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Sample records for intact human gastrointestinal

  1. [Locus HS.633957 expression in human gastrointestinal tract and tumors].

    PubMed

    Polev, D E; Krukovskaia, L L; Kozlov, A P

    2011-01-01

    Human locus HS.633957 corresponds to its namesake cluster in the UniGene database http:/www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/unigene. It is located on chromosome 7 and is 3.7 tpn in size. It does not seem to encode proteins nor has its function been identified. According to bioinformation evidence, its expression is tumor-specific. PCR assay on kDNA samples from different intact human tissues detected its slight expression in liver, heart, embryonal brain and kidney as well as in a wide spectrum of tumors. This work features locus Hs.633957 expression in different parts of human gastrointestinal tract and tumors.

  2. Chemical Probes for Visualizing Intact Animal and Human Brain Tissue.

    PubMed

    Lai, Hei Ming; Ng, Wai-Lung; Gentleman, Steve M; Wu, Wutian

    2017-06-22

    Newly developed tissue clearing techniques can be used to render intact tissues transparent. When combined with fluorescent labeling technologies and optical sectioning microscopy, this allows visualization of fine structure in three dimensions. Gene-transfection techniques have proved very useful in visualizing cellular structures in animal models, but they are not applicable to human brain tissue. Here, we discuss the characteristics of an ideal chemical fluorescent probe for use in brain and other cleared tissues, and offer a comprehensive overview of currently available chemical probes. We describe their working principles and compare their performance with the goal of simplifying probe selection for neuropathologists and stimulating probe development by chemists. We propose several approaches for the development of innovative chemical labeling methods which, when combined with tissue clearing, have the potential to revolutionize how we study the structure and function of the human brain. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Covert spatial attention is functionally intact in amblyopic human adults.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Mariel; Cymerman, Rachel; Smith, R Theodore; Kiorpes, Lynne; Carrasco, Marisa

    2016-12-01

    Certain abnormalities in behavioral performance and neural signaling have been attributed to a deficit of visual attention in amblyopia, a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by a diverse array of visual deficits following abnormal binocular childhood experience. Critically, most have inferred attention's role in their task without explicitly manipulating and measuring its effects against a baseline condition. Here, we directly investigate whether human amblyopic adults benefit from covert spatial attention-the selective processing of visual information in the absence of eye movements-to the same degree as neurotypical observers. We manipulated both involuntary (Experiment 1) and voluntary (Experiment 2) attention during an orientation discrimination task for which the effects of covert spatial attention have been well established in neurotypical and special populations. In both experiments, attention significantly improved accuracy and decreased reaction times to a similar extent (a) between the eyes of the amblyopic adults and (b) between the amblyopes and their age- and gender-matched controls. Moreover, deployment of voluntary attention away from the target location significantly impaired task performance (Experiment 2). The magnitudes of the involuntary and voluntary attention benefits did not correlate with amblyopic depth or severity. Both groups of observers showed canonical performance fields (better performance along the horizontal than vertical meridian and at the lower than upper vertical meridian) and similar effects of attention across locations. Despite their characteristic low-level vision impairments, covert spatial attention remains functionally intact in human amblyopic adults.

  4. Covert spatial attention is functionally intact in amblyopic human adults

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Mariel; Cymerman, Rachel; Smith, R. Theodore; Kiorpes, Lynne; Carrasco, Marisa

    2016-01-01

    Certain abnormalities in behavioral performance and neural signaling have been attributed to a deficit of visual attention in amblyopia, a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by a diverse array of visual deficits following abnormal binocular childhood experience. Critically, most have inferred attention's role in their task without explicitly manipulating and measuring its effects against a baseline condition. Here, we directly investigate whether human amblyopic adults benefit from covert spatial attention—the selective processing of visual information in the absence of eye movements—to the same degree as neurotypical observers. We manipulated both involuntary (Experiment 1) and voluntary (Experiment 2) attention during an orientation discrimination task for which the effects of covert spatial attention have been well established in neurotypical and special populations. In both experiments, attention significantly improved accuracy and decreased reaction times to a similar extent (a) between the eyes of the amblyopic adults and (b) between the amblyopes and their age- and gender-matched controls. Moreover, deployment of voluntary attention away from the target location significantly impaired task performance (Experiment 2). The magnitudes of the involuntary and voluntary attention benefits did not correlate with amblyopic depth or severity. Both groups of observers showed canonical performance fields (better performance along the horizontal than vertical meridian and at the lower than upper vertical meridian) and similar effects of attention across locations. Despite their characteristic low-level vision impairments, covert spatial attention remains functionally intact in human amblyopic adults. PMID:28033433

  5. Fractography of human intact long bone by bending.

    PubMed

    Kimura, T; Ogawa, K; Kamiya, M

    1977-05-27

    Human intact tibiae were tested using the static bending method to learn about the relationship between the fracture surface and the failure mode. The bending test was applied to test pieces and to whole bones. The fracture surface was observed by scanning electron microscopy. The bone fracture is closely related to the architecture of the bone substance, especially to the direction of the Haversian canals and the lamellae. The failure mode and the sequence of the break line of the bone can be found out by the observation on the fracture surface. Hardly any crushing effects caused by the compressive force is seen. The mechanical properties of the fractured bone can be estimated to some extend by considering the direction of the break line and the failure mode. The strength calculated by the simple beam formula for elastic materials can not be obtained directly because of the plastic deformation of the bone. The results of the tensile test may be applied to the fracture using the static bending moment.

  6. Bovine lactoferrin digested with human gastrointestinal enzymes inhibits replication of human echovirus 5 in cell culture.

    PubMed

    Furlund, Camilla B; Kristoffersen, Anja B; Devold, Tove G; Vegarud, Gerd E; Jonassen, Christine M

    2012-07-01

    Many infant formulas are enriched with lactoferrin (Lf) because of its claimed beneficial effects on health. Native bovine Lf (bLf) is known to inhibit in vitro replication of human enteroviruses, a group of pathogenic viruses that replicate in the gut as their primary infection site. On the basis of a model digestion and human gastrointestinal enzymes, we hypothesized that bLf could retain its antiviral properties against enterovirus in the gastrointestinal tract, either as an intact protein or through bioactive peptide fragments released by digestive enzymes. To test our hypothesis, bLf was digested with human gastric juice and duodenal juice in a 2-step in vitro digestion model. Two gastric pH levels and reduction conditions were used to simulate physiological conditions in adults and infants. The antiviral activity of native bLf and of the digested fractions was studied on echovirus 5 in vitro, using various assay conditions, addressing several mechanisms for replication inhibition. Both native and digested bLf fractions revealed a significant inhibitory effect, when added before or simultaneously with the virus onto the cells. Furthermore, a significant stronger sustained antiviral effect was observed when bLf was fully digested in the gastric phase with fast pH reduction to 2.5, compared with native bLf, suggesting the release of antiviral peptides from bLf during the human digestion process. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that bLf may have a role in the prevention of human gastrointestinal virus infection under physiological conditions and that food containing bLf may protect against infection in vivo. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. The use of injection-corrosive method in the study of extraorganic bloodstream of human intact stomach.

    PubMed

    Hryn, V H; Svintsytska, N L; Piliuhin, V; Ustenko, R L; Katsenko, A L

    Functional and morphological state of the organs and tissues mainly depends on the adequate blood supply and lymph movement, function of which is integrated by the nervous system. A crucial link in the morphogenesis of the gastric lesions is the intensity of vascularization, as well as the fact that in its venous part the gastric bloodstream is almost entirely included into the portal vein system. Knowledge of the anatomy of the normal human stomach conditions is of indispensable practical value, since they are required for the proper interpretation of the pathological changes occurred in it. To obtain the spatial visual information about the angioarchitecture of the extraorganic bloodstream of human intact stomach deep in the gastric wall. 10 post-autopsy adult total stomach specimens of patients, died for the reasons not associated with manifested gastrointestinal diseases have been analyzed. The specimens were extracted during the dissection together with portions of lesser and greater omentum, and segment of aorta with celiac trunk. To neutralize the acidic contents of the stomach, its cavity was washed by 4% sodium bicarbonate solution with subsequent wash in warm running water. The vascular injection method with subsequent corrosion of soft tissues was used in investigation of gastric bloodstream. On the basis of the investigations the advantages of the countercurrent-crossing method of injection of extraorganic vessels to fill the bloodstream of human stomach have been discussed. Positive results of the suggested technique for morphological study of blood vessels have been noted. The three-dimensional spatial organization of the extraorganic bloodstream of the intact stomach can be studied on the basis of the injection-corrosive casts. Thus, the use of the suggested method enables to obtain the fine three-dimensional reproduction of extraorganic bloodstream of the human stomach. The obtained high-quality casts, in turn, are used for the subsequent

  8. The first 1000 cultured species of the human gastrointestinal microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Rajilić-Stojanović, Mirjana; de Vos, Willem M

    2014-01-01

    The microorganisms that inhabit the human gastrointestinal tract comprise a complex ecosystem with functions that significantly contribute to our systemic metabolism and have an impact on health and disease. In line with its importance, the human gastrointestinal microbiota has been extensively studied. Despite the fact that a significant part of the intestinal microorganisms has not yet been cultured, presently over 1000 different microbial species that can reside in the human gastrointestinal tract have been identified. This review provides a systematic overview and detailed references of the total of 1057 intestinal species of Eukarya (92), Archaea (8) and Bacteria (957), based on the phylogenetic framework of their small subunit ribosomal RNA gene sequences. Moreover, it unifies knowledge about the prevalence, abundance, stability, physiology, genetics and the association with human health of these gastrointestinal microorganisms, which is currently scattered over a vast amount of literature published in the last 150 years. This detailed physiological and genetic information is expected to be instrumental in advancing our knowledge of the gastrointestinal microbiota. Moreover, it opens avenues for future comparative and functional metagenomic and other high-throughput approaches that need a systematic and physiological basis to have an impact. PMID:24861948

  9. Human gastrointestinal tolerance to D-tagatose.

    PubMed

    Buemann, B; Toubro, S; Astrup, A

    1999-04-01

    D-Tagatose is a stereoisomer of D-fructose which is poorly absorbed in the small intestine and may, therefore, have potential as a reduced calorie bulk sweetener. However, one of the major limitations is the use of malabsorbed sugars is that their consumption may be associated with gastric discomfort. This is due to the osmotic impact of the sugar molecules remaining in the gut lumen for a prolonged period. We have performed a series of studies in which gastrointestinal symptoms have been recorded after the consumption of 29 or 30 g of D-tagatose. Nausea and diarrhea were reported with an incidence of 15.1 and 31.5%, respectively, in 73 healthy young male subjects in a screening study. Increased flatulence after D-tagatose was frequently reported in all the studies and the flatulence did not decline during a 15-day period with intake of 30 g in one dose daily. In most cases, symptoms were reported as light or moderate. However, the results suggest that 30 g taken at one time may be above the dose which should be recommended for ordinary use. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  10. Recent Advances in Human Protozoan Parasites of Gastrointestinal Tract

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-02-01

    biology of the parasites, the epidemiology , diagnosis, pathogenesis and treatment. Furthermore, protozoan parasites formerly considered of no human...gastrointestinal tract and the epidemiology and pathogenesis of the diseases they cause; in most cases only papers published since 1980 were included. FLAGELLATES...are diarrhea, abdominal pain and occasionally anal pruritis. There have also been several reports of eosinophilia associated with D. fragilis

  11. Modeling human gastrointestinal inflammatory diseases using microphysiological culture systems.

    PubMed

    Hartman, Kira G; Bortner, James D; Falk, Gary W; Ginsberg, Gregory G; Jhala, Nirag; Yu, Jian; Martín, Martín G; Rustgi, Anil K; Lynch, John P

    2014-09-01

    Gastrointestinal illnesses are a significant health burden for the US population, with 40 million office visits each year for gastrointestinal complaints and nearly 250,000 deaths. Acute and chronic inflammations are a common element of many gastrointestinal diseases. Inflammatory processes may be initiated by a chemical injury (acid reflux in the esophagus), an infectious agent (Helicobacter pylori infection in the stomach), autoimmune processes (graft versus host disease after bone marrow transplantation), or idiopathic (as in the case of inflammatory bowel diseases). Inflammation in these settings can contribute to acute complaints (pain, bleeding, obstruction, and diarrhea) as well as chronic sequelae including strictures and cancer. Research into the pathophysiology of these conditions has been limited by the availability of primary human tissues or appropriate animal models that attempt to physiologically model the human disease. With the many recent advances in tissue engineering and primary human cell culture systems, it is conceivable that these approaches can be adapted to develop novel human ex vivo systems that incorporate many human cell types to recapitulate in vivo growth and differentiation in inflammatory microphysiological environments. Such an advance in technology would improve our understanding of human disease progression and enhance our ability to test for disease prevention strategies and novel therapeutics. We will review current models for the inflammatory and immunological aspects of Barrett's esophagus, acute graft versus host disease, and inflammatory bowel disease and explore recent advances in culture methodologies that make these novel microphysiological research systems possible. © 2014 by the Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine.

  12. Protective effect of human lactoferrin in the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Queiroz, Valterlinda Alves de O; Assis, Ana Marlúcia O; R Júnior, Hugo da Costa

    2013-01-01

    To describe mechanisms of action of human lactoferrin to protect gastrointestinal morbidities. Nonsystematic literature review using the following databases: SciELO, Lilacs and Medline from 1990 to 2011. The key-words used were lactoferrin, human milk/breastfeeding, gastrointestinal, and immunity, in Portuguese and English. Lactoferrin is the second predominant protein in the human milk, with higher concentrations in the colostrum (5.0 to 6.7mg/mL) if compared to mature milk (0.2 to 2.6mg/mL.) In contrast, cow's milk has lower levels, with 0.83mg/mL in the colostrum and 0.09mg/mL in the mature milk. Lactoferrin has several physiological functions to protect the gastrointestinal tract. The antimicrobial activity is related to the ability to sequester iron from biological fluids and/or to destruct the membrane of microorganisms. Lactoferrin also has the ability to stimulate cell proliferation. The anti-inflammatory action exercised by lactoferrin is associated with its ability to penetrate the core of the leukocyte and to block the Kappa B nuclear factor transcription. Given the importance of lactoferrin to prevent infectious diseases for breastfed children, the industry is using genetic engineering techniques to develop the expression of recombinant human lactoferrin in animals and plants, attempting to adjust the composition of infant formulas to that of human milk. Human lactoferrin is a peptide with great potential for preventing morbidity, especially in the gastrointestinal tract. Scientific evidence of the protective effects of human lactoferrin strengthens even more the recommendation for breastfeeding.

  13. Fungi in the healthy human gastrointestinal tract

    PubMed Central

    Hallen-Adams, Heather E.; Suhr, Mallory J.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Many species of fungi have been detected in the healthy human gut; however, nearly half of all taxa reported have only been found in one sample or one study. Fungi capable of growing in and colonizing the gut are limited to a small number of species, mostly Candida yeasts and yeasts in the family Dipodascaceae (Galactomyces, Geotrichum, Saprochaete). Malassezia and the filamentous fungus Cladosporium are potential colonizers; more work is needed to clarify their role. Other commonly-detected fungi come from the diet or environment but either cannot or do not colonize (Penicillium and Debaryomyces species, which are common on fermented foods but cannot grow at human body temperature), while still others have dietary or environmental sources (Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a fermentation agent and sometime probiotic; Aspergillus species, ubiquitous molds) yet are likely to impact gut ecology. The gut mycobiome appears less stable than the bacterial microbiome, and is likely subject to environmental factors. PMID:27736307

  14. Fungi in the healthy human gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Hallen-Adams, Heather E; Suhr, Mallory J

    2017-04-03

    Many species of fungi have been detected in the healthy human gut; however, nearly half of all taxa reported have only been found in one sample or one study. Fungi capable of growing in and colonizing the gut are limited to a small number of species, mostly Candida yeasts and yeasts in the family Dipodascaceae (Galactomyces, Geotrichum, Saprochaete). Malassezia and the filamentous fungus Cladosporium are potential colonizers; more work is needed to clarify their role. Other commonly-detected fungi come from the diet or environment but either cannot or do not colonize (Penicillium and Debaryomyces species, which are common on fermented foods but cannot grow at human body temperature), while still others have dietary or environmental sources (Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a fermentation agent and sometime probiotic; Aspergillus species, ubiquitous molds) yet are likely to impact gut ecology. The gut mycobiome appears less stable than the bacterial microbiome, and is likely subject to environmental factors.

  15. Quantitative Analysis of Human Salivary Gland-Derived Intact Proteome Using Top-Down Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Si; Brown, Joseph N.; Tolic, Nikola

    There are several notable challenges inherent to fully characterizing the entirety of the human saliva proteome using bottom-up approaches, including polymorphic isoforms, post-translational modifications, unique splice variants, deletions, and truncations. To address these challenges, we have developed a top-down based liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) approach, which cataloged 20 major human salivary proteins with a total of 83 proteoforms, containing a broad range of post-translational modifications. Among these proteins, several previously reported disease biomarker proteins were identified at the intact protein level, such as beta-2 microglobulin (B2M). In addition, intact glycosylated proteoforms of several saliva proteins were also characterized, including intactmore » N-glycosylated protein prolactin inducible protein (PIP) and O-glycosylated acidic protein rich protein (aPRP). These characterized proteoforms constitute an intact saliva proteoform database, which was used for quantitative comparison of intact salivary proteoforms among six healthy individuals. Human parotid (PS) and submandibular/sublingual gland (SMSL) secretion samples (2 μg of protein each) from six healthy individuals were compared using RPLC coupled with the 12T FTICR mass spectrometer. Significantly different protein and PTM patterns were resolved with high reproducibility between PS and SMSL glands. The results from this study provide further insight into the potential mechanisms of PTM pathways in oral glandular secretion, expanding our knowledge of this complex yet easily accessible fluid. Intact protein LC-MS approach presented herein can potentially be applied for rapid and accurate identification of biomarkers from only a few microliters of human glandular saliva.« less

  16. Frequency of human papillomavirus infection in patients with gastrointestinal cancer.

    PubMed

    Roesch-Dietlen, F; Cano-Contreras, A D; Sánchez-Maza, Y J; Espinosa-González, J M; Vázquez-Prieto, M Á; Valdés-de la O, E J; Díaz-Roesch, F; Carrasco-Arroniz, M Á; Cruz-Palacios, A; Grube-Pagola, P; Sumoza-Toledo, A; Vivanco-Cid, H; Mellado-Sánchez, G; Meixueiro-Daza, A; Silva-Cañetas, C S; Carrillo-Toledo, M G; Lagunes-Torres, R; Amieva-Balmori, M; Gómez-Castaño, P C; Reyes-Huerta, J U; Remes-Troche, J M

    2018-02-15

    Cancer is the result of the interaction of genetic and environmental factors. It has recently been related to viral infections, one of which is human papillomavirus. The aim of the present study was to describe the frequency of human papillomavirus infection in patients with digestive system cancers. A prospective, multicenter, observational study was conducted on patients with gastrointestinal cancer at 2public healthcare institutes in Veracruz. Two tumor samples were taken, one for histologic study and the other for DNA determination of human papillomavirus and its genotypes. Anthropometric variables, risk factors, sexual habits, tumor location, and histologic type of the cancer were analyzed. Absolute and relative frequencies were determined using the SPSS version 24.0 program. Fifty-three patients were studied. They had gastrointestinal cancer located in: the colon (62.26%), stomach (18.87%), esophagus (7.55%), rectum (7.55%), and small bowel (3.77%). Human papillomavirus was identified in 11.32% of the patients, 66.7% of which corresponded to squamous cell carcinoma and 33.3% to adenocarcinoma. Only genotype 18 was identified. Mean patient age was 61.8±15.2 years, 56.60% of the patients were men, and 43.40% were women. A total of 15.8% of the patients had a family history of cancer and 31.6% had a personal history of the disease, 38.6% were tobacco smokers, and 61.4% consumed alcohol. Regarding sex, 5.3% of the patients said they were homosexual, 3.5% were bisexual, 29.8% engaged in oral sex, and 24.6% in anal sex. Our study showed that human papillomavirus infection was a risk factor for the development of gastrointestinal cancer, especially of squamous cell origin. Copyright © 2018 Asociación Mexicana de Gastroenterología. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  17. In vitro comparison of human fibroblasts from intact and ruptured ACL for use in tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Brune, T; Borel, A; Gilbert, T W; Franceschi, J P; Badylak, S F; Sommer, P

    2007-12-17

    The present study compares fibroblasts extracted from intact and ruptured human anterior cruciate ligaments (ACL) for creation of a tissue engineered ACL-construct, made of porcine small intestinal submucosal extracellular matrix (SIS-ECM) seeded with these ACL cells. The comparison is based on histological, immunohistochemical and RT-PCR analyses. Differences were observed between cells in a ruptured ACL (rACL) and cells in an intact ACL (iACL), particularly with regard to the expression of integrin subunits and smooth muscle actin (SMA). Despite these differences in the cell source, both cell populations behaved similarly when seeded on an SIS-ECM scaffold, with similar cell morphology, connective tissue organization and composition, SMA and integrin expression. This study shows the usefulness of naturally occurring scaffolds such as SIS-ECM for the study of cell behaviour in vitro, and illustrates the possibility to use autologous cells extracted from ruptured ACL biopsies as a source for tissue engineered ACL constructs.

  18. Bioengineered human IAS reconstructs with functional and molecular properties similar to intact IAS

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Jagmohan

    2012-01-01

    Because of its critical importance in rectoanal incontinence, we determined the feasibility to reconstruct internal anal sphincter (IAS) from human IAS smooth muscle cells (SMCs) with functional and molecular attributes similar to the intact sphincter. The reconstructs were developed using SMCs from the circular smooth muscle layer of the human IAS, grown in smooth muscle differentiation media under sterile conditions in Sylgard-coated tissue culture plates with central Sylgard posts. The basal tone in the reconstructs and its changes were recorded following 0 Ca2+, KCl, bethanechol, isoproterenol, protein kinase C (PKC) activator phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate, and Rho kinase (ROCK) and PKC inhibitors Y-27632 and Gö-6850, respectively. Western blot (WB), immunofluorescence (IF), and immunocytochemical (IC) analyses were also performed. The reconstructs developed spontaneous tone (0.68 ± 0.26 mN). Bethanechol (a muscarinic agonist) and K+ depolarization produced contraction, whereas isoproterenol (β-adrenoceptor agonist) and Y-27632 produced a concentration-dependent decrease in the tone. Maximal decrease in basal tone with Y-27632 and Gö-6850 (each 10−5 M) was 80.45 ± 3.29 and 17.76 ± 3.50%, respectively. WB data with the IAS constructs′ SMCs revealed higher levels of RhoA/ROCK, protein kinase C-potentiated inhibitor or inhibitory phosphoprotein for myosin phosphatase (CPI-17), phospho-CPI-17, MYPT1, and 20-kDa myosin light chain vs. rectal smooth muscle. WB, IF, and IC studies of original SMCs and redispersed from the reconstructs for the relative distribution of different signal transduction proteins confirmed the feasibility of reconstruction of IAS with functional properties similar to intact IAS and demonstrated the development of myogenic tone with critical dependence on RhoA/ROCK. We conclude that it is feasible to bioengineer IAS constructs using human IAS SMCs that behave like intact IAS. PMID:22790596

  19. Palladium nanoparticles exposure: Evaluation of permeation through damaged and intact human skin.

    PubMed

    Larese Filon, Francesca; Crosera, Matteo; Mauro, Marcella; Baracchini, Elena; Bovenzi, Massimo; Montini, Tiziano; Fornasiero, Paolo; Adami, Gianpiero

    2016-07-01

    The intensified use of palladium nanoparticles (PdNPs) in many chemical reactions, jewellery, electronic devices, in car catalytic converters and in biomedical applications lead to a significant increase in palladium exposure. Pd can cause allergic contact dermatitis when in contact with the skin. However, there is still a lack of toxicological data related to nano-structured palladium and information on human cutaneous absorption. In fact, PdNPs, can be absorbed through the skin in higher amounts than bulk Pd because NPs can release more ions. In our study, we evaluated the absorption of PdNPs, with a size of 10.7 ± 2.8 nm, using intact and damaged human skin in Franz cells. 0.60 mg cm(-2) of PdNPs were applied on skin surface for 24 h. Pd concentrations in the receiving solutions at the end of experiments were 0.098 ± 0.067 μg cm(-2) and 1.06 ± 0.44 μg cm(-2) in intact skin and damaged skin, respectively. Pd flux permeation after 24 h was 0.005 ± 0.003 μg cm(-2) h(-1) and 0.057 ± 0.030 μg cm(-2) h(-1) and lag time 4.8 ± 1.7 and 4.2 ± 3.6 h, for intact and damaged skin respectively. This study indicates that Pd can penetrate human skin. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Generation of Gastrointestinal Organoids from Human Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Múnera, Jorge O; Wells, James M

    2017-01-01

    Over the past several decades, developmental biologists have discovered fundamental mechanisms by which organs form in developing embryos. With this information it is now possible to generate human "organoids" by the stepwise differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells using a process that recapitulates organ development. For the gastrointestinal tract, one of the first key steps is the formation of definitive endoderm and mesoderm, a process that relies on the TGFb molecule Nodal. Endoderm is then patterned along the anterior-posterior axis, with anterior endoderm forming the foregut and posterior endoderm forming the mid and hindgut. A-P patterning of the endoderm is accomplished by the combined activities of Wnt, BMP, and FGF. High Wnt and BMP promote a posterior fate, whereas repressing these pathways promotes an anterior endoderm fate. The stomach derives from the posterior foregut and retinoic acid signaling is required for promoting a posterior foregut fate. The small and large intestine derive from the mid and hindgut, respectively.These stages of gastrointestinal development can be precisely manipulated through the temporal activation and repression of the pathways mentioned above. For example, stimulation of the Nodal pathway with the mimetic Activin A, another TGF-β superfamily member, can trigger the differentiation of pluripotent stem cells into definitive endoderm (D'Amour et al., Nat Biotechnol 23:1534-1541, 2005). Exposure of definitive endoderm to high levels of Wnt and FGF promotes the formation of posterior endoderm and mid/hindgut tissue that expresses CDX2. Mid-hindgut spheroids that are cultured in a three-dimensional matrix form human intestinal organoids (HIOs) that are small intestinal in nature Spence et al., Nature 2011. In contrast, activation of FGF and Wnt in the presence of the BMP inhibitor Noggin promotes the formation of anterior endoderm and foregut tissues that express SOX2. These SOX2-expressing foregut spheroids can be

  1. Human gastrointestinal nematode infections: are new control methods required?

    PubMed Central

    Stepek, Gillian; Buttle, David J; Duce, Ian R; Behnke, Jerzy M

    2006-01-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) nematode infections affect 50% of the human population worldwide, and cause great morbidity as well as hundreds of thousands of deaths. Despite modern medical practices, the proportion of the population infected with GI nematodes is not falling. This is due to a number of factors, the most important being the lack of good healthcare, sanitation and health education in many developing countries. A relatively new problem is the development of resistance to the small number of drugs available to treat GI nematode infections. Here we review the most important parasitic GI nematodes and the methods available to control them. In addition, we discuss the current status of new anthelmintic treatments, particularly the plant cysteine proteinases from various sources of latex-bearing plants and fruits. PMID:16965561

  2. Intraneural stimulation elicits discrimination of textural features by artificial fingertip in intact and amputee humans.

    PubMed

    Oddo, Calogero Maria; Raspopovic, Stanisa; Artoni, Fiorenzo; Mazzoni, Alberto; Spigler, Giacomo; Petrini, Francesco; Giambattistelli, Federica; Vecchio, Fabrizio; Miraglia, Francesca; Zollo, Loredana; Di Pino, Giovanni; Camboni, Domenico; Carrozza, Maria Chiara; Guglielmelli, Eugenio; Rossini, Paolo Maria; Faraguna, Ugo; Micera, Silvestro

    2016-03-08

    Restoration of touch after hand amputation is a desirable feature of ideal prostheses. Here, we show that texture discrimination can be artificially provided in human subjects by implementing a neuromorphic real-time mechano-neuro-transduction (MNT), which emulates to some extent the firing dynamics of SA1 cutaneous afferents. The MNT process was used to modulate the temporal pattern of electrical spikes delivered to the human median nerve via percutaneous microstimulation in four intact subjects and via implanted intrafascicular stimulation in one transradial amputee. Both approaches allowed the subjects to reliably discriminate spatial coarseness of surfaces as confirmed also by a hybrid neural model of the median nerve. Moreover, MNT-evoked EEG activity showed physiologically plausible responses that were superimposable in time and topography to the ones elicited by a natural mechanical tactile stimulation. These findings can open up novel opportunities for sensory restoration in the next generation of neuro-prosthetic hands.

  3. Topically delivered dissolved oxygen reduces inflammation and positively influences structural proteins in healthy intact human skin.

    PubMed

    Kellar, Robert S; Audet, Robert G; Roe, David F; Rheins, Lawrence A; Draelos, Zoe Diana

    2013-06-01

    As oxygen is essential for wound healing and there is limited diffusion across the stratum corneum into the epidermis, we wanted to evaluate whether the topical delivery of a total dissolved oxygen in dressing form on intact human subject skin would improve clinical and histologic skin functioning. Fifty normal, healthy subjects completed a pilot clinical evaluation to assess the efficacy and tolerability of a dissolved oxygen dressing (OxygeneSys™-Continuous) to improve the health and appearance of intact skin. Clinical analysis was performed on 50 subjects; histological and gene expression analysis was performed on 12 of the 50 subjects to assess the effect of the dissolved oxygen dressing. Clinical data demonstrate that the dressing is well tolerated, and several measures of skin health and integrity showed improvements compared with a control dressing site. Skin hydration measurements showed a statistically significant increase in skin hydration at 0-4, 4-8, and 0-8 weeks (P < 0.05 at each time point). The blinded clinical investigator's grading of desquamation, roughness, and skin texture show significant decreases from baseline to the 8-week time point (P < 0.05). The dressings were removed prior to the blinded clinical investigator's grading. These data were supported by the histological and gene expression studies, which showed a general reduction in inflammatory response markers and transcription products (IL-6, IL-8, TNF-alpha, MMP-1, and MMP-12), while facilitating a general increase in structural skin proteins (collagen I, elastin, and filaggrin). Additionally, p53 signals from biopsy samples support the clinical investigator's observations of no safety concerns. The data from this study demonstrate that the dressing has no deleterious effects and stimulates beneficial effects on intact, nonwounded skin. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Translational neuropharmacology: the use of human isolated gastrointestinal tissues

    PubMed Central

    Sanger, GJ; Broad, J; Kung, V; Knowles, CH

    2013-01-01

    Translational sciences increasingly emphasize the measurement of functions in native human tissues. However, such studies must confront variations in patient age, gender, genetic background and disease. Here, these are discussed with reference to neuromuscular and neurosecretory functions of the human gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Tissues are obtained after informed consent, in collaboration with surgeons (surgical techniques help minimize variables) and pathologists. Given the difficulties of directly recording from human myenteric neurones (embedded between muscle layers), enteric motor nerve functions are studied by measuring muscle contractions/relaxations evoked by electrical stimulation of intrinsic nerves; responses are regionally dependent, often involving cholinergic and nitrergic phenotypes. Enteric sensory functions can be studied by evoking the peristaltic reflex, involving enteric sensory and motor nerves, but this has rarely been achieved. As submucosal neurones are more accessible (after removing the mucosa), direct neuronal recordings are possible. Neurosecretory functions are studied by measuring changes in short-circuit current across the mucosa. For all experiments, basic questions must be addressed. Because tissues are from patients, what are the controls and the influence of disease? How long does it take before function fully recovers? What is the impact of age- and gender-related differences? What is the optimal sample size? Addressing these and other questions minimizes variability and raises the scientific credibility of human tissue research. Such studies also reduce animal use. Further, the many differences between animal and human GI functions also means that human tissue research must question the ethical validity of using strains of animals with unproved translational significance. Linked Article BJP published a themed issue on Translational Neuropharmacology in 2011. To view the articles in this themed issue visit http://dx.doi.org/10

  5. Translational neuropharmacology: the use of human isolated gastrointestinal tissues.

    PubMed

    Sanger, G J; Broad, J; Kung, V; Knowles, C H

    2013-01-01

    Translational sciences increasingly emphasize the measurement of functions in native human tissues. However, such studies must confront variations in patient age, gender, genetic background and disease. Here, these are discussed with reference to neuromuscular and neurosecretory functions of the human gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Tissues are obtained after informed consent, in collaboration with surgeons (surgical techniques help minimize variables) and pathologists. Given the difficulties of directly recording from human myenteric neurones (embedded between muscle layers), enteric motor nerve functions are studied by measuring muscle contractions/relaxations evoked by electrical stimulation of intrinsic nerves; responses are regionally dependent, often involving cholinergic and nitrergic phenotypes. Enteric sensory functions can be studied by evoking the peristaltic reflex, involving enteric sensory and motor nerves, but this has rarely been achieved. As submucosal neurones are more accessible (after removing the mucosa), direct neuronal recordings are possible. Neurosecretory functions are studied by measuring changes in short-circuit current across the mucosa. For all experiments, basic questions must be addressed. Because tissues are from patients, what are the controls and the influence of disease? How long does it take before function fully recovers? What is the impact of age- and gender-related differences? What is the optimal sample size? Addressing these and other questions minimizes variability and raises the scientific credibility of human tissue research. Such studies also reduce animal use. Further, the many differences between animal and human GI functions also means that human tissue research must question the ethical validity of using strains of animals with unproved translational significance. © 2012 The Authors. British Journal of Pharmacology © 2012 The British Pharmacological Society.

  6. In vitro permeation of palladium powders through intact and damaged human skin.

    PubMed

    Crosera, Matteo; Mauro, Marcella; Bovenzi, Massimo; Adami, Gianpiero; Baracchini, Elena; Maina, Giovanni; Larese Filon, Francesca

    2018-05-01

    The use of palladium (Pd) has grown in the last decades, commonly used in automotive catalytic converters, jewellery and dental restorations sectors. Both general and working population can be exposed to this metal, which may act as skin sensitizer. This study investigated in vitro palladium powders permeation through excised intact and damaged human skin using the Franz diffusion cell method and the effect of rapid skin decontamination using sodium laureth-sulphate. 1 mL of a 10 min sonicated suspension made of 2.5 g of Pd powder in 50 mL synthetic sweat at pH 4.5 and room temperature was applied to the outer surface of the skin membranes for 24 h. Pd permeation, assessed by ICP-MS, was higher when damaged skin was used (p = 0.03). Final flux permeation values and lag times were 0.02 ± 0.01 μg cm -2  h -1 and 6.00 ± 3.95 h for intact, and 0.10 ± 0.02 μg cm -2  h -1 and 2.05 ± 1.49 h for damaged skin samples, respectively. Damaged skin protocol enhances Pd skin penetration inside dermal layer (p = 0.04), thus making the metal available for systemic uptake. Pd penetration (p = 0.02) and permeation (p = 0.012) through intact skin decreased significantly when a cleaning procedure was applied. This study demonstrates that after skin exposure to Pd powders a small permeation of the metal happen both through intact and damaged skin and that an early decontamination with a common cleanser can significantly decrease the final amount of metal available forsystemic uptake. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Extracellular production of an intact and biologically active human growth hormone by the Bacillus brevis system.

    PubMed

    Kajino, T; Saito, Y; Asami, O; Yamada, Y; Hirai, M; Udata, S

    1997-10-01

    The characteristic features of the Bacillus brevis system are very high productivity of heterologous proteins and very low extracellular protease activity. However, degradation of some heterologous proteins, especially mammalian proteins, can be observed and resulted in a lowering of protein productivity. By using a mutant expressing low levels of proteases and the addition of EDTA to the medium, intact human growth hormone (hGH) was successfully produced with the B. brevis system. Signal peptide modification with higher basicity in the amino terminal region and higher hydrophobicity in the middle region brought about a twelve-fold increase in hGH production. The hGH yield was further elevated to 240 mg L-1 by optimization of culture conditions. Thus, biologically active and mature hGH can be efficiently produced directly in the medium with the B. brevis system.

  8. A New High-Throughput Approach to Genotype Ancient Human Gastrointestinal Parasites.

    PubMed

    Côté, Nathalie M L; Daligault, Julien; Pruvost, Mélanie; Bennett, E Andrew; Gorgé, Olivier; Guimaraes, Silvia; Capelli, Nicolas; Le Bailly, Matthieu; Geigl, Eva-Maria; Grange, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    Human gastrointestinal parasites are good indicators for hygienic conditions and health status of past and present individuals and communities. While microscopic analysis of eggs in sediments of archeological sites often allows their taxonomic identification, this method is rarely effective at the species level, and requires both the survival of intact eggs and their proper identification. Genotyping via PCR-based approaches has the potential to achieve a precise species-level taxonomic determination. However, so far it has mostly been applied to individual eggs isolated from archeological samples. To increase the throughput and taxonomic accuracy, as well as reduce costs of genotyping methods, we adapted a PCR-based approach coupled with next-generation sequencing to perform precise taxonomic identification of parasitic helminths directly from archeological sediments. Our study of twenty-five 100 to 7,200 year-old archeological samples proved this to be a powerful, reliable and efficient approach for species determination even in the absence of preserved eggs, either as a stand-alone method or as a complement to microscopic studies.

  9. Intact Imaging of Human Heart Structure Using X-ray Phase-Contrast Tomography.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Yukihiro; Shinohara, Gen; Hoshino, Masato; Morishita, Hiroyuki; Morita, Kiyozo; Oshima, Yoshihiro; Takahashi, Masashi; Yagi, Naoto; Okita, Yutaka; Tsukube, Takuro

    2017-02-01

    Structural examination of human heart specimens at the microscopic level is a prerequisite for understanding congenital heart diseases. It is desirable not to destroy or alter the properties of such specimens because of their scarcity. However, many of the currently available imaging techniques either destroy the specimen through sectioning or alter the chemical and mechanical properties of the specimen through staining and contrast agent injection. As a result, subsequent studies may not be possible. X-ray phase-contrast tomography is an imaging modality for biological soft tissues that does not destroy or alter the properties of the specimen. The feasibility of X-ray phase-contrast tomography for the structural examination of heart specimens was tested using infantile and fetal heart specimens without congenital diseases. X-ray phase-contrast tomography was carried out at the SPring-8 synchrotron radiation facility using the Talbot grating interferometer at the bending magnet beamline BL20B2 to visualize the structure of five non-pretreated whole heart specimens obtained by autopsy. High-resolution, three-dimensional images were obtained for all specimens. The images clearly showed the myocardial structure, coronary vessels, and conduction bundle. X-ray phase-contrast tomography allows high-resolution, three-dimensional imaging of human heart specimens. Intact imaging using X-ray phase-contrast tomography can contribute to further structural investigation of heart specimens with congenital heart diseases.

  10. Direct measurement of hoop strains in the intact and torn human medial meniscus.

    PubMed

    Jones, R Spencer; Keene, G C R; Learmonth, D J A; Bickerstaff, D; Nawana, N S; Costi, J J; Pearcy, M J

    1996-07-01

    OBJECTIVE: To measure the circumferential or hoop strains generated in the medial meniscus during loading of the knee joint and to examine the effect of longitudinal and radial tears in the meniscus on these strain values. DESIGN: An in vitro investigation measuring the circumferential strains in the medial menisci of cadaveric human knees as they were loaded in a materials testing machine. BACKGROUND: The menisci transmit approximately 50% of the load through the knee, the rest being transmitted by direct contact of the articular cartilage. Damage to the menisci will alter the pattern of load transmission as will meniscectomy. This study examined the changes in the mechanics of the meniscus in situ as a result of simulated tears to assess the effect of its load carrying capacity and the implications of surgery to remove part or all of a damaged meniscus. METHODS: Nineteen human cadaveric knees were tested. Windows were made in the joint capsule and strain gauges inserted into the anterior, middle and posterior sections of the medial meniscus. The knees were then loaded to three times body weight at speeds of 50 and 500 mm/min, with the knee joint at 0 degrees and 30 degrees of flexion. The tests were repeated following the creation of a longitudinal or a radial tear in the meniscus. RESULTS: The intact menisci showed significantly less strain in the posterior section compared to the anterior and middle sections (P < 0.003, with strains of 1.54%, 2.86% and 2.65% respectively). With a longitudinal tear this pattern changed with strains decreasing anteriorly and increasing posteriorly. There were also significant differences at different angles of knee joint flexion not seen in the intact meniscus. 50% radial tears reduced the strains anteriorly whilst a complete radial tear completely defunctioned the meniscus. CONCLUSIONS: This study has shown that there are significantly different hoop strains produced in different sections of the medial meniscus under load and

  11. Cobalt Oxide Nanoparticles: Behavior towards Intact and Impaired Human Skin and Keratinocytes Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Mauro, Marcella; Crosera, Matteo; Pelin, Marco; Florio, Chiara; Bellomo, Francesca; Adami, Gianpiero; Apostoli, Piero; De Palma, Giuseppe; Bovenzi, Massimo; Campanini, Marco; Larese Filon, Francesca

    2015-01-01

    Skin absorption and toxicity on keratinocytes of cobalt oxide nanoparticles (Co3O4NPs) have been investigated. Co3O4NPs are commonly used in industrial products and biomedicine. There is evidence that these nanoparticles can cause membrane damage and genotoxicity in vitro, but no data are available on their skin absorption and cytotoxicity on keratinocytes. Two independent 24 h in vitro experiments were performed using Franz diffusion cells, using intact (experiment 1) and needle-abraded human skin (experiment 2). Co3O4NPs at a concentration of 1000 mg/L in physiological solution were used as donor phase. Cobalt content was evaluated by Inductively Coupled–Mass Spectroscopy. Co permeation through the skin was demonstrated after 24 h only when damaged skin protocol was used (57 ± 38 ng·cm−2), while no significant differences were shown between blank cells (0.92 ± 0.03 ng cm−2) and those with intact skin (1.08 ± 0.20 ng·cm−2). To further investigate Co3O4NPs toxicity, human-derived HaCaT keratinocytes were exposed to Co3O4NPs and cytotoxicity evaluated by MTT, Alamarblue® and propidium iodide (PI) uptake assays. The results indicate that a long exposure time (i.e., seven days) was necessary to induce a concentration-dependent cell viability reduction (EC50 values: 1.3 × 10−4 M, 95% CL = 0.8–1.9 × 10−4 M, MTT essay; 3.7 × 10−5 M, 95% CI = 2.2–6.1 × 10−5 M, AlamarBlue® assay) that seems to be associated to necrotic events (EC50 value: 1.3 × 10−4 M, 95% CL = 0.9–1.9 × 10−4 M, PI assay). This study demonstrated that Co3O4NPs can penetrate only damaged skin and is cytotoxic for HaCat cells after long term exposure. PMID:26193294

  12. Transferred-NOE NMR experiments on intact human platelets: receptor-bound conformation of RGD-peptide mimics.

    PubMed

    Potenza, Donatella; Belvisi, Laura

    2008-01-21

    The aim of this work is to show that transferred-NOE provides useful and detailed information on membrane-bound receptor-ligand interactions in living cells. Here, we study the interaction between intact human platelets and some ligands containing the RGD sequence. Conformational properties of the free and bound pentapeptides are reported.

  13. Ventricular stimulus site influences dynamic dispersion of repolarization in the intact human heart

    PubMed Central

    Orini, Michele; Simon, Ron B.; Providência, Rui; Khan, Fakhar Z.; Segal, Oliver R.; Babu, Girish G.; Bradley, Richard; Rowland, Edward; Ahsan, Syed; Chow, Anthony W.; Lowe, Martin D.; Taggart, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The spatial variation in restitution properties in relation to varying stimulus site is poorly defined. This study aimed to investigate the effect of varying stimulus site on apicobasal and transmural activation time (AT), action potential duration (APD) and repolarization time (RT) during restitution studies in the intact human heart. Ten patients with structurally normal hearts, undergoing clinical electrophysiology studies, were enrolled. Decapolar catheters were placed apex to base in the endocardial right ventricle (RVendo) and left ventricle (LVendo), and an LV branch of the coronary sinus (LVepi) for transmural recording. S1–S2 restitution protocols were performed pacing RVendo apex, LVendo base, and LVepi base. Overall, 725 restitution curves were analyzed, 74% of slopes had a maximum slope of activation recovery interval (ARI) restitution (Smax) > 1 (P < 0.001); mean Smax = 1.76. APD was shorter in the LVepi compared with LVendo, regardless of pacing site (30-ms difference during RVendo pacing, 25-ms during LVendo, and 48-ms during LVepi; 50th quantile, P < 0.01). Basal LVepi pacing resulted in a significant transmural gradient of RT (77 ms, 50th quantile: P < 0.01), due to loss of negative transmural AT-APD coupling (mean slope 0.63 ± 0.3). No significant transmural gradient in RT was demonstrated during endocardial RV or LV pacing, with preserved negative transmural AT-APD coupling (mean slope −1.36 ± 1.9 and −0.71 ± 0.4, respectively). Steep ARI restitution slopes predominate in the normal ventricle and dynamic ARI; RT gradients exist that are modulated by the site of activation. Epicardial stimulation to initiate ventricular activation promotes significant transmural gradients of repolarization that could be proarrhythmic. PMID:27371682

  14. Permeation of platinum and rhodium nanoparticles through intact and damaged human skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauro, Marcella; Crosera, Matteo; Bianco, Carlotta; Adami, Gianpiero; Montini, Tiziano; Fornasiero, Paolo; Jaganjac, Morana; Bovenzi, Massimo; Filon, Francesca Larese

    2015-06-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate percutaneous penetration of platinum and rhodium nanoparticles (PtNPs: 5.8 ± 0.9 nm, RhNPs: 5.3 ± 1.9 nm) through human skin. Salts compounds of these metals are sensitizers and some also carcinogenic agents. In vitro permeation experiments were performed using Franz diffusion cells with intact and damaged skin. PtNPs and RhNPs, stabilized with polyvinylpyrrolidone, were synthesized by reduction of Na2PtCl6 and RhCl3·3H2O respectively. Suspensions with a concentration of 2.0 g/L of PtNPs and RhNPs were dispersed separately in synthetic sweat at pH 4.5 and applied as donor phases to the outer surface of the skin for 24 h. Measurements of the content of the metals in the receiving solution and in the skin were performed subsequently. Rhodium skin permeation was demonstrated through damaged skin, with a permeation flux of 0.04 ± 0.04 μg cm-2 h-1 and a lag time of 7.9 ± 1.1 h, while no traces of platinum were found in receiving solutions. Platinum and rhodium skin-analysis showed significantly higher concentrations of the metals in damaged skin. Rh and Pt applied as NPs can penetrate the skin barrier and Rh can be found in receiving solutions. These experiments pointed out the need for skin contamination prevention, since even a minor injury to the skin barrier can significantly increase penetration.

  15. The optical diagnostics of parameters of biological tissues of human intact skin in near-infrared range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petruk, Vasyl; Kvaternyuk, Sergii; Bolyuh, Boris; Bolyuh, Dmitry; Dronenko, Vladimir; Harasim, Damian; Annabayev, Azamat

    2016-09-01

    Melanoma skin is difficult to diagnose in the early stages of development despite its location outside. Melanoma is difficult to visually differentiate from benign melanocytic nevi. In the work we investigated parameters of human intact skin in near-infrared range for different racial and gender groups. This allows to analyze statistical differences in the coefficient of diffuse reflection and use them in the differential diagnosis of cancer by optical methods subject.

  16. Diagnostic value of amplification of human cytomegalovirus DNA from gastrointestinal biopsies from human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Cotte, L; Drouet, E; Bissuel, F; Denoyel, G A; Trepo, C

    1993-08-01

    In order to assess the value of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) DNA amplification of gastrointestinal biopsies, we studied 57 human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients with and without gastrointestinal HCMV diseases. After DNA extraction, a 406-bp fragment from the unique short region of the HCMV genome was amplified by 35 cycles of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and semiquantified from 80 to 80,000 HCMV genomic copies. Among 12 non-AIDS patients, the PCR assay was negative for 11 of 12 duodenal and 8 of 8 colorectal samples. It was also negative for 28 of 31 duodenal and 12 of 15 colorectal samples from 31 AIDS patients without gastrointestinal HCMV diseases. Among 14 AIDS patients with gastrointestinal HCMV diseases, the PCR assay was positive for 12 of 12 patients with HCMV duodenitis and for 13 of 13 patients with HCMV colitis. Results were dichotomized between high and low HCMV-DNA copy numbers. For duodenitis, sensitivity was 92% and specificity was 100%. For colitis, sensitivity was 92% and specificity was 93%. Specificity and sensitivity were not influenced by shedding status for HCMV or by other gastrointestinal infections. HCMV DNA amplification of gastrointestinal biopsies is a sensitive and specific tool for the diagnosis of gastrointestinal HCMV diseases in AIDS patients.

  17. Intact Pneumococci Trigger Transcription of Interferon-Related Genes in Human Monocytes, while Fragmented, Autolyzed Bacteria Subvert This Response

    PubMed Central

    Nordén, Rickard; Martner, Anna; Samuelsson, Ebba; Hynsjö, Lars; Wold, Agnes E.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT A peculiar trait of pneumococci (Streptococcus pneumoniae) is their propensity to undergo spontaneous lysis during stationary growth due to activation of the enzyme autolysin (LytA), which fragments the peptidoglycan cell wall. The fragments that are generated upon autolysis impair phagocytosis and reduce production of interleukin-12 (IL-12) and gamma interferon (IFN-γ) by human leukocytes in response to intact pneumococci, thereby impeding crucial host defenses. The objective was to identify additional monocyte genes whose transcription is induced by intact pneumococci and subverted by autolyzed bacteria. Monocytes were isolated from healthy blood donors and stimulated for 3 h with UV-inactivated S. pneumoniae (Rx1PLY− LytA+ strain), which is capable of autolyzing, its LytA− isogenic autolysin-deficient mutant, or a mixture of the two (containing twice the initial bacterial concentration). Gene expression was assessed by Illumina microarray, and selected findings were confirmed by reverse transcription-quantitative real-time PCR (RT-qPCR), enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and flow cytometry. In all, we identified 121 genes that were upregulated to a significantly higher degree by intact than autolyzed pneumococci. These included IFNB1 and a large set of interferon-induced genes, such as IFIT3, RSAD2, CFCL1, and CXCL10 genes, as well as IL12B and CD40 genes. RT-qPCR revealed that transcription of these genes in response to intact pneumococci diminished when autolyzed pneumococci were admixed and that this pattern was independent of pneumolysin. Thus, transcription of interferon-related genes is triggered by intact pneumococci and subverted by fragments generated by spontaneous bacterial autolysis. We suggest that interferon-related pathways are important for elimination of pneumococci and that autolysis contributes to virulence by extinguishing these pathways. PMID:28223347

  18. Evaluation of an intact, an ACL-deficient, and a reconstructed human knee joint finite element model.

    PubMed

    Vairis, Achilles; Stefanoudakis, George; Petousis, Markos; Vidakis, Nectarios; Tsainis, Andreas-Marios; Kandyla, Betina

    2016-02-01

    The human knee joint has a three-dimensional geometry with multiple body articulations that produce complex mechanical responses under loads that occur in everyday life and sports activities. Understanding the complex mechanical interactions of these load-bearing structures is of use when the treatment of relevant diseases is evaluated and assisting devices are designed. The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) in the knee is one of four main ligaments that connects the femur to the tibia and is often torn during sudden twisting motions, resulting in knee instability. The objective of this work is to study the mechanical behavior of the human knee joint and evaluate the differences in its response for three different states, i.e., intact, ACL-deficient, and surgically treated (reconstructed) knee. The finite element models corresponding to these states were developed. For the reconstructed model, a novel repair device was developed and patented by the author in previous work. Static load cases were applied, as have already been presented in a previous work, in order to compare the calculated results produced by the two models the ACL-deficient and the surgically reconstructed knee joint, under the exact same loading conditions. Displacements were calculated in different directions for the load cases studied and were found to be very close to those from previous modeling work and were in good agreement with experimental data presented in literature. The developed finite element model for both the intact and the ACL-deficient human knee joint is a reliable tool to study the kinematics of the human knee, as results of this study show. In addition, the reconstructed human knee joint model had kinematic behavior similar to the intact knee joint, showing that such reconstruction devices can restore human knee stability to an adequate extent.

  19. Nuclear microprobe investigation of the penetration of ultrafine zinc oxide into intact and tape-stripped human skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szikszai, Z.; Kertész, Zs.; Bodnár, E.; Major, I.; Borbíró, I.; Kiss, Á. Z.; Hunyadi, J.

    2010-06-01

    Ultrafine metal oxides, such as titanium dioxide and zinc oxide are widely used in cosmetic and health products like sunscreens. These oxides are potent UV filters and the small particle size makes the product more transparent compared to formulations containing coarser particles. In the present work the penetration of ultrafine zinc oxide into intact and tape-stripped human skin was investigated using nuclear microprobe techniques, such as proton induced X-ray spectroscopy and scanning transmission ion microscopy. Our results indicate that the penetration of ultrafine zinc oxide, in a hydrophobic basis gel with 48 h application time, is limited to the stratum corneum layer of the intact skin. Removing the stratum corneum partially or entirely by tape-stripping did not cause the penetration of the particles into the deeper dermal layers; the zinc particles remained on the surface of the skin.

  20. The functionality of the gastrointestinal microbiome in non-human animals.

    PubMed

    Hanning, Irene; Diaz-Sanchez, Sandra

    2015-11-10

    Due to the significance of the microbiome on human health, much of the current data available regarding microbiome functionality is centered on human medicine. For agriculturally important taxa, the functionality of gastrointestinal bacteria has been studied with the primary goals of improving animal health and production performance. With respect to cattle, the digestive functions of bacteria in cattle are unarguably critical to digestion and positively impact production performance. Conversely, some research suggests that the gastrointestinal microbiome in chickens competes with the host for nutrients and produces toxins that can harm the host resulting in decreased growth efficiency. Concerning many other species including reptiles and cetaceans, some cataloging of fecal bacteria has been conducted, but the functionality within the host remains ambiguous. These taxa could provide interesting gastrointestinal insight into functionality and symbiosis considering the extreme feeding regimes (snakes), highly specialized diets (vampire bats), and living environments (polar bears), which warrants further exploration.

  1. Human blindsight is mediated by an intact geniculo-extrastriate pathway

    PubMed Central

    Ajina, Sara; Pestilli, Franco; Rokem, Ariel; Kennard, Christopher; Bridge, Holly

    2015-01-01

    Although damage to the primary visual cortex (V1) causes hemianopia, many patients retain some residual vision; known as blindsight. We show that blindsight may be facilitated by an intact white-matter pathway between the lateral geniculate nucleus and motion area hMT+. Visual psychophysics, diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging and fibre tractography were applied in 17 patients with V1 damage acquired during adulthood and 9 age-matched controls. Individuals with V1 damage were subdivided into blindsight positive (preserved residual vision) and negative (no residual vision) according to psychophysical performance. All blindsight positive individuals showed intact geniculo-hMT+ pathways, while this pathway was significantly impaired or not measurable in blindsight negative individuals. Two white matter pathways previously implicated in blindsight: (i) superior colliculus to hMT+ and (ii) between hMT+ in each hemisphere were not consistently present in blindsight positive cases. Understanding the visual pathways crucial for residual vision may direct future rehabilitation strategies for hemianopia patients. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.08935.001 PMID:26485034

  2. Gastrointestinal Physiology During Head Down Tilt Bedrest in Human Subjects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaksman, Z.; Guthienz, J.; Putcha, L.

    2008-01-01

    Introduction: Gastrointestinal (GI) motility plays a key role in the physiology and function of the GI tract. It directly affects absorption of medications and nutrients taken by mouth, in addition to indirectly altering GI physiology by way of changes in the microfloral composition and biochemistry of the GI tract. Astronauts have reported nausea, loss of appetite and constipation during space flight all of which indicate a reduction in GI motility and function similar to the one seen in chronic bed rest patients. The purpose of this study is to determine GI motility and bacterial proliferation during -6 degree head down tilt bed rest (HTD). Methods: Healthy male and female subjects between the ages of 25-40 participated in a 60 day HTD study protocol. GI transit time (GITT) was determined using lactulose breath hydrogen test and bacterial overgrowth was measured using glucose breath hydrogen test. H. Pylori colonization was determined using C13-urea breath test (UBIT#). All three tests were conducted on 9 days before HDT, and repeated on HDT days 2, 28, 58, and again on day 7 after HDT. Results: GITT increased during HTD compared to the respective ambulatory control values; GITT was significantly lower on day 7 after HTD. A concomitant increase in bacterial colonization was also noticed during HDT starting after approximately 28 days of HDT. However, H. Pylori proliferation was not recorded during HDT as indicated by UBIT#. Conclusion: GITT significantly decreased during HDT with a concomitant increase in the proliferation of GI bacterial flora but not H. pylori.

  3. Anticancer potential of Hericium erinaceus extracts against human gastrointestinal cancers.

    PubMed

    Li, Guang; Yu, Kai; Li, Fushuang; Xu, Kangping; Li, Jing; He, Shujin; Cao, Shousong; Tan, Guishan

    2014-04-28

    Hericium is a genus of mushrooms (fungus) in the Hericiaceae family. Hericium erinaceus (HE) has been used for the treatment of digestive diseases for over 2000 years in China. HE possesses many beneficial functions such as anticancer, antiulcer, antiinflammation and antimicrobial effects, immunomodulation and other activities. The aim of the studies was to evaluate the anticancer efficacy of two extracts (HTJ5 and HTJ5A) from the culture broth of HE against three gastrointestinal cancers such as liver, colorectal and gastric cancers in both of in vitro of cancer cell lines and in vivo of tumor xenografts and discover the active compounds. Two HE extracts (HTJ5 and HTJ5A) were used for the studies. For the study of chemical constituents, the HTJ5 and HTJ5A were separated using a combination of macroporous resin with silica gel, HW-40 and LH-20 chromatography then purified by semipreparative high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and determined by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra. For the in vitro cytotoxicity studies, HepG2 and Huh-7 liver, HT-29 colon, and NCI-87 gastric cancer cell lines were used and MTT assay was performed to determine the in vitro cytotoxicity. For in vivo antitumor efficacy and toxicity studies, tumor xenograft models of SCID mice bearing liver cancer HepG2 and Huh-7, colon cancer HT-29 and gastric cancer NCI-87 subcutaneously were used and the mice were treated with the vehicle control, HTJ5 and HTJ5A orally (500 and 1000 mg/kg/day) and compared to 5-fluorouraci (5-FU) at the maximum tolerated dose (MTD, 25-30 mg/kg/day) intraperitoneally daily for 5 days when the tumors reached about 180-200 mg (mm(3)). Tumor volumes and body weight were measured daily during the first 10 days and 2-3 times a week thereafter to assess the tumor growth inhibition, tumor doubling time, partial and complete tumor response and toxicity. Twenty-two compounds were obtained from the fractions of HTJ5/HTJ5A including seven cycli dipeptides, five

  4. Gene Expression Profiling of the Intact Dermal Sheath Cup of Human Hair Follicles.

    PubMed

    Niiyama, Shiro; Ishimatsu-Tsuji, Yumiko; Nakazawa, Yosuke; Yoshida, Yuzo; Soma, Tsutomu; Ideta, Ritsuro; Mukai, Hideki; Kishimoto, Jiro

    2018-04-24

    Cells that constitute the dermal papillae of hair follicles might be derived from the dermal sheath, the peribulbar component of which is the dermal sheath cup. The dermal sheath cup is thought to include the progenitor cells of the dermal papillae and possesses hair inductive potential; however, it has not yet been well characterized. This study investigated the gene expression profile of the intact dermal sheath cup, and identified dermal sheath cup signature genes, including extracellular matrix components and BMP-binding molecules, as well as TGF-b1 as an upstream regulator. Among these, GREM2, a member of the BMP antagonists, was found by in situ hybridization to be highly specific to the dermal sheath cup, implying that GREM2 is a key molecule contributing to maintenance of the properties of the dermal sheath cup.

  5. Strategies for Characterization of Low-Abundant Intact or Truncated Low-Molecular-Weight Proteins From Human Plasma.

    PubMed

    Cai, Tanxi; Yang, Fuquan

    2017-01-01

    Low-molecular-weight region (LMW, MW≤30kDa) of human serum/plasma proteins, including small intact proteins, truncated fragments of larger proteins, along with some other small components, has been associated with the ongoing physiological and pathological events, and thereby represent a treasure trove of diagnostic molecules. Great progress in the mining of novel biomarkers from this diagnostic treasure trove for disease diagnosis and health monitoring has been achieved based on serum samples from healthy individuals and patients and powerful new approaches in biochemistry and systems biology. However, cumulative evidence indicates that many potential LMW protein biomarkers might still have escaped from detection due to their low abundance, the dynamic complexity of serum/plasma, and the limited efficiency of characterization approaches. Here, we provide an overview of the current state of knowledge with respect to strategies for the characterization of low-abundant LMW proteins (small intact or truncated proteins) from human serum/plasma, involving prefractionation or enrichment methods to reduce dynamic range and mass spectrometry-based characterization of low-abundant LMW proteins. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Characterization of materials eliciting foreign body reaction in stapled human gastrointestinal anastomoses.

    PubMed

    Lim, C B B; Goldin, R D; Darzi, A; Hanna, G B

    2008-08-01

    Staples are made of titanium, which elicits minimal tissue reaction. The authors have encountered foreign body reaction associated with stapled human gastrointestinal anastomoses, although the literature has no reports of this. The aim of this study was to identify the refractile foreign materials causing this reaction. Histological sections were taken from 14 gastrointestinal specimens from patients with a history of a stapled anastomosis within the specimen excised. These were reviewed by light and polarization microscopy. Scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray analysis were carried out on these sections, staples and stapler cartridges used for gastrointestinal surgery. Foreign bodies rich in fluorine were found in three patients, and those rich in carbon in 12. Other elements identified included oxygen, calcium, sodium, potassium, magnesium, aluminium and silicon. One specimen was found to contain titanium with no surrounding foreign body reaction. Stapler cartridges contained carbon, oxygen, fluorine, calcium, sodium, potassium, magnesium, aluminium, silicon and traces of titanium. Staples were composed of pure titanium with some fibrous material on the surface containing elements found in stapler cartridges. The presence of foreign body reaction was confirmed in stapled human gastrointestinal anastomoses. The source of refractile materials eliciting this reaction was the stapler cartridges. (c) 2008 British Journal of Surgery Society Ltd. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Maintenance of an Intact Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 vpr Gene following Mother-to-Infant Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Yedavalli, Venkat R. K.; Chappey, Colombe; Ahmad, Nafees

    1998-01-01

    The vpr sequences from six human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-infected mother-infant pairs following perinatal transmission were analyzed. We found that 153 of the 166 clones analyzed from uncultured peripheral blood mononuclear cell DNA samples showed a 92.17% frequency of intact vpr open reading frames. There was a low degree of heterogeneity of vpr genes within mothers, within infants, and between epidemiologically linked mother-infant pairs. The distances between vpr sequences were greater in epidemiologically unlinked individuals than in epidemiologically linked mother-infant pairs. Moreover, the infants’ sequences displayed patterns similar to those seen in their mothers. The functional domains essential for Vpr activity, including virion incorporation, nuclear import, and cell cycle arrest and differentiation were highly conserved in most of the sequences. Phylogenetic analyses of 166 mother-infant pairs and 195 other available vpr sequences from HIV databases formed distinct clusters for each mother-infant pair and for other vpr sequences and grouped the six mother-infant pairs’ sequences with subtype B sequences. A high degree of conservation of intact and functional vpr supports the notion that vpr plays an important role in HIV-1 infection and replication in mother-infant isolates that are involved in perinatal transmission. PMID:9658150

  8. Gastrointestinal stem cells in health and disease: from flies to humans

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hongjie; Jasper, Heinrich

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The gastrointestinal tract of complex metazoans is highly compartmentalized. It is lined by a series of specialized epithelia that are regenerated by specific populations of stem cells. To maintain tissue homeostasis, the proliferative activity of stem and/or progenitor cells has to be carefully controlled and coordinated with regionally distinct programs of differentiation. Metaplasias and dysplasias, precancerous lesions that commonly occur in the human gastrointestinal tract, are often associated with the aberrant proliferation and differentiation of stem and/or progenitor cells. The increasingly sophisticated characterization of stem cells in the gastrointestinal tract of mammals and of the fruit fly Drosophila has provided important new insights into these processes and into the mechanisms that drive epithelial dysfunction. In this Review, we discuss recent advances in our understanding of the establishment, maintenance and regulation of diverse intestinal stem cell lineages in the gastrointestinal tract of Drosophila and mice. We also discuss the field's current understanding of the pathogenesis of epithelial dysfunctions. PMID:27112333

  9. Association between composition of the human gastrointestinal microbiome and development of fatty liver with choline deficiency.

    PubMed

    Spencer, Melanie D; Hamp, Timothy J; Reid, Robert W; Fischer, Leslie M; Zeisel, Steven H; Fodor, Anthony A

    2011-03-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease affects up to 30% of the US population, but the mechanisms underlying this condition are incompletely understood. We investigated how diet standardization and choline deficiency influence the composition of the microbial community in the human gastrointestinal tract and the development of fatty liver under conditions of choline deficiency. We performed a 2-month inpatient study of 15 female subjects who were placed on well-controlled diets in which choline levels were manipulated. We used 454-FLX pyrosequencing of 16S ribosomal RNA bacterial genes to characterize microbiota in stool samples collected over the course of the study. The compositions of the gastrointestinal microbial communities changed with choline levels of diets; each individual's microbiome remained distinct for the duration of the experiment, even though all subjects were fed identical diets. Variations between subjects in levels of Gammaproteobacteria and Erysipelotrichi were directly associated with changes in liver fat in each subject during choline depletion. Levels of these bacteria, change in amount of liver fat, and a single nucleotide polymorphism that affects choline were combined into a model that accurately predicted the degree to which subjects developed fatty liver on a choline-deficient diet. Host factors and gastrointestinal bacteria each respond to dietary choline deficiency, although the gut microbiota remains distinct in each individual. We identified bacterial biomarkers of fatty liver that result from choline deficiency, adding to the accumulating evidence that gastrointestinal microbes have a role in metabolic disorders. Copyright © 2011 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Impact of pasteurization of human milk on preterm newborn in vitro digestion: Gastrointestinal disintegration, lipolysis and proteolysis.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Samira C; Bourlieu, Claire; Ménard, Olivia; Bellanger, Amandine; Henry, Gwénaële; Rousseau, Florence; Dirson, Emelyne; Carrière, Frédéric; Dupont, Didier; Deglaire, Amélie

    2016-11-15

    Human milk feeding is an important recommendation for preterm newborns considering their vulnerability and digestive immaturity. Holder pasteurization (62.5°C, 30min) applied in milk banks modifies its biological quality and its microstructure. We investigated the impact of pasteurization of preterm human milk on its gastrointestinal kinetics of lipolysis, proteolysis and structural disintegration. An in vitro dynamic system was set up to simulate the gastrointestinal digestion of preterm newborns. A pool of preterm human milk was digested as raw or after Holder pasteurization. Pasteurization impacted the microstructure of undigested human milk, its gastrointestinal disintegration and tended to limit the intestinal lipolysis. Furthermore, the gastrointestinal bioaccessibility of some fatty acids was decreased by pasteurization, while the intestinal bioaccessibility of some amino acids was selectively modulated. The impact of pasteurization on the digestion of human milk may have nutritional relevance in vivo and potentially modulates preterm development and growth. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Optical effects of exposing intact human lenses to ultraviolet radiation and visible light.

    PubMed

    Kessel, Line; Eskildsen, Lars; Lundeman, Jesper Holm; Jensen, Ole Bjarlin; Larsen, Michael

    2011-12-30

    The human lens is continuously exposed to high levels of light. Ultraviolet radiation is believed to play a causative role in the development of cataract. In vivo, however, the lens is mainly exposed to visible light and the ageing lens absorbs a great part of the short wavelength region of incoming visible light. The aim of the present study was to examine the optical effects on human lenses of short wavelength visible light and ultraviolet radiation. Naturally aged human donor lenses were irradiated with UVA (355 nm), violet (400 and 405 nm) and green (532 nm) lasers. The effect of irradiation was evaluated qualitatively by photography and quantitatively by measuring the direct transmission before and after irradiation. Furthermore, the effect of pulsed and continuous laser systems was compared as was the effect of short, intermediate and prolonged exposures. Irradiation with high intensity lasers caused scattering lesions in the human lenses. These effects were more likely to be seen when using pulsed lasers because of the high pulse intensity. Prolonged irradiation with UVA led to photodarkening whereas no detrimental effects were observed after irradiation with visible light. Irradiation with visible light does not seem to be harmful to the human lens except if the lens is exposed to laser irradiances that are high enough to warrant thermal protein denaturation that is more readily seen using pulsed laser systems.

  12. The impact of proton pump inhibitors on the human gastrointestinal microbiome

    PubMed Central

    Freedberg, Daniel E.; Lebwohl, Benjamin; Abrams, Julian A.

    2014-01-01

    Potent gastric acid suppression using proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) is common in clinical practice yet may have important effects on human health that are mediated through changes in the gastrointestinal microbiome. Acting through pH-dependent or pH-independent mechanisms, PPIs have the potential to alter the normal microbiota throughout the human gastrointestinal lumen. In the esophagus, PPIs change the normal bacterial milieu to decrease distal esophageal exposure to inflammatory Gram-negative bacteria which may lower the risk of Barrett's esophagus. In the stomach, PPIs alter the abundance and location of gastric Helicobacter pylori and other bacteria, which has implications for peptic ulcer disease and gastric malignancy. In the small bowel, PPIs cause polymicrobial small bowel bacterial overgrowth and have been associated with the diagnosis of celiac disease. In the colon, PPIs associate with incident but not recurrent Clostridium difficile infection, putatively through alterations in commensal colonic anaerobes. Our understanding of the effect of gastric acid suppression on the human gastrointestinal microbiome is incomplete but is rapidly advancing. PMID:25439276

  13. Voltage activation and hysteresis of the non-selective voltage-dependent channel in the intact human red cell.

    PubMed

    Bennekou, Poul; Barksmann, Trine L; Jensen, Lars R; Kristensen, Berit I; Christophersen, Palle

    2004-05-01

    Suspension of intact human red cells in media with low chloride and sodium concentrations (isotonic sucrose substitution) results in strongly inside positive membrane potentials, which activate the voltage-dependent non-selective cation (NSVDC) channel. By systematic variation of the initial Nernst potentials for chloride (degree of ion substitution) as well as the chloride conductance (block by NS1652), and by exploiting the interplay between the Ca(2+)-permeable NSVDC channel, the Ca(2+)-activated K+ channel (the Gárdos channel) and the Ca(2+)-pump, a graded activation of the NSVDC channel was achieved. Under these conditions, it was shown that the NSVDC channels exist in two states of activation depending on the initial conditions for the activation. The hysteretic behaviour, which in patch clamp experiments has been found for the individual channel unit, is thus retained at the cellular level and can be demonstrated with red cells in suspension.

  14. RhoA/ROCK pathway is the major molecular determinant of basal tone in intact human internal anal sphincter.

    PubMed

    Rattan, Satish; Singh, Jagmohan

    2012-04-01

    The knowledge of molecular control mechanisms underlying the basal tone in the intact human internal anal sphincter (IAS) is critical for the pathophysiology and rational therapy for a number of debilitating rectoanal motility disorders. We determined the role of RhoA/ROCK and PKC pathways by comparing the effects of ROCK- and PKC-selective inhibitors Y 27632 and Gö 6850 (10(-8) to 10(-4) M), respectively, on the basal tone in the IAS vs. the rectal smooth muscle (RSM). Western blot studies were performed to determine the levels of RhoA/ROCK II, PKC-α, MYPT1, CPI-17, and MLC(20) in the unphosphorylated and phosphorylated forms, in the IAS vs. RSM. Confocal microscopic studies validated the membrane distribution of ROCK II. Finally, to confirm a direct relationship, we examined the enzymatic activities and changes in the basal IAS tone and p-MYPT1, p-CPI-17, and p-MLC(20), before and after Y 27632 and Gö 6850. Data show higher levels of RhoA/ROCK II and related downstream signal transduction proteins in the IAS vs. RSM. In addition, data show a significant correlation between the active RhoA/ROCK levels, ROCK enzymatic activity, downstream proteins, and basal IAS tone, before and after ROCK inhibitor. From these data we conclude 1) RhoA/ROCK and downstream signaling are constitutively active in the IAS, and this pathway (in contrast with PKC) is the critical determinant of the basal tone in intact human IAS; and 2) RhoA and ROCK are potential therapeutic targets for a number of rectoanal motility disorders for which currently there is no satisfactory treatment.

  15. RhoA/ROCK pathway is the major molecular determinant of basal tone in intact human internal anal sphincter

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Jagmohan

    2012-01-01

    The knowledge of molecular control mechanisms underlying the basal tone in the intact human internal anal sphincter (IAS) is critical for the pathophysiology and rational therapy for a number of debilitating rectoanal motility disorders. We determined the role of RhoA/ROCK and PKC pathways by comparing the effects of ROCK- and PKC-selective inhibitors Y 27632 and Gö 6850 (10−8 to 10−4 M), respectively, on the basal tone in the IAS vs. the rectal smooth muscle (RSM). Western blot studies were performed to determine the levels of RhoA/ROCK II, PKC-α, MYPT1, CPI-17, and MLC20 in the unphosphorylated and phosphorylated forms, in the IAS vs. RSM. Confocal microscopic studies validated the membrane distribution of ROCK II. Finally, to confirm a direct relationship, we examined the enzymatic activities and changes in the basal IAS tone and p-MYPT1, p-CPI-17, and p-MLC20, before and after Y 27632 and Gö 6850. Data show higher levels of RhoA/ROCK II and related downstream signal transduction proteins in the IAS vs. RSM. In addition, data show a significant correlation between the active RhoA/ROCK levels, ROCK enzymatic activity, downstream proteins, and basal IAS tone, before and after ROCK inhibitor. From these data we conclude 1) RhoA/ROCK and downstream signaling are constitutively active in the IAS, and this pathway (in contrast with PKC) is the critical determinant of the basal tone in intact human IAS; and 2) RhoA and ROCK are potential therapeutic targets for a number of rectoanal motility disorders for which currently there is no satisfactory treatment. PMID:22241857

  16. Gastrointestinal Fibroblasts Have Specialized, Diverse Transcriptional Phenotypes: A Comprehensive Gene Expression Analysis of Human Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Ishii, Genichiro; Aoyagi, Kazuhiko; Sasaki, Hiroki; Ochiai, Atsushi

    2015-01-01

    Background Fibroblasts are the principal stromal cells that exist in whole organs and play vital roles in many biological processes. Although the functional diversity of fibroblasts has been estimated, a comprehensive analysis of fibroblasts from the whole body has not been performed and their transcriptional diversity has not been sufficiently explored. The aim of this study was to elucidate the transcriptional diversity of human fibroblasts within the whole body. Methods Global gene expression analysis was performed on 63 human primary fibroblasts from 13 organs. Of these, 32 fibroblasts from gastrointestinal organs (gastrointestinal fibroblasts: GIFs) were obtained from a pair of 2 anatomical sites: the submucosal layer (submucosal fibroblasts: SMFs) and the subperitoneal layer (subperitoneal fibroblasts: SPFs). Using hierarchical clustering analysis, we elucidated identifiable subgroups of fibroblasts and analyzed the transcriptional character of each subgroup. Results In unsupervised clustering, 2 major clusters that separate GIFs and non-GIFs were observed. Organ- and anatomical site-dependent clusters within GIFs were also observed. The signature genes that discriminated GIFs from non-GIFs, SMFs from SPFs, and the fibroblasts of one organ from another organ consisted of genes associated with transcriptional regulation, signaling ligands, and extracellular matrix remodeling. Conclusions GIFs are characteristic fibroblasts with specific gene expressions from transcriptional regulation, signaling ligands, and extracellular matrix remodeling related genes. In addition, the anatomical site- and organ-dependent diversity of GIFs was also discovered. These features of GIFs contribute to their specific physiological function and homeostatic maintenance, and create a functional diversity of the gastrointestinal tract. PMID:26046848

  17. Relative quantitation of glycoisoforms of intact apolipoprotein C3 in human plasma by liquid chromatography-high-resolution mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Jian, Wenying; Edom, Richard W; Wang, Dai; Weng, Naidong; Zhang, Stanley Weihua

    2013-03-05

    Glycosylation is one of the most important post-translational modifications to mammalian proteins. Distribution of different glycoisoforms of certain proteins may reflect disease conditions and, therefore, can potentially be utilized as biomarkers. Apolipoprotein C3 (ApoC3) is one of the many plasma glycoproteins extensively studied for association with disease states. ApoC3 exists in three main glycoisoforms, including ApoC3-1 and ApoC3-2, which contain an O-linked carbohydrate moiety consisting of three and four monosaccharide residues, respectively, and ApoC3-0 that lacks the entire glycosylation chain. Changes in the ratio of different glycoisoforms of ApoC3 have been observed in pathological conditions such as kidney disease, liver disease, and diabetes. They may provide important information for diagnosis, prognosis, and evaluation of therapeutic response for metabolic conditions. In this current work, a liquid chromatography (LC)-high-resolution (HR) time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometry (MS) method was developed for relative quantitation of different glycoisoforms of intact ApoC3 in human plasma. The samples were processed using a solid-phase extraction (SPE) method and then subjected to LC-full scan HRMS analysis. Isotope peaks for each targeted glycoisoform at two charge states were extracted using a window of 50 mDa and integrated into a chromatographic peak. The peak area ratios of ApoC3-1/ApoC3-0 and ApoC3-2/ApoC3-0 were calculated and evaluated for assay performance. The results indicated that the ratio can be determined with excellent reproducibility in multiple subjects. It has also been observed that the ratios remained constant in plasma exposed to room temperature, freeze-thaw cycles, and long-term frozen storage. The method was applied in preliminary biomarker research of diabetes by analyzing plasma samples collected from normal, prediabetic, and diabetic subjects. Significant differences were revealed in the ApoC3-1/ApoC3-0 ratio and in the

  18. Learning new color names produces rapid increase in gray matter in the intact adult human cortex

    PubMed Central

    Kwok, Veronica; Niu, Zhendong; Kay, Paul; Zhou, Ke; Mo, Lei; Jin, Zhen; So, Kwok-Fai; Tan, Li Hai

    2011-01-01

    The human brain has been shown to exhibit changes in the volume and density of gray matter as a result of training over periods of several weeks or longer. We show that these changes can be induced much faster by using a training method that is claimed to simulate the rapid learning of word meanings by children. Using whole-brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) we show that learning newly defined and named subcategories of the universal categories green and blue in a period of 2 h increases the volume of gray matter in V2/3 of the left visual cortex, a region known to mediate color vision. This pattern of findings demonstrates that the anatomical structure of the adult human brain can change very quickly, specifically during the acquisition of new, named categories. Also, prior behavioral and neuroimaging research has shown that differences between languages in the boundaries of named color categories influence the categorical perception of color, as assessed by judgments of relative similarity, by response time in alternative forced-choice tasks, and by visual search. Moreover, further behavioral studies (visual search) and brain imaging studies have suggested strongly that the categorical effect of language on color processing is left-lateralized, i.e., mediated by activity in the left cerebral hemisphere in adults (hence “lateralized Whorfian” effects). The present results appear to provide a structural basis in the brain for the behavioral and neurophysiologically observed indices of these Whorfian effects on color processing. PMID:21464316

  19. Evaluation and Quantitation of Intact Wax Esters of Human Meibum by Gas-Liquid Chromatography-Ion Trap Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Butovich, Igor A.; Arciniega, Juan C.; Lu, Hua; Molai, Mike

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. Wax esters (WE) of human meibum are one of the largest group of meibomian lipids. Their complete characterization on the level of individual intact lipid species has not been completed yet. We obtained detailed structural information on previously uncharacterized meibomian WE. Methods. Intact WE were separated and analyzed by means of high-temperature capillary gas-liquid chromatography (GLC) in combination with low voltage (30 eV) electron ionization ion trap mass spectrometry (ITMS). 3D (mass-to-charge ratio [m/z] versus lipid sample weight versus signal intensity) calibration plots were used for quantitation of WE. Results. We demonstrated that GLC-ITMS was suitable for analyzing unpooled/underivatized WE collected from 14 individual donors. More than 100 of saturated and unsaturated WE (SWE and UWE, respectively) were detected. On average, UWE represented about 82% of the total WE pool. About 90% of UWE were based on oleic acid, while less than 10% were based on palmitoleic acid. The amounts of poly-UWE were <3% of their mono-UWA counterparts. SWE were based primarily on C16–C18 fatty acids (FA) in overall molar ratios of 22:65:13. A pool of C16:0-FA was comprised of a 20:80 (mol/mol) mixture of straight chain and iso-branched isomers, while the corresponding ratio for C18:0-FA was 43:57. Interestingly, C17:0-FA was almost exclusively branched, with anteiso- and iso-isomers found in a ratio of 93:7. Conclusions. GLC-ITMS can be used successfully to analyze more than 100 individual species of meibomian WE, which were shown to comprise 41 ± 8% (wt/wt) of meibum, which made them the largest group of lipids in meibum. PMID:22531701

  20. Evaluation and quantitation of intact wax esters of human meibum by gas-liquid chromatography-ion trap mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Butovich, Igor A; Arciniega, Juan C; Lu, Hua; Molai, Mike

    2012-06-20

    Wax esters (WE) of human meibum are one of the largest group of meibomian lipids. Their complete characterization on the level of individual intact lipid species has not been completed yet. We obtained detailed structural information on previously uncharacterized meibomian WE. Intact WE were separated and analyzed by means of high-temperature capillary gas-liquid chromatography (GLC) in combination with low voltage (30 eV) electron ionization ion trap mass spectrometry (ITMS). 3D (mass-to-charge ratio [m/z] versus lipid sample weight versus signal intensity) calibration plots were used for quantitation of WE. We demonstrated that GLC-ITMS was suitable for analyzing unpooled/underivatized WE collected from 14 individual donors. More than 100 of saturated and unsaturated WE (SWE and UWE, respectively) were detected. On average, UWE represented about 82% of the total WE pool. About 90% of UWE were based on oleic acid, while less than 10% were based on palmitoleic acid. The amounts of poly-UWE were <3% of their mono-UWA counterparts. SWE were based primarily on C(16)-C(18) fatty acids (FA) in overall molar ratios of 22:65:13. A pool of C(16:0)-FA was comprised of a 20:80 (mol/mol) mixture of straight chain and iso-branched isomers, while the corresponding ratio for C(18:0)-FA was 43:57. Interestingly, C(17:0)-FA was almost exclusively branched, with anteiso- and iso-isomers found in a ratio of 93:7. GLC-ITMS can be used successfully to analyze more than 100 individual species of meibomian WE, which were shown to comprise 41 ± 8% (wt/wt) of meibum, which made them the largest group of lipids in meibum.

  1. Conservation of an Intact vif Gene of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 during Maternal-Fetal Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Yedavalli, Venkat R. K.; Chappey, Colombe; Matala, Erik; Ahmad, Nafees

    1998-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) vif gene is conserved among most lentiviruses, suggesting that vif is important for natural infection. To determine whether an intact vif gene is positively selected during mother-to-infant transmission, we analyzed vif sequences from five infected mother-infant pairs following perinatal transmission. The coding potential of the vif open reading frame directly derived from uncultured peripheral blood mononuclear cell DNA was maintained in most of the 78,912 bp sequenced. We found that 123 of the 137 clones analyzed showed an 89.8% frequency of intact vif open reading frames. There was a low degree of heterogeneity of vif genes within mothers, within infants, and between epidemiologically linked mother-infant pairs. The distances between vif sequences were greater in epidemiologically unlinked individuals than in epidemiologically linked mother-infant pairs. Furthermore, the epidemiologically linked mother-infant pair vif sequences displayed similar patterns that were not seen in vif sequences from epidemiologically unlinked individuals. The functional domains, including the two cysteines at positions 114 and 133, a serine phosphorylation site at position 144, and the C-terminal basic amino acids essential for vif protein function, were highly conserved in most of the sequences. Phylogenetic analyses of 137 mother-infant pair vif sequences and 187 other available vif sequences from HIV-1 databases revealed distinct clusters for vif sequences from each mother-infant pair and for other vif sequences. Taken together, these findings suggest that vif plays an important role in HIV-1 infection and replication in mothers and their perinatally infected infants. PMID:9445004

  2. Storage and qualification of viable intact human amniotic graft and technology transfer to a tissue bank.

    PubMed

    Laurent, Romain; Nallet, Aurélie; Obert, Laurent; Nicod, Laurence; Gindraux, Florelle

    2014-06-01

    Human amniotic membrane (hAM) is known to have good potential to help the regeneration of tissue. It has been used for over 100 years in many medical disciplines because of its properties, namely a scaffold containing stem cells and growth factors, with low immunogenicity and anti-microbial, anti-inflammatory, anti-fibrotic and analgesic properties. In order to use this "boosted membrane" as an advanced therapeutic medicinal product for bone repair, we aimed to observe the influence of tissue culture and/or cryopreservation on cell viability and tissue structure, and secondly, to adapt to a tissue bank, identify easy processes to store hAM containing viable cells and to verify the quality of the graft before its release for use. To this end, we tested different published culture or cryopreservation storage conditions and cell viability assays. Tissue structure was evaluated by Giemsa staining and was compared to histological analysis. Preliminary results show no dramatic decrease in cell viability in cultured hAM as compared to cryopreserved hAM, but tissue structure alterations were observed with both storage conditions. Histological and immunohistochemical data highlight that tissue damage was associated with significantly modified protein expression, which could lead to a possible loss of differentiation potential. Finally, we report that trypan blue and Giemsa staining could constitute controls that are "materially and easily transferable" to a tissue bank.

  3. Automated Decellularization of Intact, Human-Sized Lungs for Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Price, Andrew P.; Godin, Lindsay M.; Domek, Alex; Cotter, Trevor; D'Cunha, Jonathan; Taylor, Doris A.

    2015-01-01

    We developed an automated system that can be used to decellularize whole human-sized organs and have shown lung as an example. Lungs from 20 to 30 kg pigs were excised en bloc with the trachea and decellularized with our established protocol of deionized water, detergents, sodium chloride, and porcine pancreatic DNase. A software program was written to control a valve manifold assembly that we built for selection and timing of decellularization fluid perfusion through the airway and the vasculature. This system was interfaced with a prototypic bioreactor chamber that was connected to another program, from a commercial source, which controlled the volume and flow pressure of fluids. Lung matrix that was decellularized by the automated method was compared to a manual method previously used by us and others. Automation resulted in more consistent acellular matrix preparations as demonstrated by measuring levels of DNA, hydroxyproline (collagen), elastin, laminin, and glycosaminoglycans. It also proved highly beneficial in saving time as the decellularization procedure was reduced from days down to just 24 h. Developing a rapid, controllable, automated system for production of reproducible matrices in a closed system is a major step forward in whole-organ tissue engineering. PMID:24826875

  4. Postmitotic human dermal fibroblasts preserve intact feeder properties for epithelial cell growth after long-term cryopreservation.

    PubMed

    Limat, A; Hunziker, T; Boillat, C; Noser, F; Wiesmann, U

    1990-07-01

    In vitro, human dermal fibroblasts (HDF) differentiate through morphologically and biochemically identified compartments. In the course of this spontaneous differentiation through mitotic and postmitotic states, a tremendous increase in cellular and nuclear size occurs. Induction of postmitotic states can be accelerated by chemical (e.g., mitomycin C) or physical (e.g., x-ray) treatments. Such experimentally induced postmitotic HDF cells support very efficiently the growth of cutaneous epithelial cells, i.e. interfollicular keratinocytes and follicular outer root sheath cells, especially in primary cultures starting from very low cell seeding densities. The HDF feeder system provides more fundamental and also practical advantages, i.e. use of initially diploid human fibroblasts from known anatomic locations, easy handling and excellent reproducibility, and the possibility of long-term storage by incubation at 37 degrees C. Conditions for the cryogenic storage of postmitotic HDF cells in liquid nitrogen are presented and related to the feeder capacity for epithelial cell growth. Because postmitotic HDF cells preserve intact feeder properties after long-term storage, the immediate availability of feeder cells and the possibility to repeat experiments with identical materials further substantiate the usefulness of this feeder system.

  5. A Novel Ex Vivo Method for Visualizing Live-Cell Calcium Response Behavior in Intact Human Tumors.

    PubMed

    Koh, James; Hogue, Joyce A; Sosa, Julie A

    2016-01-01

    The functional impact of intratumoral heterogeneity has been difficult to assess in the absence of a means to interrogate dynamic, live-cell biochemical events in the native tissue context of a human tumor. Conventional histological methods can reveal morphology and static biomarker expression patterns but do not provide a means to probe and evaluate tumor functional behavior and live-cell responsiveness to experimentally controlled stimuli. Here, we describe an approach that couples vibratome-mediated viable tissue sectioning with live-cell confocal microscopy imaging to visualize human parathyroid adenoma tumor cell responsiveness to extracellular calcium challenge. Tumor sections prepared as 300 micron-thick tissue slices retain viability throughout a >24 hour observation period and retain the native architecture of the parental tumor. Live-cell observation of biochemical signaling in response to extracellular calcium challenge in the intact tissue slices reveals discrete, heterogeneous kinetic waveform categories of calcium agonist reactivity within each tumor. Plotting the proportion of maximally responsive tumor cells as a function of calcium concentration yields a sigmoid dose-response curve with a calculated calcium EC50 value significantly elevated above published reference values for wild-type calcium-sensing receptor (CASR) sensitivity. Subsequent fixation and immunofluorescence analysis of the functionally evaluated tissue specimens allows alignment and mapping of the physical characteristics of individual cells within the tumor to specific calcium response behaviors. Evaluation of the relative abundance of intracellular PTH in tissue slices challenged with variable calcium concentrations demonstrates that production of the hormone can be dynamically manipulated ex vivo. The capability of visualizing live human tumor tissue behavior in response to experimentally controlled conditions opens a wide range of possibilities for personalized ex vivo

  6. Human Nanog pseudogene8 promotes the proliferation of gastrointestinal cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Uchino, Keita, E-mail: uchino13@intmed1.med.kyushu-u.ac.jp; Hirano, Gen; Hirahashi, Minako

    2012-09-10

    There is emerging evidence that human solid tumor cells originate from cancer stem cells (CSCs). In cancer cell lines, tumor-initiating CSCs are mainly found in the side population (SP) that has the capacity to extrude dyes such as Hoechst 33342. We found that Nanog is expressed specifically in SP cells of human gastrointestinal (GI) cancer cells. Nucleotide sequencing revealed that NanogP8 but not Nanog was expressed in GI cancer cells. Transfection of NanogP8 into GI cancer cell lines promoted cell proliferation, while its inhibition by anti-Nanog siRNA suppressed the proliferation. Immunohistochemical staining of primary GI cancer tissues revealed NanogP8 proteinmore » to be strongly expressed in 3 out of 60 cases. In these cases, NanogP8 was found especially in an infiltrative part of the tumor, in proliferating cells with Ki67 expression. These data suggest that NanogP8 is involved in GI cancer development in a fraction of patients, in whom it presumably acts by supporting CSC proliferation. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nanog maintains pluripotency by regulating embryonic stem cells differentiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nanog is expressed in cancer stem cells of human gastrointestinal cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nucleotide sequencing revealed that Nanog pseudogene8 but not Nanog was expressed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nanog pseudogene8 promotes cancer stem cells proliferation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nanog pseudogene8 is involved in gastrointestinal cancer development.« less

  7. Toxoplasma gondii-A Gastrointestinal Pathogen Associated with Human Brain Diseases.

    PubMed

    Severance, E G; Xiao, J; Jones-Brando, L; Sabunciyan, S; Li, Y; Pletnikov, M; Prandovszky, E; Yolken, R

    2016-01-01

    Serious psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and major depression are important causes of mortality and morbidity worldwide. While these are primarily diseases involving altered brain functioning, numerous studies have documented increased rates of gastrointestinal inflammation and dysfunction in many individuals with these disorders. Toxoplasma gondii is an apicomplexan protozoan intracellular parasite with a widespread distribution in both developed and developing countries. Toxoplasma organisms enter the ecosystem through the shedding of oocysts by Toxoplasma-infected felines. In almost all cases of postnatal human infection, Toxoplasma enters its hosts through the intestinal tract either by the ingestion of oocysts or by the consumption of meat from food animals which themselves were infected by Toxoplasma oocysts. It had previously been thought that most cases of Toxoplasma infection in immune competent children and adults were inapparent and asymptomatic. However, recent studies cast doubt on this concept as exposure to Toxoplasma has been associated with a range of acute and chronic symptoms. Of particular note has been the finding of an increased rate of a range of neurological and psychiatric disorders associated with serological evidence of Toxoplasma exposure. A role of Toxoplasma infection in brain diseases is also supported by the consistent finding of altered cognition and behavior in animal models of infections. Much of the attention relating to the role of Toxoplasma infection in neuropsychiatric disorders has focused on the brain, where Toxoplasma tissue cysts can persist for extended periods of time. However, recent discoveries relating to the role of the gastrointestinal tract in cognition and behavior suggest that Toxoplasma may also increase susceptibility to human brain diseases through immune activation, particularly involving the gastrointestinal mucosa. The study of the pathways relating to the pathobiology and

  8. Human papillomavirus and gastrointestinal cancer in Iranian population: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Omrani-Navai, Versa; Alizadeh-Navaei, Reza; Yahyapour, Yousef; Hedayatizadeh-Omran, Akbar; Abediankenari, Saeid; Janbabaei, Ghasem; Toghani, Fatima

    2017-01-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) malignancies are the most common cancers and account for nearly half of all cancer-related deaths in Iran. There was a strong association between human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and urogenital cancers, in particular the cervix. However, there is no clear causal relationship in all types of cancers, including gastrointestinal cancers. Therefore, the present study as a systematic review and meta-analysis was designed to evaluate the prevalence and relation of HPV in GI cancers. This systematic review and meta-analysis study assess the prevalence of human papillomavirus in GI cancers in Iran. Data were collected by searching electronic databases, including PubMed, Google Scholar, Scopus, SID and Iranmedex by English and Persian key words up to August 2016. Key words included: Human Papillomavirus, HPV, Cancer, Neoplasm, Carcinoma, Esophageal, colorectal, Gastrointestinal and Iran articles were entered in the EndNote software and duplicate papers were excluded. Data were extracted and analyzed by comprehensive meta-analysis software, Version 2 (CMA.V2) and random effects model. Finally, we included 17 studies in this meta-analysis. The prevalence of HPV in Iranian patients with GI cancers was 16.4% (CI95%: 10.4-24.9). Considering all HPV types, the odds ratio of GI cancers in positive patients was 3.03 (CI95%: 1.42-6.45) while in patients with HPV-16 was 3.62 (CI: 1.43-4.82). The results show a strong relationship between HPV infection especially high-risk HPV type 16 and GI cancers in Iranian population.

  9. The impact of proton pump inhibitors on the human gastrointestinal microbiome.

    PubMed

    Freedberg, Daniel E; Lebwohl, Benjamin; Abrams, Julian A

    2014-12-01

    Potent gastric acid suppression using proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) is common in clinical practice but may have important effects on human health that are mediated through changes in the gastrointestinal microbiome. In the esophagus, PPIs change the normal bacterial milieu to decrease distal esophageal exposure to inflammatory gram-negative bacteria. In the stomach, PPIs alter the abundance and location of gastric Helicobacter pylori and other bacteria. In the small bowel, PPIs cause polymicrobial small bowel bacterial overgrowth and have been associated with the diagnosis of celiac disease. In the colon, PPIs associate with incident but not recurrent Clostridium difficile infection. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Differential protein abundance of a basolateral MCT1 transporter in the human gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Al-Mosauwi, Hashemeya; Ryan, Elizabeth; McGrane, Alison; Riveros-Beltran, Stefanie; Walpole, Caragh; Dempsey, Eugene; Courtney, Danielle; Fearon, Naomi; Winter, Desmond; Baird, Alan; Stewart, Gavin

    2016-12-01

    Bacterially derived short chain fatty acids (SCFAs), such as butyrate, are vital in maintaining the symbiotic relationship that exists between humans and their gastrointestinal microbial populations. A key step in this process is the transport of SCFAs across colonic epithelial cells via MCT1 transporters. This study investigated MCT1 protein abundance in various human intestinal tissues. Initial RT-PCR analysis confirmed the expected MCT1 RNA expression pattern of colon > small intestine > stomach. Using surgical resection samples, immunoblot analysis detected higher abundance of a 45 kDa MCT1 protein in colonic tissue compared to ileum tissue (P < 0.001, N = 4, unpaired t-test). Importantly, MCT1 abundance was found to be significantly lower in sigmoid colon compared to ascending colon (P < 0.01, N = 8-11, ANOVA). Finally, immunolocalization studies confirmed MCT1 to be abundant in the basolateral membranes of surface epithelial cells of the ascending, transverse, and descending colon, but significantly less prevalent in the sigmoid colon (P < 0.05, N = 5-21, ANOVA). In conclusion, these data confirm that basolateral MCT1 protein abundance is correlated to levels of bacterially derived SCFAs along the human gastrointestinal tract. These findings highlight the importance of precise tissue location in studies comparing colonic MCT1 abundance between normal and diseased states. © 2016 International Federation for Cell Biology.

  11. Optimization of PMAxx pretreatment to distinguish between human norovirus with intact and altered capsids in shellfish and sewage samples.

    PubMed

    Randazzo, Walter; Khezri, Mohammad; Ollivier, Joanna; Le Guyader, Françoise S; Rodríguez-Díaz, Jesús; Aznar, Rosa; Sánchez, Gloria

    2018-02-02

    Shellfish contamination by human noroviruses (HuNoVs) is a serious health and economic problem. Recently an ISO procedure based on RT-qPCR for the quantitative detection of HuNoVs in shellfish has been issued, but these procedures cannot discriminate between inactivated and potentially infectious viruses. The aim of the present study was to optimize a pretreatment using PMAxx to better discriminate between intact and heat-treated HuNoVs in shellfish and sewage. To this end, the optimal conditions (30min incubation with 100μM of PMAxx and 0.5% of Triton, and double photoactivation) were applied to mussels, oysters and cockles artificially inoculated with thermally-inactivated (99°C for 5min) HuNoV GI and GII. This pretreatment reduced the signal of thermally-inactivated HuNoV GI in cockles and HuNoV GII in mussels by >3 log. Additionally, this pretreatment reduced the signal of thermally-inactivated HuNoV GI and GII between 1 and 1.5 log in oysters. Thermal inactivation of HuNoV GI and GII in PBS, sewage and bioaccumulated oysters was also evaluated by the PMAxx-Triton pretreatment. Results showed significant differences between reductions observed in the control and PMAxx-treated samples in PBS following treatment at 72 and 95°C for 15min. In sewage, the RT-qPCR signal of HuNoV GI was completely removed by the PMAxx pretreatment after heating at 72 and 95°C, while the RT-qPCR signal for HuNoV GII was completely eliminated only at 95°C. Finally, the PMAxx-Triton pretreatment was applied to naturally contaminated sewage and oysters, resulting in most of the HuNoV genomes quantified in sewage and oyster samples (12 out of 17) corresponding to undamaged capsids. Although this procedure may still overestimate infectivity, the PMAxx-Triton pretreatment represents a step forward to better interpret the quantification of intact HuNoVs in complex matrices, such as sewage and shellfish, and it could certainly be included in the procedures based on RT-qPCR. Copyright

  12. /sup 3/H-PAF-acether displacement and inhibition of binding in intact human platelets by BN 52021

    SciTech Connect

    Korth, R.; Le Couedic, J.P.; Benveniste, J.

    1986-03-05

    Intact washed human platelets incubated at 20/sup 0/C in Tyrode's buffer containing 0.25% (w/v) bovine serum albumin bound /sup 3/H paf-acether in a concentration (0-6.5 nM) and time (0-60 min) dependent manner (n=3). BN 52021 (60 ..mu..M) a chemically defined extract from Ginkgo biloba inhibited the binding of increasing concentrations of /sup 3/H paf-acether. Calculated differences between /sup 3/H paf-acether binding in the presence or absence of BN 52021 (60 ..mu..M) reached nearly a plateau in concentrations higher than 0.65 nM /sup 3/H paf-acether. Increasing concentrations of BN 52021 (0-60 ..mu..M) as well as of unlabelled paf-acether (0-50 nM) preventedmore » within 15 min /sup 3/H paf-acether binding (0.65 nM) to platelets in a concentration-dependent way. Increasing BN 52021 concentrations (0-60 ..mu..M) also displaced platelet-bound /sup 3/H paf-acether (0.65 nM) in a concentration-dependent way. Displacement increased with the time length of platelet incubation with BN 52021 and reached a plateau at 15 min. Platelet-bound /sup 3/H paf-acether displacement of 28.3 +/- 6.3%, 31.1 +/- 4.0% and 26.7 +/- 5.6% was observed using 50 nM unlabelled paf-acether, 60 ..mu..M BN 52021 or both substances together (vs 4.3 +/- 7.2% for vehicle alone). No degradation of /sup 3/H paf-acether occurred as assessed by high pressure liquid chromatography. These results demonstrate that BN 52021 competes directly with paf-acether binding sites on human platelets.« less

  13. Dengue virus infection induces broadly cross-reactive human IgM antibodies that recognize intact virions in humanized BLT-NSG mice.

    PubMed

    Jaiswal, Smita; Smith, Kenneth; Ramirez, Alejandro; Woda, Marcia; Pazoles, Pamela; Shultz, Leonard D; Greiner, Dale L; Brehm, Michael A; Mathew, Anuja

    2015-01-01

    The development of small animal models that elicit human immune responses to dengue virus (DENV) is important since prior immunity is a major risk factor for developing severe dengue disease. This study evaluated anti-DENV human antibody (hAb) responses generated from immortalized B cells after DENV-2 infection in NOD-scid IL2rγ(null) mice that were co-transplanted with human fetal thymus and liver tissues (BLT-NSG mice). DENV-specific human antibodies predominantly of the IgM isotype were isolated during acute infection and in convalescence. We found that while a few hAbs recognized the envelope protein produced as a soluble recombinant, a number of hAbs only recognized epitopes on intact virions. The majority of the hAbs isolated during acute infection and in immune mice were serotype-cross-reactive and poorly neutralizing. Viral titers in immune BLT-NSG mice were significantly decreased after challenge with a clinical strain of dengue. DENV-specific hAbs generated in BLT-NSG mice share some of the characteristics of Abs isolated in humans with natural infection. Humanized BLT-NSG mice provide an attractive preclinical platform to assess the immunogenicity of candidate dengue vaccines. © 2014 by the Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine.

  14. Dengue virus infection induces broadly cross-reactive human IgM antibodies that recognize intact virions in humanized BLT-NSG mice

    PubMed Central

    Jaiswal, Smita; Smith, Kenneth; Ramirez, Alejandro; Woda, Marcia; Pazoles, Pamela; Shultz, Leonard D; Greiner, Dale L; Brehm, Michael A

    2015-01-01

    The development of small animal models that elicit human immune responses to dengue virus (DENV) is important since prior immunity is a major risk factor for developing severe dengue disease. This study evaluated anti-DENV human antibody (hAb) responses generated from immortalized B cells after DENV-2 infection in NOD-scid IL2rγnull mice that were co-transplanted with human fetal thymus and liver tissues (BLT-NSG mice). DENV-specific human antibodies predominantly of the IgM isotype were isolated during acute infection and in convalescence. We found that while a few hAbs recognized the envelope protein produced as a soluble recombinant, a number of hAbs only recognized epitopes on intact virions. The majority of the hAbs isolated during acute infection and in immune mice were serotype-cross-reactive and poorly neutralizing. Viral titers in immune BLT-NSG mice were significantly decreased after challenge with a clinical strain of dengue. DENV-specific hAbs generated in BLT-NSG mice share some of the characteristics of Abs isolated in humans with natural infection. Humanized BLT-NSG mice provide an attractive preclinical platform to assess the immunogenicity of candidate dengue vaccines. PMID:25125497

  15. 210Polonium bioaccessibility assessment in algae for human consumption: An in vitro gastrointestinal digestion method.

    PubMed

    Desideri, Donatella; Meli, Maria Assunta; Roselli, Carla; Feduzi, Laura; Ugolini, Lucia

    2017-01-01

    The occurrence and mobility of natural radioactive element as 210 Polonium ( 210 Po) in 13 commercial algae consumed in Italy by humans were determined because the effects on human health need to take into account the bioavailability of these elements. The simulation of gastrointestinal (GIT) digestion was divided into three stages and was accomplished using three different artificial solutions: saliva, gastric, and synthetic bile-pancreas solution. The same sample was treated in two different ways: a) only gastric digestion and b) complete GIT digestion (gastric digestion followed by bile-pancreas solution). The difference between Po gastric mobility with respect to that found for GIT digestion was not significant; in fact, Po mobility exhibited a mean value 17.2 ± 15.1% and 19.5 ± 11.5% for gastric and GIT digestion, respectively.

  16. Establishment and characterization of a human gastrointestinal stromal tumour (GIST) xenograft in athymic nude mice.

    PubMed

    Revheim, Mona-Elisabeth; Seierstad, Therese; Berner, Jeanne-Marie; Bruland, Oyvind Sverre; Røe, Kathrine; Ohnstad, Hege Oma; Bjerkehagen, Bodil; Bach-Gansmo, Tore

    2009-11-01

    The majority of gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GISTs) contain oncogenic KIT (v-kit Hardy-Zuckerman 4 feline sarcoma viral oncogene homolog) or platelet-derived growth factor-alpha (PDGFRA) receptor tyrosine kinase (TK) mutations and are initially, but only temporarily sensitive to TK inhibitors. The aim of this study was to establish and characterize a human GIST xenograft that could be used for evaluating various molecularly targeted therapies. GIST tissue from four patients was implanted under the skin of athymic nude mice. In one case a tumour line was established. The xenograft showed characteristic GIST morphology and exhibited the same mutation profile as that of the patient. A human GIST xenograft with mutation in KIT exons 11 and 17 has been established and maintained in nude mice for 3 years (13 passages). This model will enable further studies on mechanisms of resistance, combination therapies and allow testing of novel targeted therapies.

  17. The Fate of Major Royal Jelly Proteins during Proteolytic Digestion in the Human Gastrointestinal Tract.

    PubMed

    Mureşan, Carmen I; Schierhorn, Angelika; Buttstedt, Anja

    2018-04-25

    Royal jelly (RJ) is a beehive product with a complex composition, major royal jelly proteins (MRJPs) being the most abundant proteins. Cell culture and animal studies suggest various biological activities for the full-length/native MRJPs. In the field of apitherapy, it is assumed that MRJPs can positively affect human health. However, whenever RJ is administered orally, the availability for assimilation in the gastrointestinal tract is a prerequisite for MRJPs to have any effect on humans. We here show that MRJPs vary in resistance to pepsin digestion with MRJP2 being most stable and still present as full-length protein after 24 h of digestion. In the intestinal phase, using trypsin and chymotrypsin, MRJPs are rapidly digested with MRJP2 again showing longest stability (40 min), suggesting that MRJPs can reach the small intestine as full-length proteins but then have to be resorbed quickly if full-length proteins are to fulfill any biological activity.

  18. Expression and Regulation of Drug Transporters and Metabolizing Enzymes in the Human Gastrointestinal Tract.

    PubMed

    Drozdzik, M; Oswald, S

    2016-01-01

    Orally administered drugs must pass through the intestinal wall and then through the liver before reaching systemic circulation. During this process drugs are subjected to different processes that may determine the therapeutic value. The intestinal barrier with active drug metabolizing enzymes and drug transporters in enterocytes plays an important role in the determination of drug bioavailability. Accumulating information demonstrates variable distribution of drug metabolizing enzymes and transporters along the human gastrointestinal tract (GI), that creates specific barrier characteristics in different segments of the GI. In this review, expression of drug metabolizing enzymes and transporters in the healthy and diseased human GI as well as their regulatory aspects: genetic, miRNA, DNA methylation are outlined. The knowledge of unique interplay between drug metabolizing enzymes and transporters in specific segments of the GI tract allows more precise definition of drug release sites within the GI in order to assure more complete bioavailability and prediction of drug interactions.

  19. Characterization of muscarinic receptors on intact human neuroblastoma cells: coupling to phosphoinositide hydrolysis and phosphorylation by phorbol esters

    SciTech Connect

    Serra, M.; Watson, M.; Roeske, W.R.

    Cloned human neuroblastoma cells (SH-SY5Y) were grown. High affinity binding of (/sup 3/H)(-)quinuclidinyl benzilate ((/sup 3/H)(-)QNB) and its quaternary derivative (/sup 3/H)(-)methyl QNB to muscarinic receptors (MR) on intact SH-SY5Y cells was studied. A 30 min rinse time gave a ratio of specific/total binding of 90% for both ligands. Association rates of (/sup 3/H)(-)QNB and (/sup 3/H)(-)methyl QNB were determined. Both ligands reached steady state by 60 min at 37/sup 0/C. Rates of dissociation for both radioligands were biphasic, although (/sup 3/H)(-)methyl QNB was faster. Saturation studies yielded K/sub d/ (dissociation constant) values of 16 and 260 pM and B/submore » max/ (maximal MR density) values of 172 and 134 fmoles/mg prot for (/sup 3/H)(-)QNB and (/sup 3/H)(-)methyl QNB, respectively. Activation of protein kinase C by phorbol esters produced increased phosphorylation of cellular proteins. Pretreatment with 100 nM of 4..beta..-phorbol 12..beta..-myristate 13..cap alpha..-acetate (PMA) induced a decrease in agonist affinity for MR, suggesting a PMA-promoted phosphorylation of the MR protein. Phosphoinositide (PhI) turnover was measured by MR agonist-induced accumulation of inositol-1-phosphate in the presence of Li/sup + +/ (10 mM). Only carbachol and acetylcholine elicited potent responses with oxotremorine (16%) pilocarpine (17%) and McN-A-343 (8%) appearing to be weak partial agonist of low efficacy.« less

  20. Modulation of the Gastrointestinal Microbiome with Nondigestible Fermentable Carbohydrates To Improve Human Health.

    PubMed

    Deehan, Edward C; Duar, Rebbeca M; Armet, Anissa M; Perez-Muñoz, Maria Elisa; Jin, Mingliang; Walter, Jens

    2017-09-01

    There is a clear association between the gastrointestinal (GI) microbiome and the development of chronic noncommunicable diseases, providing a rationale for the development of strategies that target the GI microbiota to improve human health. In this article, we discuss the potential of supplementing the human diet with nondigestible fermentable carbohydrates (NDFCs) to modulate the composition, structure, diversity, and metabolic potential of the GI microbiome in an attempt to prevent or treat human disease. The current concepts by which NDFCs can be administered to humans, including prebiotics, fermentable dietary fibers, and microbiota-accessible carbohydrates, as well as the mechanisms by which these carbohydrates exert their health benefits, are discussed. Epidemiological research presents compelling evidence for the health effects of NDFCs, with clinical studies providing further support for some of these benefits. However, rigorously designed human intervention studies with well-established clinical markers and microbial endpoints are still essential to establish (i) the clinical efficiency of specific NDFCs, (ii) the causal role of the GI microbiota in these effects, (iii) the underlying mechanisms involved, and (iv) the degree by which inter-individual differences between GI microbiomes influence these effects. Such studies would provide the mechanistic understanding needed for a systematic application of NDFCs to improve human health via GI microbiota modulation while also allowing the personalization of these dietary strategies.

  1. Gastrointestinal motor inhibition by exogenous human, salmon, and eel calcitonin in conscious dogs.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, H; Asano, T; Haruta, K; Takeda, K

    1995-01-01

    Effects of synthetic eel (E-), salmon (S-), and human (H-) calcitonin (CT) on gastrointestinal motility were studied in conscious beagle dogs, which had been implanted with strain gauge force transducers. Intramuscular administration of E-, S-, or H-CT interrupted gastric migrating motor complexes, digestive pattern, and gastric emptying. The order of potency was E-CT = S-CT > H-CT. Motor inhibition induced by CT occurred independently of plasma immunoreactive motilin levels or hypocalcemia. In addition, E-CT and S-CT induced vomiting without a retrograde giant contraction (RGC) during the postprandial state. Apomorphine or CuSO4 initiated RGC prior to vomiting. RGC induced by apomorphine was inhibited by pretreatment with E-CT as well as hexamethonium, atropine, or surgical vagotomy. E-CT showed no inhibitory effect on nicotine stimulated contraction of isolated guinea-pig ileum. These results suggest that peripherally administered CT inhibits canine gastrointestinal motility at the central nervous system level by lowering vagal activity.

  2. Metabolites of arachidonic acid formed by human gastrointestinal tissues and their actions on the muscle layers.

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, A.; Hensby, C. N.; Sanger, G. J.; Stamford, I. F.

    1981-01-01

    1. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry demonstrated the presence of arachidonic acid (AA), 6-keto-prostaglandin F1 alpha and thromboxane B2 (TxB2) in all extracts of homogenized muscle or mucosa from human stomach, terminal ileum or sigmoid colon. Prostaglandin D2 (PGD2), PGE2 or PGF2 alpha were usually found more often in the mucosal extracts. The 12-hydroxy-derivative of AA (12-HETE) was detected in all extracts of the colon but in only some of the other tissues. 2. Most prostanoids tested contracted the longitudinal muscle, the order of potency being U-46619 (an epoxymethano analogue of PGH2) greater than PGE2 greater than PGF2 alpha greater than PGD2; PGI2 usually caused relaxation, whereas its breakdown products or TxB2 had weak and variable effects. 3. U-46619 or, less potently, PGF2 alpha contracted the circular muscle, whereas PGI2 and usually PGE2 caused relaxation. PGD2, 6-keto-PGF1 alpha, 6,15-diketo-PGF1 alpha or TxB2 usually had little or no effect. 4. PGI2 antagonized contractions to some excitatory prostanoids, without greatly affecting contractions to acetylcholine. 5. For both muscle layers there was a gradient in sensitivity to prostanoids along the gastrointestinal tract. The sensitivities were stomach greater than distal ileum greater than sigmoid colon. 6. The results are discussed in relation to gastrointestinal physiology and pathophysiology. PMID:7317691

  3. Antioxidant effects of gastrointestinal digested purple carrot extract on the human cells of colonic mucosa.

    PubMed

    Olejnik, Anna; Rychlik, Joanna; Kidoń, Marcin; Czapski, Janusz; Kowalska, Katarzyna; Juzwa, Wojciech; Olkowicz, Mariola; Dembczyński, Radosław; Moyer, Mary Pat

    2016-01-01

    Purple carrot (PC) is a potential dietary constituent, which represents a valuable source of antioxidants and can modulate the reactive oxygen species (ROS) level in the gastrointestinal tract. Antioxidant capacity of a PC extract subjected to digestion process simulated in the artificial alimentary tract, including the stomach, small intestine and colon, was analyzed in normal human cells of colon mucosa. Results indicated that the extract obtained upon passage through the gastrointestinal tract, which could come into contact with the colonic cells in situ, was less potent than the extract, which was not subjected to digestion process. Digested PC extract exhibited intracellular ROS-inhibitory capacity, with 1mg/mL showing the ROS clearance of 18.4%. A 20.7% reduction in oxidative DNA damage due to colon mucosa cells' treatment with digested PC extract was observed. These findings indicate that PC extract is capable of colonic cells' protection against the adverse effects of oxidative stress. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. The use of BLT humanized mice to investigate the immune reconstitution of the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Wahl, Angela; Victor Garcia, J

    2014-08-01

    The gastrointestinal (GI) track represents an important battlefield where pathogens first try to gain entry into a host. It is also a universe where highly diverse and ever changing inhabitants co-exist in an exceptional equilibrium without parallel in any other organ system of the body. The gut as an organ has its own well-developed and fully functional immune organization that is similar and yet different in many important ways to the rest of the immune system. Both a compromised and an overactive immune system in the gut can have dire and severe consequences to human health. It has therefore been of great interest to develop animal models that recapitulate key aspects of the human condition to better understand the interplay of the host immune system with its friends and its foes. However, reconstitution of the GI tract in humanized mice has been difficult and highly variable in different systems. A better molecular understanding of the development of the gut immune system in mice has provided critical cues that have been recently used to develop novel humanized mouse models that fully recapitulate the genesis and key functions of the gut immune system of humans. Of particular interest is the presence of human gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT) aggregates in the gut of NOD/SCID BLT humanized mice that demonstrate the faithful development of bona fide human plasma cells capable of migrating to the lamina propria and producing human IgA1 and IgA2. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Emulating Host-Microbiome Ecosystem of Human Gastrointestinal Tract in Vitro.

    PubMed

    Park, Gun-Seok; Park, Min Hee; Shin, Woojung; Zhao, Connie; Sheikh, Sameer; Oh, So Jung; Kim, Hyun Jung

    2017-06-01

    The human gut microbiome performs prodigious physiological functions such as production of microbial metabolites, modulation of nutrient digestion and drug metabolism, control of immune system, and prevention of infection. Paradoxically, gut microbiome can also negatively orchestrate the host responses in diseases or chronic disorders, suggesting that the regulated and balanced host-gut microbiome crosstalk is a salient prerequisite in gastrointestinal physiology. To understand the pathophysiological role of host-microbiome crosstalk, it is critical to recreate in vivo relevant models of the host-gut microbiome ecosystem in human. However, controlling the multi-species microbial communities and their uncontrolled growth has remained a notable technical challenge. Furthermore, conventional two-dimensional (2D) or 3D culture systems do not recapitulate multicellular microarchitectures, mechanical dynamics, and tissue-specific functions. Here, we review recent advances and current pitfalls of in vitro and ex vivo models that display human GI functions. We also discuss how the disruptive technologies such as 3D organoids or a human organ-on-a-chip microphysiological system can contribute to better emulate host-gut microbiome crosstalks in health and disease. Finally, the medical and pharmaceutical significance of the gut microbiome-based personalized interventions is underlined as a future perspective.

  6. Distribution and molecular heterogeneity of galanin in human, pig, guinea pig, and rat gastrointestinal tracts.

    PubMed

    Bauer, F E; Adrian, T E; Christofides, N D; Ferri, G L; Yanaihara, N; Polak, J M; Bloom, S R

    1986-10-01

    Galanin was measured by radioimmunoassay in whole thickness extracts of the gastrointestinal wall from four species and in extracts from separate layers of human small intestine. The immunoreactivity was characterized using gel chromatography and high-pressure liquid chromatography. Two antibodies were employed, which were characterized as non-C-terminal (Gal 8) and C-terminal (Gal 9) using a C-terminal galanin 10-29 fragment. Substantial quantities of galanin immunoreactivity were found, mainly localized at the muscle layer. Both intramolecular and intermolecular heterogeneity was apparent. Two molecular forms exist in humans (Kav 0.58, 0.69). The molecular heterogeneity in humans, rats, and guinea pigs may be localized near the C-terminus of the galanin molecule. A C-terminal extension of one human galanin form is likely (Kav 0.58). These findings give radioimmunologic evidence for a neurocrine origin of galanin. The chromatographic variations suggest that extrapolation of experimental results between species should be treated with caution.

  7. Inherited Chromosomally Integrated Human Herpesvirus 6 Genomes Are Ancient, Intact, and Potentially Able To Reactivate from Telomeres

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Enjie; Bell, Adam J.; Wilkie, Gavin S.; Suárez, Nicolás M.; Batini, Chiara; Veal, Colin D.; Armendáriz-Castillo, Isaac; Neumann, Rita; Cotton, Victoria E.; Huang, Yan; Porteous, David J.; Jarrett, Ruth F.; Davison, Andrew J.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The genomes of human herpesvirus 6A (HHV-6A) and HHV-6B have the capacity to integrate into telomeres, the essential capping structures of chromosomes that play roles in cancer and ageing. About 1% of people worldwide are carriers of chromosomally integrated HHV-6 (ciHHV-6), which is inherited as a genetic trait. Understanding the consequences of integration for the evolution of the viral genome, for the telomere, and for the risk of disease associated with carrier status is hampered by a lack of knowledge about ciHHV-6 genomes. Here, we report an analysis of 28 ciHHV-6 genomes and show that they are significantly divergent from the few modern nonintegrated HHV-6 strains for which complete sequences are currently available. In addition, ciHHV-6B genomes in Europeans are more closely related to each other than to ciHHV-6B genomes from China and Pakistan, suggesting regional variation of the trait. Remarkably, at least one group of European ciHHV-6B carriers has inherited the same ciHHV-6B genome, integrated in the same telomere allele, from a common ancestor estimated to have existed 24,500 ± 10,600 years ago. Despite the antiquity of some, and possibly most, germ line HHV-6 integrations, the majority of ciHHV-6B (95%) and ciHHV-6A (72%) genomes contain a full set of intact viral genes and therefore appear to have the capacity for viral gene expression and full reactivation. IMPORTANCE Inheritance of HHV-6A or HHV-6B integrated into a telomere occurs at a low frequency in most populations studied to date, but its characteristics are poorly understood. However, stratification of ciHHV-6 carriers in modern populations due to common ancestry is an important consideration for genome-wide association studies that aim to identify disease risks for these people. Here, we present full sequence analysis of 28 ciHHV-6 genomes and show that ciHHV-6B in many carriers with European ancestry most likely originated from ancient integration events in a small number of

  8. Inherited Chromosomally Integrated Human Herpesvirus 6 Genomes Are Ancient, Intact, and Potentially Able To Reactivate from Telomeres.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Enjie; Bell, Adam J; Wilkie, Gavin S; Suárez, Nicolás M; Batini, Chiara; Veal, Colin D; Armendáriz-Castillo, Isaac; Neumann, Rita; Cotton, Victoria E; Huang, Yan; Porteous, David J; Jarrett, Ruth F; Davison, Andrew J; Royle, Nicola J

    2017-11-15

    The genomes of human herpesvirus 6A (HHV-6A) and HHV-6B have the capacity to integrate into telomeres, the essential capping structures of chromosomes that play roles in cancer and ageing. About 1% of people worldwide are carriers of chromosomally integrated HHV-6 (ciHHV-6), which is inherited as a genetic trait. Understanding the consequences of integration for the evolution of the viral genome, for the telomere, and for the risk of disease associated with carrier status is hampered by a lack of knowledge about ciHHV-6 genomes. Here, we report an analysis of 28 ciHHV-6 genomes and show that they are significantly divergent from the few modern nonintegrated HHV-6 strains for which complete sequences are currently available. In addition, ciHHV-6B genomes in Europeans are more closely related to each other than to ciHHV-6B genomes from China and Pakistan, suggesting regional variation of the trait. Remarkably, at least one group of European ciHHV-6B carriers has inherited the same ciHHV-6B genome, integrated in the same telomere allele, from a common ancestor estimated to have existed 24,500 ± 10,600 years ago. Despite the antiquity of some, and possibly most, germ line HHV-6 integrations, the majority of ciHHV-6B (95%) and ciHHV-6A (72%) genomes contain a full set of intact viral genes and therefore appear to have the capacity for viral gene expression and full reactivation. IMPORTANCE Inheritance of HHV-6A or HHV-6B integrated into a telomere occurs at a low frequency in most populations studied to date, but its characteristics are poorly understood. However, stratification of ciHHV-6 carriers in modern populations due to common ancestry is an important consideration for genome-wide association studies that aim to identify disease risks for these people. Here, we present full sequence analysis of 28 ciHHV-6 genomes and show that ciHHV-6B in many carriers with European ancestry most likely originated from ancient integration events in a small number of ancestors

  9. Sudan azo dyes and Para Red degradation by prevalent bacteria of the human gastrointestinal tract☆

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Haiyan; Heinze, Thomas M.; Paine, Donald D.; Cerniglia, Carl E.; Chen, Huizhong

    2018-01-01

    Sudan azo dyes have genotoxic effects and ingestion of food products contaminated with Sudan I, II, III, IV, and Para Red could lead to exposure in the human gastrointestinal tract. In this study, we examined thirty-five prevalent species of human intestinal bacteria to evaluate their capacity to degrade Sudan dyes and Para Red. Among these tested bacterial strains, 23, 13, 33, 30, and 29 out of 35 species tested were able to reduce Sudan I, II, III, IV, and Para Red, respectively, to some extent. Bifidobacterium infantis, Clostridium indolis, Enterococcus faecalis, Lactobacillus rhamnosus, and Ruminococcus obeum were able to reduce completely all four tested Sudan dyes and Para Red. Escherichia coli and Peptostreptococcus magnus were the only two strains that were not able to reduce any of the tested Sudan dyes and Para Red to any significant extent. Metabolites of the reduction of the tested Sudan dyes and Para Red by E. faecalis were isolated and identified by HPLC and LC/ESI-MS analyses and compared with authentic standards. Thus it appears that the ability to reduce Sudan dyes and Para Red except Sudan II is common among bacteria in the human colon. PMID:19580882

  10. Gastrointestinal parasites of canids, a latent risk to human health in Tunisia.

    PubMed

    Oudni-M'rad, Myriam; Chaâbane-Banaoues, Raja; M'rad, Selim; Trifa, Fatma; Mezhoud, Habib; Babba, Hamouda

    2017-06-05

    Although data on the parasite environmental contamination are crucial to implement strategies for control and treatment, information about zoonotic helminths is very limited in Tunisia. Contamination of areas with canid faeces harboring infective parasite elements represents a relevant health-risk impact for humans. The aim of this study was to assess the environmental contamination with eggs and oocysts of gastrointestinal parasites of dogs and wild canids in Tunisia with special attention to those that can be transmitted to humans. One thousand two hundred and seventy faecal samples from stray dogs and 104 from wild canids (red foxes and golden jackals) were collected from different geographical regions throughout Tunisia. The helminth eggs and protozoan oocysts were concentrated by sucrose flotation and identified by microscopic examination. The most frequently observed parasites in dog samples were Toxocara spp. (27.2%), E. granulosus (25.8%), and Coccidia (13.1%). For wild canid faeces, the most commonly encountered parasites were Toxocara spp. (16.3%) followed by Capillaria spp. (9.6%). The parasite contamination of dog faeces varied significantly from one region to another in function of the climate. To our knowledge, the study highlights for the first time in Tunisia a serious environmental contamination by numerous parasitic stages infective to humans. Efforts should be made to increase the awareness of the contamination risk of such parasites in the environment and implement a targeted educational program.

  11. Infections by human gastrointestinal helminths are associated with changes in faecal microbiota diversity and composition.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Timothy P; Rathnayaka, Yasara; Perera, Piyumali K; Peachey, Laura E; Nolan, Matthew J; Krause, Lutz; Rajakaruna, Rupika S; Cantacessi, Cinzia

    2017-01-01

    Investigations of the impact that patent infections by soil-transmitted gastrointestinal nematode parasites exert on the composition of the host gut commensal flora are attracting growing interest by the scientific community. However, information collected to date varies across experiments, and further studies are needed to identify consistent relationships between parasites and commensal microbial species. Here, we explore the qualitative and quantitative differences between the microbial community profiles of cohorts of human volunteers from Sri Lanka with patent infection by one or more parasitic nematode species (H+), as well as that of uninfected subjects (H-) and of volunteers who had been subjected to regular prophylactic anthelmintic treatment (Ht). High-throughput sequencing of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene, followed by bioinformatics and biostatistical analyses of sequence data revealed no significant differences in alpha diversity (Shannon) and richness between groups (P = 0.65, P = 0.13 respectively); however, beta diversity was significantly increased in H+ and Ht when individually compared to H-volunteers (P = 0.04). Among others, bacteria of the families Verrucomicrobiaceae and Enterobacteriaceae showed a trend towards increased abundance in H+, whereas the Leuconostocaceae and Bacteroidaceae showed a relative increase in H- and Ht respectively. Our findings add valuable knowledge to the vast, and yet little explored, research field of parasite-microbiota interactions and will provide a basis for the elucidation of the role such interactions play in pathogenic and immune-modulatory properties of parasitic nematodes in both human and animal hosts.

  12. A wireless capsule system with ASIC for monitoring the physiological signals of the human gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Xu, Fei; Yan, Guozheng; Zhao, Kai; Lu, Li; Gao, Jinyang; Liu, Gang

    2014-12-01

    This paper presents the design of a wireless capsule system for monitoring the physiological signals of the human gastrointestinal (GI) tract. The primary components of the system include a wireless capsule, a portable data recorder, and a workstation. Temperature, pH, and pressure sensors; an RF transceiver; a controlling and processing application specific integrated circuit (ASIC); and batteries were applied in a wireless capsule. Decreasing capsule size, improving sensor precision, and reducing power needs were the primary challenges; these were resolved by employing micro sensors, optimized architecture, and an ASIC design that include power management, clock management, a programmable gain amplifier (PGA), an A/D converter (ADC), and a serial peripheral interface (SPI) communication unit. The ASIC has been fabricated in 0.18- μm CMOS technology with a die area of 5.0 mm × 5.0 mm. The wireless capsule integrating the ASIC controller measures Φ 11 mm × 26 mm. A data recorder and a workstation were developed, and 20 cases of human experiments were conducted in hospitals. Preprocessing in the workstation can significantly improve the quality of the data, and 76 original features were determined by mathematical statistics. Based on the 13 optimal features achieved in the evaluation of the features, the clustering algorithm can identify the patients who lack GI motility with a recognition rate reaching 83.3%.

  13. Infections by human gastrointestinal helminths are associated with changes in faecal microbiota diversity and composition

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, Timothy P.; Rathnayaka, Yasara; Perera, Piyumali K.; Peachey, Laura E.; Nolan, Matthew J.; Krause, Lutz; Rajakaruna, Rupika S.

    2017-01-01

    Investigations of the impact that patent infections by soil-transmitted gastrointestinal nematode parasites exert on the composition of the host gut commensal flora are attracting growing interest by the scientific community. However, information collected to date varies across experiments, and further studies are needed to identify consistent relationships between parasites and commensal microbial species. Here, we explore the qualitative and quantitative differences between the microbial community profiles of cohorts of human volunteers from Sri Lanka with patent infection by one or more parasitic nematode species (H+), as well as that of uninfected subjects (H-) and of volunteers who had been subjected to regular prophylactic anthelmintic treatment (Ht). High-throughput sequencing of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene, followed by bioinformatics and biostatistical analyses of sequence data revealed no significant differences in alpha diversity (Shannon) and richness between groups (P = 0.65, P = 0.13 respectively); however, beta diversity was significantly increased in H+ and Ht when individually compared to H-volunteers (P = 0.04). Among others, bacteria of the families Verrucomicrobiaceae and Enterobacteriaceae showed a trend towards increased abundance in H+, whereas the Leuconostocaceae and Bacteroidaceae showed a relative increase in H- and Ht respectively. Our findings add valuable knowledge to the vast, and yet little explored, research field of parasite—microbiota interactions and will provide a basis for the elucidation of the role such interactions play in pathogenic and immune-modulatory properties of parasitic nematodes in both human and animal hosts. PMID:28892494

  14. Determination of Serotonin and Dopamine Metabolites in Human Brain Microdialysis and Cerebrospinal Fluid Samples by UPLC-MS/MS: Discovery of Intact Glucuronide and Sulfate Conjugates

    PubMed Central

    Suominen, Tina; Uutela, Päivi; Ketola, Raimo A.; Bergquist, Jonas; Hillered, Lars; Finel, Moshe; Zhang, Hongbo; Laakso, Aki; Kostiainen, Risto

    2013-01-01

    An UPLC-MS/MS method was developed for the determination of serotonin (5-HT), dopamine (DA), their phase I metabolites 5-HIAA, DOPAC and HVA, and their sulfate and glucuronide conjugates in human brain microdialysis samples obtained from two patients with acute brain injuries, ventricular cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples obtained from four patients with obstructive hydrocephalus, and a lumbar CSF sample pooled mainly from patients undergoing spinal anesthesia in preparation for orthopedic surgery. The method was validated by determining the limits of detection and quantification, linearity, repeatability and specificity. The direct method enabled the analysis of the intact phase II metabolites of 5-HT and DA, without hydrolysis of the conjugates. The method also enabled the analysis of the regioisomers of the conjugates, and several intact glucuronide and sulfate conjugates were identified and quantified for the first time in the human brain microdialysis and CSF samples. We were able to show the presence of 5-HIAA sulfate, and that dopamine-3-O-sulfate predominates over dopamine-4-O-sulfate in the human brain. The quantitative results suggest that sulfonation is a more important phase II metabolism pathway than glucuronidation in the human brain. PMID:23826355

  15. A Compositional Look at the Human Gastrointestinal Microbiome and Immune Activation Parameters in HIV Infected Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Mutlu, Ece A.; Keshavarzian, Ali; Losurdo, John; Swanson, Garth; Siewe, Basile; Forsyth, Christopher; French, Audrey; DeMarais, Patricia; Sun, Yan; Koenig, Lars; Cox, Stephen; Engen, Phillip; Chakradeo, Prachi; Abbasi, Rawan; Gorenz, Annika; Burns, Charles; Landay, Alan

    2014-01-01

    HIV progression is characterized by immune activation and microbial translocation. One factor that may be contributing to HIV progression could be a dysbiotic microbiome. We therefore hypothesized that the GI mucosal microbiome is altered in HIV patients and this alteration correlates with immune activation in HIV. 121 specimens were collected from 21 HIV positive and 22 control human subjects during colonoscopy. The composition of the lower gastrointestinal tract mucosal and luminal bacterial microbiome was characterized using 16S rDNA pyrosequencing and was correlated to clinical parameters as well as immune activation and circulating bacterial products in HIV patients on ART. The composition of the HIV microbiome was significantly different than that of controls; it was less diverse in the right colon and terminal ileum, and was characterized by loss of bacterial taxa that are typically considered commensals. In HIV samples, there was a gain of some pathogenic bacterial taxa. This is the first report characterizing the terminal ileal and colonic mucosal microbiome in HIV patients with next generation sequencing. Limitations include use of HIV-infected subjects on HAART therapy. PMID:24586144

  16. Effects of Genetically Modified Milk Containing Human Beta-Defensin-3 on Gastrointestinal Health of Mice

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yange; Shi, Zhaopeng; Gao, Ming-Qing; Zhang, Yong

    2016-01-01

    This study was performed to investigate the effects of genetically modified (GM) milk containing human beta-defensin-3 (HBD3) on mice by a 90-day feeding study. The examined parameters included the digestibility of GM milk, general physical examination, gastric emptying function, intestinal permeability, intestinal microflora composition of mice, and the possibility of horizontal gene transfer (HGT). The emphasis was placed on the effects on gastrointestinal (GI) tract due to the fact that GI tract was the first site contacting with food and played crucial roles in metabolic reactions, nutrition absorption and immunity regulation in the host. However, the traditional methods for analyzing the potential toxicological risk of GM product pay little attention on GI health. In this study, the results showed GM milk was easy to be digested in simulated gastric fluid, and it did not have adverse effects on general and GI health compared to conventional milk. And there is little possibility of HGT. This study may enrich the safety assessment of GM product on GI health. PMID:27438026

  17. Effects of dim or bright-light exposure during the daytime on human gastrointestinal activity.

    PubMed

    Sone, Yoshiaki; Hyun, Ki-Ja; Nishimura, Shinya; Lee, Young-Ah; Tokura, Hiromi

    2003-01-01

    On the basis of our previous findings that bright-light exposure during the daytime has profound influence on physiological parameters such as melatonin secretion and tympanic temperature in humans, we proposed the hypothesis that bright vs. dim light-exposure during the daytime has a different influence on the activity of the digestive system via the endocrine and/or autonomic nervous system. To examine this hypothesis, we conducted a series of counterbalanced experiments in which subjects stayed the daytime (7:00 to 15:00h) under either a dim (80 lux) or bright (5,000 lux) light condition. We measured gastrointestinal activity using a breath hydrogen (indicative of carbohydrate malabsorption) and an electrogastrography (EGG, indicative of gastric myoelectric activity) test. The results showed the postprandial breath hydrogen excretion during the following nighttime period after daytime exposure to the dim-light condition was significantly higher than under the bright-light condition (p < 0.05). In addition, the spectrum total power of the EGG recorded after taking the evening meal was significantly lower for the dim than bright-light condition (p < 0.05). These results support our hypothesis and indicate that dim-light exposure during the daytime suppresses the digestion of the evening meal, resulting in malabsorption of dietary carbohydrates in it.

  18. Candida species differ in their interactions with immature human gastrointestinal epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Falgier, Christina; Kegley, Sara; Podgorski, Heather; Heisel, Timothy; Storey, Kathleen; Bendel, Catherine M.; Gale, Cheryl A.

    2011-01-01

    Life-threatening gastrointestinal (GI) diseases of prematurity are highly associated with systemic candidiasis. This implicates the premature GI tract as an important site for invasion by Candida. Invasive interactions of Candida spp. with immature enterocytes have heretofore not been analyzed. Using a primary immature human enterocyte line, we compared the ability of multiple isolates of different Candida spp. to penetrate, injure, and induce a cytokine response from host cells. Of all the Candida spp. analyzed, C. albicans had the greatest ability to penetrate and injure immature enterocytes and to elicit interleukin-8 (IL-8) release (p < 0.01). In addition, C. albicans was the only Candida spp. to form filamentous hyphae when in contact with immature enterocytes. Similarly, a C. albicans mutant with defective hyphal morphogenesis and invasiveness had attenuated cytotoxicity for immature enterocytes (p < 0.003). Thus, hyphal morphogenesis correlates with immature enterocyte penetration, injury and inflammatory responses. Furthermore, variability in enterocyte injury was observed among hyphal-producing C. albicans strains suggesting that individual organism genotypes also influence host-pathogen interactions. Overall, the finding that Candida spp. differed in their interactions with immature enterocytes implicates that individual spp. may employ different pathogenesis mechanisms. PMID:21283049

  19. Effects of Dietary Yogurt on the Healthy Human Gastrointestinal (GI) Microbiome

    PubMed Central

    Lisko, Daniel J.; Johnston, G. Patricia; Johnston, Carl G.

    2017-01-01

    The gastrointestinal (GI) tract performs key functions that regulate the relationship between the host and the microbiota. Research has shown numerous benefits of probiotic intake in the modulation of immune responses and human metabolic processes. However, unfavorable attention has been paid to temporal changes of the microbial composition and diversity of the GI tract. This study aimed to investigate the effects of yogurt consumption on the GI microbiome bacteria community composition, structure and diversity during and after a short-term period (42 days). We used a multi-approach combining classical fingerprinting techniques (T-RFLPs), Sanger analyses and Illumina MiSeq 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing to elucidate bacterial communities and Lactobacilli and Bifidobacteria populations within healthy adults that consume high doses of yogurt daily. Results indicated that overall GI microbial community and diversity was method-dependent, yet we found individual specific changes in bacterial composition and structure in healthy subjects that consumed high doses of yogurt throughout the study. PMID:28212267

  20. Gastrointestinal transit in nonobese diabetic mouse: an animal model of human diabetes type 1.

    PubMed

    El-Salhy, M

    2001-01-01

    Gastrointestinal transit (GI) in the nonobese diabetic (NOD) mouse, an animal model of human diabetes type 1, was examined in animals with short- (duration 1-5 days) and long-term (duration 28-35 days) diabetes. Blood glucose level, serum insulin concentration, and gut neuroendocrine peptide content were also measured. GI was significantly rapid in NOD mice with long-term diabetes (LTD), but was not correlated with blood glucose level, serum insulin concentration, or pancreatic insulin content. GI was correlated with duodenal secretin content, but not with the content of other neuroendocrine peptides in the different segments investigated. Whereas antral vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) content in NOD mice with LTD was significantly higher, colonic VIP was lower in NOD mice with short-term diabetes (STD). In the duodenum, whereas the concentration of secretin in NOD mice with both STD and LTD was lower, the gastrin content was higher. Duodenal somatostatin content in NOD mice with LTD was lower. In colon, the content of galanin in NOD mice with LTD was higher than in controls. The decreased content of secretin may be among the factors that cause rapid GI in NOD mice with LTD. Changes in the antral content of VIP, duodenal somatostatin, and colonic galanin in NOD mice with LTD may cause low intestinal secretion and, together with rapid GI, give rise to diarrhoea, which is a common symptom in diabetes.

  1. Multiple Simultaneous Gastrointestinal Parasitic Infections in a Patient with Human Immunodeficiency Virus.

    PubMed

    Del Pilar-Morales, Esteban A; Cardona-Rodríguez, Zaydalee; Bertrán-Pasarell, Jorge; Soto-Malave, Ruth; De León-Borras, Rafeal

    2016-06-01

    Patients with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection are at high risk for gastrointestinal infections causing diarrhea, particularly when those infections are parasitic in nature. This propensity is more pronounced in AIDS, where opportunistic parasitic infections may cause severe diarrhea, marked absorptive dysfunction, and significant risk of mortality. There are scant data regarding parasitic infections among HIV patients in the developed world; most studies and research come from povertystricken areas of South Africa, India, Iran, and the South Pacific. Although multiple infections with the same or different parasites have been reported, simultaneous infections are rare. We present the case of a 35-year-old man who developed a co-infection with Giardia, Cryptosporidium, and Strongyloides, simultaneously, the diagnosis being made after the judicious evaluation of a stool sample. Given the associated morbidity, prompt diagnosis and treatment are needed to avoid further complications in patients with HIV. To our knowledge this is the first reported case of triple parasitic infection in a patient with HIV.

  2. Immunoextraction-Tandem Mass Spectrometry Method for Measuring Intact Human Chorionic Gonadotropin, Free β-Subunit, and β-Subunit Core Fragment in Urine

    PubMed Central

    Woldemariam, Getachew A.; Butch, Anthony W.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) stimulates testosterone production by the testicles. Because of the potential for abuse, hCG is banned (males only) in most sports and has been placed on the World Anti-Doping Agency list of prohibited substances. Intact hCG, free β-subunit (hCGβ), and β-subunit core fragment (hCGβcf) are the major variants or isoforms in urine. Immunoassays are used by antidoping laboratories to measure urinary hCG. Cross-reactivity with isoforms differs among immunoassays, resulting in widely varying results. We developed a sequential im-munoextraction method with LC-MS/MS detection for quantification of intact hCG, hCGβ, and hCGβcf in urine. METHODS hCG isoforms were immunoextracted with antibody-conjugated magnetic beads and digested with trypsin, and hCGβ and hCGβcf unique peptides were quantified by LC-MS/MS with the corresponding heavy peptides as internal standard. hCG isoform concentrations were determined in urine after administration of hCG, and the intact hCG results were compared to immunoassay results. RESULTS The method was linear to 20 IU/L. Total imprecision was 6.6%-13.7% (CV), recovery ranged from 91% to 109%, and the limit of quantification was 0.2 IU/L. Intact hCG predominated in the urine after administration of 2 hCG formulations. The window of detection ranged from 6 to 9 days. Mean immunoassay results were 12.4-15.5 IU/L higher than LC-MS/MS results. CONCLUSIONS The performance characteristics of the method are acceptable for measuring hCG isoforms, and the method can quantify intact hCG and hCGβ separately. The limit of quantification will allow LC-MS/MS hCG reference intervals to be established in nondoping male athletes for improved doping control. PMID:24899693

  3. Pharmacology of a selective cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor, HN-56249: a novel compound exhibiting a marked preference for the human enzyme in intact cells.

    PubMed

    Berg, J; Fellier, H; Christoph, T; Kremminger, P; Hartmann, M; Blaschke, H; Rovensky, F; Towart, R; Stimmeder, D

    2000-04-01

    HN-56249 (3-(2,4-dichlorothiophenoxy)-4-methylsulfonylamino-benzenesu lfonamide), a highly selective cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 inhibitor, is the prototype of a novel series of COX inhibitors comprising bicyclic arylethersulfonamides; of this series HN-56249 is the most potent and selective human COX-2 inhibitor. HN-56249 inhibited platelet aggregation as a measure of COX-1 activity only moderately (IC50 26.5+/-1.7 microM). In LPS-stimulated monocytic cells the release of prostaglandin (PG) F1alpha as a measure of COX-2 was markedly inhibited (IC50 0.027+/-0.001 microM). Thus, HN-56249 showed an approximately 1000-fold selectivity for COX-2 in intact cells. In whole blood assays HN-56249 showed a potent inhibitory activity for COX-2 (IC50 0.78+/-0.37 microM) only. COX-1 was only weakly inhibited (IC50 867+/-181 microM). Hence, HN-56249 exhibited a greater than 1000-fold selectivity for whole blood COX-2. HN-56249 surpassed the COX-2 selectivities of the COX-2 selective inhibitors 3-cyclohexyloxy-4-methylsulfonylamino-nitrobenzene (NS-398) and 6-(2,4-difluorophenoxy)-5-methyl-sulfonylamino-1-indanone (flosulide) in the intact cell assays by eight- and threefold, respectively, and in the whole blood assays by approximately 40-fold. Following i.v. administration HN-56249 inhibited carrageenan-induced rat paw oedema only moderately (ID50 26.2+/-5.7 mg/kg, mean +/- SEM), approximately tenfold less potent than indomethacin (ID50 2.1+/-0.2 mg/kg, mean +/- SEM). After oral administration HN-56249 reversed thermal hyperalgesia in the carrageenan-induced rat paw oedema test, however, some 30-fold less potently than diclofenac. Comparing the inhibitory potency of HN-56249 against human COX-2 with that against murine COX-2 in intact cells revealed a 300-fold selectivity for the human enzyme. Similar effects were observed with other COX-2-selective arylethersulfonamides. In contrast, non-COX-2-selective arylethersulfonamides, including a highly selective COX-1 inhibitor, inhibited

  4. Measurement of in vivo Gastrointestinal Release and Dissolution of Three Locally Acting Mesalamine Formulations in Regions of the Human Gastrointestinal Tract.

    PubMed

    Yu, Alex; Baker, Jason R; Fioritto, Ann F; Wang, Ying; Luo, Ruijuan; Li, Siwei; Wen, Bo; Bly, Michael; Tsume, Yasuhiro; Koenigsknecht, Mark J; Zhang, Xinyuan; Lionberger, Robert; Amidon, Gordon L; Hasler, William L; Sun, Duxin

    2017-02-06

    As an orally administered, locally acting gastrointestinal drug, mesalamine products are designed to achieve high local drug concentration in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract for the treatment of ulcerative colitis. The aim of this study was to directly measure and compare drug dissolution of three mesalamine formulations in human GI tract and to correlate their GI concentration with drug concentration in plasma. Healthy human subjects were orally administered Pentasa, Apriso, or Lialda. GI fluids were aspirated from stomach, duodenum, proximal jejunum, mid jejunum, and distal jejunum regions. Mesalamine (5-ASA) and its primary metabolite acetyl-5-mesalamine (Ac-5-ASA) were measured using LC-MS/MS. GI tract pH was measured from each GI fluid sample, which averaged 1.82, 4.97, 5.67, 6.17, and 6.62 in the stomach, duodenum, proximal jejunum, middle jejunum, and distal jejunum, respectively. For Pentasa, high levels of 5-ASA in solution were observed in the stomach, duodenum, proximal jejunum, mid jejunum, and distal jejunum from 1 to 7 h. Apriso had minimal 5-ASA levels in stomach, low to medium levels of 5-ASA in duodenum and proximal jejunum from 4 to 7 h, and high levels of 5-ASA in distal jejunum from 3 to 7 h. In contrast, Lialda had minimal 5-ASA levels from stomach and early small intestine. A composite appearance rate (CAR) was calculated from the deconvolution of individual plasma concentration to reflect drug release, dissolution, transit, and absorption in the GI tract. Individuals dosed with Pentasa had high levels of CAR from 1 to 10 h; individuals dosed with Apriso had low levels of CAR from 1 to 4 h and high levels of CAR from 5 to 10 h; Lialda showed minimal levels of CAR from 0 to 5 h, then increased to medium levels from 5 to 12 h, and then decreased to further lower levels after 12 h. In the colon region, Pentasa and Apriso showed similar levels of accumulated 5-ASA excreted in the feces, while Lialda showed slightly higher 5-ASA accumulation in

  5. Cabozantinib Is Active against Human Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor Xenografts Carrying Different KIT Mutations.

    PubMed

    Gebreyohannes, Yemarshet K; Schöffski, Patrick; Van Looy, Thomas; Wellens, Jasmien; Vreys, Lise; Cornillie, Jasmien; Vanleeuw, Ulla; Aftab, Dana T; Debiec-Rychter, Maria; Sciot, Raf; Wozniak, Agnieszka

    2016-12-01

    In the majority of gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST), oncogenic signaling is driven by KIT mutations. Advanced GIST is treated with tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) such as imatinib. Acquired resistance to TKI is mainly caused by secondary KIT mutations, but can also be attributed to a switch of KIT dependency to another receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK). We tested the efficacy of cabozantinib, a novel TKI targeting KIT, MET, AXL, and vascular endothelial growth factor receptors (VEGFR), in patient-derived xenograft (PDX) models of GIST, carrying different KIT mutations. NMRI nu/nu mice (n = 52) were bilaterally transplanted with human GIST: UZLX-GIST4 (KIT exon 11 mutation, imatinib sensitive), UZLX-GIST2 (KIT exon 9, imatinib dose-dependent resistance), or UZLX-GIST9 (KIT exon 11 and 17 mutations, imatinib resistant). Mice were grouped as control (untreated), imatinib (50 mg/kg/bid), and cabozantinib (30 mg/kg/qd) and treated orally for 15 days. Cabozantinib resulted in significant tumor regression in UZLX-GIST4 and -GIST2 and delayed tumor growth in -GIST9. In all three models, cabozantinib inhibited the proliferative activity, which was completely absent in UZLX-GIST4 and significantly reduced in -GIST2 and -GIST9. Increased apoptotic activity was observed only in UZLX-GIST4. Cabozantinib inhibited the KIT signaling pathway in UZLX-GIST4 and -GIST2. In addition, compared with both control and imatinib, cabozantinib significantly reduced microvessel density in all models. In conclusion, cabozantinib showed antitumor activity in GIST PDX models through inhibition of tumor growth, proliferation, and angiogenesis, in both imatinib-sensitive and imatinib-resistant models. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(12); 2845-52. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  6. PI3-K/Akt/JNK/NF-κB is essential for MMP-9 expression and outgrowth in human limbal epithelial cells on intact amniotic membrane.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Ching-Yi; Hsieh, Hsi-Lung; Hsiao, Li-Der; Yang, Chuen-Mao

    2012-07-01

    Matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) plays an important role in the outgrowth of expanded human limbal epithelial cells on intact amniotic membranes (AM). The mechanisms of MMP-9 expression and cell outgrowth remain unknown. Here, we demonstrated that MMP-9 is preferentially expressed at the leading edge of limbal epithelial outgrowth. Treatment with the inhibitors of PI3-K (LY294002), Akt (SH-5), MEK1/2 (U0126), and JNK1/2 (SP600125) attenuated the outgrowth area, indicating that PI3-K/Akt, p42/p44 MAPK, and JNK1/2 are involved in the outgrowth of intact AM-expanded limbal epithelial cells. However, MMP-9 expression at both transcriptional and translational levels was attenuated by treatment with SP600125, LY294002, or SH-5, not by U0126 and SB202190, suggesting that JNK1/2 and PI3-K/Akt participate in MMP-9 expression. Moreover, NF-κB phosphorylation and nuclear translocation was especially noted at the leading edge, which was attenuated by treatment with SP600125 or LY294002. Helenalin, a selective NF-κB inhibitor, reduced both the limbal epithelial outgrowth and MMP-9 expression. Finally, the data reveal that PI3-K/Akt is an upstream component of the JNK1/2 pathway in MMP-9 expression. Thus, both MAPKs and PI3-K/Akt are required for limbal epithelial outgrowth on intact AM, only the PI3-K/Akt/JNK is essential for MMP-9 expression mediated through activation of transcriptional factor NF-κB in this model. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Activin-A as an intraovarian modulator: actions, localization, and regulation of the intact dimer in human ovarian cells.

    PubMed Central

    Rabinovici, J; Spencer, S J; Doldi, N; Goldsmith, P C; Schwall, R; Jaffe, R B

    1992-01-01

    The actions, localization, and regulation of activin in the human ovary are unknown. Therefore, the aims of this study were (a) to define the effects of recombinant activin-A and its structural homologue, inhibin-A, on mitogenesis and steroidogenesis (progesterone secretion and aromatase activity) in human preovulatory follicular cells; (b) to localize the activin-A dimer in the human ovary by immunohistochemistry; and (c) to examine regulation of intracellular activin-A production in cultured human follicular cells. In addition to stimulating mitogenic activity, activin-A causes a dose- and time-dependent inhibition of basal and gonadotropin-stimulated progesterone secretion and aromatase activity in human luteinizing follicular cells on day 2 and day 4 of culture. Inhibin-A exerts no effects on mitogenesis, basal or gonadotropin-stimulated progesterone secretion and aromatase activity, and does not alter effects observed with activin-A alone. Immunostaining for dimeric activin-A occurs in granulosa and cumulus cells of human ovarian follicles and in granulosa-lutein cells of the human corpus luteum. cAMP, and to a lesser degree human chorionic gonadotropin and follicle-stimulating hormone, but not inhibin-A, activin-A, or phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate, increased the immunostaining for activin-A in cultured granulosa cells. These results indicate that activin-A may function as an autocrine or paracrine regulator of follicular function in the human ovary. Images PMID:1569191

  8. Local membrane deformations activate Ca2+-dependent K+ and anionic currents in intact human red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Dyrda, Agnieszka; Cytlak, Urszula; Ciuraszkiewicz, Anna; Lipinska, Agnieszka; Cueff, Anne; Bouyer, Guillaume; Egée, Stéphane; Bennekou, Poul; Lew, Virgilio L; Thomas, Serge L Y

    2010-02-26

    The mechanical, rheological and shape properties of red blood cells are determined by their cortical cytoskeleton, evolutionarily optimized to provide the dynamic deformability required for flow through capillaries much narrower than the cell's diameter. The shear stress induced by such flow, as well as the local membrane deformations generated in certain pathological conditions, such as sickle cell anemia, have been shown to increase membrane permeability, based largely on experimentation with red cell suspensions. We attempted here the first measurements of membrane currents activated by a local and controlled membrane deformation in single red blood cells under on-cell patch clamp to define the nature of the stretch-activated currents. The cell-attached configuration of the patch-clamp technique was used to allow recordings of single channel activity in intact red blood cells. Gigaohm seal formation was obtained with and without membrane deformation. Deformation was induced by the application of a negative pressure pulse of 10 mmHg for less than 5 s. Currents were only detected when the membrane was seen domed under negative pressure within the patch-pipette. K(+) and Cl(-) currents were strictly dependent on the presence of Ca(2+). The Ca(2+)-dependent currents were transient, with typical decay half-times of about 5-10 min, suggesting the spontaneous inactivation of a stretch-activated Ca(2+) permeability (PCa). These results indicate that local membrane deformations can transiently activate a Ca(2+) permeability pathway leading to increased [Ca(2+)](i), secondary activation of Ca(2+)-sensitive K(+) channels (Gardos channel, IK1, KCa3.1), and hyperpolarization-induced anion currents. The stretch-activated transient PCa observed here under local membrane deformation is a likely contributor to the Ca(2+)-mediated effects observed during the normal aging process of red blood cells, and to the increased Ca(2+) content of red cells in certain hereditary anemias

  9. Time of day and eating behaviors are associated with the composition and function of the human gastrointestinal microbiota.

    PubMed

    Kaczmarek, Jennifer L; Musaad, Salma Ma; Holscher, Hannah D

    2017-11-01

    Background: Preclinical research has shown that the gastrointestinal microbiota exhibits circadian rhythms and that the timing of food consumption can affect the composition and function of gut microbes. However, there is a dearth of knowledge on these relations in humans. Objective: We aimed to determine whether human gastrointestinal microbes and bacterial metabolites were associated with time of day or behavioral factors, including eating frequency, percentage of energy consumed early in the day, and overnight-fast duration. Design: We analyzed 77 fecal samples collected from 28 healthy men and women. Fecal DNA was extracted and sequenced to determine the relative abundances of bacterial operational taxonomic units (OTUs). Gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy was used to assess short-chain fatty acid concentrations. Eating frequency, percentage of energy consumed before 1400, and overnight-fast duration were determined from dietary records. Data were analyzed by linear mixed models or generalized linear mixed models, which controlled for fiber intake, sex, age, body mass index, and repeated sampling within each participant. Each OTU and metabolite were tested as the outcome in a separate model. Results: Acetate, propionate, and butyrate concentrations decreased throughout the day ( P = 0.006, 0.04, and 0.002, respectively). Thirty-five percent of bacterial OTUs were associated with time. In addition, relations were observed between gut microbes and eating behaviors, including eating frequency, early energy consumption, and overnight-fast duration. Conclusions: These results indicate that the human gastrointestinal microbiota composition and function vary throughout the day, which may be related to the circadian biology of the human body, the microbial community itself, or human eating behaviors. Behavioral factors, including timing of eating and overnight-fast duration, were also predictive of bacterial abundances. Longitudinal intervention studies are needed to

  10. Kinematics of Different Components of the Posterolateral Corner of the Knee in the Lateral Collateral Ligament-intact State: A Human Cadaveric Study.

    PubMed

    Domnick, Christoph; Frosch, Karl-Heinz; Raschke, Michael J; Vogel, Nils; Schulze, Martin; von Glahn, Mathias; Drenck, Tobias C; Herbort, Mirco

    2017-10-01

    To determine the static stabilizing effects of different anatomical structures of the posterolateral corner (PLC) of the knee in the lateral collateral ligament (LCL)-intact state. Thirteen fresh-frozen human cadaveric knees were dissected and tested using an industrial robot with an optical tracking system. Kinematics were determined for 134 N anterior/posterior loads, 10 N m valgus/varus loads, and 5 N m internal/external rotatory loads in 0°, 20°, 30°, 60°, and 90° of knee flexion. The PLC structures were dissected and consecutively released: (I) intact knee joint, (II) with released posterior cruciate ligament (PCL), (III) popliteomeniscal fibers, (IV) popliteofibular ligament, (V) arcuat and popliteotibial fibers, (VI) popliteus tendon (PLT), and (VII) LCL. Repeated-measures analysis of variance was performed with significance set at P < .05. After releasing the PCL, posterior tibial translation increased by 5.2 mm at 20° to 9.4 mm at 90° of joint flexion (P < .0001). A mild 1.8° varus instability was measured in 0° of flexion (P = .0017). After releasing the PLC structures, posterior tibial translation further increased by 2.9 mm at 20° to 5.9 mm at 90° of flexion (P < .05) and external rotation angle increased by 2.6° at 0° to 7.9° at 90° of flexion (P < .05, vs II). Varus stability did not decrease. Mild differences between states V and VI were found in 60° and 90° external rotation tests (2.1° and 3.1°; P < .05). The connecting ligaments/fibers to the PLT act as a primary static stabilizer against external rotatory loads and a secondary stabilizer against posterior tibial loads (when PCL is injured). After releasing these structures, most static stabilizing function of the intact PLT is lost. The PLC has no varus-stabilizing function in the LCL-intact knee. Anatomy and function of these structures for primary and secondary joint stability should be considered for clinical diagnostics and when performing surgery in

  11. Orthotopic Implantation of Intact Tumor Tissue Leads to Metastasis of OCUM-2MD3 Human Gastric Cancer in Nude Mice Visualized in Real Time by Intravital Fluorescence Imaging.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Takashi; Zhang, Yong; Wang, Xiaoen; Hiroshima, Yukihiko; Kasashima, Hiroaki; Yashiro, Masakazu; Hirakawa, Kosei; Miwa, Atsushi; Kiyuna, Tasuku; Matsuyama, Ryusei; Tanaka, Kuniya; Bouvet, Michael; Endo, Itaru; Hoffman, Robert M

    2016-05-01

    Orthotopic (literally "correct place") implantation of cancer in nude mice has long been known to be superior to subcutaneous transplantation because the orthotopic tumor can metastasize. We reported previously on surgical orthotopic implantation (SOI) of gastric cancer tissue in nude mice resulting in the formation of metastases in 100% of the mice with extensive primary growth to the regional lymph nodes, liver, and lung. In contrast, when cell suspensions were used to inject gastric cancer cells orthotopically, metastases occurred in only 6.7% of the mice with local tumor formation, emphasizing the importance of orthotopically implanting intact tissue to allow full expression of metastatic potential. However, the different behavior of tumors implanted orthotopically by the two methods has not been visualized in real time. OCUM-2MD3 human gastric cancer cells labeled with the fluorescent protein Azami-Green were implanted orthotopically as cells or tissue in nude mice. Orthotopic implantation of cells resulted in local spread on the stomach. In contrast, SOI of tumor tissue of OCUM-2MD3 resulted in vessel spread of the Azami-Green-expressing cancer cells. Metastasis was also observed in the left lobe of the liver after SOI. These results demonstrate the physiological importance of intact cancer tissue for orthotopic implantation in order for tumors to properly grow and express their metastatic potential. Copyright© 2016 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  12. Oral Human Immunoglobulin for Children with Autism and Gastrointestinal Dysfunction: A Prospective, Open-Label Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schneider, Cindy K.; Melmed, Raun D.; Barstow, Leon E.; Enriquez, F. Javier; Ranger-Moore, James; Ostrem, James A.

    2006-01-01

    Immunoglobulin secretion onto mucosal surfaces is a major component of the mucosal immune system. We hypothesized that chronic gastrointestinal (GI) disturbances associated with autistic disorder (AD) may be due to an underlying deficiency in mucosal immunity, and that orally administered immunoglobulin would be effective in alleviating chronic GI…

  13. Effect of dark-colored maple syrup on cell proliferation of human gastrointestinal cancer cell

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Tetsushi; Sato, Kanta; Kubota, Yuika; Mitamura, Kuniko; Taga, Atsushi

    2017-01-01

    Maple syrup is a natural sweetener that is commonly consumed worldwide. While maple syrup mainly comprises sucrose, it also contains phytochemicals that present various biological effects. Maple syrup is made by boiling down sap, and its color and composition vary in accordance with the sap collection season. Typically, seasonal progression is associated with darker syrup color, and antioxidant activity is proportional to the increasingly dark color. The authors previously reported that maple syrup demonstrated inhibitory effects on colorectal cancer cell growth and invasion, which correlated with darker maple syrup color. In the present study, they examined the effects of two different grades of maple syrup on gastrointestinal cancer cell proliferation, to investigate whether the dark-color maple syrup was suitable as a phytomedicine for gastrointestinal cancer treatment. Administration of dark-color maple syrup significantly inhibited gastrointestinal cancer cell growth as compared to non-treated cancer cells. Moreover, administration of dark-color maple syrup clearly inhibited protein kinase B (AKT) phosphorylation and did not impact mitogen-associated protein kinase phosphorylation. These data suggested that dark-color maple syrup may inhibit cell proliferation through suppression of AKT activation and, thus, may be suitable as a phytomedicine for gastrointestinal cancer treatment. PMID:28685052

  14. Effect of dark-colored maple syrup on cell proliferation of human gastrointestinal cancer cell.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Tetsushi; Sato, Kanta; Kubota, Yuika; Mitamura, Kuniko; Taga, Atsushi

    2017-07-01

    Maple syrup is a natural sweetener that is commonly consumed worldwide. While maple syrup mainly comprises sucrose, it also contains phytochemicals that present various biological effects. Maple syrup is made by boiling down sap, and its color and composition vary in accordance with the sap collection season. Typically, seasonal progression is associated with darker syrup color, and antioxidant activity is proportional to the increasingly dark color. The authors previously reported that maple syrup demonstrated inhibitory effects on colorectal cancer cell growth and invasion, which correlated with darker maple syrup color. In the present study, they examined the effects of two different grades of maple syrup on gastrointestinal cancer cell proliferation, to investigate whether the dark-color maple syrup was suitable as a phytomedicine for gastrointestinal cancer treatment. Administration of dark-color maple syrup significantly inhibited gastrointestinal cancer cell growth as compared to non-treated cancer cells. Moreover, administration of dark-color maple syrup clearly inhibited protein kinase B (AKT) phosphorylation and did not impact mitogen-associated protein kinase phosphorylation. These data suggested that dark-color maple syrup may inhibit cell proliferation through suppression of AKT activation and, thus, may be suitable as a phytomedicine for gastrointestinal cancer treatment.

  15. Local Membrane Deformations Activate Ca2+-Dependent K+ and Anionic Currents in Intact Human Red Blood Cells

    PubMed Central

    Dyrda, Agnieszka; Cytlak, Urszula; Ciuraszkiewicz, Anna; Lipinska, Agnieszka; Cueff, Anne; Bouyer, Guillaume; Egée, Stéphane; Bennekou, Poul; Lew, Virgilio L.; Thomas, Serge L. Y.

    2010-01-01

    Background The mechanical, rheological and shape properties of red blood cells are determined by their cortical cytoskeleton, evolutionarily optimized to provide the dynamic deformability required for flow through capillaries much narrower than the cell's diameter. The shear stress induced by such flow, as well as the local membrane deformations generated in certain pathological conditions, such as sickle cell anemia, have been shown to increase membrane permeability, based largely on experimentation with red cell suspensions. We attempted here the first measurements of membrane currents activated by a local and controlled membrane deformation in single red blood cells under on-cell patch clamp to define the nature of the stretch-activated currents. Methodology/Principal Findings The cell-attached configuration of the patch-clamp technique was used to allow recordings of single channel activity in intact red blood cells. Gigaohm seal formation was obtained with and without membrane deformation. Deformation was induced by the application of a negative pressure pulse of 10 mmHg for less than 5 s. Currents were only detected when the membrane was seen domed under negative pressure within the patch-pipette. K+ and Cl− currents were strictly dependent on the presence of Ca2+. The Ca2+-dependent currents were transient, with typical decay half-times of about 5–10 min, suggesting the spontaneous inactivation of a stretch-activated Ca2+ permeability (PCa). These results indicate that local membrane deformations can transiently activate a Ca2+ permeability pathway leading to increased [Ca2+]i, secondary activation of Ca2+-sensitive K+ channels (Gardos channel, IK1, KCa3.1), and hyperpolarization-induced anion currents. Conclusions/Significance The stretch-activated transient PCa observed here under local membrane deformation is a likely contributor to the Ca2+-mediated effects observed during the normal aging process of red blood cells, and to the increased Ca2+ content

  16. Stability of milk fat globule membrane proteins toward human enzymatic gastrointestinal digestion.

    PubMed

    Le, T T; Van de Wiele, T; Do, T N H; Debyser, G; Struijs, K; Devreese, B; Dewettinck, K; Van Camp, J

    2012-05-01

    The milk fat globule membrane (MFGM) fraction refers to the thin film of polar lipids and membrane proteins that surrounds fat globules in milk. It is its unique biochemical composition that renders MFGM with some beneficial biological activities, such as anti-adhesive effects toward pathogens. However, a prerequisite for the putative bioactivity of MFGM is its stability during gastrointestinal digestion. We, therefore, subjected MFGM material, isolated from raw milk, to an in vitro enzymatic gastrointestinal digestion. Sodium dodecyl sulfate PAGE, in combination with 2 staining methods, Coomassie Blue and periodic acid Schiff staining, was used to evaluate polypeptide patterns of the digest, whereas mass spectrometry was used to confirm the presence of specific MFGM proteins. Generally, it was observed that glycoproteins showed higher resistance to endogenous proteases compared with non-glycosylated proteins. Mucin 1 displayed the highest resistance to digestion and a considerable part of this protein was still detected at its original molecular weight after gastric and small intestine digestion. Cluster of differentiation 36 was also quite resistant to pepsin. A significant part of periodic acid Schiff 6/7 survived the gastric digestion, provided that the lipid moiety was not removed from the MFGM material. Overall, MFGM glycoproteins are generally more resistant to gastrointestinal digestion than serum milk proteins and the presence of lipids, besides glycosylation, may protect MFGM glycoproteins from gastrointestinal digestion. This gastrointestinal stability makes MFGM glycoproteins amenable to further studies in which their putative health-promoting effects can be explored. Copyright © 2012 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Suppression of Oral Sweet Taste Sensation with Gymnema sylvestre Affects Postprandial Gastrointestinal Blood Flow and Gastric Emptying in Humans.

    PubMed

    Kashima, Hideaki; Eguchi, Kohei; Miyamoto, Kanae; Fujimoto, Masaki; Endo, Masako Yamaoka; Aso-Someya, Nami; Kobayashi, Toshio; Hayashi, Naoyuki; Fukuba, Yoshiyuki

    2017-05-01

    An oral sweet taste sensation (OSTS) exaggerates digestive activation transiently, but whether it has a role after swallowing a meal is not known. Gymnema sylvestre (GS) can inhibit the OSTS in humans. We explored the effect of the OSTS of glucose intake on gastrointestinal blood flow, gastric emptying, blood-glucose, and plasma-insulin responses during the postprandial phase. Eight participants ingested 200 g (50 g × 4 times) of 15% glucose solution containing 100 mg of 13C-sodium acetate after rinsing with 25 mL of 2.5% roasted green tea (control) or 2.5% GS solution. During each protocol, gastrointestinal blood flow and gastric emptying were measured by ultrasonography and 13C-sodium acetate breath test, respectively. Decreased subjective sweet taste intensity was observed in all participants in the GS group. The time to attain a peak value of blood flow in the celiac artery and gastric emptying were delayed in the GS group compared with the control group. At the initial phase after glucose intake, blood-glucose and plasma-insulin responses were lower in the GS group than those for the control group. These results suggest that the OSTS itself has a substantial role in controlling postprandial gastrointestinal activities, which may affect subsequent glycemic metabolism. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. A liver-metastatic model of human primary gastric lymphoma in nude mice orthotopically constructed by using histologically intact patient specimens.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bo; Tuo, Shuai; Tuo, Chao-Wei; Zhang, Ning; Liu, Qiu-Zhen

    2010-06-01

    In recent years, incidence and mortality of lymphoma are markedly increasing worldwide. However, the pathogenesis and mechanism of invasion and metastasis for lymphoma are not yet fully clarified. It is mainly due to the lack of ideal animal models, which can precisely simulate the invasion and metastasis of lymphoma in the human body. So, it is very necessary to establish a highly metastatic nude mouse model of human lymphoma. This study developed a liver-metastatic model of primary gastric lymphoma in nude mice by using orthotopic surgical implantation of histologically intact patient specimens into the corresponding organs of the recipient small animals. A histologically intact fragment of liver metastasis derived from a surgical specimen of a patient with primary gastric lymphoma was implanted into the submucosa of the stomach in nude mice. Tumorigenicity, invasion, metastasis, morphologic characteristics (via light microscopy, electron microscopy, and immunohistochemistry), karyotype analysis, and DNA content of the orthotopically transplanted tumors were studied. An orthotopic liver metastatic model of human primary gastric lymphoma in nude mice (termed HGBL-0304) was successfully established. The histopathology of the transplanted tumors showed primary gastric diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. CD19, CD20, CD22, and CD79alpha were positive, but CD3 and CD7 were negative. The serum level of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) was elevated [(1010.56+/-200.85) U/L]. The number of chromosomes ranged from 75 to 89. The DNA index (DI) was 1.45+/-0.25 (that is, heteroploid). So far, the HGBL-0304 model has been passed on for 45 generations of nude mice. A total of 263 nude mice were used for the transplantation. Both the growth and resuscitation rates of liquid nitrogen cryopreservation of the transplanted tumors were 100%. The transplanted tumors autonomically invasively grew and damaged a whole layer in the stomach of nude mice. The metastasis rates of liver, spleen, lymph

  19. Endoscopy of the upper gastrointestinal tract as a diagnostic tool for children with human immunodeficiency virus infection.

    PubMed

    Miller, T L; McQuinn, L B; Orav, E J

    1997-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of upper gastrointestinal tract lesions in children with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection who undergo endoscopy of the upper gastrointestinal tract and to identify important clinical predictors of abnormal endoscopic results. All HIV-infected children who underwent endoscopy and were followed at Children's Hospital, Boston, from January 1985 to August 1994 were studied. The main outcome measure was endoscopic results, which were categorized into observational, histologic, and microbiologic findings. Potential predictors included height, weight, nutritional interventions, HIV disease stage, CD4 T-lymphocyte count, medications, active infections, and indications for endoscopy. Forty-three endoscopies in unique patients are reported. Most children had advanced HIV infection (67% acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, mean CD4 T-lymphocyte count z score = -2.71, weight z score = -2.04). An abnormal endoscopic finding was discovered in 93% of children and confirmed by histologic, microbiologic, or a combination of these studies in 72% of children. Thirty-five percent of children had an opportunistic pathogen identified endoscopically; 65% of these pathogens were previously undiagnosed. Observational findings often were poor indicators of histologic and microbiologic abnormalities. Independent predictors of abnormal histologic findings include younger age at endoscopy (odds ratio (OR) = 1.16 per year, 95% confidence interval (CI) (1.02, 1.33)) and guaiac-negative stools (OR = 16.7, 95% CI (1.92, 142.9)). Independent predictors of finding a pathogen at the time of endoscopy include a greater number of indications for endoscopy (OR = 2.6 per indication, 95% CI (1.3, 5.3)) and diagnosis of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (OR = 16.4, 95% CI (1.3, 213)). No other gastrointestinal, nutritional, or immunologic parameters were significantly predictive of endoscopic outcomes. Medical management was changed in

  20. Transcriptome In Vivo Analysis (TIVA) of spatially defined single cells in intact live mouse and human brain tissue

    PubMed Central

    Lovatt, Ditte; Ruble, Brittani K.; Lee, Jaehee; Dueck, Hannah; Kim, Tae Kyung; Fisher, Stephen; Francis, Chantal; Spaethling, Jennifer M.; Wolf, John A.; Grady, M. Sean; Ulyanova, Alexandra V.; Yeldell, Sean B.; Griepenburg, Julianne C.; Buckley, Peter T.; Kim, Junhyong; Sul, Jai-Yoon; Dmochowski, Ivan J.; Eberwine, James

    2014-01-01

    Transcriptome profiling is an indispensable tool in advancing the understanding of single cell biology, but depends upon methods capable of isolating mRNA at the spatial resolution of a single cell. Current capture methods lack sufficient spatial resolution to isolate mRNA from individual in vivo resident cells without damaging adjacent tissue. Because of this limitation, it has been difficult to assess the influence of the microenvironment on the transcriptome of individual neurons. Here, we engineered a Transcriptome In Vivo Analysis (TIVA)-tag, which upon photoactivation enables mRNA capture from single cells in live tissue. Using the TIVA-tag in combination with RNA-seq to analyze transcriptome variance among single dispersed cells and in vivo resident mouse and human neurons, we show that the tissue microenvironment shapes the transcriptomic landscape of individual cells. The TIVA methodology provides the first noninvasive approach for capturing mRNA from single cells in their natural microenvironment. PMID:24412976

  1. Third harmonic generation imaging of intact human cerebral organoids to assess key components of early neurogenesis in Rett Syndrome (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yildirim, Murat; Feldman, Danielle; Wang, Tianyu; Ouzounov, Dimitre G.; Chou, Stephanie; Swaney, Justin; Chung, Kwanghun; Xu, Chris; So, Peter T. C.; Sur, Mriganka

    2017-02-01

    Rett Syndrome (RTT) is a pervasive, X-linked neurodevelopmental disorder that predominantly affects girls. It is mostly caused by a sporadic mutation in the gene encoding methyl CpG-binding protein 2 (MeCP2).The clinical features of RTT are most commonly reported to emerge between the ages of 6-18 months and implicating RTT as a disorder of postnatal development. However, a variety of recent evidence from our lab and others demonstrates that RTT phenotypes are present at the earliest stages of brain development including neurogenesis, migration, and patterning in addition to stages of synaptic and circuit development and plasticity. We have used RTT patient-derived induced pluripotent stem cells to generate 3D human cerebral organoids that can serve as a model for human neurogenesis in vitro. We aim to expand on our existing findings in order to determine aberrancies at individual stages of neurogenesis by performing structural and immunocytochemical staining in isogenic control and MeCP2-deficient organoids. In addition, we aim to use Third Harmonic Generation (THG) microscopy as a label-free, nondestructive 3D tissue visualization method in order to gain a complete understanding of the structural complexity that underlies human neurogenesis. As a proof of concept, we have performed THG imaging in healthy intact human cerebral organoids cleared with SWITCH. We acquired an intrinsic THG signal with the following laser configurations: 400 kHz repetition rate, 65 fs pulse width laser at 1350 nm wavelength. In these THG images, nuclei are clearly delineated and cross sections demonstrate the depth penetration capacity (< 1mm) that extends throughout the organoid. Imaging control and MeCP2-deficient human cerebral organoids in 2D sections reveals structural and protein expression-based alterations that we expect will be clearly elucidated via both THG and three-photon fluorescence microscopy.

  2. Toxicity profiling of water contextual zinc oxide, silver, and titanium dioxide nanoparticles in human oral and gastrointestinal cell systems.

    PubMed

    Giovanni, Marcella; Tay, Chor Yong; Setyawati, Magdiel Inggrid; Xie, Jianping; Ong, Choon Nam; Fan, Rongli; Yue, Junqi; Zhang, Lifeng; Leong, David Tai

    2015-12-01

    Engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) are increasingly detected in water supply due to environmental release of ENPs as the by-products contained within the effluent of domestic and industrial run-off. The partial recycling of water laden with ENPs, albeit at ultra-low concentrations, may pose an uncharacterized threat to human health. In this study, we investigated the toxicity of three prevalent ENPs: zinc oxide, silver, and titanium dioxide over a wide range of concentrations that encompasses drinking water-relevant concentrations, to cellular systems representing oral and gastrointestinal tissues. Based on published in silico-predicted water-relevant ENPs concentration range from 100 pg/L to 100 µg/L, we detected no cytotoxicity to all the cellular systems. Significant cytotoxicity due to the NPs set in around 100 mg/L with decreasing extent of toxicity from zinc oxide to silver to titanium dioxide NPs. We also found that noncytotoxic zinc oxide NPs level of 10 mg/L could elevate the intracellular oxidative stress. The threshold concentrations of NPs that induced cytotoxic effect are at least two to five orders of magnitude higher than the permissible concentrations of the respective metals and metal oxides in drinking water. Based on these findings, the current estimated levels of NPs in potable water pose little cytotoxic threat to the human oral and gastrointestinal systems within our experimental boundaries. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Transcriptional noise in intact and TGF-beta treated human kidney cells; the importance of time-series designs.

    PubMed

    Rabieian, Reyhaneh; Moein, Shiva; Khanahmad, Hossein; Mortazavi, Mojgan; Gheisari, Yousof

    2018-05-26

    The transforming growth factor (TGF)-β signaling pathway plays a key role in various cellular processes. However, insufficient knowledge about the complex and sometimes paradoxical functions of this pathway hinders its therapeutic targeting. In this study, the transcriptional profile of seven mediators and downstream elements of the TGF-β pathway were assessed in TGF-β treated and untreated human kidney derived cells for 2 weeks in a time course manner. As expected the up-regulation of ACTA2 and COL1A2 was evident in the treated cells. However, we observed remarkable fluctuations in gene expression, even in the supposedly steady states. The magnitude of noise was diverse in the examined genes. Our findings underscore the significance of time-course designs for gene expression analyses and clearly show that misleading data can be obtained in single point measurements. Furthermore, we propose specific considerations in the interpretation of time-course data in the context of noisy gene expression. © 2018 International Federation for Cell Biology.

  4. Near-infrared thermo-optical response of the localized reflectance of intact diabetic and nondiabetic human skin.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Shu-Jen; Khalil, Omar S; Hanna, Charles F; Kantor, Stanislaw

    2003-07-01

    We observed a difference in the thermal response of localized reflectance signal of human skin between type 2 diabetics and nondiabetics. We investigated the use of this thermo-optical behavior as the basis for a noninvasive method for the determination of the diabetic status of a subject. We used a two-site temperature differential method, which is predicated upon the measurement of localized reflectance from two areas on the surface of the skin. Each of these areas is subjected to a different thermal perturbation. The response of localized reflectance to temperature perturbation was measured and used in a classification algorithm. We used a discriminant function to classify subjects as diabetic or nondiabetic. In a prediction set of twenty-four noninvasive tests collected from six diabetic and six nondiabetic subjects, the sensitivity ranged between 73 and 100%, and the specificity ranged between 75 and 100%, depending on the thermal conditions and the probe-skin contact time. The difference in the thermo-optical response of the skin of the two groups is explained in terms of a difference in the response of cutaneous microcirculation, which is manifested as a difference in the near-infrared light absorption. Another factor is the difference in the temperature response of the scattering coefficient between the two groups, which may be caused by cutaneous structural differences induced by nonenzymatic glycation of skin protein fibers, and possibly by the difference in blood cell aggregation. (c) 2003 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers.

  5. Dynamic Responses of Intact Post Mortem Human Surrogates from Inferior-to-Superior Loading at the Pelvis.

    PubMed

    Yoganandan, Narayan; Moore, Jason; Arun, Mike W J; Pintar, Frank A

    2014-11-01

    During certain events such as underbody blasts due to improvised explosive devices, occupants in military vehicles are exposed to inferior-to-superior loading from the pelvis. Injuries to the pelvis-sacrum-lumbar spine complex have been reported from these events. The mechanism of load transmission and potential variables defining the migration of injuries between pelvis and or spinal structures are not defined. This study applied inferior-to-superior impacts to the tuberosities of the ischium of supine-positioned five post mortem human subjects (PMHS) using different acceleration profiles, defined using shape, magnitude and duration parameters. Seventeen tests were conducted. Overlay temporal plots were presented for normalized (impulse momentum approach) forces and accelerations of the sacrum and spine. Scatter plots showing injury and non-injury data as a function of peak normalized forces, pulse characteristics, impulse and power, loading rate and sacrum and spine accelerations were evaluated as potential metrics related to pathological outcomes with the focus of examining the role of the pulse characteristics from inferior-to-superior loading of the pelvis-sacrum-lumbar spine complex. Interrelationships were explored between non-fracture and fracture outcomes, and fracture patterns with a focus on migration of injuries from the hip-only to hip and spine to spine-only regions. Observations indicate that injury to the pelvis and or spine from inferior-to-superior loading is associated with pulse and not just peak velocity. The role of the effect of mass recruitment and injury migration parallel knee-thigh-hip complex studies, suggest a wider application of the recruitment concept and the role of the pulse characteristics.

  6. First Insights into the Diverse Human Archaeome: Specific Detection of Archaea in the Gastrointestinal Tract, Lung, and Nose and on Skin

    PubMed Central

    Koskinen, Kaisa; Pausan, Manuela R.; Perras, Alexandra K.; Beck, Michael; Bang, Corinna; Mora, Maximilian; Schilhabel, Anke; Schmitz, Ruth

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human-associated archaea remain understudied in the field of microbiome research, although in particular methanogenic archaea were found to be regular commensals of the human gut, where they represent keystone species in metabolic processes. Knowledge on the abundance and diversity of human-associated archaea is extremely limited, and little is known about their function(s), their overall role in human health, or their association with parts of the human body other than the gastrointestinal tract and oral cavity. Currently, methodological issues impede the full assessment of the human archaeome, as bacteria-targeting protocols are unsuitable for characterization of the full spectrum of Archaea. The goal of this study was to establish conservative protocols based on specifically archaea-targeting, PCR-based methods to retrieve first insights into the archaeomes of the human gastrointestinal tract, lung, nose, and skin. Detection of Archaea was highly dependent on primer selection and the sequence processing pipeline used. Our results enabled us to retrieve a novel picture of the human archaeome, as we found for the first time Methanobacterium and Woesearchaeota (DPANN superphylum) to be associated with the human gastrointestinal tract and the human lung, respectively. Similar to bacteria, human-associated archaeal communities were found to group biogeographically, forming (i) the thaumarchaeal skin landscape, (ii) the (methano)euryarchaeal gastrointestinal tract, (iii) a mixed skin-gastrointestinal tract landscape for the nose, and (iv) a woesearchaeal lung landscape. On the basis of the protocols we used, we were able to detect unexpectedly high diversity of archaea associated with different body parts. PMID:29138298

  7. Human epididymis protein 4 immunostaining of malignant ascites differentiates cancer of Müllerian origin from gastrointestinal cancer.

    PubMed

    Stiekema, Anna; Van de Vijver, Koen K; Boot, Henk; Broeks, Annegien; Korse, Catharina M; van Driel, Willemien J; Kenter, Gemma G; Lok, Christianne A R

    2017-03-01

    An accurate diagnosis of cancer of Müllerian origin is required before the initiation of treatment. An overlap in clinical presentation and cytological, histological, or imaging studies with other nongynecological tumors does occur. Therefore, immunocytochemistry markers are used to determine tumor origin. Human epididymis protein 4 (HE4) is overexpressed in tissue of epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC). It has shown to be a sensitive and specific serum marker for EOC and to be of value for the differentiation between EOC and ovarian metastases of gastrointestinal origin. The objective of the current study was to evaluate HE4 immunocytochemistry in malignant ascites for differentiation between cancer of Müllerian origin, including EOC, and adenocarcinomas of the gastrointestinal tract. Cytological specimens of 115 different adenocarcinomas (45 EOCs, 46 cases of gastric cancer, and 24 cases of colorectal cancer) were stained for HE4, paired box 8 (PAX8), and other specific markers. 91% of the ascites samples from patients with EOC stained for both HE4 and PAX8. The 4 samples without HE4 staining were a clear cell carcinoma, a low-grade serous adenocarcinoma, an undifferentiated adenocarcinoma, and a neuroendocrine carcinoma. All high-grade serous adenocarcinomas (n = 37, 100%) stained with HE4, compared with 94% that stained positively for PAX8. In cases of gastric or colorectal cancer, 25% and 21% of cases, respectively, stained positive for HE4. No PAX8 staining was observed in colorectal or gastric adenocarcinomas. HE4 staining in ascites is feasible and appears to have a high sensitivity for high-grade serous ovarian cancer. HE4 is a useful addition to the current panel of immunocytochemistry markers for the diagnosis of EOC and for differentiation with gastrointestinal adenocarcinomas. Cancer Cytopathol 2017;125:197-204. © 2016 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  8. A Sensitive and Rapid Method to Determin the Adhesion Capacity of Probiotics and Pathogenic Microorganisms to Human Gastrointestinal Mucins.

    PubMed

    Ringot-Destrez, Bélinda; D'Alessandro, Zéa; Lacroix, Jean-Marie; Mercier-Bonin, Muriel; Léonard, Renaud; Robbe-Masselot, Catherine

    2018-05-29

    Mucus is the habitat for the microorganisms, bacteria and yeast that form the commensal flora. Mucins, the main macromolecules of mucus, and more specifically, the glycans that cover them, play essential roles in microbial gastrointestinal colonization. Probiotics and pathogens must also colonize mucus to have lasting positive or deleterious effects. The question of which mucin-harboured glycan motifs favour the adhesion of specific microorganisms remains very poorly studied. In the current study, a simple test based on the detection of fluorescent-labeled microorganisms raised against microgram amounts of mucins spotted on nitrocellulose was developed. The adhesion of various probiotic, commensal and pathogenic microorganisms was evaluated on a panel of human purified gastrointestinal mucins and compared with that of commercially available pig gastric mucins (PGM) and of mucins secreted by the colonic cancer cell line HT29-MTX. The latter two proved to be very poor indicators of adhesion capacity on intestinal mucins. Our results show that the nature of the sialylated cores of O -glycans, determined by MALDI MS-MS analysis, potentially enables sialic acid residues to modulate the adhesion of microorganisms either positively or negatively. Other identified factors affecting the adhesion propensity were O -glycan core types and the presence of blood group motifs. This test should help to select probiotics with enhanced adhesion capabilities as well as deciphering the role of specific mucin glycotopes on microbial adhesion.

  9. Human immunodeficiency virus infection of helper T cell clones. Early proliferative defects despite intact antigen-specific recognition and interleukin 4 secretion.

    PubMed Central

    Laurence, J; Friedman, S M; Chartash, E K; Crow, M K; Posnett, D N

    1989-01-01

    HIV selectively inhibited the proliferative response of clonal CD4+ T lymphocytes to alloantigen while other alloantigen-dependent responses were unperturbed. Specifically, impaired blastogenesis could be dissociated from alloantigen-specific induction of the B cell activation molecule CD23, IL-4 release, and inositol lipid hydrolysis. In addition, membrane expression of pertinent T cell receptor molecules, including CD2, CD3, and T cell antigen receptor (Ti), remained intact. Using two MHC class II-specific human CD4+ helper T cell clones, the proliferative defect was shown to be an early consequence of HIV infection, occurring within 4 d of viral inoculation and preceding increases in mature virion production. It was generalizable to three distinct methods of T cell activation, all independent of antigen-presenting cells: anti-CD3 mediated cross-linking of the CD3/Ti complex; anti-CD2 and phorbol 12-myristic 13-acetate (PMA); and anti-CD28 plus PMA. These abnormalities were not mitigated by addition of exogenous IL-2, even though expression of the IL-2 receptor (CD25) was unaltered. These studies define a selective blockade in T cell function early after HIV exposure that could serve as a model for certain in vivo manifestations of AIDS. PMID:2470786

  10. Plague Masquerading as Gastrointestinal Illness

    PubMed Central

    Hull, Harry F.; Montes, Jean M.; Mann, Jonathan M.

    1986-01-01

    In clinical descriptions of human plague, fever and tender lymphadenitis are emphasized and gastrointestinal manifestations are rarely mentioned. A review of 71 human plague cases showed that gastrointestinal symptoms occurred commonly (57%). Vomiting (39%) was the most frequent symptom, with nausea (34%), diarrhea (28%) and abdominal pain (17%) occurring less often. Physicians treating patients who reside in or have recently visited plague-endemic areas should include plague in the differential diagnosis in the presence of gastrointestinal symptoms and fever. PMID:3788132

  11. Assessment of nevirapine bioavailability from targeted sites in the human gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Macha, Sreeraj; Yong, Chan-Loi; MacGregor, Thomas R; Castles, Mark; Quinson, Anne-Marie; Rouyrre, Nicolas; Wilding, Ian

    2009-12-01

    This study investigated absorption of nevirapine (NVP) from targeted sites of the gastrointestinal tract using remotely activated capsules and gamma scintigraphy. A total of 24 participants were randomized to receive 50 mg NVP orally as a suspension or via remotely activated capsules for release into the ascending colon. The 24 participants were then rerandomized into parallel groups of n = 8 for drug release into the ileum, jejunum, or descending colon. The mean gastric emptying time of capsules ranged from 0.88 to 3.35 hours. The small intestinal and colon transit time ranged from 4.08 to 7.76 hours and 17.6 to 21.2 hours, respectively, and capsule recovery time ranged from 27.6 to 34.4 hours. The relative bioavailability ratio of NVP in the jejunum was 1.06 (90% confidence interval [CI]: 1.00-1.12) compared to suspension. In the ileum, ascending colon, and descending colon, bioavailability decreased to 0.89 (0.80-0.99), 0.82 (0.71-0.95), and 0.58 (0.22-1.53), respectively. The absorption rate decreased by approximately 10-fold from the jejunum (3.83 h(-1)) to the descending colon (0.338 h(-1)), and t(max) increased from 2.42 hours (jejunum) to 16.3 hours (descending colon). Overall, NVP is absorbed from all 4 sites of the gastrointestinal tract, and the rate of absorption decreased from the jejunum to the descending colon. Relative bioavailability of NVP was in the order of jejunum > ileum > ascending colon > descending colon.

  12. Arcobacter in Lake Erie beach waters: an emerging gastrointestinal pathogen linked with human-associated fecal contamination.

    PubMed

    Lee, Cheonghoon; Agidi, Senyo; Marion, Jason W; Lee, Jiyoung

    2012-08-01

    The genus Arcobacter has been associated with human illness and fecal contamination by humans and animals. To better characterize the health risk posed by this emerging waterborne pathogen, we investigated the occurrence of Arcobacter spp. in Lake Erie beach waters. During the summer of 2010, water samples were collected 35 times from the Euclid, Villa Angela, and Headlands (East and West) beaches, located along Ohio's Lake Erie coast. After sample concentration, Arcobacter was quantified by real-time PCR targeting the Arcobacter 23S rRNA gene. Other fecal genetic markers (Bacteroides 16S rRNA gene [HuBac], Escherichia coli uidA gene, Enterococcus 23S rRNA gene, and tetracycline resistance genes) were also assessed. Arcobacter was detected frequently at all beaches, and both the occurrence and densities of Arcobacter spp. were higher at the Euclid and Villa Angela beaches (with higher levels of fecal contamination) than at the East and West Headlands beaches. The Arcobacter density in Lake Erie beach water was significantly correlated with the human-specific fecal marker HuBac according to Spearman's correlation analysis (r = 0.592; P < 0.001). Phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that most of the identified Arcobacter sequences were closely related to Arcobacter cryaerophilus, which is known to cause gastrointestinal diseases in humans. Since human-pathogenic Arcobacter spp. are linked to human-associated fecal sources, it is important to identify and manage the human-associated contamination sources for the prevention of Arcobacter-associated public health risks at Lake Erie beaches.

  13. Tumor-Initiating Label-Retaining Cancer Cells in Human Gastrointestinal Cancers Undergo Asymmetric Cell Division

    PubMed Central

    Xin, Hong-Wu; Hari, Danielle M.; Mullinax, John E.; Ambe, Chenwi M.; Koizumi, Tomotake; Ray, Satyajit; Anderson, Andrew J.; Wiegand, Gordon W.; Garfield, Susan H.; Thorgeirsson, Snorri S.; Avital, Itzhak

    2012-01-01

    Label-retaining cells (LRCs) have been proposed to represent adult tissue stem cells. LRCs are hypothesized to result from either slow cycling or asymmetric cell division (ACD). However, the stem cell nature and whether LRC undergo ACD remain controversial. Here, we demonstrate label-retaining cancer cells (LRCCs) in several gastrointestinal (GI) cancers including fresh surgical specimens. Using a novel method for isolation of live LRCC, we demonstrate that a subpopulation of LRCC is actively dividing and exhibits stem cells and pluripotency gene expression profiles. Using real-time confocal microscopic cinematography, we show live LRCC undergoing asymmetric nonrandom chromosomal cosegregation LRC division. Importantly, LRCCs have greater tumor-initiating capacity than non-LRCCs. Based on our data and that cancers develop in tissues that harbor normal-LRC, we propose that LRCC might represent a novel population of GI stem-like cancer cells. LRCC may provide novel mechanistic insights into the biology of cancer and regenerative medicine and present novel targets for cancer treatment. PMID:22331764

  14. Prevention of gastrointestinal lead poisoning using recombinant Lactococcus lactis expressing human metallothionein-I fusion protein

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Xue; Zhang, Changbin; Liu, Dajun; Bai, Weibin; Zhang, Qihao; Xiang, Qi; Huang, Yadong; Su, Zhijian

    2016-01-01

    Low-level lead poisoning is an insidious disease that affects millions of children worldwide, leading to biochemical and neurological dysfunctions. Blocking lead uptake via the gastrointestinal tract is an important prevention strategy. With this in mind, we constructed the recombinant Lactococcus lactis strain pGSMT/MG1363, which constitutively expressed the fusion protein glutathione S-transferase (GST)–small molecule ubiquitin-like modifier protein (SUMO)–metallothionein-I (GST-SUMO-MT). The thermodynamic data indicated that the average number of lead bound to a GST-SUMO-MT molecule was 3.655 and this binding reaction was a spontaneous, exothermic and entropy-increasing process. The total lead-binding capacity of pGSMT/MG1363 was 4.11 ± 0.15 mg/g dry mass. Oral administration of pGSMT/MG1363 (1 × 1010 Colony-Forming Units) to pubertal male rats that were also treated with 5 mg/kg of lead acetate daily significantly inhibited the increase of blood lead levels, the impairment of hepatic function and the decrease of testosterone concentration in the serum, which were all impaired in rats treated by lead acetate alone. Moreover, the administration of pGSMT/MG1363 for 6 weeks did not affect the serum concentration of calcium, magnesium, potassium or sodium ions. This study provides a convenient and economical biomaterial for preventing lead poisoning via the digestive tract. PMID:27045906

  15. Prevention of gastrointestinal lead poisoning using recombinant Lactococcus lactis expressing human metallothionein-I fusion protein.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Xue; Zhang, Changbin; Liu, Dajun; Bai, Weibin; Zhang, Qihao; Xiang, Qi; Huang, Yadong; Su, Zhijian

    2016-04-05

    Low-level lead poisoning is an insidious disease that affects millions of children worldwide, leading to biochemical and neurological dysfunctions. Blocking lead uptake via the gastrointestinal tract is an important prevention strategy. With this in mind, we constructed the recombinant Lactococcus lactis strain pGSMT/MG1363, which constitutively expressed the fusion protein glutathione S-transferase (GST)-small molecule ubiquitin-like modifier protein (SUMO)-metallothionein-I (GST-SUMO-MT). The thermodynamic data indicated that the average number of lead bound to a GST-SUMO-MT molecule was 3.655 and this binding reaction was a spontaneous, exothermic and entropy-increasing process. The total lead-binding capacity of pGSMT/MG1363 was 4.11 ± 0.15 mg/g dry mass. Oral administration of pGSMT/MG1363 (1 × 10(10) Colony-Forming Units) to pubertal male rats that were also treated with 5 mg/kg of lead acetate daily significantly inhibited the increase of blood lead levels, the impairment of hepatic function and the decrease of testosterone concentration in the serum, which were all impaired in rats treated by lead acetate alone. Moreover, the administration of pGSMT/MG1363 for 6 weeks did not affect the serum concentration of calcium, magnesium, potassium or sodium ions. This study provides a convenient and economical biomaterial for preventing lead poisoning via the digestive tract.

  16. Enteric coated magnetic HPMC capsules evaluated in human gastrointestinal tract by AC biosusceptometry.

    PubMed

    Corá, Luciana A; Romeiro, Fernando G; Paixão, Fabiano C; Américo, Madileine F; Oliveira, Ricardo B; Baffa, Oswaldo; Miranda, José Ricardo A

    2006-08-01

    To employ the AC Biosusceptometry (ACB) technique to evaluate in vitro and in vivo characteristics of enteric coated magnetic hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) capsules and to image the disintegration process. HPMC capsules filled with ferrite (MnFe2O4) and coated with Eudragit were evaluated using USP XXII method and administered to fasted volunteers. Single and multisensor ACB systems were used to characterize the gastrointestinal (GI) motility and to determine gastric residence time (GRT), small intestinal transit time (SITT) and orocaecal transit time (OCTT). Mean disintegration time (t50) was quantified from 50% increase of pixels in the imaging area. In vitro and in vivo performance of the magnetic HPMC capsules as well as the disintegration process were monitored using ACB systems. The mean disintegration time (t50) calculated for in vitro was 25+/-5 min and for in vivo was 13+/-5 min. In vivo also were determined mean values for GRT (55+/-19 min), SITT (185+/-82 min) and OCTT (240+/-88 min). AC Biosusceptometry is a non-invasive technique originally proposed to monitoring pharmaceutical dosage forms orally administered and to image the disintegration process.

  17. Human-associated fecal qPCR measurements and predicted risk of gastrointestinal illness in recreational waters contaminated with raw sewage

    EPA Science Inventory

    We used quantitative microbial risk assessment (QMRA) to estimate the risk of gastrointestinal (GI) illness associated with swimming in recreational waters containing different concentrations of human-associated fecal qPCR markers from raw sewage– HF183 and HumM2. The volume/volu...

  18. Human-Associated Fecal Quantitative Polymerase Chain ReactionMeasurements and Simulated Risk of Gastrointestinal Illness in Recreational Waters Contaminated with Raw Sewage

    EPA Science Inventory

    We used quantitative microbial risk assessment (QMRA) to estimate the risk of gastrointestinal (GI) illness associated with swimming in recreational waters containing different concentrations of human-associated fecal qPCR markers from raw sewage– HF183 and HumM2. The volume/volu...

  19. Genome sequence of Victivallis vadensis ATCC BAA-548, an anaerobic bacterium from the phylum Lentisphaerae, isolated from the human gastro-intestinal tract

    SciTech Connect

    Van Passel, Mark W.J.; Kant, Ravi; Palva, Airi

    2011-01-01

    Victivallis vadensis ATCC BAA-548 represents the first cultured representative from the novel phylum Lentisphaerae, a deep-branching bacterial lineage. Few cultured bacteria from this phylum are known, and V. vadensis therefore represents an important organism for evolutionary studies. V. vadensis is a strictly anaerobic sugar-fermenting isolate from the human gastro-intestinal tract.

  20. A Robust Two-Dimensional Separation of Intact Proteins for Bottom-Up Tandem Mass Spectrometry of the Human CSF Proteome

    PubMed Central

    Bora, Adriana; Anderson, Carol; Bachani, Muznabanu; Nath, Avindra; Cotter, Robert J.

    2012-01-01

    The cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is produced in the brain by cells in the choroid plexus at a rate of 500mL/day. It is the only body fluid in direct contact with the brain. Thus, any changes in the CSF composition will reflect pathological processes and make CSF a potential source of biomarkers for different disease states. Proteomics offers a comprehensive view of the proteins found in CSF. In this study, we use a recently developed non-gel based method of sample preparation of CSF followed by liquid chromatography high accuracy mass spectrometry (LC-MS) for MS and MS/MS analyses, allowing unambiguous identification of peptides/proteins. Gel-eluted liquid fraction entrapment electrophoresis (Gelfree) is used to separate a CSF complex protein mixture in 12 user-selectable liquid-phase molecular weight fractions. Using this high throughput workflow we have been able to separate CSF intact proteins over a broad mass range 3.5 kDa-100 kDa with high resolution between 15 kDa and 100 kDa in 2 hours and 40 min. We have completely eliminated albumin and were able to interrogate the low abundance CSF proteins in a highly reproducible manner from different CSF samples in the same time. Using LC-MS as a downstream analysis, we identified 368 proteins using MidiTrap G-10 desalting columns and 166 proteins (including 57 unique proteins) using Zeba spin columns with 5% false discovery rate (FDR). Prostaglandin D2 synthase, Chromogranin A, Apolipoprotein E, Chromogranin B, Secretogranin III, Cystatin C, VGF nerve growth factor, Cadherin 2 are a few of the proteins that were characterized. The Gelfree-LC-MS is a robust method for the analysis of the human proteome that we will use to develop biomarkers for several neurodegenerative diseases and to quantitate these markers using multiple reaction monitoring. PMID:22537003

  1. Effect of bread gluten content on gastrointestinal function: a crossover MRI study on healthy humans.

    PubMed

    Coletta, Marina; Gates, Fred K; Marciani, Luca; Shiwani, Henna; Major, Giles; Hoad, Caroline L; Chaddock, Gemma; Gowland, Penny A; Spiller, Robin C

    2016-01-14

    Gluten is a crucial functional component of bread, but the effect of increasing gluten content on gastrointestinal (GI) function remains uncertain. Our aim was to investigate the effect of increasing gluten content on GI function and symptoms in healthy participants using the unique capabilities of MRI. A total of twelve healthy participants completed this randomised, mechanistic, open-label, three-way crossover study. On days 1 and 2 they consumed either gluten-free bread (GFB), or normal gluten content bread (NGCB) or added gluten content bread (AGCB). The same bread was consumed on day 3, and MRI scans were performed every 60 min from fasting baseline up to 360 min after eating. The appearance of the gastric chime in the images was assessed using a visual heterogeneity score. Gastric volumes, the small bowel water content (SBWC), colonic volumes and colonic gas content and GI symptoms were measured. Fasting transverse colonic volume after the 2-d preload was significantly higher after GFB compared with NGCB and AGCB with a dose-dependent response (289 (SEM 96) v. 212 (SEM 74) v. 179 (SEM 87) ml, respectively; P=0·02). The intragastric chyme heterogeneity score was higher for the bread with increased gluten (AGCB 6 (interquartile range (IQR) 0·5) compared with GFB 3 (IQR 0·5); P=0·003). However, gastric half-emptying time was not different between breads nor were study day GI symptoms, postprandial SBWC, colonic volume and gas content. This MRI study showed novel mechanistic insights in the GI responses to different breads, which are poorly understood notwithstanding the importance of this staple food.

  2. Gastrointestinal tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Galloway, D J; Scott, R N

    1986-10-01

    In the developed countries gastrointestinal tuberculosis is no longer common in clinical practice. In this setting the importance of the condition lies in the vagaries of its presentation and the fact that it is eminently treatable, usually by a combination of chemotherapy and surgery. The clinical features and complications of gastrointestinal tuberculosis are highlighted by the seven cases which we report. Diagnosis and treatment of this condition is discussed and attention is drawn to the importance of case notification. Clinicians should bear in mind the diagnosis of gastrointestinal tuberculosis when dealing with any patient with non-specific abdominal symptoms.

  3. Isolation and Characterization of Adenoviruses Persistently Shed from the Gastrointestinal Tract of Non-Human Primates

    PubMed Central

    Kryazhimskiy, Sergey; Grant, Rebecca; Calcedo, Roberto; Yuan, Xin; Keough, Martin; Sandhu, Arbans; Wang, Qiang; Medina-Jaszek, C. Angelica; Plotkin, Joshua B.; Wilson, James M.

    2009-01-01

    Adenoviruses are important human pathogens that have been developed as vectors for gene therapies and genetic vaccines. Previous studies indicated that human infections with adenoviruses are self-limiting in immunocompetent hosts with evidence of some persistence in adenoid tissue. We sought to better understand the natural history of adenovirus infections in various non-human primates and discovered that healthy populations of great apes (chimpanzees, bonobos, gorillas, and orangutans) and macaques shed substantial quantities of infectious adenoviruses in stool. Shedding in stools from asymptomatic humans was found to be much less frequent, comparable to frequencies reported before. We purified and fully sequenced 30 novel adenoviruses from apes and 3 novel adenoviruses from macaques. Analyses of the new ape adenovirus sequences (as well as the 4 chimpanzee adenovirus sequences we have previously reported) together with 22 complete adenovirus genomes available from GenBank revealed that (a) the ape adenoviruses could clearly be classified into species corresponding to human adenovirus species B, C, and E, (b) there was evidence for intraspecies recombination between adenoviruses, and (c) the high degree of phylogenetic relatedness of adenoviruses across their various primate hosts provided evidence for cross species transmission events to have occurred in the natural history of B and E viruses. The high degree of asymptomatic shedding of live adenovirus in non-human primates and evidence for zoonotic transmissions warrants caution for primate handling and housing. Furthermore, the presence of persistent and/or latent adenovirus infections in the gut should be considered in the design and interpretation of human and non-human primate studies with adenovirus vectors. PMID:19578438

  4. [Gastrointestinal bleeding].

    PubMed

    Lanas, Ángel

    2015-09-01

    In the Digestive Disease Week in 2015 there have been some new contributions in the field of gastrointestinal bleeding that deserve to be highlighted. Treatment of celecoxib with a proton pump inhibitor is safer than treatment with nonselective NSAID and a proton pump inhibitor in high risk gastrointestinal and cardiovascular patients who mostly also take acetylsalicylic acid. Several studies confirm the need to restart the antiplatelet or anticoagulant therapy at an early stage after a gastrointestinal hemorrhage. The need for urgent endoscopy before 6-12 h after the onset of upper gastrointestinal bleeding episode may be beneficial in patients with hemodynamic instability and high risk for comorbidity. It is confirmed that in Western but not in Japanese populations, gastrointestinal bleeding episodes admitted to hospital during weekend days are associated with a worse prognosis associated with delays in the clinical management of the events. The strategy of a restrictive policy on blood transfusions during an upper GI bleeding event has been challenged. Several studies have shown the benefit of identifying the bleeding vessel in non varicose underlying gastric lesions by Doppler ultrasound which allows direct endoscopic therapy in the patient with upper GI bleeding. Finally, it has been reported that lower gastrointestinal bleeding diverticula band ligation or hemoclipping are both safe and have the same long-term outcomes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  5. In vivo near-infrared dual-axis confocal microendoscopy in the human lower gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Piyawattanametha, Wibool; Ra, Hyejun; Qiu, Zhen; Friedland, Shai; Liu, Jonathan T C; Loewke, Kevin; Kino, Gordon S; Solgaard, Olav; Wang, Thomas D; Mandella, Michael J; Contag, Christopher H

    2012-02-01

    Near-infrared confocal microendoscopy is a promising technique for deep in vivo imaging of tissues and can generate high-resolution cross-sectional images at the micron-scale. We demonstrate the use of a dual-axis confocal (DAC) near-infrared fluorescence microendoscope with a 5.5-mm outer diameter for obtaining clinical images of human colorectal mucosa. High-speed two-dimensional en face scanning was achieved through a microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) scanner while a micromotor was used for adjusting the axial focus. In vivo images of human patients are collected at 5 frames/sec with a field of view of 362×212 μm(2) and a maximum imaging depth of 140 μm. During routine endoscopy, indocyanine green (ICG) was topically applied a nonspecific optical contrasting agent to regions of the human colon. The DAC microendoscope was then used to obtain microanatomic images of the mucosa by detecting near-infrared fluorescence from ICG. These results suggest that DAC microendoscopy may have utility for visualizing the anatomical and, perhaps, functional changes associated with colorectal pathology for the early detection of colorectal cancer.

  6. Colonizing the embryonic zebrafish gut with anaerobic bacteria derived from the human gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Toh, Michael C; Goodyear, Mara; Daigneault, Michelle; Allen-Vercoe, Emma; Van Raay, Terence J

    2013-06-01

    The zebrafish has become increasingly popular for microbiological research. It has been used as an infection model for a variety of pathogens, and is also emerging as a tool for studying interactions between a host and its resident microbial communities. The mouse microbiota has been transplanted into the zebrafish gut, but to our knowledge, there has been no attempt to introduce a bacterial community derived from the human gut. We explored two methods for colonizing the developing gut of 5-day-old germ-free zebrafish larvae with a defined anaerobic microbial community derived from a single human fecal sample. Both environmental exposure (static immersion) and direct microinjection into the gut resulted in the establishment of two species-Lactobacillus paracasei and Eubacterium limosum-from a community of 30 strains consisting of 22 anaerobic species. Of particular interest is E. limosum, which, as a strict anaerobe, represents a group of bacteria which until now have not been shown to colonize the developing zebrafish gut. Our success here indicates that further investigation of zebrafish as a tool for studying human gut microbial communities is warranted.

  7. In vivo near-infrared dual-axis confocal microendoscopy in the human lower gastrointestinal tract

    PubMed Central

    Ra, Hyejun; Qiu, Zhen; Friedland, Shai; Liu, Jonathan T. C.; Loewke, Kevin; Kino, Gordon S.; Solgaard, Olav; Wang, Thomas D.; Mandella, Michael J.; Contag, Christopher H.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract. Near-infrared confocal microendoscopy is a promising technique for deep in vivo imaging of tissues and can generate high-resolution cross-sectional images at the micron-scale. We demonstrate the use of a dual-axis confocal (DAC) near-infrared fluorescence microendoscope with a 5.5-mm outer diameter for obtaining clinical images of human colorectal mucosa. High-speed two-dimensional en face scanning was achieved through a microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) scanner while a micromotor was used for adjusting the axial focus. In vivo images of human patients are collected at 5  frames/sec with a field of view of 362×212  μm2 and a maximum imaging depth of 140 μm. During routine endoscopy, indocyanine green (ICG) was topically applied a nonspecific optical contrasting agent to regions of the human colon. The DAC microendoscope was then used to obtain microanatomic images of the mucosa by detecting near-infrared fluorescence from ICG. These results suggest that DAC microendoscopy may have utility for visualizing the anatomical and, perhaps, functional changes associated with colorectal pathology for the early detection of colorectal cancer. PMID:22463020

  8. In vivo near-infrared dual-axis confocal microendoscopy in the human lower gastrointestinal tract

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piyawattanametha, Wibool; Ra, Hyejun; Qiu, Zhen; Friedland, Shai; Liu, Jonathan T. C.; Loewke, Kevin; Kino, Gordon S.; Solgaard, Olav; Wang, Thomas D.; Mandella, Michael J.; Contag, Christopher H.

    2012-02-01

    Near-infrared confocal microendoscopy is a promising technique for deep in vivo imaging of tissues and can generate high-resolution cross-sectional images at the micron-scale. We demonstrate the use of a dual-axis confocal (DAC) near-infrared fluorescence microendoscope with a 5.5-mm outer diameter for obtaining clinical images of human colorectal mucosa. High-speed two-dimensional en face scanning was achieved through a microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) scanner while a micromotor was used for adjusting the axial focus. In vivo images of human patients are collected at 5 frames/sec with a field of view of 362×212 μm2 and a maximum imaging depth of 140 μm. During routine endoscopy, indocyanine green (ICG) was topically applied a nonspecific optical contrasting agent to regions of the human colon. The DAC microendoscope was then used to obtain microanatomic images of the mucosa by detecting near-infrared fluorescence from ICG. These results suggest that DAC microendoscopy may have utility for visualizing the anatomical and, perhaps, functional changes associated with colorectal pathology for the early detection of colorectal cancer.

  9. Immunoglobulin E (IgE) and IgE-containing cells in human gastrointestinal fluids and tissues.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, W R; Borthistle, B K; Chen, S T

    1975-01-01

    Human gastric, small intestinal, colonic and rectal mucosae were examined for IgE-containing cells by single- and double-antibody immunofluorescence techniques, and IgE in intesinal fluids was measured by a double-antibody radioimmunoassay. IgE-containing cells were identified in all tissue specimens and comprised about 2% of all immunoglobulin-containing cells. Although less numerous than cells containing IgA, IgM or IgG, they were remarkably numerous in relation to the concentration of IgE in serum (about 0-001% of total immunoglobulin). IgE immunocytes were significantly more numerous in stomach and proximal small bowel than in colon and rectum, and were very numerous at bases of gastric and duodenal peptic ulcers. Measurable IgE was found in seventy-eight of eighty-five (92%) intestinal fluids. Sucrose gradient ultracentrifugation analysis of four of the fluids revealed that the immunologically reactive IgE was largely in fractions corresponding to molecules of lower molecular weight than that of albumin, which suggests that IgE in gut contents is degraded by proteolytic enzymes. The presence of IgE-forming cells in gastrointestinal tissues, and IgE or a fragment of IgE in intestinal fluids, suggests that IgE antibodies are available for participation in local reaginic-type reactions in the gut. Images FIG. 1 PMID:813925

  10. Intracellular gold nanoparticles enhance non-invasive radiofrequency thermal destruction of human gastrointestinal cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Gannon, Christopher J; Patra, Chitta Ranjan; Bhattacharya, Resham; Mukherjee, Priyabrata; Curley, Steven A

    2008-01-01

    Background Novel approaches to treat human cancer that are effective with minimal toxicity profiles are needed. We evaluated gold nanoparticles (GNPs) in human hepatocellular and pancreatic cancer cells to determine: 1) absence of intrinsic cytotoxicity of the GNPs and 2) external radiofrequency (RF) field-induced heating of intracellular GNPs to produce thermal destruction of malignant cells. GNPs (5 nm diameter) were added to 2 human cancer cell lines (Panc-1, Hep3B). 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay and propidium iodide-fluorescence associated cell sorting (PI-FACS) assessed cell proliferation and GNP-related cytotoxicity. Other GNP-treated cells were exposed to a 13.56 MHz RF field for 1, 2, or 5 minutes, and then incubated for 24 hours. PI-FACS measured RF-induced cytotoxicity. Results GNPs had no impact on cellular proliferation by MTT assay. PI-FACS confirmed that GNPs alone produced no cytotoxicity. A GNP dose-dependent RF-induced cytotoxicity was observed. For Hep3B cells treated with a 67 μM/L dose of GNPs, cytotoxicity at 1, 2 and 5 minutes of RF was 99.0%, 98.5%, and 99.8%. For Panc-1 cells treated at the 67 μM/L dose, cytotoxicity at 1, 2, and 5 minutes of RF was 98.5%, 98.7%, and 96.5%. Lower doses of GNPs were associated with significantly lower rates of RF-induced thermal cytotoxicity for each cell line (P < 0.01). Cells not treated with GNPs but treated with RF for identical time-points had less cytotoxicity (Hep3B: 17.6%, 21%, and 75%; Panc-1: 15.3%, 26.4%, and 39.8%, all P < 0.01). Conclusion We demonstrate that GNPs 1) have no intrinsic cytotoxicity or anti-proliferative effects in two human cancer cell lines in vitro and 2) GNPs release heat in a focused external RF field. This RF-induced heat release is lethal to cancer cells bearing intracellular GNPs in vitro. PMID:18234109

  11. Study of the gastrointestinal parasitic fauna of captive non-human primates (Macaca fascicularis).

    PubMed

    Zanzani, Sergio Aurelio; Gazzonis, Alessia Libera; Epis, Sara; Manfredi, Maria Teresa

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine helminths and protozoans in cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis) imported from registered breeding facilities in China and their relation to health risks for non-human primate handlers in biomedical research centers and in breeding facilities. Fresh fecal samples were collected from a total of 443 M. fascicularis and analyzed by copromicroscopical analysis, immunoenzymatic, or molecular assays. As to helminths, whose eggs were shed in 2.03% of the samples, Trichuris and Oesophagostomum were the only two taxa found, with low prevalence and low eggs per gram (EPG) values. Protozoans were more frequently detected (87.40%), with Entamoeba coli (85.19%) and Endolimax nana (79.26%) as the most prevalent species shed. Other parasites found by fecal smear examination were uninucleated-cyst-producing Entamoebas (78.52%), Iodamoeba bütschlii (42.96%), and Chilomastix mesnili (24.44%), while cysts of Balantidium coli (22.2%) were only observed by sedimentation. No coproantigens of Giardia duodenalis, Cryptosporidium spp., and Entamoeba histolytica complex were detected. Blastocystis sp. infection was noticed in 87.63% of macaques by PCR. These cynomolgus monkeys were infected with many subtypes (ST1, ST2, ST3, ST5, and ST7), where the predominant Blastocystis sp. subtypes were ST2 (77.5%), followed by ST1 (63.5%). Data collected confirmed the presence of potentially zoonotic parasites and a high parasite diversity, suggesting the need for appropriate and sensitive techniques to adequately control them and related health risks for handlers of non-human primates in biomedical research centers and in breeding facilities.

  12. Gastrointestinal Bleeding.

    PubMed

    Nable, Jose V; Graham, Autumn C

    2016-05-01

    Acute gastrointestinal bleeding is a commonly encountered chief complaint with a high morbidity and mortality. The emergency physician is challenged with prompt diagnosis, accurate risk assessment, and appropriate resuscitation of patients with gastrointestinal bleeding. Goals of care aim to prevent end-organ injury, manage comorbid illnesses, identify the source of bleeding, stop continued bleeding, support oxygen carrying capacity, and prevent rebleeding. This article reviews current strategies for risk stratification, diagnostic modalities, localization of bleeding, transfusion strategies, adjunct therapies, and reversal of anticoagulation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Angiotensin I-converting enzyme-inhibitory activity of the Norwegian autochthonous cheeses Gamalost and Norvegia after in vitro human gastrointestinal digestion.

    PubMed

    Qureshi, T M; Vegarud, G E; Abrahamsen, R K; Skeie, S

    2013-02-01

    The angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory activity of Gamalost cheese, its pH 4.6-soluble fraction, and Norvegia cheese was monitored before and after digestion with human gastric and duodenal juices. Both Gamalost and Norvegia cheeses showed an increased ACE-inhibitory activity during gastrointestinal digestion. However, only Norvegia showed pronounced increased activity after duodenal digestion. More peptides were detected in digested Gamalost compared with digested Norvegia. Most of the peptides in Gamalost were derived from β-casein (CN), some originated from α(s1)-CN, and only a very few originated from α(s2)-CN and κ-CN. In general, the number of peptides increased during gastrointestinal digestion, whereas some peptides were further degraded and disappeared; however, surprisingly, a few peptides remained stable. The aromatic amino acids, such as Tyr, Phe, and Trp; the positively charged amino acids (Arg and Lys); and Leu increased after simulated gastrointestinal digestion of Gamalost and Norvegia. After in vitro gastrointestinal digestion, both Gamalost and Norvegia showed high ACE-inhibitory activity, which may contribute in lowering of mild hypertension. Copyright © 2013 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. PCSK1 Mutations and Human Endocrinopathies: From Obesity to Gastrointestinal Disorders.

    PubMed

    Stijnen, Pieter; Ramos-Molina, Bruno; O'Rahilly, Stephen; Creemers, John W M

    2016-08-01

    Prohormone convertase 1/3, encoded by the PCSK1 gene, is a serine endoprotease that is involved in the processing of a variety of proneuropeptides and prohormones. Humans who are homozygous or compound heterozygous for loss-of-function mutations in PCSK1 exhibit a variable and pleiotropic syndrome consisting of some or all of the following: obesity, malabsorptive diarrhea, hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, altered thyroid and adrenal function, and impaired regulation of plasma glucose levels in association with elevated circulating proinsulin-to-insulin ratio. Recently, more common variants in the PCSK1 gene have been found to be associated with alterations in body mass index, increased circulating proinsulin levels, and defects in glucose homeostasis. This review provides an overview of the endocrinopathies and other disorders observed in prohormone convertase 1/3-deficient patients, discusses the possible biochemical basis for these manifestations of the disease, and proposes a model whereby certain missense mutations in PCSK1 may result in proteins with a dominant negative action.

  15. (Photosynthesis in intact plants)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    Progress in the two years since the last renewal application has been excellent. We have made substantial contributions on both main fronts of the projects, and are particularly happy with the progress of our research on intact plants. The approach of basing our field work on a sound foundation of laboratory studies has enabled is to use methods which provide unambiguous assays of well characterized reactions. We have also made excellent progress in several laboratory studies which will have direct applications in future field work, and have introduced to the laboratory a range of molecular genetics techniques which will allowmore » us to explore new options in the attempt to understand function at the level of molecular structure.« less

  16. Gastrointestinal and ectoparasites from urban stray dogs in Fortaleza (Brazil): high infection risk for humans?

    PubMed

    Klimpel, Sven; Heukelbach, Jörg; Pothmann, David; Rückert, Sonja

    2010-08-01

    Dogs are important definite or reservoir hosts for zoonotic parasites. However, only few studies on the prevalence of intestinal parasites in urban areas in Brazil are available. We performed a comprehensive study on parasites of stray dogs in a Brazilian metropolitan area. We included 46 stray dogs caught in the urban areas of Fortaleza (northeast Brazil). After euthanization, dogs were autopsied. Ectoparasites were collected, and the intestinal content of dogs were examined for the presence of parasites. Faecal samples were collected and analysed using merthiolate iodine formaldehyde concentration method. A total of nine different parasite species were found, including five endoparasite (one protozoan, one cestode and three nematode species) and four ectoparasite species (two flea, one louse and one tick species). In the intestinal content, 3,162 specimens of four helminth species were found: Ancylostoma caninum (prevalence, 95.7%), Dipylidium caninum (45.7%), Toxocara canis (8.7%) and Trichuris vulpis (4.3%). A total of 394 ectoparasite specimens were identified, including Rhipicephalus sanguineus (prevalence, 100.0%), Heterodoxus spiniger (67.4%), Ctenocephalides canis (39.1%) and Ctenocephalides felis (17.4%). In the faeces, intestinal parasites were detected in 38 stray dogs (82.6%), including oocysts of Giardia sp. (2.2%) and eggs of the nematode A. caninum (82.6%). Neither eggs nor larval stages of D. caninum, T. canis or T. vulpis were detected in dog faeces. Sensitivity of faecal examination for A. caninum was 86.4% (95% confidence interval, 72.0-94.3) but zero percentage for the other intestinal helminth species. Our data show that stray dogs in northeast Brazil carry a multitude of zoonotic ecto- and endoparasites, posing a considerable risk for humans. With the exception of A. caninum, sensitivity of faecal examination was negligible.

  17. Anti-Infective Activities of Lactobacillus Strains in the Human Intestinal Microbiota: from Probiotics to Gastrointestinal Anti-Infectious Biotherapeutic Agents

    PubMed Central

    Liévin-Le Moal, Vanessa

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY A vast and diverse array of microbial species displaying great phylogenic, genomic, and metabolic diversity have colonized the gastrointestinal tract. Resident microbes play a beneficial role by regulating the intestinal immune system, stimulating the maturation of host tissues, and playing a variety of roles in nutrition and in host resistance to gastric and enteric bacterial pathogens. The mechanisms by which the resident microbial species combat gastrointestinal pathogens are complex and include competitive metabolic interactions and the production of antimicrobial molecules. The human intestinal microbiota is a source from which Lactobacillus probiotic strains have often been isolated. Only six probiotic Lactobacillus strains isolated from human intestinal microbiota, i.e., L. rhamnosus GG, L. casei Shirota YIT9029, L. casei DN-114 001, L. johnsonii NCC 533, L. acidophilus LB, and L. reuteri DSM 17938, have been well characterized with regard to their potential antimicrobial effects against the major gastric and enteric bacterial pathogens and rotavirus. In this review, we describe the current knowledge concerning the experimental antibacterial activities, including antibiotic-like and cell-regulating activities, and therapeutic effects demonstrated in well-conducted, placebo-controlled, randomized clinical trials of these probiotic Lactobacillus strains. What is known about the antimicrobial activities supported by the molecules secreted by such probiotic Lactobacillus strains suggests that they constitute a promising new source for the development of innovative anti-infectious agents that act luminally and intracellularly in the gastrointestinal tract. PMID:24696432

  18. Prevalence of gastrointestinal parasites in captive non-human primates of twenty-four zoological gardens in China.

    PubMed

    Li, Mei; Zhao, Bo; Li, Bo; Wang, Qiang; Niu, Lili; Deng, Jiabo; Gu, Xiaobin; Peng, Xuerong; Wang, Tao; Yang, Guangyou

    2015-06-01

    Captive primates are susceptible to gastrointestinal (GIT) parasitic infections, which are often zoonotic and can contribute to morbidity and mortality. Fecal samples were examined by the means of direct smear, fecal flotation, fecal sedimentation, and fecal cultures. Of 26.51% (317/1196) of the captive primates were diagnosed gastrointestinal parasitic infections. Trichuris spp. were the most predominant in the primates, while Entamoeba spp. were the most prevalent in Old World monkeys (P < 0.05). These preliminary data will improve the management of captive primates and the safety of animal keepers and visitors. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Medical Primatology Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Cobalt chloride compromises transepithelial barrier properties of CaCo-2 BBe human gastrointestinal epithelial cell layers.

    PubMed

    DiGuilio, K M; Valenzano, M C; Rybakovsky, E; Mullin, J M

    2018-01-05

    Elevation of the transcription factor HIF-1 is a prominent mediator of not only processes that accompany hypoxia, but also the tumor microenvironment and tissue regeneration. This study uses mediators of "chemical hypoxia" to ask the question whether HIF-1α elevation in a healthy epithelial cell layer leads to leakiness in its tight junctional seals. Transepithelial electrical resistance and transepithelial diffusion of 14 C-D-mannitol and other radiolabeled probes are used as indicators of transepithelial barrier function of CaCo-2 BBe human gastrointestinal epithelial cell layers cultured on permeable supports. Western immunoblot analyses of integral tight junctional proteins (occludin and claudins) are used as further indicators of barrier function change. Cobalt, an inhibitor of the prolyl hydroxylase enzymes governing HIF-1α breakdown in the cell, induces transepithelial leakiness in CaCo-2 BBe cell layers in a time and concentration-dependent manner. This increased leakiness is accompanied by significant changes in certain specific integral tight junctional (TJ) proteins such as a decreased level of occludin and increased level of claudin-5. Similar results regarding barrier function compromise also occur with other chemical inhibitors of HIF-1α breakdown, namely ciclopiroxolamine (CPX) and dimethyloxalylglycine (DMOG). The increased leak is manifested by both decreased transepithelial electrical resistance (R t ) and increased paracellular diffusion of D-mannitol (J m ). The induced transepithelial leak shows significant size selectivity, consistent with induced effects on TJ permeability. Less-differentiated cell layers were significantly more affected than well-differentiated cell layers regarding induced transepithelial leak. A genetically modified CaCo-2 variant with reduced levels of HIF-1β, showed reduced transepithelial leak in response to cobalt exposure, further indicating that elevation of HIF-1α levels induced by agents of "chemical hypoxia

  20. The HMI™ module: a new tool to study the Host-Microbiota Interaction in the human gastrointestinal tract in vitro.

    PubMed

    Marzorati, Massimo; Vanhoecke, Barbara; De Ryck, Tine; Sadaghian Sadabad, Mehdi; Pinheiro, Iris; Possemiers, Sam; Van den Abbeele, Pieter; Derycke, Lara; Bracke, Marc; Pieters, Jan; Hennebel, Tom; Harmsen, Hermie J; Verstraete, Willy; Van de Wiele, Tom

    2014-05-22

    Recent scientific developments have shed more light on the importance of the host-microbe interaction, particularly in the gut. However, the mechanistic study of the host-microbe interplay is complicated by the intrinsic limitations in reaching the different areas of the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) in vivo. In this paper, we present the technical validation of a new device--the Host-Microbiota Interaction (HMI) module--and the evidence that it can be used in combination with a gut dynamic simulator to evaluate the effect of a specific treatment at the level of the luminal microbial community and of the host surface colonization and signaling. The HMI module recreates conditions that are physiologically relevant for the GIT: i) a mucosal area to which bacteria can adhere under relevant shear stress (3 dynes cm(-2)); ii) the bilateral transport of low molecular weight metabolites (4 to 150 kDa) with permeation coefficients ranging from 2.4 × 10(-6) to 7.1 × 10(-9) cm sec(-1); and iii) microaerophilic conditions at the bottom of the growing biofilm (PmO2 = 2.5 × 10(-4) cm sec(-1)). In a long-term study, the host's cells in the HMI module were still viable after a 48-hour exposure to a complex microbial community. The dominant mucus-associated microbiota differed from the luminal one and its composition was influenced by the treatment with a dried product derived from yeast fermentation. The latter--with known anti-inflammatory properties--induced a decrease of pro-inflammatory IL-8 production between 24 and 48 h. The study of the in vivo functionality of adhering bacterial communities in the human GIT and of the localized effect on the host is frequently hindered by the complexity of reaching particular areas of the GIT. The HMI module offers the possibility of co-culturing a gut representative microbial community with enterocyte-like cells up to 48 h and may therefore contribute to the mechanistic understanding of host-microbiome interactions.

  1. The HMI™ module: a new tool to study the Host-Microbiota Interaction in the human gastrointestinal tract in vitro

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Recent scientific developments have shed more light on the importance of the host-microbe interaction, particularly in the gut. However, the mechanistic study of the host-microbe interplay is complicated by the intrinsic limitations in reaching the different areas of the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) in vivo. In this paper, we present the technical validation of a new device - the Host-Microbiota Interaction (HMI) module - and the evidence that it can be used in combination with a gut dynamic simulator to evaluate the effect of a specific treatment at the level of the luminal microbial community and of the host surface colonization and signaling. Results The HMI module recreates conditions that are physiologically relevant for the GIT: i) a mucosal area to which bacteria can adhere under relevant shear stress (3 dynes cm−2); ii) the bilateral transport of low molecular weight metabolites (4 to 150 kDa) with permeation coefficients ranging from 2.4 × 10−6 to 7.1 × 10−9 cm sec−1; and iii) microaerophilic conditions at the bottom of the growing biofilm (PmO2 = 2.5 × 10−4 cm sec−1). In a long-term study, the host’s cells in the HMI module were still viable after a 48-hour exposure to a complex microbial community. The dominant mucus-associated microbiota differed from the luminal one and its composition was influenced by the treatment with a dried product derived from yeast fermentation. The latter - with known anti-inflammatory properties - induced a decrease of pro-inflammatory IL-8 production between 24 and 48 h. Conclusions The study of the in vivo functionality of adhering bacterial communities in the human GIT and of the localized effect on the host is frequently hindered by the complexity of reaching particular areas of the GIT. The HMI module offers the possibility of co-culturing a gut representative microbial community with enterocyte-like cells up to 48 h and may therefore contribute to the mechanistic understanding of

  2. Ingested soluble CD14 from milk is transferred intact into the blood of newborn rats.

    PubMed

    Ward, Tonya L; Spencer, William J; Davis, Laura D R; Harrold, Joann; Mack, David R; Altosaar, Illimar

    2014-02-01

    Milk acts as an edible immune system that is transferred from mother to newborn. Soluble Cluster of Differentiation 14 (sCD14) is a protein found in significant quantities in human milk (~8-29 µg/ml). At a 10-fold lower concentration in the blood (~3 µg/ml), the most notable role of sCD14 is to sequester lipopolysaccharides of Gram-negative bacteria from immune cells. To explore the pharmacodynamics of this milk protein and its biological fate, the biodistribution of radiolabeled sCD14 ((14)C, (125)I) was monitored in 10-d-old rat pups. Up to 3.4 ± 2.2% of the radiolabeled sCD14 administered was observed, intact, in the pup blood for up to 8 h post-ingestion. Additionally, 30.3 ± 13.0% of the radiolabeled sCD14 administered was observed degraded in the stomach at 8 h post-ingestion. A reservoir of intact, administered sCD14 (3.2 ± 0.3%), however, remained in the stomach at 8 h post-ingestion. Intact sCD14 was observed in the small intestine at 5.5 ± 1.6% of the dose fed at 8 h post-ingestion. The presence of intact sCD14 in the blood and the gastrointestinal tract of newborns post-ingestion has implications in the development of allergies, obesity, and other inflammation-related pathogeneses later in life.

  3. Dynamic In Vitro Models of the Human Gastrointestinal Tract as Relevant Tools to Assess the Survival of Probiotic Strains and Their Interactions with Gut Microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Cordonnier, Charlotte; Thévenot, Jonathan; Etienne-Mesmin, Lucie; Denis, Sylvain; Alric, Monique; Livrelli, Valérie; Blanquet-Diot, Stéphanie

    2015-01-01

    The beneficial effects of probiotics are conditioned by their survival during passage through the human gastrointestinal tract and their ability to favorably influence gut microbiota. The main objective of this study was to use dynamic in vitro models of the human digestive tract to investigate the effect of fasted or fed state on the survival kinetics of the new probiotic Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain CNCM I-3856 and to assess its influence on intestinal microbiota composition and activity. The probiotic yeast showed a high survival rate in the upper gastrointestinal tract whatever the route of admistration, i.e., within a glass of water or a Western-type meal. S. cerevisiae CNCM I-3856 was more sensitive to colonic conditions, as the strain was not able to colonize within the bioreactor despite a twice daily administration. The main bacterial populations of the gut microbiota, as well as the production of short chain fatty acids were not influenced by the probiotic treatment. However, the effect of the probiotic on the gut microbiota was found to be individual dependent. This study shows that dynamic in vitro models can be advantageously used to provide useful insight into the behavior of probiotic strains in the human digestive environment. PMID:27682114

  4. Gastrointestinal Traumatic Injuries: Gastrointestinal Perforation.

    PubMed

    Revell, Maria A; Pugh, Marcia A; McGhee, Melanie

    2018-03-01

    The abdomen is a big place even in a small person. Gastrointestinal trauma can result in injury to the stomach, small bowel, colon, or rectum. Traumatic causes include blunt or penetrating trauma, such as gunshot wounds, stabbings, motor vehicle collisions, and crush injuries. Nontraumatic causes include appendicitis, Crohn disease, cancer, diverticulitis, ulcerative colitis, blockage of the bowel, and chemotherapy. The mechanism of injury will affect both the nature and severity of any resulting injuries. Treatment must address the critical and emergent nature of these injuries as well as issues that affect all trauma situations, which include management of hemodynamic instability. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Gastrointestinal gas.

    PubMed Central

    Fardy, J; Sullivan, S

    1988-01-01

    Complaints related to gastrointestinal gas are commonly encountered in clinical practice. Various therapies have been proposed, yet none has appeared to be extremely effective. A review of the literature revealed little hard evidence to support the use of simethicone, pancreatic enzymes, anticholinergic agents or antibiotics. Evidence supporting the use of prokinetic agents has been the strongest, and there may be a pathophysiologic basis for the use of these agents if the complaints are related to abnormal intestinal motility. The use of activated charcoal for adsorbing intestinal gas has been effective in healthy subjects but has not been properly investigated in patients with gas complaints. Dietary modification may be beneficial in certain cases. Additional controlled trials are necessary to clarify the issues in the treatment of this common problem. PMID:3058280

  6. Metabolism of vertebrate amino sugars with N-glycolyl groups: mechanisms underlying gastrointestinal incorporation of the non-human sialic acid xeno-autoantigen N-glycolylneuraminic acid.

    PubMed

    Banda, Kalyan; Gregg, Christopher J; Chow, Renee; Varki, Nissi M; Varki, Ajit

    2012-08-17

    Although N-acetyl groups are common in nature, N-glycolyl groups are rare. Mammals express two major sialic acids, N-acetylneuraminic acid and N-glycolylneuraminic acid (Neu5Gc). Although humans cannot produce Neu5Gc, it is detected in the epithelial lining of hollow organs, endothelial lining of the vasculature, fetal tissues, and carcinomas. This unexpected expression is hypothesized to result via metabolic incorporation of Neu5Gc from mammalian foods. This accumulation has relevance for diseases associated with such nutrients, via interaction with Neu5Gc-specific antibodies. Little is known about how ingested sialic acids in general and Neu5Gc in particular are metabolized in the gastrointestinal tract. We studied the gastrointestinal and systemic fate of Neu5Gc-containing glycoproteins (Neu5Gc-glycoproteins) or free Neu5Gc in the Neu5Gc-free Cmah(-/-) mouse model. Ingested free Neu5Gc showed rapid absorption into the circulation and urinary excretion. In contrast, ingestion of Neu5Gc-glycoproteins led to Neu5Gc incorporation into the small intestinal wall, appearance in circulation at a steady-state level for several hours, and metabolic incorporation into multiple peripheral tissue glycoproteins and glycolipids, thus conclusively proving that Neu5Gc can be metabolically incorporated from food. Feeding Neu5Gc-glycoproteins but not free Neu5Gc mimics the human condition, causing tissue incorporation into human-like sites in Cmah(-/-) fetal and adult tissues, as well as developing tumors. Thus, glycoproteins containing glycosidically linked Neu5Gc are the likely dietary source for human tissue accumulation, and not the free monosaccharide. This human-like model can be used to elucidate specific mechanisms of Neu5Gc delivery from the gut to tissues, as well as general mechanisms of metabolism of ingested sialic acids.

  7. Comparison of rat epidermal keratinocyte organotypic culture (ROC) with intact human skin: lipid composition and thermal phase behavior of the stratum corneum.

    PubMed

    Pappinen, Sari; Hermansson, Martin; Kuntsche, Judith; Somerharju, Pentti; Wertz, Philip; Urtti, Arto; Suhonen, Marjukka

    2008-04-01

    The present report is a part of our continuing efforts to explore the utility of the rat epidermal keratinocyte organotypic culture (ROC) as an alternative model to human skin in transdermal drug delivery and skin irritation studies of new chemical entities and formulations. The aim of the present study was to compare the stratum corneum lipid content of ROC with the corresponding material from human skin. The lipid composition was determined by thin-layer chromatography (TLC) and mass-spectrometry, and the thermal phase transitions of stratum corneum were studied by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). All major lipid classes of the stratum corneum were present in ROC in a similar ratio as found in human stratum corneum. Compared to human skin, the level of non-hydroxyacid-sphingosine ceramide (NS) was increased in ROC, while alpha-hydroxyacid-phytosphingosine ceramide (AP) and non-hydroxyacid-phytosphingosine ceramides (NP) were absent. Also some alterations in fatty acid profiles of ROC ceramides were noted, e.g., esterified omega-hydroxyacid-sphingosine contained increased levels of oleic acid instead of linoleic acid. The fraction of lipids covalently bound to corneocyte proteins was distinctly lower in ROC compared to human skin, in agreement with the results from DSC. ROC underwent a lipid lamellar order to disorder transition (T2) at a slightly lower temperature (68 degrees C) than human skin (74 degrees C). These differences in stratum corneum lipid composition and the thermal phase transitions may explain the minor differences previously observed in drug permeation between ROC and human skin.

  8. Gastrointestinal and pancreatic hormones in the human fetus and mother at 18-21 weeks of gestation.

    PubMed

    Adrian, T E; Soltesz, G; MacKenzie, I Z; Bloom, S R; Aynsley-Green, A

    1995-01-01

    Several gastrointestinal hormones appear to play an important developmental role in the newborn, particularly in preterm neonates. Although the cells producing these peptides develop towards the end of the first trimester, fetal secretion of these regulatory peptides has not hitherto been demonstrated. Using samples collected by fetoscopy at 19-21 weeks of gestation we have measured concentrations of several gastrointestinal and pancreatic hormones. Maternal venous and amniotic fluid hormone concentrations were measured simultaneously. Concentrations of the pancreatic hormones, insulin, glucagon and pancreatic polypeptide (PP) were similar in fetal and maternal blood. Gastrin and motilin were present in the fetal circulation but at about 30% (p < 0.05) and 60% (p < 0.01) of the maternal levels, respectively. In contrast, enteroglucagon concentrations were more than twofold higher in the fetal circulation compared with maternal levels (p < 0.05). Concentrations of gastric inhibitory polypeptide (GIP) in fetal blood were higher than levels in maternal blood but not significantly. Concentrations of GIP (p < 0.001) were higher in the amniotic fluid than the fetal circulation. Gastrin and glucagon levels were similar in amniotic fluid and fetal blood. In contrast, PP and motilin were present in amniotic fluid, but at lower concentrations than in fetal blood. Enteroglucagon was not detectable in amniotic fluid. In conclusion, several alimentary hormones are secreted in the fetus at midterm. Since these peptides have trophic, secretory and motor effects on the gut, it is likely that these regulatory peptides are involved in the functional development of the fetal intestine.

  9. Secondary Structural Changes of Intact and Disulfide Bridges-Cleaved Human Serum Albumins in Thermal Denaturation up to 130°C - Additive Effects of Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate on the Changes.

    PubMed

    Moriyama, Yoshiko; Takeda, Kunio

    2017-05-01

    The secondary structural changes of human serum albumin with the intact 17 disulfide bridges (HSA) and the disulfide bridges-cleaved human serum albumin (RCM-HSA) in thermal denaturation were examined. Most of the helical structures of HSA, whose original helicity was 66%, were sharply disrupted between 50 and 100°C. However, 14% helicity remained even at 130°C. The temperature dependence of the degree of disrupted helical structures of HSA was discussed in connection with questions about a general protein denaturation model. When HSA lost the disulfide bridges, about two-thirds of the original helices were disrupted. Although the helices of RCM-HSA remaining after the cleavage of the disulfide bridges were relatively resistant against the heat treatment, the helicity changed from 22% at 25°C to 14% at 130℃. The helicity of RCM-HSA at 130°C agreed with the helicity of HSA at the same temperature, indicating that the same helical moieties of the polypeptides remained unaffected at this high temperature. The additive effects of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) on the structural changes of HSA and RCM-HSA in thermal denaturation were also examined. A slight amount of SDS protected the helical structures of HSA from thermal denaturation below 80°C. Upon cooling to 25°C after heat treatment at temperatures below 70°C with the coexistence of SDS of low concentrations, the helical structures of HSA were reformed to the original level at 25°C before heating. A similar tendency was also observed after heat treatment at 80°C. In contrast, the helical structures of the RCM-HSA complexes with SDS are completely recovered upon cooling to 25°C even after heat treatment up to 100°C. Similar investigations were also carried out on bovine serum albumins which had the intact 17 disulfide bridges and lost all of the bridges.

  10. The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGF-R) is present on the basolateral, but not the apical, surface of enterocytes in the human gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed Central

    Playford, R J; Hanby, A M; Gschmeissner, S; Peiffer, L P; Wright, N A; McGarrity, T

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: While it is clear that luminal epidermal growth factor (EGF) stimulates repair of the damaged bowel, its significance in maintaining normal gut growth remains uncertain. If EGF is important in maintaining normal gut growth, the EGF receptor (EGF-R) should be present on the apical (luminal) surface in addition to the basolateral surface. AIMS/SUBJECTS/METHODS: This study examined the distribution of the EGF-R in the epithelium throughout the human gastro-intestinal tract using immunohistochemistry, electron microscopy, and western blotting of brush border preparations. RESULTS: Immunostaining of the oesophagus showed circumferential EGF-R positivity in the cells of the basal portions of the stratified squamous epithelium but surface cells were EGF-R negative. In the normal stomach, small intestine, and colon, immunostaining localised the receptor to the basolateral surface with the apical membranes being consistently negative. EGF-R positivity within the small intestine appeared to be almost entirely restricted to the proliferative (crypt) region. Western blotting demonstrated a 170 kDa protein in whole tissue homogenates but not in the brush border vesicle preparations. CONCLUSIONS: As the EGF-R is located only on the basolateral surfaces in the normal adult gastrointestinal tract, the major role of luminal EGF is probably to stimulate repair rather than to maintain normal gut growth. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:8977341

  11. Human extrahepatic cytochromes P450: function in xenobiotic metabolism and tissue-selective chemical toxicity in the respiratory and gastrointestinal tracts.

    PubMed

    Ding, Xinxin; Kaminsky, Laurence S

    2003-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes in extrahepatic tissues often play a dominant role in target tissue metabolic activation of xenobiotic compounds. They may also determine drug efficacy and influence the tissue burden of foreign chemicals or bioavailability of therapeutic agents. This review focuses on xenobiotic-metabolizing CYPs of the human respiratory and gastrointestinal tracts, including the lung, trachea, nasal respiratory and olfactory mucosa, esophagus, stomach, small intestine, and colon. Many CYPs are expressed in one or more of these organs, including CYP1A1, CYP1A2, CYP1B1, CYP2A6, CYP2A13, CYP2B6, CYP2C8, CYP2C9, CYP2C18, CYP2C19, CYP2D6, CYP2E1, CYP2F1, CYP2J2, CYP2S1, CYP3A4, CYP3A5, and CYP4B1. Of particular interest are the preferential expression of certain CYPs in the respiratory tract and the regional differences in CYP expression profile in different parts of the gastrointestinal tract. Current research activities on the characterization of CYP expression, function, and regulation in these tissues, as well as future research needs, are discussed.

  12. Monomethylfumarate Induces γ-Globin Expression and Fetal Hemoglobin Production in Cultured Human Retinal Pigment Epithelial (RPE) and Erythroid Cells, and in Intact Retina

    PubMed Central

    Promsote, Wanwisa; Makala, Levi; Li, Biaoru; Smith, Sylvia B.; Singh, Nagendra; Ganapathy, Vadivel; Pace, Betty S.; Martin, Pamela M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. Sickle retinopathy (SR) is a major cause of vision loss in sickle cell disease (SCD). There are no strategies to prevent SR and treatments are extremely limited. The present study evaluated (1) the retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cell as a hemoglobin producer and novel cellular target for fetal hemoglobin (HbF) induction, and (2) monomethylfumarate (MMF) as an HbF-inducing therapy and abrogator of oxidative stress and inflammation in SCD retina. Methods. Human globin gene expression was evaluated by RT–quantitative (q)PCR in the human RPE cell line ARPE-19 and in primary RPE cells isolated from Townes humanized SCD mice. γ-Globin promoter activity was monitored in KU812 stable dual luciferase reporter expressing cells treated with 0 to 1000 μM dimethylfumarate, MMF, or hydroxyurea (HU; positive control) by dual luciferase assay. Reverse transcriptase–qPCR, fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS), immunofluorescence, and Western blot techniques were used to evaluate γ-globin expression and HbF production in primary human erythroid progenitors, ARPE-19, and normal hemoglobin producing (HbAA) and homozygous βs mutation (HbSS) RPE that were treated similarly, and in MMF-injected (1000 μM) HbAA and HbSS retinas. Dihydroethidium labeling and nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2), IL-1β, and VEGF expression were also analyzed. Results. Retinal pigment epithelial cells express globin genes and synthesize adult and fetal hemoglobin MMF stimulated γ-globin expression and HbF production in cultured RPE and erythroid cells, and in HbSS mouse retina where it also reduced oxidative stress and inflammation. Conclusions. The production of hemoglobin by RPE suggests the potential involvement of this cell type in the etiology of SR. Monomethylfumarate influences multiple parameters consistent with improved retinal health in SCD and may therefore be of therapeutic potential in SR treatment. PMID:24825111

  13. Gasdermin (Gsdm) localizing to mouse Chromosome 11 is predominantly expressed in upper gastrointestinal tract but significantly suppressed in human gastric cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Saeki, N; Kuwahara, Y; Sasaki, H; Satoh, H; Shiroishi, T

    2000-09-01

    Amplification of proto-oncogenes associated with their over-expression is one of the critical carcinogenic events identified in human cancer cells. In many cases of human gastric cancer, a proto-oncogene ERBB-2 is co-amplified with CAB1 genes physically linked to ERBB-2, and both genes are over-expressed. The amplified region containing ERBB-2 and CAB1 was named 17q12 amplicon from its chromosomal location. The syntenic region corresponding to the 17q12 amplicon is well conserved in mouse. In this study we isolated and characterized a novel mouse gene that locates telomeric to the mouse syntenic region. Northern blot analysis using the mouse cDNA and a cloned partial cDNA of human homolog disclosed a unique expression pattern of the genes. They are expressed predominantly in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract and in the skin at a lower level. Moreover, in the GI tract, the expression is highly restricted to the esophagus and stomach. Thus, we named the mouse gene Gasdermin (Gsdm). This is the first report of a mammalian gene whose expression is restricted to both upper GI tract and skin. Interestingly, in spite of its expression in normal stomach, no transcript was detected by Northern blot analysis in human gastric cancer cells. These data suggest that the loss of the expression of the human homolog is required for the carcinogenesis of gastric tissue and that the gene has an activity adverse to malignant transformation of cells.

  14. Human milk probiotic Lactobacillus fermentum CECT5716 reduces the incidence of gastrointestinal and upper respiratory tract infections in infants.

    PubMed

    Maldonado, José; Cañabate, Francisco; Sempere, Luis; Vela, Francisco; Sánchez, Ana R; Narbona, Eduardo; López-Huertas, Eduardo; Geerlings, Arjan; Valero, Antonio D; Olivares, Mónica; Lara-Villoslada, Federico

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the study was to examine the effects of a follow-on formula containing Lactobacillus fermentum CECT5716 (L. fermentum) on the incidence of infections in infants between the ages of 6 and 12 months. A randomized double-blinded controlled study including infants at the age of 6 months was conducted. Infants were assigned randomly to either follow-on formula supplemented with L. fermentum plus galactooligosaccharide (experimental group, EG), or the same formula supplemented with only galactooligosaccharide (control group, CG). The main outcome was the incidence of infections for the 6-month duration of the study. The EG showed a significant 46% reduction in the incidence rate (IR) of gastrointestinal infections (EG: 0.196 ± 0.51, CG: 0.363 ± 0.53, IR ratio 0.54, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.307-0.950, P = 0.032), 27% reduction in the incidence of upper respiratory tract infections (EG: 0.969 ± 0.96, CG: 1.330 ± 1.23, IR ratio 0.729, 95% CI 0.46-1.38, P = 0.026), and 30% reduction in the total number of infections (EG: 1.464 ± 1.15, CG: 2.077 ± 1.59, IR ratio 0.70, 95% CI 0.46-1.38, P = 0.003), at the end of the study period compared with CG. Administration of a follow-on formula with L. fermentum CECT5716 may be useful for the prevention of community-acquired gastrointestinal and upper respiratory infections.

  15. Impulsive actions and choices in laboratory animals and humans: effects of high vs. low dopamine states produced by systemic treatments given to neurologically intact subjects

    PubMed Central

    D’Amour-Horvat, Valérie; Leyton, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Increases and decreases in dopamine (DA) transmission have both been suggested to influence reward-related impulse-control. The present literature review suggests that, in laboratory animals, the systemic administration of DA augmenters preferentially increases susceptibility to premature responding; with continued DA transmission, reward approach behaviors are sustained. Decreases in DA transmission, in comparison, diminish the appeal of distal and difficult to obtain rewards, thereby increasing susceptibility to temporal discounting and other forms of impulsive choice. The evidence available in humans is not incompatible with this model but is less extensive. PMID:25566001

  16. Ethyl cellulose nanocarriers and nanocrystals differentially deliver dexamethasone into intact, tape-stripped or sodium lauryl sulfate-exposed ex vivo human skin - assessment by intradermal microdialysis and extraction from the different skin layers.

    PubMed

    Döge, Nadine; Hönzke, Stefan; Schumacher, Fabian; Balzus, Benjamin; Colombo, Miriam; Hadam, Sabrina; Rancan, Fiorenza; Blume-Peytavi, Ulrike; Schäfer-Korting, Monika; Schindler, Anke; Rühl, Eckart; Skov, Per Stahl; Church, Martin K; Hedtrich, Sarah; Kleuser, Burkhard; Bodmeier, Roland; Vogt, Annika

    2016-11-28

    Understanding penetration not only in intact, but also in lesional skin with impaired skin barrier function is important, in order to explore the surplus value of nanoparticle-based drug delivery for anti-inflammatory dermatotherapy. Herein, short-term ex vivo cultures of (i) intact human skin, (ii) skin pretreated with tape-strippings and (iii) skin pre-exposed to sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS) were used to assess the penetration of dexamethasone (Dex). Intradermal microdialysis was utilized for up to 24h after drug application as commercial cream, nanocrystals or ethyl cellulose nanocarriers applied at the therapeutic concentration of 0.05%, respectively. In addition, Dex was assessed in culture media and extracts from stratum corneum, epidermis and dermis after 24h, and the results were compared to those in heat-separated split skin from studies in Franz diffusion cells. Providing fast drug release, nanocrystals significantly accelerated the penetration of Dex. In contrast to the application of cream and ethyl cellulose nanocarriers, Dex was already detectable in eluates after 6h when applying nanocrystals on intact skin. Disruption of the skin barrier further accelerated and enhanced the penetration. Encapsulation in ethyl cellulose nanocarriers delayed Dex penetration. Interestingly, for all formulations highly increased concentrations in the dialysate were observed in tape-stripped skin, whereas the extent of enhancement was less in SLS-exposed skin. The results were confirmed in tissue extracts and were in line with the predictions made by in vitro release studies and ex vivo Franz diffusion cell experiments. The use of 45kDa probes further enabled the collection of inflammatory cytokines. However, the estimation of glucocorticoid efficacy by Interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-8 analysis was limited due to the trauma induced by the probe insertion. Ex vivo intradermal microdialysis combined with culture media analysis provides an effective, skin-sparing method for

  17. [Secondary tumors of the gastrointestinal tract].

    PubMed

    Langner, C

    2012-02-01

    Metastatic involvement of the gastrointestinal tract is rare and may cause considerable difficulties with respect to differential diagnosis. The gastrointestinal tract may either be affected by direct invasion, intraperitoneal dissemination or hematogenous cancer spread, the latter most often originating from malignant melanoma, breast and lung carcinomas. Metastatic deposits primarily develop within the submucosa. Secondary involvement of the mucosa typically leads to centrally depressed and/or ulcerated (volcano-like) nodular lesions. In histology, lack of a mucosal in situ component favors diagnosis of metastasis, whereas presence of an adenomatous precursor lesion is regarded to be characteristic of primary tumors. This concept, however, has recently been challenged by demonstrating metastatic cancer growth along intact basement membranes within the mucosal layer, i.e. mucosal colonization. The histopathological, immunohistochemical and clinical features of secondary gastrointestinal tumors are discussed in detail, focusing on criteria for differential diagnosis. The prognosis of affected patients is generally poor.

  18. Requirement for an intact T-cell actin and tubulin cytoskeleton for efficient assembly and spread of human immunodeficiency virus type 1.

    PubMed

    Jolly, Clare; Mitar, Ivonne; Sattentau, Quentin J

    2007-06-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection of CD4(+) T cells leads to the production of new virions that assemble at the plasma membrane. Gag and Env accumulate in the context of lipid rafts at the inner and outer leaflets of the plasma membrane, respectively, forming polarized domains from which HIV-1 buds. HIV-1 budding can result in either release of cell-free virions or direct cell-cell spread via a virological synapse (VS). The recruitment of Gag and Env to these plasma membrane caps in T cells is poorly understood but may require elements of the T-cell secretory apparatus coordinated by the cytoskeleton. Using fixed-cell immunofluorescence labeling and confocal microscopy, we observed a high percentage of HIV-1-infected T cells with polarized Env and Gag in capped, lipid raft-like assembly domains. Treatment of infected T cells with inhibitors of actin or tubulin remodeling disrupted Gag and Env compartmentalization within the polarized raft-like domains. Depolymerization of the actin cytoskeleton reduced Gag release and viral infectivity, and actin and tubulin inhibitors reduced Env incorporation into virions. Live- and fixed-cell confocal imaging and assay of de novo DNA synthesis by real-time PCR allowed quantification of HIV-1 cell-cell transfer. Inhibition of actin and tubulin remodeling in infected cells interfered with cell-cell spread across a VS and reduced new viral DNA synthesis. Based on these data, we propose that HIV-1 requires both actin and tubulin components of the T-cell cytoskeleton to direct its assembly and budding and to elaborate a functional VS.

  19. Evaluation of the Effect of Four Fibers on Laxation, Gastrointestinal Tolerance and Serum Markers in Healthy Humans

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Maria L.; Nikhanj, Soma D.; Timm, Derek A.; Thomas, William; Slavin, Joanne L.

    2010-01-01

    Background Average dietary fiber intake in the United States is roughly half of the recommended amount. As new dietary fiber products are introduced to increase fiber intake, it is critical to evaluate the physiological effects of such fibers. Aims: This study examined the effect of 4 fibers derived from maize or tapioca on fecal chemistry, gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms and serum markers of chronic disease. Methods Twenty healthy subjects completed the single-blind crossover study in which 12 g/day of fiber (pullulan, Promitor™ Resistant Starch, soluble fiber dextrin or Promitor Soluble Corn Fiber) or placebo (maltodextrin) were consumed for 14 days followed by a 21-day washout. GI symptom surveys were completed (days 3 and 14), stools were collected (days 11–14), diet was recorded (days 12–14) and fasting blood samples were obtained (day 15). Results The 4 test fibers were well tolerated, with mild to moderate GI symptoms. Total short-chain fatty acid (SCFA) concentrations did not differ among the treatments. Fecal pH and individual SCFAs were affected by some treatments. Stool weight and serum markers of chronic disease did not change with these treatments. Conclusion Increasing fiber intake by 12 g/day was well tolerated and may have a positive impact on colon health due to fermentation. PMID:20090313

  20. Extensive T-Cell Epitope Repertoire Sharing among Human Proteome, Gastrointestinal Microbiome, and Pathogenic Bacteria: Implications for the Definition of Self

    PubMed Central

    Bremel, Robert D.; Homan, E. Jane

    2015-01-01

    T-cell receptor binding to MHC-bound peptides plays a key role in discrimination between self and non-self. Only a subset, typically a pentamer, of amino acids in a MHC-bound peptide form the motif exposed to the T-cell receptor. We categorize and compare the T-cell exposed amino acid motif repertoire of the total proteomes of two groups of bacteria, comprising pathogens and gastrointestinal microbiome organisms, with the human proteome and immunoglobulins. Given the maximum 205, or 3.2 million of such motifs that bind T-cell receptors, there is considerable overlap in motif usage. We show that the human proteome, exclusive of immunoglobulins, only comprises three quarters of the possible motifs, of which 65.3% are also present in both composite bacterial proteomes. Very few motifs are unique to the human proteome. Immunoglobulin variable regions carry a broad diversity of T-cell exposed motifs (TCEMs) that provides a stratified random sample of the motifs found in pathogens, microbiome, and the human proteome. Individual bacterial genera and species vary in the content of immunoglobulin and human proteome matched motifs that they carry. Mycobacteria and Burkholderia spp carry a particularly high content of such matched motifs. Some bacteria retain a unique motif signature and motif sharing pattern with the human proteome. The implication is that distinguishing self from non-self does not depend on individual TCEMs, but on a complex and dynamic overlay of signals wherein the same TCEM may play different roles in different organisms, and the frequency with which a particular TCEM appears influences its effect. The patterns observed provide clues to bacterial immune evasion and to strategies for intervention, including vaccine design. The breadth and distinct frequency patterns of the immunoglobulin-derived peptides suggest a role of immunoglobulins in maintaining a broadly responsive T-cell repertoire. PMID:26557118

  1. How can we conserve intact tropical peatlands?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawson, Ian; Roucoux, Katherine

    2017-04-01

    The scientific community has, for more than three decades, been expressing increasing alarm about the fate of peatlands in parts of Indonesia and Malaysia, where extensive land-use conversion and drainage for rice and oil palm have greatly compromised peatland hydrology, ecology, biological richness, and carbon storage. The discourse in the literature on these peatlands is now moving on from attempts to preserve the last remaining fragments of peat-swamp forest, towards discussion of how best to restore damaged ecosystems, and whether it is possible to manage plantations more 'sustainably'. It is becoming increasingly clear, however, that peatlands occur quite widely in other parts of the lowland tropics, including parts of Amazonia and the Congo Basin, and many of these peatlands can reasonably be described as 'intact': although few if any parts of the tropics are totally unaffected by human actions, the hydrology and functional ecology of these systems appear to be close to a 'natural' state. The question then arises as to what should be done with the knowledge of their existence. Here we analyse the arguments in favour of protecting intact peatlands, and the potential conflicts with other priorities such as economic development and social justice. We evaluate alternative mechanisms for protecting intact peatlands, focusing on the particular issues raised by peatlands as opposed to other kinds of tropical ecosystem. We identify ways in which natural science agendas can help to inform these arguments, using our own contributions in palaeoecology and carbon mapping as examples. Finally, we argue for a radical reconsideration of research agendas in tropical peatlands, highlighting the potential contribution of methodologies borrowed from the social sciences and humanities.

  2. Studies of molecular species of the human androgen receptor (AR): comparison of the physicochemical properties of the (/sup 3/H)methyltrienolone-AR complex formed in cytosol to the complex produced in intact genital skin fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Keenan, B.S.; Greger, N.C.; Hedge, A.M.

    1986-07-01

    Two forms of the human genital skin fibroblast (GSF) androgen receptor (AR) complexed with (/sup 3/H)17 alpha-methyltrienolone were compared: 1) the intact complex formed in cytosol at 4 C (broken cell or B/C complex); and 2) the complex formed in the whole cell at 37 C (W/C complex). The intact form of the B/C complex was distinguished from partly degraded forms by the gel filtration profile in 0.5 M KCl. The W/C complex was considered to represent the transformed state of the receptor. The W/C complex had a smaller molecular radius than the B/C complex by gel filtration (Kav =more » 0.26-0.28 vs. 0.11-0.18). By low salt density gradient centrifugation, the B/C complex sedimented at 8.8S and the W/C complex at 6.6S. However, in 0.5 M KCl, each sedimented at 5.1S, and they were homogeneous, indicating that the monomeric forms differed markedly in molecular radius, but by only about 20,000 daltons in calculated mol wt (134,500 vs. 114,300 daltons). The complexes were separated from DNA, desalted, and compared by chromatography on DEAE-Sephacel and hydroxylapatite (HAP). The B/C complex bound readily to both column matrices and eluted from each as a sharp homogeneous peak: from DEAE at 172-190 mM KCl and from HAP at 123 mM phosphate. The W/C complex, however, was heterogeneous. One component did not bind to DEAE, and one eluted at 22-40 mM KCl. The W/C complex eluted from HAP as a peak at 42 mM, with a shoulder at 102 mM phosphate. Thus, transformation of the human genital skin fibroblast androgen receptor involves a major decrease in molecular radius and loss of negative charge with a possible loss of a 20,000-dalton macromolecular component.« less

  3. Survival, growth and toxicity of Microcystis aeruginosa PCC 7806 in experimental conditions mimicking some features of the human gastro-intestinal environment.

    PubMed

    Stefanelli, Mara; Vichi, Susanna; Stipa, Giuseppe; Funari, Enzo; Testai, Emanuela; Scardala, Simona; Manganelli, Maura

    2014-05-25

    Cyanotoxins (CTX) are widely produced by several cyanobacteria (CB), increasingly spreading in most water bodies and terrestrial habitats, and represent a risk for human health. CB are prokaryotes, and although mostly autotrophic, several examples of heterotrophy in symbiotic relationship with different organisms have been described. In addition to the known routes of exposure, it has been hypothesized that CB might 'colonize' human intestine with relevant implications for human health. Colonization is a complex process and requires specific features of the possible invaders. Still, a short-term persistence as living and toxin-producing organisms within the intestinal lumen of the host could represent an 'internal' source of exposure to CTX. In this work we ran microcosm experiments (4-18days), looking at Microcystis aeruginosa PCC7806 resistance and cyanotoxin-producing capabilities in darkness, 37°C, pH 2, and subsequent recovery in a rich medium, in darkness, 37°C, in the presence of enteric bacteria, mimicking few important features of the gastrointestinal environment. We measured cyanobacterial populations and growth, microcystin (MC) production and the presence of mcyB gene. M. aeruginosa could grow in the dark at 37°C up to 17days, and survive at pH 2 at a rate between 30% and 70%, depending on the age and toxicity of the starting culture. Cell lysis resulted in a substantial amounts of MC released, not degraded at gastric pH. Following the acidic passage, still in the dark at 37°C, M. aeruginosa restarted to grow within 24h for the next 3-4days, independently on the presence of intestinal bacteria, maintaining the MC cell quota and mcyB gene. Our results show new features of CB: a significant resistance of M. aeruginosa in conditions far from its optimal one, that is an environment mimicking some of the important characteristics of human gastrointestinal tract, suggesting the possibility of an internal source of exposure to CTX, with implications for

  4. Human serum albumin homeostasis: a new look at the roles of synthesis, catabolism, renal and gastrointestinal excretion, and the clinical value of serum albumin measurements

    PubMed Central

    Levitt, David G; Levitt, Michael D

    2016-01-01

    Serum albumin concentration (CP) is a remarkably strong prognostic indicator of morbidity and mortality in both sick and seemingly healthy subjects. Surprisingly, the specifics of the pathophysiology underlying the relationship between CP and ill-health are poorly understood. This review provides a summary that is not previously available in the literature, concerning how synthesis, catabolism, and renal and gastrointestinal clearance of albumin interact to bring about albumin homeostasis, with a focus on the clinical factors that influence this homeostasis. In normal humans, the albumin turnover time of about 25 days reflects a liver albumin synthesis rate of about 10.5 g/day balanced by renal (≈6%), gastrointestinal (≈10%), and catabolic (≈84%) clearances. The acute development of hypoalbuminemia with sepsis or trauma results from increased albumin capillary permeability leading to redistribution of albumin from the vascular to interstitial space. The best understood mechanism of chronic hypoalbuminemia is the decreased albumin synthesis observed in liver disease. Decreased albumin production also accounts for hypoalbuminemia observed with a low-protein and normal caloric diet. However, a calorie- and protein-deficient diet does not reduce albumin synthesis and is not associated with hypoalbuminemia, and CP is not a useful marker of malnutrition. In most disease states other than liver disease, albumin synthesis is normal or increased, and hypoalbuminemia reflects an enhanced rate of albumin turnover resulting either from an increased rate of catabolism (a poorly understood phenomenon) or enhanced loss of albumin into the urine (nephrosis) or intestine (protein-losing enteropathy). The latter may occur with subtle intestinal pathology and hence may be more prevalent than commonly appreciated. Clinically, reduced CP appears to be a result rather than a cause of ill-health, and therapy designed to increase CP has limited benefit. The ubiquitous occurrence of

  5. Treatment of advanced gastrointestinal cancer with genetically modified autologous mesenchymal stem cells - TREAT-ME-1 - a phase I, first in human, first in class trial.

    PubMed

    von Einem, Jobst C; Peter, Sylvia; Günther, Christine; Volk, Hans-Dieter; Grütz, Gerald; Salat, Christoph; Stoetzer, Oliver; Nelson, Peter J; Michl, Marlies; Modest, Dominik P; Holch, Julian W; Angele, Martin; Bruns, Christiane; Niess, Hanno; Heinemann, Volker

    2017-10-06

    This phase I, first in human, first in class clinical study aimed at evaluating the safety, tolerability and efficacy of treatment with genetically modified mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) in combination with ganciclovir (GCV). MSC_apceth_101 are genetically modified autologous MSCs used as vehicles for a cell-based gene therapy in patients with advanced gastrointestinal adenocarcinoma. The study design consisted of a dose-escalation 3 + 3 design. All patients ( n = 6) were treated with up to three applications of MSC_apceth_101, followed by GCV infusions given on three consecutive days starting 48 hours after injection of MSC_apceth_101. Three of six patients received a total dose of 1.5 × 10 6 cells/kg. Two patients received three doses of 1 × 10 6 cells/kg, while one patient received only two doses of 1 × 10 6 cells/kg due to a SADR. Six patients received MSC_apceth_101. No IMP-related serious adverse events occurred. Adverse-events related to IMP-injection were increased creatinine, cough, fever, and night sweat. TNF, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10 and sE-Selectin, showed that repeated application is immunologically safe, but induces a switch of the functional properties of monocytes to an inflammatory phenotype. Treatment induced stable disease in 4/6 patients, and progressive disease in 2/6 patients. Treatment with MSC_apceth_101 in combination with GCV demonstrated acceptable safety and tolerability in patients with advanced gastrointestinal adenocarcinoma.

  6. Treatment of advanced gastrointestinal cancer with genetically modified autologous mesenchymal stem cells - TREAT-ME-1 - a phase I, first in human, first in class trial

    PubMed Central

    von Einem, Jobst C.; Peter, Sylvia; Günther, Christine; Volk, Hans-Dieter; Grütz, Gerald; Salat, Christoph; Stoetzer, Oliver; Nelson, Peter J.; Michl, Marlies; Modest, Dominik P.; Holch, Julian W.; Angele, Martin; Bruns, Christiane

    2017-01-01

    Purpose This phase I, first in human, first in class clinical study aimed at evaluating the safety, tolerability and efficacy of treatment with genetically modified mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) in combination with ganciclovir (GCV). MSC_apceth_101 are genetically modified autologous MSCs used as vehicles for a cell-based gene therapy in patients with advanced gastrointestinal adenocarcinoma. Experimental design The study design consisted of a dose-escalation 3 + 3 design. All patients (n = 6) were treated with up to three applications of MSC_apceth_101, followed by GCV infusions given on three consecutive days starting 48 hours after injection of MSC_apceth_101. Three of six patients received a total dose of 1.5 × 106 cells/kg. Two patients received three doses of 1 × 106 cells/kg, while one patient received only two doses of 1 × 106 cells/kg due to a SADR. Results Six patients received MSC_apceth_101. No IMP-related serious adverse events occurred. Adverse-events related to IMP-injection were increased creatinine, cough, fever, and night sweat. TNF, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10 and sE-Selectin, showed that repeated application is immunologically safe, but induces a switch of the functional properties of monocytes to an inflammatory phenotype. Treatment induced stable disease in 4/6 patients, and progressive disease in 2/6 patients. Conclusion Treatment with MSC_apceth_101 in combination with GCV demonstrated acceptable safety and tolerability in patients with advanced gastrointestinal adenocarcinoma. PMID:29113291

  7. Production of human metabolites by gastrointestinal bacteria as a potential source of post-mortem alteration of antemortem drug/metabolite concentrations.

    PubMed

    Martindale, Stephanie M; Powers, Robert H; Bell, Suzanne C

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that bacterial species are capable of transforming complex chemical substances. Several of these species, native to the human gastrointestinal tract, are active in postmortem decomposition. They have potential to cause biotransformations affecting compound-to-metabolite ratios within the human body, especially after death. Investigation of postmortem effects could supply valuable information, especially concerning compound identification and confirmation. The purpose of this research was to investigate the effects of Escherichia coli, Bacteroides fragilis, and Clostridium perfringens on diazepam and flunitrazepam in Reinforced Clostridial Medium, and to compare bacterial biotransformation products to those of human metabolism. A decrease in diazepam concentration between pre- and post-incubation was observed for samples inoculated with Escherichia coli (14.7-20.2%) as well as Bacteroides fragilis (13.9-25.7%); however there was no corresponding increase in concentration for the monitored human metabolites. Flunitrazepam demonstrated a greater concentration loss when incubated with individual bacterial species as well as mixed culture (79.2-100.0%). Samples incubated with Bacteroides fragilis, Clostridium perfringens, and mixed culture resulted in nearly complete conversion of flunitrazepam. Increased 7-aminoflunitrazepam concentrations accounted for the majority of the conversion; however discrepancies in the mass balance of the reaction suggested the possibility of a minor metabolite that was not monitored in the current analysis. These experiments served as a pilot study and proof of concept that can be adapted and applied to a realm of possibilities. Ultimately, this methodology would be ideal to study compounds that are too toxic or lethal for animal and human metabolic investigations. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Zinc and gastrointestinal disease

    PubMed Central

    Skrovanek, Sonja; DiGuilio, Katherine; Bailey, Robert; Huntington, William; Urbas, Ryan; Mayilvaganan, Barani; Mercogliano, Giancarlo; Mullin, James M

    2014-01-01

    This review is a current summary of the role that both zinc deficiency and zinc supplementation can play in the etiology and therapy of a wide range of gastrointestinal diseases. The recent literature describing zinc action on gastrointestinal epithelial tight junctions and epithelial barrier function is described. Zinc enhancement of gastrointestinal epithelial barrier function may figure prominently in its potential therapeutic action in several gastrointestinal diseases. PMID:25400994

  9. Hydrolysed fumonisin B1 and N-(deoxy-D-fructos-1-yl)-fumonisin B1: stability and catabolic fate under simulated human gastrointestinal conditions.

    PubMed

    Cirlini, Martina; Hahn, Irene; Varga, Elisabeth; Dall'Asta, Margherita; Falavigna, Claudia; Calani, Luca; Berthiller, Franz; Del Rio, Daniele; Dall'Asta, Chiara

    2015-02-01

    Food processing may induce thermal degradation of fumonisins in corn via Maillard-type reactions, or alkaline hydrolysis via loss of the two tricarballylic acid moieties. In the former case, N-(1-deoxy-D-fructos-1-yl)-fumonisin B(1) (NDF) can be formed, while the latter derivative is called hydrolysed fumonisin B(1) (HFB(1)). The aim of this study was to deepen the knowledge about the gastrointestinal stability of HFB(1) and NDF in humans. Due to the lack of standard, NDF was chemically synthesised and cleaned up in high purity to be used for further experiments. While NDF is already partially cleaved (about 41%) during simulated digestion, it remained rather stable towards human colon microflora. In contrast to this, HFB(1) is partially metabolised by the colon microflora to unknown compounds after 24 h of fermentation, as seen by a loss of about 22%. Concluding, the cleavage of NDF during digestion as well as the likely metabolisation of HFB(1) emphasise the need for animal trials to ascertain their toxicity in vivo.

  10. LOCALIZATION OF CALCITONIN RECEPTOR-LIKE RECEPTOR (CLR) AND RECEPTOR ACTIVITY-MODIFYING PROTEIN 1 (RAMP1) IN HUMAN GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT

    PubMed Central

    Cottrell, Graeme S.; Alemi, Farzad; Kirkland, Jacob G.; Grady, Eileen F.; Corvera, Carlos U.; Bhargava, Aditi

    2012-01-01

    Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) exerts its diverse effects on vasodilation, nociception, secretion, and motor function through a heterodimeric receptor comprising of calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CLR) and receptor activity-modifying protein 1 (RAMP1). Despite the importance of CLR•RAMP1 in human disease, little is known about its distribution in the human gastrointestinal (GI) tract, where it participates in inflammation and pain. In this study, we determined that CLR and RAMP1 mRNAs are expressed in normal human stomach, ileum and colon by RT-PCR. We next characterized antibodies that we generated to rat CLR and RAMP1 in transfected HEK cells. Having characterized these antibodies in vitro, we then localized CLR-, RAMP1-, CGRP- and intermedin-immunoreactivity (IMD-IR) in various human GI segments. In the stomach, nerve bundles in the myenteric plexus and nerve fibers throughout the circular and longitudinal muscle had prominent CLR-IR. In the proximal colon and ileum, CLR was found in nerve varicosities of the myenteric plexus and surrounding submucosal neurons. Interestingly, CGRP expressing fibers did not co-localize, but were in close proximity to CLR. However, CLR and RAMP1, the two subunits of a functional CGRP receptor were clearly localized in myenteric plexus, where they may form functional cell-surface receptors. IMD, another member of calcitonin peptide family was also found in close proximity to CLR, and like CGRP, did not co-localize with either CLR or RAMP1 receptors. Thus, CGRP and IMD appear to be released locally, where they can mediate their effect on their receptors regulating diverse functions such as inflammation, pain and motility. PMID:22484227

  11. Prevalence of gastrointestinal symptoms in patients with influenza, clinical significance, and pathophysiology of human influenza viruses in faecal samples: what do we know?

    PubMed

    Minodier, Laetitia; Charrel, Remi N; Ceccaldi, Pierre-Emmanuel; van der Werf, Sylvie; Blanchon, Thierry; Hanslik, Thomas; Falchi, Alessandra

    2015-12-12

    This review provides for the first time an assessment of the current understanding about the occurrence and the clinical significance of gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms in influenza patients, and their correlation with the presence of human influenza viruses in stools of patients with confirmed influenza virus infection. Studies exploring how human influenza viruses spread to the patient's GI tract after a primary respiratory infection have been summarized. We conducted a systematic search of published peer-reviewed literature up to June 2015 with regard to the above-mentioned aspects, focusing on human influenza viruses (A(H1N1), A(H1N1)pdm09, A(H3N2), and B). Forty-four studies were included in this systematic review and meta-analysis. The pooled prevalence of any digestive symptoms ranged from 30.9% (95% CI, 9.8 to 57.5; I(2) = 97.5%) for A(H1N1)pdm09 to 2.8% (95% CI, 0.6 to 6.5; I(2) = 75.4%) for A(H1N1). The pooled prevalence of influenza viruses in stool was 20.6% (95% CI, 8.9 to 35.5; I(2) = 96.8%), but their correlation with GI symptoms has rarely been explored. The presence of viral RNA in stools because of haematogenous dissemination to organs via infected lymphocytes is likely, but the potential to cause direct intestinal infection and faecal-oral transmission warrants further investigation. This review highlights the gaps in our knowledge, and the high degree of uncertainty about the prevalence and significance of GI symptoms in patients with influenza and their correlation with viral RNA positivity in stool because of the high level of heterogeneity among studies.

  12. Mitochondrial complex I bridges a connection between regulation of carbon flexibility and gastrointestinal commensalism in the human fungal pathogen Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xiaoyu; Li, Shanshan; Gao, Ning; Niu, Lida; Wang, Yuanyuan; Wu, Xianwei; Wu, Wenjuan; Wu, Jianhua; Zhou, Dongsheng; Zhan, Xiangjiang

    2017-01-01

    Efficient assimilation of alternative carbon sources in glucose-limited host niches is critical for colonization of Candida albicans, a commensal yeast that frequently causes opportunistic infection in human. C. albicans evolved mechanistically to regulate alternative carbon assimilation for the promotion of fungal growth and commensalism in mammalian hosts. However, this highly adaptive mechanism that C. albicans employs to cope with alternative carbon assimilation has yet to be clearly understood. Here we identified a novel role of C. albicans mitochondrial complex I (CI) in regulating assimilation of alternative carbon sources such as mannitol. Our data demonstrate that CI dysfunction by deleting the subunit Nuo2 decreases the level of NAD+, downregulates the NAD+-dependent mannitol dehydrogenase activity, and consequently inhibits hyphal growth and biofilm formation in conditions when the carbon source is mannitol, but not fermentative sugars like glucose. Mannitol-dependent morphogenesis is controlled by a ROS-induced signaling pathway involving Hog1 activation and Brg1 repression. In vivo studies show that nuo2Δ/Δ mutant cells are severely compromised in gastrointestinal colonization and the defect can be rescued by a glucose-rich diet. Thus, our findings unravel a mechanism by which C. albicans regulates carbon flexibility and commensalism. Alternative carbon assimilation might represent a fitness advantage for commensal fungi in successful colonization of host niches. PMID:28570675

  13. Effects of Simulated Human Gastrointestinal Digestion of Two Purple-Fleshed Potato Cultivars on Anthocyanin Composition and Cytotoxicity in Colonic Cancer and Non-Tumorigenic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kubow, Stan; Iskandar, Michèle M.; Melgar-Bermudez, Emiliano; Sleno, Lekha; Sabally, Kebba; Azadi, Behnam; How, Emily; Prakash, Satya; Burgos, Gabriela; zum Felde, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    A dynamic human gastrointestinal (GI) model was used to digest cooked tubers from purple-fleshed Amachi and Leona potato cultivars to study anthocyanin biotransformation in the stomach, small intestine and colonic vessels. Colonic Caco-2 cancer cells and non-tumorigenic colonic CCD-112CoN cells were tested for cytotoxicity and cell viability after 24 h exposure to colonic fecal water (FW) digests (0%, 10%, 25%, 75% and 100% FW in culture media). After 24 h digestion, liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry identified 36 and 15 anthocyanin species throughout the GI vessels for Amachi and Leona, respectively. The total anthocyanin concentration was over thirty-fold higher in Amachi compared to Leona digests but seven-fold higher anthocyanin concentrations were noted for Leona versus Amachi in descending colon digests. Leona FW showed greater potency to induce cytotoxicity and decrease viability of Caco-2 cells than observed with FW from Amachi. Amachi FW at 100% caused cytotoxicity in non-tumorigenic cells while FW from Leona showed no effect. The present findings indicate major variations in the pattern of anthocyanin breakdown and release during digestion of purple-fleshed cultivars. The differing microbial anthocyanin metabolite profiles in colonic vessels between cultivars could play a significant role in the impact of FW toxicity on tumor and non-tumorigenic cells. PMID:28850070

  14. Gastrointestinal Simulation Model TWIN-SHIME Shows Differences between Human Urolithin-Metabotypes in Gut Microbiota Composition, Pomegranate Polyphenol Metabolism, and Transport along the Intestinal Tract.

    PubMed

    García-Villalba, Rocío; Vissenaekens, Hanne; Pitart, Judit; Romo-Vaquero, María; Espín, Juan C; Grootaert, Charlotte; Selma, María V; Raes, Katleen; Smagghe, Guy; Possemiers, Sam; Van Camp, John; Tomas-Barberan, Francisco A

    2017-07-12

    A TWIN-SHIME system was used to compare the metabolism of pomegranate polyphenols by the gut microbiota from two individuals with different urolithin metabotypes. Gut microbiota, ellagitannin metabolism, short-chain fatty acids (SCFA), transport of metabolites, and phase II metabolism using Caco-2 cells were explored. The simulation reproduced the in vivo metabolic profiles for each metabotype. The study shows for the first time that microbial composition, metabolism of ellagitannins, and SCFA differ between metabotypes and along the large intestine. The assay also showed that pomegranate phenolics preserved intestinal cell integrity. Pomegranate polyphenols enhanced urolithin and propionate production, as well as Akkermansia and Gordonibacter prevalence with the highest effect in the descending colon. The system provides an insight into the mechanisms of pomegranate polyphenol gut microbiota metabolism and absorption through intestinal cells. The results obtained by the combined SHIME/Caco-2 cell system are consistent with previous human and animal studies and show that although urolithin metabolites are present along the gastrointestinal tract due to enterohepatic circulation, they are predominantly produced in the distal colon region.

  15. Structural and molecular interrogation of intact biological systems

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Kwanghun; Wallace, Jenelle; Kim, Sung-Yon; Kalyanasundaram, Sandhiya; Andalman, Aaron S.; Davidson, Thomas J.; Mirzabekov, Julie J.; Zalocusky, Kelly A.; Mattis, Joanna; Denisin, Aleksandra K.; Pak, Sally; Bernstein, Hannah; Ramakrishnan, Charu; Grosenick, Logan; Gradinaru, Viviana; Deisseroth, Karl

    2014-01-01

    Obtaining high-resolution information from a complex system, while maintaining the global perspective needed to understand system function, represents a key challenge in biology. Here we address this challenge with a method (termed CLARITY) for the transformation of intact tissue into a nanoporous hydrogel-hybridized form (crosslinked to a three-dimensional network of hydrophilic polymers) that is fully assembled but optically transparent and macromolecule-permeable. Using mouse brains, we show intact-tissue imaging of long-range projections, local circuit wiring, cellular relationships, subcellular structures, protein complexes, nucleic acids and neurotransmitters. CLARITY also enables intact-tissue in situ hybridization, immunohistochemistry with multiple rounds of staining and de-staining in non-sectioned tissue, and antibody labelling throughout the intact adult mouse brain. Finally, we show that CLARITY enables fine structural analysis of clinical samples, including non-sectioned human tissue from a neuropsychiatric-disease setting, establishing a path for the transmutation of human tissue into a stable, intact and accessible form suitable for probing structural and molecular underpinnings of physiological function and disease. PMID:23575631

  16. Intact Protein Analysis at 21 Tesla and X-Ray Crystallography Define Structural Differences in Single Amino Acid Variants of Human Mitochondrial Branched-Chain Amino Acid Aminotransferase 2 (BCAT2)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Lissa C.; Håkansson, Maria; Walse, Björn; Nilsson, Carol L.

    2017-09-01

    Structural technologies are an essential component in the design of precision therapeutics. Precision medicine entails the development of therapeutics directed toward a designated target protein, with the goal to deliver the right drug to the right patient at the right time. In the field of oncology, protein structural variants are often associated with oncogenic potential. In a previous proteogenomic screen of patient-derived glioblastoma (GBM) tumor materials, we identified a sequence variant of human mitochondrial branched-chain amino acid aminotransferase 2 as a putative factor of resistance of GBM to standard-of-care-treatments. The enzyme generates glutamate, which is neurotoxic. To elucidate structural coordinates that may confer altered substrate binding or activity of the variant BCAT2 T186R, a 45 kDa protein, we applied combined ETD and CID top-down mass spectrometry in a LC-FT-ICR MS at 21 T, and X-Ray crystallography in the study of both the variant and non-variant intact proteins. The combined ETD/CID fragmentation pattern allowed for not only extensive sequence coverage but also confident localization of the amino acid variant to its position in the sequence. The crystallographic experiments confirmed the hypothesis generated by in silico structural homology modeling, that the Lys59 side-chain of BCAT2 may repulse the Arg186 in the variant protein (PDB code: 5MPR), leading to destabilization of the protein dimer and altered enzyme kinetics. Taken together, the MS and novel 3D structural data give us reason to further pursue BCAT2 T186R as a precision drug target in GBM. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  17. Genetically encoded photocross-linkers determine the biological binding site of exendin-4 peptide in the N-terminal domain of the intact human glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R)

    PubMed Central

    Koole, Cassandra; Reynolds, Christopher A.; Mobarec, Juan C.; Hick, Caroline; Sexton, Patrick M.; Sakmar, Thomas P.

    2017-01-01

    The glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) is a key therapeutic target in the management of type II diabetes mellitus, with actions including regulation of insulin biosynthesis and secretion, promotion of satiety, and preservation of β-cell mass. Like most class B G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), there is limited knowledge linking biological activity of the GLP-1R with the molecular structure of an intact, full-length, and functional receptor·ligand complex. In this study, we have utilized genetic code expansion to site-specifically incorporate the photoactive amino acid p-azido-l-phenylalanine (azF) into N-terminal residues of a full-length functional human GLP-1R in mammalian cells. UV-mediated photolysis of azF was then carried out to induce targeted photocross-linking to determine the proximity of the azido group in the mutant receptor with the peptide exendin-4. Cross-linking data were compared directly with the crystal structure of the isolated N-terminal extracellular domain of the GLP-1R in complex with exendin(9–39), revealing both similarities as well as distinct differences in the mode of interaction. Generation of a molecular model to accommodate the photocross-linking constraints highlights the potential influence of environmental conditions on the conformation of the receptor·peptide complex, including folding dynamics of the peptide and formation of dimeric and higher order oligomeric receptor multimers. These data demonstrate that crystal structures of isolated receptor regions may not give a complete reflection of peptide/receptor interactions and should be combined with additional experimental constraints to reveal peptide/receptor interactions occurring in the dynamic, native, and full-length receptor state. PMID:28283573

  18. Reconciling certification and intact forest landscape conservation.

    PubMed

    Kleinschroth, Fritz; Garcia, Claude; Ghazoul, Jaboury

    2018-05-29

    In 2014, the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC) added a new criterion to its principles that requires protection of intact forest landscapes (IFLs). An IFL is an extensive area of forest that lacks roads and other signs of human activity as detected through remote sensing. In the Congo basin, our analysis of road networks in formally approved concessionary logging areas revealed greater loss of IFL in certified than in noncertified concessions. In areas of informal (i.e., nonregulated) extraction, road networks are known to be less detectable by remote sensing. Under the current definition of IFL, companies certified under FSC standards are likely to be penalized relative to the noncertified as well as the informal logging sector on account of their planned road networks, despite an otherwise better standard of forest management. This could ultimately undermine certification and its wider adoption, with implications for the future of sustainable forest management.

  19. Intact capture of hypervelocity projectiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsou, P.

    1990-01-01

    The ability to capture projectiles intact at hypervelocities opens new applications in science and technology that would either not be possible or would be very costly by other means. This capability has been demonstrated in the laboratory for aluminum projectiles of 1.6 mm diameter, captured at 6 km/s, in one unmelted piece, and retaining up to 95% of the original mass. Furthermore, capture was accomplished passively using microcellular underdense polymer foam. Another advantage of capturing projectiles in an underdense medium is the ability of such a medium to preserve a record of the projectile's original velocity components of speed and direction. A survey of these experimental results is described in terms of a dozen parameters which characterize the amount of capture and the effect on the projectile due to different capture media.

  20. Intact capture of hypervelocity projectiles.

    PubMed

    Tsou, P

    1990-01-01

    The ability to capture projectiles intact at hypervelocities opens new applications in science and technology that would either not be possible or would be very costly by other means. This capability has been demonstrated in the laboratory for aluminum projectiles of 1.6 mm diameter, captured at 6 km/s, in one unmelted piece, and retaining up to 95% of the original mass. Furthermore, capture was accomplished passively using microcellular underdense polymer foam. Another advantage of capturing projectiles in an underdense medium is the ability of such a medium to preserve a record of the projectile's original velocity components of speed and direction. A survey of these experimental results is described in terms of a dozen parameters which characterize the amount of capture and the effect on the projectile due to different capture media.

  1. Risk factors for gastrointestinal parasite infections of dogs living around protected areas of the Atlantic Forest: implications for human and wildlife health.

    PubMed

    Curi, N H A; Paschoal, A M O; Massara, R L; Santos, H A; Guimarães, M P; Passamani, M; Chiarello, A G

    2017-01-01

    Despite the ubiquity of domestic dogs, their role as zoonotic reservoirs and the large number of studies concerning parasites in urban dogs, rural areas in Brazil, especially those at the wildlife-domestic animal-human interface, have received little attention from scientists and public health managers. This paper reports a cross-sectional epidemiological survey of gastrointestinal parasites of rural dogs living in farms around Atlantic Forest fragments. Through standard parasitological methods (flotation and sedimentation), 13 parasite taxa (11 helminths and two protozoans) were found in feces samples from dogs. The most prevalent were the nematode Ancylostoma (47%) followed by Toxocara (18%) and Trichuris (8%). Other less prevalent (<2%) parasites found were Capillaria, Ascaridia, Spirocerca, Taeniidae, Acantocephala, Ascaris, Dipylidium caninum, Toxascaris, and the protozoans Cystoisospora and Eimeria. Mixed infections were found in 36% of samples, mostly by Ancylostoma and Toxocara. Previous deworming had no association with infections, meaning that this preventive measure is being incorrectly performed by owners. Regarding risk factors, dogs younger than one year were more likely to be infected with Toxocara, and purebred dogs with Trichuris. The number of cats in the households was positively associated with Trichuris infection, while male dogs and low body scores were associated with mixed infections. The lack of associations with dog free-ranging behavior and access to forest or villages indicates that infections are mostly acquired around the households. The results highlight the risk of zoonotic and wildlife parasite infections from dogs and the need for monitoring and controlling parasites of domestic animals in human-wildlife interface areas.

  2. Gastrointestinal Morbidity in Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Acosta, Andres; Camilleri, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is a complex disease that results from increased energy intake and decreased energy expenditure. The gastrointestinal system plays a key role in the pathogenesis of obesity and facilitates caloric imbalance. Changes in gastrointestinal hormones and the inhibition of mechanisms that curtail caloric intake result in weight gain. It is not clear if the gastrointestinal role in obesity is a cause or an effect of this disease. Obesity is often associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and cardiovascular diseases (CVD). Obesity is also associated with gastrointestinal disorders, which are more frequent and present earlier than T2DM and CVD. Diseases such as gastro-esophageal reflux disease, cholelithiasis or non-alcoholic steatohepatitis are directly related to body weight and abdominal adiposity. Our objective is to assess the role of each gastrointestinal organ in obesity and the gastrointestinal morbidity resulting in those organs from effects of obesity. PMID:24602085

  3. Gastrointestinal Epithelial Organoid Cultures from Postsurgical Tissues.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Soojung; Yoo, Jongman

    2017-08-17

    An organoid is a cellular structure three-dimensionally (3D) cultured from self-organizing stem cells in vitro, which has a cell population, architectures, and organ specific functions like the originating organs. Recent advances in the 3D culture of isolated intestinal crypts or gastric glands have enabled the generation of human gastrointestinal epithelial organoids. Gastrointestinal organoids recapitulate the human in vivo physiology because of all the intestinal epithelial cell types that differentiated and proliferated from tissue resident stem cells. Thus far, gastrointestinal organoids have been extensively used for generating gastrointestinal disease models. This protocol describes the method of isolating a gland or crypt using stomach or colon tissue after surgery and establishing them into gastroids or colonoids.

  4. Within-host evolution versus immigration as a determinant of Escherichia coli diversity in the human gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Dixit, Ojas V A; O'Brien, Claire L; Pavli, Paul; Gordon, David M

    2018-03-01

    When a human host harbors two or more strains of Escherichia coli, the second strain is more likely to be a member of the same phylogroup rather than a different phylogroup. This outcome may be the consequence of a within host evolution event or an independent immigration/establishment event. To determine the relative importance of these two events in determining E. coli diversity in a host, a collection of multiple E. coli isolates recovered from each of 67 patients undergoing colonoscopies was used. Whole genome sequence data were available for one example of every REP-fingerprint type identified in a patient. Sequence type (ST) and single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analyses revealed that 83% of strains observed in the host population were a consequence of immigration/establishment events. Restricting the analysis to hosts harboring two or more strains belonging to the same phylogroup revealed that in about half of these cases, the presence of a second strain belonging to the same phylogroup was the consequence of an independent immigration/establishment event. Thus, the results of this study show that despite hosts being exposed to a diversity of E. coli via their food, factors related to the host also determine what E. coli strains succeed in establishing. © 2017 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Release of EPA and DHA from salmon oil - a comparison of in vitro digestion with human and porcine gastrointestinal enzymes.

    PubMed

    Aarak, K E; Kirkhus, B; Holm, H; Vogt, G; Jacobsen, M; Vegarud, G E

    2013-10-01

    In the present study, we hypothesised whether in vitro digestion of salmon oil would release different amounts of PUFA depending on the origin of the lipolytic enzymes used. For this purpose, in vitro digestion of salmon oil (SO) was performed using human duodenal juice (HDJ) or a commercial enzyme preparation consisting of porcine pancreatin and bile (PB). The lipolytic effect was determined by measuring the release of fatty acids (FA) using solid-phase extraction and GC-flame ionisation detection, withdrawing samples every 20 min during digestion. The amount of FA released indicated that a plateau was reached after 80 min with approximately similar amounts of FA detected using both HDJ and PB (379 (sd 18) and 352 (sd 23) mg/g SO, respectively). However, the release of 18 : 2, EPA (20 : 5) and DHA (22 : 6) was significantly different during in vitro digestion. At 80 min, HDJ and PB released 43 and 33% of 18 : 2, 14 and 9% of EPA and 11 and 9% of DHA, respectively. Both enzyme preparations released approximately the same amounts of the other FA analysed. The effect of the addition of bile salts (BS) was significantly different in the two enzyme systems, where porcine pancreatin highly responded to the increase in BS concentration, in contrast to HDJ.

  6. Gastrointestinal disorders - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Digestive disease - resources; Resources - gastrointestinal disorders ... org American Liver Foundation -- www.liverfoundation.org National Digestive Diseases Information Clearinghouse -- www.niddk.nih.gov/health- ...

  7. Frequent Detection of Human Adenovirus from the Lower Gastrointestinal Tract in Men Who Have Sex with Men

    PubMed Central

    Curlin, Marcel E.; Huang, Meei-Li; Lu, Xiaoyan; Celum, Connie L.; Sanchez, Jorge; Selke, Stacy; Baeten, Jared M.; Zuckerman, Richard A.; Erdman, Dean D.; Corey, Lawrence

    2010-01-01

    Background The association between baseline seropositivity to human adenovirus (HAdV) type 5 and increased HIV acquisition in the Step HIV Vaccine Study has raised questions concerning frequency of acquired and/or persistent Adenovirus infections among adults at high risk of HIV-1 infection. Methodology To evaluate the frequency and pattern of HAdV shedding from the lower GI tract, we retrospectively tested rectal swabs for HAdVs in a cohort of 20 HSV-2 positive HIV-positive Peruvian men who have sex with men (MSM) undergoing rectal swabbing three times/week for 18 consecutive weeks, in a prospective study of HSV-2 suppression in HIV infection. Viral DNA was extracted and amplified using a sensitive multiplex PCR assay that detects all currently recognized HAdV types. Molecular typing of viruses was performed on selected samples by hexon gene sequencing. Baseline neutralizing antibody titers to HAdVs −5, −26, −35 and −48 were also assessed. Principal Findings 15/20 individuals had HAdV detected during follow up. The median frequency of HAdV detection was 30% of samples (range 2.0% to 64.7%). HAdV shedding typically occurred on consecutive days in clustered episodes lasting a median of 4 days (range 1 to 9 days) separated by periods without shedding, suggesting frequent new infections or reactivation of latent infections over time. 8 of the 15 shedders had more than one type detected in follow-up. 20 HAdV types from species B, C, and D were identified, including HAdV-5, −26 and −48, HAdV types under development as potential vaccine candidates. 14/20 subjects were seropositive for HAdV-5; 15/20 for HAdV-26; 3/20 for HAdV-35; and 2/20 for HAdV-48. HAdV shedding did not correlate with CD4 count, plasma HIV-1 viral load, or titers to HAdV-5 or HAdV-35. The sole individual with HAdV-5 shedding was HAdV-5 seropositive. Conclusions HAdV shedding was highly prevalent and diverse, including types presently under consideration as HIV vaccine vectors. Subclinical

  8. Vulnerability of ecosystems to climate change moderated by habitat intactness.

    PubMed

    Eigenbrod, Felix; Gonzalez, Patrick; Dash, Jadunandan; Steyl, Ilse

    2015-01-01

    The combined effects of climate change and habitat loss represent a major threat to species and ecosystems around the world. Here, we analyse the vulnerability of ecosystems to climate change based on current levels of habitat intactness and vulnerability to biome shifts, using multiple measures of habitat intactness at two spatial scales. We show that the global extent of refugia depends highly on the definition of habitat intactness and spatial scale of the analysis of intactness. Globally, 28% of terrestrial vegetated area can be considered refugia if all natural vegetated land cover is considered. This, however, drops to 17% if only areas that are at least 50% wilderness at a scale of 48×48 km are considered and to 10% if only areas that are at least 50% wilderness at a scale of 4.8×4.8 km are considered. Our results suggest that, in regions where relatively large, intact wilderness areas remain (e.g. Africa, Australia, boreal regions, South America), conservation of the remaining large-scale refugia is the priority. In human-dominated landscapes, (e.g. most of Europe, much of North America and Southeast Asia), focusing on finer scale refugia is a priority because large-scale wilderness refugia simply no longer exist. Action to conserve such refugia is particularly urgent since only 1 to 2% of global terrestrial vegetated area is classified as refugia and at least 50% covered by the global protected area network. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Development of Second Generation Intact Stability Criteria

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-12-01

    the intact stability performance of ships, have motivated the development of the second generation intact stability criteria by the IMO Subcommittee on...primary modes of stability failures which are being addressed. The second generation intact stability criteria are planned to have a multitiered structure...and 2 vulnerability criteria that are used as a preliminary design process check of dynamic stability failure risk. This report describes the U.S

  10. Primary gastrointestinal lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Ghimire, Prasanna; Wu, Guang-Yao; Zhu, Ling

    2011-01-01

    Gastrointestinal tract is the most common extranodal site involved by lymphoma with the majority being non-Hodgkin type. Although lymphoma can involve any part of the gastrointestinal tract, the most frequent sites in order of its occurrence are the stomach followed by small intestine and ileocecal region. Gastrointestinal tract lymphoma is usually secondary to the widespread nodal diseases and primary gastrointestinal tract lymphoma is relatively rare. Gastrointestinal lymphomas are usually not clinically specific and indistinguishable from other benign and malignant conditions. Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma is the most common pathological type of gastrointestinal lymphoma in essentially all sites of the gastrointestinal tract, although recently the frequency of other forms has also increased in certain regions of the world. Although some radiological features such as bulky lymph nodes and maintenance of fat plane are more suggestive of lymphoma, they are not specific, thus mandating histopathological analysis for its definitive diagnosis. There has been a tremendous leap in the diagnosis, staging and management of gastrointestinal lymphoma in the last two decades attributed to a better insight into its etiology and molecular aspect as well as the knowledge about its critical signaling pathways. PMID:21390139

  11. Advances in gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Lanas, Ángel

    2016-09-01

    The main innovations of the latest meeting of the Gastroenterological Association (2016) concerning upper gastrointestinal bleeding from the clinician's perspective can be summarised as follows: a) The Glasgow-Blatchford scale has the best accuracy in predicting the need for surgical intervention and hospital mortality; b) Prognostic scales for non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding are also useful for lower gastrointestinal bleeding; c) Preliminary data suggest that treatment with hemospray does not seem to be superior to current standard treatment in controlling active peptic ulcer bleeding; d) Either famotidine or a proton pump inhibitor may be effective in preventing haemorrhagic recurrence in patients taking aspirin, but this finding needs to be confirmed in further studies; e) There was confirmation of the need to re-introduce antiplatelet therapy as early as possible in patients with antiplatelet-associated gastrointestinal bleeding in order to prevent cardiovascular mortality; f) Routine clinical practice suggests that gastrointestinal or cardiovascular complications with celecoxib or traditional NSAIDs are very low; g) Dabigatran is associated with an increased incidence of gastrointestinal bleeding compared with apixaban or warfarin. At least half of the episodes are located in the lower gastrointestinal tract; h) Implant devices for external ventricular circulatory support are associated with early gastrointestinal bleeding in up to one third of patients; the bleeding is often secondary to arteriovenous malformations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  12. The gastrointestinal-brain axis in humans as an evolutionary advance of the root-leaf axis in plants: A hypothesis linking quantum effects of light on serotonin and auxin.

    PubMed

    Tonello, Lucio; Gashi, Bekim; Scuotto, Alessandro; Cappello, Glenda; Cocchi, Massimo; Gabrielli, Fabio; Tuszynski, Jack A

    2018-01-01

    Living organisms tend to find viable strategies under ambient conditions that optimize their search for, and utilization of, life-sustaining resources. For plants, a leading role in this process is performed by auxin, a plant hormone that drives morphological development, dynamics, and movement to optimize the absorption of light (through branches and leaves) and chemical "food" (through roots). Similarly to auxin in plants, serotonin seems to play an important role in higher animals, especially humans. Here, it is proposed that morphological and functional similarities between (i) plant leaves and the animal/human brain and (ii) plant roots and the animal/human gastro-intestinal tract have general features in common. Plants interact with light and use it for biological energy, whereas, neurons in the central nervous system seem to interact with bio-photons and use them for proper brain function. Further, as auxin drives roots "arborescence" within the soil, similarly serotonin seems to facilitate enteric nervous system connectivity within the human gastro-intestinal tract. This auxin/serotonin parallel suggests the root-branches axis in plants may be an evolutionary precursor to the gastro-intestinal-brain axis in humans. Finally, we hypothesize that light might be an important factor, both in gastro-intestinal dynamics and brain function. Such a comparison may indicate a key role for the interaction of light and serotonin in neuronal physiology (possibly in both the central nervous system and the enteric nervous system), and according to recent work, mind and consciousness.

  13. Exploratory investigations of hypervelocity intact capture spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsou, P.; Griffiths, D. J.

    1993-01-01

    The ability to capture hypervelocity projectiles intact opens a new technique available for hypervelocity research. A determination of the reactions taking place between the projectile and the capture medium during the process of intact capture is extremely important to an understanding of the intact capture phenomenon, to improving the capture technique, and to developing a theory describing the phenomenon. The intact capture of hypervelocity projectiles by underdense media generates spectra, characteristic of the material species of projectile and capture medium involved. Initial exploratory results into real-time characterization of hypervelocity intact capture techniques by spectroscopy include ultra-violet and visible spectra obtained by use of reflecting gratings, transmitting gratings, and prisms, and recorded by photographic and electronic means. Spectrometry proved to be a valuable real-time diagnostic tool for hypervelocity intact capture events, offering understanding of the interactions of the projectile and the capture medium during the initial period and providing information not obtainable by other characterizations. Preliminary results and analyses of spectra produced by the intact capture of hypervelocity aluminum spheres in polyethylene (PE), polystyrene (PS), and polyurethane (PU) foams are presented. Included are tentative emission species identifications, as well as gray body temperatures produced in the intact capture process.

  14. Immunotherapy for Gastrointestinal Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Toomey, Paul G.; Vohra, Nasreen A.; Ghansah, Tomar; Sarnaik, Amod A.; Pilon-Thomas, Shari A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Gastrointestinal (GI) cancers are the most common human tumors encountered worldwide. The majority of GI cancers are unresectable at the time of diagnosis, and in the subset of patients undergoing resection, few are cured. There is only a modest improvement in survival with the addition of modalities such as chemotherapy and radiation therapy. Due to an increasing global cancer burden, it is imperative to integrate alternative strategies to improve outcomes. It is well known that cancers possess diverse strategies to evade immune detection and destruction. This has led to the incorporation of various immunotherapeutic strategies, which enable reprogramming of the immune system to allow effective recognition and killing of GI tumors. Methods A review was conducted of the results of published clinical trials employing immunotherapy for esophageal, gastroesophageal, gastric, hepatocellular, pancreatic, and colorectal cancers. Results Monoclonal antibody therapy has come to the forefront in the past decade for the treatment of colorectal cancer. Immunotherapeutic successes in solid cancers such as melanoma and prostate cancer have led to the active investigation of immunotherapy for GI malignancies, with some promising results. Conclusions To date, monoclonal antibody therapy is the only immunotherapy approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for GI cancers. Initial trials validating new immunotherapeutic approaches, including vaccination-based and adoptive cell therapy strategies, for GI malignancies have demonstrated safety and the induction of antitumor immune responses. Therefore, immunotherapy is at the forefront of neoadjuvant as well as adjuvant therapies for the treatment and eradication of GI malignancies. PMID:23302905

  15. Intact glycopeptide characterization using mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Cao, Li; Qu, Yi; Zhang, Zhaorui; Wang, Zhe; Prytkova, Iya; Wu, Si

    2016-05-01

    Glycosylation is one of the most prominent and extensively studied protein post-translational modifications. However, traditional proteomic studies at the peptide level (bottom-up) rarely characterize intact glycopeptides (glycosylated peptides without removing glycans), so no glycoprotein heterogeneity information is retained. Intact glycopeptide characterization, on the other hand, provides opportunities to simultaneously elucidate the glycan structure and the glycosylation site needed to reveal the actual biological function of protein glycosylation. Recently, significant improvements have been made in the characterization of intact glycopeptides, ranging from enrichment and separation, mass spectroscopy (MS) detection, to bioinformatics analysis. In this review, we recapitulated currently available intact glycopeptide characterization methods with respect to their advantages and limitations as well as their potential applications.

  16. Effect of ageing on the gastro-intestinal transit of a lactulose-supplemented mixed solid-liquid meal in humans.

    PubMed

    Wegener, M; Börsch, G; Schaffstein, J; Lüth, I; Rickels, R; Ricken, D

    1988-01-01

    Gastro-intestinal transit of a mixed solid-liquid meal containing wheat bread, scrambled eggs, coffee labelled with 99mTc, orange juice with lactulose and indigocarmine was evaluated in 21 young control (mean age 33.5 years) and 25 elderly subjects (mean age 81.7 years) without gastrointestinal complaints or severe medical illness. The rate of gastric emptying was determined by an anterior gamma camera technique, mouth-to-caecum transit by the hydrogen breath test and whole-gut transit by the first stool passage of indigocarmine. Gastric emptying was significantly prolonged in older subjects: t1/2 = 136 +/- (SEM) 13 versus 81 +/- 4 min; p less than 0.001. Concerning mouth-to-caecum or whole-gut transit time, significant differences between the two study groups were not detected.

  17. 77 FR 27072 - Gastrointestinal Drugs Advisory Committee; Cancellation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-08

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2012-N-0001] Gastrointestinal Drugs Advisory Committee; Cancellation AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The meeting of the Gastrointestinal Drugs Advisory Committee scheduled for May 31, 2012, is...

  18. Depletion of mucin in mucin-producing human gastrointestinal carcinoma: Results from in vitro and in vivo studies with bromelain and N-acetylcysteine.

    PubMed

    Amini, Afshin; Masoumi-Moghaddam, Samar; Ehteda, Anahid; Liauw, Winston; Morris, David L

    2015-10-20

    Aberrant expression of membrane-associated and secreted mucins, as evident in epithelial tumors, is known to facilitate tumor growth, progression and metastasis, and to provide protection against adverse growth conditions, chemotherapy and immune surveillance. Emerging evidence provides support for the oncogenic role of MUC1 in gastrointestinal carcinomas and relates its expression to an invasive phenotype. Similarly, mucinous differentiation of gastrointestinal tumors, in particular increased or de novo expression of MUC2 and/or MUC5AC, is widely believed to imply an adverse clinicopathological feature. Through formation of viscous gels, too, MUC2 and MUC5AC significantly contribute to the biology and pathogenesis of mucin-secreting gastrointestinal tumors. Here, we investigated the mucin-depleting effects of bromelain (BR) and N-acetylcysteine (NAC), in nine different regimens as single or combination therapy, in in vitro (MKN45, KATOIII and LS174T cell lines) and in vivo (female nude mice bearing intraperitoneal MKN45 and LS174T) settings. The inhibitory effects of the treatment on cancer cell growth and proliferation were also evaluated in vivo. Our results suggest that a combination of BR and NAC with dual effects on growth and mucin products of mucin-expressing tumor cells is a promising candidate towards the development of novel approaches to gastrointestinal malignancies with the involvement of mucin pathology. This capability supports the use of this combination formulation in locoregional approaches for reducing the adverse effects of the aberrantly secreted gel-forming mucins, as in pseudomyxoma peritonei and similar pathologies with ectopic production of mucin.

  19. Depletion of mucin in mucin-producing human gastrointestinal carcinoma: Results from in vitro and in vivo studies with bromelain and N-acetylcysteine

    PubMed Central

    Amini, Afshin; Masoumi-Moghaddam, Samar; Ehteda, Anahid; Liauw, Winston; Morris, David L.

    2015-01-01

    Aberrant expression of membrane-associated and secreted mucins, as evident in epithelial tumors, is known to facilitate tumor growth, progression and metastasis, and to provide protection against adverse growth conditions, chemotherapy and immune surveillance. Emerging evidence provides support for the oncogenic role of MUC1 in gastrointestinal carcinomas and relates its expression to an invasive phenotype. Similarly, mucinous differentiation of gastrointestinal tumors, in particular increased or de novo expression of MUC2 and/or MUC5AC, is widely believed to imply an adverse clinicopathological feature. Through formation of viscous gels, too, MUC2 and MUC5AC significantly contribute to the biology and pathogenesis of mucin-secreting gastrointestinal tumors. Here, we investigated the mucin-depleting effects of bromelain (BR) and N-acetylcysteine (NAC), in nine different regimens as single or combination therapy, in in vitro (MKN45, KATOIII and LS174T cell lines) and in vivo (female nude mice bearing intraperitoneal MKN45 and LS174T) settings. The inhibitory effects of the treatment on cancer cell growth and proliferation were also evaluated in vivo. Our results suggest that a combination of BR and NAC with dual effects on growth and mucin products of mucin-expressing tumor cells is a promising candidate towards the development of novel approaches to gastrointestinal malignancies with the involvement of mucin pathology. This capability supports the use of this combination formulation in locoregional approaches for reducing the adverse effects of the aberrantly secreted gel-forming mucins, as in pseudomyxoma peritonei and similar pathologies with ectopic production of mucin. PMID:26436698

  20. Aerosol preparation of intact lipoproteins

    DOEpatents

    Benner, W Henry [Danville, CA; Krauss, Ronald M [Berkeley, CA; Blanche, Patricia J [Berkeley, CA

    2012-01-17

    A medical diagnostic method and instrumentation system for analyzing noncovalently bonded agglomerated biological particles is described. The method and system comprises: a method of preparation for the biological particles; an electrospray generator; an alpha particle radiation source; a differential mobility analyzer; a particle counter; and data acquisition and analysis means. The medical device is useful for the assessment of human diseases, such as cardiac disease risk and hyperlipidemia, by rapid quantitative analysis of lipoprotein fraction densities. Initially, purification procedures are described to reduce an initial blood sample to an analytical input to the instrument. The measured sizes from the analytical sample are correlated with densities, resulting in a spectrum of lipoprotein densities. The lipoprotein density distribution can then be used to characterize cardiac and other lipid-related health risks.

  1. Coliphages and Gastrointestinal Illness in Recreational Waters

    PubMed Central

    Benjamin-Chung, Jade; Arnold, Benjamin F.; Wade, Timothy J.; Schiff, Kenneth; Griffith, John F.; Dufour, Alfred P.; Weisberg, Stephen B.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Coliphages have been proposed as indicators of fecal contamination in recreational waters because they better mimic the persistence of pathogenic viruses in the environment and wastewater treatment than fecal indicator bacteria. We estimated the association between coliphages and gastrointestinal illness and compared it with the association with culturable enterococci. Methods: We pooled data from six prospective cohort studies that enrolled coastal beachgoers in California, Alabama, and Rhode Island. Water samples were collected and gastrointestinal illness within 10 days of the beach visit was recorded. Samples were tested for enterococci and male-specific and somatic coliphages. We estimated cumulative incidence ratios (CIR) for the association between swimming in water with detectable coliphage and gastrointestinal illness when human fecal pollution was likely present, not likely present, and under all conditions combined. The reference group was unexposed swimmers. We defined continuous and threshold-based exposures (coliphage present/absent, enterococci >35 vs. ≤35 CFU/100 ml). Results: Under all conditions combined, there was no association between gastrointestinal illness and swimming in water with detectable coliphage or enterococci. When human fecal pollution was likely present, coliphage and enterococci were associated with increased gastrointestinal illness, and there was an association between male-specific coliphage level and illness that was somewhat stronger than the association between enterococci and illness. There were no substantial differences between male-specific and somatic coliphage. Conclusions: Somatic coliphage and enterococci had similar associations with gastrointestinal illness; there was some evidence that male-specific coliphage had a stronger association with illness than enterococci in marine waters with human fecal contamination. PMID:28489717

  2. Antimicrobial activity of a new intact skin antisepsis formulation.

    PubMed

    Russo, Antonello; Viotti, Pier Luigi; Vitali, Matteo; Clementi, Massimo

    2003-04-01

    Different antiseptic formulations have shown limitations when applied to disinfecting intact skin, notably short-term tolerability and/or efficacy. The purpose of this study was optimizing a new antiseptic formulation specifically targeted at intact skin disinfection and evaluating its in vitro microbicidal activity and in vivo efficacy. The biocidal properties of the antiseptic solution containing 0.5% chloramine-T diluted in 50% isopropyl alcohol (Cloral; Eurospital SpA Trieste, Italy) were measured in vitro versus gram-positive-, gram-negative-, and acid-alcohol-resistant germs and fungi with standard suspension tests in the presence of fetal bovine serum. Virus-inhibiting activity was evaluated in vitro against human cytomegalovirus, herpes simplex virus, poliovirus, hepatitis B virus, and hepatitis C virus. Tests used different methods for the different biologic and in vitro replication capacity of these human viruses. Lastly, Cloral tolerability and skin colonization retardation efficacy after disinfection were studied in vivo. The antiseptic under review showed fast and sustained antimicrobial activity. The efficacy of Cloral against clinically important bacterial and viral pathogens and fungi was highlighted under the experimental conditions described in this article. Finally, microbial regrowth lag and no side effects were documented in vivo after disinfection of 11 volunteers. A stable chloramine-T solution in isopropyl alcohol may be suggested for intact skin antisepsis.

  3. Acute lower gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Jocić, Tatiana; Latinović Bošnjak, Olgica; Hadnađev, Ljiljana; Damjanov, Dragomir; Savić, Željka; Orlić, Tihomir

    2014-01-01

    Acute lower gastrointestinal bleeding accounts for approximately 20% of all acute gastrointestinal hemorrhages, and they are the most common urgent cases in gastroenterology. The aim of this study was to determine the most common etiology, efficacy in diagnostics and therapy, and the outcome in patients with acute lower gastrointestinal bleeding. Data were collected from the medical records of 86 patients who had been hospitalized for acute lower gastrointestinal bleeding in 2009 at the Ward of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Clinical Centre of Vojvodina. The average age of the patients was 70.4 years (ranging from 37 to 88), and the largest number of patients 41/86 (47.7%) were between the ages 71 and 80. Colon diverticulosis was the most common cause of bleeding, and it occurred in 21 patients from the study sample (24.4%), and the other causes were malignant tumors (12/86, i.e. 13.9%), polyps (10/86, i.e. 11.6%), anorectal diseases (7/86, i.e. 8.3%/0) and colitis (8/86, i.e. 9.3%). No diagnostic procedures were performed in 15 patients (17.4%) due to their poor medical condition and comorbidities. The total mortality rate was 6/86 (6.9%), and the largest number of deaths occurred (5/86 i.e. 5.8%) due to a multisystem organ failure and underlying diseases which were not associated with acute lower gastrointestinal bleeding. Uncontrolled bleeding was the cause of death in only 1 patient (1.2%). Acute lower gastrointestinal bleeding is most commonly found in the older population, whose age, comorbidities, and ongoing therapy have impact on bleeding lesions, diagnostic and therapeutic modalities and the outcomes of bleeding. Endoscopic procedures are still the gold standard in diagnostics.

  4. Genetics Home Reference: gastrointestinal stromal tumor

    MedlinePlus

    ... Treatment of Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumours (Review of NICE Technology Appraisal Guidance 196) (National Institute for Health and ... Society: Treating Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor (GIST) Cancer.Net: Gastrointestinal ...

  5. JAPANESE HERBAL MEDICINE IN FUNCTIONAL GASTROINTESTINAL DISORDERS

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Hidekazu; Inadomi, John M.; Hibi, Toshifumi

    2009-01-01

    Background Management of functional gastrointestinal disorders is hindered by both poor efficacy and adverse effects of traditional pharmacological therapy. Herbal medicine may be an attractive alternative based on the perception of its “natural” approach and low risk of side effects; however, the lack of standardization of drug components has limited the ability to perform rigorous clinical studies in Western countries. Japanese herbal medicine (JHM) is a standardized form of herbal medicine with regards to the quality and quantities of ingredients. While extensively studied and widely used in Asia, there is a paucity of data upon which physicians in other parts of the world may draw conclusions regarding the effectiveness of herbal medicine for gastrointestinal disorders. Aim To summarize the most recent developments in JHM for treatment of functional gastrointestinal disorders. Methods Animal and human studies were systematically reviewed to identify published data of JHM used for treatment of gastrointestinal disorders. The herbal components of JHM were examined. Results describing the physiological and clinical effects of JHM were abstracted, with an emphasis on functional gastrointestinal disorders. Results JHM are associated with a variety of beneficial physiological on the gastrointestinal system. Patient-based clinical outcomes are improved in several conditions. Rikkunnshi-to reduces symptoms and reverses physiological abnormalities associated with functional dyspepsia, while Dai-Kenchu-to improves symptoms of post-operative ileus and constipation in children. Conclusions This updated summary of JHM in the field of gastrointestinal disorders illustrates the potential for herbal medication to serve a valuable role in the management of patients with functional disorders. PMID:19563404

  6. Gastrointestinal endoscopy in pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Savas, Nurten

    2014-01-01

    Gastrointestinal endoscopy has a major diagnostic and therapeutic role in most gastrointestinal disorders; however, limited information is available about clinical efficacy and safety in pregnant patients. The major risks of endoscopy during pregnancy include potential harm to the fetus because of hypoxia, premature labor, trauma and teratogenesis. In some cases, endoscopic procedures may be postponed until after delivery. When emergency or urgent indications are present, endoscopic procedures may be considered with some precautions. United States Food and Drug Administration category B drugs may be used in low doses. Endoscopic procedures during pregnancy may include upper gastrointestinal endoscopy, percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy, sigmoidoscopy, colonoscopy, enteroscopy of the small bowel or video capsule endoscopy, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography and endoscopic ultrasonography. All gastrointestinal endoscopic procedures in pregnant patients should be performed in hospitals by expert endoscopists and an obstetrician should be informed about all endoscopic procedures. The endoscopy and flexible sigmoidoscopy may be safe for the fetus and pregnant patient, and may be performed during pregnancy when strong indications are present. Colonoscopy for pregnant patients may be considered for strong indications during the second trimester. Although therapeutic endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography may be considered during pregnancy, this procedure should be performed only for strong indications and attempts should be made to minimize radiation exposure. PMID:25386072

  7. Pediatric functional gastrointestinal disorders

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Functional gastrointestinal disorders continue to be a prevalent set of conditions faced by the healthcare team and have a significant emotional and economic impact. In this review, the authors highlight some of the common functional disorders seen in pediatric patients (functional dyspepsia, irrita...

  8. Apollo gastrointestinal analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nichols, B. L.; Huang, C. T. L.

    1975-01-01

    Fecal bile acid patterns for the Apollo 17 flight were studied to determine the cause of diarrhea on the mission. The fecal sterol analysis gave no indication of an infectious diarrhea, or specific, or nonspecific etiology occurring during the entire flight. It is assumed that the gastrointestinal problems encountered are the consequences of altered physiology, perhaps secondary to physical or emotional stress of flight.

  9. Gastrointestinal Bleeding in Athletes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eichner, Edward R.

    1989-01-01

    Describes the scope and importance of gastrointestinal bleeding in runners and other athletes, discussing causes, sites, and implications of exercise-related bleeding. Practical tips to mitigate the problem, potentially more troublesome in women because of lower iron stores, are presented (e.g., gradual conditioning and avoidance of prerace…

  10. Immunohistochemical characterisation of macrophages in human liver and gastrointestinal tract: expression of CD4, HLA-DR, OKM1, and the mature macrophage marker 25F9 in normal and diseased tissue.

    PubMed

    Hume, D A; Allan, W; Hogan, P G; Doe, W F

    1987-11-01

    This report describes the immunocytochemical characterisation of macrophages in sections of human liver, gastrointestinal tract, and associated lymphoid tissue and the inflammatory lesions of Crohn's disease. 25F9 is an antigen reported to be induced during the maturation of blood monocytes in vitro. The antigen was concentrated in cytoplasmic vesicular structures of isolated gastrointestinal macrophages. Similar labelled cells were observed in the apical regions of lamina propria in both small and large intestine in vivo. Their numbers and size were greatly increased in specimens of colon from patients with melanosis coli. Mucosal inflammatory lesions in specimens from patients with Crohn's disease did not contain 25F9-positive cells. The antigen was absent from giant cells and epithelioid cells in granulomata but was expressed on histiocytes in submucosal microgranulomata. In lymphoid organs, 25F9-positive cells were found in germinal centres, in the dome region of Peyer's patch, and in the medulla, but were largely excluded from T cell areas. In reactive nodes from Crohn's disease patients, the number of labelled cells in germinal centres and T cell areas was greatly increased. 25F9 was absent from the majority of typical liver Kupffer cells, but was expressed on cytoplasmic granules in a minor subpopulation of larger, more rounded cells in the liver. The results suggest that 25F9 is a marker for endocytosis rather than maturation. In parallel sections, resident macrophages of both liver and gastrointestinal tract labelled with Leu 3a/OKT4 (CD4) and with OKIa (HLA-DR antigen) but did not express OKM1 (type III complement receptor). By contrast, OKM1 was present on inflammatory cells, epithelioid cells, and giant cells in mucosal lesions of Crohn's disease.

  11. Gastrointestinal effects of low-digestible carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Grabitske, Hollie A; Slavin, Joanne L

    2009-04-01

    Low-digestible carbohydrates (LDCs) are carbohydrates that are incompletely or not absorbed in the small intestine but are at least partly fermented by bacteria in the large intestine. Fiber, resistant starch, and sugar alcohols are types of LDCs. Given potential health benefits (including a reduced caloric content, reduced or no effect on blood glucose levels, non-cariogenic effect) the prevalence of LDCs in processed foods is increasing. Many of the benefits of LDCs are related to the inability of human digestive enzymes to break down completely the carbohydrates into absorbable saccharides and the subsequent fermentation of unabsorbed carbohydrates in the colon. As a result, LDCs may affect laxation and cause gastrointestinal effects, including abdominal discomfort, flatus, and diarrhea, especially at higher or excessive intakes. Such responses, though transient, affect the perception of the well-being of consumers and their acceptance of food products containing LDCs. Current recommendations for fiber intake do not consider total LDC consumption nor recommend an upper limit for LDC intake based on potential gastrointestinal effects. Therefore, a review of published studies reporting gastrointestinal effects of LDCs was conducted. We included only studies published in refereed journals in English. Additionally, we excluded studies of subjects with incomplete or abnormal functioning gastrointestinal tracts or where antibiotics, stimulant laxatives, or other drugs affecting motility were included. Only in studies with a control period, either placebo treatment or no LDC treatment, were included. Studies must have included an acceptable measure of gastrointestinal effect. Sixty-eight studies and six review articles were evaluated. This review describes definitions, classifications, and mechanisms of LDCs, evaluates published human feeding studies of fifteen LDCs for associations between gastrointestinal effects and levels of LDC intake, and presents recommendations

  12. Dietary fiber and prebiotics and the gastrointestinal microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Holscher, Hannah D.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The gastrointestinal microbiota has an important role in human health, and there is increasing interest in utilizing dietary approaches to modulate the composition and metabolic function of the microbial communities that colonize the gastrointestinal tract to improve health, and prevent or treat disease. One dietary strategy for modulating the microbiota is consumption of dietary fiber and prebiotics that can be metabolized by microbes in the gastrointestinal tract. Human alimentary enzymes are not able to digest most complex carbohydrates and plant polysaccharides. Instead, these polysaccharides are metabolized by microbes which generate short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs), including acetate, propionate, and butyrate. This article reviews the current knowledge of the impact of fiber and prebiotic consumption on the composition and metabolic function of the human gastrointestinal microbiota, including the effects of physiochemical properties of complex carbohydrates, adequate intake and treatment dosages, and the phenotypic responses related to the composition of the human microbiota. PMID:28165863

  13. Global forest loss disproportionately erodes biodiversity in intact landscapes.

    PubMed

    Betts, Matthew G; Wolf, Christopher; Ripple, William J; Phalan, Ben; Millers, Kimberley A; Duarte, Adam; Butchart, Stuart H M; Levi, Taal

    2017-07-27

    Global biodiversity loss is a critical environmental crisis, yet the lack of spatial data on biodiversity threats has hindered conservation strategies. Theory predicts that abrupt biodiversity declines are most likely to occur when habitat availability is reduced to very low levels in the landscape (10-30%). Alternatively, recent evidence indicates that biodiversity is best conserved by minimizing human intrusion into intact and relatively unfragmented landscapes. Here we use recently available forest loss data to test deforestation effects on International Union for Conservation of Nature Red List categories of extinction risk for 19,432 vertebrate species worldwide. As expected, deforestation substantially increased the odds of a species being listed as threatened, undergoing recent upgrading to a higher threat category and exhibiting declining populations. More importantly, we show that these risks were disproportionately high in relatively intact landscapes; even minimal deforestation has had severe consequences for vertebrate biodiversity. We found little support for the alternative hypothesis that forest loss is most detrimental in already fragmented landscapes. Spatial analysis revealed high-risk hot spots in Borneo, the central Amazon and the Congo Basin. In these regions, our model predicts that 121-219 species will become threatened under current rates of forest loss over the next 30 years. Given that only 17.9% of these high-risk areas are formally protected and only 8.9% have strict protection, new large-scale conservation efforts to protect intact forests are necessary to slow deforestation rates and to avert a new wave of global extinctions.

  14. Dog-walking behaviours affect gastrointestinal parasitism in park-attending dogs.

    PubMed

    Smith, Anya F; Semeniuk, Christina A D; Kutz, Susan J; Massolo, Alessandro

    2014-09-04

    In urban parks, dogs, wildlife and humans can be sympatric, introducing the potential for inter- and intra-specific transmission of pathogens among hosts. This study was conducted to determine the prevalence of zoonotic and non-zoonotic gastrointestinal parasites in dogs in Calgary city parks, and assess if dog-walking behaviour, park management, history of veterinary care, and dog demographics were associated with parasitism in dogs From June to September 2010, 645 questionnaires were administered to dog owners in nine city parks to determine behavioural and demographic factors, and corresponding feces from 355 dogs were collected. Dog feces were analyzed for helminth and some protozoan species using a modified sugar flotation technique and microscopic examination, a subsample was analyzed for Giardia spp. and Cryptosporidium spp. using a direct immunofluorescence assay. Descriptive and multivariate statistics were conducted to determine associations among behaviours, demographics, and parasite prevalence and infection intensities Parasite prevalence was 50.2%. Giardia spp. (24.7%), Cryptosporidium spp. (14.7%), and Cystoisospora spp. (16.8%) were the most prevalent parasites. Helminth prevalence was low (4.1%). Presence of Giardia spp. was more likely in intact and young dogs; and infection with any parasite and Giardia spp. intensity were both positively associated with dogs visiting multiple parks coupled with a high frequency of park use and off-leash activity, and with being intact and young. Cryptosporidium spp. intensity was associated with being intact and young, and having visited the veterinarian within the previous year Our results indicate a higher overall prevalence of protozoa in dogs than previously found in Calgary. The zoonotic potential of some parasites found in park-attending dogs may be of interest for public health. These results are relevant for informing park managers, the public health sector, and veterinarians.

  15. Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections of intact skin.

    PubMed

    Agger, W A; Mardan, A

    1995-02-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections of healthy skin are uncommon. We report four cases of P. aeruginosa infections of intact skin. These cases illustrate the clinical spectrum of these cutaneous infections: localized, mild epidermal infections (the green nail syndrome and webbed space infections), moderately serious infections (cutaneous folliculitis and otitis externa), and, in immunocompromised patients, extremely serious infections (malignant otitis externa, perirectal infection, and ecthyma gangrenosum).

  16. HYDROCARBON VAPOR DIFFUSION IN INTACT CORE SLEEVES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The diffusion of 2,2,4-trimethylpentane (TMP) and 2,2,5-trimethylhexane (TMH) vapors put of residually contaminated sandy soil from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) field research site at Traverse City, Michigan, was measured and modeled. The headspace of an intact ...

  17. Childrearing Fathers in Intact Families With Preschoolers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Radin, Norma

    Few empirical studies have specifically examined antecedents and consequences of reversing childrearing roles. A sample of 59 white, intact, middle-class families with a preschool-aged child, 32 with boys and 27 with girls, was studied. Also explored were the father's sex-role orientation and selected paternal behaviors and attitudes. It was found…

  18. Mechanism of autoregulation in the intact kidney.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1963-12-01

    The mechanism of renal autoregulation is unclear. The subject of the present investigation is the mechanism of autoregulation of blood flow in the intact kidney. The left kidney of the anesthetized dog was exposed via a flank approach. Renal venous o...

  19. Small Particles Intact Capture Experiment (SPICE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishioka, Ken-Ji; Carle, G. C.; Bunch, T. E.; Mendez, David J.; Ryder, J. T.

    1994-01-01

    The Small Particles Intact Capture Experiment (SPICE) will develop technologies and engineering techniques necessary to capture nearly intact, uncontaminated cosmic and interplanetary dust particles (IDP's). Successful capture of such particles will benefit the exobiology and planetary science communities by providing particulate samples that may have survived unaltered since the formation of the solar system. Characterization of these particles may contribute fundamental data to our knowledge of how these particles could have formed into our planet Earth and, perhaps, contributed to the beginnings of life. The term 'uncontaminated' means that captured cosmic and IDP particles are free of organic contamination from the capture process and the term 'nearly intact capture' means that their chemical and elemental components are not materially altered during capture. The key to capturing cosmic and IDP particles that are organic-contamination free and nearly intact is the capture medium. Initial screening of capture media included organic foams, multiple thin foil layers, and aerogel (a silica gel); but, with the exception of aerogel, the requirements of no contamination or nearly intact capture were not met. To ensure no contamination of particles in the capture process, high-purity aerogel was chosen. High-purity aerogel results in high clarity (visual clearness), a useful quality in detection and recovery of embedded captured particles from the aerogel. P. Tsou at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) originally described the use of aerogel for this purpose and reported laboratory test results. He has flown aerogel as a 'GAS-can Lid' payload on STS-47 and is evaluating the results. The Timeband Capture Cell Experiment (TICCE), a Eureca 1 experiment, is also flying aerogel and is scheduled for recovery in late April.

  20. Gastrointestinal Complications of Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Camilleri, Michael; Malhi, Harmeet; Acosta, Andres

    2017-01-01

    Obesity usually is associated with morbidity related to diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular diseases. However, there are many gastrointestinal and hepatic diseases for which obesity is the direct cause (eg, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease) or is a significant risk factor, such as reflux esophagitis and gallstones. When obesity is a risk factor, it may interact with other mechanisms and result in earlier presentation or complicated diseases. There are increased odds ratios or relative risks of several gastrointestinal complications of obesity: gastroesophageal reflux disease, erosive esophagitis, Barrett’s esophagus, esophageal adenocarcinoma, erosive gastritis, gastric cancer, diarrhea, colonic diverticular disease, polyps, cancer, liver disease including nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma, gallstones, acute pancreatitis, and pancreatic cancer. Gastroenterologists are uniquely poised to participate in the multidisciplinary management of obesity as physicians caring for people with obesity-related diseases, in addition to their expertise in nutrition and endoscopic interventions. PMID:28192107

  1. Upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Feinman, Marcie; Haut, Elliott R

    2014-02-01

    Upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding remains a commonly encountered diagnosis for acute care surgeons. Initial stabilization and resuscitation of patients is imperative. Stable patients can have initiation of medical therapy and localization of the bleeding, whereas persistently unstable patients require emergent endoscopic or operative intervention. Minimally invasive techniques have surpassed surgery as the treatment of choice for most upper GI bleeding. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Gastrointestinal food allergies.

    PubMed

    Heine, Ralf G

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal food allergies present during early childhood with a diverse range of symptoms. Cow's milk, soy and wheat are the three most common gastrointestinal food allergens. Several clinical syndromes have been described, including food protein-induced enteropathy, proctocolitis and enterocolitis. In contrast with immediate, IgE-mediated food allergies, the onset of gastrointestinal symptoms is delayed for at least 1-2 hours after ingestion in non-IgE-mediated allergic disorders. The pathophysiology of these non-IgE-mediated allergic disorders is poorly understood, and useful in vitro markers are lacking. The results of the skin prick test or measurement of the food-specific serum IgE level is generally negative, although low-positive results may occur. Diagnosis therefore relies on the recognition of a particular clinical phenotype as well as the demonstration of clear clinical improvement after food allergen elimination and the re-emergence of symptoms upon challenge. There is a significant clinical overlap between non-IgE-mediated food allergy and several common paediatric gastroenterological conditions, which may lead to diagnostic confusion. The treatment of gastrointestinal food allergies requires the strict elimination of offending food allergens until tolerance has developed. In breast-fed infants, a maternal elimination diet is often sufficient to control symptoms. In formula-fed infants, treatment usually involves the use an extensively hydrolysed or amino acid-based formula. Apart from the use of hypoallergenic formulae, the solid diets of these children also need to be kept free of specific food allergens, as clinically indicated. The nutritional progress of infants and young children should be carefully monitored, and they should undergo ongoing, regular food protein elimination reassessments by cautious food challenges to monitor for possible tolerance development. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. Gastrointestinal Bleeding in Athletes.

    PubMed

    Eichner, E R

    1989-05-01

    In brief: Gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding is a troubling yet intriguing complication of distance running. This clinical overview traces our evolving understanding of the scope and importance of GI bleeding in runners and other athletes, and discusses the diverse causes, sites, and implications of exercise-related GI bleeding. It concludes with practical tips to prevent or mitigate this problem, including gradual conditioning, avoidance of prerace aspirin intake, and when indicated, therapy with antacids, H2 blockers, or iron.

  4. Silica Aerogel Captures Cosmic Dust Intact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsou, P.

    1994-01-01

    The mesostructure of silica aerogel resembles stings of grapes, ranging in size from 10 to 100 angstrom. This fine mesostructure transmits nearly 90 percent of incident light in the visible, while providing sufficiently gentle dissipation of the kinetric energy of hypervelocity cosmic dust particles to permit their intact capture. We introduced silica aerogel in 1987 as capture medium to take advantage of its low density, fine mesostruicture and most importantly, its transparency, allowing optical location of captured micron sized particles.

  5. In vivo distribution of human milk leucocytes after ingestion by newborn baboons.

    PubMed Central

    Jain, L; Vidyasagar, D; Xanthou, M; Ghai, V; Shimada, S; Blend, M

    1989-01-01

    The in vivo distribution of enterally administered human milk leucocytes labelled with indium hydroxyquinoline (111In) was studied in premature baboons. The animals were killed at 72 hours of age and tissue samples examined for radioactivity. Maximum activity was found in the luminal contents, and activity in the liver and spleen was higher than in bone marrow, the site where free isotope is normally deposited. These findings suggest that some intact milk leucocytes may cross from the gastrointestinal tract into the neonatal circulation. Also the high activity in gastrointestinal tissue that had been washed several times indicates that leucocytes adhere to mucosa or lie intramurally. We speculate that the presence of leucocytes in the gastrointestinal tract 60 hours after a single breast feed can provide an important defence mechanism against infection. PMID:2774634

  6. Autism Spectrum Disorder and intact executive functioning.

    PubMed

    Ferrara, R; Ansermet, F; Massoni, F; Petrone, L; Onofri, E; Ricci, P; Archer, T; Ricci, S

    2016-01-01

    Earliest notions concerning autism (Autism Spectrum Disorders, ASD) describe the disturbance in executive functioning. Despite altered definition, executive functioning, expressed as higher cognitive skills required complex behaviors linked to the prefrontal cortex, are defective in autism. Specific difficulties in children presenting autism or verbal disabilities at executive functioning levels have been identified. Nevertheless, the developmental deficit of executive functioning in autism is highly diversified with huge individual variation and may even be absent. The aim of the present study to examine the current standing of intact executive functioning intact in ASD. Analysis of ASD populations, whether high-functioning, Asperger's or autism Broad Phenotype, studied over a range of executive functions including response inhibition, planning, cognitive flexibility, cognitive inhibition, and alerting networks indicates an absence of damage/impairment compared to the typically-developed normal control subjects. These findings of intact executive functioning in ASD subjects provide a strong foundation on which to construct applications for growth environments and the rehabilitation of autistic subjects.

  7. Evolution of a detailed physiological model to simulate the gastrointestinal transit and absorption process in humans, part II: extension to describe performance of solid dosage forms.

    PubMed

    Thelen, Kirstin; Coboeken, Katrin; Willmann, Stefan; Dressman, Jennifer B; Lippert, Jörg

    2012-03-01

    The physiological absorption model presented in part I of this work is now extended to account for dosage-form-dependent gastrointestinal (GI) transit as well as disintegration and dissolution processes of various immediate-release and modified-release dosage forms. Empirical functions of the Weibull type were fitted to experimental in vitro dissolution profiles of solid dosage forms for eight test compounds (aciclovir, caffeine, cimetidine, diclofenac, furosemide, paracetamol, phenobarbital, and theophylline). The Weibull functions were then implemented into the model to predict mean plasma concentration-time profiles of the various dosage forms. On the basis of these dissolution functions, pharmacokinetics (PK) of six model drugs was predicted well. In the case of diclofenac, deviations between predicted and observed plasma concentrations were attributable to the large variability in gastric emptying time of the enteric-coated tablets. Likewise, oral PK of furosemide was found to be predominantly governed by the gastric emptying patterns. It is concluded that the revised model for GI transit and absorption was successfully integrated with dissolution functions of the Weibull type, enabling prediction of in vivo PK profiles from in vitro dissolution data. It facilitates a comparative analysis of the parameters contributing to oral drug absorption and is thus a powerful tool for formulation design. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Alignment-Independent Comparisons of Human Gastrointestinal Tract Microbial Communities in a Multidimensional 16S rRNA Gene Evolutionary Space▿

    PubMed Central

    Rudi, Knut; Zimonja, Monika; Kvenshagen, Bente; Rugtveit, Jarle; Midtvedt, Tore; Eggesbø, Merete

    2007-01-01

    We present a novel approach for comparing 16S rRNA gene clone libraries that is independent of both DNA sequence alignment and definition of bacterial phylogroups. These steps are the major bottlenecks in current microbial comparative analyses. We used direct comparisons of taxon density distributions in an absolute evolutionary coordinate space. The coordinate space was generated by using alignment-independent bilinear multivariate modeling. Statistical analyses for clone library comparisons were based on multivariate analysis of variance, partial least-squares regression, and permutations. Clone libraries from both adult and infant gastrointestinal tract microbial communities were used as biological models. We reanalyzed a library consisting of 11,831 clones covering complete colons from three healthy adults in addition to a smaller 390-clone library from infant feces. We show that it is possible to extract detailed information about microbial community structures using our alignment-independent method. Our density distribution analysis is also very efficient with respect to computer operation time, meeting the future requirements of large-scale screenings to understand the diversity and dynamics of microbial communities. PMID:17337554

  9. Hereditary Gastrointestinal Cancer Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Lynch, Jane F.; Shaw, Trudy G.

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT The rapid growth of molecular genetics and its attendant germline mutation discoveries has enabled identification of persons who are at an inordinately high cancer risk and, therefore, ideal candidates for prevention. However, one must fully appreciate the extensive genotypic and phenotypic heterogeneity that exists in hereditary cancer. Once the causative germline mutation has been identified in a patient, high-risk members of the family can be similarly tested and identified and provided highly targeted surveillance and management opportunities. DNA testing can change the individual's presumed risk status and affect decision making by patients and their physicians regarding surveillance and management. Our purpose is to describe familial/hereditary cancers of the gastrointestinal tract, including familial Barrett's esophagus, hereditary diffuse gastric cancer, gastrointestinal stromal tumors, familial adenomatous polyposis and desmoid tumors, Lynch syndrome, small bowel cancer, and familial pancreatic cancer. We use our discussion of Lynch syndrome as a model for diagnostic and clinical translation strategies for all hereditary gastrointestinal tract cancers, which clearly can then be extended to cancer of all anatomic sites. Highly pertinent questions from the patient's perspective include the following: What kind of counseling will be provided to a patient with a Lynch syndrome mutation, and should that counseling be mandatory? Does the proband have the responsibility to inform relatives about the familial mutation, even if the relatives do not want to know whether they carry it? Is the patient is responsible for notifying family members that a parent or sibling has Lynch syndrome? Can notification be forced and, if so, under what circumstances? These questions point out the need for criteria regarding which family members to inform and how to inform them. PMID:22368732

  10. Chest pain of gastrointestinal origin.

    PubMed Central

    Berezin, S; Medow, M S; Glassman, M S; Newman, L J

    1988-01-01

    Twenty seven children who had been diagnosed as having idiopathic chest pain were investigated to find out if the pain was of gastrointestinal origin. The symptoms had lasted from two weeks to eight months. In 21 of the 27 children (78%) the chest pain had a gastrointestinal cause: 16 had oesophagitis, four had gastritis, and one had diffuse oesophageal spasm. All patients responded to medical treatment of their gastrointestinal symptoms, resulting in disappearance of the chest pain. PMID:3232993

  11. Gastrointestinal Manifestations of Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis has historically been considered a pulmonary disease, but with the increasing life expectancy of these patients, gastrointestinal manifestations are becoming more important. Furthermore, nutritional status is closely linked to pulmonary function and, thus, overall mortality. This article discusses gastrointestinal manifestations (which involve nutritional, pancreatic, hepatobiliary, and, in particular, gastrointestinal tract issues) of cystic fibrosis as well as management of the disease. In addition, the article discusses studies that have been critical to our understanding of gastrointestinal manifestations of cystic fibrosis. PMID:27330503

  12. Bacterial Composition of the Human Upper Gastrointestinal Tract Microbiome Is Dynamic and Associated with Genomic Instability in a Barrett’s Esophagus Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Gall, Alevtina; Fero, Jutta; McCoy, Connor; Claywell, Brian C.; Sanchez, Carissa A.; Blount, Patricia L.; Li, Xiaohong; Vaughan, Thomas L.; Matsen, Frederick A.; Reid, Brian J.; Salama, Nina R.

    2015-01-01

    Background The incidence of esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) has increased nearly five-fold over the last four decades in the United States. Barrett’s esophagus, the replacement of the normal squamous epithelial lining with a mucus-secreting columnar epithelium, is the only known precursor to EAC. Like other parts of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, the esophagus hosts a variety of bacteria and comparisons among published studies suggest bacterial communities in the stomach and esophagus differ. Chronic infection with Helicobacter pylori in the stomach has been inversely associated with development of EAC, but the mechanisms underlying this association remain unclear. Methodology The bacterial composition in the upper GI tract was characterized in a subset of participants (n=12) of the Seattle Barrett’s Esophagus Research cohort using broad-range 16S PCR and pyrosequencing of biopsy and brush samples collected from squamous esophagus, Barrett’s esophagus, stomach corpus and stomach antrum. Three of the individuals were sampled at two separate time points. Prevalence of H. pylori infection and subsequent development of aneuploidy (n=339) and EAC (n=433) was examined in a larger subset of this cohort. Results/Significance Within individuals, bacterial communities of the stomach and esophagus showed overlapping community membership. Despite closer proximity, the stomach antrum and corpus communities were less similar than the antrum and esophageal samples. Re-sampling of study participants revealed similar upper GI community membership in two of three cases. In this Barrett’s esophagus cohort, Streptococcus and Prevotella species dominate the upper GI and the ratio of these two species is associated with waist-to-hip ratio and hiatal hernia length, two known EAC risk factors in Barrett’s esophagus. H. pylori-positive individuals had a significantly decreased incidence of aneuploidy and a non-significant trend toward lower incidence of EAC. PMID:26076489

  13. Glycemic Responses, Appetite Ratings and Gastrointestinal Hormone Responses of Most Common Breads Consumed in Spain. A Randomized Control Trial in Healthy Humans

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Anton, Carolina; Rico, Maria C.; Sanchez-Rodriguez, Estefania; Ruiz-Lopez, Maria D.; Gil, Angel; Mesa, Maria D.

    2015-01-01

    The present study was carried out to determine the glycemic index (GI), glycemic load (GL), insulinemic index (InI), appetite ratings and postprandial plasma concentrations of gastrointestinal hormones related to the control of food intake after the ingestion of the five most common breads consumed in Spain with different compositions and manufacturing processes. Twenty-two healthy adults participated in a randomized crossover study. The breads tested were Ordinary, Precooked-Frozen, Candeal-flour, Alfacar whites and Wholemeal. All breads portions were calculated to supply 50 g of available carbohydrates. In addition, 50 g of glucose was used as a reference. A linear mixed-effects model was used to compare data calculated for all breads with glucose load. The GI value varied from 61 for the Wholemeal, to Alfacar 68, Ordinary 76, and 78 and 86 for the Precooked-Frozen and Candeal-flour breads, respectively. Wholemeal and Alfacar had lower GI than glucose. All tested breads had a lower GL (ranged 9 to 18) compared with glucose. Wholemeal GL was similar to Alfacar, but lower than the other white breads. InI were significantly lower for all breads (ranged 68 to 73) compared with glucose, and similar among them. The intake of the Wholemeal bread led to a higher release of gastric inhibitory polypeptide compared with the Ordinary and Precooked breads and to a higher release of pancreatic polypeptide compared with the Precooked-Frozen bread. All breads affected appetite ratings similarly. In conclusion, based on GL, the Wholemeal bread would be expected to exert a favorable glycemic response. PMID:26024293

  14. Gastrointestinal medications and breastfeeding.

    PubMed

    Hagemann, T M

    1998-09-01

    Medications used to treat gastrointestinal symptoms are increasingly being used as more have been gained nonprescription status. Most of the gastrointestinal medications, such as laxatives, antacids, and antidiarrheal agents, are used short term. Women who breastfeed should be aware of the risks of taking any medications, whether prescription or nonprescription. There is little information describing transfer into breast milk for many of these products. Cimetidine, atropine, cascara, cisapride, loperamide, magnesium sulfate, and senna are the only products identified by the AAP as compatible with breast feeding. Metoclopramide is listed by the AAP as a drug whose effect on nursing infants is unknown but may be of potential concern, although studies published to date have not reported any adverse effects. The safest laxatives and antidiarrheals are those that are not absorbed and should be considered first-line therapy for conditions of constipation or loose stools. Famotidine and nizatidine are excreted into breast milk to a lesser extent than cimetidine or ranitidine and may be the preferred histamine antagonists. Despite the limited data on the use of cisapride in nursing women, it is considered safe by the AAP and may be preferred over metoclopramide for first-line prescription treatment of heartburn. Although most of these agents appear safe in the nursing infant, caretakers should be aware of the potential adverse reactions that may occur in infants whose mothers require these products.

  15. Gastrointestinal stromal tumors.

    PubMed

    Sekac, J; Labas, P; Skultety, J; Prochotsky, A; Durdik, J; Hrbaty, B

    2008-01-01

    In the last 3 years 9 patients with gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) underwent surgery at our department. All cases were with very atypical process. From these patients 3 interesting cases are described in more details. A 75-years-old woman with gastroscopically verified endoluminal tumour in the proximal third of stomach, 6x7 cm, 76-years-old man with a large endoluminal tumour in D2-D3 part of the duodenum, 4x4 cm, and 62-years-old man with verified extraluminal tumour by CT examination in the middle part of stomach. In all cases, gastrointestinal stromal tumour was histologically confirmed. Work is well photo-documented pre-surgically with endoscopic and CT-findings and during surgery: individual steps during the removal of these tumours. In assessment of the size and number of mitoses, tumours belonged to a group with highly malignant potential. Patients are regularly checked in 3-months intervals and also examination by positron emission tomography was performed--it seems to have the best demonstrability of possible relapse. All three patients live and are subjectively and objectively without significant problems (Tab. 5, Fig. 5, Ref. 7). Full Text (Free, PDF) www.bmj.sk.

  16. Calcium Signaling in Intact Dorsal Root Ganglia

    PubMed Central

    Gemes, Geza; Rigaud, Marcel; Koopmeiners, Andrew S.; Poroli, Mark J.; Zoga, Vasiliki; Hogan, Quinn H.

    2013-01-01

    Background Ca2+ is the dominant second messenger in primary sensory neurons. In addition, disrupted Ca2+ signaling is a prominent feature in pain models involving peripheral nerve injury. Standard cytoplasmic Ca2+ recording techniques use high K+ or field stimulation and dissociated neurons. To compare findings in intact dorsal root ganglia, we used a method of simultaneous electrophysiologic and microfluorimetric recording. Methods Dissociated neurons were loaded by bath-applied Fura-2-AM and subjected to field stimulation. Alternatively, we adapted a technique in which neuronal somata of intact ganglia were loaded with Fura-2 through an intracellular microelectrode that provided simultaneous membrane potential recording during activation by action potentials (APs) conducted from attached dorsal roots. Results Field stimulation at levels necessary to activate neurons generated bath pH changes through electrolysis and failed to predictably drive neurons with AP trains. In the intact ganglion technique, single APs produced measurable Ca2+ transients that were fourfold larger in presumed nociceptive C-type neurons than in nonnociceptive Aβ-type neurons. Unitary Ca2+ transients summated during AP trains, forming transients with amplitudes that were highly dependent on stimulation frequency. Each neuron was tuned to a preferred frequency at which transient amplitude was maximal. Transients predominantly exhibited monoexponential recovery and had sustained plateaus during recovery only with trains of more than 100 APs. Nerve injury decreased Ca2+ transients in C-type neurons, but increased transients in Aβ-type neurons. Conclusions Refined observation of Ca2+ signaling is possible through natural activation by conducted APs in undissociated sensory neurons and reveals features distinct to neuronal types and injury state. PMID:20526180

  17. Quantitative proteomic analysis of intact plastids.

    PubMed

    Shiraya, Takeshi; Kaneko, Kentaro; Mitsui, Toshiaki

    2014-01-01

    Plastids are specialized cell organelles in plant cells that are differentiated into various forms including chloroplasts, chromoplasts, and amyloplasts, and fulfill important functions in maintaining the overall cell metabolism and sensing environmental factors such as sunlight. It is therefore important to grasp the mechanisms of differentiation and functional changes of plastids in order to enhance the understanding of vegetality. In this chapter, details of a method for the extraction of intact plastids that makes analysis possible while maintaining the plastid functions are provided; in addition, a quantitative shotgun method for analyzing the composition and changes in the content of proteins in plastids as a result of environmental impacts is described.

  18. A Comparison of Bacterial Composition in Diabetic Ulcers and Contralateral Intact Skin

    PubMed Central

    Gontcharova, Viktoria; Youn, Eunseog; Sun, Yan; Wolcott, Randall D; Dowd, Scot E

    2010-01-01

    An extensive portion of the healthcare budget is allocated to chronic human infection. Chronic wounds in particular are a major contributor to this financial burden. Little is known about the types of bacteria which may contribute to the chronicity, biofilm and overall bioburden of the wound itself. In this study we compare the bacteriology of wounds and associated intact skin. Wound and paired intact skin swabs (from a contralateral location) were collected. The bacterial diversity was determined using bacterial Tag-encoded FLX amplicon pyrosequencing (bTEFAP). Diversity analysis showed intact skin to be significantly more diverse than wounds on both the species and genus levels (3% and 5% divergence). Furthermore, wounds show heightened levels of anaerobic bacteria, like Peptoniphilus, Finegoldia, and Anaerococcus, and other detrimental genera such as Corynebacterium and Staphylococcus. Although some of these and other bacterial genera were found to be common between intact skin and wounds, notable opportunistic wound pathogens were found at lower levels in intact skin. Principal Component Analysis demonstrated a clear separability of the two groups. The findings of the study not only greatly support the hypothesis of differing bacterial composition of intact skin and wounds, but also contribute additional insight into the ecology of skin and wound microflora. The increased diversity and lowered levels of opportunistic pathogens found in skin make the system highly distinguishable from wounds. PMID:20461221

  19. Gastrointestinal hormones regulating appetite

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhri, Owais; Small, Caroline; Bloom, Steve

    2006-01-01

    The role of gastrointestinal hormones in the regulation of appetite is reviewed. The gastrointestinal tract is the largest endocrine organ in the body. Gut hormones function to optimize the process of digestion and absorption of nutrients by the gut. In this capacity, their local effects on gastrointestinal motility and secretion have been well characterized. By altering the rate at which nutrients are delivered to compartments of the alimentary canal, the control of food intake arguably constitutes another point at which intervention may promote efficient digestion and nutrient uptake. In recent decades, gut hormones have come to occupy a central place in the complex neuroendocrine interactions that underlie the regulation of energy balance. Many gut peptides have been shown to influence energy intake. The most well studied in this regard are cholecystokinin (CCK), pancreatic polypeptide, peptide YY, glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), oxyntomodulin and ghrelin. With the exception of ghrelin, these hormones act to increase satiety and decrease food intake. The mechanisms by which gut hormones modify feeding are the subject of ongoing investigation. Local effects such as the inhibition of gastric emptying might contribute to the decrease in energy intake. Activation of mechanoreceptors as a result of gastric distension may inhibit further food intake via neural reflex arcs. Circulating gut hormones have also been shown to act directly on neurons in hypothalamic and brainstem centres of appetite control. The median eminence and area postrema are characterized by a deficiency of the blood–brain barrier. Some investigators argue that this renders neighbouring structures, such as the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus and the nucleus of the tractus solitarius in the brainstem, susceptible to influence by circulating factors. Extensive reciprocal connections exist between these areas and the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus and other energy-regulating centres of the

  20. 50 CFR 622.381 - Landing fish intact.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Landing fish intact. 622.381 Section 622... Migratory Pelagic Resources (Gulf of Mexico and South Atlantic) § 622.381 Landing fish intact. (a) Cobia... head and fins intact. Such fish may be eviscerated, gilled, and scaled, but must otherwise be...

  1. 50 CFR 622.276 - Landing fish intact.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Landing fish intact. 622.276 Section 622... Wahoo Fishery Off the Atlantic States § 622.276 Landing fish intact. (a) Dolphin and wahoo in or from the Atlantic EEZ must be maintained with head and fins intact. Such fish may be eviscerated, gilled...

  2. 50 CFR 622.381 - Landing fish intact.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Landing fish intact. 622.381 Section 622... Migratory Pelagic Resources (Gulf of Mexico and South Atlantic) § 622.381 Landing fish intact. (a) Cobia... head and fins intact. Such fish may be eviscerated, gilled, and scaled, but must otherwise be...

  3. 50 CFR 622.38 - Landing fish intact.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Landing fish intact. 622.38 Section 622... § 622.38 Landing fish intact. The operator of a vessel that fishes in the EEZ is responsible for ensuring that fish on that vessel in the EEZ are maintained intact and, if taken from the EEZ, are...

  4. 50 CFR 622.276 - Landing fish intact.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Landing fish intact. 622.276 Section 622... Wahoo Fishery Off the Atlantic States § 622.276 Landing fish intact. (a) Dolphin and wahoo in or from the Atlantic EEZ must be maintained with head and fins intact. Such fish may be eviscerated, gilled...

  5. 50 CFR 622.38 - Landing fish intact.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 10 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Landing fish intact. 622.38 Section 622... § 622.38 Landing fish intact. The operator of a vessel that fishes in the EEZ is responsible for ensuring that fish on that vessel in the EEZ are maintained intact and, if taken from the EEZ, are...

  6. Gastrointestinal helminths in raccoons in Texas.

    PubMed

    Kresta, Amy E; Henke, Scott E; Pence, Danny B

    2009-01-01

    Raccoons (n=590) were collected from October 1999 to August 2003 from 35 counties across Texas, and gastrointestinal tracts were examined for helminth parasites. Prevalence was calculated and differences in mean abundance were examined among habitat ecoregions, age classes, and between sexes. Twenty different species of helminths (13 nematodes, two cestodes, two acanthocephalans, and three trematodes) were positively identified in the gastrointestinal tracts of 590 raccoons in Texas. Five of the 20 helminth species collected (Physaloptera rara, Placoconus lotoris, Molineus barbatus, Atriotaenia procyonis, and Macracanthorhynchus ingens) had a prevalence >20%. The total number of individuals of these five species (n=22,777) accounted for over 86% of the total number of individuals of all helminth species (n=26,426) collected. Subsequent analyses were based on these five helminths. Mean abundance differed among habitat ecoregions, age classes, and between sexes for all five parasites evaluated. This study is the most comprehensive statewide survey ever done of gastrointestinal helminths of raccoons across Texas. The five most prevalent helminths identified have all been reported in at least one previous survey, indicating that these parasites are not new to Texas and that raccoons are not naïve to the effects these parasites have on them. It may be helpful to wildlife rehabilitators, trappers, wildlife biologists, and other professionals to be aware of parasite abundance in raccoons from different areas of the state, as frequent human-raccoon interactions occur, and some of these parasites could be harmful to humans and domestic animals.

  7. The gastrointestinal tract and AIDS pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Lackner, Andrew A; Mohan, Mahesh; Veazey, Ronald S

    2009-05-01

    Gastrointestinal disease has been recognized as a major manifestation of human immunodeficiency virus infection since the earliest recognition of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Originally, these disease manifestations were considered to be sequelae of the immune destruction that characterizes AIDS rather than being central to the pathogenesis of AIDS. Over time, it has become clear that the mucosal immune system in general and the intestinal immune system in particular are central to the pathogenesis of AIDS, with most of the critical events (eg, transmission, viral amplification, CD4+ T-cell destruction) occurring in the gastrointestinal tract. Compared with peripheral blood, these tissues are not easily accessible for analysis and have only begun to be examined in detail recently. In addition, although the resulting disease can progress over years, many critical events happen within the first few weeks of infection, when most patients are unaware that they are infected. Moreover, breakdown of the mucosal barrier and resulting microbial translocation are believed to be major drivers of AIDS progression. In this review, we focus on the interaction between primate lentiviruses and the gastrointestinal tract and discuss how this interaction promotes the pathogenesis of AIDS and drives immune dysfunction and progression to AIDS. This article draws extensively on work done in the nonhuman primate model of AIDS to fill gaps in our understanding of AIDS in humans.

  8. Xenopus egg cytoplasm with intact actin.

    PubMed

    Field, Christine M; Nguyen, Phuong A; Ishihara, Keisuke; Groen, Aaron C; Mitchison, Timothy J

    2014-01-01

    We report optimized methods for preparing Xenopus egg extracts without cytochalasin D, that we term "actin-intact egg extract." These are undiluted egg cytoplasm that contains abundant organelles, and glycogen which supplies energy, and represents the least perturbed cell-free cytoplasm preparation we know of. We used this system to probe cell cycle regulation of actin and myosin-II dynamics (Field et al., 2011), and to reconstitute the large, interphase asters that organize early Xenopus embryos (Mitchison et al., 2012; Wühr, Tan, Parker, Detrich, & Mitchison, 2010). Actin-intact Xenopus egg extracts are useful for analysis of actin dynamics, and interaction of actin with other cytoplasmic systems, in a cell-free system that closely mimics egg physiology, and more generally for probing the biochemistry and biophysics of the egg, zygote, and early embryo. Detailed protocols are provided along with assays used to check cell cycle state and tips for handling and storing undiluted egg extracts. © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Gastrointestinal infections in children.

    PubMed

    Mönkemüller, K E; Wilcox, C M

    2001-01-01

    Gastrointestinal infections in children are a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Children living in developing countries are particularly susceptible to infectious diarrhea because of poor standards of hygiene and sanitation. Although the magnitude of diarrheal illnesses in developed countries is less, costly hospital admissions are still frequent. The causal agent of infectious diarrhea is most frequently related to age, geographical location, lifestyle habits, use of antibiotics, associated medical conditions, social circumstances, and degree of immune competence. In this article we present some of the most important articles published in the field during the last year. The role of Helicobacter pylori in the pathogenesis of gastritis and peptic ulcer disease has been shown in adults and children. Information about the natural history of H. pylori, symptomatology, and diagnostic therapeutic approaches for children are being generated constantly; we discuss some of the most relevant information in this review.

  10. Recollections of Parent Characteristics and Attachment Patterns for College Women of Intact vs. Non-Intact Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kilmann, Peter R.; Carranza, Laura V.; Vendemia, Jennifer M. C.

    2006-01-01

    This study contrasted offsprings' attachment patterns and recollections of parent characteristics in two college samples: 147 females from intact biological parents and 157 females of parental divorce. Secure females from intact or non-intact families rated parents positively, while insecure females rated parents as absent, distant, and demanding.…

  11. Oligodeoxynucleotide Probes for Detecting Intact Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosson, Reinhardt A.; Maurina-Brunker, Julie; Langley, Kim; Pynnonen, Christine M.

    2004-01-01

    A rapid, sensitive test using chemiluminescent oligodeoxynucleotide probes has been developed for detecting, identifying, and enumerating intact cells. The test is intended especially for use in detecting and enumerating bacteria and yeasts in potable water. As in related tests that have been developed recently for similar purposes, the oligodeoxynucleotide probes used in this test are typically targeted at either singlecopy deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) genes (such as virulence genes) or the multiple copies (10,000 to 50,000 copies per cell) of 16S ribosomal ribonucleic acids (rRNAs). Some of those tests involve radioisotope or fluorescent labeling of the probes for reporting hybridization of probes to target nucleic acids. Others of those tests involve labeling with enzymes plus the use of chemiluminescent or chromogenic substrates to report hybridization via color or the emission of light, respectively. The present test is of the last-mentioned type. The chemiluminescence in the present test can be detected easily with relatively simple instrumentation. In developing the present test, the hybridization approach was chosen because hybridization techniques are very specific. Hybridization detects stable, inheritable genetic targets within microorganisms. These targets are not dependent on products of gene expression that can vary with growth conditions or physiological states of organisms in test samples. Therefore, unique probes can be designed to detect and identify specific genera or species of bacteria or yeast (in terms of rRNA target sequences) or can be designed to detect and identify virulence genes (genomic target sequences). Because of the inherent specificity of this system, there are few problems of cross-reactivity. Hybridization tests are rapid, but hybridization tests now available commercially lack sensitivity; typically, between 10(exp 6) and 10(exp 7) cells of the target organism are needed to ensure a reliable test. Consequently, the numbers of

  12. The IntAct molecular interaction database in 2012

    PubMed Central

    Kerrien, Samuel; Aranda, Bruno; Breuza, Lionel; Bridge, Alan; Broackes-Carter, Fiona; Chen, Carol; Duesbury, Margaret; Dumousseau, Marine; Feuermann, Marc; Hinz, Ursula; Jandrasits, Christine; Jimenez, Rafael C.; Khadake, Jyoti; Mahadevan, Usha; Masson, Patrick; Pedruzzi, Ivo; Pfeiffenberger, Eric; Porras, Pablo; Raghunath, Arathi; Roechert, Bernd; Orchard, Sandra; Hermjakob, Henning

    2012-01-01

    IntAct is an open-source, open data molecular interaction database populated by data either curated from the literature or from direct data depositions. Two levels of curation are now available within the database, with both IMEx-level annotation and less detailed MIMIx-compatible entries currently supported. As from September 2011, IntAct contains approximately 275 000 curated binary interaction evidences from over 5000 publications. The IntAct website has been improved to enhance the search process and in particular the graphical display of the results. New data download formats are also available, which will facilitate the inclusion of IntAct's data in the Semantic Web. IntAct is an active contributor to the IMEx consortium (http://www.imexconsortium.org). IntAct source code and data are freely available at http://www.ebi.ac.uk/intact. PMID:22121220

  13. Microrobotics for future gastrointestinal endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Menciassi, Arianna; Quirini, Marco; Dario, Paolo

    2007-01-01

    The impulse given by robotic technologies and imaging techniques to the development of a new way to conceive and perform surgery is clearly visible. Nowadays, minimally invasive surgical (MIS) procedures are often performed with the assistance of robots, such as the Da Vinci master-slave system, the AESOP robot with voice control, etc. In addition, mechatronic technologies are becoming the elective technologies for designing advanced hand-held surgical tools. The introduction of robotic technologies in endoscopy has been slower than in MIS, since the development of miniaturized robotic components for entering the small orifices of the human body is difficult. On the other hand, the large contribution that robotic technologies could bring to endoluminal techniques has been evident since the first development of instrumented catheters. In the 1990s, there was an increasing activity in the application of robotic technologies to improve endoscopic procedures in the gastrointestinal tract. The objective of robotic colonoscopy and gastroscopy was to obtain more effective diagnoses in terms of reduced pain for the patients, and to make uniform the diagnostic procedures, which too often depended on the manual abilities of the endoscopist. Currently, the availability of more reliable robotic technologies for miniaturization of size and integration of functions has allowed to conceive and develop robotic pills for the early screening of the digestive tract, with dramatic potential advantages for patients, endoscopists, and healthcare system.

  14. A new infusion pathway intactness monitoring system.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Hidekuni; Yonezawa, Yoshiharu; Maki, Hiromichi; Ninomiya, Ishio; Sata, Koji; Hamada, Shingo; Caldwell, W Morton

    2006-01-01

    A new infusion pathway monitoring system has been developed for hospital and home use. The system consists of linear integrated circuits and a low-power 8-bit single chip microcomputer which constantly monitors the infusion pathway intactness. An AC (alternating current) voltage is induced on the patient's body by electrostatic coupling from the normal 100 volt, 60 Hz AC power line wiring field in the patient's room. The induced AC voltage can be recorded by a main electrode wrapped around the infusion polyvinyl chloride tube. A reference electrode is wrapped on the electrode to monitor the AC voltage around the main electrode. If the injection needle or infusion tube becomes detached, then the system detects changes in the induced AC voltages and alerts the nursing station, via the nurse call system or PHS (personal handy phone system).

  15. Intact figure-ground segmentation in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Herzog, Michael H; Kopmann, Sabine; Brand, Andreas

    2004-11-30

    As revealed by backward masking studies, schizophrenic patients show strong impairments of early visual processing. However, the underlying temporal mechanisms are not yet well understood. To shed light on the exact timing of these deficits, we employed a paradigm in which two masks follow each other. We investigated 16 medicated schizophrenic patients and a matched group of 14 controls with a new backward masking technique, shine-through. In accordance with other masking studies, schizophrenic patients require a dramatically longer processing time to reach a predefined performance level compared with healthy subjects. However, patients are surprisingly sensitive to subtle differences in the timing of the two masks, revealing good temporal resolution. This good temporal resolution indicates intact and fast perceptual grouping and figure-ground segmentation in spite of high susceptibility to masking procedures in schizophrenia.

  16. EXPRESSION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF FULL-LENGTH HUMAN HEME OXYGENASE-1: PRESENCE OF INTACT MEMBRANE-BINDING REGION LEADS TO INCREASED BINDING AFFINITY FOR NADPH-CYTOCHROME P450 REDUCTASE

    PubMed Central

    Huber, Warren J.; Backes, Wayne L.

    2009-01-01

    Heme oxygenase (HO) is the chief regulatory enzyme in the oxidative degradation of heme to biliverdin. In the process of heme degradation, this NADPH and cytochrome P450 reductase (CPR)-dependent oxidation of heme also releases free iron and carbon monoxide. Much of the recent research involving heme oxygenase is done using a 30-kDa soluble form of the enzyme, which lacks the membrane binding region (C-terminal 23 amino acids). The goal of this study was to express and purify a full-length human HO-1 (hHO-1) protein; however, due to the lability of the full-length form, a rapid purification procedure was required. This was accomplished by use of a GST-tagged hHO-1 construct. Although the procedure permitted the generation of a full-length HO-1, this form was contaminated with a 30-kDa degradation product that could not be eliminated. Therefore, we attempted to remove a putative secondary thrombin cleavage site by a conservative mutation of amino acid 254, which replaces lysine with arginine. This mutation allowed the expression and purification of a full length hHO-1 protein. Unlike wild-type HO-1, the K254R mutant could be purified to a single 32-kDa protein capable of degrading heme at the same rate as the wild-type enzyme. The K254R full-length form had a specific activity of ~200–225 nmol bilirubin hr−1nmol−1 HO-1 as compared to ~140–150 nmol bilirubin hr−1nmol−1 for the WT form, which contains the 30-kDa contaminant. This is a 2–3-fold increase from the previously reported soluble 30-kDa HO-1, suggesting that the C-terminal 23 amino acids are essential for maximal catalytic activity. Because the membrane spanning domain is present, the full-length hHO-1 has the potential to incorporate into phospholipid membranes, which can be reconstituted at known concentrations, in combination with other ER-resident enzymes. PMID:17915953

  17. Expression and characterization of full-length human heme oxygenase-1: the presence of intact membrane-binding region leads to increased binding affinity for NADPH cytochrome P450 reductase.

    PubMed

    Huber, Warren J; Backes, Wayne L

    2007-10-30

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is the chief regulatory enzyme in the oxidative degradation of heme to biliverdin. In the process of heme degradation, HO-1 receives the electrons necessary for catalysis from the flavoprotein NADPH cytochrome P450 reductase (CPR), releasing free iron and carbon monoxide. Much of the recent research involving heme oxygenase has been done using a 30 kDa soluble form of the enzyme, which lacks the membrane binding region (C-terminal 23 amino acids). The goal of this study was to express and purify a full-length human HO-1 (hHO-1) protein; however, due to the lability of the full-length form, a rapid purification procedure was required. This was accomplished by use of a glutathione-s-transferase (GST)-tagged hHO-1 construct. Although the procedure permitted the generation of a full-length HO-1, this form was contaminated with a 30 kDa degradation product that could not be eliminated. Therefore, attempts were made to remove a putative secondary thrombin cleavage site by a conservative mutation of amino acid 254, which replaces arginine with lysine. This mutation allowed the expression and purification of a full-length hHO-1 protein. Unlike wild type (WT) HO-1, the R254K mutant could be purified to a single 32 kDa protein capable of degrading heme at the same rate as the WT enzyme. The R254K full-length form had a specific activity of approximately 200-225 nmol of bilirubin h-1 nmol-1 HO-1 as compared to approximately 140-150 nmol of bilirubin h-1 nmol-1 for the WT form, which contains the 30 kDa contaminant. This is a 2-3-fold increase from the previously reported soluble 30 kDa HO-1, suggesting that the C-terminal 23 amino acids are essential for maximal catalytic activity. Because the membrane-spanning domain is present, the full-length hHO-1 has the potential to incorporate into phospholipid membranes, which can be reconstituted at known concentrations, in combination with other endoplasmic reticulum resident enzymes.

  18. [Gastrointestinal stromal tumors: clinical considerations].

    PubMed

    Castronovo, G; Ciulla, A; Tomasello, G; Urso, G; Damiani, S

    2003-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (61ST) are an heterogeneous group of non epithelial tumors of the gastrointestinal tract. They are peculiar to extreme cellular variability and uncertain malignancy. Gist are rare tumors that arise from primitive mesenchymal cells located in all gastrointestinal tract. Till now they are object of discussion about their origin, diagnostic standards, prognostic factors, histopathological classification. They are more frequently in over 40 years old people without difference in two sex, but they can appear in the child too and in the young man suffering from HIV. The authors relate two cases of recent observation, and discuss on the biological behaviour of these rare tumors.

  19. Mast Cells in Gastrointestinal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ramsay, David B.; Stephen, Sindu; Borum, Marie; Voltaggio, Lysandra

    2010-01-01

    The function of mast cells in allergic inflammatory reactions is well documented in the literature. Mast cells also play an important role in the regulation of gastrointestinal visceral sensitivity and vascular permeability. Several studies have noted an increased number of mast cells in the mucosa of patients with gastrointestinal diseases such as irritable bowel syndrome, mastocytic enterocolitis, and systemic mastocytosis. The role of mast cells in the symptomatology of these and other diseases has only recently been fully appreciated and could provide avenues for new therapeutic opportunities. This paper examines studies that have evaluated the role of mast cells in various gastrointestinal diseases. PMID:21301631

  20. TRANSCRIPTION FACTOR ACTIVATION FOLLOWING EXPOSURE OF AN INTACT LUNG PREPARATION TO METALLIC PARTICULATE MATTER

    EPA Science Inventory

    TRANSCRIPTION FACTOR ACTIVATION FOLLOWING EXPOSURE OF AN INTACT LUNG PREPARATION TO METALLIC PARTICULATE MATTER

    James M. Samet1,2, Robert Silbajoris1, Tony Huang1 and Ilona Jaspers3

    1Human Studies Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laborato...

  1. Anti-allergic effects of a nonameric peptide isolated from the intestine gastrointestinal digests of abalone (Haliotis discus hannai) in activated HMC-1 human mast cells.

    PubMed

    Ko, Seok-Chun; Lee, Dae-Sung; Park, Won Sun; Yoo, Jong Su; Yim, Mi-Jin; Qian, Zhong-Ji; Lee, Chang-Min; Oh, Junghwan; Jung, Won-Kyo; Choi, Il-Whan

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine whether the intestine gastrointestinal (GI) digests of abalone [Haliotis discus hannai (H. discus hannai)] modulate inflammatory responses and to elucidate the mechanisms involved. The GI digests of the abalone intestines were fractionated into fractions I (>10 kDa), II (5-10 kDa) and Ⅲ (<5 kDa). Of the abalone intestine GI digests (AIGIDs), fraction Ⅲ inhibited the passive cutaneous anaphylaxis (PCA) reaction in mice. Subsequently, a bioactive peptide [abalone intestine GI digest peptide (AIGIDP)] isolated from fraction Ⅲ was determined to be 1175.2 Da, and the amino acid sequence was found to be PFNQGTFAS. We noted that the purified nonameric peptide (AIGIDP) attenuated the phorbol‑12‑myristate 13-acetate plus calcium ionophore A23187 (PMACI)-induced histamine release and the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-6 in human mast cells (HMC-1 cells). In addition, we also noted that AIGIDP inhibited the PMACI‑induced activation of nuclear factor‑κB (NF-κB) by suppressing IκBα phosphorylation and that it suppressed the production of cytokines by decreasing the phosphorylation of JNK. The findings of our study indicate that AIGIDP exerts a modulatory, anti-allergic effect on mast cell-mediated inflammatory diseases.

  2. High speed, wide velocity dynamic range Doppler optical coherence tomography (Part III): in vivo endoscopic imaging of blood flow in the rat and human gastrointestinal tracts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Victor X. D.; Gordon, Maggie L.; Tang, Shou-Jiang; Marcon, Norman E.; Gardiner, Geoffrey; Qi, Bing; Bisland, Stuart; Seng-Yue, Emily; Lo, Stewart; Pekar, Julius; Wilson, Brian C.; Vitkin, I. Alex

    2003-09-01

    We previously described a fiber based Doppler optical coherence tomography system [1] capable of imaging embryo cardiac blood flow at 4~16 frames per second with wide velocity dynamic range [2]. Coupling this system to a linear scanning fiber optical catheter design that minimizes friction and vibrations, we report here the initial results of in vivo endoscopic Doppler optical coherence tomography (EDOCT) imaging in normal rat and human esophagus. Microvascular flow in blood vessels less than 100 µm diameter was detected using a combination of color-Doppler and velocity variance imaging modes, during clinical endoscopy using a mobile EDOCT system.

  3. Population Studies of Intact Vitamin D Binding Protein by Affinity Capture ESI-TOF-MS

    PubMed Central

    Borges, Chad R.; Jarvis, Jason W.; Oran, Paul E.; Rogers, Stephen P.; Nelson, Randall W.

    2008-01-01

    Blood plasma proteins with molecular weights greater than approximately 30 kDa are refractory to comprehensive, high-throughput qualitative characterization of microheterogeneity across human populations. Analytical techniques for obtaining high mass resolution for targeted, intact protein characterization and, separately, high sample throughput exist, but efficient means of coupling these assay characteristics remain rather limited. This article discusses the impetus for analyzing intact proteins in a targeted manner across populations and describes the methodology required to couple mass spectrometric immunoassay with electrospray ionization mass spectrometry for the purpose of qualitatively characterizing a prototypical large plasma protein, vitamin D binding protein, across populations. PMID:19137103

  4. [Gastrointestinal bleeding in the elderly].

    PubMed

    Glaser, J

    2014-08-01

    Peptic ulcer disease is a common cause of gastrointestinal bleeding, independent of the patient's age. With advancing age, an increase of lower gastrointestinal bleeding (diverticula, angiodysplasia) has been observed. The administration of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and aspirin is an important risk factor for upper and lower gastrointestinal bleeding, thus in patients aged 65 years and more a concomitant therapy with proton pump inhibitors is recommended in order to prevent ulcer bleeding. Even in very old individuals endoscopy should be used for the diagnosis of gastrointestinal bleeding, providing the opportunity for definite endoscopic bleeding therapy. In elderly patients with comorbidities and recurrent bleeding after endoscopic therapy or continuous blood loss, surgery or transarterial embolisation should be considered in good time. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  5. [Prognostic analysis of gastrointestinal stromal tumors complicated with gastrointestinal bleeding].

    PubMed

    Li, R T; Zhang, G J; Fu, W H; Li, W D

    2016-05-23

    To study the relationship between clinicopathological characteristics, prognosis and gastrointestinal bleeding in primary gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST). The clinicopathological and follow-up data of 200 patients with gastrointestinal stromal tumors treated in our hospital from April 2008 to December 2014 were retrospectively reviewed. The correlation of gastrointestinal bleeding with gastrointestinal stromal tumor clinicopathological characteristics and prognosis were analyzed. The 200 GIST patients were divided into two groups according to the bleeding in the digestive tract, including 57 gastrointestinal bleeding patients and 143 non-bleeding patients. The mean tumor diameter was 6.5 cm (range 1.8-22 cm) in the bleeding group and 2.5 cm (range 0.4-18 cm) in the non-bleeding group (P<0.05). Of the 57 bleeding patients, 31 located in the stomach, 25 in the small intestine, and one had colorectal bleeding. Fifty patients had mitotic index (MI) ≤ 5/50 HPF, other 6 patients ranged between 5 and 10/50 HPF and one patient had MI >10/50 HPF. Six GIST patients were complicated with tumor rapture. But in the non-bleeding group, 125 patients had gastric GIST, 8 in the small intestine, one colorectum, and 9 had esophageal or other GIST. 141 patients had MI ≤5/50 HPF, 1 patients ranged between 5 and 10/50 HPF and one patient had MI >10/50 HPF. Only 1 GIST patients was complicated with tumor rapture. The gastrointestinal bleeding was closely associated with tumor size, mitotic index, tumor location, risk classifications, tumor rapture and tumor recurrence (P<0.05 for all). The 3-year and 5-year survival rates of the 200 patients were 96.5% and 86.8%, respectively. 16 patients developed recurrence or metastasis, and 11 died of GIST. The 5-year survival rate of patients with gastrointestinal bleeding was 76.2%, significantly lower than that of patients without gastrointestinal bleeding (91.6%, P<0.05). GIST patients complicated with gastrointestinal bleeding have

  6. Dietary fibers from mushroom Sclerotia: 2. In vitro mineral binding capacity under sequential simulated physiological conditions of the human gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Wong, Ka-Hing; Cheung, Peter C K

    2005-11-30

    The in vitro mineral binding capacity of three novel dietary fibers (DFs) prepared from mushroom sclerotia, namely, Pleurotus tuber-regium, Polyporous rhinocerus, and Wolfiporia cocos, to Ca, Mg, Cu, Fe, and Zn under sequential simulated physiological conditions of the human stomach, small intestine, and colon was investigated and compared. Apart from releasing most of their endogenous Ca (ranged from 96.9 to 97.9% removal) and Mg (ranged from 95.9 to 96.7% removal), simulated physiological conditions of the stomach also attenuated the possible adverse binding effect of the three sclerotial DFs to the exogenous minerals by lowering their cation-exchange capacity (ranged from 20.8 to 32.3%) and removing a substantial amount of their potential mineral chelators including protein (ranged from 16.2 to 37.8%) and phytate (ranged from 58.5 to 64.2%). The in vitro mineral binding capacity of the three sclerotial DF under simulated physiological conditions of small intestine was found to be low, especially for Ca (ranged from 4.79 to 5.91% binding) and Mg (ranged from 3.16 to 4.18% binding), and was highly correlated (r > 0.97) with their residual protein contents. Under simulated physiological conditions of the colon with slightly acidic pH (5.80), only bound Ca was readily released (ranged from 34.2 to 72.3% releasing) from the three sclerotial DFs, and their potential enhancing effect on passive Ca absorption in the human large intestine was also discussed.

  7. The impact of reduced gastric acid secretion on dissolution of salts of weak bases in the fasted upper gastrointestinal lumen: Data in biorelevant media and in human aspirates.

    PubMed

    Litou, Chara; Vertzoni, Maria; Xu, Wei; Kesisoglou, Filippos; Reppas, Christos

    2017-06-01

    To propose media for simulating the intragastric environment under reduced gastric acid secretion in the fasted state at three levels of simulation of the gastric environment and evaluate their usefulness in evaluating the intragastric dissolution of salts of weak bases. To evaluate the importance of bicarbonate buffer in biorelevant in vitro dissolution testing when using Level II biorelevant media simulating the environment in the fasted upper small intestine, regardless of gastric acid secretions. Media for simulating the hypochlorhydric and achlorhydric conditions in stomach were proposed using phosphates, maleates and bicarbonates buffers. The impact of bicarbonates in Level II biorelevant media simulating the environment in upper small intestine was evaluated so that pH and bulk buffer capacity were maintained. Dissolution data were collected using two model compounds, pioglitazone hydrochloride and semifumarate cocrystal of Compound B, and the mini-paddle dissolution apparatus in biorelevant media and in human aspirates. Simulated gastric fluids proposed in this study were in line with pH, buffer capacity, pepsin content, total bile salt/lecithin content and osmolality of the fasted stomach under partial and under complete inhibition of gastric acid secretion. Fluids simulating the conditions under partial inhibition of acid secretion were useful in simulating concentrations of both model compounds in gastric aspirates. Bicarbonates in Level III biorelevant gastric media and in Level II biorelevant media simulating the composition in the upper intestinal lumen did not improve simulation of concentrations in human aspirates. Level III biorelevant media for simulating the intragastric environment under hypochlorhydric conditions were proposed and their usefulness in the evaluation of concentrations of two model salts of weak bases in gastric aspirates was shown. Level II biorelevant media for simulating the environment in upper intestinal lumen led to

  8. Demonstration of pelvic anatomy by modified midline transection that maintains intact internal pelvic organs.

    PubMed

    Steinke, Hanno; Saito, Toshiyuki; Herrmann, Gudrun; Miyaki, Takayoshi; Hammer, Niels; Sandrock, Mara; Itoh, Masahiro; Spanel-Borowski, Katharina

    2010-01-01

    Gross dissection for demonstrating anatomy of the human pelvis has traditionally involved one of two approaches, each with advantages and disadvantages. Classic hemisection in the median plane through the pelvic ring transects the visceral organs but maintains two symmetric pelvic halves. An alternative paramedial transection compromises one side of the bony pelvis but leaves the internal organs intact. The authors propose a modified technique that combines advantages of both classical dissections. This novel approach involves dividing the pubic symphysis and sacrum in the median plane after shifting all internal organs to one side. The hemipelvis without internal organs is immediately available for further dissection of the lower limb. The hemipelvis with intact internal organs is ideal for showing the complex spatial relationships of the pelvic organs and vessels relative to the intact pelvic floor.

  9. Gastrointestinal Physiology and Function.

    PubMed

    Greenwood-Van Meerveld, Beverley; Johnson, Anthony C; Grundy, David

    2017-01-01

    The gastrointestinal (GI) system is responsible for the digestion and absorption of ingested food and liquids. Due to the complexity of the GI tract and the substantial volume of material that could be covered under the scope of GI physiology, this chapter briefly reviews the overall function of the GI tract, and discusses the major factors affecting GI physiology and function, including the intestinal microbiota, chronic stress, inflammation, and aging with a focus on the neural regulation of the GI tract and an emphasis on basic brain-gut interactions that serve to modulate the GI tract. GI diseases refer to diseases of the esophagus, stomach, small intestine, colon, and rectum. The major symptoms of common GI disorders include recurrent abdominal pain and bloating, heartburn, indigestion/dyspepsia, nausea and vomiting, diarrhea, and constipation. GI disorders rank among the most prevalent disorders, with the most common including esophageal and swallowing disorders, gastric and peptic ulcer disease, gastroparesis or delayed gastric emptying, irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Many GI disorders are difficult to diagnose and their symptoms are not effectively managed. Thus, basic research is required to drive the development of novel therapeutics which are urgently needed. One approach is to enhance our understanding of gut physiology and pathophysiology especially as it relates to gut-brain communications since they have clinical relevance to a number of GI complaints and represent a therapeutic target for the treatment of conditions including inflammatory diseases of the GI tract such as IBD and functional gut disorders such as IBS.

  10. Getting to the guts of the matter: the status and potential of 'omics' research of parasitic protists of the human gastrointestinal system.

    PubMed

    Jex, Aaron R; Koehler, Anson V; Ansell, Brendan R; Baker, Louise; Karunajeewa, Harin; Gasser, Robin B

    2013-11-01

    Parasitic protists are a major cause of diarrhoeal illnesses in humans globally. Collectively, enteric pathogens exceed all other forms of infectious disease, in terms of their estimated global prevalence and socioeconomic impact. They have a disproportionately high impact on children in impoverished communities, leading to acute (diarrhoea, vomiting, dehydration and death) and chronic disease (malabsorption, malnutrition, physical and cognitive stunting and predisposition to chronic, non-communicable disease) consequences. However, historically, investment in research and disease control measures has been disproportionately poor, leading to their current classification as neglected pathogens. A sound understanding of their biology is essential in underpinning detection, treatment and control efforts. One major tool in rapidly improving our knowledge of these parasites is the use of biological systems, including 'omic' technologies. In recent years, these tools have shown significant success when applied to enteric protists. This review summarises much of this knowledge and highlights the significant remaining knowledge gaps. A major focus of the present review was to provide a perspective on a way forward to address these gaps using advanced biotechnologies. Copyright © 2013 Australian Society for Parasitology Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Excitons in intact cells of photosynthetic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Freiberg, Arvi; Pajusalu, Mihkel; Rätsep, Margus

    2013-09-26

    Live cells and regular crystals seem fundamentally incompatible. Still, effects characteristic to ideal crystals, such as coherent sharing of excitation, have been recently used in many studies to explain the behavior of several photosynthetic complexes, especially the inner workings of the light-harvesting apparatus of the oldest known photosynthetic organisms, the purple bacteria. To this date, there has been no concrete evidence that the same effects are instrumental in real living cells, leaving a possibility that this is an artifact of unnatural study conditions, not a real effect relevant to the biological operation of bacteria. Hereby, we demonstrate survival of collective coherent excitations (excitons) in intact cells of photosynthetic purple bacteria. This is done by using excitation anisotropy spectroscopy for tracking the temperature-dependent evolution of exciton bands in light-harvesting systems of increasing structural complexity. The temperature was gradually raised from 4.5 K to ambient temperature, and the complexity of the systems ranged from detergent-isolated complexes to complete bacterial cells. The results provide conclusive evidence that excitons are indeed one of the key elements contributing to the energetic and dynamic properties of photosynthetic organisms.

  12. Pathophysiology of preterm labor with intact membranes.

    PubMed

    Talati, Asha N; Hackney, David N; Mesiano, Sam

    2017-11-01

    Preterm labor with intact membranes is a major cause of spontaneous preterm birth (sPTB). To prevent sPTB a clear understanding is needed of the hormonal interactions that initiate labor. The steroid hormone progesterone acting via its nuclear progesterone receptors (PRs) in uterine cells is essential for the establishment and maintenance of pregnancy and disruption of PR signaling (i.e., functional progesterone/PR withdrawal) is key trigger for labor. The process of parturition is also associated with inflammation within the uterine tissues and it is now generally accepted that inflammatory stimuli from multiple extrinsic and intrinsic sources induce labor. Recent studies suggest inflammatory stimuli induce labor by affecting PR transcriptional activity in uterine cells to cause functional progesterone/PR withdrawal. Advances in understanding the functional interaction of inflammatory load on the pregnancy uterus and progesterone/PR signaling is opening novel areas of research and may lead to rational therapeutic strategies to effectively prevent sPTB. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. NASA Hubble Sees Comet ISON Intact

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-10-09

    This image from NASA Hubble Space Telescope of the sunward plunging comet ISON suggests that the comet is intact despite some predictions that the fragile icy nucleus might disintegrate as the sun warms it. In this NASA Hubble Space Telescope image taken on October 9, 2013 the comet's solid nucleus is unresolved because it is so small. If the nucleus broke apart then Hubble would have likely seen evidence for multiple fragments. Moreover, the coma or head surrounding the comet's nucleus is symmetric and smooth. This would probably not be the case if clusters of smaller fragments were flying along. What's more, a polar jet of dust first seen in Hubble images taken in April is no longer visible and may have turned off. This color composite image was assembled using two filters. The comet's coma appears cyan, a greenish-blue color due to gas, while the tail is reddish due to dust streaming off the nucleus. The tail forms as dust particles are pushed away from the nucleus by the pressure of sunlight. The comet was inside Mars' orbit and 177 million miles from Earth when photographed. Comet ISON is predicted to make its closest approach to Earth on 26 December, at a distance of 39.9 million miles. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA18153

  14. Intact implicit learning in autism spectrum conditions.

    PubMed

    Brown, Jamie; Aczel, Balazs; Jiménez, Luis; Kaufman, Scott Barry; Grant, Kate Plaisted

    2010-09-01

    Individuals with autism spectrum condition (ASC) have diagnostic impairments in skills that are associated with an implicit acquisition; however, it is not clear whether ASC individuals show specific implicit learning deficits. We compared ASC and typically developing (TD) individuals matched for IQ on five learning tasks: four implicit learning tasks--contextual cueing, serial reaction time, artificial grammar learning, and probabilistic classification learning tasks--that used procedures expressly designed to minimize the use of explicit strategies, and one comparison explicit learning task, paired associates learning. We found implicit learning to be intact in ASC. Beyond no evidence of differences, there was evidence of statistical equivalence between the groups on all the implicit learning tasks. This was not a consequence of compensation by explicit learning ability or IQ. Furthermore, there was no evidence to relate implicit learning to ASC symptomatology. We conclude that implicit mechanisms are preserved in ASC and propose that it is disruption by other atypical processes that impact negatively on the development of skills associated with an implicit acquisition.

  15. Phase Behavior of an Intact Monoclonal Antibody

    PubMed Central

    Ahamed, Tangir; Esteban, Beatriz N. A.; Ottens, Marcel; van Dedem, Gijs W. K.; van der Wielen, Luuk A. M.; Bisschops, Marc A. T.; Lee, Albert; Pham, Christine; Thömmes, Jörg

    2007-01-01

    Understanding protein phase behavior is important for purification, storage, and stable formulation of protein drugs in the biopharmaceutical industry. Glycoproteins, such as monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) are the most abundant biopharmaceuticals and probably the most difficult to crystallize among water-soluble proteins. This study explores the possibility of correlating osmotic second virial coefficient (B22) with the phase behavior of an intact MAb, which has so far proved impossible to crystallize. The phase diagram of the MAb is presented as a function of the concentration of different classes of precipitants, i.e., NaCl, (NH4)2SO4, and polyethylene glycol. All these precipitants show a similar behavior of decreasing solubility with increasing precipitant concentration. B22 values were also measured as a function of the concentration of the different precipitants by self-interaction chromatography and correlated with the phase diagrams. Correlating phase diagrams with B22 data provides useful information not only for a fundamental understanding of the phase behavior of MAbs, but also for understanding the reason why certain proteins are extremely difficult to crystallize. The scaling of the phase diagram in B22 units also supports the existence of a universal phase diagram of a complex glycoprotein when it is recast in a protein interaction parameter. PMID:17449660

  16. Matrix Effects on the Stability and Antioxidant Activity of Red Cabbage Anthocyanins under Simulated Gastrointestinal Digestion

    PubMed Central

    Podsędek, Anna; Koziołkiewicz, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Red cabbage is, among different vegetables, one of the major sources of anthocyanins. In the present study an in vitro digestion method has been used to assay the influence of the physiological conditions in the stomach and small intestine, as well as faecal microflora on anthocyanins stability in red cabbage and anthocyanin-rich extract. The recovery of anthocyanins during in vitro gastrointestinal digestion was strongly influenced by food matrix. The results showed that other constituents present in cabbage enhanced the stability of anthocyanins during the digestion. The amount of anthocyanins (HPLC method) and antioxidant capacity (ABTS and FRAP assays) strongly decreased after pancreatic-bile digestion in both matrices but total phenolics content (Folin-Ciocalteu assay) in these digestions was higher than in initial samples. Incubation with human faecal microflora caused further decline in anthocyanins content. The results obtained suggest that intact anthocyanins in gastric and products of their decomposition in small and large intestine may be mainly responsible for the antioxidant activity and other physiological effects after consumption of red cabbage. PMID:24575407

  17. Positive Youth Development, Life Satisfaction, and Problem Behaviors of Adolescents in Intact and Non-Intact Families in Hong Kong

    PubMed Central

    Shek, Daniel T. L.; Leung, Hildie

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated whether Chinese adolescents living in intact and non-intact families differed in their positive development, life satisfaction, and risk behavior. A total of 3,328 Secondary 1 students responded to measures of positive youth development (such as resilience and psychosocial competencies), life satisfaction, and risk behavior (substance abuse, delinquency, Internet addiction, consumption of pornographic materials, self-harm, and behavioral intention to engage in problem behavior). Findings revealed that adolescents growing up in intact families reported higher levels of positive developmental outcomes and life satisfaction as compared with adolescents from non-intact families. Adolescents in non-intact families also reported higher levels of risk behaviors than those growing up in intact families. PMID:24400264

  18. Positive youth development, life satisfaction, and problem behaviors of adolescents in intact and non-intact families in Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Shek, Daniel T L; Leung, Hildie

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated whether Chinese adolescents living in intact and non-intact families differed in their positive development, life satisfaction, and risk behavior. A total of 3,328 Secondary 1 students responded to measures of positive youth development (such as resilience and psychosocial competencies), life satisfaction, and risk behavior (substance abuse, delinquency, Internet addiction, consumption of pornographic materials, self-harm, and behavioral intention to engage in problem behavior). Findings revealed that adolescents growing up in intact families reported higher levels of positive developmental outcomes and life satisfaction as compared with adolescents from non-intact families. Adolescents in non-intact families also reported higher levels of risk behaviors than those growing up in intact families.

  19. Gastrointestinal Emergency Room Admissions and Florida Red Tide Blooms.

    PubMed

    Kirkpatrick, Barbara; Bean, Judy A; Fleming, Lora E; Kirkpatrick, Gary; Grief, Lynne; Nierenberg, Kate; Reich, Andrew; Watkins, Sharon; Naar, Jerome

    2010-01-01

    Human exposure to brevetoxins during Florida red tide blooms formed by Karenia brevis has been documented to cause acute gastrointestinal, neurologic, and respiratory health effects.. Traditionally, the routes of brevetoxin exposure have been through the consumption of contaminated bivalve shellfish and the inhalation of contaminated aerosols. However, recent studies using more sensitive methods have demonstrated the presence of brevetoxins in many components of the aquatic food web which may indicate potential alternative routes for human exposure.This study examined whether the presence of a Florida red tide bloom affected the rates of admission for a gastrointestinal diagnosis to a hospital emergency room in Sarasota, FL. The rates of gastrointestinal diagnoses admissions were compared for a 3-month time period in 2001 when Florida red tide bloom was present onshore to the same 3-month period in 2002 when no Florida red tide bloom occurred. A significant 40% increase in the total number of gastrointestinal emergency room admissions for the Florida red tide bloom period was found compared to the non red tide period.These results suggest that the healthcare community may experience a significant and unrecognized impact from patients needing emergency medical care for gastrointestinal illnesses during Florida red tide blooms. Thus, additional studies characterizing the potential sources of exposure to the toxins, as well as the dose/effect relationship of brevetoxin exposure, should be undertaken.

  20. Gastrointestinal Emergency Room Admissions and Florida Red Tide Blooms

    PubMed Central

    Kirkpatrick, Barbara; Bean, Judy A; Fleming, Lora E; Kirkpatrick, Gary; Grief, Lynne; Nierenberg, Kate; Reich, Andrew; Watkins, Sharon; Naar, Jerome

    2009-01-01

    Human exposure to brevetoxins during Florida red tide blooms formed by Karenia brevis has been documented to cause acute gastrointestinal, neurologic, and respiratory health effects.. Traditionally, the routes of brevetoxin exposure have been through the consumption of contaminated bivalve shellfish and the inhalation of contaminated aerosols. However, recent studies using more sensitive methods have demonstrated the presence of brevetoxins in many components of the aquatic food web which may indicate potential alternative routes for human exposure. This study examined whether the presence of a Florida red tide bloom affected the rates of admission for a gastrointestinal diagnosis to a hospital emergency room in Sarasota, FL. The rates of gastrointestinal diagnoses admissions were compared for a 3-month time period in 2001 when Florida red tide bloom was present onshore to the same 3-month period in 2002 when no Florida red tide bloom occurred. A significant 40% increase in the total number of gastrointestinal emergency room admissions for the Florida red tide bloom period was found compared to the non red tide period. These results suggest that the healthcare community may experience a significant and unrecognized impact from patients needing emergency medical care for gastrointestinal illnesses during Florida red tide blooms. Thus, additional studies characterizing the potential sources of exposure to the toxins, as well as the dose/effect relationship of brevetoxin exposure, should be undertaken. PMID:20161425

  1. Primary Gastrointestinal Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yinting; Chen, Yanzhu; Chen, Shaojie; Wu, Lili; Xu, Lishu; Lian, Guoda; Yang, Kege; Li, Yaqing; Zeng, Linjuan; Huang, Kaihong

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Primary gastrointestinal lymphoma (PGIL) is a rare malignant tumor without standard diagnosis and treatment methods. This study is aimed to systematically analyze its clinical characteristics and draw out an appropriate flow chart of diagnosis and treatment process for PGIL in China. This study retrospectively analyzed the clinicopathological characteristics, diagnostic approaches, prognostic factors, and therapeutic modalities in 415 cases of PGIL in Chinese province of Guangdong. A systematic review was conducted in 118 studies containing 5075 patients to further identify clinical manifestations and mortalities of therapeutic modalities. The most common clinical presentations were abdominal pain and bloody stools. Endoscopic biopsy was an important diagnostic means, and usually more than once to make a definite diagnosis. Retrospective multicenter clinical study showed that younger onset age (<60 years), female, one region involved, one lesion, early stage, International Prognostic Index (IPI ≤1), normal lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), normal albumin, and nonemergency operation were significant prognostic factors for B-cell lymphoma; non-B symptom, tumor restricted to gastric or ileocecal region, one lesion, performance status (PS ≤1), normal LDH, and nonsurgery alone were significant prognostic factors for T-cell lymphoma. Site of origin and IPI were independent prognostic factors for B-cell lymphoma; PS was the independent prognostic factor for T-cell lymphoma. And T-cell lymphoma had worse overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) than B-cell lymphoma. Among different therapeutic modalities, chemotherapy alone or combined with surgery showed better OS and PFS than surgery alone for diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) of stage I/II E and T-cell lymphoma. For DLBCL of stage III E/IV and mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma, OS and PFS did not differ among different therapeutic groups. In meta-analysis, surgery plus chemotherapy

  2. Screening for Human Immunodeficiency Virus, Hepatitis B Virus, Hepatitis C Virus, and Treponema pallidum by Blood Testing Using a Bio-Flash Technology-Based Algorithm before Gastrointestinal Endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Zhen, Chen; QuiuLi, Zhang; YuanQi, An; Casado, Verónica Vocero; Fan, Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Currently, conventional enzyme immunoassays which use manual gold immunoassays and colloidal tests (GICTs) are used as screening tools to detect Treponema pallidum (syphilis), hepatitis B virus (HBV), hepatitis C virus (HCV), human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), and HIV-2 in patients undergoing surgery. The present observational, cross-sectional study compared the sensitivity, specificity, and work flow characteristics of the conventional algorithm with manual GICTs with those of a newly proposed algorithm that uses the automated Bio-Flash technology as a screening tool in patients undergoing gastrointestinal (GI) endoscopy. A total of 956 patients were examined for the presence of serological markers of infection with HIV-1/2, HCV, HBV, and T. pallidum. The proposed algorithm with the Bio-Flash technology was superior for the detection of all markers (100.0% sensitivity and specificity for detection of anti-HIV and anti-HCV antibodies, HBV surface antigen [HBsAg], and T. pallidum) compared with the conventional algorithm based on the manual method (80.0% sensitivity and 98.6% specificity for the detection of anti-HIV, 75.0% sensitivity for the detection of anti-HCV, 94.7% sensitivity for the detection of HBsAg, and 100% specificity for the detection of anti-HCV and HBsAg) in these patients. The automated Bio-Flash technology-based screening algorithm also reduced the operation time by 85.0% (205 min) per day, saving up to 24 h/week. In conclusion, the use of the newly proposed screening algorithm based on the automated Bio-Flash technology can provide an advantage over the use of conventional algorithms based on manual methods for screening for HIV, HBV, HCV, and syphilis before GI endoscopy. PMID:27707942

  3. Screening for Human Immunodeficiency Virus, Hepatitis B Virus, Hepatitis C Virus, and Treponema pallidum by Blood Testing Using a Bio-Flash Technology-Based Algorithm before Gastrointestinal Endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Jun, Zhou; Zhen, Chen; QuiuLi, Zhang; YuanQi, An; Casado, Verónica Vocero; Fan, Yuan

    2016-12-01

    Currently, conventional enzyme immunoassays which use manual gold immunoassays and colloidal tests (GICTs) are used as screening tools to detect Treponema pallidum (syphilis), hepatitis B virus (HBV), hepatitis C virus (HCV), human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), and HIV-2 in patients undergoing surgery. The present observational, cross-sectional study compared the sensitivity, specificity, and work flow characteristics of the conventional algorithm with manual GICTs with those of a newly proposed algorithm that uses the automated Bio-Flash technology as a screening tool in patients undergoing gastrointestinal (GI) endoscopy. A total of 956 patients were examined for the presence of serological markers of infection with HIV-1/2, HCV, HBV, and T. pallidum The proposed algorithm with the Bio-Flash technology was superior for the detection of all markers (100.0% sensitivity and specificity for detection of anti-HIV and anti-HCV antibodies, HBV surface antigen [HBsAg], and T. pallidum) compared with the conventional algorithm based on the manual method (80.0% sensitivity and 98.6% specificity for the detection of anti-HIV, 75.0% sensitivity for the detection of anti-HCV, 94.7% sensitivity for the detection of HBsAg, and 100% specificity for the detection of anti-HCV and HBsAg) in these patients. The automated Bio-Flash technology-based screening algorithm also reduced the operation time by 85.0% (205 min) per day, saving up to 24 h/week. In conclusion, the use of the newly proposed screening algorithm based on the automated Bio-Flash technology can provide an advantage over the use of conventional algorithms based on manual methods for screening for HIV, HBV, HCV, and syphilis before GI endoscopy. Copyright © 2016 Jun et al.

  4. Gastrointestinal metastasis to the breast.

    PubMed

    Madan, Atul K; Ternovits, Craig; Huber, Samantha A; Pei, Leo A; Jaffe, Bernard M

    2002-11-01

    Although primary breast cancer is common, metastatic disease to the breast, especially primary gastrointestinal cancer, is rare. Routine pathologic examination may be helpful in determining the true diagnosis, but can be misleading. To determine whether a signet ring carcinoma was a primary malignancy of the gastrointestinal tract metastatic to the breast or vice versa, histochemical analysis was performed for Her-2/NEU, gross cystic disease fluid protein-15, estrogen receptor, progesterone, carcinoembryonic antigen, cytokeratin 7, and cytokeratin 20. Positive staining for carcinoembryonic antigen and cytokeratin 20 (and negative staining for the breast cancer antigens), and the clinical criteria favors the diagnosis of gastrointestinal carcinoma metastatic to the mammary gland. Because the prognosis of therapy for metastatic cancer to the breast differs from that of primary breast cancer, it is imperative that the correct diagnosis be established. Immunohistochemistry for carcinoembryonic antigen and cytokeratin 20 are particularly useful. Metastatic gastrointestinal carcinoma to the breast is a rare lesion but needs to be at least included in the differential diagnosis of breast masses, especially in patients with a history of gastrointestinal cancer.

  5. 76 FR 59404 - Gastrointestinal Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-26

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2011-N-0002] Gastrointestinal Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. This notice announces a forthcoming meeting of a public advisory committee of the Food and Drug...

  6. 77 FR 50701 - Gastrointestinal Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-22

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2012-N-0001] Gastrointestinal Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. This notice announces a forthcoming meeting of a public advisory committee of the Food and Drug...

  7. 76 FR 32220 - Gastrointestinal Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-03

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2011-N-0002] Gastrointestinal Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. This notice announces a forthcoming meeting of a public advisory committee of the Food and Drug...

  8. 77 FR 37414 - Gastrointestinal Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-21

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2012-N-0001] Gastrointestinal Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. This notice announces a forthcoming meeting of a public advisory committee of the Food and Drug...

  9. 77 FR 17078 - Gastrointestinal Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-23

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2012-N-0001] Gastrointestinal Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. This notice announces a forthcoming meeting of a public advisory committee of the Food and Drug...

  10. 77 FR 7587 - Gastrointestinal Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-13

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2012-N-0001] Gastrointestinal Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. This notice announces a forthcoming meeting of a public advisory committee of the Food and Drug...

  11. 75 FR 59732 - Gastrointestinal Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-28

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2010-N-0001] Gastrointestinal Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. This notice announces a forthcoming meeting of a public advisory committee of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The meeting...

  12. 50 CFR 622.10 - Landing fish intact--general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Landing fish intact--general. 622.10... ATLANTIC General Provisions § 622.10 Landing fish intact—-general. This section contains requirements for landing fish intact that are broadly applicable to finfish in the Gulf EEZ and Caribbean EEZ, as specified...

  13. 50 CFR 622.186 - Landing fish intact.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Landing fish intact. 622.186 Section 622...-Grouper Fishery of the South Atlantic Region § 622.186 Landing fish intact. (a) South Atlantic snapper... specified in paragraph (b) of this section. Such fish may be eviscerated, gilled, and scaled, but must...

  14. 50 CFR 622.186 - Landing fish intact.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Landing fish intact. 622.186 Section 622...-Grouper Fishery of the South Atlantic Region § 622.186 Landing fish intact. (a) South Atlantic snapper... specified in paragraph (b) of this section. Such fish may be eviscerated, gilled, and scaled, but must...

  15. 50 CFR 622.10 - Landing fish intact--general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Landing fish intact--general. 622.10... ATLANTIC General Provisions § 622.10 Landing fish intact—-general. This section contains requirements for landing fish intact that are broadly applicable to finfish in the Gulf EEZ and Caribbean EEZ, as specified...

  16. 46 CFR 28.570 - Intact righting energy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Intact righting energy. 28.570 Section 28.570 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY UNINSPECTED VESSELS REQUIREMENTS FOR COMMERCIAL FISHING INDUSTRY VESSELS Stability § 28.570 Intact righting energy. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (c) of this...

  17. 46 CFR 28.570 - Intact righting energy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Intact righting energy. 28.570 Section 28.570 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY UNINSPECTED VESSELS REQUIREMENTS FOR COMMERCIAL FISHING INDUSTRY VESSELS Stability § 28.570 Intact righting energy. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (c) of this...

  18. 46 CFR 28.570 - Intact righting energy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Intact righting energy. 28.570 Section 28.570 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY UNINSPECTED VESSELS REQUIREMENTS FOR COMMERCIAL FISHING INDUSTRY VESSELS Stability § 28.570 Intact righting energy. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (c) of this...

  19. 46 CFR 28.570 - Intact righting energy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Intact righting energy. 28.570 Section 28.570 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY UNINSPECTED VESSELS REQUIREMENTS FOR COMMERCIAL FISHING INDUSTRY VESSELS Stability § 28.570 Intact righting energy. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (c) of this...

  20. 46 CFR 28.570 - Intact righting energy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Intact righting energy. 28.570 Section 28.570 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY UNINSPECTED VESSELS REQUIREMENTS FOR COMMERCIAL FISHING INDUSTRY VESSELS Stability § 28.570 Intact righting energy. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (c) of this...

  1. 50 CFR 622.38 - Landing fish intact.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Landing fish intact. 622.38 Section 622.38... Landing fish intact. The operator of a vessel that fishes in the EEZ is responsible for ensuring that fish... specified in paragraphs (c) and (d) of this section. Such fish may be eviscerated, gilled, and scaled, but...

  2. Comparison of allergenicity and immunogenicity of an intact allergen vaccine and commercially available allergoid products for birch pollen immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Lund, L; Henmar, H; Würtzen, P A; Lund, G; Hjortskov, N; Larsen, J N

    2007-04-01

    Specific immunotherapy with intact allergen vaccine is a well-documented treatment for allergic diseases. Different vaccine formulations are currently commercially available, the active ingredient either being intact allergens or chemically modified allergoids. The rationale behind allergoids is to decrease allergenicity while maintaining immunogenicity. However, data from the German health authorities based on reporting of adverse events over a 10-year period did not indicate increased safety of allergoids over intact allergens. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of chemical modification on allergenicity and immunogenicity comparing four commercial allergoid products for birch pollen immunotherapy with an intact allergen vaccine. Solid-phase IgE inhibition and histamine release assays were selected as model systems for allergenicity, and a combination of human T cell proliferation and IgG titres following mouse immunizations were used to address the immunogenicity of the intact allergen vaccine and the four allergoids. In all assays, the products were normalized with respect to the manufacturer's recommended maintenance dose. IgE inhibition experiments showed a change in epitope composition comparing intact allergen vaccine with allergoid. One allergoid product induced enhanced histamine release compared to the intact allergens, while the other three allergoids showed reduced release. Standard T cell stimulation assays using lines from allergic patients showed a reduced response for all allergoids compared with the intact allergen vaccine regardless of the cell type used for antigen presentation. All allergoids showed reduced capacity to induce allergen-specific IgG responses in mice. While some allergoids were associated with reduced allergenicity, a clear reduction in immunogenicity was observed for all allergoid products compared with the intact allergen vaccine, and the commercial allergoids tested therefore do not fulfil the allergoid

  3. Hemostatic powder spray: a new method for managing gastrointestinal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Papafragkakis, Haris; Ofori, Emmanuel; Ona, Mel A.; Krishnaiah, Mahesh; Duddempudi, Sushil; Anand, Sury

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal bleeding is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the United States. The management of gastrointestinal bleeding is often challenging, depending on its location and severity. To date, widely accepted hemostatic treatment options include injection of epinephrine and tissue adhesives such as cyanoacrylate, ablative therapy with contact modalities such as thermal coagulation with heater probe and bipolar hemostatic forceps, noncontact modalities such as photodynamic therapy and argon plasma coagulation, and mechanical hemostasis with band ligation, endoscopic hemoclips, and over-the-scope clips. These approaches, albeit effective in achieving hemostasis, are associated with a 5–10% rebleeding risk. New simple, effective, universal, and safe methods are needed to address some of the challenges posed by the current endoscopic hemostatic techniques. The use of a novel hemostatic powder spray appears to be effective and safe in controlling upper and lower gastrointestinal bleeding. Although initial reports of hemostatic powder spray as an innovative approach to manage gastrointestinal bleeding are promising, further studies are needed to support and confirm its efficacy and safety. The aim of this study was to evaluate the technical feasibility, clinical efficacy, and safety of hemostatic powder spray (Hemospray, Cook Medical, Winston-Salem, North Carolina, USA) as a new method for managing gastrointestinal bleeding. In this review article, we performed an extensive literature search summarizing case reports and case series of Hemospray for the management of gastrointestinal bleeding. Indications, features, technique, deployment, success rate, complications, and limitations are discussed. The combined technical and clinical success rate of Hemospray was 88.5% (207/234) among the human subjects and 81.8% (9/11) among the porcine models studied. Rebleeding occurred within 72 hours post-treatment in 38 patients (38/234; 16.2%) and in three porcine

  4. Hemostatic powder spray: a new method for managing gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Changela, Kinesh; Papafragkakis, Haris; Ofori, Emmanuel; Ona, Mel A; Krishnaiah, Mahesh; Duddempudi, Sushil; Anand, Sury

    2015-05-01

    Gastrointestinal bleeding is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the United States. The management of gastrointestinal bleeding is often challenging, depending on its location and severity. To date, widely accepted hemostatic treatment options include injection of epinephrine and tissue adhesives such as cyanoacrylate, ablative therapy with contact modalities such as thermal coagulation with heater probe and bipolar hemostatic forceps, noncontact modalities such as photodynamic therapy and argon plasma coagulation, and mechanical hemostasis with band ligation, endoscopic hemoclips, and over-the-scope clips. These approaches, albeit effective in achieving hemostasis, are associated with a 5-10% rebleeding risk. New simple, effective, universal, and safe methods are needed to address some of the challenges posed by the current endoscopic hemostatic techniques. The use of a novel hemostatic powder spray appears to be effective and safe in controlling upper and lower gastrointestinal bleeding. Although initial reports of hemostatic powder spray as an innovative approach to manage gastrointestinal bleeding are promising, further studies are needed to support and confirm its efficacy and safety. The aim of this study was to evaluate the technical feasibility, clinical efficacy, and safety of hemostatic powder spray (Hemospray, Cook Medical, Winston-Salem, North Carolina, USA) as a new method for managing gastrointestinal bleeding. In this review article, we performed an extensive literature search summarizing case reports and case series of Hemospray for the management of gastrointestinal bleeding. Indications, features, technique, deployment, success rate, complications, and limitations are discussed. The combined technical and clinical success rate of Hemospray was 88.5% (207/234) among the human subjects and 81.8% (9/11) among the porcine models studied. Rebleeding occurred within 72 hours post-treatment in 38 patients (38/234; 16.2%) and in three porcine

  5. [Obscure gastrointestinal bleeding due to gastrointestinal stromal tumors].

    PubMed

    Romero-Espinosa, Larry; Souza-Gallardo, Luis Manuel; Martínez-Ordaz, José Luis; Romero-Hernández, Teodoro; de la Fuente-Lira, Mauricio; Arellano-Sotelo, Jorge

    The gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GIST) are the most common soft tissue sarcomas of the digestive tract. They are usually found in the stomach (60-70%) and small intestine (25-30%) and, less commonly, in the oesophagus, mesentery, colon, or rectum. The symptoms present at diagnosis are, gastrointestinal bleeding, abdominal pain, abdominal mass, or intestinal obstruction. The type of symptomatology will depend on the location and size of the tumour. The definitive diagnosis is histopathological, with 95% of the tumours being positive for CD117. This is an observational and descriptive study of 5cases of small intestinal GIST that presented with gastrointestinal bleeding as the main symptom. The period from the initial symptom to the diagnosis varied from 1 to 84 months. The endoscopy was inconclusive in all of the patients, and the diagnosis was made using computed tomography and angiography. Treatment included resection in all patients. The histopathological results are also described. GIST can have multiple clinical pictures and unusual symptoms, such as obscure gastrointestinal bleeding. The use of computed tomography and angiography has shown to be an important tool in the diagnosis with patients with small intestine GISTs. Copyright © 2016. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A.

  6. [Characterization, influence and manipulation of the gastrointestinal microbiota in health and disease].

    PubMed

    García-Mazcorro, José F; Garza-González, Elvira; Marroquín-Cardona, Alicia G; Tamayo, José L

    2015-01-01

    The gastrointestinal tract harbors trillions of microorganisms that are indispensable for health. The gastrointestinal microbiota can be studied using culture and molecular methods. The applications of massive sequencing are constantly increasing, due to their high yield, increasingly accessible costs, and the availability of free software for data analysis. The present article provides a detailed review of a large number of studies on the gastrointestinal microbiota and its influence on human health; particular emphasis is placed on the evidence suggesting a relationship between the gastrointestinal microbial ecosystem and diverse physiological and immune/inflammatory processes. Discussion of the articles analyzed combines a medical approach and current concepts of microbial molecular ecology. The present revision aims to be useful to those interested in the gastrointestinal microbiota and its possible alteration to maintain, re-establish and enhance health in the human host. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y AEEH y AEG. All rights reserved.

  7. Entrapment by magnetic microcapsules of the protein pyrolysates IQ, PhIP and Glu-P-1, and alteration of IQ metabolite exposure within the rat gastrointestinal tract by risk-modulating components of the human diet.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, I; Ohgaki, H; Ellul, A; Turesky, R J

    1992-12-01

    The entrapment of heterocyclic aromatic amine gastrointestinal (GI) carcinogens (HAAs), by retrievable semipermeable magnetic polyethylenimine (PEI) microcapsules was investigated in vitro and in vivo as an approach for human biomonitoring. Previous studies showed that PEI microcapsules successfully entrapped benzo[a]pyrene (B[]P) and its metabolites in the GI tract of rodents. In this study, we have shown that 14C-labelled 2-amino-3-methylimidazo[4,5f]quinoline (IQ), 2-amino-1-methylphenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP) and 2-amino-6-methyldipyrido[1,2-a:3'2'-d]imidazole (Glu-P-1) are adsorbed to PEI microcapsules in vitro and can be desorbed by treatment with ammoniac methanol. Binding of HAAs to PEI microcapsules containing copper phthalocyanine (TCPTS), a moiety which reversibly binds chemicals with aromatic planar structures, was 2- to 4-fold higher than with unmodified PEI microcapsules. PEI microcapsules also acted as a nucleophile and trapped the proximate carcinogenic metabolite of IQ, 2-hydroxy-amino-3-methyl-imidazo[4,5f]quinoline (N-hydroxy-IQ). The entrapment of 14C-labelled IQ and PhIP by microcapsules was investigated in vivo in male F344 rats fed a conventional chow diet or a human diet with varying amounts of fat and beef intake typically consumed in the UK. Animals were adapted to human diets which were either high (H) or low (L) in fat (F), beef protein (B) and dietary fibre non-starch polysaccharide (NSP). Microcapsule entrapment of IQ and metabolites was 0.5-2.0% of the dose and 4-fold higher in rats consuming a HF/HB/LNSP than those consuming a LF/LB/HNSP diet, these being respectively putatative high- and low-risk-associated diets. In the HF/HB/LNSP diet group, a higher amount of IQ metabolites were detected in the microcapsules; a lower proportion of covalently bound metabolites could be removed by acid hydrolysis. Urinary excretion was 2-fold greater and analysis of the urinary metabolites showed there to be lower sulfotransferase activity

  8. Animal models of gastrointestinal and liver diseases. Animal models of cystic fibrosis: gastrointestinal, pancreatic, and hepatobiliary disease and pathophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Olivier, Alicia K.; Gibson-Corley, Katherine N.

    2015-01-01

    Multiple organ systems, including the gastrointestinal tract, pancreas, and hepatobiliary systems, are affected by cystic fibrosis (CF). Many of these changes begin early in life and are difficult to study in young CF patients. Recent development of novel CF animal models has expanded opportunities in the field to better understand CF pathogenesis and evaluate traditional and innovative therapeutics. In this review, we discuss manifestations of CF disease in gastrointestinal, pancreatic, and hepatobiliary systems of humans and animal models. We also compare the similarities and limitations of animal models and discuss future directions for modeling CF. PMID:25591863

  9. Recent advancements in nanoparticle based drug delivery for gastrointestinal disorders.

    PubMed

    Mittal, Rahul; Patel, Amit P; Jhaveri, Vasanti M; Kay, Sae-In S; Debs, Luca H; Parrish, James M; Pan, Debbie R; Nguyen, Desiree; Mittal, Jeenu; Jayant, Rahul Dev

    2018-03-01

    The emergent field of nanoparticles has presented a wealth of opportunities for improving the treatment of human diseases. Recent advances have allowed for promising developments in drug delivery, diagnostics, and therapeutics. Modified delivery systems allow improved drug delivery over traditional pH, microbe, or receptor dependent models, while antibody association allows for more advanced imaging modalities. Nanoparticles have potential clinical application in the field of gastroenterology as they offer several advantages compared to the conventional treatment systems including target drug delivery, enhanced treatment efficacy, and reduced side effects. Areas covered: The aim of this review article is to summarize the recent advancements in developing nanoparticle technologies to treat gastrointestinal diseases. We have covered the application of nanoparticles in various gastrointestinal disorders including inflammatory bowel disease and colorectal cancer. We also have discussed how the gut microbiota affects the nanoparticle based drug delivery in the gastrointestinal tract. Expert opinion: Nanoparticles based drug delivery offers a great platform for targeted drug delivery for gastrointestinal disorders. However, it is influenced by the presence of microbiota, drug interaction with nanoparticles, and cytotoxicity of nanoparticles. With the advancements in nanoparticle technology, it may be possible to overcome these barriers leading to efficient drug delivery for gastrointestinal disorders based on nanoparticle platform.

  10. Non-specific gastrointestinal features: Could it be Fabry disease?

    PubMed

    Hilz, Max J; Arbustini, Eloisa; Dagna, Lorenzo; Gasbarrini, Antonio; Goizet, Cyril; Lacombe, Didier; Liguori, Rocco; Manna, Raffaele; Politei, Juan; Spada, Marco; Burlina, Alessandro

    2018-05-01

    Non-specific gastrointestinal symptoms, including pain, diarrhoea, nausea, and vomiting, can be the first symptoms of Fabry disease. They may suggest more common disorders, e.g. irritable bowel syndrome or inflammatory bowel disease. The confounding clinical presentation and rarity of Fabry disease often cause long diagnostic delays and multiple misdiagnoses. Therefore, specialists involved in the clinical evaluation of non-specific upper and lower gastrointestinal symptoms should recognize Fabry disease as a possible cause of the symptoms, and should consider Fabry disease as a possible differential diagnosis. When symptoms or family history suggest Fabry disease, in men, low alpha-galactosidase A enzyme levels, and in women, specific Fabry mutations confirm the diagnosis. In addition to symptomatic treatments, disease-specific enzyme replacement therapy with recombinant human alpha-galactosidase A enzyme or chaperone therapy (migalastat) in patients with amenable mutations can improve the disease, including gastrointestinal symptoms, and should be initiated as early as possible after Fabry disease has been confirmed; starting enzyme replacement therapy at as young an age as possible after diagnosis improves long-term clinical outcomes. Improved diagnostic tools, such as a modified gastrointestinal symptom rating scale, may facilitate diagnosing Fabry disease in patients with gastrointestinal symptoms of unknown cause and thus assure timely initiation of disease-specific treatment. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  11. Connexin 26 facilitates gastrointestinal bacterial infection in vitro.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Charlotte; Kelsell, David P; Marchès, Olivier

    2013-01-01

    Escherichia coli, including enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC), represents the most common cause of diarrhoea worldwide and is therefore a serious public health burden. Treatment for gastrointestinal pathogens is hindered by the emergence of multiple antibiotic resistance, leading to the requirement for the development of new therapies. A variety of mechanisms act in combination to mediate gastrointestinal-bacterial-associated diarrhoea development. For example, EPEC infection of enterocytes induces attaching and effacing lesion formation and the disruption of tight junctions. An alternative enteric pathogen, Shigella flexneri, manipulates the expression of Connexin 26 (Cx26), a gap junction protein. S. flexneri can open Cx26 hemichannels allowing the release of ATP, whereas HeLa cells expressing mutant gap-junction-associated Cx26 are less susceptible to cellular invasion by S. flexneri than cells expressing wild-type (WT) Cx26. We have investigated further the link between Cx26 expression and gastrointestinal infection by using EPEC and S. flexneri as in vitro models of infection. In this study, a significant reduction in EPEC adherence was observed in cells expressing mutant Cx26 compared with WT Cx26. Furthermore, a significant reduction in both cellular invasion by S. flexneri and adherence by EPEC was demonstrated in human intestinal cell lines following treatment with Cx26 short interfering RNA. These in vitro results suggest that the loss of functional Cx26 expression provides improved protection against gastrointestinal bacterial pathogens. Thus, Cx26 represents a potential therapeutic target for gastrointestinal bacterial infection.

  12. Protein-Linked Glycan Degradation in Infants Fed Human Milk

    PubMed Central

    Dallas, David C.; Sela, David; Underwood, Mark A.; German, J. Bruce; Lebrilla, Carlito

    2014-01-01

    Many human milk proteins are glycosylated. Glycosylation is important in protecting bioactive proteins and peptide fragments from digestion. Protein-linked glycans have a variety of functions; however, there is a paucity of information on protein-linked glycan degradation in either the infant or the adult digestive system. Human digestive enzymes can break down dietary disaccharides and starches, but most of the digestive enzymes required for complex protein-linked glycan degradation are absent from both human digestive secretions and the external brush border membrane of the intestinal lining. Indeed, complex carbohydrates remain intact throughout their transit through the stomach and small intestine, and are undegraded by in vitro incubation with either adult pancreatic secretions or intact intestinal brush border membranes. Human gastrointestinal bacteria, however, produce a wide variety of glycosidases with regio- and anomeric specificities matching those of protein-linked glycan structures. These bacteria degrade a wide array of complex carbohydrates including various protein-linked glycans. That bacteria possess glycan degradation capabilities, whereas the human digestive system, perse, does not, suggests that most dietary protein-linked glycan breakdown will be of bacterial origin. In addition to providing a food source for specific bacteria in the colon, protein-linked glycans from human milk may act as decoys for pathogenic bacteria to prevent invasion and infection of the host. The composition of the intestinal microbiome may be particularly important in the most vulnerable humans-the elderly, the immunocompromised, and infants (particularly premature infants). PMID:24533224

  13. Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumors—Health Professional Version

    Cancer.gov

    Gastrointestinal carcinoid tumors are rare, slow-growing tumors that originate in the neuroendocrine cells in the GI tract. Find evidence-based information on gastrointestinal carcinoid tumors treatment and research.

  14. Gastrointestinal Complications (PDQ®)—Patient Version

    Cancer.gov

    Gastrointestinal complications (e.g., constipation, fecal impaction, bowel obstruction, diarrhea) can result from cancer or its treatment. Learn more about these and other gastrointestinal complications and ways to manage them in this expert-reviewed summary.

  15. Measurement of the Mechanical Properties of Intact Collagen Fibrils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mercedes, H.; Heim, A.; Matthews, W. G.; Koob, T.

    2006-03-01

    Motivated by the genetic disorder Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS), in which proper collagen synthesis is interrupted, we are investigating the structural and mechanical properties of collagen fibrils. The fibrous glycoprotein collagen is the most abundant protein found in the human body and plays a key role in the extracellular matrix of the connective tissue, the properties of which are altered in EDS. We have selected as our model system the collagen fibrils of the sea cucumber dermis, a naturally mutable tissue. This system allows us to work with native fibrils which have their proteoglycan complement intact, something that is not possible with reconstituted mammalian collagen fibrils. Using atomic force microscopy, we measure, as a function of the concentration of divalent cations, the fibril diameter, its response to force loading, and the changes in its rigidity. Through these experiments, we will shed light on the mechanisms which control the properties of the sea cucumber dermis and hope to help explain the altered connective tissue extracellular matrix properties associated with EDS.

  16. Reflectance Spectra Comparison of Orbital Debris, Intact Spacecraft, and Intact Rocket Bodies in the GEO Regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albercromby, Kira J.; Abell, Paul; Barker, Ed

    2009-03-01

    A key objective of NASA's Orbital Debris program office at Johnson Space Center (JSC) is to characterize the debris environment by way of assessing the physical properties (type, mass, density, and size) of objects in orbit. Knowledge of the geosynchronous orbit (GEO) debris environment in particular can be used to determine the hazard probability at specific GEO altitudes and aid predictions of the future environment. To calculate an optical size from an intensity measurement of an object in the GEO regime, a 0.175 albedo is assumed currently. However, identification of specific material type or types could improve albedo accuracy and yield a more accurate size estimate for the debris piece. Using spectroscopy, it is possible to determine the surface materials of space objects. The study described herein used the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF) to record spectral data in the ~ 0.65 to 2.5 micron regime on eight catalogued space objects. For comparison, all of the objects observed were in GEO or near-GEO. The eight objects consisted of two intact spacecraft, three rocket bodies, and three catalogued debris pieces. Two of the debris pieces stemmed from Titan 3C transtage breakup and the third is from COSMOS 2054. The reflectance spectra of the Titan 3C pieces share similar slopes (increasing with wavelength) and lack any strong absorption features. The COSMOS debris spectrum has a slight slope and has no absorption features. In contrast, the intact spacecraft show classic absorption features due to solar cells with a strong band gap feature near 1 micron. The two spacecraft were spin-stabilized objects and therefore have solar panels surrounding the outer surface. Two of the three rocket bodies are inertial upper stage (IUS) rocket bodies and have similar looking spectra. The slopes flatten out near 1.5 microns with absorption features in the near-infrared that are similar to that of white paint. The third rocket body has a similar flattening of slope but

  17. Reflectance Spectra Comparison of Orbital Debris, Intact Spacecraft, and Intact Rocket Bodies in the GEO Regime

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barker, Ed; Abercromby, Kira J.; Abell, Paul

    2009-01-01

    A key objective of NASA s Orbital Debris program office at Johnson Space Center (JSC) is to characterize the debris environment by way of assessing the physical properties (type, mass, density, and size) of objects in orbit. Knowledge of the geosynchronous orbit (GEO) debris environment in particular can be used to determine the hazard probability at specific GEO altitudes and aid predictions of the future environment. To calculate an optical size from an intensity measurement of an object in the GEO regime, a 0.175 albedo is assumed currently. However, identification of specific material type or types could improve albedo accuracy and yield a more accurate size estimate for the debris piece. Using spectroscopy, it is possible to determine the surface materials of space objects. The study described herein used the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF) to record spectral data in the 0.6 to 2.5 micron regime on eight catalogued space objects. For comparison, all of the objects observed were in GEO or near-GEO. The eight objects consisted of two intact spacecraft, three rocket bodies, and three catalogued debris pieces. Two of the debris pieces stemmed from Titan 3C transtage breakup and the third is from COSMOS 2054. The reflectance spectra of the Titan 3C pieces share similar slopes (increasing with wavelength) and lack any strong absorption features. The COSMOS debris spectra is flat and has no absorption features. In contrast, the intact spacecraft show classic absorption features due to solar panels with a strong band gap feature near 1 micron. The two spacecraft are spin-stabilized objects and therefore have solar panels surrounding the outer surface. Two of the three rocket bodies are inertial upper stage (IUS) rocket bodies and have similar looking spectra. The slopes flatten out near 1.5 microns with absorption features in the near-infrared that are similar to that of white paint. The third rocket body has a similar flattening of slope but with fewer

  18. Effect of exercise and exogenous glucocorticoid on serum level of intact parathyroid hormone.

    PubMed

    Tsai, K S; Lin, J C; Chen, C K; Cheng, W C; Yang, C H

    1997-11-01

    Most previous studies suggest that physical exercise, or physiological response to exercise such as cortisol and adrenaline secretion regulate parathyroid hormone (PTH) secretion in humans. To investigate the effects and possible interaction of exercise and excessive glucocorticoid on PTH secretion, we examined the serum of levels of intact-PTH, cortisol, adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH), calcium, magnesium and phosphorus before and during one-hour of bicycle-ergometric exercise at 60% of maximal oxygen uptake. These exercise tests were performed on eight Chinese male volunteers aged between 20 and 25 years, once with and once without pretreatment with 0.5 mg of dexamethasone taken orally 9.5 hours in advance. The results showed that dexamethasone pretreatment significantly lowered basal levels of cortisol and ACTH, but intact PTH did not change. After 60 minutes of bicycling, intact PTH level increases by 50% of baseline both with and without dexamethasone pretreatment. Serum levels of calcium, corrected for changes in serum albumin concentration, phosphorus and magnesium also increased in both cases. This study demonstrated an increase of intact-PTH with exercise which was not associated with hypocalcemia or hypomagnesemia, and was not altered in the presence of mild exogenous glucocorticoid excess and suppressed endogenous cortisol secretion.

  19. Spectrophotometric Evaluation of the Pulpal Peroxide Levels in Intact and Restored Teeth - An Invitro Study.

    PubMed

    Patri, Gaurav; Acharya, Gourismita; Agrawal, Pratik; Panda, Vijeta

    2016-08-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (30%) is a commonly used "in office" bleaching agent. Deleterious effects of hydrogen peroxide on the pulp have been observed. The present study was conducted with the aim to evaluate the penetration of 30% hydrogen peroxide into the pulp chamber through intact teeth and through the surface of teeth, restored with either hybrid composite or Resin Modified Glass Ionomer Cement (RMGIC). Sixty extracted human maxillary central incisors were selected and divided into six groups. Two groups were restored with hybrid composite resin and two with RMGIC, while two groups were left intact. The teeth with acetate buffer solution in their pulp cavity were then immersed in either 30% hydrogen peroxide or distilled water depending upon the group, for 60 minutes at 37°C. Then horseradish peroxidase and leucocrystal violet were added to the acetate buffer solution present in the pulp chamber after it was transferred to a test tube and the optical density of the resultant blue solution obtained was measured spectrophotometrically. The data obtained were analyzed using one way ANOVA and Student's t-test. The data obtained established that hydrogen peroxide penetrated into the pulp from the bleaching agent used. Hydrogen peroxide (30%) showed the highest pulpal peroxide level in teeth restored with RMGIC followed by teeth restored with hybrid composite resin and the least amount of penetration was observed in intact teeth. The amount of peroxide penetration into the tooth is more through restored tooth than intact tooth and is also dependant on the type of restorative materials used.

  20. Nuclear Scintigraphy in Practice: Gastrointestinal Motility.

    PubMed

    Solnes, Lilja B; Sheikhbahaei, Sara; Ziessman, Harvey A

    2018-05-29

    The purpose of this article is to describe the clinical utility of state-of-theart gastrointestinal transit scintigraphy, including the standardized esophageal transit, solid and liquid gastric emptying, small-bowel transit, colon transit, and whole-gut transit scintigraphy, with an emphasis on procedure performance. Radionuclide gastrointestinal motility studies are noninvasive, quantitative, and physiologic diagnostic tools for evaluating patients with gastrointestinal complaints.

  1. Virtual reality simulators for gastrointestinal endoscopy training

    PubMed Central

    Triantafyllou, Konstantinos; Lazaridis, Lazaros Dimitrios; Dimitriadis, George D

    2014-01-01

    The use of simulators as educational tools for medical procedures is spreading rapidly and many efforts have been made for their implementation in gastrointestinal endoscopy training. Endoscopy simulation training has been suggested for ascertaining patient safety while positively influencing the trainees’ learning curve. Virtual simulators are the most promising tool among all available types of simulators. These integrated modalities offer a human-like endoscopy experience by combining virtual images of the gastrointestinal tract and haptic realism with using a customized endoscope. From their first steps in the 1980s until today, research involving virtual endoscopic simulators can be divided in two categories: investigation of the impact of virtual simulator training in acquiring endoscopy skills and measuring competence. Emphasis should also be given to the financial impact of their implementation in endoscopy, including the cost of these state-of-the-art simulators and the potential economic benefits from their usage. Advances in technology will contribute to the upgrade of existing models and the development of new ones; while further research should be carried out to discover new fields of application. PMID:24527175

  2. Nutritional Aspects of Gastrointestinal Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Kaushik; Kavalukas, Sandra L.; Barbul, Adrian

    2016-01-01

    Significance: Although the wound healing cascade is similar in many tissues, in the gastrointestinal tract mucosal healing is critical for processes such as inflammatory bowel disease and ulcers and healing of the mucosa, submucosa, and serosal layers is needed for surgical anastomoses and for enterocutaneous fistula. Failure of wound healing can result in complications including infection, prolonged hospitalization, critical illness, organ failure, readmission, new or worsening enterocutaneous fistula, and even death. Recent Advances: Recent advances are relevant for the role of specific micronutrients, such as vitamin D, trace elements, and the interplay between molecules with pro- and antioxidant properties. Our understanding of the role of other small molecules, genes, proteins, and macronutrients is also rapidly changing. Recent work has elucidated relationships between oxidative stress, nutritional supplementation, and glucose metabolism. Thresholds have also been established to define adequate preoperative nutritional status. Critical Issues: Further work is needed to establish standards and definitions for measuring the extent of wound healing, particularly for inflammatory bowel disease and ulcers. In addition, a mounting body of evidence has determined the need for adequate preoperative nutritional supplementation for elective surgical procedures. Future Directions: A large portion of current work is restricted to model systems in rodents. Therefore, additional clinical and translational research is needed in this area to promote gastrointestinal wound healing in humans, particularly those suffering from critical illness, patients with enterocutaneous fistula, inflammatory bowel disease, and ulcers, and those undergoing surgical procedures. PMID:27867755

  3. Vesta is not an intact protoplanet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Consolmagno, G.; Turrini, D.; Golabek, G.; Svetsov, V.; Sirono, S.; Tsiganis, K.

    2014-07-01

    The Dawn mission was designed to explore ''remnant intact protoplanets from the earliest epoch of solar system formation'' [1]. However, models of Vesta composed of an iron core, olivine mantle, and HED crust in chondritic proportions cannot match the joint constraints from Dawn [1] of Vesta's density, core size, and the extremely limited presence of exposed olivine on its surface. Vesta has a mean density of 3456 kg/m3 and its surface composition is well matched by howardites. The Dawn gravity data suggest a nickel-iron core of radius 110 km and density 7500--7800 kg/m3. The Rheasilvia impact basin, formed within a pre-existing large basin, Veneneia, should have excavated material from a depth of 50 km to 80 km or more below Vesta's surface [2]. If the howardite crust were thinner than 50--80 km, a significant amount of olivine-rich material, derived from depth, would have been exposed within this basin; models suggest that olivine would also be distributed both on Vesta's surface and in space as meteorite-source Vestoids. Such olivine is rare on Vesta, among the Vestoids, or in our meteorite collection. Vesta's density is similar to an L chondrite, but the Na and K abundances in Vesta are strongly depleted compared to chondrites and the average metal content of an L chondrite, 8.4% by mass, would give a core radius less than 90 km. A 110 km radius metallic core, via the Dawn data, represents 15% of Vesta's mass. The Mg/Al ratio in cosmic abundances is about 10:1, but roughly 1:1 within the eucrites; thus if Vesta started with cosmic abundances, the eucrites can only represent 10% of the parent body total mass. Likewise the 10 x chondritic rare earth trace elements (REE) abundance seen in most eucrites demands that, regardless of formation mechanism, these basalts were crystallized from a melt representing 10% of the mass of the source region [3]. Thus the howardite crust of a chondritic HED parent body, mixing all the available eucritic and diogenitic material

  4. 10. VIEW SHOWING FRAGMENTED AND INTACT ORIGINAL SIDEWALK ALONG SOUTH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. VIEW SHOWING FRAGMENTED AND INTACT ORIGINAL SIDEWALK ALONG SOUTH SIDE OF SHERMAN CANAL, BETWEEN DELL AVENUE VEHICULAR BRIDGE AND GRAND CANAL COURT PEDESTRIAN BRIDGE, LOOKING EAST - Venice Canals, Community of Venice, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  5. Proof of Concept: Design and Initial Evaluation of a Device to Measure Gastrointestinal Transit Time.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Robert H; Savir-Baruch, Bital; Halama, James R; Venu, Mukund; Gabriel, Medhat S; Bova, Davide

    2017-09-01

    Chronic constipation and gastrointestinal motility disorders constitute a large part of a gastroenterology practice and have a significant impact on a patient's quality of life and lifestyle. In most cases, medications are prescribed to alleviate symptoms without there being an objective measurement of response. Commonly used investigations of gastrointestinal transit times are currently limited to radiopaque markers or electronic capsules. Repeated use of these techniques is limited because of the radiation exposure and the significant cost of the devices. We present the proof of concept for a new device to measure gastrointestinal transit time using commonly available and inexpensive materials with only a small amount of radiotracer. Methods: We assembled gelatin capsules containing a 67 Ga-citrate-radiolabeled grain of rice embedded in paraffin for use as a point-source transit device. It was tested for stability in vitro and subsequently was given orally to 4 healthy volunteers and 10 patients with constipation or diarrhea. Imaging was performed at regular intervals until the device was excreted. Results: The device remained intact and visible as a point source in all subjects until excretion. When used along with a diary of bowel movement times and dates, the device could determine the total transit time. The device could be visualized either alone or in combination with a barium small-bowel follow-through study or a gastric emptying study. Conclusion: The use of a point-source transit device for the determination of gastrointestinal transit time is a feasible alternative to other methods. The device is inexpensive and easy to assemble, requires only a small amount of radiotracer, and remains inert throughout the gastrointestinal tract, allowing for accurate determination of gastrointestinal transit time. Further investigation of the device is required to establish optimum imaging parameters and reference values. Measurements of gastrointestinal transit time

  6. Gastrointestinal Endogenous Proteins as a Source of Bioactive Peptides - An In Silico Study

    PubMed Central

    Dave, Lakshmi A.; Montoya, Carlos A.; Rutherfurd, Shane M.; Moughan, Paul J.

    2014-01-01

    Dietary proteins are known to contain bioactive peptides that are released during digestion. Endogenous proteins secreted into the gastrointestinal tract represent a quantitatively greater supply of protein to the gut lumen than those of dietary origin. Many of these endogenous proteins are digested in the gastrointestinal tract but the possibility that these are also a source of bioactive peptides has not been considered. An in silico prediction method was used to test if bioactive peptides could be derived from the gastrointestinal digestion of gut endogenous proteins. Twenty six gut endogenous proteins and seven dietary proteins were evaluated. The peptides present after gastric and intestinal digestion were predicted based on the amino acid sequence of the proteins and the known specificities of the major gastrointestinal proteases. The predicted resultant peptides possessing amino acid sequences identical to those of known bioactive peptides were identified. After gastrointestinal digestion (based on the in silico simulation), the total number of bioactive peptides predicted to be released ranged from 1 (gliadin) to 55 (myosin) for the selected dietary proteins and from 1 (secretin) to 39 (mucin-5AC) for the selected gut endogenous proteins. Within the intact proteins and after simulated gastrointestinal digestion, angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE)-inhibitory peptide sequences were the most frequently observed in both the dietary and endogenous proteins. Among the dietary proteins, after in silico simulated gastrointestinal digestion, myosin was found to have the highest number of ACE-inhibitory peptide sequences (49 peptides), while for the gut endogenous proteins, mucin-5AC had the greatest number of ACE-inhibitory peptide sequences (38 peptides). Gut endogenous proteins may be an important source of bioactive peptides in the gut particularly since gut endogenous proteins represent a quantitatively large and consistent source of protein. PMID:24901416

  7. Exploiting significance of physical exercise in prevention of gastrointestinal disorders.

    PubMed

    Bilski, Jan; Mazur-Bialy, Agnieszka; Magierowski, Marcin; Kwiecien, Slawomir; Wojcik, Dagmara; Ptak-Belowska, Agata; Surmiak, Marcin; Targosz, Aneta; Magierowska, Katarzyna; Brzozowski, Tomasz

    2018-05-21

    Physical activity can be involved in the prevention of gastrointestinal (GI)-tract diseases, however, the results regarding the volume and the intensity of exercise considered as beneficial for protection of gastrointestinal organs are conflicting. The main objective of this review is to provide a comprehensive and updated overview on the beneficial and harmful effects of physical activity on the gastrointestinal tract. We attempted to discuss recent evidence regarding the association between different modes and intensity levels of exercise and physiological functions of the gut and gut pathology. The regular, moderate exercise can exert a beneficial effect on GI-tract disorders such as reflux esophagitis, peptic ulcers, cholelithiasis, constipation and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) leading to the attenuation of the symptoms. This voluntary exercise has been shown to reduce the risk of colorectal cancer. On the other hand, there is considerable evidence that the high-intensity training or prolonged endurance training can exert a negative influence on GI-tract resulting in the exacerbation of symptoms. Physical activity can exhibit a beneficial effect on a variety of gastrointestinal diseases, however, this effect depends upon the exercise mode, duration and intensity. The accumulated evidence indicate that management of gastrointestinal problems and their relief by the exercise seems to be complicated and require adjustments of physical activity training, dietary measures and medical monitoring of symptoms. More experimental and clinical studies on the effects of physical activity on GI-tract disorders are warranted. Especially, the association between the exercise intensity and data addressing the underlying mechanism(s) of the exercise as the complementary therapy in the treatment of gastrointestinal disorders, require further determination in animal models and humans. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  8. Quality control in gastrointestinal surgery.

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Barba, Ector Jaime; Arenas-Moya, Diego; Vázquez-Guerrero, Arturo

    2011-01-01

    We analyzed the Mexican legal framework, identifying the vectors that characterize quality and control in gastrointestinal surgery. Quality is contemplated in the health protection rights determined according to the Mexican Constitution, established in the general health law and included as a specific goal in the actual National Development Plan and Health Sector Plan. Quality control implies planning, verification and application of corrective measures. Mexico has implemented several quality strategies such as certification of hospitals and regulatory agreements by the General Salubrity Council, creation of the National Health Quality Committee, generation of Clinical Practice Guidelines and the Certification of Medical Specialties, among others. Quality control in gastrointestinal surgery must begin at the time of medical education and continue during professional activities of surgeons, encouraging multidisciplinary teamwork, knowledge, abilities, attitudes, values and skills that promote homogeneous, safe and quality health services for the Mexican population.

  9. Integrative Medicine for Gastrointestinal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Ezra M.; Cohen, Jonah

    2017-01-01

    SYNOPSIS Gastrointestinal conditions are prevalent in the population and account for significant morbidity and healthcare costs. Patients with gastrointestinal conditions frequently use integrative medicine. There is growing evidence that integrative medicine approaches can improve symptoms and, in some cases, directly affect physiology and disease course. In this article we review the data on some of the most common and well-studied approaches including mind-body therapies, acupuncture, diet, probiotics, and other dietary supplements and herbs in gastroesophageal reflux disease, inflammatory bowel disease, irritable bowel syndrome, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, and nausea and vomiting. While clear recommendations can be made for some conditions, in others there are challenges in translating these findings due to small study size, lack of standardization, and trial heterogeneity. PMID:28501229

  10. Gastrointestinal endoscopy: infection and disinfection.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, H J; Axon, A T

    1983-11-01

    The past decade has seen the development of an array of complex flexible fibreoptic instruments for gastrointestinal (GI) endoscopy, and an increasing use of these for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. It has been recognised more recently that the use of contaminated endoscopic equipment can lead to serious and occasionally fatal infections. Infection with a wide variety of micro-organisms has been reported following oesophago-gastroduodenoscopy (OGD) and endoscopic retrograde cholangio-pancreatography (ERCP).

  11. Gastrointestinal endoscopy: infection and disinfection.

    PubMed Central

    O'Connor, H J; Axon, A T

    1983-01-01

    The past decade has seen the development of an array of complex flexible fibreoptic instruments for gastrointestinal (GI) endoscopy, and an increasing use of these for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. It has been recognised more recently that the use of contaminated endoscopic equipment can lead to serious and occasionally fatal infections. Infection with a wide variety of micro-organisms has been reported following oesophago-gastroduodenoscopy (OGD) and endoscopic retrograde cholangio-pancreatography (ERCP). PMID:6414894

  12. p21-activated kinases and gastrointestinal cancer.

    PubMed

    He, Hong; Baldwin, Graham S

    2013-01-01

    p21-activated kinases (PAKs) were initially identified as effector proteins downstream from GTPases of the Rho family. To date, six members of the PAK family have been discovered in mammalian cells. PAKs play important roles in growth factor signalling, cytoskeletal remodelling, gene transcription, cell proliferation and oncogenic transformation. A large body of research has demonstrated that PAKs are up-regulated in several human cancers, and that their overexpression is linked to tumour progression and resistance to therapy. Structural and biochemical studies have revealed the mechanisms involved in PAK signalling, and opened the way to the development of PAK-targeted therapies for cancer treatment. Here we summarise recent findings from biological and clinical research on the role of PAKs in gastrointestinal cancer, and discuss the current status of PAK-targeted anticancer therapies. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. New insights into gastrointestinal anthrax infection.

    PubMed

    Owen, Jennifer L; Yang, Tao; Mohamadzadeh, Mansour

    2015-03-01

    Bacterial infections are the primary cause of gastrointestinal (GI) disorders in both developing and developed countries, and are particularly dangerous for infants and children. Bacillus anthracis is the 'archetype zoonotic' pathogen; no other infectious disease affects such a broad range of species, including humans. Importantly, there are more case reports of GI anthrax infection in children than inhalational disease. Early diagnosis is difficult and widespread systemic disease develops rapidly. This review highlights new findings concerning the roles of the gut epithelia, commensal microbiota, and innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) in initiation of disease and systemic dissemination in animal models of GI anthrax, the understanding of which is crucial to designing alternative therapies that target the establishment of infection. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. New Insights into Gastrointestinal Anthrax Infection

    PubMed Central

    Owen, Jennifer L.; Yang, Tao; Mohamadzadeh, Mansour

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial infections are the primary cause of gastrointestinal (GI) disorders in both developing and developed countries, and are particularly dangerous for infants and children. Bacillus anthracis is the “archetype zoonotic” pathogen; no other infectious disease affects such a broad range of species, including humans. Importantly, there are more case reports of GI anthrax infection in children than inhalational disease. Early diagnosis is difficult and widespread systemic disease develops rapidly. This review highlights new findings concerning the roles of the gut epithelia, commensal microbiota, and innate lymphoid cells in initiation of disease and systemic dissemination in animal models of GI anthrax, the understanding of which is crucial to designing alternative therapies that target establishment of infection. PMID:25577136

  15. Comparison of Intact PTH and Bio-Intact PTH Assays Among Non-Dialysis Dependent Chronic Kidney Disease Patients.

    PubMed

    Einbinder, Yael; Benchetrit, Sydney; Golan, Eliezer; Zitman-Gal, Tali

    2017-09-01

    The third-generation bio-intact parathyroid hormone (PTH) (1-84) assay was designed to overcome problems associated with the detection of C-terminal fragments by the second-generation intact PTH assay. The two assays have been compared primarily among dialysis populations. The present study evaluated the correlations and differences between these two PTH assays among patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) stages 3 to 5 not yet on dialysis. Blood samples were collected from 98 patients with CKD stages 3 to 5. PTH concentrations were measured simultaneously by using the second-generation - PTH intact-STAT and third-generation bio-intact 1-84 PTH assays. Other serum biomarkers of bone mineral disorders were also assessed. CKD stage was calculated by using the CKD-Epidemiology Collaboration (EPI) formula. Serum bio-intact PTH concentrations were strongly correlated but significantly lower than the intact PTH concentrations (r=0.963, P<0.0001). This finding was consistent among CKD stages 3 to 5. PTH concentrations by both assays (intact and bio-intact PTH) positively correlated with urea (r=0.523, r=0.504; P=0.002, respectively), phosphorus (r=0.532, r=0.521; P<0.0001, respectively) and negatively correlated with blood calcium (r=-0.435, r=-0.476; P<0.0001, respectively), 25(OH) vitamin D, (r=-0.319, r=-0.353; respectively, P<0.0001) and the estimated glomerular filtration rate (r=-0.717, r=-0.688; P<0.0001, respectively). Among patients with CKD stages 3 to 5 not on dialysis, the bio-intact PTH assay detected significantly lower PTH concentrations compared with intact PTH assay. Additional studies that correlate the diagnosis and management of CKD mineral and bone disorders with bone histomorphometric findings are needed to determine whether bio-intact PTH assay results are better surrogate markers in these early stages of CKD. © The Korean Society for Laboratory Medicine

  16. Diet and Upper Gastrointestinal Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Abnet, Christian C.; Corley, Douglas A.; Freedman, Neal D.; Kamangar, Farin

    2015-01-01

    Diet is believed to modulate cancer risk and this relationship has been widely studied in the gastrointestinal tract. Observational epidemiologic studies have provided most of the evidence for the effects of diet on cancer risk, because clinical trials to determine nutritional exposures are often impossible, impractical, or unaffordable. Although a few foods or nutrients are thought to protect against specific types of cancer, it seems clear that the strength and even direction of dietary associations (increasing or decreasing risk) is organ site- and even histology-specific, along the gastrointestinal tract. Although some hypotheses are supported by a substantial body of observational data (drinking hot maté contributes to esophageal cancer), there is not much data to support others. We discuss some highly touted hypotheses and draw interim conclusions about what is known, and what could be done to improve the level of evidence. The complex nature of diet and its associations can be productively investigated with disease-specific studies. However, public health recommendations for normal-risk individuals regarding diet and gastrointestinal cancer should probably emphasize the importance of eating for overall health, rather than eating specific foods to reduce risk for specific cancers. PMID:25680671

  17. Diet and upper gastrointestinal malignancies.

    PubMed

    Abnet, Christian C; Corley, Douglas A; Freedman, Neal D; Kamangar, Farin

    2015-05-01

    Diet is believed to modulate cancer risk and this relationship has been widely studied in the gastrointestinal tract. Observational epidemiologic studies have provided most of the evidence about the effects of diet on cancer risk because clinical trials to determine nutritional exposures are often impossible, impractical, or unaffordable. Although a few foods or nutrients are thought to protect against specific types of cancer, it seems clear that the strength and even direction of dietary associations (increasing or decreasing risk) is organ-site- and even histology-specific, along the gastrointestinal tract. Although some hypotheses are supported by a substantial body of observational data (drinking hot maté [an infusion of the herb Ilex Paraguarensis] contributes to esophageal cancer), there are not much data to support others. We discuss some highly touted hypotheses and draw interim conclusions about what is known and what could be done to improve the level of evidence. The complex nature of diet and its associations can be productively investigated with disease-specific studies. However, public health recommendations for normal-risk individuals regarding diet and gastrointestinal cancer should probably emphasize the importance of eating for overall health rather than eating specific foods to reduce risk for specific cancers. Copyright © 2015 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Precision Medicine in Gastrointestinal Pathology.

    PubMed

    Wang, David H; Park, Jason Y

    2016-05-01

    -Precision medicine is the promise of individualized therapy and management of patients based on their personal biology. There are now multiple global initiatives to perform whole-genome sequencing on millions of individuals. In the United States, an early program was the Million Veteran Program, and a more recent proposal in 2015 by the president of the United States is the Precision Medicine Initiative. To implement precision medicine in routine oncology care, genetic variants present in tumors need to be matched with effective clinical therapeutics. When we focus on the current state of precision medicine for gastrointestinal malignancies, it becomes apparent that there is a mixed history of success and failure. -To present the current state of precision medicine using gastrointestinal oncology as a model. We will present currently available targeted therapeutics, promising new findings in clinical genomic oncology, remaining quality issues in genomic testing, and emerging oncology clinical trial designs. -Review of the literature including clinical genomic studies on gastrointestinal malignancies, clinical oncology trials on therapeutics targeted to molecular alterations, and emerging clinical oncology study designs. -Translating our ability to sequence thousands of genes into meaningful improvements in patient survival will be the challenge for the next decade.

  19. Microbial Ecology along the Gastrointestinal Tract

    PubMed Central

    Hillman, Ethan T.; Lu, Hang; Yao, Tianming; Nakatsu, Cindy H.

    2017-01-01

    The ecosystem of the human gastrointestinal (GI) tract traverses a number of environmental, chemical, and physical conditions because it runs from the oral cavity to the anus. These differences in conditions along with food or other ingested substrates affect the composition and density of the microbiota as well as their functional roles by selecting those that are the most suitable for that environment. Previous studies have mostly focused on Bacteria, with the number of studies conducted on Archaea, Eukarya, and Viruses being limited despite their important roles in this ecosystem. Furthermore, due to the challenges associated with collecting samples directly from the inside of humans, many studies are still exploratory, with a primary focus on the composition of microbiomes. Thus, mechanistic studies to investigate functions are conducted using animal models. However, differences in physiology and microbiomes need to be clarified in order to aid in the translation of animal model findings into the context of humans. This review will highlight Bacteria, Archaea, Fungi, and Viruses, discuss differences along the GI tract of healthy humans, and perform comparisons with three common animal models: rats, mice, and pigs. PMID:29129876

  20. Impact of extraneous proteins on the gastrointestinal fate of sunflower seed (Helianthus annuus) oil bodies: a simulated gastrointestinal tract study.

    PubMed

    Makkhun, Sakunkhun; Khosla, Amit; Foster, Tim; McClements, David Julian; Grundy, Myriam M L; Gray, David A

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we examined the physicochemical nature of sunflower seed oil bodies (in the absence and presence of added protein) exposed to gastrointestinal conditions in vitro: crude oil bodies (COB); washed oil bodies (WOB); whey protein isolate-enriched oil bodies (WOB-WPI); and, sodium caseinate enriched-oil bodies (WOB-SC). All oil body emulsions were passed through an in vitro digestion model that mimicked the stomach and duodenal environments, and their physicochemical properties were measured before, during, and after digestion. Oil bodies had a positive charge under gastric conditions because the pH was below the isoelectric point of the adsorbed protein layer, but they had a negative charge under duodenal conditions which was attributed to changes in interfacial composition resulting from adsorption of bile salts. Oil bodies were highly susceptible to flocculation and coalescence in both gastric and duodenal conditions. SDS-PAGE analysis indicated degradation of oleosin proteins (ca. 18-21 kDa) to a greater or lesser extent (dependent on the emulsion) during the gastric phase in all emulsions tested; there is evidence that some oleosin remained intact in the crude oil body preparation during this phase of the digestion process. Measurements of protein displacement from the surface of COBs during direct exposure to bile salts, without inclusion of a gastric phase, indicated the removal of intact oleosin from native oil bodies.

  1. Intact mass detection, interpretation, and visualization to automate Top-Down proteomics on a large scale

    PubMed Central

    Durbin, Kenneth R.; Tran, John C.; Zamdborg, Leonid; Sweet, Steve M. M.; Catherman, Adam D.; Lee, Ji Eun; Li, Mingxi; Kellie, John F.; Kelleher, Neil L.

    2011-01-01

    Applying high-throughput Top-Down MS to an entire proteome requires a yet-to-be-established model for data processing. Since Top-Down is becoming possible on a large scale, we report our latest software pipeline dedicated to capturing the full value of intact protein data in automated fashion. For intact mass detection, we combine algorithms for processing MS1 data from both isotopically resolved (FT) and charge-state resolved (ion trap) LC-MS data, which are then linked to their fragment ions for database searching using ProSight. Automated determination of human keratin and tubulin isoforms is one result. Optimized for the intricacies of whole proteins, new software modules visualize proteome-scale data based on the LC retention time and intensity of intact masses and enable selective detection of PTMs to automatically screen for acetylation, phosphorylation, and methylation. Software functionality was demonstrated using comparative LC-MS data from yeast strains in addition to human cells undergoing chemical stress. We further these advances as a key aspect of realizing Top-Down MS on a proteomic scale. PMID:20848673

  2. Cellular Energetical Actions of “Chemical” and “Surgical” Vagotomy in Gastrointestinal Mucosal Damage and Protection: Similarities, Differences and Significance for Brain-Gut Function

    PubMed Central

    Szabo, Imre L.; Czimmer, Jozsef; Mozsik, Gyula

    2016-01-01

    Background The authors, as internists, registered significant difference in the long lasting actions of surgical and chemical (atropine treatment) vagotomy in patients with peptic ulcer during second half of the last century (efficency, gastric acid secretion, gastrointestinal side effects, briefly benefical and harmful actions were examined). Aims 1. Since the authors participated in the establishing of human clinical pharmacology in this field, they wanted to know more and more facts of the acute and chronic effects of surgical and chemical (atropine treatment) on the gastrointestinal mucosal biochemisms and their actions altered by bioactive compounds and scavengers regarding the development of gastric mucosal damage and protection. Methods The observations were carried out in animals under various experimental conditions (in intact, pylorus-ligated rats, in different experimental ulcer models, together with application of various mucosal protecting compounds) without and with surgical vagotomy and chemical vagotomy produced by atropine treatment. Results 1. No changes were obtained in the cellular energy systems (ATP, ADP, AMP, cAMP, “adenylate pool”, “energy charge“ [(ATP+ 0.5 ADP)/ (ATP+ADP+AMP)] of stomach (glandular part, forestomach) in pylorus ligated rats after surgical vagotomy in contrast to those produced by only chemical vagotomy; 2. The effects of the gastric mucosal protective compounds [atropine, cimetidine, prostaglandins, scavengers (like vitamin A, β-carotene), capsaicin] disappeared after surgical vagotomy; 3. The extents of different chemical agents induced mucosal damaging effects were enhanced by surgical vagotomy and was not altered by chemical vagotomy; 4. The existence of feedback mechanisms of pharmacological (cellular and intracellular) regulatory mechanisms between the membrane-bound ATP-dependent energy systems exists in the gastric mucosa of intact animals, and after chemical vagotomy, but not after surgical vagotomy

  3. Raman mapping of intact biofilms on stainless steel surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Julie K.; Heighton, Lynne; Xu, Yunfeng; Nou, Xiangwu; Schmidt, Walter F.

    2016-05-01

    Many issues occur when microbial bacteria contaminates human food or water; it can be dangerous to the public. Determining how the microbial are growing, it can help experts determine how to prevent the outbreaks. Biofilms are a tightly group of microbial cells that grow on living surfaces or surrounding themselves. Though biofilms are not necessarily uniform; when there are more than one type of microbial bacteria that are grown, Raman mapping is performed to determine the growth patterns. Depending on the type of microbial bacteria, they can grow in various patterns such as symmetrical or scattered on the surface. The biofilms need to be intact in order to preclude and potentially figuring out the relative intensity of different components in a biofilm mixture. In addition, it is important to determine whether one biofilms is a substrate for another biofilm to be detected. For example, it is possible if layer B appears above layer A, but layer A doesn't appear above layer B. In this case, three types of biofilms that are grown includes Listeria(L), Ralstonia(R), and a mixture of the two (LR). Since microbe deposits on metal surfaces are quite suitable, biofilms were grown on stainless steel surface slides. Each slide was viewed under a Raman Microscope at 100X and using a 532nm laser to provide great results and sharp peaks. The mapping of the laser helps determine how the bacteria growth, at which intensity the bacteria appeared in order to identify specific microbes to signature markers on biofilms.

  4. Amyloid causes intermittent network disruptions in cognitively intact older subjects.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Susanne G

    2018-05-16

    Recent findings in AD models but also human patients suggest that amyloid can cause intermittent neuronal hyperactivity. The overall goal of this study was to use dynamic fMRI analysis combined with graph analysis to a) characterize the graph analytical signature of two types of intermittent hyperactivity (spike-like (spike) and hypersynchronus-like (synchron)) in simulated data and b) to attempt to identify one of these signatures in task-free fMRIs of cognitively intact subjects (CN) with or without increased brain amyloid. The toolbox simtb was used to generate 33 data sets with 2 short spike events, 33 with 2 synchron and 33 baseline data sets. A combination of sliding windows, hierarchical cluster analysis and graph analysis was used to characterize the spike and the synchron signature. Florbetapir-F18 PET and task-free 3 T fMRI was acquired in 49 CN (age = 70.7 ± 6.4). Processing the real data with the same approach as the simulated data identified phases whose graph analytical signature resembled that of the synchron signature in the simulated data. The duration of these phases was positively correlated with amyloid load (r = 0.42, p < 0.05) and negatively with memory performance (r = -0.43, p < 0.05). In conclusion, amyloid positivity is associated with intermittent hyperactivity that is caused by short phases of hypersynchronous activity. The negative association with memory performance suggests that these disturbances have the potential to interfere with cognitive processes and could lead to cognitive impairment if they become more frequent or more severe with increasing amyloid deposition.

  5. Emerging role of fecal microbiota therapy in the treatment of gastrointestinal and extra-gastrointestinal diseases.

    PubMed

    Konturek, P C; Haziri, D; Brzozowski, T; Hess, T; Heyman, S; Kwiecien, S; Konturek, S J; Koziel, J

    2015-08-01

    In the recent decade our understanding of the role of the human gut microbiome has been revolutionized by advances in development of molecular methods. Approximately, up to 100 trillion (10(14)) microorganisms per human body colonize the intestinal tract making an additional acquired organ that provides many vital functions to the host. A healthy gut microbiome can be defined by the presence of the various classes of microbes that enhance metabolism, resistance to infection and inflammation, prevention against cancer and autoimmunity and that positively influence so called braingut axis. Diet represents one of the most important driving forces that besides environmental and genetic factors, can define and influence the microbial composition of the gut. Aging process due to different changes in gut physiology (i.e. gastric hypochlorhydria, motility disorders, use of drugs, degenerative changes in enteric nervous system) has a profound effect on the composition, diversity and functional features of gut microbiota. A perturbed aged gut microbiome has been associated with the increasing number of gastrointestinal (e.g. Clostridium difficile infection - CDI) and non-gastrointestinal diseases (metabolic syndrome, diabetes mellitus, fatty liver disease, atherosclerosis etc.). Fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) is a highly effective method in the treatment of refractory CDI. FMT is the term used when stool is taken from a healthy individual and instilled during endoscopy (colonoscopy or enteroscopy) into a gut of the sick person to cure certain disease. FMT represents an effective therapy in patient with recurrent CDI and the effectiveness of FMT in the prevention of CDI recurrence had reached approx. 90%. There is also an increasing evidence that the manipulation of gut microbiota by FMT represents a promising therapeutic method in patients with inflammatory bowel disease and irritable bowel syndrome. There is also an increased interest in the role of FMT for the

  6. Laboratory Diagnosis of Parasites from the Gastrointestinal Tract.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Lynne S; Arrowood, Michael; Kokoskin, Evelyne; Paltridge, Graeme P; Pillai, Dylan R; Procop, Gary W; Ryan, Norbert; Shimizu, Robyn Y; Visvesvara, Govinda

    2018-01-01

    This Practical Guidance for Clinical Microbiology document on the laboratory diagnosis of parasites from the gastrointestinal tract provides practical information for the recovery and identification of relevant human parasites. The document is based on a comprehensive literature review and expert consensus on relevant diagnostic methods. However, it does not include didactic information on human parasite life cycles, organism morphology, clinical disease, pathogenesis, treatment, or epidemiology and prevention. As greater emphasis is placed on neglected tropical diseases, it becomes highly probable that patients with gastrointestinal parasitic infections will become more widely recognized in areas where parasites are endemic and not endemic. Generally, these methods are nonautomated and require extensive bench experience for accurate performance and interpretation. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  7. Interpretability of the PedsQL gastrointestinal symptoms scales and gastrointestinal worry scales in pediatric patients with functional and organic gastrointestinal diseases

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The present study investigates the clinical interpretability of the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventor (PedsQL) Gastrointestinal Symptoms Scales and Worry Scales in pediatric patients with functional gastrointestinal disorders or organic gastrointestinal diseases in comparison with healthy controls....

  8. Are Rice and Spicy Diet Good for Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders?

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Rice- and chili-containing foods are common in Asia. Studies suggest that rice is completely absorbed in the small bowel, produces little intestinal gas and has a low allergenicity. Several clinical studies have demonstrated that rice-based meals are well tolerated and may improve gastrointestinal symptoms in functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGID). Chili is a spicy ingredient commonly use throughout Asia. The active component of chili is capsaicin. Capsaicin can mediate a painful, burning sensation in the human gut via the transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1). Recently, the TRPV1 expressing sensory fibers have been reported to increase in the gastrointestinal tract of patients with FGID and visceral hypersensitivity. Acute exposure to capsaicin or chili can aggravate abdominal pain and burning in dyspepsia and IBS patients. Whereas, chronic ingestion of natural capsaicin agonist or chili has been shown to decrease dyspeptic and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) symptoms. The high prevalence of spicy food in Asia may modify gastrointestinal burning symptoms in patients with FGID. Studies in Asia demonstrated a low prevalence of heartburn symptoms in GERD patients in several Asian countries. In conclusion rice is well tolerated and should be advocated as the carbohydrate source of choice for patients with FGID. Although, acute chili ingestion can aggravate abdominal pain and burning symptoms in FGID, chronic ingestion of chili was found to improve functional dyspepsia and GERD symptoms in small randomized, controlled studies. PMID:20535343

  9. Probiotics for Gastrointestinal Conditions: A Summary of the Evidence.

    PubMed

    Wilkins, Thad; Sequoia, Jacqueline

    2017-08-01

    Probiotics contain microorganisms, most of which are bacteria similar to the beneficial bacteria that occur naturally in the human gut. Probiotics have been widely studied in a variety of gastrointestinal diseases. The most-studied species include Lactobacillus, Bifidobacterium, and Saccharomyces. However, a lack of clear guidelines on when to use probiotics and the most effective probiotic for different gastrointestinal conditions may be confusing for family physicians and their patients. Probiotics have an important role in the maintenance of immunologic equilibrium in the gastrointestinal tract through the direct interaction with immune cells. Probiotic effectiveness can be species-, dose-, and disease-specific, and the duration of therapy depends on the clinical indication. There is high-quality evidence that probiotics are effective for acute infectious diarrhea, antibiotic-associated diarrhea, Clostridium difficile- associated diarrhea, hepatic encephalopathy, ulcerative colitis, irritable bowel syndrome, functional gastrointestinal disorders, and necrotizing enterocolitis. Conversely, there is evidence that probiotics are not effective for acute pancreatitis and Crohn disease. Probiotics are safe for infants, children, adults, and older patients, but caution is advised in immunologically vulnerable populations.

  10. Probiotics and gastrointestinal disease: successes, problems and future prospects

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Gastrointestinal disease is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide each year. Treatment of chronic inflammatory gastrointestinal conditions such as ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease is difficult due to the ambiguity surrounding their precise aetiology. Infectious gastrointestinal diseases, such as various types of diarrheal disease are also becoming increasingly difficult to treat due to the increasing dissemination of antibiotic resistance among microorganisms and the emergence of the so-called 'superbugs'. Taking into consideration these problems, the need for novel therapeutics is essential. Although described for over a century probiotics have only been extensively researched in recent years. Their use in the treatment and prevention of disease, particularly gastrointestinal disease, has yielded many successful results, some of which we outline in this review. Although promising, many probiotics are hindered by inherent physiological and technological weaknesses and often the most clinically promising strains are unusable. Consequently we discuss various strategies whereby probiotics may be engineered to create designer probiotics. Such innovative approaches include; a receptor mimicry strategy to create probiotics that target specific pathogens and toxins, a patho-biotechnology approach using pathogen-derived genes to create more robust probiotic stains with increased host and processing-associated stress tolerance profiles and meta-biotechnology, whereby, functional metagenomics may be used to identify novel genes from diverse and vastly unexplored environments, such as the human gut, for use in biotechnology and medicine. PMID:19930635

  11. Probiotics and gastrointestinal disease: successes, problems and future prospects.

    PubMed

    Culligan, Eamonn P; Hill, Colin; Sleator, Roy D

    2009-11-23

    Gastrointestinal disease is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide each year. Treatment of chronic inflammatory gastrointestinal conditions such as ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease is difficult due to the ambiguity surrounding their precise aetiology. Infectious gastrointestinal diseases, such as various types of diarrheal disease are also becoming increasingly difficult to treat due to the increasing dissemination of antibiotic resistance among microorganisms and the emergence of the so-called 'superbugs'. Taking into consideration these problems, the need for novel therapeutics is essential. Although described for over a century probiotics have only been extensively researched in recent years. Their use in the treatment and prevention of disease, particularly gastrointestinal disease, has yielded many successful results, some of which we outline in this review. Although promising, many probiotics are hindered by inherent physiological and technological weaknesses and often the most clinically promising strains are unusable. Consequently we discuss various strategies whereby probiotics may be engineered to create designer probiotics. Such innovative approaches include; a receptor mimicry strategy to create probiotics that target specific pathogens and toxins, a patho-biotechnology approach using pathogen-derived genes to create more robust probiotic stains with increased host and processing-associated stress tolerance profiles and meta-biotechnology, whereby, functional metagenomics may be used to identify novel genes from diverse and vastly unexplored environments, such as the human gut, for use in biotechnology and medicine.

  12. Behavioural medicine and gastrointestinal disorders: the promise of positive psychology.

    PubMed

    Keefer, Laurie

    2018-04-12

    Psychosocial risk factors linked to brain-gut dysregulation are prevalent across the spectrum of gastrointestinal disorders and are associated with poor patient outcomes. Robust and reproducible data in the areas of behavioural intervention science and the brain-gut axis have led to major advances in patient care, including the routine use of brain-gut psychotherapies to manage digestive symptoms and optimize coping. The logical next step for the emerging field of psychogastroenterology is to develop a scientific framework that enables the identification of those individual characteristics and coping styles that buffer patients against the negative psychological effects of chronic gastrointestinal disorders. A shift towards a strength-based, positive psychological science of gastrointestinal disorders could facilitate the integration of early, effective psychological care into gastroenterology practice. In this Perspective, I discuss the potential role of three human strengths with relevance to gastrointestinal health - resilience, optimism and self-regulation - and how these three constructs can be cultivated through existing or emerging brain-gut psychotherapies.

  13. Ecology and pathogenicity of gastrointestinal Streptococcus bovis.

    PubMed

    Herrera, Paul; Kwon, Young Min; Ricke, Steven C

    2009-01-01

    Streptococcus bovis is an indigenous resident in the gastrointestinal tracts of both humans and animals. S. bovis is one of the major causes of bacterial endocarditis and has been implicated in the incidence of human colon cancer, possibly due to chronic inflammatory response at the site of intestinal colonization. Certain feeding regimens in ruminants can lead to overgrowth of S. bovis in the rumen, resulting in the over-production of lactate and capsular polysaccharide causing acute ruminal acidosis and bloat, respectively. There are multiple strategies in controlling acute lactic acidosis and bloat. The incidence of the two diseases may be controlled by strict dietary management. Gradual introduction of grain-based diets and the feeding of coarsely chopped roughage decrease the incidence of the two disease entities. Ionophores, which have been used to enhance feed conversion and growth rate in cattle, have been shown to inhibit the growth of lactic acid bacteria in the rumen. Other methods of controlling lactic acid bacteria in the ruminal environment (dietary supplementation of long-chain fatty acids, induction of passive and active immune responses to the bacteria, and the use of lytic bacteriophages) have also been investigated. It is anticipated that through continued in-depth ecological analysis of S. bovis the characteristics responsible for human and animal pathogenesis would be sufficiently identified to a point where more effective control strategies for the control of this bacteria can be developed.

  14. AN IN VITRO GASTROINTESTINAL METHOD TO ESTIMATE BIOAVAILABLE ARSENIC IN CONTAMINATED SOILS AND SOLID MEDIA. (R825410)

    EPA Science Inventory

    A method was developed to simulate the human gastrointestinal environment and
    to estimate bioavailability of arsenic in contaminated soil and solid media. In
    this in vitro gastrointestinal (IVG) method, arsenic is sequentially extracted
    from contaminated soil with ...

  15. 76 FR 37131 - Joint Meeting of the Gastrointestinal Drugs Advisory Committee and the Drug Safety and Risk...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-24

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2011-N-0002] Joint Meeting of the Gastrointestinal Drugs Advisory Committee and the Drug Safety and Risk Management...: Gastrointestinal Drugs Advisory Committee and the Drug Safety and Risk Management Advisory Committee. General...

  16. Efficacy and safety of the probiotic Saccharomyces boulardii for the prevention and therapy of gastrointestinal disorders

    PubMed Central

    Kelesidis, Theodoros

    2012-01-01

    Several clinical trials and experimental studies strongly suggest a place for Saccharomyces boulardii as a biotherapeutic agent for the prevention and treatment of several gastrointestinal diseases. S. boulardii mediates responses resembling the protective effects of the normal healthy gut flora. The multiple mechanisms of action of S. boulardii and its properties may explain its efficacy and beneficial effects in acute and chronic gastrointestinal diseases that have been confirmed by clinical trials. Caution should be taken in patients with risk factors for adverse events. This review discusses the evidence for efficacy and safety of S. boulardii as a probiotic for the prevention and therapy of gastrointestinal disorders in humans. PMID:22423260

  17. Quantitative measurement of intact alpha-synuclein proteoforms from post-mortem control and Parkinson's disease brain tissue by intact protein mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kellie, John F; Higgs, Richard E; Ryder, John W; Major, Anthony; Beach, Thomas G; Adler, Charles H; Merchant, Kalpana; Knierman, Michael D

    2014-07-23

    A robust top down proteomics method is presented for profiling alpha-synuclein species from autopsied human frontal cortex brain tissue from Parkinson's cases and controls. The method was used to test the hypothesis that pathology associated brain tissue will have a different profile of post-translationally modified alpha-synuclein than the control samples. Validation of the sample processing steps, mass spectrometry based measurements, and data processing steps were performed. The intact protein quantitation method features extraction and integration of m/z data from each charge state of a detected alpha-synuclein species and fitting of the data to a simple linear model which accounts for concentration and charge state variability. The quantitation method was validated with serial dilutions of intact protein standards. Using the method on the human brain samples, several previously unreported modifications in alpha-synuclein were identified. Low levels of phosphorylated alpha synuclein were detected in brain tissue fractions enriched for Lewy body pathology and were marginally significant between PD cases and controls (p = 0.03).

  18. Gastrointestinal Cancers: Screening and Early Detection.

    PubMed

    Griffin-Sobel, Joyce P

    2017-05-01

    To present an overview of current practices in the screening and early detection of gastrointestinal cancers. Literature reviews. Screening for gastrointestinal cancers is less than desirable, particularly in underserved populations. There are inadequate methods of screening for early detection of esophageal and gastric cancers. Education of patients is needed to reinforce the importance of screening for gastrointestinal cancers. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Gastrointestinal obstruction in penguin chicks.

    PubMed

    Perpiñán, David; Curro, Thomas G

    2009-12-01

    A 7-day-old gentoo penguin (Pygoscelis papua) was found dead and postmortem examination revealed impaction of the ventriculus with feathers. A review of mortality in gentoo penguin chicks from 1997 to 2007 at that institution revealed another case of feather impaction of the ventriculus in a 4-week-old chick, a sibling of the previous chick. A third case of gastrointestinal impaction occurred in a 24-day-old king penguin (Aptenodytes patagonicus) with omphallitis and enteritis. In this chick, a fibrin mat produced a complete obstruction of the intestine at the level of Meckel's diverticulum.

  20. [The gastrointestinal tract microbiom in connective tissue diseases].

    PubMed

    Krajewska-Włodarczyk, Magdalena

    Factors such as genetics, the environment, infections, and the human body microbiota, mainly gastrointestinal tract microbiota may play a role in the pathogenesis of autoimmune disorders. There is an increasing evidence that suggest an association between gastrointestinal tract dysbiosis, and in particular gut dysbiosis, and connective tissue diseases but it still remains unclear whether alterations in the microbiome are a pathogenic cause or an effect of autoimmune disease. Given the strong variability and abundance of microbes living in close relation with human host, it becomes a difficult task to define what should be considered the normal or the favorable microbiome. Further studies are needed to establish how the human microbiome contributes to disease susceptibility, and to characterize the role of microbial diversity in the pathogenesis of connective tissue diseases and their clinical manifestations. The identification of dysbiosis specific for certain connective tissue diseases may help in the development of an individualized management for each patient. This review aims to summarize current data on the role of the gastrointestinal tract microbiome in connective tissue diseases.

  1. Source Selection Simulation: Intact Team Training on Picking a Provider

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-01

    seat of a new $100 million stealth fighter before giving her flight simulation time. The ar- gument for source-selection simulation ( SSS ) training is...dynamic is the creation of the SSS Tool. Drawing on his success in using a similar tool in contingency contracting, Long decided we should use a Web...of SSS intact team training. On Sept. 30–Oct. 3, 2014, Professors Long and Elsesser de- livered DAU’s first-ever Intact Team SSS Training to Eglin’s

  2. [Gastrointestinal surgery and gastroenterology. I. Introduction].

    PubMed

    van Lanschot, J J

    1999-09-25

    The enormous increase in theoretical knowledge and technical possibilities in general surgery has led to differentiation and subspecialization. Gastrointestinal surgery is now recognized as a distinguished area of specific interest within the field of general surgery. It covers the surgical diagnosis and treatment of benign and malignant diseases of the digestive tract, including liver and pancreas. Most gastrointestinal diseases require a multidisciplinary approach in which the gastroenterologist and the gastrointestinal surgeon are key figures. This Journal is planning a series of articles highlighting the recent developments and current state of the art of gastrointestinal surgery, with special emphasis on the close connection with gastroenterology.

  3. Multiple Reaction Monitoring for Direct Quantitation of Intact Proteins Using a Triple Quadrupole Mass Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Evelyn H.; Combe, Peter C.; Schug, Kevin A.

    2016-05-01

    Methods that can efficiently and effectively quantify proteins are needed to support increasing demand in many bioanalytical fields. Triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (QQQ-MS) is sensitive and specific, and it is routinely used to quantify small molecules. However, low resolution fragmentation-dependent MS detection can pose inherent difficulties for intact proteins. In this research, we investigated variables that affect protein and fragment ion signals to enable protein quantitation using QQQ-MS. Collision induced dissociation gas pressure and collision energy were found to be the most crucial variables for optimization. Multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) transitions for seven standard proteins, including lysozyme, ubiquitin, cytochrome c from both equine and bovine, lactalbumin, myoglobin, and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) were determined. Assuming the eventual goal of applying such methodology is to analyze protein in biological fluids, a liquid chromatography method was developed. Calibration curves of six standard proteins (excluding PSA) were obtained to show the feasibility of intact protein quantification using QQQ-MS. Linearity (2-3 orders), limits of detection (0.5-50 μg/mL), accuracy (<5% error), and precision (1%-12% CV) were determined for each model protein. Sensitivities for different proteins varied considerably. Biological fluids, including human urine, equine plasma, and bovine plasma were used to demonstrate the specificity of the approach. The purpose of this model study was to identify, study, and demonstrate the advantages and challenges for QQQ-MS-based intact protein quantitation, a largely underutilized approach to date.

  4. Ghrelin and gastrointestinal stromal tumors.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Chang-Zhen; Liu, Dong; Kang, Wei-Ming; Yu, Jian-Chun; Ma, Zhi-Qiang; Ye, Xin; Li, Kang

    2017-03-14

    Ghrelin, as a kind of multifunctional protein polypeptide, is mainly produced in the fundus of the stomach and can promote occurrence and development of many tumors, including gastrointestinal tumors, which has been proved by the relevant researches. Most gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs, about 80%), as the most common mesenchymal tumor, also develop in the fundus. Scientific research has confirmed that ghrelin, its receptors and mRNA respectively can be found in GISTs, which demonstrated the existence of a ghrelin autocrine/paracrine loop in GIST tissues. However, no reports to date have specified the mechanism whether ghrelin can promote the occurrence and development of GISTs. Studies of pulmonary artery endothelial cells in a low-oxygen environment and cardiac muscle cells in an ischemic environment have shown that ghrelin can activate the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/AKT/mammalian target of rapamycin (PI3K/AKT/mTOR) signaling pathway. Moreover, some studies of GISTs have confirmed that activation of the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway can indeed promote the growth and progression of GISTs. Whether ghrelin is involved in the development or progression of GISTs through certain pathways remains unknown. Can we find a new target for the treatment of GISTs? This review explores and summaries the relationship among ghrelin, the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway and the development of GISTs.

  5. Gastrointestinal citrate absorption in nephrolithiasis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fegan, J.; Khan, R.; Poindexter, J.; Pak, C. Y.

    1992-01-01

    Gastrointestinal absorption of citrate was measured in stone patients with idiopathic hypocitraturia to determine if citrate malabsorption could account for low urinary citrate. Citrate absorption was measured directly from recovery of orally administered potassium citrate (40 mEq.) in the intestinal lavage fluid, using an intestinal washout technique. In 7 stone patients citrate absorption, serum citrate levels, peak citrate concentration in serum and area under the curve were not significantly different from those of 7 normal subjects. Citrate absorption was rapid and efficient in both groups, with 96 to 98% absorbed within 3 hours. The absorption of citrate was less efficient from a tablet preparation of potassium citrate than from a liquid preparation, probably due to a delayed release of citrate from wax matrix. However, citrate absorption from solid potassium citrate was still high at 91%, compared to 98% for a liquid preparation. Thus, hypocitraturia is unlikely to be due to an impaired gastrointestinal absorption of citrate in stone patients without overt bowel disease.

  6. Functional macrophages and gastrointestinal disorders.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yue-Hong; Ding, Yue; Gao, Chen-Chen; Li, Li-Sheng; Wang, Yue-Xiu; Xu, Jing-Dong

    2018-03-21

    Macrophages (MΦ) differentiate from blood monocytes and participate in innate and adaptive immunity. Because of their abilities to recognize pathogens and activate bactericidal activities, MΦ are always discovered at the site of immune defense. MΦ in the intestine are unique, such that in the healthy intestine, they possess complex mechanisms to protect the gut from inflammation. In these complex mechanisms, they produce anti-inflammatory cytokines, such as interleukin-10 and transforming growth factor-β, and inhibit the inflammatory pathways mediated by Toll-like receptors. It has been demonstrated that resident MΦ play a crucial role in maintaining intestinal homeostasis, and they can be recognized by their unique markers. Nonetheless, in the inflamed intestine, the function of MΦ will change because of environmental variation, which may be one of the mechanisms of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). We provide further explanation about these mechanisms in our review. In addition, we review recent discoveries that MΦ may be involved in the development of gastrointestinal tumors. We will highlight the possible therapeutic targets for the management of IBD and gastrointestinal tumors, and we also discuss why more details are needed to fully understand all other effects of intestinal MΦ.

  7. A Meta-Analysis of Probiotic Efficacy for Gastrointestinal Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Ritchie, Marina L.; Romanuk, Tamara N.

    2012-01-01

    Background Meta-analyses on the effects of probiotics on specific gastrointestinal diseases have generally shown positive effects on disease prevention and treatment; however, the relative efficacy of probiotic use for treatment and prevention across different gastrointestinal diseases, with differing etiology and mechanisms of action, has not been addressed. Methods/Principal Findings We included randomized controlled trials in humans that used a specified probiotic in the treatment or prevention of Pouchitis, Infectious diarrhea, Irritable Bowel Syndrome, Helicobacter pylori, Clostridium difficile Disease, Antibiotic Associated Diarrhea, Traveler's Diarrhea, or Necrotizing Enterocolitis. Random effects models were used to evaluate efficacy as pooled relative risks across the eight diseases as well as across probiotic species, single vs. multiple species, patient ages, dosages, and length of treatment. Probiotics had a positive significant effect across all eight gastrointestinal diseases with a relative risk of 0.58 (95% (CI) 0.51–0.65). Six of the eight diseases: Pouchitis, Infectious diarrhea, Irritable Bowel Syndrome, Helicobacter pylori, Clostridium difficile Disease, and Antibiotic Associated Diarrhea, showed positive significant effects. Traveler's Diarrhea and Necrotizing Enterocolitis did not show significant effects of probiotcs. Of the 11 species and species mixtures, all showed positive significant effects except for Lactobacillus acidophilus, Lactobacillus plantarum, and Bifidobacterium infantis. Across all diseases and probiotic species, positive significant effects of probiotics were observed for all age groups, single vs. multiple species, and treatment lengths. Conclusions/Significance Probiotics are generally beneficial in treatment and prevention of gastrointestinal diseases. Efficacy was not observed for Traveler's Diarrhea or Necrotizing Enterocolitis or for the probiotic species L. acidophilus, L. plantarum, and B. infantis. When choosing

  8. Investigation of Ion Transmission Effects on Intact Protein Quantification in a Triple Quadrupole Mass Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Evelyn H.; Appulage, Dananjaya Kalu; McAllister, Erin A.; Schug, Kevin A.

    2017-09-01

    Recently, direct intact protein quantitation using triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (QqQ-MS) and multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) was demonstrated (J. Am. Soc. Mass Spectrom. 27, 886-896 (2016)). Even though QqQ-MS is known to provide extraordinary detection sensitivity for quantitative analysis, we found that intact proteins exhibited a less than 5% ion transmission from the first quadrupole to the third quadrupole mass analyzer in the presence of zero collision energy (ZCE). With the goal to enhance intact protein quantitation sensitivity, ion scattering effects, proton transfer effects, and mass filter resolution widths were examined for their contributions to the lost signal. Protein standards myoglobin and ubiquitin along with small molecules reserpine and vancomycin were analyzed together with various collision induced dissociation (CID) gases (N2, He, and Ar) at different gas pressures. Mass resolution settings played a significant role in reducing ion transmission signal. By narrowing the mass resolution window by 0.35 m/z on each side, roughly 75%-90% of the ion signal was lost. The multiply charged proteins experienced additional proton transfer effects, corresponding to 10-fold signal reduction. A study of increased sensitivity of the method was also conducted with various MRM summation techniques. Although the degree of enhancement was analyte-dependent, an up to 17-fold increase in sensitivity was observed for ubiquitin using a summation of multiple MRM transitions. Biological matrix, human urine, and equine plasma were spiked with proteins to demonstrate the specificity of the method. This study provides additional insight into optimizing the use and sensitivity of QqQ-MS for intact protein quantification. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  9. Traditional uses of medicinal plants in gastrointestinal disorders in Nepal.

    PubMed

    Rokaya, Maan B; Uprety, Yadav; Poudel, Ram C; Timsina, Binu; Münzbergová, Zuzana; Asselin, Hugo; Tiwari, Achyut; Shrestha, Shyam S; Sigdel, Shalik R

    2014-12-02

    Gastrointestinal disorders cause morbidity and can lead to mortality, especially in the developing world where sanitation is deficient. A large part of the human population relies on medicinal plants for treating various diseases, including gastrointestinal disorders. The present review summarizes the traditional uses of medicinal plants of Nepal used to treat gastrointestinal disorders, and evaluates their bio-efficacy based on a review of the available phytochemical and pharmacological literature. We searched different electronic databases and libraries for the literature on medicinal plants used in Nepal to treat gastrointestinal disorders. For each species, we also searched the literature for information on conservation status, as well as for phytochemical and pharmacological studies in support of the ethnobotanical information. We used principal component analysis to explore the relation among disorders and plant families, plant life forms, plant parts and preparation modes. We also performed permutation tests to determine if botanical families were used more often than expected considering their availability in the Nepali flora. We documented a total of 947 species belonging to 158 families and 586 genera used to treat gastrointestinal disorders in Nepal. Diarrhea was the disorder treated by the highest number of species (348), followed by stomachache (340) and dysentery (307). Among the reported species, five were endemic to Nepal, whereas 16 orchid species were protected under CITES Appendices II and III. The randomization test showed that species belonging to 14 families were used less often than expected, whereas plants belonging to 25 families were used more often than expected. The PCA scatter plot showed distinct groups of gastrointestinal disorders treated with similar plant life forms, plant parts, and/or preparation modes. We found 763 phytochemical studies on 324 species and 654 pharmacological studies on 269 species. We showed the diversity and

  10. 51. Projection room, looking SW. Original Movietone projection equipment intact. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    51. Projection room, looking SW. Original Movietone projection equipment intact. Old photo label identifying directional view is inaccurate. This image proves the projection room was expanded southward from its original design prior to the theatre's opening (see also photo WA-197-36). - Fox Theater, Seventh Avenue & Olive Way, Seattle, King County, WA

  11. 14. Aerial view showing bldg grouping with bldg #2 intact ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. Aerial view showing bldg grouping with bldg #2 intact previous to fire (long pitched roof with 7 distinct dormers near image center) - photo by Eastern Topographics, Wolfeboro, N.H., Sept. 1985 - Lawrence Machine Shop, Building No. 2, Union & Canal Streets, Lawrence, Essex County, MA

  12. 46 CFR 174.045 - Intact stability requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Intact stability requirements. 174.045 Section 174.045 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SUBDIVISION AND STABILITY SPECIAL RULES PERTAINING TO SPECIFIC VESSEL TYPES Special Rules Pertaining to Mobile Offshore Drilling Units § 174.045...

  13. 46 CFR 174.045 - Intact stability requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Intact stability requirements. 174.045 Section 174.045 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SUBDIVISION AND STABILITY SPECIAL RULES PERTAINING TO SPECIFIC VESSEL TYPES Special Rules Pertaining to Mobile Offshore Drilling Units § 174.045...

  14. Behavior Management Style of Single Parents and Intact Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Douglas K.; And Others

    Studies examining the behavior management styles of parents as a function of family intactness and parent employment status are lacking. To assess parental style of behavior management, the Parental Management Questionnaire (PMQ) was completed by 1,957 parents of elementary school children (50% response rate). The PMQ is based on Aronfreed's…

  15. Factors mediating cheatgrass invasion of intact salt desert shrubland

    Treesearch

    Susan E. Meyer; Susan C. Garvin; Julie Beckstead

    2001-01-01

    Cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum) has recently displaced salt desert shrubland in many areas of the Great Basin. We studied the dynamics of cheatgrass invasion into an intact shadscale-gray molly community in Dugway Valley, Utah, by adding seeds and manipulating disturbance regime and resource availability. Shrub clipping or cryptobiotic crust trampling on large plots...

  16. From Primary to Secondary Science: Keeping the Threads Intact

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mould, Kirsten

    2015-01-01

    There are many transition points in the school life of a child, but the move from primary to secondary school is a particularly significant one. How can both the social and academic threads remain intact? In this article, Kristen Mould discusses the main issues relating to transition from primary to secondary science. She cites the primary factors…

  17. How to measure CFTR-dependent bicarbonate transport: from single channels to the intact epithelium.

    PubMed

    Hug, Martin J; Clarke, Lane L; Gray, Michael A

    2011-01-01

    Bicarbonate serves many functions in our body. It is the predominant buffer maintaining a physiological pH in the blood and within our cells. It is also essential for proper digestion of nutrients and solubilization of complex protein mixtures, such as digestive enzymes and mucins, in epithelial secretions. Transepithelial HCO3- transport also drives net fluid secretion in many epithelial tissues including those in the gastrointestinal and reproductive tracts as well as the airways. Indeed, defective bicarbonate secretion is a hallmark of the pathophysiology in the pancreas of most patients suffering from cystic fibrosis. Some, but not all, disease-causing mutations in the CF gene lead to impaired bicarbonate transport when expressed in heterologous systems. Recently developed pharmacological modulators of mutant CFTR have demonstrated an ability to activate chloride transport but little is known about whether they also increase the secretion of bicarbonate. It is therefore essential to assay bicarbonate transport when studying the effect of small molecules on CFTR function. However, due to the chaotropic nature of the ion, the measurement of the absolute bicarbonate concentration and its permeability through CFTR is far from trivial. In this chapter we will review some of the techniques available to measure bicarbonate transport through single ion channels, individual cells, and intact epithelial layers.

  18. Pharmacokinetics of erythropoietin in intact and anephric dogs

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, J.S.; Lertora, J.J.; Brookins, J.

    1988-06-01

    The present studies were performed to determine the pharmacokinetic parameters of erythropoietin in intact and anephric dogs by use of unlabeled crude native erythropoietin (nEp) and iodine 125-labeled purified recombinant erythropoietin (rEp) given by intravenous infusion for 15 minutes. Sephadex G-75 gel filtration was used to confirm that the 125I-rEp molecule remained iodinated in dog plasma during the 24-hour period of these studies. The plasma disappearance of erythropoietin conformed to a biexponential equation for both nEp and 125I-rEp, with the central compartment being larger than the peripheral compartment. The mean distribution half-life of 75.3 +/- 21.2 minutes for nEp wasmore » significantly (p less than 0.05) longer than that of 125I-rEp (23.7 +/- 5.0 minutes) in intact dogs. The intercompartmental clearance (CIic) for nEp (0.018 +/- 0.006 L/kg/hr) was significantly smaller than that of 125I-rEp (0.068 +/- 0.018 L/kg/hr) in intact dogs (p less than 0.05). There were no significant differences in apparent volume of distribution, elimination half-life, and elimination clearance (CIe) for nEp and rEp in intact dogs. The mean elimination half-life for 125I-rEp in intact dogs (9.0 +/- 0.6 hours) and anephric dogs (13.8 +/- 1.4 hours) was significantly different (p less than 0.05). The CIe for 125I-rEp in anephric dogs (0.008 +/- 0.001 L/kg/hr) was significantly (p less than 0.05) smaller than that of 125I-rEp in intact dogs (0.011 +/- 0.001 L/kg/hr). There were no significant differences in apparent volume of distribution, distribution half-life, and CIic for 125I-rEp in intact and anephric dogs.« less

  19. Threats to intact tropical peatlands and opportunities for their conservation.

    PubMed

    Roucoux, K H; Lawson, I T; Baker, T R; Del Castillo Torres, D; Draper, F C; Lähteenoja, O; Gilmore, M P; Honorio Coronado, E N; Kelly, T J; Mitchard, E T A; Vriesendorp, C F

    2017-12-01

    Large, intact areas of tropical peatland are highly threatened at a global scale by the expansion of commercial agriculture and other forms of economic development. Conserving peatlands on a landscape scale, with their hydrology intact, is of international conservation importance to preserve their distinctive biodiversity and ecosystem services and maintain their resilience to future environmental change. We explored threats to and opportunities for conserving remaining intact tropical peatlands; thus, we excluded peatlands of Indonesia and Malaysia, where extensive deforestation, drainage, and conversion to plantations means conservation in this region can protect only small fragments of the original ecosystem. We focused on a case study, the Pastaza-Marañón Foreland Basin (PMFB) in Peru, which is among the largest known intact tropical peatland landscapes in the world and is representative of peatland vulnerability. Maintenance of the hydrological conditions critical for carbon storage and ecosystem function of peatlands is, in the PMFB, primarily threatened by expansion of commercial agriculture linked to new transport infrastructure that is facilitating access to remote areas. There remain opportunities in the PMFB and elsewhere to develop alternative, more sustainable land-use practices. Although some of the peatlands in the PMFB fall within existing legally protected areas, this protection does not include the most carbon-dense (domed pole forest) areas. New carbon-based conservation instruments (e.g., REDD+, Green Climate Fund), developing markets for sustainable peatland products, transferring land title to local communities, and expanding protected areas offer pathways to increased protection for intact tropical peatlands in Amazonia and elsewhere, such as those in New Guinea and Central Africa which remain, for the moment, broadly beyond the frontier of commercial development. © 2017 The Authors. Conservation Biology published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc

  20. The Nervous System and Gastrointestinal Function

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Altaf, Muhammad A.; Sood, Manu R.

    2008-01-01

    The enteric nervous system is an integrative brain with collection of neurons in the gastrointestinal tract which is capable of functioning independently of the central nervous system (CNS). The enteric nervous system modulates motility, secretions, microcirculation, immune and inflammatory responses of the gastrointestinal tract. Dysphagia,…

  1. Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumors—Patient Version

    Cancer.gov

    Gastrointestinal (GI) carcinoid tumors are slow-growing tumors that form in the neuroendocrine cells in the GI tract. The GI tract includes the stomach, small intestine, colon, rectum, appendix, and other organs. Start here to find treatment information and research on gastrointestinal carcinoid tumors.

  2. Possible Waardenburg syndrome with gastrointestinal anomalies.

    PubMed Central

    Nutman, J; Steinherz, R; Sivan, Y; Goodman, R M

    1986-01-01

    We describe a patient with possible Waardenburg syndrome associated with anal atresia and oesophageal atresia with tracheooesophageal fistula. Three other published cases with atretic gastrointestinal anomalies associated with the Waardenburg syndrome are reviewed. We conclude that the association between atretic lesions of the gastrointestinal tract and the Waardenburg syndrome may be a significant one. Images PMID:3712396

  3. Changes in upper gastrointestinal physiology with age.

    PubMed

    Newton, J L

    2004-12-01

    Diseases of the upper gastrointestinal tract such as peptic ulceration and gastric cancer become more common and more severe with advancing age. In the normal stomach and duodenum, there is a balance between mucosal protective mechanisms and endogenous (gastric acid and pepsin) and exogenous aggressive factors. The high incidence of gastrointestinal pathology seen in older age groups is not related to increase in the secretion of endogenous aggressive factors. Recent work suggests that gastrointestinal mucosal protective mechanisms are impaired with age. The roles in the gastrointestinal tract of molecules that have been implicated in mucosal repair, such as trefoil peptides and matrix components, are beginning to be elucidated and their study in older people is essential to ensure appropriate, efficient, cost-effective management of gastric pathology in the elderly. Strategies to improve the management of upper gastrointestinal diseases in older people will reduce mortality and improve quality of life.

  4. The Multilevel Mixed Intact Group Analysis: A Mixed Method to Seek, Detect, Describe, and Explain Differences Among Intact Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schoonenboom, Judith

    2016-01-01

    Educational innovations often involve intact subgroups, such as school classes or university departments. In small-scale educational evaluation research, typically involving 1 to 20 subgroups, differences among these subgroups are often neglected. This article presents a mixed method from a qualitative perspective, in which differences among…

  5. Ingestible wireless capsules for enhanced diagnostic inspection of gastrointestinal tract

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasouli, Mahdi; Kencana, Andy Prima; Huynh, Van An; Ting, Eng Kiat; Lai, Joshua Chong Yue; Wong, Kai Juan; Tan, Su Lim; Phee, Soo Jay

    2011-03-01

    Wireless capsule endoscopy has become a common procedure for diagnostic inspection of gastrointestinal tract. This method offers a less-invasive alternative to traditional endoscopy by eliminating uncomfortable procedures of the traditional endoscopy. Moreover, it provides the opportunity for exploring inaccessible areas of the small intestine. Current capsule endoscopes, however, move by peristalsis and are not capable of detailed and on-demand inspection of desired locations. Here, we propose and develop two wireless endoscopes with maneuverable vision systems to enhance diagnosis of gastrointestinal disorders. The vision systems in these capsules are equipped with mechanical actuators to adjust the position of the camera. This may help to cover larger areas of the digestive tract and investigate desired locations. The preliminary experimental results showed that the developed platform could successfully communicate with the external control unit via human body and adjust the position of camera to limited degrees.

  6. Interventional Management of Gastrointestinal Fistulas

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Se Hwan; Kim, Hyoung Jung; Park, Sun Jin; Park, Ho Chul

    2008-01-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) fistulas are frequently very serious complications that are associated with high morbidity and mortality. GI fistulas can cause a wide array of pathophysiological effects by allowing abnormal diversion of the GI contents, including digestive fluid, water, electrolytes, and nutrients, from either one intestine to another or from the intestine to the skin. As an alternative to surgery, recent technical advances in interventional radiology and percutaneous techniques have been shown as advantageous to lower the morbidity and mortality rate, and allow for superior accessibility to the fistulous tracts via the use of fistulography. In addition, new interventional management techniques continue to emerge. We describe the clinical and imaging features of GI fistulas and outline the interventional management of GI fistulas. PMID:19039271

  7. Neuropathophysiology of functional gastrointestinal disorders

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Jackie D

    2007-01-01

    The investigative evidence and emerging concepts in neurogastroenterology implicate dysfunctions at the levels of the enteric and central nervous systems as underlying causes of the prominent symptoms of many of the functional gastrointestinal disorders. Neurogastroenterological research aims for improved understanding of the physiology and pathophysiology of the digestive subsystems from which the arrays of functional symptoms emerge. The key subsystems for defecation-related symptoms and visceral hyper-sensitivity are the intestinal secretory glands, the musculature and the nervous system that controls and integrates their activity. Abdominal pain and discomfort arising from these systems adds the dimension of sensory neurophysiology. This review details current concepts for the underlying pathophysiology in terms of the physiology of intestinal secretion, motility, nervous control, sensing function, immuno-neural communication and the brain-gut axis. PMID:17457962

  8. HIV-Associated Gastrointestinal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Björn E-O; Oette, Mark; Haes, Johannes; Häussinger, Dieter

    2017-01-01

    People living nowadays with HIV and AIDS may be treated effectively regarding virus replication and immunology. However, non-AIDS-defining cancer is of growing relevance due to high incidence and unfavorable outcome. The aim of this review is to summarize current knowledge on gastrointestinal (GI) carcinoma. Although literature on GI cancer is rare, an increased incidence of esophageal, gastric, pancreatic, hepatocellular, and colorectal carcinoma has been demonstrated. However, there are only few reports on therapy strategies and outcome, so that, despite increased occurrence of many GI carcinomas, only little is known about individualized treatment options and outcome in HIV-positive patients. More efforts have to be undertaken to close this gap. © 2017 S. Karger GmbH, Freiburg.

  9. Doxycycline-induced gastrointestinal injury.

    PubMed

    Affolter, Kajsa; Samowitz, Wade; Boynton, Kathleen; Kelly, Erinn Downs

    2017-08-01

    Doxycycline-induced gastric injury is a rarely recognized adverse effect of a common medication. Only 2 cases have previously described the distinctive capillary degeneration identified in gastric mucosa. We expanded on this by describing additional involved sites, endoscopic findings, and patient characteristics. Gastrointestinal biopsy materials for cases indexed with the word doxycycline were retrieved and the histology reviewed. The medical record was used to obtain clinical details. Three cases with biopsy materials were identified from the search, and doxycycline ingestion was confirmed. All patients' gastric biopsies had small vessel injury with fibrinoid material around the vessel, and 1 patient had similar changes in the duodenum. Endoscopic findings included fundic and pyloric erosions and ulcers. One patient had a normal endoscopy on follow-up after drug cessation. Confirmation and increased understanding of this drug-specific injury pattern are important for patient management, as cessation appears to result in symptom improvement and healing. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Gastrointestinal involvement in systemic mastocytosis.

    PubMed Central

    Ammann, R W; Vetter, D; Deyhle, P; Tschen, H; Sulser, H; Schmid, M

    1976-01-01

    Four consecutive patients with systemic mastocytosis were studied. One patient had a malabsorption syndrome with only minor histological changes of the intestinal mucosa. Another patient with ulcer diathesis had a gastric secretory pattern resembling Zollinger-Ellison syndrome. Serum gastrin and histamine levels were consistently normal in all patients. Endoscopy of stomach and colon disclosed urticaria-like papulae either spontaneously or after topical provocation in all patients. No increase of mast cells was found in multiple mucosal biopsies. A markedly increased gastric tissue content of histamine was found, however, in the three patients studied. The findings suggest that urticaria-like lesions associated with a high tissue content of histamine may be more important that hyperhistaminaemia in causing the various gastrointestinal symptoms. PMID:1261881

  11. Comparative gastrointestinal safety of weekly oral bisphosphonates

    PubMed Central

    Katz, J. N.; Brookhart, M. A.; Stürmer, T.; Stedman, M. R.; Levin, R.; Solomon, D. H.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Weekly bisphosphonates are the primary agents used to treat osteoporosis. Although these agents are generally well tolerated, serious gastrointestinal adverse events, including hospitalization for gastrointestinal bleed, may arise. We compared the gastrointestinal safety between weekly alendronate and weekly risedronate and found no important difference between new users of these agents. Introduction Weekly bisphosphonates are the primary agents prescribed for osteoporosis. We examined the comparative gastrointestinal safety between weekly bisphosphonates. Methods We studied new users of weekly alendronate and weekly risedronate from June 2002 to August 2005 among enrollees in a state-wide pharmaceutical benefit program for seniors. Our primary outcome was hospitalization for upper gastrointestinal bleed. Secondary outcomes included outpatient diagnoses for upper gastrointestinal disease, symptoms, endoscopic procedures, use of gastroprotective agents, and switching between therapies. We used Cox proportional hazard models to compare outcomes between agents within 120 days of treatment initiation, adjusting for propensity score quintiles. We also examined composite safety outcomes and stratified results by age and prior gastrointestinal history. Results A total of 10,420 new users were studied, mean age=79 years (SD, 6.9), and 95% women. We observed 31 hospitalizations for upper gastrointestinal bleed (0.91 per 100 person-years) within 120 days of treatment initiation. Adjusting for covariates, there was no difference in hospitalization for upper gastrointestinal bleed among those treated with risedronate compared with alendronate (HR, 1.12; 95%CI, 0.55 to 2.28). Risedronate switching rates were lower; otherwise, no differences were observed for secondary or composite outcomes. Conclusions We found no important difference in gastrointestinal safety between weekly oral bisphosphonates. PMID:19266138

  12. Patient Health Communication Mediating Effects Between Gastrointestinal Symptoms and Gastrointestinal Worry in Pediatric Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    PubMed

    Varni, James W; Shulman, Robert J; Self, Mariella M; Saeed, Shehzad A; Patel, Ashish S; Nurko, Samuel; Neigut, Deborah A; Saps, Miguel; Zacur, George M; Dark, Chelsea V; Bendo, Cristiane B; Pohl, John F

    2017-05-01

    To investigate the effects of patient health communication regarding their inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) to their health care providers and significant others in their daily life as a mediator in the relationship between gastrointestinal symptoms and gastrointestinal worry in pediatric patients. The Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory Gastrointestinal Symptoms, Gastrointestinal Worry, and Communication Scales, and Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory 4.0 Generic Core Scales were completed in a 9-site study by 252 pediatric patients with IBD. Gastrointestinal Symptoms Scales measuring stomach pain, constipation, or diarrhea and patient communication were tested for bivariate and multivariate linear associations with Gastrointestinal Worry Scales specific to patient worry about stomach pain or bowel movements. Mediational analyses were conducted to test the hypothesized mediating effects of patient health communication as an intervening variable in the relationship between gastrointestinal symptoms and gastrointestinal worry. The predictive effects of gastrointestinal symptoms on gastrointestinal worry were mediated in part by patient health communication with health care providers/significant others in their daily life. In predictive models using multiple regression analyses, the full conceptual model of demographic variables, gastrointestinal symptoms (stomach pain, constipation, or diarrhea), and patient communication significantly accounted for 46, 43, and 54 percent of the variance in gastrointestinal worry (all Ps < 0.001), respectively, reflecting large effect sizes. Patient health communication explains in part the effects of gastrointestinal symptoms on gastrointestinal worry in pediatric patients with IBD. Supporting patient disease-specific communication to their health care providers and significant others may improve health-related quality of life for pediatric patients with IBD.

  13. DNA Microarray for Detection of Gastrointestinal Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Martínez, Miguel A.; Soto-del Río, María de los Dolores; Gutiérrez, Rosa María; Chiu, Charles Y.; Greninger, Alexander L.; Contreras, Juan Francisco; López, Susana; Arias, Carlos F.

    2014-01-01

    Gastroenteritis is a clinical illness of humans and other animals that is characterized by vomiting and diarrhea and caused by a variety of pathogens, including viruses. An increasing number of viral species have been associated with gastroenteritis or have been found in stool samples as new molecular tools have been developed. In this work, a DNA microarray capable in theory of parallel detection of more than 100 viral species was developed and tested. Initial validation was done with 10 different virus species, and an additional 5 species were validated using clinical samples. Detection limits of 1 × 103 virus particles of Human adenovirus C (HAdV), Human astrovirus (HAstV), and group A Rotavirus (RV-A) were established. Furthermore, when exogenous RNA was added, the limit for RV-A detection decreased by one log. In a small group of clinical samples from children with gastroenteritis (n = 76), the microarray detected at least one viral species in 92% of the samples. Single infection was identified in 63 samples (83%), and coinfection with more than one virus was identified in 7 samples (9%). The most abundant virus species were RV-A (58%), followed by Anellovirus (15.8%), HAstV (6.6%), HAdV (5.3%), Norwalk virus (6.6%), Human enterovirus (HEV) (9.2%), Human parechovirus (1.3%), Sapporo virus (1.3%), and Human bocavirus (1.3%). To further test the specificity and sensitivity of the microarray, the results were verified by reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) detection of 5 gastrointestinal viruses. The RT-PCR assay detected a virus in 59 samples (78%). The microarray showed good performance for detection of RV-A, HAstV, and calicivirus, while the sensitivity for HAdV and HEV was low. Furthermore, some discrepancies in detection of mixed infections were observed and were addressed by reverse transcription-quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) of the viruses involved. It was observed that differences in the amount of genetic material favored the detection of the most abundant

  14. Gastrointestinal symptoms predictors of health-related quality of life in pediatric patients with functional gastrointestinal disorders

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    To investigate the patient-reported multidimensional gastrointestinal symptoms predictors of generic health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in pediatric patients with functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGIDs). The Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory (PedsQL) Gastrointestinal Symptoms Scales and ...

  15. Allergenicity, immunogenicity and dose-relationship of three intact allergen vaccines and four allergoid vaccines for subcutaneous grass pollen immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Henmar, H; Lund, G; Lund, L; Petersen, A; Würtzen, P A

    2008-01-01

    Different vaccines containing intact allergens or chemically modified allergoids as active ingredients are commercially available for specific immunotherapy. Allergoids are claimed to have decreased allergenicity without loss of immunogenicity and this is stated to allow administration of high allergoid doses. We compared the allergenicity and immunogenicity of four commercially available chemically modified grass pollen allergoid products with three commercially available intact grass pollen allergen vaccines. The allergenicity was investigated with immunoglobulin (Ig)E-inhibition and basophil activation assays. Human T cell proliferation and specific IgG-titres following mouse immunizations were used to address immunogenicity. Furthermore, intact allergen vaccines with different contents of active ingredients were selected to study the influence of the allergen dose. In general, a lower allergenicity for allergen vaccines was clearly linked to a reduced immunogenicity. Compared with the vaccine with the highest amount of intact allergen, the allergoids caused reduced basophil activation as well as diminished immunogenicity demonstrated by reduced T cell activation and/or reduced induction of murine grass-specific IgG antibodies. Interestingly, intact allergen vaccines with lower content of active ingredient exhibited similarly reduced allergenicity, while immunogenicity was still higher or equal to that of allergoids. The low allergenicity observed for some allergoids was inherently linked to a significantly lower immunogenic response questioning the rationale behind the chemical modification into allergoids. In addition, the linkage between allergenicity, immunogenicity and dose found for intact allergen vaccines and the immunogen as well as allergenic immune responses observed for allergoids suggest that the modified allergen vaccines do not contain high doses of immunologically active ingredients. PMID:18647321

  16. Allergenicity, immunogenicity and dose-relationship of three intact allergen vaccines and four allergoid vaccines for subcutaneous grass pollen immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Henmar, H; Lund, G; Lund, L; Petersen, A; Würtzen, P A

    2008-09-01

    Different vaccines containing intact allergens or chemically modified allergoids as active ingredients are commercially available for specific immunotherapy. Allergoids are claimed to have decreased allergenicity without loss of immunogenicity and this is stated to allow administration of high allergoid doses. We compared the allergenicity and immunogenicity of four commercially available chemically modified grass pollen allergoid products with three commercially available intact grass pollen allergen vaccines. The allergenicity was investigated with immunoglobulin (Ig)E-inhibition and basophil activation assays. Human T cell proliferation and specific IgG-titres following mouse immunizations were used to address immunogenicity. Furthermore, intact allergen vaccines with different contents of active ingredients were selected to study the influence of the allergen dose. In general, a lower allergenicity for allergen vaccines was clearly linked to a reduced immunogenicity. Compared with the vaccine with the highest amount of intact allergen, the allergoids caused reduced basophil activation as well as diminished immunogenicity demonstrated by reduced T cell activation and/or reduced induction of murine grass-specific IgG antibodies. Interestingly, intact allergen vaccines with lower content of active ingredient exhibited similarly reduced allergenicity, while immunogenicity was still higher or equal to that of allergoids. The low allergenicity observed for some allergoids was inherently linked to a significantly lower immunogenic response questioning the rationale behind the chemical modification into allergoids. In addition, the linkage between allergenicity, immunogenicity and dose found for intact allergen vaccines and the immunogen as well as allergenic immune responses observed for allergoids suggest that the modified allergen vaccines do not contain high doses of immunologically active ingredients.

  17. SOLITARY CHEMORECEPTOR CELL SURVIVAL IS INDEPENDENT OF INTACT TRIGEMINAL INNERVATION

    PubMed Central

    Gulbransen, Brian; Silver, Wayne; Finger, Tom

    2008-01-01

    Nasal solitary chemoreceptor cells (SCCs) are a population of specialized chemosensory epithelial cells presumed to broaden trigeminal chemoreceptivity in mammals (Finger et al., 2003). SCCs are innervated by peptidergic trigeminal nerve fibers (Finger et al., 2003) but it is currently unknown if intact innervation is necessary for SCC development or survival. We tested the dependence of SCCs on innervation by eliminating trigeminal nerve fibers during development with neurogenin-1 knockout mice, during early postnatal development with capsaicin desensitization, and during adulthood with trigeminal lesioning. Our results demonstrate that elimination of innervation at any of these times does not result in decreased SCC numbers. In conclusion, neither SCC development nor mature cell maintenance is dependent on intact trigeminal innervation. PMID:18300260

  18. Solitary chemoreceptor cell survival is independent of intact trigeminal innervation.

    PubMed

    Gulbransen, Brian; Silver, Wayne; Finger, Thomas E

    2008-05-01

    Nasal solitary chemoreceptor cells (SCCs) are a population of specialized chemosensory epithelial cells presumed to broaden trigeminal chemoreceptivity in mammals (Finger et al. [2003] Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 100:8981-8986). SCCs are innervated by peptidergic trigeminal nerve fibers (Finger et al. [2003]) but it is currently unknown if intact innervation is necessary for SCC development or survival. We tested the dependence of SCCs on innervation by eliminating trigeminal nerve fibers during development with neurogenin-1 knockout mice, during early postnatal development with capsaicin desensitization, and during adulthood with trigeminal lesioning. Our results demonstrate that elimination of innervation at any of these times does not result in decreased SCC numbers. In conclusion, neither SCC development nor mature cell maintenance is dependent on intact trigeminal innervation. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  19. Structural determination of intact proteins using mass spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    Kruppa, Gary [San Francisco, CA; Schoeniger, Joseph S [Oakland, CA; Young, Malin M [Livermore, CA

    2008-05-06

    The present invention relates to novel methods of determining the sequence and structure of proteins. Specifically, the present invention allows for the analysis of intact proteins within a mass spectrometer. Therefore, preparatory separations need not be performed prior to introducing a protein sample into the mass spectrometer. Also disclosed herein are new instrumental developments for enhancing the signal from the desired modified proteins, methods for producing controlled protein fragments in the mass spectrometer, eliminating complex microseparations, and protein preparatory chemical steps necessary for cross-linking based protein structure determination.Additionally, the preferred method of the present invention involves the determination of protein structures utilizing a top-down analysis of protein structures to search for covalent modifications. In the preferred method, intact proteins are ionized and fragmented within the mass spectrometer.

  20. Integrating Mass Spectrometry of Intact Protein Complexes into Structural Proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Hyung, Suk-Joon; Ruotolo, Brandon T.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Mass spectrometry analysis of intact protein complexes has emerged as an established technology for assessing the composition and connectivity within dynamic, heterogeneous multiprotein complexes at low concentrations and in the context of mixtures. As this technology continues to move forward, one of the main challenges is to integrate the information content of such intact protein complex measurements with other mass spectrometry approaches in structural biology. Methods such as H/D exchange, oxidative foot-printing, chemical cross-linking, affinity purification, and ion mobility separation add complementary information that allows access to every level of protein structure and organization. Here, we survey the structural information that can be retrieved by such experiments, demonstrate the applicability of integrative mass spectrometry approaches in structural proteomics, and look to the future to explore upcoming innovations in this rapidly-advancing area. PMID:22611037

  1. Rare gastrointestinal lymphomas: The endoscopic investigation

    PubMed Central

    Vetro, Calogero; Bonanno, Giacomo; Giulietti, Giorgio; Romano, Alessandra; Conticello, Concetta; Chiarenza, Annalisa; Spina, Paolo; Coppolino, Francesco; Cunsolo, Rosario; Raimondo, Francesco Di

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal lymphomas represent up to 10% of gastrointestinal malignancies and about one third of non-Hodgkin lymphomas. The most prominent histologies are mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma and diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. However, the gastrointestinal tract can be the site of rarer lymphoma subtypes as a primary or secondary localization. Due to their rarity and the multifaceted histology, an endoscopic classification has not been validated yet. This review aims to analyze the endoscopic presentation of rare gastrointestinal lymphomas from disease diagnosis to follow-up, according to the involved site and lymphoma subtype. Existing, new and emerging endoscopic technologies have been examined. In particular, we investigated the diagnostic, prognostic and follow-up endoscopic features of T-cell and natural killer lymphomas, lymphomatous polyposis and mantle cell lymphoma, follicular lymphoma, plasma cell related disease, gastrointestinal lymphomas in immunodeficiency and Hodgkin’s lymphoma of the gastrointestinal tract. Contrarily to more frequent gastrointestinal lymphomas, data about rare lymphomas are mostly extracted from case series and case reports. Due to the data paucity, a synergism between gastroenterologists and hematologists is required in order to better manage the disease. Indeed, clinical and prognostic features are different from nodal and extranodal or the bone marrow (in case of plasma cell disease) counterpart. Therefore, the approach should be based on the knowledge of the peculiar behavior and natural history of disease. PMID:26265987

  2. Purification and Thermal Stability of Intact Bacillus subtilis Flagella

    PubMed Central

    Dimmitt, K.; Simon, M.

    1971-01-01

    Flagella were prepared and purified in a relatively intact form from bacterial lysates. Immunochemical tests showed that over 95% of the protein in the final preparation consisted of flagellar antigen. These flagella are more stable to thermal denaturation than flagella filaments obtained by shearing. Their thermal properties more closely resemble those of flagella in the native state on bacteria. The presence of the hook structure is responsible for this extra stability. Images PMID:4993323

  3. Intestinal gastrointestinal stromal tumor in a cat

    PubMed Central

    SUWA, Akihisa; SHIMODA, Tetsuya

    2017-01-01

    A 12-year-old, 3.6-kg, spayed female domestic shorthaired cat had a 2-month history of anorexia and weight loss. Abdominal ultrasonography and computed tomography revealed an exophytic mass originating from the jejunum with very poor central and poor peripheral contrast enhancement. On day 14, surgical resection of the jejunum and mass with 5-cm margins and an end-to-end anastomosis were performed. Histopathological examination revealed the mass was a transmural, invasive cancer showing exophytic growth and originating from the small intestinal muscle layer. Immunohistochemical analysis of tumor cells revealed diffuse positivity for KIT protein and negativity for desmin and S-100. The mass was diagnosed as a gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST). Ultrasonographic findings indicated the tumor probably metastasized to the liver and omentum, as seen in humans and dogs. The owner rejected further treatment at the last visit on day 192. To our knowledge, this is the first report of intestinal tumor and metastasis in feline GIST and its imaging features. PMID:28163271

  4. Multimodal pain stimulation of the gastrointestinal tract

    PubMed Central

    Drewes, Asbjørn Mohr; Gregersen, Hans

    2006-01-01

    Understanding and characterization of pain and other sensory symptoms are among the most important issues in the diagnosis and assessment of patient with gastrointestinal disorders. Methods to evoke and assess experimental pain have recently developed into a new area with the possibility for multimodal stimulation (e.g., electrical, mechanical, thermal and chemical stimulation) of different nerves and pain pathways in the human gut. Such methods mimic to a high degree the pain experienced in the clinic. Multimodal pain methods have increased our basic understanding of different peripheral receptors in the gut in health and disease. Together with advanced muscle analysis, the methods have increased our understanding of receptors sensitive to mechanical, chemical and temperature stimuli in diseases, such as systemic sclerosis and diabetes. The methods can also be used to unravel central pain mechanisms, such as those involved in allodynia, hyperalgesia and referred pain. Abnormalities in central pain mechanisms are often seen in patients with chronic gut pain and hence methods relying on multimodal pain stimulation may help to understand the symptoms in these patients. Sex differences have been observed in several diseases of the gut, and differences in central pain processing between males and females have been hypothesized using multimodal pain stimulations. Finally, multimodal methods have recently been used to gain more insight into the effect of drugs against pain in the GI tract. Hence, the multimodal methods undoubtedly represents a major step forward in the future characterization and treatment of patients with various diseases of the gut. PMID:16688791

  5. Fecal microbiota transplantation for gastrointestinal disorders.

    PubMed

    Malikowski, Thomas; Khanna, Sahil; Pardi, Darrell S

    2017-01-01

    The importance of the gut microbiome in human health is being increasingly recognized. The purpose of this review is to examine the existing literature pertaining to alterations in the gut microbiome and the utility of microbiome restoration therapies in gastrointestinal disorders. Imbalance and maladaptation of the microbiome, termed dysbiosis, has been associated with several disease states such as irritable bowel syndrome, Clostridium difficile infection, inflammatory bowel diseases, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, and obesity among others. The possibility of restoration of normal microbiota has become an attractive concept for diseases in which the normal microbiome is perturbed. The rationale of using fecal microbiota transplantation to treat disease has been validated by its successful use in treating recurrent Clostridium difficile infection, which occurs as a result of decreased microbial diversity in the gut, most often in the setting of recent antibiotic treatment. Similar strategies may be applicable to other disorders. Alterations in the gut microbiome are associated with several disorders, and microbiome restoration based therapies such as fecal microbiota transplantation may be an adjunct to conventional treatments but more investigation is needed.

  6. Gastrointestinal system involvement in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Li, Z; Xu, D; Wang, Z; Wang, Y; Zhang, S; Li, M; Zeng, X

    2017-10-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a multisystem disorder which can affect the gastrointestinal (GI) system. Although GI symptoms can manifest in 50% of patients with SLE, these have barely been reviewed due to difficulty in identifying different causes. This study aims to clarify clinical characteristics, diagnosis and treatment of the four major SLE-related GI system complications: protein-losing enteropathy (PLE), intestinal pseudo-obstruction (IPO), hepatic involvement and pancreatitis. It is a systematic review using MEDLINE and EMBASE databases and the major search terms were SLE, PLE, IPO, hepatitis and pancreatitis. A total of 125 articles were chosen for our study. SLE-related PLE was characterized by edema and hypoalbuminemia, with Technetium 99m labeled human albumin scintigraphy ( 99m Tc HAS) and alpha-1-antitrypsin fecal clearance test commonly used as diagnostic test. The most common site of protein leakage was the small intestine and the least common site was the stomach. More than half of SLE-related IPO patients had ureterohydronephrosis, and sometimes they manifested as interstitial cystitis and hepatobiliary dilatation. Lupus hepatitis and SLE accompanied by autoimmune hepatitis (SLE-AIH overlap) shared similar clinical manifestations but had different autoantibodies and histopathological features, and positive anti-ribosome P antibody highly indicated the diagnosis of lupus hepatitis. Lupus pancreatitis was usually accompanied by high SLE activity with a relatively high mortality rate. Early diagnosis and timely intervention were crucial, and administration of corticosteroids and immunosuppressants was effective for most of the patients.

  7. Vehicle influence on permeation through intact and compromised skin.

    PubMed

    Gujjar, Meera; Banga, Ajay K

    2014-09-10

    The purpose of this study was to compare the transdermal permeation of a model compound, diclofenac diethylamine, from a hydrophilic and lipophilic vehicle across in vitro models simulating compromised skin. Mineral oil served as a lipophilic vehicle while 10mM phosphate buffered saline served as a hydrophilic vehicle. Compromised skin was simulated by tape stripping, delipidization, or microneedle application and compared with intact skin as a control. Transepidermal water loss was measured to assess barrier function. Skin compromised with tape stripping and delipidization significantly (p<0.05) increased permeation of diclofenac diethylamine compared to intact and microneedle treated skin with phosphate buffered saline vehicle. A similar trend in permeation was observed with mineral oil as the vehicle. For both vehicles, permeation across skin increased in the same order and correlated with degree of barrier impairment as indicated by transepidermal water loss values: intact

  8. Modified madigan prostatectomy: a procedure preserved prostatic urethra intact.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jun; Ye, Zhangqun; Hu, Weilie

    2005-01-01

    A total of 92 patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) were subjected to modified Madigan prostatectomy (MPC) for a much satisfactory effect in open prostatectomy surgery. Exposing anterior prostatic urethra near the bladder neck and conjunct cystotomy modified the MPC procedure. This modified procedure preserved prostatic urethra intact and could also deal with intracystic lesions at the same time. The intact of prostatic urethra was kept completely or largely in 86 cases. The amount of blood loss during modified procedure was less. The mean operative time was 105 min. Seventy patients had been followed up for 3-24 months. The postoperative average Qmax was 19. 2 ml/s. The cystourethrography revealed that the urethra and bladder neck were intact in 10 patients postoperatively. Furthermore, the prostatic urethra was obviously wider after modified MPC. The modified MPC can reduce the occurrence of urethra injury and enlarge the MPC indications. The modified technique is easy to perform with less complications and much satisfactory clinical result.

  9. Arraying of intact liposomes into chemically functionalized microwells.

    PubMed

    Kalyankar, Nikhil D; Sharma, Manoj K; Vaidya, Shyam V; Calhoun, David; Maldarelli, Charles; Couzis, Alexander; Gilchrist, Lane

    2006-06-06

    Here, we describe a protocol to bind individual, intact phospholipid bilayer liposomes, which are on the order of 1 microm in diameter, in microwells etched in a regular array on a silicon oxide substrate. The diameter of the wells is on the order of the liposome diameter, so only one liposome is located in each well. The background of the silicon oxide surface is functionalized with a PEG oligomer using the contact printing of a PEG silane to present a surface that resists the adsorption of proteins, lipid material, and liposomes. The interiors of the wells are functionalized with an aminosilane to facilitate the conjugation of biotin, which is then bound to Neutravidin. The avidin-coated well interiors bind the liposomes whose surfaces contain biotinylated lipids. The specific binding of the liposomes to the surface using the biotin-avidin linkage, together with the resistant nature of the background and the physical confinement of the wells, allows the liposomes to remain intact and to not unravel, rupture, and fuse onto the surface. We demonstrate this intact arraying using confocal laser scanning microscopy of fluorophores specifically tagging the microwells, the lipid bilayer, and the aqueous interior of the liposome.

  10. Reduction in heat-induced gastrointestinal hyperpermeability in rats by bovine colostrum and goat milk powders.

    PubMed

    Prosser, C; Stelwagen, K; Cummins, R; Guerin, P; Gill, N; Milne, C

    2004-02-01

    Male Sprague-Dawley rats were assigned to one of three dietary groups [standard diet (Cont; n = 8), standard diet plus bovine colostrum powder (BColost 1.7 g/kg; n = 8), or goat milk powder (GMilk 1.7 g/kg; n = 8)] to determine the ability of these supplements to reduce gastrointestinal hyperpermeability induced by heat. Raising core body temperature of rats to 41.5 degrees C increased transfer of (51)Cr-EDTA from gut into blood 34-fold relative to the ambient temperature value (P < 0.05) in the Cont group of rats, indicative of increased gastrointestinal permeability. Significantly less (P < 0.01) (51)Cr-EDTA was transferred into the blood of rats in either the BColost (27% of Cont) or GMilk group (10% of Cont) after heating, showing that prior supplementation with either bovine colostrum or goat milk powder significantly reduced the impact of heat stress on gastrointestinal permeability. The changes in the BColost group were not significantly different than those of the GMilk group. The potential mechanism of the protective effect of bovine colostrum and goat milk powders may involve modulation of tight junction permeability, because both powders were able to maintain transepithelial resistance in Madin Darby canine kidney cells challenged with EGTA compared with cells maintained in media only. The results show that bovine colostrum powder can partially alleviate the effects of hyperthermia on gastrointestinal permeability in the intact animal. Moreover, goat milk powder was equally as effective as bovine colostrum powder, and both may be of benefit in other situations where gastrointestinal barrier function is compromised.

  11. Upper gastrointestinal bleeding in patients with CKD.

    PubMed

    Liang, Chih-Chia; Wang, Su-Ming; Kuo, Huey-Liang; Chang, Chiz-Tzung; Liu, Jiung-Hsiun; Lin, Hsin-Hung; Wang, I-Kuan; Yang, Ya-Fei; Lu, Yueh-Ju; Chou, Che-Yi; Huang, Chiu-Ching

    2014-08-07

    Patients with CKD receiving maintenance dialysis are at risk for upper gastrointestinal bleeding. However, the risk of upper gastrointestinal bleeding in patients with early CKD who are not receiving dialysis is unknown. The hypothesis was that their risk of upper gastrointestinal bleeding is negatively linked to renal function. To test this hypothesis, the association between eGFR and risk of upper gastrointestinal bleeding in patients with stages 3-5 CKD who were not receiving dialysis was analyzed. Patients with stages 3-5 CKD in the CKD program from 2003 to 2009 were enrolled and prospectively followed until December of 2012 to monitor the development of upper gastrointestinal bleeding. The risk of upper gastrointestinal bleeding was analyzed using competing-risks regression with time-varying covariates. In total, 2968 patients with stages 3-5 CKD who were not receiving dialysis were followed for a median of 1.9 years. The incidence of upper gastrointestinal bleeding per 100 patient-years was 3.7 (95% confidence interval, 3.5 to 3.9) in patients with stage 3 CKD, 5.0 (95% confidence interval, 4.8 to 5.3) in patients with stage 4 CKD, and 13.9 (95% confidence interval, 13.1 to 14.8) in patients with stage 5 CKD. Higher eGFR was associated with a lower risk of upper gastrointestinal bleeding (P=0.03), with a subdistribution hazard ratio of 0.93 (95% confidence interval, 0.87 to 0.99) for every 5 ml/min per 1.73 m(2) higher eGFR. A history of upper gastrointestinal bleeding (P<0.001) and lower serum albumin (P=0.004) were independently associated with higher upper gastrointestinal bleeding risk. In patients with CKD who are not receiving dialysis, lower renal function is associated with higher risk for upper gastrointestinal bleeding. The risk is higher in patients with previous upper gastrointestinal bleeding history and low serum albumin. Copyright © 2014 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  12. Immunohistochemical features of the gastrointestinal tract tumors

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Hannah H.

    2012-01-01

    Gastrointestinal tract tumors include a wide variety of vastly different tumors and on a whole are one of the most common malignancies in western countries. These tumors often present at late stages as distant metastases which are then biopsied and may be difficult to differentiate without the aid of immunohistochemical stains. With the exception of pancreatic and biliary tumors where there are no distinct immunohistochemical patterns, most gastrointestinal tumors can be differentiated by their unique immunohistochemical profile. As the size of biopsies decrease, the role of immunohistochemical stains will become even more important in determining the origin and differentiation of gastrointestinal tract tumors. PMID:22943017

  13. Laparoscopic management of gastric gastrointestinal stromal tumors

    PubMed Central

    Correa-Cote, Juan; Morales-Uribe, Carlos; Sanabria, Alvaro

    2014-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are the most frequent gastrointestinal tumors of mesodermal origin. Gastric GISTs represent approximately 70% of all gastrointestinal GISTs. The only curative option is surgical resection. Many surgical groups have shown good results with the laparoscopic approach. There have not been any randomized controlled trials comparing the open vs laparoscopic approach, and all recommendations have been based on observational studies. The experience obtained from gastric laparoscopic surgery during recent decades and the development of specific devices have allowed the treatment of most gastric GISTs through the laparoscopic approach. PMID:25031788

  14. Laparoscopic management of gastric gastrointestinal stromal tumors.

    PubMed

    Correa-Cote, Juan; Morales-Uribe, Carlos; Sanabria, Alvaro

    2014-07-16

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are the most frequent gastrointestinal tumors of mesodermal origin. Gastric GISTs represent approximately 70% of all gastrointestinal GISTs. The only curative option is surgical resection. Many surgical groups have shown good results with the laparoscopic approach. There have not been any randomized controlled trials comparing the open vs laparoscopic approach, and all recommendations have been based on observational studies. The experience obtained from gastric laparoscopic surgery during recent decades and the development of specific devices have allowed the treatment of most gastric GISTs through the laparoscopic approach.

  15. Nanoparticle toxicity by the gastrointestinal route: evidence and knowledge gaps

    PubMed Central

    Bergin, Ingrid L.; Witzmann, Frank A.

    2013-01-01

    The increasing interest in nanoparticles for advanced technologies, consumer products, and biomedical applications has led to great excitement about potential benefits but also concern over the potential for adverse human health effects. The gastrointestinal tract represents a likely route of entry for many nanomaterials, both directly through intentional ingestion or indirectly via nanoparticle dissolution from food containers or by secondary ingestion of inhaled particles. Additionally, increased utilisation of nanoparticles may lead to increased environmental contamination and unintentional ingestion via water, food animals, or fish. The gastrointestinal tract is a site of complex, symbiotic interactions between host cells and the resident microbiome. Accordingly, evaluation of nanoparticles must take into consideration not only absorption and extraintestinal organ accumulation but also the potential for altered gut microbes and the effects of this perturbation on the host. The existing literature was evaluated for evidence of toxicity based on these considerations. Focus was placed on three categories of nanomaterials: nanometals and metal oxides, carbon-based nanoparticles, and polymer/dendrimers with emphasis on those particles of greatest relevance to gastrointestinal exposures. PMID:24228068

  16. Phytotherapy in Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders.

    PubMed

    Kelber, Olaf; Bauer, Rudolf; Kubelka, Wolfgang

    2017-01-01

    Phytotherapy is an important therapeutic option in functional gastrointestinal diseases (FGID). It has a large tradition, with different approaches in different regions of the world, some of which have made their way into modern evidence-based medicine (EBM). Taking into account the number of herbs in use, and also the cumulated scientific evidence on them, FGID are possibly the most important indication in phytotherapy. This does not only apply for European phytotherapy, but also for other regions, such as Asia. Within European phytotherapy, herbs active in FGID are usually classified according to their main active constituents and their activities. Typically, the herbs used in FGID are grouped into amara, aromatica, amara aromatica combining both properties, herbs stimulating gastric secretion, herbs containing spasmolytic and carminative essential oils or spasmolytic alkaloids, mucilaginosa soothing the mucosa, and flavonoid containing drugs with anti-inflammatory properties. In phytotherapy, different plants are frequently combined to maximize effectiveness and specificity of action. Very potent combination products can be developed when the mechanisms of action of the combination partners are complementary. This approach can be demonstrated by the example of STW 5. For this herbal combination product, therapeutic efficacy in FGID has been clinically proven according to the highest standards of EBM. This example also underlines that modern rational phytotherapy is definitely part of modern EBM. Key Messages: FGID is one of the most important indications in phytotherapy and rationally combined herbal preparations are established evidence-based therapeutic options. © 2018 The Author(s) Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  17. Quality assurance for gastrointestinal endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Allen, John I

    2012-09-01

    This review concerns quality assurance for gastrointestinal endoscopic procedures, especially colonoscopy and will emphasize research and guidelines published since January 2011. Important articles from previous years have been included for background. Critical lapses in endoscope processing and administration of intravenous sedation alerted us to the infection risk of endoscopy. Increases in cost of colonoscopy, evidence for overuse and studies demonstrating missed cancers have led some to question the value of endoscopy. Despite these setbacks, the National Polyp Study (NPS) consortium published their long-term follow-up of the original NPS patients and confirmed that colonoscopy with polyp removal can reduce the risk of colorectal cancer for an extended period. In this article, we will focus on ways to improve the value of outpatient colonoscopy. The United States national quality improvement agenda recently became organized into a more coordinated effort spearheaded by several public and private entities. They comprise the infrastructure by which performance measures are developed and implemented as accountability standards. Understanding wherein a gastroenterology (GI) practice fits into this infrastructure and learning ways we can improve our endoscopic practice is important for physicians who provide this vital service to patients. This article will provide a roadmap for developing a quality assurance program for endoscopic practice.

  18. Gastrointestinal dysfunction in liver cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Kalaitzakis, Evangelos

    2014-01-01

    Patients with liver cirrhosis exhibit several features of gut dysfunction which may contribute to the development of cirrhosis complications as well as have an impact on nutritional status and health-related quality of life. Gastrointestinal symptoms are common in cirrhosis and their pathophysiology probably involves factors related to liver disease severity, psychological distress, and gut dysfunction (e.g., increased gastric sensitivity to distension and delayed gut transit). They may lead to reduced food intake and, thus, may contribute to the nutritional status deterioration in cirrhotic patients. Although tense ascites appears to have a negative impact on meal-induced accommodation of the stomach, published data on gastric accommodation in cirrhotics without significant ascites are not unanimous. Gastric emptying and small bowel transit have generally been shown to be prolonged. This may be related to disturbances in postprandial glucose, insulin, and ghrelin levels, which, in turn, appear to be associated to insulin resistance, a common finding in cirrhosis. Furthermore, small bowel manometry disturbances and delayed gut transit may be associated with the development of small bowel bacterial overgrowth. Finally, several studies have reported intestinal barrier dysfunction in patients with cirrhosis (especially those with portal hypertension), which is related to bacterial translocation and permeation of intestinal bacterial products, e.g., endotoxin and bacterial DNA, thus potentially being involved in the pathogenesis of complications of liver cirrhosis. PMID:25356031

  19. Gastrointestinal Prophylaxis in Sports Medicine.

    PubMed

    Patel, Akash R; Oheb, Daniel; Zaslow, Tracy L

    Because sports participation at all levels often requires international travel, coaches, athletic trainers, and team physicians must effectively protect athletes from gastrointestinal infections. Traveler's diarrhea is the most common travel-related illness and can significantly interfere with training and performance. A review of relevant publications was completed using PubMed and Google Scholar. Clinical review. Level 5 Results: Enterotoxigenic and enteroaggregative Escherichia coli are the most common bacterial causes of traveler's diarrhea. Traveler's diarrhea generally occurs within 4 days of arrival, and symptoms tend to resolve within 5 days of onset. There are several prophylactic agents that physicians can recommend to athletes, including antibiotics, bismuth subsalicylate, and probiotics; however, each has its own unique limitations. Decision-making should be based on the athlete's destination, length of stay, and intent of travel. Prophylaxis with antibiotics is highly effective; however, physicians should be hesitant to prescribe medication due to the side effects and risks for creating antibiotic-resistant bacterial strains. Antibiotics may be indicated for high-risk groups, such as those with a baseline disease or travelers who have little flexible time. Since most cases of traveler's diarrhea are caused by food and/or water contamination, all athletes should be educated on the appropriate food and water consumption safety measures prior to travel.

  20. Mucoadhesive microparticles for local treatment of gastrointestinal diseases.

    PubMed

    Preisig, Daniel; Roth, Roger; Tognola, Sandy; Varum, Felipe J O; Bravo, Roberto; Cetinkaya, Yalcin; Huwyler, Jörg; Puchkov, Maxim

    2016-08-01

    Mucoadhesive microparticles formulated in a capsule and delivered to the gastrointestinal tract might be useful for local drug delivery. However, swelling and agglomeration of hydrophilic polymers in the gastrointestinal milieu can have a negative influence on particle retention of mucoadhesive microparticles. In this work, we investigated the impact of dry-coating with nano-sized hydrophilic fumed silica on dispersibility and particle retention of mucoadhesive microparticles. As a model for local treatment of gastrointestinal diseases, antibiotic therapy of Clostridium difficile infections with metronidazole was selected. For particle preparation, we used a two-step fluidized-bed method based on drug loading of porous microcarriers and subsequent outer coating with the mucoadhesive polymer chitosan. The prepared microparticles were analysed for drug content, and further characterized by thermal analysis, X-ray diffraction, and scanning electron microscopy. The optimal molecular weight and content of chitosan were selected by measuring particle retention on porcine colonic mucosa under dynamic flow conditions. Mucoadhesive microparticles coated with 5% (weight of chitosan coating/total weight of particles) of low molecular weight chitosan showed good in vitro particle retention, and were used for the investigation of dispersibility enhancement. By increasing the amount of silica, the dissolution rate measured in the USPIV apparatus was increased, which was an indirect indication for improved dispersibility due to increased surface area. Importantly, mucoadhesion was not impaired up to a silica concentration of 5% (w/w). In summary, mucoadhesive microparticles with sustained-release characteristics over several hours were manufactured at pilot scale, and dry-coating with silica nanoparticles has shown to improve the dispersibility, which is essential for better particle distribution along the intestinal mucosa in humans. Therefore, this advanced drug delivery

  1. Transcatheter Arterial Embolization for Gastrointestinal Bleeding Secondary to Gastrointestinal Lymphoma

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Lin; Shin, Ji Hoon, E-mail: jhshin@amc.seoul.kr; Han, Kichang

    PurposeTo evaluate the effectiveness of transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) for gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding caused by GI lymphoma.Materials and MethodsThe medical records of 11 patients who underwent TAE for GI bleeding caused by GI lymphoma between 2001 and 2015 were reviewed retrospectively.ResultsA total of 20 TAE procedures were performed. On angiography, contrast extravasation, and both contrast extravasation and tumor staining were seen in 95 % (19/20) and 5 % (1/20) of the procedures, respectively. The most frequently embolized arteries were jejunal (n = 13) and ileal (n = 5) branches. Technical and clinical success rates were 100 % (20/20) and 27 % (3/11), respectively. The causes of clinical failuremore » in eight patients were rebleeding at new sites. In four patients who underwent repeat angiography, the bleeding focus was new each time. Three patients underwent small bowel resection due to rebleeding after one (n = 2) or four (n = 1) times of TAEs. Another two patients underwent small bowel resection due to small bowel ischemia/perforation after three or four times of TAEs. The 30-day mortality rate was 18 % due to hypovolemic shock (n = 1) and multiorgan failure (n = 1).ConclusionAngiogram with TAE shows limited therapeutic efficacy to manage GI lymphoma-related bleeding due to high rebleeding at new sites. Although TAE can be an initial hemostatic measure, surgery should be considered for rebleeding due to possible bowel ischemic complication after repeated TAE procedures.« less

  2. Transcatheter Arterial Embolization for Gastrointestinal Bleeding Secondary to Gastrointestinal Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Lin; Shin, Ji Hoon; Han, Kichang; Tsauo, Jiaywei; Yoon, Hyun-Ki; Ko, Gi-Young; Shin, Jong-Soo; Sung, Kyu-Bo

    2016-11-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) for gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding caused by GI lymphoma. The medical records of 11 patients who underwent TAE for GI bleeding caused by GI lymphoma between 2001 and 2015 were reviewed retrospectively. A total of 20 TAE procedures were performed. On angiography, contrast extravasation, and both contrast extravasation and tumor staining were seen in 95 % (19/20) and 5 % (1/20) of the procedures, respectively. The most frequently embolized arteries were jejunal (n = 13) and ileal (n = 5) branches. Technical and clinical success rates were 100 % (20/20) and 27 % (3/11), respectively. The causes of clinical failure in eight patients were rebleeding at new sites. In four patients who underwent repeat angiography, the bleeding focus was new each time. Three patients underwent small bowel resection due to rebleeding after one (n = 2) or four (n = 1) times of TAEs. Another two patients underwent small bowel resection due to small bowel ischemia/perforation after three or four times of TAEs. The 30-day mortality rate was 18 % due to hypovolemic shock (n = 1) and multiorgan failure (n = 1). Angiogram with TAE shows limited therapeutic efficacy to manage GI lymphoma-related bleeding due to high rebleeding at new sites. Although TAE can be an initial hemostatic measure, surgery should be considered for rebleeding due to possible bowel ischemic complication after repeated TAE procedures.

  3. Virtual Reality Simulation of the Effects of Microgravity in Gastrointestinal Physiology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Compadre, Cesar M.

    1998-01-01

    The ultimate goal of this research is to create an anatomically accurate three-dimensional (3D) simulation model of the effects of microgravity in gastrointestinal physiology and to explore the role that such changes may have in the pharmacokinetics of drugs given to the space crews for prevention or therapy. To accomplish this goal the specific aims of this research are: 1) To generate a complete 3-D reconstructions of the human GastroIntestinal (GI) tract of the male and female Visible Humans. 2) To develop and implement time-dependent computer algorithms to simulate the GI motility using the above 3-D reconstruction.

  4. Drugs Approved for Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST). The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  5. METHOD OF SUPPRESSING GASTROINTESTINAL UREASE ACTIVITY

    DOEpatents

    Visek, W.J.

    1963-04-23

    This patent shows a method of increasing the growth rate of chicks. Certain diacyl substituted ureas such as alloxan, murexide, and barbituric acid are added to their feed, thereby suppressing gastrointestinal urease activity and thus promoting growth. (AEC)

  6. Gastro-intestinal phytobezoars in Zimbabwean Africans.

    PubMed

    Stein, C M; Gelfand, M

    1985-01-01

    The clinical features of 10 African patients with gastro-intestinal phytobezoars are described. These were similar to those described with persimmon bezoars and we postulate that the fruit of locally found trees, also of the genus Diospyros, are responsible.

  7. Influence of gastrointestinal tract on metabolism of bisphenol A as determined by in vitro simulated system.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yonghua; Rui, Min; Nie, Yang; Lu, Guanghua

    2018-05-07

    Oral exposure is a major route of human bisphenol A (BPA) exposure. However, influence of gastrointestinal tract on BPA metabolism is unavailable. In this study, in vitro simulator of the human intestinal microbial ecosystem (SHIME) was applied to investigate the changes in bioaccessibility and metabolism of BPA in different parts of gastrointestinal tract (stomach, small intestine and colon). Then the human hepatoma cell line HepG2 was employed to compare toxic effects of BPA itself and effluents of SHIME system on hepatic gene expression profiles. Results showed that level of bioaccessible BPA decreased with the process of gastrointestinal digestion. But the gastrointestinal digestion could not completely degrade BPA. Then, BPA exposure significantly changed microbial community in colons and increased the percentage of microbes shared in ascending, transverse and descending colons. Abundances of BPA-degradable bacteria, such as Microbacterium and Alcaligenes, were up-regulated. Further, SHIME effluents significantly up-regulated expressions of genes related to estrogenic effect and oxidative stress compared to BPA itself, but reduced or had little change on the risk of cell apoptosis and fatty deposits. This study sheds new lights on influence of gastrointestinal digestion on bioaccessibility and toxic effects of BPA. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Recent Advances in Gastrointestinal Stent Development

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jin-Seok; Jeong, Seok

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopic stenting is increasingly being used in the management of gastrointestinal luminal obstruction, and has become the current treatment of choice for the palliation of blockage caused by malignant or benign growths. A variety of stents have been developed to enhance the efficacy of the procedure, and improvements are ongoing. In this article, we review the history of, and recent advances in, gastrointestinal stenting. We describe the rationale behind the design as well as the resulting outcome for each stent type. PMID:26064820

  9. 21 CFR 876.1725 - Gastrointestinal motility monitoring system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Gastrointestinal motility monitoring system. 876... Gastrointestinal motility monitoring system. (a) Identification. A gastrointestinal motility monitoring system is a... esophageal motility monitor and tube, the gastrointestinal motility (electrical) system, and certain...

  10. 21 CFR 876.1725 - Gastrointestinal motility monitoring system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Gastrointestinal motility monitoring system. 876... Gastrointestinal motility monitoring system. (a) Identification. A gastrointestinal motility monitoring system is a... esophageal motility monitor and tube, the gastrointestinal motility (electrical) system, and certain...

  11. Abnormal gastrointestinal endocrine cells in patients with diabetes type 1: relationship to gastric emptying and myoelectrical activity.

    PubMed

    El-Salhy, M; Sitohy, B

    2001-11-01

    Gastrointestinal symptoms in patients with diabetes are believed to be caused by gastrointestinal dysmotility and secretion/absorption disturbances, and the gut endocrine cells play an important part in regulating these two functions. Studies on animal models of human diabetes type I revealed abnormality in these cells, but it is unknown whether abnormality also occurs in patients with diabetes. Eleven patients with long duration of diabetes type I and organ complications, as well as gastrointestinal symptoms, were studied. Endocrine cells in different segments of the gastrointestinal tract were detected by immunocytochemistry and quantified by computerized image analysis. Gastric emptying was measured by scintigraphy and gastric myoelectric activity was determined by electrogastrography. An abnormal density of gastrointestinal endocrine cells was found in patients with diabetes. This abnormality occurred in all segments of the upper and lower gastrointestinal tract investigated, and included most of the endocrine cell types. The patients showed delayed gastric emptying, which correlated closely with the acute glucose level, but did not correlate with HbA1c. Gastric emptying also correlated closely with the density of duodenal serotonin and secretin cells. The patients exhibited bradygastrias and tachygastrias. These dysrhythmias, however, did not differ significantly from controls. The endocrine cells are the anatomical units responsible for the production of gut hormones, and the change in their density would reflect a change in the capacity of producing these hormones. The abnormality in density of the gastrointestinal endocrine cells may contribute to the development of gastrointestinal dysmotility and the symptoms encountered in patients with diabetes.

  12. Gastrointestinal radiation injury: prevention and treatment.

    PubMed

    Shadad, Abobakr K; Sullivan, Frank J; Martin, Joseph D; Egan, Laurence J

    2013-01-14

    With the recent advances in detection and treatment of cancer, there is an increasing emphasis on the efficacy and safety aspects of cancer therapy. Radiation therapy is a common treatment for a wide variety of cancers, either alone or in combination with other treatments. Ionising radiation injury to the gastrointestinal tract is a frequent side effect of radiation therapy and a considerable proportion of patients suffer acute or chronic gastrointestinal symptoms as a result. These side effects often cause morbidity and may in some cases lower the efficacy of radiotherapy treatment. Radiation injury to the gastrointestinal tract can be minimised by either of two strategies: technical strategies which aim to physically shift radiation dose away from the normal intestinal tissues, and biological strategies which aim to modulate the normal tissue response to ionising radiation or to increase its resistance to it. Although considerable improvement in the safety of radiotherapy treatment has been achieved through the use of modern optimised planning and delivery techniques, biological techniques may offer additional further promise. Different agents have been used to prevent or minimize the severity of gastrointestinal injury induced by ionising radiation exposure, including biological, chemical and pharmacological agents. In this review we aim to discuss various technical strategies to prevent gastrointestinal injury during cancer radiotherapy, examine the different therapeutic options for acute and chronic gastrointestinal radiation injury and outline some examples of research directions and considerations for prevention at a pre-clinical level.

  13. Small Angle Neutron-Scattering Studies of the Core Structure of Intact Neurosecretory Vesicles.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krueger, Susan Takacs

    Small angle neutron scattering (SANS) was used to study the state of the dense cores within intact neurosecretory vesicles. These vesicles transport the neurophysin proteins, along with their associated hormones, oxytocin or vasopressin, from the posterior pituitary gland to the bloodstream, where the entire vesicle contents are released. Knowledge of the vesicle core structure is important in developing an understanding of this release mechanism. Since the core constituents exist in a dense state at concentrations which cannot be reproduced (in solution) in the laboratory, a new method was developed to determine the core structure from SANS experiments performed on intact neurosecretory vesicles. These studies were complemented by biochemical assays performed to determine the role, if any, played by phospholipids in the interactions between the core constituents. H_2O/D_2 O ratio in the solvent can be adjusted, using the method of contrast variation, such that the scattering due to the vesicle membranes is minimized, thus emphasizing the scattering originating from the cores. The applicability of this method for examining the interior of biological vesicles was tested by performing an initial study on human red blood cells, which are similar in structure to other biological vesicles. Changes in intermolecular hemoglobin interactions, occurring when the ionic strength of the solvent was varied or when the cells were deoxygenated, were examined. The results agreed with those expected for dense protein solutions, indicating that the method developed was suitable for the study of hemoglobin within the cells. Similar SANS studies were then performed on intact neurosecretory vesicles. The experimental results were inconsistent with model calculations which assumed that the cores consisted of small, densely-packed particles or large, globular aggregates. Although a unique model could not be determined, the data suggest that the core constituents form long aggregates of

  14. Can breathing-like pressure oscillations reverse or prevent narrowing of small intact airways?

    PubMed

    Harvey, Brian C; Parameswaran, Harikrishnan; Lutchen, Kenneth R

    2015-07-01

    Periodic length fluctuations of airway smooth muscle during breathing are thought to modulate airway responsiveness in vivo. Recent animal and human intact airway studies have shown that pressure fluctuations simulating breathing can only marginally reverse airway narrowing and are ineffective at protecting against future narrowing. However, these previous studies were performed on relatively large (>5 mm diameter) airways, which are inherently stiffer than smaller airways for which a preponderance of airway constriction in asthma likely occurs. The goal of this study was to determine the effectiveness of breathing-like transmural pressure oscillations to reverse induced narrowing and/or protect against future narrowing of smaller, more compliant intact airways. We constricted smaller (luminal diameter = 2.92 ± 0.29 mm) intact airway segments twice with ACh (10(-6) M), once while applying tidal-like pressure oscillations (5-15 cmH2O) before, during, and after inducing constriction (Pre + Post) and again while only imposing the tidal-like pressure oscillation after induced constriction (Post Only). Smaller airways were 128% more compliant than previously studied larger airways. This increased compliance translated into 196% more strain and 76% greater recovery (41 vs. 23%) because of tidal-like pressure oscillations. Larger pressure oscillations (5-25 cmH2O) caused more recovery (77.5 ± 16.5%). However, pressure oscillations applied before and during constriction resulted in the same steady-state diameter as when pressure oscillations were only applied after constriction. These data show that reduced straining of the airways before a challenge likely does not contribute to the emergence of airway hyperreactivity observed in asthma but may serve to sustain a given level of constriction. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  15. Intact Cell MALDI-TOF MS on Sperm: A Molecular Test For Male Fertility Diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Soler, Laura; Labas, Valérie; Thélie, Aurore; Grasseau, Isabelle; Teixeira-Gomes, Ana-Paula; Blesbois, Elisabeth

    2016-06-01

    Currently, evaluation of sperm quality is primarily based on in vitro measures of sperm function such as motility, viability and/or acrosome reaction. However, results are often poorly correlated with fertility, and alternative diagnostic tools are therefore needed both in veterinary and human medicine. In a recent pilot study, we demonstrated that MS profiles from intact chicken sperm using MALDI-TOF profiles could detect significant differences between fertile/subfertile spermatozoa showing that such profiles could be useful for in vitro male fertility testing. In the present study, we performed larger standardized experimental procedures designed for the development of fertility- predictive mathematical models based on sperm cell MALDI-TOF MS profiles acquired through a fast, automated method. This intact cell MALDI-TOF MS-based method showed high diagnostic accuracy in identifying fertile/subfertile males in a large male population of known fertility from two distinct genetic lineages (meat and egg laying lines). We additionally identified 40% of the m/z peaks observed in sperm MS profiles through a top-down high-resolution protein identification analysis. This revealed that the MALDI-TOF MS spectra obtained from intact sperm cells contained a large proportion of protein degradation products, many implicated in important functional pathways in sperm such as energy metabolism, structure and movement. Proteins identified by our predictive model included diverse and important functional classes providing new insights into sperm function as it relates to fertility differences in this experimental system. Thus, in addition to the chicken model system developed here, with the use of appropriate models these methods should effectively translate to other animal taxa where similar tests for fertility are warranted. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  16. Deep Learning in Gastrointestinal Endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Patel, Vivek; Armstrong, David; Ganguli, Malika; Roopra, Sandeep; Kantipudi, Neha; Albashir, Siwar; Kamath, Markad V

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) endoscopy is used to inspect the lumen or interior of the GI tract for several purposes, including, (1) making a clinical diagnosis, in real time, based on the visual appearances; (2) taking targeted tissue samples for subsequent histopathological examination; and (3) in some cases, performing therapeutic interventions targeted at specific lesions. GI endoscopy is therefore predicated on the assumption that the operator-the endoscopist-is able to identify and characterize abnormalities or lesions accurately and reproducibly. However, as in other areas of clinical medicine, such as histopathology and radiology, many studies have documented marked interobserver and intraobserver variability in lesion recognition. Thus, there is a clear need and opportunity for techniques or methodologies that will enhance the quality of lesion recognition and diagnosis and improve the outcomes of GI endoscopy. Deep learning models provide a basis to make better clinical decisions in medical image analysis. Biomedical image segmentation, classification, and registration can be improved with deep learning. Recent evidence suggests that the application of deep learning methods to medical image analysis can contribute significantly to computer-aided diagnosis. Deep learning models are usually considered to be more flexible and provide reliable solutions for image analysis problems compared to conventional computer vision models. The use of fast computers offers the possibility of real-time support that is important for endoscopic diagnosis, which has to be made in real time. Advanced graphics processing units and cloud computing have also favored the use of machine learning, and more particularly, deep learning for patient care. This paper reviews the rapidly evolving literature on the feasibility of applying deep learning algorithms to endoscopic imaging.

  17. Upper gastrointestinal issues in athletes.

    PubMed

    Waterman, Jason J; Kapur, Rahul

    2012-01-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) complaints are common among athletes with rates in the range of 30% to 70%. Both the intensity of sport and the type of sporting activity have been shown to be contributing factors in the development of GI symptoms. Three important factors have been postulated as contributing to the pathophysiology of GI complaints in athletes: mechanical forces, altered GI blood flow, and neuroendocrine changes. As a result of those factors, gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), nausea, vomiting, gastritis, peptic ulcers, GI bleeding, or exercise-related transient abdominal pain (ETAP) may develop. GERD may be treated with changes in eating habits, lifestyle modifications, and training modifications. Nausea and vomiting may respond to simple training modifications, including no solid food 3 hours prior to an athletic event. Mechanical trauma, decreased splanchnic blood flow during exercise, and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) contribute to gastritis, GI bleeding, and ulcer formation in athletes. Acid suppression with proton-pump inhibitors may be useful in athletes with persistence of any of the above symptoms. ETAP is a common, poorly-understood, self-limited acute abdominal pain which is difficult to treat. ETAP incidence increases in athletes beginning a new exercise program or increasing the intensity of their current exercise program. ETAP may respond to changes in breathing patterns or may resolve simply with continued training. Evaluation of the athlete with upper GI symptoms requires a thorough history, a detailed training log, a focused physical examination aimed at ruling out potentially serious causes of symptoms, and follow-up laboratory testing based on concerning physical examination findings.

  18. [Functional and motor gastrointestinal disorders].

    PubMed

    Mearin, Fermín; Perelló, Antonia; Balboa, Agustín

    2008-10-01

    Functional gastrointestinal (GI) and motility disorders generate a large volume of consultations in gastroenterology and primary care offices. The present article summarizes the most interesting studies presented in the annual meeting of the American Gastroenterological Association 2008. For all functional GI disorders, studies were presented that evaluated the applicability of diagnostic criteria in clinical practice and new data were presented on physiopathology (for example, mediation by neuromodulators such as serotonin, microinflammation, alterations in intestinal microbiota, and psychological factors). More specifically, the therapeutic results of new prokinetic agents in functional dyspepsia, such as acotiamide, were presented. This agent has been demonstrated to have good efficacy in symptom control, especially in patients with postprandial distress syndrome. In irritable bowel syndrome, data were presented on several drugs that act through diverse mechanisms of action and have been shown to be more effective than placebo in symptom control. These drugs include antiinflammatory agents such as mesalazine, antibiotics such as rifaximin, probiotics with distinct bacterial strains, and prokinetic agents such as lubiprostone. Highly promising results have been obtained in the treatment of constipation with prokinetics such as prucalopride and with novel laxatives such as linaclotide, as well as with techniques that continue to be shown to be effective such as anorectal biofeedback, which is also highly useful in patients with fecal incontinence. Another disorder that is less frequent but highly difficult to treat is gastroparesis. For several years, treatment in the most severe cases has consisted of implantation of a gastric pacemaker. Although the results are far from perfect, new data were presented that allow better patient selection to achieve greater symptom control. The list of new advances, both in knowledge of the physiopathology of these disorders and

  19. Feasible pickup from intact ossicular chain with floating piezoelectric microphone.

    PubMed

    Kang, Hou-Yong; Na, Gao; Chi, Fang-Lu; Jin, Kai; Pan, Tie-Zheng; Gao, Zhen

    2012-02-22

    Many microphones have been developed to meet with the implantable requirement of totally implantable cochlear implant (TICI). However, a biocompatible one without destroying the intactness of the ossicular chain still remains under investigation. Such an implantable floating piezoelectric microphone (FPM) has been manufactured and shows an efficient electroacoustic performance in vitro test at our lab. We examined whether it pick up sensitively from the intact ossicular chain and postulated whether it be an optimal implantable one. Animal controlled experiment: five adult cats (eight ears) were sacrificed as the model to test the electroacoustic performance of the FPM. Three groups were studied: (1) the experiment group (on malleus): the FPM glued onto the handle of the malleus of the intact ossicular chains; (2) negative control group (in vivo): the FPM only hung into the tympanic cavity; (3) positive control group (Hy-M30): a HiFi commercial microphone placed close to the site of the experiment ear. The testing speaker played pure tones orderly ranged from 0.25 to 8.0 kHz. The FPM inside the ear and the HiFi microphone simultaneously picked up acoustic vibration which recorded as .wav files to analyze. The FPM transformed acoustic vibration sensitively and flatly as did the in vitro test across the frequencies above 2.0 kHz, whereas inefficiently below 1.0 kHz for its overloading mass. Although the HiFi microphone presented more efficiently than the FPM did, there was no significant difference at 3.0 kHz and 8.0 kHz. It is feasible to develop such an implantable FPM for future TICIs and TIHAs system on condition that the improvement of Micro Electromechanical System and piezoelectric ceramic material technology would be applied to reduce its weight and minimize its size.

  20. Intact EAV-HP Endogenous Retrovirus in Sonnerat's Jungle Fowl

    PubMed Central

    Sacco, M. A.; Howes, K.; Venugopal, K.

    2001-01-01

    The EAV-HP group of chicken endogenous retrovirus elements was previously shown to be defective, with large deletions of the pol gene. In this report, we demonstrate that genomes of other Gallus species also maintain EAV-HP elements with similar deletions. The chicken EAV-HP1 locus was detected in both red (Gallus gallus gallus) and Sonnerat's (Gallus sonneratii) jungle fowl with identical integration sites, indicating that these elements had integrated before separation of the Gallus species. Furthermore, we demonstrate for the first time that the G. sonneratii genome carries EAV-HP elements with intact pol regions. PMID:11160706

  1. 46 CFR 178.325 - Intact stability requirements-monohull sailing vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... simplified stability proof test detailed in § 178.330 of this part, in the presence of a Coast Guard marine... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Intact stability requirements-monohull sailing vessels... PASSENGER VESSELS (UNDER 100 GROSS TONS) INTACT STABILITY AND SEAWORTHINESS Intact Stability Standards § 178...

  2. 46 CFR 178.325 - Intact stability requirements-monohull sailing vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... simplified stability proof test detailed in § 178.330 of this part, in the presence of a Coast Guard marine... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Intact stability requirements-monohull sailing vessels... PASSENGER VESSELS (UNDER 100 GROSS TONS) INTACT STABILITY AND SEAWORTHINESS Intact Stability Standards § 178...

  3. 46 CFR 178.325 - Intact stability requirements-monohull sailing vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... simplified stability proof test detailed in § 178.330 of this part, in the presence of a Coast Guard marine... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Intact stability requirements-monohull sailing vessels... PASSENGER VESSELS (UNDER 100 GROSS TONS) INTACT STABILITY AND SEAWORTHINESS Intact Stability Standards § 178...

  4. Screening of intact yeasts and cell extracts to reduce Scrapie prions during biotransformation of food waste.

    PubMed

    Huyben, David; Boqvist, Sofia; Passoth, Volkmar; Renström, Lena; Allard Bengtsson, Ulrika; Andréoletti, Olivier; Kiessling, Anders; Lundh, Torbjörn; Vågsholm, Ivar

    2018-02-08

    Yeasts can be used to convert organic food wastes to protein-rich animal feed in order to recapture nutrients. However, the reuse of animal-derived waste poses a risk for the transmission of infectious prions that can cause neurodegeneration and fatality in humans and animals. The aim of this study was to investigate the ability of yeasts to reduce prion activity during the biotransformation of waste substrates-thereby becoming a biosafety hurdle in such a circular food system. During pre-screening, 30 yeast isolates were spiked with Classical Scrapie prions and incubated for 72 h in casein substrate, as a waste substitute. Based on reduced Scrapie seeding activity, waste biotransformation and protease activities, intact cells and cell extracts of 10 yeasts were further tested. Prion analysis showed that five yeast species reduced Scrapie seeding activity by approximately 1 log10 or 90%. Cryptococcus laurentii showed the most potential to reduce prion activity since both intact and extracted cells reduced Scrapie by 1 log10 and achieved the highest protease activity. These results show that select forms of yeast can act as a prion hurdle during the biotransformation of waste. However, the limited ability of yeasts to reduce prion activity warrants caution as a sole barrier to transmission as higher log reductions are needed before using waste-cultured yeast in circular food systems.

  5. Online Hydrophobic Interaction Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry for the Analysis of Intact Monoclonal Antibodies.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bifan; Lin, Ziqing; Alpert, Andrew J; Fu, Cexiong; Zhang, Qunying; Pritts, Wayne A; Ge, Ying

    2018-06-19

    Therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are an important class of drugs for a wide spectrum of human diseases. Liquid chromatography (LC) coupled to mass spectrometry (MS) is one of the techniques in the forefront for comprehensive characterization of analytical attributes of mAbs. Among various protein chromatography modes, hydrophobic interaction chromatography (HIC) is a popular offline nondenaturing separation technique utilized to purify and analyze mAbs, typically with the use of non-MS-compatible mobile phases. Herein we demonstrate for the first time, the application of direct HIC-MS and HIC-tandem MS (MS/MS) with electron capture dissociation (ECD) for analyzing intact mAbs on quadrupole-time-of-flight (Q-TOF) and Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR) mass spectrometers, respectively. Our method allows for rapid determination of relative hydrophobicity, intact masses, and glycosylation profiles of mAbs as well as sequence and structural characterization of the complementarity-determining regions in an online configuration.

  6. SIMULATION MODELING OF GASTROINTESTINAL ABSORPTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mathematical dosimetry models incorporate mechanistic determinants of chemical disposition in a living organism to describe relationships between exposure concentration and the internal dose needed for PBPK models and human health risk assessment. Because they rely on determini...

  7. Probiotics and Chronic Gastrointestinal Disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guarner, Francisco

    Human beings are associated in a symbiotic relationship with a huge population of microorganisms. During millennia, a considerable number of microbes have evolved and adapted to live and grow in the human intestine. The intestinal habitat of an individual contains billions of microorganisms including bacteria, protozoa, archaea, fungi, and viruses (Guarner and Malagelada, 2003; Ley et al., 2006), and the number of microbial cells within the gut lumen appears to be ten times larger than the number of eukaryotic cells of the human body. Some of these bacteria are potential pathogens and can be a source of infection and sepsis under some circumstances, for instance when the integrity of the bowel barrier is physically or functionally breached. However, growing evidence suggests that important health benefits to the human host derive from the constant interaction with its microbial guests. Recognition of these benefits in recent years is drawing particular attention to the functional implications of the gut microbial communities in host physiology.

  8. Patient health communication mediating effects between gastrointestinal symptoms and gastrointestinal worry in pediatric inflammatory bowel disease

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    To investigate the effects of patient health communication regarding their inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) to their health care providers and significant others in their daily life as a mediator in the relationship between gastrointestinal symptoms and gastrointestinal worry in pediatric patients. ...

  9. Surface plasmon resonance sensing: from purified biomolecules to intact cells.

    PubMed

    Su, Yu-Wen; Wang, Wei

    2018-04-12

    Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) has become a well-recognized label-free technique for measuring the binding kinetics between biomolecules since the invention of the first SPR-based immunosensor in 1980s. The most popular and traditional format for SPR analysis is to monitor the real-time optical signals when a solution containing ligand molecules is flowing over a sensor substrate functionalized with purified receptor molecules. In recent years, rapid development of several kinds of SPR imaging techniques have allowed for mapping the dynamic distribution of local mass density within single living cells with high spatial and temporal resolutions and reliable sensitivity. Such capability immediately enabled one to investigate the interaction between important biomolecules and intact cells in a label-free, quantitative, and single cell manner, leading to an exciting new trend of cell-based SPR bioanalysis. In this Trend Article, we first describe the principle and technical features of two types of SPR imaging techniques based on prism and objective, respectively. Then we survey the intact cell-based applications in both fundamental cell biology and drug discovery. We conclude the article with comments and perspectives on the future developments. Graphical abstract Recent developments in surface plasmon resonance (SPR) imaging techniques allow for label-free mapping the mass-distribution within single living cells, leading to great expansions in biomolecular interactions studies from homogeneous substrates functionalized with purified biomolecules to heterogeneous substrates containing individual living cells.

  10. Porcine intact and wounded skin responses to atmospheric nonthermal plasma.

    PubMed

    Wu, Andrew S; Kalghatgi, Sameer; Dobrynin, Danil; Sensenig, Rachel; Cerchar, Ekaternia; Podolsky, Erica; Dulaimi, Essel; Paff, Michelle; Wasko, Kimberly; Arjunan, Krishna Priya; Garcia, Kristin; Fridman, Gregory; Balasubramanian, Manjula; Ownbey, Robert; Barbee, Kenneth A; Fridman, Alexander; Friedman, Gary; Joshi, Suresh G; Brooks, Ari D

    2013-01-01

    Thermal plasma is a valued tool in surgery for its coagulative and ablative properties. We suggested through in vitro studies that nonthermal plasma can sterilize tissues, inactive pathogens, promote coagulation, and potentiate wound healing. The present research was undertaken to study acute toxicity in porcine skin tissues. We demonstrate that floating electrode-discharge barrier discharge (FE-DBD) nonthermal plasma is electrically safe to apply to living organisms for short periods. We investigated the effects of FE-DBD plasma on Yorkshire pigs on intact and wounded skin immediately after treatment or 24h posttreatment. Macroscopic or microscopic histological changes were identified using histological and immunohistochemical techniques. The changes were classified into four groups for intact skin: normal features, minimal changes or congestive changes, epidermal layer damage, and full burn and into three groups for wounded skin: normal, clot or scab, and full burn-like features. Immunohistochemical staining for laminin layer integrity showed compromise over time. A marker for double-stranded DNA breaks, γ-H2AX, increased over plasma-exposure time. These findings identified a threshold for plasma exposure of up to 900s at low power and <120s at high power. Nonthermal FE-DBD plasma can be considered safe for future studies of external use under these threshold conditions for evaluation of sterilization, coagulation, and wound healing. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Monitoring and treatment of acute gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Lenjani, Basri; Zeka, Sadik; Krasniqi, Salih; Bunjaku, Ilaz; Jakupi, Arianit; Elshani, Besni; Xhafa, Agim

    2012-01-01

    Acute gastrointestinal bleeding-massive acute bleeding from gastrointestinal section is one of the most frequent forms of acute abdomen. The mortality degree in emergency surgery is about 10%. It's very difficult to identify the place of bleeding and etiology. The important purpose of this research is to present the cases of acute gastrointestinal bleeding from the patients which were monitored and treated at The University Clinical Center of Kosova-Emergency Center in Pristina. These inquests included 137 patients with acute gastrointestinal bleeding who were treated in emergency center of The University Clinical Center in Pristina for the period from January 2005 until December 2006. From 137 patients with acute gastrointestinal bleeding 41% or 29% was female and 96% or 70.1% male. Following the sex we gained a high significant difference of statistics (p < 0.01). The gastrointestinal bleeding was two times more frequent in male than in female. Also in the age-group we had a high significant difference of statistics (p < 0.01) 63.5% of patients were over 55 years old. The mean age of patients with an acute gastrointestinal bleeding was 58.4 years SD 15.8 age. The mean age for female patients was 56.4 age SD 18.5 age. The patients with arterial systolic pressure under 100 mmHg have been classified as patients with hypovolemic shock. They participate with 17.5% in all prevalence of acute gastrointestinal bleeding. From the number of prevalence 2 {1.5%} patients have been diagnosed with peptic ulcer, 1 {0.7%} as gastric perforation and 1 {0.7%} with intestine ischemia. Abdominal Surgery and Intensive Care 2 or 1.5% died, 1 at intensive care unit and 1 at nephrology. As we know the severe condition of the patients with gastrointestinal bleeding and etiology it is very difficult to establish, we need to improve for the better conditions in our emergency center for treatment and initiation base of clinic criteria.

  12. The gut microbiota and gastrointestinal surgery.

    PubMed

    Guyton, Kristina; Alverdy, John C

    2017-01-01

    Surgery involving the gastrointestinal tract continues to prove challenging because of the persistence of unpredictable complications such as anastomotic leakage and life-threatening infections. Removal of diseased intestinal segments results in substantial catabolic stress and might require complex reconstructive surgery to maintain the functional continuity of the intestinal tract. As gastrointestinal surgery necessarily involves a breach of an epithelial barrier colonized by microorganisms, preoperative intestinal antisepsis is used to reduce infection-related complications. The current approach to intestinal antisepsis varies widely across institutions and countries with little understanding of its mechanism of action, effect on the gut microbiota and overall efficacy. Many of the current approaches to intestinal antisepsis before gastrointestinal surgery run counter to emerging concepts of intestinal microbiota contributing to immune function and recovery from injury. Here, we review evidence outlining the role of gut microbiota in recovery from gastrointestinal surgery, particularly in the development of infections and anastomotic leak. To make surgery safer and further reduce complications, a molecular, genetic and functional understanding of the response of the gastrointestinal tract to alterations in its microbiota is needed. Methods can then be developed to preserve the health-promoting functions of the microbiota while at the same time suppressing their harmful effects.

  13. Manipulation of host diet to reduce gastrointestinal colonization by the opportunistic pathogen Candida albicans

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Candida albicans, the most common human fungal pathogen, can cause systemic infections with a mortality rate of ~40%. Infections arise from colonization of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, where C. albicans is part of the normal microflora. Reducing colonization in at-risk patients using antifungal ...

  14. BIOACCESSIBILITY OF ARSENIC BOUND TO CORUNDUM USING A SIMULATED GASTROINTESTINAL SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ingestion of soil contaminated with arsenic is an important pathway for human exposure to arsenic. The risk posed by ingestion of arsenic-contaminated soil depends on how much arsenic is dissolved in the gastrointestinal tract. Aluminum oxides are common components in the soil a...

  15. 77 FR 59624 - Gastrointestinal Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Postponement of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-28

    ... FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Cindy Hong, Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, Food and Drug... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2012-N-0001] Gastrointestinal Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Postponement of Meeting AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration...

  16. Characterization of a gastrointestinal tract microscale cell culture analog used to predict drug toxicity

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The lining of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract is the largest surface exposed to the external environment in the human body. One of the main functions of the small intestine is absorption, and intestinal absorption is a route used by essential nutrients, chemicals, and pharmaceuticals to enter the sy...

  17. The probiotic Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 enhances early gastrointestinal maturation in young turkey poults

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Concerns over the use of antibiotics as growth promoters has led to interest in finding alternative growth promoters such as natural compounds and probiotics. Supplementing feed with probiotics has shown to enhance the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) development of chickens and turkeys. The human pro...

  18. Coliphages and Gastrointestinal Illness in Recreational Waters: Pooled Analysis of Six Coastal Beach Cohorts.

    PubMed

    Benjamin-Chung, Jade; Arnold, Benjamin F; Wade, Timothy J; Schiff, Kenneth; Griffith, John F; Dufour, Alfred P; Weisberg, Stephen B; Colford, John M

    2017-09-01

    Coliphages have been proposed as indicators of fecal contamination in recreational waters because they better mimic the persistence of pathogenic viruses in the environment and wastewater treatment than fecal indicator bacteria. We estimated the association between coliphages and gastrointestinal illness and compared it with the association with culturable enterococci. We pooled data from six prospective cohort studies that enrolled coastal beachgoers in California, Alabama, and Rhode Island. Water samples were collected and gastrointestinal illness within 10 days of the beach visit was recorded. Samples were tested for enterococci and male-specific and somatic coliphages. We estimated cumulative incidence ratios (CIR) for the association between swimming in water with detectable coliphage and gastrointestinal illness when human fecal pollution was likely present, not likely present, and under all conditions combined. The reference group was unexposed swimmers. We defined continuous and threshold-based exposures (coliphage present/absent, enterococci >35 vs. ≤35 CFU/100 ml). Under all conditions combined, there was no association between gastrointestinal illness and swimming in water with detectable coliphage or enterococci. When human fecal pollution was likely present, coliphage and enterococci were associated with increased gastrointestinal illness, and there was an association between male-specific coliphage level and illness that was somewhat stronger than the association between enterococci and illness. There were no substantial differences between male-specific and somatic coliphage. Somatic coliphage and enterococci had similar associations with gastrointestinal illness; there was some evidence that male-specific coliphage had a stronger association with illness than enterococci in marine waters with human fecal contamination.

  19. Therapeutic potential of curcumin in gastrointestinal diseases

    PubMed Central

    Rajasekaran, Sigrid A

    2011-01-01

    Curcumin, also known as diferuloylmethane, is derived from the plant Curcuma longa and is the active ingredient of the spice turmeric. The therapeutic activities of curcumin for a wide variety of diseases such as diabetes, allergies, arthritis and other chronic and inflammatory diseases have been known for a long time. More recently, curcumin’s therapeutic potential for preventing and treating various cancers is being recognized. As curcumin’s therapeutic promise is being explored more systematically in various diseases, it has become clear that, due to its increased bioavailability in the gastrointestinal tract, curcumin may be particularly suited to be developed to treat gastrointestinal diseases. This review summarizes some of the current literature of curcumin’s anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant and anti-cancer potential in inflammatory bowel diseases, hepatic fibrosis and gastrointestinal cancers. PMID:21607160

  20. Transfusion strategy for acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Handel, James; Lang, Eddy

    2015-09-01

    Clinical question Does a hemoglobin transfusion threshold of 70 g/L yield better patient outcomes than a threshold of 90 g/L in patients with acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding? Article chosen Villanueva C, Colomo A, Bosch A, et al. Transfusion strategies for acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding. N Engl J Med 2013;368(1):11-21. Study objectives The authors of this study measured mortality, from any cause, within the first 45 days, in patients with acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding, who were managed with a hemoglobin threshold for red cell transfusion of either 70 g/L or 90 g/L. The secondary outcome measures included rate of further bleeding and rate of adverse events.

  1. Bayesian network modelling of upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aisha, Nazziwa; Shohaimi, Shamarina; Adam, Mohd Bakri

    2013-09-01

    Bayesian networks are graphical probabilistic models that represent causal and other relationships between domain variables. In the context of medical decision making, these models have been explored to help in medical diagnosis and prognosis. In this paper, we discuss the Bayesian network formalism in building medical support systems and we learn a tree augmented naive Bayes Network (TAN) from gastrointestinal bleeding data. The accuracy of the TAN in classifying the source of gastrointestinal bleeding into upper or lower source is obtained. The TAN achieves a high classification accuracy of 86% and an area under curve of 92%. A sensitivity analysis of the model shows relatively high levels of entropy reduction for color of the stool, history of gastrointestinal bleeding, consistency and the ratio of blood urea nitrogen to creatinine. The TAN facilitates the identification of the source of GIB and requires further validation.

  2. Heme oxygenase-1 system and gastrointestinal tumors

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xiao; Fan, Wen-Guo; Li, Dong-Pei; Lin, Marie CM; Kung, Hsiangfu

    2010-01-01

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) system catabolizes heme into three products: carbon monoxide, biliverdin/bilirubin and free iron. It is involved in many physiological and pathophysiological processes. A great deal of data has demonstrated the roles of HO-1 in the formation, growth and metastasis of tumors. The interest in this system by investigators involved in gastrointestinal tumors is fairly recent, and few papers on HO-1 have touched upon this subject. This review focuses on the current understanding of the physiological significance of HO-1 induction and its possible roles in the gastrointestinal tumors studied to date. The implications for possible therapeutic manipulation of HO-1 in gastrointestinal tumors are also discussed. PMID:20518085

  3. Management of Acute Lower Gastrointestinal Bleeding.

    PubMed

    Speir, Ethan J; Ermentrout, R Mitchell; Martin, Jonathan G

    2017-12-01

    Acute lower gastrointestinal bleeding (LGIB), defined as hemorrhage into the gastrointestinal tract distal to the ligament of Treitz, is a major cause of morbidity and mortality among adults. Overall, mortality rates are estimated between 2.4% and 3.9%. The most common etiology for LGIB is diverticulosis, implicated in approximately 30% of cases, with other causes including hemorrhoids, ischemic colitis, and postpolypectomy bleeding. Transcatheter visceral angiography has begun to play an increasingly important role in both the diagnosis and treatment of LGIB. Historically, transcatheter visceral angiography has been used to direct vasopressin infusion with embolization reserved for treatment of upper gastrointestinal bleeding. However, advances in microcatheter technology and embolotherapy have enabled super-selective embolization to emerge as the treatment of choice for many cases of LGIB. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Diolistic labeling of neuronal cultures and intact tissue using a hand-held gene gun

    PubMed Central

    O'Brien, John A; Lummis, Sarah CR

    2009-01-01

    Diolistic labeling is a highly efficient method for introducing dyes into cells using biolistic techniques. The use of lipophilic carbocyanine dyes, combined with particle-mediated biolistic delivery using a hand-held gene gun, allows non-toxic labeling of multiple cells in both living and fixed tissue. The technique is rapid (labeled cells can be visualized in minutes) and technically undemanding. Here, we provide a detailed protocol for diolistic labeling of cultured human embryonic kidney 293 cells and whole brain using a hand-held gene gun. There are four major steps: (i) coating gold microcarriers with one or more dyes; (ii) transferring the microcarriers into a cartridge to make a bullet; (iii) preparation of cells or intact tissue; and (iv) firing the microcarriers into cells or tissue. The method can be readily adapted to other cell types and tissues. This protocol can be completed in less than 1 h. PMID:17406443

  5. Nitrate-Dependent O2 Evolution in Intact Leaves 1

    PubMed Central

    de la Torre, Angel; Delgado, Begoña; Lara, Catalina

    1991-01-01

    Evolution of O2 by illuminated intact detached leaves from barley (Hordeum vulgare L. cv Athos) and pea (Pisum sativum L. cv Lincoln) in a CO2-saturating atmosphere was enhanced when KNO3 (1-2.5 millimolar) had been previously supplied through the transpiration stream. The extra O2 evolution observed after feeding KNO3 increased with the light intensity, being maximal at near saturating photon flux densities and resulting in no changes in the initial slope of the O2 versus light-intensity curve. No stimulation of O2 evolution was otherwise observed after feeding KCl or NH4Cl. The data indicate that nitrate assimilation uses photosynthetically generated reductant and stimulates the rate of non-cyclic electron flow by acting as a second electron-accepting assimilatory process in addition to CO2 fixation. PMID:16668272

  6. Label-free volumetric optical imaging of intact murine brains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Jian; Choi, Heejin; Chung, Kwanghun; Bouma, Brett E.

    2017-04-01

    A central effort of today’s neuroscience is to study the brain’s ’wiring diagram’. The nervous system is believed to be a network of neurons interacting with each other through synaptic connection between axons and dendrites, therefore the neuronal connectivity map not only depicts the underlying anatomy, but also has important behavioral implications. Different approaches have been utilized to decipher neuronal circuits, including electron microscopy (EM) and light microscopy (LM). However, these approaches typically demand extensive sectioning and reconstruction for a brain sample. Recently, tissue clearing methods have enabled the investigation of a fully assembled biological system with greatly improved light penetration. Yet, most of these implementations, still require either genetic or exogenous contrast labeling for light microscopy. Here we demonstrate a high-speed approach, termed as Clearing Assisted Scattering Tomography (CAST), where intact brains can be imaged at optical resolution without labeling by leveraging tissue clearing and the scattering contrast of optical frequency domain imaging (OFDI).

  7. In vivo measurement of muscle output in intact Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Christopher J H; Sparrow, John C

    2012-01-01

    We describe our methods for analysing muscle function in a whole intact small insect, taking advantage of a simple flexible optical beam to produce an inexpensive transducer with wide application. We review our previous data measuring the response to a single action potential driven muscle twitch to explore jumping behaviour in Drosophila melanogaster. In the fruitfly, where the sophisticated and powerful genetic toolbox is being widely employed to investigate neuromuscular function, we further demonstrate the use of the apparatus to analyse in detail, within whole flies, neuronal and muscle mutations affecting activation of muscle contraction in the jump muscle. We have now extended the use of the apparatus to record the muscle forces during larval and other aspects of adult locomotion. The robustness, simplicity and versatility of the apparatus are key to these measurements. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Intact calcium signaling in adrenergic-deficient embryonic mouse hearts.

    PubMed

    Peoples, Jessica N; Taylor, David G; Katchman, Alexander N; Ebert, Steven N

    2018-01-22

    Mouse embryos that lack the ability to produce the adrenergic hormones, norepinephrine (NE) and epinephrine (EPI), due to disruption of the dopamine beta-hydroxylase (Dbh -/- ) gene inevitably perish from heart failure during mid-gestation. Since adrenergic stimulation is well-known to enhance calcium signaling in developing as well as adult myocardium, and impairments in calcium signaling are typically associated with heart failure, we hypothesized that adrenergic-deficient embryonic hearts would display deficiencies in cardiac calcium signaling relative to adrenergic-competent controls at a developmental stage immediately preceding the onset of heart failure, which first appears beginning or shortly after mouse embryonic day 10.5 (E10.5). To test this hypothesis, we used ratiometric fluorescent calcium imaging techniques to measure cytosolic calcium transients, [Ca 2+ ] i in isolated E10.5 mouse hearts. Our results show that spontaneous [Ca 2+ ] i oscillations were intact and robustly responded to a variety of stimuli including extracellular calcium (5 mM), caffeine (5 mM), and NE (100 nM) in a manner that was indistinguishable from controls. Further, we show similar patterns of distribution (via immunofluorescent histochemical staining) and activity (via patch-clamp recording techniques) for the major voltage-gated plasma membrane calcium channel responsible for the L-type calcium current, I Ca,L , in adrenergic-deficient and control embryonic cardiac cells. These results demonstrate that despite the absence of vital adrenergic hormones that consistently leads to embryonic lethality in vivo, intracellular and extracellular calcium signaling remain essentially intact and functional in embryonic mouse hearts through E10.5. These findings suggest that adrenergic stimulation is not required for the development of