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Sample records for intact human gastrointestinal

  1. MULTIPHOTON IMAGING CAN BE USED FOR MICROSCOPIC EXAMINATION OF INTACT HUMAN GASTROINTESTINAL MUCOSA EX VIVO

    PubMed Central

    Rogart, Jason N.; Nagata, Jun; Loeser, Caroline S.; Roorda, Robert D.; Aslanian, Harry; Robert, Marie E.; Zipfel, Warren R.; Nathanson, Michael H.

    2008-01-01

    Background & Aims The ability to observe cellular and subcellular detail during routine endoscopy is a major goal in the development of new endoscopic imaging techniques. Multiphoton microscopy, which relies on nonlinear infared optical processes, has the potential to identify cellular details by excitation of endogenous fluorescent molecules. We examined the feasibility of using multiphoton microscopy to characterize mucosal histology in the human gastrointestinal tract. Methods A multiphoton microscope was used to determine the optimal excitation wavelength for examination of gastrointestinal mucosa. Fresh, unfixed, and unstained biopsy specimens obtained during routine endoscopy in human subjects were then examined by confocal microscopy and multiphoton microscopy. Multiphoton images also were compared to standard H&E images obtained from paired biopsy specimens. A prototype miniaturized multiphoton probe was used to examine intact rat colon. Results Peak multiphoton autofluorescence intensity was detected in mucosa excited at 735 nm. Multiphoton microscopic examination of unstained biopsy specimens revealed improved cellular detail relative to either unstained or stained specimens examined by confocal imaging. Resolution of structures such as epithelial nuclei, goblet cells, and interstitial fibers and cells was comparable to what was obtained using standard H&E histology. Similar findings were observed when using a prototype miniaturized multiphoton probe. Conclusions Multiphoton microscopy can be used to examine gastrointestinal mucosa at the cellular level, without the need for fluorescent dyes. The construction of a multiphoton endomicroscope could therefore provide a practical means of performing “virtual biopsies” during the course of routine endoscopy, with advantages over currently available endomicroscopy technologies. PMID:18065276

  2. Approaches to gastrointestinal cytoprotection: from isolated cells, via animal experiments to healthy human subjects and patients with different gastrointestinal disorders.

    PubMed

    Mózsik, Gyula; Szabó, Imre L; Czimmer, József

    2011-01-01

    Our clinical observations proved that the the duodenal ulcer in patients healed without any inhibition of gastric acid secretion (1965), and the healing rates of atropine vs cimetidine vs Carbenoxolone were equal and superior to that of placebo in randomized, prospective and multiclinical study of DU patients (1978). The phenomenon of gastric cytoprotection was defined by André Robert in rats (1979). The essential point of this phenomenon is that the prostaglandins prevent the chemical-induced gastric mucosal damage without affecting gastric acid secretion, this being originally suggested as a reaction specific to prostaglandins. Since then gastrointestinal cytoprotection has been shown with various agents (anticholinergic agents, H(2)RA, growth factors, body protecting compound, BPC) and retinoids in animals; the latter differing from the actions of vitamin A. In examining the various components of gastrointestinal cytoprotection , different studies have performed in isolated cells, stable cell lines, animal experiments, healthy human subjects, in patients chronic gastric and duodenal ulcers, and with different gastrointestinal disorders. Our attention has focused on the effects of cytoprotective agents on cellular viability, mitochondrial and DNA damage, oxygen free radicals, natural antioxidant systems, mucosal biochemistry, vascular events, gastrointestinal mucosal protection as well as in their prevention of different human diseases. This paper gives an overview on the different approaches for the exploring gastrointestinal cytoprotection (at the level of isolated cells, animal experiments, healthy human beings and patients with different gastrointestinal disorders). It has been indicated that the gastric cytoprotection exists in animals, human healthy subjects, patients with different gastrointestinal disorders. The our human observation in patients with duodenal ulcer healed without any changes of gastric acid secretion, there were no significant

  3. [Gastrointestinal human myiasis caused by Eristalis tenax].

    PubMed

    Kun, M; Kreiter, A; Semenas, L

    1998-08-01

    The myiasis observed in Bariloche are characterized and the probable conditions under which the infestations took place established. The larvae obtained from faeces of 2 patients were identified as Eristalis tenax (Diptera: Syrphidae) according to Hartley (1961) and Organización Panamericana de la Salud keys (1962). These 2 cases of human gastrointestinal myiasis were the first to be registered in Bariloche (Patagonia, Argentina) and their characteristics were similar to those described for this species in other parts of the world. The lack of specific control measures in the domestic water supply system was the most probable cause of the infestation. This event extends the distribution of E. tenax and human gastrointestinal myiasis in South America to 41 degrees 03' S.

  4. Dopamine receptors in human gastrointestinal mucosa

    SciTech Connect

    Hernandez, D.E.; Mason, G.A.; Walker, C.H.; Valenzuela, J.E.

    1987-12-21

    Dopamine is a putative enteric neurotransmitter that has been implicated in exocrine secretory and motility functions of the gastrointestinal tract of several mammalian species including man. This study was designed to determine the presence of dopamine binding sites in human gastric and duodenal mucosa and to describe certain biochemical characteristics of these enteric receptor sites. The binding assay was performed in triplicate with tissue homogenates obtained from healthy volunteers of both sexes using /sup 3/H-dopamine as a ligand. The extent of nonspecific binding was determined in the presence of a 100-fold excess of unlabeled dopamine. Scatchard analysis performed with increasing concentrations of /sup 3/H-dopamine (20-500 nM) revealed a single class of saturable dopamine binding sites in gastric and duodenal mucosa. The results of this report demonstrate the presence of specific dopamine receptors in human gastric and duodenal mucosa. These biochemical data suggest that molecular abnormalities of these receptor sites may be operative in the pathogenesis of important gastrointestinal disorders. 33 references, 2 figures.

  5. Bacterial biofilms in the human gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Probert, H M; Gibson, G R

    2002-09-01

    Microbial biofilms were first described in 1936 and subsequent research has unveiled their ubiquity and physiological distinction from free-living (planktonic) microorganisms. In light of their emerging significance this review examines the bacterial biofilms within the human gastrointestinal tract. Attention is paid to the nature of these mucosally- associated populations, focusing on the protected environment afforded by the continual secretion of mucus by host epithelial cells. It also examines the attributes possessed by various bacterial species that facilitate habitation of this microenvironment. Additionally, contrasts are drawn between planktonic bacteria of the lumen and sessile (biofilm) bacteria growing in close association with host cells and food particles. In particular the different fermentation profiles exhibited by these two fractions are discussed. The potential role of these communities in host health and disease, as well as the stabilisation of the lumenal population, is also considered. Reference is made to the state of mutualism that exists between these little understood populations and the host epithelia, thus highlighting their ecological significance in terms of gastrointestinal health.

  6. Covert spatial attention is functionally intact in amblyopic human adults

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Mariel; Cymerman, Rachel; Smith, R. Theodore; Kiorpes, Lynne; Carrasco, Marisa

    2016-01-01

    Certain abnormalities in behavioral performance and neural signaling have been attributed to a deficit of visual attention in amblyopia, a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by a diverse array of visual deficits following abnormal binocular childhood experience. Critically, most have inferred attention's role in their task without explicitly manipulating and measuring its effects against a baseline condition. Here, we directly investigate whether human amblyopic adults benefit from covert spatial attention—the selective processing of visual information in the absence of eye movements—to the same degree as neurotypical observers. We manipulated both involuntary (Experiment 1) and voluntary (Experiment 2) attention during an orientation discrimination task for which the effects of covert spatial attention have been well established in neurotypical and special populations. In both experiments, attention significantly improved accuracy and decreased reaction times to a similar extent (a) between the eyes of the amblyopic adults and (b) between the amblyopes and their age- and gender-matched controls. Moreover, deployment of voluntary attention away from the target location significantly impaired task performance (Experiment 2). The magnitudes of the involuntary and voluntary attention benefits did not correlate with amblyopic depth or severity. Both groups of observers showed canonical performance fields (better performance along the horizontal than vertical meridian and at the lower than upper vertical meridian) and similar effects of attention across locations. Despite their characteristic low-level vision impairments, covert spatial attention remains functionally intact in human amblyopic adults. PMID:28033433

  7. Human papillomavirus and gastrointestinal cancer: A review

    PubMed Central

    Bucchi, Dania; Stracci, Fabrizio; Buonora, Nicola; Masanotti, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is one of the most common sexually transmitted infections worldwide. Exposure to HPV is very common, and an estimated 65%-100% of sexually active adults are exposed to HPV in their lifetime. The majority of HPV infections are asymptomatic, but there is a 10% chance that individuals will develop a persistent infection and have an increased risk of developing a carcinoma. The International Agency for Research on Cancer has found that the following cancer sites have a strong causal relationship with HPV: cervix uteri, penis, vulva, vagina, anus and oropharynx, including the base of the tongue and the tonsils. However, studies of the aetiological role of HPV in colorectal and esophageal malignancies have conflicting results. The aim of this review was to organize recent evidence and issues about the association between HPV infection and gastrointestinal tumours with a focus on esophageal, colorectal and anal cancers. The ultimate goal was to highlight possible implications for prognosis and prevention. PMID:27672265

  8. Cyclosporin metabolism by human gastrointestinal mucosal microsomes.

    PubMed Central

    Webber, I R; Peters, W H; Back, D J

    1992-01-01

    The in vitro metabolism of the immunosuppressant cyclosporin (CsA) by human gastrointestinal mucosal microsomes has been studied. Macroscopically normal intestinal (n = 4) and liver (n = 2) tissue was obtained from kidney transplant donors, and microsomes prepared. Intestinal metabolism was most extensive with duodenal protein (15% conversion to metabolites M1/M17 after 2 h incubation at 37 degrees C; metabolite measurement by h.p.l.c). Western blotting confirmed the presence of P-4503A (enzyme subfamily responsible for CsA metabolism) in duodenum and ileum tissue, but not in colon tissue. The results of this study indicate that the gut wall may play a role in the first-pass metabolism of CsA, and could therefore be a contributory factor to the highly variable oral bioavailability of CsA. PMID:1389941

  9. Cancer stem cells in human gastrointestinal cancer.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Hiroaki; Moriya, Chiharu; Igarashi, Hisayoshi; Saitoh, Anri; Yamamoto, Hiroyuki; Adachi, Yasushi; Imai, Kohzoh

    2016-11-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are thought to be responsible for tumor initiation, drug and radiation resistance, invasive growth, metastasis, and tumor relapse, which are the main causes of cancer-related deaths. Gastrointestinal cancers are the most common malignancies and still the most frequent cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide. Because gastrointestinal CSCs are also thought to be resistant to conventional therapies, an effective and novel cancer treatment is imperative. The first reported CSCs in a gastrointestinal tumor were found in colorectal cancer in 2007. Subsequently, CSCs were reported in other gastrointestinal cancers, such as esophagus, stomach, liver, and pancreas. Specific phenotypes could be used to distinguish CSCs from non-CSCs. For example, gastrointestinal CSCs express unique surface markers, exist in a side-population fraction, show high aldehyde dehydrogenase-1 activity, form tumorspheres when cultured in non-adherent conditions, and demonstrate high tumorigenic potential in immunocompromised mice. The signal transduction pathways in gastrointestinal CSCs are similar to those involved in normal embryonic development. Moreover, CSCs are modified by the aberrant expression of several microRNAs. Thus, it is very difficult to target gastrointestinal CSCs. This review focuses on the current research on gastrointestinal CSCs and future strategies to abolish the gastrointestinal CSC phenotype.

  10. Recent Advances in Human Protozoan Parasites of Gastrointestinal Tract

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-02-01

    frequency of oral-anal sexual contacts. No relation was seen between the presence or chance of gastrointestinal symptoms and infection with E...Lancet May 14: 1103. SPENCER MJ., CHAPIN M.R. & GARCIA L.S. 1962. Dientamoeba fragilis: A gastrointestinal protozoan infection in adults. American...ULIC EIL& p .( RECENT ADVANCES IN HUMAN PROTOZOAN PARASITES OF GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT J.H. Cross REPORT NO. CS -142 AD-A 182 878 ,ji.. ELECTE JULS j

  11. Ultrastructure of the intact skeleton of the human erythrocyte membrane.

    PubMed

    Shen, B W; Josephs, R; Steck, T L

    1986-03-01

    Filamentous skeletons were liberated from isolated human erythrocyte membranes in Triton X-100, spread on fenestrated carbon films, negatively stained, and viewed intact and unfixed in the transmission electron microscope. Two forms of the skeleton were examined: (a) basic skeletons, stripped of accessory proteins with 1.5 M NaCl so that they contain predominantly polypeptide bands 1, 2, 4.1, and 5; and (b) unstripped skeletons, which also bore accessory proteins such as ankyrin and band 3 and small plaques of residual lipid. Freshly prepared skeletons were highly condensed. Incubation at low ionic strength and in the presence of dithiothreitol for an hour or more caused an expansion of the skeletons, which greatly increased the visibility of their elements. The expansion may reflect the opening of spectrin from a compact to an elongated disposition. Expanded skeletons appeared to be organized as networks of short actin filaments joined by multiple (5-8) spectrin tetramers. In unstripped preparations, globular masses were observed near the centers of the spectrin filaments, probably corresponding to complexes of ankyrin with band 3 oligomers. Some of these globules linked pairs of spectrin filaments. Skeletons prepared with a minimum of perturbation had thickened actin protofilaments, presumably reflecting the presence of accessory proteins. The length of these actin filaments was highly uniform, averaging 33 +/- 5 nm. This is the length of nonmuscle tropomyosin. Since there is almost enough tropomyosin present to saturate the F-actin, our data support the hypothesis that tropomyosin may determine the length of actin protofilaments in the red cell membrane.

  12. Phosphorylation of intact erythrocytes in human muscular dystrophy

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, R.M.; Nigro, M.

    1986-04-01

    The uptake of exogenous /sup 32/Pi into the membrane proteins of intact erythrocytes was measured in 8 patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy. No abnormalities were noted after autoradiographic analysis. This contrasts with earlier results obtained when isolated membranes were phosphorylated with gamma-(/sup 32/P)ATP, and suggests a possible reinterpretation of those experiments.

  13. Human T Lymphotropic virus-1 associated gastrointestinal histoplasmosis in Peru

    PubMed Central

    Canelo-Aybar, Carlos; Cuadra-Urteaga, Jose; Atencia, Fernando; Romani, Franco

    2014-01-01

    We report a 72-year-old patient with chronic diarrhoea and histologic evidence of gastrointestinal histoplasmosis. He had no history of HIV or of taking immunosuppressive drugs. The patient was found to be a carrier of Human T-lymphotropic virus-1, a condition associated with inflammatory, lymphoproliferative, and opportunistic infectious diseases. To our knowledge, there are only three previous cases reporting this coinfection and this is the first documented case with gastrointestinal involvement. PMID:21727649

  14. The first 1000 cultured species of the human gastrointestinal microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Rajilić-Stojanović, Mirjana; de Vos, Willem M

    2014-01-01

    The microorganisms that inhabit the human gastrointestinal tract comprise a complex ecosystem with functions that significantly contribute to our systemic metabolism and have an impact on health and disease. In line with its importance, the human gastrointestinal microbiota has been extensively studied. Despite the fact that a significant part of the intestinal microorganisms has not yet been cultured, presently over 1000 different microbial species that can reside in the human gastrointestinal tract have been identified. This review provides a systematic overview and detailed references of the total of 1057 intestinal species of Eukarya (92), Archaea (8) and Bacteria (957), based on the phylogenetic framework of their small subunit ribosomal RNA gene sequences. Moreover, it unifies knowledge about the prevalence, abundance, stability, physiology, genetics and the association with human health of these gastrointestinal microorganisms, which is currently scattered over a vast amount of literature published in the last 150 years. This detailed physiological and genetic information is expected to be instrumental in advancing our knowledge of the gastrointestinal microbiota. Moreover, it opens avenues for future comparative and functional metagenomic and other high-throughput approaches that need a systematic and physiological basis to have an impact. PMID:24861948

  15. Quantitative analysis of human salivary gland-derived intact proteome using top-down mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wu, Si; Brown, Joseph N; Tolić, Nikola; Meng, Da; Liu, Xiaowen; Zhang, Haizhen; Zhao, Rui; Moore, Ronald J; Pevzner, Pavel; Smith, Richard D; Paša-Tolić, Ljiljana

    2014-05-01

    There are several notable challenges inherent for fully characterizing the entirety of the human saliva proteome using bottom-up approaches, including polymorphic isoforms, PTMs, unique splice variants, deletions, and truncations. To address these challenges, we have developed a top-down based LC-MS/MS approach, which cataloged 20 major human salivary proteins with a total of 83 proteoforms, containing a broad range of PTMs. Among these proteins, several previously reported disease biomarker proteins were identified at the intact protein level, such as beta-2 microglobulin. In addition, intact glycosylated proteoforms of several saliva proteins were also characterized, including intact N-glycosylated protein prolactin inducible protein and O-glycosylated acidic protein rich protein. These characterized proteoforms constitute an intact saliva proteoform database, which was used for quantitative comparison of intact salivary proteoforms among six healthy individuals. Human parotid and submandibular/sublingual gland secretion samples (2 μg of protein each) from six healthy individuals were compared using RPLC coupled with the 12T FT-ICR mass spectrometer. Significantly different proteoform profiles were resolved with high reproducibility between parotid secretion and submandibular/sublingual glands. The results from this study provide further insight into the potential mechanisms of PTM pathways in oral glandular secretion, expanding our knowledge of this complex yet easily accessible fluid. Intact protein LC-MS approach presented herein can potentially be applied for rapid and accurate identification of biomarkers from only a few microliters of human glandular saliva.

  16. Decreased plasma isoleucine concentrations after upper gastrointestinal haemorrhage in humans.

    PubMed Central

    Dejong, C H; Meijerink, W J; van Berlo, C L; Deutz, N E; Soeters, P B

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A decrease in arterial isoleucine values after intragastric blood administration in pigs has been observed. This contrasted with increased values of most other amino acids, ammonia, and urea. After an isonitrogenous control meal in these pigs all amino acids including isoleucine increased, and urea increased to a lesser extent, suggesting a relation between the arterial isoleucine decrease and uraemia after gastrointestinal haemorrhage. METHODS: To extend these findings to humans, plasma amino acids were determined after gastrointestinal haemorrhage in patients with peptic ulcers (n = 9) or oesophageal varices induced by liver cirrhosis (n = 4) and compared with preoperative patients (n = 106). RESULTS: After gastrointestinal haemorrhage, isoleucine decreased in all patients by more than 60% and normalised within 48 hours. Most other amino acids increased and also normalised within 48 hours. Uraemia occurred in both groups, hyperammonaemia was seen in patients with liver cirrhosis. CONCLUSIONS: These results confirm previous findings in animals and healthy volunteers that plasma isoleucine decreases after simulated upper gastrointestinal haemorrhage. This supports the hypothesis that the absence of isoleucine in blood protein causes decreased plasma isoleucine values after gastrointestinal haemorrhage, and may be a contributory factor to uraemia and hyperammonaemia in patients with normal and impaired liver function, respectively. Intravenous isoleucine administration after gastrointestinal haemorrhage could be beneficial and will be the subject of further research. PMID:8881800

  17. Developmental expression of mucin genes in the human gastrointestinal system

    PubMed Central

    Reid, C; Harris, A

    1998-01-01

    Background and aims—Mucin glycoproteins play a key role in the normal function of the epithelium lining the gastrointestinal tract. The expression of mucin genes, MUC 3, 4, 5AC, 5B, 6, 7, and 8 in human fetal tissues was examined to establish the localisation and age of onset of expression of each mucin gene during human development. 
Methods—Mucin gene expression was assayed by mRNA in situ hybridisation. 
Results—Expression of MUC3 was detected in the small intestine and colon from 13 weeks gestation onwards and at low levels in the main pancreatic duct at 13 weeks only. MUC4 expression was seen at a low level in the colonic epithelium from 13 weeks of gestation but not elsewhere in the gastrointestinal tract. MUC5AC mRNA was detected in the colon at 17 weeks and at high levels in the stomach at 23 weeks. MUC6 transcripts were evident in the pancreatic ducts from 13 weeks of gestation and at high levels in the stomach at 23 weeks. MUC5B, MUC7, and MUC8 transcripts were not detected. 
Conclusions—Mucin genes are expressed from the early mid-trimester of gestation in the developing human fetal gastrointestinal tract. 

 Keywords: mucin; developmental expression; gastrointestinal tract PMID:9536947

  18. Quantitative Analysis of Human Salivary Gland-Derived Intact Proteome Using Top-Down Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Si; Brown, Joseph N.; Tolic, Nikola; Meng, Da; Liu, Xiaowen; Zhang, Haizhen; Zhao, Rui; Moore, Ronald J.; Pevzner, Pavel A.; Smith, Richard D.; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana

    2014-05-31

    There are several notable challenges inherent to fully characterizing the entirety of the human saliva proteome using bottom-up approaches, including polymorphic isoforms, post-translational modifications, unique splice variants, deletions, and truncations. To address these challenges, we have developed a top-down based liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) approach, which cataloged 20 major human salivary proteins with a total of 83 proteoforms, containing a broad range of post-translational modifications. Among these proteins, several previously reported disease biomarker proteins were identified at the intact protein level, such as beta-2 microglobulin (B2M). In addition, intact glycosylated proteoforms of several saliva proteins were also characterized, including intact N-glycosylated protein prolactin inducible protein (PIP) and O-glycosylated acidic protein rich protein (aPRP). These characterized proteoforms constitute an intact saliva proteoform database, which was used for quantitative comparison of intact salivary proteoforms among six healthy individuals. Human parotid (PS) and submandibular/sublingual gland (SMSL) secretion samples (2 μg of protein each) from six healthy individuals were compared using RPLC coupled with the 12T FTICR mass spectrometer. Significantly different protein and PTM patterns were resolved with high reproducibility between PS and SMSL glands. The results from this study provide further insight into the potential mechanisms of PTM pathways in oral glandular secretion, expanding our knowledge of this complex yet easily accessible fluid. Intact protein LC-MS approach presented herein can potentially be applied for rapid and accurate identification of biomarkers from only a few microliters of human glandular saliva.

  19. [Production of human monoclonal antibody reactive with gastrointestinal carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Soyama, N; Ohyanagi, H; Saitoh, Y

    1990-12-01

    Lymphocytes obtained from regional lymph nodes and spleen in the patients with gastrointestinal carcinoma were fused with the human B lymphoblastoid cell line GC01 and human hybridomas producing human monoclonal antibody (MoAb) were derived. Human MoAb No. 235 (IgM) derived from spleen cell of a gastric cancer patient reacted with adenocarcinoma of stomach, colon, and pancreas in the new immunohistochemical assay, modified direct immunoperoxidase method, and reacted with KATO III cells in cultured cell lines. The antigenic determinant of this antibody was suspected to be protein moiety after enzyme treatment. The competitive binding inhibition assay indicated that its epitope was different from anti-CEA monoclonal antibodies (KM10, A10, B9, AH3, JA4) and KM01. These findings suggested the possible use of human MoAb No. 235 for clinical application of targeting cancer chemotherapy in the future.

  20. Single base discrimination for ribonuclease H-dependent antisense effects within intact human leukaemia cells.

    PubMed Central

    Giles, R V; Ruddell, C J; Spiller, D G; Green, J A; Tidd, D M

    1995-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated, in vitro, that phosphodiester and phosphorothioate antisense oligodeoxynucleotides could direct ribonuclease H to cleave non-target RNA sites and that chimeric methylphosphonodiester/phosphodiester analogue structures were substantially more specific. In this report we show that such chimeric molecules can promote point mutation-specific scission of target mRNA by both Escherichia coli and human RNases H in vitro. Intact human leukaemia cells 'biochemically microinjected' with antisense effectors demonstrated efficient suppression of target mRNA expression. It was noted that the chimeric methylphosphonodiester/phosphodiester structures showed single base discrimination, whereas neither the phosphodiester nor phosphorothioate compounds were as stringent. Finally, we show that the antisense effects obtained in intact cells were due to endogenous RNase H activity. Images PMID:7731809

  1. Palladium nanoparticles exposure: Evaluation of permeation through damaged and intact human skin.

    PubMed

    Larese Filon, Francesca; Crosera, Matteo; Mauro, Marcella; Baracchini, Elena; Bovenzi, Massimo; Montini, Tiziano; Fornasiero, Paolo; Adami, Gianpiero

    2016-07-01

    The intensified use of palladium nanoparticles (PdNPs) in many chemical reactions, jewellery, electronic devices, in car catalytic converters and in biomedical applications lead to a significant increase in palladium exposure. Pd can cause allergic contact dermatitis when in contact with the skin. However, there is still a lack of toxicological data related to nano-structured palladium and information on human cutaneous absorption. In fact, PdNPs, can be absorbed through the skin in higher amounts than bulk Pd because NPs can release more ions. In our study, we evaluated the absorption of PdNPs, with a size of 10.7 ± 2.8 nm, using intact and damaged human skin in Franz cells. 0.60 mg cm(-2) of PdNPs were applied on skin surface for 24 h. Pd concentrations in the receiving solutions at the end of experiments were 0.098 ± 0.067 μg cm(-2) and 1.06 ± 0.44 μg cm(-2) in intact skin and damaged skin, respectively. Pd flux permeation after 24 h was 0.005 ± 0.003 μg cm(-2) h(-1) and 0.057 ± 0.030 μg cm(-2) h(-1) and lag time 4.8 ± 1.7 and 4.2 ± 3.6 h, for intact and damaged skin respectively. This study indicates that Pd can penetrate human skin.

  2. Bioengineered human IAS reconstructs with functional and molecular properties similar to intact IAS.

    PubMed

    Singh, Jagmohan; Rattan, Satish

    2012-09-15

    Because of its critical importance in rectoanal incontinence, we determined the feasibility to reconstruct internal anal sphincter (IAS) from human IAS smooth muscle cells (SMCs) with functional and molecular attributes similar to the intact sphincter. The reconstructs were developed using SMCs from the circular smooth muscle layer of the human IAS, grown in smooth muscle differentiation media under sterile conditions in Sylgard-coated tissue culture plates with central Sylgard posts. The basal tone in the reconstructs and its changes were recorded following 0 Ca(2+), KCl, bethanechol, isoproterenol, protein kinase C (PKC) activator phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate, and Rho kinase (ROCK) and PKC inhibitors Y-27632 and Gö-6850, respectively. Western blot (WB), immunofluorescence (IF), and immunocytochemical (IC) analyses were also performed. The reconstructs developed spontaneous tone (0.68 ± 0.26 mN). Bethanechol (a muscarinic agonist) and K(+) depolarization produced contraction, whereas isoproterenol (β-adrenoceptor agonist) and Y-27632 produced a concentration-dependent decrease in the tone. Maximal decrease in basal tone with Y-27632 and Gö-6850 (each 10(-5) M) was 80.45 ± 3.29 and 17.76 ± 3.50%, respectively. WB data with the IAS constructs' SMCs revealed higher levels of RhoA/ROCK, protein kinase C-potentiated inhibitor or inhibitory phosphoprotein for myosin phosphatase (CPI-17), phospho-CPI-17, MYPT1, and 20-kDa myosin light chain vs. rectal smooth muscle. WB, IF, and IC studies of original SMCs and redispersed from the reconstructs for the relative distribution of different signal transduction proteins confirmed the feasibility of reconstruction of IAS with functional properties similar to intact IAS and demonstrated the development of myogenic tone with critical dependence on RhoA/ROCK. We conclude that it is feasible to bioengineer IAS constructs using human IAS SMCs that behave like intact IAS.

  3. Human gastrointestinal nematode infections: are new control methods required?

    PubMed Central

    Stepek, Gillian; Buttle, David J; Duce, Ian R; Behnke, Jerzy M

    2006-01-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) nematode infections affect 50% of the human population worldwide, and cause great morbidity as well as hundreds of thousands of deaths. Despite modern medical practices, the proportion of the population infected with GI nematodes is not falling. This is due to a number of factors, the most important being the lack of good healthcare, sanitation and health education in many developing countries. A relatively new problem is the development of resistance to the small number of drugs available to treat GI nematode infections. Here we review the most important parasitic GI nematodes and the methods available to control them. In addition, we discuss the current status of new anthelmintic treatments, particularly the plant cysteine proteinases from various sources of latex-bearing plants and fruits. PMID:16965561

  4. Superresolution and Fluorescence Dynamics Evidence Reveal That Intact Liposomes Do Not Cross the Human Skin Barrier

    PubMed Central

    Dreier, Jes; Sørensen, Jens A.; Brewer, Jonathan R.

    2016-01-01

    In this study we use the combination of super resolution optical microscopy and raster image correlation spectroscopy (RICS) to study the mechanism of action of liposomes as transdermal drug delivery systems in human skin. Two different compositions of liposomes were applied to newly excised human skin, a POPC liposome and a more flexible liposome containing the surfactant sodium cholate. Stimulated emission depletion microscopy (STED) images of intact skin and cryo-sections of skin treated with labeled liposomes were recorded displaying an optical resolution low enough to resolve the 100 nm liposomes in the skin. The images revealed that virtually none of the liposomes remained intact beneath the skin surface. RICS two color cross correlation diffusion measurements of double labeled liposomes confirmed these observations. Our results suggest that the liposomes do not act as carriers that transport their cargo directly through the skin barrier, but mainly burst and fuse with the outer lipid layers of the stratum corneum. It was also found that the flexible liposomes showed a greater delivery of the fluorophore into the stratum corneum, indicating that they functioned as chemical permeability enhancers. PMID:26751684

  5. Translational neuropharmacology: the use of human isolated gastrointestinal tissues

    PubMed Central

    Sanger, GJ; Broad, J; Kung, V; Knowles, CH

    2013-01-01

    Translational sciences increasingly emphasize the measurement of functions in native human tissues. However, such studies must confront variations in patient age, gender, genetic background and disease. Here, these are discussed with reference to neuromuscular and neurosecretory functions of the human gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Tissues are obtained after informed consent, in collaboration with surgeons (surgical techniques help minimize variables) and pathologists. Given the difficulties of directly recording from human myenteric neurones (embedded between muscle layers), enteric motor nerve functions are studied by measuring muscle contractions/relaxations evoked by electrical stimulation of intrinsic nerves; responses are regionally dependent, often involving cholinergic and nitrergic phenotypes. Enteric sensory functions can be studied by evoking the peristaltic reflex, involving enteric sensory and motor nerves, but this has rarely been achieved. As submucosal neurones are more accessible (after removing the mucosa), direct neuronal recordings are possible. Neurosecretory functions are studied by measuring changes in short-circuit current across the mucosa. For all experiments, basic questions must be addressed. Because tissues are from patients, what are the controls and the influence of disease? How long does it take before function fully recovers? What is the impact of age- and gender-related differences? What is the optimal sample size? Addressing these and other questions minimizes variability and raises the scientific credibility of human tissue research. Such studies also reduce animal use. Further, the many differences between animal and human GI functions also means that human tissue research must question the ethical validity of using strains of animals with unproved translational significance. Linked Article BJP published a themed issue on Translational Neuropharmacology in 2011. To view the articles in this themed issue visit http://dx.doi.org/10

  6. Characteristics of stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHED) from intact cryopreserved deciduous teeth.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyo-Seol; Jeon, Mijeong; Jeon, Mi Jung; Kim, Seong-Oh; Kim, Seung-Hye; Lee, Jae-Ho; Lee, Jea-Ho; Ahn, Su-Jin; Shin, Yooseok; Song, Je Seon

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study is to compare the characteristics of stem cells derived from human exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHED) from cryopreserved intact deciduous teeth with those of fresh SHED. In total, 20 exfoliated deciduous teeth were randomly divided into a fresh group (f-SHED; n = 11) and cryopreserved group (c-SHED; n = 9; stored for 1-8 months). Following thawing and separation of the pulp, the SHED cells were cultured, and the characteristics as mesenchymal stem cells were investigated using proliferation assays, cell-cycle analysis, colony-forming unit-fibroblast (CFU-F) assays, and flow cytometry analyses. Furthermore, differentiation into adipogenic and osteogenic lineages was investigated in vitro as well as in vivo via transplantation in mice. We found no significant differences between the two groups in the proliferation analyses, in the expression of mesenchymal stem cell markers, or in the adipogenic and osteogenic differentiation in vitro (p < 0.05). Furthermore, the in vivo transplantation results showed no significant differences in the quantity of bone tissue that formed or in histochemistry performance (p < 0.05). In conclusion, cryopreservation of intact exfoliated deciduous teeth appears to be a useful method for preserving SHED.

  7. Epidemiology and control of human gastrointestinal parasites in children

    PubMed Central

    Harhay, Michael O; Horton, John; Olliaro, Piero L

    2010-01-01

    Parasites found in the human gastrointestinal tract can be largely categorized into two groups, protozoa and helminths. The soil-transmitted helminths (Ascaris lumbricoides, hookworm and Trichuris trichiura) are the most prevalent, infecting an estimated one-sixth of the global population. Infection rates are highest in children living in sub-Saharan Africa, followed by Asia and then Latin America and the Caribbean. The current momentum towards global drug delivery for their control is at a historical high through the efforts of numerous initiatives increasingly acting in coordination with donors, governments and local communities. Together, they have delivered enormous quantities of drugs, especially anthelmintics to children through nationwide annual or biannual mass drug administration largely coordinated through schools. However, a much larger and rapidly growing childhood population in these regions remains untreated and suffering from more than one parasite. Mass drug administration has profound potential for control but is not without considerable challenges and concerns. A principal barrier is funding. Stimulating a research and development pipeline, supporting the necessary clinical trials to refine treatment, in addition to procuring and deploying drugs (and sustaining these supply chains), requires substantial funding and resources that do not presently exist. Limited options for chemotherapy raise concerns about drug resistance developing through overuse, however, satisfactory pharmacoepidemiology and monitoring for drug resistance requires more developed health infrastructures than are generally available. Further, the limited pharmacopeia does not include any effective second-line options if resistance emerges, and the research and development pipeline is severely depressed. Herein, we discuss the major gastrointestinal protozoa and helminths reviewing their impact on child health, changing epidemiology and how this relates to their control. PMID

  8. Extracellular production of an intact and biologically active human growth hormone by the Bacillus brevis system.

    PubMed

    Kajino, T; Saito, Y; Asami, O; Yamada, Y; Hirai, M; Udata, S

    1997-10-01

    The characteristic features of the Bacillus brevis system are very high productivity of heterologous proteins and very low extracellular protease activity. However, degradation of some heterologous proteins, especially mammalian proteins, can be observed and resulted in a lowering of protein productivity. By using a mutant expressing low levels of proteases and the addition of EDTA to the medium, intact human growth hormone (hGH) was successfully produced with the B. brevis system. Signal peptide modification with higher basicity in the amino terminal region and higher hydrophobicity in the middle region brought about a twelve-fold increase in hGH production. The hGH yield was further elevated to 240 mg L-1 by optimization of culture conditions. Thus, biologically active and mature hGH can be efficiently produced directly in the medium with the B. brevis system.

  9. Differences in acoustic properties of intact and degenerated human patellar cartilage during compression.

    PubMed

    Kiviranta, Panu; Lammentausta, Eveliina; Töyräs, Juha; Nieminen, Heikki J; Julkunen, Petro; Kiviranta, Ilkka; Jurvelin, Jukka S

    2009-08-01

    Ultrasound indentation measurements have been shown to provide means to assess cartilage integrity and mechanical properties. To determine cartilage stiffness in the ultrasound indentation geometry, cartilage is compressed with an ultrasound transducer to determine the induced strain from the ultrasound signal using the time-of-flight principle. As the ultrasound speed in cartilage has been shown to vary during compression, the assumption of constant speed generates significant errors in the values of mechanical parameters. This variation in ultrasound speed has been investigated in intact cartilage, however, its existence and significance in degenerated tissue is unknown. In the present study, we investigate this issue with both intact and spontaneously degenerated human tissue. To accomplish this aim, we determined ultrasound speed and attenuation in human patellar cartilage (n=68) during mechanical loading. For reference, cartilage mechanical properties and proteoglycan, collagen and water contents were determined. The acoustic properties were related to the composition and mechanical properties of the samples. Ultrasound speed showed significant, site-dependent variation and it was significantly associated (r=0.79-0.81, p<0.01) with the mechanical properties of cartilage. The compression related decrease in ultrasound speed showed statistically significant variation between different stages of degeneration. Error simulations revealed that changes in ultrasound speed during 2% compression could generate errors up to 15% in the values of elastic moduli of samples with early degeneration, if determined with the ultrasound indentation technique. In samples with advanced degeneration, the error was significantly (p<0.05) smaller being 2% on average. As the compression related variation in ultrasound speed was lower in more degenerated samples, the mechanical parameters could be diagnosed more reliably in tissue showing advanced degeneration. The present results

  10. A New High-Throughput Approach to Genotype Ancient Human Gastrointestinal Parasites

    PubMed Central

    Côté, Nathalie M. L.; Daligault, Julien; Pruvost, Mélanie; Bennett, E. Andrew; Gorgé, Olivier; Guimaraes, Silvia; Capelli, Nicolas; Le Bailly, Matthieu; Geigl, Eva-Maria; Grange, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    Human gastrointestinal parasites are good indicators for hygienic conditions and health status of past and present individuals and communities. While microscopic analysis of eggs in sediments of archeological sites often allows their taxonomic identification, this method is rarely effective at the species level, and requires both the survival of intact eggs and their proper identification. Genotyping via PCR-based approaches has the potential to achieve a precise species-level taxonomic determination. However, so far it has mostly been applied to individual eggs isolated from archeological samples. To increase the throughput and taxonomic accuracy, as well as reduce costs of genotyping methods, we adapted a PCR-based approach coupled with next-generation sequencing to perform precise taxonomic identification of parasitic helminths directly from archeological sediments. Our study of twenty-five 100 to 7,200 year-old archeological samples proved this to be a powerful, reliable and efficient approach for species determination even in the absence of preserved eggs, either as a stand-alone method or as a complement to microscopic studies. PMID:26752051

  11. Bacillus subtilis isolated from the human gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Hong, Huynh A; Khaneja, Reena; Tam, Nguyen M K; Cazzato, Alessia; Tan, Sisareuth; Urdaci, Maria; Brisson, Alain; Gasbarrini, Antonio; Barnes, Ian; Cutting, Simon M

    2009-03-01

    As part of an ongoing study to determine the true habitat of Bacillus species, we report here the isolation and characterisation of Bacillus subtilis from the human gastrointestinal tract (GIT). Strains were obtained from ileum biopsies as well as from faecal samples and their biotypes defined. 16S rRNA analysis revealed that most isolates of B. subtilis were highly conserved, in contrast to RAPD-PCR fingerprinting that showed greater diversity with 23 distinct RAPD types. The majority of B. subtilis strains examined possessed features that could be advantageous to survival within the GIT. This included the ability to form biofilms, to sporulate anaerobically and secretion of antimicrobials. At least one isolate was shown to form spores that carried an exosporium, a loosely attached outer layer to the mature endospore, this being the first report of B. subtilis spores carrying an exosporium. This study reinforces a growing view that B. subtilis and probably other species have adapted to life within the GIT and should be considered gut commensals rather than solely soil microorganisms.

  12. Intact Imaging of Human Heart Structure Using X-ray Phase-Contrast Tomography.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Yukihiro; Shinohara, Gen; Hoshino, Masato; Morishita, Hiroyuki; Morita, Kiyozo; Oshima, Yoshihiro; Takahashi, Masashi; Yagi, Naoto; Okita, Yutaka; Tsukube, Takuro

    2017-02-01

    Structural examination of human heart specimens at the microscopic level is a prerequisite for understanding congenital heart diseases. It is desirable not to destroy or alter the properties of such specimens because of their scarcity. However, many of the currently available imaging techniques either destroy the specimen through sectioning or alter the chemical and mechanical properties of the specimen through staining and contrast agent injection. As a result, subsequent studies may not be possible. X-ray phase-contrast tomography is an imaging modality for biological soft tissues that does not destroy or alter the properties of the specimen. The feasibility of X-ray phase-contrast tomography for the structural examination of heart specimens was tested using infantile and fetal heart specimens without congenital diseases. X-ray phase-contrast tomography was carried out at the SPring-8 synchrotron radiation facility using the Talbot grating interferometer at the bending magnet beamline BL20B2 to visualize the structure of five non-pretreated whole heart specimens obtained by autopsy. High-resolution, three-dimensional images were obtained for all specimens. The images clearly showed the myocardial structure, coronary vessels, and conduction bundle. X-ray phase-contrast tomography allows high-resolution, three-dimensional imaging of human heart specimens. Intact imaging using X-ray phase-contrast tomography can contribute to further structural investigation of heart specimens with congenital heart diseases.

  13. Intraneural stimulation elicits discrimination of textural features by artificial fingertip in intact and amputee humans

    PubMed Central

    Oddo, Calogero Maria; Raspopovic, Stanisa; Artoni, Fiorenzo; Mazzoni, Alberto; Spigler, Giacomo; Petrini, Francesco; Giambattistelli, Federica; Vecchio, Fabrizio; Miraglia, Francesca; Zollo, Loredana; Di Pino, Giovanni; Camboni, Domenico; Carrozza, Maria Chiara; Guglielmelli, Eugenio; Rossini, Paolo Maria; Faraguna, Ugo; Micera, Silvestro

    2016-01-01

    Restoration of touch after hand amputation is a desirable feature of ideal prostheses. Here, we show that texture discrimination can be artificially provided in human subjects by implementing a neuromorphic real-time mechano-neuro-transduction (MNT), which emulates to some extent the firing dynamics of SA1 cutaneous afferents. The MNT process was used to modulate the temporal pattern of electrical spikes delivered to the human median nerve via percutaneous microstimulation in four intact subjects and via implanted intrafascicular stimulation in one transradial amputee. Both approaches allowed the subjects to reliably discriminate spatial coarseness of surfaces as confirmed also by a hybrid neural model of the median nerve. Moreover, MNT-evoked EEG activity showed physiologically plausible responses that were superimposable in time and topography to the ones elicited by a natural mechanical tactile stimulation. These findings can open up novel opportunities for sensory restoration in the next generation of neuro-prosthetic hands. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.09148.001 PMID:26952132

  14. Cobalt Oxide Nanoparticles: Behavior towards Intact and Impaired Human Skin and Keratinocytes Toxicity.

    PubMed

    Mauro, Marcella; Crosera, Matteo; Pelin, Marco; Florio, Chiara; Bellomo, Francesca; Adami, Gianpiero; Apostoli, Piero; De Palma, Giuseppe; Bovenzi, Massimo; Campanini, Marco; Filon, Francesca Larese

    2015-07-17

    Skin absorption and toxicity on keratinocytes of cobalt oxide nanoparticles (Co3O4NPs) have been investigated. Co3O4NPs are commonly used in industrial products and biomedicine. There is evidence that these nanoparticles can cause membrane damage and genotoxicity in vitro, but no data are available on their skin absorption and cytotoxicity on keratinocytes. Two independent 24 h in vitro experiments were performed using Franz diffusion cells, using intact (experiment 1) and needle-abraded human skin (experiment 2). Co3O4NPs at a concentration of 1000 mg/L in physiological solution were used as donor phase. Cobalt content was evaluated by Inductively Coupled-Mass Spectroscopy. Co permeation through the skin was demonstrated after 24 h only when damaged skin protocol was used (57 ± 38 ng·cm⁻²), while no significant differences were shown between blank cells (0.92 ± 0.03 ng cm⁻²) and those with intact skin (1.08 ± 0.20 ng·cm⁻²). To further investigate Co3O4NPs toxicity, human-derived HaCaT keratinocytes were exposed to Co3O4NPs and cytotoxicity evaluated by MTT, Alamarblue and propidium iodide (PI) uptake assays. The results indicate that a long exposure time (i.e., seven days) was necessary to induce a concentration-dependent cell viability reduction (EC50 values: 1.3 × 10-4 M, 95% CL = 0.8-1.9 × 10⁻⁴ M, MTT essay; 3.7 × 10⁻⁵ M, 95% CI = 2.2-6.1 × 10⁻⁵ M, AlamarBlue assay) that seems to be associated to necrotic events (EC50 value: 1.3 × 10⁻⁴ M, 95% CL = 0.9-1.9 × 10⁻⁴ M, PI assay). This study demonstrated that Co3O4NPs can penetrate only damaged skin and is cytotoxic for HaCat cells after long term exposure.

  15. Adenoviruses in Lymphocytes of the Human Gastro-Intestinal Tract

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Soumitra; Calcedo, Roberto; Medina-Jaszek, Angelica; Keough, Martin; Peng, Hui; Wilson, James M.

    2011-01-01

    Objective Persistent adenoviral shedding in stools is known to occur past convalescence following acute adenoviral infections. We wished to establish the frequency with which adenoviruses may colonize the gut in normal human subjects. Methods The presence of adenoviral DNA in intestinal specimens obtained at surgery or autopsy was tested using a nested PCR method. The amplified adenoviral DNA sequences were compared to each other and to known adenoviral species. Lamina propria lymphocytes (LPLs) were isolated from the specimens and the adenoviral copy numbers in the CD4+ and CD8+ fractions were determined by quantitative PCR. Adenoviral gene expression was tested by amplification of adenoviral mRNA. Results Intestinal tissue from 21 of 58 donors and LPLs from 21 of 24 donors were positive for the presence of adenoviral DNA. The majority of the sequences could be assigned to adenoviral species E, although species B and C sequences were also common. Multiple sequences were often present in the same sample. Forty-one non-identical sequences were identified from 39 different tissue donors. Quantitative PCR for adenoviral DNA in CD4+ and CD8+ fractions of LPLs showed adenoviral DNA to be present in both cell types and ranged from a few hundred to several million copies per million cells on average. Active adenoviral gene expression as evidenced by the presence of adenoviral messenger RNA in intestinal lymphocytes was demonstrated in 9 of the 11 donors tested. Conclusion Adenoviral DNA is highly prevalent in lymphocytes from the gastro-intestinal tract indicating that adenoviruses may be part of the normal gut flora. PMID:21980361

  16. Transferred-NOE NMR experiments on intact human platelets: receptor-bound conformation of RGD-peptide mimics.

    PubMed

    Potenza, Donatella; Belvisi, Laura

    2008-01-21

    The aim of this work is to show that transferred-NOE provides useful and detailed information on membrane-bound receptor-ligand interactions in living cells. Here, we study the interaction between intact human platelets and some ligands containing the RGD sequence. Conformational properties of the free and bound pentapeptides are reported.

  17. Corticospinal activity evoked and modulated by non-invasive stimulation of the intact human motor cortex.

    PubMed

    Di Lazzaro, Vincenzo; Rothwell, John C

    2014-10-01

    A number of methods have been developed recently that stimulate the human brain non-invasively through the intact scalp. The most common are transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), transcranial electric stimulation (TES) and transcranial direct current stimulation (TDCS). They are widely used to probe function and connectivity of brain areas as well as therapeutically in a variety of conditions such as depression or stroke. They are much less focal than conventional invasive methods which use small electrodes placed on or in the brain and are often thought to activate all classes of neurones in the stimulated area. However, this is not true. A large body of evidence from experiments on the motor cortex shows that non-invasive methods of brain stimulation can be surprisingly selective and that adjusting the intensity and direction of stimulation can activate different classes of inhibitory and excitatory inputs to the corticospinal output cells. Here we review data that have elucidated the action of TMS and TES, concentrating mainly on the most direct evidence available from spinal epidural recordings of the descending corticospinal volleys. The results show that it is potentially possible to test and condition specific neural circuits in motor cortex that could be affected differentially by disease, or be used in different forms of natural behaviour. However, there is substantial interindividual variability in the specificity of these protocols. Perhaps in the future it will be possible, with the advances currently being made to model the electrical fields induced in individual brains, to develop forms of stimulation that can reliably target more specific populations of neurones, and open up the internal circuitry of the motor cortex for study in behaving humans.

  18. Relationship between blood and urine concentrations of intact human chorionic gonadotropin and its free subunits in early pregnancy

    SciTech Connect

    Norman, R.J.; Menabawey, M.; Lowings, C.; Buck, R.H.; Chard, T.

    1987-04-01

    Paired blood and urine samples were obtained from patients between the sixth and 14th weeks of normal pregnancy. The levels of intact human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG), and of the free alpha and beta subunits, were measured by specific radioimmunoassays. There was a close association between blood and urine levels of intact hCG and of the alpha subunit of hCG, but no relation between the levels of beta subunit in these sites. These findings suggest that the use of beta subunit assays may give discrepant results according to the fluid examined. By contrast, measurement of intact hCG appears to give similar results in blood and urine.

  19. Permeation of platinum and rhodium nanoparticles through intact and damaged human skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauro, Marcella; Crosera, Matteo; Bianco, Carlotta; Adami, Gianpiero; Montini, Tiziano; Fornasiero, Paolo; Jaganjac, Morana; Bovenzi, Massimo; Filon, Francesca Larese

    2015-06-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate percutaneous penetration of platinum and rhodium nanoparticles (PtNPs: 5.8 ± 0.9 nm, RhNPs: 5.3 ± 1.9 nm) through human skin. Salts compounds of these metals are sensitizers and some also carcinogenic agents. In vitro permeation experiments were performed using Franz diffusion cells with intact and damaged skin. PtNPs and RhNPs, stabilized with polyvinylpyrrolidone, were synthesized by reduction of Na2PtCl6 and RhCl3·3H2O respectively. Suspensions with a concentration of 2.0 g/L of PtNPs and RhNPs were dispersed separately in synthetic sweat at pH 4.5 and applied as donor phases to the outer surface of the skin for 24 h. Measurements of the content of the metals in the receiving solution and in the skin were performed subsequently. Rhodium skin permeation was demonstrated through damaged skin, with a permeation flux of 0.04 ± 0.04 μg cm-2 h-1 and a lag time of 7.9 ± 1.1 h, while no traces of platinum were found in receiving solutions. Platinum and rhodium skin-analysis showed significantly higher concentrations of the metals in damaged skin. Rh and Pt applied as NPs can penetrate the skin barrier and Rh can be found in receiving solutions. These experiments pointed out the need for skin contamination prevention, since even a minor injury to the skin barrier can significantly increase penetration.

  20. Ventricular stimulus site influences dynamic dispersion of repolarization in the intact human heart

    PubMed Central

    Orini, Michele; Simon, Ron B.; Providência, Rui; Khan, Fakhar Z.; Segal, Oliver R.; Babu, Girish G.; Bradley, Richard; Rowland, Edward; Ahsan, Syed; Chow, Anthony W.; Lowe, Martin D.; Taggart, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The spatial variation in restitution properties in relation to varying stimulus site is poorly defined. This study aimed to investigate the effect of varying stimulus site on apicobasal and transmural activation time (AT), action potential duration (APD) and repolarization time (RT) during restitution studies in the intact human heart. Ten patients with structurally normal hearts, undergoing clinical electrophysiology studies, were enrolled. Decapolar catheters were placed apex to base in the endocardial right ventricle (RVendo) and left ventricle (LVendo), and an LV branch of the coronary sinus (LVepi) for transmural recording. S1–S2 restitution protocols were performed pacing RVendo apex, LVendo base, and LVepi base. Overall, 725 restitution curves were analyzed, 74% of slopes had a maximum slope of activation recovery interval (ARI) restitution (Smax) > 1 (P < 0.001); mean Smax = 1.76. APD was shorter in the LVepi compared with LVendo, regardless of pacing site (30-ms difference during RVendo pacing, 25-ms during LVendo, and 48-ms during LVepi; 50th quantile, P < 0.01). Basal LVepi pacing resulted in a significant transmural gradient of RT (77 ms, 50th quantile: P < 0.01), due to loss of negative transmural AT-APD coupling (mean slope 0.63 ± 0.3). No significant transmural gradient in RT was demonstrated during endocardial RV or LV pacing, with preserved negative transmural AT-APD coupling (mean slope −1.36 ± 1.9 and −0.71 ± 0.4, respectively). Steep ARI restitution slopes predominate in the normal ventricle and dynamic ARI; RT gradients exist that are modulated by the site of activation. Epicardial stimulation to initiate ventricular activation promotes significant transmural gradients of repolarization that could be proarrhythmic. PMID:27371682

  1. Modulation of the gastrointestinal tract of infants by human milk. Interfaces and interactions. An evolutionary perspective.

    PubMed

    Goldman, A S

    2000-02-01

    Human milk contains agents that affect the growth, development and functions of the epithelium, immune system or nervous system of the gastrointestinal tract. Some human and animal studies indicate that human milk affects the growth of intestinal villi, the development of intestinal disaccharidases, the permeability of the gastrointestinal tract and resistance to certain inflammatory/immune-mediated diseases. Moreover, one cytokine in human milk, interleukin (IL)-10, protects infant mice genetically deficient in IL-10 against an enterocolitis that resembles necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) in human premature infants. There are seven overlapping evolutionary strategies regarding the relationships between the functions of the mammary gland and the infant's gastrointestinal tract as follows: 1) certain immunologic agents in human milk compensate directly for developmental delays in those same agents in the recipient infant; 2) other agents in human milk do not compensate directly for developmental delays in the production of those same agents, but nevertheless protect the recipient; 3) agents in human milk enhance functions that are poorly expressed in the recipient; 4) agents in human milk change the physiologic state of the intestines from one adapted to intrauterine life to one suited to extrauterine life; 5) some agents in human milk prevent inflammation in the recipient's gastrointestinal tract; 6) survival of human milk agents in the gastrointestinal tract is enhanced because of delayed production of pancreatic proteases and gastric acid by newborn infants, antiproteases and inhibitors of gastric acid production in human milk, inherent resistance of some human milk agents to proteolysis, and protective binding of other factors in human milk; and 7) growth factors in human milk aid in establishing a commensal enteric microflora.

  2. Diagnostic value of amplification of human cytomegalovirus DNA from gastrointestinal biopsies from human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients.

    PubMed Central

    Cotte, L; Drouet, E; Bissuel, F; Denoyel, G A; Trepo, C

    1993-01-01

    In order to assess the value of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) DNA amplification of gastrointestinal biopsies, we studied 57 human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients with and without gastrointestinal HCMV diseases. After DNA extraction, a 406-bp fragment from the unique short region of the HCMV genome was amplified by 35 cycles of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and semiquantified from 80 to 80,000 HCMV genomic copies. Among 12 non-AIDS patients, the PCR assay was negative for 11 of 12 duodenal and 8 of 8 colorectal samples. It was also negative for 28 of 31 duodenal and 12 of 15 colorectal samples from 31 AIDS patients without gastrointestinal HCMV diseases. Among 14 AIDS patients with gastrointestinal HCMV diseases, the PCR assay was positive for 12 of 12 patients with HCMV duodenitis and for 13 of 13 patients with HCMV colitis. Results were dichotomized between high and low HCMV-DNA copy numbers. For duodenitis, sensitivity was 92% and specificity was 100%. For colitis, sensitivity was 92% and specificity was 93%. Specificity and sensitivity were not influenced by shedding status for HCMV or by other gastrointestinal infections. HCMV DNA amplification of gastrointestinal biopsies is a sensitive and specific tool for the diagnosis of gastrointestinal HCMV diseases in AIDS patients. Images PMID:8396587

  3. Gastrointestinal stem cells in health and disease: from flies to humans.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongjie; Jasper, Heinrich

    2016-05-01

    The gastrointestinal tract of complex metazoans is highly compartmentalized. It is lined by a series of specialized epithelia that are regenerated by specific populations of stem cells. To maintain tissue homeostasis, the proliferative activity of stem and/or progenitor cells has to be carefully controlled and coordinated with regionally distinct programs of differentiation. Metaplasias and dysplasias, precancerous lesions that commonly occur in the human gastrointestinal tract, are often associated with the aberrant proliferation and differentiation of stem and/or progenitor cells. The increasingly sophisticated characterization of stem cells in the gastrointestinal tract of mammals and of the fruit fly Drosophila has provided important new insights into these processes and into the mechanisms that drive epithelial dysfunction. In this Review, we discuss recent advances in our understanding of the establishment, maintenance and regulation of diverse intestinal stem cell lineages in the gastrointestinal tract of Drosophila and mice. We also discuss the field's current understanding of the pathogenesis of epithelial dysfunctions.

  4. The optical diagnostics of parameters of biological tissues of human intact skin in near-infrared range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petruk, Vasyl; Kvaternyuk, Sergii; Bolyuh, Boris; Bolyuh, Dmitry; Dronenko, Vladimir; Harasim, Damian; Annabayev, Azamat

    2016-09-01

    Melanoma skin is difficult to diagnose in the early stages of development despite its location outside. Melanoma is difficult to visually differentiate from benign melanocytic nevi. In the work we investigated parameters of human intact skin in near-infrared range for different racial and gender groups. This allows to analyze statistical differences in the coefficient of diffuse reflection and use them in the differential diagnosis of cancer by optical methods subject.

  5. Evaluation of an intact, an ACL-deficient, and a reconstructed human knee joint finite element model.

    PubMed

    Vairis, Achilles; Stefanoudakis, George; Petousis, Markos; Vidakis, Nectarios; Tsainis, Andreas-Marios; Kandyla, Betina

    2016-02-01

    The human knee joint has a three-dimensional geometry with multiple body articulations that produce complex mechanical responses under loads that occur in everyday life and sports activities. Understanding the complex mechanical interactions of these load-bearing structures is of use when the treatment of relevant diseases is evaluated and assisting devices are designed. The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) in the knee is one of four main ligaments that connects the femur to the tibia and is often torn during sudden twisting motions, resulting in knee instability. The objective of this work is to study the mechanical behavior of the human knee joint and evaluate the differences in its response for three different states, i.e., intact, ACL-deficient, and surgically treated (reconstructed) knee. The finite element models corresponding to these states were developed. For the reconstructed model, a novel repair device was developed and patented by the author in previous work. Static load cases were applied, as have already been presented in a previous work, in order to compare the calculated results produced by the two models the ACL-deficient and the surgically reconstructed knee joint, under the exact same loading conditions. Displacements were calculated in different directions for the load cases studied and were found to be very close to those from previous modeling work and were in good agreement with experimental data presented in literature. The developed finite element model for both the intact and the ACL-deficient human knee joint is a reliable tool to study the kinematics of the human knee, as results of this study show. In addition, the reconstructed human knee joint model had kinematic behavior similar to the intact knee joint, showing that such reconstruction devices can restore human knee stability to an adequate extent.

  6. Electrospray ionization Fourier transform mass spectrometric analysis of intact bikunin glycosaminoglycan from normal human plasma.

    PubMed

    Laremore, Tatiana N; Leach, Franklin E; Amster, I Jonathan; Linhardt, Robert J

    2011-08-15

    A mixture of glycosaminoglycan (GAG) chains from a plasma proteoglycan bikunin was fractionated using native, continuous-elution polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and the resulting fractions were analyzed by electrospray ionization Fourier transform mass spectrometry (ESI FTMS). Molecular mass analysis of the intact GAG afforded information about the length and composition of GAG chains in the mixture. Ambiguity in the interpretation of the intact GAG mass spectra was eliminated by conducting an additional experiment in which the GAG chains of known molecular mass were treated with a GAG-degrading enzyme, chondroitinase ABC, and the digestion products were analyzed by ESI FTMS. The plasma bikunin GAG chains consisted predominantly of odd number of saccharides, although few chains consisting of even number of saccharides were also detected. Majority of the analyzed chains were tetrasulfated or pentasulfated and comprised by 29 to 41 monosaccharides.

  7. Ultrasound backscatter measurements of intact human proximal femurs--relationships of ultrasound parameters with tissue structure and mineral density.

    PubMed

    Malo, M K H; Töyräs, J; Karjalainen, J P; Isaksson, H; Riekkinen, O; Jurvelin, J S

    2014-07-01

    Ultrasound reflection and backscatter parameters are related to the mechanical and structural properties of bone in vitro. However, the potential of ultrasound reflection and backscatter measurements has not been tested with intact human proximal femurs ex vivo. We hypothesize that ultrasound backscatter can be measured from intact femurs and that the measured backscattered signal is associated with cadaver age, bone mineral density (BMD) and trabecular bone microstructure. In this study, human femoral bones of 16 male cadavers (47.0±16.1 years, range: 21-77 years) were investigated using pulse-echo ultrasound measurements at the femoral neck in the antero-posterior direction and at the trochanter major in the anteroposterior and lateromedial directions. Recently introduced ultrasound backscatter parameters, independent of cortical thickness, e.g., time slope of apparent integrated backscatter (TSAB) and mean of the backscatter difference technique (MBD) were obtained and compared with the structural properties of trabecular bone samples, extracted from the locations of ultrasound measurements. Moreover, more conventional backscatter parameters, e.g., apparent integrated backscatter (AIB) and frequency slope of apparent integrated backscatter (FSAB) were analyzed. Bone mineral density of the intact femurs was evaluated using dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). AIB and MDB measured from the femoral neck correlated significantly (p<0.01) with the neck BMD (R2=0.44 and 0.45), cadaver age (R2=0.61 and 0.41) and several structural parameters, e.g., bone volume fraction (R2=0.33 and 0.39, p<0.05 and p<0.01), respectively. To conclude, ultrasound backscatter parameters, measured from intact proximal femurs, are significantly related (p<0.05) to structural properties and mineral density of trabecular bone.

  8. Expression of Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator in Ganglia of Human Gastrointestinal Tract

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Ruiqi; Gu, Huan; Qiu, Yamei; Guo, Yong; Korteweg, Christine; Huang, Jin; Gu, Jiang

    2016-01-01

    CF is caused by mutations of the gene encoding the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) which is an anion selective transmembrane ion channel that mainly regulates chloride transport, expressed in the epithelia of various organs. Recently, we have demonstrated CFTR expression in the brain, the spinal cord and the sympathetic ganglia. This study aims to investigate the expression and distribution of CFTR in the ganglia of the human gastrointestinal tract. Fresh tissue and formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded normal gastrointestinal tract samples were collected from eleven surgical patients and five autopsy cases. Immunohistochemistry, in situ hybridization, laser-assisted microdissection and nested reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction were performed. Expression of CFTR protein and mRNA was detected in neurons of the ganglia of all segments of the human gastrointestinal tract examined, including the stomach, duodenum, jejunum, ileum, cecum, appendix, colon and rectum. The extensive expression of CFTR in the enteric ganglia suggests that CFTR may play a role in the physiology of the innervation of the gastro-intestinal tract. The presence of dysfunctional CFTRs in enteric ganglia could, to a certain extent, explain the gastrointestinal symptoms frequently experienced by CF patients. PMID:27491544

  9. Enzymatic methylation of band 3 anion transporter in intact human erythrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Lou, L.L.; Clarke, S.

    1987-01-13

    Band 3, the anion transport protein of erythrocyte membranes, is a major methyl-accepting substrate of the intracellular erythrocyte protein carboxyl methyltransferase (S-adenosyl-L-methionine: protein-D-aspartate O-methyltransferase; EC 2.1.1.77). The localization of methylation sites in intact cells by analysis of proteolytic fragments indicated that sites were present in the cytoplasmic N-terminal domain as well as the membranous C-terminal portion of the polypeptide. The amino acid residues that serve as carboxyl methylation sites of the erythrocyte anion transporter were also investigated. /sup 3/H-Methylated band 3 was purified from intact erythrocytes incubated with L-(methyl-/sup 3/H)methionine and from trypsinized and lysed erythrocytes incubated with S-adenosyl-L-(methyl-/sup 3/H)methionine. After proteolytic digestion with carboxypeptidase Y, D-aspartic acid beta-(/sup 3/H)methyl ester was isolated in low yields (9% and 1%, respectively) from each preparation. The bulk of the radioactivity was recovered as (/sup 3/H)methanol, and the amino acid residue(s) originally associated with these methyl groups could not be determined. No L-aspartic acid beta-(/sup 3/H)methyl ester or glutamyl gamma-(/sup 3/H)methyl ester was detected. The formation of D-aspartic acid beta-(/sup 3/H)methyl esters in this protein in intact cells resulted from protein carboxyl methyltransferase activity since it was inhibited by adenosine and homocysteine thiolactone, which increases the intracellular concentration of the potent product inhibitor S-adenosylhomocysteine, and cycloleucine, which prevents the formation of the substrate S-adenosyl-L-(methyl-/sup 3/H)methionine.

  10. Gastrointestinal Physiology During Head Down Tilt Bedrest in Human Subjects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaksman, Z.; Guthienz, J.; Putcha, L.

    2008-01-01

    Introduction: Gastrointestinal (GI) motility plays a key role in the physiology and function of the GI tract. It directly affects absorption of medications and nutrients taken by mouth, in addition to indirectly altering GI physiology by way of changes in the microfloral composition and biochemistry of the GI tract. Astronauts have reported nausea, loss of appetite and constipation during space flight all of which indicate a reduction in GI motility and function similar to the one seen in chronic bed rest patients. The purpose of this study is to determine GI motility and bacterial proliferation during -6 degree head down tilt bed rest (HTD). Methods: Healthy male and female subjects between the ages of 25-40 participated in a 60 day HTD study protocol. GI transit time (GITT) was determined using lactulose breath hydrogen test and bacterial overgrowth was measured using glucose breath hydrogen test. H. Pylori colonization was determined using C13-urea breath test (UBIT#). All three tests were conducted on 9 days before HDT, and repeated on HDT days 2, 28, 58, and again on day 7 after HDT. Results: GITT increased during HTD compared to the respective ambulatory control values; GITT was significantly lower on day 7 after HTD. A concomitant increase in bacterial colonization was also noticed during HDT starting after approximately 28 days of HDT. However, H. Pylori proliferation was not recorded during HDT as indicated by UBIT#. Conclusion: GITT significantly decreased during HDT with a concomitant increase in the proliferation of GI bacterial flora but not H. pylori.

  11. Identification of human remains by DNA analysis of the gastrointestinal contents of fly larvae.

    PubMed

    de Lourdes Chávez-Briones, María; Hernández-Cortés, Raquel; Díaz-Torres, Porfirio; Niderhauser-García, Alberto; Ancer-Rodríguez, Jesús; Jaramillo-Rangel, Gilberto; Ortega-Martínez, Marta

    2013-01-01

    Dipterous fly larvae (maggots) are frequently collected from a corpse during a criminal investigation. Previous studies showed that DNA analysis of the gastrointestinal contents of maggots might be used to reveal the identity of a victim. However, this approach has not been used to date in legal investigations, and thus its practical usefulness is unknown. A badly burned body was discovered with its face and neck colonized by fly larvae. Given the condition of the body, identification was not possible. Short tandem repeat (STR) typing was performed using the gastrointestinal contents of maggots collected from the victim and was compared to STR profiles obtained from the alleged father. The probability of paternity was 99.685%. Thus, this comparative DNA test enabled the conclusive identification of the remains. This is the first reported case of analysis of human DNA isolated from the gastrointestinal tract of maggots used to identify a victim in a criminal case.

  12. Transforming growth factor alpha and epidermal growth factor levels in normal human gastrointestinal mucosa.

    PubMed Central

    Cartlidge, S. A.; Elder, J. B.

    1989-01-01

    Acid soluble proteins from 23 samples of normal human gastrointestinal mucosa derived from four normal adult organ donors were extracted and subjected to specific radiommunoassays for transforming growth factor alpha (TGF alpha) and urogastrone epidermal growth factor (URO-EGF). All tissues were found to contain immunoreactive TGF alpha and levels ranged from 57 to 4,776 pg-1 wet weight of tissue. Although levels varied between tissue donors, the distribution of TGF alpha throughout the gastrointestinal tract appeared similar in all cases. URO-EGF levels were much lower (0-216 pg g-1 wet weight). TGF alpha levels in extracts of gastrointestinal mucosa from a 7-year-old female donor were higher and the observed distribution was markedly different from adult levels. URO-EGF was not detected in mucosal or submucosal tissue extracts from this patient. Further studies in juveniles are indicated. PMID:2803941

  13. Holographic interferometry of intact and radially incised human eye-bank corneas.

    PubMed

    Smolek, M K

    1994-05-01

    Many methods to measure corneal elasticity destroy the tissue and thereby produce erroneous results. Holographic interferometry, a highly precise nondestructive optical comparison technique, was used to evaluate corneal elasticity of intact eye-bank eyes. A double-pulse holographic interferometer operating at 632.8 nm was used to measure corneal deformation in 20 whole-globe eyes from donors 45 to 83 years of age for intraocular pressures from 16 mm Hg to 21 mm Hg. Stress was computed from LaPlace's law, and arc length strain was derived from z-axis distention of the central cornea. The stress-strain relationship in the normal physiological range of intraocular pressure was linear with a Young's elastic modulus of 1.03 gigapascals for the central cornea (r = 0.999). During interferometry of radial keratotomy of the cornea, interference fringe patterns developed in association with each incision as it was made. When four incisions were placed deep along each of the primary semimeridians, the fringe pattern developed as expected, based on current keratotomy models. When incisions were shallow (approximately 50% depth) and placed asymmetrically along the nasal, temporal, and superior semimeridians, the resulting surface strain was symmetrical about the central cornea, forming an annular pattern of interference fringes. These results indicate that when the cornea was stressed at physiological pressures as part of the intact whole globe, it was less elastic than excised corneal tissue tested by strip extensiometry. Radially incised corneas demonstrated strain patterns suggestive of inherent structural anisotropy with a possible inferior quadrant weakness.

  14. Nuclear translocation of NF-κB in intact human gut tissue upon stimulation with coffee and roasting products.

    PubMed

    Sauer, Tanja; Raithel, Martin; Kressel, Jürgen; Muscat, Sonja; Münch, Gerald; Pischetsrieder, Monika

    2011-09-01

    In the healthy gut, NF-κB is a critical factor of the intestinal immune system, whereas inflammatory bowel diseases are associated with chronic activation of NF-κB. Previous studies indicated that coffee induces nuclear translocation of NF-κB in macrophages, an effect attributed to roasting products. In the present work, coffee extract or roasting products induced nuclear translocation of NF-κB in macrophages, Caco-2 cells, and primary human intestinal microvascular endothelial cells (up to fivefold, p<0.001). Since the effect clearly depended on the cell type, ex vivo experiments were performed with intact human gut tissue from biopsies. The uniformity of the specimens and tissue viability during ex vivo incubation for up to 2 h were verified. Roasting products led to a concentration dependent significant increase of nuclear translocation of NF-κB in human gut tissue (up to 2.85 fold increase, p=0.0321), whereas coffee extract induced a trend towards higher nuclear NF-κB concentration. NF-κB activation in macrophages and Caco-2 cells by roasting products was significantly blocked by co-incubation with catalase (p=0.011 and p=0.024) indicating involvement of H(2)O(2)-signaling. Monitoring of extracellular H(2)O(2) indicated that roasting products in coffee constantly generate H(2)O(2) by spontaneous oxygen reduction, which is only partially detoxified by cellular antioxidative systems. Thus, it can be concluded that ex vivo stimulation of intact human gut tissue is a valuable model to study nutritional effects on complex tissue systems. Furthermore, the consumption of coffee and roasting products may be able to induce nuclear NF-κB translocation in the human gut.

  15. The effect of selected factors on the survival of Bacillus cereus in the human gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Berthold-Pluta, Anna; Pluta, Antoni; Garbowska, Monika

    2015-05-01

    Bacillus cereus is a Gram-positive bacterium widely distributed in soil and vegetation. This bacterial species can also contaminate raw or processed foods. Pathogenic B. cereus strains can cause a range of infections in humans, as well as food poisoning of an emetic (intoxication) or diarrheal type (toxico-infection). Toxico-infections are due to the action of the Hbl toxin, Nhe toxin, and cytotoxin K produced by the microorganism in the gastrointestinal tract. This occurs once the spores or vegetative B. cereus cells survive the pH barrier of the stomach and reach the small intestine where they produce toxins in sufficient amounts. This article discusses the effect of various factors on the survival of B. cereus in the gastrointestinal tract, including low pH and the presence of digestive enzymes in the stomach, bile salts in the small intestine, and indigenous microflora in the lower parts of the gastrointestinal tract. Additional aspects also reported to affect B. cereus survival and virulence in the gastrointestinal tract include the interaction of the spores and vegetative cells with enterocytes. In vitro studies revealed that both vegetative B. cereus and spores can survive in the gastrointestinal tract suggesting that the biological form of the microorganism may have less influence on the occurrence of the symptoms of infection than was once believed. It is most likely the interaction between the pathogen and enterocytes that is necessary for the diarrheal form of B. cereus food poisoning to develop. The adhesion of B. cereus to the intestinal epithelium allows the bacterium to grow and produce enterotoxins in the proximity of the epithelium. Recent studies suggest that the human intestinal microbiota inhibits the growth of vegetative B. cereus cells considerably.

  16. Impact of pasteurization of human milk on preterm newborn in vitro digestion: Gastrointestinal disintegration, lipolysis and proteolysis.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Samira C; Bourlieu, Claire; Ménard, Olivia; Bellanger, Amandine; Henry, Gwénaële; Rousseau, Florence; Dirson, Emelyne; Carrière, Frédéric; Dupont, Didier; Deglaire, Amélie

    2016-11-15

    Human milk feeding is an important recommendation for preterm newborns considering their vulnerability and digestive immaturity. Holder pasteurization (62.5°C, 30min) applied in milk banks modifies its biological quality and its microstructure. We investigated the impact of pasteurization of preterm human milk on its gastrointestinal kinetics of lipolysis, proteolysis and structural disintegration. An in vitro dynamic system was set up to simulate the gastrointestinal digestion of preterm newborns. A pool of preterm human milk was digested as raw or after Holder pasteurization. Pasteurization impacted the microstructure of undigested human milk, its gastrointestinal disintegration and tended to limit the intestinal lipolysis. Furthermore, the gastrointestinal bioaccessibility of some fatty acids was decreased by pasteurization, while the intestinal bioaccessibility of some amino acids was selectively modulated. The impact of pasteurization on the digestion of human milk may have nutritional relevance in vivo and potentially modulates preterm development and growth.

  17. Gastrointestinal stem cells in health and disease: from flies to humans

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hongjie; Jasper, Heinrich

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The gastrointestinal tract of complex metazoans is highly compartmentalized. It is lined by a series of specialized epithelia that are regenerated by specific populations of stem cells. To maintain tissue homeostasis, the proliferative activity of stem and/or progenitor cells has to be carefully controlled and coordinated with regionally distinct programs of differentiation. Metaplasias and dysplasias, precancerous lesions that commonly occur in the human gastrointestinal tract, are often associated with the aberrant proliferation and differentiation of stem and/or progenitor cells. The increasingly sophisticated characterization of stem cells in the gastrointestinal tract of mammals and of the fruit fly Drosophila has provided important new insights into these processes and into the mechanisms that drive epithelial dysfunction. In this Review, we discuss recent advances in our understanding of the establishment, maintenance and regulation of diverse intestinal stem cell lineages in the gastrointestinal tract of Drosophila and mice. We also discuss the field's current understanding of the pathogenesis of epithelial dysfunctions. PMID:27112333

  18. The impact of proton pump inhibitors on the human gastrointestinal microbiome

    PubMed Central

    Freedberg, Daniel E.; Lebwohl, Benjamin; Abrams, Julian A.

    2014-01-01

    Potent gastric acid suppression using proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) is common in clinical practice yet may have important effects on human health that are mediated through changes in the gastrointestinal microbiome. Acting through pH-dependent or pH-independent mechanisms, PPIs have the potential to alter the normal microbiota throughout the human gastrointestinal lumen. In the esophagus, PPIs change the normal bacterial milieu to decrease distal esophageal exposure to inflammatory Gram-negative bacteria which may lower the risk of Barrett's esophagus. In the stomach, PPIs alter the abundance and location of gastric Helicobacter pylori and other bacteria, which has implications for peptic ulcer disease and gastric malignancy. In the small bowel, PPIs cause polymicrobial small bowel bacterial overgrowth and have been associated with the diagnosis of celiac disease. In the colon, PPIs associate with incident but not recurrent Clostridium difficile infection, putatively through alterations in commensal colonic anaerobes. Our understanding of the effect of gastric acid suppression on the human gastrointestinal microbiome is incomplete but is rapidly advancing. PMID:25439276

  19. Human Nanog pseudogene8 promotes the proliferation of gastrointestinal cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Uchino, Keita; Hirano, Gen; Hirahashi, Minako; Isobe, Taichi; Shirakawa, Tsuyoshi; Kusaba, Hitoshi; Baba, Eishi; Tsuneyoshi, Masazumi; Akashi, Koichi

    2012-09-10

    There is emerging evidence that human solid tumor cells originate from cancer stem cells (CSCs). In cancer cell lines, tumor-initiating CSCs are mainly found in the side population (SP) that has the capacity to extrude dyes such as Hoechst 33342. We found that Nanog is expressed specifically in SP cells of human gastrointestinal (GI) cancer cells. Nucleotide sequencing revealed that NanogP8 but not Nanog was expressed in GI cancer cells. Transfection of NanogP8 into GI cancer cell lines promoted cell proliferation, while its inhibition by anti-Nanog siRNA suppressed the proliferation. Immunohistochemical staining of primary GI cancer tissues revealed NanogP8 protein to be strongly expressed in 3 out of 60 cases. In these cases, NanogP8 was found especially in an infiltrative part of the tumor, in proliferating cells with Ki67 expression. These data suggest that NanogP8 is involved in GI cancer development in a fraction of patients, in whom it presumably acts by supporting CSC proliferation. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nanog maintains pluripotency by regulating embryonic stem cells differentiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nanog is expressed in cancer stem cells of human gastrointestinal cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nucleotide sequencing revealed that Nanog pseudogene8 but not Nanog was expressed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nanog pseudogene8 promotes cancer stem cells proliferation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nanog pseudogene8 is involved in gastrointestinal cancer development.

  20. RhoA/ROCK pathway is the major molecular determinant of basal tone in intact human internal anal sphincter.

    PubMed

    Rattan, Satish; Singh, Jagmohan

    2012-04-01

    The knowledge of molecular control mechanisms underlying the basal tone in the intact human internal anal sphincter (IAS) is critical for the pathophysiology and rational therapy for a number of debilitating rectoanal motility disorders. We determined the role of RhoA/ROCK and PKC pathways by comparing the effects of ROCK- and PKC-selective inhibitors Y 27632 and Gö 6850 (10(-8) to 10(-4) M), respectively, on the basal tone in the IAS vs. the rectal smooth muscle (RSM). Western blot studies were performed to determine the levels of RhoA/ROCK II, PKC-α, MYPT1, CPI-17, and MLC(20) in the unphosphorylated and phosphorylated forms, in the IAS vs. RSM. Confocal microscopic studies validated the membrane distribution of ROCK II. Finally, to confirm a direct relationship, we examined the enzymatic activities and changes in the basal IAS tone and p-MYPT1, p-CPI-17, and p-MLC(20), before and after Y 27632 and Gö 6850. Data show higher levels of RhoA/ROCK II and related downstream signal transduction proteins in the IAS vs. RSM. In addition, data show a significant correlation between the active RhoA/ROCK levels, ROCK enzymatic activity, downstream proteins, and basal IAS tone, before and after ROCK inhibitor. From these data we conclude 1) RhoA/ROCK and downstream signaling are constitutively active in the IAS, and this pathway (in contrast with PKC) is the critical determinant of the basal tone in intact human IAS; and 2) RhoA and ROCK are potential therapeutic targets for a number of rectoanal motility disorders for which currently there is no satisfactory treatment.

  1. A metastatic nude-mouse model of human pancreatic cancer constructed orthotopically with histologically intact patient specimens.

    PubMed Central

    Fu, X; Guadagni, F; Hoffman, R M

    1992-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most intractable and least understood of all human cancers. Pancreatic cancers is the fourth-leading cause of cancer-related mortality in the United States with less than 2% of the patients surviving for 5 yr. In an effort to help develop more effective treatment modalities for pancreatic cancer and improve detection, we report an animal model for individual human pancreatic-cancer patients. The model involves orthotopic transplantation of histologically intact pancreatic-cancer specimens to the nude-mouse pancreas, which can result in models that resemble the clinical picture including (i) extensive local tumor growth, (ii) extension of the locally growing human pancreatic cancer to the nude-mouse stomach and duodenum, (iii) metastases of the human pancreatic tumor to the nude-mouse liver and regional lymph nodes, and (iv) distant metastases of the human pancreatic tumor to the nude-mouse adrenal gland, diaphragm, and mediastinal lymph nodes. In a series of five patient cases, a 100% take rate has been demonstrated, and of 17 mice transplanted, 15 supported tumor growth. Immunohistochemical analysis of the antigenic phenotype of the transplanted human pancreatic tumors showed a similar pattern of expression of two different human tumor-associated antigens, such as tumor-associated glycoprotein 72 and carcinoembryonic antigen in the transplanted tumors when compared with the original surgical biopsy, suggesting similarity between the two. This model should, therefore, prove valuable for treatment evaluation of individual cancer patients, as well as for evaluation of experimental treatment modalities for this disease. Images PMID:1608975

  2. The Effects of Eupatilin (Stillen®) on Motility of Human Lower Gastrointestinal Tracts

    PubMed Central

    Ryoo, Seung-Bum; Oh, Heung-Kwon; Yu, Sung A; Moon, Sang Hui; Choe, Eun Kyung; Oh, Tae Young

    2014-01-01

    Gastrointestinal motility consists of phasic slow-wave contractions and the migrating motor complex (MMC). Eupatilin (Stillen®) has been widely used to treat gastritis and peptic ulcers, and various cytokines and neuropeptides are thought to be involved, which can affect gastrointestinal motility. We performed a study to identify the effects of eupatilin on lower gastrointestinal motility with electromechanical recordings of smooth muscles in the human ileum and colon. Ileum and colon samples were obtained from patients undergoing bowel resection. The tissues were immediately stored in oxygenated Krebs-Ringer's bicarbonate solution, and conventional microelectrode recordings from muscle cells and tension recordings from muscle strips and ileal or colonic segments were performed. Eupatilin was perfused into the tissue chamber, and changes in membrane potentials and contractions were measured. Hyperpolarization of resting membrane potential (RMP) was observed after administration of eupatilin. The amplitude, AUC, and frequency of tension recordings from circular and longitudinal smooth muscle strips and bowel segments of the ileum and colon were significantly decreased after admission of eupatilin. Eupatilin elicited dose-dependent decreases during segmental tension recordings. In conclusion, eupatilin (Stillen®) showed inhibitory effects on the human ileum and colon. We propose that this drug may be useful for treating diseases that increase bowel motility, but further studies are necessary. PMID:25352757

  3. Gastrointestinal Fibroblasts Have Specialized, Diverse Transcriptional Phenotypes: A Comprehensive Gene Expression Analysis of Human Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Ishii, Genichiro; Aoyagi, Kazuhiko; Sasaki, Hiroki; Ochiai, Atsushi

    2015-01-01

    Background Fibroblasts are the principal stromal cells that exist in whole organs and play vital roles in many biological processes. Although the functional diversity of fibroblasts has been estimated, a comprehensive analysis of fibroblasts from the whole body has not been performed and their transcriptional diversity has not been sufficiently explored. The aim of this study was to elucidate the transcriptional diversity of human fibroblasts within the whole body. Methods Global gene expression analysis was performed on 63 human primary fibroblasts from 13 organs. Of these, 32 fibroblasts from gastrointestinal organs (gastrointestinal fibroblasts: GIFs) were obtained from a pair of 2 anatomical sites: the submucosal layer (submucosal fibroblasts: SMFs) and the subperitoneal layer (subperitoneal fibroblasts: SPFs). Using hierarchical clustering analysis, we elucidated identifiable subgroups of fibroblasts and analyzed the transcriptional character of each subgroup. Results In unsupervised clustering, 2 major clusters that separate GIFs and non-GIFs were observed. Organ- and anatomical site-dependent clusters within GIFs were also observed. The signature genes that discriminated GIFs from non-GIFs, SMFs from SPFs, and the fibroblasts of one organ from another organ consisted of genes associated with transcriptional regulation, signaling ligands, and extracellular matrix remodeling. Conclusions GIFs are characteristic fibroblasts with specific gene expressions from transcriptional regulation, signaling ligands, and extracellular matrix remodeling related genes. In addition, the anatomical site- and organ-dependent diversity of GIFs was also discovered. These features of GIFs contribute to their specific physiological function and homeostatic maintenance, and create a functional diversity of the gastrointestinal tract. PMID:26046848

  4. Bioaccessibility and degradation of naturally occurring arsenic species from food in the human gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Chávez-Capilla, Teresa; Beshai, Mona; Maher, William; Kelly, Tamsin; Foster, Simon

    2016-12-01

    Humans are exposed to organic arsenic species through their diet and therefore, are susceptible to arsenic toxicity. Investigating the transformations occurring in the gastrointestinal tract will influence which arsenic species to focus on when studying metabolism in cells. Using a physiologically based extraction test, the bioaccessibility of arsenic species was determined after the simulated gastrointestinal digestion of rice, seaweed and fish. Pure standards of the major arsenic species present in these foodstuffs (arsenic glutathione complexes, arsenosugars and short chain fatty acids) were also evaluated to assess the effect of the food matrix on bioaccessibility and transformation. Approximately 80% of arsenic is released from these foodstuffs, potentially becoming available. Hydrolysis and demethylation of arsenic glutathione complexes and arsenosugars standards was observed, but no transformations occurred to arsenosugars present in seaweed. Demethylation of MA and DMA from rice occurs increasing the amount of inorganic arsenic species available for metabolism.

  5. Modulation of the enterohemorrhagic E. coli virulence program through the human gastrointestinal tract

    PubMed Central

    Barnett Foster, Debora

    2013-01-01

    Enteric pathogens must not only survive passage through the gastrointestinal tract but must also coordinate expression of virulence determinants in response to localized microenvironments with the host. Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC), a serious food and waterborne human pathogen, is well equipped with an arsenal of molecular factors that allows it to survive passage through the gastrointestinal tract and successfully colonize the large intestine. This review will explore how EHEC responds to various environmental cues associated with particular microenvironments within the host and how it employs these cues to modulate virulence factor expression, with a view to developing a conceptual framework for understanding modulation of EHEC’s virulence program in response to the host. In vitro studies offer significant insights into the role of individual environmental cues but in vivo studies using animal models as well as data from natural infections will ultimately provide a more comprehensive picture of the highly regulated virulence program of this pathogen. PMID:23552827

  6. Canine and Human Visual Cortex Intact and Responsive Despite Early Retinal Blindness from RPE65 Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Aguirre, Geoffrey K; Komáromy, András M; Cideciyan, Artur V; Brainard, David H; Aleman, Tomas S; Roman, Alejandro J; Avants, Brian B; Gee, James C; Korczykowski, Marc; Hauswirth, William W; Acland, Gregory M; Aguirre, Gustavo D; Aguirre, Geoffrey K

    2007-01-01

    Background RPE65 is an essential molecule in the retinoid-visual cycle, and RPE65 gene mutations cause the congenital human blindness known as Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA). Somatic gene therapy delivered to the retina of blind dogs with an RPE65 mutation dramatically restores retinal physiology and has sparked international interest in human treatment trials for this incurable disease. An unanswered question is how the visual cortex responds after prolonged sensory deprivation from retinal dysfunction. We therefore studied the cortex of RPE65-mutant dogs before and after retinal gene therapy. Then, we inquired whether there is visual pathway integrity and responsivity in adult humans with LCA due to RPE65 mutations (RPE65-LCA). Methods and Findings RPE65-mutant dogs were studied with fMRI. Prior to therapy, retinal and subcortical responses to light were markedly diminished, and there were minimal cortical responses within the primary visual areas of the lateral gyrus (activation amplitude mean ± standard deviation [SD] = 0.07% ± 0.06% and volume = 1.3 ± 0.6 cm3). Following therapy, retinal and subcortical response restoration was accompanied by increased amplitude (0.18% ± 0.06%) and volume (8.2 ± 0.8 cm3) of activation within the lateral gyrus (p < 0.005 for both). Cortical recovery occurred rapidly (within a month of treatment) and was persistent (as long as 2.5 y after treatment). Recovery was present even when treatment was provided as late as 1–4 y of age. Human RPE65-LCA patients (ages 18–23 y) were studied with structural magnetic resonance imaging. Optic nerve diameter (3.2 ± 0.5 mm) was within the normal range (3.2 ± 0.3 mm), and occipital cortical white matter density as judged by voxel-based morphometry was slightly but significantly altered (1.3 SD below control average, p = 0.005). Functional magnetic resonance imaging in human RPE65-LCA patients revealed cortical responses with a markedly diminished activation volume (8.8 ± 1.2 cm3

  7. Models of Human Metastatic Colon Cancer in Nude Mice Orthotopically Constructed by Using Histologically Intact Patient Specimens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Xinyu; Besterman, Jeffrey M.; Monosov, Ann; Hoffman, Robert M.

    1991-10-01

    There is an important need for clinically relevant animal models for human cancers. Toward this goal, histologically intact human colon-cancer specimens derived surgically from patients were implanted orthotopically to the colon or cecum of nude mice. We have observed extensive orthotopic growth in 13 of 20 cases of implanted patient colon tumors. These showed various growth patterns with subsequent regional, lymph-node, and liver metastasis, as well as general abdominal carcinomatosis. Thus, models for human colon cancer have been developed that show (i) local growth, (ii) abdominal metastasis, (iii) general abdominal carcinomatosis with extensive peritoneal seeding, (iv) lymph-node metastasis, (v) liver metastasis, and (vi) colonic obstruction. These models permit the passage of the tumors to form large cohorts. They will facilitate research into the biology of colon cancer metastatic capability and the development of new drugs active against metastatic cancer. These models may also predict the clinical course and the in vivo response to drugs of the cancer of individual patients.

  8. X-ray diffraction from intact tau aggregates in human brain tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Landahl, Eric C.; Antipova, Olga; Bongaarts, Angela; Barrea, Raul; Berry, Robert; Binder, Lester I.; Irving, Thomas; Orgel, Joseph; Vana, Laurel; Rice, Sarah E.

    2011-09-15

    We describe an instrument to record X-ray diffraction patterns from diseased regions of human brain tissue by combining an in-line visible light fluorescence microscope with an X-ray diffraction microprobe. We use thiazine red fluorescence to specifically label and detect the filamentous tau protein pathology associated with Pick's disease, as several laboratories have done previously. We demonstrate that thiazine red-enhanced regions within the tissue show periodic structure in X-ray diffraction, which is not observed in healthy tissue. One observed periodicity (4.2 {angstrom}) is characteristic of cross-beta sheet structure, consistent with previous results from powder diffraction studies performed on purified, dried tau protein.

  9. Canine distemper virus with the intact C protein has the potential to replicate in human epithelial cells by using human nectin4 as a receptor.

    PubMed

    Otsuki, Noriyuki; Sekizuka, Tsuyoshi; Seki, Fumio; Sakai, Kouji; Kubota, Toru; Nakatsu, Yuichiro; Chen, Surui; Fukuhara, Hideo; Maenaka, Katsumi; Yamaguchi, Ryoji; Kuroda, Makoto; Takeda, Makoto

    2013-01-20

    Recent outbreaks in monkeys have proven that canine distemper virus (CDV) causes diseases in a wide range of mammals. CDV uses SLAM and nectin4 as receptors to replicate in susceptible animals. Here, we show that human nectin4, but not human SLAM, is fully functional as a CDV receptor. The CDV Ac96I strain hardly replicated in nectin4-expressing human epithelial NCI-H358 cells, but readily adapted to grow in them. Unsurprisingly, no amino acid change in the H protein was required for the adaptation. The original Ac96I strain possessed a truncated C protein, and a subpopulation possessing the intact C protein was selected after growth in NCI-H358 cells. Other CDV strains possessing the intact C protein showed significantly higher growth abilities in NCI-H358 cells than the Ac96I strain with the truncated C protein. These findings suggest that the C protein is functional in human epithelial cells and critical for CDV replication in them.

  10. Impaired rapid error monitoring but intact error signaling following rostral anterior cingulate cortex lesions in humans

    PubMed Central

    Maier, Martin E.; Di Gregorio, Francesco; Muricchio, Teresa; Di Pellegrino, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Detecting one’s own errors and appropriately correcting behavior are crucial for efficient goal-directed performance. A correlate of rapid evaluation of behavioral outcomes is the error-related negativity (Ne/ERN) which emerges at the time of the erroneous response over frontal brain areas. However, whether the error monitoring system’s ability to distinguish between errors and correct responses at this early time point is a necessary precondition for the subsequent emergence of error awareness remains unclear. The present study investigated this question using error-related brain activity and vocal error signaling responses in seven human patients with lesions in the rostral anterior cingulate cortex (rACC) and adjoining ventromedial prefrontal cortex, while they performed a flanker task. The difference between errors and correct responses was severely attenuated in these patients indicating impaired rapid error monitong, but they showed no impairment in error signaling. However, impaired rapid error monitoring coincided with a failure to increase response accuracy on trials following errors. These results demonstrate that the error monitoring system’s ability to distinguish between errors and correct responses at the time of the response is crucial for adaptive post-error adjustments, but not a necessary precondition for error awareness. PMID:26136674

  11. Differences in thermal optical response between intact diabetic and nondiabetic human skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, Shu-Jen; Hanna, Charles F.; Kantor, Stan; Hohs, Ronald; Khalil, Omar S.

    2003-07-01

    We observed a difference in the thermal response of localized reflectance signal of human skin between type-2 diabetic and non-diabetic volunteers. We investigated the use of this thermo-optical behavior as a basis for a non-invasive method for the determination of the diabetic status of a subject. We used a two-site temperature differential method, which is predicated upon the measurement of localized reflectance from two areas on the surface of the skin, each of these areas is subjected to a different thermal perturbation. The response of skin localized reflectance to temperature was measured and used in a classification algorithm. We used a discriminant function to classify subjects as diabetics or non-diabetics. In a prediction set of 24 non-invasive tests collected from 6 diabetics and 6 non-diabetics, the sensitivity ranged between 73% and 100%, and the specificity ranged between 75% and 100%, depending on the thermal conditions and probe-skin contact time. The difference in thermo-optical response of the skin of the two groups may be explained in terms of difference in response of cutaneous microcirculation to temperature, which is manifested as a difference in the near infrared light absorption and scattering. Another factor is the difference in the temperature response of the scattering coefficient between the two groups, which may be caused by cutaneous structural differences induced by non-enzymatic glycation of skin protein fibers, and/or by the difference in blood cell aggregation.

  12. Phorbol ester induced phosphorylation of the estrogen receptor in intact MCF-7 human breast cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Knabbe, C.; Lippman, M.E.; Greene, G.L.; Dickson, R.B.

    1986-05-01

    Recent studies with a variety of cellular receptors have shown that phorbol ester induced phosphorylation modulates ligand binding and function. In this study the authors present direct evidence that the estrogen receptor in MCF-7 human breast cancer cells is a phosphoprotein whose phosphorylation state can be enhanced specifically by phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA). Cells were cultured to 6h in the presence of (/sup 32/P)-orthophosphate. Whole cell extracts were immunoprecipitated with a monoclonal antibody (D58) against the estrogen receptor and subjected to SDS-polyacrylamide electrophoresis. Autoradiography showed a specific band in the region of 60-62 kDa which was significantly increased in preparations from PMA treated cells. Phospho-amino acid analysis demonstrated specific phosphorylation of serine and threonine residues. Cholera toxin or forskolin did not change the phosphorylation state of this protein. In a parallel binding analysis PMA led to a rapid decrease of estrogen binding sites. The estrogen induction of both progesterone receptors and growth in semisolid medium was blocked by PMA, whereas the estrogen induction of the 8kDa protein corresponding to the ps2 gene product and of the 52 kDa protein was not affected. In conclusion, phorbol esters can induce phosphorylation of the estrogen receptor. This process may be associated with the inactivation of certain receptor functions.

  13. Automated decellularization of intact, human-sized lungs for tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Price, Andrew P; Godin, Lindsay M; Domek, Alex; Cotter, Trevor; D'Cunha, Jonathan; Taylor, Doris A; Panoskaltsis-Mortari, Angela

    2015-01-01

    We developed an automated system that can be used to decellularize whole human-sized organs and have shown lung as an example. Lungs from 20 to 30 kg pigs were excised en bloc with the trachea and decellularized with our established protocol of deionized water, detergents, sodium chloride, and porcine pancreatic DNase. A software program was written to control a valve manifold assembly that we built for selection and timing of decellularization fluid perfusion through the airway and the vasculature. This system was interfaced with a prototypic bioreactor chamber that was connected to another program, from a commercial source, which controlled the volume and flow pressure of fluids. Lung matrix that was decellularized by the automated method was compared to a manual method previously used by us and others. Automation resulted in more consistent acellular matrix preparations as demonstrated by measuring levels of DNA, hydroxyproline (collagen), elastin, laminin, and glycosaminoglycans. It also proved highly beneficial in saving time as the decellularization procedure was reduced from days down to just 24 h. Developing a rapid, controllable, automated system for production of reproducible matrices in a closed system is a major step forward in whole-organ tissue engineering.

  14. A novel molecular therapy using bioengineered adenovirus for human gastrointestinal cancer.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Toshiyoshi

    2011-06-01

    Replication-selective tumor-specific viruses constitute a novel approach for treatment of neoplastic disease. These vectors are designed to induce virus-mediated lysis of tumor cells after selective viral propagation within the tumor. Human telomerase is highly active in more than 85オ of primary cancers, regardless of their tissue origins, and its activity correlates closely with human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) expression. We constructed an attenuated adenovirus 5 vector (Telomelysin, OBP-301), in which the hTERT promoter element drives expression of E1 genes. Since only tumor cells that express telomerase activity would activate this promoter, the hTERT proximal promoter would allow for preferential expression of viral genes in tumor cells, leading to selective viral replication and oncolytic cell death. Lymphatic invasion is a major route for cancer cell dissemination, and adequate treatment of locoregional lymph nodes is required for curative treatment in patients with gastrointestinal tumors. We demonstrated that intratumoral injection of Telomelysin mediates effective in vivo purging of metastatic tumor cells from regional lymph nodes. Moreover, using noninvasive whole-body imaging, we found that intratumoral injection of Telomelysin followed by regional irradiation induces a substantial antitumor effect, resulting from tumor cell-specific radiosensitization, in an orthotopic human esophageal cancer xenograft model. These results illustrate the potential of oncolytic virotherapy as a promising strategy in the management of human gastrointestinal cancer.

  15. Gastrointestinal absorption of plutonium, uranium and neptunium in fed and fasted adult baboons: Application to humans

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharyya, M.H.; Larsen, R.P.; Oldham, R.D.; Moretti, E.S.; Cohen, N.; Ralston, L.G.; Ayres, L.

    1992-03-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) absorption values of plutonium, uranium, and neptunium were determined in fed and fasted adult baboons. A dual isotope method of determining GI absorption, which does not require animal sacrifice, was validated and shown to compare well with the sacrifice method (summation of oral isotope in urine with that in tissues at sacrifice). For all three elements, mean GI absorption values were significantly high (5- to 50-fold) in 24-hour (h)-fasted animals than in fed animals, and GI absorption values for baboons agreed well with those for humans.

  16. Horizontal gene transfer in the human gastrointestinal tract: potential spread of antibiotic resistance genes

    PubMed Central

    Huddleston, Jennifer R

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial infections are becoming increasingly difficult to treat due to widespread antibiotic resistance among pathogens. This review aims to give an overview of the major horizontal transfer mechanisms and their evolution and then demonstrate the human lower gastrointestinal tract as an environment in which horizontal gene transfer of resistance determinants occurs. Finally, implications for antibiotic usage and the development of resistant infections and persistence of antibiotic resistance genes in populations as a result of horizontal gene transfer in the large intestine will be discussed. PMID:25018641

  17. Human milk glycobiome and its impact on the infant gastrointestinal microbiota.

    PubMed

    Zivkovic, Angela M; German, J Bruce; Lebrilla, Carlito B; Mills, David A

    2011-03-15

    Human milk contains an unexpected abundance and diversity of complex oligosaccharides apparently indigestible by the developing infant and instead targeted to its cognate gastrointestinal microbiota. Recent advances in mass spectrometry-based tools have provided a view of the oligosaccharide structures produced in milk across stages of lactation and among human mothers. One postulated function for these oligosaccharides is to enrich a specific "healthy" microbiota containing bifidobacteria, a genus commonly observed in the feces of breast-fed infants. Isolated culture studies indeed show selective growth of infant-borne bifidobacteria on milk oligosaccharides or core components therein. Parallel glycoprofiling documented that numerous Bifidobacterium longum subsp. infantis strains preferentially consume small mass oligosaccharides that are abundant early in the lactation cycle. Genome sequencing of numerous B. longum subsp. infantis strains shows a bias toward genes required to use mammalian-derived carbohydrates by comparison with adult-borne bifidobacteria. This intriguing strategy of mammalian lactation to selectively nourish genetically compatible bacteria in infants with a complex array of free oligosaccharides serves as a model of how to influence the human supraorganismal system, which includes the gastrointestinal microbiota.

  18. The fingerprint of the human gastrointestinal tract microbiota: a hypothesis of molecular mapping.

    PubMed

    Tomasello, G; Mazzola, M; Jurjus, A; Cappello, F; Carini, F; Damiani, P; Gerges Geagea, A; Zeenny, M N; Leone, A

    2017-01-01

    The precise etiology of Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IDB) remains unclear and several factors are believed to play a role in its development and progression, including the composition of microbial communities resident in the gastrointestinal tract. Human intestinal microbiota are extensive with at least 15,000-36,000 bacterial species. However, thanks to the new development in sequencing and molecular taxonomic methodologies, our understanding of the microbiota population composition, dynamics, and ecology has greatly increased. Intestinal microbiota play a critical role in the maintenance of the host intestinal barrier homeostasis, while dysbiosis, which involves reduction in the microbiome diversity, can lead to progression of inflammatory disorders, such as IBD and colorectal cancer. It is hypothesized that fingerprinting characterization of the microbiota community composition is the first step in the study of this complex bacterial ecosystem and a crucial step in the targeted therapy. Molecular fingerprinting of human gastrointestinal tract microbiota could be performed by different techniques including the semi quantitation, 16SrRNA, the DNA- microarray as well as other relatively new methods which were developed to study many complex bacterial ecosystems. These techniques provide individual data and profiles, using fast and sensitive tools for the high taxonomic level fingerprint of the human intestinal microbiota and provide estimation of the relative presence of the microbial target groups within each individual. Such personalized information serves as a remarkable and unprecedented opportunity to improve targeted medical treatment and probably develop strategies to prevent disease.

  19. Mobile genetic elements of the human gastrointestinal tract: potential for spread of antibiotic resistance genes.

    PubMed

    Broaders, Eileen; Gahan, Cormac G M; Marchesi, Julian R

    2013-01-01

    The human intestine is an important location for horizontal gene transfer (HGT) due to the presence of a densely populated community of microorganisms which are essential to the health of the human superorganism. HGT in this niche has the potential to influence the evolution of members of this microbial community and to mediate the spread of antibiotic resistance genes from commensal organisms to potential pathogens. Recent culture-independent techniques and metagenomic studies have provided an insight into the distribution of mobile genetic elements (MGEs) and the extent of HGT in the human gastrointestinal tract. In this mini-review, we explore the current knowledge of mobile genetic elements in the gastrointestinal tract, the progress of research into the distribution of antibiotic resistance genes in the gut and the potential role of MGEs in the spread of antibiotic resistance. In the face of reduced treatment options for many clinical infections, understanding environmental and commensal antibiotic resistance and spread is critical to the future development of meaningful and long lasting anti-microbial therapies.

  20. /sup 3/H-PAF-acether displacement and inhibition of binding in intact human platelets by BN 52021

    SciTech Connect

    Korth, R.; Le Couedic, J.P.; Benveniste, J.

    1986-03-05

    Intact washed human platelets incubated at 20/sup 0/C in Tyrode's buffer containing 0.25% (w/v) bovine serum albumin bound /sup 3/H paf-acether in a concentration (0-6.5 nM) and time (0-60 min) dependent manner (n=3). BN 52021 (60 ..mu..M) a chemically defined extract from Ginkgo biloba inhibited the binding of increasing concentrations of /sup 3/H paf-acether. Calculated differences between /sup 3/H paf-acether binding in the presence or absence of BN 52021 (60 ..mu..M) reached nearly a plateau in concentrations higher than 0.65 nM /sup 3/H paf-acether. Increasing concentrations of BN 52021 (0-60 ..mu..M) as well as of unlabelled paf-acether (0-50 nM) prevented within 15 min /sup 3/H paf-acether binding (0.65 nM) to platelets in a concentration-dependent way. Increasing BN 52021 concentrations (0-60 ..mu..M) also displaced platelet-bound /sup 3/H paf-acether (0.65 nM) in a concentration-dependent way. Displacement increased with the time length of platelet incubation with BN 52021 and reached a plateau at 15 min. Platelet-bound /sup 3/H paf-acether displacement of 28.3 +/- 6.3%, 31.1 +/- 4.0% and 26.7 +/- 5.6% was observed using 50 nM unlabelled paf-acether, 60 ..mu..M BN 52021 or both substances together (vs 4.3 +/- 7.2% for vehicle alone). No degradation of /sup 3/H paf-acether occurred as assessed by high pressure liquid chromatography. These results demonstrate that BN 52021 competes directly with paf-acether binding sites on human platelets.

  1. Human in vivo and in vitro studies on gastrointestinal absorption of titanium dioxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Jones, Kate; Morton, Jackie; Smith, Ian; Jurkschat, Kerstin; Harding, Anne-Helen; Evans, Gareth

    2015-03-04

    The study was designed to conduct human in vivo and in vitro studies on the gastrointestinal absorption of nanoparticles, using titanium dioxide as a model compound, and to compare nanoparticle behaviour with that of larger particles. A supplier's characterisation data may not fully describe a particle formulation. Most particles tested agreed with their supplied characterisation when assessed by particle number but significant proportions of 'nanoparticle formulations' were particles >100nm when assessed by particle weight. Oral doses are measured by weight and it is therefore important that the weight characterisation is taken into consideration. The human volunteer studies demonstrated that very little titanium dioxide is absorbed gastrointestinally after an oral challenge. There was no demonstrable difference in absorption for any of the three particle sizes tested. All tested formulations were shown to agglomerate in simulated gastric fluid, particularly in the smaller particle formulations. Further agglomeration was observed when dispersing formulations in polymeric or elemental foods. Virtually no translocation of titanium dioxide particles across the cell layer was demonstrated. This study found no evidence that nanoparticulate titanium dioxide is more likely to be absorbed in the gut than micron-sized particles.

  2. Induction of spermatogenesis and spermiation by a single injection of human chorionic gonadotropin in intact and hypophysectomized immature European eel (Anguilla anguilla L.).

    PubMed

    Khan, I A; Lopez, E; Leloup-Hâtey, J

    1987-10-01

    Intact and hypophysectomized male silver eels (Anguilla anguilla) in fresh water received a single injection of human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) (250 C) or solvent (0.15 M NaCl). No effect of solvent was observed. Spermatogonia proliferated in testis of hCG-treated intact or hypophysectomized eels. One month after the injection, primary and secondary spermatocytes were found. After 3 months, numerous spermatozoa were present. In hypophysectomized eels, hCG was also effective even though maturing germ cells were less numerous and spermiation was less frequent than in intact animals. Within 1 week after hCG injection, plasma levels of free and glucuroconjugated androgens (testosterone and 11-oxotestosterone) rose significantly in intact and hypophysectomized fish. The highest values were observed within 1 month, and then plasma levels decreased to pretreatment values. The most important changes were observed in the case of free 11-oxotestosterone. The long-term effects of hCG can be explained partly by the long half-life of this hormone. The effects of hypophysectomy on the response of testis to hCG caused us to think that some endogenous pituitary secretions must interfere in the intact fish so that maximal effects of hCG, especially on the induction of spermiation, are obtained.

  3. Expression and Regulation of Drug Transporters and Metabolizing Enzymes in the Human Gastrointestinal Tract.

    PubMed

    Drozdzik, M; Oswald, S

    2016-01-01

    Orally administered drugs must pass through the intestinal wall and then through the liver before reaching systemic circulation. During this process drugs are subjected to different processes that may determine the therapeutic value. The intestinal barrier with active drug metabolizing enzymes and drug transporters in enterocytes plays an important role in the determination of drug bioavailability. Accumulating information demonstrates variable distribution of drug metabolizing enzymes and transporters along the human gastrointestinal tract (GI), that creates specific barrier characteristics in different segments of the GI. In this review, expression of drug metabolizing enzymes and transporters in the healthy and diseased human GI as well as their regulatory aspects: genetic, miRNA, DNA methylation are outlined. The knowledge of unique interplay between drug metabolizing enzymes and transporters in specific segments of the GI tract allows more precise definition of drug release sites within the GI in order to assure more complete bioavailability and prediction of drug interactions.

  4. Induction of Invasive Transitional Cell Bladder Carcinoma in Immune Intact Human MUC1 Transgenic Mice: A Model for Immunotherapy Development

    PubMed Central

    Vang, Daniel P.; Wurz, Gregory T.; Griffey, Stephen M.; Kao, Chiao-Jung; Gutierrez, Audrey M.; Hanson, Gregory K.; Wolf, Michael; DeGregorio, Michael W.

    2013-01-01

    A preclinical model of invasive bladder cancer was developed in human mucin 1 (MUC1) transgenic (MUC1.Tg) mice for the purpose of evaluating immunotherapy and/or cytotoxic chemotherapy. To induce bladder cancer, C57BL/6 mice (MUC1.Tg and wild type) were treated orally with the carcinogen N-butyl-N-(4-hydroxybutyl)nitrosamine (OH-BBN) at 3.0 mg/day, 5 days/week for 12 weeks. To assess the effects of OH-BBN on serum cytokine profile during tumor development, whole blood was collected via submandibular bleeds prior to treatment and every four weeks. In addition, a MUC1-targeted peptide vaccine and placebo were administered to groups of mice weekly for eight weeks. Multiplex fluorometric microbead immunoanalyses of serum cytokines during tumor development and following vaccination were performed. At termination, interferon gamma (IFN-γ)/interleukin-4 (IL-4) ELISpot analysis for MUC1 specific T-cell immune response and histopathological evaluations of tumor type and grade were performed. The results showed that: (1) the incidence of bladder cancer in both MUC1.Tg and wild type mice was 67%; (2) transitional cell carcinomas (TCC) developed at a 2:1 ratio compared to squamous cell carcinomas (SCC); (3) inflammatory cytokines increased with time during tumor development; and (4) administration of the peptide vaccine induces a Th1-polarized serum cytokine profile and a MUC1 specific T-cell response. All tumors in MUC1.Tg mice were positive for MUC1 expression, and half of all tumors in MUC1.Tg and wild type mice were invasive. In conclusion, using a team approach through the coordination of the efforts of pharmacologists, immunologists, pathologists and molecular biologists, we have developed an immune intact transgenic mouse model of bladder cancer that expresses hMUC1. PMID:24300078

  5. Bioengineering functional human sphincteric and non-sphincteric gastrointestinal smooth muscle constructs.

    PubMed

    Rego, Stephen L; Zakhem, Elie; Orlando, Giuseppe; Bitar, Khalil N

    2016-04-15

    Digestion and motility of luminal content through the gastrointestinal (GI) tract are achieved by cooperation between distinct cell types. Much of the 3 dimensional (3D) in vitro modeling used to study the GI physiology and disease focus solely on epithelial cells and not smooth muscle cells (SMCs). SMCs of the gut function either to propel and mix luminal contents (phasic; non-sphincteric) or to act as barriers to prevent the movement of luminal materials (tonic; sphincteric). Motility disorders including pyloric stenosis and chronic intestinal pseudoobstruction (CIPO) affect sphincteric and non-sphincteric SMCs, respectively. Bioengineering offers a useful tool to develop functional GI tissue mimics that possess similar characteristics to native tissue. The objective of this study was to bioengineer 3D human pyloric sphincter and small intestinal (SI) constructs in vitro that recapitulate the contractile phenotypes of sphincteric and non-sphincteric human GI SMCs. Bioengineered 3D human pylorus and circular SI SMC constructs were developed and displayed a contractile phenotype. Constructs composed of human pylorus SMCs displayed tonic SMC characteristics, including generation of basal tone, at higher levels than SI SMC constructs which is similar to what is seen in native tissue. Both constructs contracted in response to potassium chloride (KCl) and acetylcholine (ACh) and relaxed in response to vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP). These studies provide the first bioengineered human pylorus constructs that maintain a sphincteric phenotype. These bioengineered constructs provide appropriate models to study motility disorders of the gut or replacement tissues for various GI organs.

  6. Animal Farm: Considerations in Animal Gastrointestinal Physiology and Relevance to Drug Delivery in Humans.

    PubMed

    Hatton, Grace B; Yadav, Vipul; Basit, Abdul W; Merchant, Hamid A

    2015-09-01

    "All animals are equal, but some are more equal than others" was the illustrious quote derived from British writer George Orwell's famed work, Animal Farm. Extending beyond the remit of political allegory, however, this statement would appear to hold true for the selection of appropriate animal models to simulate human physiology in preclinical studies. There remain definite gaps in our current knowledge with respect to animal physiology, notably those of intra- and inter-species differences in gastrointestinal (GI) function, which may affect oral drug delivery and absorption. Factors such as cost and availability have often influenced the choice of animal species without clear justification for their similarity to humans, and lack of standardization in techniques employed in past studies using various animals may also have contributed to the generation of contradictory results. As it stands, attempts to identify a single animal species as appropriately representative of human physiology and which may able to adequately simulate human in vivo conditions are limited. In this review, we have compiled and critically reviewed data from numerous studies of GI anatomy and physiology of various animal species commonly used in drug delivery modeling, commenting on the appropriateness of these animals for in vivo comparison and extrapolation to humans.

  7. A Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Trial of Oral Human Immunoglobulin for Gastrointestinal Dysfunction in Children with Autistic Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Handen, Benjamin L.; Melmed, Raun D.; Hansen, Robin L.; Aman, Michael G.; Burnham, David L.; Bruss, Jon B.; McDougle, Christopher J.

    2009-01-01

    Controversy exists regarding the extent and possible causal relationship between gastrointestinal symptoms and autism. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel groups, dose-ranging study of oral, human immunoglobulin (IGOH 140, 420, or 840 mg/day) was utilized with 125 children (ages 2-17 years) with autism and persistent GI…

  8. Canine and human gastrointestinal stromal tumors display similar mutations in c-KIT exon 11

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are common mesenchymal neoplasms in the gastrointestinal tract of humans and dogs. Little is known about the pathogenesis of these tumors. This study evaluated the role of c-KIT in canine GISTs; specifically, we investigated activating mutations in exons 8, 9, 11, 13, and 17 of c-KIT and exons 12, 14, and 18 of platelet-derived growth factor receptor, alpha polypeptide (PDGFRA), all of which have been implicated in human GISTs. Methods Seventeen canine GISTs all confirmed to be positive for KIT immunostaining were studied. Exons 8, 9, 11, 13 and 17 of c-KIT and exons 12, 14, and 18 of PDGFRA, were amplified from DNA isolated from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded samples. Results Of these seventeen cases, six amplicons of exon 11 of c-KIT showed aberrant bands on gel electrophoresis. Sequencing of these amplicons revealed heterozygous in-frame deletions in six cases. The mutations include two different but overlapping six base pair deletions. Exons 8, 9, 13, and 17 of c-KIT and exons 12, 14, and 18 of PDGFRA had no abnormalities detected by electrophoresis and sequencing did not reveal any mutations, other than synonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) found in exon 11 of c-KIT and exons 12 and 14 of PDGFRA. Conclusions The deletion mutations detected in canine GISTs are similar to those previously found in the juxtamembrane domain of c-KIT in canine cutaneous mast cell tumors in our laboratory as well as to those reported in human GISTs. Interestingly, none of the other c-KIT or PDGFRA exons showed any abnormalities in our cases. This finding underlines the critical importance of c-KIT in the pathophysiology of canine GISTs. The expression of KIT and the identification of these activating mutations in c-KIT implicate KIT in the pathogenesis of these tumors. Our results indicate that mutations in c-KIT may be of prognostic significance and that targeting KIT may be a rational approach to treatment of these

  9. Different digestion of caprine whey proteins by human and porcine gastrointestinal enzymes.

    PubMed

    Eriksen, Ellen K; Holm, Halvor; Jensen, Einar; Aaboe, Ragnhild; Devold, Tove G; Jacobsen, Morten; Vegarud, Gerd E

    2010-08-01

    The objective of the present study was twofold: first to compare the degradation patterns of caprine whey proteins digested with either human digestive juices (gastric or duodenal) or commercial porcine enzymes (pepsin or pancreatic enzymes) and second to observe the effect of gastric pH on digestion. An in vitro two-step assay was performed at 37 degrees C to simulate digestion in the stomach (pH 2, 4 or 6) and the duodenum (pH 8). The whey proteins were degraded more efficiently by porcine pepsin than by human gastric juice at all pH values. Irrespective of the enzyme source, gastric digestion at pH 2 followed by duodenal digestion resulted in the most efficient degradation. Lactoferrin, serum albumin and the Ig heavy chains were highly degraded with less than 6 % remaining after digestion. About 15, 56 and 50 % Ig light chains, beta-lactoglobulin (beta-LG) and alpha-lactalbumin remained intact, respectively, when digested with porcine enzymes compared with 25, 74 and 81 % with human digestive juices. For comparison, purified bovine beta-LG was digested and the peptide profiles obtained were compared with those of the caprine beta-LG in the digested whey. The bovine beta-LG seemed to be more extensively cleaved than the caprine beta-LG in the whey. Commercial enzymes appear to digest whey proteins more efficiently compared with human digestive juices when used at similar enzyme activities. This could lead to conflicting results when comparing human in vivo protein digestion with digestion using purified enzymes of non-human species. Consequently the use of human digestive juices might be preferred.

  10. Identification of lactoferrin peptides generated by digestion with human gastrointestinal enzymes.

    PubMed

    Furlund, C B; Ulleberg, E K; Devold, T G; Flengsrud, R; Jacobsen, M; Sekse, C; Holm, H; Vegarud, G E

    2013-01-01

    Lactoferrin (LF) is a protein present in milk and other body fluids that plays important biological roles. As part of a diet, LF must survive gastrointestinal conditions or create bioactive fragments to exert its effects. The degradation of LF and formation of bioactive peptides is highly dependent on individual variation in intraluminal composition. The present study was designed to compare the degradation and peptide formation of bovine LF (bLF) following in vitro digestion under different simulated intraluminal conditions. Human gastrointestinal (GI) juices were used in a 2-step model digestion to mimic degradation in the stomach and duodenum. To account for variation in the buffering capacity of different lactoferrin-containing foods, gastric pH was adjusted either slowly or rapidly to 2.5 or 4.0. The results were compared with in vivo digestion of bLF performed in 2 volunteers. High concentration of GI juices and fast pH reduction to 2.5 resulted in complete degradation in the gastric step. More LF resisted gastric digestion when pH was slowly reduced to 2.5 or 4.0. Several peptides were identified; however, few matched with previously reported peptides from studies using nonhuman enzymes. Surprisingly, no bovine lactoferricin, f(17-41), was identified during in vitro or in vivo digestion under the intraluminal conditions used. The diversity of enzymes in human GI juices seems to affect the hydrolysis of bLF, generating different peptide fragments compared with those obtained when using only one or a few proteases of animal origin. Multiple sequence analysis of the identified peptides indicated a motif consisting of proline and neighboring hydrophobic residues that could restrict proteolytic processing. Further structure analysis showed that almost all proteolytic cutting sites were located on the surface and mainly on the nonglycosylated half of lactoferrin. Digestion of bLF by human enzymes may generate different peptides from those found when lactoferrin is

  11. [Carbon monoxide in human physiology--its role in the gastrointestinal tract].

    PubMed

    Jasnos, Katarzyna; Magierowski, Marcin; Kwiecień, Sławomir; Brzozowski, Tomasz

    2014-01-30

    Carbon monoxide (CO) is produced endogenously in the body as a byproduct of heme degradation catalyzed by the action of heme oxygenase (HO) enzymes. An inducible form, HO-1, responds to many factors such as oxidative stress, hypoxia, heme, bacterial endotoxins, proinflammatory cytokines and heavy metals. HO-2 is constitutively expressed under basal conditions in most human tissues including brain and gonads. Recent data show that CO is a gaseous mediator with multidirectional biological activity. It is involved in maintaining cellular homeostasis and many physiological and pathophysiological processes. CO shares many properties with another established vasodilatator and neurotransmitter - nitric oxide (NO). Both CO and NO are involved in neural transmission, modulation of blood vessel function and inhibition of platelet aggregation. The binding to guanylate cyclase, stimulation of the production of cGMP, activation of Ca2+-dependent potassium channels and stimulation of mitogen-activated protein kinases are well known cellular targets of CO action. Since CO is nowadays a subject of extensive investigation in many centers worldwide, the aim of the present study was to present the role of CO in various aspects of human physiology with special focus on its activity in the gastrointestinal tract.

  12. A piglet model for studying Candida albicans colonization of the human oro-gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Hoeflinger, Jennifer L; Coleman, David A; Oh, Soon-Hwan; Miller, Michael J; Hoyer, Lois L

    2014-08-01

    Pigs from a variety of sources were surveyed for oro-gastrointestinal (oro-GIT) carriage of Candida albicans. Candida albicans-positive animals were readily located, but we also identified C. albicans-free pigs. We hypothesized that pigs could be stably colonized with a C. albicans strain of choice, simply by feeding yeast cells. Piglets were farrowed routinely and remained with the sow for 4 days to acquire a normal microbiota. Piglets were then placed in an artificial rearing environment and fed sow milk replacer. Piglets were inoculated orally with one of three different C. albicans strains. Piglets were weighed daily, and culture swabs were collected to detect C. albicans orally, rectally and in the piglet's environment. Stable C. albicans colonization over the course of the study did not affect piglet growth. Necropsy revealed mucosally associated C. albicans throughout the oro-GIT with the highest abundance in the esophagus. Uninoculated control piglets remained C. albicans-negative. These data establish the piglet as a model to study C. albicans colonization of the human oro-GIT. Similarities between oro-GIT colonization in humans and pigs, as well as the ease of working with the piglet model, suggest its adaptability for use among investigators interested in understanding C. albicans-host commensal interactions.

  13. A wireless capsule system with ASIC for monitoring the physiological signals of the human gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Xu, Fei; Yan, Guozheng; Zhao, Kai; Lu, Li; Gao, Jinyang; Liu, Gang

    2014-12-01

    This paper presents the design of a wireless capsule system for monitoring the physiological signals of the human gastrointestinal (GI) tract. The primary components of the system include a wireless capsule, a portable data recorder, and a workstation. Temperature, pH, and pressure sensors; an RF transceiver; a controlling and processing application specific integrated circuit (ASIC); and batteries were applied in a wireless capsule. Decreasing capsule size, improving sensor precision, and reducing power needs were the primary challenges; these were resolved by employing micro sensors, optimized architecture, and an ASIC design that include power management, clock management, a programmable gain amplifier (PGA), an A/D converter (ADC), and a serial peripheral interface (SPI) communication unit. The ASIC has been fabricated in 0.18- μm CMOS technology with a die area of 5.0 mm × 5.0 mm. The wireless capsule integrating the ASIC controller measures Φ 11 mm × 26 mm. A data recorder and a workstation were developed, and 20 cases of human experiments were conducted in hospitals. Preprocessing in the workstation can significantly improve the quality of the data, and 76 original features were determined by mathematical statistics. Based on the 13 optimal features achieved in the evaluation of the features, the clustering algorithm can identify the patients who lack GI motility with a recognition rate reaching 83.3%.

  14. Identification, Recovery, and Refinement of Hitherto Undescribed Population-Level Genomes from the Human Gastrointestinal Tract

    PubMed Central

    Laczny, Cedric C.; Muller, Emilie E. L.; Heintz-Buschart, Anna; Herold, Malte; Lebrun, Laura A.; Hogan, Angela; May, Patrick; de Beaufort, Carine; Wilmes, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Linking taxonomic identity and functional potential at the population-level is important for the study of mixed microbial communities and is greatly facilitated by the availability of microbial reference genomes. While the culture-independent recovery of population-level genomes from environmental samples using the binning of metagenomic data has expanded available reference genome catalogs, several microbial lineages remain underrepresented. Here, we present two reference-independent approaches for the identification, recovery, and refinement of hitherto undescribed population-level genomes. The first approach is aimed at genome recovery of varied taxa and involves multi-sample automated binning using CANOPY CLUSTERING complemented by visualization and human-augmented binning using VIZBIN post hoc. The second approach is particularly well-suited for the study of specific taxa and employs VIZBIN de novo. Using these approaches, we reconstructed a total of six population-level genomes of distinct and divergent representatives of the Alphaproteobacteria class, the Mollicutes class, the Clostridiales order, and the Melainabacteria class from human gastrointestinal tract-derived metagenomic data. Our results demonstrate that, while automated binning approaches provide great potential for large-scale studies of mixed microbial communities, these approaches should be complemented with informative visualizations because expert-driven inspection and refinements are critical for the recovery of high-quality population-level genomes. PMID:27445992

  15. Stability of Rosmarinic Acid in Aqueous Extracts from Different Lamiaceae Species after in vitro Digestion with Human Gastrointestinal Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Zorić, Zoran; Markić, Joško; Pedisić, Sandra; Bučević-Popović, Viljemka; Generalić-Mekinić, Ivana; Grebenar, Katarina

    2016-01-01

    Summary The present study compares the gastrointestinal stability of rosmarinic acid in aqueous extracts of thyme, winter savory and lemon balm with the stability of pure rosmarinic acid. The stability of rosmarinic acid was detected after two-phase in vitro digestion process (gastric and duodenal) with human gastrointestinal enzymes. The concentration of rosmarinic acid in undigested and digested samples was detected using HPLC-DAD. Results showed that gastrointestinal stability of pure rosmarinic acid was significantly higher than that of rosmarinic acid from plant extracts after both gastric and intestinal phases of digestion. Among plant extracts, rosmarinic acid was the most stable in lemon balm after gastric (14.10%) and intestinal digestion phases (6.5%). The temperature (37 °C) and slightly alkaline medium (pH=7.5) did not affect the stability of rosmarinic acid, while acid medium (pH=2.5) significantly decreased its stability (≥50%). In addition, the stability rate of rosmarinic acid is influenced by the concentration of human gastrointestinal juices. PMID:27904398

  16. Stability of Rosmarinic Acid in Aqueous Extracts from Different Lamiaceae Species after in vitro Digestion with Human Gastrointestinal Enzymes.

    PubMed

    Zorić, Zoran; Markić, Joško; Pedisić, Sandra; Bučević-Popović, Viljemka; Generalić-Mekinić, Ivana; Grebenar, Katarina; Kulišić-Bilušić, Tea

    2016-03-01

    The present study compares the gastrointestinal stability of rosmarinic acid in aqueous extracts of thyme, winter savory and lemon balm with the stability of pure rosmarinic acid. The stability of rosmarinic acid was detected after two-phase in vitro digestion process (gastric and duodenal) with human gastrointestinal enzymes. The concentration of rosmarinic acid in undigested and digested samples was detected using HPLC-DAD. Results showed that gastrointestinal stability of pure rosmarinic acid was significantly higher than that of rosmarinic acid from plant extracts after both gastric and intestinal phases of digestion. Among plant extracts, rosmarinic acid was the most stable in lemon balm after gastric (14.10%) and intestinal digestion phases (6.5%). The temperature (37 °C) and slightly alkaline medium (pH=7.5) did not affect the stability of rosmarinic acid, while acid medium (pH=2.5) significantly decreased its stability (≥50%). In addition, the stability rate of rosmarinic acid is influenced by the concentration of human gastrointestinal juices.

  17. Determination of Serotonin and Dopamine Metabolites in Human Brain Microdialysis and Cerebrospinal Fluid Samples by UPLC-MS/MS: Discovery of Intact Glucuronide and Sulfate Conjugates

    PubMed Central

    Suominen, Tina; Uutela, Päivi; Ketola, Raimo A.; Bergquist, Jonas; Hillered, Lars; Finel, Moshe; Zhang, Hongbo; Laakso, Aki; Kostiainen, Risto

    2013-01-01

    An UPLC-MS/MS method was developed for the determination of serotonin (5-HT), dopamine (DA), their phase I metabolites 5-HIAA, DOPAC and HVA, and their sulfate and glucuronide conjugates in human brain microdialysis samples obtained from two patients with acute brain injuries, ventricular cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples obtained from four patients with obstructive hydrocephalus, and a lumbar CSF sample pooled mainly from patients undergoing spinal anesthesia in preparation for orthopedic surgery. The method was validated by determining the limits of detection and quantification, linearity, repeatability and specificity. The direct method enabled the analysis of the intact phase II metabolites of 5-HT and DA, without hydrolysis of the conjugates. The method also enabled the analysis of the regioisomers of the conjugates, and several intact glucuronide and sulfate conjugates were identified and quantified for the first time in the human brain microdialysis and CSF samples. We were able to show the presence of 5-HIAA sulfate, and that dopamine-3-O-sulfate predominates over dopamine-4-O-sulfate in the human brain. The quantitative results suggest that sulfonation is a more important phase II metabolism pathway than glucuronidation in the human brain. PMID:23826355

  18. [Gastrointestinal bezoars].

    PubMed

    Espinoza González, Ricardo

    2016-08-01

    Gastrointestinal bezoars are a concretion of indigested material that can be found in the gastrointestinal tract of humans and some animals. This material forms an intraluminal mass, more commonly located in the stomach. During a large period of history animal bezoars were considered antidotes to poisons and diseases. We report a historical overview since bezoars stones were thought to have medicinal properties. This magic conception was introduced in South America by Spanish conquerors. In Chile, bezoars are commonly found in a camelid named guanaco (Lama guanicoe). People at Central Chile and the Patagonia believed that bezoar stones had magical properties and they were traded at very high prices. In Santiago, during the eighteenth century the Jesuit apothecary sold preparations of bezoar stones. The human bezoars may be formed by non-digestible material like cellulose (phytobezoar), hair (trichobezoar), conglomerations of medications or his vehicles (pharmacobezoar or medication bezoar), milk and mucus component (lactobezoar) or other varieties of substances. This condition may be asymptomatic or can produce abdominal pain, ulceration, gastrointestinal bleeding, gastric outlet obstruction, perforation and mechanical intestinal obstruction. We report their classification, diagnostic modalities and treatment.

  19. Effects of Dietary Yogurt on the Healthy Human Gastrointestinal (GI) Microbiome.

    PubMed

    Lisko, Daniel J; Johnston, G Patricia; Johnston, Carl G

    2017-02-15

    The gastrointestinal (GI) tract performs key functions that regulate the relationship between the host and the microbiota. Research has shown numerous benefits of probiotic intake in the modulation of immune responses and human metabolic processes. However, unfavorable attention has been paid to temporal changes of the microbial composition and diversity of the GI tract. This study aimed to investigate the effects of yogurt consumption on the GI microbiome bacteria community composition, structure and diversity during and after a short-term period (42 days). We used a multi-approach combining classical fingerprinting techniques (T-RFLPs), Sanger analyses and Illumina MiSeq 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing to elucidate bacterial communities and Lactobacilli and Bifidobacteria populations within healthy adults that consume high doses of yogurt daily. Results indicated that overall GI microbial community and diversity was method-dependent, yet we found individual specific changes in bacterial composition and structure in healthy subjects that consumed high doses of yogurt throughout the study.

  20. Effects of Dietary Yogurt on the Healthy Human Gastrointestinal (GI) Microbiome

    PubMed Central

    Lisko, Daniel J.; Johnston, G. Patricia; Johnston, Carl G.

    2017-01-01

    The gastrointestinal (GI) tract performs key functions that regulate the relationship between the host and the microbiota. Research has shown numerous benefits of probiotic intake in the modulation of immune responses and human metabolic processes. However, unfavorable attention has been paid to temporal changes of the microbial composition and diversity of the GI tract. This study aimed to investigate the effects of yogurt consumption on the GI microbiome bacteria community composition, structure and diversity during and after a short-term period (42 days). We used a multi-approach combining classical fingerprinting techniques (T-RFLPs), Sanger analyses and Illumina MiSeq 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing to elucidate bacterial communities and Lactobacilli and Bifidobacteria populations within healthy adults that consume high doses of yogurt daily. Results indicated that overall GI microbial community and diversity was method-dependent, yet we found individual specific changes in bacterial composition and structure in healthy subjects that consumed high doses of yogurt throughout the study. PMID:28212267

  1. Gastrointestinal transit in nonobese diabetic mouse: an animal model of human diabetes type 1.

    PubMed

    El-Salhy, M

    2001-01-01

    Gastrointestinal transit (GI) in the nonobese diabetic (NOD) mouse, an animal model of human diabetes type 1, was examined in animals with short- (duration 1-5 days) and long-term (duration 28-35 days) diabetes. Blood glucose level, serum insulin concentration, and gut neuroendocrine peptide content were also measured. GI was significantly rapid in NOD mice with long-term diabetes (LTD), but was not correlated with blood glucose level, serum insulin concentration, or pancreatic insulin content. GI was correlated with duodenal secretin content, but not with the content of other neuroendocrine peptides in the different segments investigated. Whereas antral vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) content in NOD mice with LTD was significantly higher, colonic VIP was lower in NOD mice with short-term diabetes (STD). In the duodenum, whereas the concentration of secretin in NOD mice with both STD and LTD was lower, the gastrin content was higher. Duodenal somatostatin content in NOD mice with LTD was lower. In colon, the content of galanin in NOD mice with LTD was higher than in controls. The decreased content of secretin may be among the factors that cause rapid GI in NOD mice with LTD. Changes in the antral content of VIP, duodenal somatostatin, and colonic galanin in NOD mice with LTD may cause low intestinal secretion and, together with rapid GI, give rise to diarrhoea, which is a common symptom in diabetes.

  2. Behaviour of silver nanoparticles and silver ions in an in vitro human gastrointestinal digestion model.

    PubMed

    Walczak, Agata P; Fokkink, Remco; Peters, Ruud; Tromp, Peter; Herrera Rivera, Zahira E; Rietjens, Ivonne M C M; Hendriksen, Peter J M; Bouwmeester, Hans

    2013-11-01

    Oral ingestion is an important exposure route for silver nanoparticles (AgNPs), but their fate during gastrointestinal digestion is unknown. This was studied for 60 nm AgNPs and silver ions (AgNO₃) using in vitro human digestion model. Samples after saliva, gastric and intestinal digestion were analysed with SP-ICPMS, DLS and SEM-EDX. In presence of proteins, after gastric digestion the number of particles dropped significantly, to rise back to original values after the intestinal digestion. SEM-EDX revealed that reduction in number of particles was caused by their clustering. These clusters were composed of AgNPs and chlorine. During intestinal digestion, these clusters disintegrated back into single 60 nm AgNPs. The authors conclude that these AgNPs under physiological conditions can reach the intestinal wall in their initial size and composition. Importantly, intestinal digestion of AgNO₃ in presence of proteins resulted in particle formation. These nanoparticles (of 20-30 nm) were composed of silver, sulphur and chlorine.

  3. Sangre de grado Croton palanostigma induces apoptosis in human gastrointestinal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Sandoval, Manuel; Okuhama, Nataly N; Clark, Melinda; Angeles, Fausto M; Lao, Juan; Bustamante, Sergio; Miller, Mark J S

    2002-05-01

    Sangre de grado is an ethnomedicinal red tree sap obtained from Croton spp. that is used to treat gastrointestinal ulcers, cancer and to promote wound healing. To evaluate the potential role of sangre de grado (SdG) in cancer we examined its effects on human cancer cells, AGS (stomach), HT29 and T84 (colon). Viability of cells treated with SdG (10-200 microg/ml) decreased (P<0.01) in a dose dependent manner measured over a 24-h period. Cell proliferation at 48 h decreased (P<0.01) in all cells treated with SdG (>100 microg/ml). When cells in suspension were treated with SdG (100 microg/ml) cell adherence was severely compromised (>85%). Cells treated with SdG (100 microg/ml) underwent apoptosis as detected by nucleus condensation and DNA fragmentation determined by ELISA, and flow cytometry. Morphological changes as assessed by acridine orange. These effects were similar to that observed with Taxol (30 microM). A significant alteration of microtubular architecture was equally observed in both stomach and colon cancer cells exposed to SdG (100 microg/ml). The induction of apoptosis and microtubule damage in AGS, HT29 and T84 cells suggest that sangre de grado should be evaluated further as a potential source of anti-cancer agents.

  4. Effects of Genetically Modified Milk Containing Human Beta-Defensin-3 on Gastrointestinal Health of Mice

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yange; Shi, Zhaopeng; Gao, Ming-Qing; Zhang, Yong

    2016-01-01

    This study was performed to investigate the effects of genetically modified (GM) milk containing human beta-defensin-3 (HBD3) on mice by a 90-day feeding study. The examined parameters included the digestibility of GM milk, general physical examination, gastric emptying function, intestinal permeability, intestinal microflora composition of mice, and the possibility of horizontal gene transfer (HGT). The emphasis was placed on the effects on gastrointestinal (GI) tract due to the fact that GI tract was the first site contacting with food and played crucial roles in metabolic reactions, nutrition absorption and immunity regulation in the host. However, the traditional methods for analyzing the potential toxicological risk of GM product pay little attention on GI health. In this study, the results showed GM milk was easy to be digested in simulated gastric fluid, and it did not have adverse effects on general and GI health compared to conventional milk. And there is little possibility of HGT. This study may enrich the safety assessment of GM product on GI health. PMID:27438026

  5. Gastrointestinal hormone mRNA expression in human colonic adenocarcinomas, hepatic metastases and cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Monges, G; Biagini, P; Cantaloube, J F; De Micco, P; Parriaux, D; Seitz, J F; Delpero, J R; Hassoun, J

    1996-01-01

    Aims—(1) To investigate the expression of the four main hormones of the digestive tract by performing reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) on a series of samples, comprising tumoral and healthy colonic tissues, hepatic metastases and colonic cell line samples; and (2) to study the patterns of labelling obtained with serological and morphological markers. Methods—After extraction and reverse transcription, gastrin, somatostatin, cholecystokinin (CCK) and transforming growth factor α (TGFα) mRNAs were detected by PCR and nested PCR using specific primers. The corresponding proteins were detected by immunohistochemistry. Results—The cell lines expressed all four mRNAs. Gastrin mRNA was present in most tumoral and metastatic samples, while the somatostatin transcript was detected in all samples and was frequently overexpressed in the normal colon. TGFα mRNA was expressed systematically in tumours of the right and transverse colon, but not in those located in the left colon; the expression of CCK mRNA was systematically absent in the left colon. Conclusions—The data presented here shed some light on the transcriptional events involved in the production of the various hormones present in the gastrointestinal tract, in both healthy and tumoral tissues. The various mRNAs expressed in cell lines are therefore not systematically expressed in the human pathology. Images PMID:16696065

  6. Effects of dim or bright-light exposure during the daytime on human gastrointestinal activity.

    PubMed

    Sone, Yoshiaki; Hyun, Ki-Ja; Nishimura, Shinya; Lee, Young-Ah; Tokura, Hiromi

    2003-01-01

    On the basis of our previous findings that bright-light exposure during the daytime has profound influence on physiological parameters such as melatonin secretion and tympanic temperature in humans, we proposed the hypothesis that bright vs. dim light-exposure during the daytime has a different influence on the activity of the digestive system via the endocrine and/or autonomic nervous system. To examine this hypothesis, we conducted a series of counterbalanced experiments in which subjects stayed the daytime (7:00 to 15:00h) under either a dim (80 lux) or bright (5,000 lux) light condition. We measured gastrointestinal activity using a breath hydrogen (indicative of carbohydrate malabsorption) and an electrogastrography (EGG, indicative of gastric myoelectric activity) test. The results showed the postprandial breath hydrogen excretion during the following nighttime period after daytime exposure to the dim-light condition was significantly higher than under the bright-light condition (p < 0.05). In addition, the spectrum total power of the EGG recorded after taking the evening meal was significantly lower for the dim than bright-light condition (p < 0.05). These results support our hypothesis and indicate that dim-light exposure during the daytime suppresses the digestion of the evening meal, resulting in malabsorption of dietary carbohydrates in it.

  7. Age and Gender Affect the Composition of Fungal Population of the Human Gastrointestinal Tract

    PubMed Central

    Strati, Francesco; Di Paola, Monica; Stefanini, Irene; Albanese, Davide; Rizzetto, Lisa; Lionetti, Paolo; Calabrò, Antonio; Jousson, Olivier; Donati, Claudio; Cavalieri, Duccio; De Filippo, Carlotta

    2016-01-01

    The fungal component of the human gut microbiota has been neglected for long time due to the low relative abundance of fungi with respect to bacteria, and only recently few reports have explored its composition and dynamics in health or disease. The application of metagenomics methods to the full understanding of fungal communities is currently limited by the under representation of fungal DNA with respect to the bacterial one, as well as by the limited ability to discriminate passengers from colonizers. Here, we investigated the gut mycobiota of a cohort of healthy subjects in order to reduce the gap of knowledge concerning fungal intestinal communities in the healthy status further screening for phenotypical traits that could reflect fungi adaptation to the host. We studied the fecal fungal populations of 111 healthy subjects by means of cultivation on fungal selective media and by amplicon-based ITS1 metagenomics analysis on a subset of 57 individuals. We then characterized the isolated fungi for their tolerance to gastrointestinal (GI) tract-like challenges and their susceptibility to antifungals. A total of 34 different fungal species were isolated showing several phenotypic characteristics associated with intestinal environment such as tolerance to body temperature (37°C), to acidic and oxidative stress, and to bile salts exposure. We found a high frequency of azoles resistance in fungal isolates, with potential and significant clinical impact. Analyses of fungal communities revealed that the human gut mycobiota differs in function of individuals' life stage in a gender-related fashion. The combination of metagenomics and fungal cultivation allowed an in-depth understanding of the fungal intestinal community structure associated to the healthy status and the commensalism-related traits of isolated fungi. We further discussed comparatively the results of sequencing and cultivation to critically evaluate the application of metagenomics-based approaches to

  8. Human Gastrointestinal Juices Intended for Use in In Vitro Digestion Models.

    PubMed

    Ulleberg, Ellen K; Comi, Irene; Holm, Halvor; Herud, Espen B; Jacobsen, Morten; Vegarud, Gerd E

    2011-12-01

    The aim of this study was to characterise the individual human gastric and duodenal juices to be used in in vitro model digestion and to examine the storage stability of the enzymes. Gastroduodenal juices were aspirated, and individual variations in enzymatic activities as well as total volumes, pH, bile acids, protein and bilirubin concentrations were recorded. Individual pepsin activity in the gastric juice varied by a factor of 10, while individual total proteolytic activity in the duodenal juice varied by a factor of 5. The duodenal amylase activity varied from 0 to 52.6 U/ml, and the bile acid concentration varied from 0.9 to 4.5 mM. Pooled gastric and duodenal juices from 18 volunteers were characterised according to pepsin activity (26.7 U/ml), total proteolytic activity (14.8 U/ml), lipase activity (951.0 U/ml), amylase activity (26.8 U/ml) and bile acids (4.5 mM). Stability of the main enzymes in two frozen batches of either gastric or duodenal juice was studied for 6 months. Pepsin activity decreased rapidly and adjusting the pH of gastric juice to 4 did not protect the pepsin from degradation. Lipase activity remained stable for 4 months, however decreased rapidly thereafter even after the addition of protease inhibitors. Glycerol only marginally stabilised the survival of the enzymatic activities. These results of compositional variations in the individual gastrointestinal juices and the effect of storage conditions on enzyme activities are useful for the design of in vitro models enabling human digestive juices to simulate physiological digestion.

  9. Activation of the transcription factor Nrf2 in macrophages, Caco-2 cells and intact human gut tissue by Maillard reaction products and coffee.

    PubMed

    Sauer, Tanja; Raithel, Martin; Kressel, Jürgen; Münch, Gerald; Pischetsrieder, Monika

    2013-06-01

    In addition to direct antioxidative effects, Maillard reaction products (MRPs) could increase the antioxidative capacity of cells through the induction of cytoprotective enzymes. Since many of those enzymes are regulated by the transcription factor Nrf2, the effect of MRPs on nuclear translocation of Nrf2 in macrophages and Caco-2 cells was investigated. Stimulation of both cell types by MRPs showed a concentration-dependent significant increase in nuclear translocation of Nrf2 up to fivefold after short-term (2 h) and up to 50-fold after long-term treatment (24 h). In intact human gut tissue, nuclear translocation of Nrf2 was significantly twofold increased after short-term incubation. To study the activation mechanisms, macrophages and Caco-2 cells were stimulated with MRPs in the presence of catalase, which significantly suppressed Nrf2 activation. Thus, activation was related to extracellular H2O2 continuously formed from MRPs. Short-term incubation with coffee, a MRP-rich beverage, led to a trend towards Nrf2 activation in macrophages, but not in Caco-2 cells or intact human gut tissue. Long-term incubation with coffee (1-4 mg/mL) significantly increased nuclear Nrf2 up to 17-fold. Since raw coffee was inactive under the tested conditions, the effect was related to roasting products. Coffee-induced Nrf2 translocation was, however, only slightly reversed by catalase. Therefore, the Nrf2 activity of coffee can only partially be explained by MRP-induced, H2O2-dependent mechanisms. Thus, it can be concluded that MRPs may increase the antioxidative capacity inside the cell by inducing Nrf2-regulated signalling pathways not only in different cell types, but also in intact gut tissue.

  10. Connections between single-cell biomechanics and human disease states: gastrointestinal cancer and malaria.

    PubMed

    Suresh, S; Spatz, J; Mills, J P; Micoulet, A; Dao, M; Lim, C T; Beil, M; Seufferlein, T

    2005-01-01

    We investigate connections between single-cell mechanical properties and subcellular structural reorganization from biochemical factors in the context of two distinctly different human diseases: gastrointestinal tumor and malaria. Although the cell lineages and the biochemical links to pathogenesis are vastly different in these two cases, we compare and contrast chemomechanical pathways whereby intracellular structural rearrangements lead to global changes in mechanical deformability of the cell. This single-cell biomechanical response, in turn, seems to mediate cell mobility and thereby facilitates disease progression in situations where the elastic modulus increases or decreases due to membrane or cytoskeleton reorganization. We first present new experiments on elastic response and energy dissipation under repeated tensile loading of epithelial pancreatic cancer cells in force- or displacement-control. Energy dissipation from repeated stretching significantly increases and the cell's elastic modulus decreases after treatment of Panc-1 pancreatic cancer cells with sphingosylphosphorylcholine (SPC), a bioactive lipid that influences cancer metastasis. When the cell is treated instead with lysophosphatidic acid, which facilitates actin stress fiber formation, neither energy dissipation nor modulus is noticeably affected. Integrating recent studies with our new observations, we ascribe these trends to possible SPC-induced reorganization primarily of keratin network to perinuclear region of cell; the intermediate filament fraction of the cytoskeleton thus appears to dominate deformability of the epithelial cell. Possible consequences of these results to cell mobility and cancer metastasis are postulated. We then turn attention to progressive changes in mechanical properties of the human red blood cell (RBC) infected with the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. We present, for the first time, continuous force-displacement curves obtained from in-vitro deformation

  11. Reprint of: Connections between single-cell biomechanics and human disease states: gastrointestinal cancer and malaria.

    PubMed

    Suresh, S; Spatz, J; Mills, J P; Micoulet, A; Dao, M; Lim, C T; Beil, M; Seufferlein, T

    2015-09-01

    We investigate connections between single-cell mechanical properties and subcellular structural reorganization from biochemical factors in the context of two distinctly different human diseases: gastrointestinal tumor and malaria. Although the cell lineages and the biochemical links to pathogenesis are vastly different in these two cases, we compare and contrast chemomechanical pathways whereby intracellular structural rearrangements lead to global changes in mechanical deformability of the cell. This single-cell biomechanical response, in turn, seems to mediate cell mobility and thereby facilitates disease progression in situations where the elastic modulus increases or decreases due to membrane or cytoskeleton reorganization. We first present new experiments on elastic response and energy dissipation under repeated tensile loading of epithelial pancreatic cancer cells in force- or displacement-control. Energy dissipation from repeated stretching significantly increases and the cell's elastic modulus decreases after treatment of Panc-1 pancreatic cancer cells with sphingosylphosphorylcholine (SPC), a bioactive lipid that influences cancer metastasis. When the cell is treated instead with lysophosphatidic acid, which facilitates actin stress fiber formation, neither energy dissipation nor modulus is noticeably affected. Integrating recent studies with our new observations, we ascribe these trends to possible SPC-induced reorganization primarily of keratin network to perinuclear region of cell; the intermediate filament fraction of the cytoskeleton thus appears to dominate deformability of the epithelial cell. Possible consequences of these results to cell mobility and cancer metastasis are postulated. We then turn attention to progressive changes in mechanical properties of the human red blood cell (RBC) infected with the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. We present, for the first time, continuous force-displacement curves obtained from in-vitro deformation

  12. Top-down and Middle-down Protein Analysis Reveals that Intact and Clipped Human Histones Differ in Post-translational Modification Patterns.

    PubMed

    Tvardovskiy, Andrey; Wrzesinski, Krzysztof; Sidoli, Simone; Fey, Stephen J; Rogowska-Wrzesinska, Adelina; Jensen, Ole N

    2015-12-01

    Post-translational modifications (PTMs) of histone proteins play a fundamental role in regulation of DNA-templated processes. There is also growing evidence that proteolytic cleavage of histone N-terminal tails, known as histone clipping, influences nucleosome dynamics and functional properties. Using top-down and middle-down protein analysis by mass spectrometry, we report histone H2B and H3 N-terminal tail clipping in human hepatocytes and demonstrate a relationship between clipping and co-existing PTMs of histone H3. Histones H2B and H3 undergo proteolytic processing in primary human hepatocytes and the hepatocellular carcinoma cell line HepG2/C3A when grown in spheroid (3D) culture, but not in a flat (2D) culture. Using tandem mass spectrometry we localized four different clipping sites in H3 and one clipping site in H2B. We show that in spheroid culture clipped H3 proteoforms are mainly represented by canonical histone H3, whereas in primary hepatocytes over 90% of clipped H3 correspond to the histone variant H3.3. Comprehensive analysis of histone H3 modifications revealed a series of PTMs, including K14me1, K27me2/K27me3, and K36me1/me2, which are differentially abundant in clipped and intact H3. Analysis of co-existing PTMs revealed negative crosstalk between H3K36 methylation and H3K23 acetylation in clipped H3. Our data provide the first evidence of histone clipping in human hepatocytes and demonstrate that clipped H3 carry distinct co-existing PTMs different from those in intact H3.

  13. Top-down and Middle-down Protein Analysis Reveals that Intact and Clipped Human Histones Differ in Post-translational Modification Patterns*

    PubMed Central

    Tvardovskiy, Andrey; Wrzesinski, Krzysztof; Sidoli, Simone; Fey, Stephen J.; Rogowska-Wrzesinska, Adelina; Jensen, Ole N.

    2015-01-01

    Post-translational modifications (PTMs) of histone proteins play a fundamental role in regulation of DNA-templated processes. There is also growing evidence that proteolytic cleavage of histone N-terminal tails, known as histone clipping, influences nucleosome dynamics and functional properties. Using top-down and middle-down protein analysis by mass spectrometry, we report histone H2B and H3 N-terminal tail clipping in human hepatocytes and demonstrate a relationship between clipping and co-existing PTMs of histone H3. Histones H2B and H3 undergo proteolytic processing in primary human hepatocytes and the hepatocellular carcinoma cell line HepG2/C3A when grown in spheroid (3D) culture, but not in a flat (2D) culture. Using tandem mass spectrometry we localized four different clipping sites in H3 and one clipping site in H2B. We show that in spheroid culture clipped H3 proteoforms are mainly represented by canonical histone H3, whereas in primary hepatocytes over 90% of clipped H3 correspond to the histone variant H3.3. Comprehensive analysis of histone H3 modifications revealed a series of PTMs, including K14me1, K27me2/K27me3, and K36me1/me2, which are differentially abundant in clipped and intact H3. Analysis of co-existing PTMs revealed negative crosstalk between H3K36 methylation and H3K23 acetylation in clipped H3. Our data provide the first evidence of histone clipping in human hepatocytes and demonstrate that clipped H3 carry distinct co-existing PTMs different from those in intact H3. PMID:26424599

  14. Oral Human Immunoglobulin for Children with Autism and Gastrointestinal Dysfunction: A Prospective, Open-Label Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schneider, Cindy K.; Melmed, Raun D.; Barstow, Leon E.; Enriquez, F. Javier; Ranger-Moore, James; Ostrem, James A.

    2006-01-01

    Immunoglobulin secretion onto mucosal surfaces is a major component of the mucosal immune system. We hypothesized that chronic gastrointestinal (GI) disturbances associated with autistic disorder (AD) may be due to an underlying deficiency in mucosal immunity, and that orally administered immunoglobulin would be effective in alleviating chronic GI…

  15. Of Mice and Men-Warning: Intact Versus Castrated Adult Male Mice as Xenograft Hosts Are Equivalent to Hypogonadal Versus Abiraterone Treated Aging Human Males, Respectively

    PubMed Central

    Sedelaar, J.P. Michiel; Dalrymple, Susan S.; Isaacs, John T.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Immune deficient male mice bearing human prostate cancer xenografts are used to evaluate therapeutic response to novel androgen ablation approaches and the results compared to surgical castration based upon assumption that testosterone microenvironment in intact and castrated adult male mice mimics eugonadal and castrated aging adult human males. METHODS To test these assumptions, serum total testosterone (TT) and free testosterone (FT) were determined longitudinally in groups (n > 20) of intact versus castrated adult male nude, NOG, and immune competent C57BL/6 mice. RESULTS In adult male mice, TT and FT varies by 30- to 100-fold within the same animal providing a microenvironment that is only equivalent to hypogonadal, not eugonadal, adult human males (TT is 1.7 ± 1.2 ng/ml [5.8 ± 4.1 nM] in nude and 2.5 ± 1.3 ng/ml [8.7 ± 4.4 nM] in NOG mice versus >4.2 ng/ml [14.7 nM] in eugonadal humans). This was confirmed based upon enhanced growth of androgen dependent human prostate cancer xenografts inoculated into mice supplemented with exogenous testosterone to elevate and chronically maintain serum TT at a level (5 ng/ml [18 nM]) equivalent to a 50-year-old eugonadal human male. In castrated mice, TT and FT range from 2 to 20 pg/ml (7–70 pM) and <0.8 pg/ml (<2.6 pM), respectively, which is equivalent to castrate resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) patients treated with abiraterone. This was confirmed based upon the inability of another CYP17A1 inhibitor, ketoconazole, to inhibit the growth of CRPC xenografts in castrated mice. CONCLUSIONS Adult male mice supplemented with testosterone mimic eugonadal human males, while unsupplemented animals mimic standard androgen ablation and castrated animals mimic abiraterone treated patients. These studies confirm what is claimed in Robert Burns’ poem “To a Mouse” that “The best laid schemes of mice and men/often go awry. PMID:23775398

  16. Survival and digestibility of orally-administered immunoglobulin preparations containing IgG through the gastrointestinal tract in humans.

    PubMed

    Jasion, Victoria S; Burnett, Bruce P

    2015-03-07

    Oral immunoglobulin (Ig) preparations are prime examples of medicinal nutrition from natural sources. Plasma products containing Ig have been used for decades in animal feed for intestinal disorders to mitigate the damaging effects of early weaning. These preparations reduce overall mortality and increase feed utilization in various animal species leading to improved growth. Oral administration of Ig preparations from human serum as well as bovine colostrum and serum have been tested and proven to be safe as well as effective in human clinical trials for a variety of enteric microbial infections and other conditions which cause diarrhea. In infants, children, and adults, the amount of intact IgG recovered in stool ranges from trace amounts up to 25% of the original amount ingested. It is generally understood that IgG can only bind to antigens within the GI tract if the Fab structure is intact and has not been completely denatured through acidic pH or digestive proteolytic enzymes. This is a comprehensive review of human studies regarding the survivability of orally-administered Ig preparations, with a focus on IgG. This review also highlights various biochemical studies on IgG which potentially explain which structural elements are responsible for increased stability against digestion.

  17. Distribution of obestatin and ghrelin in human tissues: immunoreactive cells in the gastrointestinal tract, pancreas, and mammary glands.

    PubMed

    Grönberg, Malin; Tsolakis, Apostolos V; Magnusson, Linda; Janson, Eva T; Saras, Jan

    2008-09-01

    Obestatin and ghrelin are two peptides derived from the same prohormone. It is well established that ghrelin is produced by endocrine cells in the gastric mucosa. However, the distribution of human obestatin immunoreactive cells is not thoroughly characterized. A polyclonal antibody that specifically recognizes human obestatin was produced. Using this antibody and a commercial antibody vs ghrelin, the distribution of obestatin and ghrelin immunoreactive cells was determined in a panel of human tissues using immunohistochemistry. The two peptides were detected in the mucosa of the gastrointestinal tract, from cardia to ileum, and in the pancreatic islets. Interestingly, epithelial cells in the ducts of mammary glands showed distinct immunoreactivity for both ghrelin and obestatin. By double immunofluorescence microscopy, it was shown that all detected cells were immunoreactive for both peptides. Furthermore, the subcellular localization of obestatin and ghrelin was essentially identical, indicating that obestatin and ghrelin are stored in the same secretory vesicles.

  18. Intact Cohesion, Anaphase, and Chromosome Segregation in Human Cells Harboring Tumor-Derived Mutations in STAG2

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jung-Sik; He, Xiaoyuan; Orr, Bernardo; Wutz, Gordana; Hill, Victoria; Peters, Jan-Michael; Compton, Duane A.; Waldman, Todd

    2016-01-01

    Somatic mutations of the cohesin complex subunit STAG2 are present in diverse tumor types. We and others have shown that STAG2 inactivation can lead to loss of sister chromatid cohesion and alterations in chromosome copy number in experimental systems. However, studies of naturally occurring human tumors have demonstrated little, if any, correlation between STAG2 mutational status and aneuploidy, and have further shown that STAG2-deficient tumors are often euploid. In an effort to provide insight into these discrepancies, here we analyze the effect of tumor-derived STAG2 mutations on the protein composition of cohesin and the expected mitotic phenotypes of STAG2 mutation. We find that many mutant STAG2 proteins retain their ability to interact with cohesin; however, the presence of mutant STAG2 resulted in a reduction in the ability of regulatory subunits WAPL, PDS5A, and PDS5B to interact with the core cohesin ring. Using AAV-mediated gene targeting, we then introduced nine tumor-derived mutations into the endogenous allele of STAG2 in cultured human cells. While all nonsense mutations led to defects in sister chromatid cohesion and a subset induced anaphase defects, missense mutations behaved like wild-type in these assays. Furthermore, only one of nine tumor-derived mutations tested induced overt alterations in chromosome counts. These data indicate that not all tumor-derived STAG2 mutations confer defects in cohesion, chromosome segregation, and ploidy, suggesting that there are likely to be other functional effects of STAG2 inactivation in human cancer cells that are relevant to cancer pathogenesis. PMID:26871722

  19. A survey of gastrointestinal parasites of olive baboons (Papio anubis) in human settlement areas of Mole National Park, Ghana.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Sadie J; Brashares, Justin S; Walsh, Chesley; Milbers, Katherine; Kilroy, Cailean; Chapman, Colin A

    2012-08-01

    Fecal samples from 55 free-ranging olive baboons (Papio anubis) in Mole National Park, Ghana, were collected 22 June-7 July 2008 and analyzed for gastrointestinal parasites. This is the first survey of baboon gastrointestinal parasites in Ghana and provides baseline data for this area. Ninety-three percent of samples were infected, leaving 7% with no parasites observed. Of those infected, there was a 76% prevalence of strongyles, 53% Strongyloides spp., 11% Abbreviata caucasica , 62% prevalence of Balantidium coli (trophozoites and cysts identified), 4% Entomeba hystolytica/dispar, and 47% unidentified protozoan parasites. Of the strongyle infections, 9% were identified as Oesophagostamum sp. One sample contained an unidentified spirurid nematode that resembled Gongylonema sp. Mole has a mixed forest-savanna habitat, and baboons frequently range into human areas, which makes them subject to parasites from each habitat and multiple sources of exposure. We found a high prevalence of nematode parasites, consistent with a wet or cooler forest environment, or high rates of fecal contamination. The presence of Strongyloides sp., E. hystolitica/dispar, and B. coli suggest potential public health risk from baboons, but molecular identification of these parasites, and documentation of their presence in local human populations, would be necessary to confirm zoonotic transmission.

  20. Toxicity profiling of water contextual zinc oxide, silver, and titanium dioxide nanoparticles in human oral and gastrointestinal cell systems.

    PubMed

    Giovanni, Marcella; Tay, Chor Yong; Setyawati, Magdiel Inggrid; Xie, Jianping; Ong, Choon Nam; Fan, Rongli; Yue, Junqi; Zhang, Lifeng; Leong, David Tai

    2015-12-01

    Engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) are increasingly detected in water supply due to environmental release of ENPs as the by-products contained within the effluent of domestic and industrial run-off. The partial recycling of water laden with ENPs, albeit at ultra-low concentrations, may pose an uncharacterized threat to human health. In this study, we investigated the toxicity of three prevalent ENPs: zinc oxide, silver, and titanium dioxide over a wide range of concentrations that encompasses drinking water-relevant concentrations, to cellular systems representing oral and gastrointestinal tissues. Based on published in silico-predicted water-relevant ENPs concentration range from 100 pg/L to 100 µg/L, we detected no cytotoxicity to all the cellular systems. Significant cytotoxicity due to the NPs set in around 100 mg/L with decreasing extent of toxicity from zinc oxide to silver to titanium dioxide NPs. We also found that noncytotoxic zinc oxide NPs level of 10 mg/L could elevate the intracellular oxidative stress. The threshold concentrations of NPs that induced cytotoxic effect are at least two to five orders of magnitude higher than the permissible concentrations of the respective metals and metal oxides in drinking water. Based on these findings, the current estimated levels of NPs in potable water pose little cytotoxic threat to the human oral and gastrointestinal systems within our experimental boundaries.

  1. Efficacy of Hyaluronic Acid in The Selection of Human Spermatozoa with Intact DNA by The Swim-up Method

    PubMed Central

    Saylan, Aslihan; Duman, Selcuk

    2016-01-01

    Objective In 2014, enrolled 20 patients who applied to the Unit of Assisted Reproduction Techniques, Konya Necmettin Erbakan University. Based on the presence of hyaluronic acid (HA) in the oocyte-cumulus cell complex, sperm attached to HA in vivo were modeled in vitro. Available healthy sperm obtained in the swim-up procedure using HA were investigated. Materials and Methods This observational cohort study, a routine analysis was conducted on the ejaculation samples obtained from 20 patients. We divided each sample into two groups and the swim-up method was applied. Human serum albumin (HSA, 0.5%) was added to samples from the first group. HA (10%) was added to samples from the second group. We determined the floating linear and non-linear sperm concentrations of both groups annexin V was used to determine the rate of apoptosis of these sperm. Results Following swim-up, linear and non-linear sperm concentrations were higher in the group that contained HA compared to the group with HSA. However, there was a significantly higher apoptosis rate in the HSA group compared to the HA group. Conclusion The addition of HA to the medium in the swim-up procedure positively affected sperm parameters. Thus, healthier sperm cells were obtained without DNA damage and with high motility. PMID:27054122

  2. Uptake of intact TPGS (d-alpha-tocopheryl polyethylene glycol 1000 succinate) a water-miscible form of vitamin E by human cells in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Traber, M.G.; Thellman, C.A.; Rindler, M.J.; Kayden, H.J.

    1988-09-01

    The mechanism by which TPGS (alpha-tocopheryl succinate esterified to polyethylene glycol 1000 (PEG 1000)) delivers tocopherol (vitamin E) was studied in human fibroblasts and erythrocytes and a human intestinal cell line, Caco-2. The total cellular tocopherol content of saponified samples of fibroblasts or Caco-2 incubated for 4 h with TPGS (4 mumol/L) increased 10-fold without an increase in the free tocopherol content of nonsaponified samples. A 24-h incubation resulted in a free tocopherol content of approximately 20%, suggesting that intracellular hydrolysis of ester bonds had occurred. The increase in total tocopherol content after a 4-h incubation with TPGS was temperature dependent; no change was measurable at 4 degrees C. Addition of metabolic inhibitors during incubation with TPGS at 37 degrees C did not prevent the increase. (/sup 14/C)TPGS (synthesized from (/sup 14/C)PEG 1000) was taken up by Caco-2 cells but (/sup 14/C)PEG 1000 was not. The intracellular total tocopherol (pmol) equaled the (/sup 14/C)TPGS (pmol), unequivocally demonstrating uptake of the intact TPGS molecule.

  3. Pharmacokinetics of topically applied recombinant human keratinocyte growth factor-2 in alkali-burned and intact rabbit eye.

    PubMed

    Cai, Jianqiu; Dou, Guifang; Zheng, Long; Yang, Ting; Jia, Xuechao; Tang, Lu; Huang, Yadong; Wu, Wencan; Li, Xiaokun; Wang, Xiaojie

    2015-07-01

    Keratinocyte growth factor-2 (KGF-2), an effective agent in the development of epithelial tissue and regeneration during corneal wound healing, is a potential therapeutic option to treat the corneal diseases with corneal epithelial defects. However the tissue distribution and pharmacokinetics of KGF-2 have not been explored yet in eye upon topical application. Using (125)I-labeled recombinant human KGF-2 ((125)I-rhKGF-2), tissue distribution of rhKGF-2 in alkali-burned and control rabbit eyes was studied. Our results revealed that (125)I-rhKGF-2 was distributed to all eye tissues examined. The highest radioactivity level was found in the cornea, followed by iris, sclera, ciliary body, lens, aqueous humor, vitreous body, and serum in a greatest to least order. The levels of (125)I-rhKGF-2 were higher in corneas of alkali-burned eyes than those in control eyes though without statistical significance. Calculated pharmacokinetic parameters of t1/2, Cmax, and Tmax of rhKGF-2 in the rabbit corneas were 3.4 h, 135.2 ng/ml, and 0.5 h, respectively. In iris, lens, aqueous humor, and tear, t1/2, Cmax, and Tmax values were 6.2, 6.5, 5.2, and 2.5 h; 23.2, 4.5, 24.1, and 29,498.9 ng/ml; and 1.0, 0.5, 0.5, and 1.0 h, respectively. Predominant and rapid accumulation of rhKGF-2 in corneas suggests that therapeutic doses of rhKGF-2 could be delivered by topical application for treatment of corneal diseases.

  4. Dynamic Responses of Intact Post Mortem Human Surrogates from Inferior-to-Superior Loading at the Pelvis.

    PubMed

    Yoganandan, Narayan; Moore, Jason; Arun, Mike W J; Pintar, Frank A

    2014-11-01

    During certain events such as underbody blasts due to improvised explosive devices, occupants in military vehicles are exposed to inferior-to-superior loading from the pelvis. Injuries to the pelvis-sacrum-lumbar spine complex have been reported from these events. The mechanism of load transmission and potential variables defining the migration of injuries between pelvis and or spinal structures are not defined. This study applied inferior-to-superior impacts to the tuberosities of the ischium of supine-positioned five post mortem human subjects (PMHS) using different acceleration profiles, defined using shape, magnitude and duration parameters. Seventeen tests were conducted. Overlay temporal plots were presented for normalized (impulse momentum approach) forces and accelerations of the sacrum and spine. Scatter plots showing injury and non-injury data as a function of peak normalized forces, pulse characteristics, impulse and power, loading rate and sacrum and spine accelerations were evaluated as potential metrics related to pathological outcomes with the focus of examining the role of the pulse characteristics from inferior-to-superior loading of the pelvis-sacrum-lumbar spine complex. Interrelationships were explored between non-fracture and fracture outcomes, and fracture patterns with a focus on migration of injuries from the hip-only to hip and spine to spine-only regions. Observations indicate that injury to the pelvis and or spine from inferior-to-superior loading is associated with pulse and not just peak velocity. The role of the effect of mass recruitment and injury migration parallel knee-thigh-hip complex studies, suggest a wider application of the recruitment concept and the role of the pulse characteristics.

  5. Effects of wheat germ agglutinin on human gastrointestinal epithelium: Insights from an experimental model of immune/epithelial cell interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Pellegrina, Chiara Dalla; Perbellini, Omar; Scupoli, Maria Teresa; Tomelleri, Carlo; Zanetti, Chiara; Zoccatelli, Gianni; Fusi, Marina; Peruffo, Angelo; Rizzi, Corrado; Chignola, Roberto

    2009-06-01

    Wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) is a plant protein that binds specifically to sugars expressed, among many others, by human gastrointestinal epithelial and immune cells. WGA is a toxic compound and an anti-nutritional factor, but recent works have shown that it may have potential as an anti-tumor drug and as a carrier for oral drugs. To quantitate the toxicity threshold for WGA on normal epithelial cells we previously investigated the effects of the lectin on differentiated Caco2 cells, and showed that in the micromolar range of concentrations WGA could alter the integrity of the epithelium layer and increase its permeability to both mannitol and dextran. WGA was shown to be uptaken by Caco2 cells and only {approx} 0.1% molecules were observed to cross the epithelium layer by transcytosis. Here we show that at nanomolar concentrations WGA is unexpectedly bioactive on immune cells. The supernatants of WGA-stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) can alter the integrity of the epithelium layer when administered to the basolateral side of differentiated Caco2 cells and the effects can be partially inhibited by monoclonal antibodies against IL1, IL6 and IL8. At nanomolar concentrations WGA stimulates the synthesis of pro-inflammatory cytokines and thus the biological activity of WGA should be reconsidered by taking into account the effects of WGA on the immune system at the gastrointestinal interface. These results shed new light onto the molecular mechanisms underlying the onset of gastrointestinal disorders observed in vivo upon dietary intake of wheat-based foods.

  6. Intact rough- and smooth-form lipopolysaccharides from Escherichia coli separated by preparative gel electrophoresis exhibit differential biologic activity in human macrophages.

    PubMed

    Pupo, Elder; Lindner, Buko; Brade, Helmut; Schromm, Andra B

    2013-02-01

    We established a new preparative separation procedure, based on DOC/PAGE, to isolate intact lipopolysaccharide (LPS) fractions from natural LPS preparations of Escherichia coli. Analysis of the chemical integrity of LPS fractions by MS showed that no significant chemical modifications were introduced by the procedure. Contamination with toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2)-reactive cell-wall components present in the natural LPS mixture was effectively removed by the procedure, as determined by the absence of reactivity of the purified fractions in a HEK293-TLR2 cell line. Biologic analysis of LPS fractions derived from E. coli O111 in human macrophages demonstrated that the rough (R), semirough (SR) and smooth (S) LPS fractions were highly active at inducing tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) in the presence of human serum; however, on a weight basis the R-LPS and SR-LPS fractions were more active, by a factor of 10-100, than was the S-LPS fraction. Under serum-free conditions, the natural LPS mixture, as well as the R-LPS and SR-LPS fractions, showed dose-dependent activation of macrophages, although the response was attenuated by about 10- to 100-fold. In contrast, the S-LPS fraction failed to induce TNF-α. Remarkably, the dose-response of the natural LPS mixture resembled that of the R-LPS and SR-LPS fractions, supporting that short-chain (R and SR) forms of LPS dominate the innate immune response of human macrophages to LPS in vitro. Biologic activity to the S-LPS fraction under serum-free conditions could be restored by the addition of recombinant lipopolysaccharide-binding protein (LBP). In contrast, soluble cluster of differentiation antigen 14 was not able to confer activity of the S-LPS fraction, indicating a crucial role of LBP in the recognition of S-LPS by human macrophages.

  7. Plague Masquerading as Gastrointestinal Illness

    PubMed Central

    Hull, Harry F.; Montes, Jean M.; Mann, Jonathan M.

    1986-01-01

    In clinical descriptions of human plague, fever and tender lymphadenitis are emphasized and gastrointestinal manifestations are rarely mentioned. A review of 71 human plague cases showed that gastrointestinal symptoms occurred commonly (57%). Vomiting (39%) was the most frequent symptom, with nausea (34%), diarrhea (28%) and abdominal pain (17%) occurring less often. Physicians treating patients who reside in or have recently visited plague-endemic areas should include plague in the differential diagnosis in the presence of gastrointestinal symptoms and fever. PMID:3788132

  8. A double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of oral human immunoglobulin for gastrointestinal dysfunction in children with autistic disorder.

    PubMed

    Handen, Benjamin L; Melmed, Raun D; Hansen, Robin L; Aman, Michael G; Burnham, David L; Bruss, Jon B; McDougle, Christopher J

    2009-05-01

    Controversy exists regarding the extent and possible causal relationship between gastrointestinal symptoms and autism. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel groups, dose-ranging study of oral, human immunoglobulin (IGOH 140, 420, or 840 mg/day) was utilized with 125 children (ages 2-17 years) with autism and persistent GI symptoms. Endpoint analysis revealed no significant differences across treatment groups on a modified global improvement scale (validated in irritable bowel syndrome studies), number of daily bowel movements, days of constipation, or severity of problem behaviors. IGOH was well-tolerated; there were no serious adverse events. This study demonstrates the importance of conducting rigorous trials in children with autism and casts doubt on one GI mechanism presumed to exert etiological and/or symptomatic effects in this population.

  9. Hedgehog pathway dysregulation contributes to the pathogenesis of human gastrointestinal stromal tumors via GLI-mediated activation of KIT expression

    PubMed Central

    Burgoyne, Adam M.; Leonard, Stephanie Y.; Gao, Fei; Chan, Jonathan C.; Shi, Eileen; Chmielecki, Juliann; Morosini, Deborah; Wang, Kai; Ross, Jeffrey S.; Kendrick, Michael L.; Bardsley, Michael R.; De Siena, Martina; Mao, Junhao; Harismendy, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) arise within the interstitial cell of Cajal (ICC) lineage due to activating KIT/PDGFRA mutations. Both ICC and GIST possess primary cilia (PC), which coordinate PDGFRA and Hedgehog signaling, regulators of gastrointestinal mesenchymal development. Therefore, we hypothesized that Hedgehog signaling may be altered in human GIST and controls KIT expression. Quantitative RT-PCR, microarrays, and next generation sequencing were used to describe Hedgehog/PC-related genes in purified human ICC and GIST. Genetic and pharmacologic approaches were employed to investigate the effects of GLI manipulation on KIT expression and GIST cell viability. We report that Hedgehog pathway and PC components are expressed in ICC and GIST and subject to dysregulation during GIST oncogenesis, irrespective of KIT/PDGFRA mutation status. Using genomic profiling, 10.2% of 186 GIST studied had potentially deleterious genomic alterations in 5 Hedgehog-related genes analyzed, including in the PTCH1 tumor suppressor (1.6%). Expression of the predominantly repressive GLI isoform, GLI3, was inversely correlated with KIT mRNA levels in GIST cells and non-KIT/non-PDGFRA mutant GIST. Overexpression of the 83-kDa repressive form of GLI3 or small interfering RNA-mediated knockdown of the activating isoforms GLI1/2 reduced KIT mRNA. Treatment with GLI1/2 inhibitors, including arsenic trioxide, significantly increased GLI3 binding to the KIT promoter, decreased KIT expression, and reduced viability in imatinib-sensitive and imatinib-resistant GIST cells. These data offer new evidence that genes necessary for Hedgehog signaling and PC function in ICC are dysregulated in GIST. Hedgehog signaling activates KIT expression irrespective of mutation status, offering a novel approach to treat imatinib-resistant GIST. PMID:27793025

  10. Anoctamins and gastrointestinal smooth muscle excitability.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Kenton M; Zhu, Mei Hong; Britton, Fiona; Koh, Sang Don; Ward, Sean M

    2012-02-01

    Interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) generate electrical pacemaker activity in gastrointestinal smooth muscles. We investigated whether Tmem16a, which encodes anoctamin 1 (ANO1), a Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) channel, might be involved in pacemaker activity in ICC. The Tmem16a transcripts and ANO1 were expressed robustly in GI muscles, specifically in ICC in murine, non-human primate (Macaca fascicularis) and human GI tracts. Splice variants of Tmem16a, as well as other paralogues of the Tmem16 family, were expressed in gastrointestinal muscles. Calcium-activated Cl(-) channel blocking drugs, niflumic acid and DIDS blocked slow waves in intact muscles of mouse, primate and human small intestine and stomach. Slow waves failed to develop in Tmem16a knock-out mice (Tmem16a(tm1Bdh/tm1Bdh)). The pacemaker mechanism was investigated in isolated ICC from transgenic mice with constitutive expression of copepod super green fluorescent protein (copGFP). Depolarization of ICC activated inward currents due to a Cl(-)-selective conductance. Removal of extracellular Ca(2+), replacement of Ca(2+) with Ba(2+), or extracellular Ni(2+) (30 μM) blocked the inward current. Single Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) channels with a unitary conductance of 7.8 pS were resolved in excised patches from ICC. The inward current was blocked in a concentration-dependent manner by niflumic acid (IC(50) = 4.8 μM). The role of ANO1 in cholinergic responses in ICC was also investigated. Carbachol activated Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) currents in ICC, and responses to cholinergic nerve stimulation were blocked by niflumic acid in intact muscles. Anoctamin 1 is a prominent conductance in ICC, and these channels appear to be involved in pacemaker activity and in responses to enteric excitatory neurotransmitters.

  11. Arcobacter in Lake Erie beach waters: an emerging gastrointestinal pathogen linked with human-associated fecal contamination.

    PubMed

    Lee, Cheonghoon; Agidi, Senyo; Marion, Jason W; Lee, Jiyoung

    2012-08-01

    The genus Arcobacter has been associated with human illness and fecal contamination by humans and animals. To better characterize the health risk posed by this emerging waterborne pathogen, we investigated the occurrence of Arcobacter spp. in Lake Erie beach waters. During the summer of 2010, water samples were collected 35 times from the Euclid, Villa Angela, and Headlands (East and West) beaches, located along Ohio's Lake Erie coast. After sample concentration, Arcobacter was quantified by real-time PCR targeting the Arcobacter 23S rRNA gene. Other fecal genetic markers (Bacteroides 16S rRNA gene [HuBac], Escherichia coli uidA gene, Enterococcus 23S rRNA gene, and tetracycline resistance genes) were also assessed. Arcobacter was detected frequently at all beaches, and both the occurrence and densities of Arcobacter spp. were higher at the Euclid and Villa Angela beaches (with higher levels of fecal contamination) than at the East and West Headlands beaches. The Arcobacter density in Lake Erie beach water was significantly correlated with the human-specific fecal marker HuBac according to Spearman's correlation analysis (r = 0.592; P < 0.001). Phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that most of the identified Arcobacter sequences were closely related to Arcobacter cryaerophilus, which is known to cause gastrointestinal diseases in humans. Since human-pathogenic Arcobacter spp. are linked to human-associated fecal sources, it is important to identify and manage the human-associated contamination sources for the prevention of Arcobacter-associated public health risks at Lake Erie beaches.

  12. Genome sequence of Victivallis vadensis ATCC BAA-548, an anaerobic bacterium from the phylum Lentisphaerae, isolated from the human gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    van Passel, Mark W J; Kant, Ravi; Palva, Airi; Lucas, Susan; Copeland, Alex; Lapidus, Alla; Glavina del Rio, Tijana; Dalin, Eileen; Tice, Hope; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne; Pitluck, Sam; Davenport, Karen Walston; Sims, David; Brettin, Thomas S; Detter, John C; Han, Shunsheng; Larimer, Frank W; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren; Kyrpides, Nikolaos; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Richardson, P Paul; de Vos, Willem M; Smidt, Hauke; Zoetendal, Erwin G

    2011-05-01

    Victivallis vadensis ATCC BAA-548 represents the first cultured representative from the novel phylum Lentisphaerae, a deep-branching bacterial lineage. Few cultured bacteria from this phylum are known, and V. vadensis therefore represents an important organism for evolutionary studies. V. vadensis is a strictly anaerobic sugar-fermenting isolate from the human gastrointestinal tract.

  13. Genome sequence of Victivallis vadensis ATCC BAA-548, an anaerobic bacterium from the phylum Lentisphaerae, isolated from the human gastro-intestinal tract

    SciTech Connect

    Van Passel, Mark W.J.; Kant, Ravi; Palva, Airi; Lucas, Susan; Copeland, A; Lapidus, Alla L.; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Dalin, Eileen; Tice, Hope; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Davenport, Karen W.; Sims, David; Detter, J. Chris; Han, Cliff; Larimer, Frank W; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Richardson, Paul; De Vos, Willem M.; Smidt, Hauke; Zoetendal, Erwin G.

    2011-01-01

    Victivallis vadensis ATCC BAA-548 represents the first cultured representative from the novel phylum Lentisphaerae, a deep-branching bacterial lineage. Few cultured bacteria from this phylum are known, and V. vadensis therefore represents an important organism for evolutionary studies. V. vadensis is a strictly anaerobic sugar-fermenting isolate from the human gastro-intestinal tract.

  14. Human-associated fecal qPCR measurements and predicted risk of gastrointestinal illness in recreational waters contaminated with raw sewage

    EPA Science Inventory

    We used quantitative microbial risk assessment (QMRA) to estimate the risk of gastrointestinal (GI) illness associated with swimming in recreational waters containing different concentrations of human-associated fecal qPCR markers from raw sewage– HF183 and HumM2. The volume/volu...

  15. Human-Associated Fecal Quantitative Polymerase Chain ReactionMeasurements and Simulated Risk of Gastrointestinal Illness in Recreational Waters Contaminated with Raw Sewage

    EPA Science Inventory

    We used quantitative microbial risk assessment (QMRA) to estimate the risk of gastrointestinal (GI) illness associated with swimming in recreational waters containing different concentrations of human-associated fecal qPCR markers from raw sewage– HF183 and HumM2. The volume/volu...

  16. GLP-2 receptors in human disease: high expression in gastrointestinal stromal tumors and Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Körner, Meike; Rehmann, Ruth; Reubi, Jean Claude

    2012-11-25

    Peptide hormones of the glucagon-like peptide (GLP) family play an increasing clinical role, as reported for GLP-1 in diabetes therapy and insulinoma diagnostics. GLP-2, despite its known trophic and anti-inflammatory intestinal actions translated into preliminary clinical studies using the GLP-2 analogue teduglutide for treatment of short bowel syndrome and Crohn's disease, remains poorly characterized in terms of expression of its receptor in tissues of interest. Therefore, the GLP-2 receptor expression was assessed in 237 tumor and 148 non-neoplastic tissue samples with in vitro receptor autoradiography. A GLP-2 receptor expression was present in 68% of gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST). Furthermore, GLP-2 receptors were identified in the intestinal myenteric plexus, with significant up-regulation in active Crohn's disease. The GLP-2 receptors in GIST may be used for clinical applications like in vivo targeting with radiolabelled GLP-2 analogues for imaging and therapy. Moreover, the over-expressed GLP-2 receptor in the myenteric plexus may represent the morphological correlate of the clinical target of teduglutide in Crohn's disease.

  17. Tumor-initiating label-retaining cancer cells in human gastrointestinal cancers undergo asymmetric cell division.

    PubMed

    Xin, Hong-Wu; Hari, Danielle M; Mullinax, John E; Ambe, Chenwi M; Koizumi, Tomotake; Ray, Satyajit; Anderson, Andrew J; Wiegand, Gordon W; Garfield, Susan H; Thorgeirsson, Snorri S; Avital, Itzhak

    2012-04-01

    Label-retaining cells (LRCs) have been proposed to represent adult tissue stem cells. LRCs are hypothesized to result from either slow cycling or asymmetric cell division (ACD). However, the stem cell nature and whether LRC undergo ACD remain controversial. Here, we demonstrate label-retaining cancer cells (LRCCs) in several gastrointestinal (GI) cancers including fresh surgical specimens. Using a novel method for isolation of live LRCC, we demonstrate that a subpopulation of LRCC is actively dividing and exhibits stem cells and pluripotency gene expression profiles. Using real-time confocal microscopic cinematography, we show live LRCC undergoing asymmetric nonrandom chromosomal cosegregation LRC division. Importantly, LRCCs have greater tumor-initiating capacity than non-LRCCs. Based on our data and that cancers develop in tissues that harbor normal-LRC, we propose that LRCC might represent a novel population of GI stem-like cancer cells. LRCC may provide novel mechanistic insights into the biology of cancer and regenerative medicine and present novel targets for cancer treatment.

  18. Prevention of gastrointestinal lead poisoning using recombinant Lactococcus lactis expressing human metallothionein-I fusion protein.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Xue; Zhang, Changbin; Liu, Dajun; Bai, Weibin; Zhang, Qihao; Xiang, Qi; Huang, Yadong; Su, Zhijian

    2016-04-05

    Low-level lead poisoning is an insidious disease that affects millions of children worldwide, leading to biochemical and neurological dysfunctions. Blocking lead uptake via the gastrointestinal tract is an important prevention strategy. With this in mind, we constructed the recombinant Lactococcus lactis strain pGSMT/MG1363, which constitutively expressed the fusion protein glutathione S-transferase (GST)-small molecule ubiquitin-like modifier protein (SUMO)-metallothionein-I (GST-SUMO-MT). The thermodynamic data indicated that the average number of lead bound to a GST-SUMO-MT molecule was 3.655 and this binding reaction was a spontaneous, exothermic and entropy-increasing process. The total lead-binding capacity of pGSMT/MG1363 was 4.11 ± 0.15 mg/g dry mass. Oral administration of pGSMT/MG1363 (1 × 10(10) Colony-Forming Units) to pubertal male rats that were also treated with 5 mg/kg of lead acetate daily significantly inhibited the increase of blood lead levels, the impairment of hepatic function and the decrease of testosterone concentration in the serum, which were all impaired in rats treated by lead acetate alone. Moreover, the administration of pGSMT/MG1363 for 6 weeks did not affect the serum concentration of calcium, magnesium, potassium or sodium ions. This study provides a convenient and economical biomaterial for preventing lead poisoning via the digestive tract.

  19. Prevention of gastrointestinal lead poisoning using recombinant Lactococcus lactis expressing human metallothionein-I fusion protein

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Xue; Zhang, Changbin; Liu, Dajun; Bai, Weibin; Zhang, Qihao; Xiang, Qi; Huang, Yadong; Su, Zhijian

    2016-01-01

    Low-level lead poisoning is an insidious disease that affects millions of children worldwide, leading to biochemical and neurological dysfunctions. Blocking lead uptake via the gastrointestinal tract is an important prevention strategy. With this in mind, we constructed the recombinant Lactococcus lactis strain pGSMT/MG1363, which constitutively expressed the fusion protein glutathione S-transferase (GST)–small molecule ubiquitin-like modifier protein (SUMO)–metallothionein-I (GST-SUMO-MT). The thermodynamic data indicated that the average number of lead bound to a GST-SUMO-MT molecule was 3.655 and this binding reaction was a spontaneous, exothermic and entropy-increasing process. The total lead-binding capacity of pGSMT/MG1363 was 4.11 ± 0.15 mg/g dry mass. Oral administration of pGSMT/MG1363 (1 × 1010 Colony-Forming Units) to pubertal male rats that were also treated with 5 mg/kg of lead acetate daily significantly inhibited the increase of blood lead levels, the impairment of hepatic function and the decrease of testosterone concentration in the serum, which were all impaired in rats treated by lead acetate alone. Moreover, the administration of pGSMT/MG1363 for 6 weeks did not affect the serum concentration of calcium, magnesium, potassium or sodium ions. This study provides a convenient and economical biomaterial for preventing lead poisoning via the digestive tract. PMID:27045906

  20. Label-Free Morphology-Based Prediction of Multiple Differentiation Potentials of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells for Early Evaluation of Intact Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sasaki, Hiroto; Takeuchi, Ichiro; Okada, Mai; Sawada, Rumi; Kanie, Kei; Kiyota, Yasujiro; Honda, Hiroyuki; Kato, Ryuji

    2014-01-01

    Precise quantification of cellular potential of stem cells, such as human bone marrow–derived mesenchymal stem cells (hBMSCs), is important for achieving stable and effective outcomes in clinical stem cell therapy. Here, we report a method for image-based prediction of the multiple differentiation potentials of hBMSCs. This method has four major advantages: (1) the cells used for potential prediction are fully intact, and therefore directly usable for clinical applications; (2) predictions of potentials are generated before differentiation cultures are initiated; (3) prediction of multiple potentials can be provided simultaneously for each sample; and (4) predictions of potentials yield quantitative values that correlate strongly with the experimental data. Our results show that the collapse of hBMSC differentiation potentials, triggered by in vitro expansion, can be quantitatively predicted far in advance by predicting multiple potentials, multi-lineage differentiation potentials (osteogenic, adipogenic, and chondrogenic) and population doubling potential using morphological features apparent during the first 4 days of expansion culture. In order to understand how such morphological features can be effective for advance predictions, we measured gene-expression profiles of the same early undifferentiated cells. Both senescence-related genes (p16 and p21) and cytoskeleton-related genes (PTK2, CD146, and CD49) already correlated to the decrease of potentials at this stage. To objectively compare the performance of morphology and gene expression for such early prediction, we tested a range of models using various combinations of features. Such comparison of predictive performances revealed that morphological features performed better overall than gene-expression profiles, balancing the predictive accuracy with the effort required for model construction. This benchmark list of various prediction models not only identifies the best morphological feature conversion

  1. Functional consequences of microbial shifts in the human gastrointestinal tract linked to antibiotic treatment and obesity.

    PubMed

    Hernández, Ester; Bargiela, Rafael; Diez, María Suárez; Friedrichs, Anette; Pérez-Cobas, Ana Elena; Gosalbes, María José; Knecht, Henrik; Martínez-Martínez, Mónica; Seifert, Jana; von Bergen, Martin; Artacho, Alejandro; Ruiz, Alicia; Campoy, Cristina; Latorre, Amparo; Ott, Stephan J; Moya, Andrés; Suárez, Antonio; Martins dos Santos, Vitor A P; Ferrer, Manuel

    2013-01-01

    The microbiomes in the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) of individuals receiving antibiotics and those in obese subjects undergo compositional shifts, the metabolic effects and linkages of which are not clearly understood. Herein, we set to gain insight into these effects, particularly with regard to carbohydrate metabolism, and to contribute to unravel the underlying mechanisms and consequences for health conditions. We measured the activity level of GIT carbohydrate-active enzymes toward 23 distinct sugars in adults patients (n = 2) receiving 14-d β-lactam therapy and in obese (n = 7) and lean (n = 5) adolescents. We observed that both 14 d antibiotic-treated and obese subjects showed higher and less balanced sugar anabolic capacities, with 40% carbohydrates being preferentially processed as compared with non-treated and lean patients. Metaproteome-wide metabolic reconstructions confirmed that the impaired utilization of sugars propagated throughout the pentose phosphate metabolism, which had adverse consequences for the metabolic status of the GIT microbiota. The results point to an age-independent positive association between GIT glycosidase activity and the body mass index, fasting blood glucose and insulin resistance (r ( 2) ≥ 0.95). Moreover, antibiotics altered the active fraction of enzymes controlling the thickness, composition and consistency of the mucin glycans. Our data and analyses provide biochemical insights into the effects of antibiotic usage on the dynamics of the GIT microbiota and pin-point presumptive links to obesity. The knowledge and the hypotheses generated herein lay a foundation for subsequent, systematic research that will be paramount for the design of "smart" dietary and therapeutic interventions to modulate host-microbe metabolic co-regulation in intestinal homeostasis.

  2. Effect of bread gluten content on gastrointestinal function: a crossover MRI study on healthy humans.

    PubMed

    Coletta, Marina; Gates, Fred K; Marciani, Luca; Shiwani, Henna; Major, Giles; Hoad, Caroline L; Chaddock, Gemma; Gowland, Penny A; Spiller, Robin C

    2016-01-14

    Gluten is a crucial functional component of bread, but the effect of increasing gluten content on gastrointestinal (GI) function remains uncertain. Our aim was to investigate the effect of increasing gluten content on GI function and symptoms in healthy participants using the unique capabilities of MRI. A total of twelve healthy participants completed this randomised, mechanistic, open-label, three-way crossover study. On days 1 and 2 they consumed either gluten-free bread (GFB), or normal gluten content bread (NGCB) or added gluten content bread (AGCB). The same bread was consumed on day 3, and MRI scans were performed every 60 min from fasting baseline up to 360 min after eating. The appearance of the gastric chime in the images was assessed using a visual heterogeneity score. Gastric volumes, the small bowel water content (SBWC), colonic volumes and colonic gas content and GI symptoms were measured. Fasting transverse colonic volume after the 2-d preload was significantly higher after GFB compared with NGCB and AGCB with a dose-dependent response (289 (SEM 96) v. 212 (SEM 74) v. 179 (SEM 87) ml, respectively; P=0·02). The intragastric chyme heterogeneity score was higher for the bread with increased gluten (AGCB 6 (interquartile range (IQR) 0·5) compared with GFB 3 (IQR 0·5); P=0·003). However, gastric half-emptying time was not different between breads nor were study day GI symptoms, postprandial SBWC, colonic volume and gas content. This MRI study showed novel mechanistic insights in the GI responses to different breads, which are poorly understood notwithstanding the importance of this staple food.

  3. Gastrointestinal manifestations.

    PubMed

    Tanowitz, H B; Simon, D; Weiss, L M; Noyer, C; Coyle, C; Wittner, M

    1996-11-01

    Gastrointestinal disease is a common problem in the setting of HIV-1 infection. As patients live longer and other opportunistic pathogens are suppressed, these problems are becoming even more important in the quality of life.

  4. Antitumor effects of ricin A chain immunotoxins prepared from intact antibodies and Fab' fragments on solid human Hodgkin's disease tumors in mice.

    PubMed

    Engert, A; Martin, G; Pfreundschuh, M; Amlot, P; Hsu, S M; Diehl, V; Thorpe, P

    1990-05-15

    Three monoclonal antibodies which strongly bind to Hodgkin and Reed-Sternberg cells and two corresponding Fab' fragments were linked to deglycosylated ricin A chain (dg A) to evaluate their potential as immunotoxins for the treatment of Hodgkin's disease. Two of the antibodies, Ber-H2 and HRS-3, were shown to bind to the same epitope on the CD30 antigen, whereas the third antibody, IRac, bound to a different antigen. None of the antibodies significantly cross-reacted with normal human tissues as judged by indirect immunofluorescence and immunoperoxidase analyses on frozen sections from 28 normal tissues. All three antibodies formed potent and specific immunotoxins. They inhibited protein synthesis of the L540 Hodgkin's disease cell line in vitro by 50% at concentrations of 1 x 10(-11) M for IRac.dgA, 9 x 10(-11) M for HRS-3.dgA, and 2 x 10(-10) M for Ber-H2.dgA. HRS-3 Fab' and IRac Fab' immunotoxins were 7.8- and 60-fold less cytotoxic, respectively, than their intact counterparts in vitro. In vivo, a single i.v. injection of a dose of Ber-H2.dgA, HRS-3.dgA, or IRac.dgA corresponding to 40% of the LD50 induced lasting complete remissions in 38, 44, and 50%, respectively, of mice with solid s.c. L540 tumors of 60 to 80 mm3 size (0.5-cm diameter). At equivalent dosage (40% of the LD50), the HRS-3 Fab'.dgA and the IRac Fab'.dgA both induced lasting complete remissions in 25% of the mice, although the HRS-3 Fab'.dgA was significantly superior to IRac Fab'.dgA at retarding tumor growth in the remaining animals. The effectiveness of the immunotoxins depended on the size of the tumor at the time of injection, since IRac.dgA treatment induced complete remissions in 100% of mice with small tumors (10 to 20 mm3, approximately 0.3 cm in diameter) but only 13% of mice with larger tumors of 400 to 600 mm3 (approximately 1 cm in diameter). Tumors which regrew after IRac.dgA treatment mainly consisted of antigen-deficient mutants having reduced sensitivity to IRac.dgA but normal

  5. Degradation of fibrin and elastin by intact human alveolar macrophages in vitro. Characterization of a plasminogen activator and its role in matrix degradation.

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, H A; Stone, O L; Vavrin, Z

    1984-01-01

    Fibrin deposition is prominent in the histopathology of a number of inflammatory lung diseases. Plasmin, activated locally in the lung, can degrade not only this fibrin but potentially structural proteins important to normal lung architecture. Because alveolar macrophages are prominent in inflammatory processes of the lung, we examined the plasminogen activator (PA) activity of human alveolar macrophages. Intact alveolar macrophages from each of 10 healthy subjects expressed PA activity. There was no difference in activity between smoking and nonsmoking individuals. The activator activity was largely cell-associated, but under certain culture conditions, macrophages released a soluble activator into the culture medium. The membrane-bound activator had an apparent molecular mass of 52-55 kD in nonreduced sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) gels, and monospecific antibody to urokinase neutralized the enzyme activity. Immunoprecipitation of [35S]methionine-labeled cells showed that human alveolar macrophages actually synthesize the PA in vitro. SDS-gel analysis of the immunoprecipitated material revealed the predominant species of PA to be structurally similar to reduced, active urokinase. We also examined the role of PA in the degradation of both insoluble fibrin and elastin matrices by live macrophages. Cells degraded an insoluble fibrin matrix in the presence of plasminogen whether or not the macrophages contacted the fibrin as long as proteinase inhibitors were not in the culture medium. In the presence of serum proteinase inhibitors, macrophages still degraded a fibrin matrix, but only if they were in contact with the fibrin. Live macrophages also degraded insoluble elastin only when in contact with the elastin but could do so even in the presence of serum proteinase inhibitors. In matrices containing a mixture of fibrin and elastin, cells did not degrade elastin unless plasminogen was added to the medium. These results indicate that normal alveolar macrophages

  6. Interactions between Activation and Repolarization Restitution Properties in the Intact Human Heart: In-Vivo Whole-Heart Data and Mathematical Description

    PubMed Central

    Taggart, Peter; Srinivasan, Neil; Hayward, Martin; Lambiase, Pier D.

    2016-01-01

    Background The restitution of the action potential duration (APDR) and conduction velocity (CVR) are mechanisms whereby cardiac excitation and repolarization adapt to changes in heart rate. They modulate the vulnerability to dangerous arrhythmia, but the mechanistic link between restitution and arrhythmogenesis remains only partially understood. Methods This paper provides an experimental and theoretical study of repolarization and excitation restitution properties and their interactions in the intact human epicardium. The interdependence between excitation and repolarization dynamic is studied in 8 patients (14 restitution protocols, 1722 restitution curves) undergoing global epicardial mapping with multi-electrode socks before open heart surgery. A mathematical description of the contribution of both repolarization and conduction dynamics to the steepness of the APDR slope is proposed. Results This study demonstrates that the APDR slope is a function of both activation and repolarization dynamics. At short cycle length, conduction delay significantly increases the APDR slope by interacting with the diastolic interval. As predicted by the proposed mathematical formulation, the APDR slope was more sensitive to activation time prolongation than to the simultaneous shortening of repolarization time. A steep APDR slope was frequently identified, with 61% of all cardiac sites exhibiting an APDR slope > 1, suggesting that a slope > 1 may not necessarily promote electrical instability in the human epicardium. APDR slope did not change for different activation or repolarization times, and it was not a function of local baseline APD. However, it was affected by the spatial organization of electrical excitation, suggesting that in tissue APDR is not a unique function of local electrophysiological properties. Spatial heterogeneity in both activation and repolarization restitution contributed to the increase in the modulated dispersion of repolarization, which for short cycle

  7. [Gastrointestinal bleeding].

    PubMed

    Lanas, Ángel

    2015-09-01

    In the Digestive Disease Week in 2015 there have been some new contributions in the field of gastrointestinal bleeding that deserve to be highlighted. Treatment of celecoxib with a proton pump inhibitor is safer than treatment with nonselective NSAID and a proton pump inhibitor in high risk gastrointestinal and cardiovascular patients who mostly also take acetylsalicylic acid. Several studies confirm the need to restart the antiplatelet or anticoagulant therapy at an early stage after a gastrointestinal hemorrhage. The need for urgent endoscopy before 6-12 h after the onset of upper gastrointestinal bleeding episode may be beneficial in patients with hemodynamic instability and high risk for comorbidity. It is confirmed that in Western but not in Japanese populations, gastrointestinal bleeding episodes admitted to hospital during weekend days are associated with a worse prognosis associated with delays in the clinical management of the events. The strategy of a restrictive policy on blood transfusions during an upper GI bleeding event has been challenged. Several studies have shown the benefit of identifying the bleeding vessel in non varicose underlying gastric lesions by Doppler ultrasound which allows direct endoscopic therapy in the patient with upper GI bleeding. Finally, it has been reported that lower gastrointestinal bleeding diverticula band ligation or hemoclipping are both safe and have the same long-term outcomes.

  8. Isolation and Characterization of Adenoviruses Persistently Shed from the Gastrointestinal Tract of Non-Human Primates

    PubMed Central

    Kryazhimskiy, Sergey; Grant, Rebecca; Calcedo, Roberto; Yuan, Xin; Keough, Martin; Sandhu, Arbans; Wang, Qiang; Medina-Jaszek, C. Angelica; Plotkin, Joshua B.; Wilson, James M.

    2009-01-01

    Adenoviruses are important human pathogens that have been developed as vectors for gene therapies and genetic vaccines. Previous studies indicated that human infections with adenoviruses are self-limiting in immunocompetent hosts with evidence of some persistence in adenoid tissue. We sought to better understand the natural history of adenovirus infections in various non-human primates and discovered that healthy populations of great apes (chimpanzees, bonobos, gorillas, and orangutans) and macaques shed substantial quantities of infectious adenoviruses in stool. Shedding in stools from asymptomatic humans was found to be much less frequent, comparable to frequencies reported before. We purified and fully sequenced 30 novel adenoviruses from apes and 3 novel adenoviruses from macaques. Analyses of the new ape adenovirus sequences (as well as the 4 chimpanzee adenovirus sequences we have previously reported) together with 22 complete adenovirus genomes available from GenBank revealed that (a) the ape adenoviruses could clearly be classified into species corresponding to human adenovirus species B, C, and E, (b) there was evidence for intraspecies recombination between adenoviruses, and (c) the high degree of phylogenetic relatedness of adenoviruses across their various primate hosts provided evidence for cross species transmission events to have occurred in the natural history of B and E viruses. The high degree of asymptomatic shedding of live adenovirus in non-human primates and evidence for zoonotic transmissions warrants caution for primate handling and housing. Furthermore, the presence of persistent and/or latent adenovirus infections in the gut should be considered in the design and interpretation of human and non-human primate studies with adenovirus vectors. PMID:19578438

  9. Identification of a novel human polyomavirus in organs of the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Korup, Sarah; Rietscher, Janita; Calvignac-Spencer, Sébastien; Trusch, Franziska; Hofmann, Jörg; Moens, Ugo; Sauer, Igor; Voigt, Sebastian; Schmuck, Rosa; Ehlers, Bernhard

    2013-01-01

    Polyomaviruses are small, non-enveloped viruses with a circular double-stranded DNA genome. Using a generic polyomavirus PCR targeting the VP1 major structural protein gene, a novel polyomavirus was initially identified in resected human liver tissue and provisionally named Human Polyomavirus 12 (HPyV12). Its 5033 bp genome is predicted to encode large and small T antigens and the 3 structural proteins VP1, VP2 and VP3. Phylogenetic analyses did not reveal a close relationship to any known human or animal polyomavirus. Investigation of organs, body fluids and excretions of diseased individuals and healthy subjects with both HPyV12-specific nested PCR and quantitative real-time PCR revealed additional virus-positive samples of resected liver, cecum and rectum tissues and a positive fecal sample. A capsomer-based IgG ELISA was established using the major capsid protein VP1 of HPyV12. Seroprevalences of 23% and 17%, respectively, were determined in sera from healthy adults and adolescents and a pediatric group of children. These data indicate that the virus naturally infects humans and that primary infection may already occur in childhood.

  10. N-nitrosation of medicinal drugs catalysed by bacteria from human saliva and gastro-intestinal tract, including Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Ziebarth, D; Spiegelhalder, B; Bartsch, H

    1997-02-01

    Micro-organisms commonly present in human saliva and three DSM strains (Helicobacter pylori, Campylobacter jejuni and Neisseria cinerea), which can be isolated from the human gastro-intestinal tract, were assayed in vitro for their capacity to catalyse N-nitrosation of a series of medicinal drugs and other compounds. Following incubation at pH 7.2 in the presence of nitrate (or nitrite) for up to 24 (48) h, the yield of N-nitroso compounds (NOC) was quantified by HPLC equipped with a post-column derivatization device, allowing the sensitive detection of acid-labile and acid-stable NOC. Eleven out of the 23 test compounds underwent bacteria-catalysed nitrosation by salivary bacteria, the yield of the respective nitrosation products varying 800-fold. 4-(Methylamino)antipyrine exhibited the highest rate of nitrosation, followed by dichlofenac > metamizole > piperazine > five other drugs, whilst L-proline and L-thioproline had the lowest nitrosation rate. Ten drugs including aminophenazone, cimetidine and nicotine, did not inhibit bacterial growth, allowing transitory nitrite to be formed, but no N-nitroso derivatives were detected. Three drugs inhibited the proliferation of bacteria and neither nitrite nor any NOC were formed. Using metamizole as an easily nitrosatable precursor, two strains, Campylobacter jejuni and Helicobacter pylori, were shown to catalyse nitrosation in the presence of nitrite at pH 7.2. As compared to Neisseria cinerea used as a nitrosation-proficient control strain, H. pylori was 30-100 times less effective, whilst C. jejuni had intermediary activity. The results of our sensitive nitrosation assay further confirm that bacteria isolated from human sources, possessing nitrate reductase and/or nitrosating enzymes such as cytochrome cd1-nitrite reductase (Calmels et al., Carcinogenesis, 17, 533-536, 1996), can contribute to intragastric nitrosamine formation in the anacidic stomach when nitrosatable precursors from exogenous and endogenous sources

  11. Evolution of a detailed physiological model to simulate the gastrointestinal transit and absorption process in humans, part 1: oral solutions.

    PubMed

    Thelen, Kirstin; Coboeken, Katrin; Willmann, Stefan; Burghaus, Rolf; Dressman, Jennifer B; Lippert, Jörg

    2011-12-01

    To enable more precise prediction of oral drug absorption, an existing physiologically based absorption model was revised. The revised model reflects detailed knowledge of human gastrointestinal (GI) physiology including fluid secretion and absorption, and comprises an elaborate representation of the intestinal mucosa. The alimentary canal from the stomach to the rectum was divided into 12 compartments. A mucosal compartment was added to each luminal segment of the intestine. A training set of 111 passively absorbed drugs with reported fractions of dose absorbed was used to optimize the semiempirical equation, which calculates intestinal permeability coefficients. The model was subsequently integrated into an established physiologically based pharmacokinetic software and validated by prediction of plasma concentration-time profiles of eight test compounds with diverse physicochemical properties. A good correlation between the simulated and experimental fractions of dose absorbed was established for the 111 compounds in the training set. Subsequently, the concentration-time profiles of six out of eight test compounds were predicted with high accuracy. The detailed model for GI transit and absorption presented in this study can help to understand the complex processes of oral absorption better and will be useful during the drug development process.

  12. Multivariate discriminating algorithm for analyzing laser-induced fluorescence spectra of human gastrointestinal cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wei; Wei, Guang Hui

    1998-09-01

    The purpose of this study has been to evaluate the laser- induced fluorescence characters of normal and malignant stomach tissue in Vitro and in Vivo. The stepwise multivariate discrimination analysis was used to make a multivariate statistical algorithm for analyzing the diagnostic parameters of human stomach tissues fluorescence spectrum. The resulting spectra could be differentiating histologically stomach abnormal tissue from normal tissue with a sensitivity and specificity value of 95% and 97%. The diagnosis results were in excellent agreement with histopathological results.

  13. In vivo near-infrared dual-axis confocal microendoscopy in the human lower gastrointestinal tract

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piyawattanametha, Wibool; Ra, Hyejun; Qiu, Zhen; Friedland, Shai; Liu, Jonathan T. C.; Loewke, Kevin; Kino, Gordon S.; Solgaard, Olav; Wang, Thomas D.; Mandella, Michael J.; Contag, Christopher H.

    2012-02-01

    Near-infrared confocal microendoscopy is a promising technique for deep in vivo imaging of tissues and can generate high-resolution cross-sectional images at the micron-scale. We demonstrate the use of a dual-axis confocal (DAC) near-infrared fluorescence microendoscope with a 5.5-mm outer diameter for obtaining clinical images of human colorectal mucosa. High-speed two-dimensional en face scanning was achieved through a microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) scanner while a micromotor was used for adjusting the axial focus. In vivo images of human patients are collected at 5 frames/sec with a field of view of 362×212 μm2 and a maximum imaging depth of 140 μm. During routine endoscopy, indocyanine green (ICG) was topically applied a nonspecific optical contrasting agent to regions of the human colon. The DAC microendoscope was then used to obtain microanatomic images of the mucosa by detecting near-infrared fluorescence from ICG. These results suggest that DAC microendoscopy may have utility for visualizing the anatomical and, perhaps, functional changes associated with colorectal pathology for the early detection of colorectal cancer.

  14. Colonizing the embryonic zebrafish gut with anaerobic bacteria derived from the human gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Toh, Michael C; Goodyear, Mara; Daigneault, Michelle; Allen-Vercoe, Emma; Van Raay, Terence J

    2013-06-01

    The zebrafish has become increasingly popular for microbiological research. It has been used as an infection model for a variety of pathogens, and is also emerging as a tool for studying interactions between a host and its resident microbial communities. The mouse microbiota has been transplanted into the zebrafish gut, but to our knowledge, there has been no attempt to introduce a bacterial community derived from the human gut. We explored two methods for colonizing the developing gut of 5-day-old germ-free zebrafish larvae with a defined anaerobic microbial community derived from a single human fecal sample. Both environmental exposure (static immersion) and direct microinjection into the gut resulted in the establishment of two species-Lactobacillus paracasei and Eubacterium limosum-from a community of 30 strains consisting of 22 anaerobic species. Of particular interest is E. limosum, which, as a strict anaerobe, represents a group of bacteria which until now have not been shown to colonize the developing zebrafish gut. Our success here indicates that further investigation of zebrafish as a tool for studying human gut microbial communities is warranted.

  15. Intact growth factors are conserved in the extracellular matrix of ancient human bone and teeth: a storehouse for the study of human evolution in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Schmidt-Schultz, Tyede H; Schultz, Michael

    2005-08-01

    For the first time we have extracted, solubilized and identified growth factors, such as insulin growth factor II (IGF-II), bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2), and transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta), from archaeological compact human bone and tooth dentin dating from the late pre-ceramic pottery Neolithic (late PPNB) and the early Middle Ages. These factors are typical of special physiological or pathological situations in the metabolism of bone. The extracellular matrix proteins from bone and teeth of individuals from the late PPNB and early Middle Ages were separated by 2-D electrophoresis and more than 300 different protein spots were detected by silver staining. The matrix protein patterns of compact bone and tooth from the same individual (early Middle Ages) are very different and only 16% of the protein spots were detected in both compact bone and tooth dentin.

  16. In vitro approaches to assess bioavailability and human gastrointestinal mobilization of food-borne polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs).

    PubMed

    Adenugba, Adeola A; McMartin, Dena W; Beck, Angus J

    2008-06-01

    This study reports on the potential for gastrointestinal (GI) mobilization and bioavailability of food-borne PCBs in humans. The development and validation of a GI simulator and operational protocols, developed in compliance with the requirements of German DIN 19738 risk assessment test procedure, are presented. Food, naturally contaminated with PCBs, was homogenized with simulated saliva fluid and shaken in the GI simulator with simulated gastric fluids (containing pepsin, mucine) for 2 h at 37 degrees C. Afterwards, the simulated intestinal fluids (containing pepsin, mucine, trypsin, pancreatin, bile) were added and the mixture shaken for a further 6 h prior to centrifugation and filtration using Buchner funnels to separate the undigested GI residues from GI fluids. PCBs were recovered from GI residues and fluids by Soxhlet and liquid-liquid extraction respectively, cleaned up using silica-SFE, and analyzed by gas chromatography mass spectrometry detection (GC-MSD). Detailed studies with fish indicate variations in mobilization and bioavailability of Sigma PCBs (28, 52, 101, 118, 153, 138 and 180). For example, the bioavailable fractions (fractions mobilized) in mackerel, salmon, crab and prawn were 0.77, 0.60, 0.54, and 0.72 respectively of the Sigma PCBs initially present in these food samples. The bioavailable fraction was dependent on the physicochemical characteristics of the PCBs. In mackerel bioavailable fractions for individual PCB congeners ranged from 0.47-0.82, from 0.30-0.70 in salmon, 0.44-0.64 in crab and in prawn from 0.47-0.77. Future studies will focus on understanding better, the variability in bioavailable fractions to be expected for different foodstuffs, in addition to tissue culture techniques using human gut cell lines to investigate a simultaneous mobilization and absorption of food-borne PCBs.

  17. Coaxial atomizer liquid intact lengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eroglu, Hasan; Chigier, Norman; Farago, Zoltan

    1991-01-01

    Average intact lengths of round liquid jets generated by airblast coaxial atomizer were measured from over 1500 photographs. The intact lengths were studied over a jet Reynolds number range of 18,000 and Weber number range of 260. Results are presented for two different nozzle geometries. The intact lengths were found to be strongly dependent on Re and We numbers. An empirical equation was derived as a function of these parameters. A comparison of the intact lengths for round jets and flat sheets shows that round jets generate shorter intact lengths.

  18. The antifungal antibiotic, clotrimazole, inhibits chloride secretion by human intestinal T84 cells via blockade of distinct basolateral K+ conductances. Demonstration of efficacy in intact rabbit colon and in an in vivo mouse model of cholera.

    PubMed Central

    Rufo, P A; Merlin, D; Riegler, M; Ferguson-Maltzman, M H; Dickinson, B L; Brugnara, C; Alper, S L; Lencer, W I

    1997-01-01

    The antifungal antibiotic clotrimazole (CLT) blocks directly and with high potency the Ca2+-activated K+ channels of human erythrocytes, erythroleukemia cells, and ferret vascular smooth muscle cells. We recently reported that CLT inhibits Cl- secretion in human intestinal T84 cells, likely by affecting K+ transport (Rufo, P.A., L. Jiang, S.J. Moe, C. Brugnara, S.L. Alper, and W.I. Lencer. 1996. J. Clin. Invest. 98:2066-2075). To determine if CLT had direct effects on K+ conductances in T84 cells, we selectively permeabilized apical membranes of confluent T84 cell monolayers using the ionophore amphotericin B. This technique permits direct measurement of basolateral K+ transport. We found that CLT and a stable des-imidazolyl derivative inhibited directly two pharmacologically distinct basolateral membrane K+conductances, but had no effect on apical membrane Cl- conductances. The effects of CLT on Cl- secretion were also examined in intact tissue. CLT inhibited forskolin-induced Cl- secretion in rabbit colonic mucosal sheets mounted in Ussing chambers by 91%. CLT also inhibited cholera toxin-induced intestinal Cl- secretion in intact mice by 94%. These data provide direct evidence that CLT blocks Cl- secretion in intestinal T84 cells by inhibition of basolateral K+ conductances, and show that CLT inhibits salt and water secretion from intact tissue in vitro and in vivo. The results further support the suggestion that CLT and its metabolites may show clinical efficacy in the treatment of secretory diarrheas of diverse etiologies. PMID:9399958

  19. (Photosynthesis in intact plants)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    Progress in the two years since the last renewal application has been excellent. We have made substantial contributions on both main fronts of the projects, and are particularly happy with the progress of our research on intact plants. The approach of basing our field work on a sound foundation of laboratory studies has enabled is to use methods which provide unambiguous assays of well characterized reactions. We have also made excellent progress in several laboratory studies which will have direct applications in future field work, and have introduced to the laboratory a range of molecular genetics techniques which will allow us to explore new options in the attempt to understand function at the level of molecular structure.

  20. Gastrointestinal and ectoparasites from urban stray dogs in Fortaleza (Brazil): high infection risk for humans?

    PubMed

    Klimpel, Sven; Heukelbach, Jörg; Pothmann, David; Rückert, Sonja

    2010-08-01

    Dogs are important definite or reservoir hosts for zoonotic parasites. However, only few studies on the prevalence of intestinal parasites in urban areas in Brazil are available. We performed a comprehensive study on parasites of stray dogs in a Brazilian metropolitan area. We included 46 stray dogs caught in the urban areas of Fortaleza (northeast Brazil). After euthanization, dogs were autopsied. Ectoparasites were collected, and the intestinal content of dogs were examined for the presence of parasites. Faecal samples were collected and analysed using merthiolate iodine formaldehyde concentration method. A total of nine different parasite species were found, including five endoparasite (one protozoan, one cestode and three nematode species) and four ectoparasite species (two flea, one louse and one tick species). In the intestinal content, 3,162 specimens of four helminth species were found: Ancylostoma caninum (prevalence, 95.7%), Dipylidium caninum (45.7%), Toxocara canis (8.7%) and Trichuris vulpis (4.3%). A total of 394 ectoparasite specimens were identified, including Rhipicephalus sanguineus (prevalence, 100.0%), Heterodoxus spiniger (67.4%), Ctenocephalides canis (39.1%) and Ctenocephalides felis (17.4%). In the faeces, intestinal parasites were detected in 38 stray dogs (82.6%), including oocysts of Giardia sp. (2.2%) and eggs of the nematode A. caninum (82.6%). Neither eggs nor larval stages of D. caninum, T. canis or T. vulpis were detected in dog faeces. Sensitivity of faecal examination for A. caninum was 86.4% (95% confidence interval, 72.0-94.3) but zero percentage for the other intestinal helminth species. Our data show that stray dogs in northeast Brazil carry a multitude of zoonotic ecto- and endoparasites, posing a considerable risk for humans. With the exception of A. caninum, sensitivity of faecal examination was negligible.

  1. Terpinen-4-ol: A Novel and Promising Therapeutic Agent for Human Gastrointestinal Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Shapira, Shiran; Pleban, Shlomo; Kazanov, Diana; Tirosh, Peter; Arber, Nadir

    2016-01-01

    Background Terpinen-4-ol, a naturally occurring monoterpene is the main bioactive component of tea-tree oil and has been shown to have many biological activities. Aim To study the antitumor effects of terpinen-4-ol and its mechanism of action in prostate and GI malignancies, alone and in combination with chemotherapeutic and biological agents. Methods Terpinen-4-ol was administrated alone or combined with standard chemotherapy (Oxaliplatin, Fluorouracil, Gemcitabine, Tarceva) and biological agent (Cetuximab). It was also combined with humanized anti-CD24 mAbs (was developed by us). Killing effects were measured qualitatively by light microscopy and quantitatively using the MTT and FACS analysis, following treatment of colorectal, pancreatic, gastric and prostate cancer cells. Terpinen-4-ol effect on tumor development was evaluated in xenograft model. Results Terpinen-4-ol induces a significant growth inhibition of colorectal, pancreatic, prostate and gastric cancer cells in a dose-dependent manner (10–90% in 0.005–0.1%). Terpinen-4-ol and various anti-cancer agents (0.2μM oxaliplatin and 0.5μM fluorouracil) demonstrated a synergistic inhibitory effect (83% and 91%, respectively) on cancer cell proliferation. In KRAS mutated colorectal cancer cells, which are resistant to anti-EGFR therapy, combining of terpinen-4-ol with cetuximab (1 μM) resulted in impressive efficacy of 80–90% growth inhibition. Sub-toxic concentrations of terpinen-4-ol potentiate anti-CD24 mAb (150μg/ml)-induced growth inhibition (90%). Considerable reduction in tumor volume was seen following terpinen-4-ol (0.2%) treatment alone and with cetuximab (10mg/kg) (40% and 63%, respectively) as compare to the control group. Conclusion Terpinen-4-ol significantly enhances the effect of several chemotherapeutic and biological agents. The possible molecular mechanism for its activity involves induction of cell-death rendering this compound as a potential anti-cancer drug alone and in

  2. Anti-Infective Activities of Lactobacillus Strains in the Human Intestinal Microbiota: from Probiotics to Gastrointestinal Anti-Infectious Biotherapeutic Agents

    PubMed Central

    Liévin-Le Moal, Vanessa

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY A vast and diverse array of microbial species displaying great phylogenic, genomic, and metabolic diversity have colonized the gastrointestinal tract. Resident microbes play a beneficial role by regulating the intestinal immune system, stimulating the maturation of host tissues, and playing a variety of roles in nutrition and in host resistance to gastric and enteric bacterial pathogens. The mechanisms by which the resident microbial species combat gastrointestinal pathogens are complex and include competitive metabolic interactions and the production of antimicrobial molecules. The human intestinal microbiota is a source from which Lactobacillus probiotic strains have often been isolated. Only six probiotic Lactobacillus strains isolated from human intestinal microbiota, i.e., L. rhamnosus GG, L. casei Shirota YIT9029, L. casei DN-114 001, L. johnsonii NCC 533, L. acidophilus LB, and L. reuteri DSM 17938, have been well characterized with regard to their potential antimicrobial effects against the major gastric and enteric bacterial pathogens and rotavirus. In this review, we describe the current knowledge concerning the experimental antibacterial activities, including antibiotic-like and cell-regulating activities, and therapeutic effects demonstrated in well-conducted, placebo-controlled, randomized clinical trials of these probiotic Lactobacillus strains. What is known about the antimicrobial activities supported by the molecules secreted by such probiotic Lactobacillus strains suggests that they constitute a promising new source for the development of innovative anti-infectious agents that act luminally and intracellularly in the gastrointestinal tract. PMID:24696432

  3. Plasma profiling of intact isoflavone metabolites by high-performance liquid chromatography and mass spectrometric identification of flavone glycosides daidzin and genistin in human plasma after administration of kinako.

    PubMed

    Hosoda, Kaori; Furuta, Takashi; Yokokawa, Akitomo; Ogura, Kenichiro; Hiratsuka, Akira; Ishii, Kazuo

    2008-08-01

    The roles of isoflavones in the prevention of several hormone-dependent cancers and osteoporosis are of great interest. Despite many pharmacokinetics studies of the isoflavones, the actual types of conjugates circulating in the body and the position(s) of conjugation sites on the flavone skeleton are still uncertain because, in general, conjugated compounds in biological fluids have been evaluated by measuring the free aglycones obtained after selective enzymatic hydrolysis. Using an high-performance (HPLC)-UV-diode-array detector (DAD) method combined with solid-phase extraction, we have obtained HPLC profiles of isoflavone glycosides [daidzin (Din) and genistin (Gin)] and of intact isoflavone metabolites in human plasma: daidzein, genistein, daizein-7-glucuronide, daidzein-4'-glucuronide, genistein-7-glucuronide, genistein-4'-glucuronide, daidzein-7-sulfate, daidzein-4'-sulfate, genistein-7-sulfate, and genistein-4'-sulfate. We investigated the plasma profile of intact isoflavone metabolites in plasma obtained 1 to-7 h after orally administration of 50 g of kinako (baked soybean powder) to two healthy volunteers. The results of DAD analysis indicated that the main isoflavone metabolite peaks were identified on the HPLC chromatogram. Furthermore, the intact glycosides Din and Gin were detected in 1-h plasma samples by their positive electrospray ionization mass spectra, demonstrating that the glycosides Din and Gin can be absorbed from the gut.

  4. Survival of Lactobacillus reuteri DSM 17938 and Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG in the Human Gastrointestinal Tract with Daily Consumption of a Low-Fat Probiotic Spread▿

    PubMed Central

    Dommels, Yvonne E. M.; Kemperman, Robèr A.; Zebregs, Yvonne E. M. P.; Draaisma, René B.; Jol, Arne; Wolvers, Danielle A. W.; Vaughan, Elaine E.; Albers, Ruud

    2009-01-01

    Probiotics are live microorganisms which, when administered in adequate amounts, confer a health benefit on the host. Therefore, probiotic strains should be able to survive passage through the human gastrointestinal tract. Human gastrointestinal tract survival of probiotics in a low-fat spread matrix has, however, never been tested. The objective of this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled human intervention study was to test the human gastrointestinal tract survival of Lactobacillus reuteri DSM 17938 and Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG after daily consumption of a low-fat probiotic spread by using traditional culturing, as well as molecular methods. Forty-two healthy human volunteers were randomly assigned to one of three treatment groups provided with 20 g of placebo spread (n = 13), 20 g of spread with a target dose of 1 × 109 CFU of L. reuteri DSM 17938 (n = 13), or 20 g of spread with a target dose of 5 × 109 CFU of L. rhamnosus GG (n = 16) daily for 3 weeks. Fecal samples were obtained before and after the intervention period. A significant increase, compared to the baseline, in the recovery of viable probiotic lactobacilli in fecal samples was demonstrated after 3 weeks of daily consumption of the spread containing either L. reuteri DSM 17938 or L. rhamnosus GG by selective enumeration. In the placebo group, no increase was detected. The results of selective enumeration were supported by quantitative PCR, detecting a significant increase in DNA resulting from the probiotics after intervention. Overall, our results indicate for the first time that low-fat spread is a suitable carrier for these probiotic strains. PMID:19684171

  5. The physics of intact capture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsou, Peter; Griffiths, D. J.; Albee, A. L.

    1994-01-01

    The ability to capture projectiles intact at hypervelocities in underdense media open a new area of study in physics. Underdense material behaves markedly different than solid, liquid, or gas upon hypervelocity impact. This new phenomenon enables applications in science that would either not be possible or would be very costly by other means. This phenomenon has been fully demonstrated in the laboratory and validated in space. Even more interesting is the fact that this hypervelocity intact capture was accomplished passively. A better understanding of the physics of intact capture will lead to improvements in intact capture. A collection of physical observations of this phenomenon is presented here.

  6. Structurally intact (78-kDa) forms of maternal lactoferrin purified from urine of preterm infants fed human milk: identification of a trypsin-like proteolytic cleavage event in vivo that does not result in fragment dissociation.

    PubMed Central

    Hutchens, T W; Henry, J F; Yip, T T

    1991-01-01

    Two forms of lactoferrin, an intact lactoferrin and a "nicked" but apparently intact (i.e., 78-kDa) form, have been isolated from the urine of preterm infants fed human milk. These two forms of lactoferrin, demonstrated to be entirely of maternal origin, were copurified using affinity columns of immobilized single-stranded DNA-agarose. The relative concentrations of the intact lactoferrin and the "nicked" lactoferrin were determined after denaturation and separation by reverse-phase HPLC. N-terminal sequence analyses showed that the intact 78-kDa form had lost two residues from its N terminus. The nicked 78-kDa form was composed of only two fragments; one fragment was identified as the N terminus of the N-lobe (residues 3-283). The other fragment started with Ser-284 and included the alpha-helical structures at the C terminus of the N-lobe, as well as the entire C-lobe. Although no disulfide bonds connect these two fragments, they were tightly associated in vivo and were not separated in vitro except under denaturing conditions. Limited in vitro digestion of human milk lactoferrin with trypsin produced a nicked, but stable (78-kDa), form of DNA-binding lactoferrin nearly indistinguishable from the isolated urinary lactoferrin, except for the absence of one additional arginine residue at the N terminus of the N-lobe. Residues involved in the stable molecular interaction between fragments were evaluated using data obtained from the high-resolution crystal structure of hololactoferrin. Two features, entirely within the N-lobe, account for the lack of fragment dissociation after cleavage at residue 283 in vivo: an extensive interface at the hinge region behind the iron-binding cleft and an "anchor" sequence traversing the remainder of the N-lobe at 90 degrees relative to the fragment interface. These results document the remarkably limited degradation of absorbed lactoferrin in vivo and suggest that iron-binding activity, receptor-binding properties, and postulated

  7. Prevalence of gastrointestinal parasites in captive non-human primates of twenty-four zoological gardens in China.

    PubMed

    Li, Mei; Zhao, Bo; Li, Bo; Wang, Qiang; Niu, Lili; Deng, Jiabo; Gu, Xiaobin; Peng, Xuerong; Wang, Tao; Yang, Guangyou

    2015-06-01

    Captive primates are susceptible to gastrointestinal (GIT) parasitic infections, which are often zoonotic and can contribute to morbidity and mortality. Fecal samples were examined by the means of direct smear, fecal flotation, fecal sedimentation, and fecal cultures. Of 26.51% (317/1196) of the captive primates were diagnosed gastrointestinal parasitic infections. Trichuris spp. were the most predominant in the primates, while Entamoeba spp. were the most prevalent in Old World monkeys (P < 0.05). These preliminary data will improve the management of captive primates and the safety of animal keepers and visitors.

  8. Angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory activity and ACE inhibitory peptides of salmon (Salmo salar) protein hydrolysates obtained by human and porcine gastrointestinal enzymes.

    PubMed

    Darewicz, Małgorzata; Borawska, Justyna; Vegarud, Gerd E; Minkiewicz, Piotr; Iwaniak, Anna

    2014-08-13

    The objectives of the present study were two-fold: first, to detect whether salmon protein fractions possess angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory properties and whether salmon proteins can release ACE inhibitory peptides during a sequential in vitro hydrolysis (with commercial porcine enzymes) and ex vivo digestion (with human gastrointestinal enzymes). Secondly, to evaluate the ACE inhibitory activity of generated hydrolysates. A two-step ex vivo and in vitro model digestion was performed to simulate the human digestion process. Salmon proteins were degraded more efficiently by porcine enzymes than by human gastrointestinal juices and sarcoplasmic proteins were digested/hydrolyzed more easily than myofibrillar proteins. The ex vivo digested myofibrillar and sarcoplasmic duodenal samples showed IC50 values (concentration required to decrease the ACE activity by 50%) of 1.06 and 2.16 mg/mL, respectively. The in vitro hydrolyzed myofibrillar and sarcoplasmic samples showed IC50 values of 0.91 and 1.04 mg/mL, respectively. Based on the results of in silico studies, it was possible to identify 9 peptides of the ex vivo hydrolysates and 7 peptides of the in vitro hydrolysates of salmon proteins of 11 selected peptides. In both types of salmon hydrolysates, ACE-inhibitory peptides IW, IY, TVY and VW were identified. In the in vitro salmon protein hydrolysates an ACE-inhibitory peptides VPW and VY were also detected, while ACE-inhibitory peptides ALPHA, IVY and IWHHT were identified in the hydrolysates generated with ex vivo digestion. In our studies, we documented ACE inhibitory in vitro effects of salmon protein hydrolysates obtained by human and as well as porcine gastrointestinal enzymes.

  9. Space research with intact organisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, Robert W.; Haddy, Francis J.

    1992-01-01

    Effects of space exposure on intact organisms are briefly reviewed, and examples of future experiments that might provide new information on the role of gravity in the evolution of life are suggested. It is noted that long term experiments with intact plant and animals for studying gravitational thresholds will provide important new insights.

  10. Efficient Inhibition of HIV Replication in the Gastrointestinal and Female Reproductive Tracts of Humanized BLT Mice by EFdA

    PubMed Central

    Shanmugasundaram, Uma; Kovarova, Martina; Ho, Phong T.; Schramm, Nathaniel; Wahl, Angela; Parniak, Michael A.; Garcia, J. Victor

    2016-01-01

    Background The nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI) 4'-ethynyl-2-fluoro-2'-deoxyadenosine (EFdA) in preclinical development exhibits improved safety and antiviral activity profiles with minimal drug resistance compared to approved NRTIs. However, the systemic antiviral efficacy of EFdA has not been fully evaluated. In this study, we utilized bone marrow/liver/thymus (BLT) humanized mice to investigate the systemic effect of EFdA treatment on HIV replication and CD4+ T cell depletion in the peripheral blood (PB) and tissues. In particular, we performed a comprehensive analysis of the female reproductive tract (FRT) and gastrointestinal (GI) tract, major sites of transmission, viral replication, and CD4+ T cell depletion and where some current antiretroviral drugs have a sub-optimal effect. Results EFdA treatment resulted in reduction of HIV-RNA in PB to undetectable levels in the majority of treated mice by 3 weeks post-treatment. HIV-RNA levels in cervicovaginal lavage of EFdA-treated BLT mice also declined to undetectable levels demonstrating strong penetration of EFdA into the FRT. Our results also demonstrate a strong systemic suppression of HIV replication in all tissues analyzed. In particular, we observed more than a 2-log difference in HIV-RNA levels in the GI tract and FRT of EFdA-treated BLT mice compared to untreated HIV-infected control mice. In addition, HIV-RNA was also significantly lower in the lymph nodes, liver, lung, spleen of EFdA-treated BLT mice compared to untreated HIV-infected control mice. Furthermore, EFdA treatment prevented the depletion of CD4+ T cells in the PB, mucosal tissues and lymphoid tissues. Conclusion Our findings indicate that EFdA is highly effective in controlling viral replication and preserving CD4+ T cells in particular with high efficiency in the GI and FRT tract. Thus, EFdA represents a strong potential candidate for further development as a part of antiretroviral therapy regimens. PMID:27438728

  11. Ingested soluble CD14 from milk is transferred intact into the blood of newborn rats

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Tonya L.; Spencer, William J.; Davis, Laura D. R.; Harrold, JoAnn; Mack, David R.; Altosaar, Illimar

    2016-01-01

    Background Milk contains immunological constituents that comprise an edible immune system conveyed from mother to newborn. Soluble Cluster of Differentiation 14 (sCD14) is a protein found in significant quantities in human milk (~8–29 μg/ml). At a tenfold lower concentration in the blood (~3 μg/ml), the most notable role of sCD14 is to sequester lipopolysaccharide of Gram-negative bacteria from immune cells. Methods To explore the pharmacodynamics of this milk protein and its biological fate, the biodistribution of radiolabeled sCD14 (14C, 125I) was monitored in 10 d old rat pups. Results Up to 3.4 ± 2.2% of the radiolabeled-sCD14 administered was observed, intact, in the pup blood for up to 8 h post-ingestion. Additionally, 30.3 ± 13.0% of the radiolabeled-sCD14 administered was observed degraded in the stomach at 8 h post-ingestion. A reservoir of intact, administered sCD14 (3.2 ± 0.3%), however, remained in the stomach at 8 h post-ingestion. Intact sCD14 was observed in the small intestine at 5.5 ± 1.6% of the dose fed at 8h post-ingestion. Conclusions The presence of intact sCD14 in the blood and gastrointestinal tract of newborns post-ingestion has implications in the development of allergies, obesity and other inflammation-related pathogeneses later in life. PMID:24232637

  12. Role of CCK/gastrin receptors in gastrointestinal/metabolic diseases and results of human studies using gastrin/CCK receptor agonists/antagonists in these diseases

    PubMed Central

    Berna, Marc J.; Jensen, Robert T.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, the estabished and possible roles of CCK1 and CCK2 receptors in gastrointestinal (GI) and metabolic diseases are reviewed and available results from human agonist/antagonist studies are discussed. While there is evidence for the involvement of CCK1R in numerous diseases including pancreatic disorders, motility disorders, tumor growth, regulation of satiety and a number of CCK-deficient states, the role of CCK1R in these conditions is not clearly defined. There are encouraging data from several clinical studies of CCK1R antagonists in some of these conditions, but their role as therapeutic agents remains unclear. The role of CCK2R in physiological (atrophic gastritis, pernicious anemia) and pathological (Zollinger-Ellison syndrome) hypergastrinemic states, its effects on the gastric mucosa (ECL cell hyperplasia, carcinoids, parietal cell mass) and its role in acid-peptic disorders are clearly defined. Furthermore, recent studies point to a possible role for CCK2R in a number of GI malignancies. Current data from human studies of CCK2R antagonists are presented and their potential role in the treatment of these conditions reviewed. Furthermore, the role of CCK2 receptors as targets for medical imaging is discussed. Even though cholecystokinin (CCK) and gastrin were among the first gastrointestinal hormones discovered [1,2], both their physiological roles as well as their roles in clinically relevant gastrointestinal diseases remain unclear and even controversial in many cases [3–6]. The structural characterization of CCK and gastrin [7,8], pharmacological identification [9–13] and cloning [14,15] of CCK and gastrin receptors (CCK1R, CCK2R), characterization of receptor location, peptide and receptor genes, development of receptor antagonists and receptor/agonist knockout animals [16–21] have led to important advancements in our understanding of the physiological and pathophysiological role of CCK and gastrin signaling [3]. Most of these topics

  13. Dynamic In Vitro Models of the Human Gastrointestinal Tract as Relevant Tools to Assess the Survival of Probiotic Strains and Their Interactions with Gut Microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Cordonnier, Charlotte; Thévenot, Jonathan; Etienne-Mesmin, Lucie; Denis, Sylvain; Alric, Monique; Livrelli, Valérie; Blanquet-Diot, Stéphanie

    2015-01-01

    The beneficial effects of probiotics are conditioned by their survival during passage through the human gastrointestinal tract and their ability to favorably influence gut microbiota. The main objective of this study was to use dynamic in vitro models of the human digestive tract to investigate the effect of fasted or fed state on the survival kinetics of the new probiotic Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain CNCM I-3856 and to assess its influence on intestinal microbiota composition and activity. The probiotic yeast showed a high survival rate in the upper gastrointestinal tract whatever the route of admistration, i.e., within a glass of water or a Western-type meal. S. cerevisiae CNCM I-3856 was more sensitive to colonic conditions, as the strain was not able to colonize within the bioreactor despite a twice daily administration. The main bacterial populations of the gut microbiota, as well as the production of short chain fatty acids were not influenced by the probiotic treatment. However, the effect of the probiotic on the gut microbiota was found to be individual dependent. This study shows that dynamic in vitro models can be advantageously used to provide useful insight into the behavior of probiotic strains in the human digestive environment. PMID:27682114

  14. Triton shells of intact erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Sheetz, M P; Sawyer, D

    1978-01-01

    About 40% of human erythrocyte membrane protein is resistant to solubilization in 0.5% Triton X-114. These components comprise a structure called a Triton shell roughly similar in size and shape to the original erythrocyte and thus constitute a cytoskeleton. With increasing concentrations of Triton the lipid content of the Triton shell decreases dramatically, whereas the majority of the protein components remain constant. Exceptions to this rule include proteins contained in band 3, the presumed anion channel, and in band 4 which decrease with increasing Triton concentration. The Triton-insoluble complex includes spectrin (bands 1 and 2), actin (band 5), and bands 3' and 7. Component 3' has an apparent molecular weight of 88,000 daltons as does 3; but unlike 3, it is insensitive to protease treatment of the intact cell, has a low extinction coefficient at 280 nm, and is solubilized from the shells in alkaline water solutions. Component 7 also has a low extinction coefficient at 280 nm. Spectrin alone is solubilized from the Triton shells in isotonic media. The solubilized spectrin contains no bound Triton and coelectrophoreses with spectrin eluted in hypotonic solutions from ghosts. Electron micrographs of fixed Triton shells stained with uranyl acetate show the presence of numerous filaments which appear beaded and are 80--120 A in diameter. The filaments cannot be composed mainly af actin, but enough spectrin is present to form the filaments. Triton shells may provide an excellent source of material useful in the investigation of the erythrocyte cytoskeleton.

  15. Effectiveness of intact capture media

    SciTech Connect

    Tsou, P.; Aubert, J.; Brownlee, D.; Hrubesh, L.; Williams, J.; Albee, A.

    1989-01-01

    The possibility of capturing cosmic dust at hypervelocity has been demonstrated in the laboratory and in the unintended Solar Max spacecraft. This technology will enable a comet coma sample return mission and be important for the earth orbital cosmic dust collection mission, i.e., the Space Station Cosmic Dust Collection Facility. Since the only controllable factor in an intact capture of cosmic dust is the capturing medium, characterizing the effectiveness and properties of available capture media would be very important in the development of the technique for capturing hypervelocity cosmic dust intact. We have evaluated various capture underdense media for the relative effectiveness for intact capture. 2 refs., 2 figs.

  16. Ethyl cellulose nanocarriers and nanocrystals differentially deliver dexamethasone into intact, tape-stripped or sodium lauryl sulfate-exposed ex vivo human skin - assessment by intradermal microdialysis and extraction from the different skin layers.

    PubMed

    Döge, Nadine; Hönzke, Stefan; Schumacher, Fabian; Balzus, Benjamin; Colombo, Miriam; Hadam, Sabrina; Rancan, Fiorenza; Blume-Peytavi, Ulrike; Schäfer-Korting, Monika; Schindler, Anke; Rühl, Eckart; Skov, Per Stahl; Church, Martin K; Hedtrich, Sarah; Kleuser, Burkhard; Bodmeier, Roland; Vogt, Annika

    2016-11-28

    Understanding penetration not only in intact, but also in lesional skin with impaired skin barrier function is important, in order to explore the surplus value of nanoparticle-based drug delivery for anti-inflammatory dermatotherapy. Herein, short-term ex vivo cultures of (i) intact human skin, (ii) skin pretreated with tape-strippings and (iii) skin pre-exposed to sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS) were used to assess the penetration of dexamethasone (Dex). Intradermal microdialysis was utilized for up to 24h after drug application as commercial cream, nanocrystals or ethyl cellulose nanocarriers applied at the therapeutic concentration of 0.05%, respectively. In addition, Dex was assessed in culture media and extracts from stratum corneum, epidermis and dermis after 24h, and the results were compared to those in heat-separated split skin from studies in Franz diffusion cells. Providing fast drug release, nanocrystals significantly accelerated the penetration of Dex. In contrast to the application of cream and ethyl cellulose nanocarriers, Dex was already detectable in eluates after 6h when applying nanocrystals on intact skin. Disruption of the skin barrier further accelerated and enhanced the penetration. Encapsulation in ethyl cellulose nanocarriers delayed Dex penetration. Interestingly, for all formulations highly increased concentrations in the dialysate were observed in tape-stripped skin, whereas the extent of enhancement was less in SLS-exposed skin. The results were confirmed in tissue extracts and were in line with the predictions made by in vitro release studies and ex vivo Franz diffusion cell experiments. The use of 45kDa probes further enabled the collection of inflammatory cytokines. However, the estimation of glucocorticoid efficacy by Interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-8 analysis was limited due to the trauma induced by the probe insertion. Ex vivo intradermal microdialysis combined with culture media analysis provides an effective, skin-sparing method for

  17. Effects of activation of protein kinase C (PKC) on the hormonal stimulation and inhibition of cAMP formation in intact human platelets

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, K.A.; Haslam, R.J.

    1986-05-01

    Washed platelets, labelled by preincubation with (/sup 3/H)adenine and (/sup 32/P)P/sub i/, were studied in the presence of indomethacin, phosphocreatine and creatine phosphokinase to block thromboxane A/sub 2/ formation and inhibitory effects of released ADP. Addition of phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) or 1,2-dioctanoyl-glycerol (diC/sub 8/) decreased the initial rate of accumulation of (/sup 3/H)cAMP observed with PGE/sub 1/ and 3-isobutyl 1- methylxanthine. Maximal decreases of 31% (1 ..mu..M PMA) and 42% (100 ..mu..M diC/sub 8/) were obtained. Also, the inhibition of (/sup 3/H)cAMP formation by epinephrine (5 ..mu..M) was decreased from 68% to 16% and 31% by 1..mu..M PMA and 100 ..mu..M diC/sub 8/, respectively. The effects of increasing concentrations of PMA and diC/sub 8/ on the stimulation of (/sup 3/H)cAMp formation by PGE/sub 1/ and on the inhibitory action of epinephrine correlated with increases in /sup 32/P incorporation into the major substrate of PKC (P47) and into two other polypeptides (P41 and P20). These results suggested that activation of PKC might explain the failure of some aggregating agents (e.g. PAF and vasopressin) to inhibit adenylate cyclase in intact platelets, although they are inhibitory with isolated membranes. However, comparison of the effects of PMA and these aggregating agents on the phosphorylation of platelet polypeptides indicated that activation of PKC by aggregating agents is inadequate to block their inhibitory effects on adenylate cyclase, when PGE/sub 1/ is present.

  18. Iodine-131-labeled MAb F(ab')2 fragments are more efficient and less toxic than intact anti-CEA antibodies in radioimmunotherapy of large human colon carcinoma grafted in nude mice

    SciTech Connect

    Buchegger, F.; Pelegrin, A.; Delaloye, B.; Bischof-Delaloye, A.; Mach, J.P. )

    1990-06-01

    During one week, beginning 18 days after transplantation, nude mice bearing human colon carcinoma ranging from 115 to 943 mm3 (mean 335 mm3) were treated by repeated intravenous injections of either iodine-131-({sup 131}I) labeled intact antibodies or {sup 131}I-labeled corresponding F(ab')2 fragments of a pool of four monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) directed against distinct epitopes of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA). Complete tumor remission was observed in 8 of 10 mice after therapy with F(ab')2 and 6 of the animals survived 10 mo in good health. In contrast, after treatment with intact MAbs, tumors relapsed in 7 of 8 mice after remission periods of 1 to 3.5 mo despite the fact that body weight loss and depression of peripheral white blood cells, symptoms of radiation toxicity, and the calculated radiation doses for liver, spleen, bone, and blood were increased or equal in these animals as compared to mice treated with F(ab')2.

  19. 77 FR 27072 - Gastrointestinal Drugs Advisory Committee; Cancellation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-08

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Gastrointestinal Drugs Advisory Committee; Cancellation AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The meeting of the Gastrointestinal Drugs Advisory Committee scheduled for May 31, 2012, is canceled. This meeting was announced in...

  20. Influence of Bacillus subtilis C-3102 on microbiota in a dynamic in vitro model of the gastrointestinal tract simulating human conditions.

    PubMed

    Hatanaka, M; Nakamura, Y; Maathuis, A J H; Venema, K; Murota, I; Yamamoto, N

    2012-09-01

    Survival and germination rate of Bacillus subtilis C-3102 spores were investigated in a stomach and small intestine model (TIM-1), while the impact of C-3102 cells that had passed through TIM-1 on human colon microbiota was evaluated in a model of the large intestine (TIM-2). The survival of C-3102 spores in TIM-1 was 99%; 8% of the spores had germinated. Effluent of TIM-1 was subsequently introduced into TIM-2 and a micro-array platform was employed to assess changes in the microbiota composition. The effluent, which contained germinated C-3102 cells, increased some Bifidobacterium species and decreased some Clostridium groups. These changes were greater compared to those obtained by adding C-3102 spores directly to TIM-2. The present study suggests that oral doses of B. subtilis C-3102 spores have the potential to modulate the human colon microbiota. This effect may be caused by germination of the spores in the gastrointestinal tract.

  1. Comparison of rat epidermal keratinocyte organotypic culture (ROC) with intact human skin: lipid composition and thermal phase behavior of the stratum corneum.

    PubMed

    Pappinen, Sari; Hermansson, Martin; Kuntsche, Judith; Somerharju, Pentti; Wertz, Philip; Urtti, Arto; Suhonen, Marjukka

    2008-04-01

    The present report is a part of our continuing efforts to explore the utility of the rat epidermal keratinocyte organotypic culture (ROC) as an alternative model to human skin in transdermal drug delivery and skin irritation studies of new chemical entities and formulations. The aim of the present study was to compare the stratum corneum lipid content of ROC with the corresponding material from human skin. The lipid composition was determined by thin-layer chromatography (TLC) and mass-spectrometry, and the thermal phase transitions of stratum corneum were studied by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). All major lipid classes of the stratum corneum were present in ROC in a similar ratio as found in human stratum corneum. Compared to human skin, the level of non-hydroxyacid-sphingosine ceramide (NS) was increased in ROC, while alpha-hydroxyacid-phytosphingosine ceramide (AP) and non-hydroxyacid-phytosphingosine ceramides (NP) were absent. Also some alterations in fatty acid profiles of ROC ceramides were noted, e.g., esterified omega-hydroxyacid-sphingosine contained increased levels of oleic acid instead of linoleic acid. The fraction of lipids covalently bound to corneocyte proteins was distinctly lower in ROC compared to human skin, in agreement with the results from DSC. ROC underwent a lipid lamellar order to disorder transition (T2) at a slightly lower temperature (68 degrees C) than human skin (74 degrees C). These differences in stratum corneum lipid composition and the thermal phase transitions may explain the minor differences previously observed in drug permeation between ROC and human skin.

  2. Intact capture of hypervelocity particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsou, P.; Brownlee, D. E.; Albee, A. L.

    1986-01-01

    Knowledge of the phase, structure, and crystallography of cosmic particles, as well as their elemental and isotopic compositions, would be very valuable information toward understanding the nature of our solar system. This information can be obtained from the intact capture of large mineral grains of cosmic particles from hypervelocity impacts. Hypervelocity experiments of intact capture in underdense media have indicated realistic potential in this endeaver. The recovery of the thermal blankets and louvers from the Solar Max spacecraft have independently verified this potential in the unintended capture of cosmic materials from hypervelocity impacts. Passive underdense media will permit relatively simple and inexpensive missions to capture cosmic particles intact, either by going to a planetary body or by waiting for the particles to come to the Shuttle or the Space Station. Experiments to explore the potential of using various underdense media for an intact comet sample capture up to 6.7 km/s were performed at NASA Ames Research Center Vertical Gun Range. Explorative hypervelocity experiments up to 7.9 km/s were also made at the Ernst Mach Institute. These experiments have proven that capturing intact particles at hypervelocity impacts is definitely possible. Further research is being conducted to achieve higher capture ratios at even higher hypervelocities for even smaller projectiles.

  3. Intact capture of hypervelocity particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsou, P.; Brownlee, D. E.; Albee, A. L.

    Knowledge of the phase, structure, and crystallography of cosmic particles, as well as their elemental and isotopic compositions, would be very valuable information toward understanding the nature of our solar system. This information can be obtained from the intact capture of large mineral grains of cosmic particles from hypervelocity impacts. Hypervelocity experiments of intact capture in underdense media have indicated realistic potential in this endeaver. The recovery of the thermal blankets and louvers from the Solar Max spacecraft have independently verified this potential in the unintended capture of cosmic materials from hypervelocity impacts. Passive underdense media will permit relatively simple and inexpensive missions to capture cosmic particles intact, either by going to a planetary body or by waiting for the particles to come to the Shuttle or the Space Station. Experiments to explore the potential of using various underdense media for an intact comet sample capture up to 6.7 km/s were performed at NASA Ames Research Center Vertical Gun Range. Explorative hypervelocity experiments up to 7.9 km/s were also made at the Ernst Mach Institute. These experiments have proven that capturing intact particles at hypervelocity impacts is definitely possible. Further research is being conducted to achieve higher capture ratios at even higher hypervelocities for even smaller projectiles.

  4. Human extrahepatic cytochromes P450: function in xenobiotic metabolism and tissue-selective chemical toxicity in the respiratory and gastrointestinal tracts.

    PubMed

    Ding, Xinxin; Kaminsky, Laurence S

    2003-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes in extrahepatic tissues often play a dominant role in target tissue metabolic activation of xenobiotic compounds. They may also determine drug efficacy and influence the tissue burden of foreign chemicals or bioavailability of therapeutic agents. This review focuses on xenobiotic-metabolizing CYPs of the human respiratory and gastrointestinal tracts, including the lung, trachea, nasal respiratory and olfactory mucosa, esophagus, stomach, small intestine, and colon. Many CYPs are expressed in one or more of these organs, including CYP1A1, CYP1A2, CYP1B1, CYP2A6, CYP2A13, CYP2B6, CYP2C8, CYP2C9, CYP2C18, CYP2C19, CYP2D6, CYP2E1, CYP2F1, CYP2J2, CYP2S1, CYP3A4, CYP3A5, and CYP4B1. Of particular interest are the preferential expression of certain CYPs in the respiratory tract and the regional differences in CYP expression profile in different parts of the gastrointestinal tract. Current research activities on the characterization of CYP expression, function, and regulation in these tissues, as well as future research needs, are discussed.

  5. Intact capture of cosmic dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsou, P.

    1991-01-01

    The focus of this development effort is to capture dust particles at hypervelocities intact and unmelted in order to preserve volatile organics. At the same time, the capture process must minimize any organic elemental or compound contamination to prevent any compromise of exobiological analyses. Inorganic silicate aerogel has been developed as a successful capture medium to satisfy both requirements of intact capture and minimal organic contamination. Up to 6 km/s, silicate projectiles from a few microns up to 100 microns have been captured intact without any melting and with minimal loss of mass. Carbon in silicate aerogel can be reduced to less than 1 part in 1000 and hydrogen 3 parts in 1000 when baked in air. Under controlled inert gas environments, additional hydrocarbon reduction can be achieved.

  6. Selective inhibition of COX-2 in humans is associated with less gastrointestinal injury: a comparison of nimesulide and naproxen

    PubMed Central

    Shah, A; Thjodleifsson, B; Murray, F; Kay, E; Barry, M; Sigthorsson, G; Gudjonsson, H; Oddsson, E; Price, A; Fitzgerald, D; Bjarnason, I

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Selective inhibitors of cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 may provoke less gastric damage and platelet inhibition than conventional non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs.
AIMS—We compared the biochemical and gastrointestinal effects of nimesulide, a potent and selective COX-2 inhibitor, with naproxen which exhibits no selectivity.
SUBJECTS—Thirty six healthy volunteers were randomised to nimesulide 100 mg or naproxen 500 mg twice daily for two weeks in a double blind, crossover study with a washout between treatments.
METHODS—Gastrointestinal side effects were assessed by endoscopy, and by estimation of small intestinal absorption-permeability and inflammation. Comparisons were made between variables at the end of each treatment phase.
RESULTS—Nimesulide caused significantly less gastric injury using the modified Lanza score (p<0.001) as well as reduced duodenum injury (p=0.039). Nimesulide had lower visual analogue scores (VAS) for haemorrhage and erosive lesions in the stomach (p<0.001) and for mucosal injection in the duodenum (p=0.039). Naproxen increased excretion of calprotectin, a marker of intestinal inflammation (5.5 (1.2) to 12.1 (2.1) mg/l) while nimesulide had no effect (treatment difference p=0.03). Naproxen abolished platelet aggregation to arachidonic acid and suppressed serum thromboxane B2 (TXB2) by 98%, indices of COX-1 activity. In contrast, nimesulide had no significant effect on platelet aggregation, although it reduced serum TXB2 by 29%. Production of prostaglandin E2 and prostacyclin by gastric biopsies, also COX-1 dependent, was inhibited by naproxen, but not by nimesulide. COX-2 activity, determined as endotoxin induced prostaglandin E2 formation in plasma, was markedly suppressed by both treatments.
INTERPRETATION—Nimesulide has preferential selectivity for COX-2 over COX-1 in vivo at full therapeutic doses and induces less gastrointestinal damage than that seen with naproxen in the short term

  7. Interleukin-1 receptor antagonist delivered directly and by gene therapy inhibits matrix degradation in the intact degenerate human intervertebral disc: an in situ zymographic and gene therapy study

    PubMed Central

    Le Maitre, Christine L; Hoyland, Judith A; Freemont, Anthony J

    2007-01-01

    Data implicate IL-1 in the altered matrix biology that characterizes human intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration. In the current study we investigated the enzymic mechanism by which IL-1 induces matrix degradation in degeneration of the human IVD, and whether the IL-1 inhibitor IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra) will inhibit degradation. A combination of in situ zymography (ISZ) and immunohistochemistry was used to examine the effects of IL-1 and IL-1Ra on matrix degradation and metal-dependent protease (MDP) expression in explants of non-degenerate and degenerate human IVDs. ISZ employed three substrates (gelatin, collagen, casein) and different challenges (IL-1β, IL-1Ra and enzyme inhibitors). Immunohistochemistry was undertaken for MDPs. In addition, IL-1Ra was introduced into degenerate IVD explants using genetically engineered constructs. The novel findings from this study are: IL-1Ra delivered directly onto explants of degenerate IVDs eliminates matrix degradation as assessed by multi-substrate ISZ; there is a direct relationship between matrix degradation assessed by ISZ and MDP expression defined by immunohistochemistry; single injections of IVD cells engineered to over-express IL-1Ra significantly inhibit MDP expression for two weeks. Our findings show that IL-1 is a key cytokine driving matrix degradation in the degenerate IVD. Furthermore, IL-1Ra delivered directly or by gene therapy inhibits IVD matrix degradation. IL-1Ra could be used therapeutically to inhibit degeneration of the IVD. PMID:17760968

  8. Impulsive actions and choices in laboratory animals and humans: effects of high vs. low dopamine states produced by systemic treatments given to neurologically intact subjects

    PubMed Central

    D’Amour-Horvat, Valérie; Leyton, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Increases and decreases in dopamine (DA) transmission have both been suggested to influence reward-related impulse-control. The present literature review suggests that, in laboratory animals, the systemic administration of DA augmenters preferentially increases susceptibility to premature responding; with continued DA transmission, reward approach behaviors are sustained. Decreases in DA transmission, in comparison, diminish the appeal of distal and difficult to obtain rewards, thereby increasing susceptibility to temporal discounting and other forms of impulsive choice. The evidence available in humans is not incompatible with this model but is less extensive. PMID:25566001

  9. Effects of Buscopan on human gastrointestinal smooth muscle activity in an ex vivo model: Are there any differences for various sections?

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Song, Jun; Bai, Tao; Lu, Xiaoming; Yang, Guanghai; Qian, Wei; Wang, Ruiyun; Hou, Xiaohua

    2016-06-05

    Hyoscine butylbromide (Buscopan ®) is clinically used as an anticholinergic antispasmodic for the treatment of abdominal cramping or visceral pain associated with cramps. However, the spasmolytic efficacy on contractile activity of human gastrointestinal smooth muscle from various sections remains unclear. We aimed to investigate the potentially selective actions of Buscopan on different bowel segments, as well as muscular layers and contractile states. Human smooth muscle tissues of the esophagus, gastric corpus and antrum, jejunum, ileum and colon were obtained. Isometric measurements of circular and longitudinal muscle strips were performed to determine effects of Buscopan on spontaneous activity and induced-contractions by 30mM KCl, 10μM bethanechol and electrical field stimulation (EFS). Buscopan concentration-dependently (10(-9)-10(-5)M) inhibited smooth muscle activity, particularly in spasticity evoked by bethanechol and EFS but not high K(+). The inhibiting effects were mainly responsible for the antagonism on muscarinic M2 and M3 receptors (IC50 values: 3.1×10(-5)M vs. 0.9×10(-5)M). The sensitivity toward Buscopan revealed a tendency of increasing from the esophagus, gastric corpus and antrum to the colon, jejunum and ileum. There was a reversed gradient of mRNA and protein expression of muscarinic M2 and M3 receptors from the blocking effects of Buscopan, which could be ascribed to the fact that a higher concentration of Buscopan was needed to antagonize the spastic contraction to reach the equipotent inhibitory rate in the region with higher muscarinic receptor activity. The findings of different inhibitory effectiveness on various parts of the gastrointestinal tract provide a potential guideline for the clinical application.

  10. Multijunction Capillary Isoelectric Focusing Device Combined with Online Membrane-Assisted Buffer Exchanger Enables Isoelectric Point Fractionation of Intact Human Plasma Proteins for Biomarker Discovery.

    PubMed

    Pirmoradian, Mohammad; Astorga-Wells, Juan; Zubarev, Roman A

    2015-12-01

    Prefractionation of proteins is often employed to improve analysis specificity in proteomics. Prefractionation based on the isoelectric point (pI) is particularly attractive because pI is a well-defined parameter and it is orthogonal to hydrophobicity on which reversed-phase chromatography is based. However, direct capillary electrophoresis of blood proteins is challenging due to its high content of salts and charged small molecules. Here, we couple an online desalinator device to our multijunction capillary isoelectric focusing (MJ-CIEF) instrument and perform direct isoelectric separation of human blood plasma. In a proof-of-principle experiment, pooled samples of patients with progressive mild cognitive impairment and corresponding healthy controls were investigated. Injection of 3 μL of plasma containing over 100 μg of proteins into the desalinator was followed by pI fractionation with MJ-CIEF in less than 1 h. Shotgun proteomics of 12 collected fractions from each of the 5 replicates of pooled samples resulted in the identification and accurate quantification (median CV between the replicates is <4%) of nearly 365 protein groups from 4030 unique peptides (with <1% FDR for both peptides and proteins). The obtained results include several proteins previously reported as AD markers. The isoelectric point of each quantified protein was calculated using a set of 7 synthetic peptides spiked into the samples. Several proteins with a significant pI shift between their isoforms in the patient and control samples were identified. The presented method is straightforward, robust, and scalable; therefore, it can be used in both biological and clinical applications.

  11. Extensive T-Cell Epitope Repertoire Sharing among Human Proteome, Gastrointestinal Microbiome, and Pathogenic Bacteria: Implications for the Definition of Self.

    PubMed

    Bremel, Robert D; Homan, E Jane

    2015-01-01

    T-cell receptor binding to MHC-bound peptides plays a key role in discrimination between self and non-self. Only a subset, typically a pentamer, of amino acids in a MHC-bound peptide form the motif exposed to the T-cell receptor. We categorize and compare the T-cell exposed amino acid motif repertoire of the total proteomes of two groups of bacteria, comprising pathogens and gastrointestinal microbiome organisms, with the human proteome and immunoglobulins. Given the maximum 20(5), or 3.2 million of such motifs that bind T-cell receptors, there is considerable overlap in motif usage. We show that the human proteome, exclusive of immunoglobulins, only comprises three quarters of the possible motifs, of which 65.3% are also present in both composite bacterial proteomes. Very few motifs are unique to the human proteome. Immunoglobulin variable regions carry a broad diversity of T-cell exposed motifs (TCEMs) that provides a stratified random sample of the motifs found in pathogens, microbiome, and the human proteome. Individual bacterial genera and species vary in the content of immunoglobulin and human proteome matched motifs that they carry. Mycobacteria and Burkholderia spp carry a particularly high content of such matched motifs. Some bacteria retain a unique motif signature and motif sharing pattern with the human proteome. The implication is that distinguishing self from non-self does not depend on individual TCEMs, but on a complex and dynamic overlay of signals wherein the same TCEM may play different roles in different organisms, and the frequency with which a particular TCEM appears influences its effect. The patterns observed provide clues to bacterial immune evasion and to strategies for intervention, including vaccine design. The breadth and distinct frequency patterns of the immunoglobulin-derived peptides suggest a role of immunoglobulins in maintaining a broadly responsive T-cell repertoire.

  12. Measuring the nausea-to-emesis continuum in non-human animals: Refocusing on gastrointestinal vagal signaling

    PubMed Central

    Horn, Charles C.

    2014-01-01

    Nausea and vomiting are ubiquitous as drug side effects and symptoms of disease; however, the systems that determine these responses are arguably designed for protection against food poisoning occurring at the level of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. This basic biological pathway using GI vagal afferent communication to the brain is not well understood. Part of this lack of insight appears to be related to current experimental approaches, such as the use of experimental drugs, including systemic chemotherapy and brain penetrant agents, which activate parts of the nausea and vomiting system in potentially unnatural ways. Directly related to this issue is our ability to understand the link between nausea and vomiting, which are sometimes argued to be completely separate processes, with nausea as an unmeasurable response in animal models. An argument is made that nausea and emesis are the efferent limbs of a unified sensory input from the GI tract that is likely to be impossible to understand without more specific animal electrophysiological experimentation of vagal afferent signaling. The current paper provides a review on the use of animal models and approaches to define the biological systems for nausea and emesis and presents a potentially testable theory on how these systems work in combination. PMID:24862507

  13. The human gastrointestinal tract and oral microbiota in inflammatory bowel disease: a state of the science review.

    PubMed

    Lucas López, Rosario; Grande Burgos, María José; Gálvez, Antonio; Pérez Pulido, Rubén

    2017-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) includes a spectrum of diseases from ulcerative colitis (UC) to Crohn's disease (CD). Many studies have addressed the changes in the microbiota of individuals affected by UC and CD. A decrease in biodiversity and depletion of the phyla Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes has been reported, among others. Changes in microbial composition also result in changes in the metabolites generated in the gut from microbial activity that may involve the amount of butyrate and other metabolites such as H2 S being produced. Other factors such as diet, age, or medication need to be taken into consideration when studying dysbiosis associated with IBD. Diverse bacterial species have been associated specifically or non-specifically to IBD, but none of them have been demonstrated to be its ethiological agent. Recent studies also suggest that micro-eukaryotic populations may also be altered in IBD patients. Last, but not least, viruses, and specially bacteriophages, can play a role in controlling microbial populations in the gastrointestinal tract. This may affect both bacterial diversity and metabolism, but possible implications for IBD still remain to be solved. Dysbiosis in the oral microbiome associated with IBD remains an emerging field for future research.

  14. In-situ visualization and evaluation of neoplastic lesions of the human gastrointestinal tract using endoscopic optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rollins, Andrew M.; Westphal, Volker; Das, Ananya; Pfau, Patrick; Chak, Amitabh; Wong, Richard C. K.; Sivak, Michael J., Jr.; Izatt, Joseph A.

    2001-06-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a novel biomedical imaging technique that uses low-coherence optical interferometry to obtain micron-scale resolution cross- sectional images of tissue microstructure noninvasively. OCT fills a valuable niche in imaging of tissue structure, providing subsurface imaging with high spatial resolution (on the order of 10 micrometers) and penetration depths of 1 - 2 mm with no contact or matching medium needed between the probe and the tissue. An OCT system for gastrointestinal (GI) endoscopy has been developed using a small-diameter rotary-scanning probe compatible with standard GI endoscopes and capable of imaging in real-time. To date more than 100 volunteers have been imaged during routine upper and lower endoscopic procedures. Results of imaging in normal organs have demonstrated visualization of morphological layers (epithelium, lamina propria, muscularis mucosa, submucosa, muscularis propria) and microscopic structures (glands, villi, crypts, vessels) in all endoscopically accessible GI organs. It has been observed in more than 30 patients that the EOCT appearance of Barrett's mucosa is clearly differentiable from normal gastric or esophageal mucosa. Furthermore, the EOCT appearance of dysplasia and neoplastic lesions, including adenocarcenoma in Barrett's and villous tumor in colon have been observed and are under investigation. Preliminary data indicate the potential of EOCT for routine clinical diagnostics in GI tissues, including early cancer detection and staging and detection of tumor margins.

  15. Encapsulation of probiotic Bifidobacterium longum BIOMA 5920 with alginate-human-like collagen and evaluation of survival in simulated gastrointestinal conditions.

    PubMed

    Su, Ran; Zhu, Xiao-Li; Fan, Dai-Di; Mi, Yu; Yang, Chan-Yuan; Jia, Xin

    2011-12-01

    Alginate (ALg)-human-like collagen (HLC) microspheres were prepared by the technology of electrostatic droplet generation in order to develop a biocompatible vehicle for probiotic bacteria. Microparticles were spherical with mean particle size of 400μm. The encapsulation efficiency (EE) of ALg-HLC microspheres could reach 92-99.2%. Water-soluble and fibrous human-like collagen is combined with sodium alginate through intermolecular hydrogen bonding and electrostatic force which were investigated by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), thus the matrix of ALg-HLC was very stable. Bifidobacterium longum BIOMA 5920, as a kind of probiotic bacteria, was encapsulated with alginate-human-like collagen to survive and function in simulated gastrointestinal juice. Microparticles were very easy to degradation in simulated intestinal juices. After incubation in simulated gastric (pH 2.0, 2h), the encapsulated B. longum BIOMA 5920 numbers were 4.81 ± 0.38 log cfu/g.

  16. Homogeneous human complex-type oligosaccharides in correctly folded intact glycoproteins: evaluation of oligosaccharide influence on protein folding, stability, and conformational properties.

    PubMed

    Kajihara, Yasuhiro; Tanabe, Yasutaka; Sasaoka, Shun; Okamoto, Ryo

    2012-05-07

    The N-glycosylation of proteins is generated at the consensus sequence NXS/T (where X is any amino acid except proline) by the biosynthetic process, and occurs in the endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi apparatus. In order to investigate the influence of human complex-type oligosaccharides on counterpart protein conformation, crambin and ovomucoide, which consist of 46 and 56 amino acid residues, respectively, were selected for synthesis of model glycoproteins. These small glycoproteins were intentionally designed to be glycosylated at the α-helix (crambin: 8 position), β-sheet (crambin: 2 position) and loop position between the antiparallel β-sheets (ovomucoide: 28 position), and were synthesized by using a peptide-segment coupling strategy. After preparation of these glycosylated polypeptide chains, protein folding experiments were performed under redox conditions by using cysteine-cystine. Although the small glycoproteins bearing intentional glycosylation at the α-helix and β-sheet exhibited a suitable folding process, glycosylation at the loop position between the antiparallel β-strands caused multiple products. The conformational differences in the isolated homogeneous glycoproteins compared with non-glycosylated counterparts were evaluated by circular dichroism (CD) and NMR spectroscopy. These analyses suggested that this intentional N-glycosylation did not result in large conformational changes in the purified protein structures, including the case of glycosylation at the loop position between the antiparallel β-strands. In addition to these experiments, the conformational properties of three glycoproteins were evaluated by CD spectroscopy under different temperatures. The oligosaccharides on the protein surface fluctuated considerably; this was dependent on the increase in the solution temperature and was thought to disrupt the protein tertiary structure. Based on the measurement of the CD spectra, however, the glycoproteins bearing three disulfide

  17. Human serum albumin homeostasis: a new look at the roles of synthesis, catabolism, renal and gastrointestinal excretion, and the clinical value of serum albumin measurements

    PubMed Central

    Levitt, David G; Levitt, Michael D

    2016-01-01

    Serum albumin concentration (CP) is a remarkably strong prognostic indicator of morbidity and mortality in both sick and seemingly healthy subjects. Surprisingly, the specifics of the pathophysiology underlying the relationship between CP and ill-health are poorly understood. This review provides a summary that is not previously available in the literature, concerning how synthesis, catabolism, and renal and gastrointestinal clearance of albumin interact to bring about albumin homeostasis, with a focus on the clinical factors that influence this homeostasis. In normal humans, the albumin turnover time of about 25 days reflects a liver albumin synthesis rate of about 10.5 g/day balanced by renal (≈6%), gastrointestinal (≈10%), and catabolic (≈84%) clearances. The acute development of hypoalbuminemia with sepsis or trauma results from increased albumin capillary permeability leading to redistribution of albumin from the vascular to interstitial space. The best understood mechanism of chronic hypoalbuminemia is the decreased albumin synthesis observed in liver disease. Decreased albumin production also accounts for hypoalbuminemia observed with a low-protein and normal caloric diet. However, a calorie- and protein-deficient diet does not reduce albumin synthesis and is not associated with hypoalbuminemia, and CP is not a useful marker of malnutrition. In most disease states other than liver disease, albumin synthesis is normal or increased, and hypoalbuminemia reflects an enhanced rate of albumin turnover resulting either from an increased rate of catabolism (a poorly understood phenomenon) or enhanced loss of albumin into the urine (nephrosis) or intestine (protein-losing enteropathy). The latter may occur with subtle intestinal pathology and hence may be more prevalent than commonly appreciated. Clinically, reduced CP appears to be a result rather than a cause of ill-health, and therapy designed to increase CP has limited benefit. The ubiquitous occurrence of

  18. Monitoring Intact Viruses Using Aptamers.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Penmetcha K R

    2016-08-04

    Viral diagnosis and surveillance are necessary steps in containing the spread of viral diseases, and they help in the deployment of appropriate therapeutic interventions. In the past, the commonly employed viral detection methods were either cell-culture or molecule-level assays. Most of these assays are laborious and expensive, require special facilities, and provide a slow diagnosis. To circumvent these limitations, biosensor-based approaches are becoming attractive, especially after the successful commercialization of glucose and other biosensors. In the present article, I have reviewed the current progress using the biosensor approach for detecting intact viruses. At the time of writing this review, three types of bioreceptor surfaces (antibody-, glycan-, and aptamer-based) have been explored on different sensing platforms for detecting intact viruses. Among these bioreceptors, aptamer-based sensors have been increasingly explored for detecting intact viruses using surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and other platforms. Special emphasis is placed on the aptamer-based SPR platform in the present review.

  19. Monitoring Intact Viruses Using Aptamers

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Penmetcha K. R.

    2016-01-01

    Viral diagnosis and surveillance are necessary steps in containing the spread of viral diseases, and they help in the deployment of appropriate therapeutic interventions. In the past, the commonly employed viral detection methods were either cell-culture or molecule-level assays. Most of these assays are laborious and expensive, require special facilities, and provide a slow diagnosis. To circumvent these limitations, biosensor-based approaches are becoming attractive, especially after the successful commercialization of glucose and other biosensors. In the present article, I have reviewed the current progress using the biosensor approach for detecting intact viruses. At the time of writing this review, three types of bioreceptor surfaces (antibody-, glycan-, and aptamer-based) have been explored on different sensing platforms for detecting intact viruses. Among these bioreceptors, aptamer-based sensors have been increasingly explored for detecting intact viruses using surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and other platforms. Special emphasis is placed on the aptamer-based SPR platform in the present review. PMID:27527230

  20. Stages of Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... carcinoid tumor is cancer that forms in the lining of the gastrointestinal tract. The gastrointestinal (GI) tract ... Rectum . Enlarge Gastrointestinal carcinoid tumors form in the lining of the gastrointestinal tract, most often in the ...

  1. Zinc and gastrointestinal disease

    PubMed Central

    Skrovanek, Sonja; DiGuilio, Katherine; Bailey, Robert; Huntington, William; Urbas, Ryan; Mayilvaganan, Barani; Mercogliano, Giancarlo; Mullin, James M

    2014-01-01

    This review is a current summary of the role that both zinc deficiency and zinc supplementation can play in the etiology and therapy of a wide range of gastrointestinal diseases. The recent literature describing zinc action on gastrointestinal epithelial tight junctions and epithelial barrier function is described. Zinc enhancement of gastrointestinal epithelial barrier function may figure prominently in its potential therapeutic action in several gastrointestinal diseases. PMID:25400994

  2. Production of human metabolites by gastrointestinal bacteria as a potential source of post-mortem alteration of antemortem drug/metabolite concentrations.

    PubMed

    Martindale, Stephanie M; Powers, Robert H; Bell, Suzanne C

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that bacterial species are capable of transforming complex chemical substances. Several of these species, native to the human gastrointestinal tract, are active in postmortem decomposition. They have potential to cause biotransformations affecting compound-to-metabolite ratios within the human body, especially after death. Investigation of postmortem effects could supply valuable information, especially concerning compound identification and confirmation. The purpose of this research was to investigate the effects of Escherichia coli, Bacteroides fragilis, and Clostridium perfringens on diazepam and flunitrazepam in Reinforced Clostridial Medium, and to compare bacterial biotransformation products to those of human metabolism. A decrease in diazepam concentration between pre- and post-incubation was observed for samples inoculated with Escherichia coli (14.7-20.2%) as well as Bacteroides fragilis (13.9-25.7%); however there was no corresponding increase in concentration for the monitored human metabolites. Flunitrazepam demonstrated a greater concentration loss when incubated with individual bacterial species as well as mixed culture (79.2-100.0%). Samples incubated with Bacteroides fragilis, Clostridium perfringens, and mixed culture resulted in nearly complete conversion of flunitrazepam. Increased 7-aminoflunitrazepam concentrations accounted for the majority of the conversion; however discrepancies in the mass balance of the reaction suggested the possibility of a minor metabolite that was not monitored in the current analysis. These experiments served as a pilot study and proof of concept that can be adapted and applied to a realm of possibilities. Ultimately, this methodology would be ideal to study compounds that are too toxic or lethal for animal and human metabolic investigations.

  3. The visualisation and quantification of human gastrointestinal fat distribution with MRI: a randomised study in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dian; Parker, Helen L; Curcic, Jelena; Schwizer, Werner; Fried, Michael; Kozerke, Sebastian; Steingoetter, Andreas

    2016-03-14

    We aimed to study the fate of fat during digestion. For this purpose, we validated and investigated the non-invasive quantification of gastric and duodenal fat emptying and emulsion processing (creaming and phase separation) using the MRI method iterative decomposition with echo asymmetry and least squares estimation (IDEAL). In total, twelve healthy subjects were studied on two separate visits in a single-blind, randomised, cross-over design study. IDEAL was utilised to repeatedly acquire quantitative fat fraction maps of the gastrointestinal tract after infusion of one of two fat emulsions: E1 (acid stable, droplet size 0·33 mm) and E4 (acid unstable, 0·38 mm). In vitro and in vivo validation was carried out using diluted emulsion and gastric content samples, respectively, and resulted in Lin's concordance correlation coefficients of 1·00 (95% CI 0·98, 1·00) and 0·91 (95% CI 0·87, 0·94), respectively. Fat fraction maps and intragastric emulsion profiles enabled the identification of features of intraluminal phase separation and creaming that were not visible in conventional MRI. Gastric fat emptying was faster for E4 compared with E1 with a difference of 2·5 (95% CI 1·9, 3·1) ml/h. Duodenal content volumes were larger for E1 than for E4 with a difference of 4·9 (95% CI 3·9, 8·5) ml. This study demonstrated that with IDEAL it was possible (1) to visualise the intragastric and duodenal fat distribution and (2) to quantify the differences in emptying, phase separation and creaming of an acid-stable and an acid-unstable emulsion. This method has potential to bridge the gap between current in vitro digestive models and in vivo behaviour and to be applied in the development of effective functional foods.

  4. Fulminant Cryptosporidiosis after Near-Drowning: a Human Cryptosporidium parvum Strain Implicated in Invasive Gastrointestinal Adenocarcinoma and Cholangiocarcinoma in an Experimental Model

    PubMed Central

    Benamrouz, Sadia; Guyot, Karine; Mouray, Anthony; Chassat, Thierry; Flament, Nicolas; Delhaes, Laurence; Coiteux, Valerie; Delaire, Baptiste; Praet, Marleen; Cuvelier, Claude; Gosset, Pierre; Dei-Cas, Eduardo; Creusy, Colette

    2012-01-01

    In the present work, we report the characterization of a Cryptosporidium parvum strain isolated from a patient who nearly drowned in the Deule River (Lille, France) after being discharged from the hospital where he had undergone allogeneic stem cell transplantation. After being rescued and readmitted to the hospital, he developed fulminant cryptosporidiosis. The strain isolated from the patient's stools was identified as C. parvum II2A15G2R1 (subtype linked to zoonotic exposure) and inoculated into SCID mice. In this host, this virulent C. parvum isolate induced not only severe infection but also invasive gastrointestinal and biliary adenocarcinoma. The observation of adenocarcinomas that progressed through all layers of the digestive tract to the subserosa and spread via blood vessels confirmed the invasive nature of the neoplastic process. These results indicate for the first time that a human-derived C. parvum isolate is able to induce digestive cancer. This study is of special interest considering the exposure of a large number of humans and animals to this waterborne protozoan, which is highly tumorigenic when inoculated in a rodent model. PMID:22247151

  5. Consumption of transgenic cows' milk containing human lactoferrin results in beneficial changes in the gastrointestinal tract and systemic health of young pigs.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Caitlin A; Nelson, Kathryn M; Maga, Elizabeth A; Murray, James D

    2013-06-01

    Lactoferrin is an antimicrobial and immunomodulatory protein that is produced in high quantities in human milk and aids in the gastrointestinal (GI) maturation of infants. Beneficial health effects have been observed when supplementing human and animal diets with lactoferrin. A herd of genetically engineered cattle that secrete recombinant human lactoferrin in their milk (rhLF-milk) have been generated which provide an efficient production system and ideal medium for rhLF consumption. The effects of consumption of rhLF-milk were tested on young pigs as an animal model for the GI tract of children. When comparing rhLF-milk fed pigs to non-transgenic milk fed pigs (control), we observed that rhLF-milk fed pigs had beneficial changes in circulating leukocyte populations. There was a significant decrease in neutrophils (p = 0.0036) and increase in lymphocytes (p = 0.0017), leading to a decreased neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio (NLR) (p = 0.0153), which is an indicator of decreased systemic inflammation. We also observed changes in intestinal villi architecture. In the duodenum, rhLF-milk fed pigs tended to have taller villi (p = 0.0914) with significantly deeper crypts (p < 0.0001). In the ileum, pigs consuming rhLF-milk had villi that were significantly taller (p = 0.0002), with deeper crypts (p < 0.0001), and a thinner lamina propria (p = 0.0056). We observed no differences in cytokine expression between rhLF-milk and control-milk fed pigs, indicating that consumption of rhLF-milk did not change cytokine signaling in the intestines. Overall favorable changes in systemic health and GI villi architecture were observed; indicating that consumption of rhLF-milk has the potential to induce positive changes in the GI tract.

  6. Prevalence of gastrointestinal symptoms in patients with influenza, clinical significance, and pathophysiology of human influenza viruses in faecal samples: what do we know?

    PubMed

    Minodier, Laetitia; Charrel, Remi N; Ceccaldi, Pierre-Emmanuel; van der Werf, Sylvie; Blanchon, Thierry; Hanslik, Thomas; Falchi, Alessandra

    2015-12-12

    This review provides for the first time an assessment of the current understanding about the occurrence and the clinical significance of gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms in influenza patients, and their correlation with the presence of human influenza viruses in stools of patients with confirmed influenza virus infection. Studies exploring how human influenza viruses spread to the patient's GI tract after a primary respiratory infection have been summarized. We conducted a systematic search of published peer-reviewed literature up to June 2015 with regard to the above-mentioned aspects, focusing on human influenza viruses (A(H1N1), A(H1N1)pdm09, A(H3N2), and B). Forty-four studies were included in this systematic review and meta-analysis. The pooled prevalence of any digestive symptoms ranged from 30.9% (95% CI, 9.8 to 57.5; I(2) = 97.5%) for A(H1N1)pdm09 to 2.8% (95% CI, 0.6 to 6.5; I(2) = 75.4%) for A(H1N1). The pooled prevalence of influenza viruses in stool was 20.6% (95% CI, 8.9 to 35.5; I(2) = 96.8%), but their correlation with GI symptoms has rarely been explored. The presence of viral RNA in stools because of haematogenous dissemination to organs via infected lymphocytes is likely, but the potential to cause direct intestinal infection and faecal-oral transmission warrants further investigation. This review highlights the gaps in our knowledge, and the high degree of uncertainty about the prevalence and significance of GI symptoms in patients with influenza and their correlation with viral RNA positivity in stool because of the high level of heterogeneity among studies.

  7. Bioactive proteins in human milk: mechanisms of action.

    PubMed

    Lönnerdal, Bo

    2010-02-01

    Human milk contains a multitude of bioactive proteins, with very diverse functions. Some of these proteins are involved in the synthesis and expression of milk, but the majority appears to have evolved to provide physiological activities in the breast-fed infant. These activities are exerted by a wide variety of mechanisms and have largely been unraveled by in vitro studies. To be active in the gastrointestinal tract, these proteins must be able to resist proteolytic degradation, at least for some time. We have evaluated the human milk proteins lactoferrin, haptocorrin, alpha(1)-antitrypsin, and transforming growth factor -beta in an in vitro digestion model, mimicking the conditions of the infant gastrointestinal milieu. These bioactive proteins are resistant against proteolysis and can remain intact or as larger fragments through passage of the gastrointestinal tract. In vitro digestibility assays can be helpful to assess which human milk proteins can resist proteolysis and to what extent.

  8. Structural and molecular interrogation of intact biological systems

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Kwanghun; Wallace, Jenelle; Kim, Sung-Yon; Kalyanasundaram, Sandhiya; Andalman, Aaron S.; Davidson, Thomas J.; Mirzabekov, Julie J.; Zalocusky, Kelly A.; Mattis, Joanna; Denisin, Aleksandra K.; Pak, Sally; Bernstein, Hannah; Ramakrishnan, Charu; Grosenick, Logan; Gradinaru, Viviana; Deisseroth, Karl

    2014-01-01

    Obtaining high-resolution information from a complex system, while maintaining the global perspective needed to understand system function, represents a key challenge in biology. Here we address this challenge with a method (termed CLARITY) for the transformation of intact tissue into a nanoporous hydrogel-hybridized form (crosslinked to a three-dimensional network of hydrophilic polymers) that is fully assembled but optically transparent and macromolecule-permeable. Using mouse brains, we show intact-tissue imaging of long-range projections, local circuit wiring, cellular relationships, subcellular structures, protein complexes, nucleic acids and neurotransmitters. CLARITY also enables intact-tissue in situ hybridization, immunohistochemistry with multiple rounds of staining and de-staining in non-sectioned tissue, and antibody labelling throughout the intact adult mouse brain. Finally, we show that CLARITY enables fine structural analysis of clinical samples, including non-sectioned human tissue from a neuropsychiatric-disease setting, establishing a path for the transmutation of human tissue into a stable, intact and accessible form suitable for probing structural and molecular underpinnings of physiological function and disease. PMID:23575631

  9. Anti-inflammatory properties of fruit juices enriched with pine bark extract in an in vitro model of inflamed human intestinal epithelium: the effect of gastrointestinal digestion.

    PubMed

    Frontela-Saseta, Carmen; López-Nicolás, Rubén; González-Bermúdez, Carlos A; Martínez-Graciá, Carmen; Ros-Berruezo, Gaspar

    2013-03-01

    Enrichment of fruit juices with pine bark extract (PBE) could be a strategy to compensate for phenolic losses during the gastrointestinal digestion. A coculture system with Caco-2 cells and RAW 264.7 macrophages was established as an in vitro model of inflamed human intestinal epithelium for evaluating the anti-inflammatory capacity of fruit juices enriched with PBE (0.5 g L(-1)) before and after in vitro digestion. The digestion of both PBE-enriched pineapple and red fruit juice led to significant changes in most of the analysed phenolic compounds. The in vitro inflammatory state showed cell barrier dysfunction and overproduction of IL-8, nitric oxide (NO) and reactive oxygen species (ROS). In the inflamed cells, incubation with nondigested samples reduced (P<0.05) the production of IL-8 and NO compared with digested samples. ROS production increased in the inflamed cells exposed to digested commercial red fruit juice (86.8±1.3%) compared with fresh juice (77.4±0.8%) and increased in the inflamed cells exposed to digested enriched red fruit juice (82.6±1.6%) compared with the fresh enriched juice (55.8±6%). The anti-inflammatory properties of PBE-enriched fruit juices decreased after digestion; further research on the bioavailability of the assayed compounds is needed to properly assess their usefulness for the treatment of gut inflammation.

  10. Probiotic yogurt consumption may improve gastrointestinal symptoms, productivity, and nutritional intake of people living with human immunodeficiency virus in Mwanza, Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Irvine, Stephanie L; Hummelen, Ruben; Hekmat, Sharareh

    2011-12-01

    The gut-associated lymphoid tissue is a major site of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) activity and significantly influences disease prognosis. Reducing immune activation due to gastroenteritis may thus help slow disease progression. Probiotic microorganisms have considerable immunomodulatory effects at the level of the gut-associated lymphoid tissue. A probiotic yogurt initiative was thus established in Mwanza, Tanzania, to improve gastrointestinal (GI) integrity and reduce the incidence and severity of opportunistic infections among people with HIV. The research objective was to retrospectively evaluate the effects of yogurt supplemented with Lactobacillus rhamnosus as an adjunct to the diet of people living with HIV on systemic and GI symptoms, daily routine activities, and nutritional intake. Eighty-five people with HIV consuming probiotic yogurt and 86 controls were interviewed. Demographics and HIV disease stage were comparable between groups. Probiotic yogurt consumers reported an ability to work a median of 2 hours more daily (P = .01), experienced a lower fever incidence (P = .01), and were more likely to achieve daily nutrient requirements for vitamin A, several B complex vitamins, and calcium (P = .02). Antiretroviral users experienced less drug-induced stomach pain (P = .02) and a lower overall impact of GI symptoms on routine activities (P = .03). The results of this study need be further substantiated because of limits imposed by the observational, retrospective study design; however, results suggest that yogurt supplemented with L rhamnosus may effectively alleviate GI symptoms and improve productivity, nutritional intake, and tolerance to antiretroviral treatment among people with HIV in Mwanza.

  11. HDM-PAMPA to predict gastrointestinal absorption, binding percentage, equilibrium and kinetics constants with human serum albumin and using 2 end-point measurements.

    PubMed

    Bujard, Alban; Petit, Charlotte; Carrupt, Pierre-Alain; Rudaz, Serge; Schappler, Julie

    2017-01-15

    The parallel artificial membrane permeability assay (PAMPA) is a high-throughput screening (HTS) technique developed to predict passive permeability through numerous different biological membranes, such as the gastrointestinal tract (GIT), the blood brain barrier (BBB), and the dermal layer. PAMPA is based on an artificial membrane, such as hexadecane (HDM), which separates two compartments (i.e., a donor and an acceptor compartment). In the present study, an HDM-PAMPA method was developed with human serum albumin (HSA) under iso-pH and gradient-pH conditions to predict the percentage of binding, dissociation/association constants (Kd and Ka, respectively) and dissociation/association kinetic rates (koff and kon, respectively) between a given drug and HSA. Thanks to the kinetic properties of PAMPA, a two end-point assay was implemented to obtain all three properties. The assay was used to measure basic, acidic, and amphoteric compounds. The protein was free in solution, allowing a direct comparison between this assay and equilibrium dialysis (ED). The developed PAMPA enabled screening of up to 96 compounds in a single run, generating valuable information on absorption and distribution in a high-throughput and high-repeatable manner.

  12. Mucoadhesion and the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Varum, Felipe J O; McConnell, Emma L; Sousa, Joao J S; Veiga, Francisco; Basit, Abdul W

    2008-01-01

    The concept of mucoadhesion is one that has the potential to improve the highly variable residence times experienced by drugs and dosage forms at various sites in the gastrointestinal tract, and consequently, to reduce variability and improve efficacy. Intimate contact with the mucosa should enhance absorption or improve topical therapy. A variety of approaches have been investigated for mucoadhesion in the gastrointestinal tract, particularly for the stomach and small intestine. Despite interesting results in these sites, mucoadhesive approaches have not yet shown success in humans. The potential of the lower gut for these applications has been largely neglected, although the large intestine in particular may benefit, and the colon has several factors that suggest mucoadhesion could be successful there, including lower motility and the possibility of a lower mucus turnover and thicker mucus layer. In vitro studies on colonic mucoadhesion show promise, and rectal administration has shown some positive results in vivo. This review considers the background to mucoadhesion with respect to the physiological conditions of the gastrointestinal tract as well as the principles that underlie this concept. Mucoadhesive approaches to gastrointestinal drug delivery will be examined, with particular attention given to the lower gut.

  13. Genetically-Encoded Photocrosslinkers Determine the Biological Binding Site of Exendin-4 in the N-Terminal Domain of the Intact Human Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Receptor (GLP-1R).

    PubMed

    Koole, Cassandra; Reynolds, Christopher A; Mobarec, Juan C; Hick, Caroline; Sexton, Patrick M; Sakmar, Thomas P

    2017-03-10

    The glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) is a key therapeutic target in the management of type II diabetes mellitus, with actions including regulation of insulin biosynthesis and secretion, promotion of satiety and preservation of β-cell mass. Like most class B G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), there is limited knowledge linking biological activity of the GLP-1R with the molecular structure of an intact, full-length, functional receptor-ligand complex. In this study, we have utilized genetic code expansion to site-specifically incorporate the photoactive amino acid p-azido-L-phenylalanine (azF) into N-terminal residues of a full-length, functional human GLP-1R in mammalian cells. UV-mediated photolysis of azF was then carried out to induce targeted photocrosslinking to determine the proximity of the azido group in the mutant receptor with the peptide exendin-4. Crosslinking data were compared directly to the crystal structure of the isolated N-terminal extracellular domain (ECD) of the GLP-1R in complex with exendin(9-39), revealing both similarities as well as distinct differences in the mode of interaction. Generation of a molecular model to accommodate the photocrosslinking constraints highlights the potential influence of environmental conditions on the conformation of the receptor-peptide complex, including folding dynamics of the peptide and formation of dimeric and higher order oligomeric receptor multimers. These data demonstrate that crystal structures of isolated receptor regions may not give a complete reflection of peptide-receptor interactions, and should be combined with additional experimental constraints to reveal peptide-receptor interactions occurring in the dynamic, native, full-length receptor state.

  14. Intact capture of hypervelocity projectiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsou, P.

    1990-01-01

    The ability to capture projectiles intact at hypervelocities opens new applications in science and technology that would either not be possible or would be very costly by other means. This capability has been demonstrated in the laboratory for aluminum projectiles of 1.6 mm diameter, captured at 6 km/s, in one unmelted piece, and retaining up to 95% of the original mass. Furthermore, capture was accomplished passively using microcellular underdense polymer foam. Another advantage of capturing projectiles in an underdense medium is the ability of such a medium to preserve a record of the projectile's original velocity components of speed and direction. A survey of these experimental results is described in terms of a dozen parameters which characterize the amount of capture and the effect on the projectile due to different capture media.

  15. Intact capture of hypervelocity projectiles.

    PubMed

    Tsou, P

    1990-01-01

    The ability to capture projectiles intact at hypervelocities opens new applications in science and technology that would either not be possible or would be very costly by other means. This capability has been demonstrated in the laboratory for aluminum projectiles of 1.6 mm diameter, captured at 6 km/s, in one unmelted piece, and retaining up to 95% of the original mass. Furthermore, capture was accomplished passively using microcellular underdense polymer foam. Another advantage of capturing projectiles in an underdense medium is the ability of such a medium to preserve a record of the projectile's original velocity components of speed and direction. A survey of these experimental results is described in terms of a dozen parameters which characterize the amount of capture and the effect on the projectile due to different capture media.

  16. Risk factors for gastrointestinal parasite infections of dogs living around protected areas of the Atlantic Forest: implications for human and wildlife health.

    PubMed

    Curi, N H A; Paschoal, A M O; Massara, R L; Santos, H A; Guimarães, M P; Passamani, M; Chiarello, A G

    2016-08-15

    Despite the ubiquity of domestic dogs, their role as zoonotic reservoirs and the large number of studies concerning parasites in urban dogs, rural areas in Brazil, especially those at the wildlife-domestic animal-human interface, have received little attention from scientists and public health managers. This paper reports a cross-sectional epidemiological survey of gastrointestinal parasites of rural dogs living in farms around Atlantic Forest fragments. Through standard parasitological methods (flotation and sedimentation), 13 parasite taxa (11 helminths and two protozoans) were found in feces samples from dogs. The most prevalent were the nematode Ancylostoma (47%) followed by Toxocara (18%) and Trichuris (8%). Other less prevalent (<2%) parasites found were Capillaria, Ascaridia, Spirocerca, Taeniidae, Acantocephala, Ascaris, Dipylidium caninum, Toxascaris, and the protozoans Cystoisospora and Eimeria. Mixed infections were found in 36% of samples, mostly by Ancylostoma and Toxocara. Previous deworming had no association with infections, meaning that this preventive measure is being incorrectly performed by owners. Regarding risk factors, dogs younger than one year were more likely to be infected with Toxocara, and purebred dogs with Trichuris. The number of cats in the households was positively associated with Trichuris infection, while male dogs and low body scores were associated with mixed infections. The lack of associations with dog free-ranging behavior and access to forest or villages indicates that infections are mostly acquired around the households. The results highlight the risk of zoonotic and wildlife parasite infections from dogs and the need for monitoring and controlling parasites of domestic animals in human-wildlife interface areas.

  17. Production of Cellulose and Curli Fimbriae by Members of the Family Enterobacteriaceae Isolated from the Human Gastrointestinal Tract

    PubMed Central

    Zogaj, Xhavit; Bokranz, Werner; Nimtz, Manfred; Römling, Ute

    2003-01-01

    Citrobacter spp., Enterobacter spp., and Klebsiella spp. isolated from the human gut were investigated for the biosynthesis of cellulose and curli fimbriae (csg). While Citrobacter spp. produced curli fimbriae and cellulose and Enterobacter spp. produced cellulose with various temperature-regulatory programs, Klebsiella spp. did not show pronounced expression of those extracellular matrix components. Investigation of multicellular behavior in two Citrobacter species and Enterobacter sakazakii showed an extracellular matrix, cell clumping, pellicle formation, and biofilm formation associated with the expression of cellulose and curli fimbriae. In those three strains, the csgD-csgBA region and the cellulose synthase gene bcsA were conserved. PCR screening for the presence of csgD, csgA and bcsA revealed that besides Klebsiella pneumoniae and Klebsiella oxytoca, all species investigated harbored the genetic information for expression of curli fimbriae and cellulose. Since Citrobacter spp., Enterobacter spp., and Klebsiella spp. are frequently found to cause biofilm-related infections such as catheter-associated urinary tract infections, the human gut could serve as a reservoir for dissemination of biofilm-forming isolates. PMID:12819107

  18. Subtractive screening for probiotic properties of lactobacillus species from the human gastrointestinal tract in the search for new probiotics.

    PubMed

    Delgado, S; O'Sullivan, E; Fitzgerald, G; Mayo, B

    2007-10-01

    In the search for new probiotics, 61 Lactobacillus spp. isolates, belonging to 12 species and isolated as dominant lactic acid bacteria from the feces of healthy humans, were subjected to a subtractive system of in vitro analyses, which included desirable and undesirable traits. Twenty-four isolates were able to grow in 2% bovine bile, of which 13 grew in acidified broth at pH 3.5 in acidified cysteine-containing MRS broth. Intrinsic resistance to certain antimicrobial agents (cefoxitin, metronidazole, vancomycin) was observed in most isolates, but atypical resistances to erythromycin, clindamycin, or tetracycline were also found in 5 strains. Undesirable traits such as alpha-chymotrypsin or N-acetyl-beta-glucosaminidase activities were not detected, but low beta-glucuronidase and moderate beta-glucosidase activities were recorded in 2 strains. Two Lactobacillus gasseri and 2 Lactobacillus paracasei selected strains inhibited several intestinal pathogens in an agar spot test, including strains of Escherichia coli, Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella typhimurium, and Staphylococcus aureus. They also adhered to human Caco-2 and HT-29 epithelial cells in a manner comparable to Lactobacillus rhamnosus strain GG, and were unable to degrade pig gastric mucin in a plate assay. Together, these results suggest these 4 strains to be good probiotic candidates, concluding that the subtractive screening devised in this work could be a valuable tool in large-scale surveys for probiotics.

  19. Release of EPA and DHA from salmon oil - a comparison of in vitro digestion with human and porcine gastrointestinal enzymes.

    PubMed

    Aarak, K E; Kirkhus, B; Holm, H; Vogt, G; Jacobsen, M; Vegarud, G E

    2013-10-01

    In the present study, we hypothesised whether in vitro digestion of salmon oil would release different amounts of PUFA depending on the origin of the lipolytic enzymes used. For this purpose, in vitro digestion of salmon oil (SO) was performed using human duodenal juice (HDJ) or a commercial enzyme preparation consisting of porcine pancreatin and bile (PB). The lipolytic effect was determined by measuring the release of fatty acids (FA) using solid-phase extraction and GC-flame ionisation detection, withdrawing samples every 20 min during digestion. The amount of FA released indicated that a plateau was reached after 80 min with approximately similar amounts of FA detected using both HDJ and PB (379 (sd 18) and 352 (sd 23) mg/g SO, respectively). However, the release of 18 : 2, EPA (20 : 5) and DHA (22 : 6) was significantly different during in vitro digestion. At 80 min, HDJ and PB released 43 and 33% of 18 : 2, 14 and 9% of EPA and 11 and 9% of DHA, respectively. Both enzyme preparations released approximately the same amounts of the other FA analysed. The effect of the addition of bile salts (BS) was significantly different in the two enzyme systems, where porcine pancreatin highly responded to the increase in BS concentration, in contrast to HDJ.

  20. 15-Hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase, a COX-2 oncogene antagonist, is a TGF-β-induced suppressor of human gastrointestinal cancers

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Min; Rerko, Ronald M.; Platzer, Petra; Dawson, Dawn; Willis, Joseph; Tong, Min; Lawrence, Earl; Lutterbaugh, James; Lu, Shilong; Willson, James K. V.; Luo, Guangbin; Hensold, Jack; Tai, Hsin-Hsiung; Wilson, Keith; Markowitz, Sanford D.

    2004-01-01

    Marked increased expression of cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2), a prostaglandin-synthesizing enzyme that is pharmacologically inhibited by nonsteroid anti-inflammatory-type drugs, is a major early oncogenic event in the genesis of human colon neoplasia. We report that, in addition to inducing expression of COX-2, colon cancers further target the prostaglandin biogenesis pathway by ubiquitously abrogating expression of 15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase (15-PGDH), a prostaglandin-degrading enzyme that physiologically antagonizes COX-2. We find that 15-PGDH transcript and protein are both highly expressed by normal colonic epithelia but are nearly undetectable in colon cancers. Using gene transfection to restore 15-PGDH expression in colon cancer cells strongly inhibits the ability of these cells to form tumors in immune-deficient mice and demonstrates 15-PGDH to have functional colon cancer tumor suppressor activity. In interrogating the mechanism for 15-PGDH expression loss in colon cancer, we determined that colonic 15-PGDH expression is directly controlled and strongly induced by activation of the TGF-β tumor suppressor pathway. These findings thus delineate an enzymatic pathway that induces colon cancer suppression, a pathway that is activated by TGF-β and mediated by 15-PGDH. PMID:15574495

  1. Vulnerability of ecosystems to climate change moderated by habitat intactness.

    PubMed

    Eigenbrod, Felix; Gonzalez, Patrick; Dash, Jadunandan; Steyl, Ilse

    2015-01-01

    The combined effects of climate change and habitat loss represent a major threat to species and ecosystems around the world. Here, we analyse the vulnerability of ecosystems to climate change based on current levels of habitat intactness and vulnerability to biome shifts, using multiple measures of habitat intactness at two spatial scales. We show that the global extent of refugia depends highly on the definition of habitat intactness and spatial scale of the analysis of intactness. Globally, 28% of terrestrial vegetated area can be considered refugia if all natural vegetated land cover is considered. This, however, drops to 17% if only areas that are at least 50% wilderness at a scale of 48×48 km are considered and to 10% if only areas that are at least 50% wilderness at a scale of 4.8×4.8 km are considered. Our results suggest that, in regions where relatively large, intact wilderness areas remain (e.g. Africa, Australia, boreal regions, South America), conservation of the remaining large-scale refugia is the priority. In human-dominated landscapes, (e.g. most of Europe, much of North America and Southeast Asia), focusing on finer scale refugia is a priority because large-scale wilderness refugia simply no longer exist. Action to conserve such refugia is particularly urgent since only 1 to 2% of global terrestrial vegetated area is classified as refugia and at least 50% covered by the global protected area network.

  2. Perforation of Meckel's diverticulum by an intact fish bone

    PubMed Central

    Mouawad, Nicolas J; Hammond, Stephen; Kaoutzanis, Christodoulos

    2013-01-01

    Meckel's diverticulum is the most common congenital anomaly of the gastrointestinal tract, with an overall incidence of approximately 2.2%. It is generally noted incidentally during laparotomy for management of other abdominal pathology. Complications are infrequent, developing in 4% of individuals with this abnormality, and are usually seen in childhood. Herein, we discuss the case of a 52-year-old Caucasian man presenting with a 1-day history of worsening central and right-sided abdominal pain. Initial evaluation posed a broad differential however, following conservative measures and unremarkable plain films, the patient developed peritoneal signs necessitating operative intervention. During diagnostic laparoscopy, a Meckel's diverticulum was noted to be inflamed and perforated by an intact fish bone. The patient was treated successfully with a segmental resection and primary anastomosis, and had an uneventful postoperative recovery. PMID:23429021

  3. Primary gastrointestinal lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Ghimire, Prasanna; Wu, Guang-Yao; Zhu, Ling

    2011-01-01

    Gastrointestinal tract is the most common extranodal site involved by lymphoma with the majority being non-Hodgkin type. Although lymphoma can involve any part of the gastrointestinal tract, the most frequent sites in order of its occurrence are the stomach followed by small intestine and ileocecal region. Gastrointestinal tract lymphoma is usually secondary to the widespread nodal diseases and primary gastrointestinal tract lymphoma is relatively rare. Gastrointestinal lymphomas are usually not clinically specific and indistinguishable from other benign and malignant conditions. Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma is the most common pathological type of gastrointestinal lymphoma in essentially all sites of the gastrointestinal tract, although recently the frequency of other forms has also increased in certain regions of the world. Although some radiological features such as bulky lymph nodes and maintenance of fat plane are more suggestive of lymphoma, they are not specific, thus mandating histopathological analysis for its definitive diagnosis. There has been a tremendous leap in the diagnosis, staging and management of gastrointestinal lymphoma in the last two decades attributed to a better insight into its etiology and molecular aspect as well as the knowledge about its critical signaling pathways. PMID:21390139

  4. Advances in gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Lanas, Ángel

    2016-09-01

    The main innovations of the latest meeting of the Gastroenterological Association (2016) concerning upper gastrointestinal bleeding from the clinician's perspective can be summarised as follows: a) The Glasgow-Blatchford scale has the best accuracy in predicting the need for surgical intervention and hospital mortality; b) Prognostic scales for non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding are also useful for lower gastrointestinal bleeding; c) Preliminary data suggest that treatment with hemospray does not seem to be superior to current standard treatment in controlling active peptic ulcer bleeding; d) Either famotidine or a proton pump inhibitor may be effective in preventing haemorrhagic recurrence in patients taking aspirin, but this finding needs to be confirmed in further studies; e) There was confirmation of the need to re-introduce antiplatelet therapy as early as possible in patients with antiplatelet-associated gastrointestinal bleeding in order to prevent cardiovascular mortality; f) Routine clinical practice suggests that gastrointestinal or cardiovascular complications with celecoxib or traditional NSAIDs are very low; g) Dabigatran is associated with an increased incidence of gastrointestinal bleeding compared with apixaban or warfarin. At least half of the episodes are located in the lower gastrointestinal tract; h) Implant devices for external ventricular circulatory support are associated with early gastrointestinal bleeding in up to one third of patients; the bleeding is often secondary to arteriovenous malformations.

  5. The number and distribution of eosinophils in the adult human gastrointestinal tract: a study and comparison of racial and environmental factors.

    PubMed

    Matsushita, Takashi; Maruyama, Riruke; Ishikawa, Nahoko; Harada, Yuji; Araki, Asuka; Chen, Diane; Tauchi-Nishi, Pamela; Yuki, Takafumi; Kinoshita, Yoshikazu

    2015-04-01

    There are surprisingly limited data regarding normal counts or distribution of eosinophils in the gastrointestinal tract, despite the increasing incidence of eosinophilic gastrointestinal tract diseases. Moreover, there are no published reports on the eosinophil number throughout the gastrointestinal tract of adults or Asian populations, or those investigating the effect of race on eosinophil count. First, in our study, the number of eosinophils from each portion of the gastrointestinal mucosa was quantified on biopsy slides from a Japanese adult population (132 samples). Next, the surgical resections from Japanese (110 samples), Japanese Americans (64), and Caucasians (57) were used to investigate the racial and environmental effects. Our results with the Japanese biopsy samples showed a significant increase in the number of eosinophils from the esophagus to the right colon (mean±SD/mm: 0.07±0.43 for the esophagus, 12.18±11.39 for the stomach, and 36.59±15.50 for the right colon), compared with a decrease in the left colon (8.53±7.83). Investigation using surgical samples showed that the distribution patterns in the gastrointestinal tract were very similar among the 3 ethnic groups, and there were no significant differences in the number of eosinophils among these groups, except in the esophageal epithelium. This study is the first report on the normal numbers and distribution of eosinophils throughout the gastrointestinal tract not only of an Asian population but also of adults. Our data suggest that a cutoff value for eosinophil counts, when rendering a diagnosis of eosinophilic gastrointestinal tract disease, should be individualized to the different biopsy sites. Interestingly, race and environmental factors did not seem to have a significant effect on eosinophil densities and distributions.

  6. Radiologic diagnosis of gastrointestinal perforation.

    PubMed

    Rubesin, Stephen E; Levine, Marc S

    2003-11-01

    Perforations of the gastrointestinal tract have many causes. Holes in the wall of gastrointestinal organs can be created by blunt or penetrating trauma, iatrogenic injury, inflammatory conditions that penetrate the serosa or adventitia, extrinsic neoplasms that invade the gastrointestinal tract, or primary neoplasms that penetrate outside the wall of gastrointestinal organs. This article provides a radiologic approach for investigating the wide variety of gastrointestinal perforations. General principles about contrast agents and studies are reviewed, and then perforations in specific gastrointestinal organs are discussed.

  7. Cannabinoids and the gastrointestinal tract

    PubMed Central

    PERTWEE, R

    2001-01-01

    The enteric nervous system of several species, including the mouse, rat, guinea pig and humans, contains cannabinoid CB1 receptors that depress gastrointestinal motility, mainly by inhibiting ongoing contractile transmitter release. Signs of this depressant effect are, in the whole organism, delayed gastric emptying and inhibition of the transit of non-absorbable markers through the small intestine and, in isolated strips of ileal tissue, inhibition of evoked acetylcholine release, peristalsis, and cholinergic and non-adrenergic non-cholinergic (NANC) contractions of longitudinal or circular smooth muscle. These are contractions evoked electrically or by agents that are thought to stimulate contractile transmitter release either in tissue taken from morphine pretreated animals (naloxone) or in unpretreated tissue (γ-aminobutyric acid and 5-hydroxytryptamine). The inhibitory effects of cannabinoid receptor agonists on gastric emptying and intestinal transit are mediated to some extent by CB1 receptors in the brain as well as by enteric CB1 receptors. Gastric acid secretion is also inhibited in response to CB1 receptor activation, although the detailed underlying mechanism has yet to be elucidated. Cannabinoid receptor agonists delay gastric emptying in humans as well as in rodents and probably also inhibit human gastric acid secretion. Cannabinoid pretreatment induces tolerance to the inhibitory effects of cannabinoid receptor agonists on gastrointestinal motility. Findings that the CB1 selective antagonist/inverse agonist SR141716A produces in vivo and in vitro signs of increased motility of rodent small intestine probably reflect the presence in the enteric nervous system of a population of CB1 receptors that are precoupled to their effector mechanisms. SR141716A has been reported not to behave in this manner in the myenteric plexus-longitudinal muscle preparation (MPLM) of human ileum unless this has first been rendered cannabinoid tolerant. Nor has it been

  8. An unusual cause of gastrointestinal obstruction: bezoar.

    PubMed

    Abbas, Tariq O

    2011-03-01

    Bezoars are concretions of swallowed hair, fruit vegetable fibers, and similar substances found in the alimentary canal. The first description of a postmortem human bezoar was by Swain in 1854. Although the prevalence of bezoars in humans is low, an absence of treatment has been associated with mortality rates as high as 30%, primarily because of gastrointestinal bleeding, destruction, or perforation.

  9. The Gastrointestinal Microbiome

    PubMed Central

    Engen, Phillip A.; Green, Stefan J.; Voigt, Robin M.; Forsyth, Christopher B.; Keshavarzian, Ali

    2015-01-01

    The excessive use of alcohol is a global problem causing many adverse pathological health effects and a significant financial health care burden. This review addresses the effect of alcohol consumption on the microbiota in the gastrointestinal tract (GIT). Although data are limited in humans, studies highlight the importance of changes in the intestinal microbiota in alcohol-related disorders. Alcohol-induced changes in the GIT microbiota composition and metabolic function may contribute to the well-established link between alcohol-induced oxidative stress, intestinal hyperpermeability to luminal bacterial products, and the subsequent development of alcoholic liver disease (ALD), as well as other diseases. In addition, clinical and preclinical data suggest that alcohol-related disorders are associated with quantitative and qualitative dysbiotic changes in the intestinal microbiota and may be associated with increased GIT inflammation, intestinal hyperpermeability resulting in endotoxemia, systemic inflammation, and tissue damage/organ pathologies including ALD. Thus, gut-directed interventions, such as probiotic and synbiotic modulation of the intestinal microbiota, should be considered and evaluated for prevention and treatment of alcohol-associated pathologies. PMID:26695747

  10. A new high-content model system for studies of gastrointestinal transit: the zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Rich, A

    2009-03-01

    The zebrafish gastrointestinal (GI) tract displays an anatomy and cellular architecture that is similar to the human GI tract, with concentric layers of inner epithelia, connective tissue, circular muscle and outer longitudinal muscle layers. Propulsion of luminal content results from the integrated activity of smooth muscle cells, enteric neurons and the interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC). Zebrafish larvae are transparent and propagating contractions in the entire GI tract are easily visualized. A new moderate-throughput zebrafish-based GI transit assay is described in this issue of Neurogastroenterology and Motility. This assay utilizes intact zebrafish larvae which contain essential regulatory elements (ICC and enteric neurons). Forward genetic analysis, which identifies genes underlying specific phenotypes, is possible using the zebrafish system. The zebrafish model system compliments existing models for studies of GI motility and will contribute to the understanding of the regulation of GI motility, and to identification of novel drug targets.

  11. Japanese herbal medicine in functional gastrointestinal disorders.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, H; Inadomi, J M; Hibi, T

    2009-07-01

    Management of functional gastrointestinal disorders is hindered by both poor efficacy and adverse effects of traditional pharmacological therapy. Herbal medicine may be an attractive alternative based on the perception of its 'natural' approach and low risk of side effects; however, the lack of standardization of drug components has limited the ability to perform rigorous clinical studies in Western countries. Japanese herbal medicine (JHM) is a standardized form of herbal medicine with regards to the quality and quantities of ingredients. While extensively studied and widely used in Asia, there is a paucity of data upon which physicians in other parts of the world may draw conclusions regarding the effectiveness of herbal medicine for gastrointestinal disorders. The aim of this study was to summarize the most recent developments in JHM for treatment of functional gastrointestinal disorders. Animal and human studies were systematically reviewed to identify published data of JHM used for treatment of gastrointestinal disorders. The herbal components of JHM were examined. Results describing the physiological and clinical effects of JHM were abstracted, with an emphasis on functional gastrointestinal disorders. JHM are associated with a variety of beneficial physiological on the gastrointestinal system. Patient-based clinical outcomes are improved in several conditions. Rikkunnshi-to reduces symptoms and reverses physiological abnormalities associated with functional dyspepsia, while dai-kenchu-to improves symptoms of postoperative ileus and constipation in children. This updated summary of JHM in the field of gastrointestinal disorders illustrates the potential for herbal medication to serve a valuable role in the management of patients with functional gastrointestinal disorders.

  12. Osteoporosis and Gastrointestinal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Weinerman, Stuart

    2010-01-01

    Gastrointestinal disease is often overlooked or simply forgotten as a cause of osteoporosis. Yet, the consequences of osteoporotic fractures can be devastating. Although the bulk of the published experience regarding osteoporosis is derived from the postmenopausal population, this review will focus on gastrointestinal disorders implicated in osteoporosis, with an emphasis on inflammatory bowel disease and celiac disease. The unique aspects of gastrointestinal diseases associated with osteoporosis include early onset of disease (and, therefore, prolonged exposure to risk factors for developing osteoporosis, particularly with inflammatory bowel disease and celiac disease), malabsorption, and maldigestion of nutrients necessary for bone health and maintenance (eg, calcium, vitamin D), as well as the impact of glucocorticoids. These factors, when added to smoking, a sedentary lifestyle, hypogonadism, and a family history of osteoporosis, accumulate into an imposing package of predictors for osteoporotic fracture. This paper will review the identification and treatment strategies for patients with gastrointestinal disorders and osteoporosis. PMID:20978554

  13. Vasculitis and gastrointestinal involvement.

    PubMed

    Casella, G; Bronzino, B; Cutrino, L; Montani, N; Somma, A; Baldini, V

    2006-06-01

    The incidence of gastrointestinal involvement is relatively observed in patients with vasculitis processes. Vasculitis can be primary (necrotising or hypersensitivity) or secondary to another primary disease. Gastrointestinal involvement is present in up to 50% of the various forms of systemic vasculitis. Primary or secondary vasculitic process, according to the classification in necrotizing and hypersensitivity vasculitis, are described in this paper. A review of the literature on the the subject is also presented.

  14. Citrulline as a biomarker in the non-human primate total- and partial-body irradiation models: correlation of circulating citrulline to acute and prolonged gastrointestinal injury

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Jace W.; Bennett, Alexander; Carter, Claire L.; Tudor, Gregory; Hankey, Kim G.; Farese, Ann M.; Booth, Catherine; MacVittie, Thomas J.; Kane, Maureen A.

    2015-01-01

    The use of plasma citrulline as a biomarker for acute and prolonged gastrointestinal injury via exposure to total- and partial-body irradiation (6 MV LINAC-derived photons; 0.80 Gy min−1) in nonhuman primate models was investigated. The irradiation exposure covered gastrointestinal injuries spanning lethal, mid-lethal, and sub-lethal doses. The acute gastrointestinal injury was assessed via measurement of plasma citrulline and small intestinal histopathology over the first 15 days following radiation exposure and included total-body irradiation at 13.0 Gy, 10.5 Gy, and 7.5 Gy and partial-body irradiation at 11.0 Gy with 5% bone marrow sparing. The dosing schemes of 7.5 Gy total-body irradiation and 11.0 Gy partial-body irradiation included time points out to day 60 and day 180, respectively, which allowed for correlation of plasma citrulline to prolonged gastrointestinal injury and survival. Plasma citrulline values were radiation-dependent for all radiation doses under consideration with nadir values ranging from 63–80 % lower than radiation-naïve NHP plasma. The nadir values were observed at day 5 to 7 post irradiation. Longitudinal plasma citrulline profiles demonstrated prolonged gastrointestinal injury resulting from acute high-dose irradiation had long lasting effects on enterocyte function. Moreover, plasma citrulline did not discriminate between total-body or partial-body irradiation over the first 15 days following irradiation and was not predictive of survival based on the radiation models considered herein. PMID:26425904

  15. The gastrointestinal microbiome: a malleable, third genome of mammals

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, Ian M.; Threadgill, David W.

    2015-01-01

    The nonpathogenic, mutualistic bacteria of the mammalian gastrointestinal tract provide a number of benefits to the host. Recent reports have shown how the aggregate genomes of gastrointestinal bacteria provide novel benefits by functioning as the third major genome in mammals along with the nuclear and mitochondrial genomes. Consequently, efforts are underway to elucidate the complexity of the organisms comprising the unique ecosystem of the gastrointestinal tract, as well as those associated with other epidermal surfaces. The current knowledge of the gastrointestinal microbiome, its relationship to human health and disease with a particular focus on mammalian physiology, and efforts to alter its composition as a novel therapeutic approach are reviewed. PMID:19629594

  16. Asbestos and Gastrointestinal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Robert W.; Foliart, Donna E.; Wong, Otto

    1985-01-01

    Exposure to asbestos is among several factors cited as possible causes of esophageal, gastric and colorectal cancer. More than 45 published studies have presented mortality data on asbestos-exposed workers. For each cohort, we listed the observed and expected rates of deaths from types of gastrointestinal cancer based on the latest published follow-up. Summary standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) were then derived. Finally, we calculated summary SMRs for total gastrointestinal tract cancer for three occupational groups: asbestos factory workers, insulators/shipyard workers and asbestos miners. Statistically significant elevations in summary SMRs were found for esophageal, stomach and total gastrointestinal tract cancer in all asbestos-exposed workers. Esophageal cancer summary SMRs remained significantly elevated when data were reanalyzed to include only those cohorts with death certificate diagnoses for cause of observed deaths. However, summary SMRs were not statistically significant for stomach and total gastrointestinal tract cancer after reanalysis. Summary SMRs by occupational group showed a significant elevation for total gastrointestinal cancer in insulators/shipyard workers. The elevation was not significant after reanalysis. Based on the results after reanalysis, the elevations in summary SMRs for stomach and total gastrointestinal tract cancer are of a magnitude that could result from diagnostic and investigator error. We conclude that more studies are required before stomach and colorectal cancers are documented as asbestos-related diseases. PMID:4036114

  17. Angiography and the gastrointestinal bleeder

    SciTech Connect

    Baum, S.

    1982-05-01

    The role of angiography in the diagnosis and treatment of gastrointestinal hemorrhage is discussed. Three categories of gastrointestinal bleeding are considered: upper gastrointestinal bleeding due to gastroesophageal varices, upper gastrointestinal bleeding of arterial or capillary origin, and lower gastrointestinal bleeding. The advantages and disadvantages of angiography are compared with those of radionuclide scanning and endoscopy or colonoscopy. It is anticipated that, as radionuclide scans are more widely employed, angiography will eventually be performed only in those patients with positive scans.

  18. Depletion of mucin in mucin-producing human gastrointestinal carcinoma: Results from in vitro and in vivo studies with bromelain and N-acetylcysteine.

    PubMed

    Amini, Afshin; Masoumi-Moghaddam, Samar; Ehteda, Anahid; Liauw, Winston; Morris, David L

    2015-10-20

    Aberrant expression of membrane-associated and secreted mucins, as evident in epithelial tumors, is known to facilitate tumor growth, progression and metastasis, and to provide protection against adverse growth conditions, chemotherapy and immune surveillance. Emerging evidence provides support for the oncogenic role of MUC1 in gastrointestinal carcinomas and relates its expression to an invasive phenotype. Similarly, mucinous differentiation of gastrointestinal tumors, in particular increased or de novo expression of MUC2 and/or MUC5AC, is widely believed to imply an adverse clinicopathological feature. Through formation of viscous gels, too, MUC2 and MUC5AC significantly contribute to the biology and pathogenesis of mucin-secreting gastrointestinal tumors. Here, we investigated the mucin-depleting effects of bromelain (BR) and N-acetylcysteine (NAC), in nine different regimens as single or combination therapy, in in vitro (MKN45, KATOIII and LS174T cell lines) and in vivo (female nude mice bearing intraperitoneal MKN45 and LS174T) settings. The inhibitory effects of the treatment on cancer cell growth and proliferation were also evaluated in vivo. Our results suggest that a combination of BR and NAC with dual effects on growth and mucin products of mucin-expressing tumor cells is a promising candidate towards the development of novel approaches to gastrointestinal malignancies with the involvement of mucin pathology. This capability supports the use of this combination formulation in locoregional approaches for reducing the adverse effects of the aberrantly secreted gel-forming mucins, as in pseudomyxoma peritonei and similar pathologies with ectopic production of mucin.

  19. Depletion of mucin in mucin-producing human gastrointestinal carcinoma: Results from in vitro and in vivo studies with bromelain and N-acetylcysteine

    PubMed Central

    Amini, Afshin; Masoumi-Moghaddam, Samar; Ehteda, Anahid; Liauw, Winston; Morris, David L.

    2015-01-01

    Aberrant expression of membrane-associated and secreted mucins, as evident in epithelial tumors, is known to facilitate tumor growth, progression and metastasis, and to provide protection against adverse growth conditions, chemotherapy and immune surveillance. Emerging evidence provides support for the oncogenic role of MUC1 in gastrointestinal carcinomas and relates its expression to an invasive phenotype. Similarly, mucinous differentiation of gastrointestinal tumors, in particular increased or de novo expression of MUC2 and/or MUC5AC, is widely believed to imply an adverse clinicopathological feature. Through formation of viscous gels, too, MUC2 and MUC5AC significantly contribute to the biology and pathogenesis of mucin-secreting gastrointestinal tumors. Here, we investigated the mucin-depleting effects of bromelain (BR) and N-acetylcysteine (NAC), in nine different regimens as single or combination therapy, in in vitro (MKN45, KATOIII and LS174T cell lines) and in vivo (female nude mice bearing intraperitoneal MKN45 and LS174T) settings. The inhibitory effects of the treatment on cancer cell growth and proliferation were also evaluated in vivo. Our results suggest that a combination of BR and NAC with dual effects on growth and mucin products of mucin-expressing tumor cells is a promising candidate towards the development of novel approaches to gastrointestinal malignancies with the involvement of mucin pathology. This capability supports the use of this combination formulation in locoregional approaches for reducing the adverse effects of the aberrantly secreted gel-forming mucins, as in pseudomyxoma peritonei and similar pathologies with ectopic production of mucin. PMID:26436698

  20. Asbestos and gastrointestinal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, R.W.; Foliart, D.E.; Wong, O.

    1985-07-01

    Exposure to asbestos is among several factors cited as possible causes of esophageal, gastric and colorectal cancer. More than 45 published studies have presented mortality data on asbestos-exposed workers. For each cohort, the authors listed the observed and expected rates of deaths from types of gastrointestinal cancer based on the latest published follow-up. Summary standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) were then derived. Finally, summary SMRs were calculated for total gastrointestinal tract cancer for three occupational groups: asbestos factory workers, insulators/shipyard workers and asbestos miners. Statistically significant elevations in summary SMRs were found for esophageal, stomach and total gastrointestinal tract cancer in all asbestos-exposed workers. Esophageal cancer summary SMR remained significantly elevated when data were reanalyzed to include only those cohorts with death certificate diagnoses for cause of observed deaths. However, summary SMRs were not statistically significant for stomach and total gastrointestinal tract cancer after reanalysis. Summary SMRs by occupational group showed a significant elevation for total gastrointestinal cancer in insulators/shipyard workers. The elevation was not significant after reanalysis. 59 references, 5 tables.

  1. Aerosol preparation of intact lipoproteins

    DOEpatents

    Benner, W Henry [Danville, CA; Krauss, Ronald M [Berkeley, CA; Blanche, Patricia J [Berkeley, CA

    2012-01-17

    A medical diagnostic method and instrumentation system for analyzing noncovalently bonded agglomerated biological particles is described. The method and system comprises: a method of preparation for the biological particles; an electrospray generator; an alpha particle radiation source; a differential mobility analyzer; a particle counter; and data acquisition and analysis means. The medical device is useful for the assessment of human diseases, such as cardiac disease risk and hyperlipidemia, by rapid quantitative analysis of lipoprotein fraction densities. Initially, purification procedures are described to reduce an initial blood sample to an analytical input to the instrument. The measured sizes from the analytical sample are correlated with densities, resulting in a spectrum of lipoprotein densities. The lipoprotein density distribution can then be used to characterize cardiac and other lipid-related health risks.

  2. Candida albicans commensalism in the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Neville, B Anne; d'Enfert, Christophe; Bougnoux, Marie-Elisabeth

    2015-11-01

    Candida albicans is a polymorphic yeast species that often forms part of the commensal gastrointestinal mycobiota of healthy humans. It is also an important opportunistic pathogen. A tripartite interaction involving C. albicans, the resident microbiota and host immunity maintains C. albicans in its commensal form. The influence of each of these factors on C. albicans carriage is considered herein, with particular focus on the mycobiota and the approaches used to study it, models of gastrointestinal colonization by C. albicans, the C. albicans genes and phenotypes that are necessary for commensalism and the host factors that influence C. albicans carriage.

  3. Gastrointestinal Stent Update

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The use of self-expanding metallic stents in the upper gastrointestinal tract, placed under radiologic imaging or endoscopic guidance, is the current treatment of choice for the palliation of malignant gastrointestinal outlet obstructions. Advances in metallic stent design and delivery systems have progressed to the stage where this treatment is now considered a minimally invasive therapy. Metallic stent placement will broaden further into the field of nonsurgical therapy for the gastrointestinal tract. To date, metallic stents placed in the esophagus, gastric outlet, colorectum, and bile ducts are not intended to be curative, but rather to provide a palliative treatment for obstructions. The evolution of metallic stent technology will render such procedures not only palliative but also therapeutic, by enabling local drug delivery, and the use of biodegradable materials will reduce procedure-related complications. PMID:21103290

  4. On the sensitivity of intact cells to perturbation by ethanol

    SciTech Connect

    Hitzemann, R.; Whitaker-Azmitia, P. ); Dains, K.; Lin, J. )

    1989-01-01

    A comparison was made of ethanol's effects on the order of plasma membranes in intact cells and some isolated membrane preparations. Order was assessed by steady-state fluorescence polarization techniques using the non-permeant probe, TMA-DPH. The data show that two cultured cells, rat neonatal astroglial and N2A neuroblastoma, were sensitive to significant ethanol-induced disordering within the anesthetically relevant range. Human erythrocytes, cultured fibroblasts and homogenized astroglial cells required higher ethanol concentrations to produce a similar effect. Intact erythrocytes were approximately twice as sensitive as erythrocyte ghost membranes to ethanol induced perturbation. The neonatal glial and N2A cells were approximately five times more sensitive than synaptic membranes to ethanol effects. DMPC and DMPC + cholesterol liposomes and myelin membranes were insensitive to ethanol's effects. The incorporation of 10 mole % ganglioside GM{sub 1} sensitized the liposomes to ethanol-induced perturbation.

  5. Dietary Fiber and Prebiotics and the Gastrointestinal Microbiota.

    PubMed

    Holscher, Hannah D

    2017-02-06

    The gastrointestinal microbiota has an important role in human health, and there is increasing interest in utilizing dietary approaches to modulate the composition and metabolic function of the microbial communities that colonize the gastrointestinal tract to improve health, and prevent or treat disease. One dietary strategy for modulating the microbiota is consumption of dietary fiber and prebiotics that can be metabolized by microbes in the gastrointestinal tract. Human alimentary enzymes are not able to digest most complex carbohydrates and plant polysaccharides. Instead, these polysaccharides are metabolized by microbes which generate short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs), including acetate, propionate, and butyrate. This article reviews the current knowledge of the impact of fiber and prebiotic consumption on the composition and metabolic function of the human gastrointestinal microbiota, including the effects of physiochemical properties of complex carbohydrates, adequate intake and treatment dosages, and the phenotypic composition of the human microbiota.

  6. Treatment Option Overview (Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumors)

    MedlinePlus

    ... carcinoid tumor is cancer that forms in the lining of the gastrointestinal tract. The gastrointestinal (GI) tract ... Rectum . Enlarge Gastrointestinal carcinoid tumors form in the lining of the gastrointestinal tract, most often in the ...

  7. Treatment Options for Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... carcinoid tumor is cancer that forms in the lining of the gastrointestinal tract. The gastrointestinal (GI) tract ... Rectum . Enlarge Gastrointestinal carcinoid tumors form in the lining of the gastrointestinal tract, most often in the ...

  8. General Information about Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... carcinoid tumor is cancer that forms in the lining of the gastrointestinal tract. The gastrointestinal (GI) tract ... Rectum . Enlarge Gastrointestinal carcinoid tumors form in the lining of the gastrointestinal tract, most often in the ...

  9. Apollo gastrointestinal analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nichols, B. L.; Huang, C. T. L.

    1975-01-01

    Fecal bile acid patterns for the Apollo 17 flight were studied to determine the cause of diarrhea on the mission. The fecal sterol analysis gave no indication of an infectious diarrhea, or specific, or nonspecific etiology occurring during the entire flight. It is assumed that the gastrointestinal problems encountered are the consequences of altered physiology, perhaps secondary to physical or emotional stress of flight.

  10. Pediatric functional gastrointestinal disorders

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Functional gastrointestinal disorders continue to be a prevalent set of conditions faced by the healthcare team and have a significant emotional and economic impact. In this review, the authors highlight some of the common functional disorders seen in pediatric patients (functional dyspepsia, irrita...

  11. Gastrointestinal endoscopy in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Savas, Nurten

    2014-11-07

    Gastrointestinal endoscopy has a major diagnostic and therapeutic role in most gastrointestinal disorders; however, limited information is available about clinical efficacy and safety in pregnant patients. The major risks of endoscopy during pregnancy include potential harm to the fetus because of hypoxia, premature labor, trauma and teratogenesis. In some cases, endoscopic procedures may be postponed until after delivery. When emergency or urgent indications are present, endoscopic procedures may be considered with some precautions. United States Food and Drug Administration category B drugs may be used in low doses. Endoscopic procedures during pregnancy may include upper gastrointestinal endoscopy, percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy, sigmoidoscopy, colonoscopy, enteroscopy of the small bowel or video capsule endoscopy, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography and endoscopic ultrasonography. All gastrointestinal endoscopic procedures in pregnant patients should be performed in hospitals by expert endoscopists and an obstetrician should be informed about all endoscopic procedures. The endoscopy and flexible sigmoidoscopy may be safe for the fetus and pregnant patient, and may be performed during pregnancy when strong indications are present. Colonoscopy for pregnant patients may be considered for strong indications during the second trimester. Although therapeutic endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography may be considered during pregnancy, this procedure should be performed only for strong indications and attempts should be made to minimize radiation exposure.

  12. Gastrointestinal endoscopy in pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Savas, Nurten

    2014-01-01

    Gastrointestinal endoscopy has a major diagnostic and therapeutic role in most gastrointestinal disorders; however, limited information is available about clinical efficacy and safety in pregnant patients. The major risks of endoscopy during pregnancy include potential harm to the fetus because of hypoxia, premature labor, trauma and teratogenesis. In some cases, endoscopic procedures may be postponed until after delivery. When emergency or urgent indications are present, endoscopic procedures may be considered with some precautions. United States Food and Drug Administration category B drugs may be used in low doses. Endoscopic procedures during pregnancy may include upper gastrointestinal endoscopy, percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy, sigmoidoscopy, colonoscopy, enteroscopy of the small bowel or video capsule endoscopy, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography and endoscopic ultrasonography. All gastrointestinal endoscopic procedures in pregnant patients should be performed in hospitals by expert endoscopists and an obstetrician should be informed about all endoscopic procedures. The endoscopy and flexible sigmoidoscopy may be safe for the fetus and pregnant patient, and may be performed during pregnancy when strong indications are present. Colonoscopy for pregnant patients may be considered for strong indications during the second trimester. Although therapeutic endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography may be considered during pregnancy, this procedure should be performed only for strong indications and attempts should be made to minimize radiation exposure. PMID:25386072

  13. Gastrointestinal Bleeding in Athletes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eichner, Edward R.

    1989-01-01

    Describes the scope and importance of gastrointestinal bleeding in runners and other athletes, discussing causes, sites, and implications of exercise-related bleeding. Practical tips to mitigate the problem, potentially more troublesome in women because of lower iron stores, are presented (e.g., gradual conditioning and avoidance of prerace…

  14. Autism Spectrum Disorder and intact executive functioning.

    PubMed

    Ferrara, R; Ansermet, F; Massoni, F; Petrone, L; Onofri, E; Ricci, P; Archer, T; Ricci, S

    2016-01-01

    Earliest notions concerning autism (Autism Spectrum Disorders, ASD) describe the disturbance in executive functioning. Despite altered definition, executive functioning, expressed as higher cognitive skills required complex behaviors linked to the prefrontal cortex, are defective in autism. Specific difficulties in children presenting autism or verbal disabilities at executive functioning levels have been identified. Nevertheless, the developmental deficit of executive functioning in autism is highly diversified with huge individual variation and may even be absent. The aim of the present study to examine the current standing of intact executive functioning intact in ASD.

  15. Systemic availability of the active metabolite hydroxy-fasudil after administration of fasudil to different sites of the human gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Hinderling, Peter H; Karara, Adel H; Tao, Ben; Pawula, Maria; Wilding, Ian; Lu, Ming

    2007-01-01

    This study evaluated the gastrointestinal absorption of fasudil, a novel Rho kinase inhibitor for the treatment of stable angina, at different sites using remote-controlled capsules and assessed the feasibility of developing an extended-release formulation. Ten healthy male volunteers were enrolled, and 8 subjects completed this single-dose, open-label, randomized, 5-way crossover study. Forty milligrams of fasudil HCl was administered as solution to the distal ileum and ascending colon, as powder to the ascending colon, and orally as an immediate-release tablet and solution. All treatments were well-tolerated and no serious adverse events were observed. The mean systemic availabilities of M3 relative to the oral solution were 1.04 (distal ileum, solution), 1.14 (ascending colon, solution), 1.27 (ascending colon, powder) and 1.04 (oral tablet), indicating similar systemic availability of M3 after administration of fasudil HCl to different gastrointestinal sites. The results suggest that development of a once-a-day extended-release formulation for fasudil HCl should be readily achievable.

  16. Animal models of gastrointestinal inflammation and cancer.

    PubMed

    Lu, L; Chan, Ruby L Y; Luo, X M; Wu, William K K; Shin, Vivian Y; Cho, C H

    2014-07-11

    Inflammation and cancer are the two major disorders in the gastrointestinal tract. They are causally related in their pathogenesis. It is important to study animal models' causal relationship and, in particular, to discover new therapeutic agents for such diseases. There are several criteria for these models in order to make them useful in better understanding the etiology and treatment of the said diseases in humans. In this regard, animal models should be similar as possible to human diseases and also be easy to produce and reproducible and also economic to allow a continuous replication in different laboratories. In this review, we summarize the various animal models for inflammatory and cancerous disorders in the upper and lower gastrointestinal tract. Experimental approaches are as simple as by giving a single oral dose of alcohol or other noxious agents or by injections of multiple dosages of ulcer inducing agents or by parenteral administration or in drinking water of carcinogens or by modifying the genetic makeups of animals to produce relatively long-term pathological changes in particular organs. With these methods they could induce consistent inflammatory responses or tumorigenesis in the gastrointestinal mucosa. These animal models are widely used in laboratories in understanding the pathogenesis as well as the mechanisms of action for therapeutic agents in the treatment of gastrointestinal inflammation and cancer.

  17. HYDROCARBON VAPOR DIFFUSION IN INTACT CORE SLEEVES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The diffusion of 2,2,4-trimethylpentane (TMP) and 2,2,5-trimethylhexane (TMH) vapors put of residually contaminated sandy soil from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) field research site at Traverse City, Michigan, was measured and modeled. The headspace of an intact ...

  18. Mast cells in gastrointestinal disorders.

    PubMed

    Bischoff, Stephan C

    2016-05-05

    Mast cells are constitutively found in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. The three major physiological functions of GI mast cells comprise of - as far as we know - regulation of GI functions, namely epithelial and endothelial functions, crosstalk with the enteric nervous system, and contribution to the host defense against bacterial, viral and parasitic agents. A number of chronic GI diseases, including inflammatory bowel disease (Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis), celiac disease, irritable bowel syndrome, and food allergies, are thought to be associated with mast cell hyperplasia and humoral activity. Clinical conditions characterized by a decrease in mast cell functionality are not known so far. In the present review, we summarize current evidence which show that human mast cells play a central role at the GI barrier, both in health and disease.

  19. Visceral Pain and Gastrointestinal Microbiome

    PubMed Central

    Chichlowski, Maciej; Rudolph, Colin

    2015-01-01

    A complex set of interactions between the microbiome, gut and brain modulate responses to visceral pain. These interactions occur at the level of the gastrointestinal mucosa, and via local neural, endocrine or immune activity; as well as by the production of factors transported through the circulatory system, like bacterial metabolites or hormones. Various psychological, infectious and other stressors can disrupt this harmonious relationship and alter both the microbiome and visceral pain responses. There are critical sensitive periods that can impact visceral pain responses in adulthood. In this review we provide a brief background of the intestinal microbiome and emerging concepts of the bidirectional interactions between the microbiome, gut and brain. We also discuss recent work in animal models, and human clinical trials using prebiotics and probiotics that alter the microbiome with resultant alterations in visceral pain responses. PMID:25829337

  20. Gastrointestinal Malignancy and the Microbiome

    PubMed Central

    Abreu, Maria T.; Peek, Richard M.

    2014-01-01

    Microbial species participate in the genesis of a substantial number of malignancies—in conservative estimates, at least 15% of all cancer cases are attributable to infectious agents. Little is known about the contribution of the gastrointestinal (GI) microbiome to the development of malignancies. Resident microbes can promote carcinogenesis by inducing inflammation, increasing cell proliferation, altering stem cell dynamics, and producing metabolites such as butyrate, which affect DNA integrity and immune regulation. Studies in humans and rodent models of cancer have identified effector species and relationships among members of the microbial community in the stomach and colon that increase the risk for malignancy. Strategies to manipulate the microbiome, or the immune response to such bacteria, could be developed to prevent or treat certain GI cancers. PMID:24406471

  1. Gastrointestinal parasite infestation.

    PubMed

    Abd El Bagi, Mohamed E; Sammak, Bassam M; Mohamed, Abdulrahman E; Al Karawi, Mohamed A; Al Shahed, Mona; Al Thagafi, Mohamed A

    2004-03-01

    Twenty-five percent of the world's population could be suffering parasitic infestation. Highest prevalence is in underdeveloped agricultural and rural areas in the tropical and subtropical regions. In some areas incidence may reach 90% of the population. In contrast, some major economic projects intended to promote local development have, paradoxically, caused parasitic proliferation, e.g. bilharziasis in Egypt and Sudan and Chagas disease in Brazil. The commonest cosmopolitan gastrointestinal parasite is Entamoeba histolytica. Some intestinal parasite are endemic in temperate climates, e.g. Entrobius vermicularis. The AIDS epidemic has increased the prevalence and severity of parasitic disease, particularly Strongyloides stercolaris. Tropical parasites are seen in Western people who travel to tropical countries. Radiology has acquired a major role in diagnosis and management of gastrointestinal parasite infestations and their complications.

  2. [Microbiota and gastrointestinal diseases].

    PubMed

    Polanco Allué, I

    2015-12-01

    The bacterial colonisation is established immediately after birth, through direct contact with maternal microbiota, and may be influenced during lactation. There is emerging evidence indicating that quantitative and qualitative changes on gut microbiota contribute to alterations in the mucosal activation of the immune system, leading to intra- or extra-intestinal diseases. A balance between pathogenic and beneficial microbiota throughout childhood and adolescence is important to gastrointestinal health, including protection against pathogens, inhibition of pathogens, nutrient processing (synthesis of vitamin K), stimulation of angiogenesis, and regulation of host fat storage. Probiotics can promote an intentional modulation of intestinal microbiota favouring the health of the host. A review is presented on the modulation of intestinal microbiota on prevention, and adjuvant treatment of some paediatric gastrointestinal diseases.

  3. Small Particles Intact Capture Experiment (SPICE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishioka, Ken-Ji; Carle, G. C.; Bunch, T. E.; Mendez, David J.; Ryder, J. T.

    1994-01-01

    The Small Particles Intact Capture Experiment (SPICE) will develop technologies and engineering techniques necessary to capture nearly intact, uncontaminated cosmic and interplanetary dust particles (IDP's). Successful capture of such particles will benefit the exobiology and planetary science communities by providing particulate samples that may have survived unaltered since the formation of the solar system. Characterization of these particles may contribute fundamental data to our knowledge of how these particles could have formed into our planet Earth and, perhaps, contributed to the beginnings of life. The term 'uncontaminated' means that captured cosmic and IDP particles are free of organic contamination from the capture process and the term 'nearly intact capture' means that their chemical and elemental components are not materially altered during capture. The key to capturing cosmic and IDP particles that are organic-contamination free and nearly intact is the capture medium. Initial screening of capture media included organic foams, multiple thin foil layers, and aerogel (a silica gel); but, with the exception of aerogel, the requirements of no contamination or nearly intact capture were not met. To ensure no contamination of particles in the capture process, high-purity aerogel was chosen. High-purity aerogel results in high clarity (visual clearness), a useful quality in detection and recovery of embedded captured particles from the aerogel. P. Tsou at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) originally described the use of aerogel for this purpose and reported laboratory test results. He has flown aerogel as a 'GAS-can Lid' payload on STS-47 and is evaluating the results. The Timeband Capture Cell Experiment (TICCE), a Eureca 1 experiment, is also flying aerogel and is scheduled for recovery in late April.

  4. Gastrointestinal food allergies.

    PubMed

    Heine, Ralf G

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal food allergies present during early childhood with a diverse range of symptoms. Cow's milk, soy and wheat are the three most common gastrointestinal food allergens. Several clinical syndromes have been described, including food protein-induced enteropathy, proctocolitis and enterocolitis. In contrast with immediate, IgE-mediated food allergies, the onset of gastrointestinal symptoms is delayed for at least 1-2 hours after ingestion in non-IgE-mediated allergic disorders. The pathophysiology of these non-IgE-mediated allergic disorders is poorly understood, and useful in vitro markers are lacking. The results of the skin prick test or measurement of the food-specific serum IgE level is generally negative, although low-positive results may occur. Diagnosis therefore relies on the recognition of a particular clinical phenotype as well as the demonstration of clear clinical improvement after food allergen elimination and the re-emergence of symptoms upon challenge. There is a significant clinical overlap between non-IgE-mediated food allergy and several common paediatric gastroenterological conditions, which may lead to diagnostic confusion. The treatment of gastrointestinal food allergies requires the strict elimination of offending food allergens until tolerance has developed. In breast-fed infants, a maternal elimination diet is often sufficient to control symptoms. In formula-fed infants, treatment usually involves the use an extensively hydrolysed or amino acid-based formula. Apart from the use of hypoallergenic formulae, the solid diets of these children also need to be kept free of specific food allergens, as clinically indicated. The nutritional progress of infants and young children should be carefully monitored, and they should undergo ongoing, regular food protein elimination reassessments by cautious food challenges to monitor for possible tolerance development.

  5. Management of gastrointestinal hemorrhage.

    PubMed Central

    Hilsden, R. J.; Shaffer, E. A.

    1995-01-01

    Acute gastrointestinal hemorrhage is a common problem that requires prompt recognition and management to prevent serious morbidity and mortality. Management goals are stabilization of the patient with vigorous fluid resuscitation followed by investigation and definitive treatment of the bleeding source. Endoscopy is often the initial diagnostic test and allows therapeutic measures to be performed at the same time. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:8563510

  6. Xenopus egg cytoplasm with intact actin.

    PubMed

    Field, Christine M; Nguyen, Phuong A; Ishihara, Keisuke; Groen, Aaron C; Mitchison, Timothy J

    2014-01-01

    We report optimized methods for preparing Xenopus egg extracts without cytochalasin D, that we term "actin-intact egg extract." These are undiluted egg cytoplasm that contains abundant organelles, and glycogen which supplies energy, and represents the least perturbed cell-free cytoplasm preparation we know of. We used this system to probe cell cycle regulation of actin and myosin-II dynamics (Field et al., 2011), and to reconstitute the large, interphase asters that organize early Xenopus embryos (Mitchison et al., 2012; Wühr, Tan, Parker, Detrich, & Mitchison, 2010). Actin-intact Xenopus egg extracts are useful for analysis of actin dynamics, and interaction of actin with other cytoplasmic systems, in a cell-free system that closely mimics egg physiology, and more generally for probing the biochemistry and biophysics of the egg, zygote, and early embryo. Detailed protocols are provided along with assays used to check cell cycle state and tips for handling and storing undiluted egg extracts.

  7. Silica Aerogel Captures Cosmic Dust Intact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsou, P.

    1994-01-01

    The mesostructure of silica aerogel resembles stings of grapes, ranging in size from 10 to 100 angstrom. This fine mesostructure transmits nearly 90 percent of incident light in the visible, while providing sufficiently gentle dissipation of the kinetric energy of hypervelocity cosmic dust particles to permit their intact capture. We introduced silica aerogel in 1987 as capture medium to take advantage of its low density, fine mesostruicture and most importantly, its transparency, allowing optical location of captured micron sized particles.

  8. Hereditary gastrointestinal cancer syndromes.

    PubMed

    Lynch, Henry T; Lynch, Jane F; Shaw, Trudy G

    2011-07-01

    The rapid growth of molecular genetics and its attendant germline mutation discoveries has enabled identification of persons who are at an inordinately high cancer risk and, therefore, ideal candidates for prevention. However, one must fully appreciate the extensive genotypic and phenotypic heterogeneity that exists in hereditary cancer. Once the causative germline mutation has been identified in a patient, high-risk members of the family can be similarly tested and identified and provided highly targeted surveillance and management opportunities. DNA testing can change the individual's presumed risk status and affect decision making by patients and their physicians regarding surveillance and management. Our purpose is to describe familial/hereditary cancers of the gastrointestinal tract, including familial Barrett's esophagus, hereditary diffuse gastric cancer, gastrointestinal stromal tumors, familial adenomatous polyposis and desmoid tumors, Lynch syndrome, small bowel cancer, and familial pancreatic cancer. We use our discussion of Lynch syndrome as a model for diagnostic and clinical translation strategies for all hereditary gastrointestinal tract cancers, which clearly can then be extended to cancer of all anatomic sites. Highly pertinent questions from the patient's perspective include the following: What kind of counseling will be provided to a patient with a Lynch syndrome mutation, and should that counseling be mandatory? Does the proband have the responsibility to inform relatives about the familial mutation, even if the relatives do not want to know whether they carry it? Is the patient is responsible for notifying family members that a parent or sibling has Lynch syndrome? Can notification be forced and, if so, under what circumstances? These questions point out the need for criteria regarding which family members to inform and how to inform them.

  9. Effects of staphylococcal enterotoxin A on the rat gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed Central

    Beery, J T; Taylor, S L; Schlunz, L R; Freed, R C; Bergdoll, M S

    1984-01-01

    Staphylococcal enterotoxin A (SEA) was administered orally (15 micrograms) to two groups of rats. A marked immune reaction was evoked in the stomach and proximal small intestine of the first group. The second group of rats was used to study the absorptive fate and sites of action of orally administered SEA, utilizing immunoperoxidase staining. After oral dosing of the second group of rats. SEA-related immunoperoxidase staining was confined to: (i) neutrophils and macrophages, principally in the duodenum, and (ii) glomerular neutrophils and cells of the proximal convoluted tubules. Peroxidase staining of the kidney was noted within 15 min of exposure, indicating that SEA or some major postabsorption antigenic product can promptly pass through an intact gastrointestinal mucous membrane and become renally localized. Intestinal and renal detoxification and removal was indicated by an absence of detectable antigen in rats 180 min postexposure. Neuronal binding of SEA in the gastrointestinal tract was not demonstrable. Images PMID:6370862

  10. Evolution of a detailed physiological model to simulate the gastrointestinal transit and absorption process in humans, part II: extension to describe performance of solid dosage forms.

    PubMed

    Thelen, Kirstin; Coboeken, Katrin; Willmann, Stefan; Dressman, Jennifer B; Lippert, Jörg

    2012-03-01

    The physiological absorption model presented in part I of this work is now extended to account for dosage-form-dependent gastrointestinal (GI) transit as well as disintegration and dissolution processes of various immediate-release and modified-release dosage forms. Empirical functions of the Weibull type were fitted to experimental in vitro dissolution profiles of solid dosage forms for eight test compounds (aciclovir, caffeine, cimetidine, diclofenac, furosemide, paracetamol, phenobarbital, and theophylline). The Weibull functions were then implemented into the model to predict mean plasma concentration-time profiles of the various dosage forms. On the basis of these dissolution functions, pharmacokinetics (PK) of six model drugs was predicted well. In the case of diclofenac, deviations between predicted and observed plasma concentrations were attributable to the large variability in gastric emptying time of the enteric-coated tablets. Likewise, oral PK of furosemide was found to be predominantly governed by the gastric emptying patterns. It is concluded that the revised model for GI transit and absorption was successfully integrated with dissolution functions of the Weibull type, enabling prediction of in vivo PK profiles from in vitro dissolution data. It facilitates a comparative analysis of the parameters contributing to oral drug absorption and is thus a powerful tool for formulation design.

  11. Gastrointestinal Manifestations of Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis has historically been considered a pulmonary disease, but with the increasing life expectancy of these patients, gastrointestinal manifestations are becoming more important. Furthermore, nutritional status is closely linked to pulmonary function and, thus, overall mortality. This article discusses gastrointestinal manifestations (which involve nutritional, pancreatic, hepatobiliary, and, in particular, gastrointestinal tract issues) of cystic fibrosis as well as management of the disease. In addition, the article discusses studies that have been critical to our understanding of gastrointestinal manifestations of cystic fibrosis. PMID:27330503

  12. Management of gastrointestinal haemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, S; Watts, D; Kinnear, M

    2002-01-01

    A variety of endoscopic haemostatic techniques have enabled major advances in the management of not only bleeding peptic ulcers and bleeding varices, but also in a variety of bleeding lesions in the small intestine and in the colon. Indeed, the development and widespread implementation of endoscopic haemostasis has been one of the most important developments in clinical gastroenterology in the past two decades. An increasingly ageing cohort of patients with multiple co-morbidity are being treated and therefore improving the outcome of gastrointestinal bleeding continues to pose major challenges. PMID:11796865

  13. Esophageal subepithelial lesion diagnosed as malignant gastrointestinal neuroectodermal tumor.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung Bum; Lee, Si Hyung; Gu, Mi Jin

    2015-05-14

    A 21-year-old male visited our hospital with a complaint of aggravating dysphagia and odynophagia for a few days. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy showed huge bulging mucosa with an intact surface causing luminal narrowing at 35 cm from the incisor teeth. Endoscopic ultrasonography showed an about 35 mm sized irregular margined in-homogenous hypoechoic lesion with an obscure layer of origin. Endoscopic ultrasonography fine needle aspiration revealed spindle cell proliferation without immunoreactivity for CD117, SMA, and cytokeratin. The patient underwent excision of the subepithelial lesion at the distal esophagus. On pathologic examination of the specimen, the tumor was composed of short fascicles of oval to spindle cells with eosinophilic and clear cytoplasm and vesicular nuclei. The tumor cells were positive for S-100 and SOX10 and negative for CD117, SMA, HMB-45, melan-A, cytokeratin, and CD99. The split-apart signal was detected in EWSR1 on FISH, suggesting a malignant gastrointestinal neuroectodermal tumor. At the time of writing, the patient is on radiation therapy at the operated site of esophagus and doing well, with no recurrence for three months. Malignant gastrointestinal neuroectodermal tumor is a rare gastrointestinal tumor with features of clear cell sarcoma, without melanocytic differentiation, and shows a poor prognosis. This is the first reported case of malignant gastrointestinal neuroectodermal tumor arising as subepithelial lesion in the esophagus.

  14. Melatonin as a treatment for gastrointestinal cancer: a review.

    PubMed

    Xin, Zhenlong; Jiang, Shuai; Jiang, Peng; Yan, Xiaolong; Fan, Chongxi; Di, Shouyin; Wu, Guiling; Yang, Yang; Reiter, Russel J; Ji, Gang

    2015-05-01

    Gastrointestinal cancer is a disease that affects the population worldwide with high morbidity and mortality. Melatonin, an endogenously produced molecule, may provide a defense against a variety of cancer types. In particular, the ability of melatonin to inhibit gastrointestinal cancer is substantial. In this review, we first clarify the relationship between the disruption of the melatonin rhythm and gastrointestinal cancer (based on epidemiologic surveys and animal and human studies) and summarize the preventive effect of melatonin on carcinogenesis. Thereafter, the mechanisms through which melatonin exerts its anti-gastrointestinal cancer actions are explained, including inhibition of proliferation, invasion, metastasis, and angiogenesis, and promotion of apoptosis and cancer immunity. Moreover, we discuss the drug synergy effects and the role of melatonin receptors involved in the growth-inhibitory effects on gastrointestinal cancer. Taken together, the information compiled here serves as a comprehensive reference for the anti-gastrointestinal cancer actions of melatonin that have been identified to date and will hopefully aid in the design of further experimental and clinical studies and increase the awareness of melatonin as a therapeutic agent in cancers of the gastrointestinal tract.

  15. Glycemic responses, appetite ratings and gastrointestinal hormone responses of most common breads consumed in Spain. A randomized control trial in healthy humans.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Anton, Carolina; Rico, Maria C; Sanchez-Rodriguez, Estefania; Ruiz-Lopez, Maria D; Gil, Angel; Mesa, Maria D

    2015-05-27

    The present study was carried out to determine the glycemic index (GI), glycemic load (GL), insulinemic index (InI), appetite ratings and postprandial plasma concentrations of gastrointestinal hormones related to the control of food intake after the ingestion of the five most common breads consumed in Spain with different compositions and manufacturing processes. Twenty-two healthy adults participated in a randomized crossover study. The breads tested were Ordinary, Precooked-Frozen, Candeal-flour, Alfacar whites and Wholemeal. All breads portions were calculated to supply 50 g of available carbohydrates. In addition, 50 g of glucose was used as a reference. A linear mixed-effects model was used to compare data calculated for all breads with glucose load. The GI value varied from 61 for the Wholemeal, to Alfacar 68, Ordinary 76, and 78 and 86 for the Precooked-Frozen and Candeal-flour breads, respectively. Wholemeal and Alfacar had lower GI than glucose. All tested breads had a lower GL (ranged 9 to 18) compared with glucose. Wholemeal GL was similar to Alfacar, but lower than the other white breads. InI were significantly lower for all breads (ranged 68 to 73) compared with glucose, and similar among them. The intake of the Wholemeal bread led to a higher release of gastric inhibitory polypeptide compared with the Ordinary and Precooked breads and to a higher release of pancreatic polypeptide compared with the Precooked-Frozen bread. All breads affected appetite ratings similarly. In conclusion, based on GL, the Wholemeal bread would be expected to exert a favorable glycemic response.

  16. Glycemic Responses, Appetite Ratings and Gastrointestinal Hormone Responses of Most Common Breads Consumed in Spain. A Randomized Control Trial in Healthy Humans

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Anton, Carolina; Rico, Maria C.; Sanchez-Rodriguez, Estefania; Ruiz-Lopez, Maria D.; Gil, Angel; Mesa, Maria D.

    2015-01-01

    The present study was carried out to determine the glycemic index (GI), glycemic load (GL), insulinemic index (InI), appetite ratings and postprandial plasma concentrations of gastrointestinal hormones related to the control of food intake after the ingestion of the five most common breads consumed in Spain with different compositions and manufacturing processes. Twenty-two healthy adults participated in a randomized crossover study. The breads tested were Ordinary, Precooked-Frozen, Candeal-flour, Alfacar whites and Wholemeal. All breads portions were calculated to supply 50 g of available carbohydrates. In addition, 50 g of glucose was used as a reference. A linear mixed-effects model was used to compare data calculated for all breads with glucose load. The GI value varied from 61 for the Wholemeal, to Alfacar 68, Ordinary 76, and 78 and 86 for the Precooked-Frozen and Candeal-flour breads, respectively. Wholemeal and Alfacar had lower GI than glucose. All tested breads had a lower GL (ranged 9 to 18) compared with glucose. Wholemeal GL was similar to Alfacar, but lower than the other white breads. InI were significantly lower for all breads (ranged 68 to 73) compared with glucose, and similar among them. The intake of the Wholemeal bread led to a higher release of gastric inhibitory polypeptide compared with the Ordinary and Precooked breads and to a higher release of pancreatic polypeptide compared with the Precooked-Frozen bread. All breads affected appetite ratings similarly. In conclusion, based on GL, the Wholemeal bread would be expected to exert a favorable glycemic response. PMID:26024293

  17. 50 CFR 622.493 - Landing Caribbean queen conch intact.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... conch intact. (a) A Caribbean queen conch in or from the Caribbean EEZ must be maintained with meat and shell intact. (b) The operator of a vessel that fishes in the EEZ is responsible for ensuring...

  18. 50 CFR 622.493 - Landing Caribbean queen conch intact.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... conch intact. (a) A Caribbean queen conch in or from the Caribbean EEZ must be maintained with meat and shell intact. (b) The operator of a vessel that fishes in the EEZ is responsible for ensuring...

  19. Gastrointestinal Headache; a Narrative Review

    PubMed Central

    T Noghani, Majid; Rezaeizadeh, Hossein; Fazljoo, Sayed Mohammad Baqer; Keshavarz, Mansoor

    2016-01-01

    There are studies reporting primary headaches to be associated with gastrointestinal disorders, and some report resolution of headache following the treatment of the associated gastrointestinal disorder. Headache disorders are classified by The International Headache Society as primary or secondary; however, among the secondary headaches, those attributed to gastrointestinal disorders are not appreciated. Therefore, we aimed to review the literature to provide evidence for headaches, which originate from the gastrointestinal system. Gastrointestinal disorders that are reported to be associated with primary headaches include dyspepsia, gastro esophageal reflux disease (GERD), constipation, functional abdominal pain, inflammatory bowel syndrome (IBS), inflammatory bowel disorders (IBD), celiac disease, and helicobacter pylori (H. Pylori) infection. Some studies have demonstrated remission or improvement of headache following the treatment of the accompanying gastrointestinal disorders. Hypotheses explaining this association are considered to be central sensitization and parasympathetic referred pain, serotonin pathways, autonomic nervous system dysfunction, systemic vasculopathy, and food allergy. Traditional Persian physicians, namely Ebn-e-Sina (Avicenna) and Râzi (Rhazes) believed in a type of headache originating from disorders of the stomach and named it as an individual entity, the "Participatory Headache of Gastric Origin". We suggest providing a unique diagnostic entity for headaches coexisting with any gastrointestinal abnormality that are improved or cured along with the treatment of the gastrointestinal disorder. PMID:27800536

  20. Gastrointestinal Headache; a Narrative Review.

    PubMed

    T Noghani, Majid; Rezaeizadeh, Hossein; Fazljoo, Sayed Mohammad Baqer; Keshavarz, Mansoor

    2016-11-01

    There are studies reporting primary headaches to be associated with gastrointestinal disorders, and some report resolution of headache following the treatment of the associated gastrointestinal disorder. Headache disorders are classified by The International Headache Society as primary or secondary; however, among the secondary headaches, those attributed to gastrointestinal disorders are not appreciated. Therefore, we aimed to review the literature to provide evidence for headaches, which originate from the gastrointestinal system. Gastrointestinal disorders that are reported to be associated with primary headaches include dyspepsia, gastro esophageal reflux disease (GERD), constipation, functional abdominal pain, inflammatory bowel syndrome (IBS), inflammatory bowel disorders (IBD), celiac disease, and helicobacter pylori (H. Pylori) infection. Some studies have demonstrated remission or improvement of headache following the treatment of the accompanying gastrointestinal disorders. Hypotheses explaining this association are considered to be central sensitization and parasympathetic referred pain, serotonin pathways, autonomic nervous system dysfunction, systemic vasculopathy, and food allergy. Traditional Persian physicians, namely Ebn-e-Sina (Avicenna) and Râzi (Rhazes) believed in a type of headache originating from disorders of the stomach and named it as an individual entity, the "Participatory Headache of Gastric Origin". We suggest providing a unique diagnostic entity for headaches coexisting with any gastrointestinal abnormality that are improved or cured along with the treatment of the gastrointestinal disorder.

  1. Calcium Signaling in Intact Dorsal Root Ganglia

    PubMed Central

    Gemes, Geza; Rigaud, Marcel; Koopmeiners, Andrew S.; Poroli, Mark J.; Zoga, Vasiliki; Hogan, Quinn H.

    2013-01-01

    Background Ca2+ is the dominant second messenger in primary sensory neurons. In addition, disrupted Ca2+ signaling is a prominent feature in pain models involving peripheral nerve injury. Standard cytoplasmic Ca2+ recording techniques use high K+ or field stimulation and dissociated neurons. To compare findings in intact dorsal root ganglia, we used a method of simultaneous electrophysiologic and microfluorimetric recording. Methods Dissociated neurons were loaded by bath-applied Fura-2-AM and subjected to field stimulation. Alternatively, we adapted a technique in which neuronal somata of intact ganglia were loaded with Fura-2 through an intracellular microelectrode that provided simultaneous membrane potential recording during activation by action potentials (APs) conducted from attached dorsal roots. Results Field stimulation at levels necessary to activate neurons generated bath pH changes through electrolysis and failed to predictably drive neurons with AP trains. In the intact ganglion technique, single APs produced measurable Ca2+ transients that were fourfold larger in presumed nociceptive C-type neurons than in nonnociceptive Aβ-type neurons. Unitary Ca2+ transients summated during AP trains, forming transients with amplitudes that were highly dependent on stimulation frequency. Each neuron was tuned to a preferred frequency at which transient amplitude was maximal. Transients predominantly exhibited monoexponential recovery and had sustained plateaus during recovery only with trains of more than 100 APs. Nerve injury decreased Ca2+ transients in C-type neurons, but increased transients in Aβ-type neurons. Conclusions Refined observation of Ca2+ signaling is possible through natural activation by conducted APs in undissociated sensory neurons and reveals features distinct to neuronal types and injury state. PMID:20526180

  2. Gastrointestinal Kaposi sarcoma with appendiceal involvement.

    PubMed

    Egwuonwu, Steve; Gatto-Weis, Cara; Miranda, Roberto; Casas, Luis De Las

    2011-04-01

    Kaposi sarcoma is a vascular tumor manifesting as nodular lesions on skin, mucous membranes, or internal organs. This is a case of a 42-year-old human immunodeficiency virus- (HIV) positive bisexual male, not on highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) since diagnosis four years ago. He presented with a three-day history of abdominal pains, fever, vomiting, and a one-week history of melena stools. Endoscopy revealed Kaposi sarcoma in the stomach and duodenum. Postendoscopy, he developed acute abdomen. Exploratory laparotomy revealed extensive Kaposi sarcoma of the gastrointestinal tract with appendiceal involvement. The patient underwent appendectomy and had an uneventful recovery. A review of the literature discusses appendiceal Kaposi sarcoma with appendicitis, a rare but critical manifestation of gastrointestinal Kaposi sarcoma.

  3. Sodium Absorption by Intact Sugar Beet Plants

    PubMed Central

    El-Sheikh, Adel M; Ulrich, Albert

    1971-01-01

    Sodium absorption by intact sugar beet plants (Beta vulgaris) was found to be mediated by at least two distinct mechanisms when uptake was studied over a wide range of Na and K concentrations. The first mechanism operates at low Na concentrations (<1 milliequivalent per liter); presence of K completely blocks this mechanism for Na. The second mechanism operates at high Na concentrations (>1 milliequivalent per liter), transporting Na as well as K; but apparently this mechanism is not active for Na absorption in young sugar beet plants up to the 10-leaf stage. PMID:16657872

  4. Adhesion of bile-adapted Bifidobacterium strains to the HT29-MTX cell line is modified after sequential gastrointestinal challenge simulated in vitro using human gastric and duodenal juices.

    PubMed

    de los Reyes-Gavilán, Clara G; Suárez, Adolfo; Fernández-García, María; Margolles, Abelardo; Gueimonde, Miguel; Ruas-Madiedo, Patricia

    2011-06-01

    According to the FAO/WHO, in vitro criteria for selection of probiotics for food application consist of testing survival when confronted with gastrointestinal tract (GIT) challenge and the ability to colonize the colon. We used a model that simulated GIT transit using sequential immersion in gastric and duodenal juices of human origin to evaluate survival of bile-adapted Bifidobacterium strains. Bifidobacterium animalis tolerated gastric juice, whereas Bifidobacterium longum showed poor survival under these conditions. In contrast, B. animalis strains were more sensitive to duodenal juice than B. longum. The percentage of survival after GIT transit simulation (GITTS), determined both by plate counts and fluorescent probes, was significantly higher for bile-adapted strains than for corresponding parental ones. This suggests that use of bile-adapted strains is a suitable approach for increasing survival of bifidobacteria under the harsh conditions of the upper GIT. However, the bile resistance phenotype was not related to improvement of adhesion capacity, after GITTS, of the intestinal cell line HT29-MTX which constitutively produces mucus. This work shows that sequential GITTS with human juices modified the in vitro adhesion properties of the strains challenged with colonocyte-like cells.

  5. 7 CFR 160.29 - Containers to remain intact.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Containers to remain intact. 160.29 Section 160.29... STANDARDS FOR NAVAL STORES Analysis, Inspection, and Grading on Request § 160.29 Containers to remain intact... the containers holding such naval stores remain intact as sampled until the analysis,...

  6. Rapid isolation of intact chloroplasts from spinach leaves.

    PubMed

    Joly, David; Carpentier, Robert

    2011-01-01

    In this chapter, a rapid method to isolate intact chloroplasts from spinach leaves is described. Intact chloroplasts are isolated using two short centrifugation steps and avoiding the use of percoll gradient. Intactness of chloroplast is evaluated by the inability of potassium ferricyanide to enter inside the chloroplasts and to act as an electron acceptor for photosystem II.

  7. Multiplexed Intact-Tissue Transcriptional Analysis at Cellular Resolution.

    PubMed

    Sylwestrak, Emily Lauren; Rajasethupathy, Priyamvada; Wright, Matthew Arnot; Jaffe, Anna; Deisseroth, Karl

    2016-02-11

    In recently developed approaches for high-resolution imaging within intact tissue, molecular characterization over large volumes has been largely restricted to labeling of proteins. But volumetric nucleic acid labeling may represent a far greater scientific and clinical opportunity, enabling detection of not only diverse coding RNA variants but also non-coding RNAs. Moreover, scaling immunohistochemical detection to large tissue volumes has limitations due to high cost, limited renewability/availability, and restricted multiplexing capability of antibody labels. With the goal of versatile, high-content, and scalable molecular phenotyping of intact tissues, we developed a method using carbodiimide-based chemistry to stably retain RNAs in clarified tissue, coupled with amplification tools for multiplexed detection. The resulting technology enables robust measurement of activity-dependent transcriptional signatures, cell-identity markers, and diverse non-coding RNAs in rodent and human tissue volumes. The growing set of validated probes is deposited in an online resource for nucleating related developments from across the scientific community.

  8. Effects of Triclocarban on Intact Immature Male Rat

    PubMed Central

    Duleba, Antoni J.; Ahmed, Mohamed I.; Sun, Meng; Gao, Allen C.; Villanueva, Jesus; Conley, Alan J.; Turgeon, Judith L.; Benirschke, Kurt; Gee, Nancy A.; Chen, Jiangang; Green, Peter G.; Lasley, Bill L.

    2011-01-01

    Triclocarban (TCC; 3,4,4′-trichlorocarbanilide) is an antimicrobial agent used widely in various personal hygiene products including soaps. Recently, TCC has been shown to enhance testosterone-induced effects in vitro and to enlarge accessory sex organs in castrated male rats. This study was designed to evaluate the effects of TCC on intact age-matched male rats and on human prostate LNCaP and C4–2B cells. Seven-week-old male Sprague-Dawley rats received either a normal diet or a diet supplemented with TCC (0.25% in diet) for 10 days. Triclocarban induced hyperplasia of accessory sex organs in the absence of significant qualitative histological changes. Serum luteinizing hormone (LH) and testosterone were not significantly altered by TCC treatment. In prostate cancer-derived LNCaP and C4–2B cells, TCC potentiated androgen actions via androgen receptor-dependent actions. In conclusion, TCC significantly affects intact male reproductive organs and potentiates androgen effects in prostate cancer cells. PMID:20889956

  9. In vitro digestibility of bovine β-casein with simulated and human oral and gastrointestinal fluids. Identification and IgE-reactivity of the resultant peptides.

    PubMed

    Benedé, Sara; López-Expósito, Iván; Giménez, Gustavo; Grishina, Galina; Bardina, Ludmilla; Sampson, Hugh A; Molina, Elena; López-Fandiño, Rosina

    2014-01-15

    Stability during digestion is considered an important feature in determining the allergenicity of food proteins. This study aimed to provide an immunological characterisation of the digestion products of the major cow's milk allergen β-casein (β-CN) produced by in vitro orogastrointestinal hydrolysis with simulated and human digestive fluids. β-CN was unaffected by oral digestion, but quickly broke down during the early stages of gastric digestion. The degradation with human fluids was faster than that with commercial enzymes. There were similarities in the peptide patterns of the hydrolysates produced in both models, showing 20 peptides in common after gastric digestion. After gastroduodenal digestion, the human fluids gave less numerous and shorter peptides. The IgE binding of most of the individual sera used to the hydrolysates produced with simulated and human fluids increased at the end of the gastric phase and decreased when the duodenal digestion was completed. Two IgE-binding synthetic peptides: β-CN (57-68) and β-CN (82-93), which matched fragments released by β-CN following in vitro digestion with simulated and human fluids, consisted of the most immunoreactive areas of the protein. The similarities found between the in vitro simulated digestion system and that using human digestive fluids suggest that the former would provide a reasonably good estimation of the potential allergenicity of protein digests.

  10. Cellular and Molecular Mechanisms of 3,3′-Diindolylmethane in Gastrointestinal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Soo Mi

    2016-01-01

    Studies in humans have shown that 3,3′-diindolylmethane (DIM), which is found in cruciferous vegetables, such as cabbage and broccoli, is effective in the attenuation of gastrointestinal cancers. This review presents the latest findings on the use, targets, and modes of action of DIM for the treatment of human gastrointestinal cancers. DIM acts upon several cellular and molecular processes in gastrointestinal cancer cells, including apoptosis, autophagy, invasion, cell cycle regulation, metastasis, angiogenesis, and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. In addition, DIM increases the efficacy of other drugs or therapeutic chemicals when used in combinatorial treatment for gastrointestinal cancer. The studies to date offer strong evidence to support the use of DIM as an anticancer and therapeutic agent for gastrointestinal cancer. Therefore, this review provides a comprehensive understanding of the preventive and therapeutic properties of DIM in addition to its different perspective on the safety of DIM in clinical applications for the treatment of gastrointestinal cancers. PMID:27447608

  11. Hereditary gastrointestinal cancer.

    PubMed

    Hata, Keisuke; Yamamoto, Yoko; Kiyomatsu, Tomomichi; Tanaka, Toshiaki; Kazama, Shinsuke; Nozawa, Hiroaki; Kawai, Kazushige; Tanaka, Junichiro; Nishikawa, Takeshi; Otani, Kensuke; Yasuda, Koji; Kishikawa, Junko; Nagai, Yuzo; Anzai, Hiroyuki; Shinagawa, Takahide; Arakawa, Keiichi; Yamaguchi, Hironori; Ishihara, Soichiro; Sunami, Eiji; Kitayama, Joji; Watanabe, Toshiaki

    2016-10-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) cancer, including gastric and colorectal cancer, is a major cause of death worldwide. A substantial proportion of patients with GI cancer have a familial history, and several causative genes have been identified. Gene carriers with these hereditary GI syndromes often harbor several kinds of cancer at an early age, and genetic testing and specific surveillance may save their lives through early detection. Gastroenterologists and GI surgeons should be familiar with these syndromes, even though they are not always associated with a high penetrance of GI cancer. In this review, we provide an overview and discuss the diagnosis, genetic testing, and management of four major hereditary GI cancers: familial adenomatous polyposis, Lynch syndrome, hereditary diffuse gastric cancer, and Li-Fraumeni syndrome.

  12. Dysbiosis in gastrointestinal disorders.

    PubMed

    Chang, Christopher; Lin, Henry

    2016-02-01

    The recent development of advanced sequencing techniques has revealed the complexity and diverse functions of the gut microbiota. Furthermore, alterations in the composition or balance of the intestinal microbiota, or dysbiosis, are associated with many gastrointestinal diseases. The looming question is whether dysbiosis is a cause or effect of these diseases. In this review, we will evaluate the contribution of intestinal microbiota in obesity, fatty liver, inflammatory bowel disease, and irritable bowel syndrome. Promising results from microbiota or metabolite transfer experiments in animals suggest the microbiota may be sufficient to reproduce disease features in the appropriate host in certain disorders. Less compelling causal associations may reflect complex, multi-factorial disease pathogenesis, in which dysbiosis is a necessary condition. Understanding the contributions of the microbiota in GI diseases should offer novel insight into disease pathophysiology and deliver new treatment strategies such as therapeutic manipulation of the microbiota.

  13. [Gastrointestinal dysmotility in children].

    PubMed

    Fluge, G; Olafsdottir, E

    2001-03-20

    Motility disorders were previously impossible to penetrate, but new technics have made it possible to investigate these disorders. An overview of neurophysiological functions of the gastrointestinal tract is given, and various conditions representing primary and secondary motility disorders are discussed. Diagnostic procedures and treatment options are presented. The clinical picture of such disorders is demonstrated by two cases. A girl born in 1995, having megacystis microcolon hypoperistalsis syndrome was the first Norwegian individual to have an intestinal transplantation, which was performed in London, UK. A girl with hypoganglionosis is also reported. Since May 1998, manometry of the oesophagus was performed in 44 children, and pathological findings were demonstrated in 18 of these patients. The motoric activity of the stomach was investigated in 17 patients using two-dimensional ultrasound and electrogastrography pre- and post-prandially. Disturbed function was found in nine of these children. Anorectal manometry was performed in 147 individuals, and Hirschsprung's disease was diagnosed in four.

  14. Gastrointestinal infections in children.

    PubMed

    Mönkemüller, K E; Wilcox, C M

    2001-01-01

    Gastrointestinal infections in children are a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Children living in developing countries are particularly susceptible to infectious diarrhea because of poor standards of hygiene and sanitation. Although the magnitude of diarrheal illnesses in developed countries is less, costly hospital admissions are still frequent. The causal agent of infectious diarrhea is most frequently related to age, geographical location, lifestyle habits, use of antibiotics, associated medical conditions, social circumstances, and degree of immune competence. In this article we present some of the most important articles published in the field during the last year. The role of Helicobacter pylori in the pathogenesis of gastritis and peptic ulcer disease has been shown in adults and children. Information about the natural history of H. pylori, symptomatology, and diagnostic therapeutic approaches for children are being generated constantly; we discuss some of the most relevant information in this review.

  15. Disorders of gastrointestinal hypomotility

    PubMed Central

    Bielefeldt, Klaus; Tuteja, Ashok; Nusrat, Salman

    2016-01-01

    Ingestion and digestion of food as well as expulsion of residual material from our gastrointestinal tract requires normal propulsive, i.e. motor, function. Hypomotility refers to inherited or acquired changes that come with decreased contractile forces or slower transit. It not only often causes symptoms but also may compromise nutritional status or lead to other complications. While severe forms, such as pseudo-obstruction or ileus, may have a tremendous functional impact, the less severe forms of hypomotility may well be more relevant, as they contribute to common disorders, such as functional dyspepsia, gastroparesis, chronic constipation, and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Clinical testing can identify changes in contractile activity, defined by lower amplitudes or abnormal patterns, and the related effects on transit. However, such biomarkers show a limited correlation with overall symptom severity as experienced by patients. Similarly, targeting hypomotility with pharmacological interventions often alters gut motor function but does not consistently improve symptoms. Novel diagnostic approaches may change this apparent paradox and enable us to obtain more comprehensive information by integrating data on electrical activity, mechanical forces, patterns, wall stiffness, and motions with information of the flow of luminal contents. New drugs with more selective effects or more specific delivery may improve benefits and limit adverse effects. Lastly, the complex regulation of gastrointestinal motility involves the brain-gut axis as a reciprocal pathway for afferent and efferent signaling. Considering the role of visceral input in emotion and the effects of emotion on visceral activity, understanding and managing hypomotility disorders requires an integrative approach based on the mind-body continuum or biopsychosocial model of diseases. PMID:27583135

  16. Recollections of Parent Characteristics and Attachment Patterns for College Women of Intact vs. Non-Intact Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kilmann, Peter R.; Carranza, Laura V.; Vendemia, Jennifer M. C.

    2006-01-01

    This study contrasted offsprings' attachment patterns and recollections of parent characteristics in two college samples: 147 females from intact biological parents and 157 females of parental divorce. Secure females from intact or non-intact families rated parents positively, while insecure females rated parents as absent, distant, and demanding.…

  17. Oligodeoxynucleotide Probes for Detecting Intact Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosson, Reinhardt A.; Maurina-Brunker, Julie; Langley, Kim; Pynnonen, Christine M.

    2004-01-01

    A rapid, sensitive test using chemiluminescent oligodeoxynucleotide probes has been developed for detecting, identifying, and enumerating intact cells. The test is intended especially for use in detecting and enumerating bacteria and yeasts in potable water. As in related tests that have been developed recently for similar purposes, the oligodeoxynucleotide probes used in this test are typically targeted at either singlecopy deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) genes (such as virulence genes) or the multiple copies (10,000 to 50,000 copies per cell) of 16S ribosomal ribonucleic acids (rRNAs). Some of those tests involve radioisotope or fluorescent labeling of the probes for reporting hybridization of probes to target nucleic acids. Others of those tests involve labeling with enzymes plus the use of chemiluminescent or chromogenic substrates to report hybridization via color or the emission of light, respectively. The present test is of the last-mentioned type. The chemiluminescence in the present test can be detected easily with relatively simple instrumentation. In developing the present test, the hybridization approach was chosen because hybridization techniques are very specific. Hybridization detects stable, inheritable genetic targets within microorganisms. These targets are not dependent on products of gene expression that can vary with growth conditions or physiological states of organisms in test samples. Therefore, unique probes can be designed to detect and identify specific genera or species of bacteria or yeast (in terms of rRNA target sequences) or can be designed to detect and identify virulence genes (genomic target sequences). Because of the inherent specificity of this system, there are few problems of cross-reactivity. Hybridization tests are rapid, but hybridization tests now available commercially lack sensitivity; typically, between 10(exp 6) and 10(exp 7) cells of the target organism are needed to ensure a reliable test. Consequently, the numbers of

  18. What Are the Key Statistics about Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumors?

    MedlinePlus

    ... About Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumors What Are the Key Statistics About Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumors? Although the exact number ... a Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor? What Are the Key Statistics About Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumors? What’s New in Gastrointestinal ...

  19. Autistic disorder and gastrointestinal disease.

    PubMed

    Horvath, Karoly; Perman, Jay A

    2002-10-01

    Autistic disorder is a pervasive developmental disorder manifested in the first 3 years of life by dysfunction in social interaction and communication. Many efforts have been made to explore the biologic basis of this disorder, but the etiology remains unknown. Recent publications describing upper gastrointestinal abnormalities and ileocolitis have focused attention on gastrointestinal function and morphology in these children. High prevalence of histologic abnormalities in the esophagus, stomach, small intestine and colon, and dysfunction of liver conjugation capacity and intestinal permeability were reported. Three surveys conducted in the United States described high prevalence of gastrointestinal symptoms in children with autistic disorder. Treatment of the digestive problems may have positive effects on their behavior.

  20. In vitro bioactive properties of intact and enzymatically hydrolysed whey protein: targeting the enteroinsular axis.

    PubMed

    Power-Grant, O; Bruen, C; Brennan, L; Giblin, L; Jakeman, P; FitzGerald, R J

    2015-03-01

    Enzymatically hydrolysed milk proteins have a variety of biofunctional effects some of which may be beneficial in the management of type 2 diabetes mellitus. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of commercially available intact and hydrolysed whey protein ingredients (DH 32, DH 45) on markers of the enteroinsular axis (glucagon like peptide-1 secretion, dipeptidyl peptidase IV inhibition, insulin secretion and antioxidant activity) before and after simulated gastrointestinal digestion (SGID). A whey protein hydrolysate, DH32, significantly enhanced (P < 0.05) insulin secretion from BRIN BD11 β-cells compared to the positive control (16.7 mM glucose and 10 mM Ala). The whey protein hydrolysates inhibited dipeptidyl peptidase IV activity, yielding half maximal inhibitory concentration values (IC50) of 1.5 ± 0.1 and 1.1 ± 0.1 mg mL(-1) for the DH 32 and DH 45, samples respectively, and were significantly more potent than the intact whey (P < 0.05). Enzymatic hydrolysis of whey protein significantly enhanced (P < 0.05) its antioxidant activity compared to intact whey, as measured by the oxygen radical absorbance capacity assay (ORAC). This antioxidant activity was maintained (DH 32, P > 0.05) or enhanced (DH 45, P < 0.05) following SGID. Intact whey stimulated GLP-1 secretion from enteroendocrine cells compared to vehicle control (P < 0.05). This data confirm that whey proteins and peptides can act through multiple targets within the enteroinsular axis and as such may have glucoregulatory potential.

  1. Ghrelin and motilin in the gastrointestinal system.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chih-Yen; Tsai, Chang-Youh

    2012-01-01

    Human ghrelin and human motilin, belonging to the ghrelin/motilin-related peptide family, share 36% amino acid sequence identity, while the human ghrelin receptor exhibits a remarkable 50% overall identity with the human motilin receptor. In addition to their structural resemblance, ghrelin and motilin are the only two mammalian hormones known to decrease in the postprandial period. Ghrelin and motilin participate in initiating the migrating motor complex in the stomach, and stimulate gastrointestinal motility, accelerate gastric emptying, and induce "gastric hunger". In addition to modulating the release of growth hormone and gut motility, ghrelin plays a crucial role in the secretion and protection of the stomach and colon. Ghrelin mimetics and motilin agonists are currently being developed to reverse gastrointestinal hypomotility disorders. With additional appetite-enhancing, adiposity-promoting, and anti-inflammatory effects, ghrelin and rikkunshito (a traditional Japanese herb enhancing acyl ghrelin signaling) are superior to motilin in the treatment of cancer-related anorexia and cachexia, post-chemotherapy symptoms, rheumatological diseases, age-related frailty, as well as post-operative, septic, and post-burn gut ileus.

  2. TRANSCRIPTION FACTOR ACTIVATION FOLLOWING EXPOSURE OF AN INTACT LUNG PREPARATION TO METALLIC PARTICULATE MATTER

    EPA Science Inventory

    TRANSCRIPTION FACTOR ACTIVATION FOLLOWING EXPOSURE OF AN INTACT LUNG PREPARATION TO METALLIC PARTICULATE MATTER

    James M. Samet1,2, Robert Silbajoris1, Tony Huang1 and Ilona Jaspers3

    1Human Studies Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laborato...

  3. Protein methylation reactions in intact pea chloroplasts

    SciTech Connect

    Niemi, K.J. )

    1989-04-01

    Post-translational protein methylation was investigated in Pisum sativum chloroplasts. Intact pea chloroplasts were incubated with ({sup 3}H-methyl)-S-adenosylmethionine under various conditions. The chloroplasts were then separated into stromal and thylakoid fractions and analyzed for radioactivity transferred to protein. Light enhanced the magnitude of labeling in both fractions. One thylakoid polypeptide with an apparent molecular mass of 43 kDa was labeled only in the light. Several other thylakoid and stromal proteins were labeled in both light and dark-labeling conditions. Both base-labile methylation, carboxy-methylesters and base-stable groups, N-methylations were found. Further characterization of the methyl-transfer reactions will be presented.

  4. Drilling to gabbro in intact ocean crust.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Douglas S; Teagle, Damon A H; Alt, Jeffrey C; Banerjee, Neil R; Umino, Susumu; Miyashita, Sumio; Acton, Gary D; Anma, Ryo; Barr, Samantha R; Belghoul, Akram; Carlut, Julie; Christie, David M; Coggon, Rosalind M; Cooper, Kari M; Cordier, Carole; Crispini, Laura; Durand, Sedelia Rodriguez; Einaudi, Florence; Galli, Laura; Gao, Yongjun; Geldmacher, Jörg; Gilbert, Lisa A; Hayman, Nicholas W; Herrero-Bervera, Emilio; Hirano, Nobuo; Holter, Sara; Ingle, Stephanie; Jiang, Shijun; Kalberkamp, Ulrich; Kerneklian, Marcie; Koepke, Jürgen; Laverne, Christine; Vasquez, Haroldo L Lledo; Maclennan, John; Morgan, Sally; Neo, Natsuki; Nichols, Holly J; Park, Sung-Hyun; Reichow, Marc K; Sakuyama, Tetsuya; Sano, Takashi; Sandwell, Rachel; Scheibner, Birgit; Smith-Duque, Chris E; Swift, Stephen A; Tartarotti, Paola; Tikku, Anahita A; Tominaga, Masako; Veloso, Eugenio A; Yamasaki, Toru; Yamazaki, Shusaku; Ziegler, Christa

    2006-05-19

    Sampling an intact sequence of oceanic crust through lavas, dikes, and gabbros is necessary to advance the understanding of the formation and evolution of crust formed at mid-ocean ridges, but it has been an elusive goal of scientific ocean drilling for decades. Recent drilling in the eastern Pacific Ocean in Hole 1256D reached gabbro within seismic layer 2, 1157 meters into crust formed at a superfast spreading rate. The gabbros are the crystallized melt lenses that formed beneath a mid-ocean ridge. The depth at which gabbro was reached confirms predictions extrapolated from seismic experiments at modern mid-ocean ridges: Melt lenses occur at shallower depths at faster spreading rates. The gabbros intrude metamorphosed sheeted dikes and have compositions similar to the overlying lavas, precluding formation of the cumulate lower oceanic crust from melt lenses so far penetrated by Hole 1256D.

  5. Magnetic microcapsule exploration in the gastrointestinal cavity of the origins of colorectal cancer-associated DNA-damaging agents in the human diet.

    PubMed Central

    O'Neill, I; Bingham, S; Ellul, A; Incaurgarat, B

    1993-01-01

    Magnetically recoverable, semipermeable microcapsules have been devised for covalent entrapment of reactive substances in the intestinal cavity to biomonitor potentially DNA-damaging agents and the effects of etiologically important components of the human diet. These microcapsules have been shown to trap five types of agents in vivo, namely, carcinogen electrophiles, nitrosating agents, mutagens/carcinogens having a planar molecular structure, and as-yet unidentified endogenous cross-linking agents and precursors of reactive oxygen species. Substantial alterations in both total metabolites and types of metabolites trapped from [14C]benzo(a)pyrene were found to be caused by increasing (within the human intake range) the dietary levels of beef protein and dietary fiber. The system thus responds to a variety of potentially critical agents and in a manner consistent with epidemiologically important dietary modulators for colorectal carcinogenesis. Work toward recognizing entrapped endogenous agents has also begun. PMID:8319615

  6. Development of Eimeria bovis in vitro: suitability of several bovine, human and porcine endothelial cell lines, bovine fetal gastrointestinal, Madin-Darby bovine kidney (MDBK) and African green monkey kidney (VERO) cells.

    PubMed

    Hermosilla, C; Barbisch, B; Heise, A; Kowalik, S; Zahner, H

    2002-04-01

    Several bovine, human and porcine endothelial cell lines, bovine fetal gastrointestinal cells (BFGC), Madin-Darby bovine kidney (MDBK) and African green monkey kidney (VERO) cells were exposed in vitro to sporozoites of Eimeria bovis. Parasites invaded all cells used and changed their shape to more stumpy forms within 12 h. Sporozoites left their host cells and invaded new ones frequently within the first 12 h post-infection. Further development took place only in bovine cells, although parasites survived in the other cells for at least 3 weeks. Within the non-bovine cells, conspicuously enlarged parasitophorous vacuoles developed in VERO cells and reached a diameter of 15-20 microm. The best development to first generation schizonts with regard both to time required to mature, to schizont size and to merozoite yields was observed in BFGC, followed by bovine umbilical vein and bovine spleen lymphatic endothelial cells. MDBK cells were less suitable. The life cycle was completed (development of oocysts) only occasionally in BFGC. Results are considered under several aspects. Thus, infected VERO cells may represent a suitable tool for studying the parasitophorous vacuole, while infected endothelial cells represent a system quite narrow to the in vivo situation and should allow basic studies on parasite/host cell interactions and BFGC can be used for the mass production of E. bovis first generation merozoites.

  7. Anti-allergic effects of a nonameric peptide isolated from the intestine gastrointestinal digests of abalone (Haliotis discus hannai) in activated HMC-1 human mast cells.

    PubMed

    Ko, Seok-Chun; Lee, Dae-Sung; Park, Won Sun; Yoo, Jong Su; Yim, Mi-Jin; Qian, Zhong-Ji; Lee, Chang-Min; Oh, Junghwan; Jung, Won-Kyo; Choi, Il-Whan

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine whether the intestine gastrointestinal (GI) digests of abalone [Haliotis discus hannai (H. discus hannai)] modulate inflammatory responses and to elucidate the mechanisms involved. The GI digests of the abalone intestines were fractionated into fractions I (>10 kDa), II (5-10 kDa) and Ⅲ (<5 kDa). Of the abalone intestine GI digests (AIGIDs), fraction Ⅲ inhibited the passive cutaneous anaphylaxis (PCA) reaction in mice. Subsequently, a bioactive peptide [abalone intestine GI digest peptide (AIGIDP)] isolated from fraction Ⅲ was determined to be 1175.2 Da, and the amino acid sequence was found to be PFNQGTFAS. We noted that the purified nonameric peptide (AIGIDP) attenuated the phorbol‑12‑myristate 13-acetate plus calcium ionophore A23187 (PMACI)-induced histamine release and the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-6 in human mast cells (HMC-1 cells). In addition, we also noted that AIGIDP inhibited the PMACI‑induced activation of nuclear factor‑κB (NF-κB) by suppressing IκBα phosphorylation and that it suppressed the production of cytokines by decreasing the phosphorylation of JNK. The findings of our study indicate that AIGIDP exerts a modulatory, anti-allergic effect on mast cell-mediated inflammatory diseases.

  8. Hedgehog signaling and gastrointestinal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Saqui-Salces, Milena; Merchant, Juanita L.

    2017-01-01

    Hedgehog (Hh) signaling is critical for embryonic development and in differentiation, proliferation, and maintenance of multiple adult tissues. De-regulation of the Hh pathway is associated with birth defects and cancer. In the gastrointestinal tract, Hh ligands Sonic (Shh) and Indian (Ihh), as well as the receptor Patched (Ptch1), and transcription factors of Glioblastoma family (Gli) are all expressed during development. In the adult, Shh expression is restricted to the stomach and colon, while Ihh expression occurs throughout the luminal gastrointestinal tract, its expression being highest in the proximal duodenum. Several studies have demonstrated a requirement for Hh signaling during gastrointestinal tract development. However to date, the specific role of the Hh pathway in the adult stomach and intestine is not completely understood. The current review will place into context the implications of recent published data related to the biochemistry and cell biology of Hh signaling on the luminal gastrointestinal tract during development, normal physiology and subsequently carcinogenesis. PMID:20307590

  9. Epigenetic mechanisms and gastrointestinal development

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This review considers the hypothesis that nutrition during infancy affects developmental epigenetics in the gut, causing metabolic imprinting of gastrointestinal (GI) structure and function. Fundamentals of epigenetic gene regulation are reviewed, with an emphasis on the epigenetic mechanism of DNA ...

  10. Population Studies of Intact Vitamin D Binding Protein by Affinity Capture ESI-TOF-MS

    PubMed Central

    Borges, Chad R.; Jarvis, Jason W.; Oran, Paul E.; Rogers, Stephen P.; Nelson, Randall W.

    2008-01-01

    Blood plasma proteins with molecular weights greater than approximately 30 kDa are refractory to comprehensive, high-throughput qualitative characterization of microheterogeneity across human populations. Analytical techniques for obtaining high mass resolution for targeted, intact protein characterization and, separately, high sample throughput exist, but efficient means of coupling these assay characteristics remain rather limited. This article discusses the impetus for analyzing intact proteins in a targeted manner across populations and describes the methodology required to couple mass spectrometric immunoassay with electrospray ionization mass spectrometry for the purpose of qualitatively characterizing a prototypical large plasma protein, vitamin D binding protein, across populations. PMID:19137103

  11. First report of the isolation of an adult worm of the genus Brachylaima (Digenea: Brachylaimidae), from the gastrointestinal tract of a human.

    PubMed

    Butcher, A R; Parasuramar, P; Thompson, C S; Grove, D I

    1998-04-01

    A 78-year-old woman presented with an 18-month history of intermittent diarrhoea. Examination of her stools revealed brachylaimid eggs, which were present in three separate specimens over a week. After treatment with praziquantel a degenerate adult Brachylaima species was recovered from her faeces. She lived in a rural area of South Australia and ate vegetables grown in her own garden which had been infested with helicid snails. In south Australia these introduced European helicid snails are commonly infected with brachylaimid intermediate larval stages and are considered to be the source of the human infection.

  12. Gastrointestinal mucormycosis in immunocompromised hosts.

    PubMed

    Dioverti, M Veronica; Cawcutt, Kelly A; Abidi, Maheen; Sohail, M Rizwan; Walker, Randall C; Osmon, Douglas R

    2015-12-01

    Invasive mucormycosis is a rare fungal infection in immunocompromised hosts, but it carries a high mortality rate. Primary gastrointestinal disease is the least frequent form of presentation. Early diagnosis and treatment are critical in the management; however, symptoms are typically non-specific in gastrointestinal disease, leading to delayed therapy. To describe the clinical presentation, diagnosis, treatment and outcomes of gastrointestinal mucormycosis in immunocompromised hosts, we reviewed all cases of primary gastrointestinal mucormycosis in immunocompromised hosts reported in English literature as well as in our Institution from January 1st 1991 to December 31st 2013 for a total of 31 patients. About 52% of patients underwent solid organ transplant (SOT), while the rest had an underlying haematologic malignancy. Abdominal pain was the most common presenting symptom, followed by gastrointestinal bleeding and fever. Gastric disease was more common in SOT, whereas those with haematologic malignancy presented with intestinal disease (P = 0.002). Although gastrointestinal mucormycosis remains an uncommon condition in immunocompromised hosts, it carries significant morbidity and mortality, particularly in cases with intestinal involvement. A high index of suspicion is of utmost importance to institute early and appropriate therapy and improve outcomes.

  13. Lipomas of the gastrointestinal system.

    PubMed

    Dolai, Matilda; Andrejić, Bojana; Ivanov, Dejan

    2012-01-01

    Lipomas are rare benign tumors in the gastrointestinal system. Within the gastrointestinal system, 65% of the lipomas are located in the colon (sigmoid part of the colon or rectum) and rarely in the stomach and esophagus. The paper presents two gastrointestinal lipomas. First is the case of lipoma of the sigmoid colon and the other one is gastric lipoma. In both cases the material was sent for histopathological analysis due to suspicion of malignancy of the lesions. In both cases, the histopathologic analysis showed tumor made of mature adipocytes, localized in the submucosa both of the stomach and intestine. Hypercellularity and/or atypia of the cell was found in neither case. Lipomas are shown because of its atypical localization and clinically suspicious malignancy in the stomach and sigmoid colon. These cases show that the applied methods of preoperative diagnosis of tumors in the gastrointestinal system are not sufficient to determine the origin and biological behavior of tumors. Histopathological diagnosis provides a correct insight into the nature of tumors and determine the course of treatment. This paper presents a rare localization of lipomas in the gastrointestinal system. The preoperative diagnosis of lesions in the gastrointestinal system may not be sufficient to determine the origin and biological behavior of the lesions, hence the histopathological diagnosis gives an accurate insight into the nature of the change, preventing the possibility of further aggressive therapy.

  14. The gastrointestinal absorption of the actinide elements.

    PubMed

    Harrison, J D

    1991-03-01

    The greatest uncertainty in dose estimates for the ingestion of long-lived, alpha-emitting isotopes of the actinide elements is in the values used for their fractional absorption from the gastrointestinal tract (f1 values). Recent years have seen a large increase in the available data on actinide absorption. Human data are reviewed here, together with animal data, to illustrate the effect on absorption of chemical form, incorporation into food materials, fasting and other dietary factors, and age at ingestion. The f1 values recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection, by an Expert Group of the Nuclear Energy Agency and by the National Radiological Protection Board are discussed.

  15. Absorption and elimination of an oral dose of sup 3 H-deoxynivalenol in colostomized and intact chickens

    SciTech Connect

    Lun, A.K.; Moran, E.T. Jr.; Young, L.G.; McMillan, E.G. )

    1989-06-01

    Deoxynivalenol (DON or 3, 7, 15-trihydroxy-12, 13-epoxy-trichothec-9-en-8-one) is a mycotoxin produced by Fusarium graminearum that can contaminate grain. Domestic fowl are particularly tolerant to DON ingestion. Prelusky et al. orally administered {sup 14}C-DON to chickens and observed high radioactivity in the liver and bile with over 90% of the original label accruing in the excreta before 48 h. DON cannot be detected in portal blood concurrent to its disappearance from the gastrointestinal tract. Presumably, DON was structurally modified upon absorption then hepatically retrieved and excreted in bile. In the present experimentation, {sup 3}H-DON was intubated into colostomized and intact hens. The objective was to measure the progressive changes in distribution of radioactivity along the gastrointestinal tract, among body tissues and between urine and feces.

  16. Primary gastrointestinal lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Aledavood, Amir; Nasiri, Mohammad Reza Ghavam; Memar, Bahram; Shahidsales, Soodabeh; Raziee, Hamid Reza; Ghafarzadegan, Kamran; Mohtashami, Samira

    2012-01-01

    Background: Extranodal lymphoma may arise anywhere outside lymph nodes mostly in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract as non-Hodgkin's disease. We reviewed the clinicopathological features and treatment results of patients with primary GI lymphoma. Materials and Methods: A total number of 30 cases with primary GI lymphoma were included in this study. Patients referred to the Radiation Oncology Department of Omid Hospital (Mashhad, Iran) during a 5-year period (2006-11). Clinical, paraclinical, and radiological data was collected from medical records of the patients. Results: Out of the 30 patients with primary GI lymphoma in the study, 12 were female (40%) and 18 were male (60%) (male to female ratio: 3/2). B symptoms were present in 27 patients (90%). Antidiuretic hormone (LDH) levels were elevated in 9 patients (32.1%). The most common primary site was stomach in 14 cases (46.7%). Other common sites included small intestine and colon each in 8 patients (26.7%). All patients had histopathologically proven non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. The most common histologic subtype was diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBL) in 16 patients (53.3%). In addition, 28 patients (93.3%) received chemotherapy with cyclophosphamide, vincristine, doxorubicin, prednisolone (CHOP regimen). The median course of chemotherapy was 6 cources. Moreover, 8 patients (26.7%) received radiotherapy with cobalt 60. The median follow-up time was 26 months. The overall 5-year survival rate was 53% and the median survival time was 60 months. Conclusion: Primary GI lymphoma is commonly seen in stomach and small intestine and mostly is DLBCL or mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma. PMID:23626617

  17. Gastrointestinal Physiology and Function.

    PubMed

    Greenwood-Van Meerveld, Beverley; Johnson, Anthony C; Grundy, David

    2017-02-08

    The gastrointestinal (GI) system is responsible for the digestion and absorption of ingested food and liquids. Due to the complexity of the GI tract and the substantial volume of material that could be covered under the scope of GI physiology, this chapter briefly reviews the overall function of the GI tract, and discusses the major factors affecting GI physiology and function, including the intestinal microbiota, chronic stress, inflammation, and aging with a focus on the neural regulation of the GI tract and an emphasis on basic brain-gut interactions that serve to modulate the GI tract. GI diseases refer to diseases of the esophagus, stomach, small intestine, colon, and rectum. The major symptoms of common GI disorders include recurrent abdominal pain and bloating, heartburn, indigestion/dyspepsia, nausea and vomiting, diarrhea, and constipation. GI disorders rank among the most prevalent disorders, with the most common including esophageal and swallowing disorders, gastric and peptic ulcer disease, gastroparesis or delayed gastric emptying, irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Many GI disorders are difficult to diagnose and their symptoms are not effectively managed. Thus, basic research is required to drive the development of novel therapeutics which are urgently needed. One approach is to enhance our understanding of gut physiology and pathophysiology especially as it relates to gut-brain communications since they have clinical relevance to a number of GI complaints and represent a therapeutic target for the treatment of conditions including inflammatory diseases of the GI tract such as IBD and functional gut disorders such as IBS.

  18. Childhood functional gastrointestinal disorders

    PubMed Central

    Rasquin-Weber, A; Hyman, P; Cucchiara, S; Fleisher, D; Hyams, J; Milla, P; Staiano, A

    1999-01-01

    This is the first attempt at defining criteria for functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGIDs) in infancy, childhood, and adolescence. The decision-making process was as for adults and consisted of arriving at consensus, based on clinical experience. This paper is intended to be a quick reference. The classification system selected differs from the one used in the adult population in that it is organized according to main complaints instead of being organ-targeted. Because the child is still developing, some disorders such as toddler's diarrhea (or functional diarrhea) are linked to certain physiologic stages; others may result from behavioral responses to sphincter function acquisition such as fecal retention; others will only be recognizable after the child is cognitively mature enough to report the symptoms (e.g., dyspepsia). Infant regurgitation, rumination, and cyclic vomiting constitute the vomiting disorders. Abdominal pain disorders are classified as: functional dyspepsia, irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), functional abdominal pain, abdominal migraine, and aerophagia. Disorders of defecation include: infant dyschezia, functional constipation, functional fecal retention, and functional non-retentive fecal soiling. Some disorders, such as IBS and dyspepsia and functional abdominal pain, are exact replications of the adult criteria because there are enough data to confirm that they represent specific and similar disorders in pediatrics. Other disorders not included in the pediatric classification, such as functional biliary disorders, do occur in children; however, existing data are insufficient to warrant including them at the present time. For these disorders, it is suggested that, for the time being, clinicians refer to the criteria established for the adult population.


Keywords: infant vomiting; cyclic vomiting syndrome; functional dyspepsia in children; irritable bowel syndrome in children; functional abdominal pain in children; functional

  19. Gastrointestinal Emergency Room Admissions and Florida Red Tide Blooms.

    PubMed

    Kirkpatrick, Barbara; Bean, Judy A; Fleming, Lora E; Kirkpatrick, Gary; Grief, Lynne; Nierenberg, Kate; Reich, Andrew; Watkins, Sharon; Naar, Jerome

    2010-01-01

    Human exposure to brevetoxins during Florida red tide blooms formed by Karenia brevis has been documented to cause acute gastrointestinal, neurologic, and respiratory health effects.. Traditionally, the routes of brevetoxin exposure have been through the consumption of contaminated bivalve shellfish and the inhalation of contaminated aerosols. However, recent studies using more sensitive methods have demonstrated the presence of brevetoxins in many components of the aquatic food web which may indicate potential alternative routes for human exposure.This study examined whether the presence of a Florida red tide bloom affected the rates of admission for a gastrointestinal diagnosis to a hospital emergency room in Sarasota, FL. The rates of gastrointestinal diagnoses admissions were compared for a 3-month time period in 2001 when Florida red tide bloom was present onshore to the same 3-month period in 2002 when no Florida red tide bloom occurred. A significant 40% increase in the total number of gastrointestinal emergency room admissions for the Florida red tide bloom period was found compared to the non red tide period.These results suggest that the healthcare community may experience a significant and unrecognized impact from patients needing emergency medical care for gastrointestinal illnesses during Florida red tide blooms. Thus, additional studies characterizing the potential sources of exposure to the toxins, as well as the dose/effect relationship of brevetoxin exposure, should be undertaken.

  20. Uranium migration through intact sandstone cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Read, D.; Lawless, T. A.; Sims, R. J.; Butter, K. R.

    1993-06-01

    Uranium is often considered to be a mobile radioelement in the natural environment owing to its tendency to form stable complexes with a number of aqueous anions, particularly in oxidising milieu. A series of infiltration experiments were devised to investigate this migration behaviour under rigidly controlled laboratory conditions. Intact cores of Permo-Triassic Clashach Sandstone were pre-equilibrated with synthetic groundwater solutions and continuous flow-through of uranium monitored together with pH and concentrations of other ions. Prior to performing each experiment a simulation was carried out using a one-dimensional coupled chemical transport code, encompassing a thermodynamic description of the electrical double layer. These calculations together with electron microscopy indicated the potential role played by iron oxyhydroxide grain coatings in retarding the uranium plume. Thus, a second series of experiments was initiated on pre-acidified cores from which all surface exposed iron had been removed, allowing an assessment of the retention capacity of non-ferric components. Taken together, the data clearly illustrate the strong affinity of aqueous uranium species for natural surfaces even under strongly oxidising conditions. The success of the model in predicting a priori the dominant trends in uranium migration behaviour is encouraging and may aid in prioritising analytical requirements for investigations in more complex geochemical situations than those studied here.

  1. Molecular Testing for Gastrointestinal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hye Seung; Kim, Woo Ho; Kwak, Yoonjin; Koh, Jiwon; Bae, Jeong Mo; Kim, Kyoung-Mee; Chang, Mee Soo; Han, Hye Seung; Kim, Joon Mee; Kim, Hwal Woong; Chang, Hee Kyung; Choi, Young Hee; Park, Ji Y.; Gu, Mi Jin; Lhee, Min Jin; Kim, Jung Yeon; Kim, Hee Sung; Cho, Mee-Yon

    2017-01-01

    With recent advances in molecular diagnostic methods and targeted cancer therapies, several molecular tests have been recommended for gastric cancer (GC) and colorectal cancer (CRC). Microsatellite instability analysis of gastrointestinal cancers is performed to screen for Lynch syndrome, predict favorable prognosis, and screen patients for immunotherapy. The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitor has been approved in metastatic CRCs with wildtype RAS (KRAS and NRAS exon 2–4). A BRAF mutation is required for predicting poor prognosis. Additionally, amplification of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) and MET is also associated with resistance to EGFR inhibitor in metastatic CRC patients. The BRAF V600E mutation is found in sporadic microsatellite unstable CRCs, and thus is helpful for ruling out Lynch syndrome. In addition, the KRAS mutation is a prognostic biomarker and the PIK3CA mutation is a molecular biomarker predicting response to phosphoinositide 3-kinase/AKT/mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors and response to aspirin therapy in CRC patients. Additionally, HER2 testing should be performed in all recurrent or metastatic GCs. If the results of HER2 immunohistochemistry are equivocal, HER2 silver or fluorescence in situ hybridization testing are essential for confirmative determination of HER2 status. Epstein-Barr virus–positive GCs have distinct characteristics, including heavy lymphoid stroma, hypermethylation phenotype, and high expression of immune modulators. Recent advances in next-generation sequencing technologies enable us to examine various genetic alterations using a single test. Pathologists play a crucial role in ensuring reliable molecular testing and they should also take an integral role between molecular laboratories and clinicians. PMID:28219002

  2. 77 FR 17078 - Gastrointestinal Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-23

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Gastrointestinal Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. This notice announces a forthcoming meeting of a public advisory committee of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The meeting will be open...

  3. 77 FR 50701 - Gastrointestinal Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-22

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Gastrointestinal Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. This notice announces a forthcoming meeting of a public advisory committee of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The meeting will be open...

  4. 77 FR 37414 - Gastrointestinal Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-21

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Gastrointestinal Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. This notice announces a forthcoming meeting of a public advisory committee of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The meeting will be open...

  5. 77 FR 7587 - Gastrointestinal Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-13

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Gastrointestinal Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. This notice announces a forthcoming meeting of a public advisory committee of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). At least one portion of...

  6. 76 FR 59404 - Gastrointestinal Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-26

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Gastrointestinal Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. This notice announces a forthcoming meeting of a public advisory committee of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The meeting will be open...

  7. 76 FR 32220 - Gastrointestinal Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-03

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Gastrointestinal Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. This notice announces a forthcoming meeting of a public advisory committee of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The meeting will be open...

  8. Gastrointestinal Amyloidosis Presenting with Multiple Episodes of Gastrointestinal Bleeding

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Sang Hyeon Kang, Eun Ju; Park, Jee Won; Jo, Jung Hyun; Kim, Soo Jin; Cho, Jin Han; Kang, Myong Jin; Park, Byeong Ho

    2009-05-15

    Amyloidosis is characterized by the extracellular deposition of amyloid protein in various organs. Gastrointestinal involvement in amyloidosis is common, but a diagnosis of amyloidosis is often delayed. Severe gastrointestinal hemorrhage in amyloidosis is rare but can be fatal in some cases. We experienced a case of a 49-year-old man who presented with recurrent massive hematochezia. Although embolization was performed eight times for bleeding from different sites of the small intestine, hematochezia did not cease. We report the case, with a review of the literature.

  9. Whole-genome sequence assembly of Pediococcus pentosaceus LI05 (CGMCC 7049) from the human gastrointestinal tract and comparative analysis with representative sequences from three food-borne strains

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Strains of Pediococcus pentosaceus from food and the human gastrointestinal tract have been widely identified, and some have been reported to reduce inflammation, encephalopathy, obesity and fatty liver in animals. In this study, we sequenced the whole genome of P. pentosaceus LI05 (CGMCC 7049), which was isolated from the fecal samples of healthy volunteers, and determined its ability to reduce acute liver injury. No other genomic information for gut-borne P. pentosaceus is currently available in the public domain. Results We obtained the draft genome of P. pentosaceus LI05, which was 1,751,578 bp in size and possessed a mean G + C content of 37.3%. This genome encoded an abundance of proteins that were protective against acids, bile salts, heat, oxidative stresses, enterocin A, arsenate and universal stresses. Important adhesion proteins were also encoded by the genome. Additionally, P. pentosaceus LI05 genes encoded proteins associated with the biosynthesis of not only three antimicrobials, including prebacteriocin, lysin and colicin V, but also vitamins and functional amino acids, such as riboflavin, folate, biotin, thiamine and gamma-aminobutyrate. A comparison of P. pentosaceus LI05 with all known genomes of food-borne P. pentosaceus strains (ATCC 25745, SL4 and IE-3) revealed that it possessed four novel exopolysaccharide biosynthesis proteins, additional putative environmental stress tolerance proteins and phage-related proteins. Conclusions This work demonstrated the probiotic properties of P. pentosaceus LI05 from the gut and the three other food-borne P. pentosaceus strains through genomic analyses. We have revealed the major genomic differences between these strains, providing a framework for understanding the probiotic effects of strain LI05, which exhibits unique physiological and metabolic properties. PMID:25349631

  10. Screening for Human Immunodeficiency Virus, Hepatitis B Virus, Hepatitis C Virus, and Treponema pallidum by Blood Testing Using a Bio-Flash Technology-Based Algorithm before Gastrointestinal Endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Zhen, Chen; QuiuLi, Zhang; YuanQi, An; Casado, Verónica Vocero; Fan, Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Currently, conventional enzyme immunoassays which use manual gold immunoassays and colloidal tests (GICTs) are used as screening tools to detect Treponema pallidum (syphilis), hepatitis B virus (HBV), hepatitis C virus (HCV), human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), and HIV-2 in patients undergoing surgery. The present observational, cross-sectional study compared the sensitivity, specificity, and work flow characteristics of the conventional algorithm with manual GICTs with those of a newly proposed algorithm that uses the automated Bio-Flash technology as a screening tool in patients undergoing gastrointestinal (GI) endoscopy. A total of 956 patients were examined for the presence of serological markers of infection with HIV-1/2, HCV, HBV, and T. pallidum. The proposed algorithm with the Bio-Flash technology was superior for the detection of all markers (100.0% sensitivity and specificity for detection of anti-HIV and anti-HCV antibodies, HBV surface antigen [HBsAg], and T. pallidum) compared with the conventional algorithm based on the manual method (80.0% sensitivity and 98.6% specificity for the detection of anti-HIV, 75.0% sensitivity for the detection of anti-HCV, 94.7% sensitivity for the detection of HBsAg, and 100% specificity for the detection of anti-HCV and HBsAg) in these patients. The automated Bio-Flash technology-based screening algorithm also reduced the operation time by 85.0% (205 min) per day, saving up to 24 h/week. In conclusion, the use of the newly proposed screening algorithm based on the automated Bio-Flash technology can provide an advantage over the use of conventional algorithms based on manual methods for screening for HIV, HBV, HCV, and syphilis before GI endoscopy. PMID:27707942

  11. Screening for Human Immunodeficiency Virus, Hepatitis B Virus, Hepatitis C Virus, and Treponema pallidum by Blood Testing Using a Bio-Flash Technology-Based Algorithm before Gastrointestinal Endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Jun, Zhou; Zhen, Chen; QuiuLi, Zhang; YuanQi, An; Casado, Verónica Vocero; Fan, Yuan

    2016-12-01

    Currently, conventional enzyme immunoassays which use manual gold immunoassays and colloidal tests (GICTs) are used as screening tools to detect Treponema pallidum (syphilis), hepatitis B virus (HBV), hepatitis C virus (HCV), human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), and HIV-2 in patients undergoing surgery. The present observational, cross-sectional study compared the sensitivity, specificity, and work flow characteristics of the conventional algorithm with manual GICTs with those of a newly proposed algorithm that uses the automated Bio-Flash technology as a screening tool in patients undergoing gastrointestinal (GI) endoscopy. A total of 956 patients were examined for the presence of serological markers of infection with HIV-1/2, HCV, HBV, and T. pallidum The proposed algorithm with the Bio-Flash technology was superior for the detection of all markers (100.0% sensitivity and specificity for detection of anti-HIV and anti-HCV antibodies, HBV surface antigen [HBsAg], and T. pallidum) compared with the conventional algorithm based on the manual method (80.0% sensitivity and 98.6% specificity for the detection of anti-HIV, 75.0% sensitivity for the detection of anti-HCV, 94.7% sensitivity for the detection of HBsAg, and 100% specificity for the detection of anti-HCV and HBsAg) in these patients. The automated Bio-Flash technology-based screening algorithm also reduced the operation time by 85.0% (205 min) per day, saving up to 24 h/week. In conclusion, the use of the newly proposed screening algorithm based on the automated Bio-Flash technology can provide an advantage over the use of conventional algorithms based on manual methods for screening for HIV, HBV, HCV, and syphilis before GI endoscopy.

  12. [Characterization, influence and manipulation of the gastrointestinal microbiota in health and disease].

    PubMed

    García-Mazcorro, José F; Garza-González, Elvira; Marroquín-Cardona, Alicia G; Tamayo, José L

    2015-01-01

    The gastrointestinal tract harbors trillions of microorganisms that are indispensable for health. The gastrointestinal microbiota can be studied using culture and molecular methods. The applications of massive sequencing are constantly increasing, due to their high yield, increasingly accessible costs, and the availability of free software for data analysis. The present article provides a detailed review of a large number of studies on the gastrointestinal microbiota and its influence on human health; particular emphasis is placed on the evidence suggesting a relationship between the gastrointestinal microbial ecosystem and diverse physiological and immune/inflammatory processes. Discussion of the articles analyzed combines a medical approach and current concepts of microbial molecular ecology. The present revision aims to be useful to those interested in the gastrointestinal microbiota and its possible alteration to maintain, re-establish and enhance health in the human host.

  13. Bacterial delivery of large intact genomic-DNA-containing BACs into mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Wing; Kotzamanis, George; Abdulrazzak, Hassan; Goussard, Sylvie; Kaname, Tadashi; Kotsinas, Athanassios; Gorgoulis, Vassilis G; Grillot-Courvalin, Catherine; Huxley, Clare

    2012-01-01

    Efficient delivery of large intact vectors into mammalian cells remains problematical. Here we evaluate delivery by bacterial invasion of two large BACs of more than 150 kb in size into various cells. First, we determined the effect of several drugs on bacterial delivery of a small plasmid into different cell lines. Most drugs tested resulted in a marginal increase of the overall efficiency of delivery in only some cell lines, except the lysosomotropic drug chloroquine, which was found to increase the efficiency of delivery by 6-fold in B16F10 cells. Bacterial invasion was found to be significantly advantageous compared with lipofection in delivering large intact BACs into mouse cells, resulting in 100% of clones containing intact DNA. Furthermore, evaluation of expression of the human hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) gene from its genomic locus, which was present in one of the BACs, showed that single copy integrations of the HPRT-containing BAC had occurred in mouse B16F10 cells and that expression of HPRT from each human copy was 0.33 times as much as from each endogenous mouse copy. These data provide new evidence that bacterial delivery is a convenient and efficient method to transfer large intact therapeutic genes into mammalian cells.

  14. Experimental serpentinization of intact dunite cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luhmann, A. J.; Tutolo, B. M.; Kong, X. Z.; Bagley, B. C.; Schaen, A. T.; Saar, M. O.; Seyfried, W. E., Jr.

    2014-12-01

    Serpentinization in ultramafic-hosted hydrothermal systems, such as Lost City, produces relatively cool and alkaline fluids that support diverse ecosystems. To simulate serpentinization in such systems, we conducted single-pass, flow-through experiments on dunite cores cut out of a sample from Jackson County, North Carolina. Experimental seawater prepared using laboratory-grade reagents and standards was pumped through a core at 150ºC and 150 bar pore-fluid outlet pressure at a flow rate of 0.01 ml/min. An additional experiment will be conducted at 200ºC. At 150ºC, permeability decreased by 2.3 times with reaction progress over the course of the 36 day experiment. Fluid-rock reaction generally produced CO2, H2, CH4, and CO concentrations of 100 μmol/kg, up to 40 μmol/kg, 2 μmol/kg, and less than 1 μmol/kg, respectively. Outlet fluid chemistry was relatively stable, except for initial peaks in Al, Ba, Fe, Mn, and Si. pH of outlet fluids increased with reaction progress, but it was always lower (6.9-7.4) than the initial seawater (7.8). X-ray computed tomography scans were/will be collected for both pre- and post-experimental cores. The combination of flow-through experiments on solid, intact rock cores cut out of natural samples and X-ray tomography permits visualization and quantification of mineralogical changes and flow path evolution during serpentinization. This approach further permits physical and chemical processes to be documented on a fine scale to better understand feedbacks between chemical reactions and flow fields, with implications for ultramafic-hosted hydrothermal systems.

  15. Hemostatic powder spray: a new method for managing gastrointestinal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Papafragkakis, Haris; Ofori, Emmanuel; Ona, Mel A.; Krishnaiah, Mahesh; Duddempudi, Sushil; Anand, Sury

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal bleeding is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the United States. The management of gastrointestinal bleeding is often challenging, depending on its location and severity. To date, widely accepted hemostatic treatment options include injection of epinephrine and tissue adhesives such as cyanoacrylate, ablative therapy with contact modalities such as thermal coagulation with heater probe and bipolar hemostatic forceps, noncontact modalities such as photodynamic therapy and argon plasma coagulation, and mechanical hemostasis with band ligation, endoscopic hemoclips, and over-the-scope clips. These approaches, albeit effective in achieving hemostasis, are associated with a 5–10% rebleeding risk. New simple, effective, universal, and safe methods are needed to address some of the challenges posed by the current endoscopic hemostatic techniques. The use of a novel hemostatic powder spray appears to be effective and safe in controlling upper and lower gastrointestinal bleeding. Although initial reports of hemostatic powder spray as an innovative approach to manage gastrointestinal bleeding are promising, further studies are needed to support and confirm its efficacy and safety. The aim of this study was to evaluate the technical feasibility, clinical efficacy, and safety of hemostatic powder spray (Hemospray, Cook Medical, Winston-Salem, North Carolina, USA) as a new method for managing gastrointestinal bleeding. In this review article, we performed an extensive literature search summarizing case reports and case series of Hemospray for the management of gastrointestinal bleeding. Indications, features, technique, deployment, success rate, complications, and limitations are discussed. The combined technical and clinical success rate of Hemospray was 88.5% (207/234) among the human subjects and 81.8% (9/11) among the porcine models studied. Rebleeding occurred within 72 hours post-treatment in 38 patients (38/234; 16.2%) and in three porcine

  16. Gastrointestinal Symptoms of Marathon Runners

    PubMed Central

    Keeffe, Emmet B.; Lowe, Daniel K.; Goss, J. Richard; Wayne, Robert

    1984-01-01

    A survey of 707 participants in the 13th Annual Trail's End Marathon in Seaside, Oregon, showed a high incidence of gastrointestinal disturbances, predominantly of the lower tract, associated with long-distance running. The urge to defecate, both during and immediately after running, occurred in over a third of runners. Bowel movements (35%) and diarrhea (19%) were relatively common after running, and runners occasionally interrupted hard runs or races for bowel movements (18%) or diarrhea (10%). Lower gastrointestinal disturbances were more frequent in women than in men and in younger than in older runners. Awareness of the frequency and nature of gastrointestinal symptoms documented by this survey will assist physicians in evaluating abdominal complaints in runners. PMID:6506684

  17. Gastrointestinal symptoms of marathon runners.

    PubMed

    Keeffe, E B; Lowe, D K; Goss, J R; Wayne, R

    1984-10-01

    A survey of 707 participants in the 13th Annual Trail's End Marathon in Seaside, Oregon, showed a high incidence of gastrointestinal disturbances, predominantly of the lower tract, associated with long-distance running. The urge to defecate, both during and immediately after running, occurred in over a third of runners. Bowel movements (35%) and diarrhea (19%) were relatively common after running, and runners occasionally interrupted hard runs or races for bowel movements (18%) or diarrhea (10%). Lower gastrointestinal disturbances were more frequent in women than in men and in younger than in older runners. Awareness of the frequency and nature of gastrointestinal symptoms documented by this survey will assist physicians in evaluating abdominal complaints in runners.

  18. 46 CFR 28.570 - Intact righting energy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Intact righting energy. 28.570 Section 28.570 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY UNINSPECTED VESSELS REQUIREMENTS FOR COMMERCIAL FISHING INDUSTRY VESSELS Stability § 28.570 Intact righting energy. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (c) of...

  19. 46 CFR 28.570 - Intact righting energy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Intact righting energy. 28.570 Section 28.570 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY UNINSPECTED VESSELS REQUIREMENTS FOR COMMERCIAL FISHING INDUSTRY VESSELS Stability § 28.570 Intact righting energy. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (c) of...

  20. 50 CFR 622.186 - Landing fish intact.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...-Grouper Fishery of the South Atlantic Region § 622.186 Landing fish intact. (a) South Atlantic snapper-grouper in or from the South Atlantic EEZ must be maintained with head and fins intact, except as..., snapper-grouper lawfully harvested in Bahamian waters are exempt from the requirement that they...

  1. 50 CFR 622.186 - Landing fish intact.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...-Grouper Fishery of the South Atlantic Region § 622.186 Landing fish intact. (a) South Atlantic snapper-grouper in or from the South Atlantic EEZ must be maintained with head and fins intact, except as..., snapper-grouper lawfully harvested in Bahamian waters are exempt from the requirement that they...

  2. 50 CFR 622.455 - Landing spiny lobster intact.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Landing spiny lobster intact. 622.455... ATLANTIC Spiny Lobster Fishery of Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands § 622.455 Landing spiny lobster intact. (a) A Caribbean spiny lobster in or from the Caribbean EEZ must be maintained with head...

  3. 50 CFR 622.455 - Landing spiny lobster intact.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Landing spiny lobster intact. 622.455... ATLANTIC Spiny Lobster Fishery of Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands § 622.455 Landing spiny lobster intact. (a) A Caribbean spiny lobster in or from the Caribbean EEZ must be maintained with head...

  4. 46 CFR 28.570 - Intact righting energy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Intact righting energy. 28.570 Section 28.570 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY UNINSPECTED VESSELS REQUIREMENTS FOR COMMERCIAL FISHING INDUSTRY VESSELS Stability § 28.570 Intact righting energy. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (c) of...

  5. 46 CFR 28.570 - Intact righting energy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Intact righting energy. 28.570 Section 28.570 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY UNINSPECTED VESSELS REQUIREMENTS FOR COMMERCIAL FISHING INDUSTRY VESSELS Stability § 28.570 Intact righting energy. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (c) of...

  6. 46 CFR 28.570 - Intact righting energy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Intact righting energy. 28.570 Section 28.570 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY UNINSPECTED VESSELS REQUIREMENTS FOR COMMERCIAL FISHING INDUSTRY VESSELS Stability § 28.570 Intact righting energy. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (c) of...

  7. 50 CFR 622.10 - Landing fish intact--general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE FISHERIES OF THE CARIBBEAN, GULF OF MEXICO, AND SOUTH... landing fish intact that are broadly applicable to finfish in the Gulf EEZ and Caribbean EEZ, as specified... intact. (a) Finfish in or from the Gulf EEZ or Caribbean EEZ, except as specified in paragraphs (b)...

  8. 50 CFR 622.10 - Landing fish intact--general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE FISHERIES OF THE CARIBBEAN, GULF OF MEXICO, AND SOUTH... landing fish intact that are broadly applicable to finfish in the Gulf EEZ and Caribbean EEZ, as specified... intact. (a) Finfish in or from the Gulf EEZ or Caribbean EEZ, except as specified in paragraphs (b)...

  9. Blood thinners and gastrointestinal endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Monjur

    2016-01-01

    As the number of diagnostic and therapeutic gastrointestinal endoscopies is increasing, and there is an increase in number of patients taking blood thinners, we are seeing more and more patients on blood thinners prior to endoscopic procedures. Gastrointestinal bleeding or thromboembolism can occur in this category of patients in the periendoscopic period. To better manage these patients, endoscopists should have a clear concept about the various blood thinners in the market. Patients’ risk of thromboembolism off anticoagulation, and the risk of bleeding from endoscopic procedures should be assessed prior to endoscopy. The endoscopic procedure should be done when it is safe to do it. PMID:27668068

  10. Molecular predictive markers in tumors of the gastrointestinal tract

    PubMed Central

    Papadopoulou, Eirini; Metaxa-Mariatou, Vasiliki; Tsaousis, Georgios; Tsoulos, Nikolaos; Tsirigoti, Angeliki; Efstathiadou, Chrisoula; Apessos, Angela; Agiannitopoulos, Konstantinos; Pepe, Georgia; Bourkoula, Eugenia; Nasioulas, George

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal malignancies are among the leading causes of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Like all human malignancies they are characterized by accumulation of mutations which lead to inactivation of tumor suppressor genes or activation of oncogenes. Advances in Molecular Biology techniques have allowed for more accurate analysis of tumors’ genetic profiling using new breakthrough technologies such as next generation sequencing (NGS), leading to the development of targeted therapeutical approaches based upon biomarker-selection. During the last 10 years tremendous advances in the development of targeted therapies for patients with advanced cancer have been made, thus various targeted agents, associated with predictive biomarkers, have been developed or are in development for the treatment of patients with gastrointestinal cancer patients. This review summarizes the advances in the field of molecular biomarkers in tumors of the gastrointestinal tract, with focus on the available NGS platforms that enable comprehensive tumor molecular profile analysis. PMID:27895815

  11. Animal models of gastrointestinal and liver diseases. Animal models of cystic fibrosis: gastrointestinal, pancreatic, and hepatobiliary disease and pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Olivier, Alicia K; Gibson-Corley, Katherine N; Meyerholz, David K

    2015-03-15

    Multiple organ systems, including the gastrointestinal tract, pancreas, and hepatobiliary systems, are affected by cystic fibrosis (CF). Many of these changes begin early in life and are difficult to study in young CF patients. Recent development of novel CF animal models has expanded opportunities in the field to better understand CF pathogenesis and evaluate traditional and innovative therapeutics. In this review, we discuss manifestations of CF disease in gastrointestinal, pancreatic, and hepatobiliary systems of humans and animal models. We also compare the similarities and limitations of animal models and discuss future directions for modeling CF.

  12. Animal models of gastrointestinal and liver diseases. Animal models of cystic fibrosis: gastrointestinal, pancreatic, and hepatobiliary disease and pathophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Olivier, Alicia K.; Gibson-Corley, Katherine N.

    2015-01-01

    Multiple organ systems, including the gastrointestinal tract, pancreas, and hepatobiliary systems, are affected by cystic fibrosis (CF). Many of these changes begin early in life and are difficult to study in young CF patients. Recent development of novel CF animal models has expanded opportunities in the field to better understand CF pathogenesis and evaluate traditional and innovative therapeutics. In this review, we discuss manifestations of CF disease in gastrointestinal, pancreatic, and hepatobiliary systems of humans and animal models. We also compare the similarities and limitations of animal models and discuss future directions for modeling CF. PMID:25591863

  13. Histamine Receptor Expression in the Gastrointestinal Tract of Dogs.

    PubMed

    Schwittlick, U; Junginger, J; Hahn, K; Habierski, A; Hewicker-Trautwein, M

    2017-02-01

    Histamine is an important mediator of many physiological processes including gastrointestinal function that acts via four different histamine receptors (H1R to H4R). Elevated histamine levels and increased HR messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) have been shown in humans with gastrointestinal disorders such as irritable bowel syndrome or allergic intestinal diseases. As there is limited knowledge concerning the distribution of histamine receptors (HR) in dogs, one aim of this study was to investigate the expression of histamine 1 receptor (H1R), histamine 2 receptor (H2R) and histamine 4 receptor (H4R) in the canine gastrointestinal tract at protein level using immunohistochemistry. Histamine 1 receptor, H2R and H4R were widely expressed throughout the canine gastrointestinal tract including epithelial, mesenchymal, neuronal and immune cells. In addition, in situ hybridisation was established for detecting canine H4R mRNA. Results showed H4R mRNA to be present in enterocytes, lamina propria immune cells and submucosal plexus in the duodenum and colon of nearly all investigated animals. The results elucidate the importance of HR in the canine gut and represent the basis for investigating their possible impact on canine inflammatory gastrointestinal disorders.

  14. Development of spatial database on intact forest landscapes of India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudhakar Reddy, C.; Singh, Jyoti; Jha, C. S.; Diwakar, P. G.; Dadhwal, V. K.

    2017-01-01

    There is an increased interest in identifying the status of biodiversity in different spatial and temporal scales. The objective of the current research is to prepare a consistent spatial database of intact forest landscapes of India. The intact forest landscapes are located in the Himalayas, Andaman & Nicobar Islands, Western Ghats and Sunderbans. At national level 237 forest landscapes and 5.4% of the total natural forest remained as intact in India. Current intact forest landscapes of India consists of blocks larger than 10 km2 covering an area of 34,061 km2. Of the total area under intact forest landscapes, Eastern Himalayas represent 76.7% of the area, followed by Western Himalayas (8.8%), Andaman & Nicobar Islands (6.2%) and Western Ghats (5.7%). The largest intact forest landscape block occupies an area of 3342.9 km2 (9.8%) is found in western Arunachal Pradesh. Temperate forest zone represents the highest intactness (56.6%), followed by subtropical zone (19.2%), tropical zone (18.6%) and alpine zone (5.6%). Himalayan moist temperate forests represent the highest area (39.1%) of intact forest landscapes followed by subtropical broad-leaved hill forests, wet evergreen forests, and montane wet temperate forests. It is estimated that 4.4% of the area of intact forest landscapes fall inside the existing 47 protected areas. The results of the analysis best suited as input for the process of identification of new protected areas. The study recommends fine-scale mapping of biodiversity within the intact forest landscapes and to prepare efficient conservation plans.

  15. Vesta Is Not an Intact Protoplanet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Consolmagno, Guy; Turrini, Diego; Golabeck, Gregor; Jutzi, Martin; Sirono, Sin-iti; Svetsov, Vladimir; Tsiganis, Kleomenis

    2014-11-01

    Asteroid 4 Vesta has been identified as the likely source of howardite, eucrite, and diogenite (HED) basaltic achondrite meteorites, whose parent body differentiated and started solidifying within 3 Ma after the condensation of the Ca-Al-rich inclusions (CAIs). The formation of Jupiter and the disk-driven migration of the giant planets also occurred during this period; thus it was expected that Vesta could provide an intact record of large-scale early episodes of planetary migration and bombardment as in the proposed Jovian Early Bombardment and the “Grand Tack” scenarios. However, the results of the Dawn mission detailing Vesta’s mass, volume, density, and surface characteristics provide challenges for modeling the structure and evolution of this asteroid. All proposed models for the generation of the HEDs require the presence of a substantial olivine-rich mantle. But recent work on the depth of excavation of the large basins at the south pole of Vesta suggests that because there is not abundant mantle olivine visible on Vesta or in the Vestoid family asteroids, the crust of Vesta must be at least 80 km thick. Such a thick crust is radically at odds with previous models; should it exist, it ought to manifest itself in other ways such as Vesta’s density structure and bulk chemical composition. However, we find that no Vesta model of iron core, olivine-rich mantle, and HED crust can match the joint constraints of (a) Vesta’s density as derived from the gravity field observed by Dawn; (b) the observed depletion of sodium and potassium and trace element enrichments of the HED meteorites; and (c) the absence of exposed olivine on Vesta’s surface, among Vestoid asteroids, or in our collection of basaltic meteorites. Either Vesta was subjected to a radical change in composition, presumably due to the intense collisional environment where and when it formed, or the asteroid we see today is in fact a reaccretion of material formed elsewhere from now

  16. Computed tomography of the gastrointestinal tract

    SciTech Connect

    Meyers, M.A.

    1986-01-01

    This volume presents computed tomography of the major disease states involving the gastrointestinal tract, mesentery, and peritoneal cavity. Computed Tomography of the Gastrointestinal Tract combined experience of l5 authorities includes illustrations (most of these radiographs).

  17. Microbes in Gastrointestinal Health and Disease

    PubMed Central

    NEISH, ANDREW S.

    2010-01-01

    Most, if not all, animals coexist with a complement of prokaryotic symbionts that confer a variety of physiologic benefits. In humans, the interaction between animal and bacterial cells is especially important in the gastrointestinal tract. Technical and conceptual advances have enabled rapid progress in characterizing the taxonomic composition, metabolic capacity, and immunomodulatory activity of the human gut microbiota, allowing us to establish its role in human health and disease. The human host coevolved with a normal microbiota over millennia and developed, deployed, and optimized complex immune mechanisms that monitor and control this microbial ecosystem. These cellular mechanisms have homeostatic roles beyond the traditional concept of defense against potential pathogens, suggesting these pathways contribute directly to the well-being of the gut. During their coevolution, the bacterial microbiota has established multiple mechanisms to influence the eukaryotic host, generally in a beneficial fashion, and maintain their stable niche. The prokaryotic genomes of the human microbiota encode a spectrum of metabolic capabilities beyond that of the host genome, making the microbiota an integral component of human physiology. Gaining a fuller understanding of both partners in the normal gut-microbiota interaction may shed light on how the relationship can go awry and contribute to a spectrum of immune, inflammatory, and metabolic disorders and may reveal mechanisms by which this relationship could be manipulated toward therapeutic ends. PMID:19026645

  18. What's New in Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor Research and Treatment?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Stromal Tumor (GIST) About Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor What’s New in Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor Research and Treatment? There ... the Key Statistics About Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors? What’s New in Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor Research and Treatment? More ...

  19. [Motility and functional gastrointestinal disorders].

    PubMed

    Mearin, Fermín; Rey, Enrique; Balboa, Agustín

    2014-09-01

    This article discusses the studies on functional and motor gastrointestinal disorders presented at the 2014 Digestive Diseases Week conference that are of greatest interest to us. New data have been provided on the clinical importance of functional gastrointestinal disorders, with recent prevalence data for irritable bowel syndrome and fecal incontinence. We know more about the pathophysiological mechanisms of the various functional disorders, especially irritable bowel syndrome, which has had the largest number of studies. Thus, we have gained new data on microinflammation, genetics, microbiota, psychological aspects, etc. Symptoms such as abdominal distension have gained interest in the scientific community, both in terms of patients with irritable bowel syndrome and those with constipation. From the diagnostic point of view, the search continues for a biomarker for functional gastrointestinal disorders, especially for irritable bowel syndrome. In the therapeutic area, the importance of diet for these patients (FODMAP, fructans, etc.) is once again confirmed, and data is provided that backs the efficacy of already marketed drugs such as linaclotide, which rule out the use of other drugs such as mesalazine for patients with irritable bowel syndrome. This year, new forms of drug administration have been presented, including metoclopramide nasal sprays and granisetron transdermal patches for patients with gastroparesis. Lastly, a curiosity that caught our attention was the use of a vibrating capsule to stimulate gastrointestinal transit in patients with constipation.

  20. Virtual reality simulators for gastrointestinal endoscopy training

    PubMed Central

    Triantafyllou, Konstantinos; Lazaridis, Lazaros Dimitrios; Dimitriadis, George D

    2014-01-01

    The use of simulators as educational tools for medical procedures is spreading rapidly and many efforts have been made for their implementation in gastrointestinal endoscopy training. Endoscopy simulation training has been suggested for ascertaining patient safety while positively influencing the trainees’ learning curve. Virtual simulators are the most promising tool among all available types of simulators. These integrated modalities offer a human-like endoscopy experience by combining virtual images of the gastrointestinal tract and haptic realism with using a customized endoscope. From their first steps in the 1980s until today, research involving virtual endoscopic simulators can be divided in two categories: investigation of the impact of virtual simulator training in acquiring endoscopy skills and measuring competence. Emphasis should also be given to the financial impact of their implementation in endoscopy, including the cost of these state-of-the-art simulators and the potential economic benefits from their usage. Advances in technology will contribute to the upgrade of existing models and the development of new ones; while further research should be carried out to discover new fields of application. PMID:24527175

  1. Nutritional Aspects of Gastrointestinal Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Kaushik; Kavalukas, Sandra L.; Barbul, Adrian

    2016-01-01

    Significance: Although the wound healing cascade is similar in many tissues, in the gastrointestinal tract mucosal healing is critical for processes such as inflammatory bowel disease and ulcers and healing of the mucosa, submucosa, and serosal layers is needed for surgical anastomoses and for enterocutaneous fistula. Failure of wound healing can result in complications including infection, prolonged hospitalization, critical illness, organ failure, readmission, new or worsening enterocutaneous fistula, and even death. Recent Advances: Recent advances are relevant for the role of specific micronutrients, such as vitamin D, trace elements, and the interplay between molecules with pro- and antioxidant properties. Our understanding of the role of other small molecules, genes, proteins, and macronutrients is also rapidly changing. Recent work has elucidated relationships between oxidative stress, nutritional supplementation, and glucose metabolism. Thresholds have also been established to define adequate preoperative nutritional status. Critical Issues: Further work is needed to establish standards and definitions for measuring the extent of wound healing, particularly for inflammatory bowel disease and ulcers. In addition, a mounting body of evidence has determined the need for adequate preoperative nutritional supplementation for elective surgical procedures. Future Directions: A large portion of current work is restricted to model systems in rodents. Therefore, additional clinical and translational research is needed in this area to promote gastrointestinal wound healing in humans, particularly those suffering from critical illness, patients with enterocutaneous fistula, inflammatory bowel disease, and ulcers, and those undergoing surgical procedures. PMID:27867755

  2. Irisin immunohistochemistry in gastrointestinal system cancers.

    PubMed

    Aydin, S; Kuloglu, T; Ozercan, M R; Albayrak, S; Aydin, S; Bakal, U; Yilmaz, M; Kalayci, M; Yardim, M; Sarac, M; Kazez, A; Kocdor, H; Kanat, B; Ozercan, İ H; Gonen, M; Bilgen, M; Balgetir, F

    2016-01-01

    Cancer is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Some studies have shown that high heat kills cancer cells. Irisin is a protein involved in heat production by converting white into brown adipose tissue, but there is no information about how its expression changes in cancerous tissues. We used irisin antibody immunohistochemistry to investigate changes in irisin expression in gastrointestinal cancers compared to normal tissues. Irisin was found in human brain neuroglial cells, esophageal epithelial cells, esophageal epidermoid carcinoma, esophageal adenocarcinoma and neuroendocrine esophageal carcinoma, gastric glands, gastric adenosquamous carcinoma, gastric neuroendocrine carcinoma, gastric signet ring cell carcinoma, neutrophils in vascular tissues, intestinal glands of colon, colon adenocarcinoma, mucinous colon adenocarcinoma, hepatocytes, hepatocellular carcinoma, islets of Langerhans, exocrine pancreas, acinar cells and interlobular and interlobular ducts of normal pancreas, pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, and intra- and interlobular ducts of cancerous pancreatic tissue. Histoscores (area × intensity) indicated that irisin was increased significantly in gastrointestinal cancer tissues, except liver cancers. Our findings suggest that the relation of irisin to cancer warrants further investigation.

  3. Measurement of the Mechanical Properties of Intact Collagen Fibrils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mercedes, H.; Heim, A.; Matthews, W. G.; Koob, T.

    2006-03-01

    Motivated by the genetic disorder Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS), in which proper collagen synthesis is interrupted, we are investigating the structural and mechanical properties of collagen fibrils. The fibrous glycoprotein collagen is the most abundant protein found in the human body and plays a key role in the extracellular matrix of the connective tissue, the properties of which are altered in EDS. We have selected as our model system the collagen fibrils of the sea cucumber dermis, a naturally mutable tissue. This system allows us to work with native fibrils which have their proteoglycan complement intact, something that is not possible with reconstituted mammalian collagen fibrils. Using atomic force microscopy, we measure, as a function of the concentration of divalent cations, the fibril diameter, its response to force loading, and the changes in its rigidity. Through these experiments, we will shed light on the mechanisms which control the properties of the sea cucumber dermis and hope to help explain the altered connective tissue extracellular matrix properties associated with EDS.

  4. Reflectance Spectra Comparison of Orbital Debris, Intact Spacecraft, and Intact Rocket Bodies in the GEO Regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albercromby, Kira J.; Abell, Paul; Barker, Ed

    2009-03-01

    A key objective of NASA's Orbital Debris program office at Johnson Space Center (JSC) is to characterize the debris environment by way of assessing the physical properties (type, mass, density, and size) of objects in orbit. Knowledge of the geosynchronous orbit (GEO) debris environment in particular can be used to determine the hazard probability at specific GEO altitudes and aid predictions of the future environment. To calculate an optical size from an intensity measurement of an object in the GEO regime, a 0.175 albedo is assumed currently. However, identification of specific material type or types could improve albedo accuracy and yield a more accurate size estimate for the debris piece. Using spectroscopy, it is possible to determine the surface materials of space objects. The study described herein used the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF) to record spectral data in the ~ 0.65 to 2.5 micron regime on eight catalogued space objects. For comparison, all of the objects observed were in GEO or near-GEO. The eight objects consisted of two intact spacecraft, three rocket bodies, and three catalogued debris pieces. Two of the debris pieces stemmed from Titan 3C transtage breakup and the third is from COSMOS 2054. The reflectance spectra of the Titan 3C pieces share similar slopes (increasing with wavelength) and lack any strong absorption features. The COSMOS debris spectrum has a slight slope and has no absorption features. In contrast, the intact spacecraft show classic absorption features due to solar cells with a strong band gap feature near 1 micron. The two spacecraft were spin-stabilized objects and therefore have solar panels surrounding the outer surface. Two of the three rocket bodies are inertial upper stage (IUS) rocket bodies and have similar looking spectra. The slopes flatten out near 1.5 microns with absorption features in the near-infrared that are similar to that of white paint. The third rocket body has a similar flattening of slope but

  5. Reflectance Spectra Comparison of Orbital Debris, Intact Spacecraft, and Intact Rocket Bodies in the GEO Regime

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barker, Ed; Abercromby, Kira J.; Abell, Paul

    2009-01-01

    A key objective of NASA s Orbital Debris program office at Johnson Space Center (JSC) is to characterize the debris environment by way of assessing the physical properties (type, mass, density, and size) of objects in orbit. Knowledge of the geosynchronous orbit (GEO) debris environment in particular can be used to determine the hazard probability at specific GEO altitudes and aid predictions of the future environment. To calculate an optical size from an intensity measurement of an object in the GEO regime, a 0.175 albedo is assumed currently. However, identification of specific material type or types could improve albedo accuracy and yield a more accurate size estimate for the debris piece. Using spectroscopy, it is possible to determine the surface materials of space objects. The study described herein used the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF) to record spectral data in the 0.6 to 2.5 micron regime on eight catalogued space objects. For comparison, all of the objects observed were in GEO or near-GEO. The eight objects consisted of two intact spacecraft, three rocket bodies, and three catalogued debris pieces. Two of the debris pieces stemmed from Titan 3C transtage breakup and the third is from COSMOS 2054. The reflectance spectra of the Titan 3C pieces share similar slopes (increasing with wavelength) and lack any strong absorption features. The COSMOS debris spectra is flat and has no absorption features. In contrast, the intact spacecraft show classic absorption features due to solar panels with a strong band gap feature near 1 micron. The two spacecraft are spin-stabilized objects and therefore have solar panels surrounding the outer surface. Two of the three rocket bodies are inertial upper stage (IUS) rocket bodies and have similar looking spectra. The slopes flatten out near 1.5 microns with absorption features in the near-infrared that are similar to that of white paint. The third rocket body has a similar flattening of slope but with fewer

  6. Treatment for burn blisters: debride or leave intact?

    PubMed

    Murphy, Faye; Amblum, Jeshi

    2014-05-01

    This article presents findings from a systematic literature review of whether blisters arising from minor burns should be de-roofed or left intact. It discusses the risks of infection, healing outcomes, discomfort, choice of dressings and costs associated with each method, and reveals that debriding blisters larger than the patient's little fingernail while leaving smaller ones intact is generally agreed to be the best option. The article also explains external factors that influence the choice of whether to debride or leave blisters intact, reviews policy at the trust where one of the authors works in the context of the research and makes recommendations for practice.

  7. Some aspects of the effects of PL-10.1.AK-15 on the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Erceg, D; Simicevic, V N; Kolega, M; Dohoczky, C

    1997-01-01

    PL-10.1.AK-15 is an active fragment of a naturally occurring protein first isolated from human gastric juice. Among its other protective effects, PL-10.1.AK-15 has demonstrated a protective effect on the gastrointestinal tract. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of PL-10.1.AK-15 on two functional parameters of gastrointestinal function: gastric acid secretion and gastrointestinal motility. Gastric acid secretion was assessed in male Wistar rats using a modified method of Shay, while gastrointestinal motility was assessed in male NMRI mice by charcoal propulsion. PL-10.1.AK-15 was given in three different doses (3, 10 and 100 micrograms/kg body weight) in accordance with the experimental protocol. The results of these experiments indicate that PL-10.1.AK-15 in the investigated doses had no influence on gastric acid secretion or gastrointestinal motility.

  8. 50 CFR 622.276 - Landing fish intact.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE FISHERIES OF THE CARIBBEAN, GULF OF MEXICO, AND SOUTH ATLANTIC Dolphin and Wahoo Fishery Off the Atlantic States § 622.276 Landing fish intact. (a) Dolphin and wahoo in or...

  9. 50 CFR 622.276 - Landing fish intact.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE FISHERIES OF THE CARIBBEAN, GULF OF MEXICO, AND SOUTH ATLANTIC Dolphin and Wahoo Fishery Off the Atlantic States § 622.276 Landing fish intact. (a) Dolphin and wahoo in or...

  10. 56. POWDER MAGAZINE, VIEW OF INTACT WOOD SHEATHING ON THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    56. POWDER MAGAZINE, VIEW OF INTACT WOOD SHEATHING ON THE SOUTHWEST REAR VENTILATION PASSAGE. (SHEATHING HELP CONTROL HUMIDITY AND DECREASE DANGER OF MAETAL STRIKING STONE AND SPARKING.) - Fort Monroe, Fortress, Hampton, Hampton, VA

  11. 50 CFR 622.247 - Landing golden crab intact.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... ATLANTIC Golden Crab Fishery of the South Atlantic Region § 622.247 Landing golden crab intact. The... ashore. (a) A golden crab in or from the South Atlantic EEZ must be maintained in whole condition...

  12. 50 CFR 622.247 - Landing golden crab intact.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... ATLANTIC Golden Crab Fishery of the South Atlantic Region § 622.247 Landing golden crab intact. The... ashore. (a) A golden crab in or from the South Atlantic EEZ must be maintained in whole condition...

  13. Acoustic emissions during deformation of intact and jointed welded tuff

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holcomb, D. J.; Teufel, L. W.

    1982-07-01

    Monitoring of acoustic emissions (AE) has been widely used as a means of detecting failure in intact rock. For intact rock the technique is simple, because an increasing rate of AE is usually a sign of impending failure. However, most large rock masses contain numerous joints and the behavior of the joints controls the properties of the rock mass In particular, the failure mode often becomes stable or unstable slip (stick-slip) on a joint at stresses well below those required for failure of the intact rock. As an aid to understanding and monitoring the behavior of jointed rock masses, we have done a series of experiments on intact and artificially jointed samples of Grouse Canyon tuff. The tuff was selected because it is under consideration as a disposal medium for nuclear wastes. The samples were instrumented to measure axial and transverse displacements and AE rates.

  14. Preparation of Cardiac Extracellular Matrix from an Intact Porcine Heart

    PubMed Central

    Wainwright, John M.; Czajka, Caitlin A.; Patel, Urvi B.; Freytes, Donald O.; Tobita, Kimimasa; Gilbert, Thomas W.

    2010-01-01

    Whole organ engineering would benefit from a three-dimensional scaffold produced from intact organ-specific extracellular matrix (ECM). The microenvironment and architecture provided by such a scaffold would likely support site-appropriate cell differentiation and spatial organization. The methods to produce such scaffolds from intact organs require customized decellularization protocols. In the present study, intact adult porcine hearts were successfully decellularized in less than 10 h using pulsatile retrograde aortic perfusion. Serial perfusion of an enzymatic, nonionic detergent, ionic detergent, and acid solution with hypotonic and hypertonic rinses was used to systematically remove cellular content. The resultant cardiac ECM retained collagen, elastin, and glycosaminoglycans, and mechanical integrity. Cardiac ECM supported the formation of organized chicken cardiomyocyte sarcomere structure in vitro. The intact decellularized porcine heart provides a tissue engineering template that may be beneficial for future preclinical studies and eventual clinical applications. PMID:19702513

  15. Preparation of cardiac extracellular matrix from an intact porcine heart.

    PubMed

    Wainwright, John M; Czajka, Caitlin A; Patel, Urvi B; Freytes, Donald O; Tobita, Kimimasa; Gilbert, Thomas W; Badylak, Stephen F

    2010-06-01

    Whole organ engineering would benefit from a three-dimensional scaffold produced from intact organ-specific extracellular matrix (ECM). The microenvironment and architecture provided by such a scaffold would likely support site-appropriate cell differentiation and spatial organization. The methods to produce such scaffolds from intact organs require customized decellularization protocols. In the present study, intact adult porcine hearts were successfully decellularized in less than 10 h using pulsatile retrograde aortic perfusion. Serial perfusion of an enzymatic, nonionic detergent, ionic detergent, and acid solution with hypotonic and hypertonic rinses was used to systematically remove cellular content. The resultant cardiac ECM retained collagen, elastin, and glycosaminoglycans, and mechanical integrity. Cardiac ECM supported the formation of organized chicken cardiomyocyte sarcomere structure in vitro. The intact decellularized porcine heart provides a tissue engineering template that may be beneficial for future preclinical studies and eventual clinical applications.

  16. New insights into gastrointestinal anthrax infection.

    PubMed

    Owen, Jennifer L; Yang, Tao; Mohamadzadeh, Mansour

    2015-03-01

    Bacterial infections are the primary cause of gastrointestinal (GI) disorders in both developing and developed countries, and are particularly dangerous for infants and children. Bacillus anthracis is the 'archetype zoonotic' pathogen; no other infectious disease affects such a broad range of species, including humans. Importantly, there are more case reports of GI anthrax infection in children than inhalational disease. Early diagnosis is difficult and widespread systemic disease develops rapidly. This review highlights new findings concerning the roles of the gut epithelia, commensal microbiota, and innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) in initiation of disease and systemic dissemination in animal models of GI anthrax, the understanding of which is crucial to designing alternative therapies that target the establishment of infection.

  17. Gastrointestinal lesions associated with spondyloarthropathies

    PubMed Central

    Orlando, Ambrogio; Renna, Sara; Perricone, Giovanni; Cottone, Mario

    2009-01-01

    Subclinical gut inflammation has been described in up to two-thirds of patients with spondyloarthropathies (SpA). Arthritis represents an extra-intestinal manifestation of several gastrointestinal diseases, including inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), Whipple’s disease, Behcet’s disease, celiac disease, intestinal bypass surgery, parasitic infections of the gut and pseudomembranous colitis. Moreover about two-thirds of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug users demonstrate intestinal inflammation. Arthritis may manifest as a peripheral or axial arthritis. The spondyloarthropathy family consists of the following entities: ankylosing spondylitis, undifferentiated spondyloarthritis, reactive arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, spondyloarthritis associated with IBD, juvenile onset spondyloarthritis. This topic reviews the major gastrointestinal manifestations that can occur in patients with SpA and in nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs users. PMID:19468992

  18. Quality control in gastrointestinal surgery.

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Barba, Ector Jaime; Arenas-Moya, Diego; Vázquez-Guerrero, Arturo

    2011-01-01

    We analyzed the Mexican legal framework, identifying the vectors that characterize quality and control in gastrointestinal surgery. Quality is contemplated in the health protection rights determined according to the Mexican Constitution, established in the general health law and included as a specific goal in the actual National Development Plan and Health Sector Plan. Quality control implies planning, verification and application of corrective measures. Mexico has implemented several quality strategies such as certification of hospitals and regulatory agreements by the General Salubrity Council, creation of the National Health Quality Committee, generation of Clinical Practice Guidelines and the Certification of Medical Specialties, among others. Quality control in gastrointestinal surgery must begin at the time of medical education and continue during professional activities of surgeons, encouraging multidisciplinary teamwork, knowledge, abilities, attitudes, values and skills that promote homogeneous, safe and quality health services for the Mexican population.

  19. Advances in upper gastrointestinal endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Graham, David G.; Banks, Matthew R.

    2015-01-01

    The rapidly moving technological advances in gastrointestinal endoscopy have enhanced an endoscopist’s ability to diagnose and treat lesions within the gastrointestinal tract. The improvement in image quality created by the advent of high-definition and magnification endoscopy, alongside image enhancement, produces images of superb quality and detail that empower the endoscopist to identify important lesions that have previously been undetectable. Additionally, we are now seeing technologies emerge, such as optical coherence tomography and confocal laser endomicroscopy, that allow the endoscopist to visualize individual cells on a microscopic level and provide a real time, in vivo histological assessment. Within this article we discuss these technologies, as well as some of the results from their early use in clinical studies. PMID:26918137

  20. Glutamine and the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Ziegler, T R; Bazargan, N; Leader, L M; Martindale, R G

    2000-09-01

    The amino acid glutamine has become one of the most intensively studied nutrients in the field of nutrition and metabolic support. A variety of studies in cell culture systems, animal models of gut mucosal atrophy, injury/repair and adaptation and a limited number of clinical trials demonstrate trophic and cytoprotective effects of glutamine in small bowel and colonic mucosal cells. Although the routine clinical use of glutamine-enriched parenteral and enteral nutrient solutions remains controversial, available data demonstrate both the safety and metabolic and clinical efficacy of glutamine treatment in selected patient groups. Basic investigations are elucidating underlying mechanisms of glutamine action in intestinal cells. These will inform preclinical and clinical investigations designed to determine glutamine efficacy in selected gastrointestinal disorders. Emerging clinical trials will further define the utility of adjunctive glutamine supplementation as a component of specialized nutrition support in gastrointestinal disease.

  1. Paraneoplastic thrombocytosis in gastrointestinal cancer.

    PubMed

    Baranyai, Zsolt; Jósa, Valéria; Tóth, Ambrus; Szilasi, Zsuzsanna; Tihanyi, Balazs; Zaránd, Attila; Harsanyi, Laszlo; Szállási, Zoltán

    2016-06-01

    It has been demonstrated recently in several solid tumors that thrombocytosis at diagnosis may correlate with tumor invasion, metastatic progression and worse outcome. Several details of the pathomechanism of the relationship of thrombocytosis and cancer have been elucidated; however, the complete process is not clearly understood. Several hypotheses have been proposed. Recently, it was suggested that in ovarian cancer elevated IL-6 production by the tumor may induce increased megakaryopoiesis via hepatic thrombopoietin production leading to thrombocytosis. The importance of the prognostic power of elevated platelet count is still debated in gastrointestinal cancer. The aims of this review were to evaluate the prognostic significance of thrombocytosis in gastrointestinal tumors, to see whether clinical practice confirmed the hypotheses and to reveal the causes of the inconsistent findings.

  2. Gastrointestinal complications postthoracotomy and postvagotomy.

    PubMed

    Kokoska, E R; Naunheim, K S

    1998-08-01

    Postthoracotomy gastrointestinal complications, although relatively uncommon, can be associated with significant morbidity and mortality. It is necessary to identify patients who are at high risk for gastrointestinal complications during the preoperative evaluation. Appropriate stress ulcer prophylaxis should be provided to high-risk patients, and enteral feeds should be initiated as early in the postoperative course as possible. Postoperative hypotension and massive blood transfusions can be avoided with early reexploration in the case of postoperative hemorrhage. Finally, unexplained abdominal pain must not be ignored; a high index of suspicion should be maintained, with early and liberal use of diagnostic tools such as standard radiography, CT, endoscopy, and angiography. Consultation should be requested from a surgeon experienced in abdominal catastrophes. Early laparotomy with aggressive operative management can be lifesaving therapy but must be not applied in a cavalier fashion, as many of these disorders can and should be managed conservatively.

  3. Gastrointestinal endoscopy: infection and disinfection.

    PubMed Central

    O'Connor, H J; Axon, A T

    1983-01-01

    The past decade has seen the development of an array of complex flexible fibreoptic instruments for gastrointestinal (GI) endoscopy, and an increasing use of these for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. It has been recognised more recently that the use of contaminated endoscopic equipment can lead to serious and occasionally fatal infections. Infection with a wide variety of micro-organisms has been reported following oesophago-gastroduodenoscopy (OGD) and endoscopic retrograde cholangio-pancreatography (ERCP). PMID:6414894

  4. Diet and Upper Gastrointestinal Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Abnet, Christian C.; Corley, Douglas A.; Freedman, Neal D.; Kamangar, Farin

    2015-01-01

    Diet is believed to modulate cancer risk and this relationship has been widely studied in the gastrointestinal tract. Observational epidemiologic studies have provided most of the evidence for the effects of diet on cancer risk, because clinical trials to determine nutritional exposures are often impossible, impractical, or unaffordable. Although a few foods or nutrients are thought to protect against specific types of cancer, it seems clear that the strength and even direction of dietary associations (increasing or decreasing risk) is organ site- and even histology-specific, along the gastrointestinal tract. Although some hypotheses are supported by a substantial body of observational data (drinking hot maté contributes to esophageal cancer), there is not much data to support others. We discuss some highly touted hypotheses and draw interim conclusions about what is known, and what could be done to improve the level of evidence. The complex nature of diet and its associations can be productively investigated with disease-specific studies. However, public health recommendations for normal-risk individuals regarding diet and gastrointestinal cancer should probably emphasize the importance of eating for overall health, rather than eating specific foods to reduce risk for specific cancers. PMID:25680671

  5. [Collagen diseases with gastrointestinal manifestations].

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Hiroki; Ohara, Mikiko; Imai, Kohzoh

    2004-06-01

    Collagen vascular diseases are known to present with a diverse array of gastrointestinal manifestations. These can be classified as: 1) gastrointestinal damage due to the collagen vascular disease itself; 2) adverse events caused by pharmacotherapies; or 3) gastrointestinal infections following immunosuppression due to corticosteroid (CS) administration. The first group includes lupus enteritis and protein-losing gastroenteropathy in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), reflux esophagitis, chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction, and pneumatosis cystoids intestinalis in systemic sclerosis, amyloidosis in rheumatoid arthritis, bowel ulcer and bleeding in rheumatoid vasculitis and microscopic polyangiitis, and ileocecal ulcer in Behcet disease. In particular, colonic ulcers associated with SLE represent refractory lesions resistant to CS. Analysis of reported cases showing colonic lesions with SLE (22 cases in Japan) revealed that mean duration of SLE was 9.9 years and 77% of colonic lesions were observed in the rectum and sigmoid colon. Half of the patients developed intestinal perforation or penetration, and 6 of the 11 patients with perforation died. The second group includes lesions in the small and large intestine due to nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and CSs, in addition to peptic ulcers. As perforation in CS-treated patients displays relatively high incidence with poor prognosis, careful attention to such complications is needed. The third group includes candidal esophagitis and cytomegalovirus (CMV) enteritis. Prompt diagnosis is required to prevent colonic bleeding and perforation due to CMV.

  6. Impact of extraneous proteins on the gastrointestinal fate of sunflower seed (Helianthus annuus) oil bodies: a simulated gastrointestinal tract study.

    PubMed

    Makkhun, Sakunkhun; Khosla, Amit; Foster, Tim; McClements, David Julian; Grundy, Myriam M L; Gray, David A

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we examined the physicochemical nature of sunflower seed oil bodies (in the absence and presence of added protein) exposed to gastrointestinal conditions in vitro: crude oil bodies (COB); washed oil bodies (WOB); whey protein isolate-enriched oil bodies (WOB-WPI); and, sodium caseinate enriched-oil bodies (WOB-SC). All oil body emulsions were passed through an in vitro digestion model that mimicked the stomach and duodenal environments, and their physicochemical properties were measured before, during, and after digestion. Oil bodies had a positive charge under gastric conditions because the pH was below the isoelectric point of the adsorbed protein layer, but they had a negative charge under duodenal conditions which was attributed to changes in interfacial composition resulting from adsorption of bile salts. Oil bodies were highly susceptible to flocculation and coalescence in both gastric and duodenal conditions. SDS-PAGE analysis indicated degradation of oleosin proteins (ca. 18-21 kDa) to a greater or lesser extent (dependent on the emulsion) during the gastric phase in all emulsions tested; there is evidence that some oleosin remained intact in the crude oil body preparation during this phase of the digestion process. Measurements of protein displacement from the surface of COBs during direct exposure to bile salts, without inclusion of a gastric phase, indicated the removal of intact oleosin from native oil bodies.

  7. AN IN VITRO GASTROINTESTINAL METHOD TO ESTIMATE BIOAVAILABLE ARSENIC IN CONTAMINATED SOILS AND SOLID MEDIA. (R825410)

    EPA Science Inventory

    A method was developed to simulate the human gastrointestinal environment and
    to estimate bioavailability of arsenic in contaminated soil and solid media. In
    this in vitro gastrointestinal (IVG) method, arsenic is sequentially extracted
    from contaminated soil with ...

  8. Emerging role of fecal microbiota therapy in the treatment of gastrointestinal and extra-gastrointestinal diseases.

    PubMed

    Konturek, P C; Haziri, D; Brzozowski, T; Hess, T; Heyman, S; Kwiecien, S; Konturek, S J; Koziel, J

    2015-08-01

    In the recent decade our understanding of the role of the human gut microbiome has been revolutionized by advances in development of molecular methods. Approximately, up to 100 trillion (10(14)) microorganisms per human body colonize the intestinal tract making an additional acquired organ that provides many vital functions to the host. A healthy gut microbiome can be defined by the presence of the various classes of microbes that enhance metabolism, resistance to infection and inflammation, prevention against cancer and autoimmunity and that positively influence so called braingut axis. Diet represents one of the most important driving forces that besides environmental and genetic factors, can define and influence the microbial composition of the gut. Aging process due to different changes in gut physiology (i.e. gastric hypochlorhydria, motility disorders, use of drugs, degenerative changes in enteric nervous system) has a profound effect on the composition, diversity and functional features of gut microbiota. A perturbed aged gut microbiome has been associated with the increasing number of gastrointestinal (e.g. Clostridium difficile infection - CDI) and non-gastrointestinal diseases (metabolic syndrome, diabetes mellitus, fatty liver disease, atherosclerosis etc.). Fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) is a highly effective method in the treatment of refractory CDI. FMT is the term used when stool is taken from a healthy individual and instilled during endoscopy (colonoscopy or enteroscopy) into a gut of the sick person to cure certain disease. FMT represents an effective therapy in patient with recurrent CDI and the effectiveness of FMT in the prevention of CDI recurrence had reached approx. 90%. There is also an increasing evidence that the manipulation of gut microbiota by FMT represents a promising therapeutic method in patients with inflammatory bowel disease and irritable bowel syndrome. There is also an increased interest in the role of FMT for the

  9. Interpretability of the PedsQL gastrointestinal symptoms scales and gastrointestinal worry scales in pediatric patients with functional and organic gastrointestinal diseases

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The present study investigates the clinical interpretability of the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventor (PedsQL) Gastrointestinal Symptoms Scales and Worry Scales in pediatric patients with functional gastrointestinal disorders or organic gastrointestinal diseases in comparison with healthy controls....

  10. Probiotics and gastrointestinal disease: successes, problems and future prospects

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Gastrointestinal disease is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide each year. Treatment of chronic inflammatory gastrointestinal conditions such as ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease is difficult due to the ambiguity surrounding their precise aetiology. Infectious gastrointestinal diseases, such as various types of diarrheal disease are also becoming increasingly difficult to treat due to the increasing dissemination of antibiotic resistance among microorganisms and the emergence of the so-called 'superbugs'. Taking into consideration these problems, the need for novel therapeutics is essential. Although described for over a century probiotics have only been extensively researched in recent years. Their use in the treatment and prevention of disease, particularly gastrointestinal disease, has yielded many successful results, some of which we outline in this review. Although promising, many probiotics are hindered by inherent physiological and technological weaknesses and often the most clinically promising strains are unusable. Consequently we discuss various strategies whereby probiotics may be engineered to create designer probiotics. Such innovative approaches include; a receptor mimicry strategy to create probiotics that target specific pathogens and toxins, a patho-biotechnology approach using pathogen-derived genes to create more robust probiotic stains with increased host and processing-associated stress tolerance profiles and meta-biotechnology, whereby, functional metagenomics may be used to identify novel genes from diverse and vastly unexplored environments, such as the human gut, for use in biotechnology and medicine. PMID:19930635

  11. Raman mapping of intact biofilms on stainless steel surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Julie K.; Heighton, Lynne; Xu, Yunfeng; Nou, Xiangwu; Schmidt, Walter F.

    2016-05-01

    Many issues occur when microbial bacteria contaminates human food or water; it can be dangerous to the public. Determining how the microbial are growing, it can help experts determine how to prevent the outbreaks. Biofilms are a tightly group of microbial cells that grow on living surfaces or surrounding themselves. Though biofilms are not necessarily uniform; when there are more than one type of microbial bacteria that are grown, Raman mapping is performed to determine the growth patterns. Depending on the type of microbial bacteria, they can grow in various patterns such as symmetrical or scattered on the surface. The biofilms need to be intact in order to preclude and potentially figuring out the relative intensity of different components in a biofilm mixture. In addition, it is important to determine whether one biofilms is a substrate for another biofilm to be detected. For example, it is possible if layer B appears above layer A, but layer A doesn't appear above layer B. In this case, three types of biofilms that are grown includes Listeria(L), Ralstonia(R), and a mixture of the two (LR). Since microbe deposits on metal surfaces are quite suitable, biofilms were grown on stainless steel surface slides. Each slide was viewed under a Raman Microscope at 100X and using a 532nm laser to provide great results and sharp peaks. The mapping of the laser helps determine how the bacteria growth, at which intensity the bacteria appeared in order to identify specific microbes to signature markers on biofilms.

  12. Effects of neurotensin on small bowel propulsion in intact and vagotomized rats.

    PubMed

    Wilén, T; Gustavsson, S; Jung, B

    1982-09-01

    The effects of intravenous infusion of neurotensin on small bowel motility was studied in conscious rats. During 1 h a standardized test meal of glucose, polyethyleneglycol (PEG) 3000, phenol red and 125I-labelled polyvinylpyrrolidone was administered via a permanent gastric catheter and simultaneously the bile-excreted radio-pharmaceutic 99Tcm-Solco-HIDA was infused intravenously. Immediately after the infusions the gastrointestinal specimen was excised and examined for distribution of radioactivity. Both doses of neurotensin (0.1 and 0.3 microgram . kg-1 . h-1) resulted in an increase in the neurotensin-like immunoreactivity (NTLI) of plasma to levels similar to that found after a fatty meal. Concurrently the small bowel transport pattern was changed from an interdigestive state to one similar to that found after a meal. In animals not receiving the gastric test meal, neurotensin (0.1-0.5 microgram . kg-1 . h-) had no effect on motility. Infusion of the gastric test meal alone did not change the interdigestive motility or the NTLI value. This indicates that the presence of gastric infusates potentiates the effect of neurotensin on small bowel motility. The motility response to neurotensin did not differ between intact and vagotomized animals. This contrasts to earlier findings that the small bowel motility response to a fatty meal is dependent on intact vagal function. Thus, a difference in the mechanism responsible for the motility responses between a fatty meal and neurotensin exists. In view of this finding it seems reasonable to assume that neurotensin cannot be the only factor responsible for the shift in motility found after a fatty meal.

  13. Elements Involved In Promoting Eosinophilic Gastrointestinal Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Shukla, Anshi; Mishra, Akanksha; Venkateshaiah, Sathisha Upparahalli; Manohar, Murli; Mahadevappa, Chandrashekara Puthanapura; Mishra, Anil

    2015-01-01

    Eosinophilic gastrointestinal disorders (EGID) are food allergen-induced allergic gastrointestinal disorders, characterized by accumulation of highly induced eosinophils in different segments of gastrointestinal tract along with eosinophil microabssess and extracellular eosinophilic granules in the epithelial layer. EGID are both IgE- and cell-mediated group of diseases that include eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE), eosinophilic gastritis (EG), eosinophilic gastroenteritis (EGE) and eosinophilic colitis (EC). Despite the increased incidences and considerable progress made in understanding EGID pathogenesis. The mechanism is still not well understood. It has been shown that IL-4, IL-5, IL-13, IL-15, IL-18, eotaxin-1, eotaxin-2 and eotaxin-3 play a critical role in EGID pathogenesis. Currently, the only criterion for diagnosing EoE, EGE and EC are repetitive endoscopic and histopathological evaluation of biopsies along with other clinical characteristics/manifestations. Antigen elimination and corticosteroid therapies are the most effective therapies currently in practice for the treatment of EGID. The cytokines (anti-IL-5 and anti-IL-13) therapy trials were not very successful in case of EoE. Most recently, a clinical trial using anti-IL-13 reported only 60% reduced esophageal eosinophilia without achieving primary endpoint. This clinical finding is not surprising and is in accordance with our earlier report indicating that IL-13 is not critical in the initiation of EoE. Notably, EGID still has no reliable noninvasive diagnostic biomarkers. Hence, there is a great necessity to identify novel noninvasive diagnostic biomarkers that can easily diagnose EGID and provide an effective therapy. Now, the attention is required to target cell types like iNKT cells that produce eosinophil active cytokines and is found induced in the pathogenesis of both experimental and human EoE. iNKT cell neutralization is shown to protect allergen-induced EoE in experimental model. In this

  14. Quantitative Measurement of Intact Alpha-Synuclein Proteoforms from Post-Mortem Control and Parkinson's Disease Brain Tissue by Intact Protein Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kellie, John F.; Higgs, Richard E.; Ryder, John W.; Major, Anthony; Beach, Thomas G.; Adler, Charles H.; Merchant, Kalpana; Knierman, Michael D.

    2014-07-01

    A robust top down proteomics method is presented for profiling alpha-synuclein species from autopsied human frontal cortex brain tissue from Parkinson's cases and controls. The method was used to test the hypothesis that pathology associated brain tissue will have a different profile of post-translationally modified alpha-synuclein than the control samples. Validation of the sample processing steps, mass spectrometry based measurements, and data processing steps were performed. The intact protein quantitation method features extraction and integration of m/z data from each charge state of a detected alpha-synuclein species and fitting of the data to a simple linear model which accounts for concentration and charge state variability. The quantitation method was validated with serial dilutions of intact protein standards. Using the method on the human brain samples, several previously unreported modifications in alpha-synuclein were identified. Low levels of phosphorylated alpha synuclein were detected in brain tissue fractions enriched for Lewy body pathology and were marginally significant between PD cases and controls (p = 0.03).

  15. Cutaneous manifestation of gastrointestinal disease

    PubMed Central

    Kerstetter, Justin

    2016-01-01

    The gastrointestinal (GI) and cutaneous systems are closely linked in origin. Skin manifestations are frequently seen as a part of different GI syndromes. Gastroenterologists play an important role in recognizing the symptoms, patient workup and arriving at appropriate diagnoses, often in consultation with dermatologists. This review discusses the diseases with both cutaneous and intestinal involvement. Hereditary polyposis GI cancers, hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancers (CRCs), hamartomatous disorders, and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are reviewed with emphasis on the genetic basis, diagnostic, histologic findings, screening modalities, and therapeutic options. PMID:27034812

  16. Gastrointestinal Complications After Bariatric Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Irene T.

    2015-01-01

    Bariatric surgery is increasingly being performed in the medically complicated obese population as convincing data continue to mount, documenting the success of surgery not only in achieving meaningful weight loss but also in correcting obesity-related illnesses. Several surgical procedures with varying degrees of success and complications are currently being performed. This article discusses the short- and long-term gastrointestinal complications for the 4 most common bariatric surgical procedures: laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding, vertical sleeve gastrectomy, Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, and biliopancreatic diversion with duodenal switch. PMID:27118949

  17. Immunobiology of the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Galant, S P

    1976-06-01

    The interplay between the gut and immune abnormality appears to be a logical extension of the thesis that secretory IgA is the major immunologic line of defense between the outside environment and the host. Thus immunologic deficiency, particularly of IgA and combined T- and B-lymphocyte abnormalites, profoundly influences gut integrity. Conversely, gut pathology is bound to interfere with immunologic function, so that both humoral and cellular immunity may be impaired. Finally, hypersensitivity phenomena in the gut, resulting in immune injury, may cause gastrointestinal disturbances. As better diagnostic tools have become available, more direct evidence of hypersensitivity immune injury has been described.

  18. Tracking tagged molecules in single neurons in intact zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Armisen, Ricardo; Gleason, Michelle R; Fetcho, Joseph R; Mandel, Gail

    2007-08-01

    INTRODUCTIONThis protocol describes an approach for monitoring the movement of tagged molecules in single neurons in intact embryonic and larval zebrafish. The intact preparation provides a meaningful context for the physiological event being studied. Other advantages offered by the young zebrafish include direct in vivo imaging, the ability to produce large numbers of labeled embryos easily using microinjection, and the existence of identified sensory circuits that can be exploited to activate a particular cell type. One limitation of this system is the fragility of 2- to 3-d-old embryos, which demands delicate physical manipulation of the fish during all stages preceding and during the experiment. In contrast to brain slices or isolated cells, nearly all original neural connections and sensory components are maintained in the intact preparation, so the occurrence of a downstream event may be precluded (or its manifestation enhanced) by some complex interplay of biological processes that are not fully understood.

  19. Multiple Reaction Monitoring for Direct Quantitation of Intact Proteins Using a Triple Quadrupole Mass Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Evelyn H.; Combe, Peter C.; Schug, Kevin A.

    2016-05-01

    Methods that can efficiently and effectively quantify proteins are needed to support increasing demand in many bioanalytical fields. Triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (QQQ-MS) is sensitive and specific, and it is routinely used to quantify small molecules. However, low resolution fragmentation-dependent MS detection can pose inherent difficulties for intact proteins. In this research, we investigated variables that affect protein and fragment ion signals to enable protein quantitation using QQQ-MS. Collision induced dissociation gas pressure and collision energy were found to be the most crucial variables for optimization. Multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) transitions for seven standard proteins, including lysozyme, ubiquitin, cytochrome c from both equine and bovine, lactalbumin, myoglobin, and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) were determined. Assuming the eventual goal of applying such methodology is to analyze protein in biological fluids, a liquid chromatography method was developed. Calibration curves of six standard proteins (excluding PSA) were obtained to show the feasibility of intact protein quantification using QQQ-MS. Linearity (2-3 orders), limits of detection (0.5-50 μg/mL), accuracy (<5% error), and precision (1%-12% CV) were determined for each model protein. Sensitivities for different proteins varied considerably. Biological fluids, including human urine, equine plasma, and bovine plasma were used to demonstrate the specificity of the approach. The purpose of this model study was to identify, study, and demonstrate the advantages and challenges for QQQ-MS-based intact protein quantitation, a largely underutilized approach to date.

  20. Vasculitides of the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Eric; Luk, Adriana; Chetty, Runjan; Butany, Jagdish

    2009-05-01

    Systemic vasculitis is often not considered as a possible diagnosis by clinicians because of its low prevalence compared with other more common diseases. Vasculitis can affect any end organ, and it is therefore often missed early on in disease progression. Gastrointestinal (GI) manifestations of vasculitis are considered rare and the presentation is often nonspecific. However, if there is significant involvement of the major vessels of the gastrointestinal system, life-threatening sequelae, including perforation and bowel ischemia, may occur. This makes early and immediate management crucial to improve long-term morbidity and mortality. Diagnosis of various GI vasculitides often relies on correlation of clinical manifestations with pathology and additional investigations. This paper reviews the various vasculitides that affect the GI tract, including systemic lupus erythematosus, mixed connective tissue disease, Henoch Schönlein purpura, polyarteritis nodosa, Churg-Strauss syndrome, Wegener's granulomatosis, microscopic polyangiitis, enterocolic lymphocytic phlebitis, and Behcet's disease. Segmental arterial mediolysis, mistakenly believed to be a vasculitis, is also discussed.

  1. Feline gastrointestinal eosinophilic sclerosing fibroplasia.

    PubMed

    Craig, L E; Hardam, E E; Hertzke, D M; Flatland, B; Rohrbach, B W; Moore, R R

    2009-01-01

    A retrospective study of cases of a unique intramural inflammatory mass within the feline gastrointestinal tract was performed in order to describe and characterize the lesion. Twenty-five cases were identified from archival surgical and postmortem tissues. The lesion most often occurred as an ulcerated intramural mass at the pyloric sphincter (n = 12) or the ileocecocolic junction or colon (n = 9); the remaining cases were in the small intestine. Seven cases also had lymph node involvement. The lesions were characterized by eosinophilic inflammation, large reactive fibroblasts, and trabeculae of dense collagen. Intralesional bacteria were identified in 56% of the cases overall and all of the ileocecocolic junction and colon lesions. Fifty-eight percent of cats tested had peripheral eosinophilia. Cats treated with prednisone had a significantly longer survival time than those receiving other treatments. We propose that this is a unique fibroblastic response of the feline gastrointestinal tract to eosinophilic inflammation that in some cases is associated with bacteria. The lesion is often grossly and sometimes histologically mistaken for neoplasia.

  2. Gastrointestinal citrate absorption in nephrolithiasis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fegan, J.; Khan, R.; Poindexter, J.; Pak, C. Y.

    1992-01-01

    Gastrointestinal absorption of citrate was measured in stone patients with idiopathic hypocitraturia to determine if citrate malabsorption could account for low urinary citrate. Citrate absorption was measured directly from recovery of orally administered potassium citrate (40 mEq.) in the intestinal lavage fluid, using an intestinal washout technique. In 7 stone patients citrate absorption, serum citrate levels, peak citrate concentration in serum and area under the curve were not significantly different from those of 7 normal subjects. Citrate absorption was rapid and efficient in both groups, with 96 to 98% absorbed within 3 hours. The absorption of citrate was less efficient from a tablet preparation of potassium citrate than from a liquid preparation, probably due to a delayed release of citrate from wax matrix. However, citrate absorption from solid potassium citrate was still high at 91%, compared to 98% for a liquid preparation. Thus, hypocitraturia is unlikely to be due to an impaired gastrointestinal absorption of citrate in stone patients without overt bowel disease.

  3. Ghrelin and gastrointestinal stromal tumors

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Chang-Zhen; Liu, Dong; Kang, Wei-Ming; Yu, Jian-Chun; Ma, Zhi-Qiang; Ye, Xin; Li, Kang

    2017-01-01

    Ghrelin, as a kind of multifunctional protein polypeptide, is mainly produced in the fundus of the stomach and can promote occurrence and development of many tumors, including gastrointestinal tumors, which has been proved by the relevant researches. Most gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs, about 80%), as the most common mesenchymal tumor, also develop in the fundus. Scientific research has confirmed that ghrelin, its receptors and mRNA respectively can be found in GISTs, which demonstrated the existence of a ghrelin autocrine/paracrine loop in GIST tissues. However, no reports to date have specified the mechanism whether ghrelin can promote the occurrence and development of GISTs. Studies of pulmonary artery endothelial cells in a low-oxygen environment and cardiac muscle cells in an ischemic environment have shown that ghrelin can activate the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/AKT/mammalian target of rapamycin (PI3K/AKT/mTOR) signaling pathway. Moreover, some studies of GISTs have confirmed that activation of the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway can indeed promote the growth and progression of GISTs. Whether ghrelin is involved in the development or progression of GISTs through certain pathways remains unknown. Can we find a new target for the treatment of GISTs? This review explores and summaries the relationship among ghrelin, the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway and the development of GISTs. PMID:28348480

  4. Functional and motor gastrointestinal disorders.

    PubMed

    Mearin, Fermín; Rey, Enrique; Balboa, Agustín

    2016-09-01

    This article discusses the most interesting presentations at Digestive Disease Week, held in San Diego, in the field of functional and motor gastrointestinal disorders. One of the most important contributions was undoubtedly the presentation of the new Rome IV diagnostic criteria for functional gastrointestinal disorders. We therefore devote some space in this article to explaining these new criteria in the most common functional disorders. In fact, there has already been discussion of data comparing Rome IV and Rome III criteria in the diagnosis of irritable bowel syndrome, confirming that the new criteria are somewhat more restrictive. From the physiopathological point of view, several studies have shown that the aggregation of physiopathological alterations increases symptom severity in distinct functional disorders. From the therapeutic point of view, more data were presented on the efficacy of acotiamide and its mechanisms of action in functional dyspepsia, the safety and efficacy of domperidone in patients with gastroparesis, and the efficacy of linaclotide both in irritable bowel syndrome and constipation. In irritable bowel syndrome, more data have come to light on the favourable results of a low FODMAP diet, with emphasis on its role in modifying the microbiota. Finally, long-term efficacy data were presented on the distinct treatment options in achalasia.

  5. Ghrelin and gastrointestinal stromal tumors.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Chang-Zhen; Liu, Dong; Kang, Wei-Ming; Yu, Jian-Chun; Ma, Zhi-Qiang; Ye, Xin; Li, Kang

    2017-03-14

    Ghrelin, as a kind of multifunctional protein polypeptide, is mainly produced in the fundus of the stomach and can promote occurrence and development of many tumors, including gastrointestinal tumors, which has been proved by the relevant researches. Most gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs, about 80%), as the most common mesenchymal tumor, also develop in the fundus. Scientific research has confirmed that ghrelin, its receptors and mRNA respectively can be found in GISTs, which demonstrated the existence of a ghrelin autocrine/paracrine loop in GIST tissues. However, no reports to date have specified the mechanism whether ghrelin can promote the occurrence and development of GISTs. Studies of pulmonary artery endothelial cells in a low-oxygen environment and cardiac muscle cells in an ischemic environment have shown that ghrelin can activate the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/AKT/mammalian target of rapamycin (PI3K/AKT/mTOR) signaling pathway. Moreover, some studies of GISTs have confirmed that activation of the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway can indeed promote the growth and progression of GISTs. Whether ghrelin is involved in the development or progression of GISTs through certain pathways remains unknown. Can we find a new target for the treatment of GISTs? This review explores and summaries the relationship among ghrelin, the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway and the development of GISTs.

  6. The Unfolded Protein Response and Gastrointestinal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kaser, Arthur; Adolph, Timon Erik; Blumberg, Richard S

    2013-01-01

    As the inner lining of the gastrointestinal tract, the intestinal epithelium serves an essential role in innate immune function at the interface between the host and microbiota. Given the unique environmental challenges and thus physiologic secretory functions of this surface, it is exquisitely sensitive to perturbations that affect its capacity to resolve endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. Genetic deletion of factors involved in the unfolded protein response (UPR), which functions in the resolution of ER stress that arises from misfolded proteins, result in spontaneous intestinal inflammation closely mimicking human inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). This is demonstrated by observations wherein deletion of genes such as Xbp1 and Agr2 profoundly affects the intestinal epithelium and results in spontaneous intestinal inflammation. Moreover, both genes, along with others (e.g. ORDML3) represent genetic risk factors for human IBD, both Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis. Here we review the current mechanistic understanding for how unresolved ER stress can lead to intestinal inflammation, and highlight the findings that implicate ER stress as a genetically affected biological pathway in IBD. We further discuss environmental and microbial factors that might impact on the epithelium’s capacity to resolve ER stress, and which may constitute exogenous factors that may precipitate disease in genetically susceptible individuals. PMID:23588234

  7. Spectrophotometric Evaluation of the Pulpal Peroxide Levels in Intact and Restored Teeth - An Invitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Acharya, Gourismita; Agrawal, Pratik; Panda, Vijeta

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Hydrogen peroxide (30%) is a commonly used "in office" bleaching agent. Deleterious effects of hydrogen peroxide on the pulp have been observed. Aim The present study was conducted with the aim to evaluate the penetration of 30% hydrogen peroxide into the pulp chamber through intact teeth and through the surface of teeth, restored with either hybrid composite or Resin Modified Glass Ionomer Cement (RMGIC). Materials and Methods Sixty extracted human maxillary central incisors were selected and divided into six groups. Two groups were restored with hybrid composite resin and two with RMGIC, while two groups were left intact. The teeth with acetate buffer solution in their pulp cavity were then immersed in either 30% hydrogen peroxide or distilled water depending upon the group, for 60 minutes at 37°C. Then horseradish peroxidase and leucocrystal violet were added to the acetate buffer solution present in the pulp chamber after it was transferred to a test tube and the optical density of the resultant blue solution obtained was measured spectrophotometrically. Statistical Analysis The data obtained were analyzed using one way ANOVA and Student’s t-test. Results The data obtained established that hydrogen peroxide penetrated into the pulp from the bleaching agent used. Hydrogen peroxide (30%) showed the highest pulpal peroxide level in teeth restored with RMGIC followed by teeth restored with hybrid composite resin and the least amount of penetration was observed in intact teeth. Conclusion The amount of peroxide penetration into the tooth is more through restored tooth than intact tooth and is also dependant on the type of restorative materials used. PMID:27656562

  8. Perceived parental control processes, parent-child relational qualities and psychological well-being of Chinese adolescents in intact and non-intact families in Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Shek, Daniel T L; Lee, Tak Yan

    2007-01-01

    This paper examines whether Chinese adolescents' perceptions (N = 3,017) of parental behavioral control (parental knowledge, expectation, monitoring, discipline, and demandingness as well as parental control based on indigenous Chinese concepts), parental psychological control, parent-child relational qualities (perceived parental trust, child's trust of the parents, child's readiness to communicate with the parents, and child's satisfaction with parental control), and adolescent psychological well-being (hopelessness, mastery, life satisfaction and self-esteem) differed in intact and non-intact families. Results showed that relative to non-intact families, parental behavioral control processes were higher and parent-child relational qualities were better in intact families. In contrast, parental psychological control was higher in non-intact families than in intact families. Finally, the psychological well-being of adolescents in non-intact families was poorer than that of adolescents in intact families.

  9. What Are the Risk Factors for Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors Be Prevented? Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor (GIST) Causes, Risk Factors, and Prevention What Are the ... few known risk factors for gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs). Being older These tumors can occur in people ...

  10. What Happens After Treatment for Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Tumor Is No Longer Working Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor (GIST) After Treatment What Happens After Treatment for Gastrointestinal ... For some people with a gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST), treatment may remove or destroy the cancer. Completing ...

  11. What Are the Key Statistics about Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors?

    MedlinePlus

    ... About Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor What Are the Key Statistics About Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors? Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) ... They are slightly more common in men. Survival statistics for GIST are discussed in “ Survival rates for ...

  12. Upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage caused by superwarfarin poisoning

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Shu-Lei; Li, Peng; Ji, Ming; Zong, Ye; Zhang, Shu-Tian

    2010-01-01

    Superwarfarins are a class of rodenticides. Gastrointestinal hemorrhage is a fatal complication of superwarfarin poisoning, requiring immediate treatment. Here, we report a 55-year-old woman with tardive upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage caused by superwarfarin poisoning after endoscopic cold mucosal biopsy. PMID:20355251

  13. Upper gastrointestinal fiberoptic endoscopy in pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Prolla, J C; Diehl, A S; Bemvenuti, G A; Loguercio, S V; Magalhães, D S; Silveira, T R

    1983-11-01

    Upper gastrointestinal fiberendoscopy in pediatric patients is done safely and under local anesthesia in most instances. This study of 47 children confirmed the value of fiberendoscopy in establishing the etiology of upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage and the presence of esophageal varices. It also contributed significantly to the management of patients with disphagia, pyrosis, epigastric pain, and ingestion of foreign bodies. No significant morbidity was caused.

  14. The Nervous System and Gastrointestinal Function

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Altaf, Muhammad A.; Sood, Manu R.

    2008-01-01

    The enteric nervous system is an integrative brain with collection of neurons in the gastrointestinal tract which is capable of functioning independently of the central nervous system (CNS). The enteric nervous system modulates motility, secretions, microcirculation, immune and inflammatory responses of the gastrointestinal tract. Dysphagia,…

  15. Skull metastasis from rectal gastrointestinal stromal tumours.

    PubMed

    Gil-Arnaiz, Irene; Martínez-Trufero, Javier; Pazo-Cid, Roberto Antonio; Felipo, Francesc; Lecumberri, María José; Calderero, Verónica

    2009-09-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GIST) are the most common mesenchymal neoplasm of the gastrointestinal tract. Rectum localisation is infrequent for these neoplasms, accounting for about 5% of all cases. Distant metastases of GIST are also rare. We present a patient with special features: the tumour is localised in rectum and it has an uncommon metastatic site, the skull, implying a complex differential diagnosis approach.

  16. Operative balloon dilatation for pulmonary atresia with intact ventricular septum.

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, J R; Fonseka, S F; Wilson, N; Dickinson, D F; Walker, D R

    1987-01-01

    In six infants with pulmonary atresia and intact ventricular septum operative balloon dilatation was used to achieve continuity between the right ventricle and the main pulmonary artery as the initial procedure. Two of the six subsequently needed an aortico pulmonary shunt. All six are alive and well. Images Fig PMID:3676024

  17. Interleukin 6 in intact and injured mouse peripheral nerves.

    PubMed

    Reichert, F; Levitzky, R; Rotshenker, S

    1996-03-01

    The multifunctional cytokine interleukin 6 (IL-6) has direct growth, survival and differentiation effects on peripheral and central neurons. Furthermore, it can modulate the production by non-neuronal cells of other cytokines and growth factors, and thereby affect nerve cells indirectly. We have studied IL-6 expression and production in intact and injured peripheral nerves of C57/BL/6NHSD mice, which display the normal rapid progression of Wallerian degeneration. The IL-6 mRNA was detected in nerves degenerating in vitro or in vivo, but not in intact nerves. In vitro- and in vivo-degenerating nerve segments and neuroma nerve segments synthesized and secreted IL-6. The onset of IL-6 production was rapid and prolonged. It was detected as early as 2 h after injury and persisted for the entire period of 21 days tested after the injury. Of the non-neuronal cells that reside in intact and injured nerves, macrophages and fibroblasts were the major contributors to IL-6 production. We also studied IL-6 production in intact and injured nerves of mutant C57BL/6-WLD/OLA/NHSD mice, which display very slow progression of Wallerian degeneration. Injured nerves of C57BL/6-WLD/OLA/NHSD mice produced significantly lower amounts of IL-6 than did rapidly degenerating nerves of C57/BL/6NHSD mice.

  18. Fostering Activities of Daily Living by Intact Nursing Home Residents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blair, Charles E.; Glaister, Judy; Brown, Alston; Phillips, Carolyn

    2007-01-01

    We assessed effectiveness of four education programs in providing nursing assistants with ability to produce a therapeutic milieu supportive of intact residents' activities of daily living, positive self-esteem and mood: (1) a combination of Orem's Systems of Nursing Care and Skinner's Applied Behavioral Analysis, (2) Applied Behavioral Analysis,…

  19. Ingestible wireless capsules for enhanced diagnostic inspection of gastrointestinal tract

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasouli, Mahdi; Kencana, Andy Prima; Huynh, Van An; Ting, Eng Kiat; Lai, Joshua Chong Yue; Wong, Kai Juan; Tan, Su Lim; Phee, Soo Jay

    2011-03-01

    Wireless capsule endoscopy has become a common procedure for diagnostic inspection of gastrointestinal tract. This method offers a less-invasive alternative to traditional endoscopy by eliminating uncomfortable procedures of the traditional endoscopy. Moreover, it provides the opportunity for exploring inaccessible areas of the small intestine. Current capsule endoscopes, however, move by peristalsis and are not capable of detailed and on-demand inspection of desired locations. Here, we propose and develop two wireless endoscopes with maneuverable vision systems to enhance diagnosis of gastrointestinal disorders. The vision systems in these capsules are equipped with mechanical actuators to adjust the position of the camera. This may help to cover larger areas of the digestive tract and investigate desired locations. The preliminary experimental results showed that the developed platform could successfully communicate with the external control unit via human body and adjust the position of camera to limited degrees.

  20. Fibroblast Growth Factors in the Gastrointestinal Tract: Twists and Turns.

    PubMed

    Danopoulos, Soula; Schlieve, Christopher R; Grikscheit, Tracy C; Al Alam, Denise

    2017-02-15

    Fibroblast growth factors (FGFs) are a family of conserved peptides that play an important role in the development, homeostasis, and repair processes of many organ systems, including the gastrointestinal tract. All four FGF receptors and several FGF ligands are present in the intestine. They play important roles in controlling cell proliferation, differentiation, epithelial cell restitution, and stem cell maintenance. Several FGFs have also been proven to be protective against gastrointestinal diseases such as inflammatory bowel diseases or to aid in regeneration after intestinal loss associated with short bowel syndrome. Herein, we review the multifaceted actions of canonical FGFs in intestinal development, homeostasis, and repair in rodents and humans. Developmental Dynamics, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Waterborne transmission and the evolution of virulence among gastrointestinal bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Ewald, P. W.

    1991-01-01

    Diarrhoeal diseases are primary contributors to millions of deaths annually. Yet, little is known about the evolutionary reasons for the differences in virulence among gastrointestinal pathogens. Applying the comparative, cost/benefit approach of evolutionary biology this paper proposes that waterborne transmission should favour evolution towards high virulence. This hypothesis is supported by a cross-specific test, which shows that waterborne transmission is strongly correlated with the virulence of bacterial gastrointestinal pathogens of humans. Alternative explanations of this correlation are not supported by available data. These findings bear on public health policy because they draw attention to a previously unrecognized long-range benefit gained from purification of water supplies; diarrhoeal pathogens may evolve to lower levels of virulence. PMID:1993456

  2. Gastrointestinal Manifestations in Systemic Autoimmune Diseases

    PubMed Central

    COJOCARU, M.; COJOCARU, Inimioara Mihaela; SILOSI, Isabela; VRABIE, Camelia Doina

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT In an autoimmune disease, the immune system attacks and harms the body's own tissues. The systemic autoimmune diseases include collagen vascular diseases, the systemic vasculitides, Wegener granulomatosis, and Churg-Strauss syndrome. These disorders can involve any part of the gastrointestinal tract, hepatobiliary system and pancreas. They can cause a variety of gastrointestinal manifestations that are influenced by the pathophysiologic characteristics of the underlying disease process. There is a wide variation of gastrointestinal manifestations from these autoimmune disorders including, but not limited to: oral ulcers, dysphagia, gastroesophageal reflux disease, abdominal pain, constipation, diarrhea, fecal incontinence, pseudo-obstruction, perforation and gastrointestinal bleeding. Clinical workup should be initiated by the patient's subjective complaints. In this review, we analyze the effects of autoimmune diseases on the gastrointestinal tract. PMID:21977190

  3. Threats to intact tropical peatlands and opportunities for their conservation.

    PubMed

    Roucoux, K H; Lawson, I T; Baker, T R; Del Castillo Torres, D; Draper, F C; Lähteenoja, O; Gilmore, M P; Honorio Coronado, E N; Kelly, T J; Mitchard, E T A; Vriesendorp, C

    2017-03-08

    Large, intact areas of tropical peatland are highly threatened at a global scale by the expansion of commercial agriculture and other forms of economic development. Conserving peatlands on a landscape scale, with their hydrology intact, is of international conservation importance to preserve their distinctive biodiversity and ecosystem services, and maintain their resilience to future environmental change. Here, we explore the threats and opportunities for conserving remaining intact tropical peatlands. Our focus therefore largely excludes the peatlands of Indonesia and Malaysia, where extensive deforestation, drainage and conversion to plantation of peat swamp forests over the last few decades means that conservation efforts in this region are reduced to protecting small fragments of the original ecosystem, attempting to restore drained peatlands, or dissuading companies from expanding existing plantations. In contrast, here we focus on a case study, the Pastaza-Marañón Foreland Basin (PMFB) in Peru, which is among the largest known intact tropical peatland landscapes in the world and representative of their vulnerability. Maintenance of the hydrological conditions critical for carbon storage and ecosystem function of peatlands is, in the PMFB, primarily threatened by expansion of commercial agriculture linked to new transport infrastructure that is facilitating access to remote areas. In contrast to Indonesia and Malaysia, there remain opportunities in the PMFB and elsewhere to develop alternative, more sustainable land-use practices. Although some of the peatlands in the PMFB fall within existing legally protected areas, this protection is patchy, weak and not focused on protecting the most carbon-dense areas. New carbon-based conservation funding, developing markets for sustainable peatland products, transferring land title to local communities, and expanding protected areas offer pathways to increased protection for intact tropical peatlands in Amazonia and

  4. What Happens after Treatment for Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumors?

    MedlinePlus

    ... for Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumors? For some people with gastrointestinal (GI) carcinoid tumor, treatment may remove or destroy the cancer. Completing treatment can be both stressful and exciting. ...

  5. Interventional Management of Gastrointestinal Fistulas

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Se Hwan; Kim, Hyoung Jung; Park, Sun Jin; Park, Ho Chul

    2008-01-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) fistulas are frequently very serious complications that are associated with high morbidity and mortality. GI fistulas can cause a wide array of pathophysiological effects by allowing abnormal diversion of the GI contents, including digestive fluid, water, electrolytes, and nutrients, from either one intestine to another or from the intestine to the skin. As an alternative to surgery, recent technical advances in interventional radiology and percutaneous techniques have been shown as advantageous to lower the morbidity and mortality rate, and allow for superior accessibility to the fistulous tracts via the use of fistulography. In addition, new interventional management techniques continue to emerge. We describe the clinical and imaging features of GI fistulas and outline the interventional management of GI fistulas. PMID:19039271

  6. Gastrointestinal regulation of food intake

    PubMed Central

    Cummings, David E.; Overduin, Joost

    2007-01-01

    Despite substantial fluctuations in daily food intake, animals maintain a remarkably stable body weight, because overall caloric ingestion and expenditure are exquisitely matched over long periods of time, through the process of energy homeostasis. The brain receives hormonal, neural, and metabolic signals pertaining to body-energy status and, in response to these inputs, coordinates adaptive alterations of energy intake and expenditure. To regulate food consumption, the brain must modulate appetite, and the core of appetite regulation lies in the gut-brain axis. This Review summarizes current knowledge regarding the neuroendocrine regulation of food intake by the gastrointestinal system, focusing on gastric distention, intestinal and pancreatic satiation peptides, and the orexigenic gastric hormone ghrelin. We highlight mechanisms governing nutrient sensing and peptide secretion by enteroendocrine cells, including novel taste-like pathways. The increasingly nuanced understanding of the mechanisms mediating gut-peptide regulation and action provides promising targets for new strategies to combat obesity and diabetes. PMID:17200702

  7. Radiological Features of Gastrointestinal Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Lo Re, Giuseppe; Federica, Vernuccio; Midiri, Federico; Picone, Dario; La Tona, Giuseppe; Galia, Massimo; Lo Casto, Antonio; Lagalla, Roberto; Midiri, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal lymphomas represent 5–20% of extranodal lymphomas and mainly occur in the stomach and small intestine. Clinical findings are not specific, thus often determining a delay in the diagnosis. Imaging features at conventional and cross-sectional imaging must be known by the radiologist since he/she plays a pivotal role in the diagnosis and disease assessment, thus assisting in the choice of the optimal treatment to patients. This review focuses on the wide variety of imaging presentation of esophageal, gastric, and small and large bowel lymphoma presenting their main imaging appearances at conventional and cross-sectional imaging, mainly focusing on computed tomography and magnetic resonance, helping in the choice of the best imaging technique for the disease characterization and assessment and the recognition of potential complications. PMID:26819598

  8. Interventional management of gastrointestinal fistulas.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Se Hwan; Oh, Joo Hyeong; Kim, Hyoung Jung; Park, Sun Jin; Park, Ho Chul

    2008-01-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) fistulas are frequently very serious complications that are associated with high morbidity and mortality. GI fistulas can cause a wide array of pathophysiological effects by allowing abnormal diversion of the GI contents, including digestive fluid, water, electrolytes, and nutrients, from either one intestine to another or from the intestine to the skin. As an alternative to surgery, recent technical advances in interventional radiology and percutaneous techniques have been shown as advantageous to lower the morbidity and mortality rate, and allow for superior accessibility to the fistulous tracts via the use of fistulography. In addition, new interventional management techniques continue to emerge. We describe the clinical and imaging features of GI fistulas and outline the interventional management of GI fistulas.

  9. [Functional and motor gastrointestinal disorders].

    PubMed

    Mearin, Fermín; Rey, Enrique; Balboa, Agustín

    2015-09-01

    This article discusses the most interesting studies on functional and motor gastrointestinal disorders presented at Digestive Diseases Week (DDW), 2015. Researchers are still seeking biomarkers for irritable bowel syndrome and have presented new data. One study confirmed that the use of low-dose antidepressants has an antinociceptive effect without altering the psychological features of patients with functional dyspepsia. A contribution that could have immediate application is the use of transcutaneous electroacupuncture, which has demonstrated effectiveness in controlling nausea in patients with gastroparesis. New data have come to light on the importance of diet in irritable bowel syndrome, although the effectiveness of a low-FODMAP diet seems to be losing momentum with time. Multiple data were presented on the long-term efficacy of rifaximin therapy in patients with irritable bowel syndrome and diarrhoea. In addition, among other contributions, and more as a curiosity, a study evaluated the effect of histamine in the diet of patients with irritable bowel syndrome.

  10. Gastrointestinal manifestations in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Eggermont, E

    1996-08-01

    CFTR, or cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator, the gene product that is defective in cystic fibrosis, is present in the apical membrane of the epithelial cells from the stomach to the colon. In the foregut, the clinical manifestations are not directly related to the primary defect of the CFTR chloride channel. The most troublesome complaints and symptoms originate from the oesophagus as peptic oesophagitis or oesophageal varices. In the small intestinal wall, the clinical expression of CF depends largely on the decreased secretion of fluid and chloride ions, the increased permeability of the paracellular space between adjacent enterocytes and the sticky mucous cover over the enterocytes. As a rule, the brush border enzyme activities are normal and there is some enhanced active transport as shown for glucose and alanine. The results of continuous enteral feeding of CF patients clearly show that the small intestinal mucosa, in the daily situation, is not functioning at maximal capacity. Although CFTR expression in the colon is lower, the large intestine may be the site of several serious complications such as rectal prolapse, meconium ileus equivalent, intussusception, volvulus and silent appendicitis. In recent years colonic strictures, after the use of high-dose pancreatic enzymes, are being increasingly reported; the condition has recently been called CF fibrosing colonopathy. The CF gastrointestinal content itself differs mainly from the normal condition by the lower acidity in the foregut and the accretion of mucins and proteins, eventually resulting in intestinal obstruction, in the ileum and colon. Better understanding of the CF gastrointestinal phenotype may contribute to improvement of the overall wellbeing of these patients.

  11. The Multilevel Mixed Intact Group Analysis: A Mixed Method to Seek, Detect, Describe, and Explain Differences Among Intact Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schoonenboom, Judith

    2016-01-01

    Educational innovations often involve intact subgroups, such as school classes or university departments. In small-scale educational evaluation research, typically involving 1 to 20 subgroups, differences among these subgroups are often neglected. This article presents a mixed method from a qualitative perspective, in which differences among…

  12. DNA Microarray for Detection of Gastrointestinal Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Martínez, Miguel A.; Soto-del Río, María de los Dolores; Gutiérrez, Rosa María; Chiu, Charles Y.; Greninger, Alexander L.; Contreras, Juan Francisco; López, Susana; Arias, Carlos F.

    2014-01-01

    Gastroenteritis is a clinical illness of humans and other animals that is characterized by vomiting and diarrhea and caused by a variety of pathogens, including viruses. An increasing number of viral species have been associated with gastroenteritis or have been found in stool samples as new molecular tools have been developed. In this work, a DNA microarray capable in theory of parallel detection of more than 100 viral species was developed and tested. Initial validation was done with 10 different virus species, and an additional 5 species were validated using clinical samples. Detection limits of 1 × 103 virus particles of Human adenovirus C (HAdV), Human astrovirus (HAstV), and group A Rotavirus (RV-A) were established. Furthermore, when exogenous RNA was added, the limit for RV-A detection decreased by one log. In a small group of clinical samples from children with gastroenteritis (n = 76), the microarray detected at least one viral species in 92% of the samples. Single infection was identified in 63 samples (83%), and coinfection with more than one virus was identified in 7 samples (9%). The most abundant virus species were RV-A (58%), followed by Anellovirus (15.8%), HAstV (6.6%), HAdV (5.3%), Norwalk virus (6.6%), Human enterovirus (HEV) (9.2%), Human parechovirus (1.3%), Sapporo virus (1.3%), and Human bocavirus (1.3%). To further test the specificity and sensitivity of the microarray, the results were verified by reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) detection of 5 gastrointestinal viruses. The RT-PCR assay detected a virus in 59 samples (78%). The microarray showed good performance for detection of RV-A, HAstV, and calicivirus, while the sensitivity for HAdV and HEV was low. Furthermore, some discrepancies in detection of mixed infections were observed and were addressed by reverse transcription-quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) of the viruses involved. It was observed that differences in the amount of genetic material favored the detection of the most abundant

  13. DNA microarray for detection of gastrointestinal viruses.

    PubMed

    Martínez, Miguel A; Soto-Del Río, María de Los Dolores; Gutiérrez, Rosa María; Chiu, Charles Y; Greninger, Alexander L; Contreras, Juan Francisco; López, Susana; Arias, Carlos F; Isa, Pavel

    2015-01-01

    Gastroenteritis is a clinical illness of humans and other animals that is characterized by vomiting and diarrhea and caused by a variety of pathogens, including viruses. An increasing number of viral species have been associated with gastroenteritis or have been found in stool samples as new molecular tools have been developed. In this work, a DNA microarray capable in theory of parallel detection of more than 100 viral species was developed and tested. Initial validation was done with 10 different virus species, and an additional 5 species were validated using clinical samples. Detection limits of 1 × 10(3) virus particles of Human adenovirus C (HAdV), Human astrovirus (HAstV), and group A Rotavirus (RV-A) were established. Furthermore, when exogenous RNA was added, the limit for RV-A detection decreased by one log. In a small group of clinical samples from children with gastroenteritis (n = 76), the microarray detected at least one viral species in 92% of the samples. Single infection was identified in 63 samples (83%), and coinfection with more than one virus was identified in 7 samples (9%). The most abundant virus species were RV-A (58%), followed by Anellovirus (15.8%), HAstV (6.6%), HAdV (5.3%), Norwalk virus (6.6%), Human enterovirus (HEV) (9.2%), Human parechovirus (1.3%), Sapporo virus (1.3%), and Human bocavirus (1.3%). To further test the specificity and sensitivity of the microarray, the results were verified by reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) detection of 5 gastrointestinal viruses. The RT-PCR assay detected a virus in 59 samples (78%). The microarray showed good performance for detection of RV-A, HAstV, and calicivirus, while the sensitivity for HAdV and HEV was low. Furthermore, some discrepancies in detection of mixed infections were observed and were addressed by reverse transcription-quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) of the viruses involved. It was observed that differences in the amount of genetic material favored the detection of the most abundant

  14. Rare gastrointestinal lymphomas: The endoscopic investigation

    PubMed Central

    Vetro, Calogero; Bonanno, Giacomo; Giulietti, Giorgio; Romano, Alessandra; Conticello, Concetta; Chiarenza, Annalisa; Spina, Paolo; Coppolino, Francesco; Cunsolo, Rosario; Raimondo, Francesco Di

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal lymphomas represent up to 10% of gastrointestinal malignancies and about one third of non-Hodgkin lymphomas. The most prominent histologies are mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma and diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. However, the gastrointestinal tract can be the site of rarer lymphoma subtypes as a primary or secondary localization. Due to their rarity and the multifaceted histology, an endoscopic classification has not been validated yet. This review aims to analyze the endoscopic presentation of rare gastrointestinal lymphomas from disease diagnosis to follow-up, according to the involved site and lymphoma subtype. Existing, new and emerging endoscopic technologies have been examined. In particular, we investigated the diagnostic, prognostic and follow-up endoscopic features of T-cell and natural killer lymphomas, lymphomatous polyposis and mantle cell lymphoma, follicular lymphoma, plasma cell related disease, gastrointestinal lymphomas in immunodeficiency and Hodgkin’s lymphoma of the gastrointestinal tract. Contrarily to more frequent gastrointestinal lymphomas, data about rare lymphomas are mostly extracted from case series and case reports. Due to the data paucity, a synergism between gastroenterologists and hematologists is required in order to better manage the disease. Indeed, clinical and prognostic features are different from nodal and extranodal or the bone marrow (in case of plasma cell disease) counterpart. Therefore, the approach should be based on the knowledge of the peculiar behavior and natural history of disease. PMID:26265987

  15. Dual Roles for Immunity in Gastrointestinal Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Ferrone, Cristina; Dranoff, Glenn

    2010-01-01

    Histopathologic examination reveals that most human tumors are associated with diverse immune cell infiltrates, but the roles of host reactions in disease pathogenesis and prognosis remain to be fully clarified. Recent investigations in genetically engineered murine tumor models have uncovered dual functions for immune responses during cancer development and progression. Alterations in tumor cell gene expression profiles and coding sequences may trigger the activation of cytotoxic lymphocytes, which act to restrain tumor growth. In contrast, persistent inflammatory reactions, which may be driven by infection, environmental toxins, or impaired immune regulation, create a microenvironment that fosters tumor cell growth, survival, invasion, and dissemination. The dynamic interplay of these competing responses appears to be a critical event in cancer pathogenesis, with tumor promotion and immune evasion proving dominant in clinically evident disease. Nonetheless, longitudinal studies of patient cohorts have demonstrated that particular histopathologic and genetic signatures of cytotoxic lymphocyte reactions provide important prognostic information. Here, we discuss the dual roles of immunity in cancer development, focusing on gastrointestinal malignancies, given the depth of recent insights into the mechanisms underlying these tumors. PMID:20644090

  16. Prion diseases and the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Davies, G A; Bryant, Adam R; Reynolds, John D; Jirik, Frank R; Sharkey, Keith A

    2006-01-01

    The gastrointestinal (GI) tract plays a central role in the pathogenesis of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies. These are human and animal diseases that include bovine spongiform encephalopathy, scrapie and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. They are uniformly fatal neurological diseases, which are characterized by ataxia and vacuolation in the central nervous system. Although they are known to be caused by the conversion of normal cellular prion protein to its infectious conformational isoform (PrPsc) the process by which this isoform is propagated and transported to the brain remains poorly understood. M cells, dendritic cells and possibly enteroendocrine cells are important in the movement of infectious prions across the GI epithelium. From there, PrPsc propagation requires B lymphocytes, dendritic cells and follicular dendritic cells of Peyer's patches. The early accumulation of the disease-causing agent in the plexuses of the enteric nervous system supports the contention that the autonomic nervous system is important in disease transmission. This is further supported by the presence of PrPsc in the ganglia of the parasympathetic and sympathetic nerves that innervate the GI tract. Additionally, the lymphoreticular system has been implicated as the route of transmission from the gut to the brain. Although normal cellular prion protein is found in the enteric nervous system, its role has not been characterized. Further research is required to understand how the cellular components of the gut wall interact to propagate and transmit infectious prions to develop potential therapies that may prevent the progression of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies.

  17. Intestinal gastrointestinal stromal tumor in a cat

    PubMed Central

    SUWA, Akihisa; SHIMODA, Tetsuya

    2017-01-01

    A 12-year-old, 3.6-kg, spayed female domestic shorthaired cat had a 2-month history of anorexia and weight loss. Abdominal ultrasonography and computed tomography revealed an exophytic mass originating from the jejunum with very poor central and poor peripheral contrast enhancement. On day 14, surgical resection of the jejunum and mass with 5-cm margins and an end-to-end anastomosis were performed. Histopathological examination revealed the mass was a transmural, invasive cancer showing exophytic growth and originating from the small intestinal muscle layer. Immunohistochemical analysis of tumor cells revealed diffuse positivity for KIT protein and negativity for desmin and S-100. The mass was diagnosed as a gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST). Ultrasonographic findings indicated the tumor probably metastasized to the liver and omentum, as seen in humans and dogs. The owner rejected further treatment at the last visit on day 192. To our knowledge, this is the first report of intestinal tumor and metastasis in feline GIST and its imaging features. PMID:28163271

  18. Radioactive satellites - Intact reentry and breakup by debris impact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anz-Meador, P. D.; Potter, A. E., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    There is a substantial mass of radioactive material in nuclear reactors or radioisotope thermal generators (RTGs) in orbit about the earth. This paper examines the reentry of intact nuclear fuel cores and RTGs and the fragmentation and subsequent radioactive debris cloud deposition and evolution resulting from the impact of orbital debris upon an orbiting reactor, fuel core, or RTG. To assess the intact reentry, decay rates and a predicted decay date using historical and projected orbital decay data, are estimated. The current NASA debris environment model is utilized to estimate impact rates and debris cloud evolution of a fragmentation event. Results of these analyses are compared and concepts are tendered which would tend to minimize the radiological debris hazard to personnel and structures both on the earth's surface and in low earth orbit.

  19. Intrathecal application of cyproheptadine impairs locomotion in intact rats.

    PubMed

    Majczyński, Henryk; Cabaj, Anna; Górska, Teresa

    In intact adult rats, cyproheptadine, a 5-HT2 antagonist, administered intrathecally at the midlumbar segments was found to impair hindlimb locomotor movements during overground locomotion. These effects were dose-dependent; they varied from transient complete hindlimb paraplegia seen at doses of 300 microg/20 microl, to short-lasting trunk instability at doses of 100 microg/20 microl. After the return of overground locomotion, transient abduction of one of the hindlimbs was observed in some animals. These findings demonstrate that the blockade of 5-HT2 receptors affects locomotion in intact rats. Our results provide support for the hypothesis of serotonergic involvement in rat locomotion, which, so far, has been based mainly on the effects of 5-HT2 agonists on the recovery of locomotion in spinal rats.

  20. Spelling-stress regularity effects are intact in developmental dyslexia.

    PubMed

    Mundy, Ian R; Carroll, Julia M

    2013-01-01

    The current experiment investigated conflicting predictions regarding the effects of spelling-stress regularity on the lexical decision performance of skilled adult readers and adults with developmental dyslexia. In both reading groups, lexical decision responses were significantly faster and significantly more accurate when the orthographic structure of a word ending was a reliable as opposed to an unreliable predictor of lexical stress assignment. Furthermore, the magnitude of this spelling-stress regularity effect was found to be equivalent across reading groups. These findings are consistent with intact phoneme-level regularity effects also observed in dyslexia. The paper discusses how findings of intact spelling-sound regularity effects at both prosodic and phonemic levels, as well as other similar results, can be reconciled with the obvious difficulties that people with dyslexia experience in other domains of phonological processing.

  1. Structural determination of intact proteins using mass spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    Kruppa, Gary; Schoeniger, Joseph S.; Young, Malin M.

    2008-05-06

    The present invention relates to novel methods of determining the sequence and structure of proteins. Specifically, the present invention allows for the analysis of intact proteins within a mass spectrometer. Therefore, preparatory separations need not be performed prior to introducing a protein sample into the mass spectrometer. Also disclosed herein are new instrumental developments for enhancing the signal from the desired modified proteins, methods for producing controlled protein fragments in the mass spectrometer, eliminating complex microseparations, and protein preparatory chemical steps necessary for cross-linking based protein structure determination.Additionally, the preferred method of the present invention involves the determination of protein structures utilizing a top-down analysis of protein structures to search for covalent modifications. In the preferred method, intact proteins are ionized and fragmented within the mass spectrometer.

  2. Detection of gastrointestinal bleeding by radionuclide scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, S.; Luna, E.; Kingsley, S.; Prince, M.; Herrera, N.

    1984-01-01

    Scanning with Technetium /sup 99m/ labeled autologous red blood cells was performed in 59 patients with clinical suspicion of acute and/or intermittent, chronic gastrointestinal bleeding. In 36 patients (61%), a definite site of bleeding could be demonstrated. A strong correlation with other modalities such as upper and lower gastrointestinal endoscopy, contrast angiography, and surgical exploration was found. Overall sensitivity of the procedure was 91%; specificity 100% and accuracy 93.3%. It is suggested that radionuclide scintigraphy provides a completely noninvasive, simple, and sensitive procedure which may be routinely used for the detection and localization of gastrointestinal bleeding.

  3. Ubiquitin proteasome system research in gastrointestinal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Jia-Ling; Huang, Chang-Zhi

    2016-01-01

    The ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) is important for the degradation of proteins in eukaryotic cells. It is involved in nearly every cellular process and plays an important role in maintaining body homeostasis. An increasing body of evidence has linked alterations in the UPS to gastrointestinal malignancies, including esophageal, gastric and colorectal cancers. Here, we summarize the current literature detailing the involvement of the UPS in gastrointestinal cancer, highlighting its role in tumor occurrence and development, providing information for therapeutic targets research and anti-gastrointestinal tumor drug design. PMID:26909134

  4. Ubiquitin proteasome system research in gastrointestinal cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Jia-Ling; Huang, Chang-Zhi

    2016-02-15

    The ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) is important for the degradation of proteins in eukaryotic cells. It is involved in nearly every cellular process and plays an important role in maintaining body homeostasis. An increasing body of evidence has linked alterations in the UPS to gastrointestinal malignancies, including esophageal, gastric and colorectal cancers. Here, we summarize the current literature detailing the involvement of the UPS in gastrointestinal cancer, highlighting its role in tumor occurrence and development, providing information for therapeutic targets research and anti-gastrointestinal tumor drug design.

  5. Nanoparticle toxicity by the gastrointestinal route: evidence and knowledge gaps

    PubMed Central

    Bergin, Ingrid L.; Witzmann, Frank A.

    2013-01-01

    The increasing interest in nanoparticles for advanced technologies, consumer products, and biomedical applications has led to great excitement about potential benefits but also concern over the potential for adverse human health effects. The gastrointestinal tract represents a likely route of entry for many nanomaterials, both directly through intentional ingestion or indirectly via nanoparticle dissolution from food containers or by secondary ingestion of inhaled particles. Additionally, increased utilisation of nanoparticles may lead to increased environmental contamination and unintentional ingestion via water, food animals, or fish. The gastrointestinal tract is a site of complex, symbiotic interactions between host cells and the resident microbiome. Accordingly, evaluation of nanoparticles must take into consideration not only absorption and extraintestinal organ accumulation but also the potential for altered gut microbes and the effects of this perturbation on the host. The existing literature was evaluated for evidence of toxicity based on these considerations. Focus was placed on three categories of nanomaterials: nanometals and metal oxides, carbon-based nanoparticles, and polymer/dendrimers with emphasis on those particles of greatest relevance to gastrointestinal exposures. PMID:24228068

  6. Omega-3 fatty acids: a novel resort against gastrointestinal injury.

    PubMed

    Ianiro, G; Franceschi, F; Bibbò, S; Gasbarrini, A

    2014-10-01

    The integrity of gastric barrier derives from the balance between defending and damaging factors. In particular, prostaglandins play a relevant role in the maintenance of gastric homeostasis and prevention of peptic disease, at different levels. Omega-3 fatty acids, particularly eicosapentanoic acid, are the precursors of the third series of prostaglandins (with anti-inflammatory properties), also reducing the formation of the second series of prostaglandins (pro-inflammatory ones). Such a pathophysiological rationale brought to the experimental application, both in animal models and, more recently, in humans, of omega-3 fatty acids against gastrointestinal damage. Omega-3 fatty acids have shown interesting results in preventing different types of gastric damage in mouse models. A large retrospective case-control study on patients taking both anti-thrombotic therapy and eicosapentanoic acid showed (although only at unadjusted analysis) an inverse correlation between consumption of eicosapentanoic acid and gastrointestinal injury. Prospective, well-designed, comparative studies are warranted to clarify if omega-3 fatty acids may represent, or not, a novel resort against gastrointestinal injury.

  7. Nanoparticle toxicity by the gastrointestinal route: evidence and knowledge gaps.

    PubMed

    Bergin, Ingrid L; Witzmann, Frank A

    2013-01-01

    The increasing interest in nanoparticles for advanced technologies, consumer products, and biomedical applications has led to great excitement about potential benefits but also concern over the potential for adverse human health effects. The gastrointestinal tract represents a likely route of entry for many nanomaterials, both directly through intentional ingestion or indirectly via nanoparticle dissolution from food containers or by secondary ingestion of inhaled particles. Additionally, increased utilisation of nanoparticles may lead to increased environmental contamination and unintentional ingestion via water, food animals, or fish. The gastrointestinal tract is a site of complex, symbiotic interactions between host cells and the resident microbiome. Accordingly, evaluation of nanoparticles must take into consideration not only absorption and extraintestinal organ accumulation but also the potential for altered gut microbes and the effects of this perturbation on the host. The existing literature was evaluated for evidence of toxicity based on these considerations. Focus was placed on three categories of nanomaterials: nanometals and metal oxides, carbon-based nanoparticles, and polymer/dendrimers with emphasis on those particles of greatest relevance to gastrointestinal exposures.

  8. The Gastrointestinal Frontier: IgA and Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Blutt, Sarah E.; Conner, Margaret E.

    2013-01-01

    Viral gastroenteritis is one of the leading causes of diseases that kill ~2.2 million people worldwide each year. IgA is one of the major immune effector products present in the gastrointestinal tract yet its importance in protection against gastrointestinal viral infections has been difficult to prove. In part this has been due to a lack of small and large animal models in which pathogenesis of and immunity to gastrointestinal viral infections is similar to that in humans. Much of what we have learned about the role of IgA in the intestinal immune response has been obtained from experimental animal models of rotavirus infection. Rotavirus-specific intestinal IgA appears to be one of the principle effectors of long term protection against rotavirus infection. Thus, there has been a focus on understanding the immunological pathways through which this virus-specific IgA is induced during infection. In addition, the experimental animal models of rotavirus infection provide excellent systems in which new areas of research on viral-specific intestinal IgA including the long term maintenance of viral-specific IgA. PMID:24348474

  9. Binding of Clostridium botulinum C3 exoenzyme to intact cells.

    PubMed

    Rohrbeck, Astrid; von Elsner, Leonie; Hagemann, Sandra; Just, Ingo

    2014-06-01

    C3 from Clostridium botulinum (C3) specifically modifies Rho GTPases RhoA, RhoB, and RhoC by mono-ADP-ribosylation. The confined substrate profile of C3 is the basis for its use as pharmacological tool in cell biology to study cellular functions of Rho GTPases. Although C3 exoenzyme does not possess a cell-binding/-translocation domain, C3 is taken up by intact cells via an unknown mechanism. In the present work, binding of C3 to the hippocampus-derived HT22 cells and J774A.1 macrophages was characterized. C3 bound concentration-dependent to HT22 and J774A.1 cells. Pronase treatment of intact cells significantly reduced both C3 binding and C3 cell entry. Removal of sugar residues by glycosidase F treatment resulted in an increased binding of C3, but a reduced cell entry. To explore the involvement of phosphorylation in the binding process of C3, intact HT22 and J774A.1 cells were pre-treated with vanadate prior to incubation with C3. Inhibition of de-phosphorylation by vanadate resulted in an increased binding of C3. To differentiate between intracellular and extracellular phosphorylation, intact cells were treated with CIP (calf intestine phosphatase) to remove extracellular phosphate residues. The removal of phosphate residues resulted in a strong reduction in binding of C3 to cells. In sum, the C3 membranous binding partner is proteinaceous, and the glycosylation as well as the phosphorylation state is critical for efficient binding of C3.

  10. Dental abscess in a tooth with intact dens evaginatus.

    PubMed

    Cho, S Y

    2006-03-01

    This article reports a case of dental abscess in a mandibular premolar with intact dens evaginatus. Dentists are advised to critically evaluate those teeth with dens evaginatus, both clinically and radiographically, before attempting prophylactic treatments. This is particularly important medicolegally in case the tooth develops symptoms shortly after the prophylactic treatment. Dentists practising in Western countries should also be aware of this dental anomaly because of the increasing global migration of people from Asia.

  11. Crisscross heart with dextrocardia and intact interventricular septum.

    PubMed

    Muneer, P Kader; Kalathingathodika, Sajeer; Chakanalil, Govindan Sajeev; Sony, Manuel M

    2014-01-01

    Crisscross heart is a rare congenital heart disease characterized by a twisted atrioventricular connection, as a result of rotation of the ventricular mass along its long axis. We report an asymptomatic 48-year-old woman referred to us for evaluation of a cardiac murmur. Further evaluation showed situs solitus, dextrocardia with normal atrioventricular and ventriculoarterial connection, and a crisscross relation of the atrioventricular valves. Unlike the usual case of crisscross heart, our patient had an intact ventricular septum.

  12. Acoustic emissions during deformation of intact and jointed welded tuff

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, D.J.; Teufel, L.W.

    1982-07-01

    Monitoring of acoustic emissions (AE) has been widely used as a means of detecting failure in intact rock. For intact rock the technique is simple, because an increasing rate of AE is usually a sign of impending failure. However, most large rock masses contain numerous joints and the behavior of the joints controls the properties of the rock mass. In particular, the failure mode often becomes stable or unstable slip (stick-slip) on a joint at stresses well below those required for failure of the intact rock. As an aid to understanding and monitoring the behavior of jointed rock masses, we have done a series of experiments on intact and artificially jointed samples of Grouse Canyon tuff. The tuff was selected because it is under consideration as a disposal medium for nuclear wastes. The samples were instrumented to measure axial and transverse displacements and AE rates. Testing was done in a servo-controlled machine at axial displacement rates of 5 x 10{sup -5} cm/sec, and confining pressures ranging from 10 to 40 MPa. For the jointed samples four modes of slip were identified. First, stable sliding accompanied by a steady rate of AE. Second, stick-slip with a sharp drop in load, large displacements but no premonitory AE or slip. Third, stick-slip, as in mode 2, but with premonitory AE and slip. Fourth, slow stick-slip where the load dropped and the displacements increased but the process was slow and culminated in stable sliding. Mode 4 exhibited premonitory AE and slip and after the event, a steady rate of AE during sliding. There seemed to be no way to predict which mode would occur at a given point in the test. In all cases where stable or unstable slip occurred there was a corresponding occurrence of AE. This indicates that slip is related to damage to the joint surfaces and adjacent material. Monitoring AE would be a useful method of detecting slip.

  13. Virtual Reality Simulation of the Effects of Microgravity in Gastrointestinal Physiology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Compadre, Cesar M.

    1998-01-01

    The ultimate goal of this research is to create an anatomically accurate three-dimensional (3D) simulation model of the effects of microgravity in gastrointestinal physiology and to explore the role that such changes may have in the pharmacokinetics of drugs given to the space crews for prevention or therapy. To accomplish this goal the specific aims of this research are: 1) To generate a complete 3-D reconstructions of the human GastroIntestinal (GI) tract of the male and female Visible Humans. 2) To develop and implement time-dependent computer algorithms to simulate the GI motility using the above 3-D reconstruction.

  14. Posttranslational protein modification by polyamines in intact and regenerating nerves.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, G; Leach, T; Zanakis, M F; Sturman, J A; Ingoglia, N A

    1987-03-01

    A 150,000-g supernatant from axoplasm of the giant axon of the stellate nerve of the squid and from rat sciatic and goldfish optic nerves was found to be able to incorporate covalently [3H]putrescine and [3H]spermidine into an exogenous protein (N,N'-dimethylcasein). Incorporation of radioactivity was inhibited by CuSO4, a specific inhibitor of transglutaminases, the enzymes mediating these reactions in other tissues. Analysis of pH and temperature range and enzyme kinetics displayed characteristics predicted for transglutaminase-mediated reactions. Transglutaminase activity increased during regeneration of both vertebrate nerves, but greater activity was found in segments of nerve containing no intact axons than in either intact segments or in segments containing regenerating axons. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of endogenous modified proteins (in the absence of N,N'-dimethylcasein) showed labeling of 18-, 46- and 200-kilodalton proteins by both [3H]putrescine and [3H]spermidine. Analysis of the protein-bound radioactivity from intact and regenerating rat sciatic nerves demonstrated it to be predominantly in the form of the parent radioactive polyamine. These experiments demonstrate the covalent modification of proteins by polyamines at low levels in squid axoplasm and at relatively higher levels in rat sciatic and goldfish optic nerves. In the latter two cases, the activity of these modification reactions may be due in part to the modification of axonal proteins, but the majority of the activity occurs in nonneuronal cells of the nerve.

  15. Vehicle influence on permeation through intact and compromised skin.

    PubMed

    Gujjar, Meera; Banga, Ajay K

    2014-09-10

    The purpose of this study was to compare the transdermal permeation of a model compound, diclofenac diethylamine, from a hydrophilic and lipophilic vehicle across in vitro models simulating compromised skin. Mineral oil served as a lipophilic vehicle while 10mM phosphate buffered saline served as a hydrophilic vehicle. Compromised skin was simulated by tape stripping, delipidization, or microneedle application and compared with intact skin as a control. Transepidermal water loss was measured to assess barrier function. Skin compromised with tape stripping and delipidization significantly (p<0.05) increased permeation of diclofenac diethylamine compared to intact and microneedle treated skin with phosphate buffered saline vehicle. A similar trend in permeation was observed with mineral oil as the vehicle. For both vehicles, permeation across skin increased in the same order and correlated with degree of barrier impairment as indicated by transepidermal water loss values: intact

  16. Computer aided classification of cell nuclei in the gastrointestinal tract by volume and principal axis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagstetter, Ann M.; Camp, Jon J.; Lurken, Matthew S.; Szurszewski, Joseph H.; Farrugia, Gianrico; Gibbons, Simon J.; Robb, Richard A.

    2007-03-01

    Normal function of the gastrointestinal tract involves the coordinated activity of several cell types Human disorders of motor function of the gastrointestinal tract are often associated with changes in the number of these cells. For example, in diabetic patients, abnormalities in gastrointestinal transit are associated with changes in nerves and interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC), two key cells that generate and regulate motility. ICC are cells of mesenchymal origin that function as pacemakers and amplify neuronal signals in the gastrointestinal tract. Quantifying the changes in number of specific cell types in tissues from patients with motility disorders is challenging and requires immunolabeling for specific antigens. The shape of nuclei differs between the cell types in the wall of the gastrointestinal tract. Therefore the objective of this study was to determine whether cell nuclei can be classified by analyzing the 3D morphology of the nuclei. Furthermore, the orientation of the long axis of nuclei changes within and between the muscle layers. These features can be used to classify and differentially label the nuclei in confocal volume images of the tissue by computing the principal axis of the coordinates of the set of voxels forming each nucleus and thereby to identify cells by their nuclear morphology. Using this approach, we were able to separate and quantify nuclei in the smooth muscle layers of the tissue. Therefore we conclude that computer-aided classification of cell nuclei can be used to identify changes in the cell types expressed in gastrointestinal smooth muscle.

  17. Abnormal ghrelin secretion contributes to gastrointestinal symptoms in multiple system atrophy patients.

    PubMed

    Ozawa, Tetsutaro; Tokunaga, Jun; Arakawa, Musashi; Ishikawa, Atsushi; Takeuchi, Ryoko; Mezaki, Naomi; Miura, Takeshi; Sakai, Naoko; Hokari, Mariko; Takeshima, Akari; Utsumi, Kota; Kondo, Takashi; Yokoseki, Akio; Nishizawa, Masatoyo

    2013-08-01

    Patients with multiple system atrophy (MSA) often have evidence of compromised gastrointestinal motility. Ghrelin is a gut hormone that influences gastrointestinal motility in humans. The aim of this study was to determine whether ghrelin secretion is affected in MSA patients, and to investigate the relation between ghrelin secretion and gastrointestinal symptoms. Plasma levels of active ghrelin and unacylated ghrelin were measured in patients with MSA (n = 30), other atypical parkinsonian disorders including progressive supranuclear palsy-Richardson syndrome and corticobasal syndrome (n = 24), and control subjects (n = 24) using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Gastrointestinal symptoms were quantified in all subjects using a self-report questionnaire. The ratio of active ghrelin to total ghrelin in the plasma (active ghrelin ratio) was lower in patients with MSA (mean: 8.0 %) than in patients with other atypical parkinsonian disorders (mean: 13.7 %, P = 0.001) and control subjects (mean: 13.9 %, P = 0.001). The active ghrelin ratio was correlated with the severity of gastrointestinal symptoms in MSA (r = -0.5, P = 0.004). Our observations indicate that ghrelin secretion is affected in patients with MSA. The low active ghrelin ratio may contribute to gastrointestinal symptoms in MSA.

  18. 21 CFR 876.1725 - Gastrointestinal motility monitoring system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Gastrointestinal motility monitoring system. 876... Gastrointestinal motility monitoring system. (a) Identification. A gastrointestinal motility monitoring system is a... esophageal motility monitor and tube, the gastrointestinal motility (electrical) system, and...

  19. 21 CFR 876.1725 - Gastrointestinal motility monitoring system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Gastrointestinal motility monitoring system. 876... Gastrointestinal motility monitoring system. (a) Identification. A gastrointestinal motility monitoring system is a... esophageal motility monitor and tube, the gastrointestinal motility (electrical) system, and...

  20. 21 CFR 876.1725 - Gastrointestinal motility monitoring system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Gastrointestinal motility monitoring system. 876... Gastrointestinal motility monitoring system. (a) Identification. A gastrointestinal motility monitoring system is a... esophageal motility monitor and tube, the gastrointestinal motility (electrical) system, and...

  1. 21 CFR 876.1725 - Gastrointestinal motility monitoring system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Gastrointestinal motility monitoring system. 876... Gastrointestinal motility monitoring system. (a) Identification. A gastrointestinal motility monitoring system is a... esophageal motility monitor and tube, the gastrointestinal motility (electrical) system, and...

  2. 21 CFR 876.1725 - Gastrointestinal motility monitoring system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Gastrointestinal motility monitoring system. 876... Gastrointestinal motility monitoring system. (a) Identification. A gastrointestinal motility monitoring system is a... esophageal motility monitor and tube, the gastrointestinal motility (electrical) system, and...

  3. Unusual foreign bodies of upper gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Nijhawan, S; Rai, R R; Agarwal, S; Vijayvergiya, R

    1995-01-01

    We report management of unusual foreign bodies of upper gastrointestinal tract, namely beer bottle cap, raisins and pistachu, mango peel, betelnut and plum seed at a university hospital in Northern India.

  4. METHOD OF SUPPRESSING GASTROINTESTINAL UREASE ACTIVITY

    DOEpatents

    Visek, W.J.

    1963-04-23

    This patent shows a method of increasing the growth rate of chicks. Certain diacyl substituted ureas such as alloxan, murexide, and barbituric acid are added to their feed, thereby suppressing gastrointestinal urease activity and thus promoting growth. (AEC)

  5. Educational Card Games for Understanding Gastrointestinal Physiology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Odenweller, Cynthia M.; Hsu, Christopher T.; DiCarlo, Stephen E.

    1998-01-01

    Presents the rules for two educational card-games that provide an opportunity to integrate, analyze, and interpret basic concepts in gastrointestinal physiology. Enhances students' abilities to apply and synthesize. (DDR)

  6. Gastrointestinal complications of diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Babu; Babu, Shithu; Walker, Jessica; Walker, Adrian B; Pappachan, Joseph M

    2013-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus affects virtually every organ system in the body and the degree of organ involvement depends on the duration and severity of the disease, and other co-morbidities. Gastrointestinal (GI) involvement can present with esophageal dysmotility, gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD), gastroparesis, enteropathy, non alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and glycogenic hepatopathy. Severity of GERD is inversely related to glycemic control and management is with prokinetics and proton pump inhibitors. Diabetic gastroparesis manifests as early satiety, bloating, vomiting, abdominal pain and erratic glycemic control. Gastric emptying scintigraphy is considered the gold standard test for diagnosis. Management includes dietary modifications, maintaining euglycemia, prokinetics, endoscopic and surgical treatments. Diabetic enteropathy is also common and management involves glycemic control and symptomatic measures. NAFLD is considered a hepatic manifestation of metabolic syndrome and treatment is mainly lifestyle measures, with diabetes and dyslipidemia management when coexistent. Glycogenic hepatopathy is a manifestation of poorly controlled type 1 diabetes and is managed by prompt insulin treatment. Though GI complications of diabetes are relatively common, awareness about its manifestations and treatment options are low among physicians. Optimal management of GI complications is important for appropriate metabolic control of diabetes and improvement in quality of life of the patient. This review is an update on the GI complications of diabetes, their pathophysiology, diagnostic evaluation and management. PMID:23772273

  7. Rimonabant, Gastrointestinal Motility and Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yan; Chen, Jiande

    2012-01-01

    Background: Obesity and overweight affect more than half of the US population and are associated with a number of diseases. Rimonabant, a cannabinoid receptor 1 blocker in the endocannabinoid (EC) system, was indicated in Europe for the treatment of obesity and overweight patients with associated risk factors but withdrawn on Jan, 2009 because of side effects. Many studies have reported the effects of rimonabant on gastrointestinal (GI) motility and food intake. The aims of this review are: to review the relationship of EC system with GI motility and food intake;to review the studies of rimonabant on GI motility, food intake and obesity;and to report the tolerance and side effects of rimonabant. Methods: the literature (Pubmed database) was searched using keywords: rimonabant, obesity and GI motility. Results: GI motility is related with appetite, food intake and nutrients absorption. The EC system inhibits GI motility, reduces emesis and increases food intake; Rimonabant accelerates gastric emptying and intestinal transition but decreases energy metabolism and food intake. There is rapid onset of tolerance to the prokinetic effect of rimonabant. The main side effects of rimonabant are depression and GI symptoms. Conclusions: Rimonabant has significant effects on energy metabolism and food intake, probably mediated via its effects on GI motility. PMID:23449551

  8. Gastrointestinal bleeding and possible hypothyroidism.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Leisa L

    2012-03-01

    An 88-year-old female, living independently in the community, developed duodenal and gastric ulcers from using overthe-counter naproxen sodium for pain related to a shoulder fracture and arthritis of the knees. She was hospitalized and received packed red blood cells and intravenous proton pump inhibitor therapy. During her hospitalization, she developed atrial fibrillation (AF). Warfarin was not prescribed for stroke prevention because of the gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding. The patient was initially placed on atenolol, and then amiodarone was added. After a two-week hospital stay she was discharged to a nursing facility to gain strength, further correct her anemia, and receive physical therapy for the shoulder and ambulation problems from arthritis of the knees. The amiodarone was continued in the nursing facility. After 15 days of amiodarone therapy (hospital and nursing facility), a laboratory report indicated an elevated thyroid-stimulating hormone level. Levothyroxine was prescribed. The patient was eventually discharged to an assisted living facility once her strength returned and her ambulation improved. GI bleeding with anemia and weakness from nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug use and changes in thyroid function with amiodarone therapy for AF will be discussed.

  9. Potassium Channelopathies and Gastrointestinal Ulceration

    PubMed Central

    Han, Jaeyong; Lee, Seung Hun; Giebisch, Gerhard; Wang, Tong

    2016-01-01

    Potassium channels and transporters maintain potassium homeostasis and play significant roles in several different biological actions via potassium ion regulation. In previous decades, the key revelations that potassium channels and transporters are involved in the production of gastric acid and the regulation of secretion in the stomach have been recognized. Drugs used to treat peptic ulceration are often potassium transporter inhibitors. It has also been reported that potassium channels are involved in ulcerative colitis. Direct toxicity to the intestines from nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs has been associated with altered potassium channel activities. Several reports have indicated that the long-term use of the antianginal drug Nicorandil, an adenosine triphosphate-sensitive potassium channel opener, increases the chances of ulceration and perforation from the oral to anal regions throughout the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Several of these drug features provide further insights into the role of potassium channels in the occurrence of ulceration in the GI tract. The purpose of this review is to investigate whether potassium channelopathies are involved in the mechanisms responsible for ulceration that occurs throughout the GI tract. PMID:27784845

  10. Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumours: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Somerhausen, Nicolas De Saint Aubain

    1998-01-01

    Purpose. To study the evolution of concepts concerning gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GISTs) over 30 years. Discussion. GISTs have been, for more than 30 years, the subject of considerable controversy regarding their line of differentiation as well as the prediction of their behaviour. Furthermore, once they spread within the peritoneal cavity, they are extremely hard to control. The recent findings of c-Kit mutations and the immunohistochemical detection of the product of this gene, KIT or CD117, in the mainly non-myogenic subset of this family of tumours, has led to a reappraisal of this group of lesions, which, with some exceptions, is now thought to be derived from the interstitial cells of Cajal, and this has facilitated a clearer definition of their pathological spectrum. In this article, we review chronologically the evolution of the concept of GIST with the gradual application of electron microscopy, immunohistochemistry, DNA ploidy analysis. We discuss the impact of these techniques on the pathological assessment and clinical management of GISTs. PMID:18521245

  11. Laparoscopic approach in gastrointestinal emergencies

    PubMed Central

    Jimenez Rodriguez, Rosa M; Segura-Sampedro, Juan José; Flores-Cortés, Mercedes; López-Bernal, Francisco; Martín, Cristobalina; Diaz, Verónica Pino; Ciuro, Felipe Pareja; Ruiz, Javier Padillo

    2016-01-01

    This review focuses on the laparoscopic approach to gastrointestinal emergencies and its more recent indications. Laparoscopic surgery has a specific place in elective procedures, but that does not apply in emergency situations. In specific emergencies, there is a huge range of indications and different techniques to apply, and not all of them are equally settle. We consider that the most controversial points in minimally invasive procedures are indications in emergency situations due to technical difficulties. Some pathologies, such as oesophageal emergencies, obstruction due to colon cancer, abdominal hernias or incarcerated postsurgical hernias, are nearly always resolved by conventional surgery, that is, an open approach due to limited intraabdominal cavity space or due to the vulnerability of the bowel. These technical problems have been solved in many diseases, such as for perforated peptic ulcer or acute appendectomy for which a laparoscopic approach has become a well-known and globally supported procedure. On the other hand, endoscopic procedures have acquired further indications, relegating surgical solutions to a second place; this happens in cholangitis or pancreatic abscess drainage. This endoluminal approach avoids the need for laparoscopic development in these diseases. Nevertheless, new instruments and new technologies could extend the laparoscopic approach to a broader array of potentials procedures. There remains, however, a long way to go. PMID:26973409

  12. [Functional and motility gastrointestinal disorders].

    PubMed

    Mearin, Fermín; Rey, Enrique; Balboa, Agustín

    2012-09-01

    We summarize and discuss the studies presented at the congress of the American Association of Gastroenterology (Digestive Disease Week) that, in our opinion, are of greatest interest. Both clinically and physiopathologically, functional gastrointestinal (GI) disorders are highly complex. A single cause is unlikely to explain symptoms as heterogeneous as those of functional dyspepsia and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Therefore, it is easier (and more useful) to try to understand functional GI disorders using a bio-psycho-social model. Moreover, data supporting the combined importance of genetic, organic and psychological factors in the onset and persistence of functional GI disorders are increasingly convincing. This year, new data have been provided on pharmacogenetics in gastroparesis, on microinflammation or alterations in the modulation of somatic and visceral sensitivity in functional dyspepsia, and on the impact of psychological factors in IBS. From the therapeutic point of view, further information has been provided on the role of probiotics, the antinociceptive effect of linaclotide (demonstrated in several studies presented this year), and on the high efficacy of hypnotherapy in patients with IBS. Finally, data on the clinical management of patients with constipation due to pelvic floor dyssynergia and on the safety and efficacy of prucalopride in patients with severe constipation were also of interest.

  13. Gastrointestinal and Hepatic Involvement in Hypereosinophilic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Hurairah, Abu

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this investigation was to study the gastrointestinal and hepatic involvement in hypereosinophilic syndrome (HES). Gastrointestinal or hepatic involvement is estimated to affect up to one-third of patients with HES, although most of the clinical evidence has been derived from case reports. In literature, HES presenting with hepatitis and jaundice with subsequent development of colitis is a rare clinicopathologic entity. Given the clinical implications, physicians should include HES among differentials in these types of presentations. PMID:27733964

  14. Gastrointestinal radiation injury: Prevention and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Shadad, Abobakr K; Sullivan, Frank J; Martin, Joseph D; Egan, Laurence J

    2013-01-01

    With the recent advances in detection and treatment of cancer, there is an increasing emphasis on the efficacy and safety aspects of cancer therapy. Radiation therapy is a common treatment for a wide variety of cancers, either alone or in combination with other treatments. Ionising radiation injury to the gastrointestinal tract is a frequent side effect of radiation therapy and a considerable proportion of patients suffer acute or chronic gastrointestinal symptoms as a result. These side effects often cause morbidity and may in some cases lower the efficacy of radiotherapy treatment. Radiation injury to the gastrointestinal tract can be minimised by either of two strategies: technical strategies which aim to physically shift radiation dose away from the normal intestinal tissues, and biological strategies which aim to modulate the normal tissue response to ionising radiation or to increase its resistance to it. Although considerable improvement in the safety of radiotherapy treatment has been achieved through the use of modern optimised planning and delivery techniques, biological techniques may offer additional further promise. Different agents have been used to prevent or minimize the severity of gastrointestinal injury induced by ionising radiation exposure, including biological, chemical and pharmacological agents. In this review we aim to discuss various technical strategies to prevent gastrointestinal injury during cancer radiotherapy, examine the different therapeutic options for acute and chronic gastrointestinal radiation injury and outline some examples of research directions and considerations for prevention at a pre-clinical level. PMID:23345942

  15. Effects of enzymatic dephosphorylation on infant in vitro gastrointestinal digestibility of milk protein concentrate.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dasong; Wang, Yuanyuan; Yu, Yun; Hu, Jinhua; Lu, Naiyan; Regenstein, Joe M; Wang, Miao; Zhou, Peng

    2016-04-15

    This study investigated the effects of dephosphorylation extent on infant in vitro gastric clotting property and gastrointestinal digestibility of milk protein concentrate. Dephosphorylation was affected by phosphatase type and incubation pH. A series of milk protein concentrate with 0-69% dephosphorylation were obtained by incubation with calf intestinal alkaline phosphatase at pH 6.5 for 0-420 min. Both β- and αs1-caseins in the modified milk protein concentrate showed multiply dephosphorylated isoforms with different numbers of phosphate groups depending on the extent of dephosphorylation. With increased dephosphorylation of milk protein concentrate, the gastric clotting extent decreased and the gastrointestinal digestibility increased under infant in vitro conditions. These results suggested the potential of developing a dephosphorylated milk protein concentrate, with improved gastric clotting property and gastrointestinal digestibility, to simulate the multiply phosphorylated patterns of human casein and hence to further the humanization of infant formula on a molecular level.

  16. The gastrointestinal pharmacology of cannabinoids: focus on motility.

    PubMed

    Abalo, Raquel; Vera, Gema; López-Pérez, Ana Esther; Martínez-Villaluenga, María; Martín-Fontelles, María Isabel

    2012-01-01

    The marijuana plant Cannabis sp. and its derivatives and analogues, known as cannabinoids (CBs), induce many effects throughout the whole body. Herein we briefly review the gastrointestinal (GI) pharmacology of CBs, with special focus on motor function. Some drugs are available to treat nausea and emesis, and evidences in humans and animal models suggest that other GI motility alterations (gastro-oesophageal reflux, inflammatory bowel conditions or paralytic ileus) might benefit from modifications of the CB tone throughout the gut. However, central and peripheral (including GI) side effects may occur upon acute and chronic CB administration. Hopefully, the ongoing worldwide intense research on CBs will soon provide new, safer CB-based medicines.

  17. [Eubiosis and dysbiosis of gastrointestinal tract: myths and reality].

    PubMed

    Tsimmerman, Ia S

    2013-01-01

    Current data on eubiosis and dysbiosis of gastrointestinal tract are discussed along with the role of its microflora in human body under normal and pathological conditions. Certain debatable problems are discussed. Classification of colonic dysbiosis is presented with reference to its stages, functions of normal flora, "myths" related to the science of eubiosis and dysbiosis, the authors views of the problem. Diagnostic methods and their informative value are described. The main diseases and syndromes associated with intestinal dysbiosis are discussed. In conjunction with approaches to its correction.

  18. Targeting the gastrointestinal tract to develop novel therapies for HIV.

    PubMed

    Reeves, R K; Burgener, A; Klatt, N R

    2015-10-01

    Despite the use of antiretroviral therapy (ART), which delays and/or prevents AIDS pathogenesis, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals continue to face increased morbidities and mortality rates compared with uninfected individuals. Gastrointestinal (GI) mucosal dysfunction is a key feature of HIV infection, and is associated with mortality. In this study, we review current knowledge about mucosal dysfunction in HIV infection, and describe potential avenues for therapeutic targets to enhance mucosal function and decrease morbidities and mortalities in HIV-infected individuals.

  19. Purification and functional reconstitution of intact ral-binding Gtpase activating protein, RLIP76, in artificial liposomes.

    PubMed

    Singhal, S S; Singhal, J; Cheng, J; Pikuła, S; Sharma, R; Zimniak, P; Awasthi, Y C; Awasthi, S

    2001-01-01

    We have recently shown that RLIP76, a ral-binding GTPase activating protein, mediates ATP-dependent transport of glutathione-conjugates (GS-E) and doxorubicin (DOX) (S. Awasthi et al., Biochemistry 39,9327,2000). Transport function of RLIP76 was found to be intact despite considerable proteolytic fragmentation in preparations used for those studies, suggesting either that the residual intact RLIP76 was responsible for transport activity, or that the transport activity could be reconstituted by fragments of RLIP76. If the former were true, intact RLIP76 would have a much higher specific activity for ATP-hydrolysis than the fragmented protein. We have addressed this question by comparing transport properties of recombinant RLIP76 and human erythrocyte membrane RLIP76 purified in buffers treated with either 100 or 500 microM serine protease inhibitor, PMSF. The purity and identity of recombinant and human erythrocyte RLIP76 was established by SDS/PAGE and Western-blot analysis. These studies confirmed the origin of the 38 kDa protein, previously referred to as DNP-SG ATPase, from RLIP76. Higher PMSF concentration resulted in lower yield of the 38 kDa band and higher yield of intact RLIP76 from both human and recombinant source. In contrast, the substrate-stimulated ATPase activity in presence of DNP-SG, doxorubicin, daunorubicin, or colchicine were unaffected by increased PMSF; similarly, ATP-dependent transport of doxorubicin in proteoliposomes reconstituted with RLIP76 was unaffected by higher PMSF. These results indicated that limited proteolysis by serine proteases does not abrogate the transport function of RLIP76. Comparison of transport kinetics for daunorubicin between recombinant vs human erythrocyte RLIP76 revealed higher specific activity of transport for tissue purified RLIP76, indicating that additional factors present in tissue purified RLIP76 can modulate its transport activity.

  20. Small Angle Neutron-Scattering Studies of the Core Structure of Intact Neurosecretory Vesicles.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krueger, Susan Takacs

    Small angle neutron scattering (SANS) was used to study the state of the dense cores within intact neurosecretory vesicles. These vesicles transport the neurophysin proteins, along with their associated hormones, oxytocin or vasopressin, from the posterior pituitary gland to the bloodstream, where the entire vesicle contents are released. Knowledge of the vesicle core structure is important in developing an understanding of this release mechanism. Since the core constituents exist in a dense state at concentrations which cannot be reproduced (in solution) in the laboratory, a new method was developed to determine the core structure from SANS experiments performed on intact neurosecretory vesicles. These studies were complemented by biochemical assays performed to determine the role, if any, played by phospholipids in the interactions between the core constituents. H_2O/D_2 O ratio in the solvent can be adjusted, using the method of contrast variation, such that the scattering due to the vesicle membranes is minimized, thus emphasizing the scattering originating from the cores. The applicability of this method for examining the interior of biological vesicles was tested by performing an initial study on human red blood cells, which are similar in structure to other biological vesicles. Changes in intermolecular hemoglobin interactions, occurring when the ionic strength of the solvent was varied or when the cells were deoxygenated, were examined. The results agreed with those expected for dense protein solutions, indicating that the method developed was suitable for the study of hemoglobin within the cells. Similar SANS studies were then performed on intact neurosecretory vesicles. The experimental results were inconsistent with model calculations which assumed that the cores consisted of small, densely-packed particles or large, globular aggregates. Although a unique model could not be determined, the data suggest that the core constituents form long aggregates of

  1. Intact Cell MALDI-TOF MS on Sperm: A Molecular Test For Male Fertility Diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Soler, Laura; Labas, Valérie; Thélie, Aurore; Grasseau, Isabelle; Teixeira-Gomes, Ana-Paula; Blesbois, Elisabeth

    2016-06-01

    Currently, evaluation of sperm quality is primarily based on in vitro measures of sperm function such as motility, viability and/or acrosome reaction. However, results are often poorly correlated with fertility, and alternative diagnostic tools are therefore needed both in veterinary and human medicine. In a recent pilot study, we demonstrated that MS profiles from intact chicken sperm using MALDI-TOF profiles could detect significant differences between fertile/subfertile spermatozoa showing that such profiles could be useful for in vitro male fertility testing. In the present study, we performed larger standardized experimental procedures designed for the development of fertility- predictive mathematical models based on sperm cell MALDI-TOF MS profiles acquired through a fast, automated method. This intact cell MALDI-TOF MS-based method showed high diagnostic accuracy in identifying fertile/subfertile males in a large male population of known fertility from two distinct genetic lineages (meat and egg laying lines). We additionally identified 40% of the m/z peaks observed in sperm MS profiles through a top-down high-resolution protein identification analysis. This revealed that the MALDI-TOF MS spectra obtained from intact sperm cells contained a large proportion of protein degradation products, many implicated in important functional pathways in sperm such as energy metabolism, structure and movement. Proteins identified by our predictive model included diverse and important functional classes providing new insights into sperm function as it relates to fertility differences in this experimental system. Thus, in addition to the chicken model system developed here, with the use of appropriate models these methods should effectively translate to other animal taxa where similar tests for fertility are warranted.

  2. Can breathing-like pressure oscillations reverse or prevent narrowing of small intact airways?

    PubMed

    Harvey, Brian C; Parameswaran, Harikrishnan; Lutchen, Kenneth R

    2015-07-01

    Periodic length fluctuations of airway smooth muscle during breathing are thought to modulate airway responsiveness in vivo. Recent animal and human intact airway studies have shown that pressure fluctuations simulating breathing can only marginally reverse airway narrowing and are ineffective at protecting against future narrowing. However, these previous studies were performed on relatively large (>5 mm diameter) airways, which are inherently stiffer than smaller airways for which a preponderance of airway constriction in asthma likely occurs. The goal of this study was to determine the effectiveness of breathing-like transmural pressure oscillations to reverse induced narrowing and/or protect against future narrowing of smaller, more compliant intact airways. We constricted smaller (luminal diameter = 2.92 ± 0.29 mm) intact airway segments twice with ACh (10(-6) M), once while applying tidal-like pressure oscillations (5-15 cmH2O) before, during, and after inducing constriction (Pre + Post) and again while only imposing the tidal-like pressure oscillation after induced constriction (Post Only). Smaller airways were 128% more compliant than previously studied larger airways. This increased compliance translated into 196% more strain and 76% greater recovery (41 vs. 23%) because of tidal-like pressure oscillations. Larger pressure oscillations (5-25 cmH2O) caused more recovery (77.5 ± 16.5%). However, pressure oscillations applied before and during constriction resulted in the same steady-state diameter as when pressure oscillations were only applied after constriction. These data show that reduced straining of the airways before a challenge likely does not contribute to the emergence of airway hyperreactivity observed in asthma but may serve to sustain a given level of constriction.

  3. Can breathing-like pressure oscillations reverse or prevent narrowing of small intact airways?

    PubMed Central

    Harvey, Brian C.; Parameswaran, Harikrishnan

    2015-01-01

    Periodic length fluctuations of airway smooth muscle during breathing are thought to modulate airway responsiveness in vivo. Recent animal and human intact airway studies have shown that pressure fluctuations simulating breathing can only marginally reverse airway narrowing and are ineffective at protecting against future narrowing. However, these previous studies were performed on relatively large (>5 mm diameter) airways, which are inherently stiffer than smaller airways for which a preponderance of airway constriction in asthma likely occurs. The goal of this study was to determine the effectiveness of breathing-like transmural pressure oscillations to reverse induced narrowing and/or protect against future narrowing of smaller, more compliant intact airways. We constricted smaller (luminal diameter = 2.92 ± 0.29 mm) intact airway segments twice with ACh (10−6 M), once while applying tidal-like pressure oscillations (5–15 cmH2O) before, during, and after inducing constriction (Pre + Post) and again while only imposing the tidal-like pressure oscillation after induced constriction (Post Only). Smaller airways were 128% more compliant than previously studied larger airways. This increased compliance translated into 196% more strain and 76% greater recovery (41 vs. 23%) because of tidal-like pressure oscillations. Larger pressure oscillations (5–25 cmH2O) caused more recovery (77.5 ± 16.5%). However, pressure oscillations applied before and during constriction resulted in the same steady-state diameter as when pressure oscillations were only applied after constriction. These data show that reduced straining of the airways before a challenge likely does not contribute to the emergence of airway hyperreactivity observed in asthma but may serve to sustain a given level of constriction. PMID:25953836

  4. Role of the microbiome in non-gastrointestinal cancers

    PubMed Central

    Pevsner-Fischer, Meirav; Tuganbaev, Timur; Meijer, Mariska; Zhang, Sheng-Hong; Zeng, Zhi-Rong; Chen, Min-Hu; Elinav, Eran

    2016-01-01

    “The forgotten organ”, the human microbiome, comprises a community of microorganisms that colonizes various sites of the human body. Through coevolution of bacteria, archaea and fungi with the human host over thousands of years, a complex host-microbiome relationship emerged in which many functions, including metabolism and immune responses, became codependent. This coupling becomes evident when disruption in the microbiome composition, termed dysbiosis, is mirrored by the development of pathologies in the host. Among the most serious consequences of dysbiosis, is the development of cancer. As many as 20% of total cancers worldwide are caused by a microbial agent. To date, a vast majority of microbiome-cancer studies focus solely on the microbiome of the large intestine and the development of gastrointestinal cancers. Here, we will review the available evidence implicating microbiome involvement in the development and progression of non-gastrointestinal cancers, while distinguishing between viral and bacterial drivers of cancer, as well as “local” and “systemic”, “cancer-stimulating” and “cancer-suppressing” effects of the microbiome. Developing a system-wide approach to cancer-microbiome studies will be crucial in understanding how microbiome influences carcinogenesis, and may enable to employ microbiome-targeting approaches as part of cancer treatment. PMID:27081642

  5. Gastrointestinal Health in Classic Galactosemia.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Kelly A; Mulle, Jennifer G; Epstein, Michael P; Fridovich-Keil, Judith L

    2016-07-01

    Classic galactosemia (CG) is an autosomal recessive disorder of galactose metabolism that affects approximately 1/50,000 live births in the USA. Following exposure to milk, which contains large quantities of galactose, affected infants may become seriously ill. Early identification by newborn screening with immediate dietary galactose restriction minimizes or prevents the potentially lethal acute symptoms of CG. However, more than half of individuals with CG still experience long-term complications including cognitive disability, behavioral problems, and speech impairment. Anecdotal reports have also suggested frequent gastrointestinal (GI) problems, but this outcome has not been systematically addressed. In this study we explored the prevalence of GI symptoms among 183 children and adults with CG (cases) and 190 controls. Cases reported 4.5 times more frequent constipation (95% CI 1.8-11.5) and 4.2 times more frequent nausea (95% CI 1.2-15.5) than controls. Cases with genotypes predicting residual GALT activity reported less frequent constipation than cases without predicted GALT activity but this difference was not statistically significant. Because the rigor of dietary galactose restriction varies among individuals with galactosemia, we further tested whether GI symptoms associated with diet in infancy. Though constipation was almost four times as common among cases reporting a more restrictive diet in infancy, this difference was not statistically significant. These data confirm that certain GI symptoms are more common in classic galactosemia compared to controls and suggest that future studies should investigate associations with residual GALT activity and dietary galactose restriction in early life.

  6. Upper gastrointestinal issues in athletes.

    PubMed

    Waterman, Jason J; Kapur, Rahul

    2012-01-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) complaints are common among athletes with rates in the range of 30% to 70%. Both the intensity of sport and the type of sporting activity have been shown to be contributing factors in the development of GI symptoms. Three important factors have been postulated as contributing to the pathophysiology of GI complaints in athletes: mechanical forces, altered GI blood flow, and neuroendocrine changes. As a result of those factors, gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), nausea, vomiting, gastritis, peptic ulcers, GI bleeding, or exercise-related transient abdominal pain (ETAP) may develop. GERD may be treated with changes in eating habits, lifestyle modifications, and training modifications. Nausea and vomiting may respond to simple training modifications, including no solid food 3 hours prior to an athletic event. Mechanical trauma, decreased splanchnic blood flow during exercise, and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) contribute to gastritis, GI bleeding, and ulcer formation in athletes. Acid suppression with proton-pump inhibitors may be useful in athletes with persistence of any of the above symptoms. ETAP is a common, poorly-understood, self-limited acute abdominal pain which is difficult to treat. ETAP incidence increases in athletes beginning a new exercise program or increasing the intensity of their current exercise program. ETAP may respond to changes in breathing patterns or may resolve simply with continued training. Evaluation of the athlete with upper GI symptoms requires a thorough history, a detailed training log, a focused physical examination aimed at ruling out potentially serious causes of symptoms, and follow-up laboratory testing based on concerning physical examination findings.

  7. [Functional and motor gastrointestinal disorders].

    PubMed

    Mearin, Fermín; Perelló, Antonia; Balboa, Agustín

    2008-10-01

    Functional gastrointestinal (GI) and motility disorders generate a large volume of consultations in gastroenterology and primary care offices. The present article summarizes the most interesting studies presented in the annual meeting of the American Gastroenterological Association 2008. For all functional GI disorders, studies were presented that evaluated the applicability of diagnostic criteria in clinical practice and new data were presented on physiopathology (for example, mediation by neuromodulators such as serotonin, microinflammation, alterations in intestinal microbiota, and psychological factors). More specifically, the therapeutic results of new prokinetic agents in functional dyspepsia, such as acotiamide, were presented. This agent has been demonstrated to have good efficacy in symptom control, especially in patients with postprandial distress syndrome. In irritable bowel syndrome, data were presented on several drugs that act through diverse mechanisms of action and have been shown to be more effective than placebo in symptom control. These drugs include antiinflammatory agents such as mesalazine, antibiotics such as rifaximin, probiotics with distinct bacterial strains, and prokinetic agents such as lubiprostone. Highly promising results have been obtained in the treatment of constipation with prokinetics such as prucalopride and with novel laxatives such as linaclotide, as well as with techniques that continue to be shown to be effective such as anorectal biofeedback, which is also highly useful in patients with fecal incontinence. Another disorder that is less frequent but highly difficult to treat is gastroparesis. For several years, treatment in the most severe cases has consisted of implantation of a gastric pacemaker. Although the results are far from perfect, new data were presented that allow better patient selection to achieve greater symptom control. The list of new advances, both in knowledge of the physiopathology of these disorders and

  8. [Functional and motility gastrointestinal disorders].

    PubMed

    Mearin, Fermín; Rey, Enrique; Balboa, Agustín

    2011-10-01

    As in previous years, a huge number of studies were presented at the Congress of the American Gastroenterology Association (Digestive Diseases Week [DDW]), some of which were better than others. The present article attempts to extract and summarize the most interesting findings reported. In general terms, certain technological advances have been consolidated, with full incorporation into clinical practice, such as impedancemetry and high-resolution manometry. New physiopathological data are coming to light that increasingly indicate the inextricable link between organic and psychological factors (the biopsychosocial model) in functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGID). Despite the high hopes that the Rome III criteria would improve the diagnosis of FGID and especially that of functional dyspepsia, their practical application has been fairly discouraging. Moreover, at least two studies have demonstrated that these criteria cannot be used to differentiate subtypes of functional dyspepsia and that there is wide overlap with gastroesophageal reflux disease. New data were presented on the role of genetic, microinflammatory and psychological factors in the etiopathogenesis of the two main FGID: functional dyspepsia and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). The results on the safety and efficacy of acotiamide in functional dyspepsia and of linaclotide and prucalopride in idiopathic and IBS-associated constipation were also presented. Several studies, and even meta-analyses, have demonstrated the utility of biofeedback in the treatment of constipation. Even so, the efficacy of this therapy has been questioned due to certain methodological deficiencies in some studies. In DDW 2011, studies confirming the utility of biofeedback, whether hospital- or home-based were presented, in dyssynergy constipation. The present article also mentions certain features of special interest in the diagnosis and treatment of rumination syndrome, thoracic pain of possible esophageal origin and

  9. Feasible pickup from intact ossicular chain with floating piezoelectric microphone

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Many microphones have been developed to meet with the implantable requirement of totally implantable cochlear implant (TICI). However, a biocompatible one without destroying the intactness of the ossicular chain still remains under investigation. Such an implantable floating piezoelectric microphone (FPM) has been manufactured and shows an efficient electroacoustic performance in vitro test at our lab. We examined whether it pick up sensitively from the intact ossicular chain and postulated whether it be an optimal implantable one. Methods Animal controlled experiment: five adult cats (eight ears) were sacrificed as the model to test the electroacoustic performance of the FPM. Three groups were studied: (1) the experiment group (on malleus): the FPM glued onto the handle of the malleus of the intact ossicular chains; (2) negative control group (in vivo): the FPM only hung into the tympanic cavity; (3) positive control group (Hy-M30): a HiFi commercial microphone placed close to the site of the experiment ear. The testing speaker played pure tones orderly ranged from 0.25 to 8.0 kHz. The FPM inside the ear and the HiFi microphone simultaneously picked up acoustic vibration which recorded as .wav files to analyze. Results The FPM transformed acoustic vibration sensitively and flatly as did the in vitro test across the frequencies above 2.0 kHz, whereas inefficiently below 1.0 kHz for its overloading mass. Although the HiFi microphone presented more efficiently than the FPM did, there was no significant difference at 3.0 kHz and 8.0 kHz. Conclusions It is feasible to develop such an implantable FPM for future TICIs and TIHAs system on condition that the improvement of Micro Electromechanical System and piezoelectric ceramic material technology would be applied to reduce its weight and minimize its size. PMID:22353161

  10. An integrated workflow for characterizing intact phosphoproteins from complex mixtures

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Si; Yang, Feng; Zhao, Rui; Tolić, Nikola; Robinson, Errol W.; Camp, David; Smith, Richard D.; Paša-Tolić, Ljiljana

    2014-01-01

    The phosphorylation of any site on a given protein can affect its activity, degradation rate, ability to dock with other proteins or bind divalent cations, and/or its localization. These effects can operate within the same protein; in fact, multisite phosphorylation is a key mechanism for achieving signal integration in cells. Hence, knowing the overall phosphorylation signature of a protein is essential for understanding the "state" of a cell. However, current technologies to monitor the phosphorylation status of proteins are inefficient at determining the relative stoichiometries of phosphorylation at multiple sites. Here we report a new capability for comprehensive liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC/MS) analysis of intact phosphoproteins. The technology platform built upon integrated bottom-up and top-down approach that is facilitated by intact protein reversed-phase (RP)LC concurrently coupled with Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR) MS and fraction collection. As the use of conventional RPLC systems for phosphopeptide identification has proven challenging due to the formation of metal ion complexes at various metal surfaces during LC/MS and ESI-MS analysis, we have developed a “metal-free” RPLC-ESI-MS platform for phosphoprotein characterization. This platform demonstrated a significant sensitivity enhancement for phosphorylated casein proteins enriched from a standard protein mixture and revealed the presence of over 20 casein isoforms arising from genetic variants with varying numbers of phosphorylation sites. The integrated workflow was also applied to an enriched yeast phosphoproteome to evaluate the feasibility of this strategy for characterizing complex biological systems, and revealed ~16% of the detected yeast proteins to have multiple phosphorylation isoforms. Intact protein LC/MS platform for characterization of combinatorial posttranslational modifications (PTMs), with special emphasis on multisite phosphorylation, holds

  11. Controlled therapy by imaging of functional structures of intact liver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, W.; Zhuang, Feng Y.; Ruan, G.; Kakihana, Yasuyuki; Krug, A.; Kessler, Manfred D.

    2000-04-01

    Ligustrazine, a Chinese herb medicine has been used to treat the diseases of cardiovascular and cerebral vascular diseases in China by Chinese traditional physicians or many years. Recently, results showed that ligustrazine is a powerful hepatic vasodilator. It can greatly change the blood supply of the tissues. Due to micro-optical tissue sensor developed recently it became possible to image functional structures of tissue on the level of intact blood capillaries. In our experiment we used the Oxyscan in order to study the effect of Ligustrazine on the oxygen supply of rat liver.

  12. Fast Imaging of Intact and Shattered Cryogenic Neon Pellets

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zhehui; Combs, Stephen Kirk; Baylor, Larry R; Foust, Charles R; Lyttle, Mark S; Meitner, Steven J; Rasmussen, David A

    2014-01-01

    Compact condensed-matter injection technologies are increasingly used in magnetic fusion. One recent application is in disruption mitigation. An imaging system with less-than-100- m- and sub- s-resolution is described and used to characterize intact and shattered cryogenic neon pellets. Shattered pellets contain fine particles ranging from tens of m to about 7 mm. Time-of-flight analyses indicate that pellets could slow down if hitting the wall of the guide tube. Fast high-resolution imaging systems are thus useful to neon and other condensed-matter injector development.

  13. Fast imaging of intact and shattered cryogenic neon pellets

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zhehui; Combs, S. K.; Baylor, L. R.; Foust, C. R.; Lyttle, M. S.; Meitner, S. J.; Rasmussen, D. A.

    2014-11-15

    Compact condensed-matter injection technologies are increasingly used in magnetic fusion. One recent application is in disruption mitigation. An imaging system with less-than-100-µm- and sub-µs-resolution is described and used to characterize intact and shattered cryogenic neon pellets. Shattered pellets contain fine particles ranging from tens of µm to about 7 mm. Time-of-flight analyses indicate that pellets could slow down if hitting the wall of the guide tube. Fast high-resolution imaging systems are thus useful to neon and other condensed-matter injector development.

  14. Imaging of Intact Tissue Sections: Moving beyond the Microscope*

    PubMed Central

    Seeley, Erin H.; Schwamborn, Kristina; Caprioli, Richard M.

    2011-01-01

    MALDI-imaging MS is a new molecular imaging technology for direct in situ analysis of thin tissue sections. Multiple analytes can be monitored simultaneously without prior knowledge of their identities and without the need for target-specific reagents such as antibodies. Imaging MS provides important insights into biological processes because the native distributions of molecules are minimally disturbed, and histological features remain intact throughout the analysis. A wide variety of molecules can be imaged, including proteins, peptides, lipids, drugs, and metabolites. Several specific examples are presented to highlight the utility of the technology. PMID:21632549

  15. Physiological characterization of motor unit properties in intact cats.

    PubMed

    O'Donovan, M J; Hoffer, J A; Loeb, G E

    1983-02-01

    Single motor units were isolated in intact cats, by microstimulation through chronically implanted microwires in the L5 ventral roots. Motor unit axonal and mechanical properties were obtained by stimulus-triggered averaging the signals from an implanted femoral nerve recording cuff and patellar tendon force transducer. All unit types were sampled with this technique, and it was also possible to stimulate in isolation an axon whose ventral root spike was recorded during treadmill locomotion. A new technique was described, spike-triggered microstimulation, for verifying the identity of a stimulated and a recorded axon.

  16. Fast imaging of intact and shattered cryogenic neon pellets.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhehui; Combs, S K; Baylor, L R; Foust, C R; Lyttle, M S; Meitner, S J; Rasmussen, D A

    2014-11-01

    Compact condensed-matter injection technologies are increasingly used in magnetic fusion. One recent application is in disruption mitigation. An imaging system with less-than-100-µm- and sub-µs-resolution is described and used to characterize intact and shattered cryogenic neon pellets. Shattered pellets contain fine particles ranging from tens of µm to about 7 mm. Time-of-flight analyses indicate that pellets could slow down if hitting the wall of the guide tube. Fast high-resolution imaging systems are thus useful to neon and other condensed-matter injector development.

  17. 46 CFR 178.325 - Intact stability requirements for a sailing vessel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...) Commanding Officer, Marine Safety Center, may prescribe additional or different stability requirements for a... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Intact stability requirements for a sailing vessel. 178... VESSELS (UNDER 100 GROSS TONS) INTACT STABILITY AND SEAWORTHINESS Intact Stability Standards §...

  18. 46 CFR 178.325 - Intact stability requirements-monohull sailing vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... protected waters or partially protected waters. (d) The Commanding Officer, Marine Safety Center, may... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Intact stability requirements-monohull sailing vessels... PASSENGER VESSELS (UNDER 100 GROSS TONS) INTACT STABILITY AND SEAWORTHINESS Intact Stability Standards §...

  19. Rotational diffusion of band 3 in erythrocyte membranes. 1. Comparison of ghosts and intact cells.

    PubMed

    Matayoshi, E D; Jovin, T M

    1991-04-09

    The rotational diffusion of eosin-labeled 3 in human erythrocyte cells and hemoglobin-free ghosts at 37 degrees C has been studied in detail by polarized delayed luminescence. The time-resolved anisotropy with both cells and freshly prepared ghosts is similar, decaying with well-resolved rotational correlation times of 0.03, 0.2, and greater than or equal to 1 ms. Mild proteolytic removal of the water-soluble 41-kDa cytoplasmic domain of band 3 in ghosts results in a drastic increase in the fractional contributions of the two fastest depolarizing components. Our results, taken together with other data in the literature, imply that several classes of band 3 that differ greatly in mobility exist in ghosts and intact cells. The mobility of one class is hindered due to complexation with other membrane or cytoplasmic proteins mediated via the 41-kDa cytoplasmic domain. However, another class of band 3 molecules exists as homo-or heterooligomeric complexes larger than a dimer that are stabilized by hydrophobic interactions involving the intramembranal domain. Finally, the presence of the (previously undetected) 0.03-ms anisotropy component strongly suggests that a significant fraction of band 3 in both ghosts and intact cells is highly mobile and diffuses at the rate expected for a freely rotating dimer in the erythrocyte membrane.

  20. Obscure Gastrointestinal Bleeding Due to a Small Intestinal Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor in a Young Adult

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Mami; Yamamoto, Kentaroh; Taketomi, Hirotaka; Yamamoto, Fumio; Yamamoto, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    The source of most cases of gastrointestinal bleeding is the upper gastrointestinal tract. Since bleeding from the small intestine is very rare and difficult to diagnose, time is required to identify the source. Among small intestine bleeds, vascular abnormalities account for 70–80%, followed by small intestine tumors that account for 5–10%. The reported peak age of the onset of small intestinal tumors is about 50 years. Furthermore, rare small bowel tumors account for only 1–2% of all gastrointestinal tumors. We describe a 29-year-old man who presented with obscure anemia due to gastrointestinal bleeding and underwent laparotomy. Surgical findings revealed a well-circumscribed lesion measuring 45 × 40 mm in the jejunum that initially appeared similar to diverticulosis with an abscess. However, the postoperative pathological diagnosis was a gastrointestinal stromal tumor with extramural growth. PMID:27920659