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Sample records for intact flagellar motor

  1. Na+-driven bacterial flagellar motors.

    PubMed

    Imae, Y; Atsumi, T

    1989-12-01

    Bacterial flagellar motors are the reversible rotary engine which propels the cell by rotating a helical flagellar filament as a screw propeller. The motors are embedded in the cytoplasmic membrane, and the energy for rotation is supplied by the electrochemical potential of specific ions across the membrane. Thus, the analysis of motor rotation at the molecular level is linked to an understanding of how the living system converts chemical energy into mechanical work. Based on the coupling ions, the motors are divided into two types; one is the H+-driven type found in neutrophiles such as Bacillus subtilis and Escherichia coli and the other is the Na+-driven type found in alkalophilic Bacillus and marine Vibrio. In this review, we summarize the current status of research on the rotation mechanism of the Na+-driven flagellar motors, which introduces several new aspects in the analysis.

  2. Proposed model for the flagellar rotary motor.

    PubMed

    Mitsui, Toshio; Ohshima, Hiroyuki

    2005-11-25

    Flagellated bacteria swim by rotating helical filaments driven by motors embedded in the cell wall and cytoplasmic membrane. A model is proposed to explain the mechanism of the motor. The protons passing through the channels induce a strong electric field in Mot molecules. This field originates an impulse force to cause the flagellar rotation if the following conditions are fulfilled: (a) Mot molecules have a spontaneous electric polarization. (b) The lipid bilayers are viscoelastic. (c) There is a delay of deformation in response to stress in Mot molecules. The conclusions driven from the model are in agreement with the following experimental observations, denoting the flagellar rotation velocity as omega. (1) The torque is practically constant independent of omega from 0 to a critical value omega(cr) and then decreases sharply. (2) When omega is smaller than omega(cr), the torque varies little with temperature. (3) The critical velocity omega(cr) shifts to lower speed at lower temperatures. (4) Where omega is larger than omega(cr), declining of the torque steepens at lower temperatures. (5) When omega is smaller than omega(cr), one revolution of the flagellar rotation consists of a constant number of steps. (6) When omega is smaller than omega(cr), omega is proportional to the transmembrane potential difference. (7) The stator produces constant torque even when the stator is rotated relative to the rotor by external forces. (8) How the flagellar rotation velocity changes when the direction of the proton passage is reversed. (9) The motor has a switch that reverses the sense of the flagelllar rotation with the same absolute value of torque.

  3. How molecular motors shape the flagellar beat

    PubMed Central

    Riedel-Kruse, Ingmar H.; Hilfinger, Andreas; Howard, Jonathon; Jülicher, Frank

    2007-01-01

    Cilia and eukaryotic flagella are slender cellular appendages whose regular beating propels cells and microorganisms through aqueous media. The beat is an oscillating pattern of propagating bends generated by dynein motor proteins. A key open question is how the activity of the motors is coordinated in space and time. To elucidate the nature of this coordination we inferred the mechanical properties of the motors by analyzing the shape of beating sperm: Steadily beating bull sperm were imaged and their shapes were measured with high precision using a Fourier averaging technique. Comparing our experimental data with wave forms calculated for different scenarios of motor coordination we found that only the scenario of interdoublet sliding regulating motor activity gives rise to satisfactory fits. We propose that the microscopic origin of such “sliding control” is the load dependent detachment rate of motors. Agreement between observed and calculated wave forms was obtained only if significant sliding between microtubules occurred at the base. This suggests a novel mechanism by which changes in basal compliance could reverse the direction of beat propagation. We conclude that the flagellar beat patterns are determined by an interplay of the basal properties of the axoneme and the mechanical feedback of dynein motors. PMID:19404446

  4. Shear stress transmission model for the flagellar rotary motor.

    PubMed

    Mitsui, Toshio; Ohshima, Hiroyuki

    2008-09-01

    Most bacteria that swim are propelled by flagellar filaments, which are driven by a rotary motor powered by proton flux. The mechanism of the flagellar motor is discussed by reforming the model proposed by the present authors in 2005. It is shown that the mean strength of Coulomb field produced by a proton passing the channel is very strong in the Mot assembly so that the Mot assembly can be a shear force generator and induce the flagellar rotation. The model gives clear calculation results in agreement with experimental observations, e g., for the characteristic torque-velocity relationship of the flagellar rotation.

  5. Limiting Speed of the Bacterial Flagellar Motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nirody, Jasmine; Berry, Richard; Oster, George

    The bacterial flagellar motor (BFM) drives swimming in a wide variety of bacterial species, making it crucial for several fundamental biological processes including chemotaxis and community formation. Recent experiments have shown that the structure of this nanomachine is more dynamic than previously believed. Specifically, the number of active torque-generating units (stators) was shown to vary across applied loads. This finding invalidates the experimental evidence reporting that limiting (zero-torque) speed is independent of the number of active stators. Here, we put forward a model for the torque generation mechanism of this motor and propose that the maximum speed of the motor increases as additional torque-generators are recruited. This is contrary to the current widely-held belief that there is a universal upper limit to the speed of the BFM. Our result arises from the assumption that stators disengage from the motor for a significant portion of their mechanochemical cycles at low loads. We show that this assumption is consistent with current experimental evidence and consolidate our predictions with arguments that a processive motor must have a high duty ratio at high loads.

  6. Loose coupling in the bacterial flagellar motor

    PubMed Central

    Boschert, Ryan; Adler, Frederick R.; Blair, David F.

    2015-01-01

    Physiological properties of the flagellar rotary motor have been taken to indicate a tightly coupled mechanism in which each revolution is driven by a fixed number of energizing ions. Measurements that would directly test the tight-coupling hypothesis have not been made. Energizing ions flow through membrane-bound complexes formed from the proteins MotA and MotB, which are anchored to the cell wall and constitute the stator. Genetic and biochemical evidence points to a “power stroke” mechanism in which the ions interact with an aspartate residue of MotB to drive conformational changes in MotA that are transmitted to the rotor protein FliG. Each stator complex contains two separate ion-binding sites, raising the question of whether the power stroke is driven by one, two, or either number of ions. Here, we describe simulations of a model in which the conformational change can be driven by either one or two ions. This loosely coupled model can account for the observed physiological properties of the motor, including those that have been taken to indicate tight coupling; it also accords with recent measurements of motor torque at high load that are harder to explain in tight-coupling models. Under loads relevant to a swimming cell, the loosely coupled motor would perform about as well as a two-proton motor and significantly better than a one-proton motor. The loosely coupled motor is predicted to be especially advantageous under conditions of diminished energy supply, or of reduced temperature, turning faster than an obligatorily two-proton motor while using fewer ions. PMID:25825730

  7. Quantification of flagellar motor stator dynamics through in vivo proton-motive force control.

    PubMed

    Tipping, Murray J; Steel, Bradley C; Delalez, Nicolas J; Berry, Richard M; Armitage, Judith P

    2013-01-01

    The bacterial flagellar motor, one of the few rotary motors in nature, produces torque to drive the flagellar filament by ion translocation through membrane-bound stator complexes. We used the light-driven proton pump proteorhodopsin (pR) to control the proton-motive force (PMF) in vivo by illumination. pR excitation was shown to be sufficient to replace native PMF generation, and when excited in cells with intact native PMF generation systems increased motor speed beyond the physiological norm. We characterized the effects of rapid in vivo PMF changes on the flagellar motor. Transient PMF disruption events from loss of illumination caused motors to stop, with rapid recovery of their previous rotation rate after return of illumination. However, extended periods of PMF loss led to stepwise increases in rotation rate upon PMF return as stators returned to the motor. The rate constant for stator binding to a putative single binding site on the motor was calculated to be 0.06 s(-1). Using GFP-tagged MotB stator proteins, we found that transient PMF disruption leads to reversible stator diffusion away from the flagellar motor, showing that PMF presence is necessary for continued motor integrity, and calculated a stator dissociation rate of 0.038 s(-1).

  8. Hybrid flagellar motor/MEMS based TNT detection system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jin-Woo; Tung, Steve

    2006-05-01

    Effective and rapid detection of nitroaromatic explosive compounds, especially trinitrotoluene (TNT), is very important to homeland security as well as to environmental monitoring of contaminants in soil and water, and landmine detection. In this research, we explore a novel nanoscale flagellar motor based TNT detection system (nFMTNT). The nFMTNT is a bio-hybrid MEMS system which combines genetically engineered flagellar motors and MEMS devices. The system consists of three major components: (1) a non-pathogenic, genetically modified Escherichia coli strain KAF95 with a rotating flagellar filament, (2) a microchannel with tethered cells, and (3) a sub-micron bead attached to a rotating flagellar filament. The operational principle of nFMTNT is based on detecting the change in the rotational behavior of the nanoscale flagellar filament in the presence of TNT. The rotational behavior of flagellar filaments of E. coli KAF95 was shown to be extremely sensitive to the presence of nitrate or nitrite. Normally, the flagellar filaments were locked in to rotate in the counterclockwise direction. However, when a nitrate or nitrite was present in the immediate environment, the filaments cease to rotate. Our results indicate that the threshold concentrations required for this response were 10 -4 M for nitrate and 10 -3 M for nitrite. This is equivalent to around 10 pg of nitrate and 100 pg of nitrite, based on the dimension of the MEMS-based reaction system used for the experiment (400 μm × 100 μm × 40 μm). These detection limits can be even lower when the size of the system is reduced.

  9. An Element of Determinism in a Stochastic Flagellar Motor Switch

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Li; Altindal, Tuba; Wu, Xiao-Lun

    2015-01-01

    Marine bacterium Vibrio alginolyticus uses a single polar flagellum to navigate in an aqueous environment. Similar to Escherichia coli cells, the polar flagellar motor has two states; when the motor is counter-clockwise, the cell swims forward and when the motor is clockwise, the cell swims backward. V. alginolyticus also incorporates a direction randomization step at the start of the forward swimming interval by flicking its flagellum. To gain an understanding on how the polar flagellar motor switch is regulated, distributions of the forward Δf and backward Δb intervals are investigated herein. We found that the steady-state probability density functions, P(Δf) and P(Δb), of freely swimming bacteria are strongly peaked at a finite time, suggesting that the motor switch is not Poissonian. The short-time inhibition is sufficiently strong and long lasting, i.e., several hundred milliseconds for both intervals, which is readily observed and characterized. Treating motor reversal dynamics as a first-passage problem, which results from conformation fluctuations of the motor switch, we calculated P(Δf) and P(Δb) and found good agreement with the measurements. PMID:26554590

  10. Hybrid-fuel bacterial flagellar motors in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Sowa, Yoshiyuki; Homma, Michio; Ishijima, Akihiko; Berry, Richard M

    2014-03-04

    The bacterial flagellar motor rotates driven by an electrochemical ion gradient across the cytoplasmic membrane, either H(+) or Na(+) ions. The motor consists of a rotor ∼50 nm in diameter surrounded by multiple torque-generating ion-conducting stator units. Stator units exchange spontaneously between the motor and a pool in the cytoplasmic membrane on a timescale of minutes, and their stability in the motor is dependent upon the ion gradient. We report a genetically engineered hybrid-fuel flagellar motor in Escherichia coli that contains both H(+)- and Na(+)-driven stator components and runs on both types of ion gradient. We controlled the number of each type of stator unit in the motor by protein expression levels and Na(+) concentration ([Na(+)]), using speed changes of single motors driving 1-μm polystyrene beads to determine stator unit numbers. De-energized motors changed from locked to freely rotating on a timescale similar to that of spontaneous stator unit exchange. Hybrid motor speed is simply the sum of speeds attributable to individual stator units of each type. With Na(+) and H(+) stator components expressed at high and medium levels, respectively, Na(+) stator units dominate at high [Na(+)] and are replaced by H(+) units when Na(+) is removed. Thus, competition between stator units for spaces in a motor and sensitivity of each type to its own ion gradient combine to allow hybrid motors to adapt to the prevailing ion gradient. We speculate that a similar process may occur in species that naturally express both H(+) and Na(+) stator components sharing a common rotor.

  11. Resurrection of the flagellar rotary motor near zero load

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Junhua; Berg, Howard C.

    2008-01-01

    Flagellated bacteria, such as Escherichia coli, are propelled by helical flagellar filaments, each driven at its base by a reversible rotary motor, powered by a transmembrane proton flux. Torque is generated by the interaction of stator proteins, MotA and MotB, with a rotor protein FliG. The physiology of the motor has been studied extensively in the regime of relatively high load and low speed, where it appears to operate close to thermodynamic equilibrium. Here, we describe an assay that allows systematic study of the motor near zero load, where proton translocation and movement of mechanical components are rate limiting. Sixty-nanometer-diameter gold spheres were attached to hooks of cells lacking flagellar filaments, and light scattered from a sphere was monitored at the image plane of a microscope through a small pinhole. Paralyzed motors of cells carrying a motA point mutation were resurrected at 23°C by expression of wild-type MotA, and speeds jumped from zero to a maximum value (≈300 Hz) in one step. Thus, near zero load, the speed of the motor is independent of the number of torque-generating units. Evidently, the units act independently (they do not interfere with one another), and there are no intervals during which a second unit can add to the speed generated by the first (the duty ratio is close to 1). PMID:18202173

  12. Coordinated Switching of Bacterial Flagellar Motors: Evidence for Direct Motor-Motor Coupling?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Bo; Tu, Yuhai

    2013-04-01

    The swimming of Escherichia coli is powered by its multiple flagellar motors. Each motor spins either clockwise or counterclockwise, under the control of an intracellular regulator, CheY-P. There can be two mechanisms (extrinsic and intrinsic) to coordinate the switching of bacterial motors. The extrinsic one arises from the fact that different motors in the same cell sense a common input (CheY-P) which fluctuates near the motors’ response threshold. An alternative, intrinsic mechanism is direct motor-motor coupling which makes synchronized switching energetically favorable. Here, we develop simple models for both mechanisms and uncover their different hallmarks. A quantitative comparison to the recent experiments suggests that the direct coupling mechanism may be accountable for the observed sharp correlation between motors in a single Escherichia coli. Possible origins of this coupling (e.g., hydrodynamic interaction) are discussed.

  13. Constraints on models for the flagellar rotary motor.

    PubMed Central

    Berg, H C

    2000-01-01

    Most bacteria that swim are propelled by flagellar filaments, each driven at its base by a rotary motor embedded in the cell wall and cytoplasmic membrane. A motor is about 45 nm in diameter and made up of about 20 different kinds of parts. It is assembled from the inside out. It is powered by a proton (or in some species, a sodium-ion) flux. It steps at least 400 times per revolution. At low speeds and high torques, about 1000 protons are required per revolution, speed is proportional to protonmotive force, and torque varies little with temperature or hydrogen isotope. At high speeds and low torques, torque increases with temperature and is sensitive to hydrogen isotope. At room temperature, torque varies remarkably little with speed from about -100 Hz (the present limit of measurement) to about 200 Hz, and then it declines rapidly reaching zero at about 300 Hz. These are facts that motor models should explain. None of the existing models for the flagellar rotary motor completely do so. PMID:10836502

  14. Mechanics of torque generation in the bacterial flagellar motor

    PubMed Central

    Mandadapu, Kranthi K.; Nirody, Jasmine A.; Berry, Richard M.; Oster, George

    2015-01-01

    The bacterial flagellar motor (BFM) is responsible for driving bacterial locomotion and chemotaxis, fundamental processes in pathogenesis and biofilm formation. In the BFM, torque is generated at the interface between transmembrane proteins (stators) and a rotor. It is well established that the passage of ions down a transmembrane gradient through the stator complex provides the energy for torque generation. However, the physics involved in this energy conversion remain poorly understood. Here we propose a mechanically specific model for torque generation in the BFM. In particular, we identify roles for two fundamental forces involved in torque generation: electrostatic and steric. We propose that electrostatic forces serve to position the stator, whereas steric forces comprise the actual “power stroke.” Specifically, we propose that ion-induced conformational changes about a proline “hinge” residue in a stator α-helix are directly responsible for generating the power stroke. Our model predictions fit well with recent experiments on a single-stator motor. The proposed model provides a mechanical explanation for several fundamental properties of the flagellar motor, including torque–speed and speed–ion motive force relationships, backstepping, variation in step sizes, and the effects of key mutations in the stator. PMID:26216959

  15. Mechanics of torque generation in the bacterial flagellar motor.

    PubMed

    Mandadapu, Kranthi K; Nirody, Jasmine A; Berry, Richard M; Oster, George

    2015-08-11

    The bacterial flagellar motor (BFM) is responsible for driving bacterial locomotion and chemotaxis, fundamental processes in pathogenesis and biofilm formation. In the BFM, torque is generated at the interface between transmembrane proteins (stators) and a rotor. It is well established that the passage of ions down a transmembrane gradient through the stator complex provides the energy for torque generation. However, the physics involved in this energy conversion remain poorly understood. Here we propose a mechanically specific model for torque generation in the BFM. In particular, we identify roles for two fundamental forces involved in torque generation: electrostatic and steric. We propose that electrostatic forces serve to position the stator, whereas steric forces comprise the actual "power stroke." Specifically, we propose that ion-induced conformational changes about a proline "hinge" residue in a stator α-helix are directly responsible for generating the power stroke. Our model predictions fit well with recent experiments on a single-stator motor. The proposed model provides a mechanical explanation for several fundamental properties of the flagellar motor, including torque-speed and speed-ion motive force relationships, backstepping, variation in step sizes, and the effects of key mutations in the stator.

  16. Model Studies of the Dynamics of Bacterial Flagellar Motors

    SciTech Connect

    Bai, F; Lo, C; Berry, R; Xing, J

    2009-03-19

    The Bacterial Flagellar Motor is a rotary molecular machine that rotates the helical filaments which propel swimming bacteria. Extensive experimental and theoretical studies exist on the structure, assembly, energy input, power generation and switching mechanism of the motor. In our previous paper, we explained the general physics underneath the observed torque-speed curves with a simple two-state Fokker-Planck model. Here we further analyze this model. In this paper we show (1) the model predicts that the two components of the ion motive force can affect the motor dynamics differently, in agreement with the latest experiment by Lo et al.; (2) with explicit consideration of the stator spring, the model also explains the lack of dependence of the zero-load speed on stator number in the proton motor, recently observed by Yuan and Berg; (3) the model reproduces the stepping behavior of the motor even with the existence of the stator springs and predicts the dwelling time distribution. Predicted stepping behavior of motors with two stators is discussed, and we suggest future experimental verification.

  17. Torque and rotation rate of the bacterial flagellar motor.

    PubMed Central

    Läuger, P

    1988-01-01

    This paper describes an analysis of microscopic models for the coupling between ion flow and rotation of bacterial flagella. In model I it is assumed that intersecting half-channels exist on the rotor and the stator and that the driving ion is constrained to move together with the intersection site. Model II is based on the assumption that ion flow drives a cycle of conformational transitions in a channel-like stator subunit that are coupled to the motion of the rotor. Analysis of both mechanisms yields closed expressions relating the torque M generated by the flagellar motor to the rotation rate v. Model I (and also, under certain assumptions, model II) accounts for the experimentally observed linear relationship between M and v. The theoretical equations lead to predictions on the relationship between rotation rate and driving force which can be tested experimentally. PMID:3342270

  18. Transient pauses of the bacterial flagellar motor at low load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nord, A. L.; Pedaci, F.; Berry, R. M.

    2016-11-01

    The bacterial flagellar motor (BFM) is the molecular machine responsible for the swimming and chemotaxis of many species of motile bacteria. The BFM is bidirectional, and changes in the rotation direction of the motor are essential for chemotaxis. It has previously been observed that many species of bacteria also demonstrate brief pauses in rotation, though the underlying cause of such events remains poorly understood. We examine the rotation of Escherichia coli under low mechanical load with high spatial and temporal resolution. We observe and characterize transient pauses in rotation in a strain which lacks a functional chemosensory network, showing that such events are a phenomenon separate from a change in rotational direction. Rotating at low load, the BFM of E. coli exhibits about 10 pauses s-1, lasting on average 5 ms, during which time the rotor diffuses with net forwards rotation. Replacing the wild type stators with Na+ chimera stators has no substantial effect on the pausing. We discuss possible causes of such events, which are likely a product of a transient change in either the stator complex or the rotor.

  19. A Delicate Nanoscale Motor Made by Nature—The Bacterial Flagellar Motor

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Ruidong; Ma, Qi

    2015-01-01

    The bacterial flagellar motor (BFM) is a molecular complex ca. 45 nm in diameter that rotates the propeller that makes nearly all bacteria swim. The motor self‐assembles out of ca. 20 different proteins and can not only rotate at up to 50 000 rpm, but can also switch rotational direction in milliseconds and navigate its environment to maneuver, on average, towards regions of greater benefit. The BFM is a pinnacle of evolution that informs and inspires the design of novel nanotechnology in the new era of synthetic biology. PMID:27980978

  20. Nonconventional cation-coupled flagellar motors derived from the alkaliphilic Bacillus and Paenibacillus species.

    PubMed

    Ito, Masahiro; Takahashi, Yuka

    2017-01-01

    Prior to 2008, all previously studied conventional bacterial flagellar motors appeared to utilize either H(+) or Na(+) as coupling ions. Membrane-embedded stator complexes support conversion of energy using transmembrane electrochemical ion gradients. The main H(+)-coupled stators, known as MotAB, differ from Na(+)-coupled stators, PomAB of marine bacteria, and MotPS of alkaliphilic Bacillus. However, in 2008, a MotAB-type flagellar motor of alkaliphilic Bacillus clausii KSM-K16 was revealed as an exception with the first dual-function motor. This bacterium was identified as the first bacterium with a single stator-rotor that can utilize both H(+) and Na(+) for ion-coupling at different pH ranges. Subsequently, another exception, a MotPS-type flagellar motor of alkaliphilic Bacillus alcalophilus AV1934, was reported to utilize Na(+) plus K(+) and Rb(+) as coupling ions for flagellar rotation. In addition, the alkaline-tolerant bacterium Paenibacillus sp. TCA20, which can utilize divalent cations such as Ca(2+), Mg(2+), and Sr(2+), was recently isolated from a hot spring in Japan, which contains a high Ca(2+) concentration. These findings show that bacterial flagellar motors isolated from unique environments utilize unexpected coupling ions. This suggests that bacteria that grow in different extreme environments adapt to local conditions and evolve their motility machinery.

  1. A quantitative model of the switch cycle of an archaeal flagellar motor and its sensory control.

    PubMed

    Nutsch, Torsten; Oesterhelt, Dieter; Gilles, Ernst Dieter; Marwan, Wolfgang

    2005-10-01

    By reverse-engineering we have detected eight kinetic phases of the symmetric switch cycle of the Halobacterium salinarum flagellar motor assembly and identified those steps in the switch cycle that are controlled by sensory rhodopsins during phototaxis. Upon switching the rotational sense, the flagellar motor assembly passes through a stop state from which all subunits synchronously resume rotation in the reverse direction. The assembly then synchronously proceeds through three subsequent functional states of the switch: Refractory, Competent, and Active, from which the rotational sense is switched again. Sensory control of the symmetric switch cycle occurs at two steps in each rotational sense by inversely regulating the probabilities for a change from the Refractory to the Competent and from Competent to the Active rotational mode. We provide a mathematical model for flagellar motor switching and its sensory control, which is able to explain all tested experimental results on spontaneous and light-controlled motor switching, and give a mechanistic explanation based on synchronous conformational transitions of the subunits of the switch complex after reversible dissociation and binding of a response regulator (CheYP). We conclude that the kinetic mechanism of flagellar motor switching and its sensory control is fundamentally different in the archaeon H. salinarum and the bacterium Escherichia coli.

  2. Characterization of the flagellar motor composed of functional GFP-fusion derivatives of FliG in the Na+-driven polar flagellum of Vibrio alginolyticus

    PubMed Central

    Koike, Masafumi; Nishioka, Noriko; Kojima, Seiji; Homma, Michio

    2011-01-01

    The polar flagellum of Vibrio alginolyticus is driven by sodium ion flux via a stator complex, composed of PomA and PomB, across the cell membrane. The interaction between PomA and the rotor component FliG is believed to generate torque required for flagellar rotation. Previous research reported that a GFP-fused FliG retained function in the Vibrio flagellar motor. In this study, we found that N-terminal or C-terminal fusion of GFP has different effects on both torque generation and the switching frequency of the direction of flagellar motor rotation. We could detect the GFP-fused FliG in the basal-body (rotor) fraction although its association with the basal body was less stable than that of intact FliG. Furthermore, the fusion of GFP to the C-terminus of FliG, which is believed to be directly involved in torque generation, resulted in very slow motility and prohibited the directional change of motor rotation. On the other hand, the fusion of GFP to the N-terminus of FliG conferred almost the same swimming speed as intact FliG. These results are consistent with the premise that the C-terminal domain of FliG is directly involved in torque generation and the GFP fusions are useful to analyze the functions of various domains of FliG. PMID:27857593

  3. Applying torque to the Escherichia coli flagellar motor using magnetic tweezers

    PubMed Central

    van Oene, Maarten M.; Dickinson, Laura E.; Cross, Bronwen; Pedaci, Francesco; Lipfert, Jan; Dekker, Nynke H.

    2017-01-01

    The bacterial flagellar motor of Escherichia coli is a nanoscale rotary engine essential for bacterial propulsion. Studies on the power output of single motors rely on the measurement of motor torque and rotation under external load. Here, we investigate the use of magnetic tweezers, which in principle allow the application and active control of a calibrated load torque, to study single flagellar motors in Escherichia coli. We manipulate the external load on the motor by adjusting the magnetic field experienced by a magnetic bead linked to the motor, and we probe the motor’s response. A simple model describes the average motor speed over the entire range of applied fields. We extract the motor torque at stall and find it to be similar to the motor torque at drag-limited speed. In addition, use of the magnetic tweezers allows us to force motor rotation in both forward and backward directions. We monitor the motor’s performance before and after periods of forced rotation and observe no destructive effects on the motor. Our experiments show how magnetic tweezers can provide active and fast control of the external load while also exposing remaining challenges in calibration. Through their non-invasive character and straightforward parallelization, magnetic tweezers provide an attractive platform to study nanoscale rotary motors at the single-motor level. PMID:28266562

  4. Bio-Hybrid Micro/Nanodevices Powered by Flagellar Motor: Challenges and Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jin-Woo; Tung, Steve

    2015-01-01

    Molecular motors, which are precision engineered by nature, offer exciting possibilities for bio-hybrid engineered systems. They could enable real applications ranging from micro/nano fluidics, to biosensing, to medical diagnoses. This review describes the fundamental biological insights and fascinating potentials of these remarkable sensing and actuation machines, in particular, bacterial flagellar motors, as well as their engineering perspectives with regard to applications in bio-engineered hybrid systems. PMID:26284237

  5. A novel type bacterial flagellar motor that can use divalent cations as a coupling ion

    PubMed Central

    Imazawa, Riku; Takahashi, Yuka; Aoki, Wataru; Sano, Motohiko; Ito, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    The bacterial flagellar motor is a sophisticated nanomachine embedded in the cell envelope and powered by an electrochemical gradient of H+, Na+, or K+across the cytoplasmic membrane. Here we describe a new member of the bacterial flagellar stator channel family (MotAB1 of Paenibacillus sp. TCA20 (TCA-MotAB1)) that is coupled to divalent cations (Ca2+and Mg2+). In the absence of divalent cations of alkaline earth metals, no swimming was observed in Paenibacillus sp. TCA20, which grows optimally in Ca2+-rich environments. This pattern was confirmed by swimming assays of a stator-free Bacillus subtilis mutant expressing TCA-MotAB1. Both a stator-free and major Mg2+uptake system-deleted B. subtilis mutant expressing TCA-MotAB1 complemented both growth and motility deficiency under low Mg2+conditions and exhibited [Mg2+]in identical to that of the wild-type. This is the first report of a flagellar motor that can use Ca2+and Mg2+as coupling ions. These findings will promote the understanding of the operating principles of flagellar motors and molecular mechanisms of ion selectivity. PMID:26794857

  6. Monitoring bacterial chemotaxis by using bioluminescence resonance energy transfer: Absence of feedback from the flagellar motors

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, Thomas S.; Delalez, Nicolas; Pichler, Klemens; Berg, Howard C.

    2006-01-01

    We looked for a feedback system in Escherichia coli that might sense the rotational bias of flagellar motors and regulate the activity of the chemotaxis receptor kinase. Our search was based on the assumption that any machinery that senses rotational bias will be perturbed if flagellar rotation stops. We monitored the activity of the kinase in swimming cells by bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) between Renilla luciferase fused to the phosphatase, CheZ, and yellow fluorescent protein fused to the response regulator, CheY. Then we jammed the flagellar motors by adding an antifilament antibody that crosslinks adjacent filaments in flagellar bundles. At steady state, the rate of phosphorylation of CheY is equal to the rate of dephosphorylation of CheY-P, which is proportional to the degree of association between CheZ and CheY-P, the quantity sensed by BRET. No changes were observed, even upon addition of an amount of antibody that stopped the swimming of >95% of cells within a few seconds. So, the kinase does not appear to be sensitive to motor output. The BRET technique is complementary to one based on FRET, described previously. Its reliability was confirmed by measurements of the response of cells to the addition of attractants. PMID:16452163

  7. How Biophysics May Help Us Understand the Flagellar Motor of Bacteria Which Cause Infections.

    PubMed

    Baker, Matthew A B

    2016-01-01

    Motor proteins are molecules which convert chemical energy to mechanical work and are responsible for motility across all levels: for transport within a cell, for the motion of an individual cell in its surroundings, and for movement in multicellular aggregates, such as muscles. The bacterial flagellar motor is one of the canonical examples of a molecular complex made from several motor proteins, which self-assembles on demand and provides the locomotive force for bacteria. This locomotion provides a key aspect of bacteria's prevalence. Here, we outline the biophysics behind the assembly, the energetics, the switching and the rotation of this remarkable nanoscale electric motor that is Nature's first wheel.

  8. From conformational spread to allosteric and cooperative models of E. coli flagellar motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pezzotta, A.; Adorisio, M.; Celani, A.

    2017-02-01

    Escherichia coli swims using flagella activated by rotary motors. The direction of rotation of the motors is indirectly regulated by the binding of a single messenger protein. The conformational spread model has been shown to accurately describe the equilibrium properties as well as the dynamics of the flagellar motor. In this paper we study this model from an analytic point of view. By exploiting the separation of timescales observed in experiments, we show how to reduce the conformational spread model to a coarse-grained, cooperative binding model. We show that this simplified model reproduces very well the dynamics of the motor switch.

  9. Structure and function of the bi-directional bacterial flagellar motor.

    PubMed

    Morimoto, Yusuke V; Minamino, Tohru

    2014-02-18

    The bacterial flagellum is a locomotive organelle that propels the bacterial cell body in liquid environments. The flagellum is a supramolecular complex composed of about 30 different proteins and consists of at least three parts: a rotary motor, a universal joint, and a helical filament. The flagellar motor of Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica is powered by an inward-directed electrochemical potential difference of protons across the cytoplasmic membrane. The flagellar motor consists of a rotor made of FliF, FliG, FliM and FliN and a dozen stators consisting of MotA and MotB. FliG, FliM and FliN also act as a molecular switch, enabling the motor to spin in both counterclockwise and clockwise directions. Each stator is anchored to the peptidoglycan layer through the C-terminal periplasmic domain of MotB and acts as a proton channel to couple the proton flow through the channel with torque generation. Highly conserved charged residues at the rotor-stator interface are required not only for torque generation but also for stator assembly around the rotor. In this review, we will summarize our current understanding of the structure and function of the proton-driven bacterial flagellar motor.

  10. Structure and Function of the Bi-Directional Bacterial Flagellar Motor

    PubMed Central

    Morimoto, Yusuke V.; Minamino, Tohru

    2014-01-01

    The bacterial flagellum is a locomotive organelle that propels the bacterial cell body in liquid environments. The flagellum is a supramolecular complex composed of about 30 different proteins and consists of at least three parts: a rotary motor, a universal joint, and a helical filament. The flagellar motor of Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica is powered by an inward-directed electrochemical potential difference of protons across the cytoplasmic membrane. The flagellar motor consists of a rotor made of FliF, FliG, FliM and FliN and a dozen stators consisting of MotA and MotB. FliG, FliM and FliN also act as a molecular switch, enabling the motor to spin in both counterclockwise and clockwise directions. Each stator is anchored to the peptidoglycan layer through the C-terminal periplasmic domain of MotB and acts as a proton channel to couple the proton flow through the channel with torque generation. Highly conserved charged residues at the rotor–stator interface are required not only for torque generation but also for stator assembly around the rotor. In this review, we will summarize our current understanding of the structure and function of the proton-driven bacterial flagellar motor. PMID:24970213

  11. Diverse high-torque bacterial flagellar motors assemble wider stator rings using a conserved protein scaffold.

    PubMed

    Beeby, Morgan; Ribardo, Deborah A; Brennan, Caitlin A; Ruby, Edward G; Jensen, Grant J; Hendrixson, David R

    2016-03-29

    Although it is known that diverse bacterial flagellar motors produce different torques, the mechanism underlying torque variation is unknown. To understand this difference better, we combined genetic analyses with electron cryo-tomography subtomogram averaging to determine in situ structures of flagellar motors that produce different torques, from Campylobacter and Vibrio species. For the first time, to our knowledge, our results unambiguously locate the torque-generating stator complexes and show that diverse high-torque motors use variants of an ancestrally related family of structures to scaffold incorporation of additional stator complexes at wider radii from the axial driveshaft than in the model enteric motor. We identify the protein components of these additional scaffold structures and elucidate their sequential assembly, demonstrating that they are required for stator-complex incorporation. These proteins are widespread, suggesting that different bacteria have tailored torques to specific environments by scaffolding alternative stator placement and number. Our results quantitatively account for different motor torques, complete the assignment of the locations of the major flagellar components, and provide crucial constraints for understanding mechanisms of torque generation and the evolution of multiprotein complexes.

  12. Signal processing and flagellar motor switching during phototaxis of Halobacterium salinarum.

    PubMed

    Nutsch, Torsten; Marwan, Wolfgang; Oesterhelt, Dieter; Gilles, Ernst Dieter

    2003-11-01

    Prokaryotic taxis, the active search of motile cells for the best environmental conditions, is one of the paradigms for signal transduction. The search algorithm implemented by the cellular biochemistry modulates the probability of switching the rotational direction of the flagellar motor, a nanomachine that propels prokaryotic cells. On the basis of the well-known biochemical mechanisms of chemotaxis in Escherichia coli, kinetic modeling of the events leading from chemoreceptor activation by ligand binding to the motility response has been performed with great success. In contrast to Escherichia coli, Halobacterium salinarum, in addition, responds to visible light, which is sensed through specific photoreceptors of different wavelength sensitivity (phototaxis). Light stimuli of defined intensity and time course can be controlled precisely, which facilitates input-output measurements used for system analysis of the molecular network connecting the sensory receptors to the flagellar motor switch. Here, we analyze the response of halobacterial cells to single and double-pulse light stimuli and present the first kinetic model for prokaryotic cells that couples the signal-transduction pathway with the flagellar motor switch. Modeling based on experimental data supports the current biochemical model of halobacterial phototaxis. Moreover, the simulations demonstrate that motor switching occurs through subsequent rate-limiting steps, which are both under sensory control, suggesting that two signals may be involved in halobacterial phototaxis.

  13. Modeling Torque Versus Speed, Shot Noise, and Rotational Diffusion of the Bacterial Flagellar Motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mora, Thierry; Yu, Howard; Wingreen, Ned S.

    2009-12-01

    We present a minimal physical model for the flagellar motor that enables bacteria to swim. Our model explains the experimentally measured torque-speed relationship of the proton-driven E. coli motor at various pH and temperature conditions. In particular, the dramatic drop of torque at high rotation speeds (the “knee”) is shown to arise from saturation of the proton flux. Moreover, we show that shot noise in the proton current dominates the diffusion of motor rotation at low loads. This suggests a new way to probe the discreteness of the energy source, analogous to measurements of charge quantization in superconducting tunnel junctions.

  14. Modeling torque versus speed, shot noise, and rotational diffusion of the bacterial flagellar motor.

    PubMed

    Mora, Thierry; Yu, Howard; Wingreen, Ned S

    2009-12-11

    We present a minimal physical model for the flagellar motor that enables bacteria to swim. Our model explains the experimentally measured torque-speed relationship of the proton-driven E. coli motor at various pH and temperature conditions. In particular, the dramatic drop of torque at high rotation speeds (the "knee") is shown to arise from saturation of the proton flux. Moreover, we show that shot noise in the proton current dominates the diffusion of motor rotation at low loads. This suggests a new way to probe the discreteness of the energy source, analogous to measurements of charge quantization in superconducting tunnel junctions.

  15. Structure of the torque ring of the flagellar motor and the molecular basis for rotational switching

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Lawrence K.; Ginsburg, Michael A.; Crovace, Claudia; Donohoe, Mhairi; Stock, Daniela

    2010-09-13

    The flagellar motor drives the rotation of flagellar filaments at hundreds of revolutions per second, efficiently propelling bacteria through viscous media. The motor uses the potential energy from an electrochemical gradient of cations across the cytoplasmic membrane to generate torque. A rapid switch from anticlockwise to clockwise rotation determines whether a bacterium runs smoothly forward or tumbles to change its trajectory. A protein called FliG forms a ring in the rotor of the flagellar motor that is involved in the generation of torque through an interaction with the cation-channel-forming stator subunit MotA. FliG has been suggested to adopt distinct conformations that induce switching but these structural changes and the molecular mechanism of switching are unknown. Here we report the molecular structure of the full-length FliG protein, identify conformational changes that are involved in rotational switching and uncover the structural basis for the formation of the FliG torque ring. This allows us to propose a model of the complete ring and switching mechanism in which conformational changes in FliG reverse the electrostatic charges involved in torque generation.

  16. Torque generated by the flagellar motor of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Berg, H C; Turner, L

    1993-01-01

    Cells of the bacterium Escherichia coli were tethered and spun in a high-frequency rotating electric field at a series of discrete field strengths. This was done first at low field strengths, then at field strengths generating speeds high enough to disrupt motor function, and finally at low field strengths. Comparison of the initial and final speed versus applied-torque plots yielded relative motor torque. For backward rotation, motor torque rose steeply at speeds close to zero, peaking, on average, at about 2.2 times the stall torque. For forward rotation, motor torque remained approximately constant up to speeds of about 60% of the zero-torque speed. Then the torque dropped linearly with speed, crossed zero, and reached a minimum, on average, at about -1.7 times the stall torque. The zero-torque speed increased with temperature (about 90 Hz at 11 degrees C, 140 Hz at 16 degrees C, and 290 Hz at 23 degrees C), while other parameters remained approximately constant. Sometimes the motor slipped at either extreme (delivered constant torque over a range of speeds), but eventually it broke. Similar results were obtained whether motors broke catastrophically (suddenly and completely) or progressively or were de-energized by brief treatment with an uncoupler. These results are consistent with a tightly coupled ratchet mechanism, provided that elastic deformation of force-generating elements is limited by a stop and that mechanical components yield at high applied torques. PMID:8298044

  17. Constant torque in flagellar bacterial motors optimizes space exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Condat, Carlos A.; di Salvo, Mario E.

    2012-02-01

    Experiments indicate that the torque provided by the bacterial rotary motor is approximately constant over a large range of angular speeds. Constant torque implies that the power spent in active motion is proportional to the instantaneous bacterial speed, if the relation between angular speed and swimming speed is linear. Here we show that a constant torque maximizes the volume of the region explored by a bacterium in a resource-depleted medium. Given that nutrients in the ocean are often concentrated in separate, ephemeral patches, we propose that the observed constancy of the torque may be a trait evolved to maximize bacterial survival in the ocean. We also discuss the dependence of the explored volume with the particular features of the bacterial propulsion mechanism.

  18. The effect of flagellar motor-rotor complexes on twitching motility in P. aeruginosa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Kun; Utada, Andrew; Gibiansky, Maxsim; Xian, Wujing; Wong, Gerard

    2013-03-01

    P. aeruginosa is an opportunistic bacterium responsible for a broad range of biofilm infections. In order for biofilms to form, P. aeruginosa uses different types of surface motility. In the current understanding, flagella are used for swarming motility and type IV pili are used for twitching motility. The flagellum also plays important roles in initial surface attachment and in shaping the architectures of mature biofilms. Here we examine how flagella and pili interact during surface motility, by using cell tracking techniques. We show that the pili driven twitching motility of P. aeruginosa can be affected by the motor-rotor complexes of the flagellar system.

  19. Ion selectivity of the Vibrio alginolyticus flagellar motor.

    PubMed

    Liu, J Z; Dapice, M; Khan, S

    1990-09-01

    The marine bacterium, Vibrio alginolyticus, normally requires sodium for motility. We found that lithium will substitute for sodium. In neutral pH buffers, the membrane potential and swimming speed of glycolyzing bacteria reached maximal values as sodium or lithium concentration was increased. While the maximal potentials obtained in the two cations were comparable, the maximal swimming speed was substantially lower in lithium. Over a wide range of sodium concentration, the bacteria maintained an invariant sodium electrochemical potential as determined by membrane potential and intracellular sodium measurements. Over this range the increase of swimming speed took Michaelis-Menten form. Artificial energization of swimming motility required imposition of a voltage difference in concert with a sodium pulse. The cation selectivity and concentration dependence exhibited by the motile apparatus depended on the viscosity of the medium. In high-viscosity media, swimming speeds were relatively independent of either ion type or concentration. These facts parallel and extend observations of the swimming behavior of bacteria propelled by proton-powered flagella. In particular, they show that ion transfers limit unloaded motor speed in this bacterium and imply that the coupling between ion transfers and force generation must be fairly tight.

  20. Coupling between Switching Regulation and Torque Generation in Bacterial Flagellar Motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Fan; Minamino, Tohru; Wu, Zhanghan; Namba, Keiichi; Xing, Jianhua

    2012-04-01

    The bacterial flagellar motor plays a crucial role in both bacterial locomotion and chemotaxis. Recent experiments reveal that the switching dynamics of the motor depend on the rotation speed of the motor, and thus the motor torque, nonmonotonically. Here we present a unified mathematical model which treats motor torque generation based on experimental torque-speed curves and the torque-dependent switching based on the conformational spread model. The model successfully reproduces the observed switching rate as a function of the rotation speed, and provides a generic physical explanation independent of most details. A stator affects the switching dynamics through two mechanisms: accelerating the conformational flipping rate of individual rotor-switching units, which contributes most when the stator works at a high torque and thus a low speed; and influencing a larger number of rotor-switching units within unit time, whose contribution is the greatest when the motor rotates at a high speed. Consequently, the switching rate shows a maximum at intermediate speed, where the above two mechanisms find an optimal output. The load-switching relation may serve as a mechanism for sensing the physical environment, similar to the chemotaxis mechanism for sensing the chemical environment. It may also coordinate the switch dynamics of motors within the same cell.

  1. Resonance in the response of the bacterial flagellar motor to thermal oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demir, Mahmut; Salman, Hanna

    2017-02-01

    We have studied the dynamics of the Escherichia coli flagellar motor's angular velocity in response to thermal oscillations. We find that the oscillations' amplitude of the motor's angular velocity exhibits resonance when the temperature is oscillated at frequencies around 4 Hz. This resonance appears to be due to the existence of a natural mode of oscillation in the state of the motor, specifically in the torque generated by the motor. Natural modes of oscillation in torque generation cannot result from random fluctuations in the state of the motor. Their presence points to the existence of a coupling mechanism between the magnitude of the torque generated by the motor and the rates of transition between the different states of the motor components responsible for torque generation. The results presented here show resonance response in torque generation to external perturbations. They are explained with a simple phenomenological model, which can help future studies identify the source of the feedback mechanism between the torque and the interactions responsible for its generation. It can also help us to quantitatively estimate the strength of these interactions and how they are affected by the magnitude of the torque they generate.

  2. Coupling between Switching Regulation and Torque Generation in Bacterial Flagellar Motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Jianhua; Bai, Fan; Minamino, Tohru; Wu, Zhanghan; Namba, Keiichi

    2013-03-01

    The bacterial flagellar motor plays a crucial role in both bacterial locomotion and chemotaxis. Recent experiments reveal that the switching dynamics of the motor depend on the rotation speed of the motor, and thus the motor torque, nonmonotonically. Here we present a unified mathematical model that treats motor torque generation based on experimental torque-speed curves and the torque-dependent switching based on the Ising type conformational spread model. The model successfully reproduces the observed switching rate as a function of the rotation speed, and provides a generic physical explanation independent of most details. A stator affects the switching dynamics through two mechanisms: accelerating the conformational flipping rate of individual rotor-switching units, which contributes most when the stator works at a high torque and thus a low speed; and influencing a larger number of rotor-switching units within unit time, whose contribution is the greatest when the motor rotates at a high speed. Consequently, the switching rate shows a maximum at intermediate speed, where the above two mechanisms find an optimal output. The load-switching relation may serve as a mechanism for sensing the physical environment, similar to the chemotaxis mechanism for sensing the chemical environment.

  3. The flagellar motor of Caulobacter crescentus generates more torque when a cell swims backward

    PubMed Central

    Lele, Pushkar P.; Roland, Thibault; Shrivastava, Abhishek; Chen, Yihao; Berg, Howard C.

    2016-01-01

    Caulobacter crescentus, a monotrichous bacterium, swims by rotating a single right-handed helical filament. CW motor rotation thrusts the cell forward 1, a mode of motility known as the pusher mode; CCW motor rotation pulls the cell backward, a mode of motility referred to as the puller mode 2. The situation is opposite in E. coli, a peritrichous bacterium, where CCW rotation of multiple left-handed filaments drives the cell forward. The flagellar motor in E. coli generates more torque in the CCW direction than the CW direction in swimming cells 3,4. However, monotrichous bacteria including C. crescentus swim forward and backward at similar speeds, prompting the assumption that motor torques in the two modes are the same 5,6. Here, we present evidence that motors in C. crescentus develop higher torques in the puller mode than in the pusher mode, and suggest that the anisotropy in torque-generation is similar in two species, despite the differences in filament handedness and motor bias (probability of CW rotation). PMID:27499800

  4. Asymmetry in the clockwise and counterclockwise rotation of the bacterial flagellar motor.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Junhua; Fahrner, Karen A; Turner, Linda; Berg, Howard C

    2010-07-20

    Cells of Escherichia coli are able to swim up gradients of chemical attractants by modulating the direction of rotation of their flagellar motors, which spin alternately clockwise (CW) and counterclockwise (CCW). Rotation in either direction has been thought to be symmetric and exhibit the same torques and speeds. The relationship between torque and speed is one of the most important measurable characteristics of the motor, used to distinguish specific mechanisms of motor rotation. Previous measurements of the torque-speed relationship have been made with cells lacking the response regulator CheY that spin their motors exclusively CCW. In this case, the torque declines slightly up to an intermediate speed called the "knee speed" after which it falls rapidly to zero. This result is consistent with a "power-stroke" mechanism for torque generation. Here, we measure the torque-speed relationship for cells that express large amounts of CheY and only spin their motors CW. We find that the torque decreases linearly with speed, a result remarkably different from that for CCW rotation. We obtain similar results for wild-type cells by reexamining data collected in previous work. We speculate that CCW rotation might be optimized for runs, with higher speeds increasing the ability of cells to sense spatial gradients, whereas CW rotation might be optimized for tumbles, where the object is to change cell trajectories. But why a linear torque-speed relationship might be optimum for the latter purpose we do not know.

  5. The flagellar motor of Caulobacter crescentus generates more torque when a cell swims backwards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lele, Pushkar P.; Roland, Thibault; Shrivastava, Abhishek; Chen, Yihao; Berg, Howard C.

    2016-02-01

    The bacterium Caulobacter crescentus swims by rotating a single right-handed helical filament. These cells have two swimming modes: a pusher mode, in which clockwise (CW) rotation of the filament thrusts the cell body forwards, and a puller mode, in which counterclockwise (CCW) rotation pulls it backwards. The situation is reversed in Escherichia coli, a bacterium that rotates several left-handed filaments CCW to drive the cell body forwards. The flagellar motor in E. coli generates more torque in the CCW direction than the CW direction in swimming cells. However, C. crescentus and other bacteria with single filaments swim forwards and backwards at similar speeds, prompting the assumption that motor torques in the two modes are the same. Here, we present evidence that motors in C. crescentus develop higher torques in the puller mode than in the pusher mode, and suggest that the anisotropy in torque generation is similar in the two species, despite the differences in filament handedness and motor bias.

  6. Physiological characterization of motor unit properties in intact cats.

    PubMed

    O'Donovan, M J; Hoffer, J A; Loeb, G E

    1983-02-01

    Single motor units were isolated in intact cats, by microstimulation through chronically implanted microwires in the L5 ventral roots. Motor unit axonal and mechanical properties were obtained by stimulus-triggered averaging the signals from an implanted femoral nerve recording cuff and patellar tendon force transducer. All unit types were sampled with this technique, and it was also possible to stimulate in isolation an axon whose ventral root spike was recorded during treadmill locomotion. A new technique was described, spike-triggered microstimulation, for verifying the identity of a stimulated and a recorded axon.

  7. New mutations in flagellar motors identified by whole genome sequencing in Chlamydomonas

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The building of a cilium or flagellum requires molecular motors and associated proteins that allow the relocation of proteins from the cell body to the distal end and the return of proteins to the cell body in a process termed intraflagellar transport (IFT). IFT trains are carried out by kinesin and back to the cell body by dynein. Methods We used whole genome sequencing to identify the causative mutations for two temperature-sensitive flagellar assembly mutants in Chlamydomonas and validated the changes using reversion analysis. We examined the effect of these mutations on the localization of IFT81, an IFT complex B protein, the cytoplasmic dynein heavy chain (DHC1b), and the dynein light intermediate chain (D1bLIC). Results The strains, fla18 and fla24, have mutations in kinesin-2 and cytoplasmic dynein, respectively. The fla18 mutation alters the same glutamic acid (E24G) mutated in the fla10-14 allele (E24K). The fla18 strain loses flagella at 32?C more rapidly than the E24K allele but less rapidly than the fla10-1 allele. The fla18 mutant loses its flagella by detachment rather than by shortening. The fla24 mutation falls in cytoplasmic dynein and changes a completely conserved amino acid (L3243P) in an alpha helix in the AAA5 domain. The fla24 mutant loses its flagella by shortening within 6 hours at 32?C. DHC1b protein is reduced by 18-fold and D1bLIC is reduced by 16-fold at 21?C compared to wild-type cells. We identified two pseudorevertants (L3243S and L3243R), which remain flagellated at 32?C. Although fla24 cells assemble full-length flagella at 21?C, IFT81 protein localization is dramatically altered. Instead of localizing at the basal body and along the flagella, IFT81 is concentrated at the proximal end of the flagella. The pseudorevertants show wild-type IFT81 localization at 21?C, but proximal end localization of IFT81 at 32?C. Conclusions The change in the AAA5 domain of the cytoplasmic dynein in fla24 may block the recycling of IFT

  8. Proteomic Analysis of Intact Flagella of Procyclic Trypanosoma brucei Cells Identifies Novel Flagellar Proteins with Unique Sub-localization and Dynamics*

    PubMed Central

    Subota, Ines; Julkowska, Daria; Vincensini, Laetitia; Reeg, Nele; Buisson, Johanna; Blisnick, Thierry; Huet, Diego; Perrot, Sylvie; Santi-Rocca, Julien; Duchateau, Magalie; Hourdel, Véronique; Rousselle, Jean-Claude; Cayet, Nadège; Namane, Abdelkader; Chamot-Rooke, Julia; Bastin, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Cilia and flagella are complex organelles made of hundreds of proteins of highly variable structures and functions. Here we report the purification of intact flagella from the procyclic stage of Trypanosoma brucei using mechanical shearing. Structural preservation was confirmed by transmission electron microscopy that showed that flagella still contained typical elements such as the membrane, the axoneme, the paraflagellar rod, and the intraflagellar transport particles. It also revealed that flagella severed below the basal body, and were not contaminated by other cytoskeletal structures such as the flagellar pocket collar or the adhesion zone filament. Mass spectrometry analysis identified a total of 751 proteins with high confidence, including 88% of known flagellar components. Comparison with the cell debris fraction revealed that more than half of the flagellum markers were enriched in flagella and this enrichment criterion was taken into account to identify 212 proteins not previously reported to be associated to flagella. Nine of these were experimentally validated including a 14-3-3 protein not yet reported to be associated to flagella and eight novel proteins termed FLAM (FLAgellar Member). Remarkably, they localized to five different subdomains of the flagellum. For example, FLAM6 is restricted to the proximal half of the axoneme, no matter its length. In contrast, FLAM8 is progressively accumulating at the distal tip of growing flagella and half of it still needs to be added after cell division. A combination of RNA interference and Fluorescence Recovery After Photobleaching approaches demonstrated very different dynamics from one protein to the other, but also according to the stage of construction and the age of the flagellum. Structural proteins are added to the distal tip of the elongating flagellum and exhibit slow turnover whereas membrane proteins such as the arginine kinase show rapid turnover without a detectible polarity. PMID:24741115

  9. Proteomic analysis of intact flagella of procyclic Trypanosoma brucei cells identifies novel flagellar proteins with unique sub-localization and dynamics.

    PubMed

    Subota, Ines; Julkowska, Daria; Vincensini, Laetitia; Reeg, Nele; Buisson, Johanna; Blisnick, Thierry; Huet, Diego; Perrot, Sylvie; Santi-Rocca, Julien; Duchateau, Magalie; Hourdel, Véronique; Rousselle, Jean-Claude; Cayet, Nadège; Namane, Abdelkader; Chamot-Rooke, Julia; Bastin, Philippe

    2014-07-01

    Cilia and flagella are complex organelles made of hundreds of proteins of highly variable structures and functions. Here we report the purification of intact flagella from the procyclic stage of Trypanosoma brucei using mechanical shearing. Structural preservation was confirmed by transmission electron microscopy that showed that flagella still contained typical elements such as the membrane, the axoneme, the paraflagellar rod, and the intraflagellar transport particles. It also revealed that flagella severed below the basal body, and were not contaminated by other cytoskeletal structures such as the flagellar pocket collar or the adhesion zone filament. Mass spectrometry analysis identified a total of 751 proteins with high confidence, including 88% of known flagellar components. Comparison with the cell debris fraction revealed that more than half of the flagellum markers were enriched in flagella and this enrichment criterion was taken into account to identify 212 proteins not previously reported to be associated to flagella. Nine of these were experimentally validated including a 14-3-3 protein not yet reported to be associated to flagella and eight novel proteins termed FLAM (FLAgellar Member). Remarkably, they localized to five different subdomains of the flagellum. For example, FLAM6 is restricted to the proximal half of the axoneme, no matter its length. In contrast, FLAM8 is progressively accumulating at the distal tip of growing flagella and half of it still needs to be added after cell division. A combination of RNA interference and Fluorescence Recovery After Photobleaching approaches demonstrated very different dynamics from one protein to the other, but also according to the stage of construction and the age of the flagellum. Structural proteins are added to the distal tip of the elongating flagellum and exhibit slow turnover whereas membrane proteins such as the arginine kinase show rapid turnover without a detectible polarity.

  10. Cell cycle-controlled proteolysis of a flagellar motor protein that is asymmetrically distributed in the Caulobacter predivisional cell.

    PubMed Central

    Jenal, U; Shapiro, L

    1996-01-01

    Flagellar biogenesis and release are developmental events tightly coupled to the cell cycle of Caulobacter crescentus. A single flagellum is assembled at the swarmer pole of the predivisional cell and is released later in the cell cycle. Here we show that the MS-ring monomer FliF, a central motor component that anchors the flagellum in the cell membrane, is synthesized only in the predivisional cell and is integrated into the membrane at the incipient swarmer cell pole, where it initiates flagellar assembly. FliF is proteolytically turned over during swarmer-to-stalked cell differentiation, coinciding with the loss of the flagellum, suggesting that its degradation is coupled to flagellar release. The membrane topology of FliF was determined and a region of the cytoplasmic C-terminal domain was shown to be required for the interaction with a component of the motor switch. The very C-terminal end of FliF contains a turnover determinant, required for the cell cycle-dependent degradation of the MS-ring. The cell cycle-dependent proteolysis of FliF and the targeting of FliF to the swarmer pole together contribute to the asymmetric localization of the MS-ring in the predivisional cell. Images PMID:8665847

  11. Nonequivalence of membrane voltage and ion-gradient as driving forces for the bacterial flagellar motor at low load.

    PubMed

    Lo, Chien-Jung; Leake, Mark C; Pilizota, Teuta; Berry, Richard M

    2007-07-01

    Many bacterial species swim using flagella. The flagellar motor couples ion flow across the cytoplasmic membrane to rotation. Ion flow is driven by both a membrane potential (V(m)) and a transmembrane concentration gradient. To investigate their relation to bacterial flagellar motor function we developed a fluorescence technique to measure V(m) in single cells, using the dye tetramethyl rhodamine methyl ester. We used a convolution model to determine the relationship between fluorescence intensity in images of cells and intracellular dye concentration, and calculated V(m) using the ratio of intracellular/extracellular dye concentration. We found V(m) = -140 +/- 14 mV in Escherichia coli at external pH 7.0 (pH(ex)), decreasing to -85 +/- 10 mV at pH(ex) 5.0. We also estimated the sodium-motive force (SMF) by combining single-cell measurements of V(m) and intracellular sodium concentration. We were able to vary the SMF between -187 +/- 15 mV and -53 +/- 15 mV by varying pH(ex) in the range 7.0-5.0 and extracellular sodium concentration in the range 1-85 mM. Rotation rates for 0.35-microm- and 1-microm-diameter beads attached to Na(+)-driven chimeric flagellar motors varied linearly with V(m). For the larger beads, the two components of the SMF were equivalent, whereas for smaller beads at a given SMF, the speed increased with sodium gradient and external sodium concentration.

  12. Dynamics of the bacterial flagellar motor: the effects of stator compliance, back steps, temperature, and rotational asymmetry.

    PubMed

    Meacci, Giovanni; Lan, Ganhui; Tu, Yuhai

    2011-04-20

    The rotation of a bacterial flagellar motor (BFM) is driven by multiple stators tethered to the cell wall. Here, we extend a recently proposed power-stroke model to study the BFM dynamics under different biophysical conditions. Our model explains several key experimental observations and reveals their underlying mechanisms. 1), The observed independence of the speed at low load on the number of stators is explained by a force-dependent stepping mechanism that is independent of the strength of the stator tethering spring. Conversely, without force-dependent stepping, an unrealistically weak stator spring is required. 2), Our model with back-stepping naturally explains the observed absence of a barrier to backward rotation. Using the same set of parameters, it also explains BFM behaviors in the high-speed negative-torque regime. 3), From the measured temperature dependence of the maximum speed, our model shows that stator-stepping is a thermally activated process with an energy barrier. 4), The recently observed asymmetry in the torque-speed curve between counterclockwise- and clockwise-rotating BFMs can be quantitatively explained by the asymmetry in the stator-rotor interaction potentials, i.e., a quasilinear form for the counterclockwise motor and a quadratic form for the clockwise motor.

  13. Helicobacter pylori CheZ(HP) and ChePep form a novel chemotaxis-regulatory complex distinct from the core chemotaxis signaling proteins and the flagellar motor.

    PubMed

    Lertsethtakarn, Paphavee; Howitt, Michael R; Castellon, Juan; Amieva, Manuel R; Ottemann, Karen M

    2015-09-01

    Chemotaxis is important for Helicobacter pylori to colonize the stomach. Like other bacteria, H. pylori uses chemoreceptors and conserved chemotaxis proteins to phosphorylate the flagellar rotational response regulator, CheY, and modulate the flagellar rotational direction. Phosphorylated CheY is returned to its non-phosphorylated state by phosphatases such as CheZ. In previously studied cases, chemotaxis phosphatases localize to the cellular poles by interactions with either the CheA chemotaxis kinase or flagellar motor proteins. We report here that the H. pylori CheZ, CheZ(HP), localizes to the poles independently of the flagellar motor, CheA, and all typical chemotaxis proteins. Instead, CheZ(HP) localization depends on the chemotaxis regulatory protein ChePep, and reciprocally, ChePep requires CheZ(HP) for its polar localization. We furthermore show that these proteins interact directly. Functional domain mapping of CheZ(HP) determined the polar localization motif lies within the central domain of the protein and that the protein has regions outside of the active site that participate in chemotaxis. Our results suggest that CheZ(HP) and ChePep form a distinct complex. These results therefore suggest the intriguing idea that some phosphatases localize independently of the other chemotaxis and motility proteins, possibly to confer unique regulation on these proteins' activities.

  14. Motor Rotation Is Essential for the Formation of the Periplasmic Flagellar Ribbon, Cellular Morphology, and Borrelia burgdorferi Persistence within Ixodes scapularis Tick and Murine Hosts

    PubMed Central

    Sultan, Syed Z.; Sekar, Padmapriya; Zhao, Xiaowei; Manne, Akarsh; Liu, Jun; Wooten, R. Mark

    2015-01-01

    Borrelia burgdorferi must migrate within and between its arthropod and mammalian hosts in order to complete its natural enzootic cycle. During tick feeding, the spirochete transmits from the tick to the host dermis, eventually colonizing and persisting within multiple, distant tissues. This dissemination modality suggests that flagellar motor rotation and, by extension, motility are crucial for infection. We recently reported that a nonmotile flaB mutant that lacks periplasmic flagella is rod shaped and unable to infect mice by needle or tick bite. However, those studies could not differentiate whether motor rotation or merely the possession of the periplasmic flagella was crucial for cellular morphology and host persistence. Here, we constructed and characterized a motB mutant that is nonmotile but retains its periplasmic flagella. Even though ΔmotB bacteria assembled flagella, part of the mutant cell is rod shaped. Cryoelectron tomography revealed that the flagellar ribbons are distorted in the mutant cells, indicating that motor rotation is essential for spirochetal flat-wave morphology. The ΔmotB cells are unable to infect mice, survive in the vector, or migrate out of the tick. Coinfection studies determined that the presence of these nonmotile ΔmotB cells has no effect on the clearance of wild-type spirochetes during murine infection and vice versa. Together, our data demonstrate that while flagellar motor rotation is necessary for spirochetal morphology and motility, the periplasmic flagella display no additional properties related to immune clearance and persistence within relevant hosts. PMID:25690096

  15. Serine 26 in the PomB Subunit of the Flagellar Motor Is Essential for Hypermotility of Vibrio cholerae

    PubMed Central

    Halang, Petra; Vorburger, Thomas; Steuber, Julia

    2015-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae is motile by means of its single polar flagellum which is driven by the sodium-motive force. In the motor driving rotation of the flagellar filament, a stator complex consisting of subunits PomA and PomB converts the electrochemical sodium ion gradient into torque. Charged or polar residues within the membrane part of PomB could act as ligands for Na+, or stabilize a hydrogen bond network by interacting with water within the putative channel between PomA and PomB. By analyzing a large data set of individual tracks of swimming cells, we show that S26 located within the transmembrane helix of PomB is required to promote very fast swimming of V. cholerae. Loss of hypermotility was observed with the S26T variant of PomB at pH 7.0, but fast swimming was restored by decreasing the H+ concentration of the external medium. Our study identifies S26 as a second important residue besides D23 in the PomB channel. It is proposed that S26, together with D23 located in close proximity, is important to perturb the hydration shell of Na+ before its passage through a constriction within the stator channel. PMID:25874792

  16. The tetrameric MotA complex as the core of the flagellar motor stator from hyperthermophilic bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Takekawa, Norihiro; Terahara, Naoya; Kato, Takayuki; Gohara, Mizuki; Mayanagi, Kouta; Hijikata, Atsushi; Onoue, Yasuhiro; Kojima, Seiji; Shirai, Tsuyoshi; Namba, Keiichi; Homma, Michio

    2016-01-01

    Rotation of bacterial flagellar motor is driven by the interaction between the stator and rotor, and the driving energy is supplied by ion influx through the stator channel. The stator is composed of the MotA and MotB proteins, which form a hetero-hexameric complex with a stoichiometry of four MotA and two MotB molecules. MotA and MotB are four- and single-transmembrane proteins, respectively. To generate torque, the MotA/MotB stator unit changes its conformation in response to the ion influx, and interacts with the rotor protein FliG. Here, we overproduced and purified MotA of the hyperthermophilic bacterium Aquifex aeolicus. A chemical crosslinking experiment revealed that MotA formed a multimeric complex, most likely a tetramer. The three-dimensional structure of the purified MotA, reconstructed by electron microscopy single particle imaging, consisted of a slightly elongated globular domain and a pair of arch-like domains with spiky projections, likely to correspond to the transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains, respectively. We show that MotA molecules can form a stable tetrameric complex without MotB, and for the first time, demonstrate the cytoplasmic structure of the stator. PMID:27531865

  17. Flagellar Motor Switching in Caulobacter Crescentus Obeys First Passage Time Statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morse, Michael; Bell, Jordan; Li, Guanglai; Tang, Jay X.

    2015-11-01

    A Caulobacter crescentus swarmer cell is propelled by a helical flagellum, which is rotated by a motor at its base. The motor alternates between rotating in clockwise and counterclockwise directions and spends variable intervals of time in each state. We measure the distributions of these intervals for cells either free swimming or tethered to a glass slide. A peak time of around one second is observed in the distributions for both motor directions with counterclockwise intervals more sharply peaked and clockwise intervals displaying a larger tail at long times. We show that distributions of rotation intervals fit first passage time statistics for a biased random walker and the dynamic binding of CheY-P to FliM motor subunits accounts for this behavior. Our results also suggest that the presence of multiple CheY proteins in C. crescentus may be responsible for differences between its switching behavior and that of the extensively studied E. coli.

  18. Observed frequency-independent torque in flagellar bacterial motors optimizes space exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Salvo, Mario E.; Condat, C. A.

    2012-12-01

    A surprising feature of many bacterial motors is the apparently conserved form of their torque-frequency relation. Experiments indicate that the torque provided by the bacterial rotary motor is approximately constant over a large range of angular speeds. This is observed in both monotrichous and peritrichous bacteria, independently of whether they are propelled by a proton flux or by a Na+ ion flux. If the relation between angular speed ω and swimming speed is linear, a ω-independent torque implies that the power spent in active motion is proportional to the instantaneous bacterial speed. Using realistic values of the relevant parameters, we show that a constant torque maximizes the volume of the region explored by a bacterium in a resource-depleted medium. Given that nutrients in the ocean are often concentrated in separate, ephemeral patches, we propose that the observed constancy of the torque may be a trait evolved to maximize bacterial survival in the ocean.

  19. Dynamism and regulation of the stator, the energy conversion complex of the bacterial flagellar motor.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Seiji

    2015-12-01

    Many motile bacteria swim by rotating their motility organ, the flagellum. Rotation of the flagellum is driven by a motor at its base, and torque is generated by the rotor-stator interaction coupled with the specific ion flow through the channel in the stator. Because the stator works as an energy-conversion complex in the motor, understanding the functional mechanism of the stator is critically important. But its characterization has been hampered due to the difficulty in isolating the functional stator complex from the membrane. Recently, successful new approaches for studying the stator have been reported that reveal its novel properties. Two of those, visualization of the in vivo behavior of stator units using fluorescently tagged proteins and structure-guided functional analyses of the soluble region in the stator, are summarized in this short review.

  20. Insight into the assembly mechanism in the supramolecular rings of the sodium-driven Vibrio flagellar motor from the structure of FlgT

    PubMed Central

    Terashima, Hiroyuki; Li, Na; Sakuma, Mayuko; Koike, Masafumi; Kojima, Seiji; Homma, Michio; Imada, Katsumi

    2013-01-01

    Flagellar motility is a key factor for bacterial survival and growth in fluctuating environments. The polar flagellum of a marine bacterium, Vibrio alginolyticus, is driven by sodium ion influx and rotates approximately six times faster than the proton-driven motor of Escherichia coli. The basal body of the sodium motor has two unique ring structures, the T ring and the H ring. These structures are essential for proper assembly of the stator unit into the basal body and to stabilize the motor. FlgT, which is a flagellar protein specific for Vibrio sp., is required to form and stabilize both ring structures. Here, we report the crystal structure of FlgT at 2.0-Å resolution. FlgT is composed of three domains, the N-terminal domain (FlgT-N), the middle domain (FlgT-M), and the C-terminal domain (FlgT-C). FlgT-M is similar to the N-terminal domain of TolB, and FlgT-C resembles the N-terminal domain of FliI and the α/β subunits of F1-ATPase. To elucidate the role of each domain, we prepared domain deletion mutants of FlgT and analyzed their effects on the basal-body ring formation. The results suggest that FlgT-N contributes to the construction of the H-ring structure, and FlgT-M mediates the T-ring association on the LP ring. FlgT-C is not essential but stabilizes the H-ring structure. On the basis of these results, we propose an assembly mechanism for the basal-body rings and the stator units of the sodium-driven flagellar motor. PMID:23530206

  1. An electrostatic mechanism closely reproducing observed behavior in the bacterial flagellar motor.

    PubMed Central

    Walz, D; Caplan, S R

    2000-01-01

    A mechanism coupling the transmembrane flow of protons to the rotation of the bacterial flagellum is studied. The coupling is accomplished by means of an array of tilted rows of positive and negative charges around the circumference of the rotor, which interacts with a linear array of proton binding sites in channels. We present a rigorous treatment of the electrostatic interactions using minimal assumptions. Interactions with the transition states are included, as well as proton-proton interactions in and between channels. In assigning values to the parameters of the model, experimentally determined structural characteristics of the motor have been used. According to the model, switching and pausing occur as a consequence of modest conformational changes in the rotor. In contrast to similar approaches developed earlier, this model closely reproduces a large number of experimental findings from different laboratories, including the nonlinear behavior of the torque-frequency relation in Escherichia coli, the stoichiometry of the system in Streptococcus, and the pH-dependence of swimming speed in Bacillus subtilis. PMID:10653777

  2. Mutations alter the sodium versus proton use of a Bacillus clausii flagellar motor and confer dual ion use on Bacillus subtilis motors.

    PubMed

    Terahara, Naoya; Krulwich, Terry A; Ito, Masahiro

    2008-09-23

    Bacterial flagella contain membrane-embedded stators, Mot complexes, that harness the energy of either transmembrane proton or sodium ion gradients to power motility. Use of sodium ion gradients is associated with elevated pH and sodium concentrations. The Mot complexes studied to date contain channels that use either protons or sodium ions, with some bacteria having only one type and others having two distinct Mot types with different ion-coupling. Here, alkaliphilic Bacillus clausii KSM-K16 was shown to be motile in a pH range from 7 to 11 although its genome encodes only one Mot (BCl-MotAB). Assays of swimming as a function of pH, sodium concentration, and ion-selective motility inhibitors showed that BCl-MotAB couples motility to sodium at the high end of its pH range but uses protons at lower pH. This pattern was confirmed in swimming assays of a statorless Bacillus subtilis mutant expressing either BCl-MotAB or one of the two B. subtilis stators, sodium-coupled Bs-MotPS or proton-coupled Bs-MotAB. Pairs of mutations in BCl-MotB were identified that converted the naturally bifunctional BCl-MotAB to stators that preferentially use either protons or sodium ions across the full pH range. We then identified trios of mutations that added a capacity for dual-ion coupling on the distinct B. subtilis Bs-MotAB and Bs-MotPS motors. Determinants that alter the specificity of bifunctional and single-coupled flagellar stators add to insights from studies of other ion-translocating transporters that use both protons and sodium ions.

  3. Load- and polysaccharide-dependent activation of the Na+-type MotPS stator in the Bacillus subtilis flagellar motor

    PubMed Central

    Terahara, Naoya; Noguchi, Yukina; Nakamura, Shuichi; Kami-ike, Nobunori; Ito, Masahiro; Namba, Keiichi; Minamino, Tohru

    2017-01-01

    The flagellar motor of Bacillus subtilis possesses two distinct H+-type MotAB and Na+-type MotPS stators. In contrast to the MotAB motor, the MotPS motor functions efficiently at elevated viscosity in the presence of 200 mM NaCl. Here, we analyzed the torque-speed relationship of the Bacillus MotAB and MotPS motors over a wide range of external loads. The stall torque of the MotAB and MotPS motors at high load was about 2,200 pN nm and 220 pN nm, respectively. The number of active stators in the MotAB and MotPS motors was estimated to be about ten and one, respectively. However, the number of functional stators in the MotPS motor was increased up to ten with an increase in the concentration of a polysaccharide, Ficoll 400, as well as in the load. The maximum speeds of the MotAB and MotPS motors at low load were about 200 Hz and 50 Hz, respectively, indicating that the rate of the torque-generation cycle of the MotPS motor is 4-fold slower than that of the MotAB motor. Domain exchange experiments showed that the C-terminal periplasmic domain of MotS directly controls the assembly and disassembly dynamics of the MotPS stator in a load- and polysaccharide-dependent manner. PMID:28378843

  4. Normal motor adaptation in cervical dystonia: a fundamental cerebellar computation is intact.

    PubMed

    Sadnicka, Anna; Patani, Bansi; Saifee, Tabish A; Kassavetis, Panagiotis; Pareés, Isabel; Korlipara, Prasad; Bhatia, Kailash P; Rothwell, John C; Galea, Joseph M; Edwards, Mark J

    2014-10-01

    The potential role of the cerebellum in the pathophysiology of dystonia has become a focus of recent research. However, direct evidence for a cerebellar contribution in humans with dystonia is difficult to obtain. We examined motor adaptation, a test of cerebellar function, in 20 subjects with primary cervical dystonia and an equal number of aged matched controls. Adaptation to both visuomotor (distorting visual feedback by 30°) and forcefield (applying a velocity-dependent force) conditions were tested. Our hypothesis was that cerebellar abnormalities observed in dystonia research would translate into deficits of cerebellar adaptation. We also examined the relationship between adaptation and dystonic head tremor as many primary tremor models implicate the cerebellothalamocortical network which is specifically tested by this motor paradigm. Rates of adaptation (learning) in cervical dystonia were identical to healthy controls in both visuomotor and forcefield tasks. Furthermore, the ability to adapt was not clearly related to clinical features of dystonic head tremor. We have shown that a key motor control function of the cerebellum is intact in the most common form of primary dystonia. These results have important implications for current anatomical models of the pathophysiology of dystonia. It is important to attempt to progress from general statements that implicate the cerebellum to a more specific evidence-based model. The role of the cerebellum in this enigmatic disease perhaps remains to be proven.

  5. Biophysical characterization of the C-terminal region of FliG, an essential rotor component of the Na+-driven flagellar motor.

    PubMed

    Gohara, Mizuki; Kobayashi, Shiori; Abe-Yoshizumi, Rei; Nonoyama, Natsumi; Kojima, Seiji; Asami, Yasuo; Homma, Michio

    2014-02-01

    The bacterial flagellar motor generates a rotational force by the flow of ions through the membrane. The rotational force is generated by the interaction between the cytoplasmic regions of the rotor and the stator. FliG is directly involved in the torque generation of the rotor protein by its interaction. FliG is composed of three domains: the N-terminal, Middle and C-terminal domains, based on its structure. The C-terminal domain of FliG is assumed to be important for the interaction with the stator that generates torque. In this study, using CD spectra, gel filtration chromatography and DSC (differential scanning calorimetry), we characterized the physical properties of the C-terminal domain (G214-Stop) of wild-type (WT) FliG and its non-motile phenotype mutant derivatives (L259Q, L270R and L271P), which were derived from the sodium-driven motor of Vibrio. The CD spectra and gel filtration chromatography revealed a slight difference between the WT and the mutant FliG proteins, but the DSC results suggested a large difference in their stabilities. That structural difference was confirmed by differences in protease sensitivity. Based on these results, we conclude that mutations which confer the non-motile phenotype destabilize the C-terminal domain of FliG.

  6. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of MotY, a stator component of the Vibrio alginolyticus polar flagellar motor

    SciTech Connect

    Shinohara, Akari; Sakuma, Mayuko; Yakushi, Toshiharu; Kojima, Seiji; Namba, Keiichi; Homma, Michio; Imada, Katsumi

    2007-02-01

    Crystals of MotY, a stator protein of the V. alginolyticus polar flagellar motor, have been produced and characterized by X-ray diffraction. The polar flagellum of Vibrio alginolyticus is rotated by the sodium motor. The stator unit of the sodium motor consists of four different proteins: PomA, PomB, MotX and MotY. MotX and MotY, which are unique components of the sodium motor, form the T-ring structure attached to the LP ring in the periplasmic space. MotY has a putative peptidoglycan-binding motif in its C-terminal region and MotX is suggested to interact with PomB. Thus, MotX and MotY are thought to be required for incorporation and stabilization of the PomA/B complex. In this study, mature MotY composed of 272 amino-acid residues and its SeMet derivative were expressed with a C-terminal hexahistidine-tag sequence, purified and crystallized. Native crystals were grown in the hexagonal space group P6{sub 1}22/P6{sub 5}22, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 104.1, c = 132.6 Å. SeMet-derivative crystals belonged to the same space group with the same unit-cell parameters as the native crystals. Anomalous difference Patterson maps of the SeMet derivative showed significant peaks in their Harker sections, indicating that the derivatives are suitable for structure determination.

  7. Corticospinal activity evoked and modulated by non-invasive stimulation of the intact human motor cortex.

    PubMed

    Di Lazzaro, Vincenzo; Rothwell, John C

    2014-10-01

    A number of methods have been developed recently that stimulate the human brain non-invasively through the intact scalp. The most common are transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), transcranial electric stimulation (TES) and transcranial direct current stimulation (TDCS). They are widely used to probe function and connectivity of brain areas as well as therapeutically in a variety of conditions such as depression or stroke. They are much less focal than conventional invasive methods which use small electrodes placed on or in the brain and are often thought to activate all classes of neurones in the stimulated area. However, this is not true. A large body of evidence from experiments on the motor cortex shows that non-invasive methods of brain stimulation can be surprisingly selective and that adjusting the intensity and direction of stimulation can activate different classes of inhibitory and excitatory inputs to the corticospinal output cells. Here we review data that have elucidated the action of TMS and TES, concentrating mainly on the most direct evidence available from spinal epidural recordings of the descending corticospinal volleys. The results show that it is potentially possible to test and condition specific neural circuits in motor cortex that could be affected differentially by disease, or be used in different forms of natural behaviour. However, there is substantial interindividual variability in the specificity of these protocols. Perhaps in the future it will be possible, with the advances currently being made to model the electrical fields induced in individual brains, to develop forms of stimulation that can reliably target more specific populations of neurones, and open up the internal circuitry of the motor cortex for study in behaving humans.

  8. Hydrodynamic interaction of bacterial flagella - flagellar bundling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Sookkyung

    2013-11-01

    Flagellar bundling is an important aspect of locomotion in bacteria such as Escherichia coli. To study the hydrodynamic behavior of helical flagella, we present a computational model that is based on the geometry of the bacterial flagellar filament at the micrometer scale. We consider two model flagella, each of which has a rotary motor at its base with the rotation rate of the motor set at 100 Hz. Bundling occurs when both flagella are left-handed helices turning counterclockwise (when viewed from the nonmotor end of the flagellum looking back toward the motor) or when both flagella are right-handed helices turning clockwise. Helical flagella of the other combinations of handedness and rotation direction do not bundle. In this work we use the generalized immersed boundary method combined with the unconstrained Kirchhoff rod theory, which allows us to study the complicated hydrodynamics of flagellar behavior. This is a joint work with Charlie Peskin at NYU. NSF

  9. Mutations in the Borrelia burgdorferi Flagellar Type III Secretion System Genes fliH and fliI Profoundly Affect Spirochete Flagellar Assembly, Morphology, Motility, Structure, and Cell Division

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Lihui; Zhao, Xiaowei; Liu, Jun; Norris, Steven J.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The Lyme disease spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi migrates to distant sites in the tick vectors and mammalian hosts through robust motility and chemotaxis activities. FliH and FliI are two cytoplasmic proteins that play important roles in the type III secretion system (T3SS)-mediated export and assembly of flagellar structural proteins. However, detailed analyses of the roles of FliH and FliI in B. burgdorferi have not been reported. In this study, fliH and fliI transposon mutants were utilized to dissect the mechanism of the Borrelia type III secretion system. The fliH and fliI mutants exhibited rod-shaped or string-like morphology, greatly reduced motility, division defects (resulting in elongated organisms with incomplete division points), and noninfectivity in mice by needle inoculation. Mutants in fliH and fliI were incapable of translational motion in 1% methylcellulose or soft agar. Inactivation of either fliH or fliI resulted in the loss of the FliH-FliI complex from otherwise intact flagellar motors, as determined by cryo-electron tomography (cryo-ET). Flagellar assemblies were still present in the mutant cells, albeit in lower numbers than in wild-type cells and with truncated flagella. Genetic complementation of fliH and fliI mutants in trans restored their wild-type morphology, motility, and flagellar motor structure; however, full-length flagella and infectivity were not recovered in these complemented mutants. Based on these results, disruption of either fliH or fliI in B. burgdorferi results in a severe defect in flagellar structure and function and cell division but does not completely block the export and assembly of flagellar hook and filament proteins. PMID:25968649

  10. The LC7 Light Chains of Chlamydomonas Flagellar Dyneins Interact with Components Required for Both Motor Assembly and Regulation

    PubMed Central

    DiBella, Linda M.; Sakato, Miho; Patel-King, Ramila S.; Pazour, Gregory J.; King, Stephen M.

    2004-01-01

    Members of the LC7/Roadblock family of light chains (LCs) have been found in both cytoplasmic and axonemal dyneins. LC7a was originally identified within Chlamydomonas outer arm dynein and associates with this motor's cargo-binding region. We describe here a novel member of this protein family, termed LC7b that is also present in the Chlamydomonas flagellum. Levels of LC7b are reduced ∼20% in axonemes isolated from strains lacking inner arm I1 and are ∼80% lower in the absence of the outer arms. When both dyneins are missing, LC7b levels are diminished to <10%. In oda9 axonemal extracts that completely lack outer arms, LC7b copurifies with inner arm I1, whereas in ida1 extracts that are devoid of I1 inner arms it associates with outer arm dynein. We also have observed that some LC7a is present in both isolated axonemes and purified 18S dynein from oda1, suggesting that it is also a component of both the outer arm and inner arm I1. Intriguingly, in axonemal extracts from the LC7a null mutant, oda15, which assembles ∼30% of its outer arms, LC7b fails to copurify with either dynein, suggesting that it interacts with LC7a. Furthermore, both the outer arm γ heavy chain and DC2 from the outer arm docking complex completely dissociate after salt extraction from oda15 axonemes. EDC cross-linking of purified dynein revealed that LC7b interacts with LC3, an outer dynein arm thioredoxin; DC2, an outer arm docking complex component; and also with the phosphoprotein IC138 from inner arm I1. These data suggest that LC7a stabilizes both the outer arms and inner arm I1 and that both LC7a and LC7b are involved in multiple intradynein interactions within both dyneins. PMID:15304520

  11. Simultaneous measurement of bacterial flagellar rotation rate and swimming speed.

    PubMed Central

    Magariyama, Y; Sugiyama, S; Muramoto, K; Kawagishi, I; Imae, Y; Kudo, S

    1995-01-01

    Swimming speeds and flagellar rotation rates of individual free-swimming Vibrio alginolyticus cells were measured simultaneously by laser dark-field microscopy at 25, 30, and 35 degrees C. A roughly linear relation between swimming speed and flagellar rotation rate was observed. The ratio of swimming speed to flagellar rotation rate was 0.113 microns, which indicated that a cell progressed by 7% of pitch of flagellar helix during one flagellar rotation. At each temperature, however, swimming speed had a tendency to saturate at high flagellar rotation rate. That is, the cell with a faster-rotating flagellum did not always swim faster. To analyze the bacterial motion, we proposed a model in which the torque characteristics of the flagellar motor were considered. The model could be analytically solved, and it qualitatively explained the experimental results. The discrepancy between the experimental and the calculated ratios of swimming speed to flagellar rotation rate was about 20%. The apparent saturation in swimming speed was considered to be caused by shorter flagella that rotated faster but produced less propelling force. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 4 PMID:8580359

  12. Intact sensory-motor network structure and function in far from onset premanifest Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Gorges, Martin; Müller, Hans-Peter; Mayer, Isabella Maria Sophie; Grupe, Gesa Sophie; Kammer, Thomas; Grön, Georg; Kassubek, Jan; Landwehrmeyer, G Bernhard; Wolf, Robert Christian; Orth, Michael

    2017-03-07

    Structural and functional changes attributable to the neurodegenerative process in Huntington's disease (HD) may be evident in HTT CAG repeat expansion carriers before the clinical manifestations of HD. It remains unclear, though, how far from motor onset a consistent signature of the neurodegenerative process in HD can be detected. Twelve far from onset preHD and 22 age-matched healthy control participants underwent volumetric structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), and resting-state functional MRI (11 preHD, 22 controls) as well as electrophysiological measurements (12 preHD, 13 controls). There were no significant differences in white matter macro- and microstructure between far from onset preHD participants and controls. Functional connectivity in a basal ganglia-thalamic and motor networks, all measures of the motor efferent and sensory afferent pathways as well as sensory-motor integration were also similar in far from onset preHD and controls. With the methods used in far from onset preHD sensory-motor neural macro- or micro-structure and brain function were similar to healthy controls. This suggests that any observable structural and functional change in preHD nearer to onset, or in manifest HD, at least using comparable techniques such as in this study, most likely reflects an ongoing neurodegenerative process.

  13. Synergistic plasticity of intrinsic conductance and electrical coupling restores synchrony in an intact motor network.

    PubMed

    Lane, Brian J; Samarth, Pranit; Ransdell, Joseph L; Nair, Satish S; Schulz, David J

    2016-08-23

    Motor neurons of the crustacean cardiac ganglion generate virtually identical, synchronized output despite the fact that each neuron uses distinct conductance magnitudes. As a result of this variability, manipulations that target ionic conductances have distinct effects on neurons within the same ganglion, disrupting synchronized motor neuron output that is necessary for proper cardiac function. We hypothesized that robustness in network output is accomplished via plasticity that counters such destabilizing influences. By blocking high-threshold K(+) conductances in motor neurons within the ongoing cardiac network, we discovered that compensation both resynchronized the network and helped restore excitability. Using model findings to guide experimentation, we determined that compensatory increases of both GA and electrical coupling restored function in the network. This is one of the first direct demonstrations of the physiological regulation of coupling conductance in a compensatory context, and of synergistic plasticity across cell- and network-level mechanisms in the restoration of output.

  14. Preliminary evidence of motor impairment among polysubstance 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine users with intact neuropsychological functioning.

    PubMed

    Bousman, Chad A; Cherner, Mariana; Emory, Kristen T; Barron, Daniel; Grebenstein, Patricia; Atkinson, J Hampton; Heaton, Robert K; Grant, Igor

    2010-11-01

    Neuropsychological disturbances have been reported in association with use of the recreational drug "ecstasy," or 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA), but findings have been inconsistent. We performed comprehensive neuropsychological testing examining seven ability domains in 21 MDMA users (MDMA+) and 21 matched control participants (MDMA-). Among MDMA+ participants, median [interquartile range] lifetime MDMA use was 186 [111, 516] doses, with 120 [35-365] days of abstinence. There were no significant group differences in neuropsychological performance, with the exception of the motor speed/dexterity domain in which 43% of MDMA+ were impaired compared with 5% of MDMA- participants (p = .004). Motor impairment differences were not explained by use of other substances and were unrelated to length of abstinence or lifetime number of MDMA doses. Findings provide limited evidence for neuropsychological differences between MDMA+ and MDMA- participants with the exception of motor impairments observed in the MDMA+ group. However, replication of this finding in a larger sample is warranted.

  15. Regulation of Eukaryotic Flagellar Motility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, David R.

    2005-03-01

    The central apparatus is essential for normal eukaryotic flagellar bend propagation as evidenced by the paralysis associated with mutations that prevent central pair (CP) assembly. Interactions between doublet-associated radial spokes and CP projections are thought to modulate spoke-regulated protein kinases and phosphatases on outer doublets, and these enzymes in turn modulate dynein activity. To better understand CP control mechanisms, we determined the three-dimensional structure of the Chlamydomonas reinhardtii CP complex and analyzed CP orientation during formation and propagation of flagellar bending waves. We show that a single CP microtubule, C1, is near the outermost doublet in curved regions of the flagellum, and this orientation is maintained by twists between successive principal and reverse bends. The Chlamydomonas CP is inherently twisted; twists are not induced by bend formation, and do not depend on forces or signals transmitted through spoke-central pair interactions. We hypothesize that CP orientation passively responds to bend formation, and that bend propagation drives rotation of the CP and maintains a constant CP orientation in bends, which in turn permits signal transduction between specific CP projections and specific doublet-associated dyneins through radial spokes. The central pair kinesin, Klp1, although essential for normal motility, is therefore not the motor that drives CP rotation. The CP also acts as a scaffold for enzymes that maintain normal intraflagellar ATP concentration.

  16. Active Phase and Amplitude Fluctuations of Flagellar Beating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Rui; Klindt, Gary S.; Riedel-Kruse, Ingmar H.; Jülicher, Frank; Friedrich, Benjamin M.

    2014-07-01

    The eukaryotic flagellum beats periodically, driven by the oscillatory dynamics of molecular motors, to propel cells and pump fluids. Small but perceivable fluctuations in the beat of individual flagella have physiological implications for synchronization in collections of flagella as well as for hydrodynamic interactions between flagellated swimmers. Here, we characterize phase and amplitude fluctuations of flagellar bending waves using shape mode analysis and limit-cycle reconstruction. We report a quality factor of flagellar oscillations Q =38.0±16.7 (mean±s.e.). Our analysis shows that flagellar fluctuations are dominantly of active origin. Using a minimal model of collective motor oscillations, we demonstrate how the stochastic dynamics of individual motors can give rise to active small-number fluctuations in motor-cytoskeleton systems.

  17. Synergistic plasticity of intrinsic conductance and electrical coupling restores synchrony in an intact motor network

    PubMed Central

    Lane, Brian J; Samarth, Pranit; Ransdell, Joseph L; Nair, Satish S; Schulz, David J

    2016-01-01

    Motor neurons of the crustacean cardiac ganglion generate virtually identical, synchronized output despite the fact that each neuron uses distinct conductance magnitudes. As a result of this variability, manipulations that target ionic conductances have distinct effects on neurons within the same ganglion, disrupting synchronized motor neuron output that is necessary for proper cardiac function. We hypothesized that robustness in network output is accomplished via plasticity that counters such destabilizing influences. By blocking high-threshold K+ conductances in motor neurons within the ongoing cardiac network, we discovered that compensation both resynchronized the network and helped restore excitability. Using model findings to guide experimentation, we determined that compensatory increases of both GA and electrical coupling restored function in the network. This is one of the first direct demonstrations of the physiological regulation of coupling conductance in a compensatory context, and of synergistic plasticity across cell- and network-level mechanisms in the restoration of output. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.16879.001 PMID:27552052

  18. Intact Acquisition and Short-Term Retention of Non-Motor Procedural Learning in Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Panouillères, Muriel T N; Tofaris, George K; Brown, Peter; Jenkinson, Ned

    2016-01-01

    Procedural learning is a form of memory where people implicitly acquire a skill through repeated practice. People with Parkinson's disease (PD) have been found to acquire motor adaptation, a form of motor procedural learning, similarly to healthy older adults but they have deficits in long-term retention. A similar pattern of normal learning on initial exposure with a deficit in retention seen on subsequent days has also been seen in mirror-reading, a form of non-motor procedural learning. It is a well-studied fact that disrupting sleep will impair the consolidation of procedural memories. Given the prevalence of sleep disturbances in PD, the lack of retention on following days seen in these studies could simply be a side effect of this well-known symptom of PD. Because of this, we wondered whether people with PD would present with deficits in the short-term retention of a non-motor procedural learning task, when the test of retention was done the same day as the initial exposure. The aim of the present study was then to investigate acquisition and retention in the immediate short term of cognitive procedural learning using the mirror-reading task in people with PD. This task involved two conditions: one where triads of mirror-inverted words were always new that allowed assessing the learning of mirror-reading skill and another one where some of the triads were presented repeatedly during the experiment that allowed assessing the word-specific learning. People with PD both ON and OFF their normal medication were compared to healthy older adults and young adults. Participants were re-tested 50 minutes break after initial exposure to probe for short-term retention. The results of this study show that all groups of participants acquired and retained the two skills (mirror-reading and word-specific) similarly. These results suggest that neither healthy ageing nor the degeneration within the basal ganglia that occurs in PD does affect the mechanisms that underpin the

  19. Studies on the mechanism of bacterial flagellar rotation and the flagellar number regulation.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Seiji

    2016-01-01

    Many motile bacteria have the motility organ, the flagellum. It rotates by the rotary motor driven by the ion-motive force and is embedded in the cell surface at the base of each flagellar filament. Many researchers have been studying its rotary mechanism for years, but most of the energy conversion processes have been remained in mystery. We focused on the flagellar stator, which works at the core process of energy conversion, and found that the periplasmic region of the stator changes its conformation to be activated only when the stator units are incorporated into the motor and anchored at the cell wall. Meanwhile, the physiologically important supramolecular complex is localized in the cell at the right place and the right time with a proper amount. How the cell achieves such a proper localization is the fundamental question for life science, and we undertake this problem by analyzing the mechanism for biogenesis of a single polar flagellum of Vibrio alginolyticus. Here I describe the molecular mechanism of how the flagellum is generated at the specific place with a proper number, and also how the flagellar stator is incorporated into the motor to complete the functional motor assembly, based on our studies.

  20. A study of bacterial flagellar bundling.

    PubMed

    Flores, Heather; Lobaton, Edgar; Méndez-Diez, Stefan; Tlupova, Svetlana; Cortez, Ricardo

    2005-01-01

    Certain bacteria, such as Escherichia coli (E. coli) and Salmonella typhimurium (S. typhimurium), use multiple flagella often concentrated at one end of their bodies to induce locomotion. Each flagellum is formed in a left-handed helix and has a motor at the base that rotates the flagellum in a corkscrew motion. We present a computational model of the flagellar motion and their hydrodynamic interaction. The model is based on the equations of Stokes flow to describe the fluid motion. The elasticity of the flagella is modeled with a network of elastic springs while the motor is represented by a torque at the base of each flagellum. The fluid velocity due to the forces is described by regularized Stokeslets and the velocity due to the torques by the associated regularized rotlets. Their expressions are derived. The model is used to analyze the swimming motion of a single flagellum and of a group of three flagella in close proximity to one another. When all flagellar motors rotate counterclockwise, the hydrodynamic interaction can lead to bundling. We present an analysis of the flow surrounding the flagella. When at least one of the motors changes its direction of rotation, the same initial conditions lead to a tumbling behavior characterized by the separation of the flagella, changes in their orientation, and no net swimming motion. The analysis of the flow provides some intuition for these processes.

  1. Flagellar membranes are rich in raft-forming phospholipids

    PubMed Central

    Serricchio, Mauro; Schmid, Adrien W.; Steinmann, Michael E.; Sigel, Erwin; Rauch, Monika; Julkowska, Daria; Bonnefoy, Serge; Fort, Cécile; Bastin, Philippe; Bütikofer, Peter

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The observation that the membranes of flagella are enriched in sterols and sphingolipids has led to the hypothesis that flagella might be enriched in raft-forming lipids. However, a detailed lipidomic analysis of flagellar membranes is not available. Novel protocols to detach and isolate intact flagella from Trypanosoma brucei procyclic forms in combination with reverse-phase liquid chromatography high-resolution tandem mass spectrometry allowed us to determine the phospholipid composition of flagellar membranes relative to whole cells. Our analyses revealed that phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylserine, ceramide and the sphingolipids inositol phosphorylceramide and sphingomyelin are enriched in flagella relative to whole cells. In contrast, phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylinositol are strongly depleted in flagella. Within individual glycerophospholipid classes, we observed a preference for ether-type over diacyl-type molecular species in membranes of flagella. Our study provides direct evidence for a preferential presence of raft-forming phospholipids in flagellar membranes of T. brucei. PMID:26276100

  2. Structural Analysis of the Flagellar Component Proteins in Solution by Small Angle X-Ray Scattering.

    PubMed

    Lee, Lawrence K

    2017-01-01

    Small angle X-ray scattering is an increasingly utilized method for characterizing the shape and structural properties of proteins in solution. The technique is amenable to very large protein complexes and to dynamic particles with different conformational states. It is therefore ideally suited to the analysis of some flagellar motor components. Indeed, we recently used the method to analyze the solution structure of the flagellar motor protein FliG, which when combined with high-resolution snapshots of conformational states from crystal structures, led to insights into conformational transitions that are important in mediating the self-assembly of the bacterial flagellar motor. Here, we describe procedures for X-ray scattering data collection of flagellar motor components, data analysis, and interpretation.

  3. Growth rate control of flagellar assembly in Escherichia coli strain RP437

    PubMed Central

    Sim, Martin; Koirala, Santosh; Picton, David; Strahl, Henrik; Hoskisson, Paul A.; Rao, Christopher V.; Gillespie, Colin S.; Aldridge, Phillip D.

    2017-01-01

    The flagellum is a rotary motor that enables bacteria to swim in liquids and swarm over surfaces. Numerous global regulators control flagellar assembly in response to cellular and environmental factors. Previous studies have also shown that flagellar assembly is affected by the growth-rate of the cell. However, a systematic study has not yet been described under controlled growth conditions. Here, we investigated the effect of growth rate on flagellar assembly in Escherichia coli using steady-state chemostat cultures where we could precisely control the cell growth-rate. Our results demonstrate that flagellar abundance correlates with growth rate, where faster growing cells produce more flagella. They also demonstrate that this growth-rate dependent control occurs through the expression of the flagellar master regulator, FlhD4C2. Collectively, our results demonstrate that motility is intimately coupled to the growth-rate of the cell. PMID:28117390

  4. Instability of hooks during bacterial flagellar swimming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jabbarzadeh, Mehdi; Fu, Henry C.; Henry Fu Team

    2016-11-01

    In bacteria, a flexible hook transmits torque from the rotary motor at the cell body to the flagellum. Previously, the hook has been modeled as a Kirchhoff rod between the cell body and rotating flagellum. To study effects of the hook's flexibility on the bacteria's swimming speed and trajectory for wide range hook stiffnesses and flagellum configurations, we develop an efficient simplified spring model for the hook by linearizing the Kirchhoff rod. We treat the hydrodynamics of the cell body and helical flagellum using resistance matrices calculated by the method of regularized Stokeslets. We investigate flagellar and swimming dynamics for a range of hook flexibilities and flagellar orientations relative to the cell body and compare the results to models without hook flexibility. We investigate in detail parameters corresponding to E. coli and Vibrio alginolyticus. Generally, the flagellum changes orientation relative to the cell body, undergoing an orbit with the period of the motor rotation. We find that as the hook stiffness decreases, steady-state orbits of the flagellum first become unstable before the hook buckles, which may suggest a new mechanism of flick initiation in run-reverse-flick motility. We also find that for some parameter ranges, there are multiple stable steady state orbits, which may have implications for the tumbling and turning of bacteria.

  5. SEROLOGICAL SIMILARITY OF FLAGELLAR AND MITOTIC MICROTUBULES

    PubMed Central

    Fulton, Chandler; Kane, R. E.; Stephens, R. E.

    1971-01-01

    An antiserum to flagellar axonemes from sperm of Arbacia punctulata contains antibodies which react both with intact flagellar outer fibers and with purified tubulin from the outer fibers. Immunodiffusion tests indicate the presence of similar antigenic determinants on outer-fiber tubulins from sperm flagella of five species of sea urchins and a sand dollar, but not a starfish. The antibodies also react with extracts containing tubulins from different classes of microtubules, including central-pair fibers and both A- and B-subfibers from outer fibers of sperm flagella, an extract from unfertilized eggs, mitotic apparatuses from first cleavage embryos, and cilia from later embryos. Though most tubulins tested share similar antigenic determinants, some clear differences have been detected, even, in Pseudoboletia indiana, between the outer-fiber tubulins of sperm flagella and blastular cilia. Though tubulins are "actin-like" proteins, antitubulin serum does not react with actin from sea urchin lantern muscle. On the basis of these observations, we suggest that various echinoid microtubules are built of similar, but not identical, tubulins. PMID:4106543

  6. Hydrodynamic synchronization of flagellar oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedrich, Benjamin

    2016-11-01

    In this review, we highlight the physics of synchronization in collections of beating cilia and flagella. We survey the nonlinear dynamics of synchronization in collections of noisy oscillators. This framework is applied to flagellar synchronization by hydrodynamic interactions. The time-reversibility of hydrodynamics at low Reynolds numbers requires swimming strokes that break time-reversal symmetry to facilitate hydrodynamic synchronization. We discuss different physical mechanisms for flagellar synchronization, which break this symmetry in different ways.

  7. The use of a flagellar export signal for the secretion of recombinant proteins in Salmonella.

    PubMed

    Vonderviszt, Ferenc; Sajó, Ráchel; Dobó, József; Závodszky, Péter

    2012-01-01

    The flagellum-specific export system is a specialized type III export machinery, which exports external flagellar proteins through the central channel of the flagellar filament. A number of evidence indicates that short segments within the disordered N-terminal region of flagellar axial proteins are recognized by the flagellum-specific export apparatus. Recently, we have demonstrated that the 26-47 segment of Salmonella typhimurium flagellin is capable of mediating flagellar export. N-terminal flagellin segments containing the export signal combined with a hexahistidine tag can be attached to heterologous proteins (preferentially in the size range of 9-40 kDa) facilitating their secreted expression and easy purification from the medium. Certain over-expressed proteins that are easily degraded within the cells are found intact in the medium implying a potential application of this expression system for proteins of high proteolytic susceptibility.

  8. Analysis of flagellar phosphoproteins from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Boesger, Jens; Wagner, Volker; Weisheit, Wolfram; Mittag, Maria

    2009-07-01

    Cilia and flagella are cell organelles that are highly conserved throughout evolution. For many years, the green biflagellate alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii has served as a model for examination of the structure and function of its flagella, which are similar to certain mammalian cilia. Proteome analysis revealed the presence of several kinases and protein phosphatases in these organelles. Reversible protein phosphorylation can control ciliary beating, motility, signaling, length, and assembly. Despite the importance of this posttranslational modification, the identities of many ciliary phosphoproteins and knowledge about their in vivo phosphorylation sites are still missing. Here we used immobilized metal affinity chromatography to enrich phosphopeptides from purified flagella and analyzed them by mass spectrometry. One hundred forty-one phosphorylated peptides were identified, belonging to 32 flagellar proteins. Thereby, 126 in vivo phosphorylation sites were determined. The flagellar phosphoproteome includes different structural and motor proteins, kinases, proteins with protein interaction domains, and many proteins whose functions are still unknown. In several cases, a dynamic phosphorylation pattern and clustering of phosphorylation sites were found, indicating a complex physiological status and specific control by reversible protein phosphorylation in the flagellum.

  9. Select Acetophenones Modulate Flagellar Motility in Chlamydomonas

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Shakila K.; Pearce, Austin A.; Ibezim, Prudence K.; Primm, Todd P.; Gaillard, Anne R.

    2009-01-01

    Acetophenones were screened for activity against positive phototaxis of Chlamydomonas cells, a process that requires coordinated flagellar motility. The structure-activity relationships of a series of acetophenones are reported, including acetophenones that affect flagellar motility and cell viability. Notably, 4-methoxyacetophenone, 3,4-dimethoxyacetophenone, and 4-hydroxyacetophenone induced negative phototaxis in Chlamydomonas, suggesting interference with activity of flagellar proteins and control of flagellar dominance. PMID:20659114

  10. Intact sensory-motor network structure and function in far from onset premanifest Huntington’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Gorges, Martin; Müller, Hans-Peter; Mayer, Isabella Maria Sophie; Grupe, Gesa Sophie; Kammer, Thomas; Grön, Georg; Kassubek, Jan; Landwehrmeyer, G. Bernhard; Wolf, Robert Christian; Orth, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Structural and functional changes attributable to the neurodegenerative process in Huntington’s disease (HD) may be evident in HTT CAG repeat expansion carriers before the clinical manifestations of HD. It remains unclear, though, how far from motor onset a consistent signature of the neurodegenerative process in HD can be detected. Twelve far from onset preHD and 22 age-matched healthy control participants underwent volumetric structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), and resting-state functional MRI (11 preHD, 22 controls) as well as electrophysiological measurements (12 preHD, 13 controls). There were no significant differences in white matter macro- and microstructure between far from onset preHD participants and controls. Functional connectivity in a basal ganglia-thalamic and motor networks, all measures of the motor efferent and sensory afferent pathways as well as sensory-motor integration were also similar in far from onset preHD and controls. With the methods used in far from onset preHD sensory-motor neural macro- or micro-structure and brain function were similar to healthy controls. This suggests that any observable structural and functional change in preHD nearer to onset, or in manifest HD, at least using comparable techniques such as in this study, most likely reflects an ongoing neurodegenerative process. PMID:28266655

  11. Modulation of Training by Single-Session Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation to the Intact Motor Cortex Enhances Motor Skill Acquisition of the Paretic Hand

    PubMed Central

    Zimerman, Máximo; Heise, Kirstin F.; Hoppe, Julia; Cohen, Leonardo G.; Gerloff, Christian; Hummel, Friedhelm C.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose Mechanisms of skill learning are paramount components for stroke recovery. Recent noninvasive brain stimulation studies demonstrated that decreasing activity in the contralesional motor cortex might be beneficial, providing transient functional improvements after stroke. The more crucial question, however, is whether this intervention can also enhance the acquisition of complex motor tasks, yielding longer-lasting functional improvements. In the present study, we tested the capacity of cathodal transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) applied over the contralesional motor cortex during training to enhance the acquisition and retention of complex sequential finger movements of the paretic hand. Method Twelve well-recovered chronic patients with subcortical stroke attended 2 training sessions during which either cathodal tDCS or a sham intervention were applied to the contralesional motor cortex in a double-blind, crossover design. Two different motor sequences, matched for their degree of complexity, were tested in a counterbalanced order during as well as 90 minutes and 24 hours after the intervention. Potential underlying mechanisms were evaluated with transcranial magnetic stimulation. Results tDCS facilitated the acquisition of a new motor skill compared with sham stimulation (P=0.04) yielding better task retention results. A significant correlation was observed between the tDCS-induced improvement during training and the tDCS-induced changes of intracortical inhibition (R2=0.63). Conclusions These results indicate that tDCS is a promising tool to improve not only motor behavior, but also procedural learning. They further underline the potential of noninvasive brain stimulation as an adjuvant treatment for long-term recovery, at least in patients with mild functional impairment after stroke. PMID:22618381

  12. An adolescent with intact motor skills and intelligence after infant hemorrhagic stroke without rehabilitation therapy: a case report.

    PubMed

    Lee, Shenghuo; Yan, Tiebin; Lu, Xiao

    2012-01-01

    Devastating intracerebral hemorrhagic stroke is rarely encountered in children, but it has a high mortality rate. The case of a 15-year-old boy who survived a major stroke at 40 days old is described. He showed no significant motor or intelligence impairment in adolescence until he was hospitalized for transient left had tremors and slight left hand weakness caused by a cyst. The patient's almost complete motor recovery highlights the power of neural plasticity in young patients. The pediatric stroke was huge, but this did not affect his adolescent movement or intelligence, demonstrating the great neuroplastic potential of the developing human brain. These observations may help increase our knowledge about stroke in children and improve the treatment of pediatric stroke patients.

  13. Intraflagellar transport (IFT) cargo: IFT transports flagellar precursors to the tip and turnover products to the cell body.

    PubMed

    Qin, Hongmin; Diener, Dennis R; Geimer, Stefan; Cole, Douglas G; Rosenbaum, Joel L

    2004-01-19

    Intraflagellar transport (IFT) is the bidirectional movement of multisubunit protein particles along axonemal microtubules and is required for assembly and maintenance of eukaryotic flagella and cilia. One posited role of IFT is to transport flagellar precursors to the flagellar tip for assembly. Here, we examine radial spokes, axonemal subunits consisting of 22 polypeptides, as potential cargo for IFT. Radial spokes were found to be partially assembled in the cell body, before being transported to the flagellar tip by anterograde IFT. Fully assembled radial spokes, detached from axonemal microtubules during flagellar breakdown or turnover, are removed from flagella by retrograde IFT. Interactions between IFT particles, motors, radial spokes, and other axonemal proteins were verified by coimmunoprecipitation of these proteins from the soluble fraction of Chlamydomonas flagella. These studies indicate that one of the main roles of IFT in flagellar assembly and maintenance is to transport axonemal proteins in and out of the flagellum.

  14. Intact neurogenesis is required for benefits of exercise on spatial memory but not motor performance or contextual fear conditioning in C57BL/6J mice.

    PubMed

    Clark, P J; Brzezinska, W J; Thomas, M W; Ryzhenko, N A; Toshkov, S A; Rhodes, J S

    2008-09-09

    The mammalian hippocampus continues to generate new neurons throughout life. Experiences such as exercise, anti-depressants, and stress regulate levels of neurogenesis. Exercise increases adult hippocampal neurogenesis and enhances behavioral performance on rotarod, contextual fear and water maze in rodents. To directly test whether intact neurogenesis is required for gains in behavioral performance from exercise in C57BL/6J mice, neurogenesis was reduced using focal gamma irradiation (3 sessions of 5 Gy). Two months after treatment, mice (total n=42 males and 42 females) (Irradiated or Sham), were placed with or without running wheels (Runner or Sedentary) for 54 days. The first 10 days mice received daily injections of bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) to label dividing cells. The last 14 days mice were tested on water maze (two trials per day for 5 days, then 1 h later probe test), rotarod (four trials per day for 3 days), and contextual fear conditioning (2 days), then measured for neurogenesis using immunohistochemical detection of BrdU and neuronal nuclear protein (NeuN) mature neuronal marker. Consistent with previous studies, in Sham animals, running increased neurogenesis fourfold and gains in performance were observed for the water maze (spatial learning and memory), rotarod (motor performance), and contextual fear (conditioning). These positive results provided the reference to determine whether gains in performance were blocked by irradiation. Irradiation reduced neurogenesis by 50% in both groups, Runner and Sedentary. Irradiation did not affect running or baseline performance on any task. Minimal changes in microglia associated with inflammation (using immunohistochemical detection of cd68) were detected at the time of behavioral testing. Irradiation did not reduce gains in performance on rotarod or contextual fear, however it eliminated gain in performance on the water maze. Results support the hypothesis that intact exercise-induced hippocampal neurogenesis

  15. Nonlinear amplitude dynamics in flagellar beating

    PubMed Central

    Casademunt, Jaume

    2017-01-01

    The physical basis of flagellar and ciliary beating is a major problem in biology which is still far from completely understood. The fundamental cytoskeleton structure of cilia and flagella is the axoneme, a cylindrical array of microtubule doublets connected by passive cross-linkers and dynein motor proteins. The complex interplay of these elements leads to the generation of self-organized bending waves. Although many mathematical models have been proposed to understand this process, few attempts have been made to assess the role of dyneins on the nonlinear nature of the axoneme. Here, we investigate the nonlinear dynamics of flagella by considering an axonemal sliding control mechanism for dynein activity. This approach unveils the nonlinear selection of the oscillation amplitudes, which are typically either missed or prescribed in mathematical models. The explicit set of nonlinear equations are derived and solved numerically. Our analysis reveals the spatio-temporal dynamics of dynein populations and flagellum shape for different regimes of motor activity, medium viscosity and flagellum elasticity. Unstable modes saturate via the coupling of dynein kinetics and flagellum shape without the need of invoking a nonlinear axonemal response. Hence, our work reveals a novel mechanism for the saturation of unstable modes in axonemal beating.

  16. Mechanism for adaptive remodeling of the bacterial flagellar switch

    PubMed Central

    Lele, Pushkar P.; Branch, Richard W.; Nathan, Vedhavalli S. J.; Berg, Howard C.

    2012-01-01

    The bacterial flagellar motor has been shown in previous work to adapt to changes in the steady-state concentration of the chemotaxis signaling molecule, CheY-P, by changing the FliM content. We show here that the number of FliM molecules in the motor and the fraction of FliM molecules that exchange depend on the direction of flagellar rotation, not on CheY-P binding per se. Our results are consistent with a model in which the structural differences associated with the direction of rotation modulate the strength of FliM binding. When the motor spins counterclockwise, FliM binding strengthens, the fraction of FliM molecules that exchanges decreases, and the ring content increases. The larger number of CheY-P binding sites enhances the motor’s sensitivity, i.e., the motor adapts. An interesting unresolved question is how additional copies of FliM might be accommodated. PMID:23169659

  17. Flagellar flows around bacterial swarms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dauparas, Justas; Lauga, Eric

    2016-08-01

    Flagellated bacteria on nutrient-rich substrates can differentiate into a swarming state and move in dense swarms across surfaces. A recent experiment measured the flow in the fluid around an Escherichia coli swarm [Wu, Hosu, and Berg, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 108, 4147 (2011)], 10.1073/pnas.1016693108. A systematic chiral flow was observed in the clockwise direction (when viewed from above) ahead of the swarm with flow speeds of about 10 μ m /s , about 3 times greater than the radial velocity at the edge of the swarm. The working hypothesis is that this flow is due to the action of cells stalled at the edge of a colony that extend their flagellar filaments outward, moving fluid over the virgin agar. In this work we quantitatively test this hypothesis. We first build an analytical model of the flow induced by a single flagellum in a thin film and then use the model, and its extension to multiple flagella, to compare with experimental measurements. The results we obtain are in agreement with the flagellar hypothesis. The model provides further quantitative insight into the flagella orientations and their spatial distributions as well as the tangential speed profile. In particular, the model suggests that flagella are on average pointing radially out of the swarm and are not wrapped tangentially.

  18. Protein Arginine Methyltransferases Interact with IFT Particles and Change Location During Flagellar Growth and Resorption.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Katsutoshi; Sloboda, Roger D

    2017-03-15

    Changes in protein activity driven by post translational modifications comprise an important mechanism for the control of many cellular processes. Several flagellar proteins are methylated on arginine residues during flagellar resorption; however, the function is not understood. To learn more about the role of protein methylation during flagellar dynamics, we have focused on protein arginine methyltransferases (PRMTs) 1, 3, 5, and 10. These PRMTs localize to the tip of flagella and in a punctate pattern along the length, very similar, but not identical, to that of intraflagellar transport (IFT) components. In addition, we found that PRMTs 1 and 3 are also highly enriched at the base of the flagella, and the basal localization of these PRMTs changes during flagellar regeneration and resorption. Proteins with methyl arginine residues are also enriched at the tip and base of flagella, and their localization also changes during flagellar assembly and disassembly. PRMTs are lost from the flagella of fla10-1 cells, which carry a temperature sensitive mutation in the anterograde motor for IFT. The data define the distribution of specific PRMTs and their target proteins in flagella, and demonstrate that PRMTs are cargo for translocation within flagella by the process of IFT.

  19. Rhythmicity, Recurrence, and Recovery of Flagellar Beating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Kirsty Y.; Goldstein, Raymond E.

    2014-12-01

    The eukaryotic flagellum beats with apparently unfailing periodicity, yet responds rapidly to stimuli. Like the human heartbeat, flagellar oscillations are now known to be noisy. Using the alga C. reinhardtii, we explore three aspects of nonuniform flagellar beating. We report the existence of rhythmicity, waveform noise peaking at transitions between power and recovery strokes, and fluctuations of interbeat intervals that are correlated and even recurrent, with memory extending to hundreds of beats. These features are altered qualitatively by physiological perturbations. Further, we quantify the recovery of periodic breaststroke beating from transient hydrodynamic forcing. These results will help constrain microscopic theories on the origins and regulation of flagellar beating.

  20. Structure of the microtubule-binding domain of flagellar dynein.

    PubMed

    Kato, Yusuke S; Yagi, Toshiki; Harris, Sarah A; Ohki, Shin-ya; Yura, Kei; Shimizu, Youské; Honda, Shinya; Kamiya, Ritsu; Burgess, Stan A; Tanokura, Masaru

    2014-11-04

    Flagellar dyneins are essential microtubule motors in eukaryotes, as they drive the beating motions of cilia and flagella. Unlike myosin and kinesin motors, the track binding mechanism of dyneins and the regulation between the strong and weak binding states remain obscure. Here we report the solution structure of the microtubule-binding domain of flagellar dynein-c/DHC9 (dynein-c MTBD). The structure reveals a similar overall helix-rich fold to that of the MTBD of cytoplasmic dynein (cytoplasmic MTBD), but dynein-c MTBD has an additional flap, consisting of an antiparallel b sheet. The flap is positively charged and highly flexible. Despite the structural similarity to cytoplasmic MTBD, dynein-c MTBD shows only a small change in the microtubule- binding affinity depending on the registry change of coiled coil-sliding, whereby lacks the apparent strong binding state. The surface charge distribution of dynein-c MTBD also differs from that of cytoplasmic MTBD, which suggests a difference in the microtubule-binding mechanism.

  1. Bacterial flagellar microhydrodynamics: Laminar flow over complex flagellar filaments, analog archimedean screws and cylinders, and its perturbations.

    PubMed

    Trachtenberg, Shlomo; Fishelov, Dalia; Ben-Artzi, Matania

    2003-09-01

    The flagellar filament, the bacterial organelle of motility, is the smallest rotary propeller known. It consists of 1), a basal body (part of which is the proton driven rotary motor), 2), a hook (universal joint-allowing for off-axial transmission of rotary motion), and 3), a filament (propeller-a long, rigid, supercoiled helical assembly allowing for the conversion of rotary motion into linear thrust). Helically perturbed (so-called "complex") filaments have a coarse surface composed of deep grooves and ridges following the three-start helical lines. These surface structures, reminiscent of a turbine or Archimedean screw, originate from symmetry reduction along the six-start helical lines due to dimerization of the flagellin monomers from which the filament self assembles. Using high-resolution electron microscopy and helical image reconstruction methods, we calculated three-dimensional density maps of the complex filament of Rhizobium lupini H13-3 and determined its surface pattern and boundaries. The helical symmetry of the filament allows viewing it as a stack of identical slices spaced axially and rotated by constant increments. Here we use the closed outlines of these slices to explore, in two dimensions, the hydrodynamic effect of the turbine-like boundaries of the flagellar filament. In particular, we try to determine if, and under what conditions, transitions from laminar to turbulent flow (or perturbations of the laminar flow) may occur on or near the surface of the bacterial propeller. To address these questions, we apply the boundary element method in a manner allowing the handling of convoluted boundaries. We tested the method on several simple, well-characterized cylindrical structures before applying it to real, highly convoluted biological surfaces and to simplified mechanical analogs. Our results indicate that under extreme structural and functional conditions, and at low Reynolds numbers, a deviation from laminar flow might occur on the flagellar

  2. Probing the role of IFT particle complex A and B in flagellar entry and exit of IFT-dynein in Chlamydomonas.

    PubMed

    Williamson, Shana M; Silva, David A; Richey, Elizabeth; Qin, Hongmin

    2012-07-01

    Mediating the transport of flagellar precursors and removal of turnover products, intraflagellar transport (IFT) is required for flagella assembly and maintenance. The IFT apparatus is composed of the anterograde IFT motor kinesin II, the retrograde IFT motor IFT-dynein, and IFT particles containing two complexes, A and B. In order to have a balanced two-way transportation, IFT-dynein has to be carried into flagella and transported to the flagellar tip by kinesin II, where it is activated to drive the retrograde IFT back to the flagellar base. In this study, we investigated the role of complex A and complex B in the flagellar entry and exit of IFT-dynein. We showed that regardless of the amount of complex A, IFT-dynein accumulated proportionally to the amount of complex B in the flagella of fla15/ift144 and fla17-1/ift139, two complex A temperature-sensitive mutants. Complex A was depleted from both cellular and flagellar compartments in fla15/ift144 mutant. However, in fla17-1/ift139 mutant, the flagellar level of complex A was at the wild-type level, which was in radical contrast to the significantly reduced cellular amount of complex A. These results support that complex A is not required for the flagellar entry of IFT-dynein, but might be essential for the lagellar exit of IFT-dynein. Additionally, we confirmed the essential role of IFT172, a complex B subunit, in the flagellar entry of IFT-dynein. These results indicate that complexes A and B play complementary but distinct roles for IFT-dynein, with complex B carrying IFT-dynein into the flagella while complex A mediates the flagellar exit of IFT-dynein.

  3. Analysis of Flagellar Phosphoproteins from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Boesger, Jens; Wagner, Volker; Weisheit, Wolfram; Mittag, Maria

    2009-01-01

    Cilia and flagella are cell organelles that are highly conserved throughout evolution. For many years, the green biflagellate alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii has served as a model for examination of the structure and function of its flagella, which are similar to certain mammalian cilia. Proteome analysis revealed the presence of several kinases and protein phosphatases in these organelles. Reversible protein phosphorylation can control ciliary beating, motility, signaling, length, and assembly. Despite the importance of this posttranslational modification, the identities of many ciliary phosphoproteins and knowledge about their in vivo phosphorylation sites are still missing. Here we used immobilized metal affinity chromatography to enrich phosphopeptides from purified flagella and analyzed them by mass spectrometry. One hundred forty-one phosphorylated peptides were identified, belonging to 32 flagellar proteins. Thereby, 126 in vivo phosphorylation sites were determined. The flagellar phosphoproteome includes different structural and motor proteins, kinases, proteins with protein interaction domains, and many proteins whose functions are still unknown. In several cases, a dynamic phosphorylation pattern and clustering of phosphorylation sites were found, indicating a complex physiological status and specific control by reversible protein phosphorylation in the flagellum. PMID:19429781

  4. Silencing of a putative inner arm dynein heavy chain results in flagellar immotility in Trypanosoma brucei

    PubMed Central

    Springer, Amy L.; Bruhn, David F.; Kinzel, Kathryn W.; Rosenthal, Noël F.; Zukas, Randi; Klingbeil, Michele M.

    2010-01-01

    The Trypanosoma brucei flagellum controls motility and is crucial for cell polarity and division. Unique features of trypanosome motility suggest that flagellar beat regulation in this organism is unusual and worthy of study. The flagellar axoneme, required for motility, has a structure that is highly conserved among eukaryotes. Of the several dyneins in the axonemal inner arm complex, dynein f is thought to control flagellar waveform shape. A T. brucei gene predicted to encode the dynein f alpha heavy chain, TbDNAH10, was silenced using RNA interference in procyclic T. brucei cells. This resulted in immotile flagella, showing no movement except for occasional slight twitches at the tips. Cell growth slowed dramatically and cells were found in large clusters. Microscopic analysis of silenced cultures showed many cells with detached flagella, sometimes entangled between multiple cells. DAPI staining showed an increased frequency of mis-positioned kinetoplasts and multinucleate cells, suggesting that these cells experience disruption at an early cell cycle stage, probably secondary to the motility defect. TEM images showed apparently normal axonemes and no discernable defects in inner arm structure. This study demonstrates use of RNAi as an effective method to study very large genes such as dynein heavy chains (HCs), and the immotility phenotype of these dynein knockdowns suggests that an intact inner arm is necessary for flagellar beating in T. brucei. Since analogous mutants in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii retain motility, this phenotype likely reflects differences in requirements for motility and/or dynein assembly between the two organisms and these comparative studies will help elucidate the mechanisms of flagellar beat regulation. PMID:20888370

  5. Rhythmicity, recurrence, and recovery of flagellar beating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Kirsty; Goldstein, Raymond

    2015-03-01

    The eukaryotic flagellum beats with apparently unfailing periodicity, yet responds rapidly to stimuli. Like the human heartbeat, flagellar oscillations are now known to be noisy. Using the unicellular alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, we explore three aspects of nonuniform flagellar beating. We report the existence of rhythmicity, waveform noise peaking at transitions between power and recovery strokes, and fluctuations of interbeat intervals that are correlated and even recurrent, with memory extending to hundreds of beats. These features are altered qualitatively by physiological perturbations. Further, we quantify the recovery of periodic breaststroke beating from transient hydrodynamic forcing. These results will help constrain microscopic theories on the origins and regulation of flagellar beating. Financial support is acknowledged from the EPSRC, ERC Advanced Investigator Grant No. 247333, and a Senior Investigator Award from the Wellcome Trust.

  6. A solid-state control system for dynein-based ciliary/flagellar motility

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Ciliary and flagellar beating requires the coordinated action of multiple dyneins with different enzymatic and motor properties. In this issue, Yamamoto et al. (2013. J. Cell Biol. http://dx.doi.org/10.1083/jcb.201211048) identify the MIA (modifier of inner arms) complex within the Chlamydomonas reinhardtii axoneme that physically links to a known regulatory structure and provides a signaling conduit from the radial spokes to an inner arm dynein essential for waveform determination. PMID:23569213

  7. The role of the dynein light intermediate chain in retrograde IFT and flagellar function in Chlamydomonas.

    PubMed

    Reck, Jaimee; Schauer, Alexandria M; VanderWaal Mills, Kristyn; Bower, Raqual; Tritschler, Douglas; Perrone, Catherine A; Porter, Mary E

    2016-08-01

    The assembly of cilia and flagella depends on the activity of two microtubule motor complexes, kinesin-2 and dynein-2/1b, but the specific functions of the different subunits are poorly defined. Here we analyze Chlamydomonas strains expressing different amounts of the dynein 1b light intermediate chain (D1bLIC). Disruption of D1bLIC alters the stability of the dynein 1b complex and reduces both the frequency and velocity of retrograde intraflagellar transport (IFT), but it does not eliminate retrograde IFT. Flagellar assembly, motility, gliding, and mating are altered in a dose-dependent manner. iTRAQ-based proteomics identifies a small subset of proteins that are significantly reduced or elevated in d1blic flagella. Transformation with D1bLIC-GFP rescues the mutant phenotypes, and D1bLIC-GFP assembles into the dynein 1b complex at wild-type levels. D1bLIC-GFP is transported with anterograde IFT particles to the flagellar tip, dissociates into smaller particles, and begins processive retrograde IFT in <2 s. These studies demonstrate the role of D1bLIC in facilitating the recycling of IFT subunits and other proteins, identify new components potentially involved in the regulation of IFT, flagellar assembly, and flagellar signaling, and provide insight into the role of D1bLIC and retrograde IFT in other organisms.

  8. The role of the dynein light intermediate chain in retrograde IFT and flagellar function in Chlamydomonas

    PubMed Central

    Reck, Jaimee; Schauer, Alexandria M.; VanderWaal Mills, Kristyn; Bower, Raqual; Tritschler, Douglas; Perrone, Catherine A.; Porter, Mary E.

    2016-01-01

    The assembly of cilia and flagella depends on the activity of two microtubule motor complexes, kinesin-2 and dynein-2/1b, but the specific functions of the different subunits are poorly defined. Here we analyze Chlamydomonas strains expressing different amounts of the dynein 1b light intermediate chain (D1bLIC). Disruption of D1bLIC alters the stability of the dynein 1b complex and reduces both the frequency and velocity of retrograde intraflagellar transport (IFT), but it does not eliminate retrograde IFT. Flagellar assembly, motility, gliding, and mating are altered in a dose-dependent manner. iTRAQ-based proteomics identifies a small subset of proteins that are significantly reduced or elevated in d1blic flagella. Transformation with D1bLIC-GFP rescues the mutant phenotypes, and D1bLIC-GFP assembles into the dynein 1b complex at wild-type levels. D1bLIC-GFP is transported with anterograde IFT particles to the flagellar tip, dissociates into smaller particles, and begins processive retrograde IFT in <2 s. These studies demonstrate the role of D1bLIC in facilitating the recycling of IFT subunits and other proteins, identify new components potentially involved in the regulation of IFT, flagellar assembly, and flagellar signaling, and provide insight into the role of D1bLIC and retrograde IFT in other organisms. PMID:27251063

  9. DRC3 connects the N-DRC to dynein g to regulate flagellar waveform

    PubMed Central

    Awata, Junya; Song, Kangkang; Lin, Jianfeng; King, Stephen M.; Sanderson, Michael J.; Nicastro, Daniela; Witman, George B.

    2015-01-01

    The nexin-dynein regulatory complex (N-DRC), which is a major hub for the control of flagellar motility, contains at least 11 different subunits. A major challenge is to determine the location and function of each of these subunits within the N-DRC. We characterized a Chlamydomonas mutant defective in the N-DRC subunit DRC3. Of the known N-DRC subunits, the drc3 mutant is missing only DRC3. Like other N-DRC mutants, the drc3 mutant has a defect in flagellar motility. However, in contrast to other mutations affecting the N-DRC, drc3 does not suppress flagellar paralysis caused by loss of radial spokes. Cryo–electron tomography revealed that the drc3 mutant lacks a portion of the N-DRC linker domain, including the L1 protrusion, part of the distal lobe, and the connection between these two structures, thus localizing DRC3 to this part of the N-DRC. This and additional considerations enable us to assign DRC3 to the L1 protrusion. Because the L1 protrusion is the only non-dynein structure in contact with the dynein g motor domain in wild-type axonemes and this is the only N-DRC–dynein connection missing in the drc3 mutant, we conclude that DRC3 interacts with dynein g to regulate flagellar waveform. PMID:26063732

  10. Regulation of sperm flagellar motility activation and chemotaxis caused by egg-derived substance(s) in sea cucumber.

    PubMed

    Morita, Masaya; Kitamura, Makoto; Nakajima, Ayako; Sri Susilo, Endang; Takemura, Akihiro; Okuno, Makoto

    2009-04-01

    The sea cucumber Holothuria atra is a broadcast spawner. Among broadcast spawners, fertilization occurs by means of an egg-derived substance(s) that induces sperm flagellar motility activation and chemotaxis. Holothuria atra sperm were quiescent in seawater, but exhibited flagellar motility activation near eggs with chorion (intact eggs). In addition, they moved in a helical motion toward intact eggs as well as a capillary filled with the water layer of the egg extracts, suggesting that an egg-derived compound(s) causes motility activation and chemotaxis. Furthermore, demembranated sperm flagella were reactivated in high pH (> 7.8) solution without cAMP, and a phosphorylation assay using (gamma-32P)ATP showed that axonemal protein phosphorylation and dephosphorylation also occurred in a pH-dependent manner. These results suggest that the activation of sperm motility in holothurians is controlled by pH-sensitive changes in axonemal protein phosphorylation. Ca2+ concentration affected the swimming trajectory of demembranated sperm, indicating that Ca2+-binding proteins present at the flagella may be associated with regulation of flagellar waveform. Moreover, the phosphorylation states of several axonemal proteins were Ca2+-sensitive, indicating that Ca2+ impacts both kinase and phosphatase activities. In addition, in vivo sperm protein phosphorylation occurred after treatment with a water-soluble egg extract. Our results suggest that one or more egg-derived compounds activate motility and subsequent chemotactic behavior via Ca2+-sensitive flagellar protein phosphorylation.

  11. Load Response of the Flagellar Beat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klindt, Gary S.; Ruloff, Christian; Wagner, Christian; Friedrich, Benjamin M.

    2016-12-01

    Cilia and flagella exhibit regular bending waves that perform mechanical work on the surrounding fluid, to propel cellular swimmers and pump fluids inside organisms. Here, we quantify a force-velocity relationship of the beating flagellum, by exposing flagellated Chlamydomonas cells to controlled microfluidic flows. A simple theory of flagellar limit-cycle oscillations, calibrated by measurements in the absence of flow, reproduces this relationship quantitatively. We derive a link between the energy efficiency of the flagellar beat and its ability to synchronize to oscillatory flows.

  12. Genetic and Molecular Characterization of Flagellar Assembly in Shewanella oneidensis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Lin; Wang, Jixuan; Tang, Peng; Chen, Haijiang; Gao, Haichun

    2011-01-01

    Shewanella oneidensis is a highly motile organism by virtue of a polar flagellum. Unlike most flagellated bacteria, it contains only one major chromosome segment encoding the components of the flagellum with the exception of the motor proteins. In this region, three genes encode flagellinsaccording to the original genome annotation. However, we find that only flaA and flaB encode functional filament subunits. Although these two genesare under the control of different promoters, they are actively transcribed and subsequently translated, producing a considerable number of flagellin proteins. Additionally, both flagellins are able to interact with their chaperon FliS and are subjected to feedback regulation. Furthermore, FlaA and FlaB are glycosylated by a pathwayinvolving a major glycosylating enzyme,PseB, in spite of the lack of the majority of theconsensus glycosylation sites. In conclusion, flagellar assembly in S. oneidensis has novel features despite the conservation of homologous genes across taxa. PMID:21731763

  13. Right lower limb apraxia in a patient with left supplementary motor area infarction: intactness of the corticospinal tract confirmed by transcranial magnetic stimulation.

    PubMed

    Chang, Min Cheol; Chun, Min Ho

    2015-02-01

    We reported a 50-year-old female patient with left supplementary motor area infarction who presented right lower limb apraxia and investigated the possible causes using transcranial magnetic stimulation. The patient was able to walk and climb stairs spontaneously without any assistance at 3 weeks after onset. However, she was unable to intentionally move her right lower limb although she understood what she supposed to do. The motor evoked potential evoked by transcranial magnetic stimulation from the right lower limb was within the normal range, indicating that the corticospinal tract innervating the right lower limb was uninjured. Thus, we thought that her motor dysfunction was not induced by motor weakness, and confirmed her symptoms as apraxia. In addition, these results also suggest that transcranial magnetic stimulation is helpful for diagnosing apraxia.

  14. Flagellar Synchronization Is a Simple Alternative to Cell Cycle Synchronization for Ciliary and Flagellar Studies

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Soumita

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is an ideal model organism for studies of ciliary function and assembly. In assays for biological and biochemical effects of various factors on flagellar structure and function, synchronous culture is advantageous for minimizing variability. Here, we have characterized a method in which 100% synchronization is achieved with respect to flagellar length but not with respect to the cell cycle. The method requires inducing flagellar regeneration by amputation of the entire cell population and limiting regeneration time. This results in a maximally homogeneous distribution of flagellar lengths at 3 h postamputation. We found that time-limiting new protein synthesis during flagellar synchronization limits variability in the unassembled pool of limiting flagellar protein and variability in flagellar length without affecting the range of cell volumes. We also found that long- and short-flagella mutants that regenerate normally require longer and shorter synchronization times, respectively. By minimizing flagellar length variability using a simple method requiring only hours and no changes in media, flagellar synchronization facilitates the detection of small changes in flagellar length resulting from both chemical and genetic perturbations in Chlamydomonas. This method increases our ability to probe the basic biology of ciliary size regulation and related disease etiologies. IMPORTANCE Cilia and flagella are highly conserved antenna-like organelles that found in nearly all mammalian cell types. They perform sensory and motile functions contributing to numerous physiological and developmental processes. Defects in their assembly and function are implicated in a wide range of human diseases ranging from retinal degeneration to cancer. Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is an algal model system for studying mammalian cilium formation and function. Here, we report a simple synchronization method that allows detection of

  15. Chlamydomonas IFT172 is encoded by FLA11, interacts with CrEB1, and regulates IFT at the flagellar tip.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Lotte B; Miller, Mark S; Geimer, Stefan; Leitch, Jeffery M; Rosenbaum, Joel L; Cole, Douglas G

    2005-02-08

    The transport of flagellar precursors and removal of turnover products from the flagellar tip is mediated by intraflagellar transport (IFT) , which is essential for both flagellar assembly and maintenance . Large groups of IFT particles are moved from the flagellar base to the tip by kinesin-2, and smaller groups are returned to the base by cytoplasmic dynein 1b. The IFT particles are composed of two protein complexes, A and B, comprising approximately 16-18 polypeptides. How cargo is unloaded from IFT particles, turnover products loaded, and active IFT motors exchanged at the tip is unknown. We previously showed that the Chlamydomonas microtubule end binding protein 1 (CrEB1) localizes to the flagellar tip and is depleted from the tips of the temperature-sensitive (ts) mutant fla11ts . We demonstrate here that FLA11 encodes IFT protein 172, a component of IFT complex B, and show that IFT172 interacts with CrEB1. Because fla11ts cells are defective in IFT particle turnaround at the tip, our results indicate that IFT172 is involved in regulating the transition between anterograde and retrograde IFT at the tip, perhaps by a mechanism involving CrEB1. Therefore, IFT172 is involved in the control of flagellar assembly/disassembly at the tip.

  16. Regulation of flagellar motility during biofilm formation

    PubMed Central

    Guttenplan, Sarah B.; Kearns, Daniel B.

    2013-01-01

    Many bacteria swim in liquid or swarm over solid surfaces by synthesizing rotary flagella. The same bacteria that are motile also commonly form non-motile multicellular aggregates held together by an extracellular matrix called biofilms. Biofilms are an important part of the lifestyle of pathogenic bacteria and it is assumed that there is a motility-to-biofilm transition wherein the inhibition of motility promotes biofilm formation. The transition is largely inferred from regulatory mutants that reveal the opposite regulation of the two phenotypes. Here we review the regulation of motility during biofilm formation in Bacillus, Pseudomonas, Vibrio, and Escherichia, and we conclude that the motility-to-biofilm transition, if necessary, likely involves two steps. In the short term, flagella are functionally regulated to either inhibit rotation or modulate the basal flagellar reversal frequency. Over the long term, flagellar gene transcription is inhibited and in the absence of de novo synthesis, flagella are likely diluted to extinction through growth. Both short term and long term control is likely important to the motility-to-biofilm transition to stabilize aggregates and optimize resource investment. We emphasize the newly discovered classes of flagellar functional regulators and speculate that others await discovery in the context of biofilm formation. PMID:23480406

  17. Aeromonas hydrophila Lateral Flagellar Gene Transcriptional Hierarchy

    PubMed Central

    Wilhelms, Markus; Gonzalez, Victor; Merino, Susana

    2013-01-01

    Aeromonas hydrophila AH-3 lateral flagella are not assembled when bacteria grow in liquid media; however, lateral flagellar genes are transcribed. Our results indicate that A. hydrophila lateral flagellar genes are transcribed at three levels (class I to III genes) and share some similarities with, but have many important differences from, genes of Vibrio parahaemolyticus. A. hydrophila lateral flagellum class I gene transcription is σ70 dependent, which is consistent with the fact that lateral flagellum is constitutively transcribed, in contrast to the characteristics of V. parahaemolyticus. The fact that multiple genes are included in class I highlights that lateral flagellar genes are less hierarchically transcribed than polar flagellum genes. The A. hydrophila lafK-fliEJL gene cluster (where the subscript L distinguishes genes for lateral flagella from those for polar flagella) is exclusively from class I and is in V. parahaemolyticus class I and II. Furthermore, the A. hydrophila flgAMNL cluster is not transcribed from the σ54/LafK-dependent promoter and does not contain class II genes. Here, we propose a gene transcriptional hierarchy for the A. hydrophila lateral flagella. PMID:23335410

  18. Studies on flagellar shortening in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    SciTech Connect

    Cherniack, J.

    1985-01-01

    Flagellar shortening of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii was promoted by sodium chloride, pyrophosphate (sodium, potassium and ammonium salts), EDTA and EGTA, succinate, citrate and oxalate (sodium salts), caffeine and aminophylline. Removal of calcium from the medium potentiated the effects of these agents in inducing shortening. Investigations of the release of phosphorylated compounds to the medium during pyrophosphate-induced flagellar shortening of cells pre-labelled with /sup 32/P, revealed an as yet unidentified /sup 32/P-labelled compound with distinct chromatographic properties. Chromatography and electrophoresis indicates that it is a small, highly polar molecule with a high charge to mass ratio, containing thermo- and acid-labile phosphate linkages. Investigations showed of the release of /sup 35/S-labelled protein to the medium from cells pre-labelled with /sup 35/S-sulfate showed that flagellated cells released two prominent polypeptides which comigrated with ..cap alpha..- and ..beta..-flagellar tubulin on SDS polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, while deflagellated cells did not.

  19. Emergence of flagellar beating from the collective behavior of individual ATP-powered dyneins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Namdeo, S.; Onck, P. R.

    2016-10-01

    Flagella are hair-like projections from the surface of eukaryotic cells, and they play an important role in many cellular functions, such as cell-motility. The beating of flagella is enabled by their internal architecture, the axoneme, and is powered by a dense distribution of motor proteins, dyneins. The dyneins deliver the required mechanical work through the hydrolysis of ATP. Although the dynein-ATP cycle, the axoneme microstructure, and the flagellar-beating kinematics are well studied, their integration into a coherent picture of ATP-powered flagellar beating is still lacking. Here we show that a time-delayed negative-work-based switching mechanism is able to convert the individual sliding action of hundreds of dyneins into a regular overall beating pattern leading to propulsion. We developed a computational model based on a minimal representation of the axoneme consisting of two representative doublet microtubules connected by nexin links. The relative sliding of the microtubules is incorporated by modeling two groups of ATP-powered dyneins, each responsible for sliding in opposite directions. A time-delayed switching mechanism is postulated, which is key in converting the local individual sliding action of multiple dyneins into global beating. Our results demonstrate that an overall nonreciprocal beating pattern can emerge with time due to the spatial and temporal coordination of the individual dyneins. These findings provide insights in the fundamental working mechanism of axonemal dyneins and could possibly open new research directions in the field of flagellar motility.

  20. The bacterial flagellar protein export apparatus processively transports flagellar proteins even with extremely infrequent ATP hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Minamino, Tohru; Morimoto, Yusuke V; Kinoshita, Miki; Aldridge, Phillip D; Namba, Keiichi

    2014-12-22

    For self-assembly of the bacterial flagellum, a specific protein export apparatus utilizes ATP and proton motive force (PMF) as the energy source to transport component proteins to the distal growing end. The export apparatus consists of a transmembrane PMF-driven export gate and a cytoplasmic ATPase complex composed of FliH, FliI and FliJ. The FliI(6)FliJ complex is structurally similar to the α(3)β(3)γ complex of F(O)F(1)-ATPase. FliJ allows the gate to efficiently utilize PMF to drive flagellar protein export but it remains unknown how. Here, we report the role of ATP hydrolysis by the FliI(6)FliJ complex. The export apparatus processively transported flagellar proteins to grow flagella even with extremely infrequent or no ATP hydrolysis by FliI mutation (E211D and E211Q, respectively). This indicates that the rate of ATP hydrolysis is not at all coupled with the export rate. Deletion of FliI residues 401 to 410 resulted in no flagellar formation although this FliI deletion mutant retained 40% of the ATPase activity, suggesting uncoupling between ATP hydrolysis and activation of the gate. We propose that infrequent ATP hydrolysis by the FliI6FliJ ring is sufficient for gate activation, allowing processive translocation of export substrates for efficient flagellar assembly.

  1. A Complete Set of Flagellar Genes Acquired by Horizontal Transfer Coexists with the Endogenous Flagellar System in Rhodobacter sphaeroides▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Poggio, Sebastian; Abreu-Goodger, Cei; Fabela, Salvador; Osorio, Aurora; Dreyfus, Georges; Vinuesa, Pablo; Camarena, Laura

    2007-01-01

    Bacteria swim in liquid environments by means of a complex rotating structure known as the flagellum. Approximately 40 proteins are required for the assembly and functionality of this structure. Rhodobacter sphaeroides has two flagellar systems. One of these systems has been shown to be functional and is required for the synthesis of the well-characterized single subpolar flagellum, while the other was found only after the genome sequence of this bacterium was completed. In this work we found that the second flagellar system of R. sphaeroides can be expressed and produces a functional flagellum. In many bacteria with two flagellar systems, one is required for swimming, while the other allows movement in denser environments by producing a large number of flagella over the entire cell surface. In contrast, the second flagellar system of R. sphaeroides produces polar flagella that are required for swimming. Expression of the second set of flagellar genes seems to be positively regulated under anaerobic growth conditions. Phylogenic analysis suggests that the flagellar system that was initially characterized was in fact acquired by horizontal transfer from a γ-proteobacterium, while the second flagellar system contains the native genes. Interestingly, other α-proteobacteria closely related to R. sphaeroides have also acquired a set of flagellar genes similar to the set found in R. sphaeroides, suggesting that a common ancestor received this gene cluster. PMID:17293429

  2. Polar features in the flagellar propulsion of E. coli bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianchi, S.; Saglimbeni, F.; Lepore, A.; Di Leonardo, R.

    2015-06-01

    E. coli bacteria swim following a run and tumble pattern. In the run state all flagella join in a single helical bundle that propels the cell body along approximately straight paths. When one or more flagellar motors reverse direction the bundle unwinds and the cell randomizes its orientation. This basic picture represents an idealization of a much more complex dynamical problem. Although it has been shown that bundle formation can occur at either pole of the cell, it is still unclear whether these two run states correspond to asymmetric propulsion features. Using holographic microscopy we record the 3D motions of individual bacteria swimming in optical traps. We find that most cells possess two run states characterized by different propulsion forces, total torque, and bundle conformations. We analyze the statistical properties of bundle reversal and compare the hydrodynamic features of forward and backward running states. Our method is naturally multi-particle and opens up the way towards controlled hydrodynamic studies of interacting swimming cells.

  3. Polar features in the flagellar propulsion of E. coli bacteria.

    PubMed

    Bianchi, S; Saglimbeni, F; Lepore, A; Di Leonardo, R

    2015-06-01

    E. coli bacteria swim following a run and tumble pattern. In the run state all flagella join in a single helical bundle that propels the cell body along approximately straight paths. When one or more flagellar motors reverse direction the bundle unwinds and the cell randomizes its orientation. This basic picture represents an idealization of a much more complex dynamical problem. Although it has been shown that bundle formation can occur at either pole of the cell, it is still unclear whether these two run states correspond to asymmetric propulsion features. Using holographic microscopy we record the 3D motions of individual bacteria swimming in optical traps. We find that most cells possess two run states characterized by different propulsion forces, total torque, and bundle conformations. We analyze the statistical properties of bundle reversal and compare the hydrodynamic features of forward and backward running states. Our method is naturally multi-particle and opens up the way towards controlled hydrodynamic studies of interacting swimming cells.

  4. Flagellar synchronization through direct hydrodynamic interactions.

    PubMed

    Brumley, Douglas R; Wan, Kirsty Y; Polin, Marco; Goldstein, Raymond E

    2014-07-29

    Flows generated by ensembles of flagella are crucial to development, motility and sensing, but the mechanisms behind this striking coordination remain unclear. We present novel experiments in which two micropipette-held somatic cells of Volvox carteri, with distinct intrinsic beating frequencies, are studied by high-speed imaging as a function of their separation and orientation. Analysis of time series shows that the interflagellar coupling, constrained by lack of connections between cells to be hydrodynamical, exhibits a spatial dependence consistent with theory. At close spacings it produces robust synchrony for thousands of beats, while at increasing separations synchrony is degraded by stochastic processes. Manipulation of the relative flagellar orientation reveals in-phase and antiphase states, consistent with dynamical theories. Flagellar tracking with exquisite precision reveals waveform changes that result from hydrodynamic coupling. This study proves unequivocally that flagella coupled solely through a fluid can achieve robust synchrony despite differences in their intrinsic properties.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02750.001.

  5. On Flagellar Structure in Certain Flagellates

    PubMed Central

    Gibbons, I. R.; Grimstone, A. V.

    1960-01-01

    This paper describes the structure of the flagella, basal bodies, and some of the associated fibre systems in three genera of complex flagellates, Trichonympha, Pseudotrichonympha, and Holomastigotoides. Three groups of longitudinal fibres occur in a flagellum: two central and nine outer fibres such as have been repeatedly described in other material, and an additional set of nine smaller secondary fibres not previously identified as such. Each central fibre shows a helical substructure; the pair of them are enveloped in a common sheath. Each outer fibre is a doublet with one subfibre bearing projections—called arms—that extend toward the adjacent outer fibre. The basal body is formed by a cylinder of nine triplet outer fibres. Two subfibres of each triplet continue into the flagellum and constitute the doublets. The third subfibre terminates at the transition of basal body to flagellum, possibly giving rise to the nine radial transitional fibres that seem to attach the end of the basal body to the surface of the organism. The central and secondary flagellar fibres are not present in the lumen of the basal body, but other complex structures occur there. The form of these intraluminal structures differs from genus to genus. The flagellar unit is highly asymmetrical. All the flagella examined have possessed the same one of the two possible enantiomorphic forms. At least two systems of fibres are associated with the basal bodies of all three genera. PMID:13827900

  6. Gene Expression Profiling of Flagellar Disassembly in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    PubMed Central

    Chamberlain, Kara L.; Miller, Steven H.; Keller, Laura R.

    2008-01-01

    Flagella are sensory organelles that interact with the environment through signal transduction and gene expression networks. We used microarray profiling to examine gene regulation associated with flagellar length change in the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Microarrays were probed with fluorescently labeled cDNAs synthesized from RNA extracted from cells before and during flagellar assembly or disassembly. Evaluation of the gene expression profiles identified >100 clones showing at least a twofold change in expression during flagellar length changes. Products of these genes are associated not only with flagellar structure and motility but also with other cellular responses, including signal transduction and metabolism. Expression of specific genes from each category was further characterized at higher resolution by using quantitative real-time PCR (qRT–PCR). Analysis and comparison of the gene expression profiles coupled to flagellar assembly and disassembly revealed that each process involves a new and uncharacterized whole-cell response to flagellar length changes. This analysis lays the groundwork for a more comprehensive understanding of the cellular and molecular networks regulating flagellar length changes. PMID:18493036

  7. Synthesis, transport, and utilization of specific flagellar proteins during flagellar regeneration in Chlamydomonas

    PubMed Central

    1982-01-01

    We labeled gametes of Chlamydomonas with 10-min pulses of 35SO4(-2) before and at various times after deflagellation, and isolated whole cells and flagella immediately after the pulse. The labeled proteins were separated by one- or two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, and the amount of isotope incorporated into specific proteins was determined. Individual proteins were identified with particular structures by correlating missing axonemal polypeptides with ultrastructural defects in paralyzed mutants, or by polypeptide analysis of flagellar fractions. Synthesis of most flagellar proteins appeared to be coordinately induced after flagellar amputation. The rate of synthesis for most quantified proteins increased at least 4- to 10-fold after deflagellation. The kinetics of synthesis of proteins contained together within a structure (e.g., the radial spoke proteins [RSP] ) were frequently similar; however, the kinetics of synthesis of proteins contained in different structures (e.g., RSP vs. alpha- and beta- tubulins) were different. Most newly synthesized flagellar proteins were rapidly transported into the flagellum with kinetics reflecting the rate of growth of the organelle; exceptions included a central tubule complex protein (CT1) and an actinlike component, both of which appeared to be supplied almost entirely from pre-existing, unlabeled pools. Isotope dilution experiments showed that, for most quantified axonemal proteins, a minimum of 35-40% of the polypeptide chains used in assembling a new axoneme was synthesized during regeneration; these proteins appeared to have predeflagellation pools of approximately the same size relative to their stoichiometries in the axoneme. In contrast, CT1 and the actinlike protein had comparatively large pools. PMID:7118994

  8. Regulation of flagellar motility by the conserved flagellar protein CG34110/Ccdc135/FAP50

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yong; Cochran, Deborah A.; Gargano, Mary D.; King, Iryna; Samhat, Nayef K.; Burger, Benjain P.; Sabourin, Katherine R.; Hou, Yuqing; Awata, Junya; Parry, David A.D.; Marshall, Wallace F.; Witman, George B.; Lu, Xiangyi

    2011-01-01

    Eukaryotic cilia and flagella are vital sensory and motile organelles. The calcium channel PKD2 mediates sensory perception on cilia and flagella, and defects in this can contribute to ciliopathic diseases. Signaling from Pkd2-dependent Ca2+ rise in the cilium to downstream effectors may require intermediary proteins that are largely unknown. To identify these proteins, we carried out genetic screens for mutations affecting Drosophila melanogaster sperm storage, a process mediated by Drosophila Pkd2. Here we show that a new mutation lost boys (lobo) encodes a conserved flagellar protein CG34110, which corresponds to vertebrate Ccdc135 (E = 6e-78) highly expressed in ciliated respiratory epithelia and sperm, and to FAP50 (E = 1e-28) in the Chlamydomonas reinhardtii flagellar proteome. CG34110 localizes along the fly sperm flagellum. FAP50 is tightly associated with the outer doublet microtubules of the axoneme and appears not to be a component of the central pair, radial spokes, dynein arms, or structures defined by the mbo waveform mutants. Phenotypic analyses indicate that both Pkd2 and lobo specifically affect sperm movement into the female storage receptacle. We hypothesize that the CG34110/Ccdc135/FAP50 family of conserved flagellar proteins functions within the axoneme to mediate Pkd2-dependent processes in the sperm flagellum and other motile cilia. PMID:21289096

  9. Flagellar hook protein from Salmonella SJ25.

    PubMed

    Kagawa, H; Owaribe, K; Asakura, S; Takahashi, N

    1976-01-01

    From acid-disintegrated flagellar hooks of Salmonella SJ25 an immunochemically pure preparation of hook protein was obtained by column chromatography. The molecular weight of the protein determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate-gel electrophoresis was 43,000, whereas that of SJ25 flagellin was 56,000. The amino-terminal residue of the hook protein was determined to be seryl. The amino acid composition of the protein was determined, the results being very similar to that for an Escheria coli hook protein reported by Silverman and Simon (1972). Within a wavelength range of 200 to 250 nm, our purified preparation of hook protein gave a circular dichroism spectrum with unusually small amplitudes, suggesting that the alpha-helix content of the protein was very low.

  10. Flagellar oscillation: a commentary on proposed mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Woolley, David M

    2010-08-01

    Eukaryotic flagella and cilia have a remarkably uniform internal 'engine' known as the '9+2' axoneme. With few exceptions, the function of cilia and flagella is to beat rhythmically and set up relative motion between themselves and the liquid that surrounds them. The molecular basis of axonemal movement is understood in considerable detail, with the exception of the mechanism that provides its rhythmical or oscillatory quality. Some kind of repetitive 'switching' event is assumed to occur; there are several proposals regarding the nature of the 'switch' and how it might operate. Herein I first summarise all the factors known to influence the rate of the oscillation (the beating frequency). Many of these factors exert their effect through modulating the mean sliding velocity between the nine doublet microtubules of the axoneme, this velocity being the determinant of bend growth rate and bend propagation rate. Then I explain six proposed mechanisms for flagellar oscillation and review the evidence on which they are based. Finally, I attempt to derive an economical synthesis, drawing for preference on experimental research that has been minimally disruptive of the intricate structure of the axoneme. The 'provisional synthesis' is that flagellar oscillation emerges from an effect of passive sliding direction on the dynein arms. Sliding in one direction facilitates force-generating cycles and dynein-to-dynein synchronisation along a doublet; sliding in the other direction is inhibitory. The direction of the initial passive sliding normally oscillates because it is controlled hydrodynamically through the alternating direction of the propulsive thrust. However, in the absence of such regulation, there can be a perpetual, mechanical self-triggering through a reversal of sliding direction due to the recoil of elastic structures that deform as a response to the prior active sliding. This provisional synthesis may be a useful basis for further examination of the problem.

  11. THE FLAGELLAR PHOTORESPONSE IN VOLVOX SPECIES (VOLVOCACEAE, CHLOROPHYCEAE)(1).

    PubMed

    Solari, Cristian A; Drescher, Knut; Goldstein, Raymond E

    2011-06-01

    Steering their swimming direction toward the light is crucial for the viability of Volvox colonies, the larger members of the volvocine algae. While it is known that this phototactic steering is achieved by a difference in behavior of the flagella on the illuminated and shaded sides, conflicting reports suggest that this asymmetry arises either from a change in beating direction or a change in beating frequency. Here, we report direct observations of the flagellar behavior of various Volvox species with different phyletic origin in response to light intensity changes and thereby resolve this controversy: Volvox barberi W. Shaw from the section Volvox sensu Nozaki (2003) changes the direction of the flagellar beating plane, while species encompassed in the group Eudorina (Volvox carteri F. Stein, Volvox aureus Ehrenb., and Volvox tertius Art. Mey.) decrease the flagellar beating frequency, sometimes down to flagellar arrest.

  12. Escherichia coli modulates its motor speed on sensing an attractant.

    PubMed

    Karmakar, Richa; Naaz, Farha; Tirumkudulu, Mahesh S; Venkatesh, K V

    2016-10-01

    It is well known that Escherichia coli achieves chemotaxis by modulating the bias of the flagellar motor. Recent experiments have shown that the bacteria vary their swimming speeds as well in presence of attractants. However, this increase in the swimming speed in response to the attractants has not been correlated with the increase in the flagellar motor speed. Using flickering dark-field microscopy, we measure the head-rotation speed of a large population of cells to correlate it with the flagellar motor speed. Experiments performed with wild-type and trg-deletion mutant strains suggest that the cells are capable of modulating the flagellar motor speed via mere sensing of a ligand. The motor speed can be further correlated with the swimming speed of the cells and was found to be linear. These results suggest the existence of a hitherto unknown intra-cellular pathway that modulates the flagellar motor speed in response to sensing of chemicals, thereby making chemotaxis more efficient than previously known.

  13. Comprehensive Mapping of the Escherichia coli Flagellar Regulatory Network

    PubMed Central

    Fitzgerald, Devon M.; Bonocora, Richard P.; Wade, Joseph T.

    2014-01-01

    Flagellar synthesis is a highly regulated process in all motile bacteria. In Escherichia coli and related species, the transcription factor FlhDC is the master regulator of a multi-tiered transcription network. FlhDC activates transcription of a number of genes, including some flagellar genes and the gene encoding the alternative Sigma factor FliA. Genes whose expression is required late in flagellar assembly are primarily transcribed by FliA, imparting temporal regulation of transcription and coupling expression to flagellar assembly. In this study, we use ChIP-seq and RNA-seq to comprehensively map the E. coli FlhDC and FliA regulons. We define a surprisingly restricted FlhDC regulon, including two novel regulated targets and two binding sites not associated with detectable regulation of surrounding genes. In contrast, we greatly expand the known FliA regulon. Surprisingly, 30 of the 52 FliA binding sites are located inside genes. Two of these intragenic promoters are associated with detectable noncoding RNAs, while the others either produce highly unstable RNAs or are inactive under these conditions. Together, our data redefine the E. coli flagellar regulatory network, and provide new insight into the temporal orchestration of gene expression that coordinates the flagellar assembly process. PMID:25275371

  14. Flagellar tip activation stimulated by membrane adhesions in Chlamydomonas gametes

    PubMed Central

    1980-01-01

    Membrane adhesions between the flagella of mating-type "plus" and "minus" gametes of Chlamydomonas reinhardi are shown to stimulate a rapid change in the ultrastructure of the flagellar tips, designated as flagellar tip activation (FTA). A dense substance, termed fibrous tip material (FTM), accumulates between the flagellar membrane and the nine single A microtubules of the tip. The A microtubules then elongate, growing into the distal region of the tip, increasing tip length by 30%. This study describes FTA kinetics during normal and mutant matings, presents experiments designed to probe its role in the mating reaction, and offers the following conclusions: (a) FTA is elicited by agents that cross-link flagellar membrane components (including natural sexual agglutinins, antiflagellar antisera, and concanavalin A) but not by flagellar adherence to polylysine-coated films. (b) FTA is reversed by flagellar disadhesion. (c) Gametes can undergo repeated cycles of FTA during successive rounds of adhesion/disadhesion. (d) FTA, flagellar tipping, and sexual signaling are simultaneously blocked by colchicine and by vinblastine, suggesting that tubulinlike molecules, perhaps exposed at the membrane surface, are involved in all three responses. (e) FTA is not blocked by short exposure to chymotrypsin, by cytochalasins B and D, nor by concanavalin A, even though all block cell fusion; the response is therefore autonomous and experimentally dissociable from later stages in the mating reaction. (f) Under no experimental conditions is mating-structure activation observed to occur unless FTA also occurs. This study concludes that FTA is a necessary event in the sexual signaling sequence, and presents a testable working model for its mechanism. PMID:7358792

  15. Architecture of a flagellar apparatus in the fast-swimming magnetotactic bacterium MO-1.

    PubMed

    Ruan, Juanfang; Kato, Takayuki; Santini, Claire-Lise; Miyata, Tomoko; Kawamoto, Akihiro; Zhang, Wei-Jia; Bernadac, Alain; Wu, Long-Fei; Namba, Keiichi

    2012-12-11

    The bacterial flagellum is a motility organelle that consists of a rotary motor and a helical propeller. The flagella usually work individually or by forming a loose bundle to produce thrust. However, the flagellar apparatus of marine bacterium MO-1 is a tight bundle of seven flagellar filaments enveloped in a sheath, and it has been a mystery as to how the flagella rotate smoothly in coordination. Here we have used electron cryotomography to visualize the 3D architecture of the sheathed flagella. The seven filaments are enveloped with 24 fibrils in the sheath, and their basal bodies are arranged in an intertwined hexagonal array similar to the thick and thin filaments of vertebrate skeletal muscles. This complex and exquisite architecture strongly suggests that the fibrils counter-rotate between flagella in direct contact to minimize the friction of high-speed rotation of individual flagella in the tight bundle within the sheath to enable MO-1 cells to swim at about 300 µm/s.

  16. Flagellar apparatus gene sequences of Aeromonas hydrophila AL09-73 isolate

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Flagellar apparatus genes of recent outbreak Aeromonas hydrophila AL09-73 isolate were sequenced and characterized. Total 28 flagellar genes were identified. The sizes of the genes range from 318 to 2001 nucleotides, which potentially encode different complex flagellar proteins. At nucleotide and...

  17. Reactivation of flagellar motility in demembranated Leishmania reveals role of cAMP in flagellar wave reversal to ciliary waveform

    PubMed Central

    Mukhopadhyay, Aakash Gautam; Dey, Chinmoy Sankar

    2016-01-01

    The flagellum of parasitic trypanosomes is a multifunctional appendage essential for its viability and infectivity. However, the biological mechanisms that make the flagellum so dynamic remains unexplored. No method is available to access and induce axonemal motility at will to decipher motility regulation in trypanosomes. For the first time we report the development of a detergent-extracted/demembranated ATP-reactivated model for studying flagellar motility in Leishmania. Flagellar beat parameters of reactivated parasites were similar to live ones. Using this model we discovered that cAMP (both exogenous and endogenous) induced flagellar wave reversal to a ciliary waveform in reactivated parasites via cAMP-dependent protein kinase A. The effect was reversible and highly specific. Such an effect of cAMP on the flagellar waveform has never been observed before in any organism. Flagellar wave reversal allows parasites to change direction of swimming. Our findings suggest a possible cAMP-dependent mechanism by which Leishmania responds to its surrounding microenvironment, necessary for its survival. Our demembranated-reactivated model not only serves as an important tool for functional studies of flagellated eukaryotic parasites but has the potential to understand ciliary motility regulation with possible implication on human ciliopathies. PMID:27849021

  18. In situ ellipsometric study of surface immobilization of flagellar filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurunczi, S.; Németh, A.; Hülber, T.; Kozma, P.; Petrik, P.; Jankovics, H.; Sebestyén, A.; Vonderviszt, F.; Fried, M.; Bársony, I.

    2010-10-01

    Protein filaments composed of thousands of subunits are promising candidates as sensing elements in biosensors. In this work in situ spectroscopic ellipsometry is applied to monitor the surface immobilization of flagellar filaments. This study is the first step towards the development of layers of filamentous receptors for sensor applications. Surface activation is performed using silanization and a subsequent glutaraldehyde crosslinking. Structure of the flagellar filament layers immobilized on activated and non-activated Si wafer substrates is determined using a two-layer effective medium model that accounted for the vertical density distribution of flagellar filaments with lengths of 300-1500 nm bound to the surface. The formation of the first interface layer can be explained by the multipoint covalent attachment of the filaments, while the second layer is mainly composed of tail pinned filaments floating upwards with the free parts. As confirmed by atomic force microscopy, covalent immobilization resulted in an increased surface density compared to absorption.

  19. Magnetic Propulsion of Microswimmers with DNA-Based Flagellar Bundles.

    PubMed

    Maier, Alexander M; Weig, Cornelius; Oswald, Peter; Frey, Erwin; Fischer, Peer; Liedl, Tim

    2016-02-10

    We show that DNA-based self-assembly can serve as a general and flexible tool to construct artificial flagella of several micrometers in length and only tens of nanometers in diameter. By attaching the DNA flagella to biocompatible magnetic microparticles, we provide a proof of concept demonstration of hybrid structures that, when rotated in an external magnetic field, propel by means of a flagellar bundle, similar to self-propelling peritrichous bacteria. Our theoretical analysis predicts that flagellar bundles that possess a length-dependent bending stiffness should exhibit a superior swimming speed compared to swimmers with a single appendage. The DNA self-assembly method permits the realization of these improved flagellar bundles in good agreement with our quantitative model. DNA flagella with well-controlled shape could fundamentally increase the functionality of fully biocompatible nanorobots and extend the scope and complexity of active materials.

  20. Magnetic Propulsion of Microswimmers with DNA-Based Flagellar Bundles

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    We show that DNA-based self-assembly can serve as a general and flexible tool to construct artificial flagella of several micrometers in length and only tens of nanometers in diameter. By attaching the DNA flagella to biocompatible magnetic microparticles, we provide a proof of concept demonstration of hybrid structures that, when rotated in an external magnetic field, propel by means of a flagellar bundle, similar to self-propelling peritrichous bacteria. Our theoretical analysis predicts that flagellar bundles that possess a length-dependent bending stiffness should exhibit a superior swimming speed compared to swimmers with a single appendage. The DNA self-assembly method permits the realization of these improved flagellar bundles in good agreement with our quantitative model. DNA flagella with well-controlled shape could fundamentally increase the functionality of fully biocompatible nanorobots and extend the scope and complexity of active materials. PMID:26821214

  1. Two flagellar stators and their roles in motility and virulence in Pseudomonas syringae pv. tabaci 6605.

    PubMed

    Kanda, Eiko; Tatsuta, Takafumi; Suzuki, Tomoko; Taguchi, Fumiko; Naito, Kana; Inagaki, Yoshishige; Toyoda, Kazuhiro; Shiraishi, Tomonori; Ichinose, Yuki

    2011-02-01

    The motor proteins around the flagellar basal body consist of two cytoplasmic membrane proteins, MotA and MotB, and function as a complex that acts as the stator to generate the torque that drives rotation. Genome analysis of several Pseudomonas syringae pathovars revealed that there are two sets of genes encoding motor proteins: motAB and motCD. Deduced amino acid sequences for MotA/B and MotC/D showed homologies to the H(+)-driven stator from Escherichia coli and Na(+)-driven stator from Vibrio alginolyticus, respectively. However, the swimming motility of P. syringae pv. tabaci (Pta) 6605 was inhibited by the protonophore carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone but not by the sodium stator-specific inhibitor phenamil. To identify a gene encoding the stator protein required for motility, ∆motAB, ∆motCD, and ∆motABCD mutants were generated. The ∆motCD mutant had remarkably reduced and the ∆motABCD mutant completely abolished swimming motilities, whereas the ∆motAB mutant retained some degree of these abilities. The ∆motCD and ∆motABCD mutants did not produce N-acyl-homoserine lactones (AHLs), quorum-sensing molecules in this pathogen, and remarkably reduced the ability to cause disease in host tobacco leaves, as we previously observed in the ∆fliC mutant strain. These results strongly indicate that both stator pairs in Pta 6605 are proton-dependent and that MotCD is important for not only flagellar motility but also for production of AHLs and the ability to cause disease in host plants.

  2. Assembly mechanism of Trypanosoma brucei BILBO1 at the flagellar pocket collar.

    PubMed

    Vidilaseris, Keni; Lesigang, Johannes; Morriswood, Brooke; Dong, Gang

    2015-01-01

    The flagellar pocket is a bulb-like invagination of the plasma membrane that encloses the base of the single flagellum in trypanosomes. It is the site of all endo- and exocytic activity in the parasite and has thus been proposed to be a therapeutic target. At the neck of the flagellar pocket is an electron-dense cytoskeletal structure named the flagellar pocket collar. The protein BILBO1 was the first characterized and remains the only known component of the flagellar pocket collar, with essential functions in the biogenesis of both the flagellar pocket and flagellar pocket collar. We recently reported that the filamentous assembly of Trypanosoma brucei BILBO1 (TbBILBO1) is mediated by its central coiled coil domain and C-terminal leucine zipper. Here, we discuss how TbBILBO1 might assemble at the flagellar pocket collar in T. brucei.

  3. Functional Activation of the Flagellar Type III Secretion Export Apparatus

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Andrew M.; Calvo, Rebecca A.; Kearns, Daniel B.

    2015-01-01

    Flagella are assembled sequentially from the inside-out with morphogenetic checkpoints that enforce the temporal order of subunit addition. Here we show that flagellar basal bodies fail to proceed to hook assembly at high frequency in the absence of the monotopic protein SwrB of Bacillus subtilis. Genetic suppressor analysis indicates that SwrB activates the flagellar type III secretion export apparatus by the membrane protein FliP. Furthermore, mutants defective in the flagellar C-ring phenocopy the absence of SwrB for reduced hook frequency and C-ring defects may be bypassed either by SwrB overexpression or by a gain-of-function allele in the polymerization domain of FliG. We conclude that SwrB enhances the probability that the flagellar basal body adopts a conformation proficient for secretion to ensure that rod and hook subunits are not secreted in the absence of a suitable platform on which to polymerize. PMID:26244495

  4. Mutational Analysis of the Flagellar Rotor Protein FliN: Identification of Surfaces Important for Flagellar Assembly and Switching†

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Koushik; Harmon, Jacob G.; Blair, David F.

    2006-01-01

    FliN is a component of the flagellar switch complex in many bacterial species. The crystal structure is known for most of FliN, and a targeted cross-linking study (K. Paul and D. F. Blair, J. Bacteriol. 188:2502-2511, 2006) showed that it is organized in ring-shaped tetramers at the bottom of the basal body C ring. FliN is essential for flagellar assembly and direction switching, but its precise functions have not been defined. Here, we identify functionally important regions on FliN by systematic mutagenesis. Nonconservative mutations were made at positions sampling the surface of the protein, and the effects on flagellar assembly and function were measured. Flagellar assembly was disrupted by mutations in a conserved hydrophobic patch centered on the dimer twofold axis or by mutations on the surface that forms the dimer-dimer interface in the tetramer. The assembly defect in hydrophobic-patch mutants was partially rescued by overexpression of the flagellar export proteins FliH and FliI, and coprecipitation assays demonstrated a binding interaction between FliN and FliH that was weakened by mutations in the hydrophobic patch. Thus, FliN might contribute to export by providing binding sites for FliH or FliH-containing complexes. The region around the hydrophobic patch is also important for switching; certain mutations in or near the patch caused a smooth-swimming chemotaxis defect that in most cases could be partially rescued by overexpression of the clockwise-signaling protein CheY. The results indicate that FliN is more closely involved in switching than has been supposed, possibly contributing to the binding site for CheY on the switch. PMID:16816196

  5. Flagellar regeneration in the scaly green flagellate Tetraselmis striata (Prasinophyceae): regeneration kinetics and effect of inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reize, I. B.; Melkonian, M.

    1987-06-01

    Flagellar regeneration after experimental amputation was studied in synchronized axenic cultures of the scaly green flagellate Tetraselmis striata (Prasinophyceae). After removal of flagella by mechanical shearing, 95% of the cells regrow all four flagella (incl. the scaly covering) to nearly full length with a linear velocity of 50 nm/min under standard conditions. Flagellar regeneration is independent of photosynthesis (no effect of DCMU; the same regeneration rate in the light or in the dark), but depends on de novo protein synthesis: cycloheximide at a low concentration (0.35 μM) blocks flagellar regeneration reversibly. No pool of flagellar precursors appears to be present throughout the flagellated phase of the cell cycle. A transient pool of flagellar precursors, sufficient to generate 2.5 μm of flagellar length, however, develops during flagellar regeneration. Tunicamycin (2 μg/ml) inhibits flagellar regeneration only after a second flagellar amputation, when flagella reach only one third the length of the control. Flagellar regeneration in T. striata differs considerably from that of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and represents an excellent model system for the study of synchronous Golgi apparatus (GA) activation, and transport and exocytosis of GA-derived macromolecules (scales).

  6. Mechanoregulation of molecular motors in flagella

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gadelha, Hermes

    2014-11-01

    Molecular motors are nano-biological machines responsible for exerting forces that drive movement in living organisms, from cargo transport to cell division and motility. Interestingly, despite the inherent complexity of many interacting motors, order and structure may arise naturally, as exemplified by the harmonic, self-organized undulatory motion of the flagellum. The real mechanisms behind this collective spontaneous oscillation are still unknown, and it is challenging task to measure experimentally the molecular motor dynamics within the flagellar structure in real time. In this talk we will explore different competing hypotheses that are capable of generating flagellar bending waves that ``resemble'' in-vitro observations, emphasizing the need for further mathematical analysis and model validation. It also highlight that this is a fertile and challenging area of inter-disciplinary research for applied mathematicians and demonstrates the importance of future observational and theoretical studies in understanding the underlying mechanics of these motile cell appendages.

  7. The glycosylphosphatidylinositol-PLC in Trypanosoma brucei forms a linear array on the exterior of the flagellar membrane before and after activation.

    PubMed

    Hanrahan, Orla; Webb, Helena; O'Byrne, Robert; Brabazon, Elaine; Treumann, Achim; Sunter, Jack D; Carrington, Mark; Voorheis, H Paul

    2009-06-01

    Bloodstream forms of Trypanosoma brucei contain a glycosylphosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C (GPI-PLC) that cleaves the GPI-anchor of the variable surface glycoprotein (VSG). Its location in trypanosomes has been controversial. Here, using confocal microscopy and surface labelling techniques, we show that the GPI-PLC is located exclusively in a linear array on the outside of the flagellar membrane, close to the flagellar attachment zone, but does not co-localize with the flagellar attachment zone protein, FAZ1. Consequently, the GPI-PLC and the VSG occupy the same plasma membrane leaflet, which resolves the topological problem associated with the cleavage reaction if the VSG and the GPI-PLC were on opposite sides of the membrane. The exterior location requires the enzyme to be tightly regulated to prevent VSG release under basal conditions. During stimulated VSG release in intact cells, the GPI-PLC did not change location, suggesting that the release mechanism involves lateral diffusion of the VSG in the plane of the membrane to the fixed position of the GPI-PLC.

  8. Structure and assembly of the flagellar hook-basal body complex of Salmonella typhimurium

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, C.J.

    1989-01-01

    The hook-basal body (HBB) complex is a multi-component structure which comprises a significant part of the bacterial flagellar motor. Electrophoretic mobility shifts of HBB complex component proteins from four non-flagellate mutants have enabled the author to assign each protein as being the product of the gene defective in each of the respective strains. The author has purified and characterized HBB complexes lacking either the L ring or both the P and L rings, and concluded that the 27-kDa basal-body protein is the major component of the L ring, and that the 38-kDa basal-body protein is the major component of the P ring. He has sequenced the genes encoding the subunit proteins of the M, P, and L rings of the basal body, and have examined both the gene and deduced amino acid sequences for clues regarding the regulation of these genes and the structure of their products. By quantitating the amount of {sup 35}S incorporated into the component protein vivo and correcting for the amount of contained in each protein (as deduced from gene sequencing data), he has determined the relative stoichiometries of most of the known component proteins of the HBB complex. He has developed a protocol for differential {sup 35}S-radiolabeling of HBB complexes in vivo and used it to examine the HBB complex assembly process. He has identified proteins required for M-ring assembly or stabilization and for the possible initiation of rod assembly. The rod is not stable until the P ring is assembled onto it. The monomers of the P and L rings are exported independent of flagellar assembly. These radiolabeling experiments have also enabled me to identify several new component proteins of the HBB complex.

  9. Coaxial atomizer liquid intact lengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eroglu, Hasan; Chigier, Norman; Farago, Zoltan

    1991-01-01

    Average intact lengths of round liquid jets generated by airblast coaxial atomizer were measured from over 1500 photographs. The intact lengths were studied over a jet Reynolds number range of 18,000 and Weber number range of 260. Results are presented for two different nozzle geometries. The intact lengths were found to be strongly dependent on Re and We numbers. An empirical equation was derived as a function of these parameters. A comparison of the intact lengths for round jets and flat sheets shows that round jets generate shorter intact lengths.

  10. Opsonic activity of anti-flagellar serum against Clostridium chauvoei by mouse polymorphonuclear leucocytes.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Y; Tanaka, M

    1987-05-01

    The role of anti-flagellar serum against Clostridium chauvoei in phagocytosis by mouse polymorphonuclear leucocytes was examined. Anti-flagellar serum markedly increased phagocytic rate against the flagellated strain Okinawa but not against a non-flagellated mutant (NFM) derived from the same strain, while anti-NFM serum increased the phagocytic rate against both strains. These results indicate that anti-flagellar serum exerts its protective effect by opsonic activity.

  11. (Photosynthesis in intact plants)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    Progress in the two years since the last renewal application has been excellent. We have made substantial contributions on both main fronts of the projects, and are particularly happy with the progress of our research on intact plants. The approach of basing our field work on a sound foundation of laboratory studies has enabled is to use methods which provide unambiguous assays of well characterized reactions. We have also made excellent progress in several laboratory studies which will have direct applications in future field work, and have introduced to the laboratory a range of molecular genetics techniques which will allow us to explore new options in the attempt to understand function at the level of molecular structure.

  12. Direct evidence of flagellar synchronization through hydrodynamic interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brumley, Douglas; Polin, Marco; Wan, Kirsty; Goldstein, Raymond

    2013-11-01

    Eukaryotic cilia and flagella exhibit striking coordination, from the synchronous beating of two flagella in Chlamydomonas to the metachronal waves and large-scale flows displayed by carpets of cilia. However, the precise mechanisms responsible for flagellar synchronization remain unclear. We perform a series of experiments involving two individual flagella in a quiescent fluid. Cells are isolated from the colonial alga Volvox carteri, held in place at a fixed distance d, and oriented so that their flagellar beating planes coincide. In this fashion, we are able to explicitly assess the role of hydrodynamics in achieving synchronization. For closely separated cells, the flagella are capable of exhibiting a phase-locked state for thousands of beats at a time, despite significant differences in their intrinsic frequencies. For intermediate values of d, synchronous periods are interrupted by brief phase slips, while for d >> 1 the flagellar phase difference drifts almost linearly with time. The coupling strength extracted through analysis of the synchronization statistics exhibits excellent agreement with hydrodynamic predictions. This study unambiguously reveals that flagella coupled only through hydrodynamics are capable of exhibiting robust synchrony.

  13. Interactions between chemotaxis genes and flagellar genes in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Parkinson, J S; Parker, S R; Talbert, P B; Houts, S E

    1983-01-01

    Escherichia coli mutants defective in cheY and cheZ function are motile but generally nonchemotactic; cheY mutants have an extreme counterclockwise bias in flagellar rotation, whereas cheZ mutants have a clockwise rotational bias. Chemotactic pseudorevertants of cheY and cheZ mutants were isolated on semisolid agar and examined for second-site suppressors in other chemotaxis-related loci. Approximately 15% of the cheZ revertants and over 95% of the cheY revertants contained compensatory mutations in the flaA or flaB locus. When transferred to an otherwise wild-type background, most of these suppressor mutations resulted in a generally nonchemotactic phenotype: suppressors of cheY caused a clockwise rotational bias; suppressors of cheZ produced a counterclockwise rotational bias. Chemotactic double mutants containing a che and a fla mutation invariably exhibited flagellar rotation patterns in between the opposing extremes characteristic of the component mutations. This additive effect on flagellar rotation resulted in essentially wild-type swimming behavior and is probably the major basis of suppressor action. However, suppression effects were also allele specific, suggesting that the cheY and cheZ gene products interact directly with the flaA and flaB products. These interactions may be instrumental in establishing the unstimulated swimming pattern of E. coli. Images PMID:6305913

  14. Genetic and Transcriptional Analyses of the Flagellar Gene Cluster in Actinoplanes missouriensis

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Moon-Sun; Mouri, Yoshihiro; Uchida, Kaoru; Aizawa, Shin-Ichi; Hayakawa, Masayuki; Fujita, Nobuyuki; Tezuka, Takeaki

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Actinoplanes missouriensis, a Gram-positive and soil-inhabiting bacterium, is a member of the rare actinomycetes. The filamentous cells produce sporangia, which contain hundreds of flagellated spores that can swim rapidly for a short period of time until they find niches for germination. These swimming cells are called zoospores, and the mechanism of this unique temporal flagellation has not been elucidated. Here, we report all of the flagellar genes in the bacterial genome and their expected function and contribution for flagellar morphogenesis. We identified a large flagellar gene cluster composed of 33 genes that encode the majority of proteins essential for assembling the functional flagella of Gram-positive bacteria. One noted exception to the cluster was the location of the fliQ gene, which was separated from the cluster. We examined the involvement of four genes in flagellar biosynthesis by gene disruption, fliQ, fliC, fliK, and lytA. Furthermore, we performed a transcriptional analysis of the flagellar genes using RNA samples prepared from A. missouriensis grown on a sporangium-producing agar medium for 1, 3, 6, and 40 days. We demonstrated that the transcription of the flagellar genes was activated in conjunction with sporangium formation. Eleven transcriptional start points of the flagellar genes were determined using the rapid amplification of cDNA 5′ ends (RACE) procedure, which revealed the highly conserved promoter sequence CTCA(N15–17)GCCGAA. This result suggests that a sigma factor is responsible for the transcription of all flagellar genes and that the flagellar structure assembles simultaneously. IMPORTANCE The biology of a zoospore is very interesting from the viewpoint of morphogenesis, survival strategy, and evolution. Here, we analyzed flagellar genes in A. missouriensis, which produces sporangia containing hundreds of flagellated spores each. Zoospores released from the sporangia swim for a short time before germination occurs

  15. The physics of intact capture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsou, Peter; Griffiths, D. J.; Albee, A. L.

    1994-01-01

    The ability to capture projectiles intact at hypervelocities in underdense media open a new area of study in physics. Underdense material behaves markedly different than solid, liquid, or gas upon hypervelocity impact. This new phenomenon enables applications in science that would either not be possible or would be very costly by other means. This phenomenon has been fully demonstrated in the laboratory and validated in space. Even more interesting is the fact that this hypervelocity intact capture was accomplished passively. A better understanding of the physics of intact capture will lead to improvements in intact capture. A collection of physical observations of this phenomenon is presented here.

  16. Space research with intact organisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, Robert W.; Haddy, Francis J.

    1992-01-01

    Effects of space exposure on intact organisms are briefly reviewed, and examples of future experiments that might provide new information on the role of gravity in the evolution of life are suggested. It is noted that long term experiments with intact plant and animals for studying gravitational thresholds will provide important new insights.

  17. The Deep-Sea Bacterium Photobacterium profundum SS9 Utilizes Separate Flagellar Systems for Swimming and Swarming under High-Pressure Conditions ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Eloe, Emiley A.; Lauro, Federico M.; Vogel, Rudi F.; Bartlett, Douglas H.

    2008-01-01

    Motility is a critical function needed for nutrient acquisition, biofilm formation, and the avoidance of harmful chemicals and predators. Flagellar motility is one of the most pressure-sensitive cellular processes in mesophilic bacteria; therefore, it is ecologically relevant to determine how deep-sea microbes have adapted their motility systems for functionality at depth. In this study, the motility of the deep-sea piezophilic bacterium Photobacterium profundum SS9 was investigated and compared with that of the related shallow-water piezosensitive strain Photobacterium profundum 3TCK, as well as that of the well-studied piezosensitive bacterium Escherichia coli. The SS9 genome contains two flagellar gene clusters: a polar flagellum gene cluster (PF) and a putative lateral flagellum gene cluster (LF). In-frame deletions were constructed in the two flagellin genes located within the PF cluster (flaA and flaC), the one flagellin gene located within the LF cluster (flaB), a component of a putative sodium-driven flagellar motor (motA2), and a component of a putative proton-driven flagellar motor (motA1). SS9 PF flaA, flaC, and motA2 mutants were defective in motility under all conditions tested. In contrast, the flaB and motA1 mutants were defective only under conditions of high pressure and high viscosity. flaB and motA1 gene expression was strongly induced by elevated pressure plus increased viscosity. Direct swimming velocity measurements were obtained using a high-pressure microscopic chamber, where increases in pressure resulted in a striking decrease in swimming velocity for E. coli and a gradual reduction for 3TCK which proceeded up to 120 MPa, while SS9 increased swimming velocity at 30 MPa and maintained motility up to a maximum pressure of 150 MPa. Our results indicate that P. profundum SS9 possesses two distinct flagellar systems, both of which have acquired dramatic adaptations for optimal functionality under high-pressure conditions. PMID:18723648

  18. Individual Flagellar Waveform Affects Collective Behavior of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Kage, Azusa; Mogami, Yoshihiro

    2015-08-01

    Bioconvection is a form of collective motion that occurs spontaneously in the suspension of swimming microorganisms. In a previous study, we quantitatively described the "pattern transition," a phase transition phenomenon that so far has exclusively been observed in bioconvection of the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas. We suggested that the transition could be induced by changes in the balance between the gravitational and shear-induced torques, both of which act to determine the orientation of the organism in the shear flow. As both of the torques should be affected by the geometry of the Chlamydomonas cell, alteration in the flagellar waveform might change the extent of torque generation by altering overall geometry of the cell. Based on this working hypothesis, we examined bioconvection behavior of two flagellar mutants of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, ida1 and oda2, making reference to the wild type. Flagella of ida1 beat with an abnormal waveform, while flagella of oda2 show a normal waveform but lower beat frequency. As a result, both mutants had swimming speed of less than 50% of the wild type. ida1 formed bioconvection patterns with smaller spacing than those of wild type and oda2. Two-axis view revealed the periodic movement of the settling blobs of ida1, while oda2 showed qualitatively similar behavior to that of wild type. Unexpectedly, ida1 showed stronger negative gravitaxis than did wild type, while oda2 showed relatively weak gravitaxis. These findings suggest that flagellar waveform, not swimming speed or beat frequency, strongly affect bioconvection behavior in C. reinhardtii.

  19. [Structure and function of the bacterial flagellar type III protein export system in Salmonella
].

    PubMed

    Minamino, Tohru

    2015-01-01

    The bacterial flagellum is a filamentous organelle that propels the bacterial cell body in liquid media. For construction of the bacterial flagellum beyond the cytoplasmic membrane, flagellar component proteins are transported by its specific protein export apparatus from the cytoplasm to the distal end of the growing flagellar structure. The flagellar export apparatus consists of a transmembrane export gate complex and a cytoplasmic ATPase ring complex. Flagellar substrate-specific chaperones bind to their cognate substrates in the cytoplasm and escort the substrates to the docking platform of the export gate. The export apparatus utilizes ATP and proton motive force across the cytoplasmic membrane as the energy sources to drive protein export and coordinates protein export with assembly by ordered export of substrates to parallel with their order of assembly. In this review, we summarize our current understanding of the structure and function of the flagellar protein export system in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium.

  20. Involvement of the flagellar assembly pathway in Vibrio alginolyticus adhesion under environmental stresses

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lu; Huang, Lixing; Su, Yongquan; Qin, Yingxue; Kong, Wendi; Ma, Ying; Xu, Xiaojin; Lin, Mao; Zheng, Jiang; Yan, Qingpi

    2015-01-01

    Adhesion is an important virulence factor of Vibrio alginolyticus. This factor may be affected by environmental conditions; however, its molecular mechanism remains unclear. In our previous research, adhesion deficient strains were obtained by culturing V. alginolyticus under stresses including Cu, Pb, Hg, and low pH. With RNA-seq and bioinformatics analysis, we found that all of these stress treatments significantly affected the flagellar assembly pathway, which may play an important role in V. alginolyticus adhesion. Therefore, we hypothesized that the environmental stresses of the flagellar assembly pathway may be one way in which environmental conditions affect adhesion. To verify our hypothesis, a bioinformatics analysis, QPCR, RNAi, in vitro adhesion assay and motility assay were performed. Our results indicated that (1) the flagellar assembly pathway was sensitive to environmental stresses, (2) the flagellar assembly pathway played an important role in V. alginolyticus adhesion, and (3) motility is not the only way in which the flagellar assembly pathway affects adhesion. PMID:26322276

  1. The Three-Dimensional Structure of the Flagellar Rotor from a Clockwise-Locked Mutant of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Dennis R.; Francis, Noreen R.; Xu, Chen; DeRosier, David J.

    2006-01-01

    Three-dimensional reconstructions from electron cryomicrographs of the rotor of the flagellar motor reveal that the symmetry of individual M rings varies from 24-fold to 26-fold while that of the C rings, containing the two motor/switch proteins FliM and FliN, varies from 32-fold to 36-fold, with no apparent correlation between the symmetries of the two rings. Results from other studies provided evidence that, in addition to the transmembrane protein FliF, at least some part of the third motor/switch protein, FliG, contributes to a thickening on the face of the M ring, but there was no evidence as to whether or not any portion of FliG also contributes to the C ring. Of the four morphological features in the cross section of the C ring, the feature closest to the M ring is not present with the rotational symmetry of the rest of the C ring, but instead it has the symmetry of the M ring. We suggest that this inner feature arises from a domain of FliG. We present a hypothetical docking in which the C-terminal motor domain of FliG lies in the C ring, where it can interact intimately with FliM. PMID:17015643

  2. Effectiveness of intact capture media

    SciTech Connect

    Tsou, P.; Aubert, J.; Brownlee, D.; Hrubesh, L.; Williams, J.; Albee, A.

    1989-01-01

    The possibility of capturing cosmic dust at hypervelocity has been demonstrated in the laboratory and in the unintended Solar Max spacecraft. This technology will enable a comet coma sample return mission and be important for the earth orbital cosmic dust collection mission, i.e., the Space Station Cosmic Dust Collection Facility. Since the only controllable factor in an intact capture of cosmic dust is the capturing medium, characterizing the effectiveness and properties of available capture media would be very important in the development of the technique for capturing hypervelocity cosmic dust intact. We have evaluated various capture underdense media for the relative effectiveness for intact capture. 2 refs., 2 figs.

  3. Quorum sensing positively regulates flagellar motility in pathogenic Vibrio harveyi.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qian; Defoirdt, Tom

    2015-04-01

    Vibrios belonging to the Harveyi clade are among the major pathogens of aquatic organisms. Quorum sensing (QS) is essential for virulence of V. harveyi towards different hosts. However, most virulence factors reported to be controlled by QS to date are negatively regulated by QS, therefore suggesting that their impact on virulence is limited. In this study, we report that QS positively regulates flagellar motility. We found that autoinducer synthase mutants showed significantly lower swimming motility than the wild type, and the swimming motility could be restored by adding synthetic signal molecules. Further, motility of a luxO mutant with inactive QS (LuxO D47E) was significantly lower than that of the wild type and of a luxO mutant with constitutively maximal QS activity (LuxO D47A). Furthermore, we found that the expression of flagellar genes (both early, middle and late genes) was significantly lower in the luxO mutant with inactive QS when compared with wild type and the luxO mutant with maximal QS activity. Motility assays and gene expression also revealed the involvement of the quorum-sensing master regulator LuxR in the QS regulation of motility. Finally, the motility inhibitor phenamil significantly decreased the virulence of V. harveyi towards gnotobiotic brine shrimp larvae.

  4. Modes of flagellar assembly in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and Trypanosoma brucei

    PubMed Central

    Höög, Johanna L; Lacomble, Sylvain; O’Toole, Eileen T; Hoenger, Andreas; McIntosh, J Richard; Gull, Keith

    2014-01-01

    Defects in flagella growth are related to a number of human diseases. Central to flagellar growth is the organization of microtubules that polymerize from basal bodies to form the axoneme, which consists of hundreds of proteins. Flagella exist in all eukaryotic phyla, but neither the mechanism by which flagella grow nor the conservation of this process in evolution are known. Here, we study how protein complexes assemble onto the growing axoneme tip using (cryo) electron tomography. In Chlamydomonas reinhardtii microtubules and associated proteins are added simultaneously. However, in Trypanosoma brucei, disorganized arrays of microtubules are arranged into the axoneme structure by the later addition of preformed protein complexes. Post assembly, the T. brucei transition zone alters structure and its association with the central pair loosens. We conclude that there are multiple ways to form a flagellum and that species-specific structural knowledge is critical before evaluating flagellar defects. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01479.001 PMID:24448408

  5. Modulation of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii flagellar motility by redox poise

    PubMed Central

    Wakabayashi, Ken-ichi; King, Stephen M.

    2006-01-01

    Redox-based regulatory systems are essential for many cellular activities. Chlamydomonas reinhardtii exhibits alterations in motile behavior in response to different light conditions (photokinesis). We hypothesized that photokinesis is signaled by variations in cytoplasmic redox poise resulting from changes in chloroplast activity. We found that this effect requires photosystem I, which generates reduced NADPH. We also observed that photokinetic changes in beat frequency and duration of the photophobic response could be obtained by altering oxidative/reductive stress. Analysis of reactivated cell models revealed that this redox poise effect is mediated through the outer dynein arms (ODAs). Although the global redox state of the thioredoxin-related ODA light chains LC3 and LC5 and the redox-sensitive Ca2+-binding subunit of the docking complex DC3 did not change upon light/dark transitions, we did observe significant alterations in their interactions with other flagellar components via mixed disulfides. These data indicate that redox poise directly affects ODAs and suggest that it may act in the control of flagellar motility. PMID:16754958

  6. Bacterial flagellar capping proteins adopt diverse oligomeric states

    PubMed Central

    Postel, Sandra; Deredge, Daniel; Bonsor, Daniel A; Yu, Xiong; Diederichs, Kay; Helmsing, Saskia; Vromen, Aviv; Friedler, Assaf; Hust, Michael; Egelman, Edward H; Beckett, Dorothy; Wintrode, Patrick L; Sundberg, Eric J

    2016-01-01

    Flagella are crucial for bacterial motility and pathogenesis. The flagellar capping protein (FliD) regulates filament assembly by chaperoning and sorting flagellin (FliC) proteins after they traverse the hollow filament and exit the growing flagellum tip. In the absence of FliD, flagella are not formed, resulting in impaired motility and infectivity. Here, we report the 2.2 Å resolution X-ray crystal structure of FliD from Pseudomonas aeruginosa, the first high-resolution structure of any FliD protein from any bacterium. Using this evidence in combination with a multitude of biophysical and functional analyses, we find that Pseudomonas FliD exhibits unexpected structural similarity to other flagellar proteins at the domain level, adopts a unique hexameric oligomeric state, and depends on flexible determinants for oligomerization. Considering that the flagellin filaments on which FliD oligomers are affixed vary in protofilament number between bacteria, our results suggest that FliD oligomer stoichiometries vary across bacteria to complement their filament assemblies. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.18857.001 PMID:27664419

  7. Surface organization and composition of Euglena. II. Flagellar mastigonemes

    PubMed Central

    1978-01-01

    The surface of the Euglena flagellum is coated with about 30,000 fine filaments of two distinct types. The longer of these nontubular mastigonemes (about 3 micron) appear to be attached to the paraflagellar rod whereas the shorter nontubular mastigonemes (about 1.5 micron) are the centrifugally arranged portions of a larger complex, which consists of an attached unit parallel to and outside of the flagellar membrane. Units are arranged laternally in near registration and longitudinally overlap by one-half of a unit length. Rows of mastigoneme units are firmly attached to the axoneme microtubules or to the paraflagellar rod as evidenced by their persistence after removal of the flagellar membrane with neutral detergents. SDS-acrylamide gels of whole flagella revealed about 30 polypeptides, of which two gave strong positive staining with the periodic acid-Schiff (PAS) procedure. At least one of these two bands (glycoproteins) has been equated with the surface mastigonemes by parallel analysis of isolated and purified mastigonemes, particularly after phenol extraction. The faster moving glycoprotein has been selectively removed from whole flagella and from the mastigoneme fraction with low concentrations of neutral detergents at neutral or high pH. The larger glycoprotein was found to be polydisperse when electrophoresed through 1% agarose/SDS gels. Thin-layer chromatography of hydrolysates of whole flagella or of isolated mastigonemes has indicated that the major carbohydrate moiety is the pentose sugar, xylose, with possibly a small amount of glucose and an unknown minor component. PMID:98532

  8. Gains of Bacterial Flagellar Motility in a Fungal World

    PubMed Central

    Pion, Martin; Bshary, Redouan; Bindschedler, Saskia; Filippidou, Sevasti; Wick, Lukas Y.; Job, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    The maintenance of energetically costly flagella by bacteria in non-water-saturated media, such as soil, still presents an evolutionary conundrum. Potential explanations have focused on rare flooding events allowing dispersal. Such scenarios, however, overlook bacterial dispersal along mycelia as a possible transport mechanism in soils. The hypothesis tested in this study is that dispersal along fungal hyphae may lead to an increase in the fitness of flagellated bacteria and thus offer an alternative explanation for the maintenance of flagella even in unsaturated soils. Dispersal along fungal hyphae was shown for a diverse array of motile bacteria. To measure the fitness effect of dispersal, additional experiments were conducted in a model system mimicking limited dispersal, using Pseudomonas putida KT2440 and its nonflagellated (ΔfliM) isogenic mutant in the absence or presence of Morchella crassipes mycelia. In the absence of the fungus, flagellar motility was beneficial solely under conditions of water saturation allowing dispersal, while under conditions limiting dispersal, the nonflagellated mutant exhibited a higher level of fitness than the wild-type strain. In contrast, in the presence of a mycelial network under conditions limiting dispersal, the flagellated strain was able to disperse using the mycelial network and had a higher level of fitness than the mutant. On the basis of these results, we propose that the benefit of mycelium-associated dispersal helps explain the persistence of flagellar motility in non-water-saturated environments. PMID:23995942

  9. Gains of bacterial flagellar motility in a fungal world.

    PubMed

    Pion, Martin; Bshary, Redouan; Bindschedler, Saskia; Filippidou, Sevasti; Wick, Lukas Y; Job, Daniel; Junier, Pilar

    2013-11-01

    The maintenance of energetically costly flagella by bacteria in non-water-saturated media, such as soil, still presents an evolutionary conundrum. Potential explanations have focused on rare flooding events allowing dispersal. Such scenarios, however, overlook bacterial dispersal along mycelia as a possible transport mechanism in soils. The hypothesis tested in this study is that dispersal along fungal hyphae may lead to an increase in the fitness of flagellated bacteria and thus offer an alternative explanation for the maintenance of flagella even in unsaturated soils. Dispersal along fungal hyphae was shown for a diverse array of motile bacteria. To measure the fitness effect of dispersal, additional experiments were conducted in a model system mimicking limited dispersal, using Pseudomonas putida KT2440 and its nonflagellated (ΔfliM) isogenic mutant in the absence or presence of Morchella crassipes mycelia. In the absence of the fungus, flagellar motility was beneficial solely under conditions of water saturation allowing dispersal, while under conditions limiting dispersal, the nonflagellated mutant exhibited a higher level of fitness than the wild-type strain. In contrast, in the presence of a mycelial network under conditions limiting dispersal, the flagellated strain was able to disperse using the mycelial network and had a higher level of fitness than the mutant. On the basis of these results, we propose that the benefit of mycelium-associated dispersal helps explain the persistence of flagellar motility in non-water-saturated environments.

  10. ATP-Driven Remodeling of the Linker Domain in the Dynein Motor

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Anthony J.; Malkova, Bara; Walker, Matt L.; Sakakibara, Hitoshi; Numata, Naoki; Kon, Takahide; Ohkura, Reiko; Edwards, Thomas A.; Knight, Peter J.; Sutoh, Kazuo; Oiwa, Kazuhiro; Burgess, Stan A.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Dynein ATPases are the largest known cytoskeletal motors and perform critical functions in cells: carrying cargo along microtubules in the cytoplasm and powering flagellar beating. Dyneins are members of the AAA+ superfamily of ring-shaped enzymes, but how they harness this architecture to produce movement is poorly understood. Here, we have used cryo-EM to determine 3D maps of native flagellar dynein-c and a cytoplasmic dynein motor domain in different nucleotide states. The structures show key sites of conformational change within the AAA+ ring and a large rearrangement of the “linker” domain, involving a hinge near its middle. Analysis of a mutant in which the linker “undocks” from the ring indicates that linker remodeling requires energy that is supplied by interactions with the AAA+ modules. Fitting the dynein-c structures into flagellar tomograms suggests how this mechanism could drive sliding between microtubules, and also has implications for cytoplasmic cargo transport. PMID:22863569

  11. Intact capture of hypervelocity particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsou, P.; Brownlee, D. E.; Albee, A. L.

    1986-01-01

    Knowledge of the phase, structure, and crystallography of cosmic particles, as well as their elemental and isotopic compositions, would be very valuable information toward understanding the nature of our solar system. This information can be obtained from the intact capture of large mineral grains of cosmic particles from hypervelocity impacts. Hypervelocity experiments of intact capture in underdense media have indicated realistic potential in this endeaver. The recovery of the thermal blankets and louvers from the Solar Max spacecraft have independently verified this potential in the unintended capture of cosmic materials from hypervelocity impacts. Passive underdense media will permit relatively simple and inexpensive missions to capture cosmic particles intact, either by going to a planetary body or by waiting for the particles to come to the Shuttle or the Space Station. Experiments to explore the potential of using various underdense media for an intact comet sample capture up to 6.7 km/s were performed at NASA Ames Research Center Vertical Gun Range. Explorative hypervelocity experiments up to 7.9 km/s were also made at the Ernst Mach Institute. These experiments have proven that capturing intact particles at hypervelocity impacts is definitely possible. Further research is being conducted to achieve higher capture ratios at even higher hypervelocities for even smaller projectiles.

  12. Intact capture of hypervelocity particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsou, P.; Brownlee, D. E.; Albee, A. L.

    Knowledge of the phase, structure, and crystallography of cosmic particles, as well as their elemental and isotopic compositions, would be very valuable information toward understanding the nature of our solar system. This information can be obtained from the intact capture of large mineral grains of cosmic particles from hypervelocity impacts. Hypervelocity experiments of intact capture in underdense media have indicated realistic potential in this endeaver. The recovery of the thermal blankets and louvers from the Solar Max spacecraft have independently verified this potential in the unintended capture of cosmic materials from hypervelocity impacts. Passive underdense media will permit relatively simple and inexpensive missions to capture cosmic particles intact, either by going to a planetary body or by waiting for the particles to come to the Shuttle or the Space Station. Experiments to explore the potential of using various underdense media for an intact comet sample capture up to 6.7 km/s were performed at NASA Ames Research Center Vertical Gun Range. Explorative hypervelocity experiments up to 7.9 km/s were also made at the Ernst Mach Institute. These experiments have proven that capturing intact particles at hypervelocity impacts is definitely possible. Further research is being conducted to achieve higher capture ratios at even higher hypervelocities for even smaller projectiles.

  13. Flagellar generated flow mediates attachment of Giardia lamblia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urbach, Jeffrey; Luo, Haibei; Picou, Theodore; McAllister, Ryan; Elmendorf, Heidi

    2011-03-01

    Giardia lamblia is a protozoan parasite responsible for widespread diarrheal disease in humans and animals worldwide. Attachment to the host intestinal mucosa and resistance to peristalsis is necessary for establishing infection, but the physical basis for this attachment is poorly understood. We report results from TIRF and confocal fluorescence microscopy that demonstrate that the regular beating of the posterior flagella generate a flow through the ventral disk, a suction-cup shaped structure that is against the substrate during attachment. Finite element simulations are used to compare the negative pressure generated by the flow to the measured attachment force and the expected performance of the flagellar pump. NIH grant 1R21AI062934-0.

  14. Antiphase synchronization in a flagellar-dominance mutant of Chlamydomonas.

    PubMed

    Leptos, Kyriacos C; Wan, Kirsty Y; Polin, Marco; Tuval, Idan; Pesci, Adriana I; Goldstein, Raymond E

    2013-10-11

    Groups of beating flagella or cilia often synchronize so that neighboring filaments have identical frequencies and phases. A prime example is provided by the unicellular biflagellate Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, which typically displays synchronous in-phase beating in a low-Reynolds number version of breaststroke swimming. We report the discovery that ptx1, a flagellar-dominance mutant of C. reinhardtii, can exhibit synchronization in precise antiphase, as in the freestyle swimming stroke. High-speed imaging shows that ptx1 flagella switch stochastically between in-phase and antiphase states, and that the latter has a distinct waveform and significantly higher frequency, both of which are strikingly similar to those found during phase slips that stochastically interrupt in-phase beating of the wild-type. Possible mechanisms underlying these observations are discussed.

  15. Flagellar swimmers oscillate between pusher- and puller-type swimming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klindt, Gary S.; Friedrich, Benjamin M.

    2015-12-01

    Self-propulsion of cellular microswimmers generates flow signatures, commonly classified as pusher and puller type, which characterize hydrodynamic interactions with other cells or boundaries. Using experimentally measured beat patterns, we compute that the flagellated green alga Chlamydomonas oscillates between pusher and puller, rendering it an approximately neutral swimmer, when averaging over its full beat cycle. Beyond a typical distance of 100 μ m from the cell, inertia attenuates oscillatory microflows. We show that hydrodynamic interactions between cells oscillate in time and are of similar magnitude as stochastic swimming fluctuations. From our analysis, we also find that the rate of hydrodynamic dissipation varies in time, which implies that flagellar beat patterns are not optimized with respect to this measure.

  16. Flagellar Kinematics and Swimming of Algal Cells in Viscoelastic Fluids

    PubMed Central

    Qin, B.; Gopinath, A.; Yang, J.; Gollub, J. P.; Arratia, P. E.

    2015-01-01

    The motility of microorganisms is influenced greatly by their hydrodynamic interactions with the fluidic environment they inhabit. We show by direct experimental observation of the bi-flagellated alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii that fluid elasticity and viscosity strongly influence the beating pattern - the gait - and thereby control the propulsion speed. The beating frequency and the wave speed characterizing the cyclical bending are both enhanced by fluid elasticity. Despite these enhancements, the net swimming speed of the alga is hindered for fluids that are sufficiently elastic. The origin of this complex response lies in the interplay between the elasticity-induced changes in the spatial and temporal aspects of the flagellar cycle and the buildup and subsequent relaxation of elastic stresses during the power and recovery strokes. PMID:25778677

  17. Protein export through the bacterial flagellar type III export pathway.

    PubMed

    Minamino, Tohru

    2014-08-01

    For construction of the bacterial flagellum, which is responsible for bacterial motility, the flagellar type III export apparatus utilizes both ATP and proton motive force across the cytoplasmic membrane and exports flagellar proteins from the cytoplasm to the distal end of the nascent structure. The export apparatus consists of a membrane-embedded export gate made of FlhA, FlhB, FliO, FliP, FliQ, and FliR and a water-soluble ATPase ring complex consisting of FliH, FliI, and FliJ. FlgN, FliS, and FliT act as substrate-specific chaperones that do not only protect their cognate substrates from degradation and aggregation in the cytoplasm but also efficiently transfer the substrates to the export apparatus. The ATPase ring complex facilitates the initial entry of the substrates into the narrow pore of the export gate. The export gate by itself is a proton-protein antiporter that uses the two components of proton motive force, the electric potential difference and the proton concentration difference, for different steps of the export process. A specific interaction of FlhA with FliJ located in the center of the ATPase ring complex allows the export gate to efficiently use proton motive force to drive protein export. The ATPase ring complex couples ATP binding and hydrolysis to its assembly-disassembly cycle for rapid and efficient protein export cycle. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Protein trafficking and secretion in bacteria. Guest Editors: Anastassios Economou and Ross Dalbey.

  18. Intact capture of cosmic dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsou, P.

    1991-01-01

    The focus of this development effort is to capture dust particles at hypervelocities intact and unmelted in order to preserve volatile organics. At the same time, the capture process must minimize any organic elemental or compound contamination to prevent any compromise of exobiological analyses. Inorganic silicate aerogel has been developed as a successful capture medium to satisfy both requirements of intact capture and minimal organic contamination. Up to 6 km/s, silicate projectiles from a few microns up to 100 microns have been captured intact without any melting and with minimal loss of mass. Carbon in silicate aerogel can be reduced to less than 1 part in 1000 and hydrogen 3 parts in 1000 when baked in air. Under controlled inert gas environments, additional hydrocarbon reduction can be achieved.

  19. Biochemical, immunological, metabolic, and molecular studies on flagellar development in Euglena gracilis

    SciTech Connect

    Levasseur, P.J.

    1989-01-01

    The emergent flagellum of Euglena gracilis arises from an anterior invagination of the organism and possesses, along with the typical eukaryotic axoneme, a glycoprotein surface layer, a complement of structurally complex mastigonemes and a paraxial rod. Nonionic detergent extraction of isolated flagella yielded a fraction containing 21% of the flagellar protein. This fraction contained at least 25 components. In vivo radiolabeling experiments indicated that Euglena possessed a pool of flagellar precursors. This was evidence by the observation that flagellar proteins radiolabeled during an initial regeneration could be mobilized to flagella of a subsequent regeneration. At least one component in the pool was present in sufficient quantity to support an entire regeneration. This protein was tentatively identified as a mastigonemal protein of M{sub r} {approximately} 220,000. A cDNA library was constructed to investigate flagellar gene expression in Euglena.

  20. Application of a Short, Disordered N-Terminal Flagellin Segment, a Fully Functional Flagellar Type III Export Signal, to Expression of Secreted Proteins ▿

    PubMed Central

    Dobó, József; Varga, János; Sajó, Ráchel; Végh, Barbara M.; Gál, Péter; Závodszky, Péter; Vonderviszt, Ferenc

    2010-01-01

    Recently, we have demonstrated that the 26-47 segment of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium flagellin is capable of mediating flagellar export. In order to reveal whether other parts of the N-terminal region have any significant influence on secretion, a series of plasmids were constructed containing the lac promoter followed by the 26-47, 2-65, or 2-192 portion of Salmonella flagellin, to which various heterologous proteins of different size were fused (18 constructs overall). Essentially, all three segments could drive protein export; however, the nature of the attached polypeptide also had a significant effect on secretion efficiency. When low export efficiency was observed, it was mainly caused by inclusion body formation. Our data provide strong support for the idea that a short segment within the disordered N-terminal region of axial proteins is recognized by the flagellar type III export machinery. The 26-47 segment of flagellin contains all of the necessary information to direct translocation of attached polypeptide chains. This short (positions 26 to 47) flagellin segment attached to recombinant proteins can be used for secreted protein expression. Certain fusion proteins that are easily degraded within the cells were found to be intact in the medium, implying a potential application of this expression system for proteins with high proteolytic susceptibility. PMID:20008166

  1. Mutational analysis and overproduction effects of MotX, an essential component for motor function of Na+-driven polar flagella of Vibrio.

    PubMed

    Takekawa, Norihiro; Kojima, Seiji; Homma, Michio

    2016-10-25

    The bacterial flagellar motor is a rotary motor complex composed of various proteins. The motor contains a central rod, multiple ring-like structures and stators. The Na(+)-driven polar flagellar motor of the marine bacterium Vibrio alginolyticus has a specific ring, called the 'T-ring', which consists of two periplasmic proteins, MotX and MotY. The T-ring is essential for assembly of the torque-generating unit, the PomA/PomB stator complex, into the motor. To investigate the role of the T-ring for motor function, we performed random mutagenesis of the motX gene on a plasmid. The isolated MotX mutants showed nonmotile, slow-motile, and up-motile phenotypes by the expression from the plasmid. Deletion analysis indicated that the C-terminal region and the signal peptide in MotX are not always essential for flagellar motor function. We also found that overproduction of MotX caused the delay of growth and aberrant cell shape. MotX might have unexpected roles not only in flagellar motor function but also in cell morphology control.

  2. Early Caulobacter crescentus genes fliL and fliM are required for flagellar gene expression and normal cell division.

    PubMed Central

    Yu, J; Shapiro, L

    1992-01-01

    The biogenesis of the Caulobacter crescentus polar flagellum requires the expression of more than 48 genes, which are organized in a regulatory hierarchy. The flbO locus is near the top of the hierarchy, and consequently strains with mutations in this locus are nonmotile and lack the flagellar basal body complex. In addition to the motility phenotype, mutations in this locus also cause abnormal cell division. Complementing clones restore both motility and normal cell division. Sequence analysis of a complementing subclone revealed that this locus encodes at least two proteins that are homologs of the Salmonella typhimurium and Escherichia coli flagellar proteins FliL and FliM. FliM is thought to be a switch protein and to interface with the flagellum motor. The C. crescentus fliL and fliM genes form an operon that is expressed early in the cell cycle. Tn5 insertions in the fliM gene prevent the transcription of class II and class III flagellar genes, which are lower in the regulatory hierarchy. The start site of the fliLM operon lies 166 bp from the divergently transcribed flaCBD operon that encodes several basal body genes. Sequence comparison of the fliL transcription start site with those of other class I genes, flaS and flaO, revealed a highly conserved 29-bp sequence in a potential promoter region that differs from sigma 70, sigma 54, sigma 32, and sigma 28 promoter sequences, suggesting that at least three class I genes share a unique 5' regulatory region. Images PMID:1315735

  3. Vanadate-sensitized cleavage of dynein heavy chains by 365-nm irradiation of demembranated sperm flagella and its effect on the flagellar motility

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbons, B.H.; Gibbons, I.R.

    1987-06-15

    Irradiation of demembranated flagella of sea urchin sperm at 365 nm in the presence of 0.05-1 mM MgATP and 5-10 microM vanadate (Vi) cleaves the alpha and beta heavy chains of the outer arm dynein at the same site and at about the same rate as reported previously for the solubilized dynein. The decrease in intact alpha and beta heavy chain material is biphasic, with about 80% being lost with a half-time of 8-10 min, and the remainder more slowly. Five other axonemal polypeptides of Mr greater than 350,000 are lost similarly, concomitant with the appearance of at least 9 new peptides of Mr 150,000-250,000. The motility of irradiated sperm flagella upon subsequent dilution into reactivation medium containing 1 mM ATP and 2.5 mM catechol shows a progressive decrease in flagellar beat frequency for irradiation times that produce up to about 50% cleavage of the dynein heavy chains; more prolonged irradiation causes irreversible loss of motility. Competition between photocleaved and intact outer arm dynein for rebinding to dynein-depleted sperm flagella shows that cleavage has little effect upon the ability for rebinding, although the cleaved dynein partially inhibits subsequent motility. Substitution of MnATP for the MgATP in the irradiation medium prevents the loss of all of the axonemal polypeptides during irradiation for up to 60 min and also protects the potential for subsequent flagellar motility.

  4. Flagellar region 3b supports strong expression of integrated DNA and the highest chromosomal integration efficiency of the Escherichia coli flagellar regions

    PubMed Central

    Juhas, Mario; Ajioka, James W

    2015-01-01

    The Gram-negative bacterium Escherichia coli is routinely used as the chassis for a variety of biotechnology and synthetic biology applications. Identification and analysis of reliable chromosomal integration and expression target loci is crucial for E. coli engineering. Chromosomal loci differ significantly in their ability to support integration and expression of the integrated genetic circuits. In this study, we investigate E. coli K12 MG1655 flagellar regions 2 and 3b. Integration of the genetic circuit into seven and nine highly conserved genes of the flagellar regions 2 (motA, motB, flhD, flhE, cheW, cheY and cheZ) and 3b (fliE, F, G, J, K, L, M, P, R), respectively, showed significant variation in their ability to support chromosomal integration and expression of the integrated genetic circuit. While not reducing the growth of the engineered strains, the integrations into all 16 target sites led to the loss of motility. In addition to high expression, the flagellar region 3b supports the highest efficiency of integration of all E. coli K12 MG1655 flagellar regions and is therefore potentially the most suitable for the integration of synthetic genetic circuits. PMID:26074421

  5. Monitoring Intact Viruses Using Aptamers.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Penmetcha K R

    2016-08-04

    Viral diagnosis and surveillance are necessary steps in containing the spread of viral diseases, and they help in the deployment of appropriate therapeutic interventions. In the past, the commonly employed viral detection methods were either cell-culture or molecule-level assays. Most of these assays are laborious and expensive, require special facilities, and provide a slow diagnosis. To circumvent these limitations, biosensor-based approaches are becoming attractive, especially after the successful commercialization of glucose and other biosensors. In the present article, I have reviewed the current progress using the biosensor approach for detecting intact viruses. At the time of writing this review, three types of bioreceptor surfaces (antibody-, glycan-, and aptamer-based) have been explored on different sensing platforms for detecting intact viruses. Among these bioreceptors, aptamer-based sensors have been increasingly explored for detecting intact viruses using surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and other platforms. Special emphasis is placed on the aptamer-based SPR platform in the present review.

  6. Monitoring Intact Viruses Using Aptamers

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Penmetcha K. R.

    2016-01-01

    Viral diagnosis and surveillance are necessary steps in containing the spread of viral diseases, and they help in the deployment of appropriate therapeutic interventions. In the past, the commonly employed viral detection methods were either cell-culture or molecule-level assays. Most of these assays are laborious and expensive, require special facilities, and provide a slow diagnosis. To circumvent these limitations, biosensor-based approaches are becoming attractive, especially after the successful commercialization of glucose and other biosensors. In the present article, I have reviewed the current progress using the biosensor approach for detecting intact viruses. At the time of writing this review, three types of bioreceptor surfaces (antibody-, glycan-, and aptamer-based) have been explored on different sensing platforms for detecting intact viruses. Among these bioreceptors, aptamer-based sensors have been increasingly explored for detecting intact viruses using surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and other platforms. Special emphasis is placed on the aptamer-based SPR platform in the present review. PMID:27527230

  7. Real-Time Imaging of Fluorescent Flagellar Filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, William

    2003-03-01

    Bacteria swim by rotating flagellar filaments that are several micrometers long, but only about 18 nm in diameter. The filaments can exist in different polymorphic forms, having distinct values of curvature and twist. Rotation rates are on the order of 100 Hz. In the past, the motion of individual filaments has been visualized by dark-field or differential-interference-contrast microscopy, methods hampered by intense scattering from the cell body or shallow depth of field, respectively. We have found a simple procedure for fluorescently labeling cells and filaments that allows recording their motion in real time with an inexpensive video camera and an ordinary fluorescence microscope with mercury-arc or strobed laser illumination. We report our initial findings with cells of Escherichia coli. Tumbles (events that enable swimming cells to alter course) are remarkably varied. Not every filament on a cell needs to change its direction of rotation: different filaments can change directions at different times, and a tumble can result from the change in direction of only one. Polymorphic transformations tend to occur in the sequence normal, semicoiled, curly 1, with changes in the direction of movement of the cell body correlated with transformations to the semicoiled form.

  8. Structural insights into bacterial flagellar hooks similarities and specificities

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Young-Ho; Barker, Clive S.; Bulieris, Paula V.; Matsunami, Hideyuki; Samatey, Fadel A.

    2016-01-01

    Across bacteria, the protein that makes the flagellar hook, FlgE, has a high variability in amino acid residue composition and sequence length. We hereby present the structure of two fragments of FlgE protein from Campylobacter jejuni and from Caulobacter crescentus, which were obtained by X-ray crystallography, and a high-resolution model of the hook from Caulobacter. By comparing these new structures of FlgE proteins, we show that bacterial hook can be divided in two distinct parts. The first part comprises domains that are found in all FlgE proteins and that will make the basic structure of the hook that is common to all flagellated bacteria. The second part, hyper-variable both in size and structure, will be bacteria dependent. To have a better understanding of the C. jejuni hook, we show that a special strain of Salmonella enterica, which was designed to encode a gene of flgE that has the extra domains found in FlgE from C. jejuni, is fully motile. It seems that no matter the size of the hook protein, the hook will always have a structure made of 11 protofilaments. PMID:27759043

  9. Real-Time Imaging of Fluorescent Flagellar Filaments

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Linda; Ryu, William S.; Berg, Howard C.

    2000-01-01

    Bacteria swim by rotating flagellar filaments that are several micrometers long, but only about 20 nm in diameter. The filaments can exist in different polymorphic forms, having distinct values of curvature and twist. Rotation rates are on the order of 100 Hz. In the past, the motion of individual filaments has been visualized by dark-field or differential-interference-contrast microscopy, methods hampered by intense scattering from the cell body or shallow depth of field, respectively. We have found a simple procedure for fluorescently labeling cells and filaments that allows recording their motion in real time with an inexpensive video camera and an ordinary fluorescence microscope with mercury-arc or strobed laser illumination. We report our initial findings with cells of Escherichia coli. Tumbles (events that enable swimming cells to alter course) are remarkably varied. Not every filament on a cell needs to change its direction of rotation: different filaments can change directions at different times, and a tumble can result from the change in direction of only one. Polymorphic transformations tend to occur in the sequence normal, semicoiled, curly 1, with changes in the direction of movement of the cell body correlated with transformations to the semicoiled form. PMID:10781548

  10. Intact Procedural Motor Sequence Learning in Developmental Coordination Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lejeune, Caroline; Catale, Corinne; Willems, Sylvie; Meulemans, Thierry

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to explore the possibility of a procedural learning deficit among children with developmental coordination disorder (DCD). We tested 34 children aged 6-12 years with and without DCD using the serial reaction time task, in which the standard keyboard was replaced by a touch screen in order to minimize the impact…

  11. Intact procedural motor sequence learning in developmental coordination disorder.

    PubMed

    Lejeune, Caroline; Catale, Corinne; Willems, Sylvie; Meulemans, Thierry

    2013-06-01

    The purpose of the present study was to explore the possibility of a procedural learning deficit among children with developmental coordination disorder (DCD). We tested 34 children aged 6-12 years with and without DCD using the serial reaction time task, in which the standard keyboard was replaced by a touch screen in order to minimize the impact of perceptuomotor coordination difficulties that characterize this disorder. The results showed that children with DCD succeed as well as control children at the procedural sequence learning task. These findings challenge the hypothesis that a procedural learning impairment underlies the difficulties of DCD children in acquiring and automatizing daily activities. We suggest that the previously reported impairment of children with DCD on the serial reaction time task is not due to a sequence learning deficit per se, but rather due to methodological factors such as the response mode used in these studies.

  12. Giardia Flagellar Motility Is Not Directly Required to Maintain Attachment to Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    House, Susan A.; Richter, David J.; Pham, Jonathan K.; Dawson, Scott C.

    2011-01-01

    Giardia trophozoites attach to the intestinal microvilli (or inert surfaces) using an undefined “suction-based” mechanism, and remain attached during cell division to avoid peristalsis. Flagellar motility is a key factor in Giardia's pathogenesis and colonization of the host small intestine. Specifically, the beating of the ventral flagella, one of four pairs of motile flagella, has been proposed to generate a hydrodynamic force that results in suction-based attachment via the adjacent ventral disc. We aimed to test this prevailing “hydrodynamic model” of attachment mediated by flagellar motility. We defined four distinct stages of attachment by assessing surface contacts of the trophozoite with the substrate during attachment using TIRF microscopy (TIRFM). The lateral crest of the ventral disc forms a continuous perimeter seal with the substrate, a cytological indication that trophozoites are fully attached. Using trophozoites with two types of molecularly engineered defects in flagellar beating, we determined that neither ventral flagellar beating, nor any flagellar beating, is necessary for the maintenance of attachment. Following a morpholino-based knockdown of PF16, a central pair protein, both the beating and morphology of flagella were defective, but trophozoites could still initiate proper surface contacts as seen using TIRFM and could maintain attachment in several biophysical assays. Trophozoites with impaired motility were able to attach as well as motile cells. We also generated a strain with defects in the ventral flagellar waveform by overexpressing a dominant negative form of alpha2-annexin::GFP (D122A, D275A). This dominant negative alpha2-annexin strain could initiate attachment and had only a slight decrease in the ability to withstand normal and shear forces. The time needed for attachment did increase in trophozoites with overall defective flagellar beating, however. Thus while not directly required for attachment, flagellar motility is

  13. FlgM Is Secreted by the Flagellar Export Apparatus in Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Calvo, Rebecca A.

    2014-01-01

    The bacterial flagellum is assembled from over 20 structural components, and flagellar gene regulation is morphogenetically coupled to the assembly state by control of the anti-sigma factor FlgM. In the Gram-negative bacterium Salmonella enterica, FlgM inhibits late-class flagellar gene expression until the hook-basal body structural intermediate is completed and FlgM is inhibited by secretion from the cytoplasm. Here we demonstrate that FlgM is also secreted in the Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus subtilis and is degraded extracellularly by the proteases Epr and WprA. We further demonstrate that, like in S. enterica, the structural genes required for the flagellar hook-basal body are required for robust activation of σD-dependent gene expression and efficient secretion of FlgM. Finally, we determine that FlgM secretion is strongly enhanced by, but does not strictly require, hook-basal body completion and instead demands a minimal subset of flagellar proteins that includes the FliF/FliG basal body proteins, the flagellar type III export apparatus components FliO, FliP, FliQ, FliR, FlhA, and FlhB, and the substrate specificity switch regulator FliK. PMID:25313396

  14. The Flagellar Protein FliL Is Essential for Swimming in Rhodobacter sphaeroides▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Suaste-Olmos, Fernando; Domenzain, Clelia; Mireles-Rodríguez, José Cruz; Poggio, Sebastian; Osorio, Aurora; Dreyfus, Georges; Camarena, Laura

    2010-01-01

    In this work we characterize the function of the flagellar protein FliL in Rhodobacter sphaeroides. Our results show that FliL is essential for motility in this bacterium and that in its absence flagellar rotation is highly impaired. A green fluorescent protein (GFP)-FliL fusion forms polar and lateral fluorescent foci that show different spatial dynamics. The presence of these foci is dependent on the expression of the flagellar genes controlled by the master regulator FleQ, suggesting that additional components of the flagellar regulon are required for the proper localization of GFP-FliL. Eight independent pseudorevertants were isolated from the fliL mutant strain. In each of these strains a single nucleotide change in motB was identified. The eight mutations affected only three residues located on the periplasmic side of MotB. Swimming of the suppressor mutants was not affected by the presence of the wild-type fliL allele. Pulldown and yeast two-hybrid assays showed that that the periplasmic domain of FliL is able to interact with itself but not with the periplasmic domain of MotB. From these results we propose that FliL could participate in the coupling of MotB with the flagellar rotor in an indirect fashion. PMID:20889747

  15. High-speed holographic microscopy of malaria parasites reveals ambidextrous flagellar waveforms

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Laurence G.; Carter, Lucy M.; Reece, Sarah E.

    2013-01-01

    Axonemes form the core of eukaryotic flagella and cilia, performing tasks ranging from transporting fluid in developing embryos to the propulsion of sperm. Despite their abundance across the eukaryotic domain, the mechanisms that regulate the beating action of axonemes remain unknown. The flagellar waveforms are 3D in general, but current understanding of how axoneme components interact stems from 2D data; comprehensive measurements of flagellar shape are beyond conventional microscopy. Moreover, current flagellar model systems (e.g., sea urchin, human sperm) contain accessory structures that impose mechanical constraints on movement, obscuring the “native” axoneme behavior. We address both problems by developing a high-speed holographic imaging scheme and applying it to the (male) microgametes of malaria (Plasmodium) parasites. These isolated flagella are a unique, mathematically tractable model system for the physics of microswimmers. We reveal the 3D flagellar waveforms of these microorganisms and map the differential shear between microtubules in their axonemes. Furthermore, we overturn claims that chirality in the structure of the axoneme governs the beat pattern [Hirokawa N, et al. (2009) Ann Rev Fluid Mech 41:53–72], because microgametes display a left- or right-handed character on alternate beats. This breaks the link between structural chirality in the axoneme and larger scale symmetry breaking (e.g., in developing embryos), leading us to conclude that accessory structures play a critical role in shaping the flagellar beat. PMID:24194551

  16. Digital image analysis of flagellar beating and microtubule sliding of activated and hyperactivated sperm flagella.

    PubMed

    Ishijima, Sumio

    2007-01-01

    Flagellar beatings of Suncus, golden hamster, and monkey spermatozoa before and after hyperactivation were analysed using high-speed video microscopy and digital image processing in order to examine the sliding mechanism of the flagellar beating and the function of accessory fibres of the mammalian spermatozoa. Although these spermatozoa have different morphology and movement characteristics, the flagellar beatings of hyperactivated spermatozoa had a few common features; i.e., sharp bends at the base of the flagellum and a low beat frequency. While nonhyperactivated (activated) spermatozoa exhibited nearly constant-curvature beating, the hyperactivated spermatozoa displayed a constant-frequency beating. A detailed analysis of the microtubule sliding of the activated and hyperactivated sperm flagella revealed that the sharp bends at the base of the flagella were induced by an increase in the total length of the microtubule sliding at the base of the flagella and that the sliding velocity of the activated and hyperactivated sperm flagella was consistent within each species. A comparison of the sliding velocity of the flagellar beating of Suncus, golden hamster, and monkey spermatozoa with the moment of inertia of the cross section of the flagellar base suggests that the sliding velocity is involved in the hardness of a sperm flagellum.

  17. Quantitative analysis and modeling of katanin function in flagellar length control

    PubMed Central

    Kannegaard, Elisa; Rego, E. Hesper; Schuck, Sebastian; Feldman, Jessica L.; Marshall, Wallace F.

    2014-01-01

    Flagellar length control in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii provides a simple model system in which to investigate the general question of how cells regulate organelle size. Previous work demonstrated that Chlamydomonas cytoplasm contains a pool of flagellar precursor proteins sufficient to assemble a half-length flagellum and that assembly of full-length flagella requires synthesis of additional precursors to augment the preexisting pool. The regulatory systems that control the synthesis and regeneration of this pool are not known, although transcriptional regulation clearly plays a role. We used quantitative analysis of length distributions to identify candidate genes controlling pool regeneration and found that a mutation in the p80 regulatory subunit of katanin, encoded by the PF15 gene in Chlamydomonas, alters flagellar length by changing the kinetics of precursor pool utilization. This finding suggests a model in which flagella compete with cytoplasmic microtubules for a fixed pool of tubulin, with katanin-mediated severing allowing easier access to this pool during flagellar assembly. We tested this model using a stochastic simulation that confirms that cytoplasmic microtubules can compete with flagella for a limited tubulin pool, showing that alteration of cytoplasmic microtubule severing could be sufficient to explain the effect of the pf15 mutations on flagellar length. PMID:25143397

  18. Entosiphon sulcatum (Euglenophyceae): flagellar roots of the basal body complex and reservoir region

    SciTech Connect

    Solomon, J.A.; Walne, P.L.; Kivic, P.A.

    1987-03-01

    The flagellar root system of Entosiphon sulcatum (Dujardin) Stein (Euglenophyceae) is described and compared with kinetoplastid and other euglenoid systems. An asymmetric pattern of three microtubular roots, one between the two flagellar basal bodies and one on either side (here called the intermediate, dorsal, and ventral roots), is consistent within the euglenoid flagellates studied thus far. The dorsal root is associated with the basal body of the anterior flagellum (F1) and lies on the left dorsal side of the basal body complex. Originating between the two flagellar basal bodies, and associated with the basal body of the trailing flagellum (F2), the intermediate root is morphologically distinguished by fibrils interconnecting the individual microtubules to one another and to the overlying reservoir membrane. The intermediate root is often borne on a ridge projecting into the reservoir. The ventral root originates near the F2 basal body and lies on the right ventral side of the cell. Fibrillar connections link the membrane of F2 with the reservoir membrane at the reservoir-canal transition level. A large cross-banded fiber joins the two flagellar basal bodies, and a series of smaller striated fibers links the anterior accessory and flagellar basal bodies. Large nonstriated fibers extend from the basal body complex posteriorly into the cytoplasm.

  19. High-Pressure Microscopy for Studying Molecular Motors.

    PubMed

    Nishiyama, Masayoshi

    2015-01-01

    Movement is a fundamental characteristic of all living things. This biogenic function is carried out by various nanometer-sized molecular machines. Molecular motor is a typical molecular machinery in which the characteristic features of proteins are integrated; these include enzymatic activity, energy conversion, molecular recognition and self-assembly. These biologically important reactions occur with the association of water molecules that surround the motors. Applied pressures can alter the intermolecular interactions between the motors and water. In this chapter we describe the development of a high-pressure microscope and a new motility assay that enables the visualization of the motility of molecular motors under conditions of high-pressure. Our results demonstrate that applied pressure dynamically changes the motility of molecular motors such as kinesin, F1-ATPase and bacterial flagellar motors.

  20. Zipping and entanglement in flagellar bundle of E. coli: Role of motile cell body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adhyapak, Tapan Chandra; Stark, Holger

    2015-11-01

    The course of a peritrichous bacterium, such as E. coli, crucially depends on the level of synchronization and self-organization of several rotating flagella. However, the rotation of each flagellum generates countermovements of the body which in turn affect the flagellar dynamics. Using a detailed numerical model of an E. coli, we demonstrate that flagellar entanglement, besides fluid flow relative to the moving body, dramatically changes the dynamics of flagella from that compared to anchored flagella. In particular, bundle formation occurs through a zipping motion in a remarkably rapid time, affected little by initial flagellar orientation. A simplified analytical model supports our observations. Finally, we illustrate how entanglement, hydrodynamic interactions, and body movement contribute to zipping and bundling.

  1. Preparing well-oriented sols of straight bacterial flagellar filaments for X-ray fiber diffraction.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, I; Vonderviszt, F; Noguchi, T; Namba, K

    1991-01-20

    Well-oriented sols of straight bacterial flagellar filaments have been obtained by preparing reconstituted flagellar filaments with an appropriate length distribution and choosing appropriate solvent conditions. An average filament length of 300 to 500 nm and the use of solvents with very low concentrations of salt has allowed us to prepare highly fluid sols that make flow orientation possible. X-ray fiber diffraction from these sols has shown distinct layer-line reflections to 3.5 A resolution in the meridional direction. Layer-line intensities have been collected by the angular deconvolution method up to 5 A resolution. The possibility of using a magnetic field to further improve the orientation has been explored and a solvent condition that makes flagellar sols sensitive to the magnetic field has been found. General applicability of the method to other systems is also discussed.

  2. Biochemical characterization of tektins from sperm flagellar doublet microtubules.

    PubMed

    Linck, R W; Stephens, R E

    1987-04-01

    Tektins, protein components of stable protofilaments from sea urchin sperm flagellar outer doublet microtubules (Linck, R. W., and G. L. Langevin, 1982, J. Cell Sci., 58:1-22), are separable by preparative SDS PAGE into 47-, 51-, and 55-kD equimolar components. High resolution two-dimensional tryptic peptide mapping reveals 63-67% coincidence among peptides of the 51-kD tektin chain and its 47- and 55-kD counterparts, greater than 70% coincidence between the 47- and 55-kD tektins, but little obvious similarity to either alpha- or beta-tubulin. With reverse-phase HPLC on a C18 column, using 6 M guanidine-HCl solubilization and a 0.1% trifluoroacetic acid/CH3CN gradient system (Stephens, R. E., 1984, J. Cell Biol. 90:37a [Abstr.]), the relatively less hydrophobic 51-kD tektin elutes at greater than 45% CH3CN, immediately followed by the 55-kD chain. The 47-kD tektin is substantially more hydrophobic, eluting between the two tubulins. The amino acid compositions of the tektins are very similar to each other but totally distinct from tubulin chains, being characterized by a greater than 50% higher arginine plus lysine content (in good agreement with the number of tryptic peptides) and about half the content of glycine, histidine, proline, and tyrosine. The proline content correlates well with the fact that tektin filaments have twice as much alpha-helical content as tubulin. Total hydrophobic amino acid content correlates with HPLC elution times for the tektins but not tubulins. The average amino acid composition of the tektins indicates that they resemble intermediate filament proteins, as originally postulated from structural, solubility, and electrophoretic properties. Tektins have higher cysteine and tryptophan contents than desmin and vimentin, which characteristically have only one residue of each, more closely resembling certain keratins in these amino acids.

  3. Biochemical characterization of tektins from sperm flagellar doublet microtubules

    PubMed Central

    1987-01-01

    Tektins, protein components of stable protofilaments from sea urchin sperm flagellar outer doublet microtubules (Linck, R. W., and G. L. Langevin, 1982, J. Cell Sci., 58:1-22), are separable by preparative SDS PAGE into 47-, 51-, and 55-kD equimolar components. High resolution two-dimensional tryptic peptide mapping reveals 63-67% coincidence among peptides of the 51-kD tektin chain and its 47- and 55-kD counterparts, greater than 70% coincidence between the 47- and 55-kD tektins, but little obvious similarity to either alpha- or beta- tubulin. With reverse-phase HPLC on a C18 column, using 6 M guanidine- HCl solubilization and a 0.1% trifluoroacetic acid/CH3CN gradient system (Stephens, R. E., 1984, J. Cell Biol. 90:37a [Abstr.]), the relatively less hydrophobic 51-kD tektin elutes at greater than 45% CH3CN, immediately followed by the 55-kD chain. The 47-kD tektin is substantially more hydrophobic, eluting between the two tubulins. The amino acid compositions of the tektins are very similar to each other but totally distinct from tubulin chains, being characterized by a greater than 50% higher arginine plus lysine content (in good agreement with the number of tryptic peptides) and about half the content of glycine, histidine, proline, and tyrosine. The proline content correlates well with the fact that tektin filaments have twice as much alpha-helical content as tubulin. Total hydrophobic amino acid content correlates with HPLC elution times for the tektins but not tubulins. The average amino acid composition of the tektins indicates that they resemble intermediate filament proteins, as originally postulated from structural, solubility, and electrophoretic properties. Tektins have higher cysteine and tryptophan contents than desmin and vimentin, which characteristically have only one residue of each, more closely resembling certain keratins in these amino acids. PMID:3558479

  4. Flagellar coordination in Chlamydomonas cells held on micropipettes.

    PubMed

    Rüffer, U; Nultsch, W

    1998-01-01

    The two flagella of Chlamydomonas are known to beat synchronously: During breaststroke beating they are generally coordinated in a bilateral way while in shock responses during undulatory beating coordination is mostly parallel [Rüffer and Nultsch, 1995: Botanica Acta 108:169-276]. Analysis of a great number of shock responses revealed that in undulatory beats also periods of bilateral coordination are found and that the coordination type may change several times during a shock response, without concomitant changes of the beat envelope and the beat period. In normal wt cells no coordination changes are found during breaststroke beating, but only short temporary asynchronies: During 2 or 3 normal beats of the cis flagellum, the trans flagellum performs 3 or 4 flat beats with a reduced beat envelope and a smaller beat period, resulting in one additional trans beat. Long periods with flat beats of the same shape and beat period are found in both flagella of the non-phototactic mutant ptx1 and in defective wt 622E cells. During these periods, the coordination is parallel, the two flagella beat alternately. A correlation between normal asynchronous trans beats and the parallel-coordinated beats in the presumably cis defective cells and also the undulatory beats is discussed. In the cis defective cells, a perpetual spontaneous change between parallel beats with small beat periods (higher beat frequency) and bilateral beats with greater beat periods (lower beat frequency) are observed and render questionable the existence of two different intrinsic beat frequencies of the two flagella cis and trans. Asynchronies occur spontaneously but may also be induced by light changes, either step-up or step-down, but not by both stimuli in turn as breaststroke flagellar photoresponses (BFPRs). Asynchronies are not involved in phototaxis. They are independent of the BFPRs, which are supposed to be the basis of phototaxis. Both types of coordination must be assumed to be regulated

  5. Listeria monocytogenes DNA Glycosylase AdlP Affects Flagellar Motility, Biofilm Formation, Virulence, and Stress Responses

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ting; Bae, Dongryeoul

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The temperature-dependent alteration of flagellar motility gene expression is critical for the foodborne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes to respond to a changing environment. In this study, a genetic determinant, L. monocytogenes f2365_0220 (lmof2365_0220), encoding a putative protein that is structurally similar to the Bacillus cereus alkyl base DNA glycosylase (AlkD), was identified. This determinant was involved in the transcriptional repression of flagellar motility genes and was named adlP (encoding an AlkD-like protein [AdlP]). Deletion of adlP activated the expression of flagellar motility genes at 37°C and disrupted the temperature-dependent inhibition of L. monocytogenes motility. The adlP null strains demonstrated decreased survival in murine macrophage-like RAW264.7 cells and less virulence in mice. Furthermore, the deletion of adlP significantly decreased biofilm formation and impaired the survival of bacteria under several stress conditions, including the presence of a DNA alkylation compound (methyl methanesulfonate), an oxidative agent (H2O2), and aminoglycoside antibiotics. Our findings strongly suggest that adlP may encode a bifunctional protein that transcriptionally represses the expression of flagellar motility genes and influences stress responses through its DNA glycosylase activity. IMPORTANCE We discovered a novel protein that we named AlkD-like protein (AdlP). This protein affected flagellar motility, biofilm formation, and virulence. Our data suggest that AdlP may be a bifunctional protein that represses flagellar motility genes and influences stress responses through its DNA glycosylase activity. PMID:27316964

  6. Intact capture of hypervelocity projectiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsou, P.

    1990-01-01

    The ability to capture projectiles intact at hypervelocities opens new applications in science and technology that would either not be possible or would be very costly by other means. This capability has been demonstrated in the laboratory for aluminum projectiles of 1.6 mm diameter, captured at 6 km/s, in one unmelted piece, and retaining up to 95% of the original mass. Furthermore, capture was accomplished passively using microcellular underdense polymer foam. Another advantage of capturing projectiles in an underdense medium is the ability of such a medium to preserve a record of the projectile's original velocity components of speed and direction. A survey of these experimental results is described in terms of a dozen parameters which characterize the amount of capture and the effect on the projectile due to different capture media.

  7. Intact capture of hypervelocity projectiles.

    PubMed

    Tsou, P

    1990-01-01

    The ability to capture projectiles intact at hypervelocities opens new applications in science and technology that would either not be possible or would be very costly by other means. This capability has been demonstrated in the laboratory for aluminum projectiles of 1.6 mm diameter, captured at 6 km/s, in one unmelted piece, and retaining up to 95% of the original mass. Furthermore, capture was accomplished passively using microcellular underdense polymer foam. Another advantage of capturing projectiles in an underdense medium is the ability of such a medium to preserve a record of the projectile's original velocity components of speed and direction. A survey of these experimental results is described in terms of a dozen parameters which characterize the amount of capture and the effect on the projectile due to different capture media.

  8. A rotary motor drives Flavobacterium gliding.

    PubMed

    Shrivastava, Abhishek; Lele, Pushkar P; Berg, Howard C

    2015-02-02

    Cells of Flavobacterium johnsoniae, a rod-shaped bacterium devoid of pili or flagella, glide over glass at speeds of 2-4 μm/s [1]. Gliding is powered by a protonmotive force [2], but the machinery required for this motion is not known. Usually, cells move along straight paths, but sometimes they exhibit a reciprocal motion, attach near one pole and flip end over end, or rotate. This behavior is similar to that of a Cytophaga species described earlier [3]. Development of genetic tools for F. johnsoniae led to discovery of proteins involved in gliding [4]. These include the surface adhesin SprB that forms filaments about 160 nm long by 6 nm in diameter, which, when labeled with a fluorescent antibody [2] or a latex bead [5], are seen to move longitudinally down the length of a cell, occasionally shifting positions to the right or the left. Evidently, interaction of these filaments with a surface produces gliding. To learn more about the gliding motor, we sheared cells to reduce the number and size of SprB filaments and tethered cells to glass by adding anti-SprB antibody. Cells spun about fixed points, mostly counterclockwise, rotating at speeds of 1 Hz or more. The torques required to sustain such speeds were large, comparable to those generated by the flagellar rotary motor. However, we found that a gliding motor runs at constant speed rather than at constant torque. Now, there are three rotary motors powered by protonmotive force: the bacterial flagellar motor, the Fo ATP synthase, and the gliding motor.

  9. The flagellar motility of Chlamydomonas pf25 mutant lacking an AKAP-binding protein is overtly sensitive to medium conditions.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chun; Yang, Pinfen

    2006-01-01

    Radial spokes are a conserved axonemal structural complex postulated to regulate the motility of 9 + 2 cilia and flagella via a network of phosphoenzymes and regulatory proteins. Consistently, a Chlamydomonas radial spoke protein, RSP3, has been identified by RII overlays as an A-kinase anchoring protein (AKAP) that localizes the cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) holoenzyme by binding to the RIIa domain of PKA RII subunit. However, the highly conserved docking domain of PKA is also found in the N termini of several AKAP-binding proteins unrelated to PKA as well as a 24-kDa novel spoke protein, RSP11. Here, we report that RSP11 binds to RSP3 directly in vitro and colocalizes with RSP3 toward the spoke base near outer doublets and dynein motors in axonemes. Importantly, RSP11 mutant pf25 displays a spectrum of motility, from paralysis with flaccid or twitching flagella as other spoke mutants to wildtype-like swimming. The wide range of motility changes reversibly depending on the condition of liquid media without replacing defective proteins. We postulate that radial spokes use the RIIa/AKAP module to regulate ciliary and flagellar beating; absence of the spoke RIIa protein exposes a medium-sensitive regulatory mechanism that is not obvious in wild-type Chlamydomonas.

  10. The Bacterial Flagellar Type III Export Gate Complex Is a Dual Fuel Engine That Can Use Both H+ and Na+ for Flagellar Protein Export.

    PubMed

    Minamino, Tohru; Morimoto, Yusuke V; Hara, Noritaka; Aldridge, Phillip D; Namba, Keiichi

    2016-03-01

    The bacterial flagellar type III export apparatus utilizes ATP and proton motive force (PMF) to transport flagellar proteins to the distal end of the growing flagellar structure for self-assembly. The transmembrane export gate complex is a H+-protein antiporter, of which activity is greatly augmented by an associated cytoplasmic ATPase complex. Here, we report that the export gate complex can use sodium motive force (SMF) in addition to PMF across the cytoplasmic membrane to drive protein export. Protein export was considerably reduced in the absence of the ATPase complex and a pH gradient across the membrane, but Na+ increased it dramatically. Phenamil, a blocker of Na+ translocation, inhibited protein export. Overexpression of FlhA increased the intracellular Na+ concentration in the presence of 100 mM NaCl but not in its absence, suggesting that FlhA acts as a Na+ channel. In wild-type cells, however, neither Na+ nor phenamil affected protein export, indicating that the Na+ channel activity of FlhA is suppressed by the ATPase complex. We propose that the export gate by itself is a dual fuel engine that uses both PMF and SMF for protein export and that the ATPase complex switches this dual fuel engine into a PMF-driven export machinery to become much more robust against environmental changes in external pH and Na+ concentration.

  11. The Bacterial Flagellar Type III Export Gate Complex Is a Dual Fuel Engine That Can Use Both H+ and Na+ for Flagellar Protein Export

    PubMed Central

    Minamino, Tohru; Morimoto, Yusuke V.; Hara, Noritaka; Aldridge, Phillip D.; Namba, Keiichi

    2016-01-01

    The bacterial flagellar type III export apparatus utilizes ATP and proton motive force (PMF) to transport flagellar proteins to the distal end of the growing flagellar structure for self-assembly. The transmembrane export gate complex is a H+–protein antiporter, of which activity is greatly augmented by an associated cytoplasmic ATPase complex. Here, we report that the export gate complex can use sodium motive force (SMF) in addition to PMF across the cytoplasmic membrane to drive protein export. Protein export was considerably reduced in the absence of the ATPase complex and a pH gradient across the membrane, but Na+ increased it dramatically. Phenamil, a blocker of Na+ translocation, inhibited protein export. Overexpression of FlhA increased the intracellular Na+ concentration in the presence of 100 mM NaCl but not in its absence, suggesting that FlhA acts as a Na+ channel. In wild-type cells, however, neither Na+ nor phenamil affected protein export, indicating that the Na+ channel activity of FlhA is suppressed by the ATPase complex. We propose that the export gate by itself is a dual fuel engine that uses both PMF and SMF for protein export and that the ATPase complex switches this dual fuel engine into a PMF-driven export machinery to become much more robust against environmental changes in external pH and Na+ concentration. PMID:26943926

  12. Codon-based phylogenetics introduces novel flagellar gene markers to oomycete systematics.

    PubMed

    Robideau, Gregg P; Rodrigue, Nicolas; André Lévesque, C

    2014-10-01

    Oomycete systematics has traditionally been reliant on ribosomal RNA and mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase sequences. Here we report the use of two single-copy protein-coding flagellar genes, PF16 and OCM1, in oomycete systematics, showing their utility in phylogenetic reconstruction and species identification. Applying a recently proposed mutation-selection model of codon substitution, the phylogenetic relationships inferred by flagellar genes are largely in agreement with the current views of oomycete evolution, whereas nucleotide- and amino acid-level models produce biologically implausible reconstructions. Interesting parallels exist between the phylogeny inferred from the flagellar genes and zoospore ontology, providing external support for the tree obtained using the codon model. The resolution achieved for species identification is ample using PF16, and quite robust using OCM1, and the described PCR primers are able to amplify both genes for a range of oomycete genera. Altogether, when analyzed with a rich codon substitution model, these flagellar genes provide useful markers for the oomycete molecular toolbox.

  13. A Comparative Overview of the Flagellar Apparatus of Dinoflagellate, Perkinsids and Colpodellids

    PubMed Central

    Okamoto, Noriko; Keeling, Patrick J.

    2014-01-01

    Dinoflagellates are a member of the Alveolata, and elucidation of the early evolution of alveolates is important for our understanding of dinoflagellates, and vice versa. The ultrastructure of the flagellar apparatus has been described from several dinoflagellates in the last few decades, and the basic components appear to be well conserved. The typical dinoflagellate apparatus is composed of two basal bodies surrounded by striated collars attached to a connective fiber. The longitudinal basal body is connected to a longitudinal microtubular root (LMR; equivalent of R1) and single microtubular root (R2), whereas the transverse basal body is connected to a transverse microtubular root (TMR; R3) and transverse striated root (TSR) with a microtubule (R4). Some of these components, especially the connective fibers and collars, are dinoflagellate specific characteristics that make their flagellar apparatus relatively complex. We also compare these structures with the flagellar apparatus from a number of close relatives of dinoflagellates and their sister, the apicomplexans, including colpodellids, perkinsids, and Psammosa. Though the ultrastructural knowledge of these lineages is still relatively modest, it provides us with an interesting viewpoint of the character evolution of the flagellar apparatus among those lineages. PMID:27694777

  14. Swimming performance of Bradyrhizobium diazoefficiens is an emergent property of its two flagellar systems.

    PubMed

    Quelas, J Ignacio; Althabegoiti, M Julia; Jimenez-Sanchez, Celia; Melgarejo, Augusto A; Marconi, Verónica I; Mongiardini, Elías J; Trejo, Sebastián A; Mengucci, Florencia; Ortega-Calvo, José-Julio; Lodeiro, Aníbal R

    2016-04-07

    Many bacterial species use flagella for self-propulsion in aqueous media. In the soil, which is a complex and structured environment, water is found in microscopic channels where viscosity and water potential depend on the composition of the soil solution and the degree of soil water saturation. Therefore, the motility of soil bacteria might have special requirements. An important soil bacterial genus is Bradyrhizobium, with species that possess one flagellar system and others with two different flagellar systems. Among the latter is B. diazoefficiens, which may express its subpolar and lateral flagella simultaneously in liquid medium, although its swimming behaviour was not described yet. These two flagellar systems were observed here as functionally integrated in a swimming performance that emerged as an epistatic interaction between those appendages. In addition, each flagellum seemed engaged in a particular task that might be required for swimming oriented toward chemoattractants near the soil inner surfaces at viscosities that may occur after the loss of soil gravitational water. Because the possession of two flagellar systems is not general in Bradyrhizobium or in related genera that coexist in the same environment, there may be an adaptive tradeoff between energetic costs and ecological benefits among these different species.

  15. Swimming performance of Bradyrhizobium diazoefficiens is an emergent property of its two flagellar systems

    PubMed Central

    Quelas, J. Ignacio; Althabegoiti, M. Julia; Jimenez-Sanchez, Celia; Melgarejo, Augusto A.; Marconi, Verónica I.; Mongiardini, Elías J.; Trejo, Sebastián A.; Mengucci, Florencia; Ortega-Calvo, José-Julio; Lodeiro, Aníbal R.

    2016-01-01

    Many bacterial species use flagella for self-propulsion in aqueous media. In the soil, which is a complex and structured environment, water is found in microscopic channels where viscosity and water potential depend on the composition of the soil solution and the degree of soil water saturation. Therefore, the motility of soil bacteria might have special requirements. An important soil bacterial genus is Bradyrhizobium, with species that possess one flagellar system and others with two different flagellar systems. Among the latter is B. diazoefficiens, which may express its subpolar and lateral flagella simultaneously in liquid medium, although its swimming behaviour was not described yet. These two flagellar systems were observed here as functionally integrated in a swimming performance that emerged as an epistatic interaction between those appendages. In addition, each flagellum seemed engaged in a particular task that might be required for swimming oriented toward chemoattractants near the soil inner surfaces at viscosities that may occur after the loss of soil gravitational water. Because the possession of two flagellar systems is not general in Bradyrhizobium or in related genera that coexist in the same environment, there may be an adaptive tradeoff between energetic costs and ecological benefits among these different species. PMID:27053439

  16. Listeria monocytogenes DNA glycosylase AdiP affects flagellar motility, biofilm formation, virulence, and stress responses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The temperature-dependent alteration of flagellar motility gene expression is critical for the foodborne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes to respond to a changing environment. In this study, a genetic determinant, L. monocytogenes f2365_0220 (lmof2365_0220), encoding a putative protein that is struct...

  17. Localization of EB1, IFT polypeptides, and kinesin-2 in Chlamydomonas flagellar axonemes via immunogold scanning electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Sloboda, Roger D; Howard, Louisa

    2007-06-01

    Intraflagellar transport (IFT) refers to the bi-directional movement of particles and associated cargo along the axonemes of eukaryotic flagella and cilia. To provide a new perspective on the morphology of IFT particles, their association with the axoneme, and their composition, we have used immunogold localization coupled to detection via scanning electron microscopy. Here we co-localize in the Chlamydomonas flagellar axoneme polypeptides labeled with specific antibodies. Chlamydomonas EB1 localizes to the distal tip of the axoneme, as expected from previous immunofluorescent data (Pedersen et al. Curr Biol2003;13(22):1969-1974), thus demonstrating the utility of this approach. Using antibodies to IFT-related polypeptides, particles can be identified associated with the axoneme that fall into one of two classes: The first class is composed of IFT particles labeled with polyclonal antibodies to kinesin-2 and monoclonal antibodies to either IFT139 (an IFT complex A polypeptide) or IFT172 (a complex B polypeptide). The second class is comprised of particles that label with antibodies to IFT139 alone; thus, discrete particles are present associated with the axoneme that are composed only of complex A polypeptides. When IFT particles were purified by sucrose gradient ultracentrifugation, they appeared as more or less spherical aggregates of varying dimensions labeled with antibodies to IFT139 and to the motor protein kinesin-2. By contrast, isolated IFT particles that were labeled with IFT172 antibodies were not labeled with kinesin-2 antibodies. The data are discussed in terms of the total polypeptide composition of an IFT particle and the interaction of the particles with the motors that power IFT.

  18. Triton shells of intact erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Sheetz, M P; Sawyer, D

    1978-01-01

    About 40% of human erythrocyte membrane protein is resistant to solubilization in 0.5% Triton X-114. These components comprise a structure called a Triton shell roughly similar in size and shape to the original erythrocyte and thus constitute a cytoskeleton. With increasing concentrations of Triton the lipid content of the Triton shell decreases dramatically, whereas the majority of the protein components remain constant. Exceptions to this rule include proteins contained in band 3, the presumed anion channel, and in band 4 which decrease with increasing Triton concentration. The Triton-insoluble complex includes spectrin (bands 1 and 2), actin (band 5), and bands 3' and 7. Component 3' has an apparent molecular weight of 88,000 daltons as does 3; but unlike 3, it is insensitive to protease treatment of the intact cell, has a low extinction coefficient at 280 nm, and is solubilized from the shells in alkaline water solutions. Component 7 also has a low extinction coefficient at 280 nm. Spectrin alone is solubilized from the Triton shells in isotonic media. The solubilized spectrin contains no bound Triton and coelectrophoreses with spectrin eluted in hypotonic solutions from ghosts. Electron micrographs of fixed Triton shells stained with uranyl acetate show the presence of numerous filaments which appear beaded and are 80--120 A in diameter. The filaments cannot be composed mainly af actin, but enough spectrin is present to form the filaments. Triton shells may provide an excellent source of material useful in the investigation of the erythrocyte cytoskeleton.

  19. Sequential development of flagellar defects in spermatids and epididymal spermatozoa of selenium-deficient rats.

    PubMed

    Olson, Gary E; Winfrey, Virginia P; Hill, Kristina E; Burk, Raymond F

    2004-03-01

    In this study cauda epididymal spermatozoa of rats maintained on a selenium-deficient diet for 5 and 7 months exhibited an array of flagellar defects. Spermatids and spermatozoa were analyzed by light and electron microscopy to define the appearance of flagellar abnormalities during spermiogenesis and post-testicular sperm development. Late spermatids of selenium-deficient rats displayed normal structural organization of the flagellar plasma membrane, axoneme, outer dense fibers, fibrous sheath and annulus, but they exhibited a premature termination of the mitochondrial sheath. A comparison of late spermatids and caput epididymal spermatozoa revealed that a late step in flagellar differentiation was the structural remodeling of the annulus and its accompanying fusion with both the fibrous sheath and the mitochondrial sheath. In selenium-deficient animals, however, the annulus failed to fuse with the mitochondrial sheath, generating an apparent weak point in the flagellum. After epididymal passage, cauda epididymal spermatozoa of selenium-deficient animals also exhibited extensive flagellar disorganization resulting from the apparent sliding and extrusion of specific outer dense fiber-doublet microtubule complexes from the proximal and the distal ends of the mitochondrial sheath and the accompanying loss of the midpiece plasma membrane. Only fiber complex number 4 was extruded proximally, whereas fibers 4, 5, 6 and 7 were extruded from the mitochondrial sheath-deficient posterior midpiece. Axonemal fibers 8, 9, 1, 2 and 3 retained their normal geometric relationships. These data suggest that the known loss of male fertility in selenium deficiency results from the sequential development of sperm defects expressed during both spermiogenesis and maturation in the epididymis.

  20. A species-specific periplasmic flagellar protein of Serpulina (Treponema) hyodysenteriae.

    PubMed Central

    Li, Z; Dumas, F; Dubreuil, D; Jacques, M

    1993-01-01

    We have previously reported that a 46-kDa protein present in an outer membrane protein preparation seemed to be a species-specific antigen of Serpulina hyodysenteriae (Z. S. Li, N. S. Jensen, M. Bélanger, M.-C. L'Espérance, and M. Jacques, J. Clin. Microbiol. 30:2941-2947, 1992). The objective of this study was to further characterize this antigen. A Western blot (immunoblot) analysis and immunogold labeling with a monospecific antiserum against this protein confirmed that the protein was present in all S. hyodysenteriae reference strains but not in the nonpathogenic organism Serpulina innocens. The immunogold labeling results also indicated that the protein was associated with the periplasmic flagella of S. hyodysenteriae. N-terminal amino acid sequencing confirmed that the protein was in fact a periplasmic flagellar sheath protein. The molecular mass of this protein, first estimated to be 46 kDa by Western blotting, was determined to be 44 kDa when the protein was evaluated more precisely by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and the protein was glycosylated, as determined by glycoprotein staining and also by N-glycosidase F treatment. Five other periplasmic flagellar proteins of S. hyodysenteriae, which may have been the core proteins and had molecular masses of 39, 35, 32, 30, and 29 kDa, were antigenically related and cross-reacted with the periplasmic flagellar proteins of S. innocens. Finally, serum from a pig experimentally infected with S. hyodysenteriae recognized the 44-kDa periplasmic flagellar sheath protein. Our results suggest that the 44-kDa periplasmic flagellar sheath protein of S. hyodysenteriae is a species-specific glycoprotein antigen. Images PMID:8253687

  1. Periplasmic flagellar export apparatus protein, FliH, is involved in post-transcriptional regulation of FlaB, motility and virulence of the relapsing fever spirochete Borrelia hermsii.

    PubMed

    Guyard, Cyril; Raffel, Sandra J; Schrumpf, Merry E; Dahlstrom, Eric; Sturdevant, Daniel; Ricklefs, Stacy M; Martens, Craig; Hayes, Stanley F; Fischer, Elizabeth R; Hansen, Bryan T; Porcella, Stephen F; Schwan, Tom G

    2013-01-01

    Spirochetes are bacteria characterized in part by rotating periplasmic flagella that impart their helical or flat-wave morphology and motility. While most other bacteria rely on a transcriptional cascade to regulate the expression of motility genes, spirochetes employ post-transcriptional mechanism(s) that are only partially known. In the present study, we characterize a spontaneous non-motile mutant of the relapsing fever spirochete Borrelia hermsii that was straight, non-motile and deficient in periplasmic flagella. We used next generation DNA sequencing of the mutant's genome, which when compared to the wild-type genome identified a 142 bp deletion in the chromosomal gene encoding the flagellar export apparatus protein FliH. Immunoblot and transcription analyses showed that the mutant phenotype was linked to the posttranscriptional deficiency in the synthesis of the major periplasmic flagellar filament core protein FlaB. Despite the lack of FlaB, the amount of FlaA produced by the fliH mutant was similar to the wild-type level. The turnover of the residual pool of FlaB produced by the fliH mutant was comparable to the wild-type spirochete. The non-motile mutant was not infectious in mice and its inoculation did not induce an antibody response. Trans-complementation of the mutant with an intact fliH gene restored the synthesis of FlaB, a normal morphology, motility and infectivity in mice. Therefore, we propose that the flagellar export apparatus protein regulates motility of B. hermsii at the post-transcriptional level by influencing the synthesis of FlaB.

  2. Variation in motor output and motor performance in a centrally generated motor pattern.

    PubMed

    Wenning, Angela; Norris, Brian J; Doloc-Mihu, Anca; Calabrese, Ronald L

    2014-07-01

    Central pattern generators (CPGs) produce motor patterns that ultimately drive motor outputs. We studied how functional motor performance is achieved, specifically, whether the variation seen in motor patterns is reflected in motor performance and whether fictive motor patterns differ from those in vivo. We used the leech heartbeat system in which a bilaterally symmetrical CPG coordinates segmental heart motor neurons and two segmented heart tubes into two mutually exclusive coordination modes: rear-to-front peristaltic on one side and nearly synchronous on the other, with regular side-to-side switches. We assessed individual variability of the motor pattern and the beat pattern in vivo. To quantify the beat pattern we imaged intact adults. To quantify the phase relations between motor neurons and heart constrictions we recorded extracellularly from two heart motor neurons and movement from the corresponding heart segments in minimally dissected leeches. Variation in the motor pattern was reflected in motor performance only in the peristaltic mode, where larger intersegmental phase differences in the motor neurons resulted in larger phase differences between heart constrictions. Fictive motor patterns differed from those in vivo only in the synchronous mode, where intersegmental phase differences in vivo had a larger front-to-rear bias and were more constrained. Additionally, load-influenced constriction timing might explain the amplification of the phase differences between heart segments in the peristaltic mode and the higher variability in motor output due to body shape assumed in this soft-bodied animal. The motor pattern determines the beat pattern, peristaltic or synchronous, but heart mechanics influence the phase relations achieved.

  3. Integrated Control of Axonemal Dynein AAA+ Motors

    PubMed Central

    King, Stephen M.

    2012-01-01

    Axonemal dyneins are AAA+ enzymes that convert ATP hydrolysis to mechanical work. This leads to the sliding of doublet microtubules with respect to each other and ultimately the generation of ciliary/flagellar beating. However, in order for useful work to be generated, the action of individual dynein motors must be precisely controlled. In addition, cells modulate the motility of these organelles through a variety of second messenger systems and these signals too must be integrated by the dynein motors to yield an appropriate output. This review describes the current status of efforts to understand dynein control mechanisms and their connectivity focusing mainly on studies of the outer dynein arm from axonemes of the unicellular biflagellate green alga Chlamydomonas. PMID:22406539

  4. Identification of multicomponent histidine-aspartate phosphorelay system controlling flagellar and motility gene expression in Geobacter species.

    PubMed

    Ueki, Toshiyuki; Leang, Ching; Inoue, Kengo; Lovley, Derek R

    2012-03-30

    Geobacter species play an important role in the natural biogeochemical cycles of aquatic sediments and subsurface environments as well as in subsurface bioremediation by oxidizing organic compounds with the reduction of insoluble Fe(III) oxides. Flagellum-based motility is considered to be critical for Geobacter species to locate fresh sources of Fe(III) oxides. Functional and comparative genomic approaches, coupled with genetic and biochemical methods, identified key regulators for flagellar gene expression in Geobacter species. A master transcriptional regulator, designated FgrM, is a member of the enhancer-binding protein family. The fgrM gene in the most studied strain of Geobacter species, Geobacter sulfurreducens strain DL-1, is truncated by a transposase gene, preventing flagellar biosynthesis. Integrating a functional FgrM homolog restored flagellar biosynthesis and motility in G. sulfurreducens DL-1 and enhanced the ability to reduce insoluble Fe(III) oxide. Interrupting the fgrM gene in G. sulfurreducens strain KN400, which is motile, removed the capacity for flagellar production and inhibited Fe(III) oxide reduction. FgrM, which is also a response regulator of the two-component His-Asp phosphorelay system, was phosphorylated by histidine kinase GHK4, which was essential for flagellar production and motility. GHK4, which is a hybrid kinase with a receiver domain at the N terminus, was phosphorylated by another histidine kinase, GHK3. Therefore, the multicomponent His-Asp phosphorelay system appears to control flagellar gene expression in Geobacter species.

  5. Transcriptional regulation of coordinate changes in flagellar mRNAs during differentiation of Naegleria gruberi amoebae into flagellates

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J.H.; Walsh, C.J.

    1988-06-01

    The nuclear run-on technique was used to measure the rate of transcription of flagellar genes during the differentiation of Naegleria gruberi amebae into flagellates. Synthesis of mRNAs for the axonemal proteins ..cap alpha..- and BETA-tubulin and flagellar calmodulin, as well as a coordinately regulated poly(A)/sup +/ RNA that codes for an unidentified protein, showed transient increases averaging 22-fold. The rate of synthesis of two poly(A)/sup +/ RNAs common to ameobae and flagellates was low until the transcription of the flagellar genes began to decline, at which time synthesis of the RNAs found in ameobae increased 3- to 10-fold. The observed changes in the rate of transcription can account quantitatively for the 20-fold increase in flagellar mRNA concentration during the differentiation. The data for the flagellar calmodulin gene demonstrate transcriptional regulation for a nontubulin axonemal protein. The data also demonstrate at least two programs of transcriptional regulation during the differentiation and raise the intriguing possibility that some significant fraction of the nearly 200 different proteins of the flagellar axoneme is transcriptionally regulated during the 1 h it takes N. gruberi amebae to form visible flagella.

  6. Identification of Multicomponent Histidine-Aspartate Phosphorelay System Controlling Flagellar and Motility Gene Expression in Geobacter Species*

    PubMed Central

    Ueki, Toshiyuki; Leang, Ching; Inoue, Kengo; Lovley, Derek R.

    2012-01-01

    Geobacter species play an important role in the natural biogeochemical cycles of aquatic sediments and subsurface environments as well as in subsurface bioremediation by oxidizing organic compounds with the reduction of insoluble Fe(III) oxides. Flagellum-based motility is considered to be critical for Geobacter species to locate fresh sources of Fe(III) oxides. Functional and comparative genomic approaches, coupled with genetic and biochemical methods, identified key regulators for flagellar gene expression in Geobacter species. A master transcriptional regulator, designated FgrM, is a member of the enhancer-binding protein family. The fgrM gene in the most studied strain of Geobacter species, Geobacter sulfurreducens strain DL-1, is truncated by a transposase gene, preventing flagellar biosynthesis. Integrating a functional FgrM homolog restored flagellar biosynthesis and motility in G. sulfurreducens DL-1 and enhanced the ability to reduce insoluble Fe(III) oxide. Interrupting the fgrM gene in G. sulfurreducens strain KN400, which is motile, removed the capacity for flagellar production and inhibited Fe(III) oxide reduction. FgrM, which is also a response regulator of the two-component His-Asp phosphorelay system, was phosphorylated by histidine kinase GHK4, which was essential for flagellar production and motility. GHK4, which is a hybrid kinase with a receiver domain at the N terminus, was phosphorylated by another histidine kinase, GHK3. Therefore, the multicomponent His-Asp phosphorelay system appears to control flagellar gene expression in Geobacter species. PMID:22362768

  7. Flagellar filament bio-templated inorganic oxide materials - towards an efficient lithium battery anode.

    PubMed

    Beznosov, Sergei N; Veluri, Pavan S; Pyatibratov, Mikhail G; Chatterjee, Abhijit; MacFarlane, Douglas R; Fedorov, Oleg V; Mitra, Sagar

    2015-01-13

    Designing a new generation of energy-intensive and sustainable electrode materials for batteries to power a variety of applications is an imperative task. The use of biomaterials as a nanosized structural template for these materials has the potential to produce hitherto unachievable structures. In this report, we have used genetically modified flagellar filaments of the extremely halophilic archaea species Halobacterium salinarum to synthesize nanostructured iron oxide composites for use as a lithium-ion battery anode. The electrode demonstrated a superior electrochemical performance compared to existing literature results, with good capacity retention of 1032 mAh g(-1) after 50 cycles and with high rate capability, delivering 770 mAh g(-1) at 5 A g(-1) (~5 C) discharge rate. This unique flagellar filament based template has the potential to provide access to other highly structured advanced energy materials in the future.

  8. The phylogeny of swimming kinematics: The environment controls flagellar waveforms in sperm motility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guasto, Jeffrey; Burton, Lisa; Zimmer, Richard; Hosoi, Anette; Stocker, Roman

    2013-11-01

    In recent years, phylogenetic and molecular analyses have dominated the study of ecology and evolution. However, physical interactions between organisms and their environment, a fundamental determinant of organism ecology and evolution, are mediated by organism form and function, highlighting the need to understand the mechanics of basic survival strategies, including locomotion. Focusing on spermatozoa, we combined high-speed video microscopy and singular value decomposition analysis to quantitatively compare the flagellar waveforms of eight species, ranging from marine invertebrates to humans. We found striking similarities in sperm swimming kinematics between genetically dissimilar organisms, which could not be uncovered by phylogenetic analysis. The emergence of dominant waveform patterns across species are suggestive of biological optimization for flagellar locomotion and point toward environmental cues as drivers of this convergence. These results reinforce the power of quantitative kinematic analysis to understand the physical drivers of evolution and as an approach to uncover new solutions for engineering applications, such as micro-robotics.

  9. Flagellar filament bio-templated inorganic oxide materials - towards an efficient lithium battery anode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beznosov, Sergei N.; Veluri, Pavan S.; Pyatibratov, Mikhail G.; Chatterjee, Abhijit; Macfarlane, Douglas R.; Fedorov, Oleg V.; Mitra, Sagar

    2015-01-01

    Designing a new generation of energy-intensive and sustainable electrode materials for batteries to power a variety of applications is an imperative task. The use of biomaterials as a nanosized structural template for these materials has the potential to produce hitherto unachievable structures. In this report, we have used genetically modified flagellar filaments of the extremely halophilic archaea species Halobacterium salinarum to synthesize nanostructured iron oxide composites for use as a lithium-ion battery anode. The electrode demonstrated a superior electrochemical performance compared to existing literature results, with good capacity retention of 1032 mAh g-1 after 50 cycles and with high rate capability, delivering 770 mAh g-1 at 5 A g-1 (~5 C) discharge rate. This unique flagellar filament based template has the potential to provide access to other highly structured advanced energy materials in the future.

  10. Magnetite-Binding Flagellar Filaments Displaying the MamI Loop Motif.

    PubMed

    Bereczk-Tompa, Éva; Pósfai, Mihály; Tóth, Balázs; Vonderviszt, Ferenc

    2016-11-03

    This work aimed at developing a novel method for fabricating 1 D magnetite nanostructures with the help of mutated flagellar filaments. We constructed four different flagellin mutants displaying magnetite-binding motifs: two contained fragments of magnetosome-associated proteins from magnetotactic bacteria (MamI and Mms6), and synthetic sequences were used for the other two. A magnetic selection method identified the MamI mutant as having the highest binding affinity to magnetite. Filaments built from MamI loop-containing flagellin subunits were used as templates to form chains of magnetite nanoparticles along the filament by capturing them from suspension. Our study represents a proof-of-concept that flagellar filaments can be engineered to facilitate formation of 1 D magnetite nanostructures under ambient conditions. In addition, it proves the interaction between MamI and magnetite, with implications for the role of this protein in magnetotactic bacteria.

  11. Amphipathic helical ordering of the flagellar secretion signal of Salmonella flagellin.

    PubMed

    Tőke, Orsolya; Vonderviszt, Ferenc

    2016-08-05

    Export of external flagellar proteins requires a signal located within their N-terminal disordered part, however, these regions do not share any significant sequence similarity suggesting that the secondary/tertiary structure might be important for recognition by the export gate. NMR experiments were performed to reveal the conformational properties of the flagellin signal sequence in vitro. It assumed a largely disordered fluctuating structure in aqueous environment, but acquired a folded structure containing an amphipathic helical portion in 50% MeOH or upon addition of SDS micelles which are known to promote hydrophobic interactions. Our observations raise the possibility that the signal sequence may partially undergo amphipathic helical ordering upon interaction with the recognition unit of the flagellar export machinery in a similar way as revealed for protein import into intracellular eukaryotic organelles mediated by targeting signals of high diversity.

  12. Flagellar filament bio-templated inorganic oxide materials – towards an efficient lithium battery anode

    PubMed Central

    Beznosov, Sergei N.; Veluri, Pavan S.; Pyatibratov, Mikhail G.; Chatterjee, Abhijit; MacFarlane, Douglas R.; Fedorov, Oleg V.; Mitra, Sagar

    2015-01-01

    Designing a new generation of energy-intensive and sustainable electrode materials for batteries to power a variety of applications is an imperative task. The use of biomaterials as a nanosized structural template for these materials has the potential to produce hitherto unachievable structures. In this report, we have used genetically modified flagellar filaments of the extremely halophilic archaea species Halobacterium salinarum to synthesize nanostructured iron oxide composites for use as a lithium-ion battery anode. The electrode demonstrated a superior electrochemical performance compared to existing literature results, with good capacity retention of 1032 mAh g−1 after 50 cycles and with high rate capability, delivering 770 mAh g−1 at 5 A g−1 (~5 C) discharge rate. This unique flagellar filament based template has the potential to provide access to other highly structured advanced energy materials in the future. PMID:25583370

  13. Acetyl phosphate-sensitive regulation of flagellar biogenesis and capsular biosynthesis depends on the Rcs phosphorelay.

    PubMed

    Fredericks, Christine E; Shibata, Satoshi; Aizawa, Shin-Ichi; Reimann, Sylvia A; Wolfe, Alan J

    2006-08-01

    As part of our attempt to map the impact of acetyl phosphate (acetyl approximately P) on the entire network of two-component signal transduction pathways in Escherichia coli, we asked whether the influence of acetyl approximately P on capsular biosynthesis and flagellar biogenesis depends on the Rcs phosphorelay. To do so, we performed a series of epistasis experiments: mutations in the components of the pathway that controls acetyl approximately P levels were combined with mutations in components of the Rcs phosphorelay. Cells that did not synthesize acetyl approximately P produced no capsule under normally permissive conditions, while those that accumulated acetyl approximately P synthesized capsule under conditions previously considered to be non-permissive. Acetyl approximately P-dependent capsular biosynthesis required both RcsB and RcsA, while the lack of RcsC restored capsular biosynthesis to acetyl approximately P-deficient cells. Similarly, acetyl approximately P-sensitive repression of flagellar biogenesis was suppressed by the loss of RcsB (but not of RcsA), while it was enhanced by the lack of RcsC. Taken together, these results show that both acetyl approximately P-sensitive activation of capsular biosynthesis and acetyl approximately P-sensitive repression of flagellar biogenesis require the Rcs phosphorelay. Moreover, they provide strong genetic support for the hypothesis that RcsC can function as either a kinase or a phosphatase dependent on environmental conditions. Finally, we learned that RcsB and RcsC inversely regulated the timing of flagellar biogenesis: rcsB mutants elaborated flagella prematurely, while rcsC mutants delayed their display of flagella. Temporal control of flagella biogenesis implicates the Rcs phosphorelay (and, by extension, acetyl approximately P) in the transition of motile, planktonic individuals into sessile biofilm communities.

  14. Analysis of flagellar bending in hamster spermatozoa: characterization of an effective stroke.

    PubMed

    Kinukawa, Masashi; Ohmuro, Junko; Baba, Shoji A; Murashige, Sunao; Okuno, Makoto; Nagata, Masao; Aoki, Fugaku

    2005-12-01

    The mechanism by which flagella generate the propulsive force for movement of hamster spermatozoa was analyzed quantitatively. Tracing points positioned 30, 60, 90, and 120 microm from the head-midpiece junction on the flagellum revealed that they all had zigzag trajectories. These points departed from and returned to the line that crossed the direction of progression. They moved along the concave side (but not the convex side) of the flagellar envelope that was drawn by tracing the trajectory of the entire flagellum. To clarify this asymmetry, the bending rate was analyzed by measuring the curvatures of points 30, 60, 90, and 120 microm from the head-midpiece junction. The bending rate was not constant through the cycle of flagellar bending. The rate was higher when bending was in the direction described by the curve of the hook-shaped head (defined as a principal bend [P-bend]) to the opposite side (R-bend). We measured a lower bending rate in the principal direction (R-bend to P-bend). To identify the point at which the propulsive force is generated efficiently within the cycle of flagellar bending, we calculated the propulsive force generated at each point on the flagellum. The value of the propulsive force was positive whenever the flagellum bent from an R-bend to a P-bend (when the bending rate was lowest). By contrast, the propulsive force value was zero or negative when the flagellum bent in the other direction (when the bending rate was higher). These results indicate that flagellar bending in hamster spermatozoa produces alternate effective and ineffective strokes during propulsion.

  15. Characterization of ciliobrevin A mediated dynein ATPase inhibition on flagellar motility of Leishmania donovani.

    PubMed

    Reddy, G Srinivas; Mukhopadhyay, Aakash Gautam; Dey, Chinmoy Sankar

    2017-04-04

    Axonemal dyneins are members of AAA+ proteins involved in force generation and are responsible for flagellar motility in eukaryotes. In this study, we characterized the effects of ciliobrevin A (CbA), a dynein ATPase inhibitor, on flagella driven motility of the protozoan parasite Leishmania donovani. Using fast-capture video microscopy, we observed that CbA decreased flagellar beat frequency of swimming parasites in a concentration-dependent manner. Beat frequency of live and reactivated L. donovani decreased by approximately 89% and 41% respectively in the presence of 250μM CbA. This inhibition was lost when CbA was removed, suggesting its effects were reversible. CbA also altered wavelength and amplitude of the flagellum of live parasites. Waveform analysis of live and reactivated L. donovani revealed that CbA significantly affected flagellar waveform by inducing non-uniform bends with the flagellum beating away from the cell axis. These results suggest that CbA sensitive dynein ATPases possibly are responsible for power generation and waveform maintenance of the flagellum of L. donovani. This ability to inhibit axonemal dyneins also emphasizes the use of dynein inhibitors as valuable tools in studying functional roles of axonemal dyneins of flagellated eukaryotes.

  16. Flagellar cells and ciliary cells in the renal tubule of elasmobranchs.

    PubMed

    Lacy, E R; Luciano, L; Reale, E

    1989-01-01

    Flagella or cilia are present on most epithelial cells in the renal tubule of elasmobranch fishes (little skate, spiny dogfish, smooth dogfish, Atlantic sharpnose, scalloped hammerhead, cow-nosed ray). Flagellar cells, those with numerous flagella ordered in one, two, or more rows on the luminal surface, are shown here for the first time in a vertebrate. The flagellar cells are intercalated among other epithelial cells, each bearing a single cilium, from Bowman's capsule to the third subdivision of the intermediate segment of the nephron. The flagella form undulated ribbons up to 55 microns long. In every ribbon the axis of the central pair of microtubules in the axoneme is oriented parallel to the long axis of the flagellar row. This suggests a beat perpendicular to these two axes. The arrangement of the flagella in ribbons most likely promotes movement of glomerular filtrate down the renal tubule. Cells bearing numerous cilia occur in the large collecting ducts of spiny dogfish but without apparent preferential orientation of the cilia.

  17. Correlation between supercoiling and conformational motions of the bacterial flagellar filament.

    PubMed

    Stadler, Andreas M; Unruh, Tobias; Namba, Keiichi; Samatey, Fadel; Zaccai, Giuseppe

    2013-11-05

    The bacterial flagellar filament is a very large macromolecular assembly of a single protein, flagellin. Various supercoiled states of the filament exist, which are formed by two structurally different conformations of flagellin in different ratios. We investigated the correlation between supercoiling of the protofilaments and molecular dynamics in the flagellar filament using quasielastic and elastic incoherent neutron scattering on the picosecond and nanosecond timescales. Thermal fluctuations in the straight L- and R-type filaments were measured and compared to the resting state of the wild-type filament. Amplitudes of motion on the picosecond timescale were found to be similar in the different conformational states. Mean-square displacements and protein resilience on the 0.1 ns timescale demonstrate that the L-type state is more flexible and less resilient than the R-type, whereas the wild-type state lies in between. Our results provide strong support that supercoiling of the protofilaments in the flagellar filament is determined by the strength of molecular forces in and between the flagellin subunits.

  18. Flagellar phenotypic plasticity in volvocalean algae correlates with Péclet number.

    PubMed

    Solari, Cristian A; Drescher, Knut; Ganguly, Sujoy; Kessler, John O; Michod, Richard E; Goldstein, Raymond E

    2011-10-07

    Flagella-generated fluid stirring has been suggested to enhance nutrient uptake for sufficiently large micro-organisms, and to have played a role in evolutionary transitions to multicellularity. A corollary to this predicted size-dependent benefit is a propensity for phenotypic plasticity in the flow-generating mechanism to appear in large species under nutrient deprivation. We examined four species of volvocalean algae whose radii and flow speeds differ greatly, with Péclet numbers (Pe) separated by several orders of magnitude. Populations of unicellular Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and one- to eight-celled Gonium pectorale (Pe ∼ 0.1-1) and multicellular Volvox carteri and Volvox barberi (Pe ∼ 100) were grown in diluted and undiluted media. For C. reinhardtii and G. pectorale, decreasing the nutrient concentration resulted in smaller cells, but had no effect on flagellar length and propulsion force. In contrast, these conditions induced Volvox colonies to grow larger and increase their flagellar length, separating the somatic cells further. Detailed studies on V. carteri found that the opposing effects of increasing beating force and flagellar spacing balance, so the fluid speed across the colony surface remains unchanged between nutrient conditions. These results lend further support to the hypothesized link between the Péclet number, nutrient uptake and the evolution of biological complexity in the Volvocales.

  19. Identification and Validation of Novel Chromosomal Integration and Expression Loci in Escherichia coli Flagellar Region 1

    PubMed Central

    Juhas, Mario; Ajioka, James W.

    2015-01-01

    Escherichia coli is used as a chassis for a number of Synthetic Biology applications. The lack of suitable chromosomal integration and expression loci is among the main hurdles of the E. coli engineering efforts. We identified and validated chromosomal integration and expression target sites within E. coli K12 MG1655 flagellar region 1. We analyzed five open reading frames of the flagellar region 1, flgA, flgF, flgG, flgI, and flgJ, that are well-conserved among commonly-used E. coli strains, such as MG1655, W3110, DH10B and BL21-DE3. The efficiency of the integration into the E. coli chromosome and the expression of the introduced genetic circuit at the investigated loci varied significantly. The integrations did not have a negative impact on growth; however, they completely abolished motility. From the investigated E. coli K12 MG1655 flagellar region 1, flgA and flgG are the most suitable chromosomal integration and expression loci. PMID:25816013

  20. Bimodal rheotactic behavior reflects flagellar beat asymmetry in human sperm cells

    PubMed Central

    Bukatin, Anton; Kukhtevich, Igor; Stoop, Norbert; Dunkel, Jörn; Kantsler, Vasily

    2015-01-01

    Rheotaxis, the directed response to fluid velocity gradients, has been shown to facilitate stable upstream swimming of mammalian sperm cells along solid surfaces, suggesting a robust physical mechanism for long-distance navigation during fertilization. However, the dynamics by which a human sperm orients itself relative to an ambient flow is poorly understood. Here, we combine microfluidic experiments with mathematical modeling and 3D flagellar beat reconstruction to quantify the response of individual sperm cells in time-varying flow fields. Single-cell tracking reveals two kinematically distinct swimming states that entail opposite turning behaviors under flow reversal. We constrain an effective 2D model for the turning dynamics through systematic large-scale parameter scans, and find good quantitative agreement with experiments at different shear rates and viscosities. Using a 3D reconstruction algorithm to identify the flagellar beat patterns causing left or right turning, we present comprehensive 3D data demonstrating the rolling dynamics of freely swimming sperm cells around their longitudinal axis. Contrary to current beliefs, this 3D analysis uncovers ambidextrous flagellar waveforms and shows that the cell’s turning direction is not defined by the rolling direction. Instead, the different rheotactic turning behaviors are linked to a broken mirror symmetry in the midpiece section, likely arising from a buckling instability. These results challenge current theoretical models of sperm locomotion. PMID:26655343

  1. Flagellar biosynthesis exerts temporal regulation of secretion of specific Campylobacter jejuni colonization and virulence determinants.

    PubMed

    Barrero-Tobon, Angelica M; Hendrixson, David R

    2014-09-01

    The Campylobacter jejuni flagellum exports both proteins that form the flagellar organelle for swimming motility and colonization and virulence factors that promote commensal colonization of the avian intestinal tract or invasion of human intestinal cells respectively. We explored how the C. jejuni flagellum is a versatile secretory organelle by examining molecular determinants that allow colonization and virulence factors to exploit the flagellum for their own secretion. Flagellar biogenesis was observed to exert temporal control of secretion of these proteins, indicating that a bolus of secretion of colonization and virulence factors occurs during hook biogenesis with filament polymerization itself reducing secretion of these factors. Furthermore, we found that intramolecular and intermolecular requirements for flagellar-dependent secretion of these proteins were most reminiscent to those for flagellin secretion. Importantly, we discovered that secretion of one colonization and virulence factor, CiaI, was not required for invasion of human colonic cells, which counters previous hypotheses for how this protein functions during invasion. Instead, secretion of CiaI was essential for C. jejuni to facilitate commensal colonization of the natural avian host. Our work provides insight into the versatility of the bacterial flagellum as a secretory machine that can export proteins promoting diverse biological processes.

  2. Structure of Salmonella FlhE, conserved member of a flagellar Type III secretion operon

    DOE PAGES

    Lee, Jaemin; Monzingo, Arthur F.; Keatinge-Clay, Adrian T.; ...

    2014-12-26

    In this paper, the bacterial flagellum is assembled by a multicomponent transport apparatus categorized as a type III secretion system. The secretion of proteins that assemble into the flagellum is driven by the proton motive force. The periplasmic protein FlhE is a member of the flhBAE operon in the majority of bacteria where FlhE is found. FlhA and FlhB are established components of the flagellar type III secretion system. The absence of FlhE results in a proton leak through the flagellar system, inappropriate secretion patterns, and cell death, indicating that FlhE regulates an important aspect of proper flagellar biosynthesis. Wemore » isolated FlhE from the periplasm of Salmonella and solved its structure to 1.5 Å resolution. The structure reveals a β-sandwich fold, with no close structural homologs. Finally, possible roles of FlhE, including that of a chaperone, are discussed.« less

  3. Two flagellar BAR domain proteins in Trypanosoma brucei with stage-specific regulation

    PubMed Central

    Cicova, Zdenka; Dejung, Mario; Skalicky, Tomas; Eisenhuth, Nicole; Hanselmann, Steffen; Morriswood, Brooke; Figueiredo, Luisa M.; Butter, Falk; Janzen, Christian J.

    2016-01-01

    Trypanosomes are masters of adaptation to different host environments during their complex life cycle. Large-scale proteomic approaches provide information on changes at the cellular level, and in a systematic way. However, detailed work on single components is necessary to understand the adaptation mechanisms on a molecular level. Here, we have performed a detailed characterization of a bloodstream form (BSF) stage-specific putative flagellar host adaptation factor Tb927.11.2400, identified previously in a SILAC-based comparative proteome study. Tb927.11.2400 shares 38% amino acid identity with TbFlabarin (Tb927.11.2410), a procyclic form (PCF) stage-specific flagellar BAR domain protein. We named Tb927.11.2400 TbFlabarin-like (TbFlabarinL), and demonstrate that it originates from a gene duplication event, which occurred in the African trypanosomes. TbFlabarinL is not essential for the growth of the parasites under cell culture conditions and it is dispensable for developmental differentiation from BSF to the PCF in vitro. We generated TbFlabarinL-specific antibodies, and showed that it localizes in the flagellum. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments together with a biochemical cell fractionation suggest a dual association of TbFlabarinL with the flagellar membrane and the components of the paraflagellar rod. PMID:27779220

  4. Complex spatial organization and flagellin composition of flagellar propeller from marine magnetotactic ovoid strain MO-1.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei-Jia; Santini, Claire-Lise; Bernadac, Alain; Ruan, Juanfang; Zhang, Sheng-Da; Kato, Takayuki; Li, Ying; Namba, Keiichi; Wu, Long-Fei

    2012-03-02

    Marine magnetotactic ovoid bacterium MO-1 is capable of swimming along the geomagnetic field lines by means of its two sheathed flagellar bundles at a speed up to 300 μm/s. In this study, by using electron microscopy, we showed that, in each bundle, six individual flagella were organized in hexagon with a seventh in the middle. We identified 12 flagellin paralogs and 2 putative flagellins in the genome of MO-1. Among them, 13 were tandemly located on an ~ 17-kb segment while the 14th was on a separated locus. Using reverse transcription PCR and quantitative PCR, we found that all the 14 flagellin or putative flagellin genes were transcribed and that 2 of them were more abundantly expressed than others. A nLC (nanoliquid chromatography)-ESI (electrospray ionization)-MS/MS (mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry) mass spectrometry analysis identified all the 12 flagellin proteins in three glycosylated polypeptide bands resolved by one-dimensional denaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and 10 of them in 21 spots obtained by means of two-dimensional electrophoresis of flagellar extracts. Most spots contained more than one flagellin, and eight of the ten identified flagellins existed in multiple isoforms. Taken together, these results show unprecedented complexity in the spatial organization and flagellin composition of the flagellar propeller. Such architecture is observed only for ovoid-coccoid, bilophotrichously flagellated magnetotactic bacteria living in marine sediments, suggesting a species and environmental specificity.

  5. FlhG employs diverse intrinsic domains and influences FlhF GTPase activity to numerically regulate polar flagellar biogenesis in Campylobacter jejuni.

    PubMed

    Gulbronson, Connor J; Ribardo, Deborah A; Balaban, Murat; Knauer, Carina; Bange, Gert; Hendrixson, David R

    2016-01-01

    Flagellation in polar flagellates is one of the rare biosynthetic processes known to be numerically regulated in bacteria. Polar flagellates must spatially and numerically regulate flagellar biogenesis to create flagellation patterns for each species that are ideal for motility. FlhG ATPases numerically regulate polar flagellar biogenesis, yet FlhG orthologs are diverse in motif composition. We discovered that Campylobacter jejuni FlhG is at the center of a multipartite mechanism that likely influences a flagellar biosynthetic step to control flagellar number for amphitrichous flagellation, rather than suppressing activators of flagellar gene transcription as in Vibrio and Pseudomonas species. Unlike other FlhG orthologs, the FlhG ATPase domain was not required to regulate flagellar number in C. jejuni. Instead, two regions of C. jejuni FlhG that are absent or significantly altered in FlhG orthologs are involved in numerical regulation of flagellar biogenesis. Additionally, we found that C. jejuni FlhG influences FlhF GTPase activity, which may mechanistically contribute to flagellar number regulation. Our work suggests that FlhG ATPases divergently evolved in each polarly flagellated species to employ different intrinsic domains and extrinsic effectors to ultimately mediate a common output - precise numerical control of polar flagellar biogenesis required to create species-specific flagellation patterns optimal for motility.

  6. Conditional Granger Causality Analysis of Effective Connectivity during Motor Imagery and Motor Execution in Stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Li; Zhang, Jingna; Zhang, Ye; Yan, Rubing; Liu, Hongliang; Qiu, Mingguo

    2016-01-01

    Aims. Motor imagery has emerged as a promising technique for the improvement of motor function following stroke, but the mechanism of functional network reorganization in patients during this process remains unclear. The aim of this study is to evaluate the cortical motor network patterns of effective connectivity in stroke patients. Methods. Ten stroke patients with right hand hemiplegia and ten normal control subjects were recruited. We applied conditional Granger causality analysis (CGCA) to explore and compare the functional connectivity between motor execution and motor imagery. Results. Compared with the normal controls, the patient group showed lower effective connectivity to the primary motor cortex (M1), the premotor cortex (PMC), and the supplementary motor area (SMA) in the damaged hemisphere but stronger effective connectivity to the ipsilesional PMC and M1 in the intact hemisphere during motor execution. There were tighter connections in the cortical motor network in the patients than in the controls during motor imagery, and the patients showed more effective connectivity in the intact hemisphere. Conclusions. The increase in effective connectivity suggests that motor imagery enhances core corticocortical interactions, promotes internal interaction in damaged hemispheres in stroke patients, and may facilitate recovery of motor function. PMID:27200373

  7. Conditional Granger Causality Analysis of Effective Connectivity during Motor Imagery and Motor Execution in Stroke Patients.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li; Zhang, Jingna; Zhang, Ye; Yan, Rubing; Liu, Hongliang; Qiu, Mingguo

    2016-01-01

    Aims. Motor imagery has emerged as a promising technique for the improvement of motor function following stroke, but the mechanism of functional network reorganization in patients during this process remains unclear. The aim of this study is to evaluate the cortical motor network patterns of effective connectivity in stroke patients. Methods. Ten stroke patients with right hand hemiplegia and ten normal control subjects were recruited. We applied conditional Granger causality analysis (CGCA) to explore and compare the functional connectivity between motor execution and motor imagery. Results. Compared with the normal controls, the patient group showed lower effective connectivity to the primary motor cortex (M1), the premotor cortex (PMC), and the supplementary motor area (SMA) in the damaged hemisphere but stronger effective connectivity to the ipsilesional PMC and M1 in the intact hemisphere during motor execution. There were tighter connections in the cortical motor network in the patients than in the controls during motor imagery, and the patients showed more effective connectivity in the intact hemisphere. Conclusions. The increase in effective connectivity suggests that motor imagery enhances core corticocortical interactions, promotes internal interaction in damaged hemispheres in stroke patients, and may facilitate recovery of motor function.

  8. Evolved to fail: Bacteria induce flagellar buckling to reorient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Son, Kwangmin; Guasto, Jeffrey S.; Stocker, Roman

    2012-11-01

    Many marine bacteria swim with a single helical flagellum connected to a rotary motor via a 100 nm long universal joint called the ``hook.'' While these bacteria have seemingly just one degree of freedom, allowing them to swim only back and forth, they in fact exhibit large angular reorientations mediated by off-axis ``flicks'' of their flagellum. High-speed video microscopy revealed the mechanism underpinning this turning behavior: the buckling of the hook during the exceedingly brief (10 ms) forward run that follows a reversal. Direct measurements of the hook's mechanical properties corroborated this result, as the hook's structural stability is governed by the Sperm number, which compares the compressive load from propulsion to the elastic restoring force of the hook. Upon decreasing the Sperm number below a critical value by reducing the swimming speed, the frequency of flicks diminishes sharply, consistent with the criticality of buckling. This elegant, under-actuated turning mechanism appears widespread among marine bacteria and may provide a novel design concept in micro-robotics.

  9. Redistribution and shedding of flagellar membrane glycoproteins visualized using an anti-carbohydrate monoclonal antibody and concanavalin A

    PubMed Central

    1986-01-01

    Two carbohydrate-binding probes, the lectin concanavalin A and an anti- carbohydrate monoclonal antibody designated FMG-1, have been used to study the distribution of their respective epitopes on the surface of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, strain pf-18. Both of these ligands bind uniformly to the external surface of the flagellar membrane and the general cell body plasma membrane, although the labeling is more intense on the flagellar membrane. In addition, both ligands cross- react with cell wall glycoproteins. With respect to the flagellar membrane, both concanavalin A and the FMG-1 monoclonal antibody bind preferentially to the principal high molecular weight glycoproteins migrating with an apparent molecular weight of 350,000 although there is, in addition, cross-reactivity with a number of minor glycoproteins. Western blots of V-8 protease digests of the high molecular weight flagellar glycoproteins indicate that the epitopes recognized by the lectin and the antibody are both repeated multiple times within the glycoproteins and occur together, although the lectin and the antibody do not compete for the same binding sites. Incubation of live cells with the monoclonal antibody or lectin at 4 degrees C results in a uniform labeling of the flagellar surface; upon warming of the cells, these ligands are redistributed along the flagellar surface in a characteristic manner. All of the flagellar surface-bound antibody or lectin collects into a single aggregate at the tip of each flagellum; this aggregate subsequently migrates to the base of the flagellum, where it is shed into the medium. The rate of redistribution is temperature dependent and the glycoproteins recognized by these ligands co-redistribute with the lectin or monoclonal antibody. This dynamic flagellar surface phenomenon bears a striking resemblance to the capping phenomenon that has been described in numerous mammalian cell types. However, it occurs on a structure (the flagellum) that lacks most of the

  10. Porters versus rowers: a unified stochastic model of motor proteins

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    We present a general phenomenological theory for chemical to mechanical energy transduction by motor enzymes which is based on the classical "tight-coupling" mechanism. The associated minimal stochastic model takes explicitly into account both ATP hydrolysis and thermal noise effects. It provides expressions for the hydrolysis rate and the sliding velocity, as functions of the ATP concentration and the number of motor enzymes. It explains in a unified way many results of recent in vitro motility assays. More importantly, the theory provides a natural classification scheme for the motors: it correlates the biochemical and mechanical differences between "porters" such as cellular kinesins or dyneins, and "rowers" such as muscular myosins or flagellar dyneins. PMID:8509455

  11. Autism Spectrum Disorder and intact executive functioning.

    PubMed

    Ferrara, R; Ansermet, F; Massoni, F; Petrone, L; Onofri, E; Ricci, P; Archer, T; Ricci, S

    2016-01-01

    Earliest notions concerning autism (Autism Spectrum Disorders, ASD) describe the disturbance in executive functioning. Despite altered definition, executive functioning, expressed as higher cognitive skills required complex behaviors linked to the prefrontal cortex, are defective in autism. Specific difficulties in children presenting autism or verbal disabilities at executive functioning levels have been identified. Nevertheless, the developmental deficit of executive functioning in autism is highly diversified with huge individual variation and may even be absent. The aim of the present study to examine the current standing of intact executive functioning intact in ASD.

  12. Basic Timing Abilities Stay Intact in Patients with Musician's Dystonia

    PubMed Central

    van der Steen, M. C.; van Vugt, Floris T.; Keller, Peter E.; Altenmüller, Eckart

    2014-01-01

    Task-specific focal dystonia is a movement disorder that is characterized by the loss of voluntary motor control in extensively trained movements. Musician's dystonia is a type of task-specific dystonia that is elicited in professional musicians during instrumental playing. The disorder has been associated with deficits in timing. In order to test the hypothesis that basic timing abilities are affected by musician's dystonia, we investigated a group of patients (N = 15) and a matched control group (N = 15) on a battery of sensory and sensorimotor synchronization tasks. Results did not show any deficits in auditory-motor processing for patients relative to controls. Both groups benefited from a pacing sequence that adapted to their timing (in a sensorimotor synchronization task at a stable tempo). In a purely perceptual task, both groups were able to detect a misaligned metronome when it was late rather than early relative to a musical beat. Overall, the results suggest that basic timing abilities stay intact in patients with musician's dystonia. This supports the idea that musician's dystonia is a highly task-specific movement disorder in which patients are mostly impaired in tasks closely related to the demands of actually playing their instrument. PMID:24667273

  13. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of FliT, a bacterial flagellar substrate-specific export chaperone

    PubMed Central

    Kinoshita, Miki; Yamane, Midori; Matsunami, Hideyuki; Minamino, Tohru; Namba, Keiichi; Imada, Katsumi

    2009-01-01

    The assembly process of the bacterial flagellum is coupled to flagellar gene expression. FliT acts not only as a flagellar type III substrate-specific export chaperone for the filament-capping protein FliD but also as a negative regulator that suppresses flagellar gene expression through its specific interaction with the master regulator FlhD4C2 complex. In this study, FliT of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium was expressed, purified and crystallized. Crystals of SeMet FliT were obtained by the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion technique with potassium/sodium tartrate as the precipitant. The crystals grew in the trigonal space group P3121 or P3221 and diffracted to 3.2 Å resolution. The anomalous difference Patterson map of the SeMet FliT crystal showed significant peaks in its Harker sections, indicating the usefulness of the derivative data for structure determination. PMID:19652350

  14. Two Distinct Ca2+ Signaling Pathways Modulate Sperm Flagellar Beating Patterns in Mice1

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Haixin; Suarez, Susan S.

    2011-01-01

    Hyperactivation, a swimming pattern of mammalian sperm in the oviduct, is essential for fertilization. It is characterized by asymmetrical flagellar beating and an increase of cytoplasmic Ca2+. We observed that some mouse sperm swimming in the oviduct produce high-amplitude pro-hook bends (bends in the direction of the hook on the head), whereas other sperm produce high-amplitude anti-hook bends. Switching direction of the major bends could serve to redirect sperm toward oocytes. We hypothesized that different Ca2+ signaling pathways produce high-amplitude pro-hook and anti-hook bends. In vitro, sperm that hyperactivated during capacitation (because of activation of CATSPER plasma membrane Ca2+ channels) developed high-amplitude pro-hook bends. The CATSPER activators procaine and 4-aminopyridine (4-AP) also induced high-amplitude pro-hook bends. Thimerosal, which triggers a Ca2+ release from internal stores, induced high-amplitude anti-hook bends. Activation of CATSPER channels is facilitated by a pH rise, so both Ca2+ and pH responses to treatments with 4-AP and thimerosal were monitored. Thimerosal triggered a Ca2+ increase that initiated at the base of the flagellum, whereas 4-AP initiated a rise in the proximal principal piece. Only 4-AP triggered a flagellar pH rise. Proteins were extracted from sperm for examination of phosphorylation patterns induced by Ca2+ signaling. Procaine and 4-AP induced phosphorylation of proteins on threonine and serine, whereas thimerosal primarily induced dephosphorylation of proteins. Tyrosine phosphorylation was unaffected. We concluded that hyperactivation, which is associated with capacitation, can be modulated by release of Ca2+ from intracellular stores to reverse the direction of the dominant flagellar bend and, thus, redirect sperm. PMID:21389347

  15. Flagellar apparatus of south-seeking many-celled magnetotactic prokaryotes.

    PubMed

    Silva, Karen Tavares; Abreu, Fernanda; Almeida, Fernando P; Keim, Carolina Neumann; Farina, Marcos; Lins, Ulysses

    2007-01-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria orient and migrate along geomagnetic field lines. Each cell contains membrane-enclosed, nano-scale, iron-mineral particles called magnetosomes that cause alignment of the cell in the geomagnetic field as the bacteria swim propelled by flagella. In this work we studied the ultrastructure of the flagellar apparatus in many-celled magnetotactic prokaryotes (MMP) that consist of several Gram-negative cells arranged radially around an acellular compartment. Flagella covered the organism surface, and were observed exclusively at the portion of each cell that faced the environment. The flagella were helical tubes never as long as a complete turn of the helix. Flagellar filaments varied in length from 0.9 to 3.8 micro m (average 2.4 +/- 0.5 micro m, n = 150) and in width from 12.0 to 19.5 nm (average 15.9 +/- 1.4 nm, n = 52), which is different from previous reports for similar microorganisms. At the base of the flagella, a curved hook structure slightly thicker than the flagellar filaments was observed. In freeze-fractured samples, macromolecular complexes about 50 nm in diameter, which possibly corresponded to part of the flagella basal body, were observed in both the P-face of the cytoplasmic membrane and the E-face of the outer membrane. Transmission electron microscopy showed that magnetosomes occurred in planar groups in the cytoplasm close and parallel to the organism surface. A striated structure, which could be involved in maintaining magnetosomes fixed in the cell, was usually observed running along magnetosome chains. The coordinated movement of the MMP depends on the interaction between the flagella of each cell with the flagella of adjacent cells of the microorganism.

  16. Flagellar mutants of Chlamydomonas: Studies of radial spoke-defective strains by dikaryon and revertant analysis

    PubMed Central

    Luck, David; Piperno, Gianni; Ramanis, Zenta; Huang, B.

    1977-01-01

    The motility mutant of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii pf14 lacks radial spoke structures in its flagellar axonemes, and 12 proteins present in wild type are missing from a two-dimensional map (isoelectrofocusing/sodium dodecyl sulfate electrophoresis) of its 35S-labeled flagellar proteins. Six of these same proteins are missing in pf1, which lacks spoke-heads. To determine whether any of the missing proteins represent the mutant gene product two experimental approaches have been applied. The first makes use of the fact that gametes of either mutant strain when fused with wild-type gametes to form quadriflagellate dikaryons undergo recovery of flagellar function. Recovery at the molecular level was monitored by prelabeling the mutant proteins with 35S and allowing recovery to occur in the absence of protein synthesis. It is to be expected that the mutant gene product would not be restored as a radioactive protein and that recovery would depend on the assembly of the wild-type counterpart that is not labeled. The second technique makes use of revertants induced by UV irradiation. Dikaryon rescue in the case of pf14 leads to restoration of 11 radioactive components; only protein 3 fails to appear as a radioactive spot. For pf1 only two radioactive proteins are restored; proteins 4, 6, 9, and 10 were not radioactive. Analysis of revertants of pf1 gave evidence (altered map positions) that protein 4 is the mutant gene product. In the case of pf14, analysis of 22 revertants has not provided similar positive evidence that protein 3 is the gene product. Images PMID:269405

  17. Flagellar Cap Protein FliD Mediates Adherence of Atypical Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli to Enterocyte Microvilli

    PubMed Central

    Sampaio, Suely C. F.; Luiz, Wilson B.; Vieira, Mônica A. M.; Ferreira, Rita C. C.; Garcia, Bruna G.; Sinigaglia-Coimbra, Rita; Sampaio, Jorge L. M.; Ferreira, Luís C. S.

    2016-01-01

    The expression of flagella correlates with different aspects of bacterial pathogenicity, ranging from adherence to host cells to activation of inflammatory responses by the innate immune system. In the present study, we investigated the role of flagella in the adherence of an atypical enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (aEPEC) strain (serotype O51:H40) to human enterocytes. Accordingly, isogenic mutants deficient in flagellin (FliC), the flagellar structural subunit; the flagellar cap protein (FliD); or the MotAB proteins, involved in the control of flagellar motion, were generated and tested for binding to differentiated Caco-2 cells. Binding of the aEPEC strain to enterocytes was significantly impaired in strains with the fliC and fliD genes deleted, both of which could not form flagella on the bacterial surface. A nonmotile but flagellated MotAB mutant also showed impaired adhesion to Caco-2 cells. In accordance with these observations, adhesion of aEPEC strain 1711-4 to Caco-2 cells was drastically reduced after the treatment of Caco-2 cells with purified FliD. In addition, incubation of aEPEC bacteria with specific anti-FliD serum impaired binding to Caco-2 cells. Finally, incubation of Caco-2 cells with purified FliD, followed by immunolabeling, showed that the protein was specifically bound to the microvillus tips of differentiated Caco-2 cells. The aEPEC FliD or anti-FliD serum also reduced the adherence of prototype typical enteropathogenic, enterohemorrhagic, and enterotoxigenic E. coli strains to Caco-2 cells. In conclusion, our findings further strengthened the role of flagella in the adherence of aEPEC to human enterocytes and disclosed the relevant structural and functional involvement of FliD in the adhesion process. PMID:26831466

  18. HYDROCARBON VAPOR DIFFUSION IN INTACT CORE SLEEVES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The diffusion of 2,2,4-trimethylpentane (TMP) and 2,2,5-trimethylhexane (TMH) vapors put of residually contaminated sandy soil from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) field research site at Traverse City, Michigan, was measured and modeled. The headspace of an intact ...

  19. A numerical study of the effects of fluid rheology and stroke kinematics on flagellar swimming in complex fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chuanbin; Guy, Robert; Thomases, Becca

    2016-11-01

    It is observed in experiments that as the fluid rheology is changed, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii exhibits changes in both flagellar kinematics and the swimming speed. To understand this phenomenon, we develop a computational model of the swimmer, using flagellar strokes fit from experimental data. We conduct numerical simulations by changing strokes and fluid rheology independently to dissect the effects of these two factors. We discover that stroke patterns extracted from viscoelastic fluids generate much lower stress and have higher efficiency at the cost of lower swimming speed. We also discover that higher fluid elasticity hinders swimming for a fixed stroke pattern.

  20. Heterogeneity of dynein structure implies coordinated suppression of dynein motor activity in the axoneme.

    PubMed

    Maheshwari, Aditi; Ishikawa, Takashi

    2012-08-01

    Axonemal dyneins provide the driving force for flagellar/ciliary bending. Nucleotide-induced conformational changes of flagellar dynein have been found both in vitro and in situ by electron microscopy, and in situ studies demonstrated the coexistence of at least two conformations in axonemes in the presence of nucleotides (the apo and the nucleotide-bound forms). The distribution of the two forms suggested cooperativity between adjacent dyneins on axonemal microtubule doublets. Although the mechanism of such cooperativity is unknown it might be related to the mechanism of bending. To explore the mechanism by which structural heterogeneity of axonemal dyneins is induced by nucleotides, we used cilia from Tetrahymena thermophila to examine the structure of dyneins in a) the intact axoneme and b) microtubule doublets separated from the axoneme, both with and without additional pure microtubules. We also employed an ATPase assay on these specimens to investigate dynein activity functionally. Dyneins on separated doublets show more activation by nucleotides than those in the intact axoneme, both structurally and in the ATPase assay, and this is especially pronounced when the doublets are coupled with added microtubules, as expected. Paralleling the reduced ATPase activity in the intact axonemes, a lower proportion of these dyneins are in the nucleotide-bound form. This indicates a coordinated suppression of dynein activity in the axoneme, which could be the key for understanding the bending mechanism.

  1. Small Particles Intact Capture Experiment (SPICE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishioka, Ken-Ji; Carle, G. C.; Bunch, T. E.; Mendez, David J.; Ryder, J. T.

    1994-01-01

    The Small Particles Intact Capture Experiment (SPICE) will develop technologies and engineering techniques necessary to capture nearly intact, uncontaminated cosmic and interplanetary dust particles (IDP's). Successful capture of such particles will benefit the exobiology and planetary science communities by providing particulate samples that may have survived unaltered since the formation of the solar system. Characterization of these particles may contribute fundamental data to our knowledge of how these particles could have formed into our planet Earth and, perhaps, contributed to the beginnings of life. The term 'uncontaminated' means that captured cosmic and IDP particles are free of organic contamination from the capture process and the term 'nearly intact capture' means that their chemical and elemental components are not materially altered during capture. The key to capturing cosmic and IDP particles that are organic-contamination free and nearly intact is the capture medium. Initial screening of capture media included organic foams, multiple thin foil layers, and aerogel (a silica gel); but, with the exception of aerogel, the requirements of no contamination or nearly intact capture were not met. To ensure no contamination of particles in the capture process, high-purity aerogel was chosen. High-purity aerogel results in high clarity (visual clearness), a useful quality in detection and recovery of embedded captured particles from the aerogel. P. Tsou at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) originally described the use of aerogel for this purpose and reported laboratory test results. He has flown aerogel as a 'GAS-can Lid' payload on STS-47 and is evaluating the results. The Timeband Capture Cell Experiment (TICCE), a Eureca 1 experiment, is also flying aerogel and is scheduled for recovery in late April.

  2. Chlamydomonas IFT70/CrDYF-1 is a core component of IFT particle complex B and is required for flagellar assembly.

    PubMed

    Fan, Zhen-Chuan; Behal, Robert H; Geimer, Stefan; Wang, Zhaohui; Williamson, Shana M; Zhang, Haili; Cole, Douglas G; Qin, Hongmin

    2010-08-01

    DYF-1 is a highly conserved protein essential for ciliogenesis in several model organisms. In Caenorhabditis elegans, DYF-1 serves as an essential activator for an anterograde motor OSM-3 of intraflagellar transport (IFT), the ciliogenesis-required motility that mediates the transport of flagellar precursors and removal of turnover products. In zebrafish and Tetrahymena DYF-1 influences the cilia tubulin posttranslational modification and may have more ubiquitous function in ciliogenesis than OSM-3. Here we address how DYF-1 biochemically interacts with the IFT machinery by using the model organism Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, in which the anterograde IFT does not depend on OSM-3. Our results show that this protein is a stoichiometric component of the IFT particle complex B and interacts directly with complex B subunit IFT46. In concurrence with the established IFT protein nomenclature, DYF-1 is also named IFT70 after the apparent size of the protein. IFT70/CrDYF-1 is essential for the function of IFT in building the flagellum because the flagella of IFT70/CrDYF-1-depleted cells were greatly shortened. Together, these results demonstrate that IFT70/CrDYF-1 is a canonical subunit of IFT particle complex B and strongly support the hypothesis that the IFT machinery has species- and tissue-specific variations with functional ramifications.

  3. Complete structure of the bacterial flagellar hook reveals extensive set of stabilizing interactions

    PubMed Central

    Matsunami, Hideyuki; Barker, Clive S.; Yoon, Young-Ho; Wolf, Matthias; Samatey, Fadel A.

    2016-01-01

    The bacterial flagellar hook is a tubular helical structure made by the polymerization of multiple copies of a protein, FlgE. Here we report the structure of the hook from Campylobacter jejuni by cryo-electron microscopy at a resolution of 3.5 Å. On the basis of this structure, we show that the hook is stabilized by intricate inter-molecular interactions between FlgE molecules. Extra domains in FlgE, found only in Campylobacter and in related bacteria, bring more stability and robustness to the hook. Functional experiments suggest that Campylobacter requires an unusually strong hook to swim without its flagella being torn off. This structure reveals details of the quaternary organization of the hook that consists of 11 protofilaments. Previous study of the flagellar filament of Campylobacter by electron microscopy showed its quaternary structure made of seven protofilaments. Therefore, this study puts in evidence the difference between the quaternary structures of a bacterial filament and its hook. PMID:27811912

  4. Cloning of Flagellar Genes in Chlamydomonas Reinhardtii by DNA Insertional Mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Tam, L. W.; Lefebvre, P. A.

    1993-01-01

    Chlamydomonas is a popular genetic model system for studying many cellular processes. In this report, we describe a new approach to isolate Chlamydomonas genes using the cloned nitrate reductase gene (NIT1) as an insertional mutagen. A linearized plasmid containing the NIT1 gene was introduced into nit1 mutant cells by glass-bead transformation. Of 3000 Nit(+) transformants examined, 74 showed motility defects of a wide range of phenotypes, suggesting that DNA transformation is an effective method for mutagenizing cells. For 13 of 15 such motility mutants backcrossed to nit(-) mutant strains, the motility phenotype cosegregated with the Nit(+) phenotype, indicating that the motility defects of these 13 mutants may be caused by integration of the plasmid. Further genetic analysis indicated that three of these mutants contained alleles of previously identified loci: mbo2 (move backward only), pf13 (paralyzed flagella) and vfl1 (variable flagellar number). Three other abnormal-flagellar-number mutants did not map to any previously described loci at which mutations produce similar phenotypes. Genomic sequences flanking the integrated plasmid in the mbo2 and vfl1 mutants were isolated and used as probes to obtain wild-type genomic clones, which complemented the motility defects upon transformation into cells. Our results demonstrate the potential of this new approach for cloning genes identified by mutation in Chlamydomonas. PMID:8244002

  5. Metachronal waves in the flagellar beating of Volvox and their hydrodynamic origin.

    PubMed

    Brumley, Douglas R; Polin, Marco; Pedley, Timothy J; Goldstein, Raymond E

    2015-07-06

    Groups of eukaryotic cilia and flagella are capable of coordinating their beating over large scales, routinely exhibiting collective dynamics in the form of metachronal waves. The origin of this behavior--possibly influenced by both mechanical interactions and direct biological regulation--is poorly understood, in large part due to a lack of quantitative experimental studies. Here we characterize in detail flagellar coordination on the surface of the multicellular alga Volvox carteri, an emerging model organism for flagellar dynamics. Our studies reveal for the first time that the average metachronal coordination observed is punctuated by periodic phase defects during which synchrony is partial and limited to specific groups of cells. A minimal model of hydrodynamically coupled oscillators can reproduce semi-quantitatively the characteristics of the average metachronal dynamics, and the emergence of defects. We systematically study the model's behaviour by assessing the effect of changing intrinsic rotor characteristics, including oscillator stiffness and the nature of their internal driving force, as well as their geometric properties and spatial arrangement. Our results suggest that metachronal coordination follows from deformations in the oscillators' limit cycles induced by hydrodynamic stresses, and that defects result from sufficiently steep local biases in the oscillators' intrinsic frequencies. Additionally, we find that random variations in the intrinsic rotor frequencies increase the robustness of the average properties of the emergent metachronal waves.

  6. A “Mechanistic” Explanation of the Multiple Helical Forms Adopted by Bacterial Flagellar Filaments

    PubMed Central

    Calladine, C.R.; Luisi, B.F.; Pratap, J.V.

    2013-01-01

    The corkscrew-like flagellar filaments emerging from the surface of bacteria such as Salmonella typhimurium propel the cells toward nutrient and away from repellents. This kind of motility depends upon the ability of the flagellar filaments to adopt a range of distinct helical forms. A filament is typically constructed from ~ 30,000 identical flagellin molecules, which self-assemble into a tubular structure containing 11 near-longitudinal protofilaments. A “mechanical” model, in which the flagellin building block has the capacity to switch between two principal interfacial states, predicts that the filament can assemble into a “canonical” family of 12 distinct helical forms, each having unique curvature and twist: these include two “extreme” straight forms having left- and right-handed twists, respectively, and 10 intermediate helical forms. Measured shapes of the filaments correspond well with predictions of the model. This report is concerned with two unanswered questions. First, what properties of the flagellin determine which of the 12 discrete forms is preferred? Second, how does the interfacial “switch” work, at a molecular level? Our proposed solution of these problems is based mainly on a detailed examination of differences between the available electron cryo-microscopy structures of the straight L and R filaments, respectively. PMID:23274110

  7. Escherichia coli Flagellar Genes as Target Sites for Integration and Expression of Genetic Circuits

    PubMed Central

    Juhas, Mario; Evans, Lewis D. B.; Frost, Joe; Davenport, Peter W.; Yarkoni, Orr; Fraser, Gillian M.; Ajioka, James W.

    2014-01-01

    E. coli is a model platform for engineering microbes, so genetic circuit design and analysis will be greatly facilitated by simple and effective approaches to introduce genetic constructs into the E. coli chromosome at well-characterised loci. We combined the Red recombinase system of bacteriophage λ and Isothermal Gibson Assembly for rapid integration of novel DNA constructs into the E. coli chromosome. We identified the flagellar region as a promising region for integration and expression of genetic circuits. We characterised integration and expression at four candidate loci, fliD, fliS, fliT, and fliY, of the E. coli flagellar region 3a. The integration efficiency and expression from the four integrations varied considerably. Integration into fliD and fliS significantly decreased motility, while integration into fliT and fliY had only a minor effect on the motility. None of the integrations had negative effects on the growth of the bacteria. Overall, we found that fliT was the most suitable integration site. PMID:25350000

  8. Expression of flagellin and key regulatory flagellar genes in the non-motile bacterium Piscirickettsia salmonis.

    PubMed

    Carril, Gabriela P; Gómez, Fernando A; Marshall, Sergio H

    2017-02-08

    The Piscirickettsia salmonis genome was screened to evaluate potential flagella-related open reading frames, as well as their genomic organization and eventual expression. A complete and organized set of flagellar genes was found for P. salmonis, although no structural flagellum has ever been reported for this bacterium. To gain further understanding, the hierarchical flagellar cascade described for Legionella pneumophila was used as a reference model for putative analysis in P. salmonis. Specifically, 5 of the most relevant genes from this cascade were chosen, including 3 regulatory genes (fleQ, triggers the cascade; fliA, regulates the σ28-coding gene; and rpoN, an RNA polymerase-dependent gene) and 2 terminal structural genes (flaA and flaB, flagellin and a flagellin-like protein, respectively). Kinetic experiments evaluated gene expressions over time, with P. salmonis assessed in 2 liquid, cell-free media and during infection of the SHK-1 fish cell line. Under all conditions, the 5 target genes were primarily expressed during early growth/infection and were differentially expressed when bacteria encountered environmental stress (i.e. a high-salt concentration). Intriguingly, the flagellin monomer was fully expressed under all growth conditions and was located near the bacterial membrane. While no structural flagellum was detected under any condition, the recombinant flagellin monomer induced a proinflammatory response in SHK-1 cells, suggesting a possible immunomodulatory function. The potential implications of these observations are discussed in the context of P. salmonis biology and pathogenic potential.

  9. Role of flgA for Flagellar Biosynthesis and Biofilm Formation of Campylobacter jejuni NCTC11168.

    PubMed

    Kim, Joo-Sung; Park, Changwon; Kim, Yun-Ji

    2015-11-01

    The complex roles of flagella in the pathogenesis of Campylobacter jejuni, a major cause of worldwide foodborne diarrheal disease, are important. Compared with the wild-type, an insertional mutation of the flgA gene (cj0769c) demonstrated significant decrease in the biofilm formation of C. jejuni NCTC11168 on major food contact surfaces, such as polystyrene, stainless steel, and borosilicate glass. The flgA mutant was completely devoid of flagella and non-motile whereas the wild-type displayed the full-length flagella and motility. In addition, the biofilm formation of the wild-type was inversely dependent on the viscosity of the media. These results support that flagellar-mediated motility plays a significant role in the biofilm formation of C. jejuni NCTC11168. Moreover, our adhesion assay suggests that it plays an important role during biofilm maturation after initial attachment. Furthermore, C. jejuni NCTC11168 wild-type formed biofilm with a net-like structure of extracellular fiber-like material, but such a structure was significantly reduced in the biofilm of the flgA mutant. It supports that the extracellular fiber-like material may play a significant role in the biofilm formation of C. jejuni. This study demonstrated that flgA is essential for flagellar biosynthesis and motility, and plays a significant role in the biofilm formation of C. jejuni NCTC11168.

  10. Salmonella Enteritidis flagellar mutants have a colonization benefit in the chicken oviduct.

    PubMed

    Kilroy, Sofie; Raspoet, Ruth; Martel, An; Bosseler, Leslie; Appia-Ayme, Corinne; Thompson, Arthur; Haesebrouck, Freddy; Ducatelle, Richard; Van Immerseel, Filip

    2017-02-01

    Egg borne Salmonella Enteritidis is still a major cause of human food poisoning. Eggs can become internally contaminated following colonization of the hen's oviduct. In this paper we aimed to analyze the role of flagella of Salmonella Enteritidis in colonization of the hen's oviduct. Using a transposon library screen we showed that mutants lacking functional flagella are significantly more efficient in colonizing the hen's oviduct in vivo. A micro-array analysis proved that transcription of a number of flagellar genes is down-regulated inside chicken oviduct cells. Flagella contain flagellin, a pathogen associated molecular pattern known to bind to Toll-like receptor 5, activating a pro-inflammatory cascade. In vitro tests using primary oviduct cells showed that flagellin is not involved in invasion. Using a ligated loop model, a diminished inflammatory reaction was seen in the oviduct resulting from injection of an aflagellated mutant compared to the wild-type. It is hypothesized that Salmonella Enteritidis downregulates flagellar gene expression in the oviduct and consequently prevents a flagellin-induced inflammatory response, thereby increasing its oviduct colonization efficiency.

  11. The Trypanosome Flagellar Pocket Collar and Its Ring Forming Protein—TbBILBO1

    PubMed Central

    Perdomo, Doranda; Bonhivers, Mélanie; Robinson, Derrick R.

    2016-01-01

    Sub-species of Trypanosoma brucei are the causal agents of human African sleeping sickness and Nagana in domesticated livestock. These pathogens have developed an organelle-like compartment called the flagellar pocket (FP). The FP carries out endo- and exocytosis and is the only structure this parasite has evolved to do so. The FP is essential for parasite viability, making it an interesting structure to evaluate as a drug target, especially since it has an indispensible cytoskeleton component called the flagellar pocket collar (FPC). The FPC is located at the neck of the FP where the flagellum exits the cell. The FPC has a complex architecture and division cycle, but little is known concerning its organization. Recent work has focused on understanding how the FP and the FPC are formed and as a result of these studies an important calcium-binding, polymer-forming protein named TbBILBO1 was identified. Cellular biology analysis of TbBILBO1 has demonstrated its uniqueness as a FPC component and until recently, it was unknown what structural role it played in forming the FPC. This review summarizes the recent data on the polymer forming properties of TbBILBO1 and how these are correlated to the FP cytoskeleton. PMID:26950156

  12. Escherichia coli flagellar genes as target sites for integration and expression of genetic circuits.

    PubMed

    Juhas, Mario; Evans, Lewis D B; Frost, Joe; Davenport, Peter W; Yarkoni, Orr; Fraser, Gillian M; Ajioka, James W

    2014-01-01

    E. coli is a model platform for engineering microbes, so genetic circuit design and analysis will be greatly facilitated by simple and effective approaches to introduce genetic constructs into the E. coli chromosome at well-characterised loci. We combined the Red recombinase system of bacteriophage λ and Isothermal Gibson Assembly for rapid integration of novel DNA constructs into the E. coli chromosome. We identified the flagellar region as a promising region for integration and expression of genetic circuits. We characterised integration and expression at four candidate loci, fliD, fliS, fliT, and fliY, of the E. coli flagellar region 3a. The integration efficiency and expression from the four integrations varied considerably. Integration into fliD and fliS significantly decreased motility, while integration into fliT and fliY had only a minor effect on the motility. None of the integrations had negative effects on the growth of the bacteria. Overall, we found that fliT was the most suitable integration site.

  13. Brucella melitensis cyclic di-GMP phosphodiesterase BpdA controls expression of flagellar genes.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Erik; Chaudhuri, Pallab; Gourley, Chris; Harms, Jerome; Splitter, Gary

    2011-10-01

    Brucella melitensis encounters a variety of conditions and stimuli during its life cycle--including environmental growth, intracellular infection, and extracellular dissemination--which necessitates flexibility of bacterial signaling to promote virulence. Cyclic-di-GMP is a bacterial secondary signaling molecule that plays an important role in adaptation to changing environments and altering virulence in a number of bacteria. To investigate the role of cyclic-di-GMP in B. melitensis, all 11 predicted cyclic-di-GMP-metabolizing proteins were separately deleted and the effect on virulence was determined. Three of these cyclic-di-GMP-metabolizing proteins were found to alter virulence. Deletion of the bpdA and bpdB genes resulted in attenuation of virulence of the bacterium, while deletion of the cgsB gene produced a hypervirulent strain. In a Vibrio reporter system to monitor apparent alteration in levels of cyclic-di-GMP, both BpdA and BpdB displayed a phenotype consistent with cyclic-di-GMP-specific phosphodiesterases, while CgsB displayed a cyclic-di-GMP synthase phenotype. Further analysis found that deletion of bpdA resulted in a dramatic decrease in flagellar promoter activities, and a flagellar mutant showed similar phenotypes to the bpdA and bpdB mutant strains in mouse models of infection. These data indicate a potential role for regulation of flagella in Brucella melitensis via cyclic-di-GMP.

  14. Xenopus egg cytoplasm with intact actin.

    PubMed

    Field, Christine M; Nguyen, Phuong A; Ishihara, Keisuke; Groen, Aaron C; Mitchison, Timothy J

    2014-01-01

    We report optimized methods for preparing Xenopus egg extracts without cytochalasin D, that we term "actin-intact egg extract." These are undiluted egg cytoplasm that contains abundant organelles, and glycogen which supplies energy, and represents the least perturbed cell-free cytoplasm preparation we know of. We used this system to probe cell cycle regulation of actin and myosin-II dynamics (Field et al., 2011), and to reconstitute the large, interphase asters that organize early Xenopus embryos (Mitchison et al., 2012; Wühr, Tan, Parker, Detrich, & Mitchison, 2010). Actin-intact Xenopus egg extracts are useful for analysis of actin dynamics, and interaction of actin with other cytoplasmic systems, in a cell-free system that closely mimics egg physiology, and more generally for probing the biochemistry and biophysics of the egg, zygote, and early embryo. Detailed protocols are provided along with assays used to check cell cycle state and tips for handling and storing undiluted egg extracts.

  15. Silica Aerogel Captures Cosmic Dust Intact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsou, P.

    1994-01-01

    The mesostructure of silica aerogel resembles stings of grapes, ranging in size from 10 to 100 angstrom. This fine mesostructure transmits nearly 90 percent of incident light in the visible, while providing sufficiently gentle dissipation of the kinetric energy of hypervelocity cosmic dust particles to permit their intact capture. We introduced silica aerogel in 1987 as capture medium to take advantage of its low density, fine mesostruicture and most importantly, its transparency, allowing optical location of captured micron sized particles.

  16. MotD of Sinorhizobium meliloti and Related α-Proteobacteria Is the Flagellar-Hook-Length Regulator and Therefore Reassigned as FliK

    PubMed Central

    Eggenhofer, Elke; Rachel, Reinhard; Haslbeck, Martin; Scharf, Birgit

    2006-01-01

    The flagella of the soil bacterium Sinorhizobium meliloti differ from the enterobacterial paradigm in the complex filament structure and modulation of the flagellar rotary speed. The mode of motility control in S. meliloti has a molecular corollary in two novel periplasmic motility proteins, MotC and MotE, that are present in addition to the ubiquitous MotA/MotB energizing proton channel. A fifth motility gene is located in the mot operon downstream of the motB and motC genes. Its gene product was originally designated MotD, a cytoplasmic motility protein having an unknown function. We report here reassignment of MotD as FliK, the regulator of flagellar hook length. The FliK gene is one of the few flagellar genes not annotated in the contiguous flagellar regulon of S. meliloti. Characteristic for its class, the 475-residue FliK protein contains a conserved, compactly folded Flg hook domain in its carboxy-terminal region. Deletion of fliK leads to formation of prolonged flagellar hooks (polyhooks) with missing filament structures. Extragenic suppressor mutations all mapped in the cytoplasmic region of the transmembrane export protein FlhB and restored assembly of a flagellar filament, and thus motility, in the presence of polyhooks. The structural properties of FliK are consistent with its function as a substrate specificity switch of the flagellar export apparatus for switching from rod/hook-type substrates to filament-type substrates. PMID:16513744

  17. Molecular Cloning and Characterization of the Helicobacter pylori fliD Gene, an Essential Factor in Flagellar Structure and Motility

    PubMed Central

    Seong Kim, Jang; Hoon Chang, Ji; Il Chung, Soo; Sun Yum, Jung

    1999-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori colonizes the human stomach and can cause gastroduodenal disease. Flagellar motility is regarded as a major factor in the colonizing ability of H. pylori. The functional roles of flagellar structural proteins other than FlaA, FlaB, and FlgE are not well understood. The fliD operon of H. pylori consists of flaG, fliD, and fliS genes, in the order stated, under the control of a ς28-dependent promoter. In an effort to elucidate the function of the FliD protein, a hook-associated protein 2 homologue, in flagellar morphogenesis and motility, the fliD gene (2,058 bp) was cloned and isogenic mutants were constructed by disruption of the fliD gene with a kanamycin resistance cassette and electroporation-mediated allelic-exchange mutagenesis. In the fliD mutant, morphologically abnormal flagellar appendages in which very little filament elongation was apparent were observed. The fliD mutant strain was completely nonmotile, indicating that these abnormal flagella were functionally defective. Furthermore, the isogenic fliD mutant of H. pylori SS1, a mouse-adapted strain, was not able to colonize the gastric mucosae of host mice. These results suggest that H. pylori FliD is an essential element in the assembly of the functional flagella that are required for colonization of the gastric mucosa. PMID:10559162

  18. Genome-wide transcriptional analysis of flagellar regeneration in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii identifies orthologs of ciliary disease genes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stolc, Viktor; Samanta, Manoj Pratim; Tongprasit, Waraporn; Marshall, Wallace F.

    2005-01-01

    The important role that cilia and flagella play in human disease creates an urgent need to identify genes involved in ciliary assembly and function. The strong and specific induction of flagellar-coding genes during flagellar regeneration in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii suggests that transcriptional profiling of such cells would reveal new flagella-related genes. We have conducted a genome-wide analysis of RNA transcript levels during flagellar regeneration in Chlamydomonas by using maskless photolithography method-produced DNA oligonucleotide microarrays with unique probe sequences for all exons of the 19,803 predicted genes. This analysis represents previously uncharacterized whole-genome transcriptional activity profiling study in this important model organism. Analysis of strongly induced genes reveals a large set of known flagellar components and also identifies a number of important disease-related proteins as being involved with cilia and flagella, including the zebrafish polycystic kidney genes Qilin, Reptin, and Pontin, as well as the testis-expressed tubby-like protein TULP2.

  19. Seroprevalence in chickens against campylobacter jejuni flagellar capping protein (FliD) in selected areas of the U.S

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Campylobacter jejuni, a Gram-negative rod, is a zoonotic pathogen associated with human acute bacterial gastroenteritis. Poultry products are regarded as a major source for human infection with this microorganism. We have demonstrated that the flagellar capping protein (FliD) of C. jejuni is highl...

  20. FliH and FliI ensure efficient energy coupling of flagellar type III protein export in Salmonella.

    PubMed

    Minamino, Tohru; Kinoshita, Miki; Inoue, Yumi; Morimoto, Yusuke V; Ihara, Kunio; Koya, Satomi; Hara, Noritaka; Nishioka, Noriko; Kojima, Seiji; Homma, Michio; Namba, Keiichi

    2016-06-01

    For construction of the bacterial flagellum, flagellar proteins are exported via its specific export apparatus from the cytoplasm to the distal end of the growing flagellar structure. The flagellar export apparatus consists of a transmembrane (TM) export gate complex and a cytoplasmic ATPase complex consisting of FliH, FliI, and FliJ. FlhA is a TM export gate protein and plays important roles in energy coupling of protein translocation. However, the energy coupling mechanism remains unknown. Here, we performed a cross-complementation assay to measure robustness of the energy transduction system of the export apparatus against genetic perturbations. Vibrio FlhA restored motility of a Salmonella ΔflhA mutant but not that of a ΔfliH-fliI flhB(P28T) ΔflhA mutant. The flgM mutations significantly increased flagellar gene expression levels, allowing Vibrio FlhA to exert its export activity in the ΔfliH-fliI flhB(P28T) ΔflhA mutant. Pull-down assays revealed that the binding affinities of Vibrio FlhA for FliJ and the FlgN-FlgK chaperone-substrate complex were much lower than those of Salmonella FlhA. These suggest that Vibrio FlhA requires the support of FliH and FliI to efficiently and properly interact with FliJ and the FlgN-FlgK complex. We propose that FliH and FliI ensure robust and efficient energy coupling of protein export during flagellar assembly.

  1. Motor syndromes.

    PubMed

    Corea, Francesco; Micheli, Sara

    2012-01-01

    Motor disturbances alone or associated with other focal deficits are the most common symptoms suggesting a neurovascular event. An appropriate clinical assessment of these signs and symptoms may help physicians to better diagnose and to both better treat and predict outcome. In this paper the main clinical features of motor deficit are described together with other motor-related events such as ataxia and movement disturbances.

  2. 50 CFR 622.493 - Landing Caribbean queen conch intact.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... conch intact. (a) A Caribbean queen conch in or from the Caribbean EEZ must be maintained with meat and shell intact. (b) The operator of a vessel that fishes in the EEZ is responsible for ensuring...

  3. 50 CFR 622.493 - Landing Caribbean queen conch intact.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... conch intact. (a) A Caribbean queen conch in or from the Caribbean EEZ must be maintained with meat and shell intact. (b) The operator of a vessel that fishes in the EEZ is responsible for ensuring...

  4. Calcium Signaling in Intact Dorsal Root Ganglia

    PubMed Central

    Gemes, Geza; Rigaud, Marcel; Koopmeiners, Andrew S.; Poroli, Mark J.; Zoga, Vasiliki; Hogan, Quinn H.

    2013-01-01

    Background Ca2+ is the dominant second messenger in primary sensory neurons. In addition, disrupted Ca2+ signaling is a prominent feature in pain models involving peripheral nerve injury. Standard cytoplasmic Ca2+ recording techniques use high K+ or field stimulation and dissociated neurons. To compare findings in intact dorsal root ganglia, we used a method of simultaneous electrophysiologic and microfluorimetric recording. Methods Dissociated neurons were loaded by bath-applied Fura-2-AM and subjected to field stimulation. Alternatively, we adapted a technique in which neuronal somata of intact ganglia were loaded with Fura-2 through an intracellular microelectrode that provided simultaneous membrane potential recording during activation by action potentials (APs) conducted from attached dorsal roots. Results Field stimulation at levels necessary to activate neurons generated bath pH changes through electrolysis and failed to predictably drive neurons with AP trains. In the intact ganglion technique, single APs produced measurable Ca2+ transients that were fourfold larger in presumed nociceptive C-type neurons than in nonnociceptive Aβ-type neurons. Unitary Ca2+ transients summated during AP trains, forming transients with amplitudes that were highly dependent on stimulation frequency. Each neuron was tuned to a preferred frequency at which transient amplitude was maximal. Transients predominantly exhibited monoexponential recovery and had sustained plateaus during recovery only with trains of more than 100 APs. Nerve injury decreased Ca2+ transients in C-type neurons, but increased transients in Aβ-type neurons. Conclusions Refined observation of Ca2+ signaling is possible through natural activation by conducted APs in undissociated sensory neurons and reveals features distinct to neuronal types and injury state. PMID:20526180

  5. Lower Motor Neuron Findings after Upper Motor Neuron Injury: Insights from Postoperative Supplementary Motor Area Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Florman, Jeffrey E.; Duffau, Hugues; Rughani, Anand I.

    2013-01-01

    Hypertonia and hyperreflexia are classically described responses to upper motor neuron injury. However, acute hypotonia and areflexia with motor deficit are hallmark findings after many central nervous system insults such as acute stroke and spinal shock. Historic theories to explain these contradictory findings have implicated a number of potential mechanisms mostly relying on the loss of descending corticospinal input as the underlying etiology. Unfortunately, these simple descriptions consistently fail to adequately explain the pathophysiology and connectivity leading to acute hyporeflexia and delayed hyperreflexia that result from such insult. This article highlights the common observation of acute hyporeflexia after central nervous system insults and explores the underlying anatomy and physiology. Further, evidence for the underlying connectivity is presented and implicates the dominant role of supraspinal inhibitory influence originating in the supplementary motor area descending through the corticospinal tracts. Unlike traditional explanations, this theory more adequately explains the findings of postoperative supplementary motor area syndrome in which hyporeflexia motor deficit is observed acutely in the face of intact primary motor cortex connections to the spinal cord. Further, the proposed connectivity can be generalized to help explain other insults including stroke, atonic seizures, and spinal shock. PMID:23508473

  6. From organelle to protein gel: a 6-wk laboratory project on flagellar proteins.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Beth Ferro; Graziano, Mary R

    2006-01-01

    Research suggests that undergraduate students learn more from lab experiences that involve longer-term projects. We have developed a one-semester laboratory sequence aimed at sophomore-level undergraduates. In designing this curriculum, we focused on several educational objectives: 1) giving students a feel for the scientific research process, 2) introducing them to commonly used lab techniques, and 3) building skills in both data analysis and scientific writing. Over the course of the semester, students carry out two project-based lab experiences and write two substantial lab reports modeled on primary literature. Student assessment data indicate that this lab curriculum achieved these objectives. This article describes the first of these projects, which uses the biflagellate alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii to introduce students to the study of flagellar motility, protein synthesis, microtubule polymerization, organelle assembly, and protein isolation and characterization.

  7. Evolution. Evolutionary resurrection of flagellar motility via rewiring of the nitrogen regulation system.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Tiffany B; Mulley, Geraldine; Dills, Alexander H; Alsohim, Abdullah S; McGuffin, Liam J; Studholme, David J; Silby, Mark W; Brockhurst, Michael A; Johnson, Louise J; Jackson, Robert W

    2015-02-27

    A central process in evolution is the recruitment of genes to regulatory networks. We engineered immotile strains of the bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens that lack flagella due to deletion of the regulatory gene fleQ. Under strong selection for motility, these bacteria consistently regained flagella within 96 hours via a two-step evolutionary pathway. Step 1 mutations increase intracellular levels of phosphorylated NtrC, a distant homolog of FleQ, which begins to commandeer control of the fleQ regulon at the cost of disrupting nitrogen uptake and assimilation. Step 2 is a switch-of-function mutation that redirects NtrC away from nitrogen uptake and toward its novel function as a flagellar regulator. Our results demonstrate that natural selection can rapidly rewire regulatory networks in very few, repeatable mutational steps.

  8. A common assembly module in injectisome and flagellar type III secretion sorting platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Notti, Ryan Q.; Bhattacharya, Shibani; Lilic, Mirjana; Stebbins, C. Erec

    2015-05-01

    Translocating proteins across the double membrane of Gram-negative bacteria, type III secretion systems (T3SS) occur in two evolutionarily related forms: injectisomes, delivering virulence factors into host cells, and the flagellar system, secreting the polymeric filament used for motility. While both systems share related elements of a cytoplasmic sorting platform that facilitates the hierarchical secretion of protein substrates, its assembly and regulation remain unclear. Here we describe a module mediating the assembly of the sorting platform in both secretion systems, and elucidate the structural basis for segregation of homologous components among these divergent T3SS subtypes sharing a common cytoplasmic milieu. These results provide a foundation for the subtype-specific assembly of T3SS sorting platforms and will support further mechanistic analysis and anti-virulence drug design.

  9. Anatomical and Molecular Design of the Drosophila Antenna as a Flagellar Auditory Organ

    PubMed Central

    TODI, SOKOL V.; SHARMA, YASHODA; EBERL, DANIEL F.

    2007-01-01

    The molecular basis of hearing is less well understood than many other senses. However, recent studies in Drosophila have provided some important steps towards a molecular understanding of hearing. In this report, we summarize these findings and their implications on the relationship between hearing and touch. In Drosophila, hearing is accomplished by Johnston’s Organ, a chordotonal organ containing over 150 scolopidia within the second antennal segment. We will discuss anatomical features of the antenna and how they contribute to the function of this flagellar auditory receptor. The effects of several mutants, identified through mutagenesis screens or as homologues of vertebrate auditory genes, will be summarized. Based on evidence gathered from these studies, we propose a speculative model for how the chordotonal organ might function. PMID:15252880

  10. Acid extrusion from human spermatozoa is mediated by flagellar voltage-gated proton channel.

    PubMed

    Lishko, Polina V; Botchkina, Inna L; Fedorenko, Andriy; Kirichok, Yuriy

    2010-02-05

    Human spermatozoa are quiescent in the male reproductive system and must undergo activation once introduced into the female reproductive tract. This process is known to require alkalinization of sperm cytoplasm, but the mechanism responsible for transmembrane proton extrusion has remained unknown because of the inability to measure membrane conductance in human sperm. Here, by successfully patch clamping human spermatozoa, we show that proton channel Hv1 is their dominant proton conductance. Hv1 is confined to the principal piece of the sperm flagellum, where it is expressed at unusually high density. Robust flagellar Hv1-dependent proton conductance is activated by membrane depolarization, an alkaline extracellular environment, endocannabinoid anandamide, and removal of extracellular zinc, a potent Hv1 blocker. Hv1 allows only outward transport of protons and is therefore dedicated to inducing intracellular alkalinization and activating spermatozoa. The importance of Hv1 for sperm activation makes it an attractive target for controlling male fertility.

  11. Sodium Absorption by Intact Sugar Beet Plants

    PubMed Central

    El-Sheikh, Adel M; Ulrich, Albert

    1971-01-01

    Sodium absorption by intact sugar beet plants (Beta vulgaris) was found to be mediated by at least two distinct mechanisms when uptake was studied over a wide range of Na and K concentrations. The first mechanism operates at low Na concentrations (<1 milliequivalent per liter); presence of K completely blocks this mechanism for Na. The second mechanism operates at high Na concentrations (>1 milliequivalent per liter), transporting Na as well as K; but apparently this mechanism is not active for Na absorption in young sugar beet plants up to the 10-leaf stage. PMID:16657872

  12. Flagellar membrane fusion and protein exchange in trypanosomes; a new form of cell-cell communication?

    PubMed Central

    Imhof, Simon; Fragoso, Cristina; Hemphill, Andrew; von Schubert, Conrad; Li, Dong; Legant, Wesley; Betzig, Eric; Roditi, Isabel

    2016-01-01

    Diverse structures facilitate direct exchange of proteins between cells, including plasmadesmata in plants and tunnelling nanotubes in bacteria and higher eukaryotes.  Here we describe a new mechanism of protein transfer, flagellar membrane fusion, in the unicellular parasite Trypanosoma brucei. When fluorescently tagged trypanosomes were co-cultured, a small proportion of double-positive cells were observed. The formation of double-positive cells was dependent on the presence of extracellular calcium and was enhanced by placing cells in medium supplemented with fresh bovine serum. Time-lapse microscopy revealed that double-positive cells arose by bidirectional protein exchange in the absence of nuclear transfer.  Furthermore, super-resolution microscopy showed that this process occurred in ≤1 minute, the limit of temporal resolution in these experiments. Both cytoplasmic and membrane proteins could be transferred provided they gained access to the flagellum. Intriguingly, a component of the RNAi machinery (Argonaute) was able to move between cells, raising the possibility that small interfering RNAs are transported as cargo. Transmission electron microscopy showed that shared flagella contained two axonemes and two paraflagellar rods bounded by a single membrane. In some cases flagellar fusion was partial and interactions between cells were transient. In other cases fusion occurred along the entire length of the flagellum, was stable for several hours and might be irreversible. Fusion did not appear to be deleterious for cell function: paired cells were motile and could give rise to progeny while fused. The motile flagella of unicellular organisms are related to the sensory cilia of higher eukaryotes, raising the possibility that protein transfer between cells via cilia or flagella occurs more widely in nature. PMID:27239276

  13. Identification of a gene cluster involved in flagellar basal body biogenesis in Caulobacter crescentus.

    PubMed

    Hahnenberger, K M; Shapiro, L

    1987-03-05

    The bacterial flagellum is a complex structure composed of a transmembrane basal body, a hook, and a filament. In Caulobacter crescentus the biosynthesis and assembly of this structure is under temporal and spatial control. To help to define the order of assembly of the flagellar components and to identify the genes involved in the early steps of basal body construction, mutants defective in basal body formation have been analyzed. Mutants in the flaD flaB flaC gene cluster were found to be unable to assemble a complete basal body. The flaD BC motC region was cloned and the genes were localized by subcloning and complementation analysis. A series of Tn5 insertion mutations in the flaD BC region were mapped. Complementation analysis of the Tn5 insertion mutants indicated the existence of at least four transcriptional units in the region and identified the presence of two new genes designated flbN and flbO. Mutants in flbN, flaB, flaC and flbO were unable to assemble any basal body structure and are likely to be involved in the early steps of basal body formation. The flaD mutant, however, was found to contain a partially assembled basal body consisting of the rod and three hook-distal rings. All of the mutants in this cluster exhibited pleiotropic effects on the expression of other flagellar and chemotaxis functions, including the level of synthesis of flagellins, the hook protein and hook protein precursor, and the level of chemotaxis methylation.

  14. Nucleotide sequence and characterization of a Bacillus subtilis gene encoding a flagellar switch protein.

    PubMed Central

    Zuberi, A R; Bischoff, D S; Ordal, G W

    1991-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of the Bacillus subtilis fliM gene has been determined. This gene encodes a 38-kDa protein that is homologous to the FliM flagellar switch proteins of Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium. Expression of this gene in Che+ cells of E. coli and B. subtilis interferes with normal chemotaxis. The nature of the chemotaxis defect is dependent upon the host used. In B. subtilis, overproduction of FliM generates mostly nonmotile cells. Those cells that are motile switch less frequently. Expression of B. subtilis FliM in E. coli also generates nonmotile cells. However, those cells that are motile have a tumble bias. The B. subtilis fliM gene cannot complement an E. coli fliM mutant. A frameshift mutation was constructed in the fliM gene, and the mutation was transferred onto the B. subtilis chromosome. The mutant has a Fla- phenotype. This phenotype is consistent with the hypothesis that the FliM protein encodes a component of the flagellar switch in B. subtilis. Additional characterization of the fliM mutant suggests that the hag and mot loci are not expressed. These loci are regulated by the SigD form of RNA polymerase. We also did not observe any methyl-accepting chemotaxis proteins in an in vivo methylation experiment. The expression of these proteins is also dependent upon SigD. It is possible that a functional basal body-hook complex may be required for the expression of SigD-regulated chemotaxis and motility genes. Images PMID:1898932

  15. The physiology of motor delusions in anosognosia for hemiplegia: implications for current models of motor awareness.

    PubMed

    Gandola, Martina; Bottini, Gabriella; Zapparoli, Laura; Invernizzi, Paola; Verardi, Margherita; Sterzi, Roberto; Santilli, Ignazio; Sberna, Maurizio; Paulesu, Eraldo

    2014-02-01

    Right brain damaged patients sometimes deny that their left arm is paralysed or even claim to have just moved it. This condition is known as anosognosia for hemiplegia (AHP). Here, we used fMRI to study patients with and without AHP during the execution of a motor task. We found that the delusional belief of having moved was preceded by brain activation of the cortical regions that are implicated in motor control in the left intact hemisphere and in the spared motor regions of the right hemisphere; patients without anosognosia did not present with the same degree of activation. We conclude that the false belief of movement is associated with a combination of strategically placed brain lesions and the preceding residual neural activity of the fronto-parietal motor network. These findings provide evidence that the activity of motor cortices contributes to our beliefs about the state of our motor system.

  16. 7 CFR 160.29 - Containers to remain intact.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Containers to remain intact. 160.29 Section 160.29... STANDARDS FOR NAVAL STORES Analysis, Inspection, and Grading on Request § 160.29 Containers to remain intact... the containers holding such naval stores remain intact as sampled until the analysis,...

  17. Rapid isolation of intact chloroplasts from spinach leaves.

    PubMed

    Joly, David; Carpentier, Robert

    2011-01-01

    In this chapter, a rapid method to isolate intact chloroplasts from spinach leaves is described. Intact chloroplasts are isolated using two short centrifugation steps and avoiding the use of percoll gradient. Intactness of chloroplast is evaluated by the inability of potassium ferricyanide to enter inside the chloroplasts and to act as an electron acceptor for photosystem II.

  18. Molecular motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allemand, Jean François Desbiolles, Pierre

    2015-10-01

    How do we move? More precisely, what are the molecular mechanisms that can explain that our muscles, made of very small components can move at a osopic scale? To answer these questions we must introduce molecular motors. Those motors are proteins, or small protein assemblies that, in our cells, transform chemical energy into mechanical work. Then, like we could do for a oscopic motor, used in a car or in a fan, we are going to study the basic behavior of these molecular machines, present what are their energy sources, calculate their power, their yield. If molecular motors are crucial for our oscopic movements, we are going to see that they are also essential to cellular transport and that considering the activity of some enzymes as molecular motors bring some interesting new insights on their activity.

  19. Vaccination with recombinant flagellar proteins FlgJ and FliN induce protection against Brucella abortus 544 infection in BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Xianbo; Xu, Jie; Xie, Yongfei; Qiu, Yefeng; Fu, Simei; Yuan, Xitong; Ke, Yuehua; Yu, Shuang; Du, Xinying; Cui, Mingquan; Chen, Yanfen; Wang, Tongkun; Wang, Zhoujia; Yu, Yaqing; Huang, Kehe; Huang, Liuyu; Peng, Guangneng; Chen, Zeliang; Wang, Yufei

    2012-12-28

    Brucella has been considered as a non-motile, facultative intracellular pathogenic bacterium. However, the genome sequences of different Brucella species reveal the presence of the flagellar genes needed for the construction of a functional flagellum. Due to its roles in the interaction between pathogen and host, we hypothesized that some of the flagellar proteins might induce protective immune responses and these proteins will be good subunit vaccine candidates. This study was conducted to screening of protective antigens among these flagellar proteins. Firstly, according to the putative functional roles, a total of 30 flagellar genes of Brucella abortus were selected for in vitro expression. 15 of these flagellar genes were successfully expressed as his-tagged recombinant proteins in Escherichia coli ER2566. Then, these proteins were purified and used to analyze their T cell immunity induction activity by an in vitro gamma interferon (IFN-γ) assay. Five of the flagellar proteins could stimulate significantly higher levels of IFN-γ secretion in splenocytes from S19 immunized mice, indicating their T cell induction activity. Finally, immunogenicity and protection activity of these 5 flagellar proteins were evaluated in BALB/c mice. Results showed that immunization with FlgJ (BAB1_0260) or FliN (BAB2_0122) plus adjuvant could provide protection against B. abortus 544 infection. Furthermore, mice immunized with FlgJ and FliN developed a vigorous immunoglobulin G response, and in vitro stimulation of their splenocytes with immunizing proteins induced the secretion of IFN-γ. Altogether, these data suggest that flagellar proteins FlgJ and FliN are protective antigens that could produce humoral and cell-mediated responses in mice and candidates for use in future studies of vaccination against brucellosis.

  20. Recollections of Parent Characteristics and Attachment Patterns for College Women of Intact vs. Non-Intact Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kilmann, Peter R.; Carranza, Laura V.; Vendemia, Jennifer M. C.

    2006-01-01

    This study contrasted offsprings' attachment patterns and recollections of parent characteristics in two college samples: 147 females from intact biological parents and 157 females of parental divorce. Secure females from intact or non-intact families rated parents positively, while insecure females rated parents as absent, distant, and demanding.…

  1. Oligodeoxynucleotide Probes for Detecting Intact Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosson, Reinhardt A.; Maurina-Brunker, Julie; Langley, Kim; Pynnonen, Christine M.

    2004-01-01

    A rapid, sensitive test using chemiluminescent oligodeoxynucleotide probes has been developed for detecting, identifying, and enumerating intact cells. The test is intended especially for use in detecting and enumerating bacteria and yeasts in potable water. As in related tests that have been developed recently for similar purposes, the oligodeoxynucleotide probes used in this test are typically targeted at either singlecopy deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) genes (such as virulence genes) or the multiple copies (10,000 to 50,000 copies per cell) of 16S ribosomal ribonucleic acids (rRNAs). Some of those tests involve radioisotope or fluorescent labeling of the probes for reporting hybridization of probes to target nucleic acids. Others of those tests involve labeling with enzymes plus the use of chemiluminescent or chromogenic substrates to report hybridization via color or the emission of light, respectively. The present test is of the last-mentioned type. The chemiluminescence in the present test can be detected easily with relatively simple instrumentation. In developing the present test, the hybridization approach was chosen because hybridization techniques are very specific. Hybridization detects stable, inheritable genetic targets within microorganisms. These targets are not dependent on products of gene expression that can vary with growth conditions or physiological states of organisms in test samples. Therefore, unique probes can be designed to detect and identify specific genera or species of bacteria or yeast (in terms of rRNA target sequences) or can be designed to detect and identify virulence genes (genomic target sequences). Because of the inherent specificity of this system, there are few problems of cross-reactivity. Hybridization tests are rapid, but hybridization tests now available commercially lack sensitivity; typically, between 10(exp 6) and 10(exp 7) cells of the target organism are needed to ensure a reliable test. Consequently, the numbers of

  2. Stepper motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dekramer, Cornelis

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to describe the more commonly used permanent magnet stepper motors for spaceflight. It will discuss the mechanical and electrical aspects of the devices, their torque behavior, those parameters which need to be controlled and measured, and test methods to be employed. It will also discuss torque margins, compare these to the existing margin requirements, and determine the applicability of these requirements. Finally it will attempt to generate a set of requirements which will be used in any stepper motor procurement and will fully characterize the stepper motor behavior in a consistent and repeatable fashion.

  3. Protein methylation reactions in intact pea chloroplasts

    SciTech Connect

    Niemi, K.J. )

    1989-04-01

    Post-translational protein methylation was investigated in Pisum sativum chloroplasts. Intact pea chloroplasts were incubated with ({sup 3}H-methyl)-S-adenosylmethionine under various conditions. The chloroplasts were then separated into stromal and thylakoid fractions and analyzed for radioactivity transferred to protein. Light enhanced the magnitude of labeling in both fractions. One thylakoid polypeptide with an apparent molecular mass of 43 kDa was labeled only in the light. Several other thylakoid and stromal proteins were labeled in both light and dark-labeling conditions. Both base-labile methylation, carboxy-methylesters and base-stable groups, N-methylations were found. Further characterization of the methyl-transfer reactions will be presented.

  4. Drilling to gabbro in intact ocean crust.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Douglas S; Teagle, Damon A H; Alt, Jeffrey C; Banerjee, Neil R; Umino, Susumu; Miyashita, Sumio; Acton, Gary D; Anma, Ryo; Barr, Samantha R; Belghoul, Akram; Carlut, Julie; Christie, David M; Coggon, Rosalind M; Cooper, Kari M; Cordier, Carole; Crispini, Laura; Durand, Sedelia Rodriguez; Einaudi, Florence; Galli, Laura; Gao, Yongjun; Geldmacher, Jörg; Gilbert, Lisa A; Hayman, Nicholas W; Herrero-Bervera, Emilio; Hirano, Nobuo; Holter, Sara; Ingle, Stephanie; Jiang, Shijun; Kalberkamp, Ulrich; Kerneklian, Marcie; Koepke, Jürgen; Laverne, Christine; Vasquez, Haroldo L Lledo; Maclennan, John; Morgan, Sally; Neo, Natsuki; Nichols, Holly J; Park, Sung-Hyun; Reichow, Marc K; Sakuyama, Tetsuya; Sano, Takashi; Sandwell, Rachel; Scheibner, Birgit; Smith-Duque, Chris E; Swift, Stephen A; Tartarotti, Paola; Tikku, Anahita A; Tominaga, Masako; Veloso, Eugenio A; Yamasaki, Toru; Yamazaki, Shusaku; Ziegler, Christa

    2006-05-19

    Sampling an intact sequence of oceanic crust through lavas, dikes, and gabbros is necessary to advance the understanding of the formation and evolution of crust formed at mid-ocean ridges, but it has been an elusive goal of scientific ocean drilling for decades. Recent drilling in the eastern Pacific Ocean in Hole 1256D reached gabbro within seismic layer 2, 1157 meters into crust formed at a superfast spreading rate. The gabbros are the crystallized melt lenses that formed beneath a mid-ocean ridge. The depth at which gabbro was reached confirms predictions extrapolated from seismic experiments at modern mid-ocean ridges: Melt lenses occur at shallower depths at faster spreading rates. The gabbros intrude metamorphosed sheeted dikes and have compositions similar to the overlying lavas, precluding formation of the cumulate lower oceanic crust from melt lenses so far penetrated by Hole 1256D.

  5. Two-dimensional analysis of flagellar proteins from wild-type and paralyzed mutants of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed Central

    Piperno, G; Huang, B; Luck, D J

    1977-01-01

    Flagellar polypeptides of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii were analyzed in two-dimensions by isoelectric focusing and electrophoresis in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate. In addition to flagellar tubulin, over 130 polypeptides were resolved and 100 of these were identified as axonemal components in wild-type organisms. Flagella of two nonconditional paralyzed mutants, pf 14 and pf 1, were also analyzed and, at the same time, electron microscopic studies were carried out. pf 14 flagella, which completely lack radial spokes and associated spokeheads, are missing 12 polypeptides. Six of these polypeptides are also missing from pf 1 flagella in which spokes are clearly present but spoke heads appear to be absent. Images PMID:266200

  6. IFT57 stabilizes the assembled intraflagellar transport complex and mediates transport of motility-related flagellar cargo.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xue; Hernandez, Daniel; Hernandez, Catherine; Ding, Zhaolan; Nan, Beiyan; Aufderheide, Karl; Qin, Hongmin

    2017-03-01

    Intraflagellar transport (IFT) is essential for the assembly and maintenance of flagella and cilia. Recent biochemical studies have shown that IFT complex B (IFT-B) is comprised of two subcomplexes, IFT-B1 and IFT-B2. The IFT-B2 subunit IFT57 lies at the interface between IFT-B1 and IFT-B2. Here, using a Chlamydomonasreinhardtii mutant for IFT57, we tested whether IFT57 is required for IFT-B complex assembly by bridging IFT-B1 and IFT-B2 together. In the ift57-1 mutant, levels of IFT57 and other IFT-B proteins were greatly reduced at the whole-cell level. However, strikingly, in the protease-free flagellar compartment, while the level of IFT57 was reduced, the levels of other IFT particle proteins were not concomitantly reduced but were present at the wild-type level. The IFT movement of the IFT57-deficient IFT particles was also unchanged. Moreover, IFT57 depletion disrupted the flagellar waveform, leading to cell swimming defects. Analysis of the mutant flagellar protein composition showed that certain axonemal proteins were altered. Taken together, these findings suggest that IFT57 does not play an essential structural role in the IFT particle complex but rather functions to prevent it from degradation. Additionally, IFT57 is involved in transporting specific motility-related proteins.

  7. Association of Lis1 with outer arm dynein is modulated in response to alterations in flagellar motility

    PubMed Central

    Rompolas, Panteleimon; Patel-King, Ramila S.; King, Stephen M.

    2012-01-01

    The cytoplasmic dynein regulatory factor Lis1, which induces a persistent tight binding to microtubules and allows for transport of cargoes under high-load conditions, is also present in motile cilia/flagella. We observed that Lis1 levels in flagella of Chlamydomonas strains that exhibit defective motility due to mutation of various axonemal substructures were greatly enhanced compared with wild type; this increase was absolutely dependent on the presence within the flagellum of the outer arm dynein α heavy chain/light chain 5 thioredoxin unit. To assess whether cells might interpret defective motility as a “high-load environment,” we reduced the flagellar beat frequency of wild-type cells through enhanced viscous load and by reductive stress; both treatments resulted in increased levels of flagellar Lis1, which altered the intrinsic beat frequency of the trans flagellum. Differential extraction of Lis1 from wild-type and mutant axonemes suggests that the affinity of outer arm dynein for Lis1 is directly modulated. In cytoplasm, Lis1 localized to two punctate structures, one of which was located near the base of the flagella. These data reveal that the cell actively monitors motility and dynamically modulates flagellar levels of the dynein regulatory factor Lis1 in response to imposed alterations in beat parameters. PMID:22855525

  8. Loss of the lac operon contributes to Salmonella invasion of epithelial cells through derepression of flagellar synthesis.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Lingyan; Ni, Zhiwei; Wang, Lei; Feng, Lu; Liu, Bin

    2015-03-01

    Salmonella, a genus that is closely related to Escherichia coli, includes many pathogens of humans and other animals. A notable feature that distinguishes Salmonella from E. coli is lactose negativity, because the lac operon is lost in most Salmonella genomes. Here, we expressed the lac operon in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and compared the virulence of the Lac(+) strain to that of the wild-type strain in a murine model, invasion assays, and macrophage replication assays. We showed that the Lac(+) strain is attenuated in vivo and the attenuation of virulence is caused by its defect in epithelial cell invasion. However, the invasion-defective phenotype is unrelated to lactose utilization. Through sequencing and the comparison of the transcriptome profile between the Lac(+) and wild-type strains during invasion, we found that most flagellar genes were markedly downregulated in the Lac(+) strain, while other genes associated with invasion, such as the majority of genes encoded in Salmonella pathogenicity island 1, were not differentially expressed. Moreover, we discovered that lacA is the major repressor of flagellar gene expression in the lac operon. In conclusion, these data demonstrate that the lac operon decreases Salmonella invasion of epithelial cells through repression of flagellar biosynthesis. As the ability to invade epithelial cells is a critical virulence determinant of Salmonella, our results provide important evidence that the loss of the lac operon contributes to the evolution of Salmonella pathogenicity.

  9. Deduction of upstream sequences of Xanthomonas campestris flagellar genes responding to transcription activation by FleQ

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, R.-M.; Yang, T.-C.; Yang, S.-H.; Tseng, Y.-H. . E-mail: yhtseng@chtai.ctc.edu.tw

    2005-10-07

    Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris (Xcc), a close relative to Pseudomonas aeruginosa, is the pathogen causing black rot in cruciferous plants. In P. aeruginosa, FleQ serves as a cognate activator of {sigma}{sup 54} in transcription from several {sigma}{sup 54}-dependent promoters of flagellar genes. These P. aeruginosa promoters have been analyzed for FleQ-binding sequences; however, no consensus was deduced. Xcc, although lacks fleSR, has a fleQ homologue residing among over 40 contiguously clustered flagellar genes. A fleQ mutant, Xc17fleQ, constructed by insertional mutation is deficient in FleQ protein, non-flagellated, and immobile. Transcriptional fusion assays on six putative {sigma}{sup 54}-dependent promoters of the flagellar genes, fliE, fliQ, fliL, flgG, flgB, and flhF, indicated that each of them is also FleQ dependent. Each of these promoters has a sequence with weak consensus to 5'-gaaacCCgccgCcgctTt-3', immediately upstream of the predicted {sigma}{sup 54}-binding site, with an imperfect inverted repeat containing a GC-rich center flanked by several A and T at 5'- and 3'-ends, respectively. Replacing this region in fliE promoter with a HindIII recognition sequence abolished the transcription, indicating that this region responds to transcription activation by FleQ.

  10. Structure of Salmonella FlhE, conserved member of a flagellar Type III secretion operon

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jaemin; Monzingo, Arthur F.; Keatinge-Clay, Adrian T.; Harshey, Rasika M.

    2014-12-26

    In this paper, the bacterial flagellum is assembled by a multicomponent transport apparatus categorized as a type III secretion system. The secretion of proteins that assemble into the flagellum is driven by the proton motive force. The periplasmic protein FlhE is a member of the flhBAE operon in the majority of bacteria where FlhE is found. FlhA and FlhB are established components of the flagellar type III secretion system. The absence of FlhE results in a proton leak through the flagellar system, inappropriate secretion patterns, and cell death, indicating that FlhE regulates an important aspect of proper flagellar biosynthesis. We isolated FlhE from the periplasm of Salmonella and solved its structure to 1.5 Å resolution. The structure reveals a β-sandwich fold, with no close structural homologs. Finally, possible roles of FlhE, including that of a chaperone, are discussed.

  11. Corrective responses to loss of ground support during walking. II. Comparison of intact and chronic spinal cats.

    PubMed

    Hiebert, G W; Gorassini, M A; Jiang, W; Prochazka, A; Pearson, K G

    1994-02-01

    1. The preceding study described a corrective response in cats when one hind leg steps into a hole. In this investigation we examine the extent to which this behavior is organized at the spinal level by comparing the responses elicited in intact and chronic spinal cats. 2. Adult cats were trained to step bipedally with their hind legs on a treadmill. After training, the responses to stepping into a hole cut in the treadmill belt were monitored with a video recorder and by recording electromyograms from muscles in both hind legs. The responses to stepping into the hole were also recorded in chronic spinal cats that had recovered the ability to step with their hind legs a few weeks after spinalization. 3. The behavioral responses in the two groups of animals differed in two respects. First, the latency of the onset of the flexion movement to remove the foot from the hole was shorter in intact animals (70-150 ms in intact vs. 130-350 ms in spinal animals). Second, the flexion movement in the intact animals was stronger. The exaggerated flexion movement in intact animals lifted the paw well clear of the hole and allowed support to be regained on the treadmill belt. The weaker flexion movement in spinal animals was usually insufficient to lift the paw completely from the hole. 4. Differences in the motor patterns recorded from flexor muscles during the corrective response in intact and spinal animals correspond with the differences in the kinematics. First, the onset of flexor activity after the foot entered the hole was delayed by approximately 100 ms in spinal animals relative to intact animals. Second, in intact animals the magnitudes of flexor bursts were increased relative to the flexor bursts associated with the swing phase during stepping, whereas in spinal animals flexor bursts during the corrective response resembled those occurring during swing. 5. Similarities in the duration and the timing of bursts in different flexor muscles in intact and spinal animals

  12. Motor activity under weightless conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kasyan, I. I.; Kopanev, V. I.; Cherepakhin, M. A.; Yuganov, Y. M.

    1975-01-01

    The material presented on the motor activity under weightless conditions (brief and long) leads to the conclusion that it is not significantly disrupted, if those being examined are secured at the workplaces. Some discoordination of movement, moderately expressed disruption of the precision of reproduction of assigned muscular forces, etc., were observed. Motor disorders decrease significantly in proportion to the length of stay under weightless conditions. This apparently takes place, as a consequence of formation of a new functional system, adequate to the conditions of weightlessness. Tests on intact and labyrinthectomized animals have demonstrated that signaling from the inner ear receptors is superfluous in weightlessness, since it promotes the onset of disruptions in the combined work of the position analyzers.

  13. The Helicobacter pylori Anti-Sigma Factor FlgM Is Predominantly Cytoplasmic and Cooperates with the Flagellar Basal Body Protein FlhA ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Rust, Melanie; Borchert, Sophie; Niehus, Eike; Kuehne, Sarah A.; Gripp, Eugenia; Bajceta, Afrodita; McMurry, Jonathan L.; Suerbaum, Sebastian; Hughes, Kelly T.; Josenhans, Christine

    2009-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori requires flagellar motility and orientation to persist actively in its habitat. A particular feature of flagella in most Helicobacter species including H. pylori is a membraneous flagellar sheath. The anti-sigma factor FlgM of H. pylori is unusual, since it lacks an N-terminal domain present in other FlgM homologs, e.g., FlgM of Salmonella spp., whose regulatory function is intimately coupled to its secretion through the flagellar type III secretion system. The aim of the present study was to characterize the localization and secretion of the short H. pylori FlgM in the presence of a flagellar sheath and to elucidate its interaction with other flagellar proteins, such as the basal body protein FlhA, which was previously shown to cooperate with FlgM for regulation. H. pylori FlgM was only released into the medium in minor amounts in wild-type bacteria, where the bulk amount of the protein was retained in the cytoplasm. Some FlgM was detected in the flagellar fraction. FlgM was expressed in flhA mutants and was less soluble and differentially localized in bacterial fractions of the flhA mutant in comparison to wild-type bacteria. FlgM-green fluorescent protein and FlgM-V5 translational fusions were generated and expressed in H. pylori. FlgM displayed a predominantly polar distribution and interacted with the C-terminal domain of FlhA (FlhAC). We suggest that, in H. pylori, FlgM secretion may not be paramount for its regulatory function and that protein interactions at the flagellar basal body may determine the turnover and localization of functional FlgM. PMID:19465658

  14. Advanced Motors

    SciTech Connect

    Knoth, Edward A; Chelluri, Bhanumathi; Schumaker, Edward J

    2012-12-14

    vProject Summary Transportation energy usage is predicted to increase substantially by 2020. Hybrid vehicles and fuel cell powered vehicles are destined to become more prominent as fuel prices rise with the demand. Hybrid and fuel cell vehicle platforms are both dependent on high performance electric motors. Electric motors for transportation duty will require sizeable low-speed torque to accelerate the vehicle. As motor speed increases, the torque requirement decreases which results in a nearly constant power motor output. Interior permanent magnet synchronous motors (IPMSM) are well suited for this duty. , , These rotor geometries are configured in straight lines and semi circular arc shapes. These designs are of limited configurations because of the lack of availability of permanent magnets of any other shapes at present. We propose to fabricate rotors via a novel processing approach where we start with magnet powders and compact them into a net shape rotor in a single step. Using this approach, widely different rotor designs can be implemented for efficiency. The current limitation on magnet shape and thickness will be eliminated. This is accomplished by co-filling magnet and soft iron powders at specified locations in intricate shapes using specially designed dies and automatic powder filling station. The process fundamentals for accomplishing occurred under a previous Applied Technology Program titled, Motors and Generators for the 21st Century. New efficient motor designs that are not currently possible (or cost prohibitive) can be accomplished by this approach. Such an approach to motor fabrication opens up a new dimension in motor design. Feasibility Results We were able to optimize a IPMSM rotor to take advantage of the powder co-filling and DMC compaction processing methods. The minimum low speed torque requirement of 5 N-m can be met through an optimized design with magnet material having a Br capability of 0.2 T. This level of magnetic performance can

  15. Uranium migration through intact sandstone cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Read, D.; Lawless, T. A.; Sims, R. J.; Butter, K. R.

    1993-06-01

    Uranium is often considered to be a mobile radioelement in the natural environment owing to its tendency to form stable complexes with a number of aqueous anions, particularly in oxidising milieu. A series of infiltration experiments were devised to investigate this migration behaviour under rigidly controlled laboratory conditions. Intact cores of Permo-Triassic Clashach Sandstone were pre-equilibrated with synthetic groundwater solutions and continuous flow-through of uranium monitored together with pH and concentrations of other ions. Prior to performing each experiment a simulation was carried out using a one-dimensional coupled chemical transport code, encompassing a thermodynamic description of the electrical double layer. These calculations together with electron microscopy indicated the potential role played by iron oxyhydroxide grain coatings in retarding the uranium plume. Thus, a second series of experiments was initiated on pre-acidified cores from which all surface exposed iron had been removed, allowing an assessment of the retention capacity of non-ferric components. Taken together, the data clearly illustrate the strong affinity of aqueous uranium species for natural surfaces even under strongly oxidising conditions. The success of the model in predicting a priori the dominant trends in uranium migration behaviour is encouraging and may aid in prioritising analytical requirements for investigations in more complex geochemical situations than those studied here.

  16. Independent Control of the Static and Dynamic Components of the Chlamydomonas Flagellar Beat.

    PubMed

    Geyer, Veikko F; Sartori, Pablo; Friedrich, Benjamin M; Jülicher, Frank; Howard, Jonathon

    2016-04-25

    When the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii swims, it uses the breaststroke beat of its two flagella to pull itself forward [1]. The flagellar waveform can be decomposed into a static component, corresponding to an asymmetric time-averaged shape, and a dynamic component, corresponding to the time-varying wave [2]. Extreme lightening conditions photoshock the cell, converting the breaststroke beat into a symmetric sperm-like beat, which causes a reversal of the direction of swimming [3]. Waveform conversion is achieved by a reduction in magnitude of the static component, whereas the dynamic component remains unchanged [2]. The coupling between static and dynamic components, however, is poorly understood, and it is not known whether the static component requires the dynamic component or whether it can exist independently. We used isolated and reactivated axonemes [4] to investigate the relation between the two beat components. We discovered that, when reactivated in the presence of low ATP concentrations, axonemes displayed the static beat component in absence of the dynamic component. Furthermore, we found that the amplitudes of the two components depend on ATP in qualitatively different ways. These results show that the decomposition into static and dynamic components is not just a mathematical concept but that the two components can independently control different aspects of cell motility: the static component controls swimming direction, whereas the dynamic component provides propulsion.

  17. A conserved CaM- and radial spoke associated complex mediates regulation of flagellar dynein activity.

    PubMed

    Dymek, Erin E; Smith, Elizabeth F

    2007-11-05

    For virtually all cilia and eukaryotic flagella, the second messengers calcium and cyclic adenosine monophosphate are implicated in modulating dynein- driven microtubule sliding to regulate beating. Calmodulin (CaM) localizes to the axoneme and is a key calcium sensor involved in regulating motility. Using immunoprecipitation and mass spectrometry, we identify members of a CaM-containing complex that are involved in regulating dynein activity. This complex includes flagellar-associated protein 91 (FAP91), which shares considerable sequence similarity to AAT-1, a protein originally identified in testis as an A-kinase anchor protein (AKAP)- binding protein. FAP91 directly interacts with radial spoke protein 3 (an AKAP), which is located at the base of the spoke. In a microtubule sliding assay, the addition of antibodies generated against FAP91 to mutant axonemes with reduced dynein activity restores dynein activity to wild-type levels. These combined results indicate that the CaM- and spoke-associated complex mediates regulatory signals between the radial spokes and dynein arms.

  18. Bacterial flagellar motility on hydrated rough surfaces controlled by aqueous film thickness and connectedness

    PubMed Central

    Tecon, Robin; Or, Dani

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that rates of bacterial dispersion in soils are controlled by hydration conditions that define size and connectivity of the retained aqueous phase. Despite the ecological implications of such constraints, microscale observations of this phenomenon remain scarce. Here, we quantified aqueous film characteristics and bacterial flagellated motility in response to systematic variations in microhydrological conditions on porous ceramic surfaces that mimic unsaturated soils. We directly measured aqueous film thickness and documented its microscale heterogeneity. Flagellar motility was controlled by surface hydration conditions, as cell velocity decreased and dispersion practically ceased at water potentials exceeding –2 kPa (resulting in thinner and disconnected liquid films). The fragmentation of aquatic habitats was delineated indirectly through bacterial dispersal distances within connected aqueous clusters. We documented bacterial dispersal radii ranging from 100 to 10 μm as the water potential varied from 0 to –7 kPa, respectively. The observed decrease of flagellated velocity and dispersal ranges at lower matric potentials were in good agreement with mechanistic model predictions. Hydration-restricted habitats thus play significant role in bacterial motility and dispersal, which has potentially important impact on soil microbial ecology and diversity. PMID:26757676

  19. Identification of α-11 giardin as a flagellar and surface component of Giardia lamblia.

    PubMed

    Kim, Juri; Lee, Hye Yeon; Lee, Mi-Ae; Yong, Tai-Soon; Lee, Kyu-Ho; Park, Soon-Jung

    2013-10-01

    Giardia lamblia is a protozoan pathogen with distinct cytoskeletal structures, including median bodies and eight flagella. In this study, we examined components comprising G. lamblia flagella. Crude flagellar extracts were prepared from G. lamblia trophozoites, and analyzed by two-dimensional (2-D) gel electrophoresis. The 19 protein spots were analyzed by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry, identifying ten metabolic enzymes, six distinct giardins, Giardia trophozoite antigen 1, translational initiation factor eIF-4A, and an extracellular signal-regulated kinase 2. Among the identified proteins, we studied α-11 giardin which belongs to a group of cytoskeletal proteins specific to Giardia. Western blot analysis and real-time PCR indicated that expression of α-11 giardin is not significantly increased during encystation of G. lamblia. Immunofluorescence assays using anti-α-11 giardin antibodies revealed that α-11 giardin protein mainly localized to the plasma membranes and basal bodies of the anterior flagella of G. lamblia trophozoites, suggesting that α-11 giardin is a genuine component of the G. lamblia cytoskeleton.

  20. Flagellar mitochondrial association of the male-specific Don Juan protein in Drosophila spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Santel, A; Blümer, N; Kämpfer, M; Renkawitz-Pohl, R

    1998-11-01

    The Drosophila don juan gene encodes a basic protein (Don Juan protein), which is solely expressed postmeiotically during spermiogenesis in elongated spermatids and in mature sperm. Transgenic expression of a GFP-tagged Don Juan protein (DJ-GFP) in the male germ line showed an association of the fusion protein with the sperm tail. Detailed examination of DJ-GFP localization revealed novel insights into its distinct temporal and spatial distribution along the sperm tail during the last phase of spermatid maturation. Co-localization of DJ-GFP with actin-labeled cysts demonstrated its emergence in elongated spermatids during individualization. Additionally, the endogenous Don Juan protein was detected with epitope-specific antibodies in finally elongated nuclei of spermatids. After completion of nuclear shaping Don Juan is no longer detectable in the sperm heads with the onset of individualization. Mislocalization of the DJ-GFP protein in flagella of a mutant with defective mitochondrial differentiation provides evidence of mitochondrial association of the fusion protein with flagellar mitochondrial arrays. Ectopically expressed DJ-GFP in premeiotic germ cells as well as salivary gland cells confirmed the capability of the fusion protein to associate with mitochondria. Therefore we suppose that Don Juan is a nuclear-encoded, germ-cell specifically expressed mitochondrial protein, which might be involved in the final steps of mitochondrial differentiation within the flagellum.

  1. A SAS-6-like protein suggests that the Toxoplasma conoid complex evolved from flagellar components.

    PubMed

    de Leon, Jessica Cruz; Scheumann, Nicole; Beatty, Wandy; Beck, Josh R; Tran, Johnson Q; Yau, Candace; Bradley, Peter J; Gull, Keith; Wickstead, Bill; Morrissette, Naomi S

    2013-07-01

    SAS-6 is required for centriole biogenesis in diverse eukaryotes. Here, we describe a novel family of SAS-6-like (SAS6L) proteins that share an N-terminal domain with SAS-6 but lack coiled-coil tails. SAS6L proteins are found in a subset of eukaryotes that contain SAS-6, including diverse protozoa and green algae. In the apicomplexan parasite Toxoplasma gondii, SAS-6 localizes to the centriole but SAS6L is found above the conoid, an enigmatic tubulin-containing structure found at the apex of a subset of alveolate organisms. Loss of SAS6L causes reduced fitness in Toxoplasma. The Trypanosoma brucei homolog of SAS6L localizes to the basal-plate region, the site in the axoneme where the central-pair microtubules are nucleated. When endogenous SAS6L is overexpressed in Toxoplasma tachyzoites or Trypanosoma trypomastigotes, it forms prominent filaments that extend through the cell cytoplasm, indicating that it retains a capacity to form higher-order structures despite lacking a coiled-coil domain. We conclude that although SAS6L proteins share a conserved domain with SAS-6, they are a functionally distinct family that predates the last common ancestor of eukaryotes. Moreover, the distinct localization of the SAS6L protein in Trypanosoma and Toxoplasma adds weight to the hypothesis that the conoid complex evolved from flagellar components.

  2. CDKL5 regulates flagellar length and localizes to the base of the flagella in Chlamydomonas.

    PubMed

    Tam, Lai-Wa; Ranum, Paul T; Lefebvre, Paul A

    2013-03-01

    The length of Chlamydomonas flagella is tightly regulated. Mutations in four genes-LF1, LF2, LF3, and LF4-cause cells to assemble flagella up to three times wild-type length. LF2 and LF4 encode protein kinases. Here we describe a new gene, LF5, in which null mutations cause cells to assemble flagella of excess length. The LF5 gene encodes a protein kinase very similar in sequence to the protein kinase CDKL5. In humans, mutations in this kinase cause a severe form of juvenile epilepsy. The LF5 protein localizes to a unique location: the proximal 1 μm of the flagella. The proximal localization of the LF5 protein is lost when genes that make up the proteins in the cytoplasmic length regulatory complex (LRC)-LF1, LF2, and LF3-are mutated. In these mutants LF5p becomes localized either at the distal tip of the flagella or along the flagellar length, indicating that length regulation involves, at least in part, control of LF5p localization by the LRC.

  3. Flagellar structure and hyperthermophily: analysis of a single flagellin gene and its product in Aquifex pyrophilus.

    PubMed Central

    Behammer, W; Shao, Z; Mages, W; Rachel, R; Stetter, K O; Schmitt, R

    1995-01-01

    The polytrichously inserted flagella of Aquifex pyrophilus, a marine hyperthermophilic bacterium growing at 85 degrees C, were isolated and purified. Electron micrographs of the 19-nm-diameter flagellar filaments show prominent helical arrays of subunits. The primary structure of these 54-kDa flagellin monomers determining the helical shape and heat stability of filaments was of particular interest. The genomic region encoding the flagellin subunit (flaA gene) and an upstream open reading frame (orf1) were cloned and sequenced. The 1,503-bp flaA and 696-bp orf1 are preceded by separate sigma 28-like promoters and ribosome-binding motifs and succeeded by palindromic transcription terminators. Both genes are actively transcribed, but the nature and function of the orf1-encoded 231-residue polypeptide remain unknown. The deduced primary structure of the 501-amino-acid flagellin encoded by flaA consists of conserved N- and C-terminal regions and a variable 246-residue central domain. In comparison to mesophilic flagellins, the thermostable A. pyrophilus flagellin is characterized by increases in aromatic residues and prolines as well as by a 7.9% +/- 3.2% increase in all hydrophobic residues that is balanced by a respective decrease in hydrophilic residues. This composition is thought to form more compact flagellin monomers and stable interface contacts between neighboring subunits in the polymer. PMID:7592443

  4. Characterization of the ATP-phosphohydrolase activity of bovine spermatozoa flagellar extracts.

    PubMed

    Young, L G; Smithwick, E B

    1975-02-01

    The ATP-phosphohydrolase activity of extracts prepared from bovine spermatozoa flagella (BSFE), was characterized with respect to enzyme, substrate, activator ion and salt concentration, temperature dependence and time stability. BSFE required the presence of a divalent cation for activity: Mg++ or Ca++ could function as activator; Mn++, Zn++ and Cd++ could not. EDTA, but not EGTA, was inhibitory to enzymatic activity. Ca++ inhibited the Mg++ stimulated activity. ATP was dephosphorylated more rapidly than GTP greater than CTP greater than ITP, and ADP was dephosphorylated at 40% of the rate of ATP. The magnesium activated ATPase was stimulated by potassium and inhibited by sodium ions. Activation of BSFE ATP-phosphohydrolase was maximal in the presence of Mg++ and ATP in equimolar concentrations and K+ (0.05-0.3 M) at 30 degrees C. Although the enzymatic activity of the extract was found to decrease rapidly with time, it could be maintained for up to three days by the addition of 2-beta-mercaptoethanol to the bovine spermatozoa flagellar extracts.

  5. Immunomagnetic Separation and Coagglutination of Vibrio parahaemolyticus with Anti-Flagellar Protein Monoclonal Antibody▿

    PubMed Central

    Datta, S.; Janes, M. E.; Simonson, J. G.

    2008-01-01

    Mice were immunized by injection of Vibrio parahaemolyticus ATCC 17802 polar flagellin in order to produce monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). mAbs were analyzed by anti-H enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay using V. parahaemolyticus polar flagellar cores. The mAb exhibiting the highest anti-H titer was coated onto Cowan I Staphylococcus aureus cells at a concentration of 75 μg/ml cell suspension and used for slide coagglutination. Of 41 isolates identified genetically as V. parahaemolyticus, 100% coagglutinated with the anti-H mAb within 30 s, and the mAb did not react with 30 isolates identified as Vibrio vulnificus. A strong coagglutination reaction with V. parahaemolyticus ATCC 17802 was still observed when the S. aureus cells were armed with as little as 15 μg of mAb/ml S. aureus cell suspension. At this concentration, the mAb cross-reacted with three other Vibrio species, suggesting that they share an identical H antigen or antigens. The anti-H mAb was then used to optimize an immunomagnetic separation protocol which exhibited from 35% to about 45% binding of 102 to 103 V. parahaemolyticus cells in phosphate-buffered saline. The mAb would be useful for the rapid and selective isolation, concentration, and detection of V. parahaemolyticus cells from environmental sources. PMID:18753337

  6. Crystallization of FcpA from Leptospira, a novel flagellar protein that is essential for pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    San Martin, Fabiana; Mechaly, Ariel E; Larrieux, Nicole; Wunder, Elsio A; Ko, Albert I; Picardeau, Mathieu; Trajtenberg, Felipe; Buschiazzo, Alejandro

    2017-03-01

    The protein FcpA is a unique component of the flagellar filament of spirochete bacteria belonging to the genus Leptospira. Although it plays an essential role in translational motility and pathogenicity, no structures of FcpA homologues are currently available in the PDB. Its three-dimensional structure will unveil the novel motility mechanisms that render pathogenic Leptospira particularly efficient at invading and disseminating within their hosts, causing leptospirosis in humans and animals. FcpA from L. interrogans was purified and crystallized, but despite laborious attempts no useful X ray diffraction data could be obtained. This challenge was solved by expressing a close orthologue from the related saprophytic species L. biflexa. Three different crystal forms were obtained: a primitive and a centred monoclinic form, as well as a hexagonal variant. All forms diffracted X-rays to suitable resolutions for crystallographic analyses, with the hexagonal type typically reaching the highest limits of 2.0 Å and better. A variation of the quick-soaking procedure resulted in an iodide derivative that was instrumental for single-wavelength anomalous diffraction methods.

  7. Utility of recombinant flagellar calcium-binding protein for serodiagnosis of Trypanosoma cruzi infection.

    PubMed Central

    Godsel, L M; Tibbetts, R S; Olson, C L; Chaudoir, B M; Engman, D M

    1995-01-01

    The protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi is the causative agent of Chagas' disease, a major public health problem in Latin America and of growing concern in the United States as the number of infected immigrants increases. There is currently no testing of U.S. blood products for T. cruzi infection, and the best tests available, although highly sensitive, are not of high enough specificity to be useful for widespread screening of the blood supply in this country. Among the parasite antigens detected by sera of infected humans and mice, those in the range of 24 to 26 kDa are particularly reactive. With an aim of developing a sensitive, specific, recombinant antigen-based serologic test for T. cruzi infection, we used two antibody reagents specific for these 24- to 26-kDa antigens to isolate cDNA clones from a T. cruzi expression library. One clone was found to encode a previously characterized T. cruzi antigen, a 24-kDa flagellar calcium-binding protein (FCaBP). Recombinant FCaBP was found to be a sensitive, specific reagent for distinguishing T. cruzi-infected individuals from uninfected persons, and it therefore could potentially be used for screening purposes, especially if combined with other recombinant T. cruzi antigens that have similarly high degrees of diagnostic sensitivity and specificity. PMID:7559952

  8. [Motor rehabilitation].

    PubMed

    Doménech, J; García-Aymerich, V; Juste, J; Ortiz, A

    2002-02-01

    The child's rehabilitation objectives are the same of the early intervention. The early intervention include motor approaches to facilitate the unique way of the newborn's expression: the movement and with it his holistic development. The motor approach is a classic aspect of early intervention but it is not itself early intervention. When the treatment objective is a term or preterm newborn or neonate the motor approach may be the principal method to facilitate perceptions experiences and basic habits. This intervention is not made with a specific physiotherapeutic technique. It is a sequential stimulation or development, without forget that the child must be taken as a whole. This point of view has special importance the first days of life and must be included in perinatal approach routines. In this paper we expose the work method of a Child Rehabilitation Team liked to a Newborn Unit.

  9. An intact action-perception coupling depends on the integrity of the cerebellum.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Andrea; Giese, Martin A; Sultan, Fahad; Mueller, Oliver M; Goericke, Sophia L; Ilg, Winfried; Timmann, Dagmar

    2014-05-07

    It is widely accepted that action and perception in humans functionally interact on multiple levels. Moreover, areas originally suggested to be predominantly motor-related, as the cerebellum, are also involved in action observation. However, as yet, few studies provided unequivocal evidence that the cerebellum is involved in the action perception coupling (APC), specifically in the integration of motor and multisensory information for perception. We addressed this question studying patients with focal cerebellar lesions in a virtual-reality paradigm measuring the effect of action execution on action perception presenting self-generated movements as point lights. We measured the visual sensitivity to the point light stimuli based on signal detection theory. Compared with healthy controls cerebellar patients showed no beneficial influence of action execution on perception indicating deficits in APC. Applying lesion symptom mapping, we identified distinct areas in the dentate nucleus and the lateral cerebellum of both hemispheres that are causally involved in APC. Lesions of the right ventral dentate, the ipsilateral motor representations (lobules V/VI), and most interestingly the contralateral posterior cerebellum (lobule VII) impede the benefits of motor execution on perception. We conclude that the cerebellum establishes time-dependent multisensory representations on different levels, relevant for motor control as well as supporting action perception. Ipsilateral cerebellar motor representations are thought to support the somatosensory state estimate of ongoing movements, whereas the ventral dentate and the contralateral posterior cerebellum likely support sensorimotor integration in the cerebellar-parietal loops. Both the correct somatosensory as well as the multisensory state representations are vital for an intact APC.

  10. Selective deficit of mental visual imagery with intact primary visual cortex and visual perception.

    PubMed

    Moro, Valentina; Berlucchi, Giovanni; Lerch, Jason; Tomaiuolo, Francesco; Aglioti, Salvatore M

    2008-02-01

    There is a vigorous debate as to whether visual perception and imagery share the same neuronal networks, whether the primary visual cortex is necessarily involved in visual imagery, and whether visual imagery functions are lateralized in the brain. Two patients with brain damage from closed head injury were submitted to tests of mental imagery in the visual, tactile, auditory, gustatory, olfactory and motor domains, as well as to an extensive testing of cognitive functions. A computerized mapping procedure was used to localize the site and to assess the extent of the lesions. One patient showed pure visual mental imagery deficits in the absence of imagery deficits in other sensory domains as well as in the motor domain, while the other patient showed both visual and tactile imagery deficits. Perceptual, language, and memory deficits were conspicuously absent. Computerized analysis of the lesions showed a massive involvement of the left temporal lobe in both patients and a bilateral parietal lesion in one patient. In both patients the calcarine cortex with the primary visual area was bilaterally intact. Our study indicates that: (i) visual imagery deficits can occur independently from deficits of visual perception; (ii) visual imagery deficits can occur when the primary visual cortex is intact and (iii) the left temporal lobe plays an important role in visual mental imagery.

  11. Auditory-Motor Interactions in Pediatric Motor Speech Disorders: Neurocomputational Modeling of Disordered Development

    PubMed Central

    Terband, H.; Maassen, B.; Guenther, F.H.; Brumberg, J.

    2014-01-01

    Background/Purpose Differentiating the symptom complex due to phonological-level disorders, speech delay and pediatric motor speech disorders is a controversial issue in the field of pediatric speech and language pathology. The present study investigated the developmental interaction between neurological deficits in auditory and motor processes using computational modeling with the DIVA model. Method In a series of computer simulations, we investigated the effect of a motor processing deficit alone (MPD), and the effect of a motor processing deficit in combination with an auditory processing deficit (MPD+APD) on the trajectory and endpoint of speech motor development in the DIVA model. Results Simulation results showed that a motor programming deficit predominantly leads to deterioration on the phonological level (phonemic mappings) when auditory self-monitoring is intact, and on the systemic level (systemic mapping) if auditory self-monitoring is impaired. Conclusions These findings suggest a close relation between quality of auditory self-monitoring and the involvement of phonological vs. motor processes in children with pediatric motor speech disorders. It is suggested that MPD+APD might be involved in typically apraxic speech output disorders and MPD in pediatric motor speech disorders that also have a phonological component. Possibilities to verify these hypotheses using empirical data collected from human subjects are discussed. PMID:24491630

  12. Experimental serpentinization of intact dunite cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luhmann, A. J.; Tutolo, B. M.; Kong, X. Z.; Bagley, B. C.; Schaen, A. T.; Saar, M. O.; Seyfried, W. E., Jr.

    2014-12-01

    Serpentinization in ultramafic-hosted hydrothermal systems, such as Lost City, produces relatively cool and alkaline fluids that support diverse ecosystems. To simulate serpentinization in such systems, we conducted single-pass, flow-through experiments on dunite cores cut out of a sample from Jackson County, North Carolina. Experimental seawater prepared using laboratory-grade reagents and standards was pumped through a core at 150ºC and 150 bar pore-fluid outlet pressure at a flow rate of 0.01 ml/min. An additional experiment will be conducted at 200ºC. At 150ºC, permeability decreased by 2.3 times with reaction progress over the course of the 36 day experiment. Fluid-rock reaction generally produced CO2, H2, CH4, and CO concentrations of 100 μmol/kg, up to 40 μmol/kg, 2 μmol/kg, and less than 1 μmol/kg, respectively. Outlet fluid chemistry was relatively stable, except for initial peaks in Al, Ba, Fe, Mn, and Si. pH of outlet fluids increased with reaction progress, but it was always lower (6.9-7.4) than the initial seawater (7.8). X-ray computed tomography scans were/will be collected for both pre- and post-experimental cores. The combination of flow-through experiments on solid, intact rock cores cut out of natural samples and X-ray tomography permits visualization and quantification of mineralogical changes and flow path evolution during serpentinization. This approach further permits physical and chemical processes to be documented on a fine scale to better understand feedbacks between chemical reactions and flow fields, with implications for ultramafic-hosted hydrothermal systems.

  13. RflM functions as a transcriptional repressor in the autogenous control of the Salmonella Flagellar master operon flhDC.

    PubMed

    Singer, Hanna M; Erhardt, Marc; Hughes, Kelly T

    2013-09-01

    Motility of bacteria like Salmonella enterica is a highly regulated process that responds to a variety of internal and external stimuli. A hierarchy of three promoter classes characterizes the Salmonella flagellar system, and the onset of flagellar gene expression depends on the oligomeric regulatory complex and class 1 gene product FlhD(4)C(2). The flhDC promoter is a target for a broad range of transcriptional regulators that bind within the flhDC promoter region and either negatively or positively regulate flhDC operon transcription. In this work, we demonstrate that the RflM protein is a key component of flhDC regulation. Transposon mutagenesis was performed to investigate a previously described autoinhibitory effect of the flagellar master regulatory complex FlhD(4)C(2). RflM is a LuxR homolog that functions as a flagellar class 1 transcriptional repressor. RflM was found to be the negative regulator of flhDC expression that is responsible for the formerly described autoinhibitory effect of the FlhD(4)C(2) complex on flhDC operon transcription (K. Kutsukake, Mol. Gen. Genet. 254:440-448, 1997). We conclude that upon commencement of flagellar gene expression, the FlhD(4)C(2) complex initiates a regulatory feedback loop by activating rflM gene expression. rflM encodes a transcriptional repressor, RflM, which fine-tunes flhDC expression levels.

  14. Genetic Interactions at the Fla10 Locus: Suppressors and Synthetic Phenotypes That Affect the Cell Cycle and Flagellar Function in Chlamydomonas Reinhardtii

    PubMed Central

    Lux-III, F. G.; Dutcher, S. K.

    1991-01-01

    Through the isolation of suppressors of temperature-sensitive flagellar assembly mutations at the FLA10 locus of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, we have identified six other genes involved in flagellar assembly. Mutations at these suppressor loci, termed SUF1-SUF6, display allele specificity with respect to which fla10(-) mutant alleles they suppress. An additional mutation, apm1-122, which confers resistance to the plant herbicides amiprophos-methyl and oryzalin, was also found to interact with mutations at the FLA10 locus. The apm1-122 mutation in combination with three fla10(-) mutant alleles results in synthetic cold-sensitive cell division defects, and in combination with an additional pseudo-wild-type fla10(-) allele yields a synthetic temperature-sensitive flagellar motility phenotype. Based upon the genetic interactions of these loci, we propose that the FLA10 gene product interacts with multiple components of the flagellar apparatus and plays a role both in flagellar assembly and in the cell cycle. PMID:1874415

  15. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of Salmonella FliI, the ATPase component of the type III flagellar protein-export apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Minamino, Tohru; Imada, Katsumi; Tahara, Aiko; Kihara, May; Macnab, Robert M.; Namba, Keiichi

    2006-10-01

    Crystals of an N-terminally truncated variant of the Salmonella flagellar ATPase FliI, which exports substrate proteins into the central channel of the growing flagellar structure by utilizing the energy of ATP hydrolysis, have been obtained and characterized by X-ray diffraction. Most of the structural components making up the bacterial flagellum are translocated through the central channel of the growing flagellar structure by the type III flagellar protein-export apparatus in an ATPase-driven manner and are assembled at the growing end. FliI is the ATPase that drives flagellar protein export using the energy of ATP hydrolysis. FliI forms an oligomeric ring structure in order to attain maximum ATPase activity. In this study, FliI(Δ1–18), an N-terminally truncated variant of FliI lacking the first 18 residues, was purified and crystallized. Crystals were obtained using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion technique with PEG 8000 as a precipitant. FliI(Δ1–18) crystals grew in the monoclinic space group P2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 48, b = 73, c = 126 Å, β = 94°, and diffracted to 2.4 Å resolution. Anomalous difference Patterson maps of Os-derivative and Pt-derivative crystals showed significant peaks in their Harker sections, indicating that both derivatives are suitable for structure determination.

  16. T-POP array identifies EcnR and PefI-SrgD as novel regulators of flagellar gene expression.

    PubMed

    Wozniak, Christopher E; Lee, Changhan; Hughes, Kelly T

    2009-03-01

    The T-POP transposon was employed in a general screen for tetracycline (Tet)-induced chromosomal loci that exhibited Tet-activated or Tet-repressed expression of a fliC-lac transcriptional fusion. Insertions that activated flagellar transcription were located in flagellar genes. T-POP insertions that exhibited Tet-dependent fliC-lac inhibition were isolated upstream of the ecnR, fimZ, pefI-srgD, rcsB, and ydiV genes and in the flagellar gene flgA, which is located upstream of the anti-sigma(28) factor gene flgM. When expressed from the chromosomal P(araBAD) promoter, EcnR, FimZ, PefI-SrgD, and RcsB inhibited the transcription of the flagellar class 1 flhDC operon. YdiV, which is weakly homologous to EAL domain proteins involved in cyclic-di-GMP regulation, appears to act at a step after class 1 transcription. By using a series of deletions of the regulatory genes to try to disrupt each pathway, these regulators were found to act largely independently of one another. These results identify EcnR and PefI-SrgD as additional components of the complex regulatory network controlling flagellar expression.

  17. Therma motor

    DOEpatents

    Kandarian, R.

    The disclosure is directed to a thermal motor utilizing two tapered prestressed parallel adjacent cylinders lengthwise disposed about one third in a coolant. Heat is applied to contacting portions of the cylinders outside the coolant to cause them to deform and turn. Heat sources such as industrial waste heat, geothermal hot water, solar radiation, etc. can be used.

  18. Motor Controllers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Kollmorgen Corporation's Mermaid II two person submersible is propeller-driven by a system of five DC brushless motors with new electronic controllers that originated in work performed in a NASA/DOE project managed by Lewis Research Center. A key feature of the system is electric commutation rather than mechanical commutation for converting AC current to DC.

  19. 46 CFR 28.570 - Intact righting energy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Intact righting energy. 28.570 Section 28.570 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY UNINSPECTED VESSELS REQUIREMENTS FOR COMMERCIAL FISHING INDUSTRY VESSELS Stability § 28.570 Intact righting energy. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (c) of...

  20. 46 CFR 28.570 - Intact righting energy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Intact righting energy. 28.570 Section 28.570 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY UNINSPECTED VESSELS REQUIREMENTS FOR COMMERCIAL FISHING INDUSTRY VESSELS Stability § 28.570 Intact righting energy. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (c) of...

  1. 50 CFR 622.186 - Landing fish intact.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...-Grouper Fishery of the South Atlantic Region § 622.186 Landing fish intact. (a) South Atlantic snapper-grouper in or from the South Atlantic EEZ must be maintained with head and fins intact, except as..., snapper-grouper lawfully harvested in Bahamian waters are exempt from the requirement that they...

  2. 50 CFR 622.186 - Landing fish intact.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...-Grouper Fishery of the South Atlantic Region § 622.186 Landing fish intact. (a) South Atlantic snapper-grouper in or from the South Atlantic EEZ must be maintained with head and fins intact, except as..., snapper-grouper lawfully harvested in Bahamian waters are exempt from the requirement that they...

  3. 50 CFR 622.455 - Landing spiny lobster intact.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Landing spiny lobster intact. 622.455... ATLANTIC Spiny Lobster Fishery of Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands § 622.455 Landing spiny lobster intact. (a) A Caribbean spiny lobster in or from the Caribbean EEZ must be maintained with head...

  4. 50 CFR 622.455 - Landing spiny lobster intact.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Landing spiny lobster intact. 622.455... ATLANTIC Spiny Lobster Fishery of Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands § 622.455 Landing spiny lobster intact. (a) A Caribbean spiny lobster in or from the Caribbean EEZ must be maintained with head...

  5. 46 CFR 28.570 - Intact righting energy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Intact righting energy. 28.570 Section 28.570 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY UNINSPECTED VESSELS REQUIREMENTS FOR COMMERCIAL FISHING INDUSTRY VESSELS Stability § 28.570 Intact righting energy. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (c) of...

  6. 46 CFR 28.570 - Intact righting energy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Intact righting energy. 28.570 Section 28.570 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY UNINSPECTED VESSELS REQUIREMENTS FOR COMMERCIAL FISHING INDUSTRY VESSELS Stability § 28.570 Intact righting energy. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (c) of...

  7. 46 CFR 28.570 - Intact righting energy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Intact righting energy. 28.570 Section 28.570 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY UNINSPECTED VESSELS REQUIREMENTS FOR COMMERCIAL FISHING INDUSTRY VESSELS Stability § 28.570 Intact righting energy. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (c) of...

  8. 50 CFR 622.10 - Landing fish intact--general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE FISHERIES OF THE CARIBBEAN, GULF OF MEXICO, AND SOUTH... landing fish intact that are broadly applicable to finfish in the Gulf EEZ and Caribbean EEZ, as specified... intact. (a) Finfish in or from the Gulf EEZ or Caribbean EEZ, except as specified in paragraphs (b)...

  9. 50 CFR 622.10 - Landing fish intact--general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE FISHERIES OF THE CARIBBEAN, GULF OF MEXICO, AND SOUTH... landing fish intact that are broadly applicable to finfish in the Gulf EEZ and Caribbean EEZ, as specified... intact. (a) Finfish in or from the Gulf EEZ or Caribbean EEZ, except as specified in paragraphs (b)...

  10. Development of spatial database on intact forest landscapes of India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudhakar Reddy, C.; Singh, Jyoti; Jha, C. S.; Diwakar, P. G.; Dadhwal, V. K.

    2017-01-01

    There is an increased interest in identifying the status of biodiversity in different spatial and temporal scales. The objective of the current research is to prepare a consistent spatial database of intact forest landscapes of India. The intact forest landscapes are located in the Himalayas, Andaman & Nicobar Islands, Western Ghats and Sunderbans. At national level 237 forest landscapes and 5.4% of the total natural forest remained as intact in India. Current intact forest landscapes of India consists of blocks larger than 10 km2 covering an area of 34,061 km2. Of the total area under intact forest landscapes, Eastern Himalayas represent 76.7% of the area, followed by Western Himalayas (8.8%), Andaman & Nicobar Islands (6.2%) and Western Ghats (5.7%). The largest intact forest landscape block occupies an area of 3342.9 km2 (9.8%) is found in western Arunachal Pradesh. Temperate forest zone represents the highest intactness (56.6%), followed by subtropical zone (19.2%), tropical zone (18.6%) and alpine zone (5.6%). Himalayan moist temperate forests represent the highest area (39.1%) of intact forest landscapes followed by subtropical broad-leaved hill forests, wet evergreen forests, and montane wet temperate forests. It is estimated that 4.4% of the area of intact forest landscapes fall inside the existing 47 protected areas. The results of the analysis best suited as input for the process of identification of new protected areas. The study recommends fine-scale mapping of biodiversity within the intact forest landscapes and to prepare efficient conservation plans.

  11. Vesta Is Not an Intact Protoplanet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Consolmagno, Guy; Turrini, Diego; Golabeck, Gregor; Jutzi, Martin; Sirono, Sin-iti; Svetsov, Vladimir; Tsiganis, Kleomenis

    2014-11-01

    Asteroid 4 Vesta has been identified as the likely source of howardite, eucrite, and diogenite (HED) basaltic achondrite meteorites, whose parent body differentiated and started solidifying within 3 Ma after the condensation of the Ca-Al-rich inclusions (CAIs). The formation of Jupiter and the disk-driven migration of the giant planets also occurred during this period; thus it was expected that Vesta could provide an intact record of large-scale early episodes of planetary migration and bombardment as in the proposed Jovian Early Bombardment and the “Grand Tack” scenarios. However, the results of the Dawn mission detailing Vesta’s mass, volume, density, and surface characteristics provide challenges for modeling the structure and evolution of this asteroid. All proposed models for the generation of the HEDs require the presence of a substantial olivine-rich mantle. But recent work on the depth of excavation of the large basins at the south pole of Vesta suggests that because there is not abundant mantle olivine visible on Vesta or in the Vestoid family asteroids, the crust of Vesta must be at least 80 km thick. Such a thick crust is radically at odds with previous models; should it exist, it ought to manifest itself in other ways such as Vesta’s density structure and bulk chemical composition. However, we find that no Vesta model of iron core, olivine-rich mantle, and HED crust can match the joint constraints of (a) Vesta’s density as derived from the gravity field observed by Dawn; (b) the observed depletion of sodium and potassium and trace element enrichments of the HED meteorites; and (c) the absence of exposed olivine on Vesta’s surface, among Vestoid asteroids, or in our collection of basaltic meteorites. Either Vesta was subjected to a radical change in composition, presumably due to the intense collisional environment where and when it formed, or the asteroid we see today is in fact a reaccretion of material formed elsewhere from now

  12. The alternative sigma factor HrpL negatively modulates the flagellar system in the phytopathogenic bacterium Erwinia amylovora under hrp-inducing conditions.

    PubMed

    Cesbron, Sophie; Paulin, Jean-Pierre; Tharaud, Michel; Barny, Marie-Anne; Brisset, Marie-Noëlle

    2006-04-01

    In this work we present evidence of an opposite regulation in the phytopathogenic bacteria Erwinia amylovora between the virulence-associated Type III secretion system (TTSS) and the flagellar system. Using loss-of-function mutants we show that motility enhanced the virulence of wild-type bacteria relative to a nonmotile mutant when sprayed on apple seedlings with unwounded leaves. Then we demonstrated through analyses of motility, flagellin export and visualization of flagellar filament that HrpL, the positive key regulator of the TTSS, also down-regulates the flagellar system. Such a dual regulation mediated by an alternative sigma factor of the TTSS appears to be a level of regulation between virulence and motility not yet described among Proteobacteria.

  13. Entropy and information in flagellar axoneme cybernetics: a radial spokes integrative function.

    PubMed

    Cibert, Christian

    2003-04-01

    Radial spokes and the consequences of their relationships with the central apparatus seem to play a very important role in the regulation of axonemal activity. We modeled their behavior and observed that it appears to differ in the cilium and the flagellum with respect to the development of bending as a function of time. Specifically, our calculation raises the question of the real function of the radial spokes in the regulation of the axoneme, because a given curvature of the flagellar axoneme may correspond to two opposite of their tilts. The stable nil/low amplitude shear points that we had characterized along the flagellum allowed us to describe their axoneme as a series of modules [Cibert, 2002: Cell Motil. Cytoskeleton 51:89-111]. We observed that a nil/low shearing point moves along each module during beating when a new bend is created at the base of the flagellum [Cibert, 2001: Cell Motil. Cytoskeleton 49:161-175]. We propose that the structural gradients of isoforms of tubulin could be basic verniers that act as structural references for the axonemal machinery during the beating. This allowed us to interpret the axonemal organization as a segmented structure, that could be analyzed according to the complexion(1) theory and Shannon's information theory, which associate entropy and probability in the creation of information. The important consequence of this interpretation is that regulation of the axonemal machinery appears to be due to the upstream and downstream cross-talk between the axonemal segments that do not involve any dedicated integrative structure but depend on the energy level of the entire length of each module.

  14. Genetic dissection of the Leishmania paraflagellar rod, a unique flagellar cytoskeleton structure.

    PubMed

    Maga, J A; Sherwin, T; Francis, S; Gull, K; LeBowitz, J H

    1999-08-01

    The paraflagellar rod (PFR) is a unique network of cytoskeletal filaments that lies alongside the axoneme in the flagella of most trypanosomatids. While little is known about how two major Leishmania mexicana PFR protein components, PFR1 and PFR2, assemble into this complex structure, previous analysis of PFR2 null mutants demonstrated that the PFR is essential for proper cell motility. The structural roles of PFR1 and PFR2 are now examined through comparison of PFR2 null mutants with new PFR1 null mutant and PFR1/PFR2 double null mutant parasites. Both PFR1 and PFR2 were essential for PFR formation and cell motility. When elimination of one PFR gene prevented assembly of a native PFR structure, the other PFR protein accumulated at the distal flagellar tip. Comparison of PFR substructures remaining in each mutant revealed that: (1) fibers that attach the PFR to the axoneme did not contain PFR1 or PFR2, and assemble in the absence of a PFR. (2) PFR1 was synthesized and transported to the flagella in the absence of PFR2, where it formed a stable association with the axoneme attachment fibers. (3) PFR2 was synthesized and transported to the flagella in the absence of PFR1, though it was not found associated with the axoneme attachment fibers. (4) PFR1 and PFR2 were located throughout the subdomains of the PFR. These data suggest that while PFR filaments contain both PFR1 and PFR2, the PFR is attached to the axoneme by interaction of PFR1 with the axoneme attachment fibers.

  15. A Novel Trypanosoma cruzi Protein Associated to the Flagellar Pocket of Replicative Stages and Involved in Parasite Growth

    PubMed Central

    Durante, Ignacio M.; Cámara, María de los Milagros; Buscaglia, Carlos A.

    2015-01-01

    The flagellar pocket constitutes an active and strategic site in the body of trypanosomatids (i.e. parasitic protozoa that cause important human and/or livestock diseases), which participates in several important processes such as cell polarity, morphogenesis and replication. Most importantly, the flagellar pocket is the unique site of surface protein export and nutrient uptake in trypanosomatids, and thus constitutes a key portal for the interaction with the host. In this work, we identified and characterized a novel Trypanosoma cruzi protein, termed TCLP 1, that accumulates at the flagellar pocket area of parasite replicative forms, as revealed by biochemical, immuno-cytochemistry and electron microscopy techniques. Different in silico analyses revealed that TCLP 1 is the founding member of a family of chimeric molecules restricted to trypanosomatids bearing, in addition to eukaryotic ubiquitin-like and protein-protein interacting domains, a motif displaying significant structural homology to bacterial multi-cargo chaperones involved in the secretion of virulence factors. Using the fidelity of an homologous expression system we confirmed TCLP 1 sub-cellular distribution and showed that TCLP 1-over-expressing parasites display impaired survival and accelerated progression to late stationary phase under starvation conditions. The reduced endocytic capacity of TCLP 1-over-expressors likely underlies (at least in part) this growth phenotype. TCLP 1 is involved in the uptake of extracellular macromolecules required for nutrition and hence in T. cruzi growth. Due to the bacterial origin, sub-cellular distribution and putative function(s), we propose TCLP 1 and related orthologs in trypanosomatids as appealing therapeutic targets for intervention against these health-threatening parasites. PMID:26086767

  16. From crystal structure to in silico epitope discovery in the Burkholderia pseudomallei flagellar hook-associated protein FlgK.

    PubMed

    Gourlay, Louise J; Thomas, Rachael J; Peri, Claudio; Conchillo-Solé, Oscar; Ferrer-Navarro, Mario; Nithichanon, Arnone; Vila, Jordi; Daura, Xavier; Lertmemongkolchai, Ganjana; Titball, Richard; Colombo, Giorgio; Bolognesi, Martino

    2015-04-01

    Melioidosis, caused by the Gram-negative bacterium Burkholderia pseudomallei, is a potentially fatal infection that is endemic in Southeast Asia and Northern Australia that is poorly controlled by antibiotics. Research efforts to identify antigenic components for a melioidosis vaccine have led to the identification of several proteins, including subunits forming the flagella that mediate bacterial motility, host colonization, and virulence. This study focuses on the B. pseudomallei flagellar hook-associated protein (FlgK(Bp)), and provides the first insights into the 3D structure of FlgK proteins as targets for structure-based antigen engineering. The FlgK(Bp) crystal structure (presented here at 1.8-Å resolution) reveals a multidomain fold, comprising two small β-domains protruding from a large elongated α-helical bundle core. The evident structural similarity to flagellin, the flagellar filament subunit protein, suggests that, depending on the bacterial species, flagellar hook-associated proteins are likely to show a conserved, elongated α-helical bundle scaffold coupled to a variable number of smaller domains. Furthermore, we present immune serum recognition data confirming, in agreement with previous findings, that recovered melioidosis patients produce elevated levels of antibodies against FlgK(Bp), in comparison with seronegative and seropositive healthy subjects. Moreover, we show that FlgK(Bp) has cytotoxic effects on cultured murine macrophages, suggesting an important role in bacterial pathogenesis. Finally, computational epitope prediction methods applied to the FlgK(Bp) crystal structure, coupled with in vitro mapping, allowed us to predict three antigenic regions that locate to discrete protein domains. Taken together, our results point to FlgK(Bp) as a candidate for the design and production of epitope-containing subunits/domains as potential vaccine components.

  17. Motor Switching Rates in Caulobacter Crescentus Follow First Passage Time Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Jay; Morse, Michael; Bell, Jordan; Li, Guanglai

    2015-03-01

    The flagellar motor of uni-flagellated bacterium Caulobacter crescentus switches stochastically between clockwise (CW) and counterclockwise (CCW) rotation. We performed measurements of the time intervals between switches in order to gain insight on motor dynamics and regulation. Our measurements were performed both on free swimming cells and tethered cells with their flagella attached to a glass slide. A peak time of approximately one second was observed in both motor directions with counterclockwise intervals more sharply peaked. The distributions of switching times can be fitted using biased first passage time statistics. We present a model of motor switching dynamics, which is controlled by the binding of CheY-P to motor subunits FliM. A lower threshold number of FliM with CheY-P bound triggers a switch in motor rotation from CW to CCW, whereas a higher threshold triggers an opposing switch from CCW to CW. The time intervals between alternating switches may be increased or decreased by regulating CheY-P concentration, resulting in biased directional motion in the cells swimming trajectory over many motor cycles under external spatial or temporal gradients. Work funded by the United States National Science Foundation.

  18. Effects of osmolality on sperm morphology, motility and flagellar wave parameters in Northern pike (Esox lucius L.).

    PubMed

    Alavi, S M Hadi; Rodina, Marek; Viveiros, Ana T M; Cosson, Jacky; Gela, David; Boryshpolets, Sergei; Linhart, Otomar

    2009-07-01

    Northern pike (Esox lucius L.) spermatozoa are uniflagellated cells differentiated into a head without acrosome, a midpiece and a flagellar tail region flanked by a fin structure. Total, flagellar, head and midpiece lengths of spermatozoa were measured and show mean values of 34.5, 32.0, 1.32, 1.17 microm, respectively, with anterior and posterior widths of the midpiece measuring 0.8 and 0.6 microm, respectively. The osmolality of seminal plasma ranged from 228 to 350 mOsmol kg(-1) (average: 283.88+/-33.05). After triggering of sperm motility in very low osmolality medium (distilled water), blebs appeared along the flagellum. At later periods in the motility phase, the tip of the flagellum became curled into a loop shape which resulted in a shortening of the flagellum and a restriction of wave development to the proximal part (close to head). Spermatozoa velocity and percentage of motile spermatozoa decreased rapidly as a function of time postactivation and depended on the osmolality of activation media (P<0.05). In general, the greatest percentage of motile spermatozoa and highest spermatozoa velocity were observed between 125 and 235 mOsmol kg(-1). Osmolality above 375 mOsmol kg(-1) inhibited the motility of spermatozoa. After triggering of sperm motility in activation media, beating waves propagated along the full length of flagella, while waves appeared dampened during later periods in the motility phase, and were absent at the end of the motility phase. By increasing osmolality, the velocity of spermatozoa reached the highest value while wave length, amplitude, number of waves and curvatures also were at their highest values. This study showed that sperm morphology can be used for fish classification. Sperm morphology, in particular, the flagellar part showed several changes during activation in distilled water. Sperm motility of pike is inhibited due to high osmolality in the seminal plasma. Osmolality of activation medium affects the percentage of motile

  19. Intragastric immunization with recombinant Lactobacillus casei expressing flagellar antigen confers antibody-independent protective immunity against Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis.

    PubMed

    Kajikawa, Akinobu; Satoh, Eiichi; Leer, Rob J; Yamamoto, Shigeki; Igimi, Shizunobu

    2007-05-04

    A recombinant Lactobacillus casei expressing a flagellar antigen from Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis was constructed and evaluated as a mucosal vaccine. Intragastric immunization of the recombinant strain conferred protective immunity against Salmonella infection in mice. This immunization did not result in antigen-specific antibody in either feces or sera but induced the release of IFN-gamma on restimulation of primed lymphocytes ex vivo. The results suggested that the protective efficacy provided by flagellin-expressing L. casei is mainly attributable to cell-mediated immune responses. In addition, an adjuvant-type effect of the antigen delivery system with L. casei was also observed.

  20. The ATPase FliI can interact with the type III flagellar protein export apparatus in the absence of its regulator, FliH.

    PubMed

    Minamino, Tohru; González-Pedrajo, Bertha; Kihara, May; Namba, Keiichi; Macnab, Robert M

    2003-07-01

    Salmonella FliI is the ATPase that drives flagellar protein export. It normally exists as a complex together with the regulatory protein FliH. A fliH null mutant was slightly motile, with overproduction of FliI resulting in substantial improvement of its motility. Mutations in the cytoplasmic domains of FlhA and FlhB, which are integral membrane components of the type III flagellar export apparatus, also resulted in substantially improved motility, even at normal FliI levels. Thus, FliH, though undoubtedly important, is not essential.

  1. Reflectance Spectra Comparison of Orbital Debris, Intact Spacecraft, and Intact Rocket Bodies in the GEO Regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albercromby, Kira J.; Abell, Paul; Barker, Ed

    2009-03-01

    A key objective of NASA's Orbital Debris program office at Johnson Space Center (JSC) is to characterize the debris environment by way of assessing the physical properties (type, mass, density, and size) of objects in orbit. Knowledge of the geosynchronous orbit (GEO) debris environment in particular can be used to determine the hazard probability at specific GEO altitudes and aid predictions of the future environment. To calculate an optical size from an intensity measurement of an object in the GEO regime, a 0.175 albedo is assumed currently. However, identification of specific material type or types could improve albedo accuracy and yield a more accurate size estimate for the debris piece. Using spectroscopy, it is possible to determine the surface materials of space objects. The study described herein used the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF) to record spectral data in the ~ 0.65 to 2.5 micron regime on eight catalogued space objects. For comparison, all of the objects observed were in GEO or near-GEO. The eight objects consisted of two intact spacecraft, three rocket bodies, and three catalogued debris pieces. Two of the debris pieces stemmed from Titan 3C transtage breakup and the third is from COSMOS 2054. The reflectance spectra of the Titan 3C pieces share similar slopes (increasing with wavelength) and lack any strong absorption features. The COSMOS debris spectrum has a slight slope and has no absorption features. In contrast, the intact spacecraft show classic absorption features due to solar cells with a strong band gap feature near 1 micron. The two spacecraft were spin-stabilized objects and therefore have solar panels surrounding the outer surface. Two of the three rocket bodies are inertial upper stage (IUS) rocket bodies and have similar looking spectra. The slopes flatten out near 1.5 microns with absorption features in the near-infrared that are similar to that of white paint. The third rocket body has a similar flattening of slope but

  2. Reflectance Spectra Comparison of Orbital Debris, Intact Spacecraft, and Intact Rocket Bodies in the GEO Regime

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barker, Ed; Abercromby, Kira J.; Abell, Paul

    2009-01-01

    A key objective of NASA s Orbital Debris program office at Johnson Space Center (JSC) is to characterize the debris environment by way of assessing the physical properties (type, mass, density, and size) of objects in orbit. Knowledge of the geosynchronous orbit (GEO) debris environment in particular can be used to determine the hazard probability at specific GEO altitudes and aid predictions of the future environment. To calculate an optical size from an intensity measurement of an object in the GEO regime, a 0.175 albedo is assumed currently. However, identification of specific material type or types could improve albedo accuracy and yield a more accurate size estimate for the debris piece. Using spectroscopy, it is possible to determine the surface materials of space objects. The study described herein used the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF) to record spectral data in the 0.6 to 2.5 micron regime on eight catalogued space objects. For comparison, all of the objects observed were in GEO or near-GEO. The eight objects consisted of two intact spacecraft, three rocket bodies, and three catalogued debris pieces. Two of the debris pieces stemmed from Titan 3C transtage breakup and the third is from COSMOS 2054. The reflectance spectra of the Titan 3C pieces share similar slopes (increasing with wavelength) and lack any strong absorption features. The COSMOS debris spectra is flat and has no absorption features. In contrast, the intact spacecraft show classic absorption features due to solar panels with a strong band gap feature near 1 micron. The two spacecraft are spin-stabilized objects and therefore have solar panels surrounding the outer surface. Two of the three rocket bodies are inertial upper stage (IUS) rocket bodies and have similar looking spectra. The slopes flatten out near 1.5 microns with absorption features in the near-infrared that are similar to that of white paint. The third rocket body has a similar flattening of slope but with fewer

  3. Repression of inactive motor nerve terminals in partially denervated rat muscle after regeneration of active motor axons.

    PubMed Central

    Ribchester, R R; Taxt, T

    1984-01-01

    The fourth deep lumbrical muscle in the hind foot of adult rats was partially denervated by crushing the sural nerve (s.n.). The denervated muscle fibres became completely reinnervated by sprouts from lateral plantar nerve (l.p.n.) motor axons. By about 20 days after the nerve crush, s.n. motor axons started to reinnervate the muscle. In control muscles, a small proportion of the muscle fibres--about 2.5% of the muscle per motor unit--was reinnervated by s.n. motor axons over the following 20 days. Hence the regenerating terminals were able to re-establish functional synapses, despite the fact that all the muscle fibres were functionally innervated by l.p.n. terminals. When nerve impulse conduction in the l.p.n. was blocked with tetrodotoxin for up to 2 weeks, starting from the time when s.n. axons returned to the muscle, s.n. motor axons retrieved a much larger proportion of the muscle fibres--about 6.5% of the muscle per motor unit. There was a concomitant decrease in the tension produced by the sprouted l.p.n. motor axons. Intracellular recordings showed that many muscle fibres became innervated exclusively by regenerated s.n. motor nerve terminals. Measurements of end-plate potentials suggested that l.p.n. sprouts and the original nerve terminals were eliminated non-selectively. These results suggest that regenerating, active motor nerve terminals have an additional competitive advantage in reinnervating innervated muscles, if the intact terminals are inactive. When the l.p.n. was cut, rather than blocked, extensive reinnervation by the s.n. occurred-about 30% of the muscle per motor unit. This suggests that the absence of an intact nerve terminal in the motor end-plate provides a stronger stimulus than inactivity for synapse formation by regenerating motor axons. PMID:6707966

  4. Treatment for burn blisters: debride or leave intact?

    PubMed

    Murphy, Faye; Amblum, Jeshi

    2014-05-01

    This article presents findings from a systematic literature review of whether blisters arising from minor burns should be de-roofed or left intact. It discusses the risks of infection, healing outcomes, discomfort, choice of dressings and costs associated with each method, and reveals that debriding blisters larger than the patient's little fingernail while leaving smaller ones intact is generally agreed to be the best option. The article also explains external factors that influence the choice of whether to debride or leave blisters intact, reviews policy at the trust where one of the authors works in the context of the research and makes recommendations for practice.

  5. Structural and molecular conformation of myosin in intact muscle fibers by second harmonic generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nucciotti, V.; Stringari, C.; Sacconi, L.; Vanzi, F.; Linari, M.; Piazzesi, G.; Lombardi, V.; Pavone, F. S.

    2009-02-01

    Recently, the use of Second Harmonic Generation (SHG) for imaging biological samples has been explored with regard to intrinsic SHG in highly ordered biological samples. As shown by fractional extraction of proteins, myosin is the source of SHG signal in skeletal muscle. SHG is highly dependent on symmetries and provides selective information on the structural order and orientation of the emitting proteins and the dynamics of myosin molecules responsible for the mechano-chemical transduction during contraction. We characterise the polarization-dependence of SHG intensity in three different physiological states: resting, rigor and isometric tetanic contraction in a sarcomere length range between 2.0 μm and 4.0 μm. The orientation of motor domains of the myosin molecules is dependent on their physiological states and modulate the SHG signal. We can discriminate the orientation of the emitting dipoles in four different molecular conformations of myosin heads in intact fibers during isometric contraction, in resting and rigor. We estimate the contribution of the myosin motor domain to the total second order bulk susceptibility from its molecular structure and its functional conformation. We demonstrate that SHG is sensitive to the fraction of ordered myosin heads by disrupting the order of myosin heads in rigor with an ATP analog. We estimate the fraction of myosin motors generating the isometric force in the active muscle fiber from the dependence of the SHG modulation on the degree of overlap between actin and myosin filaments during an isometric contraction.

  6. 50 CFR 622.276 - Landing fish intact.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE FISHERIES OF THE CARIBBEAN, GULF OF MEXICO, AND SOUTH ATLANTIC Dolphin and Wahoo Fishery Off the Atlantic States § 622.276 Landing fish intact. (a) Dolphin and wahoo in or...

  7. 50 CFR 622.276 - Landing fish intact.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE FISHERIES OF THE CARIBBEAN, GULF OF MEXICO, AND SOUTH ATLANTIC Dolphin and Wahoo Fishery Off the Atlantic States § 622.276 Landing fish intact. (a) Dolphin and wahoo in or...

  8. 56. POWDER MAGAZINE, VIEW OF INTACT WOOD SHEATHING ON THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    56. POWDER MAGAZINE, VIEW OF INTACT WOOD SHEATHING ON THE SOUTHWEST REAR VENTILATION PASSAGE. (SHEATHING HELP CONTROL HUMIDITY AND DECREASE DANGER OF MAETAL STRIKING STONE AND SPARKING.) - Fort Monroe, Fortress, Hampton, Hampton, VA

  9. 50 CFR 622.247 - Landing golden crab intact.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... ATLANTIC Golden Crab Fishery of the South Atlantic Region § 622.247 Landing golden crab intact. The... ashore. (a) A golden crab in or from the South Atlantic EEZ must be maintained in whole condition...

  10. 50 CFR 622.247 - Landing golden crab intact.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... ATLANTIC Golden Crab Fishery of the South Atlantic Region § 622.247 Landing golden crab intact. The... ashore. (a) A golden crab in or from the South Atlantic EEZ must be maintained in whole condition...

  11. Acoustic emissions during deformation of intact and jointed welded tuff

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holcomb, D. J.; Teufel, L. W.

    1982-07-01

    Monitoring of acoustic emissions (AE) has been widely used as a means of detecting failure in intact rock. For intact rock the technique is simple, because an increasing rate of AE is usually a sign of impending failure. However, most large rock masses contain numerous joints and the behavior of the joints controls the properties of the rock mass In particular, the failure mode often becomes stable or unstable slip (stick-slip) on a joint at stresses well below those required for failure of the intact rock. As an aid to understanding and monitoring the behavior of jointed rock masses, we have done a series of experiments on intact and artificially jointed samples of Grouse Canyon tuff. The tuff was selected because it is under consideration as a disposal medium for nuclear wastes. The samples were instrumented to measure axial and transverse displacements and AE rates.

  12. Preparation of Cardiac Extracellular Matrix from an Intact Porcine Heart

    PubMed Central

    Wainwright, John M.; Czajka, Caitlin A.; Patel, Urvi B.; Freytes, Donald O.; Tobita, Kimimasa; Gilbert, Thomas W.

    2010-01-01

    Whole organ engineering would benefit from a three-dimensional scaffold produced from intact organ-specific extracellular matrix (ECM). The microenvironment and architecture provided by such a scaffold would likely support site-appropriate cell differentiation and spatial organization. The methods to produce such scaffolds from intact organs require customized decellularization protocols. In the present study, intact adult porcine hearts were successfully decellularized in less than 10 h using pulsatile retrograde aortic perfusion. Serial perfusion of an enzymatic, nonionic detergent, ionic detergent, and acid solution with hypotonic and hypertonic rinses was used to systematically remove cellular content. The resultant cardiac ECM retained collagen, elastin, and glycosaminoglycans, and mechanical integrity. Cardiac ECM supported the formation of organized chicken cardiomyocyte sarcomere structure in vitro. The intact decellularized porcine heart provides a tissue engineering template that may be beneficial for future preclinical studies and eventual clinical applications. PMID:19702513

  13. Preparation of cardiac extracellular matrix from an intact porcine heart.

    PubMed

    Wainwright, John M; Czajka, Caitlin A; Patel, Urvi B; Freytes, Donald O; Tobita, Kimimasa; Gilbert, Thomas W; Badylak, Stephen F

    2010-06-01

    Whole organ engineering would benefit from a three-dimensional scaffold produced from intact organ-specific extracellular matrix (ECM). The microenvironment and architecture provided by such a scaffold would likely support site-appropriate cell differentiation and spatial organization. The methods to produce such scaffolds from intact organs require customized decellularization protocols. In the present study, intact adult porcine hearts were successfully decellularized in less than 10 h using pulsatile retrograde aortic perfusion. Serial perfusion of an enzymatic, nonionic detergent, ionic detergent, and acid solution with hypotonic and hypertonic rinses was used to systematically remove cellular content. The resultant cardiac ECM retained collagen, elastin, and glycosaminoglycans, and mechanical integrity. Cardiac ECM supported the formation of organized chicken cardiomyocyte sarcomere structure in vitro. The intact decellularized porcine heart provides a tissue engineering template that may be beneficial for future preclinical studies and eventual clinical applications.

  14. Following the Viterbi Path to Deduce Flagellar Actin-Interacting Proteins of Leishmania spp.: Report on Cofilins and Twinfilins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pacheco, Ana Carolina L.; Araújo, Fabiana F.; Kamimura, Michel T.; Medeiros, Sarah R.; Viana, Daniel A.; Oliveira, Fátima de Cássia E.; Filho, Raimundo Araújo; Costa, Marcília P.; Oliveira, Diana M.

    2007-11-01

    For performing vital cellular processes, such as motility, eukaryotic cells rely on the actin cytoskeleton, whose structure and dynamics are tightly controlled by a large number of actin-interacting (AIP) or actin-related/regulating (ARP) proteins. Trypanosomatid protozoa, such as Leishmania, rely on their flagellum for motility and sensory reception, which are believed to allow parasite migration, adhesion, invasion and even persistence on mammalian host tissues to cause disease. Actin can determine cell stiffness and transmit force during mechanotransduction, cytokinesis, cell motility and other cellular shape changes, while the identification and analyses of AIPs can help to improve understanding of their mechanical properties on physiological architectures, such as the present case regarding Leishmania flagellar apparatus. This work conveniently apply bioinformatics tools in some refined pattern recognition techniques (such as hidden Markov models (HMMs) through the Viterbi algorithm/path) in order to improve the recognition of actin-binding/interacting activity through identification of AIPs in genomes, transcriptomes and proteomes of Leishmania species. We here report cofilin and twinfilin as putative components of the flagellar apparatus, a direct bioinformatics contribution in the secondary annotation of Leishmania and trypanosomatid genomes.

  15. The de novo synthesis of GDP-fucose is essential for flagellar adhesion and cell growth in Trypanosoma brucei.

    PubMed

    Turnock, Daniel C; Izquierdo, Luis; Ferguson, Michael A J

    2007-09-28

    The protozoan parasite Trypanosoma brucei causes human African sleeping sickness in sub-Saharan Africa. The parasite makes several essential glycoproteins, which has led to the investigation of the sugar nucleotides and glycosyltransferases required to synthesize these structures. Fucose is a common sugar in glycoconjugates from many organisms; however, the sugar nucleotide donor GDP-fucose was only recently detected in T. brucei, and the importance of fucose metabolism in this organism is not known. In this paper, we identified the genes encoding functional GDP-fucose biosynthesis enzymes in T. brucei and created conditional null mutants of TbGMD, the gene encoding the first enzyme in the pathway from GDP-mannose to GDP-fucose, in both bloodstream form and procyclic form parasites. Under nonpermissive conditions, both life cycle forms of the parasite became depleted in GDP-fucose and suffered growth arrest, demonstrating that fucose metabolism is essential to both life cycle stages. In procyclic form parasites, flagellar detachment from the cell body was also observed under nonpermissive conditions, suggesting that fucose plays a significant role in flagellar adhesion. Fluorescence microscopy of epitope-tagged TbGMD revealed that this enzyme is localized in glycosomes, despite the absence of PTS-1 or PTS-2 target sequences.

  16. Properties of flagellar "rigor waves" formed by abrupt removal of adenosine triphosphate from actively swimming sea urchin sperm.

    PubMed

    Gibbons, B H; Gibbons, I R

    1974-12-01

    Sea urchin sperm were demembranated and reactivated with a solution containing 0.04% Triton X-100 and 0.03 mM ATP. The ATP concentration was then lowered abruptly by diluting the sperm suspension 50-fold into reactivating solution containing no ATP. The flagella of the sperm in the diluted suspension were not motile, but they were bent into a variety of stationary rigor wave forms closely resembling the wave forms occurring at different stages of the flagellar bending cycle during normal movement. The form of these rigor waves was unchanged upon storage for several hours in the presence of dithiothreitol and EDTA. Addition of 1 microM ATP induced slow relaxation of the waves, with most of the sperm becoming partially straightened over a period of about 30 min; somewhat higher concentrations gave a more rapid and complete relaxation. Concentrations of ATP above 10 microM induced resumption of normal beating movements. Addition of ITP, GTP, or GDP (up to 1 mM) produced no relaxation of the rigor waves. Digestion with trypsin to an extent sufficient to disrupt the radial spokes and the nexin links caused no change in the rigor wave forms, suggesting that these wave forms could be maintained by the dynein cross-bridges between the outer doublet tubules of the flagellar axoneme. Study of the effects of viscous shear on the rigor wave axonemes has shown that they are resistant to distortion by bending, although they can be twisted relatively easily.

  17. A conserved flagellar pocket exposed high mannose moiety is used by African trypanosomes as a host cytokine binding molecule.

    PubMed

    Magez, S; Radwanska, M; Stijlemans, B; Xong, H V; Pays, E; De Baetselier, P

    2001-09-07

    Trypanosomes use antigenic variation of their variant-specific surface glycoprotein (VSG) coat as defense against the host immune system. However, in order to sustain their growth, they need to expose conserved epitopes, allowing host macromolecule binding and receptor-mediated endocytosis. Here we show that Trypanosoma brucei uses the conserved chitobiose-oligomannose (GlcNAc(2)-Man(5-9)) moieties of its VSG as a binding ligand for tumor necrosis factor (TNF), a host cytokine with lectin-like properties. As endocytosis in trypanosomes is restricted to the flagellar pocket, we show that soluble flagellar pocket extracts, and in particular soluble VSG, inhibit the binding of (125)I-TNF to trypanosomes. The interaction between TNF and VSG is confirmed by affinity chromatography, biosensor, and dot-blot affinity measurements, and soluble VSG inhibition of TNF-mediated trypanolysis. In all approaches, removal of N-linked carbohydrates abrogates the TNF-VSG interaction. In addition, synthetic high mannose oligosaccharides can block TNF-VSG interactions, and a VSG glycopeptide carrying the GlcNAc(2)-Man(5-9) moiety is shown to inhibit TNF-mediated trypanosome killing in mixed parasite/macrophage cell cultures. Together, these results support the observation that TNF plays a role in growth control of trypanosomes and, moreover, suggest that, by the use of conserved VSG carbohydrates as lectin-binding epitopes, trypanosomes can limit the necessity to express large numbers of invariant surface exposed receptors.

  18. CsrA-FliW interaction governs flagellin homeostasis and a checkpoint on flagellar morphogenesis in Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Sampriti; Yakhnin, Helen; Kysela, Dave; Sokoloski, Josh; Babitzke, Paul; Kearns, Daniel B.

    2011-01-01

    CsrA is a widely distributed RNA binding protein that regulates translation initiation and/or mRNA stability of target transcripts. CsrA activity is antagonized by sRNA(s) containing multiple CsrA binding sites in several Gram-negative bacterial species. Here we discover FliW, the first protein antagonist of CsrA activity that constitutes a partner switching mechanism to control flagellin synthesis in the Gram-positive organism Bacillus subtilis. Following the flagellar assembly checkpoint of hook completion, secretion of flagellin (Hag) releases FliW protein from a FliW-Hag complex. FliW then binds to CsrA and relieves CsrA-mediated translational repression of hag for flagellin synthesis concurrent with filament assembly. Thus, flagellin homeostatically restricts its own translation. Homeostatic autoregulation may be a general mechanism to precisely control structural subunits required at specific times and in finite amounts such as those involved in the assembly of flagella, type III secretion machines, and pili. Finally, phylogenetic analysis suggests that CsrA, a highly pleiotropic virulence regulator in many bacterial pathogens, had an ancestral role in flagellar assembly and evolved to co-regulate various cellular processes with motility. PMID:21895793

  19. A flagellar A-kinase anchoring protein with two amphipathic helices forms a structural scaffold in the radial spoke complex

    PubMed Central

    Sivadas, Priyanka; Dienes, Jennifer M.; St. Maurice, Martin; Meek, William D.

    2012-01-01

    A-kinase anchoring proteins (AKAPs) contain an amphipathic helix (AH) that binds the dimerization and docking (D/D) domain, RIIa, in cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA). Many AKAPs were discovered solely based on the AH–RIIa interaction in vitro. An RIIa or a similar Dpy-30 domain is also present in numerous diverged molecules that are implicated in critical processes as diverse as flagellar beating, membrane trafficking, histone methylation, and stem cell differentiation, yet these molecules remain poorly characterized. Here we demonstrate that an AKAP, RSP3, forms a dimeric structural scaffold in the flagellar radial spoke complex, anchoring through two distinct AHs, the RIIa and Dpy-30 domains, in four non-PKA spoke proteins involved in the assembly and modulation of the complex. Interestingly, one AH can bind both RIIa and Dpy-30 domains in vitro. Thus, AHs and D/D domains constitute a versatile yet potentially promiscuous system for localizing various effector mechanisms. These results greatly expand the current concept about anchoring mechanisms and AKAPs. PMID:23148234

  20. Purification and characterization of the flagellar hook-basal body complex of Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Kubori, T; Okumura, M; Kobayashi, N; Nakamura, D; Iwakura, M; Aizawa, S I

    1997-04-01

    The flagellar hook-basal body (HBB) complex of the Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus subtilis was purified and analysed by electron microscopy, gel electrophoresis, and amino acid sequencing of the major component proteins. The purified HBB complex consisted of the inner (M and S) rings, a rod and a hook. There were no outer (P and L) rings that are found in Gram-negative bacteria. The hook was 15 nm in thickness and 70 nm in length, which is thinner and longer than the hook of Salmonella typhimurium. The hook protein had an apparent molecular mass of 29 kDa, and its N-terminal sequence was identical to that of B. subtilis FIgG, which was previously reported as a rod protein. The sequence of the reported FIgG protein of B. subtilis is more closely related to that of FIgE (the hook protein) rather than FIgG (the rod protein) of S. typhimurium, in spite of the difference of the apparent molecular masses between the two hook proteins (29 kDa versus 42 kDa). The hook-basal body contained six major proteins (with apparent molecular masses of 82, 59, 35, 32, 29 and 20 kDa) and two minor proteins (23 kDa and 13 kDa), which consistently appeared from preparation to preparation. The N-terminus of each of these proteins was sequenced. Comparison with protein databases revealed the following polypeptide-gene correspondences: 82 kDa, fIiF; 59 kDa, fIgK; 35 kDa, orfF; 32 kDa, yqhF; 23 kDa, orf3 of the fIaA locus; 20 kDa, fIgB and fIgC; 13 kDa, not determined. The band at 20 kDa was a mixture of FIgB and FIgC, as revealed by two-dimensional gel analysis. Characteristic features of B. subtilis HBB are discussed in comparison with those of S. typhimiurium.

  1. Characterization of Calflagin, a Flagellar Calcium-Binding Protein from Trypanosoma congolense

    PubMed Central

    Eyford, Brett A.; Kaufman, Laura; Salama-Alber, Orly; Loveless, Bianca; Pope, Matthew E.; Burke, Robert D.; Matovu, Enock; Boulanger, Martin J.; Pearson, Terry W.

    2016-01-01

    Background Identification of species-specific trypanosome molecules is important for laboratory- and field-based research into epidemiology and disease diagnosis. Although Trypanosoma congolense is the most important trypanosome pathogen of cattle in Africa, no species-specific molecules found in infective bloodstream forms (BSF) of the parasites have been identified, thus limiting development of diagnostic tests. Methods Immuno-mass spectrometric methods were used to identify a protein that is recognized by a T. congolense-specific monoclonal antibody (mAb) Tc6/42.6.4. The identified molecule was expressed as a recombinant protein in E. coli and was tested in several immunoassays for its ability to interact with the mAb. The three dimensional structure of the protein was modeled and compared to crystal- and NMR-structures of the homologous proteins from T. cruzi and T. brucei respectively, in order to examine structural differences leading to the different immunoreactivity of the T. congolense molecule. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) were used to measure antibodies produced by trypanosome-infected African cattle in order to assess the potential for use of T. congolense calflagin in a serodiagnostic assay. Results The antigen recognized by the T. congolense-specific mAb Tc6/42.6.4 was identified as a flagellar calcium-binding protein, calflagin. The recombinant molecule showed immunoreactivity with the T. congolense-specific mAb confirming that it is the cognate antigen. Immunofluorescence experiments revealed that Ca2+ modulated the localization of the calflagin molecule in trypanosomes. Structural modelling and comparison with calflagin homologues from other trypanosomatids revealed four non-conserved regions on the surface of the T. congolense molecule that due to differences in surface chemistry and structural topography may form species-specific epitopes. ELISAs using the recombinant calflagin as antigen to detect antibodies in trypanosome

  2. Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor Density in Cognitively Intact Subjects at an Early Stage of Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Isaias, Ioannis Ugo; Spiegel, Jörg; Brumberg, Joachim; Cosgrove, Kelly P.; Marotta, Giorgio; Oishi, Naoya; Higuchi, Takahiro; Küsters, Sebastian; Schiller, Markus; Dillmann, Ulrich; van Dyck, Christopher H.; Buck, Andreas; Herrmann, Ken; Schloegl, Susanne; Volkmann, Jens; Lassmann, Michael; Fassbender, Klaus; Lorenz, Reinhard; Samnick, Samuel

    2014-01-01

    We investigated in vivo brain nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) distribution in cognitively intact subjects with Parkinson’s disease (PD) at an early stage of the disease. Fourteen patients and 13 healthy subjects were imaged with single photon emission computed tomography and the radiotracer 5-[123I]iodo-3-[2(S)-2-azetidinylmethoxy]pyridine ([123I]5IA). Patients were selected according to several criteria, including short duration of motor signs (<7 years) and normal scores at an extensive neuropsychological evaluation. In PD patients, nAChR density was significantly higher in the putamen, the insular cortex and the supplementary motor area and lower in the caudate nucleus, the orbitofrontal cortex, and the middle temporal gyrus. Disease duration positively correlated with nAChR density in the putamen ipsilateral (ρ = 0.56, p < 0.05) but not contralateral (ρ = 0.49, p = 0.07) to the clinically most affected hemibody. We observed, for the first time in vivo, higher nAChR density in brain regions of the motor and limbic basal ganglia circuits of subjects with PD. Our findings support the notion of an up-regulated cholinergic activity at the striatal and possibly cortical level in cognitively intact PD patients at an early stage of disease. PMID:25177294

  3. Bacillus subtilis Bactofilins Are Essential for Flagellar Hook- and Filament Assembly and Dynamically Localize into Structures of Less than 100 nm Diameter underneath the Cell Membrane

    PubMed Central

    El Andari, Jihad; Altegoer, Florian; Bange, Gert; Graumann, Peter L.

    2015-01-01

    Bactofilins are a widely conserved protein family implicated in cell shape maintenance and in bacterial motility. We show that the bactofilins BacE and BacF from Bacillus subtilis are essential for motility. The proteins are required for the establishment of flagellar hook- and filament structures, but apparently not for the formation of basal bodies. Functional YFP fusions to BacE and to BacF localize as discrete assemblies at the B. subtilis cell membrane, and have a diameter of 60 to 70 nm. BacF assemblies are relatively static, and partially colocalize with flagellar basal bodies, while BacE assemblies are fewer per cell than those of BacF and are highly mobile. Tracking of BacE foci showed that the assemblies arrest at a single point for a few hundred milliseconds, showing that a putative interaction with flagellar structures would be transient and fast. When overexpressed or expressed in a heterologous cell system, bactofilins can form filamentous structures, and also form multimers as purified proteins. Our data reveal a propensity for bactofilins to form filaments, however, in B. subtilis cells, bactofilins assemble into defined size assemblies that show a dynamic localization pattern and play a role in flagellar assembly. PMID:26517549

  4. The 3D Structure of the Apical Complex and Association with the Flagellar Apparatus Revealed by Serial TEM Tomography in Psammosa pacifica, a Distant Relative of the Apicomplexa

    PubMed Central

    Okamoto, Noriko; Keeling, Patrick J.

    2014-01-01

    The apical complex is one of the defining features of apicomplexan parasites, including the malaria parasite Plasmodium, where it mediates host penetration and invasion. The apical complex is also known in a few related lineages, including several non-parasitic heterotrophs, where it mediates feeding behaviour. The origin of the apical complex is unclear, and one reason for this is that in apicomplexans it exists in only part of the life cycle, and never simultaneously with other major cytoskeletal structures like flagella and basal bodies. Here, we used conventional TEM and serial TEM tomography to reconstruct the three dimensional structure of the apical complex in Psammosa pacifica, a predatory relative of apicomplexans and dinoflagellates that retains the archetype apical complex and the flagellar apparatus simultaneously. The P. pacifica apical complex is associated with the gullet and consists of the pseudoconoid, micronemes, and electron dense vesicles. The pseudoconoid is a convex sheet consisting of eight short microtubules, plus a band made up of microtubules that originate from the flagellar apparatus. The flagellar apparatus consists of three microtubular roots. One of the microtubular roots attached to the posterior basal body is connected to bypassing microtubular strands, which are themselves connected to the extension of the pseudoconoid. These complex connections where the apical complex is an extension of the flagellar apparatus, reflect the ancestral state of both, dating back to the common ancestor of apicaomplexans and dinoflagellates. PMID:24392150

  5. Motor evoked potentials enable differentiation between motor and sensory branches of peripheral nerves in animal experiments.

    PubMed

    Turkof, Edvin; Jurasch, Nikita; Knolle, Erik; Schwendenwein, Ilse; Habib, Danja; Unger, Ewald; Reichel, Martin; Losert, Udo

    2006-10-01

    Differentiation between motor and sensory fascicles is frequently necessary in reconstructive peripheral nerve surgery. The goal of this experimental study was to verify if centrally motor evoked potentials (MEP) could be implemented to differentiate sensory from motor fascicles, despite the well-known intermingling between nerve fascicles along their course to their distant periphery. This new procedure would enable surgeons to use MEP for placing nerve grafts at corresponding fascicles in the proximal and distal stumps without the need to use time-consuming staining. In ten sheep, both ulnar nerves were exposed at the terminal bifurcation between the last sensory and motor branch. Animals were then relaxed to avoid volume conduction. On central stimulation, the evoked nerve compound action potentials were simultaneously recorded from both terminal branches. In all cases, neurogenic motor nerve action potentials were recorded only from the terminal motor branch. The conclusion was that MEPs can be used for intraoperative differentiation between sensory and motor nerves. Further studies are necessary to develop this method for in situ measurements on intact nerve trunks.

  6. Gross motor control

    MedlinePlus

    Gross motor control is the ability to make large, general movements (such as waving an arm or lifting a ... Gross motor control is a milestone in the development of an infant. Infants develop gross motor control before they ...

  7. Starting motor

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, T.; Hamano, I

    1989-05-23

    This patent describes a starting motor having a housing, planetary reduction gears including an internal gear in the housing. The improvement consists of an elastic member having a first annular portion mounted in engagement with a fixed annular member of the housing and a plurality of protruding axially extending elastic portions providing a corrugated surface pressed into engagement with an end portion of the internal gear, the elastic member being sandwiched between the internal gear and the housing member, the protruding axially extending elastic portions providing resilient means which flex and incline circumferentially under turning force from the internal gear and exert reactive thrust on the internal gear elastically so that the frictional force at the abutting surfaces of the protruding portions holds the internal gear in resilient engagement with the elastic member and the resilient means acts as a buffer to absorb rotary impact force developing in the planetary reduction gears.

  8. Structural Insights into Membrane Targeting by the Flagellar Calcium-binding Protein (FCaBP) a Myristoylated and Palmitoylated Calcium Sensor in Trypanosoma cruzi

    SciTech Connect

    J Wingard; J Ladner; M Vanarotti; A Fisher; H Robinson; K Buchanan; D Engman; J Ames

    2011-12-31

    The flagellar calcium-binding protein (FCaBP) of the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi is targeted to the flagellar membrane where it regulates flagellar function and assembly. As a first step toward understanding the Ca{sup 2+}-induced conformational changes important for membrane-targeting, we report here the x-ray crystal structure of FCaBP in the Ca{sup 2+}-free state determined at 2.2{angstrom} resolution. The first 17 residues from the N terminus appear unstructured and solvent-exposed. Residues implicated in membrane targeting (Lys-19, Lys-22, and Lys-25) are flanked by an exposed N-terminal helix (residues 26-37), forming a patch of positive charge on the protein surface that may interact electrostatically with flagellar membrane targets. The four EF-hands in FCaBP each adopt a 'closed conformation' similar to that seen in Ca{sup 2+}-free calmodulin. The overall fold of FCaBP is closest to that of grancalcin and other members of the penta EF-hand superfamily. Unlike the dimeric penta EF-hand proteins, FCaBP lacks a fifth EF-hand and is monomeric. The unstructured N-terminal region of FCaBP suggests that its covalently attached myristoyl group at the N terminus may be solvent-exposed, in contrast to the highly sequestered myristoyl group seen in recoverin and GCAP1. NMR analysis demonstrates that the myristoyl group attached to FCaBP is indeed solvent-exposed in both the Ca{sup 2+}-free and Ca{sup 2+}-bound states, and myristoylation has no effect on protein structure and folding stability. We propose that exposed acyl groups at the N terminus may anchor FCaBP to the flagellar membrane and that Ca{sup 2+}-induced conformational changes may control its binding to membrane-bound protein targets..

  9. Regulation of flagellar, motility and chemotaxis genes in Rhizobium leguminosarum by the VisN/R-Rem cascade.

    PubMed

    Tambalo, Dinah D; Del Bel, Kate L; Bustard, Denise E; Greenwood, Paige R; Steedman, Audrey E; Hynes, Michael F

    2010-06-01

    In this paper, we describe the regulatory roles of VisN, VisR and Rem in the expression of flagellar, motility and chemotaxis genes in Rhizobium leguminosarum biovar viciae strains VF39SM and 3841. Individual mutations in the genes encoding these proteins resulted in a loss of motility and an absence of flagella, indicating that these regulatory genes are essential for flagellar synthesis and function. Transcriptional experiments involving gusA-gene fusions in wild-type and mutant backgrounds were performed to identify the genes under VisN/R and Rem regulation. Results showed that the chemotaxis and motility genes of R. leguminosarum could be separated into two groups: one group under VisN/R-Rem regulation and another group that is independent of this regulation. VisN and VisR regulate the expression of rem, while Rem positively regulates the expression of flaA, flaB, flaC, flaD, motA, motB, che1 and mcpD. All of these genes except mcpD are located within the main motility and chemotaxis gene cluster of R. leguminosarum. Other chemotaxis and motility genes, which are found outside of the main motility gene cluster (che2 operon, flaH for VF39SM, and flaG) or are plasmid-borne (flaE and mcpC), are not part of the VisN/R-Rem regulatory cascade. In addition, all genes exhibited the same regulation pattern in 3841 and in VF39SM, except flaE and flaH. flaE is not regulated by VisN/R-Rem in 3841 but it is repressed by Rem in VF39SM. flaH is under VisN/R-Rem regulation in 3841, but not in VF39SM. A kinetics experiment demonstrated that a subset of the flagellar genes is continuously expressed in all growth phases, indicating the importance of continuous motility for R. leguminosarum under free-living conditions. On the other hand, motility is repressed under symbiotic conditions. Nodulation experiments showed that the transcriptional activators VisN and Rem are dramatically downregulated in the nodules, suggesting that the symbiotic downregulation of motility-related genes

  10. Extracellularly identifying motor neurons for a muscle motor pool in Aplysia californica.

    PubMed

    Lu, Hui; McManus, Jeffrey M; Chiel, Hillel J

    2013-03-25

    In animals with large identified neurons (e.g. mollusks), analysis of motor pools is done using intracellular techniques. Recently, we developed a technique to extracellularly stimulate and record individual neurons in Aplysia californica. We now describe a protocol for using this technique to uniquely identify and characterize motor neurons within a motor pool. This extracellular technique has advantages. First, extracellular electrodes can stimulate and record neurons through the sheath, so it does not need to be removed. Thus, neurons will be healthier in extracellular experiments than in intracellular ones. Second, if ganglia are rotated by appropriate pinning of the sheath, extracellular electrodes can access neurons on both sides of the ganglion, which makes it easier and more efficient to identify multiple neurons in the same preparation. Third, extracellular electrodes do not need to penetrate cells, and thus can be easily moved back and forth among neurons, causing less damage to them. This is especially useful when one tries to record multiple neurons during repeating motor patterns that may only persist for minutes. Fourth, extracellular electrodes are more flexible than intracellular ones during muscle movements. Intracellular electrodes may pull out and damage neurons during muscle contractions. In contrast, since extracellular electrodes are gently pressed onto the sheath above neurons, they usually stay above the same neuron during muscle contractions, and thus can be used in more intact preparations. To uniquely identify motor neurons for a motor pool (in particular, the I1/I3 muscle in Aplysia) using extracellular electrodes, one can use features that do not require intracellular measurements as criteria: soma size and location, axonal projection, and muscle innervation. For the particular motor pool used to illustrate the technique, we recorded from buccal nerves 2 and 3 to measure axonal projections, and measured the contraction forces of the I1

  11. Vulnerability of ecosystems to climate change moderated by habitat intactness.

    PubMed

    Eigenbrod, Felix; Gonzalez, Patrick; Dash, Jadunandan; Steyl, Ilse

    2015-01-01

    The combined effects of climate change and habitat loss represent a major threat to species and ecosystems around the world. Here, we analyse the vulnerability of ecosystems to climate change based on current levels of habitat intactness and vulnerability to biome shifts, using multiple measures of habitat intactness at two spatial scales. We show that the global extent of refugia depends highly on the definition of habitat intactness and spatial scale of the analysis of intactness. Globally, 28% of terrestrial vegetated area can be considered refugia if all natural vegetated land cover is considered. This, however, drops to 17% if only areas that are at least 50% wilderness at a scale of 48×48 km are considered and to 10% if only areas that are at least 50% wilderness at a scale of 4.8×4.8 km are considered. Our results suggest that, in regions where relatively large, intact wilderness areas remain (e.g. Africa, Australia, boreal regions, South America), conservation of the remaining large-scale refugia is the priority. In human-dominated landscapes, (e.g. most of Europe, much of North America and Southeast Asia), focusing on finer scale refugia is a priority because large-scale wilderness refugia simply no longer exist. Action to conserve such refugia is particularly urgent since only 1 to 2% of global terrestrial vegetated area is classified as refugia and at least 50% covered by the global protected area network.

  12. Structural and molecular interrogation of intact biological systems

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Kwanghun; Wallace, Jenelle; Kim, Sung-Yon; Kalyanasundaram, Sandhiya; Andalman, Aaron S.; Davidson, Thomas J.; Mirzabekov, Julie J.; Zalocusky, Kelly A.; Mattis, Joanna; Denisin, Aleksandra K.; Pak, Sally; Bernstein, Hannah; Ramakrishnan, Charu; Grosenick, Logan; Gradinaru, Viviana; Deisseroth, Karl

    2014-01-01

    Obtaining high-resolution information from a complex system, while maintaining the global perspective needed to understand system function, represents a key challenge in biology. Here we address this challenge with a method (termed CLARITY) for the transformation of intact tissue into a nanoporous hydrogel-hybridized form (crosslinked to a three-dimensional network of hydrophilic polymers) that is fully assembled but optically transparent and macromolecule-permeable. Using mouse brains, we show intact-tissue imaging of long-range projections, local circuit wiring, cellular relationships, subcellular structures, protein complexes, nucleic acids and neurotransmitters. CLARITY also enables intact-tissue in situ hybridization, immunohistochemistry with multiple rounds of staining and de-staining in non-sectioned tissue, and antibody labelling throughout the intact adult mouse brain. Finally, we show that CLARITY enables fine structural analysis of clinical samples, including non-sectioned human tissue from a neuropsychiatric-disease setting, establishing a path for the transmutation of human tissue into a stable, intact and accessible form suitable for probing structural and molecular underpinnings of physiological function and disease. PMID:23575631

  13. Motor control for a brushless DC motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, William J. (Inventor); Faulkner, Dennis T. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    This invention relates to a motor control system for a brushless DC motor having an inverter responsively coupled to the motor control system and in power transmitting relationship to the motor. The motor control system includes a motor rotor speed detecting unit that provides a pulsed waveform signal proportional to rotor speed. This pulsed waveform signal is delivered to the inverter to thereby cause an inverter fundamental current waveform output to the motor to be switched at a rate proportional to said rotor speed. In addition, the fundamental current waveform is also pulse width modulated at a rate proportional to the rotor speed. A fundamental current waveform phase advance circuit is controllingly coupled to the inverter. The phase advance circuit is coupled to receive the pulsed waveform signal from the motor rotor speed detecting unit and phase advance the pulsed waveform signal as a predetermined function of motor speed to thereby cause the fundamental current waveform to be advanced and thereby compensate for fundamental current waveform lag due to motor winding reactance which allows the motor to operate at higher speeds than the motor is rated while providing optimal torque and therefore increased efficiency.

  14. Tracking tagged molecules in single neurons in intact zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Armisen, Ricardo; Gleason, Michelle R; Fetcho, Joseph R; Mandel, Gail

    2007-08-01

    INTRODUCTIONThis protocol describes an approach for monitoring the movement of tagged molecules in single neurons in intact embryonic and larval zebrafish. The intact preparation provides a meaningful context for the physiological event being studied. Other advantages offered by the young zebrafish include direct in vivo imaging, the ability to produce large numbers of labeled embryos easily using microinjection, and the existence of identified sensory circuits that can be exploited to activate a particular cell type. One limitation of this system is the fragility of 2- to 3-d-old embryos, which demands delicate physical manipulation of the fish during all stages preceding and during the experiment. In contrast to brain slices or isolated cells, nearly all original neural connections and sensory components are maintained in the intact preparation, so the occurrence of a downstream event may be precluded (or its manifestation enhanced) by some complex interplay of biological processes that are not fully understood.

  15. Intact mirror-tracing and impaired rotary-pursuit skill learning in patients with Huntington's disease: evidence for dissociable memory systems in skill learning.

    PubMed

    Gabrieli, J D; Stebbins, G T; Singh, J; Willingham, D B; Goetz, C G

    1997-04-01

    Skill learning in early-stage Huntington's disease (HD) patients was compared with that of normal controls on 2 perceptual-motor tasks, rotary pursuit and mirror tracing. HD patients demonstrated a dissociation between impaired rotary-pursuit and intact mirror-tracing skill learning. These results suggest that different forms of perceptual-motor skill learning are mediated by separable neural circuits. A striatal memory system may be essential for sequence or open-loop skill learning but not for skills that involve the closed-loop learning of novel visual-response mappings. It is hypothesized that working memory deficits in HD resulting from frontostriatal damage may account broadly for intact and impaired long-term learning and memory in HD patients.

  16. The effects of flagellar hook compliance on motility of monotrichous bacteria: A modeling study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shum, H.; Gaffney, E. A.

    2012-06-01

    A crucial structure in the motility of flagellated bacteria is the hook, which connects the flagellum filament to the motor in the cell body. Early mathematical models of swimming bacteria assume that the helically shaped flagellum rotates rigidly about its axis, which coincides with the axis of the cell body. Motivated by evidence that the hook is much more flexible than the rest of the flagellum, we develop a new model that allows a naturally straight hook to bend. Hook dynamics are based on the Kirchhoff rod model, which is combined with a boundary element method for solving viscous interactions between the bacterium and the surrounding fluid. For swimming in unbounded fluid, we find good support for using a rigid model since the hook reaches an equilibrium configuration within several revolutions of the motor. However, for effective swimming, there are constraints on the hook stiffness relative to the scale set by the product of the motor torque with the hook length. When the hook is too flexible, its shape cannot be maintained and large deformations and stresses build up. When the hook is too rigid, the flagellum does not align with the cell body axis and the cell "wobbles" with little net forward motion. We also examine the attraction of swimmers to no-slip surfaces and find that the tendency to swim steadily close to a surface can be very sensitive to the combination of the hook rigidity and the precise shape of the cell and flagellum.

  17. An outer arm dynein light chain acts in a conformational switch for flagellar motility

    PubMed Central

    Patel-King, Ramila S.

    2009-01-01

    A system distinct from the central pair–radial spoke complex was proposed to control outer arm dynein function in response to alterations in the mechanical state of the flagellum. In this study, we examine the role of a Chlamydomonas reinhardtii outer arm dynein light chain that associates with the motor domain of the γ heavy chain (HC). We demonstrate that expression of mutant forms of LC1 yield dominant-negative effects on swimming velocity, as the flagella continually beat out of phase and stall near or at the power/recovery stroke switchpoint. Furthermore, we observed that LC1 interacts directly with tubulin in a nucleotide-independent manner and tethers this motor unit to the A-tubule of the outer doublet microtubules within the axoneme. Therefore, this dynein HC is attached to the same microtubule by two sites: via both the N-terminal region and the motor domain. We propose that this γ HC–LC1–microtubule ternary complex functions as a conformational switch to control outer arm activity. PMID:19620633

  18. Self-Oligomerizing Structure of the Flagellar Cap Protein FliD and Its Implication in Filament Assembly.

    PubMed

    Song, Wan Seok; Cho, So Yeon; Hong, Ho Jeong; Park, Sun Cheol; Yoon, Sung-Il

    2017-03-24

    FliD is a self-oligomerizing structural protein that caps the growing end of the bacterial flagellar filament. FliD also plays a key role in the flagellar system by continuously adding a new flagellin protein to the tip of the filament. To structurally characterize FliD oligomerization and to provide a FliD-mediated flagellin polymerization mechanism, we have determined the crystal structures of FliD proteins from Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (ecFliD and stFliD, respectively). ecFliD consists of three domains (D1, D2, and D3) and forms a hexamer plate of the D2 and D3 domains that resembles a six-pointed star with legs consisting of the D1 domain. In contrast, the D2 and D3 domains of stFliD assemble into a pentamer as a five-pointed star plate. Despite their distinct oligomeric states, ecFliD and stFliD engage a common molecular surface for oligomerization. FliD also features interdomain and intersubunit flexibility, suggesting that FliD reorganizes its domains and adjacent subunits depending on the FliD binding partner. The similarity of the FliD shape to flagellin and the structural dynamics of FliD led us to propose a FliD-catalyzed filament elongation mechanism. In this model, FliD occupies a position in place of a nascent flagellin until the flagellin reaches the growing end of the filament, and then, FliD moves aside to repeat the positional replacement.

  19. Synthetic Cystic Fibrosis Sputum Medium Regulates Flagellar Biosynthesis through the flhF Gene in Burkholderia cenocepacia

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Brijesh; Cardona, Silvia T.

    2016-01-01

    Burkholderia cenocepacia belongs to the Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc), a group of at least 18 distinct species that establish chronic infections in the lung of people with the genetic disease cystic fibrosis (CF). The sputum of CF patients is rich in amino acids and was previously shown to increase flagellar gene expression in B. cenocepacia. We examined flagellin expression and flagellar morphology of B. cenocepacia grown in synthetic cystic fibrosis sputum medium (SCFM) compared to minimal medium. We found that CF nutritional conditions induce increased motility and flagellin expression. Individual amino acids added at the same concentrations as found in SCFM also increased motility but not flagellin expression, suggesting a chemotactic effect of amino acids. Electron microscopy and flagella staining demonstrated that the increase in flagellin corresponds to a change in the number of flagella per cell. In minimal medium, the ratio of multiple: single: aflagellated cells was 2:3.5:4.5; while under SCFM conditions, the ratio was 7:2:1. We created a deletion mutant, ΔflhF, to study whether this putative GTPase regulates the flagellation pattern of B. cenocepacia K56-2 during growth in CF conditions. The ΔflhF mutant exhibited 80% aflagellated, 14% single and 6% multiple flagellated bacterial subpopulations. Moreover, the ratio of multiple to single flagella in WT and ΔflhF was 3.5 and 0.43, respectively in CF conditions. The observed differences suggest that FlhF positively regulates flagellin expression and the flagellation pattern in B. cenocepacia K56-2 during CF nutritional conditions. PMID:27379216

  20. Pseudomonas fluorescens F113 Can Produce a Second Flagellar Apparatus, Which Is Important for Plant Root Colonization

    PubMed Central

    Barahona, Emma; Navazo, Ana; Garrido-Sanz, Daniel; Muriel, Candela; Martínez-Granero, Francisco; Redondo-Nieto, Miguel; Martín, Marta; Rivilla, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    The genomic sequence of Pseudomonas fluorescens F113 has shown the presence of a 41 kb cluster of genes that encode the production of a second flagellar apparatus. Among 2,535 pseudomonads strains with sequenced genomes, these genes are only present in the genomes of F113 and other six strains, all but one belonging to the P. fluorescens cluster of species, in the form of a genetic island. The genes are homologous to the flagellar genes of the soil bacterium Azotobacter vinelandii. Regulation of these genes is mediated by the flhDC master operon, instead of the typical regulation in pseudomonads, which is through fleQ. Under laboratory conditions, F113 does not produce this flagellum and the flhDC operon is not expressed. However, ectopic expression of the flhDC operon is enough for its production, resulting in a hypermotile strain. This flagellum is also produced under laboratory conditions by the kinB and algU mutants. Genetic analysis has shown that kinB strongly represses the expression of the flhDC operon. This operon is activated by the Vfr protein probably in a c-AMP dependent way. The strains producing this second flagellum are all hypermotile and present a tuft of polar flagella instead of the single polar flagellum produced by the wild-type strain. Phenotypic variants isolated from the rhizosphere produce this flagellum and mutation of the genes encoding it, results in a defect in competitive colonization, showing its importance for root colonization. PMID:27713729

  1. Intact mirror mechanisms for automatic facial emotions in children and adolescents with autism spectrum disorder.

    PubMed

    Schulte-Rüther, Martin; Otte, Ellen; Adigüzel, Kübra; Firk, Christine; Herpertz-Dahlmann, Beate; Koch, Iring; Konrad, Kerstin

    2017-02-01

    It has been suggested that an early deficit in the human mirror neuron system (MNS) is an important feature of autism. Recent findings related to simple hand and finger movements do not support a general dysfunction of the MNS in autism. Studies investigating facial actions (e.g., emotional expressions) have been more consistent, however, mostly relied on passive observation tasks. We used a new variant of a compatibility task for the assessment of automatic facial mimicry responses that allowed for simultaneous control of attention to facial stimuli. We used facial electromyography in 18 children and adolescents with Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and 18 typically developing controls (TDCs). We observed a robust compatibility effect in ASD, that is, the execution of a facial expression was facilitated if a congruent facial expression was observed. Time course analysis of RT distributions and comparison to a classic compatibility task (symbolic Simon task) revealed that the facial compatibility effect appeared early and increased with time, suggesting fast and sustained activation of motor codes during observation of facial expressions. We observed a negative correlation of the compatibility effect with age across participants and in ASD, and a positive correlation between self-rated empathy and congruency for smiling faces in TDC but not in ASD. This pattern of results suggests that basic motor mimicry is intact in ASD, but is not associated with complex social cognitive abilities such as emotion understanding and empathy. Autism Res 2017, 10: 298-310. © 2016 International Society for Autism Research, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Wind motor

    SciTech Connect

    Biscomb, L. I.

    1985-07-09

    A spider-like carrier having at least three generally horizontal arms has a hub mounted to the vertical, rotary-axis input shaft of a load. Each arm has at least one horizontal cross-arm secured to it near its radially outer end, which is supported from the ground by a low-friction support device such as a wheel or set of wheels. Mounted on each arm at the cross-arm or cross-arms is at least one sail, vane, airfoil or similar working member which is erected or spread generally normally to the wind when the respective arm is located for the working member to be blown downwind and is feathered or headed to the wind when the respective arm is located for the working member to be driven upwind. Horizontal axis and vertical axis journalling options for the working members and various sail shapes are shown, including a concave/convex sail and motor-oriented airfoil shape which provides lift when being driven upwind are shown.

  3. Adaptive remodelling by FliN in the bacterial rotary motor

    PubMed Central

    Branch, Richard W.; Sayegh, Michael N.; Shen, Chong; Nathan, Vedavalli S.J.; Berg, Howard C.

    2014-01-01

    Sensory adaptation in the E. coli chemosensory pathway has been the subject of interest for decades, with investigation focusing on the receptors that process extracellular inputs. Recent studies demonstrate that the flagellar motors responsible for cell locomotion also play a role, adding or subtracting FliM subunits to maximise sensitivity to pathway signals. It is difficult to reconcile this FliM remodelling with the observation that partner FliN subunits are relatively static fixtures in the motor. By fusing a fluorescent protein internally to FliN, we show that there is in fact significant FliN remodelling. The kinetics and stoichiometry of FliN in steady-state and in adapting motors are investigated and found to match the behaviour of FliM in all respects except for timescale, where FliN rates are about four times slower. We notice that motor adaptation is slower in the presence of the fluorescent protein, indicating a possible source for the difference. The behaviour of FliM and FliN is consistent with a kinetic and stoichiometric model that contradicts the traditional view of a packed, rigid motor architecture. PMID:25046382

  4. Perceived parental control processes, parent-child relational qualities and psychological well-being of Chinese adolescents in intact and non-intact families in Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Shek, Daniel T L; Lee, Tak Yan

    2007-01-01

    This paper examines whether Chinese adolescents' perceptions (N = 3,017) of parental behavioral control (parental knowledge, expectation, monitoring, discipline, and demandingness as well as parental control based on indigenous Chinese concepts), parental psychological control, parent-child relational qualities (perceived parental trust, child's trust of the parents, child's readiness to communicate with the parents, and child's satisfaction with parental control), and adolescent psychological well-being (hopelessness, mastery, life satisfaction and self-esteem) differed in intact and non-intact families. Results showed that relative to non-intact families, parental behavioral control processes were higher and parent-child relational qualities were better in intact families. In contrast, parental psychological control was higher in non-intact families than in intact families. Finally, the psychological well-being of adolescents in non-intact families was poorer than that of adolescents in intact families.

  5. Three Members of the LC8/DYNLL Family Are Required for Outer Arm Dynein Motor Function

    PubMed Central

    Tanner, Christopher A.; Rompolas, Panteleimon; Patel-King, Ramila S.; Gorbatyuk, Oksana; Wakabayashi, Ken-ichi; Pazour, Gregory J.

    2008-01-01

    The highly conserved LC8/DYNLL family proteins were originally identified in axonemal dyneins and subsequently found to function in multiple enzyme systems. Genomic analysis uncovered a third member (LC10) of this protein class in Chlamydomonas. The LC10 protein is extracted from flagellar axonemes with 0.6 M NaCl and cofractionates with the outer dynein arm in sucrose density gradients. Furthermore, LC10 is specifically missing only from axonemes of those strains that fail to assemble outer dynein arms. Previously, the oda12-1 insertional allele was shown to lack the Tctex2-related dynein light chain LC2. The LC10 gene is located ∼2 kb from that of LC2 and is also completely missing from this mutant but not from oda12-2, which lacks only the 3′ end of the LC2 gene. Although oda12-1 cells assemble outer arms that lack only LC2 and LC10, this strain exhibits a flagellar beat frequency that is consistently less than that observed for strains that fail to assemble the entire outer arm and docking complex (e.g., oda1). These results support a key regulatory role for the intermediate chain/light chain complex that is an integral and highly conserved feature of all oligomeric dynein motors. PMID:18579685

  6. Operative balloon dilatation for pulmonary atresia with intact ventricular septum.

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, J R; Fonseka, S F; Wilson, N; Dickinson, D F; Walker, D R

    1987-01-01

    In six infants with pulmonary atresia and intact ventricular septum operative balloon dilatation was used to achieve continuity between the right ventricle and the main pulmonary artery as the initial procedure. Two of the six subsequently needed an aortico pulmonary shunt. All six are alive and well. Images Fig PMID:3676024

  7. Interleukin 6 in intact and injured mouse peripheral nerves.

    PubMed

    Reichert, F; Levitzky, R; Rotshenker, S

    1996-03-01

    The multifunctional cytokine interleukin 6 (IL-6) has direct growth, survival and differentiation effects on peripheral and central neurons. Furthermore, it can modulate the production by non-neuronal cells of other cytokines and growth factors, and thereby affect nerve cells indirectly. We have studied IL-6 expression and production in intact and injured peripheral nerves of C57/BL/6NHSD mice, which display the normal rapid progression of Wallerian degeneration. The IL-6 mRNA was detected in nerves degenerating in vitro or in vivo, but not in intact nerves. In vitro- and in vivo-degenerating nerve segments and neuroma nerve segments synthesized and secreted IL-6. The onset of IL-6 production was rapid and prolonged. It was detected as early as 2 h after injury and persisted for the entire period of 21 days tested after the injury. Of the non-neuronal cells that reside in intact and injured nerves, macrophages and fibroblasts were the major contributors to IL-6 production. We also studied IL-6 production in intact and injured nerves of mutant C57BL/6-WLD/OLA/NHSD mice, which display very slow progression of Wallerian degeneration. Injured nerves of C57BL/6-WLD/OLA/NHSD mice produced significantly lower amounts of IL-6 than did rapidly degenerating nerves of C57/BL/6NHSD mice.

  8. Fostering Activities of Daily Living by Intact Nursing Home Residents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blair, Charles E.; Glaister, Judy; Brown, Alston; Phillips, Carolyn

    2007-01-01

    We assessed effectiveness of four education programs in providing nursing assistants with ability to produce a therapeutic milieu supportive of intact residents' activities of daily living, positive self-esteem and mood: (1) a combination of Orem's Systems of Nursing Care and Skinner's Applied Behavioral Analysis, (2) Applied Behavioral Analysis,…

  9. Phosphorylation of intact erythrocytes in human muscular dystrophy

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, R.M.; Nigro, M.

    1986-04-01

    The uptake of exogenous /sup 32/Pi into the membrane proteins of intact erythrocytes was measured in 8 patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy. No abnormalities were noted after autoradiographic analysis. This contrasts with earlier results obtained when isolated membranes were phosphorylated with gamma-(/sup 32/P)ATP, and suggests a possible reinterpretation of those experiments.

  10. Threats to intact tropical peatlands and opportunities for their conservation.

    PubMed

    Roucoux, K H; Lawson, I T; Baker, T R; Del Castillo Torres, D; Draper, F C; Lähteenoja, O; Gilmore, M P; Honorio Coronado, E N; Kelly, T J; Mitchard, E T A; Vriesendorp, C

    2017-03-08

    Large, intact areas of tropical peatland are highly threatened at a global scale by the expansion of commercial agriculture and other forms of economic development. Conserving peatlands on a landscape scale, with their hydrology intact, is of international conservation importance to preserve their distinctive biodiversity and ecosystem services, and maintain their resilience to future environmental change. Here, we explore the threats and opportunities for conserving remaining intact tropical peatlands. Our focus therefore largely excludes the peatlands of Indonesia and Malaysia, where extensive deforestation, drainage and conversion to plantation of peat swamp forests over the last few decades means that conservation efforts in this region are reduced to protecting small fragments of the original ecosystem, attempting to restore drained peatlands, or dissuading companies from expanding existing plantations. In contrast, here we focus on a case study, the Pastaza-Marañón Foreland Basin (PMFB) in Peru, which is among the largest known intact tropical peatland landscapes in the world and representative of their vulnerability. Maintenance of the hydrological conditions critical for carbon storage and ecosystem function of peatlands is, in the PMFB, primarily threatened by expansion of commercial agriculture linked to new transport infrastructure that is facilitating access to remote areas. In contrast to Indonesia and Malaysia, there remain opportunities in the PMFB and elsewhere to develop alternative, more sustainable land-use practices. Although some of the peatlands in the PMFB fall within existing legally protected areas, this protection is patchy, weak and not focused on protecting the most carbon-dense areas. New carbon-based conservation funding, developing markets for sustainable peatland products, transferring land title to local communities, and expanding protected areas offer pathways to increased protection for intact tropical peatlands in Amazonia and

  11. Expression of nestin, desmin and vimentin in intact and regenerating muscle spindles of rat hind limb skeletal muscles.

    PubMed

    Cízková, Dana; Soukup, Tomás; Mokrý, Jaroslav

    2009-02-01

    We describe the expression and distribution patterns of nestin, desmin and vimentin in intact and regenerating muscle spindles of the rat hind limb skeletal muscles. Regeneration was induced by intramuscular isotransplantation of extensor digitorum longus (EDL) or soleus muscles from 15-day-old rats into the EDL muscle of adult female inbred Lewis rats. The host muscles with grafts were excised after 7-, 16-, 21- and 29-day survival and immunohistochemically stained. Nestin expression in intact spindles in host muscles was restricted to Schwann cells of sensory and motor nerves. In transplanted muscles, however, nestin expression was also found in regenerating "spindle fibers", 7 and 16 days after grafting. From the 21st day onwards, the regenerated spindle fibers were devoid of nestin immunoreactivity. Desmin was detected in spindle fibers at all developmental stages in regenerating as well as in intact spindles. Vimentin was expressed in cells of the outer and inner capsules of all muscle spindles and in newly formed myoblasts and myotubes of regenerating spindles 7 days after grafting. Our results show that the expression pattern of these intermediate filaments in regenerating spindle fibers corresponds to that found in regenerating extrafusal fibers, which supports our earlier suggestion that they resemble small-diameter extrafusal fibers.

  12. The Multilevel Mixed Intact Group Analysis: A Mixed Method to Seek, Detect, Describe, and Explain Differences Among Intact Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schoonenboom, Judith

    2016-01-01

    Educational innovations often involve intact subgroups, such as school classes or university departments. In small-scale educational evaluation research, typically involving 1 to 20 subgroups, differences among these subgroups are often neglected. This article presents a mixed method from a qualitative perspective, in which differences among…

  13. Electrical stimulation of motor cortex in the uninjured hemisphere after chronic unilateral injury promotes recovery of skilled locomotion through ipsilateral control.

    PubMed

    Carmel, Jason B; Kimura, Hiroki; Martin, John H

    2014-01-08

    Partial injury to the corticospinal tract (CST) causes sprouting of intact axons at their targets, and this sprouting correlates with functional improvement. Electrical stimulation of motor cortex augments sprouting of intact CST axons and promotes functional recovery when applied soon after injury. We hypothesized that electrical stimulation of motor cortex in the intact hemisphere after chronic lesion of the CST in the other hemisphere would restore function through ipsilateral control. To test motor skill, rats were trained and tested to walk on a horizontal ladder with irregularly spaced rungs. Eight weeks after injury, produced by pyramidal tract transection, half of the rats received forelimb motor cortex stimulation of the intact hemisphere. Rats with injury and stimulation had significantly improved forelimb control compared with rats with injury alone and achieved a level of proficiency similar to uninjured rats. To test whether recovery of forelimb function was attributable to ipsilateral control, we selectively inactivated the stimulated motor cortex using the GABA agonist muscimol. The dose of muscimol we used produces strong contralateral but no ipsilateral impairments in naive rats. In rats with injury and stimulation, but not those with injury alone, inactivation caused worsening of forelimb function; the initial deficit was reinstated. These results demonstrate that electrical stimulation can promote recovery of motor function when applied late after injury and that motor control can be exerted from the ipsilateral motor cortex. These results suggest that the uninjured motor cortex could be targeted for brain stimulation in people with large unilateral CST lesions.

  14. Directed flux motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Andrew (Inventor); Punnoose, Andrew (Inventor); Strausser, Katherine (Inventor); Parikh, Neil (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A directed flux motor described utilizes the directed magnetic flux of at least one magnet through ferrous material to drive different planetary gear sets to achieve capabilities in six actuated shafts that are grouped three to a side of the motor. The flux motor also utilizes an interwoven magnet configuration which reduces the overall size of the motor. The motor allows for simple changes to modify the torque to speed ratio of the gearing contained within the motor as well as simple configurations for any number of output shafts up to six. The changes allow for improved manufacturability and reliability within the design.

  15. Characterization of the relationship between polar and lateral flagellar structural genes in the deep-sea bacterium Shewanella piezotolerans WP3.

    PubMed

    Jian, Huahua; Wang, Han; Zeng, Xianping; Xiong, Lei; Wang, Fengping; Xiao, Xiang

    2016-12-22

    Bacteria with a dual flagellar system, which consists of a polar flagellum (PF) and several lateral flagella (LF), have been identified in diverse environments. Nevertheless, whether and how these two flagellar systems interact with each other is largely unknown. In the present study, the relationship between the structural genes for the PF and LF of the deep-sea bacterium Shewanella piezotolerans WP3 was investigated by genetic, phenotypic and phylogenetic analyses. The mutation of PF genes induced the expression of LF genes and the production of LF in liquid medium, while the defective LF genes led to a decrease in PF gene transcription. However, the level of PF flagellin remained unchanged in LF gene mutants. Further investigation showed that the flgH2 gene (encoding LF L-ring protein) can compensate for mutations of the flgH1 gene (encoding PF L-ring protein), but this compensation does not occur between the flagellar hook-filament junction proteins (FlgL1, FlgL2). Swarming motility was shown to specifically require LF genes, and PF genes cannot substitute for the LF genes in the lateral flagella synthesis. Considering the importance of flagella-dependent motility for bacterial survival in the abyssal sediment, our study thus provided a better understanding of the adaptation strategy of benthic bacteria.

  16. Inhibition of tyrosine phosphorylation of sperm flagellar proteins, outer dense fiber protein-2 and tektin-2, is associated with impaired motility during capacitation of hamster spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Mariappa, Daniel; Aladakatti, Ravindranath H; Dasari, Santosh K; Sreekumar, Arun; Wolkowicz, Michael; van der Hoorn, Frans; Seshagiri, Polani B

    2010-02-01

    In mammals, acquisition of fertilization competence of spermatozoa is dependent on the phenomenon of sperm capacitation. One of the critical molecular events of sperm capacitation is protein tyrosine phosphorylation. In a previous study, we demonstrated that a specific epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-tyrosine kinase inhibitor, tyrphostin-A47, inhibited hamster sperm capacitation, accompanied by a reduced sperm protein tyrosine phosphorylation. Interestingly, a high percentage of tyrphostin-A47-treated spermatozoa exhibited circular motility, which was associated with a distinct hypo-tyrosine phosphorylation of flagellar proteins, predominantly of Mr 45,000-60,000. In this study, we provide evidence on the localization of capacitation-associated tyrosine-phosphorylated proteins to the nonmembranous, structural components of the sperm flagellum. Consistent with this, we show their ultrastructural localization in the outer dense fiber, axoneme, and fibrous sheath of spermatozoa. Among hypo-tyrosine phosphorylated major proteins of tyrphostin-A47-treated spermatozoa, we identified the 45 kDa protein as outer dense fiber protein-2 and the 51 kDa protein as tektin-2, components of the sperm outer dense fiber and axoneme, respectively. This study shows functional association of hypo-tyrosine-phosphorylation status of outer dense fiber protein-2 and tektin-2 with impaired flagellar bending of spermatozoa, following inhibition of EGFR-tyrosine kinase, thereby showing the critical importance of flagellar protein tyrosine phosphorylation during capacitation and hyperactivation of hamster spermatozoa.

  17. Characterization of the relationship between polar and lateral flagellar structural genes in the deep-sea bacterium Shewanella piezotolerans WP3

    PubMed Central

    Jian, Huahua; Wang, Han; Zeng, Xianping; Xiong, Lei; Wang, Fengping; Xiao, Xiang

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria with a dual flagellar system, which consists of a polar flagellum (PF) and several lateral flagella (LF), have been identified in diverse environments. Nevertheless, whether and how these two flagellar systems interact with each other is largely unknown. In the present study, the relationship between the structural genes for the PF and LF of the deep-sea bacterium Shewanella piezotolerans WP3 was investigated by genetic, phenotypic and phylogenetic analyses. The mutation of PF genes induced the expression of LF genes and the production of LF in liquid medium, while the defective LF genes led to a decrease in PF gene transcription. However, the level of PF flagellin remained unchanged in LF gene mutants. Further investigation showed that the flgH2 gene (encoding LF L-ring protein) can compensate for mutations of the flgH1 gene (encoding PF L-ring protein), but this compensation does not occur between the flagellar hook-filament junction proteins (FlgL1, FlgL2). Swarming motility was shown to specifically require LF genes, and PF genes cannot substitute for the LF genes in the lateral flagella synthesis. Considering the importance of flagella-dependent motility for bacterial survival in the abyssal sediment, our study thus provided a better understanding of the adaptation strategy of benthic bacteria. PMID:28004809

  18. In Situ Localization of N and C Termini of Subunits of the Flagellar Nexin-Dynein Regulatory Complex (N-DRC) Using SNAP Tag and Cryo-electron Tomography*

    PubMed Central

    Song, Kangkang; Awata, Junya; Tritschler, Douglas; Bower, Raqual; Witman, George B.; Porter, Mary E.; Nicastro, Daniela

    2015-01-01

    Cryo-electron tomography (cryo-ET) has reached nanoscale resolution for in situ three-dimensional imaging of macromolecular complexes and organelles. Yet its current resolution is not sufficient to precisely localize or identify most proteins in situ; for example, the location and arrangement of components of the nexin-dynein regulatory complex (N-DRC), a key regulator of ciliary/flagellar motility that is conserved from algae to humans, have remained elusive despite many cryo-ET studies of cilia and flagella. Here, we developed an in situ localization method that combines cryo-ET/subtomogram averaging with the clonable SNAP tag, a widely used cell biological probe to visualize fusion proteins by fluorescence microscopy. Using this hybrid approach, we precisely determined the locations of the N and C termini of DRC3 and the C terminus of DRC4 within the three-dimensional structure of the N-DRC in Chlamydomonas flagella. Our data demonstrate that fusion of SNAP with target proteins allowed for protein localization with high efficiency and fidelity using SNAP-linked gold nanoparticles, without disrupting the native assembly, structure, or function of the flagella. After cryo-ET and subtomogram averaging, we localized DRC3 to the L1 projection of the nexin linker, which interacts directly with a dynein motor, whereas DRC4 was observed to stretch along the N-DRC base plate to the nexin linker. Application of the technique developed here to the N-DRC revealed new insights into the organization and regulatory mechanism of this complex, and provides a valuable tool for the structural dissection of macromolecular complexes in situ. PMID:25564608

  19. Radioactive satellites - Intact reentry and breakup by debris impact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anz-Meador, P. D.; Potter, A. E., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    There is a substantial mass of radioactive material in nuclear reactors or radioisotope thermal generators (RTGs) in orbit about the earth. This paper examines the reentry of intact nuclear fuel cores and RTGs and the fragmentation and subsequent radioactive debris cloud deposition and evolution resulting from the impact of orbital debris upon an orbiting reactor, fuel core, or RTG. To assess the intact reentry, decay rates and a predicted decay date using historical and projected orbital decay data, are estimated. The current NASA debris environment model is utilized to estimate impact rates and debris cloud evolution of a fragmentation event. Results of these analyses are compared and concepts are tendered which would tend to minimize the radiological debris hazard to personnel and structures both on the earth's surface and in low earth orbit.

  20. On the sensitivity of intact cells to perturbation by ethanol

    SciTech Connect

    Hitzemann, R.; Whitaker-Azmitia, P. ); Dains, K.; Lin, J. )

    1989-01-01

    A comparison was made of ethanol's effects on the order of plasma membranes in intact cells and some isolated membrane preparations. Order was assessed by steady-state fluorescence polarization techniques using the non-permeant probe, TMA-DPH. The data show that two cultured cells, rat neonatal astroglial and N2A neuroblastoma, were sensitive to significant ethanol-induced disordering within the anesthetically relevant range. Human erythrocytes, cultured fibroblasts and homogenized astroglial cells required higher ethanol concentrations to produce a similar effect. Intact erythrocytes were approximately twice as sensitive as erythrocyte ghost membranes to ethanol induced perturbation. The neonatal glial and N2A cells were approximately five times more sensitive than synaptic membranes to ethanol effects. DMPC and DMPC + cholesterol liposomes and myelin membranes were insensitive to ethanol's effects. The incorporation of 10 mole % ganglioside GM{sub 1} sensitized the liposomes to ethanol-induced perturbation.

  1. Intrathecal application of cyproheptadine impairs locomotion in intact rats.

    PubMed

    Majczyński, Henryk; Cabaj, Anna; Górska, Teresa

    In intact adult rats, cyproheptadine, a 5-HT2 antagonist, administered intrathecally at the midlumbar segments was found to impair hindlimb locomotor movements during overground locomotion. These effects were dose-dependent; they varied from transient complete hindlimb paraplegia seen at doses of 300 microg/20 microl, to short-lasting trunk instability at doses of 100 microg/20 microl. After the return of overground locomotion, transient abduction of one of the hindlimbs was observed in some animals. These findings demonstrate that the blockade of 5-HT2 receptors affects locomotion in intact rats. Our results provide support for the hypothesis of serotonergic involvement in rat locomotion, which, so far, has been based mainly on the effects of 5-HT2 agonists on the recovery of locomotion in spinal rats.

  2. Spelling-stress regularity effects are intact in developmental dyslexia.

    PubMed

    Mundy, Ian R; Carroll, Julia M

    2013-01-01

    The current experiment investigated conflicting predictions regarding the effects of spelling-stress regularity on the lexical decision performance of skilled adult readers and adults with developmental dyslexia. In both reading groups, lexical decision responses were significantly faster and significantly more accurate when the orthographic structure of a word ending was a reliable as opposed to an unreliable predictor of lexical stress assignment. Furthermore, the magnitude of this spelling-stress regularity effect was found to be equivalent across reading groups. These findings are consistent with intact phoneme-level regularity effects also observed in dyslexia. The paper discusses how findings of intact spelling-sound regularity effects at both prosodic and phonemic levels, as well as other similar results, can be reconciled with the obvious difficulties that people with dyslexia experience in other domains of phonological processing.

  3. Structural determination of intact proteins using mass spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    Kruppa, Gary; Schoeniger, Joseph S.; Young, Malin M.

    2008-05-06

    The present invention relates to novel methods of determining the sequence and structure of proteins. Specifically, the present invention allows for the analysis of intact proteins within a mass spectrometer. Therefore, preparatory separations need not be performed prior to introducing a protein sample into the mass spectrometer. Also disclosed herein are new instrumental developments for enhancing the signal from the desired modified proteins, methods for producing controlled protein fragments in the mass spectrometer, eliminating complex microseparations, and protein preparatory chemical steps necessary for cross-linking based protein structure determination.Additionally, the preferred method of the present invention involves the determination of protein structures utilizing a top-down analysis of protein structures to search for covalent modifications. In the preferred method, intact proteins are ionized and fragmented within the mass spectrometer.

  4. Binding of Clostridium botulinum C3 exoenzyme to intact cells.

    PubMed

    Rohrbeck, Astrid; von Elsner, Leonie; Hagemann, Sandra; Just, Ingo

    2014-06-01

    C3 from Clostridium botulinum (C3) specifically modifies Rho GTPases RhoA, RhoB, and RhoC by mono-ADP-ribosylation. The confined substrate profile of C3 is the basis for its use as pharmacological tool in cell biology to study cellular functions of Rho GTPases. Although C3 exoenzyme does not possess a cell-binding/-translocation domain, C3 is taken up by intact cells via an unknown mechanism. In the present work, binding of C3 to the hippocampus-derived HT22 cells and J774A.1 macrophages was characterized. C3 bound concentration-dependent to HT22 and J774A.1 cells. Pronase treatment of intact cells significantly reduced both C3 binding and C3 cell entry. Removal of sugar residues by glycosidase F treatment resulted in an increased binding of C3, but a reduced cell entry. To explore the involvement of phosphorylation in the binding process of C3, intact HT22 and J774A.1 cells were pre-treated with vanadate prior to incubation with C3. Inhibition of de-phosphorylation by vanadate resulted in an increased binding of C3. To differentiate between intracellular and extracellular phosphorylation, intact cells were treated with CIP (calf intestine phosphatase) to remove extracellular phosphate residues. The removal of phosphate residues resulted in a strong reduction in binding of C3 to cells. In sum, the C3 membranous binding partner is proteinaceous, and the glycosylation as well as the phosphorylation state is critical for efficient binding of C3.

  5. Dental abscess in a tooth with intact dens evaginatus.

    PubMed

    Cho, S Y

    2006-03-01

    This article reports a case of dental abscess in a mandibular premolar with intact dens evaginatus. Dentists are advised to critically evaluate those teeth with dens evaginatus, both clinically and radiographically, before attempting prophylactic treatments. This is particularly important medicolegally in case the tooth develops symptoms shortly after the prophylactic treatment. Dentists practising in Western countries should also be aware of this dental anomaly because of the increasing global migration of people from Asia.

  6. Crisscross heart with dextrocardia and intact interventricular septum.

    PubMed

    Muneer, P Kader; Kalathingathodika, Sajeer; Chakanalil, Govindan Sajeev; Sony, Manuel M

    2014-01-01

    Crisscross heart is a rare congenital heart disease characterized by a twisted atrioventricular connection, as a result of rotation of the ventricular mass along its long axis. We report an asymptomatic 48-year-old woman referred to us for evaluation of a cardiac murmur. Further evaluation showed situs solitus, dextrocardia with normal atrioventricular and ventriculoarterial connection, and a crisscross relation of the atrioventricular valves. Unlike the usual case of crisscross heart, our patient had an intact ventricular septum.

  7. Acoustic emissions during deformation of intact and jointed welded tuff

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, D.J.; Teufel, L.W.

    1982-07-01

    Monitoring of acoustic emissions (AE) has been widely used as a means of detecting failure in intact rock. For intact rock the technique is simple, because an increasing rate of AE is usually a sign of impending failure. However, most large rock masses contain numerous joints and the behavior of the joints controls the properties of the rock mass. In particular, the failure mode often becomes stable or unstable slip (stick-slip) on a joint at stresses well below those required for failure of the intact rock. As an aid to understanding and monitoring the behavior of jointed rock masses, we have done a series of experiments on intact and artificially jointed samples of Grouse Canyon tuff. The tuff was selected because it is under consideration as a disposal medium for nuclear wastes. The samples were instrumented to measure axial and transverse displacements and AE rates. Testing was done in a servo-controlled machine at axial displacement rates of 5 x 10{sup -5} cm/sec, and confining pressures ranging from 10 to 40 MPa. For the jointed samples four modes of slip were identified. First, stable sliding accompanied by a steady rate of AE. Second, stick-slip with a sharp drop in load, large displacements but no premonitory AE or slip. Third, stick-slip, as in mode 2, but with premonitory AE and slip. Fourth, slow stick-slip where the load dropped and the displacements increased but the process was slow and culminated in stable sliding. Mode 4 exhibited premonitory AE and slip and after the event, a steady rate of AE during sliding. There seemed to be no way to predict which mode would occur at a given point in the test. In all cases where stable or unstable slip occurred there was a corresponding occurrence of AE. This indicates that slip is related to damage to the joint surfaces and adjacent material. Monitoring AE would be a useful method of detecting slip.

  8. Interplay between the localization and kinetics of phosphorylation in flagellar pole development of the bacterium Caulobacter crescentus.

    PubMed

    Tropini, Carolina; Huang, Kerwyn Casey

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial cells maintain sophisticated levels of intracellular organization that allow for signal amplification, response to stimuli, cell division, and many other critical processes. The mechanisms underlying localization and their contribution to fitness have been difficult to uncover, due to the often challenging task of creating mutants with systematically perturbed localization but normal enzymatic activity, and the lack of quantitative models through which to interpret subtle phenotypic changes. Focusing on the model bacterium Caulobacter crescentus, which generates two different types of daughter cells from an underlying asymmetric distribution of protein phosphorylation, we use mathematical modeling to investigate the contribution of the localization of histidine kinases to the establishment of cellular asymmetry and subsequent developmental outcomes. We use existing mutant phenotypes and fluorescence data to parameterize a reaction-diffusion model of the kinases PleC and DivJ and their cognate response regulator DivK. We then present a systematic computational analysis of the effects of changes in protein localization and abundance to determine whether PleC localization is required for correct developmental timing in Caulobacter. Our model predicts the developmental phenotypes of several localization mutants, and suggests that a novel strain with co-localization of PleC and DivJ could provide quantitative insight into the signaling threshold required for flagellar pole development. Our analysis indicates that normal development can be maintained through a wide range of localization phenotypes, and that developmental defects due to changes in PleC localization can be rescued by increased PleC expression. We also show that the system is remarkably robust to perturbation of the kinetic parameters, and while the localization of either PleC or DivJ is required for asymmetric development, the delocalization of one of these two components does not prevent

  9. Functional characterization of FlgM in the regulation of flagellar synthesis and motility in Yersinia pseudotuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Ding, Lisha; Wang, Yao; Hu, Yangbo; Atkinson, Steve; Williams, Paul; Chen, Shiyun

    2009-06-01

    We describe here the functional characterization of the flgM gene in Yersinia pseudotuberculosis. Direct interaction of FlgM with the alternative sigma factor sigma(28) (FliA) was first confirmed. A conserved region in the C-terminus of FlgM was found which included the sigma(28) binding domain. By site-directed mutagenesis, bacterial two-hybrid analysis and Western blotting, the primary FlgM binding sites with sigma(28) were shown to be Ile85, Ala86 and Leu89. A role for FlgM in swimming motility was demonstrated by inactivation of flgM and subsequent complementation in trans. Transcriptional fusion analyses showed differential gene expression of flhDC, fliA, flgM and fliC in the fliA and flgM mutants compared with the wild-type. flhDC expression was not influenced by sigma(28) or FlgM while fliA expression was abolished in the fliA mutant and considerably reduced in the flgM mutant when compared to the wild-type, indicating that both FliA and FlgM can activate fliA transcription. Conversely, flgM transcription was higher in the fliA mutant when compared to the wild-type, suggesting that flgM transcription was repressed by sigma(28). Interestingly, fliC expression was markedly increased in the flgM mutant, suggesting a negative regulatory role for FlgM in fliC expression. The transcription of other sigma-dependent genes (cheW, flgD, flaA, csrA and fliZ) was also examined in fliA and flgM mutant backgrounds and this revealed that other sigma-factors apart from sigma(28) may be involved in flagellar biogenesis in Y. pseudotuberculosis. Taking together the motility phenotypes and effects of flgM mutation on the regulation of these key motility genes, we propose that the mechanisms regulating flagellar biogenesis in Y. pseudotuberculosis may differ from those described for other bacteria.

  10. Posttranslational protein modification by polyamines in intact and regenerating nerves.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, G; Leach, T; Zanakis, M F; Sturman, J A; Ingoglia, N A

    1987-03-01

    A 150,000-g supernatant from axoplasm of the giant axon of the stellate nerve of the squid and from rat sciatic and goldfish optic nerves was found to be able to incorporate covalently [3H]putrescine and [3H]spermidine into an exogenous protein (N,N'-dimethylcasein). Incorporation of radioactivity was inhibited by CuSO4, a specific inhibitor of transglutaminases, the enzymes mediating these reactions in other tissues. Analysis of pH and temperature range and enzyme kinetics displayed characteristics predicted for transglutaminase-mediated reactions. Transglutaminase activity increased during regeneration of both vertebrate nerves, but greater activity was found in segments of nerve containing no intact axons than in either intact segments or in segments containing regenerating axons. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of endogenous modified proteins (in the absence of N,N'-dimethylcasein) showed labeling of 18-, 46- and 200-kilodalton proteins by both [3H]putrescine and [3H]spermidine. Analysis of the protein-bound radioactivity from intact and regenerating rat sciatic nerves demonstrated it to be predominantly in the form of the parent radioactive polyamine. These experiments demonstrate the covalent modification of proteins by polyamines at low levels in squid axoplasm and at relatively higher levels in rat sciatic and goldfish optic nerves. In the latter two cases, the activity of these modification reactions may be due in part to the modification of axonal proteins, but the majority of the activity occurs in nonneuronal cells of the nerve.

  11. Vehicle influence on permeation through intact and compromised skin.

    PubMed

    Gujjar, Meera; Banga, Ajay K

    2014-09-10

    The purpose of this study was to compare the transdermal permeation of a model compound, diclofenac diethylamine, from a hydrophilic and lipophilic vehicle across in vitro models simulating compromised skin. Mineral oil served as a lipophilic vehicle while 10mM phosphate buffered saline served as a hydrophilic vehicle. Compromised skin was simulated by tape stripping, delipidization, or microneedle application and compared with intact skin as a control. Transepidermal water loss was measured to assess barrier function. Skin compromised with tape stripping and delipidization significantly (p<0.05) increased permeation of diclofenac diethylamine compared to intact and microneedle treated skin with phosphate buffered saline vehicle. A similar trend in permeation was observed with mineral oil as the vehicle. For both vehicles, permeation across skin increased in the same order and correlated with degree of barrier impairment as indicated by transepidermal water loss values: intact

  12. Compartmentalization of a Unique ADP/ATP Carrier Protein SFEC (Sperm Flagellar Energy Carrier, AAC4) with Glycolytic Enzymes in the Fibrous Sheath of the Human Sperm Flagellar Principal Piece

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young-Hwan; Haidl, Gerhard; Schaefer, Martina; Egner, Ursula; Herr, John C.

    2007-01-01

    The longest part of the sperm flagellum, the principal piece, contains the fibrous sheath, a cytoskeletal element unique to spermiogenesis. We performed mass spectrometry proteomics on isolated human fibrous sheaths identifying a unique ADP/ATP carrier protein, SFEC [AAC4], seven glycolytic enzymes previously unreported in the human sperm fibrous sheath, and sorbitol dehydrogenase. SFEC, pyruvate kinase and aldolase were co-localized by immunofluorescence to the principal piece. A homology model constructed for SFEC predicted unique residues at the entrance to the nucleotide binding pocket of SFEC that are absent in other human ADP/ATP carriers, suggesting opportunities for selective drug targeting. This study provides the first evidence of a role for an ADP/ATP carrier family member in glycolysis. The co-localization of SFEC and glycolytic enzymes in the fibrous sheath supports a growing literature that the principal piece of the flagellum is capable of generating and regulating ATP independently from mitochondrial oxidation in the mid-piece. A model is proposed that the fibrous sheath represents a highly ordered complex, analogous to the electron transport chain, in which adjacent enzymes in the glycolytic pathway are assembled to permit efficient flux of energy substrates and products with SFEC serving to mediate energy generating and energy consuming processes in the distal flagellum, possibly as a nucleotide shuttle between flagellar glycolysis, protein phosphorylation and mechanisms of motility. PMID:17137571

  13. Energy efficient motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1995-01-01

    This TechData Sheet is intended to help activity personnel identify cost effective energy projects for energy efficient motors. With this guide an energy manager can identify when an energy efficient induction motor should be used.

  14. Introduction to ultrasonic motors

    SciTech Connect

    Sashida, Toshiiku; Kenjo, Takashi.

    1993-01-01

    The ultrasonic motor, invented in 1980, utilizes the piezoelectric effect in the ultrasonic frequency range to provide the motive force. (In conventional electric motors the motive force is electromagnetic.) The result is a motor with unusually good low-speed high-torque and power-to-weight characteristics. It has already found applications in camera autofocus mechanisms, medical equipment subject to high magnetic fields, and motorized car accessories. Its applications will increase as designers become more familiar with its unique characteristics. This book is the result of a collaboration between the inventor and an expert in conventional electric motors: the result is an introduction to the general theory presented in a way that links it to conventional motor theory. It will be invaluable both to motor designers and to those who design with and use electric motors as an introduction to this important new invention.

  15. Chronic motor tic disorder

    MedlinePlus

    Chronic vocal tic disorder; Tic - chronic motor tic disorder ... Chronic motor tic disorder is more common than Tourette syndrome . Chronic tics may be forms of Tourette syndrome. Tics usually start ...

  16. Curcumin Reduces the Motility of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium by Binding to the Flagella, Thereby Leading to Flagellar Fragility and Shedding

    PubMed Central

    Balakrishnan, Arjun; Negi, Vidya Devi; Sakorey, Deepika; Chandra, Nagasuma

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT One of the important virulence properties of the pathogen is its ability to travel to a favorable environment, cross the viscous mucus barrier (intestinal barrier for enteric pathogens), and reach the epithelia to initiate pathogenesis with the help of an appendage, like flagella. Nonetheless, flagella can act as an “Achilles heel,” revealing the pathogen's presence to the host through the stimulation of innate and adaptive immune responses. We assessed whether curcumin, a dietary polyphenol, could alter the motility of Salmonella, a foodborne pathogen. It reduced the motility of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium by shortening the length of the flagellar filament (from ∼8 μm to ∼5 μm) and decreasing its density (4 or 5 flagella/bacterium instead of 8 or 9 flagella/bacterium). Upon curcumin treatment, the percentage of flagellated bacteria declined from ∼84% to 59%. However, no change was detected in the expression of the flagellin gene and protein. A fluorescence binding assay demonstrated binding of curcumin to the flagellar filament. This might make the filament fragile, breaking it into smaller fragments. Computational analysis predicted the binding of curcumin, its analogues, and its degraded products to a flagellin molecule at an interface between domains D1 and D2. Site-directed mutagenesis and a fluorescence binding assay confirmed the binding of curcumin to flagellin at residues ASN120, ASP123, ASN163, SER164, ASN173, and GLN175. IMPORTANCE This work, to our knowledge the first report of its kind, examines how curcumin targets flagellar density and affects the pathogenesis of bacteria. We found that curcumin does not affect any of the flagellar synthesis genes. Instead, it binds to the flagellum and makes it fragile. It increases the torsional stress on the flagellar filament that then breaks, leaving fewer flagella around the bacteria. Flagella, which are crucial ligands for Toll-like receptor 5, are some of the most important

  17. Smart motor technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Packard, D.; Schmitt, D.

    1984-01-01

    Current spacecraft design relies upon microprocessor control; however, motors usually require extensive additional electronic circuitry to interface with these microprocessor controls. An improved control technique that allows a smart brushless motor to connect directly to a microprocessor control system is described. An actuator with smart motors receives a spacecraft command directly and responds in a closed loop control mode. In fact, two or more smart motors can be controlled for synchronous operation.

  18. Piezoelectric ultrasonic motors

    SciTech Connect

    Wallaschek, J.

    1994-12-31

    Piezoelectric ultrasonic motors are a new type of actuator. They are characterized by high torque at low rotational speed, simple mechanical design and good controllability. They also provide a high holding torque even if no power is applied. Compared to electromagnetic actuators the torque per volume ratio of piezoelectric ultrasonic motors can be higher by an order of magnitude. Recently various types of piezoelectric ultrasonic motors have been developed for industrial applications. This paper describes several types of piezoelectric ultrasonic motors.

  19. Function of the conserved FHIPEP domain of the flagellar type III export apparatus, protein FlhA.

    PubMed

    Barker, Clive S; Inoue, Tomoharu; Meshcheryakova, Irina V; Kitanobo, Seiya; Samatey, Fadel A

    2016-04-01

    The Type III flagellar protein export apparatus of bacteria consists of five or six membrane proteins, notably FlhA, which controls the export of other proteins and is homologous to the large family of FHIPEP export proteins. FHIPEP proteins contain a highly-conserved cytoplasmic domain. We mutagenized the cloned Salmonella flhA gene for the 692 amino acid FlhA, changing a single, conserved amino acid in the 68-amino acid FHIPEP region. Fifty-two mutations at 30 positions mostly led to loss of motility and total disappearance of microscopically visible flagella, also Western blot protein/protein hybridization showed no detectable export of hook protein and flagellin. There were two exceptions: a D199A mutant strain, which produced short-stubby flagella; and a V151L mutant strain, which did not produce flagella and excreted mainly un-polymerized hook protein. The V151L mutant strain also exported a reduced amount of hook-cap protein FlgD, but when grown with exogenous FlgD it produced polyhooks and polyhook-filaments. A suppressor mutant in the cytoplasmic domain of the export apparatus membrane protein FlhB rescued export of hook-length control protein FliK and facilitated growth of full-length flagella. These results suggested that the FHIPEP region is part of the gate regulating substrate entry into the export apparatus pore.

  20. Reassembly of flagellar B (alpha beta) tubulin into singlet microtubules: consequences for cytoplasmic microtubule structure and assembly

    PubMed Central

    1981-01-01

    B(alpha beta) tubulin was obtained from a homogeneous class of microtubules, the incomplete B subfiber of sea urchin sperm flagellar doublet microtubules, by thermal fractionation. The thermally derived soluble B tubulin fraction (100, 000 g-h) repolymerizes in vitro, yielding microtubule-like structures. The microtubule-associated protein (MAP) composition and certain assembly parameters of thermally derived B tubulin are different from those reported for sonication- derived flageller tubulin and purified vertebrate tubulin. The "microtubules" reassembled from thermally prepared B tubulin are composed of 12-15 protofilaments (73% possess 14 protofilaments). A certain number possess a single "adlumenal component" applied to their inside walls, regardless of the number of protofilaments. Following the first cycle of polymerization, 81% of the B tubulin and essentially 100% of the MAPs remain cold insoluble. Evidence suggests that B tubulin assembles faithfully into a B lattice, creating a j seam between two protofilaments that are laterally bonded in a A-lattice configuration. The significance of these seams is discussed in relation to the mechanism of microtubule assembly, the stability of observed ribbons of protofilaments, and the three-dimensional organization of microtubule-associated components. PMID:7251656

  1. Structural flexibility of the periplasmic protein, FlgA, regulates flagellar P-ring assembly in Salmonella enterica

    PubMed Central

    Matsunami, Hideyuki; Yoon, Young-Ho; Meshcheryakov, Vladimir A.; Namba, Keiichi; Samatey, Fadel A.

    2016-01-01

    A periplasmic flagellar chaperone protein, FlgA, is required for P-ring assembly in bacterial flagella of taxa such as Salmonella enterica or Escherichia coli. The mechanism of chaperone-mediated P-ring formation is poorly understood. Here we present the open and closed crystal structures of FlgA from Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, grown under different crystallization conditions. An intramolecular disulfide cross-linked form of FlgA caused a dominant negative effect on motility of the wild-type strain. Pull-down experiments support a specific protein-protein interaction between FlgI, the P-ring component protein, and the C-terminal domain of FlgA. Surface plasmon resonance and limited-proteolysis indicate that flexibility of the domain is reduced in the covalently closed form. These results show that the structural flexibility of the C-terminal domain of FlgA, which is related to the structural difference between the two crystal forms, is intrinsically associated with its molecular chaperone function in P-ring assembly. PMID:27273476

  2. Feedback delays eliminate auditory-motor learning in speech production.

    PubMed

    Max, Ludo; Maffett, Derek G

    2015-03-30

    Neurologically healthy individuals use sensory feedback to alter future movements by updating internal models of the effector system and environment. For example, when visual feedback about limb movements or auditory feedback about speech movements is experimentally perturbed, the planning of subsequent movements is adjusted - i.e., sensorimotor adaptation occurs. A separate line of studies has demonstrated that experimentally delaying the sensory consequences of limb movements causes the sensory input to be attributed to external sources rather than to one's own actions. Yet similar feedback delays have remarkably little effect on visuo-motor adaptation (although the rate of learning varies, the amount of adaptation is only moderately affected with delays of 100-200ms, and adaptation still occurs even with a delay as long as 5000ms). Thus, limb motor learning remains largely intact even in conditions where error assignment favors external factors. Here, we show a fundamentally different result for sensorimotor control of speech articulation: auditory-motor adaptation to formant-shifted feedback is completely eliminated with delays of 100ms or more. Thus, for speech motor learning, real-time auditory feedback is critical. This novel finding informs theoretical models of human motor control in general and speech motor control in particular, and it has direct implications for the application of motor learning principles in the habilitation and rehabilitation of individuals with various sensorimotor speech disorders.

  3. Length-dependent flagellar growth of Vibrio alginolyticus revealed by real time fluorescent imaging

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Meiting; Zhao, Ziyi; Yang, Jin; Peng, Kai; Baker, Matthew AB; Bai, Fan; Lo, Chien-Jung

    2017-01-01

    Bacterial flagella are extracellular filaments that drive swimming in bacteria. During motor assembly, flagellins are transported unfolded through the central channel in the flagellum to the growing tip. Here, we applied in vivo fluorescent imaging to monitor in real time the Vibrio alginolyticus polar flagella growth. The flagellar growth rate is found to be highly length-dependent. Initially, the flagellum grows at a constant rate (50 nm/min) when shorter than 1500 nm. The growth rate decays sharply when the flagellum grows longer, which decreases to ~9 nm/min at 7500 nm. We modeled flagellin transport inside the channel as a one-dimensional diffusive process with an injection force at its base. When the flagellum is short, its growth rate is determined by the loading speed at the base. Only when the flagellum grows longer does diffusion of flagellin become the rate-limiting step, dramatically reducing the growth rate. Our results shed new light on the dynamic building process of this complex extracellular structure. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.22140.001 PMID:28098557

  4. Insights into the Structure and Function of Ciliary and Flagellar Doublet Microtubules

    PubMed Central

    Linck, Richard; Fu, Xiaofeng; Lin, Jianfeng; Ouch, Christna; Schefter, Alexandra; Steffen, Walter; Warren, Peter; Nicastro, Daniela

    2014-01-01

    Cilia and flagella are conserved, motile, and sensory cell organelles involved in signal transduction and human disease. Their scaffold consists of a 9-fold array of remarkably stable doublet microtubules (DMTs), along which motor proteins transmit force for ciliary motility and intraflagellar transport. DMTs possess Ribbons of three to four hyper-stable protofilaments whose location, organization, and specialized functions have been elusive. We performed a comprehensive analysis of the distribution and structural arrangements of Ribbon proteins from sea urchin sperm flagella, using quantitative immunobiochemistry, proteomics, immuno-cryo-electron microscopy, and tomography. Isolated Ribbons contain acetylated α-tubulin, β-tubulin, conserved protein Rib45, >95% of the axonemal tektins, and >95% of the calcium-binding proteins, Rib74 and Rib85.5, whose human homologues are related to the cause of juvenile myoclonic epilepsy. DMTs contain only one type of Ribbon, corresponding to protofilaments A11-12-13-1 of the A-tubule. Rib74 and Rib85.5 are associated with the Ribbon in the lumen of the A-tubule. Ribbons contain a single ∼5-nm wide filament, composed of equimolar tektins A, B, and C, which interact with the nexin-dynein regulatory complex. A summary of findings is presented, and the functions of Ribbon proteins are discussed in terms of the assembly and stability of DMTs, ciliary motility, and other microtubule systems. PMID:24794867

  5. Identical folds used for distinct mechanical functions of the bacterial flagellar rod and hook

    PubMed Central

    Fujii, Takashi; Kato, Takayuki; Hiraoka, Koichi D.; Miyata, Tomoko; Minamino, Tohru; Chevance, Fabienne F. V.; Hughes, Kelly T.; Namba, Keiichi

    2017-01-01

    The bacterial flagellum is a motile organelle driven by a rotary motor, and its axial portions function as a drive shaft (rod), a universal joint (hook) and a helical propeller (filament). The rod and hook are directly connected to each other, with their subunit proteins FlgG and FlgE having 39% sequence identity, but show distinct mechanical properties; the rod is straight and rigid as a drive shaft whereas the hook is flexible in bending as a universal joint. Here we report the structure of the rod and comparison with that of the hook. While these two structures have the same helical symmetry and repeat distance and nearly identical folds of corresponding domains, the domain orientations differ by ∼7°, resulting in tight and loose axial subunit packing in the rod and hook, respectively, conferring the rigidity on the rod and flexibility on the hook. This provides a good example of versatile use of a protein structure in biological organisms. PMID:28120828

  6. Peripheral Nerve Injury in Developing Rats Reorganizes Representation Pattern in Motor Cortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donoghue, John P.; Sanes, Jerome N.

    1987-02-01

    We investigated the effect of neonatal nerve lesions on cerebral motor cortex organization by comparing the cortical motor representation of normal adult rats with adult rats that had one forelimb removed on the day of birth. Mapping of cerebral neocortex with electrical stimulation revealed an altered relationship between the motor cortex and the remaining muscles. Whereas distal forelimb movements are normally elicited at the lowest threshold in the motor cortex forelimb area, the same stimuli activated shoulder and trunk muscles in experimental animals. In addition, an expanded cortical representation of intact body parts was present and there was an absence of a distinct portion of motor cortex. These data demonstrate that representation patterns in motor cortex can be altered by peripheral nerve injury during development.

  7. A Reconfigurable Stepping Motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, Charles; Selvaggi, Richard

    2009-04-01

    Multiphase brushless actuators, commonly known as the stepper motors, are ubiquitous for many precision control applications. Developments in the microelectronics have lead to their use as efficient drive motors for modern electric vehicles. Understanding the physics and the control logic for interfacing these transducers continues to be important for scientists and engineers. An overview of the stepping motor principles and interfacing requirements is presented and a simple working model used to teach the concepts of stepper motors is described and demonstrated. This model was used to design a much larger stepper motor required to precisely rotate a massive optical system in the undergraduate advanced physics laboratory.

  8. Motor/generator

    DOEpatents

    Hickam, Christopher Dale

    2008-05-13

    A motor/generator is provided for connecting between a transmission input shaft and an output shaft of a prime mover. The motor/generator may include a motor/generator housing, a stator mounted to the motor/generator housing, a rotor mounted at least partially within the motor/generator housing and rotatable about a rotor rotation axis, and a transmission-shaft coupler drivingly coupled to the rotor. The transmission-shaft coupler may include a clamp, which may include a base attached to the rotor and a plurality of adjustable jaws.

  9. Solid propellant motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shafer, J. I.; Marsh, H. E., Jr. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A case bonded end burning solid propellant rocket motor is described. A propellant with sufficiently low modulus to avoid chamber buckling on cooling from cure and sufficiently high elongation to sustain the stresses induced without cracking is used. The propellant is zone cured within the motor case at high pressures equal to or approaching the pressure at which the motor will operate during combustion. A solid propellant motor with a burning time long enough that its spacecraft would be limited to a maximum acceleration of less than 1 g is provided by one version of the case bonded end burning solid propellant motor of the invention.

  10. Piezoceramic Ultrasonic Motor Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Burden, J.S.

    1999-02-24

    The objective of this project was to team Aerotech and AlliedSignal FM and T (AS) to develop a cost-efficient process for small-batch, high performance PZT motor production. Aerotech would acquire the basic process expertise in motor fabrication, assembly, and testing from AS. Together, Aerotech and AS were to identify appropriate process improvements, focusing on raw material quality, manufacturing processes, and durability assessment. Aerotech would then design and build a motor in consultation with AS. Aerotech engineering observed motor manufacturing in the AS piezo lab and worked side by side with AS personnel to build and test a prototype motor to facilitate learning the technology. Using information from AS and hands-on experience with the AS motor drive system enabled Aerotech to design and build its own laboratory drive system to operate motors. The team compiled information to establish a potential piezo motor users' list, and an intellectual property search was conducted to understand current patent and IP (intellectual property) status of motor design. Work was initiated to identify and develop an American source for piezo motor elements; however, due to manpower restraints created by the resignation of the AS Ph.D. ceramist responsible for these tasks, the project schedule slipped. The project was subsequently terminated before significant activities were accomplished. AS did, however, provide Aerotech with contacts in Japanese industry that are willing and capable of supplying them with special design motor elements.

  11. Motor degradation prediction methods

    SciTech Connect

    Arnold, J.R.; Kelly, J.F.; Delzingaro, M.J.

    1996-12-01

    Motor Operated Valve (MOV) squirrel cage AC motor rotors are susceptible to degradation under certain conditions. Premature failure can result due to high humidity/temperature environments, high running load conditions, extended periods at locked rotor conditions (i.e. > 15 seconds) or exceeding the motor`s duty cycle by frequent starts or multiple valve stroking. Exposure to high heat and moisture due to packing leaks, pressure seal ring leakage or other causes can significantly accelerate the degradation. ComEd and Liberty Technologies have worked together to provide and validate a non-intrusive method using motor power diagnostics to evaluate MOV rotor condition and predict failure. These techniques have provided a quick, low radiation dose method to evaluate inaccessible motors, identify degradation and allow scheduled replacement of motors prior to catastrophic failures.

  12. Motorized support jack

    DOEpatents

    Haney, Steven J.; Herron, Donald Joe

    2001-01-01

    A compact, vacuum compatible motorized jack for supporting heavy loads and adjusting their positions is provided. The motorized jack includes: (a) a housing having a base; (b) a first roller device that provides a first slidable surface and that is secured to the base; (c) a second roller device that provides a second slidable surface and that has an upper surface; (d) a wedge that is slidably positioned between the first roller device and the second roller device so that the wedge is in contact with the first slidable surface and the second slidable surface; (e) a motor; and (d) a drive mechanism that connects the motor and the wedge to cause the motor to controllably move the wedge forwards or backwards. Individual motorized jacks can support and lift of an object at an angle. Two or more motorized jacks can provide tip, tilt and vertical position adjustment capabilities.

  13. Motorized support jack

    DOEpatents

    Haney, Steven J.; Herron, Donald Joe

    2003-05-13

    A compact, vacuum compatible motorized jack for supporting heavy loads and adjusting their positions is provided. The motorized jack includes: (a) a housing having a base; (b) a first roller device that provides a first slidable surface and that is secured to the base; (c) a second roller device that provides a second slidable surface and that has an upper surface; (d) a wedge that is slidably positioned between the first roller device and the second roller device so that the wedge is in contact with the first slidable surface and the second slidable surface; (e) a motor; and (d) a drive mechanism that connects the motor and the wedge to cause the motor to controllably move the wedge forwards or backwards. Individual motorized jacks can support and lift of an object at an angle. Two or more motorized jacks can provide tip, tilt and vertical position adjustment capabilities.

  14. Selective Long-term Reorganization of the Corticospinal Projection from the Supplementary Motor Cortex following Recovery from Lateral Motor Cortex Injury

    PubMed Central

    McNeal, David W.; Darling, Warren G.; Ge, Jizhi; Stilwell-Morecraft, Kimberly S.; Solon, Kathryn M.; Hynes, Stephanie M.; Pizzimenti, Marc A.; Rotella, Diane; Vanadurongvan, Tyler; Morecraft, Robert J.

    2013-01-01

    Brain injury affecting the frontal motor cortex or its descending axons often causes contralateral upper extremity paresis. Although recovery is variable, the underlying mechanisms supporting favorable motor recovery remain unclear. Since the medial wall of the cerebral hemisphere is often spared following brain injury and recent functional neuroimaging studies in patients indicate a potential role for this brain region in the recovery process, we investigated the long-term effects of isolated lateral frontal motor cortical injury on the corticospinal projection (CSP) from intact, ipsilesional supplementary motor cortex (M2). Following injury to the arm region of the primary motor (M1) and lateral premotor (LPMC) cortices, upper extremity recovery is accompanied by terminal axon plasticity in the contralateral CSP but not the ipsilateral CSP from M2. Furthermore, significant contralateral plasticity occurs only in lamina VII and dorsally within lamina IX. Thus, selective intraspinal sprouting transpires in regions containing interneurons, flexor-related motor neurons and motor neurons supplying intrinsic hand muscles which all play important roles in mediating reaching and digit movements. Following recovery, subsequent injury of M2 leads to reemergence of hand motor deficits. Considering the importance of the CSP in humans and the common occurrence of lateral frontal cortex injury, these findings suggest that spared supplementary motor cortex may serve as an important therapeutic target that should be considered when designing acute and long-term post-injury patient intervention strategies aimed to enhance the motor recovery process following lateral cortical trauma. PMID:20034062

  15. Feasible pickup from intact ossicular chain with floating piezoelectric microphone

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Many microphones have been developed to meet with the implantable requirement of totally implantable cochlear implant (TICI). However, a biocompatible one without destroying the intactness of the ossicular chain still remains under investigation. Such an implantable floating piezoelectric microphone (FPM) has been manufactured and shows an efficient electroacoustic performance in vitro test at our lab. We examined whether it pick up sensitively from the intact ossicular chain and postulated whether it be an optimal implantable one. Methods Animal controlled experiment: five adult cats (eight ears) were sacrificed as the model to test the electroacoustic performance of the FPM. Three groups were studied: (1) the experiment group (on malleus): the FPM glued onto the handle of the malleus of the intact ossicular chains; (2) negative control group (in vivo): the FPM only hung into the tympanic cavity; (3) positive control group (Hy-M30): a HiFi commercial microphone placed close to the site of the experiment ear. The testing speaker played pure tones orderly ranged from 0.25 to 8.0 kHz. The FPM inside the ear and the HiFi microphone simultaneously picked up acoustic vibration which recorded as .wav files to analyze. Results The FPM transformed acoustic vibration sensitively and flatly as did the in vitro test across the frequencies above 2.0 kHz, whereas inefficiently below 1.0 kHz for its overloading mass. Although the HiFi microphone presented more efficiently than the FPM did, there was no significant difference at 3.0 kHz and 8.0 kHz. Conclusions It is feasible to develop such an implantable FPM for future TICIs and TIHAs system on condition that the improvement of Micro Electromechanical System and piezoelectric ceramic material technology would be applied to reduce its weight and minimize its size. PMID:22353161

  16. An integrated workflow for characterizing intact phosphoproteins from complex mixtures

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Si; Yang, Feng; Zhao, Rui; Tolić, Nikola; Robinson, Errol W.; Camp, David; Smith, Richard D.; Paša-Tolić, Ljiljana

    2014-01-01

    The phosphorylation of any site on a given protein can affect its activity, degradation rate, ability to dock with other proteins or bind divalent cations, and/or its localization. These effects can operate within the same protein; in fact, multisite phosphorylation is a key mechanism for achieving signal integration in cells. Hence, knowing the overall phosphorylation signature of a protein is essential for understanding the "state" of a cell. However, current technologies to monitor the phosphorylation status of proteins are inefficient at determining the relative stoichiometries of phosphorylation at multiple sites. Here we report a new capability for comprehensive liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC/MS) analysis of intact phosphoproteins. The technology platform built upon integrated bottom-up and top-down approach that is facilitated by intact protein reversed-phase (RP)LC concurrently coupled with Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR) MS and fraction collection. As the use of conventional RPLC systems for phosphopeptide identification has proven challenging due to the formation of metal ion complexes at various metal surfaces during LC/MS and ESI-MS analysis, we have developed a “metal-free” RPLC-ESI-MS platform for phosphoprotein characterization. This platform demonstrated a significant sensitivity enhancement for phosphorylated casein proteins enriched from a standard protein mixture and revealed the presence of over 20 casein isoforms arising from genetic variants with varying numbers of phosphorylation sites. The integrated workflow was also applied to an enriched yeast phosphoproteome to evaluate the feasibility of this strategy for characterizing complex biological systems, and revealed ~16% of the detected yeast proteins to have multiple phosphorylation isoforms. Intact protein LC/MS platform for characterization of combinatorial posttranslational modifications (PTMs), with special emphasis on multisite phosphorylation, holds

  17. Controlled therapy by imaging of functional structures of intact liver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, W.; Zhuang, Feng Y.; Ruan, G.; Kakihana, Yasuyuki; Krug, A.; Kessler, Manfred D.

    2000-04-01

    Ligustrazine, a Chinese herb medicine has been used to treat the diseases of cardiovascular and cerebral vascular diseases in China by Chinese traditional physicians or many years. Recently, results showed that ligustrazine is a powerful hepatic vasodilator. It can greatly change the blood supply of the tissues. Due to micro-optical tissue sensor developed recently it became possible to image functional structures of tissue on the level of intact blood capillaries. In our experiment we used the Oxyscan in order to study the effect of Ligustrazine on the oxygen supply of rat liver.

  18. Fast Imaging of Intact and Shattered Cryogenic Neon Pellets

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zhehui; Combs, Stephen Kirk; Baylor, Larry R; Foust, Charles R; Lyttle, Mark S; Meitner, Steven J; Rasmussen, David A

    2014-01-01

    Compact condensed-matter injection technologies are increasingly used in magnetic fusion. One recent application is in disruption mitigation. An imaging system with less-than-100- m- and sub- s-resolution is described and used to characterize intact and shattered cryogenic neon pellets. Shattered pellets contain fine particles ranging from tens of m to about 7 mm. Time-of-flight analyses indicate that pellets could slow down if hitting the wall of the guide tube. Fast high-resolution imaging systems are thus useful to neon and other condensed-matter injector development.

  19. Fast imaging of intact and shattered cryogenic neon pellets

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zhehui; Combs, S. K.; Baylor, L. R.; Foust, C. R.; Lyttle, M. S.; Meitner, S. J.; Rasmussen, D. A.

    2014-11-15

    Compact condensed-matter injection technologies are increasingly used in magnetic fusion. One recent application is in disruption mitigation. An imaging system with less-than-100-µm- and sub-µs-resolution is described and used to characterize intact and shattered cryogenic neon pellets. Shattered pellets contain fine particles ranging from tens of µm to about 7 mm. Time-of-flight analyses indicate that pellets could slow down if hitting the wall of the guide tube. Fast high-resolution imaging systems are thus useful to neon and other condensed-matter injector development.

  20. Imaging of Intact Tissue Sections: Moving beyond the Microscope*

    PubMed Central

    Seeley, Erin H.; Schwamborn, Kristina; Caprioli, Richard M.

    2011-01-01

    MALDI-imaging MS is a new molecular imaging technology for direct in situ analysis of thin tissue sections. Multiple analytes can be monitored simultaneously without prior knowledge of their identities and without the need for target-specific reagents such as antibodies. Imaging MS provides important insights into biological processes because the native distributions of molecules are minimally disturbed, and histological features remain intact throughout the analysis. A wide variety of molecules can be imaged, including proteins, peptides, lipids, drugs, and metabolites. Several specific examples are presented to highlight the utility of the technology. PMID:21632549

  1. Fast imaging of intact and shattered cryogenic neon pellets.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhehui; Combs, S K; Baylor, L R; Foust, C R; Lyttle, M S; Meitner, S J; Rasmussen, D A

    2014-11-01

    Compact condensed-matter injection technologies are increasingly used in magnetic fusion. One recent application is in disruption mitigation. An imaging system with less-than-100-µm- and sub-µs-resolution is described and used to characterize intact and shattered cryogenic neon pellets. Shattered pellets contain fine particles ranging from tens of µm to about 7 mm. Time-of-flight analyses indicate that pellets could slow down if hitting the wall of the guide tube. Fast high-resolution imaging systems are thus useful to neon and other condensed-matter injector development.

  2. Intact Imitation of Emotional Facial Actions in Autism Spectrum Conditions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Press, Clare; Richardson, Daniel; Bird, Geoffrey

    2010-01-01

    It has been proposed that there is a core impairment in autism spectrum conditions (ASC) to the mirror neuron system (MNS): If observed actions cannot be mapped onto the motor commands required for performance, higher order sociocognitive functions that involve understanding another person's perspective, such as theory of mind, may be impaired.…

  3. Intact connecting filaments change length in 2.3-nm quanta.

    PubMed

    Blyakhman, F; Tourovskaya, A; Pollack, G H

    2000-01-01

    In isolated titin molecules, length changes may occur in discrete steps (Tskhovrebova et al., 1997; Rief et al., 1997). The extent to which such steps are preserved in the intact muscle-filament lattice has remained unclear. We carried out experiments on single isolated insect-flight-muscle myofibrils in which thin filaments had been functionally removed either by stretch beyond overlap or by a "rigor-stretch" protocol, leaving the connecting (titin) filaments as the sole length-absorbing agent. The myofibril was released or stretched by a motor in ramp-like fashion. The time course of length change in the single sarcomere was stepwise. The same was true for half-sarcomere lengths. The presence of steps at the sarcomere level implies that parallel filaments step synchronously, with high cooperativity. Step sizes showed a consistent distribution: The smallest size was approximately 2.3 nm, and others were integer multiples of that value. Similar results were found for stretch and release. To our knowledge, the approximately 2.3-nm step quantum is the smallest consistent biomechanical event ever demonstrated. This quantum is an order of magnitude smaller than anticipated from the folding/unfolding of a complete Ig- or fibronectin-like domain, and may imply that folding occurs in sub-domain increments. The 2.3-nm incremental length change corresponds to a single turn of the domains' beta sheet.

  4. 46 CFR 178.325 - Intact stability requirements for a sailing vessel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...) Commanding Officer, Marine Safety Center, may prescribe additional or different stability requirements for a... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Intact stability requirements for a sailing vessel. 178... VESSELS (UNDER 100 GROSS TONS) INTACT STABILITY AND SEAWORTHINESS Intact Stability Standards §...

  5. 46 CFR 178.325 - Intact stability requirements-monohull sailing vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... protected waters or partially protected waters. (d) The Commanding Officer, Marine Safety Center, may... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Intact stability requirements-monohull sailing vessels... PASSENGER VESSELS (UNDER 100 GROSS TONS) INTACT STABILITY AND SEAWORTHINESS Intact Stability Standards §...

  6. Dissociating motor cortex from the motor

    PubMed Central

    Schieber, Marc H

    2011-01-01

    Abstract During closed-loop control of a brain–computer interface, neurons in the primary motor cortex can be intensely active even though the subject may be making no detectable movement or muscle contraction. How can neural activity in the primary motor cortex become dissociated from the movements and muscles of the native limb that it normally controls? Here we examine circumstances in which motor cortex activity is known to dissociate from movement – including mental imagery, visuo-motor dissociation and instructed delay. Many such motor cortex neurons may be related to muscle activity only indirectly. Furthermore, the integration of thousands of synaptic inputs by individual α-motoneurons means that under certain circumstances even cortico-motoneuronal cells, which make monosynaptic connections to α-motoneurons, can become dissociated from muscle activity. The natural ability of motor cortex neurons under voluntarily control to become dissociated from bodily movement may underlie the utility of this cortical area for controlling brain–computer interfaces. PMID:22005673

  7. Selective ion changes during spontaneous mitochondrial transients in intact astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Azarias, Guillaume; Chatton, Jean-Yves

    2011-01-01

    The bioenergetic status of cells is tightly regulated by the activity of cytosolic enzymes and mitochondrial ATP production. To adapt their metabolism to cellular energy needs, mitochondria have been shown to exhibit changes in their ionic composition as the result of changes in cytosolic ion concentrations. Individual mitochondria also exhibit spontaneous changes in their electrical potential without altering those of neighboring mitochondria. We recently reported that individual mitochondria of intact astrocytes exhibit spontaneous transient increases in their Na(+) concentration. Here, we investigated whether the concentration of other ionic species were involved during mitochondrial transients. By combining fluorescence imaging methods, we performed a multiparameter study of spontaneous mitochondrial transients in intact resting astrocytes. We show that mitochondria exhibit coincident changes in their Na(+) concentration, electrical potential, matrix pH and mitochondrial reactive oxygen species production during a mitochondrial transient without involving detectable changes in their Ca(2+) concentration. Using widefield and total internal reflection fluorescence imaging, we found evidence for localized transient decreases in the free Mg(2+) concentration accompanying mitochondrial Na(+) spikes that could indicate an associated local and transient enrichment in the ATP concentration. Therefore, we propose a sequential model for mitochondrial transients involving a localized ATP microdomain that triggers a Na(+)-mediated mitochondrial depolarization, transiently enhancing the activity of the mitochondrial respiratory chain. Our work provides a model describing ionic changes that could support a bidirectional cytosol-to-mitochondria ionic communication.

  8. Bacterial clearance in the intact and regenerating liver

    SciTech Connect

    Gross, K.; Katz, S.; Dunn, S.P.; Cikrit, D.; Rosenthal, R.; Grosfeld, J.L.

    1985-08-01

    The Kupffer cells in the liver play an important role in reticuloendothelial system (RES) function by clearing particulate matter and bacteria from the blood stream. While hepatocyte regeneration and function have been extensively studied following partial hepatectomy, little information is available concerning RES function in the regenerating liver. This study investigates hepatic RES function by evaluating bacterial clearance (live E. coli) in the intact and regenerating liver. Thirty-four young male Sprague Dawley rats were studied. Twenty-two animals underwent a standard 70% partial hepatectomy using ligature technique and 12 had a sham operation. Both groups of rats received 10(9) organism of TVS labeled E coli, intravenously at 24 hours, 72 hours, 2 1/2 weeks, and 6 weeks postoperatively. Rats were killed 10 minutes following injection and liver, lung, spleen, and kidney harvested, fixed, and radioactivity was determined using a scintillation spectrometer interfaced with a micro-computer counting the TVS radiolabel. The total organ count of trapped bacteria in liver in partially hepatectomized rats was lower than intact controls at 24 hours, but was similar at 72 hours, 2 1/2 weeks, and 6 weeks. Partial hepatectomy increased the amount of bacterial trapping in the lung at 24 hours and 72 hours and returned to normal at 2 1/2 weeks and 6 weeks. Splenic activity was increased following hepatectomy at 2 1/2 weeks. Renal clearance was increased at 72 hours and 2 1/2 weeks.

  9. Multiplexed Intact-Tissue Transcriptional Analysis at Cellular Resolution.

    PubMed

    Sylwestrak, Emily Lauren; Rajasethupathy, Priyamvada; Wright, Matthew Arnot; Jaffe, Anna; Deisseroth, Karl

    2016-02-11

    In recently developed approaches for high-resolution imaging within intact tissue, molecular characterization over large volumes has been largely restricted to labeling of proteins. But volumetric nucleic acid labeling may represent a far greater scientific and clinical opportunity, enabling detection of not only diverse coding RNA variants but also non-coding RNAs. Moreover, scaling immunohistochemical detection to large tissue volumes has limitations due to high cost, limited renewability/availability, and restricted multiplexing capability of antibody labels. With the goal of versatile, high-content, and scalable molecular phenotyping of intact tissues, we developed a method using carbodiimide-based chemistry to stably retain RNAs in clarified tissue, coupled with amplification tools for multiplexed detection. The resulting technology enables robust measurement of activity-dependent transcriptional signatures, cell-identity markers, and diverse non-coding RNAs in rodent and human tissue volumes. The growing set of validated probes is deposited in an online resource for nucleating related developments from across the scientific community.

  10. STREPTOMYCIN FORMATION BY INTACT MYCELIUM OF STREPTOMYCES GRISEUS

    PubMed Central

    Nomi, Ryosaku

    1963-01-01

    Nomi, Ryosaku (Rutgers, The State University, New Brunswick, N.J.). Streptomycin formation by intact mycelium of Streptomyces griseus. J. Bacteriol. 86:1220–1230. 1963.—A study was made of streptomycin formation by intact mycelium of Streptomyces griseus 107 grown in glucose-yeast extract medium. When mycelium harvested after 24, 48, and 72 hr was compared, the earliest growth showed the highest activity in producing streptomycin from glucose. The concentration of streptomycin in the mycelium was higher in the older growth. Calcium chloride had a remarkable effect in increasing streptomycin production from the precursors in the mycelium, especially when the mycelium was grown for 48 hr or longer. The effect of calcium chloride cannot be attributed to the precipitation of an excess of inorganic phosphate in the medium. Glucose, fructose, glycerol, lactic acid, glucosamine, streptidine, and inositol stimulated streptomycin formation, whereas gluconic acid, glucuronic acid, streptamine, and strepturea did not. When 24-hr-old mycelium was suspended and shaken in 0.5% glucose solution, the antibiotic precursors necessary to produce streptomycin were found mainly in the supernatant of the culture rather than in the mycelium. The supernatant included some substance which had a weak antibiotic activity. This substance was less basic than streptomycin and was transformed to streptomycin with a remarkable increase in antibiotic activity. PMID:14086093

  11. Microarray Noninvasive Neuronal Seizure Recordings from Intact Larval Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Michaela; Dhamne, Sameer C.; LaCoursiere, Christopher M.; Tambunan, Dimira; Poduri, Annapurna; Rotenberg, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Zebrafish epilepsy models are emerging tools in experimental epilepsy. Zebrafish larvae, in particular, are advantageous because they can be easily genetically altered and used for developmental and drug studies since agents applied to the bath penetrate the organism easily. Methods for electrophysiological recordings in zebrafish are new and evolving. We present a novel multi-electrode array method to non-invasively record electrical activity from up to 61 locations of an intact larval zebrafish head. This method enables transcranial noninvasive recording of extracellular field potentials (which include multi-unit activity and EEG) to identify epileptic seizures. To record from the brains of zebrafish larvae, the dorsum of the head of an intact larva was secured onto a multi-electrode array. We recorded from individual electrodes for at least three hours and quantified neuronal firing frequency, spike patterns (continuous or bursting), and synchrony of neuronal firing. Following 15 mM potassium chloride- or pentylenetetrazole-infusion into the bath, spike and burst rate increased significantly. Additionally, synchrony of neuronal firing across channels, a hallmark of epileptic seizures, also increased. Notably, the fish survived the experiment. This non-invasive method complements present invasive zebrafish neurophysiological techniques: it affords the advantages of high spatial and temporal resolution, a capacity to measure multiregional activity and neuronal synchrony in seizures, and fish survival for future experiments, such as studies of epileptogenesis and development. PMID:27281339

  12. Analytical strategies for the global quantification of intact proteins.

    PubMed

    Collier, Timothy S; Muddiman, David Charles

    2012-09-01

    The quantification of intact proteins is a relatively recent development in proteomics. In eukaryotic organisms, proteins are present as multiple isoforms as the result of variations in genetic code, alternative splicing, post-translational modification and other processing events. Understanding the identities and biological functions of these isoforms and how their concentrations vary across different states is the central goal of proteomics. To date, the bulk of proteomics research utilizes a "bottom-up" approach, digesting proteins into their more manageable constitutive peptides, but sacrificing information about the specific isoform and combinations of post-translational modifications present on the protein. Very specific strategies for protein quantification such as the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and Western blot are commonplace in laboratories and clinics, but impractical for the study of global biological changes. Herein, we describe strategies for the quantification of intact proteins, their distinct advantages, and challenges to their employment. Techniques contained in this review include the more traditional and widely employed methodology of differential gel electrophoresis and more recently developed mass spectrometry-based techniques including metabolic labeling, chemical labeling, and label-free methodologies.

  13. Nickel in plants: I. Uptake kinetics using intact soybean seedlings.

    PubMed

    Cataldo, D A; Garland, T R; Wildung, R E

    1978-10-01

    The absorption of Ni(2+) by 21-day-old soybean plants (Glycine max cv. Williams) was investigated with respect to its concentration dependence, transport kinetics, and interactions with various nutrient cations. Nickel absorption, measured as a function of concentration (0.02 to 100 mum), demonstrated the presence of multiple absorption isotherms. Each of the three isotherms conforms to Michaelis-Menten kinetics; kinetic constants are reported for uptake by the intact plant and for transfer from root to shoot tissues. The absorption of Ni(2+) by the intact plant and its transfer from root to shoot were inhibited by the presence of Cu(2+), Zn(2+), Fe(2+), and Co(2+). Competition kinetic studies showed Cu(2+) and Zn(2+) to inhibit Ni(2+) absorption competitively, suggesting that Ni(2+), Cu(2+), and Zn(2+) are absorbed using the same carrier site. Calculated K(m) and K(i) constants for Ni(2+) in the presence and absence of Cu(2+) were 6.1 and 9.2 mum, respectively, whereas K(m) and K(i) constants were calculated to be 6.7 and 24.4 mum, respectively, for Ni(2+) in the presence and absence of Zn(2+). The mechanism of inhibition of Ni(2+) in the presence of Fe(2+) and Co(2+) was not resolved by classical kinetic relationships.

  14. Effects of Triclocarban on Intact Immature Male Rat

    PubMed Central

    Duleba, Antoni J.; Ahmed, Mohamed I.; Sun, Meng; Gao, Allen C.; Villanueva, Jesus; Conley, Alan J.; Turgeon, Judith L.; Benirschke, Kurt; Gee, Nancy A.; Chen, Jiangang; Green, Peter G.; Lasley, Bill L.

    2011-01-01

    Triclocarban (TCC; 3,4,4′-trichlorocarbanilide) is an antimicrobial agent used widely in various personal hygiene products including soaps. Recently, TCC has been shown to enhance testosterone-induced effects in vitro and to enlarge accessory sex organs in castrated male rats. This study was designed to evaluate the effects of TCC on intact age-matched male rats and on human prostate LNCaP and C4–2B cells. Seven-week-old male Sprague-Dawley rats received either a normal diet or a diet supplemented with TCC (0.25% in diet) for 10 days. Triclocarban induced hyperplasia of accessory sex organs in the absence of significant qualitative histological changes. Serum luteinizing hormone (LH) and testosterone were not significantly altered by TCC treatment. In prostate cancer-derived LNCaP and C4–2B cells, TCC potentiated androgen actions via androgen receptor-dependent actions. In conclusion, TCC significantly affects intact male reproductive organs and potentiates androgen effects in prostate cancer cells. PMID:20889956

  15. Piezoelectric Motors and Transformers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchino, K.

    Piezoelectric ceramics forms a new field between electronic and structural ceramics [1-4]. Application fields are classified into three categories: positioners, motors, and vibration suppressors. From the market research result for 80 Japanese component industries in 1992, tiny motors in the range of 5-8 mm are required in large numbers for office and portable equipment; the conventional electromagnetic (EM) motors are rather difficult to produce in this size with sufficient energy efficiency, while Silicon MEMS actuators are too small to be used in practice. Piezoelectric ultrasonic motors whose efficiency is insensitive to size are superior in the millimeter motor area. The manufacturing precision of optical instruments such as lasers and cameras, and the positioning accuracy for fabricating semiconductor chips are of the order of 0.1μm which is much smaller than the backlash of the EM motors. Vibration suppression in space structures and military vehicles also require compact but mighty piezoelectric actuators.

  16. Borrelia burgdorferi uniquely regulates its motility genes and has an intricate flagellar hook-basal body structure.

    PubMed

    Sal, Melanie S; Li, Chunhao; Motalab, M A; Shibata, Satoshi; Aizawa, Shin-ichi; Charon, Nyles W

    2008-03-01

    Borrelia burgdorferi is a flat-wave, motile spirochete that causes Lyme disease. Motility is provided by periplasmic flagella (PFs) located between the cell cylinder and an outer membrane sheath. The structure of these PFs, which are composed of a basal body, a hook, and a filament, is similar to the structure of flagella of other bacteria. To determine if hook formation influences flagellin gene transcription in B. burgdorferi, we inactivated the hook structural gene flgE by targeted mutagenesis. In many bacteria, completion of the hook structure serves as a checkpoint for transcriptional control of flagellum synthesis and other chemotaxis and motility genes. Specifically, the hook allows secretion of the anti-sigma factor FlgM and concomitant late gene transcription promoted by sigma28. However, the control of B. burgdorferi PF synthesis differs from the control of flagellum synthesis in other bacteria; the gene encoding sigma28 is not present in the genome of B. burgdorferi, nor are any sigma28 promoter recognition sequences associated with the motility genes. We found that B. burgdorferi flgE mutants lacked PFs, were rod shaped, and were nonmotile, which substantiates previous evidence that PFs are involved in both cell morphology and motility. Although most motility and chemotaxis gene products accumulated at wild-type levels in the absence of FlgE, mutant cells had markedly decreased levels of the flagellar filament proteins FlaA and FlaB. Further analyses showed that the reduction in the levels of flagellin proteins in the spirochetes lacking FlgE was mediated at the posttranscriptional level. Taken together, our results indicate that in B. burgdorferi, the completion of the hook does not serve as a checkpoint for transcriptional regulation of flagellum synthesis. In addition, we also present evidence that the hook protein in B. burgdorferi forms a high-molecular-weight complex and that formation of this complex occurs in the periplasmic space.

  17. Architecture of the Flagellar Switch Complex of Escherichia coli: Conformational Plasticity of FliG and Implications for Adaptive Remodeling.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun A; Panushka, Joseph; Meyer, Trevor; Carlisle, Ryan; Baker, Samantha; Ide, Nicholas; Lynch, Michael; Crane, Brian R; Blair, David F

    2017-03-01

    Structural models of the complex that regulates the direction of flagellar rotation assume either ~34 or ~25 copies of the protein FliG. Support for ~34 came from cross-linking experiments identifying an inter-subunit contact most consistent with that number; support for ~25 came from the observation that flagella can assemble and rotate when FliG is genetically fused to FliF, for which the accepted number is ~25. Here, we have undertaken cross-linking and other experiments to address more fully the question of FliG number. The results indicate a copy number of ~25 for FliG. An interaction between the C-terminal and middle domains, which has been taken to support a model with ~34 copies, is also supported. To reconcile the interaction with a FliG number of ~25, we hypothesize conformational plasticity in an inter-domain segment of FliG that allows some subunits to bridge gaps created by the number mismatch. This proposal is supported by mutant phenotypes and other results indicating that the normally helical segment adopts a more extended conformation in some subunits. The FliG amino-terminal domain is organized in a regular array with dimensions matching a ring in the upper part of the complex. The model predicts that FliG copy number should be tied to that of FliF, whereas FliM copy number can increase or decrease according to the number of FliG subunits that adopt the extended conformation. This has implications for the phenomenon of adaptive switch remodeling, in which FliM the copy number varies to adjust the bias of the switch.

  18. Epitope mapping of Campylobacter jejuni flagellar capping protein (FliD) by chicken (Gallus gallus domesticus) sera.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Hung-Yueh; Telli, Arife Ezgi; Jagne, Jarra F; Benson, Christopher L; Hiett, Kelli L; Line, John E

    2016-12-01

    Campylobacter jejuni, a Gram-negative rod, is a zoonotic pathogen associated with human acute bacterial gastroenteritis worldwide. The flagellum, composed of more than 35 proteins, is responsible for colonization of C. jejuni in the host gastrointestinal tract as well as inducing protective antibodies against the homologous serotype. In our previous study, we demonstrated that the flagellar capping protein (FliD) is an immunodominant protein that reacted strongly to sera from field chickens. In this communication, we mapped linear immunoreactive epitopes on FliD using a set of 158 synthetic peptides of 15-mer overlapping with 11 amino acid residues on peptide microarrays with sera from field chickens. The results from peptide microarrays showed (1) no cross-reactivity of the immobilized peptides with the secondary anti-chicken antibody in the control incubation, and (2) heterogeneous patterns of sera reacting to the immobilized peptides. The peptides that reacted to more than three chicken sera and had higher averages of fluorescence units were selected for further validation by the peptide ELISA. The results showed peptides 24, 91 and 92 had relatively high reactivity and less variation among 64 individual serum samples, indicating these peptides represented the shared immunodominant epitopes on the C. jejuni FliD protein. These peptides were also recognized by sera from chickens immunized with the purified recombinant FliD protein. The findings of the specific shared linear immunodominant epitopes on FliD in this study provide a rationale for further evaluation to determine their utility as epitope vaccines covering multiple serotypes for chicken immunization, and subsequently, for providing safer poultry products for human consumption.

  19. Complex Interplay between FleQ, Cyclic Diguanylate and Multiple σ Factors Coordinately Regulates Flagellar Motility and Biofilm Development in Pseudomonas putida

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez-Fernández, Alicia; López-Sánchez, Aroa; Jiménez-Díaz, Lorena; Navarrete, Blanca; Calero, Patricia; Platero, Ana Isabel

    2016-01-01

    Most bacteria alternate between a free living planktonic lifestyle and the formation of structured surface-associated communities named biofilms. The transition between these two lifestyles requires a precise and timely regulation of the factors involved in each of the stages that has been likened to a developmental process. Here we characterize the involvement of the transcriptional regulator FleQ and the second messenger cyclic diguanylate in the coordinate regulation of multiple functions related to motility and surface colonization in Pseudomonas putida. Disruption of fleQ caused strong defects in flagellar motility, biofilm formation and surface attachment, and the ability of this mutation to suppress multiple biofilm-related phenotypes associated to cyclic diguanylate overproduction suggests that FleQ mediates cyclic diguanylate signaling critical to biofilm growth. We have constructed a library containing 94 promoters potentially involved in motility and biofilm development fused to gfp and lacZ, screened this library for FleQ and cyclic diguanylate regulation, and assessed the involvement of alternative σ factors σN and FliA in the transcription of FleQ-regulated promoters. Our results suggest a dual mode of action for FleQ. Low cyclic diguanylate levels favor FleQ interaction with σN-dependent promoters to activate the flagellar cascade, encompassing the flagellar cluster and additional genes involved in cyclic diguanylate metabolism, signal transduction and gene regulation. On the other hand, characterization of the FleQ-regulated σN- and FliA-independent PlapA and PbcsD promoters revealed two disparate regulatory mechanisms leading to a similar outcome: the synthesis of biofilm matrix components in response to increased cyclic diguanylate levels. PMID:27636892

  20. Genome sequence of Xanthomonas fuscans subsp. fuscans strain 4834-R reveals that flagellar motility is not a general feature of xanthomonads

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Xanthomonads are plant-associated bacteria responsible for diseases on economically important crops. Xanthomonas fuscans subsp. fuscans (Xff) is one of the causal agents of common bacterial blight of bean. In this study, the complete genome sequence of strain Xff 4834-R was determined and compared to other Xanthomonas genome sequences. Results Comparative genomics analyses revealed core characteristics shared between Xff 4834-R and other xanthomonads including chemotaxis elements, two-component systems, TonB-dependent transporters, secretion systems (from T1SS to T6SS) and multiple effectors. For instance a repertoire of 29 Type 3 Effectors (T3Es) with two Transcription Activator-Like Effectors was predicted. Mobile elements were associated with major modifications in the genome structure and gene content in comparison to other Xanthomonas genomes. Notably, a deletion of 33 kbp affects flagellum biosynthesis in Xff 4834-R. The presence of a complete flagellar cluster was assessed in a collection of more than 300 strains representing different species and pathovars of Xanthomonas. Five percent of the tested strains presented a deletion in the flagellar cluster and were non-motile. Moreover, half of the Xff strains isolated from the same epidemic than 4834-R was non-motile and this ratio was conserved in the strains colonizing the next bean seed generations. Conclusions This work describes the first genome of a Xanthomonas strain pathogenic on bean and reports the existence of non-motile xanthomonads belonging to different species and pathovars. Isolation of such Xff variants from a natural epidemic may suggest that flagellar motility is not a key function for in planta fitness. PMID:24195767

  1. FlhF, a signal recognition particle-like GTPase, is involved in the regulation of flagellar arrangement, motility behaviour and protein secretion in Bacillus cereus.

    PubMed

    Salvetti, Sara; Ghelardi, Emilia; Celandroni, Francesco; Ceragioli, Mara; Giannessi, Francesco; Senesi, Sonia

    2007-08-01

    Flagellar arrangement is a highly conserved feature within bacterial species. However, only a few genes regulating cell flagellation have been described in polar flagellate bacteria. This report demonstrates that the arrangement of flagella in the peritrichous flagellate Bacillus cereus is controlled by flhF. Disruption of flhF in B. cereus led to a reduction in the number of flagella from 10-12 to 1-3 filaments per cell in the insertion mutant MP06. Moreover, compared to the parental strain, MP06 exhibited: (i) shorter smooth swimming phases, causing reduced swimming motility but not affecting chemotaxis; (ii) complete inhibition of swarming motility, as differentiated swarm cells were never detected; (iii) an increased amount of extracellular proteins; and (iv) differential export of virulence determinants, such as haemolysin BL (HBL), phosphatidylcholine-preferring phospholipase C (PC-PLC) and non-haemolytic enterotoxin (NHE). Introduction of a plasmid harbouring flhF (pDGflhF) into MP06 completely restored the wild-type phenotype in the trans-complemented strain MP07. B. cereus flhF was found to constitute a monocistronic transcriptional unit and its overexpression did not produce abnormal features in the wild-type background. Characterization of a B. cereus mutant (MP05) carrying a partial flhF deletion indicated that the last C-terminal domain of FlhF is involved in protein export while not required for flagellar arrangement and motility behaviour. Taken together, these data suggest that B. cereus FlhF is a promising candidate for connecting diverse cellular functions, such as flagellar arrangement, motility behaviour, pattern of protein secretion and virulence phenotype.

  2. The Type VI Secretion System Modulates Flagellar Gene Expression and Secretion in Citrobacter freundii and Contributes to Adhesion and Cytotoxicity to Host Cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Liyun; Hao, Shuai; Lan, Ruiting; Wang, Guangxia; Xiao, Di; Sun, Hui; Xu, Jianguo

    2015-07-01

    The type VI secretion system (T6SS) as a virulence factor-releasing system contributes to virulence development of various pathogens and is often activated upon contact with target cells. Citrobacter freundii strain CF74 has a complete T6SS genomic island (GI) that contains clpV, hcp-2, and vgr T6SS genes. We constructed clpV, hcp-2, vgr, and T6SS GI deletion mutants in CF74 and analyzed their effects on the transcriptome overall and, specifically, on the flagellar system at the levels of transcription and translation. Deletion of the T6SS GI affected the transcription of 84 genes, with 15 and 69 genes exhibiting higher and lower levels of transcription, respectively. Members of the cell motility class of downregulated genes of the CF74ΔT6SS mutant were mainly flagellar genes, including effector proteins, chaperones, and regulators. Moreover, the production and secretion of FliC were also decreased in clpV, hcp-2, vgr, or T6SS GI deletion mutants in CF74 and were restored upon complementation. In swimming motility assays, the mutant strains were found to be less motile than the wild type, and motility was restored by complementation. The mutant strains were defective in adhesion to HEp-2 cells and were restored partially upon complementation. Further, the CF74ΔT6SS, CF74ΔclpV, and CF74Δhcp-2 mutants induced lower cytotoxicity to HEp-2 cells than the wild type. These results suggested that the T6SS GI in CF74 regulates the flagellar system, enhances motility, is involved in adherence to host cells, and induces cytotoxicity to host cells. Thus, the T6SS plays a wide-ranging role in C. freundii.

  3. Damage to Fronto-Parietal Networks Impairs Motor Imagery Ability after Stroke: A Voxel-Based Lesion Symptom Mapping Study

    PubMed Central

    Oostra, Kristine M.; Van Bladel, Anke; Vanhoonacker, Ann C. L.; Vingerhoets, Guy

    2016-01-01

    Background: Mental practice with motor imagery has been shown to promote motor skill acquisition in healthy subjects and patients. Although lesions of the common motor imagery and motor execution neural network are expected to impair motor imagery ability, functional equivalence appears to be at least partially preserved in stroke patients. Aim: To identify brain regions that are mandatory for preserved motor imagery ability after stroke. Method: Thirty-seven patients with hemiplegia after a first time stroke participated. Motor imagery ability was measured using a Motor Imagery questionnaire and temporal congruence test. A voxelwise lesion symptom mapping approach was used to identify neural correlates of motor imagery in this cohort within the first year post-stroke. Results: Poor motor imagery vividness was associated with lesions in the left putamen, left ventral premotor cortex and long association fibers linking parieto-occipital regions with the dorsolateral premotor and prefrontal areas. Poor temporal congruence was otherwise linked to lesions in the more rostrally located white matter of the superior corona radiata. Conclusion: This voxel-based lesion symptom mapping study confirms the association between white matter tract lesions and impaired motor imagery ability, thus emphasizing the importance of an intact fronto-parietal network for motor imagery. Our results further highlight the crucial role of the basal ganglia and premotor cortex when performing motor imagery tasks. PMID:26869894

  4. Cryogenic Electric Motor Tested

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Gerald V.

    2004-01-01

    Technology for pollution-free "electric flight" is being evaluated in a number of NASA Glenn Research Center programs. One approach is to drive propulsive fans or propellers with electric motors powered by fuel cells running on hydrogen. For large transport aircraft, conventional electric motors are far too heavy to be feasible. However, since hydrogen fuel would almost surely be carried as liquid, a propulsive electric motor could be cooled to near liquid hydrogen temperature (-423 F) by using the fuel for cooling before it goes to the fuel cells. Motor windings could be either superconducting or high purity normal copper or aluminum. The electrical resistance of pure metals can drop to 1/100th or less of their room-temperature resistance at liquid hydrogen temperature. In either case, super or normal, much higher current density is possible in motor windings. This leads to more compact motors that are projected to produce 20 hp/lb or more in large sizes, in comparison to on the order of 2 hp/lb for large conventional motors. High power density is the major goal. To support cryogenic motor development, we have designed and built in-house a small motor (7-in. outside diameter) for operation in liquid nitrogen.

  5. Sensorless, online motor diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Kliman, G.B.; Premerlani, W.J.; Yazici, B.; Koegl, R.A.; Mazereeuw, J.

    1997-04-01

    Electric motors play a very important role in the safe and efficient running of any industrial plant. Early detection of abnormalities in the motors will help avoid expensive failures. Motor current signature analysis (MCSA) implemented in a computer-based motor monitor can contribute to such condition-based maintenance functions. Such a system may also detect an abnormality in the process as well as the motor. Extensive online monitoring of the motors can lead to greater plant availability, extended plant life, higher quality product, and smoother plant operation. With advances in digital technology over the last several years, adequate data processing capability is now available on cost-effective, microprocessor-based, protective-relay platforms to monitor motors for a variety of abnormalities in addition to the normal protection functions. Such multifunction monitors, first introduced by Multilin, are displacing the multiplicity of electromechanical devices commonly applied for many years. Following some background information on motor monitoring, this article features recent developments in providing tools for the diagnosis of faults or incipient faults in electric motor drives: Sensorless torque measurement, direct detection of turn-to-turn short circuits, detection of cracked or broken rotor bars, and detection of bearing deterioration.

  6. Hybrid vehicle motor alignment

    DOEpatents

    Levin, Michael Benjamin

    2001-07-03

    A rotor of an electric motor for a motor vehicle is aligned to an axis of rotation for a crankshaft of an internal combustion engine having an internal combustion engine and an electric motor. A locator is provided on the crankshaft, a piloting tool is located radially by the first locator to the crankshaft. A stator of the electric motor is aligned to a second locator provided on the piloting tool. The stator is secured to the engine block. The rotor is aligned to the crankshaft and secured thereto.

  7. The phosphorylation of coated membrane proteins in intact neurons

    PubMed Central

    1986-01-01

    To complement studies that have demonstrated the prominent phosphorylation of a 50-kD coated vesicle polypeptide in vitro, we have evaluated the phosphorylation of coated membrane proteins in intact cells. A co-assembly assay has been devised in which extracts of cultured rat sympathetic neurons labeled with [32P]-Pi were combined with unlabeled carrier bovine brain coat proteins and reassembled coat structures were isolated by gradient centrifugation. Two groups of phosphorylated polypeptides, of 100-110 kD (pp100-110) and 155 kD (pp155) apparent molecular mass, were incorporated into reassembled coats. The neuronal pp100-110 are structurally and functionally related to the 100-110-kD component of the bovine brain assembly protein (AP), a protein complex that also contains 50-kD and 16.5-kD components and is characterized by its ability to promote the reassembly of clathrin coat structures under physiological conditions of pH and ionic strength (Zaremba, S. and J. H. Keen, 1983, J. Cell Biol., 97:1337-1348). The neuronal pp155 detected in reassembled coat structures was readily observable in total extracts of [32P]-Pi-labeled neurons dissolved in SDS-containing buffer. A bovine brain counterpart to the neuronal pp155 was also observed when brain coated vesicles were subjected to two- dimensional gel electrophoresis. Phosphoserine was the predominant phosphoaminoacid found in both the pp100 and pp155. A structural and functional counterpart to the 50-kD brain assembly polypeptide (AP50) was also identified in these neurons. Although the brain AP50 is prominently phosphorylated by an endogenous protein kinase in isolated coated vesicle preparations, the neuronal AP50 was not detectably phosphorylated in intact cells as assessed by two-dimensional non- equilibrium pH gradient gel electrophoresis of labeled cells dissolved directly in SDS-containing buffers. These results demonstrate that the bovine brain assembly polypeptides of 50 kD and 100-110 kD that we have

  8. Intact Conceptual Priming in the Absence of Declarative Memory

    PubMed Central

    Levy, D.A.; Stark, C.E.L.; Squire, L.R.

    2009-01-01

    Priming is an unconscious (nondeclarative) form of memory whereby identification or production of an item is improved by an earlier encounter. It has been proposed that declarative memory and priming might be related—for example, that conceptual priming results in more fluent processing, thereby providing a basis for familiarity judgments. In two experiments, we assessed conceptual priming and recognition memory across a 5-min interval in 5 memory-impaired patients. All patients exhibited fully intact priming in tests of both free association (study tent; at test, provide an association to canvas) and category verification (study lemon; at test, decide: Is lemon a type of fruit?). Yet the 2 most severely amnesic patients performed at chance on matched tests of recognition memory. These findings count against the notion that conceptual priming provides feelings of familiarity that can support accurate recognition judgments. We suggest that priming is inaccessible to conscious awareness and does not influence declarative memory. PMID:15447639

  9. Bursty gene expression in the intact mammalian liver

    PubMed Central

    Halpern, Keren Bahar; Tanami, Sivan; Landen, Shanie; Chapal, Michal; Szlak, Liran; Hutzler, Anat; Nizhberg, Anna; Itzkovitz, Shalev

    2015-01-01

    Summary Bursts of nascent mRNA have been shown to lead to substantial cell-cell variation in unicellular organisms, facilitating diverse responses to environmental challenges. It is unknown whether similar bursts and gene-expression noise occur in mammalian tissues. To address this, we combine single molecule transcript counting with dual-color labeling and quantification of nascent mRNA to characterize promoter states, transcription rates and transcript lifetimes in the intact mouse liver. We find that liver gene expression is highly bursty, with promoters stochastically switching between transcriptionally active and inactive states. Promoters of genes with short mRNA lifetimes are active longer, facilitating rapid response while reducing burst-associated noise. Moreover, polyploid hepatocytes exhibit less noise than diploid hepatocytes, suggesting a possible benefit to liver polyploidy. Thus temporal averaging and liver polyploidy dampen the intrinsic variability associated with transcriptional bursts. Our approach can be used to study transcriptional bursting in diverse mammalian tissues. PMID:25728770

  10. Rhesus monkey brain imaging through intact skull with thermoacoustic tomography.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yuan; Wang, Lihong V

    2006-03-01

    Two-dimensional microwave-induced thermoacoustic tomography (TAT) is applied to imaging the Rhesus monkey brain through the intact skull. To reduce the wavefront distortion caused by the skull, only the low-frequency components of the thermoacoustic signals (< 1 MHz) are used to reconstruct the TAT images. The methods of signal processing and image reconstruction are validated by imaging a lamb kidney. The resolution of the system is found to be 4 mm when we image a 1-month-old monkey head containing inserted needles. We also image the coronal and axial sections of a 7-month-old monkey head. Brain features that are 3 cm deep in the head are imaged clearly. Our results demonstrate that TAT has potential for use in portable, cost-effective imagers for pediatric brains.

  11. Calcium Activation Profile In Electrically Stimulated Intact Rat Heart Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geerts, Hugo; Nuydens, Rony; Ver Donck, Luc; Nuyens, Roger; De Brabander, Marc; Borgers, Marcel

    1988-06-01

    Recent advances in fluorescent probe technology and image processing equipment have made available the measurement of calcium in living systems on a real-time basis. We present the use of the calcium indicator Fura-2 in intact normally stimulated rat heart cells for the spatial and dynamic measurement of the calcium excitation profile. After electric stimulation (1 Hz), the activation proceeds from the center of the myocyte toward the periphery. Within two frame times (80 ms), the whole cell is activated. The activation is slightly faster in the center of the cell than in the periphery. The mean recovery time is 200-400 ms. There is no difference along the cell's long axis. The effect of a beta-agonist and of a calcium antagonist is described.

  12. Temperature dependence of the zeta potential in intact natural carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al Mahrouqi, Dawoud; Vinogradov, Jan; Jackson, Matthew D.

    2016-11-01

    The zeta potential is a measure of the electrical charge on mineral surfaces and is an important control on subsurface geophysical monitoring, adsorption of polar species in aquifers, and rock wettability. We report the first measurements of zeta potential in intact, water-saturated, natural carbonate samples at temperatures up to 120°C. The zeta potential is negative and decreases in magnitude with increasing temperature at low ionic strength (0.01 M NaCl, comparable to potable water) but is independent of temperature at high ionic strength (0.5 M NaCl, comparable to seawater). The equilibrium calcium concentration resulting from carbonate dissolution also increases with increasing temperature at low ionic strength but is independent of temperature at high ionic strength. The temperature dependence of the zeta potential is correlated with the temperature dependence of the equilibrium calcium concentration and shows a Nernstian linear relationship. Our findings are applicable to many subsurface carbonate rocks at elevated temperature.

  13. Citrate synthesis in intact rat-liver mitochondria is irreversible.

    PubMed

    Greksák, M; Lopes-Cardozo, M; van den Bergh, S G

    1982-02-01

    Rat-liver mitochondria were incubated with [1,5-14C]citrate in the presence of fluorocitrate to block its oxidation in the Krebs cycle. The reaction products were analysed enzymatically and by anion-exchange chromatography. Incorporation of 14C into acetyl-L-carnitine or ketone bodies via a backward action of citrate synthase was not observed. The optimal rate of citrate synthesis from pyruvate and malate in the presence of fluorocitrate was 15 nmol . mg-1 min-1. In the absence of fluorocitrate, but in the presence of malonate, citrate was oxidized to succinate at a rate of 4 nmol . mg-1 . min-1. We conclude that the synthesis of citrate by intact rat liver mitochondria is an irreversible process. The possible mechanism underlying this phenomenon and the consequence for metabolic regulation are discussed.

  14. Probing Metabolism in the Intact Retina Using Stable Isotope Tracers.

    PubMed

    Du, Jianhai; Linton, Jonathan D; Hurley, James B

    2015-01-01

    Vertebrate retinas have several characteristics that make them particularly interesting from a metabolic perspective. The retinas have a highly laminated structure, high energy demands, and they share several metabolic features with tumors, such as a strong Warburg effect and abundant pyruvate kinase M2 isoform expression. The energy demands of retinas are both qualitatively and quantitatively different in light and darkness and metabolic dysfunction could cause retinal degeneration. Stable isotope-based metabolic analysis with mass spectrometry is a powerful tool to trace the dynamic metabolic reactions and reveal novel metabolic pathways within cells and between cells in retina. Here, we describe methods to quantify retinal metabolism in intact retinas and discuss applications of these methods to the understanding of neuron-glia interaction, light and dark adaptation, and retinal degenerative diseases.

  15. Perforation of Meckel's diverticulum by an intact fish bone

    PubMed Central

    Mouawad, Nicolas J; Hammond, Stephen; Kaoutzanis, Christodoulos

    2013-01-01

    Meckel's diverticulum is the most common congenital anomaly of the gastrointestinal tract, with an overall incidence of approximately 2.2%. It is generally noted incidentally during laparotomy for management of other abdominal pathology. Complications are infrequent, developing in 4% of individuals with this abnormality, and are usually seen in childhood. Herein, we discuss the case of a 52-year-old Caucasian man presenting with a 1-day history of worsening central and right-sided abdominal pain. Initial evaluation posed a broad differential however, following conservative measures and unremarkable plain films, the patient developed peritoneal signs necessitating operative intervention. During diagnostic laparoscopy, a Meckel's diverticulum was noted to be inflamed and perforated by an intact fish bone. The patient was treated successfully with a segmental resection and primary anastomosis, and had an uneventful postoperative recovery. PMID:23429021

  16. Temporary Nerve Block at Selected Digits Revealed Hand Motor Deficits in Grasping Tasks

    PubMed Central

    Carteron, Aude; McPartlan, Kerry; Gioeli, Christina; Reid, Emily; Turturro, Matt; Hahn, Barry; Benson, Cynthia; Zhang, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral sensory feedback plays a crucial role in ensuring correct motor execution throughout hand grasp control. Previous studies utilized local anesthesia to deprive somatosensory feedback in the digits or hand, observations included sensorimotor deficits at both corticospinal and peripheral levels. However, the questions of how the disturbed and intact sensory input integrate and interact with each other to assist the motor program execution, and whether the motor coordination based on motor output variability between affected and non-affected elements (e.g., digits) becomes interfered by the local sensory deficiency, have not been answered. The current study aims to investigate the effect of peripheral deafferentation through digital nerve blocks at selective digits on motor performance and motor coordination in grasp control. Our results suggested that the absence of somatosensory information induced motor deficits in hand grasp control, as evidenced by reduced maximal force production ability in both local and non-local digits, impairment of force and moment control during object lift and hold, and attenuated motor synergies in stabilizing task performance variables, namely the tangential force and moment of force. These findings implied that individual sensory input is shared across all the digits and the disturbed signal from local sensory channel(s) has a more comprehensive impact on the process of the motor output execution in the sensorimotor integration process. Additionally, a feedback control mechanism with a sensation-based component resides in the formation process for the motor covariation structure. PMID:27932964

  17. Zeta Potential in Intact Natural Carbonates at Elevated Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Mahrouqi, D.; Vinogradov, J.; Jackson, M.

    2015-12-01

    Measurements of zeta potential have been used to monitor subsurface flows in many natural brine systems. Numerous studies report zeta potentials in carbonates using crushed samples at low ionic strength and laboratory temperatures. However, natural brines have much higher salinity; moreover, temperatures are considerably higher in many subsurface settings. The variation of zeta potentials with temperature has not been examined in natural carbonates. We report zeta potential values interpreted from streaming potential measurements in two intact carbonate rock samples, saturated with artificial brines at elevated temperatures. We measure streaming potential using an experimental set-up that incorporates in-situ measurements of saturated rock conductivity, brine temperature, brine pH, brine electrical conductivity, pressure difference and voltage at temperatures up to 120oC. The streaming potential measurements are complemented with brine effluent studies. We find that the interpreted zeta potential is negative and decreases in magnitude with increasing temperature at low ionic strength (0.01M) and independent of temperature at high ionic strength (0.5M); consistent with published zeta potential in intact natural sandstones. The concentration of Ca2+ (main potential determining ion) also decreases with temperature at low ionic strength, but remains constant at high ionic strength. The temperature dependence of the zeta potential is consistent between two different natural carbonate samples and can be explained by the temperature dependence of pCa2+. We suggest that zeta potential of carbonate is independent of temperature or pH when pCa2+ remains constant. A linear variation of pH vs. pCa2+ is exhibited, at ambient and elevated temperatures, when pCa2+ is allowed to change with pH. This linear variation explains the numerous published data that shows apparent relationship between zeta potential of carbonates and pH.

  18. Isolation of intact sub-dermal secretory cavities from Eucalyptus

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The biosynthesis of plant natural products in sub-dermal secretory cavities is poorly understood at the molecular level, largely due to the difficulty of physically isolating these structures for study. Our aim was to develop a protocol for isolating live and intact sub-dermal secretory cavities, and to do this, we used leaves from three species of Eucalyptus with cavities that are relatively large and rich in essential oils. Results Leaves were digested using a variety of commercially available enzymes. A pectinase from Aspergillus niger was found to allow isolation of intact cavities after a relatively short incubation (12 h), with no visible artifacts from digestion and no loss of cellular integrity or cavity contents. Several measurements indicated the potential of the isolated cavities for further functional studies. First, the cavities were found to consume oxygen at a rate that is comparable to that estimated from leaf respiratory rates. Second, mRNA was extracted from cavities, and it was used to amplify a cDNA fragment with high similarity to that of a monoterpene synthase. Third, the contents of the cavity lumen were extracted, showing an unexpectedly low abundance of volatile essential oils and a sizeable amount of non-volatile material, which is contrary to the widely accepted role of secretory cavities as predominantly essential oil repositories. Conclusions The protocol described herein is likely to be adaptable to a range of Eucalyptus species with sub-dermal secretory cavities, and should find wide application in studies of the developmental and functional biology of these structures, and the biosynthesis of the plant natural products they contain. PMID:20807444

  19. Differential Light Chain Assembly Influences Outer Arm Dynein Motor Function

    PubMed Central

    DiBella, Linda M.; Gorbatyuk, Oksana; Sakato, Miho; Wakabayashi, Ken-ichi; Patel-King, Ramila S.; Pazour, Gregory J.; Witman, George B.; King, Stephen M.

    2005-01-01

    Tctex1 and Tctex2 were originally described as potential distorters/sterility factors in the non-Mendelian transmission of t-haplotypes in mice. These proteins have since been identified as subunits of cytoplasmic and/or axonemal dyneins. Within the Chlamydomonas flagellum, Tctex1 is a subunit of inner arm I1. We have now identified a second Tctex1-related protein (here termed LC9) in Chlamydomonas. LC9 copurifies with outer arm dynein in sucrose density gradients and is missing only in those strains completely lacking this motor. Zero-length cross-linking of purified outer arm dynein indicates that LC9 interacts directly with both the IC1 and IC2 intermediate chains. Immunoblot analysis revealed that LC2, LC6, and LC9 are missing in an IC2 mutant strain (oda6-r88) that can assemble outer arms but exhibits significantly reduced flagellar beat frequency. This defect is unlikely to be due to lack of LC6, because an LC6 null mutant (oda13) exhibits only a minor swimming abnormality. Using an LC2 null mutant (oda12-1), we find that although some outer arm dynein components assemble in the absence of LC2, they are nonfunctional. In contrast, dyneins from oda6-r88, which also lack LC2, retain some activity. Furthermore, we observed a synthetic assembly defect in an oda6-r88 oda12-1 double mutant. These data suggest that LC2, LC6, and LC9 have different roles in outer arm assembly and are required for wild-type motor function in the Chlamydomonas flagellum. PMID:16195342

  20. Advanced Motor and Motor Control Development

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-08-01

    dc motor with electronic controller over a wide load and speed range was demonstrated. A centrifugal pump was used as the loading mechanism and hydraulic fluid was pumped in simulation of an aircraft engine fuel pump requirement. A motor speed of 45,000 rpm was reached and a maximum output of 68.5 hp was demonstrated. The response of the system to step commands for speed change was established. Reduction of size and weight of electronic control was established as a primary future goal. The program system concept with minor rotating machine improvements is viable for