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Sample records for intact coding region

  1. Intact coding region of the serotonin transporter gene in obsessive-compulsive disorder

    SciTech Connect

    Altemus, M.; Murphy, D.L.; Greenberg, B.; Lesch, K.P.

    1996-07-26

    Epidemiologic studies indicate that obsessive-compulsive disorder is genetically transmitted in some families, although no genetic abnormalities have been identified in individuals with this disorder. The selective response of obsessive-compulsive disorder to treatment with agents which block serotonin reuptake suggests the gene coding for the serotonin transporter as a candidate gene. The primary structure of the serotonin-transporter coding region was sequenced in 22 patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder, using direct PCR sequencing of cDNA synthesized from platelet serotonin-transporter mRNA. No variations in amino acid sequence were found among the obsessive-compulsive disorder patients or healthy controls. These results do not support a role for alteration in the primary structure of the coding region of the serotonin-transporter gene in the pathogenesis of obsessive-compulsive disorder. 27 refs.

  2. Detecting non-coding selective pressure in coding regions

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hui; Blanchette, Mathieu

    2007-01-01

    Background Comparative genomics approaches, where orthologous DNA regions are compared and inter-species conserved regions are identified, have proven extremely powerful for identifying non-coding regulatory regions located in intergenic or intronic regions. However, non-coding functional elements can also be located within coding region, as is common for exonic splicing enhancers, some transcription factor binding sites, and RNA secondary structure elements affecting mRNA stability, localization, or translation. Since these functional elements are located in regions that are themselves highly conserved because they are coding for a protein, they generally escaped detection by comparative genomics approaches. Results We introduce a comparative genomics approach for detecting non-coding functional elements located within coding regions. Codon evolution is modeled as a mixture of codon substitution models, where each component of the mixture describes the evolution of codons under a specific type of coding selective pressure. We show how to compute the posterior distribution of the entropy and parsimony scores under this null model of codon evolution. The method is applied to a set of growth hormone 1 orthologous mRNA sequences and a known exonic splicing elements is detected. The analysis of a set of CORTBP2 orthologous genes reveals a region of several hundred base pairs under strong non-coding selective pressure whose function remains unknown. Conclusion Non-coding functional elements, in particular those involved in post-transcriptional regulation, are likely to be much more prevalent than is currently known. With the numerous genome sequencing projects underway, comparative genomics approaches like that proposed here are likely to become increasingly powerful at detecting such elements. PMID:17288582

  3. Region-based fractal video coding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Shiping; Belloulata, Kamel

    2008-10-01

    A novel video sequence compression scheme is proposed in order to realize the efficient and economical transmission of video sequence, and also the region-based functionality of MPEG-4. The CPM and NCIM fractal coding scheme is applied on each region independently by a prior image segmentation map (alpha plane) which is exactly the same as defined in MPEG-4. The first n frames of video sequence are encoded as a "set" using the Circular Prediction Mapping (CPM) and encode the remaining frames using the Non Contractive Interframe Mapping (NCIM). The CPM and NCIM accomplish the motion estimation and compensation, which can exploit the high temporal correlations between the adjacent frames of video sequence. The experimental results with the monocular video sequences provide promising performances at low bit rate coding, such as the application in video conference. We believe the proposed fractal video codec will be a powerful and efficient technique for the region-based video sequence coding.

  4. Characterization of microsatellites in the coding regions

    SciTech Connect

    Tuskan, Gerald A; Li, Shuxian; Yin, Tongming; Wang, Prof. Mingxiu

    2009-01-01

    With the development of high-throughput sequencing techniques, transcriptome sequencing projects which provide valuable resources for designing simple sequence repeat (SSR) primers have been carried out for many plants. However, the utility of SSRs for molecular breeding depends on genomewide distribution and coverage, as well as moderately high allelic variability, in the available SSR library. In this study, we characterized the exonic SSRs developed from the publicly available Populus genome as a case study to determine their value for molecular breeding. As expected, our results confirmed that microsatellites occurred approximately three times less often in coding regions than in non-coding regions. Mutability test also showed that exonic SSRs contained less allelic variability than intronic SSRs. More importantly, exonic SSRs were unevenly distributed both among and within chromosomes. Large exonic SSRs deserts were observed on several chromosomes. Differential selection between paralogous chromosomes, at the gene level, appears to be responsible for these SSR deserts, though the mechanisms that cause chromosome-specific SSR deserts are not known. This work provides ample evidence that the candidate gene approach based on unigenes identified from transcribed sequences may not be the best strategy to identify highly polymorphic SSRs.

  5. Correlation approach to identify coding regions in DNA sequences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ossadnik, S. M.; Buldyrev, S. V.; Goldberger, A. L.; Havlin, S.; Mantegna, R. N.; Peng, C. K.; Simons, M.; Stanley, H. E.

    1994-01-01

    Recently, it was observed that noncoding regions of DNA sequences possess long-range power-law correlations, whereas coding regions typically display only short-range correlations. We develop an algorithm based on this finding that enables investigators to perform a statistical analysis on long DNA sequences to locate possible coding regions. The algorithm is particularly successful in predicting the location of lengthy coding regions. For example, for the complete genome of yeast chromosome III (315,344 nucleotides), at least 82% of the predictions correspond to putative coding regions; the algorithm correctly identified all coding regions larger than 3000 nucleotides, 92% of coding regions between 2000 and 3000 nucleotides long, and 79% of coding regions between 1000 and 2000 nucleotides. The predictive ability of this new algorithm supports the claim that there is a fundamental difference in the correlation property between coding and noncoding sequences. This algorithm, which is not species-dependent, can be implemented with other techniques for rapidly and accurately locating relatively long coding regions in genomic sequences.

  6. Code for Calculating Regional Seismic Travel Time

    SciTech Connect

    BALLARD, SANFORD; HIPP, JAMES; & BARKER, GLENN

    2009-07-10

    The RSTT software computes predictions of the travel time of seismic energy traveling from a source to a receiver through 2.5D models of the seismic velocity distribution within the Earth. The two primary applications for the RSTT library are tomographic inversion studies and seismic event location calculations. In tomographic inversions studies, a seismologist begins with number of source-receiver travel time observations and an initial starting model of the velocity distribution within the Earth. A forward travel time calculator, such as the RSTT library, is used to compute predictions of each observed travel time and all of the residuals (observed minus predicted travel time) are calculated. The Earth model is then modified in some systematic way with the goal of minimizing the residuals. The Earth model obtained in this way is assumed to be a better model than the starting model if it has lower residuals. The other major application for the RSTT library is seismic event location. Given an Earth model, an initial estimate of the location of a seismic event, and some number of observations of seismic travel time thought to have originated from that event, location codes systematically modify the estimate of the location of the event with the goal of minimizing the difference between the observed and predicted travel times. The second application, seismic event location, is routinely implemented by the military as part of its effort to monitor the Earth for nuclear tests conducted by foreign countries.

  7. Background pretruncated method for JPEG2000 region of interest coding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jianxin; Zhu, En

    2015-05-01

    We propose a new method for JPEG2000 region of interest (ROI) coding called the background pretruncated method (BPTM). An algorithm to calculate the key parameter in the BPTM is also proposed. The published JPEG2000 ROI coding methods have difficulty in balancing ROI quality and system computation. Methods based on shifting coefficients add much computation, and they significantly penalize the coding efficiency. Implicit methods cannot obtain as high-ROI quality as the coefficient shift methods. To efficiently achieve ROI coding, the BPTM assigns a proper number of the least significant bitplanes of the background to zero, and it can not only achieve high-ROI quality but also add no computation to the other modules in JPEG2000. Additionally, the BPTM supports arbitrary shaped ROI coding, and the codestream is compatible with JPEG2000 standard.

  8. CRITICA: coding region identification tool invoking comparative analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badger, J. H.; Olsen, G. J.; Woese, C. R. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    Gene recognition is essential to understanding existing and future DNA sequence data. CRITICA (Coding Region Identification Tool Invoking Comparative Analysis) is a suite of programs for identifying likely protein-coding sequences in DNA by combining comparative analysis of DNA sequences with more common noncomparative methods. In the comparative component of the analysis, regions of DNA are aligned with related sequences from the DNA databases; if the translation of the aligned sequences has greater amino acid identity than expected for the observed percentage nucleotide identity, this is interpreted as evidence for coding. CRITICA also incorporates noncomparative information derived from the relative frequencies of hexanucleotides in coding frames versus other contexts (i.e., dicodon bias). The dicodon usage information is derived by iterative analysis of the data, such that CRITICA is not dependent on the existence or accuracy of coding sequence annotations in the databases. This independence makes the method particularly well suited for the analysis of novel genomes. CRITICA was tested by analyzing the available Salmonella typhimurium DNA sequences. Its predictions were compared with the DNA sequence annotations and with the predictions of GenMark. CRITICA proved to be more accurate than GenMark, and moreover, many of its predictions that would seem to be errors instead reflect problems in the sequence databases. The source code of CRITICA is freely available by anonymous FTP (rdp.life.uiuc.edu in/pub/critica) and on the World Wide Web (http:/(/)rdpwww.life.uiuc.edu).

  9. Analysis of the PTCH coding region in human rhabdomyosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Calzada-Wack, Julia; Schnitzbauer, Udo; Walch, Axel; Wurster, Karl-Heinz; Kappler, Roland; Nathrath, Michaela; Hahn, Heidi

    2002-09-01

    Inherited mutations of the human tumor suppressor gene Patched (PTCH) lead to an autosomal dominant disorder known as Nevoid Basal Cell Carcinoma Syndrome (NBCCS). The syndrome is characterized by a combination of developmental abnormalities and a predisposition to tumor formation. Tumors in patients with NBCCS include basal cell carcinoma, medulloblastoma, fibroma and rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS). RMS are also present in 15 % of mice haplodeficient for Ptch. To investigate whether mutations in PTCH are a general feature in rhabdomyosarcomagenesis we sequenced the protein-coding region in sporadic human cases of these tumors. For this purpose we first determined the distribution and frequency of polymorphisms in 23 exons of PTCH in 48 healthy caucasians. Ten new polymorphisms were identified (IVS11 + 15-17del AAA; IVS14 + 25T>C; 2485G>A; IVS15 + 9G>C; IVS17 + 21A>G; 3033T>C; 3149T>C; 3387T>C; 3617G>A; 4080C>T). Next, the PTCH coding region in 14 RMS was sequenced. Whereas one case with LOH at the PTCH locus was detected, none of the cases showed nonsense or missense mutations in the coding region of PTCH. These data do not support the existence of frequent mutations in the protein-coding region of PTCH in RMS.

  10. Fast functional imaging of multiple brain regions in intact zebrafish larvae using selective plane illumination microscopy.

    PubMed

    Panier, Thomas; Romano, Sebastián A; Olive, Raphaël; Pietri, Thomas; Sumbre, Germán; Candelier, Raphaël; Debrégeas, Georges

    2013-01-01

    The optical transparency and the small dimensions of zebrafish at the larval stage make it a vertebrate model of choice for brain-wide in-vivo functional imaging. However, current point-scanning imaging techniques, such as two-photon or confocal microscopy, impose a strong limit on acquisition speed which in turn sets the number of neurons that can be simultaneously recorded. At 5 Hz, this number is of the order of one thousand, i.e., approximately 1-2% of the brain. Here we demonstrate that this limitation can be greatly overcome by using Selective-plane Illumination Microscopy (SPIM). Zebrafish larvae expressing the genetically encoded calcium indicator GCaMP3 were illuminated with a scanned laser sheet and imaged with a camera whose optical axis was oriented orthogonally to the illumination plane. This optical sectioning approach was shown to permit functional imaging of a very large fraction of the brain volume of 5-9-day-old larvae with single- or near single-cell resolution. The spontaneous activity of up to 5,000 neurons was recorded at 20 Hz for 20-60 min. By rapidly scanning the specimen in the axial direction, the activity of 25,000 individual neurons from 5 different z-planes (approximately 30% of the entire brain) could be simultaneously monitored at 4 Hz. Compared to point-scanning techniques, this imaging strategy thus yields a ≃20-fold increase in data throughput (number of recorded neurons times acquisition rate) without compromising the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). The extended field of view offered by the SPIM method allowed us to directly identify large scale ensembles of neurons, spanning several brain regions, that displayed correlated activity and were thus likely to participate in common neural processes. The benefits and limitations of SPIM for functional imaging in zebrafish as well as future developments are briefly discussed.

  11. Evidence for intact local connectivity but disrupted regional function in the occipital lobe in children and adolescents with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    White, Tonya; Moeller, Steen; Schmidt, Marcus; Pardo, Jose V; Olman, Cheryl

    2012-08-01

    It has long been known that specific visual frequencies result in greater blood flow to the striate cortex. These peaks are thought to reflect synchrony of local neuronal firing that is reflective of local cortical networks. Since disrupted neural connectivity is a possible etiology for schizophrenia, our goal was to investigate whether localized connectivity, as measured by aberrant synchrony, is abnormal in children and adolescents with schizophrenia. Subjects included 25 children and adolescents with schizophrenia and 39 controls matched for age and gender. Subjects were scanned on a Siemens 3 Tesla Trio scanner while observing flashing checkerboard presented at either 1, 4, 8, or 12 Hz. Image processing included both a standard GLM model and a Fourier transform analysis. Patients had significantly smaller volume of activation in the occipital lobe compared to controls. There were no differences in the integral or percent signal change of the hemodynamic response function for each of the four frequencies. Occipital activation was stable during development between childhood and late adolescence. Finally, both patients and controls demonstrated an increased response between 4 and 8 Hz consistent with synchrony or entrainment in the neuronal response. Children and adolescents with schizophrenia had a significantly lower volume of activation in the occipital lobe in response to the flashing checkerboard task. However, features of intact local connectivity in patients, such as the hemodynamic response function and maximal response at 8 Hz, were normal. These results are consistent with abnormalities in regional connectivity with preserved local connectivity in early-onset schizophrenia.

  12. Targeted Capture of Complete Coding Regions across Divergent Species

    PubMed Central

    Schott, Ryan K.; Panesar, Bhawandeep; Card, Daren C.; Preston, Matthew; Castoe, Todd A.

    2017-01-01

    Despite continued advances in sequencing technologies, there is a need for methods that can efficiently sequence large numbers of genes from diverse species. One approach to accomplish this is targeted capture (hybrid enrichment). While these methods are well established for genome resequencing projects, cross-species capture strategies are still being developed and generally focus on the capture of conserved regions, rather than complete coding regions from specific genes of interest. The resulting data is thus useful for phylogenetic studies, but the wealth of comparative data that could be used for evolutionary and functional studies is lost. Here, we design and implement a targeted capture method that enables recovery of complete coding regions across broad taxonomic scales. Capture probes were designed from multiple reference species and extensively tiled in order to facilitate cross-species capture. Using novel bioinformatics pipelines we were able to recover nearly all of the targeted genes with high completeness from species that were up to 200 myr divergent. Increased probe diversity and tiling for a subset of genes had a large positive effect on both recovery and completeness. The resulting data produced an accurate species tree, but importantly this same data can also be applied to studies of molecular evolution and function that will allow researchers to ask larger questions in broader phylogenetic contexts. Our method demonstrates the utility of cross-species approaches for the capture of full length coding sequences, and will substantially improve the ability for researchers to conduct large-scale comparative studies of molecular evolution and function. PMID:28137744

  13. Melting temperature highlights functionally important RNA structure and sequence elements in yeast mRNA coding regions.

    PubMed

    Qi, Fei; Frishman, Dmitrij

    2017-03-07

    Secondary structure elements in the coding regions of mRNAs play an important role in gene expression and regulation, but distinguishing functional from non-functional structures remains challenging. Here we investigate the dependence of sequence-structure relationships in the coding regions on temperature based on the recent PARTE data by Wan et al. Our main finding is that the regions with high and low thermostability (high Tm and low Tm regions) are under evolutionary pressure to preserve RNA secondary structure and primary sequence, respectively. Sequences of low Tm regions display a higher degree of evolutionary conservation compared to high Tm regions. Low Tm regions are under strong synonymous constraint, while high Tm regions are not. These findings imply that high Tm regions contain thermo-stable functionally important RNA structures, which impose relaxed evolutionary constraint on sequence as long as the base-pairing patterns remain intact. By contrast, low thermostability regions contain single-stranded functionally important conserved RNA sequence elements accessible for binding by other molecules. We also find that theoretically predicted structures of paralogous mRNA pairs become more similar with growing temperature, while experimentally measured structures tend to diverge, which implies that the melting pathways of RNA structures cannot be fully captured by current computational approaches.

  14. BioCode: Two biologically compatible Algorithms for embedding data in non-coding and coding regions of DNA

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In recent times, the application of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) has diversified with the emergence of fields such as DNA computing and DNA data embedding. DNA data embedding, also known as DNA watermarking or DNA steganography, aims to develop robust algorithms for encoding non-genetic information in DNA. Inherently DNA is a digital medium whereby the nucleotide bases act as digital symbols, a fact which underpins all bioinformatics techniques, and which also makes trivial information encoding using DNA straightforward. However, the situation is more complex in methods which aim at embedding information in the genomes of living organisms. DNA is susceptible to mutations, which act as a noisy channel from the point of view of information encoded using DNA. This means that the DNA data embedding field is closely related to digital communications. Moreover it is a particularly unique digital communications area, because important biological constraints must be observed by all methods. Many DNA data embedding algorithms have been presented to date, all of which operate in one of two regions: non-coding DNA (ncDNA) or protein-coding DNA (pcDNA). Results This paper proposes two novel DNA data embedding algorithms jointly called BioCode, which operate in ncDNA and pcDNA, respectively, and which comply fully with stricter biological restrictions. Existing methods comply with some elementary biological constraints, such as preserving protein translation in pcDNA. However there exist further biological restrictions which no DNA data embedding methods to date account for. Observing these constraints is key to increasing the biocompatibility and in turn, the robustness of information encoded in DNA. Conclusion The algorithms encode information in near optimal ways from a coding point of view, as we demonstrate by means of theoretical and empirical (in silico) analyses. Also, they are shown to encode information in a robust way, such that mutations have isolated

  15. The rubber hand illusion in complex regional pain syndrome: preserved ability to integrate a rubber hand indicates intact multisensory integration.

    PubMed

    Reinersmann, Annika; Landwehrt, Julia; Krumova, Elena K; Peterburs, Jutta; Ocklenburg, Sebastian; Güntürkün, Onur; Maier, Christoph

    2013-09-01

    In patients with complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) type 1, processing of static tactile stimuli is impaired, whereas more complex sensory integration functions appear preserved. This study investigated higher order multisensory integration of body-relevant stimuli using the rubber hand illusion in CRPS patients. Subjective self-reports and skin conductance responses to watching the rubber hand being harmed were compared among CRPS patients (N=24), patients with upper limb pain of other origin (N=21, clinical control group), and healthy subjects (N=24). Additionally, the influence of body representation (body plasticity [Trinity Assessment of Body Plasticity], neglect-like severity symptoms), and clinical signs of illusion strength were investigated. For statistical analysis, 1-way analysis of variance, t test, Pearson correlation, with α=0.05 were used. CRPS patients did not differ from healthy subjects and the control group with regard to their illusion strength as assessed by subjective reports or skin conductance response values. Stronger left-sided rubber hand illusions were reported by healthy subjects and left-side-affected CRPS patients. Moreover, for this subgroup, illness duration and illusion strength were negatively correlated. Overall, severity of neglect-like symptoms and clinical signs were not related to illusion strength. However, patients with CRPS of the right hand reported significantly stronger neglect-like symptoms and significantly lower illusion strength of the affected hand than patients with CRPS of the left hand. The weaker illusion of CRPS patients with strong neglect-like symptoms on the affected hand supports the role of top-down processes modulating body ownership. Moreover, the intact ability to perceive illusory ownership confirms the notion that, despite impaired processing of proprioceptive or tactile input, higher order multisensory integration is unaffected in CRPS.

  16. Evolutionary analysis of DNA-protein-coding regions based on a genetic code cube metric.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Robersy

    2014-01-01

    The right estimation of the evolutionary distance between DNA or protein sequences is the cornerstone of the current phylogenetic analysis based on distance methods. Herein, it is demonstrated that the Manhattan distance (dw), weighted by the evolutionary importance of the nucleotide bases in the codon, is a naturally derived metric in the standard genetic code cube inserted into the three-dimensional Euclidean space. Based on the application of distance dw, a novel evolutionary model is proposed. This model includes insertion/deletion mutations that are very important for cancer studies, but usually discarded in classical evolutionary models. In this study, the new evolutionary model was applied to the phylogenetic analysis of the DNA protein-coding regions of 13 mammal mitochondrial genomes and of four cancer genetic- susceptibility genes (ATM, BRCA1, BRCA2 and p53) from nine mammals. The opossum (a marsupial) was used as an out-group species for both sets of sequences. The new evolutionary model yielded the correct topology, while the current models failed to separate the evolutionarily distant species of mouse and opossum.

  17. In search of coding and non-coding regions of DNA sequences based on balanced estimation of diffusion entropy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jin; Zhang, Wenqing; Yang, Huijie

    2016-01-01

    Identification of coding regions in DNA sequences remains challenging. Various methods have been proposed, but these are limited by species-dependence and the need for adequate training sets. The elements in DNA coding regions are known to be distributed in a quasi-random way, while those in non-coding regions have typical similar structures. For short sequences, these statistical characteristics cannot be extracted correctly and cannot even be detected. This paper introduces a new way to solve the problem: balanced estimation of diffusion entropy (BEDE).

  18. HLA-G coding region and 3'untranslated region (3'UTR) in two Chinese Han populations.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wen Yi; Tian, Wei; Liu, Xue Xiang; Li, Li Xin

    2016-08-01

    In this study, exons 2-4 and 3'untranslated region (3'UTR) of human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-G gene were investigated for 201 and 104 healthy unrelated Han samples recruited from Hunan Province, southern China and central Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region, northern China, respectively, using sequence-based typing and cloning methods. Totally 12 HLA-G alleles in the coding region, 9 variable sites in 3'UTR, 8 3'UTR haplotypes and 15 HLA-G extended haplotypes (EHs) incorporating the coding region and 3'UTR were observed. Very strong linkage disequilibrium (LD) was observed between HLA-A and HLA-G, and between HLA-G coding region and 3'UTR in each population (all global P=0.0000). Seven HLA-A-G haplotypes showed significant LD in both populations. Three HLA-G alleles in the coding region, 4 polymorphic sites in the 3'UTR, 3 3'UTR haplotypes and 4 HLA-G EHs differed significantly in their distributions between the 2 Chinese Han populations (all P≤0.0001). There was evidence for balancing selection acting on HLA-G 3'UTR positions +3010, +3142 and +3187 in the two populations. The NJ dendrograms demonstrated the existence of two basic HLA-G lineages and indicated that, HLA-G*01:01:01, the most common HLA-G allele, formed a separate lineage from other alleles. Our results shed new lights into HLA-G genetics among Chinese Han populations. The findings reported here are of importance for future studies related to post-transcriptional regulation of HLA-G allelic expression and the potential role of HLA-G in disease association in populations of Chinese ancestry.

  19. Spectrum of small mutations in the dystrophin coding region.

    PubMed Central

    Prior, T W; Bartolo, C; Pearl, D K; Papp, A C; Snyder, P J; Sedra, M S; Burghes, A H; Mendell, J R

    1995-01-01

    Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophies (DMD and BMD) are caused by defects in the dystrophin gene. About two-thirds of the affected patients have large deletions or duplications, which occur in the 5' and central portion of the gene. The nondeletion/duplication cases are most likely the result of smaller mutations that cannot be identified by current diagnostic screening strategies. We screened approximately 80% of the dystrophin coding sequence for small mutations in 158 patients without deletions or duplications and identified 29 mutations. The study indicates that many of the DMD and the majority of the BMD small mutations lie in noncoding regions of the gene. All of the mutations identified were unique to single patients, and most of the mutations resulted in protein truncation. We did not find a clustering of small mutations similar to the deletion distribution but found > 40% of the small mutations 3' of exon 55. The extent of protein truncation caused by the 3' mutations did not determine the phenotype, since even the exon 76 nonsense mutation resulted in the severe DMD phenotype. Our study confirms that the dystrophin gene is subject to a high rate of mutation in CpG sequences. As a consequence of not finding any hotspots or prevalent small mutations, we conclude that it is presently not possible to perform direct carrier and prenatal diagnostics for many families without deletions or duplications. Images Figure 2 PMID:7611292

  20. Spectrum of small mutations in the dystrophin coding region.

    PubMed

    Prior, T W; Bartolo, C; Pearl, D K; Papp, A C; Snyder, P J; Sedra, M S; Burghes, A H; Mendell, J R

    1995-07-01

    Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophies (DMD and BMD) are caused by defects in the dystrophin gene. About two-thirds of the affected patients have large deletions or duplications, which occur in the 5' and central portion of the gene. The nondeletion/duplication cases are most likely the result of smaller mutations that cannot be identified by current diagnostic screening strategies. We screened approximately 80% of the dystrophin coding sequence for small mutations in 158 patients without deletions or duplications and identified 29 mutations. The study indicates that many of the DMD and the majority of the BMD small mutations lie in noncoding regions of the gene. All of the mutations identified were unique to single patients, and most of the mutations resulted in protein truncation. We did not find a clustering of small mutations similar to the deletion distribution but found > 40% of the small mutations 3' of exon 55. The extent of protein truncation caused by the 3' mutations did not determine the phenotype, since even the exon 76 nonsense mutation resulted in the severe DMD phenotype. Our study confirms that the dystrophin gene is subject to a high rate of mutation in CpG sequences. As a consequence of not finding any hotspots or prevalent small mutations, we conclude that it is presently not possible to perform direct carrier and prenatal diagnostics for many families without deletions or duplications.

  1. Discrete Ramanujan transform for distinguishing the protein coding regions from other regions.

    PubMed

    Hua, Wei; Wang, Jiasong; Zhao, Jian

    2014-01-01

    Based on the study of Ramanujan sum and Ramanujan coefficient, this paper suggests the concepts of discrete Ramanujan transform and spectrum. Using Voss numerical representation, one maps a symbolic DNA strand as a numerical DNA sequence, and deduces the discrete Ramanujan spectrum of the numerical DNA sequence. It is well known that of discrete Fourier power spectrum of protein coding sequence has an important feature of 3-base periodicity, which is widely used for DNA sequence analysis by the technique of discrete Fourier transform. It is performed by testing the signal-to-noise ratio at frequency N/3 as a criterion for the analysis, where N is the length of the sequence. The results presented in this paper show that the property of 3-base periodicity can be only identified as a prominent spike of the discrete Ramanujan spectrum at period 3 for the protein coding regions. The signal-to-noise ratio for discrete Ramanujan spectrum is defined for numerical measurement. Therefore, the discrete Ramanujan spectrum and the signal-to-noise ratio of a DNA sequence can be used for distinguishing the protein coding regions from the noncoding regions. All the exon and intron sequences in whole chromosomes 1, 2, 3 and 4 of Caenorhabditis elegans have been tested and the histograms and tables from the computational results illustrate the reliability of our method. In addition, we have analyzed theoretically and gotten the conclusion that the algorithm for calculating discrete Ramanujan spectrum owns the lower computational complexity and higher computational accuracy. The computational experiments show that the technique by using discrete Ramanujan spectrum for classifying different DNA sequences is a fast and effective method.

  2. Predicted functional RNAs within coding regions constrain evolutionary rates of yeast proteins.

    PubMed

    Warden, Charles D; Kim, Seong-Ho; Yi, Soojin V

    2008-02-13

    Functional RNAs (fRNAs) are being recognized as an important regulatory component in biological processes. Interestingly, recent computational studies suggest that the number and biological significance of functional RNAs within coding regions (coding fRNAs) may have been underestimated. We hypothesized that such coding fRNAs will impose additional constraint on sequence evolution because the DNA primary sequence has to simultaneously code for functional RNA secondary structures on the messenger RNA in addition to the amino acid codons for the protein sequence. To test this prediction, we first utilized computational methods to predict conserved fRNA secondary structures within multiple species alignments of Saccharomyces sensu strico genomes. We predict that as much as 5% of the genes in the yeast genome contain at least one functional RNA secondary structure within their protein-coding region. We then analyzed the impact of coding fRNAs on the evolutionary rate of protein-coding genes because a decrease in evolutionary rate implies constraint due to biological functionality. We found that our predicted coding fRNAs have a significant influence on evolutionary rates (especially at synonymous sites), independent of other functional measures. Thus, coding fRNA may play a role on sequence evolution. Given that coding regions of humans and flies contain many more predicted coding fRNAs than yeast, the impact of coding fRNAs on sequence evolution may be substantial in genomes of higher eukaryotes.

  3. A HYDROCHEMICAL HYBRID CODE FOR ASTROPHYSICAL PROBLEMS. I. CODE VERIFICATION AND BENCHMARKS FOR A PHOTON-DOMINATED REGION (PDR)

    SciTech Connect

    Motoyama, Kazutaka; Morata, Oscar; Hasegawa, Tatsuhiko; Shang, Hsien; Krasnopolsky, Ruben

    2015-07-20

    A two-dimensional hydrochemical hybrid code, KM2, is constructed to deal with astrophysical problems that would require coupled hydrodynamical and chemical evolution. The code assumes axisymmetry in a cylindrical coordinate system and consists of two modules: a hydrodynamics module and a chemistry module. The hydrodynamics module solves hydrodynamics using a Godunov-type finite volume scheme and treats included chemical species as passively advected scalars. The chemistry module implicitly solves nonequilibrium chemistry and change of energy due to thermal processes with transfer of external ultraviolet radiation. Self-shielding effects on photodissociation of CO and H{sub 2} are included. In this introductory paper, the adopted numerical method is presented, along with code verifications using the hydrodynamics module and a benchmark on the chemistry module with reactions specific to a photon-dominated region (PDR). Finally, as an example of the expected capability, the hydrochemical evolution of a PDR is presented based on the PDR benchmark.

  4. The influence of hypertonic mannitol on regional myocardial blood flow during acute and chronic myocardial ischemia in anesthetized and awake intact dogs.

    PubMed Central

    Willerson, J T; Watson, J T; Hutton, I; Fixler, D E; Curry, G C; Templeton, G H

    1975-01-01

    The influence of hypertonic mannitol on regional myocardial blood flow and ventricular performance was studied during acute myocardial ischemia in awake, unsedated and in anesthesized dogs and after myocardial infarction in awake unsedated dogs. Regional myocardial blood flow was measured with radioactive microspheres. Generalized increases in regional myocardial blood flow occurred after mannitol in all of the different animal models studied. The increases in coronary blood flow after mannitol were just as impressive in the nonischemic regions as in the ischemic portion of the left ventricle in all of the different models that were examined in this study. Improvement in regional myocardial blood flow to the ischemic area of the left ventricle after mannitol was associated with a reduction in ST segment elevation during acute myocardial ischemia in anesthetized dogs. The increases in regional myocardial flow after mannitol were also associated with increases in contractility, but the increases in flow appeared to be more impressive than the changes in contractility. The data obtained demonstrate that mannitol increases regional coronary blood flow to both ischemic and nonischemic myocardium in both anesthetized and awake, unsedated, intact dogs with acute and chronic myocardial ischemia and that mannitol reduces ST segment elevation during acute myocardial ischemia in anesthetized dogs. Thus the results suggest that under these circumstances the increases in regional myocardial blood flow after mannitol are of physiological importance in reducing the extent of myocardial injury. Since coronary blood flow increased to nonischemic regions the increases in regional myocardial flow demonstrated in this study after mannitol cannot be entirely explained by the mechanism of reduction in ischemic cell swelling. PMID:1123427

  5. Refinement of glucagon-like peptide 1 docking to its intact receptor using mid-region photolabile probes and molecular modeling.

    PubMed

    Miller, Laurence J; Chen, Quan; Lam, Polo C-H; Pinon, Delia I; Sexton, Patrick M; Abagyan, Ruben; Dong, Maoqing

    2011-05-06

    The glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP1) receptor is an important drug target within the B family of G protein-coupled receptors. Its natural agonist ligand, GLP1, has incretin-like actions and the receptor is a recognized target for management of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Despite recent solution of the structure of the amino terminus of the GLP1 receptor and several close family members, the molecular basis for GLP1 binding to and activation of the intact receptor remains unclear. We previously demonstrated molecular approximations between amino- and carboxyl-terminal residues of GLP1 and its receptor. In this work, we study spatial approximations with the mid-region of this peptide to gain insights into the orientation of the intact receptor and the ligand-receptor complex. We have prepared two new photolabile probes incorporating a p-benzoyl-l-phenylalanine into positions 16 and 20 of GLP1(7-36). Both probes bound to the GLP1 receptor specifically and with high affinity. These were each fully efficacious agonists, stimulating cAMP accumulation in receptor-bearing CHO cells in a concentration-dependent manner. Each probe specifically labeled a single receptor site. Protease cleavage and radiochemical sequencing identified receptor residue Leu(141) above transmembrane segment one as its site of labeling for the position 16 probe, whereas the position 20 probe labeled receptor residue Trp(297) within the second extracellular loop. Establishing ligand residue approximation with this loop region is unique among family members and may help to orient the receptor amino-terminal domain relative to its helical bundle region.

  6. Annotation of the Protein Coding Regions of the Equine Genome.

    PubMed

    Hestand, Matthew S; Kalbfleisch, Theodore S; Coleman, Stephen J; Zeng, Zheng; Liu, Jinze; Orlando, Ludovic; MacLeod, James N

    2015-01-01

    Current gene annotation of the horse genome is largely derived from in silico predictions and cross-species alignments. Only a small number of genes are annotated based on equine EST and mRNA sequences. To expand the number of equine genes annotated from equine experimental evidence, we sequenced mRNA from a pool of forty-three different tissues. From these, we derived the structures of 68,594 transcripts. In addition, we identified 301,829 positions with SNPs or small indels within these transcripts relative to EquCab2. Interestingly, 780 variants extend the open reading frame of the transcript and appear to be small errors in the equine reference genome, since they are also identified as homozygous variants by genomic DNA resequencing of the reference horse. Taken together, we provide a resource of equine mRNA structures and protein coding variants that will enhance equine and cross-species transcriptional and genomic comparisons.

  7. Annotation of the Protein Coding Regions of the Equine Genome

    PubMed Central

    Hestand, Matthew S.; Kalbfleisch, Theodore S.; Coleman, Stephen J.; Zeng, Zheng; Liu, Jinze; Orlando, Ludovic; MacLeod, James N.

    2015-01-01

    Current gene annotation of the horse genome is largely derived from in silico predictions and cross-species alignments. Only a small number of genes are annotated based on equine EST and mRNA sequences. To expand the number of equine genes annotated from equine experimental evidence, we sequenced mRNA from a pool of forty-three different tissues. From these, we derived the structures of 68,594 transcripts. In addition, we identified 301,829 positions with SNPs or small indels within these transcripts relative to EquCab2. Interestingly, 780 variants extend the open reading frame of the transcript and appear to be small errors in the equine reference genome, since they are also identified as homozygous variants by genomic DNA resequencing of the reference horse. Taken together, we provide a resource of equine mRNA structures and protein coding variants that will enhance equine and cross-species transcriptional and genomic comparisons. PMID:26107351

  8. Different hue coding underlying figure segregation and region detection tasks.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Takehiro; Uchikawa, Keiji

    2009-08-28

    Figure segregation from its background is one of the important functions of color vision for our visual system because it is a preliminary to shape recognition. However, little is known about the chromatic mechanisms underlying figure segregation as opposed to those underlying mere color discrimination and detection. We investigated whether there are differences in color difference thresholds between a shape discrimination task (involving figure segregation) and a simple region detection task. In the shape discrimination task the observer discriminated the shapes of two figures, which could be segregated from their background on the basis of a color direction (hue) difference. In the region detection task the observer simply detected a square region against its background. Thresholds of color direction differences from a range of background color directions were measured for each task. In addition, we added saturation variation in one condition to investigate the involvement of the cone-opponent channels in those tasks. First, the results showed that the saturation variation increased the thresholds evenly for all background color directions. This suggests that higher-order color mechanisms rather than the early cone-opponent mechanisms are involved in both of the two tasks. Second, the shapes of the background color direction-threshold functions were different between the two tasks and these shape differences were consistent across all observers. This finding suggests that hue information may be encoded differently for shape discrimination and region detection. Furthermore, differences in spatial frequency components and in the requirement for orientation extraction rarely affected the shapes of the threshold functions in additional experiments, suggesting the possibility that hue encoding for shape discrimination differs from encoding for region detection at a late stage of form processing where local orientation signals are globally integrated.

  9. The Fc-region of a new class of intact bispecific antibody mediates activation of accessory cells and NK cells and induces direct phagocytosis of tumour cells

    PubMed Central

    Zeidler, R; Mysliwietz, J; Csánady, M; Walz, A; Ziegler, I; Schmitt, B; Wollenberg, B; Lindhofer, H

    2000-01-01

    Bispecific antibodies (bsAb) are considered as promising tools for the elimination of disseminated tumour cells in a minimal residual disease situation. The bsAb-mediated recruitment of an immune effector cell in close vicinity of a tumour cell is thought to induce an antitumoural immune response. However, classical bispecific molecules activate only a single class of immune effector cell that may not yield optimal immune responses. We therefore constructed an intact bispecific antibody, BiUII (anti-CD3 × anti-EpCAM), that not only recognizes tumour cells and T lymphocytes with its two binding arms, but also binds and activates Fcγ-receptor positive accessory cells through its Fc-region. We have demonstrated recently that activated accessory cells contribute to the bsAb-induced antitumoural activity. We now analyse this stimulation in more detail and demonstrate here the BiUll-induced upregulation of activation markers like CD83 and CD95 on accessory cells and the induction of neopterin and biopterin synthesis. Experiments with pure cell subpopulations revealed binding of BiUll to CD64+ accessory cells and CD16+ NK cells, but not to CD32+ B lymphocytes. We provide further evidence for the importance of the Fc-region in that this bispecific molecule stimulates Fcγ-R-positive accessory cells to eliminate tumour cells in vitro by direct phagocytosis. © 2000 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10901380

  10. Regional Atmospheric Transport Code for Hanford Emission Tracking, Version 2(RATCHET2)

    SciTech Connect

    Ramsdell, James V.; Rishel, Jeremy P.

    2006-07-01

    This manual describes the atmospheric model and computer code for the Atmospheric Transport Module within SAC. The Atmospheric Transport Module, called RATCHET2, calculates the time-integrated air concentration and surface deposition of airborne contaminants to the soil. The RATCHET2 code is an adaptation of the Regional Atmospheric Transport Code for Hanford Emissions Tracking (RATCHET). The original RATCHET code was developed to perform the atmospheric transport for the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project. Fundamentally, the two sets of codes are identical; no capabilities have been deleted from the original version of RATCHET. Most modifications are generally limited to revision of the run-specification file to streamline the simulation process for SAC.

  11. Transcription control region within the protein-coding portion of adenovirus E1A genes.

    PubMed Central

    Osborne, T F; Arvidson, D N; Tyau, E S; Dunsworth-Browne, M; Berk, A J

    1984-01-01

    A single-base deletion within the protein-coding region of the adenovirus type 5 early region 1A (E1A) genes, 399 bases downstream from the transcription start site, depresses transcription to 2% of the wild-type rate. Complementation studies demonstrated that this was due to two effects of the mutation: first, inactivation of an E1A protein, causing a reduction by a factor of 5; second, a defect which acts in cis to depress E1A mRNA and nuclear RNA concentrations by a factor of 10. A larger deletion within the protein-coding region of E1A which overlaps the single-base deletion produces the same phenotype. In contrast, a linker insertion which results in a similar truncated E1A protein does not produce the cis-acting defect in E1A transcription. These results demonstrate that a critical cis-acting transcription control region occurs within the protein coding sequence in adenovirus type 5 E1A. The single-base deletion occurs in a sequence which shows extensive homology with a sequence from the enhancer regions of simian virus 40 and polyomavirus. This region is not required for E1A transcription during the late phase of infection. Images PMID:6334230

  12. Complete coding region of the mitochondrial genome of Monochamus alternatus hope (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae).

    PubMed

    Wang, Cheng-Ye; Feng, Ying; Chen, Xiao-Ming

    2013-07-01

    The Japanese pine sawyer, Monochamus alternatus Hope, 1842, an important forest pest, mainly occurs in Far East. It is the main vector of pine wood nematode Bursaphelenchus xylophilus, which causes pine wilt disease. We determined the complete mitochondrial genome coding region of M. alternatus using long PCR and conserved primer walking. Our results show that the entire mitogenome coding region is 14,649 bp long, with 78.22% A+T content [deposited in GenBank (JX987292)]. Positions and arrangement of the 37 genes encoded by the coding region are identical to those of two other longhorn beetles (Psacothea hilaris and Anoplophora glabripennis) for which the complete gene content and arrangement are known. All protein-coding genes start with a typical initiation codon ATN in insects. All tRNAs show standard clover-leaf structure, except the tRNA(Ser) (AGN), which lacks dihydrouridine (DHU) arm. The most unusual feature found is the use of TCT as tRNA(Ser) (AGN) anticodon instead of GCT, which is used in most other arthropods. This provides further insights into the diversity and evolution of the Cerambycidae family of long-horned beetles.

  13. Methylation of coding region alone inhibits gene expression in plant protoplasts.

    PubMed Central

    Hohn, T; Corsten, S; Rieke, S; Müller, M; Rothnie, H

    1996-01-01

    Derivatives of the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter lacking CG and CNG methylation targets were constructed and used to direct transcription of reporter gene constructs in transiently transformed protoplasts. Such methylation-target-free (MTF) promoters, although weaker than the 35S promoter, retain significant activity despite mutation of the as-1 element. The effect of methylation on gene expression in MTF- and 35S-promoter driven constructs was examined. Even when the promoter region was free of methylation targets, reporter gene expression was markedly reduced when cytosine residues in CG dinucleotides were methylated in vitro prior to transformation. Mosaic methylation experiments, in which only specific parts of the plasmids were methylated, revealed that methylation of the coding region alone has a negative effect on reporter gene expression. Methylation nearer the 5' end of the coding region was more inhibitory, consistent with inhibition of transcription elongation. Images Fig. 5 PMID:8710871

  14. Transposable element fragments in protein-coding regions and their contributions to human functional proteins.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ming; Li, Li; Sun, Zhirong

    2007-10-15

    Transposable elements (TEs) and their contributions to protein-coding regions are of particular interest. Here we searched for TE fragments in Homo sapiens at both the transcript and protein levels. We found evidence in support of TE exonization and its association with alternative splicing. Despite recent findings that long evolutionary times are required to incorporate TE into proteins, we found many functional proteins with translated TE cassettes derived from young TEs. Analyses of two Bcl-family proteins and Alu-encoded segments suggest the coding and functional potential of TE sequences.

  15. miR-148 targets human DNMT3b protein coding region.

    PubMed

    Duursma, Anja M; Kedde, Martijn; Schrier, Mariette; le Sage, Carlos; Agami, Reuven

    2008-05-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small noncoding RNA molecules of 20-24 nucleotides that regulate gene expression. In animals, miRNAs form imperfect interactions with sequences in the 3' Untranslated region (3'UTR) of mRNAs, causing translational inhibition and mRNA decay. In contrast, plant miRNAs mostly associate with protein coding regions. Here we show that human miR-148 represses DNA methyltransferase 3b (Dnmt3b) gene expression through a region in its coding sequence. This region is evolutionary conserved and present in the Dnmt3b splice variants Dnmt3b1, Dnmt3b2, and Dnmt3b4, but not in the abundantly expressed Dnmt3b3. Whereas overexpression of miR-148 results in decreased DNMT3b1 expression, short-hairpin RNA-mediated miR-148 repression leads to an increase in DNMT3b1 expression. Interestingly, mutating the putative miR-148 target site in Dnmt3b1 abolishes regulation by miR-148. Moreover, endogenous Dnmt3b3 mRNA, which lacks the putative miR-148 target site, is resistant to miR-148-mediated regulation. Thus, our results demonstrate that the coding sequence of Dnmt3b mediates regulation by the miR-148 family. More generally, we provide evidence that coding regions of human genes can be targeted by miRNAs, and that such a mechanism might play a role in determining the relative abundance of different splice variants.

  16. Correcting sequencing errors in DNA coding regions using a dynamic programming approach

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Y.; Mural, R.J.; Uberbacher, E.C.

    1994-12-01

    This paper presents an algorithm for detecting and ``correcting`` sequencing errors that occur in DNA coding regions. The types of sequencing error addressed include insertions and deletions (indels) of DNA bases. The goal is to provide a capability which makes single-pass or low-redundancy sequence data more informative, reducing the need for high-redundancy sequencing for gene identification and characterization purposes. The algorithm detects sequencing errors by discovering changes in the statistically preferred reading frame within a putative coding region and then inserts a number of ``neutral`` bases at a perceived reading frame transition point to make the putative exon candidate frame consistent. The authors have implemented the algorithm as a front-end subsystem of the GRAIL DNA sequence analysis system to construct a version which is very error tolerant and also intend to use this as a testbed for further development of sequencing error-correction technology. On a test set consisting of 68 Human DNA sequences with 1% randomly generated indels in coding regions, the algorithm detected and corrected 76% of the indels. The average distance between the position of an indel and the predicted one was 9.4 bases. With this subsystem in place, GRAIL correctly predicted 89% of the coding messages with 10% false message on the ``corrected`` sequences, compared to 69% correctly predicted coding messages and 11% falsely predicted messages on the ``corrupted`` sequences using standard GRAIL II method. The method uses a dynamic programming algorithm, and runs in time and space linear to the size of the input sequence.

  17. Correcting sequencing errors in DNA coding regions using a dynamic programming approach.

    PubMed

    Xu, Y; Mural, R J; Uberbacher, E C

    1995-04-01

    This paper presents an algorithm for detecting and 'correcting' sequencing errors that occur in DNA coding regions. The types of sequencing errors addressed are insertions and deletions (indels) of DNA bases. The goal is to provide a capability which makes single-pass or low-redundancy sequence data more informative, reducing the need for high-redundancy sequencing for gene identification and characterization purposes. This would permit improved sequencing efficiency and reduce genome sequencing costs. The algorithm detects sequencing errors by discovering changes in the statistically preferred reading frame within a putative coding region and then inserts a number of 'neutral' bases at a perceived reading frame transition point to make the putative exon candidate frame consistent. We have implemented the algorithm as a front-end subsystem of the GRAIL DNA sequence analysis system to construct a version which is very error tolerant and also intend to use this as a testbed for further development of sequencing error-correction technology. Preliminary test results have shown the usefulness of this algorithm and also exhibited some of its weakness, providing possible directions for further improvement. On a test set consisting of 68 human DNA sequences with 1% randomly generated indels in coding regions, the algorithm detected and corrected 76% of the indels. The average distance between the position of an indel and the predicted one was 9.4 bases. With this subsystem in place, GRAIL correctly predicted 89% of the coding messages with 10% false message on the 'corrected' sequences, compared to 69% correctly predicted coding messages and 11% falsely predicted messages on the 'corrupted' sequences using standard GRAIL II method (version 1.2).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  18. An efficient sliding window strategy for accurate location of eukaryotic protein coding regions.

    PubMed

    Rao, Nini; Lei, Xu; Guo, Jianxiu; Huang, Hao; Ren, Zhenglong

    2009-04-01

    The sliding window is one of important factors that seriously affect the accuracy of coding region prediction and location for the methods based on power spectrum technique. It is very difficult to select the appropriate sliding step and the window length for different organisms. In this study, a novel sliding window strategy is proposed on the basis of power spectrum analysis for the accurate location of eukaryotic protein coding regions. The proposed sliding window strategy is very simple and the sliding step of window is changeable. Our tests show that the average location error for the novel method is 12 bases. Compared with the previous location error of 54 bases using the fixed sliding step, the novel sliding window strategy increased the location accuracy greatly. Further, the consumed CPU time to run the novel strategy is much shorter than the strategy of the fixed length sliding step. So, the computational complexity for the novel method is decreased greatly.

  19. Natural variation in non-coding regions underlying phenotypic diversity in budding yeast.

    PubMed

    Salinas, Francisco; de Boer, Carl G; Abarca, Valentina; García, Verónica; Cuevas, Mara; Araos, Sebastian; Larrondo, Luis F; Martínez, Claudio; Cubillos, Francisco A

    2016-02-22

    Linkage mapping studies in model organisms have typically focused their efforts in polymorphisms within coding regions, ignoring those within regulatory regions that may contribute to gene expression variation. In this context, differences in transcript abundance are frequently proposed as a source of phenotypic diversity between individuals, however, until now, little molecular evidence has been provided. Here, we examined Allele Specific Expression (ASE) in six F1 hybrids from Saccharomyces cerevisiae derived from crosses between representative strains of the four main lineages described in yeast. ASE varied between crosses with levels ranging between 28% and 60%. Part of the variation in expression levels could be explained by differences in transcription factors binding to polymorphic cis-regulations and to differences in trans-activation depending on the allelic form of the TF. Analysis on highly expressed alleles on each background suggested ASN1 as a candidate transcript underlying nitrogen consumption differences between two strains. Further promoter allele swap analysis under fermentation conditions confirmed that coding and non-coding regions explained aspartic and glutamic acid consumption differences, likely due to a polymorphism affecting Uga3 binding. Together, we provide a new catalogue of variants to bridge the gap between genotype and phenotype.

  20. Comparison of Exome and Genome Sequencing Technologies for the Complete Capture of Protein‐Coding Regions

    PubMed Central

    Lelieveld, Stefan H.; Spielmann, Malte; Mundlos, Stefan; Veltman, Joris A.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT For next‐generation sequencing technologies, sufficient base‐pair coverage is the foremost requirement for the reliable detection of genomic variants. We investigated whether whole‐genome sequencing (WGS) platforms offer improved coverage of coding regions compared with whole‐exome sequencing (WES) platforms, and compared single‐base coverage for a large set of exome and genome samples. We find that WES platforms have improved considerably in the last years, but at comparable sequencing depth, WGS outperforms WES in terms of covered coding regions. At higher sequencing depth (95x–160x), WES successfully captures 95% of the coding regions with a minimal coverage of 20x, compared with 98% for WGS at 87‐fold coverage. Three different assessments of sequence coverage bias showed consistent biases for WES but not for WGS. We found no clear differences for the technologies concerning their ability to achieve complete coverage of 2,759 clinically relevant genes. We show that WES performs comparable to WGS in terms of covered bases if sequenced at two to three times higher coverage. This does, however, go at the cost of substantially more sequencing biases in WES approaches. Our findings will guide laboratories to make an informed decision on which sequencing platform and coverage to choose. PMID:25973577

  1. Natural variation in non-coding regions underlying phenotypic diversity in budding yeast

    PubMed Central

    Salinas, Francisco; de Boer, Carl G.; Abarca, Valentina; García, Verónica; Cuevas, Mara; Araos, Sebastian; Larrondo, Luis F.; Martínez, Claudio; Cubillos, Francisco A.

    2016-01-01

    Linkage mapping studies in model organisms have typically focused their efforts in polymorphisms within coding regions, ignoring those within regulatory regions that may contribute to gene expression variation. In this context, differences in transcript abundance are frequently proposed as a source of phenotypic diversity between individuals, however, until now, little molecular evidence has been provided. Here, we examined Allele Specific Expression (ASE) in six F1 hybrids from Saccharomyces cerevisiae derived from crosses between representative strains of the four main lineages described in yeast. ASE varied between crosses with levels ranging between 28% and 60%. Part of the variation in expression levels could be explained by differences in transcription factors binding to polymorphic cis-regulations and to differences in trans-activation depending on the allelic form of the TF. Analysis on highly expressed alleles on each background suggested ASN1 as a candidate transcript underlying nitrogen consumption differences between two strains. Further promoter allele swap analysis under fermentation conditions confirmed that coding and non-coding regions explained aspartic and glutamic acid consumption differences, likely due to a polymorphism affecting Uga3 binding. Together, we provide a new catalogue of variants to bridge the gap between genotype and phenotype. PMID:26898953

  2. Comparison of Exome and Genome Sequencing Technologies for the Complete Capture of Protein-Coding Regions.

    PubMed

    Lelieveld, Stefan H; Spielmann, Malte; Mundlos, Stefan; Veltman, Joris A; Gilissen, Christian

    2015-08-01

    For next-generation sequencing technologies, sufficient base-pair coverage is the foremost requirement for the reliable detection of genomic variants. We investigated whether whole-genome sequencing (WGS) platforms offer improved coverage of coding regions compared with whole-exome sequencing (WES) platforms, and compared single-base coverage for a large set of exome and genome samples. We find that WES platforms have improved considerably in the last years, but at comparable sequencing depth, WGS outperforms WES in terms of covered coding regions. At higher sequencing depth (95x-160x), WES successfully captures 95% of the coding regions with a minimal coverage of 20x, compared with 98% for WGS at 87-fold coverage. Three different assessments of sequence coverage bias showed consistent biases for WES but not for WGS. We found no clear differences for the technologies concerning their ability to achieve complete coverage of 2,759 clinically relevant genes. We show that WES performs comparable to WGS in terms of covered bases if sequenced at two to three times higher coverage. This does, however, go at the cost of substantially more sequencing biases in WES approaches. Our findings will guide laboratories to make an informed decision on which sequencing platform and coverage to choose.

  3. Regional Atmospheric Transport Code for Hanford Emission Tracking (RATCHET). Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    SciTech Connect

    Ramsdell, J.V. Jr.; Simonen, C.A.; Burk, K.W.

    1994-02-01

    The purpose of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project is to estimate radiation doses that individuals may have received from operations at the Hanford Site since 1944. This report deals specifically with the atmospheric transport model, Regional Atmospheric Transport Code for Hanford Emission Tracking (RATCHET). RATCHET is a major rework of the MESOILT2 model used in the first phase of the HEDR Project; only the bookkeeping framework escaped major changes. Changes to the code include (1) significant changes in the representation of atmospheric processes and (2) incorporation of Monte Carlo methods for representing uncertainty in input data, model parameters, and coefficients. To a large extent, the revisions to the model are based on recommendations of a peer working group that met in March 1991. Technical bases for other portions of the atmospheric transport model are addressed in two other documents. This report has three major sections: a description of the model, a user`s guide, and a programmer`s guide. These sections discuss RATCHET from three different perspectives. The first provides a technical description of the code with emphasis on details such as the representation of the model domain, the data required by the model, and the equations used to make the model calculations. The technical description is followed by a user`s guide to the model with emphasis on running the code. The user`s guide contains information about the model input and output. The third section is a programmer`s guide to the code. It discusses the hardware and software required to run the code. The programmer`s guide also discusses program structure and each of the program elements.

  4. SNP discovery and haplotype analysis in the segmentally duplicated DRD5 coding region

    PubMed Central

    HOUSLEY, D. J. E.; NIKOLAS, M.; VENTA, P. J.; JERNIGAN, K. A.; WALDMAN, I. D.; NIGG, J. T.; FRIDERICI, K. H.

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY The dopamine receptor 5 gene (DRD5) holds much promise as a candidate locus for contributing to neuropsychiatric disorders and other diseases influenced by the dopaminergic system, as well as having potential to affect normal behavioral variation. However, detailed analyses of this gene have been complicated by its location within a segmentally duplicated chromosomal region. Microsatellites and SNPs upstream from the coding region have been used for association studies, but we find, using bioinformatics resources, that these markers all lie within a previously unrecognized second segmental duplication (SD). In order to accurately analyze the DRD5 locus for polymorphisms in the absence of contaminating pseudogene sequences, we developed a fast and reliable method for sequence analysis and genotyping within the DRD5 coding region. We employed restriction enzyme digestion of genomic DNA to eliminate the pseudogenes prior to PCR amplification of the functional gene. This approach allowed us to determine the DRD5 haplotype structure using 31 trios and to reveal additional rare variants in 171 unrelated individuals. We clarify the inconsistencies and errors of the recorded SNPs in dbSNP and HapMap and illustrate the importance of using caution when choosing SNPs in regions of suspected duplications. The simple and relatively inexpensive method presented herein allows for convenient analysis of sequence variation in DRD5 and can be easily adapted to other duplicated genomic regions in order to obtain good quality sequence data. PMID:19397556

  5. Mapping overlapping functional elements embedded within the protein-coding regions of RNA viruses

    PubMed Central

    Firth, Andrew E.

    2014-01-01

    Identification of the full complement of genes and other functional elements in any virus is crucial to fully understand its molecular biology and guide the development of effective control strategies. RNA viruses have compact multifunctional genomes that frequently contain overlapping genes and non-coding functional elements embedded within protein-coding sequences. Overlapping features often escape detection because it can be difficult to disentangle the multiple roles of the constituent nucleotides via mutational analyses, while high-throughput experimental techniques are often unable to distinguish functional elements from incidental features. However, RNA viruses evolve very rapidly so that, even within a single species, substitutions rapidly accumulate at neutral or near-neutral sites providing great potential for comparative genomics to distinguish the signature of purifying selection. Computationally identified features can then be efficiently targeted for experimental analysis. Here we analyze alignments of protein-coding virus sequences to identify regions where there is a statistically significant reduction in the degree of variability at synonymous sites, a characteristic signature of overlapping functional elements. Having previously tested this technique by experimental verification of discoveries in selected viruses, we now analyze sequence alignments for ∼700 RNA virus species to identify hundreds of such regions, many of which have not been previously described. PMID:25326325

  6. Two-stage sparse coding of region covariance via Log-Euclidean kernels to detect saliency.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ying-Ying; Yang, Cai; Zhang, Ping

    2017-05-01

    In this paper, we present a novel bottom-up saliency detection algorithm from the perspective of covariance matrices on a Riemannian manifold. Each superpixel is described by a region covariance matrix on Riemannian Manifolds. We carry out a two-stage sparse coding scheme via Log-Euclidean kernels to extract salient objects efficiently. In the first stage, given background dictionary on image borders, sparse coding of each region covariance via Log-Euclidean kernels is performed. The reconstruction error on the background dictionary is regarded as the initial saliency of each superpixel. In the second stage, an improvement of the initial result is achieved by calculating reconstruction errors of the superpixels on foreground dictionary, which is extracted from the first stage saliency map. The sparse coding in the second stage is similar to the first stage, but is able to effectively highlight the salient objects uniformly from the background. Finally, three post-processing methods-highlight-inhibition function, context-based saliency weighting, and the graph cut-are adopted to further refine the saliency map. Experiments on four public benchmark datasets show that the proposed algorithm outperforms the state-of-the-art methods in terms of precision, recall and mean absolute error, and demonstrate the robustness and efficiency of the proposed method.

  7. The genomic fingerprinting of the coding region of the beta-tubulin gene in Leishmania identification.

    PubMed

    Luis, L; Ramírez, A; Aguilar, C M; Eresh, S; Barker, D C; Mendoza-León, A

    1998-06-01

    We have demonstrated the polymorphism of the beta-tubulin gene region in Leishmania and its value in the identification of the parasite. In this work we have shown that the coding region of the gene has sufficient variation to accurately discriminate these parasites at the subgenus level. Nevertheless, intrasubgenus diversity, for particular restriction enzymes, was found in New World Leishmania belonging to the Leishmania subgenus. For instance, differences were found between mexicana and amazonensis strains. A unique pattern at the species level was found in particular species of both subgenera, e.g. L. (L.) major strain P and L. (L.) tropica belonging to the Leishmania subgenus, and L. (V.) panamensis strain LS94 from the Viannia subgenus. Particular endonucleases are diagnostic in Leishmania species discrimination as in the case of PvuII for the mexicana and amazonensis. This variation evidenced in the beta-tubulin gene region of Leishmania also occurred in other Kinetoplastida e.g. Trypanosoma cruzi, Leptomonas spp. and Crithidia spp. Moreover, these organisms showed a different genomic fingerprinting for the beta-tubulin gene among them and also Leishmania. Thus, the polymorphism of the coding region of the beta-tubulin gene can be used as a molecular marker for the identification of Leishmania.

  8. Region-of-interest based rate control for UAV video coding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Chun-lei; Dai, Ming; Xiong, Jing-ying

    2016-05-01

    To meet the requirement of high-quality transmission of videos captured by unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) with low bandwidth, a novel rate control (RC) scheme based on region-of-interest (ROI) is proposed. First, the ROI information is sent to the encoder with the latest high efficient video coding (HEVC) standard to generate an ROI map. Then, by using the ROI map, bit allocation methods are developed at frame level and large coding unit (LCU) level, to avoid inaccurate bit allocation produced by camera movement. At last, by using a better robustness R- λ model, the quantization parameter ( QP) for each LCU is calculated. The experimental results show that the proposed RC method can get a lower bitrate error and a higher quality for reconstructed video by choosing appropriate pixel weight on the HEVC platform.

  9. Evidence for gene-specific rather than transcription rate-dependent histone H3 exchange in yeast coding regions.

    PubMed

    Gat-Viks, Irit; Vingron, Martin

    2009-02-01

    In eukaryotic organisms, histones are dynamically exchanged independently of DNA replication. Recent reports show that different coding regions differ in their amount of replication-independent histone H3 exchange. The current paradigm is that this histone exchange variability among coding regions is a consequence of transcription rate. Here we put forward the idea that this variability might be also modulated in a gene-specific manner independently of transcription rate. To that end, we study transcription rate-independent replication-independent coding region histone H3 exchange. We term such events relative exchange. Our genome-wide analysis shows conclusively that in yeast, relative exchange is a novel consistent feature of coding regions. Outside of replication, each coding region has a characteristic pattern of histone H3 exchange that is either higher or lower than what was expected by its RNAPII transcription rate alone. Histone H3 exchange in coding regions might be a way to add or remove certain histone modifications that are important for transcription elongation. Therefore, our results that gene-specific coding region histone H3 exchange is decoupled from transcription rate might hint at a new epigenetic mechanism of transcription regulation.

  10. Blind Detection of Region Duplication Forgery Using Fractal Coding and Feature Matching.

    PubMed

    Jenadeleh, Mohsen; Ebrahimi Moghaddam, Mohsen

    2016-05-01

    Digital image forgery detection is important because of its wide use in applications such as medical diagnosis, legal investigations, and entertainment. Copy-move forgery is one of the famous techniques, which is used in region duplication. Many of the existing copy-move detection algorithms cannot effectively blind detect duplicated regions that are made by powerful image manipulation software like Photoshop. In this study, a new method is proposed for blind detecting manipulations in digital images based on modified fractal coding and feature vector matching. The proposed method not only detects typical copy-move forgery, but also finds multiple copied forgery regions for images that are subjected to rotation, scaling, reflection, and a mixture of these postprocessing operations. The proposed method is robust against tampered images undergoing attacks such as Gaussian blurring, contrast scaling, and brightness adjustment. The experimental results demonstrated the validity and efficiency of the method.

  11. Development of a code for wall contour design in the transonic region of axisymmetric and square nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alcenius, Timothy; Schneider, Steven P.

    1994-01-01

    Nozzle design codes developed earlier under NAG1-1133 were modified and used in order to design a supersonic wind tunnel nozzle with square cross sections. As part of the design process, a computer code was written to implement the Hopkins and Hill perturbation solution for the flow in the transonic region of axisymmetric nozzles. This technique is used to design the bleed slot of quiet-flow nozzles. This new design code is documented in this report.

  12. New polymorphisms within the human TAP1 and TAP2 coding regions

    SciTech Connect

    Moins-Teisserenc, H.; Bobrynina, V.; Loiseau, P.; Charron, D.

    1994-12-31

    Two genes, TAP1 and TAP2, both located in the HLS class II region, have been identified as genes coding for membrane transporters belonging to the ABC (ATP Binding Cassette) superfamily. The products of the TAP1 and TAP2 genes form an heterodimeric complex which delivers cytosolic peptides into the endoplasmic reticulum prior to the assembly of class I molecules. Previous studies in homozygous cell lines have revealed a limited degree of allelic variation in humans: only two TAP1 and four TAP2 polymorphic sites. In addition to these TAP1 polymorphisms, three others were identified, two of which were found in diabetic patients. For the TAP2 gene, four additional mutations have been reported. In the present study, polymorphism within TAP1 and TAP2 cDNA was analyzed by the single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) method in 32 HLA homozygous cell lines from the Tenth International Histocompatibility Workshop. Since previous studies had suggested that polymorphisms of the TAP genes were localized in the C-terminal half of the molecules, we concentrated our investigation on the 3` half of TAP1 and TAP2 coding sequences. In summary, our study has revealed two new substitutions in TAP2 cDNA. One, located in the ATP binding site, is a coding substitution exchanging an Arginine to a Cysteine. This mutation may increase the potential combinations of dimorphisms and thus the number of TAP2 alleles, and may be functionally relevant. 8 refs., 2 tabs.

  13. Experimental annotation of post-translational features and translated coding regions in the pathogen Salmonella Typhimurium

    SciTech Connect

    Ansong, Charles; Tolic, Nikola; Purvine, Samuel O.; Porwollik, Steffen; Jones, Marcus B.; Yoon, Hyunjin; Payne, Samuel H.; Martin, Jessica L.; Burnet, Meagan C.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Venepally, Pratap; Smith, Richard D.; Peterson, Scott; Heffron, Fred; Mcclelland, Michael; Adkins, Joshua N.

    2011-08-25

    Complete and accurate genome annotation is crucial for comprehensive and systematic studies of biological systems. For example systems biology-oriented genome scale modeling efforts greatly benefit from accurate annotation of protein-coding genes to develop proper functioning models. However, determining protein-coding genes for most new genomes is almost completely performed by inference, using computational predictions with significant documented error rates (> 15%). Furthermore, gene prediction programs provide no information on biologically important post-translational processing events critical for protein function. With the ability to directly measure peptides arising from expressed proteins, mass spectrometry-based proteomics approaches can be used to augment and verify coding regions of a genomic sequence and importantly detect post-translational processing events. In this study we utilized “shotgun” proteomics to guide accurate primary genome annotation of the bacterial pathogen Salmonella Typhimurium 14028 to facilitate a systems-level understanding of Salmonella biology. The data provides protein-level experimental confirmation for 44% of predicted protein-coding genes, suggests revisions to 48 genes assigned incorrect translational start sites, and uncovers 13 non-annotated genes missed by gene prediction programs. We also present a comprehensive analysis of post-translational processing events in Salmonella, revealing a wide range of complex chemical modifications (70 distinct modifications) and confirming more than 130 signal peptide and N-terminal methionine cleavage events in Salmonella. This study highlights several ways in which proteomics data applied during the primary stages of annotation can improve the quality of genome annotations, especially with regards to the annotation of mature protein products.

  14. Stereoscopic Visual Attention-Based Regional Bit Allocation Optimization for Multiview Video Coding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yun; Jiang, Gangyi; Yu, Mei; Chen, Ken; Dai, Qionghai

    2010-12-01

    We propose a Stereoscopic Visual Attention- (SVA-) based regional bit allocation optimization for Multiview Video Coding (MVC) by the exploiting visual redundancies from human perceptions. We propose a novel SVA model, where multiple perceptual stimuli including depth, motion, intensity, color, and orientation contrast are utilized, to simulate the visual attention mechanisms of human visual system with stereoscopic perception. Then, a semantic region-of-interest (ROI) is extracted based on the saliency maps of SVA. Both objective and subjective evaluations of extracted ROIs indicated that the proposed SVA model based on ROI extraction scheme outperforms the schemes only using spatial or/and temporal visual attention clues. Finally, by using the extracted SVA-based ROIs, a regional bit allocation optimization scheme is presented to allocate more bits on SVA-based ROIs for high image quality and fewer bits on background regions for efficient compression purpose. Experimental results on MVC show that the proposed regional bit allocation algorithm can achieve over [InlineEquation not available: see fulltext.]% bit-rate saving while maintaining the subjective image quality. Meanwhile, the image quality of ROIs is improved by [InlineEquation not available: see fulltext.] dB at the cost of insensitive image quality degradation of the background image.

  15. Mutational analysis of the promoter and the coding region of the 5-HT1A gene

    SciTech Connect

    Erdmann, J.; Noethen, M.M.; Shimron-Abarbanell, D.

    1994-09-01

    Disturbances of serotonergic pathways have been implicated in many neuropsychiatric disorders. Serotonin (5HT) receptors can be subdivided into at least three major families (5HT1, 5HT2, and 5HT3). Five human 5HT1 receptor subtypes have been cloned, namely 1A, 1D{alpha}, 1D{beta}, 1E, and 1F. Of these, the 5HT1A receptor is the best characterized subtype. In the present study we sought to identify genetic variation in the 5HT1A receptor gene which through alteration of protein function or level of expression might contribute to the genetics of neuropsychiatric diseases. The coding region and the 5{prime} promoter region of the 5HT1A gene from 159 unrelated subjects (45 schizophrenic, 46 bipolar affective, and 43 patients with Tourette`s syndrome, as well as 25 controls) were analyzed using SSCA. SSCA revealed the presence of two mutations both located in the coding region of the 5HT1A receptor gene. The first mutation is a rare silent C{r_arrow}T substitution at nucleotide position 549. The second mutation is characterized by a base pair substitution (A{r_arrow}G) at the first position of codon 28 and results in an amino acid exchange (Ile{r_arrow}Val). Since Val28 was found only in a single schizophrenic patient and in none of the other patients or controls, we decided to extend our samples and to use a restriction assay for screening a further 74 schizophrenic, 95 bipolar affective, and 49 patients with Tourette`s syndrome, as well as 185 controls, for the presence of the mutation. In total, the mutation was found in 2 schizophrenic patients, in 3 bipolars, in 1 Tourette patient, and in 5 controls. To our knowledge the Ile-28-Val substitution reported here is the first natural occuring molecular variant which has been identified for a serotonin receptor so far.

  16. The signal sequence coding region promotes nuclear export of mRNA.

    PubMed

    Palazzo, Alexander F; Springer, Michael; Shibata, Yoko; Lee, Chung-Sheng; Dias, Anusha P; Rapoport, Tom A

    2007-12-01

    In eukaryotic cells, most mRNAs are exported from the nucleus by the transcription export (TREX) complex, which is loaded onto mRNAs after their splicing and capping. We have studied in mammalian cells the nuclear export of mRNAs that code for secretory proteins, which are targeted to the endoplasmic reticulum membrane by hydrophobic signal sequences. The mRNAs were injected into the nucleus or synthesized from injected or transfected DNA, and their export was followed by fluorescent in situ hybridization. We made the surprising observation that the signal sequence coding region (SSCR) can serve as a nuclear export signal of an mRNA that lacks an intron or functional cap. Even the export of an intron-containing natural mRNA was enhanced by its SSCR. Like conventional export, the SSCR-dependent pathway required the factor TAP, but depletion of the TREX components had only moderate effects. The SSCR export signal appears to be characterized in vertebrates by a low content of adenines, as demonstrated by genome-wide sequence analysis and by the inhibitory effect of silent adenine mutations in SSCRs. The discovery of an SSCR-mediated pathway explains the previously noted amino acid bias in signal sequences and suggests a link between nuclear export and membrane targeting of mRNAs.

  17. A unified mathematical framework for coding time, space, and sequences in the hippocampal region.

    PubMed

    Howard, Marc W; MacDonald, Christopher J; Tiganj, Zoran; Shankar, Karthik H; Du, Qian; Hasselmo, Michael E; Eichenbaum, Howard

    2014-03-26

    The medial temporal lobe (MTL) is believed to support episodic memory, vivid recollection of a specific event situated in a particular place at a particular time. There is ample neurophysiological evidence that the MTL computes location in allocentric space and more recent evidence that the MTL also codes for time. Space and time represent a similar computational challenge; both are variables that cannot be simply calculated from the immediately available sensory information. We introduce a simple mathematical framework that computes functions of both spatial location and time as special cases of a more general computation. In this framework, experience unfolding in time is encoded via a set of leaky integrators. These leaky integrators encode the Laplace transform of their input. The information contained in the transform can be recovered using an approximation to the inverse Laplace transform. In the temporal domain, the resulting representation reconstructs the temporal history. By integrating movements, the equations give rise to a representation of the path taken to arrive at the present location. By modulating the transform with information about allocentric velocity, the equations code for position of a landmark. Simulated cells show a close correspondence to neurons observed in various regions for all three cases. In the temporal domain, novel secondary analyses of hippocampal time cells verified several qualitative predictions of the model. An integrated representation of spatiotemporal context can be computed by taking conjunctions of these elemental inputs, leading to a correspondence with conjunctive neural representations observed in dorsal CA1.

  18. A Unified Mathematical Framework for Coding Time, Space, and Sequences in the Hippocampal Region

    PubMed Central

    MacDonald, Christopher J.; Tiganj, Zoran; Shankar, Karthik H.; Du, Qian; Hasselmo, Michael E.; Eichenbaum, Howard

    2014-01-01

    The medial temporal lobe (MTL) is believed to support episodic memory, vivid recollection of a specific event situated in a particular place at a particular time. There is ample neurophysiological evidence that the MTL computes location in allocentric space and more recent evidence that the MTL also codes for time. Space and time represent a similar computational challenge; both are variables that cannot be simply calculated from the immediately available sensory information. We introduce a simple mathematical framework that computes functions of both spatial location and time as special cases of a more general computation. In this framework, experience unfolding in time is encoded via a set of leaky integrators. These leaky integrators encode the Laplace transform of their input. The information contained in the transform can be recovered using an approximation to the inverse Laplace transform. In the temporal domain, the resulting representation reconstructs the temporal history. By integrating movements, the equations give rise to a representation of the path taken to arrive at the present location. By modulating the transform with information about allocentric velocity, the equations code for position of a landmark. Simulated cells show a close correspondence to neurons observed in various regions for all three cases. In the temporal domain, novel secondary analyses of hippocampal time cells verified several qualitative predictions of the model. An integrated representation of spatiotemporal context can be computed by taking conjunctions of these elemental inputs, leading to a correspondence with conjunctive neural representations observed in dorsal CA1. PMID:24672015

  19. Priorization of region-of-interest (ROI) using embedded coding of wavelet coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martel, Luc; Zaccarin, Andre

    1998-07-01

    This paper addresses the problem of prioritizing, i.e., preserve with higher fidelity, region-of-interest during image compression. Regions-of-interest are found, for example, in medical imagery where only a small area is useful for diagnostic, or in surveillance images where targets have to be identified and tracked. These ROI are often characterized by their fine details which therefore need to be preserved if the image is to be of any use after it is decompressed. Wavelet- based image compression is appropriate for such tasks because of its localization property. We present an algorithm, based on Shapiro's popular EZW (Embedded image coding using Zerotree of Wavelet coefficients) to prioritize region-of-interest. A non-uniform quantizer with smaller steps for smaller coefficients is used on the coefficients of the ROI. This allows to transmit initially the fine details of the ROI and to use successive approximation quantization to reduce the quantization error on larger coefficients of the image, ROI or non-ROI. Simulation results show that this approach allows to efficiently preserve the fine details of the ROI.

  20. Systematically characterizing dysfunctional long intergenic non-coding RNAs in multiple brain regions of major psychosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hongying; Li, Feng; Deng, Yulan; Liu, Ling; Lan, Yujia; Zhang, Xinxin; Zhao, Tingting; Xu, Chaohan; Xu, Chun; Xiao, Yun; Li, Xia

    2016-01-01

    Schizophrenia (SZ) and bipolar disorder (BD) are severe neuropsychiatric disorders with serious impact on patients, together termed “major psychosis”. Recently, long intergenic non-coding RNAs (lincRNAs) were reported to play important roles in mental diseases. However, little was known about their molecular mechanism in pathogenesis of SZ and BD. Here, we performed RNA sequencing on 82 post-mortem brain tissues from three brain regions (orbitofrontal cortex (BA11), anterior cingulate cortex (BA24) and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (BA9)) of patients with SZ and BD and control subjects, generating over one billion reads. We characterized lincRNA transcriptome in the three brain regions and identified 20 differentially expressed lincRNAs (DELincRNAs) in BA11 for BD, 34 and 1 in BA24 and BA9 for SZ, respectively. Our results showed that these DELincRNAs exhibited brain region-specific patterns. Applying weighted gene co-expression network analysis, we revealed that DELincRNAs together with other genes can function as modules to perform different functions in different brain regions, such as immune system development in BA24 and oligodendrocyte differentiation in BA9. Additionally, we found that DNA methylation alteration could partly explain the dysregulation of lincRNAs, some of which could function as enhancers in the pathogenesis of major psychosis. Together, we performed systematical characterization of dysfunctional lincRNAs in multiple brain regions of major psychosis, which provided a valuable resource to understand their roles in SZ and BD pathology and helped to discover novel biomarkers. PMID:27661005

  1. Influenza A virus coding regions exhibit host-specific global ordered RNA structure.

    PubMed

    Priore, Salvatore F; Moss, Walter N; Turner, Douglas H

    2012-01-01

    Influenza A is a significant public health threat, partially because of its capacity to readily exchange gene segments between different host species to form novel pandemic strains. An understanding of the fundamental factors providing species barriers between different influenza hosts would facilitate identification of strains capable of leading to pandemic outbreaks and could also inform vaccine development. Here, we describe the difference in predicted RNA secondary structure stability that exists between avian, swine and human coding regions. The results predict that global ordered RNA structure exists in influenza A segments 1, 5, 7 and 8, and that ranges of free energies for secondary structure formation differ between host strains. The predicted free energy distributions for strains from avian, swine, and human species suggest criteria for segment reassortment and strains that might be ideal candidates for viral attenuation and vaccine development.

  2. Evidence for a novel exon in the coding region of the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene

    SciTech Connect

    Xia, Ling; St. Denis, K.A.; Bapat, B.

    1995-08-10

    Germline mutations of the tumor suppressor gene APC cause familial adenomatous polyposis. Somatic APC alterations are involved in several sporadic neoplasma, including colorectal, duodenal, gastric, and esophageal carcinoma. The APC mRNA is encoded by 15 exons. Additional transcripts have been reported, due to alternative splicing of coding as well as noncoding regions. Two mRNA isoforms occur due to a deletion of exon 7 or a partial deletion of exon 9. We have identified a novel exon, flanked by APC exons 10 and 11, which is expressed as an alternatively transcribed product of the gene. Further, we have shown that the novel exon consists of a heptad repeat motif and is conserved across species. 18 refs., 2 figs.

  3. Characterization of the P1 protein and coding region of the zucchini yellow mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Wisler, G C; Purcifull, D E; Hiebert, E

    1995-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of the 5'-terminal P1 coding region of an aphid-transmissible isolate of zucchini yellow mosaic virus (ZYMV; strain FL/AT), a mild isolate (strain MD) and a severe isolate (strain SV), all from Florida, were compared with two other ZYMV isolates. The ZYMV MD and SV isolates and an isolate from California (ZYMV CA) had 95-98% sequence similarities to FL/AT, whereas an isolate from Reunion Island (ZYMV RU) had a 60% sequence similarity to FL/AT. ZYMV MD had an 18 nucleotide insert following the start codon of the P1 coding region. The P1 proteins of all ZYMV isolates shared conserved amino acids in areas of the C terminus similar to those reported for other potyviruses. Polyclonal antisera were prepared to the P1 proteins of ZYMV FL/AT and RU expressed in Escherichia coli. The FL/AT and RU P1 antisera showed varying degrees of reactivity in Western blots with extracts of pumpkin (Cucurbita pepo L.) singly infected with a number of distinct ZYMV isolates. The reaction of the FL/AT P1 antiserum with isolate RU-infected tissue extracts was very weak compared to the homologous reaction. Neither antiserum reacted with extracts from plants singly infected with three other potyviruses, a potexvirus, or a cucumovirus. The P1 proteins of ZYMV isolates ranged in molecular mass from 33 kDa to 35 kDa. The P1 protein of strain MD was larger (35 kDa) than that of FL/AT (34 kDa). Indirect immunofluorescence tests with FL/AT P1 antiserum indicated that the P1 protein aggregates in ZYMV-infected tissues. The antisera to the ZYMV P1 proteins have potential as serological probes for identifying ZYMV and for distinguishing ZYMV isolates by immunoblotting.

  4. Biological basis of miRNA action when their targets are located in human protein coding region.

    PubMed

    Gu, Wanjun; Wang, Xiaofei; Zhai, Chuanying; Zhou, Tong; Xie, Xueying

    2013-01-01

    Recent analyses have revealed many functional microRNA (miRNA) targets in mammalian protein coding regions. But, the mechanisms that ensure miRNA function when their target sites are located in protein coding regions of mammalian mRNA transcripts are largely unknown. In this paper, we investigate some potential biological factors, such as target site accessibility and local translation efficiency. We computationally analyze these two factors using experimentally identified miRNA targets in human protein coding region. We find site accessibility is significantly increased in miRNA target region to facilitate miRNA binding. At the mean time, local translation efficiency is also selectively decreased near miRNA target region. GC-poor codons are preferred in the flank region of miRNA target sites to ease the access of miRNA targets. Within-genome analysis shows substantial variations of site accessibility and local translation efficiency among different miRNA targets in the genome. Further analyses suggest target gene's GC content and conservation level could explain some of the differences in site accessibility. On the other hand, target gene's functional importance and conservation level can affect local translation efficiency near miRNA target region. We hence propose both site accessibility and local translation efficiency are important in miRNA action when miRNA target sites are located in mammalian protein coding regions.

  5. Low mitochondrial DNA variation among American alligators and a novel non-coding region in crocodilians.

    PubMed

    Glenn, Travis C; Staton, Joseph L; Vu, Alex T; Davis, Lisa M; Bremer, Jaime R Alvarado; Rhodes, Walter E; Brisbin, I Lehr; Sawyer, Roger H

    2002-12-15

    We analyzed 1317-1823 base pairs (bp) of mitochondrial DNA sequence beginning in the 5' end of cytochrome b (cyt b) and ending in the central domain of the control region for 25 American alligators (Alligator mississippiensis) and compared these to a homologous sequence from a Chinese alligator (A. sinensis). Both species share a non-coding spacer between cyt b and tRNA(Thr). Chinese alligator cyt b differs from that of the American alligator by 17.5% at the nucleotide level and 13.8% for inferred amino acids, which is consistent with their presumed ancient divergence. Only two cyt b haplotypes were detected among the 25 American alligators (693-1199 bp surveyed), with one haplotype shared among 24 individuals. One alligator from Mississippi differed from all other alligators by a single silent substitution. The control region contained only slightly more variation among the 25 American alligators, with two variable positions (624 bp surveyed), yielding three haplotypes with 22, two, and one individuals in each of these groups. Previous genetic studies examining allozymes and the proportion of variable microsatellite DNA loci also found low levels of genetic diversity in American alligators. However, in contrast with allozymes, microsatellites, and morphology, the mtDNA data shows no evidence of differentiation among populations from the extremes of the species range. These results suggest that American alligators underwent a severe population bottleneck in the late Pleistocene, resulting in nearly homogenous mtDNA among all American alligators today.

  6. Coding DNA repeated throughout intergenic regions of the Arabidopsis thaliana genome: Evolutionary footprints of RNA silencing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pyknons are non-random sequence patterns significantly repeated throughout non-coding genomic DNA that also appear at least once among genes. They are interesting because they portend an unforeseen connection between coding and non-coding DNA. Pyknons have only been discovered in the human genome,...

  7. Long non-coding RNA containing ultraconserved genomic region 8 promotes bladder cancer tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Olivieri, Michele; Ferro, Matteo; Terreri, Sara; Durso, Montano; Romanelli, Alessandra; Avitabile, Concetta; De Cobelli, Ottavio; Messere, Anna; Bruzzese, Dario; Vannini, Ivan; Marinelli, Luciana; Novellino, Ettore; Zhang, Wei; Incoronato, Mariarosaria; Ilardi, Gennaro; Staibano, Stefania; Marra, Laura; Franco, Renato; Perdonà, Sisto; Terracciano, Daniela; Czerniak, Bogdan; Liguori, Giovanna L; Colonna, Vincenza; Fabbri, Muller; Febbraio, Ferdinando; Calin, George A; Cimmino, Amelia

    2016-04-12

    Ultraconserved regions (UCRs) have been shown to originate non-coding RNA transcripts (T-UCRs) that have different expression profiles and play functional roles in the pathophysiology of multiple cancers. The relevance of these functions to the pathogenesis of bladder cancer (BlCa) is speculative. To elucidate this relevance, we first used genome-wide profiling to evaluate the expression of T-UCRs in BlCa tissues. Analysis of two datasets comprising normal bladder tissues and BlCa specimens with a custom T-UCR microarray identified ultraconserved RNA (uc.) 8+ as the most upregulated T-UCR in BlCa tissues, although its expression was lower than in pericancerous bladder tissues. These results were confirmed on BlCa tissues by real-time PCR and by in situ hybridization. Although uc.8+ is located within intron 1 of CASZ1, a zinc-finger transcription factor, the transcribed non-coding RNA encoding uc.8+ is expressed independently of CASZ1. In vitro experiments evaluating the effects of uc.8+ silencing, showed significantly decreased capacities for cancer cell invasion, migration, and proliferation. From this, we proposed and validated a model of interaction in which uc.8+ shuttles from the nucleus to the cytoplasm of BlCa cells, interacts with microRNA (miR)-596, and cooperates in the promotion and development of BlCa. Using computational analysis, we investigated the miR-binding domain accessibility, as determined by base-pairing interactions within the uc.8+ predicted secondary structure, RNA binding affinity, and RNA species abundance in bladder tissues and showed that uc.8+ is a natural decoy for miR-596. Thus uc.8+ upregulation results in increased expression of MMP9, increasing the invasive potential of BlCa cells. These interactions between evolutionarily conserved regions of DNA suggest that natural selection has preserved this potentially regulatory layer that uses RNA to modulate miR levels, opening up the possibility for development of useful markers for

  8. Long non-coding RNA containing ultraconserved genomic region 8 promotes bladder cancer tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Durso, Montano; Romanelli, Alessandra; Avitabile, Concetta; De Cobelli, Ottavio; Messere, Anna; Bruzzese, Dario; Vannini, Ivan; Marinelli, Luciana; Novellino, Ettore; Zhang, Wei; Incoronato, Mariarosaria; Ilardi, Gennaro; Staibano, Stefania; Marra, Laura; Franco, Renato; Perdonà, Sisto; Terracciano, Daniela; Czerniak, Bogdan; Liguori, Giovanna L.; Colonna, Vincenza; Fabbri, Muller; Febbraio, Ferdinando

    2016-01-01

    Ultraconserved regions (UCRs) have been shown to originate non-coding RNA transcripts (T-UCRs) that have different expression profiles and play functional roles in the pathophysiology of multiple cancers. The relevance of these functions to the pathogenesis of bladder cancer (BlCa) is speculative. To elucidate this relevance, we first used genome-wide profiling to evaluate the expression of T-UCRs in BlCa tissues. Analysis of two datasets comprising normal bladder tissues and BlCa specimens with a custom T-UCR microarray identified ultraconserved RNA (uc.) 8+ as the most upregulated T-UCR in BlCa tissues, although its expression was lower than in pericancerous bladder tissues. These results were confirmed on BlCa tissues by real-time PCR and by in situ hybridization. Although uc.8+ is located within intron 1 of CASZ1, a zinc-finger transcription factor, the transcribed non-coding RNA encoding uc.8+ is expressed independently of CASZ1. In vitro experiments evaluating the effects of uc.8+ silencing, showed significantly decreased capacities for cancer cell invasion, migration, and proliferation. From this, we proposed and validated a model of interaction in which uc.8+ shuttles from the nucleus to the cytoplasm of BlCa cells, interacts with microRNA (miR)-596, and cooperates in the promotion and development of BlCa. Using computational analysis, we investigated the miR-binding domain accessibility, as determined by base-pairing interactions within the uc.8+ predicted secondary structure, RNA binding affinity, and RNA species abundance in bladder tissues and showed that uc.8+ is a natural decoy for miR-596. Thus uc.8+ upregulation results in increased expression of MMP9, increasing the invasive potential of BlCa cells. These interactions between evolutionarily conserved regions of DNA suggest that natural selection has preserved this potentially regulatory layer that uses RNA to modulate miR levels, opening up the possibility for development of useful markers for

  9. Coaxial atomizer liquid intact lengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eroglu, Hasan; Chigier, Norman; Farago, Zoltan

    1991-01-01

    Average intact lengths of round liquid jets generated by airblast coaxial atomizer were measured from over 1500 photographs. The intact lengths were studied over a jet Reynolds number range of 18,000 and Weber number range of 260. Results are presented for two different nozzle geometries. The intact lengths were found to be strongly dependent on Re and We numbers. An empirical equation was derived as a function of these parameters. A comparison of the intact lengths for round jets and flat sheets shows that round jets generate shorter intact lengths.

  10. In silico screening of the chicken genome for overlaps between genomic regions: microRNA genes, coding and non-coding transcriptional units, QTL, and genetic variations.

    PubMed

    Zorc, Minja; Kunej, Tanja

    2016-05-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of non-coding RNAs involved in posttranscriptional regulation of target genes. Regulation requires complementarity between target mRNA and the mature miRNA seed region, responsible for their recognition and binding. It has been estimated that each miRNA targets approximately 200 genes, and genetic variability of miRNA genes has been reported to affect phenotypic variability and disease susceptibility in humans, livestock species, and model organisms. Polymorphisms in miRNA genes could therefore represent biomarkers for phenotypic traits in livestock animals. In our previous study, we collected polymorphisms within miRNA genes in chicken. In the present study, we identified miRNA-related genomic overlaps to prioritize genomic regions of interest for further functional studies and biomarker discovery. Overlapping genomic regions in chicken were analyzed using the following bioinformatics tools and databases: miRNA SNiPer, Ensembl, miRBase, NCBI Blast, and QTLdb. Out of 740 known pre-miRNA genes, 263 (35.5 %) contain polymorphisms; among them, 35 contain more than three polymorphisms The most polymorphic miRNA genes in chicken are gga-miR-6662, containing 23 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within the pre-miRNA region, including five consecutive SNPs, and gga-miR-6688, containing ten polymorphisms including three consecutive polymorphisms. Several miRNA-related genomic hotspots have been revealed in chicken genome; polymorphic miRNA genes are located within protein-coding and/or non-coding transcription units and quantitative trait loci (QTL) associated with production traits. The present study includes the first description of an exonic miRNA in a chicken genome, an overlap between the miRNA gene and the exon of the protein-coding gene (gga-miR-6578/HADHB), and the first report of a missense polymorphism located within a mature miRNA seed region. Identified miRNA-related genomic hotspots in chicken can serve researchers as a

  11. Genic amplification of the entire coding region of the HEF RNA segment of influenza C virus.

    PubMed

    Manuguerra, J C; Hannoun, C; Nicolson, C; Robertson, J S

    1993-01-01

    In order to provide an easy and powerful analysis of influenza C viral HEF RNA segment of a recent strain, a combination of reverse transcription and the polymerase chain reaction was used. We amplified the entire coding region of the HEF gene of a laboratory strain of virus called C/Johannesburg/1/66, widely used for binding and esterase activity studies as well as that of a strain isolated in 1991 (C/Paris/145/91) from a patient suffering from severe flu syndrome. The sequences we amplified were about 2 kilobases long. In this work, we show that the forward 'universal primer' Uni1, which has been used for influenza A and B viruses cDNA syntheses can also be used for influenza C virus. The PCR primers were designed to contain restriction sites to make the PCR products ready to be used for further purposes. A restriction analysis of the PCR products combined with analyses of all the human influenza C virus HEF gene sequences published so far permitted the design of sets of oligonucleotides which can prime PCR on cDNA of unknown influenza C virus for cloning.

  12. Benchmark Test of Differential Emission Measure Codes and Multi-thermal Energies in Solar Active Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aschwanden, Markus J.; Boerner, Paul; Caspi, Amir; McTiernan, James M.; Ryan, Daniel; Warren, Harry

    2015-10-01

    We compare the ability of 11 differential emission measure (DEM) forward-fitting and inversion methods to constrain the properties of active regions and solar flares by simulating synthetic data using the instrumental response functions of the Solar Dynamics Observatory/ Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (SDO/AIA) and EUV Variability Experiment (SDO/EVE), the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI), and the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite/ X-ray Sensor (GOES/XRS). The codes include the single-Gaussian DEM, a bi-Gaussian DEM, a fixed-Gaussian DEM, a linear spline DEM, the spatial-synthesis DEM, the Monte-Carlo Markov Chain DEM, the regularized DEM inversion, the Hinode/ X-Ray Telescope (XRT) method, a polynomial spline DEM, an EVE+GOES, and an EVE+RHESSI method. Averaging the results from all 11 DEM methods, we find the following accuracies in the inversion of physical parameters: the EM-weighted temperature Tw^{fit}/Tw^{sim}=0.9±0.1, the peak emission measure EMp^{fit}/EMp^{sim}=0.6±0.2, the total emission measure EMt^{fit}/EMt^{sim}=0.8±0.3, and the multi-thermal energies E_{th}^{fit}/EM_{th}^{approx}=1.2±0.4. We find that the AIA spatial-synthesis, the EVE+GOES, and the EVE+RHESSI method yield the most accurate results.

  13. Archetype and Rearranged Non-coding Control Regions in Urothelial Bladder Carcinoma of Immunocompetent Individuals

    PubMed Central

    ANZIVINO, ELENA; ANTONELLA ZINGAROPOLI, MARIA; IANNETTA, MARCO; ANTONIETTA PIETROPAOLO, VALERIA; OLIVA, ALESSANDRA; IORI, FRANCESCO; CIARDI, ANTONIO; MARIA RODIO, DONATELLA; ANTONINI, FRANCESCA; GIOVANNI FEDELE, CESARE; D’ABRAMO, ALESSANDRA; MARIA MASTROIANNI, CLAUDIO; VULLO, VINCENZO; ROSA CIARDI, MARIA

    2016-01-01

    Background: Polyomaviruses (PyVs) are potential transforming viruses. Despite their involvement in human tumours still being debated, there is evidence to suggest a role for PyVs in bladder carcinoma (BC). Therefore, a possible association between PyVs and BC was investigated. Materials and Methods: Urine, blood and fresh bladder tissue specimens were collected from 29 patients with BC. PyV prevalence, non-coding control region (NCCR) organization and genotypic analysis were assessed. Results: Data showed a significant prevalence of John Cunningham (JC) PyV in BC tissues and in urine with respect to BKPyV, while simian virus 40 was not revealed. A BKPyV rearranged NCCR sequence was isolated, whereas a JCPyV archetypal structure was consistently retained. A prevalence of European genotypes was observed. Conclusion: Our data would suggest a JCPyV involvement in cancer progression and a BKPyV association with BC pathogenesis in immunocompetent patients. However, further work is necessary to better understand the exact role of PyVs in urothelial carcinogenesis. PMID:27807073

  14. The PPAR{gamma} coding region and its role in visceral obesity

    SciTech Connect

    Boon Yin, Khoo Najimudin, Nazalan; Muhammad, Tengku Sifzizul Tengku

    2008-06-27

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR{gamma}) is a ligand activated transcription factor, plays many essential roles of biological function in higher organisms. The PPAR{gamma} is mainly expressed in adipose tissue. It regulates the transcriptional activity of genes by binding with other transcription factor. The PPAR{gamma} coding region has been found to be closest to that of monkey in ours and other research groups. Thus, monkey is a more suitable animal model for future PPAR{gamma} studying, although mice and rat are frequently being used. The PPAR{gamma} is involved in regulating alterations of adipose tissue masses result from changes in mature adipocyte size and/or number through a complex interplay process called adipogenesis. However, the role of PPAR{gamma} in negatively regulating the process of adipogenesis remains unclear. This review may help we investigate the differential expression of key transcription factor in adipose tissue in response to visceral obesity-induced diet in vivo. The study may also provide valuable information to define a more appropriate physiological condition in adipogenesis which may help to prevent diseases cause by negative regulation of the transcription factors in adipose tissue.

  15. (Photosynthesis in intact plants)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    Progress in the two years since the last renewal application has been excellent. We have made substantial contributions on both main fronts of the projects, and are particularly happy with the progress of our research on intact plants. The approach of basing our field work on a sound foundation of laboratory studies has enabled is to use methods which provide unambiguous assays of well characterized reactions. We have also made excellent progress in several laboratory studies which will have direct applications in future field work, and have introduced to the laboratory a range of molecular genetics techniques which will allow us to explore new options in the attempt to understand function at the level of molecular structure.

  16. Structure of transcripts from the homeotic Antennapedia gene of Drosophila melanogaster: two promoters control the major protein-coding region.

    PubMed Central

    Laughon, A; Boulet, A M; Bermingham, J R; Laymon, R A; Scott, M P

    1986-01-01

    The Antennapedia (Antp) homeotic gene of Drosophila melanogaster regulates segmental identity in the thorax. Loss of Antp function results in altered development of the embryonic thoracic segments or can cause legs to be transformed into antennae. Certain combinations of Antp recessive lethal alleles complement to permit normal development. The structure of the Antp gene, analyzed by sequencing cDNA clones and exons and by transcript mapping, revealed some of the basis for its genetic complexity. It has two promoters governing two nested transcription units, one unit 36 and one 103 kilobase pairs (kb) long. Both units incorporated the same protein-coding exons, all of which are located in the 3'-most 13 kb of the gene. The two promoters resulted in the attachment of either of two long noncoding leader sequences (1.5 and 1.7 kb) to a 1.1-kb open reading frame. Both transcription units used the same pair of alternative polyadenylation sites 1.4 kb apart; the choice of sites was developmentally regulated. Some of the mutations that disrupt the larger transcription unit complemented a mutation affecting the smaller one. Dominant mutations that transform antennae into legs split the gene but left the coding exons intact. The encoded protein has unusually long runs of glutamine and a homeodomain near the C terminus. Images PMID:2879223

  17. A 5'-regulatory region and two coding region polymorphisms modulate promoter activity and gene expression of the growth suppressor gene ZBED6 in cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Zinc finger, BED-type containing 6 (ZBED6) is an important transcription factor in placental mammals, affecting development, cell proliferation, and growth. Polymorphisms in its promoter and coding regions are likely to impact ZBED6 transcription and growth traits. In this study, a total of three no...

  18. De novo, systemic, deleterious amino acid substitutions are common in large cytoskeleton-related protein coding regions

    PubMed Central

    Stoll, Rebecca J.; Thompson, Grace R.; Samy, Mohammad D.; Blanck, George

    2017-01-01

    Human mutagenesis is largely random, thus large coding regions, simply on the basis of probability, represent relatively large mutagenesis targets. Thus, we considered the possibility that large cytoskeletal-protein related coding regions (CPCRs), including extra-cellular matrix (ECM) coding regions, would have systemic nucleotide variants that are not present in common SNP databases. Presumably, such variants arose recently in development or in recent, preceding generations. Using matched breast cancer and blood-derived normal datasets from the cancer genome atlas, CPCR single nucleotide variants (SNVs) not present in the All SNPs(142) or 1000 Genomes databases were identified. Using the Protein Variation Effect Analyzer internet-based tool, it was discovered that apparent, systemic mutations (not shared among others in the analysis group) in the CPCRs, represented numerous deleterious amino acid substitutions. However, no such deleterious variants were identified among the (cancer blood-matched) variants shared by other members of the analysis group. These data indicate that private SNVs, which potentially have a medical consequence, occur de novo with significant frequency in the larger, human coding regions that collectively impact the cytoskeleton and ECM. PMID:28357075

  19. The physics of intact capture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsou, Peter; Griffiths, D. J.; Albee, A. L.

    1994-01-01

    The ability to capture projectiles intact at hypervelocities in underdense media open a new area of study in physics. Underdense material behaves markedly different than solid, liquid, or gas upon hypervelocity impact. This new phenomenon enables applications in science that would either not be possible or would be very costly by other means. This phenomenon has been fully demonstrated in the laboratory and validated in space. Even more interesting is the fact that this hypervelocity intact capture was accomplished passively. A better understanding of the physics of intact capture will lead to improvements in intact capture. A collection of physical observations of this phenomenon is presented here.

  20. A common transcriptional activator is located in the coding region of two replication-dependent mouse histone genes.

    PubMed Central

    Hurt, M M; Bowman, T L; Marzluff, W F

    1991-01-01

    There is a region in the mouse histone H3 gene protein-encoding sequence required for high expression. The 110-nucleotide coding region activating sequence (CRAS) from codons 58 to 93 of the H3.2 gene restored expression when placed 520 nucleotides 5' of the start of transcription in the correct orientation. Since identical mRNA molecules are produced by transcription of the original deletion gene and the deletion gene with the CRAS at -520, effects of the deletions on mRNA stability or other posttranscriptional events are completely ruled out. Inversion of the CRAS sequence in its proper position in the H3 gene resulted in only a threefold increase in expression, and placing the CRAS sequence 5' of the deleted gene in the wrong orientation had no effect on expression. In-frame deletions in the coding region of an H2a.2 gene led to identification of a 105-nucleotide sequence in the coding region between amino acids 50 and 85 necessary for high expression of the gene. Additionally, insertion of the H3 CRAS into the deleted region of the H2a.2 gene restored expression of the H2a gene. Thus, the CRAS element has an orientation-dependent, position-independent effect. Gel mobility shift competition studies indicate that the same proteins interact with both the H3 and H2a CRAS elements, suggesting that a common factor is involved in expression of histone genes. Images PMID:2038312

  1. Nucleotide sequence of the capsid protein gene and 3' non-coding region of papaya mosaic virus RNA.

    PubMed

    Abouhaidar, M G

    1988-01-01

    The nucleotide sequences of cDNA clones corresponding to the 3' OH end of papaya mosaic virus RNA have been determined. The 3'-terminal sequence obtained was 900 nucleotides in length, excluding the poly(A) tail, and contained an open reading frame capable of giving rise to a protein of 214 amino acid residues with an Mr of 22930. This protein was identified as the viral capsid protein. The 3' non-coding region of PMV genome RNA was about 121 nucleotides long [excluding the poly(A) tail] and homologous to the complementary sequence of the non-coding region at the 5' end of PMV RNA. A long open reading frame was also found in the predicted 5' end region of the negative strand.

  2. R-Matrix Codes for Charged-particle Induced Reactionsin the Resolved Resonance Region

    SciTech Connect

    Leeb, Helmut; Dimitriou, Paraskevi; Thompson, Ian J.

    2017-01-01

    A Consultant’s Meeting was held at the IAEA Headquarters, from 5 to 7 December 2016, to discuss the status of R-matrix codes currently used in calculations of charged-particle induced reaction cross sections at low energies. The meeting was a follow-up to the R-matrix Codes meeting held in December 2015, and served the purpose of monitoring progress in: the development of a translation code to enable exchange of input/output parameters between the various codes in different formats, fitting procedures and treatment of uncertainties, the evaluation methodology, and finally dissemination. The details of the presentations and technical discussions, as well as additional actions that were proposed to achieve all the goals of the meeting are summarized in this report.

  3. 50 CFR 622.186 - Landing fish intact.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...-Grouper Fishery of the South Atlantic Region § 622.186 Landing fish intact. (a) South Atlantic snapper-grouper in or from the South Atlantic EEZ must be maintained with head and fins intact, except as..., snapper-grouper lawfully harvested in Bahamian waters are exempt from the requirement that they...

  4. 50 CFR 622.186 - Landing fish intact.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...-Grouper Fishery of the South Atlantic Region § 622.186 Landing fish intact. (a) South Atlantic snapper-grouper in or from the South Atlantic EEZ must be maintained with head and fins intact, except as..., snapper-grouper lawfully harvested in Bahamian waters are exempt from the requirement that they...

  5. Transcriptional profiling of long non-coding RNAs and novel transcribed regions across a diverse panel of archived human cancers

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Molecular characterization of tumors has been critical for identifying important genes in cancer biology and for improving tumor classification and diagnosis. Long non-coding RNAs, as a new, relatively unstudied class of transcripts, provide a rich opportunity to identify both functional drivers and cancer-type-specific biomarkers. However, despite the potential importance of long non-coding RNAs to the cancer field, no comprehensive survey of long non-coding RNA expression across various cancers has been reported. Results We performed a sequencing-based transcriptional survey of both known long non-coding RNAs and novel intergenic transcripts across a panel of 64 archival tumor samples comprising 17 diagnostic subtypes of adenocarcinomas, squamous cell carcinomas and sarcomas. We identified hundreds of transcripts from among the known 1,065 long non-coding RNAs surveyed that showed variability in transcript levels between the tumor types and are therefore potential biomarker candidates. We discovered 1,071 novel intergenic transcribed regions and demonstrate that these show similar patterns of variability between tumor types. We found that many of these differentially expressed cancer transcripts are also expressed in normal tissues. One such novel transcript specifically expressed in breast tissue was further evaluated using RNA in situ hybridization on a panel of breast tumors. It was shown to correlate with low tumor grade and estrogen receptor expression, thereby representing a potentially important new breast cancer biomarker. Conclusions This study provides the first large survey of long non-coding RNA expression within a panel of solid cancers and also identifies a number of novel transcribed regions differentially expressed across distinct cancer types that represent candidate biomarkers for future research. PMID:22929540

  6. Space research with intact organisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, Robert W.; Haddy, Francis J.

    1992-01-01

    Effects of space exposure on intact organisms are briefly reviewed, and examples of future experiments that might provide new information on the role of gravity in the evolution of life are suggested. It is noted that long term experiments with intact plant and animals for studying gravitational thresholds will provide important new insights.

  7. Fast Mode Decision in the HEVC Video Coding Standard by Exploiting Region with Dominated Motion and Saliency Features

    PubMed Central

    Podder, Pallab Kanti; Paul, Manoranjan; Murshed, Manzur

    2016-01-01

    The emerging High Efficiency Video Coding (HEVC) standard introduces a number of innovative and powerful coding tools to acquire better compression efficiency compared to its predecessor H.264. The encoding time complexities have also increased multiple times that is not suitable for realtime video coding applications. To address this limitation, this paper employs a novel coding strategy to reduce the time complexity in HEVC encoder by efficient selection of appropriate block-partitioning modes based on human visual features (HVF). The HVF in the proposed technique comprise with human visual attention modelling-based saliency feature and phase correlation-based motion features. The features are innovatively combined through a fusion process by developing a content-based adaptive weighted cost function to determine the region with dominated motion/saliency (RDMS)- based binary pattern for the current block. The generated binary pattern is then compared with a codebook of predefined binary pattern templates aligned to the HEVC recommended block-paritioning to estimate a subset of inter-prediction modes. Without exhaustive exploration of all modes available in the HEVC standard, only the selected subset of modes are motion estimated and motion compensated for a particular coding unit. The experimental evaluation reveals that the proposed technique notably down-scales the average computational time of the latest HEVC reference encoder by 34% while providing similar rate-distortion (RD) performance for a wide range of video sequences. PMID:26963813

  8. Genome-wide occupancy profile of mediator and the Srb8-11 module reveals interactions with coding regions.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xuefeng; Wirén, Marianna; Sinha, Indranil; Rasmussen, Nina N; Linder, Tomas; Holmberg, Steen; Ekwall, Karl; Gustafsson, Claes M

    2006-04-21

    Mediator exists in a free form containing the Med12, Med13, CDK8, and CycC subunits (the Srb8-11 module) and a smaller form, which lacks these four subunits and associates with RNA polymerase II (Pol II), forming a holoenzyme. We use chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) and DNA microarrays to investigate genome-wide localization of Mediator and the Srb8-11 module in fission yeast. Mediator and the Srb8-11 module display similar binding patterns, and interactions with promoters and upstream activating sequences correlate with increased transcription activity. Unexpectedly, Mediator also interacts with the downstream coding region of many genes. These interactions display a negative bias for positions closer to the 5' ends of open reading frames (ORFs) and appear functionally important, because downregulation of transcription in a temperature-sensitive med17 mutant strain correlates with increased Mediator occupancy in the coding region. We propose that Mediator coordinates transcription initiation with transcriptional events in the coding region of eukaryotic genes.

  9. Nucleotide sequence from the coding region of rabbit β-globin messenger RNA

    PubMed Central

    Proudfoot, N.J.

    1976-01-01

    A sequence of 89 nucleotides from rabbit β-globin mRNA has been determined and is shown to code for residues 107 to 137 of the β-globin protein. In addition, a sequence heterogeneity has been identified within this 89 nucleotide long sequence which corresponds to a known polymorphic variant of rabbit β-globin. Images PMID:61580

  10. Effectiveness of intact capture media

    SciTech Connect

    Tsou, P.; Aubert, J.; Brownlee, D.; Hrubesh, L.; Williams, J.; Albee, A.

    1989-01-01

    The possibility of capturing cosmic dust at hypervelocity has been demonstrated in the laboratory and in the unintended Solar Max spacecraft. This technology will enable a comet coma sample return mission and be important for the earth orbital cosmic dust collection mission, i.e., the Space Station Cosmic Dust Collection Facility. Since the only controllable factor in an intact capture of cosmic dust is the capturing medium, characterizing the effectiveness and properties of available capture media would be very important in the development of the technique for capturing hypervelocity cosmic dust intact. We have evaluated various capture underdense media for the relative effectiveness for intact capture. 2 refs., 2 figs.

  11. 50 CFR 622.247 - Landing golden crab intact.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... ATLANTIC Golden Crab Fishery of the South Atlantic Region § 622.247 Landing golden crab intact. The... ashore. (a) A golden crab in or from the South Atlantic EEZ must be maintained in whole condition...

  12. 50 CFR 622.247 - Landing golden crab intact.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... ATLANTIC Golden Crab Fishery of the South Atlantic Region § 622.247 Landing golden crab intact. The... ashore. (a) A golden crab in or from the South Atlantic EEZ must be maintained in whole condition...

  13. Nitrogen depletion in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe causes nucleosome loss in both promoters and coding regions of activated genes

    PubMed Central

    Kristell, Carolina; Orzechowski Westholm, Jakub; Olsson, Ida; Ronne, Hans; Komorowski, Jan; Bjerling, Pernilla

    2010-01-01

    Gene transcription is associated with local changes in chromatin, both in nucleosome positions and in chemical modifications of the histones. Chromatin dynamics has mostly been studied on a single-gene basis. Those genome-wide studies that have been made primarily investigated steady-state transcription. However, three studies of genome-wide changes in chromatin during the transcriptional response to heat shock in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae revealed nucleosome eviction in promoter regions but only minor effects in coding regions. Here, we describe the short-term response to nitrogen starvation in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Nitrogen depletion leads to a fast induction of a large number of genes in S. pombe and is thus suitable for genome-wide studies of chromatin dynamics during gene regulation. After 20 min of nitrogen removal, 118 transcripts were up-regulated. The distribution of regulated genes throughout the genome was not random; many up-regulated genes were found in clusters, while large parts of the genome were devoid of up-regulated genes. Surprisingly, this up-regulation was associated with nucleosome eviction of equal magnitudes in the promoters and in the coding regions. The nucleosome loss was not limited to induction by nitrogen depletion but also occurred during cadmium treatment. Furthermore, the lower nucleosome density persisted for at least 60 min after induction. Two highly induced genes, urg1+ and urg2+, displayed a substantial nucleosome loss, with only 20% of the nucleosomes being left in the coding region. We conclude that nucleosome loss during transcriptional activation is not necessarily limited to promoter regions. PMID:20086243

  14. Systematic screening for mutations in the promoter and the coding region of the 5-HT{sub 1A} gene

    SciTech Connect

    Erdmann, J.; Shimron-Abarbanell, D.; Cichon, S.

    1995-10-09

    In the present study we sought to identify genetic variation in the 5-HT{sub 1A} receptor gene which through alteration of protein function or level of expression might contribute to the genetic predisposition to neuropsychiatric diseases. Genomic DNA samples from 159 unrelated subjects (including 45 schizophrenic, 46 bipolar affective, and 43 patients with Tourette`s syndrome, as well as 25 healthy controls) were investigated by single-strand conformation analysis. Overlapping PCR (polymerase chain reaction) fragments covered the whole coding sequence as well as the 5{prime} untranslated region of the 5-HT{sub 1A} gene. The region upstream to the coding sequence we investigated contains a functional promoter. We found two rare nucleotide sequence variants. Both mutations are located in the coding region of the gene: a coding mutation (A{yields}G) in nucleotide position 82 which leads to an amino acid exchange (Ile{yields}Val) in position 28 of the receptor protein and a silent mutation (C{yields}T) in nucleotide position 549. The occurrence of the Ile-28-Val substitution was studied in an extended sample of patients (n = 352) and controls (n = 210) but was found in similar frequencies in all groups. Thus, this mutation is unlikely to play a significant role in the genetic predisposition to the diseases investigated. In conclusion, our study does not provide evidence that the 5-HT{sub 1A} gene plays either a major or a minor role in the genetic predisposition to schizophrenia, bipolar affective disorder, or Tourette`s syndrome. 29 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Enhanced translation by Nucleolin via G-rich elements in coding and non-coding regions of target mRNAs.

    PubMed

    Abdelmohsen, Kotb; Tominaga, Kumiko; Lee, Eun Kyung; Srikantan, Subramanya; Kang, Min-Ju; Kim, Mihee M; Selimyan, Roza; Martindale, Jennifer L; Yang, Xiaoling; Carrier, France; Zhan, Ming; Becker, Kevin G; Gorospe, Myriam

    2011-10-01

    RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) regulate gene expression at many post-transcriptional levels, including mRNA stability and translation. The RBP nucleolin, with four RNA-recognition motifs, has been implicated in cell proliferation, carcinogenesis and viral infection. However, the subset of nucleolin target mRNAs and the influence of nucleolin on their expression had not been studied at a transcriptome-wide level. Here, we globally identified nucleolin target transcripts, many of which encoded cell growth- and cancer-related proteins, and used them to find a signature motif on nucleolin target mRNAs. Surprisingly, this motif was very rich in G residues and was not only found in the 3'-untranslated region (UTR), but also in the coding region (CR) and 5'-UTR. Nucleolin enhanced the translation of mRNAs bearing the G-rich motif, since silencing nucleolin did not change target mRNA stability, but decreased the size of polysomes forming on target transcripts and lowered the abundance of the encoded proteins. In summary, nucleolin binds G-rich sequences in the CR and UTRs of target mRNAs, many of which encode cancer proteins, and enhances their translation.

  16. Experimental annotation of post-translational features and translated coding regions in the pathogen Salmonella Typhimurium

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Complete and accurate genome annotation is crucial for comprehensive and systematic studies of biological systems. However, determining protein-coding genes for most new genomes is almost completely performed by inference using computational predictions with significant documented error rates (> 15%). Furthermore, gene prediction programs provide no information on biologically important post-translational processing events critical for protein function. Results We experimentally annotated the bacterial pathogen Salmonella Typhimurium 14028, using "shotgun" proteomics to accurately uncover the translational landscape and post-translational features. The data provide protein-level experimental validation for approximately half of the predicted protein-coding genes in Salmonella and suggest revisions to several genes that appear to have incorrectly assigned translational start sites, including a potential novel alternate start codon. Additionally, we uncovered 12 non-annotated genes missed by gene prediction programs, as well as evidence suggesting a role for one of these novel ORFs in Salmonella pathogenesis. We also characterized post-translational features in the Salmonella genome, including chemical modifications and proteolytic cleavages. We find that bacteria have a much larger and more complex repertoire of chemical modifications than previously thought including several novel modifications. Our in vivo proteolysis data identified more than 130 signal peptide and N-terminal methionine cleavage events critical for protein function. Conclusion This work highlights several ways in which application of proteomics data can improve the quality of genome annotations to facilitate novel biological insights and provides a comprehensive proteome map of Salmonella as a resource for systems analysis. PMID:21867535

  17. Regulation of sex determination in mice by a non-coding genomic region.

    PubMed

    Arboleda, Valerie A; Fleming, Alice; Barseghyan, Hayk; Délot, Emmanuèle; Sinsheimer, Janet S; Vilain, Eric

    2014-07-01

    To identify novel genomic regions that regulate sex determination, we utilized the powerful C57BL/6J-Y(POS) (B6-Y(POS)) model of XY sex reversal where mice with autosomes from the B6 strain and a Y chromosome from a wild-derived strain, Mus domesticus poschiavinus (Y(POS)), show complete sex reversal. In B6-Y(POS), the presence of a 55-Mb congenic region on chromosome 11 protects from sex reversal in a dose-dependent manner. Using mouse genetic backcross designs and high-density SNP arrays, we narrowed the congenic region to a 1.62-Mb genomic region on chromosome 11 that confers 80% protection from B6-Y(POS) sex reversal when one copy is present and complete protection when two copies are present. It was previously believed that the protective congenic region originated from the 129S1/SviMJ (129) strain. However, genomic analysis revealed that this region is not derived from 129 and most likely is derived from the semi-inbred strain POSA. We show that the small 1.62-Mb congenic region that protects against B6-Y(POS) sex reversal is located within the Sox9 promoter and promotes the expression of Sox9, thereby driving testis development within the B6-Y(POS) background. Through 30 years of backcrossing, this congenic region was maintained, as it promoted male sex determination and fertility despite the female-promoting B6-Y(POS) genetic background. Our findings demonstrate that long-range enhancer regions are critical to developmental processes and can be used to identify the complex interplay between genome variants, epigenetics, and developmental gene regulation.

  18. Regulation of anthocyanin biosynthetic genes introduced into intact maize tissues by microprojectiles

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Theodore M.; Roth, Bradley A.; Fromm, Michael E.

    1989-01-01

    We have employed microprojectiles to deliver genes involved in anthocyanin biosynthesis to cells within intact aleurone and embryo tissues of maize. Clones of the A1 or Bz1 genes were introduced into aleurone tissue that lacked anthocyanins due to mutations of the endogenous A1 or Bz1 gene. Following bombardment, cells within the aleurone developed purple pigmentation, indicating that the mutation in the a1 or bz1 genotypes was corrected by the introduced gene. To analyze the expression of these genes in different genetic backgrounds, chimeric genes containing the 5′ and 3′ regions of the A1 or Bz1 genes fused to a luciferase coding region were constructed. These constructs were introduced into aleurones of genotypes carrying either dominant or recessive alleles of the C1 and R genes, which are known to regulate anthocyanin production. Levels of luciferase activity in permissive backgrounds (C1, R) were 30- to 200-fold greater than those detected in tissue carrying one or both of the recessive alleles (c1, r) of these genes. These results show that genes delivered to intact tissues by microprojectiles are regulated in a manner similar to the endogenous genes. The transfer of genes directly to intact tissues provides a rapid means for analyzing the genetic and tissue-specific regulation of gene expression. Images PMID:16594066

  19. Perceptual quality-regulable video coding system with region-based rate control scheme.

    PubMed

    Wu, Guan-Lin; Fu, Yu-Jie; Huang, Sheng-Chieh; Chien, Shao-Yi

    2013-06-01

    In this paper, we discuss a region-based perceptual quality-regulable H.264 video encoder system that we developed. The ability to adjust the quality of specific regions of a source video to a predefined level of quality is an essential technique for region-based video applications. We use the structural similarity index as the quality metric for distortion-quantization modeling and develop a bit allocation and rate control scheme for enhancing regional perceptual quality. Exploiting the relationship between the reconstructed macroblock and the best predicted macroblock from mode decision, a novel quantization parameter prediction method is built and used to achieve the target video quality of the processed macroblock. Experimental results show that the system model has only 0.013 quality error in average. Moreover, the proposed region-based rate control system can encode video well under a bitrate constraint with a 0.1% bitrate error in average. For the situation of the low bitrate constraint, the proposed system can encode video with a 0.5% bit error rate in average and enhance the quality of the target regions.

  20. Intact capture of hypervelocity particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsou, P.; Brownlee, D. E.; Albee, A. L.

    1986-01-01

    Knowledge of the phase, structure, and crystallography of cosmic particles, as well as their elemental and isotopic compositions, would be very valuable information toward understanding the nature of our solar system. This information can be obtained from the intact capture of large mineral grains of cosmic particles from hypervelocity impacts. Hypervelocity experiments of intact capture in underdense media have indicated realistic potential in this endeaver. The recovery of the thermal blankets and louvers from the Solar Max spacecraft have independently verified this potential in the unintended capture of cosmic materials from hypervelocity impacts. Passive underdense media will permit relatively simple and inexpensive missions to capture cosmic particles intact, either by going to a planetary body or by waiting for the particles to come to the Shuttle or the Space Station. Experiments to explore the potential of using various underdense media for an intact comet sample capture up to 6.7 km/s were performed at NASA Ames Research Center Vertical Gun Range. Explorative hypervelocity experiments up to 7.9 km/s were also made at the Ernst Mach Institute. These experiments have proven that capturing intact particles at hypervelocity impacts is definitely possible. Further research is being conducted to achieve higher capture ratios at even higher hypervelocities for even smaller projectiles.

  1. Intact capture of hypervelocity particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsou, P.; Brownlee, D. E.; Albee, A. L.

    Knowledge of the phase, structure, and crystallography of cosmic particles, as well as their elemental and isotopic compositions, would be very valuable information toward understanding the nature of our solar system. This information can be obtained from the intact capture of large mineral grains of cosmic particles from hypervelocity impacts. Hypervelocity experiments of intact capture in underdense media have indicated realistic potential in this endeaver. The recovery of the thermal blankets and louvers from the Solar Max spacecraft have independently verified this potential in the unintended capture of cosmic materials from hypervelocity impacts. Passive underdense media will permit relatively simple and inexpensive missions to capture cosmic particles intact, either by going to a planetary body or by waiting for the particles to come to the Shuttle or the Space Station. Experiments to explore the potential of using various underdense media for an intact comet sample capture up to 6.7 km/s were performed at NASA Ames Research Center Vertical Gun Range. Explorative hypervelocity experiments up to 7.9 km/s were also made at the Ernst Mach Institute. These experiments have proven that capturing intact particles at hypervelocity impacts is definitely possible. Further research is being conducted to achieve higher capture ratios at even higher hypervelocities for even smaller projectiles.

  2. Characterization of PRNP and SPRN coding regions from atypical scrapie cases diagnosed in Poland.

    PubMed

    Piestrzyńska-Kajtoch, Agata; Gurgul, Artur; Polak, Mirosław P; Smołucha, Grzegorz; Zmudziński, Jan F; Rejduch, Barbara

    2012-03-01

    Scrapie, a fatal transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE) occurs in two phenotypes: classical and atypical. Many authors point out that the polymorphism of three codons (136, 154, 171) of the PRNP (PrP gene) is associated with a sheep susceptibility to classical scrapie. Until now, only one PRNP gene variant coding phenylalanine at codon 141 has been found to be associated with atypical scrapie. Another recently identified and interesting candidate gene for scrapie susceptibility in sheep is an SPRN gene coding for Shadoo protein (Sho). Sho is a highly interspecies conserved protein and an insertion/deletion (indel) found in a sheep Sho gene was associated with classical scrapie occurrence. Here we determined the polymorphism of PRNP and SPRN genes in nine atypical scrapie cases (six in native born sheep and three in imported sheep) and compared these results with a control group of healthy animals comprising six corresponding Polish sheep breeds. In atypical scrapie cases five PRNP diplotypes were identified: A(136)R(154)Q(171)/ARQ, AHQ/ARQ, ARR/ARQ, ARR/AHQ and AHQ/AHQ. The ARR/AHQ diplotype was found only in imported sheep. A previously unobserved SNP in PRNP (E224K) was also found in both atypical scrapie and in a few control animals. In the ORF of the SPRN gene, six SNPs and one indel were identified. None of these variations was exclusive for scrapie animals and they were probably, naturally occurring polymorphisms. Special attention was given to the 6-bp indel SPRN polymorphism which was previously associated with classical scrapie occurrence.

  3. Histone acetylation: from code to web and router via intrinsically disordered regions.

    PubMed

    Horikoshi, Masami

    2013-01-01

    Structural changes of chromatin, which consists of nucleosomes and nucleosome-associated factors, lead to functional changes that are important determinants of eukaryotic gene regulation. These structural changes are regulated by modifications of histones and DNA, both of which are components of nucleosomes, as well as by replacement of histone variants and the actions of noncoding RNAs. In studies of chromatin modifications, a great deal of attention has been paid to histone acetylation. Progress in understanding this subject has been extensive, including i) elucidation of the relationship of histone acetylation and gene activity; ii) the first isolation of a histonemodifying enzyme; iii) the first identification of a factor that recognizes a modified site; iv) elucidation of the mechanism by which histone modification leads to structural changes in nucleosomes; and v) elucidation of the mechanism of border formation between euchromatin and heterochromatin. Histone acetylation is considered to be fundamental in several fields, including studies of a) the role of chromatin and epigenetics in higher-order biochemical systems such as transcription, DNA replication, and repair; b) biological phenomena such as cell proliferation and differentiation; and c) cancer and aging, potentially leading to clinical applications. In this review, I will discuss the histone code hypothesis, at one time believed to represent a unified theory regarding the functions of histone modification. In addition, I will describe the "modification web theory, " by which the problems in the histone code hypothesis can be overcome, as well as the "signal router theory, " which explains the mechanisms of formation, development, and evolution of the modification web from a structural viewpoint. Lastly, I will illustrate how these novel theories partially explain the robustness of biological systems against various perturbations, and elucidate the strategy that a cell employs to avoid fatal

  4. Intact capture of cosmic dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsou, P.

    1991-01-01

    The focus of this development effort is to capture dust particles at hypervelocities intact and unmelted in order to preserve volatile organics. At the same time, the capture process must minimize any organic elemental or compound contamination to prevent any compromise of exobiological analyses. Inorganic silicate aerogel has been developed as a successful capture medium to satisfy both requirements of intact capture and minimal organic contamination. Up to 6 km/s, silicate projectiles from a few microns up to 100 microns have been captured intact without any melting and with minimal loss of mass. Carbon in silicate aerogel can be reduced to less than 1 part in 1000 and hydrogen 3 parts in 1000 when baked in air. Under controlled inert gas environments, additional hydrocarbon reduction can be achieved.

  5. Non-coding RNAs match the deleted genomic regions in humans

    PubMed Central

    Byeon, Boseon; Kovalchuk, Igor

    2016-01-01

    RNA is transcribed from DNA, and therefore, there should be no RNA transcript from the deleted DNA region. Our study attempted to analyse whether any RNA cache that maps the deleted regions is present in human cells. Using data from the 1000 genome project, we selected 41 CEPH (CEU) and 38 Yoruba (YRI) samples that included the data for the entire genome sequence and ncRNA and mRNA sequences. Aligning the ncRNA reads against the genomic DNA in individual samples has revealed that 229 out of 1114 homozygous deletions have ncRNA reads that map to them. Further analysis has revealed that ncRNA reads that map the deleted regions are enriched around the deletion ends and at genic regions of the genome. The read enrichment at deletion ends suggests that these ncRNAs are likely some form of double-strand break induced RNAs. Our analysis suggests that human cells may contain a residual ncRNA cache that is possibly propagated across generations. PMID:27853310

  6. DNA-guided establishment of nucleosome patterns within coding regions of a eukaryotic genome.

    PubMed

    Beh, Leslie Y; Müller, Manuel M; Muir, Tom W; Kaplan, Noam; Landweber, Laura F

    2015-11-01

    A conserved hallmark of eukaryotic chromatin architecture is the distinctive array of well-positioned nucleosomes downstream from transcription start sites (TSS). Recent studies indicate that trans-acting factors establish this stereotypical array. Here, we present the first genome-wide in vitro and in vivo nucleosome maps for the ciliate Tetrahymena thermophila. In contrast with previous studies in yeast, we find that the stereotypical nucleosome array is preserved in the in vitro reconstituted map, which is governed only by the DNA sequence preferences of nucleosomes. Remarkably, this average in vitro pattern arises from the presence of subsets of nucleosomes, rather than the whole array, in individual Tetrahymena genes. Variation in GC content contributes to the positioning of these sequence-directed nucleosomes and affects codon usage and amino acid composition in genes. Given that the AT-rich Tetrahymena genome is intrinsically unfavorable for nucleosome formation, we propose that these "seed" nucleosomes--together with trans-acting factors--may facilitate the establishment of nucleosome arrays within genes in vivo, while minimizing changes to the underlying coding sequences.

  7. Non-coding-regulatory regions of human brain genes delineated by bacterial artificial chromosome knock-in mice

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The next big challenge in human genetics is understanding the 98% of the genome that comprises non-coding DNA. Hidden in this DNA are sequences critical for gene regulation, and new experimental strategies are needed to understand the functional role of gene-regulation sequences in health and disease. In this study, we build upon our HuGX ('high-throughput human genes on the X chromosome’) strategy to expand our understanding of human gene regulation in vivo. Results In all, ten human genes known to express in therapeutically important brain regions were chosen for study. For eight of these genes, human bacterial artificial chromosome clones were identified, retrofitted with a reporter, knocked single-copy into the Hprt locus in mouse embryonic stem cells, and mouse strains derived. Five of these human genes expressed in mouse, and all expressed in the adult brain region for which they were chosen. This defined the boundaries of the genomic DNA sufficient for brain expression, and refined our knowledge regarding the complexity of gene regulation. We also characterized for the first time the expression of human MAOA and NR2F2, two genes for which the mouse homologs have been extensively studied in the central nervous system (CNS), and AMOTL1 and NOV, for which roles in CNS have been unclear. Conclusions We have demonstrated the use of the HuGX strategy to functionally delineate non-coding-regulatory regions of therapeutically important human brain genes. Our results also show that a careful investigation, using publicly available resources and bioinformatics, can lead to accurate predictions of gene expression. PMID:24124870

  8. A G-quadruplex structure at the 5′ end of the H19 coding region regulates H19 transcription

    PubMed Central

    Fukuhara, Mitsuko; Ma, Yue; Nagasawa, Kazuo; Toyoshima, Fumiko

    2017-01-01

    The H19 gene, one of the best known imprinted genes, encodes a long non-coding RNA that regulates cell proliferation and differentiation. H19 RNA is widely expressed in embryonic tissues, but its expression is restricted in only a few tissues after birth. However, regulation of H19 gene expression remains poorly understood outside the context of genomic imprinting. Here we identified evolutionarily conserved guanine (G)-rich repeated motifs at the 5′ end of the H19 coding region that are consistent with theoretically deduced G-quadruplex sequences. Circular dichroism spectroscopy and electrophoretic mobility shift assays with G-quadruplex-specific ligands revealed that the G-rich motif, located immediately downstream of the transcription start site (TSS), forms a G-quadruplex structure in vitro. By using a series of mutant forms of H19 harboring deletion or G-to-A substitutions, we found that the H19-G-quadruplex regulates H19 gene expression. We further showed that transcription factors Sp1 and E2F1 were associated with the H19-G-quadruplex to either suppress or promote the H19 transcription, respectively. Moreover, H19 expression during differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells appears to be regulated by a genomic H19 G-quadruplex. These results demonstrate that the G-quadruplex structure immediately downstream of the TSS functions as a novel regulatory element for H19 gene expression. PMID:28367967

  9. The FSHD region on human chromosome 4q35 contains potential coding regions among pseudogenes and a high density of repeat elements.

    PubMed

    van Geel, M; Heather, L J; Lyle, R; Hewitt, J E; Frants, R R; de Jong, P J

    1999-10-01

    The distal end of chromosome 4q contains the locus involved in facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD1). Specific genomic deletions within a tandem DNA repeat (D4Z4) are associated with the disease status, but no causal genes have yet been discovered. In a systematic search for genes, a 161-kb stretch of genomic DNA proximal to D4Z4 was sequenced, analyzed for homologies, and subjected to gene prediction programs. A major fraction (45%) of the subtelomeric region is composed of repeat sequences attributable mainly to LINE-1 elements. Apart from the previously identified FRG1 and TUB4q sequences, several additional potential coding regions were identified by analyzing the sequence with exon prediction programs. So far, we have been unable to demonstrate transcripts by RT-PCR or cDNA library hybridization. However, several retrotransposed pseudogenes were identified. The high density of pseudogenes and repeat elements is consistent with the subtelomeric location of this region and explains why previous transcript identification studies have been problematic.

  10. Virtual screening of gene expression regulatory sites in non-coding regions of the infectious salmon anemia virus

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Members of the Orthomyxoviridae family, which contains an important fish pathogen called the infectious salmon anemia virus (ISAV), have a genome consisting of eight segments of single-stranded RNA that encode different viral proteins. Each of these segments is flanked by non-coding regions (NCRs). In other Orthomyxoviruses, sequences have been shown within these NCRs that regulate gene expression and virulence; however, only the sequences of these regions are known in ISAV, and a biological role has not yet been attributed to these regions. This study aims to determine possible functions of the NCRs of ISAV. Results The results suggested an association between the molecular architecture of NCR regions and their role in the viral life cycle. The available NCR sequences from ISAV isolates were compiled, alignments were performed to obtain a consensus sequence, and conserved regions were identified in this consensus sequence. To determine the molecular structure adopted by these NCRs, various bioinformatics tools, including RNAfold, RNAstructure, Sfold, and Mfold, were used. This hypothetical structure, together with a comparison with influenza, yielded reliable secondary structure models that lead to the identification of conserved nucleotide positions on an intergenus level. These models determined which nucleotide positions are involved in the recognition of the vRNA/cRNA by RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) or mRNA by the ribosome. Conclusions The information obtained in this work allowed the proposal of previously unknown sites that are involved in the regulation of different stages of the viral cycle, leading to the identification of new viral targets that may assist future antiviral strategies. PMID:25069483

  11. Genome analysis: Assigning protein coding regions to three-dimensional structures.

    PubMed Central

    Salamov, A. A.; Suwa, M.; Orengo, C. A.; Swindells, M. B.

    1999-01-01

    We describe the results of a procedure for maximizing the number of sequences that can be reliably linked to a protein of known three-dimensional structure. Unlike other methods, which try to increase sensitivity through the use of fold recognition software, we only use conventional sequence alignment tools, but apply them in a manner that significantly increases the number of relationships detected. We analyzed 11 genomes and found that, depending on the genome, between 23 and 32% of the ORFs had significant matches to proteins of known structure. In all cases, the aligned region consisted of either >100 residues or >50% of the smaller sequence. Slightly higher percentages could be attained if smaller motifs were also included. This is significantly higher than most previously reported methods, even those that have a fold-recognition component. We survey the biochemical and structural characteristics of the most frequently occurring proteins, and discuss the extent to which alignment methods can realistically assign function to gene products. PMID:10211823

  12. Coding region paraoxonase polymorphisms dictate accentuated neuronal reactions in chronic, sub-threshold pesticide exposure.

    PubMed

    Browne, R Orie; Moyal-Segal, Liat Ben; Zumsteg, Dominik; David, Yaron; Kofman, Ora; Berger, Andrea; Soreq, Hermona; Friedman, Alon

    2006-08-01

    Organophosphate pesticides (OPs), known inhibitors of acetylcholinesterase (AChE), are used extensively throughout the world. Recent studies have focused on the ACHE/PON1 locus as a determinant of inherited susceptibility to environmental OP exposure. To explore the relationship of the corresponding gene-environment interactions with brain activity, we integrated neurophysiologic, neuropsychological, biochemical, and genetic methods. Importantly, we found that subthreshold OP exposure leads to discernible physiological consequences that are significantly influenced by inherited factors. Cortical EEG analyses by LORETA revealed significantly decreased theta activity in the hippocampus, parahippocampal regions, and the cingulate cortex, as well as increased beta activity in the prefrontal cortex of exposed individuals-areas known to play a role in cholinergic-associated cognitive functions. Through neuropsychological testing, we identified an appreciable deficit in the visual recall in exposed individuals. Other neuropsychological tests revealed no significant differences between exposed and non-exposed individuals, attesting to the specificity of our findings. Biochemical analyses of blood samples revealed increases in paraoxonase and arylesterase activities and reduced serum acetylcholinesterase activity in chronically exposed individuals. Notably, specific paraoxonase genotypes were found to be associated with these exposure-related changes in blood enzyme activities and abnormal EEG patterns. Thus, gene-environment interactions involving the ACHE/PON1 locus may be causally involved in determining the physiological response to OP exposure.

  13. Intraclonal diversity in follicular lymphoma analyzed by quantitative ultra-deep sequencing of non-coding regions1

    PubMed Central

    Spence, Janice M.; Abumoussa, Andrew; Spence, John P.; Burack, W. Richard

    2014-01-01

    Cancers are characterized by genomic instability and the resulting intra-clonal diversity is a prerequisite for tumor evolution. Therefore, metrics of tumor heterogeneity may prove to be clinically meaningful. Intra-clonal heterogeneity in follicular lymphoma (FL) is apparent from studies of somatic hypermutation (SHM) caused by Activation Induced Deaminase (AID) in IGH. Aberrant SHM (aSHM), defined as AID activity outside of the IG loci, predominantly targets non-coding regions causing numerous “passenger” mutations but has the potential to generate rare significant “driver” mutations. The quantitative relationship between SHM and aSHM has not been defined. To measure SHM and aSHM, ultradeep sequencing (>20,000 fold coverage) was performed on IGH (∼1650nt) and 9 other non-coding regions potentially targeted by AID (combined 9411nt), including the 5′UTR of BCL2. Single nucleotide variants (SNV) were found in 12/12 FL specimens (median 136 SHM and 53 aSHM). The aSHM SNVs were associated with AID-motifs (p<0.0001). The number of SNVs at BCL2 varied widely among specimens and correlated with the number of SNVs at 8 other potential aSHM sites. In contrast SHM at IGH was not predictive of aSHM. Tumor heterogeneity is apparent from SNVs at low variant allele frequencies (VAF); the relative number of SNVs with VAF<5% varied with clinical grade indicating that tumor heterogeneity based on aSHM reflects a clinically meaningful parameter. These data suggest that genome-wide aSHM may be estimated from aSHM of BCL2 but not SHM of IGH. The results demonstrate a practical approach to the quantification of intra-tumoral genetic heterogeneity for clinical specimens. PMID:25311808

  14. Synonymous deoptimization of the foot-and-mouth disease virus P1 coding region causes attenuation in vivo while inducing a strong neutralizing antibody response

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Codon bias deoptimization has been previously used to successfully attenuate human pathogens including polio, respiratory syncytial and influenza viruses. We have applied a similar technology to deoptimize the capsid coding region (P1 region) of the cDNA infectious clone of foot-and-mouth disease vi...

  15. Monitoring Intact Viruses Using Aptamers.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Penmetcha K R

    2016-08-04

    Viral diagnosis and surveillance are necessary steps in containing the spread of viral diseases, and they help in the deployment of appropriate therapeutic interventions. In the past, the commonly employed viral detection methods were either cell-culture or molecule-level assays. Most of these assays are laborious and expensive, require special facilities, and provide a slow diagnosis. To circumvent these limitations, biosensor-based approaches are becoming attractive, especially after the successful commercialization of glucose and other biosensors. In the present article, I have reviewed the current progress using the biosensor approach for detecting intact viruses. At the time of writing this review, three types of bioreceptor surfaces (antibody-, glycan-, and aptamer-based) have been explored on different sensing platforms for detecting intact viruses. Among these bioreceptors, aptamer-based sensors have been increasingly explored for detecting intact viruses using surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and other platforms. Special emphasis is placed on the aptamer-based SPR platform in the present review.

  16. Monitoring Intact Viruses Using Aptamers

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Penmetcha K. R.

    2016-01-01

    Viral diagnosis and surveillance are necessary steps in containing the spread of viral diseases, and they help in the deployment of appropriate therapeutic interventions. In the past, the commonly employed viral detection methods were either cell-culture or molecule-level assays. Most of these assays are laborious and expensive, require special facilities, and provide a slow diagnosis. To circumvent these limitations, biosensor-based approaches are becoming attractive, especially after the successful commercialization of glucose and other biosensors. In the present article, I have reviewed the current progress using the biosensor approach for detecting intact viruses. At the time of writing this review, three types of bioreceptor surfaces (antibody-, glycan-, and aptamer-based) have been explored on different sensing platforms for detecting intact viruses. Among these bioreceptors, aptamer-based sensors have been increasingly explored for detecting intact viruses using surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and other platforms. Special emphasis is placed on the aptamer-based SPR platform in the present review. PMID:27527230

  17. Polymorphisms in the kappa casein (CSN3) gene in horse and comparative analysis of its promoter and coding region.

    PubMed

    Hobor, S; Kunej, T; Dovc, P

    2008-10-01

    The major parts of the coding region and promoter of the equine kappa casein (CSN3) gene were sequenced and compared among several species. Four SNPs were identified in the CSN3 gene: two in exon 1 and two in exon 4. The SNPs were genotyped in six Slovenian horse breeds using RFLP and two different PCR-based methods. The highest variation in genotype frequencies was found in the Slovenian cold-blood breed. The SNPs in exon 4 may cause a change in the amino acid sequence and may alter chemical/functional properties of the protein. Using horse-specific primers, we obtained 400 bp of exon 4 sequence from zebra and donkey. Two SNPs within the zebra exon 4 sequence were discovered; both presumably caused amino acid substitutions. Within the equine promoter sequence, 15 SNPs were found and 12 of them could be involved in the gain/loss of potential transcription factor (TF) binding sites. Using a comparative genomics approach, we obtained 1482 bp of the promoter sequence from zebra and donkey. Sequence alignment revealed highly conserved blocks of promoter sequence among nine species (sheep, goat, cow, zebra, donkey, horse, chimp, macaque and human) and clustered these species in three distinct groups. Consensus binding sites for TFs STAT5, C/EBP, NF1 and STAT6, previously demonstrated to be associated with expression, were located within conserved regions. Four promoter regions were tested for specific binding of TFs using electrophoretic mobility shift assays. Predicted binding sites for C/EBP and NF1 were confirmed and one conserved region was specifically detected by a yet-uncharacterized TF.

  18. Structure of the coding region and mRNA variants of the apyrase gene from pea (Pisum sativum)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shibata, K.; Abe, S.; Davies, E.

    2001-01-01

    Partial amino acid sequences of a 49 kDa apyrase (ATP diphosphohydrolase, EC 3.6.1.5) from the cytoskeletal fraction of etiolated pea stems were used to derive oligonucleotide DNA primers to generate a cDNA fragment of pea apyrase mRNA by RT-PCR and these primers were used to screen a pea stem cDNA library. Two almost identical cDNAs differing in just 6 nucleotides within the coding regions were found, and these cDNA sequences were used to clone genomic fragments by PCR. Two nearly identical gene fragments containing 8 exons and 7 introns were obtained. One of them (H-type) encoded the mRNA sequence described by Hsieh et al. (1996) (DDBJ/EMBL/GenBank Z32743), while the other (S-type) differed by the same 6 nucleotides as the mRNAs, suggesting that these genes may be alleles. The six nucleotide differences between these two alleles were found solely in the first exon, and these mutation sites had two types of consensus sequences. These mRNAs were found with varying lengths of 3' untranslated regions (3'-UTR). There are some similarities between the 3'-UTR of these mRNAs and those of actin and actin binding proteins in plants. The putative roles of the 3'-UTR and alternative polyadenylation sites are discussed in relation to their possible role in targeting the mRNAs to different subcellular compartments.

  19. Non-coding genomic regions possessing enhancer and silencer potential are associated with healthy aging and exceptional survival.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sangkyu; Welsh, David A; Myers, Leann; Cherry, Katie E; Wyckoff, Jennifer; Jazwinski, S Michal

    2015-02-28

    We have completed a genome-wide linkage scan for healthy aging using data collected from a family study, followed by fine-mapping by association in a separate population, the first such attempt reported. The family cohort consisted of parents of age 90 or above and their children ranging in age from 50 to 80. As a quantitative measure of healthy aging, we used a frailty index, called FI34, based on 34 health and function variables. The linkage scan found a single significant linkage peak on chromosome 12. Using an independent cohort of unrelated nonagenarians, we carried out a fine-scale association mapping of the region suggestive of linkage and identified three sites associated with healthy aging. These healthy-aging sites (HASs) are located in intergenic regions at 12q13-14. HAS-1 has been previously associated with multiple diseases, and an enhancer was recently mapped and experimentally validated within the site. HAS-2 is a previously uncharacterized site possessing genomic features suggestive of enhancer activity. HAS-3 contains features associated with Polycomb repression. The HASs also contain variants associated with exceptional longevity, based on a separate analysis. Our results provide insight into functional genomic networks involving non-coding regulatory elements that are involved in healthy aging and longevity.

  20. The non-coding B2 RNA binds to the DNA cleft and active site region of RNA polymerase II

    PubMed Central

    Ponicsan, Steven L.; Houel, Stephane; Old, William M.; Ahn, Natalie G.; Goodrich, James A.; Kugel, Jennifer F.

    2013-01-01

    The B2 family of short interspersed elements is transcribed into non-coding RNA by RNA polymerase III. The ~180 nt B2 RNA has been shown to potently repress mRNA transcription by binding tightly to RNA polymerase II (Pol II) and assembling with it into complexes on promoter DNA, where it keeps the polymerase from properly engaging the promoter DNA. Mammalian Pol II is a ~500 kD complex that contains 12 different protein subunits, providing many possible surfaces for interaction with B2 RNA. We found that the carboxy-terminal domain of the largest Pol II subunit was not required for B2 RNA to bind Pol II and repress transcription in vitro. To identify the surface on Pol II to which the minimal functional region of B2 RNA binds, we coupled multi-step affinity purification, reversible formaldehyde crosslinking, peptide sequencing by mass spectrometry, and analysis of peptide enrichment. The Pol II peptides most highly recovered after crosslinking to B2 RNA mapped to the DNA binding cleft and active site region of Pol II. These studies determine the location of a defined nucleic acid binding site on a large, native, multi-subunit complex and provide insight into the mechanism of transcriptional repression by B2 RNA. PMID:23416138

  1. The InterFrost benchmark of Thermo-Hydraulic codes for cold regions hydrology - first inter-comparison results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grenier, Christophe; Roux, Nicolas; Anbergen, Hauke; Collier, Nathaniel; Costard, Francois; Ferrry, Michel; Frampton, Andrew; Frederick, Jennifer; Holmen, Johan; Jost, Anne; Kokh, Samuel; Kurylyk, Barret; McKenzie, Jeffrey; Molson, John; Orgogozo, Laurent; Rivière, Agnès; Rühaak, Wolfram; Selroos, Jan-Olof; Therrien, René; Vidstrand, Patrik

    2015-04-01

    The impacts of climate change in boreal regions has received considerable attention recently due to the warming trends that have been experienced in recent decades and are expected to intensify in the future. Large portions of these regions, corresponding to permafrost areas, are covered by water bodies (lakes, rivers) that interact with the surrounding permafrost. For example, the thermal state of the surrounding soil influences the energy and water budget of the surface water bodies. Also, these water bodies generate taliks (unfrozen zones below) that disturb the thermal regimes of permafrost and may play a key role in the context of climate change. Recent field studies and modeling exercises indicate that a fully coupled 2D or 3D Thermo-Hydraulic (TH) approach is required to understand and model the past and future evolution of landscapes, rivers, lakes and associated groundwater systems in a changing climate. However, there is presently a paucity of 3D numerical studies of permafrost thaw and associated hydrological changes, and the lack of study can be partly attributed to the difficulty in verifying multi-dimensional results produced by numerical models. Numerical approaches can only be validated against analytical solutions for a purely thermic 1D equation with phase change (e.g. Neumann, Lunardini). When it comes to the coupled TH system (coupling two highly non-linear equations), the only possible approach is to compare the results from different codes to provided test cases and/or to have controlled experiments for validation. Such inter-code comparisons can propel discussions to try to improve code performances. A benchmark exercise was initialized in 2014 with a kick-off meeting in Paris in November. Participants from USA, Canada, Germany, Sweden and France convened, representing altogether 13 simulation codes. The benchmark exercises consist of several test cases inspired by existing literature (e.g. McKenzie et al., 2007) as well as new ones. They

  2. Joint source/channel coding for prioritized wireless transmission of multiple 3-D regions of interest in 3-D medical imaging data.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, V

    2013-02-01

    This paper presents a 3-D medical image coding method featuring two major improvements to previous work on 3-D region of interest (RoI) coding for telemedicine applications. Namely, 1) a data prioritization scheme that allows coding of multiple 3-D-RoIs; and 2) a joint/source channel coding scheme that allows prioritized transmission of multiple 3-D-RoIs over wireless channels. The method, which is based on the 3-D integer wavelet transform and embedded block coding with optimized truncation with 3-D context modeling, generates scalable and error-resilient bit streams with 3-D-RoI decoding capabilities. Coding of multiple 3-D-RoIs is attained by prioritizing the wavelet-transformed data according to a Gaussian mixed distribution, whereas error resiliency is attained by employing the error correction capabilities of rate-compatible punctured turbo codes. The robustness of the proposed method is evaluated for transmission of real 3-D medical images over Rayleigh-fading channels with a priori knowledge of the channel condition. Evaluation results show that the proposed coding method provides a superior performance compared to equal error protection and unequal error protection techniques.

  3. Simulation of Ionospheric E-Region Plasma Turbulence with a Massively Parallel Hybrid PIC/Fluid Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, M.; Oppenheim, M. M.; Dimant, Y. S.

    2015-12-01

    The Farley-Buneman (FB) and gradient drift (GD) instabilities are plasma instabilities that occur at roughly 100 km in the equatorial E-region ionosphere. They develop when ion-neutral collisions dominate ion motion while electron motion is affected by both electron-neutral collisions and the background magnetic field. GD drift waves grow when the background density gradient and electric field are aligned; FB waves grow when the background electric field causes electrons to E × B drift with a speed slightly larger than the ion acoustic speed. Theory predicts that FB and GD turbulence should develop in the same plasma volume when GD waves create a perturbation electric field that exceeds the threshold value for FB turbulence. However, ionospheric radars, which regularly observe meter-scale irregularities associated with FB turbulence, must infer kilometer-scale GD dynamics rather than observe them directly. Numerical simulations have been unable to simultaneously resolve GD and FB structure. We present results from a parallelized hybrid simulation that uses a particle-in-cell (PIC) method for ions while modeling electrons as an inertialess, quasi-neutral fluid. This approach allows us to reach length scales of hundreds of meters to kilometers with sub-meter resolution, but requires solving a large linear system derived from an elliptic PDE that depends on plasma density, ion flux, and electron parameters. We solve the resultant linear system at each time step via the Portable Extensible Toolkit for Scientific Computing (PETSc). We compare results of simulated FB turbulence from this model to results from a thoroughly tested PIC code and describe progress toward the first simultaneous simulations of FB and GD instabilities. This model has immediate applications to radar observations of the E-region ionosphere, as well as potential applications to the F-region ionosphere and the chromosphere of the Sun.

  4. Sequencing the GRHL3 Coding Region Reveals Rare Truncating Mutations and a Common Susceptibility Variant for Nonsyndromic Cleft Palate

    PubMed Central

    Mangold, Elisabeth; Böhmer, Anne C.; Ishorst, Nina; Hoebel, Ann-Kathrin; Gültepe, Pinar; Schuenke, Hannah; Klamt, Johanna; Hofmann, Andrea; Gölz, Lina; Raff, Ruth; Tessmann, Peter; Nowak, Stefanie; Reutter, Heiko; Hemprich, Alexander; Kreusch, Thomas; Kramer, Franz-Josef; Braumann, Bert; Reich, Rudolf; Schmidt, Gül; Jäger, Andreas; Reiter, Rudolf; Brosch, Sibylle; Stavusis, Janis; Ishida, Miho; Seselgyte, Rimante; Moore, Gudrun E.; Nöthen, Markus M.; Borck, Guntram; Aldhorae, Khalid A.; Lace, Baiba; Stanier, Philip; Knapp, Michael; Ludwig, Kerstin U.

    2016-01-01

    Nonsyndromic cleft lip with/without cleft palate (nsCL/P) and nonsyndromic cleft palate only (nsCPO) are the most frequent subphenotypes of orofacial clefts. A common syndromic form of orofacial clefting is Van der Woude syndrome (VWS) where individuals have CL/P or CPO, often but not always associated with lower lip pits. Recently, ∼5% of VWS-affected individuals were identified with mutations in the grainy head-like 3 gene (GRHL3). To investigate GRHL3 in nonsyndromic clefting, we sequenced its coding region in 576 Europeans with nsCL/P and 96 with nsCPO. Most strikingly, nsCPO-affected individuals had a higher minor allele frequency for rs41268753 (0.099) than control subjects (0.049; p = 1.24 × 10−2). This association was replicated in nsCPO/control cohorts from Latvia, Yemen, and the UK (pcombined = 2.63 × 10−5; ORallelic = 2.46 [95% CI 1.6–3.7]) and reached genome-wide significance in combination with imputed data from a GWAS in nsCPO triads (p = 2.73 × 10−9). Notably, rs41268753 is not associated with nsCL/P (p = 0.45). rs41268753 encodes the highly conserved p.Thr454Met (c.1361C>T) (GERP = 5.3), which prediction programs denote as deleterious, has a CADD score of 29.6, and increases protein binding capacity in silico. Sequencing also revealed four novel truncating GRHL3 mutations including two that were de novo in four families, where all nine individuals harboring mutations had nsCPO. This is important for genetic counseling: given that VWS is rare compared to nsCPO, our data suggest that dominant GRHL3 mutations are more likely to cause nonsyndromic than syndromic CPO. Thus, with rare dominant mutations and a common risk variant in the coding region, we have identified an important contribution for GRHL3 in nsCPO. PMID:27018475

  5. Evolution of naturally occurring 5'non-coding region variants of Hepatitis C virus in human populations of the South American region

    PubMed Central

    Moratorio, Gonzalo; Martínez, Mariela; Gutiérrez, María F; González, Katiuska; Colina, Rodney; López-Tort, Fernando; López, Lilia; Recarey, Ricardo; Schijman, Alejandro G; Moreno, María P; García-Aguirre, Laura; Manascero, Aura R; Cristina, Juan

    2007-01-01

    Background Hepatitis C virus (HCV) has been the subject of intense research and clinical investigation as its major role in human disease has emerged. Previous and recent studies have suggested a diversification of type 1 HCV in the South American region. The degree of genetic variation among HCV strains circulating in Bolivia and Colombia is currently unknown. In order to get insight into these matters, we performed a phylogenetic analysis of HCV 5' non-coding region (5'NCR) sequences from strains isolated in Bolivia, Colombia and Uruguay, as well as available comparable sequences of HCV strains isolated in South America. Methods Phylogenetic tree analysis was performed using the neighbor-joining method under a matrix of genetic distances established under the Kimura-two parameter model. Signature pattern analysis, which identifies particular sites in nucleic acid alignments of variable sequences that are distinctly representative relative to a background set, was performed using the method of Korber & Myers, as implemented in the VESPA program. Prediction of RNA secondary structures was done by the method of Zuker & Turner, as implemented in the mfold program. Results Phylogenetic tree analysis of HCV strains isolated in the South American region revealed the presence of a distinct genetic lineage inside genotype 1. Signature pattern analysis revealed that the presence of this lineage is consistent with the presence of a sequence signature in the 5'NCR of HCV strains isolated in South America. Comparisons of these results with the ones found for Europe or North America revealed that this sequence signature is characteristic of the South American region. Conclusion Phylogentic analysis revealed the presence of a sequence signature in the 5'NCR of type 1 HCV strains isolated in South America. This signature is frequent enough in type 1 HCV populations circulating South America to be detected in a phylogenetic tree analysis as a distinct type 1 sub-population. The

  6. The InterFrost benchmark of Thermo-Hydraulic codes for cold regions hydrology - first inter-comparison phase results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grenier, Christophe; Rühaak, Wolfram

    2016-04-01

    Climate change impacts in permafrost regions have received considerable attention recently due to the pronounced warming trends experienced in recent decades and which have been projected into the future. Large portions of these permafrost regions are characterized by surface water bodies (lakes, rivers) that interact with the surrounding permafrost often generating taliks (unfrozen zones) within the permafrost that allow for hydrologic interactions between the surface water bodies and underlying aquifers and thus influence the hydrologic response of a landscape to climate change. Recent field studies and modeling exercises indicate that a fully coupled 2D or 3D Thermo-Hydraulic (TH) approach is required to understand and model past and future evolution such units (Kurylyk et al. 2014). However, there is presently a paucity of 3D numerical studies of permafrost thaw and associated hydrological changes, which can be partly attributed to the difficulty in verifying multi-dimensional results produced by numerical models. A benchmark exercise was initialized at the end of 2014. Participants convened from USA, Canada, Europe, representing 13 simulation codes. The benchmark exercises consist of several test cases inspired by existing literature (e.g. McKenzie et al., 2007) as well as new ones (Kurylyk et al. 2014; Grenier et al. in prep.; Rühaak et al. 2015). They range from simpler, purely thermal 1D cases to more complex, coupled 2D TH cases (benchmarks TH1, TH2, and TH3). Some experimental cases conducted in a cold room complement the validation approach. A web site hosted by LSCE (Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l'Environnement) is an interaction platform for the participants and hosts the test case databases at the following address: https://wiki.lsce.ipsl.fr/interfrost. The results of the first stage of the benchmark exercise will be presented. We will mainly focus on the inter-comparison of participant results for the coupled cases TH2 & TH3. Both cases

  7. Genetic diversity of the HLA-G coding region in Amerindian populations from the Brazilian Amazon: a possible role of natural selection.

    PubMed

    Mendes-Junior, C T; Castelli, E C; Meyer, D; Simões, A L; Donadi, E A

    2013-12-01

    HLA-G has an important role in the modulation of the maternal immune system during pregnancy, and evidence that balancing selection acts in the promoter and 3'UTR regions has been previously reported. To determine whether selection acts on the HLA-G coding region in the Amazon Rainforest, exons 2, 3 and 4 were analyzed in a sample of 142 Amerindians from nine villages of five isolated tribes that inhabit the Central Amazon. Six previously described single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were identified and the Expectation-Maximization (EM) and PHASE algorithms were used to computationally reconstruct SNP haplotypes (HLA-G alleles). A new HLA-G allele, which originated in Amerindian populations by a crossing-over event between two widespread HLA-G alleles, was identified in 18 individuals. Neutrality tests evidenced that natural selection has a complex part in the HLA-G coding region. Although balancing selection is the type of selection that shapes variability at a local level (Native American populations), we have also shown that purifying selection may occur on a worldwide scale. Moreover, the balancing selection does not seem to act on the coding region as strongly as it acts on the flanking regulatory regions, and such coding signature may actually reflect a hitchhiking effect.

  8. Vulnerability of ecosystems to climate change moderated by habitat intactness.

    PubMed

    Eigenbrod, Felix; Gonzalez, Patrick; Dash, Jadunandan; Steyl, Ilse

    2015-01-01

    The combined effects of climate change and habitat loss represent a major threat to species and ecosystems around the world. Here, we analyse the vulnerability of ecosystems to climate change based on current levels of habitat intactness and vulnerability to biome shifts, using multiple measures of habitat intactness at two spatial scales. We show that the global extent of refugia depends highly on the definition of habitat intactness and spatial scale of the analysis of intactness. Globally, 28% of terrestrial vegetated area can be considered refugia if all natural vegetated land cover is considered. This, however, drops to 17% if only areas that are at least 50% wilderness at a scale of 48×48 km are considered and to 10% if only areas that are at least 50% wilderness at a scale of 4.8×4.8 km are considered. Our results suggest that, in regions where relatively large, intact wilderness areas remain (e.g. Africa, Australia, boreal regions, South America), conservation of the remaining large-scale refugia is the priority. In human-dominated landscapes, (e.g. most of Europe, much of North America and Southeast Asia), focusing on finer scale refugia is a priority because large-scale wilderness refugia simply no longer exist. Action to conserve such refugia is particularly urgent since only 1 to 2% of global terrestrial vegetated area is classified as refugia and at least 50% covered by the global protected area network.

  9. Arabidopsis Polycomb Repressive Complex 2 binding sites contain putative GAGA factor binding motifs within coding regions of genes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Polycomb Repressive Complex 2 (PRC2) is an essential regulator of gene expression that maintains genes in a repressed state by marking chromatin with trimethylated Histone H3 lysine 27 (H3K27me3). In Arabidopsis, loss of PRC2 function leads to pleiotropic effects on growth and development thought to be due to ectopic expression of seed and embryo-specific genes. While there is some understanding of the mechanisms by which specific genes are targeted by PRC2 in animal systems, it is still not clear how PRC2 is recruited to specific regions of plant genomes. Results We used ChIP-seq to determine the genome-wide distribution of hemagglutinin (HA)-tagged FERTLIZATION INDEPENDENT ENDOSPERM (FIE-HA), the Extra Sex Combs homolog protein present in all Arabidopsis PRC2 complexes. We found that the FIE-HA binding sites co-locate with a subset of the H3K27me3 sites in the genome and that the associated genes were more likely to be de-repressed in mutants of PRC2 components. The FIE-HA binding sites are enriched for three sequence motifs including a putative GAGA factor binding site that is also found in Drosophila Polycomb Response Elements (PREs). Conclusions Our results suggest that PRC2 binding sites in plant genomes share some sequence features with Drosophila PREs. However, unlike Drosophila PREs which are located in promoters and devoid of H3K27me3, Arabidopsis FIE binding sites tend to be in gene coding regions and co-localize with H3K27me3. PMID:24001316

  10. Bioinformatic analysis based on the complete coding region of the MSTN gene within and among different species.

    PubMed

    Song, X C; Xu, C; Yue, Z G; Wang, L; Wang, G W; Yang, F H

    2016-04-07

    Myostatin, encoded by the MSTN gene (previously GDF8), is a member of the transforming growth factor-β superfamily, which normally acts to limit skeletal muscle mass by regulating the number and growth of muscle fibers. In this study, a total of 84 myostatin gene sequences with known complete coding regions (CDS) and corresponding amino acid sequences were analyzed from 17 species, and differentiation within and among species was studied using comparative genomics and bioinformatics. Characteristics of the nucleotide and amino acid sequences were also predicted. The results indicated that a total of 569 polymorphic sites, including 53 singleton variable sites and 516 parsimony informative sites, which could be sorted into 44 haplotypes, were detected from 17 species. Observed genetic diversity was higher among species than within species, and Vulpes lagopus was more polymorphic than other species. There was clear differentiation of the myostatin gene among species and the reconstructed phylogenetic tree was consistent with the NCBI taxonomy. The myostatin gene was 375-aa long in most species, except for Mus musculus (376 aa) and Danio rerio (373 aa). The amino acid sequences of myostatin were deemed hydrophilic, and had theoretical pI values of <7.0, mostly due to the acidic polypeptide. The instability index of the myostatin protein was 40.48-51.63, indicating that the polypeptide is not stable. The G+C content of the CDS nucleotide sequence in different species was 40.60-51.69%. The predicted promoter region of the Ovis aries myostatin gene was 150-220 bp upstream of the start codon.

  11. Intact capture of hypervelocity projectiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsou, P.

    1990-01-01

    The ability to capture projectiles intact at hypervelocities opens new applications in science and technology that would either not be possible or would be very costly by other means. This capability has been demonstrated in the laboratory for aluminum projectiles of 1.6 mm diameter, captured at 6 km/s, in one unmelted piece, and retaining up to 95% of the original mass. Furthermore, capture was accomplished passively using microcellular underdense polymer foam. Another advantage of capturing projectiles in an underdense medium is the ability of such a medium to preserve a record of the projectile's original velocity components of speed and direction. A survey of these experimental results is described in terms of a dozen parameters which characterize the amount of capture and the effect on the projectile due to different capture media.

  12. Intact capture of hypervelocity projectiles.

    PubMed

    Tsou, P

    1990-01-01

    The ability to capture projectiles intact at hypervelocities opens new applications in science and technology that would either not be possible or would be very costly by other means. This capability has been demonstrated in the laboratory for aluminum projectiles of 1.6 mm diameter, captured at 6 km/s, in one unmelted piece, and retaining up to 95% of the original mass. Furthermore, capture was accomplished passively using microcellular underdense polymer foam. Another advantage of capturing projectiles in an underdense medium is the ability of such a medium to preserve a record of the projectile's original velocity components of speed and direction. A survey of these experimental results is described in terms of a dozen parameters which characterize the amount of capture and the effect on the projectile due to different capture media.

  13. Uranium migration through intact sandstone cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Read, D.; Lawless, T. A.; Sims, R. J.; Butter, K. R.

    1993-06-01

    Uranium is often considered to be a mobile radioelement in the natural environment owing to its tendency to form stable complexes with a number of aqueous anions, particularly in oxidising milieu. A series of infiltration experiments were devised to investigate this migration behaviour under rigidly controlled laboratory conditions. Intact cores of Permo-Triassic Clashach Sandstone were pre-equilibrated with synthetic groundwater solutions and continuous flow-through of uranium monitored together with pH and concentrations of other ions. Prior to performing each experiment a simulation was carried out using a one-dimensional coupled chemical transport code, encompassing a thermodynamic description of the electrical double layer. These calculations together with electron microscopy indicated the potential role played by iron oxyhydroxide grain coatings in retarding the uranium plume. Thus, a second series of experiments was initiated on pre-acidified cores from which all surface exposed iron had been removed, allowing an assessment of the retention capacity of non-ferric components. Taken together, the data clearly illustrate the strong affinity of aqueous uranium species for natural surfaces even under strongly oxidising conditions. The success of the model in predicting a priori the dominant trends in uranium migration behaviour is encouraging and may aid in prioritising analytical requirements for investigations in more complex geochemical situations than those studied here.

  14. Influence of coding region polymorphism on the peripheral expression of a human TCR V[beta] gene

    SciTech Connect

    Vissinga, C.S.; Charmley, P.; Concannon, P. )

    1994-02-01

    A number of human TCR V[beta] gene segments are reported to be polymorphic, with alleles differing by one or a small number of amino acid substitutions. In the absence of detailed structural information regarding the interaction of specific positions in the TCR with Ag or MHC, the significance of such variation is difficult to assess. In this report the relative use of the two common alleles of the human V[beta]6.7 gene, 6.7a and 6.7b, which differ by two nonconservative amino acid substitutions, and the use of two common alleles of the V[beta]12.2 gene, which differ by only silent substitutions, were measured in PBL derived from individuals heterozygous for these alleles. Equal use of V[beta]12.2 alleles was observed, consistent with the inability of selection mechanisms to discriminate between the products of these alleles that are indistinguishable at the amino acid level. However, statistically significant skewing in the use of V[beta]6.7 alleles was observed in 15 of 16 individuals studied. Expression levels for each allele ranged from 16 to 84% of the total V[beta]6.7 signal in heterozygous individuals, with either the 6.7a or the 6.7b allele predominant in different individuals. Based on segregation studies in families, it seems unlikely that other unidentified polymorphism in the TCR[beta] locus, such as in the V[beta]6.7 promoter, was responsible for the differential allele expression. Family studies provided no evidence for an association between specific HLA haplotypes and V[beta]6.7 allele use. These results indicate that even modest allelic variation in human TCR V[beta] coding regions can have a significant impact on the expression of human V[beta] genes in the peripheral repertoire. 29 refs., 4 figs.

  15. Characterizing the Coding Region Determinant-Binding Protein (CRD-BP)-Microphthalmia-associated Transcription Factor (MITF) mRNA interaction.

    PubMed

    Rensburg, Gerrit van; Mackedenski, Sebastian; Lee, Chow H

    2017-01-01

    Coding region determinant-binding protein (CRD-BP) binds to the 3'-UTR of microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF) mRNA to prevent its targeted degradation by miR-340. Here, we aim to further understand the molecular interaction between CRD-BP and MITF RNA. Using point mutation in the GXXG motif of each KH domains, we showed that all four KH domains of CRD-BP are important for their physical association with MITF RNA. We mapped the CRD-BP-binding site in the 3'-UTR of MITF RNA from nts 1330-1740 and showed that the 49-nt fragment 1621-1669 is the minimal size MITF RNA for binding. Upon deletion of nts 1621-1669 within the nts1550-1740 of MITF RNA, there was a 3-fold increase in dissociation constant Kd, which further confirms the critical role sequences within nts 1621-1669 in binding to CRD-BP. Amongst the eight antisense oligonucleotides designed against MITF RNA 1550-1740, we found MHO-1 and MHO-7 as potent inhibitors of the CRD-BP-MITF RNA interaction. Using RNase protection and fluorescence polarization assays, we showed that both MHO-1 and MHO-7 have affinity for the MITF RNA, suggesting that both antisense oligonucleotides inhibited CRD-BP-MITF RNA interaction by directly binding to MITF RNA. The new molecular insights provided in this study have important implications for understanding the oncogenic function of CRD-BP and development of specific inhibitors against CRD-BP-MITF RNA interaction.

  16. Characterizing the Coding Region Determinant-Binding Protein (CRD-BP)-Microphthalmia-associated Transcription Factor (MITF) mRNA interaction

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Coding region determinant-binding protein (CRD-BP) binds to the 3’-UTR of microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF) mRNA to prevent its targeted degradation by miR-340. Here, we aim to further understand the molecular interaction between CRD-BP and MITF RNA. Using point mutation in the GXXG motif of each KH domains, we showed that all four KH domains of CRD-BP are important for their physical association with MITF RNA. We mapped the CRD-BP-binding site in the 3’-UTR of MITF RNA from nts 1330–1740 and showed that the 49-nt fragment 1621–1669 is the minimal size MITF RNA for binding. Upon deletion of nts 1621–1669 within the nts1550-1740 of MITF RNA, there was a 3-fold increase in dissociation constant Kd, which further confirms the critical role sequences within nts 1621–1669 in binding to CRD-BP. Amongst the eight antisense oligonucleotides designed against MITF RNA 1550–1740, we found MHO-1 and MHO-7 as potent inhibitors of the CRD-BP-MITF RNA interaction. Using RNase protection and fluorescence polarization assays, we showed that both MHO-1 and MHO-7 have affinity for the MITF RNA, suggesting that both antisense oligonucleotides inhibited CRD-BP-MITF RNA interaction by directly binding to MITF RNA. The new molecular insights provided in this study have important implications for understanding the oncogenic function of CRD-BP and development of specific inhibitors against CRD-BP-MITF RNA interaction. PMID:28182633

  17. CADD score has limited clinical validity for the identification of pathogenic variants in non-coding regions in a hereditary cancer panel

    PubMed Central

    Mather, Cheryl A; Mooney, Sean D; Salipante, Stephen J; Scroggins, Sheena; Wu, David; Pritchard, Colin C; Shirts, Brian H

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE Several in silico tools have been shown to have reasonable research sensitivity and specificity for classifying sequence variants in coding regions. The recently-developed Combined Annotation Dependent Depletion (CADD) method generates predictive scores for single nucleotide variants (SNVs) in all areas of the genome, including non-coding regions. We sought to determine the clinical validity of non-coding variant CADD scores. METHODS We evaluated 12,391 unique SNVs in 624 patient samples submitted for germline mutation testing in a cancer-related gene panel. We compared the distributions of CADD scores of rare SNVs, common SNVs in our patient population, and the null distribution of all possible SNVs stratifying by genomic region. RESULTS The median CADD scores of intronic and nonsynonymous variants were significantly different between rare and common SNVs (p<0.0001). Despite these different distributions, no individual variants could be identified as plausibly causative among rare intronic variants with the highest scores. The ROC AUC for non-coding variants is modest, and the positive predictive value of CADD for intronic variants in panel testing was found to be 0.088. CONCLUSION Focused in-silico scoring systems with much higher predictive value will be necessary for clinical genomic applications. PMID:27148939

  18. Triton shells of intact erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Sheetz, M P; Sawyer, D

    1978-01-01

    About 40% of human erythrocyte membrane protein is resistant to solubilization in 0.5% Triton X-114. These components comprise a structure called a Triton shell roughly similar in size and shape to the original erythrocyte and thus constitute a cytoskeleton. With increasing concentrations of Triton the lipid content of the Triton shell decreases dramatically, whereas the majority of the protein components remain constant. Exceptions to this rule include proteins contained in band 3, the presumed anion channel, and in band 4 which decrease with increasing Triton concentration. The Triton-insoluble complex includes spectrin (bands 1 and 2), actin (band 5), and bands 3' and 7. Component 3' has an apparent molecular weight of 88,000 daltons as does 3; but unlike 3, it is insensitive to protease treatment of the intact cell, has a low extinction coefficient at 280 nm, and is solubilized from the shells in alkaline water solutions. Component 7 also has a low extinction coefficient at 280 nm. Spectrin alone is solubilized from the Triton shells in isotonic media. The solubilized spectrin contains no bound Triton and coelectrophoreses with spectrin eluted in hypotonic solutions from ghosts. Electron micrographs of fixed Triton shells stained with uranyl acetate show the presence of numerous filaments which appear beaded and are 80--120 A in diameter. The filaments cannot be composed mainly af actin, but enough spectrin is present to form the filaments. Triton shells may provide an excellent source of material useful in the investigation of the erythrocyte cytoskeleton.

  19. Co-expression of the human cannabinoid receptor coding region splice variants (hCB₁) affects the function of hCB₁ receptor complexes.

    PubMed

    Bagher, Amina M; Laprairie, Robert B; Kelly, Melanie E M; Denovan-Wright, Eileen M

    2013-12-05

    The human type 1 cannabinoid (hCB1) receptor is expressed at high levels in the central nervous system. mRNA variants of the coding region of this receptor, human cannabinoid hCB1a and hCB1b receptors, have been identified, their biological function remains unclear. The present study demonstrated that the three human cannabinoid hCB1 coding region variants are expressed in the human and monkey (Macaca fascicularis) brain. Western blot analyses of homogenates from different regions of the monkey brain demonstrated that proteins with the expected molecular weights of the cannabinoid CB1, CB1a and CB1b receptors were co-expressed throughout the brain. Given the co-localization of these receptors, we hypothesized that physical interactions between the three splice variants may affect cannabinoid pharmacology. The human cannabinoid hCB1, hCB1a, and hCB1b receptors formed homodimers and heterodimers, as determined by BRET in transiently transfected HEK 293A cells. We found that the co-expression of the human cannabinoid hCB1 and each of the splice variants increased cell surface expression of the human cannabinoid hCB1 receptor and increased Gi/o-dependent ERK phosphorylation in response to cannabinoid agonists. Therefore, the human cannabinoid hCB1 coding region splice variants play an important physiological role in the activity of the endocannabinoid system.

  20. The Fusion Protein Signal-Peptide-Coding Region of Canine Distemper Virus: A Useful Tool for Phylogenetic Reconstruction and Lineage Identification

    PubMed Central

    Sarute, Nicolás; Calderón, Marina Gallo; Pérez, Ruben; La Torre, José; Hernández, Martín; Francia, Lourdes; Panzera, Yanina

    2013-01-01

    Canine distemper virus (CDV; Paramyxoviridae, Morbillivirus) is the etiologic agent of a multisystemic infectious disease affecting all terrestrial carnivore families with high incidence and mortality in domestic dogs. Sequence analysis of the hemagglutinin (H) gene has been widely employed to characterize field strains, permitting the identification of nine CDV lineages worldwide. Recently, it has been established that the sequences of the fusion protein signal-peptide (Fsp) coding region are extremely variable, suggesting that analysis of its sequence might be useful for strain characterization studies. However, the divergence of Fsp sequences among worldwide strains and its phylogenetic resolution has not yet been evaluated. We constructed datasets containing the Fsp-coding region and H gene sequences of the same strains belonging to eight CDV lineages. Both datasets were used to evaluate their phylogenetic resolution. The phylogenetic analysis revealed that both datasets clustered the same strains into eight different branches, corresponding to CDV lineages. The inter-lineage amino acid divergence was fourfold greater for the Fsp peptide than for the H protein. The likelihood mapping revealed that both datasets display strong phylogenetic signals in the region of well-resolved topologies. These features indicate that Fsp-coding region sequence analysis is suitable for evolutionary studies as it allows for straightforward identification of CDV lineages. PMID:23675493

  1. A 10,400-molecular-weight membrane protein is coded by region E3 of adenovirus.

    PubMed Central

    Tollefson, A E; Krajcsi, P; Yei, S P; Carlin, C R; Wold, W S

    1990-01-01

    Previous studies with adenovirus mutants have indicated that a 10,400-molecular-weight (10.4K) protein predicted to be coded by an open reading frame in region E3 of adenovirus functions to down regulate the epidermal growth factor receptor (C. R. Carlin, A. E. Tollefson, H. A. Brady, B. L. Hoffman, and W. S. M. Wold, Cell 57:135-144, 1989). We now demonstrate that the 10.4K protein is in fact synthesized in cells infected by group C adenoviruses. This was done by immunoprecipitation of 10.4K from cells infected by a variety of E3 mutants, using antisera against three different synthetic peptides corresponding to the predicted 10.4K sequence. The 10.4K protein was translated primarily from E3 mRNA f, as indicated by cell-free translation of mRNA purified by hybridization from cells infected with an RNA processing mutant that synthesizes predominantly mRNA f. The 10.4K protein was overproduced or underproduced in vivo, respectively, by mutants that overproduce or underproduce E3 mRNA f, also indicating that the 10.4K protein is translated primarily from mRNA f. The 10.4K protein migrated as two bands with apparent molecular weights of 16,000 and 11,000 (10 to 18% gradient gels); both bands contained 10.4K epitopes, as shown by Western blot (immunoblot). Only the 16K band was obtained by cell-free translation, suggesting that the 16K protein is the precursor to the 11K protein. The 10.4K protein is a membrane protein, as shown by cell fractionation experiments and as predicted from its sequence. The predicted 10.4K sequence as well as a putative N-terminal signal sequence and 30-residue transmembrane domain are conserved in adenovirus types 2 and 5 (group C) and in types 3, 7, and 35 (group B). Images PMID:2296083

  2. Multiplexed Intact-Tissue Transcriptional Analysis at Cellular Resolution.

    PubMed

    Sylwestrak, Emily Lauren; Rajasethupathy, Priyamvada; Wright, Matthew Arnot; Jaffe, Anna; Deisseroth, Karl

    2016-02-11

    In recently developed approaches for high-resolution imaging within intact tissue, molecular characterization over large volumes has been largely restricted to labeling of proteins. But volumetric nucleic acid labeling may represent a far greater scientific and clinical opportunity, enabling detection of not only diverse coding RNA variants but also non-coding RNAs. Moreover, scaling immunohistochemical detection to large tissue volumes has limitations due to high cost, limited renewability/availability, and restricted multiplexing capability of antibody labels. With the goal of versatile, high-content, and scalable molecular phenotyping of intact tissues, we developed a method using carbodiimide-based chemistry to stably retain RNAs in clarified tissue, coupled with amplification tools for multiplexed detection. The resulting technology enables robust measurement of activity-dependent transcriptional signatures, cell-identity markers, and diverse non-coding RNAs in rodent and human tissue volumes. The growing set of validated probes is deposited in an online resource for nucleating related developments from across the scientific community.

  3. The Use and Effectiveness of Triple Multiplex System for Coding Region Single Nucleotide Polymorphism in Mitochondrial DNA Typing of Archaeologically Obtained Human Skeletons from Premodern Joseon Tombs of Korea.

    PubMed

    Oh, Chang Seok; Lee, Soong Deok; Kim, Yi-Suk; Shin, Dong Hoon

    2015-01-01

    Previous study showed that East Asian mtDNA haplogroups, especially those of Koreans, could be successfully assigned by the coupled use of analyses on coding region SNP markers and control region mutation motifs. In this study, we tried to see if the same triple multiplex analysis for coding regions SNPs could be also applicable to ancient samples from East Asia as the complementation for sequence analysis of mtDNA control region. By the study on Joseon skeleton samples, we know that mtDNA haplogroup determined by coding region SNP markers successfully falls within the same haplogroup that sequence analysis on control region can assign. Considering that ancient samples in previous studies make no small number of errors in control region mtDNA sequencing, coding region SNP analysis can be used as good complimentary to the conventional haplogroup determination, especially of archaeological human bone samples buried underground over long periods.

  4. Human growth hormone-related latrogenic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease: Search for a genetic susceptibility by analysis of the PRNP coding region

    SciTech Connect

    Jaegly, A.; Boussin, F.; Deslys, J.P.

    1995-05-20

    The human PRNP gene encoding PrP is located on chromosome 20 and consists of two exons and a single intron. The open reading frame is entirely fitted into the second exon. Genetic studies indicate that all of the familial and several sporadic forms of TSSEs are associated with mutations in the PRNP 759-bp coding region. Moreover, homozygosity at codon 129, a locus harboring a polymorphism among the general population, was proposed as a genetic susceptibility marker for both sporadic and iatrogenic CJD. To assess whether additional genetic predisposition markers exist in the PRNP gene, the authors sequenced the PRNP coding region of 17 of the 32 French patients who developed a hGH-related CJD.

  5. Smoking correlates with increased cytoskeletal protein-related coding region mutations in the lung and head and neck datasets of the cancer genome atlas.

    PubMed

    Yavorski, John M; Blanck, George

    2016-12-01

    Cancer from smoking tobacco is considered dependent on mutagens, but significant molecular aspects of smoking-specific, cancer development remain unknown. We defined sets of coding regions for oncoproteins, tumor suppressor proteins, and cytoskeletal-related proteins that were compared between nonsmokers and smokers, for mutation occurrences, in the lung adenocarcinoma (LUAD), head and neck squamous carcinoma (HNSC), bladder carcinoma (BLCA), and pancreatic adenocarcinoma ( PAAD) datasets from the cancer genome atlas (TCGA). We uncovered significant differences in overall mutation rates, and in mutation rates in cytoskeletal protein-related coding regions (CPCRs, including extracellular matrix protein coding regions), between nonsmokers and smokers in LUAD and HNSC (P < 0.001), raising the question of whether the CPCR mutation differences lead to different clinical courses for nonsmoker and smoker cancers. Another important question inspired by these results is, whether high smoker cancer mutation rates would facilitate genotoxicity or neoantigen-based therapies. No significant, mutation-based differences were found in the BLCA or PAAD datasets, between nonsmokers and smokers. However, a significant difference was uncovered for the average number of overall cancer mutations, in LUAD, for persons who stopped smoking more than 15 years ago, compared with more recent smokers (P < 0.032).

  6. Accelerate Implementation of the WHO Global Code of Practice on International Recruitment of Health Personnel: Experiences From the South East Asia Region

    PubMed Central

    Tangcharoensathien, Viroj; Travis, Phyllida

    2016-01-01

    Strengthening the health workforce and universal health coverage (UHC) are among key targets in the heath-related Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) to be committed by the United Nations (UN) Member States in September 2015. The health workforce, the backbone of health systems, contributes to functioning delivery systems. Equitable distribution of functioning services is indispensable to achieve one of the UHC goals of equitable access. This commentary argues the World Health Organization (WHO) Global Code of Practice on International Recruitment of Health Personnel is relevant to the countries in the South East Asia Region (SEAR) as there is a significant outflow of health workers from several countries and a significant inflow in a few, increased demand for health workforce in high- and middle-income countries, and slow progress in addressing the "push factors." Awareness and implementation of the Code in the first report in 2012 was low but significantly improved in the second report in 2015. An inter-country workshop in 2015 convened by WHO SEAR to review progress in implementation of the Code was an opportunity for countries to share lessons on policy implementation, on retention of health workers, scaling up health professional education and managing in and out migration. The meeting noted that capturing outmigration of health personnel, which is notoriously difficult for source countries, is possible where there is an active recruitment management through government to government (G to G) contracts or licensing the recruiters and mandatory reporting requirement by them. According to the 2015 second report on the Code, the size and profile of outflow health workers from SEAR source countries is being captured and now also increasingly being shared by destination country professional councils. This is critical information to foster policy action and implementation of the Code in the Region. PMID:26673648

  7. A New Method for Computing Three-Dimensional Capture Fraction in Heterogeneous Regional Systems using the MODFLOW Adjoint Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clemo, T. M.; Ramarao, B.; Kelly, V. A.; Lavenue, M.

    2011-12-01

    Capture is a measure of the impact of groundwater pumping upon groundwater and surface water systems. The computation of capture through analytical or numerical methods has been the subject of articles in the literature for several decades (Bredehoeft et al., 1982). Most recently Leake et al. (2010) described a systematic way to produce capture maps in three-dimensional systems using a numerical perturbation approach in which capture from streams was computed using unit rate pumping at many locations within a MODFLOW model. The Leake et al. (2010) method advances the current state of computing capture. A limitation stems from the computational demand required by the perturbation approach wherein days or weeks of computational time might be required to obtain a robust measure of capture. In this paper, we present an efficient method to compute capture in three-dimensional systems based upon adjoint states. The efficiency of the adjoint method will enable uncertainty analysis to be conducted on capture calculations. The USGS and INTERA have collaborated to extend the MODFLOW Adjoint code (Clemo, 2007) to include stream-aquifer interaction and have applied it to one of the examples used in Leake et al. (2010), the San Pedro Basin MODFLOW model. With five layers and 140,800 grid blocks per layer, the San Pedro Basin model, provided an ideal example data set to compare the capture computed from the perturbation and the adjoint methods. The capture fraction map produced from the perturbation method for the San Pedro Basin model required significant computational time to compute and therefore the locations for the pumping wells were limited to 1530 locations in layer 4. The 1530 direct simulations of capture require approximately 76 CPU hours. Had capture been simulated in each grid block in each layer, as is done in the adjoint method, the CPU time would have been on the order of 4 years. The MODFLOW-Adjoint produced the capture fraction map of the San Pedro Basin model

  8. Threats to intact tropical peatlands and opportunities for their conservation.

    PubMed

    Roucoux, K H; Lawson, I T; Baker, T R; Del Castillo Torres, D; Draper, F C; Lähteenoja, O; Gilmore, M P; Honorio Coronado, E N; Kelly, T J; Mitchard, E T A; Vriesendorp, C

    2017-03-08

    Large, intact areas of tropical peatland are highly threatened at a global scale by the expansion of commercial agriculture and other forms of economic development. Conserving peatlands on a landscape scale, with their hydrology intact, is of international conservation importance to preserve their distinctive biodiversity and ecosystem services, and maintain their resilience to future environmental change. Here, we explore the threats and opportunities for conserving remaining intact tropical peatlands. Our focus therefore largely excludes the peatlands of Indonesia and Malaysia, where extensive deforestation, drainage and conversion to plantation of peat swamp forests over the last few decades means that conservation efforts in this region are reduced to protecting small fragments of the original ecosystem, attempting to restore drained peatlands, or dissuading companies from expanding existing plantations. In contrast, here we focus on a case study, the Pastaza-Marañón Foreland Basin (PMFB) in Peru, which is among the largest known intact tropical peatland landscapes in the world and representative of their vulnerability. Maintenance of the hydrological conditions critical for carbon storage and ecosystem function of peatlands is, in the PMFB, primarily threatened by expansion of commercial agriculture linked to new transport infrastructure that is facilitating access to remote areas. In contrast to Indonesia and Malaysia, there remain opportunities in the PMFB and elsewhere to develop alternative, more sustainable land-use practices. Although some of the peatlands in the PMFB fall within existing legally protected areas, this protection is patchy, weak and not focused on protecting the most carbon-dense areas. New carbon-based conservation funding, developing markets for sustainable peatland products, transferring land title to local communities, and expanding protected areas offer pathways to increased protection for intact tropical peatlands in Amazonia and

  9. Functional study of one nucleotide mutation in pri-miR-125a coding region which related to recurrent pregnancy loss.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yi; Huo, Zheng-Hao; Liu, Chun-Mei; Liu, Shi-Guo; Zhang, Ning; Yin, Kun-Lun; Qi, Lu; Ma, Xu; Xia, Hong-Fei

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are short non-coding RNAs which modulate gene expression by binding to complementary segments present in the 3'UTR of the mRNAs of protein coding genes. MiRNAs play very important roles in maintaining normal human body physiology conditions, meanwhile, abnormal miRNA expressions have been found related to many human diseases spanning from psychiatric disorders to malignant cancers. Recently, emerging reports have indicated that disturbed miRNAs expression contributed to the pathogenesis of recurrent pregnancy loss (RPL). In this study, we identified a new mutation site (+29A>G, position relative to pre-miR-125a) by scanning pri-miR-125a coding region in 389 Chinese Han RPL patients. This site was co-existed with two polymorphisms (rs12976445 and rs41275794) in patients heterogeneously and changed the predicted secondary structures of pri-miR-125a. Subsequent in vitro analysis indicated that the A>G mutation reduced mature miR-125a expression, and further led to less efficient inhibition of verified target genes. Functional analysis showed that mutant pri-mir-125a can enhance endometrial stromal cells (ESCs) invasive capacity and increase the sensitivity of ESCs cells to mifepristone. Moreover, we further analyzed the possible molecular mechanism by RIP-chip assay and found that mutant pri-mir-125a disturbed the expression of miR-125a targetome, the functions of which includes embryonic development, cell proliferation, migration and invasion. These data suggest that A>G mutation in pri-miR-125a coding region contributes to the genetic predisposition to RPL by disordering the production of miR-125a, which consequently meddled in gene regulatory network between mir-125a and mRNA.

  10. Polar Codes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-01

    density parity check (LDPC) code, a Reed–Solomon code, and three convolutional codes. iii CONTENTS EXECUTIVE SUMMARY...the most common. Many civilian systems use low density parity check (LDPC) FEC codes, and the Navy is planning to use LDPC for some future systems...other forward error correction methods: a turbo code, a low density parity check (LDPC) code, a Reed–Solomon code, and three convolutional codes

  11. Automation of a primer design and evaluation pipeline for subsequent sequencing of the coding regions of all human Refseq genes

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Daniel; Love, Donald R

    2012-01-01

    Screening for mutations in human disease-causing genes in a molecular diagnostic environment demands simplicity with a view to allowing high throughput approaches. In order to advance these requirements, we have developed and applied a primer design program, termed BatchPD, to achieve the PCR amplification of coding exons of all known human Refseq genes. Primer design, in silico PCR checks and formatted primer information for subsequent web-based interrogation are queried from existing online tools. BatchPD acts as an intermediate to automate queries and results processing and provides exon-specific information that is summarised in a spreadsheet format. PMID:22570517

  12. Construction and uses of a new transposable element whose insertion is able to produce gene fusions with the neomycin-phosphotransferase-coding region of Tn903.

    PubMed

    Ratet, P; Richaud, F

    1986-01-01

    We describe the construction of a transposable element derived from the Mu phage that upon insertion is able to create a gene fusion between the region of Tn903 coding for neomycin phosphotransferase (NPT I), which confers resistance to aminoglycosides including kanamycin (KmR), neomycin and G418, and the control elements of the gene where the insertion occurs. A chloramphenicol (Cm) transacetylase gene (cat) that confers resistance to Cm is present in the transposon so that transposition events can be monitored even when no active fusions with the nptI coding region occur. The transposase gene is deleted and, therefore, this transposon is perfectly stable upon insertion. The properties of this new transposable element were studied by obtaining gene fusions between the Escherichia coli L-arabinose operon and 'nptI gene. In some of them the KmR phenotype is induced by arabinose. Insertions of this element in cloned fragments of the T-DNA region of Agrobacterium rhizogenes were also isolated. Some of them confer a KmR phenotype upon its E. coli carriers, which indicates that portions of the T-DNA are expressed in these cells.

  13. Analysis of the H gene, the central untranslated region and the proximal coding part of the F gene of wild-type and vaccine canine distemper viruses.

    PubMed

    Haas, L; Liermann, H; Harder, T C; Barrett, T; Löchelt, M; von Messling, V; Baumgärtner, W; Greiser-Wilke, I

    1999-09-01

    This paper summarizes the results of the genetic analysis of several parts of the genome of canine distemper virus (CDV) field isolates and vaccine viruses. The haemagglutinin (H) gene analysis showed that recent viruses did not differ significantly from vaccine strains. The analysis of the long untranslated region between the matrix (M) and fusion (F) gene revealed distinct genetic heterogeneity. The putative F protein start codon AUG461 of vaccine strain Onderstepoort was found to be mutated in all wild-type isolates and in another vaccine strain. The proximal coding part of the F gene was well conserved. Phylogenetic analysis of this segment showed the presence of several cocirculating CDV genotypes.

  14. Complete coding regions of two novel HLA-B alleles detected by phototyping (PCR-SSP) in the British caucasoid population: B*5108 and B*5002.

    PubMed

    Vilches, C; Bunce, M; de Pablo, R; Murray, A K; McIntyre, C A; Kreisler, M

    1997-07-01

    Two previously reported PCR-SSP variants of the HLA-B locus, B51GAC and B45v, were investigated by RT-PCR cloning and nucleotide sequence analysis of their complete coding regions. They have been shown to correspond to the new alleles B*5108 and B*5002, both of which differ from the common B*5101 and B*5001 subtypes, respectively, by amino acid replacements at their alpha-2 domain alpha-helices. The primary structure of B*5002, intermediate between those of B*4501 and B*5001, raises further concern about the current classification of B*45 as a B12 rather than as a B*50 subtype.

  15. Coherent activity between brain regions that code for value is linked to the malleability of human behavior

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Nicole; Bassett, Danielle S.; Falk, Emily B.

    2017-01-01

    Brain activity in medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC) during exposure to persuasive messages can predict health behavior change. This brain-behavior relationship has been linked to areas of MPFC previously associated with self-related processing; however, the mechanism underlying this relationship is unclear. We explore two components of self-related processing – self-reflection and subjective valuation – and examine coherent activity between relevant networks of brain regions during exposure to health messages encouraging exercise and discouraging sedentary behaviors. We find that objectively logged reductions in sedentary behavior in the following month are linked to functional connectivity within brain regions associated with positive valuation, but not within regions associated with self-reflection on personality traits. Furthermore, functional connectivity between valuation regions contributes additional information compared to average brain activation within single brain regions. These data support an account in which MPFC integrates the value of messages to the self during persuasive health messaging and speak to broader questions of how humans make decisions about how to behave. PMID:28240271

  16. A statistical framework to predict functional non-coding regions in the human genome through integrated analysis of annotation data.

    PubMed

    Lu, Qiongshi; Hu, Yiming; Sun, Jiehuan; Cheng, Yuwei; Cheung, Kei-Hoi; Zhao, Hongyu

    2015-05-27

    Identifying functional regions in the human genome is a major goal in human genetics. Great efforts have been made to functionally annotate the human genome either through computational predictions, such as genomic conservation, or high-throughput experiments, such as the ENCODE project. These efforts have resulted in a rich collection of functional annotation data of diverse types that need to be jointly analyzed for integrated interpretation and annotation. Here we present GenoCanyon, a whole-genome annotation method that performs unsupervised statistical learning using 22 computational and experimental annotations thereby inferring the functional potential of each position in the human genome. With GenoCanyon, we are able to predict many of the known functional regions. The ability of predicting functional regions as well as its generalizable statistical framework makes GenoCanyon a unique and powerful tool for whole-genome annotation. The GenoCanyon web server is available at http://genocanyon.med.yale.edu.

  17. The Chikungunya Virus Capsid Protein Contains Linear B Cell Epitopes in the N- and C-Terminal Regions that are Dependent on an Intact C-Terminus for Antibody Recognition

    PubMed Central

    Goh, Lucas Y. H.; Hobson-Peters, Jody; Prow, Natalie A.; Baker, Kelly; Piyasena, Thisun B. H.; Taylor, Carmel T.; Rana, Ashok; Hastie, Marcus L.; Gorman, Jeff J.; Hall, Roy A.

    2015-01-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is an arthropod-borne agent that causes severe arthritic disease in humans and is considered a serious health threat in areas where competent mosquito vectors are prevalent. CHIKV has recently been responsible for several millions of cases of disease, involving over 40 countries. The recent re-emergence of CHIKV and its potential threat to human health has stimulated interest in better understanding of the biology and pathogenesis of the virus, and requirement for improved treatment, prevention and control measures. In this study, we mapped the binding sites of a panel of eleven monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) previously generated towards the capsid protein (CP) of CHIKV. Using N- and C-terminally truncated recombinant forms of the CHIKV CP, two putative binding regions, between residues 1–35 and 140–210, were identified. Competitive binding also revealed that five of the CP-specific mAbs recognized a series of overlapping epitopes in the latter domain. We also identified a smaller, N-terminally truncated product of native CP that may represent an alternative translation product of the CHIKV 26S RNA and have potential functional significance during CHIKV replication. Our data also provides evidence that the C-terminus of CP is required for authentic antigenic structure of CP. This study shows that these anti-CP mAbs will be valuable research tools for further investigating the structure and function of the CHIKV CP. PMID:26061335

  18. Clinical coding. Code breakers.

    PubMed

    Mathieson, Steve

    2005-02-24

    --The advent of payment by results has seen the role of the clinical coder pushed to the fore in England. --Examinations for a clinical coding qualification began in 1999. In 2004, approximately 200 people took the qualification. --Trusts are attracting people to the role by offering training from scratch or through modern apprenticeships.

  19. High abundance of Serine/Threonine-rich regions predicted to be hyper-O-glycosylated in the secretory proteins coded by eight fungal genomes

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background O-glycosylation of secretory proteins has been found to be an important factor in fungal biology and virulence. It consists in the addition of short glycosidic chains to Ser or Thr residues in the protein backbone via O-glycosidic bonds. Secretory proteins in fungi frequently display Ser/Thr rich regions that could be sites of extensive O-glycosylation. We have analyzed in silico the complete sets of putatively secretory proteins coded by eight fungal genomes (Botrytis cinerea, Magnaporthe grisea, Sclerotinia sclerotiorum, Ustilago maydis, Aspergillus nidulans, Neurospora crassa, Trichoderma reesei, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae) in search of Ser/Thr-rich regions as well as regions predicted to be highly O-glycosylated by NetOGlyc (http://www.cbs.dtu.dk). Results By comparison with experimental data, NetOGlyc was found to overestimate the number of O-glycosylation sites in fungi by a factor of 1.5, but to be quite reliable in the prediction of highly O-glycosylated regions. About half of secretory proteins have at least one Ser/Thr-rich region, with a Ser/Thr content of at least 40% over an average length of 40 amino acids. Most secretory proteins in filamentous fungi were predicted to be O-glycosylated, sometimes in dozens or even hundreds of sites. Residues predicted to be O-glycosylated have a tendency to be grouped together forming hyper-O-glycosylated regions of varying length. Conclusions About one fourth of secretory fungal proteins were predicted to have at least one hyper-O-glycosylated region, which consists of 45 amino acids on average and displays at least one O-glycosylated Ser or Thr every four residues. These putative highly O-glycosylated regions can be found anywhere along the proteins but have a slight tendency to be at either one of the two ends. PMID:22994653

  20. Variation in seed fatty acid composition and sequence divergence in the FAD2 gene coding region between wild and cultivated sesame.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhenbang; Tonnis, Brandon; Morris, Brad; Wang, Richard B; Zhang, Amy L; Pinnow, David; Wang, Ming Li

    2014-12-03

    Sesame germplasm harbors genetic diversity which can be useful for sesame improvement in breeding programs. Seven accessions with different levels of oleic acid were selected from the entire USDA sesame germplasm collection (1232 accessions) and planted for morphological observation and re-examination of fatty acid composition. The coding region of the FAD2 gene for fatty acid desaturase (FAD) in these accessions was also sequenced. Cultivated sesame accessions flowered and matured earlier than the wild species. The cultivated sesame seeds contained a significantly higher percentage of oleic acid (40.4%) than the seeds of the wild species (26.1%). Nucleotide polymorphisms were identified in the FAD2 gene coding region between wild and cultivated species. Some nucleotide polymorphisms led to amino acid changes, one of which was located in the enzyme active site and may contribute to the altered fatty acid composition. Based on the morphology observation, chemical analysis, and sequence analysis, it was determined that two accessions were misnamed and need to be reclassified. The results obtained from this study are useful for sesame improvement in molecular breeding programs.

  1. Identification and characterization of an enhancer in the coding region of the genome of human immunodeficiency virus type 1.

    PubMed Central

    Verdin, E; Becker, N; Bex, F; Droogmans, L; Burny, A

    1990-01-01

    Transcription of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is regulated by cis-acting DNA elements located in the viral long terminal repeats, by viral transregulatory proteins, and by cellular transcription factors acting in concert to modulate the degree of viral expression. We demonstrate that a DNA fragment corresponding to the central portion of the HIV-1 genome exhibits enhancer activity when cloned upstream of the thymidine kinase promoter of herpes simplex virus. This enhancer is inducible by phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate in HeLa cells and is independent of its position and orientation with respect to the promoter. We have mapped the activity of the enhancer to two independent domains encompassing nucleotides 4079-4342 (end of the pol gene) and nucleotides 4781-6026 (vif gene and first coding exon of tat). This intragenic enhancer and its subdomains demonstrate cellular specificity because they are only active in specific cell lines. The presence of similar intragenic enhancer elements in other retroviruses suggests that they might be a conserved feature of this family of viruses. Images PMID:2352955

  2. Autism Spectrum Disorder and intact executive functioning.

    PubMed

    Ferrara, R; Ansermet, F; Massoni, F; Petrone, L; Onofri, E; Ricci, P; Archer, T; Ricci, S

    2016-01-01

    Earliest notions concerning autism (Autism Spectrum Disorders, ASD) describe the disturbance in executive functioning. Despite altered definition, executive functioning, expressed as higher cognitive skills required complex behaviors linked to the prefrontal cortex, are defective in autism. Specific difficulties in children presenting autism or verbal disabilities at executive functioning levels have been identified. Nevertheless, the developmental deficit of executive functioning in autism is highly diversified with huge individual variation and may even be absent. The aim of the present study to examine the current standing of intact executive functioning intact in ASD.

  3. Analytical strategies for the global quantification of intact proteins.

    PubMed

    Collier, Timothy S; Muddiman, David Charles

    2012-09-01

    The quantification of intact proteins is a relatively recent development in proteomics. In eukaryotic organisms, proteins are present as multiple isoforms as the result of variations in genetic code, alternative splicing, post-translational modification and other processing events. Understanding the identities and biological functions of these isoforms and how their concentrations vary across different states is the central goal of proteomics. To date, the bulk of proteomics research utilizes a "bottom-up" approach, digesting proteins into their more manageable constitutive peptides, but sacrificing information about the specific isoform and combinations of post-translational modifications present on the protein. Very specific strategies for protein quantification such as the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and Western blot are commonplace in laboratories and clinics, but impractical for the study of global biological changes. Herein, we describe strategies for the quantification of intact proteins, their distinct advantages, and challenges to their employment. Techniques contained in this review include the more traditional and widely employed methodology of differential gel electrophoresis and more recently developed mass spectrometry-based techniques including metabolic labeling, chemical labeling, and label-free methodologies.

  4. HYDROCARBON VAPOR DIFFUSION IN INTACT CORE SLEEVES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The diffusion of 2,2,4-trimethylpentane (TMP) and 2,2,5-trimethylhexane (TMH) vapors put of residually contaminated sandy soil from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) field research site at Traverse City, Michigan, was measured and modeled. The headspace of an intact ...

  5. Computational identification of new structured cis-regulatory elements in the 3'-untranslated region of human protein coding genes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaowei Sylvia; Brown, Chris M

    2012-10-01

    Messenger ribonucleic acids (RNAs) contain a large number of cis-regulatory RNA elements that function in many types of post-transcriptional regulation. These cis-regulatory elements are often characterized by conserved structures and/or sequences. Although some classes are well known, given the wide range of RNA-interacting proteins in eukaryotes, it is likely that many new classes of cis-regulatory elements are yet to be discovered. An approach to this is to use computational methods that have the advantage of analysing genomic data, particularly comparative data on a large scale. In this study, a set of structural discovery algorithms was applied followed by support vector machine (SVM) classification. We trained a new classification model (CisRNA-SVM) on a set of known structured cis-regulatory elements from 3'-untranslated regions (UTRs) and successfully distinguished these and groups of cis-regulatory elements not been strained on from control genomic and shuffled sequences. The new method outperformed previous methods in classification of cis-regulatory RNA elements. This model was then used to predict new elements from cross-species conserved regions of human 3'-UTRs. Clustering of these elements identified new classes of potential cis-regulatory elements. The model, training and testing sets and novel human predictions are available at: http://mRNA.otago.ac.nz/CisRNA-SVM.

  6. Small Particles Intact Capture Experiment (SPICE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishioka, Ken-Ji; Carle, G. C.; Bunch, T. E.; Mendez, David J.; Ryder, J. T.

    1994-01-01

    The Small Particles Intact Capture Experiment (SPICE) will develop technologies and engineering techniques necessary to capture nearly intact, uncontaminated cosmic and interplanetary dust particles (IDP's). Successful capture of such particles will benefit the exobiology and planetary science communities by providing particulate samples that may have survived unaltered since the formation of the solar system. Characterization of these particles may contribute fundamental data to our knowledge of how these particles could have formed into our planet Earth and, perhaps, contributed to the beginnings of life. The term 'uncontaminated' means that captured cosmic and IDP particles are free of organic contamination from the capture process and the term 'nearly intact capture' means that their chemical and elemental components are not materially altered during capture. The key to capturing cosmic and IDP particles that are organic-contamination free and nearly intact is the capture medium. Initial screening of capture media included organic foams, multiple thin foil layers, and aerogel (a silica gel); but, with the exception of aerogel, the requirements of no contamination or nearly intact capture were not met. To ensure no contamination of particles in the capture process, high-purity aerogel was chosen. High-purity aerogel results in high clarity (visual clearness), a useful quality in detection and recovery of embedded captured particles from the aerogel. P. Tsou at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) originally described the use of aerogel for this purpose and reported laboratory test results. He has flown aerogel as a 'GAS-can Lid' payload on STS-47 and is evaluating the results. The Timeband Capture Cell Experiment (TICCE), a Eureca 1 experiment, is also flying aerogel and is scheduled for recovery in late April.

  7. Measurements of tropospheric attenuation in the solar band UV spectral region and comparison with LOWTRAN-7 code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trakhovsky, E.; Ben-Shalom, A.; Devir, A. D.

    1989-12-01

    The ability of optical systems to circumvent the solar background in the troposphere would be advantageous in such fields as lidar, atmospheric communications, and remote sensing. The 'solar-blind UV' spectral region, lying in the 230-290 nm wavelength interval, has a lower limit defined by the edge of the Shumann-Runge band; the upper limit is set by the penetration of the stratospheric ozone shield by solar radiation. Recent measurements have indicated that the LOWTRAN-6 model does not encompass O2 absorption at the Herzberg I band. Since the recent LOWTRAN-7 model includes only the Herzberg contimuum, it is suggested that it should be applied only in stratospheric computations. New experimental results confirm the importance of Herzberg I's inclusion in tropospheric modeling.

  8. Alternative splicing in the coding region of Ppo-A1 directly influences the polyphenol oxidase activity in common wheat (Triticum aestivum L.).

    PubMed

    Sun, Youwei; He, Zhonghu; Ma, Wujun; Xia, Xianchun

    2011-03-01

    Polyphenol oxidase (PPO) plays a crucial role in browning reactions in fresh and processed fruits and vegetables, as well as products made from cereal grains. Common wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) has a large genome, representing an interesting system to advance our understanding of plant PPO gene expression, regulation and function. In the present study, we characterized the expression of Ppo-A1, a major PPO gene located on wheat chromosome 2A, using DNA sequencing, semi-quantitative RT-PCR, PPO activity assays and whole-grain staining methods during grain development. The results indicated that the expression of the Ppo-A1b allele was regulated by alternative splicing of pre-mRNAs, resulting from a 191-bp insertion in intron 1 and one C/G SNP in exon 2. Eight mRNA isoforms were identified in developing grains based on alignments between cDNA and genomic DNA sequences. Only the constitutively spliced isoform b encodes a putative full-length PPO protein based on its coding sequence whereas the other seven spliced isoforms, a, c, d, e, f, g and h, have premature termination codons resulting in potential nonsense-mediated mRNA decay. The differences in expression of Ppo-A1a and Ppo-A1b were confirmed by PPO activity assays and whole grain staining, providing direct evidence for the influence of alternative splicing in the coding region of Ppo-A1 on polyphenol oxidase activity in common wheat grains.

  9. Genetic Analysis of the Pestivirus Nonstructural Coding Region: Defects in the NS5A Unit Can Be Complemented in trans

    PubMed Central

    Grassmann, Claus W.; Isken, Olaf; Tautz, Norbert; Behrens, Sven-Erik

    2001-01-01

    The functional analysis of molecular determinants which control the replication of pestiviruses was considerably facilitated by the finding that subgenomic forms of the positive-strand RNA genome of BVDV (bovine viral diarrhea virus) are capable of autonomous replication in transfected host cells. The prototype replicon, BVDV DI9c, consists of the genomic 5′ and 3′ untranslated regions and a truncated open reading frame (ORF) encoding mainly the nonstructural proteins NS3, NS4A, NS4B, NS5A, and NS5B. To gain insight into which of these proteins are essential for viral replication and whether they act in cis or in trans, we introduced a large spectrum of in-frame mutations into the DI9c ORF. Tests of the mutant RNAs in terms of their replication capacity and their ability to support translation and cleavage of the nonstructural polyprotein, and whether defects could be rescued in trans, yielded the following results. (i) RNA replication was found to be dependent on the expression of each of the DI9c-encoded mature proteins NS3 to NS5B (and the known associated enzymatic activities). In the same context, a finely balanced molar ratio of the diverse proteolytic processing products was indicated to be crucial for the formation of an active catalytic replication complex. (ii) Synthesis of negative-strand intermediate and progeny positive-strand RNA was observed to be strictly coupled with all functional DI9c ORF derivatives. NS3 to NS5B were hence suggested to play a pivotal role even during early steps of the viral replication pathway. (iii) Mutations in the NS3 and NS4B units which generated nonfunctional or less functional RNAs were determined to be cis dominant. Likewise, lethal alterations in the NS4A and NS5B regions were invariably noncomplementable. (iv) In surprising contrast, replication of functional and nonfunctional NS5A mutants could be clearly enhanced and restored, respectively. In summary, our data provide initial insights into the organization of

  10. The near-naked hairless (Hr(N)) mutation disrupts hair formation but is not due to a mutation in the Hairless coding region.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yutao; Das, Suchita; Olszewski, Robert E; Carpenter, Donald A; Culiat, Cymbeline T; Sundberg, John P; Soteropoulos, Patricia; Liu, Xiaochen; Doktycz, Mitchel J; Michaud, Edward J; Voy, Brynn H

    2007-07-01

    Near-naked hairless (Hr(N)) is a semi-dominant, spontaneous mutation that was suggested by allelism testing to be allelic with mouse Hairless (Hr). Hr(N) mice differ from other Hr mutants in that hair loss appears as the postnatal coat begins to emerge, rather than as an inability to regrow hair after the first catagen and that the mutation displays semi-dominant inheritance. We sequenced the Hr cDNA in Hr(N)/Hr(N) mice and characterized the pathological and molecular phenotypes to identify the basis for hair loss in this model. Hr(N)/Hr(N) mice exhibit dystrophic hairs that are unable to emerge consistently from the hair follicle, whereas Hr(N)/+ mice display a sparse coat of hair and a milder degree of follicular dystrophy than their homozygous littermates. DNA microarray analysis of cutaneous gene expression demonstrates that numerous genes are downregulated in Hr(N)/Hr(N) mice, primarily genes important for hair structure. By contrast, Hr expression is significantly increased. Sequencing the Hr-coding region, intron-exon boundaries, 5'- and 3'-untranslated region, and immediate upstream region did not reveal the underlying mutation. Therefore, Hr(N) does not appear to be an allele of Hr but may result from a mutation in a closely linked gene or from a regulatory mutation in Hr.

  11. Functional Anthology of Intrinsic Disorder. II. Cellular Components, Domains, Technical Terms, Developmental Processes and Coding Sequence Diversities Correlated with Long Disordered Regions

    PubMed Central

    Vucetic, Slobodan; Xie, Hongbo; Iakoucheva, Lilia M.; Oldfield, Christopher J.; Dunker, A. Keith; Obradovic, Zoran; Uversky, Vladimir N.

    2008-01-01

    Biologically active proteins without stable ordered structure (i.e., intrinsically disordered proteins) are attracting increased attention. Functional repertoires of ordered and disordered proteins are very different, and the ability to differentiate whether a given function is associated with intrinsic disorder or with a well-folded protein is crucial for modern protein science. However, there is a large gap between the number of proteins experimentally confirmed to be disordered and their actual number in nature. As a result, studies of functional properties of confirmed disordered proteins, while helpful in revealing the functional diversity of protein disorder, provide only a limited view. To overcome this problem, a bioinformatics approach for comprehensive study of functional roles of protein disorder was proposed in the first paper of this series (Xie H., Vucetic S., Iakoucheva L.M., Oldfield C.J., Dunker A.K., Obradovic Z., Uversky V.N. (2006) Functional anthology of intrinsic disorder. I. Biological processes and functions of proteins with long disordered regions. J. Proteome Res.). Applying this novel approach to Swiss-Prot sequences and functional keywords, we found over 238 and 302 keywords to be strongly positively or negatively correlated, respectively, with long intrinsically disordered regions. This paper describes ~90 Swiss-Prot keywords attributed to the cellular components, domains, technical terms, developmental processes and coding sequence diversities possessing strong positive and negative correlation with long disordered regions. PMID:17391015

  12. DNMT3B interacts with constitutive centromere protein CENP-C to modulate DNA methylation and the histone code at centromeric regions.

    PubMed

    Gopalakrishnan, Suhasni; Sullivan, Beth A; Trazzi, Stefania; Della Valle, Giuliano; Robertson, Keith D

    2009-09-01

    DNA methylation is an epigenetically imposed mark of transcriptional repression that is essential for maintenance of chromatin structure and genomic stability. Genome-wide methylation patterns are mediated by the combined action of three DNA methyltransferases: DNMT1, DNMT3A and DNMT3B. Compelling links exist between DNMT3B and chromosome stability as emphasized by the mitotic defects that are a hallmark of ICF syndrome, a disease arising from germline mutations in DNMT3B. Centromeric and pericentromeric regions are essential for chromosome condensation and the fidelity of segregation. Centromere regions contain distinct epigenetic marks, including dense DNA hypermethylation, yet the mechanisms by which DNA methylation is targeted to these regions remains largely unknown. In the present study, we used a yeast two-hybrid screen and identified a novel interaction between DNMT3B and constitutive centromere protein CENP-C. CENP-C is itself essential for mitosis. We confirm this interaction in mammalian cells and map the domains responsible. Using siRNA knock downs, bisulfite genomic sequencing and ChIP, we demonstrate for the first time that CENP-C recruits DNA methylation and DNMT3B to both centromeric and pericentromeric satellite repeats and that CENP-C and DNMT3B regulate the histone code in these regions, including marks characteristic of centromeric chromatin. Finally, we demonstrate that loss of CENP-C or DNMT3B leads to elevated chromosome misalignment and segregation defects during mitosis and increased transcription of centromeric repeats. Taken together, our data reveal a novel mechanism by which DNA methylation is targeted to discrete regions of the genome and contributes to chromosomal stability.

  13. A system for the analysis of BKV non-coding control regions: application to clinical isolates from an HIV/AIDS patient.

    PubMed

    Broekema, Nicole M; Abend, Johanna R; Bennett, Shauna M; Butel, Janet S; Vanchiere, John A; Imperiale, Michael J

    2010-11-25

    The human polyomavirus BK virus (BKV) is an important opportunistic pathogen whose disease prevalence continues to increase with the growing immunocompromised population. To date, the major determinant of replication in cell culture has not been formally proven. BKV exists as archetype virus and rearranged variants, which are classified based on the DNA sequence of their non-coding control regions (NCCRs). The archetype BKV NCCR is divided into five blocks of sequence and rearranged variants contain deletions and duplications of these blocks. In this study, a genetic system was developed and used to identify the major determinant of replication ability in primary renal proximal tubule epithelial cells, the natural host cell of BKV. This system was also used to analyze NCCR variants isolated from an immunocompromised patient which contain assorted rearrangement patterns and functional differences. This study solidifies the NCCR as the major genetic determinant of BKV replication ability in vitro.

  14. Mapping of transfer and H pilus coding regions of the IncHII plasmid pHH1508a.

    PubMed

    Yan, W; Taylor, D E

    1989-02-01

    The IncHII plasmid pHH1508a (208 kilobases) encodes resistance to potassium tellurite, trimethoprim, and streptomycin. Conjugative pili encoded by pHH1508a were isolated, purified, and used for preparation of anti-H pilus antiserum. Immuno-gold labelling experiments using H pilus specific antiserum showed that antigenic determinants were located along the entire length of the H pilus. Immuno-gold labelling and lysis studies using pilH alpha, a bacteriophage specific for H pili, were used to investigate transfer-deficient mutants of pHH1508a obtained by Tn5 mutagenesis and an in vitro constructed derivative of 96 kilobases, pDT1178, which also conferred resistance to potassium tellurite, trimethoprim, and streptomycin. The transfer-deficient mutants did not specify H pili, whereas pDT1178, which transferred at low frequency (1 x 10(-4) transconjugants per recipient), specified a small number of H pili. A naturally occurring plasmid, pMG110, was found to encode the production of H pili, but was completely transfer deficient (less than 1 x 10(-7) transconjugants per recipient). This study suggests that genes required for H pilus production and assembly as well as low level transfer are located separately within the 96-kilobase fragment of pDT1178 and that other genes, located outside this region, are essential for the regulation and full expression of conjugative transfer.

  15. Capsid coding region diversity of re-emerging lineage C foot-and-mouth disease virus serotype Asia1 from India.

    PubMed

    Subramaniam, Saravanan; Mohapatra, Jajati K; Das, Biswajit; Sharma, Gaurav K; Biswal, Jitendra K; Mahajan, Sonalika; Misri, Jyoti; Dash, Bana B; Pattnaik, Bramhadev

    2015-07-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) serotype Asia1 was first reported in India in 1951, where three major genetic lineages (B, C and D) of this serotype have been described until now. In this study, the capsid protein coding region of serotype Asia1 viruses (n = 99) from India were analyzed, giving importance to the viruses circulating since 2007. All of the isolates (n = 50) recovered during 2007-2013 were found to group within the re-emerging cluster of lineage C (designated as sublineage C(R)). The evolutionary rate of sublineage C(R) was estimated to be slightly higher than that of the serotype as a whole, and the time of the most recent common ancestor for this cluster was estimated to be approximately 2001. In comparison to the older isolates of lineage C (1993-2001), the re-emerging viruses showed variation at eight amino acid positions, including substitutions at the antigenically critical residues VP279 and VP2131. However, no direct correlation was found between sequence variations and antigenic relationships. The number of codons under positive selection and the nature of the selection pressure varied widely among the structural proteins, implying a heterogeneous pattern of evolution in serotype Asia1. While episodic diversifying selection appears to play a major role in shaping the evolution of VP1 and VP3, selection pressure acting on codons of VP2 is largely pervasive. Further, episodic positive selection appears to be responsible for the early diversification of lineage C. Recombination events identified in the structural protein coding region indicates its probable role in adaptive evolution of serotype Asia1 viruses.

  16. A New Model for Real-Time Regional Vertical Total Electron Content and Differential Code Bias Estimation Using IGS Real-Time Service (IGS-RTS) Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelazeem, Mohamed; Çelik, Rahmi N.; El-Rabbany, Ahmed

    2016-04-01

    The international global navigation satellite system (GNSS) real-time service (IGS-RTS) products have been used extensively for real-time precise point positioning and ionosphere modeling applications. In this study, we develop a regional model for real-time vertical total electron content (RT-VTEC) and differential code bias (RT-DCB) estimation over Europe using the IGS-RTS satellite orbit and clock products. The developed model has a spatial and temporal resolution of 1°×1° and 15 minutes, respectively. GPS observations from a regional network consisting of 60 IGS and EUREF reference stations are processed in the zero-difference mode using the Bernese-5.2 software package in order to extract the geometry-free linear combination of the smoothed code observations. The spherical harmonic expansion function is used to model the VTEC, the receiver and the satellite DCBs. To validate the proposed model, the RT-VTEC values are computed and compared with the final IGS-global ionospheric map (IGS-GIM) counterparts in three successive days under high solar activity including one of an extreme geomagnetic activity. The real-time satellite DCBs are also estimated and compared with the IGS-GIM counterparts. Moreover, the real-time receiver DCB for six IGS stations are obtained and compared with the IGS-GIM counterparts. The examined stations are located in different latitudes with different receiver types. The findings reveal that the estimated RT-VTEC values show agreement with the IGS-GIM counterparts with root mean-square-errors (RMSEs) values less than 2 TEC units. In addition, RMSEs of both the satellites and receivers DCBs are less than 0.85 ns and 0.65 ns, respectively in comparison with the IGS-GIM.

  17. The position of yeast snoRNA-coding regions within host introns is essential for their biosynthesis and for efficient splicing of the host pre-mRNA

    PubMed Central

    Vincenti, Sara; Chiara, Valentina De; Bozzoni, Irene; Presutti, Carlo

    2007-01-01

    Genomic location of sequences encoding small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNAs) is peculiar in all eukaryotes from yeast to mammals: most of them are encoded within the introns of host genes. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, seven snoRNAs show this location. In this work we demonstrate that the position of snoRNA-coding regions with respect to splicing consensus sequences is critical: yeast strains expressing mutant constructs containing shorter or longer spacers (the regions between snoRNA ends and intron splice sites) show a drop in accumulation of U24 and U18 snoRNAs. Further mutational analysis demonstrates that altering the distance between the 3′ end of the snoRNA and the branch point is the most important constraint for snoRNA biosynthesis, and that stable external stems, which are sometimes present in introns containing snoRNAs, can overcome the positional effect. Surprisingly enough, splicing of the host introns is clearly affected in most of these constructs indicating that, at least in S. cerevisiae, an incorrect location of snoRNA-coding sequences within the host intron is detrimental to the splicing process. This is different with respect to what was demonstrated in mammals, where the activity of the splicing machinery seems to be dominant with respect to the assembly of snoRNPs, and it is not affected by the location of snoRNA sequences. We also show that intronic box C/D snoRNA recognition and assembly of snoRNPs occur during transcription when splicing sequences are recognized. PMID:17135484

  18. Xenopus egg cytoplasm with intact actin.

    PubMed

    Field, Christine M; Nguyen, Phuong A; Ishihara, Keisuke; Groen, Aaron C; Mitchison, Timothy J

    2014-01-01

    We report optimized methods for preparing Xenopus egg extracts without cytochalasin D, that we term "actin-intact egg extract." These are undiluted egg cytoplasm that contains abundant organelles, and glycogen which supplies energy, and represents the least perturbed cell-free cytoplasm preparation we know of. We used this system to probe cell cycle regulation of actin and myosin-II dynamics (Field et al., 2011), and to reconstitute the large, interphase asters that organize early Xenopus embryos (Mitchison et al., 2012; Wühr, Tan, Parker, Detrich, & Mitchison, 2010). Actin-intact Xenopus egg extracts are useful for analysis of actin dynamics, and interaction of actin with other cytoplasmic systems, in a cell-free system that closely mimics egg physiology, and more generally for probing the biochemistry and biophysics of the egg, zygote, and early embryo. Detailed protocols are provided along with assays used to check cell cycle state and tips for handling and storing undiluted egg extracts.

  19. Silica Aerogel Captures Cosmic Dust Intact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsou, P.

    1994-01-01

    The mesostructure of silica aerogel resembles stings of grapes, ranging in size from 10 to 100 angstrom. This fine mesostructure transmits nearly 90 percent of incident light in the visible, while providing sufficiently gentle dissipation of the kinetric energy of hypervelocity cosmic dust particles to permit their intact capture. We introduced silica aerogel in 1987 as capture medium to take advantage of its low density, fine mesostruicture and most importantly, its transparency, allowing optical location of captured micron sized particles.

  20. Complete coding regions of the prototypes enterovirus B93 and C95: phylogenetic analyses of the P1 and P3 regions of EV-B and EV-C strains.

    PubMed

    Junttila, N; Lévêque, N; Magnius, L O; Kabue, J P; Muyembe-Tamfum, J J; Maslin, J; Lina, B; Norder, H

    2015-03-01

    Complete coding regions were sequenced for two new enterovirus genomes: EV-B93 previously identified by VP1 sequencing, derived from a child with acute flaccid paralysis in the Democratic Republic of Congo; and EV-C95 from a French soldier with acute gastroenteritis in Djibouti. The EV-B93 P1 had more than 30% nucleotide divergence from other EV-B types, with highest similarity to E-15 and EV-B80. The P1 nucleotide sequence of EV-C95 was most similar, 71%, to CV-A21. Complete coding regions for the new enteroviruses were compared with those of 135 EV-B and 176 EV-C strains representing all types available in GenBank. When strains from the same outbreak or strains isolated during the same year in the same geographical region were excluded, 27 of the 58 EV-B, and 16 of the 23 EV-C types were represented by more than one sequence. However, for EV-B the P3 sequences formed three clades mainly according to origin or time of isolation, irrespective of type, while for EV-C the P3 sequences segregated mainly according to disease manifestation, with most strains causing paralysis, including polioviruses, forming one clade, and strains causing respiratory illness forming another. There was no intermixing of types between these two clades, apart from two EV-C96 strains. The EV-B P3 sequences had lower inter-clade and higher intra-clade variability as compared to the EV-C sequences, which may explain why inter-clade recombinations are more frequent in EV-B. Further analysis of more isolates may shed light on the role of recombinations in the evolution of EV-B in geographical context.

  1. The Near Naked Hairless (HrN) Mutation Disrupts Hair Formation but is not Due to a Mutation in the Hairless Coding Region

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yutao; Das, Suchita; Olszewski, Robert Edward; Culiat, Cymbeline T; Carpenter, D A; Sundberg, John P; Soteropoulos, Patricia; Liu, Xiaochen; Doktycz, Mitchel John; Michaud III, Edward J; Voy, Brynn H

    2007-01-01

    Near naked hairless (HrN) is a semi-dominant mutation that arose spontaneously and was suggested by allelism testing to be an allele of mouse Hairless (Hr). HrN mice differ from other Hr mutants in that hair loss appears as the postnatal coat begins to emerge, as opposed to failure to initiate the first postnatal hair cycle, and that the mutation displays semi-dominant inheritance. We sequenced the Hr cDNA in HrN/HrN mice and characterized the pathological and molecular phenotypes to identify the basis for hair loss in this model. HrN/HrN mice exhibit dystrophic hairs that are unable to consistently emerge from the hair follicle, while HrN/+ mice display a sparse coat of hair and a milder degree of follicular dystrophy than their homozygous littermates. DNA microarray analysis of cutaneous gene expression demonstrates that numerous genes are downregulated in HrN/HrN mice, primarily genes important for hair structure. By contrast, Hr expression is significantly increased. Sequencing the Hr coding region, intron-exon boundaries, 5'- and 3'- UTR and immediate upstream region did not reveal the underlying mutation. Therefore HrN does not appear to be an allele of Hr but may result from a mutation in a closely linked gene or from a regulatory mutation in Hr.

  2. Molecular characterization of severe hemophilia A suggests that about half the mutations are not within the coding regions and splice junctions of the factor VIII gene

    SciTech Connect

    Higuchi, Miyoko; Kazazian, H.H. Jr.; Kasch, L.; Warren, T.C.; McGinniss, M.J.; Antonarakis, S.E. ); Phillips, J.A. III; Janco, R. ); Kasper, C. )

    1991-08-15

    Hemophilia A is an X chromosome-linked disorder resulting from deficiency of factor VIII, an important protein in blood coagulation. A large number of disease-producing mutations have been reported in the factor VIII gene. However, a comprehensive analysis of the mutations has been difficult because of the larger gene size, its many scattered exons, and the high frequency of de novo mutations. Recently, the authors have shown that nearly all mutations resulting in mild-to-moderate hemophilia A can be detected by PCR and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). In this study, they attempted to discover the mutations causing severe hemophilia A by analyzing 47 unselected patients, 30 of whom had severe hemophilia and 17 of whom had mild-to-moderate disease. Using DGGE as a screening method, they analyzed 99% of the coding region, 94% of the splice junctions, the promoter region, and the polyadenylylation site of the gene. They found the mutation in 16 of 17 (94%) patients with mild-to-moderate disease but in only 16 of 30 (53%) patients with severe hemophilia A.

  3. H3.3 demarcates GC-rich coding and subtelomeric regions and serves as potential memory mark for virulence gene expression in Plasmodium falciparum

    PubMed Central

    Fraschka, Sabine Anne-Kristin; Henderson, Rob Wilhelmus Maria; Bártfai, Richárd

    2016-01-01

    Histones, by packaging and organizing the DNA into chromatin, serve as essential building blocks for eukaryotic life. The basic structure of the chromatin is established by four canonical histones (H2A, H2B, H3 and H4), while histone variants are more commonly utilized to alter the properties of specific chromatin domains. H3.3, a variant of histone H3, was found to have diverse localization patterns and functions across species but has been rather poorly studied in protists. Here we present the first genome-wide analysis of H3.3 in the malaria-causing, apicomplexan parasite, P. falciparum, which revealed a complex occupancy profile consisting of conserved and parasite-specific features. In contrast to other histone variants, PfH3.3 primarily demarcates euchromatic coding and subtelomeric repetitive sequences. Stable occupancy of PfH3.3 in these regions is largely uncoupled from the transcriptional activity and appears to be primarily dependent on the GC-content of the underlying DNA. Importantly, PfH3.3 specifically marks the promoter region of an active and poised, but not inactive antigenic variation (var) gene, thereby potentially contributing to immune evasion. Collectively, our data suggest that PfH3.3, together with other histone variants, indexes the P. falciparum genome to functionally distinct domains and contribute to a key survival strategy of this deadly pathogen. PMID:27555062

  4. Detection of genetic diversity and selection at the coding region of the melanocortin receptor 1 (MC1R) gene in Tibetan pigs and Landrace pigs.

    PubMed

    Liu, Rui; Jin, Long; Long, Keren; Chai, Jie; Ma, Jideng; Tang, Qianzi; Tian, Shilin; Hu, Yaodong; Lin, Ling; Wang, Xun; Jiang, Anan; Li, Xuewei; Li, Mingzhou

    2016-01-10

    Domestication and subsequent selective pressures have produced a large variety of pig coat colors in different regions and breeds. The melanocortin 1 receptor (MC1R) gene plays a crucial role in determining coat color of mammals. Here, we investigated genetic diversity and selection at the coding region of the porcine melanocortin receptor 1 (MC1R) in Tibetan pigs and Landrace pigs. By contrast, genetic variability was much lower in Landrace pigs than in Tibetan pigs. Meanwhile, haplotype analysis showed that Tibetan pigs possessed shared haplotypes, suggesting a possibility of recent introgression event by way of crossbreeding with neighboring domestic pigs or shared ancestral polymorphism. Additionally, we detected positive selection at the MC1R in both Tibetan pigs and Landrace pigs through the dN/dS analysis. These findings suggested that novel phenotypic change (dark coat color) caused by novel mutations may help Tibetan pigs against intensive solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation and camouflage in wild environment, whereas white coat color in Landrace were intentionally selected by human after domestication. Furthermore, both the phylogenetic analysis and the network analysis provided clues that MC1R in Asian and European wild boars may have initially experienced different selective pressures, and MC1R alleles diversified in modern domesticated pigs.

  5. SHAPE Analysis of the RNA Secondary Structure of the Mouse Hepatitis Virus 5′ Untranslated Region and N-Terminal Nsp1 Coding Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Dong; Liu, Pinghua; Wudeck, Elyse V.; Giedroc, David P.; Leibowitz, Julian L.

    2014-01-01

    SHAPE technology was used to analyze RNA secondary structure of the 5′ most 474 nts of the MHV-A59 genome encompassing the minimal 5′ cis-acting region required for defective interfering RNA replication. The structures generated were in agreement with previous characterizations of SL1 through SL4 and two recently predicted secondary structure elements, S5 and SL5A. SHAPE provided biochemical support for four additional stem-loops not previously functionally investigated in MHV. Secondary structure predictions for 5′ regions of MHV-A59, BCoV and SARS-CoV were similar despite high sequence divergence. The pattern of SHAPE reactivity of in virio genomic RNA, ex virio genomic RNA, and in vitro synthesized RNA were similar, suggesting that binding of N protein or other proteins to virion RNA fails to protect the RNA from reaction with lipid permeable SHAPE reagent. Reverse genetic experiments suggested that SL5C and SL6 within the nsp1 coding sequence are not required for viral replication. PMID:25462342

  6. Mini-F plasmid mutants able to replicate in the absence of sigma 32: mutations in the repE coding region producing hyperactive initiator protein.

    PubMed Central

    Kawasaki, Y; Wada, C; Yura, T

    1991-01-01

    Mini-F plasmids cannot replicate in Escherichia coli strains (delta rpoH) lacking sigma 32, presumably because transcription of the repE gene encoding the replication initiator protein (RepE protein) depends mostly on RNA polymerase containing sigma 32. We have isolated and characterized mini-F mutants able to replicate in delta rpoH cells. Contrary to the initial expectation, five mutants with mutations in the repE coding region that produce altered RepE proteins were obtained. The mutations caused replacement of a single amino acid: the 92nd glutamic acid was replaced by lysine (repE10, repE16, and repE25) or glycine (repE22) or the 109th glutamic acid was replaced by lysine (repE26). These plasmids overproduced RepE protein and exhibited very high copy numbers. Two major activities of mutated RepE proteins have been determined in vivo; the autogenous repressor activity was significantly reduced, whereas the initiator activity was much enhanced in all mutants. These results indicate the importance of a small central region of RepE protein for both initiator and repressor activities. Thus the decreased repE transcription in delta rpoH cells can be compensated for by an increased initiator activity and a decreased repressor activity of RepE, resulting in the increased synthesis of hyperactive RepE protein. Images PMID:1991708

  7. Ethical coding.

    PubMed

    Resnik, Barry I

    2009-01-01

    It is ethical, legal, and proper for a dermatologist to maximize income through proper coding of patient encounters and procedures. The overzealous physician can misinterpret reimbursement requirements or receive bad advice from other physicians and cross the line from aggressive coding to coding fraud. Several of the more common problem areas are discussed.

  8. Second-generation sequencing of entire mitochondrial coding-regions (∼15.4 kb) holds promise for study of the phylogeny and taxonomy of human body lice and head lice.

    PubMed

    Xiong, H; Campelo, D; Pollack, R J; Raoult, D; Shao, R; Alem, M; Ali, J; Bilcha, K; Barker, S C

    2014-08-01

    The Illumina Hiseq platform was used to sequence the entire mitochondrial coding-regions of 20 body lice, Pediculus humanus Linnaeus, and head lice, P. capitis De Geer (Phthiraptera: Pediculidae), from eight towns and cities in five countries: Ethiopia, France, China, Australia and the U.S.A. These data (∼310 kb) were used to see how much more informative entire mitochondrial coding-region sequences were than partial mitochondrial coding-region sequences, and thus to guide the design of future studies of the phylogeny, origin, evolution and taxonomy of body lice and head lice. Phylogenies were compared from entire coding-region sequences (∼15.4 kb), entire cox1 (∼1.5 kb), partial cox1 (∼700 bp) and partial cytb (∼600 bp) sequences. On the one hand, phylogenies from entire mitochondrial coding-region sequences (∼15.4 kb) were much more informative than phylogenies from entire cox1 sequences (∼1.5 kb) and partial gene sequences (∼600 to ∼700 bp). For example, 19 branches had > 95% bootstrap support in our maximum likelihood tree from the entire mitochondrial coding-regions (∼15.4 kb) whereas the tree from 700 bp cox1 had only two branches with bootstrap support > 95%. Yet, by contrast, partial cytb (∼600 bp) and partial cox1 (∼486 bp) sequences were sufficient to genotype lice to Clade A, B or C. The sequences of the mitochondrial genomes of the P. humanus, P. capitis and P. schaeffi Fahrenholz studied are in NCBI GenBank under the accession numbers KC660761-800, KC685631-6330, KC241882-97, EU219988-95, HM241895-8 and JX080388-407.

  9. 50 CFR 622.493 - Landing Caribbean queen conch intact.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... conch intact. (a) A Caribbean queen conch in or from the Caribbean EEZ must be maintained with meat and shell intact. (b) The operator of a vessel that fishes in the EEZ is responsible for ensuring...

  10. 50 CFR 622.493 - Landing Caribbean queen conch intact.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... conch intact. (a) A Caribbean queen conch in or from the Caribbean EEZ must be maintained with meat and shell intact. (b) The operator of a vessel that fishes in the EEZ is responsible for ensuring...

  11. Calcium Signaling in Intact Dorsal Root Ganglia

    PubMed Central

    Gemes, Geza; Rigaud, Marcel; Koopmeiners, Andrew S.; Poroli, Mark J.; Zoga, Vasiliki; Hogan, Quinn H.

    2013-01-01

    Background Ca2+ is the dominant second messenger in primary sensory neurons. In addition, disrupted Ca2+ signaling is a prominent feature in pain models involving peripheral nerve injury. Standard cytoplasmic Ca2+ recording techniques use high K+ or field stimulation and dissociated neurons. To compare findings in intact dorsal root ganglia, we used a method of simultaneous electrophysiologic and microfluorimetric recording. Methods Dissociated neurons were loaded by bath-applied Fura-2-AM and subjected to field stimulation. Alternatively, we adapted a technique in which neuronal somata of intact ganglia were loaded with Fura-2 through an intracellular microelectrode that provided simultaneous membrane potential recording during activation by action potentials (APs) conducted from attached dorsal roots. Results Field stimulation at levels necessary to activate neurons generated bath pH changes through electrolysis and failed to predictably drive neurons with AP trains. In the intact ganglion technique, single APs produced measurable Ca2+ transients that were fourfold larger in presumed nociceptive C-type neurons than in nonnociceptive Aβ-type neurons. Unitary Ca2+ transients summated during AP trains, forming transients with amplitudes that were highly dependent on stimulation frequency. Each neuron was tuned to a preferred frequency at which transient amplitude was maximal. Transients predominantly exhibited monoexponential recovery and had sustained plateaus during recovery only with trains of more than 100 APs. Nerve injury decreased Ca2+ transients in C-type neurons, but increased transients in Aβ-type neurons. Conclusions Refined observation of Ca2+ signaling is possible through natural activation by conducted APs in undissociated sensory neurons and reveals features distinct to neuronal types and injury state. PMID:20526180

  12. Sodium Absorption by Intact Sugar Beet Plants

    PubMed Central

    El-Sheikh, Adel M; Ulrich, Albert

    1971-01-01

    Sodium absorption by intact sugar beet plants (Beta vulgaris) was found to be mediated by at least two distinct mechanisms when uptake was studied over a wide range of Na and K concentrations. The first mechanism operates at low Na concentrations (<1 milliequivalent per liter); presence of K completely blocks this mechanism for Na. The second mechanism operates at high Na concentrations (>1 milliequivalent per liter), transporting Na as well as K; but apparently this mechanism is not active for Na absorption in young sugar beet plants up to the 10-leaf stage. PMID:16657872

  13. 7 CFR 160.29 - Containers to remain intact.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Containers to remain intact. 160.29 Section 160.29... STANDARDS FOR NAVAL STORES Analysis, Inspection, and Grading on Request § 160.29 Containers to remain intact... the containers holding such naval stores remain intact as sampled until the analysis,...

  14. Rapid isolation of intact chloroplasts from spinach leaves.

    PubMed

    Joly, David; Carpentier, Robert

    2011-01-01

    In this chapter, a rapid method to isolate intact chloroplasts from spinach leaves is described. Intact chloroplasts are isolated using two short centrifugation steps and avoiding the use of percoll gradient. Intactness of chloroplast is evaluated by the inability of potassium ferricyanide to enter inside the chloroplasts and to act as an electron acceptor for photosystem II.

  15. A search for intact lava tubes on the Moon: Possible lunar base habitats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coombs, Cassandra R.; Hawke, B. Ray

    1992-01-01

    We have surveyed lunar sinuous rilles and other volcanic features in an effort to locate intact lava tubes that could be used to house an advanced lunar base. Criteria were established for identifying intact tube segments. Sixty-seven tube candidates within 20 rilles were identified on the lunar nearside. The rilles, located in four mare regions, varied in size and sinuosity. We identified four rilles that exhibited particularly strong evidence for the existence of intact lava tube segments. These are located in the following areas: (1) south of Gruithuisen K, (2) in the Marius Hills region, (3) in the southeastern Mare Serenitatis, and (4) in the eastern Mare Serenitatis. We rated each of the 67 probable tube segments for lunar base suitability based on its dimensions, stability, location, and access to lunar resources. Nine tube segments associated with three separate rilles are considered prime candidates for use as part of an advanced lunar base.

  16. The rate-limiting step in yeast PGK1 mRNA degradation is an endonucleolytic cleavage in the 3'-terminal part of the coding region.

    PubMed Central

    Vreken, P; Raué, H A

    1992-01-01

    Insertion of an 18-nucleotide-long poly(G) tract into the 3'-terminal untranslated region of yeast phosphoglycerate kinase (PGK1) mRNA increases its chemical half-life by about a factor of 2 (P. Vreken, R. Van der Veen, V. C. H. F. de Regt, A. L. de Maat, R. J. Planta, and H. A. Raué, Biochimie 73:729-737, 1991). In this report, we show that this insertion also causes the accumulation of a degradation intermediate extending from the poly(G) sequence down to the transcription termination site. Reverse transcription and S1 nuclease mapping experiments demonstrated that this intermediate is the product of shorter-lived primary fragments resulting from endonucleolytic cleavage immediately downstream from the U residue of either of two 5'-GGUG-3' sequences present between positions 1100 and 1200 close to the 3' terminus (position 1251) of the coding sequence. Similar endonucleolytic cleavages appear to initiate degradation of wild-type PGK1 mRNA. Insertion of a poly(G) tract just upstream from the AUG start codon resulted in the accumulation of a 5'-terminal degradation intermediate extending from the insertion to the 1100-1200 region. RNase H degradation in the presence of oligo(dT) demonstrated that the wild-type and mutant PGK1 mRNAs are deadenylated prior to endonucleolytic cleavage and that the half-life of the poly(A) tail is three- to sixfold lower than that of the remainder of the mRNA. Thus, the endonucleolytic cleavage constitutes the rate-limiting step in degradation of both wild-type and mutant PGK1 transcripts, and the resulting fragments are degraded by a 5'----3' exonuclease, which appears to be severely retarded by a poly(G) sequence. Images PMID:1320194

  17. Color differences among feral pigeons (Columba livia) are not attributable to sequence variation in the coding region of the melanocortin-1 receptor gene (MC1R)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Genetic variation at the melanocortin-1 receptor (MC1R) gene is correlated with melanin color variation in many birds. Feral pigeons (Columba livia) show two major melanin-based colorations: a red coloration due to pheomelanic pigment and a black coloration due to eumelanic pigment. Furthermore, within each color type, feral pigeons display continuous variation in the amount of melanin pigment present in the feathers, with individuals varying from pure white to a full dark melanic color. Coloration is highly heritable and it has been suggested that it is under natural or sexual selection, or both. Our objective was to investigate whether MC1R allelic variants are associated with plumage color in feral pigeons. Findings We sequenced 888 bp of the coding sequence of MC1R among pigeons varying both in the type, eumelanin or pheomelanin, and the amount of melanin in their feathers. We detected 10 non-synonymous substitutions and 2 synonymous substitution but none of them were associated with a plumage type. It remains possible that non-synonymous substitutions that influence coloration are present in the short MC1R fragment that we did not sequence but this seems unlikely because we analyzed the entire functionally important region of the gene. Conclusions Our results show that color differences among feral pigeons are probably not attributable to amino acid variation at the MC1R locus. Therefore, variation in regulatory regions of MC1R or variation in other genes may be responsible for the color polymorphism of feral pigeons. PMID:23915680

  18. MiR-193a-5p Targets the Coding Region of AP-2α mRNA and Induces Cisplatin Resistance in Bladder Cancers.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ji; Duan, Huaxin; Xie, Yu; Ning, Yichong; Zhang, Xing; Hui, Na; Wang, Chunqing; Zhang, Jian; Zhou, Jianlin

    2016-01-01

    Transcription factor AP-2 alpha (AP-2α or TFAP2A) is a newly identified prognostic marker of chemotherapy; its expression is positively correlated with chemosensitivity and survival of cancer patients. Using computational programs, we predicted that the coding region of AP-2α gene contains a potential miRNA response element (MRE) of miR-193a-5p, and the single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) site (c.497A>G, rs111681798) resides within the predicted MRE. The results of luciferase assays and Western blot analysis demonstrated that miR-193a-5p negatively regulated the expression of AP-2α proteins, but have no influence on the mutant AP-2α (c.497A>G). Infection with lentiviral AP-2α gene or miR-193a-5p inhibitor in the bladder cancer cells decreased migration and cisplatin resistance, while knockdown of AP-2α gene or overexpression of miR-193a-5p in the urothelial cell line SV-HUC-1 increased migration and cisplatin resistances. We concluded that miR-193a-5p induced cisplatin resistance by repressing AP-2α expression in bladder cancer cells.

  19. Recollections of Parent Characteristics and Attachment Patterns for College Women of Intact vs. Non-Intact Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kilmann, Peter R.; Carranza, Laura V.; Vendemia, Jennifer M. C.

    2006-01-01

    This study contrasted offsprings' attachment patterns and recollections of parent characteristics in two college samples: 147 females from intact biological parents and 157 females of parental divorce. Secure females from intact or non-intact families rated parents positively, while insecure females rated parents as absent, distant, and demanding.…

  20. Sharing code.

    PubMed

    Kubilius, Jonas

    2014-01-01

    Sharing code is becoming increasingly important in the wake of Open Science. In this review I describe and compare two popular code-sharing utilities, GitHub and Open Science Framework (OSF). GitHub is a mature, industry-standard tool but lacks focus towards researchers. In comparison, OSF offers a one-stop solution for researchers but a lot of functionality is still under development. I conclude by listing alternative lesser-known tools for code and materials sharing.

  1. A PWWP Domain-Containing Protein Targets the NuA3 Acetyltransferase Complex via Histone H3 Lysine 36 trimethylation to Coordinate Transcriptional Elongation at Coding Regions*

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, Tonya M.; McDaniel, Stephen L.; Byrum, Stephanie D.; Cades, Jessica A.; Dancy, Blair C. R.; Wade, Herschel; Tackett, Alan J.; Strahl, Brian D.; Taverna, Sean D.

    2014-01-01

    Post-translational modifications of histones, such as acetylation and methylation, are differentially positioned in chromatin with respect to gene organization. For example, although histone H3 is often trimethylated on lysine 4 (H3K4me3) and acetylated on lysine 14 (H3K14ac) at active promoter regions, histone H3 lysine 36 trimethylation (H3K36me3) occurs throughout the open reading frames of transcriptionally active genes. The conserved yeast histone acetyltransferase complex, NuA3, specifically binds H3K4me3 through a plant homeodomain (PHD) finger in the Yng1 subunit, and subsequently catalyzes the acetylation of H3K14 through the histone acetyltransferase domain of Sas3, leading to transcription initiation at a subset of genes. We previously found that Ylr455w (Pdp3), an uncharacterized proline-tryptophan-tryptophan-proline (PWWP) domain-containing protein, copurifies with stable members of NuA3. Here, we employ mass-spectrometric analysis of affinity purified Pdp3, biophysical binding assays, and genetic analyses to classify NuA3 into two functionally distinct forms: NuA3a and NuA3b. Although NuA3a uses the PHD finger of Yng1 to interact with H3K4me3 at the 5′-end of open reading frames, NuA3b contains the unique member, Pdp3, which regulates an interaction between NuA3b and H3K36me3 at the transcribed regions of genes through its PWWP domain. We find that deletion of PDP3 decreases NuA3-directed transcription and results in growth defects when combined with transcription elongation mutants, suggesting NuA3b acts as a positive elongation factor. Finally, we determine that NuA3a, but not NuA3b, is synthetically lethal in combination with a deletion of the histone acetyltransferase GCN5, indicating NuA3b has a specialized role at coding regions that is independent of Gcn5 activity. Collectively, these studies define a new form of the NuA3 complex that associates with H3K36me3 to effect transcriptional elongation. MS data are available via ProteomeXchange with

  2. Oligodeoxynucleotide Probes for Detecting Intact Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosson, Reinhardt A.; Maurina-Brunker, Julie; Langley, Kim; Pynnonen, Christine M.

    2004-01-01

    A rapid, sensitive test using chemiluminescent oligodeoxynucleotide probes has been developed for detecting, identifying, and enumerating intact cells. The test is intended especially for use in detecting and enumerating bacteria and yeasts in potable water. As in related tests that have been developed recently for similar purposes, the oligodeoxynucleotide probes used in this test are typically targeted at either singlecopy deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) genes (such as virulence genes) or the multiple copies (10,000 to 50,000 copies per cell) of 16S ribosomal ribonucleic acids (rRNAs). Some of those tests involve radioisotope or fluorescent labeling of the probes for reporting hybridization of probes to target nucleic acids. Others of those tests involve labeling with enzymes plus the use of chemiluminescent or chromogenic substrates to report hybridization via color or the emission of light, respectively. The present test is of the last-mentioned type. The chemiluminescence in the present test can be detected easily with relatively simple instrumentation. In developing the present test, the hybridization approach was chosen because hybridization techniques are very specific. Hybridization detects stable, inheritable genetic targets within microorganisms. These targets are not dependent on products of gene expression that can vary with growth conditions or physiological states of organisms in test samples. Therefore, unique probes can be designed to detect and identify specific genera or species of bacteria or yeast (in terms of rRNA target sequences) or can be designed to detect and identify virulence genes (genomic target sequences). Because of the inherent specificity of this system, there are few problems of cross-reactivity. Hybridization tests are rapid, but hybridization tests now available commercially lack sensitivity; typically, between 10(exp 6) and 10(exp 7) cells of the target organism are needed to ensure a reliable test. Consequently, the numbers of

  3. Protein methylation reactions in intact pea chloroplasts

    SciTech Connect

    Niemi, K.J. )

    1989-04-01

    Post-translational protein methylation was investigated in Pisum sativum chloroplasts. Intact pea chloroplasts were incubated with ({sup 3}H-methyl)-S-adenosylmethionine under various conditions. The chloroplasts were then separated into stromal and thylakoid fractions and analyzed for radioactivity transferred to protein. Light enhanced the magnitude of labeling in both fractions. One thylakoid polypeptide with an apparent molecular mass of 43 kDa was labeled only in the light. Several other thylakoid and stromal proteins were labeled in both light and dark-labeling conditions. Both base-labile methylation, carboxy-methylesters and base-stable groups, N-methylations were found. Further characterization of the methyl-transfer reactions will be presented.

  4. Drilling to gabbro in intact ocean crust.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Douglas S; Teagle, Damon A H; Alt, Jeffrey C; Banerjee, Neil R; Umino, Susumu; Miyashita, Sumio; Acton, Gary D; Anma, Ryo; Barr, Samantha R; Belghoul, Akram; Carlut, Julie; Christie, David M; Coggon, Rosalind M; Cooper, Kari M; Cordier, Carole; Crispini, Laura; Durand, Sedelia Rodriguez; Einaudi, Florence; Galli, Laura; Gao, Yongjun; Geldmacher, Jörg; Gilbert, Lisa A; Hayman, Nicholas W; Herrero-Bervera, Emilio; Hirano, Nobuo; Holter, Sara; Ingle, Stephanie; Jiang, Shijun; Kalberkamp, Ulrich; Kerneklian, Marcie; Koepke, Jürgen; Laverne, Christine; Vasquez, Haroldo L Lledo; Maclennan, John; Morgan, Sally; Neo, Natsuki; Nichols, Holly J; Park, Sung-Hyun; Reichow, Marc K; Sakuyama, Tetsuya; Sano, Takashi; Sandwell, Rachel; Scheibner, Birgit; Smith-Duque, Chris E; Swift, Stephen A; Tartarotti, Paola; Tikku, Anahita A; Tominaga, Masako; Veloso, Eugenio A; Yamasaki, Toru; Yamazaki, Shusaku; Ziegler, Christa

    2006-05-19

    Sampling an intact sequence of oceanic crust through lavas, dikes, and gabbros is necessary to advance the understanding of the formation and evolution of crust formed at mid-ocean ridges, but it has been an elusive goal of scientific ocean drilling for decades. Recent drilling in the eastern Pacific Ocean in Hole 1256D reached gabbro within seismic layer 2, 1157 meters into crust formed at a superfast spreading rate. The gabbros are the crystallized melt lenses that formed beneath a mid-ocean ridge. The depth at which gabbro was reached confirms predictions extrapolated from seismic experiments at modern mid-ocean ridges: Melt lenses occur at shallower depths at faster spreading rates. The gabbros intrude metamorphosed sheeted dikes and have compositions similar to the overlying lavas, precluding formation of the cumulate lower oceanic crust from melt lenses so far penetrated by Hole 1256D.

  5. Development of a universal RT-PCR for amplifying and sequencing the leader and capsid-coding region of foot-and-mouth disease virus.

    PubMed

    Xu, Lizhe; Hurtle, William; Rowland, Jessica M; Casteran, Karissa A; Bucko, Stacey M; Grau, Fred R; Valdazo-González, Begoña; Knowles, Nick J; King, Donald P; Beckham, Tammy R; McIntosh, Michael T

    2013-04-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is a highly infectious viral disease of cloven-hoofed animals with debilitating and devastating consequences for livestock industries throughout the world. Key antigenic determinants of the causative agent, FMD virus (FMDV), reside within the surface-exposed proteins of the viral capsid. Therefore, characterization of the sequence that encodes the capsid (P1) is important for tracking the emergence or spread of FMD and for selection and development of new vaccines. Reliable methods to generate sequence for this region are challenging due to the high inter-serotypic variability between different strains of FMDV. This study describes the development and optimization of a novel, robust and universal RT-PCR method that may be used to amplify and sequence a 3kilobase (kb) fragment encompassing the leader proteinase (L) and capsid-coding portions (P1) of the FMDV genome. This new RT-PCR method was evaluated in two laboratories using RNA extracted from 134 clinical samples collected from different countries and representing a range of topotypes and lineages within each of the seven FMDV serotypes. Sequence analysis assisted in the reiterative design of primers that are suitable for routine sequencing of these RT-PCR fragments. Using this method, sequence analysis was undertaken for 49 FMD viruses collected from outbreaks in the field. This approach provides a robust tool that can be used for rapid antigenic characterization of FMDV and phylogenetic analyses and has utility for inclusion in laboratory response programs as an aid to vaccine matching or selection in the event of FMD outbreaks.

  6. BK polyomavirus with archetypal and rearranged non-coding control regions is present in cerebrospinal fluids from patients with neurological complications.

    PubMed

    Bárcena-Panero, Ana; Echevarría, Juan E; Van Ghelue, Marijke; Fedele, Giovanni; Royuela, Enrique; Gerits, Nancy; Moens, Ugo

    2012-08-01

    BK polyomavirus (BKPyV) has recently been postulated as an emerging opportunistic pathogen of the human central nervous system (CNS), but it is not known whether specific strains are associated with the neurotropic character of BKPyV. The presence of BKPyV large T-antigen DNA was examined in 2406 cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples from neurological patients with suspected JC polyomavirus infection. Twenty patients had a large T-antigen DNA-positive specimen. The non-coding control region (NCCR) of the BKPyV strains amplified from CSF from these 20 patients, strains circulating in renal and bone marrow transplant recipients and from healthy pregnant women was sequenced. The archetypal conformation was the most prevalent in all groups and 14 of the neurological patients harboured archetypal strains, while the remaining six patients possessed BKPyV with rearranged NCCR similar to previously reported variants from non-neurological patients. Transfection studies in Vero cells revealed that five of six early and four of six late rearranged promoters of these CSF isolates showed significantly higher activity than the corresponding archetypal promoter. From seven of the neurological patients with BKPyV DNA-positive CSF, paired serum samples were available. Five of them were negative for BKPyV DNA, while serum from the remaining two patients harboured BKPyV strains with archetypal NCCR that differed from those present in their CSF. Our results suggest that NCCR rearrangements are not a hallmark for BKPyV neurotropism and the dissemination of a rearranged NCCR from the blood may not be the origin of BKPyV CNS infection.

  7. The 5'-flanking region of the RP58 coding sequence shows prominent promoter activity in multipolar cells in the subventricular zone during corticogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ohtaka-Maruyama, C; Hirai, S; Miwa, A; Takahashi, A; Okado, H

    2012-01-10

    Pyramidal neurons of the neocortex are produced from progenitor cells located in the neocortical ventricular zone (VZ) and subventricular zone (SVZ) during embryogenesis. RP58 is a transcriptional repressor that is strongly expressed in the developing brain and plays an essential role in corticogenesis. The expression of RP58 is strictly regulated in a time-dependent and spatially restricted manner. It is maximally expressed in E15-16 embryonic cerebral cortex, localized specifically to the cortical plate and SVZ of the neocortex, hippocampus, and parts of amygdala during brain development, and found in glutamatergic but not GABAergic neurons. Identification of the promoter activity underlying specific expression patterns provides important clues to their mechanisms of action. Here, we show that the RP58 gene promoter is activated prominently in multipolar migrating cells, the first in vivo analysis of RP58 promoter activity in the brain. The 5.3 kb 5'-flanking genomic DNA of the RP58 coding region demonstrates promoter activity in neurons both in vitro and in vivo. This promoter is highly responsive to the transcription factor neurogenin2 (Ngn2), which is a direct upstream activator of RP58 expression. Using in utero electroporation, we demonstrate that RP58 gene promoter activity is first detected in a subpopulation of pin-like VZ cells, then prominently activated in migrating multipolar cells in the multipolar cell accumulation zone (MAZ) located just above the VZ. In dissociated primary cultured cortical neurons, RP58 promoter activity mimics in vivo expression patterns from a molecular standpoint that RP58 is expressed in a fraction of Sox2-positive progenitor cells, Ngn2-positive neuronal committed cells, and Tuj1-positive young neurons, but not in Dlx2-positive GABAergic neurons. Finally, we show that Cre recombinase expression under the control of the RP58 gene promoter is a feasible tool for conditional gene switching in post-mitotic multipolar migrating

  8. A "White" Anthocyanin-less Pomegranate (Punica granatum L.) Caused by an Insertion in the Coding Region of the Leucoanthocyanidin Dioxygenase (LDOX; ANS) Gene

    PubMed Central

    Ben-Simhon, Zohar; Judeinstein, Sylvie; Trainin, Taly; Harel-Beja, Rotem; Bar-Ya'akov, Irit; Borochov-Neori, Hamutal; Holland, Doron

    2015-01-01

    Color is an important determinant of pomegranate fruit quality and commercial value. To understand the genetic factors controlling color in pomegranate, chemical, molecular and genetic characterization of a "white" pomegranate was performed. This unique accession is lacking the typical pomegranate color rendered by anthocyanins in all tissues of the plant, including flowers, fruit (skin and arils) and leaves. Steady-state gene-expression analysis indicated that none of the analyzed "white" pomegranate tissues are able to synthesize mRNA corresponding to the PgLDOX gene (leucoanthocyanidin dioxygenase, also called ANS, anthocyanidin synthase), which is one of the central structural genes in the anthocyanin-biosynthesis pathway. HPLC analysis revealed that none of the "white" pomegranate tissues accumulate anthocyanins, whereas other flavonoids, corresponding to biochemical reactions upstream of LDOX, were present. Molecular analysis of the "white" pomegranate revealed the presence of an insertion and an SNP within the coding region of PgLDOX. It was found that the SNP does not change amino acid sequence and is not fully linked with the "white" phenotype in all pomegranate accessions from the collection. On the other hand, genotyping of pomegranate accessions from the collection and segregating populations for the "white" phenotype demonstrated its complete linkage with the insertion, inherited as a recessive single-gene trait. Taken together, the results indicate that the insertion in PgLDOX is responsible for the "white" anthocyanin-less phenotype. These data provide the first direct molecular, genetic and chemical evidence for the effect of a natural modification in the LDOX gene on color accumulation in a fruit-bearing woody perennial deciduous tree. This modification can be further utilized to elucidate the physiological role of anthocyanins in protecting the tree organs from harmful environmental conditions, such as temperature and UV radiation. PMID:26581077

  9. ENU-induced missense mutation in the C-propeptide coding region of Col2a1 creates a mouse model of platyspondylic lethal skeletal dysplasia, Torrance type.

    PubMed

    Furuichi, Tatsuya; Masuya, Hiroshi; Murakami, Tomohiko; Nishida, Keiichiro; Nishimura, Gen; Suzuki, Tomohiro; Imaizumi, Kazunori; Kudo, Takashi; Ohkawa, Kiyoshi; Wakana, Shigeharu; Ikegawa, Shiro

    2011-06-01

    The COL2A1 gene encodes the α1(II) chain of the homotrimeric type II collagen, the most abundant protein in cartilage. In humans, COL2A1 mutations create many clinical phenotypes collectively termed type II collagenopathies; however, the genetic basis of the phenotypic diversity is not well elucidated. Therefore, animal models corresponding to multiple type II collagenopathies are required. In this study we identified a novel Col2a1 missense mutation--c.44406A>C (p.D1469A)--produced by large-scale N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU) mutagenesis in a mouse line. This mutation was located in the C-propeptide coding region of Col2a1 and in the positions corresponding to a human COL2A1 mutation responsible for platyspondylic lethal skeletal dysplasia, Torrance type (PLSD-T). The phenotype was inherited as a semidominant trait. The heterozygotes were mildly but significantly smaller than wild-type mice. The homozygotes exhibited lethal skeletal dysplasias, including extremely short limbs, severe spondylar dysplasia, severe pelvic hypoplasia, and brachydactyly. As expected, these skeletal defects in the homozygotes were similar to those in PLSD-T patients. The secretion of the mutant proteins into the extracellular space was disrupted, accompanied by abnormally expanded rough endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and upregulation of ER stress-related genes, such as Grp94 and Chop, in chondrocytes. These findings suggested that the accumulation of mutant type II collagen in the ER and subsequent induction of ER stress are involved, at least in part in the PLSD-T-like phenotypes of the mutants. This mutant should serve as a good model for studying PLSD-T pathogenesis and the mechanisms that create the great diversity of type II collagenopathies.

  10. Paraoxonase activity against nerve gases measured by capillary electrophoresis and characterization of human serum paraoxonase (PON1) polymorphism in the coding region (Q192R).

    PubMed

    Kanamori-Kataoka, Mieko; Seto, Yasuo

    2009-02-01

    An analytical method for determining paraoxonase activity against sarin, soman and VX was established. We used capillary electrophoresis to measure directly the hydrolysis products: alkyl methylphosphonates. After enzymatic reaction of human serum paraoxonase (PON1) with nerve gas, substrate was removed with dichloromethane, and alkyl methylphoshphonates were quantified by capillary electrophoresis of reversed osmotic flow using cationic detergent and sorbic acid. This method was applied to the characterization of human serum PON1 polymorphism for nerve gas hydrolytic activity in the coding region (Q192R). PON1-192 and PON1-55 genotypes were determined by their gel electrophoretic fragmentation pattern with restriction enzymes after polymerase chain reaction (PCR) of blood leukocyte genomic DNA. Frequencies of genotypes among 63 members of our institutes with PON1-192 and PON1-55 were 9.5% ((192)QQ), 30.1% ((192)QR) and 44.4% ((192)RR), and 82.5% ((55)LL), 17.5% ((55)LM) and 0% ((55)MM), respectively. (192)Q and (192)R enzymes were purified from the respective genotype human plasma, using blue agarose affinity chromatography and diethyl amino ethane (DEAE) anion exchange chromatography. V(max) and K(m) were measured using Lineweaver-Burk plots for hydrolytic activities against sarin, soman and VX at pH 7.4 and 25 degrees C. For sarin and soman, the V(max) for (192)Q PON1 were 3.5- and 1.5-fold higher than those for (192)R PON1; and k(cat)/K(m) for (192)Q PON1 were 1.3- and 2.8-fold higher than those for (192)R PON1. For VX, there was little difference in V(max) and k(cat)/K(m) between (192)Q and (192)R PON1, and VX hydrolyzing activity was significantly lower than those for sarin and soman. PON1 hydrolyzed sarin and soman more effectively than paraoxon.

  11. Assessment of contractility in intact ventricular cardiomyocytes using the dimensionless 'Frank-Starling Gain' index.

    PubMed

    Bollensdorff, Christian; Lookin, Oleg; Kohl, Peter

    2011-07-01

    This paper briefly recapitulates the Frank-Starling law of the heart, reviews approaches to establishing diastolic and systolic force-length behaviour in intact isolated cardiomyocytes, and introduces a dimensionless index called 'Frank-Starling Gain', calculated as the ratio of slopes of end-systolic and end-diastolic force-length relations. The benefits and limitations of this index are illustrated on the example of regional differences in Guinea pig intact ventricular cardiomyocyte mechanics. Potential applicability of the Frank-Starling Gain for the comparison of cell contractility changes upon stretch will be discussed in the context of intra- and inter-individual variability of cardiomyocyte properties.

  12. Sharing code

    PubMed Central

    Kubilius, Jonas

    2014-01-01

    Sharing code is becoming increasingly important in the wake of Open Science. In this review I describe and compare two popular code-sharing utilities, GitHub and Open Science Framework (OSF). GitHub is a mature, industry-standard tool but lacks focus towards researchers. In comparison, OSF offers a one-stop solution for researchers but a lot of functionality is still under development. I conclude by listing alternative lesser-known tools for code and materials sharing. PMID:25165519

  13. Embedded foveation image coding.

    PubMed

    Wang, Z; Bovik, A C

    2001-01-01

    The human visual system (HVS) is highly space-variant in sampling, coding, processing, and understanding. The spatial resolution of the HVS is highest around the point of fixation (foveation point) and decreases rapidly with increasing eccentricity. By taking advantage of this fact, it is possible to remove considerable high-frequency information redundancy from the peripheral regions and still reconstruct a perceptually good quality image. Great success has been obtained previously by a class of embedded wavelet image coding algorithms, such as the embedded zerotree wavelet (EZW) and the set partitioning in hierarchical trees (SPIHT) algorithms. Embedded wavelet coding not only provides very good compression performance, but also has the property that the bitstream can be truncated at any point and still be decoded to recreate a reasonably good quality image. In this paper, we propose an embedded foveation image coding (EFIC) algorithm, which orders the encoded bitstream to optimize foveated visual quality at arbitrary bit-rates. A foveation-based image quality metric, namely, foveated wavelet image quality index (FWQI), plays an important role in the EFIC system. We also developed a modified SPIHT algorithm to improve the coding efficiency. Experiments show that EFIC integrates foveation filtering with foveated image coding and demonstrates very good coding performance and scalability in terms of foveated image quality measurement.

  14. Experimental serpentinization of intact dunite cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luhmann, A. J.; Tutolo, B. M.; Kong, X. Z.; Bagley, B. C.; Schaen, A. T.; Saar, M. O.; Seyfried, W. E., Jr.

    2014-12-01

    Serpentinization in ultramafic-hosted hydrothermal systems, such as Lost City, produces relatively cool and alkaline fluids that support diverse ecosystems. To simulate serpentinization in such systems, we conducted single-pass, flow-through experiments on dunite cores cut out of a sample from Jackson County, North Carolina. Experimental seawater prepared using laboratory-grade reagents and standards was pumped through a core at 150ºC and 150 bar pore-fluid outlet pressure at a flow rate of 0.01 ml/min. An additional experiment will be conducted at 200ºC. At 150ºC, permeability decreased by 2.3 times with reaction progress over the course of the 36 day experiment. Fluid-rock reaction generally produced CO2, H2, CH4, and CO concentrations of 100 μmol/kg, up to 40 μmol/kg, 2 μmol/kg, and less than 1 μmol/kg, respectively. Outlet fluid chemistry was relatively stable, except for initial peaks in Al, Ba, Fe, Mn, and Si. pH of outlet fluids increased with reaction progress, but it was always lower (6.9-7.4) than the initial seawater (7.8). X-ray computed tomography scans were/will be collected for both pre- and post-experimental cores. The combination of flow-through experiments on solid, intact rock cores cut out of natural samples and X-ray tomography permits visualization and quantification of mineralogical changes and flow path evolution during serpentinization. This approach further permits physical and chemical processes to be documented on a fine scale to better understand feedbacks between chemical reactions and flow fields, with implications for ultramafic-hosted hydrothermal systems.

  15. Aboveground biomass variability across intact and degraded forests in the Brazilian Amazon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longo, Marcos; Keller, Michael; dos-Santos, Maiza N.; Leitold, Veronika; Pinagé, Ekena R.; Baccini, Alessandro; Saatchi, Sassan; Nogueira, Euler M.; Batistella, Mateus; Morton, Douglas C.

    2016-11-01

    Deforestation rates have declined in the Brazilian Amazon since 2005, yet degradation from logging, fire, and fragmentation has continued in frontier forests. In this study we quantified the aboveground carbon density (ACD) in intact and degraded forests using the largest data set of integrated forest inventory plots (n = 359) and airborne lidar data (18,000 ha) assembled to date for the Brazilian Amazon. We developed statistical models relating inventory ACD estimates to lidar metrics that explained 70% of the variance across forest types. Airborne lidar-ACD estimates for intact forests ranged between 5.0 ± 2.5 and 31.9 ± 10.8 kg C m-2. Degradation carbon losses were large and persistent. Sites that burned multiple times within a decade lost up to 15.0 ± 0.7 kg C m-2 (94%) of ACD. Forests that burned nearly 15 years ago had between 4.1 ± 0.5 and 6.8 ± 0.3 kg C m-2 (22-40%) less ACD than intact forests. Even for low-impact logging disturbances, ACD was between 0.7 ± 0.3 and 4.4 ± 0.4 kg C m-2 (4-21%) lower than unlogged forests. Comparing biomass estimates from airborne lidar to existing biomass maps, we found that regional and pantropical products consistently overestimated ACD in degraded forests, underestimated ACD in intact forests, and showed little sensitivity to fires and logging. Fine-scale heterogeneity in ACD across intact and degraded forests highlights the benefits of airborne lidar for carbon mapping. Differences between airborne lidar and regional biomass maps underscore the need to improve and update biomass estimates for dynamic land use frontiers, to better characterize deforestation and degradation carbon emissions for regional carbon budgets and Reduce Emissions from Deforestation and forest Degradation (REDD+).

  16. Speech coding

    SciTech Connect

    Ravishankar, C., Hughes Network Systems, Germantown, MD

    1998-05-08

    Speech is the predominant means of communication between human beings and since the invention of the telephone by Alexander Graham Bell in 1876, speech services have remained to be the core service in almost all telecommunication systems. Original analog methods of telephony had the disadvantage of speech signal getting corrupted by noise, cross-talk and distortion Long haul transmissions which use repeaters to compensate for the loss in signal strength on transmission links also increase the associated noise and distortion. On the other hand digital transmission is relatively immune to noise, cross-talk and distortion primarily because of the capability to faithfully regenerate digital signal at each repeater purely based on a binary decision. Hence end-to-end performance of the digital link essentially becomes independent of the length and operating frequency bands of the link Hence from a transmission point of view digital transmission has been the preferred approach due to its higher immunity to noise. The need to carry digital speech became extremely important from a service provision point of view as well. Modem requirements have introduced the need for robust, flexible and secure services that can carry a multitude of signal types (such as voice, data and video) without a fundamental change in infrastructure. Such a requirement could not have been easily met without the advent of digital transmission systems, thereby requiring speech to be coded digitally. The term Speech Coding is often referred to techniques that represent or code speech signals either directly as a waveform or as a set of parameters by analyzing the speech signal. In either case, the codes are transmitted to the distant end where speech is reconstructed or synthesized using the received set of codes. A more generic term that is applicable to these techniques that is often interchangeably used with speech coding is the term voice coding. This term is more generic in the sense that the

  17. 46 CFR 28.570 - Intact righting energy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Intact righting energy. 28.570 Section 28.570 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY UNINSPECTED VESSELS REQUIREMENTS FOR COMMERCIAL FISHING INDUSTRY VESSELS Stability § 28.570 Intact righting energy. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (c) of...

  18. 46 CFR 28.570 - Intact righting energy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Intact righting energy. 28.570 Section 28.570 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY UNINSPECTED VESSELS REQUIREMENTS FOR COMMERCIAL FISHING INDUSTRY VESSELS Stability § 28.570 Intact righting energy. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (c) of...

  19. 50 CFR 622.455 - Landing spiny lobster intact.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Landing spiny lobster intact. 622.455... ATLANTIC Spiny Lobster Fishery of Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands § 622.455 Landing spiny lobster intact. (a) A Caribbean spiny lobster in or from the Caribbean EEZ must be maintained with head...

  20. 50 CFR 622.455 - Landing spiny lobster intact.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Landing spiny lobster intact. 622.455... ATLANTIC Spiny Lobster Fishery of Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands § 622.455 Landing spiny lobster intact. (a) A Caribbean spiny lobster in or from the Caribbean EEZ must be maintained with head...

  1. 46 CFR 28.570 - Intact righting energy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Intact righting energy. 28.570 Section 28.570 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY UNINSPECTED VESSELS REQUIREMENTS FOR COMMERCIAL FISHING INDUSTRY VESSELS Stability § 28.570 Intact righting energy. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (c) of...

  2. 46 CFR 28.570 - Intact righting energy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Intact righting energy. 28.570 Section 28.570 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY UNINSPECTED VESSELS REQUIREMENTS FOR COMMERCIAL FISHING INDUSTRY VESSELS Stability § 28.570 Intact righting energy. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (c) of...

  3. 46 CFR 28.570 - Intact righting energy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Intact righting energy. 28.570 Section 28.570 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY UNINSPECTED VESSELS REQUIREMENTS FOR COMMERCIAL FISHING INDUSTRY VESSELS Stability § 28.570 Intact righting energy. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (c) of...

  4. 50 CFR 622.10 - Landing fish intact--general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE FISHERIES OF THE CARIBBEAN, GULF OF MEXICO, AND SOUTH... landing fish intact that are broadly applicable to finfish in the Gulf EEZ and Caribbean EEZ, as specified... intact. (a) Finfish in or from the Gulf EEZ or Caribbean EEZ, except as specified in paragraphs (b)...

  5. 50 CFR 622.10 - Landing fish intact--general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE FISHERIES OF THE CARIBBEAN, GULF OF MEXICO, AND SOUTH... landing fish intact that are broadly applicable to finfish in the Gulf EEZ and Caribbean EEZ, as specified... intact. (a) Finfish in or from the Gulf EEZ or Caribbean EEZ, except as specified in paragraphs (b)...

  6. Molecular evolution of VP3, VP1, 3C(pro) and 3D(pol) coding regions in coxsackievirus group A type 24 variant isolates from acute hemorrhagic conjunctivitis in 2011 in Okinawa, Japan.

    PubMed

    Nidaira, Minoru; Kuba, Yumani; Saitoh, Mika; Taira, Katsuya; Maeshiro, Noriyuki; Mahoe, Yoko; Kyan, Hisako; Takara, Taketoshi; Okano, Sho; Kudaka, Jun; Yoshida, Hiromu; Oishi, Kazunori; Kimura, Hirokazu

    2014-04-01

    A large acute hemorrhagic conjunctivitis (AHC) outbreak occurred in 2011 in Okinawa Prefecture in Japan. Ten strains of coxsackievirus group A type 24 variant (CA24v) were isolated from patients with AHC and full sequence analysis of the VP3, VP1, 3C(pro) and 3D(pol) coding regions performed. To assess time-scale evolution, phylogenetic analysis was performed using the Bayesian Markov chain Monte Carlo method. In addition, similarity plots were constructed and pairwise distance (p-distance) and positive pressure analyses performed. A phylogenetic tree based on the VP1 coding region showed that the present strains belong to genotype 4 (G4). In addition, the present strains could have divided in about 2010 from the same lineages detected in other countries such as China, India and Australia. The mean rates of molecular evolution of four coding regions were estimated at about 6.15 to 7.86 × 10(-3) substitutions/site/year. Similarity plot analyses suggested that nucleotide similarities between the present strains and a prototype strain (EH24/70 strain) were 0.77-0.94. The p-distance of the present strains was relatively short (<0.01). Only one positive selected site (L25H) was identified in the VP1 protein. These findings suggest that the present CA24v strains causing AHC are genetically related to other AHC strains with rapid evolution and emerged in around 2010.

  7. Development of spatial database on intact forest landscapes of India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudhakar Reddy, C.; Singh, Jyoti; Jha, C. S.; Diwakar, P. G.; Dadhwal, V. K.

    2017-01-01

    There is an increased interest in identifying the status of biodiversity in different spatial and temporal scales. The objective of the current research is to prepare a consistent spatial database of intact forest landscapes of India. The intact forest landscapes are located in the Himalayas, Andaman & Nicobar Islands, Western Ghats and Sunderbans. At national level 237 forest landscapes and 5.4% of the total natural forest remained as intact in India. Current intact forest landscapes of India consists of blocks larger than 10 km2 covering an area of 34,061 km2. Of the total area under intact forest landscapes, Eastern Himalayas represent 76.7% of the area, followed by Western Himalayas (8.8%), Andaman & Nicobar Islands (6.2%) and Western Ghats (5.7%). The largest intact forest landscape block occupies an area of 3342.9 km2 (9.8%) is found in western Arunachal Pradesh. Temperate forest zone represents the highest intactness (56.6%), followed by subtropical zone (19.2%), tropical zone (18.6%) and alpine zone (5.6%). Himalayan moist temperate forests represent the highest area (39.1%) of intact forest landscapes followed by subtropical broad-leaved hill forests, wet evergreen forests, and montane wet temperate forests. It is estimated that 4.4% of the area of intact forest landscapes fall inside the existing 47 protected areas. The results of the analysis best suited as input for the process of identification of new protected areas. The study recommends fine-scale mapping of biodiversity within the intact forest landscapes and to prepare efficient conservation plans.

  8. Vesta Is Not an Intact Protoplanet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Consolmagno, Guy; Turrini, Diego; Golabeck, Gregor; Jutzi, Martin; Sirono, Sin-iti; Svetsov, Vladimir; Tsiganis, Kleomenis

    2014-11-01

    Asteroid 4 Vesta has been identified as the likely source of howardite, eucrite, and diogenite (HED) basaltic achondrite meteorites, whose parent body differentiated and started solidifying within 3 Ma after the condensation of the Ca-Al-rich inclusions (CAIs). The formation of Jupiter and the disk-driven migration of the giant planets also occurred during this period; thus it was expected that Vesta could provide an intact record of large-scale early episodes of planetary migration and bombardment as in the proposed Jovian Early Bombardment and the “Grand Tack” scenarios. However, the results of the Dawn mission detailing Vesta’s mass, volume, density, and surface characteristics provide challenges for modeling the structure and evolution of this asteroid. All proposed models for the generation of the HEDs require the presence of a substantial olivine-rich mantle. But recent work on the depth of excavation of the large basins at the south pole of Vesta suggests that because there is not abundant mantle olivine visible on Vesta or in the Vestoid family asteroids, the crust of Vesta must be at least 80 km thick. Such a thick crust is radically at odds with previous models; should it exist, it ought to manifest itself in other ways such as Vesta’s density structure and bulk chemical composition. However, we find that no Vesta model of iron core, olivine-rich mantle, and HED crust can match the joint constraints of (a) Vesta’s density as derived from the gravity field observed by Dawn; (b) the observed depletion of sodium and potassium and trace element enrichments of the HED meteorites; and (c) the absence of exposed olivine on Vesta’s surface, among Vestoid asteroids, or in our collection of basaltic meteorites. Either Vesta was subjected to a radical change in composition, presumably due to the intense collisional environment where and when it formed, or the asteroid we see today is in fact a reaccretion of material formed elsewhere from now

  9. Accelerate Implementation of the WHO Global Code of Practice on International Recruitment of Health Personnel: Experiences From the South East Asia Region: Comment on "Relevance and Effectiveness of the WHO Global Code Practice on the International Recruitment of Health Personnel - Ethical and Systems Perspectives".

    PubMed

    Tangcharoensathien, Viroj; Travis, Phyllida

    2015-08-30

    Strengthening the health workforce and universal health coverage (UHC) are among key targets in the heath-related Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) to be committed by the United Nations (UN) Member States in September 2015. The health workforce, the backbone of health systems, contributes to functioning delivery systems. Equitable distribution of functioning services is indispensable to achieve one of the UHC goals of equitable access. This commentary argues the World Health Organization (WHO) Global Code of Practice on International Recruitment of Health Personnel is relevant to the countries in the South East Asia Region (SEAR) as there is a significant outflow of health workers from several countries and a significant inflow in a few, increased demand for health workforce in high- and middle-income countries, and slow progress in addressing the "push factors." Awareness and implementation of the Code in the first report in 2012 was low but significantly improved in the second report in 2015. An inter-country workshop in 2015 convened by WHO SEAR to review progress in implementation of the Code was an opportunity for countries to share lessons on policy implementation, on retention of health workers, scaling up health professional education and managing in and out migration. The meeting noted that capturing outmigration of health personnel, which is notoriously difficult for source countries, is possible where there is an active recruitment management through government to government (G to G) contracts or licensing the recruiters and mandatory reporting requirement by them. According to the 2015 second report on the Code, the size and profile of outflow health workers from SEAR source countries is being captured and now also increasingly being shared by destination country professional councils. This is critical information to foster policy action and implementation of the Code in the Region.

  10. QR Codes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lai, Hsin-Chih; Chang, Chun-Yen; Li, Wen-Shiane; Fan, Yu-Lin; Wu, Ying-Tien

    2013-01-01

    This study presents an m-learning method that incorporates Integrated Quick Response (QR) codes. This learning method not only achieves the objectives of outdoor education, but it also increases applications of Cognitive Theory of Multimedia Learning (CTML) (Mayer, 2001) in m-learning for practical use in a diverse range of outdoor locations. When…

  11. Body condition and habitat use by Hermann's tortoises in burnt and intact habitats

    PubMed Central

    Lecq, S.; Ballouard, J.-M.; Caron, S.; Livoreil, B.; Seynaeve, V.; Matthieu, L.-A.; Bonnet, X.

    2014-01-01

    In Mediterranean regions, fires threaten terrestrial tortoises. Nevertheless, varying proportions of adults survive fire; these surviving individuals can play a central role for population recovery. The regions devastated by fire often include important habitat of Hermann's tortoises (Testudo hermanni hermanni), so assessing the ability of survivors to persist is essential for conserving the species. Body-condition indices provide an integrative estimate of how well individuals cope with environmental variations and impacts, including fires. Between 2002 and 2009, we monitored Hermann's tortoises in intact and burnt habitats in southeastern France. In summer 2003, a strong fire ravaged half of the surveyed zone, providing an opportunity to compare body condition of tortoises between intact and burnt areas over time. Six years later, the impact of fire on vegetation was still marked; large trees were abundant in the intact area, whereas open shrub vegetation prevailed in the burnt area. In both areas, the mean body condition of tortoises fluctuated over time; however, there were no differences between the two areas. A radio-tracking experiment demonstrated that individuals from each area were residents, and not vagrants commuting between areas. We also assessed changes in body condition and microhabitat use in radio-tracked individuals. We found no significant differences between the tortoises living in the burnt and intact areas, despite subtle differences in habitat use. In conclusion: (i) surviving tortoises in an area ravaged by fire can maintain their body condition like individuals living in an intact area, and thus, individuals from burnt areas should not be translocated to supposedly better areas; and (ii) depopulated burnt areas are likely to be appropriate for population-augmentation programmes. PMID:27293640

  12. Compensatory mechanisms underlie intact task-switching performance in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Jamadar, S; Michie, P; Karayanidis, F

    2010-04-01

    Individuals with schizophrenia tend to perform poorly on many measures of cognitive control. However, recent task-switching studies suggest that they show intact task-switching performance, despite the fact that the regions involved in task-switching are known to be structurally and functionally impaired in the disorder. Behavioral, event-related potential (ERP) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) measures were used to compare the temporal and spatial dynamics of task-switching performance in individuals with schizophrenia and controls. Consistent with previous studies, reaction time (RT) switch cost and its reduction with anticipatory preparation did not differ between groups. There were also no group differences on cue-locked ERP components associated with anticipatory preparation processes. However, both stimulus- and response-locked ERPs were significantly disrupted in schizophrenia, suggesting difficulty with task-set implementation. fMRI analyses indicated that individuals with schizophrenia showed hyperactivity in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and posterior parietal cortex. RT-fMRI and ERP-fMRI associations suggested that individuals with schizophrenia employ compensatory mechanisms to overcome difficulties in task-set implementation and thereby achieve the same behavioral outcomes as controls.

  13. Reflectance Spectra Comparison of Orbital Debris, Intact Spacecraft, and Intact Rocket Bodies in the GEO Regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albercromby, Kira J.; Abell, Paul; Barker, Ed

    2009-03-01

    A key objective of NASA's Orbital Debris program office at Johnson Space Center (JSC) is to characterize the debris environment by way of assessing the physical properties (type, mass, density, and size) of objects in orbit. Knowledge of the geosynchronous orbit (GEO) debris environment in particular can be used to determine the hazard probability at specific GEO altitudes and aid predictions of the future environment. To calculate an optical size from an intensity measurement of an object in the GEO regime, a 0.175 albedo is assumed currently. However, identification of specific material type or types could improve albedo accuracy and yield a more accurate size estimate for the debris piece. Using spectroscopy, it is possible to determine the surface materials of space objects. The study described herein used the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF) to record spectral data in the ~ 0.65 to 2.5 micron regime on eight catalogued space objects. For comparison, all of the objects observed were in GEO or near-GEO. The eight objects consisted of two intact spacecraft, three rocket bodies, and three catalogued debris pieces. Two of the debris pieces stemmed from Titan 3C transtage breakup and the third is from COSMOS 2054. The reflectance spectra of the Titan 3C pieces share similar slopes (increasing with wavelength) and lack any strong absorption features. The COSMOS debris spectrum has a slight slope and has no absorption features. In contrast, the intact spacecraft show classic absorption features due to solar cells with a strong band gap feature near 1 micron. The two spacecraft were spin-stabilized objects and therefore have solar panels surrounding the outer surface. Two of the three rocket bodies are inertial upper stage (IUS) rocket bodies and have similar looking spectra. The slopes flatten out near 1.5 microns with absorption features in the near-infrared that are similar to that of white paint. The third rocket body has a similar flattening of slope but

  14. Reflectance Spectra Comparison of Orbital Debris, Intact Spacecraft, and Intact Rocket Bodies in the GEO Regime

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barker, Ed; Abercromby, Kira J.; Abell, Paul

    2009-01-01

    A key objective of NASA s Orbital Debris program office at Johnson Space Center (JSC) is to characterize the debris environment by way of assessing the physical properties (type, mass, density, and size) of objects in orbit. Knowledge of the geosynchronous orbit (GEO) debris environment in particular can be used to determine the hazard probability at specific GEO altitudes and aid predictions of the future environment. To calculate an optical size from an intensity measurement of an object in the GEO regime, a 0.175 albedo is assumed currently. However, identification of specific material type or types could improve albedo accuracy and yield a more accurate size estimate for the debris piece. Using spectroscopy, it is possible to determine the surface materials of space objects. The study described herein used the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF) to record spectral data in the 0.6 to 2.5 micron regime on eight catalogued space objects. For comparison, all of the objects observed were in GEO or near-GEO. The eight objects consisted of two intact spacecraft, three rocket bodies, and three catalogued debris pieces. Two of the debris pieces stemmed from Titan 3C transtage breakup and the third is from COSMOS 2054. The reflectance spectra of the Titan 3C pieces share similar slopes (increasing with wavelength) and lack any strong absorption features. The COSMOS debris spectra is flat and has no absorption features. In contrast, the intact spacecraft show classic absorption features due to solar panels with a strong band gap feature near 1 micron. The two spacecraft are spin-stabilized objects and therefore have solar panels surrounding the outer surface. Two of the three rocket bodies are inertial upper stage (IUS) rocket bodies and have similar looking spectra. The slopes flatten out near 1.5 microns with absorption features in the near-infrared that are similar to that of white paint. The third rocket body has a similar flattening of slope but with fewer

  15. Treatment for burn blisters: debride or leave intact?

    PubMed

    Murphy, Faye; Amblum, Jeshi

    2014-05-01

    This article presents findings from a systematic literature review of whether blisters arising from minor burns should be de-roofed or left intact. It discusses the risks of infection, healing outcomes, discomfort, choice of dressings and costs associated with each method, and reveals that debriding blisters larger than the patient's little fingernail while leaving smaller ones intact is generally agreed to be the best option. The article also explains external factors that influence the choice of whether to debride or leave blisters intact, reviews policy at the trust where one of the authors works in the context of the research and makes recommendations for practice.

  16. Optimized Planning Target Volume for Intact Cervical Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, Alvin; Jensen, Lindsay G.; Sun Shuai; Song, William Y.; Yashar, Catheryn M.; Mundt, Arno J.; Zhang Fuquan; Jiang, Steve B.; Mell, Loren K.

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: To model interfraction clinical target volume (CTV) variation in patients with intact cervical cancer and design a planning target volume (PTV) that minimizes normal tissue dose while maximizing CTV coverage. Methods and Materials: We analyzed 50 patients undergoing external-beam radiotherapy for intact cervical cancer using daily online cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). The CBCTs (n = 972) for each patient were rigidly registered to the planning CT. The CTV was delineated on the planning CT (CTV{sub 0}) and the set of CBCTs ({l_brace}CTV{sub 1}-CTV{sub 25}{r_brace}). Manual (n = 98) and automated (n = 668) landmarks were placed over the surface of CTV{sub 0} with reference to defined anatomic structures. Normal vectors were extended from each landmark, and the minimum length required for a given probability of encompassing CTV{sub 1}-CTV{sub 25} was computed. The resulting expansions were used to generate an optimized PTV. Results: The mean (SD; range) normal vector length to ensure 95% coverage was 4.3 mm (2.7 mm; 1-16 mm). The uniform expansion required to ensure 95% probability of CTV coverage was 13 mm. An anisotropic margin of 20 mm anteriorly and posteriorly and 10 mm superiorly, inferiorly, and laterally also would have ensured a 95% probability of CTV coverage. The volume of the 95% optimized PTV (1470 cm{sup 3}) was significantly lower than both the anisotropic PTV (2220 cm{sup 3}) and the uniformly expanded PTV (2110 cm{sup 3}) (p < 0.001). For a 95% probability of CTV coverage, normal lengths of 1-3 mm were found along the superior and lateral regions of CTV{sub 0}, 5-10 mm along the interfaces of CTV{sub 0} with the bladder and rectum, and 10-14 mm along the anterior surface of CTV{sub 0} at the level of the uterus. Conclusion: Optimizing PTV definition according to surface landmarking resulted in a high probability of CTV coverage with reduced PTV volumes. Our results provide data justifying planning margins to use in practice and

  17. 50 CFR 622.276 - Landing fish intact.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE FISHERIES OF THE CARIBBEAN, GULF OF MEXICO, AND SOUTH ATLANTIC Dolphin and Wahoo Fishery Off the Atlantic States § 622.276 Landing fish intact. (a) Dolphin and wahoo in or...

  18. 50 CFR 622.276 - Landing fish intact.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE FISHERIES OF THE CARIBBEAN, GULF OF MEXICO, AND SOUTH ATLANTIC Dolphin and Wahoo Fishery Off the Atlantic States § 622.276 Landing fish intact. (a) Dolphin and wahoo in or...

  19. 56. POWDER MAGAZINE, VIEW OF INTACT WOOD SHEATHING ON THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    56. POWDER MAGAZINE, VIEW OF INTACT WOOD SHEATHING ON THE SOUTHWEST REAR VENTILATION PASSAGE. (SHEATHING HELP CONTROL HUMIDITY AND DECREASE DANGER OF MAETAL STRIKING STONE AND SPARKING.) - Fort Monroe, Fortress, Hampton, Hampton, VA

  20. Acoustic emissions during deformation of intact and jointed welded tuff

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holcomb, D. J.; Teufel, L. W.

    1982-07-01

    Monitoring of acoustic emissions (AE) has been widely used as a means of detecting failure in intact rock. For intact rock the technique is simple, because an increasing rate of AE is usually a sign of impending failure. However, most large rock masses contain numerous joints and the behavior of the joints controls the properties of the rock mass In particular, the failure mode often becomes stable or unstable slip (stick-slip) on a joint at stresses well below those required for failure of the intact rock. As an aid to understanding and monitoring the behavior of jointed rock masses, we have done a series of experiments on intact and artificially jointed samples of Grouse Canyon tuff. The tuff was selected because it is under consideration as a disposal medium for nuclear wastes. The samples were instrumented to measure axial and transverse displacements and AE rates.

  1. Preparation of Cardiac Extracellular Matrix from an Intact Porcine Heart

    PubMed Central

    Wainwright, John M.; Czajka, Caitlin A.; Patel, Urvi B.; Freytes, Donald O.; Tobita, Kimimasa; Gilbert, Thomas W.

    2010-01-01

    Whole organ engineering would benefit from a three-dimensional scaffold produced from intact organ-specific extracellular matrix (ECM). The microenvironment and architecture provided by such a scaffold would likely support site-appropriate cell differentiation and spatial organization. The methods to produce such scaffolds from intact organs require customized decellularization protocols. In the present study, intact adult porcine hearts were successfully decellularized in less than 10 h using pulsatile retrograde aortic perfusion. Serial perfusion of an enzymatic, nonionic detergent, ionic detergent, and acid solution with hypotonic and hypertonic rinses was used to systematically remove cellular content. The resultant cardiac ECM retained collagen, elastin, and glycosaminoglycans, and mechanical integrity. Cardiac ECM supported the formation of organized chicken cardiomyocyte sarcomere structure in vitro. The intact decellularized porcine heart provides a tissue engineering template that may be beneficial for future preclinical studies and eventual clinical applications. PMID:19702513

  2. Preparation of cardiac extracellular matrix from an intact porcine heart.

    PubMed

    Wainwright, John M; Czajka, Caitlin A; Patel, Urvi B; Freytes, Donald O; Tobita, Kimimasa; Gilbert, Thomas W; Badylak, Stephen F

    2010-06-01

    Whole organ engineering would benefit from a three-dimensional scaffold produced from intact organ-specific extracellular matrix (ECM). The microenvironment and architecture provided by such a scaffold would likely support site-appropriate cell differentiation and spatial organization. The methods to produce such scaffolds from intact organs require customized decellularization protocols. In the present study, intact adult porcine hearts were successfully decellularized in less than 10 h using pulsatile retrograde aortic perfusion. Serial perfusion of an enzymatic, nonionic detergent, ionic detergent, and acid solution with hypotonic and hypertonic rinses was used to systematically remove cellular content. The resultant cardiac ECM retained collagen, elastin, and glycosaminoglycans, and mechanical integrity. Cardiac ECM supported the formation of organized chicken cardiomyocyte sarcomere structure in vitro. The intact decellularized porcine heart provides a tissue engineering template that may be beneficial for future preclinical studies and eventual clinical applications.

  3. Mapping of the serotonin 5-HT{sub 1D{alpha}} autoreceptor gene (HTR1D) on chromosome 1 using a silent polymorphism in the coding region

    SciTech Connect

    Ozaki, N.; Lappalainen, J.; Linnoila, M.

    1995-04-24

    Serotonin (5-HT){sub ID} receptors are 5-HT release-regulating autoreceptors in the human brain. Abnormalities in brain 5-HT function have been hypothesized in the pathophysiology of various psychiatric disorders, including obsessive-compulsive disorder, autism, mood disorders, eating disorders, impulsive violent behavior, and alcoholism. Thus, mutations occurring in 5-HT autoreceptors may cause or increase the vulnerability to any of these conditions. 5-HT{sub 1D{alpha}} and 5-HT{sub 1D{Beta}} subtypes have been previously localized to chromosomes 1p36.3-p34.3 and 6q13, respectively, using rodent-human hybrids and in situ localization. In this communication, we report the detection of a 5-HT{sub 1D{alpha}} receptor gene polymorphism by single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis of the coding sequence. The polymorphism was used for fine scale linkage mapping of 5-HT{sub 1D{alpha}} on chromosome 1. This polymorphism should also be useful for linkage studies in populations and in families. Our analysis also demonstrates that functionally significant coding sequence variants of the 5-HT{sub 1D{alpha}} are probably not abundant either among alcoholics or in the general population. 14 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  4. Comparative genomics approach to detecting split-coding regions in a low-coverage genome: lessons from the chimaera Callorhinchus milii (Holocephali, Chondrichthyes).

    PubMed

    Dessimoz, Christophe; Zoller, Stefan; Manousaki, Tereza; Qiu, Huan; Meyer, Axel; Kuraku, Shigehiro

    2011-09-01

    Recent development of deep sequencing technologies has facilitated de novo genome sequencing projects, now conducted even by individual laboratories. However, this will yield more and more genome sequences that are not well assembled, and will hinder thorough annotation when no closely related reference genome is available. One of the challenging issues is the identification of protein-coding sequences split into multiple unassembled genomic segments, which can confound orthology assignment and various laboratory experiments requiring the identification of individual genes. In this study, using the genome of a cartilaginous fish, Callorhinchus milii, as test case, we performed gene prediction using a model specifically trained for this genome. We implemented an algorithm, designated ESPRIT, to identify possible linkages between multiple protein-coding portions derived from a single genomic locus split into multiple unassembled genomic segments. We developed a validation framework based on an artificially fragmented human genome, improvements between early and recent mouse genome assemblies, comparison with experimentally validated sequences from GenBank, and phylogenetic analyses. Our strategy provided insights into practical solutions for efficient annotation of only partially sequenced (low-coverage) genomes. To our knowledge, our study is the first formulation of a method to link unassembled genomic segments based on proteomes of relatively distantly related species as references.

  5. The sensitivity in the IR spectrum of the intact and pathological tissues by laser biophotometry.

    PubMed

    Ravariu, Cristian; Bondarciuc, Ala

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, we use the laser biophotometry for in vivo investigations, searching the most sensitive interactions of the near-infrared spectrum with different tissues. The experimental methods are based on the average reflection coefficient (ARC) measurements. For healthy persons, ARC is the average of five values provided by the biophotometer. The probe is applied on dry skin with minimum pilosity, in five regions: left-right shank, left-right forearm, and epigastrium. For the pathological tissues, the emitting terminal is moved over the suspected area, controlling the reflection coefficient level, till a minimum value occurs, as ARC-Pathological. Then, the probe is moved on the symmetrical healthy region of the body to read the complementary coefficient from intact tissue, ARC-Intact, from the same patient. The experimental results show an ARC range between 67 and 59 mW for intact tissues and a lower range, up to 58-42 mW, for pathological tissues. The method is efficient only in those pathological processes accompanied by variable skin depigmentation, water retention, inflammation, thrombosis, or swelling. Frequently, the ARC ranges are overlapping for some diseases. This induces uncertain diagnosis. Therefore, a statistical algorithm is adopted for a differential diagnosis. The laser biophotometry provides a quantitative biometric parameter, ARC, suitable for fast diagnosis in the internal and emergency medicine. These laser biophotometry measurements are representatives for the Romanian clinical trials.

  6. RELM (the Working Group for the Development of Region Earthquake Likelihood Models) and the Development of new, Open-Source, Java-Based (Object Oriented) Code for Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Field, E. H.

    2001-12-01

    Given problems with virtually all previous earthquake-forecast models for southern California, and a current lack of consensus on how such models should be constructed, a joint SCEC-USGS sponsored working group for the development of Regional Earthquake Likelihood Models (RELM) has been established (www.relm.org). The goals are as follows: 1) To develop and test a range of viable earthquake-potential models for southern California (not just one "consensus" model); 2) To examine and compare the implications of each model with respect to probabilistic seismic-hazard estimates (which will not only quantify existing hazard uncertainties, but will also indicate how future research should be focused in order to reduce the uncertainties); and 3) To design and document conclusive tests of each model with respect to existing and future geophysical observations. The variety of models under development reflects the variety of geophysical constraints available; these include geological fault information, historical seismicity, geodetic observations, stress-transfer interactions, and foreshock/aftershock statistics. One reason for developing and testing a range of models is to evaluate the extent to which any one can be exported to another region where the options are more limited. RELM is not intended to be a one-time effort. Rather, we are building an infrastructure that will facilitate an ongoing incorporation of new scientific findings into seismic-hazard models. The effort involves the development of several community models and databases, one of which is new Java-based code for probabilistic seismic hazard analysis (PSHA). Although several different PSHA codes presently exist, none are open source, well documented, and written in an object-oriented programming language (which is ideally suited for PSHA). Furthermore, we need code that is flexible enough to accommodate the wide range of models currently under development in RELM. The new code is being developed under

  7. Intact reading in patients with profound early visual dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Yong, Keir X.X.; Warren, Jason D.; Warrington, Elizabeth K.; Crutch, Sebastian J.

    2013-01-01

    Despite substantial neuroscientific evidence for a region of visual cortex dedicated to the processing of written words, many studies continue to reject explanations of letter-by-letter (LBL) reading in terms of impaired word form representations or parallel letter processing in favour of more general deficits of visual function. In the current paper, we demonstrate that whilst LBL reading is often associated with general visual deficits, these deficits are not necessarily sufficient to cause reading impairment and have led to accounts of LBL reading which are based largely on evidence of association rather than causation. We describe two patients with posterior cortical atrophy (PCA) who exhibit remarkably preserved whole word and letter reading despite profound visual dysfunction. Relative to controls, both patients demonstrated impaired performance on tests of early visual, visuoperceptual and visuospatial processing; visual acuity was the only skill preserved in both individuals. By contrast, both patients were able to read aloud words with perfect to near-perfect accuracy. Reading performance was also rapid with no overall significant difference in response latencies relative to age- and education-matched controls. Furthermore, the patients violated a key prediction of general visual accounts of LBL reading – that pre-lexical impairments should result in prominent word length effects; in the two reported patients, evidence for abnormal word length effects was equivocal or absent, and certainly an order of magnitude different to that reported for LBL readers. We argue that general visual accounts cannot explain the pattern of reading data reported, and attribute the preserved reading performance to preserved direct access to intact word form representations and/or parallel letter processing mechanisms. The current data emphasise the need for much clearer evidence of causality when attempting to draw connections between specific aspects of visual processing

  8. Pointing in visual periphery: is DF's dorsal stream intact?

    PubMed

    Hesse, Constanze; Ball, Keira; Schenk, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Observations of the visual form agnosic patient DF have been highly influential in establishing the hypothesis that separate processing streams deal with vision for perception (ventral stream) and vision for action (dorsal stream). In this context, DF's preserved ability to perform visually-guided actions has been contrasted with the selective impairment of visuomotor performance in optic ataxia patients suffering from damage to dorsal stream areas. However, the recent finding that DF shows a thinning of the grey matter in the dorsal stream regions of both hemispheres in combination with the observation that her right-handed movements are impaired when they are performed in visual periphery has opened up the possibility that patient DF may potentially also be suffering from optic ataxia. If lesions to the posterior parietal cortex (dorsal stream) are bilateral, pointing and reaching deficits should be observed in both visual hemifields and for both hands when targets are viewed in visual periphery. Here, we tested DF's visuomotor performance when pointing with her left and her right hand toward targets presented in the left and the right visual field at three different visual eccentricities. Our results indicate that DF shows large and consistent impairments in all conditions. These findings imply that DF's dorsal stream atrophies are functionally relevant and hence challenge the idea that patient DF's seemingly normal visuomotor behaviour can be attributed to her intact dorsal stream. Instead, DF seems to be a patient who suffers from combined ventral and dorsal stream damage meaning that a new account is needed to explain why she shows such remarkably normal visuomotor behaviour in a number of tasks and conditions.

  9. Intact reading in patients with profound early visual dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Yong, Keir X X; Warren, Jason D; Warrington, Elizabeth K; Crutch, Sebastian J

    2013-10-01

    Despite substantial neuroscientific evidence for a region of visual cortex dedicated to the processing of written words, many studies continue to reject explanations of letter-by-letter (LBL) reading in terms of impaired word form representations or parallel letter processing in favour of more general deficits of visual function. In the current paper, we demonstrate that whilst LBL reading is often associated with general visual deficits, these deficits are not necessarily sufficient to cause reading impairment and have led to accounts of LBL reading which are based largely on evidence of association rather than causation. We describe two patients with posterior cortical atrophy (PCA) who exhibit remarkably preserved whole word and letter reading despite profound visual dysfunction. Relative to controls, both patients demonstrated impaired performance on tests of early visual, visuoperceptual and visuospatial processing; visual acuity was the only skill preserved in both individuals. By contrast, both patients were able to read aloud words with perfect to near-perfect accuracy. Reading performance was also rapid with no overall significant difference in response latencies relative to age- and education-matched controls. Furthermore, the patients violated a key prediction of general visual accounts of LBL reading - that pre-lexical impairments should result in prominent word length effects; in the two reported patients, evidence for abnormal word length effects was equivocal or absent, and certainly an order of magnitude different to that reported for LBL readers. We argue that general visual accounts cannot explain the pattern of reading data reported, and attribute the preserved reading performance to preserved direct access to intact word form representations and/or parallel letter processing mechanisms. The current data emphasise the need for much clearer evidence of causality when attempting to draw connections between specific aspects of visual processing and

  10. Forest Loss in Protected Areas and Intact Forest Landscapes: A Global Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Heino, Matias; Kummu, Matti; Makkonen, Marika; Mulligan, Mark; Verburg, Peter H.; Jalava, Mika; Räsänen, Timo A.

    2015-01-01

    In spite of the high importance of forests, global forest loss has remained alarmingly high during the last decades. Forest loss at a global scale has been unveiled with increasingly finer spatial resolution, but the forest extent and loss in protected areas (PAs) and in large intact forest landscapes (IFLs) have not so far been systematically assessed. Moreover, the impact of protection on preserving the IFLs is not well understood. In this study we conducted a consistent assessment of the global forest loss in PAs and IFLs over the period 2000–2012. We used recently published global remote sensing based spatial forest cover change data, being a uniform and consistent dataset over space and time, together with global datasets on PAs’ and IFLs’ locations. Our analyses revealed that on a global scale 3% of the protected forest, 2.5% of the intact forest, and 1.5% of the protected intact forest were lost during the study period. These forest loss rates are relatively high compared to global total forest loss of 5% for the same time period. The variation in forest losses and in protection effect was large among geographical regions and countries. In some regions the loss in protected forests exceeded 5% (e.g. in Australia and Oceania, and North America) and the relative forest loss was higher inside protected areas than outside those areas (e.g. in Mongolia and parts of Africa, Central Asia, and Europe). At the same time, protection was found to prevent forest loss in several countries (e.g. in South America and Southeast Asia). Globally, high area-weighted forest loss rates of protected and intact forests were associated with high gross domestic product and in the case of protected forests also with high proportions of agricultural land. Our findings reinforce the need for improved understanding of the reasons for the high forest losses in PAs and IFLs and strategies to prevent further losses. PMID:26466348

  11. Forest Loss in Protected Areas and Intact Forest Landscapes: A Global Analysis.

    PubMed

    Heino, Matias; Kummu, Matti; Makkonen, Marika; Mulligan, Mark; Verburg, Peter H; Jalava, Mika; Räsänen, Timo A

    2015-01-01

    In spite of the high importance of forests, global forest loss has remained alarmingly high during the last decades. Forest loss at a global scale has been unveiled with increasingly finer spatial resolution, but the forest extent and loss in protected areas (PAs) and in large intact forest landscapes (IFLs) have not so far been systematically assessed. Moreover, the impact of protection on preserving the IFLs is not well understood. In this study we conducted a consistent assessment of the global forest loss in PAs and IFLs over the period 2000-2012. We used recently published global remote sensing based spatial forest cover change data, being a uniform and consistent dataset over space and time, together with global datasets on PAs' and IFLs' locations. Our analyses revealed that on a global scale 3% of the protected forest, 2.5% of the intact forest, and 1.5% of the protected intact forest were lost during the study period. These forest loss rates are relatively high compared to global total forest loss of 5% for the same time period. The variation in forest losses and in protection effect was large among geographical regions and countries. In some regions the loss in protected forests exceeded 5% (e.g. in Australia and Oceania, and North America) and the relative forest loss was higher inside protected areas than outside those areas (e.g. in Mongolia and parts of Africa, Central Asia, and Europe). At the same time, protection was found to prevent forest loss in several countries (e.g. in South America and Southeast Asia). Globally, high area-weighted forest loss rates of protected and intact forests were associated with high gross domestic product and in the case of protected forests also with high proportions of agricultural land. Our findings reinforce the need for improved understanding of the reasons for the high forest losses in PAs and IFLs and strategies to prevent further losses.

  12. A region of the polyoma virus genome between the replication origin and late protein coding sequences is required in cis for both early gene expression and viral DNA replication.

    PubMed Central

    Tyndall, C; La Mantia, G; Thacker, C M; Favaloro, J; Kamen, R

    1981-01-01

    Deletion mutants within the Py DNA region between the replication origin and the beginning of late protein coding sequences have been constructed and analysed for viability, early gene expression and viral DNA replication. Assay of replicative competence was facilitated by the use of Py transformed mouse cells (COP lines) which express functional large T-protein but contain no free viral DNA. Viable mutants defined three new nonessential regions of the genome. Certain deletions spanning the PvuII site at nt 5130 (67.4 mu) were unable to express early genes and had a cis-acting defect in DNA replication. Other mutants had intermediate phenotypes. Relevance of these results to eucaryotic "enhancer" elements is discussed. Images PMID:6275353

  13. Spatially rearranged object parts can facilitate perception of intact whole objects

    PubMed Central

    Cacciamani, Laura; Ayars, Alisabeth A.; Peterson, Mary A.

    2014-01-01

    The familiarity of an object depends on the spatial arrangement of its parts; when the parts are spatially rearranged, they form a novel, unrecognizable configuration. Yet the same collection of parts comprises both the familiar and novel configuration. Is it possible that the collection of familiar parts activates a representation of the intact familiar configuration even when they are spatially rearranged? We presented novel configurations as primes before test displays that assayed effects on figure-ground perception from memories of intact familiar objects. In our test displays, two equal-area regions shared a central border; one region depicted a portion of a familiar object. Previous research with such displays has shown that participants are more likely to perceive the region depicting a familiar object as the figure and the abutting region as its ground when the familiar object is depicted in its upright orientation rather than upside down. The novel primes comprised either the same or a different collection of parts as the familiar object in the test display (part-rearranged and control primes, respectively). We found that participants were more likely to perceive the familiar region as figure in upright vs. inverted displays following part-rearranged primes but not control primes. Thus, priming with a novel configuration comprising the same familiar parts as the upcoming figure-ground display facilitated orientation-dependent effects of object memories on figure assignment. Similar results were obtained when the spatially rearranged collection of parts was suggested on the groundside of the prime's border, suggesting that familiar parts in novel configurations access the representation of their corresponding intact whole object before figure assignment. These data demonstrate that familiar parts access memories of familiar objects even when they are arranged in a novel configuration. PMID:24904495

  14. Structural and molecular interrogation of intact biological systems

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Kwanghun; Wallace, Jenelle; Kim, Sung-Yon; Kalyanasundaram, Sandhiya; Andalman, Aaron S.; Davidson, Thomas J.; Mirzabekov, Julie J.; Zalocusky, Kelly A.; Mattis, Joanna; Denisin, Aleksandra K.; Pak, Sally; Bernstein, Hannah; Ramakrishnan, Charu; Grosenick, Logan; Gradinaru, Viviana; Deisseroth, Karl

    2014-01-01

    Obtaining high-resolution information from a complex system, while maintaining the global perspective needed to understand system function, represents a key challenge in biology. Here we address this challenge with a method (termed CLARITY) for the transformation of intact tissue into a nanoporous hydrogel-hybridized form (crosslinked to a three-dimensional network of hydrophilic polymers) that is fully assembled but optically transparent and macromolecule-permeable. Using mouse brains, we show intact-tissue imaging of long-range projections, local circuit wiring, cellular relationships, subcellular structures, protein complexes, nucleic acids and neurotransmitters. CLARITY also enables intact-tissue in situ hybridization, immunohistochemistry with multiple rounds of staining and de-staining in non-sectioned tissue, and antibody labelling throughout the intact adult mouse brain. Finally, we show that CLARITY enables fine structural analysis of clinical samples, including non-sectioned human tissue from a neuropsychiatric-disease setting, establishing a path for the transmutation of human tissue into a stable, intact and accessible form suitable for probing structural and molecular underpinnings of physiological function and disease. PMID:23575631

  15. A Tale of Two Temporal Coding Strategies: Common and Dissociable Brain Regions Involved in Recency versus Associative Temporal Order Retrieval Strategies.

    PubMed

    Lieberman, Jennifer S; Kyle, Colin T; Schedlbauer, Amber; Stokes, Jared; Ekstrom, Arne D

    2017-04-01

    Numerous studies indicate the importance of the hippocampus to temporal order retrieval. However, behavioral studies suggest that there are different ways to retrieve temporal order information from encoded sequences, one involving an associative strategy (retrieving associations using neighboring items in a list) and another involving a recency strategy (determining which of two items came first). It remains unresolved, however, whether both strategies recruit the hippocampus or only associative strategies, consistent with the hippocampus's role in relational processing. To address this, we developed a paradigm in which we dissociated associative versus recency-based retrieval, involving the same stimulus presentation during retrieval. Associative retrieval involved an increase in RT (and decrease in performance) with greater distances between intervals, consistent with the need to retrieve intervening associations. Recency-based retrieval involved an increase in RT (and decrease in performance) with shorter distances between intervals, suggesting the use of a strength-based coding mechanism to retrieve information. We employed fMRI to determine the neural basis of the different strategies. Both strategies showed significant levels of hippocampal activation and connectivity that did not differ between tasks. In contrast, both univariate and connectivity pattern analyses revealed differences in extrahippocampal areas such as parietal and frontal cortices. A covariate analysis suggested that differences could not be explained by task difficulty alone. Together, these findings suggest that the hippocampus plays a role in both forms of temporal order retrieval, with neocortical networks mediating the different cognitive demands for associative versus recency-based temporal order retrieval.

  16. HLA-E coding and 3' untranslated region variability determined by next-generation sequencing in two West-African population samples.

    PubMed

    Castelli, Erick C; Mendes-Junior, Celso T; Sabbagh, Audrey; Porto, Iane O P; Garcia, André; Ramalho, Jaqueline; Lima, Thálitta H A; Massaro, Juliana D; Dias, Fabrício C; Collares, Cristhianna V A; Jamonneau, Vincent; Bucheton, Bruno; Camara, Mamadou; Donadi, Eduardo A

    2015-12-01

    HLA-E is a non-classical Human Leucocyte Antigen class I gene with immunomodulatory properties. Whereas HLA-E expression usually occurs at low levels, it is widely distributed amongst human tissues, has the ability to bind self and non-self antigens and to interact with NK cells and T lymphocytes, being important for immunosurveillance and also for fighting against infections. HLA-E is usually the most conserved locus among all class I genes. However, most of the previous studies evaluating HLA-E variability sequenced only a few exons or genotyped known polymorphisms. Here we report a strategy to evaluate HLA-E variability by next-generation sequencing (NGS) that might be used to other HLA loci and present the HLA-E haplotype diversity considering the segment encoding the entire HLA-E mRNA (including 5'UTR, introns and the 3'UTR) in two African population samples, Susu from Guinea-Conakry and Lobi from Burkina Faso. Our results indicate that (a) the HLA-E gene is indeed conserved, encoding mainly two different protein molecules; (b) Africans do present several unknown HLA-E alleles presenting synonymous mutations; (c) the HLA-E 3'UTR is quite polymorphic and (d) haplotypes in the HLA-E 3'UTR are in close association with HLA-E coding alleles. NGS has proved to be an important tool on data generation for future studies evaluating variability in non-classical MHC genes.

  17. Mutational analysis of the connexin 36 gene (CX36) and exclusion of the coding sequence as a candidate region for catatonic schizophrenia in a large pedigree.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Jobst; Mai, Marion; Ortega, Gabriela; Mössner, Rainald; Lesch, Klaus-Peter

    2002-11-01

    The murine connexin 36 gene (Cx36) encodes a gap-junction channel protein which is preferentially expressed in brain and retina. The human orthologue CX36 is located on chromosome 15q14, a region recently shown to contain a susceptibility gene for hereditary catatonic schizophrenia. Therefore, CX36 was considered as a positional candidate for mutational analysis. Three polymorphic sites within CX36 were found by sequencing the two exons, the intron-exon boundaries and the putative promoter region of the gene derived from patients and control subjects. No variant exclusively cosegregates with the disease in a large pedigree that mainly supports the chromosome 15q14 locus, providing evidence that CX36 is not causative for the pathogenesis of catatonic schizophrenia in this family.

  18. Tracking tagged molecules in single neurons in intact zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Armisen, Ricardo; Gleason, Michelle R; Fetcho, Joseph R; Mandel, Gail

    2007-08-01

    INTRODUCTIONThis protocol describes an approach for monitoring the movement of tagged molecules in single neurons in intact embryonic and larval zebrafish. The intact preparation provides a meaningful context for the physiological event being studied. Other advantages offered by the young zebrafish include direct in vivo imaging, the ability to produce large numbers of labeled embryos easily using microinjection, and the existence of identified sensory circuits that can be exploited to activate a particular cell type. One limitation of this system is the fragility of 2- to 3-d-old embryos, which demands delicate physical manipulation of the fish during all stages preceding and during the experiment. In contrast to brain slices or isolated cells, nearly all original neural connections and sensory components are maintained in the intact preparation, so the occurrence of a downstream event may be precluded (or its manifestation enhanced) by some complex interplay of biological processes that are not fully understood.

  19. The intact capture of hypervelocity dust particles using underdense foams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maag, Carl R.; Borg, J.; Tanner, William G.; Stevenson, T. J.; Bibring, J.-P.

    1994-01-01

    The impact of a hypervelocity projectile (greater than 3 km/s) is a process that subjects both the impactor and the impacted material to a large transient pressure distribution. The resultant stresses cause a large degree of fragmentation, melting, vaporization, and ionization (for normal densities). The pressure regime magnitude, however, is directly related to the density relationship between the projectile and target materials. As a consequence, a high-density impactor on a low-density target will experience the lowest level of damage. Historically, there have been three different approaches toward achieving the lowest possible target density. The first employs a projectile impinging on a foil or film of moderate density, but whose thickness is much less than the particle diameter. This results in the particle experiencing a pressure transient with both a short duration and a greatly reduced destructive effect. A succession of these films, spaced to allow nondestructive energy dissipation between impacts, will reduce the impactor's kinetic energy without allowing its internal energy to rise to the point where destruction of the projectile mass will occur. An added advantage to this method is that it yields the possibility of regions within the captured particle where a minimum of thermal modification has taken place. Polymer foams have been employed as the primary method of capturing particles with minimum degradation. The manufacture of extremely low bulk density materials is usually achieved by the introduction of voids into the material base. It must be noted, however, that a foam structure only has a true bulk density of the mixture at sizes much larger than the cell size, since for impact processes this is of paramount importance. The scale at which the bulk density must still be close to that of the mixture is approximately equal to the impactor. When this density criterion is met, shock pressures during impact are minimized, which in turn maximizes the

  20. The intact capture of hypervelocity dust particles using underdense foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maag, Carl R.; Borg, J.; Tanner, William G.; Stevenson, T. J.; Bibring, J.-P.

    The impact of a hypervelocity projectile (greater than 3 km/s) is a process that subjects both the impactor and the impacted material to a large transient pressure distribution. The resultant stresses cause a large degree of fragmentation, melting, vaporization, and ionization (for normal densities). The pressure regime magnitude, however, is directly related to the density relationship between the projectile and target materials. As a consequence, a high-density impactor on a low-density target will experience the lowest level of damage. Historically, there have been three different approaches toward achieving the lowest possible target density. The first employs a projectile impinging on a foil or film of moderate density, but whose thickness is much less than the particle diameter. This results in the particle experiencing a pressure transient with both a short duration and a greatly reduced destructive effect. A succession of these films, spaced to allow nondestructive energy dissipation between impacts, will reduce the impactor's kinetic energy without allowing its internal energy to rise to the point where destruction of the projectile mass will occur. An added advantage to this method is that it yields the possibility of regions within the captured particle where a minimum of thermal modification has taken place. Polymer foams have been employed as the primary method of capturing particles with minimum degradation. The manufacture of extremely low bulk density materials is usually achieved by the introduction of voids into the material base. It must be noted, however, that a foam structure only has a true bulk density of the mixture at sizes much larger than the cell size, since for impact processes this is of paramount importance. The scale at which the bulk density must still be close to that of the mixture is approximately equal to the impactor. When this density criterion is met, shock pressures during impact are minimized, which in turn maximizes the

  1. The complete mitochondrial genome of the mantid shrimp Oratosquilla oratoria (Crustacea: Malacostraca: Stomatopoda): Novel non-coding regions features and phylogenetic implications of the Stomatopoda.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuan; Cui, Zhaoxia

    2010-09-01

    The complete mitochondrial (mt) genome sequence of Oratosquilla oratoria (Crustacea: Malacostraca: Stomatopoda) was determined; a circular molecule of 15,783 bp in length. The gene content and arrangement are consistent with the pancrustacean ground pattern. The mt control region of O. oratoria is characterized by no GA-block near the 3' end and different position of [TA(A)]n-blocks compared with other reported Stomatopoda species. The sequence of the second hairpin structure is relative conserved which suggests this region may be a synapomorphic character for the Stomatopoda. In addition, a relative large intergenic spacer (101 bp) with higher A+T content than that in control region was identified between the tRNA(Glu) and tRNA(Phe) genes. Phylogenetic analyses based on the current dataset of complete mt genomes strongly support the Stomatopoda is closely related to Euphausiacea. They in turn cluster with Penaeoidea and Caridea clades while other decapods form a separate group, which rejects the monophyly of Decapoda. This challenges the suitability of Stomatopoda as an outgroup of Decapoda in phylogenetic analyses. The basal position of Stomatopoda within Eumalacostraca according to the morphological characters is also questioned.

  2. Error-correction coding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinds, Erold W. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    This report describes the progress made towards the completion of a specific task on error-correcting coding. The proposed research consisted of investigating the use of modulation block codes as the inner code of a concatenated coding system in order to improve the overall space link communications performance. The study proposed to identify and analyze candidate codes that will complement the performance of the overall coding system which uses the interleaved RS (255,223) code as the outer code.

  3. Novel polymorphisms in UTR and coding region of inducible heat shock protein 70.1 gene in tropically adapted Indian zebu cattle (Bos indicus) and riverine buffalo (Bubalus bubalis).

    PubMed

    Sodhi, M; Mukesh, M; Kishore, A; Mishra, B P; Kataria, R S; Joshi, B K

    2013-09-25

    Due to evolutionary divergence, cattle (taurine, and indicine) and buffalo are speculated to have different responses to heat stress condition. Variation in candidate genes associated with a heat-shock response may provide an insight into the dissimilarity and suggest targets for intervention. The present work was undertaken to characterize one of the inducible heat shock protein genes promoter and coding regions in diverse breeds of Indian zebu cattle and buffaloes. The genomic DNA from a panel of 117 unrelated animals representing 14 diversified native cattle breeds and 6 buffalo breeds were utilized to determine the complete sequence and gene diversity of HSP70.1 gene. The coding region of HSP70.1 gene in Indian zebu cattle, Bos taurus and buffalo was similar in length (1,926 bp) encoding a HSP70 protein of 641 amino acids with a calculated molecular weight (Mw) of 70.26 kDa. However buffalo had a longer 5' and 3' untranslated region (UTR) of 204 and 293 nucleotides respectively, in comparison to Indian zebu cattle and Bos taurus wherein length of 5' and 3'-UTR was 172 and 286 nucleotides, respectively. The increased length of buffalo HSP70.1 gene compared to indicine and taurine gene was due to two insertions each in 5' and 3'-UTR. Comparative sequence analysis of cattle (taurine and indicine) and buffalo HSP70.1 gene revealed a total of 54 gene variations (50 SNPs and 4 INDELs) among the three species in the HSP70.1 gene. The minor allele frequencies of these nucleotide variations varied from 0.03 to 0.5 with an average of 0.26. Among the 14 B. indicus cattle breeds studied, a total of 19 polymorphic sites were identified: 4 in the 5'-UTR and 15 in the coding region (of these 2 were non-synonymous). Analysis among buffalo breeds revealed 15 SNPs throughout the gene: 6 at the 5' flanking region and 9 in the coding region. In bubaline 5'-UTR, 2 additional putative transcription factor binding sites (Elk-1 and C-Re1) were identified, other than three common sites

  4. The coding region of the UFGT gene is a source of diagnostic SNP markers that allow single-locus DNA genotyping for the assessment of cultivar identity and ancestry in grapevine (Vitis vinifera L.)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Vitis vinifera L. is one of society’s most important agricultural crops with a broad genetic variability. The difficulty in recognizing grapevine genotypes based on ampelographic traits and secondary metabolites prompted the development of molecular markers suitable for achieving variety genetic identification. Findings Here, we propose a comparison between a multi-locus barcoding approach based on six chloroplast markers and a single-copy nuclear gene sequencing method using five coding regions combined with a character-based system with the aim of reconstructing cultivar-specific haplotypes and genotypes to be exploited for the molecular characterization of 157 V. vinifera accessions. The analysis of the chloroplast target regions proved the inadequacy of the DNA barcoding approach at the subspecies level, and hence further DNA genotyping analyses were targeted on the sequences of five nuclear single-copy genes amplified across all of the accessions. The sequencing of the coding region of the UFGT nuclear gene (UDP-glucose: flavonoid 3-0-glucosyltransferase, the key enzyme for the accumulation of anthocyanins in berry skins) enabled the discovery of discriminant SNPs (1/34 bp) and the reconstruction of 130 V. vinifera distinct genotypes. Most of the genotypes proved to be cultivar-specific, and only few genotypes were shared by more, although strictly related, cultivars. Conclusion On the whole, this technique was successful for inferring SNP-based genotypes of grapevine accessions suitable for assessing the genetic identity and ancestry of international cultivars and also useful for corroborating some hypotheses regarding the origin of local varieties, suggesting several issues of misidentification (synonymy/homonymy). PMID:24298902

  5. Mouse neurovirulence determinants of poliovirus type 1 strain LS-a map to the coding regions of capsid protein VP1 and proteinase 2Apro.

    PubMed Central

    Lu, H H; Yang, C F; Murdin, A D; Klein, M H; Harber, J J; Kew, O M; Wimmer, E

    1994-01-01

    Poliovirus type 1 strain LS-a [PV1(LS-a)] is a OV variant adapted to mice by multiple passages through mouse and monkey tissues. To investigate the molecular basis underlying mouse neurovirulence of PV1(LS-a), a cDNA of the viral genome containing nucleotides 112 to 7441 was cloned, and the nucleotide sequence was determined. Compared with that of the mouse avirulent progenitor PV1(Mahoney), 54 nucleotide changes were found in the genome of the PV1(LS-a) virus, resulting in 20 amino acid substitutions in the virus polyprotein. Whereas the nucleotide changes were scattered throughout the genome, the amino acid substitutions were largely clustered in the capsid proteins and, to a certain extent, in the virus proteinase 2Apro. By in vitro mutagenesis, PV1(LS-a)-specific capsid mutations were introduced into a cDNA clone of PV1(Mahoney). We show that neither the individual amino acid mutations nor combinations of mutations in the region encoding VP1 conferred to PV1(Mahoney) the mouse-adapted phenotype of PV1(LS-a). Chimeric cDNA studies demonstrated that a recombinant type 1 virus containing the PV1(LS-a) sequence from nucleotide 2470 to nucleotide 3625 displayed a neurovirulent phenotype in mice. Further dissection of this region revealed that mouse neurovirulence of PV1(LS-a) was determined by multiple mutations in regions encoding both viral proteinase 2Apro and capsid protein VP1. The mouse neurovirulent viruses, PV1(LS-a), W1-M/LS-Pf [nucleotides 496 to 3625 from PV1(LS-a)], and W1-M/LS-NP [nucleotides 2470 to 3625 from PV1(LS-a)], showed increased sensitivity to heat treatment at 45 degrees C for 1 h. Surprisingly, the thermolabile phenotype was also displayed by a recombinant of PV1(Mahoney) carrying a PV1(LS-a) DNA fragment encoding the N-terminal portion of 2Apro. This suggests that base substitutions in the region encoding 2Apro affected capsid stability, thereby contributing to the neurovirulence of the virus in mice. Images PMID:7933134

  6. The cytolethal distending toxin-IV cdt coding region in an avian pathogenic Escherichia coli (APEC) strain shows instability and irregular excision pattern.

    PubMed

    Tóth, István; Schneider, György

    2015-12-01

    Cytolethal distending toxins (CDT) represent an emerging toxin family, widely distributed among pathogenic bacteria. The cdtABC genes in E. coli are either part of the genome of prophages, plasmid or pathogenicity island. In order to investigate the stability and the transfer potential of cdt-IV genes cdtB gene was replaced by chloramphenicol (Cm) resistance encoding cat gene in the avian pathogenic E. coli (APEC) strain E250. After consecutive passages in non-selective medium at 37 °C 7.6% (219/2900) of the investigated colonies of E250::cat strain became Cm-sensitive (Cm(S)). To reveal deletion mechanism 177 Cm(S) colonies were investigated for presence of cdtA, cdtC and cdtC associated gene by PCR. One hundred and sixteen colonies of the Cm(S) colonies (65.5%) showed partial or complete deletion in the cdt-IV region. Progressive loss of the upstream genes of the cdt cluster in E250 compared to other CDT-IV producing APEC strains and the fact that all the potential deletion patterns were identified, suggests the presence of an unstable hitherto unknown genomic region. The failure of in vitro transfer of cdt genes into a porcine EPEC E. coli strain suggests that the deletion of cdt-IV flanking genes alone do not promote the spread of cdt-IV.

  7. Perceived parental control processes, parent-child relational qualities and psychological well-being of Chinese adolescents in intact and non-intact families in Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Shek, Daniel T L; Lee, Tak Yan

    2007-01-01

    This paper examines whether Chinese adolescents' perceptions (N = 3,017) of parental behavioral control (parental knowledge, expectation, monitoring, discipline, and demandingness as well as parental control based on indigenous Chinese concepts), parental psychological control, parent-child relational qualities (perceived parental trust, child's trust of the parents, child's readiness to communicate with the parents, and child's satisfaction with parental control), and adolescent psychological well-being (hopelessness, mastery, life satisfaction and self-esteem) differed in intact and non-intact families. Results showed that relative to non-intact families, parental behavioral control processes were higher and parent-child relational qualities were better in intact families. In contrast, parental psychological control was higher in non-intact families than in intact families. Finally, the psychological well-being of adolescents in non-intact families was poorer than that of adolescents in intact families.

  8. NMR studies of internal dynamics of serine proteinase protein inhibitors: Binding region mobilities of intact and reactive-site hydrolyzed Cucurbita maxima trypsin inhibitor (CMTI)-III of the squash family and comparison with those of counterparts of CMTI-V of the potato I family.

    PubMed Central

    Liu, J.; Gong, Y.; Prakash, O.; Wen, L.; Lee, I.; Huang, J. K.; Krishnamoorthi, R.

    1998-01-01

    Serine proteinase protein inhibitors follow the standard mechanism of inhibition (Laskowski M Jr, Kato I, 1980, Annu Rev Biochem 49:593-626), whereby an enzyme-catalyzed equilibrium between intact (I) and reactive-site hydrolyzed inhibitor (I*) is reached. The hydrolysis constant, Khyd, is defined as [I*]/[I]. Here, we explore the role of internal dynamics in the resynthesis of the scissile bond by comparing the internal mobility data of intact and cleaved inhibitors belonging to two different families. The inhibitors studied are recombinant Cucurbita maxima trypsin inhibitor III (rCMTI-III; Mr 3 kDa) of the squash family and rCMTI-V (Mr approximately 7 kDa) of the potato I family. These two inhibitors have different binding loop-scaffold interactions and different Khyd values--2.4 (CMTI-III) and 9 (CMTI-V)--at 25 degrees C. The reactive-site peptide bond (P1-P1') is that between Arg5 and Ile6 in CMTI-III, and that between Lys44 and Asp45 in CMTI-V. The order parameters (S2) of backbone NHs of uniformly 15N-labeled rCMTI-III and rCMTI-III* were determined from measurements of 15N spin-lattice and spin-spin relaxation rates, and [1H]-15N steady-state heteronuclear Overhauser effects, using the model-free formalism, and compared with the data reported previously for rCMTI-V and rCMTI-V*. The backbones of rCMTI-III [(S2) = 0.71] and rCMTI-III* [(S2) = 0.63] are more flexible than those of rCMTI-V [(S2) = 0.83] and rCMTI-V* [(S2) = 0.85]. The binding loop residues, P4-P1, in the two proteins show the following average order parameters: 0.57 (rCMTI-III) and 0.44 (rCMTI-III*); 0.70 (rCMTI-V) and 0.40 (rCMTI-V*). The P1'-P4' residues, on the other hand, are associated with (S2) values of 0.56 (rCMTI-III) and 0.47 (rCMTI-III*); and 0.73 (rCMTI-V) and 0.83 (rCMTI-V*). The newly formed C-terminal (Pn residues) gains a smaller magnitude of flexibility in rCMTI-III* due to the Cys3-Cys20 crosslink. In contrast, the newly formed N-terminal (Pn' residues) becomes more flexible

  9. A new PCR primer for the identification of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis based on rRNA sequences coding the internal transcribed spacers (ITS) and 5 x 8S regions.

    PubMed

    Imai, T; Sano, A; Mikami, Y; Watanabe, K; Aoki, F H; Branchini, M L; Negroni, R; Nishimura, K; Miyaji, M

    2000-08-01

    Internal transcribed spacer (ITS) genes including the 5.8S ribosomal (r)RNA of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis were amplified and the DNA sequences were determined. Based on a comparison of the sequence information, a new polymerase chain reaction (PCR) primer pair was designed for specific amplification of DNA for P. brasiliensis. This primer pair amplified a 418-bp DNA sequence and was 100% successful in identifying 29 strains of P. brasiliensis (including the reference strains) isolated from the regions of Brazil, Costa Rica, Japan, Argentina or from different sources. The results of specificity tests of these primers to compare the fungus with those of Aspergillus fumigatus, Blastomyces dermatitidis, Candida albicans, Cryptococcus neoformans, Histoplasma capsulatum and Penicillium marneffei are also reported.

  10. NemaFootPrinter: a web based software for the identification of conserved non-coding genome sequence regions between C. elegans and C. briggsae

    PubMed Central

    Rambaldi, Davide; Guffanti, Alessandro; Morandi, Paolo; Cassata, Giuseppe

    2005-01-01

    Background NemaFootPrinter (Nematode Transcription Factor Scan Through Philogenetic Footprinting) is a web-based software for interactive identification of conserved, non-exonic DNA segments in the genomes of C. elegans and C. briggsae. It has been implemented according to the following project specifications: a) Automated identification of orthologous gene pairs. b) Interactive selection of the boundaries of the genes to be compared. c) Pairwise sequence comparison with a range of different methods. d) Identification of putative transcription factor binding sites on conserved, non-exonic DNA segments. Results Starting from a C. elegans or C. briggsae gene name or identifier, the software identifies the putative ortholog (if any), based on information derived from public nematode genome annotation databases. The investigator can then retrieve the genome DNA sequences of the two orthologous genes; visualize graphically the genes' intron/exon structure and the surrounding DNA regions; select, through an interactive graphical user interface, subsequences of the two gene regions. Using a bioinformatics toolbox (Blast2seq, Dotmatcher, Ssearch and connection to the rVista database) the investigator is able at the end of the procedure to identify and analyze significant sequences similarities, detecting the presence of transcription factor binding sites corresponding to the conserved segments. The software automatically masks exons. Discussion This software is intended as a practical and intuitive tool for the researchers interested in the identification of non-exonic conserved sequence segments between C. elegans and C. briggsae. These sequences may contain regulatory transcriptional elements since they are conserved between two related, but rapidly evolving genomes. This software also highlights the power of genome annotation databases when they are conceived as an open resource and the possibilities offered by seamless integration of different web services via the http

  11. Operative balloon dilatation for pulmonary atresia with intact ventricular septum.

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, J R; Fonseka, S F; Wilson, N; Dickinson, D F; Walker, D R

    1987-01-01

    In six infants with pulmonary atresia and intact ventricular septum operative balloon dilatation was used to achieve continuity between the right ventricle and the main pulmonary artery as the initial procedure. Two of the six subsequently needed an aortico pulmonary shunt. All six are alive and well. Images Fig PMID:3676024

  12. Interleukin 6 in intact and injured mouse peripheral nerves.

    PubMed

    Reichert, F; Levitzky, R; Rotshenker, S

    1996-03-01

    The multifunctional cytokine interleukin 6 (IL-6) has direct growth, survival and differentiation effects on peripheral and central neurons. Furthermore, it can modulate the production by non-neuronal cells of other cytokines and growth factors, and thereby affect nerve cells indirectly. We have studied IL-6 expression and production in intact and injured peripheral nerves of C57/BL/6NHSD mice, which display the normal rapid progression of Wallerian degeneration. The IL-6 mRNA was detected in nerves degenerating in vitro or in vivo, but not in intact nerves. In vitro- and in vivo-degenerating nerve segments and neuroma nerve segments synthesized and secreted IL-6. The onset of IL-6 production was rapid and prolonged. It was detected as early as 2 h after injury and persisted for the entire period of 21 days tested after the injury. Of the non-neuronal cells that reside in intact and injured nerves, macrophages and fibroblasts were the major contributors to IL-6 production. We also studied IL-6 production in intact and injured nerves of mutant C57BL/6-WLD/OLA/NHSD mice, which display very slow progression of Wallerian degeneration. Injured nerves of C57BL/6-WLD/OLA/NHSD mice produced significantly lower amounts of IL-6 than did rapidly degenerating nerves of C57/BL/6NHSD mice.

  13. Fostering Activities of Daily Living by Intact Nursing Home Residents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blair, Charles E.; Glaister, Judy; Brown, Alston; Phillips, Carolyn

    2007-01-01

    We assessed effectiveness of four education programs in providing nursing assistants with ability to produce a therapeutic milieu supportive of intact residents' activities of daily living, positive self-esteem and mood: (1) a combination of Orem's Systems of Nursing Care and Skinner's Applied Behavioral Analysis, (2) Applied Behavioral Analysis,…

  14. Phosphorylation of intact erythrocytes in human muscular dystrophy

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, R.M.; Nigro, M.

    1986-04-01

    The uptake of exogenous /sup 32/Pi into the membrane proteins of intact erythrocytes was measured in 8 patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy. No abnormalities were noted after autoradiographic analysis. This contrasts with earlier results obtained when isolated membranes were phosphorylated with gamma-(/sup 32/P)ATP, and suggests a possible reinterpretation of those experiments.

  15. Downregulation of miR-320a/383-sponge-like long non-coding RNA NLC1-C (narcolepsy candidate-region 1 genes) is associated with male infertility and promotes testicular embryonal carcinoma cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Lü, M; Tian, H; Cao, Y-x; He, X; Chen, L; Song, X; Ping, P; Huang, H; Sun, F

    2015-01-01

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs), which are extensively transcribed from the genome, have been proposed to be key regulators of diverse biological processes. However, little is known about the role of lncRNAs in regulating spermatogenesis in human males. Here, using microarray technology, we show altered expression of lncRNAs in the testes of infertile men with maturation arrest (MA) or hypospermatogenesis (Hypo), with 757 and 2370 differentially down-regulated and 475 and 163 up-regulated lncRNAs in MA and Hypo, respectively. These findings were confirmed by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) assays on select lncRNAs, including HOTTIP, imsrna320, imsrna292 and NLC1-C (narcolepsy candidate-region 1 genes). Interestingly, NLC1-C, also known as long intergenic non-protein-coding RNA162 (LINC00162), was down-regulated in the cytoplasm and accumulated in the nucleus of spermatogonia and primary spermatocytes in the testes of infertile men with mixed patterns of MA compared with normal control. The accumulation of NLC1-C in the nucleus repressed miR-320a and miR-383 transcript and promoted testicular embryonal carcinoma cell proliferation by binding to Nucleolin. Here, we define a novel mechanism by which lncRNAs modulate miRNA expression at the transcriptional level by binding to RNA-binding proteins to regulate human spermatogenesis. PMID:26539909

  16. Sequence of the intron/exon junctions of the coding region of the human androgen receptor gene and identification of a point mutation in a family with complete androgen insensitivity.

    PubMed

    Lubahn, D B; Brown, T R; Simental, J A; Higgs, H N; Migeon, C J; Wilson, E M; French, F S

    1989-12-01

    Androgens act through a receptor protein (AR) to mediate sex differentiation and development of the male phenotype. We have isolated the eight exons in the amino acid coding region of the AR gene from a human X chromosome library. Nucleotide sequences of the AR gene intron/exon boundaries were determined for use in designing synthetic oligonucleotide primers to bracket coding exons for amplification by the polymerase chain reaction. Genomic DNA was amplified from 46,XY phenotypic female siblings with complete androgen insensitivity syndrome. AR binding affinity for dihydrotestosterone in the affected siblings was lower than in normal males, but the binding capacity was normal. Sequence analysis of amplified exons demonstrated within the AR steroid-binding domain (exon G) a single guanine to adenine mutation, resulting in replacement of valine with methionine at amino acid residue 866. As expected, the carrier mother had both normal and mutant AR genes. Thus, a single point mutation in the steroid-binding domain of the AR gene correlated with the expression of an AR protein ineffective in stimulating male sexual development.

  17. Numerical modeling of heat transfer and pasteurizing value during thermal processing of intact egg.

    PubMed

    Abbasnezhad, Behzad; Hamdami, Nasser; Monteau, Jean-Yves; Vatankhah, Hamed

    2016-01-01

    Thermal Pasteurization of Eggs, as a widely used nutritive food, has been simulated. A three-dimensional numerical model, computational fluid dynamics codes of heat transfer equations using heat natural convection, and conduction mechanisms, based on finite element method, was developed to study the effect of air cell size and eggshell thickness. The model, confirmed by comparing experimental and numerical results, was able to predict the temperature profiles, the slowest heating zone, and the required heating time during pasteurization of intact eggs. The results showed that the air cell acted as a heat insulator. Increasing the air cell volume resulted in decreasing of the heat transfer rate, and the increasing the required time of pasteurization (up to 14%). The findings show that the effect on thermal pasteurization of the eggshell thickness was not considerable in comparison to the air cell volume.

  18. Genomic Rearrangements and Functional Diversification of lecA and lecB Lectin-Coding Regions Impacting the Efficacy of Glycomimetics Directed against Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Boukerb, Amine M.; Decor, Aude; Ribun, Sébastien; Tabaroni, Rachel; Rousset, Audric; Commin, Loris; Buff, Samuel; Doléans-Jordheim, Anne; Vidal, Sébastien; Varrot, Annabelle; Imberty, Anne; Cournoyer, Benoit

    2016-01-01

    LecA and LecB tetrameric lectins take part in oligosaccharide-mediated adhesion-processes of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Glycomimetics have been designed to block these interactions. The great versatility of P. aeruginosa suggests that the range of application of these glycomimetics could be restricted to genotypes with particular lectin types. The likelihood of having genomic and genetic changes impacting LecA and LecB interactions with glycomimetics such as galactosylated and fucosylated calix[4]arene was investigated over a collection of strains from the main clades of P. aeruginosa. Lectin types were defined, and their ligand specificities were inferred. These analyses showed a loss of lecA among the PA7 clade. Genomic changes impacting lec loci were thus assessed using strains of this clade, and by making comparisons with the PAO1 genome. The lecA regions were found challenged by phage attacks and PAGI-2 (genomic island) integrations. A prophage was linked to the loss of lecA. The lecB regions were found less impacted by such rearrangements but greater lecB than lecA genetic divergences were recorded. Sixteen combinations of LecA and LecB types were observed. Amino acid variations were mapped on PAO1 crystal structures. Most significant changes were observed on LecBPA7, and found close to the fucose binding site. Glycan array analyses were performed with purified LecBPA7. LecBPA7 was found less specific for fucosylated oligosaccharides than LecBPAO1, with a preference for H type 2 rather than type 1, and Lewisa rather than Lewisx. Comparison of the crystal structures of LecBPA7 and LecBPAO1 in complex with Lewisa showed these changes in specificity to have resulted from a modification of the water network between the lectin, galactose and GlcNAc residues. Incidence of these modifications on the interactions with calix[4]arene glycomimetics at the cell level was investigated. An aggregation test was used to establish the efficacy of these ligands. Great variations

  19. In silico comparison of genomic regions containing genes coding for enzymes and transcription factors for the phenylpropanoid pathway in Phaseolus vulgaris L. and Glycine max L. Merr.

    PubMed

    Reinprecht, Yarmilla; Yadegari, Zeinab; Perry, Gregory E; Siddiqua, Mahbuba; Wright, Lori C; McClean, Phillip E; Pauls, K Peter

    2013-01-01

    Legumes contain a variety of phytochemicals derived from the phenylpropanoid pathway that have important effects on human health as well as seed coat color, plant disease resistance and nodulation. However, the information about the genes involved in this important pathway is fragmentary in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.). The objectives of this research were to isolate genes that function in and control the phenylpropanoid pathway in common bean, determine their genomic locations in silico in common bean and soybean, and analyze sequences of the 4CL gene family in two common bean genotypes. Sequences of phenylpropanoid pathway genes available for common bean or other plant species were aligned, and the conserved regions were used to design sequence-specific primers. The PCR products were cloned and sequenced and the gene sequences along with common bean gene-based (g) markers were BLASTed against the Glycine max v.1.0 genome and the P. vulgaris v.1.0 (Andean) early release genome. In addition, gene sequences were BLASTed against the OAC Rex (Mesoamerican) genome sequence assembly. In total, fragments of 46 structural and regulatory phenylpropanoid pathway genes were characterized in this way and placed in silico on common bean and soybean sequence maps. The maps contain over 250 common bean g and SSR (simple sequence repeat) markers and identify the positions of more than 60 additional phenylpropanoid pathway gene sequences, plus the putative locations of seed coat color genes. The majority of cloned phenylpropanoid pathway gene sequences were mapped to one location in the common bean genome but had two positions in soybean. The comparison of the genomic maps confirmed previous studies, which show that common bean and soybean share genomic regions, including those containing phenylpropanoid pathway gene sequences, with conserved synteny. Indels identified in the comparison of Andean and Mesoamerican common bean 4CL gene sequences might be used to develop inter

  20. Molecular weight abnormalities of the CTCF transcription factor: CTCF migrates aberrantly in SDS-PAGE and the size of the expressed protein is affected by the UTRs and sequences within the coding region of the CTCF gene.

    PubMed

    Klenova, E M; Nicolas, R H; U, S; Carne, A F; Lee, R E; Lobanenkov, V V; Goodwin, G H

    1997-02-01

    CTCF belongs to the Zn finger transcription factors family and binds to the promoter region of c-myc. CTCF is highly conserved between species, ubiquitous and localised in nuclei. The endogenous CTCF migrates as a 130 kDa (CTCF-130) protein on SDS-PAGE, however, the open reading frame (ORF) of the CTCF cDNA encodes only a 82 kDa protein (CTCF-82). In the present study we investigate this phenomenon and show with mass-spectra analysis that this occurs due to aberrant mobility of the CTCF protein. Another paradox is that our original cDNA, composed of the ORF and 3'-untranslated region (3'-UTR), produces a protein with the apparent molecular weight of 70 kDa (CTCF-70). This paradox has been found to be an effect of the UTRs and sequences within the coding region of the CTCF gene resulting in C-terminal truncation of CTCF-130. The potential attenuator has been identified and point-mutated. This restored the electrophoretic mobility of the CTCF protein to 130 kDa. CTCF-70, the aberrantly migrating CTCF N-terminus per se, is also detected in some cell types and therefore may have some biological implications. In particular, CTCF-70 interferes with CTCF-130 normal function, enhancing transactivation induced by CTCF-130 in COS6 cells. The mechanism of CTCF-70 action and other possible functions of CTCF-70 are discussed.

  1. Molecular weight abnormalities of the CTCF transcription factor: CTCF migrates aberrantly in SDS-PAGE and the size of the expressed protein is affected by the UTRs and sequences within the coding region of the CTCF gene.

    PubMed Central

    Klenova, E M; Nicolas, R H; U, S; Carne, A F; Lee, R E; Lobanenkov, V V; Goodwin, G H

    1997-01-01

    CTCF belongs to the Zn finger transcription factors family and binds to the promoter region of c-myc. CTCF is highly conserved between species, ubiquitous and localised in nuclei. The endogenous CTCF migrates as a 130 kDa (CTCF-130) protein on SDS-PAGE, however, the open reading frame (ORF) of the CTCF cDNA encodes only a 82 kDa protein (CTCF-82). In the present study we investigate this phenomenon and show with mass-spectra analysis that this occurs due to aberrant mobility of the CTCF protein. Another paradox is that our original cDNA, composed of the ORF and 3'-untranslated region (3'-UTR), produces a protein with the apparent molecular weight of 70 kDa (CTCF-70). This paradox has been found to be an effect of the UTRs and sequences within the coding region of the CTCF gene resulting in C-terminal truncation of CTCF-130. The potential attenuator has been identified and point-mutated. This restored the electrophoretic mobility of the CTCF protein to 130 kDa. CTCF-70, the aberrantly migrating CTCF N-terminus per se, is also detected in some cell types and therefore may have some biological implications. In particular, CTCF-70 interferes with CTCF-130 normal function, enhancing transactivation induced by CTCF-130 in COS6 cells. The mechanism of CTCF-70 action and other possible functions of CTCF-70 are discussed. PMID:9016583

  2. The Multilevel Mixed Intact Group Analysis: A Mixed Method to Seek, Detect, Describe, and Explain Differences Among Intact Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schoonenboom, Judith

    2016-01-01

    Educational innovations often involve intact subgroups, such as school classes or university departments. In small-scale educational evaluation research, typically involving 1 to 20 subgroups, differences among these subgroups are often neglected. This article presents a mixed method from a qualitative perspective, in which differences among…

  3. Structure, domain organization, and different conformational states of stem cell factor-induced intact KIT dimers

    PubMed Central

    Opatowsky, Yarden; Lax, Irit; Tomé, Francisco; Bleichert, Franziska; Unger, Vinzenz M.; Schlessinger, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Using electron microscopy and fitting of crystal structures, we present the 3D reconstruction of ligand-induced dimers of intact receptor tyrosine kinase, KIT. We observe that KIT protomers form close contacts throughout the entire structure of ligand-bound receptor dimers, and that the dimeric receptors adopt multiple, defined conformational states. Interestingly, the homotypic interactions in the membrane proximal Ig-like domain of the extracellular region differ from those observed in the crystal structure of the unconstrained extracellular regions. We observe two prevalent conformations in which the tyrosine kinase domains interact asymmetrically. The asymmetric arrangement of the cytoplasmic regions may represent snapshots of molecular interactions occurring during trans autophosphorylation. Moreover, the asymmetric arrangements may facilitate specific intermolecular interactions necessary for trans phosphorylation of different KIT autophosphorylation sites that are required for stimulation of kinase activity and recruitment of signaling proteins by activated KIT. PMID:24449920

  4. Diagnostic Coding for Epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Williams, Korwyn; Nuwer, Marc R; Buchhalter, Jeffrey R

    2016-02-01

    Accurate coding is an important function of neurologic practice. This contribution to Continuum is part of an ongoing series that presents helpful coding information along with examples related to the issue topic. Tips for diagnosis coding, Evaluation and Management coding, procedure coding, or a combination are presented, depending on which is most applicable to the subject area of the issue.

  5. Model Children's Code.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque. American Indian Law Center.

    The Model Children's Code was developed to provide a legally correct model code that American Indian tribes can use to enact children's codes that fulfill their legal, cultural and economic needs. Code sections cover the court system, jurisdiction, juvenile offender procedures, minor-in-need-of-care, and termination. Almost every Code section is…

  6. A Novel Tumor-Promoting Function Residing in the 5′ Non-coding Region of vascular endothelial growth factor mRNA

    PubMed Central

    Masuda, Kiyoshi; Teshima-Kondo, Shigetada; Mukaijo, Mina; Yamagishi, Naoko; Nishikawa, Yoshiko; Nishida, Kensei; Kawai, Tomoko; Rokutan, Kazuhito

    2008-01-01

    Background Vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF) is one of the key regulators of tumor development, hence it is considered to be an important therapeutic target for cancer treatment. However, clinical trials have suggested that anti-VEGF monotherapy was less effective than standard chemotherapy. On the basis of the evidence, we hypothesized that vegf mRNA may have unrecognized function(s) in cancer cells. Methods and Findings Knockdown of VEGF with vegf-targeting small-interfering (si) RNAs increased susceptibility of human colon cancer cell line (HCT116) to apoptosis caused with 5-fluorouracil, etoposide, or doxorubicin. Recombinant human VEGF165 did not completely inhibit this apoptosis. Conversely, overexpression of VEGF165 increased resistance to anti-cancer drug-induced apoptosis, while an anti-VEGF165-neutralizing antibody did not completely block the resistance. We prepared plasmids encoding full-length vegf mRNA with mutation of signal sequence, vegf mRNAs lacking untranslated regions (UTRs), or mutated 5′UTRs. Using these plasmids, we revealed that the 5′UTR of vegf mRNA possessed anti-apoptotic activity. The 5′UTR-mediated activity was not affected by a protein synthesis inhibitor, cycloheximide. We established HCT116 clones stably expressing either the vegf 5′UTR or the mutated 5′UTR. The clones expressing the 5′UTR, but not the mutated one, showed increased anchorage-independent growth in vitro and formed progressive tumors when implanted in athymic nude mice. Microarray and quantitative real-time PCR analyses indicated that the vegf 5′UTR-expressing tumors had up-regulated anti-apoptotic genes, multidrug-resistant genes, and growth-promoting genes, while pro-apoptotic genes were down-regulated. Notably, expression of signal transducers and activators of transcription 1 (STAT1) was markedly repressed in the 5′UTR-expressing tumors, resulting in down-regulation of a STAT1-responsive cluster of genes (43 genes). As a result, the

  7. Phylogeny of genetic codes and punctuation codes within genetic codes.

    PubMed

    Seligmann, Hervé

    2015-03-01

    Punctuation codons (starts, stops) delimit genes, reflect translation apparatus properties. Most codon reassignments involve punctuation. Here two complementary approaches classify natural genetic codes: (A) properties of amino acids assigned to codons (classical phylogeny), coding stops as X (A1, antitermination/suppressor tRNAs insert unknown residues), or as gaps (A2, no translation, classical stop); and (B) considering only punctuation status (start, stop and other codons coded as -1, 0 and 1 (B1); 0, -1 and 1 (B2, reflects ribosomal translational dynamics); and 1, -1, and 0 (B3, starts/stops as opposites)). All methods separate most mitochondrial codes from most nuclear codes; Gracilibacteria consistently cluster with metazoan mitochondria; mitochondria co-hosted with chloroplasts cluster with nuclear codes. Method A1 clusters the euplotid nuclear code with metazoan mitochondria; A2 separates euplotids from mitochondria. Firmicute bacteria Mycoplasma/Spiroplasma and Protozoan (and lower metazoan) mitochondria share codon-amino acid assignments. A1 clusters them with mitochondria, they cluster with the standard genetic code under A2: constraints on amino acid ambiguity versus punctuation-signaling produced the mitochondrial versus bacterial versions of this genetic code. Punctuation analysis B2 converges best with classical phylogenetic analyses, stressing the need for a unified theory of genetic code punctuation accounting for ribosomal constraints.

  8. Radioactive satellites - Intact reentry and breakup by debris impact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anz-Meador, P. D.; Potter, A. E., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    There is a substantial mass of radioactive material in nuclear reactors or radioisotope thermal generators (RTGs) in orbit about the earth. This paper examines the reentry of intact nuclear fuel cores and RTGs and the fragmentation and subsequent radioactive debris cloud deposition and evolution resulting from the impact of orbital debris upon an orbiting reactor, fuel core, or RTG. To assess the intact reentry, decay rates and a predicted decay date using historical and projected orbital decay data, are estimated. The current NASA debris environment model is utilized to estimate impact rates and debris cloud evolution of a fragmentation event. Results of these analyses are compared and concepts are tendered which would tend to minimize the radiological debris hazard to personnel and structures both on the earth's surface and in low earth orbit.

  9. On the sensitivity of intact cells to perturbation by ethanol

    SciTech Connect

    Hitzemann, R.; Whitaker-Azmitia, P. ); Dains, K.; Lin, J. )

    1989-01-01

    A comparison was made of ethanol's effects on the order of plasma membranes in intact cells and some isolated membrane preparations. Order was assessed by steady-state fluorescence polarization techniques using the non-permeant probe, TMA-DPH. The data show that two cultured cells, rat neonatal astroglial and N2A neuroblastoma, were sensitive to significant ethanol-induced disordering within the anesthetically relevant range. Human erythrocytes, cultured fibroblasts and homogenized astroglial cells required higher ethanol concentrations to produce a similar effect. Intact erythrocytes were approximately twice as sensitive as erythrocyte ghost membranes to ethanol induced perturbation. The neonatal glial and N2A cells were approximately five times more sensitive than synaptic membranes to ethanol effects. DMPC and DMPC + cholesterol liposomes and myelin membranes were insensitive to ethanol's effects. The incorporation of 10 mole % ganglioside GM{sub 1} sensitized the liposomes to ethanol-induced perturbation.

  10. Intrathecal application of cyproheptadine impairs locomotion in intact rats.

    PubMed

    Majczyński, Henryk; Cabaj, Anna; Górska, Teresa

    In intact adult rats, cyproheptadine, a 5-HT2 antagonist, administered intrathecally at the midlumbar segments was found to impair hindlimb locomotor movements during overground locomotion. These effects were dose-dependent; they varied from transient complete hindlimb paraplegia seen at doses of 300 microg/20 microl, to short-lasting trunk instability at doses of 100 microg/20 microl. After the return of overground locomotion, transient abduction of one of the hindlimbs was observed in some animals. These findings demonstrate that the blockade of 5-HT2 receptors affects locomotion in intact rats. Our results provide support for the hypothesis of serotonergic involvement in rat locomotion, which, so far, has been based mainly on the effects of 5-HT2 agonists on the recovery of locomotion in spinal rats.

  11. Spelling-stress regularity effects are intact in developmental dyslexia.

    PubMed

    Mundy, Ian R; Carroll, Julia M

    2013-01-01

    The current experiment investigated conflicting predictions regarding the effects of spelling-stress regularity on the lexical decision performance of skilled adult readers and adults with developmental dyslexia. In both reading groups, lexical decision responses were significantly faster and significantly more accurate when the orthographic structure of a word ending was a reliable as opposed to an unreliable predictor of lexical stress assignment. Furthermore, the magnitude of this spelling-stress regularity effect was found to be equivalent across reading groups. These findings are consistent with intact phoneme-level regularity effects also observed in dyslexia. The paper discusses how findings of intact spelling-sound regularity effects at both prosodic and phonemic levels, as well as other similar results, can be reconciled with the obvious difficulties that people with dyslexia experience in other domains of phonological processing.

  12. Structural determination of intact proteins using mass spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    Kruppa, Gary; Schoeniger, Joseph S.; Young, Malin M.

    2008-05-06

    The present invention relates to novel methods of determining the sequence and structure of proteins. Specifically, the present invention allows for the analysis of intact proteins within a mass spectrometer. Therefore, preparatory separations need not be performed prior to introducing a protein sample into the mass spectrometer. Also disclosed herein are new instrumental developments for enhancing the signal from the desired modified proteins, methods for producing controlled protein fragments in the mass spectrometer, eliminating complex microseparations, and protein preparatory chemical steps necessary for cross-linking based protein structure determination.Additionally, the preferred method of the present invention involves the determination of protein structures utilizing a top-down analysis of protein structures to search for covalent modifications. In the preferred method, intact proteins are ionized and fragmented within the mass spectrometer.

  13. Binding of Clostridium botulinum C3 exoenzyme to intact cells.

    PubMed

    Rohrbeck, Astrid; von Elsner, Leonie; Hagemann, Sandra; Just, Ingo

    2014-06-01

    C3 from Clostridium botulinum (C3) specifically modifies Rho GTPases RhoA, RhoB, and RhoC by mono-ADP-ribosylation. The confined substrate profile of C3 is the basis for its use as pharmacological tool in cell biology to study cellular functions of Rho GTPases. Although C3 exoenzyme does not possess a cell-binding/-translocation domain, C3 is taken up by intact cells via an unknown mechanism. In the present work, binding of C3 to the hippocampus-derived HT22 cells and J774A.1 macrophages was characterized. C3 bound concentration-dependent to HT22 and J774A.1 cells. Pronase treatment of intact cells significantly reduced both C3 binding and C3 cell entry. Removal of sugar residues by glycosidase F treatment resulted in an increased binding of C3, but a reduced cell entry. To explore the involvement of phosphorylation in the binding process of C3, intact HT22 and J774A.1 cells were pre-treated with vanadate prior to incubation with C3. Inhibition of de-phosphorylation by vanadate resulted in an increased binding of C3. To differentiate between intracellular and extracellular phosphorylation, intact cells were treated with CIP (calf intestine phosphatase) to remove extracellular phosphate residues. The removal of phosphate residues resulted in a strong reduction in binding of C3 to cells. In sum, the C3 membranous binding partner is proteinaceous, and the glycosylation as well as the phosphorylation state is critical for efficient binding of C3.

  14. Dental abscess in a tooth with intact dens evaginatus.

    PubMed

    Cho, S Y

    2006-03-01

    This article reports a case of dental abscess in a mandibular premolar with intact dens evaginatus. Dentists are advised to critically evaluate those teeth with dens evaginatus, both clinically and radiographically, before attempting prophylactic treatments. This is particularly important medicolegally in case the tooth develops symptoms shortly after the prophylactic treatment. Dentists practising in Western countries should also be aware of this dental anomaly because of the increasing global migration of people from Asia.

  15. Crisscross heart with dextrocardia and intact interventricular septum.

    PubMed

    Muneer, P Kader; Kalathingathodika, Sajeer; Chakanalil, Govindan Sajeev; Sony, Manuel M

    2014-01-01

    Crisscross heart is a rare congenital heart disease characterized by a twisted atrioventricular connection, as a result of rotation of the ventricular mass along its long axis. We report an asymptomatic 48-year-old woman referred to us for evaluation of a cardiac murmur. Further evaluation showed situs solitus, dextrocardia with normal atrioventricular and ventriculoarterial connection, and a crisscross relation of the atrioventricular valves. Unlike the usual case of crisscross heart, our patient had an intact ventricular septum.

  16. Acoustic emissions during deformation of intact and jointed welded tuff

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, D.J.; Teufel, L.W.

    1982-07-01

    Monitoring of acoustic emissions (AE) has been widely used as a means of detecting failure in intact rock. For intact rock the technique is simple, because an increasing rate of AE is usually a sign of impending failure. However, most large rock masses contain numerous joints and the behavior of the joints controls the properties of the rock mass. In particular, the failure mode often becomes stable or unstable slip (stick-slip) on a joint at stresses well below those required for failure of the intact rock. As an aid to understanding and monitoring the behavior of jointed rock masses, we have done a series of experiments on intact and artificially jointed samples of Grouse Canyon tuff. The tuff was selected because it is under consideration as a disposal medium for nuclear wastes. The samples were instrumented to measure axial and transverse displacements and AE rates. Testing was done in a servo-controlled machine at axial displacement rates of 5 x 10{sup -5} cm/sec, and confining pressures ranging from 10 to 40 MPa. For the jointed samples four modes of slip were identified. First, stable sliding accompanied by a steady rate of AE. Second, stick-slip with a sharp drop in load, large displacements but no premonitory AE or slip. Third, stick-slip, as in mode 2, but with premonitory AE and slip. Fourth, slow stick-slip where the load dropped and the displacements increased but the process was slow and culminated in stable sliding. Mode 4 exhibited premonitory AE and slip and after the event, a steady rate of AE during sliding. There seemed to be no way to predict which mode would occur at a given point in the test. In all cases where stable or unstable slip occurred there was a corresponding occurrence of AE. This indicates that slip is related to damage to the joint surfaces and adjacent material. Monitoring AE would be a useful method of detecting slip.

  17. Identification by sequencing based typing and complete coding region analysis of three new HLA class II alleles: DRB3*0210, DRB3*0211 and DQB1*0310.

    PubMed

    Balas, A; Santos, S; Aviles, M J; Garcia-Sanchez, F; Lillo, R; Vicario, J L

    2000-10-01

    The study of HLA class II polymorphism by direct exon 2 DNA sequencing analysis has been established to be a reliable and accurate high-resolution typing procedure. This approach shows some advantages in relation to previous methods, polymerase chain reaction using sequence-specific oligonucleotides (PCR-SSO) and sequence-specific primers (PCR-SSP), basically due to the capability of analysis for the complete sequenced genomic region, including non-polymorphic motifs. DRB3 and DQB1 sequencing based typing (SBT) in unrelated bone marrow donor searching allowed us to detect three new alleles. The complete coding region sequences were characterised from cDNA. Two new DRB3 alleles, DRB3*0210 and DRB3*0211, were described in two Caucasian bone marrow donors. Both sequences showed single point mutations regarding DRB3*0202, producing amino acid replacements at positions 51 (Asp to Thr) and 67 (Leu to Ile), respectively. These two point mutations can be found in other DRB alleles, and suggest that gene conversion would be involved in the origin of both alleles. A new DQB1 sequence was found in a Spanish patient that showed two nucleotide differences, positions 134 and 141, with regard to its close similar DQB1*03011 allele. Only substitution at position 134 provoked amino acid replacement at residue 45, Glu to Gly. This single amino acid change would be involved in the lack of serologic recognition of this new molecule by DQ7-specific reagents.

  18. Posttranslational protein modification by polyamines in intact and regenerating nerves.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, G; Leach, T; Zanakis, M F; Sturman, J A; Ingoglia, N A

    1987-03-01

    A 150,000-g supernatant from axoplasm of the giant axon of the stellate nerve of the squid and from rat sciatic and goldfish optic nerves was found to be able to incorporate covalently [3H]putrescine and [3H]spermidine into an exogenous protein (N,N'-dimethylcasein). Incorporation of radioactivity was inhibited by CuSO4, a specific inhibitor of transglutaminases, the enzymes mediating these reactions in other tissues. Analysis of pH and temperature range and enzyme kinetics displayed characteristics predicted for transglutaminase-mediated reactions. Transglutaminase activity increased during regeneration of both vertebrate nerves, but greater activity was found in segments of nerve containing no intact axons than in either intact segments or in segments containing regenerating axons. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of endogenous modified proteins (in the absence of N,N'-dimethylcasein) showed labeling of 18-, 46- and 200-kilodalton proteins by both [3H]putrescine and [3H]spermidine. Analysis of the protein-bound radioactivity from intact and regenerating rat sciatic nerves demonstrated it to be predominantly in the form of the parent radioactive polyamine. These experiments demonstrate the covalent modification of proteins by polyamines at low levels in squid axoplasm and at relatively higher levels in rat sciatic and goldfish optic nerves. In the latter two cases, the activity of these modification reactions may be due in part to the modification of axonal proteins, but the majority of the activity occurs in nonneuronal cells of the nerve.

  19. Vehicle influence on permeation through intact and compromised skin.

    PubMed

    Gujjar, Meera; Banga, Ajay K

    2014-09-10

    The purpose of this study was to compare the transdermal permeation of a model compound, diclofenac diethylamine, from a hydrophilic and lipophilic vehicle across in vitro models simulating compromised skin. Mineral oil served as a lipophilic vehicle while 10mM phosphate buffered saline served as a hydrophilic vehicle. Compromised skin was simulated by tape stripping, delipidization, or microneedle application and compared with intact skin as a control. Transepidermal water loss was measured to assess barrier function. Skin compromised with tape stripping and delipidization significantly (p<0.05) increased permeation of diclofenac diethylamine compared to intact and microneedle treated skin with phosphate buffered saline vehicle. A similar trend in permeation was observed with mineral oil as the vehicle. For both vehicles, permeation across skin increased in the same order and correlated with degree of barrier impairment as indicated by transepidermal water loss values: intact

  20. QR Codes: Taking Collections Further

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahearn, Caitlin

    2014-01-01

    With some thought and direction, QR (quick response) codes are a great tool to use in school libraries to enhance access to information. From March through April 2013, Caitlin Ahearn interned at Sanborn Regional High School (SRHS) under the supervision of Pam Harland. As a result of Harland's un-Deweying of the nonfiction collection at SRHS,…

  1. Chilean Pitavia more closely related to Oceania and Old World Rutaceae than to Neotropical groups: evidence from two cpDNA non-coding regions, with a new subfamilial classification of the family

    PubMed Central

    Groppo, Milton; Kallunki, Jacquelyn A.; Pirani, José Rubens; Antonelli, Alexandre

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The position of the plant genus Pitavia within an infrafamilial phylogeny of Rutaceae (rue, or orange family) was investigated with the use of two non-coding regions from cpDNA, the trnL-trnF region and the rps16 intron. The only species of the genus, Pitavia punctata Molina, is restricted to the temperate forests of the Coastal Cordillera of Central-Southern Chile and threatened by loss of habitat. The genus traditionally has been treated as part of tribe Zanthoxyleae (subfamily Rutoideae) where it constitutes the monogeneric tribe Pitaviinae. This tribe and genus are characterized by fruits of 1 to 4 fleshy drupelets, unlike the dehiscent fruits typical of the subfamily. Fifty-five taxa of Rutaceae, representing 53 genera (nearly one-third of those in the family) and all subfamilies, tribes, and almost all subtribes of the family were included. Parsimony and Bayesian inference were used to infer the phylogeny; six taxa of Meliaceae, Sapindaceae, and Simaroubaceae, all members of Sapindales, were also used as out-groups. Results from both analyses were congruent and showed Pitavia as sister to Flindersia and Lunasia, both genera with species scattered through Australia, Philippines, Moluccas, New Guinea and the Malayan region, and phylogenetically far from other Neotropical Rutaceae, such as the Galipeinae (Galipeeae, Rutoideae) and Pteleinae (Toddalieae, former Toddalioideae). Additionally, a new circumscription of the subfamilies of Rutaceae is presented and discussed. Only two subfamilies (both monophyletic) are recognized: Cneoroideae (including Dictyolomatoideae, Spathelioideae, Cneoraceae, and Ptaeroxylaceae) and Rutoideae (including not only traditional Rutoideae but also Aurantioideae, Flindersioideae, and Toddalioideae). As a consequence, Aurantioideae (Citrus and allies) is reduced to tribal rank as Aurantieae. PMID:23717188

  2. Accumulate repeat accumulate codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbasfar, Aliazam; Divsalar, Dariush; Yao, Kung

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we propose an innovative channel coding scheme called 'Accumulate Repeat Accumulate codes' (ARA). This class of codes can be viewed as serial turbo-like codes, or as a subclass of Low Density Parity Check (LDPC) codes, thus belief propagation can be used for iterative decoding of ARA codes on a graph. The structure of encoder for this class can be viewed as precoded Repeat Accumulate (RA) code or as precoded Irregular Repeat Accumulate (IRA) code, where simply an accumulator is chosen as a precoder. Thus ARA codes have simple, and very fast encoder structure when they representing LDPC codes. Based on density evolution for LDPC codes through some examples for ARA codes, we show that for maximum variable node degree 5 a minimum bit SNR as low as 0.08 dB from channel capacity for rate 1/2 can be achieved as the block size goes to infinity. Thus based on fixed low maximum variable node degree, its threshold outperforms not only the RA and IRA codes but also the best known LDPC codes with the dame maximum node degree. Furthermore by puncturing the accumulators any desired high rate codes close to code rate 1 can be obtained with thresholds that stay close to the channel capacity thresholds uniformly. Iterative decoding simulation results are provided. The ARA codes also have projected graph or protograph representation that allows for high speed decoder implementation.

  3. Concatenated Coding Using Trellis-Coded Modulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Michael W.

    1997-01-01

    In the late seventies and early eighties a technique known as Trellis Coded Modulation (TCM) was developed for providing spectrally efficient error correction coding. Instead of adding redundant information in the form of parity bits, redundancy is added at the modulation stage thereby increasing bandwidth efficiency. A digital communications system can be designed to use bandwidth-efficient multilevel/phase modulation such as Amplitude Shift Keying (ASK), Phase Shift Keying (PSK), Differential Phase Shift Keying (DPSK) or Quadrature Amplitude Modulation (QAM). Performance gain can be achieved by increasing the number of signals over the corresponding uncoded system to compensate for the redundancy introduced by the code. A considerable amount of research and development has been devoted toward developing good TCM codes for severely bandlimited applications. More recently, the use of TCM for satellite and deep space communications applications has received increased attention. This report describes the general approach of using a concatenated coding scheme that features TCM and RS coding. Results have indicated that substantial (6-10 dB) performance gains can be achieved with this approach with comparatively little bandwidth expansion. Since all of the bandwidth expansion is due to the RS code we see that TCM based concatenated coding results in roughly 10-50% bandwidth expansion compared to 70-150% expansion for similar concatenated scheme which use convolution code. We stress that combined coding and modulation optimization is important for achieving performance gains while maintaining spectral efficiency.

  4. Coset Codes Viewed as Terminated Convolutional Codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fossorier, Marc P. C.; Lin, Shu

    1996-01-01

    In this paper, coset codes are considered as terminated convolutional codes. Based on this approach, three new general results are presented. First, it is shown that the iterative squaring construction can equivalently be defined from a convolutional code whose trellis terminates. This convolutional code determines a simple encoder for the coset code considered, and the state and branch labelings of the associated trellis diagram become straightforward. Also, from the generator matrix of the code in its convolutional code form, much information about the trade-off between the state connectivity and complexity at each section, and the parallel structure of the trellis, is directly available. Based on this generator matrix, it is shown that the parallel branches in the trellis diagram of the convolutional code represent the same coset code C(sub 1), of smaller dimension and shorter length. Utilizing this fact, a two-stage optimum trellis decoding method is devised. The first stage decodes C(sub 1), while the second stage decodes the associated convolutional code, using the branch metrics delivered by stage 1. Finally, a bidirectional decoding of each received block starting at both ends is presented. If about the same number of computations is required, this approach remains very attractive from a practical point of view as it roughly doubles the decoding speed. This fact is particularly interesting whenever the second half of the trellis is the mirror image of the first half, since the same decoder can be implemented for both parts.

  5. Extracellular production of an intact and biologically active human growth hormone by the Bacillus brevis system.

    PubMed

    Kajino, T; Saito, Y; Asami, O; Yamada, Y; Hirai, M; Udata, S

    1997-10-01

    The characteristic features of the Bacillus brevis system are very high productivity of heterologous proteins and very low extracellular protease activity. However, degradation of some heterologous proteins, especially mammalian proteins, can be observed and resulted in a lowering of protein productivity. By using a mutant expressing low levels of proteases and the addition of EDTA to the medium, intact human growth hormone (hGH) was successfully produced with the B. brevis system. Signal peptide modification with higher basicity in the amino terminal region and higher hydrophobicity in the middle region brought about a twelve-fold increase in hGH production. The hGH yield was further elevated to 240 mg L-1 by optimization of culture conditions. Thus, biologically active and mature hGH can be efficiently produced directly in the medium with the B. brevis system.

  6. Intact Visual Perception in Memory-Impaired Patients with Medial Temporal Lobe Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Shrager, Yael; Gold, Jeffrey J.; Hopkins, Ramona O.; Squire, Larry R.

    2006-01-01

    A recent proposal that structures of the medial temporal lobe support visual perception in addition to memory challenges the long-standing idea that the ability to acquire new memories is separable from other cognitive and perceptual functions. In four experiments, we have put this proposal to a rigorous test. Six memory-impaired patients with well characterized lesions of either the hippocampal region or the hippocampal region plus additional medial temporal lobe structures were assessed on difficult tests of visual perceptual discrimination. Across all four experiments, the patients performed as well as controls. The results show that visual perception is intact in memory-impaired patients with damage to the medial temporal lobe even when perception is assessed with challenging tasks. Furthermore, the results support the principle that the ability to acquire new memories is a distinct cerebral function, dissociable from other perceptual and cognitive functions. PMID:16495450

  7. Discussion on LDPC Codes and Uplink Coding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrews, Ken; Divsalar, Dariush; Dolinar, Sam; Moision, Bruce; Hamkins, Jon; Pollara, Fabrizio

    2007-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the progress that the workgroup on Low-Density Parity-Check (LDPC) for space link coding. The workgroup is tasked with developing and recommending new error correcting codes for near-Earth, Lunar, and deep space applications. Included in the presentation is a summary of the technical progress of the workgroup. Charts that show the LDPC decoder sensitivity to symbol scaling errors are reviewed, as well as a chart showing the performance of several frame synchronizer algorithms compared to that of some good codes and LDPC decoder tests at ESTL. Also reviewed is a study on Coding, Modulation, and Link Protocol (CMLP), and the recommended codes. A design for the Pseudo-Randomizer with LDPC Decoder and CRC is also reviewed. A chart that summarizes the three proposed coding systems is also presented.

  8. Bar Codes for Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rahn, Erwin

    1984-01-01

    Discusses the evolution of standards for bar codes (series of printed lines and spaces that represent numbers, symbols, and/or letters of alphabet) and describes the two types most frequently adopted by libraries--Code-A-Bar and CODE 39. Format of the codes is illustrated. Six references and definitions of terminology are appended. (EJS)

  9. Manually operated coded switch

    DOEpatents

    Barnette, Jon H.

    1978-01-01

    The disclosure relates to a manually operated recodable coded switch in which a code may be inserted, tried and used to actuate a lever controlling an external device. After attempting a code, the switch's code wheels must be returned to their zero positions before another try is made.

  10. QR Codes 101

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crompton, Helen; LaFrance, Jason; van 't Hooft, Mark

    2012-01-01

    A QR (quick-response) code is a two-dimensional scannable code, similar in function to a traditional bar code that one might find on a product at the supermarket. The main difference between the two is that, while a traditional bar code can hold a maximum of only 20 digits, a QR code can hold up to 7,089 characters, so it can contain much more…

  11. ARA type protograph codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Divsalar, Dariush (Inventor); Abbasfar, Aliazam (Inventor); Jones, Christopher R. (Inventor); Dolinar, Samuel J. (Inventor); Thorpe, Jeremy C. (Inventor); Andrews, Kenneth S. (Inventor); Yao, Kung (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    An apparatus and method for encoding low-density parity check codes. Together with a repeater, an interleaver and an accumulator, the apparatus comprises a precoder, thus forming accumulate-repeat-accumulate (ARA codes). Protographs representing various types of ARA codes, including AR3A, AR4A and ARJA codes, are described. High performance is obtained when compared to the performance of current repeat-accumulate (RA) or irregular-repeat-accumulate (IRA) codes.

  12. Feasible pickup from intact ossicular chain with floating piezoelectric microphone

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Many microphones have been developed to meet with the implantable requirement of totally implantable cochlear implant (TICI). However, a biocompatible one without destroying the intactness of the ossicular chain still remains under investigation. Such an implantable floating piezoelectric microphone (FPM) has been manufactured and shows an efficient electroacoustic performance in vitro test at our lab. We examined whether it pick up sensitively from the intact ossicular chain and postulated whether it be an optimal implantable one. Methods Animal controlled experiment: five adult cats (eight ears) were sacrificed as the model to test the electroacoustic performance of the FPM. Three groups were studied: (1) the experiment group (on malleus): the FPM glued onto the handle of the malleus of the intact ossicular chains; (2) negative control group (in vivo): the FPM only hung into the tympanic cavity; (3) positive control group (Hy-M30): a HiFi commercial microphone placed close to the site of the experiment ear. The testing speaker played pure tones orderly ranged from 0.25 to 8.0 kHz. The FPM inside the ear and the HiFi microphone simultaneously picked up acoustic vibration which recorded as .wav files to analyze. Results The FPM transformed acoustic vibration sensitively and flatly as did the in vitro test across the frequencies above 2.0 kHz, whereas inefficiently below 1.0 kHz for its overloading mass. Although the HiFi microphone presented more efficiently than the FPM did, there was no significant difference at 3.0 kHz and 8.0 kHz. Conclusions It is feasible to develop such an implantable FPM for future TICIs and TIHAs system on condition that the improvement of Micro Electromechanical System and piezoelectric ceramic material technology would be applied to reduce its weight and minimize its size. PMID:22353161

  13. An integrated workflow for characterizing intact phosphoproteins from complex mixtures

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Si; Yang, Feng; Zhao, Rui; Tolić, Nikola; Robinson, Errol W.; Camp, David; Smith, Richard D.; Paša-Tolić, Ljiljana

    2014-01-01

    The phosphorylation of any site on a given protein can affect its activity, degradation rate, ability to dock with other proteins or bind divalent cations, and/or its localization. These effects can operate within the same protein; in fact, multisite phosphorylation is a key mechanism for achieving signal integration in cells. Hence, knowing the overall phosphorylation signature of a protein is essential for understanding the "state" of a cell. However, current technologies to monitor the phosphorylation status of proteins are inefficient at determining the relative stoichiometries of phosphorylation at multiple sites. Here we report a new capability for comprehensive liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC/MS) analysis of intact phosphoproteins. The technology platform built upon integrated bottom-up and top-down approach that is facilitated by intact protein reversed-phase (RP)LC concurrently coupled with Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR) MS and fraction collection. As the use of conventional RPLC systems for phosphopeptide identification has proven challenging due to the formation of metal ion complexes at various metal surfaces during LC/MS and ESI-MS analysis, we have developed a “metal-free” RPLC-ESI-MS platform for phosphoprotein characterization. This platform demonstrated a significant sensitivity enhancement for phosphorylated casein proteins enriched from a standard protein mixture and revealed the presence of over 20 casein isoforms arising from genetic variants with varying numbers of phosphorylation sites. The integrated workflow was also applied to an enriched yeast phosphoproteome to evaluate the feasibility of this strategy for characterizing complex biological systems, and revealed ~16% of the detected yeast proteins to have multiple phosphorylation isoforms. Intact protein LC/MS platform for characterization of combinatorial posttranslational modifications (PTMs), with special emphasis on multisite phosphorylation, holds

  14. Controlled therapy by imaging of functional structures of intact liver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, W.; Zhuang, Feng Y.; Ruan, G.; Kakihana, Yasuyuki; Krug, A.; Kessler, Manfred D.

    2000-04-01

    Ligustrazine, a Chinese herb medicine has been used to treat the diseases of cardiovascular and cerebral vascular diseases in China by Chinese traditional physicians or many years. Recently, results showed that ligustrazine is a powerful hepatic vasodilator. It can greatly change the blood supply of the tissues. Due to micro-optical tissue sensor developed recently it became possible to image functional structures of tissue on the level of intact blood capillaries. In our experiment we used the Oxyscan in order to study the effect of Ligustrazine on the oxygen supply of rat liver.

  15. Fast Imaging of Intact and Shattered Cryogenic Neon Pellets

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zhehui; Combs, Stephen Kirk; Baylor, Larry R; Foust, Charles R; Lyttle, Mark S; Meitner, Steven J; Rasmussen, David A

    2014-01-01

    Compact condensed-matter injection technologies are increasingly used in magnetic fusion. One recent application is in disruption mitigation. An imaging system with less-than-100- m- and sub- s-resolution is described and used to characterize intact and shattered cryogenic neon pellets. Shattered pellets contain fine particles ranging from tens of m to about 7 mm. Time-of-flight analyses indicate that pellets could slow down if hitting the wall of the guide tube. Fast high-resolution imaging systems are thus useful to neon and other condensed-matter injector development.

  16. Fast imaging of intact and shattered cryogenic neon pellets

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zhehui; Combs, S. K.; Baylor, L. R.; Foust, C. R.; Lyttle, M. S.; Meitner, S. J.; Rasmussen, D. A.

    2014-11-15

    Compact condensed-matter injection technologies are increasingly used in magnetic fusion. One recent application is in disruption mitigation. An imaging system with less-than-100-µm- and sub-µs-resolution is described and used to characterize intact and shattered cryogenic neon pellets. Shattered pellets contain fine particles ranging from tens of µm to about 7 mm. Time-of-flight analyses indicate that pellets could slow down if hitting the wall of the guide tube. Fast high-resolution imaging systems are thus useful to neon and other condensed-matter injector development.

  17. Imaging of Intact Tissue Sections: Moving beyond the Microscope*

    PubMed Central

    Seeley, Erin H.; Schwamborn, Kristina; Caprioli, Richard M.

    2011-01-01

    MALDI-imaging MS is a new molecular imaging technology for direct in situ analysis of thin tissue sections. Multiple analytes can be monitored simultaneously without prior knowledge of their identities and without the need for target-specific reagents such as antibodies. Imaging MS provides important insights into biological processes because the native distributions of molecules are minimally disturbed, and histological features remain intact throughout the analysis. A wide variety of molecules can be imaged, including proteins, peptides, lipids, drugs, and metabolites. Several specific examples are presented to highlight the utility of the technology. PMID:21632549

  18. Physiological characterization of motor unit properties in intact cats.

    PubMed

    O'Donovan, M J; Hoffer, J A; Loeb, G E

    1983-02-01

    Single motor units were isolated in intact cats, by microstimulation through chronically implanted microwires in the L5 ventral roots. Motor unit axonal and mechanical properties were obtained by stimulus-triggered averaging the signals from an implanted femoral nerve recording cuff and patellar tendon force transducer. All unit types were sampled with this technique, and it was also possible to stimulate in isolation an axon whose ventral root spike was recorded during treadmill locomotion. A new technique was described, spike-triggered microstimulation, for verifying the identity of a stimulated and a recorded axon.

  19. Fast imaging of intact and shattered cryogenic neon pellets.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhehui; Combs, S K; Baylor, L R; Foust, C R; Lyttle, M S; Meitner, S J; Rasmussen, D A

    2014-11-01

    Compact condensed-matter injection technologies are increasingly used in magnetic fusion. One recent application is in disruption mitigation. An imaging system with less-than-100-µm- and sub-µs-resolution is described and used to characterize intact and shattered cryogenic neon pellets. Shattered pellets contain fine particles ranging from tens of µm to about 7 mm. Time-of-flight analyses indicate that pellets could slow down if hitting the wall of the guide tube. Fast high-resolution imaging systems are thus useful to neon and other condensed-matter injector development.

  20. Resequencing and association analysis of coding regions at twenty candidate genes suggest a role for rare risk variation at AKAP9 and protective variation at NRXN1 in schizophrenia susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Suárez-Rama, José Javier; Arrojo, Manuel; Sobrino, Beatriz; Amigo, Jorge; Brenlla, Julio; Agra, Santiago; Paz, Eduardo; Brión, María; Carracedo, Ángel; Páramo, Mario; Costas, Javier

    2015-01-01

    A fraction of genetic risk to develop schizophrenia may be due to low-frequency variants. This multistep study attempted to find low-frequency variants of high effect at coding regions of eleven schizophrenia susceptibility genes supported by genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and nine genes for the DISC1 interactome, a susceptibility gene-set. During the discovery step, a total of 125 kb per sample were resequenced in 153 schizophrenia patients and 153 controls from Galicia (NW Spain), and the cumulative role of low-frequency variants at a gene or at the DISC1 gene-set were analyzed by burden and variance-based tests. Relevant results were meta-analyzed when appropriate data were available. In addition, case-only putative damaging variants were genotyped in a further 419 cases and 398 controls. The discovery step revealed a protective effect of rare missense variants at NRXN1, a result supported by meta-analysis (OR = 0.67, 95% CI: 0.47-0.94, P = 0.021, based on 3848 patients and 3896 controls from six studies). The follow-up step based on case-only putative damaging variants revealed a promising risk variant at AKAP9. This variant, K873R, reached nominal significance after inclusion of 240 additional Spanish controls from databases. The variant, located in an ADCY2 binding region, is absent from large public databases. Interestingly, GWAS revealed an association between common ADCY2 variants and bipolar disorder, a disorder with considerable genetic overlap with schizophrenia. These data suggest a role of rare missense variants at NRXN1 and AKAP9 in schizophrenia susceptibility, probably related to alteration of the excitatory/inhibitory synaptic balance, deserving further investigation.

  1. Sequence variation in the coding region of the melanocortin-1 receptor gene (MC1R) is not associated with plumage variation in the blue-crowned manakin (Lepidothrix coronata).

    PubMed

    Cheviron, Z A; Hackett, Shannon J; Brumfield, Robb T

    2006-07-07

    Avian plumage traits are the targets of both natural and sexual selection. Consequently, genetic changes resulting in plumage variation among closely related taxa might represent important evolutionary events. The molecular basis of such differences, however, is unknown in most cases. Sequence variation in the melanocortin-1 receptor gene (MC1R) is associated with melanistic phenotypes in many vertebrate taxa, including several avian species. The blue-crowned manakin (Lepidothrix coronata), a widespread, sexually dichromatic passerine, exhibits striking geographic variation in male plumage colour across its range in southern Central America and western Amazonia. Northern males are black with brilliant blue crowns whereas southern males are green with lighter blue crowns. We sequenced 810 bp of the MC1R coding region in 23 individuals spanning the range of male plumage variation. The only variable sites we detected among L. coronata sequences were four synonymous substitutions, none of which were strictly associated with either plumage type. Similarly, comparative analyses showed that L. coronata sequences were monomorphic at the three amino acid sites hypothesized to be functionally important in other birds. These results demonstrate that genes other than MC1R underlie melanic plumage polymorphism in blue-crowned manakins.

  2. The neurovirulence and neuroinvasiveness of chimeric tick-borne encephalitis/dengue virus can be attenuated by introducing defined mutations into the envelope and NS5 protein genes and the 3' non-coding region of the genome

    SciTech Connect

    Engel, Amber R.; Rumyantsev, Alexander A.; Maximova, Olga A.; Speicher, James M.; Heiss, Brian; Murphy, Brian R.; Pletnev, Alexander G.

    2010-09-15

    Tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) is a severe disease affecting thousands of people throughout Eurasia. Despite the use of formalin-inactivated vaccines in endemic areas, an increasing incidence of TBE emphasizes the need for an alternative vaccine that will induce a more durable immunity against TBE virus (TBEV). The chimeric attenuated virus vaccine candidate containing the structural protein genes of TBEV on a dengue virus genetic background (TBEV/DEN4) retains a high level of neurovirulence in both mice and monkeys. Therefore, attenuating mutations were introduced into the envelope (E{sub 315}) and NS5 (NS5{sub 654,655}) proteins, and into the 3' non-coding region ({Delta}30) of TBEV/DEN4. The variant that contained all three mutations (v{Delta}30/E{sub 315}/NS5{sub 654,655}) was significantly attenuated for neuroinvasiveness and neurovirulence and displayed a reduced level of replication and virus-induced histopathology in the brains of mice. The high level of safety in the central nervous system indicates that v{Delta}30/E{sub 315}/NS5{sub 654,655} should be further evaluated as a TBEV vaccine.

  3. Detection of 98. 5% of the mutations in 200 Belgian cystic fibrosis alleles by reverse dot-blot and sequencing of the complete coding region and exon/intron junctions of the CFTR gene

    SciTech Connect

    Cuppens, H.; Marynen, P.; Cassiman, J.J. ); De Boeck, C. )

    1993-12-01

    The authors have previously shown that about 85% of the mutations in 194 Belgian cystic fibrosis alleles could be detected by a reverse dot-blot assay. In the present study, 50 Belgian chromosomes were analyzed for mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator gene by means of direct solid phase automatic sequencing of PCR products of individual exons. Twenty-six disease mutations and 14 polymorphisms were found. Twelve of these mutations and 3 polymorphisms were not described before. With the exception of one mutant allele carrying two mutations, these mutations were the only mutations found in the complete coding region and their exon/intron boundaries. The total sensitivity of mutant CF alleles that could be identified was 98.5%. Given the heterogeneity of these mutations, most of them very rare, CFTR mutation screening still remains rather complex in the population, and population screening, whether desirable or not, does not appear to be technically feasible with the methods currently available. 24 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  4. 46 CFR 178.325 - Intact stability requirements for a sailing vessel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...) Commanding Officer, Marine Safety Center, may prescribe additional or different stability requirements for a... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Intact stability requirements for a sailing vessel. 178... VESSELS (UNDER 100 GROSS TONS) INTACT STABILITY AND SEAWORTHINESS Intact Stability Standards §...

  5. 46 CFR 178.325 - Intact stability requirements-monohull sailing vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... protected waters or partially protected waters. (d) The Commanding Officer, Marine Safety Center, may... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Intact stability requirements-monohull sailing vessels... PASSENGER VESSELS (UNDER 100 GROSS TONS) INTACT STABILITY AND SEAWORTHINESS Intact Stability Standards §...

  6. Detection and Quantitation of Succinimide in Intact Protein via Hydrazine Trapping and Chemical Derivatization

    PubMed Central

    KLAENE, JOSHUA J.; NI, WENQIN; ALFARO, JOSHUA F.; ZHOU, ZHAOHUI SUNNY

    2014-01-01

    Formation of aspartyl succinimide (Asu) is a common post-translational modification (PTM) of protein pharmaceuticals under acidic conditions. We present a method to detect and quantitate succinimide in intact protein via hydrazine trapping and chemical derivatization. Succinimide, which is labile under typical analytical conditions, is first trapped with hydrazine to form stable hydrazide and can be directly analyzed by mass spectrometry. The resulting aspartyl hydrazide can be selectively derivatized by various tags, such as fluorescent rhodamine sulfonyl chloride that absorbs strongly in the visible region (570 nm). Our tagging strategy allows the labeled protein to be analyzed by orthogonal methods, including HPLC-UV, LC-MS, and SDS-PAGE coupled with fluorescence imaging. A unique advantage of our method is that variants containing succinimide, after derivatization, can be readily resolved via either affinity enrichment or chromatographic separation. This allows further investigation of individual factors in a complex protein mixture that affect succinimide formation. Some additional advantages imparted by fluorescence labeling include, the facile detection of the intact protein without proteolytic digestion to peptides; and high sensitivity, e.g. without optimization 0.41% succinimide was readily detected. As such, our method should be useful for rapid screening, optimization of formulation conditions and related processes relevant to protein pharmaceuticals. PMID:25043726

  7. An effective manual deboning method to prepare intact mouse nasal tissue with preserved anatomical organization.

    PubMed

    Dunston, David; Ashby, Sarah; Krosnowski, Kurt; Ogura, Tatsuya; Lin, Weihong

    2013-08-10

    The mammalian nose is a multi-functional organ with intricate internal structures. The nasal cavity is lined with various epithelia such as olfactory, respiratory, and squamous epithelia which differ markedly in anatomical locations, morphology, and functions. In adult mice, the nose is covered with various skull bones, limiting experimental access to internal structures, especially those in the posterior such as the main olfactory epithelium (MOE). Here we describe an effective method for obtaining almost the entire and intact nasal tissues with preserved anatomical organization. Using surgical tools under a dissecting microscope, we sequentially remove the skull bones surrounding the nasal tissue. This procedure can be performed on both paraformaldehyde-fixed and freshly dissected, skinned mouse heads. The entire deboning procedure takes about 20-30 min, which is significantly shorter than the experimental time required for conventional chemical-based decalcification. In addition, we present an easy method to remove air bubbles trapped between turbinates, which is critical for obtaining intact thin horizontal or coronal or sagittal sections from the nasal tissue preparation. Nasal tissue prepared using our method can be used for whole mount observation of the entire epithelia, as well as morphological, immunocytochemical, RNA in situ hybridization, and physiological studies, especially in studies where region-specific examination and comparison are of interest.

  8. Measurement of intact-core length of atomizing liquid jets by image deconvolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodward, Roger; Burch, Robert; Kuo, Kenneth; Cheung, Fan-Bill

    1993-01-01

    The investigation of liquid jet breakup and spray development is critical to the understanding of combustion phenomena in liquid propellant rocket engines. Much work has been done to characterize low-speed liquid jet breakup and dilute sprays, but atomizing jets and dense sprays have yielded few quantitative measurements due to their high liquid load fractions and hence their optical opacity. Focus was on a characteristic of the primary breakup process of round liquid jets, namely the length of the intact-liquid core. The specific application considered is that of shear-coaxial-type rocket engine injectors in which liquid oxygen is injected through the center post while high velocity gaseous hydrogen is injected through a concentric annulus, providing a shear force to the liquid jet surface. Real-time x ray radiography, capable of imaging through the dense two-phase region surrounding the liquid core, is used to make the measurements. The intact-liquid-core length data were obtained and interpreted using two conceptually different methods to illustrate the effects of chamber pressure, gas-to-liquid momentum ratio, and cavitation.

  9. Efficient entropy coding for scalable video coding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Woong Il; Yang, Jungyoup; Jeon, Byeungwoo

    2005-10-01

    The standardization for the scalable extension of H.264 has called for additional functionality based on H.264 standard to support the combined spatio-temporal and SNR scalability. For the entropy coding of H.264 scalable extension, Context-based Adaptive Binary Arithmetic Coding (CABAC) scheme is considered so far. In this paper, we present a new context modeling scheme by using inter layer correlation between the syntax elements. As a result, it improves coding efficiency of entropy coding in H.264 scalable extension. In simulation results of applying the proposed scheme to encoding the syntax element mb_type, it is shown that improvement in coding efficiency of the proposed method is up to 16% in terms of bit saving due to estimation of more adequate probability model.

  10. Selective ion changes during spontaneous mitochondrial transients in intact astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Azarias, Guillaume; Chatton, Jean-Yves

    2011-01-01

    The bioenergetic status of cells is tightly regulated by the activity of cytosolic enzymes and mitochondrial ATP production. To adapt their metabolism to cellular energy needs, mitochondria have been shown to exhibit changes in their ionic composition as the result of changes in cytosolic ion concentrations. Individual mitochondria also exhibit spontaneous changes in their electrical potential without altering those of neighboring mitochondria. We recently reported that individual mitochondria of intact astrocytes exhibit spontaneous transient increases in their Na(+) concentration. Here, we investigated whether the concentration of other ionic species were involved during mitochondrial transients. By combining fluorescence imaging methods, we performed a multiparameter study of spontaneous mitochondrial transients in intact resting astrocytes. We show that mitochondria exhibit coincident changes in their Na(+) concentration, electrical potential, matrix pH and mitochondrial reactive oxygen species production during a mitochondrial transient without involving detectable changes in their Ca(2+) concentration. Using widefield and total internal reflection fluorescence imaging, we found evidence for localized transient decreases in the free Mg(2+) concentration accompanying mitochondrial Na(+) spikes that could indicate an associated local and transient enrichment in the ATP concentration. Therefore, we propose a sequential model for mitochondrial transients involving a localized ATP microdomain that triggers a Na(+)-mediated mitochondrial depolarization, transiently enhancing the activity of the mitochondrial respiratory chain. Our work provides a model describing ionic changes that could support a bidirectional cytosol-to-mitochondria ionic communication.

  11. Bacterial clearance in the intact and regenerating liver

    SciTech Connect

    Gross, K.; Katz, S.; Dunn, S.P.; Cikrit, D.; Rosenthal, R.; Grosfeld, J.L.

    1985-08-01

    The Kupffer cells in the liver play an important role in reticuloendothelial system (RES) function by clearing particulate matter and bacteria from the blood stream. While hepatocyte regeneration and function have been extensively studied following partial hepatectomy, little information is available concerning RES function in the regenerating liver. This study investigates hepatic RES function by evaluating bacterial clearance (live E. coli) in the intact and regenerating liver. Thirty-four young male Sprague Dawley rats were studied. Twenty-two animals underwent a standard 70% partial hepatectomy using ligature technique and 12 had a sham operation. Both groups of rats received 10(9) organism of TVS labeled E coli, intravenously at 24 hours, 72 hours, 2 1/2 weeks, and 6 weeks postoperatively. Rats were killed 10 minutes following injection and liver, lung, spleen, and kidney harvested, fixed, and radioactivity was determined using a scintillation spectrometer interfaced with a micro-computer counting the TVS radiolabel. The total organ count of trapped bacteria in liver in partially hepatectomized rats was lower than intact controls at 24 hours, but was similar at 72 hours, 2 1/2 weeks, and 6 weeks. Partial hepatectomy increased the amount of bacterial trapping in the lung at 24 hours and 72 hours and returned to normal at 2 1/2 weeks and 6 weeks. Splenic activity was increased following hepatectomy at 2 1/2 weeks. Renal clearance was increased at 72 hours and 2 1/2 weeks.

  12. STREPTOMYCIN FORMATION BY INTACT MYCELIUM OF STREPTOMYCES GRISEUS

    PubMed Central

    Nomi, Ryosaku

    1963-01-01

    Nomi, Ryosaku (Rutgers, The State University, New Brunswick, N.J.). Streptomycin formation by intact mycelium of Streptomyces griseus. J. Bacteriol. 86:1220–1230. 1963.—A study was made of streptomycin formation by intact mycelium of Streptomyces griseus 107 grown in glucose-yeast extract medium. When mycelium harvested after 24, 48, and 72 hr was compared, the earliest growth showed the highest activity in producing streptomycin from glucose. The concentration of streptomycin in the mycelium was higher in the older growth. Calcium chloride had a remarkable effect in increasing streptomycin production from the precursors in the mycelium, especially when the mycelium was grown for 48 hr or longer. The effect of calcium chloride cannot be attributed to the precipitation of an excess of inorganic phosphate in the medium. Glucose, fructose, glycerol, lactic acid, glucosamine, streptidine, and inositol stimulated streptomycin formation, whereas gluconic acid, glucuronic acid, streptamine, and strepturea did not. When 24-hr-old mycelium was suspended and shaken in 0.5% glucose solution, the antibiotic precursors necessary to produce streptomycin were found mainly in the supernatant of the culture rather than in the mycelium. The supernatant included some substance which had a weak antibiotic activity. This substance was less basic than streptomycin and was transformed to streptomycin with a remarkable increase in antibiotic activity. PMID:14086093

  13. Microarray Noninvasive Neuronal Seizure Recordings from Intact Larval Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Michaela; Dhamne, Sameer C.; LaCoursiere, Christopher M.; Tambunan, Dimira; Poduri, Annapurna; Rotenberg, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Zebrafish epilepsy models are emerging tools in experimental epilepsy. Zebrafish larvae, in particular, are advantageous because they can be easily genetically altered and used for developmental and drug studies since agents applied to the bath penetrate the organism easily. Methods for electrophysiological recordings in zebrafish are new and evolving. We present a novel multi-electrode array method to non-invasively record electrical activity from up to 61 locations of an intact larval zebrafish head. This method enables transcranial noninvasive recording of extracellular field potentials (which include multi-unit activity and EEG) to identify epileptic seizures. To record from the brains of zebrafish larvae, the dorsum of the head of an intact larva was secured onto a multi-electrode array. We recorded from individual electrodes for at least three hours and quantified neuronal firing frequency, spike patterns (continuous or bursting), and synchrony of neuronal firing. Following 15 mM potassium chloride- or pentylenetetrazole-infusion into the bath, spike and burst rate increased significantly. Additionally, synchrony of neuronal firing across channels, a hallmark of epileptic seizures, also increased. Notably, the fish survived the experiment. This non-invasive method complements present invasive zebrafish neurophysiological techniques: it affords the advantages of high spatial and temporal resolution, a capacity to measure multiregional activity and neuronal synchrony in seizures, and fish survival for future experiments, such as studies of epileptogenesis and development. PMID:27281339

  14. Nickel in plants: I. Uptake kinetics using intact soybean seedlings.

    PubMed

    Cataldo, D A; Garland, T R; Wildung, R E

    1978-10-01

    The absorption of Ni(2+) by 21-day-old soybean plants (Glycine max cv. Williams) was investigated with respect to its concentration dependence, transport kinetics, and interactions with various nutrient cations. Nickel absorption, measured as a function of concentration (0.02 to 100 mum), demonstrated the presence of multiple absorption isotherms. Each of the three isotherms conforms to Michaelis-Menten kinetics; kinetic constants are reported for uptake by the intact plant and for transfer from root to shoot tissues. The absorption of Ni(2+) by the intact plant and its transfer from root to shoot were inhibited by the presence of Cu(2+), Zn(2+), Fe(2+), and Co(2+). Competition kinetic studies showed Cu(2+) and Zn(2+) to inhibit Ni(2+) absorption competitively, suggesting that Ni(2+), Cu(2+), and Zn(2+) are absorbed using the same carrier site. Calculated K(m) and K(i) constants for Ni(2+) in the presence and absence of Cu(2+) were 6.1 and 9.2 mum, respectively, whereas K(m) and K(i) constants were calculated to be 6.7 and 24.4 mum, respectively, for Ni(2+) in the presence and absence of Zn(2+). The mechanism of inhibition of Ni(2+) in the presence of Fe(2+) and Co(2+) was not resolved by classical kinetic relationships.

  15. Effects of Triclocarban on Intact Immature Male Rat

    PubMed Central

    Duleba, Antoni J.; Ahmed, Mohamed I.; Sun, Meng; Gao, Allen C.; Villanueva, Jesus; Conley, Alan J.; Turgeon, Judith L.; Benirschke, Kurt; Gee, Nancy A.; Chen, Jiangang; Green, Peter G.; Lasley, Bill L.

    2011-01-01

    Triclocarban (TCC; 3,4,4′-trichlorocarbanilide) is an antimicrobial agent used widely in various personal hygiene products including soaps. Recently, TCC has been shown to enhance testosterone-induced effects in vitro and to enlarge accessory sex organs in castrated male rats. This study was designed to evaluate the effects of TCC on intact age-matched male rats and on human prostate LNCaP and C4–2B cells. Seven-week-old male Sprague-Dawley rats received either a normal diet or a diet supplemented with TCC (0.25% in diet) for 10 days. Triclocarban induced hyperplasia of accessory sex organs in the absence of significant qualitative histological changes. Serum luteinizing hormone (LH) and testosterone were not significantly altered by TCC treatment. In prostate cancer-derived LNCaP and C4–2B cells, TCC potentiated androgen actions via androgen receptor-dependent actions. In conclusion, TCC significantly affects intact male reproductive organs and potentiates androgen effects in prostate cancer cells. PMID:20889956

  16. Scalable still image coding based on wavelet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Yang; Zhang, Zhengbing

    2005-02-01

    The scalable image coding is an important objective of the future image coding technologies. In this paper, we present a kind of scalable image coding scheme based on wavelet transform. This method uses the famous EZW (Embedded Zero tree Wavelet) algorithm; we give a high-quality encoding to the ROI (region of interest) of the original image and a rough encoding to the rest. This method is applied well in limited memory space condition, and we encode the region of background according to the memory capacity. In this way, we can store the encoded image in limited memory space easily without losing its main information. Simulation results show it is effective.

  17. Honesty and Honor Codes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCabe, Donald; Trevino, Linda Klebe

    2002-01-01

    Explores the rise in student cheating and evidence that students cheat less often at schools with an honor code. Discusses effective use of such codes and creation of a peer culture that condemns dishonesty. (EV)

  18. Cellulases and coding sequences

    DOEpatents

    Li, Xin-Liang; Ljungdahl, Lars G.; Chen, Huizhong

    2001-02-20

    The present invention provides three fungal cellulases, their coding sequences, recombinant DNA molecules comprising the cellulase coding sequences, recombinant host cells and methods for producing same. The present cellulases are from Orpinomyces PC-2.

  19. Cellulases and coding sequences

    DOEpatents

    Li, Xin-Liang; Ljungdahl, Lars G.; Chen, Huizhong

    2001-01-01

    The present invention provides three fungal cellulases, their coding sequences, recombinant DNA molecules comprising the cellulase coding sequences, recombinant host cells and methods for producing same. The present cellulases are from Orpinomyces PC-2.

  20. QR Code Mania!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shumack, Kellie A.; Reilly, Erin; Chamberlain, Nik

    2013-01-01

    space, has error-correction capacity, and can be read from any direction. These codes are used in manufacturing, shipping, and marketing, as well as in education. QR codes can be created to produce…

  1. DIANE multiparticle transport code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caillaud, M.; Lemaire, S.; Ménard, S.; Rathouit, P.; Ribes, J. C.; Riz, D.

    2014-06-01

    DIANE is the general Monte Carlo code developed at CEA-DAM. DIANE is a 3D multiparticle multigroup code. DIANE includes automated biasing techniques and is optimized for massive parallel calculations.

  2. The phosphorylation of coated membrane proteins in intact neurons

    PubMed Central

    1986-01-01

    To complement studies that have demonstrated the prominent phosphorylation of a 50-kD coated vesicle polypeptide in vitro, we have evaluated the phosphorylation of coated membrane proteins in intact cells. A co-assembly assay has been devised in which extracts of cultured rat sympathetic neurons labeled with [32P]-Pi were combined with unlabeled carrier bovine brain coat proteins and reassembled coat structures were isolated by gradient centrifugation. Two groups of phosphorylated polypeptides, of 100-110 kD (pp100-110) and 155 kD (pp155) apparent molecular mass, were incorporated into reassembled coats. The neuronal pp100-110 are structurally and functionally related to the 100-110-kD component of the bovine brain assembly protein (AP), a protein complex that also contains 50-kD and 16.5-kD components and is characterized by its ability to promote the reassembly of clathrin coat structures under physiological conditions of pH and ionic strength (Zaremba, S. and J. H. Keen, 1983, J. Cell Biol., 97:1337-1348). The neuronal pp155 detected in reassembled coat structures was readily observable in total extracts of [32P]-Pi-labeled neurons dissolved in SDS-containing buffer. A bovine brain counterpart to the neuronal pp155 was also observed when brain coated vesicles were subjected to two- dimensional gel electrophoresis. Phosphoserine was the predominant phosphoaminoacid found in both the pp100 and pp155. A structural and functional counterpart to the 50-kD brain assembly polypeptide (AP50) was also identified in these neurons. Although the brain AP50 is prominently phosphorylated by an endogenous protein kinase in isolated coated vesicle preparations, the neuronal AP50 was not detectably phosphorylated in intact cells as assessed by two-dimensional non- equilibrium pH gradient gel electrophoresis of labeled cells dissolved directly in SDS-containing buffers. These results demonstrate that the bovine brain assembly polypeptides of 50 kD and 100-110 kD that we have

  3. The intact Kunitz domain protects the amyloid precursor protein from being processed by matriptase-2.

    PubMed

    Beckmann, Anna-Madeleine; Glebov, Konstantin; Walter, Jochen; Merkel, Olaf; Mangold, Martin; Schmidt, Frederike; Becker-Pauly, Christoph; Gütschow, Michael; Stirnberg, Marit

    2016-08-01

    Proteolytic processing of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) leads to amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides. So far, the mechanism of APP processing is insufficiently characterized at the molecular level. Whereas the knowledge of Aβ generation by several proteases has been expanded, the contribution of the Kunitz-type protease inhibitor domain (KPI) present in two major APP isoforms to the complex proteolytic processing of APP is poorly understood. In this study, we have identified KPI-containing APP as a very potent, slow-binding inhibitor for the membrane-bound proteolytic regulator of iron homeostasis matriptase-2 by forming stable complexes with its target protease in HEK cells. Inhibition and complex formation depend on the intact KPI domain. By inhibiting matriptase-2, KPI-containing APP is protected from matriptase-2-mediated proteolysis within the Aβ region, thus preventing the generation of N-terminally truncated Aβ.

  4. Imaging individual proteins and nanodomains on intact cell membranes with a probe-based optical antenna.

    PubMed

    van Zanten, Thomas S; Lopez-Bosque, Maria J; Garcia-Parajo, Maria F

    2010-01-01

    Optical antennas that confine and enhance electromagnetic fields in a nanometric region hold great potential for nanobioimaging and biosensing. Probe-based monopole optical antennas are fabricated to enhance fields localized to <30 nm near the antenna apex in aqueous conditions. These probes are used under appropriate excitation antenna conditions to image individual antibodies with an unprecedented resolution of 26 +/- 4 nm and virtually no surrounding background. On intact cell membranes in physiological conditions, the obtained resolution is 30 +/- 6 nm. Importantly, the method allows individual proteins to be distinguished from nanodomains and the degree of clustering to be quantified by directly measuring physical size and intensity of individual fluorescent spots. Improved antenna geometries should lead to true live cell imaging below 10-nm resolution with position accuracy in the subnanometric range.

  5. Embedded adaptive optics for ubiquitous lab-on-a-chip readout on intact cell phones.

    PubMed

    Preechaburana, Pakorn; Suska, Anke; Filippini, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    The evaluation of disposable lab-on-a-chip (LOC) devices on cell phones is an attractive alternative to migrate the analytical strength of LOC solutions to decentralized sensing applications. Imaging the micrometric detection areas of LOCs in contact with intact phone cameras is central to provide such capability. This work demonstrates a disposable and morphing liquid lens concept that can be integrated in LOC devices and refocuses micrometric features in the range necessary for LOC evaluation using diverse cell phone cameras. During natural evaporation, the lens focus varies adapting to different type of cameras. Standard software in the phone commands a time-lapse acquisition for best focal selection that is sufficient to capture and resolve, under ambient illumination, 50 μm features in regions larger than 500 × 500 μm(2). In this way, the present concept introduces a generic solution compatible with the use of diverse and unmodified cell phone cameras to evaluate disposable LOC devices.

  6. EMF wire code research

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, T.

    1993-11-01

    This paper examines the results of previous wire code research to determines the relationship with childhood cancer, wire codes and electromagnetic fields. The paper suggests that, in the original Savitz study, biases toward producing a false positive association between high wire codes and childhood cancer were created by the selection procedure.

  7. Universal Noiseless Coding Subroutines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlutsmeyer, A. P.; Rice, R. F.

    1986-01-01

    Software package consists of FORTRAN subroutines that perform universal noiseless coding and decoding of integer and binary data strings. Purpose of this type of coding to achieve data compression in sense that coded data represents original data perfectly (noiselessly) while taking fewer bits to do so. Routines universal because they apply to virtually any "real-world" data source.

  8. Analysis of the CCR5 gene coding region diversity in five South American populations reveals two new non-synonymous alleles in Amerindians and high CCR5*D32 frequency in Euro-Brazilians

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    The CC chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) molecule is an important co-receptor for HIV. The effect of the CCR5*D32 allele in susceptibility to HIV infection and AIDS disease is well known. Other alleles than CCR5*D32 have not been analysed before, neither in Amerindians nor in the majority of the populations all over the world. We investigated the distribution of the CCR5 coding region alleles in South Brazil and noticed a high CCR5*D32 frequency in the Euro-Brazilian population of the Paraná State (9.3%), which is the highest thus far reported for Latin America. The D32 frequency is even higher among the Euro-Brazilian Mennonites (14.2%). This allele is uncommon in Afro-Brazilians (2.0%), rare in the Guarani Amerindians (0.4%) and absent in the Kaingang Amerindians and the Oriental-Brazilians. R223Q is common in the Oriental-Brazilians (7.7%) and R60S in the Afro-Brazilians (5.0%). A29S and L55Q present an impaired response to β-chemokines and occurred in Afro- and Euro-Brazilians with cumulative frequencies of 4.4% and 2.7%, respectively. Two new non-synonymous alleles were found in Amerindians: C323F (g.3729G > T) in Guarani (1.4%) and Y68C (g.2964A > G) in Kaingang (10.3%). The functional characteristics of these alleles should be defined and considered in epidemiological investigations about HIV-1 infection and AIDS incidence in Amerindian populations. PMID:21637640

  9. Mapping Local Codes to Read Codes.

    PubMed

    Bonney, Wilfred; Galloway, James; Hall, Christopher; Ghattas, Mikhail; Tramma, Leandro; Nind, Thomas; Donnelly, Louise; Jefferson, Emily; Doney, Alexander

    2017-01-01

    Background & Objectives: Legacy laboratory test codes make it difficult to use clinical datasets for meaningful translational research, where populations are followed for disease risk and outcomes over many years. The Health Informatics Centre (HIC) at the University of Dundee hosts continuous biochemistry data from the clinical laboratories in Tayside and Fife dating back as far as 1987. However, the HIC-managed biochemistry dataset is coupled with incoherent sample types and unstandardised legacy local test codes, which increases the complexity of using the dataset for reasonable population health outcomes. The objective of this study was to map the legacy local test codes to the Scottish 5-byte Version 2 Read Codes using biochemistry data extracted from the repository of the Scottish Care Information (SCI) Store.

  10. Intact Conceptual Priming in the Absence of Declarative Memory

    PubMed Central

    Levy, D.A.; Stark, C.E.L.; Squire, L.R.

    2009-01-01

    Priming is an unconscious (nondeclarative) form of memory whereby identification or production of an item is improved by an earlier encounter. It has been proposed that declarative memory and priming might be related—for example, that conceptual priming results in more fluent processing, thereby providing a basis for familiarity judgments. In two experiments, we assessed conceptual priming and recognition memory across a 5-min interval in 5 memory-impaired patients. All patients exhibited fully intact priming in tests of both free association (study tent; at test, provide an association to canvas) and category verification (study lemon; at test, decide: Is lemon a type of fruit?). Yet the 2 most severely amnesic patients performed at chance on matched tests of recognition memory. These findings count against the notion that conceptual priming provides feelings of familiarity that can support accurate recognition judgments. We suggest that priming is inaccessible to conscious awareness and does not influence declarative memory. PMID:15447639

  11. Bursty gene expression in the intact mammalian liver

    PubMed Central

    Halpern, Keren Bahar; Tanami, Sivan; Landen, Shanie; Chapal, Michal; Szlak, Liran; Hutzler, Anat; Nizhberg, Anna; Itzkovitz, Shalev

    2015-01-01

    Summary Bursts of nascent mRNA have been shown to lead to substantial cell-cell variation in unicellular organisms, facilitating diverse responses to environmental challenges. It is unknown whether similar bursts and gene-expression noise occur in mammalian tissues. To address this, we combine single molecule transcript counting with dual-color labeling and quantification of nascent mRNA to characterize promoter states, transcription rates and transcript lifetimes in the intact mouse liver. We find that liver gene expression is highly bursty, with promoters stochastically switching between transcriptionally active and inactive states. Promoters of genes with short mRNA lifetimes are active longer, facilitating rapid response while reducing burst-associated noise. Moreover, polyploid hepatocytes exhibit less noise than diploid hepatocytes, suggesting a possible benefit to liver polyploidy. Thus temporal averaging and liver polyploidy dampen the intrinsic variability associated with transcriptional bursts. Our approach can be used to study transcriptional bursting in diverse mammalian tissues. PMID:25728770

  12. Rhesus monkey brain imaging through intact skull with thermoacoustic tomography.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yuan; Wang, Lihong V

    2006-03-01

    Two-dimensional microwave-induced thermoacoustic tomography (TAT) is applied to imaging the Rhesus monkey brain through the intact skull. To reduce the wavefront distortion caused by the skull, only the low-frequency components of the thermoacoustic signals (< 1 MHz) are used to reconstruct the TAT images. The methods of signal processing and image reconstruction are validated by imaging a lamb kidney. The resolution of the system is found to be 4 mm when we image a 1-month-old monkey head containing inserted needles. We also image the coronal and axial sections of a 7-month-old monkey head. Brain features that are 3 cm deep in the head are imaged clearly. Our results demonstrate that TAT has potential for use in portable, cost-effective imagers for pediatric brains.

  13. Calcium Activation Profile In Electrically Stimulated Intact Rat Heart Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geerts, Hugo; Nuydens, Rony; Ver Donck, Luc; Nuyens, Roger; De Brabander, Marc; Borgers, Marcel

    1988-06-01

    Recent advances in fluorescent probe technology and image processing equipment have made available the measurement of calcium in living systems on a real-time basis. We present the use of the calcium indicator Fura-2 in intact normally stimulated rat heart cells for the spatial and dynamic measurement of the calcium excitation profile. After electric stimulation (1 Hz), the activation proceeds from the center of the myocyte toward the periphery. Within two frame times (80 ms), the whole cell is activated. The activation is slightly faster in the center of the cell than in the periphery. The mean recovery time is 200-400 ms. There is no difference along the cell's long axis. The effect of a beta-agonist and of a calcium antagonist is described.

  14. Temperature dependence of the zeta potential in intact natural carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al Mahrouqi, Dawoud; Vinogradov, Jan; Jackson, Matthew D.

    2016-11-01

    The zeta potential is a measure of the electrical charge on mineral surfaces and is an important control on subsurface geophysical monitoring, adsorption of polar species in aquifers, and rock wettability. We report the first measurements of zeta potential in intact, water-saturated, natural carbonate samples at temperatures up to 120°C. The zeta potential is negative and decreases in magnitude with increasing temperature at low ionic strength (0.01 M NaCl, comparable to potable water) but is independent of temperature at high ionic strength (0.5 M NaCl, comparable to seawater). The equilibrium calcium concentration resulting from carbonate dissolution also increases with increasing temperature at low ionic strength but is independent of temperature at high ionic strength. The temperature dependence of the zeta potential is correlated with the temperature dependence of the equilibrium calcium concentration and shows a Nernstian linear relationship. Our findings are applicable to many subsurface carbonate rocks at elevated temperature.

  15. Citrate synthesis in intact rat-liver mitochondria is irreversible.

    PubMed

    Greksák, M; Lopes-Cardozo, M; van den Bergh, S G

    1982-02-01

    Rat-liver mitochondria were incubated with [1,5-14C]citrate in the presence of fluorocitrate to block its oxidation in the Krebs cycle. The reaction products were analysed enzymatically and by anion-exchange chromatography. Incorporation of 14C into acetyl-L-carnitine or ketone bodies via a backward action of citrate synthase was not observed. The optimal rate of citrate synthesis from pyruvate and malate in the presence of fluorocitrate was 15 nmol . mg-1 min-1. In the absence of fluorocitrate, but in the presence of malonate, citrate was oxidized to succinate at a rate of 4 nmol . mg-1 . min-1. We conclude that the synthesis of citrate by intact rat liver mitochondria is an irreversible process. The possible mechanism underlying this phenomenon and the consequence for metabolic regulation are discussed.

  16. Probing Metabolism in the Intact Retina Using Stable Isotope Tracers.

    PubMed

    Du, Jianhai; Linton, Jonathan D; Hurley, James B

    2015-01-01

    Vertebrate retinas have several characteristics that make them particularly interesting from a metabolic perspective. The retinas have a highly laminated structure, high energy demands, and they share several metabolic features with tumors, such as a strong Warburg effect and abundant pyruvate kinase M2 isoform expression. The energy demands of retinas are both qualitatively and quantitatively different in light and darkness and metabolic dysfunction could cause retinal degeneration. Stable isotope-based metabolic analysis with mass spectrometry is a powerful tool to trace the dynamic metabolic reactions and reveal novel metabolic pathways within cells and between cells in retina. Here, we describe methods to quantify retinal metabolism in intact retinas and discuss applications of these methods to the understanding of neuron-glia interaction, light and dark adaptation, and retinal degenerative diseases.

  17. Perforation of Meckel's diverticulum by an intact fish bone

    PubMed Central

    Mouawad, Nicolas J; Hammond, Stephen; Kaoutzanis, Christodoulos

    2013-01-01

    Meckel's diverticulum is the most common congenital anomaly of the gastrointestinal tract, with an overall incidence of approximately 2.2%. It is generally noted incidentally during laparotomy for management of other abdominal pathology. Complications are infrequent, developing in 4% of individuals with this abnormality, and are usually seen in childhood. Herein, we discuss the case of a 52-year-old Caucasian man presenting with a 1-day history of worsening central and right-sided abdominal pain. Initial evaluation posed a broad differential however, following conservative measures and unremarkable plain films, the patient developed peritoneal signs necessitating operative intervention. During diagnostic laparoscopy, a Meckel's diverticulum was noted to be inflamed and perforated by an intact fish bone. The patient was treated successfully with a segmental resection and primary anastomosis, and had an uneventful postoperative recovery. PMID:23429021

  18. Zeta Potential in Intact Natural Carbonates at Elevated Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Mahrouqi, D.; Vinogradov, J.; Jackson, M.

    2015-12-01

    Measurements of zeta potential have been used to monitor subsurface flows in many natural brine systems. Numerous studies report zeta potentials in carbonates using crushed samples at low ionic strength and laboratory temperatures. However, natural brines have much higher salinity; moreover, temperatures are considerably higher in many subsurface settings. The variation of zeta potentials with temperature has not been examined in natural carbonates. We report zeta potential values interpreted from streaming potential measurements in two intact carbonate rock samples, saturated with artificial brines at elevated temperatures. We measure streaming potential using an experimental set-up that incorporates in-situ measurements of saturated rock conductivity, brine temperature, brine pH, brine electrical conductivity, pressure difference and voltage at temperatures up to 120oC. The streaming potential measurements are complemented with brine effluent studies. We find that the interpreted zeta potential is negative and decreases in magnitude with increasing temperature at low ionic strength (0.01M) and independent of temperature at high ionic strength (0.5M); consistent with published zeta potential in intact natural sandstones. The concentration of Ca2+ (main potential determining ion) also decreases with temperature at low ionic strength, but remains constant at high ionic strength. The temperature dependence of the zeta potential is consistent between two different natural carbonate samples and can be explained by the temperature dependence of pCa2+. We suggest that zeta potential of carbonate is independent of temperature or pH when pCa2+ remains constant. A linear variation of pH vs. pCa2+ is exhibited, at ambient and elevated temperatures, when pCa2+ is allowed to change with pH. This linear variation explains the numerous published data that shows apparent relationship between zeta potential of carbonates and pH.

  19. Isolation of intact sub-dermal secretory cavities from Eucalyptus

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The biosynthesis of plant natural products in sub-dermal secretory cavities is poorly understood at the molecular level, largely due to the difficulty of physically isolating these structures for study. Our aim was to develop a protocol for isolating live and intact sub-dermal secretory cavities, and to do this, we used leaves from three species of Eucalyptus with cavities that are relatively large and rich in essential oils. Results Leaves were digested using a variety of commercially available enzymes. A pectinase from Aspergillus niger was found to allow isolation of intact cavities after a relatively short incubation (12 h), with no visible artifacts from digestion and no loss of cellular integrity or cavity contents. Several measurements indicated the potential of the isolated cavities for further functional studies. First, the cavities were found to consume oxygen at a rate that is comparable to that estimated from leaf respiratory rates. Second, mRNA was extracted from cavities, and it was used to amplify a cDNA fragment with high similarity to that of a monoterpene synthase. Third, the contents of the cavity lumen were extracted, showing an unexpectedly low abundance of volatile essential oils and a sizeable amount of non-volatile material, which is contrary to the widely accepted role of secretory cavities as predominantly essential oil repositories. Conclusions The protocol described herein is likely to be adaptable to a range of Eucalyptus species with sub-dermal secretory cavities, and should find wide application in studies of the developmental and functional biology of these structures, and the biosynthesis of the plant natural products they contain. PMID:20807444

  20. Software Certification - Coding, Code, and Coders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Havelund, Klaus; Holzmann, Gerard J.

    2011-01-01

    We describe a certification approach for software development that has been adopted at our organization. JPL develops robotic spacecraft for the exploration of the solar system. The flight software that controls these spacecraft is considered to be mission critical. We argue that the goal of a software certification process cannot be the development of "perfect" software, i.e., software that can be formally proven to be correct under all imaginable and unimaginable circumstances. More realistically, the goal is to guarantee a software development process that is conducted by knowledgeable engineers, who follow generally accepted procedures to control known risks, while meeting agreed upon standards of workmanship. We target three specific issues that must be addressed in such a certification procedure: the coding process, the code that is developed, and the skills of the coders. The coding process is driven by standards (e.g., a coding standard) and tools. The code is mechanically checked against the standard with the help of state-of-the-art static source code analyzers. The coders, finally, are certified in on-site training courses that include formal exams.

  1. Color-Coded Organelles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLaughlin, Esther; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Describes how red beets can be used to demonstrate a variety of membrane phenomena. Some of the activities include observation of vacuoles; vacuoles in intact cells; isolation of vacuoles in physiological studies; demonstration of membrane integrity; and demonstration of ion diffusion and active transport with purified vacuoles. (ZWH)

  2. XSOR codes users manual

    SciTech Connect

    Jow, Hong-Nian; Murfin, W.B.; Johnson, J.D.

    1993-11-01

    This report describes the source term estimation codes, XSORs. The codes are written for three pressurized water reactors (Surry, Sequoyah, and Zion) and two boiling water reactors (Peach Bottom and Grand Gulf). The ensemble of codes has been named ``XSOR``. The purpose of XSOR codes is to estimate the source terms which would be released to the atmosphere in severe accidents. A source term includes the release fractions of several radionuclide groups, the timing and duration of releases, the rates of energy release, and the elevation of releases. The codes have been developed by Sandia National Laboratories for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in support of the NUREG-1150 program. The XSOR codes are fast running parametric codes and are used as surrogates for detailed mechanistic codes. The XSOR codes also provide the capability to explore the phenomena and their uncertainty which are not currently modeled by the mechanistic codes. The uncertainty distributions of input parameters may be used by an. XSOR code to estimate the uncertainty of source terms.

  3. Intact mirror mechanisms for automatic facial emotions in children and adolescents with autism spectrum disorder.

    PubMed

    Schulte-Rüther, Martin; Otte, Ellen; Adigüzel, Kübra; Firk, Christine; Herpertz-Dahlmann, Beate; Koch, Iring; Konrad, Kerstin

    2017-02-01

    It has been suggested that an early deficit in the human mirror neuron system (MNS) is an important feature of autism. Recent findings related to simple hand and finger movements do not support a general dysfunction of the MNS in autism. Studies investigating facial actions (e.g., emotional expressions) have been more consistent, however, mostly relied on passive observation tasks. We used a new variant of a compatibility task for the assessment of automatic facial mimicry responses that allowed for simultaneous control of attention to facial stimuli. We used facial electromyography in 18 children and adolescents with Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and 18 typically developing controls (TDCs). We observed a robust compatibility effect in ASD, that is, the execution of a facial expression was facilitated if a congruent facial expression was observed. Time course analysis of RT distributions and comparison to a classic compatibility task (symbolic Simon task) revealed that the facial compatibility effect appeared early and increased with time, suggesting fast and sustained activation of motor codes during observation of facial expressions. We observed a negative correlation of the compatibility effect with age across participants and in ASD, and a positive correlation between self-rated empathy and congruency for smiling faces in TDC but not in ASD. This pattern of results suggests that basic motor mimicry is intact in ASD, but is not associated with complex social cognitive abilities such as emotion understanding and empathy. Autism Res 2017, 10: 298-310. © 2016 International Society for Autism Research, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. DLLExternalCode

    SciTech Connect

    Greg Flach, Frank Smith

    2014-05-14

    DLLExternalCode is the a general dynamic-link library (DLL) interface for linking GoldSim (www.goldsim.com) with external codes. The overall concept is to use GoldSim as top level modeling software with interfaces to external codes for specific calculations. The DLLExternalCode DLL that performs the linking function is designed to take a list of code inputs from GoldSim, create an input file for the external application, run the external code, and return a list of outputs, read from files created by the external application, back to GoldSim. Instructions for creating the input file, running the external code, and reading the output are contained in an instructions file that is read and interpreted by the DLL.

  5. Defeating the coding monsters.

    PubMed

    Colt, Ross

    2007-02-01

    Accuracy in coding is rapidly becoming a required skill for military health care providers. Clinic staffing, equipment purchase decisions, and even reimbursement will soon be based on the coding data that we provide. Learning the complicated myriad of rules to code accurately can seem overwhelming. However, the majority of clinic visits in a typical outpatient clinic generally fall into two major evaluation and management codes, 99213 and 99214. If health care providers can learn the rules required to code a 99214 visit, then this will provide a 90% solution that can enable them to accurately code the majority of their clinic visits. This article demonstrates a step-by-step method to code a 99214 visit, by viewing each of the three requirements as a monster to be defeated.

  6. Protein-coding potential of mouse mammary tumor virus genome RNA as examined by in vitro translation.

    PubMed Central

    Dickson, C; Peters, G

    1981-01-01

    The protein-coding capacity of the mouse mammary tumor virus genome has been examined by in vitro translation of genome length and polyadenylated subgenomic fragments of viral RNA. Intact genome RNA of about 35S programmed synthesis of the Pr77gag, Pr110gag and Pr160gag/pol precursors seen in infected cells in vivo. Polyadenylated RNA fragments of 18 to 28S encoded products whose tryptic peptide maps resembled those of the nonglycosylated precursor to the envelope glycoproteins, confirming the gene order 5'-gag-pol-env-3'. Translation of polyadenylated RNA fragments smaller than 18S yielded a series of related proteins whose peptide maps bore no resemblance to any of the virion structural proteins. Thus, a region of the mouse mammary tumor virus genome distal to the env gene appears to have an open reading frame sufficient to encode at least 36,000 daltons of protein as of yet unknown function. Images PMID:6260988

  7. The stellar atmosphere simulation code Bifrost. Code description and validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gudiksen, B. V.; Carlsson, M.; Hansteen, V. H.; Hayek, W.; Leenaarts, J.; Martínez-Sykora, J.

    2011-07-01

    Context. Numerical simulations of stellar convection and photospheres have been developed to the point where detailed shapes of observed spectral lines can be explained. Stellar atmospheres are very complex, and very different physical regimes are present in the convection zone, photosphere, chromosphere, transition region and corona. To understand the details of the atmosphere it is necessary to simulate the whole atmosphere since the different layers interact strongly. These physical regimes are very diverse and it takes a highly efficient massively parallel numerical code to solve the associated equations. Aims: The design, implementation and validation of the massively parallel numerical code Bifrost for simulating stellar atmospheres from the convection zone to the corona. Methods: The code is subjected to a number of validation tests, among them the Sod shock tube test, the Orzag-Tang colliding shock test, boundary condition tests and tests of how the code treats magnetic field advection, chromospheric radiation, radiative transfer in an isothermal scattering atmosphere, hydrogen ionization and thermal conduction. Results.Bifrost completes the tests with good results and shows near linear efficiency scaling to thousands of computing cores.

  8. Inducible DNA-protein interactions of the murine kappa immunoglobulin enhancer in intact cells: comparison with in vitro interactions.

    PubMed Central

    Hromas, R; Pauli, U; Marcuzzi, A; Lafrenz, D; Nick, H; Stein, J; Stein, G; Van Ness, B

    1988-01-01

    The large intron of the kappa immunoglobulin gene contains a cis-acting enhancer element, which is important in the tissue-specific expression of the gene. We have confirmed the binding activity of a sequence-specific factor present in lymphoid extracts derived from cell lines expressing, or induced to express, the kappa gene. We have extended these studies to show the binding activity is present in normal activated splenic B cells as well as lambda producing cells, and have demonstrated by DNAse footprint analysis full protection of a sequence containing the 11 bp homology to the SV-40 core enhancer. We have compared these in vitro binding studies with an analysis of protein-DNA interactions in intact murine cell lines using genomic sequencing techniques. We demonstrate significant alterations in DMS reactivity of DNA in the murine 70Z/3 cell line after it is induced to kappa expression. These alterations occur at guanine residues which are part of the the 11 bp core sequence, and are identical to those observed in cells constitutively expressing kappa. This provides direct evidence for the induced binding of the tissue specific factor to intact chromatin. In intact chromatin we also observed significant alteration in the reactivity of a guanine, 3' of the core sequence, which is part of a potential secondary DNA structure, and protection of four residues that are part of a region homologous to the heavy chain enhancer. Images PMID:2830597

  9. Cell proliferation in type C gastritis affecting the intact stomach

    PubMed Central

    Mac, D; Willis, P; Prescott, R; Lamonby, S; Lynch, D

    2000-01-01

    Aims—Type C gastritis caused by bile reflux has a characteristic appearance, similar to that seen in other forms of chemical gastritis, such as those associated with NSAIDs or alcohol. An increase in mucosal cell proliferation increases the likelihood of a neoplastic clone of epithelial cells emerging, particularly where there is chronic epithelial injury associated with bile reflux. It has been shown previously that type C gastritis is associated with increased cell proliferation in the postsurgical stomach. The aim of this study was to determine cell proliferation in type C gastritis caused by bile reflux affecting the intact stomach. Methods—Specimens from 15 patients with a histological diagnosis of type C gastritis on antral biopsy were obtained from the pathology archives between 1994 and 1997. A control group of nine normal antral biopsies was also selected and all underwent MIB-1 immunostaining. The gastric glands were divided into three zones (zone 1, gastric pit; zone 2, isthmus; and zone 3, gland base) and the numbers of positively staining nuclei for 500 epithelial cell nuclei were counted in each zone to determine the percentage labelling index (LI%). Results—Cell proliferation was significantly higher in all three zones of the gastric glands with type C gastritis compared with controls as follows: zone 1, median LI% in type C gastritis 64.7 (range, 7.8–99.2), controls 4.7 (range, 2.0–11.3); zone 2, median LI% in type C gastritis 94.7 (range, 28.8–98.7), controls 40.2 (range, 23.1–70.3); and zone 3, median LI% in type C gastritis 20.0 (range, 1.3–96.0), controls 2.6 (range, 0.9–8.7). Conclusions—Bile reflux is thought to act as a promoter of gastric carcinogenesis in the postsurgical stomach. The same may be true in the intact stomach. Key Words: cell proliferation • epithelial kinetics • chemical gastritis PMID:11064674

  10. A Magnetic Diagnostic Code for 3D Fusion Equilibria

    SciTech Connect

    Samuel A. Lazerson, S. Sakakibara and Y. Suzuki

    2013-03-12

    A synthetic magnetic diagnostics code for fusion equilibria is presented. This code calculates the response of various magnetic diagnostics to the equilibria produced by the VMEC and PIES codes. This allows for treatment of equilibria with both good nested flux surfaces and those with stochastic regions. DIAGNO v2.0 builds upon previous codes through the implementation of a virtual casing principle. The code is validated against a vacuum shot on the Large Helical Device (LHD) where the vertical field was ramped. As an exercise of the code, the diagnostic response for various equilibria are calculated on the LHD.

  11. Mechanisms of the Frank-Starling phenomena studied in intact hearts.

    PubMed

    Burkhoff, D; Stennett, R A; Ogino, K

    1995-01-01

    The impact of ventricular volume on the relationship between intracellular calcium and ventricular pressure under steady-state conditions was determined in intact ferret hearts. The results reveal major quantitative differences and minor qualitative differences between these relations and those previously measured in isolated intact and skinned cardiac muscle. The importance of these differences is discussed within the context of developing a comprehensive mechanistic theory to describe load-dependence of the intact ventricle.

  12. Mechanical code comparator

    DOEpatents

    Peter, Frank J.; Dalton, Larry J.; Plummer, David W.

    2002-01-01

    A new class of mechanical code comparators is described which have broad potential for application in safety, surety, and security applications. These devices can be implemented as micro-scale electromechanical systems that isolate a secure or otherwise controlled device until an access code is entered. This access code is converted into a series of mechanical inputs to the mechanical code comparator, which compares the access code to a pre-input combination, entered previously into the mechanical code comparator by an operator at the system security control point. These devices provide extremely high levels of robust security. Being totally mechanical in operation, an access control system properly based on such devices cannot be circumvented by software attack alone.

  13. More box codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solomon, G.

    1992-01-01

    A new investigation shows that, starting from the BCH (21,15;3) code represented as a 7 x 3 matrix and adding a row and column to add even parity, one obtains an 8 x 4 matrix (32,15;8) code. An additional dimension is obtained by specifying odd parity on the rows and even parity on the columns, i.e., adjoining to the 8 x 4 matrix, the matrix, which is zero except for the fourth column (of all ones). Furthermore, any seven rows and three columns will form the BCH (21,15;3) code. This box code has the same weight structure as the quadratic residue and BCH codes of the same dimensions. Whether there exists an algebraic isomorphism to either code is as yet unknown.

  14. Rapid and non-invasive quantification of intramuscular fat content of intact pork cuts.

    PubMed

    Huang, H; Liu, L; Ngadi, M O; Gariépy, C

    2014-02-01

    Having acquired near infrared (NIR) hyperspectral images of intact pork loin samples through an NIR hyperspectral imaging system, the efficiency of a variety of image processing techniques including texture pattern analysis techniques were applied to process hyperspectral images so as to determine the intramuscular fat (IMF) content non-destructively. After the segmentation of region of interest (ROI), the raw spectral, texture-based spectral and textural characteristics of pork images were extracted by spectral averaging and pattern recognition techniques namely Gabor filter and improved gray level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM), respectively. First derivatives of the non-filtered and the Gabor filtered spectra were also investigated. Full waveband partial least squares regression (PLSR) was employed to determine the optimal parameters of Gabor filter and GLCM, and to select optimal wavelengths for IMF prediction. A stepwise procedure was applied to the optimal wavelengths to further optimize them to key wavelengths. Multiple linear regression (MLR) models were built based on the key wavelengths. Mean spectra and the Gabor filtered spectra outperformed GLCM. The best result, represented by correlation coefficients of calibration (Rc), cross validation (Rcv) and prediction (Rp) of 0.89, 0.89, and 0.86, respectively, was achieved using the first derivative of Gabor filtered spectra at 1193 and 1217 nm. To visualize the IMF content in pork, the distribution maps of IMF content in pork were drawn using a mean spectra-based MLR model. These promising results highlight the great potential of NIR hyperspectral imaging for non-destructive prediction of IMF content of intact pork.

  15. Transport of Indole-3-Acetic Acid during Gravitropism in Intact Maize Coleoptiles 1

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Karen E.; Briggs, Winslow R.

    1990-01-01

    We have investigated the transport of tritiated indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) in intact, red light-grown maize (Zea mays) coleoptiles during gravitropic induction and the subsequent development of curvature. This auxin is transported down the length of gravistimulated coleoptiles at a rate comparable to that in normal, upright plants. Transport is initially symmetrical across the coleoptile, but between 30 and 40 minutes after plants are turned horizontal a lateral redistribution of the IAA already present in the transport stream occurs. By 60 minutes after the beginning of the gravitropic stimulus, the ratio of tritiated tracer auxin in the lower half with respect to the upper half is approximately 2:1. The redistribution of growth that causes gravitropic curvature follows the IAA redistribution by 5 or 10 minutes at the minimum in most regions of the coleoptile. Immobilization of tracer auxin from the transport stream during gravitropism was not detectable in the most apical 10 millimeters. Previous reports have shown that in intact, red light-grown maize coleoptiles, endogenous auxin is limiting for growth, the tissue is linearly responsive to linearly increasing concentrations of small amounts of added auxin, and the lag time for the stimulation of straight growth by added IAA is approximately 8 or 9 minutes (TI Baskin, M Iino, PB Green, WR Briggs [1985] Plant Cell Environ 8: 595-603; TI Baskin, WR Briggs, M Iino [1986] Plant Physiol 81: 306-309). We conclude that redistribution of IAA in the transport stream occurs in maize coleoptiles during gravitropism, and is sufficient in degree and timing to be the immediate cause of gravitropic curvature. PMID:16667914

  16. Generating code adapted for interlinking legacy scalar code and extended vector code

    DOEpatents

    Gschwind, Michael K

    2013-06-04

    Mechanisms for intermixing code are provided. Source code is received for compilation using an extended Application Binary Interface (ABI) that extends a legacy ABI and uses a different register configuration than the legacy ABI. First compiled code is generated based on the source code, the first compiled code comprising code for accommodating the difference in register configurations used by the extended ABI and the legacy ABI. The first compiled code and second compiled code are intermixed to generate intermixed code, the second compiled code being compiled code that uses the legacy ABI. The intermixed code comprises at least one call instruction that is one of a call from the first compiled code to the second compiled code or a call from the second compiled code to the first compiled code. The code for accommodating the difference in register configurations is associated with the at least one call instruction.

  17. Estrogen receptor-beta colocalizes extensively with parvalbumin-labeled inhibitory neurons in the cortex, amygdala, basal forebrain, and hippocampal formation of intact and ovariectomized adult rats.

    PubMed

    Blurton-Jones, Mathew; Tuszynski, Mark H

    2002-10-21

    Estrogen has been reported to regulate the activity of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic interneurons within the hippocampus, basal forebrain, and hypothalamus of adult rodents. Although estrogen receptor-alpha bearing GABAergic interneurons have been identified previously, the neurotransmitter phenotype of cells that express the more recently characterized estrogen receptor-beta (ER-beta) has not been examined in vivo. We, therefore, have used fluorescent immunohistochemistry to further characterize the phenotype of ER-beta-bearing cells by double labeling for the GABAergic-associated calcium-binding protein, parvalbumin (PV). We find that a large proportion of ER-beta-immunoreactive cells within the cortex, amygdala, basal forebrain, and hippocampal formation of intact and ovariectomized (ovx) adult rats are PV-immunoreactive. Within the infralimbic, agranular insular, primary motor, parietal association, perirhinal, and lateral entorhinal cortices, an average of 95.6% +/- 0.8% (intact) and 94.5% +/- 1.4% (ovx) of all ER-beta-immunoreactive cells coexpress parvalbumin, and this proportion is strikingly similar across these diverse cortical regions. ER-beta/PV double-labeled cells represent 23.3% +/- 1.6% (intact) and 25.8% +/- 2.0% (ovx) of all PV-labeled cells within these regions. ER-beta/PV double-labeled cells are also observed within the lateral, accessory basal, and posterior cortical nuclei of the amygdala, and periamygdaloid cortex. Within the basal forebrain, 31.0% +/- 3.1% (intact) and 26.0% +/- 5.2 % (ovx) of ER-beta-immunoreactive cells coexpress PV. Almost all ER-beta-immunoreactive cells within the subiculum, a major output region of the hippocampal formation, double label for PV (intact = 97.2% +/- 2.8%; ovx = 100% +/- 0.0%). Thus, ER-beta exhibits extensive colocalization with a subclass of inhibitory neurons, suggesting a potential mechanism whereby estrogen can regulate neuronal excitability in diverse and broad brain regions by modulating

  18. Industrial Computer Codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shapiro, Wilbur

    1996-01-01

    This is an overview of new and updated industrial codes for seal design and testing. GCYLT (gas cylindrical seals -- turbulent), SPIRALI (spiral-groove seals -- incompressible), KTK (knife to knife) Labyrinth Seal Code, and DYSEAL (dynamic seal analysis) are covered. CGYLT uses G-factors for Poiseuille and Couette turbulence coefficients. SPIRALI is updated to include turbulence and inertia, but maintains the narrow groove theory. KTK labyrinth seal code handles straight or stepped seals. And DYSEAL provides dynamics for the seal geometry.

  19. Phonological coding during reading

    PubMed Central

    Leinenger, Mallorie

    2014-01-01

    The exact role that phonological coding (the recoding of written, orthographic information into a sound based code) plays during silent reading has been extensively studied for more than a century. Despite the large body of research surrounding the topic, varying theories as to the time course and function of this recoding still exist. The present review synthesizes this body of research, addressing the topics of time course and function in tandem. The varying theories surrounding the function of phonological coding (e.g., that phonological codes aid lexical access, that phonological codes aid comprehension and bolster short-term memory, or that phonological codes are largely epiphenomenal in skilled readers) are first outlined, and the time courses that each maps onto (e.g., that phonological codes come online early (pre-lexical) or that phonological codes come online late (post-lexical)) are discussed. Next the research relevant to each of these proposed functions is reviewed, discussing the varying methodologies that have been used to investigate phonological coding (e.g., response time methods, reading while eyetracking or recording EEG and MEG, concurrent articulation) and highlighting the advantages and limitations of each with respect to the study of phonological coding. In response to the view that phonological coding is largely epiphenomenal in skilled readers, research on the use of phonological codes in prelingually, profoundly deaf readers is reviewed. Finally, implications for current models of word identification (activation-verification model (Van Order, 1987), dual-route model (e.g., Coltheart, Rastle, Perry, Langdon, & Ziegler, 2001), parallel distributed processing model (Seidenberg & McClelland, 1989)) are discussed. PMID:25150679

  20. Spontaneous NA+ transients in individual mitochondria of intact astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Azarias, Guillaume; Van de Ville, Dimitri; Unser, Michael; Chatton, Jean-Yves

    2008-02-01

    Mitochondria in intact cells maintain low Na(+) levels despite the large electrochemical gradient favoring cation influx into the matrix. In addition, they display individual spontaneous transient depolarizations. The authors report here that individual mitochondria in living astrocytes exhibit spontaneous increases in their Na(+) concentration (Na(mit)(+) spiking), as measured using the mitochondrial probe CoroNa Red. In a field of view with approximately 30 astrocytes, up to 1,400 transients per minute were typically detected under resting conditions. Na(mit)(+) spiking was also observed in neurons, but was scarce in two nonneural cell types tested. Astrocytic Na(mit)(+) spikes averaged 12.2 +/- 0.8 s in duration and 35.5 +/- 3.2 mM in amplitude and coincided with brief mitochondrial depolarizations; they were impaired by mitochondrial depolarization and ruthenium red pointing to the involvement of a cation uniporter. Na(mit)(+) spiking activity was significantly inhibited by mitochondrial Na(+)/H(+) exchanger inhibition and sensitive to cellular pH and Na(+) concentration. Ca(2+) played a permissive role on Na(mit)(+) spiking activity. Finally, the authors present evidence suggesting that Na(mit)(+) spiking frequency was correlated with cellular ATP levels. This study shows that, under physiological conditions, individual mitochondria in living astrocytes exhibit fast Na(+) exchange across their inner membrane, which reveals a new form of highly dynamic and localized functional regulation.

  1. Activation and deactivation of vibronic channels in intact phycocyanin rods.

    PubMed

    Nganou, C; David, L; Meinke, R; Adir, N; Maultzsch, J; Mkandawire, M; Pouhè, D; Thomsen, C

    2014-02-28

    We investigated the excitation modes of the light-harvesting protein phycocyanin (PC) from Thermosynechococcus vulcanus in the crystalline state using UV and near-infrared Raman spectroscopy. The spectra revealed the absence of a hydrogen out-of-plane wagging (HOOP) mode in the PC trimer, which suggests that the HOOP mode is activated in the intact PC rod, while it is not active in the PC trimer. Furthermore, in the PC trimer an intense mode at 984 cm(-1) is assigned to the C-C stretching vibration while the mode at 454 cm(-1) is likely due to ethyl group torsion. In contrast, in the similar chromophore phytochromobilin the C5,10,15-D wag mode at 622 cm(-1) does not come from a downshift of the HOOP. Additionally, the absence of modes between 1200 and 1300 cm(-1) rules out functional monomerization. A correlation between phycocyanobilin (PCB) and phycoerythrobilin (PEB) suggests that the PCB cofactors of the PC trimer appear in a conformation similar to that of PEB. The conformation of the PC rod is consistent with that of the allophycocyanin (APC) trimer, and thus excitonic flow is facilitated between these two independent light-harvesting compounds. This excitonic flow from the PC rod to APC appears to be modulated by the vibration channels during HOOP wagging, C = C stretching, and the N-H rocking in-plan vibration.

  2. Management of Relocation in Cognitively Intact Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Hertz, Judith E; Koren, Mary Elaine; Rossetti, Jeanette; Tibbits, Kathryn

    2016-11-01

    Relocation, a major life transition that can affect health positively and negatively, is moving from one permanent home to another. Many older adults will relocate at some time during their life. Relocation is also a complex process that requires careful consideration and planning before the move (i.e., pre-location) and adjustment to the new home after the move (i.e., post-relocation). The current article is a summary of content based on a comprehensive evidence-based practice guideline focused on management of relocation in cognitively intact older adults. The guideline was designed to be used across diverse settings by nurses and other providers. Pre-relocation guidelines include assessment for the need for relocation, interventions prior to moving, and outcomes for evaluation of the pre-relocation process. For post-relocation, content focuses on assessment of risks for not adjusting after the move as well as intervention guidelines to promote adjustment and outcomes for evaluation. Implications include advocacy for older adults by using the guideline, disseminating it, and conducting future research. [Journal of Gerontological Nursing, 42(11), 14-23.].

  3. Basic Timing Abilities Stay Intact in Patients with Musician's Dystonia

    PubMed Central

    van der Steen, M. C.; van Vugt, Floris T.; Keller, Peter E.; Altenmüller, Eckart

    2014-01-01

    Task-specific focal dystonia is a movement disorder that is characterized by the loss of voluntary motor control in extensively trained movements. Musician's dystonia is a type of task-specific dystonia that is elicited in professional musicians during instrumental playing. The disorder has been associated with deficits in timing. In order to test the hypothesis that basic timing abilities are affected by musician's dystonia, we investigated a group of patients (N = 15) and a matched control group (N = 15) on a battery of sensory and sensorimotor synchronization tasks. Results did not show any deficits in auditory-motor processing for patients relative to controls. Both groups benefited from a pacing sequence that adapted to their timing (in a sensorimotor synchronization task at a stable tempo). In a purely perceptual task, both groups were able to detect a misaligned metronome when it was late rather than early relative to a musical beat. Overall, the results suggest that basic timing abilities stay intact in patients with musician's dystonia. This supports the idea that musician's dystonia is a highly task-specific movement disorder in which patients are mostly impaired in tasks closely related to the demands of actually playing their instrument. PMID:24667273

  4. Stress dependence of permeability of intact and fractured shale cores.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Noort, Reinier; Yarushina, Viktoriya

    2016-04-01

    Whether a shale acts as a caprock, source rock, or reservoir, understanding fluid flow through shale is of major importance for understanding fluid flow in geological systems. Because of the low permeability of shale, flow is thought to be largely confined to fractures and similar features. In fracking operations, fractures are induced specifically to allow for hydrocarbon exploration. We have constructed an experimental setup to measure core permeabilities, using constant flow or a transient pulse. In this setup, we have measured the permeability of intact and fractured shale core samples, using either water or supercritical CO2 as the transporting fluid. Our measurements show decreasing permeability with increasing confining pressure, mainly due to time-dependent creep. Furthermore, our measurements show that for a simple splitting fracture, time-dependent creep will also eliminate any significant effect of this fracture on permeability. This effect of confinement on fracture permeability can have important implications regarding the effects of fracturing on shale permeability, and hence for operations depending on that.

  5. Action Perception Is Intact in Autism Spectrum Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Justin H.G.; Neri, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Autistic traits span a wide spectrum of behavioral departures from typical function. Despite the heterogeneous nature of autism spectrum disorder (ASD), there have been attempts at formulating unified theoretical accounts of the associated impairments in social cognition. A class of prominent theories capitalizes on the link between social interaction and visual perception: effective interaction with others often relies on discrimination of subtle nonverbal cues. It has been proposed that individuals with ASD may rely on poorer perceptual representations of other people's actions as returned by dysfunctional visual circuitry and that this, in turn, may lead to less effective interpretation of those actions for social behavior. It remains unclear whether such perceptual deficits exist in ASD: the evidence currently available is limited to specific aspects of action recognition, and the reported deficits are often attributable to cognitive factors that may not be strictly visual (e.g., attention). We present results from an exhaustive set of measurements spanning the entire action processing hierarchy, from motion detection to action interpretation, designed to factor out effects that are not selectively relevant to this function. Our results demonstrate that the ASD perceptual system returns functionally intact signals for interpreting other people's actions adequately; these signals can be accessed effectively when autistic individuals are prompted and motivated to do so under controlled conditions. However, they may fail to exploit them adequately during real-life social interactions. PMID:25653346

  6. Structure of the intact ATM/Tel1 kinase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xuejuan; Chu, Huanyu; Lv, Mengjuan; Zhang, Zhihui; Qiu, Shuwan; Liu, Haiyan; Shen, Xuetong; Wang, Weiwu; Cai, Gang

    2016-05-01

    The ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) protein is an apical kinase that orchestrates the multifaceted DNA-damage response. Normally, ATM kinase is in an inactive, homodimer form and is transformed into monomers upon activation. Besides a conserved kinase domain at the C terminus, ATM contains three other structural modules, referred to as FAT, FATC and N-terminal helical solenoid. Here we report the first cryo-EM structure of ATM kinase, which is an intact homodimeric ATM/Tel1 from Schizosaccharomyces pombe. We show that two monomers directly contact head-to-head through the FAT and kinase domains. The tandem N-terminal helical solenoid tightly packs against the FAT and kinase domains. The structure suggests that ATM/Tel1 dimer interface and the consecutive HEAT repeats inhibit the binding of kinase substrates and regulators by steric hindrance. Our study provides a structural framework for understanding the mechanisms of ATM/Tel1 regulation as well as the development of new therapeutic agents.

  7. True navigation in migrating gulls requires intact olfactory nerves

    PubMed Central

    Wikelski, Martin; Arriero, Elena; Gagliardo, Anna; Holland, Richard A.; Huttunen, Markku J.; Juvaste, Risto; Mueller, Inge; Tertitski, Grigori; Thorup, Kasper; Wild, Martin; Alanko, Markku; Bairlein, Franz; Cherenkov, Alexander; Cameron, Alison; Flatz, Reinhard; Hannila, Juhani; Hüppop, Ommo; Kangasniemi, Markku; Kranstauber, Bart; Penttinen, Maija-Liisa; Safi, Kamran; Semashko, Vladimir; Schmid, Heidi; Wistbacka, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    During migratory journeys, birds may become displaced from their normal migratory route. Experimental evidence has shown that adult birds can correct for such displacements and return to their goal. However, the nature of the cues used by migratory birds to perform long distance navigation is still debated. In this experiment we subjected adult lesser black-backed gulls migrating from their Finnish/Russian breeding grounds (from >60°N) to Africa (to < 5°N) to sensory manipulation, to determine the sensory systems required for navigation. We translocated birds westward (1080 km) or eastward (885 km) to simulate natural navigational challenges. When translocated westwards and outside their migratory corridor birds with olfactory nerve section kept a clear directional preference (southerly) but were unable to compensate for the displacement, while intact birds and gulls with the ophthalmic branch of the trigeminal nerve sectioned oriented towards their population-specific migratory corridor. Thus, air-borne olfactory information seems to be important for migrating gulls to navigate successfully in some circumstances. PMID:26597351

  8. Activation and deactivation of vibronic channels in intact phycocyanin rods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nganou, C.; David, L.; Meinke, R.; Adir, N.; Maultzsch, J.; Mkandawire, M.; Pouhè, D.; Thomsen, C.

    2014-02-01

    We investigated the excitation modes of the light-harvesting protein phycocyanin (PC) from Thermosynechococcus vulcanus in the crystalline state using UV and near-infrared Raman spectroscopy. The spectra revealed the absence of a hydrogen out-of-plane wagging (HOOP) mode in the PC trimer, which suggests that the HOOP mode is activated in the intact PC rod, while it is not active in the PC trimer. Furthermore, in the PC trimer an intense mode at 984 cm-1 is assigned to the C-C stretching vibration while the mode at 454 cm-1 is likely due to ethyl group torsion. In contrast, in the similar chromophore phytochromobilin the C5,10,15-D wag mode at 622 cm-1 does not come from a downshift of the HOOP. Additionally, the absence of modes between 1200 and 1300 cm-1 rules out functional monomerization. A correlation between phycocyanobilin (PCB) and phycoerythrobilin (PEB) suggests that the PCB cofactors of the PC trimer appear in a conformation similar to that of PEB. The conformation of the PC rod is consistent with that of the allophycocyanin (APC) trimer, and thus excitonic flow is facilitated between these two independent light-harvesting compounds. This excitonic flow from the PC rod to APC appears to be modulated by the vibration channels during HOOP wagging, C = C stretching, and the N-H rocking in-plan vibration.

  9. Covert spatial attention is functionally intact in amblyopic human adults

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Mariel; Cymerman, Rachel; Smith, R. Theodore; Kiorpes, Lynne; Carrasco, Marisa

    2016-01-01

    Certain abnormalities in behavioral performance and neural signaling have been attributed to a deficit of visual attention in amblyopia, a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by a diverse array of visual deficits following abnormal binocular childhood experience. Critically, most have inferred attention's role in their task without explicitly manipulating and measuring its effects against a baseline condition. Here, we directly investigate whether human amblyopic adults benefit from covert spatial attention—the selective processing of visual information in the absence of eye movements—to the same degree as neurotypical observers. We manipulated both involuntary (Experiment 1) and voluntary (Experiment 2) attention during an orientation discrimination task for which the effects of covert spatial attention have been well established in neurotypical and special populations. In both experiments, attention significantly improved accuracy and decreased reaction times to a similar extent (a) between the eyes of the amblyopic adults and (b) between the amblyopes and their age- and gender-matched controls. Moreover, deployment of voluntary attention away from the target location significantly impaired task performance (Experiment 2). The magnitudes of the involuntary and voluntary attention benefits did not correlate with amblyopic depth or severity. Both groups of observers showed canonical performance fields (better performance along the horizontal than vertical meridian and at the lower than upper vertical meridian) and similar effects of attention across locations. Despite their characteristic low-level vision impairments, covert spatial attention remains functionally intact in human amblyopic adults. PMID:28033433

  10. Amniotic Fluid Infection in Preterm Pregnancies with Intact Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Rahkonen, Leena; Nupponen, Irmeli; Pätäri-Sampo, Anu; Tikkanen, Minna; Sorsa, Timo; Juhila, Juuso; Andersson, Sture; Paavonen, Jorma; Stefanovic, Vedran

    2017-01-01

    Introduction. Intra-amniotic infection (IAI) is a major cause of preterm labor and adverse neonatal outcome. We evaluated amniotic fluid (AF) proteolytic cascade forming biomarkers in relation to microbial invasion of the amniotic cavity (MIAC) and IAI in preterm pregnancies with intact membranes. Material and Methods. Amniocentesis was made to 73 women with singleton pregnancies; 27 with suspected IAI; and 46 controls. AF biomarkers were divided into three cascades: Cascade 1: matrix metalloproteinase-8 (MMP-8), MMP-9, myeloperoxidase (MPO), and interleukin-6; Cascade 2: neutrophil elastase (HNE), elafin, and MMP-9; Cascade 3: MMP-2, tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinases-1 (TIMP-1), MMP-8/TIMP-1 molar ratio, and C-reactive protein (CRP). MMP-8 was measured by an immunoenzymometric assay and the others were measured by ELISA. Standard biochemical methods, molecular microbiology, and culture techniques were used. Results. MMP-8, MMP-9, MPO, elafin, and TIMP-1 concentrations were higher in IAI suspected cases compared to controls and also in IAI suspected cases with MIAC compared to those without MIAC when adjusted by gestational age at amniocentesis. All biomarkers except elafin and MMP-2 had the sensitivity of 100% with thresholds based on ROC-curve. Odd ratios of biomarkers for MIAC were 1.2-38 and 95% confidential intervals 1.0-353.6. Conclusions. Neutrophil based AF biomarkers were associated with IAI and MIAC. PMID:28167848

  11. Rapid isolation of intact, viable fetal cartilage models

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, R.R.; Chepenik, K.P.; Paynton, B.V.; Cotler, J.M.

    1982-04-01

    A rapid procedure is described for the isolation of viable, intact, femoral cartilage models (humeri and femora) obtained from pregnant rats on the 18th day of gestation. Viability of these models is demonstrated in an in vitro system where the incorporation of /sup 35/S-sulfate was linear with time of incubation and with numbers of cartilage models utilized. Treatment of cartilage models with ice-cold trichloroacetic acid and a boiling water bath prior to incubation with radiolabel, reduced the amount of radioactivity incorporated to 1.3% of that observed for models incubated by routine procedures. Furthermore, digestion of cartilage model homogenates with protease yielded a supernatant from which 51% to 57% of the radioactivity was precipitated as GAG. This method may also be used to isolate fetal cartilage models as early as the 16th day of gestation. with this system, specific biochemical parameters of mammalian fetal chondrogenesis may be surveyed in normally and abnormally developing fetal cartilage free of surrounding soft tissue.

  12. Right ventricular outflow obstruction with intact ventricular septum in adults.

    PubMed Central

    Werner, A M; Darrell, J C; Pallegrini, R V; Woelfel, G F; Grant, K; Marrangoni, A G

    1997-01-01

    Cardiothoracic surgeons whose practice is limited to adults rarely see patients with right ventricular outflow obstruction and an intact ventricular septum. Of more than 10,000 open-heart procedures performed at our institution from 1983 to 1993 (in patients 18 to 75 years old), only 5 procedures were for correction of this problem. Both the pulmonary valve and the subvalvular area were abnormal in these 5 patients, and 4 of the 5 had subvalvular stenosis. The gradient across the right ventricular outflow tract was measured by cardiac catheterization before repair in all patients and averaged 118 mmHg. Various surgical approaches were used for repair. In the 2 patients whose pressures were measured postoperatively, the gradients were 25 mmHg and 45 mmHg, respectively. There were no operative deaths. At follow-up (range, 2 months to 5 years after surgery), all patients were in New York Heart Association functional class I and all had murmurs. Those who underwent echocardiography were found to have minimal gradients across the right ventricular outflow tract. Images PMID:9205983

  13. Measurement of the Mechanical Properties of Intact Collagen Fibrils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mercedes, H.; Heim, A.; Matthews, W. G.; Koob, T.

    2006-03-01

    Motivated by the genetic disorder Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS), in which proper collagen synthesis is interrupted, we are investigating the structural and mechanical properties of collagen fibrils. The fibrous glycoprotein collagen is the most abundant protein found in the human body and plays a key role in the extracellular matrix of the connective tissue, the properties of which are altered in EDS. We have selected as our model system the collagen fibrils of the sea cucumber dermis, a naturally mutable tissue. This system allows us to work with native fibrils which have their proteoglycan complement intact, something that is not possible with reconstituted mammalian collagen fibrils. Using atomic force microscopy, we measure, as a function of the concentration of divalent cations, the fibril diameter, its response to force loading, and the changes in its rigidity. Through these experiments, we will shed light on the mechanisms which control the properties of the sea cucumber dermis and hope to help explain the altered connective tissue extracellular matrix properties associated with EDS.

  14. Structure of the intact ATM/Tel1 kinase.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xuejuan; Chu, Huanyu; Lv, Mengjuan; Zhang, Zhihui; Qiu, Shuwan; Liu, Haiyan; Shen, Xuetong; Wang, Weiwu; Cai, Gang

    2016-05-27

    The ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) protein is an apical kinase that orchestrates the multifaceted DNA-damage response. Normally, ATM kinase is in an inactive, homodimer form and is transformed into monomers upon activation. Besides a conserved kinase domain at the C terminus, ATM contains three other structural modules, referred to as FAT, FATC and N-terminal helical solenoid. Here we report the first cryo-EM structure of ATM kinase, which is an intact homodimeric ATM/Tel1 from Schizosaccharomyces pombe. We show that two monomers directly contact head-to-head through the FAT and kinase domains. The tandem N-terminal helical solenoid tightly packs against the FAT and kinase domains. The structure suggests that ATM/Tel1 dimer interface and the consecutive HEAT repeats inhibit the binding of kinase substrates and regulators by steric hindrance. Our study provides a structural framework for understanding the mechanisms of ATM/Tel1 regulation as well as the development of new therapeutic agents.

  15. Structure of the intact ATM/Tel1 kinase

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xuejuan; Chu, Huanyu; Lv, Mengjuan; Zhang, Zhihui; Qiu, Shuwan; Liu, Haiyan; Shen, Xuetong; Wang, Weiwu; Cai, Gang

    2016-01-01

    The ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) protein is an apical kinase that orchestrates the multifaceted DNA-damage response. Normally, ATM kinase is in an inactive, homodimer form and is transformed into monomers upon activation. Besides a conserved kinase domain at the C terminus, ATM contains three other structural modules, referred to as FAT, FATC and N-terminal helical solenoid. Here we report the first cryo-EM structure of ATM kinase, which is an intact homodimeric ATM/Tel1 from Schizosaccharomyces pombe. We show that two monomers directly contact head-to-head through the FAT and kinase domains. The tandem N-terminal helical solenoid tightly packs against the FAT and kinase domains. The structure suggests that ATM/Tel1 dimer interface and the consecutive HEAT repeats inhibit the binding of kinase substrates and regulators by steric hindrance. Our study provides a structural framework for understanding the mechanisms of ATM/Tel1 regulation as well as the development of new therapeutic agents. PMID:27229179

  16. Hydrocarbon biodegradation kinetics in an intact unsaturated zone soil core

    SciTech Connect

    Moyer, E.E.; Ostendorf, D.W.; Richards, R.J.; Goodwin, S.

    1995-12-31

    Aerobic biodegradation of vapor-phase petroleum hydrocarbons was evaluated in an intact soil core from the site of an aviation gasoline release. A mid-depth unsaturated zone soil core was subjected to a flow of nitrogen gas, oxygen, water vapor, and vapor-phase hydrocarbons in a configuration analogous to a biofilter or an in situ bioventing or sparging situation. The vertical profiles of vapor-phase hydrocarbon concentration in the soil core were determined by gas chromatography of vapor samples. Steady-state concentrations were input to a simple analytical model balancing advection and first-order biodegradation of hydrocarbons. First-order rate constants for each major hydrocarbon compound were used to calibrate the model to the concentration profiles. Compounds with lower molecular weights, fewer methyl groups, and no quaternary carbons tended to have higher rate constants. The first-order rate constants were consistent with kinetic parameters determined from microcosm studies at the same field site, suggesting that both estimation methods were effective.

  17. Tokamak Systems Code

    SciTech Connect

    Reid, R.L.; Barrett, R.J.; Brown, T.G.; Gorker, G.E.; Hooper, R.J.; Kalsi, S.S.; Metzler, D.H.; Peng, Y.K.M.; Roth, K.E.; Spampinato, P.T.

    1985-03-01

    The FEDC Tokamak Systems Code calculates tokamak performance, cost, and configuration as a function of plasma engineering parameters. This version of the code models experimental tokamaks. It does not currently consider tokamak configurations that generate electrical power or incorporate breeding blankets. The code has a modular (or subroutine) structure to allow independent modeling for each major tokamak component or system. A primary benefit of modularization is that a component module may be updated without disturbing the remainder of the systems code as long as the imput to or output from the module remains unchanged.

  18. Topological subsystem codes

    SciTech Connect

    Bombin, H.

    2010-03-15

    We introduce a family of two-dimensional (2D) topological subsystem quantum error-correcting codes. The gauge group is generated by two-local Pauli operators, so that two-local measurements are enough to recover the error syndrome. We study the computational power of code deformation in these codes and show that boundaries cannot be introduced in the usual way. In addition, we give a general mapping connecting suitable classical statistical mechanical models to optimal error correction in subsystem stabilizer codes that suffer from depolarizing noise.

  19. FAA Smoke Transport Code

    SciTech Connect

    Domino, Stefan; Luketa-Hanlin, Anay; Gallegos, Carlos

    2006-10-27

    FAA Smoke Transport Code, a physics-based Computational Fluid Dynamics tool, which couples heat, mass, and momentum transfer, has been developed to provide information on smoke transport in cargo compartments with various geometries and flight conditions. The software package contains a graphical user interface for specification of geometry and boundary conditions, analysis module for solving the governing equations, and a post-processing tool. The current code was produced by making substantial improvements and additions to a code obtained from a university. The original code was able to compute steady, uniform, isothermal turbulent pressurization. In addition, a preprocessor and postprocessor were added to arrive at the current software package.

  20. Transonic airfoil codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garabedian, P. R.

    1979-01-01

    Computer codes for the design and analysis of transonic airfoils are considered. The design code relies on the method of complex characteristics in the hodograph plane to construct shockless airfoil. The analysis code uses artificial viscosity to calculate flows with weak shock waves at off-design conditions. Comparisons with experiments show that an excellent simulation of two dimensional wind tunnel tests is obtained. The codes have been widely adopted by the aircraft industry as a tool for the development of supercritical wing technology.

  1. Radiation Therapy of Large Intact Breasts Using a Beam Spoiler or Photons with Mixed Energies

    SciTech Connect

    Lief, Eugene P. Hunt, Margie A.; Hong, Linda X.; Amols, Howard I.

    2007-01-01

    Radiation treatment of large intact breasts with separations of more than 24 cm is typically performed using x-rays with energies of 10 MV and higher, to eliminate high-dose regions in tissue. The disadvantage of the higher energy beams is the reduced dose to superficial tissue in the buildup region. We evaluated 2 methods of avoiding this underdosage: (1) a beam spoiler: 1.7-cm-thick Lucite plate positioned in the blocking tray 35 cm from the isocenter, with 15-MV x-rays; and (2) combining 6- and 15-MV x-rays through the same portal. For the beam with the spoiler, we measured the dose distribution for normal and oblique incidence using a film and ion chamber in polystyrene, as well as a scanning diode in a water tank. In the mixed-energy approach, we calculated the dose distributions in the buildup region for different proportions of 6- and 15-MV beams. The dose enhancement due to the beam spoiler exhibited significant dependence upon the source-to-skin distance (SSD), field size, and the angle of incidence. In the center of a 20 x 20-cm{sup 2} field at 90-cm SSD, the beam spoiler raises the dose at 5-mm depth from 77% to 87% of the prescription, while maintaining the skin dose below 57%. Comparison of calculated dose with measurements suggested a practical way of treatment planning with the spoiler-usage of 2-mm 'beam' bolus-a special option offered by in-house treatment planning system. A second method of increasing buildup doses is to mix 6- and 15-MV beams. For example, in the case of a parallel-opposed irradiation of a 27-cm-thick phantom, dose to D{sub max} for each energy, with respect to midplane, is 114% for pure 6-, 107% for 15-MV beam with the spoiler, and 108% for a 3:1 mixture of 15- and 6-MV beams. Both methods are practical for radiation therapy of large intact breasts.

  2. Radiation therapy of large intact breasts using a beam spoiler or photons with mixed energies.

    PubMed

    Lief, Eugene P; Hunt, Margie A; Hong, Linda X; Amols, Howard I

    2007-01-01

    Radiation treatment of large intact breasts with separations of more than 24 cm is typically performed using x-rays with energies of 10 MV and higher, to eliminate high-dose regions in tissue. The disadvantage of the higher energy beams is the reduced dose to superficial tissue in the buildup region. We evaluated 2 methods of avoiding this underdosage: (1) a beam spoiler: 1.7-cm-thick Lucite plate positioned in the blocking tray 35 cm from the isocenter, with 15-MV x-rays; and (2) combining 6- and 15-MV x-rays through the same portal. For the beam with the spoiler, we measured the dose distribution for normal and oblique incidence using a film and ion chamber in polystyrene, as well as a scanning diode in a water tank. In the mixed-energy approach, we calculated the dose distributions in the buildup region for different proportions of 6- and 15-MV beams. The dose enhancement due to the beam spoiler exhibited significant dependence upon the source-to-skin distance (SSD), field size, and the angle of incidence. In the center of a 20 x 20-cm(2) field at 90-cm SSD, the beam spoiler raises the dose at 5-mm depth from 77% to 87% of the prescription, while maintaining the skin dose below 57%. Comparison of calculated dose with measurements suggested a practical way of treatment planning with the spoiler--usage of 2-mm "beam" bolus--a special option offered by in-house treatment planning system. A second method of increasing buildup doses is to mix 6- and 15-MV beams. For example, in the case of a parallel-opposed irradiation of a 27-cm-thick phantom, dose to D(max) for each energy, with respect to midplane, is 114% for pure 6-, 107% for 15-MV beam with the spoiler, and 108% for a 3:1 mixture of 15- and 6-MV beams. Both methods are practical for radiation therapy of large intact breasts.

  3. Scalable fluidic injector arrays for viral targeting of intact 3-D brain circuits.

    PubMed

    Chan, Stephanie; Bernstein, Jacob; Boyden, Edward

    2010-01-21

    Our understanding of neural circuits--how they mediate the computations that subserve sensation, thought, emotion, and action, and how they are corrupted in neurological and psychiatric disorders--would be greatly facilitated by a technology for rapidly targeting genes to complex 3-dimensional neural circuits, enabling fast creation of "circuit-level transgenics." We have recently developed methods in which viruses encoding for light-sensitive proteins can sensitize specific cell types to millisecond-timescale activation and silencing in the intact brain. We here present the design and implementation of an injector array capable of delivering viruses (or other fluids) to dozens of defined points within the 3-dimensional structure of the brain (Figure. 1A, 1B). The injector array comprises one or more displacement pumps that each drive a set of syringes, each of which feeds into a polyimide/fused-silica capillary via a high-pressure-tolerant connector. The capillaries are sized, and then inserted into, desired locations specified by custom-milling a stereotactic positioning board, thus allowing viruses or other reagents to be delivered to the desired set of brain regions. To use the device, the surgeon first fills the fluidic subsystem entirely with oil, backfills the capillaries with the virus, inserts the device into the brain, and infuses reagents slowly (<0.1 microliters/min). The parallel nature of the injector array facilitates rapid, accurate, and robust labeling of entire neural circuits with viral payloads such as optical sensitizers to enable light-activation and silencing of defined brain circuits. Along with other technologies, such as optical fiber arrays for light delivery to desired sets of brain regions, we hope to create a toolbox that enables the systematic probing of causal neural functions in the intact brain. This technology may not only open up such systematic approaches to circuit-focused neuroscience in mammals, and facilitate labeling of

  4. Fast Coding Unit Encoding Mechanism for Low Complexity Video Coding

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yueying; Jia, Kebin; Gao, Guandong

    2016-01-01

    In high efficiency video coding (HEVC), coding tree contributes to excellent compression performance. However, coding tree brings extremely high computational complexity. Innovative works for improving coding tree to further reduce encoding time are stated in this paper. A novel low complexity coding tree mechanism is proposed for HEVC fast coding unit (CU) encoding. Firstly, this paper makes an in-depth study of the relationship among CU distribution, quantization parameter (QP) and content change (CC). Secondly, a CU coding tree probability model is proposed for modeling and predicting CU distribution. Eventually, a CU coding tree probability update is proposed, aiming to address probabilistic model distortion problems caused by CC. Experimental results show that the proposed low complexity CU coding tree mechanism significantly reduces encoding time by 27% for lossy coding and 42% for visually lossless coding and lossless coding. The proposed low complexity CU coding tree mechanism devotes to improving coding performance under various application conditions. PMID:26999741

  5. Fast Coding Unit Encoding Mechanism for Low Complexity Video Coding.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yuan; Liu, Pengyu; Wu, Yueying; Jia, Kebin; Gao, Guandong

    2016-01-01

    In high efficiency video coding (HEVC), coding tree contributes to excellent compression performance. However, coding tree brings extremely high computational complexity. Innovative works for improving coding tree to further reduce encoding time are stated in this paper. A novel low complexity coding tree mechanism is proposed for HEVC fast coding unit (CU) encoding. Firstly, this paper makes an in-depth study of the relationship among CU distribution, quantization parameter (QP) and content change (CC). Secondly, a CU coding tree probability model is proposed for modeling and predicting CU distribution. Eventually, a CU coding tree probability update is proposed, aiming to address probabilistic model distortion problems caused by CC. Experimental results show that the proposed low complexity CU coding tree mechanism significantly reduces encoding time by 27% for lossy coding and 42% for visually lossless coding and lossless coding. The proposed low complexity CU coding tree mechanism devotes to improving coding performance under various application conditions.

  6. Non-coding genetic variants in human disease.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Feng; Lupski, James R

    2015-10-15

    Genetic variants, including single-nucleotide variants (SNVs) and copy number variants (CNVs), in the non-coding regions of the human genome can play an important role in human traits and complex diseases. Most of the genome-wide association study (GWAS) signals map to non-coding regions and potentially point to non-coding variants, whereas their functional interpretation is challenging. In this review, we discuss the human non-coding variants and their contributions to human diseases in the following four parts. (i) Functional annotations of non-coding SNPs mapped by GWAS: we discuss recent progress revealing some of the molecular mechanisms for GWAS signals affecting gene function. (ii) Technical progress in interpretation of non-coding variants: we briefly describe some of the technologies for functional annotations of non-coding variants, including the methods for genome-wide mapping of chromatin interaction, computational tools for functional predictions and the new genome editing technologies useful for dissecting potential functional consequences of non-coding variants. (iii) Non-coding CNVs in human diseases: we review our emerging understanding the role of non-coding CNVs in human disease. (iv) Compound inheritance of large genomic deletions and non-coding variants: compound inheritance at a locus consisting of coding variants plus non-coding ones is described.

  7. Non-coding genetic variants in human disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Feng; Lupski, James R.

    2015-01-01

    Genetic variants, including single-nucleotide variants (SNVs) and copy number variants (CNVs), in the non-coding regions of the human genome can play an important role in human traits and complex diseases. Most of the genome-wide association study (GWAS) signals map to non-coding regions and potentially point to non-coding variants, whereas their functional interpretation is challenging. In this review, we discuss the human non-coding variants and their contributions to human diseases in the following four parts. (i) Functional annotations of non-coding SNPs mapped by GWAS: we discuss recent progress revealing some of the molecular mechanisms for GWAS signals affecting gene function. (ii) Technical progress in interpretation of non-coding variants: we briefly describe some of the technologies for functional annotations of non-coding variants, including the methods for genome-wide mapping of chromatin interaction, computational tools for functional predictions and the new genome editing technologies useful for dissecting potential functional consequences of non-coding variants. (iii) Non-coding CNVs in human diseases: we review our emerging understanding the role of non-coding CNVs in human disease. (iv) Compound inheritance of large genomic deletions and non-coding variants: compound inheritance at a locus consisting of coding variants plus non-coding ones is described. PMID:26152199

  8. Dress Codes for Teachers?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Million, June

    2004-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses an e-mail survey of principals from across the country regarding whether or not their school had a formal staff dress code. The results indicate that most did not have a formal dress code, but agreed that professional dress for teachers was not only necessary, but showed respect for the school and had a…

  9. Lichenase and coding sequences

    DOEpatents

    Li, Xin-Liang; Ljungdahl, Lars G.; Chen, Huizhong

    2000-08-15

    The present invention provides a fungal lichenase, i.e., an endo-1,3-1,4-.beta.-D-glucanohydrolase, its coding sequence, recombinant DNA molecules comprising the lichenase coding sequences, recombinant host cells and methods for producing same. The present lichenase is from Orpinomyces PC-2.

  10. Legacy Code Modernization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hribar, Michelle R.; Frumkin, Michael; Jin, Haoqiang; Waheed, Abdul; Yan, Jerry; Saini, Subhash (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Over the past decade, high performance computing has evolved rapidly; systems based on commodity microprocessors have been introduced in quick succession from at least seven vendors/families. Porting codes to every new architecture is a difficult problem; in particular, here at NASA, there are many large CFD applications that are very costly to port to new machines by hand. The LCM ("Legacy Code Modernization") Project is the development of an integrated parallelization environment (IPE) which performs the automated mapping of legacy CFD (Fortran) applications to state-of-the-art high performance computers. While most projects to port codes focus on the parallelization of the code, we consider porting to be an iterative process consisting of several steps: 1) code cleanup, 2) serial optimization,3) parallelization, 4) performance monitoring and visualization, 5) intelligent tools for automated tuning using performance prediction and 6) machine specific optimization. The approach for building this parallelization environment is to build the components for each of the steps simultaneously and then integrate them together. The demonstration will exhibit our latest research in building this environment: 1. Parallelizing tools and compiler evaluation. 2. Code cleanup and serial optimization using automated scripts 3. Development of a code generator for performance prediction 4. Automated partitioning 5. Automated insertion of directives. These demonstrations will exhibit the effectiveness of an automated approach for all the steps involved with porting and tuning a legacy code application for a new architecture.

  11. Synthesizing Certified Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whalen, Michael; Schumann, Johann; Fischer, Bernd

    2002-01-01

    Code certification is a lightweight approach to demonstrate software quality on a formal level. Its basic idea is to require producers to provide formal proofs that their code satisfies certain quality properties. These proofs serve as certificates which can be checked independently. Since code certification uses the same underlying technology as program verification, it also requires many detailed annotations (e.g., loop invariants) to make the proofs possible. However, manually adding theses annotations to the code is time-consuming and error-prone. We address this problem by combining code certification with automatic program synthesis. We propose an approach to generate simultaneously, from a high-level specification, code and all annotations required to certify generated code. Here, we describe a certification extension of AUTOBAYES, a synthesis tool which automatically generates complex data analysis programs from compact specifications. AUTOBAYES contains sufficient high-level domain knowledge to generate detailed annotations. This allows us to use a general-purpose verification condition generator to produce a set of proof obligations in first-order logic. The obligations are then discharged using the automated theorem E-SETHEO. We demonstrate our approach by certifying operator safety for a generated iterative data classification program without manual annotation of the code.

  12. Coding Acoustic Metasurfaces.

    PubMed

    Xie, Boyang; Tang, Kun; Cheng, Hua; Liu, Zhengyou; Chen, Shuqi; Tian, Jianguo

    2017-02-01

    Coding acoustic metasurfaces can combine simple logical bits to acquire sophisticated functions in wave control. The acoustic logical bits can achieve a phase difference of exactly π and a perfect match of the amplitudes for the transmitted waves. By programming the coding sequences, acoustic metasurfaces with various functions, including creating peculiar antenna patterns and waves focusing, have been demonstrated.

  13. Computerized mega code recording.

    PubMed

    Burt, T W; Bock, H C

    1988-04-01

    A system has been developed to facilitate recording of advanced cardiac life support mega code testing scenarios. By scanning a paper "keyboard" using a bar code wand attached to a portable microcomputer, the person assigned to record the scenario can easily generate an accurate, complete, timed, and typewritten record of the given situations and the obtained responses.

  14. Pseudonoise code tracking loop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laflame, D. T. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    A delay-locked loop is presented for tracking a pseudonoise (PN) reference code in an incoming communication signal. The loop is less sensitive to gain imbalances, which can otherwise introduce timing errors in the PN reference code formed by the loop.

  15. Dead or Alive? Probing Microbial Ecosystems With Intact Polar Lipids.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sturt, H. F.; Smith, K. J.; Xu, L.; Molyneaux, S. J.; Teske, A.; Orphan, V. J.; Summons, R. E.; Hinrichs, K.

    2002-12-01

    Multi-proxy approaches consisting of isotopic information derived from diagnostic lipid biomarkers together with phylogenetic techniques have advanced our understanding of naturally occurring microbial communities. Examples include the significant advances in our understanding of the ecology of archaeal methanotrophs and planktonic crenarchaeota. However, this approach has to be modified for application to microbial ecosystems in the deep subsurface in order to distinguish live matter from dead. Polar lipids, i.e., phospho- and glycolipids, fulfill that requirement and potentially provide information on the structure, size and function of the microbial community. We utilized a high-performance-liquid-chromatograph coupled to a mass-spectrometer (HPLC-MS) to examine the distribution of intact polar lipids from microbial isolates and surface sediments that are relevant for the study of deep subsurface biospheres. Structural features of bacterial and archaeal-derived polar lipids are identified on the basis of their sequential fragmentation in an ion-trap mass spectrometer upon electrospray ionization. Additional details are obtained from a series of chemical degradations designed to release alkyl units of the polar lipids rendering them analyzable by conventional gas-chromatography-mass-spectrometry (GC-MS). Fingerprints of polar lipids from microbial isolates allow distinction of taxonomically closely related prokaryotes. Moreover, sediments from seep environments in Eel River Basin and Guaymas Basin that host anaerobic methanotrophic communities are both dominated by similar types of glycosyl biphytanyl tetraethers suggestive of a predominant low-diversity archaeal assemblage. First applications of this technique to sediments from the deep subsurface will be presented.

  16. Raman mapping of intact biofilms on stainless steel surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Julie K.; Heighton, Lynne; Xu, Yunfeng; Nou, Xiangwu; Schmidt, Walter F.

    2016-05-01

    Many issues occur when microbial bacteria contaminates human food or water; it can be dangerous to the public. Determining how the microbial are growing, it can help experts determine how to prevent the outbreaks. Biofilms are a tightly group of microbial cells that grow on living surfaces or surrounding themselves. Though biofilms are not necessarily uniform; when there are more than one type of microbial bacteria that are grown, Raman mapping is performed to determine the growth patterns. Depending on the type of microbial bacteria, they can grow in various patterns such as symmetrical or scattered on the surface. The biofilms need to be intact in order to preclude and potentially figuring out the relative intensity of different components in a biofilm mixture. In addition, it is important to determine whether one biofilms is a substrate for another biofilm to be detected. For example, it is possible if layer B appears above layer A, but layer A doesn't appear above layer B. In this case, three types of biofilms that are grown includes Listeria(L), Ralstonia(R), and a mixture of the two (LR). Since microbe deposits on metal surfaces are quite suitable, biofilms were grown on stainless steel surface slides. Each slide was viewed under a Raman Microscope at 100X and using a 532nm laser to provide great results and sharp peaks. The mapping of the laser helps determine how the bacteria growth, at which intensity the bacteria appeared in order to identify specific microbes to signature markers on biofilms.

  17. Optical properties of intact leaves for estimating chlorophyll concentration.

    PubMed

    Carter, Gregory A; Spiering, Bruce A

    2002-01-01

    Changes in leaf chlorophyll content can serve as relative indicators of plant vigor and environmental quality. This study identified reflectance, transmittance, and absorptance wavebands and band ratios within the 400- to 850-nm range for intact leaves that could be used to estimate extracted leaf chlorophyll per unit leaf area (areal concentration) with minimal error. Leaf optical properties along with chlorophyll a, b, and a + b concentrations were measured for the planar-leaved sweetgum (Liquidambar styraciflua L.), red maple (Acer rubrum L.), wild grape (Vitis rotundifolia Michx.), and switchcane [Arundinaria gigantea (Walter) Muhl.], and for needles of longleaf pine (Pinus palustris Miller). Generally, reflectance, transmittance, and absorptance corresponded most precisely with chlorophyll concentrations at wavelengths near 700 nm, although regressions were also strong in the 550- to 625-nm range. A power function was superior to a simple linear function in yielding low standard deviations of the estimate (s). When data were combined among the planar-leaved species, s values were low at approximately 50 mumol/m2 out of a 940 mumol/m2 range in chlorophyll a + b at best-fit wavelengths of 707 to 709 nm. Minimal s values for chlorophyll a + b ranged from 32 to 62 mumol/m2 across species when band ratios having numerator wavelengths of 693 to 720 nm were used with the application of a power function. Optimal denominator wavelengths for the band ratios were 850 nm for reflectance and transmittance and 400 nm for absorptance. This information can be applied in designing field portable chlorophyll meters and in the landscape-scale remote sensing of plant responses to the environment.

  18. Optical properties of intact leaves for estimating chlorophyll concentration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Gregory A.; Spiering, Bruce A.

    2002-01-01

    Changes in leaf chlorophyll content can serve as relative indicators of plant vigor and environmental quality. This study identified reflectance, transmittance, and absorptance wavebands and band ratios within the 400- to 850-nm range for intact leaves that could be used to estimate extracted leaf chlorophyll per unit leaf area (areal concentration) with minimal error. Leaf optical properties along with chlorophyll a, b, and a + b concentrations were measured for the planar-leaved sweetgum (Liquidambar styraciflua L.), red maple (Acer rubrum L.), wild grape (Vitis rotundifolia Michx.), and switchcane [Arundinaria gigantea (Walter) Muhl.], and for needles of longleaf pine (Pinus palustris Miller). Generally, reflectance, transmittance, and absorptance corresponded most precisely with chlorophyll concentrations at wavelengths near 700 nm, although regressions were also strong in the 550- to 625-nm range. A power function was superior to a simple linear function in yielding low standard deviations of the estimate (s). When data were combined among the planar-leaved species, s values were low at approximately 50 mumol/m2 out of a 940 mumol/m2 range in chlorophyll a + b at best-fit wavelengths of 707 to 709 nm. Minimal s values for chlorophyll a + b ranged from 32 to 62 mumol/m2 across species when band ratios having numerator wavelengths of 693 to 720 nm were used with the application of a power function. Optimal denominator wavelengths for the band ratios were 850 nm for reflectance and transmittance and 400 nm for absorptance. This information can be applied in designing field portable chlorophyll meters and in the landscape-scale remote sensing of plant responses to the environment.

  19. Multipurpose Dissociation Cell for Enhanced ETD of Intact Protein Species

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Christopher M.; Russell, Jason D.; Ledvina, Aaron R.; McAlister, Graeme C.; Westphall, Michael S.; Griep-Raming, Jens; Schwartz, Jae C.; Coon, Joshua J.; Syka, John E.P.

    2013-01-01

    We describe and characterize an improved implementation of ETD on a modified hybrid linear ion trap-Orbitrap instrument. Instead of performing ETD in the mass-analyzing quadrupole linear ion trap (A-QLT), the instrument collision cell was modified to enable ETD. We partitioned the collision cell into a multi-section RF ion storage and transfer device to enable injection and simultaneous separate storage of precursor and reagent ions. Application of a secondary (axial) confinement voltage to the cell end lens electrodes enables charge-sign independent trapping for ion-ion reactions. The approximately two-fold higher quadrupole field frequency of this cell relative to that of the A-QLT, enables higher reagent ion densities and correspondingly faster ETD reactions, and, with the collision cell’s longer axial dimensions, larger populations of precursor ions may be reacted. The higher ion capacity of the collision cell permits the accumulation and reaction of multiple full loads of precursor ions from the A-QLT followed by FT Orbitrap m/z analysis of the ETD product ions. This extends the intra-scan dynamic range by increasing the maximum number of product ions in a single MS/MS event. For analyses of large peptide/small protein precursor cations, this reduces or eliminates the need for spectral averaging to achieve acceptable ETD product ion signal-to-noise levels. Using larger ion populations, we demonstrate improvements in protein sequence coverage and aggregate protein identifications in LC-MS/MS analysis of intact protein species as compared to the standard ETD implementation. PMID:23609185

  20. Multipurpose dissociation cell for enhanced ETD of intact protein species.

    PubMed

    Rose, Christopher M; Russell, Jason D; Ledvina, Aaron R; McAlister, Graeme C; Westphall, Michael S; Griep-Raming, Jens; Schwartz, Jae C; Coon, Joshua J; Syka, John E P

    2013-06-01

    We describe and characterize an improved implementation of ETD on a modified hybrid linear ion trap-Orbitrap instrument. Instead of performing ETD in the mass-analyzing quadrupole linear ion trap (A-QLT), the instrument collision cell was modified to enable ETD. We partitioned the collision cell into a multi-section rf ion storage and transfer device to enable injection and simultaneous separate storage of precursor and reagent ions. Application of a secondary (axial) confinement voltage to the cell end lens electrodes enables charge-sign independent trapping for ion-ion reactions. The approximately 2-fold higher quadrupole field frequency of this cell relative to that of the A-QLT enables higher reagent ion densities and correspondingly faster ETD reactions, and, with the collision cell's longer axial dimensions, larger populations of precursor ions may be reacted. The higher ion capacity of the collision cell permits the accumulation and reaction of multiple full loads of precursor ions from the A-QLT followed by FT Orbitrap m/z analysis of the ETD product ions. This extends the intra-scan dynamic range by increasing the maximum number of product ions in a single MS/MS event. For analyses of large peptide/small protein precursor cations, this reduces or eliminates the need for spectral averaging to achieve acceptable ETD product ion signal-to-noise levels. Using larger ion populations, we demonstrate improvements in protein sequence coverage and aggregate protein identifications in LC-MS/MS analysis of intact protein species as compared to the standard ETD implementation.

  1. Secretion of acid and base equivalents by intact distal airways.

    PubMed

    Inglis, S K; Wilson, S M; Olver, R E

    2003-05-01

    Secretion of HCO(3)(-) by airway submucosal glands is essential for normal liquid and mucus secretion. Because the liquid bathing the airway surface (ASL) is acidic, it has been proposed that the surface epithelium may acidify HCO(3)(-)-rich glandular fluid. The aim of this study was to investigate the mechanisms by which intact distal bronchi, which contain both surface and glandular epithelium, modify pH of luminal fluid. Distal bronchi were isolated from pig lungs, cannulated in a bath containing HCO(3)(-)-buffered solution, and perfused continually with an aliquot of similar, lightly buffered solution (LBS) in which NaCl replaced NaHCO(3)(-) (pH 7 with NaOH). The pH of this circulating LBS initially acidified (by 0.053 +/- 0.0053 pH units) and transepithelial potential difference (PD) depolarized. The magnitude of acidification was increased when pH(LBS) was higher. This acidification was unaffected by luminal dimethylamiloride (DMA, 100 microM) but was inhibited by 100 nM bafilomycin A(1) (by 76 +/- 13%), suggesting involvement of vacuolar-H(+) ATPase. Addition of ACh (10 microM) evoked alkalinization of luminal LBS and hyperpolarization of transepithelial PD. The alkalinization was inhibited in HCO(3)(-)-free solutions containing acetazolamide (1 mM) and by DMA and was enhanced by bumetanide (100 microM), an inhibitor of Cl(-) secretion. The hyperpolarization was unaffected by these maneuvers. The anion channel blocker 5-nitro-2-(3-phenylpropylamino)benzoate (300 microM) and combined treatment with DMA and bumetanide blocked both the alkalinization and hyperpolarization responses to ACh. These results are consistent with earlier studies showing that ACh evokes glandular secretion of HCO(3)(-) and Cl(-). Isolated distal airways thus secrete both acid and base equivalents.

  2. Uptake of intact nucleoside monophosphates by Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus 109J.

    PubMed Central

    Ruby, E G; McCabe, J B; Barke, J I

    1985-01-01

    The degraded nucleic acids and ribosomes of its prey cell provide Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus 109J with a source of ribonucleoside monophosphates and deoxyribonucleoside monophosphates for biosynthesis and respiration. We demonstrate that bdellovibrios, in contrast to almost all other bacteria, take up these nucleoside monophosphates into the cell in an intact, phosphorylated form. In this way they are able to assimilate more effectively the cellular contents of their prey. Studies with UMP and dTMP demonstrate that they are transported and accumulated against a concentration gradient, achieving internal levels at least 10 times the external levels. Treatment of the bdellovibrios with azide or carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone eliminates their ability to either transport or maintain accumulated UMP and suggests the presence of a freely reversible exchange mechanism. There are at least two separate classes of transport systems for nucleoside monophosphates, each exhibiting partial specificity for either ribonucleoside monophosphates or deoxyribonucleoside monophosphates. Kinetic analyses of UMP transport in different developmental stages of strain 109J indicate that each stage expresses a single, saturable uptake system with a distinct apparent substrate affinity constant (Kt) of 104 microM in attack phase cells and 35 microM in prematurely released growth phase filaments. The capacity for transport of UMP by the growth phase filaments was 2.4 times that of the attack phase cells. These data, in addition to the apparent lack of environmental control of UMP transport capacity in attack phase cells, suggest that there are two transport systems for UMP in bdellovibrios and that the high-affinity, high-capacity growth phase system is developmentally regulated. PMID:4030692

  3. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of intact bacteriophage T4D particles.

    PubMed Central

    Childs, J D; Birnboim, H C

    1975-01-01

    A method for the electrophoresis of intact bacteriophage T4D particles through polyacrylamide gels has been developed. It was found that phage particles will migrate through dilute polyacrylamide gels (less than 2.1%) in the presence of a low concentration of MgCl2. As few as 5 x 10(9) phage particles can be seen directly as a light-scattering band during the course of electrophoresis. The band can also be detected by scanning gels at 260 to 265 nm or by eluting viable phage particles from gel slices. A new mutant (eph1) has been identified on the basis of its decreased electrophoretic mobility compared with that of the wild type; mutant particles migrated 14% slower than the wild type particles at pH 8.3 and 35% slower at pH 5.0. The isoelectric points of both the wild type and eph1 mutant were found to be between pH 4.0 and 5.0. Particles of T4 with different head lengths were also studied. Petite particles (heads 20% shorter than normal) migrated at the same rate as normal-size particles. Giant particles, heterogenous with respect to head length (two to nine times normal), migrated faster than normal-size particles as a diffuse band. This diffuseness was due to separation within the band of particles having mobilities ranging from 8 to 35% faster than those of normal-size particles. These observations extend the useful range of polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis to include much larger particles than have previously been studied, including most viruses. Images PMID:240037

  4. Ultrastructure of the intact skeleton of the human erythrocyte membrane.

    PubMed

    Shen, B W; Josephs, R; Steck, T L

    1986-03-01

    Filamentous skeletons were liberated from isolated human erythrocyte membranes in Triton X-100, spread on fenestrated carbon films, negatively stained, and viewed intact and unfixed in the transmission electron microscope. Two forms of the skeleton were examined: (a) basic skeletons, stripped of accessory proteins with 1.5 M NaCl so that they contain predominantly polypeptide bands 1, 2, 4.1, and 5; and (b) unstripped skeletons, which also bore accessory proteins such as ankyrin and band 3 and small plaques of residual lipid. Freshly prepared skeletons were highly condensed. Incubation at low ionic strength and in the presence of dithiothreitol for an hour or more caused an expansion of the skeletons, which greatly increased the visibility of their elements. The expansion may reflect the opening of spectrin from a compact to an elongated disposition. Expanded skeletons appeared to be organized as networks of short actin filaments joined by multiple (5-8) spectrin tetramers. In unstripped preparations, globular masses were observed near the centers of the spectrin filaments, probably corresponding to complexes of ankyrin with band 3 oligomers. Some of these globules linked pairs of spectrin filaments. Skeletons prepared with a minimum of perturbation had thickened actin protofilaments, presumably reflecting the presence of accessory proteins. The length of these actin filaments was highly uniform, averaging 33 +/- 5 nm. This is the length of nonmuscle tropomyosin. Since there is almost enough tropomyosin present to saturate the F-actin, our data support the hypothesis that tropomyosin may determine the length of actin protofilaments in the red cell membrane.

  5. Evolving genetic code

    PubMed Central

    OHAMA, Takeshi; INAGAKI, Yuji; BESSHO, Yoshitaka; OSAWA, Syozo

    2008-01-01

    In 1985, we reported that a bacterium, Mycoplasma capricolum, used a deviant genetic code, namely UGA, a “universal” stop codon, was read as tryptophan. This finding, together with the deviant nuclear genetic codes in not a few organisms and a number of mitochondria, shows that the genetic code is not universal, and is in a state of evolution. To account for the changes in codon meanings, we proposed the codon capture theory stating that all the code changes are non-disruptive without accompanied changes of amino acid sequences of proteins. Supporting evidence for the theory is presented in this review. A possible evolutionary process from the ancient to the present-day genetic code is also discussed. PMID:18941287

  6. Combustion chamber analysis code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Przekwas, A. J.; Lai, Y. G.; Krishnan, A.; Avva, R. K.; Giridharan, M. G.

    1993-01-01

    A three-dimensional, time dependent, Favre averaged, finite volume Navier-Stokes code has been developed to model compressible and incompressible flows (with and without chemical reactions) in liquid rocket engines. The code has a non-staggered formulation with generalized body-fitted-coordinates (BFC) capability. Higher order differencing methodologies such as MUSCL and Osher-Chakravarthy schemes are available. Turbulent flows can be modeled using any of the five turbulent models present in the code. A two-phase, two-liquid, Lagrangian spray model has been incorporated into the code. Chemical equilibrium and finite rate reaction models are available to model chemically reacting flows. The discrete ordinate method is used to model effects of thermal radiation. The code has been validated extensively against benchmark experimental data and has been applied to model flows in several propulsion system components of the SSME and the STME.

  7. Methodology for fast detection of false sharing in threaded scientific codes

    DOEpatents

    Chung, I-Hsin; Cong, Guojing; Murata, Hiroki; Negishi, Yasushi; Wen, Hui-Fang

    2014-11-25

    A profiling tool identifies a code region with a false sharing potential. A static analysis tool classifies variables and arrays in the identified code region. A mapping detection library correlates memory access instructions in the identified code region with variables and arrays in the identified code region while a processor is running the identified code region. The mapping detection library identifies one or more instructions at risk, in the identified code region, which are subject to an analysis by a false sharing detection library. A false sharing detection library performs a run-time analysis of the one or more instructions at risk while the processor is re-running the identified code region. The false sharing detection library determines, based on the performed run-time analysis, whether two different portions of the cache memory line are accessed by the generated binary code.

  8. Open Repair of Intact Thoracoabdominal Aortic Aneurysms in the ACS-NSQIP

    PubMed Central

    Bensley, Rodney P.; Curran, Thomas; Hurks, Rob; Lo, Ruby C.; Wyers, Mark C.; Hamdan, Allen D.; Chaikof, Elliot L.; Schermerhorn, Marc L.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Repair of thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysms (TAAA) is uncommon. Studies using national data report mortality rates of 20% while single institution studies report 5-8% mortality. Clinical trials are currently evaluating branched and fenestrated endografts. The purpose of this study is to establish a benchmark for future comparisons with endovascular trials using open repair of TAAA in the National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (NSQIP) database. Methods We identified all patients undergoing open surgical repair of intact TAAA (elective and emergent) in NSQIP 2005-2010 using CPT and ICD-9 codes. We analyzed demographics, comorbidities, 30-day mortality, postoperative complications, and length of stay. Multivariable logistic regression was used to identify predictors of mortality. Results We identified 450 patients (418 elective, 32 emergent) that underwent open surgical repair of an intact TAAA. Mean age was 69.4 years, 60.7% were male, and 85.6% were white. Comorbidities included hypertension (87.1%), COPD (27.3%), prior stroke/TIA (16.7%), diabetes (11.6%), and peripheral vascular disease (9.6%). Thirty-day mortality was 10.0%. Pulmonary complications were the most common: failure to wean from ventilator (39.1%), pneumonia (23.1%), and reintubation (13.8%). Acute renal failure requiring dialysis occurred in 10.7% of patients. On multivariable analysis, emergent repair [OR 3.3, 95% CI (1.03-10.83), P=.04], age > 70 years [OR 3.5, 95% CI (1.03-7.56), P=.001], preoperative dialysis [OR 8.4, 95% CI (1.90-37.29), P= .005], cardiac complication [OR 2.9, 95% CI (1.05-8.21), P=.04] and renal complication [OR 8.4, 95% CI (3.41-20.56), P<.001] were predictive of mortality. Conclusions In this study of NSQIP hospitals, the first to analyze open surgical repair of TAAA, the 30-day mortality rate of 10.0% is similar to single institution reports. However, morbidity and mortality after open TAAA repair remain high confirming the need for less invasive procedures

  9. Relationship between Size of Broken and Intact Families and Academic Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cherian, Varghese I.

    1991-01-01

    Compares relationship between family size and academic achievement of children from broken and intact families among Black African Xhosa-speaking children between the ages of 13 and 17. Results indicate a negative relationship between family size and academic achievement, regardless of broken or intact families. (Author/NL)

  10. 46 CFR 28.545 - Intact stability when using lifting gear.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Intact stability when using lifting gear. 28.545 Section... COMMERCIAL FISHING INDUSTRY VESSELS Stability § 28.545 Intact stability when using lifting gear. (a) Each vessel which lifts a weight over the side, or that uses fishing gear that can impose an...

  11. 46 CFR 28.545 - Intact stability when using lifting gear.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Intact stability when using lifting gear. 28.545 Section... COMMERCIAL FISHING INDUSTRY VESSELS Stability § 28.545 Intact stability when using lifting gear. (a) Each vessel which lifts a weight over the side, or that uses fishing gear that can impose an...

  12. Multiview coding mode decision with hybrid optimal stopping model.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Tiesong; Kwong, Sam; Wang, Hanli; Wang, Zhou; Pan, Zhaoqing; Kuo, C-C Jay

    2013-04-01

    In a generic decision process, optimal stopping theory aims to achieve a good tradeoff between decision performance and time consumed, with the advantages of theoretical decision-making and predictable decision performance. In this paper, optimal stopping theory is employed to develop an effective hybrid model for the mode decision problem, which aims to theoretically achieve a good tradeoff between the two interrelated measurements in mode decision, as computational complexity reduction and rate-distortion degradation. The proposed hybrid model is implemented and examined with a multiview encoder. To support the model and further promote coding performance, the multiview coding mode characteristics, including predicted mode probability and estimated coding time, are jointly investigated with inter-view correlations. Exhaustive experimental results with a wide range of video resolutions reveal the efficiency and robustness of our method, with high decision accuracy, negligible computational overhead, and almost intact rate-distortion performance compared to the original encoder.

  13. After rotator cuff tears, the remaining (intact) tendons are mechanically altered.

    PubMed

    Perry, Stephanie M; Getz, Charles L; Soslowsky, Louis J

    2009-01-01

    Although presumed, damage in the remaining (intact) rotator cuff tendons in the presence of an isolated supraspinatus tendon tear or multiple tendon tear has not been well studied. This study used an animal model of multiple rotator cuff tendon tears to investigate alterations in the remaining (intact) tendon mechanical properties at 4 and 8 weeks after injury. Twenty-four rats served as uninjured controls, whereas 72 were divided among 3 tendon detachment groups: supraspinatus tendon detachment, supraspinatus + infraspinatus tendon detachment, and supraspinatus + subscapularis tendon detachment. The remaining (intact) rotator cuff tendons had decreased mechanical properties in the presence of rotator cuff tears. The remaining (intact) subscapularis and infraspinatus tendon cross-sectional areas increased, whereas tendon modulus decreased after tears of both 1 and 2 tendons. The remaining (intact) tendon cross-sectional areas continued to increase with time after injury. These alterations could potentially lead to further tendon damage and tear progression.

  14. Pyramid image codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Andrew B.

    1990-01-01

    All vision systems, both human and machine, transform the spatial image into a coded representation. Particular codes may be optimized for efficiency or to extract useful image features. Researchers explored image codes based on primary visual cortex in man and other primates. Understanding these codes will advance the art in image coding, autonomous vision, and computational human factors. In cortex, imagery is coded by features that vary in size, orientation, and position. Researchers have devised a mathematical model of this transformation, called the Hexagonal oriented Orthogonal quadrature Pyramid (HOP). In a pyramid code, features are segregated by size into layers, with fewer features in the layers devoted to large features. Pyramid schemes provide scale invariance, and are useful for coarse-to-fine searching and for progressive transmission of images. The HOP Pyramid is novel in three respects: (1) it uses a hexagonal pixel lattice, (2) it uses oriented features, and (3) it accurately models most of the prominent aspects of primary visual cortex. The transform uses seven basic features (kernels), which may be regarded as three oriented edges, three oriented bars, and one non-oriented blob. Application of these kernels to non-overlapping seven-pixel neighborhoods yields six oriented, high-pass pyramid layers, and one low-pass (blob) layer.

  15. Report number codes

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, R.N.

    1985-05-01

    This publication lists all report number codes processed by the Office of Scientific and Technical Information. The report codes are substantially based on the American National Standards Institute, Standard Technical Report Number (STRN)-Format and Creation Z39.23-1983. The Standard Technical Report Number (STRN) provides one of the primary methods of identifying a specific technical report. The STRN consists of two parts: The report code and the sequential number. The report code identifies the issuing organization, a specific program, or a type of document. The sequential number, which is assigned in sequence by each report issuing entity, is not included in this publication. Part I of this compilation is alphabetized by report codes followed by issuing installations. Part II lists the issuing organization followed by the assigned report code(s). In both Parts I and II, the names of issuing organizations appear for the most part in the form used at the time the reports were issued. However, for some of the more prolific installations which have had name changes, all entries have been merged under the current name.

  16. Regional Hearing Clerk

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Regional Hearing Clerk receives filings for proceedings under the Consolidated Rules of Practice Governing the Administrative Assessment of Civil Penalties and the Revocation/Termination or Suspension of Permits, 40 Code of Federal Regulations Part 22

  17. Calcium Sparks in Intact Skeletal Muscle Fibers of the Frog

    PubMed Central

    Hollingworth, S.; Peet, J.; Chandler, W.K; Baylor, S.M.

    2001-01-01

    Calcium sparks were studied in frog intact skeletal muscle fibers using a home-built confocal scanner whose point-spread function was estimated to be ∼0.21 μm in x and y and ∼0.51 μm in z. Observations were made at 17–20°C on fibers from Rana pipiens and Rana temporaria. Fibers were studied in two external solutions: normal Ringer's ([K+] = 2.5 mM; estimated membrane potential, −80 to −90 mV) and elevated [K+] Ringer's (most frequently, [K+] = 13 mM; estimated membrane potential, −60 to −65 mV). The frequency of sparks was 0.04–0.05 sarcomere−1 s−1 in normal Ringer's; the frequency increased approximately tenfold in 13 mM [K+] Ringer's. Spark properties in each solution were similar for the two species; they were also similar when scanned in the x and the y directions. From fits of standard functional forms to the temporal and spatial profiles of the sparks, the following mean values were estimated for the morphological parameters: rise time, ∼4 ms; peak amplitude, ∼1 ΔF/F (change in fluorescence divided by resting fluorescence); decay time constant, ∼5 ms; full duration at half maximum (FDHM), ∼6 ms; late offset, ∼0.01 ΔF/F; full width at half maximum (FWHM), ∼1.0 μm; mass (calculated as amplitude × 1.206 × FWHM3), 1.3–1.9 μm3. Although the rise time is similar to that measured previously in frog cut fibers (5–6 ms; 17–23°C), cut fiber sparks have a longer duration (FDHM, 9–15 ms), a wider extent (FWHM, 1.3–2.3 μm), and a strikingly larger mass (by 3–10-fold). Possible explanations for the increase in mass in cut fibers are a reduction in the Ca2+ buffering power of myoplasm in cut fibers and an increase in the flux of Ca2+ during release. PMID:11723160

  18. Measurements and interpretations of light scattering from intact biological cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Jeremy D.

    Visible light interacts with biological cells primarily through elastic scattering. The details of how cells scatter light depend on their morphology and their substructures. In this thesis we first present a series of experiments and models to discern the specific contributions of certain sub-cellular constituents to whole-cell scattering. Exploiting the findings of those studies, we report on experiments within model systems of cell death that demonstrate the potential of light scattering measurements as a tool in modern biology. Instrumentation capable of exploiting the findings of this thesis from a biology-relevant microscopy platform is designed and developed. A Mie theory based interpretation of light scattering signals originating from a collection of particles with a broad size distribution is developed. Upon applying this model to scattering data from intact cells, we find that it robustly extracts the size scale of dominant light scattering particles, suggests that scattering measurements are sensitive primarily to mitochondrial and lysosomal morphology, and unites conflicting results in the literature. Using this model as a basis, we present a collection of studies in which we use various strategies of photodynamic therapy (PDT) as a biophysical tool to perturb mitochondria and lysosomes, and observe the effects of these perturbations on whole-cell scattering. Through these experiments, we are able to discern the individual contributions of mitochondria and lysosomes to whole-cell light scattering, and demonstrate that mitochondria are responsible for roughly 80% of the scattering signal. Results of experiments aimed at demonstrating the potential role that light scattering measurements have to play in future studies of cell death biology are presented. We first show that mitochondrial-PDT-induced morphology changes measured with light scattering map into the cell killing efficacy of the therapy. We next demonstrate that mitochondrial

  19. Computer Code for Nanostructure Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Filikhin, Igor; Vlahovic, Branislav

    2009-01-01

    Due to their small size, nanostructures can have stress and thermal gradients that are larger than any macroscopic analogue. These gradients can lead to specific regions that are susceptible to failure via processes such as plastic deformation by dislocation emission, chemical debonding, and interfacial alloying. A program has been developed that rigorously simulates and predicts optoelectronic properties of nanostructures of virtually any geometrical complexity and material composition. It can be used in simulations of energy level structure, wave functions, density of states of spatially configured phonon-coupled electrons, excitons in quantum dots, quantum rings, quantum ring complexes, and more. The code can be used to calculate stress distributions and thermal transport properties for a variety of nanostructures and interfaces, transport and scattering at nanoscale interfaces and surfaces under various stress states, and alloy compositional gradients. The code allows users to perform modeling of charge transport processes through quantum-dot (QD) arrays as functions of inter-dot distance, array order versus disorder, QD orientation, shape, size, and chemical composition for applications in photovoltaics and physical properties of QD-based biochemical sensors. The code can be used to study the hot exciton formation/relation dynamics in arrays of QDs of different shapes and sizes at different temperatures. It also can be used to understand the relation among the deposition parameters and inherent stresses, strain deformation, heat flow, and failure of nanostructures.

  20. Immunogenicity and antigenicity of immunoglobulins. XII. Intact light chain and heavy chain isotype-restricted Vk-associated epitopes.

    PubMed

    Walker, M; Hardie, D; Lowe, J; Ling, N R; De Lange, G; Jefferis, R

    1985-06-01

    Immunization with intact IgG has allowed the isolation of four hybridomas producing antibodies recognizing epitopes expressed within subpopulations of human kappa light chains unrelated to known polymorphisms (Km) and previously defined V-region subgroups. The V-region-associated epitopes recognized are conformation-dependent, being expressed on intact light chain but not on isolated VK or CK fragments. The frequency of expression within paraprotein panels of different heavy chain isotypes varied between individual antibodies. An epitope recognized by B2A6, expressed by greater than 85% IgGK paraproteins, was not represented in 16 IgM paraproteins tested, suggesting that association of VK with mu chains does not result in display of the epitope recognized, or alternatively, that selective association between VK and CH gene products occurs. These data contrast with the reactivity of other McAb for CK epitopes which were reactive with isolated CK fragments, and for all kappa-bearing paraproteins, regardless of heavy chain isotypes.

  1. Code Disentanglement: Initial Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Wohlbier, John Greaton; Kelley, Timothy M.; Rockefeller, Gabriel M.; Calef, Matthew Thomas

    2015-01-27

    The first step to making more ambitious changes in the EAP code base is to disentangle the code into a set of independent, levelized packages. We define a package as a collection of code, most often across a set of files, that provides a defined set of functionality; a package a) can be built and tested as an entity and b) fits within an overall levelization design. Each package contributes one or more libraries, or an application that uses the other libraries. A package set is levelized if the relationships between packages form a directed, acyclic graph and each package uses only packages at lower levels of the diagram (in Fortran this relationship is often describable by the use relationship between modules). Independent packages permit independent- and therefore parallel|development. The packages form separable units for the purposes of development and testing. This is a proven path for enabling finer-grained changes to a complex code.

  2. Compressible Astrophysics Simulation Code

    SciTech Connect

    Howell, L.; Singer, M.

    2007-07-18

    This is an astrophysics simulation code involving a radiation diffusion module developed at LLNL coupled to compressible hydrodynamics and adaptive mesh infrastructure developed at LBNL. One intended application is to neutrino diffusion in core collapse supernovae.

  3. Code validation study for base flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ascoli, Edward P.; Heiba, Adel H.; Lagnado, Ronald R.; Ungewitter, Ronald J.; Williams, Morgan

    1993-07-01

    New and old rocket launch concepts recommend the clustering of motors for improved lift capability. The flowfield of the base region of the rocket is very complex and can contain high temperature plume gases. These hot gases can cause catastrophic problems if not adequately designed for. To assess the base region characteristics, advanced computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is being used. As a precursor to these calculations the CFD code requires validation on base flows. The primary objective of this code validation study was to establish a high level of confidence in predicting base flows with the USA CFD code. USA has been extensively validated for fundamental flows and other applications. However, base heating flows have a number of unique characteristics so it was necessary to extend the existing validation for this class of problems. In preparation for the planned NLS 1.5 Stage base heating analysis, six case sets were studied to extend the USA code validation data base. This presentation gives a cursive review of three of these cases. The cases presented include a 2D axi-symmetric study, a 3D real nozzle study, and a 3D multi-species study. The results of all the studies show good general agreement with data with no adjustments to the base numerical algorithms or physical models in the code. The study proved the capability of the USA code for modeling base flows within the accuracy of available data.

  4. Code Validation Study for Base Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ascoli, Edward P.; Heiba, Adel H.; Lagnado, Ronald R.; Ungewitter, Ronald J.; Williams, Morgan

    1993-01-01

    New and old rocket launch concepts recommend the clustering of motors for improved lift capability. The flowfield of the base region of the rocket is very complex and can contain high temperature plume gases. These hot gases can cause catastrophic problems if not adequately designed for. To assess the base region characteristics, advanced computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is being used. As a precursor to these calculations the CFD code requires validation on base flows. The primary objective of this code validation study was to establish a high level of confidence in predicting base flows with the USA CFD code. USA has been extensively validated for fundamental flows and other applications. However, base heating flows have a number of unique characteristics so it was necessary to extend the existing validation for this class of problems. In preparation for the planned NLS 1.5 Stage base heating analysis, six case sets were studied to extend the USA code validation data base. This presentation gives a cursive review of three of these cases. The cases presented include a 2D axi-symmetric study, a 3D real nozzle study, and a 3D multi-species study. The results of all the studies show good general agreement with data with no adjustments to the base numerical algorithms or physical models in the code. The study proved the capability of the USA code for modeling base flows within the accuracy of available data.

  5. Seals Flow Code Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    In recognition of a deficiency in the current modeling capability for seals, an effort was established by NASA to develop verified computational fluid dynamic concepts, codes, and analyses for seals. The objectives were to develop advanced concepts for the design and analysis of seals, to effectively disseminate the information to potential users by way of annual workshops, and to provide experimental verification for the models and codes under a wide range of operating conditions.

  6. Transient Ejector Analysis (TEA) code user's guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drummond, Colin K.

    1993-01-01

    A FORTRAN computer program for the semi analytic prediction of unsteady thrust augmenting ejector performance has been developed, based on a theoretical analysis for ejectors. That analysis blends classic self-similar turbulent jet descriptions with control-volume mixing region elements. Division of the ejector into an inlet, diffuser, and mixing region allowed flexibility in the modeling of the physics for each region. In particular, the inlet and diffuser analyses are simplified by a quasi-steady-analysis, justified by the assumption that pressure is the forcing function in those regions. Only the mixing region is assumed to be dominated by viscous effects. The present work provides an overview of the code structure, a description of the required input and output data file formats, and the results for a test case. Since there are limitations to the code for applications outside the bounds of the test case, the user should consider TEA as a research code (not as a production code), designed specifically as an implementation of the proposed ejector theory. Program error flags are discussed, and some diagnostic routines are presented.

  7. Robust Nonlinear Neural Codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Qianli; Pitkow, Xaq

    2015-03-01

    Most interesting natural sensory stimuli are encoded in the brain in a form that can only be decoded nonlinearly. But despite being a core function of the brain, nonlinear population codes are rarely studied and poorly understood. Interestingly, the few existing models of nonlinear codes are inconsistent with known architectural features of the brain. In particular, these codes have information content that scales with the size of the cortical population, even if that violates the data processing inequality by exceeding the amount of information entering the sensory system. Here we provide a valid theory of nonlinear population codes by generalizing recent work on information-limiting correlations in linear population codes. Although these generalized, nonlinear information-limiting correlations bound the performance of any decoder, they also make decoding more robust to suboptimal computation, allowing many suboptimal decoders to achieve nearly the same efficiency as an optimal decoder. Although these correlations are extremely difficult to measure directly, particularly for nonlinear codes, we provide a simple, practical test by which one can use choice-related activity in small populations of neurons to determine whether decoding is suboptimal or optimal and limited by correlated noise. We conclude by describing an example computation in the vestibular system where this theory applies. QY and XP was supported by a grant from the McNair foundation.

  8. A comparison of cosmological hydrodynamic codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kang, Hyesung; Ostriker, Jeremiah P.; Cen, Renyue; Ryu, Dongsu; Hernquist, Lars; Evrard, August E.; Bryan, Greg L.; Norman, Michael L.

    1994-01-01

    We present a detailed comparison of the simulation results of various hydrodynamic codes. Starting with identical initial conditions based on the cold dark matter scenario for the growth of structure, with parameters h = 0.5 Omega = Omega(sub b) = 1, and sigma(sub 8) = 1, we integrate from redshift z = 20 to z = O to determine the physical state within a representative volume of size L(exp 3) where L = 64 h(exp -1) Mpc. Five indenpendent codes are compared: three of them Eulerian mesh-based and two variants of the smooth particle hydrodynamics 'SPH' Lagrangian approach. The Eulerian codes were run at N(exp 3) = (32(exp 3), 64(exp 3), 128(exp 3), and 256(exp 3)) cells, the SPH codes at N(exp 3) = 32(exp 3) and 64(exp 3) particles. Results were then rebinned to a 16(exp 3) grid with the exception that the rebinned data should converge, by all techniques, to a common and correct result as N approaches infinity. We find that global averages of various physical quantities do, as expected, tend to converge in the rebinned model, but that uncertainites in even primitive quantities such as (T), (rho(exp 2))(exp 1/2) persists at the 3%-17% level achieve comparable and satisfactory accuracy for comparable computer time in their treatment of the high-density, high-temeprature regions as measured in the rebinned data; the variance among the five codes (at highest resolution) for the mean temperature (as weighted by rho(exp 2) is only 4.5%. Examined at high resolution we suspect that the density resolution is better in the SPH codes and the thermal accuracy in low-density regions better in the Eulerian codes. In the low-density, low-temperature regions the SPH codes have poor accuracy due to statiscal effects, and the Jameson code gives the temperatures which are too high, due to overuse of artificial viscosity in these high Mach number regions. Overall the comparison allows us to better estimate errors; it points to ways of improving this current generation ofhydrodynamic

  9. Three-dimensional EM Structure of an Intact Activator-dependent Transcription Initiation Complex

    SciTech Connect

    Hudson, B.; Quispe, J; Lara-González, S; Kim, Y; Berman, H; Arnold, E; Ebright, R; Lawson, C

    2009-01-01

    We present the experimentally determined 3D structure of an intact activator-dependent transcription initiation complex comprising the Escherichia coli catabolite activator protein (CAP), RNA polymerase holoenzyme (RNAP), and a DNA fragment containing positions -78 to +20 of a Class I CAP-dependent promoter with a CAP site at position -61.5 and a premelted transcription bubble. A 20-{angstrom} electron microscopy reconstruction was obtained by iterative projection-based matching of single particles visualized in carbon-sandwich negative stain and was fitted using atomic coordinate sets for CAP, RNAP, and DNA. The structure defines the organization of a Class I CAP-RNAP-promoter complex and supports previously proposed interactions of CAP with RNAP {alpha} subunit C-terminal domain ({alpha}CTD), interactions of {alpha}CTD with {sigma}70 region 4, interactions of CAP and RNAP with promoter DNA, and phased-DNA-bend-dependent partial wrapping of DNA around the complex. The structure also reveals the positions and shapes of species-specific domains within the RNAP {beta}{prime}, {beta}, and {sigma}70 subunits.

  10. Effect of MSH/ACTH peptides on fast axonal transport in intact and regenerating sciatic nerves

    SciTech Connect

    Crescitelli, L.A.

    1985-01-01

    Fast axonal transport was examined in intact rats treated with ACTH 4-10 or ACTH 4-9 (ORG 2766), hypophysectomized rats, adrenalectomized rats, and in ACTH 4-10 treated rats with crushed regenerating sciatic nerves by injecting /sup 3/H-leucine into the ventral horn region of the spinal cord. The distance traveled by the transported activity along the sciatic nerve and the rate of fast axonal transport were not significantly altered as a result of treatment with ACTH 4-10, ACTH 4-9 (ORG 2766), hypophysectomy, or adrenalectomy. Treatment with ACTH 4-9 (ORG 2766) at concentrations of 1 ..mu..g/Kg /day and 10 ..mu..g/Kg/day caused significant reductions (62% and 64% respectively) in the crest height of the fast axonal transport curve as compared to 0.9% saline treated control animals. No significant differences were found in comparing the distance, rate, slope, or crest height of ACTH 4-10 treated animals with crushed regenerating (7 or 14d) sciatic nerves to control animals. In the group of animals in days, the amount of radiolabeled activity was significantly increased in the ACTH 4-10 treated animals as compared to control animals. The results indicate that during regeneration the peptide acts to prolong the initially high levels of synthetic activity which occur in regenerating axons.

  11. Embedded Adaptive Optics for Ubiquitous Lab-on-a-Chip Readout on Intact Cell Phones

    PubMed Central

    Preechaburana, Pakorn; Suska, Anke; Filippini, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    The evaluation of disposable lab-on-a-chip (LOC) devices on cell phones is an attractive alternative to migrate the analytical strength of LOC solutions to decentralized sensing applications. Imaging the micrometric detection areas of LOCs in contact with intact phone cameras is central to provide such capability. This work demonstrates a disposable and morphing liquid lens concept that can be integrated in LOC devices and refocuses micrometric features in the range necessary for LOC evaluation using diverse cell phone cameras. During natural evaporation, the lens focus varies adapting to different type of cameras. Standard software in the phone commands a time-lapse acquisition for best focal selection that is sufficient to capture and resolve, under ambient illumination, 50 μm features in regions larger than 500 × 500 μm2. In this way, the present concept introduces a generic solution compatible with the use of diverse and unmodified cell phone cameras to evaluate disposable LOC devices. PMID:23012507

  12. Intact Rapid Facial Mimicry as well as Generally Reduced Mimic Responses in Stable Schizophrenia Patients

    PubMed Central

    Chechko, Natalya; Pagel, Alena; Otte, Ellen; Koch, Iring; Habel, Ute

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous emotional expressions (rapid facial mimicry) perform both emotional and social functions. In the current study, we sought to test whether there were deficits in automatic mimic responses to emotional facial expressions in patients (15 of them) with stable schizophrenia compared to 15 controls. In a perception-action interference paradigm (the Simon task; first experiment), and in the context of a dual-task paradigm (second experiment), the task-relevant stimulus feature was the gender of a face, which, however, displayed a smiling or frowning expression (task-irrelevant stimulus feature). We measured the electromyographical activity in the corrugator supercilii and zygomaticus major muscle regions in response to either compatible or incompatible stimuli (i.e., when the required response did or did not correspond to the depicted facial expression). The compatibility effect based on interactions between the implicit processing of a task-irrelevant emotional facial expression and the conscious production of an emotional facial expression did not differ between the groups. In stable patients (in spite of a reduced mimic reaction), we observed an intact capacity to respond spontaneously to facial emotional stimuli. PMID:27303335

  13. Ascorbate-independent carotenoid de-epoxidation in intact spinach chloroplasts.

    PubMed

    Sokolove, P M; Marsho, T V

    1976-05-14

    Slow (greater 1 s) light-induced absorbance changes in the 475-5300 nm spectral region were examined in Type A chloroplasts from spinach. The most prominent absorption change occurred at 505 nm. The difference spectrum for this light-induced increase, its absence in osmotically shocked chloroplasts and restoration by ascorbate, and its sensitivity to dithiothreitol indicate that the absorption change is due to carotenoid de-epoxidatiion. The reaction in intact chloroplasts is characterized by its independence of exogenous ascorbate and a rate constant 3- to 8-fold higher than that reported previously for chloroplasts supplemented with ascorbate. The relevance of carotenoid de-epoxidation to other photosynthetic processes was examined by comparing their sensitivities to dithiothreitol. Levels of dithiothreitol that eliminate the 505 nm shift are without effect on saturated rates of CO2 fixation and do not appreciably inhibit fluorescence quenching. We conclude that carotenoid de-epoxidation is not directly involved in the reactions of photosynthesis or in the regulation of excitation allocation between the photosystems.

  14. Brine Inclusions Migration in Intact Salt Crystals under Thermal Gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caporuscio, F.; Boukhalfa, H.

    2013-12-01

    The behavior of water contained in rock salt under the influence of thermal gradients is critical to the performance of salt as a medium for the disposal of nuclear waste. Water contained in salt can be present as discrete inclusions within intact salt crystals, at the interface between salt crystals and aggregates, and also as hydration water and structural water present in accessory minerals present in salt. Water content in pure halite salt usually rages from 0.1 to 0.5 wt. % but is significantly higher in clay rich salt, for which water content can be up to several wt. %. Under the influence of thermal gradients brine inclusions and water associated to the accessory mineral is mobilized. Previous investigations have shown brine inclusions tend to move towards the heat source through a mechanism that involves the dissolution of salt at the hot face of the brine inclusion and its precipitation at the colder side of the inclusion. Uncertainties remain on the exact parameters that define the rate of brine migration and whether it truly migrates to towards the heat source. We performed studies under controlled thermal gradients to examine the behavior of brine inclusions in single salt crystals obtained from the underground salt mine at the Waste Isolation Power Plant (WIPP). We found that the behavior of the brine inclusions under thermal gradients is dependent on the thermal gradient magnitude and the nature of the inclusion. Full inclusions (liquid only) migrate predominantly towards the heat source, but when the inclusions are large and close to the surface they fracture the salt and release water near the surface. Inclusions that migrate towards the heat source migrate through a mechanism that involves the dissolution of salt at the hot side of the inclusion and its deposition along the migration path. SEM analysis of the migration pathways shows that brine migrates through the creation of a network of square shaped hollow channels of about 10 micron diameter

  15. 50 CFR Table 14c to Part 679 - At-sea Operation Type Codes To Be Used as Port Codes for Vessels Matching This Type of Operation

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... COMMERCE (CONTINUED) FISHERIES OF THE EXCLUSIVE ECONOMIC ZONE OFF ALASKA Pt. 679, Table 14c Table 14c to... Operation Description of code Code NMFS Alaska region ADF&G FCP Catcher/processor Floating catcher...

  16. DNA synthesis in periportal and perivenous hepatocytes of intact and hepatectomized young mice.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Blanco, A; Inda, A M; Errecalde, A L

    2015-01-01

    DNA synthesis of hepatocytes in two areas of Intact and Hepatectomized young mice liver along a circadian period was studied. DNA synthesis was significantly different at all analyzed time points in Intact and Hepatectomized animals. Differences between periportal and perivenous hepatocytes were found in hepatectomized animals at 04/42 and 08/46 hr of day/hour post-hepatectomy. DNAs peak in periportal hepatocytes regenerating liver occurs 4 hr earlier than in perivenous hepatocytes, probably reflecting their shorter G1 phase. Besides, daily mean values of regenerating livers were higher than those observed in Intact animals, as a consequence of surgical removal.

  17. Intact long-type dupA as a marker for gastroduodenal diseases in Okinawan subpopulation, Japan

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Ayaka; Shiota, Seiji; Matsunari, Osamu; Watada, Masahide; Suzuki, Rumiko; Nakachi, Saori; Kinjo, Nagisa; Kinjo, Fukunori; Yamaoka, Yoshio

    2012-01-01

    Background Helicobacter pylori dupA can be divided into two types according to the presence or absence of the mutation. In addition, full-sequenced data revealed that dupA has two types with different lengths depend on the presence of approximately 600 bp in the putative 5' region (presence; long-type and absence; short-type), which has not been taken into account in previous studies. Methods A total of 319 strains isolated from Okinawa, the south islands of Japan, were included. The status of dupA and cagA was determined by polymerase chain reaction. The presence of mutations in long-type dupA was determined by DNA sequencing. Results The prevalence of long-type dupA was 26.3% (84/319). Sequence analysis showed that there were only 6 cases (7.1%) with point mutations lead to stop codon among 84 long-type dupA strains studied. Interestingly, intact long-type dupA without frameshift mutation, but not short-type dupA was significantly associated with gastric ulcer and gastric cancer than gastritis (P = 0.001 and P = 0.019, respectively). After adjustment by age, gender and cagA, the presence of intact long-type dupA was significantly associated with gastric ulcer and gastric cancer compared with gastritis (odds ratio [OR] = 3.35, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.55–7.24 and OR = 4.14, 95% CI = 1.23–13.94, respectively). Conclusions Intact long-type dupA is a real virulence marker for severe outcomes in Okinawa, Japan. The previous information gained from PCR-based methods without taking long-type dupA into account must be interpreted with caution. PMID:23067336

  18. Strength of the Creeping Segment of the San Andreas Fault Inferred from Intact SAFOD Core Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lockner, D. A.; Morrow, C. A.; Moore, D. E.; Hickman, S.

    2012-12-01

    properties of the creeping SAF. (2) Extrapolation of lab strength tests to SAF shear rates suggests μ is less than 0.1 to 0.15, even for normal hydrostatic pore pressure. (3) Although there are no measurements of in-situ pore pressure in the foliated gouge, drilling and log data suggest that it is not overpressured with respect to the country rock and excess pore pressure is not needed to satisfy low-shear-strength constraints for the SAF. (4) We find no evidence for a transition to normal-stress-independent shear strength in either intact or crushed/sieved samples at 60 MPa effective normal stress as suggested by Carpenter et al. (2012). (5) Permeability of foliated gouge ranges from 10^-21 to 10^-23 m^2 [Morrow et al., in prep], suggesting a diffusion time constant of months to years for equilibration of pore pressure perturbations with surroundings in a 2.6 m-wide gouge zone. This makes accurate in-situ pore pressure measurements difficult. (6) The creep properties and low strength of the foliated gouge make it likely that creep transfers stress to localized locked asperities, supporting the asperity model for repeating earthquakes in this region. (7) Deeper in the SAF, a transition to higher fluid pressure and/or predominance of higher temperature weak mineral phases such as talc (observed in both core and cuttings crossing the SAF) might occur.

  19. Evolution of coding microsatellites in primate genomes.

    PubMed

    Loire, Etienne; Higuet, Dominique; Netter, Pierre; Achaz, Guillaume

    2013-01-01

    Microsatellites (SSRs) are highly susceptible to expansions and contractions. When located in a coding sequence, the insertion or the deletion of a single unit for a mono-, di-, tetra-, or penta(nucleotide)-SSR creates a frameshift. As a consequence, one would expect to find only very few of these SSRs in coding sequences because of their strong deleterious potential. Unexpectedly, genomes contain many coding SSRs of all types. Here, we report on a study of their evolution in a phylogenetic context using the genomes of four primates: human, chimpanzee, orangutan, and macaque. In a set of 5,015 orthologous genes unambiguously aligned among the four species, we show that, except for tri- and hexa-SSRs, for which insertions and deletions are frequently observed, SSRs in coding regions evolve mainly by substitutions. We show that the rate of substitution in all types of coding SSRs is typically two times higher than in the rest of coding sequences. Additionally, we observe that although numerous coding SSRs are created and lost by substitutions in the lineages, their numbers remain constant. This last observation suggests that the coding SSRs have reached equilibrium. We hypothesize that this equilibrium involves a combination of mutation, drift, and selection. We thus estimated the fitness cost of mono-SSRs and show that it increases with the number of units. We finally show that the cost of coding mono-SSRs greatly varies from function to function, suggesting that the strength of the selection that acts against them can be correlated to gene functions.

  20. Evolution of Coding Microsatellites in Primate Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Loire, Etienne; Higuet, Dominique; Netter, Pierre; Achaz, Guillaume

    2013-01-01

    Microsatellites (SSRs) are highly susceptible to expansions and contractions. When located in a coding sequence, the insertion or the deletion of a single unit for a mono-, di-, tetra-, or penta(nucleotide)-SSR creates a frameshift. As a consequence, one would expect to find only very few of these SSRs in coding sequences because of their strong deleterious potential. Unexpectedly, genomes contain many coding SSRs of all types. Here, we report on a study of their evolution in a phylogenetic context using the genomes of four primates: human, chimpanzee, orangutan, and macaque. In a set of 5,015 orthologous genes unambiguously aligned among the four species, we show that, except for tri- and hexa-SSRs, for which insertions and deletions are frequently observed, SSRs in coding regions evolve mainly by substitutions. We show that the rate of substitution in all types of coding SSRs is typically two times higher than in the rest of coding sequences. Additionally, we observe that although numerous coding SSRs are created and lost by substitutions in the lineages, their numbers remain constant. This last observation suggests that the coding SSRs have reached equilibrium. We hypothesize that this equilibrium involves a combination of mutation, drift, and selection. We thus estimated the fitness cost of mono-SSRs and show that it increases with the number of units. We finally show that the cost of coding mono-SSRs greatly varies from function to function, suggesting that the strength of the selection that acts against them can be correlated to gene functions. PMID:23315383

  1. Light microscopy mapping of connections in the intact brain.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung-Yon; Chung, Kwanghun; Deisseroth, Karl

    2013-12-01

    Mapping of neural connectivity across the mammalian brain is a daunting and exciting prospect. Current approaches can be divided into three classes: macroscale, focusing on coarse inter-regional connectivity; mesoscale, involving a finer focus on neurons and projections; and microscale, reconstructing full details of all synaptic contacts. It remains to be determined how to bridge the datasets or insights from the different levels of study. Here we review recent light-microscopy-based approaches that may help in integration across scales.

  2. Coded source neutron imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Bingham, Philip R; Santos-Villalobos, Hector J

    2011-01-01

    Coded aperture techniques have been applied to neutron radiography to address limitations in neutron flux and resolution of neutron detectors in a system labeled coded source imaging (CSI). By coding the neutron source, a magnified imaging system is designed with small spot size aperture holes (10 and 100 m) for improved resolution beyond the detector limits and with many holes in the aperture (50% open) to account for flux losses due to the small pinhole size. An introduction to neutron radiography and coded aperture imaging is presented. A system design is developed for a CSI system with a development of equations for limitations on the system based on the coded image requirements and the neutron source characteristics of size and divergence. Simulation has been applied to the design using McStas to provide qualitative measures of performance with simulations of pinhole array objects followed by a quantitative measure through simulation of a tilted edge and calculation of the modulation transfer function (MTF) from the line spread function. MTF results for both 100um and 10um aperture hole diameters show resolutions matching the hole diameters.

  3. Error coding simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noble, Viveca K.

    1993-01-01

    There are various elements such as radio frequency interference (RFI) which may induce errors in data being transmitted via a satellite communication link. When a transmission is affected by interference or other error-causing elements, the transmitted data becomes indecipherable. It becomes necessary to implement techniques to recover from these disturbances. The objective of this research is to develop software which simulates error control circuits and evaluate the performance of these modules in various bit error rate environments. The results of the evaluation provide the engineer with information which helps determine the optimal error control scheme. The Consultative Committee for Space Data Systems (CCSDS) recommends the use of Reed-Solomon (RS) and convolutional encoders and Viterbi and RS decoders for error correction. The use of forward error correction techniques greatly reduces the received signal to noise needed for a certain desired bit error rate. The use of concatenated coding, e.g. inner convolutional code and outer RS code, provides even greater coding gain. The 16-bit cyclic redundancy check (CRC) code is recommended by CCSDS for error detection.

  4. Coded source neutron imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bingham, Philip; Santos-Villalobos, Hector; Tobin, Ken

    2011-03-01

    Coded aperture techniques have been applied to neutron radiography to address limitations in neutron flux and resolution of neutron detectors in a system labeled coded source imaging (CSI). By coding the neutron source, a magnified imaging system is designed with small spot size aperture holes (10 and 100μm) for improved resolution beyond the detector limits and with many holes in the aperture (50% open) to account for flux losses due to the small pinhole size. An introduction to neutron radiography and coded aperture imaging is presented. A system design is developed for a CSI system with a development of equations for limitations on the system based on the coded image requirements and the neutron source characteristics of size and divergence. Simulation has been applied to the design using McStas to provide qualitative measures of performance with simulations of pinhole array objects followed by a quantitative measure through simulation of a tilted edge and calculation of the modulation transfer function (MTF) from the line spread function. MTF results for both 100μm and 10μm aperture hole diameters show resolutions matching the hole diameters.

  5. In vivo Sarcomere Lengths and Sarcomere Elongations Are Not Uniform across an Intact Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Moo, Eng Kuan; Fortuna, Rafael; Sibole, Scott C.; Abusara, Ziad; Herzog, Walter

    2016-01-01

    Sarcomere lengths have been a crucial outcome measure for understanding and explaining basic muscle properties and muscle function. Sarcomere lengths for a given muscle are typically measured at a single spot, often in the mid-belly of the muscle, and at a given muscle length. It is then assumed implicitly that the sarcomere length measured at this single spot represents the sarcomere lengths at other locations within the muscle, and force-length, force-velocity, and power-velocity properties of muscles are often implied based on these single sarcomere length measurements. Although, intuitively appealing, this assumption is yet to be supported by systematic evidence. The objective of this study was to measure sarcomere lengths at defined locations along and across an intact muscle, at different muscle lengths. Using second harmonic generation (SHG) imaging technique, sarcomere patterns in passive mouse tibialis anterior (TA) were imaged in a non-contact manner at five selected locations (“proximal,” “distal,” “middle,” “medial,” and “lateral” TA sites) and at three different lengths encompassing the anatomical range of motion of the TA. We showed that sarcomere lengths varied substantially within small regions of the muscle and also for different sites across the entire TA. Also, sarcomere elongations with muscle lengthening were non-uniform across the muscle, with the highest sarcomere stretches occurring near the myotendinous junction. We conclude that muscle mechanics derived from sarcomere length measured from a small region of a muscle may not well-represent the sarcomere length and associated functional properties of the entire muscle. PMID:27252660

  6. Intact MicroRNA Analysis Using High Resolution Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kullolli, Majlinda; Knouf, Emily; Arampatzidou, Maria; Tewari, Muneesh; Pitteri, Sharon J.

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small single-stranded non-coding RNAs that post-transcriptionally regulate gene expression, and play key roles in the regulation of a variety of cellular processes and in disease. New tools to analyze miRNAs will add understanding of the physiological origins and biological functions of this class of molecules. In this study, we investigate the utility of high resolution mass spectrometry for the analysis of miRNAs through proof-of-concept experiments. We demonstrate the ability of mass spectrometry to resolve and separate miRNAs and corresponding 3' variants in mixtures. The mass accuracy of the monoisotopic deprotonated peaks from various miRNAs is in the low ppm range. We compare fragmentation of miRNA by collision-induced dissociation (CID) and by higher-energy collisional dissociation (HCD) which yields similar sequence coverage from both methods but additional fragmentation by HCD versus CID. We measure the linear dynamic range, limit of detection, and limit of quantitation of miRNA loaded onto a C18 column. Lastly, we explore the use of data-dependent acquisition of MS/MS spectra of miRNA during online LC-MS and demonstrate that multiple charge states can be fragmented, yielding nearly full sequence coverage of miRNA on a chromatographic time scale. We conclude that high resolution mass spectrometry allows the separation and measurement of miRNAs in mixtures and a standard LC-MS setup can be adapted for online analysis of these molecules.

  7. Intact MicroRNA Analysis Using High Resolution Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Kullolli, Majlinda; Knouf, Emily; Arampatzidou, Maria; Tewari, Muneesh; Pitteri, Sharon J.

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small single-stranded non-coding RNAs that post-transcriptionally regulate gene expression, and play key roles in the regulation of a variety of cellular processes and in disease. New tools to analyze miRNAs will add understanding of the physiological origins and biological functions of this class of molecules. In this study we investigate the utility of high resolution mass spectrometry for the analysis of miRNAs through proof-of-concept experiments. We demonstrate the ability of mass spectrometry to resolve and separate miRNAs and corresponding 3′ variants in mixtures. The mass accuracy of the monoisotopic deprotonated peaks from various miRNAs is in the low ppm range. We compare fragmentation of miRNA by collision-induced dissociation (CID) and by higher-energy collisional dissociation (HCD) which yields similar sequence coverage from both methods but additional fragmentation by HCD versus CID. We measure the linear dynamic range, limit of detection, and limit of quantitation of miRNA loaded onto a C18 column. Lastly we explore the use of data dependent acquisition of MS/MS spectra of miRNA during online LC-MS and demonstrate that multiple charge states can be fragmented, yielding nearly full sequence coverage of miRNA on a chromatographic time scale. We conclude that high resolution mass spectrometry allows the separation and measurement of miRNAs in mixtures and a standard LC-MS setup can be adapted for online analysis of these molecules. PMID:24174127

  8. A single nucleotide polymorphism in the coding region of PGC-1α is a male-specific modifier of Huntington disease age-at-onset in a large European cohort

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Genetic modifiers are important clues for the identification of therapeutic targets in neurodegenerative diseases. Huntington disease (HD) is one of the most common autosomal dominant inherited neurodegenerative diseases. The clinical symptoms include motor abnormalities, cognitive decline and behavioral disturbances. Symptom onset is typically between 40 and 50 years of age, but can vary by several decades in extreme cases and this is in part determined by modifying genetic factors. The metabolic master regulator PGC-1α, coded by the PPARGC1A gene, coordinates cellular respiration and was shown to play a role in neurodegenerative diseases, including HD. Methods Using a candidate gene approach we analyzed a large European cohort (n = 1706) from the REGISTRY study for associations between PPARGC1A genotype and age at onset (AO) in HD. Results We report that a coding variant (rs3736265) in PPARGC1A is associated with an earlier motor AO in men but not women carrying the HD mutation. Conclusions These results further strengthen the evidence for a role of PGC-1α in HD and unexpectedly suggest a gender effect. PMID:24383721

  9. Code query by example

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaucouleur, Sebastien

    2011-02-01

    We introduce code query by example for customisation of evolvable software products in general and of enterprise resource planning systems (ERPs) in particular. The concept is based on an initial empirical study on practices around ERP systems. We motivate our design choices based on those empirical results, and we show how the proposed solution helps with respect to the infamous upgrade problem: the conflict between the need for customisation and the need for upgrade of ERP systems. We further show how code query by example can be used as a form of lightweight static analysis, to detect automatically potential defects in large software products. Code query by example as a form of lightweight static analysis is particularly interesting in the context of ERP systems: it is often the case that programmers working in this field are not computer science specialists but more of domain experts. Hence, they require a simple language to express custom rules.

  10. Seals Code Development Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, Robert C. (Compiler); Liang, Anita D. (Compiler)

    1996-01-01

    Seals Workshop of 1995 industrial code (INDSEAL) release include ICYL, GCYLT, IFACE, GFACE, SPIRALG, SPIRALI, DYSEAL, and KTK. The scientific code (SCISEAL) release includes conjugate heat transfer and multidomain with rotordynamic capability. Several seals and bearings codes (e.g., HYDROFLEX, HYDROTRAN, HYDROB3D, FLOWCON1, FLOWCON2) are presented and results compared. Current computational and experimental emphasis includes multiple connected cavity flows with goals of reducing parasitic losses and gas ingestion. Labyrinth seals continue to play a significant role in sealing with face, honeycomb, and new sealing concepts under investigation for advanced engine concepts in view of strict environmental constraints. The clean sheet approach to engine design is advocated with program directions and anticipated percentage SFC reductions cited. Future activities center on engine applications with coupled seal/power/secondary flow streams.

  11. SAC: Sheffield Advanced Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffiths, Mike; Fedun, Viktor; Mumford, Stuart; Gent, Frederick

    2013-06-01

    The Sheffield Advanced Code (SAC) is a fully non-linear MHD code designed for simulations of linear and non-linear wave propagation in gravitationally strongly stratified magnetized plasma. It was developed primarily for the forward modelling of helioseismological processes and for the coupling processes in the solar interior, photosphere, and corona; it is built on the well-known VAC platform that allows robust simulation of the macroscopic processes in gravitationally stratified (non-)magnetized plasmas. The code has no limitations of simulation length in time imposed by complications originating from the upper boundary, nor does it require implementation of special procedures to treat the upper boundaries. SAC inherited its modular structure from VAC, thereby allowing modification to easily add new physics.

  12. Autocatalysis, information and coding.

    PubMed

    Wills, P R

    2001-01-01

    Autocatalytic self-construction in macromolecular systems requires the existence of a reflexive relationship between structural components and the functional operations they perform to synthesise themselves. The possibility of reflexivity depends on formal, semiotic features of the catalytic structure-function relationship, that is, the embedding of catalytic functions in the space of polymeric structures. Reflexivity is a semiotic property of some genetic sequences. Such sequences may serve as the basis for the evolution of coding as a result of autocatalytic self-organisation in a population of assignment catalysts. Autocatalytic selection is a mechanism whereby matter becomes differentiated in primitive biochemical systems. In the case of coding self-organisation, it corresponds to the creation of symbolic information. Prions are present-day entities whose replication through autocatalysis reflects aspects of biological semiotics less obvious than genetic coding.

  13. Double-outlet right ventricle with intact ventricular septum in a foetus with trisomy-18.

    PubMed

    Patel, C R; Muise, K L; Redline, R W

    1999-07-01

    A rare case of double-outlet right ventricle with intact ventricular septum diagnosed by foetal echocardiography at 21 weeks of gestation is described. Amniocentesis revealed trisomy-18. The cardiac diagnosis was confirmed at autopsy.

  14. Code inspection instructional validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orr, Kay; Stancil, Shirley

    1992-01-01

    The Shuttle Data Systems Branch (SDSB) of the Flight Data Systems Division (FDSD) at Johnson Space Center contracted with Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) to validate the effectiveness of an interactive video course on the code inspection process. The purpose of this project was to determine if this course could be effective for teaching NASA analysts the process of code inspection. In addition, NASA was interested in the effectiveness of this unique type of instruction (Digital Video Interactive), for providing training on software processes. This study found the Carnegie Mellon course, 'A Cure for the Common Code', effective for teaching the process of code inspection. In addition, analysts prefer learning with this method of instruction, or this method in combination with other methods. As is, the course is definitely better than no course at all; however, findings indicate changes are needed. Following are conclusions of this study. (1) The course is instructionally effective. (2) The simulation has a positive effect on student's confidence in his ability to apply new knowledge. (3) Analysts like the course and prefer this method of training, or this method in combination with current methods of training in code inspection, over the way training is currently being conducted. (4) Analysts responded favorably to information presented through scenarios incorporating full motion video. (5) Some course content needs to be changed. (6) Some content needs to be added to the course. SwRI believes this study indicates interactive video instruction combined with simulation is effective for teaching software processes. Based on the conclusions of this study, SwRI has outlined seven options for NASA to consider. SwRI recommends the option which involves creation of new source code and data files, but uses much of the existing content and design from the current course. Although this option involves a significant software development effort, SwRI believes this option

  15. Placenta Accreta in a Woman with Escherichia coli Chorioamnionitis with Intact Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Montelongo, Emma M.; Blue, Nathan R.; Lee, Richard H.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Escherichia coli (E. coli) associated intrauterine infections with intact membranes are extremely rare. Case. A 30-year-old multiparous female presented at 26 weeks' gestation with clinical signs of chorioamnionitis but physical examination suggested intact membranes. Her dietary history was concerned with Listeriosis. An amniocentesis was performed. Shortly thereafter, the mother developed septic shock and an urgent Cesarean delivery was performed. The patient required a peripartum hysterectomy for placenta accreta. Amniotic fluid cultures grew E. coli. PMID:26819787

  16. Imaging cerebral blood flow through the intact rat skull with temporal laser speckle imaging.

    PubMed

    Li, Pengcheng; Ni, Songlin; Zhang, Li; Zeng, Shaoqun; Luo, Qingming

    2006-06-15

    We discovered that laser speckle temporal contrast analysis (LSTCA) is able to access the two-dimensional (2D) cerebral blood flow velocity and vessel structure through the intact rat skull. It is demonstrated that LSTCA can significantly suppress the influence of the laser speckle from the stationary structure, such as the skull, and thus reveal the blood flow and morphology of blood vessels through the laser speckle images recorded from the intact rat skull.

  17. Polar Code Validation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-09-30

    Unclassified 2a SECURITY CLASSiF-ICATiON AUTHORIT’Y 3 DIStRIBUTION AVAILABILITY OF REPORT N,A Approved for public release; 2o DECLASSIFICAIiON DOWNGRADING SCH DI...SUMMARY OF POLAR ACHIEVEMENTS ..... .......... 3 3 . POLAR CODE PHYSICAL MODELS ..... ............. 5 3.1 PL-ASMA Su ^"ru5 I1LS SH A...11 Structure of the Bipolar Plasma Sheath Generated by SPEAR I ... ...... 1 3 The POLAR Code Wake Model: Comparison with in Situ Observations . . 23

  18. Aeroacoustic Prediction Codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gliebe, P; Mani, R.; Shin, H.; Mitchell, B.; Ashford, G.; Salamah, S.; Connell, S.; Huff, Dennis (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    This report describes work performed on Contract NAS3-27720AoI 13 as part of the NASA Advanced Subsonic Transport (AST) Noise Reduction Technology effort. Computer codes were developed to provide quantitative prediction, design, and analysis capability for several aircraft engine noise sources. The objective was to provide improved, physics-based tools for exploration of noise-reduction concepts and understanding of experimental results. Methods and codes focused on fan broadband and 'buzz saw' noise and on low-emissions combustor noise and compliment work done by other contractors under the NASA AST program to develop methods and codes for fan harmonic tone noise and jet noise. The methods and codes developed and reported herein employ a wide range of approaches, from the strictly empirical to the completely computational, with some being semiempirical analytical, and/or analytical/computational. Emphasis was on capturing the essential physics while still considering method or code utility as a practical design and analysis tool for everyday engineering use. Codes and prediction models were developed for: (1) an improved empirical correlation model for fan rotor exit flow mean and turbulence properties, for use in predicting broadband noise generated by rotor exit flow turbulence interaction with downstream stator vanes: (2) fan broadband noise models for rotor and stator/turbulence interaction sources including 3D effects, noncompact-source effects. directivity modeling, and extensions to the rotor supersonic tip-speed regime; (3) fan multiple-pure-tone in-duct sound pressure prediction methodology based on computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis; and (4) low-emissions combustor prediction methodology and computer code based on CFD and actuator disk theory. In addition. the relative importance of dipole and quadrupole source mechanisms was studied using direct CFD source computation for a simple cascadeigust interaction problem, and an empirical combustor

  19. Securing mobile code.

    SciTech Connect

    Link, Hamilton E.; Schroeppel, Richard Crabtree; Neumann, William Douglas; Campbell, Philip LaRoche; Beaver, Cheryl Lynn; Pierson, Lyndon George; Anderson, William Erik

    2004-10-01

    If software is designed so that the software can issue functions that will move that software from one computing platform to another, then the software is said to be 'mobile'. There are two general areas of security problems associated with mobile code. The 'secure host' problem involves protecting the host from malicious mobile code. The 'secure mobile code' problem, on the other hand, involves protecting the code from malicious hosts. This report focuses on the latter problem. We have found three distinct camps of opinions regarding how to secure mobile code. There are those who believe special distributed hardware is necessary, those who believe special distributed software is necessary, and those who believe neither is necessary. We examine all three camps, with a focus on the third. In the distributed software camp we examine some commonly proposed techniques including Java, D'Agents and Flask. For the specialized hardware camp, we propose a cryptographic technique for 'tamper-proofing' code over a large portion of the software/hardware life cycle by careful modification of current architectures. This method culminates by decrypting/authenticating each instruction within a physically protected CPU, thereby protecting against subversion by malicious code. Our main focus is on the camp that believes that neither specialized software nor hardware is necessary. We concentrate on methods of code obfuscation to render an entire program or a data segment on which a program depends incomprehensible. The hope is to prevent or at least slow down reverse engineering efforts and to prevent goal-oriented attacks on the software and execution. The field of obfuscation is still in a state of development with the central problem being the lack of a basis for evaluating the protection schemes. We give a brief introduction to some of the main ideas in the field, followed by an in depth analysis of a technique called 'white-boxing'. We put forth some new attacks and improvements

  20. Risks for Conduct Disorder Symptoms Associated with Parental Alcoholism in Stepfather Families versus Intact Families from a Community Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foley, Debra L.; Pickles, Andrew; Rutter, Michael; Gardner, Charles O.; Maes, Hermine H.; Silberg, Judy L.; Eaves, Lindon J.

    2004-01-01

    Background: It is not known if the prevalence of parental psychiatric disorders is higher in stepfather than intact families, or if parental alcoholism is differentially associated with risk for conduct disorder (CD) symptoms in stepfather families versus intact families. Method: The sample comprised 839 girls and 741 boys from 792 intact families…

  1. 40 CFR 261.41 - Notification and Recordkeeping for Used, Intact Cathode Ray Tubes (CRTs) Exported for Reuse.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Used, Intact Cathode Ray Tubes (CRTs) Exported for Reuse. 261.41 Section 261.41 Protection of... Tubes (CRTs) Exported for Reuse. (a) Persons who export used, intact CRTs for reuse must send a one-time... forth as follows: § 261.41 Notification and Recordkeeping for Used, Intact Cathode Ray Tubes...

  2. Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor Density in Cognitively Intact Subjects at an Early Stage of Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Isaias, Ioannis Ugo; Spiegel, Jörg; Brumberg, Joachim; Cosgrove, Kelly P.; Marotta, Giorgio; Oishi, Naoya; Higuchi, Takahiro; Küsters, Sebastian; Schiller, Markus; Dillmann, Ulrich; van Dyck, Christopher H.; Buck, Andreas; Herrmann, Ken; Schloegl, Susanne; Volkmann, Jens; Lassmann, Michael; Fassbender, Klaus; Lorenz, Reinhard; Samnick, Samuel

    2014-01-01

    We investigated in vivo brain nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) distribution in cognitively intact subjects with Parkinson’s disease (PD) at an early stage of the disease. Fourteen patients and 13 healthy subjects were imaged with single photon emission computed tomography and the radiotracer 5-[123I]iodo-3-[2(S)-2-azetidinylmethoxy]pyridine ([123I]5IA). Patients were selected according to several criteria, including short duration of motor signs (<7 years) and normal scores at an extensive neuropsychological evaluation. In PD patients, nAChR density was significantly higher in the putamen, the insular cortex and the supplementary motor area and lower in the caudate nucleus, the orbitofrontal cortex, and the middle temporal gyrus. Disease duration positively correlated with nAChR density in the putamen ipsilateral (ρ = 0.56, p < 0.05) but not contralateral (ρ = 0.49, p = 0.07) to the clinically most affected hemibody. We observed, for the first time in vivo, higher nAChR density in brain regions of the motor and limbic basal ganglia circuits of subjects with PD. Our findings support the notion of an up-regulated cholinergic activity at the striatal and possibly cortical level in cognitively intact PD patients at an early stage of disease. PMID:25177294

  3. Quantitative analysis of human salivary gland-derived intact proteome using top-down mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wu, Si; Brown, Joseph N; Tolić, Nikola; Meng, Da; Liu, Xiaowen; Zhang, Haizhen; Zhao, Rui; Moore, Ronald J; Pevzner, Pavel; Smith, Richard D; Paša-Tolić, Ljiljana

    2014-05-01

    There are several notable challenges inherent for fully characterizing the entirety of the human saliva proteome using bottom-up approaches, including polymorphic isoforms, PTMs, unique splice variants, deletions, and truncations. To address these challenges, we have developed a top-down based LC-MS/MS approach, which cataloged 20 major human salivary proteins with a total of 83 proteoforms, containing a broad range of PTMs. Among these proteins, several previously reported disease biomarker proteins were identified at the intact protein level, such as beta-2 microglobulin. In addition, intact glycosylated proteoforms of several saliva proteins were also characterized, including intact N-glycosylated protein prolactin inducible protein and O-glycosylated acidic protein rich protein. These characterized proteoforms constitute an intact saliva proteoform database, which was used for quantitative comparison of intact salivary proteoforms among six healthy individuals. Human parotid and submandibular/sublingual gland secretion samples (2 μg of protein each) from six healthy individuals were compared using RPLC coupled with the 12T FT-ICR mass spectrometer. Significantly different proteoform profiles were resolved with high reproducibility between parotid secretion and submandibular/sublingual glands. The results from this study provide further insight into the potential mechanisms of PTM pathways in oral glandular secretion, expanding our knowledge of this complex yet easily accessible fluid. Intact protein LC-MS approach presented herein can potentially be applied for rapid and accurate identification of biomarkers from only a few microliters of human glandular saliva.

  4. Investigation of mitochondrial dysfunction by sequential microplate-based respiration measurements from intact and permeabilized neurons.

    PubMed

    Clerc, Pascaline; Polster, Brian M

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is a component of many neurodegenerative conditions. Measurement of oxygen consumption from intact neurons enables evaluation of mitochondrial bioenergetics under conditions that are more physiologically realistic compared to isolated mitochondria. However, mechanistic analysis of mitochondrial function in cells is complicated by changing energy demands and lack of substrate control. Here we describe a technique for sequentially measuring respiration from intact and saponin-permeabilized cortical neurons on single microplates. This technique allows control of substrates to individual electron transport chain complexes following permeabilization, as well as side-by-side comparisons to intact cells. To illustrate the utility of the technique, we demonstrate that inhibition of respiration by the drug KB-R7943 in intact neurons is relieved by delivery of the complex II substrate succinate, but not by complex I substrates, via acute saponin permeabilization. In contrast, methyl succinate, a putative cell permeable complex II substrate, failed to rescue respiration in intact neurons and was a poor complex II substrate in permeabilized cells. Sequential measurements of intact and permeabilized cell respiration should be particularly useful for evaluating indirect mitochondrial toxicity due to drugs or cellular signaling events which cannot be readily studied using isolated mitochondria.

  5. Analysis of the entire ryanodine receptor type 1 and alpha 1 subunit of the dihydropyridine receptor (CACNA1S) coding regions for variants associated with malignant hyperthermia in Australian families.

    PubMed

    Gillies, R L; Bjorksten, A R; Du Sart, D; Hockey, B M

    2015-03-01

    Defects in the genes coding for the skeletal muscle ryanodine receptor (RYR1) and alpha 1 subunit of the dihydropyridine receptor (CACNA1S) have been identified as causative for malignant hyperthermia (MH). Sixty-two MH susceptible individuals presenting to the same diagnostic centre had copy deoxyribonucleic acid, derived from muscle ribonucleic acid, sequenced to identify variants with the potential to be responsible for the MH phenotype in both RYR1 and CACNA1S. These genetic findings were combined with clinical episode details and in vitro contracture test results to improve our understanding of the Australian MH cohort. Twelve novel variants were identified in RYR1 and six in CACNA1S. Known RYR1 causative mutations were identified in six persons and novel variants in RYR1 and CACNA1S in a further 17 persons. Trends indicated higher mutation identification in those with more definitive clinical episodes and stronger in vitro contracture test responses.

  6. A small gene, designated comS, located within the coding region of the fourth amino acid-activation domain of srfA, is required for competence development in Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Hamoen, L W; Eshuis, H; Jongbloed, J; Venema, G; van Sinderen, D

    1995-01-01

    The valine-activation domain-encoding portion of the srfA locus (srfA-d4) is not only involved in the non-ribosomal synthesis of surfactin, but is also required for the regulation of competence development. In this study we show that impairment of the adenylation activity of the valine-activating domain did not affect competence development. Deletion analysis and complementation studies delineated the competence-required portion of srfA-d4 to a 168 bp fragment, which contains a small open reading frame (ORF), designated comS, encoding a polypeptide of 46 amino acids, embedded within, but translated in, a frame different from that of srfA-d4. Introduction of an amber mutation in the comS-coding frame prevented competence development, demonstrating the involvement of comS in this prokaryotic specialization process.

  7. Coding for urologic office procedures.

    PubMed

    Dowling, Robert A; Painter, Mark

    2013-11-01

    This article summarizes current best practices for documenting, coding, and billing common office-based urologic procedures. Topics covered include general principles, basic and advanced urologic coding, creation of medical records that support compliant coding practices, bundled codes and unbundling, global periods, modifiers for procedure codes, when to bill for evaluation and management services during the same visit, coding for supplies, and laboratory and radiology procedures pertinent to urology practice. Detailed information is included for the most common urology office procedures, and suggested resources and references are provided. This information is of value to physicians, office managers, and their coding staff.

  8. Accumulate Repeat Accumulate Coded Modulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbasfar, Aliazam; Divsalar, Dariush; Yao, Kung

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we propose an innovative coded modulation scheme called 'Accumulate Repeat Accumulate Coded Modulation' (ARA coded modulation). This class of codes can be viewed as serial turbo-like codes, or as a subclass of Low Density Parity Check (LDPC) codes that are combined with high level modulation. Thus at the decoder belief propagation can be used for iterative decoding of ARA coded modulation on a graph, provided a demapper transforms the received in-phase and quadrature samples to reliability of the bits.

  9. Dress Codes. Legal Brief.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zirkel, Perry A.

    2000-01-01

    As illustrated by two recent decisions, the courts in the past decade have demarcated wide boundaries for school officials considering dress codes, whether in the form of selective prohibitions or required uniforms. Administrators must warn the community, provide legitimate justification and reasonable clarity, and comply with state law. (MLH)

  10. Dress Codes and Uniforms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lumsden, Linda; Miller, Gabriel

    2002-01-01

    Students do not always make choices that adults agree with in their choice of school dress. Dress-code issues are explored in this Research Roundup, and guidance is offered to principals seeking to maintain a positive school climate. In "Do School Uniforms Fit?" Kerry White discusses arguments for and against school uniforms and summarizes the…

  11. Building Codes and Regulations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, John L.

    The hazard of fire is of great concern to libraries due to combustible books and new plastics used in construction and interiors. Building codes and standards can offer architects and planners guidelines to follow but these standards should be closely monitored, updated, and researched for fire prevention. (DS)

  12. Student Dress Codes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uerling, Donald F.

    School officials see a need for regulations that prohibit disruptive and inappropriate forms of expression and attire; students see these regulations as unwanted restrictions on their freedom. This paper reviews court litigation involving constitutional limitations on school authority, dress and hair codes, state law constraints, and school…

  13. Video Coding for ESL.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Kevin

    1992-01-01

    Coding tasks, a valuable technique for teaching English as a Second Language, are presented that enable students to look at patterns and structures of marital communication as well as objectively evaluate the degree of happiness or distress in the marriage. (seven references) (JL)

  14. Electrical Circuit Simulation Code

    SciTech Connect

    Wix, Steven D.; Waters, Arlon J.; Shirley, David

    2001-08-09

    Massively-Parallel Electrical Circuit Simulation Code. CHILESPICE is a massively-arallel distributed-memory electrical circuit simulation tool that contains many enhanced radiation, time-based, and thermal features and models. Large scale electronic circuit simulation. Shared memory, parallel processing, enhance convergence. Sandia specific device models.

  15. Multiple trellis coded modulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, Marvin K. (Inventor); Divsalar, Dariush (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A technique for designing trellis codes to minimize bit error performance for a fading channel. The invention provides a criteria which may be used in the design of such codes which is significantly different from that used for average white Gaussian noise channels. The method of multiple trellis coded modulation of the present invention comprises the steps of: (a) coding b bits of input data into s intermediate outputs; (b) grouping said s intermediate outputs into k groups of s.sub.i intermediate outputs each where the summation of all s.sub.i,s is equal to s and k is equal to at least 2; (c) mapping each of said k groups of intermediate outputs into one of a plurality of symbols in accordance with a plurality of modulation schemes, one for each group such that the first group is mapped in accordance with a first modulation scheme and the second group is mapped in accordance with a second modulation scheme; and (d) outputting each of said symbols to provide k output symbols for each b bits of input data.

  16. Intact discourse cohesion and coherence following bilateral ventromedial prefrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Kurczek, Jake; Duff, Melissa C

    2012-12-01

    Discourse cohesion and coherence give communication its continuity providing the grammatical and lexical links that hold an utterance or text together and give it meaning. Researchers often link cohesion and coherence deficits to the frontal lobes by drawing attention to frontal lobe dysfunction in populations where discourse cohesion and coherence deficits are reported and through attribution of these deficits to underlying cognitive impairments putatively associated with the frontal lobes. We examined the distinct contribution of a region of the frontal lobes, the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC), to discourse cohesion and coherence across a range of discourse tasks. We found that bilateral vmPFC damage does not impair cohesion and coherence in spoken discourse. This study provides insights into the contribution of the major anatomical subdivisions of the frontal lobes to language use and furthers our understanding of the neural and cognitive underpinnings of discourse cohesion and coherence.

  17. The fourfold way of the genetic code.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Montaño, Miguel Angel

    2009-11-01

    We describe a compact representation of the genetic code that factorizes the table in quartets. It represents a "least grammar" for the genetic language. It is justified by the Klein-4 group structure of RNA bases and codon doublets. The matrix of the outer product between the column-vector of bases and the corresponding row-vector V(T)=(C G U A), considered as signal vectors, has a block structure consisting of the four cosets of the KxK group of base transformations acting on doublet AA. This matrix, translated into weak/strong (W/S) and purine/pyrimidine (R/Y) nucleotide classes, leads to a code table with mixed and unmixed families in separate regions. A basic difference between them is the non-commuting (R/Y) doublets: AC/CA, GU/UG. We describe the degeneracy in the canonical code and the systematic changes in deviant codes in terms of the divisors of 24, employing modulo multiplication groups. We illustrate binary sub-codes characterizing mutations in the quartets. We introduce a decision-tree to predict the mode of tRNA recognition corresponding to each codon, and compare our result with related findings by Jestin and Soulé [Jestin, J.-L., Soulé, C., 2007. Symmetries by base substitutions in the genetic code predict 2' or 3' aminoacylation of tRNAs. J. Theor. Biol. 247, 391-394], and the rearrangements of the table by Delarue [Delarue, M., 2007. An asymmetric underlying rule in the assignment of codons: possible clue to a quick early evolution of the genetic code via successive binary choices. RNA 13, 161-169] and Rodin and Rodin [Rodin, S.N., Rodin, A.S., 2008. On the origin of the genetic code: signatures of its primordial complementarity in tRNAs and aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases. Heredity 100, 341-355], respectively.

  18. Coding Theory and Projective Spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silberstein, Natalia

    2008-05-01

    The projective space of order n over a finite field F_q is a set of all subspaces of the vector space F_q^{n}. In this work, we consider error-correcting codes in the projective space, focusing mainly on constant dimension codes. We start with the different representations of subspaces in the projective space. These representations involve matrices in reduced row echelon form, associated binary vectors, and Ferrers diagrams. Based on these representations, we provide a new formula for the computation of the distance between any two subspaces in the projective space. We examine lifted maximum rank distance (MRD) codes, which are nearly optimal constant dimension codes. We prove that a lifted MRD code can be represented in such a way that it forms a block design known as a transversal design. The incidence matrix of the transversal design derived from a lifted MRD code can be viewed as a parity-check matrix of a linear code in the Hamming space. We find the properties of these codes which can be viewed also as LDPC codes. We present new bounds and constructions for constant dimension codes. First, we present a multilevel construction for constant dimension codes, which can be viewed as a generalization of a lifted MRD codes construction. This construction is based on a new type of rank-metric codes, called Ferrers diagram rank-metric codes. Then we derive upper bounds on the size of constant dimension codes which contain the lifted MRD code, and provide a construction for two families of codes, that attain these upper bounds. We generalize the well-known concept of a punctured code for a code in the projective space to obtain large codes which are not constant dimension. We present efficient enumerative encoding and decoding techniques for the Grassmannian. Finally we describe a search method for constant dimension lexicodes.

  19. Boundary-Layer Code For Supersonic Combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinckney, S. Z.; Walton, J. T.

    1994-01-01

    HUD is integral computer code based on Spaulding-Chi method for predicting development of boundary layers in laminar, transitional, and turbulent regions of flows on two-dimensional or axisymmetric bodies. Approximates nonequilibrium velocity profiles as well as local surface friction in presence of pressure gradient. Predicts transfer of heat in turbulent boundary layer in presence of high axial presure gradient. Provides for pressure gradients both normal and lateral to surfaces. Also used to estimate requirements for cooling scramjet engines. Because of this capability, HUD program incorporated into several scramjet-cycle-performance-analysis codes, including SCRAM (ARC-12338) and SRGULL (LEW-15093). Written in FORTRAN 77.

  20. Performance Bounds on Two Concatenated, Interleaved Codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moision, Bruce; Dolinar, Samuel

    2010-01-01

    be erroneous. From the perspective of the present method, the topic of major interest is the performance of the communication system as quantified in the word-error rate and the undetected-error rate as functions of the SNRs and the total latency of the interleaver and inner code. The method is embodied in equations that describe bounds on these functions. Throughout the derivation of the equations that embody the method, it is assumed that the decoder for the outer code corrects any error pattern of t or fewer errors, detects any error pattern of s or fewer errors, may detect some error patterns of more than s errors, and does not correct any patterns of more than t errors. Because a mathematically complete description of the equations that embody the method and of the derivation of the equations would greatly exceed the space available for this article, it must suffice to summarize by reporting that the derivation includes consideration of several complex issues, including relationships between latency and memory requirements for block and convolutional codes, burst error statistics, enumeration of error-event intersections, and effects of different interleaving depths. In a demonstration, the method was used to calculate bounds on the performances of several communication systems, each based on serial concatenation of a (63,56) expurgated Hamming code with a convolutional inner code through a convolutional interleaver. The bounds calculated by use of the method were compared with results of numerical simulations of performances of the systems to show the regions where the bounds are tight (see figure).