthesis was observed. They conclude from these results that the hepatic GH receptor is able to mediate the effect of GH on insulin biosynthesis in RIN5-AH cells.

  17. Microcystin-LR induces dysfunction of insulin secretion in rat insulinoma (INS-1) cells: Implications for diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yanyan; Shi, Kun; Su, Xiaomei; Xie, Liqiang; Yan, Yunjun

    2016-08-15

    Microcystins (MCs) are the most frequent cyanobacterial toxins observed in freshwater systems. Accumulating evidence suggests that MCs pose a serious threat to public health. However, the contributions of the exposure of MCs to the occurrence of human diseases remain largely unknown. This study provides the evidence of the effects of MC-LR on pancreatic β-cell function through the exposure of rat insulinoma (INS-1) cells to 0, 10, 20, or 40μM MC-LR for 72h and explores the underlying molecular mechanisms. Our results demonstrate that exposure to MC-LR for 72h suppresses cell viability, disturbs glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS), and decreases the expression of insulin protein. Moreover, MC-LR disrupts the cell cycle distribution and increases cell apoptosis at 20 or 40μM for 72h, respectively, indicating that the β-cell mass would be decreased by MC-LR exposure. A transcriptomic analysis revealed several key genes (e.g., Pdx-1, Neurod1, and Abcc8) involved in insulin secretion are significantly differentially expressed in INS-1 cells in response to MC-LR exposure. In addition, several signal transduction pathways associated with diabetes (e.g., type 1 and 2 diabetes) were also identified compared with the control cells. We recommend that MC be considered as a new environmental factor that promotes diabetes development. The identified key genes or pathways may potentially contribute to the future therapies in the environmental contaminants induced β-cell damage. PMID:27107231

  18. Stimulatory effects of maitotoxin on insulin release in insulinoma HIT cells: Role of calcium uptake and phosphoinositide breakdown

    SciTech Connect

    Soergel, D.G.; Gusovsky, F.; Yasumoto, T.; Daly, J.W. )

    1990-12-01

    In hamster insulinoma (HIT) cells, maitotoxin (MTX) induces a time-dependent and concentration-dependent release of insulin that requires the presence of extracellular calcium. The response is nearly completely blocked by cinnarizine and cadmium, but is not inhibited by the L-type calcium channel blocker nifedipine or by manganese. MTX induces 45Ca+ uptake in these cells in a dose-dependent mode, and the uptake is blocked with cinnarizine, nifedipine and cadmium, and is partially inhibited by manganese. MTX induces phosphoinositide breakdown in HIT cells, and the response is partially blocked by cadmium, but is not affected by nifedipine, cinnarizine or manganese. High concentrations of potassium ions also induce insulin release and calcium uptake in HIT cells. Both effects of potassium are blocked partially by nifedipine, cadmium and cinnarizine. High concentrations of potassium do not induce phosphoinositide breakdown in HIT cells. The results suggest that MTX-elicited release of insulin is attained by two mechanisms: (1) a nifedipine-sensitive action, which results from MTX-induced activation of L-type calcium channels, which can be mimicked with high potassium concentrations; and (2) a nifedipine-insensitive action, which may be initiated by the activation of phosphoinositide breakdown by MTX. Such an activation of phospholipase C would result in the formation of 1,4,5-inositol trisphosphate, a release of intracellular calcium and then release of insulin to the extracellular space. Cinnarizine is proposed to block both MTX-elicited mechanisms, the first by blockade of calcium channels and the second by blocking 1,4,5-inositol trisphosphate-induced release of internal calcium. Either mechanism alone appears capable of eliciting release of insulin.

  19. [Malignant insulinoma: recommendations for workup and treatment].

    PubMed

    Baudin, Eric; Caron, Philippe; Lombard-Bohas, Catherine; Tabarin, Antoine; Mitry, Emmanuel; Reznick, Yves; Taieb, David; Pattou, François; Goudet, Pierre; Vezzosi, Delphine; Scoazec, Jean-Yves; Cadiot, Guillaume; Borson-Chazot, Françoise; Do Cao, Christine

    2014-06-01

    Insulinoma are malignant in 4 to 14 % of cases. Their rarity and the sparse data available in the literature have limited publication of specific guidelines for their management. The following review aim to provide up-to-date recommendations on initial evaluation including pathologic grading, measures to control hypoglycemia, antitumor strategies and long term follow-up. Will be discussed in detail respective indications of surgery, diazoxide, somatostatin analogs, everolimus, sunitinib, liver directed treatments including arterial embolization, chemotherapy and radiometabolic therapy. A Medline search using terms "insulinoma", "neuroendocrine pancreatic tumors", "islet cell carcinoma", "malignant insulinoma" was performed limiting the selection to English language articles and adult age cases, along with cross referencing.

  20. Dietary Zinc Reduction, Pyruvate Supplementation, or Zinc Transporter 5 Knockout Attenuates β-Cell Death in Nonobese Diabetic Mice, Islets, and Insulinoma Cells123

    PubMed Central

    Sheline, Christian T.; Shi, Chunxiao; Takata, Toshihiro; Zhu, Julia; Zhang, Wenlan; Sheline, P. Joshua; Cai, Ai-Li; Li, Li

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic zinc (Zn2+) concentrations are linked to diabetes and pancreatic dysfunction, but Zn2+ is also required for insulin processing and packaging. Zn2+ released with insulin increases β-cell pancreatic death after streptozotocin toxin exposure in vitro and in vivo. Triosephosphate accumulation, caused by NAD+ loss and glycolytic enzyme dysfunction, occur in type-1 diabetics (T1DM) and animal models. We previously showed these mechanisms are also involved in Zn2+ neurotoxicity and are attenuated by nicotinamide- or pyruvate-induced restoration of NAD+ concentrations, Zn2+ restriction, or inhibition of Sir2 proteins. We tested the hypothesis that similar Zn2+- and NAD+-mediated mechanisms are involved in β-cell toxicity in models of ongoing T1DM using mouse insulinoma cells, islets, and nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice. Zn2+, streptozotocin, and cytokines caused NAD+ loss and death in insulinoma cells and islets, which were attenuated by Zn2+ restriction, pyruvate, nicotinamide, NAD+, and inhibitors of Sir2 proteins. We measured diabetes incidence and mortality in NOD mice and demonstrated that pyruvate supplementation, or genetic or dietary Zn2+ reduction, attenuated these measures. T-lymphocyte infiltration, punctate Zn2+ staining, and β-cell loss increased with time in islets of NOD mice. Dietary Zn2+ restriction or Zn2+ transporter 5 knockout reduced pancreatic Zn2+ staining and increased β-cell mass, glucose homeostasis, and survival in NOD mice, whereas Zn2+ supplementation had the opposite effects. Pancreatic Zn2+ reduction or NAD+ restoration (pyruvate or nicotinamide supplementation) are suggested as novel targets for attenuating T1DM. PMID:23096014

  1. Depletion of Mouse Cells from Human Tumor Xenografts Significantly Improves Downstream Analysis of Target Cells.

    PubMed

    Agorku, David J; Tomiuk, Stefan; Klingner, Kerstin; Wild, Stefan; Rüberg, Silvia; Zatrieb, Lisa; Bosio, Andreas; Schueler, Julia; Hardt, Olaf

    2016-01-01

    The use of in vitro cell line models for cancer research has been a useful tool. However, it has been shown that these models fail to reliably mimic patient tumors in different assays(1). Human tumor xenografts represent the gold standard with respect to tumor biology, drug discovery, and metastasis research (2-4). Tumor xenografts can be derived from different types of material like tumor cell lines, tumor tissue from primary patient tumors(4) or serially transplanted tumors. When propagated in vivo, xenografted tissue is infiltrated and vascularized by cells of mouse origin. Multiple factors such as the tumor entity, the origin of xenografted material, growth rate and region of transplantation influence the composition and the amount of mouse cells present in tumor xenografts. However, even when these factors are kept constant, the degree of mouse cell contamination is highly variable. Contaminating mouse cells significantly impair downstream analyses of human tumor xenografts. As mouse fibroblasts show high plating efficacies and proliferation rates, they tend to overgrow cultures of human tumor cells, especially slowly proliferating subpopulations. Mouse cell derived DNA, mRNA, and protein components can bias downstream gene expression analysis, next-generation sequencing, as well as proteome analysis (5). To overcome these limitations, we have developed a fast and easy method to isolate untouched human tumor cells from xenografted tumor tissue. This procedure is based on the comprehensive depletion of cells of mouse origin by combining automated tissue dissociation with the benchtop tissue dissociator and magnetic cell sorting. Here, we demonstrate that human target cells can be can be obtained with purities higher than 96% within less than 20 min independent of the tumor type. PMID:27501218

  2. Overexpression of Reg3alpha increases cell growth and the levels of cyclin D1 and CDK4 in insulinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Cui, Wei; De Jesus, Kristine; Zhao, Hong; Takasawa, Shin; Shi, Bingyin; Srikant, Coimbatore B; Liu, Jun-Li

    2009-06-01

    Regenerating gene (Reg) family protein Reg3alpha is normally expressed in pancreatic acinar and endocrine cells. In order to explore its effect on islet beta-cell replication, insulinoma MIN6 cells were stably transfected with murine Reg3alpha cDNA. Determined using real-time PCR and Western blots, the levels of Reg3alpha mRNA and protein in Reg3alpha-transfected clones were increased 10- and 6-fold, respectively. Western blots also revealed that the protein was released into the culture medium, consistent with an endocrine effect. In MTT cell proliferation assay, Reg3alpha-overexpressing cells exhibited a 2-fold increase in the rate of cell growth. In order to investigate the intracellular mechanism, we studied cell cycle regulatory proteins. In Reg3alpha-expressing cells, we detected 2.2- and 2.5-fold increased levels of cyclin D1 and CDK4, respectively, which paralleled a 1.8-fold increase in the rate of Akt phosphorylation. It is established that beta-cell replication is associated with increased cyclin D1 and CDK4 levels; deficiency in CDK4 or cyclin D2 results in reduced beta-cell mass and diabetes. Our results suggest that Reg3alpha stimulates beta-cell replication, by activating Akt kinase and increasing the levels of cyclin D1/CDK4.

  3. Insulinoma Causing Prolonged Hypoglycaemic Coma.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Prabhat; Chauhan, Ajay; Dixit, Juhi; Jyotsana; Gupta, Harish

    2016-08-01

    Insulinoma is a rare pancreatic endocrine tumour with an incidence of four cases per million per year. A recurrent episode of fasting hypoglycaemia is the most common manifestation of these tumours. Diagnosis is often delayed due to varied presentation but once diagnosed, prognosis is often good after surgical resection of the lesion. Severe hypoglycaemia in insulinoma causing coma and death is rare. We report a case of hypoglycaemic coma secondary to an insulinoma in an elderly man which proved fatal. PMID:27656487

  4. Germ cell transplantation and testis tissue xenografting in mice.

    PubMed

    Tang, Lin; Rodriguez-Sosa, Jose Rafael; Dobrinski, Ina

    2012-01-01

    recipient somatic cell compartment with the germ cells from phylogenetically distant species(12). An alternative approach is transplantation of germ cells from large species together with their surrounding somatic compartment. We first reported in 2002, that small fragments of testis tissue from immature males transplanted under the dorsal skin of immunodeficient mice are able to survive and undergo full development with the production of fertilization competent sperm(13). Since then testis tissue xenografting has been shown to be successful in many species and emerged as a valuable alternative to study testis development and spermatogenesis of large animals in mice(14). PMID:22330955

  5. Visualization of the specific interaction of sulfonylurea-incorporated polymer with insulinoma cell line MIN6.

    PubMed

    Park, Keun-Hong; Akaike, Toshihiro

    2004-02-01

    A derivative of sulfonylurea (SU) that mimics glibenclamide in chemical structure was synthesized and incorporated into a water-soluble polymeric backbone as a biospecific polymer for stimulating insulin secretion. In this study, a backbone polymer fluorescence-labeled with rodamine-B isothiocyanate was found to be strongly adsorbed onto MIN6 cells, probably due to its specific interaction mediated by SU receptors on the cell membrane. The intensity of fluorescence on the cells was significantly increased by increasing the incubation time and polymer concentration. To verify the specific interaction between the SU (K(+) channel closer)-incorporated copolymer and MIN6 cells, the cells were pretreated with diazoxide, an agonist of the ATP-sensitive K(+) channel (K(+) channel opener), before adding the polymer to the cell culture medium. This treatment suppressed the interaction between SU and MIN6 cells. A confocal laser microscopic study confirmed this effect. The results of this study provide evidence that SU-incorporated copolymer stimulates insulin secretion through the specific interactions of SU moieties in the polymer with MIN6 cells.

  6. Hyperthermic radiosensitization of cells from a human melanoma xenograft

    SciTech Connect

    Rofstad, E.K.; Brustad, T.

    1984-07-01

    Cells derived directly from a human melanoma xenograft were exposed to radiation and/or hyperthermia under aerobic conditions in vitro. Single cell survival was assayed in soft agar. The activation energies for heat treatment alone were 420 +/- 40 kcal/mole (41.5-42.5/sup 0/C) and 170 +/- 10 kcal/mole (43.0-45.5/sup 0/C). Heat doses of 41.5/sup 0/C (30 min) or 43.5/sup 0/C (30 min) did not cause a reduction in the shoulder of the X-ray survival curve of the cells, but the D/sub 0/ value was reduced. The thermal enhancement ratios (the ratio of the D/sub 0/ values) were in the ranges 1.0-1.3 (41.5/sup 0/C, 30 min) and 1.1-1.7 (43.5/sup 0/C, 30 min), depending on the sequence and the time between the treatments. Repair of sublethal radiation damage was not significantly inhibited when treatments with 41.5/sup 0/C (30 min) or 43.5/sup 0/C (30 min) preceded irradiation, but was inhibited when 44.5/sup 0/C (30 min) was given immediately before radiation and when 4l.5/sup 0/C (120 min) was given immediately after radiation. Implications of the results for clinical treatment of malignant melanomas are discussed.

  7. Derivation of sperm from xenografted testis cells and tissues of the peccary (Tayassu tajacu).

    PubMed

    Campos-Junior, Paulo Henrique Almeida; Costa, Guilherme Mattos Jardim; Avelar, Gleide Fernandes; Lacerda, Samyra Maria Santos Nassif; da Costa, Nathália Nogueira; Ohashi, Otávio Mitio; Miranda, Moysés dos Santos; Barcelos, Lucíola Silva; Jorge, Erika Cristina; Guimarães, Diva Anelie; de França, Luiz Renato

    2014-03-01

    Because the collared peccary (Tayassu tajacu) has a peculiar Leydig cell cytoarchitecture, this species represents a unique mammalian model for investigating testis function. Taking advantage of the well-established and very useful testis xenograft technique, in the present study, testis tissue and testis cell suspensions from immature collared peccaries (n=4; 3 months old) were xenografted in SCID mice (n=48) and evaluated at 2, 4, 6, and 8 months after grafting. Complete spermatogenesis was observed at 6 and 8 months after testis tissue xenografting. However, probably due to de novo testis morphogenesis and low androgen secretion, functionally evaluated by the seminal vesicle weight, a delay in spermatogenesis progression was observed in the testis cell suspension xenografts, with the production of fertile sperm only at 8 months after grafting. Importantly, demonstrating that the peculiar testicular cytoarchitecture of the collared peccary is intrinsically programmed, the unique Leydig cell arrangement observed in this species was re-established after de novo testis morphogenesis. The sperm collected from the xenografts resulted in diploid embryos that expressed the paternally imprinted gene NNAT after ICSI. The present study is the first to demonstrate complete spermatogenesis with the production of fertile sperm from testis cell suspension xenografts in a wild mammalian species. Therefore, due to its unique testicular cytoarchitecture, xenograft techniques, particularly testis cell suspensions, may represent a new and very promising approach to evaluate testis morphogenesis and to investigate spermatogonial stem cell physiology and niche in the collared peccary.

  8. Inhibition of palmitate-induced GADD34 expression augments apoptosis in mouse insulinoma cells (MIN6).

    PubMed

    Fransson, Liselotte; Sjöholm, Ake; Ortsäter, Henrik

    2014-07-01

    Saturated fatty acids like palmitate induce endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in pancreatic beta-cells, an event linked to apoptotic loss of β-cells in type 2 diabetes. Sustained activation of the ER stress response leads to expression of growth arrest and DNA damage-inducible protein 34 (GADD34), a regulatory subunit of protein phosphatase 1. In the present study, we have used small interfering RNA in order to knockdown GADD34 expression in insulin-producing MIN6 cells prior to induction of ER stress by palmitate and evaluated its consequences on RNA-activated protein kinase-like ER-localized eIF2alpha kinase (PERK) signalling and apoptosis. Salubrinal, a specific inhibitor of eukaryotic initiation factor 2α (eIF2α) dephosphorylation, was used as a comparison. Salubrinal treatment augmented palmitate-induced ER stress and increased GADD34 levels. Both GADD34 knockdown and salubrinal treatment potentiated the cytotoxic effects of palmitate as evidenced by increased DNA fragmentation and activation of caspase 3, with the fundamental difference that the former did not involve enhanced levels of GADD34. The data from this study suggest that sustained activation of PERK signalling and eIF2α phosphorylation sensitizes insulin-producing MIN6 cells to lipoapoptosis independently of GADD34 expression levels. PMID:24633916

  9. Evolutionary conservation of the insulinoma gene rig and its possible function

    SciTech Connect

    Inoue, C.; Shiga, K.; Takasawa, S.; Kitagawa, M.; Yamamoto, H.; Okamoto, H.

    1987-10-01

    The authors have identified a gene, rig (rat insulinoma gene), that is activated in chemically induced rat insulinomas but not in normal pancreatic islets or in regenerating islets. In the present study, they have found that the insulinoma gene was activated in a BK virus-induced hamster insulinoma cell line and in a spontaneously occurring human insulinoma. From the hamster and human insulinoma cDNA libraries, rig homologues were isolated, and their nucleotide sequences were determined. In the same manner as the rat gene, both hamster and human homologues contained one open reading frame of 435 nucleotides, differing by 32- and 41-base substitutions, respectively. All the base substitutions were same-sense mutations. Accordingly, the deduced 145-amino acid sequence remained invariant in hamster, human, and rat insulinomas, suggesting that rig has evolved under extraordinarily strong selective constraints. Computerized structure analysis indicated that rig-encoded protein is a possible DNA-binding protein. The antisense oligodeoxyribonucleotide complementary to hamster rig mRNA was synthesized and injected into the hamster insulinoma cells. The antisense rig oligodeoxyribouncleotide inhibited DNA synthesis in the insulinoma cells, whereas the sense rig oligodeoxyribonucleotide or antisense insulin oligodeoxyribonucleotide had no inhibitory effect. These results strongly suggest that the activation of rig is both common and potentially significant in the oncogenic growth of pancreatic B cells of islets of Langerhans.

  10. Drug testing using a soft agar stem cell assay on patient and xenograft tumor material

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, J.; Coombs, A.; Moore, J.L.

    1984-09-01

    Since 1981 the authors have received 50 tumor samples from 10 different sites; over half were breast or ovary. Of the 27 that were considered suitable for cloning, 11 produced colony formation and 6 of these were drug tested. One ovarian granulosa cell tumor and its xenograft (V7) were tested against several cytotoxic agents. During a period of 16 months, sensitivity to cisplatin was relatively stable but sensitivity to vinblastine was markedly changed when the original tumor cells and original cells stored in liquid nitrogen were compared with xenograft cells. Gross histology of original tumor and xenograft were similar. Chemosensitization in vivo of a breast xenograft (Hx99) to melphalan by misonidazole was investigated. Misonidazole at a total dose of 0.5 g/kg given prior to melphalan (14 mg/kg) was an effective chemosensitizer.

  11. Hypoxia-regulated gene expression explains differences between melanoma cell line-derived xenografts and patient-derived xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Bhadury, Joydeep; Einarsdottir, Berglind O.; Podraza, Agnieszka; Bagge, Roger Olofsson; Stierner, Ulrika; Ny, Lars; López, Marcela Dávila; Nilsson, Jonas A.

    2016-01-01

    Cell line-derived xenografts (CDXs) are an integral part of drug efficacy testing during development of new pharmaceuticals against cancer but their accuracy in predicting clinical responses in patients have been debated. Patient-derived xenografts (PDXs) are thought to be more useful for predictive biomarker identification for targeted therapies, including in metastatic melanoma, due to their similarities to human disease. Here, tumor biopsies from fifteen patients and ten widely-used melanoma cell lines were transplanted into immunocompromised mice to generate PDXs and CDXs, respectively. Gene expression profiles generated from the tumors of these PDXs and CDXs clustered into distinct groups, despite similar mutational signatures. Hypoxia-induced gene signatures and overexpression of the hypoxia-regulated miRNA hsa-miR-210 characterized CDXs. Inhibition of hsa-miR-210 with decoys had little phenotypic effect in vitro but reduced sensitivity to MEK1/2 inhibition in vivo, suggesting down-regulation of this miRNA could result in development of resistance to MEK inhibitors. PMID:27009863

  12. Coffee inhibits nuclear factor-kappa B in prostate cancer cells and xenografts.

    PubMed

    Kolberg, Marit; Pedersen, Sigrid; Mitake, Maiko; Holm, Kristine Lillebø; Bøhn, Siv Kjølsrud; Blomhoff, Heidi Kiil; Carlsen, Harald; Blomhoff, Rune; Paur, Ingvild

    2016-01-01

    Chronic inflammation contributes to prostate cancer and the transcription factor Nuclear Factor-kappa B (NF-κB) is constitutively active in most such cancers. We examine the effects of coffee on NF-κB and on the regulation of selected genes in human-derived prostate cancer cells (PC3) and in PC3 xenografts in athymic nude mice. PC3 cells stably transduced with an NF-κB-luciferase reporter were used both in vitro and for xenografts. NF-κB activity was measured by reporter assays, DNA binding and in vivo imaging. Gene expression was measured in PC3 cells, xenografts and tumor microenvironment by low-density arrays. Western blotting of activated caspases was used to quantify apoptosis. Coffee inhibited TNFα-induced NF-κB activity and DNA-binding in PC3 cells. Furthermore, coffee increased apoptosis and modulated expression of a number of inflammation- and cancer-related genes in TNFα-treated PC3 cells. In vivo imaging revealed a 31% lower NF-κB-luciferase activation in the xenografts of the mice receiving 5% coffee compared to control mice. Interestingly, we observed major changes in gene expression in the PC3 cells in xenografts as compared to PC3 cells in vitro. In PC3 xenografts, genes related to inflammation, apoptosis and cytoprotection were down-regulated in mice receiving coffee, and coffee also affected the gene expression in the xenograft microenvironment. Our data demonstrate that coffee inhibits NF-κB activity in PC3 cells in vitro and in xenografts. Furthermore, coffee modulates transcription of genes related to prostate cancer and inflammation. Our results are the first to suggest mechanistic links between coffee consumption and prostate cancer in an experimental mouse model.

  13. Coffee inhibits nuclear factor-kappa B in prostate cancer cells and xenografts.

    PubMed

    Kolberg, Marit; Pedersen, Sigrid; Mitake, Maiko; Holm, Kristine Lillebø; Bøhn, Siv Kjølsrud; Blomhoff, Heidi Kiil; Carlsen, Harald; Blomhoff, Rune; Paur, Ingvild

    2016-01-01

    Chronic inflammation contributes to prostate cancer and the transcription factor Nuclear Factor-kappa B (NF-κB) is constitutively active in most such cancers. We examine the effects of coffee on NF-κB and on the regulation of selected genes in human-derived prostate cancer cells (PC3) and in PC3 xenografts in athymic nude mice. PC3 cells stably transduced with an NF-κB-luciferase reporter were used both in vitro and for xenografts. NF-κB activity was measured by reporter assays, DNA binding and in vivo imaging. Gene expression was measured in PC3 cells, xenografts and tumor microenvironment by low-density arrays. Western blotting of activated caspases was used to quantify apoptosis. Coffee inhibited TNFα-induced NF-κB activity and DNA-binding in PC3 cells. Furthermore, coffee increased apoptosis and modulated expression of a number of inflammation- and cancer-related genes in TNFα-treated PC3 cells. In vivo imaging revealed a 31% lower NF-κB-luciferase activation in the xenografts of the mice receiving 5% coffee compared to control mice. Interestingly, we observed major changes in gene expression in the PC3 cells in xenografts as compared to PC3 cells in vitro. In PC3 xenografts, genes related to inflammation, apoptosis and cytoprotection were down-regulated in mice receiving coffee, and coffee also affected the gene expression in the xenograft microenvironment. Our data demonstrate that coffee inhibits NF-κB activity in PC3 cells in vitro and in xenografts. Furthermore, coffee modulates transcription of genes related to prostate cancer and inflammation. Our results are the first to suggest mechanistic links between coffee consumption and prostate cancer in an experimental mouse model. PMID:26419686

  14. Uptake of a fluorescent L-glucose derivative 2-NBDLG into three-dimensionally accumulating insulinoma cells in a phloretin-sensitive manner.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Ayako; Nagatomo, Katsuhiro; Ono, Koki; Yamamoto, Toshihiro; Otsuka, Yuji; Teshima, Tadashi; Yamada, Katsuya

    2016-01-01

    Of two stereoisomers of glucose, only D- and not L-glucose is abundantly found in nature, being utilized as an essential fuel by most organisms. The uptake of D-glucose into mammalian cells occurs through glucose transporters such as GLUTs, and this process has been effectively monitored by a fluorescent D-glucose derivative 2-[N-(7-Nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazol-4-yl)amino]-2-deoxy-D-glucose (2-NBDG) at the single cell level. However, since fluorescence is an arbitrary measure, we have developed a fluorescent analog of L-glucose 2-[N-(7-Nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazol-4-yl)amino]-2-deoxy-L-glucose (2-NBDLG), as a negative control substrate for more accurately identifying the stereoselectivity of the uptake. Interestingly, a small portion of mouse insulinoma cells MIN6 abundantly took up 2-NBDLG at a late culture stage (≳ 10 days in vitro, DIV) when multi-cellular spheroids exhibiting heterogeneous nuclei were formed, whereas no such uptake was detected at an early culture stage (≲ 6 DIV). The 2-NBDLG uptake was persistently observed in the presence of a GLUT inhibitor cytochalasin B. Neither D- nor L-glucose in 50 mM abolished the uptake. No significant inhibition was detected by inactivating sodium/glucose cotransporters (SGLTs) with Na(+)-free condition. To our surprise, the 2-NBDLG uptake was totally inhibited by phloretin, a broad spectrum inhibitor against transporters/channels including GLUTs and aquaporins. From these, a question might be raised if non-GLUT/non-SGLT pathways participate in the 2-NBDLG uptake into spheroid-forming MIN6 insulinoma. It might also be worthwhile investigating whether 2-NBDLG can be used as a functional probe for detecting cancer, since the nuclear heterogeneity is among critical features of malignancy. PMID:26553070

  15. Melatonin-Mediated Intracellular Insulin during 2-Deoxy-d-glucose Treatment Is Reduced through Autophagy and EDC3 Protein in Insulinoma INS-1E Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Han Sung; Han, Tae-Young

    2016-01-01

    2-DG triggers glucose deprivation without altering other nutrients or metabolic pathways and then activates autophagy via activation of AMPK and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. We investigated whether 2-DG reduced intracellular insulin increased by melatonin via autophagy/EDC3 in insulinoma INS-1E cells. p-AMPK and GRP78/BiP level were significantly increased by 2-DG in the presence/absence of melatonin, but IRE1α level was reduced in 2-DG treatment. Levels of p85α, p110, p-Akt (Ser473, Thr308), and p-mTOR (Ser2481) were also significantly reduced by 2-DG in the presence/absence of melatonin. Mn-SOD increased with 2-DG plus melatonin compared to groups treated with/without melatonin alone. Bcl-2 was decreased and Bax increased with 2-DG plus melatonin. LC3II level increased with 2-DG treatment in the presence/absence of melatonin. Intracellular insulin production increased in melatonin plus 2-DG but reduced in treatment with 2-DG with/without melatonin. EDC3 was increased by 2-DG in the presence/absence of melatonin. Rapamycin, an mTOR inhibitor, increased GRP78/BiP and EDC3 levels in a dose-dependent manner and subsequently resulted in a decrease in intracellular production of insulin. These results suggest that melatonin-mediated insulin synthesis during 2-DG treatment involves autophagy and EDC3 protein in rat insulinoma INS-1E cells and subsequently results in a decrease in intracellular production of insulin. PMID:27493704

  16. Melatonin-Mediated Intracellular Insulin during 2-Deoxy-d-glucose Treatment Is Reduced through Autophagy and EDC3 Protein in Insulinoma INS-1E Cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Han Sung; Han, Tae-Young; Yoo, Yeong-Min

    2016-01-01

    2-DG triggers glucose deprivation without altering other nutrients or metabolic pathways and then activates autophagy via activation of AMPK and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. We investigated whether 2-DG reduced intracellular insulin increased by melatonin via autophagy/EDC3 in insulinoma INS-1E cells. p-AMPK and GRP78/BiP level were significantly increased by 2-DG in the presence/absence of melatonin, but IRE1α level was reduced in 2-DG treatment. Levels of p85α, p110, p-Akt (Ser473, Thr308), and p-mTOR (Ser2481) were also significantly reduced by 2-DG in the presence/absence of melatonin. Mn-SOD increased with 2-DG plus melatonin compared to groups treated with/without melatonin alone. Bcl-2 was decreased and Bax increased with 2-DG plus melatonin. LC3II level increased with 2-DG treatment in the presence/absence of melatonin. Intracellular insulin production increased in melatonin plus 2-DG but reduced in treatment with 2-DG with/without melatonin. EDC3 was increased by 2-DG in the presence/absence of melatonin. Rapamycin, an mTOR inhibitor, increased GRP78/BiP and EDC3 levels in a dose-dependent manner and subsequently resulted in a decrease in intracellular production of insulin. These results suggest that melatonin-mediated insulin synthesis during 2-DG treatment involves autophagy and EDC3 protein in rat insulinoma INS-1E cells and subsequently results in a decrease in intracellular production of insulin. PMID:27493704

  17. Proteomic Analysis of INS-1 Rat Insulinoma Cells: ER Stress Effects and the Protective Role of Exenatide, a GLP-1 Receptor Agonist

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Mi-Kyung; Cho, Jin-Hwan; Lee, Jae-Jin; Son, Moon-Ho; Lee, Kong-Joo

    2015-01-01

    Beta cell death caused by endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is a key factor aggravating type 2 diabetes. Exenatide, a glucagon-like peptide (GLP)-1 receptor agonist, prevents beta cell death induced by thapsigargin, a selective inhibitor of ER calcium storage. Here, we report on our proteomic studies designed to elucidate the underlying mechanisms. We conducted comparative proteomic analyses of cellular protein profiles during thapsigargin-induced cell death in the absence and presence of exenatide in INS-1 rat insulinoma cells. Thapsigargin altered cellular proteins involved in metabolic processes and protein folding, whose alterations were variably modified by exenatide treatment. We categorized the proteins with thapsigargin initiated alterations into three groups: those whose alterations were 1) reversed by exenatide, 2) exaggerated by exenatide, and 3) unchanged by exenatide. The most significant effect of thapsigargin on INS-1 cells relevant to their apoptosis was the appearance of newly modified spots of heat shock proteins, thimet oligopeptidase and 14-3-3β, ε, and θ, and the prevention of their appearance by exenatide, suggesting that these proteins play major roles. We also found that various modifications in 14-3-3 isoforms, which precede their appearance and promote INS-1 cell death. This study provides insights into the mechanisms in ER stress-caused INS-1 cell death and its prevention by exenatide. PMID:25793496

  18. IFN-{gamma} sensitizes MIN6N8 insulinoma cells to TNF-{alpha}-induced apoptosis by inhibiting NF-{kappa}B-mediated XIAP upregulation

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hun Sik; Kim, Sunshin; Lee, Myung-Shik . E-mail: mslee@smc.samsung.co.kr

    2005-10-28

    Although X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP) is an important intracellular suppressor of apoptosis in a variety of cell types, its role in cytokine-induced pancreatic {beta}-cell apoptosis remains unclear. Here, we found that: (i) XIAP level was inversely correlated with tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-{alpha}-induced apoptosis in MIN6N8 insulinoma cells; (ii) adenoviral XIAP overexpression abrogated the TNF-{alpha}-induced apoptosis through inhibition of caspase activity; (iii) downregulation of XIAP by antisense oligonucleotide or Smac peptide sensitized MIN6N8 cells to TNF-{alpha}-induced apoptosis; (iv) XIAP expression was induced by TNF-{alpha} through a nuclear factor-{kappa}B (NF-{kappa}B)-dependent pathway, and interferon (IFN)-{gamma} prevented such an induction in a manner independent of NF-{kappa}B, which presents a potential mechanism underlying cytotoxic IFN-{gamma}/TNF-{alpha} synergism. Taken together, our results suggest that XIAP is an important modulator of TNF-{alpha}-induced apoptosis of MIN6N8 cells, and XIAP regulation in pancreatic {beta}-cells might play an important role in pancreatic {beta}-cell apoptosis and in the pathogenesis of type 1 diabetes.

  19. Anthocyanin Induces Apoptosis of DU-145 Cells In Vitro and Inhibits Xenograft Growth of Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ha, U-Syn; Bae, Woong Jin; Kim, Su Jin; Yoon, Byung Il; Hong, Sung Hoo; Lee, Ji Youl; Hwang, Tae-Kon; Hwang, Sung Yeoun; Wang, Zhiping

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the effects of anthocyanins extracted from black soybean, which have antioxidant activity, on apoptosis in vitro (in hormone refractory prostate cancer cells) and on tumor growth in vivo (in athymic nude mouse xenograft model). Materials and Methods The growth and viability of DU-145 cells treated with anthocyanins were assessed using the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay and apoptosis was assessed by DNA laddering. Immunoblotting was conducted to evaluate differences in the expressions of p53, Bax, Bcl, androgen receptor (AR), and prostate specific antigen (PSA). To study the inhibitory effects of anthocyanins on tumor growth in vivo, DU-145 tumor xenografts were established in athymic nude mice. The anthocyanin group was treated with daily oral anthocyanin (8 mg/kg) for 14 weeks. After 2 weeks of treatment, DU-145 cells (2×106) were inoculated subcutaneously into the right flank to establish tumor xenografts. Tumor dimensions were measured twice a week using calipers and volumes were calculated. Results Anthocyanin treatment of DU-145 cells resulted in 1) significant increase in apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner, 2) significant decrease in p53 and Bcl-2 expressions (with increased Bax expression), and 3) significant decrease in PSA and AR expressions. In the xenograft model, anthocyanin treatment significantly inhibit tumor growth. Conclusion This study suggests that anthocyanins from black soybean inhibit the progression of prostate cancer in vitro and in a xenograft model. PMID:25510742

  20. Tomato paste alters NF-κB and cancer-related mRNA expression in prostate cancer cells, xenografts, and xenograft microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Kolberg, Marit; Pedersen, Sigrid; Bastani, Nasser E; Carlsen, Harald; Blomhoff, Rune; Paur, Ingvild

    2015-01-01

    Tomatoes may protect against prostate cancer development, possibly through targeting signaling pathways such as nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB). We investigated whether tomato paste could modulate NF-κB activity and cancer-related gene expression in human derived prostate cancer cells (PC3) and PC3 xenografts. PC3-cells were stably transduced with an NF-κB-luciferase construct, and treated with tomato extracts or vehicle control. Nude mice bearing PC3 xenografts were fed a Western-like diet with or without 10% tomato paste for 6.5 wk. The tomato diet significantly inhibited TNFα stimulated NF-κB activity in cultured PC3 cells, and modulated the expression of genes associated with inflammation, apoptosis, and cancer progression. Accumulation of lycopene occurred in liver, xenografts, and serum of mice fed tomato diet. Tomato paste in the diet did not affect tumor size in mice; however, there was a trend toward inhibition of NF-κB activity in the xenografts. The effect of tomato on gene expression was most prominent in the xenograft microenvironment, where among others NFKB2, STAT3, and STAT6 showed higher expression levels after tomato treatment. Our findings support biological activity of tomatoes in cancer-related inflammation. PMID:25664890

  1. [Effects of baicalin on HL-60 cell xenografts in nude mice and its mechanism].

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jing; Hu, Jian-Da; Huang, Yi; Chen, Ying-Yu; Li, Jing; Chen, Bu-Yuan

    2012-10-01

    This study was aimed to investigate the effects of baicalin on HL-60 cell xenografts in nude mice in vivo and explore its mechanism. Xenograft tumor model of HL-60 cells in nude mice was established, which was divided randomly into 6 groups: negative control group (injection of 5% NaHCO(3)), 25, 50 and 100 mg/kg baicalin groups, combination group (50 mg/kg baicalin + 2 mg/kg VP16) and positive control group (VP16 4 mg/kg). The nude mice with HL-60 cell xenografts were treated with drugs via intraperitoneal injection daily. After treatment for 14 days average weigh and inhibitory rate of transplanted tumor stripped from 5 nude mice in each group were calculated, and the ultrastructure change of xenografts cells were tested by transmission electron microscopy. Histopathologic examination was used to observed the change of main organs in nude mice. The expression of signaling molecular PI3K/Akt proteins extracted from xenografts was detected by Western blot. The effects of baicalin on overall survival time in nude mice with HL-60 cell xenografts were evaluated. The results showed that baicalin could inhibit the growth of transplanted tumors in dose-dependent manner. There were more necrotic and apoptotic cells in mice of baicalin-treated groups and combination group than that in mice of negative control group. Baicalin could inhibit the proliferation of HL-60 cells in vivo by down-regulating the PI3K/Akt/mTOR signal pathway, where the expressions of p-Akt, mTOR and p-mTOR proteins decreased compared with negative control group, and no significant difference of Akt expression was found between different groups. Compared with negative control group, the median survival time of mice in combination group was more prolongated (P < 0.05). It is concluded that baicalin can inhibit growth and induce apoptosis of HL-60 cell xenografts in nude mice, and prolong median survival time of nude mice. The possible mechanisms may be related to inhibition of Akt activity and down

  2. Germ cell differentiation in cryopreserved, immature, Indian spotted mouse deer (Moschiola indica) testes xenografted onto mice.

    PubMed

    Pothana, Lavanya; Makala, Himesh; Devi, Lalitha; Varma, Vivek Phani; Goel, Sandeep

    2015-03-01

    Death of immature animals is one of the reasons for the loss of genetic diversity of rare and endangered species. Because sperm cannot be collected from immature males, cryobanking of testicular tissue combined with testis xenografting is a potential option for conservation. The objective of this study was to evaluate the establishment of spermatogenesis in cryopreserved immature testicular tissues from Indian spotted mouse deer (Moschiola indica) after ectopic xenografting onto immunodeficient nude mice. Results showed that testis tissues that were frozen in cryomedia containing either 10% DMSO with 80% fetal bovine serum (D10S80) or 20% DMSO with 20% fetal bovine serum (D20S20) had significantly more (P < 0.01) terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeled positive interstitial cells when compared with fresh testis tissues (46.3 ± 3.4 and 51.9 ± 4.0 vs. 22.8 ± 2.0). Xenografted testicular tissues showed degenerated seminiferous tubules 24 weeks after grafting in testes that had been cryopreserved in D20S20; alternatively, pachytene spermatocytes were the most advanced germ cells in testes that were cryopreserved in D10S80. Proliferating cell nuclear antigen staining confirmed the proliferative status of spermatocytes, and the increases in tubular and lumen diameters indicated testicular maturation in xenografts. However, persistent anti-Müllerian hormone staining in Sertoli cells of xenografts revealed incomplete testicular maturation. This study reports that cryopreserved testis tissue that had been xenografted from endangered animals onto mice resulted in the establishment of spermatogenesis with initiation of meiosis. These findings are encouraging for cryobanking of testicular tissues from immature endangered animals to conserve their germplasm. PMID:25467768

  3. Mesenchymal stem cell-based NK4 gene therapy in nude mice bearing gastric cancer xenografts.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yin; Cheng, Ming; Yang, Zhen; Zeng, Chun-Yan; Chen, Jiang; Xie, Yong; Luo, Shi-Wen; Zhang, Kun-He; Zhou, Shu-Feng; Lu, Nong-Hua

    2014-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been recognized as promising delivery vehicles for gene therapy of tumors. Gastric cancer is the third leading cause of worldwide cancer mortality, and novel treatment modalities are urgently needed. NK4 is an antagonist of hepatocyte growth factor receptors (Met) which are often aberrantly activated in gastric cancer and thus represent a useful candidate for targeted therapies. This study investigated MSC-delivered NK4 gene therapy in nude mice bearing gastric cancer xenografts. MSCs were transduced with lentiviral vectors carrying NK4 complementary DNA or enhanced green fluorescent protein (GFP). Such transduction did not change the phenotype of MSCs. Gastric cancer xenografts were established in BALB/C nude mice, and the mice were treated with phosphate-buffered saline (PBS), MSCs-GFP, Lenti-NK4, or MSCs-NK4. The tropism of MSCs toward gastric cancer cells was determined by an in vitro migration assay using MKN45 cells, GES-1 cells and human fibroblasts and their presence in tumor xenografts. Tumor growth, tumor cell apoptosis and intratumoral microvessel density of tumor tissue were measured in nude mice bearing gastric cancer xenografts treated with PBS, MSCs-GFP, Lenti-NK4, or MSCs-NK4 via tail vein injection. The results showed that MSCs migrated preferably to gastric cancer cells in vitro. Systemic MSCs-NK4 injection significantly suppressed the growth of gastric cancer xenografts. MSCs-NK4 migrated and accumulated in tumor tissues after systemic injection. The microvessel density of tumor xenografts was decreased, and tumor cellular apoptosis was significantly induced in the mice treated with MSCs-NK4 compared to control mice. These findings demonstrate that MSC-based NK4 gene therapy can obviously inhibit the growth of gastric cancer xenografts, and MSCs are a better vehicle for NK4 gene therapy than lentiviral vectors. Further studies are warranted to explore the efficacy and safety of the MSC-based NK4 gene therapy in

  4. Mesenchymal stem cell-based NK4 gene therapy in nude mice bearing gastric cancer xenografts.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yin; Cheng, Ming; Yang, Zhen; Zeng, Chun-Yan; Chen, Jiang; Xie, Yong; Luo, Shi-Wen; Zhang, Kun-He; Zhou, Shu-Feng; Lu, Nong-Hua

    2014-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been recognized as promising delivery vehicles for gene therapy of tumors. Gastric cancer is the third leading cause of worldwide cancer mortality, and novel treatment modalities are urgently needed. NK4 is an antagonist of hepatocyte growth factor receptors (Met) which are often aberrantly activated in gastric cancer and thus represent a useful candidate for targeted therapies. This study investigated MSC-delivered NK4 gene therapy in nude mice bearing gastric cancer xenografts. MSCs were transduced with lentiviral vectors carrying NK4 complementary DNA or enhanced green fluorescent protein (GFP). Such transduction did not change the phenotype of MSCs. Gastric cancer xenografts were established in BALB/C nude mice, and the mice were treated with phosphate-buffered saline (PBS), MSCs-GFP, Lenti-NK4, or MSCs-NK4. The tropism of MSCs toward gastric cancer cells was determined by an in vitro migration assay using MKN45 cells, GES-1 cells and human fibroblasts and their presence in tumor xenografts. Tumor growth, tumor cell apoptosis and intratumoral microvessel density of tumor tissue were measured in nude mice bearing gastric cancer xenografts treated with PBS, MSCs-GFP, Lenti-NK4, or MSCs-NK4 via tail vein injection. The results showed that MSCs migrated preferably to gastric cancer cells in vitro. Systemic MSCs-NK4 injection significantly suppressed the growth of gastric cancer xenografts. MSCs-NK4 migrated and accumulated in tumor tissues after systemic injection. The microvessel density of tumor xenografts was decreased, and tumor cellular apoptosis was significantly induced in the mice treated with MSCs-NK4 compared to control mice. These findings demonstrate that MSC-based NK4 gene therapy can obviously inhibit the growth of gastric cancer xenografts, and MSCs are a better vehicle for NK4 gene therapy than lentiviral vectors. Further studies are warranted to explore the efficacy and safety of the MSC-based NK4 gene therapy in

  5. Biological Analysis of Human CML Stem Cells; Xenograft Model of Chronic Phase Human Chronic Myeloid Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Sheela A

    2016-01-01

    Xenograft mouse models have been instrumental in expanding our knowledge of hematopoiesis and can provide a functional description of stem cells that possess engrafting potential. Here we describe methodology outlining one way of analyzing human malignant cells that are able to engraft immune compromised mice. Using models such as these will allow researchers to gain valuable insight into the primitive leukemic subtypes that evade current therapy regimes and are critical to understand, in order to eradicate malignancy. PMID:27581148

  6. Human Insulinomas Show Distinct Patterns of Insulin Secretion In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Henquin, Jean-Claude; Nenquin, Myriam; Guiot, Yves; Rahier, Jacques; Sempoux, Christine

    2015-10-01

    Insulinomas are β-cell tumors that cause hypoglycemia through inappropriate secretion of insulin. Characterization of the in vitro dynamics of insulin secretion by perifused fragments of 10 human insulinomas permitted their subdivision into three functional groups with similar insulin content. Group A (four patients with fasting and/or postprandial hypoglycemic episodes) showed qualitatively normal responses to glucose, leucine, diazoxide, tolbutamide, and extracellular CaCl2 omission or excess. The effect of glucose was concentration dependent, but, compared with normal islets, insulin secretion was excessive in both low- and high-glucose conditions. Group B (three patients with fasting hypoglycemic episodes) was mainly characterized by large insulin responses to 1 mmol/L glucose, resulting in very high basal secretion rates that were inhibited by diazoxide and restored by tolbutamide but were not further augmented by other agents except for high levels of CaCl2. Group C (three patients with fasting hypoglycemic episodes) displayed very low rates of insulin secretion and virtually no response to stimuli (including high CaCl2 concentration) and inhibitors (CaCl2 omission being paradoxically stimulatory). In group B, the presence of low-Km hexokinase-I in insulinoma β-cells (not in adjacent islets) was revealed by immunohistochemistry. Human insulinomas thus show distinct, though not completely heterogeneous, defects in insulin secretion that are attributed to the undue expression of hexokinase-I in 3 of 10 patients. PMID:26116696

  7. Antitumoral effects of vasoactive intestinal peptide in human renal cell carcinoma xenografts in athymic nude mice.

    PubMed

    Vacas, Eva; Arenas, M Isabel; Muñoz-Moreno, Laura; Bajo, Ana M; Sánchez-Chapado, Manuel; Prieto, Juan C; Carmena, María J

    2013-08-01

    We studied antitumor effect of VIP in human renal cell carcinoma (RCC) (A498 cells xenografted in immunosuppressed mice). VIP-treated cells gave resulted in p53 upregulation and decreased nuclear β-catenin translocation and NFκB expression, MMP-2 and MMP-9 activities, VEGF levels and CD-34 expression. VIP led to a more differentiated tubular organization in tumours and less metastatic areas. Thus, VIP inhibits growth of A498-cell tumours acting on the major issues involved in RCC progression such as cell proliferation, microenvironment remodelling, tumour invasion, angiogenesis and metastatic ability. These antitumoral effects of VIP offer new therapeutical possibilities in RCC treatment.

  8. Melatonin-mediated insulin synthesis during endoplasmic reticulum stress involves HuD expression in rat insulinoma INS-1E cells.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Yeong-Min

    2013-09-01

    In this study, we investigated how melatonin mediates insulin synthesis through endoplasmic reticulum (ER) via HuD expression in rat insulinoma INS-1E cells. Under ER stress condition (thapsigargin with/without melatonin, tunicamycin with/without melatonin), phosphorylation of AMP-activated protein kinase (p-AMPK) was significantly increased when compared with only with/without melatonin (control/melatonin). Insulin receptor substrate (IRS) two protein was significantly reduced under conditions of ER stress when compared with control/melatonin, but no expression of IRS1 protein was observed. In thapsigargin treatment, melatonin (10, 50 μm) increased IRS2 protein expression in a dose-dependent manner. p-Akt (Ser473) expression significantly decreased under ER stress condition prior to control/melatonin. Melatonin (10, 50 μm) significantly reduced nuclear and cellular p85α expressions in a dose-dependent manner when compared with only thapsigargin or tunicamycin. These results indicate the activation of the aforementioned expressions under regulation of the pathway, AMPK → IRS2 → Akt/PKB → PI3K (p85α). However, mammalian target of rapamycin and raptor protein, mTORC1, was found to be independent of the ER stress response. In thapsigargin treatment, melatonin increased nuclear mammalian RNA-binding protein (HuD) expression and reduced cellular HuD expression and subsequently resulted in a decrease in cellular insulin level and rise in insulin secretion in a dose-dependent manner. In tunicamycin treatment, HuD and insulin proteins showed similar expression tendencies. These results indicate that ER stress/melatonin, especially thapsigargin/melatonin, increased nuclear HuD expression and subsequently resulted in a decrease in intracellular biosynthesis; it is hypothesized that extracellular secretion of insulin may be regulated by melatonin.

  9. Scaffold Architecture Controls Insulinoma Clustering, Viability, and Insulin Production

    PubMed Central

    Blackstone, Britani N.; Palmer, Andre F.; Rilo, Horacio R.

    2014-01-01

    Recently, in vitro diagnostic tools have shifted focus toward personalized medicine by incorporating patient cells into traditional test beds. These cell-based platforms commonly utilize two-dimensional substrates that lack the ability to support three-dimensional cell structures seen in vivo. As monolayer cell cultures have previously been shown to function differently than cells in vivo, the results of such in vitro tests may not accurately reflect cell response in vivo. It is therefore of interest to determine the relationships between substrate architecture, cell structure, and cell function in 3D cell-based platforms. To investigate the effect of substrate architecture on insulinoma organization and function, insulinomas were seeded onto 2D gelatin substrates and 3D fibrous gelatin scaffolds with three distinct fiber diameters and fiber densities. Cell viability and clustering was assessed at culture days 3, 5, and 7 with baseline insulin secretion and glucose-stimulated insulin production measured at day 7. Small, closely spaced gelatin fibers promoted the formation of large, rounded insulinoma clusters, whereas monolayer organization and large fibers prevented cell clustering and reduced glucose-stimulated insulin production. Taken together, these data show that scaffold properties can be used to control the organization and function of insulin-producing cells and may be useful as a 3D test bed for diabetes drug development. PMID:24410263

  10. Raman spectroscopy identifies radiation response in human non-small cell lung cancer xenografts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harder, Samantha J.; Isabelle, Martin; Devorkin, Lindsay; Smazynski, Julian; Beckham, Wayne; Brolo, Alexandre G.; Lum, Julian J.; Jirasek, Andrew

    2016-02-01

    External beam radiation therapy is a standard form of treatment for numerous cancers. Despite this, there are no approved methods to account for patient specific radiation sensitivity. In this report, Raman spectroscopy (RS) was used to identify radiation-induced biochemical changes in human non-small cell lung cancer xenografts. Chemometric analysis revealed unique radiation-related Raman signatures that were specific to nucleic acid, lipid, protein and carbohydrate spectral features. Among these changes was a dramatic shift in the accumulation of glycogen spectral bands for doses of 5 or 15 Gy when compared to unirradiated tumours. When spatial mapping was applied in this analysis there was considerable variability as we found substantial intra- and inter-tumour heterogeneity in the distribution of glycogen and other RS spectral features. Collectively, these data provide unique insight into the biochemical response of tumours, irradiated in vivo, and demonstrate the utility of RS for detecting distinct radiobiological responses in human tumour xenografts.

  11. Dosimetry and pharmacokinetics of monoclonal antibody A6H with human renal cell carcinoma xenografts: single dose study.

    PubMed

    Palme, D F; Berkopec, J M; Wessels, B W; Elson, M K; Lange, P H; Vessella, R L

    1991-01-01

    Implantable miniature thermoluminescent dosimeters and conventional biodistribution analysis were used to determine the locally absorbed radiation dose delivered to three morphologically distinct human renal cell carcinoma xenografts (TK-39, TK-82 and TK-177C; N = 87) following a 50 microCi infusion of 131iodine-labeled monoclonal antibody A6H. Xenografts were clearly detected by radioimmuno-scintigraphy. Pronounced differences were noted among the three xenografts in MAb pharmacokinetics and in the locally absorbed irradiation doses which ranged from 2 to 5 cGy per injected microCi of 131iodine-labelled A6H. PMID:1917523

  12. Famitinib exerted powerful antitumor activity in human gastric cancer cells and xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Sai; Zhang, Qiyue; He, Qiong; Zou, Jianling; Liu, Xijuan; Li, Na; Tian, Tiantian; Zhu, Yan; Gao, Jing; Shen, Lin

    2016-01-01

    Famitinib (SHR1020), a novel multi-targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitor, has antitumor activity against several solid tumors via targeting vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2, c-Kit and platelet-derived growth factor receptor β. The present study investigated famitinib's activity against human gastric cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. Cell viability and apoptosis were measured, and cell cycle analysis was performed following famitinib treatment using 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol −2-yl)-5-(3-carboxymethoxyphenyl)-2-(4-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium assay, flow cytometry, terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling assay and western blotting. Subsequently, cluster of differentiation 34 staining was used to evaluate microvessel density. BGC-823-derived xenografts in nude mice were established to assess drug efficacy in vivo. Famitinib inhibited cell proliferation by inducing cell cycle arrest at the G2/M phase and caused cell apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner in gastric cancer cell lines. In BGC-823 xenograft models, famitinib significantly slowed tumor growth in vivo via inhibition of angiogenesis. Compared with other chemotherapeutics such as 5-fluorouracil, cisplatin or paclitaxel alone, famitinib exhibited the greatest tumor suppression effect (>85% inhibition). The present study demonstrated for the first time that famitinib has efficacy against human gastric cancer in vitro and in vivo, which may lay the foundations for future clinical trials.

  13. Famitinib exerted powerful antitumor activity in human gastric cancer cells and xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Sai; Zhang, Qiyue; He, Qiong; Zou, Jianling; Liu, Xijuan; Li, Na; Tian, Tiantian; Zhu, Yan; Gao, Jing; Shen, Lin

    2016-01-01

    Famitinib (SHR1020), a novel multi-targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitor, has antitumor activity against several solid tumors via targeting vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2, c-Kit and platelet-derived growth factor receptor β. The present study investigated famitinib's activity against human gastric cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. Cell viability and apoptosis were measured, and cell cycle analysis was performed following famitinib treatment using 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol −2-yl)-5-(3-carboxymethoxyphenyl)-2-(4-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium assay, flow cytometry, terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling assay and western blotting. Subsequently, cluster of differentiation 34 staining was used to evaluate microvessel density. BGC-823-derived xenografts in nude mice were established to assess drug efficacy in vivo. Famitinib inhibited cell proliferation by inducing cell cycle arrest at the G2/M phase and caused cell apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner in gastric cancer cell lines. In BGC-823 xenograft models, famitinib significantly slowed tumor growth in vivo via inhibition of angiogenesis. Compared with other chemotherapeutics such as 5-fluorouracil, cisplatin or paclitaxel alone, famitinib exhibited the greatest tumor suppression effect (>85% inhibition). The present study demonstrated for the first time that famitinib has efficacy against human gastric cancer in vitro and in vivo, which may lay the foundations for future clinical trials. PMID:27602110

  14. Response of human pancreatic cancer cell xenografts to tetraiodothyroacetic acid nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Yalcin, Murat; Lin, Hung-Yun; Sudha, Thangirala; Bharali, Dhruba J; Meng, Ran; Tang, Heng-Yuan; Davis, Faith B; Stain, Steven C; Davis, Paul J; Mousa, Shaker A

    2013-06-01

    Tetraiodothyroacetic acid (tetrac) and its nanoparticle formulation (Tetrac NP) act at an integrin cell surface receptor to inhibit tumor cell proliferation and tumor-related angiogenesis. Human pancreatic cancer cell (PANC-1 and MPanc96) xenografts were established in nude mice, and the effects of tetrac versus Tetrac NP on tumor growth and tumor angiogenesis were determined. The in vitro effects of tetrac and Tetrac NP were also determined by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction or immunoblot on gene expression or gene products relevant to cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, or angiogenesis. Tetrac and Tetrac NP reduced both PANC-1 tumor mass by 45-55 % and PANC-1 tumor hemoglobin content, a marker of angiogenesis, by 50-60 % (*P < 0.05) in treated groups vs. controls by treatment day 15. Comparable results were obtained with tetrac and Tetrac NP in suppressing tumor growth and tumor angiogenesis in MPanc96 xenografts. In vitro studies showed that tetrac and Tetrac NP caused accumulation of pro-apoptotic protein BcLx-s. Tetrac NP was more effective than tetrac in increasing cellular abundance of mRNAs of pro-apoptotic p53 and p21 and anti-angiogenesis thrombospondin 1 protein in PANC-1 and MPanc96 cancer cell lines. Tetrac NP noticeably decreased expression of EGFR and of anti-apoptosis gene XIAP; tetrac did not affect EGFR and increased XIAP mRNA in both MPanc96 and PANC-1. In conclusion, tetrac or Tetrac NP effectively inhibited human pancreatic xenograft growth and tumor angiogenesis via a plasma membrane receptor that downstream modulated cellular abundance of proteins or mRNAs relevant to apoptosis and angiogenesis.

  15. Establishment and characterization of 7 novel hepatocellular carcinoma cell lines from patient-derived tumor xenografts.

    PubMed

    Xin, Hong; Wang, Ke; Hu, Gang; Xie, Fubo; Ouyang, Kedong; Tang, Xuzhen; Wang, Minjun; Wen, Danyi; Zhu, Yizhun; Qin, Xiaoran

    2014-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a common cancer with poor prognosis worldwide and the molecular mechanism is not well understood. This study aimed to establish a collection of human HCC cell lines from patient-derived xenograft (PDX) models. From the 20 surgical HCC sample collections, 7 tumors were successfully developed in immunodeficient mice and further established 7 novel HCC cell lines (LIXC002, LIXC003, LIXC004, LIXC006, LIXC011, LIXC012 and CPL0903) by primary culture. The characterization of cell lines was defined by morphology, growth kinetics, cell cycle, chromosome analysis, short tandem repeat (STR) analysis, molecular profile, and tumorigenicity. Additionally, response to clinical chemotherapeutics was validated both in vitro and in vivo. STR analysis indicated that all cell lines were unique cells different from known cell lines and free of contamination by bacteria or mycoplasma. The other findings were quite heterogeneous between individual lines. Chromosome aberration could be found in all cell lines. Alpha-fetoprotein was overexpressed only in 3 out of 7 cell lines. 4 cell lines expressed high level of vimentin. Ki67 was strongly stained in all cell lines. mRNA level of retinoic acid induced protein 3 (RAI3) was decreased in all cell lines. The 7 novel cell lines showed variable sensitivity to 8 tested compounds. LIXC011 and CPL0903 possessed multiple drug resistance property. Sorafenib inhibited xenograft tumor growth of LIXC006, but not of LIXC012. Our results indicated that the 7 novel cell lines with low passage maintaining their clinical and pathological characters could be good tools for further exploring the molecular mechanism of HCC and anti-cancer drug screening.

  16. Calcium-signaling components in rat insulinoma β-cells (INS-1) and pancreatic islets are differentially influenced by melatonin.

    PubMed

    Bazwinsky-Wutschke, Ivonne; Mühlbauer, Eckhard; Albrecht, Elke; Peschke, Elmar

    2014-05-01

    The pineal secretory product melatonin exerts its influence on the insulin secretion of pancreatic islets by different signaling pathways. The purpose of this study was to analyze the impact of melatonin on calcium-signaling components under different conditions. In a transfected INS-1 cell line overexpressing the human MT2 receptor (hMT2-INS-1), melatonin treatment induced even stronger depressive effects on calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase 2d and IV (Camk2d, CamkIV) transcripts during 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX) treatment than in normal INS-1 cells, indicating a crucial influence of melatonin receptor density on transcript-level regulation. In addition, melatonin induced a significant downregulation of calmodulin (Calm1) in IBMX-treated hMT2-INS-1 cells. Long-term administration of melatonin alone reduced CamkIV transcript levels in INS-1 cells; however, transcript levels of Camk2d remained unchanged. The release of insulin was diminished under long-term melatonin treatment. The impact of melatonin also involved reductions in CAMK2D protein during IBMX or forskolin treatments in INS-1 cells, as measured by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, indicating a functional significance of transcriptional changes in pancreatic islets. Furthermore, analysis of melatonin receptor knockout mice showed that the transcript levels of Camk2d, CamkIV, and Calm1 were differentially influenced according to the melatonin receptor subtype deleted. In conclusion, this study provides evidence that melatonin has different impacts on the regulation of Calm1 and Camk. These calcium-signaling components are known as participants in the calcium/calmodulin pathway, which plays an important functional role in the modulation of the β-cell signaling pathways leading to insulin secretion.

  17. Erlotinib Pretreatment Improves Photodynamic Therapy of Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma Xenografts via Multiple Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Gallagher-Colombo, Shannon M; Miller, Joann; Cengel, Keith A; Putt, Mary E; Vinogradov, Sergei A; Busch, Theresa M

    2015-08-01

    Aberrant expression of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a common characteristic of many cancers, including non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC), head and neck squamous cell carcinoma, and ovarian cancer. Although EGFR is currently a favorite molecular target for the treatment of these cancers, inhibition of the receptor with small-molecule inhibitors (i.e., erlotinib) or monoclonal antibodies (i.e., cetuximab) does not provide long-term therapeutic benefit as standalone treatment. Interestingly, we have found that addition of erlotinib to photodynamic therapy (PDT) can improve treatment response in typically erlotinib-resistant NSCLC tumor xenografts. Ninety-day complete response rates of 63% are achieved when erlotinib is administered in three doses before PDT of H460 human tumor xenografts, compared with 16% after PDT-alone. Similar benefit is found when erlotinib is added to PDT of A549 NCSLC xenografts. Improved response is accompanied by increased vascular shutdown, and erlotinib increases the in vitro cytotoxicity of PDT to endothelial cells. Tumor uptake of the photosensitizer (benzoporphyrin derivative monoacid ring A; BPD) is increased by the in vivo administration of erlotinib; nevertheless, this elevation of BPD levels only partially accounts for the benefit of erlotinib to PDT. Thus, pretreatment with erlotinib augments multiple mechanisms of PDT effect that collectively lead to large improvements in therapeutic efficacy. These data demonstrate that short-duration administration of erlotinib before PDT can greatly improve the responsiveness of even erlotinib-resistant tumors to treatment. Results will inform clinical investigation of EGFR-targeting therapeutics in conjunction with PDT.

  18. Altered MENIN expression disrupts the MAFA differentiation pathway in insulinoma.

    PubMed

    Hamze, Z; Vercherat, C; Bernigaud-Lacheretz, A; Bazzi, W; Bonnavion, R; Lu, J; Calender, A; Pouponnot, C; Bertolino, P; Roche, C; Stein, R; Scoazec, J Y; Zhang, C X; Cordier-Bussat, M

    2013-12-01

    The protein MENIN is the product of the multiple endocrine neoplasia type I (MEN1) gene. Altered MENIN expression is one of the few events that are clearly associated with foregut neuroendocrine tumours (NETs), classical oncogenes or tumour suppressors being not involved. One of the current challenges is to understand how alteration of MENIN expression contributes to the development of these tumours. We hypothesised that MENIN might regulate factors maintaining endocrine-differentiated functions. We chose the insulinoma model, a paradigmatic example of well-differentiated pancreatic NETs, to study whether MENIN interferes with the expression of v-MAF musculoaponeurotic fibrosarcoma oncogene homologue A (MAFA), a master glucose-dependent transcription factor in differentiated β-cells. Immunohistochemical analysis of a series of human insulinomas revealed a correlated decrease in both MENIN and MAFA. Decreased MAFA expression resulting from targeted Men1 ablation was also consistently observed in mouse insulinomas. In vitro analyses using insulinoma cell lines showed that MENIN regulated MAFA protein and mRNA levels, and bound to Mafa promoter sequences. MENIN knockdown concomitantly decreased mRNA expression of both Mafa and β-cell differentiation markers (Ins1/2, Gck, Slc2a2 and Pdx1) and, in parallel, increased the proliferation rate of tumours as measured by bromodeoxyuridine incorporation. Interestingly, MAFA knockdown alone also increased proliferation rate but did not affect the expression of candidate proliferation genes regulated by MENIN. Finally, MENIN variants with missense mutations detected in patients with MEN1 lost the WT MENIN properties to regulate MAFA. Together, our findings unveil a previously unsuspected MENIN/MAFA connection regarding control of the β-cell differentiation/proliferation balance, which could contribute to tumorigenesis.

  19. Patient-derived xenograft models of squamous cell carcinoma of the uterine cervix.

    PubMed

    Rofstad, Einar K; Simonsen, Trude G; Huang, Ruixia; Andersen, Lise Mari K; Galappathi, Kanthi; Ellingsen, Christine; Wegner, Catherine S; Hauge, Anette; Gaustad, Jon-Vidar

    2016-04-10

    Patient-derived xenograft (PDX) models of cancer are considered to reflect the biology and treatment response of human tumors to a larger extent than xenograft models initiated from established cell lines. The characterization of a panel of four novel PDX models of cervical carcinoma of the uterine cervix is described in this communication. The outcome of treatment differed substantially among the donor patients, and the PDX models were found to mirror the histology, aggressiveness, and metastatic propensity of the donor patients' tumors. Two of the models (BK-12 and LA-19) were highly metastatic, one model (ED-15) was poorly metastatic, and one model (HL-16) was non-metastatic. The primary tumors of the two highly metastatic models showed high density of intratumoral lymphatics, whereas the other two models did not develop intratumoral lymphatics. The potential of the models to metastasize to lymph nodes was associated with high expression of both angiogenesis-related genes and cancer stem cell-related genes. The models may be highly valuable for studying mechanisms linking lymph node metastasis to lymphangiogenesis, hemangiogenesis, and the presence of cancer stem cells. PMID:26828134

  20. Dual mTOR inhibitor MLN0128 suppresses Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) xenograft tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Kannan, Aarthi; Lin, Zhenyu; Shao, Qiang; Zhao, Stephanie; Fang, Bin; Moreno, Mauricio A; Vural, Emre; Stack, Brendan C; Suen, James Y; Kannan, Krishnaswamy; Gao, Ling

    2016-02-01

    Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) is an aggressive neuroendocrine skin cancer. Pathologic activation of PI3K/mTOR pathway and elevated expression of c-Myc are frequently detected in MCC. Yet, there is no targeted therapy presently available for this lethal disease. Recently, MLN0128, a second-generation dual TORC1/2 inhibitor is shown to have therapeutic efficacy in preclinical studies. MLN0128 is currently in clinical trials as a potential therapy for advanced cancers. Here we characterize the therapeutic efficacy of MLN0128 in the preclinical setting of MCC and delineate downstream targets of mTORC1/2 in MCC cellular systems. MLN0128 significantly attenuates xenograft MCC tumor growth independent of Merkel cell polyomavirus. Moreover, MLN0128 markedly diminishes MCC cell proliferation and induces apoptosis. Further investigations indicate that senescence does not contribute to MLN0128-mediated repression of xenograft MCC tumor growth. Finally, we also observe robust antitumor effects of MLN0128 when administered as a dual therapy with JQ1, a bromodomain protein BRD4 inhibitor. These results suggest dual blockade of PI3K/mTOR pathway and c-Myc axis is effective in the control of MCC tumor growth. Our results demonstrate that MLN0128 is potent as monotherapy or as a member of combination therapy with JQ1 for advanced MCC. PMID:26536665

  1. Generation of Prostate Cancer Patient Derived Xenograft Models from Circulating Tumor Cells.

    PubMed

    Williams, Estrelania S; Rodriguez-Bravo, Veronica; Rodriquez-Bravo, Veronica; Chippada-Venkata, Uma; De Ia Iglesia-Vicente, Janis; Gong, Yixuan; Galsky, Matthew; Oh, William; Cordon-Cardo, Carlos; Domingo-Domenech, Josep

    2015-10-20

    Patient derived xenograft (PDX) models are gaining popularity in cancer research and are used for preclinical drug evaluation, biomarker identification, biologic studies, and personalized medicine strategies. Circulating tumor cells (CTC) play a critical role in tumor metastasis and have been isolated from patients with several tumor types. Recently, CTCs have been used to generate PDX experimental models of breast and prostate cancer. This manuscript details the method for the generation of prostate cancer PDX models from CTCs developed by our group. Advantages of this method over conventional PDX models include independence from surgical sample collection and generating experimental models at various disease stages. Density gradient centrifugation followed by red blood cell lysis and flow cytometry depletion of CD45 positive mononuclear cells is used to enrich CTCs from peripheral blood samples collected from patients with metastatic disease. The CTCs are then injected into immunocompromised mice; subsequently generated xenografts can be used for functional studies or harvested for molecular characterization. The primary limitation of this method is the negative selection method used for CTC enrichment. Despite this limitation, the generation of PDX models from CTCs provides a novel experimental model to be applied to prostate cancer research.

  2. Patient-derived xenograft models of squamous cell carcinoma of the uterine cervix.

    PubMed

    Rofstad, Einar K; Simonsen, Trude G; Huang, Ruixia; Andersen, Lise Mari K; Galappathi, Kanthi; Ellingsen, Christine; Wegner, Catherine S; Hauge, Anette; Gaustad, Jon-Vidar

    2016-04-10

    Patient-derived xenograft (PDX) models of cancer are considered to reflect the biology and treatment response of human tumors to a larger extent than xenograft models initiated from established cell lines. The characterization of a panel of four novel PDX models of cervical carcinoma of the uterine cervix is described in this communication. The outcome of treatment differed substantially among the donor patients, and the PDX models were found to mirror the histology, aggressiveness, and metastatic propensity of the donor patients' tumors. Two of the models (BK-12 and LA-19) were highly metastatic, one model (ED-15) was poorly metastatic, and one model (HL-16) was non-metastatic. The primary tumors of the two highly metastatic models showed high density of intratumoral lymphatics, whereas the other two models did not develop intratumoral lymphatics. The potential of the models to metastasize to lymph nodes was associated with high expression of both angiogenesis-related genes and cancer stem cell-related genes. The models may be highly valuable for studying mechanisms linking lymph node metastasis to lymphangiogenesis, hemangiogenesis, and the presence of cancer stem cells.

  3. Vanadium compounds modulate PPARγ activity primarily by increasing PPARγ protein levels in mouse insulinoma NIT-1 cells.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Pan; Yang, Xiaoda

    2013-06-01

    Vanadium compounds are promising agents in the therapeutic treatment of diabetes; however, their mechanism of action has not been clearly elucidated. The current study investigated the effects of vanadium compounds, vanadyl acetylacetonate [V(IV)O(acac)2] and sodium metavanadate (NaV(V)O3), on peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs), especially PPARγ, which are important targets of anti-diabetic drugs. Our experimental results revealed that treatment of NIT-1 β-pancreas cells with vanadium compounds resulted in PPARγ activation and elevation of PPARγ protein levels. Vanadium compounds did not increase PPARγ transcription but ameliorated PPARγ degradation induced by inflammatory stimulators TNF-α/IL-6. Vanadium compounds induced binding of PPARγ to heat shock protein (Hsp60). This PPARγ-Hsp60 interaction might cause inhibition of PPARγ degradation, thus elevating the PPARγ level. In addition, modulation of PPARγ phosphorylation was also observed upon vanadium treatment. The present work demonstrated for the first time that vanadium compounds are novel PPARγ modulators. The results may provide new insights for the mechanism of anti-diabetic action of vanadium compounds.

  4. Cetuximab intensifies the ADCC activity of adoptive NK cells in a nude mouse colorectal cancer xenograft model

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shanshan; Li, Xuechun; Chen, Rongming; Yin, Mingang; Zheng, Qiuhong

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells, discovered ~40 years ago, are believed to be the most effective cytotoxic lymphocytes to counteract cancer; however, adoptive NK cell therapy in vivo has encountered certain limitations, including a lack of specificity. The drug cetuximab can mediate antibody dependent cell mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) activity through NK cells in vivo, and has been approved for the first-line treatment of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-positive metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC). However, the ADCC activity of adoptive NK cells, induced by cetuximab in a nude mouse CRC xenograft model, has not been previously reported. The aim of the present study was to explore the ADCC activity of cetuximab combined with adoptive NK cells in CRC xenograft models with various EGFR expressions. The nude mouse xenograft models were established by subcutaneously injecting LOVO or SW620 cells. The mice were then randomly divided into 6 groups: Phosphate-buffered saline, cetuximab, human immunoglobulin G (hIgG), NK cells, hIgG plus NK cells and cetuximab plus NK cells. The ADCC antitumor activity was evaluated in these CRC models. The results indicated that the cetuximab plus NK cells group showed the greatest tumor inhibition effect compared with the NK cells group in LOVO xenograft tumor models with positive EGFR expression. However, the combination of cetuximab and NK cells did not show a stronger tumor inhibitory effect against the SW620 xenograft tumor models compared with the efficiency of NK cells. In conclusion, cetuximab could intensify the ADCC antitumor activity of adoptive NK cells towards CRC with an increased EGFR expression. The combination of cetuximab and NK cells may be a potential immunotherapy for metastatic CRC patients with positive EGFR expression.

  5. Cetuximab intensifies the ADCC activity of adoptive NK cells in a nude mouse colorectal cancer xenograft model

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shanshan; Li, Xuechun; Chen, Rongming; Yin, Mingang; Zheng, Qiuhong

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells, discovered ~40 years ago, are believed to be the most effective cytotoxic lymphocytes to counteract cancer; however, adoptive NK cell therapy in vivo has encountered certain limitations, including a lack of specificity. The drug cetuximab can mediate antibody dependent cell mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) activity through NK cells in vivo, and has been approved for the first-line treatment of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-positive metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC). However, the ADCC activity of adoptive NK cells, induced by cetuximab in a nude mouse CRC xenograft model, has not been previously reported. The aim of the present study was to explore the ADCC activity of cetuximab combined with adoptive NK cells in CRC xenograft models with various EGFR expressions. The nude mouse xenograft models were established by subcutaneously injecting LOVO or SW620 cells. The mice were then randomly divided into 6 groups: Phosphate-buffered saline, cetuximab, human immunoglobulin G (hIgG), NK cells, hIgG plus NK cells and cetuximab plus NK cells. The ADCC antitumor activity was evaluated in these CRC models. The results indicated that the cetuximab plus NK cells group showed the greatest tumor inhibition effect compared with the NK cells group in LOVO xenograft tumor models with positive EGFR expression. However, the combination of cetuximab and NK cells did not show a stronger tumor inhibitory effect against the SW620 xenograft tumor models compared with the efficiency of NK cells. In conclusion, cetuximab could intensify the ADCC antitumor activity of adoptive NK cells towards CRC with an increased EGFR expression. The combination of cetuximab and NK cells may be a potential immunotherapy for metastatic CRC patients with positive EGFR expression. PMID:27602116

  6. Survivin Antisense Oligonucleotides Effectively Radiosensitize Colorectal Cancer Cells in Both Tissue Culture and Murine Xenograft Models

    SciTech Connect

    Roedel, Franz; Capalbo, Gianni; Weiss, Christian; Roedel, Claus

    2008-05-01

    Purpose: Survivin shows a radiation resistance factor in colorectal cancer. In the present study, we determined whether survivin messenger RNA levels in patients with rectal cancer predict tumor response after neoadjuvant radiochemotherapy and whether inhibition of survivin by the use of antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) enhances radiation responses. Methods and Materials: SW480 colorectal carcinoma cells were transfected with survivin ASO (LY2181308) and irradiated with doses ranging from 0-8 Gy. Survivin expression, cell-cycle distribution, {gamma}H2AX fluorescence, and induction of apoptosis were monitored by means of immunoblotting, flow cytometry, and caspase 3/7 activity. Clonogenic survival was determined by using a colony-forming assay. An SW480 xenograft model was used to investigate the effect of survivin attenuation and irradiation on tumor growth. Furthermore, survivin messenger RNA levels were studied in patient biopsy specimens by using Affymetrix microarray analysis. Results: In the translational study of 20 patients with rectal cancer, increased survivin levels were associated with significantly greater risk of local tumor recurrence (p = 0.009). Treatment of SW480 cells with survivin ASOs and irradiation resulted in an increased percentage of apoptotic cells, caspase 3/7 activity, fraction of cells in the G{sub 2}/M phase, and H2AX phosphorylation. Clonogenic survival decreased compared with control-treated cells. Furthermore, treatment of SW480 xenografts with survivin ASOs and irradiation resulted in a significant delay in tumor growth. Conclusion: Survivin appears to be a molecular biomarker in patients with rectal cancer. Furthermore, in vitro and in vivo data suggest a potential role of survivin as a molecular target to improve treatment response to radiotherapy in patients with rectal cancer.

  7. Bevacizumab radiosensitizes non-small cell lung cancer xenografts by inhibiting DNA double-strand break repair in endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Gao, Hui; Xue, Jianxin; Zhou, Lin; Lan, Jie; He, Jiazhuo; Na, Feifei; Yang, Lifei; Deng, Lei; Lu, You

    2015-08-28

    The aims of this study were to evaluate the effects of biweekly bevacizumab administration on a tumor microenvironment and to investigate the mechanisms of radiosensitization that were induced by it. Briefly, bevacizumab was administered intravenously to Balb/c nude mice bearing non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) H1975 xenografts; in addition, bevacizumab was added to NSCLC or endothelial cells (ECs) in vitro, followed by irradiation (IR). The anti-tumor efficacy, anti-angiogenic efficacy and repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) were evaluated. The activation of signaling pathways was determined using immunoprecipitation (IP) and WB analyses. Finally, biweekly bevacizumab administration inhibited the growth of H1975 xenografts and induced vascular normalization periodically. Bevacizumab more significantly increased cellular DSB and EC apoptosis when administered 1 h prior to 12 Gy/1f IR than when administered 5 days prior to IR, thereby inhibiting tumor angiogenesis and growth. In vitro, bevacizumab more effectively increased DSBs and apoptosis prior to IR and inhibited the clonogenic survival of ECs but not NSCLC cells. Using IP and WB analyses, we confirmed that bevacizumab can directly inhibit the phosphorylation of components of the VEGR2/PI3K/Akt/DNA-PKcs signaling pathway that are induced by IR in ECs. In conclusion, bevacizumab radiosensitizes NSCLC xenografts mainly by inhibiting DSB repair in ECs rather than by inducing vascular normalization.

  8. Raman spectroscopy identifies radiation response in human non-small cell lung cancer xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Harder, Samantha J.; Isabelle, Martin; DeVorkin, Lindsay; Smazynski, Julian; Beckham, Wayne; Brolo, Alexandre G.; Lum, Julian J.; Jirasek, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    External beam radiation therapy is a standard form of treatment for numerous cancers. Despite this, there are no approved methods to account for patient specific radiation sensitivity. In this report, Raman spectroscopy (RS) was used to identify radiation-induced biochemical changes in human non-small cell lung cancer xenografts. Chemometric analysis revealed unique radiation-related Raman signatures that were specific to nucleic acid, lipid, protein and carbohydrate spectral features. Among these changes was a dramatic shift in the accumulation of glycogen spectral bands for doses of 5 or 15 Gy when compared to unirradiated tumours. When spatial mapping was applied in this analysis there was considerable variability as we found substantial intra- and inter-tumour heterogeneity in the distribution of glycogen and other RS spectral features. Collectively, these data provide unique insight into the biochemical response of tumours, irradiated in vivo, and demonstrate the utility of RS for detecting distinct radiobiological responses in human tumour xenografts. PMID:26883914

  9. [Mechanism of hypoglycemia in insulinoma].

    PubMed

    Pigareva, M I; Starosel'tseva, L K; Kazeev, K N; Kertsman, V I

    1977-01-01

    A study was made of the capacity of insulinoma to catalyze the splitting of hippuryl-L-arginine (HA) and the contents of proinsulin-like component in the tissues of the tumours and in the blood serum of the patients. As revealed, in the absence of HA splitting by the tumour cytoplasmic fraction in the neutral pH zone there was noted a higher proinsulin-like component both in the tumour tissue and in the blood serum. An increase amount of proinsulin-like component in the blood serum stipulates possibly a more prolonged period of starvation before the occurrence of hypoglycemia, and a less pronounced picture of hypoglycemia in such patients in comparison with the patients whose tumours were capable of splitting HA similarly to the normal islands of Langerhans.

  10. Videolaparoscopic resection of insulinomas: experience in two institutions.

    PubMed

    Gramática, Luis; Herrera, Miguel F; Mercado-Luna, Andrés; Sierra, Mauricio; Verasay, Guillermo; Brunner, Noemí

    2002-10-01

    Laparoscopic resection of islet cell tumors has been performed in some selected cases. The aim of the study was to analyze the experience of two institutions in the laparoscopic management of insulinomas. In a 4-year period, videolaparoscopic resection of sporadic insulinomas was performed in 9 patients. All patients had hypoglycemia/hyperinsulinism and a solitary tumor demonstrated by image studies. Demographics, surgical findings, results, and complications were analyzed. Mean age of the patients was 43 years. One patient was male and eight were females. One tumor was located in the head of the pancreas, 4 in the body, and 4 in the tail. Laparoscopic resection was completed in all patients. Procedures included 4 enucleations and 5 distal pancreatectomies. Pancreatic resection with splenic preservation was achieved in 4 cases. Intraoperative ultrasound was used in 7 patients. Mean size of the tumors was 1.6 cm. All patients became normoglycemic after surgery. Complications included one pancreatic fistula, one pleural effusion, and one peripancreatic fluid collection. All resolved spontaneously. In a follow-up period between 3 and 48 months no evidence of recurrence has been observed. This series supports laparoscopic resection of preoperatively localized benign solitary insulinomas. The operation provides the advantages of minimally invasive surgery and can be safely performed in most cases.

  11. The inhibition of resveratrol to human skin squamous cell carcinoma A431 xenografts in nude mice.

    PubMed

    Hao, Yuqin; Huang, Weixing; Liao, Mingmei; Zhu, Yude; Liu, Hong; Hao, Chunguang; Liu, Guodong; Zhang, Guohui; Feng, Hongxia; Ning, Xiaohong; Li, Henggui; Li, Zhehai

    2013-04-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) is one of the commonest dermatological malignancies. Resveratrol (Res) is one type of polyphenolic compound which was first identified from the roots of Veratrum grandinorum in 1940. The previous studies found that Res can promote apoptosis of a variety of tumor cell, especially SCC cells. However it is rare to study the inhibition mechanism of Res in the animal model. In this study, through the establishment of human cutaneous SCC A431 xenografts in nude mice, we observed Res inhibition effect and investigated the inhibition mechanism by checking the expression of apoptosis-related factors, p53, ERK and survivin. The results showed that the xenograft volume and weight of Res groups were less than those of the control groups (P<0.05), but the net body mass of nude mice of Res groups was not significantly different from the control groups (P>0.05). The apoptotic index of Res groups were significantly higher than the control groups (P<0.05). The protein and mRNA expression of p53 and ERK were statistically positively correlated (P<0.05) and significantly increased in Res high- and medium-dose groups compared with the control groups (P<0.05). Moreover, the protein and mRNA expression of SVV were negatively correlated with p53 (P<0.05) and lower than the control groups (P<0.05). The results demonstrate Res inhibitory effect and indicate that the inhibition mechanism of Res is to upgrade the protein and mRNA expression of p53 and to downgrade the protein and mRNA expression of SVV, thus inducing the apoptosis of tumor cells.

  12. Growth suppression of MCF-7 cancer cell-derived xenografts in nude mice by caveolin-1

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Ping; Wang Xiaohui; Li Fei; Qi Baoju; Zhu Hua; Liu Shuang; Cui Yeqing; Chen Jianwen

    2008-11-07

    Caveolin-1 is an essential structural constituent of caveolae membrane domains that has been implicated in mitogenic signaling and oncogenesis. However, the exact functional role of caveolin-1 still remains controversial. In this report, utilizing MCF-7 human breast adenocarcinoma cells stably transfected with caveolin-1 (MCF-7/cav-1 cells), we demonstrate that caveolin-1 expression dramatically inhibits invasion and migration of these cells. Importantly, in vivo experiments employing xenograft tumor models demonstrated that expression of caveolin-1 results in significant growth inhibition of breast tumors. Moreover, a dramatic delay in tumor progression was observed in MCF-7/cav-1 cells as compared with MCF-7 cells. Histological analysis of tumor sections demonstrated a marked decrease in the percentage of proliferating tumor cells (Ki-67 assay) along with an increase in apoptotic tumor cells (TUNEL assay) in MCF-7/cav-1-treated animals. Our current findings provide for the first time in vivo evidence that caveolin-1 can indeed function as a tumor suppressor in human breast adenocarcinoma derived from MCF-7 cells rather than as a tumor promoter.

  13. Intrahepatic Xenograft of Cutaneous T-Cell Lymphoma Cell Lines: A Useful Model for Rapid Biological and Therapeutic Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Andrique, Laetitia; Poglio, Sandrine; Prochazkova-Carlotti, Martina; Kadin, Marshall Edward; Giese, Alban; Idrissi, Yamina; Beylot-Barry, Marie; Merlio, Jean-Philippe; Chevret, Edith

    2016-07-01

    Cutaneous T-cell lymphomas (CTCLs) are a heterogeneous group of diseases primarily involving the skin that could have an aggressive course with circulating blood cells, especially in Sézary syndrome and transformed mycosis fungoides. So far, few CTCL cell lines have been adapted for in vivo experiments and their tumorigenicity has not been adequately assessed, hampering the use of a reproducible model for CTCL biological evaluation. In fact, both patient-derived xenografts and cell line xenografts at subcutaneous sites failed to provide a robust tool, because engraftment was dependent on mice strain and cell line subtype. Herein, we describe an original method of intrahepatic injection into adult NOD.Cg-Prkdc(scid)Il2rg(tm1Wjl)/SzJ mice liver of both aggressive (My-La, HUT78, HH, MAC2A, and MAC2B) and indolent (FE-PD and MAC1) CTCL cell lines. Six of the seven CTCL cell lines were grafted with a high rate of success (80%). Moreover, this model provided a quick (15 days) and robust assay for in vivo evaluation of CTCL cell lines tumorigenicity and therapeutic response in preclinical studies. Such a reproducible model can be therefore used for further functional studies and in vivo drug testing. PMID:27181405

  14. Isolation and characterization of renal cancer stem cells from patient-derived xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Azzi, Sandy; Gallerne, Cindy; Michel, Julien Giron; Chiabotto, Giulia; Lecoz, Vincent; Romei, Cristina; Spaggiari, Grazia Maria; Pezzolo, Annalisa; Pistoia, Vito; Angevin, Eric; Gad, Sophie; Ferlicot, Sophie; Messai, Yosra; Kieda, Claudine; Clay, Denis; Sabatini, Federica; Escudier, Bernard; Camussi, Giovanni; Eid, Pierre; Azzarone, Bruno; Chouaib, Salem

    2016-01-01

    As rapidly developing patient-derived xenografts (PDX) could represent potential sources of cancer stem cells (CSC), we selected and characterized non-cultured PDX cell suspensions from four different renal carcinomas (RCC). Only the cell suspensions from the serial xenografts (PDX-1 and PDX-2) of an undifferentiated RCC (RCC-41) adapted to the selective CSC medium. The cell suspension derived from the original tumor specimen (RCC-41-P-0) did not adapt to the selective medium and strongly expressed CSC-like markers (CD133 and CD105) together with the non-CSC tumor marker E-cadherin. In comparison, PDX-1 and PDX-2 cells exhibited evolution in their phenotype since PDX-1 cells were CD133high/CD105-/Ecadlow and PDX-2 cells were CD133low/CD105-/Ecad-. Both PDX subsets expressed additional stem cell markers (CD146/CD29/OCT4/NANOG/Nestin) but still contained non-CSC tumor cells. Therefore, using different cell sorting strategies, we characterized 3 different putative CSC subsets (RCC-41-PDX-1/CD132+, RCC-41-PDX-2/CD133-/EpCAMlow and RCC-41-PDX-2/CD133+/EpCAMbright). In addition, transcriptomic analysis showed that RCC-41-PDX-2/CD133− over-expressed the pluripotency gene ERBB4, while RCC-41-PDX-2/CD133+ over-expressed several tumor suppressor genes. These three CSC subsets displayed ALDH activity, formed serial spheroids and developed serial tumors in SCID mice, although RCC-41-PDX-1/CD132+ and RCC-41-PDX-2/CD133+ displayed less efficiently the above CSC properties. RCC-41-PDX-1/CD132+ tumors showed vessels of human origin with CSC displaying peri-vascular distribution. By contrast, RCC-41-PDX-2 originated tumors exhibiting only vessels of mouse origin without CSC peri-vascular distribution. Altogether, our results indicate that PDX murine microenvironment promotes a continuous redesign of CSC phenotype, unmasking CSC subsets potentially present in a single RCC or generating ex novo different CSC-like subsets. PMID:26551931

  15. Isolation and characterization of renal cancer stem cells from patient-derived xenografts.

    PubMed

    Hasmim, Meriem; Bruno, Stefania; Azzi, Sandy; Gallerne, Cindy; Michel, Julien Giron; Chiabotto, Giulia; Lecoz, Vincent; Romei, Cristina; Spaggiari, Grazia Maria; Pezzolo, Annalisa; Pistoia, Vito; Angevin, Eric; Gad, Sophie; Ferlicot, Sophie; Messai, Yosra; Kieda, Claudine; Clay, Denis; Sabatini, Federica; Escudier, Bernard; Camussi, Giovanni; Eid, Pierre; Azzarone, Bruno; Chouaib, Salem

    2016-03-29

    As rapidly developing patient-derived xenografts (PDX) could represent potential sources of cancer stem cells (CSC), we selected and characterized non-cultured PDX cell suspensions from four different renal carcinomas (RCC). Only the cell suspensions from the serial xenografts (PDX-1 and PDX-2) of an undifferentiated RCC (RCC-41) adapted to the selective CSC medium. The cell suspension derived from the original tumor specimen (RCC-41-P-0) did not adapt to the selective medium and strongly expressed CSC-like markers (CD133 and CD105) together with the non-CSC tumor marker E-cadherin. In comparison, PDX-1 and PDX-2 cells exhibited evolution in their phenotype since PDX-1 cells were CD133high/CD105-/Ecadlow and PDX-2 cells were CD133low/CD105-/Ecad-. Both PDX subsets expressed additional stem cell markers (CD146/CD29/OCT4/NANOG/Nestin) but still contained non-CSC tumor cells. Therefore, using different cell sorting strategies, we characterized 3 different putative CSC subsets (RCC-41-PDX-1/CD132+, RCC-41-PDX-2/CD133-/EpCAMlow and RCC-41-PDX-2/CD133+/EpCAMbright). In addition, transcriptomic analysis showed that RCC-41-PDX-2/CD133- over-expressed the pluripotency gene ERBB4, while RCC-41-PDX-2/CD133+ over-expressed several tumor suppressor genes. These three CSC subsets displayed ALDH activity, formed serial spheroids and developed serial tumors in SCID mice, although RCC-41-PDX-1/CD132+ and RCC-41-PDX-2/CD133+ displayed less efficiently the above CSC properties. RCC-41-PDX-1/CD132+ tumors showed vessels of human origin with CSC displaying peri-vascular distribution. By contrast, RCC-41-PDX-2 originated tumors exhibiting only vessels of mouse origin without CSC peri-vascular distribution.Altogether, our results indicate that PDX murine microenvironment promotes a continuous redesign of CSC phenotype, unmasking CSC subsets potentially present in a single RCC or generating ex novo different CSC-like subsets.

  16. Antitumor effects of a monoclonal antibody to human CCR9 in leukemia cell xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Chamorro, Sonia; Vela, Maria; Franco-Villanueva, Ana; Carramolino, Laura; Gutiérrez, Julio; Gómez, Lucio; Lozano, María; Salvador, Beatriz; García-Gallo, Mónica; Martínez-A, Carlos; Kremer, Leonor

    2014-01-01

    Tumor expression of certain chemokine receptors is associated with resistance to apoptosis, migration, invasiveness and metastasis. Because CCR9 chemokine receptor expression is very restricted in healthy tissue, whereas it is present in tumors of distinct origins including leukemias, melanomas, prostate and ovary carcinomas, it can be considered a suitable candidate for target-directed therapy. Here, we report the generation and characterization of 91R, a mouse anti-human CCR9 IgG2b monoclonal antibody that recognizes an epitope within the CCR9 N-terminal domain. This antibody inhibits the growth of subcutaneous xenografts from human acute T lymphoblastic leukemia MOLT-4 cells in immunodeficient Rag2−/− mice. Tumor size in 91R-treated mice was reduced by 85% compared with isotype-matched antibody-treated controls. Tumor reduction in 91R-treated mice was concomitant with an increase in the apoptotic cell fraction and tumor necrotic areas, as well as a decrease in the fraction of proliferating cells and in tumor vascularization. In the presence of complement or murine natural killer cells, 91R promoted in vitro lysis of MOLT-4 leukemia cells, indicating that this antibody might eliminate tumor cells via complement- and cell-dependent cytotoxicity. The results show the potential of the 91R monoclonal antibody as a therapeutic agent for treatment of CCR9-expressing tumors. PMID:24870448

  17. In vivo cell cycle profiling in xenograft tumors by quantitative intravital microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Chittajallu, Deepak R; Florian, Stefan; Kohler, Rainer H; Iwamoto, Yoshiko; Orth, James D; Weissleder, Ralph; Danuser, Gaudenz; Mitchison, Timothy J

    2015-01-01

    Quantification of cell-cycle state at a single-cell level is essential to understand fundamental three-dimensional biological processes such as tissue development and cancer. Analysis of 3D in vivo images, however, is very challenging. Today’s best practice, manual annotation of select image events, generates arbitrarily sampled data distributions, unsuitable for reliable mechanistic inferences. Here, we present an integrated workflow for quantitative in vivo cell-cycle profiling. It combines image analysis and machine learning methods for automated 3D segmentation and cell-cycle state identification of individual cell-nuclei with widely varying morphologies embedded in complex tumor environments. We applied our workflow to quantify cell-cycle effects of three antimitotic cancer drugs over 8 days in HT-1080 fibrosarcoma xenografts in living mice using a dataset of 38,000 cells and compared the induced phenotypes. In contrast to 2D culture, observed mitotic arrest was relatively low, suggesting involvement of additional mechanisms in their antitumor effect in vivo. PMID:25867850

  18. Molecular Pathology of Patient Tumors, Patient-Derived Xenografts, and Cancer Cell Lines.

    PubMed

    Guo, Sheng; Qian, Wubin; Cai, Jie; Zhang, Likun; Wery, Jean-Pierre; Li, Qi-Xiang

    2016-08-15

    The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) project has generated abundant genomic data for human cancers of various histopathology types and enabled exploring cancer molecular pathology per big data approach. We developed a new algorithm based on most differentially expressed genes (DEG) per pairwise comparisons to calculate correlation coefficients to be used to quantify similarity within and between cancer types. We systematically compared TCGA cancers, demonstrating high correlation within types and low correlation between types, thus establishing molecular specificity of cancer types and an alternative diagnostic method largely equivalent to histopathology. Different coefficients for different cancers in study may reveal that the degree of the within-type homogeneity varies by cancer types. We also performed the same calculation using the TCGA-derived DEGs on patient-derived xenografts (PDX) of different histopathology types corresponding to the TCGA types, as well as on cancer cell lines. We, for the first time, demonstrated highly similar patterns for within- and between-type correlation between PDXs and patient samples in a systematic study, confirming the high relevance of PDXs as surrogate experimental models for human diseases. In contrast, cancer cell lines have drastically reduced expression similarity to both PDXs and patient samples. The studies also revealed high similarity between some types, for example, LUSC and HNSCC, but low similarity between certain subtypes, for example, LUAD and LUSC. Our newly developed algorithm seems to be a practical diagnostic method to classify and reclassify a disease, either human or xenograft, with better accuracy than traditional histopathology. Cancer Res; 76(16); 4619-26. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27325646

  19. Receptor for advanced glycation endproducts signaling cascades are activated in pancreatic fibroblasts, but not in the INS1E insulinoma cell line: Are mesenchymal cells major players in chronic inflammation?

    PubMed Central

    Tago, Kazuma; Inoue, Ken-ichi; Ouchi, Motoshi; Miura, Yoshikazu; Kubota, Keiichi

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The receptor for advanced glycation endproducts (RAGE) is a pattern recognition receptor that plays an important role in natural immunity. It is suggested that mesenchymal cells are the major players during inflammation. Previously, we reported that advanced glycation end products (AGE), known to be one of the ligands of RAGE, inhibited glucose-induced insulin secretion from ex vivo pancreatic islets, although the mechanism responsible remains largely unknown. In the present study, we examined the cascades operating downstream from RAGE using the insulinoma cell line INS1E and primary-cultured pancreatic fibroblasts as in vitro models for parenchymal (β) cells and mesenchymal cells, respectively. Phosphorylation of c-jun N-terminal kinase, inhibitor of nuclear factor κB kinase, and nuclear factor κB was stimulated by AGE or high mobility group binding 1 (HMGB1) in pancreatic fibroblasts, whereas no such effect was observed in INS1E cells. Expression of the Ccl5, Il-6, and Il-1b genes was increased by AGE/HMGB1 in fibroblasts, but not in INS1E cells. On the other hand, AGE inhibited the secretion of insulin from ex vivo pancreatic islets, and this effect was ameliorated by MK615, a Japanese apricot extract used as an anti-inflammatory agent. Glucose-induced insulin secretion from INS1E cells was not affected by direct administration of AGE/HMGB1, but was inhibited by fibroblast-conditioned medium. These results suggest that AGE suppresses glucose-induced insulin secretion from pancreatic islets through indirect mesenchymal RAGE signaling. PMID:27415824

  20. Receptor for advanced glycation endproducts signaling cascades are activated in pancreatic fibroblasts, but not in the INS1E insulinoma cell line: Are mesenchymal cells major players in chronic inflammation?

    PubMed

    Tago, Kazuma; Inoue, Ken-Ichi; Ouchi, Motoshi; Miura, Yoshikazu; Kubota, Keiichi

    2016-09-01

    The receptor for advanced glycation endproducts (RAGE) is a pattern recognition receptor that plays an important role in natural immunity. It is suggested that mesenchymal cells are the major players during inflammation. Previously, we reported that advanced glycation end products (AGE), known to be one of the ligands of RAGE, inhibited glucose-induced insulin secretion from ex vivo pancreatic islets, although the mechanism responsible remains largely unknown. In the present study, we examined the cascades operating downstream from RAGE using the insulinoma cell line INS1E and primary-cultured pancreatic fibroblasts as in vitro models for parenchymal (β) cells and mesenchymal cells, respectively. Phosphorylation of c-jun N-terminal kinase, inhibitor of nuclear factor κB kinase, and nuclear factor κB was stimulated by AGE or high mobility group binding 1 (HMGB1) in pancreatic fibroblasts, whereas no such effect was observed in INS1E cells. Expression of the Ccl5, Il-6, and Il-1b genes was increased by AGE/HMGB1 in fibroblasts, but not in INS1E cells. On the other hand, AGE inhibited the secretion of insulin from ex vivo pancreatic islets, and this effect was ameliorated by MK615, a Japanese apricot extract used as an anti-inflammatory agent. Glucose-induced insulin secretion from INS1E cells was not affected by direct administration of AGE/HMGB1, but was inhibited by fibroblast-conditioned medium. These results suggest that AGE suppresses glucose-induced insulin secretion from pancreatic islets through indirect mesenchymal RAGE signaling. PMID:27415824

  1. Development of a Patient-Derived Xenograft Model Using Brain Tumor Stem Cell Systems to Study Cancer.

    PubMed

    Chokshi, Chirayu; Dhillon, Manvir; McFarlane, Nicole; Venugopal, Chitra; Singh, Sheila K

    2016-01-01

    Patient-derived xenograft (PDX) models provide an excellent platform to understand cancer initiation and development in vivo. In the context of brain tumor initiating cells (BTICs), PDX models allow for characterization of tumor formation, growth, and recurrence, in a clinically relevant in vivo system. Here, we detail procedures to harvest, culture, characterize, and orthotopically inject human BTICs derived from patient samples.

  2. Improved Method for Ex Ovo-Cultivation of Developing Chicken Embryos for Human Stem Cell Xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Schomann, Timo; Qunneis, Firas; Widera, Darius; Kaltschmidt, Christian; Kaltschmidt, Barbara

    2013-01-01

    The characterization of human stem cells for the usability in regenerative medicine is particularly based on investigations regarding their differentiation potential in vivo. In this regard, the chicken embryo model represents an ideal model organism. However, the access to the chicken embryo is only achievable by windowing the eggshell resulting in limited visibility and accessibility in subsequent experiments. On the contrary, ex ovo-culture systems avoid such negative side effects. Here, we present an improved ex ovo-cultivation method enabling the embryos to survive 13 days in vitro. Optimized cultivation of chicken embryos resulted in a normal development regarding their size and weight. Our ex ovo-approach closely resembles the development of chicken embryos in ovo, as demonstrated by properly developed nervous system, bones, and cartilage at expected time points. Finally, we investigated the usability of our method for trans-species transplantation of adult stem cells by injecting human neural crest-derived stem cells into late Hamburger and Hamilton stages (HH26–HH28/E5—E6) of ex ovo-incubated embryos. We demonstrated the integration of human cells allowing experimentally easy investigation of the differentiation potential in the proper developmental context. Taken together, this ex ovo-method supports the prolonged cultivation of properly developing chicken embryos enabling integration studies of xenografted mammalian stem cells at late developmental stages. PMID:23554818

  3. Proscillaridin A is cytotoxic for glioblastoma cell lines and controls tumor xenograft growth in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Tchoghandjian, Aurélie; Carré, Manon; Colin, Carole; Jiglaire, Carine Jiguet; Mercurio, Sandy; Beclin, Christophe; Figarella-Branger, Dominique

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastoma is the most frequent primary brain tumor in adults. Because of molecular and cellular heterogeneity, high proliferation rate and significant invasive ability, prognosis of patients is poor. Recent therapeutic advances increased median overall survival but tumor recurrence remains inevitable. In this context, we used a high throughput screening approach to bring out novel compounds with anti-proliferative and anti-migratory properties for glioblastoma treatment. Screening of the Prestwick chemical library® of 1120 molecules identified proscillaridin A, a cardiac glycoside inhibitor of the Na+/K+ ATPase pump, with most significant effects on glioblastoma cell lines. In vitro effects of proscillaridin A were evaluated on GBM6 and GBM9 stem-like cell lines and on U87-MG and U251-MG cell lines. We showed that proscillaridin A displayed cytotoxic properties, triggered cell death, induced G2/M phase blockade in all the glioblastoma cell lines and impaired GBM stem self-renewal capacity even at low concentrations. Heterotopic and orthotopic xenotransplantations were used to confirm in vivo anticancer effects of proscillaridin A that both controls xenograft growth and improves mice survival. Altogether, results suggest that proscillaridin A is a promising candidate as cancer therapies in glioblastoma. This sustains previous reports showing that cardiac glycosides act as anticancer drugs in other cancers. PMID:25400117

  4. Proscillaridin A is cytotoxic for glioblastoma cell lines and controls tumor xenograft growth in vivo.

    PubMed

    Denicolaï, Emilie; Baeza-Kallee, Nathalie; Tchoghandjian, Aurélie; Carré, Manon; Colin, Carole; Jiglaire, Carine Jiguet; Mercurio, Sandy; Beclin, Christophe; Figarella-Branger, Dominique

    2014-11-15

    Glioblastoma is the most frequent primary brain tumor in adults. Because of molecular and cellular heterogeneity, high proliferation rate and significant invasive ability, prognosis of patients is poor. Recent therapeutic advances increased median overall survival but tumor recurrence remains inevitable. In this context, we used a high throughput screening approach to bring out novel compounds with anti-proliferative and anti-migratory properties for glioblastoma treatment. Screening of the Prestwick chemical library® of 1120 molecules identified proscillaridin A, a cardiac glycoside inhibitor of the Na(+)/K(+) ATPase pump, with most significant effects on glioblastoma cell lines. In vitro effects of proscillaridin A were evaluated on GBM6 and GBM9 stem-like cell lines and on U87-MG and U251-MG cell lines. We showed that proscillaridin A displayed cytotoxic properties, triggered cell death, induced G2/M phase blockade in all the glioblastoma cell lines and impaired GBM stem self-renewal capacity even at low concentrations. Heterotopic and orthotopic xenotransplantations were used to confirm in vivo anticancer effects of proscillaridin A that both controls xenograft growth and improves mice survival. Altogether, results suggest that proscillaridin A is a promising candidate as cancer therapies in glioblastoma. This sustains previous reports showing that cardiac glycosides act as anticancer drugs in other cancers. PMID:25400117

  5. Though Active on RINm5F Insulinoma Cells and Cultured Pancreatic Islets, Recombinant IL-22 Fails to Modulate Cytotoxicity and Disease in a Protocol of Streptozotocin-Induced Experimental Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Berner, Anika; Bachmann, Malte; Bender, Christine; Pfeilschifter, Josef; Christen, Urs; Mühl, Heiko

    2016-01-01

    Interleukin (IL)-22 is a cytokine displaying tissue protective and pro-regenerative functions in various preclinical disease models. Anti-bacterial, pro-proliferative, and anti-apoptotic properties mediated by activation of the transcription factor signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT)-3 are key to biological functions of this IL-10 family member. Herein, we introduce RINm5F insulinoma cells as rat β-cell line that, under the influence of IL-22, displays activation of STAT3 with induction of its downstream gene targets Socs3, Bcl3, and Reg3b. In addition, IL-22 also activates STAT1 in this cell type. To refine those observations, IL-22 biological activity was evaluated using ex vivo cultivated murine pancreatic islets. In accord with data on RINm5F cells, islet exposure to IL-22 activated STAT3 and upregulation of STAT3-inducible Socs3, Bcl3, and Steap4 was evident under those conditions. As these observations supported the hypothesis that IL-22 may exert protective functions in toxic β-cell injury, application of IL-22 was investigated in murine multiple-low-dose streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetes. For that purpose, recombinant IL-22 was administered thrice either immediately before and at disease onset (at d4, d6, d8) or closely thereafter (at d8, d10, d12). These two IL-22-treatment periods coincide with two early peaks of β-cell injury detectable in this model. Notably, none of the two IL-22-treatment strategies affected diabetes incidence or blood glucose levels in STZ-treated mice. Moreover, pathological changes in islet morphology analyzed 28 days after disease induction were not ameliorated by IL-22 administration. Taken together, despite being active on rat RINm5F insulinoma cells and murine pancreatic islets, recombinant IL-22 fails to protect pancreatic β-cells in the tested protocols from toxic effects of STZ and thus is unable to ameliorate disease in the widely used model of STZ-induced diabetes. PMID:26793108

  6. Unusual prolongation of radiation-induced G2 arrest in tumor xenografts derived from HeLa cells.

    PubMed

    Kaida, Atsushi; Miura, Masahiko

    2015-10-01

    The effect of ionizing radiation on cell cycle kinetics in solid tumors remains largely unknown because of technical limitations and these tumors' complicated structures. In this study, we analyzed intratumoral cell cycle kinetics after X-irradiation of tumor xenografts derived from HeLa cells expressing the fluorescent ubiquitination-based cell cycle indicator (Fucci), a novel system to visualize cell cycle kinetics in vivo. Cell cycle kinetics after X-irradiation was examined by using tumor sections and in vivo real-time imaging system in tumor xenografts derived from HeLa cells expressing Fucci. We found that G2 arrest was remarkably prolonged, up to 5 days after 10-Gy irradiation, in contrast to monolayer cultures where G2 arrest returned within 24 h. Cells isolated from tumors 5 days after irradiation exhibited a higher surviving fraction than those isolated immediately or one day after irradiation. In this study, we clearly demonstrated unusual post-irradiation cell cycle kinetics in tumor xenografts derived from HeLa-Fucci cells. Our findings imply that prolonged G2 arrest occurring in tumor microenvironments following irradiation may function as a radioresistance mechanism.

  7. Laparoscopic surgery for pancreatic insulinomas: an update.

    PubMed

    Aggeli, Chrysanthi; Nixon, Alexander M; Karoumpalis, Ioannis; Kaltsas, Gregory; Zografos, George N

    2016-04-01

    Insulinomas are the most common functioning neuroendocrine tumors of the pancreas, occurring in almost 1-4 per 1 million persons each year. In contrast to other pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors, they are usually benign and solitary at the time of diagnosis. Due to their benign nature, surgical excision is the treatment of choice, with excellent long-term results. The introduction of minimally invasive techniques in the surgical treatment of insulinoma has been gaining popularity due to shorter length of hospital stay and better cosmetic results, with serious complications being comparable to those of open surgery. Preoperative localization is of paramount importance in the determination of the appropriate surgical approach. Many invasive and non-invasive methods exist for localization of an insulinoma. A combination of these modalities is usually adequate to preoperatively localize the vast majority of tumors. Laparoscopic ultrasound is mandatory to localize these tumors intraoperatively. Despite extensive experience in highly specialized centers producing encouraging results, no randomized trials have been realized to conclusively validate these case series, this partly due to the rarity of insulinoma in the population. In this article we present the current state of laparoscopic management of insulinoma delineating still unanswered issues and we underscore some of the technical details of the most common laparoscopic procedures employed.

  8. Pancratistatin selectively targets cancer cell mitochondria and reduces growth of human colon tumor xenografts.

    PubMed

    Griffin, Carly; Karnik, Aditya; McNulty, James; Pandey, Siyaram

    2011-01-01

    The naturally occurring Amaryllidaceae alkaloid pancratistatin exhibits potent apoptotic activity against a large panel of cancer cells lines and has an insignificant effect on noncancerous cell lines, although with an elusive cellular target. Many current chemotherapeutics induce apoptosis via genotoxic mechanisms and thus have low selectivity. The observed selectivity of pancratistatin for cancer cells promoted us to consider the hypothesis that this alkaloid targets cancer cell mitochondria rather than DNA or its replicative machinery. In this study, we report that pancratistatin decreased mitochondrial membrane potential and induced apoptotic nuclear morphology in p53-mutant (HT-29) and wild-type p53 (HCT116) colorectal carcinoma cell lines, but not in noncancerous colon fibroblast (CCD-18Co) cells. Interestingly, pancratistatin was found to be ineffective against mtDNA-depleted (ρ(0)) cancer cells. Moreover, pancratistatin induced cell death in a manner independent of Bax and caspase activation, and did not alter β-tubulin polymerization rate nor cause double-stranded DNA breaks. For the first time we report the efficacy of pancratistatin in vivo against human colorectal adenocarcinoma xenografts. Intratumor administration of pancratistatin (3 mg/kg) caused significant reduction in the growth of subcutaneous HT-29 tumors in Nu/Nu mice (n = 6), with no apparent toxicity to the liver or kidneys as indicated by histopathologic analysis and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling. Altogether, this work suggests that pancratistatin may be a novel mitochondria-targeting compound that selectively induces apoptosis in cancer cells and significantly reduces tumor growth. PMID:21220492

  9. CXCR1 blockade selectively targets human breast cancer stem cells in vitro and in xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Ginestier, Christophe; Liu, Suling; Diebel, Mark E.; Korkaya, Hasan; Luo, Ming; Brown, Marty; Wicinski, Julien; Cabaud, Olivier; Charafe-Jauffret, Emmanuelle; Birnbaum, Daniel; Guan, Jun-Lin; Dontu, Gabriela; Wicha, Max S.

    2010-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that breast cancer and other solid tumors possess a rare population of cells capable of extensive self-renewal that contribute to metastasis and treatment resistance. We report here the development of a strategy to target these breast cancer stem cells (CSCs) through blockade of the IL-8 receptor CXCR1. CXCR1 blockade using either a CXCR1-specific blocking antibody or repertaxin, a small-molecule CXCR1 inhibitor, selectively depleted the CSC population in 2 human breast cancer cell lines in vitro. Furthermore, this was followed by the induction of massive apoptosis in the bulk tumor population via FASL/FAS signaling. The effects of CXCR1 blockade on CSC viability and on FASL production were mediated by the FAK/AKT/FOXO3A pathway. In addition, repertaxin was able to specifically target the CSC population in human breast cancer xenografts, retarding tumor growth and reducing metastasis. Our data therefore suggest that CXCR1 blockade may provide a novel means of targeting and eliminating breast CSCs. PMID:20051626

  10. Targeting Tumor Vasculature Endothelial Cells and Tumor Cells for Immunotherapy of Human Melanoma in a Mouse Xenograft Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Zhiwei; Sun, Ying; Garen, Alan

    1999-07-01

    An immunotherapy treatment for cancer that targets both the tumor vasculature and tumor cells has shown promising results in a severe combined immunodeficient mouse xenograft model of human melanoma. The treatment involves systemic delivery of an immunoconjugate molecule composed of a tumor-targeting domain conjugated to the Fc effector domain of human IgG1. The effector domain induces a cytolytic immune response against the targeted cells by natural killer cells and complement. Two types of targeting domains were used. One targeting domain is a human single-chain Fv molecule that binds to a chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan expressed on the surface of most human melanoma cells. Another targeting domain is factor VII (fVII), a zymogen that binds with high specificity and affinity to the transmembrane receptor tissue factor (TF) to initiate the blood coagulation cascade. TF is expressed by endothelial cells lining the tumor vasculature but not the normal vasculature, and also by many types of tumor cells including melanoma. Because the binding of a fVII immunoconjugate to TF might cause disseminated intravascular coagulation, the active site of fVII was mutated to inhibit coagulation without affecting the affinity for TF. The immunoconjugates were encoded as secreted molecules in a replication-defective adenovirus vector, which was injected into the tail vein of severe combined immunodeficient mice. The results demonstrate that a mutated fVII immunoconjugate, administered separately or together with a single-chain Fv immunoconjugate that binds to the tumor cells, can inhibit the growth or cause regression of an established human tumor xenograft. This procedure could be effective in treating a broad spectrum of human solid tumors that express TF on vascular endothelial cells and tumor cells.

  11. Discovery of a drug targeting microenvironmental support for lymphoma cells by screening using patient-derived xenograft cells

    PubMed Central

    Sugimoto, Keiki; Hayakawa, Fumihiko; Shimada, Satoko; Morishita, Takanobu; Shimada, Kazuyuki; Katakai, Tomoya; Tomita, Akihiro; Kiyoi, Hitoshi; Naoe, Tomoki

    2015-01-01

    Cell lines have been used for drug discovery as useful models of cancers; however, they do not recapitulate cancers faithfully, especially in the points of rapid growth rate and microenvironment independency. Consequently, the majority of conventional anti-cancer drugs are less sensitive to slow growing cells and do not target microenvironmental support, although most primary cancer cells grow slower than cell lines and depend on microenvironmental support. Here, we developed a novel high throughput drug screening system using patient-derived xenograft (PDX) cells of lymphoma that maintained primary cancer cell phenotype more than cell lines. The library containing 2613 known pharmacologically active substance and off-patent drugs were screened by this system. We could find many compounds showing higher cytotoxicity than conventional anti-tumor drugs. Especially, pyruvinium pamoate showed the highest activity and its strong anti-tumor effect was confirmed also in vivo. We extensively investigated its mechanism of action and found that it inhibited glutathione supply from stromal cells to lymphoma cells, implying the importance of the stromal protection from oxidative stress for lymphoma cell survival and a new therapeutic strategy for lymphoma. Our system introduces a primary cancer cell phenotype into cell-based phenotype screening and sheds new light on anti-cancer drug development. PMID:26278963

  12. Preclinical study of treatment response in HCT-116 cells and xenografts with (1) H-decoupled (31) P MRS.

    PubMed

    Darpolor, Moses M; Kennealey, Peter T; Le, H Carl; Zakian, Kristen L; Ackerstaff, Ellen; Rizwan, Asif; Chen, Jin-Hong; Sambol, Elliot B; Schwartz, Gary K; Singer, Samuel; Koutcher, Jason A

    2011-11-01

    The topoisomerase I inhibitor, irinotecan, and its active metabolite SN-38 have been shown to induce G(2) /M cell cycle arrest without significant cell death in human colon carcinoma cells (HCT-116). Subsequent treatment of these G(2) /M-arrested cells with the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, flavopiridol, induced these cells to undergo apoptosis. The goal of this study was to develop a noninvasive metabolic biomarker for early tumor response and target inhibition of irinotecan followed by flavopiridol treatment in a longitudinal study. A total of eleven mice bearing HCT-116 xenografts were separated into two cohorts where one cohort was administered saline and the other treated with a sequential course of irinotecan followed by flavopiridol. Each mouse xenograft was longitudinally monitored with proton ((1) H)-decoupled phosphorus ((31) P) magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) before and after treatment. A statistically significant decrease in phosphocholine (p = 0.0004) and inorganic phosphate (p = 0.0103) levels were observed in HCT-116 xenografts following treatment, which were evidenced within twenty-four hours of treatment completion. Also, a significant growth delay was found in treated xenografts. To discern the underlying mechanism for the treatment response of the xenografts, in vitro HCT-116 cell cultures were investigated with enzymatic assays, cell cycle analysis, and apoptotic assays. Flavopiridol had a direct effect on choline kinase as measured by a 67% reduction in the phosphorylation of choline to phosphocholine. Cells treated with SN-38 alone underwent 83 ± 5% G(2) /M cell cycle arrest compared to untreated cells. In cells, flavopiridol alone induced 5 ± 1% apoptosis while the sequential treatment (SN-38 then flavopiridol) resulted in 39 ± 10% apoptosis. In vivo (1) H-decoupled (31) P MRS indirectly measures choline kinase activity. The decrease in phosphocholine may be a potential indicator of early tumor response to

  13. Single-agent cytarabine is insufficient for the treatment of human mantle cell lymphoma in mouse xenograft model.

    PubMed

    Klanova, M; Soukup, T; Molinsky, J; Lateckova, L; Vockova, P; Alam, M; Zivny, J; Trneny, M; Klener, P

    2016-01-01

    Mantle cell lymphoma is an aggressive type of B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma with adverse prognosis. It was demonstrated that alternation of CHOP and DHAP chemotherapy improved outcome of mantle cell lymphoma patients. However, which components of DHAP, cisplatin, cytarabine, or both, were responsible for the improved outcome remained unclear. To answer this question, antitumor efficacies of equally toxic doses of cytarabine, cisplatin, and three different combinations were compared in vivo using mouse xenograft models of mantle cell lymphoma. We demonstrated that cisplatin, alone or with cytarabine, is significantly superior to single-agent cytarabine in both eliminating lymphoma cells and suppressing their proliferation rate. PMID:27468882

  14. Radiobiological comparison of external beam irradiation and radioimmunotherapy in renal cell carcinoma xenografts.

    PubMed

    Wessels, B W; Vessella, R L; Palme, D F; Berkopec, J M; Smith, G K; Bradley, E W

    1989-12-01

    Growth delay was measured in TK-82 renal cell carcinoma (RCC) xenografts implanted in nude mice receiving single fraction external beam irradiation (SF-XRT), multifraction external beam irradiation (MF-XRT), or radioimmunotherapy (RIT). Thermoluminescent dosimeter(s) (TLD) and autoradiography were used to ascertain the average absorbed dose delivered and the degree of heterogeneous uptake of radiolabeled antibody for the RIT irradiations. For intravenous administered activities of 100, 200, 400, and 600 microCi of I-131 labeled A6H antibody, volume doubling times (VDT) and TLD absorbed dose measurements for each administered activity were 7 days (341 cGy), 38 days (383 cGy), 85 days (886 cGy) and no regrowth (1034 cGy), respectively. For SF-XRT irradiations of 500, 1000, and 1500 cGy, VDT times were 11, 62, and 103 days, respectively. MF-XRT of 4 X 250 cGy over a 2-week period yielded a VDT of 25 days. Marked peripheral activity deposition was noted on most autoradiographs from multiple tumor samples. These data suggest that an equivalent to superior tumor growth delay is obtained for absorbed doses delivered by exponentially decaying low dose rate radioimmunotherapy RIT compared to similar doses of acute dose rate XRT as quantitated by the TLD method. PMID:2599909

  15. Radiobiological comparison of external beam irradiation and radioimmunotherapy in renal cell carcinoma xenografts

    SciTech Connect

    Wessels, B.W.; Vessella, R.L.; Palme, D.F. II; Berkopec, J.M.; Smith, G.K.; Bradley, E.W. )

    1989-12-01

    Growth delay was measured in TK-82 renal cell carcinoma (RCC) xenografts implanted in nude mice receiving single fraction external beam irradiation (SF-XRT), multifraction external beam irradiation (MF-XRT), or radioimmunotherapy (RIT). Thermoluminescent dosimeter(s) (TLD) and autoradiography were used to ascertain the average absorbed dose delivered and the degree of heterogeneous uptake of radiolabeled antibody for the RIT irradiations. For intravenous administered activities of 100, 200, 400, and 600 microCi of I-131 labeled A6H antibody, volume doubling times (VDT) and TLD absorbed dose measurements for each administered activity were 7 days (341 cGy), 38 days (383 cGy), 85 days (886 cGy) and no regrowth (1034 cGy), respectively. For SF-XRT irradiations of 500, 1000, and 1500 cGy, VDT times were 11, 62, and 103 days, respectively. MF-XRT of 4 X 250 cGy over a 2-week period yielded a VDT of 25 days. Marked peripheral activity deposition was noted on most autoradiographs from multiple tumor samples. These data suggest that an equivalent to superior tumor growth delay is obtained for absorbed doses delivered by exponentially decaying low dose rate radioimmunotherapy RIT compared to similar doses of acute dose rate XRT as quantitated by the TLD method.

  16. Erythropoietin Receptor Antagonist Suppressed Ectopic Hemoglobin Synthesis in Xenografts of HeLa Cells to Promote Their Destruction.

    PubMed

    Yasuda, Yoshiko; Fujita, Mitsugu; Koike, Eiji; Obata, Koshiro; Shiota, Mitsuru; Kotani, Yasushi; Musha, Terunaga; Tsuji-Kawahara, Sachiyo; Satou, Takao; Masuda, Seiji; Okano, Junko; Yamasaki, Harufumi; Okumoto, Katsumi; Uesugi, Tadao; Nakao, Shinichi; Hoshiai, Hiroshi; Mandai, Masaki

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to explore a cause-oriented therapy for patients with uterine cervical cancer that expresses erythropoietin (Epo) and its receptor (EpoR). Epo, by binding to EpoR, stimulates the proliferation and differentiation of erythroid progenitor cells into hemoglobin-containing red blood cells. In this study, we report that the HeLa cells in the xenografts expressed ε, γ, and α globins as well as myoglobin (Mb) to produce tetrameric α2ε2 and α2γ2 and monomeric Mb, most of which were significantly suppressed with an EpoR antagonist EMP9. Western blotting revealed that the EMP9 treatment inhibited the AKT-pAKT, MAPKs-pMAPKs, and STAT5-pSTAT5 signaling pathways. Moreover, the treatment induced apoptosis and suppression of the growth and inhibited the survival through disruption of the harmonized hemoprotein syntheses in the tumor cells concomitant with destruction of vascular nets in the xenografts. Furthermore, macrophages and natural killer (NK) cells with intense HIF-1α expression recruited significantly more in the degenerating foci of the xenografts. These findings were associated with the enhanced expressions of nNOS in the tumor cells and iNOS in macrophages and NK cells in the tumor sites. The treated tumor cells exhibited a substantial number of perforations on the cell surface, which indicates that the tumors were damaged by both the nNOS-induced nitric oxide (NO) production in the tumor cells as well as the iNOS-induced NO production in the innate immune cells. Taken together, these data suggest that HeLa cells constitutively acquire ε, γ and Mb synthetic capacity for their survival. Therefore, EMP9 treatment might be a cause-oriented and effective therapy for patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the uterine cervix. PMID:25874769

  17. Molecular characterization of chordoma xenografts generated from a novel primary chordoma cell source and two chordoma cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Karikari, Isaac O.; Gilchrist, Christopher L.; Jing, Liufang; Alcorta, David A.; Chen, Jun; Richardson, William J.; Gabr, Mostafa A.; Bell, Richard D.; Kelley, Michael J.; Bagley, Carlos A.; Setton, Lori A.

    2014-01-01

    Object Chordoma cells can generate solid-like tumors in xenograft models that express some molecular characteristics of the parent tumor, including positivity for brachyury and cytokeratins. However, there is a dearth of molecular markers that relate to chordoma tumor growth, as well as the cell lines needed to advance treatment. The objective in this study was to isolate a novel primary chordoma cell source and analyze the characteristics of tumor growth in a mouse xenograft model for comparison with the established U-CH1 and U-CH2b cell lines. Methods Primary cells from a sacral chordoma, called “DVC-4,” were cultured alongside U-CH1 and U-CH2b cells for more than 20 passages and characterized for expression of CD24 and brachyury. While brachyury is believed essential for driving tumor formation, CD24 is associated with healthy nucleus pulposus cells. Each cell type was subcutaneously implanted in NOD/SCID/IL2Rγnull mice. The percentage of solid tumors formed, time to maximum tumor size, and immunostaining scores for CD24 and brachyury (intensity scores of 0–3, heterogeneity scores of 0–1) were reported and evaluated to test differences across groups. Results The DVC-4 cells retained chordoma-like morphology in culture and exhibited CD24 and brachyury expression profiles in vitro that were similar to those for U-CH1 and U-CH2b. Both U-CH1 and DVC-4 cells grew tumors at rates that were faster than those for U-CH2b cells. Gross tumor developed at nearly every site (95%) injected with U-CH1 and at most sites (75%) injected with DVC-4. In contrast, U-CH2b cells produced grossly visible tumors in less than 50% of injected sites. Brachyury staining was similar among tumors derived from all 3 cell types and was intensely positive (scores of 2–3) in a majority of tissue sections. In contrast, differences in the pattern and intensity of staining for CD24 were noted among the 3 types of cell-derived tumors (p < 0.05, chi-square test), with evidence of intense

  18. Metastatic Insulinoma Managed with Radiolabeled Somatostatin Analog

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Ricardo; Bacchi, Carlos E.; Almeida Filho, Paulo

    2013-01-01

    Insulinoma is a rare pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor. Overproduction of insulin and associated hypoglycemia are hallmark features of this disease. Diagnosis can be made through demonstration of hypoglycemia and elevated plasma levels of insulin or C-Peptide. Metastatic disease can be detected through computerized tomography (CT) scans, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and positron emission tomography (PET)/CT. Somatostatin receptor scintigraphy can be used not only to document metastatic disease but also as a predictive marker of the benefit from therapy with radiolabeled somatostatin analog. Unresectable metastatic insulinomas may present as a major therapeutic challenge for the treating physician. When feasible, resection is the mainstay of treatment. Prevention of hypoglycemia is a crucial goal of therapy for unresectable/metastatic tumors. Diazoxide, hydrochlorothiazide, glucagon, and intravenous glucose infusions have been used for glycemic control yielding temporary and inconsistent results. Sandostatin and its long-acting depot forms have occasionally been used in the treatment of Octreoscan-positive insulinomas. Herein, we report a case of metastatic insulinoma with very difficult glycemic control successfully treated with the radiolabeled somatostatin analog lutetium (177LU). PMID:24455330

  19. Dynamics of genomic clones in breast cancer patient xenografts at single cell resolution

    PubMed Central

    Eirew, Peter; Steif, Adi; Khattra, Jaswinder; Ha, Gavin; Yap, Damian; Farahani, Hossein; Gelmon, Karen; Chia, Stephen; Mar, Colin; Wan, Adrian; Laks, Emma; Biele, Justina; Shumansky, Karey; Rosner, Jamie; McPherson, Andrew; Nielsen, Cydney; Roth, Andrew J. L.; Lefebvre, Calvin; Bashashati, Ali; de Souza, Camila; Siu, Celia; Aniba, Radhouane; Brimhall, Jazmine; Oloumi, Arusha; Osako, Tomo; Bruna, Alejandra; Sandoval, Jose; Algara, Teresa; Greenwood, Wendy; Leung, Kaston; Cheng, Hongwei; Xue, Hui; Wang, Yuzhuo; Lin, Dong; Mungall, Andrew J.; Moore, Richard; Zhao, Yongjun; Lorette, Julie; Nguyen, Long; Huntsman, David; Eaves, Connie J.; Hansen, Carl; Marra, Marco A.; Caldas, Carlos; Shah, Sohrab P.; Aparicio, Samuel

    2016-01-01

    Human cancers, including breast cancers, are comprised of clones differing in mutation content. Clones evolve dynamically in space and time following principles of Darwinian evolution1,2, underpinning important emergent features such as drug resistance and metastasis3–7. Human breast cancer xenoengraftment is used as a means of capturing and studying tumour biology, and breast tumour xenografts are generally assumed to be reasonable models of the originating tumours8–10. However the consequences and reproducibility of engraftment and propagation on the genomic clonal architecture of tumours has not been systematically examined at single cell resolution. Here we show by both deep genome and single cell sequencing methods, the clonal dynamics of initial engraftment and subsequent serial propagation of primary and metastatic human breast cancers in immunodeficient mice. In all 15 cases examined, clonal selection on engraftment was observed in both primary and metastatic breast tumours, varying in degree from extreme selective engraftment of minor (<5% of starting population) clones to moderate, polyclonal engraftment. Furthermore, ongoing clonal dynamics during serial passaging is a feature of tumours experiencing modest initial selection. Through single cell sequencing, we show that major mutation clusters estimated from tumour population sequencing relate predictably to the most abundant clonal genotypes, even in clonally complex and rapidly evolving cases. Finally, we show that similar clonal expansion patterns can emerge in independent grafts of the same starting tumour population, indicating that genomic aberrations can be reproducible determinants of evolutionary trajectories. Our results show that measurement of genomically defined clonal population dynamics will be highly informative for functional studies utilizing patient-derived breast cancer xenoengraftment. PMID:25470049

  20. Monitoring PAI-1 and VEGF Levels in 6 Human Squamous Cell Carcinoma Xenografts During Fractionated Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Bayer, Christine; Kielow, Achim; Schilling, Daniela; Maftei, Constantin-Alin; Zips, Daniel; Yaromina, Ala; Baumann, Michael; Molls, Michael; Multhoff, Gabriele

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: Previous studies have shown that the plasminogen activator inhibitor type-1 (PAI-1) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) are regulated by hypoxia and irradiation and are involved in neoangiogenesis. The aim of this study was to determine in vivo whether changes in PAI-1 and VEGF during fractionated irradiation could predict for radiation resistance. Methods and Materials: Six xenografted tumor lines from human squamous cell carcinomas (HSCC) of the head and neck were irradiated with 0, 3, 5, 10, and 15 daily fractions of 2 Gy. The PAI-1 and VEGF antigen levels in tumor lysates were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kits. The amounts of PAI-1 and VEGF were compared with the dose to cure 50% of tumors (TCD{sub 50}). Colocalization of PAI-1, pimonidazole (hypoxia), CD31 (endothelium), and Hoechst 33342 (perfusion) was examined by immunofluorescence. Results: Human PAI-1 and VEGF (hVEGF) expression levels were induced by fractionated irradiation in UT-SCC-15, UT-SCC-14, and UT-SCC-5 tumors, and mouse VEGF (msVEGF) was induced only in UT-SCC-5 tumors. High hVEGF levels were significantly associated with radiation sensitivity after 5 fractions (P=.021), and high msVEGF levels were significantly associated with radiation resistance after 10 fractions (P=.007). PAI-1 staining was observed in the extracellular matrix, the cytoplasm of fibroblast-like stroma cells, and individual tumor cells at all doses of irradiation. Colocalization studies showed PAI-1 staining close to microvessels. Conclusions: These results indicate that the concentration of tumor-specific and host-specific VEGF during fractionated irradiation could provide considerably divergent information for the outcome of radiation therapy.

  1. Effect of dietary selenium and cancer cell xenograft on peripheral T and B lymphocytes in adult nude mice.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Wen-Hsing; Holmstrom, Alexandra; Li, Xiangdong; Wu, Ryan T Y; Zeng, Huawei; Xiao, Zhengguo

    2012-05-01

    Selenium (Se) is known to regulate tumorigenesis and immunity at the nutritional and supranutritional levels. Because the immune system provides critical defenses against cancer and the athymic, immune-deficient NU/J nude mice are known to gradually develop CD8(+) and CD4(+) T cells, we investigated whether B and T cell maturation could be modulated by dietary Se and by tumorigenesis in nude mice. Fifteen homozygous nude mice were fed a Se-deficient, Torula yeast basal diet alone (Se-) or supplemented with 0.15 (Se+) or 1.0 (Se++) mg Se/kg (as Na(2)SeO(4)) for 6 months, followed by a 7-week time course of PC-3 prostate cancer cell xenograft (2 × 10(6) cells/site, 2 sites/mouse). Here, we show that peripheral B cell levels decreased in nude mice fed the Se -  or Se++ diet and the CD4(+) T cell levels increased in mice fed the Se++ diet. During the PC-3 cell tumorigenesis, dietary Se status did not affect peripheral CD4(+) or CD8(+) T cells in nude mice whereas mice fed with the Se++ diet appeared to exhibit greater peripheral CD25(+)CD4(+) T cells on day 9. Dietary Se status did not affect spleen weight in nude mice 7 weeks after the xenograft. Spleen weight was associated with frequency of peripheral CD4(+), but not CD8(+) T cells. Taken together, dietary Se at the nutritional and supranutritional levels regulates peripheral B and T cells in adult nude mice before and after xenograft with PC-3 prostate cancer cells.

  2. Identification of multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells in the reactive stroma of a prostate cancer xenograft by side population analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Santamaria-Martinez, Albert; Barquinero, Jordi; Barbosa-Desongles, Anna; Hurtado, Antoni; Pinos, Tomas; Seoane, Joan; Poupon, Marie-France; Morote, Joan; Reventos, Jaume; Munell, Francina

    2009-10-15

    Cancer stem cells are a distinct cellular population that is believed to be responsible for tumor initiation and maintenance. Recent data suggest that solid tumors also contain another type of stem cells, the mesenchymal stem cells or multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs), which contribute to the formation of tumor-associated stroma. The Hoechst 33342 efflux assay has proved useful to identify a rare cellular fraction, named Side Population (SP), enriched in cells with stem-like properties. Using this assay, we identified SP cells in a prostate cancer xenograft containing human prostate cancer cells and mouse stromal cells. The SP isolation, subculture and sequential sorting allowed the generation of single-cell-derived clones of murine origin that were recognized as MSC by their morphology, plastic adherence, proliferative potential, adipogenic and osteogenic differentiation ability and immunophenotype (CD45{sup -}, CD81{sup +} and Sca-1{sup +}). We also demonstrated that SP clonal cells secrete transforming growth factor {beta}1 (TGF-{beta}1) and that their inhibition reduces proliferation and accelerates differentiation. These results reveal the existence of SP cells in the stroma of a cancer xenograft, and provide evidence supporting their MSC nature and the role of TGF-{beta}1 in maintaining their proliferation and undifferentiated status. Our data also reveal the usefulness of the SP assay to identify and isolate MSC cells from carcinomas.

  3. Development and analysis of patient-derived xenograft mouse models in intravascular large B-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Shimada, K; Shimada, S; Sugimoto, K; Nakatochi, M; Suguro, M; Hirakawa, A; Hocking, T D; Takeuchi, I; Tokunaga, T; Takagi, Y; Sakamoto, A; Aoki, T; Naoe, T; Nakamura, S; Hayakawa, F; Seto, M; Tomita, A; Kiyoi, H

    2016-07-01

    Intravascular large B-cell lymphoma (IVLBCL) is a distinct disease entity with the peculiar characteristic that tumor cells proliferate within vessels. Despite recent advances in understanding the disease from clinical aspects, the underlying pathogenesis remains unknown. Here we demonstrate analyses of IVLBCL biology using four xenograft mouse models established from primary IVLBCL samples. In all four models, the main characteristic of IVLBCL tumor cell proliferation within vessels was retained. Time-lapse engraftment analyses revealed that the tumor cells initially engrafted and proliferated in the sinusoids and vessels in the liver and then engrafted and proliferated in multiple organs. Intriguingly, serial passage of tumor cells from the adrenal gland of a transplanted mouse developed from primary patient bone marrow cells into a second mouse showed that the tumor cells mainly distributed into the adrenal gland in the second mouse, implying the existence of clonal selection and/or evolution at engraftment of a specific organ. Gene expression profiling analyses demonstrated that the gene set associated with cell migration was enriched for normal peripheral blood B cells, indicating that inhibition of cell migration might be involved in IVLBCL pathogenesis. In conclusion, the mouse xenograft models described here are essential tools for uncovering IVLBCL biology.

  4. Soma-to-germline transmission of RNA in mice xenografted with human tumour cells: possible transport by exosomes.

    PubMed

    Cossetti, Cristina; Lugini, Luana; Astrologo, Letizia; Saggio, Isabella; Fais, Stefano; Spadafora, Corrado

    2014-01-01

    Mendelian laws provide the universal founding paradigm for the mechanism of genetic inheritance through which characters are segregated and assorted. In recent years, however, parallel with the rapid growth of epigenetic studies, cases of inheritance deviating from Mendelian patterns have emerged. Growing studies underscore phenotypic variations and increased risk of pathologies that are transgenerationally inherited in a non-Mendelian fashion in the absence of any classically identifiable mutation or predisposing genetic lesion in the genome of individuals who develop the disease. Non-Mendelian inheritance is most often transmitted through the germline in consequence of primary events occurring in somatic cells, implying soma-to-germline transmission of information. While studies of sperm cells suggest that epigenetic variations can potentially underlie phenotypic alterations across generations, no instance of transmission of DNA- or RNA-mediated information from somatic to germ cells has been reported as yet. To address these issues, we have now generated a mouse model xenografted with human melanoma cells stably expressing EGFP-encoding plasmid. We find that EGFP RNA is released from the xenografted human cells into the bloodstream and eventually in spermatozoa of the mice. Tumor-released EGFP RNA is associated with an extracellular fraction processed for exosome purification and expressing exosomal markers, in all steps of the process, from the xenografted cancer cells to the spermatozoa of the recipient animals, strongly suggesting that exosomes are the carriers of a flow of information from somatic cells to gametes. Together, these results indicate that somatic RNA is transferred to sperm cells, which can therefore act as the final recipients of somatic cell-derived information.

  5. Activin type IB receptor signaling in prostate cancer cells promotes lymph node metastasis in a xenograft model

    SciTech Connect

    Nomura, Masatoshi; Tanaka, Kimitaka; Wang, Lixiang; Goto, Yutaka; Mukasa, Chizu; Ashida, Kenji; Takayanagi, Ryoichi

    2013-01-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ActRIB signaling induces Snail and S100A4 expressions in prostate cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The prostate cancer cell lines expressing an active form of ActRIB were established. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ActRIB signaling promotes EMT and lymph node metastasis in xenograft model. -- Abstract: Activin, a member of the transforming growth factor-{beta} family, has been known to be a growth and differentiating factor. Despite its pluripotent effects, the roles of activin signaling in prostate cancer pathogenesis are still unclear. In this study, we established several cell lines that express a constitutive active form of activin type IB receptor (ActRIBCA) in human prostate cancer cells, ALVA41 (ALVA-ActRIBCA). There was no apparent change in the proliferation of ALVA-ActRIBCA cells in vitro; however, their migratory ability was significantly enhanced. In a xenograft model, histological analysis revealed that the expression of Snail, a cell-adhesion-suppressing transcription factor, was dramatically increased in ALVA-ActRIBCA tumors, indicating epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT). Finally, mice bearing ALVA-ActRIBCA cells developed multiple lymph node metastases. In this study, we demonstrated that ActRIBCA signaling can promote cell migration in prostate cancer cells via a network of signaling molecules that work together to trigger the process of EMT, and thereby aid in the aggressiveness and progression of prostate cancers.

  6. Establishment and characterization of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma patient-derived xenograft mouse models for preclinical drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jingchuan; Jiang, Dongxian; Li, Xiaojing; Lv, Jing; Xie, Liang; Zheng, Li; Gavine, Paul R; Hu, Qin; Shi, Yuan; Tan, Lijie; Ge, Di; Xu, Songtao; Li, Leon; Zhu, Lifang; Hou, Yingyong; Wang, Qun

    2014-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to establish and characterize patient-derived esophageal squamous cell carcinoma xenograft (PDECX) mice for utilization in antitumor drug discovery. A total of 96 esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) tissues from Chinese patients were transplanted subcutaneously into immunodeficient mice. Histology, EGFR, K-ras, B-raf, and PIK3CA mutations, and HER2 gene amplifications were analyzed in both patient tumors and mouse xenograft tissues using immunohistochemistry, mutant-enriched liquid chip sequencing and fluorescence in situ hybridization assays, respectively. Furthermore, in vivo efficacy studies using five PDECX mice harboring a variety of genetic aberrations were performed using the chemotherapy agents 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and cisplatin. Thirty-seven PDECX mouse models were successfully established in immunodeficient mice. Pathological analysis revealed similar histological architecture and degrees of differentiation between patient ESCC and xenografted tumors. No mutations were identified in EGFR, K-ras, and B-raf genes in either xenograft models or patient ESCC tissues. In contrast, PIK3CA gene mutations were detected in 12.5% (12/96) ESCC patients and 18.9% (7/37) PDECX models. Interestingly, patient ESCC tissues exhibiting HER2 overexpression or gene amplification were unable to survive in immunodeficient mice. Further analysis showed that PDECX models carrying HER2 2+ expression had no response to 5-FU/cisplatin, compared with HER2-negative models. In conclusion, a panel of PDECX mouse models, which include PIK3CA mutant and HER2-positive models, was established and characterized thus mimicking the current clinical genetic setting of esophageal carcinoma. The sensitivity of HER2-negative ESCC models to chemotherapy supports stratification approaches in the treatment of esophageal carcinoma patients and warrants further investigation of the impact of PI3KCA on treatment response.

  7. Interleukin-1 stimulates the expression of type I and type II interleukin-1 receptors in the rat insulinoma cell line Rinm5F; sequencing a rat type II interleukin-1 receptor cDNA.

    PubMed

    Bristulf, J; Gatti, S; Malinowsky, D; Bjork, L; Sundgren, A K; Bartfai, T

    1994-01-01

    The insulin secreting rat Rinm5F cells are often used to study the cytotoxic actions of interleukin-1 (IL-1) on pancreatic beta-cells. We demonstrate here that Rinm5F insulinoma cells express both type I and type II interleukin-1 receptor (IL-1R) mRNAs and gene products. IL-1R agonists, recombinant murine IL-1 alpha (rmIL-1 alpha, 10 ng/ml) and recombinant rat IL-1 beta (rrIL-1 beta, 100 pg/ml or 10 ng/ml) induce the upregulation of mRNA expression for both types of IL-1 receptors (IL-1Rs). This effect of rrIL-1 beta is antagonised by preincubation with recombinant human interleukin 1 receptor antagonist protein (rhIL-1ra, 5 micrograms/ml). Furthermore, this rrIL-1 beta induced upregulation of IL-1R mRNAs is blocked by actinomycin D (7.5 micrograms/ml), whereas cycloheximide (20 micrograms/ml) has no effect. The phorbol ester PMA (20 nM) upregulates the expression of mRNAs both IL-1 receptors, whereas glucose (50 mM) upregulates the expression of the type I IL-1R mRNA only. Pretreatment of cells with pertussis toxin (100 ng/ml) partially blocks the rrIL-1 beta induced expression of mRNA for the type I and, to a lesser extent, the type II IL-1R. Incubation of the cells with rrIL-1 beta also induces a time-dependent expression of c-fos, interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) mRNAs. Binding studies with 125I-recombinant human IL-1 beta (125I-rhIL-1 beta) indicate that IL-1R gene products, with the ligand binding characteristics of the type I IL-1R, are constitutively present on Rinm5F cells. Treatment with rrIL-1 beta (6h) increases the number of 125I-rhIL-1 beta binding sites on Rinm5F cells. We have also demonstrated that the number of type II IL-1R binding sites increases after induction with rrIL-1 beta (6h), by indirect immunofluorescence using a monoclonal antibody (ALVA 42) raised against the human type II IL-1R. Furthermore, we have sequenced the type II IL-1R cDNA in the rat insulinoma Rinm5F cells. The comparison of the amino acid

  8. Enhancement of glucose uptake in skeletal muscle L6 cells and insulin secretion in pancreatic hamster-insulinoma-transfected cells by application of non-thermal plasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Naresh; Kaushik, Nagendra K.; Park, Gyungsoon; Choi, Eun H.; Uhm, Han S.

    2013-11-01

    Type-II diabetes Mellitus is characterized by defects in insulin action on peripheral tissues, such as skeletal muscle, adipose tissue, and liver and pancreatic beta cells. Since the skeletal muscle accounts for approximately 75% of insulin-stimulated glucose-uptake in our body, impaired insulin secretion from defected beta cell plays a major role in the afflicted glucose homoeostasis. It was shown that the intracellular reactive oxygen species and nitric oxide level was increased by non-thermal-plasma treatment in ambient air. These increased intracellular reactive species may enhance glucose uptake and insulin secretion through the activation of intracellular calcium (Ca+) and cAMP production.

  9. XH1--a new cervical carcinoma cell line and xenograft model of tumour invasion, 'metastasis' and regression.

    PubMed Central

    Han, X.; Lyle, R.; Eustace, D. L.; Jewers, R. J.; Parrington, J. M.; Das, A.; Chana, T.; Dagg, B.; Money, S.; Bates, T. D.

    1991-01-01

    A new cell line, XH1, has been derived from an invasive focally keratinising adenosquamous carcinoma of the cervix in a 32 year old patient. It has been maintained in long term monolayer culture for 26 months, and passaged over 100 times (much greater than 300 population doublings). It is aneuploid with a mean chromosome number of 78. Examination using two minisatellite hypervariable DNA probes has shown it to be different from other cell lines maintained in this laboratory and from HeLa. Two sublines, XH1a and XH1b, show marked differences in monolayer culture, growth in soft agar, and xenograft formation. XH1 and XH1a cells readily form subcutaneous xenografts, and lung colonies can be established by their intravenous injection. Subcutaneous injection of XH1b cells results in rapid cell growth for a few days after which the tumour undergoes degeneration and then regresses completely. The XH1 karyotype has many rearranged chromosomes. Parental XH1 cells and both sublines show integration of HPV16 into the genome. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 9 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 10 Figure 13 Figure 14 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 15 Figure 16 Figure 17 Figure 18 PMID:1911212

  10. Diagnostic Difficulties in a Pediatric Insulinoma

    PubMed Central

    Miron, Ingrith; Diaconescu, Smaranda; Aprodu, Gabriel; Ioniuc, Ileana; Diaconescu, Mihai Radu; Miron, Lucian

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Insulinomas are functional neuroendocrine pancreatic tumors rarely encountered in pediatric pathology. Insulinomas are usually solitary and sporadic, but may occur in association with multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1. Whipple's triad—hypoglycemia, simultaneous compatible adrenergic and/or neurological signs, and relief of symptoms upon the administration of glucose—remains the fundamental diagnostic tool. We report a case of insulinoma in an 11-year-old boy with malnutrition and mild psychic retardation. History revealed neuroglycopenic symptoms associated with hypoglycemia that returned to normal values after glucose intravenous infusion; before admission in our unit, the levels of circulating insulin, as well as the abdominal ultrasound and abdominal computed tomography scan, were reported within normal range. During hospitalization in our service, the glycemic curves showed recurring low values associated with low glycated hemoglobin, positive fasting test, and elevated C-peptide. The pancreatic ultrasound was inconclusive, but the magnetic resonance imaging revealed a high signal focal area with a diameter of 1 cm, located in the tail of pancreas. Conventional enucleation of the lesion prompted a spectacular normalization of glucose metabolism and the alleviation of the main clinical symptoms. The child had a favorable evolution in the clinical follow-up, presenting with weight gain and progressive remission to complete disappearance of most symptoms—except for the mental impairments. Although in our case Whipple's triad was apparent from the beginning, the diagnosis was delayed due to the failure of conventional imaging methods in locating the tumor. Weight loss and mental impairment contributed to the diagnosis pitfalls. Pediatricians should be aware of confusing and nonspecific symptoms, especially when children with insulinoma present mental or neurological retardation. Despite the existence of medical regimens, surgery remains the gold

  11. Standardized orthotopic xenografts in zebrafish reveal glioma cell-line-specific characteristics and tumor cell heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Welker, Alessandra M.; Jaros, Brian D.; Puduvalli, Vinay K.; Imitola, Jaime; Kaur, Balveen; Beattie, Christine E.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Glioblastoma (GBM) is a deadly brain cancer, for which few effective drug treatments are available. Several studies have used zebrafish models to study GBM, but a standardized approach to modeling GBM in zebrafish was lacking to date, preventing comparison of data across studies. Here, we describe a new, standardized orthotopic xenotransplant model of GBM in zebrafish. Dose-response survival assays were used to define the optimal number of cells for tumor formation. Techniques to measure tumor burden and cell spread within the brain over real time were optimized using mouse neural stem cells as control transplants. Applying this standardized approach, we transplanted two patient-derived GBM cell lines, serum-grown adherent cells and neurospheres, into the midbrain region of embryonic zebrafish and analyzed transplanted larvae over time. Progressive brain tumor growth and premature larval death were observed using both cell lines; however, fewer transplanted neurosphere cells were needed for tumor growth and lethality. Tumors were heterogeneous, containing both cells expressing stem cell markers and cells expressing markers of differentiation. A small proportion of transplanted neurosphere cells expressed glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) or vimentin, markers of more differentiated cells, but this number increased significantly during tumor growth, indicating that these cells undergo differentiation in vivo. By contrast, most serum-grown adherent cells expressed GFAP and vimentin at the earliest times examined post-transplant. Both cell types produced brain tumors that contained Sox2+ cells, indicative of tumor stem cells. Transplanted larvae were treated with currently used GBM therapeutics, temozolomide or bortezomib, and this resulted in a reduction in tumor volume in vivo and an increase in survival. The standardized model reported here facilitates robust and reproducible analysis of glioblastoma tumor cells in real time and provides a platform for

  12. Effects of all-trans retinoic acid and interferon alpha in peripheral neuroectodermal tumor cell cultures and xenografts.

    PubMed

    Rosolen, A; Favaretto, G; Masarotto, G; Cavazzana, A; Zanesco, L; Frascella, E

    1998-11-01

    Peripheral neuroectodermal tumors (PNET) have an unsatisfactory outcome when treated with standard approaches. Among novel treatments, the use of biological response modifiers has rarely been reported in this group of malignancies. We have previously demonstrated that both all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) and interferon á (IFNá) can inhibit proliferation of human PNET cells and that ATRA can up-regulate IFNá receptor expression in vitro. In this study we evaluated the anti-tumor effects of ATRA and IFNá in PNET cells in vitro and in a human PNET xenograft model, using CHP100 cells. A synergistic inhibitory effect of ATRA and IFNá was observed on CHP100 cells in vitro. On the contrary, a significant inhibition of tumor growth was observed in mice treated with ATRA alone, whereas neither IFNá nor the combination of ATRA and IFNá, reached a statistically significant anti-tumor effect. Histologic examination of tumors revealed the presence of necrosis upon treatment with IFNá, whereas almost no necrosis, but a more differentiated morphology, confirmed by electron microscopy analysis, was associated with the ATRA containing treatments. Taken together these data show an in vitro and in vivo anti-tumor activity of ATRA in human PNET cells, although no synergism of ATRA and IFNá was observed in our xenograft model.

  13. Insulinoma-Induced Hypoglycemia in a Patient with Insulinoma after Gastrojejunostomy for Prepyloric Ulcer.

    PubMed

    Koca, Yavuz Savas; Aydın, Bünyamin; Koca, Tugba; Bülbül, Mustafa Tevfik; Tamer, Mehmet Numan

    2015-01-01

    Hyperinsulinism due to dumping syndrome following gastric surgery is an uncommon condition. It is specified with hypoglycemic attacks. However, linking symptoms to dumping syndrome in each patient to whom gastric surgery was performed leads to inappropriate diagnosis and therapy. Insulinoma and other causes that give rise to hyperinsulinemia should not be ignored and these diagnoses should be excluded. In this paper, 71-year-old male patient who was followed up for 2 years with a false conclusion of dumping syndrome and operated on due to insulinoma diagnosed at endoscopic ultrasonography is presented in the light of the literature. PMID:26558131

  14. Silencing STAT3 with short hairpin RNA enhances radiosensitivity of human laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma xenografts in vivo

    PubMed Central

    LI, XIAOMING; WANG, HAIRU; LU, XIUYING; DI, BIN

    2010-01-01

    Short hairpin RNA (shRNA) targeting signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) potentiate the radiosensitivity of human laryngeal squamous carcinoma cells in vitro. In the present study, we investigated the inhibitory effect of STAT3 shRNA plus radiotherapy on nude mouse laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma xenografts. The xenotransplanted tumors were treated with STAT3 shRNA, with or without radiation, following a planned scheme. The inhibition rate for tumor growth was calculated and the tumor growth curve was plotted. In addition, the expression of p-STAT3, B cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2), p53, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) protein and intratumoral microvessel density (MVD) was determined by immunohistochemistry. Flow cytometry was used to detect the rate of cell apoptosis. The results revealed that STAT3 shRNA transfection plus radiotherapy significantly minimized tumor volume and increased the rate of tumor inhibition. p-STAT3 protein expression and intratumoral MVD were observed to be down-regulated, whereas apoptosis was increased. There was a positive correlation between the expression of p-STAT3 and Bcl-2, and also between the expression of p53 and VEGF, and MVD. These findings indicate that STAT3 shRNA potentiate the radiosensitivity of laryngeal carcinoma xenografts in vivo by regulating downstream signaling proteins in the STAT3 pathway. PMID:22993624

  15. Optimizing lutetium 177-anti-carbonic anhydrase IX radioimmunotherapy in an intraperitoneal clear cell renal cell carcinoma xenograft model.

    PubMed

    Muselaers, Constantijn H J; Oosterwijk, Egbert; Bos, Desirée L; Oyen, Wim J G; Mulders, Peter F A; Boerman, Otto C

    2014-01-01

    A new approach in the treatment of clear cell renal carcinoma (ccRCC) is radioimmunotherapy (RIT) using anti-carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX) antibody G250. To investigate the potential of RIT with lutetium 177 (177Lu)-labeled G250, we conducted a protein dose escalation study and subsequently an RIT study in mice with intraperitoneally growing ccRCC lesions. Mice with intraperitoneal xenografts were injected with 1, 3, 10, 30, or 100 μg of G250 labeled with 10 MBq indium 111 (111In) to determine the optimal protein dose. The optimal protein dose determined with imaging and biodistribution studies was used in a subsequent RIT experiment in three groups of 10 mice with intraperitoneal SK-RC-52 tumors. One group received 13 MBq 177Lu-DOTA-G250, a control group received 13 MBq nonspecific 177Lu-MOPC21, and the second control group was not treated and received 20 MBq 111In-DOTA-G250. The optimal G250 protein dose to target ccRCC in this model was 10 μg G250. Treatment with 13 MBq 177Lu-DOTA-G250 was well tolerated and resulted in significantly prolonged median survival (139 days) compared to controls (49-53 days, p  =  .015), indicating that RIT has potential in this metastatic ccRCC model.

  16. Sodium Selenite Radiosensitizes Hormone-Refractory Prostate Cancer Xenograft Tumors but Not Intestinal Crypt Cells In Vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Tian Junqiang; Ning Shouchen; Knox, Susan J.

    2010-09-01

    Purpose: We have previously shown that sodium selenite (SSE) increases radiation-induced cell killing of human prostate carcinoma cells in vitro. In this study we further evaluated the in vivo radiosensitizing effect of SSE in prostate cancer xenograft tumors and normal radiosensitive intestinal crypt cells. Methods and Materials: Immunodeficient (SCID) mice with hormone-independent LAPC-4 (HI-LAPC-4) and PC-3 xenograft tumors (approximately 200 mm{sup 3}) were divided into four groups: control (untreated), radiation therapy (XRT, local irradiation), SSE (2 mg/kg, intraperitoneally, 3 times/week), and XRT plus SSE. The XRT was given at the beginning of the regimen as a single dose of 5 Gy for HI-LAPC-4 tumors and a single dose of 7 Gy followed by a fractional dose of 3 Gy/d for 5 days for PC-3 tumors. The tumor volume was measured 3 times per week. The radiosensitizing effect of SSE on normal intestinal epithelial cells was assessed by use of a crypt cell microcolony assay. Results: In the efficacy study, SSE alone significantly inhibited the tumor growth in HI-LAPC-4 tumors but not PC-3 tumors. Sodium selenite significantly enhanced the XRT-induced tumor growth inhibition in both HI-LAPC-4 and PC-3 tumors. In the toxicity study, SSE did not affect the intestinal crypt cell survival either alone or in combination with XRT. Conclusions: Sodium selenite significantly enhances the effect of radiation on well-established hormone-independent prostate tumors and does not sensitize the intestinal epithelial cells to radiation. These results suggest that SSE may increase the therapeutic index of XRT for the treatment of prostate cancer.

  17. Evaluation of cell-line-derived xenograft tumours as controls for immunohistochemical testing for ER and PR.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Tahrim; Carter, Beverley; Denic, Nash; Gai, Luis; Power, Jennifer; Voisey, Kim; Kao, K R

    2015-09-01

    Quality control (QC) for immunohistochemistry (IHC) analysis routinely incorporates archived specimens for on-slide control material. We have assessed the utility of cell-line-derived xenograft (CDX) tumours for QC in breast estrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PR) biomarker testing. Immunoblot and IHC analyses were used to select cell lines with different steady-state levels of ER and PR expression. CDX tumours all demonstrated consistent and comparable expression of ER and PR with corresponding cell lines from which they were derived. Three pathologists experienced in breast biomarker reporting scored tumours from different locations on mammary fat pads to determine reproducibility. Tumours from different locations were consistently scored as identical, and the CDX tumours representing different levels of biomarker expression were similar to patient-derived controls. Pathologists could not consistently distinguish CDX tumours from patient-derived controls, suggesting that within the appropriate quality management setting, CDX tumours may serve as control material for reporting purposes.

  18. 90Y-Labeled Anti-ROBO1 Monoclonal Antibody Exhibits Antitumor Activity against Small Cell Lung Cancer Xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Fujiwara, Kentaro; Koyama, Keitaro; Suga, Kosuke; Ikemura, Masako; Saito, Yasutaka; Hino, Akihiro; Iwanari, Hiroko; Kusano-Arai, Osamu; Mitsui, Kenichi; Kasahara, Hiroyuki; Fukayama, Masashi; Kodama, Tatsuhiko; Hamakubo, Takao; Momose, Toshimitsu

    2015-01-01

    Introduction ROBO1 is a membrane protein that contributes to tumor metastasis and angiogenesis. We previously reported that 90Y-labeled anti-ROBO1 monoclonal antibody (90Y-anti-ROBO1 IgG) showed an antitumor effect against ROBO1-positive tumors. In this study, we performed a biodistribution study and radioimmunotherapy (RIT) against ROBO1-positive small cell lung cancer (SCLC) models. Methods For the biodistribution study, 111In-labeled anti-ROBO1 monoclonal antibody (111In-anti-ROBO1 IgG) was injected into ROBO1-positive SCLC xenograft mice via the tail vein. To evaluate antitumor effects, an RIT study was performed, and SCLC xenograft mice were treated with 90Y-anti-ROBO1 IgG. Tumor volume and body weight were periodically measured throughout the experiments. The tumors and organs of mice were then collected, and a pathological analysis was carried out. Results As a result of the biodistribution study, we observed tumor uptake of 111In-anti-ROBO1 IgG. The liver, kidney, spleen, and lung showed comparably high accumulation of 111In-labeled anti-ROBO1. In the RIT study, 90Y-anti-ROBO1 IgG significantly reduced tumor volume compared with baseline. Pathological analyses of tumors revealed coagulation necrosis and fatal degeneration of tumor cells, significant reduction in the number of Ki-67-positive cells, and an increase in the number of apoptotic cells. A transient reduction of hematopoietic cells was observed in the spleen, sternum, and femur. Conclusions These results suggest that RIT with 90Y-anti-ROBO1 IgG is a promising treatment for ROBO1-positive SCLC. PMID:26017283

  19. Smad6 determines BMP-regulated invasive behaviour of breast cancer cells in a zebrafish xenograft model

    PubMed Central

    de Boeck, Miriam; Cui, Chao; Mulder, Aat A; Jost, Carolina R; Ikeno, Souichi; ten Dijke, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) family is known to play critical roles in cancer progression. While the dual role of TGF-β is well described, the function of bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) is unclear. In this study, we established the involvement of Smad6, a BMP-specific inhibitory Smad, in breast cancer cell invasion. We show that stable overexpression of Smad6 in breast cancer MCF10A M2 cells inhibits BMP signalling, thereby mitigating BMP6-induced suppression of mesenchymal marker expression. Using a zebrafish xenograft model, we demonstrate that overexpression of Smad6 potentiates invasion of MCF10A M2 cells and enhances the aggressiveness of breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cells in vivo, whereas a reversed phenotype is observed after Smad6 knockdown. Interestingly, BMP6 pre-treatment of MDA-MB-231 cells induced cluster formation at the invasive site in the zebrafish. BMP6 also stimulated cluster formation of MDA-MB-231 cells co-cultured on Human Microvascular Endothelial Cells (HMEC)-1 in vitro. Electron microscopy illustrated an induction of cell-cell contact by BMP6. The clinical relevance of our findings is highlighted by a correlation of high Smad6 expression with poor distant metastasis free survival in ER-negative cancer patients. Collectively, our data strongly indicates the involvement of Smad6 and BMP signalling in breast cancer cell invasion in vivo. PMID:27113436

  20. Isolation of Pancreatic Cancer Cells from a Patient-Derived Xenograft Model Allows for Practical Expansion and Preserved Heterogeneity in Culture.

    PubMed

    Pham, Kien; Delitto, Daniel; Knowlton, Andrea E; Hartlage, Emily R; Madhavan, Ricky; Gonzalo, David H; Thomas, Ryan M; Behrns, Kevin E; George, Thomas J; Hughes, Steven J; Wallet, Shannon M; Liu, Chen; Trevino, Jose G

    2016-06-01

    Commercially available, highly passaged pancreatic cancer (PC) cell lines are of limited translational value. Attempts to overcome this limitation have primarily consisted of cancer cell isolation and culture directly from human PC specimens. However, these techniques are associated with exceedingly low success rates. Here, we demonstrate a highly reproducible culture of primary PC cell lines (PPCLs) from patient-derived xenografts, which preserve, in part, the intratumoral heterogeneity known to exist in PC. PPCL expansion from patient-derived xenografts was successful in 100% of attempts (5 of 5). Phenotypic analysis was evaluated with flow cytometry, immunofluorescence microscopy, and short tandem repeat profiling. Importantly, tumorigenicity of PPCLs expanded from patient-derived xenografts was assessed by subcutaneous injection into nonobese diabeteic.Cg-Prkdc(scid)Il2rg(tm1Wjl)/SzJ mice. Morphologically, subcutaneous injection of all PPCLs into mice yielded tumors with similar characteristics to the parent xenograft. PPCLs uniformly expressed class I human leukocyte antigen, epithelial cell adhesion molecule, and cytokeratin-19. Heterogeneity within each PPCL persisted in culture for the frequency of cells expressing the cancer stem cell markers CD44, CD133, and c-Met and the immunologic markers human leukocyte antigen class II and programmed death ligand 1. This work therefore presents a reliable method for the rapid expansion of primary human PC cells and, thereby, provides a platform for translational investigation and, importantly, potential personalized therapeutic approaches.

  1. Abrogation of STAT3 signaling cascade by zerumbone inhibits proliferation and induces apoptosis in renal cell carcinoma xenograft mouse model.

    PubMed

    Shanmugam, Muthu K; Rajendran, Peramaiyan; Li, Feng; Kim, Chulwon; Sikka, Sakshi; Siveen, Kodappully Sivaraman; Kumar, Alan Prem; Ahn, Kwang Seok; Sethi, Gautam

    2015-10-01

    Persistent activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) is one of the characteristic features of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) and often linked to its deregulated proliferation, survival, and angiogenesis. In the present report, we investigated whether zerumbone, a sesquiterpene, exerts its anticancer effect through modulation of STAT3 activation pathway. The pharmacological effect of zerumbone on STAT3 activation, associated protein kinases and phosphatase, and apoptosis was investigated using both RCC cell lines and xenograft mouse model. We observed that zerumbone suppressed STAT3 activation in a dose- and time-dependent manner in RCC cells. The suppression was mediated through the inhibition of activation of upstream kinases c-Src, Janus-activated kinase 1, and Janus-activated kinase 2. Pervanadate treatment reversed zerumbone-induced downregulation of STAT3, suggesting the involvement of a tyrosine phosphatase. Indeed, we found that zerumbone induced the expression of tyrosine phosphatase SHP-1 that correlated with its ability to inhibit STAT3 activation. Interestingly, deletion of SHP-1 gene by siRNA abolished the ability of zerumbone to inhibit STAT3 activation. The inhibition of STAT3 activation by zerumbone also caused the suppression of the gene products involved in proliferation, survival, and angiogenesis. Finally, when administered i.p., zerumbone inhibited STAT3 activation in tumor tissues and the growth of human RCC xenograft tumors in athymic nu/nu mice without any side effects. Overall, our results suggest for the first time that zerumbone is a novel blocker of STAT3 signaling cascade and thus has an enormous potential for the treatment of RCC and other solid tumors.

  2. Human Adipose Tissue-Derived Stromal/Stem Cells Promote Migration and Early Metastasis of Triple Negative Breast Cancer Xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Rowan, Brian G.; Gimble, Jeffrey M.; Sheng, Mei; Anbalagan, Muralidharan; Jones, Ryan K.; Frazier, Trivia P.; Asher, Majdouline; Lacayo, Eduardo A.; Friedlander, Paul L.; Kutner, Robert; Chiu, Ernest S.

    2014-01-01

    Background Fat grafting is used to restore breast defects after surgical resection of breast tumors. Supplementing fat grafts with adipose tissue-derived stromal/stem cells (ASCs) is proposed to improve the regenerative/restorative ability of the graft and retention. However, long term safety for ASC grafting in proximity of residual breast cancer cells is unknown. The objective of this study was to determine the impact of human ASCs derived from abdominal lipoaspirates of three donors, on a human breast cancer model that exhibits early metastasis. Methodology/Principal Findings Human MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells represents “triple negative” breast cancer that exhibits early micrometastasis to multiple mouse organs [1]. Human ASCs were derived from abdominal adipose tissue from three healthy female donors. Indirect co-culture of MDA-MB-231 cells with ASCs, as well as direct co-culture demonstrated that ASCs had no effect on MDA-MB-231 growth. Indirect co-culture, and ASC conditioned medium (CM) stimulated migration of MDA-MB-231 cells. ASC/RFP cells from two donors co-injected with MDA-MB-231/GFP cells exhibited a donor effect for stimulation of primary tumor xenografts. Both ASC donors stimulated metastasis. ASC/RFP cells were viable, and integrated with MDA-MB-231/GFP cells in the tumor. Tumors from the co-injection group of one ASC donor exhibited elevated vimentin, matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), IL-8, VEGF and microvessel density. The co-injection group exhibited visible metastases to the lung/liver and enlarged spleen not evident in mice injected with MDA-MB-231/GFP alone. Quantitation of the total area of GFP fluorescence and human chromosome 17 DNA in mouse organs, H&E stained paraffin sections and fluorescent microscopy confirmed multi-focal metastases to lung/liver/spleen in the co-injection group without evidence of ASC/RFP cells. Conclusions Human ASCs derived from abdominal lipoaspirates of two donors stimulated metastasis of MDA-MB-231

  3. Silencing of APE1 enhances sensitivity of human hepatocellular carcinoma cells to radiotherapy in vitro and in a xenograft model.

    PubMed

    Cun, Yanping; Dai, Nan; Xiong, Chengjie; Li, Mengxia; Sui, Jiangdong; Qian, Chengyuan; Li, Zheng; Wang, Dong

    2013-01-01

    Resistance to radiotherapy is a key limitation for the treatment of human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). To overcome this problem, we investigated the correlation between radioresistance and the human apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease (APE1), a bifunctional protein, which plays an important role in DNA repair and redox regulation activity of transcription factors. In the present study, we examined the radiosensitivity profiles of three human HCC cell lines, HepG2, Hep3B, and MHCC97L, using the adenoviral vector Ad5/F35-mediated APE1 siRNA (Ad5/F35-siAPE1). The p53 mutant cell lines MHCC97L showed radioresistance, compared with HepG2 and Hep3B cells. APE1 was strongly expressed in MHCC97L cells and was induced by irradiation in a dose-dependent manner, and Ad5/F35-siAPE1 effectively inhibited irradiation-induced APE1 and p53 expression. Moreover, silencing of APE1 significantly potentiated the growth inhibition and apoptosis induction by irradiation in all tested human HCC cell lines. In addition, Ad5/F35-siAPE1 significantly enhanced inhibition of tumor growth and potentiated cell apoptosis by irradiation both in HepG2 and MHCC97L xenografts. In conclusion, down regulation of APE1 could enhance sensitivity of human HCC cells to radiotherapy in vitro and in vivo.

  4. Fluorescent peptide biosensor for monitoring CDK4/cyclin D kinase activity in melanoma cell extracts, mouse xenografts and skin biopsies.

    PubMed

    Prével, Camille; Pellerano, Morgan; González-Vera, Juan A; Henri, Pauline; Meunier, Laurent; Vollaire, Julien; Josserand, Véronique; Morris, May C

    2016-11-15

    Melanoma constitutes the most aggressive form of skin cancer, which further metastasizes into a deadly form of cancer. The p16(INK4a)-Cyclin D-CDK4/6-pRb pathway is dysregulated in 90% of melanomas. CDK4/Cyclin D kinase hyperactivation, associated with mutation of CDK4, amplification of Cyclin D or loss of p16(INK4a) leads to increased risk of developing melanoma. This kinase therefore constitutes a key biomarker in melanoma and an emerging pharmacological target, however there are no tools enabling direct detection or quantification of its activity. Here we report on the design and application of a fluorescent peptide biosensor to quantify CDK4 activity in melanoma cell extracts, skin biopsies and melanoma xenografts. This biosensor provides sensitive means of comparing CDK4 activity between different melanoma cell lines and further responds to CDK4 downregulation by siRNA or small-molecule inhibitors. By affording means of monitoring CDK4 hyperactivity consequent to cancer-associated molecular alterations in upstream signaling pathways that converge upon this kinase, this biosensor offers an alternative to immunological identification of melanoma-specific biomarkers, thereby constituting an attractive tool for diagnostic purposes, providing complementary functional information to histological analysis, of particular utility for detection of melanoma onset in precancerous lesions. This is indeed the first fluorescent peptide biosensor which has been successfully implemented to monitor kinase activity in skin samples and melanoma tumour xenografts. Moreover by enabling to monitor response to CDK4 inhibitors, this biosensor constitutes an attractive companion assay to identify compounds of therapeutic relevance for melanoma. PMID:27203461

  5. Fluorescent peptide biosensor for monitoring CDK4/cyclin D kinase activity in melanoma cell extracts, mouse xenografts and skin biopsies.

    PubMed

    Prével, Camille; Pellerano, Morgan; González-Vera, Juan A; Henri, Pauline; Meunier, Laurent; Vollaire, Julien; Josserand, Véronique; Morris, May C

    2016-11-15

    Melanoma constitutes the most aggressive form of skin cancer, which further metastasizes into a deadly form of cancer. The p16(INK4a)-Cyclin D-CDK4/6-pRb pathway is dysregulated in 90% of melanomas. CDK4/Cyclin D kinase hyperactivation, associated with mutation of CDK4, amplification of Cyclin D or loss of p16(INK4a) leads to increased risk of developing melanoma. This kinase therefore constitutes a key biomarker in melanoma and an emerging pharmacological target, however there are no tools enabling direct detection or quantification of its activity. Here we report on the design and application of a fluorescent peptide biosensor to quantify CDK4 activity in melanoma cell extracts, skin biopsies and melanoma xenografts. This biosensor provides sensitive means of comparing CDK4 activity between different melanoma cell lines and further responds to CDK4 downregulation by siRNA or small-molecule inhibitors. By affording means of monitoring CDK4 hyperactivity consequent to cancer-associated molecular alterations in upstream signaling pathways that converge upon this kinase, this biosensor offers an alternative to immunological identification of melanoma-specific biomarkers, thereby constituting an attractive tool for diagnostic purposes, providing complementary functional information to histological analysis, of particular utility for detection of melanoma onset in precancerous lesions. This is indeed the first fluorescent peptide biosensor which has been successfully implemented to monitor kinase activity in skin samples and melanoma tumour xenografts. Moreover by enabling to monitor response to CDK4 inhibitors, this biosensor constitutes an attractive companion assay to identify compounds of therapeutic relevance for melanoma.

  6. Naltrindole Inhibits Human Multiple Myeloma Cell Proliferation In Vitro and in a Murine Xenograft Model In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Mundra, Jyoti Joshi; Terskiy, Alexandra

    2012-01-01

    It has been demonstrated previously that immune cell activation and proliferation were sensitive to the effects of naltrindole, a nonpeptidic δ-opioid receptor-selective antagonist; therefore, we hypothesized that human multiple myeloma (MM) would be a valuable model for studying potential antineoplastic properties of naltrindole. [3H]naltrindole exhibited saturable, low-affinity binding to intact human MM cells; however, the pharmacological profile of the binding site differed considerably from the properties of δ-, κ-, and μ-opioid receptors, and opioid receptor mRNA was not detected in MM cells by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. Naltrindole inhibited the proliferation of cultured human U266 MM cells in a time- and dose-dependent manner with an EC50 of 16 μM. The naltrindole-induced inhibition of U266 cell proliferation was not blocked by a 10-fold molar excess of naltrexone, a nonselective opioid antagonist. Additive inhibition of MM cell proliferation was observed when using a combination of naltrindole with the histone deacetylase inhibitor sodium valproate, the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib, the glucocorticoid receptor agonist dexamethasone, and the HMG CoA reductase inhibitor simvastatin. Treatment of U266 cells with naltrindole significantly decreased the level of the active, phosphorylated form of the kinases, extracellular signal-regulated kinase and Akt, which may be related to its antiproliferative activity. The antiproliferative activity of naltrindole toward MM cells was maintained in cocultures of MM and bone marrow-derived stromal cells, mimicking the bone marrow microenvironment. In vivo, naltrindole significantly decreased tumor cell volumes in human MM cell xenografts in severe combined immunodeficient mice. We hypothesize that naltrindole inhibits the proliferation of MM cells through a nonopioid receptor-dependent mechanism. PMID:22537770

  7. Multi-modal and multi-wavelength imaging in xenografts bearing human tumor cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Sunkuk; Ke, Shi; Wang, Wei; Cameron, Arlin G.; Sevick Muraca, Eva M.

    2007-02-01

    Dynamic multi-wavelength fluorescence imaging was accomplished using a liquid crystal tunable filter (LCTF). Since several different emission wavelengths can be selected by tuning the LCTF, two wavelength dynamic fluorescence imaging was conducted in mice bearing human melanoma M21 and M21L after injection of a mixture of (i) RGD peptide conjugated with a near-infrared (NIR) dye that targeted integrin αvβ3 and (ii) non-specific dye, Cy5.5. Dynamic multi-wavelength imaging with LCTF can differentiate the uptake of the two different fluorescent contrast agents between tumor and normal tissue ROIs in the M21 and M21L xenograft models. Although the LCTF attenuated fluorescence signals by a factor of two when compared to holographic and bandpass filter sets used previously, Tumor to background ratio (TBR) from NIR fluorescence images with a bandpass and holographic filter were not statistically different from those acquired with the LCTF. Therefore, the benefit of spectral information as well as dynamic multi-wavelength may outweigh the impact of the lower transmission efficiencies, and could enable in vivo small animal imaging.

  8. The isothiocyanate erucin abrogates telomerase in hepatocellular carcinoma cells in vitro and in an orthotopic xenograft tumour model of HCC.

    PubMed

    Herz, Corinna; Hertrampf, Anke; Zimmermann, Stefan; Stetter, Nadine; Wagner, Meike; Kleinhans, Claudia; Erlacher, Miriam; Schüler, Julia; Platz, Stefanie; Rohn, Sascha; Mersch-Sundermann, Volker; Lamy, Evelyn

    2014-12-01

    In contrast to cancer cells, most normal human cells have no or low telomerase levels which makes it an attractive target for anti-cancer drugs. The small molecule sulforaphane from broccoli is known for its cancer therapeutic potential in vitro and in vivo. In animals and humans it was found to be quickly metabolized into 4-methylthiobutyl isothiocyanate (MTBITC, erucin) which we recently identified as strong selective apoptosis inducer in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells. Here, we investigated the relevance of telomerase abrogation for cytotoxic efficacy of MTBITC against HCC. The drug was effective against telomerase, independent from TP53 and MTBITC also blocked telomerase in chemoresistant subpopulations. By using an orthotopic human liver cancer xenograft model, we give first evidence that MTBITC at 50 mg/KG b.w./d significantly decreased telomerase activity in vivo without affecting enzyme activity of adjacent normal tissue. Upon drug exposure, telomerase decrease was consistent with a dose-dependent switch to anti-survival, cell arrest and apoptosis in our in vitro HCC models. Blocking telomerase by the specific inhibitor TMPyP4 further sensitized cancer cells to MTBITC-mediated cytotoxicity. Overexpression of hTERT, but not enzyme activity deficient DNhTERT, protected against apoptosis; neither DNA damage nor cytostasis induction by MTBITC was prevented by hTERT overexpression. These findings imply that telomerase enzyme activity does not protect against MTBITC-induced DNA damage but impacts signalling processes upstream of apoptosis execution level.

  9. The isothiocyanate erucin abrogates telomerase in hepatocellular carcinoma cells in vitro and in an orthotopic xenograft tumour model of HCC

    PubMed Central

    Herz, Corinna; Hertrampf, Anke; Zimmermann, Stefan; Stetter, Nadine; Wagner, Meike; Kleinhans, Claudia; Erlacher, Miriam; Schüler, Julia; Platz, Stefanie; Rohn, Sascha; Mersch-Sundermann, Volker; Lamy, Evelyn

    2014-01-01

    In contrast to cancer cells, most normal human cells have no or low telomerase levels which makes it an attractive target for anti-cancer drugs. The small molecule sulforaphane from broccoli is known for its cancer therapeutic potential in vitro and in vivo. In animals and humans it was found to be quickly metabolized into 4-methylthiobutyl isothiocyanate (MTBITC, erucin) which we recently identified as strong selective apoptosis inducer in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells. Here, we investigated the relevance of telomerase abrogation for cytotoxic efficacy of MTBITC against HCC. The drug was effective against telomerase, independent from TP53 and MTBITC also blocked telomerase in chemoresistant subpopulations. By using an orthotopic human liver cancer xenograft model, we give first evidence that MTBITC at 50 mg/KG b.w./d significantly decreased telomerase activity in vivo without affecting enzyme activity of adjacent normal tissue. Upon drug exposure, telomerase decrease was consistent with a dose-dependent switch to anti-survival, cell arrest and apoptosis in our in vitro HCC models. Blocking telomerase by the specific inhibitor TMPyP4 further sensitized cancer cells to MTBITC-mediated cytotoxicity. Overexpression of hTERT, but not enzyme activity deficient DNhTERT, protected against apoptosis; neither DNA damage nor cytostasis induction by MTBITC was prevented by hTERT overexpression. These findings imply that telomerase enzyme activity does not protect against MTBITC-induced DNA damage but impacts signalling processes upstream of apoptosis execution level. PMID:25256442

  10. Differential responses to radiation and hyperthermia of cloned cell lines derived from a single human melanoma xenograft

    SciTech Connect

    Rofstad, E.K.; Brustad, T.

    1984-06-01

    One uncloned and five cloned cell lines were derived from a single human melanoma xenograft. Cells from passages 7-12 were exposed to either radiation or hyperthermia (42.5/sup 0/C, pH = 7.4) under aerobic conditions and the colony forming ability of the cells was assayed in soft agar. The five cloned lines showed individual and characteristic responses to radiation as well as to hyperthermia. The variation in the response to radiation was mainly reflected in the size of the shoulders of the survival curves rather than in the D/sub 0/-values. The variation in the response to hyperthermia was mainly reflected in the terminal slopes of the survival curves. The survival curve of cells from the uncloned line, both when exposed to radiation and hyperthermia, was positioned in the midst of those of the cloned lines. The response of the cloned lines to radiation did not correlate with the response to hyperthermia, indicating that tumor cell subpopulations which are resistant to radiation may respond well to hyperthermia.

  11. Basal Tumor Cell Isolation and Patient-Derived Xenograft Engraftment Identify High-Risk Clinical Bladder Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Skowron, K. B.; Pitroda, S. P.; Namm, J. P.; Balogun, O.; Beckett, M. A.; Zenner, M. L.; Fayanju, O.; Huang, X.; Fernandez, C.; Zheng, W.; Qiao, G.; Chin, R.; Kron, S. J.; Khodarev, N. N.; Posner, M. C.; Steinberg, G. D.; Weichselbaum, R. R.

    2016-01-01

    Strategies to identify tumors at highest risk for treatment failure are currently under investigation for patients with bladder cancer. We demonstrate that flow cytometric detection of poorly differentiated basal tumor cells (BTCs), as defined by the co-expression of CD90, CD44 and CD49f, directly from patients with early stage tumors (T1-T2 and N0) and patient-derived xenograft (PDX) engraftment in locally advanced tumors (T3-T4 or N+) predict poor prognosis in patients with bladder cancer. Comparative transcriptomic analysis of bladder tumor cells isolated from PDXs indicates unique patterns of gene expression during bladder tumor cell differentiation. We found cell division cycle 25C (CDC25C) overexpression in poorly differentiated BTCs and determined that CDC25C expression predicts adverse survival independent of standard clinical and pathologic features in bladder cancer patients. Taken together, our findings support the utility of BTCs and bladder cancer PDX models in the discovery of novel molecular targets and predictive biomarkers for personalizing oncology care for patients. PMID:27775025

  12. Okadaic acid indicates a major function for protein phosphatases in stimulus-response coupling of RINm5F rat insulinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Mayer, P; Jochum, C; Schatz, H; Pfeiffer, A

    1994-01-01

    Stimulus-induced insulin secretion involves the activation of several protein kinases within the beta cell. Most prominent are protein kinase A, protein kinase C and calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinases. Protein kinase action is functionally antagonized by protein phosphatases. The four ubiquious serine/threonine protein phosphatases are termed PP-1, PP-2A, -2B and -2C. PP-1 and PP-2A are in vivo parts of major protein complexes. These complexes presumably regulate the phosphatase activity and direct the enzyme to its site of action. Therefore, PP-1 and -2A could play an important role in controlling intracellular signal transmission. Two different toxins, okadaic acid and calyculin A, both from marine invertebrates, were recently discovered and identified as potent and highly specific inhibitors of PP-1 and PP-2A. Both compounds emerged as very useful tools for studying intracellular phosphorylation events. We took advantage of these substances to investigate the significance of protein phosphatase action in stimulus-induced insulin secretion. To avoid major complexity, we confined our study to the cAMP and the phosphoinositide signal pathway. Okadaic acid alone evoked virtually no secretory response. cAMP-dependent secretion was markedly enhanced by 1 microM okadaic acid. The stimulatory effect of okadaic acid was strongly dependent on the concentration of cAMP analoga. In contrast, insulin release caused by the cholinergic agonist carbachol was not influenced by okadaic acid. Calyculin A (10 nM) slightly increased cAMP-induced secretion, but its high toxicity prohibited accurate interpretation of the data. Our findings support the idea that serine/threonine phosphatases act as important regulators in stimulus response coupling.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  13. Effects of green-synthesized silver nanoparticles on lung cancer cells in vitro and grown as xenograft tumors in vivo

    PubMed Central

    He, Yan; Du, Zhiyun; Ma, Shijing; Liu, Yue; Li, Dongli; Huang, Huarong; Jiang, Sen; Cheng, Shupeng; Wu, Wenjing; Zhang, Kun; Zheng, Xi

    2016-01-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) have now been recognized as promising therapeutic molecules and are extending their use in cancer diagnosis and therapy. This study demonstrates for the first time the antitumor activity of green-synthesized AgNPs against lung cancer in vitro and in vivo. Cytotoxicity effect was explored on human lung cancer H1299 cells in vitro by MTT and trypan blue assays. Apoptosis was measured by morphological assessment, and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) transcriptional activity was determined by a luciferase reporter gene assay. The expressions of phosphorylated stat3, bcl-2, survivin, and caspase-3 were examined by Western blot analysis. AgNPs showed dose-dependent cytotoxicity and stimulation of apoptosis in H1299 cells. The effects on H1299 cells correlated well with the inhibition of NF-κB activity, a decrease in bcl-2, and an increase in caspase-3 and survivin expression. AgNPs significantly suppressed the H1299 tumor growth in a xenograft severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mouse model. The results demonstrate the anticancer activities of AgNPs, suggesting that they may act as potential beneficial molecules in lung cancer chemoprevention and chemotherapy, especially for early-stage intervention. PMID:27217750

  14. Inhibition of endogenous hydrogen sulfide production in clear-cell renal cell carcinoma cell lines and xenografts restricts their growth, survival and angiogenic potential.

    PubMed

    Sonke, Eric; Verrydt, Megan; Postenka, Carl O; Pardhan, Siddika; Willie, Chantalle J; Mazzola, Clarisse R; Hammers, Matthew D; Pluth, Michael D; Lobb, Ian; Power, Nicholas E; Chambers, Ann F; Leong, Hon S; Sener, Alp

    2015-09-15

    Clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) is characterized by Von Hippel-Lindau (VHL)-deficiency, resulting in pseudohypoxic, angiogenic and glycolytic tumours. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is an endogenously-produced gasotransmitter that accumulates under hypoxia and has been shown to be pro-angiogenic and cytoprotective in cancer. It was hypothesized that H2S levels are elevated in VHL-deficient ccRCC, contributing to survival, metabolism and angiogenesis. Using the H2S-specific probe MeRhoAz, it was found that H2S levels were higher in VHL-deficient ccRCC cell lines compared to cells with wild-type VHL. Inhibition of H2S-producing enzymes could reduce the proliferation, metabolism and survival of ccRCC cell lines, as determined by live-cell imaging, XTT/ATP assay, and flow cytometry respectively. Using the chorioallantoic membrane angiogenesis model, it was found that systemic inhibition of endogenous H2S production was able to decrease vascularization of VHL-deficient ccRCC xenografts. Endogenous H2S production is an attractive new target in ccRCC due to its involvement in multiple aspects of disease.

  15. Inhibition of endogenous hydrogen sulfide production in clear-cell renal cell carcinoma cell lines and xenografts restricts their growth, survival and angiogenic potential

    PubMed Central

    Sonke, Eric; Verrydt, Megan; Postenka, Carl O.; Pardhan, Siddika; Willie, Chantalle J.; Mazzola, Clarisse R.; Hammers, Matthew D.; Pluth, Michael D.; Lobb, Ian; Power, Nicholas E.; Chambers, Ann F.; Leong, Hon S.; Sener, Alp

    2016-01-01

    Clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) is characterized by Von Hippel–Lindau (VHL)-deficiency, resulting in pseudohypoxic, angiogenic and glycolytic tumours. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is an endogenously-produced gasotransmitter that accumulates under hypoxia and has been shown to be pro-angiogenic and cytoprotective in cancer. It was hypothesized that H2S levels are elevated in VHL-deficient ccRCC, contributing to survival, metabolism and angiogenesis. Using the H2S-specific probe MeRhoAz, it was found that H2S levels were higher in VHL-deficient ccRCC cell lines compared to cells with wild-type VHL. Inhibition of H2S-producing enzymes could reduce the proliferation, metabolism and survival of ccRCC cell lines, as determined by live-cell imaging, XTT/ATP assay, and flow cytometry respectively. Using the chorioallantoic membrane angiogenesis model, it was found that systemic inhibition of endogenous H2S production was able to decrease vascularization of VHL-deficient ccRCC xenografts. Endogenous H2S production is an attractive new target in ccRCC due to its involvement in multiple aspects of disease. PMID:26068241

  16. Antitumor activity of a potent MEK inhibitor, TAK-733, against colorectal cancer cell lines and patient derived xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Lieu, Christopher H.; Klauck, Peter J.; Henthorn, Patrick K.; Tentler, John J.; Tan, Aik-Choon; Spreafico, Anna; Selby, Heather M.; Britt, Blair C.; Bagby, Stacey M.; Arcaroli, John J.; Messersmith, Wells A.; Pitts, Todd M.; Eckhardt, S. Gail

    2015-01-01

    Background CRC is a significant cause of cancer mortality, and new therapies are needed for patients with advanced disease. TAK-733 is a highly potent and selective investigational novel MEK allosteric site inhibitor. Materials and Methods In a preclinical study of TAK-733, a panel of CRC cell lines were exposed to varying concentrations of the agent for 72 hours followed by a sulforhodamine B assay. Twenty patient-derived colorectal cancer xenografts were then treated with TAK-733 in vivo. Tumor growth inhibition index (TGII) was assessed to evaluate the sensitivity of the CRC explants to TAK-733 while linear regression was utilized to investigate the predictive effects of genotype on the TGII of explants. Results Fifty-four CRC cell lines were exposed to TAK-733, while 42 cell lines were deemed sensitive across a broad range of mutations. Eighty-two percent of the cell lines within the sensitive subset were BRAF or KRAS/NRAS mutant, whereas 80% of the cell lines within the sensitive subset were PIK3CA WT. Twenty patient-derived human tumor CRC explants were then treated with TAK-733. In total, 15 primary human tumor explants were found to be sensitive to TAK-733 (TGII ≤ 20%), including 9 primary human tumor explants that exhibited tumor regression (TGII > 100%). Explants with a BRAF/KRAS/NRAS mutant and PIK3CA wild-type genotype demonstrated increased sensitivity to TAK-733 with a median TGII of −6%. MEK-response gene signatures also correlated with responsiveness to TAK-733 in KRAS-mutant CRC. Conclusions The MEK inhibitor TAK-733 demonstrated robust antitumor activity against CRC cell lines and patient-derived tumor explants. While the preclinical activity observed in this study was considerable, single-agent efficacy in the clinic has been limited in CRC, supporting the use of these models in an iterative manner to elucidate resistance mechanisms that can guide rational combination strategies. PMID:26439693

  17. Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma patient-derived xenograft models capture the molecular and biological heterogeneity of the disease.

    PubMed

    Chapuy, Bjoern; Cheng, Hongwei; Watahiki, Akira; Ducar, Matthew D; Tan, Yuxiang; Chen, Linfeng; Roemer, Margaretha G M; Ouyang, Jing; Christie, Amanda L; Zhang, Liye; Gusenleitner, Daniel; Abo, Ryan P; Farinha, Pedro; von Bonin, Frederike; Thorner, Aaron R; Sun, Heather H; Gascoyne, Randy D; Pinkus, Geraldine S; van Hummelen, Paul; Wulf, Gerald G; Aster, Jon C; Weinstock, David M; Monti, Stefano; Rodig, Scott J; Wang, Yuzhuo; Shipp, Margaret A

    2016-05-01

    Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is a heterogeneous disease defined by transcriptional classifications, specific signaling and survival pathways, and multiple low-frequency genetic alterations. Preclinical model systems that capture the genetic and functional heterogeneity of DLBCL are urgently needed. Here, we generated and characterized a panel of large B-cell lymphoma (LBCL) patient-derived xenograft (PDX) models, including 8 that reflect the immunophenotypic, transcriptional, genetic, and functional heterogeneity of primary DLBCL and 1 that is a plasmablastic lymphoma. All LBCL PDX models were subjected to whole-transcriptome sequencing to classify cell of origin and consensus clustering classification (CCC) subtypes. Mutations and chromosomal rearrangements were evaluated by whole-exome sequencing with an extended bait set. Six of the 8 DLBCL models were activated B-cell (ABC)-type tumors that exhibited ABC-associated mutations such as MYD88, CD79B, CARD11, and PIM1. The remaining 2 DLBCL models were germinal B-cell type, with characteristic alterations of GNA13, CREBBP, and EZH2, and chromosomal translocations involving IgH and either BCL2 or MYC Only 25% of the DLBCL PDX models harbored inactivating TP53 mutations, whereas 75% exhibited copy number alterations of TP53 or its upstream modifier, CDKN2A, consistent with the reported incidence and type of p53 pathway alterations in primary DLBCL. By CCC criteria, 6 of 8 DLBCL PDX models were B-cell receptor (BCR)-type tumors that exhibited selective surface immunoglobulin expression and sensitivity to entospletinib, a recently developed spleen tyrosine kinase inhibitor. In summary, we have established and characterized faithful PDX models of DLBCL and demonstrated their usefulness in functional analyses of proximal BCR pathway inhibition.

  18. Label-free quantitative proteomic analysis of benzo(a)pyrene-transformed 16HBE cells serum-free culture supernatant and xenografted nude mice sera.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Peng; Fu, Juanling; Yao, Biyun; Jia, Yongrui; Zhang, Hongtao; Li, Xuehui; Dong, Lisha; Gao, Ya; Liu, Wenli; Chen, Wen; Zhou, Zongcan

    2016-02-01

    To screen potential biomarkers of benzo(a)pyrene (BaP)-induced lung cancer, the proteomic profiles of BaP-transformed 16HBE cell line T-16HBE-C1 cells serum-free culture supernatant and xenografted nude mice sera were compared with those of 16HBE group by utilizing label-free quantitative proteomic strategy. By employing nano-LC-MS/MS technology followed by MaxQuant and Perseus processing, 489 differentially expressed proteins were identified between T-16HBE-C1 and 16HBE cells serum-free culture supernatant, and 49 significantly up-regulated proteins were identified in T-16HBE-C1 xenografted nude mice sera. Three proteins neuropilin-2 (NRP2), clusterin (CLU) and A-kinase anchor protein 12 (AKAP12) were up-regulated in the serum-free culture supernatant of T-16HBE-C1 cells. These 3 human proteins were present in the sera of nude mice xenografted with T-16HBE-C1 cells, but were undetectable in mice xenografted with 16HBE cells. The proteomic results of NRP2 and AKAP12 were confirmed by Western blotting and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, respectively. Moreover, the serum NRP2 levels were significantly elevated at the 4th day after tumor cell implantation and showed good positive correlation with tumor growth characterized by tumor volume. In conclusion, serum NRP2, CLU and AKAP12 could be potential biomarkers of BaP-induced lung cancer. The proteomic results will gain deeper insights into the mechanisms of BaP-induced carcinogenesis.

  19. ESI-MS/MS and MALDI-IMS Localization Reveal Alterations in Phosphatidic Acid, Diacylglycerol, and DHA in Glioma Stem Cell Xenografts.

    PubMed

    Wildburger, Norelle C; Wood, Paul L; Gumin, Joy; Lichti, Cheryl F; Emmett, Mark R; Lang, Frederick F; Nilsson, Carol L

    2015-06-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most common adult primary brain tumor. Despite aggressive multimodal therapy, the survival of patients with GBM remains dismal. However, recent evidence has demonstrated the promise of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-hMSCs) as a therapeutic delivery vehicle for anti-glioma agents due to their ability to migrate or home to human gliomas. While several studies have demonstrated the feasibility of harnessing the homing capacity of BM-hMSCs for targeted delivery of cancer therapeutics, it is now also evident, based on clinically relevant glioma stem cell (GSC) models of GBMs, that BM-hMSCs demonstrate variable tropism toward these tumors. In this study, we compared the lipid environment of GSC xenografts that attract BM-hMSCs (N = 9) with those that do not attract (N = 9) to identify lipid modalities that are conducive to homing of BM-hMSC to GBMs. We identified lipids directly from tissue by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) and electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry (ESI-MS/MS) of lipid extracts. Several species of signaling lipids, including phosphatidic acid (PA 36:2, PA 40:5, PA 42:5, and PA 42:7) and diacylglycerol (DAG 34:0, DAG 34:1, DAG 36:1, DAG 38:4, DAG 38:6, and DAG 40:6), were lower in attracting xenografts. Molecular lipid images showed that PA (36:2), DAG (40:6), and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) were decreased within tumor regions of attracting xenografts. Our results provide the first evidence for lipid signaling pathways and lipid-mediated tumor inflammatory responses in the homing of BM-hMSCs to GSC xenografts. Our studies provide new fundamental knowledge on the molecular correlates of the differential homing capacity of BM-hMSCs toward GSC xenografts.

  20. Cell and Molecular Determinants of In Vivo Efficacy of the BH3 Mimetic ABT-263 Against Pediatric Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Suryani, Santi; Carol, Hernan; Chonghaile, Triona Ni; Frismantas, Viktoras; Sarmah, Chintanu; High, Laura; Bornhauser, Beat; Cowley, Mark J; Szymanska, Barbara; Evans, Kathryn; Boehm, Ingrid; Tonna, Elise; Jones, Luke; Manesh, Donya Moradi; Kurmasheva, Raushan T.; Billups, Catherine; Kaplan, Warren; Letai, Anthony; Bourquin, Jean-Pierre; Houghton, Peter J; Smith, Malcolm A; Lock, Richard B

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Predictive biomarkers are required to identify patients who may benefit from the use of BH3 mimetics such as ABT-263. This study investigated the efficacy of ABT-263 against a panel of patient-derived pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) xenografts and utilized cell and molecular approaches to identify biomarkers that predict in vivo ABT-263 sensitivity. Experimental Design The in vivo efficacy of ABT-263 was tested against a panel of 31 patient-derived ALL xenografts comprised of MLL-, BCP- and T-ALL subtypes. Basal gene expression profiles of ALL xenografts were analyzed and confirmed by quantitative RT-PCR, protein expression and BH3 profiling. An in vitro co-culture assay with immortalized human mesenchymal cells was utilized to build a predictive model of in vivo ABT-263 sensitivity. Results ABT-263 demonstrated impressive activity against pediatric ALL xenografts, with 19 of 31 achieving objective responses. Among BCL2 family members, in vivo ABT-263 sensitivity correlated best with low MCL1 mRNA expression levels. BH3 profiling revealed that resistance to ABT-263 correlated with mitochondrial priming by NOXA peptide, suggesting a functional role for MCL1 protein. Using an in vitro co-culture assay, a predictive model of in vivo ABT-263 sensitivity was built. Testing this model against 11 xenografts predicted in vivo ABT-263 responses with high sensitivity (50%) and specificity (100%). Conclusion These results highlight the in vivo efficacy of ABT-263 against a broad range of pediatric ALL subtypes and shows that a combination of in vitro functional assays can be used to predict its in vivo efficacy. PMID:25013123

  1. Correlation between radiosensitivity, percentage hypoxic cells and pO2 measurements in one rodent and two human tumor xenografts.

    PubMed

    Thomas, C D; Chavaudra, N; Martin, L; Guichard, M

    1994-07-01

    Computerized pO2 histography has been used to measure the intratumor pO2 in patients for the past few years, and there is now evidence that these tumors contain hypoxic cells. One of the major questions that remains to be answered is the relevance of such data to radiosensitivity. The present study looks for a correlation between intratumor pO2, the percentage of hypoxic cells in the tumor and the radiosensitization induced by carbogen and/or the oxygen carrier, perflubron emulsion. Two human tumor xenografts (HRT18, Na11+) and one rodent tumor (EMT6) were used. The radiosensitivity (clonogenic assay) and the oxygen tension (computerized pO2 histography) were measured. All experiments were performed under similar conditions. Carbogen increased tumor radiosensitivity; sensitization was greatest when 4 ml/kg perflubron emulsion was used in conjunction with carbogen. The pO2 distribution was shifted to higher pO2 values in the tumors whatever the treatment; the shift was greater for perflubron emulsion plus carbogen. The low pO2 values (< 0.4 kPa) were lost for the HRT18 cells. A correlation (EMT6, HRT18) or a link (Na11+) between the radiosensitization and the oxygen tension measurements was found for values below 1.07 or 1.33 kPa. A trend between the percentage of hypoxic cells and pO2 measurements was found taking into account pO2 measurements comprised between 0.27 and 0.67 kPa. PMID:8016297

  2. Gene mutations in primary tumors and corresponding patient-derived xenografts derived from non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Shaohua; Cao, Mengru; Li, Hongyu; Hu, Jing; Huang, Xiao; Liu, Wei; Zhang, Hui; Wu, Shuhong; Pataer, Apar; Heymach, John V.; Eterovic, Agda Karina; Zhang, Qingxiu; Shaw, Kenna R.; Chen, Ken; Futreal, Andrew; Wang, Michael; Hofstetter, Wayne; Mehran, Reza; Rice, David; Roth, Jack A.; Sepesi, Boris; Swisher, Stephen G.; Vaporciyan, Ara; Walsh, Garrett L.; Johnson, Faye M.; Fang, Bingliang

    2014-01-01

    Molecular annotated patient-derived xenograft (PDX) models are useful for the preclinical investigation of anticancer drugs and individualized anticancer therapy. We established 23 PDXs from 88 surgical specimens of lung cancer patients and determined gene mutations in these PDXs and their paired primary tumors by ultradeep exome sequencing on 202 cancer-related genes. The numbers of primary tumors with deleterious mutations in TP53, KRAS, PI3KCA, ALK, STK11, and EGFR were 43.5%, 21.7%, 17.4%, 17.4%, 13.0%, and 8.7%, respectively. Other genes with deleterious mutations in ≥3 (13.0%) primary tumors were MLL3, SETD2, ATM, ARID1A, CRIPAK, HGF, BAI3, EP300, KDR, PDGRRA and RUNX1. Of 315 mutations detected in the primary tumors, 293 (93%) were also detected in their corresponding PDXs, indicating that PDXs have the capacity to recapitulate the mutations in primary tumors. Nevertheless, a substantial number of mutations had higher allele frequencies in the PDXs than in the primary tumors, or were not detectable in the primary tumor, suggesting the possibility of tumor cell enrichment in PDXs or heterogeneity in the primary tumors. The molecularly annotated PDXs generated from this study could be useful for future translational studies. PMID:25444907

  3. Gene mutations in primary tumors and corresponding patient-derived xenografts derived from non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Hao, Chuncheng; Wang, Li; Peng, Shaohua; Cao, Mengru; Li, Hongyu; Hu, Jing; Huang, Xiao; Liu, Wei; Zhang, Hui; Wu, Shuhong; Pataer, Apar; Heymach, John V; Eterovic, Agda Karina; Zhang, Qingxiu; Shaw, Kenna R; Chen, Ken; Futreal, Andrew; Wang, Michael; Hofstetter, Wayne; Mehran, Reza; Rice, David; Roth, Jack A; Sepesi, Boris; Swisher, Stephen G; Vaporciyan, Ara; Walsh, Garrett L; Johnson, Faye M; Fang, Bingliang

    2015-02-01

    Molecular annotated patient-derived xenograft (PDX) models are useful for the preclinical investigation of anticancer drugs and individualized anticancer therapy. We established 23 PDXs from 88 surgical specimens of lung cancer patients and determined gene mutations in these PDXs and their paired primary tumors by ultradeep exome sequencing on 202 cancer-related genes. The numbers of primary tumors with deleterious mutations in TP53, KRAS, PI3KCA, ALK, STK11, and EGFR were 43.5%, 21.7%, 17.4%, 17.4%, 13.0%, and 8.7%, respectively. Other genes with deleterious mutations in ≥3 (13.0%) primary tumors were MLL3, SETD2, ATM, ARID1A, CRIPAK, HGF, BAI3, EP300, KDR, PDGRRA and RUNX1. Of 315 mutations detected in the primary tumors, 293 (93%) were also detected in their corresponding PDXs, indicating that PDXs have the capacity to recapitulate the mutations in primary tumors. Nevertheless, a substantial number of mutations had higher allele frequencies in the PDXs than in the primary tumors, or were not detectable in the primary tumor, suggesting the possibility of tumor cell enrichment in PDXs or heterogeneity in the primary tumors. The molecularly annotated PDXs generated from this study could be useful for future translational studies.

  4. Neuroprotection and immunomodulation by xenografted human mesenchymal stem cells following spinal cord ventral root avulsion.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Thiago B; Duarte, Adriana S S; Longhini, Ana Leda F; Pradella, Fernando; Farias, Alessandro S; Luzo, Angela C M; Oliveira, Alexandre L R; Olalla Saad, Sara Teresinha

    2015-01-01

    The present study investigates the effects of xenotransplantation of Adipose Tissue Mesenchymal Stem Cells (AT-MSCs) in animals after ventral root avulsion. AT-MSC has similar characteristics to bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs), such as immunomodulatory properties and expression of neurotrophic factors. In this study, Lewis rats were submitted to surgery for unilateral avulsion of the lumbar ventral roots and received 5 × 10(5) AT-MSCs via the lateral funiculus. Two weeks after cell administration, the animals were sacrificed and the moto neurons, T lymphocytes and cell defense nervous system were analyzed. An increased neuronal survival and partial preservation of synaptophysin-positive nerve terminals, related to GDNF and BDNF expression of AT-MSCs, and reduction of pro-inflammatory reaction were observed. In conclusion, AT-MSCs prevent second phase neuronal injury, since they suppressed lymphocyte, astroglia and microglia effects, which finally contributed to rat motor-neuron survival and synaptic stability of the lesioned motor-neuron. Moreover, the survival of the injected AT- MSCs lasted for at least 14 days. These results indicate that neuronal survival after lesion, followed by mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) administration, might occur through cytokine release and immunomodulation, thus suggesting that AT-MSCs are promising cells for the therapy of neuronal lesions.

  5. Effect of Citrus bergamia juice on human neuroblastoma cells in vitro and in metastatic xenograft models.

    PubMed

    Navarra, M; Ursino, M R; Ferlazzo, N; Russo, M; Schumacher, U; Valentiner, U

    2014-06-01

    Neuroblastoma is the most common extracranial pediatric solid tumor with poor prognosis in children with disseminated stage of disease. A number of studies show that molecules largely distributed in commonly consumed fruits and vegetables may have anti-tumor activity. In this study we evaluate the effect of Citrus bergamia (bergamot) juice (BJ) in vitro and in a spontaneous metastatic neuroblastoma SCID mouse model. Qualitative and quantitative characterizations of BJ flavonoid fractions were performed by RP-HPLC/PDA/MS. We show that BJ significantly affects SK-N-SH and LAN-1 cell proliferation in vitro, but fails to reduce primary tumor weight in vivo. Moreover, BJ reduced cell adhesiveness and invasion of LAN-1 and SK-N-SH cells in vitro and the number of pulmonary metastases under consideration of the number of tumor cells in the blood in mice inoculated with LAN-1 cells in vivo. These effects without any apparent sign of systemic toxicity confirm the potential clinical interest of BJ and lay the basis for further investigation in cancer.

  6. Near-infrared fluorescence imaging of mammalian cells and xenograft tumors with SNAP-tag.

    PubMed

    Gong, Haibiao; Kovar, Joy L; Baker, Brenda; Zhang, Aihua; Cheung, Lael; Draney, Daniel R; Corrêa, Ivan R; Xu, Ming-Qun; Olive, D Michael

    2012-01-01

    Fluorescence in the near-infrared (NIR) spectral region is suitable for in vivo imaging due to its reduced background and high penetration capability compared to visible fluorescence. SNAP(f) is a fast-labeling variant of SNAP-tag that reacts with a fluorescent dye-conjugated benzylguanine (BG) substrate, leading to covalent attachment of the fluorescent dye to the SNAP(f). This property makes SNAP(f) a valuable tool for fluorescence imaging. The NIR fluorescent substrate BG-800, a conjugate between BG and IRDye 800CW, was synthesized and characterized in this study. HEK293, MDA-MB-231 and SK-OV-3 cells stably expressing SNAP(f)-Beta-2 adrenergic receptor (SNAP(f)-ADRβ2) fusion protein were created. The ADRβ2 portion of the protein directs the localization of the protein to the cell membrane. The expression of SNAP(f)-ADRβ2 in the stable cell lines was confirmed by the reaction between BG-800 substrate and cell lysates. Microscopic examination confirmed that SNAP(f)-ADRβ2 was localized on the cell membrane. The signal intensity of the labeled cells was dependent on the BG-800 concentration. In vivo imaging study showed that BG-800 could be used to visualize xenograph tumors expressing SNAP(f)-ADRβ2. However, the background signal was relatively high, which may be a reflection of non-specific accumulation of BG-800 in the skin. To address the background issue, quenched substrates that only fluoresce upon reaction with SNAP-tag were synthesized and characterized. Although the fluorescence was successfully quenched, in vivo imaging with the quenched substrate CBG-800-PEG-QC1 failed to visualize the SNAP(f)-ADRβ2 expressing tumor, possibly due to the reduced reaction rate. Further improvement is needed to apply this system for in vivo imaging. PMID:22479502

  7. Effect of dietary selenium on T cell immunity and cancer xenograft in nude mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Selenium is known to regulate carcinogenesis and immunity at nutritional and supranutritional levels. Because the immune system provides one of the main body defenses against cancer, we asked whether T cell immunity can modulate selenium chemoprevention. Twenty-four homozygous NU/J nude mice were fe...

  8. Concurrent insulinoma with mosaic Turner syndrome: A case report

    PubMed Central

    WANG, SHAOYUN; YANG, LIJUAN; LI, JIE; MU, YIMING

    2015-01-01

    Turner syndrome is a chromosomal abnormality in which the majority of patients have a 45XO karyotype, while a small number have a 45XO/47XXX karyotype. Congenital adrenal hyperplasia has been previously reported in patients with Turner syndrome. Although insulinomas are the most common type of functioning pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor and have been reported in patients with multiple endocrine neoplasias, the tumors have not been reported in patients with mosaic Turner syndrome. The present study reports the first case of an insulinoma in a patient with 45XO/47XXX mosaic Turner syndrome. The patient suffered from recurrent hypoglycemia, which was relieved following ingestion of glucose or food. A 5-h glucose tolerance test was performed and the levels of glucose, C-Peptide and insulin were detected. In addition, computed tomography (CT) and ultrasound scanning were performed to evaluate the possibility of an insulinoma. Pathological examination and karyotyping were performed on a surgical specimen and a whole blood sample, respectively. The patient was found to suffer from premature ovarian failure, and a physical examination was consistent with a diagnosis of Turner syndrome. An ultrasound scan demonstrated streak ovaries and the patient was found to have a 45XO/47XXX karyotype. Furthermore, a lesion was detected in the pancreas following CT scanning, which was identified as an insulinoma following surgical removal and histological examination. In conclusion, the present study reports the first case of an insulinoma in a patient with mosaic Turner syndrome. Since mosaic Turner syndrome and insulinoma are rare diseases, an association may exist that has not been previously identified. PMID:25667631

  9. Loquat (Eriobotrya japonica) leaf extract inhibits the growth of MDA-MB-231 tumors in nude mouse xenografts and invasion of MDA-MB-231 cells

    PubMed Central

    You, Mi-Kyoung; Kim, Min-Sook; Jeong, Kyu-Shik; Kim, Eun; Kim, Yong-Jae

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES The present study was conducted to examine the inhibitory effect of loquat leaves on MDA-MB-231 cell proliferation and invasion. MATERIALS/METHODS Female athymic nude mice were given a subcutaneous (s.c.) inoculation of MDA-MB-231 cells and randomly grouped to receive a s.c. injection of either 500 mg/kg ethanol, water extract or vehicle five times a week. Tumor growth, mitotic rate and necrosis were examined. MDA-MB-231 cells were cultured with DMSO or with various concentrations of loquat water or ethanol extract. Proliferation, adhesion, migration, invasion and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity were examined. RESULTS Tumor growth of xenograft nude mouse was significantly reduced by loquat extracts. The results of mitotic examination revealed that loquat extracts reduced tumor cell division. Both ethanol and water extracts significantly inhibited MDA-MB-231 cell proliferation. The protein expression of ErbB3 was significantly down-regulated by loquat leaf extracts. Loquat leaf extracts increased apoptosis of MDA-MB-231 cells following 24 hour incubation and the ethanol extract was more potent in inducing apoptosis than the water extract. Furthermore, loquat extracts inhibited adhesion, migration and invasion of MDA-MB-231 cells. MMP activity was significantly inhibited by loquat extracts. CONCLUSION Our results show that extracts of loquat inhibit the growth of tumor in MDA-MB-231 xenograft nude mice and the invasion of human breast cancer cells, indicating the inhibition of tumor cell proliferation and invasion. PMID:27087896

  10. Bufalin Inhibits HCT116 Colon Cancer Cells and Its Orthotopic Xenograft Tumor in Mice Model through Genes Related to Apoptotic and PTEN/AKT Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jie; Chen, Chao; Wang, Shiying; Zhang, Yong; Yin, Peihao; Gao, Zhongxiang; Xu, Jie; Feng, Dianxu; Zuo, Qinsong; Zhao, Ronghua; Chen, Teng

    2015-01-01

    Aims. To investigate the anticolorectal cancer (CRC) effects of Bufalin, a bioactive polyhydroxysteroid from Venenum Bufonis, using HCT116 human CRC cell and an established orthotopic xenograft model in mice, and to explore the mechanisms of action. Material and Methods. Cultured HCT116 cells or BALB/c mice with orthotopic tumor were treated by Bufalin (positive control: 5-FU). Cell proliferation, apoptosis, and cycling were determined by MTT, Annexin V/PI staining, and flow cytometry, respectively. In mice, tumor inhibition rate and animal survival were calculated. The expressions of PTEN/phosphate-PTEN, AKT/phosphate-AKT, Bad, Bcl-xl, Bax, or Caspase-3 in cells and/or tumors were determined by Western blot or immunohistochemical staining. Results. Bufalin significantly inhibited cell proliferation and induced cell apoptosis and cycle arrest in a dose/time-dependent manner. In the animal model, Bufalin treatment resulted in significant inhibition of tumor growth and prolonged survival. In the Bufalin-treated cultured cells and/or xenograft tumors, the expressions of PTEN, Bad, Bax, and Caspase-3 were significantly increased, while p-AKT and Bcl-xL significantly decreased. Conclusions. Our results indicate that Bufalin inhibit cell proliferation and orthotopic tumor growth by inducing cell apoptosis through the intrinsic apoptotic pathway, which is of pivotal significance in the identification of an anticancer drug that may synergize with Bufalin. PMID:26770191

  11. Gamma-amino butyric acid inhibits the nicotine-imposed stimulatory challenge in xenograft models of non-small cell lung carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Al-Wadei, H A N; Al-Wadei, M H; Ullah, M F; Schuller, H M

    2012-02-01

    Non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) is the leading type of lung cancer; smoking is a documented risk factor. Nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR)-mediated intracellular signaling in response to nicotine has recently been implicated in the growth regulation of NSCLC. In the current study nude mice carrying xenografts of the human lung NSCLC cell lines NCI-H322 or NCI-H441 were used as animal models. Nicotine administration and gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA) treatment lasted for 30 days. Catecholamines, cortisol, GABA, and cAMP were analyzed in blood and tumor tissues by immunoassays. Expression of nicotinic receptors and effector proteins in the xenografts was assessed by Western blotting. Our data indicate that nicotine stimulated the growth of NSCLC xenografts via modulation of nAChR upregulation and activation of cAMP signaling. The nicotine-treated group showed an enhanced level of stress neurotransmitters and second messenger cAMP in serum, blood cellular fraction, and xenograft tissues. Activation of critical proteins in the oncogenic pathway, including CREB, ERK, Akt, and Src, and upregulation of α-4 and α-7 subunits of nAChR provided mechanistic insight for the observed stimulatory effect of nicotine. Interestingly, GABA, being an antagonist to cAMP signaling, showed a promising intervention by reversing the stimulatory effect of nicotine on cancer growth and all signaling pathways. GABA has potential to lower the risk of NSCLC among smokers and could be used to enhance the clinical outcome of standard cancer intervention strategies.

  12. Evaluation of the NOD/SCID xenograft model for glucocorticoid-regulated gene expression in childhood B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Glucocorticoids such as prednisolone and dexamethasone are critical drugs used in multi-agent chemotherapy protocols used to treat acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), and response to glucocorticoids is highly predictive of outcome. The NOD/SCID xenograft mouse model of ALL is a clinically relevant model in which the mice develop a systemic leukemia which retains the fundamental biological characteristics of the original disease. Here we report a study evaluating the NOD/SCID xenograft mouse model to investigate glucocorticoid-induced gene expression. Cells from a glucocorticoid-sensitive xenograft derived from a child with B-cell precursor ALL were inoculated into NOD/SCID mice. When highly engrafted the mice were randomized into groups of 4 to receive dexamethasone 15 mg/kg by intraperitoneal injection or vehicle control. Leukemia cells were harvested from mice spleens at 0, 8, 24 or 48 hours thereafter, and gene expression analyzed on Illumina WG-6_V3 chips, comparing all groups to time 0 hours. Results The 8 hour dexamethasone-treated timepoint had the highest number of significantly differentially expressed genes, with fewer observed at the 24 and 48 hour timepoints, and with minimal changes seen across the time-matched controls. When compared to publicly available datasets of glucocorticoid-induced gene expression from an in vitro cell line study and from an in vivo study of patients with ALL, at the level of pathways, expression changes in the 8 hour xenograft samples showed a similar response to patients treated with glucocorticoids. Replicate analysis revealed that at the 8 hour timepoint, a dataset with high signal and differential expression, using data from 3 replicates instead of 4 resulted in excellent recovery scores of > 0.9. However at other timepoints with less signal very poor recovery scores were obtained with 3 replicates. Conclusions The NOD/SCID xenograft mouse model provides a reproducible experimental system in which to

  13. Transcriptomic alterations in human prostate cancer cell LNCaP tumor xenograft modulated by dietary phenethyl isothiocyanate

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Temporal growth of tumor xenografts in mice on a control diet was compared to mice supplemented daily with 3 µmol/g of the cancer preventive compound phenethyl isothiocyanate. Phenethyl isothiocyanate decreased the rate of tumor growth. The effects of phenethyl isothiocyanate on tumor growth were ex...

  14. Vorinostat, an HDAC inhibitor attenuates epidermoid squamous cell carcinoma growth by dampening mTOR signaling pathway in a human xenograft murine model

    SciTech Connect

    Kurundkar, Deepali; Srivastava, Ritesh K.; Chaudhary, Sandeep C.; Ballestas, Mary E.; Kopelovich, Levy; Elmets, Craig A.; Athar, Mohammad

    2013-01-15

    Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors are potent anticancer agents and show efficacy against various human neoplasms. Vorinostat is a potent HDAC inhibitor and has shown potential to inhibit growth of human xenograft tumors. However, its effect on the growth of skin neoplasm remains undefined. In this study, we show that vorinostat (2 μM) reduced expression of HDAC1, 2, 3, and 7 in epidermoid carcinoma A431 cells. Consistently, it increased acetylation of histone H3 and p53. Vorinostat (100 mg/kg body weight, IP) treatment reduced human xenograft tumor growth in highly immunosuppressed nu/nu mice. Histologically, the vorinostat-treated tumor showed features of well-differentiation with large necrotic areas. Based on proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) staining and expression of cyclins D1, D2, E, and A, vorinostat seems to impair proliferation by down-regulating the expression of these proteins. However, it also induced apoptosis. The mechanism by which vorinostat blocks proliferation and makes tumor cells prone to apoptosis, involved inhibition of mTOR signaling which was accompanied by reduction in cell survival AKT and extracellular-signal regulated kinase (ERK) signaling pathways. Our data provide a novel mechanism-based therapeutic intervention for cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Vorinostat may be utilized to cure skin neoplasms in organ transplant recipient (OTR). These patients have high morbidity and surgical removal of these lesions which frequently develop in these patients, is difficult. -- Highlights: ► Vorinostat reduces SCC growth in a xenograft murine model. ► Vorinostat dampens proliferation and induces apoptosis in tumor cells. ► Diminution in mTOR, Akt and ERK signaling underlies inhibition in proliferation. ► Vorinostat by inhibiting HDACs inhibits epithelial–mesenchymal transition.

  15. ASXL1 mutation correction by CRISPR/Cas9 restores gene function in leukemia cells and increases survival in mouse xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Valletta, Simona; Dolatshad, Hamid; Bartenstein, Matthias; Yip, Bon Ham; Bello, Erica; Gordon, Shanisha; Yu, Yiting; Shaw, Jacqueline; Roy, Swagata; Scifo, Laura; Schuh, Anna; Pellagatti, Andrea; Fulga, Tudor A.; Verma, Amit; Boultwood, Jacqueline

    2015-01-01

    Recurrent somatic mutations of the epigenetic modifier and tumor suppressor ASXL1 are common in myeloid malignancies, including chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), and are associated with poor clinical outcome. CRISPR/Cas9 has recently emerged as a powerful and versatile genome editing tool for genome engineering in various species. We have used the CRISPR/Cas9 system to correct the ASXL1 homozygous nonsense mutation present in the CML cell line KBM5, which lacks ASXL1 protein expression. CRISPR/Cas9-mediated ASXL1 homozygous correction resulted in protein re-expression with restored normal function, including down-regulation of Polycomb repressive complex 2 target genes. Significantly reduced cell growth and increased myeloid differentiation were observed in ASXL1 mutation-corrected cells, providing new insights into the role of ASXL1 in human myeloid cell differentiation. Mice xenografted with mutation-corrected KBM5 cells showed significantly longer survival than uncorrected xenografts. These results show that the sole correction of a driver mutation in leukemia cells increases survival in vivo in mice. This study provides proof-of-concept for driver gene mutation correction via CRISPR/Cas9 technology in human leukemia cells and presents a strategy to illuminate the impact of oncogenic mutations on cellular function and survival. PMID:26623729

  16. Setting up a wide panel of patient-derived tumor xenografts of non-small cell lung cancer by improving the preanalytical steps.

    PubMed

    Ilie, Marius; Nunes, Manoel; Blot, Lydia; Hofman, Véronique; Long-Mira, Elodie; Butori, Catherine; Selva, Eric; Merino-Trigo, Ana; Vénissac, Nicolas; Mouroux, Jérôme; Vrignaud, Patricia; Hofman, Paul

    2015-02-01

    With the ongoing need to improve therapy for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) there has been increasing interest in developing reliable preclinical models to test novel therapeutics. Patient-derived tumor xenografts (PDX) are considered to be interesting candidates. However, the establishment of such model systems requires highly specialized research facilities and introduces logistic challenges. We aimed to establish an extensive well-characterized panel of NSCLC xenograft models in the context of a long-distance research network after careful control of the preanalytical steps. One hundred fresh surgically resected NSCLC specimens were shipped in survival medium at room temperature from a hospital-integrated biobank to animal facilities. Within 24 h post-surgery, tumor fragments were subcutaneously xenografted into immunodeficient mice. PDX characterization was performed by histopathological, immunohistochemical, aCGH and next-generation sequencing approaches. For this model system, the tumor take rate was 35%, with higher rates for squamous carcinoma (60%) than for adenocarcinoma (13%). Patients for whom PDX tumors were obtained had a significantly shorter disease-free survival (DFS) compared to patients for whom no PDX tumors (P = 0.039) were obtained. We established a large panel of PDX NSCLC models with a high frequency of mutations (29%) in EGFR, KRAS, NRAS, MEK1, BRAF, PTEN, and PI3KCA genes and with gene amplification (20%) of c-MET and FGFR1. This new patient-derived NSCLC xenograft collection, established regardless of the considerable time required and the distance between the clinic and the animal facilities, recapitulated the histopathology and molecular diversity of NSCLC and provides stable and reliable preclinical models for human lung cancer research.

  17. A Novel Eg5 Inhibitor (LY2523355) Causes Mitotic Arrest and Apoptosis in Cancer Cells and Shows Potent Antitumor Activity in Xenograft Tumor Models.

    PubMed

    Ye, Xiang S; Fan, Li; Van Horn, Robert D; Nakai, Ryuichiro; Ohta, Yoshihisa; Akinaga, Shiro; Murakata, Chikara; Yamashita, Yoshinori; Yin, Tinggui; Credille, Kelly M; Donoho, Gregory P; Merzoug, Farhana F; Li, Heng; Aggarwal, Amit; Blanchard, Kerry; Westin, Eric H

    2015-11-01

    Intervention of cancer cell mitosis by antitubulin drugs is among the most effective cancer chemotherapies. However, antitubulin drugs have dose-limiting side effects due to important functions of microtubules in resting normal cells and are often rendered ineffective by rapid emergence of resistance. Antimitotic agents with different mechanisms of action and improved safety profiles are needed as new treatment options. Mitosis-specific kinesin Eg5 represents an attractive anticancer target for discovering such new antimitotic agents, because Eg5 is essential only in mitotic progression and has no roles in resting, nondividing cells. Here, we show that a novel selective Eg5 inhibitor, LY2523355, has broad target-mediated anticancer activity in vitro and in vivo. LY2523355 arrests cancer cells at mitosis and causes rapid cell death that requires sustained spindle-assembly checkpoint (SAC) activation with a required threshold concentration. In vivo efficacy of LY2523355 is highly dose/schedule-dependent, achieving complete remission in a number of xenograft tumor models, including patient-derived xenograft (PDX) tumor models. We further establish that histone-H3 phosphorylation of tumor and proliferating skin cells is a promising pharmacodynamic biomarker for in vivo anticancer activity of LY2523355. PMID:26304237

  18. Increased COX-2 expression in epithelial and stromal cells of high mammographic density tissues and in a xenograft model of mammographic density.

    PubMed

    Chew, G L; Huo, C W; Huang, D; Hill, P; Cawson, J; Frazer, H; Hopper, J L; Haviv, I; Henderson, M A; Britt, K; Thompson, E W

    2015-08-01

    Mammographic density (MD) adjusted for age and body mass index is one of the strongest known risk factors for breast cancer. Given the high attributable risk of MD for breast cancer, chemoprevention with a safe and available agent that reduces MD and breast cancer risk would be beneficial. Cox-2 has been implicated in MD-related breast cancer risk, and was increased in stromal cells in high MD tissues in one study. Our study assessed differential Cox-2 expression in epithelial and stromal cells in paired samples of high and low MD human breast tissue, and in a validated xenograft biochamber model of MD. We also examined the effects of endocrine treatment upon Cox-2 expression in high and low MD tissues in the MD xenograft model. Paired high and low MD human breast tissue samples were immunostained for Cox-2, then assessed for differential expression and staining intensity in epithelial and stromal cells. High and low MD human breast tissues were separately maintained in biochambers in mice treated with Tamoxifen, oestrogen or placebo implants, then assessed for percentage Cox-2 staining in epithelial and stromal cells. Percentage Cox-2 staining was greater for both epithelial (p = 0.01) and stromal cells (p < 0.0001) of high compared with low MD breast tissues. In high MD biochamber tissues, percentage Cox-2 staining was greater in stromal cells of oestrogen-treated versus placebo-treated tissues (p = 0.05).

  19. Hinokitiol inhibits cell growth through induction of S-phase arrest and apoptosis in human colon cancer cells and suppresses tumor growth in a mouse xenograft experiment.

    PubMed

    Lee, Youn-Sun; Choi, Kyeong-Mi; Kim, Wonkyun; Jeon, Young-Soo; Lee, Yong-Moon; Hong, Jin-Tae; Yun, Yeo-Pyo; Yoo, Hwan-Soo

    2013-12-27

    Hinokitiol (1), a tropolone-related natural compound, induces apoptosis and has anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and antitumor activities. In this study, the inhibitory effects of 1 were investigated on human colon cancer cell growth and tumor formation of xenograft mice. HCT-116 and SW-620 cells derived from human colon cancers were found to be similarly susceptible to 1, with IC50 values of 4.5 and 4.4 μM, respectively. Compound 1 induced S-phase arrest in the cell cycle progression and decreased the expression levels of cyclin A, cyclin E, and Cdk2. Conversely, 1 increased the expression of p21, a Cdk inhibitor. Compound 1 decreased Bcl-2 expression and increased the expression of Bax, and cleaved caspase-9 and -3. The effect of 1 on tumor formation when administered orally was evaluated in male BALB/c-nude mice implanted intradermally separately with HCT-116 and SW-620 cells. Tumor volumes and tumor weights in the mice treated with 1 (100 mg/kg) were decreased in both cases. These results suggest that the suppression of tumor formation by compound 1 in human colon cancer may occur through cell cycle arrest and apoptosis.

  20. Nature of tumor control by permanently and transiently modified GD2 chimeric antigen receptor T cells in xenograft models of neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Singh, Nathan; Liu, Xiaojun; Hulitt, Jessica; Jiang, Shuguang; June, Carl H; Grupp, Stephan A; Barrett, David M; Zhao, Yangbing

    2014-11-01

    Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) therapy has begun to demonstrate success as a novel treatment modality for hematologic malignancies. The success observed thus far has been with T cells permanently engineered to express chimeric receptors. T cells engineered using RNA electroporation represent an alternative with the potential for similar efficacy and greater safety when initially targeting novel antigens. Neuroblastoma is a common pediatric solid tumor with the potential to be targeted using immunotherapy. We performed xenograft studies in NSG mice in which we assessed the efficacy of both permanently modified and transiently modified CAR T cells directed against the neuroblastoma antigen GD2 in both local and disseminated disease models. Disease response was monitored by tumor volume measurement and histologic examination, as well as in vivo bioluminescence. RNA-modified GD2 CAR T cells mediated rapid tumor destruction when delivered locally. A single infusion of lentivirally modified GD2 CAR T cells resulted in long-term control of disseminated disease. Multiple infusions of RNA GD2 CAR T cells slowed the progression of disseminated disease and improved survival, but did not result in long-term disease control. Histologic examination revealed that the transiently modified cells were unable to significantly penetrate the tumor environment when delivered systemically, despite multiple infusions of CAR T cells. Thus, we demonstrate that RNA-modified GD2 CAR T cells can mediate effective antitumor responses in vivo, and permanently modified cells are able to control disseminated neuroblastoma in xenograft mice. Lack of long-term disease control by RNA-engineered cells resulted from an inability to penetrate the tumor microenvironment.

  1. Diallyl trisulfide inhibits migration, invasion and angiogenesis of human colon cancer HT-29 cells and umbilical vein endothelial cells, and suppresses murine xenograft tumour growth

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Kuang-Chi; Hsu, Shu-Chun; Yang, Jai-Sing; Yu, Chien-Chih; Lein, Jin-Cherng; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2015-01-01

    Angiogenesis inhibitors are beneficial for the prevention and treatment of angiogenesis-dependent diseases including cancer. We examined the cytotoxic, anti-metastatic, anti-cancer and anti-angiogenic effects of diallyl trisulfide (DATS). In HT29 cells, DATS inhibited migration and invasion through the inhibition of focal adhesion kinase (FAK), extracellular signal-regulated kinase, c-Jun N-terminal kinase and p38 which was associated with inhibition of matrix metalloproteinases-2, -7 and -9 and VEGF. In human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC), DATS inhibited the migration and angiogenesis through FAK, Src and Ras. DATS also inhibited the secretion of VEGF. The capillary-like tube structure formation and migration by HUVEC was inhibited by DATS. The chicken egg chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) assay indicated that DATS treatment inhibited ex-vivo angiogenesis. We investigated the anti-tumour effects of DATS against human colon cancer xenografts in BALB/cnu/nu mice and its anti-angiogenic activity in vivo. In this in-vivo study, DATS also inhibited the tumour growth, tumour weight and angiogenesis (decreased the levels of haemoglobin) in HT29 cells. In conclusion, the present results suggest that the inhibition of angiogenesis may be an important mechanism in colon cancer chemotherapy by DATS. PMID:25403643

  2. Probe-Based Confocal Laser Endomicroscopy for Imaging TRAIL-Expressing Mesenchymal Stem Cells to Monitor Colon Xenograft Tumors In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhen; Li, Ming; Chen, Feixue; Li, Lixiang; Liu, Jun; Li, Zhen; Ji, Rui; Zuo, Xiuli; Li, Yanqing

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) can serve as vehicles for therapeutic genes. However, little is known about MSC behavior in vivo. Here, we demonstrated that probe-based confocal laser endomicroscopy (pCLE) can be used to track MSCs in vivo and individually monitor tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) gene expression within carcinomas. Methods Isolated BALB/c nu/nu mice MSCs (MSCs) were characterized and engineered to co-express the TRAIL and enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) genes. The number of MSCs co-expressing EGFP and TRAIL (TRAIL-MSCs) at tumor sites was quantified with pCLE in vivo, while their presence was confirmed using immunofluorescence (IF) and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). The therapeutic effects of TRAIL-MSCs were evaluated by measuring the volumes and weights of subcutaneous HT29-derived xenograft tumors. Results Intravital imaging of the subcutaneous xenograft tumors revealed that BALB/c mice treated with TRAIL-MSCs exhibited specific cellular signals, whereas no specific signals were observed in the control mice. The findings from the pCLE images were consistent with the IF and qPCR results. Conclusion The pCLE results indicated that endomicroscopy could effectively quantify injected MSCs that homed to subcutaneous xenograft tumor sites in vivo and correlated well with the therapeutic effects of the TRAIL gene. By applying pCLE for the in vivo monitoring of cellular trafficking, stem cell-based anticancer gene therapeutic approaches might be feasible and attractive options for individualized clinical treatments. PMID:27617958

  3. A novel rabbit anti-hepatocyte growth factor monoclonal neutralizing antibody inhibits tumor growth in prostate cancer cells and mouse xenografts

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Yanlan; Chen, Yicheng; Ding, Guoqing; Wang, Mingchao; Wu, Haiyang; Xu, Liwei; Rui, Xuefang; Zhang, Zhigen

    2015-08-14

    The hepatocyte growth factor and its receptor c-Met are correlated with castration-resistance in prostate cancer. Although HGF has been considered as an attractive target for therapeutic antibodies, the lack of cross-reactivity of monoclonal antibodies with human/mouse HGFs is a major obstacle in preclinical developments. We generated a panel of anti-HGF RabMAbs either blocking HGF/c-Met interaction or inhibiting c-Met phosphorylation. We selected one RabMAb with mouse cross-reactivity and demonstrated that it blocked HGF-stimulated downstream activation in PC-3 and DU145 cells. Anti-HGF RabMAb inhibited not only the growth of PC-3 cells but also HGF-dependent proliferation in HUVECs. We further demonstrated the efficacy and potency of the anti-HGF RabMAb in tumor xenograft mice models. Through these in vitro and in vivo experiments, we explored a novel therapeutic antibody for advanced prostate cancer. - Highlights: • HGF is an attractive target for castration-refractory prostate cancer. • We generated and characterized a panel of anti-HGF rabbit monoclonal antibodies. • More than half of these anti-HGF RabMAbs was cross-reactive with mouse HGF. • Anti-HGF RabMAb blocks HGF-stimulated phosphorylation and cell growth in vitro. • Anti-HGF RabMAb inhibits tumor growth and angiogenesis in xenograft mice.

  4. HDAC inhibition does not induce estrogen receptor in human triple-negative breast cancer cell lines and patient-derived xenografts.

    PubMed

    de Cremoux, Patricia; Dalvai, Mathieu; N'Doye, Olivia; Moutahir, Fatima; Rolland, Gaëlle; Chouchane-Mlik, Olfa; Assayag, Franck; Lehmann-Che, Jacqueline; Kraus-Berthie, Laurence; Nicolas, André; Lockhart, Brian Paul; Marangoni, Elisabetta; de Thé, Hugues; Depil, Stéphane; Bystricky, Kerstin; Decaudin, Didier

    2015-01-01

    Several publications have suggested that histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACis) could reverse the repression of estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) in triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) cell lines, leading to the induction of a functional protein. Using different HDACis, vorinostat, panobinostat, and abexinostat, we therefore investigated this hypothesis in various human TNBC cell lines and patient-derived xenografts (PDXs). We used three human TNBC cell lines and three PDXs. We analyzed the in vitro toxicity of the compounds, their effects on the hormone receptors and hormone-related genes and protein expression both in vitro and in vivo models. We then explored intra-tumor histone H3 acetylation under abexinostat in xenograft models. Despite major cytotoxicity of all tested HDAC inhibitors and repression of deactylation-dependent CCND1 gene, neither ERα nor ERβ, ESR1 or ESR2 genes respectively, were re-expressed in vitro. In vivo, after administration of abexinostat for three consecutive days, we did not observe any induction of ESR1 or ESR1-related genes and ERα protein expression by RT-qPCR and immunohistochemical methods in PDXs. This observation was concomitant to the fact that in vivo administration of abexinostat increased intra-tumor histone H3 acetylation. These observations do not allow us to confirm previous studies which suggested that HDACis are able to convert ER-negative (ER-) tumors to ER-positive (ER+) tumors, and that a combination of HDAC inhibitors and hormone therapy could be proposed in the management of TNBC patients.

  5. Metformin impairs Rho GTPase signaling to induce apoptosis in neuroblastoma cells and inhibits growth of tumors in the xenograft mouse model of neuroblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Ambrish; Al-Sammarraie, Nadia; DiPette, Donald J.; Singh, Ugra S.

    2014-01-01

    Metformin has been shown to inhibit tumor growth in xenograft rodent models of adult cancers, and various human clinical trials are in progress. However, the precise molecular mechanisms of metformin action are largely unknown. In the present study we examined the anti-tumor activity of metformin against neuroblastoma, and determined the underlying signaling mechanisms. Using human neuroblastoma xenograft mice, we demonstrated that oral administration of metformin (100 and 250 mg/kg body weight) significantly inhibited the growth of tumors. The interference of metformin in spheroid formation further confirmed the anti-tumor activity of metformin. In tumors, the activation of Rac1 (GTP-Rac1) and Cdc42 (GTP-Cdc42) was increased while RhoA activation (GTP-RhoA) was decreased by metformin. It also induced phosphorylation of JNK and inhibited the phosphorylation of ERK1/2 without affecting p38 MAP Kinase. Infection of cells by adenoviruses expressing dominant negative Rac1 (Rac1-N17), Cdc42 (Cdc42-N17) or constitutively active RhoA (RhoA-V14), or incubation of cells with pharmacological inhibitors of Rac1 (NSC23766) or Cdc42 (ML141) significantly protected neuroblastoma cells from metformin-induced apoptosis. Additionally, inhibition of JNK activity along with Rac1 or Cdc42 attenuated cytotoxic effects of metformin. These studies demonstrated that metformin impairs Rho GTPases signaling to induce apoptosis via JNK pathway. PMID:25365944

  6. Metformin impairs Rho GTPase signaling to induce apoptosis in neuroblastoma cells and inhibits growth of tumors in the xenograft mouse model of neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ambrish; Al-Sammarraie, Nadia; DiPette, Donald J; Singh, Ugra S

    2014-11-30

    Metformin has been shown to inhibit tumor growth in xenograft rodent models of adult cancers, and various human clinical trials are in progress. However, the precise molecular mechanisms of metformin action are largely unknown. In the present study we examined the anti-tumor activity of metformin against neuroblastoma, and determined the underlying signaling mechanisms. Using human neuroblastoma xenograft mice, we demonstrated that oral administration of metformin (100 and 250 mg/kg body weight) significantly inhibited the growth of tumors. The interference of metformin in spheroid formation further confirmed the anti-tumor activity of metformin. In tumors, the activation of Rac1 (GTP-Rac1) and Cdc42 (GTP-Cdc42) was increased while RhoA activation (GTP-RhoA) was decreased by metformin. It also induced phosphorylation of JNK and inhibited the phosphorylation of ERK1/2 without affecting p38 MAP Kinase. Infection of cells by adenoviruses expressing dominant negative Rac1 (Rac1-N17), Cdc42 (Cdc42-N17) or constitutively active RhoA (RhoA-V14), or incubation of cells with pharmacological inhibitors of Rac1 (NSC23766) or Cdc42 (ML141) significantly protected neuroblastoma cells from metformin-induced apoptosis. Additionally, inhibition of JNK activity along with Rac1 or Cdc42 attenuated cytotoxic effects of metformin. These studies demonstrated that metformin impairs Rho GTPases signaling to induce apoptosis via JNK pathway.

  7. A novel orally available inhibitor of focal adhesion signaling increases survival in a xenograft model of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma with central nervous system involvement.

    PubMed

    Bosch, Rosa; Moreno, María José; Dieguez-Gonzalez, Rebeca; Céspedes, María Virtudes; Gallardo, Alberto; Trias, Manuel; Grañena, Albert; Sierra, Jorge; Casanova, Isolda; Mangues, Ramon

    2013-08-01

    Central nervous system dissemination is a relatively uncommon but almost always fatal complication in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma patients. Optimal therapy for central nervous involvement in this malignancy has not been established. In this paper, we aimed to evaluate the therapeutic effect of E7123, a celecoxib derivative that inhibits focal adhesion signaling, in a novel xenograft model of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma with central nervous system involvement. Cells obtained after disaggregation of HT subcutaneous tumors (HT-SC cells) were intravenously injected in NOD/SCID mice. These mice received oral vehicle or 75 mg/kg of E7123 daily until they were euthanized for weight loss or signs of sickness. The antitumor effect of E7123 was validated in an independent experiment using a bioluminescent mouse model. Intravenously injected HT-SC cells showed higher take rate and higher central nervous system tropism (associated with increased expression of β1-integrin and p130Cas proteins) than HT cells. The oral administration of E7123 significantly increased survival time in 2 independent experiments using mice injected with unmodified or bioluminescent HT-SC cells. We have developed a new xenograft model of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma with central nervous system involvement that can be used in the pre-clinical evaluation of new drugs for this malignancy. E7123 is a new, well-tolerated and orally available therapeutic agent that merits further investigation since it may improve current management of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma patients with central nervous system involvement.

  8. Combining [11C]-AnxA5 PET Imaging with Serum Biomarkers for Improved Detection in Live Mice of Modest Cell Death in Human Solid Tumor Xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Qing; Lu, Li; Grafström, Jonas; Olofsson, Maria Hägg; Thorell, Jan-Olov; Samén, Erik; Johansson, Katarina; Ahlzén, Hanna-Stina; Stone-Elander, Sharon; Linder, Stig; Arnér, Elias S. J.

    2012-01-01

    Background In vivo imaging using Annexin A5-based radioligands is a powerful technique for visualizing massive cell death, but has been less successful in monitoring the modest cell death typically seen in solid tumors after chemotherapy. Here we combined dynamic positron emission tomography (PET) imaging using Annexin A5 with a serum-based apoptosis marker, for improved sensitivity and specificity in assessment of chemotherapy-induced cell death in a solid tumor model. Methodology/Principal Findings Modest cell death was induced by doxorubicin in a mouse xenograft model with human FaDu head and neck cancer cells. PET imaging was based on 11C-labeled Sel-tagged Annexin A5 ([11C]-AnxA5-ST) and a size-matched control. 2-deoxy-2-[18F]fluoro-D-glucose ([18F]-FDG) was utilized as a tracer of tissue metabolism. Serum biomarkers for cell death were ccK18 and K18 (M30 Apoptosense® and M65). Apoptosis in tissue sections was verified ex vivo for validation. Both PET imaging using [11C]-AnxA5-ST and serum ccK18/K18 levels revealed treatment-induced cell death, with ccK18 displaying the highest detection sensitivity. [18F]-FDG uptake was not affected by this treatment in this tumor model. [11C]-AnxA5-ST gave robust imaging readouts at one hour and its short half-life made it possible to perform paired scans in the same animal in one imaging session. Conclusions/Significance The combined use of dynamic PET with [11C]-AnxA5-ST, showing specific increases in tumor binding potential upon therapy, with ccK18/K18 serum measurements, as highly sensitive markers for cell death, enabled effective assessment of modest therapy-induced cell death in this mouse xenograft model of solid human tumors. PMID:22870292

  9. Human amniotic membrane-derived epithelial stem cells display anticancer activity in BALB/c female nude mice bearing disseminated breast cancer xenografts.

    PubMed

    Kang, Nam-Hee; Yi, Bo-Rim; Lim, So Yoon; Hwang, Kyung-A; Baek, Young Seok; Kang, Kyung-Sun; Choi, Kyung-Chul

    2012-06-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most common malignant tumors and the leading cause of mortality among women. In this study, we propose a human stem cell transplantation strategy, an important method for treating various cancers, as a potential breast cancer therapy. To this end, we used human amniotic membrane-derived epithelial stem cells (hAECs) as a cell source for performing human stem cell transplantation. hAECs have multipotent differentiation abilities and possess high proliferative potential. We transplanted hAECs into female BALB/c nude mice bearing tumors originating from MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. Co-culturred hAECs and MDA-MB-231 cells at a ratio of 1:4 or 1:8 (tumor cells to stem cells) inhibited breast cancer cell growth by 67.29 and 67.33%, respectively. In the xenograft mouse model, tumor volumes were significantly decreased by 5-flurouracil (5-FU) treatment and two different ratios of hAECs (1:4 and 1:8) by 84.33, 73.88 and 56.89%, respectively. Treatment of nude mice with hAECs (1:4) produced remarkable antitumor effects without any side-effects (e.g., weight loss, death and bruising) compared to the mice that received only 5-FU treatment. Tumor progression was significantly reduced by hAEC treatment compared to the xenograft model. On the other hand, breast tissues (e.g., the epidermis, dermis and reticular layer) appeared to be well-maintained following treatment with hAECs. Taken together, these results provide strong evidence that hAECs can be used as a safe and effective cancer-targeting cytotherapy for treating breast cancer.

  10. Treatment of small-cell lung cancer xenografts with iodine-313-anti-neural cell adhesion molecule monoclonal antibody and evaluation of absorbed dose in tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Hosono, Makoto; Endo, Keigo; Hosono, Masako N.

    1994-02-01

    Human small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) is considered a feasible target for immunotherapy using a radiolabeled monoclonal antibody (Mab). A murine Mab, NE150 (IgG1), reacts with the neural cell adhesion molecule, which is identical to cluster 1 antigen of SCLC. To estimate their therapeutic effects, NE150 and an isotype-matched control Mab were labeled with {sup 131}I and administered intravenously as a single dose into athymic mice inoculated with a NCI-H69 SCLC xenograft. The absorbed dose in organs was also examined based upon a long-term biodistribution study of {sup 131}I-NE150. Tumors initial volume 563.4 {plus_minus} 223.5 mm{sup 3} treated with 11.1 MBq (300 {mu}Ci) of {sup 131}I-NE150 diminished and became invisible at days 30-33, demonstrating a 60-day mean growth delay to reach a tripled initial volume compared with sham-treated tumors. Cumulative absorbed doses were estimated to be 2310, 410, 500, 330, and 790 cGy for the tumor, liver, kidney, spleen and lung, respectively. Iodine-131-NE150 had potent therapeutic effects against SCLC transplants in athymic mice, however, careful assessment of the side effects, improvement of radioiodination and chimerization of the Mab might be necessary to achieve efficient targeting in clinical therapeutic applications. 25 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. Involvement of doublesex and mab-3-related transcription factors in human female germ cell development demonstrated by xenograft and interference RNA strategies.

    PubMed

    Poulain, Marine; Frydman, Nelly; Tourpin, Sophie; Muczynski, Vincent; Mucsynski, Vincent; Souquet, Benoit; Benachi, Alexandra; Habert, René; Rouiller-Fabre, Virginie; Livera, Gabriel

    2014-10-01

    We identified three doublesex and mab-3-related transcription factors (DMRT) that were sexually differentially expressed in human fetal gonads and present in the ovaries at the time of meiotic initiation. These were also identified in murine embryonic female germ cells. Among these, we focused on DMRTA2 (DMRT5), whose function is unknown in the developing gonads, and clarified its role in human female fetal germ cells, using an original xenograft model. Early human fetal ovaries (8-11 weeks post-fertilization) were grafted into nude mice. Grafted ovaries developed normally, with no apparent overt changes, when compared with ungrafted ovaries at equivalent developmental stages. Appropriate germ cell density, mitotic/meiotic transition, markers of meiotic progression and follicle formation were evident. Four weeks after grafting, mice were treated with siRNA, specifically targeting human DMRTA2 mRNA. DMRTA2 inhibition triggered an increase in undifferentiated FUT4-positive germ cells and a decrease in the percentage of meiotic γH2AX-positive germ cells, when compared with mice that were injected with control siRNA. Interestingly, the expression of markers associated with pre-meiotic germ cell differentiation was also impaired, as was the expression of DMRTB1 (DMRT6) and DMRTC2 (DMRT7). This study reveals, for the first time, the requirement of DMRTA2 for normal human female embryonic germ cell development. DMRTA2 appears to be necessary for proper differentiation of oogonia, prior to entry into meiosis, in the human species. Additionally, we developed a new model of organ xenografting, coupled with RNA interference, which provides a useful tool for genetic investigations of human germline development.

  12. Involvement of doublesex and mab-3-related transcription factors in human female germ cell development demonstrated by xenograft and interference RNA strategies.

    PubMed

    Poulain, Marine; Frydman, Nelly; Tourpin, Sophie; Muczynski, Vincent; Mucsynski, Vincent; Souquet, Benoit; Benachi, Alexandra; Habert, René; Rouiller-Fabre, Virginie; Livera, Gabriel

    2014-10-01

    We identified three doublesex and mab-3-related transcription factors (DMRT) that were sexually differentially expressed in human fetal gonads and present in the ovaries at the time of meiotic initiation. These were also identified in murine embryonic female germ cells. Among these, we focused on DMRTA2 (DMRT5), whose function is unknown in the developing gonads, and clarified its role in human female fetal germ cells, using an original xenograft model. Early human fetal ovaries (8-11 weeks post-fertilization) were grafted into nude mice. Grafted ovaries developed normally, with no apparent overt changes, when compared with ungrafted ovaries at equivalent developmental stages. Appropriate germ cell density, mitotic/meiotic transition, markers of meiotic progression and follicle formation were evident. Four weeks after grafting, mice were treated with siRNA, specifically targeting human DMRTA2 mRNA. DMRTA2 inhibition triggered an increase in undifferentiated FUT4-positive germ cells and a decrease in the percentage of meiotic γH2AX-positive germ cells, when compared with mice that were injected with control siRNA. Interestingly, the expression of markers associated with pre-meiotic germ cell differentiation was also impaired, as was the expression of DMRTB1 (DMRT6) and DMRTC2 (DMRT7). This study reveals, for the first time, the requirement of DMRTA2 for normal human female embryonic germ cell development. DMRTA2 appears to be necessary for proper differentiation of oogonia, prior to entry into meiosis, in the human species. Additionally, we developed a new model of organ xenografting, coupled with RNA interference, which provides a useful tool for genetic investigations of human germline development. PMID:25082981

  13. Diagnostic Difficulties in a Pediatric Insulinoma: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Miron, Ingrith; Diaconescu, Smaranda; Aprodu, Gabriel; Ioniuc, Ileana; Diaconescu, Mihai Radu; Miron, Lucian

    2016-03-01

    Insulinomas are functional neuroendocrine pancreatic tumors rarely encountered in pediatric pathology. Insulinomas are usually solitary and sporadic, but may occur in association with multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1. Whipple's triad-hypoglycemia, simultaneous compatible adrenergic and/or neurological signs, and relief of symptoms upon the administration of glucose-remains the fundamental diagnostic tool. We report a case of insulinoma in an 11-year-old boy with malnutrition and mild psychic retardation. History revealed neuroglycopenic symptoms associated with hypoglycemia that returned to normal values after glucose intravenous infusion; before admission in our unit, the levels of circulating insulin, as well as the abdominal ultrasound and abdominal computed tomography scan, were reported within normal range. During hospitalization in our service, the glycemic curves showed recurring low values associated with low glycated hemoglobin, positive fasting test, and elevated C-peptide. The pancreatic ultrasound was inconclusive, but the magnetic resonance imaging revealed a high signal focal area with a diameter of 1 cm, located in the tail of pancreas. Conventional enucleation of the lesion prompted a spectacular normalization of glucose metabolism and the alleviation of the main clinical symptoms. The child had a favorable evolution in the clinical follow-up, presenting with weight gain and progressive remission to complete disappearance of most symptoms-except for the mental impairments. Although in our case Whipple's triad was apparent from the beginning, the diagnosis was delayed due to the failure of conventional imaging methods in locating the tumor. Weight loss and mental impairment contributed to the diagnosis pitfalls. Pediatricians should be aware of confusing and nonspecific symptoms, especially when children with insulinoma present mental or neurological retardation. Despite the existence of medical regimens, surgery remains the gold standard for the

  14. Diagnostic Difficulties in a Pediatric Insulinoma: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Miron, Ingrith; Diaconescu, Smaranda; Aprodu, Gabriel; Ioniuc, Ileana; Diaconescu, Mihai Radu; Miron, Lucian

    2016-03-01

    Insulinomas are functional neuroendocrine pancreatic tumors rarely encountered in pediatric pathology. Insulinomas are usually solitary and sporadic, but may occur in association with multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1. Whipple's triad-hypoglycemia, simultaneous compatible adrenergic and/or neurological signs, and relief of symptoms upon the administration of glucose-remains the fundamental diagnostic tool. We report a case of insulinoma in an 11-year-old boy with malnutrition and mild psychic retardation. History revealed neuroglycopenic symptoms associated with hypoglycemia that returned to normal values after glucose intravenous infusion; before admission in our unit, the levels of circulating insulin, as well as the abdominal ultrasound and abdominal computed tomography scan, were reported within normal range. During hospitalization in our service, the glycemic curves showed recurring low values associated with low glycated hemoglobin, positive fasting test, and elevated C-peptide. The pancreatic ultrasound was inconclusive, but the magnetic resonance imaging revealed a high signal focal area with a diameter of 1 cm, located in the tail of pancreas. Conventional enucleation of the lesion prompted a spectacular normalization of glucose metabolism and the alleviation of the main clinical symptoms. The child had a favorable evolution in the clinical follow-up, presenting with weight gain and progressive remission to complete disappearance of most symptoms-except for the mental impairments. Although in our case Whipple's triad was apparent from the beginning, the diagnosis was delayed due to the failure of conventional imaging methods in locating the tumor. Weight loss and mental impairment contributed to the diagnosis pitfalls. Pediatricians should be aware of confusing and nonspecific symptoms, especially when children with insulinoma present mental or neurological retardation. Despite the existence of medical regimens, surgery remains the gold standard for the

  15. PKM2 Thr454 phosphorylation increases its nuclear translocation and promotes xenograft tumor growth in A549 human lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zhenhai; Huang, Liangqian; Qiao, Pengyun; Jiang, Aifang; Wang, Li; Yang, Tingting; Tang, Shengjian; Zhang, Wei; Ren, Chune

    2016-05-13

    Pyruvate kinase M2 (PKM2) is a key enzyme of glycolysis which is highly expressed in many tumor cells, and plays an important role in the Warburg effect. In previous study, we found PIM2 phosphorylates PKM2 at Thr454 residue (Yu, etl 2013). However, the functions of PKM2 Thr454 modification in cancer cells still remain unclear. Here we find PKM2 translocates into the nucleus after Thr454 phosphorylation. Replacement of wild type PKM2 with a mutant (T454A) enhances mitochondrial respiration, decreases pentose phosphate pathway, and enhances chemosensitivity in A549 cells. In addition, the mutant (T454A) PKM2 reduces xenograft tumor growth in nude mice. These findings demonstrate that PKM2 T454 phosphorylation is a potential therapeutic target in lung cancer. PMID:27045080

  16. Efficacy of JAK/STAT pathway inhibition in murine xenograft models of early T-cell precursor (ETP) acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Maude, Shannon L.; Dolai, Sibasish; Delgado-Martin, Cristina; Vincent, Tiffaney; Robbins, Alissa; Selvanathan, Arthavan; Ryan, Theresa; Hall, Junior; Wood, Andrew C.; Tasian, Sarah K.; Hunger, Stephen P.; Loh, Mignon L.; Mullighan, Charles G.; Wood, Brent L.; Hermiston, Michelle L.; Grupp, Stephan A.; Lock, Richard B.

    2015-01-01

    Early T-cell precursor (ETP) acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a recently described subtype of T-ALL characterized by a unique immunophenotype and genomic profile, as well as a high rate of induction failure. Frequent mutations in cytokine receptor and Janus kinase (JAK)/signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) signaling pathways led us to hypothesize that ETP-ALL is dependent on JAK/STAT signaling. Here we demonstrate aberrant activation of the JAK/STAT pathway in ETP-ALL blasts relative to non-ETP T-ALL. Moreover, ETP-ALL showed hyperactivation of STAT5 in response to interleukin-7, an effect that was abrogated by the JAK1/2 inhibitor ruxolitinib. In vivo, ruxolitinib displayed activity in 6 of 6 patient-derived murine xenograft models of ETP-ALL, with profound single-agent efficacy in 5 models. Ruxolitinib treatment decreased peripheral blast counts relative to pretreatment levels and compared with control (P < .01) in 5 of 6 ETP-ALL xenografts, with marked reduction in mean splenic blast counts (P < .01) in 6 of 6 samples. Surprisingly, both JAK/STAT pathway activation and ruxolitinib efficacy were independent of the presence of JAK/STAT pathway mutations, raising the possibility that the therapeutic potential of ruxolitinib in ETP-ALL extends beyond those cases with JAK mutations. These findings establish the preclinical in vivo efficacy of ruxolitinib in ETP-ALL, a biologically distinct subtype for which novel therapies are needed. PMID:25645356

  17. Human alpha-lactalbumin made lethal to tumor cells (HAMLET) kills human glioblastoma cells in brain xenografts by an apoptosis-like mechanism and prolongs survival.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Walter; Gustafsson, Lotta; Mossberg, Ann-Kristin; Gronli, Janne; Mork, Sverre; Bjerkvig, Rolf; Svanborg, Catharina

    2004-03-15

    Malignant brain tumors present a major therapeutic challenge because no selective or efficient treatment is available. Here, we demonstrate that intratumoral administration of human alpha-lactalbumin made lethal to tumor cells (HAMLET) prolongs survival in a human glioblastoma (GBM) xenograft model, by selective induction of tumor cell apoptosis. HAMLET is a protein-lipid complex that is formed from alpha-lactalbumin when the protein changes its tertiary conformation and binds oleic acid as a cofactor. HAMLET induces apoptosis in a wide range of tumor cells in vitro, but the therapeutic effect in vivo has not been examined. In this study, invasively growing human GBM tumors were established in nude rats (Han:rnu/rnu Rowett, n = 20) by transplantation of human GBM biopsy spheroids. After 7 days, HAMLET was administered by intracerebral convection-enhanced delivery for 24 h into the tumor area; and alpha-lactalbumin, the native, folded variant of the same protein, was used as a control. HAMLET reduced the intracranial tumor volume and delayed the onset of pressure symptoms in the tumor-bearing rats. After 8 weeks, all alpha-lactalbumin-treated rats had developed pressure symptoms, but the HAMLET-treated rats remained asymptomatic. Magnetic resonance imaging scans revealed large differences in tumor volume (456 versus 63 mm(3)). HAMLET caused apoptosis in vivo in the tumor but not in adjacent intact brain tissue or in nontransformed human astrocytes, and no toxic side effects were observed. The results identify HAMLET as a new candidate in cancer therapy and suggest that HAMLET should be additionally explored as a novel approach to controlling GBM progression.

  18. Targeting Tumor Cells with Anti-CD44 Antibody Triggers Macrophage-Mediated Immune Modulatory Effects in a Cancer Xenograft Model

    PubMed Central

    Maisel, Daniela; Birzele, Fabian; Voss, Edgar; Nopora, Adam; Bader, Sabine; Friess, Thomas; Goller, Bernhard; Laifenfeld, Daphna; Weigand, Stefan; Runza, Valeria

    2016-01-01

    CD44, a transmembrane receptor reported to be involved in various cellular functions, is overexpressed in several cancer types and supposed to be involved in the initiation, progression and prognosis of these cancers. Since the sequence of events following the blockage of the CD44-HA interaction has not yet been studied in detail, we profiled xenograft tumors by RNA Sequencing to elucidate the mode of action of the anti-CD44 antibody RG7356. Analysis of tumor and host gene-expression profiles led us to the hypothesis that treatment with RG7356 antibody leads to an activation of the immune system. Using cytokine measurements we further show that this activation involves the secretion of chemo-attractants necessary for the recruitment of immune cells (i.e. macrophages) to the tumor site. We finally provide evidence for antibody-dependent cellular phagocytosis (ADCP) of the malignant cells by macrophages. PMID:27463372

  19. Fangchinoline induced G1/S arrest by modulating expression of p27, PCNA, and cyclin D in human prostate carcinoma cancer PC3 cells and tumor xenograft.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chang-Dong; Huang, Jian-Guo; Gao, Xuan; Li, Yi; Zhou, Shi-Yi; Yan, Xu; Zou, An; Chang, Jun-Li; Wang, Yue-Sheng; Yang, Guang-Xiao; He, Guang-Yuan

    2010-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCA) is the most common invasive malignancy and the second leading cause of cancer-related death in males. The present study investigated the effects of fangchinoline (Fan), an important compound in Stephania Tetradra S. Moore (Fenfangji) with pain-relieving, blood pressure-depressing, and antibiotic activities, on human PCA. It was found that Fan inhibited human prostate cancer cell lines (PC3) cell proliferation in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Studies of cell-cycle progression showed that the anti-proliferative effect of Fan was associated with an increase in the G1/S phase of PC3 cells. Western blot results indicated that Fan-induced G1/S phase arrest was mediated through inhibition of cyclin-regulated signaling pathways. Fan induced p27 expression and inhibited cyclin D and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) expression in PC3 cells. Increased exposure time to Fan caused apoptosis of PC3 cells, which was associated with up-regulation of pro-apoptotic proteins Bax and caspase 3, and down-regulation of anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2. Furthermore, Fan had anti-tumorigenic activity in vivo, including reduction of tumor volume and pro-apoptotic and anti-proliferative effects in a PC3 nude mouse xenograft. Taking all this together, it can be concluded that Fan is an effective anti-proliferative agent that modulates cell growth regulators in prostate cancer cells. PMID:20208355

  20. Dealcoholized Korean Rice Wine (Makgeolli) Exerts Potent Anti-Tumor Effect in AGS Human Gastric Adenocarcinoma Cells and Tumor Xenograft Mice.

    PubMed

    Shin, Eun Ju; Kim, Sung Hee; Kim, Jae Ho; Ha, Jaeho; Hwang, Jin-Taek

    2015-09-01

    Makgeolli is a traditional wine in Korea and has been traditionally believed to exhibit health benefits. However, the inhibitory effect of dealcoholized makgeolli (MK) on cancer has never been investigated scientifically. In this study, MK exhibited an anti-angiogenic effect by inhibiting tube formation in human umbilical vein endothelial cells, without cytotoxicity. Treatment with MK reduced the proliferation of AGS human gastric adenocarcinoma cells in a dose-dependent manner and increased the sub-G1 population. Next, we evaluated whether MK could induce apoptosis in AGS cells by using the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay or Annexin V method. Treatment with MK at 500 and 1,000 μg/ml increased the number of TUNEL-positive AGS cells. Under the same conditions, MK-treated (500 and 1,000 μg/ml) cells showed significant induction of early or late apoptosis, compared with untreated cells (no induction). In addition, MK also induced phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) expression in AGS cells. However, p53 expression in AGS cells was not changed by MK treatment. Furthermore, MK at 500 mg/kg·d reduced the tumor size and volume in AGS tumor xenografts. Taken together, MK may be useful for the prevention of cancer cell growth.

  1. In Silico cancer cell versus stroma cellularity index computed from species-specific human and mouse transcriptome of xenograft models: towards accurate stroma targeting therapy assessment

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The current state of the art for measuring stromal response to targeted therapy requires burdensome and rate limiting quantitative histology. Transcriptome measures are increasingly affordable and provide an opportunity for developing a stromal versus cancer ratio in xenograft models. In these models, human cancer cells are transplanted into mouse host tissues (stroma) and together coevolve into a tumour microenvironment. However, profiling the mouse or human component separately remains problematic. Indeed, laser capture microdissection is labour intensive. Moreover, gene expression using commercial microarrays introduces significant and underreported cross-species hybridization errors that are commonly overlooked by biologists. Method We developed a customized dual-species array, H&M array, and performed cross-species and species-specific hybridization measurements. We validated a new methodology for establishing the stroma vs cancer ratio using transcriptomic data. Results In the biological validation of the H&M array, cross-species hybridization of human and mouse probes was significantly reduced (4.5 and 9.4 fold reduction, respectively; p < 2x10-16 for both, Mann-Whitney test). We confirmed the capability of the H&M array to determine the stromal to cancer cells ratio based on the estimation of cellularity index of mouse/human mRNA content in vitro. This new metrics enable to investigate more efficiently the stroma-cancer cell interactions (e.g. cellularity) bypassing labour intensive requirement and biases of laser capture microdissection. Conclusion These results provide the initial evidence of improved and cost-efficient analytics for the investigation of cancer cell microenvironment, using species-specificity arrays specifically designed for xenografts models. PMID:25079962

  2. Early events in xenograft development from the human embryonic stem cell line HS181--resemblance with an initial multiple epiblast formation.

    PubMed

    Gertow, Karin; Cedervall, Jessica; Jamil, Seema; Ali, Rouknuddin; Imreh, Marta P; Gulyas, Miklos; Sandstedt, Bengt; Ahrlund-Richter, Lars

    2011-01-01

    Xenografting is widely used for assessing in vivo pluripotency of human stem cell populations. Here, we report on early to late events in the development of mature experimental teratoma from a well-characterized human embryonic stem cell (HESC) line, HS181. The results show an embryonic process, increasingly chaotic. Active proliferation of the stem cell derived cellular progeny was detected already at day 5, and characterized by the appearance of multiple sites of engraftment, with structures of single or pseudostratified columnar epithelium surrounding small cavities. The striking histological resemblance to developing embryonic ectoderm, and the formation of epiblast-like structures was supported by the expression of the markers OCT4, NANOG, SSEA-4 and KLF4, but a lack of REX1. The early neural marker NESTIN was uniformly expressed, while markers linked to gastrulation, such as BMP-4, NODAL or BRACHYURY were not detected. Thus, observations on day 5 indicated differentiation comparable to the most early transient cell populations in human post implantation development. Confirming and expanding on previous findings from HS181 xenografts, these early events were followed by an increasingly chaotic development, incorporated in the formation of a benign teratoma with complex embryonic components. In the mature HS181 teratomas not all types of organs/tissues were detected, indicating a restricted differentiation, and a lack of adequate spatial developmental cues during the further teratoma formation. Uniquely, a kinetic alignment of rare complex structures was made to human embryos at diagnosed gestation stages, showing minor kinetic deviations between HS181 teratoma and the human counterpart.

  3. Imaging of human leukemic T-cell xenografts in nude mice by radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies and F(ab')2 fragments

    SciTech Connect

    Vacca, A.; Buchegger, F.; Carrel, S.; Mach, J.P.

    1988-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (MoAb) that react with the T-lymphocyte markers called cluster of differentiation CD5 and CD2 were labeled with iodine 131 (/sup 131/I) and were injected intravenously in nude mice bearing solid subcutaneous xenografts derived from the human T-cell leukemia line Ichikawa. Both MoAb anti-CD5 and anti-CD2 yielded favorable mean tumor to whole-body ratios of 3.8 and 5.1, respectively. These ratios were further increased up to 10.0 for MoAb anti-CD5 and 15.5 for MoAb anti-CD2 by using their F(ab')2 fragments. The tumors could be imaged clearly by external scanning after injection of F(ab')2 fragments from both MoAb. F(ab')2 fragments from MoAb anti-CD2 and of a third MoAb recognizing the clonotypic determinant (Ti) of the antigen receptor expressed by the human T-cell line Jurkat were injected in mice bearing intrasplenic Jurkat xenografts. A selective localization of both fragments in tumor tissue was demonstrated with mean tumor to whole-body ratios of 7.5 and 4.1 for MoAb anti-CD2 and anti-Ti, respectively. These in vivo experimental results may provide useful information for the potential use of radiolabeled MoAb and fragments in the diagnosis and treatment of patients with T-cell lymphoma and different other forms of T-cell malignancies.

  4. Stem Cell Therapy in Injured Vocal Folds: A Three-Month Xenograft Analysis of Human Embryonic Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Svensson, Bengt; Nagubothu, Srinivasa R; Nord, Christoffer; Cedervall, Jessica; Hultman, Isabell; Ährlund-Richter, Lars; Tolf, Anna; Hertegård, Stellan

    2015-01-01

    We have previously shown that human embryonic stem cell (hESC) therapy to injured rabbit vocal folds (VFs) induces human tissue generation with regained VF vibratory capacity. The aims of this study were to test the sustainability of such effect and to what extent derivatives of the transplanted hESCs are propagated in the VFs. The VFs of 14 New Zealand rabbits were injured by a localized resection. HESCs were transplanted to 22 VFs which were analyzed for persistence of hESCs after six weeks and after three months. At three months, the VFs were also analyzed for viscoelasticity, measured as dynamic viscosity and elastic modulus, for the lamina propria (Lp) thickness and relative content of collagen type I. Three months after hESC cell therapy, the dynamic viscosity and elastic modulus of the hESC treated VFs were similar to normal controls and lower than untreated VFs (p ≤ 0.011). A normalized VF architecture, reduction in collagen type I, and Lp thickness were found compared with untreated VFs (p ≤ 0.031). At three months, no derivatives of hESCs were detected. HESCs transplanted to injured rabbit VFs restored the vibratory characteristics of the VFs, with maintained restored function for three months without remaining hESCs or derivatives. PMID:26557696

  5. Stem Cell Therapy in Injured Vocal Folds: A Three-Month Xenograft Analysis of Human Embryonic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Svensson, Bengt; Nagubothu, Srinivasa R.; Nord, Christoffer; Cedervall, Jessica; Hultman, Isabell; Ährlund-Richter, Lars; Tolf, Anna; Hertegård, Stellan

    2015-01-01

    We have previously shown that human embryonic stem cell (hESC) therapy to injured rabbit vocal folds (VFs) induces human tissue generation with regained VF vibratory capacity. The aims of this study were to test the sustainability of such effect and to what extent derivatives of the transplanted hESCs are propagated in the VFs. The VFs of 14 New Zealand rabbits were injured by a localized resection. HESCs were transplanted to 22 VFs which were analyzed for persistence of hESCs after six weeks and after three months. At three months, the VFs were also analyzed for viscoelasticity, measured as dynamic viscosity and elastic modulus, for the lamina propria (Lp) thickness and relative content of collagen type I. Three months after hESC cell therapy, the dynamic viscosity and elastic modulus of the hESC treated VFs were similar to normal controls and lower than untreated VFs (p ≤ 0.011). A normalized VF architecture, reduction in collagen type I, and Lp thickness were found compared with untreated VFs (p ≤ 0.031). At three months, no derivatives of hESCs were detected. HESCs transplanted to injured rabbit VFs restored the vibratory characteristics of the VFs, with maintained restored function for three months without remaining hESCs or derivatives. PMID:26557696

  6. BIM upregulation and ROS-dependent necroptosis mediate the antitumor effects of the HDACi Givinostat and Sorafenib in Hodgkin lymphoma cell line xenografts.

    PubMed

    Locatelli, S L; Cleris, L; Stirparo, G G; Tartari, S; Saba, E; Pierdominici, M; Malorni, W; Carbone, A; Anichini, A; Carlo-Stella, C

    2014-09-01

    Relapsed/refractory Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL) is an unmet medical need requiring new therapeutic options. Interactions between the histone deacetylase inhibitor Givinostat and the RAF/MEK/ERK inhibitor Sorafenib were examined in HDLM-2 and L-540 HL cell lines. Exposure to Givinostat/Sorafenib induced a synergistic inhibition of cell growth (range, 70-80%) and a marked increase in cell death (up to 96%) due to increased H3 and H4 acetylation and strong mitochondrial injury. Gene expression profiling indicated that the synergistic effects of Givinostat/Sorafenib treatment are associated with the modulation of cell cycle and cell death pathways. Exposure to Givinostat/Sorafenib resulted in sustained production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and activation of necroptotic cell death. The necroptosis inhibitor Necrostatin-1 prevented Givinostat/Sorafenib-induced ROS production, mitochondrial injury, activation of BH3-only protein BIM and cell death. Knockdown experiments identified BIM as a key signaling molecule that mediates Givinostat/Sorafenib-induced oxidative death of HL cells. Furthermore, in vivo xenograft studies demonstrated a 50% reduction in tumor burden (P<0.0001), a 5- to 15-fold increase in BIM expression (P < 0.0001) and a fourfold increase in tumor necrosis in Givinostat/Sorafenib-treated animals compared with mice that received single agents. These results provide a rationale for exploring Givinostat/Sorafenib combination in relapsed/refractory HL. PMID:24561519

  7. Embolization of an Insulinoma of the Pancreas with Trisacryl Gelatin Microspheres as Definitive Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Rott, Gernot Biggemann, Martin; Pfohl, Martin

    2008-05-15

    Insulinomas are rare, mostly benign neuroendocrine tumors, originating in 99% of cases from the pancreas, that synthesize and secrete insulin, causing symptomatic hypoglycemia. Today the treatment of choice is surgical removal. We present the case of an 84-year-old woman with a symptomatic insulinoma who refused surgery and was treated with arterial embolization using trisacryl gelatin microspheres as definitive treatment.

  8. Embelin Suppresses Growth of Human Pancreatic Cancer Xenografts, and Pancreatic Cancer Cells Isolated from KrasG12D Mice by Inhibiting Akt and Sonic Hedgehog Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Minzhao; Tang, Su-Ni; Upadhyay, Ghanshyam; Marsh, Justin L.; Jackman, Christopher P.; Shankar, Sharmila; Srivastava, Rakesh K.

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a deadly disease, and therefore effective treatment and/or prevention strategies are urgently needed. The objectives of this study were to examine the molecular mechanisms by which embelin inhibited human pancreatic cancer cell growth in vitro, and xenografts in Balb C nude mice, and pancreatic cancer cell growth isolated from KrasG12D transgenic mice. XTT assays were performed to measure cell viability. AsPC-1 cells were injected subcutaneously into Balb c nude mice and treated with embelin. Cell proliferation and apoptosis were measured by Ki67 and TUNEL staining, respectively. The expression of Akt, and Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) and their target gene products were measured by the immunohistochemistry, and Western blot analysis. The effects of embelin on pancreatic cancer cells isolated from 10-months old KrasG12D mice were also examined. Embelin inhibited cell viability in pancreatic cancer AsPC-1, PANC-1, MIA PaCa-2 and Hs 766T cell lines, and these inhibitory effects were blocked either by constitutively active Akt or Shh protein. Embelin-treated mice showed significant inhibition in tumor growth which was associated with reduced expression of markers of cell proliferation (Ki67, PCNA and Bcl-2) and cell cycle (cyclin D1, CDK2, and CDK6), and induction of apoptosis (activation of caspase-3 and cleavage of PARP, and increased expression of Bax). In addition, embelin inhibited the expression of markers of angiogenesis (COX-2, VEGF, VEGFR, and IL-8), and metastasis (MMP-2 and MMP-9) in tumor tissues. Antitumor activity of embelin was associated with inhibition of Akt and Shh pathways in xenografts, and pancreatic cancer cells isolated from KrasG12D mice. Furthermore, embelin also inhibited epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) by up-regulating E-cadherin and inhibiting the expression of Snail, Slug, and ZEB1. These data suggest that embelin can inhibit pancreatic cancer growth, angiogenesis and metastasis by suppressing Akt and Shh pathways

  9. 3'-hydroxy-3,4,5,4'-tetramethoxystilbene, the metabolite of resveratrol analogue DMU-212, inhibits ovarian cancer cell growth in vitro and in a mice xenograft model.

    PubMed

    Piotrowska-Kempisty, Hanna; Ruciński, Marcin; Borys, Sylwia; Kucińska, Małgorzata; Kaczmarek, Mariusz; Zawierucha, Piotr; Wierzchowski, Marcin; Łażewski, Dawid; Murias, Marek; Jodynis-Liebert, Jadwiga

    2016-01-01

    In screening studies, the cytotoxic activity of four metabolites of resveratrol analogue 3,4,5,4'-tetramethoxystilbene (DMU-212) against A-2780 and SKOV-3 ovarian cancer cells was investigated. The most active metabolite, 3'-hydroxy-3,4,5,4'-tetramethoxystilbene (DMU-214), was chosen for further studies. The cytotoxicity of DMU-214 was shown to be higher than that of the parent compound, DMU-212, in both cell lines tested. Since DMU-212 was supposed to undergo metabolic activation through its conversion to DMU-214, an attempt was made to elucidate the mechanism of its anti-proliferative activity. We found that in SKOV-3 cells lacking p53, DMU-214 induced receptor-mediated apoptosis. In A-2780 cell line with expression of wild-type p53, DMU-214 modulated the expression pattern of p53-target genes driving intrinsic and extrinsic apoptosis pathways, as well as DNA repair and damage prevention. Regardless of the up-regulation of p48, p53R2, sestrins and Gaad45 genes involved in cancer cell DNA repair, we demonstrated the stronger anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic effects of DMU-214 in A-2780 cells when compared to those in SKOV-3. Hence we verified DMU-214 activity in the xenograft model using SCID mice injected with A-2780 cells. The strong anti-proliferative activity of DMU-214 in the in vivo model allowed to suggest the tested compound as a potential therapeutic in ovarian cancer treatment. PMID:27585955

  10. Combination of Quercetin and 2-Methoxyestradiol Enhances Inhibition of Human Prostate Cancer LNCaP and PC-3 Cells Xenograft Tumor Growth

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Feiya; Song, Liming; Wang, Huiping; Wang, Jun; Xu, Zhiqing; Xing, Nianzeng

    2015-01-01

    Quercetin and 2-Methoxyestradiol (2-ME) are promising anti-cancer substances. Our previous in vitro study showed that quercetin synergized with 2-Methoxyestradiol exhibiting increased antiproliferative and proapoptotic activity in both androgen-dependent LNCaP and androgen-independent PC-3 human prostate cancer cell lines. In the present study, we determined whether their combination could inhibit LNCaP and PC-3 xenograft tumor growth in vivo and explored the underlying mechanism. Human prostate cancer LNCaP and PC-3 cells were inoculated subcutaneously in male BALB/c nude mice. When xenograft tumors reached about 100 mm3, mice were randomly allocated to vehicle control, quercetin or 2-Methoxyestradiol singly treated and combination treatment groups. After therapeutic intervention for 4 weeks, combination treatment of quercetin and 2-ME i) significantly inhibited prostate cancer xenograft tumor growth by 46.8% for LNCaP and 51.3% for PC-3 as compared to vehicle control group, more effective than quercetin (28.4% for LNCaP, 24.8% for PC3) or 2-ME (32.1% for LNCaP, 28.9% for PC3) alone; ii) was well tolerated by BALB/c mice and no obvious toxic reactions were observed; iii) led to higher Bax/Bcl-2 ratio, cleaved caspase-3 protein expression and apoptosis rate; and iv) resulted in lower phosphorylated AKT (pAKT) protein level, vascular endothelial growth factor protein and mRNA expression, microvascular density and proliferation rate than single drug treatment. These effects were more remarkable compared to vehicle group. Therefore, combination of quercetin and 2-ME can serve as a novel clinical treatment regimen owning the potential of enhancing antitumor effect on prostate cancer in vivo and lessening the dose and side effects of either quercetin or 2-ME alone. These in vivo results will lay a further solid basis for subsequent researches on this novel therapeutic regimen in human prostate cancer. PMID:26011145

  11. Biosynthesized Platinum Nanoparticles Inhibit the Proliferation of Human Lung-Cancer Cells in vitro and Delay the Growth of a Human Lung-Tumor Xenograft in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Yogesh, Bendale; Vineeta, Bendale; Rammesh, Natu; Saili, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Lung cancer remains a deadly disease with unsatisfactory overall survival. Cisplatin, a standard platinum (Pt)-based chemotherapeutic agent, has the potential to inhibit the growth of lung cancer. Its use, however, is occasionally limited by severe organ toxicity. However, until now, no systematic study has been conducted to verify its efficacy with proper experimental support in vivo. Therefore, we examined whether biosynthesized Pt nanoparticles (NPs) inhibited human lung cancer in vitro and in vivo to validate their use in alternative and complementary medicine. Methods: We evaluated the in vitro and the in vivo anticancer efficiencies of biosynthesized Pt NPs in a subcutaneous xenograft model with A549 cells. Severe combined immune deficient mice (SCID) were divided into four groups: group 1 being the vehicle control group and groups 2, 3 and 4 being the experimental groups. Once the tumor volume had reached 70 ─ 75 mm3, the progression profile of the tumor growth kinetics and the body weights of the mice were measured every week for 6 weeks after oral administration of Pt NPs. Doses of Pt NPs of 500, 1,000 and 2,000 mg/kg of body weight were administered to the experimental groups and a dose of honey was administered to the vehicle control group. The efficacy was quantified by using the delay in tumor growth following the administration of Pt NPs of A549 human-lung-cancer xenografts growing in SCID mice. Results: The in vitro cytotoxicity evaluation indicated that Pt NPs, in a dose-dependent manner, inhibited the growth of A549 cells, and the in vivo evaluation showed that Pt NPs at the mid and high doses effectively inhibited and delayed the growth of lung cancer in SCID mice. Conclusion: These findings confirm the antitumor properties of biosynthesized Pt NPs and suggest that they may be a cost-effective alternative for the treatment of patients with lung cancer. PMID:27386144

  12. Frankincense essential oil prepared from hydrodistillation of Boswellia sacra gum resins induces human pancreatic cancer cell death in cultures and in a xenograft murine model

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Regardless of the availability of therapeutic options, the overall 5-year survival for patients diagnosed with pancreatic cancer remains less than 5%. Gum resins from Boswellia species, also known as frankincense, have been used as a major ingredient in Ayurvedic and Chinese medicine to treat a variety of health-related conditions. Both frankincense chemical extracts and essential oil prepared from Boswellia species gum resins exhibit anti-neoplastic activity, and have been investigated as potential anti-cancer agents. The goals of this study are to identify optimal condition for preparing frankincense essential oil that possesses potent anti-tumor activity, and to evaluate the activity in both cultured human pancreatic cancer cells and a xenograft mouse cancer model. Methods Boswellia sacra gum resins were hydrodistilled at 78°C; and essential oil distillate fractions were collected at different durations (Fraction I at 0–2 h, Fraction II at 8–10 h, and Fraction III at 11–12 h). Hydrodistillation of the second half of gum resins was performed at 100°C; and distillate was collected at 11–12 h (Fraction IV). Chemical compositions were identified by gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC-MS); and total boswellic acids contents were quantified by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Frankincense essential oil-modulated pancreatic tumor cell viability and cytotoxicity were determined by colorimetric assays. Levels of apoptotic markers, signaling molecules, and cell cycle regulators expression were characterized by Western blot analysis. A heterotopic (subcutaneous) human pancreatic cancer xenograft nude mouse model was used to evaluate anti-tumor capability of Fraction IV frankincense essential oil in vivo. Frankincense essential oil-induced tumor cytostatic and cytotoxic activities in animals were assessed by immunohistochemistry. Results Longer duration and higher temperature hydrodistillation produced more abundant high molecular

  13. Zollinger-Ellison Syndrome with Subsequent Association of Insulinoma

    PubMed Central

    Rustagi, Tarun; Siegel, Robert D.

    2010-01-01

    Case: A 64-year-old-woman was admitted to our hospital in 2000 for evaluation of epigastric pain, chronic diarrhea, and 15-lb weight loss. Past medical and family histories were unrevealing for any endocrine tumors. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy showed diffuse severe duodenitis and an atypical post-bulbar ulcer. Her serum gastrin level was elevated (193). ERCP showed a possible mass in the head of the pancreas compressing the main pancreatic duct. Subsequent octreotide scan confirmed a pancreatic head mass, and she underwent a Whipple procedure in 2000. The mass proved to be a 2.8 cm gastrinoma with focal venous and perineural invasion. Immunohistochemically, tumor cells were diffusely positive for gastrin, and focally positive for chromogranin A, synaptophysin and insulin. Tumor cells were negative for glucagon, VIP, somatostatin, or calcitonin. The patient received no adjuvant chemotherapy or radiotherapy. She was well until 2002, when she again developed peptic symptoms and recurrent bleeding gastric ulcers. Octreotide scan was negative. In 2003, she had an emergent laparotomy because of a perforated marginal ulcer and underwent revision of Roux-en-Y gastrojejunostomy and vagotomy. A few months later she again presented with abdominal pain and had elevated liver enzymes. Repeat octreotide scan showed positive hepatic uptake suggestive of metastatic neuroendocrine to liver. The patient was treated with depot-octreotide and proton pump inhibitors (PPI) but ultimately underwent chemo-embolization in early 2004 for progressive disease. She was stable until 2007 when she developed diaphoresis and syncopal episodes associated with hypoglycemia. Extensive cardiovascular, neurologic, and endocrine evaluations revealed elevated insulin, proinsulin and C-peptide levels consistent with a functioning insulinoma. She was treated with depot-octreotide and diazoxide with poor control of hypoglycemic episodes. She underwent hepatic embolization with complete resolution of symptoms

  14. Radioimmunotherapy of human head and neck squamous cell carcinoma xenografts with 131I-labelled monoclonal antibody E48 IgG.

    PubMed Central

    Gerretsen, M.; Schrijvers, A. H.; van Walsum, M.; Braakhuis, B. J.; Quak, J. J.; Meijer, C. J.; Snow, G. B.; van Dongen, G. A.

    1992-01-01

    Monoclonal antibody (MAb) E48 reacts with a 22 kD antigen exclusively expressed in squamous and transitional epithelia and their neoplastic counterparts. Radiolabelled with 99mTc, MAb E48 is capable of targeting metastatic and recurrent disease in patients with head and neck cancer. In this study, the capacity of 131I-labelled MAb E48 to eradicate xenografts of human squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (HNSCC) in nude mice was examined. Experimental groups received a single i.v. bolus injection of 400 microCi MAb E48 IgG (number of mice (n = 6, number of tumours (t) = 9) or 800 microCi MAb E48 IgG (n) = 5,t = 7), whereas control groups received either diluent (n = 3,t = 5), unlabelled MAb E48 IgG (n = 4,t = 5) or 800 microCi 131I-labelled isotype-matched control MAb (n = 6,t = 9). A 4.1-fold increase in the median tumour volume doubling time and regression of two out of ten tumours (20%) was observed in mice treated with 400 microCi. In mice treated with 800 microCi. In mice treated with 800 microCi, two out of seven tumours (29%) showed complete remission without regrowth during follow-up (greater than 3 months). Median tumour volume doubling time in the remaining five tumours was increased 7.8-fold. No antitumour effects were observed in mice injected with diluent, unlabelled MAb E48 or 131I-labelled control MAb. In the same xenograft model, chemotherapy with doxorubicin, 5-fluorouracil, cisplatin, bleomycin, methotrexate or 2',2'-difluorodeoxycytidine yielded a less profound effect on tumour volume doubling time. Increases in tumour volume doubling time with these chemotherapeutic agents were 4, 2.2, 2.1, 1.7, 0, and 2.6 respectively. Moreover, no cures were observed with any of these chemotherapeutic agents. From the tissue distribution of 800 microCi MAb E48, the absorbed cumulative radiation doses of tumour and various organs were calculated using the trapezoid integration method for the area under the curve. To tumour xenografts, 12,170 cGy was

  15. Tubeimoside-1 suppresses tumor angiogenesis by stimulation of proteasomal VEGFR2 and Tie2 degradation in a non-small cell lung cancer xenograft model

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Yuan; Körbel, Christina; Scheuer, Claudia; Nenicu, Anca; Menger, Michael D.; Laschke, Matthias W.

    2016-01-01

    Tubeimoside-1 (TBMS1) is a potent anti-tumor phytochemical. Its functional and molecular mode of action, however, remains elusive so far. Since angiogenesis is essential for tumor progression and metastasis, we herein investigated the anti-angiogenic effects of the compound. In a non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) xenograft model we found that treatment of CD1 nu/nu mice with TBMS1 (5mg/kg) significantly suppressed the growth and vascularization of NCI-H460 flank tumors. Moreover, TBMS1 dose-dependently reduced vascular sprouting in a rat aortic ring assay. In vitro, TBMS1 induced endothelial cell apoptosis without decreasing the viability of NSCLC tumor cells and inhibited the migration of endothelial cells by disturbing their actin filament organization. TBMS1 further stimulated the proteasomal degradation of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 (VEGFR2) and Tie2 in endothelial cells, which down-regulated AKT/mTOR signaling. These findings indicate that TBMS1 represents a novel phytochemical for anti-angiogenic treatment of cancer and other angiogenesis-related diseases. PMID:26701724

  16. Treatment of melanoma cells with the synthetic retinoid CD437 induces apoptosis via activation of AP-1 in vitro, and causes growth inhibition in xenografts in vivo

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    Human malignant melanoma is notoriously resistant to pharmacological modulation. We describe here for the first time that the synthetic retinoid CD437 has a strong dose-dependent antiproliferative effect on human melanoma cells (IC50: 5 x 10(-6) M) via the induction of programmed cell death, as judged by analysis of cell morphology, electron microscopical features, and DNA fragmentation. Programmed cell death was preceded by a strong activation of the AP-1 complex in CD437- treated cells as demonstrated by gel retardation and chloramphenicol transferase (CAT) assays. Northern blot analysis showed a time- dependent increase in the expression of c-fos and c-jun encoding components of AP-1, whereas bcl-2 and p53 mRNA levels remained constant. CD437 also exhibited a strong growth inhibitory effect on MeWo melanoma cells in a xenograft model. In tissue sections of CD437- treated MeWo tumors from these animals, apoptotic melanoma cells and c- fos overexpressing cells were colocalized by TdT-mediated deoxyuridine triphosphate-digoxigenin nick end labeling (TUNEL) staining and in situ hybridization. Taken together, this report identifies CD437 as a retinoid that activates and upregulates the transcription factor AP-1, leading eventually to programmed cell death of exposed human melanoma cells in vitro and in vivo. Further studies are needed to evaluate whether synthetic retinoids such as CD437 represent a new class of retinoids, which may open up new ways to a more effective therapy of malignant melanoma. PMID:8991099

  17. Transforming growth factor-beta can suppress tumorigenesis through effects on the putative cancer stem or early progenitor cell and committed progeny in a breast cancer xenograft model.

    PubMed

    Tang, Binwu; Yoo, Naomi; Vu, Mary; Mamura, Mizuko; Nam, Jeong-Seok; Ooshima, Akira; Du, Zhijun; Desprez, Pierre-Yves; Anver, Miriam R; Michalowska, Aleksandra M; Shih, Joanna; Parks, W Tony; Wakefield, Lalage M

    2007-09-15

    The transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) pathway has tumor-suppressor activity in many epithelial tissues. Because TGF-beta is a potent inhibitor of epithelial cell proliferation, it has been widely assumed that this property underlies the tumor-suppressor effect. Here, we have used a xenograft model of breast cancer to show that endogenous TGF-beta has the potential to suppress tumorigenesis through a novel mechanism, involving effects at two distinct levels in the hierarchy of cellular progeny that make up the epithelial component of the tumor. First, TGF-beta reduces the size of the putative cancer stem or early progenitor cell population, and second it promotes differentiation of a more committed, but highly proliferative, progenitor cell population to an intrinsically less proliferative state. We further show that reduced expression of the type II TGF-beta receptor correlates with loss of luminal differentiation in a clinical breast cancer cohort, suggesting that this mechanism may be clinically relevant. At a molecular level, the induction of differentiation by TGF-beta involves down-regulation of Id1, and forced overexpression of Id1 can promote tumorigenesis despite persistence of the antiproliferative effect of TGF-beta. These data suggest new roles for the TGF-beta pathway in regulating tumor cell dynamics that are independent of direct effects on proliferation.

  18. Inhibition of p300 lysine acetyltransferase activity by luteolin reduces tumor growth in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) xenograft mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Selvi, Ruthrotha B.; Swaminathan, Amrutha; Chatterjee, Snehajyoti; Shanmugam, Muthu K.; Li, Feng; Ramakrishnan, Gowsica B.; Siveen, Kodappully Sivaraman; Chinnathambi, Arunachalam; Zayed, M. Emam; Alharbi, Sulaiman Ali; Basha, Jeelan; Bhat, Akshay; Vasudevan, Madavan; Dharmarajan, Arunasalam; Sethi, Gautam; Kundu, Tapas K.

    2015-01-01

    Chromatin acetylation is attributed with distinct functional relevance with respect to gene expression in normal and diseased conditions thereby leading to a topical interest in the concept of epigenetic modulators and therapy. We report here the identification and characterization of the acetylation inhibitory potential of an important dietary flavonoid, luteolin. Luteolin was found to inhibit p300 acetyltransferase with competitive binding to the acetyl CoA binding site. Luteolin treatment in a xenografted tumor model of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC), led to a dramatic reduction in tumor growth within 4 weeks corresponding to a decrease in histone acetylation. Cells treated with luteolin exhibit cell cycle arrest and decreased cell migration. Luteolin treatment led to an alteration in gene expression and miRNA profile including up-regulation of p53 induced miR-195/215, let7C; potentially translating into a tumor suppressor function. It also led to down-regulation of oncomiRNAs such as miR-135a, thereby reflecting global changes in the microRNA network. Furthermore, a direct correlation between the inhibition of histone acetylation and gene expression was established using chromatin immunoprecipitation on promoters of differentially expressed genes. A network of dysregulated genes and miRNAs was mapped along with the gene ontology categories, and the effects of luteolin were observed to be potentially at multiple levels: at the level of gene expression, miRNA expression and miRNA processing. PMID:26517526

  19. Assessing Metabolic Changes in Response to mTOR Inhibition in a Mantle Cell Lymphoma Xenograft Model Using AcidoCEST MRI

    PubMed Central

    Akhenblit, Paul J.; Hanke, Neale T.; Gill, Alexander; Persky, Daniel O.; Howison, Christine M.; Pagel, Mark D.; Baker, Amanda F.

    2016-01-01

    AcidoCEST magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has previously been shown to measure tumor extracellular pH (pHe) with excellent accuracy and precision. This study investigated the ability of acidoCEST MRI to monitor changes in tumor pHe in response to therapy. To perform this study, we used the Granta 519 human mantle cell lymphoma cell line, which is an aggressive B-cell malignancy that demonstrates activation of the phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase/Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway. We performed in vitro and in vivo studies using the Granta 519 cell line to investigate the efficacy and associated changes induced by the mTOR inhibitor, everolimus (RAD001). AcidoCEST MRI studies showed a statistically significant increase in tumor pHe of 0.10 pH unit within 1 day of initiating treatment, which foreshadowed a decrease in tumor growth of the Granta 519 xenograft model. AcidoCEST MRI then measured a decrease in tumor pHe 7 days after initiating treatment, which foreshadowed a return to normal tumor growth rate. Therefore, this study is a strong example that acidoCEST MRI can be used to measure tumor pHe that may serve as a marker for therapeutic efficacy of anticancer therapies. PMID:27140422

  20. Inhibition of Cell Proliferation and Growth of Pancreatic Cancer by Silencing of Carbohydrate Sulfotransferase 15 In Vitro and in a Xenograft Model

    PubMed Central

    Shibazaki, Yuichiro; Yoneyama, Hiroyuki; Fujii, Masato; Hashiguchi, Taishi; Ito, Zensho; Kajihara, Mikio; Misawa, Takeyuki; Homma, Sadamu; Ohkusa, Toshifumi

    2015-01-01

    Chondroitin sulfate E (CS-E), a highly sulfated glycosaminoglycan, is known to promote tumor invasion and metastasis. Because the presence of CS-E is detected in both tumor and stromal cells in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), multistage involvement of CS-E in the development of PDAC has been considered. However, its involvement in the early stage of PDAC progression is still not fully understood. In this study, to clarify the direct role of CS-E in tumor, but not stromal, cells of PDAC, we focused on carbohydrate sulfotransferase 15 (CHST15), a specific enzyme that biosynthesizes CS-E, and investigated the effects of the CHST15 siRNA on tumor cell proliferation in vitro and growth in vivo. CHST15 mRNA is highly expressed in the human pancreatic cancer cell lines PANC-1, MIA PaCa-2, Capan-1 and Capan-2. CHST15 siRNA significantly inhibited the expression of CHST15 mRNA in these four cells in vitro. Silencing of the CHST15 gene in the cells was associated with significant reduction of proliferation and up-regulation of the cell cycle inhibitor-related gene p21CIP1/WAF1. In a subcutaneous xenograft tumor model of PANC-1 in nude mice, a single intratumoral injection of CHST15 siRNA almost completely suppressed tumor growth. Reduced CHST15 protein signals associated with tumor necrosis were observed with the treatment with CHST15 siRNA. These results provide evidence of the direct action of CHST15 on the proliferation of pancreatic tumor cells partly through the p21CIP1/WAF1 pathway. Thus, CHST15-CS-E axis-mediated tumor cell proliferation could be a novel therapeutic target in the early stage of PDAC progression. PMID:26642349

  1. Inhibition of Cell Proliferation and Growth of Pancreatic Cancer by Silencing of Carbohydrate Sulfotransferase 15 In Vitro and in a Xenograft Model.

    PubMed

    Takakura, Kazuki; Shibazaki, Yuichiro; Yoneyama, Hiroyuki; Fujii, Masato; Hashiguchi, Taishi; Ito, Zensho; Kajihara, Mikio; Misawa, Takeyuki; Homma, Sadamu; Ohkusa, Toshifumi; Koido, Shigeo

    2015-01-01

    Chondroitin sulfate E (CS-E), a highly sulfated glycosaminoglycan, is known to promote tumor invasion and metastasis. Because the presence of CS-E is detected in both tumor and stromal cells in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), multistage involvement of CS-E in the development of PDAC has been considered. However, its involvement in the early stage of PDAC progression is still not fully understood. In this study, to clarify the direct role of CS-E in tumor, but not stromal, cells of PDAC, we focused on carbohydrate sulfotransferase 15 (CHST15), a specific enzyme that biosynthesizes CS-E, and investigated the effects of the CHST15 siRNA on tumor cell proliferation in vitro and growth in vivo. CHST15 mRNA is highly expressed in the human pancreatic cancer cell lines PANC-1, MIA PaCa-2, Capan-1 and Capan-2. CHST15 siRNA significantly inhibited the expression of CHST15 mRNA in these four cells in vitro. Silencing of the CHST15 gene in the cells was associated with significant reduction of proliferation and up-regulation of the cell cycle inhibitor-related gene p21CIP1/WAF1. In a subcutaneous xenograft tumor model of PANC-1 in nude mice, a single intratumoral injection of CHST15 siRNA almost completely suppressed tumor growth. Reduced CHST15 protein signals associated with tumor necrosis were observed with the treatment with CHST15 siRNA. These results provide evidence of the direct action of CHST15 on the proliferation of pancreatic tumor cells partly through the p21CIP1/WAF1 pathway. Thus, CHST15-CS-E axis-mediated tumor cell proliferation could be a novel therapeutic target in the early stage of PDAC progression. PMID:26642349

  2. Anti-CCR7 therapy exerts a potent anti-tumor activity in a xenograft model of human mantle cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The chemokine receptor CCR7 mediates lymphoid dissemination of many cancers, including lymphomas and epithelial carcinomas, thus representing an attractive therapeutic target. Previous results have highlighted the potential of the anti-CCR7 monoclonal antibodies to inhibit migration in transwell assays. The present study aimed to evaluate the in vivo therapeutic efficacy of an anti-CCR7 antibody in a xenografted human mantle cell lymphoma model. Methods NOD/SCID mice were either subcutaneously or intravenously inoculated with Granta-519 cells, a human cell line derived from a leukemic mantle cell lymphoma. The anti-CCR7 mAb treatment (3 × 200 μg) was started on day 2 or 7 to target lymphoma cells in either a peri-implantation or a post-implantation stage, respectively. Results The anti-CCR7 therapy significantly delayed the tumor appearance and also reduced the volumes of tumors in the subcutaneous model. Moreover, an increased number of apoptotic tumor cells was detected in mice treated with the anti-CCR7 mAb compared to the untreated animals. In addition, significantly reduced number of Granta-519 cells migrated from subcutaneous tumors to distant lymphoid organs, such as bone marrow and spleen in the anti-CCR7 treated mice. In the intravenous models, the anti-CCR7 mAb drastically increased survival of the mice. Accordingly, dissemination and infiltration of tumor cells in lymphoid and non-lymphoid organs, including lungs and central nervous system, was almost abrogated. Conclusions The anti-CCR7 mAb exerts a potent anti-tumor activity and might represent an interesting therapeutic alternative to conventional therapies. PMID:24305507

  3. Selective small molecule Stat3 inhibitor reduces breast cancer tumor-initiating cells and improves recurrence free survival in a human-xenograft model.

    PubMed

    Dave, Bhuvanesh; Landis, Melissa D; Tweardy, David J; Chang, Jenny C; Dobrolecki, Lacey E; Wu, Meng-Fen; Zhang, Xiaomei; Westbrook, Thomas F; Hilsenbeck, Susan G; Liu, Dan; Lewis, Michael T

    2012-01-01

    Metastasis and disease relapse are hypothesized to result from tumor initiating cells (TICs). Previously, we have defined a CD44+/CD24-/low mammosphere-forming tumorigenic 493-gene signature in breast cancer. Stat3 was identified as a critical node in self-renewal based on an ongoing lentiviral shRNA screen being conducted in two breast cancer cell lines SUM159 and BT549. In corroborating work, targeting the SH2 domain of Stat3 with a novel small molecule decreased the percentage of cells expressing TIC markers (CD44+/CD24-/low and ALDH+) and mammosphere formation in p-Stat3 overexpressing human breast cancer xenografts in SCID-beige mice. Importantly, we observed a four-fold improvement in the 30-day recurrence-free survival relative to docetaxel alone with the addition of the Stat3 inhibitor in the chemoresistant tumor model. Thus, these findings provide a strong impetus for the development of selective Stat3 inhibitors in order to improve survival in patients with p-Stat3 overexpressing tumors. PMID:22879872

  4. Potent inhibitory effect of δ-tocopherol on prostate cancer cells cultured in vitro and grown as xenograft tumors in vivo.

    PubMed

    Huang, Huarong; He, Yan; Cui, Xiao-Xing; Goodin, Susan; Wang, Hong; Du, Zhi Yun; Li, Dongli; Zhang, Kun; Tony Kong, Ah-Ng; DiPaola, Robert S; Yang, Chung S; Conney, Allan H; Zheng, Xi

    2014-11-01

    In the present study, the effects of δ-tocopherol (δ-T) on growth and apoptosis of human prostate cancer cells were determined and compared with that of α-tocopherol (α-T), a commonly used form of vitamin E. Treatment of human prostate cancer cells with δ-T resulted in strong growth inhibition and apoptosis stimulation, while the effects of α-T were modest. The strong effects of δ-T on the cells were associated with suppression of androgen receptor (AR) activity and decreased level of prostate specific antigen (PSA) that is a downstream target of the AR signaling. In the in vivo study, we found that δ-T had a more potent inhibitory effect on the formation and growth of prostate xenograft tumors than that of α-T. Moreover, δ-T inhibited proliferation and stimulated apoptosis in the tumors. The present study identified δ-T as a better form of vitamin E than α-T for future clinical studies of prostate cancer prevention.

  5. Combined therapeutic effects of vinblastine and Astragalus saponins in human colon cancer cells and tumor xenograft via inhibition of tumor growth and proangiogenic factors.

    PubMed

    Auyeung, Kathy K W; Law, P C; Ko, Joshua K S

    2014-01-01

    Our previous study had demonstrated that Astragalus saponins (AST) could reduce the side effects of orthodox chemotherapeutic drugs, while concurrently promote antitumor activity. In the present study, we attempted to investigate the potential synergistic anticarcinogenic effects of AST and a vinca alkaloid vinblastine (VBL). Reduced expression of key proangiogenic and metastatic factors including VEGF, bFGF, metalloproteinase (MMP)-2, and MMP-9 was detected in VBL-treated colon cancer cells, with further downregulation by combined VBL/AST treatment. Subsequently, VBL or AST decreased LoVo cell invasiveness, with further reduction when the drugs were cotreated. Significant growth inhibition and cell cycle arrest at G2/M phase were achieved by either drug treatment with apparent synergistic effects. VBL-induced apoptosis was confirmed but found to be unrelated to induction of the novel apoptotic protein NSAID-activated gene 1. In vivo study in tumor xenograft indicates that combined VBL/AST treatment resulted in sustained regression of tumor growth, with attenuation of the neutropenic and anemic effects of VBL. In addition, downregulation of proangiogenic and proliferative factors was also visualized, with boosting effect by combined drug treatment. These findings have provided evidence that AST combined with adjuvant chemotherapeutics like VBL could alleviate cancer development through diversified modes of action, including the regulation of angiogenesis.

  6. Isoliquiritigenin Induces Apoptosis and Inhibits Xenograft Tumor Growth of Human Lung Cancer Cells by Targeting Both Wild Type and L858R/T790M Mutant EGFR*

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Sung Keun; Lee, Mee-Hyun; Lim, Do Young; Kim, Jong Eun; Singh, Puja; Lee, Sung-Young; Jeong, Chul-Ho; Lim, Tae-Gyu; Chen, Hanyong; Chi, Young-In; Kundu, Joydeb Kumar; Lee, Nam Hyouck; Lee, Charles C.; Cho, Yong-Yeon; Bode, Ann M.; Lee, Ki Won; Dong, Zigang

    2014-01-01

    Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is associated with diverse genetic alterations including mutation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). Isoliquiritigenin (ILQ), a chalcone derivative, possesses anticancer activities. In the present study, we investigated the effects of ILQ on the growth of tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI)-sensitive and -resistant NSCLC cells and elucidated its underlying mechanisms. Treatment with ILQ inhibited growth and induced apoptosis in both TKI-sensitive and -resistant NSCLC cells. ILQ-induced apoptosis was associated with the cleavage of caspase-3 and poly-(ADP-ribose)-polymerase, increased expression of Bim, and reduced expression of Bcl-2. In vitro kinase assay results revealed that ILQ inhibited the catalytic activity of both wild type and double mutant (L858R/T790M) EGFR. Treatment with ILQ inhibited the anchorage-independent growth of NIH3T3 cells stably transfected with either wild type or double-mutant EGFR with or without EGF stimulation. ILQ also reduced the phosphorylation of Akt and ERK1/2 in both TKI-sensitive and -resistant NSCLC cells, and attenuated the kinase activity of Akt1 and ERK2 in vitro. ILQ directly interacted with both wild type and double-mutant EGFR in an ATP-competitive manner. A docking model study showed that ILQ formed two hydrogen bonds (Glu-762 and Met-793) with wild type EGFR and three hydrogen bonds (Lys-745, Met-793, and Asp-855) with mutant EGFR. ILQ attenuated the xenograft tumor growth of H1975 cells, which was associated with decreased expression of Ki-67 and diminished phosphorylation of Akt and ERK1/2. Taken together, ILQ suppresses NSCLC cell growth by directly targeting wild type or mutant EGFR. PMID:25368326

  7. Additive effects of ulinastatin and docetaxel on growth of breast cancer xenograft in nude mice and expression of PGE2, IL-10, and IL-2 in primary breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Biao; Shen, Hongyan; Sun, Xin; Wang, Hong; Zhang, Yonghua; Sun, Zhijun

    2012-05-01

    Ulinastatin is a broad-spectrum enzyme inhibitor extracted from urine. Previous data from our group suggested that ulinastatin could significantly inhibit proliferation of human breast MDA-MB-231 cells, growth of tumor xenograft in nude mice, and expression of interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-8. In the present study, we investigated whether there is an additive effect of ulinastatin and docetaxel on growth of breast cancer xenografts in nude mice and its possible mechanisms. Nude mice and primary human breast cancer cells were treated with phosphate buffered saline (PBS), ulinastatin, docetaxel, or ulinastatin plus docetaxel, respectively. Their effects on xenograft growth; expressions of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX2), prostaglandin E2 receptor 2 (EP2), IL-10, and IL-2; and secretion of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) were examined using variety of methods, including semi-quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), Western blot, enzyme-linked immunosorbent (ELISA) assay, and immunohistochemistry SP method. The treatment with ulinastatin, docetaxel, or ulinastatin plus docetaxel could significantly (1) inhibit COX2 and IL-10 expression in primary tumor cells at both mRNA and protein levels, (2) reduce PGE2 secretion in culture supernatant (p<0.05), (3) inhibit COX2, EP2, and IL-10 protein levels in primary xenograft of nude mice, and (4) increase IL-2 expression (p<0.05) in primary xenografts of nude mice. In addition, ulinastatin and docetaxel had additive effects. We suggest that ulinastatin had similar effects of docetaxel and can enhance docetaxel's anticancer effects possibly by inhibiting COX2 expression, reducing PGE2 and EP2 expression and their binding, upregulating IL-2, and downregulating IL-10.

  8. Pharmacologic inhibition of MLK3 kinase activity blocks the in vitro migratory capacity of breast cancer cells but has no effect on breast cancer brain metastasis in a mouse xenograft model.

    PubMed

    Rhoo, Kun Hyoe; Granger, Megan; Sur, Joynita; Feng, Changyong; Gelbard, Harris A; Dewhurst, Stephen; Polesskaya, Oksana

    2014-01-01

    Brain metastasis of breast cancer is an important clinical problem, with few therapeutic options and a poor prognosis. Recent data have implicated mixed lineage kinase 3 (MLK3) in controlling the in vitro migratory capacity of breast cancer cells, as well as the metastasis of MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells from the mammary fat pad to distant lymph nodes in a mouse xenograft model. We therefore set out to test whether MLK3 plays a role in brain metastasis of breast cancer cells. To address this question, we used a novel, brain penetrant, MLK3 inhibitor, URMC099. URMC099 efficiently inhibited the migration of breast cancer cells in an in vitro cell monolayer wounding assay, and an in vitro transwell migration assay, but had no effect on in vitro cell growth. We also tested the effect of URMC099 on tumor formation in a mouse xenograft model of breast cancer brain metastasis. This analysis showed that URMC099 had no effect on the either the frequency or size of breast cancer brain metastases. We conclude that pharmacologic inhibition of MLK3 by URMC099 can reduce the in vitro migratory capacity of breast cancer cells, but that it has no effect on either the frequency or size of breast cancer brain metastases, in a mouse xenograft model.

  9. Establishment and characterization of HROC69 – a Crohn´s related colonic carcinoma cell line and its matched patient-derived xenograft

    PubMed Central

    Kuehn, Florian; Mullins, Christina S.; Krohn, Mathias; Harnack, Christine; Ramer, Robert; Krämer, Oliver H.; Klar, Ernst; Huehns, Maja; Linnebacher, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Colitis-associated colorectal cancer (CAC) seems to be a rather unique entity and differs in its genetic alterations, tumour formation capacities, and clinical features from sporadic colorectal carcinoma. Most descriptions about tumour biology of CAC refer to ulcerative colitis; data about Crohn´s colitis related carcinomas are scarce. The majority of patients with Crohn´s disease are under immunosuppression which generates a different environment for tumour growth. We first describe the clinical case of a fast growing CAC in a long-term immunosuppressed patient with Crohn´s disease and successful establishment and characterization of carcinoma cell lines along with their corresponding patient-derived xenograft. Subsequently, these tumor models were molecularly and functionally analysed. Beside numerous chromosomal alterations, mutations in TP53, APC, PTEN and SMAD3 were identified. The cell lines express numerous cancer testis antigens, surface molecules involved in immune evasion but low levels of HLA class I molecules. They show strong invasive but in comparison weak migratory activity. The present work is the first description of patient-derived in vitro and in vivo models for CAC from a Crohn´s disease patient. They might be valuable tools for analysis of genetic and epigenetic alterations, biomarker identification, functional testing, including response prediction, and the development of specific therapeutical strategies. PMID:27087592

  10. Establishment and characterization of HROC69 - a Crohn´s related colonic carcinoma cell line and its matched patient-derived xenograft.

    PubMed

    Kuehn, Florian; Mullins, Christina S; Krohn, Mathias; Harnack, Christine; Ramer, Robert; Krämer, Oliver H; Klar, Ernst; Huehns, Maja; Linnebacher, Michael

    2016-04-18

    Colitis-associated colorectal cancer (CAC) seems to be a rather unique entity and differs in its genetic alterations, tumour formation capacities, and clinical features from sporadic colorectal carcinoma. Most descriptions about tumour biology of CAC refer to ulcerative colitis; data about Crohn´s colitis related carcinomas are scarce. The majority of patients with Crohn´s disease are under immunosuppression which generates a different environment for tumour growth. We first describe the clinical case of a fast growing CAC in a long-term immunosuppressed patient with Crohn´s disease and successful establishment and characterization of carcinoma cell lines along with their corresponding patient-derived xenograft. Subsequently, these tumor models were molecularly and functionally analysed. Beside numerous chromosomal alterations, mutations in TP53, APC, PTEN and SMAD3 were identified. The cell lines express numerous cancer testis antigens, surface molecules involved in immune evasion but low levels of HLA class I molecules. They show strong invasive but in comparison weak migratory activity. The present work is the first description of patient-derived in vitro and in vivo models for CAC from a Crohn´s disease patient. They might be valuable tools for analysis of genetic and epigenetic alterations, biomarker identification, functional testing, including response prediction, and the development of specific therapeutical strategies.

  11. Anticancer activity of pyrithione zinc in oral cancer cells identified in small molecule screens and xenograft model: Implications for oral cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Gunjan; Matta, Ajay; Fu, Guodong; Somasundaram, Raj Thani; Datti, Alessandro; Walfish, Paul G; Ralhan, Ranju

    2015-10-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) patients diagnosed in late stages have limited chemotherapeutic options, underscoring the great need for development of new anticancer agents for more effective disease management. We aimed to identify novel anticancer agents for OSCC using quantitative high throughput assays for screening six chemical libraries consisting of 5170 small molecule inhibitors. In depth characterization resulted in identification of pyrithione zinc (PYZ) as the most effective cytotoxic agent inhibiting cell proliferation and inducing apoptosis in OSCC cells in vitro. Further, treatment with PYZ reduced colony forming, migration and invasion potential of oral cancer cells in a dose-dependent manner. PYZ treatment also led to altered expression of several key components of the major signaling pathways including PI3K/AKT/mTOR and WNT/β-catenin in OSCC cells. In addition, treatment with PYZ also reduced expression of 14-3-3ζ, 14-3-3σ, cyclin D1, c-Myc and pyruvate kinase M2 (PKM2), proteins identified in our earlier studies to be involved in development and progression of OSCCs. Importantly, PYZ treatment significantly reduced tumor xenograft volume in immunocompromised NOD/SCID/Crl mice without causing apparent toxicity to normal tissues. Taken together, we demonstrate in vitro and in vivo efficacy of PYZ in OSCC. In conclusion, we identified PYZ in HTS assays and demonstrated in vitro and in vivo pre-clinical efficacy of PYZ as a novel anticancer therapeutic candidate in OSCC. PMID:26115765

  12. Neuronal Subtype and Satellite Cell Tropism Are Determinants of Varicella-Zoster Virus Virulence in Human Dorsal Root Ganglia Xenografts In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Zerboni, Leigh; Arvin, Ann

    2015-01-01

    Varicella zoster virus (VZV), a human alphaherpesvirus, causes varicella during primary infection. VZV reactivation from neuronal latency may cause herpes zoster, post herpetic neuralgia (PHN) and other neurologic syndromes. To investigate VZV neuropathogenesis, we developed a model using human dorsal root ganglia (DRG) xenografts in immunodeficient (SCID) mice. The SCID DRG model provides an opportunity to examine characteristics of VZV infection that occur in the context of the specialized architecture of DRG, in which nerve cell bodies are ensheathed by satellite glial cells (SGC) which support neuronal homeostasis. We hypothesized that VZV exhibits neuron-subtype specific tropism and that VZV tropism for SGC contributes to VZV-related ganglionopathy. Based on quantitative analyses of viral and cell protein expression in DRG tissue sections, we demonstrated that, whereas DRG neurons had an immature neuronal phenotype prior to implantation, subtype heterogeneity was observed within 20 weeks and SGC retained the capacity to maintain neuronal homeostasis longterm. Profiling VZV protein expression in DRG neurons showed that VZV enters peripherin+ nociceptive and RT97+ mechanoreceptive neurons by both axonal transport and contiguous spread from SGC, but replication in RT97+ neurons is blocked. Restriction occurs even when the SGC surrounding the neuronal cell body were infected and after entry and ORF61 expression, but before IE62 or IE63 protein expression. Notably, although contiguous VZV spread with loss of SGC support would be predicted to affect survival of both nociceptive and mechanoreceptive neurons, RT97+ neurons showed selective loss relative to peripherin+ neurons at later times in DRG infection. Profiling cell factors that were upregulated in VZV-infected DRG indicated that VZV infection induced marked pro-inflammatory responses, as well as proteins of the interferon pathway and neuroprotective responses. These neuropathologic changes observed in sensory

  13. Dependence of Wilms tumor cells on signaling through insulin-like growth factor 1 in an orthotopic xenograft model targetable by specific receptor inhibition.

    PubMed

    Bielen, Aleksandra; Box, Gary; Perryman, Lara; Bjerke, Lynn; Popov, Sergey; Jamin, Yann; Jury, Alexa; Valenti, Melanie; Brandon, Alexis de Haven; Martins, Vanessa; Romanet, Vincent; Jeay, Sebastien; Raynaud, Florence I; Hofmann, Francesco; Robinson, Simon P; Eccles, Suzanne A; Jones, Chris

    2012-05-15

    We have previously demonstrated an increased DNA copy number and expression of IGF1R to be associated with poor outcome in Wilms tumors. We have now tested whether inhibiting this receptor may be a useful therapeutic strategy by using a panel of Wilms tumor cell lines. Both genetic and pharmacological targeting resulted in inhibition of downstream signaling through PI3 and MAP kinases, G(1) cell cycle arrest, and cell death, with drug efficacy dependent on the levels of phosphorylated IGF1R. These effects were further associated with specific gene expression signatures reflecting pathway inhibition, and conferred synergistic chemosensitisation to doxorubicin and topotecan. In the in vivo setting, s.c. xenografts of WiT49 cells resembled malignant rhabdoid tumors rather than Wilms tumors. Treatment with an IGF1R inhibitor (NVP-AEW541) showed no discernable antitumor activity and no downstream pathway inactivation. By contrast, Wilms tumor cells established orthotopically within the kidney were histologically accurate and exhibited significantly elevated insulin-like growth factor-mediated signaling, and growth was significantly reduced on treatment with NVP-AEW541 in parallel with signaling pathway ablation. As a result of the paracrine effects of enhanced IGF2 expression in Wilms tumor, this disease may be acutely dependent on signaling through the IGF1 receptor, and thus treatment strategies aimed at its inhibition may be useful in the clinic. Such efficacy may be missed if only standard ectopic models are considered as a result of an imperfect recapitulation of the specific tumor microenvironment.

  14. Endostatin enhances antitumor effect of tumor antigen-pulsed dendritic cell therapy in mouse xenograft model of lung carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Jing; Liu, Xiaolin; Xie, Qi; Chen, Guoling; Li, Xingyu; Jia, Yanrui; Yin, Beibei; Qu, Xun; Li, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the antitumor effect of endostatin combined with tumor antigen-pulsed dendritic cell (DC)-T cell therapy on lung cancer. Methods Transplanted Lewis lung cancer (LLC) models of C57BL/6 mice were established by subcutaneous injection of LLC cells in left extremity axillary. Tumor antigen-pulsed DC-T cells from spleen cells and bone of mice were cultured in vitro. Tumor-bearing mice were randomly divided into three groups, including DC-T+endostatin group, DC-T group, and phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) control group. Microvessel density (MVD) of tumor tissue in tumor-bearing mice was determined by immunohistochemistry (IHC). The expressions of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) were determined by Western blotting and IHC staining. The proportions of CD8+ T cells, mature dendritic cells (mDC), tumor-associated macrophages [TAM (M1/M2)], and myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) in suspended cells of tumor tissue were determined by flow cytometry. The expressions of interleukin (IL)-6, IL-10, IL-17, transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) and interferon-γ (IFN-γ) in suspended cells of tumor tissue were detected by enzyme-linked immune sorbent assay (ELISA). Results DC-T cells combined with endostatin remarkably suppressed tumor growth. MVD of mice in DC-T+endostatin group was significantly lower than that of the control group and DC-T monotherapy group. The expressions of VEGF, IL-6 and IL-17 in tumors were markedly decreased, but IFN-γ and HIF-1α increased after treating with DC-T cells combined with endostatin, compared to control group and DC-T group. In the DC-T+endostatin group, the proportions of MDSC and TAM (M2 type) were significantly decreased, mDC and TAM (M1 type) were up-regulated, and CD8+ T cells were recruited to infiltrate tumors, in contrast to PBS control and DC-T monotherapy. DC-T cells combined with endostatin potently reduced the expressions of IL-6, IL-10, TGF-β and

  15. An in vivo swine study for xeno-grafts of calcium sulfate-based bone grafts with human dental pulp stem cells (hDPSCs).

    PubMed

    Kuo, Tzong-fu; Lee, Sheng-Yang; Wu, Hong-Da; Poma, Malosi; Wu, Yu-Wei; Yang, Jen-Chang

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of this in vivo study was to evaluate the effect of human dental pulp stem cells (hDPSCs) on various resorbable calcium sulfate/calcium phosphate bone grafts in bone regeneration. Granular particles of calcium sulfate dehydrate (CSD), α-calcium sulfate hemihydrate/amorphous calcium phosphate (α-CSH/ACP), and CSD/β-tricalcium phosphates (β-TCP) were prepared for in vitro dissolution and implantation test. The chemical compositions of specimen residues after dissolution test were characterized by XRD. The ratios of new bone formation for implanted grafts/hDPSCs were evaluated using mandible bony defect model of Lanyu pig. All the graft systems exhibited a similar two-stage dissolution behavior and phase transformation of poor crystalline HAp. Eight weeks post-operation, the addition of hDPSCs to various graft systems showed statistically significant increasing in the ratio of new bone formation (p<0.05). Null hypothesis of hDPSCs showing no scaffold dependence in bone regeneration was rejected. The results suggest that the addition of hDPSCs to calcium sulfate based xenografts could enhance the bone regeneration in the bony defect. PMID:25746240

  16. NOTCH Pathway Blockade Depletes CD133-Positive Glioblastoma Cells and Inhibits Growth of Tumor Neurospheres and Xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Xing; Khaki, Leila; Zhu, Thant S.; Soules, Mary E.; Talsma, Caroline E.; Gul, Naheed; Koh, Cheryl; Zhang, Jiangyang; Li, Yue-Ming; Maciaczyk, Jarek; Nikkhah, Guido; DiMeco, Francesco; Piccirillo, Sara; Vescovi, Angelo L.; Eberhart, Charles G.

    2010-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are thought to be critical for the engraftment and long-term growth of many tumors, including glioblastoma (GBM). The cells are at least partially spared by traditional chemotherapies and radiation therapies, and finding new treatments that can target CSCs may be critical for improving patient survival. It has been shown that the NOTCH signaling pathway regulates normal stem cells in the brain, and that GBMs contain stem-like cells with higher NOTCH activity. We therefore used low-passage and established GBM-derived neurosphere cultures to examine the overall requirement for NOTCH activity, and also examined the effects on tumor cells expressing stem cell markers. NOTCH blockade by γ-secretase inhibitors (GSIs) reduced neurosphere growth and clonogenicity in vitro, whereas expression of an active form of NOTCH2 increased tumor growth. The putative CSC markers CD133, NESTIN, BMI1, and OLIG2 were reduced following NOTCH blockade. When equal numbers of viable cells pretreated with either vehicle (dimethyl sulfoxide) or GSI were injected subcutaneously into nude mice, the former always formed tumors, whereas the latter did not. In vivo delivery of GSI by implantation of drug-impregnated polymer beads also effectively blocked tumor growth, and significantly prolonged survival, albeit in a relatively small cohort of animals. We found that NOTCH pathway inhibition appears to deplete stem-like cancer cells through reduced proliferation and increased apoptosis associated with decreased AKT and STAT3 phosphorylation. In summary, we demonstrate that NOTCH pathway blockade depletes stem-like cells in GBMs, suggesting that GSIs may be useful as chemotherapeutic reagents to target CSCs in malignant gliomas. PMID:19904829

  17. Targeting autophagy overcomes Enzalutamide resistance in castration-resistant prostate cancer cells and improves therapeutic response in a xenograft model

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, H G; Yang, J C; Kung, H-J; Shi, X-B; Tilki, D; Lara, P N; DeVere White, R W; Gao, A C; Evans, C P

    2014-01-01

    Macro-autophagy is associated with drug resistance in various cancers and can function as an adaptive response to maintain cell survival under metabolic stresses, including androgen deprivation. Androgen deprivation or treatment with androgen receptor (AR) signaling inhibitor (ARSI), Enzalutamide (MDV-3100, ENZA) or bicalutamide induced autophagy in androgen-dependent and in castration-resistant CaP (castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC)) cell lines. The autophagic cascade triggered by AR blockage, correlated with the increased light chain 3-II/I ratio and ATG-5 expression. Autophagy was observed in a subpopulation of C4-2B cells that developed insensitivity to ENZA after sustained exposure in culture. Using flow cytometry and clonogenic assays, we showed that inhibiting autophagy with clomipramine (CMI), chloroquine or metformin increased apoptosis and significantly impaired cell viability. This autophagic process was mediated by AMP-dependent protein kinase (AMPK) activation and the suppression of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) through Raptor phosphorylation (Serine 792). Furthermore, small interfering RNA targeting AMPK significantly inhibited autophagy and promoted cell death in CaP cells acutely or chronically exposed to ENZA or androgen deprivation, suggesting that autophagy is an important survival mechanism in CRPC. Lastly, in vivo studies with mice orthotopically implanted with ENZA-resistant cells demonstrated that the combination of ENZA and autophagy modulators, CMI or metformin significantly reduced tumor growth when compared with control groups (P<0.005). In conclusion, autophagy is as an important mechanism of resistance to ARSI in CRPC. Antiandrogen-induced autophagy is mediated through the activation of AMPK pathway and the suppression of mTOR pathway. Blocking autophagy pharmacologically or genetically significantly impairs prostate cancer cell survival in vitro and in vivo, implying the therapeutics potential of autophagy inhibitors

  18. α-Mangostin, a xanthone from mangosteen fruit, promotes cell cycle arrest in prostate cancer and decreases xenograft tumor growth

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Jeremy J.; Petiwala, Sakina M.; Syed, Deeba N.; Rasmussen, John T.; Adhami, Vaqar M.; Siddiqui, Imtiaz A.; Kohl, Amanda M.; Mukhtar, Hasan

    2012-01-01

    There is a need to characterize promising dietary agents for chemoprevention and therapy of prostate cancer (PCa). We examined the anticancer effect of α-mangostin, derived from the mangosteen fruit, in human PCa cells and its role in targeting cell cycle-related proteins involved in prostate carcinogenesis. Using an 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay, we found that α-mangostin significantly decreases PCa cell viability in a dose-dependent manner. Further analysis using flow cytometry identified cell cycle arrest along with apoptosis. To establish a more precise mechanism of action, we performed a cell free biochemical kinase assay against multiple cyclins/cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) involved in cell cycle progression; the most significant inhibition in the cell free-based assays was CDK4, a critical component of the G1 phase. Through molecular modeling, we evaluated α-mangostin against the adenosine triphosphate-binding pocket of CDK4 and propose three possible orientations that may result in CDK4 inhibition. We then performed an in vivo animal study to evaluate the ability of α-mangostin to suppress tumor growth. Athymic nude mice were implanted with 22Rv1 cells and treated with vehicle or α-mangostin (100 mg/kg) by oral gavage. At the conclusion of the study, mice in the control cohort had a tumor volume of 1190 mm3, while the treatment group had a tumor volume of 410 mm3 (P < 0.01). The ability of α-mangostin to inhibit PCa in vitro and in vivo suggests α-mangostin may be a novel agent for the management of PCa. PMID:22159229

  19. Residual dormant cancer stem-cell foci are responsible for tumor relapse after antiangiogenic metronomic therapy in hepatocellular carcinoma xenografts.

    PubMed

    Martin-Padura, Ines; Marighetti, Paola; Agliano, Alice; Colombo, Federico; Larzabal, Leyre; Redrado, Miriam; Bleau, Anne-Marie; Prior, Celia; Bertolini, Francesco; Calvo, Alfonso

    2012-07-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the fifth most common solid tumor and the third leading cause of cancer-related deaths. Currently available chemotherapeutic options are not curative due in part to tumor resistance to conventional therapies. We generated orthotopic HCC mouse models in immunodeficient NOD/SCID/IL2rγ null mice by injection of human alpha-feto protein (hAFP)- and/or luciferase-expressing HCC cell lines and primary cells from patients, where tumor growth and spread can be accurately monitored in a non-invasive way. In this model, low-dose metronomic administration of cyclophosphamide (LDM-CTX) caused complete regression of the tumor mass. A significant increase in survival (P<0.0001), reduced aberrant angiogenesis and hyperproliferation, and decrease in the number of circulating tumor cells were found in LDM-CTX-treated animals, in comparison with untreated mice. Co-administration of LDM-CTX with anti-VEGF therapy further improved the therapeutic efficacy. However, the presence of residual circulating hAFP levels suggested that some tumor cells were still present in livers of treated mice. Immunohistochemistry revealed that those cells had a hAFP+/CD13+/PCNA- phenotype, suggesting that they were dormant cancer stem cells (CSC). Indeed, discontinuation of therapy resulted in tumor regrowth. Moreover, in-vitro LDM-CTX treatment reduced hepatosphere formation in both number and size, and the resulting spheres were enriched in CD13+ cells indicating that these cells were particularly resistant to therapy. Co-treatment of the CD13-targeting drug, bestatin, with LDM-CTX leads to slower tumor growth and a decreased tumor volume. Therefore, combining a CD13 inhibitor, which targets the CSC-like population, with LDM-CTX chemotherapy may be used to eradicate minimal residual disease and improve the treatment of liver cancer. PMID:22546866

  20. The soluble EP2 receptor FuEP2/Ex2 suppresses endometrial cancer cell growth in an orthotopic xenograft model in nude mice.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Tetsuyuki; Ogawa, Hirohisa; Izumi, Keisuke; Uehara, Hisanori

    2011-07-01

    Endometrial cancer is one of the most common gynecologic malignancies and many factors influence in its growth and development. As in many other types of cancer, prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) is thought to be an accelerator of cell proliferation and endometrial cancer progression. In this study, we examined the effect of FuEP2/Ex2, a soluble decoy receptor for PGE(2) on growth of endometrial cancer cells. A stable transfectant expressing FuEP2/Ex2 was established from human endometrial cancer Ishikawa cells (Ish-FuEP2/Ex2). Ish-FuEP2/Ex2 cells expressed FuEP2/Ex2 mRNA and protein. Expression levels of E-prostanoid receptor 1 (EP1), EP2, EP3, EP4, and F-prostanoid receptor (FP) were almost the same in Ish-FuEP2/Ex2 and vector control cells. Growth rates of Ish-FuEP2/Ex2 under normal culture conditions were also similar to vector control cells, although PGE(2)-induced growth stimulation was completely inhibited in Ish-FuEP2/Ex2 or by Ish-FuEP2/Ex2 culture medium. Moreover, phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and induction of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), cyclin D1, and c-fos mRNA by PGE(2) were not observed in Ish-FuEP2/Ex2 and Ish-FuEP2/Ex2 culture medium-treated vector control cells, although they were found when treated with prostaglandin F(2α). An orthotopic xenograft model in athymic nude mice revealed that Ish-FuEP2/Ex2-injected mice had significantly decreased mean tumor area. The proportion of Ki-67-positive cells in the tumor lesion was also significantly lower in Ish-FuEP2/Ex2-injected mice. These findings suggest that an EP-targeting strategy using FuEP2/Ex2 may be of use in the treatment of endometrial cancer.

  1. Curcumin and Its Analogue Induce Apoptosis in Leukemia Cells and Have Additive Effects with Bortezomib in Cellular and Xenograft Models

    PubMed Central

    Nagy, L. I.; Fehér, L. Z.; Szebeni, G. J.; Gyuris, M.; Sipos, P.; Alföldi, R.; Ózsvári, B.; Hackler, L.; Balázs, A.; Batár, P.; Kanizsai, I.; Puskás, L. G.

    2015-01-01

    Combination therapy of bortezomib with other chemotherapeutics is an emerging treatment strategy. Since both curcumin and bortezomib inhibit NF-κB, we tested the effects of their combination on leukemia cells. To improve potency, a novel Mannich-type curcumin derivative, C-150, was synthesized. Curcumin and its analogue showed potent antiproliferative and apoptotic effects on the human leukemia cell line, HL60, with different potency but similar additive properties with bortezomib. Additive antiproliferative effects were correlated well with LPS-induced NF-κB inhibition results. Gene expression data on cell cycle and apoptosis related genes, obtained by high-throughput QPCR, showed that curcumin and its analogue act through similar signaling pathways. In correlation with in vitro results similar additive effect could be obsereved in SCID mice inoculated systemically with HL60 cells. C-150 in a liposomal formulation given intravenously in combination with bortezomib was more efficient than either of the drugs alone. As our novel curcumin analogue exerted anticancer effects in leukemic cells at submicromolar concentration in vitro and at 3 mg/kg dose in vivo, which was potentiated by bortezomib, it holds a great promise as a future therapeutic agent in the treatment of leukemia alone or in combination. PMID:26075279

  2. Effect of dietary selenium and cancer cell xenograft on peripheral T and B lymphocytes in adult nude mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Selenium (Se) is known to regulate tumorigenesis and immunity at nutritional and supranutritional levels. Because the immune system provides critical defenses against cancer and the athymic, immune-deficient NU/J nude mice are known to gradually develop CD8+ and CD4+ T cells, we asked whether B and ...

  3. Methylselenol, a selenium metabolite, inhibits colon cancer cell growth and cancer xenografts in C57BL/6 mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Data indicate that methylselenol is a critical selenium (Se) metabolite for anticancer activity in vivo but its role in colon cancer prevention remains to be characterized. This study tested the hypothesis that methylselenol inhibits the growth of colon cancer cells and tumors. We found that submicr...

  4. Hwanggeumchal sorghum Induces Cell Cycle Arrest, and Suppresses Tumor Growth and Metastasis through Jak2/STAT Pathways in Breast Cancer Xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Eun Joung; Joung, Youn Hee; Hong, Dae Young; Park, Eui U.; Park, Seung Hwa; Choi, Soo Keun; Moon, Eon-Soo; Cho, Byung Wook; Park, Kyung Do; Lee, Hak Kyo; Kim, Myong-Jo; Park, Dong-Sik; Yang, Young Mok

    2012-01-01

    Background Cancer is one of the highly virulent diseases known to humankind with a high mortality rate. Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women worldwide. Sorghum is a principal cereal food in many parts of the world, and is critical in folk medicine of Asia and Africa. In the present study, we analyzed the effects of HSE in metastatic breast cancer. Methodology/Principal Findings Preliminary studies conducted on MDA-MB 231 and MCF-7 xenograft models showed tumor growth suppression by HSE. Western blotting studies conducted both in vivo and in vitro to check the effect of HSE in Jak/STAT pathways. Anti-metastatic effects of HSE were confirmed using both MDA-MB 231 and MCF-7 metastatic animal models. These studies showed that HSE can modulate Jak/STAT pathways, and it hindered the STAT5b/IGF-1R and STAT3/VEGF pathways not only by down-regulating the expression of these signal molecules and but also by preventing their phosphorylation. The expression of angiogenic factors like VEGF, VEGF-R2 and cell cycle regulators like cyclin D, cyclin E, and pRb were found down-regulated by HSE. In addition, it also targets Brk, p53, and HIF-1α for anti-cancer effects. HSE induced G1 phase arrest and migration inhibition in MDA-MB 231 cells. The metastasis of breast cancer to the lungs also found blocked by HSE in the metastatic animal model. Conclusions/Significance Usage of HS as a dietary supplement is an inexpensive natural cancer therapy, without any side effects. We strongly recommend the use of HS as an edible therapeutic agent as it possesses tumor suppression, migration inhibition, and anti-metastatic effects on breast cancer. PMID:22792362

  5. Impact of bevacizumab in combination with erlotinib on EGFR-mutated non-small cell lung cancer xenograft models with T790M mutation or MET amplification.

    PubMed

    Furugaki, Koh; Fukumura, Junko; Iwai, Toshiki; Yorozu, Keigo; Kurasawa, Mitsue; Yanagisawa, Mieko; Moriya, Yoichiro; Yamamoto, Kaname; Suda, Kenichi; Mizuuchi, Hiroshi; Mitsudomi, Tetsuya; Harada, Naoki

    2016-02-15

    Erlotinib (ERL), an epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitor, shows notable efficacy against non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) harboring EGFR mutations. Bevacizumab (BEV), a humanized monoclonal antibody to vascular endothelial cell growth factor (VEGF), in combination with ERL (BEV+ERL) significantly extended progression-free survival in patients with EGFR-mutated NSCLC compared with ERL alone. However, the efficacy of BEV+ERL against EGFR-mutated NSCLC harboring T790M mutation or MET amplification, is unclear. Here, we examined the antitumor activity of BEV+ERL in four xenograft models of EGFR-mutated NSCLC (three harboring ERL resistance mutations). In the HCC827 models (exon 19 deletion: DEL), ERL significantly inhibited tumor growth by blocking EGFR signal transduction. Although there was no difference between ERL and BEV+ERL in maximum tumor growth inhibition, BEV+ERL significantly suppressed tumor regrowth during a drug-cessation period. In the HCC827-EPR model (DEL+T790M) and HCC827-vTR model (DEL+MET amplification), ERL reduced EGFR signal transduction and showed less pronounced but still significant tumor growth inhibition than in the HCC827 model. In these models, tumor growth inhibition was significantly stronger with BEV+ERL than with each single agent. In the NCI-H1975 model (L858R+T790M), ERL did not inhibit growth or EGFR signal transduction, and BEV+ERL did not inhibit growth more than BEV. BEV alone significantly decreased microvessel density in each tumor. In conclusion, addition of BEV to ERL did not enhance antitumor activity in primarily ERL-resistant tumors with T790M mutation; however, BEV+ERL enhanced antitumor activity in T790M mutation- or MET amplification-positive tumors as long as their growth remained significantly suppressed by ERL.

  6. Alkylator-Induced and Patient-Derived Xenograft Mouse Models of Therapy-Related Myeloid Neoplasms Model Clinical Disease and Suggest the Presence of Multiple Cell Subpopulations with Leukemia Stem Cell Activity.

    PubMed

    Jonas, Brian A; Johnson, Carl; Gratzinger, Dita; Majeti, Ravindra

    2016-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a heterogeneous group of aggressive bone marrow cancers arising from transformed hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPC). Therapy-related AML and MDS (t-AML/MDS) comprise a subset of AML cases occurring after exposure to alkylating chemotherapy and/or radiation and are associated with a very poor prognosis. Less is known about the pathogenesis and disease-initiating/leukemia stem cell (LSC) subpopulations of t-AML/MDS compared to their de novo counterparts. Here, we report the development of mouse models of t-AML/MDS. First, we modeled alkylator-induced t-AML/MDS by exposing wild type adult mice to N-ethyl-N-nitrosurea (ENU), resulting in several models of AML and MDS that have clinical and pathologic characteristics consistent with human t-AML/MDS including cytopenia, myelodysplasia, and shortened overall survival. These models were limited by their inability to transplant clinically aggressive disease. Second, we established three patient-derived xenograft models of human t-AML. These models led to rapidly fatal disease in recipient immunodeficient xenografted mice. LSC activity was identified in multiple HSPC subpopulations suggesting there is no canonical LSC immunophenotype in human t-AML. Overall, we report several new t-AML/MDS mouse models that could potentially be used to further define disease pathogenesis and test novel therapeutics. PMID:27428079

  7. Alkylator-Induced and Patient-Derived Xenograft Mouse Models of Therapy-Related Myeloid Neoplasms Model Clinical Disease and Suggest the Presence of Multiple Cell Subpopulations with Leukemia Stem Cell Activity

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Carl; Gratzinger, Dita; Majeti, Ravindra

    2016-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a heterogeneous group of aggressive bone marrow cancers arising from transformed hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPC). Therapy-related AML and MDS (t-AML/MDS) comprise a subset of AML cases occurring after exposure to alkylating chemotherapy and/or radiation and are associated with a very poor prognosis. Less is known about the pathogenesis and disease-initiating/leukemia stem cell (LSC) subpopulations of t-AML/MDS compared to their de novo counterparts. Here, we report the development of mouse models of t-AML/MDS. First, we modeled alkylator-induced t-AML/MDS by exposing wild type adult mice to N-ethyl-N-nitrosurea (ENU), resulting in several models of AML and MDS that have clinical and pathologic characteristics consistent with human t-AML/MDS including cytopenia, myelodysplasia, and shortened overall survival. These models were limited by their inability to transplant clinically aggressive disease. Second, we established three patient-derived xenograft models of human t-AML. These models led to rapidly fatal disease in recipient immunodeficient xenografted mice. LSC activity was identified in multiple HSPC subpopulations suggesting there is no canonical LSC immunophenotype in human t-AML. Overall, we report several new t-AML/MDS mouse models that could potentially be used to further define disease pathogenesis and test novel therapeutics. PMID:27428079

  8. Knock down of the dual functional protein apurinic /apyrimidinic endonuclease 1 enhances the killing effect of hematoporphrphyrin derivative-mediated photodynamic therapy on non-small cell lung cancer cells in vitro and in a xenograft model.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhen-Zhou; Li, Meng-Xia; Zhang, Yun-Song; Xiang, De-Bing; Dai, Nan; Zeng, Lin-Li; Li, Zeng-Peng; Wang, Ge; Wang, Dong

    2010-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is considered to be effective treatment for many cancers including lung cancer, head and neck cancers, and prostate cancer. It uses the combination of nontoxic photosensitizers and harmless visible light to generate reactive oxygen species and kill cells. However, DNA repair and reactive oxygen species-induced signaling pathway activation play crucial roles in cellular response to PDT and may also result in therapeutic limitation of PDT. To improve the cancer therapeutic efficacy of PDT, we targeted apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease (APE1), which is essential for both DNA repair and redox regulation of gene transcription, as a potential candidate for PDT combined gene therapy. In our study, an adenovirus-mediated APE1 silencing strategy was introduced to test its therapeutic enhancement for the non-small cell lung cancer cell line A549 both in vitro and in vivo after hematoporphrphyrin derivative (HpD)-mediated PDT. The adenovirus vector Ad5/F35-shAPE1 was validated to significantly suppress the protein expression of APE1 in cultured A549 cell and in its xenograft of nude mice. Ad5/F35-shAPE1 effectively inhibited APE1 protein upregulation induced by PDT and resulted in an increase in A549 cell killing by photoirradiation compared with the hematoporphrphyrin derivative-PDT alone group. Ad5/F35-shAPE1 suppressed the DNA repair capacity for single-strand breaks and abolished the activation of some stress-related transcription factors such as hypoxia-induced factor (HIF)-1 that consequently lead to increased cell apoptosis after PDT. Additionally, knock down of APE1 enhanced the tumor suppression efficacy of PDT on the A549 xenograft. Our study indicated that APE1-targeted gene therapy combined with PDT is a promising strategy for enhancement of the efficacy of PDT in treatment of non-small cell lung cancer.

  9. Cathepsin B Contributes to Autophagy-related 7 (Atg7)-induced Nod-like Receptor 3 (NLRP3)-dependent Proinflammatory Response and Aggravates Lipotoxicity in Rat Insulinoma Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shali; Du, Leilei; Zhang, Lu; Hu, Yue; Xia, Wenchun; Wu, Jia; Zhu, Jing; Chen, Lingling; Zhu, Fengqi; Li, Chunxian; Yang, SiJun

    2013-01-01

    Impairment of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion caused by the lipotoxicity of palmitate was found in β-cells. Recent studies have indicated that defects in autophagy contribute to pathogenesis in type 2 diabetes. Here, we report that autophagy-related 7 (Atg7) induced excessive autophagic activation in INS-1(823/13) cells exposed to saturated fatty acids. Atg7-induced cathepsin B (CTSB) overexpression resulted in an unexpected significant increase in proinflammatory chemokine and cytokine production levels of IL-1β, monocyte chemotactic protein-1, IL-6, and TNF-α. Inhibition of receptor-interacting protein did not affect the inflammatory response, ruling out involvement of necrosis. CTSB siRNA suppressed the inflammatory response but did not affect apoptosis significantly, suggesting that CTSB was a molecular linker between autophagy and the proinflammatory response. Blocking caspase-3 suppressed apoptosis but did not affect the inflammatory response, suggesting that CTSB induced inflammatory effects independently of apoptosis. Silencing of Nod-like receptor 3 (NLRP3) completely abolished both IL-1β secretion and the down-regulation effects of Atg7-induced CTSB overexpression on glucose-stimulated insulin secretion impairment, thus identifying the NLRP3 inflammasome as an autophagy-responsive element in the pancreatic INS-1(823/13) cell line. Combined together, our results indicate that CTSB contributed to the Atg7-induced NLRP3-dependent proinflammatory response, resulting in aggravation of lipotoxicity, independently of apoptosis in the pancreatic INS-1(823/13) cell line. PMID:23986436

  10. Cancer-Associated Fibroblasts in a Human HEp-2 Established Laryngeal Xenografted Tumor Are Not Derived from Cancer Cells through Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition, Phenotypically Activated but Karyotypically Normal

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Mei; Wu, Chun-Ping; Pan, Jun-Yan; Zheng, Wen-Wei; Cao, Xiao-Juan; Fan, Guo-Kang

    2015-01-01

    Cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) play a crucial role in cancer progression and even initiation. However, the origins of CAFs in various cancer types remain controversial, and one of the important hypothesized origins is through epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) from cancer cells. In this study, we investigated whether the HEp-2 laryngeal cancer cells are able to generate CAFs via EMT during tumor formation, which is now still unknown. The laryngeal xenografted tumor model was established by inoculating the HEp-2 laryngeal cancer cell line in nude mice. Primary cultured CAFs from the tumor nodules and matched normal fibroblasts (NFs) from the adjacent connective tissues were subcultured, purified, and verified by immunofluorescence. Migration, invasion, and proliferation potentials were compared between the CAFs and NFs. A co-culture of CAFs with HEp-2 cells and a co-injection of CAFs with HEp-2 cells in nude mice were performed to examine the cancer-promoting potential of CAFs to further verify their identity. Karyotypic analyses of the CAFs, NFs, and HEp-2 cells were conducted. A co-culture of NFs with HEp-2 cells was also performed to examine the expression of activated markers of CAFs. A pathological examination confirmed that the laryngeal xenografted tumor model was successfully established, containing abundant CAFs. Immunocytochemical staining verified the purities and identities of the CAFs and NFs. Although the CAFs manifested higher migration, invasion, proliferation, and cancer-promoting capacities compared with the NFs, an analysis of chromosomes revealed that both the CAFs and NFs showed typical normal mouse karyotypes. In addition, the NFs co-cultured with HEp-2 cells did not show induced expressions of activated markers of CAFs. Our findings reveal that the CAFs in the HEp-2 established laryngeal xenografted tumor are not of laryngeal cancer origin but of mouse origin, indicating that the HEp-2 laryngeal cancer cells cannot generate their

  11. Cryoprotectant Delivery and Removal from Murine Insulinomas at Vitrification-Relevant Concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Indra Neil; Song, Ying C.; Sambanis, Athanassios

    2009-01-01

    Development of optimal cryopreservation protocols requires delivery and removal of cryoprotective agents (CPAs) in such a way that negative osmotic and cytotoxic effects on cells are minimized. This is especially true for vitrification, where high CPA concentrations are employed. In this study, we report on the determination of cell membrane permeability parameters for water (Lp) and solute (Ps), and on the design and experimental verification of CPA addition and removal protocols at vitrification-relevant concentrations for a murine insulinoma cell line, βTC-tet cells. Using membrane permeability values and osmotic tolerance limits, mathematical modeling and computer simulations were used to design CPA addition and removal protocols at high concentrations. The cytotoxic effects of CPAs were also evaluated. Cells were able to tolerate the addition and removal of 2.5 M dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) and 2.5 M 1,2 propanediol (PD) in single steps, but required multi-step addition and removal with 3.0 M DMSO, 3.0 M PD, and a vitrification-relevant concentration of 3.0 M DMSO+3.0M PD. Cytotoxicity studies revealed that βTC-tet cells were able to tolerate the presence of single component 6.0 M DMSO and 6.0 M PD and to a lesser extent 3.0 M DMSO+3.0 M PD. These results determine the time and concentration domain of CPA exposure that cells can tolerate and are essential for designing cryopreservation protocols for free cells as well as cells in engineered tissues. PMID:17533114

  12. Sequence and functional expression in Xenopus oocytes of a human insulinoma and islet potassium channel.

    PubMed Central

    Philipson, L H; Hice, R E; Schaefer, K; LaMendola, J; Bell, G I; Nelson, D J; Steiner, D F

    1991-01-01

    Regulation of insulin secretion involves the coordinated control of ion channels in the beta-cell membrane. We have isolated and characterized cDNA and genomic clones encoding a voltage-dependent K+ channel isoform expressed in human islets and in a human insulinoma. This K+ channel isoform, designated hPCN1, with a deduced amino acid sequence of 613 residues (Mr = 67,097), is related to the Shaker family of Drosophila K+ channels. hPCN1 is homologous to two other human K+ channel isoforms we have isolated, hPCN2 and hPCN3, with 55% and 65% amino acid sequence identity, respectively. The electrophysiological characteristics of hPCN1 were determined after microinjection of synthetic RNA into Xenopus oocytes. Two-microelectrode voltage-clamp recordings of oocytes injected with hPCN1 RNA revealed a voltage-dependent outward K+ current that inactivated slowly with time. Outward currents were inhibited by 4-aminopyridine with a Ki less than 0.10 mM and were relatively insensitive to tetraethylammonium ion or Ba2+. A delayed rectifier K+ channel such as hPCN1 could restore the resting membrane potential of beta cells after depolarization and thereby contribute to the regulation of insulin secretion. PMID:1986382

  13. Sequence and functional expression in Xenopus oocytes of a human insulinoma and islet potassium channel

    SciTech Connect

    Philipson, L.H.; Hice, R.E.; Schaefer, K.; LaMendola, J.; Bell, G.I.; Nelson, D.J.; Steiner, D.F. )

    1991-01-01

    Regulation of insulin secretion involves the coordinated control of ion channels in the {beta}-cell membrane. The authors have isolated and characterized cDNA and genomic clones encoding a voltage-dependent K{sup +} channel isoform expressed in human islets and in a human insulinoma. This K{sup +} channel isoform, designated hPCN1, with a deduced amino acid sequence of 613 residues is related to the Shaker family of Drosophila K{sup +} channels. hPCN1 is homologous to two other human K{sup +} channel isoforms. They have isolated, hPCN2 and hPCN3, with 55% and 65% amino acid sequence identity, respectively. The electrophysiological characteristics of hPCN1 were determined after microinjuection of synthetic RNA into Xenopus oocytes. Two-microelectrode voltage-clamp recordings of oocytes injected with hPCN1 RNA revealed a voltage-dependent outward K{sup +} current that inactivated slowly with time. Outward currents were inhibited by 4-aminopyridine with a K{sub i} less that 0.01 mM and were relatively insensitive to tetraethylammonium ion or Ba{sup 2+}. A delayed rectifier K{sup +} channel such as hPCN1 could restore the resting membrane potential of {beta} cells after depolarization and thereby contribute to the regulation of insulin secretion.

  14. Mechanisms of Cell Killing Response from Low Linear Energy Transfer (LET) Radiation Originating from 177Lu Radioimmunotherapy Targeting Disseminated Intraperitoneal Tumor Xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Yong, Kwon Joong; Milenic, Diane E.; Baidoo, Kwamena E.; Brechbiel, Martin W.

    2016-01-01

    Radiolabeled antibodies (mAbs) provide efficient tools for cancer therapy. The combination of low energy β−-emissions (500 keVmax; 130 keVave) along with a γ-emission for imaging makes 177Lu (T1/2 = 6.7 day) a suitable radionuclide for radioimmunotherapy (RIT) of tumor burdens possibly too large to treat with α-particle radiation. RIT with 177Lu-trastuzumab has proven to be effective for treatment of disseminated HER2 positive peritoneal disease in a pre-clinical model. To elucidate mechanisms originating from this RIT therapy at the molecular level, tumor bearing mice (LS-174T intraperitoneal xenografts) were treated with 177Lu-trastuzumab comparatively to animals treated with a non-specific control, 177Lu-HuIgG, and then to prior published results obtained using 212Pb-trastuzumab, an α-particle RIT agent. 177Lu-trastuzumab induced cell death via DNA double strand breaks (DSB), caspase-3 apoptosis, and interfered with DNA-PK expression, which is associated with the repair of DNA non-homologous end joining damage. This contrasts to prior results, wherein 212Pb-trastuzumab was found to down-regulate RAD51, which is involved with homologous recombination DNA damage repair. 177Lu-trastuzumab therapy was associated with significant chromosomal disruption and up-regulation of genes in the apoptotic process. These results suggest an inhibition of the repair mechanism specific to the type of radiation damage being inflicted by either high or low linear energy transfer radiation. Understanding the mechanisms of action of β−- and α-particle RIT comparatively through an in vivo tumor environment offers real information suitable to enhance combination therapy regimens involving α- and β−-particle RIT for the management of intraperitoneal disease. PMID:27196891

  15. Mechanisms of Cell Killing Response from Low Linear Energy Transfer (LET) Radiation Originating from (177)Lu Radioimmunotherapy Targeting Disseminated Intraperitoneal Tumor Xenografts.

    PubMed

    Yong, Kwon Joong; Milenic, Diane E; Baidoo, Kwamena E; Brechbiel, Martin W

    2016-01-01

    Radiolabeled antibodies (mAbs) provide efficient tools for cancer therapy. The combination of low energy β(-)-emissions (500 keVmax; 130 keVave) along with a γ-emission for imaging makes (177)Lu (T1/2 = 6.7 day) a suitable radionuclide for radioimmunotherapy (RIT) of tumor burdens possibly too large to treat with α-particle radiation. RIT with (177)Lu-trastuzumab has proven to be effective for treatment of disseminated HER2 positive peritoneal disease in a pre-clinical model. To elucidate mechanisms originating from this RIT therapy at the molecular level, tumor bearing mice (LS-174T intraperitoneal xenografts) were treated with (177)Lu-trastuzumab comparatively to animals treated with a non-specific control, (177)Lu-HuIgG, and then to prior published results obtained using (212)Pb-trastuzumab, an α-particle RIT agent. (177)Lu-trastuzumab induced cell death via DNA double strand breaks (DSB), caspase-3 apoptosis, and interfered with DNA-PK expression, which is associated with the repair of DNA non-homologous end joining damage. This contrasts to prior results, wherein (212)Pb-trastuzumab was found to down-regulate RAD51, which is involved with homologous recombination DNA damage repair. (177)Lu-trastuzumab therapy was associated with significant chromosomal disruption and up-regulation of genes in the apoptotic process. These results suggest an inhibition of the repair mechanism specific to the type of radiation damage being inflicted by either high or low linear energy transfer radiation. Understanding the mechanisms of action of β(-)- and α-particle RIT comparatively through an in vivo tumor environment offers real information suitable to enhance combination therapy regimens involving α- and β(-)-particle RIT for the management of intraperitoneal disease. PMID:27196891

  16. Oral administration of naturally occurring chitosan-based nanoformulated green tea polyphenol EGCG effectively inhibits prostate cancer cell growth in a xenograft model

    PubMed Central

    Mukhtar, Hasan

    2014-01-01

    In preclinical animal models, several phytochemicals have shown excellent potential to be used as effective agents in preventing and treating many cancers. However, the limited bioavailability of active agents could be one reason for their restricted usefulness for human consumption. To overcome this limitation, we recently introduced the concept of nanochemoprevention by encapsulating useful bioactive food components for their slow and sustained release. Here, we report the synthesis, characterization and efficacy assessment of a nanotechnology-based oral formulation of chitosan nanoparticles encapsulating epigallocatechin-3-gallate (Chit-nanoEGCG) for the treatment of prostate cancer (PCa) in a preclinical setting. Chit-nanoEGCG with a size of <200nm diameter and encapsulating EGCG as determined by dynamic light scattering and transmission electron microscope showed slow release of EGCG in simulated gastric juice acidic pH and faster release in simulated intestinal fluid. The antitumor efficacy of Chit-nanoEGCG was assessed in subcutaneously implanted 22Rν1 tumor xenografts in athymic nude mice. Treatment with Chit-nanoEGCG resulted in significant inhibition of tumor growth and secreted prostate-specific antigen levels compared with EGCG and control groups. In tumor tissues of mice treated with Chit-nanoEGCG, compared with groups treated with EGCG and controls, there was significant (i) induction of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerases cleavage, (ii) increase in the protein expression of Bax with concomitant decrease in Bcl-2, (iii) activation of caspases and (iv) reduction in Ki-67 and proliferating cell nuclear antigen. Through this study, we propose a novel preventive and therapeutic modality for PCa using EGCG that addresses issues related to bioavailability. PMID:24072771

  17. Treatment with connexin 46 siRNA suppresses the growth of human Y79 retinoblastoma cell xenografts in vivo.

    PubMed

    Burr, Diana B; Molina, Samuel A; Banerjee, Debarshi; Low, Derek M; Takemoto, Dolores J

    2011-04-01

    Tumors with a hypoxic component, including human Y79 retinoblastoma cells, express a specific gap junction protein, Connexin 46 (Cx46), which is usually only found in naturally hypoxic tissues such as the differentiated lens. The aim of this study was to investigate if Cx46 downregulation would suppress Y79 tumor formation in vivo. Five-week old nude mice were subcutaneously implanted with human Y79 retinoblastoma cells and treated with intratumor siRNA injections of 30 μg Cx46 siRNA (n = 6), 30 μg non-silencing siRNA (n = 6), or no siRNA treatment (n = 6) every 2 days for a maximum of 10 treatments. Tumor volume (TV) was calculated from the recorded caliper measurements of length and width. Excised tumors were measured and weighed. Western blot analyses were performed to evaluate Cx46 and Cx43 expression in tumors which received Cx46 siRNA, non-silencing siRNA, or no siRNA treatment. Tumor histopathology was used to assess tumor features. Cx46 siRNA treated Y79 tumors had a reduced TV (287 mm(3) ± 77 mm(3)) when compared to the tumors of mice receiving the negative control siRNA (894 mm(3) ± 218 mm(3); P ≤ 0.03) or no siRNA (1068 mm(3) ± 192 mm(3); P ≤ 0.002). A 6-fold knockdown of Cx46 and a 3-fold rise in Cx43 protein expression was observed from western blots of tumors treated with Cx46 siRNA compared to mice treated with non-silencing siRNA. Knockdown of Cx46 with siRNA had an antitumor effect on human Y79 retinoblastoma tumors in the nude mouse model. The results suggest that anti-Cx46 therapy may be a potential target in the future treatment of retinoblastoma. PMID:21320488

  18. Exploratory Study of the Prognostic Value of Microenvironmental Parameters During Fractionated Irradiation in Human Squamous Cell Carcinoma Xenografts

    SciTech Connect

    Yaromina, Ala; Kroeber, Theresa; Meinzer, Andreas; Boeke, Simon; Thames, Howard; Baumann, Michael; Zips, Daniel

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: To explore the prognostic value of microenvironmental parameters for local tumor control determined before and during fractionated irradiation. Methods and Materials: Six human squamous cell carcinoma (hSCC) lines were transplanted subcutaneously into the right hind leg of nude mice. Tumors were irradiated with 30 fractions within 6 weeks. Local tumor control was determined 120 days after irradiation. Radiation response was quantified as dose to cure 50% of tumors (TCD{sub 50}). In parallel, untreated and irradiated tumors were excised after injection of pimonidazole (hypoxia marker) and Hoechst 33342 (perfusion marker) for histological evaluation. Results: Pimonidazole hypoxia decreased during fractionated irradiation in the majority of tumor lines. Fraction of perfused vessels and vascular area showed modest changes during fractionated irradiation. Histological parameters before treatment and after three and five fractions did not significantly correlate with TCD{sub 50} after irradiation with 30 fractions within 6 weeks (p > 0.05). Hypoxic volume and perfused vessels after 10 fractions showed a significant association with local tumor control after fractionated irradiation (p = 0.018 and p = 0.019, respectively). None of these parameters remained statistically significant when the p value was adjusted for multiple comparisons. Conclusions: The results from this exploratory study suggest that determination of microenvironmental parameters during treatment provides better prognostic information for the outcome after fractionated radiotherapy than pretreatment parameters, which warrants further investigation and confirmation in experimental and clinical studies.

  19. Sunitinib Combined with Angiotensin-2 Type-1 Receptor Antagonists Induces More Necrosis: A Murine Xenograft Model of Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Verhoest, Grégory; Dolley-Hitze, Thibault; Jouan, Florence; Belaud-Rotureau, Marc-Antoine; Oger, Emmanuel; Bensalah, Karim; Arlot-Bonnemains, Yannick; Collet, Nicolas; Rioux-Leclercq, Nathalie; Vigneau, Cécile

    2014-01-01

    Background. Angiotensin-2 type-1 receptor antagonists not are only antihypertensive drugs but also can inhibit VEGF production. We hypothesised that adding telmisartan to sunitinib could potentiate the antiangiogenic effects. Material and Methods. 786-O cell lines were injected in nude mice. After tumor development, mice were divided into 4 groups: the first was the control group (DMSO), the second group was treated with sunitinib alone, the third group was treated with telmisartan alone, and the fourth group was treated with the combination. Drugs were orally administered every day for four weeks. Animals were sacrificed after treatment. Blood and tumor tissues were collected for analysis by immunohistochemistry, Western Blot, and ELISA methods. Results. All animals developed a ccRCC and ten in each group were treated. Using a kinetic model, tumors tended to grow slower in the combination group compared to others (P = 0.06). Compared to sunitinib alone, the addition of telmisartan significantly increased tissue necrosis (P = 0.038). Central microvascular density decreased (P = 0.0038) as well as circulating VEGF (P = 0.003). There was no significant variation in proliferation or apoptosis markers. Conclusion. The combination of sunitinib and telmisartan revealed an enhancement of the blockage of the VEGF pathway on renal tumor resulting in a decrease in neoangiogenesis and an increase in necrosis. PMID:24967411

  20. CD8+ T Cell Clones Specific for the 5T4 Antigen Target Renal Cell Carcinoma Tumor-Initiating Cells in a Murine Xenograft Model

    PubMed Central

    Tykodi, Scott S.; Satoh, Shoko; Deming, Janise D.; Chou, Jeffrey; Harrop, Richard; Warren, Edus H.

    2012-01-01

    The tumor antigen 5T4 is frequently expressed at high levels on renal cell carcinoma (RCC) and other epithelial carcinomas. Surveys of normal tissues demonstrate abundant 5T4 expression on placental trophoblast cells with limited expression elsewhere. 5T4 is the target for a therapeutic cancer vaccine (MVA-5T4) that elicits 5T4-specific serological, proliferative, and CTL responses. However, the anti-tumor activity of 5T4-specific CTL has not been extensively characterized. CD8+ T cells from HLA-A2+ healthy donors (n=4) or RCC patients (n=2) were stimulated in vitro with the HLA-A2-binding nonamer peptides 5T417–25 or 5T497–105 and screened by flow cytometry with specific tetramers (TET). CD8+/TET+ T cell clones specific for 5T417–25 or 5T497–105 peptide were isolated from 4/6 and 1/4 donors respectively. A subset of clones specific for 5T417–25 was cytolytic for MVA-5T4 infected HLA-A2+ LCL target cells and for constitutively HLA-A2- and 5T4- expressing RCC tumor cell lines (including A498 RCC). In a xenoengraftment assay, the co-inoculation of a representative 5T417–25-specific CTL clone with A498 RCC tumors cells into immune deficient mice completely prevented growth of A498 tumors. Taken together, these data demonstrate high avidity CD8+ CTL able to recognize the naturally-processed 5T417–25 epitope on RCC tumor cells including putative tumor-initiating cells are present in peripheral blood of both healthy donors and RCC patients. CD8+ T cell immunity targeting 5T417–25 is therefore of substantial interest both as a potential target for further development of vaccination or adoptive cellular immunotherapy and for immune monitoring studies in association with nonspecific immunotherapies. PMID:22892449

  1. [Video-laparoscopic excision of pancreatic insulinoma. Experience with 3 cases].

    PubMed

    Pugliese, Raffaele; Boniardi, Marco; Sansonna, Fabio; Maggioni, Dario; Scandroglio, Ildo; Costanzi, Andrea; Rapetti, Rosangela; Oppizzi, Giuseppe; Loli, Paola

    2008-01-01

    Laparoscopic treatment of lesions of the distal pancreas has gained favour worldwide in the last decade. The objective of this study was to analyze 3 cases of insulinoma successfully treated with the laparoscopic approach. From 2000 to 2007 in our institution 3 patients with insulinoma of the left pancreas were treated with a laparoscopic approach. The insulinoma was diagnosed by helical CT scan, Two cases were treated by left pancreatectomy and one by enucleation. The resections were achieved by laparoscopy with no conversion to laparotomy. There were no intraoperative complications. Average blood loss was 180 mi (range: 150-350). Mean operative time was 232 minutes (range: 225-240). Morbidity consisted in one mild pancreatic fistula after left pancreatectomy that was healed by conservative treatment after 24 days. The mean hospital stay was 13 days (range: 10-20). During the follow-up insulinoma symptoms have disappeared in all patients. This study confirms the feasibility of laparoscopic resection for insulinoma. Operative times were quite acceptable and the conversion rate was nil. Times to oral intake and walking were shorter than after open surgery, as was the mean postoperative hospital stay. PMID:18389742

  2. [Video-laparoscopic excision of pancreatic insulinoma. Experience with 3 cases].

    PubMed

    Pugliese, Raffaele; Boniardi, Marco; Sansonna, Fabio; Maggioni, Dario; Scandroglio, Ildo; Costanzi, Andrea; Rapetti, Rosangela; Oppizzi, Giuseppe; Loli, Paola

    2008-01-01

    Laparoscopic treatment of lesions of the distal pancreas has gained favour worldwide in the last decade. The objective of this study was to analyze 3 cases of insulinoma successfully treated with the laparoscopic approach. From 2000 to 2007 in our institution 3 patients with insulinoma of the left pancreas were treated with a laparoscopic approach. The insulinoma was diagnosed by helical CT scan, Two cases were treated by left pancreatectomy and one by enucleation. The resections were achieved by laparoscopy with no conversion to laparotomy. There were no intraoperative complications. Average blood loss was 180 mi (range: 150-350). Mean operative time was 232 minutes (range: 225-240). Morbidity consisted in one mild pancreatic fistula after left pancreatectomy that was healed by conservative treatment after 24 days. The mean hospital stay was 13 days (range: 10-20). During the follow-up insulinoma symptoms have disappeared in all patients. This study confirms the feasibility of laparoscopic resection for insulinoma. Operative times were quite acceptable and the conversion rate was nil. Times to oral intake and walking were shorter than after open surgery, as was the mean postoperative hospital stay.

  3. Hypersomnia as the first presentation in a patient with insulinoma: A case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Pu, Jiali; Zhang, Baorong; Yin, Xinzhen

    2016-01-01

    Insulinoma is a rare neuroendocrine tumor. Hypersomnia as the first presentation in a patient with insulinoma is even more rare and may be easy to misdiagnose. We are herein reporting a case of insulinoma initially presenting with prolonged sleep time and extreme difficulty in waking. The abovementioned symptoms occurred every 2–3 months. Over the last 2 months, the attacks had become more frequent and severe. On computed tomography examination, a 12×9-mm cystic nodule was detected in the uncinate process of the pancreas, which was pathologically diagnosed as insulinoma. Since resection, the symptom of hypersomnia has not occurred again. The aim of the present report was to raise awareness among physicians to consider insulinoma in the differential diagnosis of hypersomnia in patients without other known diseases.

  4. [INVASIVE TECHNIQUES AND INTRAOPERATIVE ECHOGRAPHY IN THE LOCALIZATION OF INSULINOMAS; A CASE REPORT].

    PubMed

    Herrera-Martínez, Aura D; Padillo-Cuenca, José C; Calañas Continente, Alfonso; Bahamondes-Opazo, Rodrigo; Muñoz-Jiménez, Concepción; Gálvez Moreno, María A

    2015-07-01

    The insulinoma is the most common pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor. Surgery is curative in most cases, an appropriate preoperative localization allows a minimal invasive surgical technique for keeping the exo and endocrine function of the pancreas. Some authors suggest the use of invasive localization techniques just in cases with non-identified tumor lesion, others recommend their routinely use. We describe a case with clinical and biochemical diagnosis of insulinoma, conventional image studies revealed a tumor image in the pancreas which corresponded to a lipoma, the intraoperative ultrasound allowed the localization of the real tumor, but body-tail pancreatectomy was performed due to pancreatic necrosis in relation with the duration of the surgery. The systematic use of invasive localization techniques as the intra-arterial calcium stimulation and the pancreatic intraoperative ultrasound would allow a better localization of insulinoma for avoiding complications and associated morbidity.

  5. Prediction of drug distribution in subcutaneous xenografts of human tumor cell lines and healthy tissues in mouse: application of the tissue composition-based model to antineoplastic drugs.

    PubMed

    Poulin, Patrick; Chen, Yung-Hsiang; Ding, Xiao; Gould, Stephen E; Hop, Cornelis Eca; Messick, Kirsten; Oeh, Jason; Liederer, Bianca M

    2015-04-01

    Advanced tissue composition-based models can predict the tissue-plasma partition coefficient (Kp ) values of drugs under in vivo conditions on the basis of in vitro and physiological input data. These models, however, focus on healthy tissues and do not incorporate data from tumors. The objective of this study was to apply a tissue composition-based model to six marketed antineoplastic drugs (docetaxel, DOC; doxorubicin, DOX; gemcitabine, GEM; methotrexate, MTX; topotecan, TOP; and fluorouracil, 5-FU) to predict their Kp values in three human tumor xenografts (HCT-116, H2122, and PC3) as well as in healthy tissues (brain, muscle, lung, and liver) under steady-state in vivo conditions in female NCR nude mice. The mechanisms considered in the tissue/tumor composition-based model are the binding to lipids and to plasma proteins, but the transporter effect was also investigated. The method consisted of analyzing tissue composition, performing the pharmacokinetics studies in mice, and calculating the corresponding in vivo Kp values. Analyses of tumor composition indicated that the tumor xenografts contained no or low amounts of common transporters by contrast to lipids. The predicted Kp values were within twofold and threefold of the measured values in 77% and 93% of cases, respectively. However, predictions for brain for each drug, for liver for MTX, and for each tumor xenograft for GEM were disparate from the observed values, and, therefore, not well served by the model. Overall, this study is the first step toward the mechanism-based prediction of Kp values of small molecules in healthy and tumor tissues in mouse when no transporter and permeation limitation effect is evident. This approach will be useful in selecting compounds based on their abilities to penetrate human cancer xenografts with a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model, thereby increasing therapeutic index for chemotherapy in oncology study.

  6. Analysis of the Lipidome of Xenografts Using MALDI-IMS and UHPLC-ESI-QTOF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández, Roberto; Lage, Sergio; Abad-García, Beatriz; Barceló-Coblijn, Gwendolyn; Terés, Silvia; López, Daniel H.; Guardiola-Serrano, Francisca; Martín, M. Laura; Escribá, Pablo V.; Fernández, José A.

    2014-07-01

    Human tumor xenografts in immunodeficient mice are a very popular model to study the development of cancer and to test new drug candidates. Among the parameters analyzed are the variations in the lipid composition, as they are good indicators of changes in the cellular metabolism. Here, we present a study on the distribution of lipids in xenografts of NCI-H1975 human lung cancer cells, using MALDI imaging mass spectrometry and UHPLC-ESI-QTOF. The identification of lipids directly from the tissue by MALDI was aided by the comparison with identification using ESI ionization in lipid extracts from the same xenografts. Lipids belonging to PCs, PIs, SMs, DAG, TAG, PS, PA, and PG classes were identified and their distribution over the xenograft was determined. Three areas were identified in the xenograft, corresponding to cells in different metabolic stages and to a layer of adipose tissue that covers the xenograft.

  7. Insulinoma Masquerading as Rapid Eye Movement Sleep Behavior Disorder: Case Series and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Keisuke; Kawasaki, Akiko; Miyamoto, Masayuki; Miyamoto, Tomoyuki; Kanbayashi, Takashi; Sato, Masatoshi; Shimizu, Tetsuo; Hirata, Koichi

    2015-06-01

    Insulinoma is a rare endocrine tumor that can cause a wide variety of symptoms, including abnormal nocturnal behavior. We report on 3 patients with insulinoma who presented with abnormal nocturnal behavior and injury during sleep, which simulated rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder (RBD). In case 1, the fasting glucose level was 15  mg/dL, and insulin levels were elevated (15  μU/mL). In case 3, when the patient was transferred to the hospital because of a disturbance of consciousness, hypoglycemia (29  mg/dL) was detected. In contrast, in case 2, fasting glucose sampling did not indicate hypoglycemia, but continuous glucose monitoring revealed nocturnal hypoglycemia. The time from initial symptoms to a diagnosis of insulinoma ranged from 7 months to 2 years. All 3 patients had previously received anticonvulsant drugs for suspected epilepsy, but the medications were ineffective. Polysomnography showed no evidence of REM sleep without atonia in any of the 3 patients. No patient remembered any events that occurred during sleep. When a patient manifests abnormal behavior during the night and early morning, glucose monitoring should be performed, especially during the night and early morning. Clinicians should be aware that although insulinomas are rare, they can mimic parasomnias, such as RBD. PMID:26107678

  8. Systemic therapy of myeloma xenografts by an attenuated measles virus.

    PubMed

    Peng, K W; Ahmann, G J; Pham, L; Greipp, P R; Cattaneo, R; Russell, S J

    2001-10-01

    Conditionally replicating viruses are promising agents for the treatment of malignancy. Here it is shown that the live attenuated Edmonston-B vaccine strain of measles virus (MV-Edm) replicates selectively in human myeloma cells and has potent antitumor activity. In vitro, replication of MV-Edm was restricted in phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-stimulated peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs) but proceeded efficiently in a panel of 6 myeloma cell lines-ARH-77, RPMI 8226, JJN-3, MM1, KAS-6/1, and KMS-11-and in primary myeloma cells isolated by CD138 sorting from the bone marrow aspirates of 6 patients. MV-Edm infection induced potent cytopathic effects in these myeloma cells, resulting in the formation of multinucleated syncytia that eventually became nonviable. In contrast, syncytial formation in PHA-stimulated PBLs was minimal after MV-Edm infection. In vivo, MV-Edm was antitumorigenic and inhibited the establishment of myeloma cells as xenografts in immunocompromised mice. When injected directly into ARH-77 myeloma xenografts in the mice, MV-Edm caused complete regression of these xenografts. MV-Edm administered intravenously into the tail veins of mice also showed significant antineoplastic activity against established RPMI 8226 and ARH-77 xenografts. In particular, the ARH-77 myeloma xenografts were exquisitely sensitive to MV-Edm therapy, and tumors in all mice regressed completely. In light of its selectivity for myeloma cells and its potent antineoplastic activity against myeloma xenografts in vivo, MV-Edm merits further development for the treatment of multiple myeloma.

  9. Identification of a novel pyrazolo[3,4-d]pyrimidine able to inhibit cell proliferation of a human osteogenic sarcoma in vitro and in a xenograft model in mice.

    PubMed

    Manetti, Fabrizio; Santucci, Annalisa; Locatelli, Giada A; Maga, Giovanni; Spreafico, Adriano; Serchi, Tommaso; Orlandini, Maurizio; Bernardini, Giulia; Caradonna, Nicola P; Spallarossa, Andrea; Brullo, Chiara; Schenone, Silvia; Bruno, Olga; Ranise, Angelo; Bondavalli, Francesco; Hoffmann, Oskar; Bologna, Mauro; Angelucci, Adriano; Botta, Maurizio

    2007-11-15

    New pyrazolo[3,4-d]pyrimidines were synthesized and found to inhibit Src phosphorylation in a cell-free assay. Some of them significantly reduced the growth of human osteogenic sarcoma (SaOS-2) cells. The best compound, in terms of inhibitory properties toward both Src and SaOS-2 cells, was further investigated and found to reduce bone resorption when used to treat mouse osteoclasts, without interfering with normal osteoblast growth. Moreover, its metabolic stability prompted its study on a human SaOS-2 xenograft tumor model in nude mice, where the compound reduced significantly both the volume and weight of the tumor. These experimental findings make the new compound an interesting hit in the field of bone-related diseases. PMID:17929792

  10. The ALK inhibitor ASP3026 eradicates NPM-ALK⁺ T-cell anaplastic large-cell lymphoma in vitro and in a systemic xenograft lymphoma model.

    PubMed

    George, Suraj Konnath; Vishwamitra, Deeksha; Manshouri, Roxsan; Shi, Ping; Amin, Hesham M

    2014-07-30

    NPM-ALK⁺ T-cell anaplastic large-cell lymphoma (ALCL) is an aggressive type of cancer. Standard treatment of NPM-ALK⁺ ALCL is CHOP polychemotherapy. Although patients initially respond favorably to CHOP, resistance, relapse, and death frequently occur. Recently, selective targeting of ALK has emerged as an alternative therapeutic strategy. ASP3026 is a second-generation ALK inhibitor that can overcome crizotinib resistance in non-small cell lung cancer, and is currently being evaluated in clinical trials of patients with ALK⁺ solid tumors. However, NPM-ALK⁺ ALCL patients are not included in these trials. We studied the effects of ASP3026 on NPM-ALK⁺ ALCL cell lines in vitro and on systemic lymphoma growth in vivo. ASP3026 decreased the viability, proliferation, and colony formation, as well as induced apoptotic cell death of NPM-ALK⁺ ALCL cells. In addition, ASP3026 significantly reduced the proliferation of 293T cells transfected with NPM-ALK mutants that are resistant to crizotinib and downregulated tyrosine phosphorylation of these mutants. Moreover, ASP3026 abrogated systemic NPM-ALK⁺ ALCL growth in mice. Importantly, the survival of ASP3026-treated mice was superior to that of control and CHOP-treated mice. Our data suggest that ASP3026 is an effective treatment for NPM-ALK⁺ ALCL, and support the enrollment of patients with this lymphoma in the ongoing clinical trials.

  11. Citrus limon-derived nanovesicles inhibit cancer cell proliferation and suppress CML xenograft growth by inducing TRAIL-mediated cell death

    PubMed Central

    Raimondo, Stefania; Naselli, Flores; Fontana, Simona; Monteleone, Francesca; Lo Dico, Alessia; Saieva, Laura; Zito, Giovanni; Flugy, Anna; Manno, Mauro; Di Bella, Maria Antonietta; De Leo, Giacomo; Alessandro, Riccardo

    2015-01-01

    Nanosized vesicles are considered key players in cell to cell communication, thus influencing physiological and pathological processes, including cancer. Nanovesicles have also been found in edible-plants and have shown therapeutic activity in inflammatory bowel diseases; however information on their role in affecting cancer progression is missing. Our study identify for the first time a fraction of vesicles from lemon juice (Citrus limon L.), obtained as a result of different ultracentrifugation, with density ranging from 1,15 to 1,19 g/ml and specific proteomic profile. By using an in vitro approach, we show that isolated nanovesicles inhibit cancer cell proliferation in different tumor cell lines, by activating a TRAIL-mediated apoptotic cell death. Furthermore, we demonstrate that lemon nanovesicles suppress CML tumor growth in vivo by specifically reaching tumor site and by activating TRAIL-mediated apoptotic cell processes. Overall, this study suggests the possible use of plant-edible nanovesicles as a feasible approach in cancer treatment. PMID:26098775

  12. Citrus limon-derived nanovesicles inhibit cancer cell proliferation and suppress CML xenograft growth by inducing TRAIL-mediated cell death.

    PubMed

    Raimondo, Stefania; Naselli, Flores; Fontana, Simona; Monteleone, Francesca; Lo Dico, Alessia; Saieva, Laura; Zito, Giovanni; Flugy, Anna; Manno, Mauro; Di Bella, Maria Antonietta; De Leo, Giacomo; Alessandro, Riccardo

    2015-08-14

    Nanosized vesicles are considered key players in cell to cell communication, thus influencing physiological and pathological processes, including cancer. Nanovesicles have also been found in edible-plants and have shown therapeutic activity in inflammatory bowel diseases; however information on their role in affecting cancer progression is missing.Our study identify for the first time a fraction of vesicles from lemon juice (Citrus limon L.), obtained as a result of different ultracentrifugation, with density ranging from 1,15 to 1,19 g/ml and specific proteomic profile. By using an in vitro approach, we show that isolated nanovesicles inhibit cancer cell proliferation in different tumor cell lines, by activating a TRAIL-mediated apoptotic cell death. Furthermore, we demonstrate that lemon nanovesicles suppress CML tumor growth in vivo by specifically reaching tumor site and by activating TRAIL-mediated apoptotic cell processes. Overall, this study suggests the possible use of plant-edible nanovesicles as a feasible approach in cancer treatment.

  13. A human fetal prostate xenograft model of developmental estrogenization

    PubMed Central

    Saffarini, Camelia M.; McDonnell-Clark, Elizabeth V.; Amin, Ali; Boekelheide, Kim

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer is a common disease in older men. Rodent models have demonstrated that an early and later-life exposure to estrogen can lead to cancerous lesions, and implicated hormonal dysregulation as an avenue for developing future prostate neoplasia. This study utilizes a human fetal prostate xenograft model to study the role of estrogen in the progression of human disease. Histopathological lesions were assessed in 7, 30, 90, 200, and 400-day human prostate xenografts. Gene expression for cell cycle, tumor suppressors, and apoptosis-related genes (i.e. CDKN1A, CASP9, ESR2, PTEN, and TP53) were performed for 200-day estrogen-treated xenografts. Glandular hyperplasia was observed in xenografts given both an initial and secondary exposure to estradiol in both 200 and 400-day xenografts. Persistent estrogenic effects were verified using immunohistochemical markers for cytokeratin 10, p63, and estrogen receptor-α. This model provides data on the histopathological state of the human prostate following estrogenic treatment, which can be utilized in understanding the complicated pathology associated with prostatic disease and early- and later-life estrogenic exposures. PMID:25633637

  14. King cobra (Ophiophagus hannah) venom L-amino acid oxidase induces apoptosis in PC-3 cells and suppresses PC-3 solid tumor growth in a tumor xenograft mouse model.

    PubMed

    Lee, Mui Li; Fung, Shin Yee; Chung, Ivy; Pailoor, Jayalakshmi; Cheah, Swee Hung; Tan, Nget Hong

    2014-01-01

    King cobra (Ophiophagus hannah) venom L-amino acid oxidase (OH-LAAO), a heat stable enzyme, has been shown to exhibit very potent anti-proliferative activity against human breast and lung tumorigenic cells but not in their non-tumorigenic counterparts. We further examine its in vitro and in vivo anti-tumor activity in a human prostate adenocarcinoma (PC-3) model. OH-LAAO demonstrated potent cytotoxicity against PC-3 cells with IC50 of 0.05 µg/mL after 72 h incubation in vitro. It induced apoptosis as evidenced with an increase in caspase-3/7 cleavages and an increase in annexin V-stained cells. To examine its in vivo anti-tumor activity, we treated PC-3 tumor xenograft implanted subcutaneously in immunodeficient NU/NU (nude) mice with 1 µg/g OH-LAAO given intraperitoneally (i.p.). After 8 weeks of treatment, OH-LAAO treated PC-3 tumors were markedly inhibited, when compared to the control group (P <0.05). TUNEL staining analysis on the tumor sections showed a significantly increase of apoptotic cells in the LAAO-treated animals. Histological examinations of the vital organs in these two groups showed no significant differences with normal tissues, indicating no obvious tissue damage. The treatment also did not cause any significant changes on the body weight of the mice during the duration of the study. These observations suggest that OH-LAAO cytotoxic effects may be specific to tumor xenografts and less to normal organs. Given its potent anti-tumor activities shown in vitro as well as in vivo, the king cobra venom LAAO can potentially be developed to treat prostate cancer and other solid tumors. PMID:24782648

  15. King cobra (Ophiophagus hannah) venom L-amino acid oxidase induces apoptosis in PC-3 cells and suppresses PC-3 solid tumor growth in a tumor xenograft mouse model.

    PubMed

    Lee, Mui Li; Fung, Shin Yee; Chung, Ivy; Pailoor, Jayalakshmi; Cheah, Swee Hung; Tan, Nget Hong

    2014-01-01

    King cobra (Ophiophagus hannah) venom L-amino acid oxidase (OH-LAAO), a heat stable enzyme, has been shown to exhibit very potent anti-proliferative activity against human breast and lung tumorigenic cells but not in their non-tumorigenic counterparts. We further examine its in vitro and in vivo anti-tumor activity in a human prostate adenocarcinoma (PC-3) model. OH-LAAO demonstrated potent cytotoxicity against PC-3 cells with IC50 of 0.05 µg/mL after 72 h incubation in vitro. It induced apoptosis as evidenced with an increase in caspase-3/7 cleavages and an increase in annexin V-stained cells. To examine its in vivo anti-tumor activity, we treated PC-3 tumor xenograft implanted subcutaneously in immunodeficient NU/NU (nude) mice with 1 µg/g OH-LAAO given intraperitoneally (i.p.). After 8 weeks of treatment, OH-LAAO treated PC-3 tumors were markedly inhibited, when compared to the control group (P <0.05). TUNEL staining analysis on the tumor sections showed a significantly increase of apoptotic cells in the LAAO-treated animals. Histological examinations of the vital organs in these two groups showed no significant differences with normal tissues, indicating no obvious tissue damage. The treatment also did not cause any significant changes on the body weight of the mice during the duration of the study. These observations suggest that OH-LAAO cytotoxic effects may be specific to tumor xenografts and less to normal organs. Given its potent anti-tumor activities shown in vitro as well as in vivo, the king cobra venom LAAO can potentially be developed to treat prostate cancer and other solid tumors.

  16. Effects of Iodonium-Class Flavin Dehydrogenase Inhibitors on Growth, Reactive Oxygen Production, Cell Cycle Progression, NADPH Oxidase 1 Levels, and Gene Expression in Human Colon Cancer Cells and Xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Doroshow, James H.; Gaur, Shikha; Markel, Susan; Lu, Jiamo; van Balgooy, Josephus; Synold, Timothy W.; Xi, Bixin; Wu, Xiwei; Juhasz, Agnes

    2013-01-01

    Iodonium-class flavoprotein dehydrogenase inhibitors have been demonstrated to possess antiproliferative potential and to inhibit reactive oxygen production in human tumor cells, although the mechanism(s) that explain the relationship between altered cell growth and the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) remain an area of active investigation. Because of the ability of these compounds to inhibit the activity of flavoprotein-containing epithelial NADPH oxidases, we chose to examine the effects of several iodonium-class flavoprotein inhibitors on human colon cancer cell lines that express high, functional levels of a single such oxidase (NADPH oxidase 1 [Nox1]). We found that diphenylene iodonium (DPI), di-2-thienyliodonium (DTI), and iodoniumdiphenyl inhibited the growth of Caco2, HT-29, and LS-174T colon cancer cells at concentrations (10–250 nM for DPI, 0.5–2.5 μM for DTI, and 155 nM to 10 μM for iodoniumdiphenyl) substantially lower than for DU145 human prostate cancer cells that do not possess functional NADPH oxidase activity. Drug treatment was associated with decreased H2O2 production and diminished intracellular ROS levels, lasting up to 24 hr, following short-term (1-hr) exposure to the iodonium analogs. Decreased tumor cell proliferation was caused, in part, by a profound block in cell cycle progression at the G1/S interface in both LS-174T and HT-29 cells exposed to either DPI or DTI; and the G1 block was produced, for LS-174T cells, by upregulation of p27 and a drug concentration-related decrease in the expression of cyclins D1, A, and E that was partially prevented by exogenous H2O2. Not only did DPI and DTI decrease intracellular ROS, they both also significantly decreased the mRNA expression levels of Nox1, potentially contributing to the prolonged reduction in tumor cell reactive oxygen levels. We also found that DPI and DTI significantly decreased the growth of both HT-29 and LS-174T human tumor xenografts, at dose levels that

  17. Xenograft of microencapsulated Sertoli cells for the cell therapy of type 2 diabetes mellitus in spontaneously diabetic nonhuman primates: preliminary data.

    PubMed

    Luca, G; Cameron, D F; Arato, I; Mancuso, F; Linden, E H; Calvitti, M; Falabella, G; Szekeres, K; Bodo, M; Ricci, G; Hansen, B C; Calafiore, R

    2014-01-01

    Insulin resistance in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) may be due to a chronic inflammation of the visceral adipose tissue (VAT) leading to local and systemic increases in proinflammatory cytokines. Microencapsulated porcine Sertoli cells (MC-pSC), by provision of immunomodulatory and trophic factors, have been successfully used to reduce such inflammation in rodent animal models of type 1 diabetes with no complications or deleterious side effects. Herein, we have begun to investigate this novel and safe therapeutic approach in the spontaneously obese nonhuman primate with spontaneous, insulin-dependent T2DM. After MC-pSC intraperitoneal injection we have evaluated, throughout a 6-month follow-up period, daily ad libitum fed glucose levels, daily exogenous insulin supplementation, biweekly body weight measurements, periodic fasting blood glucose concentrations, glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) levels, glucose tolerance tests (GTT), and fluorescence-activated cell sorting cytometry (FACS) assessment of peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Very preliminarily, we have observed a slight reduction in fasting (FPG) and mean nonfasting (NF) plasma glucose levels. We found minimal changes, only in 1 animal, in daily exogenous insulin requirements and HbA1c levels. Flow cytometric analysis was associated with decrease in CD8(+) cells only in 1 recipient with a reduction in mean regulatory T Cells (Treg), whereas interestingly, decrease of B lymphocytes was observed in both animals. These results may suggest that this novel MC-SC-based transplantation protocol might possibly impact the metabolic status of T2DM in higher mammals that are close to humans.

  18. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Infection of Neural Xenografts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cvetkovich, Therese A.; Lazar, Eliot; Blumberg, Benjamin M.; Saito, Yoshihiro; Eskin, Thomas A.; Reichman, Richard; Baram, David A.; del Cerro, Coca; Gendelman, Howard E.; del Cerro, Manuel; Epstein, Leon G.

    1992-06-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection is highly specific for its human host. To study HIV-1 infection of the human nervous system, we have established a small animal model in which second-trimester (11 to 17.5 weeks) human fetal brain or neural retina is transplanted to the anterior chamber of the eye of immunosuppressed adult rats. The human xenografts vascularized, formed a blood-brain barrier, and differentiated, forming neurons and glia. The xenografts were infected with cell-free HIV-1 or with HIV-1-infected human monocytes. Analysis by polymerase chain reaction revealed HIV-1 sequences in DNA from xenograft tissue exposed to HIV-1 virions, and in situ hybridization demonstrated HIV-1 mRNA localized in macrophages and multinucleated giant cells. Pathological damage was observed only in neural xenografts containing HIV-1-infected human monocytes, supporting the hypothesis that these cells mediate neurotoxicity. This small animal model allows the study of direct and indirect effects of HIV-1 infection on developing human fetal neural tissues, and it should prove useful in evaluating antiviral therapies, which must ultimately target HIV-1 infection of the brain.

  19. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection of neural xenografts.

    PubMed Central

    Cvetkovich, T A; Lazar, E; Blumberg, B M; Saito, Y; Eskin, T A; Reichman, R; Baram, D A; del Cerro, C; Gendelman, H E; del Cerro, M

    1992-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection is highly specific for its human host. To study HIV-1 infection of the human nervous system, we have established a small animal model in which second-trimester (11 to 17.5 weeks) human fetal brain or neural retina is transplanted to the anterior chamber of the eye of immunosuppressed adult rats. The human xenografts vascularized, formed a blood-brain barrier, and differentiated, forming neurons and glia. The xenografts were infected with cell-free HIV-1 or with HIV-1-infected human monocytes. Analysis by polymerase chain reaction revealed HIV-1 sequences in DNA from xenograft tissue exposed to HIV-1 virions, and in situ hybridization demonstrated HIV-1 mRNA localized in macrophages and multinucleated giant cells. Pathological damage was observed only in neural xenografts containing HIV-1-infected human monocytes, supporting the hypothesis that these cells mediate neurotoxicity. This small animal model allows the study of direct and indirect effects of HIV-1 infection on developing human fetal neural tissues, and it should prove useful in evaluating antiviral therapies, which must ultimately target HIV-1 infection of the brain. Images PMID:1594627

  20. Immunohistochemical demonstration of epidermal growth factor in human gastric cancer xenografts of nude mice.

    PubMed

    Yoshiyuki, T; Shimizu, Y; Onda, M; Tokunaga, A; Kiyama, T; Nishi, K; Mizutani, T; Matsukura, N; Tanaka, N; Akimoto, M

    1990-02-15

    Thirty-two surgical specimens and three cell lines of human gastric cancers were used for subcutaneous transplantation into nude mice, resulting in the establishment of eight (25%) xenografts from the surgical specimens and two (67%) from the cell lines. The localization of epidermal growth factor (EGF) in the surgical specimens and cell lines of the gastric cancers and their xenografts in nude mice was then investigated immunohistochemically. Epidermal growth factor was stained in the cytoplasm of the cancer cells, being detected in 16 (50%) of the 32 surgical specimens and in all of the cell lines. Seven (44%) of the sixteen EGF-positive surgical specimens and one (6%) of the 16 EGF-negative ones were tumorigenic in nude mice. All of the xenografts in nude mice were positive for EGF. The tumorigenicity of human gastric cancer xenografts in nude mice may, therefore, be correlated with the presence of EGF in cancer cells.

  1. Hispolon induces apoptosis through JNK1/2-mediated activation of a caspase-8, -9, and -3-dependent pathway in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells and inhibits AML xenograft tumor growth in vivo.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Pei-Ching; Hsieh, Yi-Hsien; Chow, Jyh-Ming; Yang, Shun-Fa; Hsiao, Michael; Hua, Kuo-Tai; Lin, Chien-Huang; Chen, Hui-Yu; Chien, Ming-Hsien

    2013-10-23

    Hispolon is an active phenolic compound of Phellinus igniarius, a mushroom that was recently shown to have antioxidant and anticancer activities in various solid tumors. Here, the molecular mechanisms by which hispolon exerts anticancer effects in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells was investigated. The results showed that hispolon suppressed cell proliferation in the various AML cell lines. Furthermore, hispolon effectively induced apoptosis of HL-60 AML cells through caspases-8, -9, and -3 activations and PARP cleavage. Moreover, treatment of HL-60 cells with hispolon induced sustained activation of JNK1/2, and inhibition of JNK by JNK1/2 inhibitor or JNK1/2-specific siRNA significantly abolished the hispolon-induced activation of the caspase-8/-9/-3. In vivo, hispolon significantly reduced tumor growth in mice with HL-60 tumor xenografts. In hispolon-treated tumors, activation of caspase-3 and a decrease in Ki67-positive cells were observed. Our results indicated that hispolon may have the potential to serve as a therapeutic tool to treat AML. PMID:24093560

  2. Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 1 Presenting as Hypoglycemia due to Insulinoma

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Hwal Rim; Shim, Young Seok; Lee, Hae Sang

    2016-01-01

    Multiple endocrine neoplasia (MEN) mutation is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by the occurrence of parathyroid, pancreatic islet, and anterior pituitary tumors. The incidence of insulinoma in MEN is relatively uncommon, and there have been a few cases of MEN manifested with insulinoma as the first symptom in children. We experienced a 9-year-old girl having a familial MEN1 mutation. She complained of dizziness, occasional palpitation, weakness, hunger, sweating, and generalized tonic-clonic seizure that lasted for 5 minutes early in the morning. At first, she was only diagnosed with insulinoma by abdominal magnetic resonance images of a 1.3 x 1.5 cm mass in the pancreas and high insulin levels in blood of the hepatic vein, but after her father was diagnosed with MEN1. We found she had familial MEN1 mutation, and she recovered hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia after enucleation of the mass. Therefore, the early genetic identification of MEN1 mutation is considerable for children with at least one manifestation. PMID:27247513

  3. Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 1 Presenting as Hypoglycemia due to Insulinoma.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Eun Byul; Jeong, Hwal Rim; Shim, Young Seok; Lee, Hae Sang; Hwang, Jin Soon

    2016-06-01

    Multiple endocrine neoplasia (MEN) mutation is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by the occurrence of parathyroid, pancreatic islet, and anterior pituitary tumors. The incidence of insulinoma in MEN is relatively uncommon, and there have been a few cases of MEN manifested with insulinoma as the first symptom in children. We experienced a 9-year-old girl having a familial MEN1 mutation. She complained of dizziness, occasional palpitation, weakness, hunger, sweating, and generalized tonic-clonic seizure that lasted for 5 minutes early in the morning. At first, she was only diagnosed with insulinoma by abdominal magnetic resonance images of a 1.3 x 1.5 cm mass in the pancreas and high insulin levels in blood of the hepatic vein, but after her father was diagnosed with MEN1. We found she had familial MEN1 mutation, and she recovered hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia after enucleation of the mass. Therefore, the early genetic identification of MEN1 mutation is considerable for children with at least one manifestation. PMID:27247513

  4. Casticin Induced Apoptosis in A375.S2 Human Melanoma Cells through the Inhibition of NF-[Formula: see text]B and Mitochondria-Dependent Pathways In Vitro and Inhibited Human Melanoma Xenografts in a Mouse Model In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Shiue, Yin-Wen; Lu, Chi-Cheng; Hsiao, Yu-Ping; Liao, Ching-Lung; Lin, Jing-Pin; Lai, Kuang-Chi; Yu, Chien-Chih; Huang, Yi-Ping; Ho, Heng-Chien; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2016-01-01

    Casticin, a polymethoxyflavone occurring in natural plants, has been shown to have anticancer activities. In the present study, we aims to investigate the anti-skin cancer activity of casticin on melanoma cells in vitro and the antitumor effect of casticin on human melanoma xenografts in nu/nu mice in vivo. A flow cytometric assay was performed to detect expression of viable cells, cell cycles, reactive oxygen species production, levels of [Formula: see text] and caspase activity. A Western blotting assay and confocal laser microscope examination were performed to detect expression of protein levels. In the in vitro studies, we found that casticin induced morphological cell changes and DNA condensation and damage, decreased the total viable cells, and induced G2/M phase arrest. Casticin promoted reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, decreased the level of [Formula: see text], and promoted caspase-3 activities in A375.S2 cells. The induced G2/M phase arrest indicated by the Western blotting assay showed that casticin promoted the expression of p53, p21 and CHK-1 proteins and inhibited the protein levels of Cdc25c, CDK-1, Cyclin A and B. The casticin-induced apoptosis indicated that casticin promoted pro-apoptotic proteins but inhibited anti-apoptotic proteins. These findings also were confirmed by the fact that casticin promoted the release of AIF and Endo G from mitochondria to cytosol. An electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) assay showed that casticin inhibited the NF-[Formula: see text]B binding DNA and that these effects were time-dependent. In the in vivo studies, results from immuno-deficient nu/nu mice bearing the A375.S2 tumor xenograft indicated that casticin significantly suppressed tumor growth based on tumor size and weight decreases. Early G2/M arrest and mitochondria-dependent signaling contributed to the apoptotic A375.S2 cell demise induced by casticin. In in vivo experiments, A375.S2 also efficaciously suppressed tumor volume in a

  5. Detection of mitomycin C-DNA adducts in human breast cancer cells grown in culture, as xenografted tumors in nude mice, and in biopsies of human breast cancer patient tumors as determined by (32)P-postlabeling.

    PubMed

    Warren, A J; Mustra, D J; Hamilton, J W

    2001-04-01

    Mitomycin C (MMC) is a DNA cross-linking agent that has been used in cancer chemotherapy for >20 years. However, little is known either qualitatively or quantitatively about the relationship between formation and repair of specific MMC-DNA adducts and specific biological outcomes. The goal of this study was to examine formation and removal of specific MMC-DNA adducts in breast cancer cells using a (32)P-postlabeling assay in relation to cytotoxicity and other biological end points. MMC-DNA adducts were measured in cultured human metastatic MDA-MB-435 cells, in the same cells xenografted as a mammary tumor in nude mice, and in metastatic tumor biopsies obtained from human breast cancer patients undergoing MMC-based therapy. MMC adducts corresponding to the CpG interstrand cross-link, the MMC-G bifunctional monoadduct, and two isomers of the MMC-G monofunctional monoadduct were detected in most samples. Despite similarities in the overall patterns of adduct formation, there were substantial differences between the cultured cells and the in vivo tumors in their adduct distribution profile, kinetics of adduct formation and removal, and relationship of specific adduct levels to cytotoxicity, suggesting that the in vivo microenvironment (e.g., degree of oxygenation, pH, activity of oxidoreductases, and other factors) of breast cancer cells may significantly modulate these parameters. PMID:11309355

  6. Adenovirus-Mediated Expression of the p14 Fusion-Associated Small Transmembrane Protein Promotes Cancer Cell Fusion and Apoptosis In Vitro but Does Not Provide Therapeutic Efficacy in a Xenograft Mouse Model of Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Carmen M.; Poulin, Kathy L.; Tong, Grace; Christou, Carin; Kennedy, Michael A.; Falls, Theresa; Bell, John C.; Parks, Robin J.

    2016-01-01

    Adenoviruses (Ads) are used in numerous preclinical and clinical studies for delivery of anti-cancer therapeutic genes. Unfortunately, Ad has a poor ability to distribute throughout a tumor mass after intratumoral injection, and infects cells primarily within the immediate area of the injection tract. Thus, Ad-encoded transgene expression is typically limited to only a small percentage of cells within the tumor. One method to increase the proportion of the tumor impacted by Ad is through expression of fusogenic proteins. Infection of a single cell with an Ad vector encoding a fusogenic protein should lead to syncytium formation with adjacent cells, effectively spreading the effect of Ad and Ad-encoded therapeutic transgenes to a greater percentage of the tumor mass. Moreover, syncytium formation can be cytotoxic, suggesting that such proteins may be effective sole therapeutics. We show that an early region 1 (E1)-deleted Ad expressing reptilian reovirus p14 fusion-associated small transmembrane (FAST) protein caused extensive cell fusion in the replication-permissive 293 cell line and at high multiplicity of infection in non-permissive human lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells in vitro. FAST protein expression in the A549 cancer cell line led to a loss of cellular metabolic activity and membrane integrity, which correlated with induction of apoptosis. However, in an A549 xenograft CD-1 nude mouse cancer model, Ad-mediated FAST gene delivery did not induce detectable cell fusion, reduce tumor burden nor enhance mouse survival compared to controls. Taken together, our results show that, although AdFAST can enhance cancer cell killing in vitro, it is not effective as a sole therapeutic in the A549 tumor model in vivo. PMID:26986751

  7. Adenovirus-Mediated Expression of the p14 Fusion-Associated Small Transmembrane Protein Promotes Cancer Cell Fusion and Apoptosis In Vitro but Does Not Provide Therapeutic Efficacy in a Xenograft Mouse Model of Cancer.

    PubMed

    Wong, Carmen M; Poulin, Kathy L; Tong, Grace; Christou, Carin; Kennedy, Michael A; Falls, Theresa; Bell, John C; Parks, Robin J

    2016-01-01

    Adenoviruses (Ads) are used in numerous preclinical and clinical studies for delivery of anti-cancer therapeutic genes. Unfortunately, Ad has a poor ability to distribute throughout a tumor mass after intratumoral injection, and infects cells primarily within the immediate area of the injection tract. Thus, Ad-encoded transgene expression is typically limited to only a small percentage of cells within the tumor. One method to increase the proportion of the tumor impacted by Ad is through expression of fusogenic proteins. Infection of a single cell with an Ad vector encoding a fusogenic protein should lead to syncytium formation with adjacent cells, effectively spreading the effect of Ad and Ad-encoded therapeutic transgenes to a greater percentage of the tumor mass. Moreover, syncytium formation can be cytotoxic, suggesting that such proteins may be effective sole therapeutics. We show that an early region 1 (E1)-deleted Ad expressing reptilian reovirus p14 fusion-associated small transmembrane (FAST) protein caused extensive cell fusion in the replication-permissive 293 cell line and at high multiplicity of infection in non-permissive human lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells in vitro. FAST protein expression in the A549 cancer cell line led to a loss of cellular metabolic activity and membrane integrity, which correlated with induction of apoptosis. However, in an A549 xenograft CD-1 nude mouse cancer model, Ad-mediated FAST gene delivery did not induce detectable cell fusion, reduce tumor burden nor enhance mouse survival compared to controls. Taken together, our results show that, although AdFAST can enhance cancer cell killing in vitro, it is not effective as a sole therapeutic in the A549 tumor model in vivo. PMID:26986751

  8. The Influence of Tissue Ischemia Time on RNA Integrity and Patient-Derived Xenografts (PDX) Engraftment Rate in a Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC) Biobank

    PubMed Central

    Maletta, Francesca; Gaudiano, Marcello; Ercole, Elisabetta; Annaratone, Laura; Todaro, Maria; Boita, Monica; Filosso, Pier Luigi; Solidoro, Paolo; Delsedime, Luisa; Oliaro, Alberto; Sapino, Anna; Ruffini, Enrico; Inghirami, Giorgio

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Bio-repositories are invaluable resources to implement translational cancer research and clinical programs. They represent one of the most powerful tools for biomolecular studies of clinically annotated cohorts, but high quality samples are required to generate reliable molecular readouts and functional studies. The objective of our study was to define the impact of cancer tissue ischemia time on RNA and DNA quality, and for the generation of Patient-Derived Xenografts (PDXs). Methods One-hundred thirty-five lung cancer specimens were selected among our Institutional BioBank samples. Associations between different warm (surgical) and cold (ex-vivo) ischemia time ranges and RNA quality or PDXs engraftment rates were assessed. RNA quality was determined by RNA integrity number (RINs) values. Fresh viable tissue fragments were implanted subcutaneously in NSG mice and serially transplanted. Results RNAs with a RIN>7 were detected in 51% of the sample (70/135), with values of RIN significantly lower (OR 0.08, P = 0.01) in samples preserved for more than 3 hours before cryopreservation. Higher quality DNA samples had a concomitant high RIN. Sixty-three primary tumors (41 adenocarcinoma) were implanted with an overall engraftment rate of 33%. Both prolonged warm (>2 hours) and ex-vivo ischemia time (>10 hours) were associated to a lower engraftment rate (OR 0.09 P = 0.01 and OR 0.04 P = 0.008, respectively). Conclusion RNA quality and PDXs engraftment rate were adversely affected by prolonged ischemia times. Proper tissue collection and processing reduce failure rate. Overall, NSCLC BioBanking represents an innovative modality, which can be successfully executed in routine clinical settings, when stringent Standard Operating Procedures are adopted. PMID:26731692

  9. 3′-hydroxy-3,4,5,4′-tetramethoxystilbene, the metabolite of resveratrol analogue DMU-212, inhibits ovarian cancer cell growth in vitro and in a mice xenograft model

    PubMed Central

    Piotrowska-Kempisty, Hanna; Ruciński, Marcin; Borys, Sylwia; Kucińska, Małgorzata; Kaczmarek, Mariusz; Zawierucha, Piotr; Wierzchowski, Marcin; Łażewski, Dawid; Murias, Marek; Jodynis-Liebert, Jadwiga

    2016-01-01

    In screening studies, the cytotoxic activity of four metabolites of resveratrol analogue 3,4,5,4′-tetramethoxystilbene (DMU-212) against A-2780 and SKOV-3 ovarian cancer cells was investigated. The most active metabolite, 3′-hydroxy-3,4,5,4′-tetramethoxystilbene (DMU-214), was chosen for further studies. The cytotoxicity of DMU-214 was shown to be higher than that of the parent compound, DMU-212, in both cell lines tested. Since DMU-212 was supposed to undergo metabolic activation through its conversion to DMU-214, an attempt was made to elucidate the mechanism of its anti-proliferative activity. We found that in SKOV-3 cells lacking p53, DMU-214 induced receptor-mediated apoptosis. In A-2780 cell line with expression of wild-type p53, DMU-214 modulated the expression pattern of p53-target genes driving intrinsic and extrinsic apoptosis pathways, as well as DNA repair and damage prevention. Regardless of the up-regulation of p48, p53R2, sestrins and Gaad45 genes involved in cancer cell DNA repair, we demonstrated the stronger anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic effects of DMU-214 in A-2780 cells when compared to those in SKOV-3. Hence we verified DMU-214 activity in the xenograft model using SCID mice injected with A-2780 cells. The strong anti-proliferative activity of DMU-214 in the in vivo model allowed to suggest the tested compound as a potential therapeutic in ovarian cancer treatment. PMID:27585955

  10. NOSH-aspirin (NBS-1120), a novel nitric oxide- and hydrogen sulfide-releasing hybrid is a potent inhibitor of colon cancer cell growth in vitro and in a xenograft mouse model

    SciTech Connect

    Chattopadhyay, Mitali; Kodela, Ravinder; Olson, Kenneth R.; Kashfi, Khosrow

    2012-03-16

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NOSH-aspirin is the first dual acting NO and H{sub 2}S releasing hybrid. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Its IC{sub 50} for cell growth inhibition is in the low nano-molar range. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Structure-activity studies show that the sum of the parts does not equal the whole. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NOSH-aspirin reduced tumor growth by 85% in mice bearing a colon cancer xenograft. -- Abstract: Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are prototypical anti-cancer agents. However, their long-term use is associated with adverse gastrointestinal effects. Recognition that endogenous gaseous mediators, nitric oxide (NO) and hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) can increase mucosal defense mechanisms has led to the development of NO- and H{sub 2}S-releasing NSAIDs with increased safety profiles. Here we report on a new hybrid, NOSH-aspirin, which is an NO- and H{sub 2}S-releasing agent. NOSH-aspirin inhibited HT-29 colon cancer growth with IC{sub 50}s of 45.5 {+-} 2.5, 19.7 {+-} 3.3, and 7.7 {+-} 2.2 nM at 24, 48, and 72 h, respectively. This is the first NSAID based agent with such high degree of potency. NOSH-aspirin inhibited cell proliferation, induced apoptosis, and caused G{sub 0}/G{sub 1} cell cycle block. Reconstitution and structure-activity studies representing a fairly close approximation to the intact molecule showed that NOSH-aspirin was 9000-fold more potent than the sum of its parts towards growth inhibition. NOSH-aspirin inhibited ovine COX-1 more than ovine COX-2. NOSH-ASA treatment of mice bearing a human colon cancer xenograft caused a reduction in volume of 85%. Taken together, these results demonstrate that NOSH-aspirin has strong anti-cancer potential and merits further evaluation.

  11. Repression of malignant tumor progression upon pharmacologic IGF1R blockade in a mouse model of insulinoma.

    PubMed

    Zumsteg, Adrian; Caviezel, Christoph; Pisarsky, Laura; Strittmatter, Karin; García-Echeverría, Carlos; Hofmann, Francesco; Christofori, Gerhard

    2012-06-01

    NVP-AEW541, a specific ATP-competitive inhibitor of the insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF1R) tyrosine kinase, has been reported to interfere with tumor growth in various tumor transplantation models. We have assessed the efficacy of NVP-AEW541 in repressing tumor growth and tumor progression in the Rip1Tag2 transgenic mouse model of pancreatic β-cell carcinogenesis. In addition, we have tested NVP-AEW541 in Rip1Tag2;RipIGF1R double-transgenic mice which show accelerated tumor growth and increased tumor malignancy compared with Rip1Tag2 single-transgenic mice. Previously, we have shown that high levels of IGF-2, a high-affinity ligand for IGF1R, are required for Rip1Tag2 tumor cell survival and tumor growth. Unexpectedly, treatment of Rip1Tag2 mice with NVP-AEW541 in prevention and intervention trials neither did affect tumor growth nor tumor cell proliferation and apoptosis. Yet, it significantly repressed progression to tumor malignancy, that is, the rate of the transition from differentiated adenoma to invasive carcinoma. Treatment of Rip1Tag2;RipIGF1R double-transgenic mice resulted in moderately reduced tumor volumes and increased rates of tumor cell apoptosis. Sustained expression of IGF-2 and of the IGF-2-binding form of insulin receptor (IR-A) in tumor cells suggests a compensatory role of IR-A upon IGF1R blockade. The results indicate that inhibition of IGF1R alone is not sufficient to efficiently block insulinoma growth and imply an overlapping role of IGF1R and insulin receptor in executing mitogenic and survival stimuli elicited by IGF-2. The reduction of tumor invasion upon IGF1R blockade on the other hand indicates a critical function of IGF1R signaling for the acquisition of a malignant phenotype.

  12. Gene expression profiles of cryopreserved CD34{sup +} human umbilical cord blood cells are related to their bone marrow reconstitution abilities in mouse xenografts

    SciTech Connect

    Sudo, Kazuhiro; Yasuda, Jun; Nakamura, Yukio

    2010-07-09

    Human umbilical cord blood (UCB) cells are an alternative source of hematopoietic stem cells for treatment of leukemia and other diseases. It is very difficult to assess the quality of UCB cells in the clinical situation. Here, we sought to assess the quality of UCB cells by transplantation to immunodeficient mice. Cryopreserved CD34{sup +} UCB cells from twelve different human donors were transplanted into sublethally irradiated NOD/shi-scid Jic mice. In parallel, the gene expression profiles of the UCB cells were determined from oligonucleotide microarrays. UCB cells from three donors failed to establish an engraftment in the host mice, while the other nine succeeded to various extents. Gene expression profiling indicated that 71 genes, including HOXB4, C/EBP-{beta}, and ETS2, were specifically overexpressed and 23 genes were suppressed more than 2-fold in the successful UCB cells compared to those that failed. Functional annotation revealed that cell growth and cell cycle regulators were more abundant in the successful UCB cells. Our results suggest that hematopoietic ability may vary among cryopreserved UCB cells and that this ability can be distinguished by profiling expression of certain sets of genes.

  13. A case of low serum insulin levels in a patient with insulinoma

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Ding-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Summary Insulinomas are the most common cause of hypoglycemia resulting from endogenous hyperinsulinism. Traditionally, inappropriately elevated levels of insulin in the face of hypoglycemia are the key to diagnosis. However, contradictory levels of insulin and C-peptide do not necessarily exclude the diagnosis. A 50-year-old female was brought to our emergency department because of conscious disturbance on the previous night. She had no history of diabetes mellitus, and was not using any medications or alcohol. Laboratory data showed low sugar, a significantly low insulin level, and elevated C-peptide. After admission, she had multiple episodes of spontaneous hypoglycemia after overnight fasts without discomfort. It was considered that a neuroendocrine tumor was the source of her hypoglycemia. CT scan of the abdomen revealed a 1.1cm hypervascular nodule in the pancreatic tail. Elective laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy was incorporated into her treatment course. A 1.2×1.0cm homogenous well-encapsulated tumor was resected. We monitored her glucose levels in the outpatient clinic every month for a period of six months. She did not have another episode of spontaneous hypoglycemia. Learning points Insulinoma causes endogenous hypoglycemia – it cannot be ruled out in patients presenting with hypoglycemia and low insulin levels; history and imaging studies should be done for further assessmentA 24-h fast test has the same clinical significance as that of 72-h fast testC-peptide is a useful biochemical marker in addition to serum insulin, which can be used to diagnose insulinomasCT scan is used to measure the tumor size and localize the tumor. However, definitive diagnosis is only achieved through histopathologic evaluation of diseased tissue PMID:27555915

  14. Frequent Infection of Human Cancer Xenografts with Murine Endogenous Retroviruses in Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Naseer, Asif; Terry, Anne; Gilroy, Kathryn; Kilbey, Anna; Watts, Ciorsdaidh; Mackay, Nancy; Bell, Margaret; Mason, Susan; Blyth, Karen; Cameron, Ewan; Neil, James C.

    2015-01-01

    Infection of human cancer xenografts in mice with murine leukemia viruses (MLVs) is a long-standing observation, but the likelihood of infection in vivo and its biological consequences are poorly understood. We therefore conducted a prospective study in commonly used xenograft recipient strains. From BALB/c nude mice engrafted with MCF7 human mammary carcinoma cells, we isolated a virus that was virtually identical to Bxv1, a locus encoding replication-competent xenotropic MLV (XMLV). XMLV was detected in 9/17 (53%) independently isolated explants. XMLV was not found in primary leukemias or in THP1 leukemia cells grown in Bxv1-negative NSG (NOD/SCID/γCnull) mice, although MCF7 explants harbored replication-defective MLV proviruses. To assess the significance of infection for xenograft behavior in vivo, we examined changes in growth and global transcription in MCF7 and the highly susceptible Raji Burkitt lymphoma cell line chronically infected with XMLV. Raji cells showed a stronger transcriptional response that included up-regulation of chemokines and effectors of innate antiviral immunity. In conclusion, the risk of de novo XMLV infection of xenografts is high in Bxv1 positive mice, while infection can have positive or negative effects on xenograft growth potential with significant consequences for interpretation of many xenograft studies. PMID:25912714

  15. Pre-osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 promote breast cancer cell growth in bone in a murine xenograft model

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The bones are the most common sites of breast cancer metastasis. Upon arrival within the bone microenvironment, breast cancer cells coordinate the activities of stromal cells, resulting in an increase in osteoclast activity and bone matrix degradation. In late stages of bone metastasis, breast cance...

  16. Protein expression changes during human triple negative breast cancer cell line progression to lymph node metastasis in a xenografted model in nude mice

    PubMed Central

    Roberti, María Paula; Arriaga, Juan Martín; Bianchini, Michele; Quintá, Héctor Ramiro; Bravo, Alicia Inés; Levy, Estrella Mariel; Mordoh, José; Barrio, María Marcela

    2012-01-01

    Triple negative breast cancers (TNBC) lacking hormone receptors and HER-2 amplification are very aggressive tumors. Since relevant differences between primary tumors and metastases could arise during tumor progression as evidenced by phenotypic discordances reported for hormonal receptors or HER-2 expression, in this analysis we studied changes that occurred in our TNBC model IIB-BR-G throughout the development of IIB-BR-G-MTS6 metastasis to the lymph nodes (LN) in nude mice, using an antibody-based protein array to characterize their expression profile. We also analyzed their growth kinetics, migration, invasiveness and cytoskeleton structure in vitro and in vivo. In vitro IIB-BR-G-MTS6 cells grew slower but showed higher anchorage independent growth. In vivo IIB-BR-G-MTS6 tumors grew significantly faster and showed a 100% incidence of LN metastasis after s.c. inoculation, although no metastasis was observed for IIB-BR-G. CCL3, IL1β, CXCL1, CSF2, CSF3, IGFBP1, IL1α, IL6, IL8, CCL20, PLAUR, PlGF and VEGF were strongly upregulated in IIB-BR-G-MTS6 while CCL4, ICAM3, CXCL12, TNFRSF18, FIGF were the most downregulated proteins in the metastatic cell line. IIB-BR-G-MTS6 protein expression profile could reflect a higher NFκB activation in these cells. In vitro, IIB-BR-G displayed higher migration but IIB-BR-G-MTS6 had more elevated matrigel invasion ability. In agreement with that observation, IIB-BR-G-MTS6 had an upregulated expression of MMP1, MMP9, MMP13, PLAUR and HGF. IIB-BR-G-MTS6 tumors presented also higher local lymphatic invasion than IIB-BR-G but similar lymphatic vessel densities. VEGFC and VEGFA/B expression were higher both in vitro and in vivo for IIB-BR-G-MTS6. IIB-BR-G-MTS6 expressed more vimentin than IB-BR-G cells, which was mainly localized in the cellular extremities and both cell lines are E-cadherin negative. Our results suggest that IIB-BR-G-MTS6 cells have acquired a pronounced epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition phenotype. Protein

  17. Nanolipoparticles-mediated MDR1 siRNA delivery reduces doxorubicin resistance in breast cancer cells and silences MDR1 expression in xenograft model of human breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Nourbakhsh, Mahnaz; Jaafari, Mahmoud Reza; Lage, Hermann; Abnous, Khalil; mosaffa, Fatemeh; Badiee, Ali; Behravan, Javad

    2015-01-01

    Objective(s): P-glycoprotein (P-gp) is an efflux protein, the overexpression of which has been associated with multidrug resistance in various cancers. Although siRNA delivery to reverse P-gp expression may be promising for sensitizing of tumor cells to cytotoxic drugs, the therapeutic use of siRNA requires effective carriers that can deliver siRNA intracellularly with minimal toxicity on target cells. We investigated a special class of PEGylated lipid-based nanoparticles (NP), named nanolipoparticles (NLPs), for siRNA-mediated P-gp downregulation. Materials and Methods: NLPs were prepared based on low detergent dialysis method. After characterization, we evaluated the effect of NLPs on siRNA delivery, and P-gp downregulation compared to oligofectamine™ (OFA) in vitro and in vivo. Results: Our results showed a significant decrease in P-gp expression and subsequent enhancement of chemosensitivity to doxorubicin in vitro. Although the effectiveness of NLPs for in vitro siRNA delivery compared to OFA was limited, the results of in vivo studies showed noticeable effectiveness of NLPs for systemic siRNA delivery. siRNA delivery using NLPs could downregulate MDR1 in tumor cells more than 80%, while OFA had a reverse effect on MDR1 expression in vivo. Conclusion: The results indicated that the prepared NLPs could be suitable siRNA delivery systems for tumor therapy. PMID:26019802

  18. Inhibition of the transcription factor Sp1 suppresses colon cancer stem cell growth and induces apoptosis in vitro and in nude mouse xenografts.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yingying; Zhang, Wenjing; Guo, Zheng; Ma, Feng; Wu, Yao; Bai, Yang; Gong, Wei; Chen, Ye; Cheng, Tianming; Zhi, Fachao; Zhang, Yali; Wang, Jide; Jiang, Bo

    2013-10-01

    The transcription factor specificity protein 1 (Sp1) plays a role in the development and progression of various types of human cancers, while cancer stem cells (CSCs) are important in cancer cell self-renewal, resistance to chemotherapy and metastatic potential. This study investigated the role of Sp1 in colon CSC growth and apoptosis. Colon CSCs were successfully enriched using special culture medium and identified by typical CSC gene expression. In a quiescent state, these CSCs formed spheres with slow proliferation; overexpressed Sp1, CD44, CD166 and CD133 proteins; upregulated mesenchymal markers; and a downregulated epithelial marker were noted. In ex vivo experiments, the Sp1 protein was expressed in 74.8% of colon cancer tissues, whereas it was expressed only in 42.2% of the distant normal colon mucosae. Furthermore, inhibition of SP1 expression using Sp1 siRNA or mithramycin A (MIT) led to marked suppression of CSC growth and induced apoptosis. In addition, the percentage of CD44+/CD166+ cells was significantly downregulated both in vivo and in vitro following Sp1 inhibition. In conclusion, Sp1 suppression attenuated the characteristics of colon CSCs. Thus, Sp1 inhibition may be potentially useful for the future development of a novel therapeutic strategy to control colon cancer.

  19. Photo activation of HPPH encapsulated in “Pocket” liposomes triggers multiple drug release and tumor cell killing in mouse breast cancer xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Sine, Jessica; Urban, Cordula; Thayer, Derek; Charron, Heather; Valim, Niksa; Tata, Darrell B; Schiff, Rachel; Blumenthal, Robert; Joshi, Amit; Puri, Anu

    2015-01-01

    We recently reported laser-triggered release of photosensitive compounds from liposomes containing dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) and 1,2 bis(tricosa-10,12-diynoyl)-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DC8,9PC). We hypothesized that the permeation of photoactivated compounds occurs through domains of enhanced fluidity in the liposome membrane and have thus called them “Pocket” liposomes. In this study we have encapsulated the red light activatable anticancer photodynamic therapy drug 2-(1-Hexyloxyethyl)-2-devinyl pyropheophorbide-a (HPPH) (Ex/Em410/670 nm) together with calcein (Ex/Em490/517 nm) as a marker for drug release in Pocket liposomes. A mole ratio of 7.6:1 lipid:HPPH was found to be optimal, with >80% of HPPH being included in the liposomes. Exposure of liposomes with a cw-diode 660 nm laser (90 mW, 0–5 minutes) resulted in calcein release only when HPPH was included in the liposomes. Further analysis of the quenching ratios of liposome-entrapped calcein in the laser treated samples indicated that the laser-triggered release occurred via the graded mechanism. In vitro studies with MDA-MB-231-LM2 breast cancer cell line showed significant cell killing upon treatment of cell-liposome suspensions with the laser. To assess in vivo efficacy, we implanted MDA-MB-231-LM2 cells containing the luciferase gene along the mammary fat pads on the ribcage of mice. For biodistribution experiments, trace amounts of a near infrared lipid probe DiR (Ex/Em745/840 nm) were included in the liposomes. Liposomes were injected intravenously and laser treatments (90 mW, 0.9 cm diameter, for an exposure duration ranging from 5–8 minutes) were done 4 hours postinjection (only one tumor per mouse was treated, keeping the second flank tumor as control). Calcein release occurred as indicated by an increase in calcein fluorescence from laser treated tumors only. The animals were observed for up to 15 days postinjection and tumor volume and luciferase expression was measured. A

  20. Erlotinib Inhibits Growth of a Patient-Derived Chordoma Xenograft

    PubMed Central

    Siu, I-Mei; Ruzevick, Jacob; Zhao, Qi; Connis, Nick; Jiao, Yuchen; Bettegowda, Chetan; Xia, Xuewei; Burger, Peter C.; Hann, Christine L.; Gallia, Gary L.

    2013-01-01

    Chordomas are rare primary bone tumors that occur along the neuraxis. Primary treatment is surgery, often followed by radiotherapy. Treatment options for patients with recurrence are limited and, notably, there are no FDA approved therapeutic agents. Development of therapeutic options has been limited by the paucity of preclinical model systems. We have established and previously reported the initial characterization of the first patient-derived chordoma xenograft model. In this study, we further characterize this model and demonstrate that it continues to resemble the original patient tumor histologically and immunohistochemically, maintains nuclear expression of brachyury, and is highly concordant with the original patient tumor by whole genome genotyping. Pathway analysis of this xenograft demonstrates activation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). In vitro studies demonstrate that two small molecule inhibitors of EGFR, erlotinib and gefitinib, inhibit proliferation of the chordoma cell line U-CH 1. We further demonstrate that erlotinib significantly inhibits chordoma growth in vivo. Evaluation of tumors post-treatment reveals that erlotinib reduces phosphorylation of EGFR. This is the first demonstration of antitumor activity in a patient-derived chordoma xenograft model and these findings support further evaluation of EGFR inhibitors in this disease. PMID:24260133

  1. Erlotinib inhibits growth of a patient-derived chordoma xenograft.

    PubMed

    Siu, I-Mei; Ruzevick, Jacob; Zhao, Qi; Connis, Nick; Jiao, Yuchen; Bettegowda, Chetan; Xia, Xuewei; Burger, Peter C; Hann, Christine L; Gallia, Gary L

    2013-01-01

    Chordomas are rare primary bone tumors that occur along the neuraxis. Primary treatment is surgery, often followed by radiotherapy. Treatment options for patients with recurrence are limited and, notably, there are no FDA approved therapeutic agents. Development of therapeutic options has been limited by the paucity of preclinical model systems. We have established and previously reported the initial characterization of the first patient-derived chordoma xenograft model. In this study, we further characterize this model and demonstrate that it continues to resemble the original patient tumor histologically and immunohistochemically, maintains nuclear expression of brachyury, and is highly concordant with the original patient tumor by whole genome genotyping. Pathway analysis of this xenograft demonstrates activation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). In vitro studies demonstrate that two small molecule inhibitors of EGFR, erlotinib and gefitinib, inhibit proliferation of the chordoma cell line U-CH 1. We further demonstrate that erlotinib significantly inhibits chordoma growth in vivo. Evaluation of tumors post-treatment reveals that erlotinib reduces phosphorylation of EGFR. This is the first demonstration of antitumor activity in a patient-derived chordoma xenograft model and these findings support further evaluation of EGFR inhibitors in this disease.

  2. Regression of prostate cancer xenografts by RLIP76 depletion

    PubMed Central

    Singhal, Sharad S.; Roth, Cherice; Leake, Kathryn; Singhal, Jyotsana; Yadav, Sushma; Awasthi, Sanjay

    2009-01-01

    RLIP76 plays a central role in radiation and chemotherapy resistance through its activity as a multi-specific ATP-dependent transporter which is over-expressed in a number of types of cancers. RLIP76 appears to be necessary for cancer cell survival because both in vitro cell culture and in vivo animal tumor studies show that depletion or inhibition of RLIP76 causes selective toxicity in malignant cells. RLIP76 induces apoptosis in cancer cells through the accumulation of endogenously formed GS-E. The results of our in vivo studies demonstrate that administration of RLIP76 antibodies, siRNA or anti-sense to mice bearing xenografts of PC-3 prostate cancer cells leads to near complete regression of established subcutaneous xenografts with no apparent toxic effects. Since anti-RLIP76 IgG (which inhibit RLIP76- mediated transport), siRNA and antisense (which deplete RLIP76) showed similar tumor regressing activities, our results indicate that the inhibition of RLIP76 transport activity at the cell surface is sufficient for observed anti-tumor activity. These studies indicate that RLIP76 serves a key effector function for the survival of prostate cancer cells and that it is a valid target for cancer therapy. PMID:19073149

  3. 2'-(2-bromohexadecanoyl)-paclitaxel conjugate nanoparticles for the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer in an orthotopic xenograft mouse model.

    PubMed

    Peng, Lei; Schorzman, Allison N; Ma, Ping; Madden, Andrew J; Zamboni, William C; Benhabbour, Soumya Rahima; Mumper, Russell J

    2014-01-01

    A nanoparticle (NP) formulation with 2'-(2-bromohexadecanoyl)-paclitaxel (Br-16-PX) conjugate was developed in these studies for the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The lipophilic paclitaxel conjugate Br-C16-PX was synthesized and incorporated into lipid NPs where the 16-carbon chain enhanced drug entrapment in the drug delivery system and improved in vivo pharmacokinetics. The electron-withdrawing bromine group was used to facilitate the conversion of Br-C16-PX to paclitaxel at the tumor site. The developed system was evaluated in luciferase-expressing A549 cells in vitro and in an orthotopic NSCLC mouse model. The results demonstrated that the Br-C16-PX NPs had a higher maximum tolerated dose (75 mg/kg) than Taxol (19 mg/kg) and provided significantly longer median survival (88 days versus 70 days, P<0.05) in the orthotopic NSCLC model. An improved pharmacokinetic profile was observed for the Br-C16-PX NPs at 75 mg/kg compared to Taxol at 19 mg/kg. The area under the concentration versus time curve (AUC)₀₋₉₆ h of Br-C16-PX from the NPs was 91.7-fold and 49.6-fold greater than Taxol in plasma and tumor-bearing lungs, respectively, which provided sustained drug exposure and higher antitumor efficacy in the NP-treated group.

  4. Targeted cytosine deaminase-uracil phosphoribosyl transferase suicide gene therapy induces small cell lung cancer specific cytotoxicity and tumor growth delay

    PubMed Central

    Christensen, Camilla L.; Gjetting, Torben; Poulsen, Thomas T.; Cramer, Frederik; Roth, Jack A.; Poulsen, Hans S.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is a highly malignant cancer for which there is no curable treatment and novel therapies are therefore in high demand. In the present study we investigated the therapeutic effect of transcriptionally targeted suicide gene therapy for SCLC based on the yeast cytosine deaminase (YCD) gene alone or fused with the yeast uracil phosphoribosyl transferase (YUPRT) gene followed by administration of 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC) prodrug Experimental design The YCD gene or the YCD-YUPRT gene was placed under regulation of the SCLC-specific promoter Insulinoma-associated 1 (INSM1). Therapeutic effect was evaluated in vitro in SCLC cell lines and in vivo in SCLC xenografted nude mice using the non-viral nanoparticle, DOTAP:Cholesterol for transgene delivery. Results INSM1-YCD/5-FC and INSM1-YCD-YUPRT/5-FC therapy induced high cytotoxicity in a range of SCLC cell lines. The highest therapeutic effect was obtained from the YCD-YUPRT fusion gene strategy. No cytotoxicity was induced after treatment of cell lines of other origin than SCLC. In addition the INSM1-YCD-YUPRT/5-FC therapy was superior to an established suicide gene system consisting of the Herpes Simplex Virus Thymidine Kinase (HSVTK) gene and prodrug Ganciclovir (GCV). The superior effect was in part due to massive bystander cytotoxicity of YCD-YUPRT-produced toxins. Finally, INSM1-YCD-YUPRT/5-FC therapy induced significant tumor growth delay in SCLC xenografts compared to control treated xenografts. Conclusions The current study is the first to test cytosine deaminase-based suicide gene therapy for SCLC and the first to demonstrate an anti-tumor effect from the delivery of suicide gene therapeutics for SCLC in vivo. PMID:20371678

  5. Patient-derived orthotopic xenografts: better mimic of metastasis than subcutaneous xenografts.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Robert M

    2015-08-01

    The majority of human solid tumours do not metastasize when grown subcutaneously in immunocompromised mice; this includes patient-derived xenograft (PDX) models. However, orthotopic implantation of intact tumour tissue can lead to metastasis that mimics that seen in patients. These patient-derived orthotopic xenograft (PDOX) models have a long history and might better recapitulate human tumours than PDX models.

  6. MR imaging of human pancreatic cancer xenograft labeled with superparamagnetic iron oxide in nude mice.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chao Ying; Pu, Yu; Liu, Gang; Shao, Yang; Ma, Qing Song; Zhang, Xiao Ming

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate the MRI findings on tumor xenografts induced in nude mice by the inoculation of human pancreatic cancer cells labeled with superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO), and to monitor the kinetics of SPIO distribution in tumor xenografts. The labeled cancer cells were subcutaneously inoculated into 11 nude mice to induce tumor xenograft. The unlabeled cancer cells served as a control inoculated into nine nude mice. MR imaging was performed with a 1.5 T MR scanner for the tumor xenograft at the first, second and third week after the inoculation. We found that the tumor xenograft was induced in 100% nude mice on MR imaging for both groups in the first week after the inoculation. In the SPIO group, the tumors showed homogeneous hypointensity on T₁ - and T₂ -weighted and FIESTA images 1 week after inoculation. Two and 3 weeks after inoculation, the center of the tumors was still hypointense on all the above sequences. The tumor periphery was isointense on T₁ -weighted, and hyperintense on T₂ -weighted and FIESTA images. The tumors in control group were homogeneously hypointense or isointense on T₁ -weighted, and hyperintense on T₂ -weighted and FIESTA images in the first, second and third week after the inoculation. The size and signal-to-noise ratio of the tumor center in the SPIO group had decreased subsequent to the inoculation in all T₁ - and T₂ -weighted images and FIESTA. Our results showed the human pancreatic cancer cells labeled with SPIO can induce tumor xenograft in nude mice and MRI can monitor the kinetics of SPIO distribution in tumor xenografts.

  7. Xenografting of testis tissue from bison calf donors into recipient mice as a strategy for salvaging genetic material.

    PubMed

    Abbasi, Sepideh; Honaramooz, Ali

    2011-09-01

    The objective was to evaluate the long-term outcome of testis tissue xenografting from neonatal bison calves as a model for closely related rare or endangered ungulates. Testis tissue was collected postmortem from two newborn bison calves (Bison bison bison) and small fragments of the tissue were grafted under the back skin of immunodeficient recipient mice (n = 15 mice; eight fragments/mouse). Single xenograft samples were removed from representative recipient mice every 2 mo after grafting (for up to 16 mo). The retrieved xenografts were evaluated for seminiferous tubular density, tubular diameter, seminiferous tubular morphology, and identification of the most advanced germ cell type. Overall, 69% of the grafted testis fragments were recovered as xenografts. Xenografts weight increased (P < 0.02) approximately four-fold by 2 mo and 10-fold by 16 mo post-grafting. In testis xenografts, gradual maturational changes were evident, manifested as the first detection of the following at the times specified: seminiferous tubule expansion, 2 mo; spermatocytes, 6 mo; round spermatids, 12 mo; and elongated spermatids, 16 mo. Furthermore, there were differences between the two donor calves regarding the efficiency of spermatogenesis in xenografts. The timing of complete spermatogenesis approximately corresponded to the reported timing of sexual maturation in bison. This study demonstrated, apparently for the first time, that testis tissue xenografting from neonatal bison donors into recipient mice resulted in testicular maturation and complete development of spermatogenesis in the grafts.

  8. Bone graft substitute: allograft and xenograft.

    PubMed

    Shibuya, Naohiro; Jupiter, Daniel C

    2015-01-01

    Rapid bone graft incorporation for structural rigidity is essential. Early range of motion, exercise, and weight-bearing are keys to rehabilitation. Structural and nonstructural bone grafts add length, height, and volume to alter alignment, function, and appearance. Bone graft types include: corticocancellous autograft, allograft, xenograft, and synthetic graft. Autogenic grafts are harvested from the patient, less likely to be rejected, and more likely to be incorporated; however, harvesting adds a procedure and donor site complication is common. Allografts, xenografts, and synthetic grafts eliminate secondary procedures and donor site complications; however, rejection and slower incorporation can occur.

  9. [Xenograft of human nasopharyngeal mucosa in nude mice].

    PubMed

    Huang, P

    1989-01-01

    Human nasopharyngeal mucosa from 22-cases of chronic nasopharyngitis was transplanted into 26 nude mice. The xenografts were examined on 15, 30, 45 and 60 days after transplantation, and found to have survived in 19 mice. The survival rate was 73.1 per cent. The developed epithelia took the shape of cystic cavities, which gradually enlarged and the thickly laminated columnar epithelia with cells in mitoses or squamous metaplasia changed into thin and flat ones. The epithelium proliferated actively after 15 to 30 days of transplantation. The results afford useful reference to the study of induction of cancer in human nasopharyngeal mucosa transplanted into nude mice.

  10. Embolization as an Alternative Treatment of Insulinoma in a Patient with Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 1 Syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Peppa, Melpomeni; Brountzos, Elias; Economopoulos, Nicolaos; Boutati, Eleni; Pikounis, Vasilios; Patapis, Paul; Economopoulos, Theofanis; Raptis, Sotirios A.; Hadjidakis, Dimitrios

    2009-07-15

    Insulinoma is a rare neuroendocrine tumor, most commonly originating from the pancreas, which is either sporadic or familial as a component of multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 syndrome (MEN1). It is characterized by increased insulin secretion leading to hypoglycemia. Surgical removal is considered the treatment of choice, with limited side effects and relatively low morbidity and mortality, both being improved by the laparoscopic procedure. We present the case of a 30-year-old patient with MEN1 and recurrent insulinoma with severe hypoglycemic episodes who could not be surgically treated due to the adherence of the tumor to large blood vessels and to prior multiple surgical operations. He was treated by repeated embolization using spherical polyvinyl alcohol particles, resulting in shrinkage of the tumor, improvement of the frequency and severity of the hypoglycemic episodes, and better quality of life.

  11. Genetically Engineered Cancer Models, But Not Xenografts, Faithfully Predict Anticancer Drug Exposure in Melanoma Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Combest, Austin J.; Roberts, Patrick J.; Dillon, Patrick M.; Sandison, Katie; Hanna, Suzan K.; Ross, Charlene; Habibi, Sohrab; Zamboni, Beth; Müller, Markus; Brunner, Martin; Sharpless, Norman E.

    2012-01-01

    Background. Rodent studies are a vital step in the development of novel anticancer therapeutics and are used in pharmacokinetic (PK), toxicology, and efficacy studies. Traditionally, anticancer drug development has relied on xenograft implantation of human cancer cell lines in immunocompromised mice for efficacy screening of a candidate compound. The usefulness of xenograft models for efficacy testing, however, has been questioned, whereas genetically engineered mouse models (GEMMs) and orthotopic syngeneic transplants (OSTs) may offer some advantages for efficacy assessment. A critical factor influencing the predictability of rodent tumor models is drug PKs, but a comprehensive comparison of plasma and tumor PK parameters among xenograft models, OSTs, GEMMs, and human patients has not been performed. Methods. In this work, we evaluated the plasma and tumor dispositions of an antimelanoma agent, carboplatin, in patients with cutaneous melanoma compared with four different murine melanoma models (one GEMM, one human cell line xenograft, and two OSTs). Results. Using microdialysis to sample carboplatin tumor disposition, we found that OSTs and xenografts were poor predictors of drug exposure in human tumors, whereas the GEMM model exhibited PK parameters similar to those seen in human tumors. Conclusions. The tumor PKs of carboplatin in a GEMM of melanoma more closely resembles the tumor disposition in patients with melanoma than transplanted tumor models. GEMMs show promise in becoming an improved prediction model for intratumoral PKs and response in patients with solid tumors. PMID:22993143

  12. Multimodality Imaging Methods for Assessing Retinoblastoma Orthotopic Xenograft Growth and Development

    PubMed Central

    Corson, Timothy W.; Samuels, Brian C.; Wenzel, Andrea A.; Geary, Anna J.; Riley, Amanda A.; McCarthy, Brian P.; Hanenberg, Helmut; Bailey, Barbara J.; Rogers, Pamela I.; Pollok, Karen E.; Rajashekhar, Gangaraju; Territo, Paul R.

    2014-01-01

    Genomic studies of the pediatric ocular tumor retinoblastoma are paving the way for development of targeted therapies. Robust model systems such as orthotopic xenografts are necessary for testing such therapeutics. One system involves bioluminescence imaging of luciferase-expressing human retinoblastoma cells injected into the vitreous of newborn rat eyes. Although used for several drug studies, the spatial and temporal development of tumors in this model has not been documented. Here, we present a new model to allow analysis of average luciferin flux () through the tumor, a more biologically relevant parameter than peak bioluminescence as traditionally measured. Moreover, we monitored the spatial development of xenografts in the living eye. We engineered Y79 retinoblastoma cells to express a lentivirally-delivered enhanced green fluorescent protein-luciferase fusion protein. In intravitreal xenografts, we assayed bioluminescence and computed , as well as documented tumor growth by intraocular optical coherence tomography (OCT), brightfield, and fluorescence imaging. In vivo bioluminescence, ex vivo tumor size, and ex vivo fluorescent signal were all highly correlated in orthotopic xenografts. By OCT, xenografts were dense and highly vascularized, with well-defined edges. Small tumors preferentially sat atop the optic nerve head; this morphology was confirmed on histological examination. In vivo, in xenografts showed a plateau effect as tumors became bounded by the dimensions of the eye. The combination of modeling and in vivo intraocular imaging allows both quantitative and high-resolution, non-invasive spatial analysis of this retinoblastoma model. This technique will be applied to other cell lines and experimental therapeutic trials in the future. PMID:24901248

  13. Multimodality imaging methods for assessing retinoblastoma orthotopic xenograft growth and development.

    PubMed

    Corson, Timothy W; Samuels, Brian C; Wenzel, Andrea A; Geary, Anna J; Riley, Amanda A; McCarthy, Brian P; Hanenberg, Helmut; Bailey, Barbara J; Rogers, Pamela I; Pollok, Karen E; Rajashekhar, Gangaraju; Territo, Paul R

    2014-01-01

    Genomic studies of the pediatric ocular tumor retinoblastoma are paving the way for development of targeted therapies. Robust model systems such as orthotopic xenografts are necessary for testing such therapeutics. One system involves bioluminescence imaging of luciferase-expressing human retinoblastoma cells injected into the vitreous of newborn rat eyes. Although used for several drug studies, the spatial and temporal development of tumors in this model has not been documented. Here, we present a new model to allow analysis of average luciferin flux ([Formula: see text]) through the tumor, a more biologically relevant parameter than peak bioluminescence as traditionally measured. Moreover, we monitored the spatial development of xenografts in the living eye. We engineered Y79 retinoblastoma cells to express a lentivirally-delivered enhanced green fluorescent protein-luciferase fusion protein. In intravitreal xenografts, we assayed bioluminescence and computed [Formula: see text], as well as documented tumor growth by intraocular optical coherence tomography (OCT), brightfield, and fluorescence imaging. In vivo bioluminescence, ex vivo tumor size, and ex vivo fluorescent signal were all highly correlated in orthotopic xenografts. By OCT, xenografts were dense and highly vascularized, with well-defined edges. Small tumors preferentially sat atop the optic nerve head; this morphology was confirmed on histological examination. In vivo, [Formula: see text] in xenografts showed a plateau effect as tumors became bounded by the dimensions of the eye. The combination of [Formula: see text] modeling and in vivo intraocular imaging allows both quantitative and high-resolution, non-invasive spatial analysis of this retinoblastoma model. This technique will be applied to other cell lines and experimental therapeutic trials in the future. PMID:24901248

  14. Total lymphoid irradiation and discordant cardiac xenografts

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, E.; Dresdale, A.R.; Diehl, J.T.; Katzen, N.A.; Aronovitz, M.J.; Konstam, M.A.; Payne, D.D.; Cleveland, R.J. )

    1990-01-01

    Total lymphoid irradiation can prolong concordant cardiac xenografts. The effects of total lymphoid irradiation in a discordant xenograft model (guinea pig to rat) were studied with and without adjuvant pharmacologic immunosuppression. Inbred Lewis rats were randomly allocated to one of four groups. Group 1 (n = 6) served as a control group and rats received no immunosuppression. Group 2 (n = 5) received triple-drug therapy that consisted of intraperitoneal azathioprine (2 mg/kg), cyclosporine (20 mg/kg), and methylprednisolone (1 mg/kg) for 1 week before transplantation. Group 3 animals (n = 5) received 15 Gy of total lymphoid irradiation in 12 divided doses over a 3-week period. Group 4 (n = 6) received both triple-drug therapy and total lymphoid irradiation as described for groups 2 and 3. Complement-dependent cytotoxicity assay was performed to determine if a correlation between complement-dependent cytotoxicity and rejection-free interval existed. Rejection was defined as cessation of graft pulsation and was confirmed by histologic test results. Only groups 1 and 2 showed a difference in survival (group 1, 6.9 +/- 1.0 minutes; group 2, 14.2 +/- 2.7 minutes, p = 0.02). Although total lymphoid irradiation did decrease complement-dependent cytotoxicity, linear regression revealed no correlation between complement-dependent cytotoxicity and graft survival (coefficient of correlation, 0.30). Unlike concordant cardiac xenografts, total lymphoid irradiation with or without triple-drug therapy does not prolong graft survival.

  15. Integrated Analysis of Transcriptome in Cancer Patient-Derived Xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hong; Zhu, Yinjie; Tang, Xiaoyan; Li, Junyi; Li, Yuanyuan; Zhong, Zhaomin; Ding, Guohui; Li, Yixue

    2015-01-01

    Patient-derived xenograft (PDX) tumor model is a powerful technology in evaluating anti-cancer drugs and facilitating personalized medicines. Multiple research centers and commercial companies have put huge efforts into building PDX mouse models. However, PDX models have not been widely available and their molecular features have not been systematically characterized. In this study, we provided a comprehensive survey of PDX transcriptome by integrating analysis of 58 patients involving 8 different tumors. The median correlation coefficient between patients and xenografts is 0.94, which is higher than that between patients and cell line panel or between patients with the same tumor. Major differential gene expressions in PDX occur in the engraftment of human tumor tissue into mice, while gene expressions are relatively stable over passages. 48 genes are frequently differentially expressed in PDX mice of multiple cancers. They are enriched in extracellular matrix and immune response, and some are reported as targets for anticancer drugs. A simulation study showed that expression change between PDX and patient tumor (6%) would result in acceptable change in drug sensitivity (3%). Our findings demonstrate that PDX mice represent the gene-expression and drug-response features of primary tumors effectively, and it is recommended to monitoring the overall expression profiles and drug target genes in clinical application. PMID:25951608

  16. Integrated analysis of transcriptome in cancer patient-derived xenografts.

    PubMed

    Li, Hong; Zhu, Yinjie; Tang, Xiaoyan; Li, Junyi; Li, Yuanyuan; Zhong, Zhaomin; Ding, Guohui; Li, Yixue

    2015-01-01

    Patient-derived xenograft (PDX) tumor model is a powerful technology in evaluating anti-cancer drugs and facilitating personalized medicines. Multiple research centers and commercial companies have put huge efforts into building PDX mouse models. However, PDX models have not been widely available and their molecular features have not been systematically characterized. In this study, we provided a comprehensive survey of PDX transcriptome by integrating analysis of 58 patients involving 8 different tumors. The median correlation coefficient between patients and xenografts is 0.94, which is higher than that between patients and cell line panel or between patients with the same tumor. Major differential gene expressions in PDX occur in the engraftment of human tumor tissue into mice, while gene expressions are relatively stable over passages. 48 genes are frequently differentially expressed in PDX mice of multiple cancers. They are enriched in extracellular matrix and immune response, and some are reported as targets for anticancer drugs. A simulation study showed that expression change between PDX and patient tumor (6%) would result in acceptable change in drug sensitivity (3%). Our findings demonstrate that PDX mice represent the gene-expression and drug-response features of primary tumors effectively, and it is recommended to monitoring the overall expression profiles and drug target genes in clinical application.

  17. Mifepristone improves chemo-radiation response in glioblastoma xenografts

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background We have investigated the ability of Mifepristone, an anti-progestin and anti-glucocorticoid drug, to modulate the antitumor effect of current standard clinical treatment in glioblastoma xenografts. Methods The effect of radiation alone or combined with Mifepristone and Temozolamide was evaluated on tumor growth in glioblastoma xenografts, both in terms of preferentially triggering tumor cell death and inhibiting angiogenesis. Tumor size was measured once a week using a caliper and tumor metabolic-activity was carried out by molecular imaging using a microPET/CT scanner. The effect of Mifepristone on the expression of angiogenic factors after concomitant radio-chemotherapy was determined using a quantitative real-time PCR analysis of VEGF gene expression. Results The analysis of the data shows a significant antitumoral effect by the simultaneous administration of radiation-Mifepristone-Temozolamide in comparison with radiation alone or radiation-Temozolamide. Conclusion Our results suggest that Mifepristone could improve the efficacy of chemo-radiotherapy in Glioblastoma. The addition of Mifepristone to standard radiation-Temozolamide therapy represents a potential approach as a chemo-radio-sensitizer in treating GBMs, which have very limited treatment options. PMID:23530939

  18. The anti-Fn14 antibody BIIB036 inhibits tumor growth in xenografts and patient derived primary tumor models and enhances efficacy of chemotherapeutic agents in multiple xenograft models.

    PubMed

    Michaelson, Jennifer S; Kelly, Rebecca; Yang, Lu; Zhang, Xiamei; Wortham, Kathleen; Joseph, Ingrid B J K

    2012-07-01

    Agonistic antibodies targeting Fn14, the receptor for TWEAK, have demonstrated anti-tumor activity in xenograft models. Herein, we further explore the therapeutic potential of the humanized anti-Fn14 agonistic antibody, BIIB036, as a single agent and in combination with standard of care cancer therapeutics. Pharmacokinetic studies of BIIB036 in tumor-bearing mice revealed a half-life of approximately three days suggesting twice a week dosing would be necessary to maintain efficacy. However, in multiple xenograft models, BIIB036 treatment resulted in extended tumor growth inhibition up to 40-50 d following cessation of dosing, suggesting that frequent administration of BIIB036 may not be necessary to maintain prolonged anti-tumor activity. Subsequent xenograft studies revealed that maximal efficacy was achieved with BIIB036 dosing once every two weeks, by either intraperitoneal or subcutaneous administration. Xenograft tumors that were initially treated with BIBI036 and then re-grew up to 1000 mm³ following cessation of the first cycle of treatment remained sensitive to a second cycle of treatment. BIIB036 was also evaluated in patient derived primary colon tumor models, where efficacy compared favorably with a standard of care agent. Lastly, BIIB036 enhanced the efficacy of several standard of care chemotherapeutics, including paclitaxel in MDA-MBA-231 breast tumor xenografts, paclitaxel or carboplatin in HOP62 non-small cell lung xenografts, and 5-FU in NCI-N87 gastric xenografts, with no overlapping toxicities. These studies thus establish BIIB036 as a promising therapeutic agent with durable anti-tumor activity in human xenografts as well as patient derived primary tumor models, and enhanced activity and tolerability in combination with standard of care chemotherapeutics. Taken together, the data presented herein suggest that BIIB036 warrants evaluation in the clinic.

  19. Dosimetry of [177Lu]-DO3A-VS-Cys40-Exendin-4 – impact on the feasibility of insulinoma internal radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Velikyan, Irina; Bulenga, Thomas N; Selvaraju, Ramkumar; Lubberink, Mark; Espes, Daniel; Rosenström, Ulrika; Eriksson, Olof

    2015-01-01

    [68Ga]-DO3A-VS-Cys40-Exendin-4 has been shown to be a promising imaging candidate for targeting glucagon like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R). In the light of radiotheranostics and personalized medicine the 177Lu-labelled analogue is of paramount interest. In this study we have investigated the organ distribution of [177Lu]-DO3A-VS-Cys40-Exendin-4 in rat and calculated human dosimetry parameters in order to estimate the maximal acceptable administered radioactivity, and thus potential applicability of [177Lu]-DO3A-VS-Cys40-Exendin-4 for internal radiotherapy of insulinomas. Nine male and nine female Lewis rats were injected with [177Lu]-DO3A-VS-Cys40-Exendin-4 for ex vivo organ distribution study at nine time points. The estimation of human organ/total body absorbed and total effective doses was performed using Organ Level Internal Dose Assessment Code software (OLINDA/EXM 1.1). Six more rats (male: n = 3; female: n = 3) were scanned by single photon emission tomography and computed tomography (SPECT-CT). The renal function and potential cell dysfunction were monitored by creatinine ISTAT and glucose levels. The fine uptake structure of kidney and pancreas was investigated by ex vivo autoradiography. Blood clearance and washout from most of the organs was fast. The kidney was the dose-limiting organ with absorbed dose of 5.88 and 6.04 mGy/MBq, respectively for female and male. Pancreatic beta cells demonstrated radioactivity accumulation. Renal function and beta cell function remained unaffected by radiation. The absorbed dose of [177Lu]-DO3A-VS-Cys40-Exendin-4 to kidneys may limit the clinical application of the agent. However, hypothetically, kidney protection and peptidase inhibition may allow reduction of kidney absorbed dose and amplification of tumour absorbed doses. PMID:25973333

  20. Tumor Repression of VCaP Xenografts by a Pyrrole-Imidazole Polyamide

    PubMed Central

    Hargrove, Amanda E.; Martinez, Thomas F.; Hare, Alissa A.; Kurmis, Alexis A.; Phillips, John W.; Sud, Sudha; Pienta, Kenneth J; Dervan, Peter B.

    2015-01-01

    Pyrrole-imidazole (Py-Im) polyamides are high affinity DNA-binding small molecules that can inhibit protein-DNA interactions. In VCaP cells, a human prostate cancer cell line overexpressing both AR and the TMPRSS2-ERG gene fusion, an androgen response element (ARE)-targeted Py-Im polyamide significantly downregulates AR driven gene expression. Polyamide exposure to VCaP cells reduced proliferation without causing DNA damage. Py-Im polyamide treatment also reduced tumor growth in a VCaP mouse xenograft model. In addition to the effects on AR regulated transcription, RNA-seq analysis revealed inhibition of topoisomerase-DNA binding as a potential mechanism that contributes to the antitumor effects of polyamides in cell culture and in xenografts. These studies support the therapeutic potential of Py-Im polyamides to target multiple aspects of transcriptional regulation in prostate cancers without genotoxic stress. PMID:26571387

  1. The embryonic morphogen, Nodal, is associated with channel-like structures in human malignant melanoma xenografts.

    PubMed

    McAllister, Josephine C; Zhan, Qian; Weishaupt, Carsten; Hsu, Mei-Yu; Murphy, George F

    2010-04-01

    Formation of channel-like structures, also termed vasculogenic mimicry (VM), describes the ability of aggressive melanoma cells to form PAS-positive anastomosing structures that correlate with tumor virulence. This phenomenon may indicate differentiation plasticity, a feature melanoma cells may share with stem cells in the developing embryo. Recent studies have indicated that VM and tumorigenicity of human malignant melanoma may depend on the signaling pathways of an embryonic morphogen, Nodal. However, given the secretory nature of Nodal protein and melanoma cell heterogeneity, it remains unclear whether the Nodal-expressing cells participate directly or indirectly in VM that is potentially related to tumorigenic growth. We have developed a humanized murine xenograft model in which developing human melanomas may be sequentially studied during early stages of tumorigenic growth within a physiological human dermal microenvironment. Nodal protein localized diffusely to melanoma cell membranes, with occasional foci of accentuated reactivity in patterns suggestive of channel formation. Similar findings were detected in a limited number of patient-derived tumors. In situ hybridization confirmed Nodal mRNA to be restricted to tumor cells within xenografts that formed arborizing networks in patterns consistent with VM. These data indicate that Nodal gene expression is associated with formation of VM-like structures in a physiologically relevant model of human melanoma tumorigenesis, and further support a key role for Nodal expression in the formation of channel-like structures. The humanized xenograft model should be useful in future studies to define the mechanistic pathways responsible for VM and melanoma progression.

  2. FO-SPR based dextrose sensor using Ag/ZnO nanorods/GOx for insulinoma detection.

    PubMed

    Usha, Sruthi P; Shrivastav, Anand M; Gupta, Banshi D

    2016-11-15

    In this piece of work, a fiber optic sensor has been fabricated and characterized using surface plasmon resonance for dextrose sensing. The concentration range used in this study is for diagnosing the cases of hypoglycaemia especially in suppression tests of insulinoma. Insulinoma is a medical case in which the person is recognized being hypoglycaemic with the blood dextrose level falling down to 2.2mM or less. Thus, the sensor has been characterized for the dextrose concentration range of 0 mM-10mM including the cases of normal blood dextrose range. Coatings of silver layer and zinc oxide nanorods have been carried out on the bare core fiber with a dual role of zinc oxide followed by immobilization of glucose oxidase. A three stage optimization procedure has been adopted for the best performance of the sensor. Absorbance spectra have been plotted and peak absorbance wavelengths have been extracted for each concentration chosen along with the sensitivities. The results have been made conclusive with control experiments. The probe has also been tested on sample having blood serum to check the reliability of the sensor. The sensor shows better selectivity and response time along with its real time applications, online monitoring, remote sensing and reusability.

  3. Efficacy of an Fc-modified anti-CD123 antibody (CSL362) combined with chemotherapy in xenograft models of acute myelogenous leukemia in immunodeficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Erwin M.; Yee, Dean; Busfield, Samantha J.; McManus, Julie F.; Cummings, Nik; Vairo, Gino; Wei, Andrew; Ramshaw, Hayley S.; Powell, Jason A.; Lopez, Angel F.; Lewis, Ian D.; McCall, Martin N.; Lock, Richard B.

    2015-01-01

    The prognosis of older patients with acute myelogenous leukemia is generally poor. The interleukin-3 receptor α-chain (CD123) is highly expressed on the surface of acute leukemia cells compared with normal hematopoietic stem cells. CSL362 is a fully humanized, CD123-neutralizing monoclonal antibody containing a modified Fc structure, which enhances human natural killer cell antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity. Six continuous acute myelogenous leukemia xenografts established from patient explants and characterized by cell and molecular criteria, produced progressively lethal disease 42-202 days after transplantation. CSL362 alone reduced engraftment of one of four and three of four acute myelogenous leukemia xenografts in the bone marrow and peripheral organs, respectively. A cytarabine and daunorubicin regimen was optimized using this model to identify potentially synergistic interactions with CSL362. Cytarabine/daunorubicin improved the survival of mice engrafted with four of four acute myelogenous leukemia xenografts by 31–41 days. Moreover, CSL362 extended the survival of cytarabine/daunorubicin-treated mice for two of two acute myelogenous leukemia xenografts, while augmentation of natural killer cell-deficient NSG mice with adoptively transferred human natural killer cells improved survival against a single xenograft. Interestingly, this enhanced CSL362 efficacy was lost in the absence of chemotherapy. This study shows that acute myelogenous leukemia xenografts provide a platform for the evaluation of new therapeutics, simulating complex in vivo interactions, and that the in vivo efficacy of CSL362 supports continued clinical development of this drug. PMID:26130514

  4. Orthotopic xenografts of human melanoma and colonic and ovarian carcinoma in sheep to evaluate radioimmunotherapy.

    PubMed Central

    Turner, J. H.; Rose, A. H.; Glancy, R. J.; Penhale, W. J.

    1998-01-01

    Extrapolation to humans from experimental radioimmunotherapy in nude mouse xenograft models is confounded by large relative tumour size and small volume of distribution in mice allowing tumour uptake of radiolabelled antibodies unattainable in patients. Our large animal model of human tumours in cyclosporin-immunosuppressed sheep demonstrated tumour uptake of targeted radiolabelled monoclonal antibodies comparable with uptakes reported in clinical trials. Sheep immunosuppression with daily intravenous cyclosporin augmented by oral ketoconazole maintained trough blood levels of cyclosporin within the range 1000-1500 ng ml(-1). Human tumour cells were transplanted orthotopically by inoculation of 10(7) cells: SKMEL melanoma subcutaneously; LS174T and HT29 colon carcinoma into bowel, peritoneum and liver; and JAM ovarian carcinoma into ovary and peritoneum. Tumour xenografts grew at all sites within 3 weeks of inoculation, preserving characteristic morphology without evidence of necrosis or host rejection. Lymphatic metastasis was demonstrated in regional nodes draining xenografts of melanoma and ovarian carcinoma. Colonic LS1 74T xenografts produced mucin and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA). The anti-CEA IgG1 monoclonal antibody A5B7 was radiolabelled with iodine-131 and administered intravenously to sheep. Peak uptake at 5 days in orthotopic human tumour transplants in gut was 0.027% DI g(-1) (percentage of injected dose per gram) and 0.034% DI g(-1) in hepatic metastases with tumour to blood ratios of 2-2.5. Non-specific tumour uptake in melanoma was 0.003% DI g(-1). Uptake of radiolabelled monoclonal antibody in human tumours in our large animal model is comparable with that observed in patients and may be more realistic than nude mice xenografts for prediction of clinical efficacy of radioimmunotherapy. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:9716032

  5. Xenograft assessment of predictive biomarkers for standard head and neck cancer therapies.

    PubMed

    Stein, Andrew P; Swick, Adam D; Smith, Molly A; Blitzer, Grace C; Yang, Robert Z; Saha, Sandeep; Harari, Paul M; Lambert, Paul F; Liu, Cheng Z; Kimple, Randall J

    2015-05-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) remains a challenging cancer to treat with overall 5-year survival on the order of 50-60%. Therefore, predictive biomarkers for this disease would be valuable to provide more effective and individualized therapeutic approaches for these patients. While prognostic biomarkers such as p16 expression correlate with outcome; to date, no predictive biomarkers have been clinically validated for HNSCC. We generated xenografts in immunocompromised mice from six established HNSCC cell lines and evaluated response to cisplatin, cetuximab, and radiation. Tissue microarrays were constructed from pre- and posttreatment tumor samples derived from each xenograft experiment. Quantitative immunohistochemistry was performed using a semiautomated imaging and analysis platform to determine the relative expression of five potential predictive biomarkers: epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), phospho-EGFR, phospho-Akt, phospho-ERK, and excision repair cross-complementation group 1 (ERCC1). Biomarker levels were compared between xenografts that were sensitive versus resistant to a specific therapy utilizing a two-sample t-test with equal standard deviations. Indeed the xenografts displayed heterogeneous responses to each treatment, and we linked a number of baseline biomarker levels to response. This included low ERCC1 being associated with cisplatin sensitivity, low phospho-Akt correlated with cetuximab sensitivity, and high total EGFR was related to radiation resistance. Overall, we developed a systematic approach to identifying predictive biomarkers and demonstrated several connections between biomarker levels and treatment response. Despite these promising initial results, this work requires additional preclinical validation, likely involving the use of patient-derived xenografts, prior to moving into the clinical realm for confirmation among patients with HNSCC.

  6. KIT Signaling Promotes Growth of Colon Xenograft Tumors in Mice and is Upregulated in a Subset of Human Colon Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Evan C.; Karl, Taylor A.; Kalisky, Tomer; Gupta, Santosh K.; O’Brien, Catherine A.; Longacre, Teri A.; van de Rijn, Matt; Quake, Stephen R.; Clarke, Michael F.; Rothenberg, Michael E.

    2015-01-01

    Background & Aims Receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) inhibitors have advanced colon cancer treatment. We investigated the role of the RTK KIT in development of human colon cancer. Methods An array of 137 patient-derived colon tumors and their associated xenografts were analyzed by immunohistochemistry to measure levels of KIT and its ligand KITLG. KIT and/or KITLG was stably knocked down by expression of small hairpin RNAs from lentiviral vectors in DLD1, HT29, LS174T, and COLO320 colon cancer cell lines, and in UM-COLON#8 and POP77 xenografts; cells transduced with only vector were used as controls. Cells were analyzed by real-time quantitative reverse transcription PCR, single-cell gene expression analysis, flow cytometry, and immunohistochemical, immunoblot, and functional assays. Xenograft tumors were grown from control and KIT-knockdown DLD1 and UM-COLON#8 cells in immunocompromised mice and compared. Some mice were given the RTK inhibitor imatinib following injection of cancer cells; tumor growth was measured based on bioluminescence. We assessed tumorigenicity using limiting dilution analysis. Results KIT and KITLG were expressed heterogeneously by a subset of human colon tumors. Knockdown of KIT decreased proliferation of colon cancer cell lines and growth of xenograft tumors in mice, compared with control cells. KIT knockdown cells had increased expression of enterocyte markers, decreased expression of cycling genes, and, unexpectedly, increased expression of LGR5-associated genes. No activating mutations in KIT were detected in DLD1, POP77, or UM-COLON#8 cell lines. However, KITLG-knockdown DLD1 cells formed smaller xenograft tumors than control cells. Gene expression analysis of single CD44+ cells indicated that KIT may promote growth via KITLG autocrine and/or paracrine signaling. Imatinib inhibited growth of KIT+ colon cancer organoids in culture and growth of xenograft tumors in mice. Cancer cells with endogenous KIT expression were more tumorigenic in

  7. Intracellular Doppler Signatures of Platinum Sensitivity Captured by Biodynamic Profiling in Ovarian Xenografts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merrill, Daniel; An, Ran; Sun, Hao; Yakubov, Bakhtiyor; Matei, Daniela; Turek, John; Nolte, David

    2016-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) tissue cultures are replacing conventional two-dimensional (2D) cultures for applications in cancer drug development. However, direct comparisons of in vitro 3D models relative to in vivo models derived from the same cell lines have not been reported because of the lack of sensitive optical probes that can extract high-content information from deep inside living tissue. Here we report the use of biodynamic imaging (BDI) to measure response to platinum in 3D living tissue. BDI combines low-coherence digital holography with intracellular Doppler spectroscopy to study tumor drug response. Human ovarian cancer cell lines were grown either in vitro as 3D multicellular monoculture spheroids or as xenografts in nude mice. Fragments of xenografts grown in vivo in nude mice from a platinum-sensitive human ovarian cell line showed rapid and dramatic signatures of induced cell death when exposed to platinum ex vivo, while the corresponding 3D multicellular spheroids grown in vitro showed negligible response. The differences in drug response between in vivo and in vitro growth have important implications for predicting chemotherapeutic response using tumor biopsies from patients or patient-derived xenografts.

  8. Intracellular Doppler Signatures of Platinum Sensitivity Captured by Biodynamic Profiling in Ovarian Xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Merrill, Daniel; An, Ran; Sun, Hao; Yakubov, Bakhtiyor; Matei, Daniela; Turek, John; Nolte, David

    2016-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) tissue cultures are replacing conventional two-dimensional (2D) cultures for applications in cancer drug development. However, direct comparisons of in vitro 3D models relative to in vivo models derived from the same cell lines have not been reported because of the lack of sensitive optical probes that can extract high-content information from deep inside living tissue. Here we report the use of biodynamic imaging (BDI) to measure response to platinum in 3D living tissue. BDI combines low-coherence digital holography with intracellular Doppler spectroscopy to study tumor drug response. Human ovarian cancer cell lines were grown either in vitro as 3D multicellular monoculture spheroids or as xenografts in nude mice. Fragments of xenografts grown in vivo in nude mice from a platinum-sensitive human ovarian cell line showed rapid and dramatic signatures of induced cell death when exposed to platinum ex vivo, while the corresponding 3D multicellular spheroids grown in vitro showed negligible response. The differences in drug response between in vivo and in vitro growth have important implications for predicting chemotherapeutic response using tumor biopsies from patients or patient-derived xenografts. PMID:26732545

  9. Intracellular Doppler Signatures of Platinum Sensitivity Captured by Biodynamic Profiling in Ovarian Xenografts.

    PubMed

    Merrill, Daniel; An, Ran; Sun, Hao; Yakubov, Bakhtiyor; Matei, Daniela; Turek, John; Nolte, David

    2016-01-06

    Three-dimensional (3D) tissue cultures are replacing conventional two-dimensional (2D) cultures for applications in cancer drug development. However, direct comparisons of in vitro 3D models relative to in vivo models derived from the same cell lines have not been reported because of the lack of sensitive optical probes that can extract high-content information from deep inside living tissue. Here we report the use of biodynamic imaging (BDI) to measure response to platinum in 3D living tissue. BDI combines low-coherence digital holography with intracellular Doppler spectroscopy to study tumor drug response. Human ovarian cancer cell lines were grown either in vitro as 3D multicellular monoculture spheroids or as xenografts in nude mice. Fragments of xenografts grown in vivo in nude mice from a platinum-sensitive human ovarian cell line showed rapid and dramatic signatures of induced cell death when exposed to platinum ex vivo, while the corresponding 3D multicellular spheroids grown in vitro showed negligible response. The differences in drug response between in vivo and in vitro growth have important implications for predicting chemotherapeutic response using tumor biopsies from patients or patient-derived xenografts.

  10. Berberine inhibits human tongue squamous carcinoma cancer tumor growth in a murine xenograft model.

    PubMed

    Ho, Yung-Tsuan; Yang, Jai-Sing; Lu, Chi-Cheng; Chiang, Jo-Hua; Li, Tsai-Chung; Lin, Jen-Jyh; Lai, Kuang-Chi; Liao, Ching-Lung; Lin, Jaung-Geng; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2009-09-01

    Our primary studies showed that berberine induced apoptosis in human tongue cancer SCC-4 cells in vitro. But there is no report to show berberine inhibited SCC-4 cancer cells in vivo on a murine xenograft animal model. SCC-4 tumor cells were implanted into mice and groups of mice were treated with vehicle, berberine (10mg/kg of body weight) and doxorubicin (4mg/kg of body weight). The tested agents were injected once per four days intraperitoneally (i.p.), with treatment starting 4 weeks prior to cells inoculation. Treatment with 4mg/kg of doxorubicin or with 10mg/kg of berberine resulted in a reduction in tumor incidence. Tumor size in xenograft mice treated with 10mg/kg berberine was significantly smaller than that in the control group. Our findings indicated that berbeirne inhibits tumor growth in a xenograft animal model. Therefore, berberine may represent a tongue cancer preventive agent and can be used in clinic. PMID:19303753

  11. Modeling of Chronic Myeloid Leukemia: An Overview of In Vivo Murine and Human Xenograft Models.

    PubMed

    Sontakke, Pallavi; Jaques, Jenny; Vellenga, Edo; Schuringa, Jan Jacob

    2016-01-01

    Over the past years, a wide variety of in vivo mouse models have been generated in order to unravel the molecular pathology of Chronic Myeloid Leukemia (CML) and to develop and improve therapeutic approaches. These models range from (conditional) transgenic models, knock-in models, and murine bone marrow retroviral transduction models followed by transplantation. With the advancement of immunodeficient xenograft models, it has become possible to use human stem/progenitor cells for in vivo studies as well as cells directly derived from CML patients. These models not only mimic CML but also have been instrumental in uncovering various fundamental mechanisms of CML disease progression and tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) resistance. With the availability of iPSC technology, it has become feasible to derive, maintain, and expand CML subclones that are at least genetically identical to those in patients. The following review provides an overview of all murine as well as human xenograft models for CML established till date. PMID:27642303

  12. Modeling of Chronic Myeloid Leukemia: An Overview of In Vivo Murine and Human Xenograft Models

    PubMed Central

    Vellenga, Edo

    2016-01-01

    Over the past years, a wide variety of in vivo mouse models have been generated in order to unravel the molecular pathology of Chronic Myeloid Leukemia (CML) and to develop and improve therapeutic approaches. These models range from (conditional) transgenic models, knock-in models, and murine bone marrow retroviral transduction models followed by transplantation. With the advancement of immunodeficient xenograft models, it has become possible to use human stem/progenitor cells for in vivo studies as well as cells directly derived from CML patients. These models not only mimic CML but also have been instrumental in uncovering various fundamental mechanisms of CML disease progression and tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) resistance. With the availability of iPSC technology, it has become feasible to derive, maintain, and expand CML subclones that are at least genetically identical to those in patients. The following review provides an overview of all murine as well as human xenograft models for CML established till date.

  13. Modeling of Chronic Myeloid Leukemia: An Overview of In Vivo Murine and Human Xenograft Models

    PubMed Central

    Vellenga, Edo

    2016-01-01

    Over the past years, a wide variety of in vivo mouse models have been generated in order to unravel the molecular pathology of Chronic Myeloid Leukemia (CML) and to develop and improve therapeutic approaches. These models range from (conditional) transgenic models, knock-in models, and murine bone marrow retroviral transduction models followed by transplantation. With the advancement of immunodeficient xenograft models, it has become possible to use human stem/progenitor cells for in vivo studies as well as cells directly derived from CML patients. These models not only mimic CML but also have been instrumental in uncovering various fundamental mechanisms of CML disease progression and tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) resistance. With the availability of iPSC technology, it has become feasible to derive, maintain, and expand CML subclones that are at least genetically identical to those in patients. The following review provides an overview of all murine as well as human xenograft models for CML established till date. PMID:27642303

  14. pO{sub 2} Fluctuation Pattern and Cycling Hypoxia in Human Cervical Carcinoma and Melanoma Xenografts

    SciTech Connect

    Ellingsen, Christine; Ovrebo, Kirsti Marie; Galappathi, Kanthi; Mathiesen, Berit; Rofstad, Einar K.

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: Blood perfusion in tumors is spatially and temporally heterogeneous, resulting in local fluctuations in tissue oxygen tension (pO{sub 2}) and tissue regions showing cycling hypoxia. In this study, we investigated whether the pO{sub 2} fluctuation pattern and the extent of cycling hypoxia differ between tumor types showing high (e.g., cervical carcinoma xenograft) and low (e.g., melanoma xenograft) fractions of connective tissue-associated blood vessels. Methods and Materials: Two cervical carcinoma lines (CK-160 and TS-415) and two melanoma lines (A-07 and R-18) transplanted into BALB/c nu/nu mice were included in the study. Tissue pO{sub 2} was measured simultaneously in two positions in each tumor by using a two-channel OxyLite fiber-optic oxygen-sensing device. The extent of acute and chronic hypoxia was assessed by combining a radiobiological and a pimonidazole-based immunohistochemical assay of tumor hypoxia. Results: The proportion of tumor regions showing pO{sub 2} fluctuations, the pO{sub 2} fluctuation frequency in these regions, and the relative amplitude of the pO{sub 2} fluctuations were significantly higher in the melanoma xenografts than in the cervical carcinoma xenografts. Cervical carcinoma and melanoma xenografts did not differ significantly in the fraction of acutely hypoxic cells or the fraction of chronically hypoxic cells. However, the ratio between fraction of acutely hypoxic cells and fraction of chronically hypoxic cells was significantly higher in melanoma than in cervical carcinoma xenografts. Conclusions: Temporal heterogeneity in blood flow and tissue pO{sub 2} in tumors may depend on tumor histology. Connective tissue surrounding microvessels may stabilize blood flow and pO{sub 2} and, thus, protect tumor tissue from cycling hypoxia.

  15. Pim Kinases Promote Migration and Metastatic Growth of Prostate Cancer Xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Santio, Niina M.; Eerola, Sini K.; Paatero, Ilkka; Yli-Kauhaluoma, Jari; Anizon, Fabrice; Moreau, Pascale; Tuomela, Johanna; Härkönen, Pirkko; Koskinen, Päivi J.

    2015-01-01

    Background and methods Pim family proteins are oncogenic kinases implicated in several types of cancer and involved in regulation of cell proliferation, survival as well as motility. Here we have investigated the ability of Pim kinases to promote metastatic growth of prostate cancer cells in two xenograft models for human prostate cancer. We have also evaluated the efficacy of Pim-selective inhibitors to antagonize these effects. Results We show here that tumorigenic growth of both subcutaneously and orthotopically inoculated prostate cancer xenografts is enhanced by stable overexpression of either Pim-1 or Pim-3. Moreover, Pim-overexpressing orthotopic prostate tumors are highly invasive and able to migrate not only to the nearby prostate-draining lymph nodes, but also into the lungs to form metastases. When the xenografted mice are daily treated with the Pim-selective inhibitor DHPCC-9, both the volumes as well as the metastatic capacity of the tumors are drastically decreased. Interestingly, the Pim-promoted metastatic growth of the orthotopic xenografts is associated with enhanced angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis. Furthermore, forced Pim expression also increases phosphorylation of the CXCR4 chemokine receptor, which may enable the tumor cells to migrate towards tissues such as the lungs that express the CXCL12 chemokine ligand. Conclusions Our results indicate that Pim overexpression enhances the invasive properties of prostate cancer cells in vivo. These effects can be reduced by the Pim-selective inhibitor DHPCC-9, which can reach tumor tissues without serious side effects. Thus, Pim-targeting therapies with DHPCC-9-like compounds may help to prevent progression of local prostate carcinomas to fatally metastatic malignancies. PMID:26075720

  16. New mouse xenograft model modulated by tumor-associated fibroblasts for human multi-drug resistance in cancer

    PubMed Central

    MA, YAN; LIN, ZHIQIANG; FALLON, JOHN K.; ZHAO, QIANG; LIU, DAN; WANG, YONGJUN; LIU, FENG

    2015-01-01

    We developed an MDR tumor model that is modulated by tumor-associated fibroblasts. Studies on proliferation of tumor cell lines including paclitaxel-sensitive and resistant cell lines were performed. The expressions of P-gp and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) antigen were evaluated by immunohistochemistry and western blot analysis. Quantitative P-gp analyses of different cell lines were accomplished by nanoUPLC-MS/MS. Tumor cell colony formation assay and established xenograft model was used to investigate the relationship between P-gp expression, fibroblast levels and tumorigenesis. The mouse xenograft model was developed after co-inoculation with MDR tumor cells and NIH/3T3 fibroblast cells. There was no correlation between tumorigenesis in vivo and the growth rate of cells in vitro. The proliferation among different cell lines had no significant differences, but the P-gp expression and tumor growth in the xenograft model were fairly different. P-gp determination and α-SMA immunofluorescence staining clarified the relationship between P-gp expression, fibroblast levels and tumorigenesis. It was more difficult for tumor cells with higher P-gp levels to recruit fibroblasts in vivo, resulting in lower tumorigenesis due to the lack of structural and chemical support during tumor progression. In the established paclitaxel-resistant mouse xenograft model, no obvious antitumor effect was observed after Taxol treatment, but a significant decrease in tumor size for the group treated with gemcitabine sensitive to the model. The results show that the added fibroblasts do not disturb the applicability of the model in MDR. Therefore, this mouse xenograft MDR model could serve as an effective tool for MDR research. PMID:26352907

  17. A simple guide screw method for intracranial xenograft studies in mice.

    PubMed

    Donoghue, Jacqueline F; Bogler, Oliver; Johns, Terrance G

    2011-09-26

    The grafting of human tumor cells into the brain of immunosuppressed mice is an established method for the study of brain cancers including glioblastoma (glioma) and medulloblastoma. The widely used stereotactic approach only allows for the injection of a single animal at a time, is labor intensive and requires highly specialized equipment. The guide screw method, initially developed by Lal et al.,(1) was developed to eliminate cumbersome stereotactic procedures. We now describe a modified guide screw approach that is rapid and exceptionally safe; both of which are critical ethical considerations. Notably, our procedure now incorporates an infusion pump that allows up to 10 animals to be simultaneously injected with tumor cells. To demonstrate the utility of this procedure, we established human U87MG glioma cells as intracranial xenografts in mice, which were then treated with AMG102; a fully human antibody directed to HGF/scatter factor currently undergoing clinical evaluation(2-5). Systemic injection of AMG102 significantly prolonged the survival of all mice with intracranial U87MG xenografts and resulted in a number of complete cures. This study demonstrates that the guide screw method is an inexpensive, highly reproducible approach for establishing intracranial xenografts. Furthermore, it provides a relevant physiological model for validating novel therapeutic strategies for the treatment of brain cancers.

  18. Picosecond pulsed electric fields induce apoptosis in a cervical cancer xenograft.

    PubMed

    Jia, Jia; Xiong, Zheng-Ai; Qin, Qin; Yao, Chen-Guo; Zhao, Xiao-Zhen

    2015-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the efficacy of picosecond pulsed electric fields (psPEF) on a cervical cancer xenograft. Human cervical cancer xenografts were established in nude mice by transplantation of HeLa cells, and the tumors were then treated with psPEF. The histological changes were observed by hematoxylin‑eosin staining and transmission electron microscopy. The rate of tumor cell apoptosis was determined using a terminal deoxynucleotidyl‑transferase‑mediated dUTP nick end labeling assay. The mitochondrial transmembrane potential of the tumor cells was detected by laser scanning confocal microscopy, and the activity of caspase‑3, ‑8, ‑9 and ‑12 was determined. The inhibitory rate seven days post‑psPEF treatment was also calculated. The results showed that exposure to psPEF led to an increased rate of apoptosis, collapse of mitochondrial transmembrane potential, and activation of caspases. The inhibitory rate was 9.11% at day 7. The results of the present study indicate that psPEF may induce apoptosis in a cervical cancer xenograft through the endoplasmic reticulum stress and caspase‑dependent signaling pathways. PMID:25405328

  19. Identification of Biomarkers of Necrosis in Xenografts Using Imaging Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández, Roberto; Garate, Jone; Lage, Sergio; Terés, Silvia; Higuera, Mónica; Bestard-Escalas, Joan; López, Daniel H.; Guardiola-Serrano, Francisca; Escribá, Pablo V.; Barceló-Coblijn, Gwendolyn; Fernández, José A.

    2016-02-01

    Xenografts are commonly used to test the effect of new drugs on human cancer. However, because of their heterogeneity, analysis of the results is often controversial. Part of the problem originates in the existence of tumor cells at different metabolic stages: from metastatic to necrotic cells, as it happens in real tumors. Imaging mass spectrometry is an excellent solution for the analysis of the results as it yields detailed information not only on the composition of the tissue but also on the distribution of the biomolecules within the tissue. Here, we use imaging mass spectrometry to determine the distribution of phosphatidylcholine (PC), phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), and their plasmanyl- and plasmenylether derivatives (PC-P/O and PE-P/O) in xenografts of five different tumor cell lines: A-549, NCI-H1975, BX-PC3, HT29, and U-87 MG. The results demonstrate that the necrotic areas showed a higher abundance of Na+ adducts and of PC-P/O species, whereas a large abundance of PE-P/O species was found in all the xenografts. Thus, the PC/PC-ether and Na+/K+ ratios may highlight the necrotic areas while an increase on the number of PE-ether species may be pointing to the existence of viable tumor tissues. Furthermore, the existence of important changes in the concentration of Na+ and K+ adducts between different tissues has to be taken into account while interpreting the imaging mass spectrometry results.

  20. Single-photon emission computed tomographic imaging of the early time course of therapy-induced cell death using technetium 99m tricarbonyl His-annexin A5 in a colorectal cancer xenograft model.

    PubMed

    Vangestel, Christel; Van de Wiele, Christophe; Mees, Gilles; Mertens, Koen; Staelens, Steven; Reutelingsperger, Chris; Pauwels, Patrick; Van Damme, Nancy; Peeters, Marc

    2012-04-01

    As apoptosis occurs over an interval of time after administration of apoptosis-inducing therapy in tumors, the changes in technetium 99m ((99m)Tc)-tricarbonyl (CO)₃ His-annexin A5 (His-ann A5) accumulation over time were examined. Colo205-bearing mice were divided into six treatment groups: (1) control, (2) 5-fluorouracil (5-FU; 250 mg/kg), (3) irinotecan (100 mg/kg), (4) oxaliplatin (30 mg/kg), (5) bevacizumab (5 mg/kg), and (6) panitumumab (6 mg/kg). (99m)Tc-(CO)₃ His-ann A5 was injected 4, 8, 12, 24, and 48 hours posttreatment, and micro-single-photon emission computed tomography was performed. Immunostaining of caspase-3 (apoptosis), survivin (antiapoptosis), and LC3-II (autophagy marker) was also performed. Different dynamics of (99m)Tc-(CO)₃ His-ann A5 uptake were observed in this colorectal cancer xenograft model, in response to a single dose of three different chemotherapeutics (5-FU, irinotecan, and oxaliplatin). Bevacizumab-treated mice showed no increased uptake of the radiotracer, and a peak of (99m)Tc-(CO)₃ His-ann A5 uptake in panitumumab-treated mice was observed 24 hours posttreatment, as confirmed by caspase-3 immunostaining. For irinotecan-, oxaliplatin-, and bevacizumab-treated tumors, a significant correlation was established between the radiotracer uptake and caspase-3 immunostaining (r  =  .8, p < .05; r  =  .9, p < .001; r  =  .9, p < .001, respectively). For 5-FU- and panitumumab-treated mice, the correlation coefficients were r  =  .7 (p  =  .18) and r  =  .7 (p  =  .19), respectively. Optimal timing of annexin A5 imaging after the start of different treatments in the Colo205 model was determined.

  1. Rejection of Cardiac Xenografts Transplanted from α 1,3-Galactosyltransferase Gene-Knockout (GalT-KO) Pigs to Baboons

    PubMed Central

    Hisashi, Y.; Yamada, K.; Kuwaki, K.; Tseng, Y.-L; Dor, F. J. M. F.; Houser, S. L; Robson, S. C.; Schuurman, H.-J.; Cooper, D. K. C.; Sachs, D. H.; Colvin, R. B.; Shimizu, A.

    2010-01-01

    The use of α 1,3-galactosyltransferase gene-knockout (GalT-KO) swine donors in discordant xenotransplantation has extended the survival of cardiac xenografts in baboons following transplantation. Eight baboons received heterotopic cardiac xenografts from GalT-KO swine and were treated with a chronic immunosuppressive regimen. The pathologic features of acute humoral xenograft rejection (AHXR), acute cellular xenograft rejection (ACXR) and chronic rejection were assessed in the grafts. No hyperacute rejection developed and one graft survived up to 6 months after transplantation. However, all GalT-KO heart grafts underwent graft failure with AHXR, ACXR and/or chronic rejection. AHXR was characterized by interstitial hemorrhage and multiple thrombi in vessels of various sizes. ACXR was characterized by TUNEL+ graft cell injury with the infiltration of T cells (including CD3 and TIA-1+ cytotoxic T cells), CD4+ cells, CD8+ cells, macrophages and a small number of B and NK cells. Chronic xenograft vasculopathy, a manifestation of chronic rejection, was characterized by arterial intimal thickening with TUNEL+ dead cells, antibody and complement deposition, and/or cytotoxic T-cell infiltration. In conclusion, despite the absence of the Gal epitope, acute and chronic antibody and cell-mediated rejection developed in grafts, maintained by chronic immunosupression, presumably due to de novo responses to non-Gal antigens. PMID:19032222

  2. Survivin inhibitor YM155 suppresses gastric cancer xenograft growth in mice without affecting normal tissues

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Xiao Jiao; Lin, Jia Cheng; Ding, Yan Fei; Zhu, Liming; Ye, Jing; Tu, Shui Ping

    2016-01-01

    Survivin overexpression is associated with poor prognosis of human gastric cancer, and is a target for gastric cancer therapy. YM155 is originally identified as a specific inhibitor of survivin. In this study, we investigated the antitumor effect of YM155 on human gastric cancer. Our results showed that YM155 treatment significantly inhibited cell proliferation, reduced colony formation and induced apoptosis of gastric cancer cells in a dose-dependent manner. Accordingly, YM155 treatment significantly decreased survivin expression without affecting XIAP expression and increased the cleavage of apoptosis-associated proteins caspase 3, 7, 8, 9. YM155 significantly inhibited sphere formation of gastric cancer cells, suppressed expansion and growth of the formed spheres (cancer stem cell-like cells, CSCs) and downregulated the protein levels of β-catenin, c-Myc, Cyclin D1 and CD44 in gastric cancer cells. YM155 infusion at 5 mg/kg/day for 7 days markedly inhibited growth of gastric cancer xenograft in a nude mouse model. Immunohistochemistry staining and Western Blot showed that YM155 treatment inhibited expression of survivin and CD44, induced apoptosis and reduced CD44+ CSCs in xenograft tumor tissues in vivo. No obvious pathological changes were observed in organs (e.g. heart, liver, lung and kidney) in YM155-treated mice. Our results demonstrated that YM155 inhibits cell proliferation, induces cell apoptosis, reduces cancer stem cell expansion, and inhibits xenograft tumor growth in gastric cancer cells. Our results elucidate a new mechanism by which YM155 inhibits gastric cancer growth by inhibition of CSCs. YM155 may be a promising agent for gastric cancer treatment. PMID:26771139

  3. Maintaining Tumor Heterogeneity in Patient-Derived Tumor Xenografts.

    PubMed

    Cassidy, John W; Caldas, Carlos; Bruna, Alejandra

    2015-08-01

    Preclinical models often fail to capture the diverse heterogeneity of human malignancies and as such lack clinical predictive power. Patient-derived tumor xenografts (PDX) have emerged as a powerful technology: capable of retaining the molecular heterogeneity of their originating sample. However, heterogeneity within a tumor is governed by both cell-autonomous (e.g., genetic and epigenetic heterogeneity) and non-cell-autonomous (e.g., stromal heterogeneity) drivers. Although PDXs can largely recapitulate the polygenomic architecture of human tumors, they do not fully account for heterogeneity in the tumor microenvironment. Hence, these models have substantial utility in basic and translational research in cancer biology; however, study of stromal or immune drivers of malignant progression may be limited. Similarly, PDX models offer the ability to conduct patient-specific in vivo and ex vivo drug screens, but stromal contributions to treatment responses may be under-represented. This review discusses the sources and consequences of intratumor heterogeneity and how these are recapitulated in the PDX model. Limitations of the current generation of PDXs are discussed and strategies to improve several aspects of the model with respect to preserving heterogeneity are proposed.

  4. [Transformation of patient-derived tumor xenografts into lymphomas: characteristics, influence factors and precautions].

    PubMed

    Zou, Jianling; Gao, Jing; Shen, Lin

    2016-07-01

    The patient-derived tumor xenografts (PDX) model is an animal model established by directly engrafting fresh tumor tissue of patients into immunodeficiency mice after surgery or biopsy, which plays an important role in the study of tumor biology. However, the transformation of PDX into lymphoma limits the application of this model. The characters of this transformation include that epithelial tumors origin, predorminance of B-cell lymphomas, lost of architectural feature of primary tumor, absence of epithelial tumor markers, and CD45 and CD20 expression. That were characteristics of human B lymphocytes, and possible infection of Epstein-Barr virus(EBV). The biology of primary tumor, EBV infection, inflammation infiltration in primary tumors and the host immune status are the main related factors in this transformation. Therefore, selective xenograft by the detection of EBV infection and inflammation infiltration in primary tumors may be effective methods to prevent lymphomagenesis.

  5. Generation of human acute lymphoblastic leukemia xenografts for use in oncology drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Holmfeldt, Linda; Mullighan, Charles G

    2015-01-01

    The establishment of reproducible mouse models of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is necessary to provide in vivo therapeutic test systems that recapitulate human ALL, and for amplification of limited amounts of primary tumor material. A popular assay is the primary xenograft model that utilizes immunocompromised mice. The protocol includes injection of primary patient tumor specimens into mice with subsequent serial passaging of the tumors by retransplants of cells harvested from the mouse bone marrow and spleen. The tumors generated are then used for genomic profiling, ex vivo compound testing, mechanistic studies and retransplantation. Detailed in this unit are procedures for the establishment and maintenance of primary ALL xenograft panels for use in basic research and translational studies. PMID:25737157

  6. Generation of human acute lymphoblastic leukemia xenografts for use in oncology drug discovery

    PubMed Central

    Holmfeldt, Linda

    2015-01-01

    The establishment of reproducible mouse models of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is necessary to provide in vivo therapeutic models that recapitulate human ALL, and for amplification of limiting amounts of primary tumor material. A frequently used model is the primary xenograft model that utilizes immunocompromised mice and involves injection of primary patient tumor specimens into mice, and subsequent serial passaging of the tumors by retransplants of cells harvested from the mouse bone marrow and spleen. The tumors generated can then be used for genomic profiling, ex vivo compound testing, mechanistic studies and retransplantation. This unit describes detailed procedures for the establishment and maintenance of primary ALL xenograft panels for potential use in basic research or translational studies. PMID:25737157

  7. Response of a high-glucuronidase human tumour xenograft to aniline mustard.

    PubMed

    Warenius, H M; Workman, P; Bleehen, N M

    1982-01-01

    The HT29R colonic adenocarcinoma xenograft has been shown to be rich in the enzyme beta-glucuronidase. Experiments in rodent systems have demonstrated a marked anti-tumour effect of the drug aniline mustard (AM) on tumours with high levels of this enzyme (e.g. the plasmacytomas PC5 and PC6). We have found that AM is no more effective than its analogue paramethyl aniline mustard (PMAM) or other alkylating agents against the HT29R xenograft. Amongst the possible explanations for this may be: (1) The wide shoulder on the cell-survival curve shown for exposure to alkylating agents of HT29R in vivo. (2) Lack of correlation between physiological availability of beta-glucuronidase and the high levels measured by the standard assay. (3) Increased beta-glucuronidase levels in host mouse marrow, making the latter potentially more susceptible to AM damage.

  8. Global metabolite profiling of human colorectal cancer xenografts in mice using HPLC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Loftus, Neil J; Lai, Lindsay; Wilkinson, Robert W; Odedra, Rajesh; Wilson, Ian D; Barnes, Alan J

    2013-06-01

    Reversed-phase gradient LC-MS was used to perform untargeted metabonomic analysis on extracts of human colorectal cancer (CRC) cell lines (COLO 205, HT-29, HCT 116 and SW620) subcutaneously implanted into age-matched athymic nude male mice to study small molecule metabolic profiles and examine possible correlations with human cancer biopsies. Following high mass accuracy data analysis using MS and MS/MS, metabolites were identified by searching against major metabolite databases including METLIN, MASSBANK, The Human Metabolome Database, PubChem, Biospider, LipidMaps and KEGG. HT-29 and COLO 205 tumor xenografts showed a distribution of metabolites that differed from SW620 and HCT 116 xenografts (predominantly on the basis of relative differences in the amounts of amino acids and lipids detected). This finding is consistent with NMR-based analysis of human colorectal tissue, where the metabolite profiles of HT-29 tumors exhibit the greatest similarity to human rectal cancer tissue with respect to changes in the relative amounts of lipids and choline-containing compounds. As the metabolic signatures of cancer cells result from oncogene-directed metabolic reprogramming, the HT-29 xenografts in mice may prove to be a useful model to further study the tumor microenvironment and cancer biology. PMID:23631600

  9. Primary esophageal and gastro-esophageal junction cancer xenograft models: clinicopathological features and engraftment.

    PubMed

    Dodbiba, Lorin; Teichman, Jennifer; Fleet, Andrew; Thai, Henry; Sun, Bin; Panchal, Devang; Patel, Devalben; Tse, Alvina; Chen, Zhuo; Faluyi, Olusola O; Renouf, Daniel J; Girgis, Hala; Bandarchi, Bizhan; Schwock, Joerg; Xu, Wei; Bristow, Robert G; Tsao, Ming-Sound; Darling, Gail E; Ailles, Laurie E; El-Zimaity, Hala; Liu, Geoffrey

    2013-04-01

    There are very few xenograft models available for the study of esophageal (E) and gastro-esophageal junction (GEJ) cancer. Using a NOD/SCID model, we implanted 90 primary E and GEJ tumors resected from patients and six endoscopic biopsy specimens. Of 69 resected tumors with histologically confirmed viable adenocarcinoma or squamous cell carcinoma, 22 (32%) was engrafted. One of 11 tumors, considered to have had a complete pathological response to neo-adjuvant chemo-radiation, also engrafted. Of the 23 patients whose tumors were engrafted, 65% were male; 30% were early stage while 70% were late stage; 22% received neo-adjuvant chemo-radiation; 61% were GEJ cancers. Engraftment occurred in 18/54 (33%) adenocarcinomas and 5/16 (31%) squamous cell carcinomas. Small endoscopic biopsy tissue had a 50% (3/6) engraftment rate. Of the factors analyzed, pretreatment with chemo-radiation and well/moderate differentiation showed significantly lower correlation with engraftment (P<0.05). In the subset of patients who did not receive neo-adjuvant chemo-radiation, 18/41 (44%) engrafted compared with those with pretreatment where 5/29 (17%, P=0.02) engrafted. Primary xenograft lines may be continued through 4-12 passages. Xenografts maintained similar histology and morphological characteristics with only minor variations even after multiple passaging in most instances.

  10. Global metabolite profiling of human colorectal cancer xenografts in mice using HPLC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Loftus, Neil J; Lai, Lindsay; Wilkinson, Robert W; Odedra, Rajesh; Wilson, Ian D; Barnes, Alan J

    2013-06-01

    Reversed-phase gradient LC-MS was used to perform untargeted metabonomic analysis on extracts of human colorectal cancer (CRC) cell lines (COLO 205, HT-29, HCT 116 and SW620) subcutaneously implanted into age-matched athymic nude male mice to study small molecule metabolic profiles and examine possible correlations with human cancer biopsies. Following high mass accuracy data analysis using MS and MS/MS, metabolites were identified by searching against major metabolite databases including METLIN, MASSBANK, The Human Metabolome Database, PubChem, Biospider, LipidMaps and KEGG. HT-29 and COLO 205 tumor xenografts showed a distribution of metabolites that differed from SW620 and HCT 116 xenografts (predominantly on the basis of relative differences in the amounts of amino acids and lipids detected). This finding is consistent with NMR-based analysis of human colorectal tissue, where the metabolite profiles of HT-29 tumors exhibit the greatest similarity to human rectal cancer tissue with respect to changes in the relative amounts of lipids and choline-containing compounds. As the metabolic signatures of cancer cells result from oncogene-directed metabolic reprogramming, the HT-29 xenografts in mice may prove to be a useful model to further study the tumor microenvironment and cancer biology.

  11. Antibody-mediated Xenograft Injury: Mechanisms and Protective Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Pierson, Richard N.

    2009-01-01

    The use of porcine organs for clinical transplantation is a promising potential solution to the shortage of human organs. Preformed anti-pig antibody is the primary cause of hyperacute rejection, while elicited antibody can contribute to subsequent “delayed” xenograft rejection. This article will review recent progress to overcome antibody mediated xenograft rejection, through modification of the host immunity and use of genetically engineered pig organs. PMID:19376229

  12. Development and characterization of a human orthotopic neuroblastoma xenograft

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Elizabeth; Shelat, Anang; Bradley, Cori; Chen, Xiang; Federico, Sara; Thiagarajan, Suresh; Shirinifard, Abbas; Bahrami, Armita; Pappo, Alberto; Qu, Chunxu; Finkelstein, David; Sablauer, Andras; Dyer, Michael A.

    2016-01-01

    Neuroblastoma is a pediatric cancer of the developing sympathoadrenal lineage. The tumors are known to develop from the adrenal gland or paraspinal ganglia and have molecular and cellular features of sympathetic neurons such as dense core vesicles and catecholamine production. Here we present the detailed molecular, cellular, genetic and epigenetic characterization of an orthotopic xenograft derived from a high-risk stage 4 neuroblastoma patient. Overall, the xenografted tumor retained the high risk features of the primary tumor and showed aggressive growth and metastasis in the mouse. Also, the genome was preserved with no additional copy number variations, structural variations or aneuploidy. There were 13 missense mutations identified in the xenograft that were not present in the patient’s primary tumor and there were no new nonsense mutations. None of the missense mutations acquired in the xenograft were in known cancer genes. We also demonstrate the feasibility of using the orthotopic neuroblastoma xenograft to test standard of care chemotherapy and molecular targeted therapeutics. Finally, we optimized a new approach to produce primary cultures of the neuroblastoma xenografts for high-throughput drug screening which can be used to test new combinations of therapeutic agents for neuroblastoma. PMID:25863122

  13. An integrated analysis of miRNA and gene copy numbers in xenografts of Ewing's sarcoma

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Xenografts have been shown to provide a suitable source of tumor tissue for molecular analysis in the absence of primary tumor material. We utilized ES xenograft series for integrated microarray analyses to identify novel biomarkers. Method Microarray technology (array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) and micro RNA arrays) was used to screen and identify copy number changes and differentially expressed miRNAs of 34 and 14 passages, respectively. Incubated cells used for xenografting (Passage 0) were considered to represent the primary tumor. Four important differentially expressed miRNAs (miR-31, miR-31*, miR-145, miR-106) were selected for further validation by real time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Integrated analysis of aCGH and miRNA data was performed on 14 xenograft passages by bioinformatic methods. Results The most frequent losses and gains of DNA copy number were detected at 9p21.3, 16q and at 8, 15, 17q21.32-qter, 1q21.1-qter, respectively. The presence of these alterations was consistent in all tumor passages. aCGH profiles of xenograft passages of each series resembled their corresponding primary tumors (passage 0). MiR-21, miR-31, miR-31*, miR-106b, miR-145, miR-150*, miR-371-5p, miR-557 and miR-598 showed recurrently altered expression. These miRNAS were predicted to regulate many ES-associated genes, such as genes of the IGF1 pathway, EWSR1, FLI1 and their fusion gene (EWS-FLI1). Twenty differentially expressed miRNAs were pinpointed in regions carrying altered copy numbers. Conclusion In the present study, ES xenografts were successfully applied for integrated microarray analyses. Our findings showed expression changes of miRNAs that were predicted to regulate many ES associated genes, such as IGF1 pathway genes, FLI1, EWSR1, and the EWS-FLI1 fusion genes. PMID:22429812

  14. Patient-derived xenograft models in gynecologic malignancies.

    PubMed

    Scott, Clare L; Mackay, Helen J; Haluska, Paul

    2014-01-01

    In the era of targeted therapies, patients with gynecologic malignancies have not yet been major beneficiaries of this new class of agents. This may reflect the fact that the main tumor types-ovarian, uterine, and cervical--are a highly heterogeneous group of cancers with variable response to standard chemotherapies and the lack of models in which to study the diversity of these cancers. Cancer-derived cell lines fail to adequately recapitulate molecular hallmarks of specific cancer subsets and complex microenvironments, which may be critical for sensitivity to targeted therapies. Patient-derived xenografts (PDX) generated from fresh human tumor without prior in vitro culture, combined with whole genome expression, gene copy number, and sequencing analyses, could dramatically aid the development of novel therapies for gynecologic malignancies. Gynecologic tumors can be engrafted in immunodeficient mice with a high rate of success and within a reasonable time frame. The resulting PDX accurately recapitulates the patient's tumor with respect to histologic, molecular, and in vivo treatment response characteristics. Orthotopic PDX develop complications relevant to the clinic, such as ascites and bowel obstruction, providing opportunities to understand the biology of these clinical problems. Thus, PDX have great promise for improved understanding of gynecologic malignancies, serve as better models for designing novel therapies and clinical trials, and could underpin individualized, directed therapy for patients from whom such models have been established.

  15. Patient-derived xenograft models for pancreatic adenocarcinoma demonstrate retention of tumor morphology through incorporation of murine stromal elements.

    PubMed

    Delitto, Daniel; Pham, Kien; Vlada, Adrian C; Sarosi, George A; Thomas, Ryan M; Behrns, Kevin E; Liu, Chen; Hughes, Steven J; Wallet, Shannon M; Trevino, Jose G

    2015-05-01

    Direct implantation of viable surgical specimens provides a representative preclinical platform in pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Patient-derived xenografts consistently demonstrate retained tumor morphology and genetic stability. However, the evolution of the tumor microenvironment over time remains poorly characterized in these models. This work specifically addresses the recruitment and incorporation of murine stromal elements into expanding patient-derived pancreatic adenocarcinoma xenografts, establishing the integration of murine cells into networks of invading cancer cells. In addition, we provide methods and observations in the establishment and maintenance of a patient-derived pancreatic adenocarcinoma xenograft model. A total of 25 histologically confirmed pancreatic adenocarcinoma specimens were implanted subcutaneously into nonobese diabetic severe combined immunodeficiency mice. Patient demographics, staging, pathological analysis, and outcomes were analyzed. After successful engraftment of tumors, histological and immunofluorescence analyses were performed on explanted tumors. Pancreatic adenocarcinoma specimens were successfully engrafted in 15 (60%) of 25 attempts. Successful engraftment does not appear to correlate with clinicopathologic factors or patient survival. Tumor morphology is conserved through multiple passages, and tumors retain metastatic potential. Interestingly, despite morphological similarity between passages, human stromal elements do not appear to expand with invading cancer cells. Rather, desmoplastic murine stroma dominates the xenograft microenvironment after the initial implantation. Recruitment of stromal elements in this manner to support and maintain tumor growth represents a novel avenue for investigation into tumor-stromal interactions.

  16. Monitoring Antivascular Therapy in Head and Neck Cancer Xenografts using Contrast-enhanced MR and US Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Seshadri, Mukund; Sacadura, Nuno T.; Coulthard, Tonya

    2013-01-01

    Background The overall goal of this study was to non-invasively monitor changes in blood flow of squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN) xenografts using contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) and ultrasound (US) imaging. Methods Experimental studies were performed on mice bearing FaDu tumors and SCCHN xenografts derived from human surgical tissue. MR examinations were performed using gadofosveset trisodium at 4.7T. Change in T1-relaxation rate of tumors (ΔR1) and tumor enhancement parameters (amplitude, area under the curve - AUC) were measured at baseline and 24 hours after treatment with a tumor-vascular disrupting agent (tumor-VDA), 5,6-dimethylxanthenone-4-acetic acid (DMXAA; ASA404) and correlated with tumor necrosis and treatment outcome. CE-US was performed using microbubbles (Vevo MicroMarker®) to assess the change in relative tumor blood volume following VDA treatment. Results A marked decrease (up to 68% of baseline) in T1-enhancement of FaDu tumors was observed one day after VDA therapy indicative of a reduction in blood flow. Early (24h) vascular response of individual tumors to VDA therapy detected by MRI correlated with tumor necrosis and volume estimates at 10 days post treatment. VDA treatment also resulted in a significant reduction in AUC and amplitude of patient tumor-derived SCCHN xenografts. Consistent with MRI observations, CE-US revealed a significant reduction in tumor blood volume of patient tumor-derived SCCHN xenografts after VDA therapy. Treatment with VDA resulted in a significant tumor growth inhibition of patient tumor derived SCCHN xenografts. Conclusions These findings demonstrate that both CE-MRI and CE-US allow monitoring of early changes in vascular function following VDA therapy. The results also demonstrate, for the first time, potent vascular disruptive and antitumor activity of DMXAA against patient tumor-derived head and neck carcinoma xenografts. PMID:21901534

  17. Slow Freezing, but Not Vitrification Supports Complete Spermatogenesis in Cryopreserved, Neonatal Sheep Testicular Xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Pukazhenthi, Budhan S.; Nagashima, Jennifer; Travis, Alexander J.; Costa, Guilherme M.; Escobar, Enrique N.; França, Luiz R.; Wildt, David E.

    2015-01-01

    The ability to spur growth of early stage gametic cells recovered from neonates could lead to significant advances in rescuing the genomes of rare genotypes or endangered species that die unexpectedly. The purpose of this study was to determine, for the first time, the ability of two substantially different cryopreservation approaches, slow freezing versus vitrification, to preserve testicular tissue of the neonatal sheep and subsequently allow initiation of spermatogenesis post-xenografting. Testis tissue from four lambs (3-5 wk old) was processed and then untreated or subjected to slow freezing or vitrification. Tissue pieces (fresh, n = 214; slow freezing, then thawing, n = 196; vitrification, then warming, n = 139) were placed subcutaneously under the dorsal skin of SCID mice and then grafts recovered and evaluated 17 wk later. Grafts from fresh and slow frozen tissue contained the most advanced stages of spermatogenesis, including normal tubule architecture with elongating spermatids in ~1% (fresh) and ~10% (slow frozen) of tubules. Fewer than 2% of seminiferous tubules advanced to the primary spermatocyte stage in xenografts derived from vitrified tissue. Results demonstrate that slow freezing of neonatal lamb testes was far superior to vitrification in preserving cellular integrity and function after xenografting, including allowing ~10% of tubules to retain the capacity to resume spermatogenesis and yield mature spermatozoa. Although a first for any ruminant species, findings also illustrate the importance of preemptive studies that examine cryo-sensitivity of testicular tissue before attempting this type of male fertility preservation on a large scale. PMID:25923660

  18. Eradication of large colon tumor xenografts by targeted delivery of maytansinoids.

    PubMed Central

    Liu, C; Tadayoni, B M; Bourret, L A; Mattocks, K M; Derr, S M; Widdison, W C; Kedersha, N L; Ariniello, P D; Goldmacher, V S; Lambert, J M; Blättler, W A; Chari, R V

    1996-01-01

    The maytansinoid drug DM1 is 100- to 1000-fold more cytotoxic than anticancer drugs that are currently in clinical use. The immunoconjugate C242-DM1 was prepared by conjugating DM1 to the monoclonal antibody C242, which recognizes a mucin-type glycoprotein expressed to various extents by human colorectal cancers. C242-DM1 was found to be highly cytotoxic toward cultured colon cancer cells in an antigen-specific manner and showed remarkable antitumor efficacy in vivo. C242-DM1 cured mice bearing subcutaneous COLO 205 human colon tumor xenografts (tumor size at time of treatment 65-130 mm3), at doses that showed very little toxicity and were well below the maximum tolerated dose. C242-DM1 could even effect complete regressions or cures in animals with large (260- to 500-mm3) COLO 205 tumor xenografts. Further, C242-DM1 induced complete regressions of subcutaneous LoVo and HT-29 colon tumor xenografts that express the target antigen in a heterogeneous manner. C242-DM1 represents a new generation of immunoconjugates that may yet fulfill the promise of effective cancer therapy through antibody targeting of cytotoxic agents. Images Fig. 3 PMID:8710920

  19. Human skeletal muscle xenograft as a new preclinical model for muscle disorders

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuanfan; King, Oliver D.; Rahimov, Fedik; Jones, Takako I.; Ward, Christopher W.; Kerr, Jaclyn P.; Liu, Naili; Emerson, Charles P.; Kunkel, Louis M.; Partridge, Terence A.; Wagner, Kathryn R.

    2014-01-01

    Development of novel therapeutics requires good animal models of disease. Disorders for which good animal models do not exist have very few drugs in development or clinical trial. Even where there are accepted, albeit imperfect models, the leap from promising preclinical drug results to positive clinical trials commonly fails, including in disorders of skeletal muscle. The main alternative model for early drug development, tissue culture, lacks both the architecture and, usually, the metabolic fidelity of the normal tissue in vivo. Herein, we demonstrate the feasibility and validity of human to mouse xenografts as a preclinical model of myopathy. Human skeletal muscle biopsies transplanted into the anterior tibial compartment of the hindlimbs of NOD-Rag1null IL2rγnull immunodeficient host mice regenerate new vascularized and innervated myofibers from human myogenic precursor cells. The grafts exhibit contractile and calcium release behavior, characteristic of functional muscle tissue. The validity of the human graft as a model of facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy is demonstrated in disease biomarker studies, showing that gene expression profiles of xenografts mirror those of the fresh donor biopsies. These findings illustrate the value of a new experimental model of muscle disease, the human muscle xenograft in mice, as a feasible and valid preclinical tool to better investigate the pathogenesis of human genetic myopathies and to more accurately predict their response to novel therapeutics. PMID:24452336

  20. [Biomaterials for bone filling: comparisons between autograft, hydroxyapatite and one highly purified bovine xenograft].

    PubMed

    Chappard, D; Zhioua, A; Grizon, F; Basle, M F; Rebel, A

    1993-12-01

    Bone grafts are becoming increasingly common in orthopaedics, neurosurgery and periodontology. Twenty one New Zealand rabbits were used in the present study comparing several materials usable as bone substitutes. A 4.5 mm hole was drilled in the inner femoral condyles. Holes were filled with either an autograft (from the opposite condyle), an hydroxylapatite (Bioapatite), or a highly purified bovine xenograft (T650 Lubboc). Animals were sacrificed at 1, 3 and 6 months post implantation and a quantitative analysis of newly-formed bone volume (BNF/IV) and remaining biomaterials (BMAT/IV) was done. In addition, some holes were left unfilled and served as controls. At 6 months, there was no tendency for spontaneous repair in the control animals. The autografted animals have repaired their trabecular mass and architecture within the first month. Hydroxylapatite appeared unresorbed at six months and only thin and scanty new trabeculae were observed. The xenograft induced woven bone trabeculae formation on the first month. This was associated with resorption of the material by two multinucleated cell populations. At six months, the epiphyseal architecture was restored and the biomaterial has disappeared in most cases. Xenografts appear a promising alternative to autografts and allografts, whose infectious risks and ethical problems should always be borne in mind.

  1. Patient-Derived Xenograft: An Adjuvant Technology for the Treatment of Metastatic Disease.

    PubMed

    Bousquet, Guilhem; Janin, Anne

    2016-01-01

    The occurrence of metastases severely affects prognosis for patients with cancer, making metastatic disease a daily societal challenge. Because of resistance to drugs, the potential curability with chemotherapy at the metastatic stage remains low. Large genomic analyses to identify new targets have their limitations due to intratumor heterogeneity when they are performed on tumor samples from primary tumors and because the functional value of molecular abnormalities in a cancer is usually not known. Additional tools are thus required for the development of new anticancer agents. The use of preclinical models is a key component of translational research in oncology. For four decades, xenograft models of human cancer cell lines injected subcutaneously in immunocompromised mice have been widely used, with disappointing results for predicting the clinical benefit of a new drug. Patient-derived xenografts are preclinical models rediscovered as innovative pharmacological tools, both for the preclinical development of anticancer drugs and as individual models for personalized treatment of metastatic disease. Here, we review the recent progress reported using patient-derived xenografts for the treatment of metastatic disease, and discuss the feasibility of their implementation in daily oncological care.

  2. Slow freezing, but not vitrification supports complete spermatogenesis in cryopreserved, neonatal sheep testicular xenografts.

    PubMed

    Pukazhenthi, Budhan S; Nagashima, Jennifer; Travis, Alexander J; Costa, Guilherme M; Escobar, Enrique N; França, Luiz R; Wildt, David E

    2015-01-01

    The ability to spur growth of early stage gametic cells recovered from neonates could lead to significant advances in rescuing the genomes of rare genotypes or endangered species that die unexpectedly. The purpose of this study was to determine, for the first time, the ability of two substantially different cryopreservation approaches, slow freezing versus vitrification, to preserve testicular tissue of the neonatal sheep and subsequently allow initiation of spermatogenesis post-xenografting. Testis tissue from four lambs (3-5 wk old) was processed and then untreated or subjected to slow freezing or vitrification. Tissue pieces (fresh, n = 214; slow freezing, then thawing, n = 196; vitrification, then warming, n = 139) were placed subcutaneously under the dorsal skin of SCID mice and then grafts recovered and evaluated 17 wk later. Grafts from fresh and slow frozen tissue contained the most advanced stages of spermatogenesis, including normal tubule architecture with elongating spermatids in ~1% (fresh) and ~10% (slow frozen) of tubules. Fewer than 2% of seminiferous tubules advanced to the primary spermatocyte stage in xenografts derived from vitrified tissue. Results demonstrate that slow freezing of neonatal lamb testes was far superior to vitrification in preserving cellular integrity and function after xenografting, including allowing ~10% of tubules to retain the capacity to resume spermatogenesis and yield mature spermatozoa. Although a first for any ruminant species, findings also illustrate the importance of preemptive studies that examine cryo-sensitivity of testicular tissue before attempting this type of male fertility preservation on a large scale.

  3. The Zebrafish Xenograft Platform: Evolution of a Novel Cancer Model and Preclinical Screening Tool.

    PubMed

    Wertman, Jaime; Veinotte, Chansey J; Dellaire, Graham; Berman, Jason N

    2016-01-01

    Animal xenografts of human cancers represent a key preclinical tool in the field of cancer research. While mouse xenografts have long been the gold standard, investigators have begun to use zebrafish (Danio rerio) xenotransplantation as a relatively rapid, robust and cost-effective in vivo model of human cancers. There are several important methodological considerations in the design of an informative and efficient zebrafish xenotransplantation experiment. Various transgenic fish strains have been created that facilitate microscopic observation, ranging from the completely transparent casper fish to the Tg(fli1:eGFP) fish that expresses fluorescent GFP protein in its vascular tissue. While human cancer cell lines have been used extensively in zebrafish xenotransplantation studies, several reports have also used primary patient samples as the donor material. The zebrafish is ideally suited for transplanting primary patient material by virtue of the relatively low number of cells required for each embryo (between 50 and 300 cells), the absence of an adaptive immune system in the early zebrafish embryo, and the short experimental timeframe (5-7 days). Following xenotransplantation into the fish, cells can be tracked using in vivo or ex vivo measures of cell proliferation and migration, facilitated by fluorescence or human-specific protein expression. Importantly, assays have been developed that allow for the reliable detection of in vivo human cancer cell growth or inhibition following administration of drugs of interest. The zebrafish xenotransplantation model is a unique and effective tool for the study of cancer cell biology.

  4. The Zebrafish Xenograft Platform: Evolution of a Novel Cancer Model and Preclinical Screening Tool.

    PubMed

    Wertman, Jaime; Veinotte, Chansey J; Dellaire, Graham; Berman, Jason N

    2016-01-01

    Animal xenografts of human cancers represent a key preclinical tool in the field of cancer research. While mouse xenografts have long been the gold standard, investigators have begun to use zebrafish (Danio rerio) xenotransplantation as a relatively rapid, robust and cost-effective in vivo model of human cancers. There are several important methodological considerations in the design of an informative and efficient zebrafish xenotransplantation experiment. Various transgenic fish strains have been created that facilitate microscopic observation, ranging from the completely transparent casper fish to the Tg(fli1:eGFP) fish that expresses fluorescent GFP protein in its vascular tissue. While human cancer cell lines have been used extensively in zebrafish xenotransplantation studies, several reports have also used primary patient samples as the donor material. The zebrafish is ideally suited for transplanting primary patient material by virtue of the relatively low number of cells required for each embryo (between 50 and 300 cells), the absence of an adaptive immune system in the early zebrafish embryo, and the short experimental timeframe (5-7 days). Following xenotransplantation into the fish, cells can be tracked using in vivo or ex vivo measures of cell proliferation and migration, facilitated by fluorescence or human-specific protein expression. Importantly, assays have been developed that allow for the reliable detection of in vivo human cancer cell growth or inhibition following administration of drugs of interest. The zebrafish xenotransplantation model is a unique and effective tool for the study of cancer cell biology. PMID:27165359

  5. The chick chorioallantoic membrane as an in vivo xenograft model for Burkitt lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Burkitt lymphoma (BL) is an aggressive malignancy that arises from B-cells and belongs to the group of Non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHL). Due to the lack of appropriate in vivo models NHL research is mainly performed in vitro. Here, we studied the use of the chick chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) for the generation of human BL xenograft tumors, which we compared with known characteristics of the human disease. Methods In order to generate experimental BL tumors, we inoculated human BL2B95 and BL2-GFP cells on the CAM. BL2B95 xenograft-tumors were grown for seven days and subsequently analyzed with transmission electron and immunofluorescence microscopy, as well as histological staining approaches. BL2-GFP cells were studied at regular intervals up to seven days, and their metastatic behavior was visualized with intravital immunofluorescence techniques. Results Xenografted BL2B95 cells formed solid tumors in the CAM model with a Ki67-index greater than 90%, preservation of typical tumor markers (CD10, CD19, CD20), a ‘starry sky’ morphology, production of agyrophilic fibers in the stroma, formation of blood and lymphatic vessels and lymphogenic dissemination of BL2B95 to distant sites. We identified macrophages, lymphocytes and heterophilic granulocytes (chick homolog of neutrophils) as the most abundant immune cells in the experimental tumors. BL2-GFP cells could be traced in real-time during their distribution in the CAM, and the first signs for their dissemination were visible after 2-3 days. Conclusions We show that xenografted BL2B95 cells generate tumors in the CAM with a high degree of cellular, molecular and proliferative concord with the human disease, supporting the application of the CAM model for NHL research with a focus on tumor-stroma interactions. Additionally we report that BL2-GFP cells, grafted on the CAM of ex ovo cultured chick embryos, provide a powerful tool to study lymphogenic dissemination in real-time. PMID:24884418

  6. 99mTc Labeled Glucagon-Like Peptide-1-Analogue (99mTc-GLP1) Scintigraphy in the Management of Patients with Occult Insulinoma

    PubMed Central

    Sowa-Staszczak, Anna; Trofimiuk-Müldner, Małgorzata; Stefańska, Agnieszka; Tomaszuk, Monika; Buziak-Bereza, Monika; Gilis-Januszewska, Aleksandra; Jabrocka-Hybel, Agata; Głowa, Bogusław; Małecki, Maciej; Bednarczuk, Tomasz; Kamiński, Grzegorz; Kowalska, Aldona; Mikołajczak, Renata; Janota, Barbara; Hubalewska-Dydejczyk, Alicja

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this study was to assess the utility of [Lys40(Ahx-HYNIC-99mTc/EDDA)NH2]-exendin-4 scintigraphy in the management of patients with hypoglycemia, particularly in the detection of occult insulinoma. Materials and Methods Forty patients with hypoglycemia and increased/confusing results of serum insulin and C-peptide concentration and negative/inconclusive results of other imaging examinations were enrolled in the study. In all patients GLP-1 receptor imaging was performed to localise potential pancreatic lesions. Results Positive results of GLP-1 scintigraphy were observed in 28 patients. In 18 patients postsurgical histopathological examination confirmed diagnosis of insulinoma. Two patients had contraindications to the surgery, one patient did not want to be operated. One patient, who presented with postprandial hypoglycemia, with positive result of GLP-1 imaging was not qualified for surgery and is in the observational group. Eight patients were lost for follow up, among them 6 patients with positive GLP-1 scintigraphy result. One patient with negative scintigraphy was diagnosed with malignant insulinoma. In two patients with negative scintigraphy Munchausen syndrome was diagnosed (patients were taking insulin). Other seven patients with negative results of 99mTcGLP-1 scintigraphy and postprandial hypoglycemia with C-peptide and insulin levels within the limits of normal ranges are in the observational group. We would like to mention that 99mTc-GLP1-SPECT/CT was also performed in 3 pts with nesidioblastosis (revealing diffuse tracer uptake in two and a focal lesion in one case) and in two patients with malignant insulinoma (with the a focal uptake in the localization of a removed pancreatic headin one case and negative GLP-1 1 scintigraphy in the other patient). Conclusions 99mTc-GLP1-SPECT/CT could be helpful examination in the management of patients with hypoglycemia enabling proper localization of the pancreatic lesion and effective

  7. Application of Coiled Coil Peptides in Liposomal Anticancer Drug Delivery Using a Zebrafish Xenograft Model.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jian; Shimada, Yasuhito; Olsthoorn, René C L; Snaar-Jagalska, B Ewa; Spaink, Herman P; Kros, Alexander

    2016-08-23

    The complementary coiled coil forming peptides E4 [(EIAALEK)4] and K4 [(KIAALKE)4] are known to trigger liposomal membrane fusion when tethered to lipid vesicles in the form of lipopeptides. In this study, we examined whether these coiled coil forming peptides can be used for drug delivery applications. First, we prepared E4 peptide modified liposomes containing the far-red fluorescent dye TO-PRO-3 iodide (E4-Lipo-TP3) and confirmed that E4-liposomes could deliver TP3 into HeLa cells expressing K4 peptide on the membrane (HeLa-K) under cell culture conditions in a selective manner. Next, we prepared doxorubicin-containing E4-liposomes (E4-Lipo-DOX) and confirmed that E4-liposomes could also deliver DOX into HeLa-K cells. Moreover, E4-Lipo-DOX showed enhanced cytotoxicity toward HeLa-K cells compared to free doxorubicin. To prove the suitability of E4/K4 coiled coil formation for in vivo drug delivery, we injected E4-Lipo-TP3 or E4-Lipo-DOX into zebrafish xenografts of HeLa-K. As a result, E4-liposomes delivered TP3 to the implanted HeLa-K cells, and E4-Lipo-DOX could suppress cancer proliferation in the xenograft when compared to nontargeted conditions (i.e., zebrafish xenograft with free DOX injection). These data demonstrate that coiled coil formation enables drug selectivity and efficacy in vivo. It is envisaged that these findings are a step forward toward biorthogonal targeting systems as a tool for clinical drug delivery. PMID:27504667

  8. High efficacy of the BCL-2 inhibitor ABT199 (venetoclax) in BCL-2 high-expressing neuroblastoma cell lines and xenografts and rational for combination with MCL-1 inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Bate-Eya, Laurel T.; den Hartog, Ilona J.M.; van der Ploeg, Ida; Schild, Linda; Koster, Jan; Santo, Evan E.; Westerhout, Ellen M.; Versteeg, Rogier; Caron, Huib N.; Molenaar, Jan J.; Dolman, M. Emmy M.

    2016-01-01

    The anti-apoptotic protein B cell lymphoma/leukaemia 2 (BCL-2) is highly expressed in neuroblastoma and plays an important role in oncogenesis. In this study, the selective BCL-2 inhibitor ABT199 was tested in a panel of neuroblastoma cell lines with diverse expression levels of BCL-2 and other BCL-2 family proteins. ABT199 caused apoptosis more potently in neuroblastoma cell lines expressing high BCL-2 and BIM/BCL-2 complex levels than low expressing cell lines. Effects on cell viability correlated with effects on BIM displacement from BCL-2 and cytochrome c release from the mitochondria. ABT199 treatment of mice with neuroblastoma tumors expressing high BCL-2 levels only resulted in growth inhibition, despite maximum BIM displacement from BCL-2 and the induction of a strong apoptotic response. We showed that neuroblastoma cells might survive ABT199 treatment due to its acute upregulation of the anti-apoptotic BCL-2 family protein myeloid cell leukaemia sequence 1 (MCL-1) and BIM sequestration by MCL-1. In vitro inhibition of MCL-1 sensitized neuroblastoma cell lines to ABT199, confirming the pivotal role of MCL-1 in ABT199 resistance. Our findings suggest that neuroblastoma patients with high BCL-2 and BIM/BCL-2 complex levels might benefit from combination treatment with ABT199 and compounds that inhibit MCL-1 expression. PMID:27056887

  9. Pharmacologic inhibition of cdk4/6 arrests the growth of glioblastoma multiforme intracranial xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Michaud, Karine; Solomon, David A.; Oermann, Eric; Kim, Jung-Sik; Zhong, Wei-Zhu; Prados, Michael D.; Ozawa, Tomoko; James, C. David; Waldman, Todd

    2010-01-01

    Activation of cyclin-dependent kinases 4 and 6 (cdk4/6) occurs in the majority of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) tumors, and represents a promising molecular target for the development of small molecule inhibitors. In the current study we investigated the molecular determinants and in vivo response of diverse GBM cell lines and xenografts to PD-0332991, a cdk4/6 specific inhibitor. In vitro testing of PD-0332991 against a panel of GBM cell lines revealed a potent G1 cell cycle arrest and induction of senescence in each of 16 Rb-proficient cell lines regardless of other genetic lesions, whereas each of 5 cell lines with homozygous inactivation of Rb were completely resistant to treatment. shRNA depletion of Rb expression conferred resistance of GBM cells to PD-0332991, further demonstrating a requirement of Rb for sensitivity to cdk4/6 inhibition. PD-0332991 was found to efficiently cross the blood-brain barrier and proved highly effective in suppressing the growth of intracranial GBM xenograft tumors, including those that had recurred after initial therapy with temozolomide. Remarkably, no mice receiving PD-0332991 had significant disease progression or died while on therapy. Additionally, the combination of PD-0332991 and radiation therapy resulted in significantly increased survival benefit compared with either therapy alone. In total, our results support clinical trial evaluation of PD-0332991 against newly-diagnosed as well as recurrent GBM, and indicate that Rb status is the primary determinant of potential benefit from this therapy. PMID:20354191

  10. Strigolactone analogs act as new anti-cancer agents in inhibition of breast cancer in xenograft model

    PubMed Central

    Mayzlish-Gati, Einav; Laufer, Dana; Grivas, Christopher F; Shaknof, Julia; Sananes, Amiram; Bier, Ariel; Ben-Harosh, Shani; Belausov, Eduard; Johnson, Michael D; Artuso, Emma; Levi, Oshrat; Genin, Ola; Prandi, Cristina; Khalaila, Isam; Pines, Mark; Yarden, Ronit I; Kapulnik, Yoram; Koltai, Hinanit

    2015-01-01

    Strigolactones (SLs) are a novel class of plant hormones. Previously, we found that analogs of SLs induce growth arrest and apoptosis in breast cancer cell lines. These compounds also inhibited the growth of breast cancer stem cell enriched-mammospheres with increased potency. Furthermore, strigolactone analogs inhibited growth and survival of colon, lung, prostate, melanoma, osteosarcoma and leukemia cancer cell lines. To further examine the anti-cancer activity of SLs in vivo, we have examined their effects on growth and viability of MDA-MB-231 tumor xenografts model either alone or in combination with paclitaxel. We show that strigolactone act as new anti-cancer agents in inhibition of breast cancer in xenograft model. In addition we show that SLs affect the integrity of the microtubule network and therefore may inhibit the migratory phenotype of the highly invasive breast cancer cell lines that were examined. PMID:26192476

  11. Pseudotyped AAV Vector-Mediated Gene Transfer in a Human Fetal Trachea Xenograft Model: Implications for In Utero Gene Therapy for Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Alice; Katz, Anna B.; Lim, Foong-Yen; Habli, Mounira; Jones, Helen N.; Wilson, James M.; Crombleholme, Timothy M.

    2012-01-01

    Background Lung disease including airway infection and inflammation currently causes the majority of morbidities and mortalities associated with cystic fibrosis (CF), making the airway epithelium and the submucosal glands (SMG) novel target cells for gene therapy in CF. These target cells are relatively inaccessible to postnatal gene transfer limiting the success of gene therapy. Our previous work in a human-fetal trachea xenograft model suggests the potential benefit for treating CF in utero. In this study, we aim to validate adeno-associated virus serotype 2 (AAV2) gene transfer in a human fetal trachea xenograft model and to compare transduction efficiencies of pseudotyping AAV2 vectors in fetal xenografts and postnatal xenograft controls. Methodology/Principal Findings Human fetal trachea or postnatal bronchus controls were xenografted onto immunocompromised SCID mice for a four-week engraftment period. After injection of AAV2/2, 2/1, 2/5, 2/7 or 2/8 with a LacZ reporter into both types of xenografts, we analyzed for transgene expression in the respiratory epithelium and SMGs. At 1 month, transduction by AAV2/2 and AAV2/8 in respiratory epithelium and SMG cells was significantly greater than that of AAV2/1, 2/5, and 2/7 in xenograft tracheas. Efficiency in SMG transduction was significantly greater in AAV2/8 than AAV2/2. At 3 months, AAV2/2 and AAV2/8 transgene expression was >99% of respiratory epithelium and SMG. At 1 month, transduction efficiency of AAV2/2 and AAV2/8 was significantly less in adult postnatal bronchial xenografts than in fetal tracheal xenografts. Conclusions/Significance Based on the effectiveness of AAV vectors in SMG transduction, our findings suggest the potential utility of pseudotyped AAV vectors for treatment of cystic fibrosis. The human fetal trachea xenograft model may serve as an effective tool for further development of fetal gene therapy strategies for the in utero treatment of cystic fibrosis. PMID:22937069

  12. Pathologic Correlates of Primary Central Nervous System Lymphoma Defined in an Orthotopic Xenograft Model

    PubMed Central

    Kadoch, Cigall; Dinca, Eduard B.; Voicu, Ramona; Chen, Lingjing; Nguyen, Diana; Parikh, Seema; Karrim, Juliana; Shuman, Marc A.; Lowell, Clifford A.; Treseler, Patrick A.; James, C. David; Rubenstein, James L.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The prospect for advances in the treatment of patients with primary central nervous system lymphoma (PCNSL) is likely dependent on the systematic evaluation of its pathobiology. Animal models of PCNSL are needed to facilitate the analysis of its molecular pathogenesis and for the efficient evaluation of novel therapeutics. Experimental Design We characterized the molecular pathology of CNS lymphoma tumors generated by the intracerebral implantation of Raji B lymphoma cells in athymic mice. Lymphoma cells were modified for bioluminescence imaging to facilitate monitoring of tumor growth and response to therapy. In parallel, we identified molecular features of lymphoma xenograft histopathology that are evident in human PCNSL specimens. Results Intracerebral Raji tumors were determined to faithfully reflect the molecular pathogenesis of PCNSL, including the predominant immunophenotypic state of differentiation of lymphoma cells and their reactive microenvironment. We show the expression of interleukin-4 by Raji and other B lymphoma cell lines in vitro and by Raji tumors in vivo and provide evidence for a role of this cytokine in the M2 polarization of lymphoma macrophages both in the murine model and in diagnostic specimens of human PCNSL. Conclusion Intracerebral implantation of Raji cells results in a reproducible and invasive xenograft model, which recapitulates the histopathology and molecular features of PCNSL, and is suitable for preclinical testing of novel agents. We also show for the first time the feasibility and accuracy of tumor bioluminescence in the monitoring of a highly infiltrative brain tumor. PMID:19276270

  13. Crucial role of insulin in leptin maintenance: profound decrease in serum leptin by octreotide acetate in insulinoma subjects.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, T; Nagasaka, S; Ishikawa, S; Nonaka, M; Fujibayashi, K; Saito, T; Kusaka, I; Higashiyama, M; Saito, T

    2000-06-01

    To further clarify the relationship between insulin and leptin, time course changes in plasma glucose, serum insulin and leptin levels were analyzed after subcutaneous administration of 100 microg octreotide acetate in two insulinoma subjects. Octreotide acetate induced a prompt decrease in serum insulin level, accompanied with an increase in plasma glucose in both patients. Following the decrease in serum insulin level, serum leptin concentrations were profoundly decreased by 66% and 44%, 8-12 hrs after octreotide injection; that is, the concentrations decreased from 41.1 to 13.8 ng/ml in patient 1, and from 17.5 to 9.8 ng/ml in patient 2. Daily profiles of plasma glucose, serum insulin and leptin without octreotide administration did not show such alterations in these indexes in patient 1. These data show that circulating leptin may be susceptible to decline dependent on the decrease in serum insulin, suggesting that insulin plays a crucial role in the maintenance of leptin secretion in humans.

  14. Low doses of gamma irradiation potentially modifies immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment by retuning tumor-associated macrophages: lesson from insulinoma.

    PubMed

    Prakash, Hridayesh; Klug, Felix; Nadella, Vinod; Mazumdar, Varadendra; Schmitz-Winnenthal, Hubertus; Umansky, Liudmila

    2016-03-01

    Tumor infiltrating iNOS+ macrophages under the influence of immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment gets polarized to tumor-promoting and immunosuppressive macrophages, known as tumor-associated macrophages (TAM). Their recruitment and increased density in the plethora of tumors has been associated with poor prognosis in cancer patients. Therefore, retuning of TAM to M1 phenotype would be a key for effective immunotherapy. Radiotherapy has been a potential non-invasive strategy to improve cancer immunotherapy and tumor immune rejection. Irradiation of late-stage tumor-bearing Rip1-Tag5 mice twice with 2 Gy dose resulted in profound changes in the inflammatory tumor micromilieu, characterized by induction of M1-associated effecter cytokines as well as reduction in protumorigenic and M2-associated effecter cytokines. Similarly, in vitro irradiation of macrophages with 2 Gy dose-induced expression of iNOS, NO, NFκBpp65, pSTAT3 and proinflammatory cytokines secretion while downregulating p38MAPK which are involved in iNOS translation and acquisition of an M1-like phenotype. Enhancement of various M2 effecter cytokines and angiogenic reprogramming in iNOs+ macrophage depleted tumors and their subsequent reduction by 2 Gy dose in Rip1-Tag5 transgenic mice furthermore demonstrated a critical role of peritumoral macrophages in the course of gamma irradiation mediated M1 retuning of insulinoma. PMID:26785731

  15. Xenograft Models of Primary Acute Myeloid Leukemia for the Development of Imaging Strategies and Evaluation of Novel Targeted Therapies.

    PubMed

    Gelebart, Pascal; Popa, Mihaela; McCormack, Emmet

    2016-01-01

    Despite the tremendous progress made in the comprehension of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) over the last 30 years most patients die from their disease. Our understanding of AML has relied on an intensive in-vitro research approach, based on AML cell lines as well as primary AML patient cells. However, experimental insight into the early events of AML leukemogenesis before they become clinically observable is not possible in humans. Thus, preclinical animal models have served the purpose to extend our knowledge of the disease as well as to develop innovative therapeutic strategies. Today, xenograft models using patient-derived neoplastic/leukemia cells represent the strategy of choice for preclinical studies of AML. These models exhibit several key advantages over AML cell lines. In fact, patient-derived cells, in contrast to AML cell lines, encompass the entire complexity of AML disease and can therefore provide more trustworthy results on the efficacy outcome of novel therapies. One other important aspect in the development of xenograft models of AML is the possibility to use imaging techniques to monitor in-vivo the progression of the disease. Imaging techniques also authorize the evaluation of the efficacy of an experimental treatment on tumor growth. This review will focus on the description of xenograft models of AML and will provide researchers and clinicians an overview of how these models have been used for the development of new therapeutic options and new imaging approaches to study AML in-vivo.

  16. Influence of the Implantation Site on the Sensitivity of Patient Pancreatic Tumor Xenografts to Apo2L/TRAIL Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, R; Buitrago, S; Pitoniak, R; Gibbs, JF; Curtin, L; Seshadri, M; Repasky, EA; Hylander, BL

    2015-01-01

    Objectives We have previously demonstrated activity of Apo2L/TRAIL against patient pancreatic tumor xenografts. Here, we have examined the influence of the tumor implantation site on therapeutic response of orthotopic tumors and their metastases to Apo2L/TRAIL. Methods Sensitivity of six patient pancreatic tumor xenografts to Apo2L/TRAIL was determined in a subcutaneous model. To compare the response of orthotopic tumors, cells from subcutaneous xenografts were injected into the pancreas. Tumor growth was confirmed by histological examination of selected mice and then treatment was started. When all control mice developed externally palpable tumors, the experiment was terminated and pancreatic weights compared between control and treated groups. Magnetic resonance imaging was used to quantitate the response of orthotopic and metastatic tumors. Results The sensitivity to Apo2L/TRAIL observed in subcutaneous tumors was maintained in orthotopic tumors. Metastatic spread was observed with orthotopic tumor implantation. In an orthotopic model of a sensitive tumor, primary and metastatic tumor burden was significantly reduced and median survival significantly extended by Apo2L/TRAIL therapy. Conclusions Our data provide evidence that the site of tumor engraftment does not alter the inherent sensitivity of patient xenografts to Apo2L/TRAIL and these results highlight the potential of Apo2/TRAIL therapy against primary and metastatic pancreatic cancer. PMID:24518511

  17. The Cellular Immune Mechanism after Transfer of Chemically Extracted Acellular Nerve Xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Xingshi; Yang, Ruojia; He, Qing; Ruan, Dike

    2013-01-01

    Severe peripheral nerve defect by injuries causing functional loss require nerve grafting. Autograft has limitations for clinical use because it results in the creation of a new nerve injury and the generation of donor site morbidity. Based on these limitations, nerve allografts and xenografts provide a readily accessible alternative strategy. The aim of the present study was to observe the immune mechanism underlying the rejection of chemically extracted acellular nerve xenografts, and further evaluate immunogenicity of chemically treated acellular nerve grafts for clinical applications. A total of 160 BALB/c mice were randomly divided into a negative contrast group (NC, 40 mice), a fresh autograft group (AG, 40 mice), a fresh xenogeneic nerve group (FXN, 40 mice) and a chemically extracted acellular xenogeneic nerve group (CEXN, 40 mice). Various types of nerve grafts were implanted into the thigh muscle of BALB/C mice in the corresponding groups. At 3, 7, 14 and 28 days post-operation, the mice (10 mice from each group) were sacrificed and their spleens were extracted. The spleens were ground into paste. The erythrocytes and other cells were lysed using distilled water and the T lymphocytes were collected. Fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) -labeled monoclonal antibodies (CD3, CD4, CD8, CD25, IL-2, IFN-γ and TNF-α) were then added to the solution. The Fluorescence Activated Cell Sorting (FACS) was used to determine the positivity rate of the cells combined with the monoclonal antibodies above. No significant statistical differences were observed between the CEXN, NC and AG groups, so that no obvious immune rejections were observed among the chemically extracted acellular nerve xenografts. PMID:23874771

  18. Hemodynamics in vasculogenic mimicry and angiogenesis of inflammatory breast cancer xenograft.

    PubMed

    Shirakawa, Kazuo; Kobayashi, Hisataka; Heike, Yuji; Kawamoto, Satomi; Brechbiel, Martin W; Kasumi, Fujio; Iwanaga, Toshihiko; Konishi, Fumio; Terada, Masaaki; Wakasugi, Hiro

    2002-01-15

    In the present study, we examined hemodynamics in vasculogenic mimicry (VM) and angiogenesis of inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) xenografts (WIBC-9), having previously reported on the unique histological features and molecular basis of these processes (K. Shirakawa et al., Cancer Res., 61: 445-451, 2001). Histologically, the WIBC-9 xenografts exhibited invasive ductal carcinoma with a hypervascular structure (angiogenesis) in the tumor margin and VM without endothelial cells, central necrosis, or fibrosis in the tumor center. Results of molecular analysis indicated that WIBC-9 had a vasculogenic phenotype, including expression of Flt-1 and Tie-2. Comparison of WIBC-9 with an established non-IBC xenograft (MC-5), using time-coursed dynamic micromagnetic resonance angiography analysis (with our newly developed intravascular macromolecular magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent), electromicroscopy, and immunohistochemistry, demonstrated blood flow and a VM-angiogenesis junction in the central area of the WIBC-9 tumor. It has previously been considered impossible to prove a connection between VM and angiogenesis using angiography, because there are no intravascular macromolecular magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents that do not exhibit significant leakage through the vascular wall. In the present study, laser-captured microdissection was performed in regions of WIBC-9 tumors that exhibited VM without endothelial cells, central necrosis, or fibrosis, revealing expression of human-Flt-1 and human-Tie2 and the absence of human-CD31, human-endothelin B receptor, and human-thrombin receptor. These facts led us to hypothesize that the VM of WIBC-9 involves hemodynamics that serve to feed WIBC-9 cells, and this in turn suggests a connection between VM and angiogenesis. PMID:11809710

  19. Metformin Treatment Does Not Inhibit Growth of Pancreatic Cancer Patient-Derived Xenografts.

    PubMed

    Lipner, Matthew B; Marayati, Raoud; Deng, Yangmei; Wang, Xianxi; Raftery, Laura; O'Neil, Bert H; Yeh, Jen Jen

    2016-01-01

    There is currently tremendous interest in developing anti-cancer therapeutics targeting cell signaling pathways important for both cancer cell metabolism and growth. Several epidemiological studies have shown that diabetic patients taking metformin have a decreased incidence of pancreatic cancer. This has prompted efforts to evaluate metformin, a drug with negligible toxicity, as a therapeutic modality in pancreatic cancer. Preclinical studies in cell line xenografts and one study in patient-derived xenograft (PDX) models were promising, while recently published clinical trials showed no benefit to adding metformin to combination therapy regimens for locally advanced and metastatic pancreatic cancer. PDX models in which patient tumors are directly engrafted into immunocompromised mice have been shown to be excellent preclinical models for biomarker discovery and therapeutic development. We evaluated the response of four PDX tumor lines to metformin treatment and found that all four of our PDX lines were resistant to metformin. We found that the mechanisms of resistance may occur through lack of sustained activation of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) or downstream reactivation of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR). Moreover, combined treatment with metformin and mTOR inhibitors failed to improve responses in cell lines, which further indicates that metformin alone or in combination with mTOR inhibitors will be ineffective in patients, and that resistance to metformin may occur through multiple pathways. Further studies are required to better understand these mechanisms of resistance and inform potential combination therapies with metformin and existing or novel therapeutics.

  20. A simple PCR-based strategy for estimating species-specific contributions in chimeras and xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Ealba, Erin L.; Schneider, Richard A.

    2013-01-01

    Many tissue-engineering approaches for repair and regeneration involve transplants between species. Yet a challenge is distinguishing donor versus host effects on gene expression. This study provides a simple molecular strategy to quantify species-specific contributions in chimeras and xenografts. Species-specific primers for reverse transcription quantitative real-time PCR (RT-qPCR) were designed by identifying silent mutations in quail, duck, chicken, mouse and human ribosomal protein L19 (RPL19). cDNA from different pairs of species was mixed in a dilution series and species-specific RPL19 primers were used to generate standard curves. Then quail cells were transplanted into transgenic-GFP chick and resulting chimeras were analyzed with species-specific primers. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) confirmed that donor- and host-specific levels of RPL19 expression represent actual proportions of cells. To apply the RPL19 strategy, we measured Runx2 expression in quail-duck chimeras. Elevated Runx2 levels correlated with higher percentages of donor cells. Finally, RPL19 primers also discriminated mouse from human and chick. Thus, this strategy enables chimeras and/or xenografts to be screened rapidly at the molecular level. PMID:23785056

  1. Novel celastrol derivatives inhibit the growth of hepatocellular carcinoma patient-derived xenografts.

    PubMed

    Wei, Wei; Wu, Song; Wang, Xiaolin; Sun, Chris Kin-Wai; Yang, Xiaoyang; Yan, Xinrui; Chua, Mei-Sze; So, Samuel

    2014-07-30

    The molecular co-chaperone CDC37 is over-expressed in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells, where it functions with HSP90 to regulate the activity of protein kinases in multiple oncogenic signaling pathways that contribute towards hepatocarcinogenesis. Disruption of these signaling pathways via inhibition of HSP90/CDC37 interaction is therefore a rational therapeutic approach. We evaluated the anti-tumor effects of celastrol, pristimerin, and two novel derivatives (cel-D2, and cel-D7) on HCC cell lines in vitro and on orthotopic HCC patient-derived xenografts in vivo. All four compounds preferentially inhibited viability of HCC cells in vitro,and significantly inhibited the growth of three orthotopic HCC patient-derived xenografts in vivo; with the novel derivatives cel-D2 and cel-D7 exhibiting lower toxicity. All four compounds also induced cell apoptosis; and promoted degradation and inhibited phosphorylation of protein kinases in the Raf/MEK/ERK and PI3K/AKT/mTOR signaling pathways. We demonstrated that HSP90/CDC37 antagonists are potentially broad spectrum agents that might be beneficial for treating the heterogeneous subtypes of HCC, either as monotherapy, or in combination with other chemotherapeutic agents.

  2. RAD001 (everolimus) inhibits tumour growth in xenograft models of human hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Huynh, Hung; Chow, K H Pierce; Soo, Khee Chee; Toh, Han Chong; Choo, Su Pin; Foo, Kian Fong; Poon, Donald; Ngo, Van Chanh; Tran, Evelyn

    2009-07-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the fifth most common malignancy worldwide and highly resistant to available chemotherapies. Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) functions to regulate protein translation, angiogenesis and cell cycle progression in many cancers including HCC. In the present study, subcutaneous patient-derived HCC xenografts were used to study the effects of an mTOR inhibitor, RAD001 (everolimus), on tumour growth, apoptosis and angiogenesis. We report that oral administration of RAD001 to mice bearing patient-derived HCC xenografts resulted in a dose-dependent inhibition of tumour growth. RAD001-induced growth suppression was associated with inactivation of downstream targets of mTOR, reduction in VEGF expression and microvessel density, inhibition of cell proliferation, up-regulation of p27(Kip1) and down-regulation of p21(Cip1/Waf1), Cdk-6, Cdk-2, Cdk-4, cdc-25C, cyclin B1 and c-Myc. Our data indicate that the mTOR pathway plays an important role in angiogenesis, cell cycle progression and proliferation of liver cancer cells. Our study provides a strong rationale for clinical investigation of mTOR inhibitor RAD001 in patients with HCC.

  3. Effect of pantoprazole to enhance activity of docetaxel against human tumour xenografts by inhibiting autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Q; Joshua, A M; Saggar, J K; Yu, M; Wang, M; Kanga, N; Zhang, J Y; Chen, X; Wouters, B G; Tannock, I F

    2015-01-01

    Background: Autophagy allows recycling of cellular components and may facilitate cell survival after chemotherapy. Pantoprazole inhibits proton pumps and is reported to inhibit autophagy. Here we evaluate the effects of pantoprazole to modify cytotoxicity of the anticancer drug docetaxel, and underlying mechanisms. Methods: Effects of docetaxel±pantoprazole were studied against wild-type and autophagy-deficient PC3 cells and against four human xenografts. Effects of pantoprazole on autophagy were evaluated by quantifying LC3-I, LC3-II and p62 proteins in western blots, and by fluorescent microscopy of cells transfected with RFP-GFP-LC3. The distribution of drug effects and of autophagy was quantified in tumour sections in relation to blood vessels and hypoxia by immunohistochemistry using γH2AX, cleaved caspase-3, Ki67 and LC3/ p62. Results: Pantoprazole increased the toxicity of docetaxel in vitro, increased docetaxel-induced expression of γH2AX and cleaved caspase-3, and decreased Ki67 in tumour sections. Pantoprazole increased growth delay of four human xenografts of low, moderate and high sensitivity to docetaxel, with minimal increase in toxicity. Docetaxel led to increased autophagy throughout tumour sections. Pantoprazole inhibited autophagy, and effects of pantoprazole were reduced against genetically modified cells with decreased ability to undergo autophagy. Conclusions: Autophagy is a mechanism of resistance to docetaxel chemotherapy that may be modified by pantoprazole to improve therapeutic index. PMID:25647012

  4. Constitutive secretion of soluble interleukin-2 receptor by human T cell lymphoma xenografted into SCID mice. Correlation of tumor volume with concentration of tumor-derived soluble interleukin-2 receptor in body fluids of the host mice.

    PubMed Central

    Wasik, M. A.; Sioutos, N.; Tuttle, M.; Butmarc, J. R.; Kaplan, W. D.; Kadin, M. E.

    1994-01-01

    Increased serum concentration of soluble alpha-chain receptor for interleukin-2 (sIL-2R) has been noted in patients with a variety of inflammatory conditions and lymphoid malignancies including T cell leukemia and lymphoma. Elevated sIL-2R serum levels seen in lymphoid malignancies appear to correlate with the clinical stage of disease. However, because sIL-2R is produced by normal activated lymphocytes, it has been uncertain whether serum sIL-2R in such conditions is derived from tumor cells or normal immune cells responding to the tumor. To address this question, we used a model of human (CD30+) anaplastic, large T cell lymphoma transplanted into immunodeficient SCID mice. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction of tumor RNA showed that the tumor, designated mJB6, contains mRNA for alpha-chain of human IL-2R. Furthermore, 15 to 25% of tumor cells stained with anti-human IL-2R alpha-chain mAb. Solid phase ELISA analysis of serum samples from mice bearing mJB6 lymphoma showed high concentrations of human sIL-2R. None of the control mice without lymphoma or with human nonlymphoid tumors (prostatic carcinoma, ovarian carcinoma, and glioblastoma multiforme) showed detectable human sIL-2R. The sIL-2R serum titers of mJB6-bearing mice correlated strongly with tumor volume (P < 0.0001). Tumors as small as 0.4 to 0.8 mm3 could be detected by this method. The sensitivity of sIL-2R ELISA exceeded at least 150 times the sensitivity of conventional radioisotopic tumor detection. Total resection of mJB6 tumors resulted in complete clearance of sIL-2R from the murine serum within 48 hours with a half-life of 6 hours. Accordingly, partial resection led to a significant decrease in sIL-2R followed by gradual increase with tumor regrowth. sIL-2R was also detected in the urine of mJB6-transplanted mice. As in serum, urine concentrations of sIL-2R were proportional to tumor mass (P < 0.02). Based on these findings we postulate that malignant cells are a major source of serum

  5. Deficiency of caspase 3 in tumor xenograft impairs therapeutic effect of measles virus Edmoston strain.

    PubMed

    Wang, Biao; Yan, Xu; Guo, Qingguo; Li, Yan; Zhang, Haiyan; Xie, Ji Sheng; Meng, Xin

    2015-06-30

    The oncolytic measles virus Edmonston (MV-Edm) strain shows considerable oncolytic activity against a variety of human tumors. In this study, we report MV-Edm is able to trigger apoptosis pathways in infected tumor cells and elucidate the roles of cellular apoptosis in the whole oncolytic process. We also show that activated caspase 3, a key executioner of apoptosis, plays key roles in the oncolytic virotherapy. Activated caspase 3 can accelerate viral replication in cervical cancer cells and enhance the killing effects of the virus. Deficiency of caspase 3 either in tumor cells or in tumor xenograft significantly desensitized tumor to oncolysis with MV-Edm. In the infected cells, caspase 3 regulates interferon α release, which can inhibit viral replication in neighboring tumor cells. We propose that caspase-3 activation enhances the oncolytic effects of MV-Edm, thus inhibiting tumor growth in mice.

  6. Modeling Leukemogenesis in the Zebrafish Using Genetic and Xenograft Models.

    PubMed

    Rajan, Vinothkumar; Dellaire, Graham; Berman, Jason N

    2016-01-01

    The zebrafish is a widely accepted model to study leukemia. The major advantage of studying leukemogenesis in zebrafish is attributed to its short life cycle and superior imaging capacity. This chapter highlights using transgenic- and xenograft-based models in zebrafish to study a specific leukemogenic mutation and analyze therapeutic responses in vivo. PMID:27464808

  7. Developmental Exposure to Estrogen Alters Differentiation and Epigenetic Programming in a Human Fetal Prostate Xenograft Model

    PubMed Central

    Saffarini, Camelia M.; McDonnell-Clark, Elizabeth V.; Amin, Ali; Huse, Susan M.; Boekelheide, Kim

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most frequent non-cutaneous malignancy in men. There is strong evidence in rodents that neonatal estrogen exposure plays a role in the development of this disease. However, there is little information regarding the effects of estrogen in human fetal prostate tissue. This study explored early life estrogen exposure, with and without a secondary estrogen and testosterone treatment in a human fetal prostate xenograft model. Histopathological lesions, proliferation, and serum hormone levels were evaluated at 7, 30, 90, and 200-day time-points after xenografting. The expression of 40 key genes involved in prostatic glandular and stromal growth, cell-cycle progression, apoptosis, hormone receptors and tumor suppressors was evaluated using a custom PCR array. Epigenome-wide analysis of DNA methylation was performed on whole tissue, and laser capture-microdissection (LCM) isolated epithelial and stromal compartments of 200-day prostate xenografts. Combined initial plus secondary estrogenic exposures had the most severe tissue changes as revealed by the presence of hyperplastic glands at day 200. Gene expression changes corresponded with the cellular events in the KEGG prostate cancer pathway, indicating that initial plus secondary exposure to estrogen altered the PI3K-Akt signaling pathway, ultimately resulting in apoptosis inhibition and an increase in cell cycle progression. DNA methylation revealed that differentially methylated CpG sites significantly predominate in the stromal compartment as a result of estrogen-treatment, thereby providing new targets for future investigation. By using human fetal prostate tissue and eliminating the need for species extrapolation, this study provides novel insights into the gene expression and epigenetic effects related to prostate carcinogenesis following early life estrogen exposure. PMID:25799167

  8. Epirubicin-gold nanoparticles suppress hepatocellular carcinoma xenograft growth in nude mice

    PubMed Central

    Meng, William C. S.; Pan, Yunlong; Zhao, Xiaoxu

    2015-01-01

    Abstract We sought to investigate the effects of epirubicin-nanogold compounds (EPI-AuNP) on hepatocellular carcinoma xenograft growth in nude mice. EPI-AuNP was prepared and hepatoma xenograft model was established in nude mice. The mice were then randomly divided into four groups: the control group with injection of saline, the AuNP treatment group, the EPI treatment group and the EPI-AuNP treatment group. After two weeks, the hepatoma weight and volume of the xenografts were assessed. Our transmission electron microscopy revealed that epirubicin-gold nanoparticles caused significantly more structural changes of hepatocellular carcinoma cells HepG2. The tumor weight in the Epi-AuNP treatment group (0.80±0.11 g) was significantly lower than that of the control group (2.48±0.15 g), the AuNP treatment group (1.67±0.17 g), and the EPI treatment group (1.39±0.10 g) (P<0.01). Furthermore, the tumor volume of mice in the EPI-AuNP treatment group (0.27±0.06 cm3) was significantly smaller than that of the control group (2.23±0.34 cm3), the AuNP treatment group (1.21±0.25 cm3) and the EPI treatment group (0.81±0.11 cm3) (P<0.01). In conclusion, epirubicin-nanogold compounds (EPI-AuNP) have significant inhibitory effects on the growth of hepatocellular carcinoma cells in vivo. PMID:26423611

  9. Establishment of patient-derived cancer xenografts in immunodeficient NOG mice.

    PubMed

    Chijiwa, Tsuyoshi; Kawai, Kenji; Noguchi, Akira; Sato, Hidemitsu; Hayashi, Akimune; Cho, Haruhiko; Shiozawa, Manabu; Kishida, Takeshi; Morinaga, Soichiro; Yokose, Tomoyuki; Katayama, Makoto; Takenaka, Nobuo; Suemizu, Hiroshi; Yamada, Roppei; Nakamura, Yoshiyasu; Ohtsu, Takashi; Takano, Yasuo; Imai, Kohzoh; Miyagi, Yohei; Nakamura, Masato

    2015-07-01

    Viable and stable human cancer cell lines and animal models combined with adequate clinical information are essential for future advances in cancer research and patient care. Conventional in vitro cancer cell lines are commonly available; however, they lack detailed information on the patient from which they originate, including disease phenotype and drug sensitivity. Patient-derived xenografts (PDX) with clinical information (so-called 'cancer xenopatients') are a promising advance that may accelerate the development of anticancer therapies. We established 61 PDX lines from 116 surgically removed tumor tissues inoculated subcutaneously into NOG mice (53% success rate). PDX lines were established from various types of epithelial tumors and also from sarcomas, including gastrointestinal stromal tumors and Ewing/PNET sarcomas. The metastatic tumors yielded PDX lines more effectively (65%) than the primary tumors (27%, P<0.001). In our PDX models, morphological characteristics, gene expression profiles, and genetic alteration patterns were all well preserved. In eight cases (7%), the transplantable xenografts for several generations were composed of large monotonous nonepithelial cells of human origin, revealed to be Epstein-Barr virus infection-associated lympho-proliferative lesions. Despite this, PDX linked with clinical information offer many advantages for preclinical studies investigating new anticancer drugs. The fast and efficient establishment of individual PDX may also contribute to future personalized anticancer therapies.

  10. Celecoxib enhanced the cytotoxic effect of cisplatin in chemo-resistant gastric cancer xenograft mouse models through a cyclooxygenase-2-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hong-Bin; Shen, Fu-Ming; Lv, Qian-Zhou

    2016-04-01

    Our previous study suggested that co-administration of celecoxib increased chemo-sensitivity of multidrug-resistant human gastric cancer SGC-7901/DDP cells to cisplatin (DDP) in vitro. The present study was designed to investigate whether celecoxib had the similar activities in vivo. SGC-7901/DDP and SGC-7901 xenograft mouse models were established. At the end of the experiment, cisplatin treatment alone significantly inhibited tumor growth in SGC-7901 xenograft, as compared with that in SGC-7901/DDP xenograft, suggesting that it maintained cisplatin sensitivity. When cisplatin and celecoxib were co-administrated, their antitumor activities were augmented in SGC-7901/DDP xenograft. The levels of Ki67 and PCNA after combination therapy were significantly decreased in SGC-7901/DDP xenograft, as compared with those of cisplatin treatment alone. Moreover, examining the apoptotic index by TUNEL assay showed similar results. Further studies demonstrated the inhibitory effect of celecoxib on cyclooxygenase-2 and P-glycoprotein expression was the possible reason to increase sensitivity of SGC-7901/DDP cells to cisplatin in vivo. However, the ratio of thromboxane B2 and prostaglandin F1α was elevated after celecoxib treatment in mice. This has been proposed to increase the risk of thrombogenesis. Further studies are required to evaluate the efficacy and safety of celecoxib for reducing chemo-resistance in gastric cancer. PMID:26879869

  11. A Sensitive IHC Method for Monitoring Autophagy-Specific Markers in Human Tumor Xenografts.

    PubMed

    He, Helen; Yang, Yu; Xiang, Zhongmin; Yu, Lunyin; Chouitar, Jouhara; Yu, Jie; D'Amore, Natalie Roy; Li, Ping; Li, Zhi; Bowman, Douglas; Theisen, Matthew; Brownell, James E; Tirrell, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Use of tyramide signal amplification (TSA) to detect autophagy biomarkers in formalin fixed and paraffin embedded (FFPE) xenograft tissue. Materials and Methods. Autophagy marker regulation was studied in xenograft tissues using Amp HQ IHC and standard IHC methods. Results. The data demonstrate the feasibility of using high sensitivity TSA IHC assays to measure low abundant autophagy markers in FFPE xenograft tissue. PMID:27247826

  12. A Sensitive IHC Method for Monitoring Autophagy-Specific Markers in Human Tumor Xenografts

    PubMed Central

    He, Helen; Yang, Yu; Xiang, Zhongmin; Yu, Lunyin; Chouitar, Jouhara; Yu, Jie; D'Amore, Natalie Roy; Li, Ping; Li, Zhi; Bowman, Douglas; Theisen, Matthew; Brownell, James E.; Tirrell, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Use of tyramide signal amplification (TSA) to detect autophagy biomarkers in formalin fixed and paraffin embedded (FFPE) xenograft tissue. Materials and Methods. Autophagy marker regulation was studied in xenograft tissues using Amp HQ IHC and standard IHC methods. Results. The data demonstrate the feasibility of using high sensitivity TSA IHC assays to measure low abundant autophagy markers in FFPE xenograft tissue. PMID:27247826

  13. Metastatic Insulinoma Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumor Treated With 177Lu-DOTATATE Induction and Maintenance Peptide Receptor Radionuclide Therapy: A Suggested Protocol.

    PubMed

    Makis, William; McCann, Karey; McEwan, Alexander J B

    2016-01-01

    A 70-year-old woman presented with frequent episodes of hypoglycemia. Imaging revealed a 6-cm pancreatic mass with several liver lesions. The pancreatic mass was resected and confirmed to be a well-differentiated insulinoma. Surgery improved but did not resolve her hypoglycemic episodes, and she was referred for peptide receptor radionuclide therapy with 177Lu-DOTATATE to treat her residual disease. A modified protocol with a continuous IV dextrose infusion was used, and the treatments were well tolerated. After 4 induction and 2 maintenance treatments, her hypoglycemic symptoms resolved completely and her disease stabilized. She has been progression free for 24 months. PMID:26562579

  14. Pairwise Comparison of 89Zr- and 124I-labeled cG250 Based on Positron Emission Tomography Imaging and Non-Linear Immunokinetic Modeling: In Vivo Carbonic Anhydrase IX Receptor Binding and Internalization in Mouse Xenografts of Clear Cell Renal Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Cheal, Sarah M.; Punzalan, Blesida; Doran, Michael G.; Evans, Michael J.; Osborne, Joseph R.; Lewis, Jason S.; Zanzonico, Pat; Larson, Steven M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The positron-emitting tomography (PET) tracer, 124I-cG250, directed against carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX) shows promise for pre-surgical diagnosis of clear renal cell carcinoma (cRCC) [1, 2]. The radiometal zirconium-89 (89Zr), however, may offer advantages as a surrogate PET nuclide over 124I in terms of greater tumor uptake and retention [3]. In the current report, we have developed a non-linear immunokinetic model to facilitate a quantitative comparison of absolute uptake and antibody turnover between 124I-cG250 and 89Zr- cG250 using a human cRCC xenograft tumor model in mice. We believe that his unique model better relates quantitative imaging data to the salient biologic features of tumor antibody-antigen binding and turnover. Methods We conducted experiments with 89Zr-cG250 and 124I-cG250 using a human ccRCC cell line (SK-RC-38) to characterize the binding affinity and internalization kinetics of the two tracers in vitro. Serial-PET imaging was performed in mice bearing sub-cutaneous cRCC tumors to simultaneously detect and quantify time-dependent tumor uptake in vivo. Using the known specific activities of the two tracers, the equilibrium rates of antibody internalization and turnover in the tumor were derived from the PET images using non-linear compartmental modeling. Results The two tracers demonstrate virtually identical tumor-cell binding and internalization but with markedly different retentions in vitro. Superior PET images were obtained using 89Zr-cG250, owing to the more prolonged trapping of the radiolabel in the tumor and simultaneous wash-out from normal tissues. Estimates of cG250-CAIX complex turnover were 1.35–5.51 × 1012 molecules per hour per gram of tumor (20% of receptors internalized per hour), and the ratio of 124I/89Zr atoms released per unit time by tumor was 17.5. Conclusions Pairwise evaluation of 89Zr-cG250 and 124I-cG250 provided the basis for a non-linear immunokinetic model which yielded quantitative information about

  15. miR-143 Overexpression Impairs Growth of Human Colon Carcinoma Xenografts in Mice with Induction of Apoptosis and Inhibition of Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Borralho, Pedro M.; Simões, André E. S.; Gomes, Sofia E.; Lima, Raquel T.; Carvalho, Tânia; Ferreira, Duarte M. S.; Vasconcelos, Maria H.; Castro, Rui E.; Rodrigues, Cecília M. P.

    2011-01-01

    Background MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are aberrantly expressed in human cancer and involved in the (dys)regulation of cell survival, proliferation, differentiation and death. Specifically, miRNA-143 (miR-143) is down-regulated in human colon cancer. In the present study, we evaluated the role of miR-143 overexpression on the growth of human colon carcinoma cells xenografted in nude mice (immunodeficient mouse strain: N: NIH(s) II-nu/nu). Methodology/Principal Findings HCT116 cells with stable miR-143 overexpression (Over-143) and control (Empty) cells were subcutaneously injected into the flanks of nude mice, and tumor growth was evaluated over time. Tumors arose ∼ 14 days after tumor cell implantation, and the experiment was ended at 40 days after implantation. miR-143 was confirmed to be significantly overexpressed in Over-143 versus Empty xenografts, by TaqMan® Real-time PCR (p<0.05). Importantly, Over-143 xenografts displayed slower tumor growth compared to Empty xenografts from 23 until 40 days in vivo (p<0.05), with final volumes of 928±338 and 2512±387 mm3, respectively. Evaluation of apoptotic proteins showed that Over-143 versus Empty xenografts displayed reduced Bcl-2 levels, and increased caspase-3 activation and PARP cleavage (p<0.05). In addition, the incidence of apoptotic tumor cells, assessed by TUNEL, was increased in Over-143 versus Empty xenografts (p<0.01). Finally, Over-143 versus Empty xenografts displayed significantly reduced NF-κB activation and ERK5 levels and activation (p<0.05), as well as reduced proliferative index, evaluated by Ki-67 immunohistochemistry (p<0.01). Conclusions Our results suggest that reduced tumor volume in Over-143 versus Empty xenografts may result from increased apoptosis and decreased proliferation induced by miR-143. This reinforces the relevance of miR-143 in colon cancer, indicating an important role in the control of in vivo tumor progression, and suggesting that miR-143 may constitute a putative novel

  16. Noninvasive and real-time monitoring of molecular targeting therapy for lymph node and peritoneal metastasis in nude mice bearing xenografts of human colorectal cancer cells tagged with GFP and DsRed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakanishi, Hayao; Hara, Masayasu; Ikehara, Yuzuru; Tatematsu, Masae

    2007-02-01

    We have developed an in vivo imaging system consisting of GFP- and DsRed-tagged human colonic cancer cell line, which has peritoneal and lymph node metastatic potential and show high sensitivity to EGFR targeting drugs, and convenient detection devices for GFP and DsRed. The latter includes a small handy fluorescence detection device for external monitoring of the therapeutic effect of the drug and a convenient stereo fluorescent microscope for internal visualization of micrometastases. We applied this imaging system to investigate anti-metastatic effects of EGFR targeting drugs such as gefitinib (Iressa). This system allowed sensitive detection of the development of peritoneal and lymph node metastases from the micrometastasis stage at the cellular level and also permited noninvasive, non-anesthetic monitoring of anti-metastatic effect of the drug in an animal facility without any pretreatment. Significant decreases in the intraabdominal metastatic tumor growth and prevention of inguinal lymph node metastasis by gefitinib treatment could be clearly monitored. These results suggest that convenient, low-cost, true real-time monitoring of therapeutic effect using such a fluorescence-mediated whole body imaging system seems to enhance the speed of preclinical study for novel anti-cancer agents and will allow us to understand the action mechanism of molecular targeting drugs.

  17. Intrinsic and extrinsic heterogeneity in the responses of parent and clonal human colon carcinoma xenografts to photon irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Leith, J.T.; Bliven, S.F.; Lee, E.S.; Glicksman, A.S.; Dexter, D.L.

    1984-09-01

    Responses to photon irradiation of xenografted human colon tumors derived from the heterogeneous DLD-1 line or its derivative A and D subpopulations were determined using excision assay and tumor regrowth delay assays. Differential responses among the three xenografted carcinomas were demonstrated. Clone A tumors treated with up to 17.5 Gy showed no actual regression below pretreatment volume. In contrast, clone D tumors were sensitive to doses as low as 3.5 Gy, and tumor volumes were reduced by 65% with a dose of 17.5 Gy. The responses of DLD-1 tumors were intermediate between the clone A and clone D tumor responses. Data indicate that the DLD-1 tumors were the most resistant, with clone A of intermediate sensitivity, clone D being the most sensitive tumor. In addition to the interclonal diversity among xenograft lines, intraclonal variation was also observed with clone A (but not clone D or DLD-1) tumors. A biphasic survival curve of cells from clone A xenografts irradiated in air-breathing hosts clearly indicated a minority (approximately 3%) subpopulation of hypoxic cells. Similar results indicating a small percentage of hypoxic cells in clone A solid tumors were obtained from the tumor regrowth delay studies. Also, excision assay data from experiments in which the heterografted carcinomas were irradiated under anoxic conditions support the interpretation that clone A tumors contain a small fraction of hypoxic cells. This study indicates that: (a) heterogeneity in vivo to ionizing radiation exists in the DLD-1 system; and (b) intraclonal variation occurs in vivo due to extrinsic (e.g., environmental hypoxia) factors, such that the intrinsic radioresistance of a subpopulation (clone A) of a heterogeneous human tumor can be further increased.

  18. Therapeutic effect against human xenograft tumors in nude mice by the third generation microtubule stabilizing epothilones.

    PubMed

    Chou, Ting-Chao; Zhang, Xiuguo; Zhong, Zi-Yang; Li, Yong; Feng, Li; Eng, Sara; Myles, David R; Johnson, Robert; Wu, Nian; Yin, Ye Ingrid; Wilson, Rebecca M; Danishefsky, Samuel J

    2008-09-01

    The epothilones represent a promising class of natural product-based antitumor drug candidates. Although these compounds operate through a microtubule stabilization mechanism similar to that of taxol, the epothilones offer a major potential therapeutic advantage in that they retain their activity against multidrug-resistant cell lines. We have been systematically synthesizing and evaluating synthetic epothilone congeners that are not accessible through modification of the natural product itself. We report herein the results of biological investigations directed at two epothilone congeners: iso-fludelone and iso-dehydelone. Iso-fludelone, in particular, exhibits a number of properties that render it an excellent candidate for preclinical development, including biological stability, excellent solubility in water, and remarkable potency relative to other epothilones. In nude mouse xenograft settings, iso-fludelone was able to achieve therapeutic cures against a number of human cancer cell lines, including mammarian-MX-1, ovarian-SK-OV-3, and the fast-growing, refractory, subcutaneous neuroblastoma-SK-NAS. Strong therapeutic effect was observed against drug-resistant lung-A549/taxol and mammary-MCF-7/Adr xenografts. In addition, iso-fludelone was shown to exhibit a significant therapeutic effect against an intracranially implanted SK-NAS tumor. PMID:18755900

  19. Development and characterization of a tamoxifen-resistant breast carcinoma xenograft.

    PubMed

    Naundorf, H; Becker, M; Lykkesfeldt, A E; Elbe, B; Neumann, C; Büttner, B; Fichtner, I

    2000-06-01

    A human tamoxifen-resistant mammary carcinoma, MaCa 3366/TAM, originating from a sensitive parental xenograft 3366 was successfully established by treatment of tumour-bearing nude mice with 1-50 mg kg(-1) tamoxifen for 3 years during routine passaging. Both tumours did not differ significantly in OR- and PR-positivity, however, when compared with the sensitive tumour line, the mean OR content of the TAM-resistant subline is slightly lower. An OR-upregulation following withdrawal of oestradiol treatment was observed in the parental tumours but not in the resistant xenografts. Following long-term treatment with tamoxifen, the histological pattern of the breast carcinoma changed. The more differentiated structures being apparent after treatment with 17beta-oestradiol in the original 3366 tumour were not induced in the resistant line. Tamoxifen failed to induce a tumour growth inhibition in comparison to the tamoxifen-sensitive line. The pure anti-oestrogen, ICI 182 780, revealed cross-resistance. Sequence analysis of the hormone-binding domain of the OR of both lines showed no differences, suggesting that either mutations in other regions of the OR are involved in the TAM-resistance phenotype or that mechanisms outside of this protein induced this phenotype. Oestrogen and anti-oestrogen regulate pS2 and cathepsin D expression in 3366 tumours as in the human breast cancer cell line MCF-7. The resistant 3366/TAM tumours have lost this regulation. The established breast cancer xenografts 3366 and 3366/TAM offer the possibility of investigating mechanisms of anti-oestrogen resistance in an in vivo situation. They can be used to test novel approaches to prevent, or to overcome, this resistance in a clinically related manner. PMID:10839300

  20. CysLT(1)R antagonists inhibit tumor growth in a xenograft model of colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Savari, Sayeh; Liu, Minghui; Zhang, Yuan; Sime, Wondossen; Sjölander, Anita

    2013-01-01

    The expression of the inflammatory G-protein coupled receptor CysLT1R has been shown to be upregulated in colon cancer patients and associated with poor prognosis. The present study investigated the correlation between CysLT1R and colon cancer development in vivo using CysLT1R antagonists (ZM198,615 or Montelukast) and the nude mouse xenograft model. Two drug administration regimens were established. The first regimen was established to investigate the importance of CysLT1R in tumor initiation. Nude mice were inoculated with 50 µM CysLT1R antagonist-pretreated HCT-116 colon cancer cells and received continued treatment (5 mg/kg/day, intraperitoneally). The second regimen aimed to address the role of CysLT1R in tumor progression. Nude mice were inoculated with non-pretreated HCT-116 cells and did not receive CysLT1R antagonist treatment until recordable tumor appearance. Both regimens resulted in significantly reduced tumor size, attributed to changes in proliferation and apoptosis as determined by reduced Ki-67 levels and increased levels of p21(WAF/Cip1) (P<0.01), cleaved caspase 3, and the caspase-cleaved product of cytokeratin 18. Decreased levels of VEGF (P<0.01) and reduced vessel size (P<0.05) were also observed, the latter only in the ZM198,615-pretreatment group. Furthermore, we performed a series of in vitro studies using the colon cancer cell line HCT-116 and CysLT1R antagonists. In addition to significant reductions in cell proliferation, adhesion and colony formation, we observed induction of cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner. The ability of Montelukast to inhibit growth of human colon cancer xenograft was further validated by using two additional colon cancer cell lines, SW-480 and HT-29. Our results demonstrate that CysLT1R antagonists inhibit growth of colon cancer xenografts primarily by reducing proliferation and inducing apoptosis of the tumor cells.

  1. Mapping the Redox State of CHOP-Treated Non-Hodgkin’s Lymphoma Xenografts in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Xu, He N.; Mir, Tahreem A.; Lee, Seung-Cheol; Feng, Min; Farhad, Namisa; Choe, Regine; Glickson, Jerry D.; Li, Lin Z.

    2015-01-01

    Drug treatment may alter the metabolism of cancer cells and may alter the mitochondrial redox state. Using the redox scanner that collects the fluorescence signals from both the oxidized flavoproteins (Fp) and the reduced form of nicotin-amide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) in snap-frozen tumor tissues, we investigated the effects of chemotherapy on mouse xenografts of a human diffuse large B-cell lymphoma cell line (DLCL2). The mice in the treatment group were treated with CHOP – cyclophosphamide (C) + hydroxydoxorubicin (H) + Oncovin (O) + prednisone (P) using the following regimen: CHO administration on day 1 followed by prednisone administration on day 1–5. On day 5 the mitochondrial redox state of the treated group was slightly more reduced than that of the control group (p = 0.049), and the Fp content of the treated group was significantly decreased (p = 0.033). PMID:23852501

  2. A Novel Chordoma Xenograft Allows In Vivo Drug Testing and Reveals the Importance of NF-κB Signaling in Chordoma Biology

    PubMed Central

    Trucco, Matteo M.; Awad, Ola; Wilky, Breelyn A.; Goldstein, Seth D.; Huang, Ruili; Walker, Robert L.; Shah, Preeti; Katuri, Varalakshmi; Gul, Naheed; Zhu, Yuelin J.; McCarthy, Edward F.; Paz-Priel, Ido; Meltzer, Paul S.; Austin, Christopher P.; Xia, Menghang; Loeb, David M.

    2013-01-01

    Chordoma is a rare primary bone malignancy that arises in the skull base, spine and sacrum and originates from remnants of the notochord. These tumors are typically resistant to conventional chemotherapy, and to date there are no FDA-approved agents to treat chordoma. The lack of in vivo models of chordoma has impeded the development of new therapies for this tumor. Primary tumor from a sacral chordoma was xenografted into NOD/SCID/IL-2R γ-null mice. The xenograft is serially transplantable and was characterized by both gene expression analysis and whole genome SNP genotyping. The NIH Chemical Genomics Center performed high-throughput screening of 2,816 compounds using two established chordoma cell lines, U-CH1 and U-CH2B. The screen yielded several compounds that showed activity and two, sunitinib and bortezomib, were tested in the xenograft. Both agents slowed the growth of the xenograft tumor. Sensitivity to an inhibitor of IκB, as well as inhibition of an NF-κB gene expression signature demonstrated the importance of NF-κB signaling for chordoma growth. This serially transplantable chordoma xenograft is thus a practical model to study chordomas and perform in vivo preclinical drug testing. PMID:24223206

  3. Of mice and MEN1: Insulinomas in a conditional mouse knockout.

    PubMed

    Crabtree, Judy S; Scacheri, Peter C; Ward, Jerrold M; McNally, Sara R; Swain, Gary P; Montagna, Cristina; Hager, Jeffrey H; Hanahan, Douglas; Edlund, Helena; Magnuson, Mark A; Garrett-Beal, Lisa; Burns, A Lee; Ried, Thomas; Chandrasekharappa, Settara C; Marx, Stephen J; Spiegel, Allen M; Collins, Francis S

    2003-09-01

    Patients with multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1) develop multiple endocrine tumors, primarily affecting the parathyroid, pituitary, and endocrine pancreas, due to the inactivation of the MEN1 gene. A conditional mouse model was developed to evaluate the loss of the mouse homolog, Men1, in the pancreatic beta cell. Men1 in these mice contains exons 3 to 8 flanked by loxP sites, such that, when the mice are crossed to transgenic mice expressing cre from the rat insulin promoter (RIP-cre), exons 3 to 8 are deleted in beta cells. By 60 weeks of age, >80% of mice homozygous for the floxed Men1 gene and expressing RIP-cre develop multiple pancreatic islet adenomas. The formation of adenomas results in elevated serum insulin levels and decreased blood glucose levels. The delay in tumor appearance, even with early loss of both copies of Men1, implies that additional somatic events are required for adenoma formation in beta cells. Comparative genomic hybridization of beta cell tumor DNA from these mice reveals duplication of chromosome 11, potentially revealing regions of interest with respect to tumorigenesis.

  4. pH in human tumour xenografts: effect of intravenous administration of glucose.

    PubMed Central

    Volk, T.; Jähde, E.; Fortmeyer, H. P.; Glüsenkamp, K. H.; Rajewsky, M. F.

    1993-01-01

    pH frequency distributions of tumours grown s.c. from 30 human tumour xenograft lines in rnu/rnu rats were analysed with the use of H+ ion-sensitive semi-microelectrodes prior to and following stimulation of tumour cell glycolysis by i.v. infusion of glucose. At normoglycemia, the average pH of the tumours investigated was 6.83 (range, 6.72-7.01; n = 268). Without exception, all xenografts responded to the temporary increase in plasma glucose concentration (PGC) from 6 +/- 1 to 30 +/- 3 mM by an accumulation of acidic metabolites, as indicated by a pH reduction to an average value of 6.43 (range, 6.12-6.78; n = 292). This pH value corresponds to a ten-fold increase in H+ ion activity in tumour tissue as compared to arterial blood. Tumour pH approached minimum values at 2-4 h after the onset of glucose administration and could be maintained at acidic levels for 24 h by controlled glucose infusion. Irrespective of pH variations between tumours grown from individual xenograft lines, there was no major difference in pH response to glucose between the four main histopathological tumour entities investigated, i.e. breast, lung and gastrointestinal carcinomas, and sarcomas. In tumours from several xenograft lines, an increase in blood glucose to only 2.5-times the normal value (14 mM) was sufficient to reduce the mean pH to 6.4. Glucose-induced acidosis was tumour-specific. The pH frequency distributions in liver, kidney and skeletal muscle of tumour-bearing rnu/rnu rats were only marginally sensitive to hyperglycemia (average pH, 6.97 vs normal value of 7.14). Tumour-selective activation of pH-sensitive anti-cancer agents, e.g. alkylating drugs, acid-labile prodrugs or pH-sensitive immunoconjugates may thus be feasible in a wide variety of human cancers. PMID:8353039

  5. Exclusion of Complex Paraannular Aortic Abscess With the Freestyle Xenograft.

    PubMed

    Guihaire, Julien; Kloeckner, Martin; Deleuze, Philippe

    2016-10-01

    Destructive aortic valve endocarditis is a serious condition that can result in aortoventricular disjunction. The appropriate surgical approach for severe excavating lesions remains a matter of debate. Homografts, prosthetic valves associated with a pericardial patch for annulus repair, and prosthetic valve conduits can be used. We report the technical issue of subcoronary inclusion of the full root Freestyle xenograft for complicated aortic endocarditis extending to the left ventricular outflow tract. PMID:27645988

  6. Genomic profiling of patient-derived colon cancer xenograft models.

    PubMed

    Lee, Won-Suk; Kim, Hye-Youn; Seok, Jae Yeon; Jang, Ho Hee; Park, Yeon Ho; Kim, So-Young; Shin, Dong Bok; Hong, Suntaek

    2014-12-01

    Recent evidence suggests that patient derived xenograft (PDX) models can maintain certain pathological and molecular features of the original disease. However, these characterizations are limited to immunohistochemistry or by tissue microarray analysis. We conducted a high-throughput sequencing of primary colon tumor and PDX has not been reported yet. Fresh primary colon cancer tissues that originate from surgery were implanted into the subcutaneous space of 6- to 8-week-old female BALB/c nu/nu or NOD/SCID mice and serially passaged in vivo. Ion AmpliSeq Cancer Hotspot Panel v2 (Ion Torrent) was used to detect frequent somatic mutations and similarity of molecular characteristics between the 10 patient tumors and matched PDX. Histologic and immunohistochemical analyses revealed a high degree of pathologic similarity including histologic architecture and expression of CEA, CK7, and CD20 between the patient and xenograft tumors. In 80% cases, all of the somatic mutations detected in primary tumor were concordantly detected in PDX models. However, 2 PDX models showed gained mutations such as PIK3CA or FBWX7 mutation. Ten patient-derived advanced colon cancer xenograft models were established. These models maintained the key characteristic features of the original tumors, suggesting useful tool for preclinical personalized medicine platform.

  7. Spheroid culture of LuCaP 136 patient-derived xenograft enables versatile preclinical models of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Valta, Maija P; Zhao, Hongjuan; Saar, Matthias; Tuomela, Johanna; Nolley, Rosalie; Linxweiler, Johannes; Sandholm, Jouko; Lehtimäki, Jaakko; Härkönen, Pirkko; Coleman, Ilsa; Nelson, Peter S; Corey, Eva; Peehl, Donna M

    2016-04-01

    LuCaP serially transplantable patient-derived xenografts (PDXs) are valuable preclinical models of locally advanced or metastatic prostate cancer. Using spheroid culture methodology, we recently established cell lines from several LuCaP PDXs. Here, we characterized in depth the features of xenografts derived from LuCaP 136 spheroid cultures and found faithful retention of the phenotype of the original PDX. In vitro culture enabled luciferase transfection into LuCaP 136 spheroids, facilitating in vivo imaging. We showed that LuCaP 136 spheroids formed intratibial, orthotopic, and subcutaneous tumors when re-introduced into mice. Intratibial tumors responded to castration and were highly osteosclerotic. LuCaP 136 is a realistic in vitro-in vivo preclinical model of a subtype of bone metastatic prostate cancer.

  8. A Walnut-Enriched Diet Reduces the Growth of LNCaP Human Prostate Cancer Xenografts in Nude Mice

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Dun-Xian; Manchester, Lucien C.; Korkmaz, Ahmet; Fuentes-Broto, Lorena; Hardman, W. Elaine; Rosales-Corral, Sergio A.; Qi, Wenbo

    2013-01-01

    It was investigated whether a standard mouse diet (AIN-76A) supplemented with walnuts reduced the establishment and growth of LNCaP human prostate cancer cells in nude (nu/nu) mice. The walnut-enriched diet reduced the number of tumors and the growth of the LNCaP xenografts; 3 of 16 (18.7%) of the walnut-fed mice developed tumors; conversely, 14 of 32 mice (44.0%) of the control diet-fed animals developed tumors. Similarly, the xenografts in the walnut-fed animals grew more slowly than those in the control diet mice. The final average tumor size in the walnut-diet animals was roughly one-fourth the average size of the prostate tumors in the mice that ate the control diet. PMID:23758186

  9. Renal capsule xenografting and subcutaneous pellet implantation for the evaluation of prostate carcinogenesis and benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, Tristan M; Uchtmann, Kristen S; Valdez, Conrad D; Theberge, Ashleigh B; Miralem, Tihomir; Ricke, William A

    2013-01-01

    New therapies for two common prostate diseases, prostate cancer (PrCa) and benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), depend critically on experiments evaluating their hormonal regulation. Sex steroid hormones (notably androgens and estrogens) are important in PrCa and BPH; we probe their respective roles in inducing prostate growth and carcinogenesis in mice with experiments using compressed hormone pellets. Hormone and/or drug pellets are easily manufactured with a pellet press, and surgically implanted into the subcutaneous tissue of the male mouse host. We also describe a protocol for the evaluation of hormonal carcinogenesis by combining subcutaneous hormone pellet implantation with xenografting of prostate cell recombinants under the renal capsule of immunocompromised mice. Moreover, subcutaneous hormone pellet implantation, in combination with renal capsule xenografting of BPH tissue, is useful to better understand hormonal regulation of benign prostate growth, and to test new therapies targeting sex steroid hormone pathways. PMID:24022657

  10. Pulsed high-intensity focused ultrasound therapy enhances targeted delivery of cetuximab to colon cancer xenograft model in mice.

    PubMed

    Park, Min Jung; Kim, Young-Sun; Yang, Jehoon; Sun, Woo Chul; Park, Hajan; Chae, Sun Young; Namgung, Mi-Sun; Choi, Kyu-Sil

    2013-02-01

    Our aim was to evaluate whether pulsed high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) therapy enhances the effect of an epidermal growth factor receptor-targeted chemotherapeutic drug, cetuximab, in treating human colon cancer xenografts in a mouse model. Balb/c nude mice with subcutaneous xenografts of HT-29 cells were randomly categorized into control (n = 9), pulsed HIFU alone (n = 10), cetuximab monotherapy (n = 8) or combined pulsed HIFU and cetuximab therapy (n = 9) group. Cetuximab, pulsed HIFU therapy, or both were administered three times per week starting from day 8 after tumor cell injection. Based on tumor growth curves up to 34 days, the combination therapy group showed more suppressed tumor growth than all other groups (p < 0.05). The final relative tumor volumes were 5.4 ± 2.1, 5.2 ± 1.3, 4.8 ± 1.8, and 3.1 ± 0.9 for control, pulsed HIFU alone, cetuximab monotherapy, and combination therapy groups, respectively. In conclusion, pulsed HIFU therapy appears to enhance the anti-tumor effect of epidermal growth factor receptor-targeted cetuximab on human colon cancer xenograft models in mice. PMID:23219035

  11. Generation of Pediatric Leukemia Xenograft Models in NSG-B2m Mice: Comparison with NOD/SCID Mice.

    PubMed

    Gopalakrishnapillai, Anilkumar; Kolb, E Anders; Dhanan, Priyanka; Bojja, Aruna Sri; Mason, Robert W; Corao, Diana; Barwe, Sonali P

    2016-01-01

    Generation of orthotopic xenograft mouse models of leukemia is important to understand the mechanisms of leukemogenesis, cancer progression, its cross talk with the bone marrow microenvironment, and for preclinical evaluation of drugs. In these models, following intravenous injection, leukemic cells home to the bone marrow and proliferate there before infiltrating other organs, such as spleen, liver, and the central nervous system. Moreover, such models have been shown to accurately recapitulate the human disease and correlate with patient response to therapy and prognosis. Thus, various immune-deficient mice strains have been used with or without recipient preconditioning to increase engraftment efficiency. Mice homozygous for the severe combined immune deficiency (SCID) mutation and with non-obese diabetic background (NOD/SCID) have been used in the majority of leukemia xenograft studies. Later, NOD/SCID mice deficient for interleukin 2 receptor gamma chain (IL2Rγ) gene called NSG mice became the model of choice for leukemia xenografts. However, engraftment of leukemia cells without irradiation preconditioning still remained a challenge. In this study, we used NSG mice with null alleles for major histocompatibility complex class I beta2-microglobulin (β2m) called NSG-B2m. This is a first report describing the 100% engraftment efficiency of pediatric leukemia cell lines and primary samples in NSG-B2m mice in the absence of host preconditioning by sublethal irradiation. We also show direct comparison of the engraftment efficiency and growth rate of pediatric acute leukemia cells in NSG-B2m and NOD/SCID mice, which showed 80-90% engraftment efficiency. Secondary and tertiary xenografts in NSG-B2m mice generated by injection of cells isolated from the spleens of leukemia-bearing mice also behaved similar to the primary patient sample. We have successfully engrafted 25 acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and 5 acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patient samples with

  12. Generation of Pediatric Leukemia Xenograft Models in NSG-B2m Mice: Comparison with NOD/SCID Mice.

    PubMed

    Gopalakrishnapillai, Anilkumar; Kolb, E Anders; Dhanan, Priyanka; Bojja, Aruna Sri; Mason, Robert W; Corao, Diana; Barwe, Sonali P

    2016-01-01

    Generation of orthotopic xenograft mouse models of leukemia is important to understand the mechanisms of leukemogenesis, cancer progression, its cross talk with the bone marrow microenvironment, and for preclinical evaluation of drugs. In these models, following intravenous injection, leukemic cells home to the bone marrow and proliferate there before infiltrating other organs, such as spleen, liver, and the central nervous system. Moreover, such models have been shown to accurately recapitulate the human disease and correlate with patient response to therapy and prognosis. Thus, various immune-deficient mice strains have been used with or without recipient preconditioning to increase engraftment efficiency. Mice homozygous for the severe combined immune deficiency (SCID) mutation and with non-obese diabetic background (NOD/SCID) have been used in the majority of leukemia xenograft studies. Later, NOD/SCID mice deficient for interleukin 2 receptor gamma chain (IL2Rγ) gene called NSG mice became the model of choice for leukemia xenografts. However, engraftment of leukemia cells without irradiation preconditioning still remained a challenge. In this study, we used NSG mice with null alleles for major histocompatibility complex class I beta2-microglobulin (β2m) called NSG-B2m. This is a first report describing the 100% engraftment efficiency of pediatric leukemia cell lines and primary samples in NSG-B2m mice in the absence of host preconditioning by sublethal irradiation. We also show direct comparison of the engraftment efficiency and growth rate of pediatric acute leukemia cells in NSG-B2m and NOD/SCID mice, which showed 80-90% engraftment efficiency. Secondary and tertiary xenografts in NSG-B2m mice generated by injection of cells isolated from the spleens of leukemia-bearing mice also behaved similar to the primary patient sample. We have successfully engrafted 25 acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and 5 acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patient samples with

  13. Generation of Pediatric Leukemia Xenograft Models in NSG-B2m Mice: Comparison with NOD/SCID Mice

    PubMed Central

    Gopalakrishnapillai, Anilkumar; Kolb, E. Anders; Dhanan, Priyanka; Bojja, Aruna Sri; Mason, Robert W.; Corao, Diana; Barwe, Sonali P.

    2016-01-01

    Generation of orthotopic xenograft mouse models of leukemia is important to understand the mechanisms of leukemogenesis, cancer progression, its cross talk with the bone marrow microenvironment, and for preclinical evaluation of drugs. In these models, following intravenous injection, leukemic cells home to the bone marrow and proliferate there before infiltrating other organs, such as spleen, liver, and the central nervous system. Moreover, such models have been shown to accurately recapitulate the human disease and correlate with patient response to therapy and prognosis. Thus, various immune-deficient mice strains have been used with or without recipient preconditioning to increase engraftment efficiency. Mice homozygous for the severe combined immune deficiency (SCID) mutation and with non-obese diabetic background (NOD/SCID) have been used in the majority of leukemia xenograft studies. Later, NOD/SCID mice deficient for interleukin 2 receptor gamma chain (IL2Rγ) gene called NSG mice became the model of choice for leukemia xenografts. However, engraftment of leukemia cells without irradiation preconditioning still remained a challenge. In this study, we used NSG mice with null alleles for major histocompatibility complex class I beta2-microglobulin (β2m) called NSG-B2m. This is a first report describing the 100% engraftment efficiency of pediatric leukemia cell lines and primary samples in NSG-B2m mice in the absence of host preconditioning by sublethal irradiation. We also show direct comparison of the engraftment efficiency and growth rate of pediatric acute leukemia cells in NSG-B2m and NOD/SCID mice, which showed 80–90% engraftment efficiency. Secondary and tertiary xenografts in NSG-B2m mice generated by injection of cells isolated from the spleens of leukemia-bearing mice also behaved similar to the primary patient sample. We have successfully engrafted 25 acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and 5 acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patient samples with

  14. Antral follicles develop in xenografted cryopreserved African elephant (Loxodonta africana) ovarian tissue.

    PubMed

    Gunasena, K T; Lakey, J R; Villines, P M; Bush, M; Raath, C; Critser, E S; McGann, L E; Critser, J K

    1998-10-01

    The preservation of germ plasm from endangered species could augment captive breeding programs aimed at maintaining genetic diversity. Mammalian female germ plasm (oocytes) is extremely difficult to collect and cryopreserve; however, a promising alternative is the cryopreservation of ovarian tissue. In the present study, athymic nude (nu/nu) Balb/C mice were used to evaluate in vivo viability of cryopreserved ovarian tissue from Institute of Cancer Research genotype (ICR) mice or elephants. Female mice were ovariectomized prior to transplant of cryopreserved-thawed ovarian tissue from ICR mice (n=4) or elephants (n=6). Control mice were sham operated (n=4) or ovariectomized (n=5). Transplants were in the ovarian bursa, enabling in vivo ovulation and pregnancies from allografts. Vaginal cytology was monitored daily, and the intervals between and duration of epithelial cells present in smears were evaluated. Appearance of epithelial cells in sham-operated and allografted mice were at intervals of 4.3+/-0.6 and 3.3+/-0.5 days, lasting for 1.4+/-0.1 and 1.6+/-0.2 days, respectively. Sporadic incidence of epithelial cells in ovariectomized animals occurred at longer intervals (8.6+/-3.8 days). Females with xenografted elephant ovarian tissue demonstrated epithelial cells in vaginal smears at intervals of 4.5+/-1.0 days, for 2.5+/-0.5 days duration, which was significantly longer than the other groups (P < 0.05). Histological evaluation of tissues at the time of epithelial cells in smears demonstrated well-developed antral follicles, although oocytes were of poor morphological appearance or only cumulus-like complexes were seen. The nude mouse model is effective for assessing cryopreserved ovarian tissue xenograft function which can support the development of antral follicles.

  15. p53 Small Molecule Inhibitor Enhances Temozolomide Cytotoxic Activity against Intracranial Glioblastoma Xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Dinca, Eduard B.; Lu, Kan V.; Sarkaria, Jann N.; Pieper, Russell O.; Prados, Michael D.; Haas-Kogan, Daphne A.; VandenBerg, Scott R.; Berger, Mitchel S.; James, C. David

    2010-01-01

    In this study we investigated corresponding precursor and active forms of a p53 small molecule inhibitor for effect on temozolomide (TMZ) anti-tumor activity against glioblastoma (GBM), using both in vitro and in vivo experimental approaches. Results from in vitro cell viability analysis showed that the cytotoxic activity of TMZ was substantially increased when GBMs with wild-type p53 were co-treated with the active form of p53 inhibitor, and this heightened cytotoxic response was accompanied by increased PARP cleavage as well as elevated cellular phospho-H2AX. Analysis of the same series of GBMs, as intracranial xenografts in athymic mice, and administering corresponding p53 inhibitor precursor, that is converted to the active compound in vivo, yielded results consistent with the in vitro analyses: i.e., TMZ + p53 inhibitor precursor co-treatment, of three distinct wild-type p53 GBM xenografts, resulted in significant enhancement of TMZ anti-tumor effect relative to treatment with TMZ alone, as indicated by serial bioluminescence monitoring as well as survival analysis (p < 0.001 for co-treatment survival benefit in each case). Mice receiving intracranial injection with p53 null GBM showed similar survival benefit from TMZ treatment regardless of the presence or absence of p53 inhibitor precursor. In total, our results indicate that the p53 active and precursor inhibitor pair enhance TMZ cytotoxicity in vitro and in vivo, respectively, and do so in a p53-dependent manner. PMID:19074867

  16. Bioluminescence imaging of invasive intracranial xenografts: implications for translational research and targeted therapeutics of brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Dinca, Eduard B; Voicu, Ramona V; Ciurea, Alexandru V

    2010-10-01

    Despite decades of study, the etiology of brain cancer remains elusive. However, extensive molecular characterization of primary brain tumors has been accomplished, outlining recurrent features that are proving useful for devising targeted therapies. There are far too few patients available for comparing the efficacy of therapeutic combinations, especially when variations in dosing, frequency, and sequencing are taken into account. Consequently, there is a substantial need for increasing preclinical testing throughput using clinically relevant models. We review luminescent optical imaging for its potential in facilitating in vivo assessment of intracranial tumor growth and response to therapy in rodent orthotopic xenograft models of primary brain malignancies. We review the rationale behind the need of an in vivo model, why orthotopic tumor models displaying an invasive phenotype may be a superior choice when compared to flank-implanted tumors, and what advantages may be drawn from the use of modified cells, suitable for sequential monitoring by in vivo optical imaging. Studies show that luminescent signal correlates highly both with tumor burden and Kaplan-Meier survival curves of rodents bearing intracranial xenografts. We conclude that bioluminescent imaging is a highly sensitive technique for assessment of tumor burden, response to therapy, tumor recurrence, and behavior to salvage therapy, making it a superior option for longitudinal monitoring in intracranial rodent models of primary brain tumors.

  17. p53 Small-molecule inhibitor enhances temozolomide cytotoxic activity against intracranial glioblastoma xenografts.

    PubMed

    Dinca, Eduard B; Lu, Kan V; Sarkaria, Jann N; Pieper, Russell O; Prados, Michael D; Haas-Kogan, Daphne A; Vandenberg, Scott R; Berger, Mitchel S; James, C David

    2008-12-15

    In this study, we investigated the precursor and active forms of a p53 small-molecule inhibitor for their effects on temozolomide (TMZ) antitumor activity against glioblastoma (GBM), using both in vitro and in vivo experimental approaches. Results from in vitro cell viability analysis showed that the cytotoxic activity of TMZ was substantially increased when p53 wild-type (p53(wt)) GBMs were cotreated with the active form of p53 inhibitor, and this heightened cytotoxic response was accompanied by increased poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase cleavage as well as elevated cellular phospho-H2AX. Analysis of the same series of GBMs, as intracranial xenografts in athymic mice, and administering corresponding p53 inhibitor precursor, which is converted to the active compound in vivo, yielded results consistent with the in vitro analyses: TMZ + p53 inhibitor precursor cotreatment of three distinct p53(wt) GBM xenografts resulted in significant enhancement of TMZ antitumor effect relative to treatment with TMZ alone, as indicated by serial bioluminescence monitoring as well as survival analysis (P < 0.001 for cotreatment survival benefit in each case). Mice receiving intracranial injection with p53(null) GBM showed similar survival benefit from TMZ treatment regardless of the presence or absence of p53 inhibitor precursor. In total, our results indicate that the p53 active and precursor inhibitor pair enhances TMZ cytotoxicity in vitro and in vivo, respectively, and do so in a p53-dependent manner.

  18. Small-sample inference for incomplete longitudinal data with truncation and censoring in tumor xenograft models.

    PubMed

    Tan, Ming; Fang, Hong-Bin; Tian, Guo-Liang; Houghton, Peter J

    2002-09-01

    In cancer drug development, demonstrating activity in xenograft models, where mice are grafted with human cancer cells, is an important step in bringing a promising compound to humans. A key outcome variable is the tumor volume measured in a given period of time for groups of mice given different doses of a single or combination anticancer regimen. However, a mouse may die before the end of a study or may be sacrificed when its tumor volume quadruples, and its tumor may be suppressed for some time and then grow back. Thus, incomplete repeated measurements arise. The incompleteness or missingness is also caused by drastic tumor shrinkage (<0.01 cm3) or random truncation. Because of the small sample sizes in these models, asymptotic inferences are usually not appropriate. We propose two parametric test procedures based on the EM algorithm and the Bayesian method to compare treatment effects among different groups while accounting for informative censoring. A real xenograft study on a new antitumor agent, temozolomide, combined with irinotecan is analyzed using the proposed methods.

  19. Orthotopic xenografts of RCC retain histological, immunophenotypic and genetic features of tumors in patients

    PubMed Central

    Grisanzio, Chiara; Seeley, Apryle; Chang, Michelle; Collins, Michael; Di Napoli, Arianna; Cheng, Su-Chun; Percy, Andrew; Beroukhim, Rameen; Signoretti, Sabina

    2013-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is an aggressive malignancy with limited responsiveness to existing treatments. In vivo models of human cancer, including RCC, are critical for developing more effective therapies. Unfortunately, current RCC models do not accurately represent relevant properties of the human disease. The goal of this study was to develop clinically relevant animal models of RCC for preclinical investigations. We transplanted intact human tumor tissue fragments orthotopically in immunodeficient mice. The xenografts were validated by comparing the morphologic, phenotypic, and genetic characteristics of the kidney tumor tissues before and after implantation. Twenty kidney tumors were transplanted into mice. Successful tumor growth was detected in 19 cases (95%). The histopathologic and immunophenotypic features of the xenografts and those of the original tumors largely overlapped in all the cases. Evaluation of genetic alterations in a subset of 10 cases demonstrated that the grafts largely retained the genetic features of the pre-implantation RCC tissues. Indeed, primary tumors and corresponding grafts displayed identical VHL mutations. Moreover, an identical pattern of DNA copy amplification or loss was observed in 6 of 10 cases (60%). In summary, orthotopic engrafting of RCC tissue fragments can be successfully used to generate animal models that closely resemble RCC in patients. These models will be invaluable for in vivo preclinical drug testing, and for deeper understanding of kidney carcinogenesis. PMID:21710693

  20. Experimental investigation of the penetration of ultrasound nanobubbles in a gastric cancer xenograft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Xiaozhou; Wang, Luofu; Guo, Yanli; Tong, Haipeng; Li, Lang; Ding, Jun; Huang, Haiyun

    2013-08-01

    Nanobubbles as a type of ultrasound contrast agent have attracted much interest in recent years due to their many advantages, such as strong penetrating power and high stability. However, there is still insufficient morphological evidence concerning gas-filled nanobubbles in tumor tissue spaces and tumor angiogenesis. We used a gastric cancer xenograft as an example to study this question. Nanobubbles with a particle size of 435.2 ± 60.53 nm were prepared and compared with SonoVue® microbubbles in vitro and in vivo, and they exhibited a superior contrast imaging effect. After excluding the impact of the nanobubbles in blood vessels through saline flush, we used an ultrasound burst and frozen sectioning to investigate the distribution of nanobubbles in the gastric cancer xenografts and confirmed this by transmission electron microscopy. Preliminary results showed that the nanobubbles were able to pass through the gaps between the endothelial cells in the tumor vascular system to enter the tissue space. These findings could provide morphological evidence for extravascular ultrasound imaging of tumors and serve as a foundation for the application of nanobubbles in extravascular tumor-targeted ultrasonic diagnostics and therapy.

  1. Pulmonary vascular disease in mice xenografted with human BM progenitors from patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Farha, Samar; Lichtin, Alan; Graham, Brian; George, Deepa; Aldred, Micheala; Hazen, Stanley L.; Loyd, James; Tuder, Rubin

    2012-01-01

    Hematopoietic myeloid progenitors released into the circulation are able to promote vascular remodeling through endothelium activation and injury. Endothelial injury is central to the development of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), a proliferative vasculopathy of the pulmonary circulation, but the origin of vascular injury is unknown. In the present study, mice transplanted with BM-derived CD133+ progenitor cells from patients with PAH, but not from healthy controls, exhibited morbidity and/or death due to features of PAH: in situ thrombi and endothelial injury, angioproliferative remodeling, and right ventricular hypertrophy and failure. Myeloid progenitors from patients with heritable and/or idiopathic PAH all produced disease in xenografted mice. Analyses of hematopoietic transcription factors and colony formation revealed underlying abnormalities of progenitors that skewed differentiation toward the myeloid-erythroid lineage. The results of the present study suggest a causal role for hematopoietic stem cell abnormalities in vascular injury, right ventricular hypertrophy, and morbidity associated with PAH. PMID:22745307

  2. Patient-Derived Tumor Xenografts Are Susceptible to Formation of Human Lymphocytic Tumors.

    PubMed

    Bondarenko, Gennadiy; Ugolkov, Andrey; Rohan, Stephen; Kulesza, Piotr; Dubrovskyi, Oleksii; Gursel, Demirkan; Mathews, Jeremy; O'Halloran, Thomas V; Wei, Jian J; Mazar, Andrew P

    2015-09-01

    Patient-derived xenograft (PDX) tumor models have emerged as a new approach to evaluate the effects of cancer drugs on patients' personalized tumor grafts enabling to select the best treatment for the cancer patient and providing a new tool for oncology drug developers. Here, we report that human tumors engrafted in immunodeficient mice are susceptible to formation of B-and T-cell PDX tumors. We xenografted human primary and metastatic tumor samples into immunodeficient mice and found that a fraction of PDX tumors generated from patients' samples of breast, colon, pancreatic, bladder and renal cancer were histologically similar to lymphocytic neoplasms. Moreover, we found that the first passage of breast and pancreatic cancer PDX tumors after initial transplantation of the tumor pieces from the same human tumor graft could grow as a lymphocytic tumor in one mouse and as an adenocarcinoma in another mouse. Whereas subcutaneous PDX tumors resembling human adenocarcinoma histology were slow growing and non-metastatic, we found that subcutaneous PDX lymphocytic tumors were fast growing and formed large metastatic lesions in mouse lymph nodes, liver, lungs, and spleen. PDX lymphocytic tumors were comprised of B-cells which were Epstein-Barr virus positive and expressed CD45 and CD20. Because B-cells are typically present in malignant solid tumors, formation of B-cell tumor may evolve in a wide range of PDX tumor models. Although PDX tumor models show great promise in the development of personalized therapy for cancer patients, our results suggest that confidence in any given PDX tumor model requires careful screening of lymphocytic markers. PMID:26476081

  3. Patient-Derived Tumor Xenografts Are Susceptible to Formation of Human Lymphocytic Tumors1

    PubMed Central

    Bondarenko, Gennadiy; Ugolkov, Andrey; Rohan, Stephen; Kulesza, Piotr; Dubrovskyi, Oleksii; Gursel, Demirkan; Mathews, Jeremy; O’Halloran, Thomas V.; Wei, Jian J.; Mazar, Andrew P.

    2015-01-01

    Patient-derived xenograft (PDX) tumor models have emerged as a new approach to evaluate the effects of cancer drugs on patients’ personalized tumor grafts enabling to select the best treatment for the cancer patient and providing a new tool for oncology drug developers. Here, we report that human tumors engrafted in immunodeficient mice are susceptible to formation of B-and T-cell PDX tumors. We xenografted human primary and metastatic tumor samples into immunodeficient mice and found that a fraction of PDX tumors generated from patients’ samples of breast, colon, pancreatic, bladder and renal cancer were histologically similar to lymphocytic neoplasms. Moreover, we found that the first passage of breast and pancreatic cancer PDX tumors after initial transplantation of the tumor pieces from the same human tumor graft could grow as a lymphocytic tumor in one mouse and as an adenocarcinoma in another mouse. Whereas subcutaneous PDX tumors resembling human adenocarcinoma histology were slow growing and non-metastatic, we found that subcutaneous PDX lymphocytic tumors were fast growing and formed large metastatic lesions in mouse lymph nodes, liver, lungs, and spleen. PDX lymphocytic tumors were comprised of B-cells which were Epstein-Barr virus positive and expressed CD45 and CD20. Because B-cells are typically present in malignant solid tumors, formation of B-cell tumor may evolve in a wide range of PDX tumor models. Although PDX tumor models show great promise in the development of personalized therapy for cancer patients, our results suggest that confidence in any given PDX tumor model requires careful screening of lymphocytic markers. PMID:26476081

  4. Bioengineered Human Arginase I with Enhanced Activity and Stability Controls Hepatocellular and Pancreatic Carcinoma Xenografts1

    PubMed Central

    Glazer, Evan S; Stone, Everett M; Zhu, Cihui; Massey, Katherine L; Hamir, Amir N; Curley, Steven A

    2011-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and pancreatic carcinoma (PC) cells often have inherent urea cycle defects rendering them auxotrophic for the amino acid l-arginine (l-arg). Most HCC and PC require extracellular sources of l-arg and undergo cell cycle arrest and apoptosis when l-arg is restricted. Systemic, enzyme-mediated depletion of l-arg has been investigated in mouse models and human trials. Non-human enzymes elicit neutralizing antibodies, whereas human arginases display poor pharmacological properties in serum. Co2+ substitution of the Mn2+ metal cofactor in human arginase I (Co-hArgI) was shown to confer more than 10-fold higher catalytic activity (kcat/Km) and 5-fold greater stability. We hypothesized that the Co-hArgI enzyme would decrease tumor burden by systemic elimination of l-arg in a murine model. Co-hArgI was conjugated to 5-kDa PEG (Co-hArgI-PEG) to enhance circulation persistence. It was used as monotherapy for HCC and PC in vitro and in vivo murine xenografts. The mechanism of cell death was also investigated. Weekly treatment of 8 mg/kg Co-hArgI-PEG effectively controlled human HepG2 (HCC) and Panc-1 (PC) tumor xenografts (P = .001 and P = .03, respectively). Both cell lines underwent apoptosis in vitro with significant increased expression of activated caspase-3 (P < .001). Furthermore, there was evidence of autophagy in vitro and in vivo. We have demonstrated that Co-hArgI-PEG is effective at controlling two types of l-arg-dependent carcinomas. Being a nonessential amino acid, arginine deprivation therapy through Co-hArgI-PEG holds promise as a new therapy in the treatment of HCC and PC. PMID:21633669

  5. Patient-Derived Tumor Xenografts Are Susceptible to Formation of Human Lymphocytic Tumors.

    PubMed

    Bondarenko, Gennadiy; Ugolkov, Andrey; Rohan, Stephen; Kulesza, Piotr; Dubrovskyi, Oleksii; Gursel, Demirkan; Mathews, Jeremy; O'Halloran, Thomas V; Wei, Jian J; Mazar, Andrew P

    2015-09-01

    Patient-derived xenograft (PDX) tumor models have emerged as a new approach to evaluate the effects of cancer drugs on patients' personalized tumor grafts enabling to select the best treatment for the cancer patient and providing a new tool for oncology drug developers. Here, we report that human tumors engrafted in immunodeficient mice are susceptible to formation of B-and T-cell PDX tumors. We xenografted human primary and metastatic tumor samples into immunodeficient mice and found that a fraction of PDX tumors generated from patients' samples of breast, colon, pancreatic, bladder and renal cancer were histologically similar to lymphocytic neoplasms. Moreover, we found that the first passage of breast and pancreatic cancer PDX tumors after initial transplantation of the tumor pieces from the same human tumor graft could grow as a lymphocytic tumor in one mouse and as an adenocarcinoma in another mouse. Whereas subcutaneous PDX tumors resembling human adenocarcinoma histology were slow growing and non-metastatic, we found that subcutaneous PDX lymphocytic tumors were fast growing and formed large metastatic lesions in mouse lymph nodes, liver, lungs, and spleen. PDX lymphocytic tumors were comprised of B-cells which were Epstein-Barr virus positive and expressed CD45 and CD20. Because B-cells are typically present in malignant solid tumors, formation of B-cell tumor may evolve in a wide range of PDX tumor models. Although PDX tumor models show great promise in the development of personalized therapy for cancer patients, our results suggest that confidence in any given PDX tumor model requires careful screening of lymphocytic markers.

  6. Treatment of malignant effusion by oncolytic virotherapy in an experimental subcutaneous xenograft model of lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Malignant pleural effusion (MPE) is associated with advanced stages of lung cancer and is mainly dependent on invasion of the pleura and expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) by cancer cells. As MPE indicates an incurable disease with limited palliative treatment options and poor outcome, there is an urgent need for new and efficient treatment options. Methods In this study, we used subcutaneously generated PC14PE6 lung adenocarcinoma xenografts in athymic mice that developed subcutaneous malignant effusions (ME) which mimic pleural effusions of the orthotopic model. Using this approach monitoring of therapeutic intervention was facilitated by direct observation of subcutaneous ME formation without the need of sacrificing mice or special imaging equipment as in case of MPE. Further, we tested oncolytic virotherapy using Vaccinia virus as a novel treatment modality against ME in this subcutaneous PC14PE6 xenograft model of advanced lung adenocarcinoma. Results We demonstrated significant therapeutic efficacy of Vaccinia virus treatment of both advanced lung adenocarcinoma and tumor-associated ME. We attribute the efficacy to the virus-mediated reduction of tumor cell-derived VEGF levels in tumors, decreased invasion of tumor cells into the peritumoral tissue, and to viral infection of the blood vessel-invading tumor cells. Moreover, we showed that the use of oncolytic Vaccinia virus encoding for a single-chain antibody (scAb) against VEGF (GLAF-1) significantly enhanced mono-therapy of oncolytic treatment. Conclusions Here, we demonstrate for the first time that oncolytic virotherapy using tumor-specific Vaccinia virus represents a novel and promising treatment modality for therapy of ME associated with advanced lung cancer. PMID:23635329

  7. Curcumin treatment alters ERK-1/2 signaling in vitro and inhibits nasopharyngeal carcinoma proliferation in mouse xenografts.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yi-Qiang; Wu, Xian-Bo; Tang, Song-Qi

    2014-01-01

    Curcumin, a plant phenol, has been used for centuries in traditional medicines for its anti-inflammatory and anti-neoplastic properties. The compound is believed to act on a range of proteins involved in cell cycle regulation. In this study, the effect of curcumin on ERK-1/2 pathway protein expression and on proliferation of nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells was investigated. CNE-2Z nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells were cultured with 10, 20, 40, or 80 μM curcumin for 24 h before proliferation was assessed by MTT colorimetry. Cell proliferation was increasingly inhibited as the concentration of curcumin increased (P<0.005). Additionally, Western blotting revealed that expression of p-ERK-1/2, MMP-9, and TIMP-1 was altered following curcumin treatment, also in a dose-dependent manner. Expression of p-ERK-1/2 and MMP-9 decreased, while expression of TIMP-1 increased (P<0.05). Finally, CNE-2Z cells were xenografted under the skin of 18 nude mice. Mice were treated with vehicle only (control), 24 mg/kg curcumin (low-dose group), or 50 mg/kg curcumin (high-dose group) every other day for 40 days beginning 24 h after xenografting. Compared to tumors from the control group, the volume and weight of xenograft tumors was significantly lower in both curcumin groups, with a higher magnitude of difference in the high-dose curcumin group (P<0.05). These results indicate that curcumin treatment can inhibit proliferation of nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells and alter expression of proteins in the ERK-1/2 signaling pathway. Therefore, curcumin warrants further investigation as a potential treatment for nasopharyngeal cancer.

  8. Comparative efficacy of 177Lu and 90Y for Anti-CD20 Pretargeted Radioimmunotherapy in Murine Lymphoma Xenograft Models

    DOE PAGES

    Frost, Sofia H. L.; Frayo, Shani L.; Miller, Brian W.; Orozco, Johnnie J.; Booth, Garrett C.; Hylarides, Mark D.; Lin, Yukang; Green, Damian J.; Gopal, Ajay K.; Pagel, John M.; et al

    2015-03-18

    Purpose Pretargeted radioimmunotherapy (PRIT) is a multi-step method of selectively delivering high doses of radiotherapy to tumor cells while minimizing exposure to surrounding tissues. Yttrium-90 (90Y) and lutetium-177 (177Lu) are two of the most promising beta-particle emitting radionuclides used for radioimmunotherapy, which despite having similar chemistries differ distinctly in terms of radiophysical features. These differences may have important consequences for the absorbed dose to tumors and normal organs. Whereas 90Y has been successfully applied in a number of preclinical and clinical radioimmunotherapy settings, there have been few published pretargeting studies with 177Lu. We therefore compared the therapeutic potential of targetingmore » either 90Y or 177Lu to human B-cell lymphoma xenografts in mice. Methods Parallel experiments evaluating the biodistribution, imaging, dosimetry, therapeutic efficacy, and toxicity were performed in female athymic nude mice bearing either Ramos (Burkitt lymphoma) or Granta (mantle cell lymphoma) xenografts, utilizing an anti-CD20 antibodystreptavidin conjugate (1F5-SA) and an 90Y- or 177Lu-labeled 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA)-biotin second step reagent. Results The two radionuclides displayed comparable biodistributions in tumors and normal organs; however, the absorbed radiation dose delivered to tumor was more than twice as high for 90Y (1.3 Gy/MBq) as for 177Lu (0.6 Gy/MBq). More importantly, therapy with 90Y-DOTAbiotin was dramatically more effective than with 177Lu-DOTA-biotin, with 100% of Ramos xenograft-bearing mice cured with 37 MBq 90Y, whereas 0% were cured using identical amounts of 177Lu-DOTA-biotin. Similar results were observed in mice bearing Granta xenografts, with 80% of the mice cured with 90Y-PRIT and 0% cured with 177Lu-PRIT. Toxicities were comparable with both isotopes. Conclusion 90Y was therapeutically superior to 177Lu for streptavidin-biotin PRIT

  9. Comparative Efficacy of 177Lu and 90Y for Anti-CD20 Pretargeted Radioimmunotherapy in Murine Lymphoma Xenograft Models

    PubMed Central

    Frost, Sofia H. L.; Frayo, Shani L.; Miller, Brian W.; Orozco, Johnnie J.; Booth, Garrett C.; Hylarides, Mark D.; Lin, Yukang; Green, Damian J.; Gopal, Ajay K.; Pagel, John M.; Bäck, Tom A.; Fisher, Darrell R.; Press, Oliver W.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Pretargeted radioimmunotherapy (PRIT) is a multi-step method of selectively delivering high doses of radiotherapy to tumor cells while minimizing exposure to surrounding tissues. Yttrium-90 (90Y) and lutetium-177 (177Lu) are two of the most promising beta-particle emitting radionuclides used for radioimmunotherapy, which despite having similar chemistries differ distinctly in terms of radiophysical features. These differences may have important consequences for the absorbed dose to tumors and normal organs. Whereas 90Y has been successfully applied in a number of preclinical and clinical radioimmunotherapy settings, there have been few published pretargeting studies with 177Lu. We therefore compared the therapeutic potential of targeting either 90Y or 177Lu to human B-cell lymphoma xenografts in mice. Methods Parallel experiments evaluating the biodistribution, imaging, dosimetry, therapeutic efficacy, and toxicity were performed in female athymic nude mice bearing either Ramos (Burkitt lymphoma) or Granta (mantle cell lymphoma) xenografts, utilizing an anti-CD20 antibody-streptavidin conjugate (1F5-SA) and an 90Y- or 177Lu-labeled 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA)-biotin second step reagent. Results The two radionuclides displayed comparable biodistributions in tumors and normal organs; however, the absorbed radiation dose delivered to tumor was more than twice as high for 90Y (1.3 Gy/MBq) as for 177Lu (0.6 Gy/MBq). More importantly, therapy with 90Y-DOTA-biotin was dramatically more effective than with 177Lu-DOTA-biotin, with 100% of Ramos xenograft-bearing mice cured with 37 MBq 90Y, whereas 0% were cured using identical amounts of 177Lu-DOTA-biotin. Similar results were observed in mice bearing Granta xenografts, with 80% of the mice cured with 90Y-PRIT and 0% cured with 177Lu-PRIT. Toxicities were comparable with both isotopes. Conclusion 90Y was therapeutically superior to 177Lu for streptavidin-biotin PRIT approaches in

  10. The Growth of SGC-7901 Tumor Xenografts Was Suppressed by Chinese Bayberry Anthocyanin Extract through Upregulating KLF6 Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yue; Zhang, Xia-nan; Xie, Wen-hua; Zheng, Yi-xiong; Cao, Jin-ping; Cao, Pei-rang; Chen, Qing-jun; Li, Xian; Sun, Chong-de

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the antitumor effect of anthocyanins extracted from Chinese bayberry fruit (Myrica rubra Sieb. et Zucc.), a nude mouse tumor xenograft model was established. Treatments with C3G (cyanidin-3-glucoside, an anthocyanin) significantly suppressed the growth of SGC-7901 tumor xenografts in a dose-dependent manner. Immunohistochemical staining showed a significant increase in p21 expression, indicating that the cell cycle of tumor xenografts was inhibited. qPCR screening showed that C3G treatment up-regulated the expression of the KLF6 gene, which is an important tumor suppressor gene inactivated in many human cancers. Western blot showed that C3G treatments markedly increased KLF6 and p21 protein levels, inhibited CDK4 and Cyclin D1 expression, but did not notably change the expression of p53. These results indicated that KLF6 up-regulates p21 in a p53-independent manner and significantly reduces tumor proliferation. This study provides important information for the possible mechanism of C3G-induced antitumor activity against gastric adenocarcinoma in vivo. PMID:27690088

  11. Near-Infrared Fluorescence Imaging of Carbonic Anhydrase IX in Athymic Mice Bearing HT-29 Tumor Xenografts

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) imaging technology is a highly sensitive imaging modality and has been widely used in noninvasively studying the status of receptor expression in small animal models, with an appropriate NIRF probe targeting a specific receptor. In this report, Cy5.5-conjugated anti-CAIX monoclonal antibody (Mab-Cy5.5) was evaluated in athymic mice bearing HT-29 tumor xenografts in order to investigate the effect of conjugate on tumor targeting efficacy. In vitro binding studies showed that Mab-Cy5.5 could specifically bind to the cells which expressed CAIX. Results from in vivo imaging showed that HT-29 tumor xenografts can be clearly visualized at 48 h after injection of Mab-Cy5.5, and in the blocking experiment, free anti-CAIX antibody effectively blocked the concentration of Mab-Cy5.5 in the tumors. Western blotting and immunohistochemistry analysis of HT-29 tumor xenografts verified the expression of CAIX in HT-29 tumors. Mab-Cy5.5 could specifically bind to the tumors which expressed CAIX. These results suggested that Mab-Cy5.5 was suitable for CAIX expression imaging in the preclinical research. PMID:27652266

  12. Serum CEA levels in patients with gastric carcinoma correlate with the tumorigenicity of their xenografts in nude mice.

    PubMed

    Kiyama, T; Onda, M; Tokunaga, A; Okuda, T; Mizutani, T; Yoshiyuki, T; Shimizu, Y; Nishi, K; Matsukura, N; Tanaka, N

    1991-01-01

    We examined the correlation among preoperative serum carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) levels, staining properties of the tumors by CEA immunohistochemistry and the tumorigenicity of their xenografts in nude mice, in 28 patients with gastric cancer. Eleven (40 per cent) of them were positive for serum CEA (greater than or equal to 2.5 ng/ml) and seven (25 per cent) of the xenografts were tumorigenic in nude mice. All the tumorigenic cases were positive for serum CEA (p less than 0.001) and the mean value of the serum CEA level in the patients with tumorigenic neoplasms was 20.8 ng/ml, being significantly higher than that (1.4 ng/ml) in the patients with non-tumorigenic neoplasms (p less than 0.001). Twenty-five of the 28 carcinomas (89 per cent) were positive for CEA staining in their cancer cells by the ABC method and CEA localization correlated with tumorigenicity (p less than 0.05). These results suggest that the serum CEA level in patients is correlated with the tumorigenicity of their gastric carcinoma xenografts in nude mice and may account for the poor prognosis of patients with high serum CEA.

  13. Near-Infrared Fluorescence Imaging of Carbonic Anhydrase IX in Athymic Mice Bearing HT-29 Tumor Xenografts.

    PubMed

    Li, Jianbo; Bao, Baoliang; Liu, Lei; Wang, Xuemei

    2016-01-01

    Near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) imaging technology is a highly sensitive imaging modality and has been widely used in noninvasively studying the status of receptor expression in small animal models, with an appropriate NIRF probe targeting a specific receptor. In this report, Cy5.5-conjugated anti-CAIX monoclonal antibody (Mab-Cy5.5) was evaluated in athymic mice bearing HT-29 tumor xenografts in order to investigate the effect of conjugate on tumor targeting efficacy. In vitro binding studies showed that Mab-Cy5.5 could specifically bind to the cells which expressed CAIX. Results from in vivo imaging showed that HT-29 tumor xenografts can be clearly visualized at 48 h after injection of Mab-Cy5.5, and in the blocking experiment, free anti-CAIX antibody effectively blocked the concentration of Mab-Cy5.5 in the tumors. Western blotting and immunohistochemistry analysis of HT-29 tumor xenografts verified the expression of CAIX in HT-29 tumors. Mab-Cy5.5 could specifically bind to the tumors which expressed CAIX. These results suggested that Mab-Cy5.5 was suitable for CAIX expression imaging in the preclinical research. PMID:27652266

  14. Near-Infrared Fluorescence Imaging of Carbonic Anhydrase IX in Athymic Mice Bearing HT-29 Tumor Xenografts

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) imaging technology is a highly sensitive imaging modality and has been widely used in noninvasively studying the status of receptor expression in small animal models, with an appropriate NIRF probe targeting a specific receptor. In this report, Cy5.5-conjugated anti-CAIX monoclonal antibody (Mab-Cy5.5) was evaluated in athymic mice bearing HT-29 tumor xenografts in order to investigate the effect of conjugate on tumor targeting efficacy. In vitro binding studies showed that Mab-Cy5.5 could specifically bind to the cells which expressed CAIX. Results from in vivo imaging showed that HT-29 tumor xenografts can be clearly visualized at 48 h after injection of Mab-Cy5.5, and in the blocking experiment, free anti-CAIX antibody effectively blocked the concentration of Mab-Cy5.5 in the tumors. Western blotting and immunohistochemistry analysis of HT-29 tumor xenografts verified the expression of CAIX in HT-29 tumors. Mab-Cy5.5 could specifically bind to the tumors which expressed CAIX. These results suggested that Mab-Cy5.5 was suitable for CAIX expression imaging in the preclinical research.

  15. Antitumor effect of Deoxypodophyllotoxin on human breast cancer xenograft transplanted in BALB/c nude mice model.

    PubMed

    Khaled, Meyada; Belaaloui, Ghania; Jiang, Zhen-Zhou; Zhu, Xiong; Zhang, Lu-Yong

    2016-10-01

    Recently, biologically active compounds isolated from plants used in herbal medicine have been the center of interest. Deoxypodophyllotoxin (DPT), structurally closely related to the lignan podophyllotoxin, was found to be a potent antitumor and antiproliferative agent, in several tumor cells, in vitro. However, DPT has not been used clinically yet because of the lack of in vivo studies. This study is the first report demonstrating the antitumor effect of DPT on MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer xenografts in nude mice. DPT, significantly, inhibited the growth of MDA-MB-231 xenograft in BALB/c nude mice. The T/C value (the value of the relative tumor volume of treatment group compared to the control group) of groups treated with 5, 10, and 20 mg/kg of intravenous DPT-HP-β-CD was 42.87%, 34.04% and 9.63%, respectively, suggesting the positive antitumor activity of DPT. In addition, the antitumor effect of DPT-HP-β-CD (20 mg/kg) in human breast cancer MDA-MB-231 xenograft was more effective than etoposide (VP-16) (20 mg/kg) and docetaxel (20 mg/kg). These findings suggest that this drug is a promising chemotherapy candidate against human breast carcinoma. PMID:27578026

  16. Antiproliferative effect of methyl-beta-cyclodextrin in vitro and in human tumour xenografted athymic nude mice.

    PubMed Central

    Grosse, P. Y.; Bressolle, F.; Pinguet, F.

    1998-01-01

    The anti-tumour activity of methyl-beta-cyclodextrin (MEBCD), a cyclic oligosaccharide known for its interaction with the plasma membrane, was investigated in vitro and in vivo and compared with that of doxorubicin (DOX) in the human tumour models MCF7 breast carcinoma and A2780 ovarian carcinoma. In vitro proliferation was assessed using the MTT assay. In vivo studies were carried out using xenografted Swiss nude mice injected weekly i.p. with MEBCD at 300 or 800 mg kg(-1) or DOX at 2 mg kg(-1), during 2 months. Under these conditions, MEBCD was active against MCF7 and A2780 cell lines and tumour xenografts. For each tumour model, the tumoral volume of the xenografted mice treated with MEBCD was at least twofold reduced compared with the control group. In the MCF7 model, MEBCD (800 mg kg(-1)) was more active than DOX (2 mg kg(-1)). After 56 days of treatment with MEBCD, no toxicologically meaningful differences were observed in macroscopic and microscopic parameters compared with controls. The accumulation of MEBCD in normal and tumour tissues was also assessed using a chromatographic method. Results indicated that after a single injection of MEBCD, tumour, liver and kidneys accumulated the highest concentrations of MEBCD. These results provided a basis for the potential therapeutic application of MEBCD in cancer therapy. PMID:9820174

  17. Intratumoral spread of wild-type adenovirus is limited after local injection of human xenograft tumors: virus persists and spreads systemically at late time points.

    PubMed

    Sauthoff, Harald; Hu, Jing; Maca, Cielo; Goldman, Michael; Heitner, Sheila; Yee, Herman; Pipiya, Teona; Rom, William N; Hay, John G

    2003-03-20

    Oncolytic replicating adenoviruses are a promising new modality for the treatment of cancer. Despite the assumed biologic advantage of continued viral replication and spread from infected to uninfected cancer cells, early clinical trials demonstrate that the efficacy of current vectors is limited. In xenograft tumor models using immune-incompetent mice, wild-type adenovirus is also rarely able to eradicate established tumors. This suggests that innate immune mechanisms may clear the virus or that barriers within the tumor prevent viral spread. The aim of this study was to evaluate the kinetics of viral distribution and spread after intratumoral injection of virus in a human tumor xenograft model. After intratumoral injection of wild-type virus, high levels of titratable virus persisted within the xenograft tumors for at least 8 weeks. Virus distribution within the tumors as determined by immunohistochemistry was patchy, and virus-infected cells appeared to be flanked by tumor necrosis and connective tissue. The close proximity of virus-infected cells to the tumor-supporting structure, which is of murine origin, was clearly demonstrated using a DNA probe that specifically hybridizes to the B1 murine DNA repeat. Importantly, although virus was cleared from the circulation 6 hr after intratumoral injection, after 4 weeks systemic spread of virus was detected. In addition, vessels of infected tumors were surrounded by necrosis and an advancing rim of virus-infected tumor cells, suggesting reinfection of the xenograft tumor through the vasculature. These data suggest that human adenoviral spread within tumor xenografts is impaired by murine tumor-supporting structures. In addition, there is evidence for continued viral replication within the tumor, with subsequent systemic dissemination and reinfection of tumors via the tumor vasculature. Despite the limitations of immune-incompetent models, an understanding of the interactions between the virus and the tumor

  18. The Anti-Proliferative Effect of Boron Neutron Capture Therapy in a Prostate Cancer Xenograft Model

    PubMed Central

    Yoshikawa, Yuki; Takai, Tomoaki; Ibuki, Naokazu; Hirano, Hajime; Nomi, Hayahito; Kawabata, Shinji; Kiyama, Satoshi; Miyatake, Shin-Ichi; Kuroiwa, Toshihiko; Suzuki, Minoru; Kirihata, Mitsunori; Azuma, Haruhito

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a selective radiation treatment for tumors that preferentially accumulate drugs carrying the stable boron isotope, 10B. BNCT has been evaluated clinically as an alternative to conventional radiation therapy for the treatment of brain tumors, and more recently, recurrent advanced head and neck cancer. Here we investigated the effect of BNCT on prostate cancer (PCa) using an in vivo mouse xenograft model that we have developed. Materials and Methods Mice bearing the xenotransplanted androgen-independent human PCa cell line, PC3, were divided into four groups: Group 1: untreated controls; Group 2: Boronophenylalanine (BPA); Group 3: neutron; Group 4: BPA-mediated BNCT. We compared xenograft growth among these groups, and the body weight and any motility disturbance were recorded. Immunohistochemical (IHC) studies of the proliferation marker, Ki-67, and TUNEL staining were performed 9 weeks after treatment. Results The in vivo studies demonstrated that BPA-mediated BNCT significantly delayed tumor growth in comparison with the other groups, without any severe adverse events. There was a significant difference in the rate of freedom from gait abnormalities between the BPA-mediated BNCT group and the other groups. The IHC studies revealed that BNCT treatment significantly reduced the number of Ki-67-positive cells in comparison with the controls (mean±SD 6.9±1.5 vs 12.7±4.0, p<0.05), while there was no difference in the number of apoptotic cells, suggesting that BPA-mediated BNCT reduced PCa progression without affecting apoptosis at 9 weeks post-treatment. Conclusions This study has provided the first preclinical proof-of-principle data to indicate that BPA-mediated BNCT reduces the in vivo growth of PCa. Although further studies will be necessary, BNCT might be a novel potential treatment for PCa. PMID:26325195

  19. beta 1 integrin inhibition dramatically enhances radiotherapy efficacy in human breast cancer xenografts

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Catherine C.; Park, Catherine C.; Zhang, Hui J.; Yao, Evelyn S.; Park, Chong J.; Bissell, Mina J.

    2008-06-02

    {beta}1 integrin signaling has been shown to mediate cellular resistance to apoptosis after exposure to ionizing radiation (IR). Other signaling molecules that increase resistance include Akt, which promotes cell survival downstream of {beta}1 integrin signaling. We showed previously that {beta}1 integrin inhibitory antibodies, AIIB2, enhance apoptosis and decrease growth in human breast cancer cells in 3 dimensional laminin-rich extracellular matrix (3D lrECM) cultures and in vivo. Here we asked whether AIIB2 could synergize with IR to modify Akt-mediated IR resistance. We used 3D lrECM cultures to test the optimal combination of AIIB2 with IR treatment of two breast cancer cell lines, MCF-7 and HMT3522-T4-2, as well as T4-2 myr-Akt breast cancer colonies or HMT3522-S-1, which form normal organotypic structures in 3D lrECM. Colonies were assayed for apoptosis and {beta}1 integrin/Akt signaling pathways were evaluated using western blot. In addition, mice bearing MCF-7 xenografts were used to validate the findings in 3D lrECM. We report that AIIB2 increased apoptosis optimally post-IR by down regulating Akt in breast cancer colonies in 3D lrECM. In vivo, addition of AIIB2 after IR significantly enhanced tumor growth inhibition and apoptosis compared to either treatment alone. Remarkably, the degree of tumor growth inhibition using AIIB2 plus 2 Gy radiation was similar to that of 8 Gy alone. We showed previously that AIIB2 had no discernible toxicity in mice; here, its addition allowed for a significant reduction in the IR dose that was necessary to achieve comparable growth inhibition and apoptosis in breast cancer xenografts in vivo.

  20. Differential effects of human interferon alpha and interferon gamma on xenografted human thyroid tissue in severe combined immunodeficient mice and nude mice.

    PubMed

    Kawai, K; Enomoto, T; Fornasier, V; Resetkova, E; Volpé, R

    1997-03-01

    We have studied the in vivo effects of human interferon alpha (IFN-alpha) and interferon gamma (IFN-gamma) administration on human thyroid tissue xenografted into two mouse strains: severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice and nude mice. Human lymphocytes survive in SCID mice but are lysed in nude mice. Thyroid tissues from Graves' disease or Hashimoto's thyroiditis, or paranodular [normal, (N)] tissue was xenografted into SCID mice (0.8 g/mouse) pretreated with anti-asialo GM-1 antiserum and radiation and also into nude mice. One week after xenografting, SCID and nude mice were divided into three groups. Group A was treated with IFN-alpha intraperitoneally (2,000 units/mouse) three times weekly; group B was treated with IFN-gamma similarly; group C was treated with phosphate buffered saline (PBS) only (control). Autologous human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were added to mice receiving N xenografts. Blood was taken every 2 weeks for levels of IgG and thyroid antibodies (TAb). After 6 weeks of treatment, mice were sacrificed, and xenograft thyrocyte histocompatibility leukocyte antigen (HLA-DR) and intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM-1) expression were measured. In addition, thyrocyte cultures were stimulated in vitro with 200 units/ml of either IFN-alpha or IFN-gamma or PBS (control). SCID mice xenografted with autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD) in group A showed a significantly higher TAb production than group C, whereas in group B, TAb production was not statistically increased compared to control (group C). SCID mice xenografted with N did not produce TAb in any group, nor did nude mice xenografted with AITD. Thyrocyte HLA-DR expression was markedly increased in group A and B in SCID mice xenografted with Graves' disease, Hashimoto's thyroiditis, and N tissue compared to group C. In contrast, only group B (IFN-gamma) showed an increase in thyrocyte HLA-DR in nude mice. In the in vitro studies, only IFN-gamma (not IFN-alpha) stimulated

  1. Xenograft models for undifferentiated pleomorphic sarcoma not otherwise specified are essential for preclinical testing of therapeutic agents

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Marc; Graf, Claudine; Tonak, Marcus; Radsak, Markus P.; Bopp, Tobias; Bals, Robert; Bohle, Rainer M.; Theobald, Matthias; Rommens, Pol-Maria; Proschek, Dirk; Wehler, Thomas C.

    2016-01-01

    Undifferentiated pleomorphic sarcoma not otherwise specified belongs to the heterogeneous group of soft tissue tumors. It is preferentially located in the upper and lower extremities of the body, and surgical resection remains the only curative treatment. Preclinical animal models are crucial to improve the development of novel chemotherapeutic agents for the treatment of undifferentiated pleomorphic sarcoma. However, this approach has been hampered by the lack of reproducible animal models. The present study established two xenograft animal models generated from stable non-clonal cell cultures, and investigated the difference in chemotherapeutic effects on tumor growth between undifferentiated pleomorphic sarcoma in vivo and in vitro. The cell cultures were generated from freshly isolated tumor tissues of two patients with undifferentiated pleomorphic sarcoma. For the in vivo analysis, these cells were injected subcutaneously into immunodeficient mice. The mice were monitored for tumor appearance and treated with the most common or innovative chemotherapeutic agents available to date. Furthermore, the same drugs were administered to in vitro cell cultures. The most effective tumor growth inhibition in vitro was observed with doxorubicin and the histone deacetylase inhibitor suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA), also known as vorinostat. In the in vivo xenograft mouse model, the combination of doxorubicin and the tyrosine kinase inhibitor pazopanib induced a significant tumor reduction. By contrast, treatment with vorinostat did not reduce the tumor growth. Taken together, the results obtained from drug testing in vitro differed significantly from the in vivo results. Therefore, the novel and reproducible xenograft animal model established in the present study demonstrated that in vivo models are required to test potential chemotherapeutic agents for the treatment of undifferentiated pleomorphic sarcoma prior to clinical use, since animal models are more similar

  2. High-throughput screening using patient-derived tumor xenografts to predict clinical trial drug response.

    PubMed

    Gao, Hui; Korn, Joshua M; Ferretti, Stéphane; Monahan, John E; Wang, Youzhen; Singh, Mallika; Zhang, Chao; Schnell, Christian; Yang, Guizhi; Zhang, Yun; Balbin, O Alejandro; Barbe, Stéphanie; Cai, Hongbo; Casey, Fergal; Chatterjee, Susmita; Chiang, Derek Y; Chuai, Shannon; Cogan, Shawn M; Collins, Scott D; Dammassa, Ernesta; Ebel, Nicolas; Embry, Millicent; Green, John; Kauffmann, Audrey; Kowal, Colleen; Leary, Rebecca J; Lehar, Joseph; Liang, Ying; Loo, Alice; Lorenzana, Edward; Robert McDonald, E; McLaughlin, Margaret E; Merkin, Jason; Meyer, Ronald; Naylor, Tara L; Patawaran, Montesa; Reddy, Anupama; Röelli, Claudia; Ruddy, David A; Salangsang, Fernando; Santacroce, Francesca; Singh, Angad P; Tang, Yan; Tinetto, Walter; Tobler, Sonja; Velazquez, Roberto; Venkatesan, Kavitha; Von Arx, Fabian; Wang, Hui Qin; Wang, Zongyao; Wiesmann, Marion; Wyss, Daniel; Xu, Fiona; Bitter, Hans; Atadja, Peter; Lees, Emma; Hofmann, Francesco; Li, En; Keen, Nicholas; Cozens, Robert; Jensen, Michael Rugaard; Pryer, Nancy K; Williams, Juliet A; Sellers, William R

    2015-11-01

    Profiling candidate therapeutics with limited cancer models during preclinical development hinders predictions of clinical efficacy and identifying factors that underlie heterogeneous patient responses for patient-selection strategies. We established ∼1,000 patient-derived tumor xenograft models (PDXs) with a diverse set of driver mutations. With these PDXs, we performed in vivo compound screens using a 1 × 1 × 1 experimental design (PDX clinical trial or PCT) to assess the population responses to 62 treatments across six indications. We demonstrate both the reproducibility and the clinical translatability of this approach by identifying associations between a genotype and drug response, and established mechanisms of resistance. In addition, our results suggest that PCTs may represent a more accurate approach than cell line models for assessing the clinical potential of some therapeutic modalities. We therefore propose that this experimental paradigm could potentially improve preclinical evaluation of treatment modalities and enhance our ability to predict clinical trial responses.

  3. Modulation of host CD59 expression by varicella-zoster virus in human xenografts in vivo.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Wang, Xin; Yang, Lianwei; Fu, Wenkun; Pan, Dequan; Liu, Jian; Ye, Jianghui; Zhao, Qinjian; Zhu, Hua; Cheng, Tong; Xia, Ningshao

    2016-04-01

    Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) is the causative agent of both chickenpox (varicella) and shingles (zoster). VZV survives host defenses, even with an intact immune system, and disseminates in the host before causing disease. To date, several diverse immunomodulatory strategies used by VZV to undermine host immunity have been identified; however, few studies have addressed the complement evasion strategies used by this virus. Here, we show that expression of CD59, which is a key member of host regulators of complement activation (RCA), is significantly upregulated in response to VZV infection in human T cells and dorsal root ganglia (DRG) but not in human skin xenografts in SCID-hu mice in vivo. This is the first report demonstrating that VZV infection upregulates host CD59 expression in a tissue-specific manner in vivo, which may aid VZV in complement evasion and pathogenesis. PMID:26891237

  4. Modulation of host CD59 expression by varicella-zoster virus in human xenografts in vivo.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Wang, Xin; Yang, Lianwei; Fu, Wenkun; Pan, Dequan; Liu, Jian; Ye, Jianghui; Zhao, Qinjian; Zhu, Hua; Cheng, Tong; Xia, Ningshao

    2016-04-01

    Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) is the causative agent of both chickenpox (varicella) and shingles (zoster). VZV survives host defenses, even with an intact immune system, and disseminates in the host before causing disease. To date, several diverse immunomodulatory strategies used by VZV to undermine host immunity have been identified; however, few studies have addressed the complement evasion strategies used by this virus. Here, we show that expression of CD59, which is a key member of host regulators of complement activation (RCA), is significantly upregulated in response to VZV infection in human T cells and dorsal root ganglia (DRG) but not in human skin xenografts in SCID-hu mice in vivo. This is the first report demonstrating that VZV infection upregulates host CD59 expression in a tissue-specific manner in vivo, which may aid VZV in complement evasion and pathogenesis.

  5. Efficacy and Hemotoxicity of Stealth Doxorubicin-Loaded Magnetic Nanovectors on Breast Cancer Xenografts.

    PubMed

    Gautier, J; Allard-Vannier, E; Burlaud-Gaillard, J; Domenech, J; Chourpa, I

    2015-01-01

    In the field of oncology, research is now focused on the development of theranostic nanosystems that combine the functions of drug delivery and imaging for diagnosis/monitoring. In this context, we designed polyethylene glycol (PEG)ylated superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) for the delivery of doxorubicin (DOX), an antineoplastic agent. These DOX-loaded PEGylated SPIONs, or DLPS, should be useful for the delivery of DOX in vivo, as well as for magnetic drug targeting (MDT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential applications of DLPS in vivo as drug carrier systems for the reduction of xenograft breast tumors induced in nude mice. Prior to the animal model experiments, the main internalization pathways for the nanovectors in MDA-MB435 breast cancer cells were determined to be based on caveolae- and clathrin-mediated endocytosis. The time- and quantity-dependence of the nanoparticle uptake by the cells altered the in vitro cytotoxicity of the DLPS. The in vitro antiproliferative effect of the DLPS was dependent not only on DOX concentration, but also on the efficacy of nanoparticle internalization. Evaluation of the effect of DLPS treatment on xenograft tumors in nude mice showed that DLPS limited tumor growth in a manner comparable to that of free DOX under normal conditions of tumor growth. The application of an external magnetic field on tumors, i.e., MDT, did not improve the efficacy of the DLPS treatment. Nevertheless, the vectorization of DOX with DLPS appears to limit the hematologic side effects usually associated with DOX treatment.

  6. Efficacy and Hemotoxicity of Stealth Doxorubicin-Loaded Magnetic Nanovectors on Breast Cancer Xenografts.

    PubMed

    Gautier, J; Allard-Vannier, E; Burlaud-Gaillard, J; Domenech, J; Chourpa, I

    2015-01-01

    In the field of oncology, research is now focused on the development of theranostic nanosystems that combine the functions of drug delivery and imaging for diagnosis/monitoring. In this context, we designed polyethylene glycol (PEG)ylated superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) for the delivery of doxorubicin (DOX), an antineoplastic agent. These DOX-loaded PEGylated SPIONs, or DLPS, should be useful for the delivery of DOX in vivo, as well as for magnetic drug targeting (MDT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential applications of DLPS in vivo as drug carrier systems for the reduction of xenograft breast tumors induced in nude mice. Prior to the animal model experiments, the main internalization pathways for the nanovectors in MDA-MB435 breast cancer cells were determined to be based on caveolae- and clathrin-mediated endocytosis. The time- and quantity-dependence of the nanoparticle uptake by the cells altered the in vitro cytotoxicity of the DLPS. The in vitro antiproliferative effect of the DLPS was dependent not only on DOX concentration, but also on the efficacy of nanoparticle internalization. Evaluation of the effect of DLPS treatment on xenograft tumors in nude mice showed that DLPS limited tumor growth in a manner comparable to that of free DOX under normal conditions of tumor growth. The application of an external magnetic field on tumors, i.e., MDT, did not improve the efficacy of the DLPS treatment. Nevertheless, the vectorization of DOX with DLPS appears to limit the hematologic side effects usually associated with DOX treatment. PMID:26301312

  7. Effects of ATRA combined with citrus and ginger-derived compounds in human SCC xenografts

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background NF-κB is a survival signaling transcription factor complex involved in the malignant phenotype of many cancers, including squamous cell carcinomas (SCC). The citrus coumarin, auraptene (AUR), and the ethno-medicinal ginger (Alpinia galanga) phenylpropanoid, 1'-acetoxychavicol acetate (ACA), were previously shown to suppress 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) induced mouse skin tumor promotion. The goal of the present study was to determine whether AUR and ACA are effective either alone or in combination with all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) for suppressing SCC tumor growth. Methods We first determined the effects of orally administered ACA (100 mg/kg bw) and AUR (200 mg/kg bw) on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced NF-κB activation in NF-κB-RE-luc (Oslo) luciferase reporter mice. Dietary administration of AUR and ACA ± ATRA was next evaluated in a xenograft mouse model. Female SCID/bg mice were fed diets containing the experimental compounds, injected with 1 × 106 SRB12-p9 cells s.c., palpated and weighed twice a week for 28 days following injection. Results Both ACA and AUR suppressed LPS-induced NF-κB activation in the report mice. In the xenograft model, AUR (1000 ppm) and ACA (500 ppm) modestly suppressed tumor volume. However, in combination with ATRA at 5, 10, and 30 ppm, ACA 500 ppm significantly inhibited tumor volume by 56%, 62%, and 98%, respectively. The effect of ATRA alone was 37%, 33%, and 93% inhibition, respectively. AUR 1000 ppm and ATRA 10 ppm were not very effective when administered alone, but when combined, strongly suppressed tumor volume by 84%. Conclusions Citrus AUR may synergize the tumor suppressive effects of ATRA, while ACA may prolong the inhibitory effects of ATRA. Further studies will be necessary to determine whether these combinations may be useful in the control of human SCC. PMID:20659317

  8. Efficacy of protracted temozolomide dosing is limited in MGMT unmethylated GBM xenograft models

    PubMed Central

    Cen, Ling; Carlson, Brett L.; Pokorny, Jenny L.; Mladek, Ann C.; Grogan, Patrick T.; Schroeder, Mark A.; Decker, Paul A.; Anderson, S. Keith; Giannini, Caterina; Wu, Wenting; Ballman, Karla V.; Kitange, Gaspar J.; Sarkaria, Jann N.

    2013-01-01

    Background Temozolomide (TMZ) is important chemotherapy for glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), but the optimal dosing schedule is unclear. Methods The efficacies of different clinically relevant dosing regimens were compared in a panel of 7 primary GBM xenografts in an intracranial therapy evaluation model. Results Protracted TMZ therapy (TMZ daily M–F, 3 wk every 4) provided superior survival to a placebo-treated group in 1 of 4 O6-DNA methylguanine-methyltransferase (MGMT) promoter hypermethylated lines (GBM12) and none of the 3 MGMT unmethylated lines, while standard therapy (TMZ daily M–F, 1 wk every 4) provided superior survival to the placebo-treated group in 2 of 3 MGMT unmethylated lines (GBM14 and GBM43) and none of the methylated lines. In comparing GBM12, GBM14, and GBM43 intracranial specimens, both GBM14 and GBM43 mice treated with protracted TMZ had a significant elevation in MGMT levels compared with placebo. Similarly, high MGMT was found in a second model of acquired TMZ resistance in GBM14 flank xenografts, and resistance was reversed in vitro by treatment with the MGMT inhibitor O6-benzylguanine, demonstrating a mechanistic link between MGMT overexpression and TMZ resistance in this line. Additionally, in an analysis of gene expression data, comparison of parental and TMZ-resistant GBM14 demonstrated enrichment of functional ontologies for cell cycle control within the S, G2, and M phases of the cell cycle and DNA damage checkpoints. Conclusions Across the 7 tumor models studied, there was no consistent difference between protracted and standard TMZ regimens. The efficacy of protracted TMZ regimens may be limited in a subset of MGMT unmethylated tumors by induction of MGMT expression. PMID:23479134

  9. Gene expression profiling upon (212) Pb-TCMC-trastuzumab treatment in the LS-174T i.p. xenograft model.

    PubMed

    Yong, Kwon J; Milenic, Diane E; Baidoo, Kwamena E; Kim, Young-Seung; Brechbiel, Martin W

    2013-10-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that therapy with (212) Pb-TCMC-trastuzumab resulted in (1) induction of apoptosis, (2) G2/M arrest, and (3) blockage of double-strand DNA damage repair in LS-174T i.p. (intraperitoneal) xenografts. To further understand the molecular basis of the cell killing efficacy of (212) Pb-TCMC-trastuzumab, gene expression profiling was performed with LS-174T xenografts 24 h after exposure to (212) Pb-TCMC-trastuzumab. DNA damage response genes (84) were screened using a quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction array (qRT-PCR array). Differentially regulated genes were identified following exposure to (212) Pb-TCMC-trastuzumab. These included genes involved in apoptosis (ABL, GADD45α, GADD45γ, PCBP4, and p73), cell cycle (ATM, DDIT3, GADD45α, GTSE1, MKK6, PCBP4, and SESN1), and damaged DNA binding (DDB) and repair (ATM and BTG2). The stressful growth arrest conditions provoked by (212) Pb-TCMC-trastuzumab were found to induce genes involved in apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in the G2/M phase. The expression of genes involved in DDB and single-strand DNA breaks was also enhanced by (212) Pb-TCMC-trastuzumab while no modulation of genes involved in double-strand break repair was apparent. Furthermore, the p73/GADD45 signaling pathway mediated by p38 kinase signaling may be involved in the cellular response, as evidenced by the enhanced expression of genes and proteins of this pathway. These results further support the previously described cell killing mechanism by (212) Pb-TCMC-trastuzumab in the same LS-174T i.p. xenograft. Insight into these mechanisms could lead to improved strategies for rational application of radioimmunotherapy using α-particle emitters.

  10. TSU-68 (SU6668) inhibits local tumor growth and liver metastasis of human colon cancer xenografts via anti-angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Yorozuya, Kyoko; Kubota, Tetsuro; Watanabe, Masahiko; Hasegawa, Hirotoshi; Ozawa, Soji; Kitajima, Masaki; Chikahisa, Lumi Muramatsu; Yamada, Yuji

    2005-09-01

    A number of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) are involved in angiogenesis. TSU-68 (SU-6668) was developed as an inhibitor of RTKs involved in VEGF, bFGF and PDGF signaling, which then inhibits endothelial cell proliferation. We investigated the antitumor effects of TSU-68 against human colon cancer xenografts in male SCID mice and its anti-angiogenic activity using a dorsal air-sac (DAS) assay. TSU-68 was administered orally at a dose of 200 mg/kg twice daily. Mice bearing human colon carcinoma, HT-29, or WiDr xenografts were treated for 16 days. To determine the effect on hepatic metastasis, cell suspensions of HT-29 or WAV-I were injected into the spleen of mice on day 0, and mice treated for 28 days starting from day 1. For the DAS assay, HT-29, WiDr or WAV-I cells suspended in PBS at 2 x 10(7) cells/Millipore chamber were implanted subcutaneously into SCID mice, which were then treated from day 0 to 5, On day 6, the anti-angiogenic effects were assessed. Results indicated that TSU-68 significantly inhibited the growth of subcutaneous tumors. In the hepatic metastasis model, liver weights of the TSU-68-treated group were significantly reduced, compared to those of control mice. In the DAS assay, the angiogenic indices of the treated groups were significantly decreased for HT-29, WiDr and WAV-I tumors, with T/C ratios of 13.4, 50 and 35.3%, respectively. As TSU-68 significantly inhibited tumor growth and liver metastasis formation of human colon cancer xenografts, probably through anti-angiogenic activity, this agent may be useful for the treatment of colon cancer.

  11. By activating Fas/ceramide synthase 6/p38 kinase in lipid rafts, stichoposide D inhibits growth of leukemia xenografts.

    PubMed

    Yun, Seong-Hoon; Park, Eun-Seon; Shin, Sung-Won; Ju, Mi-Ha; Han, Jin-Yeong; Jeong, Jin-Sook; Kim, Sung-Hyun; Stonik, Valentin A; Kwak, Jong-Young; Park, Joo-In

    2015-09-29

    Stichoposide D (STD) is a marine triterpene glycoside isolated from sea cucumbers. We examined the molecular mechanisms underlying the antitumor activity of STD in human leukemia cells. The role of Fas (CD95), ceramide synthase 6 (CerS6) and p38 kinase during STD-induced apoptosis was examined in human leukemia cells. In addition, the antitumor effects of STD in K562 and HL-60 leukemia xenograft models were investigated. We found that STD induces Fas translocation to lipid rafts, and thus mediates cell apoptosis. We also observed the activation of CerS6 and p38 kinase during STD-induced apoptosis. The use of methyl-β-cyclodextrin and nystatin to disrupt lipid rafts prevents the clustering of Fas and the activation of CerS6 and p38 kinase, and also inhibits STD-induced apoptosis. Specific inhibition by Fas, CerS6, and p38 kinase siRNA transfection partially blocked STD-induced apoptosis. In addition, STD has antitumor activity through the activation of CerS6 and p38 kinase without displaying any toxicity in HL-60 and K562 xenograft models. We observed that the anti-tumor effect of STD is partially prevented in CerS6 shRNA-silenced xenograft models. We first report that Fas/CerS6/p38 kinase activation in lipid rafts by STD is involved in its anti-leukemic activity. We also established that STD is able to enhance the chemosensitivity of K562 cells to etoposide or Ara-C. These data suggest that STD may be used alone or in combination with other chemotherapeutic agents to treat leukemia.

  12. Reproducibility of Differential Proteomic Technologies in CPTAC Fractionated Xenografts

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The NCI Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium (CPTAC) employed a pair of reference xenograft proteomes for initial platform validation and ongoing quality control of its data collection for The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) tumors. These two xenografts, representing basal and luminal-B human breast cancer, were fractionated and analyzed on six mass spectrometers in a total of 46 replicates divided between iTRAQ and label-free technologies, spanning a total of 1095 LC–MS/MS experiments. These data represent a unique opportunity to evaluate the stability of proteomic differentiation by mass spectrometry over many months of time for individual instruments or across instruments running dissimilar workflows. We evaluated iTRAQ reporter ions, label-free spectral counts, and label-free extracted ion chromatograms as strategies for data interpretation (source code is available from http://homepages.uc.edu/~wang2x7/Research.htm). From these assessments, we found that differential genes from a single replicate were confirmed by other replicates on the same instrument from 61 to 93% of the time. When comparing across different instruments and quantitative technologies, using multiple replicates, differential genes were reproduced by other data sets from 67 to 99% of the time. Projecting gene differences to biological pathways and networks increased the degree of similarity. These overlaps send an encouraging message about the maturity of technologies for proteomic differentiation. PMID:26653538

  13. Scabraside D Extracted from Holothuria scabra Induces Apoptosis and Inhibits Growth of Human Cholangiocarcinoma Xenografts in Mice.

    PubMed

    Assawasuparerk, Kanjana; Vanichviriyakit, Rapeepun; Chotwiwatthanakun, Charoonroj; Nobsathian, Saksit; Rawangchue, Thanakorn; Wittayachumnankul, Boonsirm

    2016-01-01

    Scabraside D, a sulfated triterpene glycoside extract from sea cucumber Holothulia scabra, shows various biological activities, but effects on human cholangiocarcinoma cells have not previously been reported. In the present study, we investigated the activity of scabraside D against human cholangiocarcinoma (HuCCA) both in vitro and for tumor growth inhibition in vivo using a xenograft model in nude mice. Scabraside D (12.5-100 μg/mL) significantly decreased the viability and the migration of the HuCCA cells in a dose-dependent manner, with 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) of 12.8 ± 0.05 μg/mL at 24 h. It induced signs of apoptotic cells, including shrinkage, pyknosis and karyorrhetic nuclei and DNA fragmentation on agarose gel electrophoresis. Moreover, by quantitative real-time PCR, scabraside D effectively decreased Bcl-2 while increasing Bax and Caspase-3 gene expression levels suggesting that the scabraside D could induce apoptosis in HuCCA cells. In vivo study demonstrated that scabraside D (1 mg/kg/day, i.p. for 21 days) significantly reduced growth of the HuCCA xenografts without adverse effects on the nude mice. Conclusively, scabraside D induced apopt