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Sample records for intact protein profiling

  1. (E)-Propyl α-Cyano-4-Hydroxyl Cinnamylate: A High Sensitive and Salt Tolerant Matrix for Intact Protein Profiling by MALDI Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Sheng; Xiao, Zhaohui; Xiao, Chunsheng; Wang, Huixin; Wang, Bing; Li, Ying; Chen, Xuesi; Guo, Xinhua

    2016-04-01

    Low-abundance samples and salt interference are always of great challenges for the practical protein profiling by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS). Herein, a series of carboxyl-esterified derivatives of α-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid (CHCA) were synthesized and evaluated as matrices for MALDI-MS analysis of protein. Among them, (E)-propyl α-cyano-4-hydroxyl cinnamylate (CHCA-C3) was found to exhibit excellent assay performance for intact proteins by improving the detection sensitivity 10 folds compared with the traditional matrices [i.e., super2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid (superDHB), sinapic acid (SA), and CHCA]. In addition, CHCA-C3 was shown to have high tolerance to salts, the ion signal of myoglobin was readily detected even in the presence of urea (8 M), NH4HCO3 (2 M), and KH2PO4 (500 mM), meanwhile sample washability was robust. These achievements were mainly attributed to improved ablation ability and increased hydrophobicity or affinity of CHCA-C3 to proteins in comparison with hydrophilic matrixes, leading to more efficient ionization of analyte. Furthermore, direct analysis of proteins from crude egg white demonstrated that CHCA-C3 was a highly efficient matrix for the analysis of low-abundance proteins in complex biological samples. These outstanding performances indicate the tremendous potential use of CHCA-C3 in protein profiling by MALDI-MS.

  2. (E)-Propyl α-Cyano-4-Hydroxyl Cinnamylate: A High Sensitive and Salt Tolerant Matrix for Intact Protein Profiling by MALDI Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wang, Sheng; Xiao, Zhaohui; Xiao, Chunsheng; Wang, Huixin; Wang, Bing; Li, Ying; Chen, Xuesi; Guo, Xinhua

    2016-04-01

    Low-abundance samples and salt interference are always of great challenges for the practical protein profiling by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS). Herein, a series of carboxyl-esterified derivatives of α-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid (CHCA) were synthesized and evaluated as matrices for MALDI-MS analysis of protein. Among them, (E)-propyl α-cyano-4-hydroxyl cinnamylate (CHCA-C3) was found to exhibit excellent assay performance for intact proteins by improving the detection sensitivity 10 folds compared with the traditional matrices [i.e., super2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid (superDHB), sinapic acid (SA), and CHCA]. In addition, CHCA-C3 was shown to have high tolerance to salts, the ion signal of myoglobin was readily detected even in the presence of urea (8 M), NH4HCO3 (2 M), and KH2PO4 (500 mM), meanwhile sample washability was robust. These achievements were mainly attributed to improved ablation ability and increased hydrophobicity or affinity of CHCA-C3 to proteins in comparison with hydrophilic matrixes, leading to more efficient ionization of analyte. Furthermore, direct analysis of proteins from crude egg white demonstrated that CHCA-C3 was a highly efficient matrix for the analysis of low-abundance proteins in complex biological samples. These outstanding performances indicate the tremendous potential use of CHCA-C3 in protein profiling by MALDI-MS. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  3. Mass Spectrometry of Intact Membrane Protein Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Laganowsky, Arthur; Reading, Eamonn; Hopper, Jonathan T.S.; Robinson, Carol V.

    2014-01-01

    Mass spectrometry of intact soluble protein complexes has emerged as a powerful technique to study the stoichiometry, structure-function and dynamics of protein assemblies. Recent developments have extended this technique to the study of membrane protein complexes where it has already revealed subunit stoichiometries and specific phospholipid interactions. Here, we describe a protocol for mass spectrometry of membrane protein complexes. The protocol begins with preparation of the membrane protein complex enabling not only the direct assessment of stoichiometry, delipidation, and quality of the target complex, but also evaluation of the purification strategy. A detailed list of compatible non-ionic detergents is included, along with a protocol for screening detergents to find an optimal one for mass spectrometry, biochemical and structural studies. This protocol also covers the preparation of lipids for protein-lipid binding studies and includes detailed settings for a Q-ToF mass spectrometer after introduction of complexes from gold-coated nanoflow capillaries. PMID:23471109

  4. Protein methylation reactions in intact pea chloroplasts

    SciTech Connect

    Niemi, K.J. )

    1989-04-01

    Post-translational protein methylation was investigated in Pisum sativum chloroplasts. Intact pea chloroplasts were incubated with ({sup 3}H-methyl)-S-adenosylmethionine under various conditions. The chloroplasts were then separated into stromal and thylakoid fractions and analyzed for radioactivity transferred to protein. Light enhanced the magnitude of labeling in both fractions. One thylakoid polypeptide with an apparent molecular mass of 43 kDa was labeled only in the light. Several other thylakoid and stromal proteins were labeled in both light and dark-labeling conditions. Both base-labile methylation, carboxy-methylesters and base-stable groups, N-methylations were found. Further characterization of the methyl-transfer reactions will be presented.

  5. First ultraperformance liquid chromatography based strategy for profiling intact proteins in complex matrices: application to the evaluation of the performance of olive ( Olea europaea L.) stone proteins for cultivar fingerprinting.

    PubMed

    Esteve, Clara; Del Río, Carmen; Marina, María Luisa; García, María Concepción

    2010-07-28

    There is a clear need for accelerating protein separations by HPLC. Different proposals have been developed including the use of perfusion and monolithic stationary phases. Nevertheless, these stationary phases, in some occasions, do not provide enough efficiency to resolve these large molecules when they are present in complex matrices. Although ultraperformance liquid chromatography (UPLC) columns have been successfully used for the efficient and rapid separation of small molecules, this is the first time these columns were proposed for the separation of intact proteins in a real complex matrix: the olive stone. Two different strategies were employed for the extraction of olive proteins: enzymatic assisted extraction and buffered extraction. Five different columns traditionally employed for the separation of proteins were used, and results were compared with those obtained when using different sub-2 microm particle columns. Separations obtained with sub-2 mum particle columns significantly improved the separations obtained with the other columns. This paper also demonstrates the applicability of protein profiles obtained from the olive stone for the discrimination among olive varieties.

  6. Shining a spotlight on intact proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Masselon, Christophe

    2014-05-01

    Cells react to cues from their environment using various mechanisms that include changes in metabolites, gene expression, protein binding partners, protein localization, and protein posttranslational modifications (PTMs), all of which contribute to altered cellular signatures that enable appropriate cellular responses. Given the seemingly infinite number of mechanisms available to affect protein function and modulate biological processes, the question arises as to how cells manage to interpret protein readouts to accomplish the appropriate cell-type specific response to a particular stimulus.

  7. Expression profile of heat shock proteins in placental tissues of patients with preterm prelabor rupture of membranes and spontaneous preterm labor with intact membranes.

    PubMed

    Dvorakova, Lenka; Ivankova, Katarina; Krofta, Ladislav; Hromadnikova, Ilona

    2017-10-01

    Investigating the stress response in the central cotyledon zone of placental tissue in pregnancies with PPROM, PTB, and at term in labor. Gene expression of Hsp27, Hsp60, Hsp70, Hsp90, and HspBP1 was compared between these particular groups. Correlation between variables including Hsp gene expression in placental tissue and the gestational age at delivery, WBC count at admission, and serum levels of CRP at admission in patients with PPROM and PTB was determined. Both PPROM and PTB pregnancies were associated with altered Hsp gene expression profile. While PPROM and PTB always induced upregulation of Hsp27 and Hsp60, downregulation of Hsp70 and HspBP1 was present entirely in patients with PPROM. HspBP1 expression profile was also able to differentiate between PPROM and PTB pregnancies. The highest mRNA levels of Hsp60 and Hsp70 were detected in PTB pregnancies with elevated CRP levels at admission. Some of the examined Hsp displayed increased expression with advancing gestational age in both groups (PPROM: Hsp27, Hsp70, and Hsp90; and PTB: Hsp27). Upregulation of Hsp27 is a common phenomenon shared between pregnancies affected with PTB and PPROM. On the other hand, downregulation of Hsp70 and HspBP1 represents a unique feature of PPROM. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Structural determination of intact proteins using mass spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    Kruppa, Gary; Schoeniger, Joseph S.; Young, Malin M.

    2008-05-06

    The present invention relates to novel methods of determining the sequence and structure of proteins. Specifically, the present invention allows for the analysis of intact proteins within a mass spectrometer. Therefore, preparatory separations need not be performed prior to introducing a protein sample into the mass spectrometer. Also disclosed herein are new instrumental developments for enhancing the signal from the desired modified proteins, methods for producing controlled protein fragments in the mass spectrometer, eliminating complex microseparations, and protein preparatory chemical steps necessary for cross-linking based protein structure determination.Additionally, the preferred method of the present invention involves the determination of protein structures utilizing a top-down analysis of protein structures to search for covalent modifications. In the preferred method, intact proteins are ionized and fragmented within the mass spectrometer.

  9. Calcium Activation Profile In Electrically Stimulated Intact Rat Heart Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geerts, Hugo; Nuydens, Rony; Ver Donck, Luc; Nuyens, Roger; De Brabander, Marc; Borgers, Marcel

    1988-06-01

    Recent advances in fluorescent probe technology and image processing equipment have made available the measurement of calcium in living systems on a real-time basis. We present the use of the calcium indicator Fura-2 in intact normally stimulated rat heart cells for the spatial and dynamic measurement of the calcium excitation profile. After electric stimulation (1 Hz), the activation proceeds from the center of the myocyte toward the periphery. Within two frame times (80 ms), the whole cell is activated. The activation is slightly faster in the center of the cell than in the periphery. The mean recovery time is 200-400 ms. There is no difference along the cell's long axis. The effect of a beta-agonist and of a calcium antagonist is described.

  10. Posttranslational protein modification by polyamines in intact and regenerating nerves.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, G; Leach, T; Zanakis, M F; Sturman, J A; Ingoglia, N A

    1987-03-01

    A 150,000-g supernatant from axoplasm of the giant axon of the stellate nerve of the squid and from rat sciatic and goldfish optic nerves was found to be able to incorporate covalently [3H]putrescine and [3H]spermidine into an exogenous protein (N,N'-dimethylcasein). Incorporation of radioactivity was inhibited by CuSO4, a specific inhibitor of transglutaminases, the enzymes mediating these reactions in other tissues. Analysis of pH and temperature range and enzyme kinetics displayed characteristics predicted for transglutaminase-mediated reactions. Transglutaminase activity increased during regeneration of both vertebrate nerves, but greater activity was found in segments of nerve containing no intact axons than in either intact segments or in segments containing regenerating axons. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of endogenous modified proteins (in the absence of N,N'-dimethylcasein) showed labeling of 18-, 46- and 200-kilodalton proteins by both [3H]putrescine and [3H]spermidine. Analysis of the protein-bound radioactivity from intact and regenerating rat sciatic nerves demonstrated it to be predominantly in the form of the parent radioactive polyamine. These experiments demonstrate the covalent modification of proteins by polyamines at low levels in squid axoplasm and at relatively higher levels in rat sciatic and goldfish optic nerves. In the latter two cases, the activity of these modification reactions may be due in part to the modification of axonal proteins, but the majority of the activity occurs in nonneuronal cells of the nerve.

  11. Toponomics: studying protein-protein interactions and protein networks in intact tissue.

    PubMed

    Pierre, Sandra; Scholich, Klaus

    2010-04-01

    The function of a protein is determined on several levels including the genome, transcriptome, proteome, and the recently introduced toponome. The toponome describes the topology of all proteins, protein complexes and protein networks which constitute and influence the microenvironment of a given protein. It has long been known that cellular function or dysfunction of proteins strongly depends on their microenvironment and even small changes in protein arrangements can dramatically alter their activity/function. Thus, deciphering the topology of the multi-dimensional networks which control normal and disease-related pathways will give a better understanding of the mechanisms underlying disease development. While various powerful proteomic tools allow simultaneous quantification of proteins, only a limited number of techniques are available to visualize protein networks in intact cells and tissues. This review discusses a novel approach to map and decipher functional molecular networks of proteins in intact cells or tissues. Multi-epitope-ligand-cartography (MELC) is an imaging technology that identifies and quantifies protein networks at the subcellular level of morphologically-intact specimens. This immunohistochemistry-based method allows serial visualization and biomathematical analysis of up to 100 cellular components using fluorescence-labelled tags. The resulting toponome maps, simultaneously ranging from the subcellular to the supracellular scale, have the potential to provide the basis for a mathematical description of the dynamic topology of protein networks, and will complement current proteomic data to enhance the understanding of physiological and pathophysiological cell functions.

  12. Analytical strategies for the global quantification of intact proteins.

    PubMed

    Collier, Timothy S; Muddiman, David Charles

    2012-09-01

    The quantification of intact proteins is a relatively recent development in proteomics. In eukaryotic organisms, proteins are present as multiple isoforms as the result of variations in genetic code, alternative splicing, post-translational modification and other processing events. Understanding the identities and biological functions of these isoforms and how their concentrations vary across different states is the central goal of proteomics. To date, the bulk of proteomics research utilizes a "bottom-up" approach, digesting proteins into their more manageable constitutive peptides, but sacrificing information about the specific isoform and combinations of post-translational modifications present on the protein. Very specific strategies for protein quantification such as the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and Western blot are commonplace in laboratories and clinics, but impractical for the study of global biological changes. Herein, we describe strategies for the quantification of intact proteins, their distinct advantages, and challenges to their employment. Techniques contained in this review include the more traditional and widely employed methodology of differential gel electrophoresis and more recently developed mass spectrometry-based techniques including metabolic labeling, chemical labeling, and label-free methodologies.

  13. Intact-protein analysis system for discovery of serum-based disease biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong; Hanash, Samir

    2011-01-01

    Profiling of serum and plasma proteins has substantial relevance to the discovery of circulating disease biomarkers. However, the extreme complexity and vast dynamic range of protein abundance in serum and plasma present a formidable challenge for protein analysis. Thus, integration of multiple technologies is required to achieve high-resolution and high-sensitivity proteomic analysis of serum or plasma. In this chapter, we describe an orthogonal multidimensional intact-protein analysis system (IPAS) (Wang et al., Mol Cell Proteomics 4:618-625, 2005) coupled with protein tagging (Faca et al., J Proteome Res 5:2009-2018, 2006) to profile the serum and plasma proteomes quantitatively, which we have applied in our biomarker discovery studies (Katayama et al., Genome Med 1:47, 2009; Faca et al., PLoS Med 5:e123, 2008; Zhang et al. Genome Biol 9:R93, 2008).

  14. Intact-Protein Analysis System for Discovery of Serum-Based Disease Biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hong; Hanash, Samir

    2015-01-01

    Profiling of serum and plasma proteins has substantial relevance to the discovery of circulating disease biomarkers. However, the extreme complexity and vast dynamic range of protein abundance in serum and plasma present a formidable challenge for protein analysis. Thus, integration of multiple technologies is required to achieve high-resolution and high-sensitivity proteomic analysis of serum or plasma. In this chapter, we describe an orthogonal multidimensional intact-protein analysis system (IPAS) (Wang et al., Mol Cell Proteomics 4:618–625, 2005) coupled with protein tagging (Faca et al., J Proteome Res 5:2009–2018, 2006) to profile the serum and plasma proteomes quantitatively, which we have applied in our biomarker discovery studies (Katayama et al., Genome Med 1:47, 2009; Faca et al., PLoS Med 5:e123, 2008; Zhang et al. Genome Biol 9:R93, 2008). PMID:21468941

  15. Identification of Bremia lactucae and Oidium neolycopersici proteins extracted for intact spore MALDI mass spectrometric biotyping.

    PubMed

    Beinhauer, Jana; Lenobel, René; Loginov, Dmitry; Chamrád, Ivo; Řehulka, Pavel; Sedlářová, Michaela; Marchetti-Deschmann, Martina; Allmaier, Günter; Šebela, Marek

    2016-11-01

    Several proteomic approaches were applied to identify protein markers providing typical signals during intact cell/spore (IC/IS) MALDI-TOF MS of two plant pathogens, namely Bremia lactucae (a downy mildew) and Oidium neolycopersici (a powdery mildew). First, proteins were extracted from intact spores of the microorganisms under conditions simulating their treatment prior to the mass spectrometric analysis. After a separation by electrophoresis and tryptic digestion, 198 and 140 proteins were identified in the B. lactucae and O. neolycopersici extracts, respectively. A large portion of them were found to be involved in the process of protein biosynthesis. For the first time, some proteins were assigned to characteristic signals in MS profiles of the investigated pathogens based on an agreement in the molecular mass. There were 9 and 10 proteins recognized, respectively, which could contribute significantly to the spectral patterns. These proteins were assigned tentatively to the following peaks in the MS profiles: (i) m/z 7828; 8593; 10 456; 11 312; 12 450; 12 763; 14 756 and 16 854 for B. lactucae; (ii) m/z 7709; 8895; 9504; 9952; 11 317; 14 082 and 14 839 for O. neolycopersici. We demonstrated the presence of ribosomal proteins and histones, which could be employed as markers in biotyping analyses for pathogen identification. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. The phosphorylation of coated membrane proteins in intact neurons

    PubMed Central

    1986-01-01

    To complement studies that have demonstrated the prominent phosphorylation of a 50-kD coated vesicle polypeptide in vitro, we have evaluated the phosphorylation of coated membrane proteins in intact cells. A co-assembly assay has been devised in which extracts of cultured rat sympathetic neurons labeled with [32P]-Pi were combined with unlabeled carrier bovine brain coat proteins and reassembled coat structures were isolated by gradient centrifugation. Two groups of phosphorylated polypeptides, of 100-110 kD (pp100-110) and 155 kD (pp155) apparent molecular mass, were incorporated into reassembled coats. The neuronal pp100-110 are structurally and functionally related to the 100-110-kD component of the bovine brain assembly protein (AP), a protein complex that also contains 50-kD and 16.5-kD components and is characterized by its ability to promote the reassembly of clathrin coat structures under physiological conditions of pH and ionic strength (Zaremba, S. and J. H. Keen, 1983, J. Cell Biol., 97:1337-1348). The neuronal pp155 detected in reassembled coat structures was readily observable in total extracts of [32P]-Pi-labeled neurons dissolved in SDS-containing buffer. A bovine brain counterpart to the neuronal pp155 was also observed when brain coated vesicles were subjected to two- dimensional gel electrophoresis. Phosphoserine was the predominant phosphoaminoacid found in both the pp100 and pp155. A structural and functional counterpart to the 50-kD brain assembly polypeptide (AP50) was also identified in these neurons. Although the brain AP50 is prominently phosphorylated by an endogenous protein kinase in isolated coated vesicle preparations, the neuronal AP50 was not detectably phosphorylated in intact cells as assessed by two-dimensional non- equilibrium pH gradient gel electrophoresis of labeled cells dissolved directly in SDS-containing buffers. These results demonstrate that the bovine brain assembly polypeptides of 50 kD and 100-110 kD that we have

  17. Multipurpose dissociation cell for enhanced ETD of intact protein species.

    PubMed

    Rose, Christopher M; Russell, Jason D; Ledvina, Aaron R; McAlister, Graeme C; Westphall, Michael S; Griep-Raming, Jens; Schwartz, Jae C; Coon, Joshua J; Syka, John E P

    2013-06-01

    We describe and characterize an improved implementation of ETD on a modified hybrid linear ion trap-Orbitrap instrument. Instead of performing ETD in the mass-analyzing quadrupole linear ion trap (A-QLT), the instrument collision cell was modified to enable ETD. We partitioned the collision cell into a multi-section rf ion storage and transfer device to enable injection and simultaneous separate storage of precursor and reagent ions. Application of a secondary (axial) confinement voltage to the cell end lens electrodes enables charge-sign independent trapping for ion-ion reactions. The approximately 2-fold higher quadrupole field frequency of this cell relative to that of the A-QLT enables higher reagent ion densities and correspondingly faster ETD reactions, and, with the collision cell's longer axial dimensions, larger populations of precursor ions may be reacted. The higher ion capacity of the collision cell permits the accumulation and reaction of multiple full loads of precursor ions from the A-QLT followed by FT Orbitrap m/z analysis of the ETD product ions. This extends the intra-scan dynamic range by increasing the maximum number of product ions in a single MS/MS event. For analyses of large peptide/small protein precursor cations, this reduces or eliminates the need for spectral averaging to achieve acceptable ETD product ion signal-to-noise levels. Using larger ion populations, we demonstrate improvements in protein sequence coverage and aggregate protein identifications in LC-MS/MS analysis of intact protein species as compared to the standard ETD implementation.

  18. Multipurpose Dissociation Cell for Enhanced ETD of Intact Protein Species

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Christopher M.; Russell, Jason D.; Ledvina, Aaron R.; McAlister, Graeme C.; Westphall, Michael S.; Griep-Raming, Jens; Schwartz, Jae C.; Coon, Joshua J.; Syka, John E.P.

    2013-01-01

    We describe and characterize an improved implementation of ETD on a modified hybrid linear ion trap-Orbitrap instrument. Instead of performing ETD in the mass-analyzing quadrupole linear ion trap (A-QLT), the instrument collision cell was modified to enable ETD. We partitioned the collision cell into a multi-section RF ion storage and transfer device to enable injection and simultaneous separate storage of precursor and reagent ions. Application of a secondary (axial) confinement voltage to the cell end lens electrodes enables charge-sign independent trapping for ion-ion reactions. The approximately two-fold higher quadrupole field frequency of this cell relative to that of the A-QLT, enables higher reagent ion densities and correspondingly faster ETD reactions, and, with the collision cell’s longer axial dimensions, larger populations of precursor ions may be reacted. The higher ion capacity of the collision cell permits the accumulation and reaction of multiple full loads of precursor ions from the A-QLT followed by FT Orbitrap m/z analysis of the ETD product ions. This extends the intra-scan dynamic range by increasing the maximum number of product ions in a single MS/MS event. For analyses of large peptide/small protein precursor cations, this reduces or eliminates the need for spectral averaging to achieve acceptable ETD product ion signal-to-noise levels. Using larger ion populations, we demonstrate improvements in protein sequence coverage and aggregate protein identifications in LC-MS/MS analysis of intact protein species as compared to the standard ETD implementation. PMID:23609185

  19. THE ENDOCRINE PROFILE OF INTACT FEMALE RATS ON THE DAY OF PROESTRUS FOLLOWING EXPOSURE TO ATRAZINE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Endocrine Profile of Intact Female Rats on the Day of Proestrus Following Exposure to Atrazine.
    RL Cooper, A Buckalew, SC Laws and TE Stoker
    Endocrinology Branch, RTD, NHEERL, ORD, U.S. EPA, RTP, NC, 27711.

    The chlorotriazine herbicide, atrazine, has been sho...

  20. Quantitative Measurement of Intact Alpha-Synuclein Proteoforms from Post-Mortem Control and Parkinson's Disease Brain Tissue by Intact Protein Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kellie, John F.; Higgs, Richard E.; Ryder, John W.; Major, Anthony; Beach, Thomas G.; Adler, Charles H.; Merchant, Kalpana; Knierman, Michael D.

    2014-07-01

    A robust top down proteomics method is presented for profiling alpha-synuclein species from autopsied human frontal cortex brain tissue from Parkinson's cases and controls. The method was used to test the hypothesis that pathology associated brain tissue will have a different profile of post-translationally modified alpha-synuclein than the control samples. Validation of the sample processing steps, mass spectrometry based measurements, and data processing steps were performed. The intact protein quantitation method features extraction and integration of m/z data from each charge state of a detected alpha-synuclein species and fitting of the data to a simple linear model which accounts for concentration and charge state variability. The quantitation method was validated with serial dilutions of intact protein standards. Using the method on the human brain samples, several previously unreported modifications in alpha-synuclein were identified. Low levels of phosphorylated alpha synuclein were detected in brain tissue fractions enriched for Lewy body pathology and were marginally significant between PD cases and controls (p = 0.03).

  1. Applying the INTACT method to purify endosperm nuclei and to generate parental-specific epigenome profiles.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Romero, Jordi; Santos-González, Juan; Hennig, Lars; Köhler, Claudia

    2017-02-01

    The early endosperm tissue of dicot species is very difficult to isolate by manual dissection. This protocol details how to apply the INTACT (isolation of nuclei tagged in specific cell types) system for isolating early endosperm nuclei of Arabidopsis at high purity and how to generate parental-specific epigenome profiles. As a Protocol Extension, this article describes an adaptation of an existing Nature Protocol that details the use of the INTACT method for purification of root nuclei. We address how to obtain the INTACT lines, generate the starting material and purify the nuclei. We describe a method that allows purity assessment, which has not been previously addressed. The purified nuclei can be used for ChIP and DNA bisulfite treatment followed by next-generation sequencing (seq) to study histone modifications and DNA methylation profiles, respectively. By using two different Arabidopsis accessions as parents that differ by a large number of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), we were able to distinguish the parental origin of epigenetic modifications. Our protocol describes the only working method to our knowledge for generating parental-specific epigenome profiles of the early Arabidopsis endosperm. The complete protocol, from silique collection to finished libraries, can be completed in 2 d for bisulfite-seq (BS-seq) and 3 to 4 d for ChIP-seq experiments.This protocol is an extension to: Nat. Protoc. 6, 56-68 (2011); doi:10.1038/nprot.2010.175; published online 16 December 2010.

  2. A wide range of protein isoforms in serum and plasma uncovered by a quantitative intact protein analysis system.

    PubMed

    Misek, David E; Kuick, Rork; Wang, Hong; Galchev, Vladimir; Deng, Bin; Zhao, Rong; Tra, John; Pisano, Michael R; Amunugama, Ravi; Allen, David; Walker, Angela K; Strahler, John R; Andrews, Philip; Omenn, Gilbert S; Hanash, Samir M

    2005-08-01

    We have implemented an orthogonal 3-D intact protein analysis system (IPAS) to quantitatively profile protein differences between human serum and plasma. Reference specimens consisting of pooled Caucasian-American serum, citrate-anticoagulated plasma, and EDTA-anticoagulated plasma were each depleted of six highly abundant proteins, concentrated, and labeled with a different Cy dye (Cy5, Cy3, or Cy2). A mixture consisting of each of the labeled samples was subjected to three dimensions of separation based on charge, hydrophobicity, and molecular mass. Differences in the abundance of proteins between each of the three samples were determined. More than 5000 bands were found to have greater than two-fold difference in intensity between any pair of labeled specimens by quantitative imaging. As expected, some of the differences in band intensities between serum and plasma were attributable to proteins related to coagulation. Interestingly, many proteins were identified in multiple fractions, each exhibiting different pI, hydrophobicity, or molecular mass. This is likely reflective of the expression of different protein isoforms or specific protein cleavage products, as illustrated by complement component 3 precursor and clusterin. IPAS provides a high resolution, high sensitivity, and quantitative approach for the analysis of serum and plasma proteins, and allows assessment of PTMs as a potential source of biomarkers.

  3. High resolution TOF MS coupled to CE for the analysis of isotopically resolved intact proteins.

    PubMed

    Taichrib, Angelina; Pelzing, Matthias; Pellegrino, Cristoforo; Rossi, Mara; Neusüss, Christian

    2011-06-10

    Intact protein analysis by mass spectrometry is of great interest for the characterisation of biotechnological products. Exact mass measurement in combination with isotopic resolution allows the detection of modifications leading to small mass changes like deamidation or reduction of disulfide bonds directly on the level of the intact protein. Here, a concept is presented based on time-of-flight mass spectrometry. A bench top TOF MS and a high resolution TOF MS were used to resolve the isotopes of intact recombinant human growth hormone and intact human erythropoietin, respectively. Thus, these 22 and around 30kDa large proteins can be characterised sensitively in great detail and along with capillary electrophoretic separation unambiguous identification of minor protein modifications like deamidation is possible. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Population Studies of Intact Vitamin D Binding Protein by Affinity Capture ESI-TOF-MS

    PubMed Central

    Borges, Chad R.; Jarvis, Jason W.; Oran, Paul E.; Rogers, Stephen P.; Nelson, Randall W.

    2008-01-01

    Blood plasma proteins with molecular weights greater than approximately 30 kDa are refractory to comprehensive, high-throughput qualitative characterization of microheterogeneity across human populations. Analytical techniques for obtaining high mass resolution for targeted, intact protein characterization and, separately, high sample throughput exist, but efficient means of coupling these assay characteristics remain rather limited. This article discusses the impetus for analyzing intact proteins in a targeted manner across populations and describes the methodology required to couple mass spectrometric immunoassay with electrospray ionization mass spectrometry for the purpose of qualitatively characterizing a prototypical large plasma protein, vitamin D binding protein, across populations. PMID:19137103

  5. Fluorescent labeling of tetracysteine-tagged proteins in intact cells

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Carsten; Gaietta, Guido; Zürn, Alexander; Adams, Stephen R; Terrillon, Sonia; Ellisman, Mark H; Tsien, Roger Y; Lohse, Martin J

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we provide a general protocol for labeling proteins with the membrane-permeant fluorogenic biarsenical dye fluorescein arsenical hairpin binder–ethanedithiol (FlAsH-EDT2). Generation of the tetracysteine-tagged protein construct by itself is not described, as this is a protein-specific process. This method allows site-selective labeling of proteins in living cells and has been applied to a wide variety of proteins and biological problems. We provide here a generally applicable labeling procedure and discuss the problems that can occur as well as general considerations that must be taken into account when designing and implementing the procedure. The method can even be applied to proteins with expression below 1 pmol mg−1 of protein, such as G protein–coupled receptors, and it can be used to study the intracellular localization of proteins as well as functional interactions in fluorescence resonance energy transfer experiments. The labeling procedure using FlAsH-EDT2 as described takes 2–3 h, depending on the number of samples to be processed. PMID:20885379

  6. Modeling of Recovery Profiles in Mentally Disabled and Intact Patients after Sevoflurane Anesthesia; A Pharmacodynamic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Teo Jeon; Noh, Gyu-Jeong; Koo, Yong-Seo

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Mentally disabled patients show different recovery profiles compared to normal patients after general anesthesia. However, the relationship of dose-recovery profiles of mentally disabled patients has never been compared to that of normal patients. Materials and Methods Twenty patients (10 mentally disabled patients and 10 mentally intact patients) scheduled to dental surgery under general anesthesia was recruited. Sevoflurane was administered to maintain anesthesia during dental treatment. At the end of the surgery, sevoflurane was discontinued. End-tidal sevoflurane and recovery of consciousness (ROC) were recorded after sevoflurane discontinuation. The pharmacodynamic relation between the probability of ROC and end-tidal sevoflurane concentration was analyzed using NONMEM software (version VII). Results End-tidal sevoflurane concentration associated with 50% probability of ROC (C50) and γ value were lower in the mentally disabled patients (C50=0.37 vol %, γ=16.5 in mentally intact patients, C50=0.19 vol %, γ=4.58 in mentally disabled patients). Mentality was a significant covariate of C50 for ROC and γ value to pharmacodynamic model. Conclusion A sigmoid Emanx model explains the pharmacodynamic relationship between end-tidal sevoflurane concentration and ROC. Mentally disabled patients may recover slower from anesthesia at lower sevoflurane concentration at ROC an compared to normal patients. PMID:25323901

  7. Sex Steroid Metabolism in Benign and Malignant Intact Prostate Biopsies: Individual Profiling of Prostate Intracrinology

    PubMed Central

    Gianfrilli, Daniele; Pierotti, Silvia; Leonardo, Costantino; Ciccariello, Mauro

    2014-01-01

    In vitro studies reveal that androgens, oestrogens, and their metabolites play a crucial role in prostate homeostasis. Most of the studies evaluated intraprostatic hormone metabolism using cell lines or preprocessed specimens. Using an ex vivo model of intact tissue cultures with preserved architecture, we characterized the enzymatic profile of biopsies from patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) or cancer (PC), focusing on 17β-hydroxy-steroid-dehydrogenases (17β-HSDs) and aromatase activities. Samples from 26 men who underwent prostate needle core biopsies (BPH n = 14; PC n = 12) were incubated with radiolabeled 3H-testosterone or 3H-androstenedione. Conversion was evaluated by TLC separation and beta-scanning of extracted supernatants. We identified three major patterns of conversion. The majority of BPHs revealed no active testosterone/oestradiol conversion as opposed to prostate cancer. Conversion correlated with histology and PSA, but not circulating hormones. Highest Gleason scores had a higher androstenedion-to-testosterone conversion and expression of 17β-HSD-isoenzymes-3/5. Conclusions. We developed an easy tool to profile individual intraprostatic enzymatic activity by characterizing conversion pathways in an intact tissue environment. In fresh biopsies we found that 17β-HSD-isoenzymes and aromatase activities correlate with biological behaviour allowing for morphofunctional phenotyping of pathology specimens and clinical monitoring of novel enzyme-targeting drugs. PMID:25184140

  8. Multiple Reaction Monitoring for Direct Quantitation of Intact Proteins Using a Triple Quadrupole Mass Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Evelyn H.; Combe, Peter C.; Schug, Kevin A.

    2016-05-01

    Methods that can efficiently and effectively quantify proteins are needed to support increasing demand in many bioanalytical fields. Triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (QQQ-MS) is sensitive and specific, and it is routinely used to quantify small molecules. However, low resolution fragmentation-dependent MS detection can pose inherent difficulties for intact proteins. In this research, we investigated variables that affect protein and fragment ion signals to enable protein quantitation using QQQ-MS. Collision induced dissociation gas pressure and collision energy were found to be the most crucial variables for optimization. Multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) transitions for seven standard proteins, including lysozyme, ubiquitin, cytochrome c from both equine and bovine, lactalbumin, myoglobin, and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) were determined. Assuming the eventual goal of applying such methodology is to analyze protein in biological fluids, a liquid chromatography method was developed. Calibration curves of six standard proteins (excluding PSA) were obtained to show the feasibility of intact protein quantification using QQQ-MS. Linearity (2-3 orders), limits of detection (0.5-50 μg/mL), accuracy (<5% error), and precision (1%-12% CV) were determined for each model protein. Sensitivities for different proteins varied considerably. Biological fluids, including human urine, equine plasma, and bovine plasma were used to demonstrate the specificity of the approach. The purpose of this model study was to identify, study, and demonstrate the advantages and challenges for QQQ-MS-based intact protein quantitation, a largely underutilized approach to date.

  9. Designing medical foods for inherited metabolic disorders: why intact protein is superior to amino acids.

    PubMed

    Ney, Denise Marie; Etzel, Mark Raymond

    2017-04-01

    Phenylketonuria and tyrosinemia are inherited metabolic disorders characterized by high blood levels of phenylalanine (Phe) or tyrosine (Tyr), due to mutations in genes affecting Phe and Tyr metabolism, respectively. The primary management is a lifelong diet restricted in protein from natural foods in combination with medical foods comprised mixtures of synthetic amino acids. Compliance is often poor after childhood leading to neuropsychological sequela. Glycomacropeptide, an intact 64 amino acid glycophosphopeptide isolated from cheese whey, provides a new paradigm for the management of phenylketonuria and tyrosinemia because glycomacropeptide contains no Phe and Tyr in its pure form, and is also a prebiotic. Medical foods made from glycomacropeptide have been used successfully for the management of phenylketonuria and tyrosinemia. Preclinical and clinical studies demonstrate that intact protein from glycomacropeptide provides a more acceptable and physiologic source of defined protein compared to amino acids in medical foods. For example, harmful gut bacteria were reduced, beneficial short chain fatty acids increased, renal workload decreased, protein utilization increased, and bone fragility decreased using intact protein versus amino acids. Advances in biotechnology will propel the transition from synthetic amino acids to intact proteins for the management of inherited metabolic disorders. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy for predicting amino acids content in intact processed animal proteins.

    PubMed

    De la Haba, Maria José; Garrido-Varo, Ana; Guerrero-Ginel, José Emilio; Pérez-Marín, Dolores C

    2006-10-04

    Near-infrared calibrations were developed for the instantaneous prediction of amino acids composition of processed animal proteins (PAPs). Two sample presentation modes were compared (ground vs intact) for demonstrating the viability of the analysis in the intact form, avoiding the need for milling. Modified partial least-squares (MPLS) equations for the prediction of amino acids in PAPs were developed using the same set of samples (N = 92 PAPs) analyzed in ground and intact form and in three cups differing in the optical window size. The standard error for cross validation (SECV) and the coefficient of determination (1-VR) values yielded with the calibrations developed using the samples analyzed in the intact form showed similar or even better accuracy than those obtained with finely ground samples. The excellent predictive ability (1-VR > 0.90; CV < 3.0%) obtained for the prediction of amino acids in intact processed animal proteins opens an enormous expectative for the on-line implementation of NIRS technology in the processing and marketing of these important protein feed ingredients, alleviating the costs and time associated with the routine quality controls.

  11. Detection of intact megaDalton protein assemblies of vanillyl-alcohol oxidase by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed Central

    van Berkel, W. J.; van den Heuvel, R. H.; Versluis, C.; Heck, A. J.

    2000-01-01

    Well-resolved ion signals of intact large protein assemblies, with molecular masses extending above one million Dalton, have been detected and mass analyzed using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry, with an uncertainty in mass of <0.2%. The mass spectral data seem to reflect known solution-phase behavior of the studied protein assembly and have therefore been directly used to probe the protein assembly topology and stability as a function of ionic strength and pH. PMID:10752605

  12. Protein profiling comes of age

    PubMed Central

    Tomlinson, Ian M; Holt, Lucy J

    2001-01-01

    Ever since DNA microarrays were first applied to the quantitation of RNA levels, there has been considerable interest in generating a protein homolog that can be used to assay cellular protein expression. A recent paper describes the first microarray that can be used for such protein profiling. PMID:11182890

  13. Microchip capillary electrophoresis-electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry of intact proteins using uncoated Ormocomp microchips.

    PubMed

    Sikanen, Tiina; Aura, Susanna; Franssila, Sami; Kotiaho, Tapio; Kostiainen, Risto

    2012-01-20

    We present rapid (<5 min) and efficient intact protein analysis by mass spectrometry (MS) using fully microfabricated and monolithically integrated capillary electrophoresis-electrospray ionization (CE-ESI) microchips. The microchips are fabricated fully of commercial inorganic-organic hybrid material, Ormocomp, by UV-embossing and adhesive Ormocomp-Ormocomp bonding (CE microchannels). A sheath-flow ESI interface is monolithically integrated with the UV-embossed separation channels by cutting a rectangular emitter tip in the end with a dicing saw. As a result, electrospray was produced from the corner of chip with good reproducibility between parallel tips (stability within 3.8-9.2% RSD). Thanks to its inherent biocompatibility and stable (negative) surface charge, Ormocomp microchips enable efficient intact protein analysis with up to ∼10(4) theoretical separation plates per meter without any chemical or physical surface modification before analysis. The same microchip setup is also feasible for rapid peptide sequencing and mass fingerprinting and shows excellent migration time repeatability from run to run for both peptides (5.6-5.9% RSD, n=4) and intact proteins (1.3-7.5% RSD, n=3). Thus, the Ormocomp microchips provide a versatile new tool for MS-based proteomics. Particularly, the feasibility of the Ormocomp chips for rapid analysis of intact proteins with such a simple setup is a valuable increment to the current technology.

  14. Optimization of a MALDI TOF-TOF mass spectrometer for intact protein analysis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhaoyang; Schey, Kevin L

    2005-04-01

    A MALDI TOF-TOF instrument was optimized and evaluated for intact protein analysis by tandem mass spectrometry. Ion source voltages and delay times were adjusted to affect an up to a 10-fold improvement in fragment ion yield compared to data obtained using default settings employed in peptide analysis. For large peptides (3-4.5 kDa), up to 90% of all possible b- and y-fragment ions were observed, which provides sufficient information for de novo sequencing and unambiguous protein identification. Product ion signals associated with preferential cleavages C-terminal to aspartic acid and glutamic acid residues and N-terminal to proline residues became dominant with increased protein molecular weight. Matrix effects were also evaluated and, among the eight matrices examined, alpha-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid (CHCA) was found to produce the best intact protein tandem mass spectra for proteins up to 12 kDa. Optimized performance yielded detection limits of 50-125 fmol for proteins of 4 and 12 kDa, respectively. This improved performance has yielded an instrument with potential to be a useful tool in proteomic investigations via analysis of intact proteins.

  15. Proteomic Analysis of a Fraction with Intact Eyespots of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and Assignment of Protein Methylation.

    PubMed

    Eitzinger, Nicole; Wagner, Volker; Weisheit, Wolfram; Geimer, Stefan; Boness, David; Kreimer, Georg; Mittag, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Flagellate green algae possess a visual system, the eyespot. In Chlamydomonas reinhardtii it is situated at the edge of the chloroplast and consists of two carotenoid rich lipid globule layers subtended by thylakoid membranes (TM) that are attached to both chloroplast envelope membranes and a specialized area of the plasma membrane (PM). A former analysis of an eyespot fraction identified 203 proteins. To increase the understanding of eyespot related processes, knowledge of the protein composition of the membranes in its close vicinity is desirable. Here, we present a purification procedure that allows isolation of intact eyespots. This gain in intactness goes, however, hand in hand with an increase of contaminants from other organelles. Proteomic analysis identified 742 proteins. Novel candidates include proteins for eyespot development, retina-related proteins, ion pumps, and membrane-associated proteins, calcium sensing proteins as well as kinases, phosphatases and 14-3-3 proteins. Methylation of proteins at Arg or Lys is known as an important posttranslational modification involved in, e.g., signal transduction. Here, we identify several proteins from eyespot fractions that are methylated at Arg and/or Lys. Among them is the eyespot specific SOUL3 protein that influences the size and position of the eyespot and EYE2, a protein important for its development.

  16. Proteomic Analysis of a Fraction with Intact Eyespots of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and Assignment of Protein Methylation

    PubMed Central

    Eitzinger, Nicole; Wagner, Volker; Weisheit, Wolfram; Geimer, Stefan; Boness, David; Kreimer, Georg; Mittag, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Flagellate green algae possess a visual system, the eyespot. In Chlamydomonas reinhardtii it is situated at the edge of the chloroplast and consists of two carotenoid rich lipid globule layers subtended by thylakoid membranes (TM) that are attached to both chloroplast envelope membranes and a specialized area of the plasma membrane (PM). A former analysis of an eyespot fraction identified 203 proteins. To increase the understanding of eyespot related processes, knowledge of the protein composition of the membranes in its close vicinity is desirable. Here, we present a purification procedure that allows isolation of intact eyespots. This gain in intactness goes, however, hand in hand with an increase of contaminants from other organelles. Proteomic analysis identified 742 proteins. Novel candidates include proteins for eyespot development, retina-related proteins, ion pumps, and membrane-associated proteins, calcium sensing proteins as well as kinases, phosphatases and 14-3-3 proteins. Methylation of proteins at Arg or Lys is known as an important posttranslational modification involved in, e.g., signal transduction. Here, we identify several proteins from eyespot fractions that are methylated at Arg and/or Lys. Among them is the eyespot specific SOUL3 protein that influences the size and position of the eyespot and EYE2, a protein important for its development. PMID:26697039

  17. MALDI FTICR IMS of intact proteins: Using mass accuracy to link protein images with proteomics data

    PubMed Central

    Spraggins, Jeffrey M.; Rizzo, David G.; Moore, Jessica L.; Rose, Kristie L.; Hammer, Neal D.; Skaar, Eric P.; Caprioli, Richard M.

    2015-01-01

    MALDI imaging mass spectrometry is a highly sensitive and selective tool used to visualize biomolecules in tissue. However, identification of detected proteins remains a difficult task. Indirect identifications strategies have been limited by insufficient mass accuracy to confidently link ion images to proteomics data. Here we demonstrate the capabilities of MALDI FTICR MS for imaging intact proteins. MALDI FTICR IMS provides an unprecedented combination of mass resolving power (∼75,000 at m/z 5,000) and accuracy (<5 ppm) for proteins up to ∼12 kDa enabling identification based on correlation with LC-MS/MS proteomics data. Analysis of rat brain tissue was performed as a proof-of-concept highlighting the capabilities of this approach by imaging and identifying a number of proteins including N-terminally acetylated Thymosin β4 (m/z 4,963.502, 0.6 ppm) and ATP Synthase subunit ε (m/z 5,636.074, −2.3 ppm). MALDI FTICR IMS was also used to differentiate a series of oxidation products of S100A8 (m/z 10,164.03, −2.1 ppm), a subunit of the heterodimer calprotectin, in kidney tissue from mice infected with Staphylococcus aureus. S100A8 – M37O/C42O3 (m/z 10228.00, −2.6 ppm) was found to co-localize with bactierial microcolonies at the center of infectious foci. The ability of MALDI FTICR IMS to distinguish S100A8 modifications is critical to understanding calprotectin’s roll in nutritional immunity. PMID:25904064

  18. MALDI FTICR IMS of Intact Proteins: Using Mass Accuracy to Link Protein Images with Proteomics Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spraggins, Jeffrey M.; Rizzo, David G.; Moore, Jessica L.; Rose, Kristie L.; Hammer, Neal D.; Skaar, Eric P.; Caprioli, Richard M.

    2015-06-01

    MALDI imaging mass spectrometry is a highly sensitive and selective tool used to visualize biomolecules in tissue. However, identification of detected proteins remains a difficult task. Indirect identification strategies have been limited by insufficient mass accuracy to confidently link ion images to proteomics data. Here, we demonstrate the capabilities of MALDI FTICR MS for imaging intact proteins. MALDI FTICR IMS provides an unprecedented combination of mass resolving power (~75,000 at m/z 5000) and accuracy (<5ppm) for proteins up to ~12kDa, enabling identification based on correlation with LC-MS/MS proteomics data. Analysis of rat brain tissue was performed as a proof-of-concept highlighting the capabilities of this approach by imaging and identifying a number of proteins including N-terminally acetylated thymosin β4 ( m/z 4,963.502, 0.6ppm) and ATP synthase subunit ɛ ( m/z 5,636.074, -2.3ppm). MALDI FTICR IMS was also used to differentiate a series of oxidation products of S100A8 ( m/z 10,164.03, -2.1ppm), a subunit of the heterodimer calprotectin, in kidney tissue from mice infected with Staphylococcus aureus. S100A8 - M37O/C42O3 ( m/z 10228.00, -2.6ppm) was found to co-localize with bacterial microcolonies at the center of infectious foci. The ability of MALDI FTICR IMS to distinguish S100A8 modifications is critical to understanding calprotectin's roll in nutritional immunity.

  19. Investigation of Ion Transmission Effects on Intact Protein Quantification in a Triple Quadrupole Mass Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Evelyn H.; Appulage, Dananjaya Kalu; McAllister, Erin A.; Schug, Kevin A.

    2017-09-01

    Recently, direct intact protein quantitation using triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (QqQ-MS) and multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) was demonstrated (J. Am. Soc. Mass Spectrom. 27, 886-896 (2016)). Even though QqQ-MS is known to provide extraordinary detection sensitivity for quantitative analysis, we found that intact proteins exhibited a less than 5% ion transmission from the first quadrupole to the third quadrupole mass analyzer in the presence of zero collision energy (ZCE). With the goal to enhance intact protein quantitation sensitivity, ion scattering effects, proton transfer effects, and mass filter resolution widths were examined for their contributions to the lost signal. Protein standards myoglobin and ubiquitin along with small molecules reserpine and vancomycin were analyzed together with various collision induced dissociation (CID) gases (N2, He, and Ar) at different gas pressures. Mass resolution settings played a significant role in reducing ion transmission signal. By narrowing the mass resolution window by 0.35 m/z on each side, roughly 75%-90% of the ion signal was lost. The multiply charged proteins experienced additional proton transfer effects, corresponding to 10-fold signal reduction. A study of increased sensitivity of the method was also conducted with various MRM summation techniques. Although the degree of enhancement was analyte-dependent, an up to 17-fold increase in sensitivity was observed for ubiquitin using a summation of multiple MRM transitions. Biological matrix, human urine, and equine plasma were spiked with proteins to demonstrate the specificity of the method. This study provides additional insight into optimizing the use and sensitivity of QqQ-MS for intact protein quantification. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  20. In vitro bioactive properties of intact and enzymatically hydrolysed whey protein: targeting the enteroinsular axis.

    PubMed

    Power-Grant, O; Bruen, C; Brennan, L; Giblin, L; Jakeman, P; FitzGerald, R J

    2015-03-01

    Enzymatically hydrolysed milk proteins have a variety of biofunctional effects some of which may be beneficial in the management of type 2 diabetes mellitus. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of commercially available intact and hydrolysed whey protein ingredients (DH 32, DH 45) on markers of the enteroinsular axis (glucagon like peptide-1 secretion, dipeptidyl peptidase IV inhibition, insulin secretion and antioxidant activity) before and after simulated gastrointestinal digestion (SGID). A whey protein hydrolysate, DH32, significantly enhanced (P < 0.05) insulin secretion from BRIN BD11 β-cells compared to the positive control (16.7 mM glucose and 10 mM Ala). The whey protein hydrolysates inhibited dipeptidyl peptidase IV activity, yielding half maximal inhibitory concentration values (IC50) of 1.5 ± 0.1 and 1.1 ± 0.1 mg mL(-1) for the DH 32 and DH 45, samples respectively, and were significantly more potent than the intact whey (P < 0.05). Enzymatic hydrolysis of whey protein significantly enhanced (P < 0.05) its antioxidant activity compared to intact whey, as measured by the oxygen radical absorbance capacity assay (ORAC). This antioxidant activity was maintained (DH 32, P > 0.05) or enhanced (DH 45, P < 0.05) following SGID. Intact whey stimulated GLP-1 secretion from enteroendocrine cells compared to vehicle control (P < 0.05). This data confirm that whey proteins and peptides can act through multiple targets within the enteroinsular axis and as such may have glucoregulatory potential.

  1. Enhanced Dissociation of Intact Proteins with High Capacity Electron Transfer Dissociation

    PubMed Central

    Riley, Nicholas M.; Mullen, Christopher; Weisbrod, Chad R.; Sharma, Seema; Senko, Michael W.; Zabrouskov, Vlad; Westphall, Michael S.; Syka, John E.P.; Coon, Joshua J.

    2015-01-01

    Electron transfer dissociation (ETD) is a valuable tool for protein sequence analysis, especially for the fragmentation of intact proteins. However, low product ion signal-to-noise often requires some degree of signal averaging to achieve high quality MS/MS spectra of intact proteins. Here we describe a new implementation of ETD on the newest generation of quadrupole-Orbitrap-linear ion trap Tribrid, the Orbitrap Fusion Lumos, for improved product ion signal-to-noise via ETD reactions on larger precursor populations. In this new high precursor capacity ETD implementation, precursor cations are accumulated in the center section of the high pressure cell in the dual pressure linear ion trap prior to charge-sign independent trapping, rather than precursor ion sequestration in only the back section as is done for standard ETD. This new scheme increases the charge capacity of the precursor accumulation event, enabling storage of approximately three fold more precursor charges. High capacity ETD boosts the number of matching fragments identified in a single MS/MS event, reducing the need for spectral averaging. These improvements in intra-scan dynamic range via reaction of larger precursor populations, which have been previously demonstrated through custom modified hardware, are now available on a commercial platform, offering considerable benefits for intact protein analysis and top down proteomics. In this work, we characterize the advantages of high precursor capacity ETD through studies with myoglobin and carbonic anhydrase. PMID:26589699

  2. A proximity-dependent assay for specific RNA-protein interactions in intact cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Xie, Mingyi; Shu, Mei-Di; Steitz, Joan A; DiMaio, Daniel

    2016-11-01

    The proximity ligation assay (PLA) is an immune staining method that detects protein-protein interactions in fixed cells. We describe here RNA-PLA, a simple adaptation of this technology that allows the detection of specific RNA-protein interactions in fixed cells by using a DNA oligonucleotide that hybridizes to a target RNA in combination with an antibody that recognizes the protein bound to the target RNA. Stable and transient RNA-protein interactions can be readily detected by generation of a fluorescent signal in discrete compartments in intact fixed cells with high specificity. We demonstrate that this approach requires the colocalization of the binding protein and its RNA target in the same cellular compartment, use of an oligonucleotide complementary to the target RNA, and the presence of a binding site for the protein in the target RNA. © 2016 Zhang et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  3. Mass Spectrometry of Intact Proteins Reveals +98 u Chemical Artifacts Following Precipitation in Acetone.

    PubMed

    Güray, Melda Z; Zheng, Shi; Doucette, Alan A

    2017-02-03

    Protein precipitation in acetone is frequently employed ahead of mass spectrometry for sample preconcentration and purification. Unfortunately, acetone is not chemically inert; mass artifacts have previously been observed on glycine-containing peptides when exposed to acetone under acidic conditions. We herein report a distinct chemical modification occurring at the level of intact proteins when incubated in acetone. This artifact manifests as one or more satellite peaks in the MS spectrum of intact protein, spaced 98 u above the mass of the unmodified protein. Other artifacts (+84, +112 u) also appear upon incubation of proteins or peptides in acetone. The reaction is pH-sensitive, being suppressed when proteins are exposed to acetone under acidic conditions. The +98 u artifact is speculated to originate through an intermediate product of aldol condensation of acetone to form diacetone alcohol and mesityl oxide. A +98 u product could originate from nucleophilic attack on mesityl oxide or through condensation with diacetone alcohol. Given the extent of modification possible upon exposure of proteins to acetone, particularly following overnight solvent exposure or incubation at room temperature, an awareness of the variables influencing this novel modification is valued by proteomics researchers who employ acetone precipitation for protein purification.

  4. Intact protein separation by chromatographic and/or electrophoretic techniques for top-down proteomics.

    PubMed

    Capriotti, Anna Laura; Cavaliere, Chiara; Foglia, Patrizia; Samperi, Roberto; Laganà, Aldo

    2011-12-09

    Mass spectrometry used in combination with a wide variety of separation methods is the principal methodology for proteomics. In bottom-up approach, proteins are cleaved with a specific proteolytic enzyme, followed by peptide separation and MS identification. In top-down approach intact proteins are introduced into the mass spectrometer. The ions generated by electrospray ionization are then subjected to gas-phase separation, fragmentation, fragment separation, and automated interpretation of mass spectrometric and chromatographic data yielding both the molecular weight of the intact protein and the protein fragmentation pattern. This approach requires high accuracy mass measurement analysers capable of separating the multi-charged isotopic cluster of proteins, such as hybrid ion trap-Fourier transform instruments (LTQ-FTICR, LTQ-Orbitrap). Front-end separation technologies tailored for proteins are of primary importance to implement top-down proteomics. This review intends to provide the state of art of protein chromatographic and electrophoretic separation methods suitable for MS coupling, and to illustrate both monodimensional and multidimensional approaches used for LC-MS top-down proteomics. In addition, some recent progresses in protein chromatography that may provide an alternative to those currently employed are also discussed.

  5. Mixed-mode reversed phase/positively charged repulsion chromatography for intact protein separation.

    PubMed

    Ding, Ling; Guo, Zhimou; Hu, Zhuo; Liang, Xinmiao

    2017-05-10

    A mixed-mode reversed phase/positively charged repulsion stationary phase C8PN composed of octyl and amino group has been developed for separation of intact protein. Before the separation of proteins, a set of probe compounds were employed to evaluate the chromatographic properties of C8PN, demonstrating typical reversed phase/positively charged repulsion interaction on this stationary phase as estimated. Then the new C8PN stationary phase was used to separate a standard protein mixture on the reversed phase mode. Compared with a commercial C4 stationary phase, it showed different selectivity for some proteins. In order to better understand the properties of C8PN, the effect of acetonitrile content was investigated based on retention equation. Higher values of the equation parameters on C8PN demonstrated that the protein retentions were more sensitive to the change of acetonitrile content. Besides, the influences of buffer salt additives on the protein retentions were also studied. The retention factors of the proteins got larger with the increase of buffer salt concentration, which confirmed the positively charged repulsion interaction on the column. Finally, the C8PN was further applied to separate oxidized- and reduced- forms of Recombinant Human Growth Hormone. Our study indicated the advantages and application potential of mixed-mode reversed phase/positively charged repulsion stationary phase for intact protein separation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Characterization of protein variants and post-translational modifications: ESI-MSn analyses of intact proteins eluted from polyacrylamide gels.

    PubMed

    Claverol, Stéphane; Burlet-Schiltz, Odile; Gairin, Jean Edouard; Monsarrat, Bernard

    2003-08-01

    We have developed a strategy to characterize protein isoforms, resulting from single-point mutations and post-translational modifications. This strategy is based on polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis separation of protein isoforms, mass spectrometry (MS) and MSn analyses of intact proteins, and tandem MS analyses of proteolytic peptides. We extracted protein isoforms from polyacrylamide gels by passive elution using SDS, followed by nanoscale hydrophilic phase chromatography for SDS removal. We performed electrospray ionization MS analyses of the intact proteins to determine their molecular mass, allowing us to draw hypotheses on the nature of the modification. In the case of labile post-translational modifications, like phosphorylations and glycosylations, we conducted electrospray ionization MSn analyses of the intact proteins to confirm their presence. Finally, after digestion of the proteins in solution, we performed tandem MS analyses of the modified peptides to locate the modifications. Using this strategy, we have determined the molecular mass of 5-10 pmol of a protein up to circa 50 kDa loaded on a gel with a 0.01% mass accuracy. The efficiency of this approach for the characterization of protein variants and post-translational modifications is illustrated with the study of a mixture of kappa-casein isoforms, for which we were able to identify the two major variants and their phosphorylation site and glycosylation motif. We believe that this strategy, which combines two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometric analyses of gel-eluted intact proteins using a benchtop ion trap mass spectrometer, represents a promising approach in proteomics.

  7. Intraduodenal administration of intact pea protein effectively reduces food intake in both lean and obese male subjects.

    PubMed

    Geraedts, Maartje C P; Troost, Freddy J; Munsters, Marjet J M; Stegen, Jos H C H; de Ridder, Rogier J; Conchillo, Jose M; Kruimel, Joanna W; Masclee, Ad A M; Saris, Wim H M

    2011-01-01

    Human duodenal mucosa secretes increased levels of satiety signals upon exposure to intact protein. However, after oral protein ingestion, gastric digestion leaves little intact proteins to enter the duodenum. This study investigated whether bypassing the stomach, through intraduodenal administration, affects hormone release and food-intake to a larger extent than orally administered protein in both lean and obese subjects. Ten lean (BMI:23.0±0.7 kg/m²) and ten obese (BMI:33.4±1.4 kg/m²) healthy male subjects were included. All subjects randomly received either pea protein solutions (250 mg/kg bodyweight in 0.4 ml/kg bodyweight of water) or placebo (0.4 ml/kg bodyweight of water), either orally or intraduodenally via a naso-duodenal tube. Appetite-profile, plasma GLP-1, CCK, and PYY concentrations were determined over a 2 h period. After 2 h, subjects received an ad-libitum meal and food-intake was recorded. CCK levels were increased at 10(p<0.02) and 20(p<0.01) minutes after intraduodenal protein administration (IPA), in obese subjects, compared to lean subjects, but also compared to oral protein administration (OPA)(p<0.04). GLP-1 levels increased after IPA in obese subjects after 90(p<0.02) to 120(p<0.01) minutes, compared to OPA. Food-intake was reduced after IPA both in lean and obese subjects (-168.9±40 kcal (p<0.01) and -298.2±44 kcal (p<0.01), respectively), compared to placebo. Also, in obese subjects, food-intake was decreased after IPA (-132.6±42 kcal; p<0.01), compared to OPA. Prevention of gastric proteolysis through bypassing the stomach effectively reduces food intake, and seems to affect obese subjects to a greater extent than lean subjects. Enteric coating of intact protein supplements may provide an effective dietary strategy in the prevention/treatment of obesity.

  8. Detection and Quantitation of Succinimide in Intact Protein via Hydrazine Trapping and Chemical Derivatization

    PubMed Central

    KLAENE, JOSHUA J.; NI, WENQIN; ALFARO, JOSHUA F.; ZHOU, ZHAOHUI SUNNY

    2014-01-01

    Formation of aspartyl succinimide (Asu) is a common post-translational modification (PTM) of protein pharmaceuticals under acidic conditions. We present a method to detect and quantitate succinimide in intact protein via hydrazine trapping and chemical derivatization. Succinimide, which is labile under typical analytical conditions, is first trapped with hydrazine to form stable hydrazide and can be directly analyzed by mass spectrometry. The resulting aspartyl hydrazide can be selectively derivatized by various tags, such as fluorescent rhodamine sulfonyl chloride that absorbs strongly in the visible region (570 nm). Our tagging strategy allows the labeled protein to be analyzed by orthogonal methods, including HPLC-UV, LC-MS, and SDS-PAGE coupled with fluorescence imaging. A unique advantage of our method is that variants containing succinimide, after derivatization, can be readily resolved via either affinity enrichment or chromatographic separation. This allows further investigation of individual factors in a complex protein mixture that affect succinimide formation. Some additional advantages imparted by fluorescence labeling include, the facile detection of the intact protein without proteolytic digestion to peptides; and high sensitivity, e.g. without optimization 0.41% succinimide was readily detected. As such, our method should be useful for rapid screening, optimization of formulation conditions and related processes relevant to protein pharmaceuticals. PMID:25043726

  9. Proteomic analysis using 2-D liquid separations of intact proteins from whole-cell lysates.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Kan; Yan, Fang; O'Neil, Kimberly A; Hamler, Rick; Lubman, David M; Lin, Linda; Barder, Timothy J

    2004-02-01

    This unit describes procedures for 2-D liquid separations of proteins from whole-cell lysates. Protocols for protein isoelectric point (pI) fractionation in the first dimension include the use of liquid isoelectric focusing (IEF) and chromatofocusing. The liquid IEF provides a pI-based fractionation using a batch-phase electrophoretic method, while chromatofocusing uses a column-based chromatographic method to generate the pH gradient. Using either method, a second-dimension fractionation is provided in the liquid phase using nonporous silica-based reversed-phase HPLC (NPS-RP-HPLC) to generate a 2-D liquid map of the protein content of the cell. The eluate of the 2-D liquid fractionation is directly coupled to a mass spectrometer for on-line detection of the intact molecular weights of proteins. As a result, a multidimensional map of protein expression is obtained that characterizes cellular proteins by pI, hydrophobicity, and intact molecular weight. Such expression maps are useful for differential proteomic comparison between different cell samples.

  10. Web and database software for identification of intact proteins using "top down" mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Gregory K; Kim, Yong-Bin; Forbes, Andrew J; Meng, Fanyu; McCarthy, Ryan; Kelleher, Neil L

    2003-08-15

    For the identification and characterization of proteins harboring posttranslational modifications (PTMs), a "top down" strategy using mass spectrometry has been forwarded recently but languishes without tailored software widely available. We describe a Web-based software and database suite called ProSight PTM constructed for large-scale proteome projects involving direct fragmentation of intact protein ions. Four main components of ProSight PTM are a database retrieval algorithm (Retriever), MySQL protein databases, a file/data manager, and a project tracker. Retriever performs probability-based identifications from absolute fragment ion masses, automatically compiled sequence tags, or a combination of the two, with graphical rendering and browsing of the results. The database structure allows known and putative protein forms to be searched, with prior or predicted PTM knowledge used during each search. Initial functionality is illustrated with a 36-kDa yeast protein identified from a processed cell extract after automated data acquisition using a quadrupole-FT hybrid mass spectrometer. A +142-Da delta(m) on glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase was automatically localized between Asp90 and Asp192, consistent with its two cystine residues (149 and 153) alkylated by acrylamide (+71 Da each) during the gel-based sample preparation. ProSight PTM is the first search engine and Web environment for identification of intact proteins (https://prosightptm.scs.uiuc.edu/).

  11. On the utility of predictive chromatography to complement mass spectrometry based intact protein identification.

    PubMed

    Pridatchenko, Marina L; Perlova, Tatyana Yu; Ben Hamidane, Hisham; Goloborodko, Anton A; Tarasova, Irina A; Gorshkov, Alexander V; Evreinov, Victor V; Tsybin, Yury O; Gorshkov, Mikhail V

    2012-03-01

    The amino acid sequence determines the individual protein three-dimensional structure and its functioning in an organism. Therefore, "reading" a protein sequence and determining its changes due to mutations or post-translational modifications is one of the objectives of proteomic experiments. The commonly utilized approach is gradient high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) in combination with tandem mass spectrometry. While serving as a way to simplify the protein mixture, the liquid chromatography may be an additional analytical tool providing complementary information about the protein structure. Previous attempts to develop "predictive" HPLC for large biomacromolecules were limited by empirically derived equations based purely on the adsorption mechanisms of the retention and applicable to relatively small polypeptide molecules. A mechanism of the large biomacromolecule retention in reversed-phase gradient HPLC was described recently in thermodynamics terms by the analytical model of liquid chromatography at critical conditions (BioLCCC). In this work, we applied the BioLCCC model to predict retention of the intact proteins as well as their large proteolytic peptides separated under different HPLC conditions. The specific aim of these proof-of-principle studies was to demonstrate the feasibility of using "predictive" HPLC as a complementary tool to support the analysis of identified intact proteins in top-down, middle-down, and/or targeted selected reaction monitoring (SRM)-based proteomic experiments.

  12. Membrane protein stoichiometry studied in intact mammalian cells using liquid-phase electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    DE Jonge, N

    2017-05-04

    Receptor membrane proteins in the plasma membranes of cells respond to extracellular chemical signals by conformational changes, spatial redistribution, and (re-)assembly into protein complexes, for example, into homodimers (pairs of the same protein type). The functional state of the proteins can be determined from information about how subunits are assembled into protein complexes. Stoichiometric information about the protein complex subunits, however, is generally not obtained from intact cells but from pooled material extracted from many cells, resulting in a lack of fundamental knowledge about the functioning of membrane proteins. First, functional states may dramatically differ from cell to cell on account of cell heterogeneity. Second, extracting the membrane proteins from the plasma membrane may lead to many artefacts. Liquid-phase scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), in short liquid STEM, is a new technique capable of determining the locations of individual membrane proteins within the intact plasma membranes of cells in liquid. Many tens of whole cells can readily be imaged. It is possible to analyse the stoichiometry of membrane proteins in single cells while accounting for heterogenic cell populations. Liquid STEM was used to image epidermal growth factor receptors in whole COS7 cells. A study of the dimerisation of the HER2 protein in breast cancer cells revealed the presence of rare cancer cells in which HER2 was in a different functional state than in the bulk cells. Stoichiometric information about receptors is essential not only for basic science but also for biomedical application because they present many important pharmaceutical targets. © 2017 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2017 Royal Microscopical Society.

  13. Identification of a ZP3-binding protein on acrosome-intact mouse sperm by photoaffinity crosslinking

    SciTech Connect

    Bleil, J.D.; Wassarman, P.M. )

    1990-07-01

    During the process of fertilization in mammals, sperm bind in a relatively species-specific manner to the zona pellucida (ZP) of ovulated eggs. ZP3, a glycoprotein found in the mouse egg zona pellucida, serves as receptor for sperm during gamete adhesion. We report here that a Mr 56,000 protein found on mouse sperm has properties expected for a sperm component that recognizes and binds to ZP3. This sperm protein is radiolabeled preferentially by a photoactivatable heterobifunctional crosslinker (Denny-Jaffee reagent) covalently linked to purified ZP3, binds very tightly to ZP3-affinity columns, and is localized to heads of acrosome-intact but not acrosome-reacted sperm. These and other findings suggest that this protein may be a ZP3-binding protein that, together with the sperm receptor, supports species-specific binding of mouse sperm to unfertilized eggs.

  14. A photoactivable phospholipid analogue that specifically labels membrane cytoskeletal proteins of intact erythrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Pradhan, D.; Williamson, P.; Schlegel, R.A. )

    1989-08-22

    A radioactive photoactivable analogue of phosphatidylethanolamine, 2-(2-azido-4-nitrobenzoyl)-1-acyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho({sup 14}C)ethanolamine(({sup 14}C)AzPE), was synthesized. Upon incubation with erythrocytes in the dark, about 90% of ({sup 14}C)AzPE spontaneously incorporated into the cells; of this fraction, about 90% associated with the membrane, all of it noncovalently. Upon photoactivation, 3-4% of the membrane-associated probe was incorporated into protein. Analysis of this fraction by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, as well as extraction of labeled membranes with alkali or detergent, showed that the probe preferentially labeled cytoskeletal proteins. ({sup 14}C)AzPE appears to be a useful tool for the study of lipid-protein interactions at the cytoplasmic face of the plasma membrane of intact cells.

  15. Fragmentation of multiply-charged intact protein ions using MALDI TOF-TOF mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhaoyang; Schey, Kevin L

    2008-02-01

    Top down proteomics in a TOF-TOF instrument was further explored by examining the fragmentation of multiply charged precursors ions generated by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization. Evaluation of sample preparation conditions allowed selection of solvent/matrix conditions and sample deposition methods to produce sufficiently abundant doubly and triply charged precursor ions for subsequent CID experiments. As previously reported, preferential cleavage was observed at sites C-terminal to acidic residues and N-terminal to proline residues for all ions examined. An increase in nonpreferential fragmentation as well as additional low mass product ions was observed in the spectra from multiply charged precursor ions providing increased sequence coverage. This enhanced fragmentation from multiply charged precursor ions became increasingly important with increasing protein molecular weight and facilitates protein identification using database searching algorithms. The useable mass range for MALDI TOF-TOF analysis of intact proteins has been expanded to 18.2 kDa using this approach.

  16. Release of proteins from intact chloroplasts induced by reactive oxygen species during biotic and abiotic stress.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Kwang-Chul; Verma, Dheeraj; Jin, Shuangxia; Singh, Nameirakpam D; Daniell, Henry

    2013-01-01

    Plastids sustain life on this planet by providing food, feed, essential biomolecules and oxygen. Such diverse metabolic and biosynthetic functions require efficient communication between plastids and the nucleus. However, specific factors, especially large molecules, released from plastids that regulate nuclear genes have not yet been fully elucidated. When tobacco and lettuce transplastomic plants expressing GFP within chloroplasts, were challenged with Erwinia carotovora (biotic stress) or paraquat (abiotic stress), GFP was released into the cytoplasm. During this process GFP moves gradually towards the envelope, creating a central red zone of chlorophyll fluorescence. GFP was then gradually released from intact chloroplasts into the cytoplasm with an intact vacuole and no other visible cellular damage. Different stages of GFP release were observed inside the same cell with a few chloroplasts completely releasing GFP with detection of only red chlorophyll fluorescence or with no reduction in GFP fluorescence or transitional steps between these two phases. Time lapse imaging by confocal microscopy clearly identified sequence of these events. Intactness of chloroplasts during this process was evident from chlorophyll fluorescence emanated from thylakoid membranes and in vivo Chla fluorescence measurements (maximum quantum yield of photosystem II) made before or after infection with pathogens to evaluate their photosynthetic competence. Hydrogen peroxide and superoxide anion serve as signal molecules for generation of reactive oxygen species and Tiron, scavenger of superoxide anion, blocked release of GFP from chloroplasts. Significant increase in ion leakage in the presence of paraquat and light suggests changes in the chloroplast envelope to facilitate protein release. Release of GFP-RC101 (an antimicrobial peptide), which was triggered by Erwinia infection, ceased after conferring protection, further confirming this export phenomenon. These results suggest a

  17. Release of Proteins from Intact Chloroplasts Induced by Reactive Oxygen Species during Biotic and Abiotic Stress

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Nameirakpam D.; Daniell, Henry

    2013-01-01

    Plastids sustain life on this planet by providing food, feed, essential biomolecules and oxygen. Such diverse metabolic and biosynthetic functions require efficient communication between plastids and the nucleus. However, specific factors, especially large molecules, released from plastids that regulate nuclear genes have not yet been fully elucidated. When tobacco and lettuce transplastomic plants expressing GFP within chloroplasts, were challenged with Erwinia carotovora (biotic stress) or paraquat (abiotic stress), GFP was released into the cytoplasm. During this process GFP moves gradually towards the envelope, creating a central red zone of chlorophyll fluorescence. GFP was then gradually released from intact chloroplasts into the cytoplasm with an intact vacuole and no other visible cellular damage. Different stages of GFP release were observed inside the same cell with a few chloroplasts completely releasing GFP with detection of only red chlorophyll fluorescence or with no reduction in GFP fluorescence or transitional steps between these two phases. Time lapse imaging by confocal microscopy clearly identified sequence of these events. Intactness of chloroplasts during this process was evident from chlorophyll fluorescence emanated from thylakoid membranes and in vivo Chla fluorescence measurements (maximum quantum yield of photosystem II) made before or after infection with pathogens to evaluate their photosynthetic competence. Hydrogen peroxide and superoxide anion serve as signal molecules for generation of reactive oxygen species and Tiron, scavenger of superoxide anion, blocked release of GFP from chloroplasts. Significant increase in ion leakage in the presence of paraquat and light suggests changes in the chloroplast envelope to facilitate protein release. Release of GFP-RC101 (an antimicrobial peptide), which was triggered by Erwinia infection, ceased after conferring protection, further confirming this export phenomenon. These results suggest a

  18. Development and validation of an intact cell assay for protein tyrosine phosphatases using recombinant baculoviruses.

    PubMed

    Cromlish, W A; Payette, P; Kennedy, B P

    1999-11-15

    We have developed an intact cell assay to be used in the direct quantitation of protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) activity. Utilizing the baculovirus expression system, the assay readily allows for a direct activity readout for PTPs such as PTP1B or CD45. Infected Sf9 cells expressing either full-length PTP1B, full-length CD45, CD45 catalytic domain, or hCOX-1 (mock-infected) are harvested 29 hr post-infection, at which time cells are viable and the expressed proteins are processed, as well as localized to their predicted subcellular compartments. Assays are carried out in a 96-well format, with cells expressing the PTP of interest. Cells are preincubated with or without inhibitor and challenged with substrate, and the phosphatase activity is determined spectrophotometrically by monitoring the conversion of p-nitrophenyl phosphate to p-nitrophenol at OD405. Documented PTP inhibitors have been used to validate this assay system. This study demonstrates that a direct readout of PTP activity in intact cells can be achieved, thus providing a useful cell-based screen for determining selective inhibitors of PTPs.

  19. Effects of chromatography conditions on intact protein separations for top-down proteomics.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yueju; Balgley, Brian M; Rudnick, Paul A; Lee, Cheng S

    2005-05-06

    For top-down proteomics, nano-reversed phase liquid chromatography (RPLC) plays a major role in both single and multidimensional protein separations in an effort to increase the overall peak capacity for the resolution of complex protein mixtures prior to mass spectrometry analysis. Effects of various chromatography conditions, including alkyl chain length in the stationary phase, capillary column temperature, and ion-pairing agent, on the resolution of intact proteins are studied using nano-RPLC-electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry. Optimal chromatography conditions include the use of C18 column heated at 60 degrees C and the addition of trifluoroacetic acid instead of heptafluorobutyric acid as the ion-paring agent in the mobile phase. Under optimized chromatography conditions, there are no significant differences in the separation performance of yeast cell lysates present in the native versus denatured states. Denatured yeast proteins resolved and eluted from nano-RPLC can be subjected to proteolytic digestion in an on- or off-line approach to provide improved protein sequence coverage toward protein identification in a combined top-down/bottom-up proteome platform.

  20. Topically delivered dissolved oxygen reduces inflammation and positively influences structural proteins in healthy intact human skin.

    PubMed

    Kellar, Robert S; Audet, Robert G; Roe, David F; Rheins, Lawrence A; Draelos, Zoe Diana

    2013-06-01

    As oxygen is essential for wound healing and there is limited diffusion across the stratum corneum into the epidermis, we wanted to evaluate whether the topical delivery of a total dissolved oxygen in dressing form on intact human subject skin would improve clinical and histologic skin functioning. Fifty normal, healthy subjects completed a pilot clinical evaluation to assess the efficacy and tolerability of a dissolved oxygen dressing (OxygeneSys™-Continuous) to improve the health and appearance of intact skin. Clinical analysis was performed on 50 subjects; histological and gene expression analysis was performed on 12 of the 50 subjects to assess the effect of the dissolved oxygen dressing. Clinical data demonstrate that the dressing is well tolerated, and several measures of skin health and integrity showed improvements compared with a control dressing site. Skin hydration measurements showed a statistically significant increase in skin hydration at 0-4, 4-8, and 0-8 weeks (P < 0.05 at each time point). The blinded clinical investigator's grading of desquamation, roughness, and skin texture show significant decreases from baseline to the 8-week time point (P < 0.05). The dressings were removed prior to the blinded clinical investigator's grading. These data were supported by the histological and gene expression studies, which showed a general reduction in inflammatory response markers and transcription products (IL-6, IL-8, TNF-alpha, MMP-1, and MMP-12), while facilitating a general increase in structural skin proteins (collagen I, elastin, and filaggrin). Additionally, p53 signals from biopsy samples support the clinical investigator's observations of no safety concerns. The data from this study demonstrate that the dressing has no deleterious effects and stimulates beneficial effects on intact, nonwounded skin. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Profiling of the Glycoforms of the Intact α Subunit of Recombinant Human Chorionic Gonadotropin by High Resolution CE/MS

    PubMed Central

    Thakur, D.; Rejtar, T.; Karger, B. L.; Washburn, N.; Bosques, C.J.; Gunay, N.S.; Shriver, Z.; Venkataraman, G.

    2009-01-01

    With the rapid growth of complex heterogeneous biological molecules, effective techniques that are capable of rapid, characterization of biologics are essential to ensure the desired product characteristics. To address this need, we have developed a method for analysis of intact glycoproteins based on high resolution capillary electrophoretic separation coupled to an LTQ-FT mass spectrometer. We evaluated the performance of this method on the alpha subunit of mouse cell line-derived recombinant human chorionic gonadotrophin (r-αhCG), a protein that is glycosylated at two sites and is part of the clinically-relevant gonadotrophin family. Analysis of r-αhCG, using capillary electrophoresis (CE) with a separation time under 20 minutes, resulted in the identification of over 60 different glycoforms with up to nine sialic acids. High resolution CE/FT-MS allowed separation and analysis of not only intact glycoforms with different numbers of sialic acids but also intact glycoforms that differed by the number and extent of neutral monosaccharides. The high mass resolution of the FT-MS enabled a limited mass range to be targeted for the examination of the protein glycoforms, simplifying the analysis without sacrificing accuracy. In addition, the limited mass range resulted in a fast scan speed that enhanced the reproducibility of the relative quantitation of individual glycoforms. The intact glycoprotein analysis was complemented with the analysis of the tryptic glycopeptides and glycans of r-αhCG to enable the assignment of glycan structures to individual sites, resulting in a detailed characterization of the protein. Samples of r-αhCG obtained from a CHO cell line were also analyzed and briefly shown to be significantly different from the murine cell line product. Taken together, the results suggest that the CE coupled to high resolution FT-MS can be one of the effective tools for in-process monitoring, as well as for final product characterization. PMID:19817480

  2. Defining Gas-Phase Fragmentation Propensities of Intact Proteins During Native Top-Down Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Haverland, Nicole A; Skinner, Owen S; Fellers, Ryan T; Tariq, Areeba A; Early, Bryan P; LeDuc, Richard D; Fornelli, Luca; Compton, Philip D; Kelleher, Neil L

    2017-06-01

    Fragmentation of intact proteins in the gas phase is influenced by amino acid composition, the mass and charge of precursor ions, higher order structure, and the dissociation technique used. The likelihood of fragmentation occurring between a pair of residues is referred to as the fragmentation propensity and is calculated by dividing the total number of assigned fragmentation events by the total number of possible fragmentation events for each residue pair. Here, we describe general fragmentation propensities when performing top-down mass spectrometry (TDMS) using denaturing or native electrospray ionization. A total of 5311 matched fragmentation sites were collected for 131 proteoforms that were analyzed over 165 experiments using native top-down mass spectrometry (nTDMS). These data were used to determine the fragmentation propensities for 399 residue pairs. In comparison to denatured top-down mass spectrometry (dTDMS), the fragmentation pathways occurring either N-terminal to proline or C-terminal to aspartic acid were even more enhanced in nTDMS compared with other residues. More generally, 257/399 (64%) of the fragmentation propensities were significantly altered (P ≤ 0.05) when using nTDMS compared with dTDMS, and of these, 123 were altered by 2-fold or greater. The most notable enhancements of fragmentation propensities for TDMS in native versus denatured mode occurred (1) C-terminal to aspartic acid, (2) between phenylalanine and tryptophan (F|W), and (3) between tryptophan and alanine (W|A). The fragmentation propensities presented here will be of high value in the development of tailored scoring systems used in nTDMS of both intact proteins and protein complexes. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  3. Structural characterization of intact proteins is enhanced by prevalent fragmentation pathways rarely observed for peptides

    PubMed Central

    Cobb, Jennifer S.; Easterling, Michael L.; Agar, Jeffrey N.

    2010-01-01

    While collisionally activated dissociation (CAD) pathways for peptides are well characterized, those of intact proteins are not. We systematically assigned CAD product ions of ubiquitin, myoglobin, and bovine serum albumin generated using high-yield, in-source fragmentation. Assignment of >98% of hundreds of product ions implies fragmentation pathways described are representative of major pathways. Protein dissociation mechanisms were found to be modulated by both source declustering potential and precursor ion charge state. Like peptides, higher charge states of proteins fragmented at lower energies next to Pro, via mobile protons, while lower charge states fragmented at higher energies after Asp and Glu, via localized protons. Unlike peptides, however, predominant fragmentation channels of proteins occurred at intermediate charge states via non-canonical mechanisms and produced extensive internal fragmentation. The non-canonical mechanisms include prominent cleavages C-terminal to Pro and Asn and N-terminal to Ile, Leu and Ser; these cleavages along with internal fragments led to a 45% increase in sequence coverage, improving the specificity of top-down protein identification. Three applications take advantage of the different mechanisms of protein fragmentation. First, modulation of declustering potential selectively fragments different charge states, allowing the source region to be used as the first stage of a low-resolution tandem mass spectrometer facilitating pseudo-MS3 of product ions with known parent charge states. Second, development and integration of automated modulation of ion funnel declustering potential allows users access to a particular fragmentation mechanism and yielding facile cleavage on a liquid chromatography timescale. Third, augmentation of a top-down search engine can improve protein characterization. PMID:20303285

  4. The intact Kunitz domain protects the amyloid precursor protein from being processed by matriptase-2.

    PubMed

    Beckmann, Anna-Madeleine; Glebov, Konstantin; Walter, Jochen; Merkel, Olaf; Mangold, Martin; Schmidt, Frederike; Becker-Pauly, Christoph; Gütschow, Michael; Stirnberg, Marit

    2016-08-01

    Proteolytic processing of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) leads to amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides. So far, the mechanism of APP processing is insufficiently characterized at the molecular level. Whereas the knowledge of Aβ generation by several proteases has been expanded, the contribution of the Kunitz-type protease inhibitor domain (KPI) present in two major APP isoforms to the complex proteolytic processing of APP is poorly understood. In this study, we have identified KPI-containing APP as a very potent, slow-binding inhibitor for the membrane-bound proteolytic regulator of iron homeostasis matriptase-2 by forming stable complexes with its target protease in HEK cells. Inhibition and complex formation depend on the intact KPI domain. By inhibiting matriptase-2, KPI-containing APP is protected from matriptase-2-mediated proteolysis within the Aβ region, thus preventing the generation of N-terminally truncated Aβ.

  5. Imaging individual proteins and nanodomains on intact cell membranes with a probe-based optical antenna.

    PubMed

    van Zanten, Thomas S; Lopez-Bosque, Maria J; Garcia-Parajo, Maria F

    2010-01-01

    Optical antennas that confine and enhance electromagnetic fields in a nanometric region hold great potential for nanobioimaging and biosensing. Probe-based monopole optical antennas are fabricated to enhance fields localized to <30 nm near the antenna apex in aqueous conditions. These probes are used under appropriate excitation antenna conditions to image individual antibodies with an unprecedented resolution of 26 +/- 4 nm and virtually no surrounding background. On intact cell membranes in physiological conditions, the obtained resolution is 30 +/- 6 nm. Importantly, the method allows individual proteins to be distinguished from nanodomains and the degree of clustering to be quantified by directly measuring physical size and intensity of individual fluorescent spots. Improved antenna geometries should lead to true live cell imaging below 10-nm resolution with position accuracy in the subnanometric range.

  6. Super-resolution microscopy using standard fluorescent proteins in intact cells under cryo-conditions.

    PubMed

    Kaufmann, Rainer; Schellenberger, Pascale; Seiradake, Elena; Dobbie, Ian M; Jones, E Yvonne; Davis, Ilan; Hagen, Christoph; Grünewald, Kay

    2014-07-09

    We introduce a super-resolution technique for fluorescence cryo-microscopy based on photoswitching of standard genetically encoded fluorescent marker proteins in intact mammalian cells at low temperature (81 K). Given the limit imposed by the lack of cryo-immersion objectives, current applications of fluorescence cryo-microscopy to biological specimens achieve resolutions between 400-500 nm only. We demonstrate that the single molecule characteristics of reversible photobleaching of mEGFP and mVenus at liquid nitrogen temperature are suitable for the basic concept of single molecule localization microscopy. This enabled us to perform super-resolution imaging of vitrified biological samples and to visualize structures in unperturbed fast frozen cells for the first time with a structural resolution of ∼125 nm (average single molecule localization accuracy ∼40 nm), corresponding to a 3-5 fold resolution improvement.

  7. Cell-free methods to produce structurally intact mammalian membrane proteins

    PubMed Central

    Shinoda, Takehiro; Shinya, Naoko; Ito, Kaori; Ishizuka-Katsura, Yoshiko; Ohsawa, Noboru; Terada, Takaho; Hirata, Kunio; Kawano, Yoshiaki; Yamamoto, Masaki; Tomita, Taisuke; Ishibashi, Yohei; Hirabayashi, Yoshio; Kimura-Someya, Tomomi; Shirouzu, Mikako; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki

    2016-01-01

    The crystal structures of four membrane proteins, from bacteria or a unicellular alga, have been solved with samples produced by cell-free protein synthesis. In this study, for mammalian membrane protein production, we established the precipitating and soluble membrane fragment methods: membrane proteins are synthesized with the Escherichia coli cell-free system in the presence of large and small membrane fragments, respectively, and are simultaneously integrated into the lipid environments. We applied the precipitating membrane fragment method to produce various mammalian membrane proteins, including human claudins, glucosylceramide synthase, and the γ-secretase subunits. These proteins were produced at levels of about 0.1–1.0 mg per ml cell-free reaction under the initial conditions, and were obtained as precipitates by ultracentrifugation. Larger amounts of membrane proteins were produced by the soluble membrane fragment method, collected in the ultracentrifugation supernatants, and purified directly by column chromatography. For several proteins, the conditions of the membrane fragment methods were further optimized, such as by the addition of specific lipids/detergents. The functional and structural integrities of the purified proteins were confirmed by analyses of their ligand binding activities, size-exclusion chromatography profiles, and/or thermal stabilities. We successfully obtained high-quality crystals of the complex of human claudin-4 with an enterotoxin. PMID:27465719

  8. Redox modulation of global phosphatase activity and protein phosphorylation in intact skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Valerie P; Reiser, Peter J; Clanton, Thomas L

    2009-01-01

    Skeletal muscles produce transient reactive oxygen species (ROS) in response to intense stimulation, disuse atrophy, heat stress, hypoxia, osmotic stress, stretch and cell receptor activation. The physiological significance is not well understood. Protein phosphatases (PPases) are known to be highly sensitive to oxidants and could contribute to many different signalling responses in muscle. We tested whether broad categories of PPases are inhibited by levels of acute oxidant exposure that do not result in loss of contractile function or gross oxidative stress. We also tested if this exposure results in elevated levels of global protein phosphorylation. Rat diaphragm muscles were treated with either 2,3-dimethoxy-1-naphthoquinone (DMNQ; 1, 10, 100 μm; a mitochondrial O2•−/H2O2 generator) or exogenous H2O2 (5, 50, 500 μm) for 30 min. Supernatants were assayed for serine/threonine PPase (Ser/Thr-PPase) or protein tyrosine PPase (PTP) activities. With the exception of 500 μm H2O2, no other oxidant exposures significantly elevated protein carbonyl formation, nor did they alter the magnitude of twitch force. DMNQ significantly decreased all categories of PPase activity at 10 and 100 μm and reduced PTP at 1 μm. Similar reductions in Ser/Thr-PPase activity were seen in response to 50 and 500 μm H2O2 and PTP at 500 μm H2O2. ROS treatments resulted a dose-dependent increase in the phosphorylation states of many proteins. The data are consistent with the concept that PPases, within intact skeletal muscles, are highly sensitive to acute changes in ROS activity and that localized ROS play a critical role in lowering the barriers for effective phosphorylation events to occur in muscle cells, thus increasing the probability for cell signalling responses to proceed. PMID:19841000

  9. Differential isotope dansylation labeling combined with liquid chromatography mass spectrometry for quantification of intact and N-terminal truncated proteins.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yanan; Li, Liang

    2013-08-20

    The N-terminal amino acids of proteins are important structure units for maintaining the biological function, localization, and interaction networks of proteins. Under different biological conditions, one or several N-terminal amino acids could be cleaved from an intact protein due to processes, such as proteolysis, resulting in the change of protein properties. Thus, the ability to quantify the N-terminal truncated forms of proteins is of great importance, particularly in the area of development and production of protein-based drugs where the relative quantity of the intact protein and its truncated form needs to be monitored. In this work, we describe a rapid method for absolute quantification of protein mixtures containing intact and N-terminal truncated proteins. This method is based on dansylation labeling of the N-terminal amino acids of proteins, followed by microwave-assisted acid hydrolysis of the proteins into amino acids. It is shown that dansyl labeled amino acids are stable in acidic conditions and can be quantified by liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS) with the use of isotope analog standards.

  10. Intact protein folding in the glutathione-depleted endoplasmic reticulum implicates alternative protein thiol reductants

    PubMed Central

    Tsunoda, Satoshi; Avezov, Edward; Zyryanova, Alisa; Konno, Tasuku; Mendes-Silva, Leonardo; Pinho Melo, Eduardo; Harding, Heather P; Ron, David

    2014-01-01

    Protein folding homeostasis in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) requires efficient protein thiol oxidation, but also relies on a parallel reductive process to edit disulfides during the maturation or degradation of secreted proteins. To critically examine the widely held assumption that reduced ER glutathione fuels disulfide reduction, we expressed a modified form of a cytosolic glutathione-degrading enzyme, ChaC1, in the ER lumen. ChaC1CtoS purged the ER of glutathione eliciting the expected kinetic defect in oxidation of an ER-localized glutathione-coupled Grx1-roGFP2 optical probe, but had no effect on the disulfide editing-dependent maturation of the LDL receptor or the reduction-dependent degradation of misfolded alpha-1 antitrypsin. Furthermore, glutathione depletion had no measurable effect on induction of the unfolded protein response (UPR); a sensitive measure of ER protein folding homeostasis. These findings challenge the importance of reduced ER glutathione and suggest the existence of alternative electron donor(s) that maintain the reductive capacity of the ER. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03421.001 PMID:25073928

  11. Direct mass spectrometric analysis of intact proteins of the yeast large ribosomal subunit using capillary LC/FTICR

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang-Won; Berger, Scott J.; Martinović, Suzana; Paša-Tolić, Ljiljana; Anderson, Gordon A.; Shen, Yufeng; Zhao, Rui; Smith, Richard D.

    2002-01-01

    Electrospray ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry coupled with capillary reverse-phase liquid chromatography was used to characterize intact proteins from the large subunit of the yeast ribosome. High mass measurement accuracy, achieved by “mass locking” with an internal standard from a dual electrospray ionization source, allowed identification of ribosomal proteins. Analyses of the intact proteins revealed information on cotranslational and posttranslational modifications of the ribosomal proteins that included loss of the initiating methionine, acetylation, methylation, and proteolytic maturation. High-resolution separations permitted differentiation of protein isoforms having high structural similarity as well as proteins from their modified forms, facilitating unequivocal assignments. The study identified 42 of the 43 core large ribosomal subunit proteins and 58 (of 64 possible) core large subunit protein isoforms having unique masses in a single analysis. These results demonstrate the basis for the high-throughput analyses of complex mixtures of intact proteins, which we believe will be an important complement to other approaches for defining protein modifications and their changes resulting from physiological processes or environmental perturbations. PMID:11983894

  12. Hypoxia and fatigue-induced modification of function and proteins in intact and skinned murine diaphragm muscle.

    PubMed

    Brotto, M A; Andreatta-van Leyen, S; Nosek, C M; Brotto, L S; Nosek, T M

    2000-09-01

    Fatigue studies of isolated, intact muscles typically utilize solutions saturated with O2. However, under in vivo fatiguing conditions, less oxygen is delivered to the muscles and they actually experience hypoxia. No studies to date have correlated the effects of acute hypoxia on the isometric contractile properties of intact muscles, skinned fibers isolated from the same muscles, and the cellular content of specific muscle proteins. Therefore, we have studied the effects of in vitro acute hypoxia on the fatigability of intact diaphragm muscle strips and on the isometric contractile properties of single Triton-skinned fibers isolated from control and hypoxic diaphragm muscles. We found that hypoxia and fatiguing stimulation per se affect the tetanic force of intact muscle strips without exhibiting any significant deleterious effects on the calcium-activated force of skinned muscle fibers dissected from the intact muscles. In contrast, fatiguing stimulation under hypoxic conditions decreased both the tetanic force of muscle strips and the calcium-activated force of skinned muscle fibers. Gel electrophoresis of muscles subjected to hypoxia and hypoxic-fatigue revealed that there is a significant reduction in three protein bands when compared to control muscles. Protein modification may be the underlying mechanism of muscle fatigue under physiologic conditions.

  13. A way to probe the microenvironment of free sulfhydryls in intact proteins with a series of monofunctional organic mercurials.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ming; Yang, Limin; Wang, Qiuquan

    2012-10-29

    Monofunctional organic mercurials (MFOHgs) of different sizes and electronic properties were used to evaluate the accessibility of SH groups in intact proteins. The change in conformation of proteins, such as BLG and OVA, when treated with MFOHgs of increasing size was used as a measure of the accessibility of SH groups contained within these proteins. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Effects of hydrolysed casein, intact casein and intact whey protein on energy expenditure and appetite regulation: a randomised, controlled, cross-over study.

    PubMed

    Bendtsen, Line Q; Lorenzen, Janne K; Gomes, Sisse; Liaset, Bjørn; Holst, Jens J; Ritz, Christian; Reitelseder, Søren; Sjödin, Anders; Astrup, Arne

    2014-10-28

    Casein and whey differ in amino acid composition and in the rate of absorption; however, the absorption rate of casein can be increased to mimic that of whey by exogenous hydrolysis. The objective of the present study was to compare the effects of hydrolysed casein (HC), intact casein (IC) and intact whey (IW) on energy expenditure (EE) and appetite regulation, and thereby to investigate the influence of amino acid composition and the rate of absorption. In the present randomised cross-over study, twenty-four overweight and moderately obese young men and women consumed three isoenergetic dietary treatments that varied in protein source. The study was conducted in a respiration chamber, where EE, substrate oxidation and subjective appetite were measured over 24 h at three independent visits. Moreover, blood and urine samples were collected from the participants. The results showed no differences in 24 h and postprandial EE or appetite regulation. However, lipid oxidation, estimated from the respiratory quotient (RQ), was found to be higher after consumption of IW than after consumption of HC during daytime (P= 0·014) as well as during the time after the breakfast meal (P= 0·008) when the food was provided. Likewise, NEFA concentrations were found to be higher after consumption of IW than after consumption of HC and IC (P< 0·01). However, there was no overall difference in the concentration of insulin or glucagon-like peptide 1. In conclusion, dietary treatments when served as high-protein mixed meals induced similar effects on EE and appetite regulation, except for lipid oxidation, where RQ values suggest that it is higher after consumption of IW than after consumption of HC.

  15. Intact vinculin protein is required for control of cell shape, cell mechanics, and rac-dependent lamellipodia formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldmann, Wolfgang H.; Ingber, Donald E.

    2002-01-01

    Studies were carried out using vinculin-deficient F9 embryonic carcinoma (gamma229) cells to analyze the relationship between structure and function within the focal adhesion protein vinculin, in the context of control of cell shape, cell mechanics, and movement. Atomic force microscopy studies revealed that transfection of the head (aa 1-821) or tail (aa 811-1066) domain of vinculin, alone or together, was unable to fully reverse the decrease in cell stiffness, spreading, and lamellipodia formation caused by vinculin deficiency. In contrast, replacement with intact vinculin completely restored normal cell mechanics and spreading regardless of whether its tyrosine phosphorylation site was deleted. Constitutively active rac also only induced extension of lamellipodia when microinjected into cells that expressed intact vinculin protein. These data indicate that vinculin's ability to physically couple integrins to the cytoskeleton, to mechanically stabilize cell shape, and to support rac-dependent lamellipodia formation all appear to depend on its intact three-dimensional structure.

  16. Intact vinculin protein is required for control of cell shape, cell mechanics, and rac-dependent lamellipodia formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldmann, Wolfgang H.; Ingber, Donald E.

    2002-01-01

    Studies were carried out using vinculin-deficient F9 embryonic carcinoma (gamma229) cells to analyze the relationship between structure and function within the focal adhesion protein vinculin, in the context of control of cell shape, cell mechanics, and movement. Atomic force microscopy studies revealed that transfection of the head (aa 1-821) or tail (aa 811-1066) domain of vinculin, alone or together, was unable to fully reverse the decrease in cell stiffness, spreading, and lamellipodia formation caused by vinculin deficiency. In contrast, replacement with intact vinculin completely restored normal cell mechanics and spreading regardless of whether its tyrosine phosphorylation site was deleted. Constitutively active rac also only induced extension of lamellipodia when microinjected into cells that expressed intact vinculin protein. These data indicate that vinculin's ability to physically couple integrins to the cytoskeleton, to mechanically stabilize cell shape, and to support rac-dependent lamellipodia formation all appear to depend on its intact three-dimensional structure.

  17. Screening of Small Intact Proteins by Capillary Electrophoresis Electrospray Ionization-Mass Spectrometry (CE-ESI-MS).

    PubMed

    Neuberger, Sabine; Rafai, Angelina; Neusüß, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Capillary electrophoresis (CE) has been shown to be a suitable separation technique for complex samples. Combined with electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (ESI-MS), it is a powerful tool offering the opportunity of high selectivity and sensitivity combined with the possibility to identify and characterize intact proteins. In this protocol, we demonstrate a screening method for intact proteins based on capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) separation coupled with online mass spectrometric detection. In order to avoid protein-wall interactions, a neutral coated capillary is used to create a universal method for proteins with both low and high electrophoretic mobilities. In addition, we show the successful validation and application of this screening method for a set of eight standard proteins and the glycoprotein erythropoietin.

  18. Profiling of integral membrane proteins and their post translational modifications using high-resolution mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Souda, Puneet; Ryan, Christopher M.; Cramer, William A.; Whitelegge, Julian

    2011-01-01

    Integral membrane proteins pose challenges to traditional proteomics approaches due to unique physicochemical properties including hydrophobic transmembrane domains that limit solubility in aqueous solvents. A well resolved intact protein molecular mass profile defines a protein’s native covalent state including post-translational modifications, and is thus a vital measurement toward full structure determination. Both soluble loop regions and transmembrane regions potentially contain post-translational modifications that must be characterized if the covalent primary structure of a membrane protein is to be defined. This goal has been achieved using electrospray-ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) with low-resolution mass analyzers for intact protein profiling, and high-resolution instruments for top-down experiments, toward complete covalent primary structure information. In top-down, the intact protein profile is supplemented by gas-phase fragmentation of the intact protein, including its transmembrane regions, using collisionally activated and/or electroncapture dissociation (CAD/ECD) to yield sequence-dependent high-resolution MS information. Dedicated liquid chromatography systems with aqueous/organic solvent mixtures were developed allowing us to demonstrate that polytopic integral membrane proteins are amenable to ESI-MS analysis, including top-down measurements. Covalent post-translational modifications are localized regardless of their position in transmembrane domains. Top-down measurements provide a more detail oriented high-resolution description of post-transcriptional and post-translational diversity for enhanced understanding beyond genomic translation. PMID:21982782

  19. Metabolic Profiling of Intact Arabidopsis thaliana Leaves during Circadian Cycle Using 1H High Resolution Magic Angle Spinning NMR

    PubMed Central

    van Schadewijk, R.; de Groot, H. J. M.; Alia, A.

    2016-01-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana is the most widely used model organism for research in plant biology. While significant advances in understanding plant growth and development have been made by focusing on the molecular genetics of Arabidopsis, extracting and understanding the functional framework of metabolism is challenging, both from a technical perspective due to losses and modification during extraction of metabolites from the leaves, and from the biological perspective, due to random variation obscuring how well the function is performed. The purpose of this work is to establish the in vivo metabolic profile directly from the Arabidopsis thaliana leaves without metabolite extraction, to reduce the complexity of the results by multivariate analysis, and to unravel the mitigation of cellular complexity by predominant functional periodicity. To achieve this, we use the circadian cycle that strongly influences metabolic and physiological processes and exerts control over the photosynthetic machinery. High resolution-magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (HR-MAS NMR) was applied to obtain the metabolic profile directly from intact Arabidopsis leaves. Combining one- and two-dimensional 1H HR-MAS NMR allowed the identification of several metabolites including sugars and amino acids in intact leaves. Multivariate analysis on HR-MAS NMR spectra of leaves throughout the circadian cycle revealed modules of primary metabolites with significant and consistent variations of their molecular components at different time points of the circadian cycle. Since robust photosynthetic performance in plants relies on the functional periodicity of the circadian rhythm, our results show that HR-MAS NMR promises to be an important non-invasive method that can be used for metabolomics of the Arabidopsis thaliana mutants with altered physiology and photosynthetic efficiency. PMID:27662620

  20. Fluorescent in situ sequencing (FISSEQ) of RNA for gene expression profiling in intact cells and tissues.

    PubMed

    Lee, Je Hyuk; Daugharthy, Evan R; Scheiman, Jonathan; Kalhor, Reza; Ferrante, Thomas C; Terry, Richard; Turczyk, Brian M; Yang, Joyce L; Lee, Ho Suk; Aach, John; Zhang, Kun; Church, George M

    2015-03-01

    RNA-sequencing (RNA-seq) measures the quantitative change in gene expression over the whole transcriptome, but it lacks spatial context. In contrast, in situ hybridization provides the location of gene expression, but only for a small number of genes. Here we detail a protocol for genome-wide profiling of gene expression in situ in fixed cells and tissues, in which RNA is converted into cross-linked cDNA amplicons and sequenced manually on a confocal microscope. Unlike traditional RNA-seq, our method enriches for context-specific transcripts over housekeeping and/or structural RNA, and it preserves the tissue architecture for RNA localization studies. Our protocol is written for researchers experienced in cell microscopy with minimal computing skills. Library construction and sequencing can be completed within 14 d, with image analysis requiring an additional 2 d.

  1. Fluorescent in situ sequencing (FISSEQ) of RNA for gene expression profiling in intact cells and tissues

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Je Hyuk; Daugharthy, Evan R.; Scheiman, Jonathan; Kalhor, Reza; Ferrante, Thomas C.; Terry, Richard; Turczyk, Brian M.; Yang, Joyce L.; Lee, Ho Suk; Aach, John; Zhang, Kun; Church, George M.

    2014-01-01

    RNA sequencing measures the quantitative change in gene expression over the whole transcriptome, but it lacks spatial context. On the other hand, in situ hybridization provides the location of gene expression, but only for a small number of genes. Here we detail a protocol for genome-wide profiling of gene expression in situ in fixed cells and tissues, in which RNA is converted into cross-linked cDNA amplicons and sequenced manually on a confocal microscope. Unlike traditional RNA-seq our method enriches for context-specific transcripts over house-keeping and/or structural RNA, and it preserves the tissue architecture for RNA localization studies. Our protocol is written for researchers experienced in cell microscopy with minimal computing skills. Library construction and sequencing can be completed within 14 d, with image analysis requiring an additional 2 d. PMID:25675209

  2. Autopilot: An Online Data Acquisition Control System for the Enhanced High-Throughput Characterization of Intact Proteins

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The ability to study organisms by direct analysis of their proteomes without digestion via mass spectrometry has benefited greatly from recent advances in separation techniques, instrumentation, and bioinformatics. However, improvements to data acquisition logic have lagged in comparison. Past workflows for Top Down Proteomics (TDPs) have focused on high throughput at the expense of maximal protein coverage and characterization. This mode of data acquisition has led to enormous overlap in the identification of highly abundant proteins in subsequent LC-MS injections. Furthermore, a wealth of data is left underutilized by analyzing each newly targeted species as unique, rather than as part of a collection of fragmentation events on a distinct proteoform. Here, we present a major advance in software for acquisition of TDP data that incorporates a fully automated workflow able to detect intact masses, guide fragmentation to achieve maximal identification and characterization of intact protein species, and perform database search online to yield real-time protein identifications. On Pseudomonas aeruginosa, the software combines fragmentation events of the same precursor with previously obtained fragments to achieve improved characterization of the target form by an average of 42 orders of magnitude in confidence. When HCD fragmentation optimization was applied to intact proteins ions, there was an 18.5 order of magnitude gain in confidence. These improved metrics set the stage for increased proteome coverage and characterization of higher order organisms in the future for sharply improved control over MS instruments in a project- and lab-wide context. PMID:24400813

  3. Autopilot: an online data acquisition control system for the enhanced high-throughput characterization of intact proteins.

    PubMed

    Durbin, Kenneth R; Fellers, Ryan T; Ntai, Ioanna; Kelleher, Neil L; Compton, Philip D

    2014-02-04

    The ability to study organisms by direct analysis of their proteomes without digestion via mass spectrometry has benefited greatly from recent advances in separation techniques, instrumentation, and bioinformatics. However, improvements to data acquisition logic have lagged in comparison. Past workflows for Top Down Proteomics (TDPs) have focused on high throughput at the expense of maximal protein coverage and characterization. This mode of data acquisition has led to enormous overlap in the identification of highly abundant proteins in subsequent LC-MS injections. Furthermore, a wealth of data is left underutilized by analyzing each newly targeted species as unique, rather than as part of a collection of fragmentation events on a distinct proteoform. Here, we present a major advance in software for acquisition of TDP data that incorporates a fully automated workflow able to detect intact masses, guide fragmentation to achieve maximal identification and characterization of intact protein species, and perform database search online to yield real-time protein identifications. On Pseudomonas aeruginosa, the software combines fragmentation events of the same precursor with previously obtained fragments to achieve improved characterization of the target form by an average of 42 orders of magnitude in confidence. When HCD fragmentation optimization was applied to intact proteins ions, there was an 18.5 order of magnitude gain in confidence. These improved metrics set the stage for increased proteome coverage and characterization of higher order organisms in the future for sharply improved control over MS instruments in a project- and lab-wide context.

  4. Complementary LC-MS/MS-Based N-Glycan, N-Glycopeptide, and Intact N-Glycoprotein Profiling Reveals Unconventional Asn71-Glycosylation of Human Neutrophil Cathepsin G

    PubMed Central

    Loke, Ian; Packer, Nicolle H.; Thaysen-Andersen, Morten

    2015-01-01

    Neutrophil cathepsin G (nCG) is a central serine protease in the human innate immune system, but the importance of its N-glycosylation remains largely undescribed. To facilitate such investigations, we here use complementary LC-MS/MS-based N-glycan, N-glycopeptide, and intact glycoprotein profiling to accurately establish the micro- and macro-heterogeneity of nCG from healthy individuals. The fully occupied Asn71 carried unconventional N-glycosylation consisting of truncated chitobiose core (GlcNAcβ: 55.2%; Fucα1,6GlcNAcβ: 22.7%), paucimannosidic N-glycans (Manβ1,4GlcNAcβ1,4GlcNAcβ: 10.6%; Manβ1,4GlcNAcβ1,4(Fucα1,6)GlcNAcβ: 7.9%; Manα1,6Manβ1,4GlcNAcβ1,4GlcNAcβ: 3.7%, trace level of Manα1,6Manβ1,4GlcNAcβ1,4(Fucα1,6)GlcNAcβ), and trace levels of monoantennary α2,6- and α2,3-sialylated complex N-glycans. High-resolution/mass accuracy LC-MS profiling of intact nCG confirmed the Asn71-glycoprofile and identified two C-terminal truncation variants at Arg243 (57.8%) and Ser244 (42.2%), both displaying oxidation of solvent-accessible Met152. Asn71 appeared proximal (~19 Å) to the active site of nCG, but due to the truncated nature of Asn71-glycans (~5–17 Å) we questioned their direct modulation of the proteolytic activity of the protein. This work highlights the continued requirement of using complementary technologies to accurately profile even relatively simple glycoproteins and illustrates important challenges associated with the analysis of unconventional protein N-glycosylation. Importantly, this study now facilitates investigation of the functional role of nCG Asn71-glycosylation. PMID:26274980

  5. Recombinant chymosin used for exact and complete removal of a prochymosin derived fusion tag releasing intact native target protein

    PubMed Central

    Justesen, Sune F L; Lamberth, Kasper; Nielsen, Lise-Lotte B; Schafer-Nielsen, Claus; Buus, Søren

    2009-01-01

    Fusion tags add desirable properties to recombinant proteins, but they are not necessarily acceptable in the final products. Ideally, fusion tags should be removed releasing the intact native protein with no trace of the tag. Unique endoproteinases with the ability to cleave outside their own recognition sequence can potentially cleave at the boundary of any native protein. Chymosin was recently shown to cleave a pro-chymosin derived fusion tag releasing native target proteins. In our hands, however, not all proteins are chymosin-resistant under the acidic cleavage conditions (pH 4.5) used in this system. Here, we have modified the pro-chymosin fusion tag and demonstrated that chymosin can remove this tag at more neutral pH (pH 6.2); conditions, that are less prone to compromise the integrity of target proteins. Chymosin was successfully used to produce intact native target protein both at the level of small and large-scale preparations. Using short peptide substrates, we further examined the influence of P1′ amino acid (the N-terminus of the native target protein) and found that chymosin accepts many different, although not all, amino acids. We conclude that chymosin has several appealing characteristics for the exact removal of fusion tags. It is readily available in highly purified recombinant versions approved by the FDA for preparation of food for human consumption. We suggest that one should consider extending the use of chymosin to the preparation of pharmaceutical proteins. PMID:19388053

  6. Intact subepidermal nerve fibers mediate mechanical hypersensitivity via the activation of protein kinase C gamma in spared nerve injury

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Miau-Hwa; Yang, Ming-Ling; Youn, Su-Chung; Tseng, To-Jung

    2016-01-01

    Background Spared nerve injury is an important neuropathic pain model for investigating the role of intact primary afferents in the skin on pain hypersensitivity. However, potential cellular mechanisms remain poorly understood. In phosphoinositide-3 kinase pathway, pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 1 (PDK1) participates in the regulation of neuronal plasticity for central sensitization. The downstream cascades of PDK1 include: (1) protein kinase C gamma (PKCγ) controls the trafficking and phosphorylation of ionotropic glutamate receptor; (2) protein kinase B (Akt)/the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling is responsible for local protein synthesis. Under these statements, we therefore hypothesized that an increase of PKCγ activation and mTOR-dependent PKCγ synthesis in intact primary afferents after SNI might contribute to pain hypersensitivity. Results The variants of spared nerve injury were performed in Sprague-Dawley rats by transecting any two of the three branches of the sciatic nerve, leaving only one branch intact. Following SNIt (spared tibial branch), mechanical hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia, but not thermal hyperalgesia, were significantly induced. In the first footpad, normal epidermal innervations were verified by the protein gene product 9.5 (PGP9.5)- and growth-associated protein 43 (GAP43)-immunoreactive (IR) intraepidermal nerve fibers (IENFs) densities. Furthermore, the rapid increases of phospho-PKCγ- and phospho-mTOR-IR subepidermal nerve fibers (SENFs) areas were distinct gathered from the results of PGP9.5-, GAP43-, and neurofilament 200 (NF200)-IR SENFs areas. The efficacy of PKC inhibitor (GF 109203X) or mTOR complex 1 inhibitor (rapamycin) for attenuating mechanical hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia by intraplantar injection was dose-dependent. Conclusions From results obtained in this study, we strongly recommend that the intact SENFs persistently increase PKCγ activation and mTOR-dependent PKCγ synthesis participate

  7. Improved separation of fluorogenic derivatized intact proteins with high resolution and efficiency using a reversed-phase liquid chromatographic system.

    PubMed

    Ichibangase, Tomoko; Nakata, Katsunori; Imai, Kazuhiro

    2014-06-01

    Although the efficient separation of intact protein mixtures is extremely difficult, reversed-phase chromatography is an important technique for performing quantitative, accurate and reproducible proteomics analyses. Here, we show that, despite the operating constraints of conventional high-performance liquid chromatography, such as column temperature, operating pressure and separation time, comprehensive separation of fluorogenic derivatized intact proteins could be achieved with high resolution and separation efficiency. First, amylin was chosen as a model peptide and used to estimate the separation efficiency with respect to column temperature and flow rate, as indicated by peak capacity. Then, an extract of human primary hepatocytes was used to model complex component mixtures and the separation conditions were optimized. The effects of mobile-phase pH, the separation time and the column length were also investigated. Consequently, more than 890 peaks could be separated efficiently in the extract, which is 1.5-fold greater than when using conventional conditions. Finally, it was demonstrated that both longer separation time and column length contributed greatly to the effective separation of the protein mixture. These results are expected to provide insights into the separation of intact proteins.

  8. Ingestion of a protein hydrolysate is accompanied by an accelerated in vivo digestion and absorption rate when compared with its intact protein.

    PubMed

    Koopman, René; Crombach, Nico; Gijsen, Annemie P; Walrand, Stéphane; Fauquant, Jacques; Kies, Arie K; Lemosquet, Sophie; Saris, Wim H M; Boirie, Yves; van Loon, Luc J C

    2009-07-01

    It has been suggested that a protein hydrolysate, as opposed to its intact protein, is more easily digested and absorbed from the gut, which results in greater plasma amino acid availability and a greater muscle protein synthetic response. We aimed to compare dietary protein digestion and absorption kinetics and the subsequent muscle protein synthetic response to the ingestion of a single bolus of protein hydrolysate compared with its intact protein in vivo in humans. Ten elderly men (mean +/- SEM age: 64 +/- 1 y) were randomly assigned to a crossover experiment that involved 2 treatments in which the subjects consumed a 35-g bolus of specifically produced L-[1-(13)C]phenylalanine-labeled intact casein (CAS) or hydrolyzed casein (CASH). Blood and muscle-tissue samples were collected to assess the appearance rate of dietary protein-derived phenylalanine in the circulation and subsequent muscle protein fractional synthetic rate over a 6-h postprandial period. The mean (+/-SEM) exogenous phenylalanine appearance rate was 27 +/- 6% higher after ingestion of CASH than after ingestion of CAS (P < 0.001). Splanchnic extraction was significantly lower in CASH compared with CAS treatment (P < 0.01). Plasma amino acid concentrations increased to a greater extent (25-50%) after the ingestion of CASH than after the ingestion of CAS (P < 0.01). Muscle protein synthesis rates averaged 0.054 +/- 0.004% and 0.068 +/- 0.006%/h in the CAS and CASH treatments, respectively (P = 0.10). Ingestion of a protein hydrolysate, as opposed to its intact protein, accelerates protein digestion and absorption from the gut, augments postprandial amino acid availability, and tends to increase the incorporation rate of dietary amino acids into skeletal muscle protein.

  9. Separation of peptides and intact proteins by electrostatic repulsion reversed phase liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Gritti, Fabrice; Guiochon, Georges

    2014-12-29

    A new brand of BEH-C18 hybrid particles chemically bonded to a leash carrying an amine group permits the implementation of electrostatic repulsive interactions chromatography. Using columns packed with this material, the influence of the concentration of positive charges bonded to the BEH-C18 surface on the overloaded band profiles of a few positively charged peptides and proteins was investigated in the gradient elution mode. Three columns packed with endcapped BEH-C18 particles bonded with three different surface-charge densities (LOW, MEDIUM and HIGH) were used and compared with those provided by a column packed with non-doped, endcapped BEH-C18 particles. The surface concentrations of fixed charges in the LOW, MEDIUM and HIGH columns were estimated at 0.029, 0.050, and 0.064μmol/m(2), for example, about two orders of magnitude smaller than the surface density of bonded C18 chains (2.1μmol/m(2)). Three different mobile phase additives (0.1% v/v of trifluoro-acetic, phosphoric, and formic acid) were used to optimize the purification levels of proteins under different loading conditions. The weak ion-pairing ions (formate and phosphate) generate smaller retention but broader, more fronting band profiles than those eluted with a stronger ion-pairing ion (trifluoroactate). This effect is worse in the presence of fixed charges at the surface of the BEH-C18 particles. This was explained by an enhanced anti-Langmuirian adsorption behavior of the charged proteins in the presence of fixed surface charges. As the protein concentration increases in the bulk, so does the internal ionic strength, the electrostatic repulsive interactions weaken, and retention increases. Band fronting is mostly eliminated by replacing weak ion-pairing acids with TFA with which the adsorption isotherm remains weakly langmuirian. Faster but still complete gradient separation of insulin and myoglobin were achieved with the HIGH column than with the reference neutral column, despite a measurable

  10. Proteomic profiling of hempseed proteins from Cheungsam.

    PubMed

    Park, Seul-Ki; Seo, Jong-Bok; Lee, Mi-Young

    2012-02-01

    Proteomic profiling of hempseed proteins from a non-drug type of industrial hemp (Cannabis sativa L.), Cheungsam, was conducted using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry. A total of 1102 protein spots were resolved on pH 3-10 immobilized pH gradient strips, and 168 unique protein spots were identified. The proteins were categorized based on function, including involvement in energy regulation (23%), metabolism (18%), stress response (16%), unclassified (12%), cytoskeleton (11%), binding function (5%), and protein synthesis (3%). These proteins might have important biological functions in hempseed, such as germination, storage, or development. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Serum Protein Profile Alterations in Hemodialysis Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, G A; Davies, R W; Choi, M W; Perkins, J; Turteltaub, K W; McCutchen-Maloney, S L; Langlois, R G; Curzi, M P; Trebes, J E; Fitch, J P; Dalmasso, E A; Colston, B W; Ying, Y; Chromy, B A

    2003-11-18

    Background: Serum protein profiling patterns can reflect the pathological state of a patient and therefore may be useful for clinical diagnostics. Here, we present results from a pilot study of proteomic expression patterns in hemodialysis patients designed to evaluate the range of serum proteomic alterations in this population. Methods: Surface-Enhanced Laser Desorption/Ionization Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (SELDI-TOFMS) was used to analyze serum obtained from patients on periodic hemodialysis treatment and healthy controls. Serum samples from patients and controls were first fractionated into six eluants on a strong anion exchange column, followed by application to four array chemistries representing cation exchange, anion exchange, metal affinity and hydrophobic surfaces. A total of 144 SELDI-TOF-MS spectra were obtained from each serum sample. Results: The overall profiles of the patient and control samples were consistent and reproducible. However, 30 well-defined protein differences were observed; 15 proteins were elevated and 15 were decreased in patients compared to controls. Serum from one patient exhibited novel protein peaks suggesting possible additional changes due to a secondary disease process. Conclusion: SELDI-TOF-MS demonstrated dramatic serum protein profile differences between patients and controls. Similarity in protein profiles among dialysis patients suggests that patient physiological responses to end-stage renal disease and/or dialysis therapy have a major effect on serum protein profiles.

  12. Purification and functional reconstitution of intact ral-binding Gtpase activating protein, RLIP76, in artificial liposomes.

    PubMed

    Singhal, S S; Singhal, J; Cheng, J; Pikuła, S; Sharma, R; Zimniak, P; Awasthi, Y C; Awasthi, S

    2001-01-01

    We have recently shown that RLIP76, a ral-binding GTPase activating protein, mediates ATP-dependent transport of glutathione-conjugates (GS-E) and doxorubicin (DOX) (S. Awasthi et al., Biochemistry 39,9327,2000). Transport function of RLIP76 was found to be intact despite considerable proteolytic fragmentation in preparations used for those studies, suggesting either that the residual intact RLIP76 was responsible for transport activity, or that the transport activity could be reconstituted by fragments of RLIP76. If the former were true, intact RLIP76 would have a much higher specific activity for ATP-hydrolysis than the fragmented protein. We have addressed this question by comparing transport properties of recombinant RLIP76 and human erythrocyte membrane RLIP76 purified in buffers treated with either 100 or 500 microM serine protease inhibitor, PMSF. The purity and identity of recombinant and human erythrocyte RLIP76 was established by SDS/PAGE and Western-blot analysis. These studies confirmed the origin of the 38 kDa protein, previously referred to as DNP-SG ATPase, from RLIP76. Higher PMSF concentration resulted in lower yield of the 38 kDa band and higher yield of intact RLIP76 from both human and recombinant source. In contrast, the substrate-stimulated ATPase activity in presence of DNP-SG, doxorubicin, daunorubicin, or colchicine were unaffected by increased PMSF; similarly, ATP-dependent transport of doxorubicin in proteoliposomes reconstituted with RLIP76 was unaffected by higher PMSF. These results indicated that limited proteolysis by serine proteases does not abrogate the transport function of RLIP76. Comparison of transport kinetics for daunorubicin between recombinant vs human erythrocyte RLIP76 revealed higher specific activity of transport for tissue purified RLIP76, indicating that additional factors present in tissue purified RLIP76 can modulate its transport activity.

  13. Spatiotemporal expression profiling of proteins in rat sciatic nerve regeneration using reverse phase protein arrays

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Protein expression profiles throughout 28 days of peripheral nerve regeneration were characterized using an established rat sciatic nerve transection injury model. Reverse phase protein microarrays were used to identify the spatial and temporal expression profile of multiple proteins implicated in peripheral nerve regeneration including growth factors, extracellular matrix proteins, and proteins involved in adhesion and migration. This high-throughput approach enabled the simultaneous analysis of 3,360 samples on a nitrocellulose-coated slide. Results The extracellular matrix proteins collagen I and III, laminin gamma-1, fibronectin, nidogen and versican displayed an early increase in protein levels in the guide and proximal sections of the regenerating nerve with levels at or above the baseline expression of intact nerve by the end of the 28 day experimental course. The 28 day protein levels were also at or above baseline in the distal segment however an early increase was only noted for laminin, nidogen, and fibronectin. While the level of epidermal growth factor, ciliary neurotrophic factor and fibroblast growth factor-1 and -2 increased throughout the experimental course in the proximal and distal segments, nerve growth factor only increased in the distal segment and fibroblast growth factor-1 and -2 and nerve growth factor were the only proteins in that group to show an early increase in the guide contents. As expected, several proteins involved in cell adhesion and motility; namely focal adhesion kinase, N-cadherin and β-catenin increased earlier in the proximal and distal segments than in the guide contents reflecting the relatively acellular matrix of the early regenerate. Conclusions In this study we identified changes in expression of multiple proteins over time linked to regeneration of the rat sciatic nerve both demonstrating the utility of reverse phase protein arrays in nerve regeneration research and revealing a detailed, composite

  14. Illuminating parasite protein production by ribosome profiling

    PubMed Central

    Parsons, Marilyn; Myler, Peter J.

    2016-01-01

    While technologies for global enumeration of transcript abundance are well-developed, those that assess protein abundance require tailoring to penetrate to low abundance proteins. Ribosome profiling circumvents this challenge by measuring global protein production via sequencing small mRNA fragments protected by the assembled ribosome. This powerful approach is now being applied to protozoan parasites, including trypanosomes and Plasmodium. It has been used to identify new protein coding sequences (CDSs) and clarify the boundaries of previously annotated CDSs in Trypanosoma brucei. Ribosome profiling has demonstrated that translation efficiencies vary widely between genes and, for trypanosomes at least, for the same gene across stages. The ribosomal proteins are themselves subjected to translational control, suggesting a means of reinforcing global translational regulation. PMID:27061497

  15. Cell-penetrating peptides meditated encapsulation of protein therapeutics into intact red blood cells and its application.

    PubMed

    He, Huining; Ye, Junxiao; Wang, Yinsong; Liu, Quan; Chung, Hee Sun; Kwon, Young Min; Shin, Meong Cheol; Lee, Kyuri; Yang, Victor C

    2014-02-28

    Red blood cells (RBCs) based drug carrier appears to be the most appealing for protein drugs due to their unmatched biocompatability, biodegradability, and long lifespan in the circulation. Numerous methods for encapsulating protein drugs into RBCs were developed, however, most of them induce partial disruption of the cell membrane, resulting in irreversible alterations in both physical and chemical properties of RBCs. Herein, we introduce a novel method for encapsulating proteins into intact RBCs, which was meditated by a cell penetrating peptide (CPP) developed in our lab-low molecular weight protamine (LMWP). l-asparaginase, one of the primary drugs used in treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), was chosen as a model protein to illustrate the encapsulation into erythrocytes mediated by CPPs. In addition current treatment of ALL using different l-asparaginase delivery and encapsulation methods as well as their associated problems were also reviewed.

  16. Top-down mass spectrometry of intact membrane protein complexes reveals oligomeric state and sequence information in a single experiment

    PubMed Central

    Konijnenberg, Albert; Bannwarth, Ludovic; Yilmaz, Duygu; Koçer, Armağan; Venien-Bryan, Catherine; Sobott, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Here we study the intact stoichiometry and top-down fragmentation behavior of three integral membrane proteins which were natively reconstituted into detergent micelles: the mechano-sensitive ion channel of large conductance (MscL), the Kirbac potassium channel and the p7 viroporin from the hepatitis C virus. By releasing the proteins under nondenaturing conditions inside the mass spectrometer, we obtained their oligomeric sizes. Increasing the ion activation (collision energy) causes unfolding and subsequent ejection of a highly charged monomer from the membrane protein complexes. Further increase of the ion activation then causes collision-induced dissociation (CID) of the ejected monomers, with fragments observed which were predominantly found to stem from membrane-embedded regions. These experiments show how in a single experiment, we can probe the relation between higher-order structure and protein sequence, by combining the native MS data with fragmentation obtained from top-down MS. PMID:25970171

  17. Cell-penetrating peptides meditated encapsulation of protein therapeutics into intact red blood cells and its application

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yinsong; Liu, Quan; Chung, Hee Sun; Kwon, Young Min; Shin, Meong Cheol; Lee, Kyuri; Yang, Victor C

    2014-01-01

    Red blood cells (RBCs) based drug carrier appears to be the most appealing for protein drugs due to their unmatched biocompatability, biodegradability, and long lifespan in the circulation. Numerous methods for encapsulating protein drugs into RBCs were developed, however, most of them induce partial disruption of the cell membrane, resulting in irreversible alterations in both physical and chemical properties of RBCs. Herein, we introduce a novel method for encapsulating proteins into intact RBCs, which was meditated by a cell penetrating peptide (CPP) developed in our lab—low molecular weight protamine (LMWP). L-asparaginase, one of the primary drugs used in treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), was chosen as a model protein to illustrate the encapsulation into erythrocytes mediated by CPPs. In addition current treatment of ALL using different L-asparaginase delivery and encapsulation methods as well as their associated problems were also reviewed. PMID:24374002

  18. Activity-Based Protein Profiling of Microbes

    SciTech Connect

    Sadler, Natalie C.; Wright, Aaron T.

    2015-02-01

    Activity-Based Protein Profiling (ABPP) in conjunction with multimodal characterization techniques has yielded impactful findings in microbiology, particularly in pathogen, bioenergy, drug discovery, and environmental research. Using small molecule chemical probes that react irreversibly with specific proteins or protein families in complex systems has provided insights in enzyme functions in central metabolic pathways, drug-protein interactions, and regulatory protein redox, for systems ranging from photoautotrophic cyanobacteria to mycobacteria, and combining live cell or cell extract ABPP with proteomics, molecular biology, modeling, and other techniques has greatly expanded our understanding of these systems. New opportunities for application of ABPP to microbial systems include: enhancing protein annotation, characterizing protein activities in myriad environments, and reveal signal transduction and regulatory mechanisms in microbial systems.

  19. Hydrolysed ovalbumin offers more effective preventive and therapeutic protection against egg allergy than the intact protein.

    PubMed

    Lozano-Ojalvo, D; Pérez-Rodríguez, L; Pablos-Tanarro, A; Molina, E; López-Fandiño, R

    2017-08-01

    The application of specific immunotherapy to stimulate oral tolerance towards food allergens is hampered by the high frequency of adverse side-effects and the excessive duration of the treatments. In this work, a hydrolysate of ovalbumin with pepsin (OP), selected for its low IgE reactivity and Th2-stimulating capacity, was assayed for its ability to prevent and treat allergy to egg white (EW). As a first step, the safety of OP, in terms of the absence of sensitizing and eliciting potential, was evaluated in BALB/c mice. Then, its suitability for prophylactic and therapeutic applications was compared with that of the intact allergen, paying attention to the molecular and cellular mechanisms involved in the control of the allergic process. To this aim, IgE, IgG1, IgG2a and IgA levels, allergic reactions, expression of genes related to Th1, Th2, Th17 and Treg responses, dendritic and T cell populations were assessed in intestinal tissues and spleens of EW-allergic mice, either untreated or treated with intact ovalbumin (OVA) or OP. The hydrolysate of OVA with pepsin was hypoallergenic, lacked sensitizing potential and offered preventive and therapeutic protection against allergy to EW through the induction of Treg cells and the up-regulation of TGF-β, IL-10, IL-17, Foxp3 and RORγt in intestinal tissues. This restrained the expression of GATA3 and the differentiation of Th2 cells, leading to low cytokine responses following ex vivo spleen cell stimulation. As compared with intact OVA, OP was more effective against sensitization. In addition, in the therapeutic setting, OP provided quicker desensitization that lasted for at least 3 weeks after discontinuation of the therapy. This study provides evidence for the superior role of hydrolysed, as compared to intact allergens, in the prevention of allergy development and in the promotion of long-term desensitization, as well as of intermolecular tolerance. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Inducible DNA-protein interactions of the murine kappa immunoglobulin enhancer in intact cells: comparison with in vitro interactions.

    PubMed Central

    Hromas, R; Pauli, U; Marcuzzi, A; Lafrenz, D; Nick, H; Stein, J; Stein, G; Van Ness, B

    1988-01-01

    The large intron of the kappa immunoglobulin gene contains a cis-acting enhancer element, which is important in the tissue-specific expression of the gene. We have confirmed the binding activity of a sequence-specific factor present in lymphoid extracts derived from cell lines expressing, or induced to express, the kappa gene. We have extended these studies to show the binding activity is present in normal activated splenic B cells as well as lambda producing cells, and have demonstrated by DNAse footprint analysis full protection of a sequence containing the 11 bp homology to the SV-40 core enhancer. We have compared these in vitro binding studies with an analysis of protein-DNA interactions in intact murine cell lines using genomic sequencing techniques. We demonstrate significant alterations in DMS reactivity of DNA in the murine 70Z/3 cell line after it is induced to kappa expression. These alterations occur at guanine residues which are part of the the 11 bp core sequence, and are identical to those observed in cells constitutively expressing kappa. This provides direct evidence for the induced binding of the tissue specific factor to intact chromatin. In intact chromatin we also observed significant alteration in the reactivity of a guanine, 3' of the core sequence, which is part of a potential secondary DNA structure, and protection of four residues that are part of a region homologous to the heavy chain enhancer. Images PMID:2830597

  1. Direct Imaging of Protein Organization in an Intact Bacterial Organelle Using High-Resolution Atomic Force Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The function of bioenergetic membranes is strongly influenced by the spatial arrangement of their constituent membrane proteins. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) can be used to probe protein organization at high resolution, allowing individual proteins to be identified. However, previous AFM studies of biological membranes have typically required that curved membranes are ruptured and flattened during sample preparation, with the possibility of disruption of the native protein arrangement or loss of proteins. Imaging native, curved membranes requires minimal tip–sample interaction in both lateral and vertical directions. Here, long-range tip–sample interactions are reduced by optimizing the imaging buffer. Tapping mode AFM with high-resonance-frequency small and soft cantilevers, in combination with a high-speed AFM, reduces the forces due to feedback error and enables application of an average imaging force of tens of piconewtons. Using this approach, we have imaged the membrane organization of intact vesicular bacterial photosynthetic “organelles”, chromatophores. Despite the highly curved nature of the chromatophore membrane and lack of direct support, the resolution was sufficient to identify the photosystem complexes and quantify their arrangement in the native state. Successive imaging showed the proteins remain surprisingly static, with minimal rotation or translation over several-minute time scales. High-order assemblies of RC-LH1-PufX complexes are observed, and intact ATPases are successfully imaged. The methods developed here are likely to be applicable to a broad range of protein-rich vesicles or curved membrane systems, which are an almost ubiquitous feature of native organelles. PMID:28114766

  2. Evolution of organelle-associated protein profiling.

    PubMed

    Yan, Wei; Aebersold, Ruedi; Raines, Elaine W

    2009-02-15

    Identification of the protein constituents of cell organelles forms the basis for studies to define the roles of specific proteins in organelle structure and functions. Over the past decade, the use of mass spectrometry-based proteomics has dissected various organelles and allowed the association of many novel proteins with particular organelles. This review chronicles the evolution of organelle proteomics technology, and discusses how many limitations, such as organelle heterogeneity and purity, can be avoided with recently developed quantitative profiling approaches. Although many challenges remain, quantitative profiling of organelles holds the promise to begin to address the complex and dynamic shuttling of proteins among organelles that will be critical for application of this advanced technology to disease-based changes in organelle function.

  3. Fluorescent-Protein Stabilization and High-Resolution Imaging of Cleared, Intact Mouse Brains

    PubMed Central

    Schwarz, Martin K.; Scherbarth, Annemarie; Sprengel, Rolf; Engelhardt, Johann; Theer, Patrick; Giese, Guenter

    2015-01-01

    In order to observe and quantify long-range neuronal connections in intact mouse brain by light microscopy, it is first necessary to clear the brain, thus suppressing refractive-index variations. Here we describe a method that clears the brain and preserves the signal from proteinaceous fluorophores using a pH-adjusted non-aqueous index-matching medium. Successful clearing is enabled through the use of either 1-propanol or tert-butanol during dehydration whilst maintaining a basic pH. We show that high-resolution fluorescence imaging of entire, structurally intact juvenile and adult mouse brains is possible at subcellular resolution, even following many months in clearing solution. We also show that axonal long-range projections that are EGFP-labelled by modified Rabies virus can be imaged throughout the brain using a purpose-built light-sheet fluorescence microscope. To demonstrate the viability of the technique, we determined a detailed map of the monosynaptic projections onto a target cell population in the lateral entorhinal cortex. This example demonstrates that our method permits the quantification of whole-brain connectivity patterns at the subcellular level in the uncut brain. PMID:25993380

  4. Comparison of Tobacco Host Cell Protein Removal Methods by Blanching Intact Plants or by Heat Treatment of Extracts.

    PubMed

    Buyel, Johannes F; Hubbuch, Jürgen; Fischer, Rainer

    2016-08-08

    Plants not only provide food, feed and raw materials for humans, but have also been developed as an economical production system for biopharmaceutical proteins, such as antibodies, vaccine candidates and enzymes. These must be purified from the plant biomass but chromatography steps are hindered by the high concentrations of host cell proteins (HCPs) in plant extracts. However, most HCPs irreversibly aggregate at temperatures above 60 °C facilitating subsequent purification of the target protein. Here, three methods are presented to achieve the heat precipitation of tobacco HCPs in either intact leaves or extracts. The blanching of intact leaves can easily be incorporated into existing processes but may have a negative impact on subsequent filtration steps. The opposite is true for heat precipitation of leaf extracts in a stirred vessel, which can improve the performance of downstream operations albeit with major changes in process equipment design, such as homogenizer geometry. Finally, a heat exchanger setup is well characterized in terms of heat transfer conditions and easy to scale, but cleaning can be difficult and there may be a negative impact on filter capacity. The design-of-experiments approach can be used to identify the most relevant process parameters affecting HCP removal and product recovery. This facilitates the application of each method in other expression platforms and the identification of the most suitable method for a given purification strategy.

  5. [Optimization of two-dimensional high performance liquid chromatographic columns for highly efficient separation of intact proteins].

    PubMed

    Hong, Guangfeng; Gao, Mingxia; Yan, Guoquan; Guan, Xia; Tao, Qian; Zhang, Xiangmin

    2010-02-01

    In order to optimize two-dimensional liquid chromatographic (2D-LC) columns for highly efficient separation of proteins, several liquid chromatographic columns were investigated and evaluated. Weak anion-exchange (WAX) column was chosen as the first dimension because of its extensive protein separation power. By comparison of different WAX chromatographic columns for human liver protein separation, TSKgel DEAE-5PW column was selected as the first dimension of a 2D-LC system. For the second dimension, ten typical reversed-phase (RP) LC columns (250 mm x 4.6 mm, 5 microm, 30 nm) were investigated and evaluated. Their silica based RP stationary phases were butyl (C4), octyl (C8) or octadecyl (C18). To evaluate the retention behavior and non-specific protein adsorption ability of these ten columns, four neutral compounds (uracil, nitrobenzene, naphthalene and fluorene) and three standard proteins (cytochrome C, myoglobin and albumin from chicken egg white) were adopted and separated by RPLC. Meantime, WAX fractions were used to investigate the separation ability of different alkyl-bonded silica stationary phase columns for complex protein samples. By comparison of column separation efficiency, adsorption of intact proteins and sample analysis, Jupiter 300 C4 column was finally employed for its excellent separation ability. Optimization of WAX and RPLC columns offers reliable foundation for the construction of 2D-LC protein separation systems.

  6. Torsion Profiling of Proteins Using Magnetic Particles

    PubMed Central

    van Reenen, A.; Gutiérrez-Mejía, F.; van IJzendoorn, L.J.; Prins, M.W.J.

    2013-01-01

    We report a method to profile the torsional spring properties of proteins as a function of the angle of rotation. The torque is applied by superparamagnetic particles and has been calibrated while taking account of the magnetization dynamics of the particles. We record and compare the torsional profiles of single Protein G-Immunoglobulin G (IgG) and IgG-IgG complexes, sandwiched between a substrate and a superparamagnetic particle, for torques in the range between 0.5 × 103 and 5 × 103 pN·nm. Both molecular systems show torsional stiffening for increasing rotation angle, but the elastic and inelastic torsion stiffnesses are remarkably different. We interpret the results in terms of the structural properties of the molecules. The torsion profiling technique opens new dimensions for research on biomolecular characterization and for research on bio-nanomechanical structure-function relationships. PMID:23473490

  7. Measurement of intact insulin-like growth factor-binding protein-3 in human plasma using a ligand immunofunctional assay.

    PubMed

    Lassarre, C; Binoux, M

    2001-03-01

    Limited proteolysis of insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3) is a fundamental mechanism in the regulation of IGF-I bioavailability in the bloodstream. Its measurement by Western immunoblotting provides only semiquantitative estimation. We have developed a ligand immunofunctional assay (LIFA) for quantifying human (h) intact IGFBP-3 in biological fluids. IGFBP-bound IGFs are dissociated and separated by acid pH ultrafiltration, and a monoclonal antibody specific to the first 160 amino acids of IGFBP-3 is used to capture hIGFBP-3 in a solid-phase assay. The complex is then incubated with (125)I-IGF-I, which binds to intact IGFBP-3 but not to its proteolytic fragments. Binding specificity was demonstrated in competition experiments with unlabeled IGF. Nonspecific binding was 1.4%. The fragments comprising residues 1-160 and 1-95 of recombinant hIGFBP-3 [corresponding to the major proteolytic fragments of approximately 30 kDa and (glycosylated) 20 or (nonglycosylated) 16 kDa detected in serum by Western immunoblotting, respectively] fail to bind (125)I-IGF-I when complexed with the monoclonal antibody. Similarly, no binding of (125)I-IGF-I was obtained in the LIFA when applied to plasmas from pregnant women during the final 3 months of pregnancy, where the characteristic 42- to 39-kDa doublet of intact IGFBP-3 is undetectable. The standard curve was established using a pool of plasmas (EDTA) from healthy adults, for which standardization with glycosylated recombinant hIGFBP-3 yielded an intact IGFBP-3 content of 2 microg/mL. The dynamic range of the LIFA was 0.50-3.75 microL equivalent of the plasma pool in a total volume of 300 microL per assay tube, with a sensitivity threshold of approximately 1 ng intact IGFBP-3. Unknown plasma samples were studied at three concentrations. Intra- and interassay variations were 3.6% and 4%, respectively. In 31 healthy adults, the mean plasma concentration of intact IGFBP-3 was 2.24 +/- 0.08 (SEM) mg/L, and that of

  8. A new method for the experimental heating of intact soil profiles for application to climate change experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, Paul J; Childs, Kenneth W; Wullschleger, Stan D; Riggs, Jeffery S; Thomas, Warren Kyle; Todd Jr, Donald E; Warren, Jeffrey

    2011-01-01

    systems to address uncertainties in process-level responses of microbial, plant, and animal communities in whole, intact ecosystems using this new heating method that capture expected future warming and temperature dynamics throughout the soil profile.

  9. Fast top-down intact protein characterization with capillary zone electrophoresis-electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Liangliang; Knierman, Michael D.; Zhu, Guijie; Dovichi, Norman J.

    2013-01-01

    Capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE)-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry (ESI-MS/MS) was applied for rapid top-down intact protein characterization. A mixture containing four model proteins (cytochrome c, myoglobin, bovine serum albumin (BSA) and beta casein) was used as the sample. The CZE-ESI-MS system was first evaluated with the mixture. The four model proteins and five impurities were baseline separated within 12 min. The limits of detection (s/n = 3) of the four model proteins ranged from 20 amole (cytochrome c) to 800 amole (BSA). The relative standard deviations of migration time and intensity for the four model proteins were less than 3% and 30%, respectively, in quintuplicate runs. CZE-ESI-MS/MS was then applied for top-down characterization of the mixture. Three of the model proteins (all except BSA) and an impurity (bovine transthyretin) were confidently identified by database searching of the acquired tandem spectra from protein fragmentation. Modifications including phosphorylation, N-terminal acetylation, and heme group binding were identified. PMID:23692435

  10. Whole intact rapeseeds or sunflower oil in high-forage or high-concentrate diets affects milk yield, milk composition, and mammary gene expression profile in goats.

    PubMed

    Ollier, S; Leroux, C; de la Foye, A; Bernard, L; Rouel, J; Chilliard, Y

    2009-11-01

    This study aimed to ascertain the response of goat mammary metabolic pathways to concentrate and lipid feeding in relation to milk fatty acid (FA) composition and secretion. Sixteen midlactation multiparous goats received diets differing in forage-to-concentrate ratio [high forage (HF) 64:36, and low forage (LF) 43:57] supplemented or not with lipids [HF with 130 g/d of oil from whole intact rapeseeds (RS) and LF with 130 g/d of sunflower oil (SO)] in a 4 x 4 Latin square design. Milk yield, milk composition, FA profile, and FA secretion were measured, as well as the expression profiles of key genes in mammary metabolism and of 8,382 genes, using a bovine oligonucleotide microarray. After 3 wk of treatment, milk, lactose, and protein yields were lower with HF-RS than with the other diets, whereas treatment had no effect on milk protein content. Milk fat content was higher with the HF-RS and LF-SO diets than with the HF and LF diets, and SO supplementation increased milk fat yield compared with the LF diet. Decreasing the forage-to-concentrate ratio from 64:36 to 43:57 had a limited effect on goat milk FA concentrations and secretions. Supplementing the LF diet with SO changed almost all the FA concentrations, including decreases in medium-chain saturated FA and large increases in trans C18:1 and C18:2 isomers (particularly trans-11 C18:1 and cis-9, trans-11 conjugated linoleic acid), without significant changes in C18:0 and cis-9 C18:1, whereas supplementing the HF diet with RS led to a strong decrease in short- and medium-chain saturated FA and a very strong increase in C18:0 and cis-9 C18:1, without significant changes in trans C18:1 and conjugated linoleic acid. Despite the decreases in milk lactose and protein yields observed with HF-RS, and despite the decrease in milk medium-chain FA and the increase in C18 FA secretion with RS or SO supplementation, none of the dietary treatments had any effect on mammary mRNA expression of the key genes involved in lactose

  11. Quantitation and Identification of Intact Major Milk Proteins for High-Throughput LC-ESI-Q-TOF MS Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Vincent, Delphine; Elkins, Aaron; Condina, Mark R.; Ezernieks, Vilnis; Rochfort, Simone

    2016-01-01

    Cow’s milk is an important source of proteins in human nutrition. On average, cow’s milk contains 3.5% protein. The most abundant proteins in bovine milk are caseins and some of the whey proteins, namely beta-lactoglobulin, alpha-lactalbumin, and serum albumin. A number of allelic variants and post-translationally modified forms of these proteins have been identified. Their occurrence varies with breed, individuality, stage of lactation, and health and nutritional status of the animal. It is therefore essential to have reliable methods of detection and quantitation of these proteins. Traditionally, major milk proteins are quantified using liquid chromatography (LC) and ultra violet detection method. However, as these protein variants co-elute to some degree, another dimension of separation is beneficial to accurately measure their amounts. Mass spectrometry (MS) offers such a tool. In this study, we tested several RP-HPLC and MS parameters to optimise the analysis of intact bovine proteins from milk. From our tests, we developed an optimum method that includes a 20-28-40% phase B gradient with 0.02% TFA in both mobile phases, at 0.2 mL/min flow rate, using 75°C for the C8 column temperature, scanning every 3 sec over a 600–3000 m/z window. The optimisations were performed using external standards commercially purchased for which ionisation efficiency, linearity of calibration, LOD, LOQ, sensitivity, selectivity, precision, reproducibility, and mass accuracy were demonstrated. From the MS analysis, we can use extracted ion chromatograms (EICs) of specific ion series of known proteins and integrate peaks at defined retention time (RT) window for quantitation purposes. This optimum quantitative method was successfully applied to two bulk milk samples from different breeds, Holstein-Friesian and Jersey, to assess differences in protein variant levels. PMID:27749892

  12. Quantitation and Identification of Intact Major Milk Proteins for High-Throughput LC-ESI-Q-TOF MS Analyses.

    PubMed

    Vincent, Delphine; Elkins, Aaron; Condina, Mark R; Ezernieks, Vilnis; Rochfort, Simone

    2016-01-01

    Cow's milk is an important source of proteins in human nutrition. On average, cow's milk contains 3.5% protein. The most abundant proteins in bovine milk are caseins and some of the whey proteins, namely beta-lactoglobulin, alpha-lactalbumin, and serum albumin. A number of allelic variants and post-translationally modified forms of these proteins have been identified. Their occurrence varies with breed, individuality, stage of lactation, and health and nutritional status of the animal. It is therefore essential to have reliable methods of detection and quantitation of these proteins. Traditionally, major milk proteins are quantified using liquid chromatography (LC) and ultra violet detection method. However, as these protein variants co-elute to some degree, another dimension of separation is beneficial to accurately measure their amounts. Mass spectrometry (MS) offers such a tool. In this study, we tested several RP-HPLC and MS parameters to optimise the analysis of intact bovine proteins from milk. From our tests, we developed an optimum method that includes a 20-28-40% phase B gradient with 0.02% TFA in both mobile phases, at 0.2 mL/min flow rate, using 75°C for the C8 column temperature, scanning every 3 sec over a 600-3000 m/z window. The optimisations were performed using external standards commercially purchased for which ionisation efficiency, linearity of calibration, LOD, LOQ, sensitivity, selectivity, precision, reproducibility, and mass accuracy were demonstrated. From the MS analysis, we can use extracted ion chromatograms (EICs) of specific ion series of known proteins and integrate peaks at defined retention time (RT) window for quantitation purposes. This optimum quantitative method was successfully applied to two bulk milk samples from different breeds, Holstein-Friesian and Jersey, to assess differences in protein variant levels.

  13. Surfactant-free purification of membrane proteins with intact native membrane environment.

    PubMed

    Jamshad, Mohammed; Lin, Yu-Pin; Knowles, Timothy J; Parslow, Rosemary A; Harris, Craig; Wheatley, Mark; Poyner, David R; Bill, Roslyn M; Thomas, Owen R T; Overduin, Michael; Dafforn, Tim R

    2011-06-01

    In order to study the structure and function of a protein, it is generally required that the protein in question is purified away from all others. For soluble proteins, this process is greatly aided by the lack of any restriction on the free and independent diffusion of individual protein particles in three dimensions. This is not the case for membrane proteins, as the membrane itself forms a continuum that joins the proteins within the membrane with one another. It is therefore essential that the membrane is disrupted in order to allow separation and hence purification of membrane proteins. In the present review, we examine recent advances in the methods employed to separate membrane proteins before purification. These approaches move away from solubilization methods based on the use of small surfactants, which have been shown to suffer from significant practical problems. Instead, the present review focuses on methods that stem from the field of nanotechnology and use a range of reagents that fragment the membrane into nanometre-scale particles containing the protein complete with the local membrane environment. In particular, we examine a method employing the amphipathic polymer poly(styrene-co-maleic acid), which is able to reversibly encapsulate the membrane protein in a 10 nm disc-like structure ideally suited to purification and further biochemical study.

  14. Protein Aggregation Profile of the Bacterial Cytosol

    PubMed Central

    de Groot, Natalia S.; Ventura, Salvador

    2010-01-01

    Background Protein misfolding is usually deleterious for the cell, either as a consequence of the loss of protein function or the buildup of insoluble and toxic aggregates. The aggregation behavior of a given polypeptide is strongly influenced by the intrinsic properties encoded in its sequence. This has allowed the development of effective computational methods to predict protein aggregation propensity. Methodology/Principal Findings Here, we use the AGGRESCAN algorithm to approximate the aggregation profile of an experimental cytosolic Escherichia coli proteome. The analysis indicates that the aggregation propensity of bacterial proteins is associated with their length, conformation, location, function, and abundance. The data are consistent with the predictions of other algorithms on different theoretical proteomes. Conclusions/Significance Overall, the study suggests that the avoidance of protein aggregation in functional environments acts as a strong evolutionary constraint on polypeptide sequences in both prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms. PMID:20195530

  15. A rapid, simple method for the genetic discrimination of intact Arabidopsis thaliana mutant seeds using metabolic profiling by direct analysis in real-time mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Efficient high throughput screening systems of useful mutants are prerequisite for study of plant functional genomics and lots of application fields. Advance in such screening tools, thanks to the development of analytic instruments. Direct analysis in real-time (DART)-mass spectrometry (MS) by ionization of complex materials at atmospheric pressure is a rapid, simple, high-resolution analytical technique. Here we describe a rapid, simple method for the genetic discrimination of intact Arabidopsis thaliana mutant seeds using metabolic profiling by DART-MS. Results To determine whether this DART-MS combined by multivariate analysis can perform genetic discrimination based on global metabolic profiling, intact Arabidopsis thaliana mutant seeds were subjected to DART-MS without any sample preparation. Partial least squares-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) of DART-MS spectral data from intact seeds classified 14 different lines of seeds into two distinct groups: Columbia (Col-0) and Landsberg erecta (Ler) ecotype backgrounds. A hierarchical dendrogram based on partial least squares-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) subdivided the Col-0 ecotype into two groups: mutant lines harboring defects in the phenylpropanoid biosynthetic pathway and mutants without these defects. These results indicated that metabolic profiling with DART-MS could discriminate intact Arabidopsis seeds at least ecotype level and metabolic pathway level within same ecotype. Conclusion The described DART-MS combined by multivariate analysis allows for rapid screening and metabolic characterization of lots of Arabidopsis mutant seeds without complex metabolic preparation steps. Moreover, potential novel metabolic markers can be detected and used to clarify the genetic relationship between Arabidopsis cultivars. Furthermore this technique can be applied to predict the novel gene function of metabolic mutants regardless of morphological phenotypes. PMID:21658279

  16. Assigning protein functions by comparative genome analysis protein phylogenetic profiles

    DOEpatents

    Pellegrini, Matteo; Marcotte, Edward M.; Thompson, Michael J.; Eisenberg, David; Grothe, Robert; Yeates, Todd O.

    2003-05-13

    A computational method system, and computer program are provided for inferring functional links from genome sequences. One method is based on the observation that some pairs of proteins A' and B' have homologs in another organism fused into a single protein chain AB. A trans-genome comparison of sequences can reveal these AB sequences, which are Rosetta Stone sequences because they decipher an interaction between A' and B. Another method compares the genomic sequence of two or more organisms to create a phylogenetic profile for each protein indicating its presence or absence across all the genomes. The profile provides information regarding functional links between different families of proteins. In yet another method a combination of the above two methods is used to predict functional links.

  17. Micro - Proteome Analysis Using Micro-Chromatofocusing In Intact Protein Separations

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyeyeung; Lubman, David M.

    2008-01-01

    Multidimensional liquid-based separation is required for fractionation and mapping of complex protein mixtures from cells. A method that has been used as the first dimension in such separations is chromatofocusing, which is a based on generating a pH gradient on an anion exchange column. The use of pH in the first dimension is essential where pH is a fundamental property of proteins and can provide information on post-translationally modified forms of a protein. In this work, a micro-chromatofocusing technique is introduced which can separate microgram levels of proteins from cell lysates for further analysis by LC-MS/MS. It is shown that this method can analyze 10 µg of sample and detect nearly 700–800 proteins from ovarian cancer cell line lysates. PMID:18407281

  18. Micro-proteome analysis using micro-chromatofocusing in intact protein separations.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyeyeung; Lubman, David M

    2008-06-13

    Multi-dimensional liquid-based separation is required for fractionation and mapping of complex protein mixtures from cells. A method that has been used as the first dimension in such separations is chromatofocusing (CF), which is based on generating a pH gradient on an anion exchange column. The use of pH in the first dimension is essential where pH is a fundamental property of proteins and can provide information on post-translationally modified forms of a protein. In this work, a micro-chromatofocusing technique is introduced which can separate microgram levels of proteins from cell lysates for further analysis by LC-MS/MS. It is shown that this method can analyze 10 microg of sample and detect nearly 700-800 proteins from ovarian cancer cell line lysates.

  19. Reproductive hacking. A male seminal protein acts through intact reproductive pathways in female Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Rubinstein, C Dustin; Wolfner, Mariana F

    2014-01-01

    Seminal proteins are critical for reproductive success in all animals that have been studied. Although seminal proteins have been identified in many taxa, and female reproductive responses to receipt of these proteins have been documented in several, little is understood about the mechanisms by which seminal proteins affect female reproductive physiology. To explore this topic, we investigated how a Drosophila seminal protein, ovulin, increases ovulation rate in mated females. Ovulation is a relatively simple physiological process, with known female regulators: previous studies have shown that ovulation rate is promoted by the neuromodulator octopamine (OA) in D. melanogaster and other insects. We found that ovulin stimulates ovulation by increasing OA signaling in the female. This finding supports a model in which a male seminal protein acts through "hacking" a well-conserved, regulatory system females use to adjust reproductive output, rather than acting downstream of female mechanisms of control or in parallel pathways altogether. We also discuss similarities between 2 forms of intersexual control of behavior through chemical communication: seminal proteins and pheromones.

  20. The liquid protein phase in crystallization: a case study—intact immunoglobulins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, Yurii G.; Malkin, Alexander J.; McPherson, Alexander

    2001-11-01

    A common observation by protein chemists has been the appearance, for many proteins in aqueous solutions, of oil like droplets, or in more extreme cases the formation of a second oil like phase. These may accompany the formation of precipitate in "salting out" or "salting in' procedures, but more commonly appear in place of any precipitate. Such phase separations also occur, with even greater frequency, in the presence of polymeric precipitants such as polyethyleneglycol (PEG). In general the appearance of a second liquid phase has been taken as indicative of protein aggregation, though an aggregate state distinctly different from that characteristic of amorphous precipitate. While the latter is thought to be composed of linear and branched assemblies, polymers of a sort, the oil phase suggests a more compact, three-dimensional, but fluid state. An important property of an alternate, fluid phase is that it can mediate transitions between other states, for example, between protein molecules free in solution and protein molecules immobilized in amorphous precipitate or crystals. The "liquid protein" phase can be readily observed in many crystallization experiments either prior to the appearance of visible crystals, or directly participating in the crystal growth process. In some cases the relationship between the liquid phase and developing crystals is intimate. Crystals grow directly from the liquid phase, or appear only after the visible formation of the liquid phase. We describe here our experience with a class of macromolecules, immunoglobulins, and particularly IDEC-151, an IgG specific for CD4 on human lymphocytes. This protein has been crystallized from a Jeffamine-LiSO 4 mother liquor and, its crystallization illustrates many of the features associated with the liquid protein, or protein rich phase.

  1. Protein profiles of hatchery egg shell membrane.

    PubMed

    Rath, N C; Liyanage, R; Makkar, S K; Lay, J O

    2016-01-01

    Eggshells which consist largely of calcareous outer shell and shell membranes, constitute a significant part of poultry hatchery waste. The shell membranes (ESM) not only contain proteins that originate from egg whites but also from the developing embryos and different contaminants of microbial and environmental origins. As feed supplements, during post hatch growth, the hatchery egg shell membranes (HESM) have shown potential for imparting resistance of chickens to endotoxin stress and exert positive health effects. Considering that these effects are mediated by the bioactive proteins and peptides present in the membrane, the objective of the study was to identify the protein profiles of hatchery eggshell membranes (HESM). Hatchery egg shell membranes were extracted with acidified methanol and a guanidine hydrochloride buffer then subjected to reduction/alkylation, and trypsin digestion. The methanol extract was additionally analyzed by matrix assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS). The tryptic digests were analyzed by liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS-MS) to identify the proteins. Our results showed the presence of several proteins that are inherent and abundant in egg white such as, ovalbumin, ovotransferrin, ovocleidin-116, and lysozyme, and several proteins associated with cytoskeletal, cell signaling, antimicrobial, and catalytic functions involving carbohydrate, nucleic acid, and protein metabolisms. There were some blood derived proteins most likely originating from the embryos and several other proteins identified with different aerobic, anaerobic, gram positive, gram negative, soil, and marine bacterial species some commensals and others zoonotic. The variety of bioactive proteins, particularly the cell signaling and enzymatic proteins along with the diverse microbial proteins, make the HESM suitable for nutritional and biological application to improve post hatch immunity of poultry.

  2. Comparative protein profiles of the Ambrosia plants.

    PubMed

    Barton, Janice S; Schomacker, Rachel

    2017-06-01

    Ragweed pollen is primarily responsible for the hay fever allergies of sufferers throughout the world. A proteome study of three ragweed plants (Ambrosia artemisiifolia, Ambrosia trifida, and Ambrosia psilostachya) was undertaken to document and compare their protein profiles. Proteins extracted from the pollen of the three plants were subjected to one dimensional electrophoresis followed by tandem liquid chromatography-mass spectroscopy. Peptide sequence mapping permitted discovery of proteins not previously reported for all three plants and 45% of the identified proteins were shared by all three of them. Application of stringent criteria revealed not only a majority of known allergens for short ragweed but also allergens not previously reported for the other two plants. Additionally, potentially allergy inducing enolases are reported for the three plants. These results suggest that all three ragweed plants could contribute to the allergy malady. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Characterization of metabolic profile of intact non-tumor and tumor breast cells by high-resolution magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Maria, Roberta M; Altei, Wanessa F; Andricopulo, Adriano D; Becceneri, Amanda B; Cominetti, Márcia R; Venâncio, Tiago; Colnago, Luiz A

    2015-11-01

    (1)H high-resolution magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H HR-MAS NMR) spectroscopy was used to analyze the metabolic profile of an intact non-tumor breast cell line (MCF-10A) and intact breast tumor cell lines (MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231). In the spectra of MCF-10A cells, six metabolites were assigned, with glucose and ethanol in higher concentrations. Fifteen metabolites were assigned in MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 (1)H HR-MAS NMR spectra. They did not show glucose and ethanol, and the major component in both tumor cells was phosphocholine (higher in MDA-MB-231 than in MCF-7), which can be considered as a tumor biomarker of breast cancer malignant transformation. These tumor cells also show acetone signal that was higher in MDA-MB-231 cells than in MCF-7 cells. The high acetone level may be an indication of high demand for energy in MDA-MB-231 to maintain cell proliferation. The higher acetone and phosphocholine levels in MDA-MB-231 cells indicate the higher malignance of the cell line. Therefore, HR-MAS is a rapid reproducible method to study the metabolic profile of intact breast cells, with minimal sample preparation and contamination, which are critical in the analyses of slow-growth cells. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Aqueous size-exclusion chromatographic separations of intact proteins under native conditions: Effect of pressure on selectivity and efficiency.

    PubMed

    De Vos, Jelle; Kaal, Erwin R; Swart, Remco; Baca, Martyna; Heyden, Yvan Vander; Eeltink, Sebastiaan

    2016-02-01

    The selectivity and separation efficiency of aqueous size-exclusion chromatographic separations of intact proteins were assessed for different flow rates, using columns packed with 3 and 5 μm silica particles containing 150 and 290 Å stagnant pores. A mixture of intact proteins with molecular weights ranging between 17 000 and 670 000 Da was used to construct the calibration curves. Both the model fit and the predictive properties, using a leave-one-out strategy, of different polynomial models (up to fifth order) were evaluated for different flow rates. The best compromise between model fit and predictive properties was obtained using a third-order polynomial model. The accuracy of the predictive properties decreased with 10% with an eightfold increase in the flow rate. No changes in retention factors (hence selectivity) were observed in the flow-rate range applied. A strong correlation between molecular weight and plate height was observed. Exclusion of large-molecular-weight proteins led to a significant reduction in the stationary-phase mass-transfer contribution to the total plate-height value, and this effect was also independent of the flow rate applied. The kinetic-performance limits, in terms of plate number and time, and optimal column-length particle-size combinations were determined at the maximum recommended operating pressure of the size-exclusion chromatography columns (20 MPa). Finally, the possibilities of method speed-up using ultra-high-pressure size-exclusion chromatography in combination with columns packed with sub-2 μm particles are discussed. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. NMR-Profiles of Protein Solutions

    PubMed Central

    Pedrini, Bill; Serrano, Pedro; Mohanty, Biswaranjan; Geralt, Michael; Wüthrich, Kurt

    2014-01-01

    NMR-Profiles are quantitative one-dimensional presentations of two-dimensional [15N,1H]-correlation spectra used to monitor the quality of protein solutions prior to and during NMR structure determinations and functional studies. In our current use in structural genomics projects, a NMR-Profile is recorded at the outset of a structure determination, using a uniformly 15N-labeled micro-scale sample of the protein. We thus assess the extent to which polypeptide backbone resonance assignments can be achieved with given NMR techniques, for example, conventional triple resonance experiments or APSY-NMR. With the availability of sequence-specific polypeptide backbone resonance assignments in the course of the structure determination, an “Assigned NMR-Profile” is generated, which visualizes the variation of the 15N–1H correlation cross peak intensities along the sequence and thus maps the sequence locations of polypeptide segments for which the NMR line shapes are affected by conformational exchange or other processes. The Assigned NMR-Profile provides a guiding reference during later stages of the structure determination, and is of special interest for monitoring the protein during functional studies, where dynamic features may be modulated during physiological functions. PMID:23839514

  6. Cotton leaf curl Burewala virus with intact or mutant transcriptional activator proteins: complexity of cotton leaf curl disease.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Jitendra; Gunapati, Samatha; Alok, Anshu; Lalit, Adarsh; Gadre, Rekha; Sharma, Naresh C; Roy, Joy K; Singh, Sudhir P

    2015-05-01

    Cotton leaf curl disease (CLCuD) is a serious disease of cotton on the Indian subcontinent. In the present study, three cotton leaf curl viruses, cotton leaf curl Burewala virus (CLCuBuV), cotton leaf curl Kokhran virus (CLCuKoV) and cotton leaf curl Multan virus (CLCuMV), and their associated satellites, cotton leaf curl Multan betasatellite (CLCuMB) and cotton leaf curl Multan alphasatellite (CLCuMA), were detected. CLCuBuV with either intact (CLCuBuV-1) or mutant (CLCuBuV-2) transcriptional activator protein (TrAP) were detected in different plants. Agroinoculation with CLCuBuV-1 or CLCuBuV-2 together with CLCuMB and CLCuMA, resulted in typical leaf curling and stunting of tobacco plants. Inoculation with CLCuKoV or an isolate of CLCuMV (CLCuMV-2), together with CLCuMB and CLCuMA, induced severe leaf curling, while the other isolate of CLCuMV (CLCuMV-1), which was recombinant in origin, showed mild leaf curling in tobacco. To investigate the effect of intact or mutant TrAP and also the recombination events, CLCuBuV-1, CLCuBuV-2, CLCuMV-1 or CLCuMV-2 together with the satellites (CLCuMA and CLCuMB) were transferred to cotton via whitefly-mediated transmission. Cotton plants containing CLCuBuV-1, CLCuBuV-2 or CLCuMV-2 together with satellites showed curling and stunting, whereas the plants having CLCuMV-1 and the satellites showed only mild and indistinguishable symptoms. CLCuBuV-1 (intact TrAP) showed severe symptoms in comparison to CLCuBuV-2 (mutant TrAP). The present study reveals that two types of CLCuBuV, one with an intact TrAP and the other with a mutant TrAP, exist in natural infection of cotton in India. Additionally, CLCuMuV-1, which has a recombinant origin, induces mild symptoms in comparison to the other CLCuMV isolates.

  7. Role of Rho proteins in carbachol-induced contractions in intact and permeabilized guinea-pig intestinal smooth muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Otto, B; Steusloff, A; Just, I; Aktories, K; Pfitzer, G

    1996-01-01

    1. The aim of this study was to determine whether the low molecular mass GTPase RhoA or related proteins are involved in carbachol- and high-K(+)-induced contractions in intact intestinal smooth muscle as well as the carbachol-induced increase in Ca2+ sensitivity of the myofilaments in permeabilized preparations. 2. The carbachol-induced increase in the Ca2+ sensitivity of force production in beta-escin-permeabilized intestinal smooth muscle was enhanced in preparations that were loaded with the constitutively active mutant of RhoA, Val14RhoA, and was inhibited by exoenzyme C3 from Clostridium botulinum, which ADP-ribosylates and inactivates small GTPases of the Rho family. The effect of C3 on Ca2+ sensitivity in the absence of the agonist was negligible, while the maximal Ca(2+)-activated force was inhibited by about 20%. 3. Inhibition of carbachol-induced force was associated with an increase in ADP-ribosylation of a protein band with a molecular mass of approximately 22 kDa, corresponding to Rho, and was partially reversed in the presence of Ile41RhoA, which is not a substrate for C3. Val14RhoA did not restore carbachol-induced Ca2+ sensitization in C3-treated smooth muscle. 4. In intact intestinal smooth muscle, toxin B from Clostridium difficile, which monoglucosylates members of the Rho family, inhibited high-K(+)-induced contractions and the initial phasic response to carbachol by about 30%. The delayed contractile response to carbachol was completely inhibited. 5. In smooth muscle preparations that were permeabilized with beta-escin after treatment with toxin B, carbachol-and GTP gamma S-induced Ca2+ sensitization was significantly inhibited. 6. These findings are consistent with a role for Rho or Rho-like proteins in agonist-induced increase in Ca2+ sensitivity of force production in intact and permeabilized intestinal smooth muscle. Images Figure 2 PMID:8910218

  8. Coupling detergent lysis/clean-up methodology with intact protein fractionation for enhanced proteome characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Ritin; Dill, Brian; Chourey, Karuna; Shah, Manesh B; Verberkmoes, Nathan C; Hettich, Robert {Bob} L

    2012-01-01

    The expanding use of surfactants for proteome sample preparations has prompted the need to systematically optimize the application and removal of these MS-deleterious agents prior to proteome measurements. Here we compare four different detergent clean-up methods (Trichloroacetic acid (TCA) precipitation, Chloroform/Methanol/Water (CMW) extraction, commercial detergent removal spin column method (DRS) and filter-aided sample preparation(FASP)) with respect to varying amounts of protein biomass in the samples, and provide efficiency benchmarks with respect to protein, peptide, and spectral identifications for each method. Our results show that for protein limited samples, FASP outperforms the other three clean-up methods, while at high protein amount all the methods are comparable. This information was used in a dual strategy of comparing molecular weight based fractionated and unfractionated lysates from three increasingly complex samples (Escherichia coli, a five microbial isolate mixture, and a natural microbial community groundwater sample), which were all lysed with SDS and cleaned up using FASP. The two approaches complemented each other by enhancing the number of protein identifications by 8%-25% across the three samples and provided broad pathway coverage.

  9. Proteomic profile of edible bird's nest proteins.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoqing; Lai, Xintian; Zhang, Shiwei; Huang, Xiuli; Lan, Quanxue; Li, Yun; Li, Bifang; Chen, Wei; Zhang, Qinlei; Hong, Dezhi; Yang, Guowu

    2012-12-26

    Edible bird's nest (EBN) is made of the swiftlets' saliva, which has attracted rather more attention owing to its nutritious and medical properties. Although protein constitutes the main composition and plays an important role in EBN, few studies have focused on the proteomic profile of EBN. The purpose of this study was to produce a proteomic map and clarify common EBN proteins. Liquid-phase isoelectric focusing (LIEF) was combined with two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) for comprehensive analysis of EBN proteins. From 20 to 100 protein spots were detected on 2-DE maps of EBN samples from 15 different sources. The proteins were mainly distributed in four taxa (A, B, C, and D) according to their molecular mass. Taxa A and D both contained common proteins and proteins that may be considered another characteristic of EBN. Taxon A was identified using MALDI-TOF-TOF/MS and found to be homologous to acidic mammalian chitinase-like ( Meleagris gallopavo ), which is in glycosyl hydrolase family 18.

  10. Coupling a detergent lysis/cleanup methodology with intact protein fractionation for enhanced proteome characterization.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Ritin; Dill, Brian D; Chourey, Karuna; Shah, Manesh; VerBerkmoes, Nathan C; Hettich, Robert L

    2012-12-07

    The expanding use of surfactants for proteome sample preparations has prompted the need to systematically optimize the application and removal of these MS-deleterious agents prior to proteome measurements. Here we compare four detergent cleanup methods (trichloroacetic acid (TCA) precipitation, chloroform/methanol/water (CMW) extraction, a commercial detergent removal spin column method (DRS) and filter-aided sample preparation (FASP)) to provide efficiency benchmarks with respect to protein, peptide, and spectral identifications in each case. Our results show that for protein-limited samples, FASP outperforms the other three cleanup methods, while at high protein amounts, all the methods are comparable. This information was used to investigate and contrast molecular weight-based fractionated with unfractionated lysates from three increasingly complex samples ( Escherichia coli K-12, a five microbial isolate mixture, and a natural microbial community groundwater sample), all of which were prepared with an SDS-FASP approach. The additional fractionation step enhanced the number of protein identifications by 8% to 25% over the unfractionated approach across the three samples.

  11. Gas-phase IR spectra of intact [alpha]-helical coiled coil protein complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagel, Kevin; Kupser, Peter; Bierau, Frauke; Polfer, Nicolas C.; Steill, Jeffrey D.; Oomens, Jos; Meijer, Gerard; Koksch, Beate; von Helden, Gert

    2009-06-01

    Electrospray ionization (ESI) is the softest ionization method that is currently available and it is widely accepted, that ESI generated ions of proteins and protein assemblies at certain conditions retain characteristic aspects of their solution-state conformation. ESI mass spectrometry (MS) therefore evolved as a useful tool to obtain information on composition, stoichiometry, and dynamics of non-covalently associated protein complexes. While tertiary structure information of proteins can be obtained from ion mobility spectrometry (IMS), only a few techniques yield direct information on the secondary structure of gas-phase peptides and proteins. We present here the mid-IR spectroscopic secondary structural analysis of three de novo designed [alpha]-helical coiled coil model peptides and their non-covalently associated complexes in the gas-phase. The conformational stability of such coiled coil peptides in solution is primarily driven by aggregation. Isolated monomers usually remain unfolded. Two of the investigated peptides were designed to assemble into stable [alpha]-helical complexes in acidic solution, while the third one remains monomeric and unfolded at these conditions. Monomer ions of all three peptides show comparable photodissociation IR spectra and therefore suggest an unfolded conformation in the gas phase. In contrast, considerable CO stretch (amide-I) and N-H bend (amide-II) band shifts have been observed for the dimers which is consistent with an elevated H-bond content. These findings provide evidence that at least a fraction of the condensed phase [alpha]-helical structure is retained in the gas-phase coiled coil complexes.

  12. Protein kinase C and epidermal growth factor stimulation of Raf1 potentiates adenylyl cyclase type 6 activation in intact cells.

    PubMed

    Beazely, Michael A; Alan, Jamie K; Watts, Val J

    2005-01-01

    Adenylyl cyclase type 6 (AC6) activity is inhibited by protein kinase C (PKC) in vitro; however, in intact cells, PKC activation does not inhibit the activity of transiently expressed AC6. To investigate the effects of PKC activation on AC6 activity in intact cells, we constructed human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 cells that stably express wild-type AC6 (AC6-WT) or an AC6 mutant lacking a PKC and cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) phosphorylation site, Ser674 (AC6-S674A). In contrast to in vitro observations, we observed a PKC-mediated enhancement of forskolin- and isoproterenol-stimulated cyclic AMP accumulation in HEK-AC6 cells. Phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate also potentiated cyclic AMP accumulation in cells expressing endogenous AC6, including Chinese hamster ovary cells and differentiated Cath.a differentiated cells. In HEK-AC6-S674A cells, the potentiation of AC6 stimulation was significantly greater than in cells expressing AC6-WT. The positive effect of PKC activation on AC6 activity seemed to involve Raf1 kinase because the Raf1 inhibitor 3-(3,5-dibromo-4-hydroxybenzylidene-5-iodo-1,3-dihydro-indol-2-one (GW5074) inhibited the PKC potentiation of AC6 activity. Furthermore, the forskolin-stimulated activity of a recombinant AC6 in which the putative Raf1 regulatory sites have been eliminated was not potentiated by activation of PKC. The ability of Raf1 to regulate AC6 may involve a direct interaction because AC6 and a constitutively active Raf1 construct were coimmunoprecipitated. In addition, we report that epidermal growth factor receptor activation also enhances AC6 signaling in a Raf1-dependent manner. These data suggest that Raf1 potentiates drug-stimulated cyclic AMP accumulation in cells expressing AC6 after activation of multiple signaling pathways.

  13. Enhancing recombinant protein quality and yield by protein stability profiling.

    PubMed

    Mezzasalma, Tara M; Kranz, James K; Chan, Winnie; Struble, Geoffrey T; Schalk-Hihi, Céline; Deckman, Ingrid C; Springer, Barry A; Todd, Matthew J

    2007-04-01

    The reliable production of large amounts of stable, high-quality proteins is a major challenge facing pharmaceutical protein biochemists, necessary for fulfilling demands from structural biology, for high-throughput screening, and for assay purposes throughout early discovery. One strategy for bypassing purification challenges in problematic systems is to engineer multiple forms of a particular protein to optimize expression, purification, and stability, often resulting in a nonphysiological sub-domain. An alternative strategy is to alter process conditions to maximize wild-type construct stability, based on a specific protein stability profile (PSP). ThermoFluor, a miniaturized 384-well thermal stability assay, has been implemented as a means of monitoring solution-dependent changes in protein stability, complementing the protein engineering and purification processes. A systematic analysis of pH, buffer or salt identity and concentration, biological metals, surfactants, and common excipients in terms of an effect on protein stability rapidly identifies conditions that might be used (or avoided) during protein production. Two PSPs are presented for the kinase catalytic domains of Akt-3 and cFMS, in which information derived from a ThermoFluor PSP led to an altered purification strategy, improving the yield and quality of the protein using the primary sequences of the catalytic domains.

  14. Profiling the glycoforms of the intact alpha subunit of recombinant human chorionic gonadotropin by high-resolution capillary electrophoresis-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Thakur, Dipak; Rejtar, Tomas; Karger, Barry L; Washburn, Nathaniel J; Bosques, Carlos J; Gunay, Nur S; Shriver, Zachary; Venkataraman, Ganesh

    2009-11-01

    With the rapid growth of complex heterogeneous biological molecules, effective techniques that are capable of rapid characterization of biologics are essential to ensure the desired product characteristics. To address this need, we have developed a method for analysis of intact glycoproteins based on high-resolution capillary electrophoretic separation coupled to an LTQ-FT mass spectrometer. We evaluated the performance of this method on the alpha subunit of mouse cell line-derived recombinant human chorionic gonadotrophin (r-alpha hCG), a protein that is glycosylated at two sites and is part of the clinically relevant gonadotrophin family. Analysis of r-alpha hCG, using capillary electrophoresis (CE) with a separation time under 20 min, resulted in the identification of over 60 different glycoforms with up to nine sialic acids. High-resolution CE-Fourier transform mass spectrometry (FT-MS) allowed separation and analysis of not only intact glycoforms with different numbers of sialic acids but also intact glycoforms that differed by the number and extent of neutral monosaccharides. The high mass resolution of the FT-MS enabled a limited mass range to be targeted for the examination of the protein glycoforms, simplifying the analysis without sacrificing accuracy. In addition, the limited mass range resulted in a fast scan speed that enhanced the reproducibility of the relative quantitation of individual glycoforms. The intact glycoprotein analysis was complemented with the analysis of the tryptic glycopeptides and glycans of r-alpha hCG to enable the assignment of glycan structures to individual sites, resulting in a detailed characterization of the protein. Samples of r-alpha hCG obtained from a CHO cell line were also analyzed and briefly shown to be significantly different from the murine cell line product. Taken together, the results suggest that the CE coupled to high-resolution FT-MS can be one of the effective tools for in-process monitoring as well as for

  15. Fast quantification of recombinant protein inclusion bodies within intact cells by FT-IR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Gross-Selbeck, Sven; Margreiter, Gerd; Obinger, Christian; Bayer, Karl

    2007-01-01

    The accomplishment of the quantification of the recombinant protein content of whole bacterial cells by FT-IR spectroscopy by application of chemometrics is shown. Recombinant Escherichia coli cells expressing an inclusion body forming fusion protein were dried on a 96-well silicon plate for the analysis in a high-throughput FT-IR spectrometer. Acquired spectra of additionally conventionally quantified samples were used to establish a multivariate calibration. The obtained method was tested by predicting inclusion body contents of samples not used for the multivariate model. Results from FT-IR spectra coincided well with the data of universalized electrophoresis analysis. Hence FT-IR spectroscopy could prove as a fast and simple alternative to conventional quantification methods.

  16. Activation of Ras in vitro and in intact fibroblasts by the Vav guanine nucleotide exchange protein.

    PubMed Central

    Gulbins, E; Coggeshall, K M; Langlet, C; Baier, G; Bonnefoy-Berard, N; Burn, P; Wittinghofer, A; Katzav, S; Altman, A

    1994-01-01

    We recently identified Vav, the product of the vav proto-oncogene, as a guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) for Ras. Vav is enzymatically activated by lymphocyte antigen receptor-coupled protein tyrosine kinases or independently by diglycerides. To further evaluate the physiological role of Vav, we assessed its GDP-GTP exchange activity against several Ras-related proteins in vitro and determined whether Vav activation in transfected NIH 3T3 fibroblasts correlates with the activity status of Ras and mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases. In vitro translated purified Vav activated by phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) or phosphorylation with recombinant p56lck displayed GEF activity against Ras but not against recombinant RacI, RacII, Ral, or RhoA proteins. Expression of vav or proto-vav in stably transfected NIH 3T3 cells led to a approximately 10-fold increase in basal or PMA-stimulated Ras exchange activity, respectively, in total-cell lysates and Vav immunoprecipitates. Elevated GEF activity was paralleled in each case by a significant increase in the proportion of active, GTP-bound Ras. PMA had a minimal effect on the low Ras. GTP level in untransfected control fibroblasts but increased it from 20 to 37% in proto-vav-transfected cells. vav-transfected cells displayed a constitutively elevated Ras. GTP level (35%), which was not increased further by PMA treatment. MAP kinases, known downstream intermediates in Ras-dependent signaling pathways, similarly exhibited increased basal or PMA-stimulated activity in Vav-expressing cells by comparison with normal NIH 3T3 cells. These results demonstrate a physiologic interaction between Vav and its target, Ras, leading to MAP kinase activation. Images PMID:8289830

  17. Quantification of allergenic bovine milk α(S1)-casein in baked goods using an intact ¹⁵N-labeled protein internal standard.

    PubMed

    Newsome, G Asher; Scholl, Peter F

    2013-06-19

    Intact bovine ¹⁵N-α(S1)-casein was used as an internal standard in a selected reaction monitoring (SRM) assay for milk protein in baked food samples containing fats, sugar, and gums. Effects on SRM results of sample matrix composition in two biscuit recipes containing nonfat dry milk (NFDM) were studied, including samples from a milk allergen ELISA proficiency trial. Following extraction of defatted samples with carbohydrate-degrading enzymes and acid precipitation of casein, the SRM assay exhibited an LOQ of <3 ppm NFDM with 60-80% recovery. NFDM levels measured by the SRM assay were 1.7-2.5 times greater than median levels determined by ELISA. Differences were observed in the α(S1)-casein interpeptide SRM ion abundance profile between recipes and after baking. ¹⁵N-α(S1)-Casein increases SRM analysis accuracy by correcting for extraction recovery but does not eliminate underestimation of allergen concentrations due to baking-related milk protein transformation (modifications).

  18. Multiplexed protein profiling by sequential affinity capture

    PubMed Central

    Ayoglu, Burcu; Birgersson, Elin; Mezger, Anja; Nilsson, Mats; Uhlén, Mathias; Nilsson, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Antibody microarrays enable parallelized and miniaturized analysis of clinical samples, and have proven to provide novel insights for the analysis of different proteomes. However, there are concerns that the performance of such direct labeling and single antibody assays are prone to off‐target binding due to the sample context. To improve selectivity and sensitivity while maintaining the possibility to conduct multiplexed protein profiling, we developed a multiplexed and semi‐automated sequential capture assay. This novel bead‐based procedure encompasses a first antigen capture, labeling of captured protein targets on magnetic particles, combinatorial target elution and a read‐out by a secondary capture bead array. We demonstrate in a proof‐of‐concept setting that target detection via two sequential affinity interactions reduced off‐target contribution, while lowered background and noise levels, improved correlation to clinical values compared to single binder assays. We also compared sensitivity levels with single binder and classical sandwich assays, explored the possibility for DNA‐based signal amplification, and demonstrate the applicability of the dual capture bead‐based antibody microarray for biomarker analysis. Hence, the described concept enhances the possibilities for antibody array assays to be utilized for protein profiling in body fluids and beyond. PMID:26935855

  19. Integration of Ultraviolet Photodissociation with Proton Transfer Reactions and Ion Parking for Analysis of Intact Proteins.

    PubMed

    Holden, Dustin D; McGee, William M; Brodbelt, Jennifer S

    2016-01-05

    We report the implementation of proton transfer reactions (PTR) and ion parking on an Orbitrap mass spectrometer. PTR/ion parking allows charge states of proteins to be focused into a single lower charge state via sequential deprotonation reactions with a proton scavenging reagent, in this case, a nitrogen-containing adduct of fluoranthene. Using PTR and ion parking, we evaluate the charge state dependence of fragmentation of ubiquitin (8.6 kDa), myoglobin (17 kDa), and carbonic anhydrase (29 kDa) upon higher energy collisional dissociation (HCD) or ultraviolet photodissociation (UVPD). UVPD exhibited less charge state dependence, thus yielding more uniform distributions of cleavages along the protein backbone and consequently higher sequence coverage than HCD. HCD resulted in especially prominent cleavages C-terminal to amino acids containing acidic side-chains and N-terminal to proline residues; UVPD did not exhibit preferential cleavage adjacent to acidic residues but did show enhancement next to proline and phenylalanine.

  20. The intact CFTR protein mediates ATPase rather than adenylate kinase activity.

    PubMed

    Ramjeesingh, Mohabir; Ugwu, Francisca; Stratford, Fiona L L; Huan, Ling-Jun; Li, Canhui; Bear, Christine E

    2008-06-01

    The two NBDs (nucleotide-binding domains) of ABC (ATP-binding-cassette) proteins function in a complex to mediate ATPase activity and this activity has been linked to their regulated transport activity. A similar model has been proposed for CFTR (cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator), the chloride channel defective in cystic fibrosis, wherein ATP binding and hydrolysis regulate the channel gate. Recently, it was shown that the individual NBDs isolated from CFTR primarily mediate adenylate kinase activity, raising the possibility that this activity may also contribute to gating of the CFTR channel. However, this present study shows that whereas the isolated NBDs exhibit adenylate kinase activity, the full-length purified and reconstituted CFTR protein functions as an ATPase, arguing that the enzymatic activity of the NBDs is dependent on their molecular context and appropriate domain-domain assembly. As expected, the disease-causing mutant bearing a mutation in the ABC signature motif, CFTR-G551D, exhibited a markedly reduced ATPase activity. Furthermore, mutation of the putative catalytic base in CFTR caused a reduction in ATPase activity, with the CFTR-E1371Q mutant supporting a low level of residual activity. Neither of these mutants exhibited detectable adenylate kinase activity. Together, these findings support the concept that the molecular mechanism of action of CFTR is dependent on ATP binding and hydrolysis, and that the structure of prokaryotic ABC ATPases provide a useful template for understanding their mechanism of action.

  1. Microwave-assisted acid and base hydrolysis of intact proteins containing disulfide bonds for protein sequence analysis by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Reiz, Bela; Li, Liang

    2010-09-01

    Controlled hydrolysis of proteins to generate peptide ladders combined with mass spectrometric analysis of the resultant peptides can be used for protein sequencing. In this paper, two methods of improving the microwave-assisted protein hydrolysis process are described to enable rapid sequencing of proteins containing disulfide bonds and increase sequence coverage, respectively. It was demonstrated that proteins containing disulfide bonds could be sequenced by MS analysis by first performing hydrolysis for less than 2 min, followed by 1 h of reduction to release the peptides originally linked by disulfide bonds. It was shown that a strong base could be used as a catalyst for microwave-assisted protein hydrolysis, producing complementary sequence information to that generated by microwave-assisted acid hydrolysis. However, using either acid or base hydrolysis, amide bond breakages in small regions of the polypeptide chains of the model proteins (e.g., cytochrome c and lysozyme) were not detected. Dynamic light scattering measurement of the proteins solubilized in an acid or base indicated that protein-protein interaction or aggregation was not the cause of the failure to hydrolyze certain amide bonds. It was speculated that there were some unknown local structures that might play a role in preventing an acid or base from reacting with the peptide bonds therein.

  2. Effect of enzyme-aided cell wall disintegration on protein extractability from intact and dehulled rapeseed (Brassica rapa L. and Brassica napus L.) press cakes.

    PubMed

    Rommi, Katariina; Hakala, Terhi K; Holopainen, Ulla; Nordlund, Emilia; Poutanen, Kaisa; Lantto, Raija

    2014-08-13

    Cell-wall- and pectin-degrading enzyme preparations were used to enhance extractability of proteins from rapeseed press cake. Rapeseed press cakes from cold pressing of intact Brassica rapa and partially dehulled Brassica napus seeds, containing 36-40% protein and 35% carbohydrates, were treated with pectinolytic (Pectinex Ultra SP-L), xylanolytic (Depol 740L), and cellulolytic (Celluclast 1.5L) enzyme preparations. Pectinex caused effective disintegration of embryonic cell walls through hydrolysis of pectic polysaccharides and glucans and increased protein extraction by up to 1.7-fold in comparison to treatment without enzyme addition. Accordingly, 56% and 74% of the total protein in the intact and dehulled press cakes was extracted. Light microscopy of the press cakes suggested the presence of pectins colocalized with proteins inside the embryo cells. Hydrolysis of these intracellular pectins and deconstruction of embryonic cell walls during Pectinex treatment were concluded to relate with enhanced protein release.

  3. Insulin rapidly stimulates phosphorylation of a 46-kDa membrane protein on tyrosine residues as well as phosphorylation of several soluble proteins in intact fat cells.

    PubMed Central

    Häring, H U; White, M F; Machicao, F; Ermel, B; Schleicher, E; Obermaier, B

    1987-01-01

    It is speculated that the transmission of an insulin signal across the plasma membrane of cells occurs through activation of the tyrosine-specific receptor kinase, autophosphorylation of the receptor, and subsequent phosphorylation of unidentified substrates in the cell. In an attempt to identify possible substrates, we labeled intact rat fat cells with [32P]orthophosphate and used an antiphosphotyrosine antibody to identify proteins that become phosphorylated on tyrosine residues in an insulin-stimulated way. In the membrane fraction of the fat cells, we found, in addition to the 95-kDa beta-subunit of the receptor, a 46-kDa phosphoprotein that is phosphorylated exclusively on tyrosine residues. This protein is not immunoprecipitated by antibodies against different regions of the insulin receptor and its HPLC tryptic peptide map is different from the tryptic peptide map of the insulin receptor, suggesting that it is not derived from the receptor beta-subunit. Insulin stimulates the tyrosine phosphorylation of the 46-kDa protein within 150 sec in the intact cell 3- to 4-fold in a dose-dependent way at insulin concentrations between 0.5 nM and 100 nM. The insulin effect starts after 30 sec, is maximal at 150 sec, and declines to almost basal values by 5 min. Furthermore, the antiphosphotyrosine antibody precipitated at least five proteins in the soluble fraction of the fat cell. Insulin (0.5 nM, 100 nM) stimulated within 2 min the 32P incorporation into a 116-kDa band, a 62-kDa band, and three bands between 45 kDa and 50 kDa 2- to 10-fold. We suggest that the 46-kDa membrane protein and possibly also the soluble proteins are endogenous substrates of the receptor tyrosine kinase in fat cells and that their phosphorylation is an early step in insulin signal transmission. Images PMID:3540953

  4. A setup for simultaneous measurement of infrared spectra and light scattering signals: Watching amyloid fibrils grow from intact proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yang; Maurer, Jürgen; Roth, Andreas; Vogel, Vitali; Winter, Ernst; Mäntele, Werner

    2014-08-15

    A setup for the simultaneous measurement of mid-infrared spectra and static light scattering is described that can be used for the analysis of the formation of nanoscale and microscopic aggregates from smaller molecules to biopolymers. It can be easily integrated into sample chambers of infrared spectrometers or combined with laser beams from tunable infrared lasers. Here, its use for the analysis of the formation of amyloid fibrils from intact proteins is demonstrated. The formation of amyloid fibrils or plaques from proteins is a widespread and pathogenetic relevant process, and a number of diseases are caused and correlated with the deposition of amyloid fibrils in cells and tissues. The molecular mechanisms of these transformations, however, are still unclear. We report here the simultaneous measurement of infrared spectra and static light scattering for the analysis of fibril formation from egg-white lysozyme. The transformation of the native form into non-native forms rich in β-sheet structure is measured by analysis of the amide I spectral region in the infrared spectra, which is sensitive for local structures. At the same time, light scattering signals at forward direction as well as the forward/backward ratio, which are sensitive for the number of scattering centers and their approximate sizes, respectively, are collected for the analysis of fibril growth. Thermodynamic and kinetic parameters as well as mechanistic information are deduced from the combination of the two complementary techniques.

  5. Metabolic Characterization of Intact Cells Reveals Intracellular Amyloid Beta but Not Its Precursor Protein to Reduce Mitochondrial Respiration.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, Patrick M; von Einem, Bjoern; Walther, Paul; Calzia, Enrico; von Arnim, Christine A F

    2016-01-01

    One hallmark of Alzheimer´s disease are senile plaques consisting of amyloid beta (Aβ), which derives from the processing of the amyloid precursor protein (APP). Mitochondrial dysfunction has been linked to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer´s disease and both Aβ and APP have been reported to affect mitochondrial function in isolated systems. However, in intact cells, considering a physiological localization of APP and Aβ, it is pending what triggers the mitochondrial defect. Thus, the aim of this study was to dissect the impact of APP versus Aβ in inducing mitochondrial alterations with respect to their subcellular localization. We performed an overexpression of APP or beta-site amyloid precursor protein cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1), increasing APP and Aβ levels or Aβ alone, respectively. Conducting a comprehensive metabolic characterization we demonstrate that only APP overexpression reduced mitochondrial respiration, despite lower extracellular Aβ levels compared to BACE overexpression. Surprisingly, this could be rescued by a gamma secretase inhibitor, oppositionally indicating an Aβ-mediated mitochondrial toxicity. Analyzing Aβ localization revealed that intracellular levels of Aβ and an increased spatial association of APP/Aβ with mitochondria are associated with reduced mitochondrial respiration. Thus, our data provide marked evidence for a prominent role of intracellular Aβ accumulation in Alzheimer´s disease associated mitochondrial dysfunction. Thereby it highlights the importance of the localization of APP processing and intracellular transport as a decisive factor for mitochondrial function, linking two prominent hallmarks of neurodegenerative diseases.

  6. Metabolic Characterization of Intact Cells Reveals Intracellular Amyloid Beta but Not Its Precursor Protein to Reduce Mitochondrial Respiration

    PubMed Central

    Schaefer, Patrick M.; von Einem, Bjoern; Walther, Paul; Calzia, Enrico; von Arnim, Christine A. F.

    2016-01-01

    One hallmark of Alzheimer´s disease are senile plaques consisting of amyloid beta (Aβ), which derives from the processing of the amyloid precursor protein (APP). Mitochondrial dysfunction has been linked to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer´s disease and both Aβ and APP have been reported to affect mitochondrial function in isolated systems. However, in intact cells, considering a physiological localization of APP and Aβ, it is pending what triggers the mitochondrial defect. Thus, the aim of this study was to dissect the impact of APP versus Aβ in inducing mitochondrial alterations with respect to their subcellular localization. We performed an overexpression of APP or beta-site amyloid precursor protein cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1), increasing APP and Aβ levels or Aβ alone, respectively. Conducting a comprehensive metabolic characterization we demonstrate that only APP overexpression reduced mitochondrial respiration, despite lower extracellular Aβ levels compared to BACE overexpression. Surprisingly, this could be rescued by a gamma secretase inhibitor, oppositionally indicating an Aβ-mediated mitochondrial toxicity. Analyzing Aβ localization revealed that intracellular levels of Aβ and an increased spatial association of APP/Aβ with mitochondria are associated with reduced mitochondrial respiration. Thus, our data provide marked evidence for a prominent role of intracellular Aβ accumulation in Alzheimer´s disease associated mitochondrial dysfunction. Thereby it highlights the importance of the localization of APP processing and intracellular transport as a decisive factor for mitochondrial function, linking two prominent hallmarks of neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:28005987

  7. ATR-FTIR spectroscopy reveals involvement of lipids and proteins of intact pea pollen grains to heat stress tolerance.

    PubMed

    Lahlali, Rachid; Jiang, Yunfei; Kumar, Saroj; Karunakaran, Chithra; Liu, Xia; Borondics, Ferenc; Hallin, Emil; Bueckert, Rosalind

    2014-01-01

    With climate change, pea will be more frequently subjected to heat stress in semi-arid regions like Saskatchewan during flowering. The pollen germination percentage of two pea cultivars was reduced by heat stress (36°C) with an important decrease in cultivar 'CDC Golden' compared to 'CDC Sage.' Lipids, protein and other pollen coat compositions of whole intact pollen grains of both pea cultivars were investigated using mid infrared (mid-IR) attenuated total reflectance (ATR)-Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Curve fitting of ATR absorbance spectra in the protein region enabled estimation and comparison of different protein secondary structures between the two cultivars. CDC Sage had relatively greater amounts of α-helical structures (48.6-43.6%; band at 1654 cm(-1)) and smaller amounts of β-sheets (41.3-46%) than CDC Golden. The CDC Golden had higher amounts of β-sheets (46.3-51.7%) compared to α-helical structures (35.3-36.2%). Further, heat stress resulted in prominent changes in the symmetrical and asymmetrical CH2 bands from lipid acyl chain, ester carbonyl band, and carbohydrate region. The intensity of asymmetric and symmetric CH2 vibration of heat stressed CDC Golden was reduced considerably in comparison to the control and the decrease was higher compared to CDC Sage. In addition, CDC Golden showed an increase in intensity at the oxidative band of 3015 cm(-1). These results reveal that the whole pollen grains of both pea cultivars responded differently to heat stress. The tolerance of CDC Sage to heat stress (expressed as pollen germination percentage) may be due to its protein richness with α-helical structures which would protect against the destructive effects of dehydration due to heat stress. The low pollen germination percentage of CDC Golden after heat stress may be also due to its sensitivity to lipid changes due to heat stress.

  8. Phylogenetic profiles of all membrane transport proteins

    PubMed Central

    Weiner, January; Kooij, Taco W.A.

    2016-01-01

    In order to combat the on-going malaria epidemic, discovery of new drug targets remains vital. Proteins that are essential to survival and specific to malaria parasites are key candidates. To survive within host cells, the parasites need to acquire nutrients and dispose of waste products across multiple membranes. Additionally, like all eukaryotes, they must redistribute ions and organic molecules between their various internal membrane bound compartments. Membrane transport proteins mediate all of these processes and are considered important mediators of drug resistance as well as drug targets in their own right. Recently, using advanced experimental genetic approaches and streamlined life cycle profiling, we generated a large collection of Plasmodium berghei gene deletion mutants and assigned essential gene functions, highlighting potential targets for prophylactic, therapeutic, and transmission-blocking anti-malarial drugs. Here, we present a comprehensive orthology assignment of all Plasmodium falciparum putative membrane transport proteins and provide a detailed overview of the associated essential gene functions obtained through experimental genetics studies in human and murine model parasites. Furthermore, we discuss the phylogeny of selected potential drug targets identified in our functional screen. We extensively discuss the results in the context of the functional assignments obtained using gene targeting available to date. PMID:28357319

  9. Mass-tag enhanced immuno-laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry for sensitive detection of intact protein antigens.

    PubMed

    Lorey, Martina; Adler, Belinda; Yan, Hong; Soliymani, Rabah; Ekström, Simon; Yli-Kauhaluoma, Jari; Laurell, Thomas; Baumann, Marc

    2015-05-19

    A new read-out method for antibody arrays using laser desorption/ionization-mass spectrometry (LDI-MS) is presented. Small, photocleavable reporter molecules with a defined mass called "mass-tags" are used for detection of immunocaptured proteins from human plasma. Using prostate specific antigen (PSA), a biomarker for prostate cancer, as a model antigen, a high sensitivity generic detection methodology based immunocapture with a primary antibody and with a biotin labeled secondary antibody coupled to mass-tagged avidin is demonstrated. As each secondary antibody can bind several avidin molecules, each having a large number of mass-tags, signal amplification can be achieved. The developed PSA sandwich mass-tag analysis method provided a limit of detection below 200 pg/mL (6 pM) for a 10 μL plasma sample, well below the clinically relevant cutoff value of 3-4 ng/mL. This brings the limit of detection (LOD) for detection of intact antigens with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) down to levels comparable to capture by anti-peptide antibodies selected reaction monitoring (SISCAPA SRM) and enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), as 6 pM corresponds to a maximal amount of 60 amol PSA captured on-spot. We propose the potential use of LDI (laser desorption/ionization) with mass-tag read-out implemented in a sandwich assay format for low abundant and/or early disease biomarker detection.

  10. Naturally Acquired Antibodies Target the Glutamate-Rich Protein on Intact Merozoites and Predict Protection Against Febrile Malaria.

    PubMed

    Kana, Ikhlaq Hussain; Adu, Bright; Tiendrebeogo, Régis Wendpayangde; Singh, Susheel Kumar; Dodoo, Daniel; Theisen, Michael

    2017-02-15

    Plasmodium species antigens accessible at the time of merozoite release are likely targets of biologically functional antibodies. Immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies against intact merozoites were quantified in the plasma of Ghanaian children from a longitudinal cohort using a novel flow cytometry-based immunofluorescence assay. Functionality of these antibodies, as well as glutamate-rich protein (GLURP)-specific affinity-purified IgG from malaria hyperimmune Liberian adults, was assessed by the opsonic phagocytosis (OP) assay. Opsonic phagocytosis activity was strongly associated (hazard ratio [HR] = 0.46; 95% confidence interval [CI] = .30-.73; P = .0008) with protection against febrile malaria. Of the antimerozoite-specific antibodies, only IgG3 was significantly associated with both OP and protection (HR = 0.53; 95% CI = .34-.84; Pcorrected = .03) against febrile malaria. Similarly, GLURP-specific antibodies previously shown to be protective against febrile malaria in this same cohort were significantly associated with OP activity in this study. GLURP-specific antibodies recognized merozoites and also mediated OP activity. These findings support previous studies that found OP of merozoites to be associated with protection against malaria and further shows IgG3 and GLURP antibodies are key in the OP mechanism, thus giving further impetus for the development of malaria vaccines targeting GLURP.

  11. Characterization and Quantification of Intact 26S Proteasome Proteins by Real-Time Measurement of Intrinsic Fluorescence Prior to Top-down Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Russell, Jason D.; Scalf, Mark; Book, Adam J.; Ladror, Daniel T.; Vierstra, Richard D.; Smith, Lloyd M.; Coon, Joshua J.

    2013-01-01

    Quantification of gas-phase intact protein ions by mass spectrometry (MS) is impeded by highly-variable ionization, ion transmission, and ion detection efficiencies. Therefore, quantification of proteins using MS-associated techniques is almost exclusively done after proteolysis where peptides serve as proxies for estimating protein abundance. Advances in instrumentation, protein separations, and informatics have made large-scale sequencing of intact proteins using top-down proteomics accessible to the proteomics community; yet quantification of proteins using a top-down workflow has largely been unaddressed. Here we describe a label-free approach to determine the abundance of intact proteins separated by nanoflow liquid chromatography prior to MS analysis by using solution-phase measurements of ultraviolet light-induced intrinsic fluorescence (UV-IF). UV-IF is measured directly at the electrospray interface just prior to the capillary exit where proteins containing at least one tryptophan residue are readily detected. UV-IF quantification was demonstrated using commercially available protein standards and provided more accurate and precise protein quantification than MS ion current. We evaluated the parallel use of UV-IF and top-down tandem MS for quantification and identification of protein subunits and associated proteins from an affinity-purified 26S proteasome sample from Arabidopsis thaliana. We identified 26 unique proteins and quantified 13 tryptophan-containing species. Our analyses discovered previously unidentified N-terminal processing of the β6 (PBF1) and β7 (PBG1) subunit - such processing of PBG1 may generate a heretofore unknown additional protease active site upon cleavage. In addition, our approach permitted the unambiguous identification and quantification both isoforms of the proteasome-associated protein DSS1. PMID:23536786

  12. ATR–FTIR spectroscopy reveals involvement of lipids and proteins of intact pea pollen grains to heat stress tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Lahlali, Rachid; Jiang, Yunfei; Kumar, Saroj; Karunakaran, Chithra; Liu, Xia; Borondics, Ferenc; Hallin, Emil; Bueckert, Rosalind

    2014-01-01

    With climate change, pea will be more frequently subjected to heat stress in semi-arid regions like Saskatchewan during flowering. The pollen germination percentage of two pea cultivars was reduced by heat stress (36°C) with an important decrease in cultivar ‘CDC Golden’ compared to ‘CDC Sage.’ Lipids, protein and other pollen coat compositions of whole intact pollen grains of both pea cultivars were investigated using mid infrared (mid-IR) attenuated total reflectance (ATR)–Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Curve fitting of ATR absorbance spectra in the protein region enabled estimation and comparison of different protein secondary structures between the two cultivars. CDC Sage had relatively greater amounts of α-helical structures (48.6–43.6%; band at 1654 cm-1) and smaller amounts of β-sheets (41.3–46%) than CDC Golden. The CDC Golden had higher amounts of β-sheets (46.3–51.7%) compared to α-helical structures (35.3–36.2%). Further, heat stress resulted in prominent changes in the symmetrical and asymmetrical CH2 bands from lipid acyl chain, ester carbonyl band, and carbohydrate region. The intensity of asymmetric and symmetric CH2 vibration of heat stressed CDC Golden was reduced considerably in comparison to the control and the decrease was higher compared to CDC Sage. In addition, CDC Golden showed an increase in intensity at the oxidative band of 3015 cm-1. These results reveal that the whole pollen grains of both pea cultivars responded differently to heat stress. The tolerance of CDC Sage to heat stress (expressed as pollen germination percentage) may be due to its protein richness with α-helical structures which would protect against the destructive effects of dehydration due to heat stress. The low pollen germination percentage of CDC Golden after heat stress may be also due to its sensitivity to lipid changes due to heat stress. PMID:25566312

  13. Relationship between Insulin-Resistance Processing Speed and Specific Executive Function Profiles in Neurologically Intact Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Frazier, Darvis T; Bettcher, Brianne M; Dutt, Shubir; Patel, Nihar; Mungas, Dan; Miller, Joshua; Green, Ralph; Kramer, Joel H

    2015-09-01

    This study investigated the relationship between insulin-resistance and constituent components of executive function in a sample of neurologically intact older adult subjects using the homeostasis model assessment (HOMA-IR) and latent factors of working memory, cognitive control and processing speed derived from confirmatory factor analysis. Low-density lipoprotein (LDL), mean arterial pressure (MAP), along with body mass index (BMI) and white matter hypointensity (WMH) were used to control for vascular risk factors, adiposity and cerebrovascular injury. The study included 119 elderly subjects recruited from the University of California, San Francisco Memory and Aging Center. Subjects underwent neuropsychological assessment, fasting blood draw and brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Partial correlations and linear regression models were used to examine the HOMA-IR-executive function relationship. Pearson correlation adjusting for age showed a significant relationship between HOMA-IR and working memory (rp = -.18; p = .047), a trend with cognitive control (rp = -.17; p = .068), and no relationship with processing speed (rp = .013; p = .892). Linear regression models adjusting for demographic factors (age, education, and gender), LDL, MAP, BMI, and WMH indicated that HOMA-IR was negatively associated with cognitive control (r = -.256; p = .026) and working memory (r = -.234; p = .054). These results suggest a greater level of peripheral insulin-resistance is associated with decreased cognitive control and working memory. After controlling for demographic factors, vascular risk, adiposity and cerebrovascular injury, HOMA-IR remained significantly associated with cognitive control, with working memory showing a trend. These findings substantiate the insulin-resistance-executive function hypothesis and suggest a complex interaction, demonstrated by the differential impact of insulin-resistance on processing speed and specific aspects of executive function.

  14. Two new types of assays to determine protein concentrations in biological fluids using mass spectrometry of intact proteins with cystatin C in spinal fluid as an example

    PubMed Central

    Tyrefors, Niklas; Michelsen, Peter

    2014-01-01

    There is no reference method that is generally acknowledged to be unbiased for the determination of the concentration of any protein in biological fluids. This is probably because mass spectrometry (MS) methods acknowledged as reference methods for determination of low molecular mass substances in biological fluids, e.g. creatinine, have been difficult to adapt for proteins. Here we suggest two tentative MS methods, which might be used as reference methods for the determination of protein concentrations in biological fluids. One is based upon the addition to the fluid of a non-proteome reference protein, very similar to the one to be measured, and analyzing the ratio between the corresponding peaks in a selected ion monitoring (SIM) chromatogram. We call this method LC-MS-NPRP (NPRP, Non-Proteome Reference Protein). The other method is based upon the classical standard addition assay for low molecular mass substances. The results of these assays for cystatin C in spinal fluid were compared to those obtained by an immunoassay. Both methods indicated lower concentration than the immunoassay. This was found to be due to the presence of a significant fraction of monohydroxylated cystatin C in spinal fluid. It turned out that the sum of the unhydroxylated and hydroxylated cystatin C concentrations, determined by either of the two MS methods, were close to the results obtained by the immunoassay. These MS-based methods analyze intact proteins and therefore seem more suitable for the determination of protein concentrations in biological fluids than other MS-based methods requiring proteolytic degradation with its inherent lack of precision. PMID:25010448

  15. Profiling the progression of cancer: separation of microsomal proteins in MCF10 breast epithelial cell lines using nonporous chromatophoresis.

    PubMed

    O'Neil, Kimberly A; Miller, Fred R; Barder, Timothy J; Lubman, David M

    2003-07-01

    The heterogeneity of cellular protein expression has stimulated development of separations targeting smaller groups of related proteins rather than entire proteomes. The following work describes the development of a technique for the characterization of membrane subproteomes from five different breast epithelial cell lines. Intact membrane proteins are separated by hydrophobicity in the first dimension using nonporous reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) to generate unique chromatographic profiles. Fractions of eluent are further separated using sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) to create distinct banding patterns. This hybrid liquid phase/gel phase method circumvents issues of membrane protein precipitation and provides a simple strategy aimed at isolating and characterizing a traditionally underrepresented protein class. Membrane protein profiles are created that discriminate between microsomal fractions of breast epithelial cells in different stages of neoplastic progression. Proteins are subsequently identified using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization - mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) mass fingerprinting and MALDI-quadrupole time of flight - tandem mass spectrometry (QTOF-MS/MS) peptide sequencing. Furthermore, as this strategy preserves intact protein structure, further characterization can be performed on proteins producing mass fingerprint spectra and fragmentation spectra that did not result in database protein identifications. The coupling of nonporous RP-HPLC with SDS-PAGE provides a useful alternative to two-dimensional PAGE (2-D-PAGE) for membrane protein analysis.

  16. Comparison of immune responses induced by rat RT-1 antigens presented as inserts into liposomes, as protein micelles and as intact cells.

    PubMed

    Hedlund, G; Jansson, B; Sjögren, H O

    1984-09-01

    Partially purified rat transplantation antigens (RT-1) were inserted into liposomes composed of various types of lipids and used for immunization. The immune responses induced by the liposomes were compared with responses induced by RT-1 as protein micelles, alone or emulsified in Freund's incomplete adjuvant, or intact cells. Liposomes gave generally a higher humoral response than protein micelles. Each type of RT-1 immunization gave a particular pattern of specific Ig (sub)class responses. Freund's incomplete adjuvant was not only lacking in potentiating effect on low protein dose immunization but had a significant inhibitory effect. Besides intact cells only distearoyl-phosphatidylcholine liposomes had the potential to induce a cell-mediated cytotoxic response.

  17. Cotton leaf curl disease in resistant cotton is associated with a single begomovirus that lacks an intact transcriptional activator protein.

    PubMed

    Amrao, Luqman; Amin, Imran; Shahid, M Shafiq; Briddon, Rob W; Mansoor, Shahid

    2010-09-01

    Cotton leaf curl disease (CLCuD) is the major limitation to cotton production across Pakistan and northwestern India. The disease first appeared in epidemic form in the 1980s and was shown to be caused by monopartite begomoviruses (seven distinct species have thus far been shown to be involved), frequently as multiple infections. Additionally, the viruses are associated with a specific satellite, the CLCuD betasatellite Cotton leaf curl Multan betasatellite (CLCuMB), which is responsible for the distinctive disease symptoms, and a satellite-like molecule (termed an alphasatellite), the function of which is unclear. During the late 1990s, cotton varieties with conventional resistance were introduced, alleviating losses to cotton production. However, during 2001 a resistance breaking strain of CLCuD (known as the "Burewala" strain) appeared which spread across most cotton producing areas of Pakistan. We have conducted an analysis of the Burewala strain and show that, contrary to the earlier (Multan) strain, it consists of a single begomovirus. The virus is associated with a recombinant betasatellite, derived from the Multan strain, but we were unable to detect the presence of an alphasatellite. Sequence comparisons show the virus to be a new recombinant species, consisting of sequences derived from two of the viruses associated with the first epidemic, for which we propose the name Cotton leaf curl Burewala virus (CLCuBuV). Surprisingly the virus lacks an intact C2 gene, encoding the transcriptional activator protein, which is invariably present in begomoviruses. The possible mechanisms for the selection of a "defective" begomovirus are discussed.

  18. Phosphorylation substrates for protein kinase C in intact pituitary cells: characterization of a receptor-mediated event using novel gonadotropin-releasing hormone analogues

    SciTech Connect

    Strulovici, B.; Tahilramani, R.; Nestor, J.J. Jr.

    1987-09-22

    The involvement of protein kinase C in the signal transduction of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) action was investigated with a GnRH superagonist, partial agonists, and antagonists in intact rat pituitary cells. Exposure of /sup 32/P-labeled cells to GnRH or to the superagonist (D-Nal(2)/sup 6/)GnRH induced the enhanced phosphorylation of 42-, 34-, 11-, and 10-kDa proteins and the dephosphorylation of a 15-kDa protein as assessed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis/autoradiography. This effect was blocked in a dose-dependent manner by potent GnRG antagonists. Downregulation of protein kinase C by prolonged incubation of the pituitary cells with high concentrations of active phorbol esters abolished protein kinase C activity and also prevented the phosphorylation induced by GnRN, or (D-Nal(2)/sup 6/)GnRH. The same effect was obtained by preincubating the cells with the protein kinase C inhibitor H-7. In this study the authors identify for the first time physiological substrates for protein kinase C in intact pituitary cells. They demonstrate a close quantitative correlation between the extent of translocation of protein kinase C, levels of phosphorylation of specific substrates in the intact cells, and the biological activity of the GnRH analogues with varying affinity for the GnRH receptor. These data strengthen the contention that the physiological effects of GnRH are primarily mediated via the phosphatidylinositol/Ca/sup 2 +/ signal transfer system and represent a first step toward defining the physiological substrates of protein kinase C and their role in the cascade of events that starts upon binding of GnRH to its receptor.

  19. Hormone-induced protein phosphorylation. I. Relationship between secretagogue action and endogenous protein phosphorylation in intact cells from the exocrine pancreas and parotid

    PubMed Central

    1982-01-01

    We undertook studies to determine whether secretagogue action on the exocrine pancreas and parotid is accompanied by phosphorylation of proteins in intact cells. For this purpose, rat pancreatic, and parotid lobules were preincubated with 32Pi for 45 min at 37 degrees C, washed, and then incubated at 37 degrees C in the presence or absence of secretagogues that effect discharge through different second messengers. Among a variety of polypeptides exhibiting enhanced phosphorylation in pancreatic lobules upon a 30-s incubation in the presence of the secretagogues carbamylcholine, cholecystokinin octapeptide, or secretin, one species with an Mr of 29,000 was especially notable for three reasons: (a) its enhanced level of phosphorylation was dependent on the dose of secretagogue used and was still apparent after incubation for 30 min at 37 degrees C; (b) an analogous phosphorylated polypeptide was observed in isoproterenol- stimulated parotid lobules; and (c) in both tissues its selective dephosphorylation was observed upon termination of stimulation by administration of atropine to carbamylcholine-stimulated pancreatic lobules and propranolol to isoproterenol-stimulated parotid lobules. These results suggest that the phosphorylation of one protein with an Mr of 29,000 is closely correlated both temporally and in a dose- dependent fashion with secretagogue action in both the exocrine pancreas and parotid. PMID:6296160

  20. Comprehensive profiling of amino acid response uncovers unique methionine-deprived response dependent on intact creatine biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Tang, Xiaohu; Keenan, Melissa M; Wu, Jianli; Lin, Chih-An; Dubois, Laura; Thompson, J Will; Freedland, Stephen J; Murphy, Susan K; Chi, Jen-Tsan

    2015-04-01

    Besides being building blocks for protein synthesis, amino acids serve a wide variety of cellular functions, including acting as metabolic intermediates for ATP generation and for redox homeostasis. Upon amino acid deprivation, free uncharged tRNAs trigger GCN2-ATF4 to mediate the well-characterized transcriptional amino acid response (AAR). However, it is not clear whether the deprivation of different individual amino acids triggers identical or distinct AARs. Here, we characterized the global transcriptional response upon deprivation of one amino acid at a time. With the exception of glycine, which was not required for the proliferation of MCF7 cells, we found that the deprivation of most amino acids triggered a shared transcriptional response that included the activation of ATF4, p53 and TXNIP. However, there was also significant heterogeneity among different individual AARs. The most dramatic transcriptional response was triggered by methionine deprivation, which activated an extensive and unique response in different cell types. We uncovered that the specific methionine-deprived transcriptional response required creatine biosynthesis. This dependency on creatine biosynthesis was caused by the consumption of S-Adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM) during creatine biosynthesis that helps to deplete SAM under methionine deprivation and reduces histone methylations. As such, the simultaneous deprivation of methionine and sources of creatine biosynthesis (either arginine or glycine) abolished the reduction of histone methylation and the methionine-specific transcriptional response. Arginine-derived ornithine was also required for the complete induction of the methionine-deprived specific gene response. Collectively, our data identify a previously unknown set of heterogeneous amino acid responses and reveal a distinct methionine-deprived transcriptional response that results from the crosstalk of arginine, glycine and methionine metabolism via arginine

  1. Comprehensive Profiling of Amino Acid Response Uncovers Unique Methionine-Deprived Response Dependent on Intact Creatine Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Xiaohu; Keenan, Melissa M.; Wu, Jianli; Lin, Chih-An; Dubois, Laura; Thompson, J. Will; Freedland, Stephen J.; Murphy, Susan K.; Chi, Jen-Tsan

    2015-01-01

    Besides being building blocks for protein synthesis, amino acids serve a wide variety of cellular functions, including acting as metabolic intermediates for ATP generation and for redox homeostasis. Upon amino acid deprivation, free uncharged tRNAs trigger GCN2-ATF4 to mediate the well-characterized transcriptional amino acid response (AAR). However, it is not clear whether the deprivation of different individual amino acids triggers identical or distinct AARs. Here, we characterized the global transcriptional response upon deprivation of one amino acid at a time. With the exception of glycine, which was not required for the proliferation of MCF7 cells, we found that the deprivation of most amino acids triggered a shared transcriptional response that included the activation of ATF4, p53 and TXNIP. However, there was also significant heterogeneity among different individual AARs. The most dramatic transcriptional response was triggered by methionine deprivation, which activated an extensive and unique response in different cell types. We uncovered that the specific methionine-deprived transcriptional response required creatine biosynthesis. This dependency on creatine biosynthesis was caused by the consumption of S-Adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM) during creatine biosynthesis that helps to deplete SAM under methionine deprivation and reduces histone methylations. As such, the simultaneous deprivation of methionine and sources of creatine biosynthesis (either arginine or glycine) abolished the reduction of histone methylation and the methionine-specific transcriptional response. Arginine-derived ornithine was also required for the complete induction of the methionine-deprived specific gene response. Collectively, our data identify a previously unknown set of heterogeneous amino acid responses and reveal a distinct methionine-deprived transcriptional response that results from the crosstalk of arginine, glycine and methionine metabolism via arginine

  2. Comprehensive analysis of proteins of pH fractionated samples using monolithic LC/MS/MS, intact MW measurement and MALDI-QIT-TOF MS

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Chul; Patwa, Tasneem H.; Kreunin, Paweena; Miller, Fred R.; Huber, Christian G.; Nesvizhskii, Alexey I.; Lubman, David M.

    2012-01-01

    A comprehensive platform that integrates information from the protein and peptide levels by combining various MS techniques has been employed for the analysis of proteins in fully malignant human breast cancer cells. The cell lysates were subjected to chromatofocusing fractionation, followed by tryptic digestion of pH fractions for on-line monolithic RP-HPLC interfaced with linear ion trap MS analysis for rapid protein identification. This unique approach of direct analysis of pH fractions resulted in the identification of large numbers of proteins from several selected pH fractions, in which approximately 1.5 μg of each of the pH fraction digests was consumed for an analysis time of ca 50 min. In order to combine valuable information retained at the protein level with the protein identifications obtained from the peptide level information, the same pH fraction was analyzed using nonporous (NPS)-RP-HPLC/ESI-TOF MS to obtain intact protein MW measurements. In order to further validate the protein identification procedures from the fraction digest analysis, NPS-RP-HPLC separation was performed for off-line protein collection to closely examine each protein using MALDI-TOF MS and MALDI-quadrupole ion trap (QIT)-TOF MS, and excellent agreement of protein identifications was consistently observed. It was also observed that the comparison to intact MW and other MS information was particularly useful for analyzing proteins whose identifications were suggested by one sequenced peptide from fraction digest analysis. PMID:17206599

  3. MALDI tissue profiling of integral membrane proteins from ocular tissues.

    PubMed

    Thibault, Danielle B; Gillam, Christopher J; Grey, Angus C; Han, Jun; Schey, Kevin L

    2008-06-01

    MALDI tissue profiling and imaging have become valuable tools for rapid, direct analysis of tissues to investigate spatial distributions of proteins, potentially leading to an enhanced understanding of the molecular basis of disease. Sample preparation methods developed to date for these techniques produce protein expression profiles from predominantly hydrophilic, soluble proteins. The ability to obtain information about the spatial distribution of integral membrane proteins is critical to more fully understand their role in physiological processes, including transport, adhesion, and signaling. In this article, a sample preparation method for direct tissue profiling of integral membrane proteins is presented. Spatially resolved profiles for the abundant lens membrane proteins aquaporin 0 (AQP0) and MP20, and the retinal membrane protein opsin, were obtained using this method. MALDI tissue profiling results were validated by analysis of dissected tissue prepared by traditional membrane protein processing methods. Furthermore, direct tissue profiling of lens membrane proteins revealed age related post-translational modifications, as well as a novel modification that had not been detected using conventional tissue homogenization methods.

  4. Canine distemper virus with the intact C protein has the potential to replicate in human epithelial cells by using human nectin4 as a receptor.

    PubMed

    Otsuki, Noriyuki; Sekizuka, Tsuyoshi; Seki, Fumio; Sakai, Kouji; Kubota, Toru; Nakatsu, Yuichiro; Chen, Surui; Fukuhara, Hideo; Maenaka, Katsumi; Yamaguchi, Ryoji; Kuroda, Makoto; Takeda, Makoto

    2013-01-20

    Recent outbreaks in monkeys have proven that canine distemper virus (CDV) causes diseases in a wide range of mammals. CDV uses SLAM and nectin4 as receptors to replicate in susceptible animals. Here, we show that human nectin4, but not human SLAM, is fully functional as a CDV receptor. The CDV Ac96I strain hardly replicated in nectin4-expressing human epithelial NCI-H358 cells, but readily adapted to grow in them. Unsurprisingly, no amino acid change in the H protein was required for the adaptation. The original Ac96I strain possessed a truncated C protein, and a subpopulation possessing the intact C protein was selected after growth in NCI-H358 cells. Other CDV strains possessing the intact C protein showed significantly higher growth abilities in NCI-H358 cells than the Ac96I strain with the truncated C protein. These findings suggest that the C protein is functional in human epithelial cells and critical for CDV replication in them.

  5. Two variables dominating the retention of intact proteins under gradient elution with simultaneous ultrafast high-resolution separation by hydrophobic interaction chromatography.

    PubMed

    Geng, Xindu; Jia, Xiaodan; Liu, Peng; Wang, Fei; Yang, Xiaoming

    2015-10-07

    The retention of intact proteins under gradient elution in hydrophobic interaction chromatography (HIC) was found to be governed by two variables, the steady region (SR) and the migration region (MR). In the SR, the proteins are immobilized by the strong interactions with the stationary phase such that the retention time is independent of the column length. In the MR, the proteins also interact with the stationary phase, but they move normally, thus the retention time depends on their partition coefficients and the column length. The SR can be used as an operation space (OP) for high-throughput protein analysis by 1D-LC using short columns at high flow rates to maintain a high resolution. The OP can also be employed for all assisted operations in online 2D-LC. Based on the steady region/migration region optimization strategy developed in this study, five successive complete separations of seven intact proteins were performed in a HIC cake in less than 5 min, and a crude extract of ribonuclease A from bovine pancreas was purified using online 2D-LC to 95.8% purity with 93.2% mass recovery in 45 min. This approach can be used to expedite the purification of drug-target proteins and should therefore be of interest to the pharmaceutical industry.

  6. Gel-aided sample preparation (GASP)--a simplified method for gel-assisted proteomic sample generation from protein extracts and intact cells.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Roman; Kessler, Benedikt M

    2015-04-01

    We describe a "gel-assisted" proteomic sample preparation method for MS analysis. Solubilized protein extracts or intact cells are copolymerized with acrylamide, facilitating denaturation, reduction, quantitative cysteine alkylation, and matrix formation. Gel-aided sample preparation has been optimized to be highly flexible, scalable, and to allow reproducible sample generation from 50 cells to milligrams of protein extracts. This methodology is fast, sensitive, easy-to-use on a wide range of sample types, and accessible to nonspecialists. © 2014 The Authors. PROTEOMICS published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Highly efficient enrichment of low-abundance intact proteins by core-shell structured Fe3O4-chitosan@graphene composites.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peng; Fang, Xiaoni; Yan, Guoquan; Gao, Mingxia; Zhang, Xiangmin

    2017-11-01

    In proteomics research, the screening and monitoring of disease biomarkers is still a major challenge, mainly due to their low concentration in biological samples. However, the universal enrichment of intact proteins has not been further studied. In this work, we developed a Fe3O4-chitosan@graphene (Fe3O4-CS@G) core-shell composite to enrich low-abundance proteins from biological samples. Fe3O4-CS@G composite holds chitosan layer decorated Fe3O4 core, which improves the hydrophilicity of materials greatly. Meanwhile, the graphene nanosheets shell formed via electrostatic assembly endows the composite with huge surface area (178m(2)/g). The good water dispersibility ensures the sufficient contact opportunities between graphene composites and proteins, and the large surface area provides enough adsorption sites for the enrichment of proteins. Using Fe3O4-CS@G, four standard proteins Cyt-c, BSA, Myo and OVA were enriched with better adsorption capacity and recovery rate, compared with previously reported magnetic graphene composites. Additionally, the mechanism of compared to" is corrected into "compared with". proteins adsorption on Fe3O4-CS@G was further studied, which indicates that hydrophobic and electrostatic interaction work together to facilitate the universal and efficient enrichment of proteins. Human plasma sample was employed to further evaluate the enrichment performance of Fe3O4-CS@G. Eventually, 123 proteins were identified from one of SAX fractions of human plasma, which is much better than commercial Sep-pak C18 enrichment column (39 proteins). All these outstanding performances suggest that Fe3O4-CS@G is an ideal platform for the enrichment of low-abundance intact proteins and thus holds great potential to facilitate the identification of biomarkers from biological samples in proteomics research. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Fast, robust and high-resolution glycosylation profiling of intact monoclonal IgG antibodies using nanoLC-chip-QTOF.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Joannes F M; Wevers, Ron A; Lefeber, Dirk J; van Scherpenzeel, Monique

    2016-10-01

    Optimal glycosylation of immunoglobulins is essential in the generation of therapeutic biologicals with respect to efficacy, pharmacokinetics and immunogenic properties. This challenge in the field of biopharmaceuticals requires technologies for fast, robust and quantitative analysis of glycosylation. Current analyses of monoclonal antibody glycosylation are proteolysis-based mass spectrometry methods, which provide detailed structural information, but suffer a number of drawbacks such as lengthy sample preparation with the possibility to introduce artifacts. Here, we describe a fast, robust and high-resolution nanoLC-chip-QTOF method for quantitative analysis of intact monoclonal IgG glycosylation profiling. The method is able to detect hypoglycosylation, i.e. the lack of whole glycans, which is an important advantage over the well-established methods for free N-glycan or glycopeptide analysis. Moreover, the method is highly amenable to automation and because no digestion steps are involved, it provides direct relative quantitative information of both glycans on each IgG attachment site. We demonstrate that the ease and robustness make this technique ideally suited for quality control of the production process of mAb biopharmaceuticals, and provides new opportunities to study the clinical impact of mAb-glycosylation in patients with monoclonal gammopathies.

  9. Protein Profiling of Preeclampsia Placental Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Shu, Chang; Liu, Zitao; Cui, Lifeng; Wei, Chengguo; Wang, Shuwen; Tang, Jian Jenny; Cui, Miao; Lian, Guodong; Li, Wei; Liu, Xiufen; Xu, Hongmei; Jiang, Jing; Lee, Peng; Zhang, David Y.

    2014-01-01

    Preeclampsia is a multi-system disorder involved in pregnancy without an effective treatment except delivery. The precise pathogenesis of this complicated disorder is still not completely understood. The objective of this study is to evaluate the alterations of protein expression and phosphorylations that are important in regulating placental cell function in preterm and term preeclampsia. Using the Protein Pathway Array, 38 proteins in placental tissues were found to be differentially expressed between preterm preeclampsia and gestational age matched control, while 25 proteins were found to be expressed differentially between term preeclampsia and matched controls. Among these proteins, 16 proteins and their associated signaling pathways overlapped between preterm and term preeclampsia, suggesting the common pathogenesis of two subsets of disease. On the other hand, many proteins are uniquely altered in either preterm or term preeclampsia and correlated with severity of clinical symptoms and outcomes, therefore, providing molecular basis for these two subsets of preeclampsia. Furthermore, the expression levels of some of these proteins correlated with neonatal small for gestational age (PAI-1 and PAPP-A) and adverse outcomes (Flt-1) in women with preterm preeclampsia. These proteins could potentially be used as candidate biomarkers for predicting outcomes of preeclampsia. PMID:25392996

  10. Protein profiling of preeclampsia placental tissues.

    PubMed

    Shu, Chang; Liu, Zitao; Cui, Lifeng; Wei, Chengguo; Wang, Shuwen; Tang, Jian Jenny; Cui, Miao; Lian, Guodong; Li, Wei; Liu, Xiufen; Xu, Hongmei; Jiang, Jing; Lee, Peng; Zhang, David Y; He, Jin; Ye, Fei

    2014-01-01

    Preeclampsia is a multi-system disorder involved in pregnancy without an effective treatment except delivery. The precise pathogenesis of this complicated disorder is still not completely understood. The objective of this study is to evaluate the alterations of protein expression and phosphorylations that are important in regulating placental cell function in preterm and term preeclampsia. Using the Protein Pathway Array, 38 proteins in placental tissues were found to be differentially expressed between preterm preeclampsia and gestational age matched control, while 25 proteins were found to be expressed differentially between term preeclampsia and matched controls. Among these proteins, 16 proteins and their associated signaling pathways overlapped between preterm and term preeclampsia, suggesting the common pathogenesis of two subsets of disease. On the other hand, many proteins are uniquely altered in either preterm or term preeclampsia and correlated with severity of clinical symptoms and outcomes, therefore, providing molecular basis for these two subsets of preeclampsia. Furthermore, the expression levels of some of these proteins correlated with neonatal small for gestational age (PAI-1 and PAPP-A) and adverse outcomes (Flt-1) in women with preterm preeclampsia. These proteins could potentially be used as candidate biomarkers for predicting outcomes of preeclampsia.

  11. Differences of protein profile before and after orthodontic treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasri, Farah Amirah Mohd; Wahab, Rohaya Megat Abdul; Karsani, Saiful Anuar; Ariffin, Shahrul Hisham Zainal

    2016-11-01

    Mechanical forces in orthodontic treatment used to treat malocclusion can cause inflamed gingival tissue and the process of tooth movement may resorb dental root. Root resorption is an iatrogenic effect of orthodontic treatment but it can be monitored using protein biomarker. This study aims to investigate the differences of protein profile before and after orthodontic treatment using different staining methods. Human gingival crevicular fluid and saliva were collected from orthodontic patients before and after treatment. Protein profile were observed using SDS-PAGE. Our study shows down regulation of proteins after 3 months of treatment. Hence, there are potential values from this study to aid in investigation for specific biomarkers for root resorption.

  12. Protein aggregation profile of the human kinome

    PubMed Central

    Graña-Montes, Ricardo; Sant'Anna de Oliveira, Ricardo; Ventura, Salvador

    2012-01-01

    Protein aggregation into amyloid fibrils is associated with the onset of an increasing number of human disorders, including Alzheimer's disease, diabetes, and some types of cancer. The ability to form toxic amyloids appears to be a property of most polypeptides. Accordingly, it has been proposed that reducing aggregation and its effect in cell fitness is a driving force in the evolution of proteins sequences. This control of protein solubility should be especially important for regulatory hubs in biological networks, like protein kinases. These enzymes are implicated in practically all processes in normal and abnormal cell physiology, and phosphorylation is one of the most frequent protein modifications used to control protein activity. Here, we use the AGGRESCAN algorithm to study the aggregation propensity of kinase sequences. We compared them with the rest of globular proteins to decipher whether they display differential aggregation properties. In addition, we compared the human kinase complement with the kinomes of other organisms to see if we can identify any evolutionary trend in the aggregational properties of this protein superfamily. Our analysis indicates that kinase domains display significant aggregation propensity, a property that decreases with increasing organism complexity. PMID:23181023

  13. Investigating Homology between Proteins using Energetic Profiles

    PubMed Central

    Wrabl, James O.; Hilser, Vincent J.

    2010-01-01

    Accumulated experimental observations demonstrate that protein stability is often preserved upon conservative point mutation. In contrast, less is known about the effects of large sequence or structure changes on the stability of a particular fold. Almost completely unknown is the degree to which stability of different regions of a protein is generally preserved throughout evolution. In this work, these questions are addressed through thermodynamic analysis of a large representative sample of protein fold space based on remote, yet accepted, homology. More than 3,000 proteins were computationally analyzed using the structural-thermodynamic algorithm COREX/BEST. Estimated position-specific stability (i.e., local Gibbs free energy of folding) and its component enthalpy and entropy were quantitatively compared between all proteins in the sample according to all-vs.-all pairwise structural alignment. It was discovered that the local stabilities of homologous pairs were significantly more correlated than those of non-homologous pairs, indicating that local stability was indeed generally conserved throughout evolution. However, the position-specific enthalpy and entropy underlying stability were less correlated, suggesting that the overall regional stability of a protein was more important than the thermodynamic mechanism utilized to achieve that stability. Finally, two different types of statistically exceptional evolutionary structure-thermodynamic relationships were noted. First, many homologous proteins contained regions of similar thermodynamics despite localized structure change, suggesting a thermodynamic mechanism enabling evolutionary fold change. Second, some homologous proteins with extremely similar structures nonetheless exhibited different local stabilities, a phenomenon previously observed experimentally in this laboratory. These two observations, in conjunction with the principal conclusion that homologous proteins generally conserved local stability, may

  14. Investigating homology between proteins using energetic profiles.

    PubMed

    Wrabl, James O; Hilser, Vincent J

    2010-03-26

    Accumulated experimental observations demonstrate that protein stability is often preserved upon conservative point mutation. In contrast, less is known about the effects of large sequence or structure changes on the stability of a particular fold. Almost completely unknown is the degree to which stability of different regions of a protein is generally preserved throughout evolution. In this work, these questions are addressed through thermodynamic analysis of a large representative sample of protein fold space based on remote, yet accepted, homology. More than 3,000 proteins were computationally analyzed using the structural-thermodynamic algorithm COREX/BEST. Estimated position-specific stability (i.e., local Gibbs free energy of folding) and its component enthalpy and entropy were quantitatively compared between all proteins in the sample according to all-vs.-all pairwise structural alignment. It was discovered that the local stabilities of homologous pairs were significantly more correlated than those of non-homologous pairs, indicating that local stability was indeed generally conserved throughout evolution. However, the position-specific enthalpy and entropy underlying stability were less correlated, suggesting that the overall regional stability of a protein was more important than the thermodynamic mechanism utilized to achieve that stability. Finally, two different types of statistically exceptional evolutionary structure-thermodynamic relationships were noted. First, many homologous proteins contained regions of similar thermodynamics despite localized structure change, suggesting a thermodynamic mechanism enabling evolutionary fold change. Second, some homologous proteins with extremely similar structures nonetheless exhibited different local stabilities, a phenomenon previously observed experimentally in this laboratory. These two observations, in conjunction with the principal conclusion that homologous proteins generally conserved local stability, may

  15. Protein Profiling of Bladder Urothelial Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Jinghai; Ye, Fei; Cui, Miao; Lee, Peng; Wei, Chengguo; Hao, Yuanyuan; Wang, Xiaoqing; Wang, Yanbo; Lu, Zhihua; Galsky, Matthew; McBride, Russell; Wang, Li; Wang, Dongwen; Cordon-Cardo, Carlos; Wang, Chunxi; Zhang, David Y.

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to detect protein changes that can assist to understand the underlying biology of bladder cancer. The data showed forty five proteins were found to be differentially expressed comparing tumors vs non-tumor tissues, of which EGFR and cdc2p34 were correlated with muscle invasion and histological grade. Ten proteins (ß-catenin, HSP70, autotaxin, Notch4, PSTPIP1, DPYD, ODC, cyclinB1, calretinin and EPO) were able to classify muscle invasive BCa (MIBC) into 2 distinct groups, with group 2 associated with poorer survival. Finally, 3 proteins (P2X7, cdc25B and TFIIH p89) were independent factors for favorable overall survival. PMID:27626805

  16. cAMP Response Element-Binding Protein Is Required for Dopamine-Dependent Gene Expression in the Intact But Not the Dopamine-Denervated Striatum

    PubMed Central

    Andersson, Malin; Konradi, Christine; Cenci, M. Angela

    2014-01-01

    The cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) is believed to play a pivotal role in dopamine (DA) receptor-mediated nuclear signaling and neuroplasticity. Here we demonstrate that the significance of CREB for gene expression depends on the experimental paradigm. We compared the role of CREB in two different but related models: L-DOPA administration to unilaterally 6-hydroxydopamine lesioned rats, and cocaine administration to neurologically intact animals. Antisense technology was used to produce a local knockdown of CREB in the lateral caudate–putamen, a region that mediates the dyskinetic or stereotypic manifestations associated with L-DOPA or cocaine treatment, respectively. In intact rats, CREB antisense reduced both basal and cocaine-induced expression of c-Fos, FosB/ΔFosB, and prodynorphin mRNA. In the DA-denervated striatum, CREB was not required for L-DOPA to induce these gene products, nor did CREB contribute considerably to DNA binding activity at cAMP responsive elements (CREs) and CRE-like enhancers. ΔFosB-related proteins and JunD were the main contributors to both CRE and AP-1 DNA–protein complexes in L-DOPA-treated animals. In behavioral studies, intrastriatal CREB knockdown caused enhanced activity scores in intact control animals and exacerbated the dyskinetic effects of acute L-DOPA treatment in 6-OHDA-lesioned animals. These data demonstrate that CREB is not required for the development of L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia in hemiparkinsonian rats. Moreover, our results reveal an unexpected alteration of nuclear signaling mechanisms in the parkinsonian striatum treated with L-DOPA, where AP-1 transcription factors appear to supersede CREB in the activation of CRE-containing genes. PMID:11739600

  17. Prefractionation of intact proteins by reversed-phase and anion-exchange chromatography for the differential proteomic analysis of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Stobaugh, Jordan T; Fague, Kaitlin M; Jorgenson, James W

    2013-02-01

    The need for multidimensional separations for bottom-up proteomic analyses has been well demonstrated by many over the past decade. The vast majority of reported approaches has focused primarily on improving the separation once the sample has already been digested. The work presented in this study shows an improvement in multidimensional approaches by prefractionation of intact proteins prior to digestion and separation of the peptides. Two modes of intact protein separation were compared, anion-exchange and reversed-phase, to assess the utility of each mode for the purpose of fractionation. Each of the samples was then enzymatically digested and analyzed by RP-UPLC-MS(E). To assess the validity of each approach, baker's yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) was grown on two different carbon sources, glycerol and dextrose. More proteins were identified by the reversed-phase prefractionation approach (546) than were found by the anion-exchange method (262). As a result, there was much greater coverage of the metabolic pathways of interest for the reversed-phase method than for the anion-exchange method.

  18. Differential protein occupancy profiling of the mRNA transcriptome

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) mediate mRNA biogenesis, translation and decay. We recently developed an approach to profile transcriptome-wide RBP contacts on polyadenylated transcripts by next-generation sequencing. A comparison of such profiles from different biological conditions has the power to unravel dynamic changes in protein-contacted cis-regulatory mRNA regions without a priori knowledge of the regulatory protein component. Results We compared protein occupancy profiles of polyadenylated transcripts in MCF7 and HEK293 cells. Briefly, we developed a bioinformatics workflow to identify differential crosslinking sites in cDNA reads of 4-thiouridine crosslinked polyadenylated RNA samples. We identified 30,000 differential crosslinking sites between MCF7 and HEK293 cells at an estimated false discovery rate of 10%. 73% of all reported differential protein-RNA contact sites cannot be explained by local changes in exon usage as indicated by complementary RNA-seq data. The majority of differentially crosslinked positions are located in 3′ UTRs, show distinct secondary-structure characteristics and overlap with binding sites of known RBPs, such as ELAVL1. Importantly, mRNA transcripts with the most significant occupancy changes show elongated mRNA half-lives in MCF7 cells. Conclusions We present a global comparison of protein occupancy profiles from different cell types, and provide evidence for altered mRNA metabolism as a result of differential protein-RNA contacts. Additionally, we introduce POPPI, a bioinformatics workflow for the analysis of protein occupancy profiling experiments. Our work demonstrates the value of protein occupancy profiling for assessing cis-regulatory RNA sequence space and its dynamics in growth, development and disease. PMID:24417896

  19. Protein profiles of hatchery egg shell membrane

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Background: Eggshells, which consist largely of calcareous outer shell and shell membranes, constitute a significant part of poultry hatchery waste. The shell membranes (ESM) not only contain proteins that originate from egg whites but also from the developing embryos and different contaminants of m...

  20. Canola Proteins for Human Consumption: Extraction, Profile, and Functional Properties

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Siong H; Mailer, Rodney J; Blanchard, Christopher L; Agboola, Samson O

    2011-01-01

    Canola protein isolate has been suggested as an alternative to other proteins for human food use due to a balanced amino acid profile and potential functional properties such as emulsifying, foaming, and gelling abilities. This is, therefore, a review of the studies on the utilization of canola protein in human food, comprising the extraction processes for protein isolates and fractions, the molecular character of the extracted proteins, as well as their food functional properties. A majority of studies were based on proteins extracted from the meal using alkaline solution, presumably due to its high nitrogen yield, followed by those utilizing salt extraction combined with ultrafiltration. Characteristics of canola and its predecessor rapeseed protein fractions such as nitrogen yield, molecular weight profile, isoelectric point, solubility, and thermal properties have been reported and were found to be largely related to the extraction methods. However, very little research has been carried out on the hydrophobicity and structure profiles of the protein extracts that are highly relevant to a proper understanding of food functional properties. Alkaline extracts were generally not very suitable as functional ingredients and contradictory results about many of the measured properties of canola proteins, especially their emulsification tendencies, have also been documented. Further research into improved extraction methods is recommended, as is a more systematic approach to the measurement of desired food functional properties for valid comparison between studies. PMID:21535703

  1. Metagenome and Metatranscriptome Analyses Using Protein Family Profiles

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Cuncong; Yooseph, Shibu

    2016-01-01

    Analyses of metagenome data (MG) and metatranscriptome data (MT) are often challenged by a paucity of complete reference genome sequences and the uneven/low sequencing depth of the constituent organisms in the microbial community, which respectively limit the power of reference-based alignment and de novo sequence assembly. These limitations make accurate protein family classification and abundance estimation challenging, which in turn hamper downstream analyses such as abundance profiling of metabolic pathways, identification of differentially encoded/expressed genes, and de novo reconstruction of complete gene and protein sequences from the protein family of interest. The profile hidden Markov model (HMM) framework enables the construction of very useful probabilistic models for protein families that allow for accurate modeling of position specific matches, insertions, and deletions. We present a novel homology detection algorithm that integrates banded Viterbi algorithm for profile HMM parsing with an iterative simultaneous alignment and assembly computational framework. The algorithm searches a given profile HMM of a protein family against a database of fragmentary MG/MT sequencing data and simultaneously assembles complete or near-complete gene and protein sequences of the protein family. The resulting program, HMM-GRASPx, demonstrates superior performance in aligning and assembling homologs when benchmarked on both simulated marine MG and real human saliva MG datasets. On real supragingival plaque and stool MG datasets that were generated from healthy individuals, HMM-GRASPx accurately estimates the abundances of the antimicrobial resistance (AMR) gene families and enables accurate characterization of the resistome profiles of these microbial communities. For real human oral microbiome MT datasets, using the HMM-GRASPx estimated transcript abundances significantly improves detection of differentially expressed (DE) genes. Finally, HMM-GRASPx was used to

  2. Sensitive protein comparisons with profiles and hidden Markov models.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, K

    2000-05-01

    Sequence database searches have become an important tool for the life sciences in general and for gene discovery-driven biotechnology in particular. Both the functional assignment of newly found proteins and the mining of genome databases for functional candidates are equally important tasks typically addressed by database searches. Sensitivity and reliability of the search methods are of crucial importance. The overall performance of sequence alignments and database searches can be enhanced considerably, when profiles or hidden Markov models (HMMs) derived from protein families are used as query objects instead of single sequences. This review discusses the concept of profiles, generalised profiles and profile-HMMs, the methods how they are constructed and the scope of possible applications in gene discovery and gene functional assignment.

  3. Profile-based short linear protein motif discovery

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Short linear protein motifs are attracting increasing attention as functionally independent sites, typically 3–10 amino acids in length that are enriched in disordered regions of proteins. Multiple methods have recently been proposed to discover over-represented motifs within a set of proteins based on simple regular expressions. Here, we extend these approaches to profile-based methods, which provide a richer motif representation. Results The profile motif discovery method MEME performed relatively poorly for motifs in disordered regions of proteins. However, when we applied evolutionary weighting to account for redundancy amongst homologous proteins, and masked out poorly conserved regions of disordered proteins, the performance of MEME is equivalent to that of regular expression methods. However, the two approaches returned different subsets within both a benchmark dataset, and a more realistic discovery dataset. Conclusions Profile-based motif discovery methods complement regular expression based methods. Whilst profile-based methods are computationally more intensive, they are likely to discover motifs currently overlooked by regular expression methods. PMID:22607209

  4. Comparison of Metalloproteinase Protein and Activity Profiling

    PubMed Central

    Giricz, Orsi; Lauer, Janelle L.; Fields, Gregg B.

    2010-01-01

    Proteolytic enzymes play fundamental roles in many biological processes. Members of the matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) family have been shown to take part in processes crucial in disease progression. The present study used the ExcelArray Human MMP/TIMP Array to quantify MMP and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP) production in the lysates and media of 14 cancer and one normal cell line. The overall patterns were very similar in terms of which MMPs and TIMPs were secreted in the media versus associated with the cells in the individual samples. However, more MMP was found in the media, both in amount and in variety. TIMP-1 was produced in all cell lines. MMP activity assays with three different FRET substrates were then utilized to determine if protein production correlated with function for the WM-266-4 and BJ cell lines. Metalloproteinase activity was observed for both cell lines with a general MMP substrate (Knight SSP), consistent with protein production data. However, although both cell lines promoted the hydrolysis of a more selective MMP substrate (NFF-3), metalloproteinase activity was only confirmed in the BJ cell line. The use of inhibitors to confirm metalloproteinase activities pointed to the strengths and weaknesses of in situ FRET substrate assays. PMID:20920458

  5. Microfluidic chips for protein differential expression profiling.

    PubMed

    Armenta, Jenny M; Dawoud, Abdulilah A; Lazar, Iulia M

    2009-04-01

    Biomarker discovery and screening using novel proteomic technologies is an area that is attracting increased attention in the biomedical community. Early detection of abnormal physiological conditions will be highly beneficial for diagnosing various diseases and increasing survivability rates. Clearly, progress in this area will depend on the development of fast, reliable, and highly sensitive and specific sample bioanalysis methods. Microfluidics has emerged as a technology that could become essential in proteomics research as it enables the integration of all sample preparation, separation, and detection steps, with the added benefit of enhanced sample throughput. The combination of these advantages with the sensitivity and capability of MS detection to deliver precise structural information makes microfluidics-MS a very competitive technology for biomarker discovery. The integration of LC microchip devices with MS detection, and specifically their applicability to biomarker screening applications in MCF-7 breast cancer cellular extracts is reported in this manuscript. Loading approximately 0.1-1 microg of crude protein extract tryptic digest on the chip has typically resulted in the reliable identification of approximately 40-100 proteins. The potential of an LC-ESI-MS chip for comparative proteomic analysis of isotopically labeled MCF-7 breast cancer cell extracts is explored for the first time.

  6. Dynamic regulation of a GPCR-tetraspanin-G protein complex on intact cells: central role of CD81 in facilitating GPR56-Galpha q/11 association.

    PubMed

    Little, Kevin D; Hemler, Martin E; Stipp, Christopher S

    2004-05-01

    By means of a variety of intracellular scaffolding proteins, a vast number of heterotrimeric G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) may achieve specificity in signaling through a much smaller number of heterotrimeric G proteins. Members of the tetraspanin family organize extensive complexes of cell surface proteins and thus have the potential to act as GPCR scaffolds; however, tetraspanin-GPCR complexes had not previously been described. We now show that a GPCR, GPR56/TM7XN1, and heterotrimeric G protein subunits, Galpha(q), Galpha(11), and Gbeta, associate specifically with tetraspanins and CD81, but not with other tetraspanins. CD9 Complexes of GPR56 with CD9 and CD81 remained intact when fully solubilized and were resistant to cholesterol depletion. Hence they do not depend on detergent-insoluble, raft-like membrane microdomains for stability. A central role for CD81 in promoting or stabilizing a GPR56-CD81-Galpha(q/11) complex was revealed by CD81 immunodepletion and reexpression experiments. Finally, antibody engagement of cell surface CD81 or cell activation with phorbol ester revealed two distinct mechanisms by which GPR56-CD81-Galpha(q/11) complexes can be dynamically regulated. These data reveal a potential role for tetraspanins CD9 and CD81 as GPCR scaffolding proteins.

  7. Phospholamban and troponin I are substrates for protein kinase C in vitro but not in intact beating guinea pig hearts

    SciTech Connect

    Edes, I.; Kranias, E.G. )

    1990-08-01

    The incorporation of (32P)inorganic phosphate into membranous, myofibrillar, and cytosolic proteins was studied in Langendorff-perfused guinea pig hearts treated with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) or 1,2-dioctanoylglycerol (D8G), which are potent activators of protein kinase C. Control hearts were perfused with an inactive phorbol ester (4 alpha-phorbol 12,13-didecanoate), which does not cause activation of protein kinase C. To ensure the blockade of different receptor systems, the perfusions were carried out in the presence of prazosin, propranolol, and atropine. Perfusion of hearts with either PMA (4 microM) or D8G (200 microM) was associated with a negative effect on left ventricular inotropy and relaxation. Examination of the 32P incorporation into various fractions revealed that there were no increases in the degree of phosphorylation of phospholamban in sarcoplasmic reticulum, and troponin I and C protein in the myofibrils, although these proteins were found to be substrates for protein kinase C in vitro. However, in the same hearts, there were significant changes in the 32P incorporation into a 28-kDa cytosolic-protein. Examination of the activity levels of protein kinase C in hearts perfused with PMA indicated a redistribution of this activity from the cytosolic to the membrane fraction, suggesting the activation of the enzyme in vivo. These findings indicate that cardiac regulatory phosphoproteins, which may be phosphorylated by protein kinase C in vitro, are not substrates for protein kinase C in beating hearts perfused with phorbol esters or diacylglycerol analogues.

  8. Objective Diagnosis of Cervical Cancer by Tissue Protein Profile Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patil, Ajeetkumar; Bhat, Sujatha; Rai, Lavanya; Kartha, V. B.; Chidangil, Santhosh

    2011-07-01

    Protein profiles of homogenized normal cervical tissue samples from hysterectomy subjects and cancerous cervical tissues from biopsy samples collected from patients with different stages of cervical cancer were recorded using High Performance Liquid Chromatography coupled with Laser Induced Fluorescence (HPLC-LIF). The Protein profiles were subjected to Principle Component Analysis to derive statistically significant parameters. Diagnosis of sample types were carried out by matching three parameters—scores of factors, squared residuals, and Mahalanobis Distance. ROC and Youden's Index curves for calibration standards were used for objective estimation of the optimum threshold for decision making and performance.

  9. Twelve serum protein profiles in children with acute nonbacterial gastroenterocolitis.

    PubMed

    Wiermannová, D; Wiedermann, D; Kadlcáková, E

    1978-01-01

    In thirty children hospitalized with acute benign, short-duration gastroenterocolitis, no obligate pathogens were isolated from stools. Five bleedings were established from each patient in order to obtain the protein profiles of albumin, orosomucoid, haptoglobin, alpha2-macroglobulin, ceruloplasmin, transferrin, C3-component, C-reactive protein, immunglobulins IgG, IgA, IgM and IgD. The proteins were quantitated by the single radial immunodiffusion method. The initial drop in some of the proteins followed may be related to general protein loss, negative nitrogen balance or hemodilution. The absence of a significant increase in all the investigated immunoglobulin classes contrasted with remarkable increase in haptoglobin and orosomucoid, both reaching normal levels in late convalescence. C-reactive protein could be demonstrated in half of the children showing early normalization with disappearance of clinical symptoms. In contrast to ceruloplasmin and C3- component, alpha2-macroglobulin was not involved in the acute phase protein reaction.

  10. Generation and Surface Localization of Intact M Protein in Streptococcus pyogenes Are Dependent on sagA

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, Indranil; Germon, Pierre; McDade, Kathleen; Scott, June R.

    2001-01-01

    The M protein is an important surface-located virulence factor of Streptococcus pyogenes, the group A streptococcus (GAS). Expression of M protein is primarily controlled by Mga, a transcriptional activator protein. A recent report suggested that the sag locus, which includes nine genes necessary and sufficient for production of streptolysin S, another GAS virulence factor, is also needed for transcription of emm, encoding the M protein (Z. Li, D. D. Sledjeski, B. Kreikemeyer, A. Podbielski, and M. D. Boyle, J. Bacteriol. 181:6019–6027, 1999). To investigate this in more detail, we constructed an insertion-deletion mutation in sagA, the first gene in the sag locus, in the M6 strain JRS4. The resulting strain, JRS470, produced no detectable streptolysin S and showed a drastic reduction in cell surface-associated M protein, as measured by cell aggregation and Western blot analysis. However, transcription of the emm gene was unaffected by the sagA mutation. Detailed analysis with monoclonal antibodies and an antipeptide antibody showed that the M protein in the sagA mutant strain was truncated so that it lacks the C-repeat region and the C-terminal domain required for anchoring it to the cell surface. This truncated M protein was largely found, as expected, in the culture supernatant. Lack of surface-located M protein made the sagA mutant strain susceptible to phagocytosis. Thus, although sagA does not affect transcription of the M6 protein gene, it is needed for the surface localization of this important virulence factor. PMID:11598078

  11. Escherichia coli TatA and TatB Proteins Have N-out, C-in Topology in Intact Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Koch, Sabrina; Fritsch, Maximilian J.; Buchanan, Grant; Palmer, Tracy

    2012-01-01

    The twin arginine protein transport (Tat) system translocates folded proteins across the cytoplasmic membrane of prokaryotes and the thylakoid membrane of chloroplasts. In Escherichia coli, TatA, TatB, and TatC are essential components of the machinery. A complex of TatB and TatC acts as the substrate receptor, whereas TatA is proposed to form the Tat transport channel. TatA and TatB are related proteins that comprise an N-terminal transmembrane helix and an adjacent amphipathic helix. Previous studies addressing the topological organization of TatA have given conflicting results. In this study, we have addressed the topological arrangement of TatA and TatB in intact cells by labeling of engineered cysteine residues with the membrane-impermeable thiol reagent methoxypolyethylene glycol maleimide. Our results show that TatA and TatB share an N-out, C-in topology, with no evidence that the amphipathic helices of either protein are exposed at the periplasmic side of the membrane. We further show that the N-out, C-in topology of TatA is fixed and is not affected by the absence of other Tat components or by the overproduction of a Tat substrate. These data indicate that topological reorganization of TatA is unlikely to accompany Tat-dependent protein transport. PMID:22399293

  12. Escherichia coli TatA and TatB proteins have N-out, C-in topology in intact cells.

    PubMed

    Koch, Sabrina; Fritsch, Maximilian J; Buchanan, Grant; Palmer, Tracy

    2012-04-27

    The twin arginine protein transport (Tat) system translocates folded proteins across the cytoplasmic membrane of prokaryotes and the thylakoid membrane of chloroplasts. In Escherichia coli, TatA, TatB, and TatC are essential components of the machinery. A complex of TatB and TatC acts as the substrate receptor, whereas TatA is proposed to form the Tat transport channel. TatA and TatB are related proteins that comprise an N-terminal transmembrane helix and an adjacent amphipathic helix. Previous studies addressing the topological organization of TatA have given conflicting results. In this study, we have addressed the topological arrangement of TatA and TatB in intact cells by labeling of engineered cysteine residues with the membrane-impermeable thiol reagent methoxypolyethylene glycol maleimide. Our results show that TatA and TatB share an N-out, C-in topology, with no evidence that the amphipathic helices of either protein are exposed at the periplasmic side of the membrane. We further show that the N-out, C-in topology of TatA is fixed and is not affected by the absence of other Tat components or by the overproduction of a Tat substrate. These data indicate that topological reorganization of TatA is unlikely to accompany Tat-dependent protein transport.

  13. An intact signal peptide on dengue virus E protein enhances immunogenicity for CD8(+) T cells and antibody when expressed from modified vaccinia Ankara.

    PubMed

    Quinan, Bárbara R; Flesch, Inge E A; Pinho, Tânia M G; Coelho, Fabiana M; Tscharke, David C; da Fonseca, Flávio G

    2014-05-23

    Dengue is a global public health concern and this is aggravated by a lack of vaccines or antiviral therapies. Despite the well-known role of CD8(+) T cells in the immunopathogenesis of Dengue virus (DENV), only recent studies have highlighted the importance of this arm of the immune response in protection against the disease. Thus, the majority of DENV vaccine candidates are designed to achieve protective titers of neutralizing antibodies, with less regard for cellular responses. Here, we used a mouse model to investigate CD8(+) T cell and humoral responses to a set of potential DENV vaccines based on recombinant modified vaccinia virus Ankara (rMVA). To enable this study, we identified two CD8(+) T cell epitopes in the DENV-3 E protein in C57BL/6 mice. Using these we found that all the rMVA vaccines elicited DENV-specific CD8(+) T cells that were cytotoxic in vivo and polyfunctional in vitro. Moreover, vaccines expressing the E protein with an intact signal peptide sequence elicited more DENV-specific CD8(+) T cells than those expressing E proteins in the cytoplasm. Significantly, it was these same ER-targeted E protein vaccines that elicited antibody responses. Our results support the further development of rMVA vaccines expressing DENV E proteins and add to the tools available for dengue vaccine development.

  14. Multiplex single-molecule interaction profiling of DNA barcoded proteins

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Liangcai; Li, Chao; Aach, John; Hill, David E.; Vidal, Marc; Church, George M.

    2014-01-01

    In contrast with advances in massively parallel DNA sequencing1, high-throughput protein analyses2-4 are often limited by ensemble measurements, individual analyte purification and hence compromised quality and cost-effectiveness. Single-molecule (SM) protein detection achieved using optical methods5 is limited by the number of spectrally nonoverlapping chromophores. Here, we introduce a single molecular interaction-sequencing (SMI-Seq) technology for parallel protein interaction profiling leveraging SM advantages. DNA barcodes are attached to proteins collectively via ribosome display6 or individually via enzymatic conjugation. Barcoded proteins are assayed en masse in aqueous solution and subsequently immobilized in a polyacrylamide (PAA) thin film to construct a random SM array, where barcoding DNAs are amplified into in situ polymerase colonies (polonies)7 and analyzed by DNA sequencing. This method allows precise quantification of various proteins with a theoretical maximum array density of over one million polonies per square millimeter. Furthermore, protein interactions can be measured based on the statistics of colocalized polonies arising from barcoding DNAs of interacting proteins. Two demanding applications, G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) and antibody binding profiling, were demonstrated. SMI-Seq enables “library vs. library” screening in a one-pot assay, simultaneously interrogating molecular binding affinity and specificity. PMID:25252978

  15. DSP: a protein shape string and its profile prediction server

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jiangming; Tang, Shengnan; Xiong, Wenwei; Cong, Peisheng; Li, Tonghua

    2012-01-01

    Many studies have demonstrated that shape string is an extremely important structure representation, since it is more complete than the classical secondary structure. The shape string provides detailed information also in the regions denoted random coil. But few services are provided for systematic analysis of protein shape string. To fill this gap, we have developed an accurate shape string predictor based on two innovative technologies: a knowledge-driven sequence alignment and a sequence shape string profile method. The performance on blind test data demonstrates that the proposed method can be used for accurate prediction of protein shape string. The DSP server provides both predicted shape string and sequence shape string profile for each query sequence. Using this information, the users can compare protein structure or display protein evolution in shape string space. The DSP server is available at both http://cheminfo.tongji.edu.cn/dsp/ and its main mirror http://chemcenter.tongji.edu.cn/dsp/. PMID:22553364

  16. DSP: a protein shape string and its profile prediction server.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jiangming; Tang, Shengnan; Xiong, Wenwei; Cong, Peisheng; Li, Tonghua

    2012-07-01

    Many studies have demonstrated that shape string is an extremely important structure representation, since it is more complete than the classical secondary structure. The shape string provides detailed information also in the regions denoted random coil. But few services are provided for systematic analysis of protein shape string. To fill this gap, we have developed an accurate shape string predictor based on two innovative technologies: a knowledge-driven sequence alignment and a sequence shape string profile method. The performance on blind test data demonstrates that the proposed method can be used for accurate prediction of protein shape string. The DSP server provides both predicted shape string and sequence shape string profile for each query sequence. Using this information, the users can compare protein structure or display protein evolution in shape string space. The DSP server is available at both http://cheminfo.tongji.edu.cn/dsp/ and its main mirror http://chemcenter.tongji.edu.cn/dsp/.

  17. Fertilization in C. elegans requires an intact C-terminal RING finger in sperm protein SPE-42

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The C. elegans sperm protein SPE-42, a membrane protein of unknown structure and molecular function, is required for fertilization. Sperm from worms with spe-42 mutations appear normal but are unable to fertilize eggs. Sequence analysis revealed the presence of 8 conserved cysteine residues in the C-terminal cytoplasmic domain of this protein suggesting these residues form a zinc-coordinating RING finger structure. Results We made an in silico structural model of the SPE-42 RING finger domain based on primary sequence analysis and previously reported RING structures. To test the model, we created spe-42 transgenes coding for mutations in each of the 8 cysteine residues predicted to coordinate Zn++ ions in the RING finger motif. Transgenes were crossed into a spe-42 null background and protein function was measured by counting progeny. We found that all 8 cysteines are required for protein function. We also showed that sequence differences between the C-terminal 29 and 30 amino acids in C. elegans and C. briggsae SPE-42 following the RING finger domain are not responsible for the failure of the C. briggsae SPE-42 homolog to rescue C. elegans spe-42 mutants. Conclusions The results suggest that a bona fide RING domain is present at the C-terminus of the SPE-42 protein and that this motif is required for sperm-egg interactions during C. elegans fertilization. Our structural model of the RING domain provides a starting point for further structure-function analysis of this critical region of the protein. The C-terminal domain swap experiment suggests that the incompatibility between the C. elegans and C. briggsae SPE-42 proteins is caused by small amino acid differences outside the C-terminal domain. PMID:21345212

  18. Protein kinase C epsilon induces systolic cardiac failure marked by exhausted inotropic reserve and intact Frank-Starling mechanism.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, David E; Rundell, Veronica L M; Goldspink, Paul H; Urboniene, Dalia; Geenen, David L; de Tombe, Pieter P; Buttrick, Peter M

    2005-11-01

    Myofilament dysfunction is a common point of convergence for many forms of heart failure. Recently, we showed that cardiac overexpression of PKC epsilon initially depresses myofilament activity and then leads to a progression of changes characteristic of human heart failure. Here, we examined the effects of PKC epsilon on contractile reserve, Starling mechanism, and myofilament activation in this model of end-stage dilated cardiomyopathy. Pressure-volume loop analysis and echocardiography showed that the PKC epsilon mice have markedly compromised systolic function and increased end-diastolic volumes. Dobutamine challenge resulted in a small increase in contractility in PKC epsilon mice but failed to enhance cardiac output. The PKC epsilon mice showed a normal length-dependent tension development in skinned cardiac muscle preparations, although Frank-Starling mechanism appeared to be compromised in the intact animal. Simultaneous measurement of tension and ATPase demonstrated that the maximum tension and ATPase were markedly lower in the PKC epsilon mice at any length or Ca2+ concentration. However, the tension cost was also lower indicating less energy expenditure. We conclude 1) that prolonged overexpression of PKC epsilon ultimately leads to a dilated cardiomyopathy marked by exhausted contractile reserve, 2) that PKC epsilon does not compromise the Frank-Starling mechanism at the myofilament level, and 3) that the Starling curve excursion is limited by the inotropic state of the heart. These results reflect the significance of the primary myofilament contractilopathy induced by phosphorylation and imply a role for PKC epsilon-mediated phosphorylation in myofilament physiology and the pathophysiology of decompensated cardiac failure.

  19. Catalytic Activity of cGMP-Dependent Protein Kinase Type I in Intact Cells Is Independent of N-Terminal Autophosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Vallur, Raghavan; Kalbacher, Hubert; Feil, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Although cGMP-dependent protein kinase type I (cGKI) is an important mediator of cGMP signaling and upcoming drug target, its in vivo-biochemistry is not well understood. Many studies showed that purified cGKI autophosphorylates multiple sites at its N-terminus. Autophosphorylation might be involved in kinase activation, but it is unclear whether this happens also in intact cells. To study cGKI autophosphorylation in vitro and in vivo, we have generated phospho-specific antisera against major in vitro-autophosphorylation sites of the cGKI isoforms, cGKIα and cGKIβ. These antisera detected specifically and with high sensitivity phospho-cGKIα (Thr58), phospho-cGKIα (Thr84), or phospho-cGKIβ (Thr56/Ser63/Ser79). Using these antisera, we show that ATP-induced autophosphorylation of cGKI in purified preparations and cell extracts did neither require nor induce an enzyme conformation capable of substrate heterophosphorylation; it was even inhibited by pre-incubation with cGMP. Interestingly, phospho-cGKI species were not detectable in intact murine cells and tissues, both under basal conditions and after induction of cGKI catalytic activity. We conclude that N-terminal phosphorylation, although readily induced in vitro, is not required for the catalytic activity of cGKIα and cGKIβ in vivo. These results will also inform screening strategies to identify novel cGKI modulators. PMID:24897423

  20. Proteomic analysis of intact flagella of procyclic Trypanosoma brucei cells identifies novel flagellar proteins with unique sub-localization and dynamics.

    PubMed

    Subota, Ines; Julkowska, Daria; Vincensini, Laetitia; Reeg, Nele; Buisson, Johanna; Blisnick, Thierry; Huet, Diego; Perrot, Sylvie; Santi-Rocca, Julien; Duchateau, Magalie; Hourdel, Véronique; Rousselle, Jean-Claude; Cayet, Nadège; Namane, Abdelkader; Chamot-Rooke, Julia; Bastin, Philippe

    2014-07-01

    Cilia and flagella are complex organelles made of hundreds of proteins of highly variable structures and functions. Here we report the purification of intact flagella from the procyclic stage of Trypanosoma brucei using mechanical shearing. Structural preservation was confirmed by transmission electron microscopy that showed that flagella still contained typical elements such as the membrane, the axoneme, the paraflagellar rod, and the intraflagellar transport particles. It also revealed that flagella severed below the basal body, and were not contaminated by other cytoskeletal structures such as the flagellar pocket collar or the adhesion zone filament. Mass spectrometry analysis identified a total of 751 proteins with high confidence, including 88% of known flagellar components. Comparison with the cell debris fraction revealed that more than half of the flagellum markers were enriched in flagella and this enrichment criterion was taken into account to identify 212 proteins not previously reported to be associated to flagella. Nine of these were experimentally validated including a 14-3-3 protein not yet reported to be associated to flagella and eight novel proteins termed FLAM (FLAgellar Member). Remarkably, they localized to five different subdomains of the flagellum. For example, FLAM6 is restricted to the proximal half of the axoneme, no matter its length. In contrast, FLAM8 is progressively accumulating at the distal tip of growing flagella and half of it still needs to be added after cell division. A combination of RNA interference and Fluorescence Recovery After Photobleaching approaches demonstrated very different dynamics from one protein to the other, but also according to the stage of construction and the age of the flagellum. Structural proteins are added to the distal tip of the elongating flagellum and exhibit slow turnover whereas membrane proteins such as the arginine kinase show rapid turnover without a detectible polarity.

  1. Matrix-assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Time of Flight (MALDI-TOF) Mass Spectrometric Analysis of Intact Proteins Larger than 100 kDa

    PubMed Central

    Signor, Luca; Boeri Erba, Elisabetta

    2013-01-01

    Effectively determining masses of proteins is critical to many biological studies (e.g. for structural biology investigations). Accurate mass determination allows one to evaluate the correctness of protein primary sequences, the presence of mutations and/or post-translational modifications, the possible protein degradation, the sample homogeneity, and the degree of isotope incorporation in case of labelling (e.g. 13C labelling). Electrospray ionisation (ESI) mass spectrometry (MS) is widely used for mass determination of denatured proteins, but its efficiency is affected by the composition of the sample buffer. In particular, the presence of salts, detergents, and contaminants severely undermines the effectiveness of protein analysis by ESI-MS. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) MS is an attractive alternative, due to its salt tolerance and the simplicity of data acquisition and interpretation. Moreover, the mass determination of large heterogeneous proteins (bigger than 100 kDa) is easier by MALDI-MS due to the absence of overlapping high charge state distributions which are present in ESI spectra. Here we present an accessible approach for analysing proteins larger than 100 kDa by MALDI-time of flight (TOF). We illustrate the advantages of using a mixture of two matrices (i.e. 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid and α-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid) and the utility of the thin layer method as approach for sample deposition. We also discuss the critical role of the matrix and solvent purity, of the standards used for calibration, of the laser energy, and of the acquisition time. Overall, we provide information necessary to a novice for analysing intact proteins larger than 100 kDa by MALDI-MS. PMID:24056304

  2. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometric analysis of intact proteins larger than 100 kDa.

    PubMed

    Signor, Luca; Boeri Erba, Elisabetta

    2013-09-09

    Effectively determining masses of proteins is critical to many biological studies (e.g. for structural biology investigations). Accurate mass determination allows one to evaluate the correctness of protein primary sequences, the presence of mutations and/or post-translational modifications, the possible protein degradation, the sample homogeneity, and the degree of isotope incorporation in case of labelling (e.g. (13)C labelling). Electrospray ionisation (ESI) mass spectrometry (MS) is widely used for mass determination of denatured proteins, but its efficiency is affected by the composition of the sample buffer. In particular, the presence of salts, detergents, and contaminants severely undermines the effectiveness of protein analysis by ESI-MS. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) MS is an attractive alternative, due to its salt tolerance and the simplicity of data acquisition and interpretation. Moreover, the mass determination of large heterogeneous proteins (bigger than 100 kDa) is easier by MALDI-MS due to the absence of overlapping high charge state distributions which are present in ESI spectra. Here we present an accessible approach for analysing proteins larger than 100 kDa by MALDI-time of flight (TOF). We illustrate the advantages of using a mixture of two matrices (i.e. 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid and α-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid) and the utility of the thin layer method as approach for sample deposition. We also discuss the critical role of the matrix and solvent purity, of the standards used for calibration, of the laser energy, and of the acquisition time. Overall, we provide information necessary to a novice for analysing intact proteins larger than 100 kDa by MALDI-MS.

  3. Proteomic Analysis of Intact Flagella of Procyclic Trypanosoma brucei Cells Identifies Novel Flagellar Proteins with Unique Sub-localization and Dynamics*

    PubMed Central

    Subota, Ines; Julkowska, Daria; Vincensini, Laetitia; Reeg, Nele; Buisson, Johanna; Blisnick, Thierry; Huet, Diego; Perrot, Sylvie; Santi-Rocca, Julien; Duchateau, Magalie; Hourdel, Véronique; Rousselle, Jean-Claude; Cayet, Nadège; Namane, Abdelkader; Chamot-Rooke, Julia; Bastin, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Cilia and flagella are complex organelles made of hundreds of proteins of highly variable structures and functions. Here we report the purification of intact flagella from the procyclic stage of Trypanosoma brucei using mechanical shearing. Structural preservation was confirmed by transmission electron microscopy that showed that flagella still contained typical elements such as the membrane, the axoneme, the paraflagellar rod, and the intraflagellar transport particles. It also revealed that flagella severed below the basal body, and were not contaminated by other cytoskeletal structures such as the flagellar pocket collar or the adhesion zone filament. Mass spectrometry analysis identified a total of 751 proteins with high confidence, including 88% of known flagellar components. Comparison with the cell debris fraction revealed that more than half of the flagellum markers were enriched in flagella and this enrichment criterion was taken into account to identify 212 proteins not previously reported to be associated to flagella. Nine of these were experimentally validated including a 14-3-3 protein not yet reported to be associated to flagella and eight novel proteins termed FLAM (FLAgellar Member). Remarkably, they localized to five different subdomains of the flagellum. For example, FLAM6 is restricted to the proximal half of the axoneme, no matter its length. In contrast, FLAM8 is progressively accumulating at the distal tip of growing flagella and half of it still needs to be added after cell division. A combination of RNA interference and Fluorescence Recovery After Photobleaching approaches demonstrated very different dynamics from one protein to the other, but also according to the stage of construction and the age of the flagellum. Structural proteins are added to the distal tip of the elongating flagellum and exhibit slow turnover whereas membrane proteins such as the arginine kinase show rapid turnover without a detectible polarity. PMID:24741115

  4. Ca/sup + +/- and cyclic AMP-induced changes in intact cell phosphorylation of ileal microvillus membrane proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Sharp, G.W.G.; Hannah, C.M.; Cohen, M.; Donowitz, M.

    1986-03-05

    Pieces of rabbit distal ileal mucosa, with the muscularis propria and serosa removed, were incubated for 90 minutes in Krebs-Ringer bicarborate buffer (KRB) with /sup 32/PO/sub 4/ to label the intracellular nucleotide pools. After rinsing, the mucosal pieces were transferred to KRB in the absence and presence of 10 ..mu..M A23187 or 10 mM theophylline. After a further 10 minutes the cells were scraped off and microvillus membranes prepared. The membranes were solubilized, subjected to two dimensional gel electrophoresis and autoradiography, and analyzed by densitometry. A23187 increased the phosphorylation of four microvillus membrane proteins with M/sub r/ of 32, 52, 110 and 116K. Increased phosphorylation of the 52 and 116K proteins has also been detected in microvillus membranes subjected to Ca/sup + +/ and calmodulin in the presence of ..gamma..-/sup 32/P-ATP. Theophylline increased the phosphorylation of the same 32 and 52K proteins and, additionally, of a second 32K peptide. While any of these proteins could be involved in the control of electrolyte transport, it is noteworthy that increased Ca/sup + +/, and increased cyclic AMP levels exert similar effects upon intestinal electrolyte transport. That A23187 and theophylline both increase the phosphorylation of the 32 and 52K proteins increases the possibility that these are involved in ion transport.

  5. Protein profile of Lupinus texensis phloem sap exudates: searching for Fe- and Zn-containing proteins.

    PubMed

    Lattanzio, Giuseppe; Andaluz, Sofía; Matros, Andrea; Calvete, Juan José; Kehr, Julia; Abadía, Anunciación; Abadía, Javier; López-Millán, Ana-Flor

    2013-08-01

    The aim of this study was to obtain a comprehensive overview of the phloem sap protein profile of Lupinus texensis, with a special focus on proteins binding Fe and Zn. L. texensis was chosen as model plant given the simplicity to obtain exudates from sieve elements. Protein profiling by 2DE revealed 249 spots, and 54 of them were unambiguously identified by MALDI-MS and ESI-MS/MS. The largest number of identified protein species belongs to protein modification/turnover and general metabolism (19-21%), followed by redox homeostasis (9%) and defense and cell structural components (7%). This protein profile is similar to that reported in other plant species, suggesting that the phloem sap proteome is quite conserved. Staining of 2DE gels for Fe-containing proteins and affinity chromatography experiments revealed the presence of two low molecular weight Fe-binding proteins in phloem sap: a metallothionein-like protein type 2B identified in the Fe-affinity chromatography, and a second protein identified with both Fe staining methods. This protein species had a molecular weight of 13.5 kDa, a pI of 5.6 and 51% homology to a phloem-specific protein from Medicago truncatula. Zinc affinity chromatography revealed four Zn-binding proteins in phloem sap, one belonging to the dehydrin family and three Zn finger proteins.

  6. Distinguishing between respiratory syncytial virus subgroups by protein profile analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Walpita, P; Mufson, M A; Stanek, R J; Pfeifer, D; Connor, J D

    1992-01-01

    We subgrouped 75 strains of respiratory syncytial virus by a protein profile method (PPM) which relies on different mobilities of the phosphoprotein in one-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and does not require monoclonal antibodies. When compared with enzyme immunoassay, PPM correctly subgrouped 54 of 56 subgroup A and all 19 subgroup B strains. Images PMID:1572961

  7. Changes in serum protein profiles of chickens with tibial dyschondroplasia

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Differences in serum protein profiles were analyzed to identify biomarkers associated with a poultry leg problem named tibial dyschondroplasia (TD) that can cause lameness. We used a bead-based affinity matrix containing a combinatorial library of hexapeptides (ProteoMinerTM) to deplete high abundan...

  8. Rapid activity-dependent delivery of the neurotrophic protein CPG15 to the axon surface of neurons in intact Xenopus tadpoles.

    PubMed

    Cantallops, Isabel; Cline, Hollis T

    2008-05-01

    CPG15 (aka neuritin) is an activity-induced GPI-anchored axonal protein that promotes dendritic and axonal growth, and accelerates synaptic maturation in vivo. Here we show that CPG15 is distributed inside axons and on the axon surface. CPG15 is trafficked to and from the axonal surface by membrane depolarization. To assess CPG15 trafficking in vivo, we expressed an ecliptic pHluorin (EP)-CPG15 fusion protein in optic tectal explants and in retinal ganglion cells of intact Xenopus tadpoles. Depolarization by KCl increased EP-CPG15 fluorescence on axons. Intraocular kainic acid (KA) injection rapidly increased cell-surface EP-CPG15 in retinotectal axons, but coinjection of TTX and KA did not. Consistent with this, we find that intracellular CPG15 is localized to vesicles and endosomes in presynaptic terminals and colocalizes with synaptic vesicle proteins. The results indicate that the delivery of the neurotrophic protein CPG15 to the axon surface can be regulated on a rapid time scale by activity-dependent mechanisms in vivo.

  9. Vaccinia Virus Protein Synthesis Has a Low Requirement for the Intact Translation Initiation Factor eIF4F, the Cap-Binding Complex, within Infected Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mulder, Jacqueline; Robertson, Morwenna E. M.; Seamons, Rachael A.; Belsham, Graham J.

    1998-01-01

    The role of the cap-binding complex, eIF4F, in the translation of vaccinia virus mRNAs has been analyzed within infected cells. Plasmid DNAs, which express dicistronic mRNAs containing a picornavirus internal ribosome entry site, produced within vaccinia virus-infected cells both β-glucuronidase and a cell surface-targeted single-chain antibody (sFv). Cells expressing sFv were selected from nonexpressing cells, enabling analysis of protein synthesis specifically within the transfected cells. Coexpression of poliovirus 2A or foot-and-mouth disease virus Lb proteases, which cleaved translation initiation factor eIF4G, greatly inhibited cap-dependent protein (β-glucuronidase) synthesis. Under these conditions, internal ribosome entry site-directed expression of sFv continued and cell selection was maintained. Furthermore, vaccinia virus protein synthesis persisted in the selected cells containing cleaved eIF4G. Thus, late vaccinia virus protein synthesis has a low requirement for the intact cap-binding complex eIF4F. This may be attributed to the short unstructured 5′ noncoding regions of the vaccinia virus mRNAs, possibly aided by the presence of poly(A) at both 5′ and 3′ termini. PMID:9765426

  10. Front-End Electron Transfer Dissociation Coupled to a 21 Tesla FT-ICR Mass Spectrometer for Intact Protein Sequence Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weisbrod, Chad R.; Kaiser, Nathan K.; Syka, John E. P.; Early, Lee; Mullen, Christopher; Dunyach, Jean-Jacques; English, A. Michelle; Anderson, Lissa C.; Blakney, Greg T.; Shabanowitz, Jeffrey; Hendrickson, Christopher L.; Marshall, Alan G.; Hunt, Donald F.

    2017-07-01

    High resolution mass spectrometry is a key technology for in-depth protein characterization. High-field Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR MS) enables high-level interrogation of intact proteins in the most detail to date. However, an appropriate complement of fragmentation technologies must be paired with FTMS to provide comprehensive sequence coverage, as well as characterization of sequence variants, and post-translational modifications. Here we describe the integration of front-end electron transfer dissociation (FETD) with a custom-built 21 tesla FT-ICR mass spectrometer, which yields unprecedented sequence coverage for proteins ranging from 2.8 to 29 kDa, without the need for extensive spectral averaging (e.g., 60% sequence coverage for apo-myoglobin with four averaged acquisitions). The system is equipped with a multipole storage device separate from the ETD reaction device, which allows accumulation of multiple ETD fragment ion fills. Consequently, an optimally large product ion population is accumulated prior to transfer to the ICR cell for mass analysis, which improves mass spectral signal-to-noise ratio, dynamic range, and scan rate. We find a linear relationship between protein molecular weight and minimum number of ETD reaction fills to achieve optimum sequence coverage, thereby enabling more efficient use of instrument data acquisition time. Finally, real-time scaling of the number of ETD reactions fills during method-based acquisition is shown, and the implications for LC-MS/MS top-down analysis are discussed.

  11. Protein and Amino Acid Profiles of Different Whey Protein Supplements.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Cristine C; Alvares, Thiago S; Costa, Marion P; Conte-Junior, Carlos A

    2016-01-01

    Whey protein (WP) supplements have received increasing attention by consumers due to the high nutritional value of the proteins and amino acids they provide. However, some WP supplements may not contain the disclosed amounts of the ingredients listed on the label, compromising the nutritional quality and the effectiveness of these supplements. The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the contents of total protein (TP), α-lactalbumin (α-LA), β-lactoglobulin (β-LG), free essential amino acids (free EAA), and free branched-chain amino acids (free BCAA), amongst different WP supplements produced by U.S. and Brazilian companies. Twenty commercial brands of WP supplements were selected, ten manufactured in U.S. (WP-USA) and ten in Brazil (WP-BRA). The TP was analyzed using the Kjeldahl method, while α-LA, β-LG, free EAA, and free BCAA were analyzed using HPLC system. There were higher (p < 0.05) concentrations of TP, α-LA, β-LG, and free BCAA in WP-USA supplements, as compared to the WP-BRA supplements; however, there was no difference (p > 0.05) in the content of free EAA between WP-USA and WP-BRA. Amongst the 20 brands evaluated, four WP-USA and seven WP-BRA had lower (p < 0.05) values of TP than those specified on the label. In conclusion, the WP-USA supplements exhibited better nutritional quality, evaluated by TP, α-LA, β-LG, and free BCAA when compared to WP-BRA.

  12. Proteins in vacuo: A molecular dynamics study of the unfolding behavior of highly charged disulfide-bond-intact lysozyme subjected to a temperature pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reimann, C. T.; Velázquez, I.; Bittner, M.; Tapia, O.

    1999-12-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations were used to interpret a variety of experimental data on highly charged disulfide-bond-intact lysozyme in vacuo. The simulation approach involved submitting a model of the protein [Reimann, Velázquez, and Tapia, J. Phys. Chem. B 102, 9344 (1998)] in a given charge state to a 3-ns-long heat pulse (usually at 500 K) followed by cooling or relaxation for 1 ns back to room temperature (293 K). This treatment yielded a charge threshold around Q0=8+ for obtaining significant unfolding, as indicated by an enhancement in collision cross section and conformer length. The collision cross sections and lengths theoretically obtained, along with the threshold charge state for initiating unfolding, were compatible with experimental results on lysozyme in vacuo. The unfolded, highly elongated conformations obtained for Q>=9+ displayed a significant level of non-native β-sheet content which appeared to be additionally stabilized by charge self-solvation.

  13. Plasma profiling of intact isoflavone metabolites by high-performance liquid chromatography and mass spectrometric identification of flavone glycosides daidzin and genistin in human plasma after administration of kinako.

    PubMed

    Hosoda, Kaori; Furuta, Takashi; Yokokawa, Akitomo; Ogura, Kenichiro; Hiratsuka, Akira; Ishii, Kazuo

    2008-08-01

    The roles of isoflavones in the prevention of several hormone-dependent cancers and osteoporosis are of great interest. Despite many pharmacokinetics studies of the isoflavones, the actual types of conjugates circulating in the body and the position(s) of conjugation sites on the flavone skeleton are still uncertain because, in general, conjugated compounds in biological fluids have been evaluated by measuring the free aglycones obtained after selective enzymatic hydrolysis. Using an high-performance (HPLC)-UV-diode-array detector (DAD) method combined with solid-phase extraction, we have obtained HPLC profiles of isoflavone glycosides [daidzin (Din) and genistin (Gin)] and of intact isoflavone metabolites in human plasma: daidzein, genistein, daizein-7-glucuronide, daidzein-4'-glucuronide, genistein-7-glucuronide, genistein-4'-glucuronide, daidzein-7-sulfate, daidzein-4'-sulfate, genistein-7-sulfate, and genistein-4'-sulfate. We investigated the plasma profile of intact isoflavone metabolites in plasma obtained 1 to-7 h after orally administration of 50 g of kinako (baked soybean powder) to two healthy volunteers. The results of DAD analysis indicated that the main isoflavone metabolite peaks were identified on the HPLC chromatogram. Furthermore, the intact glycosides Din and Gin were detected in 1-h plasma samples by their positive electrospray ionization mass spectra, demonstrating that the glycosides Din and Gin can be absorbed from the gut.

  14. Protein profiles and immunoreactivities of Acanthamoeba morphological groups and genotypes.

    PubMed

    Pumidonming, Wilawan; Koehsler, Martina; Leitsch, David; Walochnik, Julia

    2014-11-01

    Acanthamoeba is a free-living protozoan found in a wide variety of habitats. A classification of Acanthamoeba into currently eighteen genotypes (T1-T18) has been established, however, data on differences between genotypes on the protein level are scarce. The aim of this study was to compare protein and immunoreactivity profiles of Acanthamoeba genotypes. Thirteen strains, both clinical and non-clinical, from genotypes T4, T5, T6, T7, T9, T11 and T12, representing three morphological groups, were investigated for their protein profiles and IgG, IgM and IgA immunoreactivities. It was shown that protein and immunoreactivity profiles of Acanthamoeba genotypes T4, T5, T6, T7, T9, T11 and T12 are clearly distinct from each other, but the banding patterns correlate to the morphological groups. Normal human sera revealed anti-Acanthamoeba antibodies against isolates of all investigated genotypes, interestingly, however only very weak IgM and virtually no IgA immunoreactivity with T7 and T9, both representing morphological group I. The strongest IgG, IgM and IgA immunoreactivities were observed for genotypes T4, T5 and T6. Differences of both, protein and immunological patterns, between cytopathic and non-cytopathic strains, particularly within genotype T4, were not at the level of banding patterns, but rather in expression levels.

  15. Rapid discrimination of Bacillus anthracis from other members of the B. cereus group by mass and sequence of "intact" small acid soluble proteins (SASPs) using mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Castanha, Elisangela R; Fox, Alvin; Fox, Karen F

    2006-11-01

    The intentional contamination of buildings, e.g. anthrax in the bioterrorism attacks of 2001, demonstrated that the population can be affected rapidly and lethally if the appropriate treatment is not provided at the right time. Molecular approaches, primarily involving PCR, have proved useful in characterizing "white powders" used in these attacks as well as isolated organisms. However there is a need for a simpler approach, which does not involve temperamental reagents (e.g. enzymes and primers) which could potentially be used by first responders. It is demonstrated here that small acid-soluble proteins (SASPs), located in the core region of Bacillus spores, are reliable biomarkers for identification. The general strategy used in this study was to measure the molecular weight (MW) of an intact SASP by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI MS) followed by generation of sequence-specific information by ESI MS/MS (tandem mass spectrometry). A prominent SASP of mass 6679 was present in all B. anthracis strains. For B. cereus and B. thuringiensis strains the SASP had a mass of 6712. This represents a two amino acid substitution (serine to alanine; phenylalanine to tyrosine). The only SASP present in the B. anthracis genome consistent with this sequence is encoded by the gene ssB. This protein has a predicted mass of 6810, presumably post-translational processing leads to loss of methionine (mass 131) generating a SASP of mass 6679. This study showed that intact SASPs can be used as a biomarker for identification of B. anthracis; the protocol is simple and rapid. Extrapolation of this approach might prove important for real-time biodetection.

  16. Top-down and Middle-down Protein Analysis Reveals that Intact and Clipped Human Histones Differ in Post-translational Modification Patterns*

    PubMed Central

    Tvardovskiy, Andrey; Wrzesinski, Krzysztof; Sidoli, Simone; Fey, Stephen J.; Rogowska-Wrzesinska, Adelina; Jensen, Ole N.

    2015-01-01

    Post-translational modifications (PTMs) of histone proteins play a fundamental role in regulation of DNA-templated processes. There is also growing evidence that proteolytic cleavage of histone N-terminal tails, known as histone clipping, influences nucleosome dynamics and functional properties. Using top-down and middle-down protein analysis by mass spectrometry, we report histone H2B and H3 N-terminal tail clipping in human hepatocytes and demonstrate a relationship between clipping and co-existing PTMs of histone H3. Histones H2B and H3 undergo proteolytic processing in primary human hepatocytes and the hepatocellular carcinoma cell line HepG2/C3A when grown in spheroid (3D) culture, but not in a flat (2D) culture. Using tandem mass spectrometry we localized four different clipping sites in H3 and one clipping site in H2B. We show that in spheroid culture clipped H3 proteoforms are mainly represented by canonical histone H3, whereas in primary hepatocytes over 90% of clipped H3 correspond to the histone variant H3.3. Comprehensive analysis of histone H3 modifications revealed a series of PTMs, including K14me1, K27me2/K27me3, and K36me1/me2, which are differentially abundant in clipped and intact H3. Analysis of co-existing PTMs revealed negative crosstalk between H3K36 methylation and H3K23 acetylation in clipped H3. Our data provide the first evidence of histone clipping in human hepatocytes and demonstrate that clipped H3 carry distinct co-existing PTMs different from those in intact H3. PMID:26424599

  17. Top-down and Middle-down Protein Analysis Reveals that Intact and Clipped Human Histones Differ in Post-translational Modification Patterns.

    PubMed

    Tvardovskiy, Andrey; Wrzesinski, Krzysztof; Sidoli, Simone; Fey, Stephen J; Rogowska-Wrzesinska, Adelina; Jensen, Ole N

    2015-12-01

    Post-translational modifications (PTMs) of histone proteins play a fundamental role in regulation of DNA-templated processes. There is also growing evidence that proteolytic cleavage of histone N-terminal tails, known as histone clipping, influences nucleosome dynamics and functional properties. Using top-down and middle-down protein analysis by mass spectrometry, we report histone H2B and H3 N-terminal tail clipping in human hepatocytes and demonstrate a relationship between clipping and co-existing PTMs of histone H3. Histones H2B and H3 undergo proteolytic processing in primary human hepatocytes and the hepatocellular carcinoma cell line HepG2/C3A when grown in spheroid (3D) culture, but not in a flat (2D) culture. Using tandem mass spectrometry we localized four different clipping sites in H3 and one clipping site in H2B. We show that in spheroid culture clipped H3 proteoforms are mainly represented by canonical histone H3, whereas in primary hepatocytes over 90% of clipped H3 correspond to the histone variant H3.3. Comprehensive analysis of histone H3 modifications revealed a series of PTMs, including K14me1, K27me2/K27me3, and K36me1/me2, which are differentially abundant in clipped and intact H3. Analysis of co-existing PTMs revealed negative crosstalk between H3K36 methylation and H3K23 acetylation in clipped H3. Our data provide the first evidence of histone clipping in human hepatocytes and demonstrate that clipped H3 carry distinct co-existing PTMs different from those in intact H3.

  18. A Correlation between Protein Function and Ligand Binding Profiles

    PubMed Central

    Shortridge, Matthew D.; Bokemper, Michael; Copeland, Jennifer C.; Stark, Jaime L.; Powers, Robert

    2011-01-01

    We report that proteins with the same function bind the same set of small molecules from a standardized chemical library. This observation led to a quantifiable and rapidly adaptable method for protein functional analysis using experimentally-derived ligand binding profiles. Ligand binding is measured using a high-throughput NMR ligand affinity screen with a structurally diverse chemical library. The method was demonstrated using a set of 19 proteins with a range of functions. A statistically significant similarity in ligand binding profiles was only observed between the two functionally identical albumins and between the five functionally similar amylases. This new approach is independent of sequence, structure or evolutionary information, and therefore, extends our ability to analyze and functionally annotate novel genes. PMID:21366353

  19. Combining a NHS ester and glutaraldehyde improves crosslinking prior to MALDI MS analysis of intact protein complexes.

    PubMed

    Boeri Erba, Elisabetta; Klein, Pierre Andre; Signor, Luca

    2015-10-01

    Protein complexes play pivotal roles in cellular life. Nevertheless, their characterization remains a substantial challenge. Mass spectrometry (MS) is an emerging tool to study protein assemblies, and electrospray ionization (ESI) is often used because it preserves non-covalent interactions. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) represents an important alternative to ESI because it is more tolerant to salts and detergents (e.g. necessary in the case of membrane complex analyses). Prior to MALDI-MS, the subunits should be crosslinked (XLed). Moreover, crosslinking (XLing) is useful when constraint distances are determined to obtain low-resolution structural information. Here we report a novel XLing approach to study protein complexes with MALDI-MS. We investigated two tetramers (i.e. alcohol dehydrogenase and aldolase) larger than 140 kDa at two pH values (7.2 and 8.0). We tested two different crosslinkers (XLers) (i.e. BS(3) and glutaraldehyde), used separately or in combination. We utilized gentle agitation and ultracentrifugation. Our data shows that the pH influenced the XLing when using a single XLer. Combining two XLers was demonstrated to be more efficient than using a reagent alone. In particular, the combination determined a higher degree of XLing and lower mass shift. This could suggest a ranking in target amino acid availability. First residues at specific distances are linked by BS(3) , then glutaraldehyde binds residues that are still available at larger distances. Ultracentrifugation and gentle agitation both provide similar degrees of XLing, but the former method determined a lower mass increment resulting from redundant XLing. To conclude, we present an efficient dual XLing approach for determining mass and stoichiometry of protein assemblies. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Chemoproteomic profiling and discovery of protein electrophiles in human cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, Megan L.; He, Lin; Horning, Benjamin D.; Olson, Erika J.; Correia, Bruno E.; Yates, John R.; Dawson, Philip E.; Cravatt, Benjamin F.

    2016-10-01

    Activity-based protein profiling (ABPP) serves as a chemical proteomic platform to discover and characterize functional amino acids in proteins on the basis of their enhanced reactivity towards small-molecule probes. This approach, to date, has mainly targeted nucleophilic functional groups, such as the side chains of serine and cysteine, using electrophilic probes. Here we show that 'reverse-polarity' (RP)-ABPP using clickable, nucleophilic hydrazine probes can capture and identify protein-bound electrophiles in cells. Using this approach, we demonstrate that the pyruvoyl cofactor of S-adenosyl-L-methionine decarboxylase (AMD1) is dynamically controlled by intracellular methionine concentrations. We also identify a heretofore unknown modification—an N-terminally bound glyoxylyl group—in the poorly characterized protein secernin-3. RP-ABPP thus provides a versatile method to monitor the metabolic regulation of electrophilic cofactors and discover novel types of electrophilic modifications on proteins in human cells.

  1. Chemoproteomic profiling and discovery of protein electrophiles in human cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, Megan L.; He, Lin; Horning, Benjamin D.; Olson, Erika J.; Correia, Bruno E.; Yates, John R.; Dawson, Philip E.; Cravatt, Benjamin F.

    2017-03-01

    Activity-based protein profiling (ABPP) serves as a chemical proteomic platform to discover and characterize functional amino acids in proteins on the basis of their enhanced reactivity towards small-molecule probes. This approach, to date, has mainly targeted nucleophilic functional groups, such as the side chains of serine and cysteine, using electrophilic probes. Here we show that 'reverse-polarity' (RP)-ABPP using clickable, nucleophilic hydrazine probes can capture and identify protein-bound electrophiles in cells. Using this approach, we demonstrate that the pyruvoyl cofactor of S-adenosyl-L-methionine decarboxylase (AMD1) is dynamically controlled by intracellular methionine concentrations. We also identify a heretofore unknown modification—an N-terminally bound glyoxylyl group—in the poorly characterized protein secernin-3. RP-ABPP thus provides a versatile method to monitor the metabolic regulation of electrophilic cofactors and discover novel types of electrophilic modifications on proteins in human cells.

  2. Structural Analysis of the Glycosylated Intact HIV-1 gp120-b12 Antibody Complex Using Hydroxyl Radical Protein Footprinting.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaoyan; Grant, Oliver C; Ito, Keigo; Wallace, Aaron; Wang, Shixia; Zhao, Peng; Wells, Lance; Lu, Shan; Woods, Robert J; Sharp, Joshua S

    2017-02-21

    Glycoprotein gp120 is a surface antigen and virulence factor of human immunodeficiency virus 1. Broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) that react to gp120 from a variety of HIV isolates offer hope for the development of broadly effective immunogens for vaccination purposes, if the interactions between gp120 and bNAbs can be understood. From a structural perspective, gp120 is a particularly difficult system because of its size, the presence of multiple flexible regions, and the large amount of glycosylation, all of which are important in gp120-bNAb interactions. Here, the interaction of full-length, glycosylated gp120 with bNAb b12 is probed using high-resolution hydroxyl radical protein footprinting (HR-HRPF) by fast photochemical oxidation of proteins. HR-HRPF allows for the measurement of changes in the average solvent accessible surface area of multiple amino acids without the need for measures that might alter the protein conformation, such as mutagenesis. HR-HRPF of the gp120-b12 complex coupled with computational modeling shows a novel extensive interaction of the V1/V2 domain, probably with the light chain of b12. Our data also reveal HR-HRPF protection in the C3 domain caused by interaction of the N330 glycan with the b12 light chain. In addition to providing information about the interactions of full-length, glycosylated gp120 with b12, this work serves as a template for the structural interrogation of full-length glycosylated gp120 with other bNAbs to better characterize the interactions that drive the broad specificity of the bNAb.

  3. Near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy predicts protein, starch, and seed weight in intact seeds of common bean ( Phaseolus vulgaris L.).

    PubMed

    Hacisalihoglu, Gokhan; Larbi, Bismark; Settles, A Mark

    2010-01-27

    The objective of this study was to explore the potential of near-infrared reflectance (NIR) spectroscopy to determine individual seed composition in common bean ( Phaseolus vulgaris L.). NIR spectra and analytical measurements of seed weight, protein, and starch were collected from 267 individual bean seeds representing 91 diverse genotypes. Partial least-squares (PLS) regression models were developed with 61 bean accessions randomly assigned to a calibration data set and 30 accessions assigned to an external validation set. Protein gave the most accurate PLS regression, with the external validation set having a standard error of prediction (SEP) = 1.6%. PLS regressions for seed weight and starch had sufficient accuracy for seed sorting applications, with SEP = 41.2 mg and 4.9%, respectively. Seed color had a clear effect on the NIR spectra, with black beans having a distinct spectral type. Seed coat color did not impact the accuracy of PLS predictions. This research demonstrates that NIR is a promising technique for simultaneous sorting of multiple seed traits in single bean seeds with no sample preparation.

  4. O-GlcNAc profiling: from proteins to proteomes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    O-linked β-D-N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc) modification (O-GlcNAcylation) onto serine and threonine residues of proteins is an important post-translational modification (PTM), which is involved in many crucial biological processes including transcription, translation, proteasomal degradation, and signal transduction. Aberrant protein O-GlcNAcylation is directly linked to the pathological progression of chronic diseases including diabetes, cancer, and neurodegenerative disorders. Identification, site mapping, and quantification of O-GlcNAc proteins are a prerequisite to decipher their functions. In this review, we mainly focus on technological developments regarding O-GlcNAc protein profiling. Specifically, on one hand, we show how these techniques are being used for the comprehensive characterization of certain targeted proteins in which biologists are most interested. On the other hand, we present several newly developed approaches for O-GlcNAcomic profiling as well as how they provide us with a systems perspective to crosstalk amongst different PTMs and complicated biological events. Promising technical trends are also highlighted to evoke more efforts by diverse laboratories, which would further expand our understanding of the physiological and pathological roles of protein O-GlcNAcylation in chronic diseases. PMID:24593906

  5. PLIP: fully automated protein-ligand interaction profiler.

    PubMed

    Salentin, Sebastian; Schreiber, Sven; Haupt, V Joachim; Adasme, Melissa F; Schroeder, Michael

    2015-07-01

    The characterization of interactions in protein-ligand complexes is essential for research in structural bioinformatics, drug discovery and biology. However, comprehensive tools are not freely available to the research community. Here, we present the protein-ligand interaction profiler (PLIP), a novel web service for fully automated detection and visualization of relevant non-covalent protein-ligand contacts in 3D structures, freely available at projects.biotec.tu-dresden.de/plip-web. The input is either a Protein Data Bank structure, a protein or ligand name, or a custom protein-ligand complex (e.g. from docking). In contrast to other tools, the rule-based PLIP algorithm does not require any structure preparation. It returns a list of detected interactions on single atom level, covering seven interaction types (hydrogen bonds, hydrophobic contacts, pi-stacking, pi-cation interactions, salt bridges, water bridges and halogen bonds). PLIP stands out by offering publication-ready images, PyMOL session files to generate custom images and parsable result files to facilitate successive data processing. The full python source code is available for download on the website. PLIP's command-line mode allows for high-throughput interaction profiling. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  6. Elevation of Intact and Proteolytic Fragments of Acute Phase Proteins Constitutes the Earliest Systemic Antiviral Response in HIV-1 Infection

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, Holger B.; Lavender, Kerry J.; Qin, Li; Stacey, Andrea R.; Liu, Michael K. P.; di Gleria, Katalin; Simmons, Alison; Gasper-Smith, Nancy; Haynes, Barton F.; McMichael, Andrew J.; Borrow, Persephone; Kessler, Benedikt M.

    2010-01-01

    The earliest immune responses activated in acute human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection (AHI) exert a critical influence on subsequent virus spread or containment. During this time frame, components of the innate immune system such as macrophages and DCs, NK cells, β-defensins, complement and other anti-microbial factors, which have all been implicated in modulating HIV infection, may play particularly important roles. A proteomics-based screen was performed on a cohort from whom samples were available at time points prior to the earliest positive HIV detection. The ability of selected factors found to be elevated in the plasma during AHI to inhibit HIV-1 replication was analyzed using in vitro PBMC and DC infection models. Analysis of unique plasma donor panels spanning the eclipse and viral expansion phases revealed very early alterations in plasma proteins in AHI. Induction of acute phase protein serum amyloid A (A-SAA) occurred as early as 5–7 days prior to the first detection of plasma viral RNA, considerably prior to any elevation in systemic cytokine levels. Furthermore, a proteolytic fragment of alpha–1-antitrypsin (AAT), termed virus inhibitory peptide (VIRIP), was observed in plasma coincident with viremia. Both A-SAA and VIRIP have anti-viral activity in vitro and quantitation of their plasma levels indicated that circulating concentrations are likely to be within the range of their inhibitory activity. Our results provide evidence for a first wave of host anti-viral defense occurring in the eclipse phase of AHI prior to systemic activation of other immune responses. Insights gained into the mechanism of action of acute-phase reactants and other innate molecules against HIV and how they are induced could be exploited for the future development of more efficient prophylactic vaccine strategies. PMID:20463814

  7. Self-organized criticality in proteins: Hydropathic roughening profiles of G-protein-coupled receptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, J. C.

    2013-03-01

    Proteins appear to be the most dramatic natural example of self-organized criticality (SOC), a concept that explains many otherwise apparently unlikely phenomena. Protein conformational functionality is often dominated by long-range hydrophobic or hydrophilic interactions which both drive protein compaction and mediate protein-protein interactions. Superfamily transmembrane G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are the largest family of proteins in the human genome; their amino acid sequences form the largest database for protein-membrane interactions. While there are now structural data on the heptad transmembrane structures of representatives of several heptad families, here we show how fresh insights into global and some local chemical trends in GPCR properties can be obtained accurately from sequences alone, especially by algebraically separating the extracellular and cytoplasmic loops from transmembrane segments. The global mediation of long-range water-protein interactions occurs in conjunction with modulation of these interactions by roughened interfaces. Hydropathic roughening profiles are defined here solely in terms of amino acid sequences, and knowledge of protein coordinates is not required. Roughening profiles both for GPCR and some simpler protein families display accurate and transparent connections to protein functionality, and identify natural length scales for protein functionality.

  8. Isozyme patterns and protein profiles in neuromuscular disorders.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Y H; Tipler, T D; Morgan-Hughes, J A; Neerunjun, J S; Hopkinson, D A

    1982-06-01

    The isozyme patterns of six different enzymes and the polypeptide profiles of soluble proteins have been examined in muscle biopsy specimens from 74 patients with a wide variety of neuromuscular disorders. About half of the samples showed unusual features in at least one, and often several, of the enzymes and proteins tested. The extent of the biochemical abnormalities was roughly proportional to the severity of the disorders. In all cases the unusual isozymes and polypeptide profiles seemed to reflect a reversion to the fetal pattern of gene expression. However, this change appeared to occur in extant muscle and was not dependent on the appearance of new muscle fibres. Among the enzymes, phosphoglycerate mutase followed by creatine kinase appeared to be the most sensitive index of muscle disorder. The extent of the change in the muscle creatine kinase isozyme pattern was not correlated with the levels of serum creatine kinase activity.

  9. Isozyme patterns and protein profiles in neuromuscular disorders.

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Y H; Tipler, T D; Morgan-Hughes, J A; Neerunjun, J S; Hopkinson, D A

    1982-01-01

    The isozyme patterns of six different enzymes and the polypeptide profiles of soluble proteins have been examined in muscle biopsy specimens from 74 patients with a wide variety of neuromuscular disorders. About half of the samples showed unusual features in at least one, and often several, of the enzymes and proteins tested. The extent of the biochemical abnormalities was roughly proportional to the severity of the disorders. In all cases the unusual isozymes and polypeptide profiles seemed to reflect a reversion to the fetal pattern of gene expression. However, this change appeared to occur in extant muscle and was not dependent on the appearance of new muscle fibres. Among the enzymes, phosphoglycerate mutase followed by creatine kinase appeared to be the most sensitive index of muscle disorder. The extent of the change in the muscle creatine kinase isozyme pattern was not correlated with the levels of serum creatine kinase activity. Images PMID:6286971

  10. Characterization of intact protein conjugates and biopharmaceuticals using ion-exchange chromatography with online detection by native electrospray ionization mass spectrometry and top-down tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Muneeruddin, Khaja; Nazzaro, Mark; Kaltashov, Igor A

    2015-10-06

    Characterization of biopharmaceutical products is a challenging task, which needs to be carried out at several different levels (including both primary structure and conformation). An additional difficulty frequently arises due to the structural heterogeneity inherent to many protein-based therapeutics (e.g., extensive glycosylation or "designer" modifications such as chemical conjugation) or introduced postproduction as a result of stress (e.g., oxidation and deamidation). A combination of ion-exchange chromatography (IXC) with online detection by native electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI MS) allows characterization of complex and heterogeneous therapeutic proteins and protein conjugates to be accomplished at a variety of levels without compromising their conformational integrity. The IXC/ESI MS measurements allow protein conjugates to be profiled by analyzing conjugation stoichiometry and the presence of multiple positional isomers, as well as to establish the effect of chemical modifications on the conformational integrity of each species. While mass profiling alone is not sufficient for identification of nonenzymatic post-translational modifications (PTMs) that result in a very small mass change of the eluting species (e.g., deamidation), this task can be completed using online top-down structural analysis, as demonstrated using stressed interferon-β as an example. The wealth of information that can be provided by IXC/native ESI MS and tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) on protein-based therapeutics will undoubtedly make it a very valuable addition to the experimental toolbox of biopharmaceutical analysis.

  11. Selective and Nonselective Cleavages in Positive and Negative CID of the Fragments Generated from In-Source Decay of Intact Proteins in MALDI-MS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takayama, Mitsuo; Sekiya, Sadanori; Iimuro, Ryunosuke; Iwamoto, Shinichi; Tanaka, Koichi

    2014-01-01

    Selective and nonselective cleavages in ion trap low-energy collision-induced dissociation (CID) experiments of the fragments generated from in-source decay (ISD) with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI MS) of intact proteins are described in both positive and negative ion modes. The MALDI-ISD spectra of the proteins demonstrate common, discontinuous, abundant c- and z'-ions originating from cleavage at the N-Cα bond of Xxx-Asp/Asn and Gly-Xxx residues in both positive- and negative-ion modes. The positive ion CID of the c- and z'-ions resulted in product ions originating from selective cleavage at Asp-Xxx, Glu-Xxx and Cys-Xxx residues. Nonselective cleavage product ions rationalized by the mechanism of a "mobile proton" are also observed in positive ion CID spectra. Negative ion CID of the ISD fragments results in complex product ions accompanied by the loss of neutrals from b-, c-, and y-ions. The most characteristic feature of negative ion CID is selective cleavage of the peptide bonds of acidic residues, Xxx-Asp/Glu/Cys. A definite influence of α-helix on the CID product ions was not obtained. However, the results from positive ion and negative ion CID of the MALDI-ISD fragments that may have long α-helical domains suggest that acidic residues in helix-free regions tend to degrade more than those in helical regions.

  12. Selective and nonselective cleavages in positive and negative CID of the fragments generated from in-source decay of intact proteins in MALDI-MS.

    PubMed

    Takayama, Mitsuo; Sekiya, Sadanori; Iimuro, Ryunosuke; Iwamoto, Shinichi; Tanaka, Koichi

    2014-01-01

    Selective and nonselective cleavages in ion trap low-energy collision-induced dissociation (CID) experiments of the fragments generated from in-source decay (ISD) with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI MS) of intact proteins are described in both positive and negative ion modes. The MALDI-ISD spectra of the proteins demonstrate common, discontinuous, abundant c- and z'-ions originating from cleavage at the N-Cα bond of Xxx-Asp/Asn and Gly-Xxx residues in both positive- and negative-ion modes. The positive ion CID of the c- and z'-ions resulted in product ions originating from selective cleavage at Asp-Xxx, Glu-Xxx and Cys-Xxx residues. Nonselective cleavage product ions rationalized by the mechanism of a "mobile proton" are also observed in positive ion CID spectra. Negative ion CID of the ISD fragments results in complex product ions accompanied by the loss of neutrals from b-, c-, and y-ions. The most characteristic feature of negative ion CID is selective cleavage of the peptide bonds of acidic residues, Xxx-Asp/Glu/Cys. A definite influence of α-helix on the CID product ions was not obtained. However, the results from positive ion and negative ion CID of the MALDI-ISD fragments that may have long α-helical domains suggest that acidic residues in helix-free regions tend to degrade more than those in helical regions.

  13. Front-End Electron Transfer Dissociation Coupled to a 21 Tesla FT-ICR Mass Spectrometer for Intact Protein Sequence Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weisbrod, Chad R.; Kaiser, Nathan K.; Syka, John E. P.; Early, Lee; Mullen, Christopher; Dunyach, Jean-Jacques; English, A. Michelle; Anderson, Lissa C.; Blakney, Greg T.; Shabanowitz, Jeffrey; Hendrickson, Christopher L.; Marshall, Alan G.; Hunt, Donald F.

    2017-09-01

    High resolution mass spectrometry is a key technology for in-depth protein characterization. High-field Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR MS) enables high-level interrogation of intact proteins in the most detail to date. However, an appropriate complement of fragmentation technologies must be paired with FTMS to provide comprehensive sequence coverage, as well as characterization of sequence variants, and post-translational modifications. Here we describe the integration of front-end electron transfer dissociation (FETD) with a custom-built 21 tesla FT-ICR mass spectrometer, which yields unprecedented sequence coverage for proteins ranging from 2.8 to 29 kDa, without the need for extensive spectral averaging (e.g., 60% sequence coverage for apo-myoglobin with four averaged acquisitions). The system is equipped with a multipole storage device separate from the ETD reaction device, which allows accumulation of multiple ETD fragment ion fills. Consequently, an optimally large product ion population is accumulated prior to transfer to the ICR cell for mass analysis, which improves mass spectral signal-to-noise ratio, dynamic range, and scan rate. We find a linear relationship between protein molecular weight and minimum number of ETD reaction fills to achieve optimum sequence coverage, thereby enabling more efficient use of instrument data acquisition time. Finally, real-time scaling of the number of ETD reactions fills during method-based acquisition is shown, and the implications for LC-MS/MS top-down analysis are discussed. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  14. Gene expression profiling to identify eggshell proteins involved in physical defense of the chicken egg

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background As uricoletic animals, chickens produce cleidoic eggs, which are self-contained bacteria-resistant biological packages for extra-uterine development of the chick embryo. The eggshell constitutes a natural physical barrier against bacterial penetration if it forms correctly and remains intact. The eggshell's remarkable mechanical properties are due to interactions among mineral components and the organic matrix proteins. The purpose of our study was to identify novel eggshell proteins by examining the transcriptome of the uterus during calcification of the eggshell. An extensive bioinformatic analysis on genes over-expressed in the uterus allowed us to identify novel eggshell proteins that contribute to the egg's natural defenses. Results Our 14 K Del-Mar Chicken Integrated Systems microarray was used for transcriptional profiling in the hen's uterus during eggshell deposition. A total of 605 transcripts were over-expressed in the uterus compared with the magnum or white isthmus across a wide range of abundance (1.1- to 79.4-fold difference). The 605 highly-expressed uterine transcripts correspond to 469 unique genes, which encode 437 different proteins. Gene Ontology (GO) analysis was used for interpretation of protein function. The most over-represented GO terms are related to genes encoding ion transport proteins, which provide eggshell mineral precursors. Signal peptide sequence was found for 54 putative proteins secreted by the uterus during eggshell formation. Many functional proteins are involved in calcium binding or biomineralization--prerequisites for interacting with the mineral phase during eggshell fabrication. While another large group of proteins could be involved in proper folding of the eggshell matrix. Many secreted uterine proteins possess antibacterial properties, which would protect the egg against microbial invasion. A final group includes proteases and protease inhibitors that regulate protein activity in the acellular uterine fluid

  15. Interaction of silver nanoparticles with proteins: a characteristic protein concentration dependent profile of SPR signal.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Victor; Das, K P

    2013-11-01

    Silver nanoparticles are finding increasing applications in biological systems, for example as antimicrobial agents and potential candidates for control drug release systems. In all such applications, silver nanoparticles interact with proteins and other biomolecules. Hence, the study of such interactions is of considerable importance. While BSA has been extensively used as a model protein for the study of interaction with the silver nanoparticles, studies using other proteins are rather limited. The interaction of silver nanoparticles with light leads to collective oscillation of the conducting electrons giving rise to surface plasmon resonance (SPR). Here, we have studied the protein concentration dependence of the SPR band profiles for a number of proteins. We found that for all the proteins, with increase in concentration, the SPR band intensity initially decreased, reaching minima and then increased again leading to a characteristic "dip and rise" pattern. Minimum point of the pattern appeared to be related to the isoelectric point of the proteins. Detailed dynamic light scattering and transmission electron microscopy studies revealed that the consistency of SPR profile was dependent on the average particle size and state of association of the silver nanoparticles with the change in the protein concentration. Fluorescence spectroscopic studies showed the binding constants of the proteins with the silver nanoparticles were in the nano molar range with more than one nanoparticle binding to protein molecule. Structural studies demonstrate that protein retains its native-like structure on the nanoparticle surface unless the molar ratio of silver nanoparticles to protein exceeds 10. Our study reveals that nature of the protein concentration dependent profile of SPR signal is a general phenomena and mostly independent of the size and structure of the proteins. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Profiling proteins in nutraceutical formulations: characterization of the constituents.

    PubMed

    Bellomaria, Alessia; Nepravishta, Ridvan; Marchetti, Mario; Paci, Maurizio

    2016-03-01

    Several nutraceutical preparations containing proteins, amino acids and other small molecules are nowadays present on the market. In this work we propose NMR spectroscopy such as (1)H NMR, (1)H-(1)H TOCSY and DOSY for their constituents characterization, identification and profiling, comparing these results with those obtained by electrophoretic technique such as SDS-PAGE. The (1)H NMR spectroscopy was applied for measurements of the amino acids and other small compounds added from the manufacturer. Further the autocorrelation function obtained from the one dimensional spectrum was used without the complete assignment of the resonances of the NMR spectrum of proteins for the evaluation of the folding quality and stability. Finally the DOSY NMR technique was performed on the samples for the characterization of the mean molecular weight range of proteins. All this features considered together create an important set of data useful for the evaluation of the protein profiling and the characterization of such formulations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Expression of constitutively active Akt/protein kinase B signals GLUT4 translocation in the absence of an intact actin cytoskeleton.

    PubMed

    Eyster, Craig A; Duggins, Quwanza S; Olson, Ann Louise

    2005-05-06

    The actin cytoskeleton has been shown to be required for insulin-dependent GLUT4 translocation; however, the role that the actin network plays is unknown. Actin may play a role in formation of an active signaling complex, or actin may be required for movement of vesicles to the plasma membrane surface. To distinguish between these possibilities, we examined the ability of myr-Akt, a constitutively active form of Akt that signals GLUT4 translocation to the plasma membrane in the absence of insulin, to signal translocation of an HA-GLUT4-GFP reporter protein in the presence or absence of an intact cytoskeleton in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Expression of myr-Akt signaled the redistribution of the GLUT4 reporter protein to the cell surface in the absence or presence of 10 microm latrunculin B, a concentration sufficient to completely inhibit insulin-dependent redistribution of the GLUT4 reporter to the cell surface. These data suggest that the actin network plays a primary role in organization of the insulin-signaling complex. To further support this conclusion, we measured the activation of known signaling proteins using a saturating concentration of insulin in cells pretreated without or with 10 microm latrunculin B. We found that latrunculin treatment did not affect insulin-dependent tyrosine phosphorylation of the insulin receptor beta-subunit and IRS-1 but completely inhibited activation of Akt/PKB enzymatic activity. Phosphorylation of Akt/PKB at Ser-473 and Thr-308 was inhibited by latrunculin B treatment, indicating that the defect in signaling lies prior to Akt/PKB activation. In summary, our data support the hypothesis that the actin network plays a role in organization of the insulin-signaling complex but is not required for vesicle trafficking and/or fusion.

  18. High quality protein sequence alignment by combining structural profile prediction and profile alignment using SABERTOOTH

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Protein alignments are an essential tool for many bioinformatics analyses. While sequence alignments are accurate for proteins of high sequence similarity, they become unreliable as they approach the so-called 'twilight zone' where sequence similarity gets indistinguishable from random. For such distant pairs, structure alignment is of much better quality. Nevertheless, sequence alignment is the only choice in the majority of cases where structural data is not available. This situation demands development of methods that extend the applicability of accurate sequence alignment to distantly related proteins. Results We develop a sequence alignment method that combines the prediction of a structural profile based on the protein's sequence with the alignment of that profile using our recently published alignment tool SABERTOOTH. In particular, we predict the contact vector of protein structures using an artificial neural network based on position-specific scoring matrices generated by PSI-BLAST and align these predicted contact vectors. The resulting sequence alignments are assessed using two different tests: First, we assess the alignment quality by measuring the derived structural similarity for cases in which structures are available. In a second test, we quantify the ability of the significance score of the alignments to recognize structural and evolutionary relationships. As a benchmark we use a representative set of the SCOP (structural classification of proteins) database, with similarities ranging from closely related proteins at SCOP family level, to very distantly related proteins at SCOP fold level. Comparing these results with some prominent sequence alignment tools, we find that SABERTOOTH produces sequence alignments of better quality than those of Clustal W, T-Coffee, MUSCLE, and PSI-BLAST. HHpred, one of the most sophisticated and computationally expensive tools available, outperforms our alignment algorithm at family and superfamily levels

  19. Fold homology detection using sequence fragment composition profiles of proteins.

    PubMed

    Solis, Armando D; Rackovsky, Shalom R

    2010-10-01

    The effectiveness of sequence alignment in detecting structural homology among protein sequences decreases markedly when pairwise sequence identity is low (the so-called "twilight zone" problem of sequence alignment). Alternative sequence comparison strategies able to detect structural kinship among highly divergent sequences are necessary to address this need. Among them are alignment-free methods, which use global sequence properties (such as amino acid composition) to identify structural homology in a rapid and straightforward way. We explore the viability of using tetramer sequence fragment composition profiles in finding structural relationships that lie undetected by traditional alignment. We establish a strategy to recast any given protein sequence into a tetramer sequence fragment composition profile, using a series of amino acid clustering steps that have been optimized for mutual information. Our method has the effect of compressing the set of 160,000 unique tetramers (if using the 20-letter amino acid alphabet) into a more tractable number of reduced tetramers (approximately 15-30), so that a meaningful tetramer composition profile can be constructed. We test remote homology detection at the topology and fold superfamily levels using a comprehensive set of fold homologs, culled from the CATH database that share low pairwise sequence similarity. Using the receiver-operating characteristic measure, we demonstrate potentially significant improvement in using information-optimized reduced tetramer composition, over methods relying only on the raw amino acid composition or on traditional sequence alignment, in homology detection at or below the "twilight zone". 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  20. Fold Homology Detection Using Sequence Fragment Composition Profiles of Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Solis, Armando D.; Rackovsky, Shalom R.

    2010-01-01

    The effectiveness of sequence alignment in detecting structural homology among protein sequences decreases markedly when pairwise sequence identity is low (the so-called “twilight zone” problem of sequence alignment). Alternative sequence comparison strategies able to detect structural kinship among highly divergent sequences are necessary to address this need. Among them are alignment-free methods, which use global sequence properties (such as amino acid composition) to identify structural homology in a rapid and straightforward way. We explore the viability of using tetramer sequence fragment composition profiles in finding structural relationships that lie undetected by traditional alignment. We establish a strategy to recast any given protein sequence into a tetramer sequence fragment composition profile, using a series of amino acid clustering steps that have been optimized for mutual information. Our method has the effect of compressing the set of 160,000 unique tetramers (if using the 20-letter amino acid alphabet) into a more tractable number of reduced tetramers (around 15 to 30), so that a meaningful tetramer composition profile can be constructed. We test remote homology detection at the topology and fold superfamily levels using a comprehensive set of fold homologs, culled from the CATH database, that share low pairwise sequence similarity. Using the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) measure, we demonstrate potentially significant improvement in using information-optimized reduced tetramer composition, over methods relying only on the raw amino acid composition or on traditional sequence alignment, in homology detection at or below the “twilight zone”. PMID:20635424

  1. Intact metabolite profiling of mouse brain by probe electrospray ionization/triple quadrupole tandem mass spectrometry (PESI/MS/MS) and its potential use for local distribution analysis of the brain.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Yumi; Zaitsu, Kei; Murata, Tasuku; Ohara, Tomomi; Moreau, Stéphane; Kusano, Maiko; Tanihata, Hiroshi; Tsuchihashi, Hitoshi; Ishii, Akira; Ishikawa, Tetsuya

    2017-08-29

    Probe electrospray ionization (PESI), which is an ambient ionization technique, enables us to analyze intact endogenous metabolites without sample preparation. In this study, we applied the newly developed method of PESI coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (PESI/MS/MS) to analyze metabolites in mouse brain, where its lipid composition often interfere with MS-based metabolome analysis. As a result, PESI/MS/MS directly detected 25 metabolites in a mouse frontal cortex, and clearly discriminated the metabolic profiles of mice model with energy metabolism disruption from control mice. PESI/MS/MS also allowed us to perform local distribution analysis of the hippocampus as well as the frontal cortex in each mouse (n = 5), discriminating their subtle metabolic differences. These results showed high potential of PESI/MS/MS for direct metabolome profiling of mouse brain. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Parameters affecting the separation of intact proteins in gradient-elution reversed-phase chromatography using poly(styrene-co-divinylbenzene) monolithic capillary columns.

    PubMed

    Detobel, Frederik; Broeckhoven, Ken; Wellens, Joke; Wouters, Bert; Swart, Remco; Ursem, Mario; Desmet, Gert; Eeltink, Sebastiaan

    2010-04-30

    An experimental study was performed to investigate the effects of column parameters and gradient conditions on the separation of intact proteins using styrene-based monolithic columns. The effect of flow rate on peak width was investigated at constant gradient steepness by normalizing the gradient time for the column hold-up time. When operating the column at a temperature of 60 degrees C a small C-term effect was observed in a flow rate range of 1-4 microL/min. However, the C-term effect on peak width is not as strong as the decrease in peak width due to increasing flow rate. The peak capacity increased according to the square root of the column length. Decreasing the macropore size of the polymer monolith while maintaining the column length constant, resulted in an increase in peak capacity. A trade-off between peak capacity and total analysis time was made for 50, 100, and 250 mm long monolithic columns and a microparticulate column packed with 5 microm porous silica particles while operating at a flow rate of 2 microL/min. The peak capacity per unit time of the 50mm long monolithic column with small pore size was superior when the total analysis time is below 120 min, yielding a maximum peak capacity of 380. For more demanding separations the 250 mm long monolith provided the highest peak capacity in the shortest possible time frame.

  3. Fragrance release profile from sonochemically prepared protein microsphere containers.

    PubMed

    Tzhayik, Oshrat; Cavaco-Paulo, Artur; Gedanken, Aharon

    2012-07-01

    Protein microspheres have been prepared by sonicating a mixture of pure fragrant oil (amyl acetate (AA)) with an aqueous protein (bovine serum albumin) solution. The prepared protein spheres are nano- to micrometer sized with an encapsulation efficiency of approx. 97% for the AA present on the surface and inside the BSA capsule. Containers were found stable for more than 6 months when stored sealed at 4°C and 20°C. For the release profile measurements, we used a simple, automated and direct method. We continuously weighed the encapsulated microspheres and measured the evaporation rates. The release profiles at 15°C and 25°C display two different evaporation rates. The higher rate is the sum of a few evaporation rates, including water molecules, while the slower rate is due to the evaporation of pure AA. The changes in the evaporation rates occur upon the collapse of the container. This event coincides with the full evaporation of water. For morphological characterization we dyed the AA with Nile red, and used SEM, ESEM, Cryo-SEM, light microscopy, and confocal laser scanning microscopy measurements. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. A versatile protein microarray platform enabling antibody profiling against denatured proteins.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jie; Barker, Kristi; Steel, Jason; Park, Jin; Saul, Justin; Festa, Fernanda; Wallstrom, Garrick; Yu, Xiaobo; Bian, Xiaofang; Anderson, Karen S; Figueroa, Jonine D; LaBaer, Joshua; Qiu, Ji

    2013-06-01

    We aim to develop a protein microarray platform capable of presenting both natural and denatured forms of proteins for antibody biomarker discovery. We will further optimize plasma screening protocols to improve detection. We developed a new covalent capture protein microarray chemistry using HaloTag fusion proteins and ligand. To enhance protein yield, we used HeLa cell lysate as an in vitro transcription translation (IVTT) system. Escherichia coli lysates were added to the plasma blocking buffer to reduce nonspecific background. These protein microarrays were probed with plasma samples and autoantibody responses were quantified and compared with or without denaturing buffer treatment. We demonstrated that protein microarrays using the covalent attachment chemistry endured denaturing conditions. Blocking with E. coli lysates greatly reduced the background signals and expression with IVTT based on HeLa cell lysates significantly improved the antibody signals on protein microarrays probed with plasma samples. Plasma samples probed on denatured protein arrays produced autoantibody profiles distinct from those probed on natively displayed proteins. This versatile protein microarray platform allows the display of both natural and denatured proteins, offers a new dimension to search for disease-specific antibodies, broadens the repertoire of potential biomarkers, and will potentially yield clinical diagnostics with greater performance. © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Protein profiling of the dimorphic, pathogenic fungus, Penicillium marneffei

    PubMed Central

    Chandler, Julie M; Treece, Erin R; Trenary, Heather R; Brenneman, Jessica L; Flickner, Tressa J; Frommelt, Jonathan L; Oo, Zaw M; Patterson, Megan M; Rundle, William T; Valle, Olga V; Kim, Thomas D; Walker, Gary R; Cooper, Chester R

    2008-01-01

    Background Penicillium marneffei is a pathogenic fungus that afflicts immunocompromised individuals having lived or traveled in Southeast Asia. This species is unique in that it is the only dimorphic member of the genus. Dimorphism results from a process, termed phase transition, which is regulated by temperature of incubation. At room temperature, the fungus grows filamentously (mould phase), but at body temperature (37°C), a uninucleate yeast form develops that reproduces by fission. Formation of the yeast phase appears to be a requisite for pathogenicity. To date, no genes have been identified in P. marneffei that strictly induce mould-to-yeast phase conversion. In an effort to help identify potential gene products associated with morphogenesis, protein profiles were generated from the yeast and mould phases of P. marneffei. Results Whole cell proteins from the early stages of mould and yeast development in P. marneffei were resolved by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Selected proteins were recovered and sequenced by capillary-liquid chromatography-nanospray tandem mass spectrometry. Putative identifications were derived by searching available databases for homologous fungal sequences. Proteins found common to both mould and yeast phases included the signal transduction proteins cyclophilin and a RACK1-like ortholog, as well as those related to general metabolism, energy production, and protection from oxygen radicals. Many of the mould-specific proteins identified possessed similar functions. By comparison, proteins exhibiting increased expression during development of the parasitic yeast phase comprised those involved in heat-shock responses, general metabolism, and cell-wall biosynthesis, as well as a small GTPase that regulates nuclear membrane transport and mitotic processes in fungi. The cognate gene encoding the latter protein, designated RanA, was subsequently cloned and characterized. The P. marneffei RanA protein sequence, which contained the

  6. Specificity profiling of protein phosphatases toward phosphoseryl and phosphothreonyl peptides.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Qing; Luechapanichkul, Rinrada; Zhai, Yujing; Pei, Dehua

    2013-07-03

    A combinatorial library method was developed to systematically profile the substrate specificity of protein phosphatases toward phosphoseryl (pS) and phosphothreonyl (pT) peptides. Application of this method and a previously reported phosphotyrosyl (pY) library screening technique to dual-specificity phosphatase (DUSP) VH1 of vaccinia virus revealed that VH1 is highly active toward both pS/pT and pY peptides. VH1 exhibits different and more stringent sequence specificity toward pS/pT than pY substrates. Unlike previously characterized protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs), the activity and specificity of VH1 are primarily determined by the amino acid residues C-terminal to the pS, pT, or pY residue. In contrast, the mammalian VH1-related (VHR) DUSP has intrinsically low catalytic activity toward pS and pT substrates, suggesting that its primary physiological function is to dephosphorylate pY residues in substrate proteins. This method is applicable to other DUSPs and protein-serine/threonine phosphatases, and the substrate specificity data will be useful for identifying the physiological substrates of these enzymes.

  7. Profiling of urinary proteins in Karan Fries cows reveals more than 1550 proteins.

    PubMed

    Bathla, Shveta; Rawat, Preeti; Baithalu, Rubina; Yadav, Munna Lal; Naru, Jasmine; Tiwari, Anurag; Kumar, Sudarshan; Balhara, Ashok K; Singh, Surender; Chaudhary, Suman; Kumar, Rajesh; Lotfan, Masoud; Behare, Pradip; Phulia, Sushil K; Mohanty, Tushar K; Kaushik, Jai K; Nallapeta, Shivramaiah; Singh, Inderjeet; Ambatipudi, Srinivas K; Mohanty, Ashok K

    2015-09-08

    Urine is a non-invasive source of biological fluid, which reflects the physiological status of the mammals. We have profiled the cow urinary proteome and analyzed its functional significance. The urine collected from three healthy cows was concentrated by diafiltration (DF) followed by protein extraction using three methods, namely methanol, acetone, and ammonium sulphate (AS) precipitation and Proteo Spin urine concentration kit (PS). The quality of the protein was assessed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2DE). In-gel digestion method revealed more proteins (1191) in comparison to in-solution digestion method (541). Collectively, 938, 606 and 444 proteins were identified in LC-MS/MS after in-gel and in-solution tryptic digestion of proteins prepared by AS, PS and DF methods, respectively resulting in identification of a total of 1564 proteins. Gene ontology (GO) using Panther7.0 grouped the majority of the proteins into cytoplasmic (location), catalytic activity (function), and metabolism (biological processes), while Cytoscape grouped proteins into complement and coagulation cascades; protease inhibitor activity and wound healing. Functional significance of few selected proteins seems to play important role in their physiology. Comparative analysis with human urine revealed 315 overlapping proteins. This study reports for the first time evidence of more than 1550 proteins in urine of healthy cow donors. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Proteomics in India.

  8. Effect of phosphorus levels on the protein profiles of secreted protein and root surface protein of rice.

    PubMed

    Shinano, Takuro; Yoshimura, Tomoko; Watanabe, Toshihiro; Unno, Yusuke; Osaki, Mitsuru; Nanjo, Yohei; Komatsu, Setsuko

    2013-11-01

    Plant roots are complicated organs that absorb water and nutrients from the soil. Roots also play an essential role in protecting plants from attack by soil pathogens and develop a beneficial role with some soil microorganisms. Plant-derived rhizosphere proteins (e.g., root secretory proteins and root surface binding proteins) are considered to play important roles in developing mutual relationships in the rhizosphere. In the rhizosphere, where plant roots meet the surrounding environment, it has been suggested that root secretory protein and root surface binding protein are important factors. Furthermore, it is not known how the physiological status of the plant affects the profile of these proteins. In this study, rice plants were grown aseptically, with or without phosphorus nutrition, and proteins were obtained from root bathing solution (designated as root secretory proteins) and obtained using 0.2 M CaCl2 solution (designated as root surface binding proteins). The total number of identified proteins in the root bathing solution was 458, and the number of root surface binding proteins was 256. More than half of the proteins were observed in both fractions. Most of the proteins were categorized as either having signal peptides or no membrane transport helix sites. The functional categorization suggested that most of the proteins seemed to have secretory pathways and were involved in defense/disease-related functions. These characteristics seem to be unique to rhizosphere proteins, and the latter might be part of the plants strategy to defeat pathogens in the soil. The low phosphorus treatment significantly increased the number of pathogenesis-related proteins in the root secretory proteins, whereas the change was small in the case of the root surface binding proteins. The results suggested that the roots are actively and selectively secreting protein into the rhizosphere.

  9. Post-polymerization photografting on methacrylate-based monoliths for separation of intact proteins and protein digests with comprehensive two-dimensional liquid chromatography hyphenated with high-resolution mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Vonk, Rudy J; Wouters, Sam; Barcaru, Andrei; Vivó-Truyols, Gabriel; Eeltink, Sebastiaan; de Koning, Leo J; Schoenmakers, Peter J

    2015-05-01

    Post-polymerization photografting is a versatile tool to alter the surface chemistry of organic-based monoliths so as to obtain desired stationary phase properties. In this study, 2-acrylamido-2-methyl-1-propanesulfonic acid was grafted to a hydrophobic poly(butyl methacrylate-co-ethylene glycol dimethacrylate) monolith to create a strong cation exchange stationary phase. Both single-step and two-step photografting were addressed, and the effects of grafting conditions were assessed. An experimental design has been applied in an attempt to optimize three of the key parameters of the two-step photografting chemistry, i.e. the grafting time of the initiator, the monomer concentration and the monomer irradiation time. The photografted columns were implemented in a comprehensive two-dimensional column liquid chromatography ( (t) LC ×  (t) LC) workflow and applied for the separation of intact proteins and peptides. A baseline separation of 11 intact proteins was obtained within 20 min by implementing a gradient across a limited RP composition window in the second dimension. (t) LC ×  (t) LC with UV detection was used for the separation of cytochrome c digest, bovine serum insulin digest and a digest of a complex protein mixture. A semi-quantitative estimation of the occupation of separation space, the orthogonality, of the (t) LC ×  (t) LC system yielded 75%. The (t) LC ×  (t) LC setup was hyphenated to a high-resolution Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer instrument to identify the bovine serum insulin tryptic peptides and to demonstrate the compatibility with MS analysis.

  10. Mercury Alters B-Cell Protein Phosphorylation Profiles

    PubMed Central

    Carruthers, Nicholas J.; Stemmer, Paul M.; Shin, Namhee; Dombkowski, Alan; Caruso, Joseph A.; Gill, Randal; Rosenspire, Allen

    2014-01-01

    Environmental exposure to mercury is suggested to contribute to human immune dysfunction. To shed light on the mechanism we identified changes in the phosphoproteomic profile of the WEHI-231 B cell line after intoxication with Hg2+. These changes were compared to changes in the phosphoproteome that were induced by pervanadate or okadaic acid exposure. Both 250 μM HgCl2 and pervanadate, a known phosphotyrosine phosphatase inhibitor, caused an increase in the number of proteins identified after TiO2 affinity selection and LC-MS/MS analysis. Pervanadate treatment had a larger effect than Hg2+ on the number of Scansite motifs which were tyrosine-phosphorylated, 17, and Ingenuity canonical signaling pathways activated, 4 with score > 5.0. However, Hg2+ had a more focused effect, primarily causing tyrosine-phosphorylation in SH2 domains in proteins that are in the B cell receptor signaling pathway. The finding that many of the changes induced by Hg2+ overlap with those of pervanadate, indicates that at high concentrations Hg2+ inhibits protein tyrosine phosphatases. PMID:24224561

  11. Construction of hormonally responsive intact cell hybrids by cell fusion: transfer of. beta. -adrenergic receptor and nucleotide regulatory protein(s) in normal and desensitized cells

    SciTech Connect

    Schulster, D.; Salmon, D.M.

    1985-01-01

    Fusion of normal, untreated human erythrocytes with desensitized turkey erythrocytes increases isoproterenol stimulation of cyclic (/sup 3/H)AMP accumulation over basal rates. Moreover, pretreatment of the human erythrocytes with cholera toxin before they are fused with desensitized turkey erthythrocytes leads to a large stimulation with isoproterenol. This is even greater and far more rapid than the response obtained if turkey erythrocytes are treated directly with cholera toxin. It is concluded that the stimulation in the fused system is due to the transfer of an ADP-ribosylated subunit of nucleotide regulatory protein.

  12. Protein profile changes during porcine oocyte aging and effects of caffeine on protein expression patterns.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Guang-Jian; Wang, Ke; Miao, De-Qiang; Guo, Lei; Hou, Yi; Schatten, Heide; Sun, Qing-Yuan

    2011-01-01

    It has been shown that oocyte aging critically affects reproduction and development. By using proteomic tools, in the present study, changes in protein profiles during porcine oocyte aging and effects of caffeine on oocyte aging were investigated. By comparing control MII oocytes with aging MII oocytes, we identified 23 proteins that were up-regulated and 3 proteins that were down-regulated during the aging process. In caffeine-treated oocytes, 6 proteins were identified as up-regulated and 12 proteins were identified as down-regulated. A total of 38 differentially expressed proteins grouped into 5 regulation patterns were determined to relate to the aging and anti-aging process. By using the Gene Ontology system, we found that numerous functional gene products involved in metabolism, stress response, reactive oxygen species and cell cycle regulation were differentially expressed during the oocyte aging process, and most of these proteins are for the first time reported in our study, including 2 novel proteins. In addition, several proteins were found to be modified during oocyte aging. These data contribute new information that may be useful for future research on cellular aging and for improvement of oocyte quality.

  13. Profiling Protein Kinases and Other ATP Binding Proteins in Arabidopsis Using Acyl-ATP Probes*

    PubMed Central

    Villamor, Joji Grace; Kaschani, Farnusch; Colby, Tom; Oeljeklaus, Julian; Zhao, David; Kaiser, Markus; Patricelli, Matthew P.; van der Hoorn, Renier A. L.

    2013-01-01

    Many protein activities are driven by ATP binding and hydrolysis. Here, we explore the ATP binding proteome of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana using acyl-ATP (AcATP)1 probes. These probes target ATP binding sites and covalently label lysine residues in the ATP binding pocket. Gel-based profiling using biotinylated AcATP showed that labeling is dependent on pH and divalent ions and can be competed by nucleotides. The vast majority of these AcATP-labeled proteins are known ATP binding proteins. Our search for labeled peptides upon in-gel digest led to the discovery that the biotin moiety of the labeled peptides is oxidized. The in-gel analysis displayed kinase domains of two receptor-like kinases (RLKs) at a lower than expected molecular weight, indicating that these RLKs lost the extracellular domain, possibly as a result of receptor shedding. Analysis of modified peptides using a gel-free platform identified 242 different labeling sites for AcATP in the Arabidopsis proteome. Examination of each individual labeling site revealed a preference of labeling in ATP binding pockets for a broad diversity of ATP binding proteins. Of these, 24 labeled peptides were from a diverse range of protein kinases, including RLKs, mitogen-activated protein kinases, and calcium-dependent kinases. A significant portion of the labeling sites could not be assigned to known nucleotide binding sites. However, the fact that labeling could be competed with ATP indicates that these labeling sites might represent previously uncharacterized nucleotide binding sites. A plot of spectral counts against expression levels illustrates the high specificity of AcATP probes for protein kinases and known ATP binding proteins. This work introduces profiling of ATP binding activities of a large diversity of proteins in plant proteomes. The data have been deposited in ProteomeXchange with the identifier PXD000188. PMID:23722185

  14. Protein profiling and phosphoprotein analysis by isoelectric focusing.

    PubMed

    Maccarrone, Giuseppina; Filiou, Michaela D

    2015-01-01

    Protein profiling enables the qualitative characterization of a proteome of interest. Phosphorylation is a post-translational modification with regulatory functions in a plethora of cell processes. We present an experimental workflow for simultaneous analysis of the proteome and phosphoproteome with no additional enrichment for phosphoproteins/phosphopeptides. Our approach is based on isoelectric focusing (IEF) which allows the separation of peptide mixtures on an immobilized pH gradient (IPG) according to their isoelectric point. Due to the negative charge of the phosphogroup, most of the phosphopeptides migrate toward acidic pH values. Peptides and phosphopeptides are then identified by mass spectrometry (MS) and phosphopeptide spectra are manually checked for the assignment of phosphorylation sites. Here, we apply this methodology to investigate synaptosome extracts from whole mouse brain. IEF-based peptide separation is an efficient method for peptide and phosphopeptide identification.

  15. Characterisation and protein expression profiling of annexins in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Duncan, R; Carpenter, B; Main, L C; Telfer, C; Murray, G I

    2008-01-29

    The annexins are family of calcium-regulated phospholipid-binding proteins with diverse roles in cell biology. Individual annexins have been implicated in tumour development and progression, and in this investigation a range of annexins have been studied in colorectal cancer. Annexins A1, A2, A4 and A11 were identified by comparative proteomic analysis to be overexpressed in colorectal cancer. Annexins A1, A2, A4 and A11 were further studied by immunohistochemistry with a colorectal cancer tissue microarray containing primary and metastatic colorectal cancer and also normal colon. There was significant increase in expression in annexins A1 (P=0.01), A2 (P<0.001), A4 (P<0.001) and A11 (P<0.001) in primary tumours compared with normal colon. There was increasing expression of annexins A2 (P=0.001), A4 (P=0.03) and A11 (P=0.006) with increasing tumour stage. An annexin expression profile was identified by k-means cluster analysis, and the annexin profile was associated with tumour stage (P=0.01) and also patient survival. Patients in annexin cluster group 1 (low annexin expression) had a better survival (log rank=5.33, P=0.02) than patients in cluster group 2 (high annexins A4 and A11 expression). In conclusion, this study has shown that individual annexins are present in colorectal cancer, specific annexins are overexpressed in colorectal cancer and the annexin expression profile is associated with survival.

  16. Computational Drug Target Screening through Protein Interaction Profiles

    PubMed Central

    Vilar, Santiago; Quezada, Elías; Uriarte, Eugenio; Costanzi, Stefano; Borges, Fernanda; Viña, Dolores; Hripcsak, George

    2016-01-01

    The development of computational methods to discover novel drug-target interactions on a large scale is of great interest. We propose a new method for virtual screening based on protein interaction profile similarity to discover new targets for molecules, including existing drugs. We calculated Target Interaction Profile Fingerprints (TIPFs) based on ChEMBL database to evaluate drug similarity and generated new putative compound-target candidates from the non-intersecting targets in each pair of compounds. A set of drugs was further studied in monoamine oxidase B (MAO-B) and cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1) enzyme through molecular docking and experimental assays. The drug ethoxzolamide and the natural compound piperlongumine, present in Piper longum L, showed hMAO-B activity with IC50 values of 25 and 65 μM respectively. Five candidates, including lapatinib, SB-202190, RO-316233, GW786460X and indirubin-3′-monoxime were tested against human COX-1. Compounds SB-202190 and RO-316233 showed a IC50 in hCOX-1 of 24 and 25 μM respectively (similar range as potent inhibitors such as diclofenac and indomethacin in the same experimental conditions). Lapatinib and indirubin-3′-monoxime showed moderate hCOX-1 activity (19.5% and 28% of enzyme inhibition at 25 μM respectively). Our modeling constitutes a multi-target predictor for large scale virtual screening with potential in lead discovery, repositioning and drug safety. PMID:27845365

  17. Using size exclusion chromatography-RPLC and RPLC-CIEF as two-dimensional separation strategies for protein profiling

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, David C.; Ahn, Seonghee; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Bogdanov, Bogdan; Mottaz, Heather M.; Vilkov, Andrey N.; Anderson, Gordon A.; Lipton, Mary S.; Smith, Richard D.

    2006-07-27

    Bottom-up proteomics (analyzing peptides that result from protein digestion) has demonstrated the capability for broad proteome coverage and good throughput, but is not ideally suited to the discovery and identification of modified proteins. Top-down proteomics (including subjecting intact protein ions to gas-phase dissociation) allows the study of modified proteins, but coverage, sensitivity and throughput are presently problematic. In this work, we describe the combination of bottom-up with intact protein analyses for the characterization of modified proteins. Fractionation at the intact protein level was employed to reduce complexity and increase measurement dynamic range. Bottom-up measurements were used to identify the subset of proteins that were present in each fraction. These identifications were then used in combination with high-accuracy Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR)-mass spectrometry (MS) intact protein mass measurements to achieve protein and modified-protein identifications. The relative performance of size exclusion chromatography (SEC) fractionation combined with on-line reversed-phase liquid chromatography (RPLC)-FTICR-MS was compared with RPLC fractionation combined with capillary isoelectric focusing (CIEF)-FTICR-MS. Finally, the relative coverage provided by proteomic analyses based on tryptic peptides and intact proteins is considered.

  18. Nanosilver pathophysiology in earthworms: Transcriptional profiling of secretory proteins and the implication for the protein corona.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Yuya; Miclaus, Teodora; Engelmann, Péter; Autrup, Herman; Sutherland, Duncan S; Scott-Fordsmand, Janeck J

    2016-01-01

    Previously we have identified lysenin as a key protein constituent of the secretome from Eisenia fetida coelomocytes and revealed its critical importance in priming interactions between the cells and the protein corona around nanosilver. As alterations of the protein environment can directly affect the corona composition, the extent to which nanoparticles influence the cells' protein secretion profile is of remarkable interest that has rarely acquired attention. Here, we have probed transcriptional responses of E. fetida coelomocytes to the representative nanosilver NM-300K (15 nm) in a time-dependent manner (2, 4, 8 and 24 h at a low-cytotoxic concentration), and examined the implication of the temporal changes in transcriptional profiles of secretory proteins with a particular reference to that of lysenin. NM-300K was accumulated in/at the cells and lysenin was, after transient induction, gradually suppressed over time indicating a negative feedback cycle. This may limit further enrichment of lysenin in the corona and thereby decrease the lysenin-assisted uptake of the nanoparticles. Other differentially expressed genes were those involved in metal stress (likewise in AgNO3-stressed cells) and in Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling. This offers an intriguing perspective of the nanosilver pathophysiology in earthworms, in which the conserved pattern recognition receptor TLRs may play an effector role.

  19. Strain-dependent profile of misfolded prion protein aggregates

    PubMed Central

    Morales, Rodrigo; Hu, Ping Ping; Duran-Aniotz, Claudia; Moda, Fabio; Diaz-Espinoza, Rodrigo; Chen, Baian; Bravo-Alegria, Javiera; Makarava, Natallia; Baskakov, Ilia V.; Soto, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    Prions are composed of the misfolded prion protein (PrPSc) organized in a variety of aggregates. An important question in the prion field has been to determine the identity of functional PrPSc aggregates. In this study, we used equilibrium sedimentation in sucrose density gradients to separate PrPSc aggregates from three hamster prion strains (Hyper, Drowsy, SSLOW) subjected to minimal manipulations. We show that PrPSc aggregates distribute in a wide range of arrangements and the relative proportion of each species depends on the prion strain. We observed a direct correlation between the density of the predominant PrPSc aggregates and the incubation periods for the strains studied. The relative presence of PrPSc in fractions of different sucrose densities was indicative of the protein deposits present in the brain as analyzed by histology. Interestingly, no association was found between sensitivity to proteolytic degradation and aggregation profiles. Therefore, the organization of PrP molecules in terms of the density of aggregates generated may determine some of the particular strain properties, whereas others are independent from it. Our findings may contribute to understand the mechanisms of strain variation and the role of PrPSc aggregates in prion-induced neurodegeneration. PMID:26877167

  20. Strain-dependent profile of misfolded prion protein aggregates.

    PubMed

    Morales, Rodrigo; Hu, Ping Ping; Duran-Aniotz, Claudia; Moda, Fabio; Diaz-Espinoza, Rodrigo; Chen, Baian; Bravo-Alegria, Javiera; Makarava, Natallia; Baskakov, Ilia V; Soto, Claudio

    2016-02-15

    Prions are composed of the misfolded prion protein (PrP(Sc)) organized in a variety of aggregates. An important question in the prion field has been to determine the identity of functional PrP(Sc) aggregates. In this study, we used equilibrium sedimentation in sucrose density gradients to separate PrP(Sc) aggregates from three hamster prion strains (Hyper, Drowsy, SSLOW) subjected to minimal manipulations. We show that PrP(Sc) aggregates distribute in a wide range of arrangements and the relative proportion of each species depends on the prion strain. We observed a direct correlation between the density of the predominant PrP(Sc) aggregates and the incubation periods for the strains studied. The relative presence of PrP(Sc) in fractions of different sucrose densities was indicative of the protein deposits present in the brain as analyzed by histology. Interestingly, no association was found between sensitivity to proteolytic degradation and aggregation profiles. Therefore, the organization of PrP molecules in terms of the density of aggregates generated may determine some of the particular strain properties, whereas others are independent from it. Our findings may contribute to understand the mechanisms of strain variation and the role of PrP(Sc) aggregates in prion-induced neurodegeneration.

  1. Target identification with quantitative activity based protein profiling (ABPP).

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiao; Wong, Yin Kwan; Wang, Jigang; Zhang, Jianbin; Lee, Yew-Mun; Shen, Han-Ming; Lin, Qingsong; Hua, Zi-Chun

    2017-02-01

    As many small bioactive molecules fulfill their functions through interacting with protein targets, the identification of such targets is crucial in understanding their mechanisms of action (MOA) and side effects. With technological advancements in target identification, it has become possible to accurately and comprehensively study the MOA and side effects of small molecules. While small molecules with therapeutic potential were derived solely from nature in the past, the remodeling and synthesis of such molecules have now been made possible. Presently, while some small molecules have seen successful application as drugs, the majority remain undeveloped, requiring further understanding of their MOA and side effects to fully tap into their potential. Given the typical promiscuity of many small molecules and the complexity of the cellular proteome, a high-flux and high-accuracy method is necessary. While affinity chromatography approaches combined with MS have had successes in target identification, limitations associated with nonspecific results remain. To overcome these complications, quantitative chemical proteomics approaches have been developed including metabolic labeling, chemical labeling, and label-free methods. These new approaches are adopted in conjunction with activity-based protein profiling (ABPP), allowing for a rapid process and accurate results. This review will briefly introduce the principles involved in ABPP, then summarize current advances in quantitative chemical proteomics approaches as well as illustrate with examples how ABPP coupled with quantitative chemical proteomics has been used to detect the targets of drugs and other bioactive small molecules including natural products.

  2. DNA binding protein identification by combining pseudo amino acid composition and profile-based protein representation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bin; Wang, Shanyi; Wang, Xiaolong

    2015-10-01

    DNA-binding proteins play an important role in most cellular processes. Therefore, it is necessary to develop an efficient predictor for identifying DNA-binding proteins only based on the sequence information of proteins. The bottleneck for constructing a useful predictor is to find suitable features capturing the characteristics of DNA binding proteins. We applied PseAAC to DNA binding protein identification, and PseAAC was further improved by incorporating the evolutionary information by using profile-based protein representation. Finally, Combined with Support Vector Machines (SVMs), a predictor called iDNAPro-PseAAC was proposed. Experimental results on an updated benchmark dataset showed that iDNAPro-PseAAC outperformed some state-of-the-art approaches, and it can achieve stable performance on an independent dataset. By using an ensemble learning approach to incorporate more negative samples (non-DNA binding proteins) in the training process, the performance of iDNAPro-PseAAC was further improved. The web server of iDNAPro-PseAAC is available at http://bioinformatics.hitsz.edu.cn/iDNAPro-PseAAC/.

  3. Translational Profiling of Clock Cells Reveals Circadianly Synchronized Protein Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yanmei; Ainsley, Joshua A.; Reijmers, Leon G.; Jackson, F. Rob

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Genome-wide studies of circadian transcription or mRNA translation have been hindered by the presence of heterogeneous cell populations in complex tissues such as the nervous system. We describe here the use of a Drosophila cell-specific translational profiling approach to document the rhythmic “translatome” of neural clock cells for the first time in any organism. Unexpectedly, translation of most clock-regulated transcripts—as assayed by mRNA ribosome association—occurs at one of two predominant circadian phases, midday or mid-night, times of behavioral quiescence; mRNAs encoding similar cellular functions are translated at the same time of day. Our analysis also indicates that fundamental cellular processes—metabolism, energy production, redox state (e.g., the thioredoxin system), cell growth, signaling and others—are rhythmically modulated within clock cells via synchronized protein synthesis. Our approach is validated by the identification of mRNAs known to exhibit circadian changes in abundance and the discovery of hundreds of novel mRNAs that show translational rhythms. This includes Tdc2, encoding a neurotransmitter synthetic enzyme, which we demonstrate is required within clock neurons for normal circadian locomotor activity. PMID:24348200

  4. Protein solubility and differential proteomic profiling of recombinant Escherichia coli overexpressing double-tagged fusion proteins.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Chung-Hsien; Lee, Wen-Chien

    2010-08-28

    Overexpression of recombinant proteins usually triggers the induction of heat shock proteins that regulate aggregation and solubility of the overexpressed protein. The two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE)-mass spectrometry approach was used to profile the proteome of Escherichia coli overexpressing N-acetyl-D-glucosamine 2-epimerase (GlcNAc 2-epimerase) and N-acetyl-D-neuraminic acid aldolase (Neu5Ac aldolase), both fused to glutathione S-transferase (GST) and polyionic peptide (5D or 5R). Overexpression of fusion proteins by IPTG induction caused significant differential expression of numerous cellular proteins; most of these proteins were down-regulated, including enzymes connected to the pentose phosphate pathway and the enzyme LuxS that could lead to an inhibition of tRNA synthesis. Interestingly, when plasmid-harboring cells were cultured in LB medium, gluconeogenesis occurred mainly through MaeB, while in the host strain, gluconeogenesis occurred by a different pathway (by Mdh and PckA). Significant up-regulation of the chaperones ClpB, HslU and GroEL and high-level expression of two protective small heat shock proteins (IbpA and IbpB) were found in cells overexpressing GST-GlcNAc 2-epimerase-5D but not in GST-Neu5Ac aldolase-5R-expressing E. coli. Although most of the recombinant protein was present in insoluble aggregates, the soluble fraction of GST-GlcNAc 2-epimerase-5D was higher than that of GST-Neu5Ac aldolase-5R. Also, in cells overexpressing recombinant GST-GlcNAc 2-epimerase-5D, the expression of σ32 was maintained at a higher level following induction. Differential expression of metabolically functional proteins, especially those in the gluconeogenesis pathway, was found between host and recombinant cells. Also, the expression patterns of chaperones/heat shock proteins differed among the plasmid-harboring bacteria in response to overproduction of recombinant proteins. In conclusion, the solubility of overexpressed recombinant proteins could

  5. Protein solubility and differential proteomic profiling of recombinant Escherichia coli overexpressing double-tagged fusion proteins

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Overexpression of recombinant proteins usually triggers the induction of heat shock proteins that regulate aggregation and solubility of the overexpressed protein. The two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE)-mass spectrometry approach was used to profile the proteome of Escherichia coli overexpressing N-acetyl-D-glucosamine 2-epimerase (GlcNAc 2-epimerase) and N-acetyl-D-neuraminic acid aldolase (Neu5Ac aldolase), both fused to glutathione S-transferase (GST) and polyionic peptide (5D or 5R). Results Overexpression of fusion proteins by IPTG induction caused significant differential expression of numerous cellular proteins; most of these proteins were down-regulated, including enzymes connected to the pentose phosphate pathway and the enzyme LuxS that could lead to an inhibition of tRNA synthesis. Interestingly, when plasmid-harboring cells were cultured in LB medium, gluconeogenesis occurred mainly through MaeB, while in the host strain, gluconeogenesis occurred by a different pathway (by Mdh and PckA). Significant up-regulation of the chaperones ClpB, HslU and GroEL and high-level expression of two protective small heat shock proteins (IbpA and IbpB) were found in cells overexpressing GST-GlcNAc 2-epimerase-5D but not in GST-Neu5Ac aldolase-5R-expressing E. coli. Although most of the recombinant protein was present in insoluble aggregates, the soluble fraction of GST-GlcNAc 2-epimerase-5D was higher than that of GST-Neu5Ac aldolase-5R. Also, in cells overexpressing recombinant GST-GlcNAc 2-epimerase-5D, the expression of σ32 was maintained at a higher level following induction. Conclusions Differential expression of metabolically functional proteins, especially those in the gluconeogenesis pathway, was found between host and recombinant cells. Also, the expression patterns of chaperones/heat shock proteins differed among the plasmid-harboring bacteria in response to overproduction of recombinant proteins. In conclusion, the solubility of

  6. Three-level prediction of protein function by combining profile-sequence search, profile-profile search, and domain co-occurrence networks.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zheng; Cao, Renzhi; Cheng, Jianlin

    2013-01-01

    Predicting protein function from sequence is useful for biochemical experiment design, mutagenesis analysis, protein engineering, protein design, biological pathway analysis, drug design, disease diagnosis, and genome annotation as a vast number of protein sequences with unknown function are routinely being generated by DNA, RNA and protein sequencing in the genomic era. However, despite significant progresses in the last several years, the accuracy of protein function prediction still needs to be improved in order to be used effectively in practice, particularly when little or no homology exists between a target protein and proteins with annotated function. Here, we developed a method that integrated profile-sequence alignment, profile-profile alignment, and Domain Co-Occurrence Networks (DCN) to predict protein function at different levels of complexity, ranging from obvious homology, to remote homology, to no homology. We tested the method blindingly in the 2011 Critical Assessment of Function Annotation (CAFA). Our experiments demonstrated that our three-level prediction method effectively increased the recall of function prediction while maintaining a reasonable precision. Particularly, our method can predict function terms defined by the Gene Ontology more accurately than three standard baseline methods in most situations, handle multi-domain proteins naturally, and make ab initio function prediction when no homology exists. These results show that our approach can combine complementary strengths of most widely used BLAST-based function prediction methods, rarely used in function prediction but more sensitive profile-profile comparison-based homology detection methods, and non-homology-based domain co-occurrence networks, to effectively extend the power of function prediction from high homology, to low homology, to no homology (ab initio cases).

  7. Three-Level Prediction of Protein Function by Combining Profile-Sequence Search, Profile-Profile Search, and Domain Co-Occurrence Networks

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Predicting protein function from sequence is useful for biochemical experiment design, mutagenesis analysis, protein engineering, protein design, biological pathway analysis, drug design, disease diagnosis, and genome annotation as a vast number of protein sequences with unknown function are routinely being generated by DNA, RNA and protein sequencing in the genomic era. However, despite significant progresses in the last several years, the accuracy of protein function prediction still needs to be improved in order to be used effectively in practice, particularly when little or no homology exists between a target protein and proteins with annotated function. Here, we developed a method that integrated profile-sequence alignment, profile-profile alignment, and Domain Co-Occurrence Networks (DCN) to predict protein function at different levels of complexity, ranging from obvious homology, to remote homology, to no homology. We tested the method blindingly in the 2011 Critical Assessment of Function Annotation (CAFA). Our experiments demonstrated that our three-level prediction method effectively increased the recall of function prediction while maintaining a reasonable precision. Particularly, our method can predict function terms defined by the Gene Ontology more accurately than three standard baseline methods in most situations, handle multi-domain proteins naturally, and make ab initio function prediction when no homology exists. These results show that our approach can combine complementary strengths of most widely used BLAST-based function prediction methods, rarely used in function prediction but more sensitive profile-profile comparison-based homology detection methods, and non-homology-based domain co-occurrence networks, to effectively extend the power of function prediction from high homology, to low homology, to no homology (ab initio cases). PMID:23514381

  8. Predicting the Effect of Mutations on Protein-Protein Binding Interactions through Structure-Based Interface Profiles

    PubMed Central

    Brender, Jeffrey R.; Zhang, Yang

    2015-01-01

    The formation of protein-protein complexes is essential for proteins to perform their physiological functions in the cell. Mutations that prevent the proper formation of the correct complexes can have serious consequences for the associated cellular processes. Since experimental determination of protein-protein binding affinity remains difficult when performed on a large scale, computational methods for predicting the consequences of mutations on binding affinity are highly desirable. We show that a scoring function based on interface structure profiles collected from analogous protein-protein interactions in the PDB is a powerful predictor of protein binding affinity changes upon mutation. As a standalone feature, the differences between the interface profile score of the mutant and wild-type proteins has an accuracy equivalent to the best all-atom potentials, despite being two orders of magnitude faster once the profile has been constructed. Due to its unique sensitivity in collecting the evolutionary profiles of analogous binding interactions and the high speed of calculation, the interface profile score has additional advantages as a complementary feature to combine with physics-based potentials for improving the accuracy of composite scoring approaches. By incorporating the sequence-derived and residue-level coarse-grained potentials with the interface structure profile score, a composite model was constructed through the random forest training, which generates a Pearson correlation coefficient >0.8 between the predicted and observed binding free-energy changes upon mutation. This accuracy is comparable to, or outperforms in most cases, the current best methods, but does not require high-resolution full-atomic models of the mutant structures. The binding interface profiling approach should find useful application in human-disease mutation recognition and protein interface design studies. PMID:26506533

  9. Convergent evolution in structural elements of proteins investigated using cross profile analysis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Evolutionary relations of similar segments shared by different protein folds remain controversial, even though many examples of such segments have been found. To date, several methods such as those based on the results of structure comparisons, sequence-based classifications, and sequence-based profile-profile comparisons have been applied to identify such protein segments that possess local similarities in both sequence and structure across protein folds. However, to capture more precise sequence-structure relations, no method reported to date combines structure-based profiles, and sequence-based profiles based on evolutionary information. The former are generally regarded as representing the amino acid preferences at each position of a specific conformation of protein segment. They might reflect the nature of ancient short peptide ancestors, using the results of structural classifications of protein segments. Results This report describes the development and use of "Cross Profile Analysis" to compare sequence-based profiles and structure-based profiles based on amino acid occurrences at each position within a protein segment cluster. Using systematic cross profile analysis, we found structural clusters of 9-residue and 15-residue segments showing remarkably strong correlation with particular sequence profiles. These correlations reflect structural similarities among constituent segments of both sequence-based and structure-based profiles. We also report previously undetectable sequence-structure patterns that transcend protein family and fold boundaries, and present results of the conformational analysis of the deduced peptide of a segment cluster. These results suggest the existence of ancient short-peptide ancestors. Conclusions Cross profile analysis reveals the polyphyletic and convergent evolution of β-hairpin-like structures, which were verified both experimentally and computationally. The results presented here give us new insights into the

  10. Fractionation profiling: a fast and versatile approach for mapping vesicle proteomes and protein–protein interactions

    PubMed Central

    Borner, Georg H. H.; Hein, Marco Y.; Hirst, Jennifer; Edgar, James R.; Mann, Matthias; Robinson, Margaret S.

    2014-01-01

    We developed “fractionation profiling,” a method for rapid proteomic analysis of membrane vesicles and protein particles. The approach combines quantitative proteomics with subcellular fractionation to generate signature protein abundance distribution profiles. Functionally associated groups of proteins are revealed through cluster analysis. To validate the method, we first profiled >3500 proteins from HeLa cells and identified known clathrin-coated vesicle proteins with >90% accuracy. We then profiled >2400 proteins from Drosophila S2 cells, and we report the first comprehensive insect clathrin-coated vesicle proteome. Of importance, the cluster analysis extends to all profiled proteins and thus identifies a diverse range of known and novel cytosolic and membrane-associated protein complexes. We show that it also allows the detailed compositional characterization of complexes, including the delineation of subcomplexes and subunit stoichiometry. Our predictions are presented in an interactive database. Fractionation profiling is a universal method for defining the clathrin-coated vesicle proteome and may be adapted for the analysis of other types of vesicles and particles. In addition, it provides a versatile tool for the rapid generation of large-scale protein interaction maps. PMID:25165137

  11. Exploring Proteins in Anopheles gambiae Male and Female Antennae through MALDI Mass Spectrometry Profiling

    PubMed Central

    Dani, Francesca R.; Francese, Simona; Mastrobuoni, Guido; Felicioli, Antonio; Caputo, Beniamino; Simard, Frederic; Pieraccini, Giuseppe; Moneti, Gloriano; Coluzzi, Mario; della Torre, Alessandra; Turillazzi, Stefano

    2008-01-01

    MALDI profiling and imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) are novel techniques for direct analysis of peptides and small proteins in biological tissues. In this work we applied them to the study of Anopheles gambiae antennae, with the aim of analysing expression of soluble proteins involved in olfaction perireceptor events. MALDI spectra obtained by direct profiling on single antennae and by the analysis of extracts, showed similar profiles, although spectra obtained through profiling had a richer ion population and higher signal to noise ratio. Male and female antennae showed distinct protein profiles. MALDI imaging experiments were also performed and differences were observed in the localization of some proteins. Two proteins were identified through high resolution measurement and top-down MS/MS experiments. A 8 kDa protein only present in the male antennae matched with an unannotated sequence of the An. gambiae genome, while the presence of odorant binding protein 9 (OBP-9) was confirmed through experiments of 2-DE, followed by MS and MS/MS analysis of digested spots. This work shows that MALDI MS profiling is a technique suitable for the analysis of proteins of small and medium MW in insect appendices, and allows obtaining data for several specimens which can be investigated for differences between groups. Proteins of interest can be identified through other complementary MS approaches. PMID:18665262

  12. Degradation pattern of photosystem II reaction center protein D1 in intact leaves. The major photoinhibition-induced cleavage site in D1 polypeptide is located amino terminally of the DE loop.

    PubMed Central

    Kettunen, R; Tyystjärvi, E; Aro, E M

    1996-01-01

    Photoinhibition-induced degradation of the D1 protein of the photosystem II reaction center was studied in intact pumpkin (Cucurbita pepo L.) leaves. Photoinhibition was observed to cause the cleavage of the D1 protein at two distinct sites. The main cleavage generated an 18-kD N-terminal and a 20-kD C-terminal degradation fragment of the D1 protein. this cleavage site was mapped to be located clearly N terminally of the DE loop. The other, less-frequent cleavage occurred at the DE loop and produced the well-documented 23-kD, N-terminal D1 degradation product. Furthermore, the 23-kD, N-terminal D1 fragment appears to be phosphorylated and can be detected only under severe photoinhibition in vivo. Comparison of the D1 degradation pattern after in vivo photoinhibition to that after in vitro acceptor-side and donor-side photoinhibition, performed with isolated photosystem II core particles, gives indirect evidence in support of donor-side photoinhibition in intact leaves. PMID:8756500

  13. Label-free detection of proteins in ternary mixtures using surface-enhanced Raman scattering and protein melting profiles.

    PubMed

    Keskin, Sercan; Efeoğlu, Esen; Keçeci, Kaan; Çulha, Mustafa

    2013-03-01

    ABSTRACT. The multiplex detection of biologically important molecules such as proteins in complex mixtures has critical importance not only in disease diagnosis but also in other fields such as proteomics and biotechnology. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) is a powerful technique for multiplex identification of molecular components in a mixture. We combined the multiplexing power of SERS and heat denaturation of proteins to identify proteins in ternary protein mixtures. The heat denaturation profiles of four model blood proteins, transferrin, human serum albumin, fibrinogen, and hemoglobin, were studied with SERS. Then, two ternary mixtures of these four proteins were used to test the feasibility of the approach. It was demonstrated that unique denaturation profiles of each protein could be used for their identification in the mixture.

  14. Global Membrane Protein Interactome Analysis using In vivo Crosslinking and Mass Spectrometry-based Protein Correlation Profiling*

    PubMed Central

    Larance, Mark; Kirkwood, Kathryn J.; Tinti, Michele; Brenes Murillo, Alejandro; Ferguson, Michael A. J.; Lamond, Angus I.

    2016-01-01

    We present a methodology using in vivo crosslinking combined with HPLC-MS for the global analysis of endogenous protein complexes by protein correlation profiling. Formaldehyde crosslinked protein complexes were extracted with high yield using denaturing buffers that maintained complex solubility during chromatographic separation. We show this efficiently detects both integral membrane and membrane-associated protein complexes,in addition to soluble complexes, allowing identification and analysis of complexes not accessible in native extracts. We compare the protein complexes detected by HPLC-MS protein correlation profiling in both native and formaldehyde crosslinked U2OS cell extracts. These proteome-wide data sets of both in vivo crosslinked and native protein complexes from U2OS cells are freely available via a searchable online database (www.peptracker.com/epd). Raw data are also available via ProteomeXchange (identifier PXD003754). PMID:27114452

  15. Label-free detection of proteins in ternary mixtures using surface-enhanced Raman scattering and protein melting profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keskin, Sercan; Efeoğlu, Esen; Keçeci, Kaan; Çulha, Mustafa

    2013-03-01

    The multiplex detection of biologically important molecules such as proteins in complex mixtures has critical importance not only in disease diagnosis but also in other fields such as proteomics and biotechnology. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) is a powerful technique for multiplex identification of molecular components in a mixture. We combined the multiplexing power of SERS and heat denaturation of proteins to identify proteins in ternary protein mixtures. The heat denaturation profiles of four model blood proteins, transferrin, human serum albumin, fibrinogen, and hemoglobin, were studied with SERS. Then, two ternary mixtures of these four proteins were used to test the feasibility of the approach. It was demonstrated that unique denaturation profiles of each protein could be used for their identification in the mixture.

  16. Species Differentiation of a Diverse Suite of Bacillus Spores by Mass Spectrometry-Based Protein Profiling

    PubMed Central

    Dickinson, Danielle N.; La Duc, Myron T.; Haskins, William E.; Gornushkin, Igor; Winefordner, James D.; Powell, David H.; Venkateswaran, Kasthuri

    2004-01-01

    In this study, we demonstrate the versatility of matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOFMS) protein profiling for the species differentiation of a diverse suite of Bacillus spores. MALDI-TOFMS protein profiles of 11 different strains of Bacillus spores, encompassing nine different species, were evaluated. Bacillus species selected for MALDI-TOFMS analysis represented the spore-forming bacterial diversity of typical class 100K clean room spacecraft assembly facilities. A one-step sample treatment and MALDI-TOFMS preparation were used to minimize the sample preparation time. A library of MALDI-TOFMS spectra was created from these nine Bacillus species, the most diverse protein profiling study of the genus reported to date. Linear correlation analysis was used to successfully differentiate the MALDI-TOFMS protein profiles from all strains evaluated in this study. The MALDI-TOFMS protein profiles were compared with 16S rDNA sequences for their bacterial systematics and molecular phylogenetic affiliations. The MALDI-TOFMS profiles were found to be complementary to the 16S rDNA analysis. Proteomic studies of Bacillus subtilis 168 were pursued to identify proteins represented by the biomarker peaks in the MALDI-TOFMS spectrum. Four small, acid-soluble proteins (A, B, C, and D), one DNA binding protein, hypothetical protein ymf J, and four proteins associated with the spore coat and spore coat formation (coat JB, coat F, coat T, and spoIVA) were identified. The ability to visualize higher-molecular-mass coat proteins (10 to 25 kDa) as well as smaller proteins (<10 kDa) with MALDI-TOFMS profiling is critical for the complete and effective species differentiation of the Bacillus genus. PMID:14711677

  17. Enhancing the Pharmacokinetic Profile of Protein-Based Drugs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-12

    bioavailability when given subcutaneously. Extend Biosciences is developing proprietary carrier molecules that will allow proteins to access a...in the development of longer-lasting versions of bioscavenger proteins that could then be delivered subcutaneously and become bioavailable within...protein-based drugs have limited efficacy due to a short half-life or require intravenous delivery because of low bioavailability when given

  18. STRUCTFAST: protein sequence remote homology detection and alignment using novel dynamic programming and profile-profile scoring.

    PubMed

    Debe, Derek A; Danzer, Joseph F; Goddard, William A; Poleksic, Aleksandar

    2006-09-01

    STRUCTFAST is a novel profile-profile alignment algorithm capable of detecting weak similarities between protein sequences. The increased sensitivity and accuracy of the STRUCTFAST method are achieved through several unique features. First, the algorithm utilizes a novel dynamic programming engine capable of incorporating important information from a structural family directly into the alignment process. Second, the algorithm employs a rigorous analytical formula for profile-profile scoring to overcome the limitations of ad hoc scoring functions that require adjustable parameter training. Third, the algorithm employs Convergent Island Statistics (CIS) to compute the statistical significance of alignment scores independently for each pair of sequences. STRUCTFAST routinely produces alignments that meet or exceed the quality obtained by an expert human homology modeler, as evidenced by its performance in the latest CAFASP4 and CASP6 blind prediction benchmark experiments.

  19. Coaxial atomizer liquid intact lengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eroglu, Hasan; Chigier, Norman; Farago, Zoltan

    1991-01-01

    Average intact lengths of round liquid jets generated by airblast coaxial atomizer were measured from over 1500 photographs. The intact lengths were studied over a jet Reynolds number range of 18,000 and Weber number range of 260. Results are presented for two different nozzle geometries. The intact lengths were found to be strongly dependent on Re and We numbers. An empirical equation was derived as a function of these parameters. A comparison of the intact lengths for round jets and flat sheets shows that round jets generate shorter intact lengths.

  20. A unique protein profile of peripheral neutrophils from COPD patients does not reflect cytokine-induced protein profiles of neutrophils in vitro

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Inflammation, both local and systemic, is a hallmark of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Inflammatory mediators such as TNFα and GM-CSF are secreted by lung epithelium, alveolar macrophages and other inflammatory cells and are thought to be important contributors in the pathogenesis of COPD. Indeed, neutrophils are activated by these cytokines and these cells are one of the major inflammatory cell types recruited to the pulmonary compartment of COPD patients. Furthermore, these inflammatory mediators are found in the peripheral blood of COPD patients and, therefore, we hypothesized that TNFα/GM-CSF-induced protein profiles can be found in peripheral neutrophils of COPD patients. Methods Using fluorescence 2-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis we investigated differentially regulated proteins in peripheral neutrophils from COPD patients and healthy age-matched control subjects. Furthermore, protein profiles from COPD patients were compared with those of neutrophils of healthy age-matched controls that were stimulated with TNFα and/or GM-CSF in vitro. Protein gels were compared using DeCyder 7.0 software. Results We identified 7 significantly regulated protein spots between peripheral neutrophils from COPD patients and age-matched healthy control subjects. Stimulation of peripheral neutrophils with TNFα, GM-CSF or TNFα + GM-CSF in vitro resulted in 13, 20 and 22 regulated protein spots, respectively. However, these cytokine-induced protein differences did not correspond with the protein differences found in neutrophils from COPD patients. Conclusion These results show that neutrophils from COPD patients have a unique protein profile compared to neutrophils from healthy age-matched controls. Furthermore, the neutrophil profiles of COPD patients do not reflect putative dominant signals induced by TNFα, GM-CSF or their combination. Our results indicate that systemic neutrophil responses in COPD patients are caused by a unique but

  1. Emory University: High-Throughput Protein-Protein Interaction Analysis for Hippo Pathway Profiling | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    The CTD2 Center at Emory University used high-throughput protein-protein interaction (PPI) mapping for Hippo signaling pathway profiling to rapidly unveil promising PPIs as potential therapeutic targets and advance functional understanding of signaling circuitry in cells. Read the abstract.

  2. Factors affecting the reactivation of the oligomycin-sensitive adenosine 5'-triphosphatase and the release of ATPase inhibitor protein during the re-energization of intact mitochondria from ischemic cardiac muscle.

    PubMed

    Rouslin, W

    1987-03-15

    In the present study we examined factors affecting the reversal of the ischemia-induced protonic inhibition of the mitochondrial ATPase described earlier (Rouslin, W. (1983) J. Biol. Chem. 258, 9657-9661). It was found that ATPase reactivation and accompanying inhibitor protein release during the re-energization of intact mitochondria isolated from 20-min ischemic canine heart muscle could be blocked completely by either carbonyl cyanide p-trifluoromethoxyphenylhydrazone (FCCP) or nigericin but was unaffected by valinomycin at 35 mM K+. At higher K+ concentrations, valinomycin also blocked ATPase reactivation but not quite as completely as did nigericin. These observations suggest that ATPase reactivation and inhibitor protein release are particularly dependent upon either the trans-inner membrane pH gradient (delta pH) or possibly upon matrix pH per se and slightly less dependent upon membrane potential (delta psi) in intact cardiac muscle mitochondria. The addition of FCCP at the end of the re-energization incubations limited partially the extent of both ATPase reactivation and inhibitor protein release. This latter effect appears to have been mediated by a partial reassociation of the inhibitor protein with the enzyme, and it was accentuated (when FCCP was added at the end of the incubations) or mimicked (when FCCP was absent) by lowering the pH of the re-energization medium. A close examination of the first 10 min of the time course of enzyme activation and of inhibitor protein release revealed that while the former process was essentially finished in 1 min or less, the latter required approximately 10 min for completion. This observation led to the proposal of a two-site model of enzyme-inhibitor interaction which is discussed.

  3. Identification of discriminant proteins through antibody profiling, methods and apparatus for identifying an individual

    DOEpatents

    Thompson, Vicki S; Lacey, Jeffrey A; Gentillon, Cynthia A; Apel, William A

    2015-03-03

    A method for determining a plurality of proteins for discriminating and positively identifying an individual based from a biological sample. The method may include profiling a biological sample from a plurality of individuals against a protein array including a plurality of proteins. The protein array may include proteins attached to a support in a preselected pattern such that locations of the proteins are known. The biological sample may be contacted with the protein array such that a portion of antibodies in the biological sample reacts with and binds to the proteins forming immune complexes. A statistical analysis method, such as discriminant analysis, may be performed to determine discriminating proteins for distinguishing individuals. Proteins of interest may be used to form a protein array. Such a protein array may be used, for example, to compare a forensic sample from an unknown source with a sample from a known source.

  4. Identification of discriminant proteins through antibody profiling, methods and apparatus for identifying an individual

    DOEpatents

    Apel, William A.; Thompson, Vicki S; Lacey, Jeffrey A.; Gentillon, Cynthia A.

    2016-08-09

    A method for determining a plurality of proteins for discriminating and positively identifying an individual based from a biological sample. The method may include profiling a biological sample from a plurality of individuals against a protein array including a plurality of proteins. The protein array may include proteins attached to a support in a preselected pattern such that locations of the proteins are known. The biological sample may be contacted with the protein array such that a portion of antibodies in the biological sample reacts with and binds to the proteins forming immune complexes. A statistical analysis method, such as discriminant analysis, may be performed to determine discriminating proteins for distinguishing individuals. Proteins of interest may be used to form a protein array. Such a protein array may be used, for example, to compare a forensic sample from an unknown source with a sample from a known source.

  5. ProC-TEL: Profiling of Protein C-Termini by Enzymatic Labeling.

    PubMed

    Duan, Wenwen; Xu, Guoqiang

    2017-01-01

    Proteins are frequently processed by proteases in cell signaling pathways to perform their biological functions in response to environmental stimuli. Identification of the exact cleavage sites provides necessary information for the study of their biological functions. Although proteomic approaches for profiling of protein N-termini have been developed extensively in the past few years, the N-terminal profiling strategy has its inherent disadvantages. Therefore, C-terminal profiling approaches might be a complementary approach for the identification of protein cleavages although it has similar shortcomings as N-terminal profiling methods. In this protocol, we describe an approach, termed ProC-TEL: Profiling of Protein C-Termini by Enzymatic Labeling, for affinity labeling of protein C-termini for a protein or proteome. This method uses the transpeptidase activity of carboxypeptidase Y to label protein C-termini with an affinity biotin tag for subsequent isolation with avidin beads and identification by mass spectrometer. It is complementary to the N-terminal profiling approaches and can be used to identify proteolytic cleavages for a specific protease or in cell signaling events, such as apoptosis.

  6. Protein profile of mature soybean seeds and prepared soybean milk.

    PubMed

    Capriotti, Anna Laura; Caruso, Giuseppe; Cavaliere, Chiara; Samperi, Roberto; Stampachiacchiere, Serena; Zenezini Chiozzi, Riccardo; Laganà, Aldo

    2014-10-08

    The soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merrill) is economically the most important bean in the world, providing a wide range of vegetable proteins. Soybean milk is a colloidal solution obtained as water extract from swelled and ground soybean seeds. Soybean proteins represent about 35-40% on a dry weight basis and they are receiving increasing attention with respect to their health effects. However, the soybean is a well-recognized allergenic food, and therefore, it is urgent to define its protein components responsible for the allergenicity in order to develop hypoallergenic soybean products for sensitive people. The main aim of this work was the characterization of seed and milk soybean proteome and their comparison in terms of protein content and specific proteins. Using a shotgun proteomics approach, 243 nonredundant proteins were identified in mature soybean seeds.

  7. (Photosynthesis in intact plants)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    Progress in the two years since the last renewal application has been excellent. We have made substantial contributions on both main fronts of the projects, and are particularly happy with the progress of our research on intact plants. The approach of basing our field work on a sound foundation of laboratory studies has enabled is to use methods which provide unambiguous assays of well characterized reactions. We have also made excellent progress in several laboratory studies which will have direct applications in future field work, and have introduced to the laboratory a range of molecular genetics techniques which will allow us to explore new options in the attempt to understand function at the level of molecular structure.

  8. Triton shells of intact erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Sheetz, M P; Sawyer, D

    1978-01-01

    About 40% of human erythrocyte membrane protein is resistant to solubilization in 0.5% Triton X-114. These components comprise a structure called a Triton shell roughly similar in size and shape to the original erythrocyte and thus constitute a cytoskeleton. With increasing concentrations of Triton the lipid content of the Triton shell decreases dramatically, whereas the majority of the protein components remain constant. Exceptions to this rule include proteins contained in band 3, the presumed anion channel, and in band 4 which decrease with increasing Triton concentration. The Triton-insoluble complex includes spectrin (bands 1 and 2), actin (band 5), and bands 3' and 7. Component 3' has an apparent molecular weight of 88,000 daltons as does 3; but unlike 3, it is insensitive to protease treatment of the intact cell, has a low extinction coefficient at 280 nm, and is solubilized from the shells in alkaline water solutions. Component 7 also has a low extinction coefficient at 280 nm. Spectrin alone is solubilized from the Triton shells in isotonic media. The solubilized spectrin contains no bound Triton and coelectrophoreses with spectrin eluted in hypotonic solutions from ghosts. Electron micrographs of fixed Triton shells stained with uranyl acetate show the presence of numerous filaments which appear beaded and are 80--120 A in diameter. The filaments cannot be composed mainly af actin, but enough spectrin is present to form the filaments. Triton shells may provide an excellent source of material useful in the investigation of the erythrocyte cytoskeleton.

  9. Chemical Probes to Directly Profile Palmitoleoylation of Proteins.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Baohui; Jarugumilli, Gopala K; Chen, Baoen; Wu, Xu

    2016-11-03

    Palmitoleoylation is a unique fatty acylation of proteins in which a monounsaturated fatty acid, palmitoleic acid (C16:1), is covalently attached to a protein. Wnt proteins are known to be palmitoleoylated by cis-Δ9 palmitoleate at conserved serine residues. O-palmitoleoylation plays a critical role in regulating Wnt secretion, binding to the receptors, and in the dynamics of Wnt signaling. Therefore, protein palmitoleoylation is important in tissue homeostasis and tumorigenesis. Chemical probes based on saturated fatty acids, such as ω-alkynyl palmitic acid (Alk-14 or Alk-C16 ), have been used to study Wnt palmitoleoylation. However, such probes require prior conversion to the unsaturated fatty acid by stearoyl-CoA desaturase (SCD) in cells, significantly decreasing their selectivity and efficiency for studying protein palmitoleoylation. We synthesized and characterized ω-alkynyl cis- and trans-palmitoleic acids (cis- and trans-Alk-14:1) as chemical probes to directly study protein palmitoleoylation. We found that cis-Alk-14:1 could more efficiently label Wnt proteins in cells. Interestingly, the DHHC family of palmitoyl acyltransferases can charge both saturated and unsaturated fatty acids, potentially using both as acyl donors in protein palmitoylation and palmitoleoylation. Furthermore, proteomic analysis of targets labeled by these probes revealed new cis- and trans-palmitoleoylated proteins. Our studies provided new chemical tools and revealed new insights into palmitoleoylation in cell signaling.

  10. Membrane Protein Stability Analyses by Means of Protein Energy Profiles in Case of Nephrogenic Diabetes Insipidus

    PubMed Central

    Heinke, Florian; Labudde, Dirk

    2012-01-01

    Diabetes insipidus (DI) is a rare endocrine, inheritable disorder with low incidences in an estimated one per 25,000–30,000 live births. This disease is characterized by polyuria and compensatory polydypsia. The diverse underlying causes of DI can be central defects, in which no functional arginine vasopressin (AVP) is released from the pituitary or can be a result of defects in the kidney (nephrogenic DI, NDI). NDI is a disorder in which patients are unable to concentrate their urine despite the presence of AVP. This antidiuretic hormone regulates the process of water reabsorption from the prourine that is formed in the kidney. It binds to its type-2 receptor (V2R) in the kidney induces a cAMP-driven cascade, which leads to the insertion of aquaporin-2 water channels into the apical membrane. Mutations in the genes of V2R and aquaporin-2 often lead to NDI. We investigated a structure model of V2R in its bound and unbound state regarding protein stability using a novel protein energy profile approach. Furthermore, these techniques were applied to the wild-type and selected mutations of aquaporin-2. We show that our results correspond well to experimental water ux analysis, which confirms the applicability of our theoretical approach to equivalent problems. PMID:22474537

  11. The commonly used cGMP-dependent protein kinase type I (cGKI) inhibitor Rp-8-Br-PET-cGMPS can activate cGKI in vitro and in intact cells.

    PubMed

    Valtcheva, Nadejda; Nestorov, Peter; Beck, Alexander; Russwurm, Michael; Hillenbrand, Matthias; Weinmeister, Pascal; Feil, Robert

    2009-01-02

    Small-molecule modulators of cGMP signaling are of interest to basic and clinical research. The cGMP-dependent protein kinase type I (cGKI) is presumably a major mediator of cGMP effects, and the cGMP analogue Rp-8-Br-PET-cGMPS (Rp-PET) (chemical name: beta-phenyl-1,N2-etheno-8-bromoguanosine-3',5'-cyclic monophosphorothioate, Rp-isomer) is currently considered one of the most permeable, selective, and potent cGKI inhibitors available for intact cell studies. Here, we have evaluated the properties of Rp-PET using cGKI-expressing and cGKI-deficient primary vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs), purified cGKI isozymes, and an engineered cGMP sensor protein. cGKI activity in intact VSMCs was monitored by cGMP/cGKI-stimulated cell growth and phosphorylation of vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein. Unexpectedly, Rp-PET (100 microm) did not efficiently antagonize activation of cGKI by the agonist 8-Br-cGMP (100 microm) in intact VSMCs. Moreover, in the absence of 8-Br-cGMP, Rp-PET (100 microm) stimulated cell growth in a cGKIalpha-dependent manner. Kinase assays with purified cGKI isozymes confirmed the previously reported inhibition of the cGMP-stimulated enzyme by Rp-PET in vitro. However, in the absence of the agonist cGMP, Rp-PET partially activated the cGKIalpha isoform. Experiments with a fluorescence resonance energy transfer-based construct harboring the cGMP binding sites of cGKI suggested that binding of Rp-PET induces a conformational change similar to the agonist cGMP. Together, these findings indicate that Rp-PET is a partial cGKIalpha agonist that under certain conditions stimulates rather than inhibits cGKI activity in vitro and in intact cells. Data obtained with Rp-PET as cGKI inhibitor should be interpreted with caution and not be used as sole evidence to dissect the role of cGKI in signaling processes.

  12. Effects of pinacidil on contractile proteins in high K(+)-treated intact, and in beta-escin-treated skinned smooth muscle of the rabbit mesenteric artery.

    PubMed Central

    Itoh, T.; Suzuki, S.; Kuriyama, H.

    1991-01-01

    1. The effects of pinacidil were investigated on changes in cellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) and tension in intact and chemically skinned smooth muscle strips of the rabbit mesenteric artery. 2. High K+ (128 mM) produced a large phasic followed by a tonic increase in [Ca2+]i and tension in intact muscle strips. Pinacidil at 10 microM but not 1 microM, inhibited the phasic and tonic contractions induced by 128 mM K+ without a corresponding change in [Ca2+]i. 3. In beta-escin-treated skinned smooth muscle, the minimum Ca2+ concentration that produced contraction was 0.1 microM and the maximum contraction was obtained at 10 microM. Pinacidil at 10 microM but not 1 microM, shifted the pCa-tension relation curve to the right and also inhibited the maximum contraction induced by Ca2+. The concentrations of Ca2+ required for half maximal tension were 0.9 microM in control and 1.5 microM in the presence of 10 microM pinacidil. Calmodulin (2 microM) increased the contraction induced by 0.3 microM Ca2+ (but not by 10 microM Ca2+) in the skinned strips. Pinacidil (10 microM) inhibited the contraction induced by 0.3 microM or 10 microM Ca2+ in the presence of 2 microM calmodulin. 4. Noradrenaline (NA, 10 microM) with guanosine triphosphate (GTP, 3 microM), guanosine 5'-O-(3-thiotriphosphate) (GTP gamma S, 3 microM) or 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA, 0.1 microM) all enhanced the contraction induced by 0.3 microM Ca2+. Pinacidil (10 microM) inhibited the contraction induced by 0.3 microM Ca2+ more strongly in the presence of the above agents than in their absence.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1933133

  13. Correlations Between Single Cell Signaling Dynamics and Protein Expressions Profiles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-08-16

    the need for fluorescent or radioactive labels. These deter- minations have been performed within picoliter volumes using microfluidic channels...developments are addressing this. Future efforts will fully integrate the microfluidic nanophysiometer, OCIBD analyte detection system, MALDI-TOF protein...upon full integration of the microfluidic nanophysiometer, OCIBD analyte detection system, MALDI-TOF protein traps, and cell loading (for internalization

  14. Comparative protein profiles of Butea superba tubers under seasonal changes.

    PubMed

    Leelahawong, Chonchanok; Srisomsap, Chantragan; Cherdshewasart, Wichai; Chokchaichamnankit, Daranee; Vinayavekhin, Nawaporn; Sangvanich, Polkit

    2016-07-01

    Seasonal changes are major factors affecting environmental conditions which induce multiple stresses in plants, leading to changes in protein relative abundance in the complex cellular plant metabolic pathways. Proteomics was applied to study variations in proteome composition of Butea. superba tubers during winter, summer and rainy season throughout the year using two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis coupled with a nanoflow liquid chromatography coupled to electrospray ionization quadrupole-time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry. A total of 191 protein spots were identified and also classified into 12 functional groups. The majority of these were mainly involved in carbohydrate and energy metabolism (30.37 %) and defense and stress (18.32 %). The results exhibited the highest numbers of identified proteins in winter-harvested samples. Forty-five differential proteins were found in different seasons, involving important metabolic pathways. Further analysis indicated that changes in the protein levels were due mainly to temperature stress during summer and to water stress during winter, which affected cellular structure, photosynthesis, signal transduction and homeostasis, amino-acid biosynthesis, protein destination and storage, protein biosynthesis and stimulated defense and stress mechanisms involving glycolytic enzymes and relative oxygen species catabolizing enzymes. The proteins with differential relative abundances might induce an altered physiological status within plant tubers for survival. The work provided new insights into the better understanding of the molecular basis of plant proteomes and stress tolerance mechanisms, especially during seasonal changes. The finding suggested proteins that might potentially be used as protein markers in differing seasons in other plants and aid in selecting B. superba tubers with the most suitable medicinal properties in the future.

  15. Comprehensive glycosylation profiling of IgG and IgG-fusion proteins by top-down MS with multiple fragmentation techniques.

    PubMed

    Tran, Bao Quoc; Barton, Christopher; Feng, Jinhua; Sandjong, Aimee; Yoon, Sung Hwan; Awasthi, Shivangi; Liang, Tao; Khan, Mohd M; Kilgour, David P A; Goodlett, David R; Goo, Young Ah

    2016-02-16

    We employed top- and middle-down analyses with multiple fragmentation techniques including electron transfer dissociation (ETD), electron capture dissociation (ECD), and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization in-source decay (MALDI-ISD) for characterization of a reference monoclonal antibody (mAb) IgG1 and a fusion IgG protein. Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) or high performance liquid chromatography electrospray ionization (HPLC-ESI) on an Orbitrap was employed. These experiments provided a comprehensive view on the protein species; especially for different glycosylation level in these two proteins, which showed good agreement with oligosaccharide profiling. Top- and middle-down MS provided additional information regarding glycosylation sites and different combinational protein species that were not available from oligosaccharide mapping or conventional bottom-up analysis. Finally, incorporating a limited enzymatic digestion by immunoglobulin G-degrading enzyme of Streptococcus pyogene (IdeS) with MALDI-ISD analysis enabled extended sequence coverage of the internal region of protein without pre-fractionation. Oligosaccharide profiling together with top- and middle-down methods enabled: 1) detection of heterogeneous glycosylated protein species and sites in intact IgG1 and fusion proteins with high mass accuracy, 2) estimation of relative abundance levels of protein species in the sample, 3) confirmation of the protein termini structural information, and 4) improved sequence coverage by MALDI-ISD analysis for the internal regions of the proteins without sample pre-fractionation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. RNA Whole-Mount In Situ Hybridization Proximity Ligation Assay (rISH-PLA), an Assay for Detecting RNA-Protein Complexes in Intact Cells.

    PubMed

    Roussis, Ioannis M; Myers, Fiona A; Scarlett, Garry P

    2017-03-03

    Techniques for studying RNA-protein interactions have lagged behind those for DNA-protein interactions as a consequence of the complexities associated with working with RNA. This unit describes a method for the adaptation of the In Situ Hybridization-Proximity Ligation Assay (ISH-PLA) to the study of RNA regulation (rISH-PLA). The rISH-PLA assay allows the identification of a given RNA-protein complex at subcellular and single-cell resolution, thus avoiding the lack of spatial resolution and sensitivity associated with assaying heterogeneous cell populations from which conventional RNA-protein interaction detection techniques suffer. This technique will be particularly usefully for studying the activity of RNA binding proteins (RBPs) in complex mixtures of cells, for example tissue sections or whole embryos. © 2017 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  17. Intact Cell MALDI-TOF MS on Sperm: A Molecular Test For Male Fertility Diagnosis*

    PubMed Central

    Soler, Laura; Grasseau, Isabelle; Teixeira-Gomes, Ana-Paula; Blesbois, Elisabeth

    2016-01-01

    Currently, evaluation of sperm quality is primarily based on in vitro measures of sperm function such as motility, viability and/or acrosome reaction. However, results are often poorly correlated with fertility, and alternative diagnostic tools are therefore needed both in veterinary and human medicine. In a recent pilot study, we demonstrated that MS profiles from intact chicken sperm using MALDI-TOF profiles could detect significant differences between fertile/subfertile spermatozoa showing that such profiles could be useful for in vitro male fertility testing. In the present study, we performed larger standardized experimental procedures designed for the development of fertility- predictive mathematical models based on sperm cell MALDI-TOF MS profiles acquired through a fast, automated method. This intact cell MALDI-TOF MS-based method showed high diagnostic accuracy in identifying fertile/subfertile males in a large male population of known fertility from two distinct genetic lineages (meat and egg laying lines). We additionally identified 40% of the m/z peaks observed in sperm MS profiles through a top-down high-resolution protein identification analysis. This revealed that the MALDI-TOF MS spectra obtained from intact sperm cells contained a large proportion of protein degradation products, many implicated in important functional pathways in sperm such as energy metabolism, structure and movement. Proteins identified by our predictive model included diverse and important functional classes providing new insights into sperm function as it relates to fertility differences in this experimental system. Thus, in addition to the chicken model system developed here, with the use of appropriate models these methods should effectively translate to other animal taxa where similar tests for fertility are warranted. PMID:27044871

  18. Intact Cell MALDI-TOF MS on Sperm: A Molecular Test For Male Fertility Diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Soler, Laura; Labas, Valérie; Thélie, Aurore; Grasseau, Isabelle; Teixeira-Gomes, Ana-Paula; Blesbois, Elisabeth

    2016-06-01

    Currently, evaluation of sperm quality is primarily based on in vitro measures of sperm function such as motility, viability and/or acrosome reaction. However, results are often poorly correlated with fertility, and alternative diagnostic tools are therefore needed both in veterinary and human medicine. In a recent pilot study, we demonstrated that MS profiles from intact chicken sperm using MALDI-TOF profiles could detect significant differences between fertile/subfertile spermatozoa showing that such profiles could be useful for in vitro male fertility testing. In the present study, we performed larger standardized experimental procedures designed for the development of fertility- predictive mathematical models based on sperm cell MALDI-TOF MS profiles acquired through a fast, automated method. This intact cell MALDI-TOF MS-based method showed high diagnostic accuracy in identifying fertile/subfertile males in a large male population of known fertility from two distinct genetic lineages (meat and egg laying lines). We additionally identified 40% of the m/z peaks observed in sperm MS profiles through a top-down high-resolution protein identification analysis. This revealed that the MALDI-TOF MS spectra obtained from intact sperm cells contained a large proportion of protein degradation products, many implicated in important functional pathways in sperm such as energy metabolism, structure and movement. Proteins identified by our predictive model included diverse and important functional classes providing new insights into sperm function as it relates to fertility differences in this experimental system. Thus, in addition to the chicken model system developed here, with the use of appropriate models these methods should effectively translate to other animal taxa where similar tests for fertility are warranted.

  19. Using support vector machine and evolutionary profiles to predict antifreeze protein sequences.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xiaowei; Ma, Zhiqiang; Yin, Minghao

    2012-01-01

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) are ice-binding proteins. Accurate identification of new AFPs is important in understanding ice-protein interactions and creating novel ice-binding domains in other proteins. In this paper, an accurate method, called AFP_PSSM, has been developed for predicting antifreeze proteins using a support vector machine (SVM) and position specific scoring matrix (PSSM) profiles. This is the first study in which evolutionary information in the form of PSSM profiles has been successfully used for predicting antifreeze proteins. Tested by 10-fold cross validation and independent test, the accuracy of the proposed method reaches 82.67% for the training dataset and 93.01% for the testing dataset, respectively. These results indicate that our predictor is a useful tool for predicting antifreeze proteins. A web server (AFP_PSSM) that implements the proposed predictor is freely available.

  20. Abseq: Ultrahigh-throughput single cell protein profiling with droplet microfluidic barcoding

    PubMed Central

    Shahi, Payam; Kim, Samuel C.; Haliburton, John R.; Gartner, Zev J.; Abate, Adam R.

    2017-01-01

    Proteins are the primary effectors of cellular function, including cellular metabolism, structural dynamics, and information processing. However, quantitative characterization of proteins at the single-cell level is challenging due to the tiny amount of protein available. Here, we present Abseq, a method to detect and quantitate proteins in single cells at ultrahigh throughput. Like flow and mass cytometry, Abseq uses specific antibodies to detect epitopes of interest; however, unlike these methods, antibodies are labeled with sequence tags that can be read out with microfluidic barcoding and DNA sequencing. We demonstrate this novel approach by characterizing surface proteins of different cell types at the single-cell level and distinguishing between the cells by their protein expression profiles. DNA-tagged antibodies provide multiple advantages for profiling proteins in single cells, including the ability to amplify low-abundance tags to make them detectable with sequencing, to use molecular indices for quantitative results, and essentially limitless multiplexing. PMID:28290550

  1. Abseq: Ultrahigh-throughput single cell protein profiling with droplet microfluidic barcoding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahi, Payam; Kim, Samuel C.; Haliburton, John R.; Gartner, Zev J.; Abate, Adam R.

    2017-03-01

    Proteins are the primary effectors of cellular function, including cellular metabolism, structural dynamics, and information processing. However, quantitative characterization of proteins at the single-cell level is challenging due to the tiny amount of protein available. Here, we present Abseq, a method to detect and quantitate proteins in single cells at ultrahigh throughput. Like flow and mass cytometry, Abseq uses specific antibodies to detect epitopes of interest; however, unlike these methods, antibodies are labeled with sequence tags that can be read out with microfluidic barcoding and DNA sequencing. We demonstrate this novel approach by characterizing surface proteins of different cell types at the single-cell level and distinguishing between the cells by their protein expression profiles. DNA-tagged antibodies provide multiple advantages for profiling proteins in single cells, including the ability to amplify low-abundance tags to make them detectable with sequencing, to use molecular indices for quantitative results, and essentially limitless multiplexing.

  2. Abseq: Ultrahigh-throughput single cell protein profiling with droplet microfluidic barcoding.

    PubMed

    Shahi, Payam; Kim, Samuel C; Haliburton, John R; Gartner, Zev J; Abate, Adam R

    2017-03-14

    Proteins are the primary effectors of cellular function, including cellular metabolism, structural dynamics, and information processing. However, quantitative characterization of proteins at the single-cell level is challenging due to the tiny amount of protein available. Here, we present Abseq, a method to detect and quantitate proteins in single cells at ultrahigh throughput. Like flow and mass cytometry, Abseq uses specific antibodies to detect epitopes of interest; however, unlike these methods, antibodies are labeled with sequence tags that can be read out with microfluidic barcoding and DNA sequencing. We demonstrate this novel approach by characterizing surface proteins of different cell types at the single-cell level and distinguishing between the cells by their protein expression profiles. DNA-tagged antibodies provide multiple advantages for profiling proteins in single cells, including the ability to amplify low-abundance tags to make them detectable with sequencing, to use molecular indices for quantitative results, and essentially limitless multiplexing.

  3. Hierarchical partitioning of metazoan protein conservation profiles provides new functional insights.

    PubMed

    Witztum, Jonathan; Persi, Erez; Horn, David; Pasmanik-Chor, Metsada; Chor, Benny

    2014-01-01

    The availability of many complete, annotated proteomes enables the systematic study of the relationships between protein conservation and functionality. We explore this question based solely on the presence or absence of protein homologues (a.k.a. conservation profiles). We study 18 metazoans, from two distinct points of view: the human's and the fly's. Using the GOrilla gene ontology (GO) analysis tool, we explore functional enrichment of the "universal proteins", those with homologues in all 17 other species, and of the "non-universal proteins". A large number of GO terms are strongly enriched in both human and fly universal proteins. Most of these functions are known to be essential. A smaller number of GO terms, exhibiting markedly different properties, are enriched in both human and fly non-universal proteins. We further explore the non-universal proteins, whose conservation profiles are consistent with the "tree of life" (TOL consistent), as well as the TOL inconsistent proteins. Finally, we applied Quantum Clustering to the conservation profiles of the TOL consistent proteins. Each cluster is strongly associated with one or a small number of specific monophyletic clades in the tree of life. The proteins in many of these clusters exhibit strong functional enrichment associated with the "life style" of the related clades. Most previous approaches for studying function and conservation are "bottom up", studying protein families one by one, and separately assessing the conservation of each. By way of contrast, our approach is "top down". We globally partition the set of all proteins hierarchically, as described above, and then identify protein families enriched within different subdivisions. While supporting previous findings, our approach also provides a tool for discovering novel relations between protein conservation profiles, functionality, and evolutionary history as represented by the tree of life.

  4. Early Lung Cancer Detection via Global Protein Modification Profiles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-12-01

    remission at 3 years (low risk) following diagnosis (Figure 2). The top graph shows the mean difference in the observed expression of the first 100...in patients with remission at 3 years. These preliminary results suggest that the PTM profiles of Lung cancer tumors with poor prognosis may be...highly divergent from that of tumors from patients that were in remission at 3 years following diagnosis and these differences can be detected using

  5. Multijunction Capillary Isoelectric Focusing Device Combined with Online Membrane-Assisted Buffer Exchanger Enables Isoelectric Point Fractionation of Intact Human Plasma Proteins for Biomarker Discovery.

    PubMed

    Pirmoradian, Mohammad; Astorga-Wells, Juan; Zubarev, Roman A

    2015-12-01

    Prefractionation of proteins is often employed to improve analysis specificity in proteomics. Prefractionation based on the isoelectric point (pI) is particularly attractive because pI is a well-defined parameter and it is orthogonal to hydrophobicity on which reversed-phase chromatography is based. However, direct capillary electrophoresis of blood proteins is challenging due to its high content of salts and charged small molecules. Here, we couple an online desalinator device to our multijunction capillary isoelectric focusing (MJ-CIEF) instrument and perform direct isoelectric separation of human blood plasma. In a proof-of-principle experiment, pooled samples of patients with progressive mild cognitive impairment and corresponding healthy controls were investigated. Injection of 3 μL of plasma containing over 100 μg of proteins into the desalinator was followed by pI fractionation with MJ-CIEF in less than 1 h. Shotgun proteomics of 12 collected fractions from each of the 5 replicates of pooled samples resulted in the identification and accurate quantification (median CV between the replicates is <4%) of nearly 365 protein groups from 4030 unique peptides (with <1% FDR for both peptides and proteins). The obtained results include several proteins previously reported as AD markers. The isoelectric point of each quantified protein was calculated using a set of 7 synthetic peptides spiked into the samples. Several proteins with a significant pI shift between their isoforms in the patient and control samples were identified. The presented method is straightforward, robust, and scalable; therefore, it can be used in both biological and clinical applications.

  6. MRI of intact plants.

    PubMed

    Van As, Henk; Scheenen, Tom; Vergeldt, Frank J

    2009-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a non-destructive and non-invasive technique that can be used to acquire two- or even three-dimensional images of intact plants. The information within the images can be manipulated and used to study the dynamics of plant water relations and water transport in the stem, e.g., as a function of environmental (stress) conditions. Non-spatially resolved portable NMR is becoming available to study leaf water content and distribution of water in different (sub-cellular) compartments. These parameters directly relate to stomatal water conductance, CO(2) uptake, and photosynthesis. MRI applied on plants is not a straight forward extension of the methods discussed for (bio)medical MRI. This educational review explains the basic physical principles of plant MRI, with a focus on the spatial resolution, factors that determine the spatial resolution, and its unique information for applications in plant water relations that directly relate to plant photosynthetic activity. © Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2009

  7. Effects of activation of protein kinase C (PKC) on the hormonal stimulation and inhibition of cAMP formation in intact human platelets

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, K.A.; Haslam, R.J.

    1986-05-01

    Washed platelets, labelled by preincubation with (/sup 3/H)adenine and (/sup 32/P)P/sub i/, were studied in the presence of indomethacin, phosphocreatine and creatine phosphokinase to block thromboxane A/sub 2/ formation and inhibitory effects of released ADP. Addition of phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) or 1,2-dioctanoyl-glycerol (diC/sub 8/) decreased the initial rate of accumulation of (/sup 3/H)cAMP observed with PGE/sub 1/ and 3-isobutyl 1- methylxanthine. Maximal decreases of 31% (1 ..mu..M PMA) and 42% (100 ..mu..M diC/sub 8/) were obtained. Also, the inhibition of (/sup 3/H)cAMP formation by epinephrine (5 ..mu..M) was decreased from 68% to 16% and 31% by 1..mu..M PMA and 100 ..mu..M diC/sub 8/, respectively. The effects of increasing concentrations of PMA and diC/sub 8/ on the stimulation of (/sup 3/H)cAMp formation by PGE/sub 1/ and on the inhibitory action of epinephrine correlated with increases in /sup 32/P incorporation into the major substrate of PKC (P47) and into two other polypeptides (P41 and P20). These results suggested that activation of PKC might explain the failure of some aggregating agents (e.g. PAF and vasopressin) to inhibit adenylate cyclase in intact platelets, although they are inhibitory with isolated membranes. However, comparison of the effects of PMA and these aggregating agents on the phosphorylation of platelet polypeptides indicated that activation of PKC by aggregating agents is inadequate to block their inhibitory effects on adenylate cyclase, when PGE/sub 1/ is present.

  8. The protein expression profile of meningioma cells is associated with distinct cytogenetic tumour subgroups.

    PubMed

    Domingues, Patrícia Henriques; Teodósio, Cristina; Otero, Álvaro; Sousa, Pablo; Gonçalves, Jesus Maria; Nieto, Ana Belen; Lopes, Maria Celeste; de Oliveira, Catarina; Orfao, Alberto; Tabernero, Maria Dolores

    2015-04-01

    Limited information exists about the impact of cytogenetic alterations on the protein expression profiles of individual meningioma cells and their association with the clinicohistopathological characteristics of the disease. The aim of this study is to investigate the potential association between the immunophenotypic profile of single meningioma cells and the most relevant features of the tumour. Multiparameter flow cytometry (MFC) was used to evaluate the immunophenotypic profile of tumour cells (n = 51 patients) and the Affymetrix U133A chip was applied for the analysis of the gene expression profile (n = 40) of meningioma samples, cytogenetically characterized by interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization. Overall, a close association between the pattern of protein expression and the cytogenetic profile of tumour cells was found. Thus, diploid tumours displayed higher levels of expression of the CD55 complement regulatory protein, tumours carrying isolated monosomy 22/del(22q) showed greater levels of bcl2 and PDGFRβ and meningiomas carrying complex karyotypes displayed a greater proliferation index and decreased expression of the CD13 ectoenzyme, the CD9 and CD81 tetraspanins, and the Her2/neu growth factor receptor. From the clinical point of view, higher expression of CD53 and CD44 was associated with a poorer outcome. Here we show that the protein expression profile of individual meningioma cells is closely associated with tumour cytogenetics, which may reflect the involvement of different signalling pathways in the distinct cytogenetic subgroups of meningiomas, with specific immunophenotypic profiles also translating into a different tumour clinical behaviour. © 2014 British Neuropathological Society.

  9. Proteomic analysis of Clostridium thermocellum core metabolism: relative protein expression profiles and growth phase-dependent changes in protein expression

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Clostridium thermocellum produces H2 and ethanol, as well as CO2, acetate, formate, and lactate, directly from cellulosic biomass. It is therefore an attractive model for biofuel production via consolidated bioprocessing. Optimization of end-product yields and titres is crucial for making biofuel production economically feasible. Relative protein expression profiles may provide targets for metabolic engineering, while understanding changes in protein expression and metabolism in response to carbon limitation, pH, and growth phase may aid in reactor optimization. We performed shotgun 2D-HPLC-MS/MS on closed-batch cellobiose-grown exponential phase C. thermocellum cell-free extracts to determine relative protein expression profiles of core metabolic proteins involved carbohydrate utilization, energy conservation, and end-product synthesis. iTRAQ (isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantitation) based protein quantitation was used to determine changes in core metabolic proteins in response to growth phase. Results Relative abundance profiles revealed differential levels of putative enzymes capable of catalyzing parallel pathways. The majority of proteins involved in pyruvate catabolism and end-product synthesis were detected with high abundance, with the exception of aldehyde dehydrogenase, ferredoxin-dependent Ech-type [NiFe]-hydrogenase, and RNF-type NADH:ferredoxin oxidoreductase. Using 4-plex 2D-HPLC-MS/MS, 24% of the 144 core metabolism proteins detected demonstrated moderate changes in expression during transition from exponential to stationary phase. Notably, proteins involved in pyruvate synthesis decreased in stationary phase, whereas proteins involved in glycogen metabolism, pyruvate catabolism, and end-product synthesis increased in stationary phase. Several proteins that may directly dictate end-product synthesis patterns, including pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductases, alcohol dehydrogenases, and a putative bifurcating hydrogenase

  10. The physics of intact capture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsou, Peter; Griffiths, D. J.; Albee, A. L.

    1994-01-01

    The ability to capture projectiles intact at hypervelocities in underdense media open a new area of study in physics. Underdense material behaves markedly different than solid, liquid, or gas upon hypervelocity impact. This new phenomenon enables applications in science that would either not be possible or would be very costly by other means. This phenomenon has been fully demonstrated in the laboratory and validated in space. Even more interesting is the fact that this hypervelocity intact capture was accomplished passively. A better understanding of the physics of intact capture will lead to improvements in intact capture. A collection of physical observations of this phenomenon is presented here.

  11. The physics of intact capture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsou, Peter; Griffiths, D. J.; Albee, A. L.

    1994-01-01

    The ability to capture projectiles intact at hypervelocities in underdense media open a new area of study in physics. Underdense material behaves markedly different than solid, liquid, or gas upon hypervelocity impact. This new phenomenon enables applications in science that would either not be possible or would be very costly by other means. This phenomenon has been fully demonstrated in the laboratory and validated in space. Even more interesting is the fact that this hypervelocity intact capture was accomplished passively. A better understanding of the physics of intact capture will lead to improvements in intact capture. A collection of physical observations of this phenomenon is presented here.

  12. Membrane Protein Profiling of Human Colon Reveals Distinct Regional Differences *

    PubMed Central

    van der Post, Sjoerd; Hansson, Gunnar C.

    2014-01-01

    The colonic epithelium is a highly dynamic system important for the regulation of ion and water homeostasis via absorption and secretion and for the maintenance of a protective barrier between the outer milieu and the inside of the body. These processes are known to gradually change along the length of the colon, although a complete characterization at the protein level is lacking. We therefore analyzed the membrane proteome of isolated human (n = 4) colonic epithelial cells from biopsies obtained via routine colonoscopy for four segments along the large intestine: ascending, transverse, descending, and sigmoid colon. Label-free quantitative proteomic analyses using high-resolution mass spectrometry were performed on enriched membrane proteins. The results showed a stable level for the majority of membrane proteins but a distinct decrease in proteins associated with bacterial sensing, cation transport, and O-glycosylation in the proximal to distal regions. In contrast, proteins involved in microbial defense and anion transport showed an opposing gradient and increased toward the distal end. The gradient of ion-transporter proteins could be directly related to previously observed ion transport activities. All individual glycosyltransferases required for the O-glycosylation of the major colonic mucin MUC2 were observed and correlated with the known glycosylation variation along the colon axis. This is the first comprehensive quantitative dataset of membrane protein abundance along the human colon and will add to the knowledge of the physiological function of the different regions of the colonic mucosa. Mass spectrometry data have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange with the identifier PXD000987. PMID:24889196

  13. Enzymatic activities and protein profile of latex from Calotropis procera.

    PubMed

    Freitas, Cleverson Diniz T; Oliveira, Jefferson Soares; Miranda, Maria Raquel A; Macedo, Nívea Maria R; Sales, Maurício Pereira; Villas-Boas, Laurival A; Ramos, Márcio Viana

    2007-01-01

    The laticifer fluid of Calotropis procera is rich in proteins and there is evidence that they are involved in the pharmacological properties of the latex. However, not much is known about how the latex-containing proteins are produced or their functions. In this study, laticifer proteins of C. procera were pooled and examined by 1D and 2D electrophoresis, masses spectrometry (MALDI-TOF) and characterized in respect of proteolytic activity and oxidative enzymes. Soluble laticifer proteins were predominantly composed of basic proteins (PI>6.0) with molecular masses varying between 5 and 95 kDa. Proteins with a molecular mass of approximately 26,000 Da were more evident. Strong anti-oxidative activity of superoxide dismutase (EC 1.15.1.1) (1007.74+/-91.89 Ug(-1)DM) and, to a lesser extent ascorbate peroxidase (EC 1.11.1.1) (0.117(d)+/-0.013 microMol H(2)O(2)g(-1)min(-1)), were detected. However, catalase (EC 1.11.1.6) was absent. The strong proteolytic activities of laticifer proteins from C. procera were shown to be shared by at least four distinct cysteine proteinases (EC 3.4.22.16) that were isolated by gel filtration chromatography. Serine and metaloproteinases were not detected and aspartic proteinase activities were barely visible. Chitinases (EC 3.2.1.14) were also isolated in a chitin column and their activities quantified. The presence of these enzymatic activities in latex from C. procera may confirm their involvement in resistance to phytopathogens and insects, mainly in its leaves where the latex circulates abundantly.

  14. Ribosome profiling: a Hi-Def monitor for protein synthesis at the genome-wide scale.

    PubMed

    Michel, Audrey M; Baranov, Pavel V

    2013-01-01

    Ribosome profiling or ribo-seq is a new technique that provides genome-wide information on protein synthesis (GWIPS) in vivo. It is based on the deep sequencing of ribosome protected mRNA fragments allowing the measurement of ribosome density along all RNA molecules present in the cell. At the same time, the high resolution of this technique allows detailed analysis of ribosome density on individual RNAs. Since its invention, the ribosome profiling technique has been utilized in a range of studies in both prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms. Several studies have adapted and refined the original ribosome profiling protocol for studying specific aspects of translation. Ribosome profiling of initiating ribosomes has been used to map sites of translation initiation. These studies revealed the surprisingly complex organization of translation initiation sites in eukaryotes. Multiple initiation sites are responsible for the generation of N-terminally extended and truncated isoforms of known proteins as well as for the translation of numerous open reading frames (ORFs), upstream of protein coding ORFs. Ribosome profiling of elongating ribosomes has been used for measuring differential gene expression at the level of translation, the identification of novel protein coding genes and ribosome pausing. It has also provided data for developing quantitative models of translation. Although only a dozen or so ribosome profiling datasets have been published so far, they have already dramatically changed our understanding of translational control and have led to new hypotheses regarding the origin of protein coding genes. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Ribosome profiling: a Hi-Def monitor for protein synthesis at the genome-wide scale

    PubMed Central

    Michel, Audrey M; Baranov, Pavel V

    2013-01-01

    Ribosome profiling or ribo-seq is a new technique that provides genome-wide information on protein synthesis (GWIPS) in vivo. It is based on the deep sequencing of ribosome protected mRNA fragments allowing the measurement of ribosome density along all RNA molecules present in the cell. At the same time, the high resolution of this technique allows detailed analysis of ribosome density on individual RNAs. Since its invention, the ribosome profiling technique has been utilized in a range of studies in both prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms. Several studies have adapted and refined the original ribosome profiling protocol for studying specific aspects of translation. Ribosome profiling of initiating ribosomes has been used to map sites of translation initiation. These studies revealed the surprisingly complex organization of translation initiation sites in eukaryotes. Multiple initiation sites are responsible for the generation of N-terminally extended and truncated isoforms of known proteins as well as for the translation of numerous open reading frames (ORFs), upstream of protein coding ORFs. Ribosome profiling of elongating ribosomes has been used for measuring differential gene expression at the level of translation, the identification of novel protein coding genes and ribosome pausing. It has also provided data for developing quantitative models of translation. Although only a dozen or so ribosome profiling datasets have been published so far, they have already dramatically changed our understanding of translational control and have led to new hypotheses regarding the origin of protein coding genes. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:23696005

  16. Protein and lipid MALDI profiles classify breast cancers according to the intrinsic subtype

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry (MS) has been demonstrated to be useful for molecular profiling of common solid tumors. Using recently developed MALDI matrices for lipid profiling, we evaluated whether direct tissue MALDI MS analysis on proteins and lipids may classify human breast cancer samples according to the intrinsic subtype. Methods Thirty-four pairs of frozen, resected breast cancer and adjacent normal tissue samples were analyzed using histology-directed, MALDI MS analysis. Sinapinic acid and 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid/α-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid were manually deposited on areas of each tissue section enriched in epithelial cells to identify lipid profiles, and mass spectra were acquired using a MALDI-time of flight instrument. Results Protein and lipid profiles distinguish cancer from adjacent normal tissue samples with the median prediction accuracy of 94.1%. Luminal, HER2+, and triple-negative tumors demonstrated different protein and lipid profiles, as evidenced by permutation P values less than 0.01 for 0.632+ bootstrap cross-validated misclassification rates with all classifiers tested. Discriminatory proteins and lipids were useful for classifying tumors according to the intrinsic subtype with median prediction accuracies of 80.0-81.3% in random test sets. Conclusions Protein and lipid profiles accurately distinguish tumor from adjacent normal tissue and classify breast cancers according to the intrinsic subtype. PMID:22029885

  17. Optimization of translation profiles enhances protein expression and solubility.

    PubMed

    Hess, Anne-Katrin; Saffert, Paul; Liebeton, Klaus; Ignatova, Zoya

    2015-01-01

    mRNA is translated with a non-uniform speed that actively coordinates co-translational folding of protein domains. Using structure-based homology we identified the structural domains in epoxide hydrolases (EHs) and introduced slow-translating codons to delineate the translation of single domains. These changes in translation speed dramatically improved the solubility of two EHs of metagenomic origin in Escherichia coli. Conversely, the importance of transient attenuation for the folding, and consequently solubility, of EH was evidenced with a member of the EH family from Agrobacterium radiobacter, which partitions in the soluble fraction when expressed in E. coli. Synonymous substitutions of codons shaping the slow-transiting regions to fast-translating codons render this protein insoluble. Furthermore, we show that low protein yield can be enhanced by decreasing the free folding energy of the initial 5'-coding region, which can disrupt mRNA secondary structure and enhance ribosomal loading. This study provides direct experimental evidence that mRNA is not a mere messenger for translation of codons into amino acids but bears an additional layer of information for folding, solubility and expression level of the encoded protein. Furthermore, it provides a general frame on how to modulate and fine-tune gene expression of a target protein.

  18. Optimization of Translation Profiles Enhances Protein Expression and Solubility

    PubMed Central

    Hess, Anne-Katrin; Saffert, Paul; Liebeton, Klaus; Ignatova, Zoya

    2015-01-01

    mRNA is translated with a non-uniform speed that actively coordinates co-translational folding of protein domains. Using structure-based homology we identified the structural domains in epoxide hydrolases (EHs) and introduced slow-translating codons to delineate the translation of single domains. These changes in translation speed dramatically improved the solubility of two EHs of metagenomic origin in Escherichia coli. Conversely, the importance of transient attenuation for the folding, and consequently solubility, of EH was evidenced with a member of the EH family from Agrobacterium radiobacter, which partitions in the soluble fraction when expressed in E. coli. Synonymous substitutions of codons shaping the slow-transiting regions to fast-translating codons render this protein insoluble. Furthermore, we show that low protein yield can be enhanced by decreasing the free folding energy of the initial 5’-coding region, which can disrupt mRNA secondary structure and enhance ribosomal loading. This study provides direct experimental evidence that mRNA is not a mere messenger for translation of codons into amino acids but bears an additional layer of information for folding, solubility and expression level of the encoded protein. Furthermore, it provides a general frame on how to modulate and fine-tune gene expression of a target protein. PMID:25965266

  19. Multidimensional profiling of cell surface proteins and nuclear markers

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Ju; Chang, Hang; Andarawewa, Kumari; Yaswen, Paul; Helen Barcellos-Hoff, Mary; Parvin, Bahram

    2009-01-30

    Cell membrane proteins play an important role in tissue architecture and cell-cell communication. We hypothesize that segmentation and multidimensional characterization of the distribution of cell membrane proteins, on a cell-by-cell basis, enable improved classification of treatment groups and identify important characteristics that can otherwise be hidden. We have developed a series of computational steps to (i) delineate cell membrane protein signals and associate them with a specific nucleus; (ii) compute a coupled representation of the multiplexed DNA content with membrane proteins; (iii) rank computed features associated with such a multidimensional representation; (iv) visualize selected features for comparative evaluation through heatmaps; and (v) discriminate between treatment groups in an optimal fashion. The novelty of our method is in the segmentation of the membrane signal and the multidimensional representation of phenotypic signature on a cell-by-cell basis. To test the utility of this method, the proposed computational steps were applied to images of cells that have been irradiated with different radiation qualities in the presence and absence of other small molecules. These samples are labeled for their DNA content and E-cadherin membrane proteins. We demonstrate that multidimensional representations of cell-by-cell phenotypes improve predictive and visualization capabilities among different treatment groups, and identify hidden variables.

  20. Impact of Profiling Technologies in the Understanding of Recombinant Protein Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijayendran, Chandran; Flaschel, Erwin

    Since expression profiling methods have been available in a high throughput fashion, the implication of these technologies in the field of biotechnology has increased dramatically. Microarray technology is one such unique and efficient methodology for simultaneous exploration of expression levels of numerous genes. Likewise, two-dimensional gel electrophoresis or multidimensional liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry are extensively utilised for studying expression levels of numerous proteins. In the field of biotechnology these highly parallel analytical methods have paved the way to study and understand various biological phenomena depending on expression patterns. The next phenomenological level is represented by the metabolome and the (metabolic) fluxome. However, this chapter reviews gene and protein profiling and their impact on understanding recombinant protein production. We focus on the computational methods utilised for the analyses of data obtained from these profiling technologies as well as prominent results focusing on recombinant protein expression with Escherichia coli. Owing to the knowledge accumulated with respect to cellular signals triggered during recombinant protein production, this field is on the way to design strategies for developing improved processes. Both gene and protein profiling have exhibited a handful of functional categories to concentrate on in order to identify target genes and proteins, respectively, involved in the signalling network with major impact on recombinant protein production.

  1. Neurobiological Signatures of Alcohol Dependence Revealed by Protein Profiling

    PubMed Central

    Gorini, Giorgio; Roberts, Amanda J.; Mayfield, R. Dayne

    2013-01-01

    Alcohol abuse causes dramatic neuroadaptations in the brain, which contribute to tolerance, dependence, and behavioral modifications. Previous proteomic studies in human alcoholics and animal models have identified candidate alcoholism-related proteins. However, recent evidences suggest that alcohol dependence is caused by changes in co-regulation that are invisible to single protein-based analysis. Here, we analyze global proteomics data to integrate differential expression, co-expression networks, and gene annotations to unveil key neurobiological rearrangements associated with the transition to alcohol dependence modeled by a Chronic Intermittent Ethanol (CIE), two-bottle choice (2BC) paradigm. We analyzed cerebral cortices (CTX) and midbrains (MB) from male C57BL/6J mice subjected to a CIE, 2BC paradigm, which induces heavy drinking and represents one of the best available animal models for alcohol dependence and relapse drinking. CIE induced significant changes in protein levels in dependent mice compared with their non-dependent controls. Multiple protein isoforms showed region-specific differential regulation as a result of post-translational modifications. Our integrative analysis identified modules of co-expressed proteins that were highly correlated with CIE treatment. We found that modules most related to the effects of CIE treatment coordinate molecular imbalances in endocytic- and energy-related pathways, with specific proteins involved, such as dynamin-1. The qRT-PCR experiments validated both differential and co-expression analyses, and the correspondence among our data and previous genomic and proteomic studies in humans and rodents substantiates our findings. The changes identified above may play a key role in the escalation of ethanol consumption associated with dependence. Our approach to alcohol addiction will advance knowledge of brain remodeling mechanisms and adaptive changes in response to drug abuse, contribute to understanding of

  2. Association of protein structure, protein and carbohydrate subfractions with bioenergy profiles and biodegradation functions in modeled forage.

    PubMed

    Ji, Cuiying; Zhang, Xuewei; Yu, Peiqiang

    2016-03-15

    The objectives of this study were to detect unique aspects and association of forage protein inherent structure, biological compounds, protein and carbohydrate subfractions, bioenergy profiles, and biodegradation features. In this study, common available alfalfa hay from two different sourced-origins (FSO vs. CSO) was used as a modeled forage for inherent structure profile, bioenergy, biodegradation and their association between their structure and bio-functions. The molecular spectral profiles were determined using non-invasive molecular spectroscopy. The parameters included: protein structure amide I group, amide II group and their ratios; protein subfractions (PA1, PA2, PB1, PB2, PC); carbohydrate fractions (CA1, CA2, CA3, CA4, CB1, CB2, CC); biodegradable and undegradable fractions of protein (RDPA2, RDPB1, RDPB2, RDP; RUPA2 RUPB1, RUPB2, RUPC, RUP); biodegradable and undegradable fractions of carbohydrate (RDCA4, RDCB1, RDCB2, RDCB3, RDCHO; RUCA4, RUCB1; RUCB2; RUCB3 RUCC, RUCHO) and bioenergy profiles (tdNDF, tdFA, tdCP, tdNFC, TDN1×, DE3×, ME3×, NEL3×; NEm, NEg). The results show differences in protein and carbohydrate (CHO) subfractions in the moderately degradable true protein fraction (PB1: 502 vs. 420 g/kg CP, P=0.09), slowly degraded true protein fraction (PB2: 45 vs. 96 g/kg CP, P=0.02), moderately degradable CHO fraction (CB2: 283 vs. 223 g/kg CHO, P=0.06) and slowly degraded CHO fraction (CB3: 369 vs. 408 g/kg CHO) between the two sourced origins. As to biodegradable (RD) fractions of protein and CHO in rumen, there were differences in RD of PB1 (417 vs. 349 g/kg CP, P=0.09), RD of PB2 (29 vs. 62 g/kg CP, P=0.02), RD of CB2 (251 vs. 198 g/kg DM, P=0.06), RD of CB3 (236 vs. 261 g/kg CHO, P=0.08). As to bioenergy profile, there were differences in total digestible nutrient (TDN: 551 vs. 537 g/kg DM, P=0.06), and metabolic bioenergy (P=0.095). As to protein molecular structure, there were differences in protein structure 1st and 2nd amide groups (P

  3. Association of protein structure, protein and carbohydrate subfractions with bioenergy profiles and biodegradation functions in modeled forage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Cuiying; Zhang, Xuewei; Yu, Peiqiang

    2016-03-01

    The objectives of this study were to detect unique aspects and association of forage protein inherent structure, biological compounds, protein and carbohydrate subfractions, bioenergy profiles, and biodegradation features. In this study, common available alfalfa hay from two different sourced-origins (FSO vs. CSO) was used as a modeled forage for inherent structure profile, bioenergy, biodegradation and their association between their structure and bio-functions. The molecular spectral profiles were determined using non-invasive molecular spectroscopy. The parameters included: protein structure amide I group, amide II group and their ratios; protein subfractions (PA1, PA2, PB1, PB2, PC); carbohydrate fractions (CA1, CA2, CA3, CA4, CB1, CB2, CC); biodegradable and undegradable fractions of protein (RDPA2, RDPB1, RDPB2, RDP; RUPA2 RUPB1, RUPB2, RUPC, RUP); biodegradable and undegradable fractions of carbohydrate (RDCA4, RDCB1, RDCB2, RDCB3, RDCHO; RUCA4, RUCB1; RUCB2; RUCB3 RUCC, RUCHO) and bioenergy profiles (tdNDF, tdFA, tdCP, tdNFC, TDN1 ×, DE3 ×, ME3 ×, NEL3 ×; NEm, NEg). The results show differences in protein and carbohydrate (CHO) subfractions in the moderately degradable true protein fraction (PB1: 502 vs. 420 g/kg CP, P = 0.09), slowly degraded true protein fraction (PB2: 45 vs. 96 g/kg CP, P = 0.02), moderately degradable CHO fraction (CB2: 283 vs. 223 g/kg CHO, P = 0.06) and slowly degraded CHO fraction (CB3: 369 vs. 408 g/kg CHO) between the two sourced origins. As to biodegradable (RD) fractions of protein and CHO in rumen, there were differences in RD of PB1 (417 vs. 349 g/kg CP, P = 0.09), RD of PB2 (29 vs. 62 g/kg CP, P = 0.02), RD of CB2 (251 vs. 198 g/kg DM, P = 0.06), RD of CB3 (236 vs. 261 g/kg CHO, P = 0.08). As to bioenergy profile, there were differences in total digestible nutrient (TDN: 551 vs. 537 g/kg DM, P = 0.06), and metabolic bioenergy (P = 0.095). As to protein molecular structure, there were differences in protein structure 1st

  4. The Effect of Povidone-Iodine (Betadine) on Serum Protein-Bound Iodine, When Used as a Surgical Preparation on Intact Skin

    PubMed Central

    Higgins, H. P.; Hawks, G. H.; O'Sullivan, M.; Shaw, M.

    1964-01-01

    A study was undertaken to determine whether the use of povidone-iodine (Betadine) as a skin disinfectant prior to surgery would affect the protein-bound iodine (PBI) and so invalidate this parameter of thyroid function. Ninety-seven consecutive patients were chosen who had no thyroid disease and who had not recently been exposed to iodine in any form. Their serum PBI levels were determined before and after a wide variety of surgical operations. Povidone-iodine was used as a skin disinfectant in the operating room in all cases. Care was taken to avoid contact of the povidone-iodine with the mucous membranes. No significant change in the protein-bound iodine could be detected and it was concluded that there could be no objection to the use of povidone-iodine on the ground of its possible effect on the protein-bound iodine. PMID:14158542

  5. Homogeneous human complex-type oligosaccharides in correctly folded intact glycoproteins: evaluation of oligosaccharide influence on protein folding, stability, and conformational properties.

    PubMed

    Kajihara, Yasuhiro; Tanabe, Yasutaka; Sasaoka, Shun; Okamoto, Ryo

    2012-05-07

    The N-glycosylation of proteins is generated at the consensus sequence NXS/T (where X is any amino acid except proline) by the biosynthetic process, and occurs in the endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi apparatus. In order to investigate the influence of human complex-type oligosaccharides on counterpart protein conformation, crambin and ovomucoide, which consist of 46 and 56 amino acid residues, respectively, were selected for synthesis of model glycoproteins. These small glycoproteins were intentionally designed to be glycosylated at the α-helix (crambin: 8 position), β-sheet (crambin: 2 position) and loop position between the antiparallel β-sheets (ovomucoide: 28 position), and were synthesized by using a peptide-segment coupling strategy. After preparation of these glycosylated polypeptide chains, protein folding experiments were performed under redox conditions by using cysteine-cystine. Although the small glycoproteins bearing intentional glycosylation at the α-helix and β-sheet exhibited a suitable folding process, glycosylation at the loop position between the antiparallel β-strands caused multiple products. The conformational differences in the isolated homogeneous glycoproteins compared with non-glycosylated counterparts were evaluated by circular dichroism (CD) and NMR spectroscopy. These analyses suggested that this intentional N-glycosylation did not result in large conformational changes in the purified protein structures, including the case of glycosylation at the loop position between the antiparallel β-strands. In addition to these experiments, the conformational properties of three glycoproteins were evaluated by CD spectroscopy under different temperatures. The oligosaccharides on the protein surface fluctuated considerably; this was dependent on the increase in the solution temperature and was thought to disrupt the protein tertiary structure. Based on the measurement of the CD spectra, however, the glycoproteins bearing three disulfide

  6. The polar profile of ancient proteins: a computational extrapolation from prebiotics to paleobiochemistry.

    PubMed

    Polanco, Carlos; Buhse, Thomas; Vizcaíno, Gloria; Picciotto, Jacobo Levy

    2017-01-01

    This paper addresses the polar profile of ancient proteins using a comparative study of amino acids found in 25 000 000-year-old shells described in Abelson's work. We simulated the polar profile with a computer platform that represented an evolutionary computational toy model that mimicked the generation of small proteins starting from a pool of monomeric amino acids and that included several dynamic properties, such as self-replication and fragmentation-recombination of the proteins. The simulations were taken up to 15 generations and produced a considerable number of proteins of 25 amino acids in length. The computational model included the amino acids found in the ancient shells, the thermal degradation factor, and the relative abundance of the amino acids observed in the Miller-Urey experimental simulation of the prebiotic amino acid formation. We found that the amino acid polar profiles of the ancient shells and those simulated and extrapolated from the Miller-Urey abundances are coincident.

  7. Specificity of interaction between carcinogenic polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons and nuclear proteins: widespread occurrence of a restricted pattern of histone-binding in intact cells

    SciTech Connect

    MacLeod, M.C.; Pelling, J.C.; Slaga, T.J.; Nikbakht-Noghrei, P.A.; Mansfield, B.K.; Selkirk, J.K.

    1982-01-01

    Metabolic activation of benzo(a)pyrene (B(a)P) produces a number of potentially reactive metabolites. The endproducts of one metabolic pathway, 7,8-dihydroxy-9,10-oxy-7,8,9,10-tetrahydro-B(a)P (BPDE) are responsible for essentially all DNA adduct formation in animal cells treated with B(a)P, and a particular stereoisomer, designated (+)-anti-BPDE is thought to be the ultimate carcinogenic derivative of B(a)P. In hamster embryo cell nuclei treated with (+)-anti-BPDE, two of the histones of the nucleosomal core, H3 and H2A, are covalently modified, while the remaining core histones, H4 and H2B, are essentially unmodified. All four purified core histones, however, serve as targets. 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene and 3-methylcholanthrene show the same pattern of histone binding in hamster embryo cells. Treatment of mouse embryo cells with (/sup 3/H)-BPDE results in covalent binding of the hydrocarbon to histones H3 and H2A among the many cellular targets, while histones H2B and H4 are not bound. Similar binding patterns are seen in mouse embryo cells, a permanent murine, fibroblastic cell line, and a human mammary epithelial cell line, T47D, treated with (/sup 3/H)B(a)P. Again, the histones are unevenly labeled, displaying the H3 and H2A pattern. Histone-binding in the human cells may also be mediated by BPDE. Similar BPDE binding patterns were observed in other murine and human cell lines and in primary cultures of murine epidermal epithelial cells. The restriction of histone H2B and H4 binding appears to be general when intact cultured cells are studied. This specificity was not observed in a mixed reconstituted system in which rat liver microsomes were used to activate B(a)P. This finding reinforces reservations concerning the use of microsomal systems to probe the interactions of carcinogens with macromolecules and the relationships of adduct formation with the processes of carcinogenesis. (ERB)

  8. Sensory and protein profiles of Mexican Chihuahua cheese.

    PubMed

    Paul, Moushumi; Nuñez, Alberto; Van Hekken, Diane L; Renye, John A

    2014-11-01

    Native microflora in raw milk cheeses, including the Mexican variety Queso Chihuahua, contribute to flavor development through degradation of milk proteins. The effects of proteolysis were studied in four different brands of Mexican Queso Chihuahua made from raw milk. All of the cheeses were analyzed for chemical and sensory characteristics. Sensory testing revealed that the fresh cheeses elicited flavors of young, basic cheeses, with slight bitter notes. Analysis by gel electrophoresis and reverse phase-high performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) revealed that the Queseria Blumen (X) and Queseria Super Fino (Z) cheeses show little protein degradation over time while the Queseria America (W) and Queseria Lago Grande (Y) samples are degraded extensively when aged at 4 °C for 8 weeks. Analysis of the mixture of water-soluble cheese proteins by mass spectrometry revealed the presence of short, hydrophobic peptides in quantities correlating with bitterness. All cheese samples contained enterococcal strains known to produce enterocins. The W and Y cheese samples had the highest number of bacteria and exhibited greater protein degradation than that observed for the X and Z cheeses.

  9. Serum protein profiling of adults and children with Crohn disease.

    PubMed

    Vaiopoulou, Anna; Gazouli, Maria; Papadopoulou, Aggeliki; Anagnostopoulos, Athanassios K; Karamanolis, George; Theodoropoulos, George E; M'Koma, Amosy; Tsangaris, George T

    2015-01-01

    Crohn disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC), known collectively as inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs), are chronic immunoinflammatory pathologies of unknown aetiology. Despite the frequent use of biomarkers in medical practice, there is a relative lack of information regarding validated paediatric biomarkers for IBD. Furthermore, biomarkers proved to be efficacious in adults are frequently extrapolated to the paediatric clinical setting without considering that the pathogenesis of many diseases is distinctly different in children. In the present study, proteomics technology was used to monitor differences in protein expression among adult and young patients with CD, identify a panel of candidate protein biomarkers that may be used to improve prognostic-diagnostic accuracy, and advance paediatric medical care. Male and female serum samples from 12 adults and 12 children with active CD were subjected to 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Following the relative quantitation of protein spots exhibiting a differential expression between the 2 groups by densitometry, the spots were further characterized by matrix-assisted laser desorption tandem time-of-flight mass spectrometer. The results were confirmed by Western blot analysis. Clusterin was found to be significantly overexpressed in adults with CD, whereas ceruloplasmin and apolipoprotein B-100 were found to be significantly overexpressed in children, indicating that the expression of these proteins may be implicated in the onset or progression of CD in these 2 subgroups of patients. Interestingly, we found a differential expression of several proteins in adults versus paediatric patients with CD. Undoubtedly, future experiments using a larger cohort of patients with CD are needed to evaluate the relevance of our preliminary findings.

  10. Microphotometrical quantification of protein thiols in morphologically intact cells of the cervical epithelium. I. Basic results with superficial cells of healthy women.

    PubMed

    Nöhammer, G; Schauenstein, E; Bajardi, F; Unger-Ullmann, C L

    1977-01-01

    The investigations are based on Esterbauer's results according to which the staining of protein thiols (PSH) with DDD-Fast Blue B (Barrnett and Seligman) is of a quantitative order. Consequently, the PSH of the nucleus and the cytoplasm of superficial cells of the ectocervical epithelium of healthy women are determined to 0.3 and 4.1 X 10(-14) moles, respectively. After it has been found that the mean absorption spectrum between 310 and 238 nm of the pure proteins, the extinction at 278 nm of a cytoplasmic area (300 to 400 micron2) of unstained cells is taken as a first measure for the cytoplasmic protein content which is calculated to approximately 5 X 10(-18) moles per micron2 whereas the PSH content results to 1.9 X 10(-17) moles per micron2. From this value results a very plausible number of 3.6 SH per 10(5) g of cytoplasmic proteins.

  11. Hierarchical Partitioning of Metazoan Protein Conservation Profiles Provides New Functional Insights

    PubMed Central

    Witztum, Jonathan; Persi, Erez; Horn, David; Pasmanik-Chor, Metsada; Chor, Benny

    2014-01-01

    The availability of many complete, annotated proteomes enables the systematic study of the relationships between protein conservation and functionality. We explore this question based solely on the presence or absence of protein homologues (a.k.a. conservation profiles). We study 18 metazoans, from two distinct points of view: the human's and the fly's. Using the GOrilla gene ontology (GO) analysis tool, we explore functional enrichment of the “universal proteins”, those with homologues in all 17 other species, and of the “non-universal proteins”. A large number of GO terms are strongly enriched in both human and fly universal proteins. Most of these functions are known to be essential. A smaller number of GO terms, exhibiting markedly different properties, are enriched in both human and fly non-universal proteins. We further explore the non-universal proteins, whose conservation profiles are consistent with the “tree of life” (TOL consistent), as well as the TOL inconsistent proteins. Finally, we applied Quantum Clustering to the conservation profiles of the TOL consistent proteins. Each cluster is strongly associated with one or a small number of specific monophyletic clades in the tree of life. The proteins in many of these clusters exhibit strong functional enrichment associated with the “life style” of the related clades. Most previous approaches for studying function and conservation are “bottom up”, studying protein families one by one, and separately assessing the conservation of each. By way of contrast, our approach is “top down”. We globally partition the set of all proteins hierarchically, as described above, and then identify protein families enriched within different subdivisions. While supporting previous findings, our approach also provides a tool for discovering novel relations between protein conservation profiles, functionality, and evolutionary history as represented by the tree of life. PMID:24594619

  12. Identification of Cargo for Adaptor Protein (AP) Complexes 3 and 4 by Sucrose Gradient Profiling.

    PubMed

    Pertl-Obermeyer, Heidi; Wu, Xu Na; Schrodt, Jens; Müdsam, Christina; Obermeyer, Gerhard; Schulze, Waltraud X

    2016-09-01

    Intracellular vesicle trafficking is a fundamental process in eukaryotic cells. It enables cellular polarity and exchange of proteins between subcellular compartments such as the plasma membrane or the vacuole. Adaptor protein complexes participate in the vesicle formation by specific selection of the transported cargo. We investigated the role of the adaptor protein complex 3 (AP-3) and adaptor protein complex 4 (AP-4) in this selection process by screening for AP-3 and AP-4 dependent cargo proteins. Specific cargo proteins are expected to be mis-targeted in knock-out mutants of adaptor protein complex components. Thus, we screened for altered distribution profiles across a density gradient of membrane proteins in wild type versus ap-3β and ap-4β knock-out mutants. In ap-3β mutants, especially proteins with transport functions, such as aquaporins and plasma membrane ATPase, as well as vesicle trafficking proteins showed differential protein distribution profiles across the density gradient. In the ap-4β mutant aquaporins but also proteins from lipid metabolism were differentially distributed. These proteins also showed differential phosphorylation patterns in ap-3β and ap-4β compared with wild type. Other proteins, such as receptor kinases were depleted from the AP-3 mutant membrane system, possibly because of degradation after mis-targeting. In AP-4 mutants, membrane fractions were depleted for cytochrome P450 proteins, cell wall proteins and receptor kinases. Analysis of water transport capacity in wild type and mutant mesophyll cells confirmed aquaporins as cargo proteins of AP-3 and AP-4. The combination of organelle density gradients with proteome analysis turned out as a suitable experimental strategy for large-scale analyses of protein trafficking.

  13. Milk protein profiles in response to Streptococcus agalactiae subclinical mastitis in dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Pongthaisong, Pongphol; Katawatin, Suporn; Thamrongyoswittayakul, Chaiyapas; Roytrakul, Sittiruk

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the milk protein profiles of normal milk and those of milk during the course of subclinical mastitis, caused by natural Streptococcus agalactiae infection. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and liquid chromatography mass spectrometry were used to assess protein profiles and to identify the proteins. The results showed that S. agalactiae subclinical mastitis altered the protein profiles of milk. Following Mascot database matching, 11 and 12 protein types were identified in the milk collected from healthy and S. agalactiae subclinical mastitic udders, respectively. The distinct presence of the antibacterial protein cathelicidin-1 was detected in infected milk samples, which in turn was highly correlated to the severity of subclinical mastitis as represented by the milk somatic cell count (r = 0.616), but not the bacterial count. The protein profile of milk reveals changes in the host response to S. agalactiae intramammary infection; cathelicidin-1 could therefore serve as a biomarker for the detection of subclinical mastitis in dairy cows.

  14. Space research with intact organisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, Robert W.; Haddy, Francis J.

    1992-01-01

    Effects of space exposure on intact organisms are briefly reviewed, and examples of future experiments that might provide new information on the role of gravity in the evolution of life are suggested. It is noted that long term experiments with intact plant and animals for studying gravitational thresholds will provide important new insights.

  15. Proteomic profiling of cellular proteins interacting with the hepatitis C virus core protein.

    PubMed

    Kang, Su-Min; Shin, Min-Jung; Kim, Jung-Hee; Oh, Jong-Won

    2005-05-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a causative agent of chronic hepatitis and hepatocellular carcinoma. The core protein of HCV packages the viral RNA genome to form a nucleocapsid. In addition to its function as a structural protein, core protein is involved in regulation of cellular transcription, virus-induced transformation, and pathogenesis. To gain insights into cellular functions of the core protein by identification of cellular proteins interacting with the core protein, we employed a proteomic approach. Hepatocytes soluble cytoplasmic proteins were applied to the core proteins immobilized on Ni-nitrilotriacetic resin and total bound cellular proteins were resolved by 2-DE. Analyses of interacting proteins by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry allowed identification of 14 cellular proteins binding to the core protein. These proteins include DEAD-box polypeptide 5, similar in function to a known protein identified previously by yeast two-hybrid screening and 13 newly identified cellular proteins. Interestingly, nine protein spots were identified as intermediate microfilament proteins, including cytokeratins (five spots for cytokeratin 8, two for cytokeratin 19, and one for cytokeratin 18) and vimentin. Cytokeratin 8 and vimentin, which were previously shown to be involved in the infection processes of other viruses, were further analyzed to confirm their in vivo interactions with the core protein by immunoblotting and immunofluorescence microscopy. We discuss the functional implications of the interactions of the core protein with newly identified cellular proteins in HCV infection and pathogenesis.

  16. Protein profile of exhaled breath condensate determined by high resolution mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Muccilli, Vera; Saletti, Rosaria; Cunsolo, Vincenzo; Ho, Jenny; Gili, Elisa; Conte, Enrico; Sichili, Stefania; Vancheri, Carlo; Foti, Salvatore

    2015-02-01

    A method based on liquid chromatography/high resolution tandem mass spectrometry coupled with electrophoretic separation, for determination and relative quantification of the protein composition of exhaled breath condensate (EBC), was developed. Application of the procedure to a sample of EBC, pooled from nine healthy subjects, resulted in the identification of 167 unique gene products, 113 of which not previously reported in EBC samples. The abundance of the protein identified was estimated by means of the exponentially modified protein abundance index protocol (emPAI). Cytokeratins were by far the most abundant proteins in EBC samples. Many of the identified proteins were associated with multiple cellular location with cytoplasm constituting the largest group. Cytosol, nucleus, membrane, cytoskeleton and extracellular were other abundantly represented locations. No amylase was detected, suggesting the absence of saliva protein contamination. The profile obtained represents the most comprehensive protein characterization of EBC so far reported and demonstrates that this approach provides a powerful tool for investigating the protein profile of EBC samples. Compared with analogous investigations, this study also shows that the protein profile of EBC is strongly affected by the sampling method adopted.

  17. Profiling of Urine Using ProteinChip Technology

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    Lindner, S., Meyer, M., Asif, A.R., Oellerich, M., Strutz, F. (2007) Characterization of Diabetic Nephropathy by Urinary Proteomic Analysis...Identifi cation of a Processed Ubiquitin Form as a Differentially Excreted Protein in Diabetic Nephropathy Patients. Clin Chem. 53 : 1636–1645 . 2...Thadhani, R. (2007) Prediction of Diabetic Nephropathy Using Urine Proteomic Profi ling 10 Years Prior to Development of Nephropathy . Diabetes Care. 30

  18. Tools for Interpreting Large-Scale Protein Profiling in Microbiology

    PubMed Central

    Hendrickson, E. L.; Lamont, R. J.; Hackett, M.

    2009-01-01

    Quantitative proteome analysis of microbial systems generates large datasets that can be difficult and time consuming to interpret. Fortunately, many of the data display and gene clustering tools developed to analyze large transcriptome microarray datasets are also applicable to proteomes. Plots of abundance ratio versus total signal or spectral counts can highlight regions of random error and putative change. Displaying data in the physical order of the genes in the genome sequence can highlight potential operons. At a basic level of transcriptional organization, identifying operons can give insights into regulatory pathways as well as provide corroborating evidence for proteomic results. Classification and clustering algorithms can group proteins together by their abundance changes under different conditions, helping to identify interesting expression patterns, but often work poorly with noisy data like that typically generated in a large-scale proteome analysis. Biological interpretation can be aided more directly by overlaying differential protein abundance data onto metabolic pathways, indicating pathways with altered activities. More broadly, ontology tools detect altered levels of protein abundance for different metabolic pathways, molecular functions and cellular localizations. In practice, pathway analysis and ontology are limited by the level of database curation associated with the organism of interest. PMID:18946006

  19. Transformation of human T-cell clones by Herpesvirus saimiri: intact antigen recognition by autonomously growing myelin basic protein-specific T cells.

    PubMed Central

    Weber, F; Meinl, E; Drexler, K; Czlonkowska, A; Huber, S; Fickenscher, H; Müller-Fleckenstein, I; Fleckenstein, B; Wekerle, H; Hohlfeld, R

    1993-01-01

    Herpesvirus saimiri has recently been shown to immortalize human T cells. It was unknown, however, whether Herpesvirus saimiri transformation affects T-cell receptor (TCR) expression and signal transduction. In the present study, we have transformed CD4+ human T-cell clones specific for human myelin basic protein. The transformed T cells were grown in interleukin 2 and divided in the absence of antigen and antigen-presenting cells. They retained the membrane phenotype of activated T cells and secreted the cytokines interferon gamma and lymphotoxin, but interleukin 4 was not detected. Further, the transformed T cells continued to express the original TCR as demonstrated by TCR variable-region-V beta-specific monoclonal antibodies and TCR sequencing. Antigen-specific recognition and signal transduction by the TCR were demonstrated by myelin-basic-protein-induced HLA-DR-restricted secretion of interferon gamma and lymphotoxin and by myelin-basic-protein-specific proliferation. Antigen specificity and reactivity have been maintained for > 1 year after transformation. Transformation with Herpesvirus saimiri now allows the production of virtually unlimited numbers of (auto)antigen-specific T cells expressing functional TCR and a stable membrane phenotype. This technology will facilitate studies of the pathogenesis of putative autoimmune diseases, such as multiple sclerosis, and may be of help in TCR-targeted immunotherapy. PMID:7504291

  20. Evaluation of a new wide pore core-shell material (Aeris WIDEPORE) and comparison with other existing stationary phases for the analysis of intact proteins.

    PubMed

    Fekete, Szabolcs; Berky, Róbert; Fekete, Jenő; Veuthey, Jean-Luc; Guillarme, Davy

    2012-05-04

    The separation of large biomolecules such as proteins or monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) by RPLC can be drastically enhanced thanks to the use of columns packed with wide-pore porous sub-2 μm particles or shell particles. In this context, a new wide-pore core-shell material has been recently released under the trademark Aeris WIDEPORE. It is made of a 3.2 μm solid inner core surrounded by a 0.2 μm porous layer (total particle size of 3.6 μm). The aim of this study was to evaluate the performance of this new material, compare it to other recently developed and older conventional wide-pore columns and demonstrate its applicability to real-life separations of proteins and mAbs. At first, the traditional h(min) values of the Aeris WIDEPORE column were determined for small model compounds. The h(min) values were equal to 1.7-1.8 and 1.4 for the 2.1 and 4.6 mm I.D. columns, respectively, which are in agreement with the values reported for other core-shell materials. In the case of a small protein Insulin (5.7 kDa), the achievable lowest h value was below 2 and this impressive result confirms that the Aeris WIDEPORE material should be dedicated to protein analysis. This column was then compared with five other commercially available wide-pore and medium-pore stationary phases, in the gradient elution mode, using various flow rates, gradient steepness and model proteins of MW=5.7-66.8 kDa. The Aeris WIDEPORE material often provided the best performance, in terms of peak capacity, peak capacity per time and pressure unit (PPT) and also based on the gradient kinetic plot representation. Finally, real separations of filgrastim (18.8 kDa) and its oxidized and reduced forms were performed on the different columns and the Aeris WIDEPORE material provided the most impressive performance (peak capacity>100 for t(grad)<6 min). Last but not least, this new material was also evaluated on digested and reduced mAb and powerful, high-throughput separations were also attained.

  1. Intact Protein Analysis at 21 Tesla and X-Ray Crystallography Define Structural Differences in Single Amino Acid Variants of Human Mitochondrial Branched-Chain Amino Acid Aminotransferase 2 (BCAT2)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Lissa C.; Håkansson, Maria; Walse, Björn; Nilsson, Carol L.

    2017-09-01

    Structural technologies are an essential component in the design of precision therapeutics. Precision medicine entails the development of therapeutics directed toward a designated target protein, with the goal to deliver the right drug to the right patient at the right time. In the field of oncology, protein structural variants are often associated with oncogenic potential. In a previous proteogenomic screen of patient-derived glioblastoma (GBM) tumor materials, we identified a sequence variant of human mitochondrial branched-chain amino acid aminotransferase 2 as a putative factor of resistance of GBM to standard-of-care-treatments. The enzyme generates glutamate, which is neurotoxic. To elucidate structural coordinates that may confer altered substrate binding or activity of the variant BCAT2 T186R, a 45 kDa protein, we applied combined ETD and CID top-down mass spectrometry in a LC-FT-ICR MS at 21 T, and X-Ray crystallography in the study of both the variant and non-variant intact proteins. The combined ETD/CID fragmentation pattern allowed for not only extensive sequence coverage but also confident localization of the amino acid variant to its position in the sequence. The crystallographic experiments confirmed the hypothesis generated by in silico structural homology modeling, that the Lys59 side-chain of BCAT2 may repulse the Arg186 in the variant protein (PDB code: 5MPR), leading to destabilization of the protein dimer and altered enzyme kinetics. Taken together, the MS and novel 3D structural data give us reason to further pursue BCAT2 T186R as a precision drug target in GBM. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  2. Intact Protein Analysis at 21 Tesla and X-Ray Crystallography Define Structural Differences in Single Amino Acid Variants of Human Mitochondrial Branched-Chain Amino Acid Aminotransferase 2 (BCAT2)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Lissa C.; Håkansson, Maria; Walse, Björn; Nilsson, Carol L.

    2017-07-01

    Structural technologies are an essential component in the design of precision therapeutics. Precision medicine entails the development of therapeutics directed toward a designated target protein, with the goal to deliver the right drug to the right patient at the right time. In the field of oncology, protein structural variants are often associated with oncogenic potential. In a previous proteogenomic screen of patient-derived glioblastoma (GBM) tumor materials, we identified a sequence variant of human mitochondrial branched-chain amino acid aminotransferase 2 as a putative factor of resistance of GBM to standard-of-care-treatments. The enzyme generates glutamate, which is neurotoxic. To elucidate structural coordinates that may confer altered substrate binding or activity of the variant BCAT2 T186R, a 45 kDa protein, we applied combined ETD and CID top-down mass spectrometry in a LC-FT-ICR MS at 21 T, and X-Ray crystallography in the study of both the variant and non-variant intact proteins. The combined ETD/CID fragmentation pattern allowed for not only extensive sequence coverage but also confident localization of the amino acid variant to its position in the sequence. The crystallographic experiments confirmed the hypothesis generated by in silico structural homology modeling, that the Lys59 side-chain of BCAT2 may repulse the Arg186 in the variant protein (PDB code: 5MPR), leading to destabilization of the protein dimer and altered enzyme kinetics. Taken together, the MS and novel 3D structural data give us reason to further pursue BCAT2 T186R as a precision drug target in GBM.

  3. Sorting competition with membrane-permeable peptides in intact epithelial cells revealed discrimination of transmembrane proteins not only at the trans-Golgi network but also at pre-Golgi stages.

    PubMed

    Soza, Andrea; Norambuena, Andrés; Cancino, Jorge; de la Fuente, Erwin; Henklein, Peter; González, Alfonso

    2004-04-23

    Transmembrane proteins destined to the basolateral cell surface of epithelial cells contain in their cytosolic domain at least two classes of sorting signals: one class promotes exit from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and transport to the Golgi complex, and the other class operates at the trans-Golgi network (TGN) specifying segregation into basolateral exocytic pathways. Both kinds of addressing motifs are quite diverse among different proteins. It is unclear to what extent this feature reflects alternative decoding mechanisms or variations in motifs recognized by the same sorting factor. Here we applied a novel strategy based on permeable peptide technology and temperature-sensitive model proteins to study competition between cytosolic sorting motifs in the context of mammalian living cells. We used the transduction domain of HIV-1 Tat protein to make a membrane-permeable peptide of the cytosolic tail of GtsO45, which contains a well characterized ER exit di-acidic (DIE) motif and a tyrosine-based basolateral sorting signal (YTDI). This peptide added to the media inhibited transport of GtsO45 from both ER-to-Golgi and TGN-to-basolateral cell surface in transfected Madin-Darby canine kidney cells. Instead, it did not affect the exocytic trafficking of a GtsO45-derived chimeric protein bearing 30 juxtamembrane residues from the cytosolic domain of the epidermal growth factor receptor that contains a variant ER exit motif (ERE) and an unconventional proline-based basolateral sorting signal. These results not only proved the feasibility of competing for sorting events in intact cells but also showed that distinct plasma membrane proteins can be discriminated at pre-TGN stages, and that basolateral sorting involves different recognition elements for tyrosine-based motifs and an unconventional basolateral motif.

  4. Intact Transition Epitope Mapping (ITEM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yefremova, Yelena; Opuni, Kwabena F. M.; Danquah, Bright D.; Thiesen, Hans-Juergen; Glocker, Michael O.

    2017-08-01

    Intact transition epitope mapping (ITEM) enables rapid and accurate determination of protein antigen-derived epitopes by either epitope extraction or epitope excision. Upon formation of the antigen peptide-containing immune complex in solution, the entire mixture is electrosprayed to translate all constituents as protonated ions into the gas phase. There, ions from antibody-peptide complexes are separated from unbound peptide ions according to their masses, charges, and shapes either by ion mobility drift or by quadrupole ion filtering. Subsequently, immune complexes are dissociated by collision induced fragmentation and the ion signals of the "complex-released peptides," which in effect are the epitope peptides, are recorded in the time-of-flight analyzer of the mass spectrometer. Mixing of an antibody solution with a solution in which antigens or antigen-derived peptides are dissolved is, together with antigen proteolysis, the only required in-solution handling step. Simplicity of sample handling and speed of analysis together with very low sample consumption makes ITEM faster and easier to perform than other experimental epitope mapping methods.

  5. Dynamic profiling of double-stranded RNA binding proteins

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xinlei; Vukovic, Lela; Koh, Hye Ran; Schulten, Klaus; Myong, Sua

    2015-01-01

    Double-stranded (ds) RNA is a key player in numerous biological activities in cells, including RNA interference, anti-viral immunity and mRNA transport. The class of proteins responsible for recognizing dsRNA is termed double-stranded RNA binding proteins (dsRBP). However, little is known about the molecular mechanisms underlying the interaction between dsRBPs and dsRNA. Here we examined four human dsRBPs, ADAD2, TRBP, Staufen 1 and ADAR1 on six dsRNA substrates that vary in length and secondary structure. We combined single molecule pull-down (SiMPull), single molecule protein-induced fluorescence enhancement (smPIFE) and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to investigate the dsRNA-dsRBP interactions. Our results demonstrate that despite the highly conserved dsRNA binding domains, the dsRBPs exhibit diverse substrate specificities and dynamic properties when in contact with different RNA substrates. While TRBP and ADAR1 have a preference for binding simple duplex RNA, ADAD2 and Staufen1 display higher affinity to highly structured RNA substrates. Upon interaction with RNA substrates, TRBP and Staufen1 exhibit dynamic sliding whereas two deaminases ADAR1 and ADAD2 mostly remain immobile when bound. MD simulations provide a detailed atomic interaction map that is largely consistent with the affinity differences observed experimentally. Collectively, our study highlights the diverse nature of substrate specificity and mobility exhibited by dsRBPs that may be critical for their cellular function. PMID:26184879

  6. Developmental changes in the protein profiles of human cardiac and skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Tipler, T D; Edwards, Y H; Hopkinson, D A

    1978-05-01

    1. The use of SDS electrophoresis as a tool for the analysis of development processes in man has been evaluated. 2. The protein profiles of cardiac and skeletal muscle from foetal (10--24 weeks gestation) infant and adult specimens have been analysed and striking developmental changes were found which involved all the major proteins. 3. Before 20 weeks gestation the soluble protein profile of skeletal muscle appears to consist largely of extracellular proteins. 4. Myoglobin was found in foetal cardiac muscle from 20 weeks gestation but was not demonstrable in foetal (greater than 24 weeks) skeletal muscle. Foetal and adult myoglobin were indistinguishable. 5. A limited survey of the protein patterns of brain, liver and kidney was carried out. In general these tissues show less developmental change than skeletal or cardiac muscle.

  7. Peritoneal culture alters Streptococcus pneumoniae protein profiles and virulence properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orihuela, C. J.; Janssen, R.; Robb, C. W.; Watson, D. A.; Niesel, D. W.

    2000-01-01

    We have examined the properties of Streptococcus pneumoniae cultured in the murine peritoneal cavity and compared its virulence-associated characteristics to those of cultures grown in vitro. Analysis of mRNA levels for specific virulence factors demonstrated a 2.8-fold increase in ply expression and a 2.2-fold increase in capA3 expression during murine peritoneal culture (MPC). Two-dimensional gels and immunoblots using convalescent-phase patient sera and murine sera revealed distinct differences in protein production in vivo (MPC). MPC-grown pneumococci adhered to A549 epithelial cell lines at levels 10-fold greater than those cultured in vitro.

  8. Peritoneal culture alters Streptococcus pneumoniae protein profiles and virulence properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orihuela, C. J.; Janssen, R.; Robb, C. W.; Watson, D. A.; Niesel, D. W.

    2000-01-01

    We have examined the properties of Streptococcus pneumoniae cultured in the murine peritoneal cavity and compared its virulence-associated characteristics to those of cultures grown in vitro. Analysis of mRNA levels for specific virulence factors demonstrated a 2.8-fold increase in ply expression and a 2.2-fold increase in capA3 expression during murine peritoneal culture (MPC). Two-dimensional gels and immunoblots using convalescent-phase patient sera and murine sera revealed distinct differences in protein production in vivo (MPC). MPC-grown pneumococci adhered to A549 epithelial cell lines at levels 10-fold greater than those cultured in vitro.

  9. Normal tear protein profiles and age-related changes.

    PubMed Central

    McGill, J I; Liakos, G M; Goulding, N; Seal, D V

    1984-01-01

    The specific and non-specific tear proteins have been analysed by means of the ELISA technique to establish the normal and age-related values. There is a linear and related decline of lysozyme and lactoferrin with age, and a similar but unrelated reduction in tear volume. IgA levels gradually decline, while caeruloplasmin and IgG both increase after the fifth decade. The results suggest that tear IgG and caeruloplasmin are probably transudates from the serum, that IgA is secreted independently of tear volume, and that lysozyme and lactoferrin are secreted at the same site but independently of tear volume. PMID:6712908

  10. Maize IgE binding proteins: each plant a different profile?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Allergies are nearly always triggered by protein molecules and the majority of individuals with documented immunologic reactions to foods exhibit IgE hypersensitivity reactions. In this study we aimed to understand if natural differences, at proteomic level, between maize populations, may induce different IgE binding proteins profiles among maize-allergic individuals. We also intended to deepen our knowledge on maize IgE binding proteins. Results In order to accomplish this goal we have used proteomic tools (SDS-PAGE and 2-D gel electrophoresis followed by western blot) and tested plasma IgE reactivity from four maize-allergic individuals against four different protein fractions (albumins, globulins, glutelins and prolamins) of three different maize cultivars. We have observed that maize cultivars have different proteomes that result in different IgE binding proteins profiles when tested against plasma from maize-allergic individuals. We could identify 19 different maize IgE binding proteins, 11 of which were unknown to date. Moreover, we found that most (89.5%) of the 19 identified potential maize allergens could be related to plant stress. Conclusions These results lead us to conclude that, within each species, plant allergenic potential varies with genotype. Moreover, considering the stress-related IgE binding proteins identified, we hypothesise that the environment, particularly stress conditions, may alter IgE binding protein profiles of plant components. PMID:24650160

  11. Protein turnover, amino acid profile and amino acid flux in juvenile shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei: effects of dietary protein source.

    PubMed

    Mente, Eleni; Coutteau, Peter; Houlihan, Dominic; Davidson, Ian; Sorgeloos, Patrick

    2002-10-01

    The effect of dietary protein on protein synthesis and growth of juvenile shrimps Litopenaeus vannamei was investigated using three different diets with equivalent protein content. Protein synthesis was investigated by a flooding dose of tritiated phenylalanine. Survival, specific growth and protein synthesis rates were higher, and protein degradation was lower, in shrimps fed a fish/squid/shrimp meal diet, or a 50% laboratory diet/50% soybean meal variant diet, than in those fed a casein-based diet. The efficiency of retention of synthesized protein as growth was 94% for shrimps fed the fish meal diet, suggesting a very low protein turnover rate; by contrast, the retention of synthesized protein was only 80% for shrimps fed the casein diet. The amino acid profile of the casein diet was poorly correlated with that of the shrimps. 4 h after a single meal the protein synthesis rates increased following an increase in RNA activity. A model was developed for amino acid flux, suggesting that high growth rates involve a reduction in the turnover of proteins, while amino acid loss appears to be high.

  12. Z-scan fluorescence profile deconvolution of cytosolic and membrane-associated protein populations.

    PubMed

    Smith, Elizabeth M; Hennen, Jared; Chen, Yan; Mueller, Joachim D

    2015-07-01

    This study introduces a technique that characterizes the spatial distribution of peripheral membrane proteins that associate reversibly with the plasma membrane. An axial scan through the cell generates a z-scan intensity profile of a fluorescently labeled peripheral membrane protein. This profile is analytically separated into membrane and cytoplasmic components by accounting for both the cell geometry and the point spread function. We experimentally validated the technique and characterized both the resolvability and stability of z-scan measurements. Furthermore, using the cellular brightness of green fluorescent protein, we were able to convert the fluorescence intensities into concentrations at the membrane and in the cytoplasm. We applied the technique to study the translocation of the pleckstrin homology domain of phospholipase C delta 1 labeled with green fluorescent protein on ionomycin treatment. Analysis of the z-scan fluorescence profiles revealed protein-specific cell height changes and allowed for comparison between the observed fluorescence changes and predictions based on the cellular surface area-to-volume ratio. The quantitative capability of z-scan fluorescence profile deconvolution offers opportunities for investigating peripheral membrane proteins in the living cell that were previously not accessible. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Structural Analysis of the Glycosylated Intact HIV-1 gp120–b12 Antibody Complex Using Hydroxyl Radical Protein Footprinting

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Glycoprotein gp120 is a surface antigen and virulence factor of human immunodeficiency virus 1. Broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) that react to gp120 from a variety of HIV isolates offer hope for the development of broadly effective immunogens for vaccination purposes, if the interactions between gp120 and bNAbs can be understood. From a structural perspective, gp120 is a particularly difficult system because of its size, the presence of multiple flexible regions, and the large amount of glycosylation, all of which are important in gp120–bNAb interactions. Here, the interaction of full-length, glycosylated gp120 with bNAb b12 is probed using high-resolution hydroxyl radical protein footprinting (HR-HRPF) by fast photochemical oxidation of proteins. HR-HRPF allows for the measurement of changes in the average solvent accessible surface area of multiple amino acids without the need for measures that might alter the protein conformation, such as mutagenesis. HR-HRPF of the gp120–b12 complex coupled with computational modeling shows a novel extensive interaction of the V1/V2 domain, probably with the light chain of b12. Our data also reveal HR-HRPF protection in the C3 domain caused by interaction of the N330 glycan with the b12 light chain. In addition to providing information about the interactions of full-length, glycosylated gp120 with b12, this work serves as a template for the structural interrogation of full-length glycosylated gp120 with other bNAbs to better characterize the interactions that drive the broad specificity of the bNAb. PMID:28102671

  14. Proteomic profiling of camel and cow milk proteins under heat treatment.

    PubMed

    Felfoul, Imène; Jardin, Julien; Gaucheron, Frédéric; Attia, Hamadi; Ayadi, M A

    2017-02-01

    Cow and camel milk proteins before and after heat treatment at 80°C for 60min were identified using LC/MS and LC-MS/MS following monodimensional electrophoresis. The database used for the identification of camel and cow proteins was set from http://www.uniprot.org/. The obtained results showed that, after heating, camel milk at 80°C for 60min, camel α-lactalbumin (α-la) and peptidoglycan recognition protein (PGRP) were not detected while camel serum albumin (CSA) was significantly diminished. When heating cow milk at 80°C for 60min, α-lactalbumin (α-la) and β-lactoglobulin (β-lg) were not significantly detected. Moreover, 19 protein bands from SDS-PAGE were analyzed and a total of 45 different proteins were identified by LC-MS/MS. Casein fractions were kept intact under a heat treatment of 80°C during 60min of both camel and cow milks. Camel and bovine whey proteins were affected by a heat treatment of 80°C for 60min. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Secondary structure features of ribosomal RNA species within intact ribosomal subunits and efficiency of RNA-protein interactions in thermoacidophilic (Caldariella acidophila, Bacillus acidocaldarius) and mesophilic (Escherichia coli) bacteria.

    PubMed

    Cammarano, P; Mazzei, F; Londei, P; Teichner, A; de Rosa, M; Gambacorta, A

    1983-08-02

    Ribosomal subunits of Caldariella acidophila (max.growth temp., 90 degrees C) have been compared to subunits of Bacillus acidocaldarius (max. growth temp., 70 degrees C) and Escherichia coli (max. growth temp., 47 degrees C) with respect to (a) bihelical content of rRNA; (b) G . C content of bihelical domains and (c) tightness of rRNA-protein interactions. The principal results are as follows. Subunits of C. acidophilia ribosomes (Tm = 90-93 degrees C) exhibit considerable thermal tolerance over their B. acidocaldarius (Tm = 77 degrees C) and E. coli counterparts (Tm = 72 degrees C). Based on the "melting' hyperchromicities of the intact ribosomal subunits a 51-55% fraction of the nucleotides appears to participate in hydrogen-bonded base pairing regardless of ribosome source, whereas a larger fraction, 67-70%, appears to be involved in hydrogen bonding in the naked rRNA species. The G . C content of bihelical domains of both free and ribosome-bound rRNA increases with increasing thermophily; based on hyperchromicity dispersion spectra of intact subunits and free rRNA, the bihelical parts of C. acidophila rRNA are estimated to contain 63-64% G . C, compared to 58.5% G . C for B. acidocaldarius and 55% G . C for E. coli. The increment of ribosome Tm values with increasing thermophily is greater than the increase in Tm for the free rRNA, indicating that within ribosomes bihelical domains of the thermophile rRNA species are stabilized more efficiently than their mesophile counterparts by proteins or/ and other component(s). The efficiency of the rRNA-protein interactions in the mesophile and thermophile ribosomes has been probed by comparing the releases, with LiCl-urea, of the rRNA species from the corresponding ribosomal subunits stuck to a Celite column through their protein moiety; it has been established that the release of C. acidophila rRNA from the Celite-bound ribosomes occurs at salt-urea concentrations about 4-fold higher than those required to release r

  16. Proteomic profiling of neuromas reveals alterations in protein composition and local protein synthesis in hyper-excitable nerves

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Hong-Lei; Cendan, Cruz-Miguel; Roza, Carolina; Okuse, Kenji; Cramer, Rainer; Timms, John F; Wood, John N

    2008-01-01

    Neuropathic pain may arise following peripheral nerve injury though the molecular mechanisms associated with this are unclear. We used proteomic profiling to examine changes in protein expression associated with the formation of hyper-excitable neuromas derived from rodent saphenous nerves. A two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) profiling strategy was employed to examine protein expression changes between developing neuromas and normal nerves in whole tissue lysates. We found around 200 proteins which displayed a >1.75-fold change in expression between neuroma and normal nerve and identified 55 of these proteins using mass spectrometry. We also used immunoblotting to examine the expression of low-abundance ion channels Nav1.3, Nav1.8 and calcium channel α2δ-1 subunit in this model, since they have previously been implicated in neuronal hyperexcitability associated with neuropathic pain. Finally, S35methionine in vitro labelling of neuroma and control samples was used to demonstrate local protein synthesis of neuron-specific genes. A number of cytoskeletal proteins, enzymes and proteins associated with oxidative stress were up-regulated in neuromas, whilst overall levels of voltage-gated ion channel proteins were unaffected. We conclude that altered mRNA levels reported in the somata of damaged DRG neurons do not necessarily reflect levels of altered proteins in hyper-excitable damaged nerve endings. An altered repertoire of protein expression, local protein synthesis and topological re-arrangements of ion channels may all play important roles in neuroma hyper-excitability. PMID:18700027

  17. Anatomical profiling of G protein-coupled receptor expression

    PubMed Central

    Regard, Jean B.; Sato, Isaac T.; Coughlin, Shaun R.

    2008-01-01

    Summary G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) comprise the largest family of transmembrane signaling molecules and regulate a host of physiological and disease processes. To better understand the functions of GPCRs in vivo, we quantified transcript levels of 353 non-odorant GPCRs in 41 adult mouse tissues. Cluster analysis placed many GPCRs into anticipated anatomical and functional groups and predicted novel roles for less studied receptors. From one such prediction, we showed that the Gpr91 ligand succinate can regulate lipolysis in white adipose tissue suggesting that signaling by this citric acid cycle intermediate may regulate energy homeostasis. We also showed that pairwise analysis of GPCR expression across tissues may help predict drug side effects. This resource will aid studies to understand GPCR function in vivo and may assist in the identification of therapeutic targets. PMID:18984166

  18. Effectiveness of intact capture media

    SciTech Connect

    Tsou, P.; Aubert, J.; Brownlee, D.; Hrubesh, L.; Williams, J.; Albee, A.

    1989-01-01

    The possibility of capturing cosmic dust at hypervelocity has been demonstrated in the laboratory and in the unintended Solar Max spacecraft. This technology will enable a comet coma sample return mission and be important for the earth orbital cosmic dust collection mission, i.e., the Space Station Cosmic Dust Collection Facility. Since the only controllable factor in an intact capture of cosmic dust is the capturing medium, characterizing the effectiveness and properties of available capture media would be very important in the development of the technique for capturing hypervelocity cosmic dust intact. We have evaluated various capture underdense media for the relative effectiveness for intact capture. 2 refs., 2 figs.

  19. Glycan profiling of proteins using lectin binding by Surface Plasmon Resonance.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Soriano, Brian; Chen, Qing

    2017-09-22

    Glycan profiling of proteins was studied through their lectin binding activity by Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR). To validate the method, we monitored specific lectin binding with sequential removal of sugar moieties from human transferrin using specific glycosidases. The results clearly indicated that glycans on the protein can be identified by their selective binding activity to various lectins. Using this method, we characterized Fc glycosylation profiles of therapeutic peptibodies and antibodies expressed in mammalian cells (CHO and HEK 293 6E cells), with E. coli expressed proteins as the negative controls. We observed that antibodies expressed in CHO cells did not contain any sialic acid, while antibodies expressed in 293 6E cells contained sialic acid. CHO cell expressed antibodies were also more heavily fucosylated than the ones expressed by 293 6E cells. We further applied this method to measure the fucose composition of glycan engineered mouse antibodies, as well as to determine mannose composition of human antibody variants with depletion or enrichment of high mannose. The glycan profiles generated using this method were comparable to results from 2-AB labeled glycan analysis of normal-phase separated glycans, and Fc gamma receptor binding activity of the glycan engineered antibodies were consistent with their glycan profiles. Hence, we demonstrated that SPR lectin binding analysis can be a quick alternative method to profile protein glycosylation. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. Profiles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macintosh, Henry G.

    An introduction to profiles is presented with examples provided to permit an overall appraisal of the potential of profiles, of the principles upon which they might be based, and of the problems that will have to be overcome if their potential is to be realized in practice. The larger scale examples of profiles discussed are the Scottish Pupil…

  1. Changes in the 2-DE protein profile during zygotic embryogenesis in the Brazilian Pine (Araucaria angustifolia).

    PubMed

    Balbuena, Tiago S; Silveira, Vanildo; Junqueira, Magno; Dias, Leonardo L C; Santa-Catarina, Claudete; Shevchenko, Andrej; Floh, Eny I S

    2009-04-13

    Araucaria angustifolia is the only native conifer of economic importance in the Brazilian Atlantic Rainforest. Due to a clear-cutting form of exploitation this species has received the status of vulnerable. The aim of this work was to investigate and characterize changes in protein expression profile during seed development of this endangered species. For this, the proteome of developing seeds was characterized by 2-DE and LC-MS/MS. Ninety six proteins were confidently identified and classified according to their biological function and expression profile. Overaccumulated proteins in early seed development indicated a higher control on oxidative stress metabolism during this phase. In contrast, highly expressed proteins in late stages revealed an active metabolism, leading to carbon assimilation and storage compounds accumulation. Comprehensive protein expression profiles and identification of overaccumulated proteins provide new insights into the process of embryogenesis in this recalcitrant species. Considerations on the improvement and control of somatic embryogenesis through medium manipulation and protein markers screening using data generated are also discussed.

  2. Protein Signaling Networks from Single Cell Fluctuations and Information Theory Profiling

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Young Shik; Remacle, F.; Fan, Rong; Hwang, Kiwook; Wei, Wei; Ahmad, Habib; Levine, R.D.; Heath, James R.

    2011-01-01

    Protein signaling networks among cells play critical roles in a host of pathophysiological processes, from inflammation to tumorigenesis. We report on an approach that integrates microfluidic cell handling, in situ protein secretion profiling, and information theory to determine an extracellular protein-signaling network and the role of perturbations. We assayed 12 proteins secreted from human macrophages that were subjected to lipopolysaccharide challenge, which emulates the macrophage-based innate immune responses against Gram-negative bacteria. We characterize the fluctuations in protein secretion of single cells, and of small cell colonies (n = 2, 3,···), as a function of colony size. Measuring the fluctuations permits a validation of the conditions required for the application of a quantitative version of the Le Chatelier's principle, as derived using information theory. This principle provides a quantitative prediction of the role of perturbations and allows a characterization of a protein-protein interaction network. PMID:21575571

  3. Protein signaling networks from single cell fluctuations and information theory profiling.

    PubMed

    Shin, Young Shik; Remacle, F; Fan, Rong; Hwang, Kiwook; Wei, Wei; Ahmad, Habib; Levine, R D; Heath, James R

    2011-05-18

    Protein signaling networks among cells play critical roles in a host of pathophysiological processes, from inflammation to tumorigenesis. We report on an approach that integrates microfluidic cell handling, in situ protein secretion profiling, and information theory to determine an extracellular protein-signaling network and the role of perturbations. We assayed 12 proteins secreted from human macrophages that were subjected to lipopolysaccharide challenge, which emulates the macrophage-based innate immune responses against Gram-negative bacteria. We characterize the fluctuations in protein secretion of single cells, and of small cell colonies (n = 2, 3,···), as a function of colony size. Measuring the fluctuations permits a validation of the conditions required for the application of a quantitative version of the Le Chatelier's principle, as derived using information theory. This principle provides a quantitative prediction of the role of perturbations and allows a characterization of a protein-protein interaction network.

  4. Exogenous corticosterone induces the expression of the clock protein, PERIOD2, in the oval nucleus of the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis and the central nucleus of the amygdala of adrenalectomized and intact rats.

    PubMed

    Segall, Lauren A; Amir, Shimon

    2010-10-01

    The cyclical expression of the clock protein PERIOD2 (PER2) in select regions of the limbic forebrain is contingent upon the rhythmic secretion of the adrenal glucocorticoid, corticosterone. Daily rhythmic PER2 expression in the oval nucleus of the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNSTov) and the central nucleus of the amygdala (CEA) is abolished with the removal of the adrenal glands but restored with rhythmic hormone replacement via the drinking water at a time corresponding to the endogenous peak of circulating glucocorticoids. Here, we investigated the effects of serial or acute systemic injections of corticosterone on the expression of PER2 in the BNSTov and CEA of both adrenalectomized (ADX) and intact rats. We sought to determine whether there is a temporal window of corticosterone sensitivity by delivering the hormone at a time corresponding to trough levels of circulating glucocorticoids, at lights on. We found that daily morning injections of corticosterone induced PER2 expression in the BNSTov and CEA of ADX rats, with levels peaking 1 h after injection. In intact rats, daily morning injections significantly upregulated the expression of PER2 in the BNSTov and CEA 1 h after injection and dampened the evening peak, while a single injection abolished the rhythm of PER2 expression in the CEA but had no effect on PER2 in the BNSTov. Our findings suggest that despite the potential masking effect of signals from the light-entrained master clock, daytime chronic and acute corticosterone administration can alter the rhythmic expression of PER2 in the BNSTov and CEA, and that the response is region-specific and dependent on the duration of treatment.

  5. Chemically modified diamond-like carbon (DLC) for protein enrichment and profiling by MALDI-MS.

    PubMed

    Najam-ul-Haq, M; Rainer, M; Huck, C W; Ashiq, M N; Bonn, G K

    2012-08-01

    The development of new high throughput methods based on different materials with chemical modifications for protein profiling of complex mixtures leads towards biomarkers; used particularly for early diagnosis of a disease. In this work, diamond-like carbon (DLC) is developed and optimized for serum protein profiling by matrix-assisted laser/desorption ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS). This study is carried out in connection with a material-based approach, termed as material-enhanced laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry. DLC is selected as carrier surface which provides large surface to volume ratio and offers high sensitivity. DLC has a dual role of working as MALDI target while acting as an interface for protein profiling by specifically binding peptides and proteins out of serum samples. Serum constituents are bound through immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography (IMAC) functionality, created through glycidyl methacrylate polymerization under ultraviolet light followed by further derivatization with iminodiacetic acid and copper ion loading. Scanning electron microscopy highlights the morphological characteristics of DLC surface. It could be demonstrated that IMAC functionalized DLC coatings represent a powerful material in trapping biomolecules for their further analysis by MALDI-MS resulting in improved sensitivity, specificity and capacity in comparison to other protein-profiling methods.

  6. Muscle Protein Profiles Used for Prediction of Texture of Farmed Salmon (Salmo salar L.).

    PubMed

    Ørnholt-Johansson, Gine; Frosch, Stina; Gudjónsdóttir, María; Wulff, Tune; Jessen, Flemming

    2017-04-26

    A soft texture is undesired in Atlantic salmon as it leads to downgrading and reduced yield, yet it is a factor for which the cause is not fully understood. This lack of understanding highlights the need for identifying the cause of the soft texture and developing solutions by which the processing industry can improve the yield. Changes in muscle protein profiles can occur both pre- and postharvest and constitute an overall characterization of the muscle properties including texture. The aim of this study was to investigate this relationship between specific muscle proteins and the texture of the salmon fillet. Samples for 2D-gel-based proteomics were taken from the fillet above the lateral line at the same position as where the texture had been measured. The resulting protein profiles were analyzed using multivariate data analysis. Sixteen proteins were found to correlate to the measured texture, showing that it is possible to predict peak force based on a small subset of proteins. Additionally, eight of the 16 proteins were identified by tandem mass spectrometry including serum albumin, dipeptidyl peptidase 3, heat shock protein 70, annexins, and a protein presumed to be a titin fragment. It is contemplated that the identification of these proteins and their significance for the measured texture will contribute to further understanding of the Atlantic salmon muscle texture.

  7. Vectorially oriented membrane protein monolayers: profile structures via x-ray interferometry/holography.

    PubMed Central

    Chupa, J A; McCauley, J P; Strongin, R M; Smith, A B; Blasie, J K; Peticolas, L J; Bean, J C

    1994-01-01

    X-ray interferometry/holography was applied to meridional x-ray diffraction data to determine uniquely the profile structures of a single monolayer of an integral membrane protein and a peripheral membrane protein, each tethered to the surface of a solid inorganic substrate. Bifunctional, organic self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) were utilized to tether the proteins to the surface of Ge/Si multilayer substrates, fabricated by molecular beam epitaxy, to facilitate the interferometric/holographic x-ray structure determination. The peripheral membrane protein yeast cytochrome c was covalently tethered to the surface of a sulfhydryl-terminated 11-siloxyundecanethiol SAM via a disulfide linkage with residue 102. The detergent-solubilized, photosynthetic reaction center integral membrane protein was electrostatically tethered to the surface of an analogous amine-terminated SAM. Optical absorption measurements performed on these two tethered protein monolayer systems were consistent with the x-ray diffraction results indicating the reversible formation of densely packed single monolayers of each fully functional membrane protein on the surface of the respective SAM. The importance of utilizing the organic self-assembled monolayers (as opposed to Langmuir-Blodgett) lies in their ability to tether specifically both soluble peripheral membrane proteins and detergent-solubilized integral membrane proteins. The vectorial orientations of the cytochrome c and the reaction center molecules were readily distinguishable in the profile structure of each monolayer at a spatial resolution of 7 A. Images FIGURE 9 FIGURE 10 PMID:7919004

  8. Multiplex single-molecule interaction profiling of DNA-barcoded proteins.

    PubMed

    Gu, Liangcai; Li, Chao; Aach, John; Hill, David E; Vidal, Marc; Church, George M

    2014-11-27

    In contrast with advances in massively parallel DNA sequencing, high-throughput protein analyses are often limited by ensemble measurements, individual analyte purification and hence compromised quality and cost-effectiveness. Single-molecule protein detection using optical methods is limited by the number of spectrally non-overlapping chromophores. Here we introduce a single-molecular-interaction sequencing (SMI-seq) technology for parallel protein interaction profiling leveraging single-molecule advantages. DNA barcodes are attached to proteins collectively via ribosome display or individually via enzymatic conjugation. Barcoded proteins are assayed en masse in aqueous solution and subsequently immobilized in a polyacrylamide thin film to construct a random single-molecule array, where barcoding DNAs are amplified into in situ polymerase colonies (polonies) and analysed by DNA sequencing. This method allows precise quantification of various proteins with a theoretical maximum array density of over one million polonies per square millimetre. Furthermore, protein interactions can be measured on the basis of the statistics of colocalized polonies arising from barcoding DNAs of interacting proteins. Two demanding applications, G-protein coupled receptor and antibody-binding profiling, are demonstrated. SMI-seq enables 'library versus library' screening in a one-pot assay, simultaneously interrogating molecular binding affinity and specificity.

  9. Analysis of protein profiles in diabetic rat blood plasma that induced by alloxan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidayati, Dewi; Abdulgani, Nurlita; Setiyawan, Hengki; Trisnawati, Indah; Ashuri, Nova Maulidina; Sa'adah, Noor Nailis

    2017-06-01

    Proteomics is the study to identify the proteins involved in physiological metabolic pathway. The protein profiles of blood plasma from alloxan-induced diabetic rats has investigated using Sodium Dodecyl Sulphate Polyacrylamide Gel Electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Data were analyzed descriptively based on variations of the type and intensity of the protein. There were identified the similarity of protein variant between diabetic and control rats included ankyrin (200kDa), IgG (150kDa), nephrin (136 kDa), IDE (112 kDA), albumin (66 kDa), prealbumin (55 kDA), CICP (43 kDa), ApoA-V (39 kDa), GAPDH (35 kDa), C-RP (27,1 kDa), leptin (16 kDa) and apelin (13 kDa). However, the apelin profile at diabetic rats shows the higher intensity than control.

  10. Plasma Biomarker Discovery Using 3D Protein Profiling Coupled with Label-Free Quantitation

    PubMed Central

    Beer, Lynn A.; Tang, Hsin-Yao; Barnhart, Kurt T.; Speicher, David W.

    2011-01-01

    In-depth quantitative profiling of human plasma samples for biomarker discovery remains quite challenging. One promising alternative to chemical derivatization with stable isotope labels for quantitative comparisons is direct, label-free, quantitative comparison of raw LC–MS data. But, in order to achieve high-sensitivity detection of low-abundance proteins, plasma proteins must be extensively pre-fractionated, and results from LC–MS runs of all fractions must be integrated efficiently in order to avoid misidentification of variations in fractionation from sample to sample as “apparent” biomarkers. This protocol describes a powerful 3D protein profiling method for comprehensive analysis of human serum or plasma proteomes, which combines abundant protein depletion and high-sensitivity GeLC–MS/MS with label-free quantitation of candidate biomarkers. PMID:21468938

  11. A (1)H NMR metabolic profiling to the assessment of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B role in liver regeneration after partial hepatectomy.

    PubMed

    Samino, Sara; Revuelta-Cervantes, Jesús; Vinaixa, Maria; Rodríguez, Miguel Ángel; Valverde, Angela M; Correig, Xavier

    2013-04-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) is a negative regulator of the tyrosine kinase growth factor signaling pathway, which is involved in major physiological mechanisms such as liver regeneration. We investigate early hepatic metabolic events produced by partial hepatectomy (PHx) for PTP1B deficient (PTP1B KO) and wild type (WT) mice using proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Metabolic response of the two genotypes produced 24 h upon PHx is compared using magic angle spinning high-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H-HR-MAS-NMR) on intact liver tissues. In addition, genotype-associated metabolic profile changes were monitored during the first 48 h after PHx using high-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H-HR-NMR) on liver extracts. A marked increase of lipid-related signals in regenerating livers was observed after 24 h PHx in either intact tissues or liver extracts studies. In spite of this common initial metabolic response, results obtained 48 h after PHx on liver extracts indicate a genotype-differential metabolic pattern. This metabolic pattern resulted in line with well known regenerative features such as more sustained cell proliferation, a better management of lipids as energy fuel and lessened liver injury for PTP1B KO mice as compared to WT. Taken together, these findings suggest the metabolic basis to the pivotal role of PTP1B in liver regeneration.

  12. Comparative Protein Profiling of Intraphagosomal Expressed Proteins of Mycobacterium bovis BCG.

    PubMed

    Singhal, Neelja; Kumar, Manish; Sharma, Divakar; Bisht, Deepa

    2016-01-01

    BCG, the only available vaccine against tuberculosis affords a variable protection which wanes with time. In this study we have analyzed and compared the proteins which are expressed differentially during broth-culture and intraphagosomal growth of M.bovis BCG. Eight proteins which showed increased expression during the intraphagosomal growth were identified by MALDI-TOF/MS. These were - a precursor of alanine and proline-rich secreted protein apa, isoforms of malate dehydrogenase, large subunit alpha (Alpha-ETF) of electron transfer flavoprotein, immunogenic protein MPB64 precursor, UPF0036 protein, and two proteins with unknown function. Based on these findings we speculate that higher expression of these proteins has a probable role in intracellular survival, adaptation and/or immunoprotective effect of BCG. Further, these proteins might also be used as gene expression markers for endosome trafficking events of BCG.

  13. dRHP-PseRA: detecting remote homology proteins using profile-based pseudo protein sequence and rank aggregation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Junjie; Long, Ren; Wang, Xiao-Long; Liu, Bin; Chou, Kuo-Chen

    2016-09-01

    Protein remote homology detection is an important task in computational proteomics. Some computational methods have been proposed, which detect remote homology proteins based on different features and algorithms. As noted in previous studies, their predictive results are complementary to each other. Therefore, it is intriguing to explore whether these methods can be combined into one package so as to further enhance the performance power and application convenience. In view of this, we introduced a protein representation called profile-based pseudo protein sequence to extract the evolutionary information from the relevant profiles. Based on the concept of pseudo proteins, a new predictor, called "dRHP-PseRA", was developed by combining four state-of-the-art predictors (PSI-BLAST, HHblits, Hmmer, and Coma) via the rank aggregation approach. Cross-validation tests on a SCOP benchmark dataset have demonstrated that the new predictor has remarkably outperformed any of the existing methods for the same purpose on ROC50 scores. Accordingly, it is anticipated that dRHP-PseRA holds very high potential to become a useful high throughput tool for detecting remote homology proteins. For the convenience of most experimental scientists, a web-server for dRHP-PseRA has been established at http://bioinformatics.hitsz.edu.cn/dRHP-PseRA/.

  14. Stimulation of host centriolar antigen in TC7 cells by simian virus 40: requirement for RNA and protein syntheses and an intact simian virus 40 small-t gene function.

    PubMed

    Shyamala, M; Atcheson, C L; Kasamatsu, H

    1982-08-01

    Simian virus 40 (SV 40) stimulated a host cell antigen in the centriolar region after infection of African green monkey kidney (AGMK) cells. The addition of puromycin and actinomycin D to cells infected with SV40 within 5 h after infection inhibited the stimulation of the host cell antigen, indicating that de novo protein and RNA syntheses that occurred within the first 5 h after infection were essential for the stimulation. Early viable deletion mutants of SV40 with deletions mapping between 0.54 and 0.59 map units on the SV40 genome, dl2000, dl2001, dl2003, dl2004, dl2005, dl2006, and dl2007, did not stimulate the centriolar antigen above the level of uninfected cells. This indicated that an intact, functional small-t protein was essential for the SV40-mediated stimulation of the host cell antigen. Our studies, using cells infected with nondefective adenovirus-SV40 hybrid viruses that lack the small-t gene region of SV40 (Ad2+ND1, Ad2+ND2, Ad2+ND3, Ad2+ND4, and Ad2+ND5), revealed that the lack of small-t gene function of SV40 could be complemented by a gene function of the adenovirus-SV40 hybrid viruses for the centriolar antigen stimulation. Thus, adenovirus 2 has a gene(s) that is analogous to the small-t gene of SV40 for the stimulation of the host cell antigen in AGMK cells.

  15. Schistosoma japonicum and S. mansoni cercariae: different effects of protein in medium, of mechanical stress, and of an intact complement system on in vitro transformation to schistosomula.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenshi; Kirschfink, Michael; Ruppel, Andreas

    2006-08-01

    The cercariae of Schistosoma japonicum were subjected in vitro to treatments known for Schistosoma mansoni to generate schistosomula-like organisms. As a technical prerequisite to pipette or to otherwise handle the sticky cercariae of S. japonicum, the addition of protein to water or medium was found to abolish the stickiness of cercariae of this species. Shearing forces exerted in vitro by syringe (22 G) passage are known since long to fully transform S. mansoni cercariae, but this treatment was found to be much less efficient with S. japonicum. Thus, even with very narrow needles (27 G), complete transformation of cercariae was not obtained with S. japonicum. Complement, provided by fresh human serum, is also well known to induce rapid transformation of S. mansoni cercariae with subsequent killing of the schistosomula. This treatment of S. japonicum cercariae induced degeneration of the tails and strongly promoted the transformation to schistosomula-like organisms, but at a much slower pace. These effects were absent from sera either heat-inactivated or depleted of factor B or of complement component C8, but were restored after adding the purified respective complement components. The schistosomula-like organisms of S. japonicum were not susceptible to lysis after 1 day of in vitro culture in the presence of 50% fresh human serum, although both cercariae and schistosomula of S. mansoni were killed under these conditions. In conclusion, the dynamics of in vitro transformation of S. japonicum cercariae differ significantly from those of S. mansoni, and complement has a major transformation-promoting activity.

  16. Extracellular α-synuclein induces sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor subtype 1 uncoupled from inhibitory G-protein leaving β-arrestin signal intact

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lifang; Okada, Taro; Badawy, Shaymaa Mohamed Mohamed; Hirai, Chihoko; Kajimoto, Taketoshi; Nakamura, Shun-ichi

    2017-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is the second most common neurodegenerative disorder. The presence of α-synuclein (α-Syn)-positive intracytoplasmic inclusions, known as Lewy bodies, is the cytopathological hallmark of PD. Increasing bodies of evidence suggest that cell-to-cell transmission of α-Syn plays a role in the progression of PD. Although extracellular α-Syn is known to cause abnormal cell motility, the precise mechanism remains elusive. Here we show that impairment of platelet-derived growth factor-induced cell motility caused by extracellular α-Syn is mainly attributed to selective inhibition of sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) signalling. Treatment of human neuroblastoma cells with recombinant α-Syn caused S1P type 1 (S1P1) receptor-selective uncoupling from inhibitory G-protein (Gi) as determined by both functional and fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based structural analyses. By contrast, α-Syn caused little or no effect on S1P2 receptor-mediated signalling. Both wild-type and α-Syn(A53T), a mutant found in familiar PD, caused uncoupling of S1P1 receptor, although α-Syn(A53T) showed stronger potency in uncoupling. Moreover, S1P1 receptor-mediated β-arrestin signal was unaltered by α-Syn(A53T). These results suggest that exogenous α-Syn modulates S1P1 receptor-mediated signalling from both Gi and β-arrestin signals into β-arrestin-biased signal. These findings uncovered a novel function of exogenous α-Syn in the cells. PMID:28300069

  17. An improved hypergeometric probability method for identification of functionally linked proteins using phylogenetic profiles

    PubMed Central

    Kotaru, Appala Raju; Shameer, Khader; Sundaramurthy, Pandurangan; Joshi, Ramesh Chandra

    2013-01-01

    Predicting functions of proteins and alternatively spliced isoforms encoded in a genome is one of the important applications of bioinformatics in the post-genome era. Due to the practical limitation of experimental characterization of all proteins encoded in a genome using biochemical studies, bioinformatics methods provide powerful tools for function annotation and prediction. These methods also help minimize the growing sequence-to-function gap. Phylogenetic profiling is a bioinformatics approach to identify the influence of a trait across species and can be employed to infer the evolutionary history of proteins encoded in genomes. Here we propose an improved phylogenetic profile-based method which considers the co-evolution of the reference genome to derive the basic similarity measure, the background phylogeny of target genomes for profile generation and assigning weights to target genomes. The ordering of genomes and the runs of consecutive matches between the proteins were used to define phylogenetic relationships in the approach. We used Escherichia coli K12 genome as the reference genome and its 4195 proteins were used in the current analysis. We compared our approach with two existing methods and our initial results show that the predictions have outperformed two of the existing approaches. In addition, we have validated our method using a targeted protein-protein interaction network derived from protein-protein interaction database STRING. Our preliminary results indicates that improvement in function prediction can be attained by using coevolution-based similarity measures and the runs on to the same scale instead of computing them in different scales. Our method can be applied at the whole-genome level for annotating hypothetical proteins from prokaryotic genomes. PMID:23750082

  18. An improved hypergeometric probability method for identification of functionally linked proteins using phylogenetic profiles.

    PubMed

    Kotaru, Appala Raju; Shameer, Khader; Sundaramurthy, Pandurangan; Joshi, Ramesh Chandra

    2013-01-01

    Predicting functions of proteins and alternatively spliced isoforms encoded in a genome is one of the important applications of bioinformatics in the post-genome era. Due to the practical limitation of experimental characterization of all proteins encoded in a genome using biochemical studies, bioinformatics methods provide powerful tools for function annotation and prediction. These methods also help minimize the growing sequence-to-function gap. Phylogenetic profiling is a bioinformatics approach to identify the influence of a trait across species and can be employed to infer the evolutionary history of proteins encoded in genomes. Here we propose an improved phylogenetic profile-based method which considers the co-evolution of the reference genome to derive the basic similarity measure, the background phylogeny of target genomes for profile generation and assigning weights to target genomes. The ordering of genomes and the runs of consecutive matches between the proteins were used to define phylogenetic relationships in the approach. We used Escherichia coli K12 genome as the reference genome and its 4195 proteins were used in the current analysis. We compared our approach with two existing methods and our initial results show that the predictions have outperformed two of the existing approaches. In addition, we have validated our method using a targeted protein-protein interaction network derived from protein-protein interaction database STRING. Our preliminary results indicates that improvement in function prediction can be attained by using coevolution-based similarity measures and the runs on to the same scale instead of computing them in different scales. Our method can be applied at the whole-genome level for annotating hypothetical proteins from prokaryotic genomes.

  19. Blood profiling of proteins and steroids during weight maintenance with manipulation of dietary protein level and glycaemic index.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ping; Holst, Claus; Astrup, Arne; Bouwman, Freek G; van Otterdijk, Sanne; Wodzig, Will K W H; Andersen, Malene R; van Baak, Marleen A; Rasmussen, Lone G; Martinez, J Alfredo; Jebb, Susan A; Pfeiffer, Andreas F H; Kafatos, Anthony; Handjieva-Darlenska, Teodora; Hlavaty, Petr; Saris, Wim H M; Mariman, Edwin C M

    2012-01-01

    Weight regain after weight loss is common. In the Diogenes dietary intervention study, a high-protein and low-glycaemic index (GI) diet improved weight maintenance. The objective of the present study was to identify (1) blood profiles associated with continued weight loss and weight regain (2) blood biomarkers of dietary protein and GI levels during the weight-maintenance phase. Blood samples were collected at baseline, after 8 weeks of low-energy diet-induced weight loss and after a 6-month dietary intervention period from female continued weight losers (n 48) and weight regainers (n 48), evenly selected from four dietary groups that varied in protein and GI levels. The blood concentrations of twenty-nine proteins and three steroid hormones were measured. The changes in analytes during weight maintenance largely correlated negatively with the changes during weight loss, with some differences between continued weight losers and weight regainers. Increases in leptin (LEP) and C-reactive protein (CRP) were significantly associated with weight regain (P < 0·001 and P = 0·005, respectively), and these relationships were influenced by the diet. Consuming a high-protein and high-GI diet dissociated the positive relationship between the change in LEP concentration and weight regain. CRP increased during the weight-maintenance period only in weight regainers with a high-protein diet (P < 0·001). In addition, testosterone, luteinising hormone, angiotensinogen, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, resistin, retinol-binding protein 4, insulin, glucagon, haptoglobin and growth hormone were also affected by the dietary intervention. The blood profile reflects not only the weight change during the maintenance period, but also the macronutrient composition of the dietary intervention, especially the protein level.

  20. Classification of Phylogenetic Profiles for Protein Function Prediction: An SVM Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotaru, Appala Raju; Joshi, Ramesh C.

    Predicting the function of an uncharacterized protein is a major challenge in post-genomic era due to problems complexity and scale. Having knowledge of protein function is a crucial link in the development of new drugs, better crops, and even the development of biochemicals such as biofuels. Recently numerous high-throughput experimental procedures have been invented to investigate the mechanisms leading to the accomplishment of a protein’s function and Phylogenetic profile is one of them. Phylogenetic profile is a way of representing a protein which encodes evolutionary history of proteins. In this paper we proposed a method for classification of phylogenetic profiles using supervised machine learning method, support vector machine classification along with radial basis function as kernel for identifying functionally linked proteins. We experimentally evaluated the performance of the classifier with the linear kernel, polynomial kernel and compared the results with the existing tree kernel. In our study we have used proteins of the budding yeast saccharomyces cerevisiae genome. We generated the phylogenetic profiles of 2465 yeast genes and for our study we used the functional annotations that are available in the MIPS database. Our experiments show that the performance of the radial basis kernel is similar to polynomial kernel is some functional classes together are better than linear, tree kernel and over all radial basis kernel outperformed the polynomial kernel, linear kernel and tree kernel. In analyzing these results we show that it will be feasible to make use of SVM classifier with radial basis function as kernel to predict the gene functionality using phylogenetic profiles.

  1. Comparative protein profiling of serum and plasma using an antibody suspension bead array approach.

    PubMed

    Schwenk, Jochen M; Igel, Ulrika; Kato, Bernet S; Nicholson, George; Karpe, Fredrik; Uhlén, Mathias; Nilsson, Peter

    2010-02-01

    In the pursuit towards a systematic analysis of human diseases, array-based approaches within antibody proteomics offer high-throughput strategies to discover protein biomarkers in serum and plasma. To investigate the influence of sample preparation on such discovery attempts, we report on a systematic effort to compare serum and plasma protein profiles determined with an antibody suspension bead array. The intensity levels were used to define protein profiles and no significant differences between serum and plasma were observed for 79% of the 174 antibodies (targeting 156 proteins). By excluding 36 antibodies giving rise to differential intensity levels, cluster analysis revealed donor-specific rather than preparation-dependent grouping. With a cohort from a clinically relevant medical condition, the metabolic syndrome, the influence of the sample type on a multiplexed biomarker discovery approach was further investigated. Independent comparisons of protein profiles in serum and plasma revealed an antibody targeting ADAMTSL-4, a protein that would qualify to be studied further in association with the condition. In general, the preparation type had an impact on the results of the applied antibody suspension bead array, and while the technical variability was equal, plasma offered a greater biological variability and allowed to give rise to more discoveries than serum.

  2. ORION: a web server for protein fold recognition and structure prediction using evolutionary hybrid profiles

    PubMed Central

    Ghouzam, Yassine; Postic, Guillaume; Guerin, Pierre-Edouard; de Brevern, Alexandre G.; Gelly, Jean-Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Protein structure prediction based on comparative modeling is the most efficient way to produce structural models when it can be performed. ORION is a dedicated webserver based on a new strategy that performs this task. The identification by ORION of suitable templates is performed using an original profile-profile approach that combines sequence and structure evolution information. Structure evolution information is encoded into profiles using structural features, such as solvent accessibility and local conformation —with Protein Blocks—, which give an accurate description of the local protein structure. ORION has recently been improved, increasing by 5% the quality of its results. The ORION web server accepts a single protein sequence as input and searches homologous protein structures within minutes. Various databases such as PDB, SCOP and HOMSTRAD can be mined to find an appropriate structural template. For the modeling step, a protein 3D structure can be directly obtained from the selected template by MODELLER and displayed with global and local quality model estimation measures. The sequence and the predicted structure of 4 examples from the CAMEO server and a recent CASP11 target from the ‘Hard’ category (T0818-D1) are shown as pertinent examples. Our web server is accessible at http://www.dsimb.inserm.fr/ORION/. PMID:27319297

  3. The Regulatory Protein RosR Affects Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. trifolii Protein Profiles, Cell Surface Properties, and Symbiosis with Clover

    PubMed Central

    Rachwał, Kamila; Boguszewska, Aleksandra; Kopcińska, Joanna; Karaś, Magdalena; Tchórzewski, Marek; Janczarek, Monika

    2016-01-01

    Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. trifolii is capable of establishing a symbiotic relationship with plants from the genus Trifolium. Previously, a regulatory protein encoded by rosR was identified and characterized in this bacterium. RosR possesses a Cys2-His2-type zinc finger motif and belongs to Ros/MucR family of rhizobial transcriptional regulators. Transcriptome profiling of the rosR mutant revealed a role of this protein in several cellular processes, including the synthesis of cell-surface components and polysaccharides, motility, and bacterial metabolism. Here, we show that a mutation in rosR resulted in considerable changes in R. leguminosarum bv. trifolii protein profiles. Extracellular, membrane, and periplasmic protein profiles of R. leguminosarum bv. trifolii wild type and the rosR mutant were examined, and proteins with substantially different abundances between these strains were identified. Compared with the wild type, extracellular fraction of the rosR mutant contained greater amounts of several proteins, including Ca2+-binding cadherin-like proteins, a RTX-like protein, autoaggregation protein RapA1, and flagellins FlaA and FlaB. In contrast, several proteins involved in the uptake of various substrates were less abundant in the mutant strain (DppA, BraC, and SfuA). In addition, differences were observed in membrane proteins of the mutant and wild-type strains, which mainly concerned various transport system components. Using atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging, we characterized the topography and surface properties of the rosR mutant and wild-type cells. We found that the mutation in rosR gene also affected surface properties of R. leguminosarum bv. trifolii. The mutant cells were significantly more hydrophobic than the wild-type cells, and their outer membrane was three times more permeable to the hydrophobic dye N-phenyl-1-naphthylamine. The mutation of rosR also caused defects in bacterial symbiotic interaction with clover plants. Compared with

  4. The Regulatory Protein RosR Affects Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. trifolii Protein Profiles, Cell Surface Properties, and Symbiosis with Clover.

    PubMed

    Rachwał, Kamila; Boguszewska, Aleksandra; Kopcińska, Joanna; Karaś, Magdalena; Tchórzewski, Marek; Janczarek, Monika

    2016-01-01

    Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. trifolii is capable of establishing a symbiotic relationship with plants from the genus Trifolium. Previously, a regulatory protein encoded by rosR was identified and characterized in this bacterium. RosR possesses a Cys2-His2-type zinc finger motif and belongs to Ros/MucR family of rhizobial transcriptional regulators. Transcriptome profiling of the rosR mutant revealed a role of this protein in several cellular processes, including the synthesis of cell-surface components and polysaccharides, motility, and bacterial metabolism. Here, we show that a mutation in rosR resulted in considerable changes in R. leguminosarum bv. trifolii protein profiles. Extracellular, membrane, and periplasmic protein profiles of R. leguminosarum bv. trifolii wild type and the rosR mutant were examined, and proteins with substantially different abundances between these strains were identified. Compared with the wild type, extracellular fraction of the rosR mutant contained greater amounts of several proteins, including Ca(2+)-binding cadherin-like proteins, a RTX-like protein, autoaggregation protein RapA1, and flagellins FlaA and FlaB. In contrast, several proteins involved in the uptake of various substrates were less abundant in the mutant strain (DppA, BraC, and SfuA). In addition, differences were observed in membrane proteins of the mutant and wild-type strains, which mainly concerned various transport system components. Using atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging, we characterized the topography and surface properties of the rosR mutant and wild-type cells. We found that the mutation in rosR gene also affected surface properties of R. leguminosarum bv. trifolii. The mutant cells were significantly more hydrophobic than the wild-type cells, and their outer membrane was three times more permeable to the hydrophobic dye N-phenyl-1-naphthylamine. The mutation of rosR also caused defects in bacterial symbiotic interaction with clover plants. Compared with

  5. Fluorescence response profiling for small molecule sensors utilizing the green fluorescent protein chromophore and its derivatives.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jun-Seok; Baldridge, Anthony; Feng, Suihan; SiQiang, Yang; Kim, Yun Kyung; Tolbert, Laren M; Chang, Young-Tae

    2011-01-10

    Using a fluorescence response profile, a systematic examination was performed for synthetic chromophores of the green fluorescent protein (GFP) to discover new small molecule sensors. A group of 41 benzylideneimidazolinone compounds (BDI) was prepared and screened toward 94 biologically relevant analytes to generate fluorescence response profiles. From the response pattern, compounds containing aminobenzyl and heteroaromatic cyclic substructures revealed a pH dependent emission decrease effect, and unlike other fluorescence scaffolds, most BDIs showed fluorescence quenching when mixed with proteins. On the basis of the primary response profile, we obtained three selective fluorescence turn-on sensors for pH, human serum albumin (HSA), and total ribonucleic acid (RNA). Following analysis, a fluorescence response profile testing four nucleic acids revealed the alkyloxy (Ph-OR) functional group in the para position of benzyl analogues contributes to RNA selectivity. Among the primary hit compounds, BDI 2 showed outstanding selectivity toward total RNA with 5-fold emission enhancement. Finally, BDI 24 showed selective fluorescence increase to HSA (K(d) = 3.57 μM) with a blue-shifted emission max wavelength (Δλ(em) = 15 nm). These examples of fluorescence sensor discovery by large-scale fluorescence response profiling demonstrate the general applicability of this approach and the usefulness of the response profiles.

  6. Differential expression profile of membrane proteins in zebrafish (Danio rerio) brain exposed to methyl parathion.

    PubMed

    Huang, Qing-Yu; Huang, He-Qing

    2011-09-01

    Methyl parathion (MP) is a widely used organophosphorus pesticide, which has been related to a broad spectrum of toxic effects on environmental organisms. The present study investigated the changes in the protein profile of enriched membrane fraction from zebrafish (Danio rerio) brain exposed to three concentrations (0.5, 1 and 2 mg/L) of MP. 2-DE revealed that the abundance of 21 protein spots was significantly changed by MP stress. By matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry and database search, 16 protein spots were identified as membrane proteins, among which 8 were down-regulated, while 8 were up-regulated. These proteins are mainly involved in oxidative stress response, signal transduction, metabolism, protein synthesis and degradation, neuroplasticity and regeneration as well as synaptic transmission. These results may aid our understanding of the mechanism of MP-induced neurotoxicity and provide the possibility of the establishment of candidate biomarkers of MP.

  7. Proteomic profiling of the mitochondrial ribosome identifies Atp25 as a composite mitochondrial precursor protein.

    PubMed

    Woellhaf, Michael W; Sommer, Frederik; Schroda, Michael; Herrmann, Johannes M

    2016-10-15

    Whereas the structure and function of cytosolic ribosomes are well characterized, we only have a limited understanding of the mitochondrial translation apparatus. Using SILAC-based proteomic profiling, we identified 13 proteins that cofractionated with the mitochondrial ribosome, most of which play a role in translation or ribosomal biogenesis. One of these proteins is a homologue of the bacterial ribosome-silencing factor (Rsf). This protein is generated from the composite precursor protein Atp25 upon internal cleavage by the matrix processing peptidase MPP, and in this respect, it differs from all other characterized mitochondrial proteins of baker's yeast. We observed that cytosolic expression of Rsf, but not of noncleaved Atp25 protein, is toxic. Our results suggest that eukaryotic cells face the challenge of avoiding negative interference from the biogenesis of their two distinct translation machineries.

  8. Proteomic Profiling of Nonenzymatically Glycated Proteins in Human Plasma and Erythrocyte Membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Qibin; Tang, Ning; Schepmoes, Athena A.; Phillips, Lawrence S.; Smith, Richard D.; Metz, Thomas O.

    2008-05-01

    Non-enzymatic glycation of peptides and proteins by D-glucose has important implications in the pathogenesis of diabetes mellitus, particularly in the development of diabetic complications. In this report, a thorough proteomic profiling of glycated proteins was attempted by using phenylboronate affinity chromatography to enrich glycated proteins and glycated, tryptic peptides from human plasma and erythrocyte membranes. Enriched peptides were subsequently analyzed by liquid chromatography coupled with electron transfer dissociation tandem mass spectrometry, and 76 and 31 proteins were confidently identified as glycated from human plasma and erythrocyte membrane, respectively. It was observed that most of the glycated proteins can be identified in samples from individuals with normal glucose tolerance, although samples from individuals with impaired glucose tolerance and type 2 diabetes mellitus have slightly higher numbers of glycated proteins and more glycation sites identified.

  9. TMBETADISC-RBF: Discrimination of beta-barrel membrane proteins using RBF networks and PSSM profiles.

    PubMed

    Ou, Yu-Yen; Gromiha, M Michael; Chen, Shu-An; Suwa, Makiko

    2008-06-01

    Discriminating outer membrane proteins (OMPs) from other folding types of globular and membrane proteins is an important task both for identifying OMPs from genomic sequences and for the successful prediction of their secondary and tertiary structures. We have developed a method based on radial basis function networks and position specific scoring matrix (PSSM) profiles generated by PSI-BLAST and non-redundant protein database. Our approach with PSSM profiles has correctly predicted the OMPs with a cross-validated accuracy of 96.4% in a set of 1251 proteins, which contain 206 OMPs, 667 globular proteins and 378 alpha-helical inner membrane proteins. Furthermore, we applied our method on a dataset containing 114 OMPs, 187 TMH proteins and 195 globular proteins obtained with less than 20% sequence identity and obtained the cross-validated accuracy of 95%. This accuracy of discriminating OMPs is higher than other methods in the literature and our method could be used as an effective tool for dissecting OMPs from genomic sequences. We have developed a prediction server, TMBETADISC-RBF, which is available at http://rbf.bioinfo.tw/~sachen/OMP.html.

  10. Effects of Fe deficiency on the protein profile of Brassica napus phloem sap

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The aim of this work was to study the effect of Fe deficiency on the protein profile of phloem sap exudates from Brassica napus using 2-DE (IEF-SDS PAGE). The experiment was repeated thrice and two technical replicates per treatment were done. Two hundred sixty-three spots were consistently detected...

  11. PLASMA PROTEIN PROFILING AS A HIGH THROUGHPUT TOOL FOR CHEMICAL SCREENING USING A SMALL FISH MODEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hudson, R. Tod, Michael J. Hemmer, Kimberly A. Salinas, Sherry S. Wilkinson, James Watts, James T. Winstead, Peggy S. Harris, Amy Kirkpatrick and Calvin C. Walker. In press. Plasma Protein Profiling as a High Throughput Tool for Chemical Screening Using a Small Fish Model (Abstra...

  12. PLASMA PROTEIN PROFILING AS A HIGH THROUGHPUT TOOL FOR CHEMICAL SCREENING USING A SMALL FISH MODEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hudson, R. Tod, Michael J. Hemmer, Kimberly A. Salinas, Sherry S. Wilkinson, James Watts, James T. Winstead, Peggy S. Harris, Amy Kirkpatrick and Calvin C. Walker. In press. Plasma Protein Profiling as a High Throughput Tool for Chemical Screening Using a Small Fish Model (Abstra...

  13. Potential of treatment-specific protein biomarker profiles for detection of hormone abuse in cattle.

    PubMed

    Ludwig, Susann Katrina Julie; Smits, Nathalie Gabriëlle Esther; Cannizzo, Francesca Tiziana; Nielen, Michel Wilhelmus Franciscus

    2013-05-15

    Targeted protein biomarker profiling is suggested as a fast screening approach for detection of illegal hormone treatment in meat production. The advantage of using biomarkers is that they mark the biological response and, thus, are responsive to a panel of substances with similar effects. In a preliminary feasibility study, a 4-plex protein biomarker flow cytometric immunoassay (FCIA) previously developed for the detection of recombinant bovine somatotropin (rbST) was applied to cattle treated with steroids, such as estradiol, dexamethasone, and prednisolone. Each treatment resulted in a specific plasma biomarker profile for insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), IGF binding protein 2, osteocalcin, and anti-rbST antibodies, which could be distinguished from the profile of untreated animals. In summary, the 4-plex biomarker FCIA is, apart from rbST, also capable of detecting treatment with other growth-promoting agents and therefore clearly shows the potential of biomarker profiling as a screening method in veterinary control. It is proposed to perform additional validation studies covering high numbers of treated and untreated animals to support inclusion or adaptation of protein biomarker approaches in future monitoring regulations.

  14. Protein Electrophoretic Profiles and the Origin of the B Genome of Wheat

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, B. Lennart

    1972-01-01

    Protein electrophoretic profiles cast doubt upon the prevalent theory that the B genome of the polyploid wheats was derived from a species of Aegilops. They suggest, instead, that the wild tetraploid wheats comprise a complex, whose components were derived from various combinations of diploid Triticum types, which evidently include the B-genome type. Images PMID:4504349

  15. Bayesian segmental models with multiple sequence alignment profiles for protein secondary structure and contact map prediction.

    PubMed

    Chu, Wei; Ghahramani, Zoubin; Podtelezhnikov, Alexei; Wild, David L

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we develop a segmental semi-Markov model (SSMM) for protein secondary structure prediction which incorporates multiple sequence alignment profiles with the purpose of improving the predictive performance. The segmental model is a generalization of the hidden Markov model where a hidden state generates segments of various length and secondary structure type. A novel parameterized model is proposed for the likelihood function that explicitly represents multiple sequence alignment profiles to capture the segmental conformation. Numerical results on benchmark data sets show that incorporating the profiles results in substantial improvements and the generalization performance is promising. By incorporating the information from long range interactions in beta-sheets, this model is also capable of carrying out inference on contact maps. This is an important advantage of probabilistic generative models over the traditional discriminative approach to protein secondary structure prediction. The Web server of our algorithm and supplementary materials are available at http://public.kgi.edu/-wild/bsm.html.

  16. Effects of gamma irradiation on chickpea seeds vis-a-vis total seed storage proteins, antioxidant activity and protein profiling.

    PubMed

    Bhagyawant, S S; Gupta, N; Shrivastava, N

    2015-10-23

    The present work describes radiation—induced effects on seed composition vis—à—vis total seed proteins, antioxidant levels and protein profiling employing two dimensional gel electrophoresis (2D—GE) in kabuli and desi chickpea varities. Seeds were exposed to the radiation doses of 1,2,3,4 and 5 kGy. The total protein concentrations decreased and antioxidant levels were increased with increasing dose compared to control seed samples. Radiation induced effects were dose dependent to these seed parameters while it showed tolerance to 1 kGy dose. Increase in the dose was complimented with increase in antioxidant levels, like 5 kGy enhanced % scavenging activities in all the seed extracts. Precisely, the investigations reflected that the dose range from 2 to 5 kGy was effective for total seed storage proteins, as depicted quantitatively and qualitative 2D—GE means enhance antioxidant activities in vitro.

  17. Genetic differences in the serum proteome of horses, donkeys and mules are detectable by protein profiling.

    PubMed

    Henze, Andrea; Aumer, Franziska; Grabner, Arthur; Raila, Jens; Schweigert, Florian J

    2011-10-01

    Although horses and donkeys belong to the same genus, their genetic characteristics probably result in specific proteomes and post-translational modifications (PTM) of proteins. Since PTM can alter protein properties, specific PTM may contribute to species-specific characteristics. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to analyse differences in serum protein profiles of horses and donkeys as well as mules, which combine the genetic backgrounds of both species. Additionally, changes in PTM of the protein transthyretin (TTR) were analysed. Serum protein profiles of each species (five animals per species) were determined using strong anion exchanger ProteinChips® (Bio-Rad, Munich, Germany) in combination with surface-enhanced laser desorption ionisation-time of flight MS. The PTM of TTR were analysed subsequently by immunoprecipitation in combination with matrix-assisted laser desorption ionisation-time of flight MS. Protein profiling revealed species-specific differences in the proteome, with some protein peaks present in all three species as well as protein peaks that were unique for donkeys and mules, horses and mules or for horses alone. The molecular weight of TTR of horses and donkeys differed by 30 Da, and both species revealed several modified forms of TTR besides the native form. The mass spectra of mules represented a merging of TTR spectra of horses and donkeys. In summary, the present study indicated that there are substantial differences in the proteome of horses and donkeys. Additionally, the results probably indicate that the proteome of mules reveal a higher similarity to donkeys than to horses.

  18. Advancing the Accuracy of Protein Fold Recognition by Utilizing Profiles From Hidden Markov Models.

    PubMed

    Lyons, James; Dehzangi, Abdollah; Heffernan, Rhys; Yang, Yuedong; Zhou, Yaoqi; Sharma, Alok; Paliwal, Kuldip

    2015-10-01

    Protein fold recognition is an important step towards solving protein function and tertiary structure prediction problems. Among a wide range of approaches proposed to solve this problem, pattern recognition based techniques have achieved the best results. The most effective pattern recognition-based techniques for solving this problem have been based on extracting evolutionary-based features. Most studies have relied on the Position Specific Scoring Matrix (PSSM) to extract these features. However it is known that profile-profile sequence alignment techniques can identify more remote homologs than sequence-profile approaches like PSIBLAST. In this study we use a profile-profile sequence alignment technique, namely HHblits, to extract HMM profiles. We will show that unlike previous studies, using the HMM profile to extract evolutionary information can significantly enhance the protein fold prediction accuracy. We develop a new pattern recognition based system called HMMFold which extracts HMM based evolutionary information and captures remote homology information better than previous studies. Using HMMFold we achieve up to 93.8% and 86.0% prediction accuracies when the sequential similarity rates are less than 40% and 25%, respectively. These results are up to 10% better than previously reported results for this task. Our results show significant enhancement especially for benchmarks with sequential similarity as low as 25% which highlights the effectiveness of HMMFold to address this problem and its superiority over previously proposed approaches found in the literature. The HMMFold is available online at: http://sparks-lab.org/pmwiki/download/index.php?Download =HMMFold.tar.bz2.

  19. Intact and N- or C- terminal end truncated AQP0 function as open water channels and cell-to-cell adhesion proteins: End truncation could be a prelude for adjusting the refractive index of the lens to prevent spherical aberration

    PubMed Central

    Kumari, S. Sindhu; Varadaraj, Kulandaiappan

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Investigate the impact of natural N- or C-terminal post-translational truncations of lens mature fiber cell Aquaporin 0 (AQP0) on water permeability (Pw) and cell-to-cell adhesion (CTCA) functions. Methods The following deletions/truncations were created by site-directed mutagenesis (designations in parentheses): Amino acid residues (AA) 2–6 (AQP0-N-del-2-6), AA235-263 (AQP0-1-234), AA239-263 (AQP0-1-238), AA244-263 (AQP0-1-243), AA247-263 (AQP0-1-246), AA250-263 (AQP0-1-249) and AA260-263 (AQP0-1-259). Protein expression was studied using immunostaining, fluorescent tags and organelle-specific markers. Pw was tested by expressing the respective cRNA in Xenopus oocytes and conducting osmotic swelling assay. CTCA was assessed by transfecting intact or mutant AQP0 into adhesion-deficient L-cells and performing cell aggregation and adhesion assays. Results AQP0-1-234 and AQP0-1-238 did not traffic to the plasma membrane. Trafficking of AQP0-N-del-2-6 and AQP0-1-243 was reduced causing decreased membrane Pw and CTCA. AQP0-1-246, AQP0-1-249 and AQP0-1-259 mutants trafficked properly and functioned normally. Pw and CTCA functions of the mutants were directly proportional to the respective amount of AQP0 expressed at the plasma membrane and remained comparable to those of intact AQP0 (AQP0-1-263). Conclusion Post-translational truncation of N- or C-terminal end amino acids does not alter the basal water permeability of AQP0 or its adhesive functions. AQP0 may play a role in adjusting the refractive index to prevent spherical aberration in the constantly growing lens. General significance Similar studies can be extended to other lens proteins which undergo post-translational truncations to find out how they assist the lens to maintain transparency and homeostasis for proper focusing of objects on to the retina. PMID:24821012

  20. Heavy/light chain specific immunoglobulin ratios provides no additional information than serum proteins electrophoresis and immunofixation for the diagnosis and the follow-up of intact immunoglobulin multiple myeloma patients.

    PubMed

    Beaumont-Epinette, M-P; Moreau, C; Besnard, S; Latute, F; Collet, N; Sebillot, M; Grosbois, B; Bendavid, C; Guenet, L; Decaux, O

    2015-09-01

    Serum protein electrophoresis (SPE) and immunofixation electrophoresis (IFE) are used for diagnosis and follow-up of patients with intact immunoglobulin multiple myeloma. However, the numerous limitations of these methods led to the development of a nephelometric immunoassay (Hevylite™) for the specific measurement of serum IgGκ, IgGλ, IgAκ and IgAλ concentrations. In this study, we evaluated the correlation between this assay and SPE and IFE in 114 sera of 15 patients (12 IgG and 3 IgA patients) and its impact on the clinical care of patients, especially for diagnosis, for the evaluation of residual disease and for early detection of relapse. At inclusion and during follow-up, we found a good correlation between monoclonal immunoglobulin concentrations and SPE (R(2)=0.902 for IgA and R(2)=0.915 for IgG) and nephelometric quantification (R(2)=0.948 for IgA and R(2)=0.920 for IgG) for the evaluation of monoclonal and polyclonal immunoglobulins. Our results illustrate that the Hevylite™ test is less sensitive than the IFE for detection of residual disease: 5 patients who obtained very good partial response or complete response had normalization of the Hevylite™ ratio while IFE was still positive. A relapse had been detectable with the Hevylite™ ratio 1 to 2 months earlier than with SPE and IFE in 3 patients out of 15, but no recommendations for treating patients with only slight biological relapse are available. Our results demonstrate that heavy/light chain specific immunoglobulin ratios provides no additional information than serum proteins electrophoresis and immunofixation for the diagnosis and the follow-up of intact immunoglobulin multiple myeloma patients. We also studied the correlation between the concentration of total immunoglobulin measured by Hevylite™ (sum of Ig'κ + Ig'λ) and nephelometric measurement of total IgG or IgA. For this correlation analysis, all 114 sera were analyzed. The correlation coefficient was R(2) = 0

  1. Serum protein expression profiling and bioinformatics analysis in workers occupationally exposed to chromium (VI).

    PubMed

    Hu, Guiping; Wang, Tianjing; Liu, Jiaxing; Chen, Zhangjian; Zhong, Lijun; Yu, Shanfa; Zhao, Zuchang; Zhai, Min; Jia, Guang

    2017-08-05

    Cr(VI) is widely-recognized as occupational and environmental contaminant, but the precise underlying mechanisms of Cr(VI) induced carcinogenic toxicity remain to be elucidated. Among kinds of toxic mechanisms, alteration of protein profiling usually elaborate a key mechanism of Cr(VI) induced toxicity and carcinogenesis. Large-scale proteins changes can reflect the onset or progression of carcinogenic toxicity, and potential serum protein biomarkers of Cr(VI) exposure. To gain an insight into the serum proteins expression profiling in chromate workers and find potential novel serum proteins biomarkers of Cr(VI) exposure, 107 male participants from a chromate production plant were recruited into the study. Questionnaire was applied to collect personal information and occupational history. Chromium concentration in blood (CrB) was measured to evaluate the participants' internal exposure. Serum proteins profiling and bioinformatics analysis were performed to explore differentially expressed proteins, proteins-chemical interaction network, critical proteins nodes related to the signaling pathways among 16 controls and 25 exposure workers in the first stage. ELISA tests were applied to verify the critical interested proteins nodes in the remaining 41 exposure workers and 25 controls. The results showed that the CrB levels in the control group were significantly lower than that in the exposure group (P<0.05). 44 significantly differentially expressed serum proteins formed 16 significant signaling pathways and a complex proteins-chemical interaction network, which associated with the immune system and extracellular matrix organization. C reactive protein (CRP), sonic hedgehog protein (SHH) and calcium located at critical nodes in proteins-chemical interaction network. There was a significant negative correlation between serum CRP level and CrB (P<0.05), and a significant positive correlation between SHH concentrations and CrB (P<0.05), which indicated that CRP and SHH

  2. Direct prediction of profiles of sequences compatible with a protein structure by neural networks with fragment-based local and energy-based nonlocal profiles.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhixiu; Yang, Yuedong; Faraggi, Eshel; Zhan, Jian; Zhou, Yaoqi

    2014-10-01

    Locating sequences compatible with a protein structural fold is the well-known inverse protein-folding problem. While significant progress has been made, the success rate of protein design remains low. As a result, a library of designed sequences or profile of sequences is currently employed for guiding experimental screening or directed evolution. Sequence profiles can be computationally predicted by iterative mutations of a random sequence to produce energy-optimized sequences, or by combining sequences of structurally similar fragments in a template library. The latter approach is computationally more efficient but yields less accurate profiles than the former because of lacking tertiary structural information. Here we present a method called SPIN that predicts Sequence Profiles by Integrated Neural network based on fragment-derived sequence profiles and structure-derived energy profiles. SPIN improves over the fragment-derived profile by 6.7% (from 23.6 to 30.3%) in sequence identity between predicted and wild-type sequences. The method also reduces the number of residues in low complex regions by 15.7% and has a significantly better balance of hydrophilic and hydrophobic residues at protein surface. The accuracy of sequence profiles obtained is comparable to those generated from the protein design program RosettaDesign 3.5. This highly efficient method for predicting sequence profiles from structures will be useful as a single-body scoring term for improving scoring functions used in protein design and fold recognition. It also complements protein design programs in guiding experimental design of the sequence library for screening and directed evolution of designed sequences. The SPIN server is available at http://sparks-lab.org. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Direct prediction of profiles of sequences compatible to a protein structure by neural networks with fragment-based local and energy-based nonlocal profiles

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhixiu; Yang, Yuedong; Faraggi, Eshel; Zhan, Jian; Zhou, Yaoqi

    2014-01-01

    Locating sequences compatible to a protein structural fold is the well-known inverse protein-folding problem. While significant progress has been made, the success rate of protein design remains low. As a result, a library of designed sequences or profile of sequences is currently employed for guiding experimental screening or directed evolution. Sequence profiles can be computationally predicted by iterative mutations of a random sequence to produce energy-optimized sequences, or by combining sequences of structurally similar fragments in a template library. The latter approach is computationally more efficient but yields less accurate profiles than the former because of lacking tertiary structural information. Here we present a method called SPIN that predicts Sequence Profiles by Integrated Neural network based on fragment-derived sequence profiles and structure-derived energy profiles. SPIN improves over the fragment-derived profile by 6.7% (from 23.6% to 30.3%) in sequence identity between predicted and wild-type sequences. The method also reduces the number of residues in low complex regions by 15.7% and has a significant better balance of hydrophilic and hydrophobic residues at protein surfaces. The accuracy of sequence profiles obtained is comparable to those generated from the protein design program RosettaDesign 3.5. This highly efficient method for predicting sequence profiles from structures will be useful as a single-body scoring term for improving scoring functions used in protein design and fold recognition. It also complements protein design programs in guiding experimental design of the sequence library for screening and directed evolution of designed sequences. The SPIN server is available at http://sparks-lab.org. PMID:24898915

  4. Relating the shape of protein binding sites to binding affinity profiles: is there an association?

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Various pattern-based methods exist that use in vitro or in silico affinity profiles for classification and functional examination of proteins. Nevertheless, the connection between the protein affinity profiles and the structural characteristics of the binding sites is still unclear. Our aim was to investigate the association between virtual drug screening results (calculated binding free energy values) and the geometry of protein binding sites. Molecular Affinity Fingerprints (MAFs) were determined for 154 proteins based on their molecular docking energy results for 1,255 FDA-approved drugs. Protein binding site geometries were characterized by 420 PocketPicker descriptors. The basic underlying component structure of MAFs and binding site geometries, respectively, were examined by principal component analysis; association between principal components extracted from these two sets of variables was then investigated by canonical correlation and redundancy analyses. Results PCA analysis of the MAF variables provided 30 factors which explained 71.4% of the total variance of the energy values while 13 factors were obtained from the PocketPicker descriptors which cumulatively explained 94.1% of the total variance. Canonical correlation analysis resulted in 3 statistically significant canonical factor pairs with correlation values of 0.87, 0.84 and 0.77, respectively. Redundancy analysis indicated that PocketPicker descriptor factors explain 6.9% of the variance of the MAF factor set while MAF factors explain 15.9% of the total variance of PocketPicker descriptor factors. Based on the salient structures of the factor pairs, we identified a clear-cut association between the shape and bulkiness of the drug molecules and the protein binding site descriptors. Conclusions This is the first study to investigate complex multivariate associations between affinity profiles and the geometric properties of protein binding sites. We found that, except for few specific

  5. The genomic sequence analysis of the left and right species-specific terminal region of a cowpox virus strain reveals unique sequences and a cluster of intact ORFs for immunomodulatory and host range proteins.

    PubMed

    Shchelkunov, S N; Safronov, P F; Totmenin, A V; Petrov, N A; Ryazankina, O I; Gutorov, V V; Kotwal, G J

    1998-04-10

    Sequencing and computer analysis of the left (52,283 bp) and right (49,649 bp) variable DNA regions of the cowpox virus strain GRI-90 (CPV-GRI) has revealed 51 and 37 potential open reading frames (ORFs), respectively. Comparison of the structure-function organization of these DNA regions of CPV-GRI with those previously published for corresponding regions of genomes of vaccinia virus, strains Copenhagen (VAC-COP) and Western Reserve (VAC-WR); and variola major virus, strains India-1967 (VAR-IND), Bangladesh-1975 (VAR-BSH); and alastrim variola minor virus, strain Garcia-1966 (VAR-GAR), was performed. Within the left terminal region under study, an extended DNA sequence (14,171 bp), unique to CPV, has been found. Within the right region of the CPV-GRI genome two segments, which are unique to CPV DNA (1579 and 3585 bp) have been found. Numerous differences have been revealed in the genetic structure of CPV-GRI DNA regions, homologous to fragments of the genomes of the above-mentioned orthopoxvirus strains. A cluster of ORFs with structural similarity ot immunomodulatory and host range function of other poxviruses have also been detected. A comparison of the sequences of ORF B, crmA, crmB, crmC, IMP, and CHO hr genes of CPV Brighton strain (CPV-BRI) with the corresponding genes in strain GRI-90 have revealed an identity at the amino acid level ranging from 82 to 96% between the two strains. The findings are significant in light of the recent demonstration of CPV as an important poxvirus model system to probe the precise in vivo role(s) of the unique virally encoded immunomodulatory proteins. Also, the presence of a complete and intact repertoire of immunomodulatory proteins, ring canal proteins family, and host range genes indicates that CPV may have been the most ancient of all studied orthopoxviruses.

  6. Impact of the antifungal protein PgAFP from Penicillium chrysogenum on the protein profile in Aspergillus flavus.

    PubMed

    Delgado, Josué; Owens, Rebecca A; Doyle, Sean; Asensio, Miguel A; Núñez, Félix

    2015-10-01

    Antifungal proteins produced by molds are generally small, highly basic, and cysteine-rich. The best known effects of these proteins include morphological changes, metabolic inactivation, and membrane perturbation on sensitive fungi. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation leads to apoptosis, with G -protein playing a key role in transduction of cell death signals. The antifungal protein PgAFP from Penicillium chrysogenum inhibits growth of some toxigenic molds. Here we analyzed the effect of the antifungal protein PgAFP on the growth of Aspergillus flavus. For this, comparative proteomic analysis was used to identify the whole protein profile and protein change in abundance after PgAFP treatment. PgAFP provoked metabolic changes related to reduced energy metabolism, cell wall integrity alteration, and increased stress response due to higher levels of ROS. The observed changes in protein abundance, favoring a higher glutathione concentration as well as the increased abundance in heat shock proteins, do not seem to be enough to avoid necrosis. The decreased chitin deposition observed in PgAFP-treated A. flavus is attributed to a lower relative quantity of Rho1. The reduced relative abundance of a β subunit of G -protein seems to be the underlying reason for modulation of apoptosis in PgAFP-treated A. flavus hyphae. We propose Rho1 and G -protein subunit β CpcB to be the main factors in the mode of action of PgAFP in A. flavus. Additionally, enzymes essential for the biosynthesis of aflatoxin were no longer detectable in A. flavus hyphae at 24 h, following treatment with PgAFP. This presents a promising effect of PgAFP, which may prevent A. flavus from producing mycotoxins. However, the impact of PgAFP on actual aflatoxin production requires further study.

  7. Effects of Holder pasteurization on the protein profile of human milk.

    PubMed

    Peila, Chiara; Coscia, Alessandra; Bertino, Enrico; Cavaletto, Maria; Spertino, Stefano; Icardi, Sara; Tortone, Claudia; Visser, Gerard H A; Gazzolo, Diego

    2016-04-07

    The most widespread method for the treatment of donor milk is the Holder pasteurization (HoP). The available literature data show that HoP may cause degradation of some bioactive components. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of HoP on the protein profile of human milk (HM) using a GeLC-MS method, a proteomic approach and a promising technique able to offer a qualitative HM protein profile. HM samples were collected by standardized methods from 20 mothers carrying both preterm and term newborns. A aliquot of each sample was immediately frozen at -80 °C, whilst another one was Holder pasteurized and then frozen. All samples were then analyzed by GeLC-MS. The protein bands of interest were excised from the gel, digested with trypsin and identified by nano-HPLC-MS/MS analysis. The protein profile before and after HoP showed qualitative differences only in 6 samples out of 20, while in the remaining 14 no detectable differences were found. The differences interested only colostrums and transitional milk samples and regarded the decrease of the electrophoretic bands corresponding to alpha and beta-casein, tenascin, lactoferrin and immunoglobulin. In the majority of samples, HoP did not cause any modification, thereby preserving the biological activity of HM proteins.

  8. Fast and efficient MCR-based synthesis of clickable rhodamine tags for protein profiling.

    PubMed

    Brauch, Sebastian; Henze, Michael; Osswald, Bianca; Naumann, Kai; Wessjohann, Ludger A; van Berkel, Sander S; Westermann, Bernhard

    2012-02-07

    Protein profiling probes are important tools for studying the composition of the proteome and as such have contributed greatly to the understanding of various complex biological processes in higher organisms. For this purpose the application of fluorescently labeled activity or affinity probes is highly desirable. Especially for in vivo detection of low abundant target proteins, otherwise difficult to analyse by standard blotting techniques, fluorescently labeled profiling probes are of high value. Here, a one-pot protocol for the synthesis of activated fluorescent labels (i.e. azide, alkynyl or NHS), based on the Ugi-4-component reaction (Ugi-4CR), is presented. As a result of the peptoidic structure formed, the fluorescent properties of the products are pH insensitive. Moreover, the applicability of these probes, as exemplified by the labeling of model protein BSA, will be discussed.

  9. Systematic Comparative Protein Expression Profiling of Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Lichtenfels, Rudolf; Dressler, Sven P.; Zobawa, Monica; Recktenwald, Christian V.; Ackermann, Angelika; Atkins, Derek; Kersten, Michael; Hesse, Andrea; Puttkammer, Maria; Lottspeich, Friedrich; Seliger, Barbara

    2009-01-01

    Proteome-based technologies represent powerful tools for the analysis of protein expression profiles, including the identification of potential cancer candidate biomarkers. Thus, here we provide a comprehensive protein expression map for clear cell renal cell carcinoma established by systematic comparative two-dimensional gel electrophoresis-based protein expression profiling of 16 paired tissue systems comprising clear cell renal cell carcinoma lesions and corresponding tumor-adjacent renal epithelium using overlapping narrow pH gradients. This approach led to the mapping of 348 distinct spots corresponding to 248 different protein identities. By implementing restriction criteria concerning their detection frequency and overall regulation mode, 28 up- and 56 down-regulated single target spots were considered as potential candidate biomarkers. Based on their gene ontology information, these differentially expressed proteins were classified into distinct functional groups and according to their cellular distribution. Moreover, three representative members of this group, namely calbindin, gelsolin, and heart fatty acid-binding protein, were selected, and their expression pattern was analyzed by immunohistochemistry using tissue microarrays. Thus, this pilot study provides a significant update of the current renal cell carcinoma map and defines a number of differentially expressed proteins, but both their potential as candidate biomarkers and clinical relevance has to be further explored in tissues and for body fluids like serum and urine. PMID:19752005

  10. Generating a detailed protein profile of Fasciola hepatica during the chronic stage of infection in cattle.

    PubMed

    Haçarız, Orçun; Baykal, Ahmet Tarık; Akgün, Mete; Kavak, Pınar; Sağıroğlu, Mahmut Şamil; Sayers, Gearóid Patrick

    2014-06-01

    Fasciola hepatica is a trematode helminth causing a damaging disease, fasciolosis, in ruminants and humans. Comprehensive proteomic studies broaden our knowledge of the parasite's protein profile, and provide new insights into the development of more effective strategies to deal with fasciolosis. The objective of this study was to generate a comprehensive profile of F. hepatica proteins expressed during the chronic stage of infection in cattle by building on previous efforts in this area. The approach included an improved sample preparation procedure for surface and internal layers of the parasite, the application of nano-UPLC-ESI-qTOF-MS (nano-ultra-performance LC and ESI quadrupole TOF MS) integrated with different acquisition methods and in silico database search against various protein databases and a transcript database including a new assembly of publically available EST. Of a total of 776 identified proteins, 206 and 332 were specific to the surface and internal layers of the parasite, respectively. Furthermore, 238 proteins were common to both layers, with comparative differences of 172 proteins detected. Specific proteins not previously identified in F. hepatica, but shown to be immunomodulatory or potential drug targets for other parasites, are discussed.

  11. Autoantibody Profiling in Multiple Sclerosis Using Arrays of Human Protein Fragments*

    PubMed Central

    Ayoglu, Burcu; Häggmark, Anna; Khademi, Mohsen; Olsson, Tomas; Uhlén, Mathias; Schwenk, Jochen M.; Nilsson, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Profiling the autoantibody repertoire with large antigen collections is emerging as a powerful tool for the identification of biomarkers for autoimmune diseases. Here, a systematic and undirected approach was taken to screen for profiles of IgG in human plasma from 90 individuals with multiple sclerosis related diagnoses. Reactivity pattern of 11,520 protein fragments (representing ∼38% of all human protein encoding genes) were generated on planar protein microarrays built within the Human Protein Atlas. For more than 2,000 antigens IgG reactivity was observed, among which 64% were found only in single individuals. We used reactivity distributions among multiple sclerosis subgroups to select 384 antigens, which were then re-evaluated on planar microarrays, corroborated with suspension bead arrays in a larger cohort (n = 376) and confirmed for specificity in inhibition assays. Among the heterogeneous pattern within and across multiple sclerosis subtypes, differences in recognition frequencies were found for 51 antigens, which were enriched for proteins of transcriptional regulation. In conclusion, using protein fragments and complementary high-throughput protein array platforms facilitated an alternative route to discovery and verification of potentially disease-associated autoimmunity signatures, that are now proposed as additional antigens for large-scale validation studies across multiple sclerosis biobanks. PMID:23732997

  12. Protein Profiles Associated With Context Fear Conditioning and Their Modulation by Memantine*

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Md. Mahiuddin; Dhanasekaran, A. Ranjitha; Block, Aaron; Tong, Suhong; Costa, Alberto C. S.; Gardiner, Katheleen J.

    2014-01-01

    Analysis of the molecular basis of learning and memory has revealed details of the roles played by many genes and the proteins they encode. Because most individual studies focus on a small number of proteins, many complexities of the relationships among proteins and their dynamic responses to stimulation are not known. We have used the technique of reverse phase protein arrays (RPPA) to assess the levels of more than 80 proteins/protein modifications in subcellular fractions from hippocampus and cortex of mice trained in Context Fear Conditioning (CFC). Proteins include components of signaling pathways, several encoded by immediate early genes or involved in apoptosis and inflammation, and subunits of glutamate receptors. At one hour after training, levels of more than half the proteins had changed in one or more fractions, among them multiple components of the Mitogen-activated protein kinase, MAPK, and Mechanistic Target of Rapamycin, MTOR, pathways, subunits of glutamate receptors, and the NOTCH pathway modulator, NUMB homolog (Drosophila). Levels of 37 proteins changed in the nuclear fraction of hippocampus alone. Abnormalities in levels of thirteen proteins analyzed have been reported in brains of patients with Alzheimer's Disease. We therefore further investigated the protein profiles of mice treated with memantine, a drug approved for treatment of AD. In hippocampus, memantine alone induced many changes similar to those seen after CFC and altered the levels of seven proteins associated with Alzheimer's Disease abnormalities. Lastly, to further explore the relevance of these datasets, we superimposed responses to CFC and memantine onto components of the long term potentiation pathway, a process subserving learning and memory formation. Fourteen components of the long term potentiation pathway and 26 proteins interacting with components responded to CFC and/or memantine. Together, these datasets provide a novel view of the diversity and complexity in protein

  13. The application of multiple reaction monitoring and multi-analyte profiling to HDL proteins

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background HDL carries a rich protein cargo and examining HDL protein composition promises to improve our understanding of its functions. Conventional mass spectrometry methods can be lengthy and difficult to extend to large populations. In addition, without prior enrichment of the sample, the ability of these methods to detect low abundance proteins is limited. Our objective was to develop a high-throughput approach to examine HDL protein composition applicable to diabetes and cardiovascular disease (CVD). Methods We optimized two multiplexed assays to examine HDL proteins using a quantitative immunoassay (Multi-Analyte Profiling- MAP) and mass spectrometric-based quantitative proteomics (Multiple Reaction Monitoring-MRM). We screened HDL proteins using human xMAP (90 protein panel) and MRM (56 protein panel). We extended the application of these two methods to HDL isolated from a group of participants with diabetes and prior cardiovascular events and a group of non-diabetic controls. Results We were able to quantitate 69 HDL proteins using MAP and 32 proteins using MRM. For several common proteins, the use of MRM and MAP was highly correlated (p < 0.01). Using MAP, several low abundance proteins implicated in atherosclerosis and inflammation were found on HDL. On the other hand, MRM allowed the examination of several HDL proteins not available by MAP. Conclusions MAP and MRM offer a sensitive and high-throughput approach to examine changes in HDL proteins in diabetes and CVD. This approach can be used to measure the presented HDL proteins in large clinical studies. PMID:24397693

  14. Intact capture of hypervelocity particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsou, P.; Brownlee, D. E.; Albee, A. L.

    1986-01-01

    Knowledge of the phase, structure, and crystallography of cosmic particles, as well as their elemental and isotopic compositions, would be very valuable information toward understanding the nature of our solar system. This information can be obtained from the intact capture of large mineral grains of cosmic particles from hypervelocity impacts. Hypervelocity experiments of intact capture in underdense media have indicated realistic potential in this endeaver. The recovery of the thermal blankets and louvers from the Solar Max spacecraft have independently verified this potential in the unintended capture of cosmic materials from hypervelocity impacts. Passive underdense media will permit relatively simple and inexpensive missions to capture cosmic particles intact, either by going to a planetary body or by waiting for the particles to come to the Shuttle or the Space Station. Experiments to explore the potential of using various underdense media for an intact comet sample capture up to 6.7 km/s were performed at NASA Ames Research Center Vertical Gun Range. Explorative hypervelocity experiments up to 7.9 km/s were also made at the Ernst Mach Institute. These experiments have proven that capturing intact particles at hypervelocity impacts is definitely possible. Further research is being conducted to achieve higher capture ratios at even higher hypervelocities for even smaller projectiles.

  15. Intact capture of hypervelocity particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsou, P.; Brownlee, D. E.; Albee, A. L.

    Knowledge of the phase, structure, and crystallography of cosmic particles, as well as their elemental and isotopic compositions, would be very valuable information toward understanding the nature of our solar system. This information can be obtained from the intact capture of large mineral grains of cosmic particles from hypervelocity impacts. Hypervelocity experiments of intact capture in underdense media have indicated realistic potential in this endeaver. The recovery of the thermal blankets and louvers from the Solar Max spacecraft have independently verified this potential in the unintended capture of cosmic materials from hypervelocity impacts. Passive underdense media will permit relatively simple and inexpensive missions to capture cosmic particles intact, either by going to a planetary body or by waiting for the particles to come to the Shuttle or the Space Station. Experiments to explore the potential of using various underdense media for an intact comet sample capture up to 6.7 km/s were performed at NASA Ames Research Center Vertical Gun Range. Explorative hypervelocity experiments up to 7.9 km/s were also made at the Ernst Mach Institute. These experiments have proven that capturing intact particles at hypervelocity impacts is definitely possible. Further research is being conducted to achieve higher capture ratios at even higher hypervelocities for even smaller projectiles.

  16. Substantial equivalence analysis in fruits from three Theobroma species through chemical composition and protein profiling.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Mora, Walter; Jorrin-Novo, Jesús V; Melgarejo, Luz Marina

    2018-02-01

    Substantial equivalence studies were performed in three Theobroma spp., cacao, bicolor and grandiflorum through chemical composition analysis and protein profiling of fruit (pulp juice and seeds). Principal component analysis of sugar, organic acid, and phenol content in pulp juice revealed equivalence among the three species, with differences in some of the compounds that may result in different organoleptic properties. Proteins were extracted from seeds and pulp juice, resolved by two dimensional electrophoresis and major spots subjected to mass spectrometry analysis and identification. The protein profile, as revealed by principal component analysis, was variable among the three species in both seed and pulp, with qualitative and quantitative differences in some of protein species. The functional grouping of the identified proteins correlated with the biological role of each organ. Some of the identified proteins are of interest, being minimally discussed, including vicilin, a protease inhibitor, and a flavonol synthase/flavanone 3-hydroxylase. Theobroma grandiflorum and Theobroma bicolor are endemic Amazonian plants that are poorly traded at the local level. As close relatives of Theobroma cacao, they may provide a good alternative for human consumption and industrial purposes. In this regard, we performed equivalence studies by conducting a comparative biochemical and proteomics analysis of the fruit, pulp juice and seeds of these three species. The results indicated equivalent chemical compositions and variable protein profiles with some differences in the content of the specific compounds or protein species that may result in variable organoleptic properties between the species and can be exploited for traceability purposes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Kinetoplast DNA-binding protein profile in the epimastigote form of Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Zavala-Castro, Jorge E; Acosta-Viana, Karla; Baylon-Pacheco, Lydia; González-Robles, Arturo; Guzmán-Marín, Eugenia; Rosales-Encina, José L

    2002-01-01

    The Trypanosomatidae family possesses one of the most unusual DNAs found in nature: the kinetoplast genome. It consists of a few dozen maxicircles that encode for some subunits of mitochondrial enzymes and rRNAs in a cryptic pattern and thousands of minicircles that encode for the guide RNAs (gRNAs), all catenated and constituting a dense network. The complexity of kinetoplast genome based on its intricate DNA structure is well known; however, only a small number of proteins associated with kinetoplast DNA (kDNA) have been described, and the majority are related with the replication process. We describe the protein profile obtained using formaldehyde as a cross-linking agent to obtain the kinetoplast DNA-protein complex, and Southwestern assay to identify the kDNA binding proteins present in the complex. We identified seven proteins eluted from the kDNA complex fixed by formaldehyde. Polyclonal antiserum developed against the kDNA-protein complex recognized only four proteins in crude extracts of epimastigote stage, suggesting immunogenic differences among these proteins and/or their availability in the kinetoplast genome. Southwestern assay using minicircle fragments showed nine kDNA binding proteins in crude extracts of Trypanosoma cruzi epimastigote. We describe several proteins associated with the kDNA. Some could be involved in the essential process for parasite life and also could be a good target for drug or vaccine development. The results contribute to understanding the organization of the kinetoplast genome.

  18. Proteomic Profiling Of Two-Dimensional Gel Electrophoresis Protein Expression Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Norhaiza; Zhang, J.; Brown, P. J.; James, D. C.; Birch, J. R.; Racher, A. J.; Smales, C. M.

    2008-01-01

    We have undertaken two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) proteomic profiling on a series of cell lines with different recombinant antibody production rates. Due to the nature of 2-DE proteomic investigations there will always be `process variability' factors in any data set collected in this way. Some of this variation will arise during sample preparation, gel running and staining, while further variation will arise from the gel analysis procedure. Therefore, in order to identify all significant changes in protein expression between biological samples when analysed by 2-DE, the system precision or `error', and how this correlates to protein abundance, must be known. Only then can the system be considered robust and investigators accurately and confidently report all observable statistically significant changes in protein expression. We introduce an expression variability test to identify protein spots whose expression correlates with increased antibody production. The results have highlighted a small number of candidate proteins for further investigation.

  19. UFO: a web server for ultra-fast functional profiling of whole genome protein sequences.

    PubMed

    Meinicke, Peter

    2009-09-02

    Functional profiling is a key technique to characterize and compare the functional potential of entire genomes. The estimation of profiles according to an assignment of sequences to functional categories is a computationally expensive task because it requires the comparison of all protein sequences from a genome with a usually large database of annotated sequences or sequence families. Based on machine learning techniques for Pfam domain detection, the UFO web server for ultra-fast functional profiling allows researchers to process large protein sequence collections instantaneously. Besides the frequencies of Pfam and GO categories, the user also obtains the sequence specific assignments to Pfam domain families. In addition, a comparison with existing genomes provides dissimilarity scores with respect to 821 reference proteomes. Considering the underlying UFO domain detection, the results on 206 test genomes indicate a high sensitivity of the approach. In comparison with current state-of-the-art HMMs, the runtime measurements show a considerable speed up in the range of four orders of magnitude. For an average size prokaryotic genome, the computation of a functional profile together with its comparison typically requires about 10 seconds of processing time. For the first time the UFO web server makes it possible to get a quick overview on the functional inventory of newly sequenced organisms. The genome scale comparison with a large number of precomputed profiles allows a first guess about functionally related organisms. The service is freely available and does not require user registration or specification of a valid email address.

  20. UFO: a web server for ultra-fast functional profiling of whole genome protein sequences

    PubMed Central

    Meinicke, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Background Functional profiling is a key technique to characterize and compare the functional potential of entire genomes. The estimation of profiles according to an assignment of sequences to functional categories is a computationally expensive task because it requires the comparison of all protein sequences from a genome with a usually large database of annotated sequences or sequence families. Description Based on machine learning techniques for Pfam domain detection, the UFO web server for ultra-fast functional profiling allows researchers to process large protein sequence collections instantaneously. Besides the frequencies of Pfam and GO categories, the user also obtains the sequence specific assignments to Pfam domain families. In addition, a comparison with existing genomes provides dissimilarity scores with respect to 821 reference proteomes. Considering the underlying UFO domain detection, the results on 206 test genomes indicate a high sensitivity of the approach. In comparison with current state-of-the-art HMMs, the runtime measurements show a considerable speed up in the range of four orders of magnitude. For an average size prokaryotic genome, the computation of a functional profile together with its comparison typically requires about 10 seconds of processing time. Conclusion For the first time the UFO web server makes it possible to get a quick overview on the functional inventory of newly sequenced organisms. The genome scale comparison with a large number of precomputed profiles allows a first guess about functionally related organisms. The service is freely available and does not require user registration or specification of a valid email address. PMID:19725959

  1. Intact capture of cosmic dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsou, P.

    1991-01-01

    The focus of this development effort is to capture dust particles at hypervelocities intact and unmelted in order to preserve volatile organics. At the same time, the capture process must minimize any organic elemental or compound contamination to prevent any compromise of exobiological analyses. Inorganic silicate aerogel has been developed as a successful capture medium to satisfy both requirements of intact capture and minimal organic contamination. Up to 6 km/s, silicate projectiles from a few microns up to 100 microns have been captured intact without any melting and with minimal loss of mass. Carbon in silicate aerogel can be reduced to less than 1 part in 1000 and hydrogen 3 parts in 1000 when baked in air. Under controlled inert gas environments, additional hydrocarbon reduction can be achieved.

  2. Proteomic profiling of proteins associated with methamphetamine-induced neurotoxicity in different regions of rat brain.

    PubMed

    Li, Xuefeng; Wang, Huijun; Qiu, Pingming; Luo, Hong

    2008-01-01

    It is well documented that methamphetamine (MA) can cause obvious damage to the brain, but the exact mechanism is still unknown. In the present study, proteomic methods of two-dimensional gel electrophoresis in combination with mass spectrometry analysis were used to identify global protein profiles associated with MA-induced neurotoxicity. For the first time, 30 protein spots have been found differentially expressed in different regions of rat brain, including 14 in striatum, 12 in hippocampus and 4 in frontal cortex. The proteins identified by tandem mass spectrometry were Cu, Zn superoxide dismutase, dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolase 1, alpha synuclein, ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme E2N, stathmin 1, calcineurin B, cystatin B, subunit of mitochondrial H-ATP synthase, ATP synthase D chain, mitochondrial, NADH dehydrogenase(ubiquinone) Fe-S protein 8, glia maturation factor, beta, Ash-m, neurocalcin delta, myotrophin, profiling IIa, D-dopachrome tautomerase, and brain lipid binding protein. The known functions of these proteins were related to the pathogenesis of MA-induced neurotoxicity, including oxidative stress, degeneration/apoptosis, mitochontrial/energy metabolism and others. Of these proteins, alpha-synuclein was up-regulated, and ATP synthase D chain, mitochondrial was down-regulated in all brain regions. Two proteins, Cu, Zn superoxide dismutase, subunit of mitochondrial H-ATPsynthase were down-regulated and Ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme E2N, NADH dehydrogenase (ubiquinone) Fe-S protein 8 were up-regulated simultaneously in striatum and hippocaltum. The expression of dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolase 1 (DDAH 1) increased both in striatum and frontal cortex. The parallel expression patterns of these proteins suggest that the pathogenesis of MA neurotoxicity in different brain regions may share some same pathways.

  3. Profiles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Arts, 1979

    1979-01-01

    Profiles seven Black, Native American, and Chicano artists and art teachers: Hale A. Woodruff, Allan Houser, Luis Jimenez, Betrand D. Phillips, James E. Pate, I, and Fernando Navarro. This article is part of a theme issue on multicultural art. (SJL)

  4. Profiles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Arts, 1979

    1979-01-01

    Profiles seven Black, Native American, and Chicano artists and art teachers: Hale A. Woodruff, Allan Houser, Luis Jimenez, Betrand D. Phillips, James E. Pate, I, and Fernando Navarro. This article is part of a theme issue on multicultural art. (SJL)

  5. Hexapeptide libraries for enhanced protein PTM identification and relative abundance profiling in whole human saliva.

    PubMed

    Bandhakavi, Sricharan; Van Riper, Susan K; Tawfik, Pierre N; Stone, Matthew D; Haddad, Tufia; Rhodus, Nelson L; Carlis, John V; Griffin, Timothy J

    2011-03-04

    Dynamic range compression (DRC) by hexapeptide libraries increases MS/MS-based identification of lower-abundance proteins in complex mixtures. However, two unanswered questions impede fully realizing DRC's potential in shotgun proteomics. First, does DRC enhance identification of post-translationally modified proteins? Second, can DRC be incorporated into a workflow enabling relative protein abundance profiling? We sought to answer both questions analyzing human whole saliva. Addressing question one, we coupled DRC with covalent glycopeptide enrichment and MS/MS. With DRC we identified ∼2 times more N-linked glycoproteins and their glycosylation sites than without DRC, dramatically increasing the known salivary glycoprotein catalog. Addressing question two, we compared differentially stable isotope-labeled saliva samples pooled from healthy and metastatic breast cancer women using a multidimensional peptide fractionation-based workflow, analyzing in parallel one sample portion with DRC and one portion without. Our workflow categorizes proteins with higher absolute abundance, whose relative abundance ratios are altered by DRC, from proteins of lower absolute abundance detected only after DRC. Within each of these salivary protein categories, we identified novel abundance changes putatively associated with breast cancer, demonstrating feasibility and benefits of DRC for relative abundance profiling. Collectively, our results bring us closer to realizing the full potential of DRC for proteomic studies.

  6. Cassava interspecific hybrids with increased protein content and improved amino acid profiles.

    PubMed

    Gomes, P T C; Nassar, N M A

    2013-04-12

    Cassava (Manihot esculenta) is a principal food for large populations of poor people in the tropics and subtropics. Its edible roots are poor in protein and lack several essential amino acids. Interspecific hybrids may acquire high protein characteristics from wild species. We analyzed 19 hybrids of M. esculenta with its wild relative, M. oligantha, for crude protein, amino acid profile, and total cyanide. Some hybrids produced roots with high protein content of up to 5.7%, while the common cultivar that we examined had just 2.3% crude protein. The essential amino acids alanine, phenylalanine, and valine were detected in the hybrids. The sulfur-containing amino acids cysteine and methionine were found at relatively high concentrations in the roots of 4 hybrids. The proportion of lysine in one hybrid was 20 times higher than in the common cultivar. The levels of total cyanide ranged from 19.73 to 172.56 mg/kg and most of the roots analyzed were classified as "non-toxic" and "low toxic". Furthermore, 2 progenies showed reasonable levels of cyanide, but higher protein content and amino acid profile more advantageous than the common cassava.

  7. EvoDesign: De novo protein design based on structural and evolutionary profiles.

    PubMed

    Mitra, Pralay; Shultis, David; Zhang, Yang

    2013-07-01

    Protein design aims to identify new protein sequences of desirable structure and biological function. Most current de novo protein design methods rely on physics-based force fields to search for low free-energy states following Anfinsen's thermodynamic hypothesis. A major obstacle of such approaches is the inaccuracy of the force field design, which cannot accurately describe the atomic interactions or distinguish correct folds. We developed a new web server, EvoDesign, to design optimal protein sequences of given scaffolds along with multiple sequence and structure-based features to assess the foldability and goodness of the designs. EvoDesign uses an evolution-profile-based Monte Carlo search with the profiles constructed from homologous structure families in the Protein Data Bank. A set of local structure features, including secondary structure, torsion angle and solvation, are predicted by single-sequence neural-network training and used to smooth the sequence motif and accommodate the physicochemical packing. The EvoDesign algorithm has been extensively tested in large-scale protein design experiments, which demonstrate enhanced foldability and structural stability of designed sequences compared with the physics-based designing methods. The EvoDesign server is freely available at http://zhanglab.ccmb.med.umich.edu/EvoDesign.

  8. The myelin basic protein-specific T cell repertoire in (transgenic) Lewis rat/SCID mouse chimeras: preferential V beta 8.2 T cell receptor usage depends on an intact Lewis thymic microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Kääb, G; Brandl, G; Marx, A; Wekerle, H; Bradl, M

    1996-05-01

    In the Lewis rat, myelin basic protein (MBP)-specific, encephalitogenic T cells preferentially recognize sequence 68-88, and use the V beta 8.2 gene to encode their T cell receptors. To analyze the structural prerequisites for the development of the MBP-specific T cell repertoire, we reconstituted severe-combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice with fetal (embryonic day 15-16) Lewis rat lymphoid tissue, and then isolated MBP-specific T cell lines from the adult chimeras after immunization. Two types of chimera were constructed: SCID mice reconstituted with rat fetal liver cells only, allowing T cell maturation within a chimeric SCID thymus consisting of mouse thymic epithelium and rat interdigitating dendritic cells, and SCID mice reconstituted with rat fetal liver cells and rat fetal thymus grafts, allowing T cell maturation within the chimeric SCID and the intact Lewis rat thymic microenvironment. Without exception, the T cell lines isolated from MBP-immunized SCID chimeras were restricted by MHC class II of the Lewis rat (RT1.B1), and none by I-Ad of the SCID mouse. Most of the T cell lines recognized the immunodominant MBP epitope 68-88. In striking contrast to intact Lewis rats, in SCID mice reconstituted by rat fetal liver only, MBP-specific T cell clones used a seemingly random repertoire of V beta genes without a bias for V beta 8.2. In chimeras containing fetal Lewis liver plus fetal thymus grafted under the kidney capsule, however, dominant utilization of V beta 8.2 was restored. The migration of liver-derived stem cells through rat thymus grafts was documented by combining fetal tissues from wild-type and transgenic Lewis rats. The results confirm that the recognition of the immunodominant epitope 68-88 by MBP-specific encephalitogenic T cells is a genetically determined feature of the Lewis rat T cell repertoire. They further suggest that the formation of the repertoire requires T cell differentiation in a syngeneic thymic microenvironment.

  9. Biochemical composition and protein profile of alpaca (Vicugna pacos) oviductal fluid.

    PubMed

    Apichela, S A; Argañaraz, M E; Zampini, R; Vencato, J; Miceli, D C; Stelletta, C

    2015-03-01

    Knowledge and assessment of the constituents of the oviductal fluid (OF) in camelids is necessary for a correct formulation of specific culture media for the development of reproductive biotechnology. This study is the first describing the biochemical composition and SDS-PAGE protein profile of alpaca oviductal fluid in non-pregnant animals and animals that have completed the first month and second month of gestation. Samples were also classified into oviducts that were ipsilateral or contralateral to the ovary with corpus luteum. No differences were found between both oviducts, whereas pregnant and non-pregnant females displayed significant differences in the biochemical composition and protein profile of the oviductal fluid. Relative albumin content was higher in non-pregnant females. Relative creatinine content in OF from females that have completed the second month of gestation was lower than non-pregnant females and females that have completed the first month of gestation. Ion Na(+) concentration was higher in OF from non-pregnant females when compared with pregnant ones. The protein profile of non-pregnant females showed five protein bands of 70, 42, 25, 24 and 19kDa that were significantly more intense compared with pregnant animals. Bands were identified as moesin, actin cytoplasmic 2, hydroxypyruvate isomerase, ferritin light chain and peroxiredoxin-6 with MALDI/MS. Our results encourage more thorough future studies, in order to unravel the complex reproductive processes of the South American camelid oviduct.

  10. Proposed second class of Haemophilus ducreyi strains show altered protein and lipooligosaccharide profiles.

    PubMed

    Post, Deborah M B; Gibson, Bradford W

    2007-09-01

    Haemophilus ducreyi is the etiologic agent of chancroid, a sexually transmitted genital ulcer disease. Previously we have shown that the protein profiles and lipooligosaccharide (LOS) structures from various strains of H. ducreyi are generally well conserved. Previous studies have demonstrated that at least one strain, 33921, has a variant protein profile and LOS structure. In this study, both the whole cell lysate and the membrane proteins from strain 33921 were further examined and compared to the prototypical strain 35000HP by 2-DE and by the 16-BAC (benzyldimethyl-n-hexadecylammonium chloride)/SDS-PAGE two-detergent system, respectively. These comparisons demonstrated that a number of the proteins that could be identified from both strains had altered positions on the gels, both in their apparent molecular weight and pI values. Strain 33921 has been suggested to be a member of a second class of strains, termed class II strains. In this study, the proteomic profiles and the LOS structures from the five potential class II strains were examined and found to be similar to strain 33921.

  11. Identification of chemical-specific protein profiles in Daphnia magna using neural networks

    SciTech Connect

    Iamonte, T.; Broadt, T.; Bradley, B.

    1995-12-31

    One dimensional gel electrophoresis was performed on whole-animal homogenates of 10 Daphnia magna exposed for 48 hours to one toxic and one non-toxic concentration of 2,4-dinitrophenol and sodium pentachlorophenate, two uncouplers of oxidative phosphorylation; malathion, an organophosphate; and permethrine, a pyrethroid, along with culture water and solvent controls, as appropriate. Ten randomized complete block exposures were conducted to minimize among-cohort variability. The 10-animal samples were gel electrophoresed, visualized using neutral silver staining and digitized with a Molecular Dynamics personal laser densitometer equipped with ImageQuant software. Densitometric data were used in a commercial neural network software package to construct a learning set, or database, of the protein profiles induced by the known chemical treatments. Novel data sets were then presented to the neural network program for assignment to treatment categories. Although no differences in protein profile between controls and chemical treatments and among chemical treatments could be detected visually in one dimensional gels, the neural network was able to correctly assign each sample to the appropriate learned treatment category about 70 percent of the time. Key proteins used by the neural network software to learn the protein profile of each chemical were identified by molecular weight and assigned a relative importance for identification of that chemical.

  12. The Increasing Impact of Activity-Based Protein Profiling in Plant Science.

    PubMed

    Morimoto, Kyoko; van der Hoorn, Renier A L

    2016-03-01

    The active proteome dictates plant physiology. Yet, active proteins are difficult to predict based on transcript or protein levels, because protein activities are regulated post-translationally in their microenvironments. Over the past 10 years, activity-based protein profiling (ABPP) is increasingly used in plant science. ABPP monitors the activities of hundreds of plant proteins using tagged chemical probes that react with the active site of proteins in a mechanism-dependent manner. Since labeling is covalent and irreversible, labeled proteins can be detected and identified on protein gels and by mass spectrometry using tagged fluorophores and/or biotin. Here, we discuss general concepts, approaches and practical considerations of ABPP, before we summarize the discoveries made using 40 validated probes representing 14 chemotypes that can monitor the active state of >4,500 plant proteins. These discoveries and new opportunities indicate that this emerging functional proteomic technology is a powerful discovery tool that will have an increasing impact on plant science. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Dietary indispensable amino acids profile affects protein utilization and growth of Senegalese sole larvae.

    PubMed

    Canada, Paula; Engrola, Sofia; Richard, Nadège; Lopes, Ana Filipa; Pinto, Wilson; Valente, Luísa M P; Conceição, Luís E C

    2016-12-01

    In diet formulation for fish, it is critical to assure that all the indispensable amino acids (IAA) are available in the right quantities and ratios. This will allow minimizing dietary AA imbalances that will result in unavoidable AA losses for energy dissipation rather than for protein synthesis and growth. The supplementation with crystalline amino acids (CAA) is a possible solution to correct the dietary amino acid (AA) profile that has shown positive results for larvae of some fish species. This study tested the effect of supplementing a practical microdiet with encapsulated CAA as to balance the dietary IAA profile and to improve the capacity of Senegalese sole larvae to utilize AA and maximize growth potential. Larvae were reared at 19 °C under a co-feeding regime from mouth opening. Two microdiets were formulated and processed as to have as much as possible the same ingredients and proximate composition. The control diet (CTRL) formulation was based on commonly used protein sources. A balanced diet (BAL) was formulated as to meet the ideal IAA profile defined for Senegalese sole: the dietary AA profile was corrected by replacing 4 % of encapsulated protein hydrolysate by CAA. The in vivo method of controlled tube-feeding was used to assess the effect on the larvae capacity to utilize protein, during key developmental stages. Growth was monitored until 51 DAH. The supplementation of microdiets with CAA in order to balance the dietary AA had a positive short-term effect on the Senegalese sole larvae capacity to retain protein. However, that did not translate into increased growth. On the contrary, larvae fed a more imbalanced (CTRL group) diet attained a better performance. Further studies are needed to ascertain whether this was due to an effect on the voluntary feed intake as a compensatory response to the dietary IAA imbalance in the CTRL diet or due to the higher content of tryptophan in the BAL diet.

  14. Stimulation of host centriolar antigen in TC7 cells by simian virus 40: requirement for RNA and protein syntheses and an intact simian virus 40 small-t gene function.

    PubMed Central

    Shyamala, M; Atcheson, C L; Kasamatsu, H

    1982-01-01

    Simian virus 40 (SV 40) stimulated a host cell antigen in the centriolar region after infection of African green monkey kidney (AGMK) cells. The addition of puromycin and actinomycin D to cells infected with SV40 within 5 h after infection inhibited the stimulation of the host cell antigen, indicating that de novo protein and RNA syntheses that occurred within the first 5 h after infection were essential for the stimulation. Early viable deletion mutants of SV40 with deletions mapping between 0.54 and 0.59 map units on the SV40 genome, dl2000, dl2001, dl2003, dl2004, dl2005, dl2006, and dl2007, did not stimulate the centriolar antigen above the level of uninfected cells. This indicated that an intact, functional small-t protein was essential for the SV40-mediated stimulation of the host cell antigen. Our studies, using cells infected with nondefective adenovirus-SV40 hybrid viruses that lack the small-t gene region of SV40 (Ad2+ND1, Ad2+ND2, Ad2+ND3, Ad2+ND4, and Ad2+ND5), revealed that the lack of small-t gene function of SV40 could be complemented by a gene function of the adenovirus-SV40 hybrid viruses for the centriolar antigen stimulation. Thus, adenovirus 2 has a gene(s) that is analogous to the small-t gene of SV40 for the stimulation of the host cell antigen in AGMK cells. Images PMID:6180184

  15. A profile of protein-protein interaction: Crystal structure of a lectin-lectin complex.

    PubMed

    Surya, Sukumaran; Abhilash, Joseph; Geethanandan, Krishnan; Sadasivan, Chittalakkottu; Haridas, Madhathilkovilakathu

    2016-06-01

    Proteins may utilize complex networks of interactions to create/proceed signaling pathways of highly adaptive responses such as programmed cell death. Direct binary interactions study of proteins may help propose models for protein-protein interaction. Towards this goal we applied a combination of thermodynamic kinetics and crystal structure analyses to elucidate the complexity and diversity in such interactions. By determining the heat change on the association of two galactose-specific legume lectins from Butea monosperma (BML) and Spatholobus parviflorus (SPL) belonging to Fabaceae family helped to compute the binding equilibrium. It was extended further by X-ray structural analysis of BML-SPL binary complex. In order to chart the proteins interacting mainly through their interfaces, identification of the nature of forces which stabilized the association of the lectin-lectin complex was examined. Comprehensive analysis of the BMLSPL complex by isothermal titration calorimetry and X-ray crystal structure threw new light on the lectin-lectin interacti